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Sample records for activation analysis investigation

  1. Evolution & Phylogenetic Analysis: Classroom Activities for Investigating Molecular & Morphological Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franklin, Wilfred A.

    2010-01-01

    In a flexible multisession laboratory, students investigate concepts of phylogenetic analysis at both the molecular and the morphological level. Students finish by conducting their own analysis on a collection of skeletons representing the major phyla of vertebrates, a collection of primate skulls, or a collection of hominid skulls.

  2. Investigation of therapeutic potentials of some selected medicinal plants using neutron activation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Abubakar, Sani; Isa, Nasiru Fage; Usman, Ahmed Rufa’i; Khandaker, Mayeen Uddin; Abubakar, Nuraddeen

    2015-04-24

    Series of attempts were made to investigate concentrations of trace elements and their therapeutic properties in various medicinal plants. In this study, samples of some commonly used plants were collected from Bauchi State, Nigeria. They includes leaves of azadirachta indica (neem), Moringa Oleifera (moringa), jatropha curcas (purgin Nut), guiera senegalensis (custard apple) and anogeissus leiocarpus (African birch). These samples were analyzed for their trace elements contents with both short and long irradiation protocols of Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA) at Nigerian Research Reactor-1 (NIRR-1) of Ahmadu Bello University, Zaria, Nigeria. The level of trace elements found varies from one sample to another, with some reported at hundreds of mg/Kg dry weight. The results have been compared with the available literature data. The presence of these trace elements indicates promising potentials of these plants for relief of certain ailments.

  3. Investigation of therapeutic potentials of some selected medicinal plants using neutron activation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abubakar, Sani; Usman, Ahmed Rufa'i.; Isa, Nasiru Fage; Khandaker, Mayeen Uddin; Abubakar, Nuraddeen

    2015-04-01

    Series of attempts were made to investigate concentrations of trace elements and their therapeutic properties in various medicinal plants. In this study, samples of some commonly used plants were collected from Bauchi State, Nigeria. They includes leaves of azadirachta indica (neem), Moringa Oleifera (moringa), jatropha curcas (purgin Nut), guiera senegalensis (custard apple) and anogeissus leiocarpus (African birch). These samples were analyzed for their trace elements contents with both short and long irradiation protocols of Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA) at Nigerian Research Reactor-1 (NIRR-1) of Ahmadu Bello University, Zaria, Nigeria. The level of trace elements found varies from one sample to another, with some reported at hundreds of mg/Kg dry weight. The results have been compared with the available literature data. The presence of these trace elements indicates promising potentials of these plants for relief of certain ailments.

  4. Investigation of the Activity of the Microorganisms in a Reblochon-Style Cheese by Metatranscriptomic Analysis.

    PubMed

    Monnet, Christophe; Dugat-Bony, Eric; Swennen, Dominique; Beckerich, Jean-Marie; Irlinger, Françoise; Fraud, Sébastien; Bonnarme, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    The microbial communities in cheeses are composed of varying bacteria, yeasts, and molds, which contribute to the development of their typical sensory properties. In situ studies are needed to better understand their growth and activity during cheese ripening. Our objective was to investigate the activity of the microorganisms used for manufacturing a surface-ripened cheese by means of metatranscriptomic analysis. The cheeses were produced using two lactic acid bacteria (Streptococcus thermophilus and Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus), one ripening bacterium (Brevibacterium aurantiacum), and two yeasts (Debaryomyces hansenii and Geotrichum candidum). RNA was extracted from the cheese rinds and, after depletion of most ribosomal RNA, sequencing was performed using a short-read sequencing technology that generated ~75 million reads per sample. Except for B. aurantiacum, which failed to grow in the cheeses, a large number of CDS reads were generated for the inoculated species, making it possible to investigate their individual transcriptome over time. From day 5 to 35, G. candidum accounted for the largest proportion of CDS reads, suggesting that this species was the most active. Only minor changes occurred in the transcriptomes of the lactic acid bacteria. For the two yeasts, we compared the expression of genes involved in the catabolism of lactose, galactose, lactate, amino acids, and free fatty acids. During ripening, genes involved in ammonia assimilation and galactose catabolism were down-regulated in the two species. Genes involved in amino acid catabolism were up-regulated in G. candidum from day 14 to day 35, whereas in D. hansenii, they were up-regulated mainly at day 35, suggesting that this species catabolized the cheese amino acids later. In addition, after 35 days of ripening, there was a down-regulation of genes involved in the electron transport chain, suggesting a lower cellular activity. The present study has exemplified how

  5. Investigation of the Activity of the Microorganisms in a Reblochon-Style Cheese by Metatranscriptomic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Monnet, Christophe; Dugat-Bony, Eric; Swennen, Dominique; Beckerich, Jean-Marie; Irlinger, Françoise; Fraud, Sébastien; Bonnarme, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    The microbial communities in cheeses are composed of varying bacteria, yeasts, and molds, which contribute to the development of their typical sensory properties. In situ studies are needed to better understand their growth and activity during cheese ripening. Our objective was to investigate the activity of the microorganisms used for manufacturing a surface-ripened cheese by means of metatranscriptomic analysis. The cheeses were produced using two lactic acid bacteria (Streptococcus thermophilus and Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus), one ripening bacterium (Brevibacterium aurantiacum), and two yeasts (Debaryomyces hansenii and Geotrichum candidum). RNA was extracted from the cheese rinds and, after depletion of most ribosomal RNA, sequencing was performed using a short-read sequencing technology that generated ~75 million reads per sample. Except for B. aurantiacum, which failed to grow in the cheeses, a large number of CDS reads were generated for the inoculated species, making it possible to investigate their individual transcriptome over time. From day 5 to 35, G. candidum accounted for the largest proportion of CDS reads, suggesting that this species was the most active. Only minor changes occurred in the transcriptomes of the lactic acid bacteria. For the two yeasts, we compared the expression of genes involved in the catabolism of lactose, galactose, lactate, amino acids, and free fatty acids. During ripening, genes involved in ammonia assimilation and galactose catabolism were down-regulated in the two species. Genes involved in amino acid catabolism were up-regulated in G. candidum from day 14 to day 35, whereas in D. hansenii, they were up-regulated mainly at day 35, suggesting that this species catabolized the cheese amino acids later. In addition, after 35 days of ripening, there was a down-regulation of genes involved in the electron transport chain, suggesting a lower cellular activity. The present study has exemplified how

  6. Investigation of the Activity of the Microorganisms in a Reblochon-Style Cheese by Metatranscriptomic Analysis.

    PubMed

    Monnet, Christophe; Dugat-Bony, Eric; Swennen, Dominique; Beckerich, Jean-Marie; Irlinger, Françoise; Fraud, Sébastien; Bonnarme, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    The microbial communities in cheeses are composed of varying bacteria, yeasts, and molds, which contribute to the development of their typical sensory properties. In situ studies are needed to better understand their growth and activity during cheese ripening. Our objective was to investigate the activity of the microorganisms used for manufacturing a surface-ripened cheese by means of metatranscriptomic analysis. The cheeses were produced using two lactic acid bacteria (Streptococcus thermophilus and Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus), one ripening bacterium (Brevibacterium aurantiacum), and two yeasts (Debaryomyces hansenii and Geotrichum candidum). RNA was extracted from the cheese rinds and, after depletion of most ribosomal RNA, sequencing was performed using a short-read sequencing technology that generated ~75 million reads per sample. Except for B. aurantiacum, which failed to grow in the cheeses, a large number of CDS reads were generated for the inoculated species, making it possible to investigate their individual transcriptome over time. From day 5 to 35, G. candidum accounted for the largest proportion of CDS reads, suggesting that this species was the most active. Only minor changes occurred in the transcriptomes of the lactic acid bacteria. For the two yeasts, we compared the expression of genes involved in the catabolism of lactose, galactose, lactate, amino acids, and free fatty acids. During ripening, genes involved in ammonia assimilation and galactose catabolism were down-regulated in the two species. Genes involved in amino acid catabolism were up-regulated in G. candidum from day 14 to day 35, whereas in D. hansenii, they were up-regulated mainly at day 35, suggesting that this species catabolized the cheese amino acids later. In addition, after 35 days of ripening, there was a down-regulation of genes involved in the electron transport chain, suggesting a lower cellular activity. The present study has exemplified how

  7. Detailed investigation of Long-Period activity at Campi Flegrei by Convolutive Independent Component Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capuano, P.; De Lauro, E.; De Martino, S.; Falanga, M.

    2016-04-01

    This work is devoted to the analysis of seismic signals continuously recorded at Campi Flegrei Caldera (Italy) during the entire year 2006. The radiation pattern associated with the Long-Period energy release is investigated. We adopt an innovative Independent Component Analysis algorithm for convolutive seismic series adapted and improved to give automatic procedures for detecting seismic events often buried in the high-level ambient noise. The extracted waveforms characterized by an improved signal-to-noise ratio allows the recognition of Long-Period precursors, evidencing that the seismic activity accompanying the mini-uplift crisis (in 2006), which climaxed in the three days from 26-28 October, had already started at the beginning of the month of October and lasted until mid of November. Hence, a more complete seismic catalog is then provided which can be used to properly quantify the seismic energy release. To better ground our results, we first check the robustness of the method by comparing it with other blind source separation methods based on higher order statistics; secondly, we reconstruct the radiation patterns of the extracted Long-Period events in order to link the individuated signals directly to the sources. We take advantage from Convolutive Independent Component Analysis that provides basic signals along the three directions of motion so that a direct polarization analysis can be performed with no other filtering procedures. We show that the extracted signals are mainly composed of P waves with radial polarization pointing to the seismic source of the main LP swarm, i.e. a small area in the Solfatara, also in the case of the small-events, that both precede and follow the main activity. From a dynamical point of view, they can be described by two degrees of freedom, indicating a low-level of complexity associated with the vibrations from a superficial hydrothermal system. Our results allow us to move towards a full description of the complexity of

  8. Activation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Alfassi, Z.B. . Dept. of Nuclear Engineering)

    1990-01-01

    This volume contains 16 chapters on the application of activation analysis in the fields of life sciences, biological materials, coal and its effluents, environmental samples, archaeology, material science, and forensics. Each chapter is processed separately for the data base.

  9. Deep investigation on inorganic fraction of atmospheric PM in Mediterranean area by neutron and photon activation analysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Anthropogenic activities introduce materials increasing levels of many dangerous substances for the environmental quality and being hazardous to human health. Major attention has been given to those elements able to alter the environment and endanger human health. The airborne particulate matter pollutant is considered one of the most difficult task in environmental chemistry for its complex composition and implications complicating notably the behavior comprehension. So, for investigating deeply the elemental composition we used two nuclear techniques, Neutron Activation Analysis and Photon Activation Analysis, characterized by high sensitivity, precision and accuracy. An important task has been devoted to the investigation of Quality Control (QC) and Quality Assurance (QA) of the methodology used in this study. This study was therefore extended as far back as possible in time (from 1965 until 2000) in order to analyze the trend of airborne concentration of pollutant elements in connection with the industrial and lifestyle growth during the entire period. Results Almost all the elements may be attributed to long-range transport phenomena from other natural and/or anthropogenic sources: this behavior is common to all the periods studied even if a very light decreasing trend can be evidenced from 1970 to 2002. Finally, in order to investigate a retrospective study of elements in PM10 and their evolution in relationship with the natural or anthropogenic origins, we have investigated the Enrichment Factors. The study shows the EF trends for some elements in PM10 during four decades. Conclusions The two nuclear techniques have allowed to reach elevated sensibility/accuracy levels for determining elements at very low concentrations (trace and ultra-trace levels). The element concentrations determined in this study do not basically show a significant level of attention from a toxicological point of view. PMID:24196275

  10. Investigating Microbial Activity in Diazotrophic Methane Seep Sediment via Transcript Analysis and Single-Cell FISH-NanoSIMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dekas, A. E.; Connon, S. A.; Chadwick, G.; Orphan, V. J.

    2012-12-01

    Methane seep microbial ecosystems are phylogenetically diverse and physiologically complex, and require culture-independent techniques to accurately investigate metabolic activity. In the present study we combine an RNA analysis of four key microbial genes with FISH-NanoSIMS analysis of single cells to determine the diversity of nitrogen fixing microorganisms (diazotrophs) present at a deep-sea methane-seeping site, as well as investigate the methane-dependency of a variety of community members. Recently, methane-dependent nitrogen fixation was observed in Mound 12 Costa Rica sediments, and was spatially correlated with the abundance of aggregates of anaerobic methanotrophic archaea (ANME) and sulfate reducing bacterial symbionts (SRB). Combined with the detection of 15N uptake from 15N2 in these aggregates, this suggested that the ANME-SRB aggregates are the primary diazotrophs in seep sediment. However, the diversity of dinitrogenase reductase (nifH) sequences recovered from several deep-sea locales, including Mound 12, suggests a greater diversity of diazotrophs in marine sediment. To investigate the activity of these potential diazotrophs in Mound 12 sediment, we investigated a suite of RNA transcripts in 15N2 incubations in both the presence and absence of methane: nifH, bacterial 16S rRNA, methyl coenzyme M reductase A (mcrA), and adenosine-5'-phosposulfate reductase alpha subunit (aprA). No nifH transcripts were recovered in incubations without methane, consistent with previous measurements lacking 15N2 uptake in the same sediments. The activity of the bacterial community in general, assessed by variable transcription, was also greatly affected by the presence or absence of methane. Single-cell fluorescence in situ hybridization coupled to nanoscale secondary ion mass spectrometry (FISH-NanoSIMS) was employed to confirm diazotrophic activity (15N2 uptake) and protein synthesis (15NH4+ uptake) of particular species implicated as ecologically important by the

  11. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Community Active Case Finding and Household Contact Investigation for Tuberculosis Case Detection in Urban Africa

    PubMed Central

    Sekandi, Juliet N.; Dobbin, Kevin; Oloya, James; Okwera, Alphonse; Whalen, Christopher C.; Corso, Phaedra S.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Case detection by passive case finding (PCF) strategy alone is inadequate for detecting all tuberculosis (TB) cases in high burden settings especially Sub-Saharan Africa. Alternative case detection strategies such as community Active Case Finding (ACF) and Household Contact Investigations (HCI) are effective but empirical evidence of their cost-effectiveness is sparse. The objective of this study was to determine whether adding ACF or HCI compared with standard PCF alone represent cost-effective alternative TB case detection strategies in urban Africa. Methods A static decision modeling framework was used to examine the costs and effectiveness of three TB case detection strategies: PCF alone, PCF+ACF, and PCF+HCI. Probability and cost estimates were obtained from National TB program data, primary studies conducted in Uganda, published literature and expert opinions. The analysis was performed from the societal and provider perspectives over a 1.5 year time-frame. The main effectiveness measure was the number of true TB cases detected and the outcome was incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs) expressed as cost in 2013 US$ per additional true TB case detected. Results Compared to PCF alone, the PCF+HCI strategy was cost-effective at US$443.62 per additional TB case detected. However, PCF+ACF was not cost-effective at US$1492.95 per additional TB case detected. Sensitivity analyses showed that PCF+ACF would be cost-effective if the prevalence of chronic cough in the population screened by ACF increased 10-fold from 4% to 40% and if the program costs for ACF were reduced by 50%. Conclusions Under our baseline assumptions, the addition of HCI to an existing PCF program presented a more cost-effective strategy than the addition of ACF in the context of an African city. Therefore, implementation of household contact investigations as a part of the recommended TB control strategy should be prioritized. PMID:25658592

  12. The Current Situation of Students’ Participatation in Extracurricular Sports Activities of Private Middle School in Henan Province and the Analysis of Investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhe, Wang

    By using the methods of document literature, questionnaire survey and mathematical statistics, this paper investigates and analyses the cuurent situation of students' participation in extrucurricular sports activities of 36 private middle schools in Henan province which have legal education procedures through the following aspects: the attitude, motivation, times, duration, selection of programs, and influential factors of participating in extracurricular sports activities. Based on the investigation and analysis, this paper points out the existing problems and puts forward suggestions

  13. An Investigation, Analysis, and Evaluation of Activities Connected with the Operation of Educational Information Service Centers. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherman, C. Neil; and Others

    This one-year project produced several publications and an evaluative investigation, all having to do with the rapidly growing community of educational information centers. Over 1500 such centers were surveyed by questionnaire to determine their locations, sizes, activities, and holdings. A directory which lists and describes some four hundred…

  14. Analysis of the essential oil of Origanum dubium growing wild in Cyprus. Investigation of its antioxidant capacity and antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Karioti, A; Vrahimi-Hadjilouca, T; Droushiotis, D; Rancic, A; Hadjipavlou-Litina, D; Skaltsa, H

    2006-11-01

    The volatile composition of Origanum dubium in two different maturation stages has been studied. The essential oils were obtained by hydrodistillation in a modified Clevenger-type apparatus, and their analyses were performed by GC and GC-MS. Identification of the components was made by comparison of mass spectra and retention indices with literature records and by co-chromatography with authentic compounds. Carvacrol was shown to be the main constituent. The essential oils were evaluated for antimicrobial activity and proved to be active against all tested microorganisms. Furthermore, their potential antioxidant activity was investigated and found to be significant in scavenging O2-. The samples were further evaluated for inhibition of soybean lipoxygenase LOX and showed high inhibitory activity. PMID:17022006

  15. Experimental Investigation on Spontaneously Active Hippocampal Cultures Recorded by Means of High-Density MEAs: Analysis of the Spatial Resolution Effects.

    PubMed

    Maccione, Alessandro; Gandolfo, Mauro; Tedesco, Mariateresa; Nieus, Thierry; Imfeld, Kilian; Martinoia, Sergio; Berdondini, Luca

    2010-01-01

    Based on experiments performed with high-resolution Active Pixel Sensor microelectrode arrays (APS-MEAs) coupled with spontaneously active hippocampal cultures, this work investigates the spatial resolution effects of the neuroelectronic interface on the analysis of the recorded electrophysiological signals. The adopted methodology consists, first, in recording the spontaneous activity at the highest spatial resolution (interelectrode separation of 21 mum) from the whole array of 4096 microelectrodes. Then, the full resolution dataset is spatially downsampled in order to evaluate the effects on raster plot representation, array-wide spike rate (AWSR), mean firing rate (MFR) and mean bursting rate (MBR). Furthermore, the effects of the array-to-network relative position are evaluated by shifting a subset of equally spaced electrodes on the entire recorded area. Results highlight that MFR and MBR are particularly influenced by the spatial resolution provided by the neuroelectronic interface. On high-resolution large MEAs, such analysis better represent the time-based parameterization of the network dynamics. Finally, this work suggest interesting capabilities of high-resolution MEAs for spatial-based analysis in dense and low-dense neuronal preparation for investigating signaling at both local and global neuronal circuitries.

  16. Investigating models of protein function and allostery with a widespread mutational analysis of a light-activated protein.

    PubMed

    Zayner, Josiah P; Antoniou, Chloe; French, Alexander R; Hause, Ronald J; Sosnick, Tobin R

    2013-08-20

    To investigate the relationship between a protein's sequence and its biophysical properties, we studied the effects of more than 100 mutations in Avena sativa light-oxygen-voltage domain 2, a model protein of the Per-Arnt-Sim family. The A. sativa light-oxygen-voltage domain 2 undergoes a photocycle with a conformational change involving the unfolding of the terminal helices. Whereas selection studies typically search for winners in a large population and fail to characterize many sites, we characterized the biophysical consequences of mutations throughout the protein using NMR, circular dichroism, and ultraviolet/visible spectroscopy. Despite our intention to introduce highly disruptive substitutions, most had modest or no effect on function, and many could even be considered to be more photoactive. Substitutions at evolutionarily conserved sites can have minimal effect, whereas those at nonconserved positions can have large effects, contrary to the view that the effects of mutations, especially at conserved positions, are predictable. Using predictive models, we found that the effects of mutations on biophysical function and allostery reflect a complex mixture of multiple characteristics including location, character, electrostatics, and chemistry. PMID:23972854

  17. Active Spacecraft Potential Control Investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torkar, K.; Nakamura, R.; Tajmar, M.; Scharlemann, C.; Jeszenszky, H.; Laky, G.; Fremuth, G.; Escoubet, C. P.; Svenes, K.

    2016-03-01

    In tenuous plasma the floating potential of sunlit spacecraft reaches tens of volts, positive. The corresponding field disturbs measurements of the ambient plasma by electron and ion sensors and can reduce micro-channel plate lifetime in electron detectors owing to large fluxes of attracted photoelectrons. Also the accuracy of electric field measurements may suffer from a high spacecraft potential. The Active Spacecraft Potential Control (ASPOC) neutralizes the spacecraft potential by releasing positive charge produced by indium ion emitters. The method has been successfully applied on other spacecraft such as Cluster and Double Star. Two ASPOC units are present on each spacecraft. Each unit contains four ion emitters, whereby one emitter per instrument is operated at a time. ASPOC for the Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission includes new developments in the design of the emitters and the electronics. New features include the use of capillaries instead of needles, new materials for the emitters and their internal thermal insulators, an extended voltage and current range of the electronics, both for ion emission and heating purposes, and a more capable control software. This enables lower spacecraft potentials, higher reliability, and a more uniform potential structure in the spacecraft's sheath compared to previous missions. Results from on-ground testing demonstrate compliance with requirements. Model calculations confirm the findings from previous applications that the plasma measurements will not be affected by the beam's space charge. Finally, the various operating modes to adapt to changing boundary conditions are described along with the main data products.

  18. Tripod-BETA: Incident investigation and analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Doran, J.A.; Graaf, G.C. van der

    1996-12-31

    Tripod-BETA is a methodology for conducting an incident analysis in parallel with the investigation, supported by a PC based tool. Interaction between these two processes provides the investigators with confirmation of the relevance of their fact gathering and highlights avenues of investigation leading to latent failures. The benefit to the analysis process is that logical anomalies can be highlighted and resolved while The investigation is still active. Tripod-BETA focuses initially on the accident mechanism - the physical process of the accident - and uses it as a structure to identify the controls and defenses that should have been in place. For the incident to happen these controls and defenses either were missing or failed. The investigation then examines the immediate and latent failures behind each missing or failed defense, following the Tripod theory of accident causation. Tripod-BETA software provides the means to collect and assemble investigation facts and manipulate them on screen into a graphic representation of the event and its causes - an accident tree. The logic of the tree structure (labeling and connections) can be tested to ensure that it conforms to the concepts of the Hazard and Effects Management Process (HEMP) and the Tripod theory. When anomalies and omissions have been resolved, a draft accident report can be auto-generated for final editing using a word processing package.

  19. Investigation of the effect of nanoparticle exposure on the flocculability of activated sludge using particle image velocimetry in combination with the extended DLVO analysis.

    PubMed

    Xu, J; Li, X Y

    2016-07-01

    With the application of nanotechnologies, nanoparticles (NPs) may enter the wastewater collection system, threatening the operation and stability of the treatment process. The present study investigated the effect of short-term exposures of activated sludge (AS) to NPs on the sludge flocculation ability. Three types of NPs, ZnO, TiO2 and SiO2, were used at a concentration level of 100mg/L for the 24-h exposure, and the particle image velocimetry (PIV) technology was employed to track the sludge flocculation dynamics during the tests. The results showed that a short-term exposure of the AS to NPs did not cause deterioration of the sludge in treatment performance and flocculation. According to the PIV detections, the flocculability of the AS actually was enhanced to some extent after the short-term NPs exposure. Flocs formed after the NPs exposure became more fractal with an elongated shape and a rougher surface, as a result of the improved cell attachment. The extended DLVO theory in combination with the thermodynamic analysis can be well applied to describe the enhanced AS flocculation after the NPs exposure. It is apparent that the attachment of NPs onto cells and flocs can effectively reduce the interaction energy barriers, leading to their improved flocculation ability.

  20. Math Activities Using LogoWriter--Investigations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flewelling, Gary

    This book is one in a series of teacher resource books developed to: (1) rescue students from the clutches of computers that drill and control; and (2) supply teachers with computer activities compatible with a mathematics program that emphasizes investigation, problem solving, creativity, and hypothesis making and testing. This is not a book…

  1. Neutron-activation analysis using thermochromatography. I. Investigation of factors affecting processes of sample chlorination and thermochromatographic separation of chlorides of the elements

    SciTech Connect

    Sattarov, G.; Davydov, A.B.; Khatamov, S.; Kist, A.A.

    1985-07-01

    With the goal of evaluating the feasibility of gas thermochromatography in radioactive analysis, the authors consider the basic factors affecting the processes of sample chlorination, volatilization and thermochromatographic separation of chlorides for a number of elements, the determination of which is carried out by the neutron activation analysis method. They study the behavior of chlorides of /sup 124/Sb, /sup 76/As, /sup 198/Au, /sup 203/Hg as a function of the starting temperature, the chlorination period, the reagent gas delivery rate, the sorbent grain size, the magnitude of the temperature gradient, and other factors.

  2. Investigation of the deep crustal structure and magmatic activity at the NW Hellenic Volcanic Arc with 3-D aeromagnetic inversion and seimotectonic analysis.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efstathiou, Angeliki; Tzanis, Andreas; Chailas, Stylianos; Stamatakis, Michael

    2013-04-01

    We report the results of a joint analysis of geophysical (aeromagnetic) and seismotectonic data, applied to the investigation of the deep structure, magmatic activity and geothermal potential of the north-western stretches of the Hellenic Volcanic Arc (HVA). The HVA is usually considered to be a single arcuate entity stretching from Sousaki (near Corinth) at the NW, to Nisyros Island at the SE. However, different types of and their ages indicate the presence of two different volcanic groups. Our study focuses on the northern part of the west (older) volcanic group and includes the Crommyonian (Sousaki) volcanic field at the west end of Megaris peninsula (east margin on the contemporary Corinth Rift), the Aegina and Methana volcanic complex at the Saronic Gulf, where typical Quaternary calc-alkaline volcanics predominate, and the Argolid peninsula to the south and south-west. In addition to the rocks associated with Quaternary volcanism, the study area includes a series of Mesozoic ultramafic (ophiolitic) outcrops at the Megaris peninsula, to the north and north-east of the Crommyonian volcanic field, as well as throughout the Argolid. A major deep structural and tectonic feature of the study area, and one with profound influence on crustal deformation and the evolution of rapidly deforming extensional structures like the Corinth Rift and the Saronic Gulf, is the local geometry and dynamics of the African oceanic crust subducting beneath the Aegean plate. Locally, the subducting slab has a NNW strike and ENE plunge, with the dip angle changing rapidly (steepening) approx. beneath the Argolid. The aeromagnetic data was extracted from the recently (re)compiled aeromagnetic map of Greece (Chailas et al, 2010) and was inverted with the UBC-GIF magnetic inversion suite (Li and Oldenburg, 1996). The inversion included rigorous geological constraints introduced by means of numerous in-situ magnetic susceptibility measurements. The inversion has imaged several isolated

  3. Geometric investigation of a gaming active device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menna, Fabio; Remondino, Fabio; Battisti, Roberto; Nocerino, Erica

    2011-07-01

    3D imaging systems are widely available and used for surveying, modeling and entertainment applications, but clear statements regarding their characteristics, performances and limitations are still missing. The VDI/VDE and the ASTME57 committees are trying to set some standards but the commercial market is not reacting properly. Since many new users are approaching these 3D recording methodologies, clear statements and information clarifying if a package or system satisfies certain requirements before investing are fundamental for those users who are not really familiar with these technologies. Recently small and portable consumer-grade active sensors came on the market, like TOF rangeimaging cameras or low-cost triangulation-based range sensor. A quite interesting active system was produced by PrimeSense and launched on the market thanks to the Microsoft Xbox project with the name of Kinect. The article reports the geometric investigation of the Kinect active sensors, considering its measurement performances, the accuracy of the retrieved range data and the possibility to use it for 3D modeling application.

  4. Neutron activation analysis system

    DOEpatents

    Taylor, M.C.; Rhodes, J.R.

    1973-12-25

    A neutron activation analysis system for monitoring a generally fluid media, such as slurries, solutions, and fluidized powders, including two separate conduit loops for circulating fluid samples within the range of radiation sources and detectors is described. Associated with the first loop is a neutron source that emits s high flux of slow and thermal neutrons. The second loop employs a fast neutron source, the flux from which is substantially free of thermal neutrons. Adjacent to both loops are gamma counters for spectrographic determination of the fluid constituents. Other gsmma sources and detectors are arranged across a portion of each loop for deterMining the fluid density. (Official Gazette)

  5. Investigating Ceiling Effects in Longitudinal Data Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Lijuan; Zhang, Zhiyong; McArdle, John J.; Salthouse, Timothy A.

    2008-01-01

    Score limitation at the top of a scale is commonly termed "ceiling effect." Ceiling effects can lead to serious artifactual parameter estimates in most data analysis. This study examines the consequences of ceiling effects in longitudinal data analysis and investigates several methods of dealing with ceiling effects through Monte Carlo simulations…

  6. An analysis of science instruction in the fifth-grade science classroom: Investigating activity-based instruction with student-generated discussion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vowell, Julie E.

    interview. Observations were made in two fifth-grade classrooms and Flanders' Categories for Interaction Analysis was used as a framework for observing the level of social interaction. The observations were transcribed and developed into a "thick" record as suggested by Dr. Phil Carspecken's stages of qualitative research. Member checking and peer debriefing techniques were employed to increase the trustworthiness of the study. The quantitative data suggested science achievement of fifth-grade science students who learned through activity-based instruction with debriefing was statistically significantly higher than the science achievement of fifth-grade science students who learned through activity-based instruction without debriefing (p<.01), as measured by the first posttest. Also, student retention as measured by fifth-grade science students who learned through activity-based instruction was statistically significantly higher than fifth-grade science students who learned through activity-based instruction without debriefing (p<.01), as measured by the second posttest. Additionally, the effect sizes for achievement and retention were very large and educationally meaningful. Activity-based instruction enhanced with debriefing resulted in a deeper construction of knowledge and retention of understanding.

  7. An investigation of the neutron flux in bone-fluorine phantoms comparing accelerator based in vivo neutron activation analysis and FLUKA simulation data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mostafaei, F.; McNeill, F. E.; Chettle, D. R.; Matysiak, W.; Bhatia, C.; Prestwich, W. V.

    2015-01-01

    We have tested the Monte Carlo code FLUKA for its ability to assist in the development of a better system for the in vivo measurement of fluorine. We used it to create a neutron flux map of the inside of the in vivo neutron activation analysis irradiation cavity at the McMaster Accelerator Laboratory. The cavity is used in a system that has been developed for assessment of fluorine levels in the human hand. This study was undertaken to (i) assess the FLUKA code, (ii) find the optimal hand position inside the cavity and assess the effects on precision of a hand being in a non-optimal position and (iii) to determine the best location for our γ-ray detection system within the accelerator beam hall. Simulation estimates were performed using FLUKA. Experimental measurements of the neutron flux were performed using Mn wires. The activation of the wires was measured inside (1) an empty bottle, (2) a bottle containing water, (3) a bottle covered with cadmium and (4) a dry powder-based fluorine phantom. FLUKA was used to simulate the irradiation cavity, and used to estimate the neutron flux in different positions both inside, and external to, the cavity. The experimental results were found to be consistent with the Monte Carlo simulated neutron flux. Both experiment and simulation showed that there is an optimal position in the cavity, but that the effect on the thermal flux of a hand being in a non-optimal position is less than 20%, which will result in a less than 10% effect on the measurement precision. FLUKA appears to be a code that can be useful for modeling of this type of experimental system.

  8. Investigating magnetic activity of F stars with the Kepler mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathur, S.; García, R. A.; Ballot, J.; Ceillier, T.; Salabert, D.; Metcalfe, T. S.; Régulo, C.; Jiménez, A.; Bloemen, S.

    2014-08-01

    The dynamo process is believed to drive the magnetic activity of stars like the Sun that have an outer convection zone. Large spectroscopic surveys showed that there is a relation between the rotation periods and the cycle periods: the longer the rotation period is, the longer the magnetic activity cycle period will be. We present the analysis of F stars observed by Kepler for which individual p modes have been measure and with surface rotation periods shorter than 12 days. We defined magnetic indicators and proxies based on photometric observations to help characterise the activity levels of the stars. With the Kepler data, we investigate the existence of stars with cycles (regular or not), stars with a modulation that could be related to magnetic activity, and stars that seem to show a flat behaviour.

  9. Investigating Nitrogen Pollution: Activities and Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green Teacher, 2000

    2000-01-01

    Introduces activities on nitrogen, nitrogen pollution from school commuters, nitrogen response in native and introduced species, and nutrient loading models. These activities help students determine the nitrogen contribution from their parents' cars, test native plant responses to nitrogen, and experiment with the results of removing water from…

  10. An Analysis of the Credit Investigation Occupation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyatt, Tom; Ulrich, Larry

    The general purpose of the occupational analysis is to provide workable, basic information dealing with the many and varied duties performed in the credit investigation occupation. The document opens with a brief introduction followed by a job description. The bulk of the document is presented in table form. Four duties are broken down into a…

  11. 76 FR 20707 - Notice of Possible Shutdown of Investigative Activities

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-13

    ... determined to shut down its investigative activities in the event of the absence of an appropriation. FOR... shut down its investigative activities for the duration of the absence of appropriation....

  12. An Initial Investigation of Active Galaxies in RESOLVE and ECO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norman, Dara J.; Kannappan, Sheila; Bittner, Ashley; Yarber, Aara'L.; Hoversten, Erik A.; Stark, David; RESOLVE Team

    2016-01-01

    The volume-limited REsolved Spectroscopy Of a Local VolumE (RESOLVE) survey and its complementary Environmental COntext (ECO) catalog are dominated by low mass, gas-rich galaxies, as is typical of the bulk of large-scale structure in the local universe. These surveys, therefore, provide an excellent opportunity to investigate the complete large-scale environments of low-redshift AGN and nuclear starbursts in such galaxies, in order to search for external triggering, examine activity in relation to gas supply, and investigate the role of feedback. By data-mining multi-wavelength catalogs that use varied techniques, we identify known AGN in RESOLVE and ECO, including a population of gas-dominated low-mass galaxies. We take advantage of these surveys' multi-wavelength supporting data to investigate triggering, feedback, and the roles of environment and gas supply in this initial sample of active galaxies. Because biases in standard AGN candidate selection techniques (e.g. BPT, X-ray luminosity) make them individually poor selectors of AGN activity in star-forming and low mass (<10^10 Msun) host galaxies, we also seek to improve the identification of nuclear activity in such galaxies via combined analysis of star formation and AGN signatures. RESOLVE is supported by NSF grant AST-0955368

  13. Investigation into stereoselective pharmacological activity of phenotropil.

    PubMed

    Zvejniece, Liga; Svalbe, Baiba; Veinberg, Grigory; Grinberga, Solveiga; Vorona, Maksims; Kalvinsh, Ivars; Dambrova, Maija

    2011-11-01

    Phenotropil [N-carbamoylmethyl-4-aryl-2-pyrrolidone (2-(2-oxo-4-phenyl-pyrrolidin-1-yl) acetamide; carphedon)] is clinically used in its racemic form as a nootropic drug that improves physical condition and cognition. The aim of this study was to compare the stereoselective pharmacological activity of R- and S-enantiomers of phenotropil in different behavioural tests. Racemic phenotropil and its enantiomers were tested for locomotor, antidepressant and memory-improving activity and influence on the central nervous system (CNS) using general pharmacological tests in mice. After a single administration, the amount of compound in brain tissue extracts was determined using an ultra performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC/MS/MS) method in a positive ion electrospray mode. In the open-field test, a significant increase in locomotor activity was observed after a single administration of R-phenotropil at doses of 10 and 50 mg/kg and S-phenotropil at a dose of 50 mg/kg. In the forced swim test, R-phenotropil induced an antidepressant effect at doses of 100 and 50 mg/kg, and S-phenotropil was active at a dose of 100 mg/kg. R-phenotropil significantly enhanced memory function in a passive avoidance response test at a dose of 1 mg/kg; the S-enantiomer did not show any activity in this test. However, the concentrations of R- and S-phenotropils in brain tissue were similar. In conclusion, the antidepressant and increased locomotor activity relies on both R- and S-phenotropils, but the memory-improving activity is only characteristic of R-phenotropil. These results may be important for the clinical use of optically pure isomers of phenotropil.

  14. [Investigation of physical activity among adults].

    PubMed

    Meboniia, N M; Kalandadze, I L; Chachava, T D; Sadzhaia, M V

    2006-06-01

    Lack of physical activity as well as smoking, overweight, high blood cholesterol level and hypertension are independent risk factors for development of various chronic diseases. Lack of physical activity is a main cause of non-communicable diseases morbidity and mortality in about 23% of cases (WHO, 2002). Goal of the survey was the identification and characteristics of physical activity among adults. We conducted epidemiologic survey among the school-children and students in Tbilisi. Survey was carried out in 40 schools from all regions of Tbilisi and 9 state and private institutes. Schools were selected by randomized trail in each region of Tbilisi and in each school were questioned all teen-agers from 14-17 year old. For selecting group of survey was used method of "proportional probability of value". There were questioned 2 500 school children and 1000 students, 38% boys and 62% girls. The results of survey ascertained that 23,5%-39,5% of respondents are training or engaged in sport everyday, or several times per week; 17,2% - once in a month; 9,3% once in a year; or 10,5% - never. Adults are less informed about useful effect of physical activity. Respondents had different point of on the role of physical activity: some of them thought it controls weight; others - prevents development of different diseases; the rest thinks that it copes with psycho-emotional stress, and none of them precise about effectiveness of physical activity in all cases mentioned above. Propaganda of healthy life stile must be associated with the effectiveness of physical activity on health.

  15. Investigating Deformylase and Deacylase Activity of Mammalian and Bacterial Sirtuins.

    PubMed

    Seidel, Julian; Klockenbusch, Cordula; Schwarzer, Dirk

    2016-03-01

    Lysine acylation constitutes a major group of post-translational modifications of proteins, and is found in the proteomes of organisms from all kingdoms of life. Sirtuins are considered the main erasers of these modification marks, and thus contribute to acylation-dependent regulation of enzyme activity, and potentially of protein quality control. We have established a substrate scaffold to enable the analysis of sirtuin activity with a broad range of acyl-lysine modifications, including hydrophobic fatty acids. Characterization of the deacylase activity of the bacterial SrtN, which is encoded by the yhdZ gene of Bacillus subtilis, showed that this enzyme is capable of removing a broad range of acyl groups. These investigations further showed that SrtN and human SIRT1 are efficient lysine-deformylases, thereby providing a first clue as to how this nonenzymatic modification might be removed from affected proteins.

  16. One Pot Selective Arylation of 2-Bromo-5-Chloro Thiophene; Molecular Structure Investigation via Density Functional Theory (DFT), X-ray Analysis, and Their Biological Activities.

    PubMed

    Rasool, Nasir; Kanwal, Aqsa; Rasheed, Tehmina; Ain, Quratulain; Mahmood, Tariq; Ayub, Khurshid; Zubair, Muhammad; Khan, Khalid Mohammed; Arshad, Muhammad Nadeem; M Asiri, Abdullah; Zia-Ul-Haq, Muhammad; Jaafar, Hawa Z E

    2016-01-01

    Synthesis of 2,5-bisarylthiophenes was accomplished by sequential Suzuki cross coupling reaction of 2-bromo-5-chloro thiophenes. Density functional theory (DFT) studies were carried out at the B3LYP/6-31G(d, p) level of theory to compare the geometric parameters of 2,5-bisarylthiophenes with those from X-ray diffraction results. The synthesized compounds are screened for in vitro bacteria scavenging abilities. At the concentration of 50 and 100 μg/mL, compounds 2b, 2c, 2d, 3c, and 3f with IC50-values of 51.4, 52.10, 58.0, 56.2, and 56.5 μg/mL respectively, were found most potent against E. coli. Among all the synthesized compounds 2a, 2d, 3c, and 3e with the least values of IC50 77, 76.26, 79.13 μg/mL respectively showed significant antioxidant activities. Almost all of the compounds showed good antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli, whereas 2-chloro-5-(4-methoxyphenyl) thiophene (2b) was found most active among all synthesized compound with an IC50 value of 51.4 μg/mL. All of the synthesized compounds were screened for nitric oxide scavenging activity as well. Frontier molecular orbitals (FMOs) and molecular electrostatic potentials of the target compounds were also studied theoretically to account for their relative reactivity. PMID:27367666

  17. One Pot Selective Arylation of 2-Bromo-5-Chloro Thiophene; Molecular Structure Investigation via Density Functional Theory (DFT), X-ray Analysis, and Their Biological Activities

    PubMed Central

    Rasool, Nasir; Kanwal, Aqsa; Rasheed, Tehmina; Ain, Quratulain; Mahmood, Tariq; Ayub, Khurshid; Zubair, Muhammad; Khan, Khalid Mohammed; Arshad, Muhammad Nadeem; M. Asiri, Abdullah; Zia-Ul-Haq, Muhammad; Jaafar, Hawa Z. E.

    2016-01-01

    Synthesis of 2,5-bisarylthiophenes was accomplished by sequential Suzuki cross coupling reaction of 2-bromo-5-chloro thiophenes. Density functional theory (DFT) studies were carried out at the B3LYP/6-31G(d, p) level of theory to compare the geometric parameters of 2,5-bisarylthiophenes with those from X-ray diffraction results. The synthesized compounds are screened for in vitro bacteria scavenging abilities. At the concentration of 50 and 100 μg/mL, compounds 2b, 2c, 2d, 3c, and 3f with IC50-values of 51.4, 52.10, 58.0, 56.2, and 56.5 μg/mL respectively, were found most potent against E. coli. Among all the synthesized compounds 2a, 2d, 3c, and 3e with the least values of IC50 77, 76.26, 79.13 μg/mL respectively showed significant antioxidant activities. Almost all of the compounds showed good antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli, whereas 2-chloro-5-(4-methoxyphenyl) thiophene (2b) was found most active among all synthesized compound with an IC50 value of 51.4 μg/mL. All of the synthesized compounds were screened for nitric oxide scavenging activity as well. Frontier molecular orbitals (FMOs) and molecular electrostatic potentials of the target compounds were also studied theoretically to account for their relative reactivity PMID:27367666

  18. Investigations into mirror fabrication metrology analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimmock, John O.

    1994-08-01

    This final report describes the work performed under this delivery order from June 1993 through August 1994. The scope of work included three distinct tasks in support of the AXAF-I program. The objective of the first task was to perform investigations of the grinding and polishing characteristics of the zerodur material by fabricating several samples. The second task was to continue the development of the integrated optical performance modeling software for AXAF-I. The purpose of third and final task was to develop and update the database of AXAF technical documents for an easy and rapid access. The MSFC optical and metrology shops were relocated from the B-wing of Building 4487 to Room BC 144 of Building 4466 in the beginning of this contract. This included dismantling, packing, and moving the equipment from its old location, and then reassembling it at the new location. A total of 65 zerodur samples, measuring 1 inch x 2 inches x 6 inches were ground and polished to a surface figure of lambda/10 p-v, and a surface finish of 5A rms were fabricated for coating tests. A number of special purpose tools and metal mirrors were also fabricated to support various AXAF-I development activities. In the metrology area, the ZYGO Mark 4 interferometer was relocated and also upgraded with a faster and more powerful processor. Surface metrology work was also performed on the coating samples and other optics using ZYGO interferometer and WYKO profilometer. A number of new features have been added to the GRAZTRACE program to enhance its analysis and modeling capabilities. A number of new commands have been added to the command mode GRAZTRACE program to provide a better control to the user on the program execution and data manipulation. Some commands and parameter entries have been reorganized for a uniform format. The command mode version of the convolution program CONVOLVE has been developed. An on-line help system and a user's manual have also been developed for the benefit of

  19. Investigations into mirror fabrication metrology analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dimmock, John O.

    1994-01-01

    This final report describes the work performed under this delivery order from June 1993 through August 1994. The scope of work included three distinct tasks in support of the AXAF-I program. The objective of the first task was to perform investigations of the grinding and polishing characteristics of the zerodur material by fabricating several samples. The second task was to continue the development of the integrated optical performance modeling software for AXAF-I. The purpose of third and final task was to develop and update the database of AXAF technical documents for an easy and rapid access. The MSFC optical and metrology shops were relocated from the B-wing of Building 4487 to Room BC 144 of Building 4466 in the beginning of this contract. This included dismantling, packing, and moving the equipment from its old location, and then reassembling it at the new location. A total of 65 zerodur samples, measuring 1 inch x 2 inches x 6 inches were ground and polished to a surface figure of lambda/10 p-v, and a surface finish of 5A rms were fabricated for coating tests. A number of special purpose tools and metal mirrors were also fabricated to support various AXAF-I development activities. In the metrology area, the ZYGO Mark 4 interferometer was relocated and also upgraded with a faster and more powerful processor. Surface metrology work was also performed on the coating samples and other optics using ZYGO interferometer and WYKO profilometer. A number of new features have been added to the GRAZTRACE program to enhance its analysis and modeling capabilities. A number of new commands have been added to the command mode GRAZTRACE program to provide a better control to the user on the program execution and data manipulation. Some commands and parameter entries have been reorganized for a uniform format. The command mode version of the convolution program CONVOLVE has been developed. An on-line help system and a user's manual have also been developed for the benefit of

  20. Activation analysis using Cornell TRIGA

    SciTech Connect

    Hossain, Tim Z.

    1994-07-01

    A major use of the Cornell TRIGA is for activation analysis. Over the years many varieties of samples have been analyzed from a number of fields of interest ranging from geology, archaeology and textiles. More recently the analysis has been extended to high technology materials for applications in optical and semiconductor devices. Trace analysis in high purity materials like Si wafers has been the focus in many instances, while in others analysis of major/minor components were the goals. These analysis has been done using the delayed mode. Results from recent measurements in semiconductors and other materials will be presented. In addition the near future capability of using prompt gamma activation analysis using the Cornell cold neutron beam will be discussed. (author)

  1. Standardizing Activation Analysis: New Software for Photon Activation Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Z. J.; Wells, D.; Green, J.; Segebade, C.

    2011-06-01

    Photon Activation Analysis (PAA) of environmental, archaeological and industrial samples requires extensive data analysis that is susceptible to error. For the purpose of saving time, manpower and minimizing error, a computer program was designed, built and implemented using SQL, Access 2007 and asp.net technology to automate this process. Based on the peak information of the spectrum and assisted by its PAA library, the program automatically identifies elements in the samples and calculates their concentrations and respective uncertainties. The software also could be operated in browser/server mode, which gives the possibility to use it anywhere the internet is accessible. By switching the nuclide library and the related formula behind, the new software can be easily expanded to neutron activation analysis (NAA), charged particle activation analysis (CPAA) or proton-induced X-ray emission (PIXE). Implementation of this would standardize the analysis of nuclear activation data. Results from this software were compared to standard PAA analysis with excellent agreement. With minimum input from the user, the software has proven to be fast, user-friendly and reliable.

  2. 19 CFR 207.20 - Investigative activity following preliminary determination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Investigative activity following preliminary determination. 207.20 Section 207.20 Customs Duties UNITED STATES INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION NONADJUDICATIVE INVESTIGATIONS INVESTIGATIONS OF WHETHER INJURY TO DOMESTIC INDUSTRIES RESULTS FROM IMPORTS SOLD AT LESS THAN FAIR VALUE OR FROM...

  3. Investigating seasonal gravity wave activity in the summer polar mesosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Y.; Taylor, M. J.; Randall, C. E.; Lumpe, J. D.; Siskind, D. E.; Bailey, S. M.; Russell, J. M.

    2015-05-01

    The NASA Aeronomy of Ice in the Mesosphere (AIM) satellite is the first spaceborne mission dedicated to studying high-altitude (~83 km) Polar Mesospheric Clouds (PMCs). Since its launch in 2007, the Cloud Imaging and Particle Size (CIPS) instrument onboard AIM has obtained large-field, high resolution (25 km2/pixel) images of the PMCs, enabling a unique investigation of mesospheric gravity wave activity in the summer polar mesosphere where previous measurements have been sparse. In this study, we have analyzed 12 consecutive seasons of AIM/CIPS PMC albedo data to determine the statistical properties of medium and large horizontal scale (>100 km) gravity waves present in the PMC data. Over 60,000 wave events with horizontal scale-sizes ranging up to >2000 km have been identified and measured, revealing a wealth of wave events particularly in the ~300-800 km range where our analysis sensitivity is largest. These data are ideal for investigating the intra-seasonal, inter-annual and hemispheric variability of these waves as observed over the whole summer polar cap regions. Throughout this 6 year study, the wave activity in the southern hemisphere was found to be consistently 10-15% higher than in the northern hemisphere and both the northern and southern hemisphere wave activity was determined to decrease systematically (by ~15%) during the course of each summer season. This decrease agrees well with previous seasonal stratospheric studies of variations in the wave energy, suggesting a direct influence of the lower atmospheric sources on polar mesospheric dynamics. Very similar and consistent results were also found from season to season in both hemispheres providing new information for gravity wave modeling and dynamical studies of the high-latitude summer-time mesosphere.

  4. Vibrational spectroscopy [FTIR and FTRaman] investigation, computed vibrational frequency analysis and IR intensity and Raman activity peak resemblance analysis on 4-chloro 2-methylaniline using HF and DFT [LSDA, B3LYP and B3PW91] calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramalingam, S.; Periandy, S.

    2011-03-01

    In the present study, the FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra of 4-chloro-2-methylaniline (4CH2MA) have been recorded in the range of 4000-100 cm -1. The fundamental modes of vibrational frequencies of 4CH2MA are assigned. All the geometrical parameters have been calculated by HF and DFT (LSDA, B3LYP and B3PW91) methods with 6-31G (d, p) and 6-311G (d, p) basis sets. Optimized geometries of the molecule have been interpreted and compared with the reported experimental values for aniline and some substituted aniline. The harmonic and anharmonic vibrational wavenumbers, IR intensities and Raman activities are calculated at the same theory levels used in geometry optimization. The calculated frequencies are scaled and compared with experimental values. The scaled vibrational frequencies at LSDA/B3LYP/6-311G (d, p) seem to coincide with the experimentally observed values with acceptable deviations. The impact of substitutions on the benzene structure is investigated. The molecular interactions between the substitutions (Cl, CH 3 and NH 2) are also analyzed.

  5. Discriminant and Proximity Analysis in Intercultural Investigation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laveault, Dany

    1982-01-01

    Discriminant analysis is applied to data from previous research dealing with assessing the particularities of cognitive development in young (four to nine years old) Montagnais Indians and French Canadians. The most important future contribution of discriminant analysis to intercultural research will be its ability to conceptualize group…

  6. Neutron Activation Analysis: Techniques and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacLellan, Ryan

    2011-04-01

    The role of neutron activation analysis in low-energy low-background experimentsis discussed in terms of comparible methods. Radiochemical neutron activation analysis is introduce. The procedure of instrumental neutron activation analysis is detailed especially with respect to the measurement of trace amounts of natural radioactivity. The determination of reactor neutron spectrum parameters required for neutron activation analysis is also presented.

  7. Neutron Activation Analysis: Techniques and Applications

    SciTech Connect

    MacLellan, Ryan

    2011-04-27

    The role of neutron activation analysis in low-energy low-background experimentsis discussed in terms of comparible methods. Radiochemical neutron activation analysis is introduce. The procedure of instrumental neutron activation analysis is detailed especially with respect to the measurement of trace amounts of natural radioactivity. The determination of reactor neutron spectrum parameters required for neutron activation analysis is also presented.

  8. Investigating Water Problems. A Water Analysis Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Renn, Charles E.

    This booklet has been prepared expressly for teachers and students who are interested in investigating the quality of water supplies. The intent is to provide technical support and background information concerning water quality factors and to give basic information on field and laboratory water testing techniques. It is assumed that the reader is…

  9. Waco investigation: analysis of FLIR videotapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klasen, Lena M.

    2001-09-01

    This paper presents some of the image processing techniques that were applied to seek an answer to the question whether agents of the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) directed gunfired against the Branch Davidian complex in the tragic event that took place in Waco, Texas, U.S., 1993. The task for this investigation was to provide a scientific opinion that clarified the cause of the questioned events, or flashes, that can be seen on one of the surveillance videotapes. These flashes were by several experts, concluded to be evidence of gunfire. However, there were many reasons to question the correctness of that conclusion, such as the fact that some of the flashes appeared on a regular basis. The main hypothesis for this work was that the flashes instead were caused by specular solar reflections. The technical approach for this work was to analyze and compare the flashes appearance. By reconstructing the spatial and temporal position of the sensor, the complex and the sun, the geometrical properties was compared to the theoretical appearance of specular solar reflections. The result showed that the flashes seen on the FLIR videotape, were caused by solar or heat reflections from single or multiple objects. Consequently, they could not form evidence of gunfire. Further, the result highlights the importance of considering the characteristics of the imaging system within investigations that utilizes images as information source. This is due to the need of separating real data from other phenomena (such as solar reflections), distortions and artifacts in a correct manner.

  10. Climate Data Analysis Tools Facilitate Scientific Investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doutriaux, Charles; Drach, Robert; McCoy, Renata; Mlaker, Velimir; Williams, Dean

    2009-09-01

    Insightful analysis of geophysical phenomena often depends on the choice of software tools to access, manipulate, and visualize data sets of interest. These data exploration tasks can be efficiently executed in a single computational environment by the freely distributed Climate Data Analysis Tools (CDAT; http://www-pcmdi.llnl.gov/software-portal/). Although CDAT has been designed primarily for climate science applications, its capabilities are increasingly being enhanced to address the data needs of other geophysical sciences. The CDAT software is based on the object-oriented Python computer language, but the software extends existing constructs to achieve capabilities that are relevant to any gridded geophysical data. Depending on the user's preference, CDAT can be fully deployed by either a script or graphical user interface.

  11. US--ITER activation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Attaya, H.; Gohar, Y.; Smith, D.

    1990-09-01

    Activation analysis has been made for the US ITER design. The radioactivity and the decay heat have been calculated, during operation and after shutdown for the two ITER phases, the Physics Phase and the Technology Phase. The Physics Phase operates about 24 full power days (FPDs) at fusion power level of 1100 MW and the Technology Phase has 860 MW fusion power and operates for about 1360 FPDs. The point-wise gamma sources have been calculated everywhere in the reactor at several times after shutdown of the two phases and are then used to calculate the biological dose everywhere in the reactor. Activation calculations have been made also for ITER divertor. The results are presented for different continuous operation times and for only one pulse. The effect of the pulsed operation on the radioactivity is analyzed. 6 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Prompt-gamma activation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Lindstrom, R.M.

    1993-01-01

    A permenent, full-time instrument for prompt-gamma activation analysis is nearing completion as part of the Cold Neutron Research Facility (CNRF). The design of the analytical system has been optimized for high gamma detection efficiency and low background, particularly for hydrogen. Because of the purity of the neutron beam, shielding requirements are modest and the scatter-capture background is low. As a result of a compact sample-detector geometry, the sensitivity (counting rate per gram of analyte) is a factor of four better than the existing Maryland-NIST thermal-neutron instrument at the reactor. Hydrogen backgrounds of a few micrograms have already been achieved, which promises to be of value in numerous applications where quantitative nondestructive analysis of small quantities of hydrogen in materials is necessary.

  13. Investigating Material Approximations in Spacecraft Radiation Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, Steven A.; Slaba, Tony C.; Clowdsley, Martha S.; Blattnig, Steve R.

    2011-01-01

    During the design process, the configuration of space vehicles and habitats changes frequently and the merits of design changes must be evaluated. Methods for rapidly assessing astronaut exposure are therefore required. Typically, approximations are made to simplify the geometry and speed up the evaluation of each design. In this work, the error associated with two common approximations used to simplify space radiation vehicle analyses, scaling into equivalent materials and material reordering, are investigated. Over thirty materials commonly found in spacesuits, vehicles, and human bodies are considered. Each material is placed in a material group (aluminum, polyethylene, or tissue), and the error associated with scaling and reordering was quantified for each material. Of the scaling methods investigated, range scaling is shown to be the superior method, especially for shields less than 30 g/cm2 exposed to a solar particle event. More complicated, realistic slabs are examined to quantify the separate and combined effects of using equivalent materials and reordering. The error associated with material reordering is shown to be at least comparable to, if not greater than, the error associated with range scaling. In general, scaling and reordering errors were found to grow with the difference between the average nuclear charge of the actual material and average nuclear charge of the equivalent material. Based on this result, a different set of equivalent materials (titanium, aluminum, and tissue) are substituted for the commonly used aluminum, polyethylene, and tissue. The realistic cases are scaled and reordered using the new equivalent materials, and the reduced error is shown.

  14. Analysis of body calcium (regional changes in body calcium by in vivo neutron activation analysis)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suki, W.; Johnson, P. C.; Leblanc, A.; Evans, H. J.

    1981-01-01

    The effect of space flight on urine and fecal calcium loss was documented during the three long-term Skylab flights. Neutron activation analysis was used to determine regional calcium loss. Various designs for regional analysis were investigated.

  15. Experimental investigation of active loads control for aircraft landing gear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgehee, J. R.; Dreher, R. C.

    1982-01-01

    Aircraft dynamic loads and vibrations resulting from landing impact and from runway and taxiway unevenness are recognized as significant in causing fatigue damage, dynamic stress on the airframe, crew and passenger discomfort, and reduction of the pilot's ability to control the aircraft during ground operations. One potential method for improving operational characteistics of aircraft on the ground is the application of active control technology to the landing gears to reduce ground loads applied to the airframe. An experimental investigation was conducted which simulated the landing dynamics of a light airplane to determine the feasibility and potential of a series hydraulic active control main landing gear. The experiments involved a passive gear and an active control gear. Results of this investigation show that a series hydraulically controlled gear is feasible and that such a gear is very effective in reducing the loads transmitted by the gear to the airframe during ground operations.

  16. Software reliability experiments data analysis and investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, J. Leslie; Caglayan, Alper K.

    1991-01-01

    The objectives are to investigate the fundamental reasons which cause independently developed software programs to fail dependently, and to examine fault tolerant software structures which maximize reliability gain in the presence of such dependent failure behavior. The authors used 20 redundant programs from a software reliability experiment to analyze the software errors causing coincident failures, to compare the reliability of N-version and recovery block structures composed of these programs, and to examine the impact of diversity on software reliability using subpopulations of these programs. The results indicate that both conceptually related and unrelated errors can cause coincident failures and that recovery block structures offer more reliability gain than N-version structures if acceptance checks that fail independently from the software components are available. The authors present a theory of general program checkers that have potential application for acceptance tests.

  17. Investigation of electroforming techniques, literature analysis report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malone, G. A.

    1975-01-01

    A literature analysis is presented of reports, specifications, and documented experiences with the use of electroforming to produce copper and nickel structures for aerospace and other engineering applications. The literature period covered is from 1948 to 1974. Specific effort was made to correlate mechanical property data for the electrodeposited material with known electroforming solution compositions and operating conditions. From this survey, electrolytes are suggested for selection to electroform copper and nickel outer shells on regeneratively cooled thrust chamber liners, and other devices subject to thermal and pressure exposure, based on mechanical properties obtainable, performance under various thermal environments, and ease of process control for product reproducibility. Processes of potential value in obtaining sound bonds between electrodeposited copper and nickel and copper alloy substrates are also discussed.

  18. Tools to investigate how interprofessional education activities link to competencies.

    PubMed

    West, Courtney; Veronin, Michael; Landry, Karen; Kurz, Terri; Watzak, Bree; Quiram, Barbara; Graham, Lori

    2015-01-01

    Integrating interprofessional education (IPE) activities and curricular components in health professions education has been emphasized recently by the inclusion of accreditation standards across disciplines. The Interprofessional Education Collaborative (IPEC) established IPE competencies in 2009, but evaluating how activities link to competencies has not been investigated in depth. The purpose of this project is to investigate how well two IPE activities align with IPEC competencies. To evaluate how our IPE activities met IPEC competencies, we developed a checklist and an observation instrument. A brief description of each is included as well as the outcomes. We analyzed Disaster Day, a simulation exercise that includes participants from Nursing, Medicine, and Pharmacy, and Interprofessional Healthcare Ethics (IPHCE), a course that introduced medical, nursing, and pharmacy students to ethical issues using didactic sessions and case discussions. While both activities appeared to facilitate the development of IPE competencies, Disaster Day aligned more with IPEC competencies than the IPHCE course and appears to be a more comprehensive way of addressing IPEC competencies. However, offering one IPE activity or curricular element is not sufficient. Having several IPE options available, utilizing the tools we developed to map the IPE curriculum and evaluating competency coverage is recommended.

  19. Investigation of Antiulcer and Antioxidant Activity of Moclobemide in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Albayrak, Abdulmecit; Alp, Hamit H.; Suleyman, Halis

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Even though there are many drugs for the treatment of gastric ulcers, these drugs sometimes cannot succeed. Since the 1950s, antidepressant drugs have been used for several non-psychiatric indications. Many antidepressant drugs have been shown experimentally to produce antiulcer activity in various ulcer models. Moclobemide is an antidepressant drug which inhibits monoamine oxidase-A (MAO) enzyme selectively. When it is compared to the classic antidepressants drugs, moclobemide is the first choice in depression treatment because of its effectiveness and less side effects. This study aimed to investigate the antiulcer effects of moclobemide and to determine its relationship with antioxidant mechanisms in rat gastric tissue. Materials and Methods: The antiulcer activities of 10, 20, 40, 80, 150 mg/kg moclobemide and 20 mg/kg famotidine have been investigated on indomethacin-induced ulcers in rats, and the results have been compared with that of the control group. Results: Moclobemide decreased the indomethacin-induced ulcers significantly at all doses used. While used doses of moclobemide increased the glutathione (GSH), nitric oxide (NO) level and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, it decreased the malondialdehyde (MDA) level and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity in stomach tissue when compared to the control group. Conclusion: It is determined that an antidepressant drug, moclobemide is a potent anti-ulcer agent. Inhibition of toxic oxidant radicals and activation of antioxidant mechanisms play a role in its anti-ulcer effect mechanisms. PMID:25745343

  20. Experimental and analytical investigation of active loads control for aircraft landing gear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, D. L.; Mcgehee, J. R.

    1983-01-01

    A series hydraulic, active loads control main landing gear from a light, twin-engine civil aircraft was investigated. Tests included landing impact and traversal of simulated runway roughness. It is shown that the active gear is feasible and very effective in reducing the force transmitted to the airframe. Preliminary validation of a multidegree of freedom active gear flexible airframe takeoff and landing analysis computer program, which may be used as a design tool for active gear systems, is accomplished by comparing experimental and computed data for the passive and active gears.

  1. Investigation of Fast and Slow CMEs Effect on Geomagnetic Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donmez, Burcin; Kilcik, Ali

    2016-07-01

    Here we investigate the relationship between the fast (v>800 km/s) and slow (v<400 km/s) coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and geomagnetic Ap and Dst indices during the last two solar cycles (cycle 23 and 24). In result of our analysis we found following results 1) Fast CMEs show much better relationship with geomagnetic Ap and Dst indices compared to slow ones, 2) Similar to geomagnetic indices, the number of fast CMEs decreased seriously during solar cycle 24th, while the number of slow CMEs are almost the same during the investigated whole time interval (1996 through 2016).

  2. Students' Performance in Investigative Activity and Their Understanding of Activity Aims

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gomes, Alessandro Damasio Trani; Borges, A. Tarciso; Justi, Rosaria

    2008-01-01

    This study investigates the relationship between the students' understanding of the aims of an investigative activity and their performance when conducting it. One hundred and eighty-one year nine students from a public middle school in Brazil took part in the study. Students working in pairs were asked to investigate two problems using a…

  3. Investigations into the immunomodulatory activity of Argyreia speciosa.

    PubMed

    Gokhale, A B; Damre, A S; Saraf, M N

    2003-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the immunomodulatory activity of Argyreia speciosa on cellular and humoral immunity. Oral administration of the ethanolic extract of A. speciosa root (ASEE), at the doses of 50, 100 and 200 mg/kg in mice, dose-dependently potentiated the delayed-type hypersensitivity reaction induced both by sheep red blood cells (SRBC) and oxazolone. It significantly enhanced the production of circulating antibody titre in mice in response to SRBC. ASEE failed to show any effect on macrophage phagocytosis. Chronic administration of ASEE significantly ameliorated the total white blood cell count and also restored the myelosuppressive effects induced by cyclophosphamide. The present investigation reveals that ASEE possesses immunomodulatory activity.

  4. Investigation into biologically active constituents of Geum rivale L.

    PubMed

    Owczarek, Aleksandra; Gudej, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Aerial and underground parts of Geum rivale (Rosaceae) were investigated. Tiliroside, gallic acid, ellagic acid and a sterol fraction were isolated from aerial parts of the plant. The sterol fraction was analyzed using GC-MS. Eleven phenolic acids were identified in aerial parts of the plant, and eight in underground parts, by means of RP-HPLC analysis. The quantitative determination of phenolic acids, tannins and flavonoids was also carried out.

  5. Investigations on the sporicidal and fungicidal activity of disinfectants.

    PubMed

    Lensing, H H; Oei, H L

    1985-12-01

    The sporicidal and fungicidal activity of disinfectants was studied in a suspension test. Glutaraldehyde 4%, sodium-dichloroisocyanurate-dihydrate (2400 ppm active chlorine) and peracetic acid 0.25% demonstrated after 30 min of exposure at 20 degrees C in the presence of 4% horse serum a clear activity against spores of Bacillus cereus. Under the same conditions formaldehyde 4% and glutaraldehyde 2% were also found to be sporicidal, but only after a longer time of exposure. Spores of Bacillus anthracis and B. cereus appeared to be comparably resistant against the investigated disinfectants, whereas conidiospores of Aspergillus fumigatus and Aspergillus niger were less resistant. Of the micro-organisms tested Candida albicans proved to be slightest resistant, while spores of Bacillus subtilis were found the most resistant. PMID:3938146

  6. Incident investigation and analysis for E and P operations

    SciTech Connect

    Waterfall, K.W.; Willink, C.A.T.; Milne, D.J. )

    1995-01-01

    Incident investigation and analysis in Shell E and P operations is part of performance monitoring in health, safety, and environment (HSE) management systems. The focus is on identifying underlying causes. A step-wise approach is given from immediate response through determining the level of investigation, coverage of investigation aspects, analysis, recording, and follow-up. The means to analyze incidents by application of the Tripod system, which is directed toward understanding underlying causes of incidents, are reviewed.

  7. Structural Investigation of Alkali Activated Clay Minerals for Application in Water Treatment Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bumanis, G.; Bajare, D.; Dembovska, L.

    2015-11-01

    Alkali activation technology can be applied for a wide range of alumo-silicates to produce innovative materials with various areas of application. Most researches focuse on the application of alumo-silicate materials in building industry as cement binder replacement to produce mortar and concrete [1]. However, alkali activation technology offers high potential also in biotechnologies [2]. In the processes where certain pH level, especially alkaline environment, must be ensured, alkali activated materials can be applied. One of such fields is water treatment systems where high level pH (up to pH 10.5) ensures efficient removal of water pollutants such as manganese [3]. Previous investigations had shown that alkali activation technology can be applied to calcined clay powder and aluminium scrap recycling waste as a foam forming agent to create porous alkali activated materials. This investigation focuses on the structural investigation of calcined kaolin and illite clay alkali activation processes. Chemical and mineralogical composition of both clays were determined and structural investigation of alkali activated materials was made by using XRD, DTA, FTIR analysis; the microstructure of hardened specimens was observed by SEM. Physical properties of the obtained material were determined. Investigation indicates the essential role of chemical composition of the clay used in the alkali activation process, and potential use of the obtained material in water treatment systems.

  8. Drilling to investigate processes in active tectonics and magmatism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shervais, J.; Evans, J.; Toy, V.; Kirkpatrick, J.; Clarke, A.; Eichelberger, J.

