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Sample records for activation analysis an analytical

  1. FASP, an analytic resource appraisal program for petroleum play analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crovelli, R.A.; Balay, R.H.

    1986-01-01

    An analytic probabilistic methodology for resource appraisal of undiscovered oil and gas resources in play analysis is presented in a FORTRAN program termed FASP. This play-analysis methodology is a geostochastic system for petroleum resource appraisal in explored as well as frontier areas. An established geologic model considers both the uncertainty of the presence of the assessed hydrocarbon and its amount if present. The program FASP produces resource estimates of crude oil, nonassociated gas, dissolved gas, and gas for a geologic play in terms of probability distributions. The analytic method is based upon conditional probability theory and many laws of expectation and variance. ?? 1986.

  2. Risk analysis by FMEA as an element of analytical validation.

    PubMed

    van Leeuwen, J F; Nauta, M J; de Kaste, D; Odekerken-Rombouts, Y M C F; Oldenhof, M T; Vredenbregt, M J; Barends, D M

    2009-12-05

    We subjected a Near-Infrared (NIR) analytical procedure used for screening drugs on authenticity to a Failure Mode and Effects Analysis (FMEA), including technical risks as well as risks related to human failure. An FMEA team broke down the NIR analytical method into process steps and identified possible failure modes for each step. Each failure mode was ranked on estimated frequency of occurrence (O), probability that the failure would remain undetected later in the process (D) and severity (S), each on a scale of 1-10. Human errors turned out to be the most common cause of failure modes. Failure risks were calculated by Risk Priority Numbers (RPNs)=O x D x S. Failure modes with the highest RPN scores were subjected to corrective actions and the FMEA was repeated, showing reductions in RPN scores and resulting in improvement indices up to 5.0. We recommend risk analysis as an addition to the usual analytical validation, as the FMEA enabled us to detect previously unidentified risks.

  3. An analytic method for sensitivity analysis of complex systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yueying; Wang, Qiuping Alexandre; Li, Wei; Cai, Xu

    2017-03-01

    Sensitivity analysis is concerned with understanding how the model output depends on uncertainties (variances) in inputs and identifying which inputs are important in contributing to the prediction imprecision. Uncertainty determination in output is the most crucial step in sensitivity analysis. In the present paper, an analytic expression, which can exactly evaluate the uncertainty in output as a function of the output's derivatives and inputs' central moments, is firstly deduced for general multivariate models with given relationship between output and inputs in terms of Taylor series expansion. A γ-order relative uncertainty for output, denoted by Rvγ, is introduced to quantify the contributions of input uncertainty of different orders. On this basis, it is shown that the widely used approximation considering the first order contribution from the variance of input variable can satisfactorily express the output uncertainty only when the input variance is very small or the input-output function is almost linear. Two applications of the analytic formula are performed to the power grid and economic systems where the sensitivities of both actual power output and Economic Order Quantity models are analyzed. The importance of each input variable in response to the model output is quantified by the analytic formula.

  4. An overview on forensic analysis devoted to analytical chemists.

    PubMed

    Castillo-Peinado, L S; Luque de Castro, M D

    2017-05-15

    The present article has as main aim to show analytical chemists interested in forensic analysis the world they will face if decision in favor of being a forensic analytical chemist is adopted. With this purpose, the most outstanding aspects of forensic analysis in dealing with sampling (involving both bodily and no bodily samples), sample preparation, and analytical equipment used in detection, identification and quantitation of key sample components are critically discussed. The role of the great omics in forensic analysis, and the growing role of the youngest of the great omics -metabolomics- are also discussed. The foreseeable role of integrative omics is also outlined.

  5. A Visual Analytics Approach to Structured Data Analysis to Enhance Nonproliferation and Arms Control Verification Activities

    SciTech Connect

    Gillen, David S.

    2014-08-07

    Analysis activities for Nonproliferation and Arms Control verification require the use of many types of data. Tabular structured data, such as Excel spreadsheets and relational databases, have traditionally been used for data mining activities, where specific queries are issued against data to look for matching results. The application of visual analytics tools to structured data enables further exploration of datasets to promote discovery of previously unknown results. This paper discusses the application of a specific visual analytics tool to datasets related to the field of Arms Control and Nonproliferation to promote the use of visual analytics more broadly in this domain. Visual analytics focuses on analytical reasoning facilitated by interactive visual interfaces (Wong and Thomas 2004). It promotes exploratory analysis of data, and complements data mining technologies where known patterns can be mined for. Also with a human in the loop, they can bring in domain knowledge and subject matter expertise. Visual analytics has not widely been applied to this domain. In this paper, we will focus on one type of data: structured data, and show the results of applying a specific visual analytics tool to answer questions in the Arms Control and Nonproliferation domain. We chose to use the T.Rex tool, a visual analytics tool developed at PNNL, which uses a variety of visual exploration patterns to discover relationships in structured datasets, including a facet view, graph view, matrix view, and timeline view. The facet view enables discovery of relationships between categorical information, such as countries and locations. The graph tool visualizes node-link relationship patterns, such as the flow of materials being shipped between parties. The matrix visualization shows highly correlated categories of information. The timeline view shows temporal patterns in data. In this paper, we will use T.Rex with two different datasets to demonstrate how interactive exploration of

  6. An Analysis of Earth Science Data Analytics Use Cases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shie, Chung-Lin; Kempler, Steve

    2014-01-01

    The increase in the number and volume, and sources, of globally available Earth science data measurements and datasets have afforded Earth scientists and applications researchers unprecedented opportunities to study our Earth in ever more sophisticated ways. In fact, the NASA Earth Observing System Data Information System (EOSDIS) archives have doubled from 2007 to 2014, to 9.1 PB (Ramapriyan, 2009; and https:earthdata.nasa.govaboutsystem-- performance). In addition, other US agency, international programs, field experiments, ground stations, and citizen scientists provide a plethora of additional sources for studying Earth. Co--analyzing huge amounts of heterogeneous data to glean out unobvious information is a daunting task. Earth science data analytics (ESDA) is the process of examining large amounts of data of a variety of types to uncover hidden patterns, unknown correlations and other useful information. It can include Data Preparation, Data Reduction, and Data Analysis. Through work associated with the Earth Science Information Partners (ESIP) Federation, a collection of Earth science data analytics use cases have been collected and analyzed for the purpose of extracting the types of Earth science data analytics employed, and requirements for data analytics tools and techniques yet to be implemented, based on use case needs. ESIP generated use case template, ESDA use cases, use case types, and preliminary use case analysis (this is a work in progress) will be presented.

  7. An Analysis of Earth Science Data Analytics Use Cases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shie, C. L.; Kempler, S. J.

    2015-12-01

    The increase in the number and volume, and sources, of globally available Earth science data measurements and datasets have afforded Earth scientists and applications researchers unprecedented opportunities to study our Earth in ever more sophisticated ways. In fact, the NASA Earth Observing System Data Information System (EOSDIS) archives have doubled from 2007 to 2014, to 9.1 PB (Ramapriyan, 2009; and https://earthdata.nasa.gov/about/system-performance). In addition, other US agency, international programs, field experiments, ground stations, and citizen scientists provide a plethora of additional sources for studying Earth. Co-analyzing huge amounts of heterogeneous data to glean out unobvious information is a daunting task. Earth science data analytics (ESDA) is the process of examining large amounts of data of a variety of types to uncover hidden patterns, unknown correlations and other useful information. It can include Data Preparation, Data Reduction, and Data Analysis. Through work associated with the Earth Science Information Partners (ESIP) Federation, a collection of Earth science data analytics use cases have been collected and analyzed for the purpose of extracting the types of Earth science data analytics employed, and requirements for data analytics tools and techniques yet to be implemented, based on use case needs. ESIP generated use case template, ESDA use cases, use case types, and preliminary use case analysis (this is a work in progress) will be presented.

  8. An analytical paradigm for the analysis of national inmigration patterns.

    PubMed

    Weisberg, Y; Eaglstein, A S

    1988-09-01

    This study proposes and demonstrates an analytic paradigm based upon a substantive categorization of a set of inmigration correlates. It exemplifies the notion of categorizing, analyzing according to the categorization, and subsequently discussing the phenomenon in more depth. The paradigm has 2 steps: 1) the variables are categorized according to the cells resulting from the intersection of a preferably small number of nominal dimensions and 2) the data are analyzed, directly anchored in the prior categorization. The data used is Israel's 1983 census macro-data gathered from the Central Bureau of Statistics for the Israeli towns with populations of at least 5000. The authors defined 6 variables as push variables and 4 as pull variables. Results of the regression employing push variables show that 4 variables accounting for 72% of inmigration were found to significantly predict inmigration: 1) unemployment, 2) percentage of Asians-Africans, 3) town size, and 4) religiosity. Within the pull classification, the regression analysis reveals that 2 of the 4 variables explain 31% of the inmigration variance: 1) educational level (26%) and 2) income (5%). The 1st regression analysis on the 2nd dimension shows that the percentage of Asian-African origin and town population size account for 32% of the immigration variance. In the 2nd regression analysis, unemployment explains 48% of the inmigration variance and educational level explains 8%. In the 3rd regression, only home crowding explains a significant amount of the immigration variance (19%). Results of a multiple regression analysis show that unemployment level, percentage of Asian-Africans, population size, and level of religiosity account for 72% of the inmigration variance. Thus, the characteristics of a town inmigrating (push variables) are demographic, economic, and social. However, the attractive features of a town are only economic. Among all economic factors, unemployment is primary. In addition, not only are

  9. Hydraulic characterization of an activated sludge reactor with recycling system by tracer experiment and analytical models.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, F; Viedma, A; Kaiser, A S

    2016-09-15

    Fluid dynamic behaviour plays an important role in wastewater treatment. An efficient treatment requires the inexistence of certain hydraulic problems such as dead zones or short-circuiting flows. Residence time distribution (RTD) analysis is an excellent technique for detecting these inefficiencies. However, many wastewater treatment installations include water or sludge recycling systems, which prevent us from carrying out a conventional tracer pulse experiment to obtain the RTD curve of the installation. This paper develops an RTD analysis of an activated sludge reactor with recycling system. A tracer experiment in the reactor is carried out. Three analytical models, derived from the conventional pulse model, are proposed to obtain the RTD curve of the reactor. An analysis of the results is made, studying which model is the most suitable for each situation. This paper is useful to analyse the hydraulic efficiency of reactors with recycling systems.

  10. fMRI activation patterns in an analytic reasoning task: consistency with EEG source localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bian; Vasanta, Kalyana C.; O'Boyle, Michael; Baker, Mary C.; Nutter, Brian; Mitra, Sunanda

    2010-03-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is used to model brain activation patterns associated with various perceptual and cognitive processes as reflected by the hemodynamic (BOLD) response. While many sensory and motor tasks are associated with relatively simple activation patterns in localized regions, higher-order cognitive tasks may produce activity in many different brain areas involving complex neural circuitry. We applied a recently proposed probabilistic independent component analysis technique (PICA) to determine the true dimensionality of the fMRI data and used EEG localization to identify the common activated patterns (mapped as Brodmann areas) associated with a complex cognitive task like analytic reasoning. Our preliminary study suggests that a hybrid GLM/PICA analysis may reveal additional regions of activation (beyond simple GLM) that are consistent with electroencephalography (EEG) source localization patterns.

  11. Redundancy in neutron activation analysis: A valuable tool in assuring analytical quality

    SciTech Connect

    Greenberg, R.R.

    1996-12-31

    Neutron activation analysis (NAA) has become widely used and is extremely valuable for the certification of standard reference materials (SRMs) at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). This is due to a number of reasons. First, NAA has essentially no significant sources of error in common with the other analytical techniques used at NIST to measure inorganic concentrations. This is important because most certified elemental concentrations are derived from the data determined by two (and occasionally more) independent analytical techniques. Two or more techniques are used for SRM certification because, although each technique has previously been evaluated and shown to be accurate, unexpected problems can arise, especially when analyzing new matrices. Another reason for the use of NAA for SRM certification is the potential of this technique for accuracy. The SRM measurements with estimated accuracies of 1 to 2% (at essentially 95% confidence intervals) are routinely made at NIST using NAA.

  12. Improvement of analytical capabilities of neutron activation analysis laboratory at the Colombian Geological Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parrado, G.; Cañón, Y.; Peña, M.; Sierra, O.; Porras, A.; Alonso, D.; Herrera, D. C.; Orozco, J.

    2016-07-01

    The Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA) laboratory at the Colombian Geological Survey has developed a technique for multi-elemental analysis of soil and plant matrices, based on Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA) using the comparator method. In order to evaluate the analytical capabilities of the technique, the laboratory has been participating in inter-comparison tests organized by Wepal (Wageningen Evaluating Programs for Analytical Laboratories). In this work, the experimental procedure and results for the multi-elemental analysis of four soil and four plant samples during participation in the first round on 2015 of Wepal proficiency test are presented. Only elements with radioactive isotopes with medium and long half-lives have been evaluated, 15 elements for soils (As, Ce, Co, Cr, Cs, Fe, K, La, Na, Rb, Sb, Sc, Th, U and Zn) and 7 elements for plants (Br, Co, Cr, Fe, K, Na and Zn). The performance assessment by Wepal based on Z-score distributions showed that most results obtained |Z-scores| ≤ 3.

  13. An analysis of beam parameters on proton-acoustic waves through an analytic approach.

    PubMed

    Aytac Kipergil, Esra; Erkol, Hakan; Kaya, Serhat; Gulsen, Gultekin; Unlu, Mehmet

    2017-03-02

    It has been reported that acoustic waves are generated when a high energy pulsed proton beam is deposited in a small volume within tissue. One possible application of the proton induced acoustics is to get a real-time feedback for intratreatment adjustments by monitoring such acoustic waves. High spatial resolution in ultrasound imaging may reduce proton range uncertainty. Thus, it is crucial to understand the dependence of the acoustic waves on the proton beam characteristics. In this manuscript, firstly, an analytic solution to the proton induced acoustic wave is presented to reveal the dependence of signal on beam parameters, and then combined with an analytic approximation of the Bragg curve. The influence of the beam energy, pulse duration, and beam diameter variation on the acoustic waveform are investigated. Further analysis is performed regarding the Fourier decomposition of proton-acoustic signals. Our results show that smaller spill time of proton beam upsurges the amplitude of acoustic wave for constant number of protons, and hence beneficial for dose monitoring. The increase in the energy of each individual proton in the beam leads to spatial broadening of the Bragg curve, which also yields acoustic waves of greater amplitude. The pulse duration and the beam width of the proton beam do not affect the central frequency of the acoustic wave, but they change the amplitude of the spectral components.

  14. An analytical derivative procedure for the calculation of vibrational Raman optical activity spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liégeois, Vincent; Ruud, Kenneth; Champagne, Benoît

    2007-11-01

    We present an analytical time-dependent Hartree-Fock algorithm for the calculation of the derivatives of the electric dipole-magnetic dipole polarizability with respect to atomic Cartesian coordinates. Combined with analogous procedures to determine the derivatives of the electric dipole-electric dipole and electric dipole-electric quadrupole polarizabilities, it enables a fully analytical evaluation of the three frequency-dependent vibrational Raman optical activity (VROA) invariants within the harmonic approximation. The procedure employs traditional non-London atomic orbitals, and the gauge-origin dependence of the VROA intensities has, therefore, been assessed for the commonly used aug-cc-pVDZ and rDPS:3-21G basis sets.

  15. Multimedia Analysis plus Visual Analytics = Multimedia Analytics

    SciTech Connect

    Chinchor, Nancy; Thomas, James J.; Wong, Pak C.; Christel, Michael; Ribarsky, Martin W.

    2010-10-01

    Multimedia analysis has focused on images, video, and to some extent audio and has made progress in single channels excluding text. Visual analytics has focused on the user interaction with data during the analytic process plus the fundamental mathematics and has continued to treat text as did its precursor, information visualization. The general problem we address in this tutorial is the combining of multimedia analysis and visual analytics to deal with multimedia information gathered from different sources, with different goals or objectives, and containing all media types and combinations in common usage.

  16. Analytical determination of flavonoids aimed to analysis of natural samples and active packaging applications.

    PubMed

    Castro-López, María del Mar; López-Vilariño, José Manuel; González-Rodríguez, María Victoria

    2014-05-01

    Several HPLC and UHPLC developed methods were compared to analyse the natural antioxidants catechins and quercetin used in active packaging and functional foods. Photodiode array detector coupled with a fluorescence detector and compared with LTQ-Orbitrap-MS was used. UHPLC was investigated as quick alternative without compromising the separation, analysis time shortened up to 6-fold. The feasibility of the four developed methods was compared. Linearity up to 0.9995, low detection limits (between 0.02 and 0.7 for HPLC-PDA, 2 to 7-fold lower for HPLC- LTQ-Orbitrap-MS and from 0.2 to 2mgL(-)(1) for UHPLC-PDA) and good precision parameters (RSD lower than 0.06%) were obtained. All methods were successfully applied to natural samples. LTQ-Orbitrap-MS allowed to identify other analytes of interest too. Good feasibility of the methods was also concluded from the analysis of catechin and quercetin release from new active packaging materials based on polypropylene added with catechins and green tea.

  17. Exploratory Analysis in Learning Analytics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibson, David; de Freitas, Sara

    2016-01-01

    This article summarizes the methods, observations, challenges and implications for exploratory analysis drawn from two learning analytics research projects. The cases include an analysis of a games-based virtual performance assessment and an analysis of data from 52,000 students over a 5-year period at a large Australian university. The complex…

  18. An analytical method for measuring α-amylase activity in starch-containing foods.

    PubMed

    Koyama, Kazuo; Hirao, Takashi; Toriba, Akira; Hayakawa, Kazuichi

    2013-05-01

    The quality of starch-containing foods may be significantly impaired by contamination with very small amounts of α-amylase, which can enzymatically hydrolyze the starch and cause viscosity loss. Thus, for quality control, it is necessary to have an analytical method that can measure low amylase activity. We developed a sensitive analytical method for measuring the activity of α-amylase (from Bacillus subtilis) in starch-containing foods. The method consists of six steps: (1) crude extraction of α-amylase by centrifugation and filtration; (2) α-amylase purification by desalting and anion-exchange chromatography; (3) reaction of the purified amylase with boron-dipyrromethene (BODIPY)-labeled substrate, which releases a fluorescent fragment upon digestion of the substrate, thus avoiding interference from starch derivatives in the sample; (4) stopping the reaction with acetonitrile; (5) reversed-phase solid-phase extraction of the fluorescent substrate to remove contaminating dye and impurities; and (6) separation and measurement of BODIPY fluorescence by HPLC. The proposed method could quantify α-amylase activities as low as 10 mU/mL, which is enough to reduce the viscosity of starch-containing foods.

  19. Analytical modeling of the input admittance of an electric drive for stability analysis purposes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girinon, S.; Baumann, C.; Piquet, H.; Roux, N.

    2009-07-01

    Embedded electric HVDC distribution network are facing difficult issues on quality and stability concerns. In order to help to resolve those problems, this paper proposes to develop an analytical model of an electric drive. This self-contained model includes an inverter, its regulation loops and the PMSM. After comparing the model with its equivalent (abc) full model, the study focuses on frequency analysis. The association with an input filter helps in expressing stability of the whole assembly by means of Routh-Hurtwitz criterion.

  20. Nonlinear rheology of active particle suspensions: insights from an analytical approach.

    PubMed

    Heidenreich, Sebastian; Hess, Siegfried; Klapp, Sabine H L

    2011-01-01

    We consider active suspensions in the isotropic phase subjected to a shear flow. Using a set of extended hydrodynamic equations we derive a variety of analytical expressions for rheological quantities such as shear viscosity and normal stress differences. In agreement to full-blown numerical calculations and experiments we find a shear-thickening or -thinning behavior depending on whether the particles are contractile or extensile. Moreover, our analytical approach predicts that the normal stress differences can change their sign in contrast to passive suspensions.

  1. An analytical approach to grid sensitivity analysis. [of NACA wing sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadrehaghighi, Ideen; Smith, Robert E.; Tiwari, Surendra N.

    1992-01-01

    Sensitivity analysis in Computational Fluid Dynamics with emphasis on grids and surface parameterization is described. An interactive algebraic grid-generation technique is employed to generate C-type grids around NACA four-digit wing sections. An analytical procedure is developed for calculating grid sensitivity with respect to design parameters of a wing section. A comparison of the sensitivity with that obtained using a finite-difference approach is made. Grid sensitivity with respect to grid parameters, such as grid-stretching coefficients, are also investigated. Using the resultant grid sensitivity, aerodynamic sensitivity is obtained using the compressible two-dimensional thin-layer Navier-Stokes equations.

  2. An analytical approach to grid sensitivity analysis for NACA four-digit wing sections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadrehaghighi, I.; Tiwari, S. N.

    1992-01-01

    Sensitivity analysis in computational fluid dynamics with emphasis on grids and surface parameterization is described. An interactive algebraic grid-generation technique is employed to generate C-type grids around NACA four-digit wing sections. An analytical procedure is developed for calculating grid sensitivity with respect to design parameters of a wing section. A comparison of the sensitivity with that obtained using a finite difference approach is made. Grid sensitivity with respect to grid parameters, such as grid-stretching coefficients, are also investigated. Using the resultant grid sensitivity, aerodynamic sensitivity is obtained using the compressible two-dimensional thin-layer Navier-Stokes equations.

  3. Marketing Mix Formulation for Higher Education: An Integrated Analysis Employing Analytic Hierarchy Process, Cluster Analysis and Correspondence Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ho, Hsuan-Fu; Hung, Chia-Chi

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine how a graduate institute at National Chiayi University (NCYU), by using a model that integrates analytic hierarchy process, cluster analysis and correspondence analysis, can develop effective marketing strategies. Design/methodology/approach: This is primarily a quantitative study aimed at…

  4. Publication bias in studies of an applied behavior-analytic intervention: an initial analysis.

    PubMed

    Sham, Elyssa; Smith, Tristram

    2014-01-01

    Publication bias arises when studies with favorable results are more likely to be reported than are studies with null findings. If this bias occurs in studies with single-subject experimental designs(SSEDs) on applied behavior-analytic (ABA) interventions, it could lead to exaggerated estimates of intervention effects. Therefore, we conducted an initial test of bias by comparing effect sizes, measured by percentage of nonoverlapping data (PND), in published SSED studies (n=21) and unpublished dissertations (n=10) on 1 well-established intervention for children with autism, pivotal response treatment (PRT). Although published and unpublished studies had similar methodologies, the mean PND in published studies was 22% higher than in unpublished studies, 95% confidence interval (4%, 38%). Even when unpublished studies are included, PRT appeared to be effective (PNDM=62%). Nevertheless, the disparity between published and unpublished studies suggests a need for further assessment of publication bias in the ABA literature.

  5. Addressing fundamental architectural challenges of an activity-based intelligence and advanced analytics (ABIAA) system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yager, Kevin; Albert, Thomas; Brower, Bernard V.; Pellechia, Matthew F.

    2015-06-01

    The domain of Geospatial Intelligence Analysis is rapidly shifting toward a new paradigm of Activity Based Intelligence (ABI) and information-based Tipping and Cueing. General requirements for an advanced ABIAA system present significant challenges in architectural design, computing resources, data volumes, workflow efficiency, data mining and analysis algorithms, and database structures. These sophisticated ABI software systems must include advanced algorithms that automatically flag activities of interest in less time and within larger data volumes than can be processed by human analysts. In doing this, they must also maintain the geospatial accuracy necessary for cross-correlation of multi-intelligence data sources. Historically, serial architectural workflows have been employed in ABIAA system design for tasking, collection, processing, exploitation, and dissemination. These simpler architectures may produce implementations that solve short term requirements; however, they have serious limitations that preclude them from being used effectively in an automated ABIAA system with multiple data sources. This paper discusses modern ABIAA architectural considerations providing an overview of an advanced ABIAA system and comparisons to legacy systems. It concludes with a recommended strategy and incremental approach to the research, development, and construction of a fully automated ABIAA system.

  6. An apparatus for the determination of volatile analytes by stopped-flow injection analysis using an integrated fiber optic detector.

    PubMed

    Baxter, P J; Růzicka, J; Christian, G D; Olson, D C

    1994-03-01

    A new method for the analysis of volatile analytes using a stopped-flow injection system originating from either a gas or liquid phase has been developed. It uses an integrated fiber optic detector which also serves as a reactor. This system combines the advantages of gas diffusion and stopped-flow, making the overall assay very sensitive. Both gas streams and aqueous solutions containing ammonia were analyzed. The limits of detection are 40 ppb for gas phase analysis and 1.0 ppm for aqueous phase analysis.

  7. An Analytic Approximation to Very High Specific Impulse and Specific Power Interplanetary Space Mission Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Craig Hamilton

    1995-01-01

    A simple, analytic approximation is derived to calculate trip time and performance for propulsion systems of very high specific impulse (50,000 to 200,000 seconds) and very high specific power (10 to 1000 kW/kg) for human interplanetary space missions. The approach assumed field-free space, constant thrust/constant specific power, and near straight line (radial) trajectories between the planets. Closed form, one dimensional equations of motion for two-burn rendezvous and four-burn round trip missions are derived as a function of specific impulse, specific power, and propellant mass ratio. The equations are coupled to an optimizing parameter that maximizes performance and minimizes trip time. Data generated for hypothetical one-way and round trip human missions to Jupiter were found to be within 1% and 6% accuracy of integrated solutions respectively, verifying that for these systems, credible analysis does not require computationally intensive numerical techniques.

  8. Non invasive analysis of miniature paintings: Proposal for an analytical protocol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aceto, Maurizio; Agostino, Angelo; Fenoglio, Gaia; Gulmini, Monica; Bianco, Valentina; Pellizzi, Eleonora

    2012-06-01

    The characterisation of palettes used in manuscript illumination is a hard analytical task, due to value and fragility of the analysed items. Analysis on miniatures must be necessarily non-invasive and fast and requires the use of several techniques since no single technique is able to provide all information needed. In this work a four-step analytical protocol is proposed for non-invasive in situ characterisation of miniature paintings. The protocol allows the identification of coloured materials through the use in sequence of complementary techniques, so as to fully exploit the information given by each instrument. Preliminarily to the instrumental investigations on ancient books and miniatures is the compilation of spectroscopic databases obtained from "standard" samples prepared on parchment, according to recipes described in medieval artistic treatises. The protocol starts with an extensive investigation with UV-visible spectrophotometry in reflectance mode, collecting spectra from all the most significant painted areas in the manuscript; chemometric classification is then performed on the spectra to highlight areas possibly containing the same materials. The second step involves in-depth inspection of miniatures under optical microscopy that guides the interpretation of reflectance spectra. XRF spectrometry is then performed to characterise pigments and metal layers, to verify the presence of overlapping layers, to identify mordants in lakes and to recognise minor components that may yield information concerning provenance; in addition, chemometric classification can be performed on element concentrations to highlight similar areas. Finally, Raman spectroscopy is used to shed light on the uncertain cases, if still present. Such a procedure offers a wealth of information without causing stress to the manuscripts under analysis.

  9. Measuring Gravel Transport in an Active Natural System: An Analytical Framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanfilippo, J. D.; Lancaster, S. T.

    2014-12-01

    In order to measure sediment flux in Porter Creek, a small tributary to the North Fork of the Siuslaw River near Florence Oregon, we have deployed ~600 pieces of tracer gravel embedded with passive integrated transponder (PIT) tags, 8 fixed antennas, and 9 logging pressure transducers spaced along 130 m of channel comprising 3 wood jams and substrates of sand, gravel, cobble, and bedrock. Tracer deployment is uniform along the instrumented reach, analogous to constant-source solute or dye injection, so that sediment flux [L3/T] for the ith grain size class is Qi = niVpiFi/fTi, where ni is count rate, [T-1], Vpi is particle volume, and Fi and fTi are fractional coverage of the ith size class of grains and tracers, respectively. Tracer concentrations, fTi, must be large enough for accurate estimation of ni = 1/TAi where TAi is the mean inter-arrival time of tracers at an antenna, during a period of nearly constant discharge. A square wave or constant sediment injection is undertaken by placing a concentration of tracers dispersed upstream of the study reach, such that it will add to the concentration within the study reach as gravels migrate downstream, replacing the gravels within the antenna network. Preliminary results show dispersion values ranging from ~7 m2/month for 8-16mm size fraction, to ~0.2 m2/month for 32-64mm size fraction, with travel distances of 60 meters for the 8-16mm, 16 meters for the 16-32mm, 8 meters for the 32-64mm, and 4 meters for the >64mm for 1 water year. Since there is a high level of variability in dispersion within the antennae array given the heterogeneity of substrates and wood placed within the system, it is likely that some tracers will need to be added within the regions between antennae after high water events. The tracer concentration within the regions occupied between antennae must remain at such a level as to provide viable statistical relationships between tracer and non-tracer gravels, and percent mobile versus percent

  10. Publication Bias in Studies of an Applied Behavior-Analytic Intervention: An Initial Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sham, Elyssa; Smith, Tristram

    2014-01-01

    Publication bias arises when studies with favorable results are more likely to be reported than are studies with null findings. If this bias occurs in studies with single-subject experimental designs (SSEDs) on applied behavior-analytic (ABA) interventions, it could lead to exaggerated estimates of intervention effects. Therefore, we conducted an…

  11. Instrumental Analysis of Biodiesel Content in Commercial Diesel Blends: An Experiment for Undergraduate Analytical Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feng, Z. Vivian; Buchman, Joseph T.

    2012-01-01

    The potential of replacing petroleum fuels with renewable biofuels has drawn significant public interest. Many states have imposed biodiesel mandates or incentives to use commercial biodiesel blends. We present an inquiry-driven experiment where students are given the tasks to gather samples, develop analytical methods using various instrumental…

  12. Determination and analysis of an analytical potential for ions in excited configurations in plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez Perez, Rafael

    The main objective in this Thesis is to propose an analytical expression, within the context of the Independent Particle Model in a central field, for the effective potential that a bound electron feels when it belongs to an ion which is in an excited configuration. It is also an objective that this potential will be obtained as a correction to the effective potential corresponding to the ion in ground state. The potential proposed not only allows to include the effects that the excited configurations introduce on atomic magnitudes but also allows to broach, in a simple and fast way, how to determine the ionic populations and the optical properties of plasmas. The great advantage of the analytical potentials is that they avoid the iterative procedures, which are characteristic in the self-consistent methods, in the calculations of atomic magnitudes and plasma properties. This fact allow a considerable diminution in calculation time. Moreover, the analytical potential proposed in this Thesis has the advantage with respect other analytical potentials that it does not need to fit its parameters when we consider different excited configurations. This fact implies a considerable diminution in the complexity of the problem and in the calculation time and allows to include more excited configurations to model the ions present in the plasma, which improves the results. With the potential proposed in this Thesis we have studied the influence of the excited configurations on atomic magnitudes. Those results have been checked satisfactorily with others obtained by self-consistent methods and by using analytical potentials. We have also used the potential proposed to determine which excited configurations have more probability of presence in a plasma in Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium.

  13. An analytical model accounting for tip shape evolution during atom probe analysis of heterogeneous materials.

    PubMed

    Rolland, N; Larson, D J; Geiser, B P; Duguay, S; Vurpillot, F; Blavette, D

    2015-12-01

    An analytical model describing the field evaporation dynamics of a tip made of a thin layer deposited on a substrate is presented in this paper. The difference in evaporation field between the materials is taken into account in this approach in which the tip shape is modeled at a mesoscopic scale. It was found that the non-existence of sharp edge on the surface is a sufficient condition to derive the morphological evolution during successive evaporation of the layers. This modeling gives an instantaneous and smooth analytical representation of the surface that shows good agreement with finite difference simulations results, and a specific regime of evaporation was highlighted when the substrate is a low evaporation field phase. In addition, the model makes it possible to calculate theoretically the tip analyzed volume, potentially opening up new horizons for atom probe tomographic reconstruction.

  14. moocRP: Enabling Open Learning Analytics with an Open Source Platform for Data Distribution, Analysis, and Visualization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pardos, Zachary A.; Whyte, Anthony; Kao, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we address issues of transparency, modularity, and privacy with the introduction of an open source, web-based data repository and analysis tool tailored to the Massive Open Online Course community. The tool integrates data request/authorization and distribution workflow features as well as provides a simple analytics module upload…

  15. An analytical solution of the Fokker-Planck equation in the phase-locked loop transient analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Weijian

    1987-01-01

    A probabilistic approach is used to obtain an analytical solution to the Fokker-Planck equation used in the transient analysis of the phase-locked loop phase error process of the first-order phase-locked loop. The solution procedure, which is based on the Girsanov transformation, is described.

  16. Analytic process and dreaming about analysis.

    PubMed

    Sirois, François

    2016-12-01

    Dreams about the analytic session feature a manifest content in which the analytic setting is subject to distortion while the analyst appears undisguised. Such dreams are a consistent yet infrequent occurrence in most analyses. Their specificity consists in never reproducing the material conditions of the analysis as such. This paper puts forward the following hypothesis: dreams about the session relate to some aspects of the analyst's activity. In this sense, such dreams are indicative of the transference neurosis, prefiguring transference resistances to the analytic elaboration of key conflicts. The parts taken by the patient and by the analyst are discussed in terms of their ability to signal a deepening of the analysis.

  17. Focal-plane wavefront sensing for active optics in the VST based on an analytical optical aberration model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holzlöhner, R.; Taubenberger, S.; Rakich, A. P.; Noethe, L.; Schipani, P.; Kuijken, K.

    2016-08-01

    We study a novel focal plane wavefront sensing and active optics control scheme at the VST on Cerro Paranal, an f/5.5 survey telescope with a 1x1 degree field of view and a 2.6m primary mirror. This scheme analyzes the elongation pattern of stellar PSFs across the full science image (256 Mpixels) and compares their second moments with an analytical model based on 5th-order geometrical optics. We consider 11 scalar degrees of freedom in mirror misalignments and deformations (M2 piston, tip/tilt and lateral displacement, detector tip/tilt, plus M1 figure astigmatism and trefoil). Using a numerical optimization method, we extract up to 4000 stars and complete the fitting process in under one minute. We demonstrate successful closed-loop active optics control based on maximum likelihood filtering.

  18. Some Comments on Analytic Traditions in EFA As against CFA: An Analysis of Selected Research Reports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kieffer, Kevin M.

    Factor analysis has historically been used for myriad purposes in the social and behavioral sciences, but an especially important application of this technique has been to evaluate construct validity. Since in the present milieu both exploratory factor analysis (EFA) and confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) are readily available to the researcher,…

  19. Climate Services in the activities of WMO and GMES: an analytical overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kortchev, G.; Batchvarova, E.; Alexandrov, V.; Yotova, A.

    2010-09-01

    In view of the great interest and concern worldwide regarding climate change issues, climate services are in the focus of attention of many international and European organizations. In particular, World Meteorological Organization (WMO) has established and developed the WMO Integrated Global Observing System (WIGOS) as well as has been working to address the need for improved climate information and to provide an effective interface between scientists, service providers and decision-makers. In 2009, WMO organized the 3rd World Climate Conference during which the development of a new Global Framework for Climate Services (GFCS) is proposed and decided to start. On the other hand, Global Monitoring for Environment and Security (GMES) - the European Union' contribution to the Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS), has the purpose to deliver information which corresponds to user needs. The processing and dissemination of this information is carried out within the "GMES service component" which depends on Earth observation data, collected from space, air, water or land measurements. In the proposed paper, the understanding, experience and practice in climate services within WMO and GMES are analysed to find the cross-points which can enable the National Hydrometeorological Services (NHMs) to perform strategic planning in a way to optimize resources in the time of economic difficulties. The present situation in the above aspects is examined on the example of National Institute of Meteorology and Hydrology at the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences (NIMH-BAS) as national HMS of Bulgaria. Operational and research activities carried out at NIMH-BAS are discussed from point of view to suggest future initiatives that will contribute to the respective development of climate services within both WMO-GFCS and GMES activities. Practical steps towards implementation of improved climate services nationally and internationally are defined to serve as basis for development of

  20. Challenges in the analytical method development and validation for an unstable active pharmaceutical ingredient.

    PubMed

    Sajonz, Peter; Wu, Yan; Natishan, Theresa K; McGachy, Neil T; Detora, David

    2006-03-01

    A sensitive high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) impurity profile method for the antibiotic ertapenem is developed and subsequently validated. The method utilizes an Inertsil phenyl column at ambient temperature, gradient elution with aqueous sodium phosphate buffer at pH 8, and acetonitrile as the mobile phase. The linearity, method precision, method ruggedness, limit of quantitation, and limit of detection of the impurity profile HPLC method are found to be satisfactory. The method is determined to be specific, as judged by resolving ertapenem from in-process impurities in crude samples and degradation products that arise from solid state thermal and light stress, acid, base, and oxidative stressed solutions. In addition, evidence is obtained by photodiode array detection studies that no degradate or impurity having a different UV spectrum coeluted with the major component in stressed or unstressed samples. The challenges during the development and validation of the method are discussed. The difficulties of analyzing an unstable active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) are addressed. Several major impurities/degradates of the API have very different UV response factors from the API. These impurities/degradates are synthesized or prepared by controlled degradation and the relative response factors are determined.

  1. Policy-Making Theory as an Analytical Framework in Policy Analysis: Implications for Research Design and Professional Advocacy.

    PubMed

    Sheldon, Michael R

    2016-01-01

    Policy studies are a recent addition to the American Physical Therapy Association's Research Agenda and are critical to our understanding of various federal, state, local, and organizational policies on the provision of physical therapist services across the continuum of care. Policy analyses that help to advance the profession's various policy agendas will require relevant theoretical frameworks to be credible. The purpose of this perspective article is to: (1) demonstrate the use of a policy-making theory as an analytical framework in a policy analysis and (2) discuss how sound policy analysis can assist physical therapists in becoming more effective change agents, policy advocates, and partners with other relevant stakeholder groups. An exploratory study of state agency policy responses to address work-related musculoskeletal disorders is provided as a contemporary example to illustrate key points and to demonstrate the importance of selecting a relevant analytical framework based on the context of the policy issue under investigation.

  2. An overview of city analytics

    PubMed Central

    Higham, Desmond J.; Batty, Michael; Bettencourt, Luís M. A.; Greetham, Danica Vukadinović; Grindrod, Peter

    2017-01-01

    We introduce the 14 articles in the Royal Society Open Science themed issue on City Analytics. To provide a high-level, strategic, overview, we summarize the topics addressed and the analytical tools deployed. We then give a more detailed account of the individual contributions. Our overall aims are (i) to highlight exciting advances in this emerging, interdisciplinary field, (ii) to encourage further activity and (iii) to emphasize the variety of new, public-domain, datasets that are available to researchers. PMID:28386454

  3. Creating and Sustaining Professional Learning Partnerships: Activity Theory as an Analytic Tool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bloomfield, Dianne; Nguyen, Hoa Thi Mai

    2015-01-01

    Significant attention has been paid to the forms and practices of effective school-university partnerships in recent times as they are commonly seen as a key element to improve the quality of teacher education programs and thus graduate teachers. However, analysis of the effectiveness of such partnerships has not been so evident. This article…

  4. An Analytical System Designed to Measure Multiple Malodorous Compounds Related to Kraft Mill Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulik, J. D.; And Others

    Reported upon in this research study is the development of two automated chromatographs equipped with flame photometric detectors for the qualitative and quantitative analysis of both low- and high-molecular weight sulfur compounds in kraft mill effluents. In addition the study sought to determine the relationship between total gaseous sulfur and…

  5. Recursive organizer (ROR): an analytic framework for sequence-based association analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lue Ping; Huang, Xin

    2013-07-01

    The advent of next-generation sequencing technologies affords the ability to sequence thousands of subjects cost-effectively, and is revolutionizing the landscape of genetic research. With the evolving genotyping/sequencing technologies, it is not unrealistic to expect that we will soon obtain a pair of diploidic fully phased genome sequences from each subject in the near future. Here, in light of this potential, we propose an analytic framework called, recursive organizer (ROR), which recursively groups sequence variants based upon sequence similarities and their empirical disease associations, into fewer and potentially more interpretable super sequence variants (SSV). As an illustration, we applied ROR to assess an association between HLA-DRB1 and type 1 diabetes (T1D), discovering SSVs of HLA-DRB1 with sequence data from the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium. Specifically, ROR reduces 36 observed unique HLA-DRB1 sequences into 8 SSVs that empirically associate with T1D, a fourfold reduction of sequence complexity. Using HLA-DRB1 data from Type 1 Diabetes Genetics Consortium as cases and data from Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center as controls, we are able to validate associations of these SSVs with T1D. Further, SSVs consist of nine nucleotides, and each associates with its corresponding amino acids. Detailed examination of these selected amino acids reveals their potential functional roles in protein structures and possible implication to the mechanism of T1D.

  6. GeneAnalytics: An Integrative Gene Set Analysis Tool for Next Generation Sequencing, RNAseq and Microarray Data

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Ari Fuchs, Shani; Lieder, Iris; Mazor, Yaron; Buzhor, Ella; Kaplan, Sergey; Bogoch, Yoel; Plaschkes, Inbar; Shitrit, Alina; Rappaport, Noa; Kohn, Asher; Edgar, Ron; Shenhav, Liraz; Safran, Marilyn; Lancet, Doron; Guan-Golan, Yaron; Warshawsky, David; Shtrichman, Ronit

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Postgenomics data are produced in large volumes by life sciences and clinical applications of novel omics diagnostics and therapeutics for precision medicine. To move from “data-to-knowledge-to-innovation,” a crucial missing step in the current era is, however, our limited understanding of biological and clinical contexts associated with data. Prominent among the emerging remedies to this challenge are the gene set enrichment tools. This study reports on GeneAnalytics™ (geneanalytics.genecards.org), a comprehensive and easy-to-apply gene set analysis tool for rapid contextualization of expression patterns and functional signatures embedded in the postgenomics Big Data domains, such as Next Generation Sequencing (NGS), RNAseq, and microarray experiments. GeneAnalytics' differentiating features include in-depth evidence-based scoring algorithms, an intuitive user interface and proprietary unified data. GeneAnalytics employs the LifeMap Science's GeneCards suite, including the GeneCards®—the human gene database; the MalaCards—the human diseases database; and the PathCards—the biological pathways database. Expression-based analysis in GeneAnalytics relies on the LifeMap Discovery®—the embryonic development and stem cells database, which includes manually curated expression data for normal and diseased tissues, enabling advanced matching algorithm for gene–tissue association. This assists in evaluating differentiation protocols and discovering biomarkers for tissues and cells. Results are directly linked to gene, disease, or cell “cards” in the GeneCards suite. Future developments aim to enhance the GeneAnalytics algorithm as well as visualizations, employing varied graphical display items. Such attributes make GeneAnalytics a broadly applicable postgenomics data analyses and interpretation tool for translation of data to knowledge-based innovation in various Big Data fields such as precision medicine, ecogenomics, nutrigenomics

  7. An analytical quality by design (aQbD) approach for a L-asparaginase activity method.

    PubMed

    Yao, Han; Vancoillie, Jochem; D'Hondt, Matthias; Wynendaele, Evelien; Bracke, Nathalie; De Spiegeleer, Bart

    2016-01-05

    L-asparaginase is an effective anti-tumor agent for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. This work presents the development of an activity determination of L-ASNase preparations for pharmaceutical quality control purposes, in accordance with analytical Quality by Design principles. Critical method attributes, the absorbance at 450 nm (A450) of the Nessler product as well as its variability, were evaluated as a function of critical method variables, by using experimental designs. The design space of the enzyme activity assay was defined (Nessler method: C(KI)/C(HgI2) of 1.90-1.95, C(NaOH)/C(HgI2) of 17.0-18.0, C(HgI2final) of 20-40 mM and time of 10-40 min; enzyme activity conditions: temperature range of 36.6-37.4 °C, pH range of the KH2PO4 buffer from 7.1 to 7.7, KH2PO4 buffer concentration: 0.18-0.22 M and L-Asn concentration of 18-22 mM), leading to a final enzyme activity assay method. A control strategy was ultimately implemented using system suitability tests.

  8. An Integrated Geovisual Analytics Framework for Analysis of Energy Consumption Data and Renewable Energy Potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Omitaomu, Olufemi A; Kramer, Ian S; Kodysh, Jeffrey B; Bhaduri, Budhendra L; Steed, Chad A; Karthik, Rajasekar; Nugent, Philip J; Myers, Aaron T

    2012-01-01

    We present an integrated geovisual analytics framework for utility consumers to interactively analyze and benchmark their energy consumption. The framework uses energy and property data already available with the utility companies and county governments respectively. The motivation for the developed framework is the need for citizens to go beyond the conventional utility bills in understanding the patterns in their energy consumption. There is also a need for citizens to go beyond one-time improvements that are often not monitored and measured over time. Some of the features of the framework include the ability for citizens to visualize their historical energy consumption data along with weather data in their location. The quantity of historical energy data available is significantly more than what is available from utility bills. An overlay of the weather data provides users with a visual correlation between weather patterns and their energy consumption patterns. Another feature of the framework is the ability for citizens to compare their consumption on an aggregated basis to that of their peers other citizens living in houses of similar size and age and within the same or different geographical boundaries, such as subdivision, zip code, or county. The users could also compare their consumption to others based on the size of their family and other attributes. This feature could help citizens determine if they are among the best in class . The framework can also be used by the utility companies to better understand their customers and to plan their services. To make the framework easily accessible, it is developed to be compatible with mobile consumer electronics devices.

  9. An Overview of Learning Analytics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clow, Doug

    2013-01-01

    Learning analytics, the analysis and representation of data about learners in order to improve learning, is a new lens through which teachers can understand education. It is rooted in the dramatic increase in the quantity of data about learners and linked to management approaches that focus on quantitative metrics, which are sometimes antithetical…

  10. An innovative dosimetric model for formulating a semi-analytical solution for the activity-volume relationship in prostate implants

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Plato C.; Parks, Eric K.; Moran, Brian J

    2003-12-31

    An innovative (and yet simple) dosimetric model is proposed that provides a semi-analytical solution to the total activity-volume relationship in ultrasound-guided transperineal prostate implant. This dosimetric model is based on 4 simple assumptions. First, the prostate target volume is approximated as a sphere. Second, the urethra is presumed to transverse through the center of the prostate target volume. Third, peripheral loading is applied as the seed-loading technique. Fourth, as the major innovation of the proposed model, the radial dose function of the Iodine-125 {sup 125}I seed is forced to fit a simple power function of the distance r. Pursuant to the third assumption, the peripherally-loaded seeds also define a spherical volume defined as the loading volume w. Also pursuant to the fourth assumption, the radial dose function is expressed as 1.139*r{sup -0.474} for r = 1.5 to 2.5 cm. Thereafter, a simple analytical power-law equation, A = 1.630* w{sup 0.825}, for the relationship between the total activity A in mCi and the loading volume w in cc is derived for {sup 125}I monotherapy. Isodose plans for loading volumes corresponding to r = 1.5, 1.8, 2.2, and 2.5 cm were performed. The maximal isodose coverage volume {sub max}V100 was calculated for each case and was found to be on the average 65% larger than the loading volume w. Matching prostate target volume V to the loading volume w therefore yields a generous implant (with a margin of approximately 3.3 mm). Conversely, matching the prostate target volume V to the {sub max}V100 yields a tight implant (with 0.0 mm or no margin). Matching the prostate target volume V to a midpoint between the loading volume w and {sub max}V100 yields a moderate implant (with approximately 1- to 2-mm margin). Three individual equations are derived for each type of implants: A = 1.630* V{sup 0.825}, A = 1.288* V{sup 0.825}, or A = 1.078 V{sup 0.825} for generous, tight, or moderate implants, respectively. Patient data at the

  11. Concept mapping and network analysis: an analytic approach to measure ties among constructs.

    PubMed

    Goldman, Alyssa W; Kane, Mary

    2014-12-01

    Group concept mapping is a mixed-methods approach that helps a group visually represent its ideas on a topic of interest through a series of related maps. The maps and additional graphics are useful for planning, evaluation and theory development. Group concept maps are typically described, interpreted and utilized through points, clusters and distances, and the implications of these features in understanding how constructs relate to one another. This paper focuses on the application of network analysis to group concept mapping to quantify the strength and directionality of relationships among clusters. The authors outline the steps of this analysis, and illustrate its practical use through an organizational strategic planning example. Additional benefits of this analysis to evaluation projects are also discussed, supporting the overall utility of this supplemental technique to the standard concept mapping methodology.

  12. An analytical and experimental stress analysis of a practical mode II fracture-test specimen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chisholm, D. B.; Jones, D. L.

    1975-01-01

    A boundary collocation method has been employed to determine the Mode II stress intensity factors for a pair of through-the-thickness edge cracks in a finite isotropic plate. An elastostatic analysis has been carried out in terms of the complete Williams stress function employing both even and odd components. The results of the numerical analysis were verified by a two-step procedure whereby the symmetric and antisymmetric portions of the solution were independently compared with existing solutions. The complete solution was verified by comparison with a photoelastic analysis. A compact shear specimen (CSS) of Hysol epoxy resin was loaded in a photoelastic experiment designed to study the isochromatic fringe patterns resulting from the Mode II crack tip stress distribution. The experiment verified that a pure Mode II stress distribution existed in the neighborhood of the crack tips and confirmed the accuracy of the boundary collocation solution for the Mode II stress intensity factors.

  13. An Analytical Model for the Performance Analysis of Concurrent Transmission in IEEE 802.15.4

    PubMed Central

    Gezer, Cengiz; Zanella, Alberto; Verdone, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Interference is a serious cause of performance degradation for IEEE802.15.4 devices. The effect of concurrent transmissions in IEEE 802.15.4 has been generally investigated by means of simulation or experimental activities. In this paper, a mathematical framework for the derivation of chip, symbol and packet error probability of a typical IEEE 802.15.4 receiver in the presence of interference is proposed. Both non-coherent and coherent demodulation schemes are considered by our model under the assumption of the absence of thermal noise. Simulation results are also added to assess the validity of the mathematical framework when the effect of thermal noise cannot be neglected. Numerical results show that the proposed analysis is in agreement with the measurement results on the literature under realistic working conditions. PMID:24658624

  14. An analytical model for the performance analysis of concurrent transmission in IEEE 802.15.4.

    PubMed

    Gezer, Cengiz; Zanella, Alberto; Verdone, Roberto

    2014-03-20

    Interference is a serious cause of performance degradation for IEEE802.15.4 devices. The effect of concurrent transmissions in IEEE 802.15.4 has been generally investigated by means of simulation or experimental activities. In this paper, a mathematical framework for the derivation of chip, symbol and packet error probability of a typical IEEE 802.15.4 receiver in the presence of interference is proposed. Both non-coherent and coherent demodulation schemes are considered by our model under the assumption of the absence of thermal noise. Simulation results are also added to assess the validity of the mathematical framework when the effect of thermal noise cannot be neglected. Numerical results show that the proposed analysis is in agreement with the measurement results on the literature under realistic working conditions.

  15. Validation of an Active Gear, Flexible Aircraft Take-off and Landing analysis (AGFATL)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgehee, J. R.

    1984-01-01

    The results of an analytical investigation using a computer program for active gear, flexible aircraft take off and landing analysis (AGFATL) are compared with experimental data from shaker tests, drop tests, and simulated landing tests to validate the AGFATL computer program. Comparison of experimental and analytical responses for both passive and active gears indicates good agreement for shaker tests and drop tests. For the simulated landing tests, the passive and active gears were influenced by large strut binding friction forces. The inclusion of these undefined forces in the analytical simulations was difficult, and consequently only fair to good agreement was obtained. An assessment of the results from the investigation indicates that the AGFATL computer program is a valid tool for the study and initial design of series hydraulic active control landing gear systems.

  16. Development of an analytical method for the simultaneous analysis of MCPD esters and glycidyl esters in oil-based foodstuffs.

    PubMed

    Ermacora, Alessia; Hrnčiřík, Karel

    2014-01-01

    Substantial progress has been recently made in the development and optimisation of analytical methods for the quantification of 2-MCPD, 3-MCPD and glycidyl esters in oils and fats, and there are a few methods currently available that allow a reliable quantification of these contaminants in bulk oils and fats. On the other hand, no standard method for the analysis of foodstuffs has yet been established. The aim of this study was the development and validation of a new method for the simultaneous quantification of 2-MCPD, 3-MCPD and glycidyl esters in oil-based food products. The developed protocol includes a first step of liquid-liquid extraction and purification of the lipophilic substances of the sample, followed by the application of a previously developed procedure based on acid transesterification, for the indirect quantification of these contaminants in oils and fats. The method validation was carried out on food products (fat-based spreads, creams, margarine, mayonnaise) manufactured in-house, in order to control the manufacturing process and account for any food matrix-analyte interactions (the sample spiking was carried out on the single components used for the formulations rather than the final products). The method showed good accuracy (the recoveries ranged from 97% to 106% for bound 3-MCPD and 2-MCPD and from 88% to 115% for bound glycidol) and sensitivity (the LOD was 0.04 and 0.05 mg kg(-1) for bound MCPD and glycidol, respectively). Repeatability and reproducibility were satisfactory (RSD below 2% and 5%, respectively) for all analytes. The levels of salts and surface-active compounds in the formulation were found to have no impact on the accuracy and the other parameters of the method.

  17. Using instrumental neutron activation analysis for geochemical analyses of terrestrial impact structures: current analytical procedures at the university of vienna geochemistry activation analysis laboratory.

    PubMed

    Mader, Dieter; Koeberl, Christian

    2009-12-01

    The Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis Gamma Spectroscopy Laboratory at the Department of Lithospheric Research, University of Vienna, has been upgraded in the year 2006. This paper describes the sample preparation, new instrumentation and data evaluation for hundreds of rock samples of two terrestrial impact structures. The measurement and data evaluation are done by using Genie 2000 and a custom-made batch software for the used analysis sequences.

  18. Putting an Ethical Lens on Learning Analytics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    West, Deborah; Huijser, Henk; Heath, David

    2016-01-01

    As learning analytics activity has increased, a variety of ethical implications and considerations have emerged, though a significant research gap remains in explicitly investigating the views of key stakeholders, such as academic staff. This paper draws on ethics-related findings from an Australian study featuring two surveys, one of…

  19. Venous hemodynamics in neurological disorders: an analytical review with hydrodynamic analysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Venous abnormalities contribute to the pathophysiology of several neurological conditions. This paper reviews the literature regarding venous abnormalities in multiple sclerosis (MS), leukoaraiosis, and normal-pressure hydrocephalus (NPH). The review is supplemented with hydrodynamic analysis to assess the effects on cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) dynamics and cerebral blood flow (CBF) of venous hypertension in general, and chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency (CCSVI) in particular. CCSVI-like venous anomalies seem unlikely to account for reduced CBF in patients with MS, thus other mechanisms must be at work, which increase the hydraulic resistance of the cerebral vascular bed in MS. Similarly, hydrodynamic changes appear to be responsible for reduced CBF in leukoaraiosis. The hydrodynamic properties of the periventricular veins make these vessels particularly vulnerable to ischemia and plaque formation. Venous hypertension in the dural sinuses can alter intracranial compliance. Consequently, venous hypertension may change the CSF dynamics, affecting the intracranial windkessel mechanism. MS and NPH appear to share some similar characteristics, with both conditions exhibiting increased CSF pulsatility in the aqueduct of Sylvius. CCSVI appears to be a real phenomenon associated with MS, which causes venous hypertension in the dural sinuses. However, the role of CCSVI in the pathophysiology of MS remains unclear. PMID:23724917

  20. Proteomic analysis of synovial fluid as an analytical tool to detect candidate biomarkers for knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Liao, Weixiong; Li, Zhongli; Zhang, Hao; Li, Ji; Wang, Ketao; Yang, Yimeng

    2015-01-01

    We conducted research to detect the proteomic profiles in synovial fluid (SF) from knee osteoarthritis (OA) patients to better understand the pathogenesis and aetiology of OA. Our long-term goal is to identify reliable candidate biomarkers for OA in SF. The SF proteins obtained from 10 knee OA patients and 10 non-OA patients (9 of whom were patients with a meniscus injury in the knee; 1 had a discoid meniscus in the knee, and all exhibited intact articular cartilage) were separated by two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE). The repeatability of the obtained protein spots regarding their intensity was tested via triplicate 2-DE of selected samples. The observed protein expression patterns were subjected to statistical analysis, and differentially expressed protein spots were identified via matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation-time of flight/time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF MS). Our analyses showed low intrasample variability and clear intersample variation. Among the protein spots observed on the gels, there were 29 significant differences, of which 22 corresponded to upregulation and 7 to downregulation in the OA group. One of the upregulated protein spots was confirmed to be haptoglobin by mass spectrometry, and the levels of haptoglobin in SF are positively correlated with the severity of OA (r = 0.89, P < 0.001). This study showed that 2-DE could be used under standard conditions to screen SF samples and identify a small subset of proteins in SF that are potential markers associated with OA. Spots of interest identified by mass spectrometry, such as haptoglobin, may be associated with OA severity.

  1. Performance analysis for wireless networks: an analytical approach by multifarious Sym Teredo.

    PubMed

    Punithavathani, D Shalini; Radley, Sheryl

    2014-01-01

    IPv4-IPv6 transition rolls out numerous challenges to the world of Internet as the Internet is drifting from IPv4 to IPv6. IETF recommends few transition techniques which includes dual stack and translation and tunneling. By means of tunneling the IPv6 packets over IPv4 UDP, Teredo maintains IPv4/IPv6 dual stack node in isolated IPv4 networks behindhand network address translation (NAT). However, the proposed tunneling protocol works with the symmetric and asymmetric NATs. In order to make a Teredo support several symmetric NATs along with several asymmetric NATs, we propose multifarious Sym Teredo (MTS), which is an extension of Teredo with a capability of navigating through several symmetric NATs. The work preserves the Teredo architecture and also offers a backward compatibility with the original Teredo protocol.

  2. Performance Analysis for Wireless Networks: An Analytical Approach by Multifarious Sym Teredo

    PubMed Central

    Punithavathani, D. Shalini; Radley, Sheryl

    2014-01-01

    IPv4-IPv6 transition rolls out numerous challenges to the world of Internet as the Internet is drifting from IPv4 to IPv6. IETF recommends few transition techniques which includes dual stack and translation and tunneling. By means of tunneling the IPv6 packets over IPv4 UDP, Teredo maintains IPv4/IPv6 dual stack node in isolated IPv4 networks behindhand network address translation (NAT). However, the proposed tunneling protocol works with the symmetric and asymmetric NATs. In order to make a Teredo support several symmetric NATs along with several asymmetric NATs, we propose multifarious Sym Teredo (MTS), which is an extension of Teredo with a capability of navigating through several symmetric NATs. The work preserves the Teredo architecture and also offers a backward compatibility with the original Teredo protocol. PMID:25506611

  3. Photography by Cameras Integrated in Smartphones as a Tool for Analytical Chemistry Represented by an Butyrylcholinesterase Activity Assay.

    PubMed

    Pohanka, Miroslav

    2015-06-11

    Smartphones are popular devices frequently equipped with sensitive sensors and great computational ability. Despite the widespread availability of smartphones, practical uses in analytical chemistry are limited, though some papers have proposed promising applications. In the present paper, a smartphone is used as a tool for the determination of cholinesterasemia i.e., the determination of a biochemical marker butyrylcholinesterase (BChE). The work should demonstrate suitability of a smartphone-integrated camera for analytical purposes. Paper strips soaked with indoxylacetate were used for the determination of BChE activity, while the standard Ellman's assay was used as a reference measurement. In the smartphone-based assay, BChE converted indoxylacetate to indigo blue and coloration was photographed using the phone's integrated camera. A RGB color model was analyzed and color values for the individual color channels were determined. The assay was verified using plasma samples and samples containing pure BChE, and validated using Ellmans's assay. The smartphone assay was proved to be reliable and applicable for routine diagnoses where BChE serves as a marker (liver function tests; some poisonings, etc.). It can be concluded that the assay is expected to be of practical applicability because of the results' relevance.

