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Sample records for activation augments nmda

  1. Sodium channel activation augments NMDA receptor function and promotes neurite outgrowth in immature cerebrocortical neurons

    PubMed Central

    George, Joju; Dravid, Shashank M.; Prakash, Anand; Xie, Jun; Peterson, Jennifer; Jabba, Sairam V.; Baden, Daniel G.; Murray, Thomas F.

    2009-01-01

    A range of extrinsic signals, including afferent activity, affect neuronal growth and plasticity. Neuronal activity regulates intracellular Ca2+ and activity-dependent calcium signaling has been shown to regulate dendritic growth and branching (Konur and Ghosh, 2005). NMDA receptor (NMDAR) stimulation of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase signaling cascades has moreover been demonstrated to regulate neurite/axonal outgrowth (Wayman et al., 2004). We used a sodium channel activator, brevetoxin (PbTx-2), to explore the relationship between intracellular [Na+] and NMDAR-dependent development. PbTx-2 alone, at a concentration of 30 nM, did not affect Ca2+ dynamics in DIV-2 cerebrocortical neurons; however, this treatment robustly potentiated NMDA-induced Ca2+ influx. The 30 nM PbTx-2 treatment produced a maximum [Na+]i of 16.9 ± 1.5 mM representing an increment of 8.8 ± 1.8 mM over basal. The corresponding membrane potential change produced by 30 nM PbTx-2 was modest and therefore insufficient to relieve the voltage-dependent Mg2+ block of NMDARs. To unambiguously demonstrate the enhancement of NMDA receptor function by PbTx-2, we recorded single-channel currents from cell-attached patches. PbTx-2 treatment was found to increase both the mean open time and open probability of NMDA receptors. These effects of PbTx-2 on NMDA receptor function were dependent on extracellular Na+ and activation of Src kinase. The functional consequences of PbTx-2-induced enhancement of NMDAR function were evaluated in immature cerebrocortical neurons. PbTx-2 concentrations between 3 and 300 nM enhanced neurite outgrowth. Voltage-gated sodium channel activators may accordingly represent a novel pharmacologic strategy to regulate neuronal plasticity through an NMDA receptor and Src family kinase-dependent mechanism. PMID:19279266

  2. Recruiting extrasynaptic NMDA receptors augments synaptic signaling.

    PubMed

    Harris, Alexander Z; Pettit, Diana L

    2008-02-01

    N-Methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) activation may promote cell survival or initiate cell death, with the outcome dependent on whether synaptic or extrasynaptic receptors are activated. Similarly, this differential activation has been proposed to govern the direction of plasticity. However, the physiological parameters necessary to activate extrasynaptic NMDARs in brain slices remain unknown. Using the irreversible use-dependent NMDAR antagonist MK-801 to isolate extrasynaptic NMDARs, we have tested the ability of short-stimulation trains from 5 to 400 Hz to activate these receptors on CA1 hippocampal slice pyramidal neurons. Frequencies as low as 25 Hz engage extrasynaptic NMDARs, with maximal activation at frequencies between 100 and 200 Hz. Since similar bursts of synaptic input occur during exploratory behavior in rats, our results demonstrate that "extrasynaptic" NMDARs regularly participate in synaptic transmission. Further, 175-Hz-stimulation trains activate all available synaptic and extrasynaptic dendritic NMDARs, suggesting these NMDARs act as synaptic receptors as needed, transiently increasing synaptic strength. Thus extrasynaptic NMDARs play a vital role in synaptic physiology, calling into question their status as "extrasynaptic."

  3. Active NMDA glutamate receptors are expressed by mammalian osteoclasts

    PubMed Central

    Espinosa, Leon; Itzstein, Cécile; Cheynel, Hervé; Delmas, Pierre D; Chenu, Chantal

    1999-01-01

    The N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) glutamate receptor, widely distributed in the mammalian nervous system, has recently been identified in bone. In this study, we have investigated whether NMDA receptors expressed by osteoclasts have an electrophysiological activity. Using the patch clamp technique two agonists of the NMDA receptor, L-glutamate (Glu) and NMDA, were shown to activate whole-cell currents recorded in isolated rabbit osteoclasts. The current-voltage (I-V) relationships of the currents induced by Glu (IGlu) and NMDA (INMDA) were studied using Mg2+-free solutions. The agonist-induced currents had a linear I-V relationship with a reversal potential near 0 mV, as expected for a voltage independent and non-selective cationic current. IGlu and INMDA were sensitive to specific blockers of NMDA subtype glutamate receptors, such as magnesium ions, (5R, 10S)-(+)-5-methyl-10,11-dihydro-5H-dibenzo[a, d]cyclohepten -5,10-imine (MK-801) and 1-(1,2-diphenylethyl) piperidine (DEP). The block of IGlu and INMDA by these specific antagonists was voltage dependent, strong for negative potentials (inward current) and absent for positive potentials (outward current). These results demonstrate that NMDA receptors are functional in rabbit osteoclasts, and that their electrophysiological and pharmacological properties in these cells are similar to those documented for neuronal cells. Active NMDA receptors expressed by osteoclasts may represent a new target for regulating bone resorption. PMID:10373688

  4. Novel benzopolycyclic amines with NMDA receptor antagonist activity.

    PubMed

    Valverde, Elena; Sureda, Francesc X; Vázquez, Santiago

    2014-05-01

    A new series of benzopolycyclic amines active as NMDA receptor antagonists were synthesized. Most of them exhibited increased activity compared with related analogues previously published. All the tested compounds were more potent than clinically approved amantadine and one of them displayed a lower IC50 value than memantine, an anti-Alzheimer's approved drug.