    2014-12-01

    Coordinated drilling efforts are an important method to investigate active tectonics and magmatic processes related to faults and volcanoes. The US National Science Foundation (NSF) recently sponsored a series of workshops to define the nature of future continental drilling efforts. As part of this series, we convened a workshop to explore how continental scientific drilling can be used to better understand active tectonic and magmatic processes. The workshop, held in Park City, Utah, in May 2013, was attended by 41 investigators from seven countries. Participants were asked to define compelling scientific justifications for examining problems that can be addressed by coordinated programs of continental scientific drilling and related site investigations. They were also asked to evaluate a wide range of proposed drilling projects, based on white papers submitted prior to the workshop. Participants working on faults and fault zone processes highlighted two overarching topics with exciting potential for future scientific drilling research: (1) the seismic cycle and (2) the mechanics and architecture of fault zones. Recommended projects target fundamental mechanical processes and controls on faulting, and range from induced earthquakes and earthquake initiation to investigations of detachment fault mechanics and fluid flow in fault zones. Participants working on active volcanism identified five themes: the volcano eruption cycle; eruption sustainability, near-field stresses, and system recovery; eruption hazards; verification of geophysical models; and interactions with other Earth systems. Recommended projects address problems that are transferrable to other volcanic systems, such as improved methods for identifying eruption history and constraining the rheological structure of shallow caldera regions. Participants working on chemical geodynamics identified four major themes: large igneous provinces (LIPs), ocean islands, continental hotspot tracks and rifts, and

  9. Investigating the physiology of brain activation with MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buxton, Richard B.; Uludag, Kamil; Dubowitz, David J.

    2004-04-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has become a powerful tool for investigating the working human brain based on the blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) effect on the MR signal. However, despite the widespread use of fMRI techniques for mapping brain activation, the basic physiological mechanisms underlying the observed signal changes are still poorly understood. Arterial spin labeling (ASL) techniques, which measure cerebral blood flow (CBF) and the BOLD effect simultaneously, provide a useful tool for investigating these physiological questions. In this paper, recent results of studies manipulating the baseline CBF both pharmacologically and physiologically will be discussed. These data are consistent with a feed-forward mechanism of neurovascular coupling, and suggest that the CBF change itself may be a more robust reflection of neural activity changes than the BOLD effect. Consistent with these data, a new thermodynamic hypothesis is proposed for the physiological function of CBF regulation: maintenance of the [O2]/[CO2] concentration ratio at the mitochondria in order to preserve the free energy available from oxidative metabolism. A kinetic model based on this hypothesis provides a reasonable quantitative description of the CBF changes associated with neural activity and altered blood gases (CO2 and O2).

  10. Optical Tools to Investigate Cellular Activity in the Intestinal Wall

    PubMed Central

    Boesmans, Werend; Hao, Marlene M; Berghe, Pieter Vanden

    2015-01-01

    Live imaging has become an essential tool to investigate the coordinated activity and output of cellular networks. Within the last decade, 2 Nobel prizes have been awarded to recognize innovations in the field of imaging: one for the discovery, use, and optimization of the green fluorescent protein (2008) and the second for the development of super-resolved fluorescence microscopy (2014). New advances in both optogenetics and microscopy now enable researchers to record and manipulate activity from specific populations of cells with better contrast and resolution, at higher speeds, and deeper into live tissues. In this review, we will discuss some of the recent developments in microscope technology and in the synthesis of fluorescent probes, both synthetic and genetically encoded. We focus on how live imaging of cellular physiology has progressed our understanding of the control of gastrointestinal motility, and we discuss the hurdles to overcome in order to apply the novel tools in the field of neurogastroenterology and motility. PMID:26130630

  11. AN ULTRAVIOLET INVESTIGATION OF ACTIVITY ON EXOPLANET HOST STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Shkolnik, Evgenya L.

    2013-03-20

    Using the far-UV (FUV) and near-UV (NUV) photometry from the NASA Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX), we searched for evidence of increased stellar activity due to tidal and/or magnetic star-planet interactions (SPI) in the 272 known FGK planetary hosts observed by GALEX. With the increased sensitivity of GALEX, we are able probe systems with lower activity levels and at larger distances than what has been done to date with X-ray satellites. We compared samples of stars with close-in planets (a < 0.1 AU) to those with far-out planets (a > 0.5 AU) and looked for correlations of excess activity with other system parameters. This statistical investigation found no clear correlations with a, M{sub p} , or M{sub p} /a, in contrast to some X-ray and Ca II studies. However, there is tentative evidence (at a level of 1.8{sigma}) that stars with radial-velocity-(RV)-detected close-in planets are more FUV-active than stars with far-out planets, in agreement with several published X-ray and Ca II results. The case is strengthened to a level of significance to 2.3{sigma} when transit-detected close-in planets are included. This is most likely because the RV-selected sample of stars is significantly less active than the field population of comparable stars, while the transit-selected sample is similarly active. Given the factor of 2-3 scatter in fractional FUV luminosity for a given stellar effective temperature, it is necessary to conduct a time-resolved study of the planet hosts in order to better characterize their UV variability and generate a firmer statistical result.

  12. Investigation of some biologic activities of Swertia longifolia Boiss.

    PubMed

    Hajimehdipoor, H; Esmaeili, S; Shekarchi, M; Emrarian, T; Naghibi, F

    2013-10-01

    Swertia species are widespread in Eastern and Southern Asian countries and used in traditional medicine as anti-pyretic, analgesic, gastro and liver tonic. Among different species, only Swertia longifolia grows in Iran. In this investigation, antioxidant, cytotoxic and acetylcholinesterase inhibitory activities of S. longifolia have been studied. Aerial parts and roots of the plant were collected, dried and extracted with methanol 80% (total extract). Different extracts of the plant were obtained using hexane, chloroform, ethyl acetate, methanol, methanol:water (1:1) and water, respectively. Cytotoxic activity was determined by MTT assay on MDBK, HepG2, MCF7, HT29 and A549 cell lines. Antioxidant activity was measured by 2,2-diphenyl-1-picryl hydrazyl (DPPH) free radicals and acetylcholinesterase inhibitory (AChEI) effect was evaluated based on Ellman's method in 96-well microplates.The results showed no cytotoxicity of the plant extracts on MDBK, HepG2, MCF7, HT29 and A549 cell lines up to 100 μg/ml. All samples showed radical scavenging activity but methanol extract of aerial parts and ethyl acetate extract of the roots showed the highest effects.Total extract of the roots showed higher AChEI activity than the aerial parts. Among different extracts, chloroform and ethyl acetate extracts of the roots and chloroform and methanol:water extracts of the aerial parts were more potent in AChEI assay. It is concluded that aerial parts and roots of the plant are rich in antioxidant agents with no cytotoxicity on selected cell lines up to 100 μg/ml. Moreover, since antioxidant and AChEI activity of compounds play an important role in the treatment of Alzheimer's disorder, this plant might be a potential candidate for isolation of antioxidant and AChEI compounds which could be used as supportive treatment of Alzheimer's disease. PMID:24082894

  13. Flow Cytometric Investigation of Classical and Alternative Platelet Activation Markers

    PubMed Central

    Debreceni, Ildikó Beke; Kappelmayer, János

    2013-01-01

    Platelets show a substantial role in the maintenance of vascular integrity when these cells after a rapid activation adhere to the vessel wall lesion, aggregate with other platelets and leukocytes resulting in an arterial thrombosis. Analysis of in vivo platelet activation at an early time point is crucial in the detection of developing thrombotic events. In addition, the forecast of future complications as well as the evaluation of the efficacy of anti- platelet medication are also essential in a large group of patients. Changes in the levels of platelet receptors or alteration in other surface properties due to intra- and extracellular responses to a stimulus can be measurable primarily by flow cytometry with specific antibodies via the assessment of classical and alternative platelet activation markers. Some of these biomarkers have been already used in routine laboratory settings in many cases, while others still stand in the phase of research applications. Deficiency in platelet receptors is also accessible with this technique for the diagnosis of certain bleeding disorders. We here describe the most important types of platelet activation markers, and give an overview how the levels of these markers are altered in different diseases.

  14. LDEF meteoroid and debris special investigation group investigations and activities at the Johnson Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    See, Thomas H.; Warren, Jack L.; Zolensky, Michael E.; Sapp, Clyde A.; Bernhard, Ronald P.; Dardano, Claire B.

    1995-01-01

    Since the return of the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) in January, 1990, members of the Meteoroid and Debris Special Investigation Group (M&D SIG) at the Johnson Space Center (JSC) in Houston, Texas have been examining LDEF hardware in an effort to expand the knowledge base regarding the low-Earth orbit (LEO) particulate environment. In addition to the various investigative activities, JSC is also the location of the general Meteoroid & Debris database. This publicly accessible database contains information obtained from the various M&D SIG investigations, as well as limited data obtained by individual LDEF Principal Investigators. LDEF exposed approximately 130 m(exp 2) of surface area to the LEO particulate environment, approximately 15.4 m(exp 2) of which was occupied by structural frame components (i.e., longerons and intercoastals) of the spacecraft. The data reported here was obtained as a result of detailed scans of LDEF intercoastals, 68 of which reside at JSC. The limited amount of data presently available on the A0178 thermal control blankets was reported last year and will not be reiterated here. The data presented here are limited to measurements of crater diameters and their frequency of occurrence (i.e., flux).

  15. Comparative Sensitivity Analysis of Muscle Activation Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Rockenfeller, Robert; Günther, Michael; Schmitt, Syn; Götz, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    We mathematically compared two models of mammalian striated muscle activation dynamics proposed by Hatze and Zajac. Both models are representative for a broad variety of biomechanical models formulated as ordinary differential equations (ODEs). These models incorporate parameters that directly represent known physiological properties. Other parameters have been introduced to reproduce empirical observations. We used sensitivity analysis to investigate the influence of model parameters on the ODE solutions. In addition, we expanded an existing approach to treating initial conditions as parameters and to calculating second-order sensitivities. Furthermore, we used a global sensitivity analysis approach to include finite ranges of parameter values. Hence, a theoretician striving for model reduction could use the method for identifying particularly low sensitivities to detect superfluous parameters. An experimenter could use it for identifying particularly high sensitivities to improve parameter estimation. Hatze's nonlinear model incorporates some parameters to which activation dynamics is clearly more sensitive than to any parameter in Zajac's linear model. Other than Zajac's model, Hatze's model can, however, reproduce measured shifts in optimal muscle length with varied muscle activity. Accordingly we extracted a specific parameter set for Hatze's model that combines best with a particular muscle force-length relation. PMID:26417379

  16. Fuel Cells Vehicle Systems Analysis (Fuel Cell Freeze Investigation)

    SciTech Connect

    Pesaran, A.; Kim, G.; Markel, T.; Wipke, K.

    2005-05-01

    Presentation on Fuel Cells Vehicle Systems Analysis (Fuel Cell Freeze Investigation) for the 2005 Hydrogen, Fuel Cells & Infrastructure Technologies Program Annual Review held in Arlington, Virginia on May 23-26, 2005.

  17. Green synthesis, spectroscopic investigation and photocatalytic activity of lead nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Elango, Ganesh; Roopan, Selvaraj Mohana

    2015-03-15

    Most of researcher focused their research towards synthesize of nanoparticles by the method of applied chemical method which was one of the costliest method. We have focused cheapest and simplest method for the synthesizing of lead nanoparticles (Pb-NPs) using cocos nucifera L extract. The methanolic extract of cocos nucifera L was efficiently used as a reducing agent for synthesizing Pb-NPs. On treatment of lead acetate with cocos nucifera coir extracts, stable Pb-NPs were formed. The synthesized Pb-NPs were further confirmed by UV-visible spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Transmission electron microscope (TEM) and Energy Dispersive (EDAX) analysis. The secondary metabolites present in methanolic extract which can mainly act as a reducing and capping agents for the formation of Pb-NPs were identified by GC-MS. Anti-microbial activity for Pb-NPs against four pathogenic strain's such as Staphylococcus aureus, Escheria coli, Staphylococcus epidermis and Bacillus subtilis. Result states that Pb-NPs size was 47 nm and also shows good activity against S. aureus. Further we report on photocatalytic absorption of malachite green dye processed in short UV wavelength at 254 nm. UV spectral analysis showed peak absorbance at 613 nm with special reference to the excitation of surfaces plasmon vibration by Pb-NPs. PMID:25574657

  18. Green synthesis, spectroscopic investigation and photocatalytic activity of lead nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elango, Ganesh; Roopan, Selvaraj Mohana

    2015-03-01

    Most of researcher focused their research towards synthesize of nanoparticles by the method of applied chemical method which was one of the costliest method. We have focused cheapest and simplest method for the synthesizing of lead nanoparticles (Pb-NPs) using cocos nucifera L extract. The methanolic extract of cocos nucifera L was efficiently used as a reducing agent for synthesizing Pb-NPs. On treatment of lead acetate with cocos nucifera coir extracts, stable Pb-NPs were formed. The synthesized Pb-NPs were further confirmed by UV-visible spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Transmission electron microscope (TEM) and Energy Dispersive (EDAX) analysis. The secondary metabolites present in methanolic extract which can mainly act as a reducing and capping agents for the formation of Pb-NPs were identified by GC-MS. Anti-microbial activity for Pb-NPs against four pathogenic strain's such as Staphylococcus aureus, Escheria coli, Staphylococcus epidermis and Bacillus subtilis. Result states that Pb-NPs size was 47 nm and also shows good activity against S. aureus. Further we report on photocatalytic absorption of malachite green dye processed in short UV wavelength at 254 nm. UV spectral analysis showed peak absorbance at 613 nm with special reference to the excitation of surfaces plasmon vibration by Pb-NPs.

  19. Investigating Seasonal Gravity Wave Activity in the Summer Polar Mesosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Y.; Taylor, M. J.; Randall, C. E.; Lumpe, J. D., Jr.; Siskind, D. E.; Bailey, S. M.; Russell, J. M., III

    2014-12-01

    The NASA Aeronomy of Ice in the Mesosphere (AIM) satellite is the first satellite mission dedicated to studying polar mesospheric clouds (PMCs). In particular, the Cloud Imaging and Particle Size (CIPS) instrument onboard AIM obtains large-field PMC images enabling a unique investigation of the mesospheric gravity waves, as the satellite traverses over the summer polar regions. The high quality of CIPS data has provided an exceptional capability to investigate the gravity wave signatures in the summer polar mesosphere where previous measurements have been sparse. We have utilized 12 consecutive seasons of AIM/CIPS PMC albedo data to derive the statistical properties of a broad spectrum of gravity waves present in the PMC data. Over 60,000 waves with horizontal scale sizes ranging from ~50 to >2000 km were identified and measured, revealing a well-developed, consistent distribution for their horizontal wavelengths with a peak in occurrence frequency centered around 400 km. The same result was found from season to season and in both hemispheres. Throughout this study, the wave activity in the southern hemisphere was found to be 10-15% higher than in the northern hemisphere and both northern and southern wave activity was found to decrease systematically (average ~15%) during the course of each summer season. We present new results of the intra-seasonal, inter-annual and hemispheric variability of these waves observed over the whole summer polar cap regions. The systematic decrease in wave activity is consistent with background wind filtering in the northern hemisphere but is not apparently associated with the critical level filtering in the southern hemisphere.

  20. Investigation of MEK activity in COS7 cells entering mitosis.

    PubMed

    Shi, Huaiping; Zhang, Tianying; Yi, Yongqing; Luo, Jun

    2014-12-01

    Although the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway has been extensively investigated, numerous events remain unclear. In the present study, we examined mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK) expression from interphase to mitosis. Following nocodazole treatment, COS7 cells gradually became round as early as 4 h after treatment. Cyclin B1 expression gradually increased from 4 to 24 h in the presence of nocodazole. When cells were treated with nocodazole for 4 h, the level of epidermal growth factor (EGF)-mediated MEK phosphorylation did not significantly change between nocodazole-untreated and -treated (4 h) cells (P>0.05). However, EGF-mediated MEK phosphorylation was significantly inhibited upon treatment with nocodazole for 8 and 24 h compared to nocodazole-untreated cells (P<0.05). MEK phosphorylation levels were comparable between 1, 5, 10 and 50 ng/ml EGF treatments. Phorbol 12-myristic 13-acetate (PMA) did not activate MEK in mitotic cells. Following treatment of COS7 cells at the interphase with AG1478 or U0126, MEK phosphorylation was blocked. In addition, the investigation of the expression of proteins downstream of MEK demonstrated that EGF does not significantly affect the phosphorylation level of extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK), ribosomal protein S6 kinase (RSK) and Elk in mitotic cells (P>0.05). The results showed that MEK expression is gradually inhibited from cell interphase to mitosis, and that MEK downstream signaling is affected by this inhibition, which probably reflects the requirements of cell physiology during mitosis.

  1. Active control: an investigation method for combustion instabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poinsot, T.; Yip, B.; Veynante, D.; Trouvé, A.; Samaniego, J. M.; Candel, S.

    1992-07-01

    Closed-loop active control methods and their application to combustion instabilities are discussed. In these methods the instability development is impeded with a feedback control loop: the signal provided by a sensor monitoring the flame or pressure oscillations is processed and sent back to actuators mounted on the combustor or on the feeding system. Different active control systems tested on a non-premixed multiple-flame turbulent combustor are described. These systems can suppress all unstable plane modes of oscillation (i.e. low frequency modes). The active instability control (AIC) also constitutes an original and powerful technique for studies of mechanisms leading to instability or resulting from the instability. Two basic applications of this kind are described. In the first case the flame is initially controlled with AIC, the feedback loop is then switched off and the growth of the instability is analysed through high speed Schlieren cinematography and simultaneous sound pressure and reaction rate measurements. Three phases are identified during th growth of the oscillations: (1) a linear phase where acoustic waves induce a flapping motion of the flame sheets without interaction between sheets, (2) a modulation phase, where flame sheets interact randomly and (3) a nonlinear phase where the flame sheets are broken and a limit cycle is reached. In the second case we investigate different types of flame extinctions associated with combustion instability. It is shown that pressure oscillations may lead to partial or total extinctions. Extinctions occur in various forms but usually follow a rapid growth of pressure oscillations. The flame is extinguished during the modulation phase observed in the initiation experiments. In these studies devoted to transient instability phenomena, the control system constitutes a unique investigation tool because it is difficult to obtain the same information by other means. Implications for modelling and prediction of

  2. Seal Investigations of an Active Clearance Control System Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M.; Taylor, Shawn; Oswald, Jay; DeCastro, Jonathan A.

    2006-01-01

    In an effort to improve upon current thermal active clearance control methods, a first generation, fast-acting mechanically actuated, active clearance control system has been designed and installed into a non-rotating test rig. In order to harvest the benefit of tighter blade tip clearances, low-leakage seals are required for the actuated carrier segments of the seal shroud to prevent excessive leakage of compressor discharge (P3) cooling air. The test rig was designed and fabricated to facilitate the evaluation of these types of seals, identify seal leakage sources, and test other active clearance control system concepts. The objective of this paper is to present both experimental and analytical investigations into the nature of the face-seal to seal-carrier interface. Finite element analyses were used to examine face seal contact pressures and edge-loading under multiple loading conditions, varied E-seal positions and two new face seal heights. The analyses indicated that moving the E-seal inward radially and reducing face seal height would lead to more uniform contact conditions between the face seal and the carriers. Lab testing confirmed that moving the balance diameter inward radially caused a decrease in overall system leakage.

  3. 28 CFR 94.33 - Investigation and analysis of claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Investigation and analysis of claims. 94.33 Section 94.33 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) CRIME VICTIM SERVICES International Terrorism Victim Expense Reimbursement Program Program Administration § 94.33 Investigation...

  4. 28 CFR 94.33 - Investigation and analysis of claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Investigation and analysis of claims. 94.33 Section 94.33 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) CRIME VICTIM SERVICES International Terrorism Victim Expense Reimbursement Program Program Administration § 94.33 Investigation...

  5. 28 CFR 94.33 - Investigation and analysis of claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Investigation and analysis of claims. 94.33 Section 94.33 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) CRIME VICTIM SERVICES International Terrorism Victim Expense Reimbursement Program Program Administration § 94.33 Investigation...

  6. 28 CFR 94.33 - Investigation and analysis of claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Investigation and analysis of claims. 94.33 Section 94.33 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) CRIME VICTIM SERVICES International Terrorism Victim Expense Reimbursement Program Program Administration § 94.33 Investigation...

  7. 28 CFR 94.33 - Investigation and analysis of claims.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Investigation and analysis of claims. 94.33 Section 94.33 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) CRIME VICTIM SERVICES International Terrorism Victim Expense Reimbursement Program Program Administration § 94.33 Investigation...

  8. Investigation of Cytotoxic Activity in Four Stachys Species from Iran

    PubMed Central

    Khanavi, Mahnaz; Manayi, Azadeh; Lotfi, Mahnaz; Abbasi, Rofeyde; Majdzadeh, Maryam; Ostad, Seyed Nasser

    2012-01-01

    The aerial parts of Stachys laxa Boiss. and Buhse. from Siah-bishe in Mazandaran province, Stachys trinervis Aitch. and Hemsl. from Karaj in Alborz province, Stachys subaphylla Rech. F. and Stachys turcomanica Trautv. from Golestan province have been collected in May 2008. Total extracts were obtained through MeOH/H2O (80/20) and then partitioned between CHCl3, EtOAc and MeOH. These fractions and total extracts have been investigated for in-vitro cytotoxic activity against the colon carcinoma (HT-29), colorectal adenocarcinoma (Caco-2), breast ductal carcinoma (T47D) and Swiss mouse embryo fibroblast (NIH 3T3) cell lines using MTT assay (3-(4,5-di methyl thiazol-2-yl)-2,5-di phenyltetrazolium bromide). At each cell line, doses of 3.125, 6.25, 12.5, 25, 100, 200, 400 and 800 µg/mL in 1% (v/v) DMSO of all samples were tested. Ethyl acetate and chloroform fractions of Stachys laxa against proliferation of T47D and HT-29 cell lines and chloroform fraction of Stachys subaphylla and Stachys subaphylla ethyl acetate fraction toward T47D cell line exhibited highest cytotoxic activity (IC50 < 50 µg/mL). Ethyl acetate and chloroform fractions of Stachys turcomanica against HT-29 cell line, except methanol fraction of Stachys subaphylla, the other extrcts on T47D cell line, represented moderate cytotoxic activity (IC50 < 70 µg/mL). All fractions of S. trinervis demonstrated no effective cytotoxic activity. IC50 values confirmed that the growth and proliferation of HT-29 and T47D cells were most affected by chloroform and ethyl acetate fractions of Stachys laxa and Stachys turcomanica due to their nonpolar compounds. PMID:24250483

  9. Project-Based Language Learning: An Activity Theory Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibbes, Marina; Carson, Lorna

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on an investigation of project-based language learning (PBLL) in a university language programme. Learner reflections of project work were analysed through Activity Theory, where tool-mediated activity is understood as the central unit of analysis for human interaction. Data were categorised according to the components of human…

  10. Investigating Molecular Hydrogen in Active Regions with IRIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaeggli, Sarah A.; Saar, Steven H.; Daw, Adrian N.; Innes, Davina

    2014-06-01

    Molecular hydrogen should be the most abundant molecular species in sunspots, but recent observations with IRIS show that its florescent signature is absent from above the sunspot umbra, but appears brightly during flares. In this poster we continue the analysis of FUV observations of H2 in active regions, examining the correlation between the intensity of the H2 lines and the lines of C II and Si IV which are responsible for their excitation. We particularly focus on differentiating places where H2 is abundant, holes in the chromospheric opacity where FUV photons can enter more deeply into the solar atmosphere, and places where the FUV radiation field is intense, as in flares.

  11. Quality investigation of hydroxyprogesterone caproate active pharmaceutical ingredient and injection

    PubMed Central

    Chollet, John L.; Jozwiakowski, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the quality of hydroxyprogesterone caproate (HPC) active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) sources that may be used by compounding pharmacies, compared to the FDA-approved source of the API; and to investigate the quality of HPC injection samples obtained from compounding pharmacies in the US, compared to the FDA-approved product (Makena®). Samples of API were obtained from every source confirmed to be an original manufacturer of the drug for human use, which were all companies in China that were not registered with FDA. Eight of the ten API samples (80%) did not meet the impurity specifications required by FDA for the API used in the approved product. One API sample was found to not be HPC at all; additional laboratory testing showed that it was glucose. Thirty samples of HPC injection obtained from com pounding pharmacies throughout the US were also tested, and eight of these samples (27%) failed to meet the potency requirement listed in the USP monograph for HPC injection and/or the HPLC assay. Sixteen of the thirty injection samples (53%) exceeded the impurity limit setforthe FDA-approved drug product. These results confirm the inconsistency of compounded HPC Injections and suggest that the risk-benefit ratio of using an unapproved compounded preparation, when an FDA-approved drug product is available, is not favorable. PMID:22329865

  12. Electrodermal activity analysis during affective haptic elicitation.

    PubMed

    Greco, Alberto; Valenza, Gaetano; Nardelli, Mimma; Bianchi, Matteo; Lanata, Antonio; Scilingo, Enzo Pasquale

    2015-08-01

    This paper investigates how the autonomic nervous system dynamics, quantified through the analysis of the electrodermal activity (EDA), is modulated according to affective haptic stimuli. Specifically, a haptic display able to convey caress-like stimuli is presented to 32 healthy subjects (16 female). Each stimulus is changed according to six combinations of three velocities and two forces levels of two motors stretching a strip of fabric. Subjects were also asked to score each stimulus in terms of arousal (high/low activation) and valence (pleasant/unpleasant), in agreement with the circumplex model of affect. EDA was processed using a deconvolutive method, separating tonic and phasic components. A statistical analysis was performed in order to identify significant differences in EDA features among force and velocity levels, as well as in their valence and arousal scores. Results show that the simulated caress induced by the haptic display significantly affects the EDA. In detail, the phasic component seems to be inversely related to the valence score. This finding is new and promising, since it can be used, e.g., as an additional cue for haptics design. PMID:26737605

  13. Synthesis, crystal structure analysis, spectral investigations, DFT computations, Biological activities and molecular docking of methyl(2E)-2-{[N-(2-formylphenyl)(4-methylbenzene) sulfonamido]methyl}-3-(4-fluorophenyl)prop-2-enoate, a potential bioactive agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murugavel, S.; Vetri Velan, V.; Kannan, Damodharan; Bakthadoss, Manickam

    2016-03-01

    The title compound methyl(2E)-2-{[N-(2-formylphenyl) (4-methylbenzene)sulfonamido]methyl}-3-(4-fluorophenyl) prop-2-enoate (MFMSF) has been synthesized and single crystals were grown by slow evaporation solution growth technique at room temperature. The grown crystals were characterized by FTIR, 1H NMR, 13C NMR, and single crystal X-ray diffraction. In the crystal, molecules are linked by intermolecular C-H…O hydrogen bonds forming a two-dimensional supramolecular network along [110] direction. The molecular geometry was also optimized using density functional theory (DFT/B3LYP) method with the 6-311G (d,p) basis set in ground state and compared with the experimental data. The entire vibrational assignments of wave numbers were made on the basis of potential energy distribution (PED) by VEDA 4 programme. Stability of the molecule arising from hyper conjugative interactions, charge delocalization has been analyzed using natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis. In addition, NLO, MEP, Mulliken, thermodynamic properties, HOMO and LUMO energy gap were theoretically predicted. The global chemical reactivity descriptors are calculated for MFMSF and used to predict their relative stability and reactivity. The antibacterial activity of the compound was also tested against various pathogens. The molecular docking studies concede that title compound may exhibit PBP-2X inhibitor activity.

  14. Beneficial effects of cocoa on lipid peroxidation and inflammatory markers in type 2 diabetic patients and investigation of probable interactions of cocoa active ingredients with prostaglandin synthase-2 (PTGS-2/COX-2) using virtual analysis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    of Cocoa on the lipid peroxidation prevention and inflammatory markers in type 2 diabetic patients. Cocoa ingredients block the Cox-2 activation and reduce inflammatory prostanoids synthesis according to virtual analysis. PMID:24495354

  15. Investigation of an Immunoassay with Broad Specificity to Quinolone Drugs by Genetic Algorithm with Linear Assignment of Hypermolecular Alignment of Data Sets and Advanced Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship Analysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiahong; Lu, Ning; Shen, Xing; Tang, Qiushi; Zhang, Chijian; Xu, Jun; Sun, Yuanming; Huang, Xin-An; Xu, Zhenlin; Lei, Hongtao

    2016-04-01

    A polyclonal antibody against the quinolone drug pazufloxacin (PAZ) but with surprisingly broad specificity was raised to simultaneously detect 24 quinolones (QNs). The developed competitive indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ciELISA) exhibited limits of detection (LODs) for the 24 QNs ranging from 0.45 to 15.16 ng/mL, below the maximum residue levels (MRLs). To better understand the obtained broad specificity, a genetic algorithm with linear assignment of hypermolecular alignment of data sets (GALAHAD) was used to generate the desired pharmacophore model and superimpose the QNs, and then advanced comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA) and advanced comparative molecular similarity indices analysis (CoMSIA) models were employed to study the three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship (3D QSAR) between QNs and the antibody. It was found that the QNs could interact with the antibody with different binding poses, and cross-reactivity was mainly positively correlated with the bulky substructure containing electronegative atom at the 7-position, while it was negatively associated with the large bulky substructure at the 1-position of QNs.

  16. An investigation of the theoretical content of physical activity brochures

    PubMed Central

    Gainforth, Heather L.; Barg, Carolyn J.; Latimer, Amy E.; Schmid, Kristina L.; O'Malley, Deborah; Salovey, Peter

    2011-01-01

    New evidence-based physical activity guidelines and recommendations for constructing messages supplementing the guidelines have been put forth. As well, recent reviewshave identified theoretical constructs that hold promise as targets for intervention: self-regulation, outcome expectancies and self-efficacy. The purpose of this study was to examine the integration of messages targeting self-regulation, self-efficacy and outcome expectancies in existing physical activity brochures. Twenty-two PA brochures from Canadian and American National Health Organizations were assessed for their use self-efficacy, self-regulatory processes and outcome expectancies. Brochures were analyzed line-by-line using a modified version of the validated Content Analysis Approach to Theory-Specified Persuasive Educational Communication (CAATSPEC; Abraham et al., 2007). One third of the brochures were coded by two independent raters coded a third of the brochures (n = 7). Inter-rater reliability was acceptable for 17 of the 20 categories (rs> .79). Discrepancies in all categories were discussed and agreement was reached. The remaining brochures were coded by one of the two raters. Usage of thethree key theoretical constructs accounted for only 36.43% of brochure content (20.23% self-efficacy, 10.40% outcome expectancies, 5.80% self-regulation). Brochures lacked the use of a variety of theoretical strategies, specifically goal-setting, planning and verbal persuasion and rarely highlighted the affective benefits of physical activity. In the future brochures should aim to place increased emphasis on self-regulation, self-efficacy, and affective outcome expectancies. PMID:22125418

  17. Total body nitrogen analysis. [neutron activation analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, H. E.

    1975-01-01

    Studies of two potential in vivo neutron activation methods for determining total and partial body nitrogen in animals and humans are described. A method using the CO-11 in the expired air as a measure of nitrogen content was found to be adequate for small animals such as rats, but inadequate for human measurements due to a slow excretion rate. Studies on the method of measuring the induced N-13 in the body show that with further development, this method should be adequate for measuring muscle mass changes occurring in animals or humans during space flight.

  18. Wavelet Analysis for Investigation of Precise Gnss Solutions' Credibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogusz, Janusz; Klos, Anna

    2010-01-01

    This publication presents the results of searching short-term oscillations of the ASG network sites using wavelet transform. Polish Active Geodetic Network (ASG-EUPOS) is the multifunctional precise satellite positioning system established by the Head Office of Geodesy and Cartography in 2008. The adjusted network consisted of over 130 stations from Poland and neighbouring countries. The period covered observations gathered from June 2008 to July 2010. The method of processing elaborated in the CAG (Centre of Applied Geomatics, Warsaw Military University of Technology), which is one of the 17 EPN LAC (EUREF Permanent Network Local Analysis Centre) acting now in Europe, established at the end of 2009, is similar with the official one used in EPN. It is based on the Bernese 5.0 software, but the difference to the EPN's solutions lies in the resolution of resulting coordinates. In the presented research the 1-hour sampling rate with 3-hour windowing (66% of correlation) is applied. This allows us to make the interpretations concerning short period information in GNSS (Global Navigation Satellite System) coordinates series. Analyses using FFT and least squares (tidal) gave very coherent results and confirmed several millimetres diurnal and sub-diurnal oscillations. Wavelet analysis is aimed at the investigation of credibility of the precise GNSS solutions in terms of changes of the amplitude of oscillations in time. As a result of this study the changes in the amplitude of oscillations at diurnal and sub-diurnal frequency bands were obtained. These could be caused by the artificial modulations of the near-by frequencies, but also some geophysical signals could be clearly distinguished. Additionally the comparison of Continuous Wavelet Transforms of near stations (three pairs from ASG-EUPOS network) was performed. This comparison showed different behaviour of oscillations of residual coordinates, mainly due to the different thermal response or artefacts related to the

  19. Investigation of Weibull statistics in fracture analysis of cast aluminum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holland, Frederic A., Jr.; Zaretsky, Erwin V.

    1989-01-01

    The fracture strengths of two large batches of A357-T6 cast aluminum coupon specimens were compared by using two-parameter Weibull analysis. The minimum number of these specimens necessary to find the fracture strength of the material was determined. The applicability of three-parameter Weibull analysis was also investigated. A design methodology based on the combination of elementary stress analysis and Weibull statistical analysis is advanced and applied to the design of a spherical pressure vessel shell. The results from this design methodology are compared with results from the applicable ASME pressure vessel code.

  20. Analysis of active renin heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Katz, S A; Malvin, R L; Lee, J; Kim, S H; Murray, R D; Opsahl, J A; Abraham, P A

    1991-09-01

    Active renin is a heterogeneous enzyme that can be separated into multiple forms with high-resolution isoelectric focusing. The isoelectric heterogeneity may result from differences in glycosylation between the different forms. In order to determine the relationship between active renin heterogeneity and differences in composition or attachment of oligosaccharides, two separate experiments were performed: (i) Tunicamycin, which interferes with normal glycosylation processing, increased the proportion of relatively basic renin forms secreted into the incubation media by rat renal cortical slices. (ii) Endoglycosidase F, which enzymatically removes carbohydrate from some classes of glycoprotein, similarly increased the proportion of relatively basic forms when incubated with active human recombinant renin. In addition, further studies with inhibitors of human renin activity revealed that the heterogeneous renin forms were similarly inhibited by two separate renin inhibitors. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that renin isoelectric heterogeneity is due in part to differences in carbohydrate moiety attachment and that the heterogeneity of renin does not influence access of direct renin inhibitors to the active site of renin.

  1. Analysis of active renin heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Katz, S A; Malvin, R L; Lee, J; Kim, S H; Murray, R D; Opsahl, J A; Abraham, P A

    1991-09-01

    Active renin is a heterogeneous enzyme that can be separated into multiple forms with high-resolution isoelectric focusing. The isoelectric heterogeneity may result from differences in glycosylation between the different forms. In order to determine the relationship between active renin heterogeneity and differences in composition or attachment of oligosaccharides, two separate experiments were performed: (i) Tunicamycin, which interferes with normal glycosylation processing, increased the proportion of relatively basic renin forms secreted into the incubation media by rat renal cortical slices. (ii) Endoglycosidase F, which enzymatically removes carbohydrate from some classes of glycoprotein, similarly increased the proportion of relatively basic forms when incubated with active human recombinant renin. In addition, further studies with inhibitors of human renin activity revealed that the heterogeneous renin forms were similarly inhibited by two separate renin inhibitors. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that renin isoelectric heterogeneity is due in part to differences in carbohydrate moiety attachment and that the heterogeneity of renin does not influence access of direct renin inhibitors to the active site of renin. PMID:1908097

  2. Investigation and improvement of three-dimensional plasma crystal analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietz, C.; Thoma, M. H.

    2016-09-01

    In this work, existing methods for plasma crystal analysis are investigated using artificial and simulated calibration data, which reproduce a multiphase system consisting of fcc, hcp, and bcc crystal data. Disturbances of the artificial data including Gaussian noise, stretching, and randomly missing particles are used to investigate the methods thoroughly. A popular method, called bond order parameter, has been repeatedly criticized as a structure analysis tool and will be improved with the help of a recent development. The method is called the bcc-sensitive Minkowski structure metric. It enhances robustness and consistency, while remaining compatible with previous bond-order-based results. Also, a promising method rooted in the molecular dynamics community is tested, yielding detailed insight of bond-order-specific drawbacks. With this investigation, the state of three-dimensional plasma crystal analysis will be significantly improved.

  3. Neutron activation analysis of a penny

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, Richard E.

    2000-04-01

    Neutron activation analysis has been used for many years as an analysis tool and as an educational tool to teach students about nuclear properties. This article presents an exercise in the neutron activation analysis of a penny which, due to the simplicity of the resulting gamma-ray spectra, is appropriate for general physics classes. Students express a great deal of interest both in seeing the reactor in use as well as determining the composition of something that is familiar to them.

  4. LACBWR primary shield activation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, L.L.; Lahti, G.P.; Johnson, W.J.

    1996-11-01

    Nuclear power plants in the US are required to estimate the costs of decommissioning to ensure that adequate funds are accumulated during the useful life of the plant. A major component of the decommissioning cost is the disposal of radioactive material, including material near the reactor created by neutron activation. An accurate assessment of the residual radioactivity in the reactor`s primary shield is necessary to determine this portion of the decommissioning demolition and disposal cost. This paper describes the efforts used to determine the activation levels remaining in the primary shield of the LaCrosse boiling water reactor (LACBWR), owned and operated by Dairyland Power Cooperative.

  5. Business process analysis of a foodborne outbreak investigation mobile system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowicki, T.; Waszkowski, R.; Saniuk, A.

    2016-08-01

    Epidemiological investigation during an outbreak of food-borne disease requires taking a number of activities carried out in the field. This results in a restriction of access to current data about the epidemic and reducing the possibility of transferring information from the field to headquarters. This problem can be solved by using an appropriate system of mobile devices. The purpose of this paper is to present the IT solution based on the central repository for epidemiological investigations and mobile devices designed for use in the field. Based on such a solution business processes can be properly rebuild in a way to achieve better results in the activities of health inspectors.

  6. Investigate the Child's Scientific Activities on Practical Child's Activity Books for the Kindergarten's Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aldarabah, Intisar Turki; Al-Mouhtadi, Reham

    2015-01-01

    This research aimed to investigate the extent to which the interactive international curriculum is included in the "Child's Scientific Activities" issued by the Ministry of Education in Jordan, for the kindergarten stage according to the global criterion (NRC). In order to answer the study questions, an instrument was developed to…

  7. Conference on Instrumental Activation Analysis: IAA 89

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vobecky, M.; Obrusnik, I.

    1989-05-01

    The proceedings contain 40 abstracts of papers all of which have been incorporated in INIS. The papers were centred on the applications of radioanalytical methods, especially on neutron activation analysis, x ray fluorescence analysis, PIXE analysis and tracer techniques in biology, medicine and metallurgy, measuring instruments including microcomputers, and data processing methods.

  8. Investigation of the skin sensitizing activity of linalool.

    PubMed

    Basketter, David A; Wright, Zoë M; Colson, Neil R; Patlewicz, Grace Y; Pease, Camilla K Smith

    2002-09-01

    An increasing range of chemicals appears to be capable of causing skin sensitization as a result of their capacity to undergo air oxidation (autoxidation) with the consequent formation of reactive species such as epoxides and hydroperoxides. In this small investigation, the ability of linalool, a common fragrance ingredient, to cause such effects was quantified using the local lymph node assay before and after careful purification by vacuum distillation. The commercially available grade of linalool (97% purity) was shown to be a weak skin sensitizer. Various impurities, including linalool oxide, dihydrolinalool, epoxylinalool, 3-hexenyl butyrate and 3,7-dimethyl-1,7-octadiene-3,6-diol were identified and were completely removed (except for the dihydrolinalool remaining at 1.4%) and the re-purified linalool retested. Neither linalool or dihydrolinalool are protein-reactive compounds. The sensitization potency of the re-purified linalool sample was considerably reduced, but not entirely eliminated, suggesting either that an allergenic impurity could be very quickly reformed by mechanisms of activation or that certain potent undetectable allergens remained. Both possibilities are consistent with what is understood of the chemistry and composition of commercially available linalool.

  9. Preliminary investigations of active pixel sensors in Nuclear Medicine imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ott, Robert; Evans, Noel; Evans, Phil; Osmond, J.; Clark, A.; Turchetta, R.

    2009-06-01

    Three CMOS active pixel sensors have been investigated for their application to Nuclear Medicine imaging. Startracker with 525×525 25 μm square pixels has been coupled via a fibre optic stud to a 2 mm thick segmented CsI(Tl) crystal. Imaging tests were performed using 99mTc sources, which emit 140 keV gamma rays. The system was interfaced to a PC via FPGA-based DAQ and optical link enabling imaging rates of 10 f/s. System noise was measured to be >100e and it was shown that the majority of this noise was fixed pattern in nature. The intrinsic spatial resolution was measured to be ˜80 μm and the system spatial resolution measured with a slit was ˜450 μm. The second sensor, On Pixel Intelligent CMOS (OPIC), had 64×72 40 μm pixels and was used to evaluate noise characteristics and to develop a method of differentiation between fixed pattern and statistical noise. The third sensor, Vanilla, had 520×520 25 μm pixels and a measured system noise of ˜25e. This sensor was coupled directly to the segmented phosphor. Imaging results show that even at this lower level of noise the signal from 140 keV gamma rays is small as the light from the phosphor is spread over a large number of pixels. Suggestions for the 'ideal' sensor are made.

  10. The Use of LS-DYNA in the Columbia Accident Investigation and Return to Flight Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gabrys, Jonathan; Schatz, Josh; Carney, Kelly; Melis, Matthew; Fasanella, Edwin L.; Lyle, Karen H.

    2004-01-01

    During the launch of the Space Shuttle Columbia on January 16, 2003, foam originating from the external tank impacted the shuttle's left wing 81 seconds after lift-off. Then on February 1st, Space Shuttle Columbia broke-up during re-entry. In the weeks that followed, the Columbia Accident Investigation Board had formed various teams to investigate every aspect of the tragedy. One of these teams was the Impact Analysis Team, which was asked to investigate the foam impact on the wing leading edge. This paper will describe the approach and methodology used by the team to support the accident investigation, and more specifically the use of LS-DYNA for analyzing the foam impact event. Due to the success of the analytical predictions, the impact analysis team has also been asked to support Return to Flight activities. These activities will analyze a far broader range of impact events, but not with just foam and not only on the wing leading edge. The debris list has expanded and so have the possible impact locations. This paper will discuss the Return to Flight activities and the use of LS-DYNA to support them.

  11. Investigating Convergence Patterns for Numerical Methods Using Data Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Sheldon P.

    2013-01-01

    The article investigates the patterns that arise in the convergence of numerical methods, particularly those in the errors involved in successive iterations, using data analysis and curve fitting methods. In particular, the results obtained are used to convey a deeper level of understanding of the concepts of linear, quadratic, and cubic…

  12. Theory, Investigation and Stability of Cathode Electrocatalytic Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Dong; Liu, Mingfei; Lai, Samson; Blinn, Kevin; Liu, Meilin

    2012-09-30

    conditions. This was also confirmed by x-ray analyses. For example, soft x-ray XANES data reveal that Co cations displace the Mn cations as being more favored to be reduced. Variations in the Sr-O in the annealed LSCF Fourier-transformed (FT) EXAFS suggest that some Sr segregation is occurring, but is not present in the annealed LSM-infiltrated LSCF cathode materials. Further, a surface enhanced Raman technique was also developed into to probe and map LSM and LSCF phase on underlying YSZ substrate, enabling us to capture important chemical information of cathode surfaces under practical operating conditions. Electrochemical models for the design of test cells and understanding of mechanism have been developed for the exploration of fundamental properties of electrode materials. Novel catalyst coatings through particle depositions (SDC, SSC, and LCC) or continuous thin films (PSM and PSCM) were successfully developed to improve the activity and stability of LSCF cathodes. Finally, we have demonstrated enhanced activity and stability of LSCF cathodes over longer periods of time in homemade and commercially available cells by an optimized LSM infiltration process. Microstructure examination of the tested cells did not show obvious differences between blank and infiltrated cells, suggesting that the infiltrated LSM may form a coherent film on the LSCF cathodes. There was no significant change in the morphology or microstructure of the LSCF cathode due to the structural similarity of LSCF and LSM. Raman analysis of the tested cells indicated small peaks emerging on the blank cells that correspond to trace amounts of secondary phase formation during operation (e.g., CoO{sub x}). The formation of this secondary phase might be attributed to performance degradation. In contrast, there was no such secondary phase observed in the LSM infiltrated cells, indicating that the LSM modification staved off secondary phase formation and thus improved the stability.

  13. Thermodiffusion in multicomponent hydrocarbon mixtures: Experimental investigations and computational analysis.

    PubMed

    VanVaerenbergh, Stefan; Srinivasan, Seshasai; Saghir, M Ziad

    2009-09-21

    In an unprecedented experimental investigation, a ternary and a four component hydrocarbon mixture at high pressure have been studied in a nearly convection free environment to understand the thermodiffusion process. A binary mixture has also been investigated in this environment. Experimental investigations of the three mixtures have been conducted in space onboard the spacecraft FOTON-M3 thereby isolating the gravity-induced convection that otherwise interferes with thermodiffusion experiments on Earth. The experimental results have also been used to test a thermodiffusion model that has been calibrated based on the results of previous experimental investigations. It was found that with an increase in the number of components in the mixtures, the performance of the thermodiffusion model deteriorated. Computational analysis was also made to estimate the possible sources of errors. Simulations showed that the vibrations of the spacecraft could influence the estimates of thermodiffusion factors. It was also found that they are sensitive to slight variations in the temperature of the mixture.

  14. Stability investigations of airfoil flow by global analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morzynski, Marek; Thiele, Frank

    1992-01-01

    As the result of global, non-parallel flow stability analysis the single value of the disturbance growth-rate and respective frequency is obtained. This complex value characterizes the stability of the whole flow configuration and is not referred to any particular flow pattern. The global analysis assures that all the flow elements (wake, boundary and shear layer) are taken into account. The physical phenomena connected with the wake instability are properly reproduced by the global analysis. This enhances the investigations of instability of any 2-D flows, including ones in which the boundary layer instability effects are known to be of dominating importance. Assuming fully 2-D disturbance form, the global linear stability problem is formulated. The system of partial differential equations is solved for the eigenvalues and eigenvectors. The equations, written in the pure stream function formulation, are discretized via FDM using a curvilinear coordinate system. The complex eigenvalues and corresponding eigenvectors are evaluated by an iterative method. The investigations performed for various Reynolds numbers emphasize that the wake instability develops into the Karman vortex street. This phenomenon is shown to be connected with the first mode obtained from the non-parallel flow stability analysis. The higher modes are reflecting different physical phenomena as for example Tollmien-Schlichting waves, originating in the boundary layer and having the tendency to emerge as instabilities for the growing Reynolds number. The investigations are carried out for a circular cylinder, oblong ellipsis and airfoil. It is shown that the onset of the wake instability, the waves in the boundary layer, the shear layer instability are different solutions of the same eigenvalue problem, formulated using the non-parallel theory. The analysis offers large potential possibilities as the generalization of methods used till now for the stability analysis.

  15. Neutron Activation Analysis of Water - A Review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buchanan, John D.

    1971-01-01

    Recent developments in this field are emphasized. After a brief review of basic principles, topics discussed include sources of neutrons, pre-irradiation physical and chemical treatment of samples, neutron capture and gamma-ray analysis, and selected applications. Applications of neutron activation analysis of water have increased rapidly within the last few years and may be expected to increase in the future.

  16. I. Developing Methods for the Analysis of Chemistry Students' Inscriptions, II. Exploring the Regioselectivity of 1,3-Dipolar Cycloadditions of Munchnones, III. Stereochemical Investigations of C-H Activation Reactions Involving Germylene and Stannylene/Aryl Iodide Reagents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kiste, Alan L.

    2009-01-01

    I. Analyzing and comparing student-generated inscriptions in chemistry is crucial to gaining insight into students' understanding about chemistry concepts. Thus, we developed two methods of analyzing student-generated inscriptions: features analysis and thematic analysis. We have also demonstrated how these methods are able to discern differences…

  17. Simulated, Emulated, and Physical Investigative Analysis (SEPIA) of networked systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Burton, David P.; Van Leeuwen, Brian P.; McDonald, Michael James; Onunkwo, Uzoma A.; Tarman, Thomas David; Urias, Vincent E.

    2009-09-01

    This report describes recent progress made in developing and utilizing hybrid Simulated, Emulated, and Physical Investigative Analysis (SEPIA) environments. Many organizations require advanced tools to analyze their information system's security, reliability, and resilience against cyber attack. Today's security analysis utilize real systems such as computers, network routers and other network equipment, computer emulations (e.g., virtual machines) and simulation models separately to analyze interplay between threats and safeguards. In contrast, this work developed new methods to combine these three approaches to provide integrated hybrid SEPIA environments. Our SEPIA environments enable an analyst to rapidly configure hybrid environments to pass network traffic and perform, from the outside, like real networks. This provides higher fidelity representations of key network nodes while still leveraging the scalability and cost advantages of simulation tools. The result is to rapidly produce large yet relatively low-cost multi-fidelity SEPIA networks of computers and routers that let analysts quickly investigate threats and test protection approaches.

  18. The Analysis and Reconciliation of Students' Rebuttals in Argumentation Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Yu-Ren; Hung, Jeng-Fung

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigated the guidance provided by science teachers to resolve conflicts during socioscientific issue-based argumentation activities. A graphical representation (GR) was developed as a tool to code and analyze the dialogue interaction process. Through the GR and qualitative analysis, we identified three types of dialogue…

  19. Investigating the Jack the Ripper Case: Engaging Students in a Criminal Investigations Class through Active Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gutierrez, Daniel; Kazmi, Syed

    2010-01-01

    The present study examines the utilization of a class project involving the Jack the Ripper murders. Students enrolled in a criminal investigations class were required to investigate the five canonical murders associated with the infamous serial killer known as Jack the Ripper and the murders that occurred in London during 1888. This paper…

  20. [Investigation of the antibacterial activity of faropenem against Streptococcus pneumoniae].

    PubMed

    Hanaki, H; Inaba, Y; Hiramatsu, K

    1999-09-01

    We evaluated the antibacterial activity of faropenem against penicillin-susceptible Streptococcus pneumoniae (PSSP) and penicillin-resistant S. pneumoniae (PRSP). It was shown that the minimum inhibitory concentrations against 90% of the clinically isolated strains (MIC90) of faropenem, penicillin G, cefaclor, cefcapene, and cefditoren against PSSP were 0.032, 0.063, 2, 0.25, and 0.125 micrograms/ml, respectively. While those against PRSP were 0.5, 2, > 128, 1, and 1 micrograms/ml, respectively. Furthermore, we evaluated the bactericidal activity, at the level of 1/4, 1, and 4 MIC, of faropenem and the above four reference antibacterial agents against PSSP and PRSP. Against PSSP No. 127, a sensitive strain to both penicillin G and cefcapene, faropenem showed almost the same bactericidal activity as those of reference agents. Against PSSP No. 108, a penicillin-susceptible and cephem-resistant strain, and PRSP No. 57, a resistant strain to both of penicillin and cephem, faropenem of 1 MIC showed bactericidal activity, but reference agents needed 4 MIC to show bactericidal activity. PMID:10746191

  1. An Investigation of Implicit Active Contours for Scientific Image Segmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Weeratunga, S K; Kamath, C

    2003-10-29

    The use of partial differential equations in image processing has become an active area of research in the last few years. In particular, active contours are being used for image segmentation, either explicitly as snakes, or implicitly through the level set approach. In this paper, we consider the use of the implicit active contour approach for segmenting scientific images of pollen grains obtained using a scanning electron microscope. Our goal is to better understand the pros and cons of these techniques and to compare them with the traditional approaches such as the Canny and SUSAN edge detectors. The preliminary results of our study show that the level set method is computationally expensive and requires the setting of several different parameters. However, it results in closed contours, which may be useful in separating objects from the background in an image.

  2. Investigating Stellar Activity with CoRoT Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathur, S.; Salabert, D.; García, R. A.; Régulo, C.; Ballot, J.; Metcalfe, T. S.

    2012-09-01

    The recent study of the CoRoT target HD 49933 found evidence of variability in its magnetic activity. This was the first time that stellar activity had been detected using asteroseismic data. For the Sun and HD 49933, we observe an increase of the p-mode frequencies and a decrease of the maximum amplitude per radial mode when the activity level is higher. Moreover a similar behavior of the frequency shifts with frequency has been found for the Sun and HD 49933. We study three other CoRoT targets, for which modes have been detected and well identified: HD 181420, HD 49385, and HD 52265 (which is hosting a planet). We report on how the seismic parameters (frequency shifts and amplitude) vary during the observation of these stars.

  3. Human hair neutron activation analysis: Analysis on population level, mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuk, L. I.; Kist, A. A.

    1999-01-01

    Neutron activation analysis is an outstanding analytical method having very wide applications in various fields. Analysis of human hair within last decades mostly based on neutron activation analysis is a very attractive illustration of the application of nuclear analytical techniques. Very interesting question is how the elemental composition differs in different areas or cities. In this connection the present paper gives average data and maps of various localities in the vicinity of drying-out Aral Sea and of various industrial cities in Central Asia.

  4. Phytochemical investigation and antimicrobial activity of Psidium guajava L. leaves

    PubMed Central

    Metwally, A. M.; Omar, A. A.; Harraz, F. M.; El Sohafy, S. M.

    2010-01-01

    Psidium guajava L. leaves were subjected to extraction, fractionation and isolation of the flavonoidal compounds. Five flavonoidal compounds were isolated which are quercetin, quercetin-3-O-α-L-arabinofuranoside, quercetin-3-O-β-D-arabinopyranoside, quercetin-3-O-β-D-glucoside and quercetin-3-O-β-D-galactoside. Quercetin-3-O-β-D-arabinopyranoside was isolated for the first time from the leaves. Fractions together with the isolates were tested for their antimicrobial activity. The antimicrobial studies showed good activities for the extracts and the isolated compounds. PMID:20931082

  5. [Investigation of Aerosol Mixed State and CCN Activity in Nanjing].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lin; Ma, Yan; Zheng, Jun; Li, Shi-zheng; Wang, Li-peng

    2016-04-15

    During 11-18 September 2014, the size-resolved aerosol Cloud Condensation Nuclei (CCN) activity and mixing state were measured using Cloud Condensation Nuclei Counter (CCNC), Aerosol Particle Mass (APM) and Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS). The results showed that aerosols mainly existed as an internal mixture. For 76, 111, 138 and 181 nm particles, black carbon (BC) accounted for 5.4%, 10%, l0.7% and 6.7% of the particle mass, but as high as 51%, 57%, 70% and 59% of the particle number concentrations, respectively, suggesting that BC was a type of important condensation nuclei in the atmosphere and made significant contributions to particle numbers. The occasionally observed external mixtures were mainly present in 111 and 138 nm particles. The critical supersaturation was 0.25%, 0.13%, 0.06% and 0.015% for 76, 111, 138 and 181 nm particles, respectively. Precipitation and haze had significant effects on the particle CCN activity. The hygroscopicity parameter K was 0.37, 0.29 and 0.39 in rainy, clear and hazy days, respectively. Particle density and CCN activity were impacted by chemical compositions. Compared with clear days, higher contents of inorganic salts and lower contents of organics were found on hazy days, accompanied by lower particle density and higher CCN activity. PMID:27548938

  6. Our Economy: How It Works. Activities and Investigation. Teacher's Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clawson, Elmer U.

    To help junior and senior high school students develop a better understanding of the United States' economy, this teacher's guide presents a series of learning activities centered around eight general themes. The topics (corresponding to the document's eight chapters) include both international and global economic issues as well as current…

  7. Designing the Perfect Plant: Activities to Investigate Plant Ecology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lehnhoff, Erik; Woolbaugh, Walt; Rew, Lisa

    2008-01-01

    Plant ecology is an important subject that often receives little attention in middle school, as more time during science classes is devoted to plant biology. Therefore, the authors have developed a series of activities, including a card game--Designing the Perfect Plant--to introduce student's to plant ecology and the ecological trade offs…

  8. Development and Pilot Investigation of Behavioral Activation for Negative Symptoms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mairs, Hilary; Lovell, Karina; Campbell, Malcolm; Keeley, Philip

    2011-01-01

    Negative symptoms cause functional impairment and impede recovery from psychosis, not least, because of limited developments in empirically validated treatments. This article details a pilot evaluation of a behavioral activation (BA) treatment with eight people presenting with psychosis and marked negative symptoms. The rationale for this…

  9. STRUCTURE-ACTIVITY RELATIONSHIP STUIDES AND THEIR ROLE IN PREDICTING AND INVESTIGATING CHEMICAL TOXICITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Structure-Activity Relationship Studies and their Role in Predicting and Investigating Chemical Toxicity

    Structure-activity relationships (SAR) represent attempts to generalize chemical information relative to biological activity for the twin purposes of generating insigh...

  10. An investigation of the impact of selected prereading activities on student content learning through laboratory activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kass, Jesse (Shaya)

    This study investigated whether two prereading activities impacted student learning from hands-on science activities. The study was based on constructivist learning theory. Based on the work of Piaget, it was hypothesized that students who activated prior knowledge would learn more from the activities. Based on the work of Vygotsky it was hypothesized that students who talk more and write more would learn more from the activity. The K-W-L chart and anticipation guide strategies were used with eighth grade students at Graves Middle School in Whittier, California before learning about levers and convection currents. D. M. Ogle (1986) created the three-column K-W-L chart to have students activate prior knowledge. In the first column, the students write what they already know about a subject, in the second column, the students write what they want to know about the subject, and the students complete the third column after learning about a subject by writing answers to the questions that they asked in the second column. Duffelmeyer (1994) created the anticipation guide based on Herber's (1978) reasoning guide. In the anticipation guide, the teacher creates three or four sentences that convey the major ideas of the topic and the students either agree or disagree with the statements. After learning about the topic, students revisit their answers and decide if they were correct or incorrect and they must defend their choices. This research used the Solomon (1947) four-square design and compared both the experimental groups to a control group that simply discussed the concepts before completing the activity. The research showed no significant difference between the control group and either of the treatment groups. The reasons for the lack of significant differences are considered. It was hypothesized that since the students were unfamiliar with the prereading activities and did not have much experience with using either writing-to-learn or talking-to-learn strategies, the

  11. Hierarchical spike clustering analysis for investigation of interneuron heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Boehlen, Anne; Heinemann, Uwe; Henneberger, Christian

    2016-04-21

    Action potentials represent the output of a neuron. Especially interneurons display a variety of discharge patterns ranging from regular action potential firing to prominent spike clustering or stuttering. The mechanisms underlying this heterogeneity remain incompletely understood. We established hierarchical cluster analysis of spike trains as a measure of spike clustering. A clustering index was calculated from action potential trains recorded in the whole-cell patch clamp configuration from hippocampal (CA1, stratum radiatum) and entorhinal (medial entorhinal cortex, layer 2) interneurons in acute slices and simulated data. Prominent, region-dependent, but also variable spike clustering was detected using this measure. Further analysis revealed a strong positive correlation between spike clustering and membrane potentials oscillations but an inverse correlation with neuronal resonance. Furthermore, clustering was more pronounced when the balance between fast-activating K(+) currents, assessed by the spike repolarisation time, and hyperpolarization-activated currents, gauged by the size of the sag potential, was shifted in favour of fast K(+) currents. Simulations of spike clustering confirmed that variable ratios of fast K(+) and hyperpolarization-activated currents could underlie different degrees of spike clustering and could thus be crucial for temporally structuring interneuron spike output. PMID:26987719

  12. Radioactivity analysis in niobium activation foils

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, G.E.

    1995-06-01

    The motivation for this study was to measure and analyze the activity of six (6) niobium (Nb) foils (the x-rays from an internal transition in Nb-93m) and apply this information with previously obtained activation foil data. The niobium data was used to determine the epithermal to MeV range for the neutron spectrum and fluence. The foil activation data was re-evaluated in a spectrum analysis code (STAY`SL) to provide new estimates of the exposure at the Los Alamos Spallation Radiation Effect Facility (LASREF). The activity of the niobium foils was measured and analyzed at the University of Missouri-Columbia (UMC) under the direction of Professor William Miller. The spectrum analysis was performed at the University of Missouri-Rolla (UMR) by Professor Gary Mueller.

  13. Single Cell Analysis of Transcriptional Activation Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Rafalska-Metcalf, Ilona U.; Powers, Sara Lawrence; Joo, Lucy M.; LeRoy, Gary; Janicki, Susan M.

    2010-01-01

    Background Gene activation is thought to occur through a series of temporally defined regulatory steps. However, this process has not been completely evaluated in single living mammalian cells. Methodology/Principal Findings To investigate the timing and coordination of gene activation events, we tracked the recruitment of GCN5 (histone acetyltransferase), RNA polymerase II, Brd2 and Brd4 (acetyl-lysine binding proteins), in relation to a VP16-transcriptional activator, to a transcription site that can be visualized in single living cells. All accumulated rapidly with the VP16 activator as did the transcribed RNA. RNA was also detected at significantly more transcription sites in cells expressing the VP16-activator compared to a p53-activator. After α-amanitin pre-treatment, the VP16-activator, GCN5, and Brd2 are still recruited to the transcription site but the chromatin does not decondense. Conclusions/Significance This study demonstrates that a strong activator can rapidly overcome the condensed chromatin structure of an inactive transcription site and supercede the expected requirement for regulatory events to proceed in a temporally defined order. Additionally, activator strength determines the number of cells in which transcription is induced as well as the extent of chromatin decondensation. As chromatin decondensation is significantly reduced after α-amanitin pre-treatment, despite the recruitment of transcriptional activation factors, this provides further evidence that transcription drives large-scale chromatin decondensation. PMID:20422051

  14. Electrochemical investigations on the oxygen activation by cytochrome P-450.

    PubMed

    Scheller, F; Renneberg, R; Schwarze, W; Strnad, G; Pommerening, K; Prümke, H J; Mohr, P

    1979-01-01

    The application of cytochrome P-450 in substrate conversion is complicated both due to the limited stability and the cofactor regeneration problems. To overcome the disadvantages of NADPH consumption the transfer of the reduction equivalents from an electrode into the cytochrome P-450-system was studied: 1. NADPH was cathodically reduced at a mercury pool electrode. By immobilization of NADP on dialdehyde Sephadex the reductive recycling was possible. 2. Different forms of reduced oxygen were produced by the cathode: a) The reaction of O2- with deoxycorticosterone yields a carboxylic acid derivative. In contrast the cytochrome P-450 catalyzed NADPH-dependent reaction with the same substrate gives corticosterone, O2- represents only an intermediate in the activation of oxygen and is not the "activated oxygen" species. b) Molecular oxygen was reduced to HO2- and H2O2, respectively. The interaction of adsorbed cytochrome P-450 on the electrode surface with the reduced oxygen species in the absence of NADPH was studied. The electrochemically generated peroxide seems to be more active than added H2O2. 3. In a model of electro-enzyme-reactor several substrates were hydroxylated by microsomal cytochrome P-450 with cathodically reduced oxygen which substitutes NADPH.

  15. Investigation of antibacterial activity of aspidin BB against Propionibacterium acnes.

    PubMed

    Gao, Chang; Guo, Na; Li, Na; Peng, Xiao; Wang, Peng; Wang, Wei; Luo, Meng; Fu, Yu-Jie

    2016-03-01

    In the present study, antibacterial activity of four kinds of phloroglucinol derivatives extracted from Dryopteris fragrans (L.) Schott against S. aureus, S. epidermidis and P. acnes has been tested. Aspidin BB exerted the strongest antibacterial activity with minimal inhibition concentration (MIC) values ranging from 7.81 to 15.63 μg/mL. The time-kill assay indicated that aspidin BB could kill P. acnes completely at 2 MIC (MBC) within 4 h. By using AFM, we demonstrated extensive cell surface alterations of aspidin BB-treated P. acnes. SDS-PAGE of supernatant proteins and lipid peroxidation results showed that aspidin BB dose-dependently affected membrane permeability of P. acnes. DNA damage and protein degradation of P. acnes were also verified. SDS-PAGE of precipitated proteins revealed possible targets of aspidin BB, i.e., heat shock proteins (26 kDa) and lipase (33 kDa) which could all cause inflammation. Aspidin BB also seriously increased the inhibition rate of lipase activity from 10.20 to 65.20 % to possibly inhibit the inflammation. In conclusions, the effective constituents of D. fragrans (L.) Schott to treat acne might be phloroglucinol derivatives including aspidin BB, aspidin PB, aspidinol and dryofragin. Among this, aspidin BB inhibited the growth of P. acnes by disrupting their membrane, DNA and proteins and finally leaded to the cell death. The obtained data highlighted the potential of using aspidin BB as an alternative treatment for acne vulgaris. PMID:26596576

  16. Polar Plasma Wave Investigation Data Analysis in the Extended Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurnett, Donald A.; Hoffman, Robert A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This Summary of Research is being submitted to NASA Goddard Space Flight Center in fulfillment of the final reporting requirement under Grant NAG5-7943, which terminated on March 31, 2002. The following contains a summary of the significant accomplishments of the Polar Plasma Wave Investigation (PWI) team during the period of the grant, April 1, 1999 through March 31, 2002, and a listing of all of the publications that resulted from work carried out under the grant. Also included below is a listing of the numerous public outreach activities that took place during the period of the grant in which the Polar mission and Polar PWI science were discussed.

  17. Advanced XAS Analysis for Investigating Fuel Cell Electrocatalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Witkowska, Agnieszka; Principi, Emiliano; Di Cicco, Andrea; Marassi, Roberto

    2007-02-02

    In the paper we present an accurate structural study of a Pt-based electrode by means of XAS, accounting for both the catalytic nanoparticles size distribution and sample inhomogeneities. Morphology and size distribution of the nanoparticles were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction techniques. XAS data-analysis was performed using advanced multiple-scattering techniques (GNXAS), disentangling possible effects due to surface atom contributions in nanoparticles and sample homogeneity, contributing to a reduction of intensity of the structural signal. This approach for XAS investigation of electrodes of FC devices can represent a viable and reliable way to understand structural details, important for producing more efficient catalytic materials.

  18. Virtual Investigations of an Active Deep Sea Volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sautter, L.; Taylor, M. M.; Fundis, A.; Kelley, D. S.; Elend, M.

    2013-12-01

    Axial Seamount, located on the Juan de Fuca spreading ridge 300 miles off the Oregon coast, is an active volcano whose summit caldera lies 1500 m beneath the sea surface. Ongoing construction of the Regional Scale Nodes (RSN) cabled observatory by the University of Washington (funded by the NSF Ocean Observatories Initiative) has allowed for exploration of recent lava flows and active hydrothermal vents using HD video mounted on the ROVs, ROPOS and JASON II. College level oceanography/marine geology online laboratory exercises referred to as Online Concept Modules (OCMs) have been created using video and video frame-captured mosaics to promote skill development for characterizing and quantifying deep sea environments. Students proceed at their own pace through a sequence of short movies with which they (a) gain background knowledge, (b) learn skills to identify and classify features or biota within a targeted environment, (c) practice these skills, and (d) use their knowledge and skills to make interpretations regarding the environment. Part (d) serves as the necessary assessment component of the laboratory exercise. Two Axial Seamount-focused OCMs will be presented: 1) Lava Flow Characterization: Identifying a Suitable Cable Route, and 2) Assessing Hydrothermal Vent Communities: Comparisons Among Multiple Sulfide Chimneys.