  4. Photography by Cameras Integrated in Smartphones as a Tool for Analytical Chemistry Represented by an Butyrylcholinesterase Activity Assay

    PubMed Central

    Pohanka, Miroslav

    2015-01-01

    Smartphones are popular devices frequently equipped with sensitive sensors and great computational ability. Despite the widespread availability of smartphones, practical uses in analytical chemistry are limited, though some papers have proposed promising applications. In the present paper, a smartphone is used as a tool for the determination of cholinesterasemia i.e., the determination of a biochemical marker butyrylcholinesterase (BChE). The work should demonstrate suitability of a smartphone-integrated camera for analytical purposes. Paper strips soaked with indoxylacetate were used for the determination of BChE activity, while the standard Ellman’s assay was used as a reference measurement. In the smartphone-based assay, BChE converted indoxylacetate to indigo blue and coloration was photographed using the phone’s integrated camera. A RGB color model was analyzed and color values for the individual color channels were determined. The assay was verified using plasma samples and samples containing pure BChE, and validated using Ellmans’s assay. The smartphone assay was proved to be reliable and applicable for routine diagnoses where BChE serves as a marker (liver function tests; some poisonings, etc.). It can be concluded that the assay is expected to be of practical applicability because of the results’ relevance. PMID:26110404

  5. Applying an Activity System to Online Collaborative Group Work Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choi, Hyungshin; Kang, Myunghee

    2010-01-01

    This study determines whether an activity system provides a systematic framework to analyse collaborative group work. Using an activity system as a unit of analysis, the research examined learner behaviours, conflicting factors and facilitating factors while students engaged in collaborative work via asynchronous computer-mediated communication.…

  6. Analysis of System-Wide Investment in the National Airspace System: A Portfolio Analytical Framework and an Example

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhadra, Dipasis; Morser, Frederick R.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, the authors review the FAA s current program investments and lay out a preliminary analytical framework to undertake projects that may address some of the noted deficiencies. By drawing upon the well developed theories from corporate finance, an analytical framework is offered that can be used for choosing FAA s investments taking into account risk, expected returns and inherent dependencies across NAS programs. The framework can be expanded into taking multiple assets and realistic values for parameters in drawing an efficient risk-return frontier for the entire FAA investment programs.

  7. Spatio-temporal analysis of industrial composition with IVIID: an interactive visual analytics interface for industrial diversity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mack, Elizabeth A.; Zhang, Yifan; Rey, Sergio; Maciejewski, Ross

    2014-04-01

    The industrial composition of places has received considerable attention because of the widespread belief that industrial diversity buffers regional economies from economic shocks. Subsequently, a variety of toolkits and indices have been developed with the goal of better capturing the compositional dynamics of regions. Although useful, a key drawback of these indices is their static nature, which limits the utility of these indices in a space-time context. This paper provides an overview of and applications of an interface called interactive visualization tool for indices of industrial diversity, which is a visual analytics tool developed specifically for the analysis and visualization of local measures of industrial composition for areal data. This overview will include a discussion of its key features, as well as a demonstration of the utility of the interface in exploring questions surrounding diversity and the dynamic nature of composition through space and time. A focus of this demonstration is to highlight how the interactivity and query functionality of this interface overcome several of the obstacles to understanding composition through space and time that prior toolkits and comparative static approaches have been unable to address.

  8. Project-Based Language Learning: An Activity Theory Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibbes, Marina; Carson, Lorna

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on an investigation of project-based language learning (PBLL) in a university language programme. Learner reflections of project work were analysed through Activity Theory, where tool-mediated activity is understood as the central unit of analysis for human interaction. Data were categorised according to the components of human…

  9. Numerical analysis of a photonic crystal fiber based on a surface plasmon resonance sensor with an annular analyte channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chao; Yang, Lin; Su, Weiquan; Wang, Famei; Sun, Tao; Liu, Qiang; Mu, Haiwei; Chu, Paul K.

    2017-01-01

    A sensing structure is designed with a photonic crystal fiber based on a surface plasmon resonance (PCF-SPR) sensor using gold as the sensitive material. The benefit of the structure is to reduce the difficulty in gold deposition, because the Au film is deposited on the outside of the fiber core instead of on the holes filled with analyte inside the core. The properties of the sensor are numerically calculated by the finite element method. The results show that the thickness of the gold film, refractive index of the analyte, and radius of the central hole affect the sensing performance of the PCF-SPR. By optimizing the model, an extra graphene layer with the thickness of 20 nm is deposited on the gold film in the model. The maximum spectral sensitivity can be as high as 7500 nm/RIU for the sensor with the gold-graphene composite film as the sensitive material.

  10. Visual Analytics for Power Grid Contingency Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Pak C.; Huang, Zhenyu; Chen, Yousu; Mackey, Patrick S.; Jin, Shuangshuang

    2014-01-20

    Contingency analysis is the process of employing different measures to model scenarios, analyze them, and then derive the best response to remove the threats. This application paper focuses on a class of contingency analysis problems found in the power grid management system. A power grid is a geographically distributed interconnected transmission network that transmits and delivers electricity from generators to end users. The power grid contingency analysis problem is increasingly important because of both the growing size of the underlying raw data that need to be analyzed and the urgency to deliver working solutions in an aggressive timeframe. Failure to do so may bring significant financial, economic, and security impacts to all parties involved and the society at large. The paper presents a scalable visual analytics pipeline that transforms about 100 million contingency scenarios to a manageable size and form for grid operators to examine different scenarios and come up with preventive or mitigation strategies to address the problems in a predictive and timely manner. Great attention is given to the computational scalability, information scalability, visual scalability, and display scalability issues surrounding the data analytics pipeline. Most of the large-scale computation requirements of our work are conducted on a Cray XMT multi-threaded parallel computer. The paper demonstrates a number of examples using western North American power grid models and data.

  11. Multivariate optimization of an analytical method for the analysis of dog and cat foods by ICP OES.

    PubMed

    da Costa, Silvânio Silvério Lopes; Pereira, Ana Cristina Lima; Passos, Elisangela Andrade; Alves, José do Patrocínio Hora; Garcia, Carlos Alexandre Borges; Araujo, Rennan Geovanny Oliveira

    2013-04-15

    Experimental design methodology was used to optimize an analytical method for determination of the mineral element composition (Al, Ca, Cd, Cr, Cu, Ba, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, P, S, Sr and Zn) of dog and cat foods. Two-level full factorial design was applied to define the optimal proportions of the reagents used for microwave-assisted sample digestion (2.0 mol L(-1) HNO3 and 6% m/v H2O2). A three-level factorial design for two variables was used to optimize the operational conditions of the inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometer, employed for analysis of the extracts. A radiofrequency power of 1.2 kW and a nebulizer argon flow of 1.0 L min(-1) were selected. The limits of quantification (LOQ) were between 0.03 μg g(-1) (Cr, 267.716 nm) and 87 μg g(-1) (Ca, 373.690 nm). The trueness of the optimized method was evaluated by analysis of five certified reference materials (CRMs): wheat flour (NIST 1567a), bovine liver (NIST 1577), peach leaves (NIST 1547), oyster tissue (NIST 1566b), and fish protein (DORM-3). The recovery values obtained for the CRMs were between 80 ± 4% (Cr) and 117 ± 5% (Cd), with relative standard deviations (RSDs) better than 5%, demonstrating that the proposed method offered good trueness and precision. Ten samples of pet food (five each of cat and dog food) were acquired at supermarkets in Aracaju city (Sergipe State, Brazil). Concentrations in the dog food ranged between 7.1 mg kg(-1) (Ba) and 2.7 g kg(-1) (Ca), while for cat food the values were between 3.7 mg kg(-1) (Ba) and 3.0 g kg(-1) (Ca). The concentrations of Ca, K, Mg, P, Cu, Fe, Mn, and Zn in the food were compared with the guidelines of the United States' Association of American Feed Control Officials (AAFCO) and the Brazilian Ministry of Agriculture, Livestock, and Food Supply (Ministério da Agricultura, Pecuária e Abastecimento-MAPA).

  12. Cortical activation by tactile stimulation to face and anterior neck areas: an fMRI study with three analytic methods.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chou-Ching K; Sun, Yung-Nien; Huang, Chung-I; Yu, Chin-Yin; Ju, Ming-Shaung

    2010-12-01

    The main purpose of this study was to investigate the sensory cortical activation of the anterior neck region and the relationship between the neck and face representation areas. Functional MRI by blood oxygenation level dependent measurements was performed while tactile stimulation was applied to the face or neck area. Nonpainful tactile stimuli were manually delivered by an experimenter at a frequency of ∼1 Hz. Block (epoch) design was adopted with a block duration of 30 s and a whole run duration of 6 min. For each location, two runs were performed. After the image data were preprocessed, both parameteric and nonparametric methods were performed to test the group results. The results showed that (1) unilateral face or neck stimulation could elicit bilateral cortical activation, (2) mainly the face representation and face-hand junction areas, but not the conventional neck representation area, were activated by face or neck stimulation, and (3) the activation areas were larger when right face or neck was stimulated. In conclusion, the sensory cortical representation area of the anterior neck region was mainly at the junction of hand and face representation area and the activated area was larger when the right face or neck was stimulated.

  13. An analytical toolkit for polyploid willow discrimination

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Wei; Hou, Jing; Yin, Tongming; Chen, Yingnan

    2016-01-01

    Polyploid breeding is an important means for creating elite willow cultivars, and therefore provokes an active demand for discriminating the ploidy levels of natural willow stands. In this study, we established an analytical toolkit for polyploid willow identification by combining molecular markers and flow cytometry (FCM). A total of 10 single-copy fully informative SSRs were chosen for marker-aided selection based on a segregation test with a full-sib willow pedigree and a mutability test with a collection of natural willow stands. Aided by these molecular markers, we performed polyploid selection in two tree species and two shrub species of the genus Salix. The ploidy levels of the investigated samples were further examined using a flow cytometer. It was previously shown that results from marker-aided selection were consistent with those from FCM measurements. Based on ploidy level assessment in different willow species, it was found that tree willows were dominantly tetraploid, whereas shrub willows were most frequently diploid. With this analytical toolkit, polyploids can be rapidly screened from a large number of natural stands; thereafter, the exact ploidy levels of the polyploid candidates can be efficiently confirmed by FCM. This analytical toolkit will greatly enhance polyploid breeding programs for willows. PMID:27934953

  14. Analytic solutions of an unclassified artifact /

    SciTech Connect

    Trent, Bruce C.

    2012-03-01

    This report provides the technical detail for analytic solutions for the inner and outer profiles of the unclassified CMM Test Artifact (LANL Part Number 157Y-700373, 5/03/2001) in terms of radius and polar angle. Furthermore, analytic solutions are derived for the legacy Sheffield measurement hardware, also in terms of radius and polar angle, using part coordinates, i.e., relative to the analytic profile solutions obtained. The purpose of this work is to determine the exact solution for the “cosine correction” term inherent to measurement with the Sheffield hardware. The cosine correction is required in order to interpret the actual measurements taken by the hardware in terms of an actual part definition, or “knot-point spline definition,” that typically accompanies a component drawing. Specifically, there are two portions of the problem: first an analytic solution must be obtained for any point on the part, e.g., given the radii and the straight lines that define the part, it is required to find an exact solution for the inner and outer profile for any arbitrary polar angle. Next, the problem of the inspection of this part must be solved, i.e., given an arbitrary sphere (representing the inspection hardware) that comes in contact with the part (inner and outer profiles) at any arbitrary polar angle, it is required to determine the exact location of that intersection. This is trivial for the case of concentric circles. In the present case, however, the spherical portion of the profiles is offset from the defined center of the part, making the analysis nontrivial. Here, a simultaneous solution of the part profiles and the sphere was obtained.

  15. Analytical Chemistry as an Information Science.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-06-01

    AD-AIOS 433 WASHINGTON UNIV SEATTLE LAB OR CHEMOMETRICS /7/ ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY AS AN INFORMATION SCIENCE Ul NAb7/ .JUN 81 B A KO WALSKI NUUUIA 75C...AN INFORMATION SCIENCE by B. R. Kowalski Prepared for Publication in Trends in Analytical Chemistry University of Washington Department of Chemistry...S. TYPE OF REPORT & PERIOD COVERED Technical Report - Interim ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY AS AN INFORMATION SCIENCE , 2/1981 - 6/1981 6. PERFORMING ORG

  16. Analytical study of acoustically perturbed Brillouin active magnetized semiconductor plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Shukla, Arun; Jat, K. L.

    2015-07-31

    An analytical study of acoustically perturbed Brillouin active magnetized semiconductor plasma has been reported. In the present analytical investigation, the lattice displacement, acousto-optical polarization, susceptibility, acousto-optical gain constant arising due to the induced nonlinear current density and acousto-optical process are deduced in an acoustically perturbed Brillouin active magnetized semiconductor plasma using the hydrodynamical model of plasma and coupled mode scheme. The influence of wave number and magnetic field has been explored. The analysis has been applied to centrosymmetric crystal. Numerical estimates are made for n-type InSb crystal duly irradiated by a frequency doubled 10.6 µm CO{sub 2} laser. It is found that lattice displacement, susceptibility and acousto-optical gain increase linearly with incident wave number and applied dc magnetic field, while decrease with scattering angle. The gain also increases with electric amplitude of incident laser beam. Results are found to be well in agreement with available literature.

  17. Phenol Analysis -- Some Analytical Considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starkey, R. J., Jr.

    1971-01-01

    Contamination of potable water supplies with halogenated phenols in concentrations of 2-10 parts per billion (ppb) produces objectionable tastes and odors capable of influencing consumer acceptability. Routine analysis by the distillation/ 4-aminoantipyrine method is limited by lack of sensitivity and subject to interference by aryl amines. This has been overcome by developing a continuous liquid-liquid extraction system to selectively isolate phenols and eliminate major interfering substances. Stable reagents have been formulated to reduce blank color and extend sensitivity. Equipment suitable for analysis of phenols at the 1 ppb level or less in 20 minutes is described.

  18. Derivation and analysis of the analytical velocity and vortex stretching expressions for an O(N log N)-FMM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berdowski, T.; Walther, J.; Ferreira, C.; Meng, F.

    2016-09-01

    In the current paper, a method for deriving the analytical expressions for the velocity and vortex stretching terms as a function of the spherical multipole expansion approximation of the vector potential is presented. These terms are essential in the context of 3D Lagrangian vortex particle methods combined with fast summation techniques. The convergence and computational efficiency of this approach is assessed in the framework of an O(N log N)-type Fast Multipole Method (FMM), by using vorticity particles to simulate a system of coaxial vortex rings for which also the exact results are known. It is found that the current implementation converges rapidly to the exact solution with increasing expansion order and acceptance factor. An investigation into the computational efficiency demonstrated that the O(N log N)-type FMM is already viable for a particle size of only several thousands and that this speedup increases significantly with the number of particles. Finally, it is shown that the implementation of the FMM with the current analytical expressions is at least twice as fast as when opting for using even the simplest implementation of finite differences instead.

  19. An analytical theory of corona discharge plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Uhm, H.S.; Lee, W.M.

    1997-09-01

    In this paper we describe an analytical investigation of corona discharge systems. Electrical charge and the energy transfer mechanism are investigated based on the circuit analysis. Efficient delivery of electrical energy from the external circuit to the reactor chamber is a major issue in design studies. The optimum condition obtained in this paper ensures 100{percent} energy transfer. Second-order coupled differential equations are numerically solved. All the analytical results agree remarkably well with numerical data. The reactor capacitor plays a pivotal role in circuit performance. The voltage profile is dominated by the reactor capacitor. Corona discharge properties in the reactor chamber are also investigated, assuming that a specified voltage profile V(t) is fed through the inner conductor. The analytical description is based on the electron moment equation. Defining the plasma breakdown parameter u=V/R{sub c}p, plasma is generated for a high-voltage pulse satisfying u{gt}u{sub c}, where u{sub c} is the critical breakdown parameter defined by geometrical configuration. Here, u is in units of a million volts per m per atm, and R{sub c} is the outer conductor radius. It is found that the plasma density profile generated inside the reactor chamber depends very sensitively on the system parameters. A small change of a physical parameter can easily lead to a density change in one order of magnitude.

  20. An analytic Pade-motivated QCD coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, H. E.; Cvetic, G.

    2010-08-04

    We consider a modification of the Minimal Analytic (MA) coupling of Shirkov and Solovtsov. This modified MA (mMA) coupling reflects the desired analytic properties of the space-like observables. We show that an approximation by Dirac deltas of its discontinuity function {rho} is equivalent to a Pade(rational) approximation of the mMA coupling that keeps its analytic structure. We propose a modification to mMA that, as preliminary results indicate, could be an improvement in the evaluation of low-energy observables compared with other analytic couplings.

  1. Activity anorexia: An interplay between basic and applied behavior analysis.

    PubMed

    Pierce, W D; Epling, W F; Dews, P B; Estes, W K; Morse, W H; Van Orman, W; Herrnstein, R J

    1994-01-01

    The relationship between basic research with nonhumans and applied behavior analysis is illustrated by our work on activity anorexia. When rats are fed one meal a day and allowed to run on an activity wheel, they run excessively, stop eating, and die of starvation. Convergent evidence, from several different research areas, indicates that the behavior of these animals and humans who self-starve is functionally similar. A biobehavioral theory of activity anorexia is presented that details the cultural contingencies, behavioral processes, and physiology of anorexia. Diagnostic criteria and a three-stage treatment program for activity-based anorexia are outlined. The animal model permits basic research on anorexia that for practical and ethical reasons cannot be conducted with humans. Thus, basic research can have applied importance.

  2. Empire: An Analytical Category for Educational Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coloma, Roland Sintos

    2013-01-01

    In this article Roland Sintos Coloma argues for the relevance of empire as an analytical category in educational research. He points out the silence in mainstream studies of education on the subject of empire, the various interpretive approaches to deploying empire as an analytic, and the importance of indigeneity in research on empire and…

  3. Development of an analytical method for analysis of flubendiamide, des-iodo flubendiamide and study of their residue persistence in tomato and soil.

    PubMed

    Mohapatra, S; Ahuja, A K; Deepa, M; Jagadish, G K; Rashmi, N; Sharma, D

    2011-01-01

    Flubendiamide is a new insecticide that has been found to give excellent control of lepidopterous pests of tomato. This study has been undertaken to develop an improved method for analysis of flubendiamide and its metabolite des-iodo flubendiamide and determine residue retention in tomato and soil. The analytical method developed involved extraction of flubendiamide and its metabolite des-iodo flubendiamide with acetonitrile, liquid-liquid partitioning into hexane-ethyl acetate mixture (6:4, v v⁻¹) and cleanup with activated neutral alumina. Finally the residues were dissolved in gradient high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) grade acetonitrile for analysis by HPLC. The mobile phase, acetonitrile-water at 60:40 (v v⁻¹) proportion and the wavelength of 235 nm gave maximum peak resolution. Using the above method and HPLC parameters described, nearly 100 % recovery of both insecticides were obtained. There was no matrix interference and the limit of quantification (LOQ) of the method was 0.01 mg kg⁻¹. Initial residue deposits of flubendiamide on field-treated tomato from treatments @ 48 and 96 g active ingredient hectare⁻¹ were 0.83 and 1.68 mg kg⁻¹, respectively. The residues of flubendiamide dissipated at the half-life of 3.9 and 4.4 days from treatments @ 48 and 96 g a.i. ha⁻¹, respectively and persisted for 15 days from both the treatments. Des-iodo flubendiamide was not detected in tomato fruits at any time during the study period. Residues of flubendiamide and des-iodo flubendiamide in soil from treatment @ 48 and 96 g a.i. ha⁻¹ were below detectable level (BDL, < 0.01 mg kg⁻¹) after 20 days. Flubendiamide completely dissipated from tomato within 20 days when the 480 SC formulation was applied at doses recommended for protection against lepidopterous pests.

  4. Mothers impose physical activity restrictions on their asthmatic children and adolescents: an analytical cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Physical activities are important for children and adolescents, especially asthmatics. A significant proportion is considered less active than their non-asthmatic peers and mother’s beliefs about asthma are thought to be a determinant factor. The research objectives were to investigate whether mothers try to impose limitations on the physical activity (PA) of their asthmatic children/adolescents; identify associated factors; and explore if this attitude has any impact on children’s PA levels. Methods In this cross sectional investigation, we studied 115 asthmatics aged between 9 and 19 years and their mothers. Asthma severity, PA level and exercise induced bronchospasm (EIB) were evaluated. Mothers were questioned on their beliefs about physical activity in non-asthmatic and asthmatic children, if they imposed restrictions on their children’s physical activity, on EIB perception and personal levels of anxiety and depression. Results Ninety six percent of the mothers answered that PA are important for children and adolescents. Despite this, 37% of them admitted imposing restrictions to their children’s PA. This attitude was associated with mother’s negative opinions about asthmatics doing PA, perception of children’s dyspnea after running on a treadmill, mother’s anxiety level and children’s asthma severity. The mother’s restrictive attitudes were not associated with children’s lower PA levels. Conclusion A high proportion of the mothers said that they restrained their asthmatic children from engaging in physical activity. This fact should be recognized by health professionals and discussed with parents and caregivers as these negative beliefs may lead to conflicts and prejudiced attitudes that could discourage children’s involvement in physical activities and sports. PMID:24673939

  5. Active Learning Strategies in the Analytical Chemistry Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Michael R.; Fulton, Robert B.

    1994-01-01

    Describes an analytical chemistry course restructured around the use of cooperative groups to help students become active learners in a non-competitive environment. Five years of experience with the course indicates that the syllabus covers almost exactly the same content as old courses and that test scores compare favorably on the national level.…

  6. a Multidisciplinary Analytical Framework for Studying Active Mobility Patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orellana, D.; Hermida, C.; Osorio, P.

    2016-06-01

    Intermediate cities are urged to change and adapt their mobility systems from a high energy-demanding motorized model to a sustainable low-motorized model. In order to accomplish such a model, city administrations need to better understand active mobility patterns and their links to socio-demographic and cultural aspects of the population. During the last decade, researchers have demonstrated the potential of geo-location technologies and mobile devices to gather massive amounts of data for mobility studies. However, the analysis and interpretation of this data has been carried out by specialized research groups with relatively narrow approaches from different disciplines. Consequently, broader questions remain less explored, mainly those relating to spatial behaviour of individuals and populations with their geographic environment and the motivations and perceptions shaping such behaviour. Understanding sustainable mobility and exploring new research paths require an interdisciplinary approach given the complex nature of mobility systems and their social, economic and environmental impacts. Here, we introduce the elements for a multidisciplinary analytical framework for studying active mobility patterns comprised of three components: a) Methodological, b) Behavioural, and c) Perceptual. We demonstrate the applicability of the framework by analysing mobility patterns of cyclists and pedestrians in an intermediate city integrating a range of techniques, including: GPS tracking, spatial analysis, auto-ethnography, and perceptual mapping. The results demonstrated the existence of non-evident spatial behaviours and how perceptual features affect mobility. This knowledge is useful for developing policies and practices for sustainable mobility planning.

  7. Joint Analysis of X-Ray and Sunyaev-Zel'Dovich Observations of Galaxy Clusters Using an Analytic Model of the Intracluster Medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasler, Nicole; Bulbul, Esra; Bonamente, Massimiliano; Carlstrom, John E.; Culverhouse, Thomas L.; Gralla, Megan; Greer, Christopher; Lamb, James W.; Hawkins, David; Hennessy, Ryan; Joy, Marshall; Kolodziejczak, Jeffrey; Landry, David; Leitch, Erik M.; Mantz, Adam; Marrone, Daniel P.; Miller, Amber; Mroczkowski, Tony; Muchovej, Stephen; Plagge, Thomas; Pryke, Clem; Woody, David

    2012-01-01

    We perform a joint analysis of X-ray and Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect data using an analytic model that describes the gas properties of galaxy clusters. The joint analysis allows the measurement of the cluster gas mass fraction profile and Hubble constant independent of cosmological parameters. Weak cosmological priors are used to calculate the overdensity radius within which the gas mass fractions are reported. Such an analysis can provide direct constraints on the evolution of the cluster gas mass fraction with redshift. We validate the model and the joint analysis on high signal-to-noise data from the Chandra X-ray Observatory and the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Array for two clusters, A2631 and A2204.

  8. JOINT ANALYSIS OF X-RAY AND SUNYAEV-ZEL'DOVICH OBSERVATIONS OF GALAXY CLUSTERS USING AN ANALYTIC MODEL OF THE INTRACLUSTER MEDIUM

    SciTech Connect

    Hasler, Nicole; Bulbul, Esra; Bonamente, Massimiliano; Landry, David; Carlstrom, John E.; Culverhouse, Thomas L.; Gralla, Megan; Greer, Christopher; Hennessy, Ryan; Leitch, Erik M.; Mantz, Adam; Marrone, Daniel P.; Plagge, Thomas; Hawkins, David; Lamb, James W.; Muchovej, Stephen; Joy, Marshall; Kolodziejczak, Jeffery; Miller, Amber; Mroczkowski, Tony; and others

    2012-04-01

    We perform a joint analysis of X-ray and Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect data using an analytic model that describes the gas properties of galaxy clusters. The joint analysis allows the measurement of the cluster gas mass fraction profile and Hubble constant independent of cosmological parameters. Weak cosmological priors are used to calculate the overdensity radius within which the gas mass fractions are reported. Such an analysis can provide direct constraints on the evolution of the cluster gas mass fraction with redshift. We validate the model and the joint analysis on high signal-to-noise data from the Chandra X-ray Observatory and the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Array for two clusters, A2631 and A2204.

  9. Design and analysis of an intelligent controller for active geometry suspension systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodarzi, Avesta; Oloomi, Ehsan; Esmailzadeh, Ebrahim

    2011-02-01

    An active geometry suspension (AGS) system is a device to optimise suspension-related factors such as toe angle and roll centre height by controlling vehicle's suspension geometry. The suspension geometry could be changed through control of suspension mounting point's position. In this paper, analysis and control of an AGS system is addressed. First, the effects of suspension geometry change on roll centre height and toe angle are studied. Then, based on an analytical approach, the improvement of the vehicle's stability and handling due to the control of suspension geometry is investigated. In the next section, an eight-degree-of-freedom handling model of a sport utility vehicle equipped with an AGS system is introduced. Finally, a self-tuning proportional-integral controller has been designed, using the fuzzy control theory, to control the actuator that changes the geometry of the suspension system. The simulation results show that an AGS system can improve the handling and stability of the vehicle.

  10. Performance analysis of junctionless double gate VeSFET considering the effects of thermal variation - An explicit 2D analytical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhary, Tarun; Khanna, Gargi

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this paper is to explore junctionless double gate vertical slit field effect transistor (JLDG VeSFET) with reduced short channel effects and to develop an analytical threshold voltage model for the device considering the impact of thermal variations for the very first time. The model has been derived by solving 2D Poisson's equation and the effects of variation in temperature on various electrical parameters of the device such as Rout, drain current, mobility, subthreshold slope and DIBL has been studied and described in the paper. The model provides a deep physical insight of the device behavior and is also very helpful in contributing to the design space exploration for JLDG VeSFET. The proposed model is verified with simulative analysis at different radii of the device and it has been observed that there is a good agreement between the analytical model and simulation results.

  11. Development and optimization of an analytical system for volatile organic compound analysis coming from the heating of interstellar/cometary ice analogues.

    PubMed

    Abou Mrad, Ninette; Duvernay, Fabrice; Theulé, Patrice; Chiavassa, Thierry; Danger, Grégoire

    2014-08-19

    This contribution presents an original analytical system for studying volatile organic compounds (VOC) coming from the heating and/or irradiation of interstellar/cometary ice analogues (VAHIIA system) through laboratory experiments. The VAHIIA system brings solutions to three analytical constraints regarding chromatography analysis: the low desorption kinetics of VOC (many hours) in the vacuum chamber during laboratory experiments, the low pressure under which they sublime (10(-9) mbar), and the presence of water in ice analogues. The VAHIIA system which we developed, calibrated, and optimized is composed of two units. The first is a preconcentration unit providing the VOC recovery. This unit is based on a cryogenic trapping which allows VOC preconcentration and provides an adequate pressure allowing their subsequent transfer to an injection unit. The latter is a gaseous injection unit allowing the direct injection into the GC-MS of the VOC previously transferred from the preconcentration unit. The feasibility of the online transfer through this interface is demonstrated. Nanomoles of VOC can be detected with the VAHIIA system, and the variability in replicate measurements is lower than 13%. The advantages of the GC-MS in comparison to infrared spectroscopy are pointed out, the GC-MS allowing an unambiguous identification of compounds coming from complex mixtures. Beyond the application to astrophysical subjects, these analytical developments can be used for all systems requiring vacuum/cryogenic environments.

  12. An Analytical Cost Estimation Procedure

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Econometrics - Classic and Contemporary by R. E. Berndt, Addison- Wesley,1991. [4] An Introduction to Mathematical Economics - Methods and Applications by G.C...Archibald and R.G. Lipsey , Harper & Row, 1976. 8 Appendix Overview Of Data Storage in PACE by Jim Wilson, Institute for Defense Analyses PACE uses

  13. Summative Mass Analysis of Algal Biomass - Integration of Analytical Procedures: Laboratory Analytical Procedure (LAP)

    SciTech Connect

    Laurens, L. M. L.

    2013-12-01

    This procedure guides the integration of laboratory analytical procedures to measure algal biomass constituents in an unambiguous manner and ultimately achieve mass balance closure for algal biomass samples. Many of these methods build on years of research in algal biomass analysis.

  14. Differential Recall Bias, Intermediate Confounding, and Mediation Analysis in Life Course Epidemiology: An Analytic Framework with Empirical Example.

    PubMed

    Sheikh, Mashhood A; Abelsen, Birgit; Olsen, Jan Abel

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms by which childhood socioeconomic status (CSES) affects adult mental health, general health, and well-being are not clear. Moreover, the analytical assumptions employed when assessing mediation in social and psychiatric epidemiology are rarely explained. The aim of this paper was to explain the intermediate confounding assumption, and to quantify differential recall bias in the association between CSES, childhood abuse, and mental health (SCL-10), general health (EQ-5D), and subjective well-being (SWLS). Furthermore, we assessed the mediating role of psychological and physical abuse in the association between CSES and mental health, general health, and well-being; and the influence of differential recall bias in the estimation of total effects, direct effects, and proportion of mediated effects. The assumptions employed when assessing mediation are explained with reference to a causal diagram. Poisson regression models (relative risk, RR and 99% CIs) were used to assess the association between CSES and psychological and physical abuse in childhood. Mediation analysis (difference method) was used to assess the indirect effect of CSES (through psychological and physical abuse in childhood) on mental health, general health, and well-being. Exposure (CSES) was measured at two time points. Mediation was assessed with both cross-sectional and longitudinal data. Psychological abuse and physical abuse mediated the association between CSES and adult mental health, general health, and well-being (6-16% among men and 7-14% among women, p < 0.001). The results suggest that up to 27% of the association between CSES and childhood abuse, 23% of the association between childhood abuse, and adult mental health, general health, and well-being, and 44% of the association between CSES and adult mental health, general health, and well-being is driven by differential recall bias. Assessing mediation with cross-sectional data (exposure, mediator, and outcome measured at the

  15. Differential Recall Bias, Intermediate Confounding, and Mediation Analysis in Life Course Epidemiology: An Analytic Framework with Empirical Example

    PubMed Central

    Sheikh, Mashhood A.; Abelsen, Birgit; Olsen, Jan Abel

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms by which childhood socioeconomic status (CSES) affects adult mental health, general health, and well-being are not clear. Moreover, the analytical assumptions employed when assessing mediation in social and psychiatric epidemiology are rarely explained. The aim of this paper was to explain the intermediate confounding assumption, and to quantify differential recall bias in the association between CSES, childhood abuse, and mental health (SCL-10), general health (EQ-5D), and subjective well-being (SWLS). Furthermore, we assessed the mediating role of psychological and physical abuse in the association between CSES and mental health, general health, and well-being; and the influence of differential recall bias in the estimation of total effects, direct effects, and proportion of mediated effects. The assumptions employed when assessing mediation are explained with reference to a causal diagram. Poisson regression models (relative risk, RR and 99% CIs) were used to assess the association between CSES and psychological and physical abuse in childhood. Mediation analysis (difference method) was used to assess the indirect effect of CSES (through psychological and physical abuse in childhood) on mental health, general health, and well-being. Exposure (CSES) was measured at two time points. Mediation was assessed with both cross-sectional and longitudinal data. Psychological abuse and physical abuse mediated the association between CSES and adult mental health, general health, and well-being (6–16% among men and 7–14% among women, p < 0.001). The results suggest that up to 27% of the association between CSES and childhood abuse, 23% of the association between childhood abuse, and adult mental health, general health, and well-being, and 44% of the association between CSES and adult mental health, general health, and well-being is driven by differential recall bias. Assessing mediation with cross-sectional data (exposure, mediator, and outcome measured at

  16. An explorative cost-effectiveness analysis of school-based screening for child anxiety using a decision analytic model.

    PubMed

    Simon, Ellin; Dirksen, Carmen D; Bögels, Susan M

    2013-10-01

    Anxiety in children is highly frequent and causes severe dysfunction. Various studies have used screening procedures to identify high-anxious children and offer them indicated prevention, but the cost-effectiveness of these screening procedures in combination with a preventive intervention has never been examined. This study compared four potential strategies in relation to the prevention of child anxiety: (1) a one-time school-based screening which offers a child-focused intervention, (2) the screening and offering of a parent-focused intervention, (3) the screening and differentially offering a child- or parent-focused intervention, depending on whether or not the parents are anxious themselves, and (4) or doing nothing. An economic evaluation from a societal perspective (i.e. including direct healthcare costs, direct non-healthcare costs, indirect costs, and out-of-pocket costs), using a decision-analytic model. The model was based on the real-world 2-year participation rates of screening and intervention, and real-world costs and effects of high- and median-anxious children (aged 8-12) from regular primary schools. Incremental cost-effectiveness ratios were calculated, and several secondary and one-way sensitivity analyses were performed. The strategy of doing nothing and the strategy of screening and differentially offering the child- or parent-focused intervention, depending on parental anxiety levels were both worthwhile, with the latter strategy costing relatively little extra money compared to doing nothing. In conclusion, some evidence for the cost-effectiveness of screening and intervening was found. Screening and offering a parent-focused intervention to children of anxious parents, and a child-focused intervention to children of non-anxious parents, were found to be the most cost-effective approach.

  17. An alternative analytical method based on ultrasound micro bath hydrolysis and GC-MS analysis for the characterization of organic biomarkers in archaeological ceramics.

    PubMed

    Blanco-Zubiaguirre, Laura; Olivares, Maitane; Castro, Kepa; Iñañez, Javier G; Madariaga, Juan Manuel

    2016-11-01

    The analysis of organic biomarkers in ancient and valuable archaeological remains provides a worthwhile source of information regarding their management. This work was focused on the development of an analytical procedure to characterize organic residues that have remained in archaeological ceramic samples. A novel analytical approach based on an alkaline hydrolysis by means of an ultrasound micro bath followed by liquid extraction was proposed to isolate saturated and unsaturated fatty acids, degradation products such as dihydroxy acids or dienoic fatty acids, isoprenoid fatty acids, and many other biomarkers from archaeological remains. This main goal has been achieved after the optimization of the main parameters affecting the hydrolysis step, the extraction procedure, and the derivatization step prior to the gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis. In this work, archaeological ceramic remains suspected to have been used by Basque Whalers to store whale oil in the period from the sixteenth to the seventeenth century were studied. Nevertheless, the proposed method is useful to determine the organic remains preserved in many other archaeological ceramic remains. Moreover, this methodology can be used to determine organic remains in any porous ceramic, archaeological or not. The preliminary results of the analysis of ceramic vessels led to the determination of some interesting unsaturated compounds such as 11-eicosenoic acid, an important biomarker of marine commodities, and several saturated fatty acids, which could be indicative of having used the vessels to store whale oil. Graphical abstract ᅟ.

  18. Production Workers' Literacy and Numeracy Practices: Using Cultural-Historical Activity Theory (CHAT) as an Analytical Tool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yasukawa, Keiko; Brown, Tony; Black, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Public policy discourses claim that there is a "crisis" in the literacy and numeracy levels of the Australian workforce. In this paper, we propose a methodology for examining this "crisis" from a critical perspective. We draw on findings from an ongoing research project by the authors which investigates production workers'…

  19. An analytical approach to thermal modeling of Bridgman type crystal growth: One dimensional analysis. Computer program users manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cothran, E. K.

    1982-01-01

    The computer program written in support of one dimensional analytical approach to thermal modeling of Bridgman type crystal growth is presented. The program listing and flow charts are included, along with the complete thermal model. Sample problems include detailed comments on input and output to aid the first time user.

  20. Typology of Analytical Errors in Qualitative Educational Research: An Analysis of the 2003-2007 Education Science Dissertations in Turkey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karadag, Engin

    2010-01-01

    In this research, the level of quality of the qualitative research design used and the analytic mistakes made in the doctorate dissertations carried out in the field of education science in Turkey have been tried to be identified. Case study design has been applied in the study in which qualitative research techniques have been used. The universe…

  1. A study and comparative analysis of managerial and leadership effectiveness in the National Health Service: an empirical factor analytic study within an NHS Trust hospital.

    PubMed

    Hamlin, R G

    2002-11-01

    The research described in this article was concerned primarily with identifying the criteria of managerial/leadership effectiveness applying at the middle and front line levels of management within an NHS Trust Hospital using critical incident technique and factor analysis methods. The findings suggest that the self-perceptions of managers and the perceptions of superiors and subordinates are very similar, and only differ on a limited number of criteria. This challenges the 'perspective-specific' models of managerial effectiveness advocated by some researchers. The results are compared against those from a near identical study carried out by the author within one part of the British Civil Service, and the results from a different but comparable factor analytic study carried out by other researchers elsewhere in the NHS. The results suggest the existence of generalized criteria of managerial effectiveness, which lend considerable support to the notion of the 'universally effective manager'. This challenges the 'contingent models' of managerial effectiveness advocated by various expert commentators. In addition, the research supports the new model of transformational leadership offered by Alimo-Metcalfe and Alban-Metcalfe for application within both the NHS and local government, and adds to the empirical base supporting the current drive towards evidence-based practice in management within the healthcare sector.

  2. Visual analytics for power grid contingency analysis.

    PubMed

    Pak Chung Wong; Zhenyu Huang; Yousu Chen; Mackey, Patrick; Shuangshuang Jin

    2014-01-01

    Contingency analysis employs different measures to model scenarios, analyze them, and then derive the best response to any threats. A proposed visual-analytics pipeline for power grid management can transform approximately 100 million contingency scenarios to a manageable size and form. Grid operators can examine individual scenarios and devise preventive or mitigation strategies in a timely manner. Power grid engineers have applied the pipeline to a Western Electricity Coordinating Council power grid model.

  3. Analytical techniques and instrumentation: A compilation. [analytical instrumentation, materials performance, and systems analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Technical information is presented covering the areas of: (1) analytical instrumentation useful in the analysis of physical phenomena; (2) analytical techniques used to determine the performance of materials; and (3) systems and component analyses for design and quality control.

  4. Analytical characterization of an orally-delivered peptide pharmaceutical product.

    PubMed

    Kelley, Wayne P; Chen, Shujun; Floyd, Philip D; Hu, Ping; Kapsi, Shiva G; Kord, Alireza S; Sun, Mingjiang; Vogt, Frederick G

    2012-05-15

    The characterization of orally-delivered peptide pharmaceuticals presents several challenges to analytical methods in comparison to characterization of conventional small-molecule drugs. These challenges include the analysis and characterization of difficult-to-separate impurities, secondary structure, the amorphous solid-state form, and the integrity of enteric-coated drug delivery systems. This work presents the multidisciplinary analytical characterization of a parathyroid hormone (PTH) peptide active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) and an oral formulation of this API within enteric-coated sucrose spheres. The analysis of impurities and degradation products in API and formulated drug product was facilitated by the development of an ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC) method for analysis by high-resolution mass spectrometry (MS). The use of UHPLC allowed for additional resolution needed to detect impurities and degradation products of interest. The secondary structure was probed using a combination of solution-state NMR, infrared, and circular dichroism spectroscopic methods. Solid-state NMR is used to detect amorphous API in a nondestructive manner directly within the coated sucrose sphere formulation. Fluorescence and Raman microscopy were used in conjunction with Raman mapping to show enteric coating integrity and observe the distribution of API beneath the enteric-coating on the sucrose spheres. The methods are combined in a multidisciplinary approach to characterize the quality of the enteric-coated peptide product.

  5. Metatranscriptomic Analysis of Groundwater Reveals an Active Anammox Bacterial Population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jewell, T. N. M.; Karaoz, U.; Thomas, B. C.; Banfield, J. F.; Brodie, E.; Williams, K. H.; Beller, H. R.

    2014-12-01

    Groundwater is a major natural resource, yet little is known about the contribution of microbial anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) activity to subsurface nitrogen cycling. During anammox, energy is generated as ammonium is oxidized under anaerobic conditions to dinitrogen gas, using nitrite as the final electron acceptor. This process is a global sink for fixed nitrogen. Only a narrow range of monophyletic bacteria within the Planctomycetes carries out anammox, and the full extent of their metabolism, and subsequent impact on nitrogen cycling and microbial community structure, is still unknown. Here, we employ a metatranscriptomic analysis on enriched mRNA to identify the abundance and activity of a population of anammox bacteria within an aquifer at Rifle, CO. Planktonic biomass was collected over a two-month period after injection of up to 1.5 mM nitrate. Illumina-generated sequences were mapped to a phylogenetically binned Rifle metagenome database. We identified transcripts for genes with high protein sequence identities (81-98%) to those of anammox strain KSU-1 and to two of the five anammox bacteria genera, Brocadia and Kuenenia, suggesting an active, if not diverse, anammox population. Many of the most abundant anammox transcripts mapped to a single scaffold, indicative of a single dominant anammox species. Transcripts of the genes necessary for the anammox pathway were present, including an ammonium transporter (amtB), nitrite/formate transporter, nitrite reductase (nirK), and hydrazine oxidoreductase (hzoB). The form of nitrite reductase encoded by anammox is species-dependent, and we only identified nirK, with no evidence of anammox nirS. In addition to the anammox pathway we saw evidence of the anammox bacterial dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium pathway (narH, putative nrfA, and nrfB), which provides an alternate means of generating substrates for anammox from nitrate, rather than relying on an external pool. Transcripts for hydroxylamine

  6. Analytical heat transfer of a porous media: An analysis of the thermal characteristics of synthetic lightweight aggregate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellickson, Timothy H.

    The thermal insulative properties of a sustainable concrete-based aggregate infused with recycling waste plus fly-ash are investigated to define the effective thermal conductivity based upon optimal volume ratio of the constituent materials. The complex structures were characterized with the use of metallographic sectioning and image processing by exploiting the information given by the gradient of the color held within the image. Next, a tri-skeleton mesh was mapped over the image and a finite element analysis was conducted. The output of the finite element analysis was the temperature contour and an integrated flux over each surface from which the effective thermal conductivity of the material could be calculated via Fourier's Law. The development of a new methodology that evaluates the effective thermal conductivity for a conductivity ratio of less than 10 and a volume density of 0.60 was developed based upon the material properties, the microscopic geometry and a non-interaction approximation. Lastly, the results of the thermal test were used validate the finite element program.

  7. Making Sense of Total VET Activity: An Initial Market Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Centre for Vocational Education Research (NCVER), 2016

    2016-01-01

    Following the successful first national publication of total vocational education and training (VET) activity and presentation of various informative data products, NCVER has continued to undertake further analysis of the submitted data. This paper is the first in a suite of the National Centre for Vocational Education Research (NCVER) authored…

  8. Mission Stream Analysis - Delta Analytic Model. Revision

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    demonstrating mission effectiveness. The second tool is the  ( Delta ) Analytic Model, which provides an approach for identifying disparate...requirements into a system’s technical performance and operator workload requirements; and help minimize the “ delta ” between domains across the system’s...mission and system capability requirements into a system’s technical performance and operator workload requirements; and help minimize the “ delta

  9. An Introduction to Social Network Data Analytics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aggarwal, Charu C.

    The advent of online social networks has been one of the most exciting events in this decade. Many popular online social networks such as Twitter, LinkedIn, and Facebook have become increasingly popular. In addition, a number of multimedia networks such as Flickr have also seen an increasing level of popularity in recent years. Many such social networks are extremely rich in content, and they typically contain a tremendous amount of content and linkage data which can be leveraged for analysis. The linkage data is essentially the graph structure of the social network and the communications between entities; whereas the content data contains the text, images and other multimedia data in the network. The richness of this network provides unprecedented opportunities for data analytics in the context of social networks. This book provides a data-centric view of online social networks; a topic which has been missing from much of the literature. This chapter provides an overview of the key topics in this field, and their coverage in this book.

  10. Ultrasensitive electrochemical analysis of two analytes by using an autonomous DNA machine that works in a two-cycle mode.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui; Fang, Congcong; Zhang, Shusheng

    2011-06-27

    We report a novel autonomous DNA machine for amplified electrochemical analysis of two DNAs. The DNA machine operates in a two-cycle working mode to amplify DNA recognition events; the working mode is assisted by two different nicking endonucleases (NEases). Two bio-barcode probes, a ZnS nanoparticle (NP)-DNA probe and a CdS NP-DNA probe, were used to trace two target DNAs. The detection system was based on a sensitive differential pulse anodic stripping voltammetry (DPASV) method for the simultaneous detection of Zn(II) and Cd(II) tracers, which were obtained by dissolving the two probes. Under the optimised conditions, detection limits as low as 5.6×10(-17) (3σ) and 4.1×10(-17)  M (3σ) for the two target DNAs were achieved. It has been proven that the DNA machine system can simultaneously amplify two target DNAs by more than four orders of magnitude within 30 min at room temperature. In addition, in combination with an aptamer recognition strategy, the DNA machine was further used in the aptamer-based amplification analysis of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and lysozyme. With the amplification of the DNA machine, detection limits as low as 5.6×10(-9)  M (3σ) for ATP and 5.2×10(-13)  M (3σ) for lysozyme were simultaneously obtained. The satisfactory determination of ATP and lysozyme in Ramos cells reveals the good selectivity and feasibility of this protocol. The DNA machine is a promising tool for ultrasensitive and simultaneous multianalysis because of its remarkable signal amplification and simple machine-like operation.

  11. Retail video analytics: an overview and survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connell, Jonathan; Fan, Quanfu; Gabbur, Prasad; Haas, Norman; Pankanti, Sharath; Trinh, Hoang

    2013-03-01

    Today retail video analytics has gone beyond the traditional domain of security and loss prevention by providing retailers insightful business intelligence such as store traffic statistics and queue data. Such information allows for enhanced customer experience, optimized store performance, reduced operational costs, and ultimately higher profitability. This paper gives an overview of various camera-based applications in retail as well as the state-ofthe- art computer vision techniques behind them. It also presents some of the promising technical directions for exploration in retail video analytics.

  12. PDAs as Lifelong Learning Tools: An Activity Theory Based Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waycott, Jenny; Jones, Ann; Scanlon, Eileen

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes the use of an activity theory (AT) framework to analyze the ways that distance part time learners and mobile workers adapted and appropriated mobile devices for their activities and in turn how their use of these new tools changed the ways that they carried out their learning or their work. It is argued that there are two key…

  13. Adult Active Transport in the Netherlands: An Analysis of Its Contribution to Physical Activity Requirements

    PubMed Central

    Fishman, Elliot; Böcker, Lars; Helbich, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Modern, urban lifestyles have engineered physical activity out of everyday life and this presents a major threat to human health. The Netherlands is a world leader in active travel, particularly cycling, but little research has sought to quantify the cumulative amount of physical activity through everyday walking and cycling. Methods Using data collected as part of the Dutch National Travel Survey (2010 – 2012), this paper determines the degree to which Dutch walking and cycling contributes to meeting minimum level of physical activity of 150 minutes of moderate intensity aerobic activity throughout the week. The sample includes 74,465 individuals who recorded at least some travel on the day surveyed. As physical activity benefits are cumulative, all walking and cycling trips are analysed, including those to and from public transport. These trips are then converted into an established measure of physical activity intensity, known as metabolic equivalents of tasks. Multivariate Tobit regression models were performed on a range of socio-demographic, transport resources, urban form and meteorological characteristics. Results The results reveal that Dutch men and women participate in 24 and 28 minutes of daily physical activity through walking and cycling, which is 41% and 55% more than the minimum recommended level. It should be noted however that some 57% of the entire sample failed to record any walking or cycling, and an investigation of this particular group serves as an important topic of future research. Active transport was positively related with age, income, bicycle ownership, urban density and air temperature. Car ownership had a strong negative relationship with physically active travel. Conclusion The results of this analysis demonstrate the significance of active transport to counter the emerging issue of sedentary lifestyle disease. The Dutch experience provides other countries with a highly relevant case study in the creation of

  14. Risk analysis of analytical validations by probabilistic modification of FMEA.

    PubMed

    Barends, D M; Oldenhof, M T; Vredenbregt, M J; Nauta, M J

    2012-05-01

    Risk analysis is a valuable addition to validation of an analytical chemistry process, enabling not only detecting technical risks, but also risks related to human failures. Failure Mode and Effect Analysis (FMEA) can be applied, using a categorical risk scoring of the occurrence, detection and severity of failure modes, and calculating the Risk Priority Number (RPN) to select failure modes for correction. We propose a probabilistic modification of FMEA, replacing the categorical scoring of occurrence and detection by their estimated relative frequency and maintaining the categorical scoring of severity. In an example, the results of traditional FMEA of a Near Infrared (NIR) analytical procedure used for the screening of suspected counterfeited tablets are re-interpretated by this probabilistic modification of FMEA. Using this probabilistic modification of FMEA, the frequency of occurrence of undetected failure mode(s) can be estimated quantitatively, for each individual failure mode, for a set of failure modes, and the full analytical procedure.

  15. Quantifying construction and demolition waste: An analytical review

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Zezhou; Yu, Ann T.W.; Shen, Liyin; Liu, Guiwen

    2014-09-15

    Highlights: • Prevailing C and D waste quantification methodologies are identified and compared. • One specific methodology cannot fulfill all waste quantification scenarios. • A relevance tree for appropriate quantification methodology selection is proposed. • More attentions should be paid to civil and infrastructural works. • Classified information is suggested for making an effective waste management plan. - Abstract: Quantifying construction and demolition (C and D) waste generation is regarded as a prerequisite for the implementation of successful waste management. In literature, various methods have been employed to quantify the C and D waste generation at both regional and project levels. However, an integrated review that systemically describes and analyses all the existing methods has yet to be conducted. To bridge this research gap, an analytical review is conducted. Fifty-seven papers are retrieved based on a set of rigorous procedures. The characteristics of the selected papers are classified according to the following criteria - waste generation activity, estimation level and quantification methodology. Six categories of existing C and D waste quantification methodologies are identified, including site visit method, waste generation rate method, lifetime analysis method, classification system accumulation method, variables modelling method and other particular methods. A critical comparison of the identified methods is given according to their characteristics and implementation constraints. Moreover, a decision tree is proposed for aiding the selection of the most appropriate quantification method in different scenarios. Based on the analytical review, limitations of previous studies and recommendations of potential future research directions are further suggested.

  16. The New Numerical Galaxy Catalog (ν2GC): An updated semi-analytic model of galaxy and active galactic nucleus formation with large cosmological N-body simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makiya, Ryu; Enoki, Motohiro; Ishiyama, Tomoaki; Kobayashi, Masakazu A. R.; Nagashima, Masahiro; Okamoto, Takashi; Okoshi, Katsuya; Oogi, Taira; Shirakata, Hikari

    2016-04-01

    We present a new cosmological galaxy formation model, ν2GC, as an updated version of our previous model νGC. We adopt the so-called "semi-analytic" approach, in which the formation history of dark matter halos is computed by N-body simulations, while the baryon physics such as gas cooling, star formation, and supernova feedback are simply modeled by phenomenological equations. Major updates of the model are as follows: (1) the merger trees of dark matter halos are constructed in state-of-the-art N-body simulations, (2) we introduce the formation and evolution process of supermassive black holes and the suppression of gas cooling due to active galactic nucleus (AGN) activity, (3) we include heating of the intergalactic gas by the cosmic UV background, and (4) we tune some free parameters related to the astrophysical processes using a Markov chain Monte Carlo method. Our N-body simulations of dark matter halos have unprecedented box size and mass resolution (the largest simulation contains 550 billion particles in a 1.12 Gpc h-1 box), enabling the study of much smaller and rarer objects. The model was tuned to fit the luminosity functions of local galaxies and mass function of neutral hydrogen. Local observations, such as the Tully-Fisher relation, the size-magnitude relation of spiral galaxies, and the scaling relation between the bulge mass and black hole mass were well reproduced by the model. Moreover, the model also reproduced well the cosmic star formation history and redshift evolution of rest-frame K-band luminosity functions. The numerical catalog of the simulated galaxies and AGNs is publicly available on the web.

  17. Toward a Shared Vocabulary for Visual Analysis: An Analytic Toolkit for Deconstructing the Visual Design of Graphic Novels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connors, Sean P.

    2012-01-01

    Literacy educators might advocate using graphic novels to develop students' visual literacy skills, but teachers who lack a vocabulary for engaging in close analysis of visual texts may be reluctant to teach them. Recognizing this, teacher educators should equip preservice teachers with a vocabulary for analyzing visual texts. This article…

  18. Analytic Perturbation Analysis of Discrete Event Dynamic Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Uryasev, S.

    1994-09-01

    This paper considers a new Analytic Perturbation Analysis (APA) approach for Discrete Event Dynamic Systems (DEDS) with discontinuous sample-path functions with respect to control parameters. The performance functions for DEDS usually are formulated as mathematical expectations, which can be calculated only numerically. APA is based on new analytic formulas for the gradients of expectations of indicator functions; therefore, it is called an analytic perturbation analysis. The gradient of performance function may not coincide with the expectation of a gradient of sample-path function (i.e., the interchange formula for the gradient and expectation sign may not be valid). Estimates of gradients can be obtained with one simulation run of the models.

  19. An Experimental Introduction to Interlaboratory Exercises in Analytical Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Puignou, L.; Llaurado, M.

    2005-01-01

    An experimental exercise on analytical proficiency studies in collaborative trials is proposed. This practical provides students in advanced undergraduate courses in chemistry, pharmacy, and biochemistry, with the opportunity to improve their quality assurance skills. It involves an environmental analysis, determining the concentration of a…

  20. Analytical analysis of particle-core dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Batygin, Yuri K

    2010-01-01

    Particle-core interaction is a well-developed model of halo formation in high-intensity beams. In this paper, we present an analytical solution for averaged, single particle dynamics, around a uniformly charged beam. The problem is analyzed through a sequence of canonical transformations of the Hamiltonian, which describes nonlinear particle oscillations. A closed form expression for maximum particle deviation from the axis is obtained. The results of this study are in good agreement with numerical simulations and with previously obtained data.

  1. The use of aqueous normal phase chromatography as an analytical tool for food analysis: determination of histamine as a model system.

    PubMed

    Dang, Andy; Pesek, Joseph J; Matyska, Maria T

    2013-12-15

    A simple, fast, robust protocol that does not require derivatisation for the determination of histamine, a polar primary bioamine, in red wine and food products is presented. Histamine can be retained and quantified under aqueous normal phase (ANP) conditions, using a Diamond Hydride (DH) column for high performance liquid chromatography/ultraviolet-visible (HPLC-UV) and mass spectrometry (MS) detection. An ANP gradient was developed, allowing for the direct analyses of the wines and food products. The peak shape for this basic compound was also evaluated under optimal analytical conditions. From UV and MS detection, a linear correlation for quantitation is obtained. The basic strategy presented for the analysis of histamine is applicable to a broad range of polar compounds in a variety of foods and beverages.

  2. Microemulsification: an approach for analytical determinations.

    PubMed

    Lima, Renato S; Shiroma, Leandro Y; Teixeira, Alvaro V N C; de Toledo, José R; do Couto, Bruno C; de Carvalho, Rogério M; Carrilho, Emanuel; Kubota, Lauro T; Gobbi, Angelo L

    2014-09-16

    We address a novel method for analytical determinations that combines simplicity, rapidity, low consumption of chemicals, and portability with high analytical performance taking into account parameters such as precision, linearity, robustness, and accuracy. This approach relies on the effect of the analyte content over the Gibbs free energy of dispersions, affecting the thermodynamic stabilization of emulsions or Winsor systems to form microemulsions (MEs). Such phenomenon was expressed by the minimum volume fraction of amphiphile required to form microemulsion (Φ(ME)), which was the analytical signal of the method. Thus, the measurements can be taken by visually monitoring the transition of the dispersions from cloudy to transparent during the microemulsification, like a titration. It bypasses the employment of electric energy. The performed studies were: phase behavior, droplet dimension by dynamic light scattering, analytical curve, and robustness tests. The reliability of the method was evaluated by determining water in ethanol fuels and monoethylene glycol in complex samples of liquefied natural gas. The dispersions were composed of water-chlorobenzene (water analysis) and water-oleic acid (monoethylene glycol analysis) with ethanol as the hydrotrope phase. The mean hydrodynamic diameter values for the nanostructures in the droplet-based water-chlorobenzene MEs were in the range of 1 to 11 nm. The procedures of microemulsification were conducted by adding ethanol to water-oleic acid (W-O) mixtures with the aid of micropipette and shaking. The Φ(ME) measurements were performed in a thermostatic water bath at 23 °C by direct observation that is based on the visual analyses of the media. The experiments to determine water demonstrated that the analytical performance depends on the composition of ME. It shows flexibility in the developed method. The linear range was fairly broad with limits of linearity up to 70.00% water in ethanol. For monoethylene glycol in

  3. Quantifying construction and demolition waste: an analytical review.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zezhou; Yu, Ann T W; Shen, Liyin; Liu, Guiwen

    2014-09-01

    Quantifying construction and demolition (C&D) waste generation is regarded as a prerequisite for the implementation of successful waste management. In literature, various methods have been employed to quantify the C&D waste generation at both regional and project levels. However, an integrated review that systemically describes and analyses all the existing methods has yet to be conducted. To bridge this research gap, an analytical review is conducted. Fifty-seven papers are retrieved based on a set of rigorous procedures. The characteristics of the selected papers are classified according to the following criteria - waste generation activity, estimation level and quantification methodology. Six categories of existing C&D waste quantification methodologies are identified, including site visit method, waste generation rate method, lifetime analysis method, classification system accumulation method, variables modelling method and other particular methods. A critical comparison of the identified methods is given according to their characteristics and implementation constraints. Moreover, a decision tree is proposed for aiding the selection of the most appropriate quantification method in different scenarios. Based on the analytical review, limitations of previous studies and recommendations of potential future research directions are further suggested.

  4. Focused analyte spray emission apparatus and process for mass spectrometric analysis

    DOEpatents

    Roach, Patrick J [Kennewick, WA; Laskin, Julia [Richland, WA; Laskin, Alexander [Richland, WA

    2012-01-17

    An apparatus and process are disclosed that deliver an analyte deposited on a substrate to a mass spectrometer that provides for trace analysis of complex organic analytes. Analytes are probed using a small droplet of solvent that is formed at the junction between two capillaries. A supply capillary maintains the droplet of solvent on the substrate; a collection capillary collects analyte desorbed from the surface and emits analyte ions as a focused spray to the inlet of a mass spectrometer for analysis. The invention enables efficient separation of desorption and ionization events, providing enhanced control over transport and ionization of the analyte.

  5. An analytical theory of planetary rotation rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, A. W.

    1977-01-01

    An approximate analytical theory is derived for the rate of rotation acquired by a planet as it grows from the solar nebula. This theory was motivated by a numerical study by Giuli, and yields fair agreement with his results. The periods of planetary rotation obtained are proportional to planetesimal encounter velocity, and appear to suggest lower values of this velocity than are commonly assumed to have existed during planetary formation.

  6. An Analytical Satellite Orbit Predictor (ASOP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The documentation and user's guide are presented for the analytical satellite orbit predictor computer program which is intended to be used for computation of near-earth orbits including those of the shuttle orbiter and its payloads. The Poincare-Similar elements used make it possible to compute near-earth orbits to within an accuracy of a few meters. Recursive equations are used instead of complicated formulas. Execution time is on the order of a few milliseconds.

  7. Optimization of Turbine Engine Cycle Analysis with Analytic Derivatives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hearn, Tristan; Hendricks, Eric; Chin, Jeffrey; Gray, Justin; Moore, Kenneth T.