  5. Augmented gamma band auditory steady-state responses: support for NMDA hypofunction in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Hamm, Jordan P; Gilmore, Casey S; Clementz, Brett A

    2012-06-01

    Individuals with schizophrenia (SZ) have deviations in auditory perception perhaps attributable to altered neural oscillatory response properties in thalamo-cortical and/or local cortico-cortical circuits. Previous EEG studies of auditory steady-state responses (aSSRs; a measure of sustained neuronal entrainment to repetitive stimulation) in SZ have indicated attenuated gamma range (≈40 Hz) neural entrainment. Stimuli in most such studies have been relatively brief (500-1000 ms) trains of 1 ms clicks or amplitude modulated pure tones (1000 Hz) with short, fixed interstimulus intervals (200-1000 ms). The current study used extended (1500 ms), more aurally dense broadband stimuli (500-4000 Hz noise; previously demonstrated to elicit larger aSSRs) with longer, variable interstimulus intervals (2700-3300 ms). Dense array EEG (256 sensor) was collected while 17 SZ and 16 healthy subjects passively listed to stimuli modulated at 15 different frequencies spanning beta and gamma ranges (16-44 Hz in 2 Hz steps). Results indicate that SZ have augmented aSSRs that were most extreme in the gamma range. Results also constructively replicate previous findings of attenuated low frequency auditory evoked responses (2-8 Hz) in SZ. These findings (i) highlight differential characteristics of low versus high frequency and induced versus entrained oscillatory auditory responses in both SZ and healthy stimulus processing, (ii) provide support for an NMDA-receptor hypofunction-based pharmacological model of SZ, and (iii) report a novel pattern of aSSR abnormalities suggesting that gamma band neural entrainment deviations among SZ may be more complex than previously supposed, including possibly being substantially influenced by physical stimulus properties. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Antidepressant Augmentation Using the NMDA-Antagonist Memantine: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Eric G.; Deligiannidis, Kristina M.; Ulbricht, Christine M.; Landolin, Chelsea S.; Patel, Jayendra K.; Rothschild, Anthony J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Intravenous NMDA antagonists have shown promising results in rapidly ameliorating depression symptoms, but placebo-controlled trials of oral NMDA antagonists as monotherapy have not observed efficacy. We conducted a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial (NCT00344682) of the NMDA antagonist memantine as an augmentation treatment for patients with DSM-IV major depressive disorder. Method 31 participants with partial or nonresponse to their current antidepressant were randomized (from 2006–2011) to add memantine (flexible dose 5–20 mg/day, with all memantine group participants reaching the dose of 20 mg/day) (n= 15) or placebo (n= 16) to their existing treatment for 8 weeks. The primary outcome, change in Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Score (MADRS), was evaluated with repeated measures mixed effects models using last-observation-carried-forward methods. Secondary outcomes included other depression and anxiety rating scales, suicidal and delusional ideation, and other adverse effects. Results Participants receiving memantine did not show a statistically or clinically significant change in MADRS scores compared to placebo, either over the entire study (β=0.133, favoring placebo, p=0.74) or at study completion (week 8 MADRS score change: −7.13 +/−6.61 (memantine); −7.25 +/−11.14 (placebo), p=0.97). A minimal-to-small effect size (comparing change to baseline variability) was observed (d=0.19), favoring placebo. Similarly, no substantial effect sizes favoring memantine, nor statistically significant between-group differences, were observed on secondary efficacy or safety outcomes. Conclusions This trial did not detect significant statistical or effect size differences between memantine and placebo augmentation among nonresponders or poor responders to conventional antidepressants. While the small number of participants is a limitation, this study suggests memantine lacks substantial efficacy as an augmentation treatment against

  7. Contribution of NMDA and non-NMDA receptors to in vivo glutamate-induced calpain activation in the rat striatum. Relation to neuronal damage.

    PubMed

    Del Río, Perla; Montiel, Teresa; Massieu, Lourdes

    2008-08-01

    Glutamate, the major excitatory neurotransmitter, can cause the death of neurons by a mechanism known as excitotoxicity. This is a calcium-dependent process and activation of the NMDA receptor subtype contributes mainly to neuronal damage, due to its high permeability to calcium. Activation of calpain, a calcium-dependent cysteine protease, has been implicated in necrotic excitotoxic neuronal death. We have investigated the contribution of NMDA and non-NMDA ionotropic receptors to calpain activation and neuronal death induced by the acute administration of glutamate into the rat striatum. Calpain activity was assessed by the cleavage of the cytoskeletal protein, alpha-spectrin. Caspase-3 activity was also studied because glutamate can also lead to apoptosis. Results show no caspase-3 activity, but a strong calpain activation involving both NMDA and non-NMDA receptors. Although neuronal damage is mediated mainly by the NMDA receptor subtype, it can not be attributed solely to calpain activity.