  19. Synthesis of marmycin A and investigation into its cellular activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cañeque, Tatiana; Gomes, Filipe; Mai, Trang Thi; Maestri, Giovanni; Malacria, Max; Rodriguez, Raphaël

    2015-09-01

    Anthracyclines such as doxorubicin are used extensively in the treatment of cancers. Anthraquinone-related angucyclines also exhibit antiproliferative properties and have been proposed to operate via similar mechanisms, including direct genome targeting. Here, we report the chemical synthesis of marmycin A and the study of its cellular activity. The aromatic core was constructed by means of a one-pot multistep reaction comprising a regioselective Diels-Alder cycloaddition, and the complex sugar backbone was introduced through a copper-catalysed Ullmann cross-coupling, followed by a challenging Friedel-Crafts cyclization. Remarkably, fluorescence microscopy revealed that marmycin A does not target the nucleus but instead accumulates in lysosomes, thereby promoting cell death independently of genome targeting. Furthermore, a synthetic dimer of marmycin A and the lysosome-targeting agent artesunate exhibited a synergistic activity against the invasive MDA-MB-231 cancer cell line. These findings shed light on the elusive pathways through which anthraquinone derivatives act in cells, pointing towards unanticipated biological and therapeutic applications.

  20. Transforming Teacher Education, An Activity Theory Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNicholl, Jane; Blake, Allan

    2013-01-01

    This paper explores the work of teacher education in England and Scotland. It seeks to locate this work within conflicting sociocultural views of professional practice and academic work. Drawing on an activity theory framework that integrates the analysis of these seemingly contradictory discourses with a study of teacher educators' practical…

  1. Computer-automated neutron activation analysis system

    SciTech Connect

    Minor, M.M.; Garcia, S.R.

    1983-01-01

    An automated delayed neutron counting and instrumental neutron activation analysis system has been developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory's Omega West Reactor (OWR) to analyze samples for uranium and 31 additional elements with a maximum throughput of 400 samples per day. 5 references.

  2. Investigation of tritium analysis methods for ion microbeam application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bykov, I.; Petersson, P.; Bergsåker, H.; Hallén, A.; Possnert, G.

    2012-02-01

    The trapping and retention of tritium in deposited layers on plasma-facing components is a critical issue for the international tokamak experimental reactor (ITER) and for future power producing tokamak fusion reactors. Cross sections of deposited layers at surfaces in the JET tokamak divertor are being investigated using ion microbeam analysis. To include tritium analysis with high spatial resolution, a number of plausible ion beam techniques have been investigated. Calibration samples with 150 nm tritiated titanium films were used. Absolute concentrations were determined with classical ERD using 2.5-3.5 MeV 12C +. Cross sections for non-Rutherford ERD and for the T( 12C,p) 14C and T( 12C,α) 11B nuclear reactions were measured for different angles in the energy range 2.5-15 MeV. Background spectra were collected from pure carbon, beryllium and deuterium enriched samples and the sensitivity for microbeam NRA measurements of the tritium concentration in thick targets with predominantly Be-C-D matrix was estimated.

  3. Investigations of biomechanical activity of macrophages during phagocytosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovari, Daniel; Curtis, Jennifer

    2012-02-01

    Phagocytosis has traditionally been investigated in terms of the relevant biochemical signaling pathways that trigger the process and lead to the deformation of the cell as it engulfs a target. Physical changes in the cell include rearrangement and polymerization of actin in the phagocytic cup, large membrane deformations, increased membrane area via exocytosis, and closure of the phagocytic cup through membrane fusion. Hence, phagocytosis is a fine-tuned balance between biophysical cellular events and chemical signaling, which are responsible for driving these materials and mechanical changes. We present a series of assays designed to probe the physical/mechanical parameters that govern a cell during phagocytosis. Custom built micropipette manipulators are used to manipulate individual cells, facilitating high-resolution microscopy of individual phagocytic events. This work has been supported by NSF PoLS #0848797.

  4. Ancestry analysis in the 11-M Madrid bomb attack investigation.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Christopher; Prieto, Lourdes; Fondevila, Manuel; Salas, Antonio; Gómez-Tato, Antonio; Alvarez-Dios, José; Alonso, Antonio; Blanco-Verea, Alejandro; Brión, María; Montesino, Marta; Carracedo, Angel; Lareu, María Victoria

    2009-08-11

    The 11-M Madrid commuter train bombings of 2004 constituted the second biggest terrorist attack to occur in Europe after Lockerbie, while the subsequent investigation became the most complex and wide-ranging forensic case in Spain. Standard short tandem repeat (STR) profiling of 600 exhibits left certain key incriminatory samples unmatched to any of the apprehended suspects. A judicial order to perform analyses of unmatched samples to differentiate European and North African ancestry became a critical part of the investigation and was instigated to help refine the search for further suspects. Although mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and Y-chromosome markers routinely demonstrate informative geographic differentiation, the populations compared in this analysis were known to show a proportion of shared mtDNA and Y haplotypes as a result of recent gene-flow across the western Mediterranean, while any two loci can be unrepresentative of the ancestry of an individual as a whole. We based our principal analysis on a validated 34plex autosomal ancestry-informative-marker single nucleotide polymorphism (AIM-SNP) assay to make an assignment of ancestry for DNA from seven unmatched case samples including a handprint from a bag containing undetonated explosives together with personal items recovered from various locations in Madrid associated with the suspects. To assess marker informativeness before genotyping, we predicted the probable classification success for the 34plex assay with standard error estimators for a naïve Bayesian classifier using Moroccan and Spanish training sets (each n = 48). Once misclassification error was found to be sufficiently low, genotyping yielded seven near-complete profiles (33 of 34 AIM-SNPs) that in four cases gave probabilities providing a clear assignment of ancestry. One of the suspects predicted to be North African by AIM-SNP analysis of DNA from a toothbrush was identified late in the investigation as Algerian in origin. The results achieved

  5. Ancestry Analysis in the 11-M Madrid Bomb Attack Investigation

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Christopher; Prieto, Lourdes; Fondevila, Manuel; Salas, Antonio; Gómez-Tato, Antonio; Álvarez-Dios, José; Alonso, Antonio; Blanco-Verea, Alejandro; Brión, María; Montesino, Marta; Carracedo, Ángel; Lareu, María Victoria

    2009-01-01

    The 11-M Madrid commuter train bombings of 2004 constituted the second biggest terrorist attack to occur in Europe after Lockerbie, while the subsequent investigation became the most complex and wide-ranging forensic case in Spain. Standard short tandem repeat (STR) profiling of 600 exhibits left certain key incriminatory samples unmatched to any of the apprehended suspects. A judicial order to perform analyses of unmatched samples to differentiate European and North African ancestry became a critical part of the investigation and was instigated to help refine the search for further suspects. Although mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and Y-chromosome markers routinely demonstrate informative geographic differentiation, the populations compared in this analysis were known to show a proportion of shared mtDNA and Y haplotypes as a result of recent gene-flow across the western Mediterranean, while any two loci can be unrepresentative of the ancestry of an individual as a whole. We based our principal analysis on a validated 34plex autosomal ancestry-informative-marker single nucleotide polymorphism (AIM-SNP) assay to make an assignment of ancestry for DNA from seven unmatched case samples including a handprint from a bag containing undetonated explosives together with personal items recovered from various locations in Madrid associated with the suspects. To assess marker informativeness before genotyping, we predicted the probable classification success for the 34plex assay with standard error estimators for a naïve Bayesian classifier using Moroccan and Spanish training sets (each n = 48). Once misclassification error was found to be sufficiently low, genotyping yielded seven near-complete profiles (33 of 34 AIM-SNPs) that in four cases gave probabilities providing a clear assignment of ancestry. One of the suspects predicted to be North African by AIM-SNP analysis of DNA from a toothbrush was identified late in the investigation as Algerian in origin. The results

  6. Investigation of nonlinear pupil dynamics by recurrence quantification analysis.

    PubMed

    Mesin, L; Monaco, A; Cattaneo, R

    2013-01-01

    Pupil is controlled by the autonomous nervous system (ANS). It shows complex movements and changes of size even in conditions of constant stimulation. The possibility of extracting information on ANS by processing data recorded during a short experiment using a low cost system for pupil investigation is studied. Moreover, the significance of nonlinear information contained in the pupillogram is investigated. We examined 13 healthy subjects in different stationary conditions, considering habitual dental occlusion (HDO) as a weak stimulation of the ANS with respect to the maintenance of the rest position (RP) of the jaw. Images of pupil captured by infrared cameras were processed to estimate position and size on each frame. From such time series, we extracted linear indexes (e.g., average size, average displacement, and spectral parameters) and nonlinear information using recurrence quantification analysis (RQA). Data were classified using multilayer perceptrons and support vector machines trained using different sets of input indexes: the best performance in classification was obtained including nonlinear indexes in the input features. These results indicate that RQA nonlinear indexes provide additional information on pupil dynamics with respect to linear descriptors, allowing the discrimination of even a slight stimulation of the ANS. Their use in the investigation of pathology is suggested. PMID:24187665

  7. Investigation of musculoskeletal discomfort, work postures, and muscle activation among practicing tattoo artists.

    PubMed

    Keester, Dana L; Sommerich, Carolyn M

    2017-01-01

    Tattoo artists are an understudied worker population with respect to investigation of work-related musculoskeletal (MSK) discomfort and associated risk factors. Results from one discomfort survey has been published; no analysis of worker biomechanics has been published. As such, a study was conducted to begin exposure assessment of tattoo artists to work factors that could result in MSK discomfort. Consistent with the prior survey, the current study showed an elevated prevalence of MSK discomfort. Twelve month discomfort prevalence exceeded 50% in the neck, shoulders, hands/wrists, and upper and lower back (range: 53-94%). Seventy-one percent of postures evaluated during 16 h of observation had total RULA scores of 5, 6, or 7 (investigation and changes are required soon or immediately). Static muscle activity levels in the left, right, or both upper trapezius muscles in each study participant exceeded the 2-5% MVE limit recommended in the literature. Intervention concepts are also discussed. PMID:27633206

  8. Solid state structural and theoretical investigations of a biologically active chalcone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbas, Asghar; Gökce, Halil; Bahceli, Semiha; Bolte, Michael; Naseer, Muhammad Moazzam

    2016-05-01

    The computational methods are presently emerging as an efficient and reliable tool for predicting structural properties of biologically important compounds. In the present manuscript, the solid state structural and theoretical investigations of a biologically active chalcone i-e (E)-3-(4-(hexyloxy)phenyl)-1-phenylprop-2-en-1-one (6c) have been reported. The solid state structure of 6c was measured by X-ray crystallographic technique whereas the optimized molecular geometry, vibrational frequencies, the simulated UV-vis spectra (in gas and in methanol solvent), 1H and 13C NMR chemical shift (in gas and in chloroform solvent) values, HOMO-LUMO analysis, the molecular electrostatic potential (MEP) surface and thermodynamic parameters were calculated by using DFT/B3LYP method with 6-311++G(d,p) basis set in ground state. The results of the theoretical investigations were found to be in good agreement with experimental data.

  9. Investigating the Structure of Active Galactic Nuclei: The Dusty Torus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stalevski, Marko

    2012-11-01

    Active galactic nuclei Nowadays it is widely accepted that every massive galaxy harbors a supermassive black hole (SMBH) at its center. A number of apparent correlations between SMBH mass and host galaxy structural and dynamical properties have been observed. The correlation between the masses of SMBHs and their host galactic bulges suggest a link between their growth (Kormendy & Richstone, 1995; Kormendy & Gebhardt, 2001). Active galactic nucleus (AGN) represents a phase in the life of a galaxy, during which the SMBH growth is directly observable. The term AGN encompasses a variety of energetic phenomena in galactic centers triggered by the matter spiralling into a SMBH at a relatively high rate. The radiation coming from AGNs originates in the conversion of gravitational potential energy into thermal energy as matter spirals towards the SMBH through an accretion disk (Lynden- Bell, 1969). Their luminosity can be up to 10000 greater then the total luminosity of a normal galaxy. The radiated AGN continuum covers a broad range of spectrum, from the X to radio domain, it is partially polarized and variable in time. Radiation from the central engine is ionizing the surrounding medium, creating conditions for the strong emission line spectrum, superimposed on the continuum. Sometimes, highly collimated and fast outflows (“jets”) emerge perpendicular to the accretion disk. Since the discovery of Keel (1980) that the orientation of Seyfert 1 galaxies is not random, it xxx has been recognized that the appearance of an AGN varies with the viewing angle. This has led to the picture of “orientation unification” (see Antonucci, 1993; Urry & Padovani, 1995) where the structure of AGNs is believed to be basically similar but what we see is a strong function of orientation (see Fig. 9). In this unified model, the central black hole is surrounded by a geometrically-thin accretion disk which is the source of the strong X-ray emission and UV/optical continuum (see Jovanovic

  10. Neutron activation analysis of Etruscan pottery

    SciTech Connect

    Whitehead, J.; Silverman, A.; Ouellet, C.G.; Clark, D.D.; Hossain, T.Z

    1992-07-01

    Neutron activation analysis (NAA) has been widely used in archaeology for compositional analysis of pottery samples taken from sites of archaeological importance. Elemental profiles can determine the place of manufacture. At Cornell, samples from an Etruscan site near Siena, Italy, are being studied. The goal of this study is to compile a trace element concentration profile for a large number of samples. These profiles will be matched with an existing data bank in an attempt to understand the place of origin for these samples. The 500 kW TRIGA reactor at the Ward Laboratory is used to collect NAA data for these samples. Experiments were done to set a procedure for the neutron activation analysis with respect to sample preparation, selection of irradiation container, definition of activation and counting parameters and data reduction. Currently, we are able to analyze some 27 elements in samples of mass 500 mg with a single irradiation of 4 hours and two sequences of counting. Our sensitivity for many of the trace elements is better than 1 ppm by weight under the conditions chosen. In this talk, details of our procedure, including quality assurance as measured by NIST standard reference materials, will be discussed. In addition, preliminary results from data treatment using cluster analysis will be presented. (author)

  11. Activity Analysis and Cost Analysis in Medical Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koehler, John E.; Slighton, Robert L.

    There is no unique answer to the question of what an ongoing program costs in medical schools. The estimates of program costs generated by classical methods of cost accounting are unsatisfactory because such accounting cannot deal with the joint production or joint cost problem. Activity analysis models aim at calculating the impact of alternative…

  12. Disaccharidase activities in camel small intestine: biochemical investigations of maltase-glucoamylase activity.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Saleh A; Fahmy, Afaf S; Salah, Hala A

    2007-01-01

    Disaccharidases (maltase, cellobiase, lactase, and sucrase), alpha-amylase, and glucoamylase in the camel small intestine were investigated to integrate the enzymatic digestion profile in camel. High activities were detected for maltase and glucoamylase, followed by moderate levels of sucrase and alpha-amylase. Very low activity levels were detected for lactase and cellobiase. Camel intestinal maltase-glucoamylase (MG) was purified by DEAE-Sepharose and Sephacryl S-200 columns. The molecular weight of camel small intestinal MG4 and MG6 were estimated to be 140,000 and 180,000 using Sephacryl S-200. These values were confirmed by SDS-PAGE, where the two enzymes migrated as single subunits. This study encompassed characterization of MGs from camel intestine. The Km values of MG4 and MG6 were estimated to be 13.3 mM and 20 mM maltose, respectively. Substrate specificity for MG4 and MG6 indicated that the two enzymes are maltase-glucoamylases because they catalysed the hydrolysis of maltose and starch with alpha-1,4 and alpha-1,6 glycosidic bonds, but not sucrose with alpha-1,2 glycosidic bond which was hydrolyzed by sucrase-isomaltase. Camel intestinal MG4 and MG6 had the same optimum pH at 7.0 and temperature optimum at 50 degrees C and 40 degrees C, respectively. The two enzymes were stable up to 50 degrees C and 40 degrees C, followed by strong decrease in activity at 60 degrees C and 50 degrees C, respectively. The effect of divalent cations on the activity of camel intestinal MG4 and MG6 was studied. All the examined divalent cations Ca(2+), Mn(2+), Mg(2+), Co(2+) and Fe(3+) had slight effects on the two enzymes except Hg(2+) which had a strong inhibitory effect. The effect of different inhibitors on MG4 and MG6 indicated that the two enzymes had a cysteine residue. PMID:17098455

  13. Investigation, Analysis, and Testing of Self-contained Oxygen Generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keddy, Christopher P.; Haas, Jon P.; Starritt, Larry

    2008-01-01

    Self Contained Oxygen Generators (SCOGs) have widespread use in providing emergency breathing oxygen in a variety of environments including mines, submarines, spacecraft, and aircraft. These devices have definite advantages over storing of gaseous or liquid oxygen. The oxygen is not generated until a chemical briquette containing a chlorate or perchlorate oxidizer and a solid metallic fuel such as iron is ignited starting a thermal decomposition process allowing gaseous oxygen to be produced. These devices are typically very safe to store, easy to operate, and have primarily only a thermal hazard to the operator that can be controlled by barriers or furnaces. Tens of thousands of these devices are operated worldwide every year without major incident. This report examines the rare case of a SCOG whose behavior was both abnormal and lethal. This particular type of SCOG reviewed is nearly identical to a flight qualified version of SCOG slated for use on manned space vehicles. This Investigative Report is a compilation of a NASA effort in conjunction with other interested parties including military and aerospace to understand the causes of the particular SCOG accident and what preventative measures can be taken to ensure this incident is not repeated. This report details the incident and examines the root causes of the observed SCOG behavior from forensic evidence. A summary of chemical and numerical analysis is provided as a background to physical testing of identical SCOG devices. The results and findings of both small scale and full scale testing are documented on a test-by-test basis along with observations and summaries. Finally, conclusions are presented on the findings of this investigation, analysis, and testing along with suggestions on preventative measures for any entity interested in the safe use of these devices.

  14. Sustained Effects of Acupuncture Stimulation Investigated with Centrality Mapping Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Long, Xiangyu; Huang, Wenjing; Napadow, Vitaly; Liang, Fanrong; Pleger, Burkhard; Villringer, Arno; Witt, Claudia M.; Nierhaus, Till; Pach, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Acupuncture can have instant and sustained effects, however, its mechanisms of action are still unclear. Here, we investigated the sustained effect of acupuncture by evaluating centrality changes in resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging after manually stimulating the acupuncture point ST36 at the lower leg or two control point locations (CP1 same dermatome, CP2 different dermatome). Data from a previously published experiment evaluating instant BOLD effects and S2-seed-based resting state connectivity was re-analyzed using eigenvector centrality mapping and degree centrality mapping. These data-driven methods might add new insights into sustained acupuncture effects on both global and local inter-region connectivity (centrality) by evaluating the summary of connections of every voxel. We found higher centrality in parahippocampal gyrus and middle temporal gyrus after ST36 stimulation in comparison to the two control points. These regions are positively correlated to major hubs of the default mode network, which might be the primary network affected by chronic pain. The stronger integration of both regions within the whole-brain connectome after stimulation of ST36 might be a potential contributor to pain modulation by acupuncture. These findings highlight centrality mapping as a valuable analysis for future imaging studies investigating clinically relevant outcomes associated with physiological response to acupuncture stimulation. Clinical trial registration: NCT01079689, ClinicalTrials.gov. PMID:27803655

  15. The Sample Analysis at Mars Investigation and Instrument Suite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahaffy, Paul; Webster, Christopher R.; Conrad, Pamela G.; Arvey, Robert; Bleacher, Lora; Brinckerhoff, William B.; Eigenbrode, Jennifer L.; Chalmers, Robert A.; Dworkin, Jason P.; Errigo, Therese; Farley, Rodger; Feng, Steven; Frazier, Gregory; Glavin, Daniel P.; Harpold, Daniel N.; Jordan, Partick; Kellogg, James; Lewis, Jesse; Martin, David K.; Maurer, John; McAdam, Amy C.; McLennan, Douglas; Pavlov, Alexander A.; Raaen, Eric; Schinman, Oren

    2012-01-01

    The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) investigation of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) addresses the chemical and isotopic composition of the atmosphere and volatiles extracted from solid samples. The SAM investigation is designed to contribute substantially to the mission goal of quantitatively assessing the habitability of Mars as an essential step in the search for past or present life on Mars. SAM is a 40 kg instrument suite located in the interior of MSL's Curiosity rover. The SAM instruments are a quadrupole mass spectrometer, a tunable laser spectrometer, and a 6-column gas chromatograph all coupled through solid and gas processing systems to provide complementary information on the same samples. The SAM suite is able to measure a suite of light isotopes and to analyze volatiles directly from the atmosphere or thermally released from solid samples. In addition to measurements of simple inorganic compounds and noble gases SAM will conduct a sensitive search for organic compounds with either thermal or chemical extraction from sieved samples delivered by the sample processing system on the Curiosity rover's robotic arm,

  16. The Sample Analysis at Mars Investigation and Instrument Suite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahaffy, Paul; Webster, Chris R.; Cabane, M.; Conrad, Pamela G.; Coll, Patrice; Atreya, Sushil K.; Arvey, Robert; Barciniak, Michael; Benna, Mehdi; Bleacher, L.; Brinckerhoff, William B.; Eigenbrode, Jennifer L.; Carignan, Daniel; Cascia, Mark; Chalmers, Robert A.; Dworkin, Jason P.; Errigo, Therese; Everson, Paula; Franz, Heather; Farley, Rodger; Feng, Steven; Frazier, Gregory; Freissinet, Caroline; Glavin, Daniel P.; Harpold, Daniel N.

    2012-01-01

    The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) investigation of the Mars Science Laboratory(MSL) addresses the chemical and isotopic composition of the atmosphere and volatilesextracted from solid samples. The SAM investigation is designed to contribute substantiallyto the mission goal of quantitatively assessing the habitability of Mars as an essentialstep in the search for past or present life on Mars. SAM is a 40 kg instrument suite locatedin the interior of MSLs Curiosity rover. The SAM instruments are a quadrupole massspectrometer, a tunable laser spectrometer, and a 6-column gas chromatograph all coupledthrough solid and gas processing systems to provide complementary information on thesame samples. The SAM suite is able to measure a suite of light isotopes and to analyzevolatiles directly from the atmosphere or thermally released from solid samples. In additionto measurements of simple inorganic compounds and noble gases SAM will conducta sensitive search for organic compounds with either thermal or chemical extraction fromsieved samples delivered by the sample processing system on the Curiosity rovers roboticarm.

  17. Scaling analysis for the investigation of slip mechanisms in nanofluids

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The primary objective of this study is to investigate the effect of slip mechanisms in nanofluids through scaling analysis. The role of nanoparticle slip mechanisms in both water- and ethylene glycol-based nanofluids is analyzed by considering shape, size, concentration, and temperature of the nanoparticles. From the scaling analysis, it is found that all of the slip mechanisms are dominant in particles of cylindrical shape as compared to that of spherical and sheet particles. The magnitudes of slip mechanisms are found to be higher for particles of size between 10 and 80 nm. The Brownian force is found to dominate in smaller particles below 10 nm and also at smaller volume fraction. However, the drag force is found to dominate in smaller particles below 10 nm and at higher volume fraction. The effect of thermophoresis and Magnus forces is found to increase with the particle size and concentration. In terms of time scales, the Brownian and gravity forces act considerably over a longer duration than the other forces. For copper-water-based nanofluid, the effective contribution of slip mechanisms leads to a heat transfer augmentation which is approximately 36% over that of the base fluid. The drag and gravity forces tend to reduce the Nusselt number of the nanofluid while the other forces tend to enhance it. PMID:21791036

  18. Scaling analysis for the investigation of slip mechanisms in nanofluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savithiri, S.; Pattamatta, Arvind; Das, Sarit K.

    2011-07-01

    The primary objective of this study is to investigate the effect of slip mechanisms in nanofluids through scaling analysis. The role of nanoparticle slip mechanisms in both water- and ethylene glycol-based nanofluids is analyzed by considering shape, size, concentration, and temperature of the nanoparticles. From the scaling analysis, it is found that all of the slip mechanisms are dominant in particles of cylindrical shape as compared to that of spherical and sheet particles. The magnitudes of slip mechanisms are found to be higher for particles of size between 10 and 80 nm. The Brownian force is found to dominate in smaller particles below 10 nm and also at smaller volume fraction. However, the drag force is found to dominate in smaller particles below 10 nm and at higher volume fraction. The effect of thermophoresis and Magnus forces is found to increase with the particle size and concentration. In terms of time scales, the Brownian and gravity forces act considerably over a longer duration than the other forces. For copper-water-based nanofluid, the effective contribution of slip mechanisms leads to a heat transfer augmentation which is approximately 36% over that of the base fluid. The drag and gravity forces tend to reduce the Nusselt number of the nanofluid while the other forces tend to enhance it.

  19. Photoresist film analysis to investigate LWR generation mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Shinichi; Mochida, Kenji; Kimura, Tooru; Nakanishi, Kana; Kawasaki, Naohiko; Man, Naoki

    2013-03-01

    In order to understand the mechanism of line width roughness (LWR) generation and to find control knobs for improving photoresist design, we established PAG activity analysis methods by utilizing Time-of-Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). TOF-SIMS depth profiling using Gas Cluster Ion Beam (GCIB) allowed the ability to clearly identify photoresist ingredient distribution in the photoresist films from the surface to the bottom of the resist films. TEM provided distribution information of photoresist ingredients in nanometer scale. As a result, PAG function and polymer reaction mechanism can be monitored by these methods. The TOFSIMS outputs during coating, exposure, and post-exposure bake (PEB) steps provide indications of distribution change of PAGs, quenching reaction derivatives, and remaining protecting group, which correspond to acid generation distribution, acid diffusion, and diffusion of deprotection reaction in photoresist film respectively during each consecutive lithographic patterning step. The difference in activity of PAGs can also be observed. These novel analytical methods can provide remarkably helpful information about identifying proper control knobs for lithographic performance of photoresist and for next generation lithography (NGL), especially extreme ultra violet lithography (EUVL) materials, where exposure tool time is very limited.

  20. Active Desiccant-Based Preconditioning Market Analysis and Product Development

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, J.

    2001-01-11

    The Phase 1 report (ORNL/Sub/94-SVO44/1), completed earlier in this program, involved a comprehensive field survey and market analysis comparing various specialized outdoor air handling units. This initial investigation included conventional cooling and reheat, conventional cooling with sensible recovery, total energy recovery systems (passive desiccant technology) and various active desiccant systems. The report concluded that several markets do promise a significant sales opportunity for a Climate Changer-based active desiccant system offering. (Climate Changer is a registered trademark of Trane Company.) This initial market analysis defined the wants and needs of the end customers (design engineers and building owners), which, along with subsequent information included in this report, have been used to guide the determination of the most promising active desiccant system configurations. This Phase 2 report begins with a summary of a more thorough investigation of those specific markets identified as most promising for active desiccant systems. Table 1 estimates the annual sales potential for a cost-effective product line of active desiccant systems, such as that built from Climate Changer modules. The Product Development Strategy section describes the active desiccant system configurations chosen to best fit the needs of the marketplace while minimizing system options. Key design objectives based on market research are listed in this report for these active desiccant systems. Corresponding performance goals for the dehumidification wheel required to meet the overall system design objectives are also defined. The Performance Modeling section describes the strategy used by SEMCO to design the dehumidification wheels integrated into the prototype systems currently being tested as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Desiccant Technology Program. Actual performance data from wheel testing was used to revise the system performance and energy analysis

  1. Fundamental and Applied Investigations in Atomic Spectrometric Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Min

    Simultaneous laser-excited fluorescence and absorption measurements were performed and the results have revealed that any interference caused by easily ionized elements does not originate from variations in analyte emission (quantum) efficiency. A closely related area, the roles of wet and dry aerosols in the matrix interference are clarified through spatially resolved imaging of the plasma by a charged coupled device camera. To eliminate matrix interference effects practically, various methods have been developed based on the above studies. The use of column pre-concentration with flow injection analysis has been found to provide a simple solution for reducing interference effects and increasing sensitivity of elemental analysis. A novel mini-spray chamber was invented. The new vertical rotary spray chamber combines gravitational, centrifugal, turbulent, and impact droplet segregation mechanisms to achieve a higher efficiency of small-droplet formation in a nebulized sample spray. As a result, it offers also higher sample-transport efficiency, lower memory effects, and improved analytical figures of merit over existing devices. This new device was employed with flow injection analysis to simulate an interface for coupling high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) to a microwave plasma for chromatographic detection. The detection limits for common metallic elements are in the range of 5-50 mug/mL, and are degraded only twofold when the elements are presented in an organic solvent such as ethanol or methanol. Other sample-introduction schemes have also been investigated to improve sample-introduction technology. The direct coupling of hydride-generation techniques to the helium microwave plasma torch was evaluated for the determination of arsenic, antimony and tin by atomic emission spectrometry. A manually controlled peristaltic pump was modified for computer control and continuous flow injection was evaluated for standard calibration and trace elemental

  2. Productivity Analysis of Public and Private Airports: A Causal Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vasigh, Bijan; Gorjidooz, Javad

    2007-01-01

    Around the world, airports are being viewed as enterprises, rather than public services, which are expected to be managed efficiently and provide passengers with courteous customer services. Governments are, increasingly, turning to the private sectors for their efficiency in managing the operation, financing, and development, as well as providing security for airports. Operational and financial performance evaluation has become increasingly important to airport operators due to recent trends in airport privatization. Assessing performance allows the airport operators to plan for human resources and capital investment as efficiently as possible. Productivity measurements may be used as comparisons and guidelines in strategic planning, in the internal analysis of operational efficiency and effectiveness, and in assessing the competitive position of an airport in transportation industry. The primary purpose of this paper is to investigate the operational and financial efficiencies of 22 major airports in the United States and Europe. These airports are divided into three groups based on private ownership (7 British Airport Authority airports), public ownership (8 major United States airports), and a mix of private and public ownership (7 major European Union airports. The detail ownership structures of these airports are presented in Appendix A. Total factor productivity (TFP) model was utilized to measure airport performance in terms of financial and operational efficiencies and to develop a benchmarking tool to identify the areas of strength and weakness. A regression model was then employed to measure the relationship between TFP and ownership structure. Finally a Granger causality test was performed to determine whether ownership structure is a Granger cause of TFP. The results of the analysis presented in this paper demonstrate that there is not a significant relationship between airport TFP and ownership structure. Airport productivity and efficiency is

  3. Experimental and theoretical investigations on the antioxidant activity of isoorientin from Crotalaria globosa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deepha, V.; Praveena, R.; Sivakumar, Raman; Sadasivam, K.

    2014-03-01

    The increasing interests in naturally occurring flavonoids are well known for their bioactivity as antioxidants. The present investigations with combined experimental and theoretical methods are employed to determine the radical scavenging activity and phytochemicals present in Crotalaria globosa, a novel plant source. Preliminary quantification of ethanolic extract of leaves shows high phenolic and flavonoid content than root extract; also it is validated through DPPHrad assay. Further analysis is carried out with successive extracts of leaves of varying polarity of solvents. In DPPHrad and FRAP assays, ethyl acetate fraction (EtOAc) exhibit higher scavenging activity followed by ethanol fraction (EtOH) whereas in NOS assay ethanol fraction is slightly predominant over the EtOAc fraction. The LC-MS analysis provides tentative information about the presence of flavonoid C-glycoside in EtOAc fraction (yellow solid). Presence of flavonoid isorientin has been confirmed through isolation (PTLC) and detected by spectroscopy methods (UV-visible and 1H NMR). Utilizing B3LYP/6-311G (d,p) level of theory the structure and reactivity of flavonoid isoorientin theoretically have been explored. The analysis of the theoretical Bond dissociation energy values, for all Osbnd H sites of isoorientin reveals that minimum energy is required to dissociate H-atom from B-ring than A and C-rings. In order to validate the antioxidant characteristics of isoorientin the relevant molecular descriptors IP, HOMO-LUMO, Mulliken spin density analysis and molecular electrostatic potential surfaces have been computed and interpreted. From experimental and theoretical results, it is proved that isoorientin can act as potent antiradical scavenger in oxidative system.

  4. Thermal Analysis Investigation of Dapoxetine and Vardenafil Hydrochlorides using Molecular Orbital Calculations

    PubMed Central

    Attia, Ali Kamal; Souaya, Eglal R.; Soliman, Ethar A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Thermal analysis techniques have been used to study the thermal behavior of dapoxetine and vardenafil hydrochlorides and confirmed using semi-empirical molecular orbital calculations. Methods: Thermogravimetric analysis, derivative thermogravimetry, differential thermal analysis and differential scanning calorimetry were used to determine the thermal behavior and purity of the drugs under investigation. Thermodynamic parameters such as activation energy, enthalpy, entropy and Gibbs free energy were calculated. Results: Thermal behavior of DAP and VAR were confirmed using by semi-empirical molecular orbital calculations. The purity values were found to be 99.97% and 99.95% for dapoxetine and vardenafil hydrochlorides, respectively. The purity of dapoxetine and vardenafil hydrochlorides is similar to that found by reported methods according to DSC data. Conclusion: Thermal analysis justifies its application in quality control of pharmaceutical compounds due to its simplicity, sensitivity and low operational costs. PMID:26819925

  5. Elemental investigation of Syrian medicinal plants using PIXE analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rihawy, M. S.; Bakraji, E. H.; Aref, S.; Shaban, R.

    2010-09-01

    Particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE) technique has been employed to perform elemental analysis of K, Ca, Mn, Fe, Cu, Zn, Br and Sr for Syrian medicinal plants used traditionally to enhance the body immunity. Plant samples were prepared in a simple dried base. The results were verified by comparing with those obtained from both IAEA-359 and IAEA-V10 reference materials. Relative standard deviations are mostly within ±5-10% suggest good precision. A correlation between the elemental content in each medicinal plant with its traditional remedial usage has been proposed. Both K and Ca are found to be the major elements in the samples. Fe, Mn and Zn have been detected in good levels in most of these plants clarifying their possible contribution to keep the body immune system in good condition. The contribution of the elements in these plants to the dietary recommended intakes (DRI) has been evaluated. Advantages and limitations of PIXE analytical technique in this investigation have been reviewed.

  6. The experimental investigation and thermodynamic analysis of vortex tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celik, Adem; Yilmaz, Mehmet; Kaya, Mehmet; Karagoz, Sendogan

    2016-05-01

    In the present study, it was aimed to produce a fundamental i nformation and to investigate the effects of various design parameters on tube performance characteristics by setting up vortex tube experimental system in order to study the parameters predetermined for the design of vortex tubes and by conducting thermodynamic analysis. According to the findings of experiments, as the mass flow rate of cold flow increases (yc) temperature of cold flow also increases, while the temperature of warm flow increases approximately to yc = 0.6 and then decreases. Increases in inlet pressure, inlet nozzle surface and diameter of the cold outlet orifice increased temperature differences between cold and warm flows. Tube with L/D = 10 showed better performance than with L/D = 20. The finding that irreversibility parameter is very close to critical threshold of irreversibility proved that process in vortex tube is considerably irreversible. Coefficient of performance (COP) values in vortex tube were much lower than other heating and cooling systems. This situation may show that vortex tubes are convenient in the processes where productivity is at the second rate compared to other factors.

  7. Refractometric investigation and analysis of nano-scaled dispersions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarov, Yanko; Kostic, Ivan; Capek, I.; Andok, R.; Sarova, Valentina; Capek, P.; Rangelow, Ivo W.

    2005-04-01

    This work presents the applications of the method of the disappearing diffraction pattern for refractometric measurements and analysis of scattering media. The behavior of the refractive indices of different aqueous dispersions containing metal and polymer particles is studied theoretically and experimentally. Both metallic and latex solutions exhibit linear dependence of the refractive index on the concentration of particles. Values of the specific refractive index increment dn/dc for Co, Fe and Ag nano-dispersions are calculated. Poly(2-ethylhexyl) acrylate and poly(vinyl acetate) latexes with size of particles between 50 and 1300 nm and concentration up to the maximum possible are systematically studied with respect to the properties of the particles-concentration, diameter and refractive index. Empirical relationships are derived for the investigated latexes, describing the dependence of the refractive index of latexes on their properties and on the light wavelength. Such approach could be used to solve the inverse problem of calculating the concentration or the size of particles, measuring the refractive index. It is shown that the refractometry provides a simple, easy and accurate way to study and analyze properties of dense nano- and micro-dispersions.

  8. Investigating the atmospheric energy spectra using ECMWF analysis: Regional dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, P.; Zhang, M.

    2010-12-01

    The atmospheric turbulence energy spectrum has been a subject of active research for a long time. Beginning with Kolmogorov’s theory of three-dimensional turbulence, to Kraichnan’s two-dimensional turbulence and its extension to the quasi-geostrophic case by Charney, various theoretical models and hypothesis have tried to explain the energy spectrum slope. However, the success or failure of a theory can only be gauged by comparing its output with actual observational data. Nastrom and Gage were able to do just that by analyzing thousands of flight observation data and plotting the wave number spectra of wind and temperature in 1980’s. But, the flight data was confined only to the upper atmosphere and mostly mid-latitudes of northern hemisphere. We use the high-resolution ECMWF analysis data, as a part of Year of Tropical Convection (YOTC) to study the atmospheric energy spectra over a wide range of conditions. We compared and interpreted the differences of the atmospheric energy spectra in the tropics and mid-latitudes, in the winter (DJF) and summer (JJA), at the surface and in the upper troposphere. Our results conform to the previously observed -3 power law for mid-latitude data in the upper troposphere, but the slope of the energy spectrum from the surface wind data and for the tropics exhibited quite different shapes. The causes of these differences are discussed.

  9. Neutron activation analysis in archaeological chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Harbottle, G.

    1987-01-01

    Neutron activation analysis has proven to be a convenient way of performing the chemical analysis of archaeologically-excavated artifacts and materials. It is fast and does not require tedious laboratory operations. It is multielement, sensitive, and can be made nondestructive. Neutron activation analysis in its instrumental form, i.e., involving no chemical separation, is ideally suited to automation and conveniently takes the first step in data flow patterns that are appropriate for many taxonomic and statistical operations. The future will doubtless see improvements in the practice of NAA in general, but in connection with archaeological science the greatest change will be the filling, interchange and widespread use of data banks based on compilations of analytical data. Since provenience-oriented data banks deal with materials (obsidian, ceramics, metals, semiprecious stones, building materials and sculptural media) that participated in trade networks, the analytical data is certain to be of interest to a rather broad group of archaeologists. It is to meet the needs of the whole archaeological community that archaeological chemistry must now turn.

  10. Criminal investigations in child protective services cases: an empirical analysis.

    PubMed

    Cross, Theodore P; Chuang, Emmeline; Helton, Jesse J; Lux, Emily A

    2015-05-01

    This study analyzed the frequency and correlates of criminal investigation of child maltreatment in cases investigated by child protective service (CPS), using national probability data from the National Survey of Child and Adolescent Well-Being. Criminal investigations were conducted in slightly more than 25% of cases. Communities varied substantially in percentage criminally investigated. Sexual abuse was the most frequent type of maltreatment criminally investigated followed by physical abuse. Logistic regression results indicated that criminal investigations were more likely when caseworkers perceived greater harm and more evidence; when CPS conducted an investigation rather than an assessment; when a parent or a legal guardian reported the maltreatment; and when cases were located in communities in which CPS and police had a memorandum of understanding (MOU) governing coordination. Most variation between communities in criminal investigation remained unexplained. The findings suggest the potential of MOUs for communities wanting to increase criminal investigation.

  11. Analysis of DOE international environmental management activities

    SciTech Connect

    Ragaini, R.C.

    1995-09-01

    The Department of Energy`s (DOE) Strategic Plan (April 1994) states that DOE`s long-term vision includes world leadership in environmental restoration and waste management activities. The activities of the DOE Office of Environmental Management (EM) can play a key role in DOE`s goals of maintaining U.S. global competitiveness and ensuring the continuation of a world class science and technology community. DOE`s interest in attaining these goals stems partly from its participation in organizations like the Trade Policy Coordinating Committee (TPCC), with its National Environmental Export Promotion Strategy, which seeks to strengthen U.S. competitiveness and the building of public-private partnerships as part of U.S. industrial policy. The International Interactions Field Office task will build a communication network which will facilitate the efficient and effective communication between DOE Headquarters, Field Offices, and contractors. Under this network, Headquarters will provide the Field Offices with information on the Administration`s policies and activities (such as the DOE Strategic Plan), interagency activities, as well as relevant information from other field offices. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) will, in turn, provide Headquarters with information on various international activities which, when appropriate, will be included in reports to groups like the TPCC and the EM Focus Areas. This task provides for the collection, review, and analysis of information on the more significant international environmental restoration and waste management initiatives and activities which have been used or are being considered at LLNL. Information gathering will focus on efforts and accomplishments in meeting the challenges of providing timely and cost effective cleanup of its environmentally damaged sites and facilities, especially through international technical exchanges and/or the implementation of foreign-development technologies.

  12. Scalable histopathological image analysis via active learning.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yan; Zhang, Shaoting; Liu, Wei; Metaxas, Dimitris N

    2014-01-01

    Training an effective and scalable system for medical image analysis usually requires a large amount of labeled data, which incurs a tremendous annotation burden for pathologists. Recent progress in active learning can alleviate this issue, leading to a great reduction on the labeling cost without sacrificing the predicting accuracy too much. However, most existing active learning methods disregard the "structured information" that may exist in medical images (e.g., data from individual patients), and make a simplifying assumption that unlabeled data is independently and identically distributed. Both may not be suitable for real-world medical images. In this paper, we propose a novel batch-mode active learning method which explores and leverages such structured information in annotations of medical images to enforce diversity among the selected data, therefore maximizing the information gain. We formulate the active learning problem as an adaptive submodular function maximization problem subject to a partition matroid constraint, and further present an efficient greedy algorithm to achieve a good solution with a theoretically proven bound. We demonstrate the efficacy of our algorithm on thousands of histopathological images of breast microscopic tissues. PMID:25320821

  13. Neotectonic and seismotectonic investigation of seismically active regions in Tunisia: a multidisciplinary approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahrouni, N.; Bouaziz, S.; Soumaya, A.; Ben Ayed, N.; Attafi, K.; Houla, Y.; El Ghali, A.; Rebai, N.

    2014-04-01

    Due to its key position within the Africa-Europe convergence zone, Tunisia is marked by thrusting, folding, and faulting and has a major rupture zones associated with active faults. Consequently, most of Tunisian land is seismically active with significant active deformations, showing recent seismic events and their relative surface effects. This paper reports on several aspects of the seismotectonics, historical, and present-day seismicity and places them in the general tectonic and geodynamic framework of Tunisia. Field investigations, based on an integrated multidisciplinary approach, included (1) the identification of active faults, their motion and displacement, geomorphic aspects, and scarps and their relation with the general structural map of Tunisia and (2) an extensive analysis of brittle tectonic deformation affecting Quaternary deposits in several sites throughout Tunisia. The integration of field data within the existing data related to the seismic events that took place during the last decades allowed the establishment of an earthquake distribution map, as well as major seismic zones for better understanding of the seismicity database of Tunisia. To establish microzonation maps in seismic regions such as Gafsa and its surroundings, we have analyzed surface effects and secondary structures associated with active faults and correlated them with deformation rates, reconstructed for significant seismic events. Most faults exhibited typical left-stepping en-echelon with strike-slip component pattern suggesting that Tunisia is presently subjected to NNW-SSE compression. The focal mechanism of most Tunisia earthquakes combined with the existing tectonic and structural information and reconstruction of the Quaternary stress tensor allowed (a) better understanding of seismic zoning, (b) provided better assessment of the seismic hazard, and (c) facilitated the interpretation of the relationship between seismic zones and the geodynamic African-Eurasian plate

  14. Quantification of extracellular carbonic anhydrase activity in two marine diatoms and investigation of its role.

    PubMed

    Hopkinson, Brian M; Meile, Christof; Shen, Chen

    2013-06-01

    Many microalgae induce an extracellular carbonic anhydrase (eCA), associated with the cell surface, at low carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations. This enzyme is thought to aid inorganic carbon uptake by generating CO2 at the cell surface, but alternative roles have been proposed. We developed a new approach to quantify eCA activity in which a reaction-diffusion model is fit to data on (18)O removal from inorganic carbon. In contrast to previous methods, eCA activity is treated as a surface process, allowing the effects of eCA on cell boundary-layer chemistry to be assessed. Using this approach, we measured eCA activity in two marine diatoms (Thalassiosira pseudonana and Thalassiosira weissflogii), characterized the kinetics of this enzyme, and studied its regulation as a function of culture pH and CO2 concentration. In support of a role for eCA in CO2 supply, eCA activity specifically responded to low CO2 rather than to changes in pH or HCO3(-), and the rates of eCA activity are nearly optimal for maintaining cell surface CO2 concentrations near those in the bulk solution. Although the CO2 gradients abolished by eCA are small (less than 0.5 μm concentration difference between bulk and cell surface), CO2 uptake in these diatoms is a passive process driven by small concentration gradients. Analysis of the effects of short-term and long-term eCA inhibition on photosynthesis and growth indicates that eCA provides a small energetic benefit by reducing the surface-to-bulk CO2 gradient. Alternative roles for eCA in CO2 recovery as HCO3(-) and surface pH regulation were investigated, but eCA was found to have minimal effects on these processes.

  15. Investigation of spectral analysis techniques for randomly sampled velocimetry data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sree, Dave

    1993-01-01

    It is well known that velocimetry (LV) generates individual realization velocity data that are randomly or unevenly sampled in time. Spectral analysis of such data to obtain the turbulence spectra, and hence turbulence scales information, requires special techniques. The 'slotting' technique of Mayo et al, also described by Roberts and Ajmani, and the 'Direct Transform' method of Gaster and Roberts are well known in the LV community. The slotting technique is faster than the direct transform method in computation. There are practical limitations, however, as to how a high frequency and accurate estimate can be made for a given mean sampling rate. These high frequency estimates are important in obtaining the microscale information of turbulence structure. It was found from previous studies that reliable spectral estimates can be made up to about the mean sampling frequency (mean data rate) or less. If the data were evenly samples, the frequency range would be half the sampling frequency (i.e. up to Nyquist frequency); otherwise, aliasing problem would occur. The mean data rate and the sample size (total number of points) basically limit the frequency range. Also, there are large variabilities or errors associated with the high frequency estimates from randomly sampled signals. Roberts and Ajmani proposed certain pre-filtering techniques to reduce these variabilities, but at the cost of low frequency estimates. The prefiltering acts as a high-pass filter. Further, Shapiro and Silverman showed theoretically that, for Poisson sampled signals, it is possible to obtain alias-free spectral estimates far beyond the mean sampling frequency. But the question is, how far? During his tenure under 1993 NASA-ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship Program, the author investigated from his studies on the spectral analysis techniques for randomly sampled signals that the spectral estimates can be enhanced or improved up to about 4-5 times the mean sampling frequency by using a suitable

  16. The contribution of forensic science to crime analysis and investigation: forensic intelligence.

    PubMed

    Ribaux, Olivier; Walsh, Simon J; Margot, Pierre

    2006-01-27

    The debate in forensic science concentrates on issues such as standardisation, accreditation and de-contextualisation, in a legal and economical context, in order to ensure the scientific objectivity and efficiency that must guide the process of collecting, analysing, interpreting and reporting forensic evidence. At the same time, it is recognised that forensic case data is still poorly integrated into the investigation and the crime analysis process, despite evidence of its great potential in various situations and studies. A change of attitude is needed in order to accept an extended role for forensic science that goes beyond the production of evidence for the court. To stimulate and guide this development, a long-term intensive modelling activity of the investigative and crime analysis process that crosses the boundaries of different disciplines has been initiated. A framework that fully integrates forensic case data shows through examples the capital accumulated that may be put to use systematically.

  17. Modern accident investigation and analysis - An executive guide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferry, T. S.

    The first part of the book primes the reader for mishap investigation. Three chapters lead into the serious business of investigation through a discussion of the need for and examination of who has a stake in investigation. This is followed by coverage of the preparation that makes an efficient investigation possible. Finally a description is presented of the first important steps in the investigation, conducted at the scene of a mishap. The interacting roles of man, environment, and systems are examined, taking into account unsafe acts, human limitations, the various types of environments, different types of materials, and aspects of systems investigation. Attention is also given to analytical techniques, the mishap report, information collection, and legal aspects of investigation.

  18. Finite element analysis of lightweight active primary mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Wei Xin; Guan, Chun Lin; Rao, Chang Hui

    2012-09-01

    With the increasing requirement on spatial resolution to achieve ideal performance in space-based optical imaging system, there is a need to enlarge primary apertures. However, primary mirrors of such systems cannot maintain its optical tolerances across the mirror surface after sending to space, because of gravity change and varying ambient temperature. It necessitates active optics technology of primary mirror surface correction. Since mass-to-orbit is expensive and limited, lightweight primary mirror is needed. The paper investigates a lightweight, active primary mirror. This primary mirror structure includes lightweight face sheet and substrate with surface-parallel actuators embedded in the recess of web support ribs. Finite element models of lightweight, active primary mirror structures with different structural parameters are established and simulated. Using the response function matrixes acquired from finite element analysis, the fitting errors for Zernike polynomials are computed by MATLAB. Correctability comparisons of lightweight, active primary mirror structures with different parameters are carried out. To get best correctability, the mirrors should have small recess depth, high and thin ribs, thick face sheets and long actuators. The structural analysis result will be valuable for the design of lightweight, active primary mirror.

  19. Investigation of biochemical property changes in activation-induced CD 8 + T cell apoptosis using Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Young Ju; Ahn, Hyung Joon; Lee, Gi-Ja; Jung, Gyeong Bok; Lee, Gihyun; Kim, Dohyun; Shin, Jae-Ho; Jin, Kyung-Hyun; Park, Hun-Kuk

    2015-07-01

    The study was to investigate the changes in biochemical properties of activated mature CD8+ T cells related to apoptosis at a molecular level. We confirmed the activation and apoptosis of CD8+ T cells by fluorescence-activated cell sorting and atomic force microscopy and then performed Raman spectral measurements on activated mature CD8+ T cells and cellular deoxyribose nucleic acid (DNA). In the activated mature CD8+ T cells, there were increases in protein spectra at 1002 and 1234 cm-1. In particular, to assess the apoptosis-related DNA spectral signatures, we investigated the spectra of the cellular DNA isolated from resting and activated mature CD8+ T cells. Raman spectra at 765 to 786 cm-1 and 1053 to 1087 cm-1 were decreased in activated mature DNA. In addition, we analyzed Raman spectrum using the multivariate statistical method including principal component analysis. Raman spectra of activated mature DNA are especially well-discriminated from those of resting DNA. Our findings regarding the biochemical and structural changes associated with apoptosis in activated mature T cells and cellular DNA according to Raman spectroscopy provide important insights into allospecific immune responses generated after organ transplantation, and may be useful for therapeutic manipulation of the immune response.

  20. Task Analysis of Shuttle Entry and Landing Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holland, Albert W.; Vanderark, Stephen T.

    1993-01-01

    The Task Analysis of Shuttle Entry and Landing (E/L) Activities documents all tasks required to land the Orbiter following an STS mission. In addition to analysis of tasks performed, task conditions are described, including estimated time for completion, altitude, relative velocity, normal and lateral acceleration, location of controls operated or monitored, and level of g's experienced. This analysis precedes further investigations into potential effects of zero g on piloting capabilities for landing the Orbiter following long-duration missions. This includes, but is not limited to, researching the effects of extended duration missions on piloting capabilities. Four primary constraints of the analysis must be clarified: (1) the analysis depicts E/L in a static manner--the actual process is dynamic; (2) the task analysis was limited to a paper analysis, since it was not feasible to conduct research in the actual setting (i.e., observing or filming duration an actual E/L); (3) the tasks included are those required for E/L during nominal, daylight conditions; and (4) certain E/L tasks will vary according to the flying style of each commander.

  1. Investigation of seismo-electromagnetic precursors by data analysis from low earth orbiting DEMETER satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Shourabh

    One of the major technological advancements in the subjective area of space science studies has been the investigation of seismo-electromagnetic phenomena with the help of satellite based data analysis. These studies primarily refer to the electric and magnetic field perturbations occurring before earthquakes and are observable a few days to a few hours before the seismic activities. In order to encourage such investigation which could serve as a tool for studying earthquake precursors, the DEMETER satellite has been launched from in 2004 which aims at the detection of such perturbations at ionospheric level. This satellite comprises of various on-board scientific experiments to detect the electric and magnetic field perturbations, electron density and ion density characteristics in the ionosphere. In this paper, the authors intent to present some vital results pertaining to seismo-electromagnetic phenomena observed before strong seismic activities in the recent past.The measurements and data analysis have been perfromed through data from low earth orbiting DEMETER satellite. In view of the results, the authors also discuss the long term benefits of such space based investigations for understanding and complexities of natural hazards such as earthquakes.

  2. Felony Investigation Decision Model: An Analysis of Investigative Elements of Information.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenberg, Bernard; And Others

    The primary goal of research performed in Oakland, California was decision models for four felony classes--robbery, assault, with a deadly weapon, car theft, and rape--to determine cases having sufficient probability of clearance to warrant intensive investigation. A secondary objective, determination of personal-appearance and crime-event…

  3. Adult Active Transport in the Netherlands: An Analysis of Its Contribution to Physical Activity Requirements

    PubMed Central

    Fishman, Elliot; Böcker, Lars; Helbich, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Modern, urban lifestyles have engineered physical activity out of everyday life and this presents a major threat to human health. The Netherlands is a world leader in active travel, particularly cycling, but little research has sought to quantify the cumulative amount of physical activity through everyday walking and cycling. Methods Using data collected as part of the Dutch National Travel Survey (2010 – 2012), this paper determines the degree to which Dutch walking and cycling contributes to meeting minimum level of physical activity of 150 minutes of moderate intensity aerobic activity throughout the week. The sample includes 74,465 individuals who recorded at least some travel on the day surveyed. As physical activity benefits are cumulative, all walking and cycling trips are analysed, including those to and from public transport. These trips are then converted into an established measure of physical activity intensity, known as metabolic equivalents of tasks. Multivariate Tobit regression models were performed on a range of socio-demographic, transport resources, urban form and meteorological characteristics. Results The results reveal that Dutch men and women participate in 24 and 28 minutes of daily physical activity through walking and cycling, which is 41% and 55% more than the minimum recommended level. It should be noted however that some 57% of the entire sample failed to record any walking or cycling, and an investigation of this particular group serves as an important topic of future research. Active transport was positively related with age, income, bicycle ownership, urban density and air temperature. Car ownership had a strong negative relationship with physically active travel. Conclusion The results of this analysis demonstrate the significance of active transport to counter the emerging issue of sedentary lifestyle disease. The Dutch experience provides other countries with a highly relevant case study in the creation of

  4. Analysis of physical activities in Taekwondo Pumsae.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang-Bock; Cha, Eun-Jong; Lee, Tae-Soo

    2008-01-01

    Exercise is very important element for successful aging. Among many sports events, Korea is the suzerain of Taekwondo. When competing (Taekwondo Free Fighting) after learning Poomse as basic movements and inuring them, people compete with movements depending on situation. Among Poomses of Taekwondo, Taegeuk Poomse consists of very basic movements from 1 Jang to 8 Jang and they are for inuring to body. In order to prescribe Taegeuk Jang, which is the basic movement of Taekwondo that Korea is the suzerain, as an exercise for successful aging, it is necessary to analyze physical activity level of each Taegeuk Jang (From 1 Jang through 8 Jang) and suggest the same. Therefore, in this study, I analyzed physical activity level of each Jang of Taegeuk Poomse by attaching Armband made by Body Media Company on brachia and legs below knee of Taekwondo trainees. The result of the analysis of the whole momentum from Taegeuk 1 Jang to 8 Jang is as follows: First, the average absolute value of acceleration variation of vertical direction signal (L-MAD): 5.15. Second, the average absolute value of acceleration variation of horizontal direction signal (T-MAD): 3.44. Finally, the average of calorie consumption per minute (AEE/Min): 5.06 Cal. The obtained result corresponds to proper exercise condition for successful aging and it can be utilized as data for exercise prescription for the young and the old.

  5. Active polarimeter optical system laser hazard analysis.

    SciTech Connect

    Augustoni, Arnold L.

    2005-07-01

    A laser hazard analysis was performed for the SNL Active Polarimeter Optical System based on the ANSI Standard Z136.1-2000, American National Standard for Safe Use of Lasers and the ANSI Standard Z136.6-2000, American National Standard for Safe Use of Lasers Outdoors. The Active Polarimeter Optical System (APOS) uses a pulsed, near-infrared, chromium doped lithium strontium aluminum fluoride (Cr:LiSAF) crystal laser in conjunction with a holographic diffuser and lens to illuminate a scene of interest. The APOS is intended for outdoor operations. The system is mounted on a height adjustable platform (6 feet to 40 feet) and sits atop a tripod that points the beam downward. The beam can be pointed from nadir to as much as 60 degrees off of nadir producing an illuminating spot geometry that can vary from circular (at nadir) to elliptical in shape (off of nadir). The JP Innovations crystal Cr:LiSAF laser parameters are presented in section II. The illuminating laser spot size is variable and can be adjusted by adjusting the separation distance between the lens and the holographic diffuser. The system is adjusted while platform is at the lowest level. The laser spot is adjusted for a particular spot size at a particular distance (elevation) from the laser by adjusting the separation distance (d{sub diffuser}) to predetermined values. The downward pointing angle is also adjusted before the platform is raised to the selected operation elevation.

  6. Analysis of retrotransposon activity in plants.

    PubMed

    Defraia, Christopher; Slotkin, R Keith

    2014-01-01

    Retrotransposons are transposable elements that duplicate themselves by converting their transcribed RNA genome into cDNA, which is then integrated back into the genome. Retrotransposons can be divided into two major classes based on their mechanism of transposition and the presence or absence of long terminal repeats (LTRs). In contrast to mammalian genomes, in which non-LTR retrotransposons have proliferated, plant genomes show evolutionary evidence of an explosion in LTR retrotransposon copy number. These retrotransposons can comprise a large fraction of the genome (75 % in maize). Although often viewed as molecular parasites, retrotransposons have been shown to influence neighboring gene expression and play a structural and potential regulatory role in the centromere. To prevent retrotransposon activity, eukaryotic cells have evolved overlapping mechanisms to repress transposition. Plants are an excellent system for studying the mechanisms of LTR retrotransposon inhibition such as DNA methylation and small RNA-mediated degradation of retrotransposon transcripts. However, analysis of these multi-copy, mobile elements is considerably more difficult than analysis of single-copy genes located in stable regions of the genome. In this chapter we outline methods for analyzing the progress of LTR retrotransposons through their replication cycle in plants. We describe a mixture of traditional molecular biology experiments, such as Southern, Northern, and Western blotting, in addition to nontraditional techniques designed to take advantage of the specific mechanism of LTR retrotransposition.

  7. Investigation of membrane active properties and antiradical activity of gossypol and its derivatives

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    New asymmetrical derivatives of gossypol were synthesized. The antioxidant activity of gossypol and these derivatives was studied. The interaction of these compounds with modeled lipid membranes was also studied. It was found that the antioxidant effects and ability to interact with membranes was...

  8. HPTLC Analysis, Antioxidant and Antigout Activity of Indian Plants.

    PubMed

    Nile, Shivraj Hariram; Park, Se Won

    2014-01-01

    The HPTLC analysis, antioxidant, and antigout activity of Asparagus racemosus, Withania somnifera, Vitex negundo, Plumbago zeylanica, Butea monosperma and Tephrosia purpurea extracts were investigated. The chemical fingerprinting were carried out by high performance thin layer chromatography (HPTLC), antioxidant activity by ABTS, DPPH, FRAP radical scavenging assays, and antiogout activity by cow milk xanthine oxidase. The HPTLC fingerprint qualitatively revealed predominant amount of flavonoids. The TEAC values ranged from 45.80 to 140 µM trolox/100 g dry weight for ABTS, from 85 to 430 µM trolox/ 100 g dw DPPH, and 185 to 560 µM trolox/100 g dw for FRAP respectively. Plants used in this study was found to inhibit the toxicity, as seen from the decreased LPO and increased GSH, SOD and CAT levels. The total phenolic and flavonoid content ranged from 10.21 to 28.17 and 5.80 to 10.1 mg of gallic acid equivalents (GAE)/100 gdw respectively. The plant extracts demonstrated significant xanthine oxidase inhibitory activity at 100 g/mL and revealed an inhibition greater than 50 % and IC50 values below the standard. This effect was almost similar to the activity of allopurinol (Standard drug) against xanthine oxidase (90.2 ± 0.4 %). These plant root extract will be subjected for further extensive studies to isolate and identify their active constituents which are useful for against inflammation and gout. PMID:25237348

  9. Super Saver Investigators: An Elementary, Interdisciplinary, Environmental Studies Activity Guidebook about Solid Waste and Natural Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landis, David; And Others

    This is an elementary, interdisciplinary, environmental studies activity guidebook about solid waste and natural resources. "Super Saver Investigators" what solid waste is, where it is generated, how we manage it and could manage it better, and the consequence of mismanagement. It contains many hands-on, skill enhancing activities for elementary…

  10. Storm Surges. Teacher Guide and Activity Book. OEAGLS Investigation No. 25.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keir, John; Mayer, Victor J.

    This investigation is designed to help students understand storm surges on Lake Erie. Activity A includes experiments and discussions intended to help students understand what causes storm surges on Lake Erie. Activity B considers how storm surges affect water levels and, in turn, coastal areas. The student booklet contains questions, experiments,…

  11. Teachers' Beliefs Related to Activity Play in the Preschool Setting: A Phenomenological Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pisha, Lorelei Emma

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate how early childhood teachers working in Head Start programs made meaning of preschool-age children's physical activity play by exploring their personal childhood and professional experiences with physical activity play. The study was conducted to contribute research-based recommendations for…

  12. Assessing physical activity intensity by video analysis.

    PubMed

    Silva, P; Santiago, C; Reis, L P; Sousa, A; Mota, J; Welk, G

    2015-05-01

    Assessing physical activity (PA) is a challenging task and many different approaches have been proposed. Direct observation (DO) techniques can objectively code both the behavior and the context in which it occurred, however, they have significant limitations such as the cost and burden associated with collecting and processing data. Therefore, this study evaluated the utility of an automated video analysis system (CAM) designed to record and discriminate the intensity of PA using a subject tracking methodology. The relative utility of the CAM system and DO were compared with criterion data from an objective accelerometry-based device (Actigraph GT3X+). Eight 10 year old children (three girls and five boys) wore the GT3X+ during a standard basketball session. PA was analyzed by two observers using the SOPLAY instrument and by the CAM system. The GT3X+ and the CAM were both set up to collect data at 30 Hz while the DO was performed every two minutes, with 10 s of observation for each gender. The GT3X+ was processed using cut points by Evanson and the outcome measure was the percentage of time spent in different intensities of PA. The CAM data were processed similarly using the same speed thresholds as were used in establishing the Evenson cut-off points (light: <2 mph; walking: 2-4 mph; very active: >4 mph). Similar outcomes were computed from the SOPLAY default analyses. A chi-square test was used to test differences in the percentage of time at the three intensity zones (light, walking and very active). The Yates' correction was used to prevent overestimation of statistical significance for small data. When compared with GT3X+, the CAM had better results than the SOPLAY. The chi-square test yielded the following pairwise comparisons: CAM versus GT3x+ was χ(2) (5) = 24.18, p < .001; SOPLAY2 versus GT3x+ was χ(2) (5) = 144.44, p < .001; SOPLAY1 versus GT3x+ was χ(2) (5) = 119.55, p < .001. The differences were smaller between CAM and GT3x

  13. Structural Analysis for the American Airlines Flight 587 Accident Investigation: Global Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Richard D.; Lovejoy, Andrew E.; Hilburger, Mark W.; Moore, David F.

    2005-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) supported the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) in the American Airlines Flight 587 accident investigation due to LaRC's expertise in high-fidelity structural analysis and testing of composite structures and materials. A Global Analysis Team from LaRC reviewed the manufacturer s design and certification procedures, developed finite element models and conducted structural analyses, and participated jointly with the NTSB and Airbus in subcomponent tests conducted at Airbus in Hamburg, Germany. The Global Analysis Team identified no significant or obvious deficiencies in the Airbus certification and design methods. Analysis results from the LaRC team indicated that the most-likely failure scenario was failure initiation at the right rear main attachment fitting (lug), followed by an unstable progression of failure of all fin-to-fuselage attachments and separation of the VTP from the aircraft. Additionally, analysis results indicated that failure initiates at the final observed maximum fin loading condition in the accident, when the VTP was subjected to loads that were at minimum 1.92 times the design limit load condition for certification. For certification, the VTP is only required to support loads of 1.5 times design limit load without catastrophic failure. The maximum loading during the accident was shown to significantly exceed the certification requirement. Thus, the structure appeared to perform in a manner consistent with its design and certification, and failure is attributed to VTP loads greater than expected.

  14. A Comparative Investigation of Rotation Criteria within Exploratory Factor Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sass, Daniel A.; Schmitt, Thomas A.

    2010-01-01

    Exploratory factor analysis (EFA) is a commonly used statistical technique for examining the relationships between variables (e.g., items) and the factors (e.g., latent traits) they depict. There are several decisions that must be made when using EFA, with one of the more important being choice of the rotation criterion. This selection can be…

  15. Implementation of objective activity monitoring to supplement the interpretation of ambulatory esophageal PH investigations.

    PubMed

    Kwasnicki, R M; Ley Greaves, R; Ali, R; Gummett, P A; Yang, G Z; Darzi, A; Hoare, J

    2016-04-01

    Conventional catheter-based systems used for ambulatory esophageal pH monitoring have been reported to affect patient behavior. As physical activity has been associated with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), there is a risk that abnormal behavior will degrade the value of this diagnostic investigation and consequent management strategies. The aim of this study was to quantify the effect of conventional pH monitoring on behavior and to investigate the temporal association between activity and reflux. A total of 20 patients listed for 24 hours pH monitoring underwent activity monitoring using a lightweight ear-worn accelerometer (e-AR sensor, Imperial College London) 2 days prior to, and during their investigation. PH was measured and recorded using a conventional nasogastric catheter and waist-worn receiver. Daily activity levels, including subject-specific activity intensity quartiles, were calculated and compared. Physical activity was added to the standard pH output to supplement interpretation. Average patient activity levels decreased by 26.5% during pH monitoring (range -4.5 to 51.0%, P = 0.036). High-intensity activity decreased by 24.4% (range -4.0 to 75.6%, P = 0.036), and restful activity increased on average by 34% although this failed to reach statistical significance (-24.0 to 289.2%, P = 0.161). Some patients exhibited consistent associations between bouts of activity and acidic episodes. The results of this study support the previously reported reduction in activity during ambulatory esophageal pH monitoring, with the added reliability of objective data. In the absence of more pervasive pH monitoring systems (e.g. wireless), quantifying activity changes in the setting of activity-induced reflux might guide the physicians' interpretation of patient DeMeester scores resulting in more appropriate management of GERD.

  16. Activation Likelihood Estimation meta-analysis revisited

    PubMed Central

    Eickhoff, Simon B.; Bzdok, Danilo; Laird, Angela R.; Kurth, Florian; Fox, Peter T.