    2016-01-01

    A new engine cycle analysis tool, called Pycycle, was built using the OpenMDAO framework. Pycycle provides analytic derivatives allowing for an efficient use of gradient-based optimization methods on engine cycle models, without requiring the use of finite difference derivative approximation methods. To demonstrate this, a gradient-based design optimization was performed on a turbofan engine model. Results demonstrate very favorable performance compared to an optimization of an identical model using finite-difference approximated derivatives.

  8. An analytical analysis of the dispersion predictions for effluents from the Saturn 5 and Scout-Algol 3 rocket exhausts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, J. B.; Susko, M.; Kaufman, J. W.; Hill, C. K.

    1973-01-01

    Predictions of the spatial concentration mapping of the potentially toxic constituents of the exhaust effluents from a launch of a Saturn 5 and of a Scout-Algol 3 vehicle utilizing the NASA/MSFC Multilayer Diffusion Program are provided. In the case of the Saturn 5, special attention was given to the concentration fields of carbon monoxide with a correlation of carbon dioxide concentrations. The Scout-Algol 3 provided an example of the centerline concentrations of hydrogen chloride, carbon monoxide, and alumina under typical meteorological conditions. While these results define the specific environmental impact of these two launches under the meteorological conditions existing during launches, they also provide a basis for the empirical monitoring of the constituents of the exhaust effluents of these vehicles.

  9. Precise determination of the low-energy hadronic contribution to the muon g -2 from analyticity and unitarity: An improved analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ananthanarayan, B.; Caprini, Irinel; Das, Diganta; Imsong, I. Sentitemsu

    2016-06-01

    The two-pion low-energy contribution to the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon, aμ≡(g -2 )μ/2 , expressed as an integral over the modulus squared of the pion electromagnetic form factor, brings a relatively large contribution to the theoretical error, since the low accuracy of experimental measurements in this region is amplified by the drastic increase of the integration kernel. We derive stringent constraints on the two-pion contribution by exploiting analyticity and unitarity of the pion electromagnetic form factor. To avoid the poor knowledge of the modulus of this function, we use instead its phase, known with high precision in the elastic region from Roy equations for pion-pion scattering via the Fermi-Watson theorem. Above the inelastic threshold we adopt a conservative integral condition on the modulus, determined from data and perturbative QCD. Additional high precision data on the modulus in the range 0.65-0.71 GeV, obtained from e+e- annihilation and τ -decay experiments, are used to improve the predictions on the modulus at lower energies by means of a parametrization-free analytic extrapolation. The results are optimal for a given input and do not depend on the unknown phase of the form factor above the inelastic threshold. The present work improves a previous analysis based on the same technique, including more experimental data and employing better statistical tools for their treatment. We obtain for the contribution to aμ from below 0.63 GeV the value (133.258 ±0.723 )×10-10 , which amounts to a reduction of the theoretical error by about 6 ×10-11 .

  10. Analytical Validation of Telomerase Activity for Cancer Early Detection

    PubMed Central

    Jakupciak, John P.; Wang, Wendy; Barker, Peter E.; Srivastava, Sudhir; Atha, Donald H.

    2004-01-01

    Activation of telomerase plays a critical role in unlimited proliferation and immortalization of cells. Telomerase activity has been shown to correlate with tumor progression, indicating that tumors expressing this enzyme possess aggressive clinical behavior and that telomerase activity may be a useful biomarker for early detection of cancer. However, measurements of telomerase activity by current methods such as telomeric repeat amplification protocol (TRAP)/polymerase chain reaction (PCR) or antibody-based radioimmunoassay (RIA) are low-throughput and not robust enough to easily accommodate the required statistical analysis to determine whether telomerase activity is a practical biomarker. As part of the National Cancer Institute Early Detection Research Network of analytical validation, we have developed a robot assisted TRAP assay (RApidTRAP) of telomerase, a potential biomarker for cancer early detection. Measurements of human telomerase reverse transcriptase catalytic subunit (hTERT) mRNA were performed in concert with measurement of telomerase activity. For this purpose we determined hTERT mRNA concentration and telomerase activity in human normal (RPE-28) and cancer (A549) cell lines as well as in human serum (SRM 1951A). Telomerase activity measurements were made using the TRAP/PCR capillary electrophoresis (CE) method on (50 to 1000) cells/reaction isolated from cell extracts. Measurement of hTERT mRNA was made using specific primers and probes on a LightCycler in the range of (10 to 7000) cells/reaction. Comparison of high-throughput telomerase activity measurements using the robot and those performed manually were consistent in sensitivity and reproducibility. Using this combination of telomerase activity and hTERT mRNA measurements, the automated system improved efficiency over traditional TRAP/PCR methods. PMID:15269291

  11. Phenolic molecules in virgin olive oils: a survey of their sensory properties, health effects, antioxidant activity and analytical methods. An overview of the last decade.

    PubMed

    Bendini, Alessandra; Cerretani, Lorenzo; Carrasco-Pancorbo, Alegria; Gómez-Caravaca, Ana Maria; Segura-Carretero, Antonio; Fernández-Gutiérrez, Alberto; Lercker, Giovanni

    2007-08-06

    Among vegetable oils, virgin olive oil (VOO) has nutritional and sensory characteristics that to make it unique and a basic component of the Mediterranean diet. The importance of VOO is mainly attributed both to its high content of oleic acid a balanced contribution quantity of polyunsaturated fatty acids and its richness in phenolic compounds, which act as natural antioxidants and may contribute to the prevention of several human diseases. The polar phenolic compounds of VOO belong to different classes: phenolic acids, phenyl ethyl alcohols, hydroxy-isochromans, flavonoids, lignans and secoiridoids. This latter family of compounds is characteristic of Oleaceae plants and secoiridoids are the main compounds of the phenolic fraction. Many agronomical and technological factors can affect the presence of phenols in VOO. Its shelf life is higher than other vegetable oils, mainly due to the presence of phenolic molecules having a catechol group, such as hydroxytyrosol and its secoiridoid derivatives. Several assays have been used to establish the antioxidant activity of these isolated phenolic compounds. Typical sensory gustative properties of VOO, such as bitterness and pungency, have been attributed to secoiridoid molecules. Considering the importance of the phenolic fraction of VOO, high performance analytical methods have been developed to characterize its complex phenolic pattern. The aim of this review is to realize a survey on phenolic compounds of virgin olive oils bearing in mind their chemical-analytical, healthy and sensory aspects. In particular, starting from the basic studies, the results of researches developed in the last ten years will be focused.

  12. An Improved Analytic Model for Microdosimeter Response

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shinn, Judy L.; Wilson, John W.; Xapsos, Michael A.

    2001-01-01

    An analytic model used to predict energy deposition fluctuations in a microvolume by ions through direct events is improved to include indirect delta ray events. The new model can now account for the increase in flux at low lineal energy when the ions are of very high energy. Good agreement is obtained between the calculated results and available data for laboratory ion beams. Comparison of GCR (galactic cosmic ray) flux between Shuttle TEPC (tissue equivalent proportional counter) flight data and current calculations draws a different assessment of developmental work required for the GCR transport code (HZETRN) than previously concluded.

  13. Photovoltaic Degradation Rates -- An Analytical Review

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, D. C.; Kurtz, S. R.

    2012-06-01

    As photovoltaic penetration of the power grid increases, accurate predictions of return on investment require accurate prediction of decreased power output over time. Degradation rates must be known in order to predict power delivery. This article reviews degradation rates of flat-plate terrestrial modules and systems reported in published literature from field testing throughout the last 40 years. Nearly 2000 degradation rates, measured on individual modules or entire systems, have been assembled from the literature, showing a median value of 0.5%/year. The review consists of three parts: a brief historical outline, an analytical summary of degradation rates, and a detailed bibliography partitioned by technology.

  14. Design and Analysis of an Active Helical Drive Downhole Tractor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LI, Yujia; LIU, Qingyou; CHEN, Yonghua; REN, Tao

    2017-03-01

    During oil-gas well drilling and completion, downhole tools and apparatus should be conveyed to the destination to complete a series of downhole works. Downhole tractors have been used to convey tools in complex wellbores, however a very large tractive force is needed to carry more downhole tools to accomplish works with high efficiency. A novel serial active helical drive downhole tractor which has significantly improved performance compared with previous work is proposed. All previously reported helical drive downhole tractors need stators to balance the torque generated by the rotator. By contrast, the proposed serial downhole tractor does not need a stator; several rotator-driven units should only be connected to one another to achieve a tractive force multifold higher than that was previously reported. As a result, the length of a single unit is shortened, and the motion flexibility of the downhole tractor is increased. The major performance indicators, namely, gear ratio, velocity, and tractive force, are analyzed. Experimental results show that the maximum tractive force of a single-unit prototype with a length of 900 mm is 165.3 kg or 1620 N. The analysis and experimental results show that the proposed design has considerable potential for downhole works.

  15. An experimental and analytical investigation of the nonlinear behaviour and modal analysis of a structurally nonlinear, two-dimensional airfoil in subsonic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsden, Catharine Chauvin

    Modal testing is often employed in the determination of natural frequencies and damping levels in aircraft structures. In aircraft flutter testing, potentially dangerous flight regimes are avoided by obtaining modal frequency and damping values at airspeeds well below the flutter speed and extrapolating the data to estimate the airspeed at which the onset of flutter instabilities is expected to occur. In the modal analysis, the structure is typically assumed to be linear and the parameters to be time-invariant. Nonlinearities in aeroelastic systems can arise from both structural and aerodynamic sources and may initiate aeroelastic instabilities both above and below the flutter speed predicted by linear theory. Typical nonlinear responses include limit cycle oscillations and in some cases, chaotic response. For aeroelastic systems containing even small nonlinearities, the nonlinear frequency response curve may be distorted, and this distortion can contribute to errors in the values of frequency and damping obtained during modal testing. The current study includes an analytical and an experimental investigation into the modal testing of a nonlinear aeroelastic system. In the case of aeroelastic systems containing limited structural nonlinearities, the nonlinearity, although it changes the system frequency and damping values and distorts the transfer function, does not substantially affect the critical flutter speed. For this reason, the nonlinearity behaves a little like "noise" in that it prevents accurate values of frequency and damping from being obtained during the modal test. One solution to this problem is to separate the linear and nonlinear portions of the frequency response using spectral decomposition methods. In the analytical portion of this study, a specific spectral decomposition technique is tested on numerical data, and the results show that the technique may be used to separate the linear and nonlinear portions of the transfer function obtained from

  16. Experimental analysis of tablet properties for discrete element modeling of an active coating process.

    PubMed

    Just, Sarah; Toschkoff, Gregor; Funke, Adrian; Djuric, Dejan; Scharrer, Georg; Khinast, Johannes; Knop, Klaus; Kleinebudde, Peter

    2013-03-01

    Coating of solid dosage forms is an important unit operation in the pharmaceutical industry. In recent years, numerical simulations of drug manufacturing processes have been gaining interest as process analytical technology tools. The discrete element method (DEM) in particular is suitable to model tablet-coating processes. For the development of accurate simulations, information on the material properties of the tablets is required. In this study, the mechanical parameters Young's modulus, coefficient of restitution (CoR), and coefficients of friction (CoF) of gastrointestinal therapeutic systems (GITS) and of active-coated GITS were measured experimentally. The dynamic angle of repose of these tablets in a drum coater was investigated to revise the CoF. The resulting values were used as input data in DEM simulations to compare simulation and experiment. A mean value of Young's modulus of 31.9 MPa was determined by the uniaxial compression test. The CoR was found to be 0.78. For both tablet-steel and tablet-tablet friction, active-coated GITS showed a higher CoF compared with GITS. According to the values of the dynamic angle of repose, the CoF was adjusted to obtain consistent tablet motion in the simulation and in the experiment. On the basis of this experimental characterization, mechanical parameters are integrated into DEM simulation programs to perform numerical analysis of coating processes.

  17. Lessons Learned from Deploying an Analytical Task Management Database

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Neil, Daniel A.; Welch, Clara; Arceneaux, Joshua; Bulgatz, Dennis; Hunt, Mitch; Young, Stephen

    2007-01-01

    Defining requirements, missions, technologies, and concepts for space exploration involves multiple levels of organizations, teams of people with complementary skills, and analytical models and simulations. Analytical activities range from filling a To-Be-Determined (TBD) in a requirement to creating animations and simulations of exploration missions. In a program as large as returning to the Moon, there are hundreds of simultaneous analysis activities. A way to manage and integrate efforts of this magnitude is to deploy a centralized database that provides the capability to define tasks, identify resources, describe products, schedule deliveries, and generate a variety of reports. This paper describes a web-accessible task management system and explains the lessons learned during the development and deployment of the database. Through the database, managers and team leaders can define tasks, establish review schedules, assign teams, link tasks to specific requirements, identify products, and link the task data records to external repositories that contain the products. Data filters and spreadsheet export utilities provide a powerful capability to create custom reports. Import utilities provide a means to populate the database from previously filled form files. Within a four month period, a small team analyzed requirements, developed a prototype, conducted multiple system demonstrations, and deployed a working system supporting hundreds of users across the aeros pace community. Open-source technologies and agile software development techniques, applied by a skilled team enabled this impressive achievement. Topics in the paper cover the web application technologies, agile software development, an overview of the system's functions and features, dealing with increasing scope, and deploying new versions of the system.

  18. Analytical testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flannelly, W. G.; Fabunmi, J. A.; Nagy, E. J.

    1981-01-01

    Analytical methods for combining flight acceleration and strain data with shake test mobility data to predict the effects of structural changes on flight vibrations and strains are presented. This integration of structural dynamic analysis with flight performance is referred to as analytical testing. The objective of this methodology is to analytically estimate the results of flight testing contemplated structural changes with minimum flying and change trials. The category of changes to the aircraft includes mass, stiffness, absorbers, isolators, and active suppressors. Examples of applying the analytical testing methodology using flight test and shake test data measured on an AH-1G helicopter are included. The techniques and procedures for vibration testing and modal analysis are also described.

  19. An Analysis of Teacher Discourse that Introduces Real Science Activities to High School Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Pei-Ling; Roth, Wolff-Michael

    2009-08-01

    Most academic science educators encourage teachers to provide their students with access to more authentic science activities. What can and do teachers say to increase students’ interests in participating in opportunities to do real science? What are the discursive resources they draw on to introduce authentic science to students? The purpose of this ethnographic and discourse-analytic study is to investigate the ways in which the activities of scientists are discursively presented to high school students in a biology/career preparation course. Data sources were collected by means of observation, field notes, interviews, and videotaped lessons in an eleventh-grade biology/career preparation course. Drawing on discourse analysis, we investigate the discursive resources—or, more specifically and technically, the interpretative repertoires—teachers used to explain and promote opportunities to engage students in real science activities. Our analysis identifies and characterizes six types of interpretative repertoires: specialized, a-stereotypical, relevant, empirical, emotive, and rare-opportunity. To better understand the “big picture” of how these discursive resources are drawn on in the classroom, we also report on the frequencies of the repertoires in the discourse and the ways in which repertoires changed in the course of teacher-student interactions. The findings of this case study offer teachers and researchers with a better understanding of how specific forms of discourse—i.e., the repertoires—can serve as resources to enhance teacher-introduction of authentic science to students and provide students a bridge between school and authentic science.

  20. An analytic approach to cyber adversarial dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sweeney, Patrick; Cybenko, George

    2012-06-01

    To date, cyber security investment by both the government and commercial sectors has been largely driven by the myopic best response of players to the actions of their adversaries and their perception of the adversarial environment. However, current work in applying traditional game theory to cyber operations typically assumes that games exist with prescribed moves, strategies, and payos. This paper presents an analytic approach to characterizing the more realistic cyber adversarial metagame that we believe is being played. Examples show that understanding the dynamic metagame provides opportunities to exploit an adversary's anticipated attack strategy. A dynamic version of a graph-based attack-defend game is introduced, and a simulation shows how an optimal strategy can be selected for success in the dynamic environment.

  1. Optimization of Turbine Engine Cycle Analysis with Analytic Derivatives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hearn, Tristan; Hendricks, Eric; Chin, Jeffrey; Gray, Justin; Moore, Kenneth T.

    2016-01-01

    A new engine cycle analysis tool, called Pycycle, was recently built using the OpenMDAO framework. This tool uses equilibrium chemistry based thermodynamics, and provides analytic derivatives. This allows for stable and efficient use of gradient-based optimization and sensitivity analysis methods on engine cycle models, without requiring the use of finite difference derivative approximation methods. To demonstrate this, a gradient-based design optimization was performed on a multi-point turbofan engine model. Results demonstrate very favorable performance compared to an optimization of an identical model using finite-difference approximated derivatives.

  2. Electrochemical flow injection analysis of hydrazine in an excess of an active pharmaceutical ingredient: achieving pharmaceutical detection limits electrochemically.

    PubMed

    Channon, Robert B; Joseph, Maxim B; Bitziou, Eleni; Bristow, Anthony W T; Ray, Andrew D; Macpherson, Julie V

    2015-10-06

    The quantification of genotoxic impurities (GIs) such as hydrazine (HZ) is of critical importance in the pharmaceutical industry in order to uphold drug safety. HZ is a particularly intractable GI and its detection represents a significant technical challenge. Here, we present, for the first time, the use of electrochemical analysis to achieve the required detection limits by the pharmaceutical industry for the detection of HZ in the presence of a large excess of a common active pharmaceutical ingredient (API), acetaminophen (ACM) which itself is redox active, typical of many APIs. A flow injection analysis approach with electrochemical detection (FIA-EC) is utilized, in conjunction with a coplanar boron doped diamond (BDD) microband electrode, insulated in an insulating diamond platform for durability and integrated into a two piece flow cell. In order to separate the electrochemical signature for HZ such that it is not obscured by that of the ACM (present in excess), the BDD electrode is functionalized with Pt nanoparticles (NPs) to significantly shift the half wave potential for HZ oxidation to less positive potentials. Microstereolithography was used to fabricate flow cells with defined hydrodynamics which minimize dispersion of the analyte and optimize detection sensitivity. Importantly, the Pt NPs were shown to be stable under flow, and a limit of detection of 64.5 nM or 0.274 ppm for HZ with respect to the ACM, present in excess, was achieved. This represents the first electrochemical approach which surpasses the required detection limits set by the pharmaceutical industry for HZ detection in the presence of an API and paves the wave for online analysis and application to other GI and API systems.

  3. Teaching an Engaged Analysis Class through Active Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mullen, Erin Terwilleger

    2012-01-01

    Real Analysis is a required class for most undergraduate mathematics majors, but it is also one of the most difficult classes they will take. In this article, the author compares two approaches to teaching in the two analysis classes she has taught. The first one was taught in a traditional lecture-homework-exam format, while the second was taught…

  4. Exhaled breath condensate – from an analytical point of view

    PubMed Central

    Dodig, Slavica; Čepelak, Ivana

    2013-01-01

    Over the past three decades, the goal of many researchers is analysis of exhaled breath condensate (EBC) as noninvasively obtained sample. A total quality in laboratory diagnostic processes in EBC analysis was investigated: pre-analytical (formation, collection, storage of EBC), analytical (sensitivity of applied methods, standardization) and post-analytical (interpretation of results) phases. EBC analysis is still used as a research tool. Limitations referred to pre-analytical, analytical, and post-analytical phases of EBC analysis are numerous, e.g. low concentrations of EBC constituents, single-analyte methods lack in sensitivity, and multi-analyte has not been fully explored, and reference values are not established. When all, pre-analytical, analytical and post-analytical requirements are met, EBC biomarkers as well as biomarker patterns can be selected and EBC analysis can hopefully be used in clinical practice, in both, the diagnosis and in the longitudinal follow-up of patients, resulting in better outcome of disease. PMID:24266297

  5. Method and apparatus for detecting an analyte

    DOEpatents

    Allendorf, Mark D [Pleasanton, CA; Hesketh, Peter J [Atlanta, GA

    2011-11-29

    We describe the use of coordination polymers (CP) as coatings on microcantilevers for the detection of chemical analytes. CP exhibit changes in unit cell parameters upon adsorption of analytes, which will induce a stress in a static microcantilever upon which a CP layer is deposited. We also describe fabrication methods for depositing CP layers on surfaces.

  6. An Analytic Approach to Perturbative QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magradze, B. A.

    The two-loop invariant (running) coupling of QCD is written in terms of the Lambert W function. The analyticity structure of the coupling in the complex Q2-plane is established. The corresponding analytic coupling is reconstructed via a dispersion relation. We also consider some other approximations to the QCD β-function, when the corresponding couplings are solved in terms of the Lambert function. The Landau gauge gluon propagator has been considered in the renormalization group invariant analytic approach (IAA). It is shown that there is a nonperturbative ambiguity in determination of the anomalous dimension function of the gluon field. Several analytic solutions for the propagator at the one-loop order are constructed. Properties of the obtained analytical solutions are discussed.

  7. Approximated analytical solution to an Ebola optimal control problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hincapié-Palacio, Doracelly; Ospina, Juan; Torres, Delfim F. M.

    2016-11-01

    An analytical expression for the optimal control of an Ebola problem is obtained. The analytical solution is found as a first-order approximation to the Pontryagin Maximum Principle via the Euler-Lagrange equation. An implementation of the method is given using the computer algebra system Maple. Our analytical solutions confirm the results recently reported in the literature using numerical methods.

  8. Analytical Development of an Experimental Paradigm for C(3) Organizations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-10-01

    INFORMATION AND DECISION SYSTEMS MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY Cambridge, MA 02139 2 88 11 4009 ANALYTICAL DEVELOPMENT OF AN EXPERIMENTAL...organizations that is being developed at the MIT Laboratory for Information and Decision Systems (Levis 1984; 1988). Therefore, a project was undertaken in order...of a simple human decisionmaking processes and the analysis of information -processing systems . There are two quantities of primary interest in

  9. Big Data Visual Analytics for Exploratory Earth System Simulation Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Steed, Chad A.; Ricciuto, Daniel M.; Shipman, Galen M.; Smith, Brian E.; Thornton, Peter E.; Wang, Dali; Shi, Xiaoying; Williams, Dean N.

    2013-12-01

    Rapid increases in high performance computing are feeding the development of larger and more complex data sets in climate research, which sets the stage for so-called big data analysis challenges. However, conventional climate analysis techniques are inadequate in dealing with the complexities of today s data. In this paper, we describe and demonstrate a visual analytics system, called the Exploratory Data analysis ENvironment (EDEN), with specific application to the analysis of complex earth system simulation data sets. EDEN represents the type of interactive visual analysis tools that are necessary to transform data into insight, thereby improving critical comprehension of earth system processes. In addition to providing an overview of EDEN, we describe real-world studies using both point ensembles and global Community Land Model Version 4 (CLM4) simulations.

  10. Flipping the Audience Script: An Activity That Integrates Research and Audience Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lam, Chris; Hannah, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    This article describes a flipped classroom activity that requires students to integrate research and audience analysis. The activity uses Twitter as a data source. In the activity, students identify a sample, collect customer tweets, and analyze the language of the tweets in an effort to construct knowledge about an audience's values, needs, and…

  11. Validation of an analytical method for analysis of cannabinoids in hair by headspace solid-phase microextraction and gas chromatography-ion trap tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Emídio, Elissandro Soares; Prata, Vanessa de Menezes; Dórea, Haroldo Silveira

    2010-06-18

    The development of an analytical method for the determination of Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), cannabidiol (CBD) and cannabinol (CBN) in samples of human hair is described. Samples were subjected to a procedure based on the combination of headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) with gas chromatography linked with mass spectrometry operating in tandem mode (GC-MS/MS). A 10 mg aliquot of sample was firstly decontaminated using petroleum ether, deionized water and dichloromethane (2 mL of each solvent), for 10 min under sonication, and then digested in alkaline solution (1 mol L(-1) NaOH). The method variables evaluated were pH, mass of hair, fiber type, extraction temperature, desorption time, ionic strength, pre-equilibrium time and extraction time. Parameters concerning operation of the tandem mode MS/MS were also assessed and optimized. Validation of the method demonstrated excellent linearity in the range 0.1-8.0 ng mg(-1), with regression coefficients better than 0.994. Precision was determined using two different concentrations (upper and lower limits of the linear range), and RSD values were between 6.6 and 16.4%. Absolute recoveries (measured in triplicate) were in the range 1.1-8.7%, and limits of detection and quantification were 0.007-0.031 ng mg(-1) and 0.012-0.062 ng mg(-1), respectively. The LOQ for THC (0.062 ng mg(-1)) was below the cut-off value (LOQ < or = 0.1 ng mg(-1)) established by the Society of Hair Testing (SOHT), the Society of Toxicological and Forensic Chemistry (STFCh) and the Société Française de Toxicologie Analytique (SFTA). The optimized SPME method was applied in analysis of hair samples from Cannabis drug users, showing that CBN and CBD were present in all samples analyzed.

  12. An analytical model of joint contact.

    PubMed

    Eberhardt, A W; Keer, L M; Lewis, J L; Vithoontien, V

    1990-11-01

    The stress distribution in the region of contact between a layered elastic sphere and a layered elastic cavity is determined using an analytical model to stimulate contact of articulating joints. The purpose is to use the solution to analyze the effects of cartilage thickness and stiffness, bone stiffness and joint curvature on the resulting stress field, and investigate the possibility of cracking of the material due to tensile and shear stresses. Vertical cracking of cartilage as well as horizontal splitting at the cartilage-calcified cartilage interface has been observed in osteoarthritic joints. The current results indicate that for a given system (material properties mu and nu constant), the stress distribution is a function of the ratio of contact radius to layer thickness (a/h), and while tensile stresses are seen to occur only when a/h is small, tensile strain is observed for all a/h values. Significant shear stresses are observed at the cartilage-bone interface. Softening of cartilage results in an increase in a/h, and a decrease in maximum normal stress. Cartilage thinning increases a/h and the maximum contact stress, while thickening has the opposite effect. A reduction in the indenting radius reduces a/h and increases the maximum normal stress. Bone softening is seen to have negligible effect on the resulting contact parameters and stress distribution.

  13. The Immediate Exchange model: an analytical investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katriel, Guy

    2015-01-01

    We study the Immediate Exchange model, recently introduced by Heinsalu and Patriarca [Eur. Phys. J. B 87, 170 (2014)], who showed by simulations that the wealth distribution in this model converges to a Gamma distribution with shape parameter 2. Here we justify this conclusion analytically, in the infinite-population limit. An infinite-population version of the model is derived, describing the evolution of the wealth distribution in terms of iterations of a nonlinear operator on the space of probability densities. It is proved that the Gamma distributions with shape parameter 2 are fixed points of this operator, and that, starting with an arbitrary wealth distribution, the process converges to one of these fixed points. We also discuss the mixed model introduced in the same paper, in which exchanges are either bidirectional or unidirectional with fixed probability. We prove that, although, as found by Heinsalu and Patriarca, the equilibrium distribution can be closely fit by Gamma distributions, the equilibrium distribution for this model is not a Gamma distribution.

  14. An Active Learning Exercise for Introducing Agent-Based Modeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinder, Jonathan P.

    2013-01-01

    Recent developments in agent-based modeling as a method of systems analysis and optimization indicate that students in business analytics need an introduction to the terminology, concepts, and framework of agent-based modeling. This article presents an active learning exercise for MBA students in business analytics that demonstrates agent-based…

  15. An analysis of the history of dust activity on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, L. J.; Zurek, R. W.

    1993-02-01

    A comprehensive list of dust storm activity on Mars has been compiled from various published lists and additional data. For uniformity and clarity, each event is classified using a new system that includes a well-defined nomenclature. Maps showing the reported locations of events have been compiled. Detailed commentaries describe the events and/or circumstances of their observation. The seasonal distribution of Martian dust events is diagrammed and discussed together with a seasonal and annual (Mars years) timeline that includes the frequency of photographic coverage. Regional dust storms tend to occur most frequently, and all planet-encircling dust storms have been observed during the southern spring and summer seasons, although there is significant interannual variability.

  16. Economic Risk Analysis: Using Analytical and Monte Carlo Techniques.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Donnell, Brendan R.; Hickner, Michael A.; Barna, Bruce A.

    2002-01-01

    Describes the development and instructional use of a Microsoft Excel spreadsheet template that facilitates analytical and Monte Carlo risk analysis of investment decisions. Discusses a variety of risk assessment methods followed by applications of the analytical and Monte Carlo methods. Uses a case study to illustrate use of the spreadsheet tool…

  17. Analytical Essay Writing: A New Activity Introduced to a Traditional Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kommalage, Mahinda

    2012-01-01

    Medical students following a traditional curriculum get few opportunities to engage in activities such as a literature search, scientific writing, and active and collaborative learning. An analytical essay writing activity (AEWA) in physiology was introduced to first-year students. Each student prepared an essay incorporating new research findings…

  18. Electronic tongue: An analytical gustatory tool.

    PubMed

    Latha, Rewanthwar Swathi; Lakshmi, P K

    2012-01-01

    Taste is an important organoleptic property governing acceptance of products for administration through mouth. But majority of drugs available are bitter in taste. For patient acceptability and compliance, bitter taste drugs are masked by adding several flavoring agents. Thus, taste assessment is one important quality control parameter for evaluating taste-masked formulations. The primary method for the taste measurement of drug substances and formulations is by human panelists. The use of sensory panelists is very difficult and problematic in industry and this is due to the potential toxicity of drugs and subjectivity of taste panelists, problems in recruiting taste panelists, motivation and panel maintenance are significantly difficult when working with unpleasant products. Furthermore, Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-unapproved molecules cannot be tested. Therefore, analytical taste-sensing multichannel sensory system called as electronic tongue (e-tongue or artificial tongue) which can assess taste have been replacing the sensory panelists. Thus, e-tongue includes benefits like reducing reliance on human panel. The present review focuses on the electrochemical concepts in instrumentation, performance qualification of E-tongue, and applications in various fields.

  19. Integrating Variances into an Analytical Database

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanchez, Carlos

    2010-01-01

    For this project, I enrolled in numerous SATERN courses that taught the basics of database programming. These include: Basic Access 2007 Forms, Introduction to Database Systems, Overview of Database Design, and others. My main job was to create an analytical database that can handle many stored forms and make it easy to interpret and organize. Additionally, I helped improve an existing database and populate it with information. These databases were designed to be used with data from Safety Variances and DCR forms. The research consisted of analyzing the database and comparing the data to find out which entries were repeated the most. If an entry happened to be repeated several times in the database, that would mean that the rule or requirement targeted by that variance has been bypassed many times already and so the requirement may not really be needed, but rather should be changed to allow the variance's conditions permanently. This project did not only restrict itself to the design and development of the database system, but also worked on exporting the data from the database to a different format (e.g. Excel or Word) so it could be analyzed in a simpler fashion. Thanks to the change in format, the data was organized in a spreadsheet that made it possible to sort the data by categories or types and helped speed up searches. Once my work with the database was done, the records of variances could be arranged so that they were displayed in numerical order, or one could search for a specific document targeted by the variances and restrict the search to only include variances that modified a specific requirement. A great part that contributed to my learning was SATERN, NASA's resource for education. Thanks to the SATERN online courses I took over the summer, I was able to learn many new things about computers and databases and also go more in depth into topics I already knew about.

  20. An Analysis of Generational Differences Among Active Duty Members

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-03-01

    political , and racial lenses. Therefore, it may be difficult to point to an absolute generational group that is defined by a set of shared...group as those born between 1965 and 1978. Finally, the newest generation born after 1979, the Millennials , often given the label Generation Y or Echo...computer technology. Howe and Strauss (2000) define the Millennials as the generation born between 1982 and 2000. The Millennial Cohort, as defined by

  1. Composable Analytic Systems for next-generation intelligence analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DiBona, Phil; Llinas, James; Barry, Kevin

    2015-05-01

    Lockheed Martin Advanced Technology Laboratories (LM ATL) is collaborating with Professor James Llinas, Ph.D., of the Center for Multisource Information Fusion at the University at Buffalo (State of NY), researching concepts for a mixed-initiative associate system for intelligence analysts to facilitate reduced analysis and decision times while proactively discovering and presenting relevant information based on the analyst's needs, current tasks and cognitive state. Today's exploitation and analysis systems have largely been designed for a specific sensor, data type, and operational context, leading to difficulty in directly supporting the analyst's evolving tasking and work product development preferences across complex Operational Environments. Our interactions with analysts illuminate the need to impact the information fusion, exploitation, and analysis capabilities in a variety of ways, including understanding data options, algorithm composition, hypothesis validation, and work product development. Composable Analytic Systems, an analyst-driven system that increases flexibility and capability to effectively utilize Multi-INT fusion and analytics tailored to the analyst's mission needs, holds promise to addresses the current and future intelligence analysis needs, as US forces engage threats in contested and denied environments.

  2. Semi Active Control of Civil Structures, Analytical and Numerical Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerboua, M.; Benguediab, M.; Megnounif, A.; Benrahou, K. H.; Kaoulala, F.

    Structural control for civil structures was born out of a need to provide safer and more efficient designs with the reality of limited resources. The purpose of structural control is to absorb and to reflect the energy introduced by dynamic loads such as winds, waves, earthquakes, and traffic. Today, the protection of civil structures from severe dynamic loading is typically achieved by allowing the structures to be damaged. Semi-active control devices, also called "smart" control devices, assume the positive aspects of both the passive and active control devices. A semi-active control strategy is similar to the active control strategy. Only here, the control actuator does not directly apply force to the structure, but instead it is used to control the properties of a passive energy device, a controllable passive damper. Semi-active control strategies can be used in many of the same civil applications as passive and active control. One method of operating smart cable dampers is in a purely passive capacity, supplying the dampers with constant optimal voltage. The advantages to this strategy are the relative simplicity of implementing the control strategy as compared to a smart or active control strategy and that the dampers are more easily optimally tuned in- place, eliminating the need to have passive dampers with unique optimal damping coefficients. This research investigated semi-active control of civil structures for natural hazard mitigation. The research has two components, the seismic protection of buildings and the mitigation of wind-induced vibration in structures. An ideal semi-active motion equation of a composite beam that consists of a cantilever beam bonded with a PZT patch using Hamilton's principle and Galerkin's method was treated. A series R-L and a parallel R-L shunt circuits are coupled into the motion equation respectively by means of the constitutive relation of piezoelectric material and Kirchhoff's law to control the beam vibration. A

  3. Dynamic analysis of a flexible spacecraft with rotating components. Volume 1: Analytical developments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bodley, C. S.; Devers, A. D.; Park, A. C.

    1975-01-01

    Analytical procedures and digital computer code are presented for the dynamic analysis of a flexible spacecraft with rotating components. Topics, considered include: (1) nonlinear response in the time domain, and (2) linear response in the frequency domain. The spacecraft is assumed to consist of an assembly of connected rigid or flexible subassemblies. The total system is not restricted to a topological connection arrangement and may be acting under the influence of passive or active control systems and external environments. The analytics and associated digital code provide the user with the capability to establish spacecraft system nonlinear total response for specified initial conditions, linear perturbation response about a calculated or specified nominal motion, general frequency response and graphical display, and spacecraft system stability analysis.

  4. An Analytical Model for Learning: An Applied Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kassebaum, Peter Arthur

    A mediated-learning package, geared toward non-traditional students, was developed for use in the College of Marin's cultural anthropology courses. An analytical model for learning was used in the development of the package, utilizing concepts related to learning objectives, programmed instruction, Gestalt psychology, cognitive psychology, and…

  5. Facilitating the analysis of immunological data with visual analytic techniques.

    PubMed

    Shih, David C; Ho, Kevin C; Melnick, Kyle M; Rensink, Ronald A; Kollmann, Tobias R; Fortuno, Edgardo S

    2011-01-02

    Visual analytics (VA) has emerged as a new way to analyze large dataset through interactive visual display. We demonstrated the utility and the flexibility of a VA approach in the analysis of biological datasets. Examples of these datasets in immunology include flow cytometry, Luminex data, and genotyping (e.g., single nucleotide polymorphism) data. Contrary to the traditional information visualization approach, VA restores the analysis power in the hands of analyst by allowing the analyst to engage in real-time data exploration process. We selected the VA software called Tableau after evaluating several VA tools. Two types of analysis tasks analysis within and between datasets were demonstrated in the video presentation using an approach called paired analysis. Paired analysis, as defined in VA, is an analysis approach in which a VA tool expert works side-by-side with a domain expert during the analysis. The domain expert is the one who understands the significance of the data, and asks the questions that the collected data might address. The tool expert then creates visualizations to help find patterns in the data that might answer these questions. The short lag-time between the hypothesis generation and the rapid visual display of the data is the main advantage of a VA approach.

  6. An Analytical Satellite Orbit Predictor (ASOP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starke, S. E.

    1977-01-01

    The documentation and user's guide for the Analytical Satellite Orbit Predictor (ASOP) computer program is presented. The ASOP is based on mathematical methods that represent a new state-of-the-art for rapid orbit computation techniques. It is intended to be used for computation of near-earth orbits including those of the shuttle/orbiter and its payloads.

  7. Nuclear analytical chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Brune, D.; Forkman, B.; Persson, B.

    1984-01-01

    This book covers the general theories and techniques of nuclear chemical analysis, directed at applications in analytical chemistry, nuclear medicine, radiophysics, agriculture, environmental sciences, geological exploration, industrial process control, etc. The main principles of nuclear physics and nuclear detection on which the analysis is based are briefly outlined. An attempt is made to emphasise the fundamentals of activation analysis, detection and activation methods, as well as their applications. The book provides guidance in analytical chemistry, agriculture, environmental and biomedical sciences, etc. The contents include: the nuclear periodic system; nuclear decay; nuclear reactions; nuclear radiation sources; interaction of radiation with matter; principles of radiation detectors; nuclear electronics; statistical methods and spectral analysis; methods of radiation detection; neutron activation analysis; charged particle activation analysis; photon activation analysis; sample preparation and chemical separation; nuclear chemical analysis in biological and medical research; the use of nuclear chemical analysis in the field of criminology; nuclear chemical analysis in environmental sciences, geology and mineral exploration; and radiation protection.

  8. An analytical model of memristors in plants

    PubMed Central

    Markin, Vladislav S; Volkov, Alexander G; Chua, Leon

    2014-01-01

    The memristor, a resistor with memory, was postulated by Chua in 1971 and the first solid-state memristor was built in 2008. Recently, we found memristors in vivo in plants. Here we propose a simple analytical model of 2 types of memristors that can be found within plants. The electrostimulation of plants by bipolar periodic waves induces electrical responses in the Aloe vera and Mimosa pudica with fingerprints of memristors. Memristive properties of the Aloe vera and Mimosa pudica are linked to the properties of voltage gated K+ ion channels. The potassium channel blocker TEACl transform plant memristors to conventional resistors. The analytical model of a memristor with a capacitor connected in parallel exhibits different characteristic behavior at low and high frequency of applied voltage, which is the same as experimental data obtained by cyclic voltammetry in vivo. PMID:25482769

  9. School-based friendship networks and children's physical activity: A spatial analytical approach.

    PubMed

    Macdonald-Wallis, Kyle; Jago, Russell; Page, Angie S; Brockman, Rowan; Thompson, Janice L

    2011-07-01

    Despite the known health benefits, the majority of children do not meet physical activity guidelines, with past interventions to increase physical activity yielding little success. Social and friendship networks have been shown to influence obesity, smoking and academic achievement, and peer-led interventions have successfully reduced the uptake of adolescent smoking. However, the role of social networks on physical activity is not clear. This paper investigates the extent to which friendship networks influence children's physical activity, and attempts to quantify the association using spatial analytical techniques to account for the social influence. Physical activity data were collected for 986 children, aged 10-11 years old, from 40 schools in Bristol, UK. Data from 559 children were used for analysis. Mean accelerometer counts per minute (CPM) and mean minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity per day (MVPA) were calculated as objective measures of physical activity. Children nominated up to 4 school-friends, and school-based friendship networks were constructed from these nominations. Networks were tested to assess whether physical activity showed spatial dependence (in terms of social proximity in social space) using Moran's I statistic. Spatial autoregressive modelling was then used to assess the extent of spatial dependence, whilst controlling for other known predictors of physical activity. This model was compared with linear regression models for improvement in goodness-of-fit. Results indicated spatial autocorrelation of both mean MVPA (I = .346) and mean CPM (I = .284) in the data, indicating that children clustered in friendship groups with similar activity levels. Spatial autoregressive modelling of mean MVPA concurred that spatial dependence was present (ρ = .26, p < .001), and improved model fit by 31% on the linear regression model. These results demonstrate an association between physical activity levels of children and their

  10. Analysis of Whiskey by Dispersive Liquid-Liquid Microextraction Coupled with Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry: An Upper Division Analytical Chemistry Experiment Guided by Green Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owens, Janel E.; Zimmerman, Laura B.; Gardner, Michael A.; Lowe, Luis E.

    2016-01-01

    Analysis of whiskey samples prepared by a green microextraction technique, dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME), before analysis by a qualitative gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS) method, is described as a laboratory experiment for an upper division instrumental methods of analysis laboratory course. Here, aroma compounds in…

  11. An analytical thermohydraulic model for discretely fractured geothermal reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, Don B.; Koch, Donald L.; Tester, Jefferson W.

    2016-09-01

    In discretely fractured reservoirs such as those found in Enhanced/Engineered Geothermal Systems (EGS), knowledge of the fracture network is important in understanding the thermal hydraulics, i.e., how the fluid flows and the resulting temporal evolution of the subsurface temperature. The purpose of this study was to develop an analytical model of the fluid flow and heat transport in a discretely fractured network that can be used for a wide range of modeling applications and serve as an alternative analysis tool to more computationally intensive numerical codes. Given the connectivity and structure of a fracture network, the flow in the system was solved using a linear system of algebraic equations for the pressure at the nodes of the network. With the flow determined, the temperature in the fracture was solved by coupling convective heat transport in the fracture with one-dimensional heat conduction perpendicular to the fracture, employing the Green's function derived solution for a single discrete fracture. The predicted temperatures along the fracture surfaces from the analytical solution were compared to numerical simulations using the TOUGH2 reservoir code. Through two case studies, we showed the capabilities of the analytical model and explored the effect of uncertainty in the fracture apertures and network structure on thermal performance. While both sources of uncertainty independently produce large variations in production temperature, uncertainty in the network structure, whenever present, had a predominant influence on thermal performance.

  12. Standardisation of elemental analytical techniques applied to provenance studies of archaeological ceramics: an inter laboratory calibration study.

    PubMed

    Hein, A; Tsolakidou, A; Iliopoulos, I; Mommsen, H; Buxeda i Garrigós, J; Montana, G; Kilikoglou, V

    2002-04-01

    Chemical analysis is a well-established procedure for the provenancing of archaeological ceramics. Various analytical techniques are routinely used and large amounts of data have been accumulated so far in data banks. However, in order to exchange results obtained by different laboratories, the respective analytical procedures need to be tested in terms of their inter-comparability. In this study, the schemes of analysis used in four laboratories that are involved in archaeological pottery studies on a routine basis were compared. The techniques investigated were neutron activation analysis (NAA), X-ray fluorescence analysis (XRF), inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). For this comparison series of measurements on different geological standard reference materials (SRM) were carried out and the results were statistically evaluated. An attempt was also made towards the establishment of calibration factors between pairs of analytical setups in order to smooth the systematic differences among the results.

  13. Comparison of Analytical and Numerical Performance Predictions for an International Space Station Node 3 Internal Active Thermal Control System Regenerative Heat Exchanger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wise, Stephen A.; Holt, James M.

    2002-01-01

    The complexity of International Space Station (ISS) systems modeling often necessitates the concurrence of various dissimilar, parallel analysis techniques to validate modeling. This was the case with a feasibility and performance study of the ISS Node 3 Regenerative Heat Exchanger (RHX). A thermo-hydraulic network model was created and analyzed in SINDA/FLUINT. A less complex, closed form solution of the systems dynamics was created using an Excel Spreadsheet. The purpose of this paper is to provide a brief description of the modeling processes utilized, the results and benefits of each to the ISS Node 3 RHX study.

  14. Advanced Durability Analysis. Volume 1. Analytical Methods

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-07-31

    for microstruc .- tural behavior . This approach for representing the IFQ, when properly used, can provide reasonable durability analysis rt,- sults for...equivalent initial flaw size distribution (EIFSD) function. Engineering principles rather than mechanistic-based theories for microstructural behavior are...accurate EIFS distribution and a service crack growth behavior . The determinations of EIFS distribution have been described in detail previously. In this

  15. A Double Scattering Analytical Model For Elastic Recoil Detection Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Barradas, N. P.; Lorenz, K.; Alves, E.; Darakchieva, V.

    2011-06-01

    We present an analytical model for calculation of double scattering in elastic recoil detection measurements. Only events involving the beam particle and the recoil are considered, i.e. 1) an ion scatters off a target element and then produces a recoil, and 2) an ion produces a recoil which then scatters off a target element. Events involving intermediate recoils are not considered, i.e. when the primary ion produces a recoil which then produces a second recoil. If the recoil element is also present in the stopping foil, recoil events in the stopping foil are also calculated. We included the model in the standard code for IBA data analysis NDF, and applied it to the measurement of hydrogen in Si.

  16. Analytical Characterization of Erythritol Tetranitrate, an Improvised Explosive.

    PubMed

    Matyáš, Robert; Lyčka, Antonín; Jirásko, Robert; Jakový, Zdeněk; Maixner, Jaroslav; Mišková, Linda; Künzel, Martin

    2016-05-01

    Erythritol tetranitrate (ETN), an ester of nitric acid and erythritol, is a solid crystalline explosive with high explosive performance. Although it has never been used in any industrial or military application, it has become one of the most prepared and misused improvise explosives. In this study, several analytical techniques were explored to facilitate analysis in forensic laboratories. FTIR and Raman spectrometry measurements expand existing data and bring more detailed assignment of bands through the parallel study of erythritol [(15) N4 ] tetranitrate. In the case of powder diffraction, recently published data were verified, and (1) H, (13) C, and (15) N NMR spectra are discussed in detail. The technique of electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry was successfully used for the analysis of ETN. Described methods allow fast, versatile, and reliable detection or analysis of samples containing erythritol tetranitrate in forensic laboratories.

  17. Comparison of analytical eddy current models using principal components analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contant, S.; Luloff, M.; Morelli, J.; Krause, T. W.

    2017-02-01

    Monitoring the gap between the pressure tube (PT) and the calandria tube (CT) in CANDU® fuel channels is essential, as contact between the two tubes can lead to delayed hydride cracking of the pressure tube. Multifrequency transmit-receive eddy current non-destructive evaluation is used to determine this gap, as this method has different depths of penetration and variable sensitivity to noise, unlike single frequency eddy current non-destructive evaluation. An Analytical model based on the Dodd and Deeds solutions, and a second model that accounts for normal and lossy self-inductances, and a non-coaxial pickup coil, are examined for representing the response of an eddy current transmit-receive probe when considering factors that affect the gap response, such as pressure tube wall thickness and pressure tube resistivity. The multifrequency model data was analyzed using principal components analysis (PCA), a statistical method used to reduce the data set into a data set of fewer variables. The results of the PCA of the analytical models were then compared to PCA performed on a previously obtained experimental data set. The models gave similar results under variable PT wall thickness conditions, but the non-coaxial coil model, which accounts for self-inductive losses, performed significantly better than the Dodd and Deeds model under variable resistivity conditions.

  18. Analytical-HZETRN Model for Rapid Assessment of Active Magnetic Radiation Shielding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Washburn, S. A.; Blattnig, S. R.; Singleterry, R. C.; Westover, S. C.

    2014-01-01

    The use of active radiation shielding designs has the potential to reduce the radiation exposure received by astronauts on deep-space missions at a significantly lower mass penalty than designs utilizing only passive shielding. Unfortunately, the determination of the radiation exposure inside these shielded environments often involves lengthy and computationally intensive Monte Carlo analysis. In order to evaluate the large trade space of design parameters associated with a magnetic radiation shield design, an analytical model was developed for the determination of flux inside a solenoid magnetic field due to the Galactic Cosmic Radiation (GCR) radiation environment. This analytical model was then coupled with NASA's radiation transport code, HZETRN, to account for the effects of passive/structural shielding mass. The resulting model can rapidly obtain results for a given configuration and can therefore be used to analyze an entire trade space of potential variables in less time than is required for even a single Monte Carlo run. Analyzing this trade space for a solenoid magnetic shield design indicates that active shield bending powers greater than 15 Tm and passive/structural shielding thicknesses greater than 40 g/cm2 have a limited impact on reducing dose equivalent values. Also, it is shown that higher magnetic field strengths are more effective than thicker magnetic fields at reducing dose equivalent.

  19. Analytical-HZETRN model for rapid assessment of active magnetic radiation shielding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Washburn, S. A.; Blattnig, S. R.; Singleterry, R. C.; Westover, S. C.

    2014-01-01

    The use of active radiation shielding designs has the potential to reduce the radiation exposure received by astronauts on deep-space missions at a significantly lower mass penalty than designs utilizing only passive shielding. Unfortunately, the determination of the radiation exposure inside these shielded environments often involves lengthy and computationally intensive Monte Carlo analysis. In order to evaluate the large trade space of design parameters associated with a magnetic radiation shield design, an analytical model was developed for the determination of flux inside a solenoid magnetic field due to the Galactic Cosmic Radiation (GCR) radiation environment. This analytical model was then coupled with NASA's radiation transport code, HZETRN, to account for the effects of passive/structural shielding mass. The resulting model can rapidly obtain results for a given configuration and can therefore be used to analyze an entire trade space of potential variables in less time than is required for even a single Monte Carlo run. Analyzing this trade space for a solenoid magnetic shield design indicates that active shield bending powers greater than ∼15 Tm and passive/structural shielding thicknesses greater than 40 g/cm2 have a limited impact on reducing dose equivalent values. Also, it is shown that higher magnetic field strengths are more effective than thicker magnetic fields at reducing dose equivalent.

  20. An in-depth analysis of temperature effect on DIBL in UTBB FD SOI MOSFETs based on experimental data, numerical simulations and analytical models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, A. S. N.; de Streel, G.; Planes, N.; Haond, M.; Giacomini, R.; Flandre, D.; Kilchytska, V.

    2017-02-01

    The Drain Induced Barrier Lowering (DIBL) behavior in Ultra-Thin Body and Buried oxide (UTBB) transistors is investigated in details in the temperature range up to 150 °C, for the first time to the best of our knowledge. The analysis is based on experimental data, physical device simulation, compact model (SPICE) simulation and previously published models. Contrary to MASTAR prediction, experiments reveal DIBL increase with temperature. Physical device simulations of different thin-film fully-depleted (FD) devices outline the generality of such behavior. SPICE simulations, with UTSOI DK2.4 model, only partially adhere to experimental trends. Several analytic models available in the literature are assessed for DIBL vs. temperature prediction. Although being the closest to experiments, Fasarakis' model overestimates DIBL(T) dependence for shortest devices and underestimates it for upsized gate lengths frequently used in ultra-low-voltage (ULV) applications. This model is improved in our work, by introducing a temperature-dependent inversion charge at threshold. The improved model shows very good agreement with experimental data, with high gain in precision for the gate lengths under test.

  1. A New Analytic Framework for Moderation Analysis --- Moving Beyond Analytic Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Wan; Yu, Qin; Crits-Christoph, Paul; Tu, Xin M.

    2009-01-01

    Conceptually, a moderator is a variable that modifies the effect of a predictor on a response. Analytically, a common approach as used in most moderation analyses is to add analytic interactions involving the predictor and moderator in the form of cross-variable products and test the significance of such terms. The narrow scope of such a procedure is inconsistent with the broader conceptual definition of moderation, leading to confusion in interpretation of study findings. In this paper, we develop a new approach to the analytic procedure that is consistent with the concept of moderation. The proposed framework defines moderation as a process that modifies an existing relationship between the predictor and the outcome, rather than simply a test of a predictor by moderator interaction. The approach is illustrated with data from a real study. PMID:20161453

  2. Content Analysis of Science Books for Upper Primary Stage in Jordan and Intermediate Stage in Saudi Arabia from an Islamic Perspective: Analytical Comparative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aldossari, Ali Tarad; Al Khaldi, Jamal Khalil; Altarawneh, Mohammad Hasan

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to identify the current situation of science books in Jordan and Saudi Arabia from an Islamic perspective. For this end, the content analysis approach has been used through the analysis of the unit concept in the science books for the seventh, eighth and ninth grades in the academic year (2015/2016) in Jordan and Saudi Arabia. The…

  3. Three-dimensional analysis of optical forces generated by an active tractor beam using radial polarization.

    PubMed

    Carretero, Luis; Acebal, Pablo; Blaya, Salvador

    2014-02-10

    We theoretically study the three-dimensional behavior of nanoparticles in an active optical conveyor. To do this, we solved the Langevin equation when the forces are generated by a focusing system at the near field. Analytical expressions for the optical forces generated by the optical conveyor were obtained by solving the Richards and Wolf vectorial diffraction integrals in an approximated form when a mask of two annular pupils is illuminated by a radially polarized Hermite-Gauss beam. Trajectories, in both the transverse plane and the longitudinal direction, are analyzed showing that the behavior of the optical conveyor can be optimized by conveniently choosing the configuration of the mask of the two annular pupils (inner and outer radius of the two rings) in order to trap and transport all particles at the focal plane.

  4. ANALYTICAL GALAXY PROFILES FOR PHOTOMETRIC AND LENSING ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    Spergel, David N.

    2010-11-15

    This article introduces a family of analytical functions of the form x {sup {nu}} K {sub {nu}}(x), where K {sub {nu}} is the incomplete Bessel function of the third kind. This family of functions can describe the density profile, projected and integrated light profiles, and the gravitational potentials of galaxies. For the proper choice of parameters, these functions accurately approximate Sersic functions over a range of indices and are good fits to galaxy light profiles. With an additional parameter corresponding to a galaxy core radius, these functions can fit galaxy like M87 over a factor of 10{sup 5} in radius. Unlike Sersic profiles, these functions have simple analytical two-dimensional and three-dimensional Fourier transforms, so they are easily convolved with spatially varying point-spread function (PSF) and are well suited for photometric and lensing analysis. We use these functions to estimate the effects of seeing on lensing measurements and show that high S/N measurements, even when the PSF is larger than the galaxy effective radius, should be able to recover accurate estimates of lensing distortions by weighting light in the outer isophotes that are less affected by seeing.

  5. Automating the analytical laboratory via the Chemical Analysis Automation paradigm

    SciTech Connect

    Hollen, R.; Rzeszutko, C.

    1997-10-01

    To address the need for standardization within the analytical chemistry laboratories of the nation, the Chemical Analysis Automation (CAA) program within the US Department of Energy, Office of Science and Technology`s Robotic Technology Development Program is developing laboratory sample analysis systems that will automate the environmental chemical laboratories. The current laboratory automation paradigm consists of islands-of-automation that do not integrate into a system architecture. Thus, today the chemist must perform most aspects of environmental analysis manually using instrumentation that generally cannot communicate with other devices in the laboratory. CAA is working towards a standardized and modular approach to laboratory automation based upon the Standard Analysis Method (SAM) architecture. Each SAM system automates a complete chemical method. The building block of a SAM is known as the Standard Laboratory Module (SLM). The SLM, either hardware or software, automates a subprotocol of an analysis method and can operate as a standalone or as a unit within a SAM. The CAA concept allows the chemist to easily assemble an automated analysis system, from sample extraction through data interpretation, using standardized SLMs without the worry of hardware or software incompatibility or the necessity of generating complicated control programs. A Task Sequence Controller (TSC) software program schedules and monitors the individual tasks to be performed by each SLM configured within a SAM. The chemist interfaces with the operation of the TSC through the Human Computer Interface (HCI), a logical, icon-driven graphical user interface. The CAA paradigm has successfully been applied in automating EPA SW-846 Methods 3541/3620/8081 for the analysis of PCBs in a soil matrix utilizing commercially available equipment in tandem with SLMs constructed by CAA.

  6. An analytical model of flagellate hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dölger, Julia; Bohr, Tomas; Andersen, Anders

    2017-04-01

    Flagellates are unicellular microswimmers that propel themselves using one or several beating flagella. We consider a hydrodynamic model of flagellates and explore the effect of flagellar arrangement and beat pattern on swimming kinematics and near-cell flow. The model is based on the analytical solution by Oseen for the low Reynolds number flow due to a point force outside a no-slip sphere. The no-slip sphere represents the cell and the point force a single flagellum. By superposition we are able to model a freely swimming flagellate with several flagella. For biflagellates with left–right symmetric flagellar arrangements we determine the swimming velocity, and we show that transversal forces due to the periodic movements of the flagella can promote swimming. For a model flagellate with both a longitudinal and a transversal flagellum we determine radius and pitch of the helical swimming trajectory. We find that the longitudinal flagellum is responsible for the average translational motion whereas the transversal flagellum governs the rotational motion. Finally, we show that the transversal flagellum can lead to strong feeding currents to localized capture sites on the cell surface.

  7. Fully Grouted Rock Bolts: An Analytical Investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, L.; An, X. M.; Zhao, Z. Y.

    2015-05-01

    This paper analytically investigates the performance of fully grouted rock bolts in typical scenarios, including pullout test, suspending loosened block, and increasing joint aperture, respectively. The interface shear stress distribution follows the model proposed by Li and Stillborg (Int J Rock Mech Mining Sci 36:1013-1029, 1999), while the axial behavior of the bolt shank obeys the elasto-plastic (yielding-hardening) constitutive model of steel. Three different failure modes are taken into account: tensile failure of bolt shank, bolt shank being pulled out along the bolt/rock interface, and loss of face plate. The evolution of the interface shear stress and the axial tensile stress are examined for both long and short bolts under displacement and load boundary conditions. The derived charts are able to predict the load capacity of fully grouted bolts in pullout test, the minimum length requirement of the bolt to suspend a loosened block, and the maximum allowed opening displacement of a rock joint for a fully grouted bolt. In addition, different potential failure modes are specified. Full range load-displacement curves are produced and compared for various failure modes. The derived charts could be directly used in rock-bolting design.

  8. Emphasizing Mineral Chemistry in an Analytical Chemistry Unit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunn, Jeffrey G.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Describes an analytical chemistry unit in the second year of the chemistry degree course at Curtin University that was designed to reflect the numerous employment opportunities for chemistry graduates in the mineral processing industries and private analytical laboratories. Presents the lecture syllabus, the laboratory course description, and…

  9. Physical and Chemical Analytical Analysis: A key component of Bioforensics

    SciTech Connect

    Velsko, S P

    2005-02-15

    The anthrax letters event of 2001 has raised our awareness of the potential importance of non-biological measurements on samples of biological agents used in a terrorism incident. Such measurements include a variety of mass spectral, spectroscopic, and other instrumental techniques that are part of the current armamentarium of the modern materials analysis or analytical chemistry laboratory. They can provide morphological, trace element, isotopic, and other molecular ''fingerprints'' of the agent that may be key pieces of evidence, supplementing that obtained from genetic analysis or other biological properties. The generation and interpretation of such data represents a new domain of forensic science, closely aligned with other areas of ''microbial forensics''. This paper describes some major elements of the R&D agenda that will define this sub-field in the immediate future and provide the foundations for a coherent national capability. Data from chemical and physical analysis of BW materials can be useful to an investigation of a bio-terror event in two ways. First, it can be used to compare evidence samples collected at different locations where such incidents have occurred (e.g. between the powders in the New York and Washington letters in the Amerithrax investigation) or between the attack samples and those seized during the investigation of sites where it is suspected the material was manufactured (if such samples exist). Matching of sample properties can help establish the relatedness of disparate incidents, and mis-matches might exclude certain scenarios, or signify a more complex etiology of the events under investigation. Chemical and morphological analysis for sample matching has a long history in forensics, and is likely to be acceptable in principle in court, assuming that match criteria are well defined and derived from known limits of precision of the measurement techniques in question. Thus, apart from certain operational issues (such as how to

  10. Analytical formulation of selected activities of the remote manipulator system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerman, K. J.

    1977-01-01

    Existing analysis of Orbiter-RMS-Payload kinematics were surveyed, including equations dealing with the two body kinematics in the presence of a massless RMS and compares analytical explicit solutions with numerical solutions. For the following operational phases of the RMS numerical demonstration, problems are provided: (1) payload capture; (2) payload stowage and removal from cargo bay; and (3) payload deployment. The equation of motion provided accounted for RMS control forces and torque moments and could be extended to RMS flexibility and control loop simulation without increasing the degrees of freedom of the two body system.