  8. Impact of calcium-activated potassium channels on NMDA spikes in cortical layer 5 pyramidal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Bock, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    Active electrical events play an important role in shaping signal processing in dendrites. As these events are usually associated with an increase in intracellular calcium, they are likely to be under the control of calcium-activated potassium channels. Here, we investigate the impact of calcium-activated potassium channels on N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor-dependent spikes, or NMDA spikes, evoked by glutamate iontophoresis onto basal dendrites of cortical layer 5 pyramidal neurons. We found that small-conductance calcium-activated potassium channels (SK channels) act to reduce NMDA spike amplitude but at the same time, also decrease the iontophoretic current required for their generation. This SK-mediated decrease in NMDA spike threshold was dependent on R-type voltage-gated calcium channels and indicates a counterintuitive, excitatory effect of SK channels on NMDA spike generation, whereas the capacity of SK channels to suppress NMDA spike amplitude is in line with the expected inhibitory action of potassium channels on dendritic excitability. Large-conductance calcium-activated potassium channels had no significant impact on NMDA spikes, indicating that these channels are either absent from basal dendrites or not activated by NMDA spikes. These experiments reveal complex and opposing interactions among NMDA receptors, SK channels, and voltage-gated calcium channels in basal dendrites of cortical layer 5 pyramidal neurons during NMDA spike generation, which are likely to play an important role in regulating the way these neurons integrate the thousands of synaptic inputs they receive. PMID:26936985

  9. Full-gestational exposure to nicotine and ethanol augments nicotine self-administration by altering ventral tegmental dopaminergic function due to NMDA receptors in adolescent rats.

    PubMed

    Roguski, Emily E; Sharp, Burt M; Chen, Hao; Matta, Shannon G

    2014-03-01

    In adult rats, we have shown full-gestational exposure to nicotine and ethanol (Nic + EtOH) augmented nicotine self-administration (SA) (increased nicotine intake) compared to pair-fed (PF) offspring. Therefore, we hypothesized that full-gestational exposure to Nic + EtOH disrupts control of dopaminergic (DA) circuitry by ventral tegmental area (VTA) NMDA receptors, augmenting nicotine SA and DA release in nucleus accumbens (NAcc) of adolescents. Both NAcc DA and VTA glutamate release were hyper-responsive to intra-VTA NMDA in Nic + EtOH offspring versus PF (p = 0.03 and 0.02, respectively). Similarly, DA release was more responsive to i.v. nicotine in Nic + EtOH offspring (p = 0.02). Local DL-2-Amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid sodium salt (AP5) (NMDA receptor antagonist) infusion into the VTA inhibited nicotine-stimulated DA release in Nic + EtOH and PF offspring. Nicotine SA was augmented in adolescent Nic + EtOH versus PF offspring (p = 0.000001). Daily VTA microinjections of AP5 reduced nicotine SA by Nic + EtOH offspring, without affecting PF (p = 0.000032). Indeed, nicotine SA in Nic + EtOH offspring receiving AP5 was not different from PF offspring. Both VTA mRNA transcripts and NMDA receptor subunit proteins were not altered in Nic + EtOH offspring. In summary, adolescent offspring exposed to gestational Nic + EtOH show markedly increased vulnerability to become dependent on nicotine. This reflects the enhanced function of a subpopulation of VTA NMDA receptors that confer greater nicotine-induced DA release in NAcc. We hypothesized that concurrent gestational exposure to nicotine and ethanol would disrupt the control of VTA dopaminergic circuitry by NMDA receptors. Resulting in the augmented nicotine self-administration (SA) in adolescent offspring.

  10. Augmenting NMDA receptor signaling boosts experience-dependent neuroplasticity in the adult human brain.

    PubMed

    Forsyth, Jennifer K; Bachman, Peter; Mathalon, Daniel H; Roach, Brian J; Asarnow, Robert F

    2015-12-15

    Experience-dependent plasticity is a fundamental property of the brain. It is critical for everyday function, is impaired in a range of neurological and psychiatric disorders, and frequently depends on long-term potentiation (LTP). Preclinical studies suggest that augmenting N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) signaling may promote experience-dependent plasticity; however, a lack of noninvasive methods has limited our ability to test this idea in humans until recently. We examined the effects of enhancing NMDAR signaling using d-cycloserine (DCS) on a recently developed LTP EEG paradigm that uses high-frequency visual stimulation (HFvS) to induce neural potentiation in visual cortex neurons, as well as on three cognitive tasks: a weather prediction task (WPT), an information integration task (IIT), and a n-back task. The WPT and IIT are learning tasks that require practice with feedback to reach optimal performance. The n-back assesses working memory. Healthy adults were randomized to receive DCS (100 mg; n = 32) or placebo (n = 33); groups were similar in IQ and demographic characteristics. Participants who received DCS showed enhanced potentiation of neural responses following repetitive HFvS, as well as enhanced performance on the WPT and IIT. Groups did not differ on the n-back. Augmenting NMDAR signaling using DCS therefore enhanced activity-dependent plasticity in human adults, as demonstrated by lasting enhancement of neural potentiation following repetitive HFvS and accelerated acquisition of two learning tasks. Results highlight the utility of considering cellular mechanisms underlying distinct cognitive functions when investigating potential cognitive enhancers.