    2011-01-01

    A widely used technique for coordinate-based meta-analysis of neuroimaging data is activation likelihood estimation (ALE), which determines the convergence of foci reported from different experiments. ALE analysis involves modelling these foci as probability distributions whose width is based on empirical estimates of the spatial uncertainty due to the between-subject and between-template variability of neuroimaging data. ALE results are assessed against a null-distribution of random spatial association between experiments, resulting in random-effects inference. In the present revision of this algorithm, we address two remaining drawbacks of the previous algorithm. First, the assessment of spatial association between experiments was based on a highly time-consuming permutation test, which nevertheless entailed the danger of underestimating the right tail of the null-distribution. In this report, we outline how this previous approach may be replaced by a faster and more precise analytical method. Second, the previously applied correction procedure, i.e. controlling the false discovery rate (FDR), is supplemented by new approaches for correcting the family-wise error rate and the cluster-level significance. The different alternatives for drawing inference on meta-analytic results are evaluated on an exemplary dataset on face perception as well as discussed with respect to their methodological limitations and advantages. In summary, we thus replaced the previous permutation algorithm with a faster and more rigorous analytical solution for the null-distribution and comprehensively address the issue of multiple-comparison corrections. The proposed revision of the ALE-algorithm should provide an improved tool for conducting coordinate-based meta-analyses on functional imaging data. PMID:21963913

  17. The landing flare: An analysis and flight-test investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seckel, E.

    1975-01-01

    Results are given of an extensive investigation of conventional landing flares in general aviation type airplanes. A wide range of parameters influencing flare behavior are simulated in experimental landings in a variable-stability Navion. The most important feature of the flare is found to be the airplane's deceleration in the flare. Various effects on this are correlated in terms of the average flare load factor. Piloting technique is extensively discussed. Design criteria are presented.

  18. Pilot Workload and Speech Analysis: A Preliminary Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bittner, Rachel M.; Begault, Durand R.; Christopher, Bonny R.

    2013-01-01

    Prior research has questioned the effectiveness of speech analysis to measure the stress, workload, truthfulness, or emotional state of a talker. The question remains regarding the utility of speech analysis for restricted vocabularies such as those used in aviation communications. A part-task experiment was conducted in which participants performed Air Traffic Control read-backs in different workload environments. Participant's subjective workload and the speech qualities of fundamental frequency (F0) and articulation rate were evaluated. A significant increase in subjective workload rating was found for high workload segments. F0 was found to be significantly higher during high workload while articulation rates were found to be significantly slower. No correlation was found to exist between subjective workload and F0 or articulation rate.

  19. Investigation of Periodic Nuclear Decay Data with Spectral Analysis Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javorsek, D.; Sturrock, P.; Buncher, J.; Fischbach, E.; Gruenwald, T.; Hoft, A.; Horan, T.; Jenkins, J.; Kerford, J.; Lee, R.; Mattes, J.; Morris, D.; Mudry, R.; Newport, J.; Petrelli, M.; Silver, M.; Stewart, C.; Terry, B.; Willenberg, H.

    2009-12-01

    We provide the results from a spectral analysis of nuclear decay experiments displaying unexplained periodic fluctuations. The analyzed data was from 56Mn decay reported by the Children's Nutrition Research Center in Houston, 32Si decay reported by an experiment performed at the Brookhaven National Laboratory, and 226Ra decay reported by an experiment performed at the Physikalisch-Technische-Bundesanstalt in Germany. All three data sets possess the same primary frequency mode consisting of an annual period. Additionally a spectral comparison of the local ambient temperature, atmospheric pressure, relative humidity, Earth-Sun distance, and the plasma speed and latitude of the heliospheric current sheet (HCS) was performed. Following analysis of these six possible causal factors, their reciprocals, and their linear combinations, a possible link between nuclear decay rate fluctuations and the linear combination of the HCS latitude and 1/R motivates searching for a possible mechanism with such properties.

  20. Eye movement analysis for activity recognition using electrooculography.

    PubMed

    Bulling, Andreas; Ward, Jamie A; Gellersen, Hans; Tröster, Gerhard

    2011-04-01

    In this work, we investigate eye movement analysis as a new sensing modality for activity recognition. Eye movement data were recorded using an electrooculography (EOG) system. We first describe and evaluate algorithms for detecting three eye movement characteristics from EOG signals-saccades, fixations, and blinks-and propose a method for assessing repetitive patterns of eye movements. We then devise 90 different features based on these characteristics and select a subset of them using minimum redundancy maximum relevance (mRMR) feature selection. We validate the method using an eight participant study in an office environment using an example set of five activity classes: copying a text, reading a printed paper, taking handwritten notes, watching a video, and browsing the Web. We also include periods with no specific activity (the NULL class). Using a support vector machine (SVM) classifier and person-independent (leave-one-person-out) training, we obtain an average precision of 76.1 percent and recall of 70.5 percent over all classes and participants. The work demonstrates the promise of eye-based activity recognition (EAR) and opens up discussion on the wider applicability of EAR to other activities that are difficult, or even impossible, to detect using common sensing modalities.

  1. Extending methods: using Bourdieu's field analysis to further investigate taste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schindel Dimick, Alexandra

    2015-06-01

    In this commentary on Per Anderhag, Per-Olof Wickman and Karim Hamza's article Signs of taste for science, I consider how their study is situated within the concern for the role of science education in the social and cultural production of inequality. Their article provides a finely detailed methodology for analyzing the constitution of taste within science education classrooms. Nevertheless, because the authors' socially situated methodology draws upon Bourdieu's theories, it seems equally important to extend these methods to consider how and why students make particular distinctions within a relational context—a key aspect of Bourdieu's theory of cultural production. By situating the constitution of taste within Bourdieu's field analysis, researchers can explore the ways in which students' tastes and social positionings are established and transformed through time, space, place, and their ability to navigate the field. I describe the process of field analysis in relation to the authors' paper and suggest that combining the authors' methods with a field analysis can provide a strong methodological and analytical framework in which theory and methods combine to create a detailed understanding of students' interest in relation to their context.

  2. Synthesis, characterization, investigation of biological activity and theoretical studies of hydrazone compounds containing choloroacetyl group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cukurovali, Alaaddin; Yilmaz, Engin

    2014-10-01

    In this study, three new hydrazide-hydrazone derivative compounds which contain choloroacetyl group have been synthesized and characterized. In the characterization, spectral techniques such as IR, 1H NMR, 13C NMR and UV-Vis spectroscopy techniques were used. Antibacterial effects of the synthesized compounds were investigated against Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 29213, Enterococcus faecalis ATCC 29212, Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 27853. In the theoretical calculations Gaussian 09 software was used with the DFT/6-311+(d,p) basis set. Experimental X-ray analysis of compounds has not been studied. Theoretical bond lengths of synthesized compounds were compared with experimental bond lengths of a similar compound. Theoretical and experimental bond lengths are in good agreement with R2: 0.896, 0.899 and 0.900 for compounds 1, 2, and 3, respectively. For antibacterial activity, the most effective one was found to be N‧-(4-bromobenzylidene)-2-chloro-N-(4-(3-methyl-3-phenylcyclobutyl)-thiazol-2-yl) acetohydrazide against P.aeroginaosa ATTC 27853, among the studied compounds.

  3. Hi-C Observations of an Active Region Corona, and Investigation of the Underlying Magnetic Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiwari, S. K.; Alexander, C. E.; Winebarger, A.; Moore, R. L.

    2014-01-01

    The solar corona is much hotter (>=10(exp 6) K) than its surface (approx 6000 K), puzzling astrophysicists for several decades. Active region (AR) corona is again hotter than the quiet Sun (QS) corona by a factor of 4-10. The most widely accepted mechanism that could heat the active region corona is the energy release by current dissipation via reconnection of braided magnetic field structure, first proposed by E. N. Parker three decades ago. The first observational evidence for this mechanism has only recently been presented by Cirtain et al. by using High-resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C) observations of an AR corona at a spatial resolution of 0.2 arcsec, which is required to resolve the coronal loops, and was not available before the rocket flight of Hi-C in July 2012. The Hi-C project is led by NASA/MSFC. In the case of the QS, work done by convection/granulation on the inter-granular feet of the coronal field lines translates into the heat observed in the corona. In the case of the AR, as here, there could be flux emergence, cancellation/submergence, or shear flows generating large stress and tension in coronal field loops which is released as heat in the corona. We are currently investigating the changes taking place in photospheric feet of the magnetic field involved with brightenings in the Hi-C AR corona. For this purpose, we are also using SDO/AIA data of +/- 2 hours around the 5 minutes Hi-C flight. In the present talk, I will first summarize some of the results of the Hi-C observations and then present some results from our recent analysis on what photospheric processes feed the magnetic energy that dissipates into heat in coronal loops.

  4. Dynamic analysis of a motorbike engine timing system: Experimental and numerical investigation of the geartrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivola, Alessandro; Troncossi, Marco

    2014-10-01

    The development of high-performance vehicle engines requires advanced investigations in order to provide engineers with proper analysis tools to optimize the system design. The elastodynamic behaviour of the engine powertrain may be critical at high velocities (when the flexibility of the system components can have a major role on the overall performance) with consequences on the valve timing and the transmission of dynamic loads. A thorough numerical/experimental investigation was performed on the timing system of a racing motorbike engine. The timing system included the geartrain, which transmits power from the crankshaft to the camshafts, and the valve train, formed by the camshafts and the cam-follower mechanisms for the valve actuation. An experimental campaign was designed and carried out with the purpose of inspecting the timing system behaviour for different velocities and different design parameters. A numerical model was developed in order to provide a simulation/analysis tool that permits the design optimization of the main system components. The present work focuses on the geartrain elastodynamic analysis, which is the main novelty of a long-lasting activity carried out by the authors in collaborations with Ducati Motor Holding S.p.a. (Bologna, Italy). The experimental campaign, the model development and validation, and some simulation results are reported and discussed.

  5. Investigating primary marine aerosol properties: CCN activity of sea salt and mixed particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, S. M.; Butcher, A. C.; Rosenoern, T.; Coz, E.; Lieke, K. I.; de Leeuw, G.; Nilsson, E. D.; Bilde, M.

    2012-04-01

    Sea salt particles ejected as a result of bubbles bursting from artificial seawater in a closed stainless steel tank were sampled for size distribution, morphology, and cloud condensation nucleus (CCN) activity. The two-component artificial seawater consisted of salt, either NaCl or sea salt, and one organic compound in deionized water. Several organic molecules representative of oceanic organic matter were investigated. Bubbles were generated either by aeration through a porous diffuser or by water jet impingement on the surface of the artificial seawater. The effect of bubble lifetime, which was controlled by varying the depth of the diffuser in the water column, on particle size and CCN activity was investigated and was found to be insignificant for the organic compounds studied. The CCN activities of particles produced from diffuser-generated bubbles were generally governed by the high hygroscopicity of salt, such that activation was indistinguishable from that of salt, except in the case of very low mass ratio of salt to organic matter in the seawater solution. There was, however, a considerable decrease in CCN activity for particles produced from jet impingement on seawater that had a salinity of 10‰ and contained 0.45 mM of sodium laurate, an organic surfactant. The production of a thick foam layer from impingement may explain the difference in activation and supports hypotheses that particle production from the two methods of generating bubbles is not similar. Accurate conclusions from observed CCN activities of particles from artificial seawater containing organic matter require knowledge of the CCN activity of the inorganic component, especially as a small amount of the inorganic can heavily influence activation. Therefore, the CCN activity of both artificial sea salt and NaCl were measured and compared. Part of the discrepancy observed between the CCN activities of the two salts may be due to morphological differences, which were investigated using

  6. Analysis of mitogen-activated protein kinase activity in yeast.

    PubMed

    Elion, Elaine A; Sahoo, Rupam

    2010-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases play central roles in transmitting extracellular and intracellular information in a wide variety of situations in eukaryotic cells. Their activities are perturbed in a large number of diseases, and their activating kinases are currently therapeutic targets in cancer. MAPKs are highly conserved among all eukaryotes. MAPKs were first cloned from the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Yeast has five MAPKs and one MAPK-like kinase. The mating MAPK Fus3 is the best characterized yeast MAPK. Members of all subfamilies of human MAPKs can functionally substitute S. cerevisiae MAPKs, providing systems to use genetic approaches to study the functions of either yeast or human MAPKs and to identify functionally relevant amino acid residues that enhance or reduce the effects of therapeutically relevant inhibitors and regulatory proteins. Here, we describe an assay to measure Fus3 activity in immune complexes prepared from S. cerevisiae extracts. The assay conditions are applicable to other MAPKs, as well. PMID:20811996

  7. Hydrochemical investigations and correlation analysis of groundwater quality.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Anita; Seth, Gita

    2011-04-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate the water quality of Sambhar lake city (India) and its adjoining areas. Groundwater samples from hand pumps and tube wells of fifteen sampling stations were analyzed during post-monsoon session with the help of standard methods of APHA. The analytical results showed higher concentrations of TDS, EC, Sodium, Nitrate, Sulphate and Fluoride, which indicate signs of deterioration but values of pH, Calcium, Magnesium, TH and Carbonate were found within permissible limits as per the WHO standards. From correlation analysis it was observed that very strong correlations exist between Na+ and Cl- (0.99) as well as EC and Cl-. From Hill-piper trilinear diagram it is observed that the majority of groundwater from sampling stations was sodium-potassium-chloride-sulphate type water. The values of sodium absorption ratio and EC of groundwater were plotted in the US salinity laboratory diagram of irrigation water. Only one sample was found to fall in C3S1 quality with high salinity hazard and low sodium hazard. Another samples were found to fall in high salinity hazard and high sodium hazard. Chemical analysis of groundwater showed that mean concentration of cation is in order sodium > magnesium > calcium > potassium while for the anion it is chloride > bicarbonate > nitrate > sulphate. PMID:23033697

  8. [Radiobiological analysis of cancerogenic risk values in radioepidemiological investigations].

    PubMed

    Rozhdestvenskiĭ, L M

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the present article consisted in critical analysis of the epidemiological approach to radiocancerogenic risk estimation in region of low level radiation (LLR). The estimation is making by means of mathematician models that ignore a principal difference in biological action of LLR and high level radiation (HLR). The main formal characteristic of LLR action is the presence of a plateau in beginning of a dose-effect curve of radiogenic risk. It may be argued by the following positions: repeating the plateau-phenomenon on various radiobiological effects, in different tests and bioobjects, first; a paradoxical trend of reciprocal ERR/Sv increasing regarding dose decreasing in region of plateau, second, and third, the increasing of the curvature in dose-effect curve beginning. The presence of a plateau is associated with the presence of a real radiogenic risk threshold. Besides, the analysis of processes influencing significantly the dynamics of initial radiation injury of biologically important macromolecules showed the preference in region of LLR those, decreasing/eliminating genome damages. There is follows from mentioned above a necessity to evaluate radiogenic risks in LLR region separately from HLR region. PMID:18825986

  9. Investigation of computer-aided colonic crypt pattern analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Xin; Pan, Yinsheng; Sivak, Michael V., Jr.; Olowe, Kayode; Rollins, Andrew M.

    2007-02-01

    Colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related death in the United States. Approximately 50% of these deaths could be prevented by earlier detection through screening. Magnification chromoendoscopy is a technique which utilizes tissue stains applied to the gastrointestinal mucosa and high-magnification endoscopy to better visualize and characterize lesions. Prior studies have shown that shapes of colonic crypts change with disease and show characteristic patterns. Current methods for assessing colonic crypt patterns are somewhat subjective and not standardized. Computerized algorithms could be used to standardize colonic crypt pattern assessment. We have imaged resected colonic mucosa in vitro (N = 70) using methylene blue dye and a surgical microscope to approximately simulate in vivo imaging with magnification chromoendoscopy. We have developed a method of computerized processing to analyze the crypt patterns in the images. The quantitative image analysis consists of three steps. First, the crypts within the region of interest of colonic tissue are semi-automatically segmented using watershed morphological processing. Second, crypt size and shape parameters are extracted from the segmented crypts. Third, each sample is assigned to a category according to the Kudo criteria. The computerized classification is validated by comparison with human classification using the Kudo classification criteria. The computerized colonic crypt pattern analysis algorithm will enable a study of in vivo magnification chromoendoscopy of colonic crypt pattern correlated with risk of colorectal cancer. This study will assess the feasibility of screening and surveillance of the colon using magnification chromoendoscopy.

  10. [Investigation and analysis of China residents' environmental conservation desire].

    PubMed

    Cao, Shi-Xiong; Chen, Jun; Chen, Li; Gao, Wang-Sheng; Yin, Hong-Wei

    2007-09-01

    From the viewpoints of country's safety and residents' desire, this paper investigated and analyzed the factors affecting China residents' attitudes on environmental protection policies, and the implementing results of these polices. It was indicated that people have an enhanced consciousness on environmental protection, and the relations between this consciousness and economic growth fit Kuznets curve, because most of the poor people are living in the suburban or remote regions with bad or seriously degraded environment, while the fast development of urbanization accelerates the deterioration of urban environment. People are more concerned about environment deterioration, and support the governments' policies of environmental conservation. The environment policy-making should put more emphasis on developing economics, strengthening education, and improving residents' livelihood.

  11. Investigation on interaction of prulifloxacin with pepsin: A spectroscopic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yabei; Yan, Jie; Liu, Benzhi; Yu, Zhang; Gao, Xiaoyan; Tang, Yingcai; Zi, Yanqin

    2010-03-01

    The interaction between prulifloxacin, a kind of new oral taking antibiotic and pepsin, a kind of enzyme in the stomach has been investigated in vitro under a simulated physiological condition by different spectroscopic methods. The intrinsic fluorescence of pepsin was strongly quenched by prulifloxacin. This effect was rationalized in terms of a static quenching procedure. The binding parameters have been evaluated by fluorescence quenching methods. The negative value of Δ G0 reveals that the binding process is a spontaneous process. The binding distance R between donor (pepsin) and acceptor (prulifloxacin) was obtained according to the Förster's resonance energy transfer theory and found to be 0.95 nm. The results obtained herein will be of biological significance in pharmacology and clinical medicine.

  12. Investigating the recheck rules for urine analysis in children.

    PubMed

    He, Y M; Yao, S W; Huang, Y J; Liang, B S; Liu, H Y

    2016-04-25

    The aim of this study was to establish recheck rules of urinalysis in children by investigating the concordance rate of the results obtained using the LabUMat urine dry chemistry analyzer (referred to as dry chemistry) and the UriSed tangible composition analyzer with that of the microscopic examination. First, 1040 urine samples from children (mean age 6.5 years) were analyzed using LabUMat and UriSed analyzers, and subsequently subjected to microscopic examination. The missed detection rate was evaluated and recheck rules were established to avoid missed diagnoses of abnormal renal function. Finally, clinical validations of the recheck rules were performed on 200 additional specimens. Among the samples used to investigate the recheck rules, the samples with positive microscopic examination results accounted for 58.65% of the total, while the samples with negative results accounted for 41.35%. Of the positive samples, a major portion (>50%) were RBC positive. The samples that were WBC positive and CAST positive accounted for 23.08 and 7.69%, respectively. The concordance rate was 87.5% and the missed detection rate was 2.9%. For the validation of the recheck rules in 200 urine samples, the concordance rate was 87.5% and the missed detection rate was 2.4%. When the detection of occult blood, WBC, and protein by dry chemistry, and the detection of RBC, WBC, and CAST by the UriSed analyzer are inconsistent, or the differences between them greater than 2 levels, recheck by microscopic examination is suggested.

  13. Preliminary investigation of a sealed, remotely activated silver-zinc battery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheat, C. G.

    1977-01-01

    Methods necessary to provide a remotely activated, silver zinc battery capable of an extended activated stand while in a sealed condition were investigated. These requirements were to be accomplished in a battery package demonstrating an energy density of at least 35 watt hours per pound. Several methods of gas suppression were considered in view of the primary nature of this unit and utilized the electroplated dendritic zinc electrode. Amalgamation of the electrode provided the greatest suppression of gas at the zinc electrode. The approach to extending the activated stand capability of the remotely activated battery was through evaluation of three basic methods of remote, multi-cell activation; 1) the electrolyte manifold, 2) the gas manifold and 3) the individual cell. All three methods of activation can be incorporated into units which will meet the minimum energy density requirement.

  14. Investigation of thiol derivatized gold nanoparticle sensors for gas analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephens, Jared S.

    Analysis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in air and exhaled breath by sensor array is a very useful testing technique. It can provide non-invasive, fast, inexpensive testing for many diseases. Breath analysis has been very successful in identifying cancer and other diseases by using a chemiresistor sensor or array with gold nanoparticles to detect biomarkers. Acetone is a biomarker for diabetes and having a portable testing device could help to monitor diabetic and therapeutic progress. An advantage to this testing method is it is conducted at room temperature instead of 200 degrees Celsius. 3. The objective of this research is to determine the effect of thiol derivatized gold nanoparticles based on sensor(s) detection of VOCs. The VOCs to be tested are acetone, ethanol, and a mixture of acetone and ethanol. Each chip is tested under all three VOCs and three concentration levels (0.1, 1, and 5.0 ppm). VOC samples are used to test the sensors' ability to detect and differentiate VOCs. Sensors (also referred to as a chip) are prepared using several types of thiol derivatized gold nanoparticles. The factors are: thiol compound and molar volume loading of the thiol in synthesis. The average resistance results are used to determine the VOC selectivity of the sensors tested. The results show a trend of increasing resistance as VOC concentration is increased relative to dry air; which is used as baseline for VOCs. Several sensors show a high selectivity to one or more VOCs. Overall the 57 micromoles of 4-methoxy-toluenethiol sensor shows the strongest selectivity for VOCs tested. 3. Gerfen, Kurt. 2012. Detection of Acetone in Air Using Silver Ion Exchanged ZSM-5 and Zinc Oxide Sensing Films. Master of Science thesis, University of Louisville.

  15. Subterranean Sympatry: An Investigation into Diet Using Stable Isotope Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Robb, Gillian N.; Woodborne, Stephan; Bennett, Nigel C.

    2012-01-01

    In the Western Cape three species of mole-rat occur in sympatry, however, little is known about differences in their dietary preferences. Dietary composition of the three species; the common mole-rat (Cryptomys hottentotus hottentotus), the Cape mole-rat (Georychus capensis) and the Cape dune mole-rat (Bathyergus suillus) were examined using stable isotope analysis. Blood, fur and claw samples were collected from 70 mole-rats, in addition to several potential food items, to assess food selection of the three species under natural conditions. Overall there was a significant difference in the isotopic composition (δ13C and δ15N) between all three species and significant differences in their diet composition. There were also significant differences between tissues in all three species suggesting temporal variation in diet. The small size and colonial lifestyle of C. h. hottentotus allows it to feed almost 100% on bulbs, while the solitary and larger species G. capensis and B. suillus fed to a greater extent on other resources such as grasses and clover. B. suillus, the largest of the species, had the most generalized diet. However, overall all species relied most heavily upon geophytes and consumed the same species suggesting competition for resources could exist. We also showed a high level of individual variation in diet choices. This was most pronounced in B. suillus and G. capensis and less so in C. h. hottentotus. We demonstrate that stable isotope analysis can successfully be applied to examine dietary patterns in subterranean mammals and provide insights into foraging patterns and dietary variation at both the inter and intra population level. PMID:23139795

  16. The 5 alpha-reductase inhibitory components from heartwood of Artocarpus incisus: structure-activity investigations.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, K; Fukuda, M; Kondo, R; Sakai, K

    2000-02-01

    The methanol extract of heartwood of Artocarpus incisus showed potent 5 alpha-reductase inhibitory activity. We investigated the 5 alpha-reductase inhibitory effects of nine compounds isolated from A. incisus. Chlorophorin (IC50 = 37 microM) and artocarpin (IC50 = 85 microM) showed more potent inhibitory effects than did alpha-linolenic acid, which is known as a naturally occurring potent inhibitor. Structure-activity investigations suggested that the presence of an isoprene substituent (prenyl and geranyl) would enhance 5 alpha-reductase inhibitory effects.

  17. [Kinetic analysis of additive effect on desulfurization activity].

    PubMed

    Han, Kui-hua; Zhao, Jian-li; Lu, Chun-mei; Wang, Yong-zheng; Zhao, Gai-ju; Cheng, Shi-qing

    2006-02-01

    The additive effects of A12O3, Fe2O3 and MnCO3 on CaO sulfation kinetics were investigated by thermogravimetic analysis method and modified grain model. The activation energy (Ea) and the pre-exponential factor (k0) of surface reaction, the activation energy (Ep) and the pre-exponential factor (D0) of product layer diffusion reaction were calculated according to the model. Additions of MnCO3 can enhance the initial reaction rate, product layer diffusion and the final CaO conversion of sorbents, the effect mechanism of which is similar to that of Fe2O3. The method based isokinetic temperature Ts and activation energy can not estimate the contribution of additive to the sulfation reactivity, the rate constant of the surface reaction (k), and the effective diffusivity of reactant in the product layer (Ds) under certain experimental conditions can reflect the effect of additives on the activation. Unstoichiometric metal oxide may catalyze the surface reaction and promote the diffusivity of reactant in the product layer by the crystal defect and distinct diffusion of cation and anion. According to the mechanism and effect of additive on the sulfation, the effective temperature and the stoichiometric relation of reaction, it is possible to improve the utilization of sorbent by compounding more additives to the calcium-based sorbent.

  18. Investigation of Biological Soil Crusts Metabolic Webs Using Exometabolomic Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Northen, T.; Karaoz, U.; Jenkins, S.; Lau, R.; Bowen, B.; Cadillo-Quiroz, H.; Garcia-Pichel, F.; Brodie, E.; Richard, B.

    2014-12-01

    Desert biological soil crusts are simple cyanobacteria-dominated surface soil microbial communities found in areas with infrequent wetting, often extreme temperatures, low coverage of vascular plants and constitute the world's largest biofilm. They exist for extended periods in a desiccated dormant state, yet rapidly re-boot metabolism within minutes of wetting. These soil microbial communities are highly dependent on filamentous cyanobacteria such as Microcoleus vaginatusto stabilize the soil and to act as primary producers for the community through the release carbon sources to feed a diversity of heterotrophs. Exometabolomic analysis was performed using liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry on biological soil crust pore water and spent media of key soil bacterial isolates. Comparison of spent vs. fresh media was used to determine uptake or release of metabolites by specific microbes. To link pore water experiments with isolate studies, metabolite extracts of authentic soil were used as supplements for isolate exometabolomic profiling. Our soil metabolomics methods detected hundreds of metabolites from soils including may novel compounds. Only a small set of which being targeted by all isolates. Beyond these few metabolites, the individual bacteria examined showed specialization towards specific metabolites. Surprisingly, many of the most abundant oligosaccharides and other metabolites were ignored by these isolates. The observed specialization of biological soil crust bacteria may play a significant role in determining community structure.

  19. Investigation and analysis of microbiological communities in natural Ophiocordyceps sinensis.

    PubMed

    Xia, Fei; Liu, Yan; Shen, Guang-Rong; Guo, Lian-Xian; Zhou, Xuan-Wei

    2015-02-01

    Ophiocordyceps sinensis is a fungus that parasitizes caterpillars, and more than 30 species of filamentous fungi have been isolated from its fruiting body. However, its microbiological diversity remains unclear. Based on the clone library and quantitative PCR techniques, the bacterial flora and mycobiota of 3 different samples (larva, stromata/sclerotia, and surface soil) from natural O. sinensis specimens were investigated using primer sets that targeted the 16S rRNA gene and internal transcribed spacer region of ribosomal DNA. The results showed that the abundance of bacterial and fungal communities in the soil attached to the surface of O. sinensis was (6.4 ± 1.4) × 10(6) and (6.0 ± 0.3) × 10(7) copies/g dry matter, respectively, which was the highest compared with that in the larva and stromal samples. The main groups of bacteria in the O. sinensis samples were Proteobacteria and Actinobacteria, while Ascomycota was the most dominant fungal group in the 3 samples. At the genus level, Geomyces, Phoma, and Trichocladium were the dominant genera in the larval sample, while Geomyces and Cladosporium were the dominant genera in the stromal sample. In conclusion, a great number of bacterial and fungal species were present in naturally occurring O. sinensis specimens, and there was a high diversity of bacterial and fungal communities. These findings contribute to the understanding of the bacterial and fungal community structure of this valuable medicinal fungus and lay the foundation for the future discovery of new medicinal microorganism resources.

  20. Investigation and analysis of microbiological communities in natural Ophiocordyceps sinensis.

    PubMed

    Xia, Fei; Liu, Yan; Shen, Guang-Rong; Guo, Lian-Xian; Zhou, Xuan-Wei

    2015-02-01

    Ophiocordyceps sinensis is a fungus that parasitizes caterpillars, and more than 30 species of filamentous fungi have been isolated from its fruiting body. However, its microbiological diversity remains unclear. Based on the clone library and quantitative PCR techniques, the bacterial flora and mycobiota of 3 different samples (larva, stromata/sclerotia, and surface soil) from natural O. sinensis specimens were investigated using primer sets that targeted the 16S rRNA gene and internal transcribed spacer region of ribosomal DNA. The results showed that the abundance of bacterial and fungal communities in the soil attached to the surface of O. sinensis was (6.4 ± 1.4) × 10(6) and (6.0 ± 0.3) × 10(7) copies/g dry matter, respectively, which was the highest compared with that in the larva and stromal samples. The main groups of bacteria in the O. sinensis samples were Proteobacteria and Actinobacteria, while Ascomycota was the most dominant fungal group in the 3 samples. At the genus level, Geomyces, Phoma, and Trichocladium were the dominant genera in the larval sample, while Geomyces and Cladosporium were the dominant genera in the stromal sample. In conclusion, a great number of bacterial and fungal species were present in naturally occurring O. sinensis specimens, and there was a high diversity of bacterial and fungal communities. These findings contribute to the understanding of the bacterial and fungal community structure of this valuable medicinal fungus and lay the foundation for the future discovery of new medicinal microorganism resources. PMID:25578897

  1. Echicetin Coated Polystyrene Beads: A Novel Tool to Investigate GPIb-Specific Platelet Activation and Aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Petunin, Alexey; Clemetson, Kenneth J.; Gambaryan, Stepan; Walter, Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    von Willebrand factor/ristocetin (vWF/R) induces GPIb-dependent platelet agglutination and activation of αIIbβ3 integrin, which also binds vWF. These conditions make it difficult to investigate GPIb-specific signaling pathways in washed platelets. Here, we investigated the specific mechanisms of GPIb signaling using echicetin-coated polystyrene beads, which specifically activate GPIb. We compared platelet activation induced by echicetin beads to vWF/R. Human platelets were stimulated with polystyrene beads coated with increasing amounts of echicetin and platelet activation by echicetin beads was then investigated to reveal GPIb specific signaling. Echicetin beads induced αIIbβ3-dependent aggregation of washed platelets, while under the same conditions vWF/R treatment led only to αIIbβ3-independent platelet agglutination. The average distance between the echicetin molecules on the polystyrene beads must be less than 7 nm for full platelet activation, while the total amount of echicetin used for activation is not critical. Echicetin beads induced strong phosphorylation of several proteins including p38, ERK and PKB. Synergistic signaling via P2Y12 and thromboxane receptor through secreted ADP and TxA2, respectively, were important for echicetin bead triggered platelet activation. Activation of PKG by the NO/sGC/cGMP pathway inhibited echicetin bead-induced platelet aggregation. Echicetin-coated beads are powerful and reliable tools to study signaling in human platelets activated solely via GPIb and GPIb-triggered pathways. PMID:24705415

  2. Investigating the performance of CoxOy/activated carbon catalysts for ethyl acetate catalytic combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Hongmei; Zhao, Xiaoping; Zhou, Guilin; He, Xiaoling; Lan, Hai; Jiang, Zongxuan

    2015-01-01

    The catalytic properties of Co-supported activated carbon (AC) catalysts for ethyl acetate catalytic elimination in air were investigated. Results showed that air atmosphere promoted the generation of high-valence state cobalt oxides, and promote the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the Co3O4/AC catalyst. ROS crucially functioned in improving the catalytic activity of Co3O4/AC catalysts. Therefore, CoACA catalyst prepared in air exhibited higher catalytic activity than CoACN catalyst prepared in nitrogen, and CoACA catalyst led to high ethyl acetate conversion (>93%) and stability at a low reaction temperature (210 °C).

  3. Intruder Activity Analysis under Unreliable Sensor Networks

    SciTech Connect

    Tae-Sic Yoo; Humberto E. Garcia

    2007-09-01

    This paper addresses the problem of counting intruder activities within a monitored domain by a sensor network. The deployed sensors are unreliable. We characterize imperfect sensors with misdetection and false-alarm probabilities. We model intruder activities with Markov Chains. A set of Hidden Markov Models (HMM) models the imperfect sensors and intruder activities to be monitored. A novel sequential change detection/isolation algorithm is developed to detect and isolate a change from an HMM representing no intruder activity to another HMM representing some intruder activities. Procedures for estimating the entry time and the trace of intruder activities are developed. A domain monitoring example is given to illustrate the presented concepts and computational procedures.

  4. Effectiveness of Physical Activity Interventions for Preschoolers: A Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Elliott S.; Tucker, Patricia; Burke, Shauna M.; Carron, Albert V.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the meta-analysis was to examine the effectiveness of physical activity interventions on physical activity participation among preschoolers. A secondary purpose was to investigate the influence of several possible moderator variables (e.g., intervention length, location, leadership, type) on moderate-to-vigorous physical…

  5. Investigation of plant latices of Asteraceae and Campanulaceae regarding proteolytic activity.

    PubMed

    Sytwala, Sonja; Domsalla, André; Melzig, Matthias F

    2015-12-01

    Occurrence of plant latices is widespread, there are more than 40 families of plants characterized to establish lactiferous structures. The appearance of hydrolytic active proteins, incorporated in latices is already characterized, and hydrolytic active proteins are considerable, and for several plant families, the occurrence of hydrolytic active proteins is already specified e.g. Apocynaceae Juss., Caricaceae Dumort, Euphorbiaceae Juss., Moraceae Gaudich and Papaveraceae Juss. In our investigation, focused on latex bearing plants of order Asterales, Asteraceae and Campanulaceae in particular. The present outcomes represent a comprehensive study, relating to the occurrence of proteolytic active enzymes of order Asterales for the first time. 131 different species of Asteraceae and Campanulaceae were tested, and the appearance of plant latex proteases were determined in different quantities. Proteolytic activity was investigated by inhibitory studies and determination of residual activity in the following, enable us to characterize the proteases. Most of the considered species exhibit a serine protease activity and a multiplicity of species exhibited two or more subclasses of proteases.

  6. Investigation of plant latices of Asteraceae and Campanulaceae regarding proteolytic activity.

    PubMed

    Sytwala, Sonja; Domsalla, André; Melzig, Matthias F

    2015-12-01

    Occurrence of plant latices is widespread, there are more than 40 families of plants characterized to establish lactiferous structures. The appearance of hydrolytic active proteins, incorporated in latices is already characterized, and hydrolytic active proteins are considerable, and for several plant families, the occurrence of hydrolytic active proteins is already specified e.g. Apocynaceae Juss., Caricaceae Dumort, Euphorbiaceae Juss., Moraceae Gaudich and Papaveraceae Juss. In our investigation, focused on latex bearing plants of order Asterales, Asteraceae and Campanulaceae in particular. The present outcomes represent a comprehensive study, relating to the occurrence of proteolytic active enzymes of order Asterales for the first time. 131 different species of Asteraceae and Campanulaceae were tested, and the appearance of plant latex proteases were determined in different quantities. Proteolytic activity was investigated by inhibitory studies and determination of residual activity in the following, enable us to characterize the proteases. Most of the considered species exhibit a serine protease activity and a multiplicity of species exhibited two or more subclasses of proteases. PMID:26458257

  7. High-Throughput Analysis of Enzyme Activities

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Guoxin

    2007-01-01

    High-throughput screening (HTS) techniques have been applied to many research fields nowadays. Robot microarray printing technique and automation microtiter handling technique allows HTS performing in both heterogeneous and homogeneous formats, with minimal sample required for each assay element. In this dissertation, new HTS techniques for enzyme activity analysis were developed. First, patterns of immobilized enzyme on nylon screen were detected by multiplexed capillary system. The imaging resolution is limited by the outer diameter of the capillaries. In order to get finer images, capillaries with smaller outer diameters can be used to form the imaging probe. Application of capillary electrophoresis allows separation of the product from the substrate in the reaction mixture, so that the product doesn't have to have different optical properties with the substrate. UV absorption detection allows almost universal detection for organic molecules. Thus, no modifications of either the substrate or the product molecules are necessary. This technique has the potential to be used in screening of local distribution variations of specific bio-molecules in a tissue or in screening of multiple immobilized catalysts. Another high-throughput screening technique is developed by directly monitoring the light intensity of the immobilized-catalyst surface using a scientific charge-coupled device (CCD). Briefly, the surface of enzyme microarray is focused onto a scientific CCD using an objective lens. By carefully choosing the detection wavelength, generation of product on an enzyme spot can be seen by the CCD. Analyzing the light intensity change over time on an enzyme spot can give information of reaction rate. The same microarray can be used for many times. Thus, high-throughput kinetic studies of hundreds of catalytic reactions are made possible. At last, we studied the fluorescence emission spectra of ADP and obtained the detection limits for ADP under three different

  8. 3D QSAR investigations on locomotor activity of 5-cyano-N1,6-disubstituted 2-thiouracil derivatives.

    PubMed

    Kuchekar, B S; Pore, Y V

    2010-06-01

    Three dimensional quantitative structure activity relationship (3D QSAR) investigations were carried out on a series of 5-cyano-N1,6-disubstituted 2-thiouracil derivatives for their locomotor activity. The structures of all compounds were built on a workspace of VlifeMDS3.5 molecular modeling software and 3D QSAR models were generated by applying a partial least square (PLS) linear regression analysis coupled with a stepwise variable selection method. Both derived models were found to be statistically significant in terms of regression and internal and external predictive ability (r(2) = 0.9414 and 0.8511, q(2) = 0.8582 and 0.6222, pred_r(2) = 0.5142 and 0.7917). The QSAR models indicated that both electrostatic and steric interaction energies were contributing significantly to locomotor activity of thiouracil derivatives. PMID:22491179

  9. Investigating Pre-Service Early Childhood Teachers' Attitudes towards the Computer Based Education in Science Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yilmaz, Nursel; Alici, Sule

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate pre-service early childhood teachers' attitudes towards using Computer Based Education (CBE) while implementing science activities. More specifically, the present study examined the effect of different variables such as gender, year in program, experience in preschool, owing a computer, and the…

  10. Investigating Mediations in Student Activities in an English Immersion Context in Mainland China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liang, Xiaohua

    2009-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the role of mediation in the learning process from a sociocultural perspective, activity theory in particular. This study was carried out in a primary English immersion school within the CCUEI Programs in Mainland China. Data were collected mainly through observations and interviews, which were then supplemented by…

  11. Authentic Experience within Investigative Activities: The Role of Reflection in the Learning Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petrosino, Anthony J., Jr.

    This document examines how a unit on model rockets, designed to be a "hands-on" activity within the "Mission to Mars" curriculum that was implemented in the Nashville (Tennessee) area middle schools, has been used to investigate children's understanding of experimentation. A literature review explores some of the traditional constraints placed on…

  12. Investigation of the Relations between Religious Activities and Subjective Well-Being of High School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eryilmaz, Ali

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the relation between participation in religious activities and the subjective wellbeing of high school students. The study group involves 196 participants, 99 female and 97 male; all of the participants were adolescents attending high school in Eskisehir, Turkey, their ages varying from 14 to 16. The measurement…

  13. Young Children's Literacy in the Activity Space of the Library: A Geosemiotic Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nichols, Sue

    2011-01-01

    An ecological approach, emphasizing the importance of understanding multiple contexts for learning, underpins this study of libraries as activity spaces for young children's literacy participation. Five libraries serving a diversity of communities were the subject of ethnographic investigation incorporating participant observation, visual…

  14. Problematic Internet Use among Turkish University Students: A Multidimensional Investigation Based on Demographics and Internet Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tekinarslan, Erkan; Gurer, Melih Derya

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the Turkish undergraduate university students' problematic Internet use (PIU) levels on different dimensions based on demographics (e.g., gender, Internet use by time of day), and Internet activities (e.g., chat, entertainment, social networking, information searching, etc.). Moreover, the study explored some predictors of…

  15. Going Underground: A Field Investigation and Lab Activity on Karst Topography and Water Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Dell, Gary; Gonzalez-Espada, Wilson

    2011-01-01

    Students learn science best with activities that mirror the way scientists work. This article describes how geologists investigate groundwater flow systems in areas of karst topography--geologic formations shaped by dissolving bedrock--and provides a way for students to replicate this research. Students also use electric current to model water…

  16. Investigating Learner Attitudes toward E-Books as Learning Tools: Based on the Activity Theory Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liaw, Shu-Sheng; Huang, Hsiu-Mei

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates the use of e-books as learning tools in terms of learner satisfaction, usefulness, behavioral intention, and learning effectiveness. Based on the activity theory approach, this research develops a research model to understand learner attitudes toward e-books in two physical sizes: 10? and 7?. Results suggest that screen…

  17. Locating Active Plate Boundaries by Earthquake Data. Crustal Evaluation Education Project. Teacher's Guide [and] Student Investigation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoever, Edward C., Jr.

    Crustal Evolution Education Project (CEEP) modules were designed to: (1) provide students with the methods and results of continuing investigations into the composition, history, and processes of the earth's crust and the application of this knowledge to man's activities and (2) to be used by teachers with little or no previous background in the…

  18. An Investigation into Social Learning Activities by Practitioners in Open Educational Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schreurs, Bieke; Van den Beemt, Antoine; Prinsen, Fleur; Witthaus, Gabi; Conole, Gráinne; De Laat, Maarten

    2014-01-01

    By investigating how educational practitioners participate in activities around open educational practices (OEP), this paper aims at contributing to an understanding of open practices and how these practitioners learn to use OEP. Our research is guided by the following hypothesis: Different social configurations support a variety of social…

  19. Investigating Acceptance toward Mobile Learning to Assist Individual Knowledge Management: Based on Activity Theory Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liaw, Shu-Sheng; Hatala, Marek; Huang, Hsiu-Mei

    2010-01-01

    Mobile devices could facilitate human interaction and access to knowledge resources anytime and anywhere. With respect to wide application possibilities of mobile learning, investigating learners' acceptance towards it is an essential issue. Based on activity theory approach, this research explores positive factors for the acceptance of m-learning…

  20. Automation of o-dianisidine assay for ceruloplasmin activity analyses: usefulness of investigation in Wilson's disease and in hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Siotto, Mariacristina; Pasqualetti, Patrizio; Marano, Massimo; Squitti, Rosanna

    2014-10-01

    Ceruloplasmin (Cp) is a serum ferroxidase that plays an essential role in iron metabolism. It is routinely tested by immunoturbidimetric assays that quantify the concentration of the protein both in its active and inactive forms. Cp activity is generally analyzed manually; the process is time-consuming, has a limited repeatability, and is not suitable for a clinical setting. To overcome these inconveniences, we have set the automation of the o-dianisidine Cp activity assay on a Cobas Mira Plus apparatus. The automation was rapid and repeatable, and the data were provided in terms of IU/L. The assay was adapted for human sera and showed a good precision [coefficient of variation (CV) 3.7 %] and low limit of detection (LoD 11.58 IU/L). The simultaneous analysis of Cp concentration and activity in the same run allowed us to calculate the Cp-specific activity that provides a better index of the overall Cp status. To test the usefulness of this automation, we tested this assay on 104 healthy volunteers and 36 patients with Wilson's disease, hepatic encephalopathy, and chronic liver disease. Cp activity and specific activity distinguished better patients between groups with respect to Cp concentration alone, and providing support for the clinical investigation of neurological diseases in which liver failure is one of the clinical hallmarks.

  1. Karyotype Analysis Activity: A Constructivist Learning Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahmed, Noveera T.

    2015-01-01

    This classroom activity is based on a constructivist learning design and engages students in physically constructing a karyotype of three mock patients. Students then diagnose the chromosomal aneuploidy based on the karyotype, list the symptoms associated with the disorder, and discuss the implications of the diagnosis. This activity is targeted…

  2. Investigation of spherical loudspeaker arrays for local active control of sound.

    PubMed

    Peleg, Tomer; Rafaely, Boaz

    2011-10-01

    Active control of sound can be employed globally to reduce noise levels in an entire enclosure, or locally around a listener's head. Recently, spherical loudspeaker arrays have been studied as multiple-channel sources for local active control of sound, presenting the fundamental theory and several active control configurations. In this paper, important aspects of using a spherical loudspeaker array for local active control of sound are further investigated. First, the feasibility of creating sphere-shaped quiet zones away from the source is studied both theoretically and numerically, showing that these quiet zones are associated with sound amplification and poor system robustness. To mitigate the latter, the design of shell-shaped quiet zones around the source is investigated. A combination of two spherical sources is then studied with the aim of enlarging the quiet zone. The two sources are employed to generate quiet zones that surround a rigid sphere, investigating the application of active control around a listener's head. A significant improvement in performance is demonstrated in this case over a conventional headrest-type system that uses two monopole secondary sources. Finally, several simulations are presented to support the theoretical work and to demonstrate the performance and limitations of the system.

  3. Seeing the Moon: A Series of Inquiry Activities Using Light to Investigate the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shupla, Christine; Runyon, C.; Shipp, S.; Tremain, A. H.

    2007-12-01

    Seeing the Moon: Using Light to Investigate the Moon is a series of educational activity modules created for the Moon Mineralogy Mapper instrument aboard the Chandrayaan-1. In these modules, classroom students investigate light and the geologic history of the Moon. Through the hands-on inquiry based activities, 5th to 8th grade students experiment with light and color, collect and analyze authentic data from rock samples using an ALTA reflectance spectrometer, map the rock types of the Moon, and develop theories of the Moon's history. This poster will describe the activities and share the location of the modules. This poster will also share information on the availability of loaner kits which including rock samples and sets of the ALTA reflectance spectrometer.

  4. A Meta-Analysis of Cross Sectional Studies Investigating Language in Maltreated Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lum, Jarrad A. G.; Powell, Martine; Timms, Lydia; Snow, Pamela

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: In this review article, meta-analysis was used to summarize research investigating language skills in maltreated children. Method: A systematic search of published studies was undertaken. Studies were included in the meta-analysis if they investigated language skills in groups comprising maltreated and nonmaltreated children. Studies were…

  5. Bio-active nanoemulsions enriched with gold nanoparticle, marigold extracts and lipoic acid: In vitro investigations.

    PubMed

    Guler, Emine; Barlas, F Baris; Yavuz, Murat; Demir, Bilal; Gumus, Z Pinar; Baspinar, Yucel; Coskunol, Hakan; Timur, Suna

    2014-09-01

    A novel and efficient approach for the preparation of enriched herbal formulations was described and their potential applications including wound healing and antioxidant activity (cell based and cell free) were investigated via in vitro cell culture studies. Nigella sativa oil was enriched with Calendula officinalis extract and lipoic acid capped gold nanoparticles (AuNP-LA) using nanoemulsion systems. The combination of these bio-active compounds was used to design oil in water (O/W) and water in oil (W/O) emulsions. The resulted emulsions were characterized by particle size measurements. The phenolic content of each nanoemulsion was examined by using both colorimetric assay and chromatographic analyses. Two different methods containing cell free chemical assay (1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl method) and cell based antioxidant activity test were used to evaluate the antioxidant capacities. In order to investigate the bio-activities of the herbal formulations, in vitro cell culture experiments, including cytotoxicity, scratch assay, antioxidant activity and cell proliferation were carried out using Vero cell line as a model cell line. Furthermore, to monitor localization of the nanoemulsions after application of the cell culture, the cell images were monitored via fluorescence microscope after FITC labeling. All data confirmed that the enriched N. sativa formulations exhibited better antioxidant and wound healing activity than N. sativa emulsion without any enrichment. In conclusion, the incorporation of AuNP-LA and C. officinalis extract into the N. sativa emulsions significantly increased the bio-activities. The present work may support further studies about using the other bio-active agents for the enrichment of herbal preparations to strengthen their activities.

  6. Bio-active nanoemulsions enriched with gold nanoparticle, marigold extracts and lipoic acid: In vitro investigations.

    PubMed

    Guler, Emine; Barlas, F Baris; Yavuz, Murat; Demir, Bilal; Gumus, Z Pinar; Baspinar, Yucel; Coskunol, Hakan; Timur, Suna

    2014-09-01

    A novel and efficient approach for the preparation of enriched herbal formulations was described and their potential applications including wound healing and antioxidant activity (cell based and cell free) were investigated via in vitro cell culture studies. Nigella sativa oil was enriched with Calendula officinalis extract and lipoic acid capped gold nanoparticles (AuNP-LA) using nanoemulsion systems. The combination of these bio-active compounds was used to design oil in water (O/W) and water in oil (W/O) emulsions. The resulted emulsions were characterized by particle size measurements. The phenolic content of each nanoemulsion was examined by using both colorimetric assay and chromatographic analyses. Two different methods containing cell free chemical assay (1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl method) and cell based antioxidant activity test were used to evaluate the antioxidant capacities. In order to investigate the bio-activities of the herbal formulations, in vitro cell culture experiments, including cytotoxicity, scratch assay, antioxidant activity and cell proliferation were carried out using Vero cell line as a model cell line. Furthermore, to monitor localization of the nanoemulsions after application of the cell culture, the cell images were monitored via fluorescence microscope after FITC labeling. All data confirmed that the enriched N. sativa formulations exhibited better antioxidant and wound healing activity than N. sativa emulsion without any enrichment. In conclusion, the incorporation of AuNP-LA and C. officinalis extract into the N. sativa emulsions significantly increased the bio-activities. The present work may support further studies about using the other bio-active agents for the enrichment of herbal preparations to strengthen their activities. PMID:25009101

  7. Time-frequency analysis of rhythmic masticatory muscle activity.

    PubMed

    Farella, Mauro; Palla, Sandro; Gallo, Luigi Maria

    2009-06-01

    The aim of this study was to develop and validate under laboratory conditions an algorithm for a time-frequency analysis of rhythmic masticatory muscle activity (RMMA). The algorithm baseband demodulated the electromyographic (EMG) signal to provide a frequency versus time representation. Using appropriate thresholds for frequency and power parameters, it was possible to automatically assess the features of RMMA without examiner interaction. The algorithm was first tested using synthetic EMG signals and then using real EMG signals obtained from the masticatory muscles of 11 human subjects who underwent well-defined rhythmic, static, and possible confounding oral tasks. The accuracy of detection was quantified by receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curves. Sensitivity and specificity values were > or =90% and > or =96%, respectively. The areas under the ROC curves were > or =95% (standard error +/-0.1%). The proposed approach represents a promising tool to effectively investigate rhythmical contractions of the masticatory muscles.

  8. The analysis and reconciliation of students' rebuttals in argumentation activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yu-Ren; Hung, Jeng-Fung

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigated the guidance provided by science teachers to resolve conflicts during socioscientific issue-based argumentation activities. A graphical representation (GR) was developed as a tool to code and analyze the dialogue interaction process. Through the GR and qualitative analysis, we identified three types of dialogue reconciling strategies. The first one consists of teacher management, in which the teacher temporarily maintains the right to speak when students get mired in an emotional rebuttal situation. The second strategy involves the use of qualifiers to identify the strengths and weaknesses of an opposing argument. The third strategy consists of providing students with guidance to keep both parties (i.e. the students taking, respectively, the affirmative and negative positions) on the same discussion topic and can be used to assist teachers with forming broad questions that prompt students to conduct deeper discussions. These reconciling strategies were beneficial in that they helped students to argue in a more reflective way.

  9. Structural analysis and investigation of molecular properties of Cefpodoxime acid, a third generation antibiotic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suganthi, S.; Balu, P.; Sathyanarayanamoorthi, V.; Kannappan, V.; Kamil, M. G. Mohamed; Kumar, R.

    2016-03-01

    Extensive quantum mechanical studies are carried out on Cefpodoxime acid (CA), a new generation drug by Hartree-Fock (HF) and B3LYP methods to understand the structural and spectral characteristics of the molecule. The most stable geometry of the molecule was optimized and the bond parameters were reported. The spectroscopic properties of this pharmaceutically important compound were investigated by FT-IR, FT-Raman, UV and 1H NMR techniques. The scaled vibrational frequencies of CA in the ground state are calculated by HF and B3LYP methods with 6-311++G (d, p) basis set and compared with the observed FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra. The vibrational spectral analysis indicates the presence of two intra molecular hydrogen bonds in the molecule which is supported by theoretical study. 1H NMR chemical shifts (δ) were calculated for the CA molecule and compared with the experimental values. The theoretical electronic absorption spectral data in water and ethanol solvents were computed by TD-DFT method. UV-Vis absorption spectra of CA are recorded in these two solvents and compared with theoretical spectra. The spectral data and natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis confirm the occurrence of intra molecular interactions in CA. The electronic distribution, in conjunction with electrophilicity index of CA was used to establish the active site and type of interaction between CA and beta lactamases. Mulliken population analysis on atomic charges is also carried out and thermodynamic properties of the title compound are calculated.

  10. Investigating properties of a set of variable AGN with cluster analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nair, A. D.

    1997-05-01

    Optical and gamma-ray properties of a sample of active galactic nuclei monitored at the Rosemary Hill Observatory are analysed using cluster analysis. Cluster analysis can be used to analyse large amounts of data with many variables and investigate linear or non-linear relationships in the data. It is found that the time-scale of variation is not related to the amplitude of variability. For BLLacs and optically violent variable (OVV) quasars the variability is proportional to the redshift and absolute magnitude, but this is not true for quasars in this sample. The analysis shows that gamma-ray-loud AGN tend to be associated with superluminal sources with OVV-like characteristics. The gamma-ray fluxes, for both OVV quasars and BLLacs, are proportional to the apparent transverse velocity, and this may point to beaming as the dominant cause for the gamma-ray flux. A large majority of the OVV quasars that display a large amplitude of variability are gamma- ray-loud, but this is not true for BL Lacs.

  11. Investigations on the estrogenic activity of the metallohormone cadmium in the rat intestine.

    PubMed

    Höfer, Nicola; Diel, Patrick; Wittsiepe, Jürgen; Wilhelm, Michael; Kluxen, Felix M; Degen, Gisela H

    2010-07-01

    Cadmium (Cd), a toxic heavy metal and an important environmental pollutant, is now also regarded as potential endocrine disruptor. Its estrogenic effects have been examined so far just in classical target tissues, e.g. uterus, and mostly upon intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of CdCl(2). Yet, estrogen receptors are also expressed in the gut, and food is the main source of cadmium intake in the general population. Therefore, possible estrogenic effects were now investigated in the intestine of ovariectomized Wistar rats after oral short- and long-term administration of CdCl(2) (0.05-4 mg/kg bw on 3 days by gavage and 0.4-9 mg/kg bw for 4 weeks in drinking water) or upon i.p. injection (0.00005-2 mg CdCl(2)/kg bw), and compared to steroid estrogen (estradiol or ethinylestradiol) treated groups. Analysis of Cd in kidneys and small intestine by atomic absorption spectrometry showed dose-dependent increases in tissue levels with rather high Cd concentrations in the gut, both after oral and i.p. administration. Expression of metallothionein (MT1a), a typical metal response parameter, was clearly induced in kidney and small intestine of several CdCl(2) treated groups, but also notably increased by steroid estrogens. Levels of estrogen-regulated genes, i.e. pS2/TFF1, vitamin D receptor (VDR), and estrogen receptor alpha and beta (ER alpha/beta) were studied as parameters of hormonal activity: The intestinal mRNA expression of pS2/TFF1 was significantly decreased in the estrogen reference groups, but also after single i.p. injection and oral long-term administration of CdCl(2). In contrast, the mRNA and protein expression of the VDR were unaffected by long-term administration of Cd via drinking water. We detected expression of ERbeta, but not ERalpha in the small intestine of OVX rats. ERbeta mRNA and protein expression were significantly down-regulated by Cd, similar to the ethinylestradiol reference group. The mRNA expression and immunostaining of proliferating cell

  12. Characterization of indoor cooking aerosol using neutron activation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, D.; Landsberger, S.; Larson, S. )

    1993-01-01

    Suspended particles in air are potentially harmful to human health, depending on their sizes and chemical composition. Residential indoor particles mainly come from (a) outdoor sources that are transported indoors, (b) indoor dust that is resuspended, and (c) indoor combustion sources, which include cigarette smoking, cooking, and heating. Jedrychowski stated that chronic phlegm in elderly women was strongly related to the cooking exposure. Kamens et al. indicated that cooking could generate small particles (<0.1 [mu]m), and cooking one meal could contribute [approximately]5 to 18% of total daytime particle volume exposure. Although cooking is a basic human activity, there are not many data available on the properties of particles generated by this activity. Some cooking methods, such as stir-frying and frying, which are the most favored for Chinese and other Far East people, generate a large quantity of aerosols. This research included the following efforts: 1. investigating particle number concentrations, distributions, and their variations with four different cooking methods and ventilation conditions; 2. measuring the chemical composition of cooking aerosol samples by instrumental neutron activation analysis.

  13. [Copper and cadmium toxicities to activated sludge investigated with ToxTell biosensor].

    PubMed

    Wang, Xue-Jiang; Wang, Xin; Liu, Mian; Wu, Zhen; Yang, Lian-Zhen; Xia, Si-Qing

    2012-06-01

    Effects of different concentrations of Cu2+, Cu2+ and Cd2+ combined pollution on the removal performance of COD in activated sludge system were investigated, and the ToxTell biosensor with activated sludge was constructed to determine the toxicity of Cu2+, Cu2+ and Cd2+ combined pollution. The results showed that there was no significant impact on the activated sludge process when Cu2+ concentration was lower than 10 mg x L(-1), and the addition of Cd2+ enhanced the inhibition of COD removal, and the maximum inhibition efficiency of COD reached at about 1.5 h. With the increase of aeration time, the COD removal efficiency increased slowly again. The toxicity measurement with ToxTell biosensor was close to the biological effects (inhibition efficiencies of COD), which showed that the ToxTell biosensor could be used well in the early warming determination of Cu2+ and Cd2+ in the activated sludge process.

  14. Analysis of microseismic signals and temperature recordings for rock slope stability investigations in high mountain areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Occhiena, C.; Coviello, V.; Arattano, M.; Chiarle, M.; Morra di Cella, U.; Pirulli, M.; Pogliotti, P.; Scavia, C.

    2012-07-01

    The permafrost degradation is a probable cause for the increase of rock instabilities and rock falls observed in recent years in high mountain areas, particularly in the Alpine region. The phenomenon causes the thaw of the ice filling rock discontinuities; the water deriving from it subsequently freezes again inducing stresses in the rock mass that may lead, in the long term, to rock falls. To investigate these processes, a monitoring system composed by geophones and thermometers was installed in 2007 at the Carrel hut (3829 m a.s.l., Matterhorn, NW Alps). In 2010, in the framework of the Interreg 2007-2013 Alcotra project no. 56 MASSA, the monitoring system has been empowered and renovated in order to meet project needs. In this paper, the data recorded by this renewed system between 6 October 2010 and 5 October 2011 are presented and 329 selected microseismic events are analysed. The data processing has concerned the classification of the recorded signals, the analysis of their distribution in time and the identification of the most important trace characteristics in time and frequency domain. The interpretation of the results has evidenced a possible correlation between the temperature trend and the event occurrence. The research is still in progress and the data recording and interpretation are planned for a longer period to better investigate the spatial-temporal distribution of microseismic activity in the rock mass, with specific attention to the relation of microseismic activity with temperatures. The overall goal is to verify the possibility to set up an effective monitoring system for investigating the stability of a rock mass under permafrost conditions, in order to supply the researchers with useful data to better understand the relationship between temperature and rock mass stability and, possibly, the technicians with a valid tool for decision-making.

  15. Overview of MSFC's Applied Fluid Dynamics Analysis Group Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, Roberto; Griffin, Lisa; Williams, Robert

    2002-01-01

    This viewgraph report presents an overview of activities and accomplishments of NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center's Applied Fluid Dynamics Analysis Group. Expertise in this group focuses on high-fidelity fluids design and analysis with application to space shuttle propulsion and next generation launch technologies. Topics covered include: computational fluid dynamics research and goals, turbomachinery research and activities, nozzle research and activities, combustion devices, engine systems, MDA development and CFD process improvements.

  16. Acceleration of reverse analysis method using hyperbolic activation function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pwasong, Augustine; Sathasivam, Saratha

    2015-10-01

    Hyperbolic activation function is examined for its ability to accelerate the performance of doing data mining by using a technique named as Reverse Analysis method. In this paper, we describe how Hopfield network perform better with hyperbolic activation function and able to induce logical rules from large database by using reverse analysis method: given the values of the connections of a network, we can hope to know what logical rules are entrenched in the database. We limit our analysis to Horn clauses.

  17. An Investigation into Cloud Condensation Nuclei (CCN) Activation in the Southwestern United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crosbie, E. C.; Youn, J.; Wonaschuetz, A.; Sorooshian, A.

    2013-12-01

    Cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) comprise a key component of the total aerosol with critical influences on weather and climate. The importance of CCN concentration is often linked to radiative feedbacks associated with cloud albedo, which has important consequences for climate sensitivity, however the importance of CCN may also extend to cloud dynamics in convective environments and atmospheric electricity. We present data from fifteen months of field measurements taken in an urban environment on a rooftop of a building at the University of Arizona campus in Tucson, Arizona. CCN were measured at high temporal resolution concurrently with measurements of particle size distributions, meteorological parameters, and the composition of the organic fraction of the aerosol. We investigate monthly, weekly, and diurnal patterns in the data along with activation ratio and apparent activation diameter, which provide important insight into the micro-scale dependencies of cloud activation. Furthermore, we examine the relationship between CCN and local and regional meteorology, with particular focus on the North American Monsoon season, to investigate feedback and response mechanisms relating to dynamics, microphysics, and chemistry. Monsoon aerosol are shown to have favorable composition to allow for higher CCN activity and thus lower apparent activation diameters. This finding coincides with enhanced aqueous-phase chemistry to produce more hygroscopic aerosol constituents such as sulfate and water-soluble organic compounds.

  18. An Analysis of Solar Global Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mouradian, Zadig

    2013-02-01

    This article proposes a unified observational model of solar activity based on sunspot number and the solar global activity in the rotation of the structures, both per 11-year cycle. The rotation rates show a variation of a half-century period and the same period is also associated to the sunspot amplitude variation. The global solar rotation interweaves with the observed global organisation of solar activity. An important role for this assembly is played by the Grand Cycle formed by the merging of five sunspot cycles: a forgotten discovery by R. Wolf. On the basis of these elements, the nature of the Dalton Minimum, the Maunder Minimum, the Gleissberg Cycle, and the Grand Minima are presented.

  19. Method for photon activation positron annihilation analysis

    DOEpatents

    Akers, Douglas W.

    2006-06-06

    A non-destructive testing method comprises providing a specimen having at least one positron emitter therein; determining a threshold energy for activating the positron emitter; and determining whether a half-life of the positron emitter is less than a selected half-life. If the half-life of the positron emitter is greater than or equal to the selected half-life, then activating the positron emitter by bombarding the specimen with photons having energies greater than the threshold energy and detecting gamma rays produced by annihilation of positrons in the specimen. If the half-life of the positron emitter is less then the selected half-life, then alternately activating the positron emitter by bombarding the specimen with photons having energies greater then the threshold energy and detecting gamma rays produced by positron annihilation within the specimen.

  20. Faculty Activity Analysis in the Universidad Tecnica Del Estado Campuses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karadima, Oscar

    An analysis of academic activities of college faculty at the eight campuses of Chile's Universidad Tecnica del Estado was conducted. Activities were grouped into seven categories: direct teaching, indirect teaching, research, community services, faculty development, academic administration, and other activities. Following the narrative…

  1. Chemical and biological investigation of N-hydroxy-valdecoxib: An active metabolite of valdecoxib.

    PubMed

    Erdélyi, Péter; Fodor, Tamás; Varga, Agnes Kis; Czugler, Mátyás; Gere, Anikó; Fischer, János

    2008-05-01

    The inhibition of cyclooxygenase enzymes plays an important role in the treatment of inflammatory diseases. N-Hydroxy-4-(5-methyl-3-phenylisoxazol-4-yl)benzenesulfonamide (3)-a primary metabolite of the highly selective COX-2 inhibitor valdecoxib-was synthesized and stabilized as its monohydrate (3a.H(2)O). The anti-inflammatory properties of 3a.H(2)O were investigated in carrageenan-induced edema and in acute and chronic pain models. Based on our biological investigation, we conclude that N-hydroxy-valdecoxib 3a is an active metabolite of valdecoxib.

  2. Phytochemical investigation of sesquiterpenes from the fruits of Schisandra chinensis and their cytotoxic activity.

    PubMed

    Venkanna, A; Siva, B; Poornima, B; Vadaparthi, P R Rao; Prasad, K Rajendra; Reddy, K Ashok; Reddy, G Bhanu Prakash; Babu, K Suresh

    2014-06-01

    Phytochemical investigation of ethanolic extract from the fruits of Schisandra chinensis led to the isolation of four new sesquiterpenes (1-4); their structures were determined by a combination of NMR (1D and 2D) and MS spectroscopic techniques. In addition, all these isolates were screened for their cytotoxic activities against MCF-7, Caco-2, Hela, Lncap, Hep G2 and MDA-MB231 cancer cell lines. Results indicated that compounds 2 and 3 displayed potent cytotoxic activity against Caco2 cell lines with IC50 values of 17.10 μg/mM and 16.46 μg/mM, respectively.

  3. Barbiturate bearing aroylhydrazine derivatives: Synthesis, NMR investigations, single crystal X-ray studies and biological activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giziroglu, Emrah; Sarikurkcu, Cengiz; Aygün, Muhittin; Basbulbul, Gamze; Soyleyici, H. Can; Firinci, Erkan; Kirkan, Bulent; Alkis, Ayse; Saylica, Tayfur; Biyik, Halil

    2016-03-01

    A series of barbituric acid aroylhydrazine derivatives have been prepared from their corresponding 1,3-dimethyl-5-acetyl barbituric acid and aroylhydrazines. All compounds have been fully characterized by using FT-IR, multinuclear NMR (1H, 13C) and Mass (MS) spectrometry. We also describe the X-ray crystal structure of 3a, which crystallizes in the monoclinic P21/n space group. The crystal structure is stabilized with infinite linear chains of dimeric units. Furthermore, all compounds were investigated for their tyrosinase inhibition, antioxidative and antimicrobial activies. The results from biological activity assays have shown that all of compounds have excellent antioxidant, significant tyrosinase inhibition and moderate antimicrobial activity.

  4. Investigation of the chemical composition-antibacterial activity relationship of essential oils by chemometric methods.