  11. Analytical toxicology of emerging drugs of abuse--an update.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Markus R; Peters, Frank T

    2012-12-01

    The steady increase of new drugs of abuse on the illicit drug market is a great challenge for analytical toxicologists. Because most of these new drugs or drug classes are not included in established analytical methods targeting classic drugs of abuse, analytical procedures must be adapted or new procedures must be developed to cover such new compounds. This review summarizes procedures for analysis of these drugs of abuse published from January 2009 to January 2012 covering the following classes of emerging drugs of abuse as follows: β-keto-amphetamines, pyrrolidinophenones, tryptamines, and synthetic cannabinoids.

  12. Analytical framework for recurrence network analysis of time series.

    PubMed

    Donges, Jonathan F; Heitzig, Jobst; Donner, Reik V; Kurths, Jürgen

    2012-04-01

    Recurrence networks are a powerful nonlinear tool for time series analysis of complex dynamical systems. While there are already many successful applications ranging from medicine to paleoclimatology, a solid theoretical foundation of the method has still been missing so far. Here, we interpret an ɛ-recurrence network as a discrete subnetwork of a "continuous" graph with uncountably many vertices and edges corresponding to the system's attractor. This step allows us to show that various statistical measures commonly used in complex network analysis can be seen as discrete estimators of newly defined continuous measures of certain complex geometric properties of the attractor on the scale given by ɛ. In particular, we introduce local measures such as the ɛ-clustering coefficient, mesoscopic measures such as ɛ-motif density, path-based measures such as ɛ-betweennesses, and global measures such as ɛ-efficiency. This new analytical basis for the so far heuristically motivated network measures also provides an objective criterion for the choice of ɛ via a percolation threshold, and it shows that estimation can be improved by so-called node splitting invariant versions of the measures. We finally illustrate the framework for a number of archetypical chaotic attractors such as those of the Bernoulli and logistic maps, periodic and two-dimensional quasiperiodic motions, and for hyperballs and hypercubes by deriving analytical expressions for the novel measures and comparing them with data from numerical experiments. More generally, the theoretical framework put forward in this work describes random geometric graphs and other networks with spatial constraints, which appear frequently in disciplines ranging from biology to climate science.

  13. An Emergent Language Program Framework: Actively Involving Learners in Needs Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Savage, William; Storer, Graeme

    1992-01-01

    Relates the experience of the staff of an aquaculture outreach program in Northeast Thailand in implementing an English for special purposes program. By actively involving learners in both the needs analysis and program design, teachers were able to adapt the program content to the requirements of the students. (15 references) (JL)

  14. Analytical and experimental analysis of magnetorheological elastomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trabia, Sarah

    Many engineering applications ranging from robotic joints to shock and vibration mitigation can benefit by incorporating components with variable stiffness. In addition, variable stiffness structures can provide haptic feedback (the sense of touch) to the user. In this work, it is proposed to study Magnetorheological Elastomers (MRE), where iron particles within the elastomer compound develop a dipole interaction energy, to be used in a device for haptic feedback. A novel feature of this MRE device is to introduce a field-induced variable shear modulus bias via a permanent magnet and using a current input to the electromagnetic control coil to change the modulus of the elastomer in both directions (softer or harder). In this preliminary work, both computational and experimental results of the proposed MRE design are presented. The design is created in COMSOL to verify that the magnetic field is in the desired direction. MRE was fabricated and characterized using a Bose Dynamic Mechanical Analyzer for the shear modulus. Using this information, it is possible to know how the MRE will react in magnetic fields within the haptic feedback device. Additionally, a model for an MRE is developed in a multi-physics COMSOL program that is linked to a MATLAB function that predicts the shear modulus and incorporates it into the material properties to best simulate the MRE's ability to change shear modulus.

  15. Determination of natural and depleted uranium in urine at the ppt level: an interlaboratory analytical exercise.

    PubMed

    Ough, E A; Lewis, B J; Andrews, W S; Bennett, L G I; Hancock, R G V; D'Agastino, P A

    2006-05-01

    An analytical exercise was initiated in order to determine those procedures with the capability to measure total uranium and uranium (238U/235U) isotopic ratios in urine samples containing >0.02 microg U kg-1 urine. A host laboratory prepared six identical sets of twelve synthetic urine samples containing total uranium in the range of 25 to 770 ng U kg-1 urine and with 238U/235U isotopic ratios ranging from 138 (100% NU) to 215 (51% DU). Sets of samples were shipped to five testing laboratories (four based in Canada and one based in Europe). Each laboratory utilized one of the following analytical techniques: sector field inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-SF-MS), quadrupole inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-Q-MS), thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS), and instrumental/delayed neutron activation analysis (I/DNAA), in their analyses.

  16. Academic Analytics: Anatomy of an Exploratory Essay

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferreira, Sérgio André; Andrade, António

    2016-01-01

    Investment in technological subsystems to support the activity of teaching and learning and the various areas of the life of Higher Education Institutions (HEI) is of increasing importance in the implementation of the policy and strategy of these organizations. Each of these subsystems collects a huge amount of data that, if properly organized,…

  17. Integrating bio-inorganic and analytical chemistry into an undergraduate biochemistry laboratory.

    PubMed

    Erasmus, Daniel J; Brewer, Sharon E; Cinel, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    Undergraduate laboratories expose students to a wide variety of topics and techniques in a limited amount of time. This can be a challenge and lead to less exposure to concepts and activities in bio-inorganic chemistry and analytical chemistry that are closely-related to biochemistry. To address this, we incorporated a new iron determination by atomic absorption spectroscopy exercise as part of a five-week long laboratory-based project on the purification of myoglobin from beef. Students were required to prepare samples for chemical analysis, operate an atomic absorption spectrophotometer, critically evaluate their iron data, and integrate these data into a study of myoglobin.

  18. Analytical and experimental analysis of tube coil heat exchanger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smusz, R.

    2016-09-01

    The paper presents the analytical and experimental analysis of heat transfer for the finned tube coil heat exchanger immersed in thermal storage tank. The tank is equipped with three helical-shaped heating coils and cylindrical- shaped stratification device. Two coils, upper and lower, use the water as a heating medium. The third, double wall heat exchanger coil, located at the bottom head on the tank is filled by the refrigerant (freon). Calculations of thermal power of water coil were made. Correlations of heat transfer coefficients in curved tubes were applied. In order to verify the analytical calculations the experimental studies of heat transfer characteristic for coil heat exchanger were performed.

  19. Analytical analysis of borehole experiments for the estimation of subsurface thermal properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moscoso Lembcke, Luis G.; Roubinet, Delphine; Gidel, Floriane; Irving, James; Pehme, Peeter; Parker, Beth L.

    2016-05-01

    Estimating subsurface thermal properties is required in many research fields and applications. To this end, borehole experiments such as the thermal response test (TRT) and active-line-source (ALS) method are of significant interest because they allow us to determine thermal property estimates in situ. With these methods, the subsurface thermal conductivity and diffusivity are typically estimated using asymptotic analytical expressions, whose simplifying assumptions have an impact on the accuracy of the values obtained. In this paper, we develop new analytical tools for interpreting borehole thermal experiments, and we use these tools to assess the impact of such assumptions on thermal property estimates. Quite importantly, our results show that the simplifying assumptions of currently used analytical models can result in errors in the estimated thermal conductivity and diffusivity of up to 60% and 40%, respectively. We also show that these errors are more important for short-term analysis and can be reduced with an appropriate choice of experimental duration. Our results demonstrate the need for cautious interpretation of the data collected during TRT and ALS experiments as well as for improvement of the existing in-situ experimental methods.

  20. Analytic Hierarchy Process to Define the Most Important Factors and Related Technologies for Empowering Elderly People in Taking an Active Role in their Health.

    PubMed

    Fico, G; Gaeta, E; Arredondo, M T; Pecchia, L

    2015-09-01

    Successful management of health conditions in older population is determined by strategic involvement of a professional team of careers and by empowering patients and their caregivers to take over a central role and responsibility in the daily management of condition. Identifying, structuring and ranking the most important needs related to these aspects could pave the way for improved strategies in designing systems and technological solutions supporting user empowerment. This paper presents the preliminary results of a study aiming to elicit these needs. Healthcare professionals, working together in the European and Innovation Partnership on Active and Healthy Ageing (EIP-AHA) initiative, have defined a set of needs and factors that have been organized in two hierarchies around the concepts of patient activation and proactive and prepared care team, defined in the Chronic Care Model. The two hierarchies have been mapped, by a team of experts in computer science, with technologies and solutions that could facilitate the achievement of the identified needs.

  1. Analytical essay writing: a new activity introduced to a traditional curriculum.

    PubMed

    Kommalage, Mahinda

    2012-03-01

    Medical students following a traditional curriculum get few opportunities to engage in activities such as a literature search, scientific writing, and active and collaborative learning. An analytical essay writing activity (AEWA) in physiology was introduced to first-year students. Each student prepared an essay incorporating new research findings with existing knowledge on a medical topic. Students were expected to study on the topic in detail from textbooks as well as from research publications and write a descriptive and critical analysis. This activity would help them to be aware of new developments in the field and understand the complexity and rapidity of changes in the subject. The aim of this study was to learn how students used the AEWA as a learning process. For this purpose, student perceptions were assessed quantitatively and those of the faculty staff were assessed qualitatively. The data from the students showed considerable achievements in the medical database search, scientific writing, group work, and search for new scientific knowledge. The activity was influenced by prior capabilities in computer use, English language knowledge, and writing ability. Resources available at the medical school had a greater influence on the activity. Faculty staff appreciated the quality of the essay while highlighting areas of improvement. The students seemed to be satisfied with the supervisory role of the faculty staff, whereas the staff felt that the students used the supervisors less than expected. The AEWA was a successful activity promoting many aspects of active and collaborative learning. The low availability of books and information and communications technology (ICT) resources, poor internet connection, and insufficient English language skills were probably responsible for the negative feedback on this activity in this resource-deprived environment.

  2. Design and Analysis of Hammerhead Ribozyme Activity Against an Artificial Gene Target

    PubMed Central

    Carter, James; Nawtaisong, Pruksa; Balaraman, Velmurugan; Fraser, Malcolm J.

    2014-01-01

    In vitro cleavage assays are routinely conducted to properly assess the catalytic activity of hammerhead ribozymes (HHR) against target RNA molecules like the dengue virus RNA genomes. These experiments are performed for initial assessment of HHR catalysis in a cell-free system and have been simplified by the substitution of agarose gel electrophoresis for SDS-PAGE. Substituting mobility assays enables the analysis of ribozymes in a more rapid fashion without radioisotopes. Here we describe the in vitro transcription of an HHR and corresponding target from T7-promoted plasmids into RNA molecules leading to the analysis of HHR activity against the RNA target by in vitro cleavage assays. PMID:24318886

  3. Critical Access Hospitals and Retail Activity: An Empirical Analysis in Oklahoma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks, Lara; Whitacre, Brian E.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This paper takes an empirical approach to determining the effect that a critical access hospital (CAH) has on local retail activity. Previous research on the relationship between hospitals and economic development has primarily focused on single-case, multiplier-oriented analysis. However, as the efficacy of federal and state-level rural…

  4. An Analytic Technique for Investigating Mode-Locked Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Usechak, N.G.; Agrawal, G.P.

    2005-09-30

    We present an analytic theory capable of predicting pulse parameters in mode-locked lasers in the presence of dispersion and nonlinearity. Excellent agreement is obtained between this approach and full numerical solutions.

  5. Meta-analytic investigations of structural grey matter, executive domain-related functional activations, and white matter diffusivity in obsessive compulsive disorder: an integrative review.

    PubMed

    Eng, Goi Khia; Sim, Kang; Chen, Shen-Hsing Annabel

    2015-05-01

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is a debilitating disorder. However, existing neuroimaging findings involving executive function and structural abnormalities in OCD have been mixed. Here we conducted meta-analyses to investigate differences in OCD samples and controls in: Study 1 - grey matter structure; Study 2 - executive function task-related activations during (i) response inhibition, (ii) interference, and (iii) switching tasks; and Study 3 - white matter diffusivity. Results showed grey matter differences in the frontal, striatal, thalamus, parietal and cerebellar regions; task domain-specific neural differences in similar regions; and abnormal diffusivity in major white matter regions in OCD samples compared to controls. Our results reported concurrence of abnormal white matter diffusivity with corresponding abnormalities in grey matter and task-related functional activations. Our findings suggested the involvement of other brain regions not included in the cortico-striato-thalamo-cortical network, such as the cerebellum and parietal cortex, and questioned the involvement of the orbitofrontal region in OCD pathophysiology. Future research is needed to clarify the roles of these brain regions in the disorder.

  6. An Asymptotic Analysis of a 2-D Model of Dynamically Active Compartments Coupled by Bulk Diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gou, J.; Ward, M. J.

    2016-08-01

    A class of coupled cell-bulk ODE-PDE models is formulated and analyzed in a two-dimensional domain, which is relevant to studying quorum-sensing behavior on thin substrates. In this model, spatially segregated dynamically active signaling cells of a common small radius ɛ ≪ 1 are coupled through a passive bulk diffusion field. For this coupled system, the method of matched asymptotic expansions is used to construct steady-state solutions and to formulate a spectral problem that characterizes the linear stability properties of the steady-state solutions, with the aim of predicting whether temporal oscillations can be triggered by the cell-bulk coupling. Phase diagrams in parameter space where such collective oscillations can occur, as obtained from our linear stability analysis, are illustrated for two specific choices of the intracellular kinetics. In the limit of very large bulk diffusion, it is shown that solutions to the ODE-PDE cell-bulk system can be approximated by a finite-dimensional dynamical system. This limiting system is studied both analytically, using a linear stability analysis and, globally, using numerical bifurcation software. For one illustrative example of the theory, it is shown that when the number of cells exceeds some critical number, i.e., when a quorum is attained, the passive bulk diffusion field can trigger oscillations through a Hopf bifurcation that would otherwise not occur without the coupling. Moreover, for two specific models for the intracellular dynamics, we show that there are rather wide regions in parameter space where these triggered oscillations are synchronous in nature. Unless the bulk diffusivity is asymptotically large, it is shown that a diffusion-sensing behavior is possible whereby more clustered spatial configurations of cells inside the domain lead to larger regions in parameter space where synchronous collective oscillations between the small cells can occur. Finally, the linear stability analysis for these cell

  7. Analytical studies: a framework for quality improvement design and analysis.

    PubMed

    Provost, Lloyd P

    2011-04-01

    Conducting studies for learning is fundamental to improvement. Deming emphasised that the reason for conducting a study is to provide a basis for action on the system of interest. He classified studies into two types depending on the intended target for action. An enumerative study is one in which action will be taken on the universe that was studied. An analytical study is one in which action will be taken on a cause system to improve the future performance of the system of interest. The aim of an enumerative study is estimation, while an analytical study focuses on prediction. Because of the temporal nature of improvement, the theory and methods for analytical studies are a critical component of the science of improvement.

  8. Active Control of Fan Noise: Feasibility Study. Volume 6; Theoretical Analysis for Coupling of Active Noise Control Actuator Ring Sources to an Annular Duct with Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kraft, R. E.

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this effort is to develop an analytical model for the coupling of active noise control (ANC) piston-type actuators that are mounted flush to the inner and outer walls of an annular duct to the modes in the duct generated by the actuator motion. The analysis will be used to couple the ANC actuators to the modal analysis propagation computer program for the annular duct, to predict the effects of active suppression of fan-generated engine noise sources. This combined program will then be available to assist in the design or evaluation of ANC systems in fan engine annular exhaust ducts. An analysis has been developed to predict the modes generated in an annular duct due to the coupling of flush-mounted ring actuators on the inner and outer walls of the duct. The analysis has been combined with a previous analysis for the coupling of modes to a cylindrical duct in a FORTRAN computer program to perform the computations. The method includes the effects of uniform mean flow in the duct. The program can be used for design or evaluation purposes for active noise control hardware for turbofan engines. Predictions for some sample cases modeled after the geometry of the NASA Lewis ANC Fan indicate very efficient coupling in both the inlet and exhaust ducts for the m = 6 spinning mode at frequencies where only a single radial mode is cut-on. Radial mode content in higher order cut-off modes at the source plane and the required actuator displacement amplitude to achieve 110 dB SPL levels in the desired mode were predicted. Equivalent cases with and without flow were examined for the cylindrical and annular geometry, and little difference was found for a duct flow Mach number of 0.1. The actuator ring coupling program will be adapted as a subroutine to the cylindrical duct modal analysis and the exhaust duct modal analysis. This will allow the fan source to be defined in terms of characteristic modes at the fan source plane and predict the propagation to the

  9. Optimizing an immersion ESL curriculum using analytic hierarchy process.

    PubMed

    Tang, Hui-Wen Vivian

    2011-11-01

    The main purpose of this study is to fill a substantial knowledge gap regarding reaching a uniform group decision in English curriculum design and planning. A comprehensive content-based course criterion model extracted from existing literature and expert opinions was developed. Analytical hierarchy process (AHP) was used to identify the relative importance of course criteria for the purpose of tailoring an optimal one-week immersion English as a second language (ESL) curriculum for elementary school students in a suburban county of Taiwan. The hierarchy model and AHP analysis utilized in the present study will be useful for resolving several important multi-criteria decision-making issues in planning and evaluating ESL programs. This study also offers valuable insights and provides a basis for further research in customizing ESL curriculum models for different student populations with distinct learning needs, goals, and socioeconomic backgrounds.

  10. Defining Behavior-Environment Interactions: Translating and Developing An Experimental and Applied Behavior-Analytic Vocabulary in and to the National Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tuomisto, Marti T.; Parkkinen, Lauri

    2012-01-01

    Verbal behavior, as in the use of terms, is an important part of scientific activity in general and behavior analysis in particular. Many glossaries and dictionaries of behavior analysis have been published in English, but few in any other language. Here we review the area of behavior analytic terminology, its translations, and development in…

  11. Analytical methods in sphingolipidomics: Quantitative and profiling approaches in food analysis.

    PubMed

    Canela, Núria; Herrero, Pol; Mariné, Sílvia; Nadal, Pedro; Ras, Maria Rosa; Rodríguez, Miguel Ángel; Arola, Lluís

    2016-01-08

    In recent years, sphingolipidomics has emerged as an interesting omic science that encompasses the study of the full sphingolipidome characterization, content, structure and activity in cells, tissues or organisms. Like other omics, it has the potential to impact biomarker discovery, drug development and systems biology knowledge. Concretely, dietary food sphingolipids have gained considerable importance due to their extensively reported bioactivity. Because of the complexity of this lipid family and their diversity among foods, powerful analytical methodologies are needed for their study. The analytical tools developed in the past have been improved with the enormous advances made in recent years in mass spectrometry (MS) and chromatography, which allow the convenient and sensitive identification and quantitation of sphingolipid classes and form the basis of current sphingolipidomics methodologies. In addition, novel hyphenated nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) strategies, new ionization strategies, and MS imaging are outlined as promising technologies to shape the future of sphingolipid analyses. This review traces the analytical methods of sphingolipidomics in food analysis concerning sample extraction, chromatographic separation, the identification and quantification of sphingolipids by MS and their structural elucidation by NMR.

  12. An investigation of helicopter dynamic coupling using an analytical model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, Jeffrey D.

    1995-01-01

    Many attempts have been made in recent years to predict the off-axis response of a helicopter to control inputs, and most have had little success. Since physical insight is limited by the complexity of numerical simulation models, this paper examines the off-axis response problem using an analytical model, with the goal of understanding the mechanics of the coupling. A new induced velocity model is extended to include the effects of wake distortion from pitch rate. It is shown that the inclusion of these results in a significant change in the lateral flap response to a steady pitch rate. The proposed inflow model is coupled with the full rotor/body dynamics, and comparisons are made between the model and flight test data for a UH-60 in hover. Results show that inclusion of induced velocity variations due to shaft rate improves correlation in the pitch response to lateral cycle inputs.

  13. An Analytic Phase Function for Cylindrical Particles.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-08-01

    Light Scattering by Randomly Oriented Spheroidal Parti- cles," Appl Opt, 19(6):962-97 Light -scattering properties of an assembly of randomly ...concentration of them in Chapter 14. Cheung, R. L-T, and A. Ishimaru, 1982, "Transmission, Backscattering , and Depolarization of Waves in Randomly Distributed... Particles ," J Opt Soc Am A, 1(4):359-364. General matrix representation of the vector radiative-transfer equation for randomly dis- tributed nonspherical

  14. Low cost quantitative digital imaging as an alternative to qualitative in vivo bioassays for analysis of active aflatoxin B1.

    PubMed

    Rasooly, Reuven; Do, Paula M; Hernlem, Bradley J

    2016-06-15

    Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) producing fungi contaminate food and feed and are a major health concern. To minimize the sources and incidence of AFB1 illness there is a need to develop affordable, sensitive mobile devices for detection of active AFB1. In the present study we used a low cost fluorescence detector and describe two quantitative assays for detection of detoxified and active AFB1 demonstrating that AFB1 concentration can be measured as intensity of fluorescence. When the assay plate containing increasing concentrations of AFB1 is illuminated with a 366 nm ultraviolet lamp, AFB1 molecules absorb photons and emit blue light with peak wavelength of 432 nm. The fluorescence intensity increased in dose dependent manner. However, this method cannot distinguish between active AFB1 which poses a threat to health, and the detoxified AFB1 which exhibits no toxicity. To measure the toxin activity, we used a cell based assay that makes quantification more robust and is capable of detecting multiple samples simultaneously. It is an alternative to the qualitative duckling bioassay which is the "gold-standard" assay currently being used for quantitative analysis of active AFB1. AFB1 was incubated with transduced Vero cells expressing the green fluorescence protein (GFP) gene. After excitation with blue light at 475 nm, cells emitted green light with emission peak at 509 nm. The result shows that AFB1 inhibits protein expression in a concentration dependent manner resulting in proportionately less GFP fluorescence in cells exposed to AFB1. The result also indicates strong positive linear relationship with R(2)=0.90 between the low cost CCD camera and a fluorometer, which costs 100 times more than a CCD camera. This new analytical method for measuring active AFB1 is low in cost and combined with in vitro assay, is quantitative. It also does not require the use of animals and may be useful especially for laboratories in regions with limited resources.

  15. A literature review of methods of analysis of organic analytes in radioactive wastes with an emphasis on sources from the United Kingdom

    SciTech Connect

    Clauss, S.A.; Bean, R.M.

    1993-09-01

    This report, compiled by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), examines literature originating through the United Kingdom (UK) nuclear industry relating to the analyses of organic constituents of radioactive waste. Additionally, secondary references from the UK and other counties, including the United States, have been reviewed. The purpose of this literature review was to find analytical methods that would apply to the mixed-waste matrices found at Hanford.

  16. Green functions of graphene: An analytic approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawlor, James A.; Ferreira, Mauro S.

    2015-04-01

    In this article we derive the lattice Green Functions (GFs) of graphene using a Tight Binding Hamiltonian incorporating both first and second nearest neighbour hoppings and allowing for a non-orthogonal electron wavefunction overlap. It is shown how the resulting GFs can be simplified from a double to a single integral form to aid computation, and that when considering off-diagonal GFs in the high symmetry directions of the lattice this single integral can be approximated very accurately by an algebraic expression. By comparing our results to the conventional first nearest neighbour model commonly found in the literature, it is apparent that the extended model leads to a sizeable change in the electronic structure away from the linear regime. As such, this article serves as a blueprint for researchers who wish to examine quantities where these considerations are important.

  17. The cause of complexity in nature: An analytical and computational approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mainzer, Klaus

    2012-09-01

    This work is going to present the cause of complexity in nature from an analytical and computational point of view. The cause of complex pattern formation is explained by the local activity of cells in complex systems which are analytically modeled by nonlinear reaction-diffusion equations in physics, chemistry, biology and brain research. There are not only rigorous analytical criteria of local activity and the edge of chaos, but also constructive procedures to visualize them by computer simulations. In technology, the question arises whether these criteria and procedures can be used to construct artificial life and artificial minds.

  18. An Analytical Model of Tribocharging in Regolith

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, D. P.; Hartzell, C. M.

    2015-12-01

    discuss the design of an experiment planned to test the charging estimates provided by the model presented and the potential implications for our understanding of regolith behavior.

  19. Digital forensics: an analytical crime scene procedure model (ACSPM).

    PubMed

    Bulbul, Halil Ibrahim; Yavuzcan, H Guclu; Ozel, Mesut

    2013-12-10

    In order to ensure that digital evidence is collected, preserved, examined, or transferred in a manner safeguarding the accuracy and reliability of the evidence, law enforcement and digital forensic units must establish and maintain an effective quality assurance system. The very first part of this system is standard operating procedures (SOP's) and/or models, conforming chain of custody requirements, those rely on digital forensics "process-phase-procedure-task-subtask" sequence. An acceptable and thorough Digital Forensics (DF) process depends on the sequential DF phases, and each phase depends on sequential DF procedures, respectively each procedure depends on tasks and subtasks. There are numerous amounts of DF Process Models that define DF phases in the literature, but no DF model that defines the phase-based sequential procedures for crime scene identified. An analytical crime scene procedure model (ACSPM) that we suggest in this paper is supposed to fill in this gap. The proposed analytical procedure model for digital investigations at a crime scene is developed and defined for crime scene practitioners; with main focus on crime scene digital forensic procedures, other than that of whole digital investigation process and phases that ends up in a court. When reviewing the relevant literature and interrogating with the law enforcement agencies, only device based charts specific to a particular device and/or more general perspective approaches to digital evidence management models from crime scene to courts are found. After analyzing the needs of law enforcement organizations and realizing the absence of crime scene digital investigation procedure model for crime scene activities we decided to inspect the relevant literature in an analytical way. The outcome of this inspection is our suggested model explained here, which is supposed to provide guidance for thorough and secure implementation of digital forensic procedures at a crime scene. In digital forensic

  20. Dairy Analytics and Nutrient Analysis (DANA) Prototype System User Manual

    SciTech Connect

    Sam Alessi; Dennis Keiser

    2012-10-01

    This document is a user manual for the Dairy Analytics and Nutrient Analysis (DANA) model. DANA provides an analysis of dairy anaerobic digestion technology and allows users to calculate biogas production, co-product valuation, capital costs, expenses, revenue and financial metrics, for user customizable scenarios, dairy and digester types. The model provides results for three anaerobic digester types; Covered Lagoons, Modified Plug Flow, and Complete Mix, and three main energy production technologies; electricity generation, renewable natural gas generation, and compressed natural gas generation. Additional options include different dairy types, bedding types, backend treatment type as well as numerous production, and economic parameters. DANA’s goal is to extend the National Market Value of Anaerobic Digester Products analysis (informa economics, 2012; Innovation Center, 2011) to include a greater and more flexible set of regional digester scenarios and to provide a modular framework for creation of a tool to support farmer and investor needs. Users can set up scenarios from combinations of existing parameters or add new parameters, run the model and view a variety of reports, charts and tables that are automatically produced and delivered over the web interface. DANA is based in the INL’s analysis architecture entitled Generalized Environment for Modeling Systems (GEMS) , which offers extensive collaboration, analysis, and integration opportunities and greatly speeds the ability construct highly scalable web delivered user-oriented decision tools. DANA’s approach uses server-based data processing and web-based user interfaces, rather a client-based spreadsheet approach. This offers a number of benefits over the client-based approach. Server processing and storage can scale up to handle a very large number of scenarios, so that analysis of county, even field level, across the whole U.S., can be performed. Server based databases allow dairy and digester

  1. High speed cylindrical rolling element bearing analysis 'CYBEAN' - Analytic formulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleckner, R. J.; Pirvics, J.; Castelli, V.

    1979-01-01

    This paper documents the analytic foundation and software architecture for the computerized mathematical simulation of high speed cylindrical rolling element bearing behavior. The software, CYBEAN (CYlindrical BEaring ANalysis), considers a flexible, variable geometry outer ring, EHD films, roller centrifugal and quasidynamic loads, roller tilt and skew, mounting fits, cage and flange interactions. The representation includes both steady state and time transient simulation of thermal interactions internal to and coupled with the surroundings of the bearing. A sample problem illustrating program use is presented.

  2. An analytic performance model of disk arrays and its application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Edward K.; Katz, Randy H.

    1991-01-01

    As disk arrays become widely used, tools for understanding and analyzing their performance become increasingly important. In particular, performance models can be invaluable in both configuring and designing disk arrays. Accurate analytic performance models are desirable over other types of models because they can be quickly evaluated, are applicable under a wide range of system and workload parameters, and can be manipulated by a range of mathematical techniques. Unfortunately, analytical performance models of disk arrays are difficult to formulate due to the presence of queuing and fork-join synchronization; a disk array request is broken up into independent disk requests which must all complete to satisfy the original request. We develop, validate, and apply an analytic performance model for disk arrays. We derive simple equations for approximating their utilization, response time, and throughput. We then validate the analytic model via simulation and investigate the accuracy of each approximation used in deriving the analytical model. Finally, we apply the analytical model to derive an equation for the optimal unit of data striping in disk arrays.

  3. Applications of nuclear analytical methods to materials analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, K.W.; Hanson, A.L.; Kraner, H.W.

    1982-01-01

    Nuclear analytical methods have now become important in the characterization of many types of materials and have been shown to be an extremely important extension of many more common methods. To illustrate the breadth of their use, some recent Brookhaven experiments are described that deal with the depth distribution of hydrogen in Nb-H alloys, the diffusion of Mo in graphite at high temperatures, and the measurement of Al and Si concentrations in zeolite catalysts. It is hoped that the presentation of these illustrative examples will serve as a stimulus and encouragement for the further application of nuclear analytical methods.

  4. Active Storage with Analytics Capabilities and I/O Runtime System for Petascale Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Choudhary, Alok

    2015-03-18

    Computational scientists must understand results from experimental, observational and computational simulation generated data to gain insights and perform knowledge discovery. As systems approach the petascale range, problems that were unimaginable a few years ago are within reach. With the increasing volume and complexity of data produced by ultra-scale simulations and high-throughput experiments, understanding the science is largely hampered by the lack of comprehensive I/O, storage, acceleration of data manipulation, analysis, and mining tools. Scientists require techniques, tools and infrastructure to facilitate better understanding of their data, in particular the ability to effectively perform complex data analysis, statistical analysis and knowledge discovery. The goal of this work is to enable more effective analysis of scientific datasets through the integration of enhancements in the I/O stack, from active storage support at the file system layer to MPI-IO and high-level I/O library layers. We propose to provide software components to accelerate data analytics, mining, I/O, and knowledge discovery for large-scale scientific applications, thereby increasing productivity of both scientists and the systems. Our approaches include 1) design the interfaces in high-level I/O libraries, such as parallel netCDF, for applications to activate data mining operations at the lower I/O layers; 2) Enhance MPI-IO runtime systems to incorporate the functionality developed as a part of the runtime system design; 3) Develop parallel data mining programs as part of runtime library for server-side file system in PVFS file system; and 4) Prototype an active storage cluster, which will utilize multicore CPUs, GPUs, and FPGAs to carry out the data mining workload.

  5. Analysis of Cultural Heritage by Accelerator Techniques and Analytical Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ide-Ektessabi, Ari; Toque, Jay Arre; Murayama, Yusuke

    2011-12-01

    In this paper we present the result of experimental investigation using two very important accelerator techniques: (1) synchrotron radiation XRF and XAFS; and (2) accelerator mass spectrometry and multispectral analytical imaging for the investigation of cultural heritage. We also want to introduce a complementary approach to the investigation of artworks which is noninvasive and nondestructive that can be applied in situ. Four major projects will be discussed to illustrate the potential applications of these accelerator and analytical imaging techniques: (1) investigation of Mongolian Textile (Genghis Khan and Kublai Khan Period) using XRF, AMS and electron microscopy; (2) XRF studies of pigments collected from Korean Buddhist paintings; (3) creating a database of elemental composition and spectral reflectance of more than 1000 Japanese pigments which have been used for traditional Japanese paintings; and (4) visible light-near infrared spectroscopy and multispectral imaging of degraded malachite and azurite. The XRF measurements of the Japanese and Korean pigments could be used to complement the results of pigment identification by analytical imaging through spectral reflectance reconstruction. On the other hand, analysis of the Mongolian textiles revealed that they were produced between 12th and 13th century. Elemental analysis of the samples showed that they contained traces of gold, copper, iron and titanium. Based on the age and trace elements in the samples, it was concluded that the textiles were produced during the height of power of the Mongol empire, which makes them a valuable cultural heritage. Finally, the analysis of the degraded and discolored malachite and azurite demonstrates how multispectral analytical imaging could be used to complement the results of high energy-based techniques.

  6. An analytic reconstruction method for PET based on cubic splines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kastis, George A.; Kyriakopoulou, Dimitra; Fokas, Athanasios S.

    2014-03-01

    PET imaging is an important nuclear medicine modality that measures in vivo distribution of imaging agents labeled with positron-emitting radionuclides. Image reconstruction is an essential component in tomographic medical imaging. In this study, we present the mathematical formulation and an improved numerical implementation of an analytic, 2D, reconstruction method called SRT, Spline Reconstruction Technique. This technique is based on the numerical evaluation of the Hilbert transform of the sinogram via an approximation in terms of 'custom made' cubic splines. It also imposes sinogram thresholding which restricts reconstruction only within object pixels. Furthermore, by utilizing certain symmetries it achieves a reconstruction time similar to that of FBP. We have implemented SRT in the software library called STIR and have evaluated this method using simulated PET data. We present reconstructed images from several phantoms. Sinograms have been generated at various Poison noise levels and 20 realizations of noise have been created at each level. In addition to visual comparisons of the reconstructed images, the contrast has been determined as a function of noise level. Further analysis includes the creation of line profiles when necessary, to determine resolution. Numerical simulations suggest that the SRT algorithm produces fast and accurate reconstructions at realistic noise levels. The contrast is over 95% in all phantoms examined and is independent of noise level.

  7. Paper-based analytical devices for environmental analysis.

    PubMed

    Meredith, Nathan A; Quinn, Casey; Cate, David M; Reilly, Thomas H; Volckens, John; Henry, Charles S

    2016-03-21

    The field of paper-based microfluidics has experienced rapid growth over the past decade. Microfluidic paper-based analytical devices (μPADs), originally developed for point-of-care medical diagnostics in resource-limited settings, are now being applied in new areas, such as environmental analyses. Low-cost paper sensors show great promise for on-site environmental analysis; the theme of ongoing research complements existing instrumental techniques by providing high spatial and temporal resolution for environmental monitoring. This review highlights recent applications of μPADs for environmental analysis along with technical advances that may enable μPADs to be more widely implemented in field testing.

  8. Exact free vibration analysis for mechanical system composed of Timoshenko beams with intermediate eccentric rigid body on elastic supports: An experimental and analytical investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farghaly, S. H.; El-Sayed, T. A.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to investigate the changes in the magnitude of natural frequencies and their associated modal shapes of Timoshenko beam with respect to different system design parameters. This beam includes an intermediate extended eccentric rigid mass mounted on two elastic segments. The equilibrium equations which govern the transverse and rotational motions are derived. The application of the developed system frequency equation is demonstrated by several illustrative examples. Several end and intermediate conditions are considered. The influence of, rotary inertia, shear deformation, axial load, eccentric mass and elastic segments step ratio on the system natural frequencies and mode shapes are conducted. Several sets of new results are presented. Comparison of the present model results with the experimental data for shaft integrated with intermediate rigid mass demonstrates the accuracy of the analysis in practical applications. The present model is valid for several industrial applications, such as mechanical, structural, naval and for wider range of applications.

  9. Course Shopping in Urban Community Colleges: An Analysis of Student Drop and Add Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hagedorn, Linda Serra; Maxwell, William E.; Cypers, Scott; Moon, Hye Sun; Lester, Jaime

    2007-01-01

    This study examined the course shopping behaviors among a sample of approximately 5,000 community college students enrolled across nine campuses of a large urban district. The sample was purposely designed as an analytic, rather than a random, sample that sought to obtain adequate numbers of students in course areas that were of theoretical and of…

  10. Drug target identification using network analysis: Taking active components in Sini decoction as an example.

    PubMed

    Chen, Si; Jiang, Hailong; Cao, Yan; Wang, Yun; Hu, Ziheng; Zhu, Zhenyu; Chai, Yifeng

    2016-04-20

    Identifying the molecular targets for the beneficial effects of active small-molecule compounds simultaneously is an important and currently unmet challenge. In this study, we firstly proposed network analysis by integrating data from network pharmacology and metabolomics to identify targets of active components in sini decoction (SND) simultaneously against heart failure. To begin with, 48 potential active components in SND against heart failure were predicted by serum pharmacochemistry, text mining and similarity match. Then, we employed network pharmacology including text mining and molecular docking to identify the potential targets of these components. The key enriched processes, pathways and related diseases of these target proteins were analyzed by STRING database. At last, network analysis was conducted to identify most possible targets of components in SND. Among the 25 targets predicted by network analysis, tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) was firstly experimentally validated in molecular and cellular level. Results indicated that hypaconitine, mesaconitine, higenamine and quercetin in SND can directly bind to TNF-α, reduce the TNF-α-mediated cytotoxicity on L929 cells and exert anti-myocardial cell apoptosis effects. We envisage that network analysis will also be useful in target identification of a bioactive compound.

  11. Drug target identification using network analysis: Taking active components in Sini decoction as an example

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Si; Jiang, Hailong; Cao, Yan; Wang, Yun; Hu, Ziheng; Zhu, Zhenyu; Chai, Yifeng

    2016-04-01

    Identifying the molecular targets for the beneficial effects of active small-molecule compounds simultaneously is an important and currently unmet challenge. In this study, we firstly proposed network analysis by integrating data from network pharmacology and metabolomics to identify targets of active components in sini decoction (SND) simultaneously against heart failure. To begin with, 48 potential active components in SND against heart failure were predicted by serum pharmacochemistry, text mining and similarity match. Then, we employed network pharmacology including text mining and molecular docking to identify the potential targets of these components. The key enriched processes, pathways and related diseases of these target proteins were analyzed by STRING database. At last, network analysis was conducted to identify most possible targets of components in SND. Among the 25 targets predicted by network analysis, tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) was firstly experimentally validated in molecular and cellular level. Results indicated that hypaconitine, mesaconitine, higenamine and quercetin in SND can directly bind to TNF-α, reduce the TNF-α-mediated cytotoxicity on L929 cells and exert anti-myocardial cell apoptosis effects. We envisage that network analysis will also be useful in target identification of a bioactive compound.

  12. Drug target identification using network analysis: Taking active components in Sini decoction as an example

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Si; Jiang, Hailong; Cao, Yan; Wang, Yun; Hu, Ziheng; Zhu, Zhenyu; Chai, Yifeng

    2016-01-01

    Identifying the molecular targets for the beneficial effects of active small-molecule compounds simultaneously is an important and currently unmet challenge. In this study, we firstly proposed network analysis by integrating data from network pharmacology and metabolomics to identify targets of active components in sini decoction (SND) simultaneously against heart failure. To begin with, 48 potential active components in SND against heart failure were predicted by serum pharmacochemistry, text mining and similarity match. Then, we employed network pharmacology including text mining and molecular docking to identify the potential targets of these components. The key enriched processes, pathways and related diseases of these target proteins were analyzed by STRING database. At last, network analysis was conducted to identify most possible targets of components in SND. Among the 25 targets predicted by network analysis, tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) was firstly experimentally validated in molecular and cellular level. Results indicated that hypaconitine, mesaconitine, higenamine and quercetin in SND can directly bind to TNF-α, reduce the TNF-α-mediated cytotoxicity on L929 cells and exert anti-myocardial cell apoptosis effects. We envisage that network analysis will also be useful in target identification of a bioactive compound. PMID:27095146

  13. An analytic model for MODFET capacitance-voltage characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, G.; Hauser, John R.

    1990-05-01

    An analytic model for the capacitance-voltage (C-V) characteristics of n-channel modulation doped FETs (MODFETs) is derived. Gauss law is used to relate the net areal gate charge density in an AlGaAs/GaAs MODFET to the electric field intensity at the metal-AlGaAs interface. An analytic expression for the electric field intensity which accounts for the neutralization of donors and the generation of free electrons is derived. The gate capacitance is derived as a closed-form analytic function of the gate voltage. The expression derived is easily computable and affords physical insight. The results, when compared with numerical calculations and experimental data, yield good agreement over a wide range of gate voltages.

  14. HbA(1c)--an analyte of increasing importance.

    PubMed

    Higgins, Trefor

    2012-09-01

    Since the incorporation in 1976 of HbA(1c) into a monitoring program of individuals with diabetes, this test has become the gold standard for assessment of glycemic control. Analytical methods have steadily improved in the past two decades, largely through the efforts of the National Glycohemoglobin Standardization program (NGSP). The new definition of HbA(1c) and the introduction of an analytically pure calibrator have increased the possibility for greater improvements in analytical performance. Controversies exist in the reporting of HbA(1c). The use of HbA(1c) has expanded beyond the use solely as a measure of glycemic control into a test for screening and diagnosing diabetes. With improvements in analytical performance, the effects of demographic factors such as age and ethnicity and clinical factors such as iron deficiency have been observed. In this review, the history, formation, analytical methods and parameters that affect HbA(1c) analysis are discussed.

  15. An Analysis of Data Activities and Instructional Supports in Middle School Science Textbooks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Bradley J.; Masnick, Amy M.; Baker, Katie; Junglen, Angela

    2015-11-01

    A critical component of science and math education is reasoning with data. Science textbooks are instructional tools that provide opportunities for learning science content (e.g. facts about force and motion) and process skills (e.g. data recording) that support and augment reasoning with data. In addition, the construction and design of textbooks influence the instructional strategies used in the classroom to teach science. An analysis of science textbooks provides a window to examine what students are being taught about data and how they are being taught. We had two objectives for the present study: (1) to examine opportunities for reasoning with data and (2) to examine to what extent these activities are aligned with instructional supports derived from evidence-based learning strategies. We conducted a descriptive study in which we examined how 20 Middle School science textbooks, across 731 activities, presented opportunities for reasoning with data. Our results demonstrate that although half of activities in textbooks included data, very few of these activities provide opportunities to learn how to record, analyze, and interpret data and the activities rarely provided instructional supports based on evidence-based learning strategies. Our analysis suggests that science textbooks provide limited support for reasoning with data.

  16. Short Term Forecasts of Volcanic Activity Using An Event Tree Analysis System and Logistic Regression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junek, W. N.; Jones, W. L.; Woods, M. T.

    2011-12-01

    An automated event tree analysis system for estimating the probability of short term volcanic activity is presented. The algorithm is driven by a suite of empirical statistical models that are derived through logistic regression. Each model is constructed from a multidisciplinary dataset that was assembled from a collection of historic volcanic unrest episodes. The dataset consists of monitoring measurements (e.g. InSAR, seismic), source modeling results, and historic eruption activity. This provides a simple mechanism for simultaneously accounting for the geophysical changes occurring within the volcano and the historic behavior of analog volcanoes. The algorithm is extensible and can be easily recalibrated to include new or additional monitoring, modeling, or historic information. Standard cross validation techniques are employed to optimize its forecasting capabilities. Analysis results from several recent volcanic unrest episodes are presented.

  17. Defining the smallest analyte concentration an immunoassay can measure.

    PubMed

    Brown, E N; McDermott, T J; Bloch, K J; McCollom, A D

    1996-06-01

    An immunoassay's minimal detectable concentration (MDC), the smallest analyte concentration the assay can reliably measure, is one of its most important properties. Bayes' theorem is used to unify the five current mathematical MDC definitions. The unified definition has significant implications for defining positive results for screening and diagnostic tests, setting criteria for immunoassay quality control and optimal design, reliably measuring biological substances at low concentrations, and, in general, measuring small analyte concentrations with calibrated analytic methods. As an illustration, we apply the unified definition to the microparticle capture enzyme immunoassay for prostate-specific antigen (PSA) developed for the Abbott IMx automated immunoassay system. The MDC of this assay as estimated by our unifying approach is shown to be 4.1-7.1 times greater than currently reported. As a consequence, the ability of the assay to measure reliably small concentrations of PSA to detect early recurrences of prostate cancer is probably overstated.

  18. An analytical formulation for phase noise in MEMS oscillators.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Deepak; Seshia, Ashwin

    2014-12-01

    In recent years, there has been much interest in the design of low-noise MEMS oscillators. This paper presents a new analytical formulation for noise in a MEMS oscillator encompassing essential resonator and amplifier nonlinearities. The analytical expression for oscillator noise is derived by solving a second-order nonlinear stochastic differential equation. This approach is applied to noise modeling of an electrostatically addressed MEMS resonator-based square-wave oscillator in which the resonator and oscillator circuit nonlinearities are integrated into a single modeling framework. By considering the resulting amplitude and phase relations, we derive additional noise terms resulting from resonator nonlinearities. The phase diffusion of an oscillator is studied and the phase diffusion coefficient is proposed as a metric for noise optimization. The proposed nonlinear phase noise model provides analytical insight into the underlying physics and a pathway toward the design optimization for low-noise MEMS oscillators.

  19. Testing microtaphofacies as an analytic tool for integrated facies and sedimentological analysis using Lower Miocene mixed carbonate/siliciclastic sediments from the North Alpine Foreland Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nebelsick, James; Bieg, Ulrich

    2010-05-01

    Taphonomic studies have mostly concentrated on the investigation and quantification of isolated macroscopic faunal and floral elements. Carbonate rocks, in contrary to isolated macroscopic objects, have rarely been specifically addressed in terms of taphonomic features, although many aspects of microfacies analyses are directly related to the preservation of constituent biogenic components. There is thus a high potential for analyzing and quantifying taphonomic features in carbonate rocks (microtaphofacies), not the least as an additional tool for facies analysis. Analyzing the role of taphonomy in carbonate environments can be used to determine how different skeletal architectures through time and evolving synecological relationships (bioerosion and encrustation) have influence carbonate environments and their preservation in the rock record. This pilot study analyses the microtaphofacies of Lower Miocene, shallow water, mixed carbonate - siliciclastic environment from the North Alpine Foreland Basin (Molasse Sea) of southern Germany. The sediments range from biogenic bryomol carbonates to pure siliciclastics. This allows environmental interpretation to be made not only with respect to biogenic composition (dominated by bivalves, gastropods, bryozoans and barnacles), but also to siliciclastic grain characteristics and sedimentary features. Facies interpretation is relatively straight forward with a somewhat varied near shore facies distribution characterized dominated by carbonate which grade into higher energy, siliciclastic offshore sediments. Taphonomic features are assessed along this gradient with respect to total component composition as well as by following the trajectories of individual components types. The results are interpreted with respect to biogenic production, fragmentation, abrasion and transport.

  20. Design Evaluation of Wind Turbine Spline Couplings Using an Analytical Model: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Y.; Keller, J.; Wallen, R.; Errichello, R.; Halse, C.; Lambert, S.

    2015-02-01

    Articulated splines are commonly used in the planetary stage of wind turbine gearboxes for transmitting the driving torque and improving load sharing. Direct measurement of spline loads and performance is extremely challenging because of limited accessibility. This paper presents an analytical model for the analysis of articulated spline coupling designs. For a given torque and shaft misalignment, this analytical model quickly yields insights into relationships between the spline design parameters and resulting loads; bending, contact, and shear stresses; and safety factors considering various heat treatment methods. Comparisons of this analytical model against previously published computational approaches are also presented.

  1. Conflicting notions of citizenship in old age: An analysis of an activation practice.

    PubMed

    van Hees, Susan; Horstman, Klasien; Jansen, Maria; Ruwaard, Dirk

    2015-12-01

    Ageing societies and increasing healthcare expenditures are inducing Western welfare states to reform their care arrangements. In a qualitative research project, we explored how citizenship in old age is constructed in a public innovative care practice situated in the southern part of the Netherlands: the shaping of 'life cycle robust neighbourhoods'. Life cycle robustness entails a further not formally defined ideal of age-friendly places, enabling older adults to live independently for longer periods of time. Participation is being presented as an important element towards life cycle robustness. We used ethnographic methods to understand different constructions of citizenship in old age. We analysed documents and interviewed local policymakers and civil servants, managers and directors in the fields of housing, care and welfare, professionals working for these organisations, and older adults living (independently) in these neighbourhoods (n=73). Additionally, we observed formal and informal meetings and organised focus groups. Our findings demonstrate conflicting notions of old age. Policymakers and civil servants, managers and directors, professionals, and even representatives of older adults share a belief an activation policy is necessary, although they differ in how they interpret this need. Policymakers and civil servants are convinced that societal and financial incentives necessitate current reforms, managers and directors talk about quality and organisational needs, while professionals mainly strive to empower older adults (as citizens). Simultaneously, older adults try to live their lives as independent as possible. We argue that, whereas old age became a distinct category in the last century, we now recognise a new period in which this category is being more and more de-categorised.

  2. Evaluating knickpoint recession along an active fault for paleoseismological analysis: The Huoshan Piedmont, Eastern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Zhanyu; Bi, Lisi; Xu, Yueren; He, Honglin

    2015-04-01

    Ground-rupturing earthquakes can generate tectonic knickpoints within upstream reaches of streams across active fault zones. These knickpoints are characteristic of upstream propagation of time-related process once generated by an earthquake, so analysis of knickpoint series in streams which cross fault zones can be used to infer paleoearthquake events. We studied the knickpoints along the Huoshan Piedmont Fault (HPF), which is an active normal fault in the Shanxi Faulted Basin zone, China, and demonstrate that analysis of knickpoints shows evidence for two paleoearthquakes in the HPF. First, we identified knickpoints in bedrock reaches upstream of the HPF using high-resolution DEMs derived from IRS-P5 stereo images and the stream-gradient method. After excluding non-faulting knickpoints, 47 knickpoints were identified in 23 bedrock reaches upstream from the HPF. Analysis of the most recent knickpoints caused by the 1303 CE Hongdong Earthquake allowed for local calibration of the retreat rates. Applying these retreat rates across the study area allows for the estimation of the age of other knickpoints, and constrains the age ranges of two knickpoint groups to be 2269-3336 a BP and 4504-5618 a BP. These ages constrain the ages of two paleoearthquake events at 2710 ± 102 and 4980 ± 646 a BP. The knickpoints along the HPF obey the parallel retreating model in which knickpoint morphology was roughly maintained during retreat, so the heights of knickpoints represent the coseismic vertical displacements generated by the earthquakes along the HPF. The vertical offsets for these three earthquake events are similar and are approximately 4 m, which indicates that the ruptures on the HPF obey a characteristic slip model with a similar slip distribution for several successive earthquakes. These results provide additional evidence of paleoearthquakes on the HPF and show that analysis of knickpoint recession along an active fault is a valuable tool for paleoseismology.

  3. A May American Economic Review Papers Seminar and an Analytic Project for Advanced Undergraduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elliott, Catherine S.

    2004-01-01

    The author describes two learning activities for teaching economics at the advanced undergraduate level: a May American Economic Review (AER) papers seminar and an analytic project. Both activities help students learn to "do economics." The May AER papers seminar promotes in-depth synthesis and interpretation on the basis of printed session papers…

  4. Applying an analytical method to study neutron behavior for dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirazi, S. A. Mousavi

    2016-12-01

    In this investigation, a new dosimetry process is studied by applying an analytical method. This novel process is associated with a human liver tissue. The human liver tissue has compositions including water, glycogen and etc. In this study, organic compound materials of liver are decomposed into their constituent elements based upon mass percentage and density of every element. The absorbed doses are computed by analytical method in all constituent elements of liver tissue. This analytical method is introduced applying mathematical equations based on neutron behavior and neutron collision rules. The results show that the absorbed doses are converged for neutron energy below 15MeV. This method can be applied to study the interaction of neutrons in other tissues and estimating the absorbed dose for a wide range of neutron energy.

  5. Beamforming and holography image formation methods: an analytic study.

    PubMed

    Solimene, Raffaele; Cuccaro, Antonio; Ruvio, Giuseppe; Tapia, Daniel Flores; O'Halloran, Martin

    2016-04-18

    Beamforming and holographic imaging procedures are widely used in many applications such as radar sensing, sonar, and in the area of microwave medical imaging. Nevertheless, an analytical comparison of the methods has not been done. In this paper, the Point Spread Functions pertaining to the two methods are analytically determined. This allows a formal comparison of the two techniques, and to easily highlight how the performance depends on the configuration parameters, including frequency range, number of scatterers, and data discretization. It is demonstrated that the beamforming and holography basically achieve the same resolution but beamforming requires a cheaper (less sensors) configuration..

  6. An analytical model of the HINT performance metric

    SciTech Connect

    Snell, Q.O.; Gustafson, J.L.

    1996-10-01

    The HINT benchmark was developed to provide a broad-spectrum metric for computers and to measure performance over the full range of memory sizes and time scales. We have extended our understanding of why HINT performance curves look the way they do and can now predict the curves using an analytical model based on simple hardware specifications as input parameters. Conversely, by fitting the experimental curves with the analytical model, hardware specifications such as memory performance can be inferred to provide insight into the nature of a given computer system.

  7. Using Presentation Software to Flip an Undergraduate Analytical Chemistry Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitzgerald, Neil; Li, Luisa

    2015-01-01

    An undergraduate analytical chemistry course has been adapted to a flipped course format. Course content was provided by video clips, text, graphics, audio, and simple animations organized as concept maps using the cloud-based presentation platform, Prezi. The advantages of using Prezi to present course content in a flipped course format are…

  8. An Interactive Analytical Chemistry Summer Camp for Middle School Girls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robbins, Mary E.; Schoenfisch, Mark H.

    2005-01-01

    A summer outreach program, which was implemented for the first time in the summer of 2004, that provided middle school girls with an opportunity to conduct college-level analytical chemistry experiments under the guidance of female graduate students is explained. The program proved beneficial to participants at each level.

  9. Spectroelectrochemical Sensing of Aqueous Iron: An Experiment for Analytical Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shtoyko, Tanya; Stuart, Dean; Gray, H. Neil

    2007-01-01

    We have designed a laboratory experiment to illustrate the use of spectroelectrochemical techniques for determination of aqueous iron. The experiment described in this article is applicable to an undergraduate laboratory course in analytical chemistry. Students are asked to fabricate spectroelectrochemical sensors, make electrochemical and optical…

  10. An analytically linearized helicopter model with improved modeling accuracy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, Patrick T.; Curtiss, H. C., Jr.; Mckillip, Robert M., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    An analytically linearized model for helicopter flight response including rotor blade dynamics and dynamic inflow, that was recently developed, was studied with the objective of increasing the understanding, the ease of use, and the accuracy of the model. The mathematical model is described along with a description of the UH-60A Black Hawk helicopter and flight test used to validate the model. To aid in utilization of the model for sensitivity analysis, a new, faster, and more efficient implementation of the model was developed. It is shown that several errors in the mathematical modeling of the system caused a reduction in accuracy. These errors in rotor force resolution, trim force and moment calculation, and rotor inertia terms were corrected along with improvements to the programming style and documentation. Use of a trim input file to drive the model is examined. Trim file errors in blade twist, control input phase angle, coning and lag angles, main and tail rotor pitch, and uniform induced velocity, were corrected. Finally, through direct comparison of the original and corrected model responses to flight test data, the effect of the corrections on overall model output is shown.

  11. Canine olfaction as an alternative to analytical instruments for ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Recent literature has touted the use of canine olfaction as a diagnostic tool for identifying pre-clinical disease status, especially cancer and infection from biological media samples. Studies have shown a wide range of outcomes, ranging from almost perfect discrimination, all the way to essentially random results. This disparity is not likely to be a detection issue; dogs have been shown to have extremely sensitive noses as proven by their use for tracking, bomb detection and search and rescue. However, in contrast to analytical instruments, dogs are subject to boredom, fatigue, hunger and external distractions. These challenges are of particular importance in a clinical environment where task repetition is prized, but not as entertaining for a dog as chasing odours outdoors. The question addressed here is how to exploit the intrinsic sensitivity and simplicity of having a dog simply sniff out disease, in the face of variability in behavior and response. There is no argument that living cells emanate a variety of gas- and liquid-phase compounds as waste from normal metabolism, and that these compounds become easureable from various biological media including skin, blood, urine, breath, feces, etc. [1, 2] The overarching term for this phenomenon from the perspective of systems biology analysis is “cellular respiration”, which has become an important topic for the interpretation and documentation of the human exposome, the chemical counterpart to the genome.

  12. An analytical framework for optimizing variant discovery from personal genomes

    PubMed Central

    Highnam, Gareth; Wang, Jason J.; Kusler, Dean; Zook, Justin; Vijayan, Vinaya; Leibovich, Nir; Mittelman, David

    2015-01-01

    The standardization and performance testing of analysis tools is a prerequisite to widespread adoption of genome-wide sequencing, particularly in the clinic. However, performance testing is currently complicated by the paucity of standards and comparison metrics, as well as by the heterogeneity in sequencing platforms, applications and protocols. Here we present the genome comparison and analytic testing (GCAT) platform to facilitate development of performance metrics and comparisons of analysis tools across these metrics. Performance is reported through interactive visualizations of benchmark and performance testing data, with support for data slicing and filtering. The platform is freely accessible at http://www.bioplanet.com/gcat. PMID:25711446

  13. Analytics for Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacNeill, Sheila; Campbell, Lorna M.; Hawksey, Martin

    2014-01-01

    This article presents an overview of the development and use of analytics in the context of education. Using Buckingham Shum's three levels of analytics, the authors present a critical analysis of current developments in the domain of learning analytics, and contrast the potential value of analytics research and development with real world…

  14. Safety of active implantable devices during MRI examinations: a finite element analysis of an implantable pump.

    PubMed

    Büchler, Philippe; Simon, Anne; Burger, Jürgen; Ginggen, Alec; Crivelli, Rocco; Tardy, Yanik; Luechinger, Roger; Olsen, Sigbjørn

    2007-04-01

    The goal of this study was to propose a general numerical analysis methodology to evaluate the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-safety of active implants. Numerical models based on the finite element (FE) technique were used to estimate if the normal operation of an active device was altered during MRI imaging. An active implanted pump was chosen to illustrate the method. A set of controlled experiments were proposed and performed to validate the numerical model. The calculated induced voltages in the important electronic components of the device showed dependence with the MRI field strength. For the MRI radiofrequency fields, significant induced voltages of up to 20 V were calculated for a 0.3T field-strength MRI. For the 1.5 and 3.0OT MRIs, the calculated voltages were insignificant. On the other hand, induced voltages up to 11 V were calculated in the critical electronic components for the 3.0T MRI due to the gradient fields. Values obtained in this work reflect to the worst case situation which is virtually impossible to achieve in normal scanning situations. Since the calculated voltages may be removed by appropriate protection circuits, no critical problems affecting the normal operation of the pump were identified. This study showed that the proposed methodology helps the identification of the possible incompatibilities between active implants and MR imaging, and can be used to aid the design of critical electronic systems to ensure MRI-safety.

  15. DESIGN AND ANALYSIS OF AN FPGA-BASED ACTIVE FEEDBACK DAMPING SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Zaipeng; Schulte, Mike; Deibele, Craig Edmond

    2010-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory is a high-intensity proton-based accelerator that produces neutron beams for neutronscattering research. As the most powerful pulsed neutron source in the world, the SNS accelerator has experienced an unprecedented beam instability that has a wide bandwidth (0 to 300MHz) and fast growth time (10 to100 s). In this paper, we propose and analyze several FPGA-based designs for an active feedback damping system. This signal processing system is the first FPGA-based design for active feedback damping of wideband instabilities in high intensity accelerators. It can effectively mitigate instabilities in highintensity protons beams, reduce radiation, and boost the accelerator s luminosity performance. Unlike existing systems, which are designed using analog components, our FPGA-based active feedback damping system offers programmability while maintaining high performance. To meet the system throughput and latency requirements, our proposed designs are guided by detailed analysis of resource and performance tradeoffs. These designs are mapped onto a reconfigurable platform that includes Xilinx Virtex-II Pro FPGAs and high-speed analog-to-digital and digital-toanalog converters. Our results show that our FPGA-based active feedback damping system can provide increased flexibility and improved signal processing performance that are not feasible with existing analog systems.

  16. An analytical study on the synchronization of strange non-chaotic attractors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivaganesh, G.; Arulgnanam, A.

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, we present an analytical study on the synchronization dynamics observed in unidirectionally-coupled quasiperiodically-forced systems that exhibit strange non-chaotic attractors (SNA) in their dynamics. The SNA dynamics observed in the uncoupled system is studied analytically through phase portraits and Poincare maps. A difference system is obtained by coupling the state equations of similar piecewise linear regions of the drive and the response systems. The mechanism of synchronization of the coupled system is realized through the bifurcation of the eigenvalues in one of the piecewise linear regions of the difference system. The analytical solutions obtained for the normalized state equations in each piecewise linear region of the difference system have been used to explain the synchronization dynamics through phase portraits and time-series analysis. The stability of the synchronized state is confirmed through the master stability function. An explicit analytical solution explaining the synchronization of SNAs is reported in the literature for the first time.