  11. Mechanical stress activates NMDA receptors in the absence of agonists

    PubMed Central

    Maneshi, Mohammad Mehdi; Maki, Bruce; Gnanasambandam, Radhakrishnan; Belin, Sophie; Popescu, Gabriela K.; Sachs, Frederick; Hua, Susan Z.

    2017-01-01

    While studying the physiological response of primary rat astrocytes to fluid shear stress in a model of traumatic brain injury (TBI), we found that shear stress induced Ca2+ entry. The influx was inhibited by MK-801, a specific pore blocker of N-Methyl-D-aspartic acid receptor (NMDAR) channels, and this occurred in the absence of agonists. Other NMDA open channel blockers ketamine and memantine showed a similar effect. The competitive glutamate antagonists AP5 and GluN2B-selective inhibitor ifenprodil reduced NMDA-activated currents, but had no effect on the mechanically induced Ca2+ influx. Extracellular Mg2+ at 2 mM did not significantly affect the shear induced Ca2+ influx, but at 10 mM it produced significant inhibition. Patch clamp experiments showed mechanical activation of NMDAR and inhibition by MK-801. The mechanical sensitivity of NMDARs may play a role in the normal physiology of fluid flow in the glymphatic system and it has obvious relevance to TBI. PMID:28045032

  12. Topiramate antagonizes NMDA- and AMPA-induced seizure-like activity in planarians.

    PubMed

    Rawls, Scott M; Thomas, Timmy; Adeola, Mobilaji; Patil, Tanvi; Raymondi, Natalie; Poles, Asha; Loo, Michael; Raffa, Robert B

    2009-10-01

    The mechanism of anticonvulsant action of topiramate includes inhibition of glutamate-activated ion channels. The evidence is most convincing for direct inhibitory action at the ionotropic AMPA (alpha-Amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid) and kainate ((2S,3S,4S)-3-(Carboxymethyl)-4-prop-1-en-2-ylpyrrolidine-2-carboxylic acid) glutamate receptor subtypes. Less direct connection has been made to the NMDA (N-Methyl-d-aspartate) subtype. In the present study, we demonstrate that NMDA and AMPA produce concentration-dependent seizure-like activity in planarians, a type of flatworm which possesses mammalian-like neurotransmitters. In contrast, planarians exposed to the inhibitory amino acid, glycine, did not display pSLA. For combination experiments, topiramate significantly reduced planarian seizure-like activity (pSLA) produced by NMDA or AMPA. Additionally, NMDA-induced pSLA was antagonized by either an NMDA receptor antagonist (MK-801) or AMPA receptor antagonist (DNQX), thus suggesting that NMDA-induced pSLA was mediated by NMDA and non-NMDA receptors. The present results provide pharmacologic evidence of a functional inhibitory action of topiramate on glutamate receptor activity in invertebrates and provide a sensitive, quantifiable end-point for studying anti-seizure pharmacology.

  13. Quantitative structure activity relationship (QSAR) of competitive N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) antagonists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korkut, Anil; Varnali, Tereza

    Glutamic acid is an excitatory amino acid neurotransmitter in the mammalian central nervous system and the NMDA molecule binds to NMDA-type glutamic acid receptors as a glutamic acid analogue, in vitro. The NMDA-type glutamic acid receptors are known for their function in many neural processes, such as neural plasticity, learning and memory. In addition, excessive NMDA receptor activity has been shown to be related to neurodegenerative diseases like epilepsy so the design of new NMDA antagonists has extra importance as potent drugs for various neural diseases. Potential antagonist molecules are usually synthesized and their activity is measured by experimental techniques. Here, computational chemistry methods are applied to develop a model, which allows one to predict the activity of potent competitive NMDA antagonists. First, various molecular parameters are calculated for a series of competitive NMDA antagonists with known activity values and those parameters are used to make a regression analysis which provides a model that relates the computationally calculated parameters to experimentally determined activity values. By the quantitative structure activity relationship (QSAR) model developed here, it is possible to predict the activity of a potent drug before its synthesis since only theoretically determined molecular parameters are used for the prediction.

  14. Effects of acute and repeated administration of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) into the ventral tegmental area: locomotor activating effects of NMDA and cocaine.

    PubMed

    Schenk, S; Partridge, B

    1997-09-26

    Repeated, intermittent administration of psychostimulants produces an enhancement of the subsequent behavioral effects of these drugs. This behavioral sensitization has been implicated in maintenance of and relapse to drug-taking. As a result, there has been great interest in elucidating the mechanisms underlying both the development and expression of sensitization. An accumulation of data from studies of stimulant-induced locomotor activity has implicated excitatory amino acids in the development of behavioral sensitization. In the present study, N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) (0.6, 1.25 or 2.5 microg) infused bilaterally into the ventral tegmental area (VTA) produced dose-dependent locomotor activation. The locomotor activating effect of NMDA was increased following repeated NMDA administration (two exposures to intra-VTA NMDA), suggesting sensitization. However, repeated intra-VTA NMDA failed to sensitize rats to the locomotor activating effects of systemically administered cocaine (5.0, 10.0 or 20.0 mg/kg). These findings are consistent with the notion that repeated activation of NMDA receptors is sufficient for the development of behavioral sensitization to NMDA. Other neuroadaptations produced by repeated psychostimulant administration are required in order for the development of sensitization to the behavioral effects of those drugs.