    PubMed

    Miladinović, Dragoljub L; Ilić, Budimir S; Mihajilov-Krstev, Tatjana M; Nikolić, Nikola D; Miladinović, Ljiljana C; Cvetković, Olga G

    2012-05-01

    The antibacterial effects of Thymus vulgaris (Lamiaceae), Lavandula angustifolia (Lamiaceae), and Calamintha nepeta (Lamiaceae) Savi subsp. nepeta var. subisodonda (Borb.) Hayek essential oils on five different bacteria were estimated. Laboratory control strain and clinical isolates from different pathogenic media were researched by broth microdilution method, with an emphasis on a chemical composition-antibacterial activity relationship. The main constituents of thyme oil were thymol (59.95%) and p-cymene (18.34%). Linalool acetate (38.23%) and β-linalool (35.01%) were main compounds in lavender oil. C. nepeta essential oil was characterized by a high percentage of piperitone oxide (59.07%) and limonene (9.05%). Essential oils have been found to have antimicrobial activity against all tested microorganisms. Classification and comparison of essential oils on the basis of their chemical composition and antibacterial activity were made by utilization of appropriate chemometric methods. The chemical principal component analysis (PCA) and hierachical cluster analysis (HCA) separated essential oils into two groups and two sub-groups. Thyme essential oil forms separate chemical HCA group and exhibits highest antibacterial activity, similar to tetracycline. Essential oils of lavender and C. nepeta in the same chemical HCA group were classified in different groups, within antibacterial PCA and HCA analyses. Lavender oil exhibits higher antibacterial ability in comparison with C. nepeta essential oil, probably based on the concept of synergistic activity of essential oil components. PMID:22389175

  5. An investigation of the mimetic enzyme activity of two-dimensional Pd-based nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Jingping; Chen, Xiaolan; Shi, Saige; Mo, Shiguang; Zheng, Nanfeng

    2015-11-01

    In this work, we investigated the mimetic enzyme activity of two-dimensional (2D) Pd-based nanostructures (e.g. Pd nanosheets, Pd@Au and Pd@Pt nanoplates) and found that they possess intrinsic peroxidase-, oxidase- and catalase-like activities. These nanostructures were able to activate hydrogen peroxide or dissolved oxygen for catalyzing the oxidation of organic substrates, and decompose hydrogen peroxide to generate oxygen. More systematic investigations revealed that the peroxidase-like activities of these Pd-based nanomaterials were highly structure- and composition-dependent. Among them, Pd@Pt nanoplates displayed the highest peroxidase-like activity. Based on these findings, Pd-based nanostructures were applied for the colorimetric detection of H2O2 and glucose, and also the electro-catalytic reduction of H2O2. This work offers a promising prospect for the application of 2D noble metal nanostructures in biocatalysis.In this work, we investigated the mimetic enzyme activity of two-dimensional (2D) Pd-based nanostructures (e.g. Pd nanosheets, Pd@Au and Pd@Pt nanoplates) and found that they possess intrinsic peroxidase-, oxidase- and catalase-like activities. These nanostructures were able to activate hydrogen peroxide or dissolved oxygen for catalyzing the oxidation of organic substrates, and decompose hydrogen peroxide to generate oxygen. More systematic investigations revealed that the peroxidase-like activities of these Pd-based nanomaterials were highly structure- and composition-dependent. Among them, Pd@Pt nanoplates displayed the highest peroxidase-like activity. Based on these findings, Pd-based nanostructures were applied for the colorimetric detection of H2O2 and glucose, and also the electro-catalytic reduction of H2O2. This work offers a promising prospect for the application of 2D noble metal nanostructures in biocatalysis. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: TEM images, EDX and dispersion stability of Pd-based nanomaterials

  6. Microscopic Analysis of Activated Sludge. Training Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Water Program Operations (EPA), Cincinnati, OH. National Training and Operational Technology Center.

    This training manual presents material on the use of a compound microscope to analyze microscope communities, present in wastewater treatment processes, for operational control. Course topics include: sampling techniques, sample handling, laboratory analysis, identification of organisms, data interpretation, and use of the compound microscope.…

  7. An investigation of the energy balance of solar active regions using the ACRIM irradiance data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petro, L. D.

    1986-01-01

    The detection of a significant correlation between the solar irradiance, corrected for flux deficit due to sunspots, and both the 205 nm flux and a photometric facular index were examined. A detailed analysis supports facular emission as the more likely source of correlation with the corrected radiance, rather then the error in sunspot correction. A computer program which simulates two dimensional convection in a compressible, stratified medium was investigated. Subroutines to calculate ionization and other thermodynamic variables were also completed.

  8. Investigating a new neuromodulation treatment for brain disorders using synchronized activation of multimodal pathways

    PubMed Central

    Markovitz, Craig D.; Smith, Benjamin T.; Gloeckner, Cory D.; Lim, Hubert H.

    2015-01-01

    Neuromodulation is an increasingly accepted treatment for neurological and psychiatric disorders but is limited by its invasiveness or its inability to target deep brain structures using noninvasive techniques. We propose a new concept called Multimodal Synchronization Therapy (mSync) for achieving targeted activation of the brain via noninvasive and precisely timed activation of auditory, visual, somatosensory, motor, cognitive, and limbic pathways. In this initial study in guinea pigs, we investigated mSync using combined activation of just the auditory and somatosensory pathways, which induced differential and timing dependent plasticity in neural firing within deep brain and cortical regions of the auditory system. Furthermore, by varying the location of somatosensory stimulation across the body, we increased or decreased spiking activity across different neurons. These encouraging results demonstrate the feasibility of systematically modulating the brain using mSync. Considering that hearing disorders such as tinnitus and hyperacusis have been linked to abnormal and hyperactive firing patterns within the auditory system, these results open up the possibility for using mSync to decrease this pathological activity by varying stimulation parameters. Incorporating multiple types of pathways beyond just auditory and somatosensory inputs and using other activation patterns may enable treatment of various brain disorders. PMID:25804410

  9. An investigation of antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities from blood components of Crocodile (Crocodylus siamensis).

    PubMed

    Phosri, Santi; Mahakunakorn, Pramote; Lueangsakulthai, Jiraporn; Jangpromma, Nisachon; Swatsitang, Prasan; Daduang, Sakda; Dhiravisit, Apisak; Thammasirirak, Sompong

    2014-10-01

    Antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities were found from Crocodylus siamensis (C. siamensis) blood. The 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS) radical scavenging, nitric oxide scavenging, hydroxyl radical scavenging and linoleic peroxidation assays were used to investigate the antioxidant activities of the crocodile blood. Results show that crocodile blood components had antioxidant activity, especially hemoglobin (40.58 % nitric oxide radical inhibition), crude leukocyte extract (78 % linoleic peroxidation inhibition) and plasma (57.27 % hydroxyl radical inhibition). Additionally, the anti-inflammatory activity of the crocodile blood was studied using murine macrophage (RAW 264.7) as a model. The results show that hemoglobin, crude leukocyte extract and plasma were not toxic to RAW 264.7 cells. Also they showed anti-inflammatory activity by reduced nitric oxide (NO) and interleukin 6 (IL-6) productions from lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated cells. The NO inhibition percentages of hemoglobin, crude leukocyte extract and plasma were 31.9, 48.24 and 44.27 %, respectively. However, only crude leukocyte extract could inhibit IL-6 production. So, the results of this research directly indicate that hemoglobin, crude leukocyte extract and plasma of C. siamensis blood provide both antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities, which could be used as a supplementary agent in pharmaceutical products.

  10. Investigation of catalytic activity towards oxygen reduction reaction of Pt dispersed on boron doped graphene in acid medium.

    PubMed

    Pullamsetty, Ashok; Sundara, Ramaprabhu

    2016-10-01

    Boron doped graphene was prepared by a facile method and platinum (Pt) decoration over boron doped graphene was done in various chemical reduction methods such as sodium borohydride (NaBH4), polyol and modified polyol. X-ray diffraction analysis indicates that the synthesized catalyst particles are present in a nanocrystalline structure and transmission and scanning electron microscopy were employed to investigate the morphology and particle distribution. The electrochemical properties were investigated with the help of the rotating disk electrode (RDE) technique and cyclic voltammetry. The results show that the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) takes place by a four-electron process. The kinetics of the ORR was evaluated using K-L and Tafel plots. The electrocatalyst obtained in modified polyol reduction method has shown the better catalytic activity compared to other two electrocatalysts. PMID:27393888

  11. Synthesis, structural characterization, antimicrobial activities and theoretical investigations of some 4-(4-aminophenylsulfonyl) phenylimino) methyl)-4-(aryldiazenyl) phenol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghasemian, Motaleb; Kakanejadifard, Ali; Karami, Tahereh

    2016-11-01

    The azo-azomethine dyes with a different substitution have been designed from the reaction of 4,4‧-diaminodiphenyl sulfone with 2-hydroxy-5-(aryldiazenyl)benzaldehyde. The compounds have been characterized by elemental analysis, Mass, IR, UV-Vis, TGA-DTA and NMR spectroscopy. The solvatochromism behaviors, effects of substitution and pH on the electronic absorption spectra of dyes were evaluated. The in vitro antimicrobial activities were also screened for their potential for antibiotic activities by broth micro dilution method. Also, the optimum molecular geometries, molecular electrostatic potential (MEP), nucleus-independent chemical shift (NICS) and frontier molecular orbitals (FMO), vibrational spectra (IR) and electronic absorption (UV-Vis) spectra of the title compounds have been investigated with the help of DFT and TDDFT methods with 6-311 ++G(d,p) basis sets and PCM calculations. The results of the calculations show excellent agreement with the experimental value.

  12. Synthesis, structural characterization, antimicrobial activities and theoretical investigations of some 4-(4-aminophenylsulfonyl) phenylimino) methyl)-4-(aryldiazenyl) phenol.

    PubMed

    Ghasemian, Motaleb; Kakanejadifard, Ali; Karami, Tahereh

    2016-11-01

    The azo-azomethine dyes with a different substitution have been designed from the reaction of 4,4'-diaminodiphenyl sulfone with 2-hydroxy-5-(aryldiazenyl)benzaldehyde. The compounds have been characterized by elemental analysis, Mass, IR, UV-Vis, TGA-DTA and NMR spectroscopy. The solvatochromism behaviors, effects of substitution and pH on the electronic absorption spectra of dyes were evaluated. The in vitro antimicrobial activities were also screened for their potential for antibiotic activities by broth micro dilution method. Also, the optimum molecular geometries, molecular electrostatic potential (MEP), nucleus-independent chemical shift (NICS) and frontier molecular orbitals (FMO), vibrational spectra (IR ) and electronic absorption (UV-Vis) spectra of the title compounds have been investigated with the help of DFT and TDDFT methods with 6-311++G(d,p) basis sets and PCM calculations. The results of the calculations show excellent agreement with the experimental value. PMID:27294547

  13. Characterizing cerebellar activity during autobiographical memory retrieval: ALE and functional connectivity investigations.

    PubMed

    Addis, Donna Rose; Moloney, Eleanor E J; Tippett, Lynette J; P Roberts, Reece; Hach, Sylvia

    2016-09-01

    Previous neuroimaging research has shown that the cerebellum is often activated during autobiographical memory (AM) retrieval. However, the reliability of that activation, its localization within the cerebellum, and its relationship to other areas of the AM network remains unknown. The current study used Activation Likelihood Estimation meta-analysis (ALE) as well as resting-state and task-related functional connectivity analyses to better characterize cerebellar activation in relation to AM. The ALE meta-analysis was run on 32 neuroimaging studies of AM retrieval. The results revealed a cluster of reliable AM-related activity within the Crus I lobule of the right posterior cerebellum. Using the peak ALE coordinate within Crus I as a seed region, both task-related and resting state functional connectivity analyses were run on fMRI data from 38 healthy participants. To determine the specificity of connectivity patterns to Crus I, we also included a cerebellar seed region in right Lobule VI previously identified in an ALE meta-analysis as associated with working memory. Resting-state functional connectivity analyses indicated that Crus I was intrinsically connected with other areas of the AM network as well as surrounding and contralateral cerebellar regions. In contrast, the Lobule VI seed was functionally connected with cerebral and cerebellar regions typically associated with working memory. The task-related connectivity analyses revealed a similar pattern, where the Crus I seed exhibited significant connectivity with key nodes of the AM network while the Lobule IV seed did not. During a semantic control task, both Crus I and Lobule VI showed significant correlations with a network of regions that was largely distinct from the AM network. Together these results indicate that right Crus I lobule is reliably engaged during AM retrieval and is functionally connected to the AM network both during rest, and more importantly, during AM retrieval. PMID:27235570

  14. Synthesis of sulfanilamide derivatives and investigation of in vitro inhibitory activities and antimicrobial and physical properties.

    PubMed

    Turkmen, Hasan; Zengin, Gulay; Buyukkircali, Belkis

    2011-06-01

    Novel sulfanilamide derivatives were synthesized and evaluated for carbonic anhydrase inhibitory activity as a target for the treatment of glaucoma, and antibacterial properties for use in chemotherapy. Synthesized compounds were characterized by FT-IR, (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR and photoluminescence. In vitro inhibitory activities were measured by UV-Vis and some of the compounds were found have greater inhibitory effects than the lead compound sulfanilamide. The correlation between inhibitory activity, biological properties and the physicochemical properties of water solubility and partition coefficients was also investigated. Sulfanilamide derivatives gave intense emissions upon irradiation by UV light and a dimethyl substituted compound and a cyclic analog have photoluminescence quantum yields 42% and 31% and long excited-state lifetimes of 3.92 and 2.91 ns, respectively. PMID:21429552

  15. Analysis of essential oils from Voacanga africana seeds at different hydrodistillation extraction stages: chemical composition, antioxidant activity and antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiong; Yang, Dongliang; Liu, Jiajia; Ren, Na

    2015-01-01

    In this study, essential oils from Voacanga africana seeds at different extraction stages were investigated. In the chemical composition analysis, 27 compounds representing 86.69-95.03% of the total essential oils were identified and quantified. The main constituents in essential oils were terpenoids, alcohols and fatty acids accounting for 15.03-24.36%, 21.57-34.43% and 33.06-57.37%, respectively. Moreover, the analysis also revealed that essential oils from different extraction stages possessed different chemical compositions. In the antioxidant evaluation, all analysed oils showed similar antioxidant behaviours, and the concentrations of essential oils providing 50% inhibition of DPPH-scavenging activity (IC50) were about 25 mg/mL. In the antimicrobial experiments, essential oils from different extraction stages exhibited different antimicrobial activities. The antimicrobial activity of oils was affected by extraction stages. By controlling extraction stages, it is promising to obtain essential oils with desired antimicrobial activities.

  16. Experimental Investigation of Active Noise Controller for Internal Combustion Engine Exhaust System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jian-Da; Chen, Chih-Keng; Lee, Chun-Ying; Lee, Tian-Hua

    2002-10-01

    Two active noise control (ANC) algorithms for internal combustion engine exhaust systems are developed and their performances are compared in various experiments. The first controller is based on the filtered-x least mean square (FXLMS) algorithm with feedback neutralization, while the second is a fixed controller with a gain-scheduled active control technique for broadband attenuation with thermal effects. Both control algorithms are implemented on a digital signal processing (DSP) platform. Experiments are carried out to evaluate the attenuation performance of the proposed active noise control systems for an engine exhaust system. The results of the experiments indicate that both the adaptive controller and the gain-scheduled controller effectively suppress the noise of engine exhaust systems. The experimental comparison and analysis of the proposed controllers are also described.

  17. Investigating regulatory signatures of human autophagy related gene 5 (ATG5) through functional in silico analysis.

    PubMed

    Vij, Avni; Randhawa, Rohit; Parkash, Jyoti; Changotra, Harish

    2016-09-01

    Autophagy is an essential, homeostatic process which removes damaged cellular proteins and organelles for cellular renewal. ATG5, a part of E3 ubiquitin ligase-like complex (Atg12-Atg5/Atg16L1), is a key regulator involved in autophagosome formation - a crucial phase of autophagy. In this study, we used different in silico methods for comprehensive analysis of ATG5 to investigate its less explored regulatory activity. We have predicted various physico-chemical parameters and two possible transmembrane models that helped in exposing its functional regions. Twenty four PTM sites and 44 TFBS were identified which could be targeted to modulate the autophagy pathway. Furthermore, LD analysis identified 3 blocks of genotyped SNPs and 2 deleterious nsSNPs that may have damaging impact on protein function and thus could be employed for carrying genome-wide association studies. In conclusion, the information obtained in this study could be helpful for better understanding of regulatory roles of ATG5 and provides a base for its implication in population-based studies. PMID:27617225

  18. Active vision in satellite scene analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naillon, Martine

    1994-01-01

    In earth observation or planetary exploration it is necessary to have more and, more autonomous systems, able to adapt to unpredictable situations. This imposes the use, in artificial systems, of new concepts in cognition, based on the fact that perception should not be separated from recognition and decision making levels. This means that low level signal processing (perception level) should interact with symbolic and high level processing (decision level). This paper is going to describe the new concept of active vision, implemented in Distributed Artificial Intelligence by Dassault Aviation following a 'structuralist' principle. An application to spatial image interpretation is given, oriented toward flexible robotics.

  19. Passive versus active mitigation cost analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Parazin, R.J.; Galbraith, J.D.

    1995-04-01

    The scope of this task is to assess the impact of mitigation alternatives for Tanks 241-SY-101 and 241-SY-103 on the Project W-236A Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility. This assessment and other related tasks are part of an Action Plan Path Forward prepared by the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Life Extension and Transition Program. Task 3.7 of the Action Plan for Project W-236A MWTF analyzed the comparative cost/risk of two hydrogen gas mitigation alternatives (active versus passive) to recommend the most appropriate course of action to resolve the hydrogen gas safety issue. The qualitative success of active mitigation has been demonstrated through Tank 241-SY-101 testing. Passive mitigation has not been demonstrated but will be validated by laboratory test work performed under Task 3.1 of the Action Plan. It is assumed for this assessment that the uncertainties associated with the performance of either alternative is comparable. Determining alternative specific performance measures beyond those noted are not in the scope of this effort.

  20. An Item Analysis and Validity Investigation of Bender Visual Motor Gestalt Test Score Items

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lambert, Nadine M.

    1971-01-01

    This investigation attempted to demonstrate the utility of standard item analysis procedures for selecting the most reliable and valid items for scoring Bender Visual Motor Gestalt Test test records. (Author)

  1. Evaluating the Role of Time in Investigative Analysis of Document Collections.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Bum chul; Javed, Waqas; Ghani, Sohaib; Elmqvist, Niklas; Yi, Ji Soo; Ebert, David S

    2012-11-01

    Time is a universal and essential aspect of data in any investigative analysis. It helps analysts establish causality, build storylines from evidence, and reject infeasible hypotheses. For this reason, many investigative analysis tools provide visual representations designed for making sense of temporal data. However, the field of visual analytics still needs more evidence explaining how temporal visualization actually aids the analysis process, as well as design recommendations for how to build these visualizations. To fill this gap, we conducted an insight-based qualitative study to investigate the influence of temporal visualization on investigative analysis. We found that visualizing temporal information helped participants externalize chains of events. Another contribution of our work is the lightweight evaluation approach used to collect, visualize, and analyze insight.

  2. Natural male contraceptive: phytochemical investigation and anti-spermatogenic activity of Pistia stratiotes Linn.

    PubMed

    Singh, Kiran; Dubey, Bidhyut Kumar; Tripathi, Avinash C; Singh, Ajeet Pal; Saraf, Shailendra K

    2014-01-01

    This work is an attempt to explore the anti-spermatogenic activity of Pistia stratiotes and to investigate it as a male contraceptive. The prepared extracts were screened for the presence of alkaloids, glycosides, steroids, flavonoids, saponin and phenolic compounds. To assess the anti-spermatogenic activity, mice were orally administered with the various extracts of P. stratiotes (dose: 100 and 200 mg/kg body weight/day, for 45 days) and the most active, ethanolic extract was subjected to the isolation of phytoconstituent responsible for the activity. Diethyl ether fraction of ethanolic extract was taken to isolate a saponin, sitosterol-3-O-[2,4-di-O-acetyl-6-O-stearyl-β-D-glucopyranoside]. Anti-spermatogenic activity of the isolated saponin was evaluated at a dose of 50 mg/kg body weight/day, for 45 days. The treatment caused significant decrease (P < 0.01) in the weight of reproductive organs (testis, epididymis and seminal vesicle). The sperm count, sperm viability and serum testosterone levels were significantly lowered compared with that of the control group.

  3. Investigating the active hydrothermal field of Kolumbo Volcano using CTD profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eleni Christopoulou, Maria; Mertzimekis, Theo; Nomikou, Paraskevi; Papanikolaou, Dimitrios; Carey, Steve

    2014-05-01

    The submarine Kolumbo volcano NE of Santorini Island and the unique active hydrothermal vent field on its crater field (depth ~ 500 m) have been recently explored in multiple cruises aboard E/V Nautilus. ROV explorations showed the existence of extensive vent activity and almost completely absence of vent-specific macrofauna. Gas discharges have been found to be 99%-rich in CO2, which is sequestered at the bottom of the crater due to a special combination of physicochemical and geomorphological factors. The dynamic conditions existing along the water column in the crater have been studied in detail by means of temperature, salinity and conductivity depth profiles for the first time. CTD sensors aboard the ROV Hercules were employed to record anomalies in those parameters in an attempt to investigate several active and inactive vent locations. Temporal CTD monitoring inside and outside of the crater was carried out over a period of two years. Direct comparison between the vent field and locations outside the main cone, where no hydrothermal activity is known to exist, showed completely different characteristics. CTD profiles above the active vent field (NNE side) are correlated to Kolumbo's cone morphology. The profiles suggest the existence of four distinct zones of physicochemical properties in the water column. The layer directly above the chimneys exhibit gas discharges highly enriched in CO2. Continuous gas motoring is essential to identify the onset of geological hazards in the region.

  4. Biphasic investigation of contact mechanics in natural human hips during activities

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Xijin; Jin, Zhongmin; Fisher, John; Wilcox, Ruth K

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the cartilage contact mechanics and the associated fluid pressurisation of the hip joint under eight daily activities, using a three-dimensional finite element hip model with biphasic cartilage layers and generic geometries. Loads with spatial and temporal variations were applied over time and the time-dependent performance of the hip cartilage during walking was also evaluated. It was found that the fluid support ratio was over 90% during the majority of the cycles for all the eight activities. A reduced fluid support ratio was observed for the time at which the contact region slid towards the interior edge of the acetabular cartilage, but these occurred when the absolute level of the peak contact stress was minimal. Over 10 cycles of gait, the peak contact stress and peak fluid pressure remained constant, but a faster process of fluid exudation was observed for the interior edge region of the acetabular cartilage. The results demonstrate the excellent function of the hip cartilage within which the solid matrix is prevented from high levels of stress during activities owing to the load shared by fluid pressurisation. The findings are important in gaining a better understanding of the hip function during daily activities, as well as the pathology of hip degeneration and potential for future interventions. They provide a basis for future subject-specific biphasic investigations of hip performance during activities. PMID:24898443

  5. A preliminary investigation of anticholinesterase activity of some Iranian medicinal plants commonly used in traditional medicine

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to evaluate acetylcholinesterase inhibitory activity of some commonly used herbal medicine in Iran to introduce a new source for management of Alzheimer’s disease. A total of 18 aqueous-methanolic extract (1:1; v/v) from the following plants: Brassica alba, Brassica nigra, Camellia sinensis, Cinchona officinalis, Citrus aurantifolia, Citrus x aurantium, Ferula assafoetida, Humulus lupulus, Juglans regia, Juniperus sabina, Myristica fragrans, Pelargonium graveolens, Pistacia vera, Punica granatum, Rheum officinale, Rosa damascena, Salix alba, and Zizyphus vulgaris were prepared and screened for their acetylcholinesterase inhibitory activity using in vitro Ellman spectrophotometric method. Results According to the obtained results, the order of inhibitory activity (IC50 values, μg /ml) of extracts from highest to the lowest was: C. sinensis (5.96), C. aurantifolia (19.57), Z. vulgaris (24.37), B. nigra (84.30) and R. damascena (93.1). Conclusions The results indicated and confirmed the traditional use of these herbs for management of central nervous system disorders. C. sinensis showed the highest activity in inhibition of acetylcholinesterase. However, further investigations on identification of active components in the extracts are needed. PMID:24401532

  6. Physiological investigation of automobile driver's activation index using simulated monotonous driving.

    PubMed

    Yamakoshi, T; Yamakoshi, K; Tanaka, S; Nogawa, M; Kusakabe, M; Kusumi, M; Tanida, K

    2004-01-01

    Monotonous automobile operation in our daily life may cause the lowering of what might be termed an activation state of the human body, resulting in an increased risk of an accident. We therefore propose to create a more suitable environment in-car so as to allow active operation of the vehicle, hopefully thus avoiding potentially dangerous situations during driving. In order to develop such an activation method as a final goal, we have firstly focused on the acquisition of physiological variables, including cardiovascular parameters, during presentation to the driver of a monotonous screen image, simulating autonomous travel of constant-speed on a motorway. Subsequently, we investigated the derivation of a driver's activation index. During the screen image presentation, a momentary electrical stimulation of about 1 second duration was involuntarily applied to a subject's shoulder to obtain a physiological response. We have successfully monitored various physiological variables during the image presentation, and results suggest that a peculiar pattern in the beat-by-beat change of blood pressure in response to the involuntary stimulus may be an appropriate, and feasible, index relevant to activation state.

  7. Biphasic investigation of contact mechanics in natural human hips during activities.

    PubMed

    Li, Junyan; Hua, Xijin; Jin, Zhongmin; Fisher, John; Wilcox, Ruth K

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the cartilage contact mechanics and the associated fluid pressurisation of the hip joint under eight daily activities, using a three-dimensional finite element hip model with biphasic cartilage layers and generic geometries. Loads with spatial and temporal variations were applied over time and the time-dependent performance of the hip cartilage during walking was also evaluated. It was found that the fluid support ratio was over 90% during the majority of the cycles for all the eight activities. A reduced fluid support ratio was observed for the time at which the contact region slid towards the interior edge of the acetabular cartilage, but these occurred when the absolute level of the peak contact stress was minimal. Over 10 cycles of gait, the peak contact stress and peak fluid pressure remained constant, but a faster process of fluid exudation was observed for the interior edge region of the acetabular cartilage. The results demonstrate the excellent function of the hip cartilage within which the solid matrix is prevented from high levels of stress during activities owing to the load shared by fluid pressurisation. The findings are important in gaining a better understanding of the hip function during daily activities, as well as the pathology of hip degeneration and potential for future interventions. They provide a basis for future subject-specific biphasic investigations of hip performance during activities.

  8. Improved mesh based photon sampling techniques for neutron activation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Relson, E.; Wilson, P. P. H.; Biondo, E. D.

    2013-07-01

    The design of fusion power systems requires analysis of neutron activation of large, complex volumes, and the resulting particles emitted from these volumes. Structured mesh-based discretization of these problems allows for improved modeling in these activation analysis problems. Finer discretization of these problems results in large computational costs, which drives the investigation of more efficient methods. Within an ad hoc subroutine of the Monte Carlo transport code MCNP, we implement sampling of voxels and photon energies for volumetric sources using the alias method. The alias method enables efficient sampling of a discrete probability distribution, and operates in 0(1) time, whereas the simpler direct discrete method requires 0(log(n)) time. By using the alias method, voxel sampling becomes a viable alternative to sampling space with the 0(1) approach of uniformly sampling the problem volume. Additionally, with voxel sampling it is straightforward to introduce biasing of volumetric sources, and we implement this biasing of voxels as an additional variance reduction technique that can be applied. We verify our implementation and compare the alias method, with and without biasing, to direct discrete sampling of voxels, and to uniform sampling. We study the behavior of source biasing in a second set of tests and find trends between improvements and source shape, material, and material density. Overall, however, the magnitude of improvements from source biasing appears to be limited. Future work will benefit from the implementation of efficient voxel sampling - particularly with conformal unstructured meshes where the uniform sampling approach cannot be applied. (authors)

  9. [Investigation of "reading" with FFT analysis of the beta waves in EEG during "rapid-reading"].

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, S

    1992-06-01

    The beta waves in electroencephalograms (EEGs) during "reading" were investigated by means of the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) analysis method. The subjects who had mastered a "rapid-reading" method, were classified into two groups according to their rapid-reading achievement level: the "under-trained readers" (male 5, female 2) had already acquired the ability of smooth eye movement, but continued to use the mental phonetic process while reading. The "well-trained readers" (male 6, female 2) could understand the contents of the text without resorting to such phonetic process. All subjects were righthanded. The tasks were designed to eliminate the artifact of the eye movement and the electromyogram as much as possible. The EEGs were recorded with twelve channels of the international standard 10-20 electrode system. The relative power value (R.P.V.) was calculated as follows: RPV(%) = [(X-C)/N] x 100(%) where X is the beta 1 or beta 2 power value by FFT analysis while doing tasks, C is the power value while doing control tasks, and N is the value in the resting state with the eyes open. The results were statistically analyzed by paired t-test. The following results were obtained: In both groups; (a) the left angular gyrus was usually activate during the rapid-reading; (b) the Wernicke's center was activated only during reading with the phonetic process; (c) in the well-trained readers the activation of the right visual cortex was associated with some visual imaging during the rapid-reading; (d) in the under-trained readers, the association between the activation of the central frontal area and the rapid-reading was observed. Thus, the following model for "reading" was obtained: Two parallel pathways seem important in the processing of the verbal information presented visually; one relates only to the left angular gyrus where the visual-verbal information is processed directly, and the other relates to the interactive pathway between the left angular gyrus and the

  10. Activation analysis of the compact ignition tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Selcow, E.C.

    1986-01-01

    The US fusion program has completed the conceptual design of a compact tokamak device that achieves ignition. The high neutron wall loadings associated with this compact deuterium-tritium-burning device indicate that radiation-related issues may be significant considerations in the overall system design. Sufficient shielding will be requied for the radiation protection of both reactor components and occupational personnel. A close-in igloo shield has been designed around the periphery of the tokamak structure to permit personnel access into the test cell after shutdown and limit the total activation of the test cell components. This paper describes the conceptual design of the igloo shield system and discusses the major neutronic concerns related to the design of the Compact Ignition Tokamak.

  11. Phosphorus Determination by Derivative Activation Analysis: A Multifaceted Radiochemical Application.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kleppinger, E. W.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Although determination of phosphorus is important in biology, physiology, and environmental science, traditional gravimetric and colorimetric methods are cumbersome and lack the requisite sensitivity. Therefore, a derivative activation analysis method is suggested. Background information, procedures, and results are provided. (JN)

  12. Promoting active lifestyles in young children: investigating mothers' decisions about their child's physical activity and screen time behaviours.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Kyra; Thomson, Courtney E; White, Katherine M

    2013-07-01

    Given increasing trends of obesity being noted from early in life and that active lifestyles track across time, it is important that children at a very young age be active to combat a foundation of unhealthy behaviours forming. This study investigated, within a theory of planned behaviour (TPB) framework, factors which influence mothers' decisions about their child's (1) adequate physical activity (PA) and (2) limited screen time behaviours. Mothers (N = 162) completed a main questionnaire, via on-line or paper-based administration, which comprised standard TPB items in addition to measures of planning and background demographic variables. One week later, consenting mothers completed a follow-up telephone questionnaire which assessed the decisions they had made regarding their child's PA and screen time behaviours during the previous week. Hierarchical multiple regression analyses revealed support for the predictive model, explaining an overall 73 and 78 % of the variance in mothers' intention and 38 and 53 % of the variance in mothers' decisions to ensure their child engages in adequate PA and limited screen time, respectively. Attitude and subjective norms predicted intention in both target behaviours, as did intentions with behaviour. Contrary to predictions, perceived behavioural control (PBC) in PA behaviour and planning in screen time behaviour were not significant predictors of intention, neither was PBC a predictor of either behaviour. The findings illustrate the various roles that psycho-social factors play in mothers' decisions to ensure their child engages in active lifestyle behaviours which can help to inform future intervention programs aimed at combating very young children's inactivity. PMID:22833334

  13. Investigating temporary acyclicity in a captive group of Asian elephants (Elephas maximus): Relationship between management, adrenal activity and social factors.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Katie L; Trotter, Jessica; Jones, Martin; Brown, Janine L; Steinmetz, Hanspeter W; Walker, Susan L

    2016-01-01

    Routine faecal steroid monitoring has been used to aid the management of five captive Asian elephant (Elephas maximus) females at Chester Zoo, UK, since 2007. Progestagen analysis initially revealed synchronised oestrous cycles among all females. However, a 14- to 20-week period of temporary acyclicity subsequently occurred in three females, following several management changes (increased training, foot-care and intermittent matriarch removal for health reasons) and the initiation of pregnancy in another female. The aim of this study was to retrospectively investigate whether these management changes were related to increased adrenal activity and disruption of ovarian activity, or whether social factors may have been involved in the temporary cessation of cyclicity. Faecal samples collected every other day were analysed to investigate whether glucocorticoid metabolites were related to reproductive status (pregnant, cycling, acyclic) or management (training, foot-care, matriarch presence). Routine training and foot-care were not associated with adrenal activity; however, intensive foot-care to treat an abscess in one female was associated with increased glucocorticoid concentration. Matriarch presence influenced adrenal activity in three females, being lower when the matriarch was separated from the group at night compared to being always present. However, in the females that exhibited temporary acyclicity, there was no consistent relationship between glucocorticoids and cyclicity state. Although the results of this study do not fully explain this occurrence, the highly synchronised nature of oestrous cycles within this group, and the concurrent acyclicity in three females, raises the question of whether social factors could have been involved in the temporary disruption of ovarian activity.

  14. Investigating temporary acyclicity in a captive group of Asian elephants (Elephas maximus): Relationship between management, adrenal activity and social factors.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Katie L; Trotter, Jessica; Jones, Martin; Brown, Janine L; Steinmetz, Hanspeter W; Walker, Susan L

    2016-01-01

    Routine faecal steroid monitoring has been used to aid the management of five captive Asian elephant (Elephas maximus) females at Chester Zoo, UK, since 2007. Progestagen analysis initially revealed synchronised oestrous cycles among all females. However, a 14- to 20-week period of temporary acyclicity subsequently occurred in three females, following several management changes (increased training, foot-care and intermittent matriarch removal for health reasons) and the initiation of pregnancy in another female. The aim of this study was to retrospectively investigate whether these management changes were related to increased adrenal activity and disruption of ovarian activity, or whether social factors may have been involved in the temporary cessation of cyclicity. Faecal samples collected every other day were analysed to investigate whether glucocorticoid metabolites were related to reproductive status (pregnant, cycling, acyclic) or management (training, foot-care, matriarch presence). Routine training and foot-care were not associated with adrenal activity; however, intensive foot-care to treat an abscess in one female was associated with increased glucocorticoid concentration. Matriarch presence influenced adrenal activity in three females, being lower when the matriarch was separated from the group at night compared to being always present. However, in the females that exhibited temporary acyclicity, there was no consistent relationship between glucocorticoids and cyclicity state. Although the results of this study do not fully explain this occurrence, the highly synchronised nature of oestrous cycles within this group, and the concurrent acyclicity in three females, raises the question of whether social factors could have been involved in the temporary disruption of ovarian activity. PMID:26393308

  15. Investigating Baseline, Alternative and Copula-based Algorithm for combining Airborne Active and Passive Microwave Observations in the SMAP Context

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montzka, C.; Lorenz, C.; Jagdhuber, T.; Laux, P.; Hajnsek, I.; Kunstmann, H.; Entekhabi, D.; Vereecken, H.

    2015-12-01

    The objective of the NASA Soil Moisture Active & Passive (SMAP) mission is to provide global measurements of soil moisture and freeze/thaw states. SMAP integrates L-band radar and radiometer instruments as a single observation system combining the respective strengths of active and passive remote sensing for enhanced soil moisture mapping. Airborne instruments will be a key part of the SMAP validation program. Here, we present an airborne campaign in the Rur catchment, Germany, in which the passive L-band system Polarimetric L-band Multi-beam Radiometer (PLMR2) and the active L-band system F-SAR of DLR were flown simultaneously on the same platform on six dates in 2013. The flights covered the full heterogeneity of the area under investigation, i.e. all types of land cover and experimental monitoring sites with in situ sensors. Here, we used the obtained data sets as a test-bed for the analysis of three active-passive fusion techniques: A) The SMAP baseline algorithm: Disaggregation of passive microwave brightness temperature by active microwave backscatter and subsequent inversion to soil moisture, B), the SMAP alternative algorithm: Estimation of soil moisture by passive sensor data and subsequent disaggregation by active sensor backscatter and C) Copula-based combination of active and passive microwave data. For method C empirical Copulas were generated and theoretical Copulas fitted both on the level of the raw products brightness temperature and backscatter as well as two soil moisture products. Results indicate that the regression parameters for method A and B are dependent on the radar vegetation index (RVI). Similarly, for method C the best performance was gained by generating separate Copulas for individual land use classes. For more in-depth analyses longer time series are necessary as can obtained by airborne campaigns, therefore, the methods will be applied to SMAP data.

  16. Prompt Gamma-Ray Neutron Activation Analysis (PGNAA) for Elemental Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Robin P. Gardner

    2006-04-11

    This research project was to improve the prompt gamma-ray neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) measurement approach for bulk analysis, oil well logging, and small sample thermal enutron bean applications.

  17. Analysis of supercooling activities of surfactants.

    PubMed

    Kuwabara, Chikako; Terauchi, Ryuji; Tochigi, Hiroshi; Takaoka, Hisao; Arakawa, Keita; Fujikawa, Seizo

    2014-08-01

    Supercooling-promoting activities (SCAs) of 25 kinds of surfactants including non-ionic, anionic, cationic and amphoteric types were examined in solutions (buffered Milli-Q water, BMQW) containing the ice nucleation bacterium (INB) Erwinia ananas, silver iodide (AgI) or BMQW alone, which unintentionally contained unidentified ice nucleators, by a droplet freezing assay. Most of the surfactants exhibited SCA in solutions containing AgI but not in solutions containing the INB E. ananas or BMQW alone. SCAs of many surfactants in solutions containing AgI were very high compared with those of previously reported supercooling-promoting substances. Cationic surfactants, hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (C16TAB) and hexadecyltrimethylammonium chloride (C16TAC), at concentrations of 0.01% (w/v) exhibited SCA of 11.8 °C, which is the highest SCA so far reported. These surfactants also showed high SCAs at very low concentrations in solutions containing AgI. C16TAB exhibited SCA of 5.7 °C at a concentration of 0.0005% (w/v). PMID:24792543

  18. Analysis of supercooling activities of surfactants.

    PubMed

    Kuwabara, Chikako; Terauchi, Ryuji; Tochigi, Hiroshi; Takaoka, Hisao; Arakawa, Keita; Fujikawa, Seizo

    2014-08-01

    Supercooling-promoting activities (SCAs) of 25 kinds of surfactants including non-ionic, anionic, cationic and amphoteric types were examined in solutions (buffered Milli-Q water, BMQW) containing the ice nucleation bacterium (INB) Erwinia ananas, silver iodide (AgI) or BMQW alone, which unintentionally contained unidentified ice nucleators, by a droplet freezing assay. Most of the surfactants exhibited SCA in solutions containing AgI but not in solutions containing the INB E. ananas or BMQW alone. SCAs of many surfactants in solutions containing AgI were very high compared with those of previously reported supercooling-promoting substances. Cationic surfactants, hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (C16TAB) and hexadecyltrimethylammonium chloride (C16TAC), at concentrations of 0.01% (w/v) exhibited SCA of 11.8 °C, which is the highest SCA so far reported. These surfactants also showed high SCAs at very low concentrations in solutions containing AgI. C16TAB exhibited SCA of 5.7 °C at a concentration of 0.0005% (w/v).

  19. Thinking through Text Comprehension II: Analysis of Verbal and Investigative Repertoires

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sota, Melinda; Leon, Marta; Layng, T. V. Joe

    2011-01-01

    Reading comprehension can be considered a complex human performance involving two integrated repertoires: a verbal repertoire and an investigative (generative) repertoire. This paper describes an analysis of these repertoires in terms which can ultimately inform the design of programs to teach them, using the analysis and design of Headsprout[R]…

  20. Investigating the Application of Needs Analysis on EAP Business Administration Materials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohammed, Saifalislam Abdalla Hajahmed

    2016-01-01

    This study is conducted to investigate the application of needs analysis in developing EAP materials for business administration students in two Sudanese universities. The subjects are 2 head departments of English language. To collect data, the researcher uses interview and content analysis. The study adopts the descriptive approach. The data of…

  1. A Monte Carlo Investigation of the Analysis of Variance Applied to Non-Independent Bernoulli Variates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Draper, John F., Jr.

    The applicability of the Analysis of Variance, ANOVA, procedures to the analysis of dichotomous repeated measure data is described. The design models for which data were simulated in this investigation were chosen to represent simple cases of two experimental situations: situation one, in which subjects' responses to a single randomly selected set…

  2. Analysis of systems hardware flown on LDEF. Results of the systems special investigation group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dursch, Harry W.; Spear, W. Steve; Miller, Emmett A.; Bohnhoff-Hlavacek, Gail L.; Edelman, Joel

    1992-01-01

    The Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) was retrieved after spending 69 months in low Earth orbit (LEO). LDEF carried a remarkable variety of mechanical, electrical, thermal, and optical systems, subsystems, and components. The Systems Special Investigation Group (Systems SIG) was formed to investigate the effects of the long duration exposure to LEO on systems related hardware and to coordinate and collate all systems analysis of LDEF hardware. Discussed here is the status of the LDEF Systems SIG investigation through the end of 1991.

  3. The antioxidant activity of sulphurous thermal water protects against oxidative DNA damage: a comet assay investigation.

    PubMed

    Braga, P C; Ceci, C; Marabini, L; Nappi, G

    2013-04-01

    Various studies have recently shown that sulphurous waters acts against the oxidants released during respiratory bursts of human neutrophils, and free radicals such as HO•, O2¯•, Tempol and Fremy's salt. However, there is still a lack of data concerning their direct protection of DNA. The aim of this study was to investigate the antigenotoxicity effects of sulphurous water, which has never been previously investigated for this purpose, using the alkaline single cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE) approach (comet assay). The comet assay is a sensitive method for assessing DNA fragmentation in individual cells in genotoxicity studies but can also be used to investigate the activity of agents that protect against DNA damage. The extent of migration was measured by means of SCGE, and DNA damage was expressed as tail moment. All of these assays were made using natural sulphurous water, degassed sulphurous water (no detectable HS), and reconstituted sulphurous water (degassed plus NaHS). DNA damages was significantly inhibited by natural water with HS concentrations of 5.0 and 2.5 μg/mL. The use of degassed water did not lead to any significant differences from baseline values, whereas the reconstituted water led to significant results overlapping those obtained using natural water. These findings confirm the importance of the presence of an HS group (reductive activity) and indicate that, in addition to their known mucolytic activity and trophic effects on respiratory mucosa, HS groups in sulphurous water also protect against oxidative DNA damage and contribute to the water's therapeutic effects on upper and lower airway inflammatory diseases.

  4. (E)-3-chloro-N-((5-nitrothiophen-2-yl)methylene)aniline: a combined crystallographic, theoretical and antimicrobial activity investigation.

    PubMed

    Yılmaz, Işıl; Kazak, Canan; Gümüş, Sümeyye; Ağar, Erbil; Ardalı, Yüksel

    2012-11-01

    The title molecule, (E)-3-chloro-N-((5-nitrothiophen-2-yl)methylene)aniline, (C(11)H(7)ClN(2)O(2)S), was synthesized and characterized by IR and single-crystal X-ray structure determination. The compound crystallizes in the monoclinic space group P2(1)/c. In addition, the molecular geometry, vibrational frequencies and frontier molecular orbitals analysis of the title compound in the ground state have been calculated by using the PM3 semi-empirical, HF/6-31G(d) and B3LYP/6-31G(d) ab initio methods. The results of the optimized molecular structure are exhibited and compared with the experimental X-ray diffraction and the calculated results are show that the optimized geometry can well reproduce the crystal structure. The Schiff base compounds are very important in medicinal and pharmaceutical fields because of their wide spectrum of biological activities. Most of them show biological activities such as antimicrobial, antifungal as well as antitumor activity. Therefore, (C(11)H(7)ClN(2)O(2)S) was investigated for their antimicrobial activities, Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria.

  5. Caveat medicus: consequences of federal investigations of marketing activities of pharmaceutical suppliers of prostate cancer drugs.

    PubMed

    McKoy, June M; Lyons, E Allison; Obadina, Eniola; Carson, Kenneth; Pickard, A Simon; Schellhammer, Paul; McLeod, David; Boyd, Cynthia E; McWilliams, Norene; Sartor, Oliver; Schumock, Glen T; McCaffery, Kathryn; Bennett, Charles L

    2005-12-01

    In the course of recent health care fraud investigations against TAP Pharmaceuticals (Lake Forest, IL) and AstraZeneca International (London, United Kingdom), each pled guilty to one violation of the Prescription Drug Marketing Act, settled claims related to alleged violations of the False Claims Act without admitting guilt, and paid fines, settlements for liabilities, and reimbursements of dollar 850 million and dollar 355 million, respectively. In a unique aspect of these cases, federal investigators brought criminal charges against 14 TAP employees and investigated the billing practices of several urologists. These investigations resulted in guilty pleas from both urologists and industry employees relative to the Prescription Drug Marketing Act or the False Claims Act and probationary sentences with payments of fines and restitution to the government for urologists who cooperated with federal investigations. One uncooperative urologist was found guilty of violating the Federal False Claims Act and sentenced to 6 months of home arrest, excluded from Medicare for 5 years, required to provide 600 hours of free medical care to indigent patients and patients covered by Medicare or Medicaid, and paid fines and restitution to the government. The cases against TAP and AstraZeneca have been followed by federal and state investigations of allegedly illegal marketing practices of other pharmaceutical firms and have resulted in negotiated settlements of dollar 3.8 billion and dollar 71.5 million, respectively. Believing that an Average Wholesale Price-based reimbursement system was an important driving factor for these marketing activities, Medicare has shifted to an Average Sales Price-based reimbursement system. This is expected to greatly impact the practice of outpatient oncology nationwide.

  6. Present-day biogeochemical activities of anaerobic bacteria and their relevance to future exobiological investigations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oremland, R.S.

    1989-01-01

    If the primordial atmosphere was reducing, then the first microbial ecosystem was probably composed of anaerobic bacteria. However, despite the presence of an oxygen-rich atmosphere, anaerobic habitats are important, commonplace components of the Earth's present biosphere. The geochemical activities displayed by these anaerobes impact the global cycling of certain elements (e.g., C, N, S, Fe, Mn, etc.). Methane provides an obvious example of how human-enhanced activities on a global scale can influence the content of a "radiative" (i.e., infrared absorbing) trace gas in the atmosphere. Methane can be oxidized by anaerobic bacteria, but this does not appear to support their growth. Acetylene, however, does support such growth. This may form the basis for future exobiological investigations of the atmospheres of anoxic, hydrocarbon-rich planets like Jupiter and Saturn, as well as the latter's satellite Titan. ?? 1989.

  7. Investigation of photocalalytic activity of ZnO prepared by spray pyrolis with various precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourfaa, F.; Lamri Zeggar, M.; A, A.; Aida, M. S.; Attaf, N.

    2016-03-01

    Semiconductor photocatalysts such as ZnO has attracted much attention in recent years due to their various applications for the degradation of organic pollutants in water, air and in dye sensitized photovoltaic solar cell. In the present work, ZnO thin films were prepared by ultrasonic spray pyrolysis by using different precursors namely: acetate, chloride and zinc nitrate in order to investigate their influence on ZnO photocatalytic activity. The films crystalline structure was studied by mean of X- ray diffraction measurements (XRD) and the films surface morphology by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). The films optical properties were studied by mean of UV-visible spectroscopy. The prepared films were tested for the degradation of the red reactive dye largely used in textile industry. As a result, we found that the zinc nitrate is the best precursor to prepare ZnO thin films suitable for a good photocatalytic activity.

  8. An investigation of the energy consumption and conversion of piezoelectric actuators integrated in active structures

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, C.; Sun, F.; Rogers, C.A.

    1994-12-31

    This paper quantifies the energy consumption and conversion of an active structure driven by piezoelectric ceramic (PZT) actuators. The principle and methodology discussed in this paper may also be applied to other active structures with different types of actuators. The paper first discusses the energy conversion of PZT actuator materials, including the energy dissipation and electro-mechanical energy conversion. The energy conversion efficiency for the static and dynamic applications of PZT actuator is then defined and discussed. A numerical case study has also been conducted. One of the major conclusions from the investigation is that the physical process of energy conversion (electrical to mechanical and vice versa) within an induced strain actuator depends on the operating conditions of the actuator, namely, the type of structure it interacts, as well as the structural impedance.

  9. Investigating real-time activation of adenosine receptors by bioluminescence resonance energy transfer technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yimei; Yang, Hongqin; Zheng, Liqin; Chen, Jiangxu; Wang, Yuhua; Li, Hui; Xie, Shusen

    2013-02-01

    Adenosine receptors play important roles in many physiological and pathological processes, for example regulating myocardial oxygen consumption and the release of neurotransmitters. The activations of adenosine receptors have been studied by some kinds of techniques, such as western blot, immunohistochemistry, etc. However, these techniques cannot reveal the dynamical response of adenosine receptors under stimulation. In this paper, bioluminescence resonance energy transfer technique was introduced to study the real-time activation of adenosine receptors by monitoring the dynamics of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) level. The results showed that there were significant differences between adenosine receptors on real-time responses under stimulation. Moreover, the dynamics of cAMP level demonstrated that competition between adenosine receptors existed. Taken together, our study indicates that monitoring the dynamics of cAMP level using bioluminescence resonance energy transfer technique could be one potential approach to investigate the mechanism of competitions between adenosine receptors.

  10. Investigations on the activity of poly(2-oxazoline) enzyme conjugates dissolved in organic solvents.

    PubMed

    Konieczny, Stefan; Krumm, Christian; Doert, Dominik; Neufeld, Katharina; Tiller, Joerg C

    2014-07-10

    The use of enzymes in organic solvents offers a great opportunity for the highly selective synthesis of complex organic compounds. In this study we investigate the POXylation of several enzymes with different polyoxazolines ranging from the hydrophilic poly(2-methyl-oxazoline) (PMOx) to the hydrophobic poly(2-heptyl-oxazoline) (PHeptOx). As reported previously on the examples of model enzymes POXylation mediated by pyromellitic acid dianhydride results in highly modified, organosoluble protein conjugates. This procedure is here extended to a larger number of proteins and optimized for the different polyoxazolines. The resulting polymer-enzyme conjugates (PEC) became soluble in different organic solvents ranging from hydrophilic DMF to even toluene. These conjugates were characterized regarding their solubility and especially their activity in organic solvents and in some cases the PECs showed significantly (up to 153,000 fold) higher activities than the respective native enzymes. PMID:24709400

  11. Overview af MSFC's Applied Fluid Dynamics Analysis Group Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, Roberto; Griffin, Lisa; Williams, Robert

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents viewgraphs on NASA Marshall Space Flight Center's Applied Fluid Dynamics Analysis Group Activities. The topics include: 1) Status of programs at MSFC; 2) Fluid Mechanics at MSFC; 3) Relevant Fluid Dynamics Activities at MSFC; and 4) Shuttle Return to Flight.

  12. Spatiotemporal Data Mining, Analysis, and Visualization of Human Activity Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Xun

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation addresses the research challenge of developing efficient new methods for discovering useful patterns and knowledge in large volumes of electronically collected spatiotemporal activity data. I propose to analyze three types of such spatiotemporal activity data in a methodological framework that integrates spatial analysis, data…

  13. Understanding Tensions: Activity Systems Analysis of Cross-Continental Collaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryder, LanHui Zhang; Yamagata-Lynch, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    Using the lens of Vygotsky's sociocultural theory, activity theory, and Engeström's activity systems analysis, this qualitative study explores students' experiences in the context of a sixteen-week transpacific collaboration between seven students at Northern Illinois University (NIU) and seven students from Shandong Normal…

  14. Microfluidic Investigation Reveals Distinct Roles for Actin Cytoskeleton and Myosin II Activity in Capillary Leukocyte Trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Gabriele, Sylvain; Benoliel, Anne-Marie; Bongrand, Pierre; Théodoly, Olivier

    2009-01-01

    Circulating leukocyte sequestration in pulmonary capillaries is arguably the initiating event of lung injury in acute respiratory distress syndrome. We present a microfluidic investigation of the roles of actin organization and myosin II activity during the different stages of leukocyte trafficking through narrow capillaries (entry, transit and shape relaxation) using specific drugs (latrunculin A, jasplakinolide, and blebbistatin). The deformation rate during entry reveals that cell stiffness depends strongly on F-actin organization and hardly on myosin II activity, supporting a microfilament role in leukocyte sequestration. In the transit stage, cell friction is influenced by stiffness, demonstrating that the actin network is not completely broken after a forced entry into a capillary. Conversely, membrane unfolding was independent of leukocyte stiffness. The surface area of sequestered leukocytes increased by up to 160% in the absence of myosin II activity, showing the major role of molecular motors in microvilli wrinkling and zipping. Finally, cell shape relaxation was largely independent of both actin organization and myosin II activity, whereas a deformed state was required for normal trafficking through capillary segments. PMID:19450501

  15. Post-Chernobyl investigations of radiocaesium activity concentrations in Adriatic Sea pilchards.

    PubMed

    Franić, Zdenko; Petrinec, Branko; Branica, Gina; Marović, Gordana; Kubelka, Dragan; Franić, Zrinka

    2012-08-01

    Investigations in the post-Chernobyl period (1986-2009) of radiocaesium activity concentrations in Adriatic pilchards are presented. Compared with pre-Chernobyl period, the Chernobyl nuclear accident caused increase of (137)Cs activity concentrations in pilchards. By fitting the measured (137)Cs activity concentrations to the theoretical curve was estimated to be 1.5±0.4 y for 1986-90 and 5.8±0.4 y for 1991-2009 and the bimodal behaviour for the ecological half-life of (137)Cs in pilchards has been observed. Estimated annual effective doses received by (134)Cs and (137)Cs intake due to consumption for an adult member of Croatian population are small. Collective dose for the 1986-2009 period was 4.9+0.3 person-Sv. The observed (134)Cs/(137)Cs activity ratio in pilchards was similar to the ratio that has been found in other environmental samples. The concentration factor for pilchards was roughly estimated to be 93.7±39.2 l kg(-1), which is consistent with the values observed elsewhere.

  16. Extracellular enzyme activity assays (EEA) as a tool to investigate priming in freshwater biofilms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, K.; Sieczko, A.; Bengtsson, M. M.; Burns, N.; Herberg, E.; Battin, T.

    2012-04-01

    The priming effect describes a phenomenon, where an input of labile organic matter (LOM) increases the mineralization rate of recalcitrant organic matter (ROM). Until now priming has been mostly studied in soils, but not in aquatic ecosystems. In streams, microbial biofilms play a key role in carbon cycling. In this study, we investigate if priming contributes the metabolism of ROM in stream biofilms. We used bioreactors mimicking heterotrophic biofilms in the streambed, which were exposed to either glucose + NO3 and PO4 or to algal extracts as potential primers. Extracellular enzymatic activities were measured both in the biofilms, before and after the experiment, and in the in- and outflow of the bioreactors during the experiment. We measured the activity of β-d-glucosidase, α-d-glucosidase, β-d-xylosidase, cellobiohydrolase as enzymes involved in carbon metabolism, of leucine-aminopeptidase and endopeptidase as enzymes involved in peptides decomposition, and of esterase and phosphatase. Furthermore, phenol oxidase activity was assessed as an indicator for ROM. We evaluate these enzymatic activities to illuminate possible mechanisms underlying priming in the biofilms.

  17. Experimental investigation of the external nitrification biological nutrient removal activated sludge (ENBNRAS) system.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhi-Rong; Sötemann, S; Moodley, R; Wentzel, M C; Ekama, G A

    2003-08-01

    A systematic lab-scale experimental investigation is reported for the external nitrification (EN) biological nutrient removal (BNR) activated sludge (ENBNRAS) system, which is a combined fixed and suspended medium system. The ENBNRAS system was proposed to intensify the treatment capacity of BNR-activated sludge (BNRAS) systems by addressing two difficulties often encountered in practice: (a) the long sludge age for nitrification requirement; and (b) sludge bulking. In the ENBNRAS system, nitrification is transferred from the aerobic reactor in the suspended medium activated sludge system to a fixed medium nitrification system. Thus, the sludge age of the suspended medium activated sludge system can be reduced from 20 to 25 days to 8 to 10 days, resulting in a decrease in reactor volume per ML wastewater treated of about 30%. Furthermore, the aerobic mass fraction can also be reduced from 50% to 60% to <30% and concommitantly the anoxic mass fraction can be increased from 25% to 35% to >55% (if the anaerobic mass fraction is 15%), and thus complete denitrification in the anoxic reactors becomes possible. Research indicates that both the short sludge age and complete denitrification could ameliorate anoxic aerobic (AA) or low food/microorganism (F/M) ratio filamentous bulking, and hence reduce the surface area of secondary settling tanks or increase the treatment capacity of existing systems. The lab-scale experimental investigations indicate that the ENBNRAS system can obtain: (i) very good chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal, even with an aerobic mass fraction as low as 20%; (ii) high nitrogen removal, even for a wastewater with a high total kjeldahl nitrogen (TKN)/COD ratio, up to 0.14; (iii) adequate settling sludge (diluted sludge volume index [DSVI] <100 mL/g); and (iv) a significant reduction in oxygen demand.

  18. Investigation of biological activity of polar extracts isolated from Phlomis crinita Cav ssp. mauritanica Munby.

    PubMed

    Limem-Ben Amor, Ilef; Skandrani, Ines; Boubaker, Jihed; Ben Sghaïer, Mohamed; Neffati, Aicha; Bhouri, Wissem; Bouhlel, Ines; Chouchane, Nabil; Kilani, Soumaya; Guedon, Emmanuel; Ghoul, Mohamed; Ghedira, Kamel; Chekir-Ghedira, Leila

    2009-01-01

    The lyophilized infusion, the methanol, the ethyl acetate, and the total oligomer flavonoid (TOF)-enriched extracts prepared from the dried leaves of Phlomis crinita Cav. ssp. mauritanica Munby were investigated for the contents of flavonoids, tannins, coumarines and steroids. Antibacterial activity was investigated toward five bacterial strains. An inhibitory effect was observed against Staphyllococcus aureus and Enterococcus feacalis, and the minimal inhibitory concentrations ranged from 2.5 to 5 mg/mL of extract. The tested extracts exhibit an important free radical scavenging activity toward the 1,1-diphenyl 2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) free radical; with IC(50) values of 30.5, 6, 32, and 31.5 microg/mL, respectively, in the presence of lyophilized infusion, the TOF, the methanol, and the ethyl acetate extracts. Genotoxic and antigenotoxic properties of the different extracts were studied by using the SOS chromotest with Escherichia coli PQ37. The lyophilized infusion and TOF extracts obtained from P. crinita ssp. mauritanica showed no genotoxicity, whereas methanol and ethyl acetate extracts are considered as marginally genotoxic. On the other hand, we showed that each extract inhibited the mutagenicity induced by aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) (10 microg/assay) and nifuroxazide (NF) (10 microg/assay). The ethyl acetate extract showed the strongest level of protection toward the genotoxicity induced by both directly and indirectly genotoxic NF and AFB1. These tests proved that the lyophilized infusion possesses an antiradical activity likewise, it showed no genotoxic effect; that is why we choose this extract to assess its antiulcerogenic activity by using an ethanol-induced ulcerogenesis model in the rat. This test demonstrates that 300 mg/kg of a P. crinita ssp. mauritanica lyophilized infusion was more effective than the reference compound, cimetidine. PMID:19514937

  19. Simulation and experimental investigation of active lightweight compliant mechanisms with integrated piezoceramic actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modler, Niels; Winkler, Anja; Filippatos, Angelos; Lovasz, Erwin-Christian; Mărgineanu, Dan

    2016-08-01

    Compliant mechanisms with integrated actuators can enable new function-integrative structures through the elastic deformation of elements without the use of classical links and joints. For such designs, the mechanical behaviour of the mechanism has to be well known, because external loads, the utilised materials and the geometry of the structural parts influence the deformation performance significantly. In order to speed up the development process of such mechanisms, a tool for the dynamic analysis of compliant movements is necessary before any further FEM simulation and manufacturing. Therefore, the paper presents a simulating procedure for active compliant mechanisms obtained through the integration of piezoceramic actuators into fibre-reinforced composite structures using a double layer model. A new mechanism was designed, simulated, constructed and tested. The comparison between simulation and experimental results confirm the effectiveness of the presented procedure in regard to the design phase of new active compliant structures.

  20. Investigating Informatics Activity, Control, and Training Needs in Large, Medium, and Small Health Departments

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Ryan; Yang, Biru

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: A recent National Association of City & County Health Officials survey shed light on informatics workforce development needs. Local health departments (LHDs) of various jurisdictional sizes and control over informatics may differ on training needs and activity. Understanding the precise nature of this variation will allow stakeholders to appropriately develop workforce development tools to advance the field. Objective: To understand the informatics training needs for LHDs of different jurisdictional sizes. Methods: Survey responses were analyzed by comparing training needs and LHD population size. Results: Larger health departments consistently reported having greater informatics-related capacity and informatics-related training needs. Quantitative data analysis was identified as a primary need for large LHDs. In addition, LHDs that report higher control of informatics/information technology were able to engage in more informatics activities. Conclusion: Smaller LHDs need additional resources to improve informatics-related capacity and engagement with the field. PMID:27684621

  1. Aeroservoelastic wind-tunnel investigations using the Active Flexible Wing Model: Status and recent accomplishments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noll, Thomas E.; Perry, Boyd, III; Tiffany, Sherwood H.; Cole, Stanley R.; Buttrill, Carey S.; Adams, William M., Jr.; Houck, Jacob A.; Srinathkumar, S.; Mukhopadhyay, Vivek; Pototzky, Anthony S.

    1989-01-01

    The status of the joint NASA/Rockwell Active Flexible Wing Wind-Tunnel Test Program is described. The objectives are to develop and validate the analysis, design, and test methodologies required to apply multifunction active control technology for improving aircraft performance and stability. Major tasks include designing digital multi-input/multi-output flutter-suppression and rolling-maneuver-load alleviation concepts for a flexible full-span wind-tunnel model, obtaining an experimental data base for the basic model and each control concept and providing comparisons between experimental and analytical results to validate the methodologies. The opportunity is provided to improve real-time simulation techniques and to gain practical experience with digital control law implementation procedures.

  2. Investigation of wound healing activity of methanolic extract of stem bark of Mimusops elengi Linn.

    PubMed

    Gupta, N; Jain, U K

    2011-01-01

    The present study was aimed to evaluate the wound healing activity of extract of bark part of Mimusops elengi. It is well-known plant in Indian traditional medicines. On the basis of traditional use and literature references, this plant was selected for wound healing potential. A methanolic extract of bark parts of Mimusops elengi was examined for wound healing activity in the form of ointment in three types of wound models on mice: the excision, the incision and dead space wound model. The extract ointments showed considerable response in all the above said wound models as comparable to those of a standard drug Betadine ointment in terms of wound contracting ability, wound closure time, tensile strength and dry granuloma weight. Histological analysis was also consistent with the proposal that Mimusops elengi bark extract exhibits significant wound healing.

  3. Status of remedial investigation activities in the Hanford Site 300 Area groundwater operable unit

    SciTech Connect

    Hulstrom, L.C.; Innis, B.E.; Frank, M.A.

    1993-09-01

    The Phase 1 remedial investigation (RI) and Phase 1 and 2 feasibility studies (FS) for the 300-FF-5 groundwater operable unit underlying the 300 Area on the Hanford Site have been completed. Analysis and evaluation of soil, sediment, and surface water, and biotic sampling data, groundwater chemistry, and radiological data gathered over the past 3 years has been completed. Risk assessment calculations have been performed. Use of the data gathered, coupled with information from an automated water level data collection system, has enabled engineers to track three plumes that represent the most significant contamination of the groundwater.

  4. Kramers-Krönig analysis of modulated reflectance data investigation of errors.

    PubMed

    Balzarotti, A; Colavita, E; Gentile, S; Rosei, R

    1975-10-01

    The errors introduced in Deltaepsilon(2) spectra by Kramers-Krönig analysis of modulated reflectivity data are investigated using an analytical model. It is found that the energy position of singularities is always reproduced with good accuracy even if the experimental spectrum of DeltaR/R is cut barely above the last structure of interest. This procedure is instead completely insufficient when a quantitative line shape analysis is required. In such cases data up to very high energy are required for a meaningful analysis. Errors due to other sources, like baseline shifts or inaccurate static optical constants, are also investigated.

  5. Investigating diet and physical activity in Malaysia: education and family history of diabetes relate to lower levels of physical activity

    PubMed Central

    Tam, Cai Lian; Bonn, Gregory; Yeoh, Si Han; Wong, Chee Piau

    2014-01-01

    The National Health and Morbidity Survey (NHMS, 2011), estimates that the number of Malaysian adults suffering from type 2 diabetes has increased from 8.3 to 31.2% since 1996. This study is a preliminary investigation of possible factors contributing to this epidemic. Knowledge of diabetes, health locus of control, diet and exercise habits, as well as family history, education level and other demographic factors to better understand the correlates of risky and healthy behaviors. This was done as part of a larger initiative to improve prevention efforts. Questionnaires were completed by 770 individuals from three Malaysian states: Selangor, Penang, and Terengganu. Findings showed that people with better health knowledge and those who have a family history of type 2 diabetes were more likely to have healthy diets. Also, health knowledge related to lower alcohol consumption. Participants with diabetic family members, however, also reported higher levels of stress. Counterintuitively, higher educational levels, higher internal locus of control, better health knowledge, as well as a family history of diabetes all correlated with lower levels of physical activity. Thus, it is suggested that, while increasing health knowledge will be important in addressing the type 2 diabetes epidemic in Malaysia, especially in relation to diet, other cultural factors, specifically norms related to exercise and physical activity, also need to be addressed if the spread of type 2 diabetes is to be addressed over the long term. PMID:25520676

  6. Investigating diet and physical activity in Malaysia: education and family history of diabetes relate to lower levels of physical activity.

    PubMed

    Tam, Cai Lian; Bonn, Gregory; Yeoh, Si Han; Wong, Chee Piau

    2014-01-01

    The National Health and Morbidity Survey (NHMS, 2011), estimates that the number of Malaysian adults suffering from type 2 diabetes has increased from 8.3 to 31.2% since 1996. This study is a preliminary investigation of possible factors contributing to this epidemic. Knowledge of diabetes, health locus of control, diet and exercise habits, as well as family history, education level and other demographic factors to better understand the correlates of risky and healthy behaviors. This was done as part of a larger initiative to improve prevention efforts. Questionnaires were completed by 770 individuals from three Malaysian states: Selangor, Penang, and Terengganu. Findings showed that people with better health knowledge and those who have a family history of type 2 diabetes were more likely to have healthy diets. Also, health knowledge related to lower alcohol consumption. Participants with diabetic family members, however, also reported higher levels of stress. Counterintuitively, higher educational levels, higher internal locus of control, better health knowledge, as well as a family history of diabetes all correlated with lower levels of physical activity. Thus, it is suggested that, while increasing health knowledge will be important in addressing the type 2 diabetes epidemic in Malaysia, especially in relation to diet, other cultural factors, specifically norms related to exercise and physical activity, also need to be addressed if the spread of type 2 diabetes is to be addressed over the long term.

  7. Spatial heterogeneity analysis of brain activation in fMRI

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Lalit; Besseling, René M.H.; Overvliet, Geke M.; Hofman, Paul A.M.; de Louw, Anton; Vaessen, Maarten J.; Aldenkamp, Albert P.; Ulman, Shrutin; Jansen, Jacobus F.A.; Backes, Walter H.