  17. An analytical method for predicting postwildfire peak discharges

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moody, John A.

    2012-01-01

    An analytical method presented here that predicts postwildfire peak discharge was developed from analysis of paired rainfall and runoff measurements collected from selected burned basins. Data were collected from 19 mountainous basins burned by eight wildfires in different hydroclimatic regimes in the western United States (California, Colorado, Nevada, New Mexico, and South Dakota). Most of the data were collected for the year of the wildfire and for 3 to 4 years after the wildfire. These data provide some estimate of the changes with time of postwildfire peak discharges, which are known to be transient but have received little documentation. The only required inputs for the analytical method are the burned area and a quantitative measure of soil burn severity (change in the normalized burn ratio), which is derived from Landsat reflectance data and is available from either the U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service or the U.S. Geological Survey. The method predicts the postwildfire peak discharge per unit burned area for the year of a wildfire, the first year after a wildfire, and the second year after a wildfire. It can be used at three levels of information depending on the data available to the user; each subsequent level requires either more data or more processing of the data. Level 1 requires only the burned area. Level 2 requires the burned area and the basin average value of the change in the normalized burn ratio. Level 3 requires the burned area and the calculation of the hydraulic functional connectivity, which is a variable that incorporates the sequence of soil burn severity along hillslope flow paths within the burned basin. Measurements indicate that the unit peak discharge response increases abruptly when the 30-minute maximum rainfall intensity is greater than about 5 millimeters per hour (0.2 inches per hour). This threshold may relate to a change in runoff generation from saturated-excess to infiltration-excess overland flow. The

  18. Prompt-Gamma Activation Analysis.

    PubMed

    Lindstrom, Richard M

    1993-01-01

    A permanent, full-time instrument for prompt-gamma activation analysis is nearing completion as part of the Cold Neutron Research Facility (CNRF). The design of the analytical system has been optimized for high gamma detection efficiency and low background, particularly for hydrogen. Because of the purity of the neutron beam, shielding requirements are modest and the scatter-capture background is low. As a result of a compact sample-detector geometry, the sensitivity (counting rate per gram of analyte) is a factor of four better than the existing Maryland-NIST thermal-neutron instrument at this reactor. Hydrogen backgrounds of a few micrograms have already been achieved, which promises to be of value in numerous applications where quantitative nondestructive analysis of small quantities of hydrogen in materials is necessary.

  19. Risk Based Requirements for Long Term Stewardship: A Proof-of-Principle Analysis of an Analytic Method Tested on Selected Hanford Locations

    SciTech Connect

    GM Gelston; JW Buck; LR Huesties; MS Peffers; TB Miley; TT Jarvis; WB Andrews

    1998-12-03

    Since 1989, the Department of Energy's (DOE) Environmental Management (EM) Program has managed the environmental legacy of US nuclear weapons production research and testing at 137 facilities in 31 states and one US territory. The EM program has conducted several studies on the public risks posed by contaminated sites at these facilities. In Risks and the Risk Debate DOE, 1995a, the Department analyzed the risks at sites before, during, and after remediation work by the EM program. The results indicated that aside from a few urgent risks, most hazards present little inherent risk because physical and active site management controls limit both the releases of site contaminants, and public access to these hazards. Without these controls, these sites would pose greater risks to the public. Past risk reports, however, provided little irdiormation about post- cleanup risk, primarily because of uncertainty about fiture site uses and site characteristics at the end of planned cleanup activities. This is of concern because in many cases current cleanup technologies, and remedies, will last a shorter period of time than the waste itself and the resulting contamination will remain hazardous.

  20. Coffee-ring effect-based simultaneous SERS substrate fabrication and analyte enrichment for trace analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Weidong; Yin, Yongguang; Tan, Zhiqiang; Liu, Jingfu

    2014-07-01

    Based on the ``coffee-ring effect'', we developed a highly efficient SERS platform which integrates the fabrication of SERS-active substrates and the preconcentration of analytes into one step. The high sensitivity, robustness, reproducibility and simplicity make this platform ideal for on-site analysis of small volume samples at low concentrations in complex matrices.Based on the ``coffee-ring effect'', we developed a highly efficient SERS platform which integrates the fabrication of SERS-active substrates and the preconcentration of analytes into one step. The high sensitivity, robustness, reproducibility and simplicity make this platform ideal for on-site analysis of small volume samples at low concentrations in complex matrices. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr03198a

  1. An analytical approach for solid oxide cell electrode geometric design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, George J.

    2015-12-01

    An analytical model for gas distributions in porous solid oxide cell electrodes is applied to develop dimensionless metrics that describe electrode performance. These metrics include two forms of a dimensionless reactant depletion current density and a geometry sensitive Damköhler number used to assess electrode catalytic effectiveness. The first dimensionless depletion current density defines when reducing electrode thickness no longer benefits mass transfer performance for a given cell geometry. The second dimensionless depletion current density provides a gage of deviation from the limiting current behavior predicted using button-cell experimental and modeling approaches. The Damköhler number and related catalytic effectiveness quantify two-dimensional transport effects under non-depleted operating conditions, providing a means of generalizing insights from reactant depletion behavior for typical cell operating conditions. A finite element solution for gas transport based on the dusty-gas model is used as a benchmark for the analytical model and dimensionless metrics. Estimates of concentration polarization based on analytical and numerical models compare well to published experimental data. Analytical performance predictions provide clear demonstration of the influence of two-dimensional electrode geometry on solid oxide cell performance. These results agree with finite element predictions and suggest that reduction of electrode thickness does not exclusively benefit cell performance.

  2. Analytic model of an IR radiation heat pipe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, Pamela J.

    1990-01-01

    An IR radiation heat pipe made from multilayer insulation blankets and proposed to be used aboard spacecraft to transfer waste heat was modeled analytically. A circular cross section pipe 9-in. in diameter, 10-ft long, with a specular reflectivity of 0.94 was found to have an efficiency of 58.6 percent. Several key parameters were varied for the circular model to understand their significance. In addition, square and triangular cross section pipes were investigated.

  3. Social Cognitive Career Theory, Conscientiousness, and Work Performance: A Meta-Analytic Path Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Steven D.; Lent, Robert W.; Telander, Kyle; Tramayne, Selena

    2011-01-01

    We performed a meta-analytic path analysis of an abbreviated version of social cognitive career theory's (SCCT) model of work performance (Lent, Brown, & Hackett, 1994). The model we tested included the central cognitive predictors of performance (ability, self-efficacy, performance goals), with the exception of outcome expectations. Results…

  4. An analytical study of double bend achromat lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Fakhri, Ali Akbar Kant, Pradeep; Singh, Gurnam; Ghodke, A. D.

    2015-03-15

    In a double bend achromat, Chasman-Green (CG) lattice represents the basic structure for low emittance synchrotron radiation sources. In the basic structure of CG lattice single focussing quadrupole (QF) magnet is used to form an achromat. In this paper, this CG lattice is discussed and an analytical relation is presented, showing the limitation of basic CG lattice to provide the theoretical minimum beam emittance in achromatic condition. To satisfy theoretical minimum beam emittance parameters, achromat having two, three, and four quadrupole structures is presented. In this structure, different arrangements of QF and defocusing quadruple (QD) are used. An analytical approach assuming quadrupoles as thin lenses has been followed for studying these structures. A study of Indus-2 lattice in which QF-QD-QF configuration in the achromat part has been adopted is also presented.

  5. Nonlinear inertial oscillations of a multilayer eddy: An analytical solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dotsenko, S. F.; Rubino, A.

    2008-06-01

    Nonlinear axisymmetric oscillations of a warm baroclinic eddy are considered within the framework of an reduced-gravity model of the dynamics of a multilayer ocean. A class of exact analytical solutions describing pure inertial oscillations of an eddy formation is found. The thicknesses of layers in the eddy vary according to a quadratic law, and the horizontal projections of the velocity in the layers depend linearly on the radial coordinate. Owing to a complicated structure of the eddy, weak limitations on the vertical distribution of density, and an explicit form of the solution, the latter can be treated as a generalization of the exact analytical solutions of this form that were previously obtained for homogeneous and baroclinic eddies in the ocean.

  6. Analytical applications of microbial fuel cells. Part II: Toxicity, microbial activity and quantification, single analyte detection and other uses.

    PubMed

    Abrevaya, Ximena C; Sacco, Natalia J; Bonetto, Maria C; Hilding-Ohlsson, Astrid; Cortón, Eduardo

    2015-01-15

    Microbial fuel cells were rediscovered twenty years ago and now are a very active research area. The reasons behind this new activity are the relatively recent discovery of electrogenic or electroactive bacteria and the vision of two important practical applications, as wastewater treatment coupled with clean energy production and power supply systems for isolated low-power sensor devices. Although some analytical applications of MFCs were proposed earlier (as biochemical oxygen demand sensing) only lately a myriad of new uses of this technology are being presented by research groups around the world, which combine both biological-microbiological and electroanalytical expertises. This is the second part of a review of MFC applications in the area of analytical sciences. In Part I a general introduction to biological-based analytical methods including bioassays, biosensors, MFCs design, operating principles, as well as, perhaps the main and earlier presented application, the use as a BOD sensor was reviewed. In Part II, other proposed uses are presented and discussed. As other microbially based analytical systems, MFCs are satisfactory systems to measure and integrate complex parameters that are difficult or impossible to measure otherwise, such as water toxicity (where the toxic effect to aquatic organisms needed to be integrated). We explore here the methods proposed to measure toxicity, microbial metabolism, and, being of special interest to space exploration, life sensors. Also, some methods with higher specificity, proposed to detect a single analyte, are presented. Different possibilities to increase selectivity and sensitivity, by using molecular biology or other modern techniques are also discussed here.

  7. Nine-analyte detection using an array-based biosensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taitt, Chris Rowe; Anderson, George P.; Lingerfelt, Brian M.; Feldstein, s. Mark. J.; Ligler, Frances S.

    2002-01-01

    A fluorescence-based multianalyte immunosensor has been developed for simultaneous analysis of multiple samples. While the standard 6 x 6 format of the array sensor has been used to analyze six samples for six different analytes, this same format has the potential to allow a single sample to be tested for 36 different agents. The method described herein demonstrates proof of principle that the number of analytes detectable using a single array can be increased simply by using complementary mixtures of capture and tracer antibodies. Mixtures were optimized to allow detection of closely related analytes without significant cross-reactivity. Following this facile modification of patterning and assay procedures, the following nine targets could be detected in a single 3 x 3 array: Staphylococcal enterotoxin B, ricin, cholera toxin, Bacillus anthracis Sterne, Bacillus globigii, Francisella tularensis LVS, Yersiniapestis F1 antigen, MS2 coliphage, and Salmonella typhimurium. This work maximizes the efficiency and utility of the described array technology, increasing only reagent usage and cost; production and fabrication costs are not affected.

  8. An analysis of the factors influencing demand-side management activity in the electric utility industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bock, Mark Joseph

    Demand-side management (DSM), defined as the "planning, implementation, and monitoring of utility activities designed to encourage consumers to modify their pattern of electricity usage, including the timing and level of electricity demand," is a relatively new concept in the U.S. electric power industry. Nevertheless, in twenty years since it was first introduced, utility expenditures on DSM programs, as well as the number of such programs, have grown rapidly. At first glance, it may seem peculiar that a firm would actively attempt to reduce demand for its primary product. There are two primary explanations as to why a utility might pursue DSM: regulatory mandate, and self-interest. The purpose of this dissertation is to determine the impact these influences have on the amount of DSM undertaken by utilities. This research is important for two reasons. First, it provides insight into whether DSM will continue to exist as competition becomes more prevalent in the industry. Secondly, it is important because no one has taken a comprehensive look at firm-level DSM activity on an industry-wide basis. The primary data set used in this dissertation is the U.S. Department of Energy's Annual Electric Utility Report, Form EIA-861, which represents the most comprehensive data set available for analyzing DSM activity in the U.S. There are four measures of DSM activity in this data set: (1) utility expenditures on DSM programs; (2) energy savings by DSM program participants; and (3) the actual and (4) the potential reductions in peak load resulting from utility DSM measures. Each is used as the dependent variable in an econometric analysis where independent variables include various utility characteristics, regulatory characteristics, and service territory and customer characteristics. In general, the results from the econometric analysis suggest that in 1993, DSM activity was primarily the result of regulatory pressure. All of the evidence suggests that if DSM continues to

  9. Trunk muscle activation in low-back pain patients, an analysis of the literature.

    PubMed

    van Dieën, Jaap H; Selen, Luc P J; Cholewicki, Jacek

    2003-08-01

    This paper provides an analysis of the literature on trunk muscle recruitment in low-back pain patients. Two models proposed in the literature, the pain-spasm-pain model and the pain adaptation model, yield conflicting predictions on how low- back pain would affect trunk muscle recruitment in various activities. The two models are outlined and evidence for the two from neurophsysiological studies is reviewed. Subsequently, specific predictions with respect to changes in activation of the lumbar extensor musculature are derived from both models. These predictions are compared to the results from 30 clinical studies and three induced pain studies retrieved in a comprehensive literature search. Neither of the two models is unequivocally supported by the literature. These data and further data on timing of muscle activity and load sharing between muscles suggest an alternative model to explain the alterations of trunk muscle recruitment due to low-back pain. It is proposed that motor control changes in patients are functional in that they enhance spinal stability.

  10. Effect of Sediment on Dynamic Pressure of Gravity Dams Using an Analytical Solution

    SciTech Connect

    Khiavi, Majid Pasbani; Gharabaghi, Ahmad R. M.; Abedi, Karim

    2008-07-08

    This paper presents an analytical solution to get a reliable estimation of the earthquake-induced hydrodynamic pressure on gravity dams by proposing closed-form formulas for the eigenvalues involved when solving the fluid and dam interaction problem. A new analytical technique is presented for calculation of earthquake-induced hydrodynamic pressure on rigid gravity dams allowing for water compressibility and wave absorption at the reservoir bottom. This new analytical solution can take into account the effect of bottom material on seismic response of gravity dams. The obtained results are in good agreement with other classical solutions. The main capability of proposed analytical solution is direct calculation of eigenvalues, without any need for numerical solution. In addition the method can be easily incorporated in dynamic analysis of a dam.

  11. Quantitative 1H NMR: Development and Potential of an Analytical Method – an Update

    PubMed Central

    Pauli, Guido F.; Gödecke, Tanja; Jaki, Birgit U.; Lankin, David C.

    2012-01-01

    Covering the literature from mid-2004 until the end of 2011, this review continues a previous literature overview on quantitative 1H NMR (qHNMR) methodology and its applications in the analysis of natural products (NPs). Among the foremost advantages of qHNMR is its accurate function with external calibration, the lack of any requirement for identical reference materials, a high precision and accuracy when properly validated, and an ability to quantitate multiple analytes simultaneously. As a result of the inclusion of over 170 new references, this updated review summarizes a wealth of detailed experiential evidence and newly developed methodology that supports qHNMR as a valuable and unbiased analytical tool for natural product and other areas of research. PMID:22482996

  12. LC-MS screening techniques for wastewater analysis and analytical data handling strategies: Sartans and their transformation products as an example.

    PubMed

    Letzel, Thomas; Bayer, Anne; Schulz, Wolfgang; Heermann, Alexandra; Lucke, Thomas; Greco, Giorgia; Grosse, Sylvia; Schüssler, Walter; Sengl, Manfred; Letzel, Marion

    2015-10-01

    A large number of anthropogenic trace contaminants such as pharmaceuticals, their human metabolites and further transformation products (TPs) enter wastewater treatment plants on a daily basis. A mixture of known, expected, and unknown molecules are discharged into the receiving aquatic environment because only partial elimination occurs for many of these chemicals during physical, biological and chemical treatment processes. In this study, an array of LC-MS methods from three collaborating laboratories was applied to detect and identify anthropogenic trace contaminants and their TPs in different waters. Starting with theoretical predictions of TPs, an efficient workflow using the combination of target, suspected-target and non-target strategies for the identification of these TPs in the environment was developed. These techniques and strategies were applied to study anti-hypertensive drugs from the sartan group (i.e., candesartan, eprosartan, irbesartan, olmesartan, and valsartan). Degradation experiments were performed in lab-scale wastewater treatment plants, and a screening workflow including an inter-laboratory approach was used for the identification of transformation products in the effluent samples. Subsequently, newly identified compounds were successfully analyzed in effluents of real wastewater treatment plants and river waters.

  13. An analytic model for buoyancy resonances in protoplanetary disks

    SciTech Connect

    Lubow, Stephen H.; Zhu, Zhaohuan E-mail: zhzhu@astro.princeton.edu

    2014-04-10

    Zhu et al. found in three-dimensional shearing box simulations a new form of planet-disk interaction that they attributed to a vertical buoyancy resonance in the disk. We describe an analytic linear model for this interaction. We adopt a simplified model involving azimuthal forcing that produces the resonance and permits an analytic description of its structure. We derive an analytic expression for the buoyancy torque and show that the vertical torque distribution agrees well with the results of the Athena simulations and a Fourier method for linear numerical calculations carried out with the same forcing. The buoyancy resonance differs from the classic Lindblad and corotation resonances in that the resonance lies along tilted planes. Its width depends on damping effects and is independent of the gas sound speed. The resonance does not excite propagating waves. At a given large azimuthal wavenumber k{sub y} > h {sup –1} (for disk thickness h), the buoyancy resonance exerts a torque over a region that lies radially closer to the corotation radius than the Lindblad resonance. Because the torque is localized to the region of excitation, it is potentially subject to the effects of nonlinear saturation. In addition, the torque can be reduced by the effects of radiative heat transfer between the resonant region and its surroundings. For each azimuthal wavenumber, the resonance establishes a large scale density wave pattern in a plane within the disk.

  14. An Analytic Theory for the Orbits of Circumbinary Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, Gene C. K.; Lee, Man Hoi

    2013-02-01

    Three transiting circumbinary planets (Kepler-16 b, Kepler-34 b, and Kepler-35 b) have recently been discovered from photometric data taken by the Kepler spacecraft. Their orbits are significantly non-Keplerian because of the large secondary-to-primary mass ratio and orbital eccentricity of the binaries, as well as the proximity of the planets to the binaries. We present an analytic theory, with the planet treated as a test particle, which shows that the planetary motion can be represented by the superposition of the circular motion of a guiding center, the forced oscillations due to the non-axisymmetric components of the binary's potential, the epicyclic motion, and the vertical motion. In this analytic theory, the periapse and ascending node of the planet precess at nearly equal rates in opposite directions. The largest forced oscillation term corresponds to a forced eccentricity (which is an explicit function of the parameters of the binary and of the guiding center radius of the planet), and the amplitude of the epicyclic motion (which is a free parameter of the theory) is the free eccentricity. Comparisons with direct numerical orbit integrations show that this analytic theory gives an accurate description of the planetary motion for all three Kepler systems. We find that all three Kepler circumbinary planets have nonzero free eccentricities.

  15. AN ANALYTIC THEORY FOR THE ORBITS OF CIRCUMBINARY PLANETS

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, Gene C. K.; Lee, Man Hoi

    2013-02-15

    Three transiting circumbinary planets (Kepler-16 b, Kepler-34 b, and Kepler-35 b) have recently been discovered from photometric data taken by the Kepler spacecraft. Their orbits are significantly non-Keplerian because of the large secondary-to-primary mass ratio and orbital eccentricity of the binaries, as well as the proximity of the planets to the binaries. We present an analytic theory, with the planet treated as a test particle, which shows that the planetary motion can be represented by the superposition of the circular motion of a guiding center, the forced oscillations due to the non-axisymmetric components of the binary's potential, the epicyclic motion, and the vertical motion. In this analytic theory, the periapse and ascending node of the planet precess at nearly equal rates in opposite directions. The largest forced oscillation term corresponds to a forced eccentricity (which is an explicit function of the parameters of the binary and of the guiding center radius of the planet), and the amplitude of the epicyclic motion (which is a free parameter of the theory) is the free eccentricity. Comparisons with direct numerical orbit integrations show that this analytic theory gives an accurate description of the planetary motion for all three Kepler systems. We find that all three Kepler circumbinary planets have nonzero free eccentricities.

  16. A Visual Analytics Approach for Correlation, Classification, and Regression Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Steed, Chad A; SwanII, J. Edward; Fitzpatrick, Patrick J.; Jankun-Kelly, T.J.

    2012-02-01

    New approaches that combine the strengths of humans and machines are necessary to equip analysts with the proper tools for exploring today's increasing complex, multivariate data sets. In this paper, a novel visual data mining framework, called the Multidimensional Data eXplorer (MDX), is described that addresses the challenges of today's data by combining automated statistical analytics with a highly interactive parallel coordinates based canvas. In addition to several intuitive interaction capabilities, this framework offers a rich set of graphical statistical indicators, interactive regression analysis, visual correlation mining, automated axis arrangements and filtering, and data classification techniques. The current work provides a detailed description of the system as well as a discussion of key design aspects and critical feedback from domain experts.

  17. A Visual Analytics Approach for Correlation, Classification, and Regression Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Steed, Chad A; SwanII, J. Edward; Fitzpatrick, Patrick J.; Jankun-Kelly, T.J.

    2013-01-01

    New approaches that combine the strengths of humans and machines are necessary to equip analysts with the proper tools for exploring today s increasing complex, multivariate data sets. In this paper, a visual data mining framework, called the Multidimensional Data eXplorer (MDX), is described that addresses the challenges of today s data by combining automated statistical analytics with a highly interactive parallel coordinates based canvas. In addition to several intuitive interaction capabilities, this framework offers a rich set of graphical statistical indicators, interactive regression analysis, visual correlation mining, automated axis arrangements and filtering, and data classification techniques. This chapter provides a detailed description of the system as well as a discussion of key design aspects and critical feedback from domain experts.

  18. The Autonomic Brain: An Activation Likelihood Estimation Meta-Analysis for Central Processing of Autonomic Function

    PubMed Central

    Meissner, Karin; Bär, Karl-Jürgen; Napadow, Vitaly

    2013-01-01

    The autonomic nervous system (ANS) is of paramount importance for daily life. Its regulatory action on respiratory, cardiovascular, digestive, endocrine, and many other systems is controlled by a number of structures in the CNS. While the majority of these nuclei and cortices have been identified in animal models, neuroimaging studies have recently begun to shed light on central autonomic processing in humans. In this study, we used activation likelihood estimation to conduct a meta-analysis of human neuroimaging experiments evaluating central autonomic processing to localize (1) cortical and subcortical areas involved in autonomic processing, (2) potential subsystems for the sympathetic and parasympathetic divisions of the ANS, and (3) potential subsystems for specific ANS responses to different stimuli/tasks. Across all tasks, we identified a set of consistently activated brain regions, comprising left amygdala, right anterior and left posterior insula and midcingulate cortices that form the core of the central autonomic network. While sympathetic-associated regions predominate in executive- and salience-processing networks, parasympathetic regions predominate in the default mode network. Hence, central processing of autonomic function does not simply involve a monolithic network of brain regions, instead showing elements of task and division specificity. PMID:23785162

  19. An analysis of solar-cycle temporal relationships among activity indicators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachmann, K. T.; Maymani, H.; Nautiyal, K.; te Velde, V.

    2004-01-01

    Differences in the time development of solar activity indices are an important clue in the search for physical processes responsible for changing solar emission at various wavelengths. In this paper we describe our investigation of temporal relationships among two space-based indices, Lyman-α 121.6 nm emission (Lα) and the Mg II 280 nm core-to-wing ratio, and four ground-based indices - the 10.7 cm flux (F10), the He I 1083 nm equivalent width, the Ca II K 393.4 nm emission index, and the International Sunspot Number (ISN). We provide scatterplots of index pairs passed through a 2-year Gaussian filter during each available solar cycle, and we approximate the temporal relationships quantitatively as overall temporal offsets with uncertainties. We reconcile our findings with qualitative ideas concerning the variation of solar emissions with solar activity. Since the F10 and ISN time series are longer than four complete solar cycles, we are able to evaluate the reproducibility of temporal offsets over multiple solar cycles. The chief motivation for our work is to improve solar indicator analysis by providing a method of seeing and analyzing temporal relationships clearly and easily. We believe that future physical models of magnetic activity and spectral emissions in the solar chromosphere and transition region may make quantitative predictions of temporal relationships among full-disk solar indices for comparison with analyses such as ours.

  20. A methylation-stimulated DNA machine: an autonomous isothermal route to methyltransferase activity and inhibition analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Changfeng; Wen, Yanqin; Peng, Hongzhen; Long, Yitao; He, Yao; Huang, Qing; Li, Di; Fan, Chunhai

    2011-04-01

    The operation of DNA nanomachines is generally triggered by either conformational changes of DNA nanostructure or external environmental stimuli. In the present study, we demonstrate an alternative driving force, DNA methylation, to stimulate DNA machine operation. DNA methylation changes neither DNA sequence and conformation nor external environment, however, blocks its cleavage by corresponding methylation-sensitive restriction endonuclease. We thus designed a strand displacement amplification DNA machine, which could be stimulated upon DNA methylation and then autonomously generates accumulated amounts of peroxidase-mimicking DNAzyme signaling machine products in an isothermal manner. The machine product DNAzyme could catalyze the H(2)O(2)-mediated oxidation of 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzo thiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS(2-)) to a colored product ABTS(·-). This methylation-stimulated DNA machine was further used as a colorimetric assay for analysis of methyltransferases activities and screening of methylation inhibitors. As compared with classical methylation assay, this facile isothermal DNA machine avoids the introduction of methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction and radioactive labels, which might be employed as an effective tool for DNA methylation analysis.

  1. Evidence for an analytic perception of multiharmonic sounds in the bat, Megaderma lyra, and its possible role for echo spectral analysis.

    PubMed

    Krumbholz, K; Schmidt, S

    2001-04-01

    For echolocation, the gleaning bat Megaderma lyra relies on short and broadband calls consisting of multiple harmonic components, each of which is downward frequency modulated. The harmonic components in M. lyra's calls have a relatively small frequency excursion and do not overlap spectrally. Broadband calls of other bat species, on the other hand, often consist of only a few harmonics which are modulated over broad and sometimes overlapping frequency ranges. A call consisting of narrow and nonoverlapping harmonic components may provide a less complete representation of target structure than a call which consists of broadly modulated components. However, a multiharmonic call may help the bats to perceive local spectral changes in the echo from shifts in the peak frequencies of single harmonics, and thereby to extract additional information about the target. To assess this hypothesis, the accuracy with which M. lyra can analyze frequency shifts of single partials in multiharmonic complex tones was investigated. A two-alternative, forced-choice behavioral task was used to measure M. lyra's frequency discrimination threshold for the third partial in complex tones whose spectral composition resembled that of the bat's sonar calls. The discrimination threshold for the third partial in a 21.5-kHz harmonic tone amounted to about 2% and was similar to the bat's pure-tone discrimination threshold at 64.5 kHz. Discrimination performance was essentially unaffected by random frequency changes of the other partials and by reducing stimulus duration from 50.5 to 1.5 ms. Both findings are in accordance with predictions made on the basis of the shape of M. Ivra's cochlear filters. The comparison between the observed frequency discrimination performance and a computational estimate of the expected frequency shift in the third harmonic of an echo reflected by a simple, two-front target showed that M. lyra's frequency resolution is sufficient for analyzing the target

  2. An analytical approach to obtaining JWL parameters from cylinder tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutton, B. D.; Ferguson, J. W.; Hodgson, A. N.

    2017-01-01

    An analytical method for determining parameters for the JWL Equation of State from cylinder test data is described. This method is applied to four datasets obtained from two 20.3 mm diameter EDC37 cylinder tests. The calculated pressure-relative volume (p-Vr) curves agree with those produced by hydro-code modelling. The average calculated Chapman-Jouguet (CJ) pressure is 38.6 GPa, compared to the model value of 38.3 GPa; the CJ relative volume is 0.729 for both. The analytical pressure-relative volume curves produced agree with the one used in the model out to the commonly reported expansion of 7 relative volumes, as do the predicted energies generated by integrating under the p-Vr curve. The calculated energy is within 1.6% of that predicted by the model.

  3. Assessing Proposals for New Global Health Treaties: An Analytic Framework

    PubMed Central

    Røttingen, John-Arne; Frenk, Julio

    2015-01-01

    We have presented an analytic framework and 4 criteria for assessing when global health treaties have reasonable prospects of yielding net positive effects. First, there must be a significant transnational dimension to the problem being addressed. Second, the goals should justify the coercive nature of treaties. Third, proposed global health treaties should have a reasonable chance of achieving benefits. Fourth, treaties should be the best commitment mechanism among the many competing alternatives. Applying this analytic framework to 9 recent calls for new global health treaties revealed that none fully meet the 4 criteria. Efforts aiming to better use or revise existing international instruments may be more productive than is advocating new treaties. PMID:26066926

  4. Microbiological Analysis of an Active Pilot-Scale Mobile Bioreactor Treating Organic Contaminants

    SciTech Connect

    Brigmon, R.L.

    1997-11-26

    Samples were obtained for microbiological analysis from a granular activated carbon fluidized bed bioreactor (GAC-FBR). This GAC-FBR was in operation at a former manufactured gas plant (MGP) Site in Augusta Georgia for in situ groundwater bioremediation of organics. The samples included contaminated site groundwater, GAC-FBR effluent, and biofilm coated granular activated carbon at 5, 9, and 13 feet within the GAC-FBR column. The objective of this analysis was to correlate contaminant removal with microbiological activity within the GAC-FBR.

  5. An Analytic Function of Lunar Surface Temperature for Exospheric Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurley, Dana M.; Sarantos, Menelaos; Grava, Cesare; Williams, Jean-Pierre; Retherford, Kurt D.; Siegler, Matthew; Greenhagen, Benjamin; Paige, David

    2014-01-01

    We present an analytic expression to represent the lunar surface temperature as a function of Sun-state latitude and local time. The approximation represents neither topographical features nor compositional effects and therefore does not change as a function of selenographic latitude and longitude. The function reproduces the surface temperature measured by Diviner to within +/-10 K at 72% of grid points for dayside solar zenith angles of less than 80, and at 98% of grid points for nightside solar zenith angles greater than 100. The analytic function is least accurate at the terminator, where there is a strong gradient in the temperature, and the polar regions. Topographic features have a larger effect on the actual temperature near the terminator than at other solar zenith angles. For exospheric modeling the effects of topography on the thermal model can be approximated by using an effective longitude for determining the temperature. This effective longitude is randomly redistributed with 1 sigma of 4.5deg. The resulting ''roughened'' analytical model well represents the statistical dispersion in the Diviner data and is expected to be generally useful for future models of lunar surface temperature, especially those implemented within exospheric simulations that address questions of volatile transport.

  6. An analytical SMASH procedure (ASP) for sensitivity-encoded MRI.

    PubMed

    Lee, R F; Westgate, C R; Weiss, R G; Bottomley, P A

    2000-05-01

    The simultaneous acquisition of spatial harmonics (SMASH) method of imaging with detector arrays can reduce the number of phase-encoding steps, and MRI scan time several-fold. The original approach utilized numerical gradient-descent fitting with the coil sensitivity profiles to create a set of composite spatial harmonics to replace the phase-encoding steps. Here, an analytical approach for generating the harmonics is presented. A transform is derived to project the harmonics onto a set of sensitivity profiles. A sequence of Fourier, Hilbert, and inverse Fourier transform is then applied to analytically eliminate spatially dependent phase errors from the different coils while fully preserving the spatial-encoding. By combining the transform and phase correction, the original numerical image reconstruction method can be replaced by an analytical SMASH procedure (ASP). The approach also allows simulation of SMASH imaging, revealing a criterion for the ratio of the detector sensitivity profile width to the detector spacing that produces optimal harmonic generation. When detector geometry is suboptimal, a group of quasi-harmonics arises, which can be corrected and restored to pure harmonics. The simulation also reveals high-order harmonic modulation effects, and a demodulation procedure is presented that enables application of ASP to a large numbers of detectors. The method is demonstrated on a phantom and humans using a standard 4-channel phased-array MRI system.

  7. The big bang and inflation united by an analytic solution

    SciTech Connect

    Bars, Itzhak; Chen, Shih-Hung

    2011-02-15

    Exact analytic solutions for a class of scalar-tensor gravity theories with a hyperbolic scalar potential are presented. Using an exact solution we have successfully constructed a model of inflation that produces the spectral index, the running of the spectral index, and the amplitude of scalar perturbations within the constraints given by the WMAP 7 years data. The model simultaneously describes the big bang and inflation connected by a specific time delay between them so that these two events are regarded as dependent on each other. In solving the Friedmann equations, we have utilized an essential Weyl symmetry of our theory in 3+1 dimensions which is a predicted remaining symmetry of 2T-physics field theory in 4+2 dimensions. This led to a new method of obtaining analytic solutions in the 1T field theory which could in principle be used to solve more complicated theories with more scalar fields. Some additional distinguishing properties of the solution includes the fact that there are early periods of time when the slow-roll approximation is not valid. Furthermore, the inflaton does not decrease monotonically with time; rather, it oscillates around the potential minimum while settling down, unlike the slow-roll approximation. While the model we used for illustration purposes is realistic in most respects, it lacks a mechanism for stopping inflation. The technique of obtaining analytic solutions opens a new window for studying inflation, and other applications, more precisely than using approximations.

  8. Readability Analysis of the Package Leaflets for Biological Medicines Available on the Internet Between 2007 and 2013: An Analytical Longitudinal Study

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background The package leaflet included in the packaging of all medicinal products plays an important role in the transmission of medicine-related information to patients. Therefore, in 2009, the European Commission published readability guidelines to try to ensure that the information contained in the package leaflet is understood by patients. Objective The main objective of this study was to calculate and compare the readability levels and length (number of words) of the package leaflets for biological medicines in 2007, 2010, and 2013. Methods The sample of this study included 36 biological medicine package leaflets that were downloaded from the European Medicines Agency website in three different years: 2007, 2010, and 2013. The readability of the selected package leaflets was obtained using the following readability formulas: SMOG grade, Flesch-Kincaid grade level, and Szigriszt’s perspicuity index. The length (number of words) of the package leaflets was also measured. Afterwards, the relationship between these quantitative variables (three readability indexes and length) and categorical (or qualitative) variables were analyzed. The categorical variables were the year when the package leaflet was downloaded, the package leaflet section, type of medicine, year of authorization of biological medicine, and marketing authorization holder. Results The readability values of all the package leaflets exceeded the sixth-grade reading level, which is the recommended value for health-related written materials. No statistically significant differences were found between the three years of study in the readability indexes, although differences were observed in the case of the length (P=.002), which increased over the study period. When the relationship between readability indexes and length and the other variables was analyzed, statistically significant differences were found between package leaflet sections (P<.001) and between the groups of medicine only with regard

  9. Nutrient elements of commercial tea from Nigeria by an instrumental neutron activation analysis technique.

    PubMed

    Jona, S A; Williams, I S

    2000-08-30

    A prototype miniature neutron source reactor (MNSR) with a thermal neutron flux of 3.0 x 10(11) n cm(-2) s(-1) has been used to determine the concentrations of some nutrient elements leading to short-lived activation products in commercial tea leaf samples from Nigeria. A total of eight elements Al, Ca, Cl, Cu, K, Mg, Mn and Na, that can be routinely used for quality control purposes, were analyzed in this study. Two biological reference materials, tomato leaves (NIST-1573) and citrus leaves (NIST-1572) were used as the standard and quality control materials, respectively. The analytical results show that the average concentrations of Al, Ca, Cl, Cu, K, Mg, Mn and Na in Nigerian tea are slightly higher when compared with a Chinese herbal tea analyzed in this study. The concentration ratios of K/Ca were found to be high in all the samples analyzed suggesting cultivation in potash-rich soils.

  10. Stability analysis of magnetized neutron stars - a semi-analytic approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herbrik, Marlene; Kokkotas, Kostas D.

    2017-04-01

    We implement a semi-analytic approach for stability analysis, addressing the ongoing uncertainty about stability and structure of neutron star magnetic fields. Applying the energy variational principle, a model system is displaced from its equilibrium state. The related energy density variation is set up analytically, whereas its volume integration is carried out numerically. This facilitates the consideration of more realistic neutron star characteristics within the model compared to analytical treatments. At the same time, our method retains the possibility to yield general information about neutron star magnetic field and composition structures that are likely to be stable. In contrast to numerical studies, classes of parametrized systems can be studied at once, finally constraining realistic configurations for interior neutron star magnetic fields. We apply the stability analysis scheme on polytropic and non-barotropic neutron stars with toroidal, poloidal and mixed fields testing their stability in a Newtonian framework. Furthermore, we provide the analytical scheme for dropping the Cowling approximation in an axisymmetric system and investigate its impact. Our results confirm the instability of simple magnetized neutron star models as well as a stabilization tendency in the case of mixed fields and stratification. These findings agree with analytical studies whose spectrum of model systems we extend by lifting former simplifications.

  11. A compact two-wave dichrometer of an optical biosensor analytical system for medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chulkov, D. P.; Gusev, V. M.; Kompanets, O. N.; Vereschagin, F. V.; Skuridin, S. G.; Yevdokimov, Yu. M.

    2016-12-01

    An experimental model has been developed of a compact two-wave dichrometer on the base of LEDs that is well-suited to work with "liquid" DNA nanoconstructions as biosensing units. The mobile and inexpensive device is intended for use in a biosensor analytical system for rapid determination of biologically active compounds in liquids to solve practical problems of clinic medicine and pharmacology.

  12. Analytical Model of Water Flow in Coal with Active Matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siemek, Jakub; Stopa, Jerzy

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents new analytical model of gas-water flow in coal seams in one dimension with emphasis on interactions between water flowing in cleats and coal matrix. Coal as a flowing system, can be viewed as a solid organic material consisting of two flow subsystems: a microporous matrix and a system of interconnected macropores and fractures. Most of gas is accumulated in the microporous matrix, where the primary flow mechanism is diffusion. Fractures and cleats existing in coal play an important role as a transportation system for macro scale flow of water and gas governed by Darcy's law. The coal matrix can imbibe water under capillary forces leading to exchange of mass between fractures and coal matrix. In this paper new partial differential equation for water saturation in fractures has been formulated, respecting mass exchange between coal matrix and fractures. Exact analytical solution has been obtained using the method of characteristics. The final solution has very simple form that may be useful for practical engineering calculations. It was observed that the rate of exchange of mass between the fractures and the coal matrix is governed by an expression which is analogous to the Newton cooling law known from theory of heat exchange, but in present case the mass transfer coefficient depends not only on coal and fluid properties but also on time and position. The constant term of mass transfer coefficient depends on relation between micro porosity and macro porosity of coal, capillary forces, and microporous structure of coal matrix. This term can be expressed theoretically or obtained experimentally. W artykule zaprezentowano nowy model matematyczny przepływu wody i gazu w jednowymiarowej warstwie węglowej z uwzględnieniem wymiany masy między systemem szczelin i matrycą węglową. Węgiel jako system przepływowy traktowany jest jako układ o podwójnej porowatości i przepuszczalności, składający się z mikroporowatej matrycy węglowej oraz z

  13. An analytic approach to the design of survivable optical mesh networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhardwaj, Manish

    2007-12-01

    One of the key components of the cost of building and operating optical mesh communication networks is the requirement of survivability and many mesh survivability schemes have been suggested and their cost and performance numerically evaluated in the literature. However, little work has been done in developing comprehensive and tractable analytic models of the requirements in terms of capacity deployment and performance of the different mesh restoration schemes. Such analytic models are all the more significant given the large computation time required to numerically evaluate every possible network scenario. The focus of this thesis is to fill this void in our understanding of the costs and performance of mesh restoration schemes. Analytic models of the capacity requirements of mesh restoration schemes are presented and the accuracy of the analytic models evaluated over a wide range of network scenarios. Analytic models of the temporal performance of mesh restoration schemes are also presented thus extending for the first time the network modeling effort into the operational expenditure domain. Consequently, the number and nature of variables incorporated into the analysis is also enhanced from just the network topology and demand profile to include the switch hardware and routing protocols. We show for the first time in a quantifiable fashion the consequences of certain technology choices on the operational expenditure of optical mesh networks. Finally, the analytic models are leveraged to design a novel mesh network restoration architecture with lower restoration capacity requirement and better temporal performance than existing architectures. Such an architecture, although relevant in its own right due to its lower cost and better performance also represents a paradigm shift in the design philosophy of mesh networks wherein the analytic model guides the design process and numerical analysis confirms improvements predicted by the model. Future applications of

  14. Solar activity and terrestrial climate: an analysis of some purported correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laut, Peter

    2003-05-01

    The last decade has seen a revival of various hypotheses claiming a strong correlation between solar activity and a number of terrestrial climate parameters: Links between cosmic rays and cloud cover, first total cloud cover and then only low clouds, and between solar cycle lengths and Northern Hemisphere land temperatures. These hypotheses play an important role in the scientific as well as in the public debate about the possibility or reality of a man-made global climate change. I have analyzed a number of published graphs which have played a major role in these debates and which have been claimed to support solar hypotheses. My analyses show that the apparent strong correlations displayed on these graphs have been obtained by an incorrect handling of the physical data. Since the graphs are still widely referred to in the literature and their misleading character has not yet been generally recognized, I have found it appropriate to deliver the present overview. Especially, I want to caution against drawing any conclusions based upon these graphs concerning the possible wisdom or futility of reducing the emissions of man-made greenhouse gases. My findings do not by any means rule out the existence of important links between solar activity and terrestrial climate. Such links have over the years been demonstrated by many authors. The sole objective of the present analysis is to draw attention to the fact that some of the widely publicized, apparent correlations do not properly reflect the underlying physical data.

  15. Understanding Emotions as Situated, Embodied, and Fissured: Thinking with Theory to Create an Analytical Tool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuby, Candace R.

    2014-01-01

    An emerging theoretical perspective is that emotions are a verb or something we do in relation to others. Studies that demonstrate ways to analyze emotions from a performative stance are scarce. In this article, a new analytical tool is introduced; a critical performative analysis of emotion (CPAE) that draws upon three theoretical perspectives:…

  16. Scholarly Blogging Practice as Situated Genre: An Analytical Framework Based on Genre Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kjellberg, Sara

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: Examines how an analytical framework of situated genre analysis can be used to study how research blogs are constructed and used as tools in scholarly communication. Method: A framework was extracted from genre research theories consisting of four concepts: aim, form, content and context. The term "situated genre" was used to focus…

  17. Development and Evaluation of an Analytical Method for the Determination of Total Atmospheric Mercury. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chase, D. L.; And Others

    Total mercury in ambient air can be collected in iodine monochloride, but the subsequent analysis is relatively complex and tedious, and contamination from reagents and containers is a problem. A sliver wool collector, preceded by a catalytic pyrolysis furnace, gives good recovery of mercury and simplifies the analytical step. An instrumental…

  18. Probabilistic capture zone delineation based on an analytic solution.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Elizabeth; Andricevic, Roko; Morrice, Joseph

    2002-01-01

    A major tool used in the design of wellhead protection areas is the delineation of a capture zone for a pumping well by use of a simple, steady-state analytic solution. This simple approach has been useful for many small municipalities because of the high costs associated with obtaining the hydrogeologic information needed for detailed numerical modeling. This analytic solution, however, is deterministic, and uncertainty in the mean value estimates of the hydraulic parameters used in this model can be a major source of error in predicting capture zones. To address this problem, a statistical theory was developed for including the uncertainty in the transmissivity and the magnitude and direction of the hydraulic head gradient in the analytic solution for both the ultimate and time-dependent capture zone for an arbitrary reliability level. To demonstrate the method and investigate the effect of varying magnitudes of uncertainty on time-dependent capture zones, the method is applied to three synthetic data sets based on data from the Borden Aquifer in Ontario, Canada. In general, the results show that uncertainty in the length of the time-dependent capture zone at a given reliability level is dependent on the uncertainty in the magnitude of the mean regional flow, which is equal to the transmissivity multiplied by the hydraulic head gradient; uncertainty in the maximum width of the capture zone is dependent primarily on the uncertainty in the mean direction of the regional flow.

  19. Organic analysis and analytical methods development: FY 1995 progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Clauss, S.A.; Hoopes, V.; Rau, J.

    1995-09-01

    This report describes the status of organic analyses and developing analytical methods to account for the organic components in Hanford waste tanks, with particular emphasis on tanks assigned to the Flammable Gas Watch List. The methods that have been developed are illustrated by their application to samples obtained from Tank 241-SY-103 (Tank 103-SY). The analytical data are to serve as an example of the status of methods development and application. Samples of the convective and nonconvective layers from Tank 103-SY were analyzed for total organic carbon (TOC). The TOC value obtained for the nonconvective layer using the hot persulfate method was 10,500 {mu}g C/g. The TOC value obtained from samples of Tank 101-SY was 11,000 {mu}g C/g. The average value for the TOC of the convective layer was 6400 {mu}g C/g. Chelator and chelator fragments in Tank 103-SY samples were identified using derivatization. gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Organic components were quantified using GC/flame ionization detection. Major components in both the convective and nonconvective-layer samples include ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA), succinic acid, nitrosoiminodiacetic acid (NIDA), citric acid, and ethylenediaminetriacetic acid (ED3A). Preliminary results also indicate the presence of C16 and C18 carboxylic acids in the nonconvective-layer sample. Oxalic acid was one of the major components in the nonconvective layer as determined by derivatization GC/flame ionization detection.

  20. An analytical and experimental study of crack extension in center-notched composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beuth, Jack L., Jr.; Herakovich, Carl T.

    1987-01-01

    The normal stress ratio theory for crack extension in anisotropic materials is studied analytically and experimentally. The theory is applied within a microscopic-level analysis of a single center notch of arbitrary orientation in a unidirectional composite material. The bulk of the analytical work of this study applies an elasticity solution for an infinite plate with a center line to obtain critical stress and crack growth direction predictions. An elasticity solution for an infinite plate with a center elliptical flaw is also used to obtain qualitative predictions of the location of crack initiation on the border of a rounded notch tip. The analytical portion of the study includes the formulation of a new crack growth theory that includes local shear stress. Normal stress ratio theory predictions are obtained for notched unidirectional tensile coupons and unidirectional Iosipescu shear specimens. These predictions are subsequently compared to experimental results.

  1. Maternal and infant activity: Analytic approaches for the study of circadian rhythm.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Karen A; Burr, Robert L; Spieker, Susan

    2015-11-01

    The study of infant and mother circadian rhythm entails choice of instruments appropriate for use in the home environment as well as selection of analytic approach that characterizes circadian rhythm. While actigraphy monitoring suits the needs of home study, limited studies have examined mother and infant rhythm derived from actigraphy. Among this existing research a variety of analyses have been employed to characterize 24-h rhythm, reducing ability to evaluate and synthesize findings. Few studies have examined the correspondence of mother and infant circadian parameters for the most frequently cited approaches: cosinor, non-parametric circadian rhythm analysis (NPCRA), and autocorrelation function (ACF). The purpose of this research was to examine analytic approaches in the study of mother and infant circadian activity rhythm. Forty-three healthy mother and infant pairs were studied in the home environment over a 72h period at infant age 4, 8, and 12 weeks. Activity was recorded continuously using actigraphy monitors and mothers completed a diary. Parameters of circadian rhythm were generated from cosinor analysis, NPCRA, and ACF. The correlation among measures of rhythm center (cosinor mesor, NPCRA mid level), strength or fit of 24-h period (cosinor magnitude and R(2), NPCRA amplitude and relative amplitude (RA)), phase (cosinor acrophase, NPCRA M10 and L5 midpoint), and rhythm stability and variability (NPCRA interdaily stability (IS) and intradaily variability (IV), ACF) was assessed, and additionally the effect size (eta(2)) for change over time evaluated. Results suggest that cosinor analysis, NPCRA, and autocorrelation provide several comparable parameters of infant and maternal circadian rhythm center, fit, and phase. IS and IV were strongly correlated with the 24-h cycle fit. The circadian parameters analyzed offer separate insight into rhythm and differing effect size for the detection of change over time. Findings inform selection of analysis and

  2. An analytical method for 14C in environmental water based on a wet-oxidation process.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yan-Jun; Guo, Gui-Yin; Wu, Lian-Sheng; Zhang, Bing; Chen, Chao-Feng; Zhang, Hai-Ying; Qin, Hong-Juan; Shang-Guan, Zhi-Hong

    2015-04-01

    An analytical method for (14)C in environmental water based on a wet-oxidation process was developed. The method can be used to determine the activity concentrations of organic and inorganic (14)C in environmental water, or total (14)C, including in drinking water, surface water, rainwater and seawater. The wet-oxidation of the organic component allows the conversion of organic carbon to an inorganic form, and the extraction of the inorganic (14)C can be achieved by acidification and nitrogen purging. Environmental water with a volume of 20 L can be used for the wet-oxidation and extraction, and a detection limit of about 0.02 Bq/g(C) can be achieved for water with carbon content above 15 mg(C)/L, obviously lower than the natural level of (14)C in the environment. The collected carbon is sufficient for measurement with a low level liquid scintillation counter (LSC) for typical samples. Extraction or recovery experiments for inorganic carbon and organic carbon from typical materials, including analytical reagents of organic benzoquinone, sucrose, glutamic acid, nicotinic acid, humic acid, ethane diol, et cetera., were conducted with excellent results based on measurement on a total organic carbon analyzer and LSC. The recovery rate for inorganic carbon ranged tween 98.7%-99.0% with a mean of 98.9(± 0.1)%, for organic carbon recovery ranged between 93.8% and 100.0% with a mean of 97.1(± 2.6)%. Verification and an uncertainty budget of the method are also presented for a representative environmental water. The method is appropriate for (14)C analysis in environmental water, and can be applied also to the analysis of liquid effluent from nuclear facilities.

  3. Development of a geovisual analytics environment using parallel coordinates with applications to tropical cyclone trend analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steed, Chad Allen

    A global transformation is being fueled by unprecedented growth in the quality, quantity, and number of different parameters in environmental data through the convergence of several technological advances in data collection and modeling. Although these data hold great potential for helping us understand many complex and, in some cases, life-threatening environmental processes, our ability to generate such data is far outpacing our ability to analyze it. In particular, conventional environmental data analysis tools are inadequate for coping with the size and complexity of these data. As a result, users are forced to reduce the problem in order to adapt to the capabilities of the tools. To overcome these limitations, we must complement the power of computational methods with human knowledge, flexible thinking, imagination, and our capacity for insight by developing visual analysis tools that distill information into the actionable criteria needed for enhanced decision support. In light of said challenges, we have integrated automated statistical analysis capabilities with a highly interactive, multivariate visualization interface to produce a promising approach for visual environmental data analysis. By combining advanced interaction techniques such as dynamic axis scaling, conjunctive parallel coordinates, statistical indicators, and aerial perspective shading, we provide an enhanced variant of the classical parallel coordinates plot. Furthermore, the system facilitates statistical processes such as stepwise linear regression and correlation analysis to assist in the identification and quantification of the most significant predictors for a particular dependent variable. These capabilities are combined into a unique geovisual analytics system that is demonstrated via a pedagogical case study and three North Atlantic tropical cyclone climate studies using a systematic workflow. In addition to revealing several significant associations between environmental

  4. An analysis of flaring and venting activity in the Alberta upstream oil and gas industry.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Matthew R; Coderre, Adam R

    2011-02-01

    Alberta, Canada, is an important global producer of petroleum resources. In association with this production, large amounts of gas (1.14 billion m3 in 2008) are flared or vented. Although the amount of flaring and venting has been measurably reduced since 2002, data from 2005 reveal sharp increases in venting, which have important implications in terms of resource conservation and greenhouse gas emissions (which exceeded 8 million tonnes of carbon dioxide equivalent in 2008). With use of extensive monthly production data for 18,203 active batteries spanning the years 2002-2008 obtained in close cooperation with the Alberta Energy Resources Conservation Board, a detailed analysis has been completed to examine activity patterns of flaring and venting and reasons behind these trends in the Alberta upstream oil and gas industry. In any given year, approximately 6000 batteries reported flaring and/or venting, but the distribution of volumes flared and vented at individual sites was highly skewed, such that small numbers of sites handled large fractions of the total gas flaring and venting in the Province. Examination of month-to-month volume variability at individual sites, cast in terms of a nominal turndown ratio that would be required for a compressor to capture that gas and direct it into a pipeline, further revealed that volumes at a majority of sites were reasonably stable and there was no evidence that larger or more stable sites had been preferentially reduced, leaving potential barriers to future mitigation. Through linking of geospatial data with production data coupled with additional statistical analysis, the 31.2% increase in venting volumes since 2005 was revealed to be predominantly associated with increased production of heavier oils and bitumen in the Lloydminster region of the Province. Overall, the data suggest that quite significant reductions in flaring and venting could be realized by seeking mitigation solutions for only the largest batteries in

  5. Determination of an Optimal Threshold Value for Muscle Activity Detection in EMG Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Özgünen, Kerem Tuncay; Çelik, Umut; Kurdak, Sanlı Sadi

    2010-01-01

    It is commonly agreed that one needs to use a threshold value in the detection of muscle activity timing in electromyographic (EMG) signal analysis. However, the algorithm for threshold determination lacks an agreement between the investigators. In this study we aimed to determine a proper threshold value in an incremental cycling exercise for accurate EMG signal analysis. Nine healthy recreationally active male subjects cycled until exhaustion. EMG recordings were performed on four low extremity muscle groups; gastrocnemius lateralis (GL), gastrocnemius medialis (GM), soleus (SOL) and vastus medialis (VM). We have analyzed our data using three different threshold levels: 25%, 35% and 45% of the mean RMS EMG value. We compared the appropriateness of these threshold values using two criteria: (1) significant correlation between the actual and estimated number of bursts and (2) proximity of the regression line of the actual and estimated number of bursts to the line of identity. It had been possible to find a significant correlation between the actual and estimated number of bursts with the 25, 35 and 45% threshold values for the GL muscle. Correlation analyses for the VM muscle had shown that the number of bursts estimated with the 35% threshold value was found to be significantly correlated with the actual number of bursts. For the GM muscle, it had been possible to predict the burst number by using either the 35% or 45% threshold value and for the SOL muscle the 25% threshold value was found as the best predictor for actual number of burst estimation. Detailed analyses of the actual and estimated number of bursts had shown that success of threshold estimation may differ among muscle groups. Evaluation of our data had clearly shown that it is important to select proper threshold values for correct EMG signal analyses. Using a single threshold value for different exercise intensities and different muscle groups may cause misleading results. Key points α priori

  6. Promoting Active Learning by Practicing the "Self-Assembly" of Model Analytical Instruments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Algar, W. Russ; Krull, Ulrich J.

    2010-01-01

    In our upper-year instrumental analytical chemistry course, we have developed "cut-and-paste" exercises where students "build" models of analytical instruments from individual schematic images of components. These exercises encourage active learning by students. Instead of trying to memorize diagrams, students are required to think deeply about…

  7. Cryogenic parallel, single phase flows: an analytical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichhorn, R.

    2017-02-01

    Managing the cryogenic flows inside a state-of-the-art accelerator cryomodule has become a demanding endeavour: In order to build highly efficient modules, all heat transfers are usually intercepted at various temperatures. For a multi-cavity module, operated at 1.8 K, this requires intercepts at 4 K and at 80 K at different locations with sometimes strongly varying heat loads which for simplicity reasons are operated in parallel. This contribution will describe an analytical approach, based on optimization theories.

  8. An analytical model of a longitudinal-torsional ultrasonic transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Budairi, Hassan; Lucas, Margaret

    2012-08-01

    The combination of longitudinal and torsional (LT) vibrations at high frequencies finds many applications such as ultrasonic drilling, ultrasonic welding, and ultrasonic motors. The LT mode can be obtained by modifications to the design of a standard bolted Langevin ultrasonic transducer driven by an axially poled piezoceramic stack, by a technique that degenerates the longitudinal mode to an LT motion by a geometrical alteration of the wave path. The transducer design is developed and optimised through numerical modelling which can represent the geometry and mechanical properties of the transducer and its vibration response to an electrical input applied across the piezoceramic stack. However, although these models can allow accurate descriptions of the mechanical behaviour, they do not generally provide adequate insights into the electrical characteristics of the transducer. In this work, an analytical model is developed to present the LT transducer based on the equivalent circuit method. This model can represent both the mechanical and electrical aspects and is used to extract many of the design parameters, such as resonance and anti-resonance frequencies, the impedance spectra and the coupling coefficient of the transducer. The validity of the analytical model is demonstrated by close agreement with experimental results.

  9. An integrated security framework for GOSS power grid analytics platform

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, Tara D.; Ciraci, Selim; Sharma, Poorva; Allwardt, Craig H.; Rice, Mark J.; Akyol, Bora A.

    2014-06-23

    In power grid operations, security is an essential component for any middleware platform. Security protects data against unwanted access as well as cyber attacks. GridOpticsTM Software System (GOSS) is an open source power grid analytics platform that facilitates ease of access between applications and data sources and promotes development of advanced analytical applications. GOSS contains an API that abstracts many of the difficulties in connecting to various heterogeneous data sources. A number of applications and data sources have already been implemented to demonstrate functionality and ease of use. A security framework has been implemented which leverages widely accepted, robust JavaTM security tools in a way such that they can be interchanged as needed. This framework supports the complex fine-grained, access control rules identified for the diverse data sources already in GOSS. Performance and reliability are also important considerations in any power grid architecture. An evaluation is done to determine the overhead cost caused by security within GOSS and ensure minimal impact to performance.

  10. Social cognition and the cerebellum: A meta-analytic connectivity analysis.

    PubMed

    Van Overwalle, Frank; D'aes, Tine; Mariën, Peter

    2015-12-01

    This meta-analytic connectivity modeling (MACM) study explores the functional connectivity of the cerebellum with the cerebrum in social cognitive processes. In a recent meta-analysis, Van Overwalle, Baetens, Mariën, and Vandekerckhove (2014) documented that the cerebellum is implicated in social processes of "body" reading (mirroring; e.g., understanding other persons' intentions from observing their movements) and "mind" reading (mentalizing, e.g., inferring other persons' beliefs, intentions or personality traits, reconstructing persons' past, future, or hypothetical events). In a recent functional connectivity study, Buckner et al. (2011) offered a novel parcellation of cerebellar topography that substantially overlaps with the cerebellar meta-analytic findings of Van Overwalle et al. (2014). This overlap suggests that the involvement of the cerebellum in social reasoning depends on its functional connectivity with the cerebrum. To test this hypothesis, we explored the meta-analytic co-activations as indices of functional connectivity between the cerebellum and the cerebrum during social cognition. The MACM results confirm substantial and distinct connectivity with respect to the functions of (a) action understanding ("body" reading) and (b) mentalizing ("mind" reading). The consistent and strong connectivity findings of this analysis suggest that cerebellar activity during social judgments reflects distinct mirroring and mentalizing functionality, and that these cerebellar functions are connected with corresponding functional networks in the cerebrum.

  11. Development of an accelerator based system for in vivo neutron activation analysis measurements of manganese in humans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, Michelle Lynn

    2001-11-01

    Manganese is required by the human body, but as with many heavy elements, in large amounts it can be toxic, producing a neurological disorder similar to that of Parkinson's Disease. The primary industrial uses of the element are for the manufacturing of steel and alkali batteries. Environmental exposure may occur via drinking water or exhaust emissions from vehicles using gasoline with the manganese containing compound MMT as an antiknock agent (MMT has been approved for use in both Canada and the United States). Preclinical symptoms of toxicity have recently been detected in individuals occupationally exposed to airborne manganese at levels below the present threshold limit value set by the EPA. Evidence also suggests that early detection of manganese toxicity is crucial since once the symptoms have developed past a certain point, the syndrome will continue to progress even if manganese exposure ceases. The development of a system for in vivo neutron activation analysis (IVNAA) measurement of manganese levels was investigated, with the goal being to have a means of monitoring both over exposed and manganese deficient populations. The McMaster KN-accelerator was used to provide low-energy neutrons, activation within an irradiation site occurred via the 55Mn(n,gamma) 56Mn capture reaction, and the 847 keV gamma-rays emitted when 56Mn decayed were measured using one or more Nal(TI) detectors. The present data regarding manganese metabolism and storage within the body are limited, and it is unclear what the optimal measurement site would be to provide a suitable biomarker of past exposure. Therefore the feasibility of IVNAA measurements in three sites was examined---the liver, brain and hand bones. Calibration curves were derived, minimum detectable limits determined and resulting doses calculated for each site (experimentally in the case of the liver and hand bones, and through computer simulations for the brain). Detailed analytical calculations of the 7Li(p,n) 7Be

  12. An analytical model for microsegregation in open and expanding domains

    SciTech Connect

    Nastac, L.; Stefanescu, D.M.; Chuzhoy, L.