  15. Reduction of food intake by cholecystokinin requires activation of hindbrain NMDA-type glutamate receptors.

    PubMed

    Wright, Jason; Campos, Carlos; Herzog, Thiebaut; Covasa, Mihai; Czaja, Krzysztof; Ritter, Robert C

    2011-08-01

    Intraperitoneal injection of CCK reduces food intake and triggers a behavioral pattern similar to natural satiation. Reduction of food intake by CCK is mediated by vagal afferents that innervate the stomach and small intestine. These afferents synapse in the hindbrain nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) where gastrointestinal satiation signals are processed. Previously, we demonstrated that intraperitoneal (IP) administration of either competitive or noncompetitive N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonists attenuates reduction of food intake by CCK. However, because vagal afferents themselves express NMDA receptors at both central and peripheral endings, our results did not speak to the question of whether NMDA receptors in the brain play an essential role in reduction of feeding by CCK. We hypothesized that activation of NMDA receptors in the NTS is necessary for reduction of food intake by CCK. To test this hypothesis, we measured food intake following IP CCK, subsequent to NMDA receptor antagonist injections into the fourth ventricle, directly into the NTS or subcutaneously. We found that either fourth-ventricle or NTS injection of the noncompetitive NMDA receptor antagonist MK-801 was sufficient to inhibit CCK-induced reduction of feeding, while the same antagonist doses injected subcutaneously did not. Similarly fourth ventricle injection of d-3-(2-carboxypiperazin-4-yl)-1-propenyl-1-phosphoric acid (d-CPPene), a competitive NMDA receptor antagonist, also blocked reduction of food intake following IP CCK. Finally, d-CPPene injected into the fourth ventricle attenuated CCK-induced expression of nuclear c-Fos immunoreactivity in the dorsal vagal complex. We conclude that activation of NMDA receptors in the hindbrain is necessary for the reduction of food intake by CCK. Hindbrain NMDA receptors could comprise a critical avenue for control and modulation of satiation signals to influence food intake and energy balance.

  16. Ethanol inhibits epileptiform activity and NMDA receptor-mediated synaptic transmission in rat amygdaloid slices

    SciTech Connect

    Gean, P.W. )

    1992-02-26

    The effect of ethanol on the epileptiform activity induced by Mg{sup ++}-free solution was studied in rat amygdalar slices using intracellular recording techniques. The spontaneous and evoked epileptiform discharges consisting of an initial burst followed by afterdischarges were observed 20-30 min after switching to Mg{sup ++}-free medium. Superfusion with ethanol reversibly reduced the duration of spontaneous and evoked bursting discharges in a concentration-dependent manner. Synaptic response mediated by N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor activation was isolated by application of a solution containing the non-NMDA receptor antagonist 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX) and either in Mg{sup ++}-free solution or in the presence of 50 {mu}M bicuculline. Application of ethanol reversibly suppressed the duration of NMDA receptor-mediated synaptic response. These results suggest that intoxicating concentrations of ethanol possess anticonvulsant activity through blocking the NMDA receptor-mediated synaptic excitation.

  17. Further insights into the anti-aggregating activity of NMDA in human platelets

    PubMed Central

    Franconi, Flavia; Miceli, Mauro; Alberti, Luisa; Seghieri, Giuseppe; De Montis, M Graziella; Tagliamonte, Alessandro

    1998-01-01

    In the present study the effect of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) on thromboxane B2 synthesis and on [Ca2+]i was studied in human platelets.NMDA (10−7 M) completely inhibited the synthesis of thromboxane B2 from exogenous arachidonic acid (AA), while it did not interfere with the aggregating effect of the thromboxane A2 receptor agonist U-46619.NMDA (0.1 μM–10 μM) dose-dependently increased intracellular calcium in washed platelets pre-loaded with fura 2 AM, and this effect was not additive with that of AA.NMDA shifted the dose-response curve of AA to the right. At the highest AA concentrations platelet aggregation was not inhibited.The antiaggregating effect of NMDA was not antagonized by NG-monomethyl-L-arginine (L-NMMA), a nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor.Finally, NMDA (0.01 nM–100 nM) associated with either aspirin or indomethacin significantly potentiated the antiaggregating activity of both cyclo-oxygenase inhibitors.It was concluded that NMDA is a potent inhibitor of platelet aggregation and thromboxane B2 synthesis in human platelet rich plasma (PRP). PMID:9630340

  18. Dual effects of anandamide on NMDA receptor-mediated responses and neurotransmission.

    PubMed

    Hampson, A J; Bornheim, L M; Scanziani, M; Yost, C S; Gray, A T; Hansen, B M; Leonoudakis, D J; Bickler, P E