    2014-01-01

    In many brain diseases it can be qualitatively observed that spatial patterns in blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) activation maps appear more (diffusively) distributed than in healthy controls. However, measures that can quantitatively characterize this spatial distributiveness in individual subjects are lacking. In this study, we propose a number of spatial heterogeneity measures to characterize brain activation maps. The proposed methods focus on different aspects of heterogeneity, including the shape (compactness), complexity in the distribution of activated regions (fractal dimension and co-occurrence matrix), and gappiness between activated regions (lacunarity). To this end, functional MRI derived activation maps of a language and a motor task were obtained in language impaired children with (Rolandic) epilepsy and compared to age-matched healthy controls. Group analysis of the activation maps revealed no significant differences between patients and controls for both tasks. However, for the language task the activation maps in patients appeared more heterogeneous than in controls. Lacunarity was the best measure to discriminate activation patterns of patients from controls (sensitivity 74%, specificity 70%) and illustrates the increased irregularity of gaps between activated regions in patients. The combination of heterogeneity measures and a support vector machine approach yielded further increase in sensitivity and specificity to 78% and 80%, respectively. This illustrates that activation distributions in impaired brains can be complex and more heterogeneous than in normal brains and cannot be captured fully by a single quantity. In conclusion, heterogeneity analysis has potential to robustly characterize the increased distributiveness of brain activation in individual patients. PMID:25161893

  8. Neutron activation analysis for antimetabolites. [in food samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Determination of metal ion contaminants in food samples is studied. A weighed quantity of each sample was digested in a concentrated mixture of nitric, hydrochloric and perchloric acids to affect complete solution of the food products. The samples were diluted with water and the pH adjusted according to the specific analysis performed. The samples were analyzed by neutron activation analysis, polarography, and atomic absorption spectrophotometry. The solid food samples were also analyzed by neutron activation analysis for increased sensitivity and lower levels of detectability. The results are presented in tabular form.

  9. A Functional Analysis of Moderate-to-Vigorous Physical Activity in Young Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larson, Tracy A.; Normand, Matthew P.; Morley, Allison J.; Miller, Bryon G.

    2013-01-01

    Inadequate physical activity increases the risks related to a number of health problems in children, most notably obesity and the corresponding range of associated health problems. The purpose of the current study was to conduct a functional analysis to investigate the effects of several consequent variables on moderate-to-vigorous physical…

  10. SEM-EDS investigation on PM10 data collected in Central Italy: Principal Component Analysis and Hierarchical Cluster Analysis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Hierarchical Cluster Analysis (HCA) were applied on PM10 particle data in order to: identify particle clusters that can be differentiated on the bases of their chemical composition and morphology, investigate the relationship among the chemical and morphological parameters and evaluate differences among the sampling sites. PM10 was collected in 3 different sites in central Italy characterized by different conditions: yard, urban and rural sites. The concentration of 20 chemical parameters (C, O, Na, Mg, Al, Si, P, Cd, Cl, K, Ca, Sn, Ti, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn) were determined by Scanning Electron Microscopy – Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (SEM-EDS) and the particle images were processed by an image analysis software in order to measure: Area, Aspect Ratio, Roundness, Fractal Dimension, Box Width, Box Height and Perimeter. Result Results revealed the presence of different clusters of particles, differentiated on the bases of chemical composition and morphological parameters (aluminosilicates, calcium particles, biological particles, soot, cenosphere, sodium chloride, sulphates, metallic particles, iron spherical particles). Aluminosilicates and Calcium particles of rural and urban sites showed a similar nature due to a mainly natural origin, while those of the yard site showed a more heterogeneous composition mainly related to human activity. Biological particles and soot can be differentiated on the bases of the higher loads of Fractal Dimension, which characterizes soot, and content of Na, Mg, Ca, Cl and K which characterize the biological ones. The soot of the urban site showed higher loadings of Roundness and Fractal Dimension than the soot belonging to the yard and rural sites, this was due to the different life time of the particles. The metal particles, characterized mainly by the higher loading of iron, were present in two morphological forms: spherical and angular particles. The first were

  11. Investigating Climate Change Issues With Web-Based Geospatial Inquiry Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dempsey, C.; Bodzin, A. M.; Sahagian, D. L.; Anastasio, D. J.; Peffer, T.; Cirucci, L.

    2011-12-01

    In the Environmental Literacy and Inquiry middle school Climate Change curriculum we focus on essential climate literacy principles with an emphasis on weather and climate, Earth system energy balance, greenhouse gases, paleoclimatology, and how human activities influence climate change (http://www.ei.lehigh.edu/eli/cc/). It incorporates a related set of a framework and design principles to provide guidance for the development of the geospatial technology-integrated Earth and environmental science curriculum materials. Students use virtual globes, Web-based tools including an interactive carbon calculator and geologic timeline, and inquiry-based lab activities to investigate climate change topics. The curriculum includes educative curriculum materials that are designed to promote and support teachers' learning of important climate change content and issues, geospatial pedagogical content knowledge, and geographic spatial thinking. The curriculum includes baseline instructional guidance for teachers and provides implementation and adaptation guidance for teaching with diverse learners including low-level readers, English language learners and students with disabilities. In the curriculum, students use geospatial technology tools including Google Earth with embedded spatial data to investigate global temperature changes, areas affected by climate change, evidence of climate change, and the effects of sea level rise on the existing landscape. We conducted a designed-based research implementation study with urban middle school students. Findings showed that the use of the Climate Change curriculum showed significant improvement in urban middle school students' understanding of climate change concepts.

  12. Investigating the relationship of lightning activity and rainfall: A case study for Crete Island

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iordanidou, V.; Koutroulis, A. G.; Tsanis, I. K.

    2016-05-01

    The relationship of lightning activity and rainfall is investigated for rain events of variable intensity. Rain data from 22 gauging stations over the island of Crete and lightning activity from the Global Lightning Network including both cloud-to-ground and some cloud flashes are analyzed for the period September 2012 to June 2014. Local thunderstorms' characteristics are investigated both individually as well as in groups according to the results of k-means clustering algorithm in 3 dimensions (space (x, y) and time (t)) in which the number of clusters is decided by G-means algorithm. Correlation of non-zero pairs of rain intensity and number of flashes is examined at various time intervals, time lags and effective radii. Also, correlation of flash count within 50 km radius around the stations is examined for the rain events of maximum hourly intensity for each gauging station. The highest coincidence of lightning clusters with intense rain events reaches 60% when gauges are 25-30 km from the cluster center. Maximum correlation within non-zero pairs of rain intensity and flashes number is obtained for more intense rain (99th percentile) and for increased flash count within the searching area (more than 10 flashes). Also, correlation is stronger for shorter time windows. The findings of this study improve the understanding of thunderstorm events and could provide staple information for the improvement of forecasting extreme events.

  13. Synthesis, molecular structure investigations and antimicrobial activity of 2-thioxothiazolidin-4-one derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barakat, Assem; Al-Najjar, Hany J.; Al-Majid, Abdullah Mohammed; Soliman, Saied M.; Mabkhot, Yahia Nasser; Al-Agamy, Mohamed H. M.; Ghabbour, Hazem A.; Fun, Hoong-Kun

    2015-02-01

    A variety of 2-thioxothiazolidin-4-one derivatives were prepared and their in vitro antimicrobial activities were studied. Most of these compounds showed significant antibacterial activity specifically against Gram-positive bacteria, among which compounds 4a,e,g, 5b,e,g,h and 6f exhibit high levels of antimicrobial activity against Bacillus subtilis ATCC 10400 with Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) value of 16 μg/mL. All compounds have antifungal activity against Candida albicans. Unfortunately, however, none of the compounds were active against Gram-negative bacteria. The chemical structure of 3 was confirmed by X-ray single crystal diffraction technique. DFT calculations of 3 have been performed on the free C10H7Cl2NO2S2, 3a and the H-bonded complex, C10H7Cl2NO2S2·H2O, 3b to explore the effect of the H-bonding interactions on the geometric and electronic properties of the studied systems. A small increase in bond length was observed in the C12-O6 due to the H-bonding interactions between 3a and water molecule. MEP study has been used to recognize the most reactive sites towards electrophilic and nucleophilic attacks as well as the possible sites for the H-bonding interactions. The TD-DFT calculations have been used to predict theoretically the electronic spectra of the studied compound. The most intense transition band is predicted at 283.9 nm due to the HOMO-2/HOMO-1 to LUMO transitions. NBO analyses were carried out to investigate the stabilization energy of the various intramolecular charge transfer interactions within the studied molecules.

  14. Investigations into the antiadhesive activity of herbal extracts against Campylobacter jejuni.

    PubMed

    Bensch, K; Tiralongo, J; Schmidt, K; Matthias, A; Bone, K M; Lehmann, R; Tiralongo, E

    2011-08-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is one of the most common bacterial causes of diarrhoea in the industrialized world, being associated with the occurrence of Guillain-Barré Syndrome, and inducing diseases partially through intestinal adherence. With increasing reports of C. jejuni drug resistance against standard antibiotics, investigations into antiadhesive agents for the prevention of bacterial infection are highly significant. Given the consumer-driven development towards holistic and integrative healthcare, research into additional anti-Campylobacter effects of herbal medicines that are already used for their beneficial effects on bowel and digestive functions is important. Twenty-one herbal extracts were screened for antiadhesive activity against C. jejuni using modifications of previously published antiadhesion assays. Antiadhesion effects with IC(50) values <3 mg/mL were obtained for seven ethanol plant extracts, with Zingiber officinale (ginger), Capsicum annum (cayenne) and Glycyrrhiza glabra (licorice) displaying the highest antiadhesion activity against C. jejuni (IC(50) : <0.1 mg/mL, 0.29 mg/mL and 0.65 mg/mL, respectively). Differences in antiadhesion activity were found for two different Echinacea species, with E. purpurea displaying significantly higher and dose dependent antiadhesion activity than E. angustifolia. No significant antiadhesion activity (IC(50) values >35 mg/mL) was found for Agrimonia eupatoria (agrimony), Andrographis paniculata (andrographis), Matricaria recutita (chamomile), Foeniculum vulgare (fennel), Filipendula ulmaria (meadowsweet) and Artemisia absinthium (wormwood) extracts. This study provides evidence for additional beneficial effects of marketed herbal medicines in gastrointestinal disorders. PMID:21280113

  15. Investigation of shallow gas hydrate occurrence and gas seep activity on the Sakhalin continental slope, Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Young Keun; Baranov, Boris; Obzhirov, Anatoly; Salomatin, Alexander; Derkachev, Alexander; Hachikubo, Akihiro; Minami, Hrotsugu; Kuk Hong, Jong

    2016-04-01

    The Sakhalin continental slope has been a well-known gas hydrate area since the first finding of gas hydrate in 1980's. This area belongs to the southernmost glacial sea in the northern hemisphere where most of the area sea is covered by sea ice the winter season. Very high organic carbon content in the sediment, cold sea environment, and active tectonic regime in the Sakhalin slope provide a very favorable condition for occurring shallow gas hydrate accumulation and gas emission phenomena. Research expeditions under the framework of a Korean-Russian-Japanese long-term international collaboration projects (CHAOS, SSGH-I, SSGH-II projects) have been conducted to investigate gas hydrate occurrence and gas seepage activities on the Sakhalin continental slope, Russia from 2003 to 2015. During the expeditions, near-surface gas hydrate samples at more than 30 sites have been retrieved and hundreds of active gas seepage structures on the seafloor were newly registered by multidisciplinary surveys. The gas hydrates occurrence at the various water depths from about 300 m to 1000 m in the study area were accompanied by active gas seepage-related phenomena in the sub-bottom, on the seafloor, and in the water column: well-defined upward gas migration structures (gas chimney) imaged by high-resolution seismic, hydroacoustic anomalies of gas emissions (gas flares) detected by echosounders, seafloor high backscatter intensities (seepage structures) imaged by side-scan sonar and bathymetric structures (pockmarks and mounds) mapped by single/multi-beam surveys, and very shallow SMTZ (sulphate-methane transition zone) depths, strong microbial activities and high methane concentrations measured in sediment/seawater samples. The highlights of the expeditions are shallow gas hydrate occurrences around 300 m in the water depth which is nearly closed to the upper boundary of gas hydrate stability zone in the area and a 2,000 m-high gas flare emitted from the deep seafloor.

  16. Investigation on the two-stage active magnetic regenerative refrigerator for liquefaction of hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Inmyong; Park, Jiho; Jeong, Sangkwon; Kim, Youngkwon

    2014-01-29

    An active magnetic regenerative refrigerator (AMRR) is expected to be useful for hydrogen liquefaction due to its inherent high thermodynamic efficiency. Because the temperature of the cold end of the refrigerator has to be approximately liquid temperature, a large temperature span of the active magnetic regenerator (AMR) is indispensable when the heat sink temperature is liquid nitrogen temperature or higher. Since magnetic refrigerants are only effective in the vicinity of their own transition temperatures, which limit the temperature span of the AMR, an innovative structure is needed to increase the temperature span. The AMR must be a layered structure and the thermophysical matching of magnetic field and flow convection effects is very important. In order to design an AMR for liquefaction of hydrogen, the implementation of multi-layered AMR with different magnetic refrigerants is explored with multi-staging. In this paper, the performance of the multi-layered AMR using four rare-earth compounds (GdNi{sub 2}, Gd{sub 0.1}Dy{sub 0.9}Ni{sub 2}, Dy{sub 0.85}Er{sub 0.15}Al{sub 2}, Dy{sub 0.5}Er{sub 0.5}Al{sub 2}) is investigated. The experimental apparatus includes two-stage active magnetic regenerator containing two different magnetic refrigerants each. A liquid nitrogen reservoir connected to the warm end of the AMR maintains the temperature of the warm end around 77 K. High-pressure helium gas is employed as a heat transfer fluid in the AMR and the maximum magnetic field of 4 T is supplied by the low temperature superconducting (LTS) magnet. The temperature span with the variation of parameters such as phase difference between magnetic field and mass flow rate of magnetic refrigerants in AMR is investigated. The maximum temperature span in the experiment is recorded as 50 K and several performance issues have been discussed in this paper.

  17. Investigation into the lignin decomposition mechanism by analysis of the pyrolysis product of Pinus radiata.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young-Min; Jae, Jungho; Myung, Soyoung; Sung, Bong Hyun; Dong, Jong-In; Park, Young-Kwon

    2016-11-01

    Lignin pyrolysis chemistry was investigated via the analysis of the products obtained from the fast pyrolysis of a pine wood at different temperatures. Methoxy phenols, such as guaiacols and eugenols, were produced mainly at 375 and 475°C, while non-methoxy phenols, such as alkyl phenols and pyrocatechols were dominant at 525 and 575°C. At 575°C, aromatic hydrocarbons were formed together with larger amounts of light hydrocarbon gases. When the temperature was increased from 375 and 475°C, the yield of pyrolytic lignin was increased, whereas its average molecular weight was decreased. At 525°C, smaller molecular pyrolytic lignin with a maximum concentration of phenolic hydroxyl groups was produced due to the increased secondary cracking of the reaction intermediates. On the other hand, at 575°C, larger molecular pyrolytic lignin with smaller amounts of phenolic hydroxyl groups was produced due to the increased condensation activity of the pyrolysis reaction intermediates. PMID:27501034

  18. Current activities and results of the Long Duration Exposure Facility Meteoroid and Debris Special Investigation Group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    See, Thomas H.; Leago, Kimberly S.; Warren, Jack L.; Bernhard, Ronald P.; Zolensky, Michael E.

    1994-01-01

    Fiscal Year 1994 will bring to a close the initial investigative activities associated with the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF). LDEF was a 14-faced spacecraft (i.e., 12-sided cylinder and two ends) which housed 54 different experimental packages in low-Earth orbit (LEO) from Apr. 1984 to Jan. 1990 (i.e., for approx. 5.75 years). Since LDEF's return, the Meteoroid & Debris Special Investigation Group (M&D SIG) has been examining various LDEF components in order to better understand and define the LEO particulate environment. Members of the M&D SIG at JSC in Houston, TX have been contributing to these studies by carefully examining and documenting all impact events found on LDEF's 6061-T6 aluminum Intercostals (i.e., one of the spacecraft's structural frame components). Unlike all other hardware on LDEF, the frame exposed significantly large surface areas of a single homogeneous material in all (i.e., 26) possible LDEF pointing directions. To date, 28 of the 68 Intercostals in the possession of the M&D SIG have been documented. This data, as well as similar information from various LDEF investigators, can be accessed through the M&D SIG Database which is maintained at JSC.

  19. Investigation of the possible biological activities of a poisonous South African plant; Hyaenanche globosa (Euphorbiaceae).

    PubMed

    Momtaz, Saeideh; Lall, Namrita; Hussein, Ahmed; Ostad, Seyed Nasser; Abdollahi, Mohammad

    2010-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to explore the possible biochemical activities of Hyaenanche globosa Lamb. and its compounds. Two different extracts (ethanol and dichloromethane) of four different parts (leaves, root, stem, and fruits) of H. globosa were evaluated for their possible antibacterial, antityrosinase, and anticancer (cytotoxicity) properties. Two pure compounds were isolated using column chromatographic techniques. Active extracts and pure compounds were investigated for their antioxidant effect on cultured 'Hela cells'. Antioxidant/oxidative properties of the ethanolic extract of the fruits of H. globosa and purified compounds were investigated using reactive oxygen species (ROS), ferric-reducing antioxidant power (FRAP), and lipid peroxidation thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS) assays. The ethanolic extract of the leaves and fruits of H. globosa showed the best activity, exhibiting a minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 3.1 mg/ ml and a minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) of 1.56 and 6.2 mg/ml, respectively, against M. smegmatis. The ethanolic extract of the fruits of H. globosa (F.E) showed the highest percentage of inhibitory activity of monophenolase (90.4% at 200 mug/ml). In addition, F.E exhibited 50% inhibitory concentration (IC(50)) of 37.7 mug/ml on the viability of 'HeLa cells' using cytotoxicity MTT assay. Subsequently, F.E was fractionated using phase-partitioning with n-hexane, ethyl acetate, and n-butanol. The cytotoxicity of these fractions were determined in vitro using different cancer cell lines. The n-hexane fraction exhibited the highest activity of toxicity. Therefore, this fraction was subjected to further separation by chromatographic methods. Two pure compounds known as: 'Tutin' and 'hyenanchin' were isolated and their structures were determined by NMR spectroscopic methods. Unpredictably, none of them showed significant (P < 0.01) inhibition on cell viability/proliferation at the concentrations that were

  20. Investigation of the possible biological activities of a poisonous South African plant; Hyaenanche globosa (Euphorbiaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Momtaz, Saeideh; Lall, Namrita; Hussein, Ahmed; Ostad, Seyed Nasser; Abdollahi, Mohammad

    2010-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to explore the possible biochemical activities of Hyaenanche globosa Lamb. and its compounds. Two different extracts (ethanol and dichloromethane) of four different parts (leaves, root, stem, and fruits) of H. globosa were evaluated for their possible antibacterial, antityrosinase, and anticancer (cytotoxicity) properties. Two pure compounds were isolated using column chromatographic techniques. Active extracts and pure compounds were investigated for their antioxidant effect on cultured ‘Hela cells’. Antioxidant/oxidative properties of the ethanolic extract of the fruits of H. globosa and purified compounds were investigated using reactive oxygen species (ROS), ferric-reducing antioxidant power (FRAP), and lipid peroxidation thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS) assays. The ethanolic extract of the leaves and fruits of H. globosa showed the best activity, exhibiting a minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 3.1 mg/ ml and a minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) of 1.56 and 6.2 mg/ml, respectively, against M. smegmatis. The ethanolic extract of the fruits of H. globosa (F.E) showed the highest percentage of inhibitory activity of monophenolase (90.4% at 200 μg/ml). In addition, F.E exhibited 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 37.7 μg/ml on the viability of ‘HeLa cells’ using cytotoxicity MTT assay. Subsequently, F.E was fractionated using phase-partitioning with n-hexane, ethyl acetate, and n-butanol. The cytotoxicity of these fractions were determined in vitro using different cancer cell lines. The n-hexane fraction exhibited the highest activity of toxicity. Therefore, this fraction was subjected to further separation by chromatographic methods. Two pure compounds known as: ‘Tutin’ and ‘hyenanchin’ were isolated and their structures were determined by NMR spectroscopic methods. Unpredictably, none of them showed significant (P < 0.01) inhibition on cell viability/proliferation at the

  1. Investigation of relationships between parameters of solar nano-flares and solar activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safari, Hossein; Javaherian, Mohsen; Kaki, Bardia

    2016-07-01

    Solar flares are one of the important coronal events which are originated in solar magnetic activity. They release lots of energy during the interstellar medium, right after the trigger. Flare prediction can play main role in avoiding eventual damages on the Earth. Here, to interpret solar large-scale events (e.g., flares), we investigate relationships between small-scale events (nano-flares) and large-scale events (e.g., flares). In our method, by using simulations of nano-flares based on Monte Carlo method, the intensity time series of nano-flares are simulated. Then, the solar full disk images taken at 171 angstrom recorded by SDO/AIA are employed. Some parts of the solar disk (quiet Sun (QS), coronal holes (CHs), and active regions (ARs)) are cropped and the time series of these regions are extracted. To compare the simulated intensity time series of nano-flares with the intensity time series of real data extracted from different parts of the Sun, the artificial neural networks is employed. Therefore, we are able to extract physical parameters of nano-flares like both kick and decay rate lifetime, and the power of their power-law distributions. The procedure of variations in the power value of power-law distributions within QS, CH is similar to AR. Thus, by observing the small part of the Sun, we can follow the procedure of solar activity.

  2. Trait anxiety impact on posterior activation asymmetries at rest and during evoked negative emotions: EEG investigation.

    PubMed

    Aftanas, Ljubomir I; Pavlov, Sergey V

    2005-01-01

    The main objective of the present investigation was to examine how high trait anxiety would influence cortical EEG asymmetries under non-emotional conditions and while experiencing negative emotions. The 62-channel EEG was recorded in control (n=21) and high anxiety (HA, n=18) non-patient individuals. Results showed that in HA subjects, the lowest level of arousal (eyes closed) was associated with stronger right-sided parieto-temporal theta-1 (4-6 Hz) and beta-1 (12-18 Hz) activity, whereas increased non-emotional arousal (eyes open, viewing neutral movie clip) was marked by persisting favored right hemisphere beta-1 activity. In turn, viewing aversive movie clip by the HA group led to significant lateralized decrease of the right parieto-temporal beta-1 power, which was initially higher in the emotionally neutral conditions. The EEG data suggests that asymmetrical parieto-temporal theta-1 and beta-1 EEG activity might be better interpreted in terms of Gray's BAS and BIS theory. PMID:15598519

  3. Investigation of the effects of some drugs and phenolic compounds on human dihydrofolate reductase activity.

    PubMed

    Aslan, Erdem; Adem, Sevki

    2015-03-01

    Dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) plays a fundamental role in cellular metabolism and cell growth. Inhibition of this enzyme will cause a decrease in the amount of folate that occurs in many metabolic processes, and the deficiency of which may cause various diseases. This study investigated the effects of some drugs and phenolic compounds on DHFR activity in vitro. To determine the inhibitory effect of compounds, enzyme activity was measured with a final concentration of an inhibitor ranging from 10 μM to 51 mM. DHFR was inhibited effectively by naringin, ferulic acid, and levofloxacin with IC50 values under 660 μM. Syringic acid, cefepime, ceftizoxime, cefazolin, ceftriaxone, and ceftazidime exhibited inhibitory effects on the enzyme activity with IC50 values in the range of 3.840-30.224 mM. K(i) constants were calculated using the Cheng-Prusoff equation. K(i) constants calculated in the range of 0.009-2.024 mM with respect to nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase (NADPH) and in the range of 0.060-5.830 mM about FH2.

  4. Investigation of active substance release from poly(ethylene oxide) hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Savaş, H; Güven, O

    2001-08-14

    The uptake and controlled release of model active substances from poly(ethylene oxide), (PEO), hydrogels synthesized by irradiation were investigated. For the characterization of network structure of PEO hydrogels, swelling properties in water and the number average molecular weight between crosslinks were determined. Salicylic acid, phthalic acid and resorcinol were used as model substances for their controlled release from PEO hydrogels. The effects of dose rate, total dose and chemical structure of active substance on the uptake and release have been studied. The active substance uptake capacity of hydrogels was found to be lowest for phthalic acid and highest for resorcinol in the gel system obtained by irradiation both at low and high dose rates. The release was lowest both in rate and in total amounts in hydrogels containing phthalic acid, more in those with salicylic acid and highest in those with resorcinol. The physical and chemical factors affecting the release of model compounds such as the network structure of hydrogels and hydrogen bond formation between the adsorbent and PEO chains were discussed.

  5. Stiffening hydrogels for investigating the dynamics of hepatic stellate cell mechanotransduction during myofibroblast activation

    PubMed Central

    Caliari, Steven R.; Perepelyuk, Maryna; Cosgrove, Brian D.; Tsai, Shannon J.; Lee, Gi Yun; Mauck, Robert L.; Wells, Rebecca G.; Burdick, Jason A.

    2016-01-01

    Tissue fibrosis contributes to nearly half of all deaths in the developed world and is characterized by progressive matrix stiffening. Despite this, nearly all in vitro disease models are mechanically static. Here, we used visible light-mediated stiffening hydrogels to investigate cell mechanotransduction in a disease-relevant system. Primary hepatic stellate cell-seeded hydrogels stiffened in situ at later time points (following a recovery phase post-isolation) displayed accelerated signaling kinetics of both early (Yes-associated protein/Transcriptional coactivator with PDZ-binding motif, YAP/TAZ) and late (alpha-smooth muscle actin, α-SMA) markers of myofibroblast differentiation, resulting in a time course similar to observed in vivo activation dynamics. We further validated this system by showing that α-SMA inhibition following substrate stiffening resulted in attenuated stellate cell activation, with reduced YAP/TAZ nuclear shuttling and traction force generation. Together, these data suggest that stiffening hydrogels may be more faithful models for studying myofibroblast activation than static substrates and could inform the development of disease therapeutics. PMID:26906177

  6. Stiffening hydrogels for investigating the dynamics of hepatic stellate cell mechanotransduction during myofibroblast activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caliari, Steven R.; Perepelyuk, Maryna; Cosgrove, Brian D.; Tsai, Shannon J.; Lee, Gi Yun; Mauck, Robert L.; Wells, Rebecca G.; Burdick, Jason A.

    2016-02-01

    Tissue fibrosis contributes to nearly half of all deaths in the developed world and is characterized by progressive matrix stiffening. Despite this, nearly all in vitro disease models are mechanically static. Here, we used visible light-mediated stiffening hydrogels to investigate cell mechanotransduction in a disease-relevant system. Primary hepatic stellate cell-seeded hydrogels stiffened in situ at later time points (following a recovery phase post-isolation) displayed accelerated signaling kinetics of both early (Yes-associated protein/Transcriptional coactivator with PDZ-binding motif, YAP/TAZ) and late (alpha-smooth muscle actin, α-SMA) markers of myofibroblast differentiation, resulting in a time course similar to observed in vivo activation dynamics. We further validated this system by showing that α-SMA inhibition following substrate stiffening resulted in attenuated stellate cell activation, with reduced YAP/TAZ nuclear shuttling and traction force generation. Together, these data suggest that stiffening hydrogels may be more faithful models for studying myofibroblast activation than static substrates and could inform the development of disease therapeutics.

  7. Investigation of activation cross-section data of proton induced nuclear reactions on rhenium.

    PubMed

    Ditrói, F; Tárkányi, F; Takács, S; Hermanne, A; Yamazaki, H; Baba, M; Mohammadi, A; Ignatyuk, A V

    2013-07-01

    In the frame of systematic investigations of activation cross-section data for different applications the excitation functions of (nat)Re(p,x)(185)Os, (183m)Os, (183g)Os, (182)Os, (181m)Os, (186g)Re, (184m)Re, (184g)Re, (183)Re, (182m)Re, (182g)Re and (181g)Re reactions were measured up to 70MeV. The data for the (nat)Re(p,x) (183m)Os, (183g)Os, (182)Os, (181g)Os,(186g)Re, (184m)Re,(182m)Re, (182g)Re, and (181)Re reactions are reported for the first time. The activation method, the stacked foil irradiation technique and γ-spectroscopy for activity detection were used. The experimental data were compared with predictions of three theoretical codes. From the measured cross-section thick target integral yields were also calculated and presented.

  8. How Can Visual Analytics Assist Investigative Analysis? Design Implications from an Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Youn-Ah Kang; Görg, Carsten; Stasko, John

    2011-05-01

    Despite the growing number of systems providing visual analytic support for investigative analysis, few empirical studies of the potential benefits of such systems have been conducted, particularly controlled, comparative evaluations. Determining how such systems foster insight and sensemaking is important for their continued growth and study, however. Furthermore, studies that identify how people use such systems and why they benefit (or not) can help inform the design of new systems in this area. We conducted an evaluation of the visual analytics system Jigsaw employed in a small investigative sensemaking exercise, and compared its use to three other more traditional methods of analysis. Sixteen participants performed a simulated intelligence analysis task under one of the four conditions. Experimental results suggest that Jigsaw assisted participants to analyze the data and identify an embedded threat. We describe different analysis strategies used by study participants and how computational support (or the lack thereof) influenced the strategies. We then illustrate several characteristics of the sensemaking process identified in the study and provide design implications for investigative analysis tools based thereon. We conclude with recommendations on metrics and techniques for evaluating visual analytics systems for investigative analysis.

  9. Investigations of the use of bioavailability data to adjust occupational exposure limits for active pharmaceutical ingredients.

    PubMed

    Naumann, Bruce D; Weideman, Patricia A; Sarangapani, Ramesh; Hu, Shu-Cheih; Dixit, Rakesh; Sargent, Edward V

    2009-11-01

    Occupational exposure limits (OELs) for active pharmaceutical ingredients have traditionally been established using no-observed-adverse-effect levels derived from clinical studies employing po and iv routes of administration and by applying default uncertainty factors or chemical-specific adjustment factors. However, exposure by the inhalation or dermal route is more relevant in terms of occupational safety. In this investigation, to explore new methods for route-to-route extrapolation, the bioavailability of MK-0679, a leukotriene D(4) receptor antagonist, was compared following iv, po, intranasal (in), or intratracheal (it) administration. The relative bioavailability of MK-0679 was iv congruent with it > po congruent with in. Bioavailability correction factors (BCFs) of 2.0 and 0.6 were derived from these data to adjust a hypothetical OEL of 0.1 mg/m(3) for MK-0679 with particle sizes of 10 and 50 mum, respectively. These BCFs were used to adjust the OEL established using po clinical data, to reflect the differences in bioavailability following deposition in different regions of the respiratory tract. To further investigate how bioavailability data could be used in setting OELs, a preliminary pharmacokinetic (PK) model was developed to describe the time course of plasma concentrations using the data from the route comparison study. An inhalation study was then performed to test the validity of using either empirical data or modeling approaches to derive BCFs when setting OELs. These investigations demonstrated how the use of route-specific PK data could reduce some of the uncertainties associated with route-to-route extrapolation and allow for improved precision and quantitative adjustments when establishing OELs. Further investigations are needed to better understand the factors responsible for differences in systemic uptake following deposition in different regions of the respiratory tract and how these can be generalized across different classes of soluble

  10. Health-care district management information system plan: Review of operations analysis activities during calendar year 1975 and plan for continued research and analysis activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nielson, G. J.; Stevenson, W. G.

    1976-01-01

    Operations research activities developed to identify the information required to manage both the efficiency and effectiveness of the Veterans Administration (VA) health services as these services relate to individual patient care are reported. The clinical concerns and management functions that determine this information requirement are discussed conceptually. Investigations of existing VA data for useful management information are recorded, and a diagnostic index is provided. The age-specific characteristics of diseases and lengths of stay are explored, and recommendations for future analysis activities are articulated. The effect of the introduction of new technology to health care is also discussed.

  11. Investigating age-related changes in anterior and posterior neural activity throughout the information processing stream.

    PubMed

    Alperin, Brittany R; Tusch, Erich S; Mott, Katherine K; Holcomb, Phillip J; Daffner, Kirk R

    2015-10-01

    Event-related potential (ERP) and other functional imaging studies often demonstrate age-related increases in anterior neural activity and decreases in posterior activity while subjects carry out task demands. It remains unclear whether this "anterior shift" is limited to late cognitive operations like those indexed by the P3 component, or is evident during other stages of information processing. The temporal resolution of ERPs provided an opportunity to address this issue. Temporospatial principal component analysis (PCA) was used to identify underlying components that may be obscured by overlapping ERP waveforms. ERPs were measured during a visual oddball task in 26 young, 26 middle-aged, and 29 old subjects who were well-matched for IQ, executive function, education, and task performance. PCA identified six anterior factors peaking between ∼140 ms and 810 ms, and four posterior factors peaking between ∼300 ms and 810 ms. There was an age-related increase in the amplitude of anterior factors between ∼200 and 500 ms, and an age-associated decrease in amplitude of posterior factors after ∼500 ms. The increase in anterior processing began as early as middle-age, was sustained throughout old age, and appeared to be linear in nature. These results suggest that age-associated increases in anterior activity occur after early sensory processing has taken place, and are most prominent during a period in which attention is being marshaled to evaluate a stimulus. In contrast, age-related decreases in posterior activity manifest during operations involved in stimulus categorization, post-decision monitoring, and preparation for an upcoming event. PMID:26295684

  12. Investigation of MMP-2 and MMP-9 activities in canine sera with dilated cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Chegeni, S; Khaki, Z; Shirani, D; Vajhi, A; Taheri, M; Tamrchi, Y; Rostami, A

    2015-01-01

    Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) is accompanied by myocytes and connective tissue changes. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) play important roles in cardiac remodeling. It seems that the gelatinases (MMP-2 and MMP-9) are effective enzymes in cardiomyopathy. Dilated cardiomyopathy was confirmed in 22 dogs (patient group) including 11 female and 11 male by clinical examination, auscultation, thoracic radiography and echocardiography. 17 healthy dogs (control group) with similar weight and breed to patients were also selected from referred cases to Small Animal Hospital of the Veterinary Faculty of Tehran University and the same diagnostic procedures were performed on them. After that, serum MMP-2 and MMP-9 of control and patient groups were measured by semi-quantitative zymography. Semiquantitative analysis of zymograms from canine serums with DCM showed that total MMP-9 in patients is more than control group, while there was no significant difference in total MMP-2 between the two groups. Pro-MMP-2 was not detected in patient group but its active form was present in both groups, of course MMP-2 activity in patients was significantly more than control. Active form of MMP-9 was detected only in patients. Although pro-MMP-9 was present in both groups, its level in control group was significantly higher than patients. The heart enlargement was observed in the left, right or both parts. Statistically significant differences in active form of MMP-2 and MMP-9 levels were observed between different groups of heart enlargement (right, left and both parts) compared to control but this difference was not significant considering chambers affected and VHS (vertebral heart score) groups. In conclusion, although there are some changes in serum MMP-2 and MMP-9 levels in canine DCM, it seems that increase of MMP-9 is more prominent than MMP-2 and neither of them were affected by heart enlargement or VHS grade. PMID:27175173

  13. Coupled numerical analysis to investigate the heating mechanism of ultrasonic imprint lithography.

    PubMed

    Park, Jong Han; Lee, Ki Yeon; Park, Keun

    2015-07-01

    Ultrasonic imprint lithography (UIL) is a micropattern replication technology on thermoplastic polymers using ultrasonic vibration energy. The UIL process involves three steps: (i) microscale vibration from an ultrasonic horn causes repetitive deformation of a polymer surface, (ii) the polymer surface is locally softened by repetitive deformation and friction, and (iii) micro/nanoscale patterns engraved on the horn or the mold are replicated on the softened substrate. To replicate micro/nano patterns with high accuracy, the effects of various processing conditions should be investigated, and so far, these have been studied experimentally. In this study, coupled numerical analysis was performed using finite element simulation to investigate the heating mechanism of the UIL process, by joining transient structural analysis and heat transfer analysis. The effect of imprinting conditions on the heating capability was investigated using the proposed coupled simulation. The differences between direct and indirect imprinting are also discussed in terms of heating mechanism, and compared with experiments.

  14. Multidimensional analysis and probabilistic model of volcanic and seismic activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedorov, V.

    2009-04-01

    .I. Gushchenko, 1979) and seismological (database of USGS/NEIC Significant Worldwide Earthquakes, 2150 B.C.- 1994 A.D.) information which displays dynamics of endogenic relief-forming processes over a period of 1900 to 1994. In the course of the analysis, a substitution of calendar variable by a corresponding astronomical one has been performed and the epoch superposition method was applied. In essence, the method consists in that the massifs of information on volcanic eruptions (over a period of 1900 to 1977) and seismic events (1900-1994) are differentiated with respect to value of astronomical parameters which correspond to the calendar dates of the known eruptions and earthquakes, regardless of the calendar year. The obtained spectra of volcanic eruptions and violent earthquake distribution in the fields of the Earth orbital movement parameters were used as a basis for calculation of frequency spectra and diurnal probability of volcanic and seismic activity. The objective of the proposed investigations is a probabilistic model development of the volcanic and seismic events, as well as GIS designing for monitoring and forecast of volcanic and seismic activities. In accordance with the stated objective, three probability parameters have been found in the course of preliminary studies; they form the basis for GIS-monitoring and forecast development. 1. A multidimensional analysis of volcanic eruption and earthquakes (of magnitude 7) have been performed in terms of the Earth orbital movement. Probability characteristics of volcanism and seismicity have been defined for the Earth as a whole. Time intervals have been identified with a diurnal probability twice as great as the mean value. Diurnal probability of volcanic and seismic events has been calculated up to 2020. 2. A regularity is found in duration of dormant (repose) periods has been established. A relationship has been found between the distribution of the repose period probability density and duration of the period. 3

  15. Trace element analysis of K, U and Th in high purity materials by neutron activation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Pillalamarri, Ila

    2005-09-08

    The concept and usage of 'high purity' are explained. Trace element analysis of K, U and Th by neutron activation analysis is described, the radio-isotopes and their corresponding gamma-rays used to identify the elements are listed. The interfering elements are described. The advantages and disadvantages of using neutron activation analysis are discussed. Some examples of trace impurity determinations in high purity materials are provided.

  16. Investigating correlation of lighting activity and precipitation in an Eastern Mediterranean island

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iordanidou, Vasiliki; Koutroulis, Aristeidis; Tsanis, Ioannis

    2015-04-01

    This study examines conditions under which lightning activity and precipitation events can be correlated in an Eastern Mediterranean island climate. As a first step, the activity within a predefined area of 50km radius around the gauge station is examined, given the temporal evolution of rain accumulation at an hourly time step. Then the lightning activity is grouped in time-space clusters and for each lightning-cluster precipitation recordings of 10 minutes time step from nearby gauges are searched in an area of variable radius ranging from 10 to 100km. The number of clusters is decided according to the g-means algorithm in which the number of clusters is increasing until the data of all clusters follow the Gaussian distribution. For different durations, number of lightning events and radius the proportion of the corresponding precipitation events for the given radius around the lightning-clusters is investigated. The methods are tested in the case study of the island of Crete. Precipitation data from 22 gauging stations over Crete and lightning data from the Global Lightning Network (GLN) are examined for the investigation of possible associations in a period of almost two years (09/2012-07/2014). For the first approach, for half of the stations rain accumulations over 10mm/h (90th percentile of rain) are recorded up to a day after lightning activity occurrence. According to the second approach, lightning-clusters of smaller duration (up to 5 hours) and more lightning flashes (more than 100) are highly associated with rain events. The optimal radius from the center of the lightning-cluster, according to the proportion of rain events, is found to be 30km. The results establish a better understanding of the relations between lightning and precipitation and could provide valuable information to the now-casting of flash flood events triggered by severe thunderstorms. The research reported in this study effort was fully supported by the "ARISTEIA II" Action

  17. Geophysical Investigations at Hidden Dam, Raymond, California: Summary of Fieldwork and Data Analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Minsley, Burke J.; Burton, Bethany L.; Ikard, Scott; Powers, Michael H.

    2010-01-01

    Geophysical field investigations have been carried out at the Hidden Dam in Raymond, California for the purpose of better understanding the hydrogeology and seepage-related conditions at the site. Known seepage areas on the northwest right abutment area of the downstream side of the dam are documented by Cedergren. Subsequent to the 1980 seepage study, a drainage blanket with a subdrain system was installed to mitigate downstream seepage. Flow net analysis provided by Cedergren suggests that the primary seepage mechanism involves flow through the dam foundation due to normal reservoir pool elevations, which results in upflow that intersects the ground surface in several areas on the downstream side of the dam. In addition to the reservoir pool elevations and downstream surface topography, flow is also controlled by the existing foundation geology as well as the presence or absence of a horizontal drain within the downstream portion of the dam. The purpose of the current geophysical work is to (1) identify present-day seepage areas that may not be evident due to the effectiveness of the drainage blanket in redirecting seepage water, and (2) provide information about subsurface geologic structures that may control subsurface flow and seepage. These tasks are accomplished through the use of two complementary electrical geophysical methods, self-potentials (SP) and direct-current (DC) electrical resistivity, which have been commonly utilized in dam-seepage studies. SP is a passive method that is primarily sensitive to active subsurface groundwater flow and seepage, whereas DC resistivity is an active-source method that is sensitive to changes in subsurface lithology and groundwater saturation. The focus of this field campaign was on the downstream area on the right abutment, or northwest side of the dam, as this is the main area of interest regarding seepage. Two exploratory self-potential lines were also collected on the downstream left abutment of the dam to identify

  18. Surface water investigations in Afghanistan: a summary of activities from 1952 to 1969

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Westfall, Arthur O.

    1969-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to summarize briefly the history of the Surface Water Research project since its inception in 1952, the work accomplished, and the problems encountered. In general, each topic is discussed under two periods of time: 1952-1963, when projects were confined to the Helmand River Valley and was entitled Helmand Surface Water Investigations (306-12-021, 306-M-12-AD and 306-AC-12-AD5), and 1963-1969 when activities were expanded to cover most of Afghanistan and title was changed to Surface Water Research (306-11-190-002). Prepared by the United States Geological Survey in cooperation with the Water and Soil Survey Department, Ministry of Agriculture and Irrigation, Royal Government of Afghanistan under the auspices of the United States Agency for International Development.

  19. Experimental Investigation of Active Feedback Control of Turbulent Transport in a Magnetized Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Gilmore, Mark Allen

    2013-07-07

    A new and unique basic plasma science laboratory device - the HelCat device (HELicon-CAThode) - has been constructed and is operating at the University of New Mexico. HelCat is a 4 m long, 0.5 m diameter device, with magnetic field up to 2.2 kG, that has two independent plasmas sources - an RF helicon source, and a thermionic cathode. These two sources, which can operate independently or simultaneously, are capable of producing plasmas with a wide range of parameters and turbulence characteristics, well suited to a variety of basic plasma physics experiments. An extensive set of plasma diagnostics is also operating. Experiments investigating the active feedback control of turbulent transport of particles and heat via electrode biasing to affect plasma ExB flows are underway, and ongoing.

  20. Investigation of Water-Soluble X-ray Luminescence Nanoparticles for Photodynamic Activation

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yuanfang; Chen, Wei; Wang, Shaopeng; Joly, Alan G.

    2008-01-28

    In this letter, we report the synthesis of LaF3:Tb3+-MTCP (meso-Tetra(4-carboxyphenyl) porphine) nanoparticle conjugates and investigate the energy transfer as well as singlet oxygen generation following X-ray irradiation. Our observations indicate that LaF3:Tb3+-MTCP nanoparticle conjugates are efficient photodynamic agents that can be initiated by X-rays at a reasonably low dose. The addition of folic acid to facilitate targeting to folate receptors on tumor cells has no effect on the quantum yield of singlet oxygen in the nanoparticle-MTCP conjugates. Our pilot studies indicate that water-soluble scintillation nanoparticles can be potentially used to activate photodynamic therapy as a promising deep cancer treatment.

  1. Thiaminase activity and life history investigations in American Shad in the Columbia river

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wetzel, Lisa A.; Parsley, Michael J; van der Leeuw, Bjorn K.; Larsen, Kimberly A.

    2011-01-01

    American shad Alosa sapidissima fry were successfully transplanted from the Atlantic to the Pacific coast in 1871 and have subsequently proliferated. The Columbia River population is in the millions, yet few investigations have been conducted to better understand their life history, population dynamics, or potential impacts on other species. In 2007 and 2008 we captured American shad from the Columbia River to assess levels of thiaminase activity and to characterize some aspects of American shad life history. Thiaminase levels in age-0 and adult fish were high and ranged from 4,113-20,874 pmol/g/min. Ages of spawning American shad ranged from 3-7 years and iteroparity was approximately 33-36% in the spawning population. Males were typically younger and smaller and had a higher degree of iteroparity than females

  2. Investigating the capacity of self and peer assessment activities to engage students and promote learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willey, Keith; Gardner, Anne

    2010-08-01

    The authors have previously reported the effectiveness of using self and peer assessment to improve learning outcomes by providing opportunities to practise, assess and provide feedback on students' attribute development. Despite this work and the research of others, a significant number of students and, indeed, many academics focus on the free-rider deterrent capability of self and peer assessment, rather than its capacity to provide opportunities for developing judgement and facilitating reflection and feedback to complete the learning cycle. The advent of web-based tools such as SPARKPLUS allows the frequent and efficient implementation of self and peer assessment activities even in large classes. This article reports the results of an investigation into whether the regular use of self and peer assessment in different contexts promoted effective peer learning, increased engagement and encouraged students to learn.

  3. Mechanistic investigation of industrial wastewater naphthenic acids removal using granular activated carbon (GAC) biofilm based processes.

    PubMed

    Islam, Md Shahinoor; Zhang, Yanyan; McPhedran, Kerry N; Liu, Yang; Gamal El-Din, Mohamed

    2016-01-15

    Naphthenic acids (NAs) found in oil sands process-affected waters (OSPW) have known environmental toxicity and are resistant to conventional wastewater treatments. The granular activated carbon (GAC) biofilm treatment process has been shown to effectively treat OSPW NAs via combined adsorption/biodegradation processes despite the lack of research investigating their individual contributions. Presently, the NAs removals due to the individual processes of adsorption and biodegradation in OSPW bioreactors were determined using sodium azide to inhibit biodegradation. For raw OSPW, after 28 days biodegradation and adsorption contributed 14% and 63% of NA removal, respectively. For ozonated OSPW, biodegradation removed 18% of NAs while adsorption reduced NAs by 73%. Microbial community 454-pyrosequencing of bioreactor matrices indicated the importance of biodegradation given the diverse carbon degrading families including Acidobacteriaceae, Ectothiorhodospiraceae, and Comamonadaceae. Overall, results highlight the ability to determine specific processes of NAs removals in the combined treatment process in the presence of diverse bacteria metabolic groups found in GAC bioreactors.

  4. The ERTS-1 investigation (ER-600). Volume 4: ERTS-1 range analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erb, R. B.

    1974-01-01

    The Range Analysis Team conducted an investigation to determine the utility of using LANDSAT 1 data for mapping vegetation-type information on range and related grazing lands. Two study areas within the Houston Area Test Site (HATS) were mapped to the highest classification level possible using manual image interpretation and computer aided classification techniques. Rangeland was distinguished from nonrangeland (water, urban area, and cropland) and was further classified as woodland versus nonwoodland. Finer classification of coastal features was attempted with some success in differentiating the lowland zone from the drier upland zone. Computer aided temporal analysis techniques enhanced discrimination among nearly all the vegetation types found in this investigation.

  5. A Typology of Child School Behavior: Investigation Using Latent Profile Analysis and Cluster Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mindrila, Diana L.

    2016-01-01

    To describe and facilitate the identification of child school behavior patterns, we developed a typology of child school behavior (ages 6-11 years) using the norming data (N = 2,338) for the second edition of the Behavior Assessment System for Children Teacher Rating-Child form). Latent profile analysis was conducted with the entire data set,…

  6. Visual Analysis of Biological Activity Data with Scaffold Hunter.

    PubMed

    Klein, Karsten; Koch, Oliver; Kriege, Nils; Mutzel, Petra; Schäfer, Till

    2013-12-01

    The growing interest in chemogenomics approaches over the last years has led to an increasing amount of data regarding chemical and the corresponding biological activity space. The resulting data, collected in either in-house or public databases, need to be analyzed efficiently to speed-up the increasingly difficult task of drug discovery. Unfortunately, the discovery of new chemical entities or new targets for known drugs ('drug repurposing') is not suitable to a fully automated analysis or a simple drill down process. Visual interactive interfaces that allow to explore chemical space in a systematic manner and facilitate analytical reasoning can help to overcome these problems. Scaffold Hunter is a tool for the visual analysis of chemical compound databases that provides integrated visualization and analysis of biological activity data and fosters the interactive exploration of data imported from a variety of sources. We describe the features and illustrate the use by means of an exemplary analysis workflow.

  7. INDUSTRIAL/MILITARY ACTIVITY-INITIATED ACCIDENT SCREENING ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    D.A. Kalinich

    1999-09-27

    Impacts due to nearby installations and operations were determined in the Preliminary MGDS Hazards Analysis (CRWMS M&O 1996) to be potentially applicable to the proposed repository at Yucca Mountain. This determination was conservatively based on limited knowledge of the potential activities ongoing on or off the Nevada Test Site (NTS). It is intended that the Industrial/Military Activity-Initiated Accident Screening Analysis provided herein will meet the requirements of the ''Standard Review Plan for the Review of Safety Analysis Reports for Nuclear Power Plants'' (NRC 1987) in establishing whether this external event can be screened from further consideration or must be included as a design basis event (DBE) in the development of accident scenarios for the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR). This analysis only considers issues related to preclosure radiological safety. Issues important to waste isolation as related to impact from nearby installations will be covered in the MGR performance assessment.

  8. Analysis of initial in-plant active neutron multiplicity measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Ensslin, N.; Krick, M.S.; Harker, W.C.

    1993-08-01

    This paper analyzes initial in-plant measurements made by active neutron multiplicity counting, a new technique currently under development for the assay of bulk uranium containing kilograms of {sup 235}U. The measurements were made at Savannah River and Y-12 using active well coincidence counters and prototype multiplicity electronics and software from Los Alamos. For one of the sets of highly enriched uranium samples measured to data, we improved the assay accuracy by an order-of-magnitude by adding the multiplicity analysis to the conventional coincidence analysis. This paper summarizes our results and describes areas where further work is needed.

  9. Physical basis for prompt-neutron activation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Chrien, R.E.

    1982-01-01

    The technique called prompt ..gamma..-ray neutron activation analysis has been applied to rapid materials analysis. The radiation following the neutron radiation capture is prompt in the sense that the nuclear decay time is on the order of 10/sup -15/ second, and thus the technique is not strictly activation, but should be called radiation neutron capture spectroscopy or neutron capture ..gamma..-ray spectroscopy. This paper reviews the following: sources and detectors, theory of radiative capture, nonstatistical capture, giant dipole resonance, fast neutron capture, and thermal neutron capture ..gamma..-ray spectra. 14 figures.

  10. Investigation of a sterilization system using active oxygen species generated by ultraviolet irradiation.

    PubMed

    Yoshino, Kiyoshi; Matsumoto, Hiroyuki; Iwasaki, Tatsuyuki; Kinoshita, Shinobu; Noda, Kazutoshi; Oya, Kei; Iwamori, Satoru

    2015-01-01

    We have been investigating an advanced sterilization system that employs active oxygen species (AOS). We designed the sterilization equipment, including an evacuation system, which generates AOS from pure oxygen gas using ultraviolet irradiation, in order to study the conditions necessary for sterilization in the system's chamber. Using Geobachillus stearothermophilus spores (10(6) CFU) in a sterile bag as a biological indicator (BI) in the chamber of the AOS sterilization apparatus, we examined the viability of the BI as a function of exposure time, assessing the role of the decompression level in the sterilization performance. We found that the survival curves showed exponential reduction, and that the decompression level did not exert a significant influence on the survival curve. Subsequently, we investigated the sterilization effect as influenced by the spatial and environmental temperature variation throughout the chamber, and found that the sterilization effect varied with position, due to the varying environmental temperature in the respective areas. We confirmed that temperature is one of the most important factors influencing sterilization in the chamber, and estimated the temperature effect on the distribution of atomic oxygen concentration, using the quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) method with fluorocarbon thin film prepared by radio frequency sputtering.

  11. Investigation of Real-Time Photorepair Activity on DNA via Surface Plasmon Resonance

    PubMed Central

    Kizilel, Rıza; Demir, Enis; Azizoglu, Selimcan; Asımgi, Hande; Kavakli, Ibrahim Halil; Kizilel, Seda

    2012-01-01

    The cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer (CPD) and 6–4 lesion formations along with the specific breaks on strands are the most common type of DNA damage caused by Ultraviolet light (UV) irradiation. CPD photolyase I and II construct two subfamilies of flavoproteins, which have recognition and repair capabilities of CPD sites on both single stranded (ssDNA) and double stranded DNA (dsDNA) with the aid of blue light energy. The other types of flavoprotein family consist of cryptochromes (CRY) that act as photoreceptors in plants, or circadian rhythm regulators in animals. Recent findings showed that a specific type of Cryptochrome-Drosophila, Arabidopsis, Synechocystis, Human (CRY-DASH) has photorepair activity on ssDNA. In this work, real-time interactions between CRY-DASH and ss/dsDNA as well as the interactions between Vibrio cholerae photolyase (VcPHR) and ss/dsDNA were investigated using Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR). The interactions were then characterized and compared in order to investigate the effect of different types of flavoprotein on UV damaged ss/dsDNA. SPR results confirm the specific binding of VcPHR and CRY-DASH with UV treated DNA. This study is the first instance to quantify the interactions of UV treated and untreated DNA with flavoproteins. PMID:22952969

  12. Investigation of the Highly Active Manganese Superoxide Dismutase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Cabelli, D.E.; Barnese, K.; Sheng, Y.; Stich, T.A.; Gralla, E.B.; Britt, R.D.; Valentine, J.S.

    2010-09-15

    Manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) from different species differs in its efficiency in removing high concentrations of superoxide (O{sub 2}{sup -}), due to different levels of product inhibition. Human MnSOD exhibits a substantially higher level of product inhibition than the MnSODs from bacteria. In order to investigate the mechanism of product inhibition and whether it is a feature common to eukaryotic MnSODs, we purified MnSOD from Saccharomyces cerevisiae (ScMnSOD). It was a tetramer with 0.6 equiv of Mn per monomer. The catalytic activity of ScMnSOD was investigated by pulse radiolysis and compared with human and two bacterial (Escherichia coli and Deinococcus radiodurans) MnSODs. To our surprise, ScMnSOD most efficiently facilitates removal of high concentrations of O{sub 2}{sup -} among these MnSODs. The gating value k{sub 2}/k{sub 3} that characterizes the level of product inhibition scales as ScMnSOD > D. radiodurans MnSOD > E. coli MnSOD > human MnSOD. While most MnSODs rest as the oxidized form, ScMnSOD was isolated in the Mn{sup 2+} oxidation state as revealed by its optical and electron paramagnetic resonance spectra. This finding poses the possibility of elucidating the origin of product inhibition by comparing human MnSOD with ScMnSOD.

  13. Investigation of a sterilization system using active oxygen species generated by ultraviolet irradiation.

    PubMed

    Yoshino, Kiyoshi; Matsumoto, Hiroyuki; Iwasaki, Tatsuyuki; Kinoshita, Shinobu; Noda, Kazutoshi; Oya, Kei; Iwamori, Satoru

    2015-01-01

    We have been investigating an advanced sterilization system that employs active oxygen species (AOS). We designed the sterilization equipment, including an evacuation system, which generates AOS from pure oxygen gas using ultraviolet irradiation, in order to study the conditions necessary for sterilization in the system's chamber. Using Geobachillus stearothermophilus spores (10(6) CFU) in a sterile bag as a biological indicator (BI) in the chamber of the AOS sterilization apparatus, we examined the viability of the BI as a function of exposure time, assessing the role of the decompression level in the sterilization performance. We found that the survival curves showed exponential reduction, and that the decompression level did not exert a significant influence on the survival curve. Subsequently, we investigated the sterilization effect as influenced by the spatial and environmental temperature variation throughout the chamber, and found that the sterilization effect varied with position, due to the varying environmental temperature in the respective areas. We confirmed that temperature is one of the most important factors influencing sterilization in the chamber, and estimated the temperature effect on the distribution of atomic oxygen concentration, using the quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) method with fluorocarbon thin film prepared by radio frequency sputtering. PMID:25817808

  14. Investigation of the Deformation Activation Volume of an Ultrafinegrained Ti50Ni50 Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunderov, D. V.; Churakova, A. A.; Lukianov, A. V.; Prokofiev, E. A.; Prokoshkin, S. D.; Kreizberg, A. Yu.; Raab, G. I.; Sabirov, I. N.

    2015-10-01

    The mechanical properties, strain rate sensitivity (m) and deformation activation volume (ΔV) are investigated at the experimental temperatures from 20 to 400°C in a Ti50Ni50 alloy in a coarse-grained (CG) state with the austenite grain size D = 200 μm and in an ultrafine-grained (UFG) state with D = 700 μm following an ECAP treatment. It is observed that this treatment improves the yield strength of the alloy compared to its CG-state. The strain rate sensitivity, m, is found to be by a factor of 1.5-2 higher than that of CG-specimens; it increases with the temperature in both states of the material. As the temperature of the material in tension increases up to Т = 150-250°C, parameter ΔV increases to its maximum and with a further growth of the experimental temperature to 400°C, parameter ΔV decreases. The deformation activation volume of the alloy in the UFG-state is by a factor of 2-4 larger than that in the CG-state for the same experimental temperatures.

  15. A Helioseismic Survey to Investigate Relationships between Subsurface Flows beneath Large Active Regions and Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, Douglas; Leka, K D.; Barnes, Graham

    2014-06-01

    A survey of the subsurface flow properties of about 120 of the largest active regions, determined from the application of helioseismic holography to Dopplergrams obtained with the HMI instrument onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory, is being carried out. The overriding goal is to characterize differences in the subsurface flows between active regions associated with eruptive flares and the flows observed in relatively quiescent regions. Applications to flare forecasting comprise only one part of this investigation, since the potential response of the subsurface environment to eruptive events during and after their occurrence is also of scientific interest. Other priorities include understanding the limitations of the helioseismic methods, identifying and correcting systematic effects, and validating the reliability of the measurements using artificial data. While inversions to determine the variation with depth of subsurface flows are planned, preliminary results will be discussed which make use of proxies for near-surface depth-integrated properties, including the horizontal component of the flow divergence and the vertical component of the flow vorticity.This work is supported by the Solar Terrestrial Program of the National Science Foundation, through grant AGS-1127327, and by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration SBIR program.

  16. Investigation into the antioxidant and antidiabetic potential of Moringa stenopetala: identification of the active principles.

    PubMed

    Habtemariam, Solomon

    2015-03-01

    The fresh leaves of Moringa stenopetala (family, Moringaceae) are commonly eaten as cabbage while dried leaves are used as nutritional supplement and for treating a variety of disease conditions including diabetes. The present investigation into the therapeutic potential of the leaves and seeds of the plant revealed no inhibitory effect against α-glucosidase enzyme up to the concentration of 200 μg/mL but the leaves extract displayed potent DPPH (1,1-diphenyl-2- picrylhydrazyl) radical scavenging effect (IC50, 59.5 ± 4.1 μg/mL). An activity directed fractionation and isolation procedure resulted in the identification of the major antioxidant compound as rutin and minor active component, neochlorogenic acid. Both the crude extract (0.8-200 μg/mL) and rutin (0.8-200 μM) but not neochlorogenic acid displayed a concentration-dependent protection of human pancreatic β-cells (1.4E7 cells) from oxidant-induced cell death. The identification of these compounds along with their potential role in the nutritional and medicinal significance of the plant is discussed. PMID:25924532

  17. Investigation of aromatase inhibitory activity of metal complexes of 8-hydroxyquinoline and uracil derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Prachayasittikul, Veda; Pingaew, Ratchanok; Nantasenamat, Chanin; Prachayasittikul, Supaluk; Ruchirawat, Somsak; Prachayasittikul, Virapong

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Estrogens play important roles in the pathogenesis and progression of breast cancer as well as estrogen-related diseases. Aromatase is a key enzyme in the rate-limiting step of estrogen production, in which its inhibition is one strategy for controlling estrogen levels to improve prognosis of estrogen-related cancers and diseases. Herein, a series of metal (Mn, Cu, and Ni) complexes of 8-hydroxyquinoline (8HQ) and uracil derivatives (4–9) were investigated for their aromatase inhibitory and cytotoxic activities. Methods The aromatase inhibition assay was performed according to a Gentest™ kit using CYP19 enzyme, wherein ketoconazole and letrozole were used as reference drugs. The cytotoxicity was tested on normal embryonic lung cells (MRC-5) using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Results Only Cu complexes (6 and 9) exhibited aromatase inhibitory effect with IC50 0.30 and 1.7 μM, respectively. Cytotoxicity test against MRC-5 cells showed that Mn and Cu complexes (5 and 6), as well as free ligand 8HQ, exhibited activity with IC50 range 0.74–6.27 μM. Conclusion Cu complexes (6 and 9) were found to act as a novel class of aromatase inhibitor. Our findings suggest that these 8HQ–Cu–uracil complexes are promising agents that could be potentially developed as a selective anticancer agent for breast cancer and other estrogen-related diseases. PMID:25152615

  18. Investigation into the antioxidant and antidiabetic potential of Moringa stenopetala: identification of the active principles.

    PubMed

    Habtemariam, Solomon

    2015-03-01

    The fresh leaves of Moringa stenopetala (family, Moringaceae) are commonly eaten as cabbage while dried leaves are used as nutritional supplement and for treating a variety of disease conditions including diabetes. The present investigation into the therapeutic potential of the leaves and seeds of the plant revealed no inhibitory effect against α-glucosidase enzyme up to the concentration of 200 μg/mL but the leaves extract displayed potent DPPH (1,1-diphenyl-2- picrylhydrazyl) radical scavenging effect (IC50, 59.5 ± 4.1 μg/mL). An activity directed fractionation and isolation procedure resulted in the identification of the major antioxidant compound as rutin and minor active component, neochlorogenic acid. Both the crude extract (0.8-200 μg/mL) and rutin (0.8-200 μM) but not neochlorogenic acid displayed a concentration-dependent protection of human pancreatic β-cells (1.4E7 cells) from oxidant-induced cell death. The identification of these compounds along with their potential role in the nutritional and medicinal significance of the plant is discussed.

  19. Investigations into the antibacterial activities of phytotherapeutics against Helicobacter pylori and Campylobacter jejuni.

    PubMed

    Cwikla, C; Schmidt, K; Matthias, A; Bone, K M; Lehmann, R; Tiralongo, E

    2010-05-01

    The prevalence of gastric diseases is increasing with H. pylori, the causative agent of acute and chronic gastritis, being a major predisposing factor for peptic ulcer disease and gastric carcinoma. C. jejuni is the most common cause of enteric infections, particularly among children, resulting in severe diarrhoea. Increasing drug resistance of these bacteria against standard antibiotics, and the more widespread use of herbal medicines, favours investigations into additional anti-Helicobacter and anti-Campylobacter effects of phytotherapeutics that are already used for their beneficial effects on bowel and digestive functions. Twenty-one hydroethanol herbal extracts and four essential oils were screened for antibacterial activity using a modification of a previously described micro-dilution assay and compared with the inhibitory effects of antibiotics. The herbal extracts showing the highest growth inhibition of C. jejuni were Calendula officinalis, Matricaria recutita, Zingiber officinale, Salvia officinalis, Foeniculum vulgare and Silybum marianum. Agrimonia eupatoria, Hydrastis canadensis, Filipendula ulmaria and Salvia officinalis were the most active herbal extracts in inhibiting the growth of H. pylori. This study provides evidence for additional beneficial effects of phytotherapeutics marketed for their gastrointestinal effects and identifies new beneficial antibacterial effects for some herbal medicines not currently recommended for gastrointestinal problems. PMID:19653313

  20. INVESTIGATION OF HELICITY AND ENERGY FLUX TRANSPORT IN THREE EMERGING SOLAR ACTIVE REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Vemareddy, P.

    2015-06-20

    We report the results of an investigation of helicity and energy flux transport from three emerging solar active regions (ARs). Using time sequence vector magnetic field observations obtained from the Helioseismic Magnetic Imager, the velocity field of plasma flows is derived by the differential affine velocity estimator for vector magnetograms. In three cases, the magnetic fluxes evolve to pump net positive, negative, and mixed-sign helicity flux into the corona. The coronal helicity flux is dominantly coming from the shear term that is related to horizontal flux motions, whereas energy flux is dominantly contributed by the emergence term. The shear helicity flux has a phase delay of 5–14 hr with respect to absolute magnetic flux. The nonlinear curve of coronal energy versus relative helicity identifies the configuration of coronal magnetic fields, which is approximated by a fit of linear force-free fields. The nature of coronal helicity related to the particular pattern of evolving magnetic fluxes at the photosphere has implications for the generation mechanism of two kinds of observed activity in the ARs.

  1. Kinetic and mechanistic investigations of the degradation of sulfamethazine in heat-activated persulfate oxidation process.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yan; Ji, Yuefei; Kong, Deyang; Lu, Junhe; Zhou, Quansuo

    2015-12-30

    Sulfamethazine (SMZ) is widely used in livestock feeding and aquaculture as an antibiotic agent and growth promoter. Widespread occurrence of SMZ in surface water, groundwater, soil and sediment has been reported. In this study, degradation of SMZ by heat-activated persulfate (PS) oxidation was investigated in aqueous solution. Experimental results demonstrated that SMZ degradation followed pseudo-first-order reaction kinetics. The pseudo-first-order rate constant (kobs) was increased markedly with increasing concentration of PS and temperature. Radical scavenging tests revealed that the predominant oxidizing species was SO4·(-) with HO playing a less important role. Aniline moiety in SMZ molecule was confirmed to be the reactive site for SO4·(-) attack by comparison with substructural analogs. Nontarget natural water constituents affected SMZ removal significantly, e.g., Cl(-) and HCO3(-) improved the degradation while fulvic acid reduced it. Reaction products were enriched by solid phase extraction (SPE) and analyzed by liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS/MS). 6 products derived from sulfonamide S--N bond cleavage, aniline moiety oxidation and Smiles-type rearrangement were identified, and transformation pathways of SMZ oxidation were proposed. Results reveal that heat-activated PS oxidation could be an efficient approach for remediation of water contaminated by SMZ and related sulfonamides.

  2. Investigation of Pyrolyzed Chars from Physic Nut Waste for the Preparation of Activated Carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pechyen, Chiravoot; Atong, Duangduen; Aht-Ong, Duangdao; Sricharoenchaikul, Viboon

    Fixed bed pyrolysis of physic nut waste was conducted to investigate the influence of different operating conditions, such as sample size, final temperature and hold time, on properties of the pyrolyzed chars. The obtained chars were characterized by a thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA) for proximate analyses and by Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) for determination of their accelerated surface area. The surface morphology of char was investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). For chemical characterization, an X-ray diffractometer (XRD) and a Fourier transform infrared spectroscope (FTIR) were used to identify inorganic components and surface organic functional groups of the char. In this work, the FTIR analysis indicated the existence of phosphonate groups, carboxyl groups and amine groups on char surface. The XRD pattern of the surface also verified the presence of graphite as main carbon structure. The conditions yielding char with maximum BET surface area of 249.60 m2·g-1 and high fixed carbon are final temperature of 800°C, hold time of 15 minutes, and heating rate of 20°C/min for 0.425-0.5 mm particle. Generally, high temperature pyrolysis of raw materials with short hold time results in char with favorable smooth, porous surface with large cavities.

  3. Overview of MSFC's Applied Fluid Dynamics Analysis Group Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, Roberto; Wang, Tee-See; Griffin, Lisa; Turner, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This document is a presentation graphic which reviews the activities of the Applied Fluid Dynamics Analysis Group at Marshall Space Flight Center (i.e., Code TD64). The work of this group focused on supporting the space transportation programs. The work of the group is in Computational Fluid Dynamic tool development. This development is driven by hardware design needs. The major applications for the design and analysis tools are: turbines, pumps, propulsion-to-airframe integration, and combustion devices.