    1995-12-31

    A review of existing models for microsegregation shows that there are no analytical models that consider limited diffusion in both liquid and solid phases for an expanding domain (system). Earlier, an analytical mathematical model for microsegregation was introduced for the closed system case. Mass transport by diffusion only was considered, but diffusion in both liquid and solid was assumed. The model proposed in this paper relaxes the assumptions of a closed system. Thus, the contribution of mass transport by fluid flow, and the effects of coarsening and coalescence can be included in microsegregation calculations. The model does not require a prescribed movement of the interface, and therefore, it can be used in microscopic modeling of solidification. The derivation assumed spherical geometry of the domain. Thus, it is possible to calculate microsegregation at the level of equiaxed dendrites. The importance of an open and expanding domain assumptions was studied by comparing results obtained with the present model with calculation based on the closed system assumptions. The microsegregation model was coupled with a macro transport-transformation kinetics code to compare the calculated results with experimental results for spheroidal graphite iron castings.

  13. Students' perceptions of patient safety during the transition from undergraduate to postgraduate training: an activity theory analysis.

    PubMed

    de Feijter, Jeantine M; de Grave, Willem S; Dornan, Tim; Koopmans, Richard P; Scherpbier, Albert J J A

    2011-08-01

    Evidence that medical error can cause harm to patients has raised the attention of the health care community towards patient safety and influenced how and what medical students learn about it. Patient safety is best taught when students are participating in clinical practice where they actually encounter patients at risk. This type of learning is referred to as workplace learning, a complex system in which various factors influence what is being learned and how. A theory that can highlight potential difficulties in this complex learning system about patient safety is activity theory. Thirty-four final year undergraduate medical students participated in four focus groups about their experiences concerning patient safety. Using activity theory as analytical framework, we performed constant comparative thematic analysis of the focus group transcripts to identify important themes. We found eight general themes relating to two activities: learning to be a doctor and delivering safe patient care. Simultaneous occurrence of these two activities can cause contradictions. Our results illustrate the complexity of learning about patient safety at the workplace. Students encounter contradictions when learning about patient safety, especially during a transitional phase of their training. These contradictions create potential learning opportunities which should be used in education about patient safety. Insight into the complexities of patient safety is essential to improve education in this important area of medicine.

  14. An analytic model for acoustic scattering from an impedance cylinder placed normal to an impedance plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swearingen, Michelle Elaine

    2003-10-01

    This thesis is a presentation of an analytic model, developed in cylindrical coordinates, for the scattering of a spherical wave off a semi infinite right cylinder placed normal to a ground surface. The model is developed to simulate a single tree and is developed as a first piece to creating a model for estimating attenuation in a forest based on scattering from individual tree trunks. Comparisons are made to the plane wave case, the transparent cylinder case, and the rigid and soft ground cases as a method of theoretically verifying the model. Agreement is excellent for these benchmark cases. Model sensitivity to five parameters is determined, which aids in error analysis, particularly when comparing the model results to experimental data, and offers insight into the inner workings of the model. An experiment was performed to collect real-world data on scattering from a cylinder normal to a ground surface. The data from the experiment is analyzed with a transfer function method into frequency and impulse responses. The model results are compared to the experimental data.

  15. An approach to estimate spatial distribution of analyte within cells using spectrally-resolved fluorescence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Dharmendar Kumar; Irfanullah, Mir; Basu, Santanu Kumar; Madhu, Sheri; De, Suman; Jadhav, Sameer; Ravikanth, Mangalampalli; Chowdhury, Arindam

    2017-03-01

    While fluorescence microscopy has become an essential tool amongst chemists and biologists for the detection of various analyte within cellular environments, non-uniform spatial distribution of sensors within cells often restricts extraction of reliable information on relative abundance of analytes in different subcellular regions. As an alternative to existing sensing methodologies such as ratiometric or FRET imaging, where relative proportion of analyte with respect to the sensor can be obtained within cells, we propose a methodology using spectrally-resolved fluorescence microscopy, via which both the relative abundance of sensor as well as their relative proportion with respect to the analyte can be simultaneously extracted for local subcellular regions. This method is exemplified using a BODIPY sensor, capable of detecting mercury ions within cellular environments, characterized by spectral blue-shift and concurrent enhancement of emission intensity. Spectral emission envelopes collected from sub-microscopic regions allowed us to compare the shift in transition energies as well as integrated emission intensities within various intracellular regions. Construction of a 2D scatter plot using spectral shifts and emission intensities, which depend on the relative amount of analyte with respect to sensor and the approximate local amounts of the probe, respectively, enabled qualitative extraction of relative abundance of analyte in various local regions within a single cell as well as amongst different cells. Although the comparisons remain semi-quantitative, this approach involving analysis of multiple spectral parameters opens up an alternative way to extract spatial distribution of analyte in heterogeneous systems. The proposed method would be especially relevant for fluorescent probes that undergo relatively nominal shift in transition energies compared to their emission bandwidths, which often restricts their usage for quantitative ratiometric imaging in

  16. Optimizing multi-pinhole SPECT geometries using an analytical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rentmeester, M. C. M.; van der Have, F.; Beekman, F. J.

    2007-05-01

    State-of-the-art multi-pinhole SPECT devices allow for sub-mm resolution imaging of radio-molecule distributions in small laboratory animals. The optimization of multi-pinhole and detector geometries using simulations based on ray-tracing or Monte Carlo algorithms is time-consuming, particularly because many system parameters need to be varied. As an efficient alternative we develop a continuous analytical model of a pinhole SPECT system with a stationary detector set-up, which we apply to focused imaging of a mouse. The model assumes that the multi-pinhole collimator and the detector both have the shape of a spherical layer, and uses analytical expressions for effective pinhole diameters, sensitivity and spatial resolution. For fixed fields-of-view, a pinhole-diameter adapting feedback loop allows for the comparison of the system resolution of different systems at equal system sensitivity, and vice versa. The model predicts that (i) for optimal resolution or sensitivity the collimator layer with pinholes should be placed as closely as possible around the animal given a fixed detector layer, (ii) with high-resolution detectors a resolution improvement up to 31% can be achieved compared to optimized systems, (iii) high-resolution detectors can be placed close to the collimator without significant resolution losses, (iv) interestingly, systems with a physical pinhole diameter of 0 mm can have an excellent resolution when high-resolution detectors are used.

  17. Analytic solution of an oscillatory migratory α2 stellar dynamo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandenburg, A.

    2017-02-01

    Context. Analytic solutions of the mean-field induction equation predict a nonoscillatory dynamo for homogeneous helical turbulence or constant α effect in unbounded or periodic domains. Oscillatory dynamos are generally thought impossible for constant α. Aims: We present an analytic solution for a one-dimensional bounded domain resulting in oscillatory solutions for constant α, but different (Dirichlet and von Neumann or perfect conductor and vacuum) boundary conditions on the two boundaries. Methods: We solve a second order complex equation and superimpose two independent solutions to obey both boundary conditions. Results: The solution has time-independent energy density. On one end where the function value vanishes, the second derivative is finite, which would not be correctly reproduced with sine-like expansion functions where a node coincides with an inflection point. The field always migrates away from the perfect conductor boundary toward the vacuum boundary, independently of the sign of α. Conclusions: The obtained solution may serve as a benchmark for numerical dynamo experiments and as a pedagogical illustration that oscillatory migratory dynamos are possible with constant α.

  18. An analytical approach to estimate curvature effect of coseismic deformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Jie; Sun, Wenke; Zhou, Xin; Wang, Rongjiang

    2016-08-01

    We present an analytical approach to compute the curvature effect by the new analytical solutions of coseismic deformation derived for the homogeneous sphere model. We consider two spheres with different radii: one is the same as earth and the other with a larger radius can approximate a half-space model. Then, we calculate the coseismic displacements for the two spheres and define the relative percentage of the displacements as the curvature effect. The near-field curvature effect is defined relative to the maximum coseismic displacement. The results show that the maximum curvature effect is about 4 per cent for source depths of less than 100 km, and about 30 per cent for source depths of less than 600 km. For the far-field curvature effect, we define it relative to the observing point. The curvature effect is extremely large and sometimes exceeds 100 per cent. Moreover, this new approach can be used to estimate any planet's curvature effect quantitatively. For a smaller sphere, such as the Moon, the curvature effect is much larger than that of the Earth, with an inverse ratio to the earth's radius.

  19. Analytical and Numerical Studies of Active and Passive Microwave Ocean Remote Sensing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-09-30

    of both analytical and efficient numerical methods for electromagnetics and hydrodynamics. New insights regarding these phenomena can then be applied to improve microwave active and passive remote sensing of the ocean surface.

  20. Dynamic test/analysis correlation using reduced analytical models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgowan, Paul E.; Angelucci, A. F.; Javeed, Mehzad

    1992-01-01

    Test/analysis correlation is an important aspect of the verification of analysis models which are used to predict on-orbit response characteristics of large space structures. This paper presents results of a study using reduced analysis models for performing dynamic test/analysis correlation. The reduced test-analysis model (TAM) has the same number and orientation of DOF as the test measurements. Two reduction methods, static (Guyan) reduction and the Improved Reduced System reduction, are applied to the test/analysis correlation of a laboratory truss structure. Simulated test results and modal test data are used to examine the performance of each method. It is shown that selection of DOF to be retained in the TAM is critical when large structural masses are involved. In addition, the use of modal test results may provide difficulties in TAM accuracy even if a large number of DOF are retained in the TAM.

  1. Dynamic test/analysis correlation using reduced analytical models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgowan, Paul E.; Angelucci, A. Filippo; Javeed, Mehzad

    1992-01-01

    Test/analysis correlation is an important aspect of the verification of analysis models which are used to predict on-orbit response characteristics of large space structures. This paper presents results of a study using reduced analysis models for performing dynamic test/analysis correlation. The reduced test-analysis model (TAM) has the same number and orientation of DOF as the test measurements. Two reduction methods, static (Guyan) reduction and the Improved Reduced System (IRS) reduction, are applied to the test/analysis correlation of a laboratory truss structure. Simulated test results and modal test data are used to examine the performance of each method. It is shown that selection of DOF to be retained in the TAM is critical when large structural masses are involved. In addition, the use of modal test results may provide difficulties in TAM accuracy even if a large number of DOF are retained in the TAM.

  2. Discovering the Thermodynamics of Simultaneous Equilibria: An Entropy Analysis Activity Involving Consecutive Equilibria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bindel, Thomas H.

    2007-01-01

    An activity is presented in which the thermodynamics of simultaneous, consecutive equilibria are explored. The activity is appropriate for second-year high school or AP chemistry. Students discover that a reactant-favored (entropy-diminishing or endergonic) reaction can be caused to happen if it is coupled with a product-favored reaction of…

  3. Chemical analysis and antihyperglycemic activity of an original extract from burdock root (Arctium lappa).

    PubMed

    Tousch, Didier; Bidel, Luc P R; Cazals, Guillaume; Ferrare, Karine; Leroy, Jeremy; Faucanié, Marie; Chevassus, Hugues; Tournier, Michel; Lajoix, Anne-Dominique; Azay-Milhau, Jacqueline

    2014-08-06

    In the present study, we obtained a dried burdock root extract (DBRE) rich in caffeoylquinic acids derivatives. We performed the chemical characterization of DBRE and explored its antihyperglycemic potential in both in vitro and in vivo experiments. Chemical analysis of DBRE using LC-MS and GC-MS revealed the presence of a great majority of dicaffeoylquinic acid derivatives (75.4%) of which 1,5-di-O-caffeoyl-4-O-maloylquinic acid represents 44% of the extract. In the in vitro experiments, DBRE is able to increase glucose uptake in cultured L6 myocytes and to decrease glucagon-induced glucose output from rat isolated hepatocytes together with a reduction of hepatic glucose 6-phosphatase activity. DBRE did not increase insulin secretion in the INS-1 pancreatic β-cell line. In vivo, DBRE improves glucose tolerance both after intraperitoneal and oral subchronic administration. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that DBRE constitutes an original set of caffeoylquinic acid derivatives displaying antihyperglycemic properties.

  4. Design studies related to an in vivo neutron activation analysis facility for measuring total body nitrogen.

    PubMed

    Stamatelatos, I E; Chettle, D R; Green, S; Scott, M C

    1992-08-01

    Design studies relating to an in vivo prompt capture neutron activation analysis facility measuring total body nitrogen are presented. The basis of the design is a beryllium-graphite neutron collimator and reflector configuration for (alpha, n) type radionuclide neutron sources (238PuBe or 241AmBe), so as to reflect leaking, or out-scattered, neutrons towards the subject. This improves the ratio of thermal neutron flux to dose and the spatial distribution of thermal flux achieved with these sources, whilst retaining their advantage of long half-lives as compared to 252Cf based systems. The common problem of high count-rate at the detector, and therefore high nitrogen region of interest background due to pile-up, is decreased by using a set of smaller (5.1 cm diameter x 10.2 cm long) NaI(Tl) detectors instead of large ones. The facility described presents a relative error of nitrogen measurement of 3.6% and a nitrogen to background ratio of 2.3 for 0.45 mSv skin dose (assuming ten 5.1 cm x 10.2 cm NaI(Tl) detectors).

  5. AN ANALYTIC RADIATIVE-CONVECTIVE MODEL FOR PLANETARY ATMOSPHERES

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, Tyler D.; Catling, David C.

    2012-09-20

    We present an analytic one-dimensional radiative-convective model of the thermal structure of planetary atmospheres. Our model assumes that thermal radiative transfer is gray and can be represented by the two-stream approximation. Model atmospheres are assumed to be in hydrostatic equilibrium, with a power-law scaling between the atmospheric pressure and the gray thermal optical depth. The convective portions of our models are taken to follow adiabats that account for condensation of volatiles through a scaling parameter to the dry adiabat. By combining these assumptions, we produce simple, analytic expressions that allow calculations of the atmospheric-pressure-temperature profile, as well as expressions for the profiles of thermal radiative flux and convective flux. We explore the general behaviors of our model. These investigations encompass (1) worlds where atmospheric attenuation of sunlight is weak, which we show tend to have relatively high radiative-convective boundaries; (2) worlds with some attenuation of sunlight throughout the atmosphere, which we show can produce either shallow or deep radiative-convective boundaries, depending on the strength of sunlight attenuation; and (3) strongly irradiated giant planets (including hot Jupiters), where we explore the conditions under which these worlds acquire detached convective regions in their mid-tropospheres. Finally, we validate our model and demonstrate its utility through comparisons to the average observed thermal structure of Venus, Jupiter, and Titan, and by comparing computed flux profiles to more complex models.

  6. Gravitational waves from bubble collisions: An analytic derivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jinno, Ryusuke; Takimoto, Masahiro

    2017-01-01

    We consider gravitational wave production by bubble collisions during a cosmological first-order phase transition. In the literature, such spectra have been estimated by simulating the bubble dynamics, under so-called thin-wall and envelope approximations in a flat background metric. However, we show that, within these assumptions, the gravitational wave spectrum can be estimated in an analytic way. Our estimation is based on the observation that the two-point correlator of the energy-momentum tensor ⟨T (x )T (y )⟩ can be expressed analytically under these assumptions. Though the final expressions for the spectrum contain a few integrations that cannot be calculated explicitly, we can easily estimate it numerically. As a result, it is found that the most of the contributions to the spectrum come from single-bubble contribution to the correlator, and in addition the fall-off of the spectrum at high frequencies is found to be proportional to f-1 . We also provide fitting formulas for the spectrum.

  7. An Analytical Dynamics Approach to the Control of Mechanical Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mylapilli, Harshavardhan

    A new and novel approach to the control of nonlinear mechanical systems is presented in this study. The approach is inspired by recent results in analytical dynamics that deal with the theory of constrained motion. The control requirements on the dynamical system are viewed from an analytical dynamics perspective and the theory of constrained motion is used to recast these control requirements as constraints on the dynamical system. Explicit closed form expressions for the generalized nonlinear control forces are obtained by using the fundamental equation of mechanics. The control so obtained is optimal at each instant of time and causes the constraints to be exactly satisfied. No linearizations and/or approximations of the nonlinear dynamical system are made, and no a priori structure is imposed on the nature of nonlinear controller. Three examples dealing with highly nonlinear complex dynamical systems that are chosen from diverse areas of discrete and continuum mechanics are presented to demonstrate the control approach. The first example deals with the energy control of underactuated inhomogeneous nonlinear lattices (or chains), the second example deals with the synchronization of the motion of multiple coupled slave gyros with that of a master gyro, and the final example deals with the control of incompressible hyperelastic rubber-like thin cantilever beams. Numerical simulations accompanying these examples show the ease, simplicity and the efficacy with which the control methodology can be applied and the accuracy with which the desired control objectives can be met.

  8. Anisotropies in the cosmic microwave background: an analytic approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Wayne; Sugiyama, Naoshi

    1995-05-01

    We introduce a conceptually simple yet powerful analytic method which traces the structure of cosmic microwave background anisotropies to better than 5%-10% in temperature fluctuations on all scales. It is applicable to any model in which the gravitational potential is known and last scattering is sufficiently early. Moreover, it recovers and explains the presence of the 'Doppler peaks' at degree scales as driven acoustic oscillations of the photon-baryon fluid. We treat in detail such subtleties as the time dependence of the gravitational driving force, anisotropic stress from the neutrino quadrupole, and damping during the recombination process, again all from an analytic standpoint. We apply this formalism to the standard cold dark matter model to gain physical insight into the anisotropies, including the dependence of the peak locations and heights on cosmological parameters such as Omegab and h. Furthermore, the ionization history controls damping due to the finite thickness of the last scattering surface, which is in fact mianly caused by photon diffusion. In addition to being a powerful probe into the nature of anisotropies, this treatment can be used in place of the standard Boltzmann code where 5%-10% accuracy in temperature fluctuations is satisfactory and/or speed is essential. Equally importantly, it can be used as a portable standard by which numerical codes can be tested and compared.

  9. A basis in an invariant subspace of analytic functions

    SciTech Connect

    Krivosheev, A S; Krivosheeva, O A

    2013-12-31

    The existence problem for a basis in a differentiation-invariant subspace of analytic functions defined in a bounded convex domain in the complex plane is investigated. Conditions are found for the solvability of a certain special interpolation problem in the space of entire functions of exponential type with conjugate diagrams lying in a fixed convex domain. These underlie sufficient conditions for the existence of a basis in the invariant subspace. This basis consists of linear combinations of eigenfunctions and associated functions of the differentiation operator, whose exponents are combined into relatively small clusters. Necessary conditions for the existence of a basis are also found. Under a natural constraint on the number of points in the groups, these coincide with the sufficient conditions. That is, a criterion is found under this constraint that a basis constructed from relatively small clusters exists in an invariant subspace of analytic functions in a bounded convex domain in the complex plane. Bibliography: 25 titles.

  10. TLD efficiency calculations for heavy ions: an analytical approach

    SciTech Connect

    Boscolo, Daria; Scifoni, Emanuele; Carlino, Antonio; La Tessa, Chiara; Berger, Thomas; Durante, Marco; Rosso, Valeria; Krämer, Michael

    2015-12-18

    The use of thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) in heavy charged particles’ dosimetry is limited by their non-linear dose response curve and by their response dependence on the radiation quality. Thus, in order to use TLDs with particle beams, a model that can reproduce the behavior of these detectors under different conditions is needed. Here a new, simple and completely analytical algorithm for the calculation of the relative TL-efficiency depending on the ion charge Z and energy E is presented. In addition, the detector response is evaluated starting from the single ion case, where the computed effectiveness values have been compared with experimental data as well as with predictions from a different method. The main advantage of this approach is that, being fully analytical, it is computationally fast and can be efficiently integrated into treatment planning verification tools. In conclusion, the calculated efficiency values have been then implemented in the treatment planning code TRiP98 and dose calculations on a macroscopic target irradiated with an extended carbon ion field have been performed and verified against experimental data.

  11. TLD efficiency calculations for heavy ions: an analytical approach

    DOE PAGES

    Boscolo, Daria; Scifoni, Emanuele; Carlino, Antonio; ...

    2015-12-18

    The use of thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) in heavy charged particles’ dosimetry is limited by their non-linear dose response curve and by their response dependence on the radiation quality. Thus, in order to use TLDs with particle beams, a model that can reproduce the behavior of these detectors under different conditions is needed. Here a new, simple and completely analytical algorithm for the calculation of the relative TL-efficiency depending on the ion charge Z and energy E is presented. In addition, the detector response is evaluated starting from the single ion case, where the computed effectiveness values have been compared withmore » experimental data as well as with predictions from a different method. The main advantage of this approach is that, being fully analytical, it is computationally fast and can be efficiently integrated into treatment planning verification tools. In conclusion, the calculated efficiency values have been then implemented in the treatment planning code TRiP98 and dose calculations on a macroscopic target irradiated with an extended carbon ion field have been performed and verified against experimental data.« less

  12. Analysis of Volatile Compounds by Advanced Analytical Techniques and Multivariate Chemometrics.

    PubMed

    Lubes, Giuseppe; Goodarzi, Mohammad

    2017-03-17

    Smelling is one of the five senses, which plays an important role in our everyday lives. Volatile compounds are, for example, characteristics of food where some of them can be perceivable by humans because of their aroma. They have a great influence on the decision making of consumers when they choose to use a product or not. In the case where a product has an offensive and strong aroma, many consumers might not appreciate it. On the contrary, soft and fresh natural aromas definitely increase the acceptance of a given product. These properties can drastically influence the economy; thus, it has been of great importance to manufacturers that the aroma of their food product is characterized by analytical means to provide a basis for further optimization processes. A lot of research has been devoted to this domain in order to link the quality of, e.g., a food to its aroma. By knowing the aromatic profile of a food, one can understand the nature of a given product leading to developing new products, which are more acceptable by consumers. There are two ways to analyze volatiles: one is to use human senses and/or sensory instruments, and the other is based on advanced analytical techniques. This work focuses on the latter. Although requirements are simple, low-cost technology is an attractive research target in this domain; most of the data are generated with very high-resolution analytical instruments. Such data gathered based on different analytical instruments normally have broad, overlapping sensitivity profiles and require substantial data analysis. In this review, we have addressed not only the question of the application of chemometrics for aroma analysis but also of the use of different analytical instruments in this field, highlighting the research needed for future focus.

  13. Portraying the Work of Instructional Designing: An Activity-Oriented Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rathbun, Gail A.

    This study tested the usefulness of an activity-oriented approach in describing and explaining the work of designing an international distance education course in business entrepreneurship at Indiana University. The course was team taught with an instructor at the City University of Hong Kong; video conferencing and Internet-based technologies…

  14. Magnetic field barriers in graphene: an analytically solvable model.

    PubMed

    Milpas, Enrique; Torres, Manuel; Murguía, Gabriela

    2011-06-22

    We study the dynamics of carriers in graphene subjected to an inhomogeneous magnetic field. For a magnetic field with a hyperbolic profile the corresponding Dirac equation can be analyzed within the formalism of supersymmetric quantum mechanics, and leads to an exactly solvable model. We study in detail the bound-state spectrum. For a narrow barrier the spectrum is characterized by a few bands, except for the zero energy level that remains degenerated. As the width of the barrier increases we can track the band's evolution into the degenerated Landau levels. In the scattering regime a simple analytical formula is obtained for the transmission coefficient, this result allows us to identify the resonant conditions at which the barrier becomes transparent.

  15. Analytical solution for inviscid flow inside an evaporating sessile drop.

    PubMed

    Masoud, Hassan; Felske, James D

    2009-01-01

    Inviscid flow within an evaporating sessile drop is analyzed. The field equation E;{2}psi=0 is solved for the stream function. The exact analytical solution is obtained for arbitrary contact angle and distribution of evaporative flux along the free boundary. Specific results and computations are presented for evaporation corresponding to both uniform flux and purely diffusive gas phase transport into an infinite ambient. Wetting and nonwetting contact angles are considered, with flow patterns in each case being illustrated. The limiting behaviors of small contact angle and droplets of hemispherical shape are treated. All of the above categories are considered for the cases of droplets whose contact lines are either pinned or free to move during evaporation.

  16. Laser satellite constellations for strategic defense - an analytic model

    SciTech Connect

    Parmentola, J.A.; Milton, A.F.

    1987-10-01

    Using mainly geometric reasoning, an analytic model is constructed that predicts the required characteristics of an orbiting constellation of laser battle stations, each of which is designed to destroy ballistic missiles during their boost phase. The geometry of the constellation configuration and some general aspects of the coverage problem are discussed. The determination of the absentee ratio falls into two main categories that depend upon whether the Soviet ICBM threat is concentrated at a single location or whether it is distributed as it is now. A point-threat model and a distributive threat model are considered, the determination of the respective kill rates for these models is discussed, and the scaling properties of the laser constellation with respect to a change in the quantitative nature of the two types of ICBM threats are considered.

  17. Analytical model of an isolated single-atom electron source.

    PubMed

    Engelen, W J; Vredenbregt, E J D; Luiten, O J

    2014-12-01

    An analytical model of a single-atom electron source is presented, where electrons are created by near-threshold photoionization of an isolated atom. The model considers the classical dynamics of the electron just after the photon absorption, i.e. its motion in the potential of a singly charged ion and a uniform electric field used for acceleration. From closed expressions for the asymptotic transverse electron velocities and trajectories, the effective source temperature and the virtual source size can be calculated. The influence of the acceleration field strength and the ionization laser energy on these properties has been studied. With this model, a single-atom electron source with the optimum electron beam properties can be designed. Furthermore, we show that the model is also applicable to ionization of rubidium atoms, and thus also describes the ultracold electron source, which is based on photoionization of laser-cooled alkali atoms.

  18. Analytical solution for drainage and recession from an unconfined aquifer.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xiuyu; Zhang, You-Kuan

    2012-01-01

    One-dimensional transient groundwater flow from a divide to a river in an unconfined aquifer described by the Boussinesq equation was studied. We derived the analytical solution for the water table recession and drainage change process described with a linearized Boussinesq equation with a physically based initial condition. A method for determining the average water table in the solutions was proposed. It is shown that the solution derived in the form of infinite series can be well approximated with the simplified solution which contains only the leading term of the original solution. The solution and their simplification can be easily evaluated and used by others to study the groundwater flow problems, such as drainage and base flow estimation, in an unconfined aquifer.

  19. Toward making the mean spherical approximation of primitive model electrolytes analytic: An analytic approximation of the MSA screening parameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillespie, Dirk

    2011-01-01

    The mean spherical approximation (MSA) for the primitive model of electrolytes provides reasonable estimates of thermodynamic quantities such as the excess chemical potential and screening length. It is especially widely used because of its explicit formulas so that numerically solving equations is minimized. As originally formulated, the MSA screening parameter Γ (akin to the reciprocal of the Debye screening length) does not have an explicit analytic formula; an equation for Γ must be solved numerically. Here, an analytic approximation for Γ is presented whose relative error is generally ≲ 10^{-5}. If more accuracy is desired, one step of an iterative procedure (which also produces an explicit formula for Γ) is shown to give relative errors within machine precision in many cases. Even when ion diameter ratios are ˜10 and ion valences are ˜10, the relative error for the analytic approximation is still ≲ 10^{-3} and for the single iterative substitution it is ≲ 10^{-9}.

  20. An Overview of Conventional and Emerging Analytical Methods for the Determination of Mycotoxins

    PubMed Central

    Cigić, Irena Kralj; Prosen, Helena

    2009-01-01

    Mycotoxins are a group of compounds produced by various fungi and excreted into the matrices on which they grow, often food intended for human consumption or animal feed. The high toxicity and carcinogenicity of these compounds and their ability to cause various pathological conditions has led to widespread screening of foods and feeds potentially polluted with them. Maximum permissible levels in different matrices have also been established for some toxins. As these are quite low, analytical methods for determination of mycotoxins have to be both sensitive and specific. In addition, an appropriate sample preparation and pre-concentration method is needed to isolate analytes from rather complicated samples. In this article, an overview of methods for analysis and sample preparation published in the last ten years is given for the most often encountered mycotoxins in different samples, mainly in food. Special emphasis is on liquid chromatography with fluorescence and mass spectrometric detection, while in the field of sample preparation various solid-phase extraction approaches are discussed. However, an overview of other analytical and sample preparation methods less often used is also given. Finally, different matrices where mycotoxins have to be determined are discussed with the emphasis on their specific characteristics important for the analysis (human food and beverages, animal feed, biological samples, environmental samples). Various issues important for accurate qualitative and quantitative analyses are critically discussed: sampling and choice of representative sample, sample preparation and possible bias associated with it, specificity of the analytical method and critical evaluation of results. PMID:19333436

  1. Determination of Cd and Cr in an ABS candidate reference material by instrumental neutron activation analysis.

    PubMed

    Park, Kwangwon; Kang, Namgoo; Cho, Kyunghaeng; Lee, Jounghae

    2008-12-01

    In order to practically better cope with technical barriers to trade (TBT) of a great number of resin goods, our research presents first-ever results for the determination of Cd and Cr in acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) candidate reference material using instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) recently recognized as a candidate primary ratio method with a particular attention to the estimation of involved measurement uncertainties.

  2. Analytical model development of an eddy-current-based non-contacting steel plate conveyance system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Cheng-Tsung; Lin, Sheng-Yang; Yang, Yung-Yi; Hwang, Chang-Chou

    A concise model for analyzing and predicting the quasi-static electromagnetic characteristics of an eddy-current-based non-contacting steel plate conveyance system has been developed. Confirmed by three-dimensional (3-D) finite element analysis (FEA), adequacy of the analytical model can be demonstrated. Such an effective approach, which can be conveniently used by the potential industries for preliminary system operational performance evaluations, will be essential for designers and on-site engineers.

  3. An Analysis of Muscle Activities of Healthy Women during Pilates Exercises in a Prone Position.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bo-In; Jung, Ju-Hyeon; Shim, Jemyung; Kwon, Hae-Yeon; Kim, Haroo

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] This study analyzed the activities of the back and hip muscles during Pilates exercises conducted in a prone position. [Subjects] The subjects were 18 healthy women volunteers who had practiced at a Pilates center for more than three months. [Methods] The subjects performed three Pilates exercises. To examine muscle activity during the exercises, 8-channel surface electromyography (Noraxon USA, Inc., Scottsdale, AZ) was used. The surface electrodes were attached to the bilateral latissimus dorsi muscle, multifidus muscle, gluteus maximus, and semitendinous muscle. Three Pilates back exercises were compared: (1) double leg kick (DLK), (2) swimming (SW), and (3) leg beat (LB). Electrical muscle activation was normalized to maximal voluntary isometric contraction. Repeated measures analysis of variance was performed to assess the differences in activation levels among the exercises. [Results] The activity of the multifidus muscle was significantly high for the SW (52.3±11.0, 50.9±9.8) and LB exercises(51.8±12.8, 48.3±13.9) and the activity of the semitendinosus muscle was higher for the LB exercise (49.2±8.7, 52.9±9.3) than for the DLK and SW exercises. [Conclusion] These results may provide basic material for when Pilates exercises are performed in a prone position and may be useful information on clinical Pilates for rehabilitation programs.

  4. The dimeric assembly of Photobacterium leiognathi and Salmonella typhimurium SodC1 Cu,Zn superoxide dismutases is affected differently by active site demetallation and pH: an analytical ultracentrifuge study.

    PubMed

    Catacchio, B; D'Orazio, M; Battistoni, A; Chiancone, E

    2008-03-01

    To establish whether the species-specific variations at the subunit interface of bacterial Cu,Zn superoxide dismutases affect dimer assembly, the association state of the Photobacterium leiognathi (PlSOD) and Salmonella typhimurium (StSOD) enzymes, which differ in 11 out of 19 interface residues, was investigated by analytical ultracentrifugation. The same linkage pattern correlates quaternary assembly, active site metallation, and pH in the two enzymes albeit with quantitative differences. Both holo-enzymes are stable dimers at pH 6.8 and 8.0, although their shape is altered at alkaline pH. In contrast, dimer stability is affected differently by metal removal. Thus, apo-StSOD is a stable dimer at pH 6.8 whereas apo-PlSOD is in reversible monomer-dimer equilibrium. In both apoproteins a pH increase to 8.0 favors monomerization. These effects prove the existence of long-range communication between the active site and the subunit interface and provide a structural explanation for the known functional differences between the two enzymes.

  5. A Review of Emerging Analytical Techniques for Objective Physical Activity Measurement in Humans.

    PubMed

    Clark, Cain C T; Barnes, Claire M; Stratton, Gareth; McNarry, Melitta A; Mackintosh, Kelly A; Summers, Huw D

    2017-03-01

    Physical inactivity is one of the most prevalent risk factors for non-communicable diseases in the world. A fundamental barrier to enhancing physical activity levels and decreasing sedentary behavior is limited by our understanding of associated measurement and analytical techniques. The number of analytical techniques for physical activity measurement has grown significantly, and although emerging techniques may advance analyses, little consensus is presently available and further synthesis is therefore required. The objective of this review was to identify the accuracy of emerging analytical techniques used for physical activity measurement in humans. We conducted a search of electronic databases using Web of Science, PubMed, and Google Scholar. This review included studies written in English and published between January 2010 and December 2014 that assessed physical activity using emerging analytical techniques and reported technique accuracy. A total of 2064 papers were initially retrieved from three databases. After duplicates were removed and remaining articles screened, 50 full-text articles were reviewed, resulting in the inclusion of 11 articles that met the eligibility criteria. Despite the diverse nature and the range in accuracy associated with some of the analytic techniques, the rapid development of analytics has demonstrated that more sensitive information about physical activity may be attained. However, further refinement of these techniques is needed.

  6. Ballistic transport in Saturn's rings - An analytic theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lissauer, J. J.

    1984-01-01

    Ejecta from impacts of micrometeoroids on Saturn's ring particles will, in most cases, remain in orbit about Saturn and eventually be reaccreted by the rings, possibly at a different radial location. The resulting mass transport has been suggested as the cause of some of the features observed in Saturn's rings. Previous attempts to model this transport have used numerical simulations which have not included the effects of the angular momentum transport coincident with mass transport. An analytical model for ballistic mass transport in Saturn's rings is developed. The model includes the effects of angular momentum advection and shows that the net material movement due to angular momentum advection is comparable to that caused by direct ballistic mass transport.

  7. An analytical model of dynamic sliding friction during impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arakawa, Kazuo

    2017-01-01

    Dynamic sliding friction was studied based on the angular velocity of a golf ball during an oblique impact. This study used the analytical model proposed for the dynamic sliding friction on lubricated and non-lubricated inclines. The contact area A and sliding velocity u of the ball during impact were used to describe the dynamic friction force Fd = λAu, where λ is a parameter related to the wear of the contact area. A comparison with experimental results revealed that the model agreed well with the observed changes in the angular velocity during impact, and λAu is qualitatively equivalent to the empirical relationship, μN + μη‧dA/dt, given by the product between the frictional coefficient μ and the contact force N, and the additional term related to factor η‧ for the surface condition and the time derivative of A.

  8. An analytical study of electric vehicle handling dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greene, J. E.; Segal, D. J.

    1979-01-01

    Hypothetical electric vehicle configurations were studied by applying available analytical methods. Elementary linearized models were used in addition to a highly sophisticated vehicle dynamics computer simulation technique. Physical properties of specific EV's were defined for various battery and powertrain packaging approaches applied to a range of weight distribution and inertial properties which characterize a generic class of EV's. Computer simulations of structured maneuvers were performed for predicting handling qualities in the normal driving range and during various extreme conditions related to accident avoidance. Results indicate that an EV with forward weight bias will possess handling qualities superior to a comparable EV that is rear-heavy or equally balanced. The importance of properly matching tires, suspension systems, and brake system front/rear torque proportioning to a given EV configuration during the design stage is demonstrated.

  9. Developing retinal biomarkers of neurological disease: an analytical perspective.

    PubMed

    MacCormick, Ian J C; Czanner, Gabriela; Faragher, Brian

    2015-01-01

    The inaccessibility of the brain poses a problem for neuroscience. Scientists have traditionally responded by developing biomarkers for brain physiology and disease. The retina is an attractive source of biomarkers since it shares many features with the brain. Some even describe the retina as a 'window' to the brain, implying that retinal signs are analogous to brain disease features. However, new analytical methods are needed to show whether or not retinal signs really are equivalent to brain abnormalities, since this requires greater evidence than direct associations between retina and brain. We, therefore propose a new way to think about, and test, how clearly one might see the brain through the retinal window, using cerebral malaria as a case study.

  10. Developing retinal biomarkers of neurological disease: an analytical perspective

    PubMed Central

    MacCormick, Ian JC; Czanner, Gabriela; Faragher, Brian

    2015-01-01

    The inaccessibility of the brain poses a problem for neuroscience. Scientists have traditionally responded by developing biomarkers for brain physiology and disease. The retina is an attractive source of biomarkers since it shares many features with the brain. Some even describe the retina as a ‘window’ to the brain, implying that retinal signs are analogous to brain disease features. However, new analytical methods are needed to show whether or not retinal signs really are equivalent to brain abnormalities, since this requires greater evidence than direct associations between retina and brain. We, therefore propose a new way to think about, and test, how clearly one might see the brain through the retinal window, using cerebral malaria as a case study. PMID:26174843

  11. An analytic framework to assess future electricity options in Kosovo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kittner, Noah; Dimco, Hilda; Azemi, Visar; Tairyan, Evgenia; Kammen, Daniel M.

    2016-10-01

    We have developed an analytic platform to analyze the electricity options, costs, and impacts for Kosovo, a nation that is a critical part of the debate over centralized versus distributed electricity generation and the role of fossil fuels versus cleaner electricity options to meet growing demands for power. We find that a range of alternatives exists to meet present supply constraints all at a lower cost than constructing a proposed 600 MW coal plant. The options include energy efficiency measures, combinations of solar PV, wind, hydropower, and biomass, and the introduction of natural gas. A 30 EUR ton-1 shadow price on CO2 increases costs of coal generation by at least 330 million EUR. The results indicate that financing a new coal plant is the most expensive pathway to meet future electricity demand.

  12. An analytical model of dynamic sliding friction during impact

    PubMed Central

    Arakawa, Kazuo

    2017-01-01

    Dynamic sliding friction was studied based on the angular velocity of a golf ball during an oblique impact. This study used the analytical model proposed for the dynamic sliding friction on lubricated and non-lubricated inclines. The contact area A and sliding velocity u of the ball during impact were used to describe the dynamic friction force Fd = λAu, where λ is a parameter related to the wear of the contact area. A comparison with experimental results revealed that the model agreed well with the observed changes in the angular velocity during impact, and λAu is qualitatively equivalent to the empirical relationship, μN + μη′dA/dt, given by the product between the frictional coefficient μ and the contact force N, and the additional term related to factor η′ for the surface condition and the time derivative of A. PMID:28054668

  13. An analytic function approach to weak mutually unbiased bases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olupitan, T.; Lei, C.; Vourdas, A.

    2016-08-01

    Quantum systems with variables in Z(d) are considered, and three different structures are studied. The first is weak mutually unbiased bases, for which the absolute value of the overlap of any two vectors in two different bases is 1 /√{ k } (where k | d) or 0. The second is maximal lines through the origin in the Z(d) × Z(d) phase space. The third is an analytic representation in the complex plane based on Theta functions, and their zeros. It is shown that there is a correspondence (triality) that links strongly these three apparently different structures. For simplicity, the case where d =p1 ×p2, where p1 ,p2 are odd prime numbers different from each other, is considered.

  14. Tank 241-AN-103, cores 166 and 167 analytical results for the final report

    SciTech Connect

    Steen, F.H.

    1997-05-15

    This document is the analytical laboratory report for tank 241-AN-103 [Hydrogen Watch Listed] push mode core segments collected between September 13, 1996 and September 23, 1996. The segments were subsampled and analyzed in accordance with the Tank 241-AN-103 Push Mode Core Sampling and Analysis Plan (TSAP), the Safety Screening Data Quality Objective (DQO) and the Flammable Gas Data Quality Objective (DQO). The analytical results are included in the data summary table. The raw data are included in this document. None of the samples submitted for Total Alpha Activity (AT), Total Organic Carbon (TOC) and Plutonium analyses exceeded notification limits as stated in the TSAP. One sample submitted for Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) analysis exceeded the notification limit of 480 Joules/g (dry weight basis) as stated in the Safety Screening DQO. Appropriate notifications were made. Statistical evaluation of results by calculating the 95% upper confidence limit is not performed by the 222-S Laboratory and is not considered in this report. Appearance and Sample Handling Attachment 1 is a cross reference to relate the tank farm identification numbers to the 222-S Laboratory LabCore/LIMS sample numbers. The subsamples generated in the laboratory for analyses are identified in these diagrams with their sources shown. The diagrams identifying the core composites are also included. Core 166 Nineteen push mode core segments were removed from tank 241-AN-103 riser 12A between September 13, 1996 and September 17, 1996. Segments were received by the 222-S Laboratory between September 20, 1996 and September 30, 1996. Table 2 summarizes the extrusion information. Selected segments (2, 5 and 14) were sampled using the Retained Gas Sampler (RGS) and extruded by the Process Chemistry and Statistical Analysis Group. Core 167 Eighteen push mode core segments were removed from tank 241-AN-103 riser 21A between September 18, 1996 and September 23, 1996. Tank Farm Operations were

  15. Peer Reviewing of OER in a Contested Domain--An Activity Theoretical Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Algers, Anne; Ljung, Magnus

    2015-01-01

    Globally, we experience numerous initiatives to increase the adoption of open educational resources (OER), but quality concerns challenge the adoption. In this study we present an analysis of the peer review process of an OER. The OER under review is produced by the European Commission (EU). It has the goal to teach children about farm animal…

  16. Development of an Analytical Method for Explosive Residues in Soil,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-06-01

    block number) FIELD GROUP SUB-GROUP Analytical methods High - performance liquid chromatography Contaminated soils Soils Explosives % 19. ABSTRACT (Continue...and high - performance liquid chromatography tion limits for linear calibration curves. Analytical electrochemical detection. Journal of Chromatography... performance liquid chromatography . 5. Soils. 1. Walsh, Mari- anne E. 1. United States. Army. Corps of Engineers. 11. Cold Regions Research and

  17. An analysis of changes in in vivo cartilage thickness of the healthy ankle following dynamic activity.

    PubMed

    Cher, Wei Liang; Utturkar, Gangadhar M; Spritzer, Charles E; Nunley, James A; DeFrate, Louis E; Collins, Amber T

    2016-09-06

    Abnormal cartilage loading after injury is believed to be an important factor leading to post-traumatic ankle osteoarthritis. Due to the viscoelastic behavior of cartilage, it is possible to measure localized cartilage strains from changes in thickness following dynamic activities. However, there are limited data characterizing in vivo cartilage mechanics under physiological loading conditions in the healthy ankle. Therefore, the objective of this study was to directly measure in vivo cartilage strains in the healthy ankle joint in response to a dynamic hopping exercise. Ten healthy subjects with no history of ankle injury underwent magnetic resonance imaging before and after a single-leg hopping exercise. Bony and articular cartilage surfaces were created from these images using solid modeling software. Pre-exercise and post-exercise models were then registered to each other, and site-specific cartilage strains (defined as the normalized changes in cartilage thickness) were calculated at grid points spanning the articular surfaces. The effects of both location and exercise on strain were tested using a two-way repeated measures analysis of variance. We did not detect any significant interaction effect between location and exercise for either tibial or talar cartilage. However, hopping resulted in significant decreases in tibial (p<0.05) and talar (p<0.05) cartilage thicknesses, corresponding to strains of 3% and 2%, respectively. Additionally, pre-exercise cartilage thickness varied significantly by location in the talus (p<0.05), but not in the tibia. These strain data may provide important baseline information for future studies investigating altered biomechanics in those at high risk for the development of post-traumatic ankle osteoarthritis.

  18. An in vitro thermal analysis during different light-activated hydrogen peroxide bleaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabbach, W.; Zezell, D. M.; Bandéca, M. C.; Pereira, T. M.; Andrade, M. F.

    2010-09-01

    This study measured the critical temperature reaching time and also the variation of temperature in the surface of the cervical region and within the pulp chamber of human teeth submitted to dental bleaching using 35% hydrogen peroxide gel activated by three different light sources. The samples were randomly divided into 3 groups ( n = 15), according to the catalyst light source: Halogen Light (HL), High Intensity Diode Laser (DL), and Light Emmited Diode (LED). The results of temperature variation were submitted to the analysis of variance and Tukey test with p < 0.05. The temperature increase (mean value and standard deviation) inside the pulp chamber for the HL group was 6.8 ± 2.8°C; for the DL group was 15.3 ± 8.8°C; and for the LED group was 1.9 ± 1.0°C for. The temperature variation (mean value and standard deviation) on the tooth surface, for the group irradiated with HL was 9.1 ± 2.2°C; for the group irradiated with DL were 25.7 ± 18.9°C; and for the group irradiated with LED were 2.6 ± 1.4°C. The mean temperature increase values were significantly higher for the group irradiated with DL when compared with groups irradiated with HL and LED ( p < 0.05). When applying the inferior limits of the interval of confidence of 95%, an application time of 38.7 s was found for HL group, and 4.4 s for DL group. The LED group did not achieve the critical temperatures for pulp or the periodontal, even when irradiated for 360 s. The HL and DL light sources may be used for dental bleaching for a short period of time. The LED source did not heat the target tissues significantly within the parameters used in this study.

  19. An analytic description of electrodynamic dispersion in free-flow zone electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Debashis

    2015-07-24

    The present work analyzes the electrodynamic dispersion of sample streams in a free-flow zone electrophoresis (FFZE) chamber resulting due to partial or complete blockage of electroosmotic flow (EOF) across the channel width by the sidewalls of the conduit. This blockage of EOF has been assumed to generate a pressure-driven backflow in the transverse direction for maintaining flow balance in the system. A parallel-plate based FFZE device with the analyte stream located far away from the channel side regions has been considered to simplify the current analysis. Applying a method-of-moments formulation, an analytic expression was derived for the variance of the sample zone at steady state as a function of its position in the separation chamber under these conditions. It has been shown that the increase in stream broadening due to the electrodynamic dispersion phenomenon is additive to the contributions from molecular diffusion and sample injection, and simply modifies the coefficient for the hydrodynamic dispersion term for a fixed lateral migration distance of the sample stream. Moreover, this dispersion mechanism can dominate the overall spatial variance of analyte zones when a significant fraction of the EOF is blocked by the channel sidewalls. The analysis also shows that analyte streams do not undergo any hydrodynamic broadening due to unwanted pressure-driven cross-flows in an FFZE chamber in the absence of a transverse electric field. The noted results have been validated using Monte Carlo simulations which further demonstrate that while the sample concentration profile at the channel outlet approaches a Gaussian distribution only in FFZE chambers substantially longer than the product of the axial pressure-driven velocity and the characteristic diffusion time in the system, the spatial variance of the exiting analyte stream is well described by the Taylor-Aris dispersion limit even in analysis ducts much shorter than this length scale.

  20. Detecting doping use: more than an analytical problem.

    PubMed

    Delanghe, J R; Maenhout, T M; Speeckaert, M M; De Buyzere, M L

    2014-01-01

    The recent Armstrong case, where more than 250 negative doping tests are confronted with the athlete's confession of erythropoietin use, blood doping, steroid, and growth hormone abuse, illustrates the limitations of current laboratory tests in detecting doping in sport. Despite numerous doping controls and simultaneous indications of common doping abuse among professional athletes in the last two decades, the number of positive urine tests for recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO) remains remarkably low. Athletes are using various masking strategies, among them protease inhibitors, intravenous injections of rHuEPO and alternative erythropoiesis stimulating agents. As one of the countermeasures, the Athlete's Biological Passport has been introduced. The sensitivity of the Athlete's Biological Passport is limited if the effect of a low-dose doping remains within the intra-individual reference range. A possible solution could be the use of a novel Epo test (MAIIA Diagnostics). Another performance-enhancing strategy is the return to 'old' doping techniques, such as autologous blood transfusions. Several indirect methods to detect autologous blood transfusions have been proposed with the majority relying on changes in erythropoiesis-sensitive blood markers. Currently, an algorithm based on the haemoglobin (Hb) level concentration and the percentage of reticulocytes (OFF-hr model; Hb(g/l)-60·√%ret) is approved by the World Anti-Doping Agency. Genetic factors have been identified which may interfere with test interpretation. A large inter- and intra-ethnic variation in testosterone glucuronidation and excretion has been described. Consideration of genetic variation should improve performance of the testosterone doping test. Taking into account the pre-analytical care and better tailoring of the threshold values could increase test sensitivity. Anti-doping laboratories should routinely adjust for multiple testing as failure of doping control to detect cheaters

  1. An Active Global Attack Model for Sensor Source Location Privacy: Analysis and Countermeasures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yi; Zhu, Sencun; Cao, Guohong; Laporta, Thomas

    Source locations of events are sensitive contextual information that needs to be protected in sensor networks. Previous work focuses on either an active local attacker that traces back to a real source in a hop-by-hop fashion, or a passive global attacker that eavesdrops/analyzes all network traffic to discover real sources. An active global attack model, which is more realistic and powerful than current ones, has not been studied yet. In this paper, we not only formalize this strong attack model, but also propose countermeasures against it.

  2. An ecological analysis of environmental correlates of active commuting in urban U.S.

    PubMed

    Fan, Jessie X; Wen, Ming; Kowaleski-Jones, Lori

    2014-11-01

    We conduct a cross-sectional ecological analysis to examine environmental correlates of active commuting in 39,660 urban tracts using data from the 2010 Census, 2007-2011 American Community Survey, and other sources. The five-year average (2007-2011) prevalence is 3.05% for walking, 0.63% for biking, and 7.28% for public transportation to work, with higher prevalence for all modes in lower-income tracts. Environmental factors account for more variances in public transportation to work but economic and demographic factors account for more variances in walking and biking to work. Population density, median housing age, street connectivity, tree canopy, distance to parks, air quality, and county sprawl index are associated with active commuting, but the association can vary in size and direction for different transportation mode and for higher-income and lower-income tracts.

  3. Assessment of an analytical procedure for predicting supersonic ejector nozzle performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, B. H.

    1974-01-01

    The ability of analysis to predict ejector nozzle characteristics over a wide range of conditions and to study the relation between design parameters and performance is assessed. The analytical method investigated provided an accurate and economical method for predicting the performance of supersonic ejector nozzles. The factors which had the greatest influence over ejector nozzle behavior were those which influenced the initial expansion and recompression process.

  4. An Activity-Rotation Relationship and Kinematic Analysis of Nearby M Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weisenburger, Kolby; West, A. A.; Irwin, J.; Charbonneau, D.; Berta, Z. K.; Dittmann, J.; Newton, E. R.

    2013-01-01

    Using spectroscopic observations and photometric light curves of 298 nearby M dwarfs from the MEarth transit survey, we examine the relationships between magnetic activity (quantified by H-alpha emission), rotation period, and stellar age (derived from three-dimensional space velocities). Although we have known for decades that a large fraction of mid-late-type M dwarfs are magnetically active, it was not clear what role rotation played in the magnetic field generation (and subsequent chromospheric heating). Previous attempts to investigate the relationship between magnetic activity and rotation in mid-late-type M dwarfs were hampered by the limited number of M dwarfs with measured rotation periods (and the fact that vsini measurements only probe rapid rotation). However, the photometric data from the MEarth survey allows us to probe a wide range of rotation periods for M dwarf stars (<1-150 days). Over all M spectral types we find that magnetic activity decreases with longer rotation periods. We note the most magnetically active (and hence, most rapidly rotating) stars to be consistent with a kinematically young population, while slow-rotators are less active or inactive and appear to belong to an older, dynamically heated stellar population. We acknowledge MEarth funding from the Packard Fellowship for Science and Engineering, the NSF (AST-0807690 and AST-1109273) and the Boston University UROP Program.

  5. Answering the Call for Accountability: An Activity and Cost Analysis Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carducci, Rozana; Kisker, Carrie B.; Chang, June; Schirmer, James

    2007-01-01

    This article summarizes the findings of a case study on the creation and application of an activity-based cost accounting model that links community college salary expenditures to mission-critical practices within academic divisions of a southern California community college. Although initially applied as a financial management tool in private…

  6. Critical Incident Analysis Based Training: An Approach for Developing Active Racial/Cultural Awareness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Noah M.; Pieterse, Alex L.

    2007-01-01

    The authors discuss 2 perspectives on the Multicultural Counseling Competencies (D. W. Sue, P. Arredondo, & R. J. McDavis, 1992): fixed goal and process. Noting that the process has been underemphasized, they introduce active racial/cultural awareness as an operationalization of this perspective. Current training approaches are critiqued from this…

  7. Enhanced Lipid and Biodiesel Production from Glucose-Fed Activated Sludge: Kinetics an Microbial Community Analysis

    EPA Science Inventory

    An innovative approach to increase biofuel feedstock lipid yields from municipal sewage sludge via manipulation of carbon:nitrogen (C:N) ratio and glucose loading in activated sludge bioreactors was investigated. Sludge lipid and fatty acid methyl ester (biodiesel) yields (% cel...

  8. Lignocellulose-based analytical devices: bamboo as an analytical platform for chemical detection

    PubMed Central

    Kuan, Chen-Meng; York, Roger L.; Cheng, Chao-Min

    2015-01-01

    This article describes the development of lignocellulose-based analytical devices (LADs) for rapid bioanalysis in low-resource settings. LADs are constructed using either a single lignocellulose or a hybrid design consisting of multiple types of lignocellulose. LADs are simple, low-cost, easy to use, provide rapid response, and do not require external instrumentation during operation. Here, we demonstrate the implementation of LADs for food and water safety (i.e., nitrite assay in hot-pot soup, bacterial detection in water, and resazurin assay in milk) and urinalysis (i.e., nitrite, urobilinogen, and pH assays in human urine). Notably, we created a unique approach using simple chemicals to achieve sensitivity similar to that of commercially available immunochromatographic strips that is low-cost, and provides on-site, rapid detection, for instance, of Eschericia coli (E. coli) in water. PMID:26686576

  9. An analytical bond-order potential for carbon

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Xiaowang; Ward, Donald K.; Foster, Michael E.

    2015-05-27

    Carbon is the most widely studied material today because it exhibits special properties not seen in any other materials when in nano dimensions such as nanotube and graphene. Reduction of material defects created during synthesis has become critical to realize the full potential of carbon structures. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, in principle, allow defect formation mechanisms to be studied with high fidelity, and can, therefore, help guide experiments for defect reduction. Such MD simulations must satisfy a set of stringent requirements. First, they must employ an interatomic potential formalism that is transferable to a variety of carbon structures. Second, the potential needs to be appropriately parameterized to capture the property trends of important carbon structures, in particular, diamond, graphite, graphene, and nanotubes. The potential must predict the crystalline growth of the correct phases during direct MD simulations of synthesis to achieve a predictive simulation of defect formation. An unlimited number of structures not included in the potential parameterization are encountered, thus the literature carbon potentials are often not sufficient for growth simulations. We have developed an analytical bond order potential for carbon, and have made it available through the public MD simulation package LAMMPS. We also demonstrate that our potential reasonably captures the property trends of important carbon phases. As a result, stringent MD simulations convincingly show that our potential accounts not only for the crystalline growth of graphene, graphite, and carbon nanotubes but also for the transformation of graphite to diamond at high pressure.

  10. An Analytic Criterion for Turbulent Disruption of Planetary Resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batygin, Konstantin; Adams, Fred C.

    2017-03-01

    Mean motion commensurabilities in multi-planet systems are an expected outcome of protoplanetary disk-driven migration, and their relative dearth in the observational data presents an important challenge to current models of planet formation and dynamical evolution. One natural mechanism that can lead to the dissolution of commensurabilities is stochastic orbital forcing, induced by turbulent density fluctuations within the nebula. While this process is qualitatively promising, the conditions under which mean motion resonances can be broken are not well understood. In this work, we derive a simple analytic criterion that elucidates the relationship among the physical parameters of the system, and find the conditions necessary to drive planets out of resonance. Subsequently, we confirm our findings with numerical integrations carried out in the perturbative regime, as well as direct N-body simulations. Our calculations suggest that turbulent resonance disruption depends most sensitively on the planet–star mass ratio. Specifically, for a disk with properties comparable to the early solar nebula with α ={10}-2, only planet pairs with cumulative mass ratios smaller than ({m}1+{m}2)/M≲ {10}-5∼ 3{M}\\oplus /{M}ȯ are susceptible to breaking resonance at semimajor axis of order a∼ 0.1 {au}. Although turbulence can sometimes compromise resonant pairs, an additional mechanism (such as suppression of resonance capture probability through disk eccentricity) is required to adequately explain the largely non-resonant orbital architectures of extrasolar planetary systems.

  11. An analytical model of capped turbulent oscillatory bottom boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, Kenji

    2010-03-01

    An analytical model of capped turbulent oscillatory bottom boundary layers (BBLs) is proposed using eddy viscosity of a quadratic form. The common definition of friction velocity based on maximum bottom shear stress is found unsatisfactory for BBLs under rotating flows, and a possible extension based on turbulent kinetic energy balance is proposed. The model solutions show that the flow may slip at the top of the boundary layer due to capping by the water surface or stratification, reducing the bottom shear stress, and that the Earth's rotation induces current and bottom shear stress components perpendicular to the interior flow with a phase lag (or lead). Comparisons with field and numerical experiments indicate that the model predicts the essential characteristics of the velocity profiles, although the agreement is rather qualitative due to assumptions of quadratic eddy viscosity with time-independent friction velocity and a well-mixed boundary layer. On the other hand, the predicted linear friction coefficients, phase lead, and veering angle at the bottom agreed with available data with an error of 3%-10%, 5°-10°, and 5°-10°, respectively. As an application of the model, the friction coefficients are used to calculate e-folding decay distances of progressive internal waves with a semidiurnal frequency.

  12. An analytical bond-order potential for carbon

    DOE PAGES

    Zhou, Xiaowang; Ward, Donald K.; Foster, Michael E.

    2015-05-27

    Carbon is the most widely studied material today because it exhibits special properties not seen in any other materials when in nano dimensions such as nanotube and graphene. Reduction of material defects created during synthesis has become critical to realize the full potential of carbon structures. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, in principle, allow defect formation mechanisms to be studied with high fidelity, and can, therefore, help guide experiments for defect reduction. Such MD simulations must satisfy a set of stringent requirements. First, they must employ an interatomic potential formalism that is transferable to a variety of carbon structures. Second, themore » potential needs to be appropriately parameterized to capture the property trends of important carbon structures, in particular, diamond, graphite, graphene, and nanotubes. The potential must predict the crystalline growth of the correct phases during direct MD simulations of synthesis to achieve a predictive simulation of defect formation. An unlimited number of structures not included in the potential parameterization are encountered, thus the literature carbon potentials are often not sufficient for growth simulations. We have developed an analytical bond order potential for carbon, and have made it available through the public MD simulation package LAMMPS. We also demonstrate that our potential reasonably captures the property trends of important carbon phases. As a result, stringent MD simulations convincingly show that our potential accounts not only for the crystalline growth of graphene, graphite, and carbon nanotubes but also for the transformation of graphite to diamond at high pressure.« less

  13. An Analytical Treatment of Aircraft Propeller Precession Instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, Wilmer H., III; Bland, Samuel R.

    1961-01-01

    An analytical investigation is made of a precession-type instability which can occur in a flexibly supported aircraft-engine-propeller combination. By means of an idealized mathematical model which is comprised of a rigid power-plant system flexibly mounted in pitch and yaw to a fixed backup structure, the conditions required for neutral stability are determined. The paper also examines the sensitivity of the stability boundaries to changes in such parameters as stiffness, damping, and asymmetries in the engine mount, propeller speed, airspeed, Mach number, propeller thrust, and location of pitch and yaw axes. Stability is found to depend strongly on the damping and stiffness in the system. With the use of nondimensional charts, theoretical stability boundaries are compared with experimental results obtained in wind-tunnel tests of an aeroelastic airplane model. In general, the theoretical results, which do not account for wing response, show the same trends as observed experimentally; however, for a given set of conditions calculated airspeeds for neutral stability are consistently lower than the measured values. Evidently, this result is due to the fact that wing response tends to add damping to the system.