    1998-02-01

    Anandamide is an endogenous ligand of cannabinoid receptors that induces pharmacological responses in animals similar to those of cannabinoids such as delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). Typical pharmacological effects of cannabinoids include disruption of pain, memory formation, and motor coordination, systems that all depend on NMDA receptor mediated neurotransmission. We investigated whether anandamide can influence NMDA receptor activity by examining NMDA-induced calcium flux (deltaCa2+NMDA) in rat brain slices. The presence of anandamide reduced deltaCa2+NMDA and the inhibition was disrupted by cannabinoid receptor antagonist, pertussis toxin treatment, and agatoxin (a calcium channel inhibitor). Whereas these treatments prevented anandamide inhibiting deltaCa2+NMDA, they also revealed another, underlying mechanism by which anandamide influences deltaCa2+NMDA. In the presence of cannabinoid receptor antagonist, anandamide potentiated deltaCa2+NMDA in cortical, cerebellar, and hippocampal slices. Anandamide (but not THC) also augmented NMDA-stimulated currents in Xenopus oocytes expressing cloned NMDA receptors, suggesting a capacity to directly modulate NMDA receptor activity. In a similar manner, anandamide enhanced neurotransmission across NMDA receptor-dependent synapses in hippocampus in a manner that was not mimicked by THC and was unaffected by cannabinoid receptor antagonist. These data demonstrate that anandamide can modulate NMDA receptor activity in addition to its role as a cannabinoid receptor ligand.

  19. NMDA Receptor Activity in Circulating Red Blood Cells: Methods of Detection.

    PubMed

    Makhro, Asya; Kaestner, Lars; Bogdanova, Anna

    2017-01-01

    Abundance and activity of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) in circulating red blood cells contributes to the maintenance of intracellular Ca(2+) in these cells and, by doing that, controls red cell volume, membrane stability, and O2 carrying capacity. Detection of the NMDA receptor activity in red blood cells is challenging as the number of its copies is low and shows substantial cell-to-cell heterogeneity. Receptor abundance is reliably assessed using the radiolabeled antagonist ([(3)H]MK-801) binding technique. Uptake of Ca(2+) following the NMDA receptor activation is detected in cells loaded with Ca(2+)-sensitive fluorescent dye Fluo-4 AM. Both microfluorescence live-cell imaging and flow cytometry may be used for fluorescence intensity detection. Automated patch clamp is currently used for recording of electric currents triggered by the stimulation of the NMDA receptor. These currents are mediated by the Ca(2+)-sensitive K(+) (Gardos) channels that open upon Ca(2+) uptake via the active NMDA receptor. Furthermore, K(+) flux through the Gardos channels induced by the NMDA receptor stimulation in red blood cells may be detected using unidirectional K(+)((86)Rb(+)) influx.

  20. Intramuscular ketorolac inhibits activation of rat peripheral NMDA receptors.

    PubMed

    Cairns, Brian E; Dong, Xu-Dong; Wong, Hayes; Svensson, Peter

    2012-06-01

    The nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) diclofenac has local anesthetic-like and peripheral N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist characteristics when administered at higher concentrations to masticatory muscle. It is not known if the ability to inhibit NMDA receptors is unique to diclofenac or shared by other NSAIDs. This study was undertaken to determine whether intramuscular injection of ketorolac or naproxen at concentrations that do not induce local anesthetic-like effects could attenuate jaw-closer muscle nociceptor discharge in anesthetized Sprague-Dawley rats. It was found that ketorolac (5 mM) inhibited hypertonic saline-evoked nociceptor discharge, which suggests that at this concentration, ketorolac has local anesthetic-like properties. A lower concentration of ketorolac (0.5 mM), which did not affect hypertonic saline-evoked discharge, did inhibit nociceptor discharge evoked by NMDA. In contrast, naproxen (5 mM) did not alter hypertonic saline- or NMDA-evoked nociceptor discharge. Subsequent experiments revealed that ketorolac (0.5 mM) had no effect on nociceptor discharge evoked by αβ-methylene ATP, 5-hydroxytryptamine, or AMPA. The inhibitory effect of ketorolac did not appear to be related to cyclooxygenase inhibition, because the concentration of prostaglandin E(2) in the masticatory muscles 10 min after injection of either NSAID was not significantly decreased. The present study indicates that in vivo, ketorolac, but not naproxen, can antagonize NMDA-evoked nociceptor discharge similarly to diclofenac. We speculate that structural similarities between ketorolac and diclofenac could account for the ability of these NSAIDs to inhibit NMDA-evoked nociceptor discharge. These properties may partly explain the analgesic effect of intramuscularly injected ketorolac in the clinic.

  1. Selective Augmentation of Striatal Functional Connectivity Following NMDA Receptor Antagonism: Implications for Psychosis

    PubMed Central

    Dandash, Orwa; Harrison, Ben J; Adapa, Ram; Gaillard, Raphael; Giorlando, Francesco; Wood, Stephen J; Fletcher, Paul C; Fornito, Alex