  4. Pharmacological Investigations of the Cellular Transduction Pathways Used by Cholecystokinin to Activate Nodose Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Huan; Kinch, Dallas C.; Simasko, Steven M.

    2011-01-01

    Cholecystokinin (CCK) directly activates vagal afferent neurons resulting in coordinated gastrointestinal functions and satiation. In vitro, the effects of CCK on dissociated vagal afferent neurons are mediated via activation of the vanilloid family of transient receptor potential (TRPV) cation channels leading to membrane depolarization and an increase in cytosolic calcium. However, the cellular transduction pathway(s) involved in this process between CCK receptors and channel opening have not been identified. To address this question, we monitored CCK-induced cytosolic calcium responses in dissociated nodose neurons from rat in the presence or absence of reagents that interact with various intracellular signaling pathways. We found that the phospholipase C (PLC) inhibitor U-73122 significantly attenuated CCK-induced responses, whereas the inactive analog U-73433 had no effect. Responses to CCK were also cross-desensitized by a brief pretreatment with m-3M3FBS, a PLC stimulator. Together these observations strongly support the participation of PLC in the effects of CCK on vagal afferent neurons. In contrast, pharmacological antagonism of phospholipase A2, protein kinase A, and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase revealed that they are not critical in the CCK-induced calcium response in nodose neurons. Further investigations of the cellular pathways downstream of PLC showed that neither protein kinase C (PKC) nor generation of diacylglycerol (DAG) or release of calcium from intracellular stores participates in the response to CCK. These results suggest that alteration of membrane phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) content by PLC activity mediates CCK-induced calcium response and that this pathway may underlie the vagally-mediated actions of CCK to induce satiation and alter gastrointestinal functions. PMID:21664195

  5. ALVIN investigation of an active propagating rift system, Galapagos 95.5° W

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hey, R.N.; Sinton, J.M.; Kleinrock, M.C.; Yonover, R.N.; MacDonald, K.C.; Miller, S.P.; Searle, R.C.; Christie, D.M.; Atwater, T.M.; Sleep, N.H.; Johnson, H. Paul; Neal, C.A.

    1992-01-01

    ALVIN investigations have defined the fine-scale structural and volcanic patterns produced by active rift and spreading center propagation and failure near 95.5° W on the Galapagos spreading center. Behind the initial lithospheric rifting, which is propagating nearly due west at about 50 km m.y.−1, a triangular block of preexisting lithosphere is being stretched and fractured, with some recent volcanism along curving fissures. A well-organized seafloor spreading center, an extensively faulted and fissured volcanic ridge, develops ~ 10 km (~ 200,000 years) behind the tectonic rift tip. Regional variations in the chemical compositions of the youngest lavas collected during this program contrast with those encompassing the entire 3 m.y. of propagation history for this region. A maximum in degree of magmatic differentiation occurs about 9 km behind the propagating rift tip, in a region of diffuse rifting. The propagating spreading center shows a gentle gradient in magmatic differentiation culminating at the SW-curving spreading center tip. Except for the doomed rift, which is in a constructional phase, tectonic activity also dominates over volcanic activity along the failing spreading system. In contrast to the propagating rift, failing rift lavas show a highly restricted range of compositions consistent with derivation from a declining upwelling zone accompanying rift failure. The lithosphere transferred from the Cocos to the Nazca plate by this propagator is extensively faulted and characterized by ubiquitous talus in one of the most tectonically disrupted areas of seafloor known. The pseudofault scarps, where the preexisting lithosphere was rifted apart, appear to include both normal and propagator lavas and are thus more lithologically complex than previously thought. Biological communities, probably vestimentiferan tubeworms, occur near the top of the outer pseudofault scarp, although no hydrothermal venting was observed.

  6. In Vitro Antioxidant versus Metal Ion Chelating Properties of Flavonoids: A Structure-Activity Investigation

    PubMed Central

    Cherrak, Sabri Ahmed; Mokhtari-Soulimane, Nassima; Berroukeche, Farid; Bensenane, Bachir; Cherbonnel, Angéline; Merzouk, Hafida; Elhabiri, Mourad

    2016-01-01

    Natural flavonoids such as quercetin, (+)catechin and rutin as well as four methoxylated derivatives of quercetin used as models were investigated to elucidate their impact on the oxidant and antioxidant status of human red blood cells (RBCs). The impact of these compounds against metal toxicity was studied as well as their antiradical activities with DPPH assay. Antihemolytic experiments were conducted on quercetin, (+)catechin and rutin with excess of Fe, Cu and Zn (400 μM), and the oxidant (malondialdehyde, carbonyl proteins) and antioxidant (reduced glutathione, catalase activity) markers were evaluated. The results showed that Fe and Zn have the highest prooxidant effect (37 and 33% of hemolysis, respectively). Quercetin, rutin and (+)catechin exhibited strong antioxidant properties toward Fe, but this effect was decreased with respect to Zn ions. However, the Cu showed a weak antioxidant effect at the highest flavonoid concentration (200 μM), while a prooxidant effect was observed at the lowest flavonoid concentration (100 μM). These results are in agreement with the physico-chemical and antiradical data which demonstrated that binding of the metal ions (for FeNTA: (+)Catechin, KLFeNTA = 1.6(1) × 106 M-1 > Rutin, KLFeNTA = 2.0(9) × 105 M-1 > Quercetin, KLFeNTA = 1.0(7) × 105 M-1 > Q35OH, KLFeNTA = 6.3(8.7) × 104 M-1 > Quercetin3’4’OH and Quercetin 3OH, KLFeNTA ~ 2 × 104 M-1) reflects the (anti)oxidant status of the RBCs. This study reveals that flavonoids have both prooxidant and antioxidant activity depending on the nature and concentration of the flavonoids and metal ions. PMID:27788249

  7. INVESTIGATING THE NUCLEAR ACTIVITY OF BARRED SPIRAL GALAXIES: THE CASE OF NGC 1672

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkins, L. P.; Brandt, W. N.; Colbert, E. J. M.; Kuntz, K. D.; Koribalski, B.; Levan, A. J.; Ojha, R.; Zezas, A.

    2011-06-10

    We have performed an X-ray study of the nearby barred spiral galaxy NGC 1672, primarily to ascertain the effect of the bar on its nuclear activity. We use both Chandra and XMM-Newton observations to investigate its X-ray properties, together with supporting high-resolution optical imaging data from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), infrared imaging from the Spitzer Space Telescope, and Australia Telescope Compact Array ground-based radio data. We detect 28 X-ray sources within the D{sub 25} area of the galaxy; many are spatially correlated with star formation in the bar and spiral arms, and two are identified as background galaxies in the HST images. Nine of the X-ray sources are ultraluminous X-ray sources, with the three brightest (L{sub X} > 5 x 10{sup 39} erg s{sup -1}) located at the ends of the bar. With the spatial resolution of Chandra, we are able to show for the first time that NGC 1672 possesses a hard ({Gamma} {approx} 1.5) nuclear X-ray source with a 2-10 keV luminosity of 4 x 10{sup 38} erg s{sup -1}. This is surrounded by an X-ray-bright circumnuclear star-forming ring, comprised of point sources and hot gas, which dominates the 2-10 keV emission in the central region of the galaxy. The spatially resolved multiwavelength photometry indicates that the nuclear source is a low-luminosity active galactic nucleus (LLAGN), but with star formation activity close to the central black hole. A high-resolution multiwavelength survey is required to fully assess the impact of both large-scale bars and smaller-scale phenomena such as nuclear bars, rings, and nuclear spirals on the fueling of LLAGN.

  8. Investigating the Nuclear Activity of Barred Spiral Galaxies: The Case of NGC 1672

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, L. P.; Brandt, W. N.; Colbert, E. J.; Koribalski, B.; Kuntz, K. D.; Levan, A. J.; Ojha, R.; Roberts, T. P.; Ward, M. J.; Zezas, A.

    2011-01-01

    We have performed an X-ray study of the nearby barred spiral galaxy NGC 1672, primarily to ascertain the effect of the bar on its nuclear activity. We use both Chandra and XMM-Newton observations to investigate its X-ray properties, together with supporting high-resolution optical imaging data from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) infrared imaging from the Spitzer Space Telescope, and Australia Telescope Compact Array ground-based radio data. We detect 28 X-ray sources within the D25 area of the galaxy; many are spatially correlated with star formation in the bar and spiral arms, and two are identified as background galaxies in the HST images. Nine of the X-ray sources are ultraluminous X-ray sources, with the three brightest (LX 5 * 10(exp 39) erg s(exp -1)) located at the ends of the bar. With the spatial resolution of Chandra, we are able to show for the first time that NGC 1672 possesses a hard (1.5) nuclear X-ray source with a 2-10 keV luminosity of 4 * 10(exp 38) erg s(exp -1). This is surrounded by an X-ray-bright circumnuclear star-forming ring, comprised of point sources and hot gas, which dominates the 2-10 keV emission in the central region of the galaxy. The spatially resolved multiwavelength photometry indicates that the nuclear source is a low-luminosity active galactic nucleus (LLAGN), but with star formation activity close to the central black hole. A high-resolution multiwavelength survey is required to fully assess the impact of both large-scale bars and smaller-scale phenomena such as nuclear bars, rings, and nuclear spirals on the fueling of LLAGN.

  9. Investigation on active vibration isolation of a Stewart platform with piezoelectric actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chaoxin; Xie, Xiling; Chen, Yanhao; Zhang, Zhiyi

    2016-11-01

    A Stewart platform with piezoelectric actuators is presented for micro-vibration isolation. The Jacobi matrix of the Stewart platform, which reveals the relationship between the position/pointing of the payload and the extensions of the six struts, is derived by kinematic analysis. The dynamic model of the Stewart platform is established by the FRF (frequency response function) synthesis method. In the active control loop, the direct feedback of integrated forces is combined with the FxLMS based adaptive feedback to dampen vibration of inherent modes and suppress transmission of periodic vibrations. Numerical simulations were conducted to prove vibration isolation performance of the Stewart platform under random and periodical disturbances, respectively. In the experiment, the output consistencies of the six piezoelectric actuators were measured at first and the theoretical Jacobi matrix as well as the feedback gain of each piezoelectric actuator was subsequently modified according to the measured consistencies. The direct feedback loop was adjusted to achieve sufficient active damping and the FxLMS based adaptive feedback control was adopted to suppress vibration transmission in the six struts. Experimental results have demonstrated that the Stewart platform can achieve 30 dB attenuation of periodical disturbances and 10-20 dB attenuation of random disturbances in the frequency range of 5-200 Hz.

  10. Spectroscopic investigation of biosynthesized nickel nanoparticles and its larvicidal, pesticidal activities.

    PubMed

    Elango, Ganesh; Roopan, Selvaraj Mohana; Dhamodaran, Kasinathan Irukatla; Elumalai, Kuppusamy; Al-Dhabi, Naif Abdullah; Arasu, Mariadhas Valan

    2016-09-01

    Methanolic extract of Cocos nucifera (C. nucifera) was collected using Soxhlet apparatus. C. nucifera methanolic extract was used to prepare Nickel nanoparticles (Ni NPs). Eco-friendly synthesized Ni NPs were confirmed by several analytical techniques such as UV-Visible spectroscopy (UV-Vis), Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), Energy Dispersive X-ray analysis (EDAX), Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) and Zeta potential. The obtained results infer that green synthesized Ni NPs are in cubical shape with an average particle size of 47nm. Synthesized Ni NPs were subjected to pesticidal activity against agricultural pest Callasobruchus maculates (C. maculates) which resulted in 97.31% mortality. These results were compared with commercially available standard Azadirachtin. Also we have studied larvicidal activity against Aedes ageypti (A. ageypti) larvae which resulted in LC 50 and LC 90 value of 259.24, 446.99ppm respectively and the result proved to be significant which were processed by ANOVA LSD Tukey's test. PMID:27371915

  11. Investigation of a MMP-2 Activity-Dependent Anchoring Probe for Nuclear Imaging of Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Temma, Takashi; Hanaoka, Hirofumi; Yonezawa, Aki; Kondo, Naoya; Sano, Kohei; Sakamoto, Takeharu; Seiki, Motoharu; Ono, Masahiro; Saji, Hideo

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Since matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) is an important marker of tumor malignancy, we developed an original drug design strategy, MMP-2 activity dependent anchoring probes (MDAP), for use in MMP-2 activity imaging, and evaluated the usefulness of this probe in in vitro and in vivo experiments. Methods We designed and synthesized MDAP1000, MDAP3000, and MDAP5000, which consist of 4 independent moieties: RI unit (111In hydrophilic chelate), MMP-2 substrate unit (short peptide), anchoring unit (alkyl chain), and anchoring inhibition unit (polyethylene glycol (PEGn; where n represents the approximate molecular weight, n = 1000, 3000, and 5000). Probe cleavage was evaluated by chromatography after MMP-2 treatment. Cellular uptake of the probes was then measured. Radioactivity accumulation in tumor xenografts was evaluated after intravenous injection of the probes, and probe cleavage was evaluated in tumor homogenates. Results MDAP1000, MDAP3000, and MDAP5000 were cleaved by MMP-2 in a concentration-dependent manner. MDAP3000 pretreated with MMP-2 showed higher accumulation in tumor cells, and was completely blocked by additional treatment with an MMP inhibitor. MDAP3000 exhibited rapid blood clearance and a high tumor accumulation after intravenous injection in a rodent model. Furthermore, pharmacokinetic analysis revealed that MDAP3000 exhibited a considerably slow washout rate from tumors to blood. A certain fraction of cleaved MDAP3000 existed in tumor xenografts in vivo. Conclusions The results indicate the possible usefulness of our MDAP strategy for tumor imaging. PMID:25010662

  12. Cooperative magnetographic and radioastronomical investigations of the active solar region AR 3804 in July 1982.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhmedov, Sh. B.; Borovik, V. N.; Gel'Frejkh, G. B.; Bogod, V. M.; Korzhavin, A. N.; Petrov, Z. E.; Hofmann, A.; Bachmann, G.

    An analysis of the radiation peculiar source in the active solar region AR 3804 is presented using the magnetograms obtained at ZIAP AW DDR in Potsdam. The source is on the border line of polarities of the photospheric magnetic field above the filament and has the flux spectrum increasing with the wavelength, the brightness temperature at 4 cm being above 6×106K, and the logarithm spectrum slope in the shortwave region (λ = 2 cm) being about n = 10. The polarization degree within 2 - 4 cm is close to 30%. An analysis of magnetograms of the total field vector showed that in the source region there is observed a density increase of the longitudinal current in the photosphere, this increase having different signs on different sides from the zero magnetic line. Near the source there is observed a magnetic field hill of the reverse polarity relative to the background field. It is suggested to relate the source with the magnetic loop of the "twisted" field in the corona in which the local energy emission and corona heating due to dissipation of magnetic fields of complex configuration occur (apparently, with the current sheet formation).

  13. Investigating environmental determinants of diet, physical activity, and overweight among adults in Sao Paulo, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Jaime, Patricia Constante; Duran, Ana Clara; Sarti, Flávia Mori; Lock, Karen

    2011-06-01

    There is worldwide recognition that the burden of noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) and obesity-related health problems is rapidly increasing in low- and middle-income countries. Environmental determinants of obesity are likely to differ between countries, particularly in those undergoing rapid socioeconomic and nutrition transitions such as Brazil. This study aims to describe some built environment and local food environment variables and to explore their association with the overweight rate and diet and physical activity area-level aggregated indicators of adults living in the city of Sao Paulo, the largest city in Brazil. This formative study includes an ecological analysis of environmental factors associated with overweight across 31 submunicipalities of the city of Sao Paulo using statistical and spatial analyses. Average prevalence of overweight was 41.69% (95% confidence interval 38.74, 44.64), ranging from 27.14% to 60.75% across the submunicipalities. There was a wide geographical variation of both individual diet and physical activity, and indicators of food and built environments, favoring wealthier areas. After controlling for area socioeconomic status, there was a positive correlation between regular fruits and vegetables (FV) intake and density of FV specialized food markets (r = 0.497; p < 0.001), but no relationship between fast-food restaurant density and overweight prevalence was found. A negative association between overweight prevalence and density of parks and public sport facilities was seen (r = -0.527; p < 0.05). Understanding the relationship between local neighborhood environments and increasing rates of poor diet, physical activity, and obesity is essential in countries undergoing rapid economic and urban development, such as Brazil, in order to provide insights for policies to reduce increasing rates of NCDs and food access and health inequalities. PMID:21327549

  14. Investigation of gravity wave activity based on operational radiosonde data from 13 years (1997-2009): Climatology and possible induced variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramer, R.; Wüst, S.; Bittner, M.

    2016-03-01

    Atmospheric gravity waves (GWs) are important for the dynamics of the atmosphere. The analysis of 13 years of routine radiosonde data from Prague (50.01°N, 14.27°E) with temporal highly resolved temperature, pressure and wind measurements is presented in order to derive a climatology of gravity wave activity in the lower stratosphere. An annual cycle with a maximum during winter and a minimum during summer is identified. Gravity wave activity is twice as high during winter as during summer. Winter periods are investigated by wavelet analysis. They show similar periods in vertical flux of horizontal momentum and pressure variance time series. These features may be attributed to planetary waves. When analyzing individual years, maxima of gravity wave activity and vertical flux of horizontal momentum often appears together with minima in surface pressure. We speculate therefore that at least parts of the interannual variations of gravity wave activity may due to cyclones.

  15. [Deterministic analysis as a tool to investigate the contingency of various components of biocenosis].

    PubMed

    Bulgakov, N G; Maksimov, V N

    2005-01-01

    Specific application of deterministic analysis to investigate the contingencies of various components of natural biocenosis was illustrated by the example of fish production and biomass of phyto- and zooplankton. Deterministic analysis confirms the theoretic assumptions on food preferences of herbivorous fish: both silver and bighead carps avoided feeding on cyanobacteria. Being a facultative phytoplankton feeder, silver carp preferred microalgae to zooplankton. Deterministic analysis allowed us to demonstrate the contingency of the mean biomass of phyto- and zooplankton during both the whole fish production cycle and the individual periods. PMID:16004266

  16. First principles investigation of the activity of thin film Pt, Pd and Au surface alloys for oxygen reduction.

    PubMed

    Tripkovic, Vladimir; Hansen, Heine Anton; Rossmeisl, Jan; Vegge, Tejs

    2015-05-01

    Further advances in fuel cell technologies are hampered by kinetic limitations associated with the sluggish cathodic oxygen reduction reaction. We have investigated a range of different formulations of binary and ternary Pt, Pd and Au thin films as electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction. The most active binary thin films are near-surface alloys of Pt with subsurface Pd and certain PdAu and PtAu thin films with surface and/or subsurface Au. The most active ternary thin films are with pure metal Pt or Pd skins with some degree of Au in the surface and/or subsurface layer and the near-surface alloys of Au with mixed Pt-Pd skins. The activity of the binary and ternary catalysts is explained through weakening of the OH binding energy caused by solute elements. However, given the low alloy formation energies it may be difficult to tune and retain the composition under operating conditions. This is particularly challenging for alloys containing Au due to a high propensity of Au to segregate to the surface. We also show that once Au is on the surface it will diffuse to defect sites, explaining why small amounts of Au retard dissolution of Pt nanoparticles. For the PtPd thin films there is no pronounced driving force for surface segregation, diffusion to defects or surface self-assembling. On the basis of stability and activity analysis we conclude that the near surface alloy of Pd in Pt and some PdAu binary and PtPdAu ternary thin films with a controlled amount of Au are the best catalysts for oxygen reduction. PMID:25865333

  17. Investigation of decolorization of textile wastewater in an anaerobic/aerobic biological activated carbon system (A/A BAC).

    PubMed

    Pasukphun, N; Vinitnantharat, S; Gheewala, S

    2010-04-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the decolorization in anaerobic/aerobic biological activated carbon (A/A BAC) system. The experiment was divided into 2 stages; stage I is batch test for preliminary study of dye removal equilibrium time. The preliminary experiment (stage I) provided the optimal data for experimental design of A/A BAC system in SBR (stage II). Stage II is A/A BAC system imitated Sequencing Batch Reactor (SBR) which consist of 5 main periods; fill, react, settle, draw and idle. React period include anaerobic phase followed by aerobic phase. The BAC main media; Granular Activated Carbon (GAC), Mixed Cultures (MC) and Biological Activated Carbon (BAC) were used for dye and organic substances removal in three different solutions; Desizing Agent Solution (DAS), dye Solution (DS) and Synthetic Textile Wastewater (STW). Results indicate that GAC adsorption plays role in dye removal followed by BAC and MC activities, respectively. In the presence desizing agent, decolorization by MC was improved because desizing agent acts as co-substrates for microorganisms. It was found that 50% of dye removal efficiency was achieved in Fill period by MC. GC/MS analysis was used to identify dye intermediate from decolorization. Dye intermediate containing amine group was found in the solution and on BAC surfaces. The results demonstrated that combination of MC and BAC in the system promotes decolorization and dye intermediate removal. In order to improve dye removal efficiency in an A/A BAC system, replacement of virgin GAC, sufficient co-substrates supply and the appropriate anaerobic: aerobic period should be considered.

  18. Facilitating neuronal connectivity analysis of evoked responses by exposing local activity with principal component analysis preprocessing: simulation of evoked MEG.

    PubMed

    Gao, Lin; Zhang, Tongsheng; Wang, Jue; Stephen, Julia

    2013-04-01

    When connectivity analysis is carried out for event related EEG and MEG, the presence of strong spatial correlations from spontaneous activity in background may mask the local neuronal evoked activity and lead to spurious connections. In this paper, we hypothesized PCA decomposition could be used to diminish the background activity and further improve the performance of connectivity analysis in event related experiments. The idea was tested using simulation, where we found that for the 306-channel Elekta Neuromag system, the first 4 PCs represent the dominant background activity, and the source connectivity pattern after preprocessing is consistent with the true connectivity pattern designed in the simulation. Improving signal to noise of the evoked responses by discarding the first few PCs demonstrates increased coherences at major physiological frequency bands when removing the first few PCs. Furthermore, the evoked information was maintained after PCA preprocessing. In conclusion, it is demonstrated that the first few PCs represent background activity, and PCA decomposition can be employed to remove it to expose the evoked activity for the channels under investigation. Therefore, PCA can be applied as a preprocessing approach to improve neuronal connectivity analysis for event related data.

  19. Preliminary Work Domain Analysis for Human Extravehicular Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGuire, Kerry; Miller, Matthew; Feigh, Karen

    2015-01-01

    A work domain analysis (WDA) of human extravehicular activity (EVA) is presented in this study. A formative methodology such as Cognitive Work Analysis (CWA) offers a new perspective to the knowledge gained from the past 50 years of living and working in space for the development of future EVA support systems. EVA is a vital component of human spaceflight and provides a case study example of applying a work domain analysis (WDA) to a complex sociotechnical system. The WDA presented here illustrates how the physical characteristics of the environment, hardware, and life support systems of the domain guide the potential avenues and functional needs of future EVA decision support system development.

  20. Optimizing human activity patterns using global sensitivity analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hickmann, Kyle S.; Mniszewski, Susan M.; Del Valle, Sara Y.; Hyman, James M.

    2014-01-01

    Implementing realistic activity patterns for a population is crucial for modeling, for example, disease spread, supply and demand, and disaster response. Using the dynamic activity simulation engine, DASim, we generate schedules for a population that capture regular (e.g., working, eating, and sleeping) and irregular activities (e.g., shopping or going to the doctor). We use the sample entropy (SampEn) statistic to quantify a schedule’s regularity for a population. We show how to tune an activity’s regularity by adjusting SampEn, thereby making it possible to realistically design activities when creating a schedule. The tuning process sets up a computationally intractable high-dimensional optimization problem. To reduce the computational demand, we use Bayesian Gaussian process regression to compute global sensitivity indices and identify the parameters that have the greatest effect on the variance of SampEn. We use the harmony search (HS) global optimization algorithm to locate global optima. Our results show that HS combined with global sensitivity analysis can efficiently tune the SampEn statistic with few search iterations. We demonstrate how global sensitivity analysis can guide statistical emulation and global optimization algorithms to efficiently tune activities and generate realistic activity patterns. Though our tuning methods are applied to dynamic activity schedule generation, they are general and represent a significant step in the direction of automated tuning and optimization of high-dimensional computer simulations. PMID:25580080

  1. Optimizing human activity patterns using global sensitivity analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Fairchild, Geoffrey; Hickmann, Kyle S.; Mniszewski, Susan M.; Del Valle, Sara Y.; Hyman, James M.

    2013-12-10

    Implementing realistic activity patterns for a population is crucial for modeling, for example, disease spread, supply and demand, and disaster response. Using the dynamic activity simulation engine, DASim, we generate schedules for a population that capture regular (e.g., working, eating, and sleeping) and irregular activities (e.g., shopping or going to the doctor). We use the sample entropy (SampEn) statistic to quantify a schedule’s regularity for a population. We show how to tune an activity’s regularity by adjusting SampEn, thereby making it possible to realistically design activities when creating a schedule. The tuning process sets up a computationally intractable high-dimensional optimization problem. To reduce the computational demand, we use Bayesian Gaussian process regression to compute global sensitivity indices and identify the parameters that have the greatest effect on the variance of SampEn. Here we use the harmony search (HS) global optimization algorithm to locate global optima. Our results show that HS combined with global sensitivity analysis can efficiently tune the SampEn statistic with few search iterations. We demonstrate how global sensitivity analysis can guide statistical emulation and global optimization algorithms to efficiently tune activities and generate realistic activity patterns. Finally, though our tuning methods are applied to dynamic activity schedule generation, they are general and represent a significant step in the direction of automated tuning and optimization of high-dimensional computer simulations.

  2. Optimizing human activity patterns using global sensitivity analysis

    DOE PAGES

    Fairchild, Geoffrey; Hickmann, Kyle S.; Mniszewski, Susan M.; Del Valle, Sara Y.; Hyman, James M.

    2013-12-10

    Implementing realistic activity patterns for a population is crucial for modeling, for example, disease spread, supply and demand, and disaster response. Using the dynamic activity simulation engine, DASim, we generate schedules for a population that capture regular (e.g., working, eating, and sleeping) and irregular activities (e.g., shopping or going to the doctor). We use the sample entropy (SampEn) statistic to quantify a schedule’s regularity for a population. We show how to tune an activity’s regularity by adjusting SampEn, thereby making it possible to realistically design activities when creating a schedule. The tuning process sets up a computationally intractable high-dimensional optimizationmore » problem. To reduce the computational demand, we use Bayesian Gaussian process regression to compute global sensitivity indices and identify the parameters that have the greatest effect on the variance of SampEn. Here we use the harmony search (HS) global optimization algorithm to locate global optima. Our results show that HS combined with global sensitivity analysis can efficiently tune the SampEn statistic with few search iterations. We demonstrate how global sensitivity analysis can guide statistical emulation and global optimization algorithms to efficiently tune activities and generate realistic activity patterns. Finally, though our tuning methods are applied to dynamic activity schedule generation, they are general and represent a significant step in the direction of automated tuning and optimization of high-dimensional computer simulations.« less

  3. Meta-Analysis of Studies Investigating the Effects of Father Absence on Children's Cognitive Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salzman, Stephanie A.

    A meta-analysis was conducted of 137 studies investigating the effects of father absence due to employment, military service, death, divorce, separation, or desertion on children's cognitive performance as assessed by scores on standardized intelligence, scholastic aptitude, and academic achievement tests and school grades. Aggregation of the…

  4. Investigating the Magnetic Interaction with Geomag and Tracker Video Analysis: Static Equilibrium and Anharmonic Dynamics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Onorato, P.; Mascheretti, P.; DeAmbrosis, A.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we describe how simple experiments realizable by using easily found and low-cost materials allow students to explore quantitatively the magnetic interaction thanks to the help of an Open Source Physics tool, the Tracker Video Analysis software. The static equilibrium of a "column" of permanents magnets is carefully investigated by…

  5. Investigating Importance Weighting of Satisfaction Scores from a Formative Model with Partial Least Squares Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Chia-Huei; Chen, Lung Hung; Tsai, Ying-Mei

    2009-01-01

    This study introduced a formative model to investigate the utility of importance weighting on satisfaction scores with partial least squares analysis. Based on the bottom-up theory of satisfaction evaluations, the measurement structure for weighted/unweighted domain satisfaction scores was modeled as a formative model, whereas the measurement…

  6. An investigation on the intra-sample distribution of cotton color by using image analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The colorimeter principle is widely used to measure cotton color. This method provides the sample’s color grade; but the result does not include information about the color distribution and any variation within the sample. We conducted an investigation that used image analysis method to study the ...

  7. Reflected Signal Analysis and Surface Albedo in the Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivanov, Anton B.; Muhleman, Duane O.

    2001-01-01

    This work presents results from the analysis of the reflectivity data from the MOLA investigation. We will discuss calculation of the surface albedo using the MGS TES 9 micron opacity. We will also overview reflectivity data collected to date. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  8. Statistical Analysis of Acoustic Wave Parameters Near Solar Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabello-Soares, M. Cristina; Bogart, Richard S.; Scherrer, Philip H.

    2016-08-01

    In order to quantify the influence of magnetic fields on acoustic mode parameters and flows in and around active regions, we analyze the differences in the parameters in magnetically quiet regions nearby an active region (which we call “nearby regions”), compared with those of quiet regions at the same disk locations for which there are no neighboring active regions. We also compare the mode parameters in active regions with those in comparably located quiet regions. Our analysis is based on ring-diagram analysis of all active regions observed by the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) during almost five years. We find that the frequency at which the mode amplitude changes from attenuation to amplification in the quiet nearby regions is around 4.2 mHz, in contrast to the active regions, for which it is about 5.1 mHz. This amplitude enhacement (the “acoustic halo effect”) is as large as that observed in the active regions, and has a very weak dependence on the wave propagation direction. The mode energy difference in nearby regions also changes from a deficit to an excess at around 4.2 mHz, but averages to zero over all modes. The frequency difference in nearby regions increases with increasing frequency until a point at which the frequency shifts turn over sharply, as in active regions. However, this turnover occurs around 4.9 mHz, which is significantly below the acoustic cutoff frequency. Inverting the horizontal flow parameters in the direction of the neigboring active regions, we find flows that are consistent with a model of the thermal energy flow being blocked directly below the active region.

  9. Comparative transcriptome analysis to investigate the high starch accumulation of duckweed (Landoltia punctata) under nutrient starvation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Duckweed can thrive on anthropogenic wastewater and produce tremendous biomass production. Due to its relatively high starch and low lignin percentage, duckweed is a good candidate for bioethanol fermentation. Previous studies have observed that water devoid of nutrients is good for starch accumulation, but its molecular mechanism remains unrevealed. Results This study globally analyzed the response to nutrient starvation in order to investigate the starch accumulation in duckweed (Landoltia punctata). L. punctata was transferred from nutrient-rich solution to distilled water and sampled at different time points. Physiological measurements demonstrated that the activity of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase, the key enzyme of starch synthesis, as well as the starch percentage in duckweed, increased continuously under nutrient starvation. Samples collected at 0 h, 2 h and 24 h time points respectively were used for comparative gene expression analysis using RNA-Seq. A comprehensive transcriptome, comprising of 74,797 contigs, was constructed by a de novo assembly of the RNA-Seq reads. Gene expression profiling results showed that the expression of some transcripts encoding key enzymes involved in starch biosynthesis was up-regulated, while the expression of transcripts encoding enzymes involved in starch consumption were down-regulated, the expression of some photosynthesis-related transcripts were down-regulated during the first 24 h, and the expression of some transporter transcripts were up-regulated within the first 2 h. Very interestingly, most transcripts encoding key enzymes involved in flavonoid biosynthesis were highly expressed regardless of starvation, while transcripts encoding laccase, the last rate-limiting enzyme of lignifications, exhibited very low expression abundance in all three samples. Conclusion Our study provides a comprehensive expression profiling of L. punctata under nutrient starvation, which indicates that nutrient starvation down

  10. Physiological Investigation and Transcriptome Analysis of Polyethylene Glycol (PEG)-Induced Dehydration Stress in Cassava

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Lili; Ding, Zehong; Han, Bingying; Hu, Wei; Li, Yajun; Zhang, Jiaming

    2016-01-01

    Cassava is an important tropical and sub-tropical root crop that is adapted to drought environment. However, severe drought stress significantly influences biomass accumulation and starchy root production. The mechanism underlying drought-tolerance remains obscure in cassava. In this study, changes of physiological characters and gene transcriptome profiles were investigated under dehydration stress simulated by polyethylene glycol (PEG) treatments. Five traits, including peroxidase (POD) activity, proline content, malondialdehyde (MDA), soluble sugar and soluble protein, were all dramatically induced in response to PEG treatment. RNA-seq analysis revealed a gradient decrease of differentially expressed (DE) gene number in tissues from bottom to top of a plant, suggesting that cassava root has a quicker response and more induced/depressed DE genes than leaves in response to drought. Overall, dynamic changes of gene expression profiles in cassava root and leaves were uncovered: genes related to glycolysis, abscisic acid and ethylene biosynthesis, lipid metabolism, protein degradation, and second metabolism of flavonoids were significantly induced, while genes associated with cell cycle/organization, cell wall synthesis and degradation, DNA synthesis and chromatin structure, protein synthesis, light reaction of photosynthesis, gibberelin pathways and abiotic stress were greatly depressed. Finally, novel pathways in ABA-dependent and ABA-independent regulatory networks underlying PEG-induced dehydration response in cassava were detected, and the RNA-Seq results of a subset of fifteen genes were confirmed by real-time PCR. The findings will improve our understanding of the mechanism related to dehydration stress-tolerance in cassava and will provide useful candidate genes for breeding of cassava varieties better adapted to drought environment. PMID:26927071

  11. Physiological Investigation and Transcriptome Analysis of Polyethylene Glycol (PEG)-Induced Dehydration Stress in Cassava.

    PubMed

    Fu, Lili; Ding, Zehong; Han, Bingying; Hu, Wei; Li, Yajun; Zhang, Jiaming

    2016-02-25

    Cassava is an important tropical and sub-tropical root crop that is adapted to drought environment. However, severe drought stress significantly influences biomass accumulation and starchy root production. The mechanism underlying drought-tolerance remains obscure in cassava. In this study, changes of physiological characters and gene transcriptome profiles were investigated under dehydration stress simulated by polyethylene glycol (PEG) treatments. Five traits, including peroxidase (POD) activity, proline content, malondialdehyde (MDA), soluble sugar and soluble protein, were all dramatically induced in response to PEG treatment. RNA-seq analysis revealed a gradient decrease of differentially expressed (DE) gene number in tissues from bottom to top of a plant, suggesting that cassava root has a quicker response and more induced/depressed DE genes than leaves in response to drought. Overall, dynamic changes of gene expression profiles in cassava root and leaves were uncovered: genes related to glycolysis, abscisic acid and ethylene biosynthesis, lipid metabolism, protein degradation, and second metabolism of flavonoids were significantly induced, while genes associated with cell cycle/organization, cell wall synthesis and degradation, DNA synthesis and chromatin structure, protein synthesis, light reaction of photosynthesis, gibberelin pathways and abiotic stress were greatly depressed. Finally, novel pathways in ABA-dependent and ABA-independent regulatory networks underlying PEG-induced dehydration response in cassava were detected, and the RNA-Seq results of a subset of fifteen genes were confirmed by real-time PCR. The findings will improve our understanding of the mechanism related to dehydration stress-tolerance in cassava and will provide useful candidate genes for breeding of cassava varieties better adapted to drought environment.

  12. Physiological Investigation and Transcriptome Analysis of Polyethylene Glycol (PEG)-Induced Dehydration Stress in Cassava.

    PubMed

    Fu, Lili; Ding, Zehong; Han, Bingying; Hu, Wei; Li, Yajun; Zhang, Jiaming

    2016-01-01

    Cassava is an important tropical and sub-tropical root crop that is adapted to drought environment. However, severe drought stress significantly influences biomass accumulation and starchy root production. The mechanism underlying drought-tolerance remains obscure in cassava. In this study, changes of physiological characters and gene transcriptome profiles were investigated under dehydration stress simulated by polyethylene glycol (PEG) treatments. Five traits, including peroxidase (POD) activity, proline content, malondialdehyde (MDA), soluble sugar and soluble protein, were all dramatically induced in response to PEG treatment. RNA-seq analysis revealed a gradient decrease of differentially expressed (DE) gene number in tissues from bottom to top of a plant, suggesting that cassava root has a quicker response and more induced/depressed DE genes than leaves in response to drought. Overall, dynamic changes of gene expression profiles in cassava root and leaves were uncovered: genes related to glycolysis, abscisic acid and ethylene biosynthesis, lipid metabolism, protein degradation, and second metabolism of flavonoids were significantly induced, while genes associated with cell cycle/organization, cell wall synthesis and degradation, DNA synthesis and chromatin structure, protein synthesis, light reaction of photosynthesis, gibberelin pathways and abiotic stress were greatly depressed. Finally, novel pathways in ABA-dependent and ABA-independent regulatory networks underlying PEG-induced dehydration response in cassava were detected, and the RNA-Seq results of a subset of fifteen genes were confirmed by real-time PCR. The findings will improve our understanding of the mechanism related to dehydration stress-tolerance in cassava and will provide useful candidate genes for breeding of cassava varieties better adapted to drought environment. PMID:26927071

  13. Making Sense of Total VET Activity: An Initial Market Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Centre for Vocational Education Research (NCVER), 2016

    2016-01-01

    Following the successful first national publication of total vocational education and training (VET) activity and presentation of various informative data products, NCVER has continued to undertake further analysis of the submitted data. This paper is the first in a suite of the National Centre for Vocational Education Research (NCVER) authored…

  14. Pupil Inquiry Behavior Analysis and Change Activity. Interim Project Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manion, Raymond C.

    This interim report discusses progress toward three major goals of the Pupil Inquiry Behavior Analysis and Change Activity: increased pupil inquiry, changed teacher behavior to facilitate pupil inquiry, and the development of a 32-week course of instruction to provide for these behavioral changes. Data currently available deals with the emotional…

  15. Concurrent Validity For an Activity Vector Analysis Index of Anxiety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plante, Thomas G.

    1982-01-01

    Utilizing 182 subjects, this study determined the concurrent validity between the Activity Vector Analysis (AVA) index of anxiety and scores on the IPAT Anxiety Scale. The IPAT and the AVA index of anxiety seem essentially to measure the same construct of basic anxiety. (Author/PN)

  16. 78 FR 35283 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request: Investigational...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-12

    ... 29, 2010 (75 FR 59935), FDA published a document entitled ``Investigational New Drug Safety Reporting... Collection; Comment Request: Investigational New Drug Safety Reporting Requirements for Human Drug and... from investigational new drug (IND) safety reporting requirements and safety reporting requirements...

  17. HMG-CoA reductase inhibitory activity and phytocomponent investigation of Basella alba leaf extract as a treatment for hypercholesterolemia.

    PubMed

    Baskaran, Gunasekaran; Salvamani, Shamala; Ahmad, Siti Aqlima; Shaharuddin, Noor Azmi; Pattiram, Parveen Devi; Shukor, Mohd Yunus

    2015-01-01

    The enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase is the key enzyme of the mevalonate pathway that produces cholesterol. Inhibition of HMG-CoA reductase reduces cholesterol biosynthesis in the liver. Synthetic drugs, statins, are commonly used for the treatment of hypercholesterolemia. Due to the side effects of statins, natural HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors of plant origin are needed. In this study, 25 medicinal plant methanol extracts were screened for anti-HMG-CoA reductase activity. Basella alba leaf extract showed the highest inhibitory effect at about 74%. Thus, B. alba was examined in order to investigate its phytochemical components. Gas chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry and reversed phase high-performance liquid chromatography analysis revealed the presence of phenol 2,6-bis(1,1-dimethylethyl), 1-heptatriacotanol, oleic acid, eicosyl ester, naringin, apigenin, luteolin, ascorbic acid, and α-tocopherol, which have been reported to possess antihypercholesterolemic effects. Further investigation of in vivo models should be performed in order to confirm its potential as an alternative treatment for hypercholesterolemia and related cardiovascular diseases. PMID:25609924

  18. HMG-CoA reductase inhibitory activity and phytocomponent investigation of Basella alba leaf extract as a treatment for hypercholesterolemia

    PubMed Central

    Baskaran, Gunasekaran; Salvamani, Shamala; Ahmad, Siti Aqlima; Shaharuddin, Noor Azmi; Pattiram, Parveen Devi; Shukor, Mohd Yunus

    2015-01-01

    The enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase is the key enzyme of the mevalonate pathway that produces cholesterol. Inhibition of HMG-CoA reductase reduces cholesterol biosynthesis in the liver. Synthetic drugs, statins, are commonly used for the treatment of hypercholesterolemia. Due to the side effects of statins, natural HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors of plant origin are needed. In this study, 25 medicinal plant methanol extracts were screened for anti-HMG-CoA reductase activity. Basella alba leaf extract showed the highest inhibitory effect at about 74%. Thus, B. alba was examined in order to investigate its phytochemical components. Gas chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry and reversed phase high-performance liquid chromatography analysis revealed the presence of phenol 2,6-bis(1,1-dimethylethyl), 1-heptatriacotanol, oleic acid, eicosyl ester, naringin, apigenin, luteolin, ascorbic acid, and α-tocopherol, which have been reported to possess antihypercholesterolemic effects. Further investigation of in vivo models should be performed in order to confirm its potential as an alternative treatment for hypercholesterolemia and related cardiovascular diseases. PMID:25609924

  19. Kinetics, equilibrium, and thermodynamics investigation on the adsorption of lead(II) by coal-based activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Yi, Zhengji; Yao, Jun; Zhu, Mijia; Chen, Huilun; Wang, Fei; Liu, Xing

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this research is to investigate the feasibility of using activated coal-based activated carbon (CBAC) to adsorb Pb(II) from aqueous solutions through batch tests. Effects of contact time, pH, temperature and initial Pb(II) concentration on the Pb(II) adsorption were examined. The Pb(II) adsorption is strongly dependent on pH, but insensitive to temperature. The best pH for Pb(II) removal is in the range of 5.0-5.5 with more than 90 % of Pb(II) removed. The equilibrium time was found to be 60 min and the adsorption data followed the pseudo-second-order kinetics. Isotherm data followed Langmuir isotherm model with a maximum adsorption capacity of 162.33 mg/g. The adsorption was exothermic and spontaneous in nature. The Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy analysis suggested that CBAC possessed a porous structure and was rich in carboxyl and hydroxyl groups on its surface, which might play a major role in Pb(II) adsorption. These findings indicated that CBAC has great potential as an alternative adsorbent for Pb(II) removal. PMID:27504258

  20. An investigation of the practice activities and coaching behaviors of professional top-level youth soccer coaches.

    PubMed

    Partington, M; Cushion, C

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the coaching behaviors of elite English youth soccer coaches in different practice settings and gain insight into the coaches' cognitive processes underpinning these behaviors. The practice setting was split into two types of activities, "training form" and "playing form," and behavioral data were collected using a modified version of the Coach Analysis and Intervention System. Interpretive interview data were triangulated with the behavioral data to ensure that both the "what" and the "why" of the coaches' behavior and practice were considered. The results showed the coaches using more "training form" activities than "playing form," and using high levels of prescriptive instruction, regardless of practice type, in contrast to a stated desire to "developing the whole player," creating "decision makers," and being a "facilitator of knowledge creation." The interviews revealed that the coaches had a low self-awareness about their behavior, with an epistemological gap identified between understanding and practice, with statements of intent not being matched by knowledge and action.

  1. Phytochemical investigation and in vitro antioxidant activity of an indigenous medicinal plant Alpinia nigra B.L. Burtt

    PubMed Central

    Sahoo, Suprava; Ghosh, Goutam; Das, Debajyoti; Nayak, Sanghamitra

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate antioxidant potential of methanol extract of Alpinia nigra leaves. Methods The study was done by using various in vitro methods such as 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH), 2,2-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulphonic acid) (ABTS), nitric oxide and hydrogen peroxide radical scavenging assays. Phytochemical constituents, total phenolic content and total flavonoid content of the extract at different concentrations (10-500 µg/mL) were determined. Results Alpinia nigra leaves showed high free radical scavenging activity as evidenced by the low IC50 values in DPPH (64.51 µg/mL), in ABTS (28.32 µg/mL), in nitric oxide (80.02 µg/mL) and in H2O2 (77.45 µg/mL) scavenging assays. Furthermore the TPC and TFC of the extract were found to be 69.25 mg gallic acid equivalent per gram of extract and 78.84 mg quercetin equivalent per gram of extract respectively. Conclusions The results of present comprehensive analysis demonstrated that Alpinia nigra leaves possess high phenolic, flavonoid contents and potential antioxidant activity, and could be used as a viable source of natural antioxidants and might be exploited for functional foods and neutraceutical applications.

  2. Synthesis and investigation of antimicrobial activity and spectrophotometric and dyeing properties of some novel azo disperse dyes based on naphthalimides.

    PubMed

    Shaki, Hanieh; Gharanjig, Kamaladin; Khosravi, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    A series of novel disperse dyes containing azo group were synthesized through a diazotization and coupling process. The 4-amino-N-2-aminomethylpyridine-1,8-naphthalimide was diazotized by nitrosylsulphuric acid and coupled with various aromatic amines such as N,N-diethylaniline, N,N-dihydroxyethylaniline, 8-hydroxyquinoline, and 2-methylindole. Chemical structures of the synthesized dyes were characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), proton nuclear magnetic resonance ((1) H NMR), carbon nuclear magnetic resonance ((13) C NMR), elemental analysis, and ultraviolet-visible (UV-visible) spectroscopy. The spectrophotometric data of all dyes were evaluated in various solvents with different polarity. Eventually, the dyes were applied on polyamide fabrics in order to investigate their dyeing properties. The fastness properties of the dyed fabrics such as wash, light, and rubbing fastness degrees were measured by standard methods. Moreover, the color gamut of the synthesized dyes was measured on polyamide fabrics. Results indicated that some of the synthesized dyes were able to dye polyamide fabrics with deep shades. They had very good wash and rubbing fastness degrees and moderate-to-good light fastness on polyamide fabrics. The antibacterial and antifungal activities of the synthesized dyes were evaluated in soluble state and on the dyed fabrics. The results indicated that dye 2 containing N,N-dihydroxyethylaniline as coupler had the highest activity against all the bacteria and fungi used.

  3. Synthesis and investigation of antimicrobial activity and spectrophotometric and dyeing properties of some novel azo disperse dyes based on naphthalimides.

    PubMed

    Shaki, Hanieh; Gharanjig, Kamaladin; Khosravi, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    A series of novel disperse dyes containing azo group were synthesized through a diazotization and coupling process. The 4-amino-N-2-aminomethylpyridine-1,8-naphthalimide was diazotized by nitrosylsulphuric acid and coupled with various aromatic amines such as N,N-diethylaniline, N,N-dihydroxyethylaniline, 8-hydroxyquinoline, and 2-methylindole. Chemical structures of the synthesized dyes were characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), proton nuclear magnetic resonance ((1) H NMR), carbon nuclear magnetic resonance ((13) C NMR), elemental analysis, and ultraviolet-visible (UV-visible) spectroscopy. The spectrophotometric data of all dyes were evaluated in various solvents with different polarity. Eventually, the dyes were applied on polyamide fabrics in order to investigate their dyeing properties. The fastness properties of the dyed fabrics such as wash, light, and rubbing fastness degrees were measured by standard methods. Moreover, the color gamut of the synthesized dyes was measured on polyamide fabrics. Results indicated that some of the synthesized dyes were able to dye polyamide fabrics with deep shades. They had very good wash and rubbing fastness degrees and moderate-to-good light fastness on polyamide fabrics. The antibacterial and antifungal activities of the synthesized dyes were evaluated in soluble state and on the dyed fabrics. The results indicated that dye 2 containing N,N-dihydroxyethylaniline as coupler had the highest activity against all the bacteria and fungi used. PMID:25967675

  4. Validation of an Active Gear, Flexible Aircraft Take-off and Landing analysis (AGFATL)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgehee, J. R.

    1984-01-01

    The results of an analytical investigation using a computer program for active gear, flexible aircraft take off and landing analysis (AGFATL) are compared with experimental data from shaker tests, drop tests, and simulated landing tests to validate the AGFATL computer program. Comparison of experimental and analytical responses for both passive and active gears indicates good agreement for shaker tests and drop tests. For the simulated landing tests, the passive and active gears were influenced by large strut binding friction forces. The inclusion of these undefined forces in the analytical simulations was difficult, and consequently only fair to good agreement was obtained. An assessment of the results from the investigation indicates that the AGFATL computer program is a valid tool for the study and initial design of series hydraulic active control landing gear systems.

  5. Interaction investigations of crustacean β-GBP recognition toward pathogenic microbial cell membrane and stimulate upon prophenoloxidase activation.

    PubMed

    Sivakamavalli, Jeyachandran; Selvaraj, Chandrabose; Singh, Sanjeev Kumar; Vaseeharan, Baskaralingam

    2014-04-01

    In invertebrates, crustaceans' immune system consists of pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) instead of immunoglobulin's, which involves in the microbial recognition and initiates the protein-ligand interaction between hosts and pathogens. In the present study, PRRs namely β-1,3 glucan binding protein (β-GBP) from mangrove crab Episesarma tetragonum and its interactions with the pathogens such as bacterial and fungal outer membrane proteins (OMP) were investigated through microbial aggregation and computational interaction studies. Molecular recognition and microbial aggregation results of Episesarma tetragonum β-GBP showed the specific binding affinity toward the fungal β-1,3 glucan molecule when compared to other bacterial ligands. Because of this microbial recognition, prophenoloxidase activity was enhanced and triggers the innate immunity inside the host animal. Our findings disclose the role of β-GBP in molecular recognition, host-pathogen interaction through microbial aggregation, and docking analysis. In vitro results were concurred with the in silico docking, and molecular dynamics simulation analysis. This study would be helpful to understand the molecular mechanism of β-GBP and update the current knowledge on the PRRs of crustaceans.

  6. Investigation of the mechanical behaviour of the plantar soft tissue during gait cycle: Experimental and numerical activities.

    PubMed

    Fontanella, Chiara G; Forestiero, Antonella; Carniel, Emanuele L; Natali, Arturo N

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this work is to investigate the mechanical response of the plantar soft tissue from the heel strike to the midstance, developing both experimental and numerical activities. Using force plates and motion tracking system, the dynamic and kinematic data of 10 subjects are evaluated. The average kinematics data obtained from the experimental tests are assumed as boundary and loading conditions for the computational analyses. A three-dimensional virtual solid model of the foot is developed from the analysis of Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine images from computed tomography and magnetic resonance. Constitutive formulations that interpret the mechanical response of the biological tissues are defined. Because of the major role of plantar soft tissue in the proposed analysis, a specific visco-hyperelastic constitutive formulation is provided considering the typical features of the tissue mechanics. The three-dimensional numerical model permits to evaluate the capability of the plantar soft tissue to redistribute the deformations, especially during the midstance, and to define quantitative aspects related to the energy absorption. The numerical results highlight the stress distribution from the heel strike to the midstance. The values of stress and strain reached are more intensive during the midstance, when there is a single support of the foot.

  7. Smog Chamber Investigation on the Iron-Catalyzed Activation of Chloride from Modeled Saltpans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wittmer, Julian; Bleicher, Sergej; Oeste <, Franz Dietrich; Zetzsch, Cornelius

    2014-05-01

    Halogen activation on sea spray aerosols and other halide surfaces and thus the formation of reactive halogen species (RHS), influencing trace and greenhouse gases, has become an important topic of research in recent years. In this context the chloride and bromide activation, in particular the formation of RHS by photochemically induced halogen release from (sea) salt surface and reactions with ozone (O3) and nitrogen oxides (NOx), came into focus [1,2]. Our studies concentrate on the quantification of atomic chlorine (Cl), bromine (Br) and hydroxyl (OH) radicals in the gas phase above lab-models of salt pans, enriched in iron(III) chloride (FeCl3), that are exposed to simulated sunlight in a smog chamber. The applied radical clock method [3] results in time profiles and source strengths for Cl, Br and OH, which are combined with the various compositions of humidified salts. In particular, the influence of bromine, sulfate, oxalate, and catechol on the FeCl3 enriched salt is investigated. Comparable investigations only exist for the aqueous phase chemistry of FeCl3 (e.g. [4]). Driven by the photolytic reduction from Fe(III) to Fe(II), an enormous amount of chlorine atoms (>107 cm-3) could be detected for sodium chloride (NaCl) salt pans with low addition of FeCl3 (0.5 - 2 wt%), even in an O3 and NOx free environment. The Cl2 source strength reaches a maximum of 8×1011 Cl2 molecules per cm3 within the first hour of the experiment, corresponding to a Cl2 mixing ratio of 30 ppbv at standard pressure. These concentrations exceeded the release above pure NaCl samples by a factor of 1000. A crucial factor for the Cl2 release is the pH and thus the formation of iron(III) complexes on the salt crystals that differ in their sensitivity for photolysis. Whereas the presence of sodium bromide normally strengthens the chlorine release, a suppression accompanied by strong bromine activation (>1010 cm-3) could be observed for iron enriched samples. Furthermore, the addition of

  8. Investigation of the Fate of Type I Angiotensin Receptor after Biased Activation

    PubMed Central

    Szakadáti, Gyöngyi; Tóth, András D.; Oláh, Ilona; Erdélyi, László Sándor; Balla, Tamas; Várnai, Péter; Balla, András

    2015-01-01

    Biased agonism on the type I angiotensin receptor (AT1-R) can achieve different outcomes via activation of G protein–dependent and –independent cellular responses. In this study, we investigated whether the biased activation of AT1-R can lead to different regulation and intracellular processing of the receptor. We analyzed β-arrestin binding, endocytosis, and subsequent trafficking steps, such as early and late phases of recycling of AT1-R in human embryonic kidney 293 cells expressing wild-type or biased mutant receptors in response to different ligands. We used Renilla luciferase–tagged receptors and yellow fluorescent protein–tagged β-arrestin2, Rab5, Rab7, and Rab11 proteins in bioluminescence resonance energy transfer measurements to follow the fate of the receptor after stimulation. We found that not only is the signaling of the receptor different upon using selective ligands, but the fate within the cells is also determined by the type of the stimulation. β-arrestin binding and the internalization kinetics of the angiotensin II–stimulated AT1-R differed from those stimulated by the biased agonists. Similarly, angiotensin II–stimulated wild-type AT1-R showed differences compared with a biased mutant AT1-R (DRY/AAY AT1-R) with regards to β-arrestin binding and endocytosis. We found that the differences in the internalization kinetics of the receptor in response to biased agonist stimulation are due to the differences in plasma membrane phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate depletion. Moreover, the stability of the β-arrestin binding is a major determinant of the later fate of the internalized AT1-R receptor. PMID:25804845

  9. Investigation of the fate of type I angiotensin receptor after biased activation.

    PubMed

    Szakadáti, Gyöngyi; Tóth, András D; Oláh, Ilona; Erdélyi, László Sándor; Balla, Tamas; Várnai, Péter; Hunyady, László; Balla, András

    2015-06-01

    Biased agonism on the type I angiotensin receptor (AT1-R) can achieve different outcomes via activation of G protein-dependent and -independent cellular responses. In this study, we investigated whether the biased activation of AT1-R can lead to different regulation and intracellular processing of the receptor. We analyzed β-arrestin binding, endocytosis, and subsequent trafficking steps, such as early and late phases of recycling of AT1-R in human embryonic kidney 293 cells expressing wild-type or biased mutant receptors in response to different ligands. We used Renilla luciferase-tagged receptors and yellow fluorescent protein-tagged β-arrestin2, Rab5, Rab7, and Rab11 proteins in bioluminescence resonance energy transfer measurements to follow the fate of the receptor after stimulation. We found that not only is the signaling of the receptor different upon using selective ligands, but the fate within the cells is also determined by the type of the stimulation. β-arrestin binding and the internalization kinetics of the angiotensin II-stimulated AT1-R differed from those stimulated by the biased agonists. Similarly, angiotensin II-stimulated wild-type AT1-R showed differences compared with a biased mutant AT1-R (DRY/AAY AT1-R) with regards to β-arrestin binding and endocytosis. We found that the differences in the internalization kinetics of the receptor in response to biased agonist stimulation are due to the differences in plasma membrane phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate depletion. Moreover, the stability of the β-arrestin binding is a major determinant of the later fate of the internalized AT1-R receptor.

  10. Nonlinear analysis of motor activity shows differences between schizophrenia and depression: a study using Fourier analysis and sample entropy.

    PubMed

    Hauge, Erik R; Berle, Jan Øystein; Oedegaard, Ketil J; Holsten, Fred; Fasmer, Ole Bernt

    2011-01-28

    The purpose of this study has been to describe motor activity data obtained by using wrist-worn actigraphs in patients with schizophrenia and major depression by the use of linear and non-linear methods of analysis. Different time frames were investigated, i.e., activity counts measured every minute for up to five hours and activity counts made hourly for up to two weeks. The results show that motor activity was lower in the schizophrenic patients and in patients with major depression, compared to controls. Using one minute intervals the depressed patients had a higher standard deviation (SD) compared to both the schizophrenic patients and the controls. The ratio between the root mean square successive differences (RMSSD) and SD was higher in the schizophrenic patients compared to controls. The Fourier analysis of the activity counts measured every minute showed that the relation between variance in the low and the high frequency range was lower in the schizophrenic patients compared to the controls. The sample entropy was higher in the schizophrenic patients compared to controls in the time series from the activity counts made every minute. The main conclusions of the study are that schizophrenic and depressive patients have distinctly different profiles of motor activity and that the results differ according to period length analysed.

  11. Contact investigation for tuberculosis: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Gregory J.; Barry, Simone E.; Britton, Warwick J.; Marks, Guy B.

    2013-01-01

    Investigation of contacts of patients with tuberculosis (TB) is a priority for TB control in high-income countries, and is increasingly being considered in resource-limited settings. This review was commissioned for a World Health Organization Expert Panel to develop global contact investigation guidelines. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of all studies reporting the prevalence of TB and latent TB infection, and the annual incidence of TB among contacts of patients with TB. After screening 9,555 titles, we included 203 published studies. In 95 studies from low- and middle-income settings, the prevalence of active TB in all contacts was 3.1% (95% CI 2.2–4.4%, I2=99.4%), microbiologically proven TB was 1.2% (95% CI 0.9–1.8%, I2=95.9%), and latent TB infection was 51.5% (95% CI 47.1–55.8%, I2=98.9%). The prevalence of TB among household contacts was 3.1% (95% CI 2.1–4.5%, I2=98.8%) and among contacts of patients with multidrug-resistant or extensively drug-resistant TB was 3.4% (95% CI 0.8–12.6%, I2=95.7%). Incidence was greatest in the first year after exposure. In 108 studies from high-income settings, the prevalence of TB among contacts was 1.4% (95% CI 1.1–1.8%, I2=98.7%), and the prevalence of latent infection was 28.1% (95% CI 24.2–32.4%, I2=99.5%). There was substantial heterogeneity among published studies. Contacts of TB patients are a high-risk group for developing TB, particularly within the first year. Children <5 yrs of age and people living with HIV are particularly at risk. Policy recommendations must consider evidence of the cost-effectiveness of various contact tracing strategies, and also incorporate complementary strategies to enhance case finding. PMID:22936710

  12. The use of non-linear analysis for differentiating the biomagnetic activity in ovarian lesions.

    PubMed

    Anninos, P A; Anastasiadis, P; Kotini, A

    1999-05-01

    In this study we investigated the biomagnetic activity measured with the superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) in benign and malignant ovarian lesions using non-linear analysis. We used a single channel biomagnetometer SQUID in order to measure the magnetic field emitted from benign and malignant ovarian lesions. We can differentiate such biomagnetic activities using non-linear analysis. Using the application of non-linear analysis in the ovarian lesions together with the use of dimensional calculations we have observed a clear saturation value for the dimension of malignant ovarian lesions and non-saturation for benign ovarian lesions. The biomagnetic measurements with the SQUID and the application of non-linear analysis in benign and malignant ovarian lesions, is a promising procedure in assessing and differentiating ovarian tumours. PMID:15512296

  13. Investigating the Use of Coherence Analysis on Mandibular Electromyograms to Investigate Neural Control of Early Oromandibular Behaviours: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steeve, Roger W.; Price, Christiana M.

    2010-01-01

    An empirical method for investigating differences in neural control of jaw movement across oromandibular behaviours is to compute the coherence function for electromyographic signals obtained from mandibular muscle groups. This procedure has been used with adults but not extended to children. This pilot study investigated if coherence analysis…

  14. neutron activation analysis using thermochromatography. II. thermochromatographic separation of elements in the analysis of geological samples

    SciTech Connect

    Sattarov, G.; Davydov, A.V.; Khamatov, S.; Kist, A.A.

    1986-07-01

    The use of gas thermochromatography (GTC) in the radioactivation analysis of difficulty soluble samples with a strongly activating substrate is discussed. The effect of sample coarseness and ore type on the rate of extraction of gold and accompanying elements was studied. The limits of detection of 22 elements were compared using neutron activation analysis with GTC and INAA. The analytical parameters of the procedure were estimated.

  15. Investigating the activity of the Campi Flegrei caldera (Italy) through remote and in situ sensors (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trasatti, E.; Polcari, M.; Bignami, C.; Bonafede, M.; Buongiorno, F.; Stramondo, S.

    2013-12-01

    Campi Flegrei is a nested caldera in Italy, whose structure includes submerged and continental parts at the western edge of the Bay of Naples. Together with Vesuvius and Etna, it is one of the Italian GeoHazard Supersites. The last eruption took place in 1538 A.D. and since then intense degassing, seismic swarms and several episodes of ground uplift have been observed. The area is characterized by one of the highest volcanic hazard in the world, due to the very high density of inhabitants. A major unrest episode took place in 1982-84, when the town of Pozzuoli, located at the caldera center, was uplifted by 1.80 m (~1 m/yr). During the following decades the area has been generally subsiding but minor uplift episodes of the order of few cm, seismic swarms and degassing episodes took place in 1989, 2000-01 and 2004-06, showing that the caldera is in a critical state on the verge of instability. Since March 1970 leveling surveys were regularly carried out to monitor the elevation changes. In the following decades many efforts have been done to monitor the different aspects of the activity of the area, and nowadays Campi Flegrei is subjected to intense geodetic, geophysical and geochemical monitoring. In the last 30 years a number of geophysical investigations has provided important constraints to the description of the subsurface structure and the historical volcanic activity. Surface deformation, microgravity changes and geochemical anomalies at Campi Flegrei have been interpreted either in terms of instabilities of the hydrothermal system or variations in the magmatic source. In particular, discerning between magmatic vs hydrothermal origin of the source responsible of the large uplift episode during 1982-84 (most probably due to deep magmatic source) and of the mini-uplifts (e.g. 2000 and 2004-06, most probably due to pressure variations in the shallow aquifer) may have important implications in terms of civil protection. In the last two decades, the precise and

  16. Patterns of Activity Revealed by a Time Lag Analysis of a Model Active Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradshaw, Stephen; Viall, Nicholeen

    2016-05-01

    We investigate the global activity patterns predicted from a model active region heated by distributions of nanoflares that have a range of average frequencies. The activity patterns are manifested in time lag maps of narrow-band instrument channel pairs. We combine an extrapolated magnetic skeleton with hydrodynamic and forward modeling codes to create a model active region, and apply the time lag method to synthetic observations. Our aim is to recover some typical properties and patterns of activity observed in active regions. Our key findings are: 1. Cooling dominates the time lag signature and the time lags between the channel pairs are generally consistent with observed values. 2. Shorter coronal loops in the core cool more quickly than longer loops at the periphery. 3. All channel pairs show zero time lag when the line-of-sight passes through coronal loop foot-points. 4. There is strong evidence that plasma must be re-energized on a time scale comparable to the cooling timescale to reproduce the observed coronal activity, but it is likely that a relatively broad spectrum of heating frequencies operates across active regions. 5. Due to their highly dynamic nature, we find nanoflare trains produce zero time lags along entire flux tubes in our model active region that are seen between the same channel pairs in observed active regions.

  17. Investigating apical adverse effects of four endocrine active substances in the freshwater gastropod Lymnaea stagnalis.

    PubMed

    Giusti, Arnaud; Lagadic, Laurent; Barsi, Alpar; Thomé, Jean-Pierre; Joaquim-Justo, Célia; Ducrot, Virginie

    2014-09-15

    The hermaphroditic gastropod Lymnaea stagnalis is proposed as a candidate species for the development of OECD guidelines for testing of the reprotoxicity of chemicals, including endocrine active substances (EASs). Up to now, only a few putative EASs have been tested for their reproductive toxicity in this species. In this study, we investigate the effects of four EASs with different affinities to the vertebrate estrogen and androgen receptors (chlordecone as an estrogen; cyproterone acetate, fenitrothion and vinclozolin as anti-androgens) on the reproduction of L. stagnalis in a 21-day semi-static test. Testosterone and 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2) were used as the reference compounds. The tested EASs had no significant effect on growth and survival at the tested concentration ranges (ng to μg/L). Classical reproduction endpoints (i.e., oviposition and fecundity) were not responsive to the tested chemicals, except for chlordecone and 17α-ethinylestradiol, which hampered reproduction from 19.6 μg/L and 17.6 μg/L, respectively. The frequency of polyembryonic eggs, used as an additional endpoint, demonstrated the effects of all compounds except EE2. The molecular pathways, which are involved in such reproduction impairments, remain unknown. Our results suggest that egg quality is a more sensitive endpoint as compared to other reproductive endpoints commonly assessed in mollusk toxicity tests.

  18. Investigation of the use of various plant extracts activity in ruminant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yüca, Songül; Gül, Mehmet; Ćaǧlayan, Alper

    2016-04-01

    The prohibition of the use of antibiotics and as a result of the adverse effect on health of synthetic products, research has focused on natural feed additives. In recent years, the diet of farm animals many feed additives have been used for various purposes or continues. These include as used in ruminant rations as plant extract thyme, anise, pepper, mint, garlic, rosemary, cinnamon, parsley, bay leaf, coconut, like used herbal extracts and their effects on the performance of ruminants was investigated. Antioxidant, antifungal, antiviral, anti-inflamaotry is known to have effects of plant extract. By stimulating the digestive system of ruminants, they increase the activity of digestive enzymes, to prevent environmental pollution caused by manure, regulations rumen fermentation, inhibition of methane formation and protein degradability in the rumen as well as the animal is known to have many benefits. The structure of essential oils and plant extracts in this collection, examining the use of ruminant livestock events and the importance of the use in animal nutrition into practice will be discussed.

  19. Pharmacological Investigation of the Wound Healing Activity of Cestrum nocturnum (L.) Ointment in Wistar Albino Rats.