  14. Analytical Round Robin for Elastic-Plastic Analysis of Surface Cracked Plates: Phase I Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wells, D. N.; Allen, P. A.

    2012-01-01

    An analytical round robin for the elastic-plastic analysis of surface cracks in flat plates was conducted with 15 participants. Experimental results from a surface crack tension test in 2219-T8 aluminum plate provided the basis for the inter-laboratory study (ILS). The study proceeded in a blind fashion given that the analysis methodology was not specified to the participants, and key experimental results were withheld. This approach allowed the ILS to serve as a current measure of the state of the art for elastic-plastic fracture mechanics analysis. The analytical results and the associated methodologies were collected for comparison, and sources of variability were studied and isolated. The results of the study revealed that the J-integral analysis methodology using the domain integral method is robust, providing reliable J-integral values without being overly sensitive to modeling details. General modeling choices such as analysis code, model size (mesh density), crack tip meshing, or boundary conditions, were not found to be sources of significant variability. For analyses controlled only by far-field boundary conditions, the greatest source of variability in the J-integral assessment is introduced through the constitutive model. This variability can be substantially reduced by using crack mouth opening displacements to anchor the assessment. Conclusions provide recommendations for analysis standardization.

  15. An automated tool for face recognition using visual attention and active shape models analysis.

    PubMed

    Faro, A; Giordano, D; Spampinato, C

    2006-01-01

    An entirely automated approach for the recognition of the face of a people starting from her/his images is presented. The approach uses a computational attention module to find automatically the most relevant facial features using the Focus Of Attentions (FOA) These features are used to build the model of a face during the learning phase and for recognition during the testing phase. The landmarking of the features is performed by applying the active contour model (ACM) technique, whereas the active shape model (ASM) is adopted for constructing a flexible model of the selected facial features. The advantages of this approach and opportunities for further improvements are discussed.

  16. An analytical sensitivity method for use in integrated aeroservoelastic aircraft design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, Michael G.

    1989-01-01

    Interdisciplinary analysis capabilities have been developed for aeroservoelastic aircraft and large flexible spacecraft, but the requisite integrated design methods are only beginning to be developed. One integrated design method which has received attention is based on hierarchal problem decompositions, optimization, and design sensitivity analyses. This paper highlights a design sensitivity analysis method for Linear Quadratic Gaussian (LQG) optimal control laws, enabling the use of LQG techniques in the hierarchal design methodology. The LQG sensitivity analysis method calculates the change in the optimal control law and resulting controlled system responses due to changes in fixed design integration parameters using analytical sensitivity equations. Numerical results of an LQG design sensitivity analysis for a realistic aeroservoelastic aircraft example are presented. In this example, the sensitivity of the optimal control law and aircraft response for various parameters such as wing bending natural frequency is determined. The sensitivity results computed from the analytical expressions are used to estimate changes in response resulting from changes in the parameters. Comparisons of the estimates with exact calculated responses show they are reasonably accurate for + or - 15 percent changes in the parameters. Evaluation of the analytical expressions is computationally faster than equivalent finite difference calculations.

  17. An analytical filter design method for guided wave phased arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Hyu-Sang; Kim, Jin-Yeon

    2016-12-01

    This paper presents an analytical method for designing a spatial filter that processes the data from an array of two-dimensional guided wave transducers. An inverse problem is defined where the spatial filter coefficients are determined in such a way that a prescribed beam shape, i.e., a desired array output is best approximated in the least-squares sense. Taking advantage of the 2π-periodicity of the generated wave field, Fourier-series representation is used to derive closed-form expressions for the constituting matrix elements. Special cases in which the desired array output is an ideal delta function and a gate function are considered in a more explicit way. Numerical simulations are performed to examine the performance of the filters designed by the proposed method. It is shown that the proposed filters can significantly improve the beam quality in general. Most notable is that the proposed method does not compromise between the main lobe width and the sidelobe levels; i.e. a narrow main lobe and low sidelobes are simultaneously achieved. It is also shown that the proposed filter can compensate the effects of nonuniform directivity and sensitivity of array elements by explicitly taking these into account in the formulation. From an example of detecting two separate targets, how much the angular resolution can be improved as compared to the conventional delay-and-sum filter is quantitatively illustrated. Lamb wave based imaging of localized defects in an elastic plate using a circular array is also presented as an example of practical applications.

  18. Commentary on "Distributed Revisiting: An Analytic for Retention of Coherent Science Learning"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hewitt, Jim

    2015-01-01

    The article, "Distributed Revisiting: An Analytic for Retention of Coherent Science Learning" is an interesting study that operates at the intersection of learning theory and learning analytics. The authors observe that the relationship between learning theory and research in the learning analytics field is constrained by several…

  19. Multiple Theoretical Lenses as an Analytical Strategy in Researching Group Discussions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berge, Maria; Ingerman, Åke

    2017-01-01

    Background: In science education today, there is an emerging focus on what is happening in situ, making use of an array of analytical traditions. Common practice is to use one specific analytical framing within a research project, but there are projects that make use of multiple analytical framings to further the understanding of the same data,…

  20. Incorporating Information Literacy Skills into Analytical Chemistry: An Evolutionary Step

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walczak, Mary M.; Jackson, Paul T.

    2007-01-01

    The American Chemical Society (ACS) has recently decided to incorporate various information literacy skills for teaching analytical chemistry to the students. The methodology has been found to be extremely effective, as it provides better understanding to the students.

  1. An Analytic Model of Dusty, Stratified, Spherical H II Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Ramírez, J. C.; Raga, A. C.; Lora, V.; Cantó, J.

    2016-12-01

    We study analytically the effect of radiation pressure (associated with photoionization processes and with dust absorption) on spherical, hydrostatic H ii regions. We consider two basic equations, one for the hydrostatic balance between the radiation-pressure components and the gas pressure, and another for the balance among the recombination rate, the dust absorption, and the ionizing photon rate. Based on appropriate mathematical approximations, we find a simple analytic solution for the density stratification of the nebula, which is defined by specifying the radius of the external boundary, the cross section of dust absorption, and the luminosity of the central star. We compare the analytic solution with numerical integrations of the model equations of Draine, and find a wide range of the physical parameters for which the analytic solution is accurate.

  2. Estrogenic activity of ternary UV filter mixtures in fish (Pimephales promelas) - An analysis with nonlinear isobolograms

    SciTech Connect

    Kunz, Petra Y.; Fent, Karl

    2009-01-01

    Numerous estrogenic compounds are present in aquatic environments, but currently it is not well understood how compounds that differ in maxima and slope of their individual dose-response curves contribute to the overall mixture effect. In order to better understand such interactions we investigated 3 commonly used UV filters, for their estrogenic mixture activity and analysed their joint effects by using the concentration addition (CA) concept. Thereby, we extended the method of isoboles for analysis of 3 compounds that differ in maxima and slopes of their dose-response curves. 3-Benzylidene camphor (3BC), benzophenone-1 (BP1) and benzophenone-2 (BP2) are estrogenic in fish and act as pure- or partial estrogen receptor {alpha} agonists. First we exposed juvenile fathead minnows for 14 days to six concentrations of each UV filter alone to determine vitellogenin (VTG) induction curves, calculate equi-effective mixture concentrations and predict mixture effects. For 3BC, BP1 and BP2 significant VTG-induction occurred at 420, 2668, and 4715 {mu}g/L, respectively. BP2 displayed a full dose-response curve, whereas 3BC and BP1 showed submaximal activity of 70 and 78%, respectively. Second, we exposed fish to 6 equi-effective mixtures (EC-NOEC, EC1, EC5, EC10, EC20, EC30) of these UV filters. Significant VTG-induction occurred at EC5 and higher. Submaximal activity of 67% as compared to the control EE2 (100 ng/L) was reached. The curves for the observed and predicted mixture activity agreed for mixture levels (EC10 to EC30), however, at EC-NOEC, EC1 and EC5, lower activity was observed than predicted by CA. Detailed isobolographic analysis indicate additivity at EC10 to EC30, and antagonism at low levels (EC-NOEC to EC5). Our data show for the first time, that for compounds with differences in maxima and slope, considerably more mixture combinations are additive than previously thought. This should be taken into account for hazard and risk assessment of UV filters and

  3. The Analytic Onion: Examining Training Issues from Different Levels of Analysis. Interim Technical Paper for Period July 1989-June 1991.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamb, Theodore A.; Chin, Keric B. O.

    This paper proposes a conceptual framework based on different levels of analysis using the metaphor of the layers of an onion to help organize and structure thinking on research issues concerning training. It discusses the core of the "analytic onion," the biological level, and seven levels of analysis that surround that core: the individual, the…

  4. An analytical master curve for Goodman diagram data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berkovits, A.; Fang, D.

    1993-05-01

    Estimation of the remaining safe life of structural parts which are not easily inspectable continues to be a problem. Even when load histories are available, laborious interpolation of Goodman diagram data is required in order to determine the remaining fatigue life of such parts. An analytical formulation of Goodman diagram data would expedite the life check. It is shown in this paper that, for many engineering materials at room temperature, the entire range of Goodman diagram data collapses on to a single master curve when presented as the ratio of lifetime with mean stress to lifetime at R = -1 for a given stress amplitude, as a function of a non-dimensional load parameter consisting of stress amplitude, mean stress, and material strength. The master curve is conveniently expressed in terms of two easily determined Weibull constants. Stress-concentration factor influences the value of the constants, as does the strain-rate sensitivity of some materials. By use of the master curve formula in an algorithm together with the Manson-Coffin life relation and Miner cumulative damage rule, computed fatigue lives lay within a factor of 2 of results obtained in tests under aircraft spectrum loads.

  5. Swimming Efficiently: An Analytical Study of Optimal Swimming in Fish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiens, A. Josh; Hosoi, Anette

    2014-11-01

    The Strouhal Number (St) , is widely considered to be the defining parameter for efficient undulatory swimming. Biological studies have shown that fish species across a broad range of shapes and sizes adhere to a narrow St range (0 . 2 < St < 0 . 4). Despite its significance, St alone provides an incomplete description of the kinematics and geometry of a swimming fish. The dimensionless speed and amplitude of the body wave, along with the size and shape of the body can also play a significant role in swimming performance. We apply Lighthill's elongated body theory to construct a simple but powerful reduction of the steady-swimming problem. Through this reduction, the energetic efficiency of a swimming fish can be directly expressed as an analytical function of body geometry and kinematics. In this reduced form, the interplay between the parameters of the system, and their collective role in determining the performance of the swimmer can be readily observed and understood. In particular, the reduced model is applied to understand how wave amplitude, wave speed, and St must relate for optimal swimming efficiency. Following this, we then explore how these relationships are altered by geometric factors such as tail size and compliance.

  6. Evaluation and expansion of an analytical model for fatigue of notched composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramkumar, R. L.; Kulkarni, S. V.; Pipes, R. B.

    1978-01-01

    The analytical and experimental study performed to expand the existing static and fatigue failure analysis is described. The analytical effort extended the analysis to include interlaminar effects, while the experimental effort developed methods to obtain basic experimental data required as input to the analysis. The static failure analysis for notched laminates was modified to include interlaminar effects near the notch. Three dimensional elastic and two dimensional elasticplastic finite element analysis were performed for some notched laminates.

  7. Analysis of brain activity and response to colour stimuli during learning tasks: an EEG study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Folgieri, Raffaella; Lucchiari, Claudio; Marini, Daniele

    2013-02-01

    The research project intends to demonstrate how EEG detection through BCI device can improve the analysis and the interpretation of colours-driven cognitive processes through the combined approach of cognitive science and information technology methods. To this end, firstly it was decided to design an experiment based on comparing the results of the traditional (qualitative and quantitative) cognitive analysis approach with the EEG signal analysis of the evoked potentials. In our case, the sensorial stimulus is represented by the colours, while the cognitive task consists in remembering the words appearing on the screen, with different combination of foreground (words) and background colours. In this work we analysed data collected from a sample of students involved in a learning process during which they received visual stimuli based on colour variation. The stimuli concerned both the background of the text to learn and the colour of the characters. The experiment indicated some interesting results concerning the use of primary (RGB) and complementary (CMY) colours.

  8. Advanced Durability Analysis. Volume 2. Analytical Predictions, Test Results and Analytical Correlations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-02-27

    used for the back-extrapolation. Recommendations for durability analysis are as follows: (1) define the equivalent initial flaw size distribution ...WAFXHR4 Data Set) for Cumulative Distribution of Service Time to Reach Crack Size x1 -0.59" Based on DCGA- DCGA. xiv List of Figures (Continued) Fiaur. ag ...be used to make predictions for the probability bf crack exceedance at any service time, 7’ , and the cumulative distribution of service time to

  9. Activities of an Environmental Analysis Van in the German Federal State Schleswig-Holstein.

    PubMed Central

    Pröhl, A; Böge, K P; Alsen-Hinrichs, C

    1997-01-01

    A cooperation was started between the Union of Physicians of Schleswig-Holstein (Bad Segeberg, Germany) and an environmental engineer in 1992. A mobile unit for environmental analysis was set up, the Environmental analysis Van (EAV) or mobile umweltambulanz. Inspection of sites and collection of air and dust/material samples for analysis of xenobiotics were performed on request. The results of this cooperation were evaluated to show which sources of indoor pollutants could be particularly relevant to human health impairment. During a 30-month period form July 1993 to December 1995, 1793 site inspections wer conducted. Xenobiotic analysis and subsequent advising was performed in 1318 cases; enhanced concentrations of one or more toxic substances (mainly biocides such a pentachlorophenol, permethrin, and/or hexachlorocyclohexane) were found in 71% of the sites analyzed. Formaldehyde, volatile organic compounds, and contamination by molds were also documented. A follow-up was done on 80 clients of the Environmental Analysis Van, which had detected elevated concentrations of permethrin because of pyrethroid-treated carpeting. The effect of removing all contaminated carpeting on health improvement in comparison with nonremoval was statistically significant (p<0.0001). Pyrethroid-treated carpeting, which was already 5, 7 and 10 years old, revealed permethrin concentrations of 115, 100, and 150 mg/kg dust. This result indicates that indoor contamination of permethrin is highly persistent and may be the cause of adverse health effects. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. PMID:9300932

  10. Path integral analysis of Jarzynski's equality: analytical results.

    PubMed

    Minh, David D L; Adib, Artur B

    2009-02-01

    We apply path integrals to study nonequilibrium work theorems in the context of Brownian dynamics, deriving in particular the equations of motion governing the most typical and most dominant trajectories. For the analytically soluble cases of a moving harmonic potential and a harmonic oscillator with a time-dependent natural frequency, we find such trajectories, evaluate the work-weighted propagators, and validate Jarzynski's equality.

  11. Application of Multidimensional Spectrum Analysis for Analytical Chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Hatsukawa, Yuichi; Hayakawa, Takehito; Toh, Yosuke; Shinohara, Nobuo; Oshima, Masumi

    1999-12-31

    Feasibility of application of the multidimensional {gamma} ray spectroscopy for analytical chemistry was examined. Two reference igneous rock (JP-1, JB-1a) samples issued by the Geological Survey of Japan (GSJ) were irradiated at a research reactor with thermal neutrons, and {gamma} rays from the radioisotopes produced by neutron capture reactions were measured using a {gamma}-ray detector array. Simultaneously 27 elements were observed with no chemical separation.

  12. Application of multidimensional spectrum analysis for analytical chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Hatsukawa, Yuichi; Hayakawa, Takehito; Toh, Yosuke; Shinohara, Nobuo; Oshima, Masumi

    1999-11-16

    Feasibility of application of the multidimensional {gamma} ray spectroscopy for analytical chemistry was examined. Two reference igneous rock (JP-1, JB-1a) samples issued by the Geological Survey of Japan (GSJ) were irradiated at a research reactor with thermal neutrons, and {gamma} rays from the radioisotopes produced by neutron capture reactions were measured using a {gamma}-ray detector array. Simultaneously 27 elements were observed with no chemical separation.

  13. Activation of sensory cortex by imagined genital stimulation: an fMRI analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wise, Nan J.; Frangos, Eleni; Komisaruk, Barry R.

    2016-01-01

    Background During the course of a previous study, our laboratory made a serendipitous finding that just thinking about genital stimulation resulted in brain activations that overlapped with, and differed from, those generated by physical genital stimulation. Objective This study extends our previous findings by further characterizing how the brain differentially processes physical ‘touch’ stimulation and ‘imagined’ stimulation. Design Eleven healthy women (age range 29–74) participated in an fMRI study of the brain response to imagined or actual tactile stimulation of the nipple and clitoris. Two additional conditions – imagined dildo self-stimulation and imagined speculum stimulation – were included to characterize the effects of erotic versus non-erotic imagery. Results Imagined and tactile self-stimulation of the nipple and clitoris each activated the paracentral lobule (the genital region of the primary sensory cortex) and the secondary somatosensory cortex. Imagined self-stimulation of the clitoris and nipple resulted in greater activation of the frontal pole and orbital frontal cortex compared to tactile self-stimulation of these two bodily regions. Tactile self-stimulation of the clitoris and nipple activated the cerebellum, primary somatosensory cortex (hand region), and premotor cortex more than the imagined stimulation of these body regions. Imagining dildo stimulation generated extensive brain activation in the genital sensory cortex, secondary somatosensory cortex, hippocampus, amygdala, insula, nucleus accumbens, and medial prefrontal cortex, whereas imagining speculum stimulation generated only minimal activation. Conclusion The present findings provide evidence of the potency of imagined stimulation of the genitals and that the following brain regions may participate in erogenous experience: primary and secondary sensory cortices, sensory-motor integration areas, limbic structures, and components of the ‘reward system’. In addition

  14. An analytically tractable model for community ecology with many species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickens, Benjamin; Fisher, Charles; Mehta, Pankaj; Pankaj Mehta Biophysics Theory Group Team

    A fundamental problem in community ecology is to understand how ecological processes such as selection, drift, and immigration yield observed patterns in species composition and diversity. Here, we present an analytically tractable, presence-absence (PA) model for community assembly and use it to ask how ecological traits such as the strength of competition, diversity in competition, and stochasticity affect species composition in a community. In our PA model, we treat species as stochastic binary variables that can either be present or absent in a community: species can immigrate into the community from a regional species pool and can go extinct due to competition and stochasticity. Despite its simplicity, the PA model reproduces the qualitative features of more complicated models of community assembly. In agreement with recent work on large, competitive Lotka-Volterra systems, the PA model exhibits distinct ecological behaviors organized around a special (``critical'') point corresponding to Hubbell's neutral theory of biodiversity. Our results suggest that the concepts of ``phases'' and phase diagrams can provide a powerful framework for thinking about community ecology and that the PA model captures the essential ecological dynamics of community assembly. Pm was supported by a Simons Investigator in the Mathematical Modeling of Living Systems and a Sloan Research Fellowship.

  15. An analytical study of various telecomminication networks using markov models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramakrishnan, M.; Jayamani, E.; Ezhumalai, P.

    2015-04-01

    The main aim of this paper is to examine issues relating to the performance of various Telecommunication networks, and applied queuing theory for better design and improved efficiency. Firstly, giving an analytical study of queues deals with quantifying the phenomenon of waiting lines using representative measures of performances, such as average queue length (on average number of customers in the queue), average waiting time in queue (on average time to wait) and average facility utilization (proportion of time the service facility is in use). In the second, using Matlab simulator, summarizes the finding of the investigations, from which and where we obtain results and describing methodology for a) compare the waiting time and average number of messages in the queue in M/M/1 and M/M/2 queues b) Compare the performance of M/M/1 and M/D/1 queues and study the effect of increasing the number of servers on the blocking probability M/M/k/k queue model.

  16. Analytical methods for the determination of personal care products in human samples: an overview.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Díaz, I; Zafra-Gómez, A; Ballesteros, O; Navalón, A

    2014-11-01

    Personal care products (PCPs) are organic chemicals widely used in everyday human life. Nowadays, preservatives, UV-filters, antimicrobials and musk fragrances are widely used PCPs. Different studies have shown that some of these compounds can cause adverse health effects, such as genotoxicity, which could even lead to mutagenic or carcinogenic effects, or estrogenicity because of their endocrine disruption activity. Due to the absence of official monitoring protocols, there is an increasing demand of analytical methods that allow the determination of those compounds in human samples in order to obtain more information regarding their behavior and fate in the human body. The complexity of the biological matrices and the low concentration levels of these compounds make necessary the use of advanced sample treatment procedures that afford both, sample clean-up, to remove potentially interfering matrix components, as well as the concentration of analytes. In the present work, a review of the more recent analytical methods published in the scientific literature for the determination of PCPs in human fluids and tissue samples, is presented. The work focused on sample preparation and the analytical techniques employed.

  17. An Analysis Technique for Active Neutron Multiplicity Measurements Based on First Principles

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, Louise G; Goddard, Braden; Charlton, William S; Peerani, Paolo

    2012-08-13

    Passive neutron multiplicity counting is commonly used to quantify the total mass of plutonium in a sample, without prior knowledge of the sample geometry. However, passive neutron counting is less applicable to uranium measurements due to the low spontaneous fission rates of uranium. Active neutron multiplicity measurements are therefore used to determine the {sup 235}U mass in a sample. Unfortunately, there are still additional challenges to overcome for uranium measurements, such as the coupling of the active source and the uranium sample. Techniques, such as the coupling method, have been developed to help reduce the dependence of calibration curves for active measurements on uranium samples; although, they still require similar geometry known standards. An advanced active neutron multiplicity measurement method is being developed by Texas A&M University, in collaboration with Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in an attempt to overcome the calibration curve requirements. This method can be used to quantify the {sup 235}U mass in a sample containing uranium without using calibration curves. Furthermore, this method is based on existing detectors and nondestructive assay (NDA) systems, such as the LANL Epithermal Neutron Multiplicity Counter (ENMC). This method uses an inexpensive boron carbide liner to shield the uranium sample from thermal and epithermal neutrons while allowing fast neutrons to reach the sample. Due to the relatively low and constant fission and absorption energy dependent cross-sections at high neutron energies for uranium isotopes, fast neutrons can penetrate the sample without significant attenuation. Fast neutron interrogation therefore creates a homogeneous fission rate in the sample, allowing for first principle methods to be used to determine the {sup 235}U mass in the sample. This paper discusses the measurement method concept and development, including measurements and simulations performed to date, as well as the potential

  18. Health Informatics for Neonatal Intensive Care Units: An Analytical Modeling Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Mench-Bressan, Nadja; McGregor, Carolyn; Pugh, James Edward

    2015-01-01

    The effective use of data within intensive care units (ICUs) has great potential to create new cloud-based health analytics solutions for disease prevention or earlier condition onset detection. The Artemis project aims to achieve the above goals in the area of neonatal ICUs (NICU). In this paper, we proposed an analytical model for the Artemis cloud project which will be deployed at McMaster Children’s Hospital in Hamilton. We collect not only physiological data but also the infusion pumps data that are attached to NICU beds. Using the proposed analytical model, we predict the amount of storage, memory, and computation power required for the system. Capacity planning and tradeoff analysis would be more accurate and systematic by applying the proposed analytical model in this paper. Numerical results are obtained using real inputs acquired from McMaster Children’s Hospital and a pilot deployment of the system at The Hospital for Sick Children (SickKids) in Toronto. PMID:27170907

  19. Is it really necessary to validate an analytical method or not? That is the question.

    PubMed

    Rambla-Alegre, Maria; Esteve-Romero, Josep; Carda-Broch, Samuel

    2012-04-06

    Method validation is an important requirement in the practice of chemical analysis. However, awareness of its importance, why it should be done and when, and exactly what needs to be done, seems to be poor amongst analytical chemists. Much advice related to method validation already exists in the literature, especially related to particular methods, but more often than not is underused. Some analysts see method validation as something that can only be done by collaborating with other laboratories and therefore do not go about it. In addition, analysts' understanding of method validation is inhibited by the fact that many of the technical terms used in the processes for evaluating methods vary in different sectors of analytical measurement, both in terms of their meaning and the way they are determined. Validation applies to a defined protocol, for the determination of a specified analyte and range of concentrations in a particular type of test material, used for a specified purpose. In general, validation should check that the method performs adequately for the purpose throughout the range of analyte concentrations and test materials to which it is applied. It follows that these features, together with a statement of any fitness-for-purpose criteria, should be completely specified before any validation takes place.

  20. Familiarity Vs Trust: A Comparative Study of Domain Scientists' Trust in Visual Analytics and Conventional Analysis Methods.

    PubMed

    Dasgupta, Aritra; Lee, Joon-Yong; Wilson, Ryan; Lafrance, Robert A; Cramer, Nick; Cook, Kristin; Payne, Samuel

    2017-01-01

    Combining interactive visualization with automated analytical methods like statistics and data mining facilitates data-driven discovery. These visual analytic methods are beginning to be instantiated within mixed-initiative systems, where humans and machines collaboratively influence evidence-gathering and decision-making. But an open research question is that, when domain experts analyze their data, can they completely trust the outputs and operations on the machine-side? Visualization potentially leads to a transparent analysis process, but do domain experts always trust what they see? To address these questions, we present results from the design and evaluation of a mixed-initiative, visual analytics system for biologists, focusing on analyzing the relationships between familiarity of an analysis medium and domain experts' trust. We propose a trust-augmented design of the visual analytics system, that explicitly takes into account domain-specific tasks, conventions, and preferences. For evaluating the system, we present the results of a controlled user study with 34 biologists where we compare the variation of the level of trust across conventional and visual analytic mediums and explore the influence of familiarity and task complexity on trust. We find that despite being unfamiliar with a visual analytic medium, scientists seem to have an average level of trust that is comparable with the same in conventional analysis medium. In fact, for complex sense-making tasks, we find that the visual analytic system is able to inspire greater trust than other mediums. We summarize the implications of our findings with directions for future research on trustworthiness of visual analytic systems.

  1. InfoStar: An Adaptive Visual Analytics Platform for Mobile Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Sanfilippo, Antonio P.; May, Richard A.; Danielson, Gary R.; Baddeley, Bob L.; Riensche, Roderick M.; Collins, Sharon; Thornton, Susan E.; Washington, Kenneth; Schrager, Matt; Van Randwyk, Jamie; Borchers, Bob; Gatchell, Doug

    2005-05-09

    We present the design and implementation of InfoStar, an adaptive Visual Analytics platform for mobile devices such a PDAs, laptops, Tablet PCs and mobile phones. InfoStar extends the reach of visual analytics technology beyond the traditional desktop paradigm to provide ubiquitous access to inter-active visualizations of information spaces. These visualizations are critical in addressing the knowledge needs of human agents operating in the field, in areas as diverse as business, homeland security, law enforcement, protective services, emergency medical services and scientific discovery. We describe an initial real world deployment of this technology, in which the InfoStar platform has been used to offer mobile access to scheduling and venue information to conference attendees at Supercomputing 2004.

  2. InfoStar : an adaptive visual analytics platform for mobile devices.

    SciTech Connect

    Gatchell, Doug; Borchers, Bob; Schrager, Matthew A.; Thornton, Susan; Collins, Sharon; Van Randwyk, Jamie A.; Danielson, Gary; Riensche, Rick; May, Richard; Baddeley, Bob; Sanfilippo, Antonio; Washington, Kenneth Edward

    2005-03-01

    We present the design and implementation of InfoStar, an adaptive Visual Analytics platform for mobile devices such a PDAs, laptops, Tablet PCs and mobile phones. InfoStar extends the reach of visual analytics technology beyond the traditional desktop paradigm to provide ubiquitous access to inter-active visualizations of information spaces. These visualizations are critical in addressing the knowledge needs of human agents operating in the field, in areas as diverse as business, homeland security, law enforcement, protective services, emergency medical services and scientific discovery. We describe an initial real world deployment of this technology, in which the InfoStar platform has been used to offer mobile access to scheduling and venue information to conference attendees at Supercomputing 2004.

  3. Topologic analysis and comparison of brain activation in children with epilepsy versus controls: an fMRI study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oweis, Khalid J.; Berl, Madison M.; Gaillard, William D.; Duke, Elizabeth S.; Blackstone, Kaitlin; Loew, Murray H.; Zara, Jason M.

    2010-03-01

    This paper describes the development of novel computer-aided analysis algorithms to identify the language activation patterns at a certain Region of Interest (ROI) in Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI). Previous analysis techniques have been used to compare typical and pathologic activation patterns in fMRI images resulting from identical tasks but none of them analyzed activation topographically in a quantitative manner. This paper presents new analysis techniques and algorithms capable of identifying a pattern of language activation associated with localization related epilepsy. fMRI images of 64 healthy individuals and 31 patients with localization related epilepsy have been studied and analyzed on an ROI basis. All subjects are right handed with normal MRI scans and have been classified into three age groups (4-6, 7-9, 10-12 years). Our initial efforts have focused on investigating activation in the Left Inferior Frontal Gyrus (LIFG). A number of volumetric features have been extracted from the data. The LIFG has been cut into slices and the activation has been investigated topographically on a slice by slice basis. Overall, a total of 809 features have been extracted, and correlation analysis was applied to eliminate highly correlated features. Principal Component analysis was then applied to account only for major components in the data and One-Way Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) has been applied to test for significantly different features between normal and patient groups. Twenty Nine features have were found to be significantly different (p<0.05) between patient and control groups

  4. EUV analysis of an active region. [of solar corona in limb region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raghavan, N.; Withbroe, G. L.

    1975-01-01

    A sequence of extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) spectroheliograms of McMath region No. 10283 were obtained by OSO-6. The lines O VI (1032 A) Mg X (625 A), Si XII (499 A), and Fe XVI (335 A) were used to determine coronal temperatures and densities above the active region. A comparison of theoretical and observed line ratios yielded coronal temperatures of 2.2 to 2.3 million K above the active region and 2.0 to 2.1 million K in the surrounding area. The temperatures derived from ratios involving the O VI intensities are systematically higher than the others. This is attributed to an error in the theoretical O VI intensities. The intensities observed above the limb are compared with intensities predicted by a simple model based on cylindrical geometry. The overall agreement shows that the assumption of an isothermal corona in hydrostatic equilibrium above the active region is a resonable working hypothesis and that the adopted geometrical model for the electron density distribution is adequate.

  5. A quantitative analytic pipeline for evaluating neuronal activities by high throughput synaptic vesicle imaging

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Jing; Xia, Xiaofeng; Li, Ying; Dy, Jennifer G.

    2012-01-01

    Synaptic vesicle dynamics play an important role in the study of neuronal and synaptic activities of neurodegradation diseases ranging from the epidemic Alzheimer’s disease to the rare Rett syndrome. A high-throughput assay with a large population of neurons would be useful and efficient to characterize neuronal activity based on the dynamics of synaptic vesicles for the study of mechanisms or to discover drug candidates for neurodegenerative and neurodevelopmental disorders. However, the massive amounts of image data generated via high throughput screening require enormous manual processing time and effort, restricting the practical use of such an assay. This paper presents an automated analytic system to process and interpret the huge data set generated by such assays. Our system enables the automated detection, segmentation, quantification, and measurement of neuron activities based on the synaptic vesicle assay. To overcome challenges such as noisy background, inhomogeneity, and tiny object size, we first employ MSVST (Multi-Scale Variance Stabilizing Transform) to obtain a denoised and enhanced map of the original image data. Then, we propose an adaptive thresholding strategy to solve the inhomogeneity issue, based on the local information, and to accurately segment synaptic vesicles. We design algorithms to address the issue of tiny objects-of-interest overlapping. Several post-processing criteria are defined to filter false positives. A total of 152 features are extracted for each detected vesicle. A score is defined for each synaptic vesicle image to quantify the neuron activity. We also compare the unsupervised strategy with the supervised method. Our experiments on hippocampal neuron assays showed that the proposed system can automatically detect vesicles and quantify their dynamics for evaluating neuron activities. The availability of such an automated system will open opportunities for investigation of synaptic neuropathology and identification of

  6. Beyond Wicking: Expanding the Role of Patterned Paper as the Foundation for an Analytical Platform.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Syrena C; Walz, Jenna A; Wilson, Daniel J; Brooks, Jessica C; Mace, Charles R

    2017-04-13

    This Feature article discusses the use of patterned paper as a platform for the development of low-cost microfluidic devices and analytical tests that are designed for use in limited-resource settings. While a number of assays for soluble analytes have been developed using paper-based microfluidic devices, the detection and analysis of blood cells has remained an outstanding challenge. Expanding the utility of paper to determine cell counts would address a critical disparity that exists in managing healthcare and diagnosing diseases at the point-of-care. To realize this capability, an improved understanding of the relationship between paper and blood cells is required. In this Feature, we highlight the different material properties of paper and how they contribute to the development and performance of paper-based microfluidic devices. Finally, we discuss how, by considering all of these properties, paper-based devices can be designed to enable cellular assays for use at the point-of-care.

  7. Chemometrics tools used in analytical chemistry: an overview.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Naveen; Bansal, Ankit; Sarma, G S; Rawal, Ravindra K

    2014-06-01

    This article presents various important tools of chemometrics utilized as data evaluation tools generated by various hyphenated analytical techniques including their application since its advent to today. The work has been divided into various sections, which include various multivariate regression methods and multivariate resolution methods. Finally the last section deals with the applicability of chemometric tools in analytical chemistry. The main objective of this article is to review the chemometric methods used in analytical chemistry (qualitative/quantitative), to determine the elution sequence, classify various data sets, assess peak purity and estimate the number of chemical components. These reviewed methods further can be used for treating n-way data obtained by hyphenation of LC with multi-channel detectors. We prefer to provide a detailed view of various important methods developed with their algorithm in favor of employing and understanding them by researchers not very familiar with chemometrics.

  8. [Governance in Public Health: towards an analytical framework].

    PubMed

    Hufty, Marc

    2010-01-01

    This paper argues that the governance analytical framework (GAF) is a methodology having strong potential for investigation in social policy, particularly in the case of public health. It defines the concept of governance in a pragmatic way as being the processes of interactions between the actors involved in a public affair leading to decision-making or to formulating social norms. It is postulated that any society has governance processes and, unlike other approaches, that these can be observed and be analysed from a non-normative perspective. A methodology for analysing governance processes based on five main analytical units is presented here: problems/stakes, actors, norms, processes and nodal points. These logically articulated analytical units make up a coherent methodology aimed at being used as a tool for social policy research.

  9. An Integrated Gate Turnaround Management Concept Leveraging Big Data Analytics for NAS Performance Improvements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, William W.; Ingram, Carla D.; Ahlquist, Douglas Kurt; Chachad, Girish H.

    2016-01-01

    unique airport attributes (e.g., runway, taxiway, terminal, and gate configurations and tenants), and combined statistics from past data and live data based on a specific set of ATM concept-of-operations (ConOps) and operational parameters via systems analysis using an analytic network learning model. The IGTM tool will then bound the uncertainties that arise from nominal and off-nominal operational conditions with direct assessment of the gate turnaround status and the impact of a certain operational decision on the NAS performance, and provide a set of recommended actions to optimize the NAS performance by allowing stakeholders to take mitigation actions to reduce uncertainty and time deviation of planned operational events. An IGTM prototype was developed at NASA Ames Simulation Laboratories (SimLabs) to demonstrate the benefits and applicability of the concept. A data network, using the System Wide Information Management (SWIM)-like messaging application using the ActiveMQ message service, was connected to the simulated data warehouse, scheduled flight plans, a fast-time airport simulator, and a graphic UI. A fast-time simulation was integrated with the data warehouse or Big Data/Analytics (BAI), scheduled flight plans from Aeronautical Operational Control AOC, IGTM Controller, and a UI via a SWIM-like data messaging network using the ActiveMQ message service, illustrated in Figure 1, to demonstrate selected use-cases showing the benefits of the IGTM concept on the NAS performance.

  10. An analytical model of rumpling in thermal barrier coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balint, D. S.; Hutchinson, J. W.

    2005-04-01

    Multilayer thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) deposited on superalloy turbine blades provide protection from combustion temperatures in excess of 1500 °C. One of the dominant failure modes comprises cracking from undulation growth, or rumpling, of the highly compressed oxide layer that grows between the ceramic top coat and the intermetallic bond coat. In this paper, a mechanistic model providing an analytical approximation of undulation growth is presented for realistic cyclic thermal histories. Thickening, lateral growth straining and high temperature yielding of the oxide layer are taken into account. Undulation growth in TBC systems is highly nonlinear and characterized by more than 20 material and geometric parameters, highlighting the importance of a robust yet computationally efficient model. At temperatures above 600 °C, the bond coat creeps. Thermal expansion mismatch occurs between the superalloy substrate and the oxide layer and, in some systems, the bond coat. In addition, some bond coats, such as PtNiAl, exhibit a martensitic phase transformation accompanied by nearly a 1% linear expansion, giving rise to a large effective mismatch. These two mismatches promote undulation growth. Nonlinear interaction between the stress in the bond coat induced by the constraining effect of the thick substrate and normal tractions applied at the surface of the bond coat by the compressed, undulating oxide layer produces an increment of undulation growth during each thermal cycle, before the stress decays by creep. A series of problems for systems without the ceramic top coat are used to elucidate the mechanics of undulation growth and to replicate trends observed in a series of experiments and in prior finite-element simulations. The model is employed to study for the first time the effect on undulation growth of a shift in the temperature range over which the transformation occurs, as well as the relative importance of the transformation compared to thermal expansion

  11. Towards an analytical framework for tailoring supercontinuum generation.

    PubMed

    Castelló-Lurbe, David; Vermeulen, Nathalie; Silvestre, Enrique

    2016-11-14

    A fully analytical toolbox for supercontinuum generation relying on scenarios without pulse splitting is presented. Furthermore, starting from the new insights provided by this formalism about the physical nature of direct and cascaded dispersive wave emission, a unified description of this radiation in both normal and anomalous dispersion regimes is derived. Previously unidentified physics of broadband spectra reported in earlier works is successfully explained on this basis. Finally, a foundry-compatible few-millimeters-long silicon waveguide allowing octave-spanning supercontinuum generation pumped at telecom wavelengths in the normal dispersion regime is designed, hence showcasing the potential of this new analytical approach.

  12. Analytical method for thermal stress analysis of plasma facing materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, J. H.; Bolt, H.

    2001-10-01

    The thermo-mechanical response of plasma facing materials (PFMs) to heat loads from the fusion plasma is one of the crucial issues in fusion technology. In this work, a fully analytical description of the thermal stress distribution in armour tiles of plasma facing components is presented which is expected to occur under typical high heat flux (HHF) loads. The method of stress superposition is applied considering the temperature gradient and thermal expansion mismatch. Several combinations of PFMs and heat sink metals are analysed and compared. In the framework of the present theoretical model, plastic flow and the effect of residual stress can be quantitatively assessed. Possible failure features are discussed.

  13. Global sensitivity analysis of analytical vibroacoustic transmission models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christen, Jean-Loup; Ichchou, Mohamed; Troclet, Bernard; Bareille, Olivier; Ouisse, Morvan

    2016-04-01

    Noise reduction issues arise in many engineering problems. One typical vibroacoustic problem is the transmission loss (TL) optimisation and control. The TL depends mainly on the mechanical parameters of the considered media. At early stages of the design, such parameters are not well known. Decision making tools are therefore needed to tackle this issue. In this paper, we consider the use of the Fourier Amplitude Sensitivity Test (FAST) for the analysis of the impact of mechanical parameters on features of interest. FAST is implemented with several structural configurations. FAST method is used to estimate the relative influence of the model parameters while assuming some uncertainty or variability on their values. The method offers a way to synthesize the results of a multiparametric analysis with large variability. Results are presented for transmission loss of isotropic, orthotropic and sandwich plates excited by a diffuse field on one side. Qualitative trends found to agree with the physical expectation. Design rules can then be set up for vibroacoustic indicators. The case of a sandwich plate is taken as an example of the use of this method inside an optimisation process and for uncertainty quantification.

  14. The effects of physical activity on sleep: a meta-analytic review.

    PubMed

    Kredlow, M Alexandra; Capozzoli, Michelle C; Hearon, Bridget A; Calkins, Amanda W; Otto, Michael W

    2015-06-01

    A significant body of research has investigated the effects of physical activity on sleep, yet this research has not been systematically aggregated in over a decade. As a result, the magnitude and moderators of these effects are unclear. This meta-analytical review examines the effects of acute and regular exercise on sleep, incorporating a range of outcome and moderator variables. PubMed and PsycINFO were used to identify 66 studies for inclusion in the analysis that were published through May 2013. Analyses reveal that acute exercise has small beneficial effects on total sleep time, sleep onset latency, sleep efficiency, stage 1 sleep, and slow wave sleep, a moderate beneficial effect on wake time after sleep onset, and a small effect on rapid eye movement sleep. Regular exercise has small beneficial effects on total sleep time and sleep efficiency, small-to-medium beneficial effects on sleep onset latency, and moderate beneficial effects on sleep quality. Effects were moderated by sex, age, baseline physical activity level of participants, as well as exercise type, time of day, duration, and adherence. Significant moderation was not found for exercise intensity, aerobic/anaerobic classification, or publication date. Results were discussed with regards to future avenues of research and clinical application to the treatment of insomnia.

  15. Capillary electrophoresis as an analytical tool for monitoring nicotine in ATF regulated tobacco products.

    PubMed

    Ralapati, S

    1997-07-18

    Tobacco products are classified at different excise tax rates according to the Code of Federal Regulations. These include cigars, cigarettes, pipe tobacco, roll-your-own tobacco, chewing tobacco and snuff. Nicotine is the primary determinant of what constitutes a tobacco product from a regulatory standpoint. Determination of nicotine, therefore, is of primary importance and interest to ATF. Since nicotine is also the most abundant alkaloid found in tobacco, comprising about 98% of the total alkaloid content, a rapid method for the determination of nicotine in ATF regulated products is desirable. Capillary electrophoresis (CE), as an analytical technique, is rapidly gaining importance capturing the interest of analysts in several areas. The unique and powerful capabilities of CE including high resolution and short analysis times, make it a powerful analytical tool in the regulatory area as well. Preliminary studies using a 25 mM sodium phosphate buffer, pH 2.5 at 260 nm have yielded promising results for the analysis of nicotine in tobacco products. Application of an analytical method for the determination of nicotine by CE to ATF regulated tobacco products will be presented.

  16. Situation Analysis of R & D Activities: An Empirical Study in Iranian Pharmaceutical Companies

    PubMed Central

    Rasekh, Hamid Reza; Mehralian, Gholamhossein; Vatankhah-Mohammadabadi, Abbas Ali

    2012-01-01

    As global competition intensifies, research and development (R & D) organizations need to enhance their strategic management in order to become goal-directed communities for innovation and allocate their resources consistent with their overall R & D strategy. The world pharmaceutical market has undergone fast, unprecedented, tremendous and complex changes in the last several years. The pharmaceutical industry is today still one of the most inventive, innovative and lucrative of the so-called “high-tech” industries. This industry serves a dual role in modern society. On one hand, it is a growing industry, and its output makes a direct contribution to gross domestic product (GDP). On the other side, drugs, this industry’s major output, are an input in the production of good health. The purpose of this study is to evaluate R & D activities of pharmaceutical companies, and also to highlight critical factors which have influential effect on results of these activities. To run this study a valid questionnaire based on literature review and experts’ opinion was designed and delivered to 11 pharmaceutical companies. Empirical data show there is not acceptable situations considering of the factors that should be taken in to account by managers including; management commitment, human resource management, information technology and financial management. Furthermore, we concluded some interesting results related to different aspects of R & D management. In conclusion, managers must be aware about their performance in R & D activities, accordingly they will able to take a comprehensive policy in both national and within the company. PMID:24250532

  17. Modulation of electroencephalograph activity by manual acupuncture stimulation in healthy subjects: An autoregressive spectral analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Guo-Sheng; Wang, Jiang; Deng, Bin; Wei, Xi-Le; Han, Chun-Xiao

    2013-02-01

    To investigate whether and how manual acupuncture (MA) modulates brain activities, we design an experiment where acupuncture at acupoint ST36 of the right leg is used to obtain electroencephalograph (EEG) signals in healthy subjects. We adopt the autoregressive (AR) Burg method to estimate the power spectrum of EEG signals and analyze the relative powers in delta (0 Hz-4 Hz), theta (4 Hz-8 Hz), alpha (8 Hz-13 Hz), and beta (13 Hz-30 Hz) bands. Our results show that MA at ST36 can significantly increase the EEG slow wave relative power (delta band) and reduce the fast wave relative powers (alpha and beta bands), while there are no statistical differences in theta band relative power between different acupuncture states. In order to quantify the ratio of slow to fast wave EEG activity, we compute the power ratio index. It is found that the MA can significantly increase the power ratio index, especially in frontal and central lobes. All the results highlight the modulation of brain activities with MA and may provide potential help for the clinical use of acupuncture. The proposed quantitative method of acupuncture signals may be further used to make MA more standardized.

  18. Modeling, analysis, and validation of an active T-shaped noise barrier.

    PubMed

    Fan, Rongping; Su, Zhongqing; Cheng, Li

    2013-09-01

    With ever-increasing land traffic, abatement of traffic noise using noise barriers remains significant, yet it is a challenging task due to spatial competition with other infrastructure. In this study, a deep insight into the diffraction characteristics of acoustic fields near noise barriers of various geometries and surface conditions was achieved using numerical simulations. A T-shaped passive noise barrier with acoustically soft upper surfaces was demonstrated to outperform other candidates in a middle- or high-frequency range. Based on attributes of the acoustic field diffracted by T-shaped barriers, an active control strategy was developed to revamp the T-shaped barrier, in which a filtered minimax algorithm was established to drive the secondary sound sources. This algorithm resulted in more uniformly distributed residual sound fields than a filtered-X least mean square algorithm. Performance of the actively controlled barrier was evaluated at different positions and spacings of secondary sound sources and error sensors, leading to a series of optimal criteria for the design of active noise barriers. A prototype was fabricated and validated experimentally, manifesting particular effectiveness in insulating low-frequency noise, supplementing well the capacity of a passive T-shaped barrier which is effective in the middle- or high-frequency range.

  19. Electrochemical study and analytical applications for new biologically active 2-nitrophenylbenzimidazole derivatives.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Lueje, A; Zapata-Urzúa, C; Brain-Isasi, S; Pérez-Ortiz, M; Barros, L; Pessoa-Mahana, H; Kogan, M J

    2009-08-15

    The present study addresses the electrochemical behavior and the analytical applications of six 2-nitrophenylbenzimidazole derivatives with activity against Trypanosoma cruzi. When studied in a wide range of pH, by differential pulse polarography, tast polarography and cyclic voltammetry, these compounds exhibited two irreversible cathodic responses. With analytical purposes, the differential pulse polarography mode was selected, which exhibited adequate analytical parameters of repeatability, reproducibility and selectivity. The percentage of recovery was in all cases over 99%, and the detection and quantitation limits were at the level of 1 x 10(-7)mol L(-1) and 1 x 10(-6)mol L(-1), respectively. In addition, the differential pulse polarography method was successfully applied to study the hydrolytic degradation kinetic of one of the tested compounds. Activation energy, kinetic rate constants at different temperatures and half-life values of such application are reported.

  20. Analysis of Hydrogen Tunneling in an Enzyme Active Site using von Neumann Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Sumner, Isaiah; Iyengar, Srinivasan S.

    2010-01-01

    We build on our earlier quantum wavepacket study of hydrogen transfer in the biological enzyme, soybean lipoxygenase-1, by using von Neumann quantum measurement theory to gain qualitative insights into the transfer event. We treat the enzyme active site as a measurement device which acts on the tunneling hydrogen nucleus via the potential it exerts at each configuration. A series of changing active site geometries during the tunneling process effects a sequential projection of the initial, reactant state onto the final, product state. We study this process using several different kinds of von Neumann measurements and show how a discrete sequence of such measurements not only progressively increases the projection of the hydrogen nuclear wavepacket onto the product side but also favors proton over deuteron transfer. Several qualitative features of the hydrogen tunneling problem found in wavepacket dynamics studies are also recovered here. These include the shift in the “transition state” towards the reactant as a result of nuclear quantization, greater participation of excited states in the case of deuterium, and presence of critical points along the reaction coordinate that facilitate hydrogen and deuterium transfer and coincide with surface crossings. To further “tailor” the dynamics, we construct a perturbation to the sequence of measurements, that is a perturbation to the dynamical sequence of active site geometry evolution, which leads us to insight on the existence of sensitive regions of the reaction profile where subtle changes to the dynamics of the active site can have an effect on the hydrogen and deuterium transfer process. PMID:22933858

  1. Linear models of activation cascades: analytical solutions and coarse-graining of delayed signal transduction

    PubMed Central

    Desikan, Radhika

    2016-01-01

    Cellular signal transduction usually involves activation cascades, the sequential activation of a series of proteins following the reception of an input signal. Here, we study the classic model of weakly activated cascades and obtain analytical solutions for a variety of inputs. We show that in the special but important case of optimal gain cascades (i.e. when the deactivation rates are identical) the downstream output of the cascade can be represented exactly as a lumped nonlinear module containing an incomplete gamma function with real parameters that depend on the rates and length of the cascade, as well as parameters of the input signal. The expressions obtained can be applied to the non-identical case when the deactivation rates are random to capture the variability in the cascade outputs. We also show that cascades can be rearranged so that blocks with similar rates can be lumped and represented through our nonlinear modules. Our results can be used both to represent cascades in computational models of differential equations and to fit data efficiently, by reducing the number of equations and parameters involved. In particular, the length of the cascade appears as a real-valued parameter and can thus be fitted in the same manner as Hill coefficients. Finally, we show how the obtained nonlinear modules can be used instead of delay differential equations to model delays in signal transduction. PMID:27581482

  2. Linear models of activation cascades: analytical solutions and coarse-graining of delayed signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Beguerisse-Díaz, Mariano; Desikan, Radhika; Barahona, Mauricio

    2016-08-01

    Cellular signal transduction usually involves activation cascades, the sequential activation of a series of proteins following the reception of an input signal. Here, we study the classic model of weakly activated cascades and obtain analytical solutions for a variety of inputs. We show that in the special but important case of optimal gain cascades (i.e. when the deactivation rates are identical) the downstream output of the cascade can be represented exactly as a lumped nonlinear module containing an incomplete gamma function with real parameters that depend on the rates and length of the cascade, as well as parameters of the input signal. The expressions obtained can be applied to the non-identical case when the deactivation rates are random to capture the variability in the cascade outputs. We also show that cascades can be rearranged so that blocks with similar rates can be lumped and represented through our nonlinear modules. Our results can be used both to represent cascades in computational models of differential equations and to fit data efficiently, by reducing the number of equations and parameters involved. In particular, the length of the cascade appears as a real-valued parameter and can thus be fitted in the same manner as Hill coefficients. Finally, we show how the obtained nonlinear modules can be used instead of delay differential equations to model delays in signal transduction.

  3. Visual Analytics approach for Lightning data analysis and cell nowcasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Stefan; Meng, Liqiu; Betz, Hans-Dieter

    2013-04-01

    Thunderstorms and their ground effects, such as flash floods, hail, lightning, strong wind and tornadoes, are responsible for most weather damages (Bonelli & Marcacci 2008). Thus to understand, identify, track and predict lightning cells is essential. An important aspect for decision makers is an appropriate visualization of weather analysis results including the representation of dynamic lightning cells. This work focuses on the visual analysis of lightning data and lightning cell nowcasting which aim to detect and understanding spatial-temporal patterns of moving thunderstorms. Lightnings are described by 3D coordinates and the exact occurrence time of lightnings. The three-dimensionally resolved total lightning data used in our experiment are provided by the European lightning detection network LINET (Betz et al. 2009). In all previous works, lightning point data, detected lightning cells and derived cell tracks are visualized in 2D. Lightning cells are either displayed as 2D convex hulls with or without the underlying lightning point data. Due to recent improvements of lightning data detection and accuracy, there is a growing demand on multidimensional and interactive visualization in particular for decision makers. In a first step lightning cells are identified and tracked. Then an interactive graphic user interface (GUI) is developed to investigate the dynamics of the lightning cells: e.g. changes of cell density, location, extension as well as merging and splitting behavior in 3D over time. In particular a space time cube approach is highlighted along with statistical analysis. Furthermore a lightning cell nowcasting is conducted and visualized. The idea thereby is to predict the following cell features for the next 10-60 minutes including location, centre, extension, density, area, volume, lifetime and cell feature probabilities. The main focus will be set to a suitable interactive visualization of the predicted featured within the GUI. The developed visual

  4. A Numerical and Analytic Analysis of Nonlinear Implicit Differential Equations Arising in Control and Circuit Problems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-01-15

    This research project was to develop methods for the numerical and analytic analysis of implicit systems of differential equations, (DAE)- F(x’, z ,t...0 (1) which are not equivalent to an explicit ordinary differential equation (ODE), (ODE) z ’ = G( z , t) (2) That is, the Jacobian Fe of (1) is...structure theorems and a general numerical procedure for the linear time varying DAE E(t)w’(t) + F(t) z (t) = f(t) (3) This numerical algorithm was the

  5. An Analytical Study of Wave Propagation Through Foliage

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-01-01

    suggested a feasibility study to resolve these issues. We feel very strongly LS Pbout the need for a measure•Me.ts program because of the analytical...known fact that one cannot usl the asymptotic cross secticn of a small dielectric sphere to obtain the scattering cross section of a small perfectly

  6. Optimizing an Immersion ESL Curriculum Using Analytic Hierarchy Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tang, Hui-Wen Vivian

    2011-01-01

    The main purpose of this study is to fill a substantial knowledge gap regarding reaching a uniform group decision in English curriculum design and planning. A comprehensive content-based course criterion model extracted from existing literature and expert opinions was developed. Analytical hierarchy process (AHP) was used to identify the relative…

  7. An Evaluation of Cluster Analytic Approaches to Initial Model Specification.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bacon, Donald R.

    2001-01-01

    Evaluated the performance of several alternative cluster analytic approaches to initial model specification using population parameter analyses and a Monte Carlo simulation. Of the six cluster approaches evaluated, the one using the correlations of item correlations as a proximity metric and average linking as a clustering algorithm performed the…

  8. Distributed Revisiting: An Analytic for Retention of Coherent Science Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Svihla, Vanessa; Wester, Michael J.; Linn, Marcia C.

    2015-01-01

    Designing learning experiences that support the development of coherent understanding of complex scientific phenomena is challenging. We sought to identify analytics that can also guide such designs to support retention of coherent understanding. Based on prior research that distributing study of material over time supports retention, we explored…

  9. An Analytical Solution for Transient Thermal Response of an Insulated Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blosser, Max L.

    2012-01-01

    An analytical solution was derived for the transient response of an insulated aerospace vehicle structure subjected to a simplified heat pulse. This simplified problem approximates the thermal response of a thermal protection system of an atmospheric entry vehicle. The exact analytical solution is solely a function of two non-dimensional parameters. A simpler function of these two parameters was developed to approximate the maximum structural temperature over a wide range of parameter values. Techniques were developed to choose constant, effective properties to represent the relevant temperature and pressure-dependent properties for the insulator and structure. A technique was also developed to map a time-varying surface temperature history to an equivalent square heat pulse. Using these techniques, the maximum structural temperature rise was calculated using the analytical solutions and shown to typically agree with finite element simulations within 10 to 20 percent over the relevant range of parameters studied.

  10. An analytical approach to customer requirement information processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zude; Xiao, Zheng; Liu, Quan; Ai, Qingsong

    2013-11-01

    'Customer requirements' (CRs) management is a key component of customer relationship management (CRM). By processing customer-focused information, CRs management plays an important role in enterprise systems (ESs). Although two main CRs analysis methods, quality function deployment (QFD) and Kano model, have been applied to many fields by many enterprises in the past several decades, the limitations such as complex processes and operations make them unsuitable for online businesses among small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs). Currently, most SMEs do not have the resources to implement QFD or Kano model. In this article, we propose a method named customer requirement information (CRI), which provides a simpler and easier way for SMEs to run CRs analysis. The proposed method analyses CRs from the perspective of information and applies mathematical methods to the analysis process. A detailed description of CRI's acquisition, classification and processing is provided.

  11. An Analysis of an Automatic Coolant Bypass in the International Space Station Node 2 Internal Active Thermal Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clanton, Stephen E.; Holt, James M.; Turner, Larry D. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A challenging part of International Space Station (ISS) thermal control design is the ability to incorporate design changes into an integrated system without negatively impacting performance. The challenge presents itself in that the typical ISS Internal Active Thermal Control System (IATCS) consists of an integrated hardware/software system that provides active coolant resources to a variety of users. Software algorithms control the IATCS to specific temperatures, flow rates, and pressure differentials in order to meet the user-defined requirements. What may seem to be small design changes imposed on the system may in fact result in system instability or the temporary inability to meet user requirements. The purpose of this paper is to provide a brief description of the solution process and analyses used to implement one such design change that required the incorporation of an automatic coolant bypass in the ISS Node 2 element.

  12. ICRPG WORKING GROUP ON ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY ROUND ROBIN NO. 22 -- EUDIOMETRIC ANALYSIS OF POWDERED ALUMINUM,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Analytical Chemistry voted to conduct a round robin to estimate the interlaboratory reproducibility. The round robin was designed to facilitate statistical analysis of the data. Three samples representing different purity levels as

  13. Reinforcement learning models and their neural correlates: An activation likelihood estimation meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Chase, Henry W; Kumar, Poornima; Eickhoff, Simon B; Dombrovski, Alexandre Y

    2015-06-01

    Reinforcement learning describes motivated behavior in terms of two abstract signals. The representation of discrepancies between expected and actual rewards/punishments-prediction error-is thought to update the expected value of actions and predictive stimuli. Electrophysiological and lesion studies have suggested that mesostriatal prediction error signals control behavior through synaptic modification of cortico-striato-thalamic networks. Signals in the ventromedial prefrontal and orbitofrontal cortex are implicated in representing expected value. To obtain unbiased maps of these representations in the human brain, we performed a meta-analysis of functional magnetic resonance imaging studies that had employed algorithmic reinforcement learning models across a variety of experimental paradigms. We found that the ventral striatum (medial and lateral) and midbrain/thalamus represented reward prediction errors, consistent with animal studies. Prediction error signals were also seen in the frontal operculum/insula, particularly for social rewards. In Pavlovian studies, striatal prediction error signals extended into the amygdala, whereas instrumental tasks engaged the caudate. Prediction error maps were sensitive to the model-fitting procedure (fixed or individually estimated) and to the extent of spatial smoothing. A correlate of expected value was found in a posterior region of the ventromedial prefrontal cortex, caudal and medial to the orbitofrontal regions identified in animal studies. These findings highlight a reproducible motif of reinforcement learning in the cortico-striatal loops and identify methodological dimensions that may influence the reproducibility of activation patterns across studies.

  14. Reinforcement Learning Models and Their Neural Correlates: An Activation Likelihood Estimation Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Poornima; Eickhoff, Simon B.; Dombrovski, Alexandre Y.