    2015-01-01

    The psychotomimetic effect of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) antagonist ketamine is thought to arise from a functional modulation of the brain's fronto-striato-thalamic (FST) circuits. Animal models suggest a pronounced effect on ventral ‘limbic' FST systems, although recent work in patients with psychosis and high-risk individuals suggests specific alterations of dorsal ‘associative' FST circuits. Here, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging to investigate the effects of a subanesthetic dose of ketamine on measures of functional connectivity as indexed by the temporal coherence of spontaneous neural activity in both dorsal and ventral FST circuits, as well as their symptom correlates. We adopted a placebo-controlled, double-blind, randomized, repeated-measures design in which 19 healthy participants received either an intravenous saline infusion or a racemic mixture of ketamine (100 ng/ml) separated by at least 1 week. Compared with placebo, ketamine increased functional connectivity between the dorsal caudate and both the thalamus and midbrain bilaterally. Ketamine additionally increased functional connectivity of the ventral striatum/nucleus accumbens and ventromedial prefrontal cortex. Both connectivity increases significantly correlated with the psychosis-like and dissociative symptoms under ketamine. Importantly, dorsal caudate connectivity with the ventrolateral thalamus and subthalamic nucleus showed inverse correlation with ketamine-induced symptomatology, pointing to a possible resilience role to disturbances in FST circuits. Although consistent with the role of FST in mediating psychosis, these findings contrast with previous research in clinical samples by suggesting that acute NMDAR antagonism may lead to psychosis-like experiences via a mechanism that is distinct from that implicated in frank psychotic illness. PMID:25141922

  2. Structure-activity relationships for allosteric NMDA receptor inhibitors based on 2-naphthoic acid

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Blaise Mathias; Irvine, Mark W.; Fang, Guangyu; Eaves, Richard J.; Mayo-Martin, Maria Belen; Laube, Bodo; Jane, David E.; Monaghan, Daniel T.

    2012-01-01

    Over-activation of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors is critically involved in many neurological conditions, thus there has been considerable interest in developing NMDA receptor antagonists. We have recently identified a series of naphthoic and phenanthroic acid compounds that allosterically modulate NMDA receptors through a novel mechanism of action. In the present study, we have determined the structure-activity relationships of 18 naphthoic acid derivatives for the ability to inhibit the four GluN1/GluN2(A-D) NMDA receptor subtypes. 2-Naphthoic acid has low activity at GluN2A-containing receptors and yet lower activity at other NMDA receptors. 3-Amino addition, and especially 3-hydroxy addition, to 2-naphthoic acid increased inhibitory activity at GluN1/GluN2C and GluN1/GluN2D receptors. Further halogen and phenyl substitutions to 2-hydroxy-3-naphthoic acid leads to several relatively potent inhibitors, the most potent of which is UBP618 (1-bromo-2-hydroxy-6-phenylnaphthalene-3-carboxylic acid) with an IC50 ~ 2 μM at each of the NMDA receptor subtypes. While UBP618 is non-selective, elimination of the hydroxyl group in UBP618, as in UBP628 and UBP608, leads to an increase in GluN1/GluN2A selectivity. Of the compounds evaluated, specifically those with a 6-phenyl substitution were less able to fully inhibit GluN1/GluN2A, GluN1/GluN2B and GluN1/GluN2C responses (maximal % inhibition of 60 – 90%). Such antagonists may potentially have reduced adverse effects by not excessively blocking NMDA receptor signaling. Together, these studies reveal discrete structure-activity relationships for the allosteric antagonism of NMDA receptors that may facilitate the development of NMDA receptor modulator agents for a variety of neuropsychiatric and neurological conditions. PMID:22155206

  3. Novel dimeric bis(7)-tacrine proton-dependently inhibits NMDA-activated currents

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Jialie; Li, Wenming; Liu, Yuwei; Zhang, Wei; Fu, Hongjun; Lee, Nelson T.K.; Yu, Hua; Pang, Yuanping; Huang, Pingbo; Xia, Jun; Li, Zhi-Wang; Li, Chaoying; Han, Yifan . E-mail: bcyfhan@ust.hk

    2007-09-21

    Bis(7)-tacrine has been shown to prevent glutamate-induced neuronal apoptosis by blocking NMDA receptors. However, the characteristics of the inhibition have not been fully elucidated. In this study, we further characterize the features of bis(7)-tacrine inhibition of NMDA-activated current in cultured rat hippocampal neurons. The results show that with the increase of extracellular pH, the inhibitory effect decreases dramatically. At pH 8.0, the concentration-response curve of bis(7)-tacrine is shifted rightwards with the IC{sub 50} value increased from 0.19 {+-} 0.03 {mu}M to 0.41 {+-} 0.04 {mu}M. In addition, bis(7)-tacrine shifts the proton inhibition curve rightwards. Furthermore, the inhibitory effect of bis(7)-tacrine is not altered by the presence of the NMDA receptor proton sensor shield spermidine. These results indicate that bis(7)-tacrine inhibits NMDA-activated current in a pH-dependent manner by sensitizing NMDA receptors to proton inhibition, rendering it potentially beneficial therapeutic effects under acidic conditions associated with stroke and ischemia.