    PubMed

    Nagar, Hemant Kumar; Srivastava, Amit Kumar; Srivastava, Rajnish; Kurmi, Madan Lal; Chandel, Harinarayan Singh; Ranawat, Mahendra Singh

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. The present study was aimed at investigating the wound healing effect of ethanolic extract of Cestrum nocturnum (L.) leaves (EECN) using excision and incision wound model. Methods. Wistar albino rats were divided into five groups each consisting of six animals; group I (left untreated) considered as control, group II (ointment base treated) considered as negative control, group III treated with 5% (w/w) povidone iodine ointment (Intadine USP), which served as standard, group IV treated with EECN 2% (w/w) ointment, and group V treated with EECN 5% (w/w) ointment were considered as test groups. All the treatments were given once daily. The wound healing effect was assessed by percentage wound contraction, epithelialization period, and histoarchitecture studies in excision wound model while breaking strength and hydroxyproline content in the incision wound model. Result. Different concentration of EECN (2% and 5% w/w) ointment promoted the wound healing activity significantly in both the models studied. The high rate of wound contraction (P < 0.001), decrease in the period for epithelialization (P < 0.01), high skin breaking strength (P < 0.001), and elevated hydroxyproline content were observed in animal treated with EECN ointments when compared to the control and negative control group of animals. Histopathological studies of the EECN ointments treated groups also revealed the effectiveness in improved wound healing. Conclusions. Ethanolic extract of Cestrum nocturnum (EECN) leaves possesses a concentration dependent wound healing effect. PMID:27018126

  20. Theoretical and experimental investigations on the structures of purified clay and acid-activated clay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Tao; Wen, Xiao-Dong; Li, Junfen; Yang, Liming

    2006-07-01

    The purified and acidified montmorillonite clay were characterized by XRD, BET and TPD. These results show that acidified clay is provided with more surface area and acid sites. For NH 3-TPD, molecular NH 3 desorption on purified clay and acidified clay occurs at temperatures with 873 and 1000 K, respectively. It is shown for the existence for strong acid sites. By two reactions of the tetrahydropyranylation of n-propanol and the esterification of cyclo-2-pentene with acetic acid, it is shown that the acidified clay displays better catalytic activity for above two organic reactions. By density-functional theory (DFT) method, we have analyzed the structures of different substituted montmorillonite and the effect sorption behavior of Na + in different montmorillonite models. The result shows that the process of substitution will occur apart from octahedral aluminums. The adsorption of NH 3 on clay surfaces have been investigated using TPD and DFT. This is shown that acid sites locate at round the octahedral aluminums, and substitution of Al 3+ for tetrahedral Si will be favorable to NH 3 adsorption.

  1. Detailed investigation of the microbial community in foaming activated sludge reveals novel foam formers

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Feng; Wang, Zhi-Ping; Yu, Ke; Zhang, T.

    2015-01-01

    Foaming of activated sludge (AS) causes adverse impacts on wastewater treatment operation and hygiene. In this study, we investigated the microbial communities of foam, foaming AS and non-foaming AS in a sewage treatment plant via deep-sequencing of the taxonomic marker genes 16S rRNA and mycobacterial rpoB and a metagenomic approach. In addition to Actinobacteria, many genera (e.g., Clostridium XI, Arcobacter, Flavobacterium) were more abundant in the foam than in the AS. On the other hand, deep-sequencing of rpoB did not detect any obligate pathogenic mycobacteria in the foam. We found that unknown factors other than the abundance of Gordonia sp. could determine the foaming process, because abundance of the same species was stable before and after a foaming event over six months. More interestingly, although the dominant Gordonia foam former was the closest with G. amarae, it was identified as an undescribed Gordonia species by referring to the 16S rRNA gene, gyrB and, most convincingly, the reconstructed draft genome from metagenomic reads. Our results, based on metagenomics and deep sequencing, reveal that foams are derived from diverse taxa, which expands previous understanding and provides new insight into the underlying complications of the foaming phenomenon in AS. PMID:25560234

  2. Micron dimensioned cavity array supported lipid bilayers for the electrochemical investigation of ionophore activity.

    PubMed

    Maher, Sean; Basit, Hajra; Forster, Robert J; Keyes, Tia E

    2016-12-01

    Microcavity supported lipid bilayers, MSLBs, were applied to an electrochemical investigation of ionophore mediated ion transport. The arrays comprise of a 1cm(2) gold electrode imprinted with an ordered array of uniform spherical-cap pores of 2.8μm diameter prepared by gold electrodeposition through polystyrene templating spheres. The pores were pre-filled with aqueous buffer prior to Langmuir-Blodgett assembly of a 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine bilayer. Fluorescence lifetime correlation spectroscopy enabled by the micron dimensions of the pores permitted study of lipid diffusion across single apertures, yielding a diffusion coefficient of 12.58±1.28μm(2)s(-1) and anomalous exponent of 1.03±0.02, consistent with Brownian motion. From FLCS, the MSLBs were stable over 3days and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy of the membrane with and without ionic gradient over experimental windows of 6h showed excellent stability. Two ionophores were studied at the MSLBs; Valinomycin, a K(+) uniporter and Nigericin, a K(+)/H(+) antiporter. Ionophore reconstituted into the DOPC bilayer resulted in a decrease and increase in membrane resistance and capacitance respectively. Significant increases in Valinomycin and Nigericin activity were observed, reflected in large decreases in membrane resistance when K(+) was present in the contacting buffer and in the presence of H(+) ionic gradient across the membrane respectively. PMID:27420132

  3. Investigation of the correlation of the acrylamide content and the antioxidant activity of model cookies.

    PubMed

    Summa, Carmelina; Wenzl, Thomas; Brohee, Marcel; De La Calle, Beatriz; Anklam, Elke

    2006-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the correlation between the acrylamide (AA) content and the antioxidant activity (AOA) of self-prepared cookies. Cookies were baked in the laboratory under defined conditions following four different recipes. The parameters of investigation were the influence of the type and relative content of sugar (glucose and fructose) and the baking time on the AA content as well as AOA of the final products. Parameters depending on the recipe and baking conditions such as the moisture content, the total nitrogen concentration, and the color of the products were evaluated for all samples as well. To prove the transferability of the findings gained with model cookies to samples from industry, the same measurements were performed on seven different types/brands of cookies that were purchased in local markets. A direct correlation was found between the concentration of AA and the AOA. With increasing baking time, the moisture content of the cookies decreased. The latter parameter correlated well with the AA concentration and AOA. The use of fructose enhanced the concentration of AA and the AOA of the final products, when compared with the use of sucrose. However, a simple model for the prediction of acrylamide contents and the AOA of samples from the baking time, color, protein, or moisture content of the samples was not found.

  4. Investigation of the density wave activity in the thermosphere above 220 KM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Illés-Almár, E.; Almár, I.; Bencze, P.

    Based on CACTUS (Capteur Accélérométrique Capacitif Triaxial Ultra Sensible) microaccelerometer measurements it has been demonstrated that - after taking into account all effects included in the MSIS'86=CIRA'86 (COSPAR, 1988) model - there are residual fluctuations in the density of the upper atmosphere much larger than that the accuracy of the measurements can account for. These fluctuations are attributed to some kind of wave activity (Illés-Almár, 1993, Illés-Almár et al. 1996a). The average deviations from a model are considered as a measure of the amplitude of the waves in the atmosphere and are analysed as a function of geomagnetic coordinates, altitude and local solar time, in order to identify possible wave sources either in the lower lying atmosphere or in the thermosphere/ionosphere system. As a first step, the present investigation intends to make a map of the wave pattern by this method.

  5. Micron dimensioned cavity array supported lipid bilayers for the electrochemical investigation of ionophore activity.

    PubMed

    Maher, Sean; Basit, Hajra; Forster, Robert J; Keyes, Tia E

    2016-12-01

    Microcavity supported lipid bilayers, MSLBs, were applied to an electrochemical investigation of ionophore mediated ion transport. The arrays comprise of a 1cm(2) gold electrode imprinted with an ordered array of uniform spherical-cap pores of 2.8μm diameter prepared by gold electrodeposition through polystyrene templating spheres. The pores were pre-filled with aqueous buffer prior to Langmuir-Blodgett assembly of a 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine bilayer. Fluorescence lifetime correlation spectroscopy enabled by the micron dimensions of the pores permitted study of lipid diffusion across single apertures, yielding a diffusion coefficient of 12.58±1.28μm(2)s(-1) and anomalous exponent of 1.03±0.02, consistent with Brownian motion. From FLCS, the MSLBs were stable over 3days and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy of the membrane with and without ionic gradient over experimental windows of 6h showed excellent stability. Two ionophores were studied at the MSLBs; Valinomycin, a K(+) uniporter and Nigericin, a K(+)/H(+) antiporter. Ionophore reconstituted into the DOPC bilayer resulted in a decrease and increase in membrane resistance and capacitance respectively. Significant increases in Valinomycin and Nigericin activity were observed, reflected in large decreases in membrane resistance when K(+) was present in the contacting buffer and in the presence of H(+) ionic gradient across the membrane respectively.

  6. Pharmacological Investigation of the Wound Healing Activity of Cestrum nocturnum (L.) Ointment in Wistar Albino Rats

    PubMed Central

    Nagar, Hemant Kumar; Srivastava, Amit Kumar; Srivastava, Rajnish; Kurmi, Madan Lal; Chandel, Harinarayan Singh; Ranawat, Mahendra Singh

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. The present study was aimed at investigating the wound healing effect of ethanolic extract of Cestrum nocturnum (L.) leaves (EECN) using excision and incision wound model. Methods. Wistar albino rats were divided into five groups each consisting of six animals; group I (left untreated) considered as control, group II (ointment base treated) considered as negative control, group III treated with 5% (w/w) povidone iodine ointment (Intadine USP), which served as standard, group IV treated with EECN 2% (w/w) ointment, and group V treated with EECN 5% (w/w) ointment were considered as test groups. All the treatments were given once daily. The wound healing effect was assessed by percentage wound contraction, epithelialization period, and histoarchitecture studies in excision wound model while breaking strength and hydroxyproline content in the incision wound model. Result. Different concentration of EECN (2% and 5% w/w) ointment promoted the wound healing activity significantly in both the models studied. The high rate of wound contraction (P < 0.001), decrease in the period for epithelialization (P < 0.01), high skin breaking strength (P < 0.001), and elevated hydroxyproline content were observed in animal treated with EECN ointments when compared to the control and negative control group of animals. Histopathological studies of the EECN ointments treated groups also revealed the effectiveness in improved wound healing. Conclusions. Ethanolic extract of Cestrum nocturnum (EECN) leaves possesses a concentration dependent wound healing effect. PMID:27018126

  7. New investigational drugs with single-agent activity in multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Rajan, A M; Kumar, S

    2016-01-01

    The treatment of multiple myeloma (MM) is rapidly evolving. In the United States, four drugs (panobinostat, ixazomib, daratumumab and elotuzumab) were approved for the treatment of MM in 2015. As a result of improved diagnosis and therapy, there has been a dramatic improvement in the outcome of MM in the last decade, probably more than any other malignancy. Numerous agents continue to be studied in preclinical models and in clinical trials, with many demonstrating clinical efficacy that appears promising enough to have a trajectory for regulatory approval. The purpose of this article is to summarize the current data and provide perspective on new investigational agents with promising single-agent activity in MM. The agents reviewed include Isatuximab, an anti-CD38 monoclonal antibody; marizomib, a new proteasome inhibitor; oprozomib, an oral proteasome inhibitor; filanesib (ARRY-520), a kinesin spindle protein inhibitor; dinaciclib, a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor; venetoclax (ABT-199), a selective BCL-2 inhibitor; and LGH-447, pan PIM kinase inhibitor. PMID:27471867

  8. Detailed investigation of the microbial community in foaming activated sludge reveals novel foam formers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Feng; Wang, Zhi-Ping; Yu, Ke; Zhang, T.

    2015-01-01

    Foaming of activated sludge (AS) causes adverse impacts on wastewater treatment operation and hygiene. In this study, we investigated the microbial communities of foam, foaming AS and non-foaming AS in a sewage treatment plant via deep-sequencing of the taxonomic marker genes 16S rRNA and mycobacterial rpoB and a metagenomic approach. In addition to Actinobacteria, many genera (e.g., Clostridium XI, Arcobacter, Flavobacterium) were more abundant in the foam than in the AS. On the other hand, deep-sequencing of rpoB did not detect any obligate pathogenic mycobacteria in the foam. We found that unknown factors other than the abundance of Gordonia sp. could determine the foaming process, because abundance of the same species was stable before and after a foaming event over six months. More interestingly, although the dominant Gordonia foam former was the closest with G. amarae, it was identified as an undescribed Gordonia species by referring to the 16S rRNA gene, gyrB and, most convincingly, the reconstructed draft genome from metagenomic reads. Our results, based on metagenomics and deep sequencing, reveal that foams are derived from diverse taxa, which expands previous understanding and provides new insight into the underlying complications of the foaming phenomenon in AS.

  9. Complementary non-radioactive assays for investigation of human flap endonuclease 1 activity

    PubMed Central

    Dorjsuren, Dorjbal; Kim, Daemyung; Maloney, David J.; Wilson, David M.; Simeonov, Anton

    2011-01-01

    FEN1, a key participant in DNA replication and repair, is the major human flap endonuclease that recognizes and cleaves flap DNA structures. Deficiencies in FEN1 function or deletion of the fen1 gene have profound biological effects, including the suppression of repair of DNA damage incurred from the action of various genotoxic agents. Given the importance of FEN1 in resolving abnormal DNA structures, inhibitors of the enzyme carry a potential as enhancers of DNA-interactive anticancer drugs. To facilitate the studies of FEN1 activity and the search for novel inhibitors, we developed a pair of complementary-readout homogeneous assays utilizing fluorogenic donor/quencher and AlphaScreen chemiluminescence strategies. A previously reported FEN1 inhibitor 3-hydroxy-5-methyl-1-phenylthieno[2,3-d]pyrimidine-2,4(1H,3H)-dione displayed equal potency in the new assays, in agreement with its published IC50. The assays were optimized to a low 4 µl volume and used to investigate a set of small molecules, leading to the identification of previously-unreported FEN1 inhibitors, among which aurintricarboxylic acid and NSC-13755 (an arylstibonic derivative) displayed submicromolar potency (average IC50 of 0.59 and 0.93 µM, respectively). The availability of these simple complementary assays obviates the need for undesirable radiotracer-based assays and should facilitate efforts to develop novel inhibitors for this key biological target. PMID:21062821

  10. Experimental investigation on the thermal performance of heat storage walls coupled with active solar systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Chunyu; You, Shijun; Zhu, Chunying; Yu, Wei

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents an experimental investigation of the performance of a system combining a low-temperature water wall radiant heating system and phase change energy storage technology with an active solar system. This system uses a thermal storage wall that is designed with multilayer thermal storage plates. The heat storage material is expanded graphite that absorbs a mixture of capric acid and lauric acid. An experiment is performed to study the actual effect. The following are studied under winter conditions: (1) the temperature of the radiation wall surface, (2) the melting status of the thermal storage material in the internal plate, (3) the density of the heat flux, and (4) the temperature distribution of the indoor space. The results reveal that the room temperature is controlled between 16 and 20 °C, and the thermal storage wall meets the heating and temperature requirements. The following are also studied under summer conditions: (1) the internal relationship between the indoor temperature distribution and the heat transfer within the regenerative plates during the day and (2) the relationship between the outlet air temperature and inlet air temperature in the thermal storage wall in cooling mode at night. The results indicate that the indoor temperature is approximately 27 °C, which satisfies the summer air-conditioning requirements.

  11. Quantitative analysis of cardiovascular modulation in respiratory neural activity.

    PubMed

    Dick, Thomas E; Morris, Kendall F

    2004-05-01

    We propose the 'delta(2)-statistic' for assessing the magnitude and statistical significance of arterial pulse-modulated activity of single neurones and present the results of applying this tool to medullary respiratory-modulated units. This analytical tool is a modification of the eta(2)-statistic and, consequently, based on the analysis of variance. The eta(2)-statistic reflects the consistency of respiratory-modulated activity on a cycle-by-cycle basis. However, directly applying this test to activity during the cardiac cycle proved ineffective because subjects-by-treatments matrices did not contain enough 'information'. We increased information by dividing the cardiac cycle into fewer bins, excluding cycles without activity and summing activity over multiple cycles. The analysed neuronal activity was an existing data set examining the neural control of respiration and cough. Neurones were recorded in the nuclei of the solitary tracts, and in the rostral and caudal ventral respiratory groups of decerebrate, neuromuscularly blocked, ventilated cats (n= 19). Two hundred of 246 spike trains were respiratory modulated; of these 53% were inspiratory (I), 36.5% expiratory (E), 6% IE phase spanning and 4.5% EI phase spanning and responsive to airway stimulation. Nearly half (n= 96/200) of the respiratory-modulated units were significantly pulse modulated and 13 were highly modulated with delta(2) values exceeding 0.3. In 10 of these highly modulated units, eta(2) values were greater than 0.3 and all 13 had, at least, a portion of their activity during expiration. We conclude that cardiorespiratory interaction is reciprocal; in addition to respiratory-modulated activity in a subset of neuronal activity patterns controlling the cardiovascular system, pulse-modulated activity exists in a subset of neuronal activity patterns controlling the respiratory system. Thus, cardio-ventilatory coupling apparent in respiratory motor output is evident and, perhaps, derived from the

  12. Investigation of cell proliferative activity on the surface of the nanocomposite material produced by laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhurbina, N. N.; Kurilova, U. E.; Ickitidze, L. P.; Podgaetsky, V. M.; Selishchev, S. V.; Suetina, I. A.; Mezentseva, M. V.; Eganova, E. M.; Pavlov, A. A.; Gerasimenko, A. Y.

    2016-04-01

    A new method for the formation of composite nanomaterials based on multi-walled and single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNT) on a silicon substrate has been developed. Formation is carried out by ultrasound coating of a silicon substrate by homogenous dispersion of CNTs in the albumin matrix and further irradiation with the continuous laser beam with a wavelength of 810 nm and power of 5.5 watts. The high electrical conductivity of CNTs provides its structuring under the influence of the laser radiation electric field. The result is a scaffold that provides high mechanical strength of nanocomposite material (250 MPa). For in vitro studies of materials biocompatibility a method of cell growth microscopic analysis was developed. Human embryonic fibroblasts (EPP) were used as biological cells. Investigation of the interaction between nanocomposite material and cells was carried out by optical and atomic force microscopy depending on the time of cells incubation. The study showed that after 3 hours incubation EPP were fixed on the substrate surface, avoiding the surface of the composite material. However, after 24 hours of incubation EPP fix on the sample surface and then begin to grow and divide. After 72 hours of incubation, the cells completely fill the sample surface of nanocomposite material. Thus, a nanocomposite material based on CNTs in albumin matrix does not inhibit cell growth on its surface, and favours their growth. The nanocomposite material can be used for creating soft tissue implants

  13. Spectroscopic investigations, antimicrobial, and cytotoxic activity of green synthesized gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Lokina, S; Suresh, R; Giribabu, K; Stephen, A; Lakshmi Sundaram, R; Narayanan, V

    2014-08-14

    The gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) were synthesized by using naturally available Punica Granatum fruit extract as reducing and stabilizing agent. The biosynthesized AuNPs was characterized by using UV-Vis, fluorescence, high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and thermogravimetric (TGA) analysis. The surface plasmon resonance (SPR) band at 585nm confirmed the reduction of auric chloride to AuNPs. The crystalline nature of the biosynthesized AuNPs was confirmed from the HRTEM images, XRD and selected area electron diffraction (SAED) pattern. The HRTEM images showed the mixture of triangular and spherical-like AuNPs having size between 5 and 20nm. The weight loss of the AuNPs was measured by TGA as a function of temperature under a controlled atmosphere. The biomolecules are responsible for the reduction of AuCl4(-) ions and the formation of stable AuNPs which was confirmed by FTIR measurement. The synthesized AuNPs showed an excellent antibacterial activity against Candida albicans (ATCC 90028), Aspergillus flavus (ATCC 10124), Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 25175), Salmonella typhi (ATCC 14028) and Vibrio cholerae (ATCC 14033). The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of AuNPs was recorded against various microorganisms. Further, the synthesized AuNPs shows an excellent cytotoxic result against HeLa cancer cell lines at different concentrations. PMID:24755638

  14. Spectroscopic investigations, antimicrobial, and cytotoxic activity of green synthesized gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lokina, S.; Suresh, R.; Giribabu, K.; Stephen, A.; Lakshmi Sundaram, R.; Narayanan, V.

    2014-08-01

    The gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) were synthesized by using naturally available Punica Granatum fruit extract as reducing and stabilizing agent. The biosynthesized AuNPs was characterized by using UV-Vis, fluorescence, high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and thermogravimetric (TGA) analysis. The surface plasmon resonance (SPR) band at 585 nm confirmed the reduction of auric chloride to AuNPs. The crystalline nature of the biosynthesized AuNPs was confirmed from the HRTEM images, XRD and selected area electron diffraction (SAED) pattern. The HRTEM images showed the mixture of triangular and spherical-like AuNPs having size between 5 and 20 nm. The weight loss of the AuNPs was measured by TGA as a function of temperature under a controlled atmosphere. The biomolecules are responsible for the reduction of AuCl4- ions and the formation of stable AuNPs which was confirmed by FTIR measurement. The synthesized AuNPs showed an excellent antibacterial activity against Candida albicans (ATCC 90028), Aspergillus flavus (ATCC 10124), Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 25175), Salmonella typhi (ATCC 14028) and Vibrio cholerae (ATCC 14033). The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of AuNPs was recorded against various microorganisms. Further, the synthesized AuNPs shows an excellent cytotoxic result against HeLa cancer cell lines at different concentrations.

  15. Investigation of Active Flow Control to Improve Aerodynamic Performance of Oscillating Wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narducci, Robert P.; Bowersox, Rodney; Bussom, Richard; McVeigh, Michael; Raghu, Surya; White, Edward

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this effort is to design a promising active flow control concept on an oscillating airfoil for on-blade alleviation of dynamic stall. The concept must be designed for a range of representative Mach numbers (0.2 to 0.5) and representative reduced frequency characteristics of a full-scale rotorcraft. Specifications for a sweeping-jet actuator to mitigate the detrimental effects of retreating blade stall experienced by edgewise rotors in forward flight has been performed. Wind tunnel modifications have been designed to accommodate a 5x6 test section in the Oran W. Nicks Low Speed Wind Tunnel at Texas A&M University that will allow the tunnel to achieve Mach 0.5. The flow control design is for a two-dimensional oscillating VR-7 blade section with a 15- inch chord at rotor-relevant flow conditions covering the range of reduced frequencies from 0.0 to 0.15 and Mach numbers from 0.2 to 0.5. A Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis has been performed to influence the placement of the flow control devices for optimal effectiveness.

  16. The Role of Materials Degradation and Analysis in the Space Shuttle Columbia Accident Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McDanels, Steven J.

    2006-01-01

    The efforts following the loss of the Space Shuttle Columbia included debris recovery, reconstruction, and analysis. The debris was subjected to myriad quantitative and semiquantitative chemical analysis techniques, ranging from examination via the scanning electron microscope (SEM) with energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS) to X-Ray diffraction (XRD) and electron probe micro-analysis (EPMA). The results from the work with the debris helped the investigators determine the location where a breach likely occurred in the leading edge of the left wing during lift off of the Orbiter from the Kennedy Space Center. Likewise, the information evidenced by the debris was also crucial in ascertaining the path of impinging plasma flow once it had breached the wing. After the Columbia Accident Investigation Board (CAIB) issued its findings, the major portion of the investigation was concluded. However, additional work remained to be done on many pieces of debris from portions of the Orbiter which were not directly related to the initial impact during ascent. This subsequent work was not only performed in the laboratory, but was also performed with portable equipment, including examination via portable X-Ray fluorescence (XRF) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Likewise, acetate and silicon-rubber replicas of various fracture surfaces were obtained for later macroscopic and fractographic examination. This paper will detail the efforts and findings from the initial investigation, as well as present results obtained by the later examination and analysis of debris from the Orbiter including its windows, bulkhead structures, and other components which had not been examined during the primary investigation.

  17. A fuselage/tank structure study for actively cooled hypersonic cruise vehicles: Active cooling system analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, J. E.

    1975-01-01

    The effects of fuselage cross section and structural arrangement on the performance of actively cooled hypersonic cruise vehicles are investigated. An active cooling system which maintains the aircraft's entire surface area at temperatures below 394 K at Mach 6 is developed along with a hydrogen fuel tankage thermal protection system. Thermodynamic characteristics of the actively cooled thermal protection systems established are summarized. Design heat loads and coolant flowrate requirements are defined for each major structural section and for the total system. Cooling system weights are summarized at the major component level. Conclusions and recommendations are included.

  18. Activity anorexia: An interplay between basic and applied behavior analysis

    PubMed Central

    Pierce, W. David; Epling, W. Frank; Dews, Peter B.; Estes, William K.; Morse, William H.; Van Orman, Willard; Herrnstein, Richard J.

    1994-01-01

    The relationship between basic research with nonhumans and applied behavior analysis is illustrated by our work on activity anorexia. When rats are fed one meal a day and allowed to run on an activity wheel, they run excessively, stop eating, and die of starvation. Convergent evidence, from several different research areas, indicates that the behavior of these animals and humans who self-starve is functionally similar. A biobehavioral theory of activity anorexia is presented that details the cultural contingencies, behavioral processes, and physiology of anorexia. Diagnostic criteria and a three-stage treatment program for activity-based anorexia are outlined. The animal model permits basic research on anorexia that for practical and ethical reasons cannot be conducted with humans. Thus, basic research can have applied importance. PMID:22478169

  19. Investigating Children's Musical Interactions within the Activities Systems of Group Composing and Arranging: An Application of Engestrom's Activity Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burnard, Pamela; Younker, Betty Anne

    2008-01-01

    This article applies Engestrom's Activity Theory (AT) as an analytical lens to identify defining characteristics of the collaborative creative music making activities of composing and arranging. Attention is paid to the complex interrelationships among the various elements of interaction in children's collaborative creative music making as…

  20. Application of activation techniques to biological analysis. [813 references

    SciTech Connect

    Bowen, H.J.M.

    1981-12-01

    Applications of activation analysis in the biological sciences are reviewed for the period of 1970 to 1979. The stages and characteristics of activation analysis are described, and its advantages and disadvantages enumerated. Most applications involve activation by thermal neutrons followed by either radiochemical or instrumental determination. Relatively little use has been made of activation by fast neutrons, photons, or charged particles. In vivo analyses are included, but those based on prompt gamma or x-ray emission are not. Major applications include studies of reference materials, and the elemental analysis of plants, marine biota, animal and human tissues, diets, and excreta. Relatively little use of it has been made in biochemistry, microbiology, and entomology, but it has become important in toxicology and environmental science. The elements most often determined are Ag, As, Au, Br, Ca, Cd, Cl, Co, Cr, Cs, Cu, Fe, Hg, I, K, Mn, Mo, Na, Rb, Sb, Sc, Se, and Zn, while few or no determinations of B, Be, Bi, Ga, Gd, Ge, H, In, Ir, Li, Nd, Os, Pd, Pr, Pt, Re, Rh, Ru, Te, Tl, or Y have been made in biological materials.

  1. Multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis of optogenetic modulation of neural activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, S.; Gu, L.; Ghosh, N.; Mohanty, S. K.

    2013-02-01

    Here, we introduce a computational procedure to examine whether optogenetically activated neuronal firing recordings could be characterized as multifractal series. Optogenetics is emerging as a valuable experimental tool and a promising approach for studying a variety of neurological disorders in animal models. The spiking patterns from cortical region of the brain of optogenetically-stimulated transgenic mice were analyzed using a sophisticated fluctuation analysis method known as multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis (MFDFA). We observed that the optogenetically-stimulated neural firings are consistent with a multifractal process. Further, we used MFDFA to monitor the effect of chemically induced pain (formalin injection) and optogenetic treatment used to relieve the pain. In this case, dramatic changes in parameters characterizing a multifractal series were observed. Both the generalized Hurst exponent and width of singularity spectrum effectively differentiates the neural activities during control and pain induction phases. The quantitative nature of the analysis equips us with better measures to quantify pain. Further, it provided a measure for effectiveness of the optogenetic stimulation in inhibiting pain. MFDFA-analysis of spiking data from other deep regions of the brain also turned out to be multifractal in nature, with subtle differences in the parameters during pain-induction by formalin injection and inhibition by optogenetic stimulation. Characterization of neuronal firing patterns using MFDFA will lead to better understanding of neuronal response to optogenetic activation and overall circuitry involved in the process.

  2. Real-time fMRI-based activation analysis and stimulus control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moench, Tobias; Hollmann, Maurice; Bernarding, Johannes

    2007-03-01

    The real-time analysis of brain activation using functional MRI data offers a wide range of new experiments such as investigating self-regulation or learning strategies. However, besides special data acquisition and real-time data analysing techniques such examination requires dynamic and adaptive stimulus paradigms and self-optimising MRI-sequences. This paper presents an approach that enables the unified handling of parameters influencing the different software systems involved in the acquisition and analysing process. By developing a custom-made Experiment Description Language (EDL) this concept is used for a fast and flexible software environment which treats aspects like extraction and analysis of activation as well as the modification of the stimulus presentation. We describe how extracted real-time activation is subsequently evaluated by comparing activation patterns to previous acquired templates representing activated regions of interest for different predefined conditions. According to those results the stimulus presentation is adapted. The results showed that the developed system in combination with EDL is able to reliably detect and evaluate activation patterns in real-time. With a processing time for data analysis of about one second the approach is only limited by the natural time course of the hemodynamic response function of the brain activation.

  3. Comparing Self-Reported Versus Objectively Measured Physical Activity Behavior: A Preliminary Investigation of Older Filipino American Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atienza, Audie A.; King, Abby C.

    2005-01-01

    The importance of examining health behaviors, such as physical activity, among Filipino Americans is highlighted by their higher rates of chronic disease. As physical inactivity has been linked to chronic diseases (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 1996), this study investigated the physical activity levels of older Filipinas. This…

  4. neutron activation analysis using thermochromatography. III. analysis of samples of biological origin

    SciTech Connect

    Sattarov, G.; Davydov, A.V.; Khamatov, S.; Kist, A.A.

    1986-07-01

    The use of gas thermochromatography (GTC) in the radioactivation analysis of biological materials is discussed. A group separation of a number of highly volatile elements from sodium and bromine radionuclides has been achieved. The limit of detection of the elements by INAA and neutron activation analysis was estimated using GTC. The advantages of the procedure and the analytical parameters are discussed.

  5. Phytochemical Analysis and Anti-cancer Investigation of Boswellia serrata Bioactive Constituents In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Hanaa H; Abd-Rabou, Ahmed A; Hassan, Amal Z; Kotob, Soheir E

    2015-01-01

    presence of pent-2-ene-1,4-dione, 2-methyl- levulinic acid methyl ester, 3,5- dimethyl- 1- hexane, methyl-1-methylpentadecanoate, 1,1- dimethoxy cyclohexane, 1-methoxy-4-(1-propenyl)benzene and 17a-hydroxy-17a-cyano, preg-4-en-3-one. GC/MS analysis of volatile oils of B. Serrata oleo gum resin revealed the presence of sabinene (19.11%), terpinen-4-ol (14.64%) and terpinyl acetate (13.01%) as major constituents. The anti-cancer effect of two extracts (1 and 2) and four fractions (I, II, III and IV) as well as volatile oils of B. Serrata oleo gum resin on HepG2 and HCT 116 cell lines was investigated using SRB assay. Regarding HepG2 cell line, extracts 1 and 2 elicited the most pronounced cytotoxic activity with IC50 values equal 1.58 and 5.82 μg/mL at 48 h, respectively which were comparable to doxorubicin with an IC50 equal 4.68 μg/mL at 48 h. With respect to HCT 116 cells, extracts 1 and 2 exhibited the most obvious cytotoxic effect; with IC50 values equal 0.12 and 6.59 μg/mL at 48 h, respectively which were comparable to 5-fluorouracil with an IC50 equal 3.43 μg/ mL at 48 h. In conclusion, total extracts, fractions and volatile oils of B. Serrata oleo gum resin proved their usefulness as cytotoxic mediators against HepG2 and HCT 116 cell lines with different potentiality (extracts > fractions > volatile oil). In the two studied cell lines the cytotoxic acivity of each of extract 1 and 2 was comparable to doxorubicin and 5-fluorouracil, respectively. Extensive in vivo research is warranted to explore the precise molecular mechanisms of these bioactive natural products in cytotoxicity against HCC and CRC cells. PMID:26514509

  6. Analysis of active volcanoes from the Earth Observing System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mouginis-Mark, Peter; Rowland, Scott; Crisp, Joy; Glaze, Lori; Jones, Kenneth; Kahle, Anne; Pieri, David; Zebker, Howard; Krueger, Arlin; Walter, Lou

    1991-01-01

    The Earth Observing System (EOS) scheduled for launch in 1997 and 1999 is briefly described, and the EOS volcanology investigation objectives are discussed. The volcanology investigation will include long- and short-term monitoring of selected volcanoes, the detection of precursor activity associated with unanticipated eruptions, and a detailed study of on-going eruptions. A variety of instruments on the EOS platforms will enable the study of local- and regional-scale thermal and deformational features of volcanoes, and the chemical and structural features of volcanic eruption plumes and aerosols.

  7. [The legal frameworks and organizational forms of the work of a forensic medical expert participating in group investigation activities].

    PubMed

    Kachina, N N

    2013-01-01

    The problems pertaining to the modern organization of group investigation activities and the role of a forensic medical expert involved in them are discussed. It is shown that the variety of such groups formed in accordance with departmental and interdepartmental guidelines and regulations can be reduced to two major types, viz. investigation teams (brigades) and alert operational investigations groups. Either type can and some must include a forensic medical expert although neither legal nor institutional frameworks has been formulated for his participation.

  8. Active-site titration analysis of surface influence on immobilized Candida antarctica Lipase B activity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Matrix morphology and surface polarity effects were investigated for Candida antarctica lipase B immobilization. Measurements of the amount of lipase immobilized (bicinchoninic acid method) and the catalyst’s tributyrin hydrolysis activity, coupled with a determination of the lipase’s functional fr...

  9. Analysis of reactor material experiments investigating corium crust stability and heat transfer in jet impingement flow

    SciTech Connect

    Sienicki, J.J.; Spencer, B.W.

    1985-01-01

    Presented is an analysis of the results of the CSTI-1, CSTI-3, and CWTI-11 reactor material experiments in which a jet of molten corium initially at 3080/sup 0/K was directed downward upon a stainless steel plate. The experiments are a continuation of a program of reactor material tests investigating LWR severe accident phenomena. Objective of the present analysis is to determine the existence or nonexistence of a corium crust during impingement from comparison of the measured heatup of the plate (as measured by thermocouples imbedded immediately beneath the steel surface) with model calculations assuming alternately the presence and absence of a stable crust during impingement.

  10. Multichannel analysis of surface waves (MASW) - Active and passive methods

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Park, C.B.; Miller, R.D.; Xia, J.; Ivanov, J.

    2007-01-01

    The conventional seismic approaches for near-surface investigation have usually been either high-resolution reflection or refraction surveys that deal with a depth range of a few tens to hundreds meters. Seismic signals from these surveys consist of wavelets with frequencies higher than 50 Hz. The multichannel analysis of surface waves (MASW) method deals with surface waves in the lower frequencies (e.g., 1-30 Hz) and uses a much shallower depth range of investigation (e.g., a few to a few tens of meters). ?? 2007 Society of Exploration Geophysicists.

  11. Analysis of alternatives for immobilized low activity waste disposal

    SciTech Connect

    Burbank, D.A.

    1997-10-28

    This report presents a study of alternative disposal system architectures and implementation strategies to provide onsite near-surface disposal capacity to receive the immobilized low-activity waste produced by the private vendors. The analysis shows that a flexible unit strategy that provides a suite of design solutions tailored to the characteristics of the immobilized low-activity waste will provide a disposal system that best meets the program goals of reducing the environmental, health, and safety impacts; meeting the schedule milestones; and minimizing the life-cycle cost of the program.

  12. Multi-scale statistical analysis of coronal solar activity

    DOE PAGES

    Gamborino, Diana; del-Castillo-Negrete, Diego; Martinell, Julio J.

    2016-07-08

    Multi-filter images from the solar corona are used to obtain temperature maps that are analyzed using techniques based on proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) in order to extract dynamical and structural information at various scales. Exploring active regions before and after a solar flare and comparing them with quiet regions, we show that the multi-scale behavior presents distinct statistical properties for each case that can be used to characterize the level of activity in a region. Information about the nature of heat transport is also to be extracted from the analysis.

  13. Analysis of exposure due to work on activated components

    SciTech Connect

    Cossairt, J.D.

    1987-09-01

    In this brief note the author summarized analysis of the exposure incurred in various maintenance jobs involving activated accelerator and beam line components at Fermilab. A tabulation was made of parameters associated with each job. Included are rather terse descriptions of the various tasks. The author presented various plots of the quantities in the table. All exposure rates are mR/hr while all exposures accumulated are mR. The exposure rates were generally measured at the Fermilab standard one foot distance from the activated component. Accumulated exposures are taken from the self-reading pocket dosimeter records maintained by the radiation control technicians.

  14. Investigation of CO2 induced biogeochemical reactions and active microorganisms of two German gas fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoth, N.; Kassahun, A.; Seifert, J.; Krüger, M.; Bretschneider, H.; Gniese, C.; Frerichs, J.; Simon, A.; Simon, E.; Muschalle, T.

    2009-04-01

    The BMBF-Geotechnologien project "RECOBIO 2" continues the investigation of the long-term biogeochemical transformation of stored CO2. In addition to the Upper Carboniferous gas reservoir Schneeren (Westphalian C) the almost depleted Altmark gas field (Permian - Upper Rotliegend) is also investigated. Both sandstone reservoirs belong to the North German Basin and are operated by the GDF SUEZ E&P Germany (GDF SUEZ). The reservoirs differ in depth, initial and current fluid pressure as well as reservoir temperature, which is a biogeochemical important parameter. While the uplifted horst structure of Schneeren (approx. depth 2700 m) has a temperature level of 80 - 90 °C, the Altmark gas field (approx. depth 3300 m) shows temperatures around 120 °C. The Altmark site is known to be favourable for underground CO2-storage by enhanced gas recovery (EGR). This EGR process is operated by GDF SUEZ at the small and hydraulic isolated reservoir block "Altensalzwedel". This pilot test is accompanied by the scientific large-scale project CLEAN. In addition the RECOBIO2 project characterises the biogeochemical situation of the both large reservoir blocks of the Altmark gas field - „Salzwedel/ Peckensen" and „Heidberg/ Mellin". The produced formation waters of these reservoir blocks were sampled on different wellheads. The redox potentials are partly very low (Eh up to -300 mV) with slightly acidic pH-values (5,5 to 6). The high saline and (nearly) sulphate free formation waters of Na/Ca-Cl type have very high loads of Zn, Pb, Hg and As. In combination to the analysed DOC levels the talk discusses the importance of metal organic complexes. Also results of fluid geochemical calculations will be presented. Furthermore the diversity of bacteria and archaea of the formation waters as well as the potentials of CH4-, CO2-formation and sulphate reduction will be shown. Therefore the cultivation experiments were carried out with different substrates (H2/CO2, acetate, methanol). It

  15. Fault Activity Investigations in the Lower Tagus Valley (Portugal) With Seismic and Geoelectric Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvalho, J. G.; Gonçalves, R.; Torres, L. M.; Cabral, J.; Mendes-Victor, L. A.

    2004-05-01

    The Lower Tagus River Valley is located in Central Portugal, and includes a large portion of the densely populated area of Lisbon. It is sited in the Lower Tagus Cenozoic Basin, a tectonic depression where up to 2,000 m of Cenozoic sediments are preserved, which was developed in the Neogene as a compressive foredeep basin related to tectonic inversion of former Mesozoic extensional structures. It is only a few hundred kilometers distant from the Eurasia-Africa plate boundary, and is characterized by a moderate seismicity presenting a diffuse pattern, with historical earthquakes having caused serious damage, loss of lives and economical problems. It has therefore been the target of several seismic hazard studies in which extensive geological and geophysical research was carried out on several geological structures. This work focuses on the application of seismic and geoelectric methods to investigate an important NW-SE trending normal fault detected on deep oil-industry seismic reflection profiles in the Tagus Cenozoic Basin. In these seismic sections this fault clearly offsets horizons that are ascribed to the Upper Miocene. However, due to the poor near surface resolution of the seismic data and the fact that the fault is hidden under the recent alluvial cover of the Tagus River, it was not clear whether it displaced the upper sediments of Holocene age. In order to constrain the fault geometry and kinematics and to evaluate its recent tectonic activity, a few high-resolution seismic reflection profiles were acquired and refraction interpretation of the reflection data was performed. Some vertical electrical soundings were also carried out. A complex fault system was detected, apparently with normal and reverse faulting. The collected data strongly supports the possibility that one of the detected faults affects the uppermost Neogene sediments and very probably the Holocene alluvial sediments of the Tagus River. The evidence of recent activity on this fault, its

  16. Structural analysis and antioxidant activities of polysaccharide isolated from Jinqian mushroom.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yong; Du, Yi-Qun; Wang, Jun-Hui; Zha, Xue-Qiang; Zhang, Jian-Bo

    2014-03-01

    Jinqian mushroom is a precious edible mushroom with delicious taste and high nutritional value. In this paper, a polysaccharide fraction JQPs was isolated and purified from the fruiting body of Jinqian mushroom. The chemical structure, chain conformation and antioxidant activities of JQPs were investigated. The results indicated that JQPs was mainly composed of glucose with trace amounts of xylose. The backbone of JQPs consisted of β-(1 → 3)-D-glucan with β-(1 → 6)-glucosyl side chain. The chain conformation analysis showed that JQPs was a triple helical polysaccharide. The antioxidant activity tests in vitro revealed that JQPs exhibited high DPPH radical and ABTS radical scavenging activities, moderate superoxide radical and hydroxyl radical scavenging activities, low reducing power and Fe(2+) chelating activities. The results suggested that JQPs could be used as a potential natural antioxidant.

  17. Investigation of electrically-active deep levels in single-crystalline diamond by particle-induced charge transient spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kada, W.; Kambayashi, Y.; Ando, Y.; Onoda, S.; Umezawa, H.; Mokuno, Y.; Shikata, S.; Makino, T.; Koka, M.; Hanaizumi, O.; Kamiya, T.; Ohshima, T.

    2016-04-01

    To investigate electrically-active deep levels in high-resistivity single-crystalline diamond, particle-induced charge transient spectroscopy (QTS) techniques were performed using 5.5 MeV alpha particles and 9 MeV carbon focused microprobes. For unintentionally-doped (UID) chemical vapor deposition (CVD) diamond, deep levels with activation energies of 0.35 eV and 0.43 eV were detected which correspond to the activation energy of boron acceptors in diamond. The results suggested that alpha particle and heavy ion induced QTS techniques are the promising candidate for in-situ investigation of deep levels in high-resistivity semiconductors.

  18. Laminar analysis of slow wave activity in humans

    PubMed Central

    Csercsa, Richárd; Dombovári, Balázs; Fabó, Dániel; Wittner, Lucia; Erőss, Loránd; Entz, László; Sólyom, András; Rásonyi, György; Szűcs, Anna; Kelemen, Anna; Jakus, Rita; Juhos, Vera; Grand, László; Magony, Andor; Halász, Péter; Freund, Tamás F.; Maglóczky, Zsófia; Cash, Sydney S.; Papp, László; Karmos, György; Halgren, Eric

    2010-01-01

    Brain electrical activity is largely composed of oscillations at characteristic frequencies. These rhythms are hierarchically organized and are thought to perform important pathological and physiological functions. The slow wave is a fundamental cortical rhythm that emerges in deep non-rapid eye movement sleep. In animals, the slow wave modulates delta, theta, spindle, alpha, beta, gamma and ripple oscillations, thus orchestrating brain electrical rhythms in sleep. While slow wave activity can enhance epileptic manifestations, it is also thought to underlie essential restorative processes and facilitate the consolidation of declarative memories. Animal studies show that slow wave activity is composed of rhythmically recurring phases of widespread, increased cortical cellular and synaptic activity, referred to as active- or up-state, followed by cellular and synaptic inactivation, referred to as silent- or down-state. However, its neural mechanisms in humans are poorly understood, since the traditional intracellular techniques used in animals are inappropriate for investigating the cellular and synaptic/transmembrane events in humans. To elucidate the intracortical neuronal mechanisms of slow wave activity in humans, novel, laminar multichannel microelectrodes were chronically implanted into the cortex of patients with drug-resistant focal epilepsy undergoing cortical mapping for seizure focus localization. Intracortical laminar local field potential gradient, multiple-unit and single-unit activities were recorded during slow wave sleep, related to simultaneous electrocorticography, and analysed with current source density and spectral methods. We found that slow wave activity in humans reflects a rhythmic oscillation between widespread cortical activation and silence. Cortical activation was demonstrated as increased wideband (0.3–200 Hz) spectral power including virtually all bands of cortical oscillations, increased multiple- and single-unit activity and

  19. Observing Active Volcanism on Earth and Beyond With an Autonomous Science Investigation Capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, A. G.; Mjolsness, E. D.; Fink, W.; Castano, R.; Park, H. G.; Zak, M.; Burl, M. C.

    2001-12-01

    Operational constraints imposed by restricted downlink and long communication delays make autonomous systems a necessity for exploring dynamic processes in the Solar System and beyond. Our objective is to develop an onboard, modular, automated science analysis tool that will autonomously detect unexpected events, identify rare events at predicted sites, quantify the processes under study, and prioritize the science data and analyses as they are collected. A primary target for this capability is terrestrial active volcanism. Our integrated, science-driven command and control package represents the next stage of the automatic monitoring of volcanic activity pioneered by GOES. The resulting system will maximize science return from day-to-day instrument use and provide immediate reaction to capture the fullest information from infrequent events. For example, a sensor suite consisting of a Galileo-like multi-filter visible wavelength camera and an infrared spectrometer, can acquire high-spatial resolution data of eruptions of lava and volcanic plumes and identify large concentrations of volcanic SO2. After image/spectrum formation, software is applied to the data which is capable of change detection (in the visible and infrared), feature identification (both in imagery and spectra), and novelty detection. In this particular case, the latter module detects change in the parameter space of an advanced multi-component black-body volcanic thermal emission model by means of a novel technique called the "Grey-Box" method which analyzes time series data through a combination of deterministic and stochastic models. This approach can be demonstrated using data obtained by the Galileo spacecraft of ionian volcanism. The system autonomously identifies the most scientifically important targets and prioritizes data and analyses for return. All of these techniques have been successfully demonstrated in laboratory experiments, and are ready to be tested in an operational environment

  20. Experimental and theoretical investigation of a pyridine containing Schiff base: Hirshfeld analysis of crystal structure, interaction with biomolecules and cytotoxicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chithiraikumar, S.; Neelakantan, M. A.

    2016-03-01

    A pyridine containing Schiff base (E)-2-methoxy-6-(((pyridin-2-ylmethyl)imino)methyl) phenol (L) was isolated in single crystals. The molecular structure of L was studied by FT-IR, NMR, UV-Vis techniques, single crystal XRD analysis and computationally by DFT method. L prefers enol form in the solid state. Electronic spectrum of L was recorded in different organic solvents to investigate the dependence of tautomerism on solvent types. The polar solvents facilitate the proton transfer by decreasing the activation energy needed for transition state. Potential energy curve for the intramolecular proton transfer in the ground state is generated in gas and solution phases. The 3D Hirshfeld surfaces and the associated 2D fingerprint plots were investigated. The percentages of various interactions were analyzed by fingerprint plots of Hirshfeld surface. The interaction of L with CT DNA was investigated under physiological conditions using UV-Vis spectroscopy, fluorescence quenching and molecular docking methods. Molecular docking studies reveal that binding of L to the groove of B-DNA is through hydrogen bonding and hydrophobic interactions. The in vitro cytotoxicity of L was carried out in two different human tumor cell lines, MCF 7 and MIA-Pa-Ca-2 exhibits moderate activity.

  1. Experimental and theoretical investigation of a pyridine containing Schiff base: Hirshfeld analysis of crystal structure, interaction with biomolecules and cytotoxicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chithiraikumar, S.; Neelakantan, M. A.

    2016-03-01

    A pyridine containing Schiff base (E)-2-methoxy-6-(((pyridin-2-ylmethyl)imino)methyl) phenol (L) was isolated in single crystals. The molecular structure of L was studied by FT-IR, NMR, UV-Vis techniques, single crystal XRD analysis and computationally by DFT method. L prefers enol form in the solid state. Electronic spectrum of L was recorded in different organic solvents to investigate the dependence of tautomerism on solvent types. The polar solvents facilitate the proton transfer by decreasing the activation energy needed for transition state. Potential energy curve for the intramolecular proton transfer in the ground state is generated in gas and solution phases. The 3D Hirshfeld surfaces and the associated 2D fingerprint plots were investigated. The percentages of various interactions were analyzed by fingerprint plots of Hirshfeld surface. The interaction of L with CT DNA was investigated under physiological conditions using UV-Vis spectroscopy, fluorescence quenching and molecular docking methods. Molecular docking studies reveal that binding of L to the groove of B-DNA is through hydrogen bonding and hydrophobic interactions. The in vitro cytotoxicity of L was carried out in two different human tumor cell lines, MCF 7 and MIA-Pa-Ca-2 exhibits moderate activity.

  2. INVESTIGATING TWO SUCCESSIVE FLUX ROPE ERUPTIONS IN A SOLAR ACTIVE REGION

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, X.; Zhang, J.; Ding, M. D.; Guo, Y.; Olmedo, O.; Sun, X. D.; Liu, Y.

    2013-06-01

    We investigate two successive flux rope (FR1 and FR2) eruptions resulting in two coronal mass ejections (CMEs) on 2012 January 23. Both flux ropes (FRs) appeared as an EUV channel structure in the images of high temperature passbands of the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly prior to the CME eruption. Through fitting their height evolution with a function consisting of linear and exponential components, we determine the onset time of the FR impulsive acceleration with high temporal accuracy for the first time. Using this onset time, we divide the evolution of the FRs in the low corona into two phases: a slow rise phase and an impulsive acceleration phase. In the slow rise phase of FR1, the appearance of sporadic EUV and UV brightening and the strong shearing along the polarity inverse line indicates that the quasi-separatrix-layer reconnection likely initiates the slow rise. On the other hand, for FR2, we mainly contribute its slow rise to the FR1 eruption, which partially opened the overlying field and thus decreased the magnetic restriction. At the onset of the impulsive acceleration phase, FR1 (FR2) reaches the critical height of 84.4 ± 11.2 Mm (86.2 ± 13.0 Mm) where the decline of the overlying field with height is fast enough to trigger the torus instability. After a very short interval (∼2 minutes), the flare emission began to enhance. These results reveal the compound activity involving multiple magnetic FRs and further suggest that the ideal torus instability probably plays the essential role of initiating the impulsive acceleration of CMEs.

  3. Dynamic Three-Dimensional Shoulder Mri during Active Motion for Investigation of Rotator Cuff Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Tempelaere, Christine; Pierrart, Jérome; Lefèvre-Colau, Marie-Martine; Vuillemin, Valérie; Cuénod, Charles-André; Hansen, Ulrich; Mir, Olivier; Skalli, Wafa; Gregory, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Background MRI is the standard methodology in diagnosis of rotator cuff diseases. However, many patients continue to have pain despite treatment, and MRI of a static unloaded shoulder seems insufficient for best diagnosis and treatment. This study evaluated if Dynamic MRI provides novel kinematic data that can be used to improve the understanding, diagnosis and best treatment of rotator cuff diseases. Methods Dynamic MRI provided real-time 3D image series and was used to measure changes in the width of subacromial space, superior-inferior translation and anterior-posterior translation of the humeral head relative to the glenoid during active abduction. These measures were investigated for consistency with the rotator cuff diseases classifications from standard MRI. Results The study included: 4 shoulders with massive rotator cuff tears, 5 shoulders with an isolated full-thickness supraspinatus tear, 5 shoulders with tendinopathy and 6 normal shoulders. A change in the width of subacromial space greater than 4mm differentiated between rotator cuff diseases with tendon tears (massive cuff tears and supraspinatus tear) and without tears (tendinopathy) (p = 0.012). The range of the superior-inferior translation was higher in the massive cuff tears group (6.4mm) than in normals (3.4mm) (p = 0.02). The range of the anterior-posterior translation was higher in the massive cuff tears (9.2 mm) and supraspinatus tear (9.3 mm) shoulders compared to normals (3.5mm) and tendinopathy (4.8mm) shoulders (p = 0.05). Conclusion The Dynamic MRI enabled a novel measure; ‘Looseness’, i.e. the translation of the humeral head on the glenoid during an abduction cycle. Looseness was better able at differentiating different forms of rotator cuff disease than a simple static measure of relative glenohumeral position. PMID:27434235

  4. 76 FR 35016 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comments Requested: Investigator...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-15

    ... Collection; Comments Requested: Investigator Integrity Questionnaire ACTION: 30-Day Notice and request for... Form/Collection: Investigator Integrity Questionnaire. (3) Agency form number, if any, and the... questionnaire regarding the investigator's degree of professionalism. (5) An estimate of the total number...

  5. Epithermal Neutron Activation Analysis of Some Geological Samples of Different Origin

    SciTech Connect

    Duliu, O. G.; Cristache, C. I.; Oaie, G.; Ricman, C.; Culicov, O. A.; Frontasyeva, M. V.

    2010-01-21

    Instrumental Epithermal Neutron Activation Analysis was used to investigate the distribution of six major elements and 34 trace elements in a set of eight igneous and metamorphic rocks collected from Carpathian and Macin Mountainsas well as unconsolidated sediments collected from anoxic zone of the Black Sea. All experimental data were interpreted within the Upper Continental Core and Mid Ocean Ridge Basalt model system that allowed getting more information concerning samples origin as well as the environmental peculiarities.

  6. Investigating the Mechanisms of Learning from a Constrained Preparation for Future Learning Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siler, Stephanie A.; Klahr, David; Price, Norman

    2013-01-01

    Many studies have shown benefits associated with engaging students in problem-solving activities prior to administering lessons. These problem-solving activities are assumed to activate relevant knowledge and allow students to develop some initial knowledge structures, which support understanding of the lesson. In this paper we report the results…

  7. Generalized investigation of the rotation-activity relation: favoring rotation period instead of Rossby number

    SciTech Connect

    Reiners, A.; Passegger, V. M.; Schüssler, M.

    2014-10-20

    Magnetic activity in Sun-like and low-mass stars causes X-ray coronal emission which is stronger for more rapidly rotating stars. This relation is often interpreted in terms of the Rossby number, i.e., the ratio of rotation period to convective overturn time. We reconsider this interpretation on the basis of the observed X-ray emission and rotation periods of 821 stars with masses below 1.4 M {sub ☉}. A generalized analysis of the relation between X-ray luminosity normalized by bolometric luminosity, L {sub X}/L {sub bol}, and combinations of rotational period, P, and stellar radius, R, shows that the Rossby formulation does not provide the solution with minimal scatter. Instead, we find that the relation L {sub X}/L {sub bol}∝P {sup –2} R {sup –4} optimally describes the non-saturated fraction of the stars. This relation is equivalent to L {sub X}∝P {sup –2}, indicating that the rotation period alone determines the total X-ray emission. Since L {sub X} is directly related to the magnetic flux at the stellar surface, this means that the surface flux is determined solely by the star's rotation and is independent of other stellar parameters. While a formulation in terms of a Rossby number would be consistent with these results if the convective overturn time scales exactly as L{sub bol}{sup −1/2}, our generalized approach emphasizes the need to test a broader range of mechanisms for dynamo action in cool stars.

  8. Diagnostic Application of Absolute Neutron Activation Analysis in Hematology

    SciTech Connect

    Zamboni, C.B.; Oliveira, L.C.; Dalaqua, L. Jr.

    2004-10-03

    The Absolute Neutron Activation Analysis (ANAA) technique was used to determine element concentrations of Cl and Na in blood of healthy group (male and female blood donators), select from Blood Banks at Sao Paulo city, to provide information which can help in diagnosis of patients. This study permitted to perform a discussion about the advantages and limitations of using this nuclear methodology in hematological examinations.

  9. Analyses of Oxyanion Materials by Prompt Gamma Activation Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Firestone, Richard B; Perry, D.L.; English, G.A.; Firestone, R.B.; Leung, K.-N.; Garabedian, G.; Molnar, G.L.; Revay, Zs.

    2008-03-24

    Prompt gamma activation analysis (PGAA) has been used to analyze metal ion oxyanion materials that have multiple applications, including medicine, materials, catalysts, and electronics. The significance for the need for accurate, highly sensitive analyses for the materials is discussed in the context of quality control of end products containing the parent element in each material. Applications of the analytical data for input to models and theoretical calculations related to the electronic and other properties of the materials are discussed.

  10. Obsidian sources characterized by neutron-activation analysis.

    PubMed

    Gordus, A A; Wright, G A; Griffin, J B

    1968-07-26

    Concentrations of elements such as manganese, scandium, lanthanum, rubidium, samarium, barium, and zirconium in obsidian samples from different flows show ranges of 1000 percent or more, whereas the variation in element content in obsidian samples from a single flow appears to be less than 40 percent. Neutron-activation analysis of these elements, as well as of sodium and iron, provides a means of identifying the geologic source of an archeological artifact of obsidian.

  11. Nonlinear analysis of LWR components: areas of investigation/benefits/recommendations

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, S. J.

    1980-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to identify specific topics of investigation into design procedures, design concepts, methods of analysis, testing practices, and standards which are characterized by nonlinear behavior (both geometric and material) and which are considered to offer some economic and/or technical benefits to the LWR industry (excluding piping). In this study these topics were collected, compiled, and subjectively evaluated as to their potential benefit. The topics considered to have the greatest benefit/impact potential are discussed. The topics of investigation were found to fall basically into three areas: component, code interpretation, and load/failure mechanism. The topics are arbitrarily reorganized into six areas of investigation: Fracture, Fatigue, Vibration/Dynamic/Seismic, Plasticity, Component/Computational Considerations, and Code Interpretation.

  12. Analysis Of Usefulness Of Satellite Image Processing Methods For Investigations Of Cultural Heritage Resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osińska-Skotak, Katarzyna; Zapłata, Rafał

    2015-12-01

    The paper presents the analysis of usefulness of WorldView-2 satellite image processing, which enhance information concerning the cultural heritage objects. WorldView-2 images are characterised by the very high spatial resolution and high spectral resolution; that is why they create new possibilities for many applications, including investigations of the cultural heritage. The vicinities of Iłża have been selected as the test site for presented investigations. The presented results of works are the effect of research works, which were performed in the frames of the scientific project "Utilisation of laser scanning and remote sensing in protection, investigations and inventory of the cultural heritage. Development of non-invasive, digital methods of documenting and recognising the architectural and archaeological heritage", as the part of "The National Programme for the Development of Humanities" of the Minister of Science and Higher Education in the period of 2012-2015.

  13. Quantitative end qualitative analysis of the electrical activity of rectus abdominis muscle portions.

    PubMed

    Negrão Filho, R de Faria; Bérzin, F; Souza, G da Cunha

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the electrical behavior pattern of the Rectus abdominis muscle by qualitative and quantitative analysis of the electromyographic signal obtained from its superior, medium and inferior portions during dynamic and static activities. Ten voluntaries (aged X = 17.8 years, SD = 1.6) athletic males were studied without history of muscle skeletal disfunction. For the quantitative analysis the RMS (Root Mean Square) values obtained in the electromyographic signal during the isometric exercises were normalized and expressed in maximum voluntary isometric contraction percentages. For the qualitative analysis of the dynamic activity the electromyographic signal was processed by full-wave rectification, linear envelope and normalization (amplitude and time), so that the resulting curve of the processed signal was submitted to descriptive graphic analysis. The results of the quantitative study show that there is not a statistically significant difference among the portions of the muscle. Qualitative analysis demonstrated two aspects: the presence of a common activation electric pattern in the portions of Rectus abdominis muscle and the absence of significant difference in the inclination angles in the electrical activity curve during the isotonic exercises. PMID:12964259

  14. Algal Biomass Constituent Analysis: Method Uncertainties and Investigation of the Underlying Measuring Chemistries

    SciTech Connect

    Laurens, L. M. L.; Dempster, T. A.; Jones, H. D. T.; Wolfrum, E. J.; Van Wychen, S.; McAllister, J. S. P.; Rencenberger, M.; Parchert, K. J.; Gloe, L. M.

    2012-02-21

    Algal biomass compositional analysis data form the basis of a large number of techno-economic process analysis models that are used to investigate and compare different processes in algal biofuels production. However, the analytical methods used to generate these data are far from standardized. This work investigated the applicability of common methods for rapid chemical analysis of biomass samples with respect to accuracy and precision. This study measured lipids, protein, carbohydrates, ash, and moisture of a single algal biomass sample at 3 institutions by 8 independent researchers over 12 separate workdays. Results show statistically significant differences in the results from a given analytical method among laboratories but not between analysts at individual laboratories, suggesting consistent training is a critical issue for empirical analytical methods. Significantly different results from multiple lipid and protein measurements were found to be due to different measurement chemistries. We identified a set of compositional analysis procedures that are in best agreement with data obtained by more advanced analytical procedures. The methods described here and used for the round robin experiment do not require specialized instrumentation, and with detailed analytical documentation, the differences between laboratories can be markedly reduced.

  15. Genomic analysis and expression investigation of caleosin gene family in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yue; Xie, Jun; Liu, Rui-Dan; Ni, Xue-Feng; Wang, Xue-Hao; Li, Zhi-Xi; Zhang, Meng

    2014-06-13

    Caleosin is a common lipid-droplet surface protein, which has the ability to bind calcium. Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) is considered a model organism in plant researches. Although there are growing researches about caleosin in the past few years, a systemic analysis of caleosins in Arabidopsis is still scarce. In this study, a comprehensive investigation of caleosins in Arabidopsis was performed by bioinformatics methods. Firstly, eight caleosins in Arabidopsis are divided into two types, L-caleosin and H-caleosin, according to their molecular weights, and these two types of caleosin have many differences in characteristics. Secondly, phylogenetic tree result indicates that L-caleosin may evolve from H-caleosin. Thirdly, duplication pattern analysis shows that segmental and tandem duplication are main reasons for Arabidopsis caleosin expansion with the equal part. Fourthly, the expression profiles of caleosins are also investigated in silico in different organs and under various stresses and hormones. In addition, based on promoter analysis, caleosin may be involved in calcium signal transduction and lipid accumulation. Thus, the classification and expression analysis of caleosin genes in Arabidopsis provide facilities to the research of phylogeny and functions in this gene family. PMID:24796675

  16. Genetic analysis of lipolytic activities in Thermus thermophilus HB27.

    PubMed

    Leis, Benedikt; Angelov, Angel; Li, Haijuan; Liebl, Wolfgang

    2014-12-10

    The extremely thermophilic bacterium Thermus thermophilus HB27 displays lipolytic activity for the hydrolysis of triglycerides. In this study we performed a mutational in vivo analysis of esterases and lipases that confer growth on tributyrin. We interrupted 10 ORFs suspected to encode lipolytic enzymes. Two chromosomal loci were identified that resulted in reduced hydrolysis capabilities against tributyrin and various para-nitrophenyl acyl esters. By implementation of a convenient new one-step method which abstains from the use of selectable markers, a mutant strain with multiple scar-less deletions was constructed by sequentially deleting ORFs TT_C1787, TT_C0340, TT_C0341 and TT_C0904. The quadruple deletion mutant of T. thermophilus exhibited significantly lower lipolytic activity (approximately 25% residual activity compared to wild type strain) over a broad range of fatty acyl esters and had lost the ability to grow on agar plates containing tributyrin as the sole carbon source. Furthermore, we were able to determine the impact of each gene disruption on the lipolytic activity profile in this model organism and show that the esterase activity in T. thermophilus HB27 is due to a concerted action of several hydrolases having different substrate preferences and activities. The esterase-less T. thermophilus multi-deletion mutant from this study can be used as a screening and expression host for esterase genes from thermophiles or metagenomes. PMID:25102235

  17. Genetic analysis of lipolytic activities in Thermus thermophilus HB27.

    PubMed

    Leis, Benedikt; Angelov, Angel; Li, Haijuan; Liebl, Wolfgang

    2014-12-10

    The extremely thermophilic bacterium Thermus thermophilus HB27 displays lipolytic activity for the hydrolysis of triglycerides. In this study we performed a mutational in vivo analysis of esterases and lipases that confer growth on tributyrin. We interrupted 10 ORFs suspected to encode lipolytic enzymes. Two chromosomal loci were identified that resulted in reduced hydrolysis capabilities against tributyrin and various para-nitrophenyl acyl esters. By implementation of a convenient new one-step method which abstains from the use of selectable markers, a mutant strain with multiple scar-less deletions was constructed by sequentially deleting ORFs TT_C1787, TT_C0340, TT_C0341 and TT_C0904. The quadruple deletion mutant of T. thermophilus exhibited significantly lower lipolytic activity (approximately 25% residual activity compared to wild type strain) over a broad range of fatty acyl esters and had lost the ability to grow on agar plates containing tributyrin as the sole carbon source. Furthermore, we were able to determine the impact of each gene disruption on the lipolytic activity profile in this model organism and show that the esterase activity in T. thermophilus HB27 is due to a concerted action of several hydrolases having different substrate preferences and activities. The esterase-less T. thermophilus multi-deletion mutant from this study can be used as a screening and expression host for esterase genes from thermophiles or metagenomes.

  18. Transition path theory analysis of c-Src kinase activation.

    PubMed

    Meng, Yilin; Shukla, Diwakar; Pande, Vijay S; Roux, Benoît

    2016-08-16

    Nonreceptor tyrosine kinases of the Src family are large multidomain allosteric proteins that are crucial to cellular signaling pathways. In a previous study, we generated a Markov state model (MSM) to simulate the activation of c-Src catalytic domain, used as a prototypical tyrosine kinase. The long-time kinetics of transition predicted by the MSM was in agreement with experimental observations. In the present study, we apply the framework of transition path theory (TPT) to the previously constructed MSM to characterize the main features of the activation pathway. The analysis indicates that the activating transition, in which the activation loop first opens up followed by an inward rotation of the αC-helix, takes place via a dense set of intermediate microstates distributed within a fairly broad "transition tube" in a multidimensional conformational subspace connecting the two end-point conformations. Multiple microstates with negligible equilibrium probabilities carry a large transition flux associated with the activating transition, which explains why extensive conformational sampling is necessary to accurately determine the kinetics of activation. Our results suggest that the combination of MSM with TPT provides an effective framework to represent conformational transitions in complex biomolecular systems. PMID:27482115

  19. Investigating the Link Between Climate and Leptospirosis in the Caribbean Using Wavelet Analysis.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batchelor, T. W.; Amarakoon, D.; Taylor, M. A.; Stephenson, T.

    2009-05-01

    The Caribbean has shown changes in its climate (temperature and rainfall) as a result of urbanisation, population growth and industrialisation. The climatic changes have implications for the emergence and re- emergence of rodent-borne diseases such as leptospirosis. In this paper wavelet analysis is used to investigate the relationship between the incidence of leptospirosis in the Caribbean and climate variables such as temperature and precipitation. Wavelet analysis takes into account characteristics unique to climate and epidemiological data which other spectral techniques failed to do. The analysis reveals 2-3 year periodic signals in both the wavelet power spectrum and wavelet coherency. There is also a correlation between incidence of leptospirosis and late season Caribbean rainfall.

  20. Automated image analysis for experimental investigations of salt water intrusion in coastal aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, G.; Hamill, G. A.; Ahmed, Ashraf A.

    2015-11-01

    A novel methodology has been developed to quantify important salt water intrusion parameters in a sandbox experiment using image analysis. Existing methods found in the literature are based mainly on visual observations, which are subjective, labour intensive and limit the temporal and spatial resolutions that can be analysed. A robust error analysis was undertaken to determine the optimum methodology to convert image light intensity to concentration. Results showed that defining a relationship on a pixel-wise basis provided the most accurate image to concentration conversion and allowed quantification of the width of the mixing zone between salt water and freshwater. A high image sample rate was used to investigate the transient dynamics of salt water intrusion, which rendered analysis by visual observation unsuitable. This paper presents the methodologies developed to minimise human input, promote autonomy, provide high resolution image to concentration conversion, and allow the quantification of intrusion parameters under transient conditions.