    2015-01-01

    Reinforcement learning describes motivated behavior in terms of two abstract signals. The representation of discrepancies between expected and actual rewards/punishments – prediction error – is thought to update the expected value of actions and predictive stimuli. Electrophysiological and lesion studies suggest that mesostriatal prediction error signals control behavior through synaptic modification of cortico-striato-thalamic networks. Signals in the ventromedial prefrontal and orbitofrontal cortex are implicated in representing expected value. To obtain unbiased maps of these representations in the human brain, we performed a meta-analysis of functional magnetic resonance imaging studies that employed algorithmic reinforcement learning models, across a variety of experimental paradigms. We found that the ventral striatum (medial and lateral) and midbrain/thalamus represented reward prediction errors, consistent with animal studies. Prediction error signals were also seen in the frontal operculum/insula, particularly for social rewards. In Pavlovian studies, striatal prediction error signals extended into the amygdala, while instrumental tasks engaged the caudate. Prediction error maps were sensitive to the model-fitting procedure (fixed or individually-estimated) and to the extent of spatial smoothing. A correlate of expected value was found in a posterior region of the ventromedial prefrontal cortex, caudal and medial to the orbitofrontal regions identified in animal studies. These findings highlight a reproducible motif of reinforcement learning in the cortico-striatal loops and identify methodological dimensions that may influence the reproducibility of activation patterns across studies. PMID:25665667

  15. Gray matter atrophy in narcolepsy: An activation likelihood estimation meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Weng, Hsu-Huei; Chen, Chih-Feng; Tsai, Yuan-Hsiung; Wu, Chih-Ying; Lee, Meng; Lin, Yu-Ching; Yang, Cheng-Ta; Tsai, Ying-Huang; Yang, Chun-Yuh

    2015-12-01

    The authors reviewed the literature on the use of voxel-based morphometry (VBM) in narcolepsy magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies via the use of a meta-analysis of neuroimaging to identify concordant and specific structural deficits in patients with narcolepsy as compared with healthy subjects. We used PubMed to retrieve articles published between January 2000 and March 2014. The authors included all VBM research on narcolepsy and compared the findings of the studies by using gray matter volume (GMV) or gray matter concentration (GMC) to index differences in gray matter. Stereotactic data were extracted from 8 VBM studies of 149 narcoleptic patients and 162 control subjects. We applied activation likelihood estimation (ALE) technique and found significant regional gray matter reduction in the bilateral hypothalamus, thalamus, globus pallidus, extending to nucleus accumbens (NAcc) and anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), left mid orbital and rectal gyri (BAs 10 and 11), right inferior frontal gyrus (BA 47), and the right superior temporal gyrus (BA 41) in patients with narcolepsy. The significant gray matter deficits in narcoleptic patients occurred in the bilateral hypothalamus and frontotemporal regions, which may be related to the emotional processing abnormalities and orexin/hypocretin pathway common among populations of patients with narcolepsy.

  16. Oppression, freedom, and recognition in an analytic therapy group: group and therapist interactions from relational and group analytic perspectives.

    PubMed

    Peleg, Ido

    2012-07-01

    Group analytic and relational writings point to the development of mutual recognition between individuals as a main treatment goal. To achieve this, it is necessary to face up to issues of control and oppression in the therapeutic relationship, particularly as enacted by the therapist. The relationship between the therapist and group members is a co-construction, shaped by their respective subjectivities. The therapist's willingness to enter into an open examination of his or her enactments can stimulate change in relationships with patients, resulting in freer and more spontaneous communication in the group. To illustrate, several sessions of an analytic therapy group are presented in which there were struggles between (1) the desire for equality and mutuality and (2) firm exercise of authority.

  17. Advances in Analytical and Numerical Dispersion Modeling of Pollutants Releasing from an Area-source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nimmatoori, Praneeth

    The air quality near agricultural activities such as tilling, plowing, harvesting, and manure application is of main concern because they release fine particulate matter into the atmosphere. These releases are modeled as area-sources in the air quality modeling research. None of the currently available dispersion models relate and incorporate physical characteristics and meteorological conditions for modeling the dispersion and deposition of particulates emitting from such area-sources. This knowledge gap was addressed by developing the advanced analytical and numerical methods for modeling the dispersion of particulate matter. The development, application, and evaluation of new dispersion modeling methods are discussed in detail in this dissertation. In the analytical modeling, a ground-level area source analytical dispersion model known as particulate matter deposition -- PMD was developed for predicting the concentrations of different particle sizes. Both the particle dynamics (particle physical characteristics) and meteorological conditions which have significant effect on the dispersion of particulates were related and incorporated in the PMD model using the formulations of particle gravitational settling and dry deposition velocities. The modeled particle size concentrations of the PMD model were evaluated statistically after applying it to particulates released from a biosolid applied agricultural field. The evaluation of the PMD model using the statistical criteria concluded effective and successful inclusion of dry deposition theory for modeling particulate matter concentrations. A comprehensive review of analytical area-source dispersion models, which do not account for dry deposition and treat pollutants as gases, was conducted and determined three models -- the Shear, the Parker, and the Smith. A statistical evaluation of these dispersion models was conducted after applying them to two different field data sets and the statistical results concluded that

  18. Analysis of 10B by PIGE with factor analytical gamma-ray peak identification.

    PubMed

    Savolainen, S; Räisänen, J; Eteläniemi, V; Abo Ramadan, U A; Kallio, M

    1995-09-01

    Studying the biodistribution of boronated compounds for B neutron capture therapy (BNCT) requires the accurate detection of low levels of boron (10B) in biological samples. Proton induced gamma-ray emission analysis (PIGE) of 10B was found to be viable in a study of low density lipoprotein (LDL), in tissue and blood samples. However, the method is sensitive to Na present in the samples and can therefore not be used for accurate measurements of 10B concentrations below 5 ppm in samples containing Na. PIGE can be considered to be an appropriate reference method for chemical B analysis. The factor analytical method presented here is the most objective way to separate Na and B peaks from each other, and the factorizing method can be applied in different forms of spectral analysis.

  19. A Survey of Risk Analytics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picoult, Evan

    2003-03-01

    Risk Analytical Units within Wall Street firms are responsible for developing the methods used to quantify the different forms of risk inherent in the firms' activities. This talk is an overview of risk analytics. It will cover: the function and validation of valuation models; the measurement of market risk; and the measurement of the different aspects of and forms of credit risk, including the simulation of the potential counterparty credit exposure of derivatives, the estimation of obligor default probability and the simulation of the potential loss distribution of loan portfolios. Risk Analytics is an applied field that integrates finance theory, mathematics and statistical analysis. It is a field in that has attracted many physicists and one in which many physicists have flourished. The talk will conclude with an analysis of why this is so.

  20. Recovery of soil unicellular eukaryotes: an efficiency and activity analysis on the single cell level.

    PubMed

    Lentendu, Guillaume; Hübschmann, Thomas; Müller, Susann; Dunker, Susanne; Buscot, François; Wilhelm, Christian

    2013-12-01

    Eukaryotic unicellular organisms are an important part of the soil microbial community, but they are often neglected in soil functional microbial diversity analysis, principally due to the absence of specific investigation methods in the special soil environment. In this study we used a method based on high-density centrifugation to specifically isolate intact algal and yeast cells, with the aim to analyze them with flow cytometry and sort them for further molecular analysis such as deep sequencing. Recovery efficiency was tested at low abundance levels that fit those in natural environments (10(4) to 10(6) cells per g soil). Five algae and five yeast morphospecies isolated from soil were used for the testing. Recovery efficiency was between 1.5 to 43.16% and 2 to 30.2%, respectively, and was dependent on soil type for three of the algae. Control treatments without soil showed that the majority of cells were lost due to the method itself (58% and 55.8% respectively). However, the cell extraction technique did not much compromise cell vitality because a fluorescein di-acetate assay indicated high viability percentages (73.3% and 97.2% of cells, respectively). The low abundant algae and yeast morphospecies recovered from soil were cytometrically analyzed and sorted. Following, their DNA was isolated and amplified using specific primers. The developed workflow enables isolation and enrichment of intact autotrophic and heterotrophic soil unicellular eukaryotes from natural environments for subsequent application of deep sequencing technologies.

  1. Analytical quality of environmental analysis: Recent results and future trends of the IAEA-ILMR's Analytical Quality Control Program

    SciTech Connect

    Ballestra, S.; Vas, D.; Holm, E.; Lopez, J.J.; Parsi, P. )

    1988-01-01

    The Analytical Quality Control Services Program of the IAEA-ILMR covers a wide variety of intercalibration and reference materials. The purpose of the program is to ensure the comparability of the results obtained by the different participants and to enable laboratories engaged in low-level analyses of marine environmental materials to control their analytical performance. Within the past five years, the International Laboratory of Marine Radioactivity in Monaco has organized eight intercomparison exercises, on a world-wide basis, on natural materials of marine origin comprising sea water, sediment, seaweed and fish flesh. Results on artificial (fission and activation products, transuranium elements) and natural radionuclides were compiled and evaluated. Reference concentration values were established for a number of the intercalibration samples allowing them to become certified as reference materials available for general distribution. The results of the fish flesh sample and those of the deep-sea sediment are reviewed. The present status of three on-going intercomparison exercises on post-Chernobyl samples IAEA-306 (Baltic Sea sediment), IAEA-307 (Mediterranean sea-plant Posidonia oceanica) and IAEA-308 (Mediterranean mixed seaweed) is also described. 1 refs., 4 tabs.

  2. Real-time analysis for intensive care: development and deployment of the artemis analytic system.

    PubMed

    Blount, Marion; Ebling, Maria R; Eklund, J Mikael; James, Andrew G; McGregor, Carolyn; Percival, Nathan; Smith, Kathleen P; Sow, Daby

    2010-01-01

    The lives of many thousands of children born premature or ill at term around the world have been saved by those who work within neonatal intensive care units (NICUs). Modern-day neonatologists, together with nursing staff and other specialists within this domain, enjoy modern technologies for activities such as financial transactions, online purchasing, music, and video on demand. Yet, when they move into their workspace, in many cases, they are supported by nearly the same technology they used 20 years ago. Medical devices provide visual displays of vital signs through physiological streams such as electrocardiogram (ECG), heart rate, blood oxygen saturation (SpO(2)), and respiratory rate. Electronic health record initiatives around the world provide an environment for the electronic management of medical records, but they fail to support the high-frequency interpretation of streaming physiological data. We have taken a collaborative research approach to address this need to provide a flexible platform for the real-time online analysis of patients' data streams to detect medically significant conditions that precede the onset of medical complications. The platform supports automated or clinician-driven knowledge discovery to discover new relationships between physiological data stream events and latent medical conditions as well as to refine existing analytics. Patients benefit from the system because earlier detection of signs of the medical conditions may lead to earlier intervention that may potentially lead to improved patient outcomes and reduced length of stays. The clinician benefits from a decision support tool that provides insight into multiple streams of data that are too voluminous to assess with traditional methods. The remainder of this article summarizes the strengths of our research collaboration and the resulting environment known as Artemis, which is currently being piloted within the NICU of The Hospital for Sick Children (SickKids) in Toronto

  3. A MULTI-WAVELENGTH ANALYSIS OF NGC 4178: A BULGELESS GALAXY WITH AN ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS

    SciTech Connect

    Secrest, N. J.; Satyapal, S.; Gliozzi, M.; Moran, S. M.; Cheung, C. C.; Giroletti, M.; Bergmann, M. P.; Seth, A. C.

    2013-11-10

    We present Gemini longslit optical spectroscopy and Very Large Array radio observations of the nuclear region of NGC 4178, a late-type bulgeless disk galaxy recently confirmed to host an active galactic nucleus (AGN) through infrared and X-ray observations. Our observations reveal that the dynamical center of the galaxy is coincident with the location of the Chandra X-ray point source discovered in a previous work, providing further support for the presence of an AGN. While the X-ray and IR observations provide robust evidence for an AGN, the optical spectrum shows no evidence for the AGN, underscoring the need for the penetrative power of mid-IR and X-ray observations in finding buried or weak AGNs in this class of galaxy. Finally, the upper limit to the radio flux, together with our previous X-ray and IR results, is consistent with the scenario in which NGC 4178 harbors a deeply buried AGN accreting at a high rate.

  4. Day Services for People with Profound Intellectual and Multiple Disabilities: An Analysis of Thematically Organized Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Putten, Annette; Vlaskamp, Carla

    2011-01-01

    One of the recent ideas to emerge in the Netherlands for improving the quality of activities provided for people with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities is to organize these activities thematically. Among the expected effects was that more activities with a greater variety would be provided and more attention would be offered to each…

  5. A Critical Analysis of Active Learning and an Alternative Pedagogical Framework for Introductory Information Systems Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drake, John R.

    2012-01-01

    Active learning has been championed in academic circles as the pedagogical fix to boring lectures typically found in introduction to information systems courses. However, the literature on active learning is mixed. In this paper, we critically examine active learning research and discover a misplaced emphasis leading to paradoxical findings in…

  6. Physically Active Adults: An Analysis of the Key Variables That Keep Them Moving

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Downs, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Background: A large proportion of adults are insufficiently physically active, and researchers have yet to determine the factors that enable individuals to maintain adequate levels of physical activity throughout adulthood. Purpose: This study sought to identify the key variables linked with consistent physical activity in adulthood as elucidated…

  7. Student Activism as an Agent of Social Change: A Phenomenological Analysis of Contemporary Campus Unrest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhoads, Robert A.

    This study of student activism as a campus phenomenon analyzed over 200 major incidents of college student activism. Most of the incidents were associated with racial struggle, women's concerns or gay liberation activities. These represent what have been called "cultural wars,""campus wars,""identity wars," or "multicultural unrest." Five cases…

  8. An improved analytical strategy combining microextraction by packed sorbent combined with ultra high pressure liquid chromatography for the determination of fluoxetine, clomipramine and their active metabolites in human urine.

    PubMed

    Alves, Vera; Gonçalves, João; Conceição, Carlota; Teixeira, Helena M; Câmara, José S

    2015-08-21

    A powerful and sensitive method, by microextraction packed sorbent (MEPS), and ultra-high performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC) with a photodiode array (PDA) detection, is described for the determination of fluoxetine, clomipramine and their active metabolites in human urine samples. The MEPS variables, such as sample volume, pH, number of extraction cycles (draw-eject), and desorption conditions (solvent and solvent volume of elution) were optimized. The analysis were carried out using small sample volumes (500μL) and in a short time period (5min for the entire sample preparation step). Good linearity was obtained for all antidepressants with the correlation coefficients (R(2)) above 0.9965. The limits of detection (LOD) ranged from 0.068 to 0.087μgmL(-1). The recoveries were from 93% to 98%, with relative standard deviations less than 6%. The inter-day precision, expressed as the relative standard deviation, varied between 3.8% and 8.5% while the intra-day precision between 3.0% and 7.1%. In order to evaluate the proposed method for clinical use, the MEPS/UHPLC-PDA method was applied to analysis of urine samples from depressed patients.

  9. An analytical procedure for evaluating shuttle abort staging aerodynamic characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, R.

    1973-01-01

    An engineering analysis and computer code (AERSEP) for predicting Space Shuttle Orbiter - HO Tank longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics during abort separation has been developed. Computed results are applicable at Mach numbers above 2 for angle-of-attack between plus or minus 10 degrees. No practical restrictions on orbiter-tank relative positioning are indicated for tank-under-orbiter configurations. Input data requirements and computer running times are minimal facilitating program use for parametric studies, test planning, and trajectory analysis. In a majority of cases AERSEP Orbiter-Tank interference predictions are as accurate as state-of-the-art estimates for interference-free or isolated-vehicle configurations. AERSEP isolated-orbiter predictions also show excellent correlation with data.

  10. The Policy Dystopia Model: An Interpretive Analysis of Tobacco Industry Political Activity

    PubMed Central

    Ulucanlar, Selda; Fooks, Gary J.; Gilmore, Anna B.

    2016-01-01

    Background Tobacco industry interference has been identified as the greatest obstacle to the implementation of evidence-based measures to reduce tobacco use. Understanding and addressing industry interference in public health policy-making is therefore crucial. Existing conceptualisations of corporate political activity (CPA) are embedded in a business perspective and do not attend to CPA’s social and public health costs; most have not drawn on the unique resource represented by internal tobacco industry documents. Building on this literature, including systematic reviews, we develop a critically informed conceptual model of tobacco industry political activity. Methods and Findings We thematically analysed published papers included in two systematic reviews examining tobacco industry influence on taxation and marketing of tobacco; we included 45 of 46 papers in the former category and 20 of 48 papers in the latter (n = 65). We used a grounded theory approach to build taxonomies of “discursive” (argument-based) and “instrumental” (action-based) industry strategies and from these devised the Policy Dystopia Model, which shows that the industry, working through different constituencies, constructs a metanarrative to argue that proposed policies will lead to a dysfunctional future of policy failure and widely dispersed adverse social and economic consequences. Simultaneously, it uses diverse, interlocking insider and outsider instrumental strategies to disseminate this narrative and enhance its persuasiveness in order to secure its preferred policy outcomes. Limitations are that many papers were historical (some dating back to the 1970s) and focused on high-income regions. Conclusions The model provides an evidence-based, accessible way of understanding diverse corporate political strategies. It should enable public health actors and officials to preempt these strategies and develop realistic assessments of the industry’s claims. PMID:27649386

  11. 2D CFD Analysis of an Airfoil with Active Continuous Trailing Edge Flap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaksich, Dylan; Shen, Jinwei

    2014-11-01

    Efficient and quieter helicopter rotors can be achieved through on-blade control devices, such as active Continuous Trailing-Edge Flaps driven by embedded piezoelectric material. This project aims to develop a CFD simulation tool to predict the aerodynamic characteristics of an airfoil with CTEF using open source code: OpenFOAM. Airfoil meshes used by OpenFOAM are obtained with MATLAB scripts. Once created it is possible to rotate the airfoil to various angles of attack. When the airfoil is properly set up various OpenFOAM properties, such as kinematic viscosity and flow velocity, are altered to achieve the desired testing conditions. Upon completion of a simulation, the program gives the lift, drag, and moment coefficients as well as the pressure and velocity around the airfoil. The simulation is then repeated across multiple angles of attack to give full lift and drag curves. The results are then compared to previous test data and other CFD predictions. This research will lead to further work involving quasi-steady 2D simulations incorporating NASTRAN to model aeroelastic deformation and eventually to 3D aeroelastic simulations. NSF ECE Grant #1358991 supported the first author as an REU student.

  12. An Exploratory Analysis of the Potential Association Between SCI Secondary Health Conditions and Daily Activities

    PubMed Central

    Cobb, John; Dumont, Frédéric S.; Leblond, Jean; Park, So Eyun; Noonan, Vanessa K.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Secondary health conditions (SHCs) are common following traumatic spinal cord injury (tSCI) and are believed to influence a person’s ability to participate in daily activities (DAs). This association should be understood so that health care providers may target interventions with clarity and purpose to manage SHCs and facilitate DAs to maximal effect. Objective: To explore the association between SHCs and DAs expressed as the increased chance of not participating as much as wanted in a DA when an SHC is present. Methods: Community-dwelling persons with tSCI (n = 1,137) responded to the SCI Community Survey. The occurrence and frequency of 21 SHCs were determined. The extent of participation in 26 DAs was measured. The relative risk (RR) of not participating as much as wanted in a DA when a SHC is present was calculated. Results: When some SHC were present, the RR of not participating as much as wanted increased significantly (range, 15%-153%; P < .001). Certain SHCs (light-headedness/dizziness, fatigue, weight problems, constipation, shoulder problems) were associated with a greater chance of not participating in many DAs. No single SHC was associated with every DA and conversely not every DA was associated with an SHC. Conclusions: Maximizing participation in DAs requires minimizing SHCs in every instance. Understanding the association between SHCs and DAs may facilitate targeted care resulting in less severe SHCs, greater participation in DAs, and benefits to both the individual and society. PMID:25477741

  13. An explicit closed-form analytical solution for European options under the CGMY model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wenting; Du, Meiyu; Xu, Xiang

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we consider the analytical pricing of European path-independent options under the CGMY model, which is a particular type of pure jump Le´vy process, and agrees well with many observed properties of the real market data by allowing the diffusions and jumps to have both finite and infinite activity and variation. It is shown that, under this model, the option price is governed by a fractional partial differential equation (FPDE) with both the left-side and right-side spatial-fractional derivatives. In comparison to derivatives of integer order, fractional derivatives at a point not only involve properties of the function at that particular point, but also the information of the function in a certain subset of the entire domain of definition. This "globalness" of the fractional derivatives has added an additional degree of difficulty when either analytical methods or numerical solutions are attempted. Albeit difficult, we still have managed to derive an explicit closed-form analytical solution for European options under the CGMY model. Based on our solution, the asymptotic behaviors of the option price and the put-call parity under the CGMY model are further discussed. Practically, a reliable numerical evaluation technique for the current formula is proposed. With the numerical results, some analyses of impacts of four key parameters of the CGMY model on European option prices are also provided.

  14. Two-condition within-participant statistical mediation analysis: A path-analytic framework.

    PubMed

    Montoya, Amanda K; Hayes, Andrew F

    2017-03-01

    Researchers interested in testing mediation often use designs where participants are measured on a dependent variable Y and a mediator M in both of 2 different circumstances. The dominant approach to assessing mediation in such a design, proposed by Judd, Kenny, and McClelland (2001), relies on a series of hypothesis tests about components of the mediation model and is not based on an estimate of or formal inference about the indirect effect. In this article we recast Judd et al.'s approach in the path-analytic framework that is now commonly used in between-participant mediation analysis. By so doing, it is apparent how to estimate the indirect effect of a within-participant manipulation on some outcome through a mediator as the product of paths of influence. This path-analytic approach eliminates the need for discrete hypothesis tests about components of the model to support a claim of mediation, as Judd et al.'s method requires, because it relies only on an inference about the product of paths-the indirect effect. We generalize methods of inference for the indirect effect widely used in between-participant designs to this within-participant version of mediation analysis, including bootstrap confidence intervals and Monte Carlo confidence intervals. Using this path-analytic approach, we extend the method to models with multiple mediators operating in parallel and serially and discuss the comparison of indirect effects in these more complex models. We offer macros and code for SPSS, SAS, and Mplus that conduct these analyses. (PsycINFO Database Record

  15. An analytical solution for curved piezoelectric micromachined ultrasonic transducers with spherically shaped diaphragms.

    PubMed

    Sammoura, Firas; Akhbari, Sina; Lin, Liwei

    2014-09-01

    An analytical solution for piezoelectrically actuated spherically shaped diaphragms has been developed to study their dynamic behavior with targeted applications in piezoelectric micromachined ultrasonic transducers (pMUT). The analytical model starts with a curved pMUT composed of a piezoelectric diaphragm with a nominal radius in size, a radius of curvature in shape, and under both possible actuation sources of radial pressure and electric potential. The diaphragm has the piezoelectric material polarized in the direction perpendicular to its surface and sandwiched between two metal electrodes. When an electric field is applied between the two electrodes, the in-plane piezoelectric strain can cause larger out-of-plane deflections than a flat unimorph piezoelectric diaphragm because of the diaphragm's spherical curvature with a clamped periphery for high electromechanical coupling factor. Key performance parameters, including mechanical mode shapes, resonant frequencies, dynamic responses, and displacements, with respect to the curvature and size of the diaphragm have been investigated. Both analytical derivations and numerical simulations using finite element analysis have been performed for the optimal design of the electromechanical coupling factor, with varying factors such as mechanical resonant frequency, radius of curvature, nominal radius, and thickness. As such, this work provides theoretical foundations for the design of curved pMUTs with high electromechanical coupling factor compared with planar-shape pMUTs.

  16. Analytical and Experimental Vibration Analysis of a Faulty Gear System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choy, F. K.; Braun, M. J.; Polyshchuk, V.; Zakrajsek, J. J.; Townsend, D. P.; Handschuh, R. F.

    1994-01-01

    A comprehensive analytical procedure was developed for predicting faults in gear transmission systems under normal operating conditions. A gear tooth fault model is developed to simulate the effects of pitting and wear on the vibration signal under normal operating conditions. The model uses changes in the gear mesh stiffness to simulate the effects of gear tooth faults. The overall dynamics of the gear transmission system is evaluated by coupling the dynamics of each individual gear-rotor system through gear mesh forces generated between each gear-rotor system and the bearing forces generated between the rotor and the gearbox structure. The predicted results were compared with experimental results obtained from a spiral bevel gear fatigue test rig at NASA Lewis Research Center. The Wigner-Ville distribution (WVD) was used to give a comprehensive comparison of the predicted and experimental results. The WVD method applied to the experimental results were also compared to other fault detection techniques to verify the WVD's ability to detect the pitting damage, and to determine its relative performance. Overall results show good correlation between the experimental vibration data of the damaged test gear and the predicted vibration from the model with simulated gear tooth pitting damage. Results also verified that the WVD method can successfully detect and locate gear tooth wear and pitting damage.

  17. An analytical study for the design of advanced rotor airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kemp, L. D.

    1973-01-01

    A theoretical study has been conducted to design and evaluate two airfoils for helicopter rotors. The best basic shape, designed with a transonic hodograph design method, was modified to meet subsonic criteria. One airfoil had an additional constraint for low pitching-moment at the transonic design point. Airfoil characteristics were predicted. Results of a comparative analysis of helicopter performance indicate that the new airfoils will produce reduced rotor power requirements compared to the NACA 0012. The hodograph design method, written in CDC Algol, is listed and described.

  18. An Analytical State Transition Matrix for Orbits Perturbed by an Oblate Spheroid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, A. C.

    1977-01-01

    An analytical state transition matrix and its inverse, which include the short period and secular effects of the second zonal harmonic, were developed from the nonsingular PS satellite theory. The fact that the independent variable in the PS theory is not time is in no respect disadvantageous, since any explicit analytical solution must be expressed in the true or eccentric anomaly. This is shown to be the case for the simple conic matrix. The PS theory allows for a concise, accurate, and algorithmically simple state transition matrix. The improvement over the conic matrix ranges from 2 to 4 digits accuracy.

  19. An analytic model for footprint dispersions and its application to mission design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, J. R. Jagannatha; Chen, Yi-Chao

    1992-01-01

    This is the final report on our recent research activities that are complementary to those conducted by our colleagues, Professor Farrokh Mistree and students, in the context of the Taguchi method. We have studied the mathematical model that forms the basis of the Simulation and Optimization of Rocket Trajectories (SORT) program and developed an analytic method for determining mission reliability with a reduced number of flight simulations. This method can be incorporated in a design algorithm to mathematically optimize different performance measures of a mission, thus leading to a robust and easy-to-use methodology for mission planning and design.

  20. Analytical solution for the wind-driven circulation in a lake containing an island

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, M. E.; Gedney, R. T.

    1971-01-01

    An analysis was carried out to determine analytically the effect of an island on the wind driven currents in a shallow lake (or sea). A general analysis is developed that can be applied to a large class of lake and island geometries and bottom topographies. Detailed numerical results are obtained for a circular island located eccentrically or concentrically in a circular lake with a logarithmic bottom topography. It is shown that an island can produce volume flow (vertically integrated velocities) gyres that are completely different from those produced by a normal basin without an island. These gyres in the neighborhood of the island will produce different velocity patterns, which include the acceleration of flow near the island shore.

  1. Fitting It All In: Adapting a Green Chemistry Extraction Experiment for Inclusion in an Undergraduate Analytical Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buckley, Heather L.; Beck, Annelise R.; Mulvihill, Martin J.; Douskey, Michelle C.

    2013-01-01

    Several principles of green chemistry are introduced through this experiment designed for use in the undergraduate analytical chemistry laboratory. An established experiment of liquid CO2 extraction of D-limonene has been adapted to include a quantitative analysis by gas chromatography. This facilitates drop-in incorporation of an exciting…

  2. Cortical Midline Structures and Autobiographical-Self Processes: An Activation-Likelihood Estimation Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Araujo, Helder F.; Kaplan, Jonas; Damasio, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    The autobiographical-self refers to a mental state derived from the retrieval and assembly of memories regarding one’s biography. The process of retrieval and assembly, which can focus on biographical facts or personality traits or some combination thereof, is likely to vary according to the domain chosen for an experiment. To date, the investigation of the neural basis of this process has largely focused on the domain of personality traits using paradigms that contrasted the evaluation of one’s traits (self-traits) with those of another person’s (other-traits). This has led to the suggestion that cortical midline structures (CMSs) are specifically related to self states. Here, with the goal of testing this suggestion, we conducted activation-likelihood estimation (ALE) meta-analyses based on data from 28 neuroimaging studies. The ALE results show that both self-traits and other-traits engage CMSs; however, the engagement of medial prefrontal cortex is greater for self-traits than for other-traits, while the posteromedial cortex is more engaged for other-traits than for self-traits. These findings suggest that the involvement CMSs is not specific to the evaluation of one’s own traits, but also occurs during the evaluation of another person’s traits. PMID:24027520

  3. High-resolution seismic structure analysis of an active submarine mud volcano area off SW Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Hsiao-Shan; Hsu, Shu-Kun; Tsai, Wan-Lin; Tsai, Ching-Hui; Lin, Shin-Yi; Chen, Song-Chuen

    2015-04-01

    In order to better understand the subsurface structure related to an active mud volcano MV1 and to understand their relationship with gas hydrate/cold seep formation, we conducted deep-towed side-scan sonar (SSS), sub-bottom profiler (SBP), multibeam echo sounding (MBES), and multi-channel reflection seismic (MCS) surveys off SW Taiwan from 2009 to 2011. As shown in the high-resolution sub-bottom profiler and EK500 sonar data, the detailed structures reveal more gas seeps and gas flares in the study area. In addition, the survey profiles show several submarine landslides occurred near the thrust faults. Based on the MCS results, we can find that the MV1 is located on top of a mud diapiric structure. It indicates that the MV1 has the same source as the associated mud diapir. The blanking of the seismic signal may indicate the conduit for the upward migration of the gas (methane or CO2). Therefore, we suggest that the submarine mud volcano could be due to a deep source of mud compressed by the tectonic convergence. Fluids and argillaceous materials have thus migrated upward along structural faults and reach the seafloor. The gas-charged sediments or gas seeps in sediments thus make the seafloor instable and may trigger submarine landslides.

  4. An Analytical Model of Wave-Induced Longshore Current Based on Power Law Wave Height Decay.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-01-01

    34I ANALYtTICAL MODEL OF NAVE-INDUCED LON6SHORE CURRENT BASED ON PONE* LAW.. (U) COASTAL ENG INEERING RESEAKNH CENTER VICKSBURG NS J N SMITH ET AL...j . - .L .V . : ; * AN ANALYTICAL MODEL OF WAVE-INDUCED ~ z * LONGSHORE CURRENT BASED ON POWER LAW * - WAVE HEIGHT DECAY by Jane McKee...I_ I IF 31592 11. TITLE (Include Security Classfication) • An Analytical Model of Wave-Induced Longshore Current Based on Power Law . Wave

  5. An analytical and experimental evaluation of shadow shields and their support members

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stochl, R. J.; Boyle, R. J.

    1972-01-01

    Experimental tests were performed on a model shadow shield thermal protection system to examine the effect of certain configuration variables. The experimental results were used to verify the ability of an analytical program to predict the shadow shield performance including the shield-support interaction. In general, the analysis (assuming diffuse surfaces) agreed well with the experimental support temperature profiles. The agreement for the shield profiles was not as good. The results demonstrated: (1) shadow shields can be effective in reducing the heat transfer into cryogenic propellant tanks, and (2) the conductive heat transfer through supports can be reduced by selective surface coatings.

  6. Collective Digital Storytelling: An Activity-Theoretical Analysis of Second Language Learning and Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalyaniwala-Thapliyal, Carmenne

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the collective activity of a group of four students who created a digital story as a teaching resource that was to be used for teaching English as a foreign language. It uncovers and analyzes the actual processes underlining the activity as it unfolds from one stage to another. Four processes, viz., sociocognitive…

  7. Research in Activity: An Analysis of Speed Bumps as Mediational Means

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Witte, Stephen P.; Haas, Christina

    2005-01-01

    This article traces the historical and conceptual development of what is known as activity theory, from Vygotsky and Luria, to A. N. Leontev, to Engestrm, in order to illustrate what I see as two problems with the activity theoretic approach, especially as manifest in the work of Leontev and Engestrm: what I call the boundary and/or focus problem…

  8. An analytically solvable eigenvalue problem for the linear elasticity equations.

    SciTech Connect

    Day, David Minot; Romero, Louis Anthony

    2004-07-01

    Analytic solutions are useful for code verification. Structural vibration codes approximate solutions to the eigenvalue problem for the linear elasticity equations (Navier's equations). Unfortunately the verification method of 'manufactured solutions' does not apply to vibration problems. Verification books (for example [2]) tabulate a few of the lowest modes, but are not useful for computations of large numbers of modes. A closed form solution is presented here for all the eigenvalues and eigenfunctions for a cuboid solid with isotropic material properties. The boundary conditions correspond physically to a greased wall.

  9. Acoustic-resonance spectrometry as a process analytical technology for the quantification of active pharmaceutical ingredient in semi-solids.

    PubMed

    Medendorp, Joseph; Buice, Robert G; Lodder, Robert A

    2006-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to demonstrate acoustic resonance spectrometry (ARS) as an alternative process analytical technology to near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy for the quantification of active pharmaceutical ingradient (API) in semi-solids such as creams, gels, ointments, and lotions. The ARS used for this research was an inexpensive instrument constructed from readily available parts. Acoustic-resonance spectra were collected with a frequency spectrum from 0 to 22.05 KHz. NIR data were collected from 1100 to 2500 nm. Using 1-point net analyte signal (NAS) calibration, NIR for the API (colloidal oatmeal [CO]) gave anr (2) prediction accuracy of 0.971, and a standard error of performance (SEP) of 0.517%CO. ARS for the API resulted in anr (2) of 0.983 and SEP of 0.317%CO. NAS calibration is compared with principal component regression. This research demonstrates that ARS can sometimes outperform NIR spectrometry and can be an effective analytical method for the quantification of API in semi-solids. ARS requires no sample preparation, provides larger penetration depths into lotions than optical techniques, and measures API concentrations faster and more accurately. These results suggest that ARS is a useful process analytical technology (PAT).

  10. An Exchange Structure Analysis of the Development of Online Intercultural Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kitade, Keiko

    2012-01-01

    Internet-mediated intercultural discussions have been adopted for intercultural and second-language learning. However, the notion of community development in this context has received less attention. This study employs exchange structure (ES) analysis (Stubbs, M. (1983). "Discourse analysis." Oxford: Basil Blackwell) to investigate the…

  11. Micro-Crater Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy--an Analytical approach in metals samples

    SciTech Connect

    Piscitelli, Vincent; Gonzalez, Jhanis; Mao Xianglei; Russo, Richard; Fernandez, Alberto

    2008-04-15

    The laser ablation has been increasing its popularity like as technique of chemical analysis. This is due to its great potentiality in the analysis of solid samples. On the way to contributing to the development of the technique, we in this work studied the laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) in conditions of micro ablation for future studies of coverings and micro crates analysis. Craters between 2 and 7 micrometers of diameter were made using an Nd-YAG nanosecond laser in their fundamental emission of 1064 nm. In order to create these craters we use an objective lens of long distance work and 0.45 of numerical aperture. The atomic emission versus the energy of the laser and its effect on the size of craters was study. We found that below 3 micrometers although there was evidence of material removal by the formation of a crater, it was no detectable atomic emission for our instruments. In order to try to understand this, curves of size of crater versus plasma temperature using the Boltzmann distribution graphs taking the Copper emission lines in the visible region were made. In addition calibration curves for Copper and aluminum were made in two different matrices; one of it was a Cu/Zn alloy and the other a Zinc Matrix. The atomic lines Cu I (521.78 nm) and Al I (396.15 nm) was used. From the Calibration curve the analytical limit of detection and other analytical parameters were obtained.

  12. An Analytic Model of Close-Range Blast Fragment Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rottenkolber, Ernst; Arnold, Werner

    2006-07-01

    The effects of blast-fragmentation warheads need to be carefully characterized in a variety of applications like passive and active vehicle protection or hard target defeat and TBM defense. With these applications in mind, we have developed a collection of tools called FI-BLAST (Fast Interface for Blast-Fragment Load Analysis of Structures). In the present paper we describe the essential part of these tools, namely the close range blast-fragment model. The meaning of "close range" is here defined as the standoff to a charge at which blast effects can inflict serious damage on massive structures. In order to quantify our model's range of validity, examples of measured and calculated momentum of bare and confined charges are given in the present paper. Short (L/D = 0.5) and long (L/D = 5) cylindrical charges are included as well as spherical charges. The presented examples demonstrate that the model gives reasonable results in the intended domains of application.

  13. AN ANALYTICAL SOLUTION TO RICHARDS' EQUATIONS FOR A DRAINING SOIL PROFILE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Analytical solutions are developed for the Richards' equation following the analysis of Broadbridge and White. Included here is the solution for drainage and redistribution of a partially or deeply wetted profile. Additionally, infiltration for various initial conditions is exami...

  14. Professional Learning of K-6 Teachers in Science Through Collaborative Action Research: An Activity Theory Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodnough, Karen

    2016-11-01

    Primary/elementary teachers are uniquely positioned in terms of their need for ongoing, science-focused professional development. They are usually generalists, having limited preparation for teaching science, and often do not feel prepared or comfortable in teaching science. In this case study, CHAT or cultural-historical activity theory is used as a lens to examine primary/elementary teachers' activity system as they engaged in a teacher-driven professional development initiative. Teachers engaged in collaborative action research to change their practice, with the objective of making their science teaching more engaging and hands-on for students. A range of qualitative methods and sources such as teacher interviews and reflections, teacher-created artifacts, and researcher observational notes were adopted to gain insight into teacher learning. Outcomes report on how the teachers' activity system changed as they participated in two cycles of collaborative action research and how the contradictions that arose in their activity system became sources of professional growth. Furthermore, this research shows how the framework of activity theory may be used to garner insight into the activity and learning of teachers as both their professional activities and the context change over time.

  15. Defining behavior-environment interactions: translating and developing an experimental and applied behavior-analytic vocabulary in and to the national language.

    PubMed

    Tuomisto, Martti T; Parkkinen, Lauri

    2012-05-01

    Verbal behavior, as in the use of terms, is an important part of scientific activity in general and behavior analysis in particular. Many glossaries and dictionaries of behavior analysis have been published in English, but few in any other language. Here we review the area of behavior analytic terminology, its translations, and development in languages other than English. As an example, we use our own mother tongue, Finnish, which provides a suitable example of the process of translation and development of behavior analytic terminology, because it differs from Indo-European languages and entails specific advantages and challenges in the translation process. We have published three editions of a general dictionary of behavior analysis including 801 terms relevant to the experimental analysis of behavior and applied behavior analysis and one edition of a dictionary of applied and clinical behavior analysis containing 280 terms. Because this work has been important to us, we hope this review will encourage similar work by behavior analysts in other countries whose native language is not English. Behavior analysis as an advanced science deserves widespread international dissemination and proper translations are essential to that goal.

  16. Defining Behavior–Environment Interactions: Translating and Developing an Experimental and Applied Behavior-Analytic Vocabulary in and to the National Language

    PubMed Central

    Tuomisto, Martti T; Parkkinen, Lauri

    2012-01-01

    Verbal behavior, as in the use of terms, is an important part of scientific activity in general and behavior analysis in particular. Many glossaries and dictionaries of behavior analysis have been published in English, but few in any other language. Here we review the area of behavior analytic terminology, its translations, and development in languages other than English. As an example, we use our own mother tongue, Finnish, which provides a suitable example of the process of translation and development of behavior analytic terminology, because it differs from Indo-European languages and entails specific advantages and challenges in the translation process. We have published three editions of a general dictionary of behavior analysis including 801 terms relevant to the experimental analysis of behavior and applied behavior analysis and one edition of a dictionary of applied and clinical behavior analysis containing 280 terms. Because this work has been important to us, we hope this review will encourage similar work by behavior analysts in other countries whose native language is not English. Behavior analysis as an advanced science deserves widespread international dissemination and proper translations are essential to that goal. PMID:22693363

  17. Analytical thresholds and sensitivity: establishing RFU thresholds for forensic DNA analysis.

    PubMed

    Bregu, Joli; Conklin, Danielle; Coronado, Elisse; Terrill, Margaret; Cotton, Robin W; Grgicak, Catherine M

    2013-01-01

    Determining appropriate analytical thresholds (ATs) for forensic DNA analysis is critical to maximize allele detection. In this study, six methods to determine ATs for forensic DNA purposes were examined and compared. Four of the methods rely on analysis of the baseline noise of a number of negatives, while two utilize the relationship between relative fluorescence unit signal and DNA input in the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) derived from a dilution series ranging from 1 to 0.06 ng. Results showed that when a substantial mass of DNA (i.e., >1 ng) was amplified, the baseline noise increased, suggesting the application of an AT derived from negatives should only be applied to samples with low levels of DNA. Further, the number and intensity of these noise peaks increased with increasing injection times, indicating that to maximize the ability to detect alleles, ATs should be validated for each post-PCR procedure employed.

  18. Analysis of heterogeneity in molecular weight and shape by analytical ultracentrifugation using parallel distributed computing.

    PubMed

    Demeler, Borries; Brookes, Emre; Nagel-Steger, Luitgard

    2009-01-01

    A computational approach for fitting sedimentation velocity experiments from an analytical ultracentrifuge in a model-independent fashion is presented. This chapter offers a recipe for obtaining high-resolution information for both the shape and the molecular weight distributions of complex mixtures that are heterogeneous in shape and molecular weight and provides suggestions for experimental design to optimize information content. A combination of three methods is used to find the solution most parsimonious in parameters and to verify the statistical confidence intervals of the determined parameters. A supercomputer implementation with a MySQL database back end is integrated into the UltraScan analysis software. The UltraScan LIMS Web portal is used to perform the calculations through a Web interface. The performance and limitations of the method when employed for the analysis of complex mixtures are demonstrated using both simulated data and experimental data characterizing amyloid aggregation.

  19. Emergent self-regulatory activity among young children during scientific inquiry: An analysis of six kindergarten children

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lomangino, Adrienne Gelpi

    2000-10-01

    This qualitative investigation extends the study of self-regulation to examine young children's developing self-regulated learning competencies. The framework for this research draws upon social cognitive, developmental, and sociocultural perspectives on self-regulation and research on children's scientific thinking. Taking a multiple case study approach, this study examines six kindergarten children's emerging self-regulatory competencies during inquiry-based science instruction. Data were collected during two inquiry-based science programs of study, one pertaining to light and shadow and a second pertaining to motion on inclined planes. Data sources included: videotaped records of the instruction, transcriptions of the videotapes, interviews with the children and teacher, student work, and field notes. Taking an inductive approach to analysis, patterns in the children's activity were identified through a recursive process of defining and refining categories that characterized the children's verbal and behavioral activity. Each case study examines a child's behavior within each phase of the inquiry for evidence of emerging self-regulatory competence. Analysis revealed nascent forms of goal-setting and planning, monitoring, resource management, seeking social assistance, and evaluating. Monitoring activity occurred more frequently than planning or evaluating. For several children, animating materials served to promote motivation. Children's efforts to support peers' activity and monitor the meaning of ongoing discourse contrast with common assumptions about children's attention to others' thinking. Variations in self-regulatory activity were found across phases of instruction. The children exhibited interpersonal self-regulatory efforts, in which monitoring and control of the self was entwined with the activity of others. Joint participation also played a critical role in supporting the metacognitive demands of self-regulation and prompting metacognitive awareness

  20. Visual analytics for multimodal social network analysis: a design study with social scientists.

    PubMed

    Ghani, Sohaib; Kwon, Bum Chul; Lee, Seungyoon; Yi, Ji Soo; Elmqvist, Niklas

    2013-12-01

    Social network analysis (SNA) is becoming increasingly concerned not only with actors and their relations, but also with distinguishing between different types of such entities. For example, social scientists may want to investigate asymmetric relations in organizations with strict chains of command, or incorporate non-actors such as conferences and projects when analyzing coauthorship patterns. Multimodal social networks are those where actors and relations belong to different types, or modes, and multimodal social network analysis (mSNA) is accordingly SNA for such networks. In this paper, we present a design study that we conducted with several social scientist collaborators on how to support mSNA using visual analytics tools. Based on an openended, formative design process, we devised a visual representation called parallel node-link bands (PNLBs) that splits modes into separate bands and renders connections between adjacent ones, similar to the list view in Jigsaw. We then used the tool in a qualitative evaluation involving five social scientists whose feedback informed a second design phase that incorporated additional network metrics. Finally, we conducted a second qualitative evaluation with our social scientist collaborators that provided further insights on the utility of the PNLBs representation and the potential of visual analytics for mSNA.

  1. Neutron activation and other analytical data for plutonic rocks from North America and Africa. National Uranium Resource Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Price, V.; Fay, W.M.; Cook, J.R.

    1982-09-01

    The objective of this report is to retrieve the elements of an analytical study of granites and associated other plutonic rocks which was begun as a part of the U.S. Department of Energy's National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) program. A discussion of the Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) neutron activation analysis system is given so that a user will understand the linmitations of the data. Enough information is given so that an experienced geochemist can clean up the data set to the extent required by any project. The data are generally good as they are presented. It is intended that the data be read from a magnetic tape written to accompany this report. Microfiche tables of the data follow the text. These tables were prepared from data on the tape, and programs which will read the tape are presented in the section THE DATA TAPE. It is our intent to write a later paper which will include a thoroughly scrubbed data set and a technical discussion of results of the study. 1 figure.

  2. tranSMART: An Open Source Knowledge Management and High Content Data Analytics Platform

    PubMed Central

    Scheufele, Elisabeth; Aronzon, Dina; Coopersmith, Robert; McDuffie, Michael T.; Kapoor, Manish; Uhrich, Christopher A.; Avitabile, Jean E.; Liu, Jinlei; Housman, Dan; Palchuk, Matvey B.

    2014-01-01

    The tranSMART knowledge management and high-content analysis platform is a flexible software framework featuring novel research capabilities. It enables analysis of integrated data for the purposes of hypothesis generation, hypothesis validation, and cohort discovery in translational research. tranSMART bridges the prolific world of basic science and clinical practice data at the point of care by merging multiple types of data from disparate sources into a common environment. The application supports data harmonization and integration with analytical pipelines. The application code was released into the open source community in January 2012, with 32 instances in operation. tranSMART’s extensible data model and corresponding data integration processes, rapid data analysis features, and open source nature make it an indispensable tool in translational or clinical research. PMID:25717408

  3. tranSMART: An Open Source Knowledge Management and High Content Data Analytics Platform.

    PubMed

    Scheufele, Elisabeth; Aronzon, Dina; Coopersmith, Robert; McDuffie, Michael T; Kapoor, Manish; Uhrich, Christopher A; Avitabile, Jean E; Liu, Jinlei; Housman, Dan; Palchuk, Matvey B

    2014-01-01

    The tranSMART knowledge management and high-content analysis platform is a flexible software framework featuring novel research capabilities. It enables analysis of integrated data for the purposes of hypothesis generation, hypothesis validation, and cohort discovery in translational research. tranSMART bridges the prolific world of basic science and clinical practice data at the point of care by merging multiple types of data from disparate sources into a common environment. The application supports data harmonization and integration with analytical pipelines. The application code was released into the open source community in January 2012, with 32 instances in operation. tranSMART's extensible data model and corresponding data integration processes, rapid data analysis features, and open source nature make it an indispensable tool in translational or clinical research.

  4. Brain activation in response to randomized visual stimulation as obtained from conjunction and differential analysis: an fMRI study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasaruddin, N. H.; Yusoff, A. N.; Kaur, S.

    2014-11-01

    The objective of this multiple-subjects functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study was to identify the common brain areas that are activated when viewing black-and-white checkerboard pattern stimuli of various shapes, pattern and size and to investigate specific brain areas that are involved in processing static and moving visual stimuli. Sixteen participants viewed the moving (expanding ring, rotating wedge, flipping hour glass and bowtie and arc quadrant) and static (full checkerboard) stimuli during an fMRI scan. All stimuli have black-and-white checkerboard pattern. Statistical parametric mapping (SPM) was used in generating brain activation. Differential analyses were implemented to separately search for areas involved in processing static and moving stimuli. In general, the stimuli of various shapes, pattern and size activated multiple brain areas mostly in the left hemisphere. The activation in the right middle temporal gyrus (MTG) was found to be significantly higher in processing moving visual stimuli as compared to static stimulus. In contrast, the activation in the left calcarine sulcus and left lingual gyrus were significantly higher for static stimulus as compared to moving stimuli. Visual stimulation of various shapes, pattern and size used in this study indicated left lateralization of activation. The involvement of the right MTG in processing moving visual information was evident from differential analysis, while the left calcarine sulcus and left lingual gyrus are the areas that are involved in the processing of static visual stimulus.

  5. An analytical approach for the Propagation Saw Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedetti, Lorenzo; Fischer, Jan-Thomas; Gaume, Johan

    2016-04-01

    The Propagation Saw Test (PST) [1, 2] is an experimental in-situ technique that has been introduced to assess crack propagation propensity in weak snowpack layers buried below cohesive snow slabs. This test attracted the interest of a large number of practitioners, being relatively easy to perform and providing useful insights for the evaluation of snow instability. The PST procedure requires isolating a snow column of 30 centimeters of width and -at least-1 meter in the downslope direction. Then, once the stratigraphy is known (e.g. from a manual snow profile), a saw is used to cut a weak layer which could fail, potentially leading to the release of a slab avalanche. If the length of the saw cut reaches the so-called critical crack length, the onset of crack propagation occurs. Furthermore, depending on snow properties, the crack in the weak layer can initiate the fracture and detachment of the overlying slab. Statistical studies over a large set of field data confirmed the relevance of the PST, highlighting the positive correlation between test results and the likelihood of avalanche release [3]. Recent works provided key information on the conditions for the onset of crack propagation [4] and on the evolution of slab displacement during the test [5]. In addition, experimental studies [6] and simplified models [7] focused on the qualitative description of snowpack properties leading to different failure types, namely full propagation or fracture arrest (with or without slab fracture). However, beside current numerical studies utilizing discrete elements methods [8], only little attention has been devoted to a detailed analytical description of the PST able to give a comprehensive mechanical framework of the sequence of processes involved in the test. Consequently, this work aims to give a quantitative tool for an exhaustive interpretation of the PST, stressing the attention on important parameters that influence the test outcomes. First, starting from a pure

  6. Stable semi-analytical method for analysis of plasmonic propagation on periodically patterned metal plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasrebi, Navid; Khorasani, Sina; Karami-Taheri, Hossein; Rashidian, Bizhan; Hosseini, Amir

    2010-02-01

    The need for antennas with improved characteristics for communication and radar applications has resulted in an ever-increasing demand for research in the field of high impedance surfaces, which can work as an artificial magnetic conductor. One method in fabrication of these surfaces is formation of a metamaterial by patterning a metallic surface in the shape of space filling curves (e.g. Hilbert or Peanu Curves). In this paper, we present a novel semi-analytical solution to the problem of plasmonic propagation on these surfaces. The method is based on a previously presented Green's function formalism, which has been reported in an earlier paper of ours. We have modified and improved the method for analysis of periodic structures with a large number of spatial harmonics, and used different methods to get the necessary stabilization. Here propagating modes of different structures and their corresponding frequencies are calculated, and the possibility of frequency gap formation and stability of the method are investigated.

  7. The analytic solution of the structural analysis problem and its use in structural synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, M. B.

    An overview is presented of the analytic expressions for the inverse of the stiffness matrix, the nodal displacements, and the internal forces in linear elastic redundant structures. The inverse of the stiffness matrix and the nodal displacements are obtained using Binet and Cauchy's theorem on the product of compound matrices. The formula for the internal forces is derived from the principles of structural mechanics. This approach is shown to apply to all framed structures via the unimodal stiffnesses of its elements. Approximate models are constructed which are exact at preselected points along a line in the analysis space. An argument is also made for the use of multilinear polynomials as an alternative to Taylor expansion-based approximations.

  8. Physical Analytics: An emerging field with real-world applications and impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamann, Hendrik

    2015-03-01

    In the past most information on the internet has been originated by humans or computers. However with the emergence of cyber-physical systems, vast amount of data is now being created by sensors from devices, machines etc digitizing the physical world. While cyber-physical systems are subject to active research around the world, the vast amount of actual data generated from the physical world has attracted so far little attention from the engineering and physics community. In this presentation we use examples to highlight the opportunities in this new subject of ``Physical Analytics'' for highly inter-disciplinary research (including physics, engineering and computer science), which aims understanding real-world physical systems by leveraging cyber-physical technologies. More specifically, the convergence of the physical world with the digital domain allows applying physical principles to everyday problems in a much more effective and informed way than what was possible in the past. Very much like traditional applied physics and engineering has made enormous advances and changed our lives by making detailed measurements to understand the physics of an engineered device, we can now apply the same rigor and principles to understand large-scale physical systems. In the talk we first present a set of ``configurable'' enabling technologies for Physical Analytics including ultralow power sensing and communication technologies, physical big data management technologies, numerical modeling for physical systems, machine learning based physical model blending, and physical analytics based automation and control. Then we discuss in detail several concrete applications of Physical Analytics ranging from energy management in buildings and data centers, environmental sensing and controls, precision agriculture to renewable energy forecasting and management.

  9. An analytical light distribution model in the optical system of a scintillation detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, Sergey; Skachkov, E. V.; Belyaev, V. N.

    2017-01-01

    The article describes an analytical light distribution model in the optical system of a scintillation detector. The model can be useful for scintillation detector development since it allows to make quick calculations with different parameters. Comparison of the analytical model and Geant4 calculation results has been done. The comparison of the analytical model calculation results and experimental measurements have been done. Both comparisons show model validity and a capability to be used in the research.

  10. An approximate analytic solution for the radiation from a line-driven fluid-loaded plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diperna, Daniel T.; Feit, David

    2001-12-01

    In the analysis of a fluid loaded line-driven plate, the fields in the structure and the fluid are often expressed in terms of a Fourier transform. Once the boundary conditions are matched, the structural displacement can be expressed as an inverse transform, which can be evaluated using contour integration. The result is then a sum of propagating or decaying waves, each arising from poles in the complex plane, plus a branch cut integral. The branch cut is due to a square root in the transform of the acoustic impedance. The complex layer analysis (CLA) used here eliminates the branch cut singularity by approximating the square root with a rational function, causing the characteristic equation to become a polynomial in the transform variable. An approximate analytic solution to the characteristic equation is then found using a perturbation method. The result is four poles corresponding to the roots of the in vacuo plate, modified by the presence of the fluid, plus an infinity of poles located along the branch cut of the acoustic impedance. The solution is then found analytically using contour integration, with the integrand containing only simple poles.

  11. Aggregation and spatial analysis of walking activity in an urban area: results from the Halifax space-time activity survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neatt, K.; Millward, H.; Spinney, J.

    2016-04-01

    This study examines neighborhood characteristics affecting the incidence of walking trips in urban and suburban areas of Halifax, Canada. We employ data from the Space-Time Activity Research (STAR) survey, conducted in 2007-8. Primary respondents completed a two- day time-diary survey, and their movements were tracked using a GPS data logger. Primary respondents logged a total of 5,005 walking trips, specified by 781,205 individual GPS points. Redundant and erroneous points, such as those with zero or excessive speed, were removed. Data points were then imported into ArcGIS, converted from points to linear features, visually inspected for data quality, and cleaned appropriately. From mapped walking tracks we developed hypotheses regarding variations in walking density. To test these, walking distances were aggregated by census tracts (CTs), and expressed as walking densities (per resident, per metre of road, and per developed area). We employed multivariate regression to examine which neighborhood (CT) variables are most useful as estimators of walking densities. Contrary to much of the planning literature, built-environment measures of road connectivity and dwelling density were found to have little estimating power. Office and institutional land uses are more useful estimators, as are the income and age characteristics of the resident population.

  12. Topological data analysis: A promising big data exploration tool in biology, analytical chemistry and physical chemistry.

    PubMed

    Offroy, Marc; Duponchel, Ludovic

    2016-03-03

    An important feature of experimental science is that data of various kinds is being produced at an unprecedented rate. This is mainly due to the development of new instrumental concepts and experimental methodologies. It is also clear that the nature of acquired data is significantly different. Indeed in every areas of science, data take the form of always bigger tables, where all but a few of the columns (i.e. variables) turn out to be irrelevant to the questions of interest, and further that we do not necessary know which coordinates are the interesting ones. Big data in our lab of biology, analytical chemistry or physical chemistry is a future that might be closer than any of us suppose. It is in this sense that new tools have to be developed in order to explore and valorize such data sets. Topological data analysis (TDA) is one of these. It was developed recently by topologists who discovered that topological concept could be useful for data analysis. The main objective of this paper is to answer the question why topology is well suited for the analysis of big data set in many areas and even more efficient than conventional data analysis methods. Raman analysis of single bacteria should be providing a good opportunity to demonstrate the potential of TDA for the exploration of various spectroscopic data sets considering different experimental conditions (with high noise level, with/without spectral preprocessing, with wavelength shift, with different spectral resolution, with missing data).

  13. Contact angle of a hemispherical bubble: an analytical approach.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, M A C; Teixeira, P I C

    2009-10-01

    We have calculated the equilibrium shape of the axially symmetric Plateau border along which a spherical bubble contacts a flat wall, by analytically integrating Laplace's equation in the presence of gravity, in the limit of small Plateau border sizes. This method has the advantage that it provides closed-form expressions for the positions and orientations of the Plateau border surfaces. Results are in very good overall agreement with those obtained from a numerical solution procedure, and are consistent with experimental data. In particular we find that the effect of gravity on Plateau border shape is relatively small for typical bubble sizes, leading to a widening of the Plateau border for sessile bubbles and to a narrowing for pendant bubbles. The contact angle of the bubble is found to depend even more weakly on gravity.

  14. An analytical model of joule heating in piezoresistive microcantilevers.

    PubMed

    Ansari, Mohd Zahid; Cho, Chongdu

    2010-01-01

    The present study investigates Joule heating in piezoresistive microcantilever sensors. Joule heating and thermal deflections are a major source of noise in such sensors. This work uses analytical and numerical techniques to characterise the Joule heating in 4-layer piezoresistive microcantilevers made of silicon and silicon dioxide substrates but with the same U-shaped silicon piezoresistor. A theoretical model for predicting the temperature generated due to Joule heating is developed. The commercial finite element software ANSYS Multiphysics was used to study the effect of electrical potential on temperature and deflection produced in the cantilevers. The effect of piezoresistor width on Joule heating is also studied. Results show that Joule heating strongly depends on the applied potential and width of piezoresistor and that a silicon substrate cantilever has better thermal characteristics than a silicon dioxide cantilever.

  15. Climate Change: An Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Garry

    1995-01-01

    Presents a segment of the Geoscience Education booklet, Climate Change, that contains information and activities that enable students to gain a better appreciation of the possible effects human activity has on the Earth's climate. Describes the Terrace Temperatures activity that leads students through an investigation using foraminifera data to…

  16. Antecedents of Approach-Avoidance Achievement Goal Adoption: An Analysis of Two Physical Education Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warburton, Victoria; Spray, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between implicit theories of ability and competence perceptions to changes in approach-avoidance goal adoption in two specific activities in the curriculum. Four hundred and thirty pupils, aged 11-15 years, completed measures of approach-avoidance goals, perceived competence and implicit…

  17. Alcohol, Sex and Illegal Activities: An Analysis of Selected Facebook Central Photos in Fifty States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Sandy White; Smith, Zachary; Driver, Jennifer

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this research study was to evaluate the central photos of 150 students in 50 states participating in Facebook for evidence of alcohol consumption, illegal activities and portrayal of sexually inappropriate behaviors (including nudity or partial nudity). Because the media has frequently reported evidence of these behaviors in…

  18. Teacher Learning through Reciprocal Peer Coaching: An Analysis of Activity Sequences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zwart, R. C.; Wubbels, Th.; Bolhuis, S.; Bergen, Th. C. M.

    2008-01-01

    Just what and how eight experienced teachers in four coaching dyads learned during a 1-year reciprocal peer coaching trajectory was examined in the present study. The learning processes were mapped by providing a detailed description of reported learning activities, reported learning outcomes, and the relations between these two. The sequences of…

  19. An Analysis of Teacher Discourse that Introduces Real Science Activities to High School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsu, Pei-Ling; Roth, Wolff-Michael

    2009-01-01

    Most academic science educators encourage teachers to provide their students with access to more authentic science activities. What can and do teachers say to increase students' interests in participating in opportunities to do real science? What are the discursive "resources" they draw on to introduce authentic science to students? The purpose of…

  20. Towards an Analytical Age-Dependent Model of Contrast Sensitivity Functions for an Ageing Society

    PubMed Central

    Joulan, Karine; Brémond, Roland

    2015-01-01

    The Contrast Sensitivity Function (CSF) describes how the visibility of a grating depends on the stimulus spatial frequency. Many published CSF data have demonstrated that contrast sensitivity declines with age. However, an age-dependent analytical model of the CSF is not available to date. In this paper, we propose such an analytical CSF model based on visual mechanisms, taking into account the age factor. To this end, we have extended an existing model from Barten (1999), taking into account the dependencies of this model's optical and physiological parameters on age. Age-dependent models of the cones and ganglion cells densities, the optical and neural MTF, and optical and neural noise are proposed, based on published data. The proposed age-dependent CSF is finally tested against available experimental data, with fair results. Such an age-dependent model may be beneficial when designing real-time age-dependent image coding and display applications. PMID:26078994