  4. Rhythmic motor activity evoked by NMDA in the spinal zebrafish larva.

    PubMed

    McDearmid, Jonathan R; Drapeau, Pierre

    2006-01-01

    We have examined the localization and activity of the neural circuitry that generates swimming behavior in developing zebrafish that were spinalized to isolate the spinal cord from descending brain inputs. We found that addition of the excitatory amino acid agonist N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) to spinalized zebrafish at 3 days in development induced repeating episodes of rhythmic tail beating activity reminiscent of slow swimming behavior. The neural correlate of this activity, monitored by extracellular recording comprised repeating episodes of rhythmic, rostrocaudally progressing peripheral nerve discharges that alternated between the two sides of the body. Motoneuron recordings revealed an activity pattern comprising a slow oscillatory and a fast synaptic component that was consistent with fictive swimming behavior. Pharmacological and voltage-clamp analysis implicated glycine and glutamate in generation of motoneuron activity. Contralateral alternation of motor activity was disrupted with strychnine, indicating a role for glycine in coordinating left-right alternation during NMDA-induced locomotion. At embryonic stages, while rhythmic synaptic activity patterns could still be evoked in motoneurons, they were typically lower in frequency. Kinematic recordings revealed that prior to 3 days in development, NMDA was unable to reliably generate rhythmic tail beating behavior. We conclude that NMDA induces episodes of rhythmic motor activity in spinalized developing zebrafish that can be monitored physiologically in paralyzed preparations. Therefore as for other vertebrates, the zebrafish central pattern generator is intrinsic to the spinal cord and can operate in isolation provided a tonic source of excitation is given.

  5. NMDA receptor activation regulates sociability by its effect on mTOR signaling activity

    PubMed Central

    Burket, Jessica A.; Benson, Andrew D.; Tang, Amy H.; Deutsch, Stephen I.

    2017-01-01

    Tuberous Sclerosis Complex is one example of a syndromic form of autism spectrum disorder associated with disinhibited activity of mTORCl in neurons (e.g., cerebellar Purkinje cells). mTORCl is a complex protein possessing serine/threonine kinase activity and a key downstream molecule in a signaling cascade beginning at the cell surface with the transduction of neurotransmitters (e.g., glutamate and acetylcholine) and nerve growth factors (e.g., Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor). Interestingly, the severity of the intellectual disability in Tuberous Sclerosis Complex may relate more to this metabolic disturbance (i.e., overactivity of mTOR signaling) than the density of cortical tubers. Several recent reports showed that rapamycin, an inhibitor of mTORCl, improved sociability and other symptoms in mouse models of Tuberous Sclerosis Complex and autism spectrum disorder, consistent with mTORCl overactivity playing an important pathogenic role. NMDA receptor activation may also dampen mTORCl activity by at least two possible mechanisms: regulating intraneuronal accumulation of arginine and the phosphorylation status of a specific extracellular signal regulating kinase (i.e., ERK1/2), both of which are “drivers” of mTORCl activity. Conceivably, the prosocial effects of targeting the NMDA receptor with agonists in mouse models of autism spectrum disorders result from their ability to dampen mTORC1 activity in neurons. Strategies for dampening mTORC1 overactivity by NMDA receptor activation may be preferred to its direct inhibition in chronic neurodevelopmental disorders, such as autism spectrum disorders. PMID:25703582

  6. Activation of nucleus accumbens NMDA receptors differentially affects appetitive or aversive taste learning and memory

    PubMed Central

    Núñez-Jaramillo, Luis; Rangel-Hernández, José A.; Burgueño-Zúñiga, Belén; Miranda, María I.

    2012-01-01

    Taste memory depends on motivational and post-ingestional consequences; thus, it can be aversive (e.g., conditioned taste aversion, CTA) if a novel, palatable taste is paired with visceral malaise, or it can be appetitive if no intoxication appears after novel taste consumption, and a taste preference is developed.The nucleus accumbens (NAc) plays a role in hedonic reactivity to taste stimuli, and recent findings suggest that reward and aversion are differentially encoded by the activity of NAc neurons. The present study examined whether the requirement for N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors in the NAc core during rewarding appetitive taste learning differs from that during aversive taste conditioning, as well as during retrieval of appetitive vs. aversive taste memory, using the taste preference or CTA model, respectively. Bilateral infusions of NMDA (1 μg/μl, 0.5 μl) into the NAc core were performed before acquisition or before retrieval of taste preference or CTA. Activation of NMDA receptors before taste preference training or CTA acquisition did not alter memory formation. Furthermore, NMDA injections before aversive taste retrieval had no effect on taste memory; however, 24 h later, CTA extinction was significantly delayed. Also, NMDA injections, made before familiar appetitive memory retrieval, interrupted the development of taste preference and produced a preference delay 24 h later. These results suggest that memory formation for a novel taste produces neurochemical changes in the NAc core that have differential requirements for NMDA receptors during retrieval of appetitive or aversive memory. PMID:22529783

  7. Sos2 is dispensable for NMDA-induced Erk activation and LTP induction

    PubMed Central

    Arai, Junko A.; Li, Shaomin; Feig, Larry A.

    2009-01-01

    N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor-induced activation of extracellular signal-related protein kinase (Erk) plays important roles in various neuronal functions including long-term potentiation (LTP). Son of sevenless (Sos) proteins have been implicated in NMDA-induced Erk activation in neurons of young mice. However, contribution of each of the two Sos isoforms, Sos1 and Sos2, has not been clarified. In this study, Sos2 involvement in NMDA-induced Erk activation was examined. We observed no defect in Erk phosphorylation induced by NMDA treatment of cortical neuronal cultures from Sos2-/- newborn mice. Moreover, theta-burst induced LTP induction in the hippocampus of Sos2-/- mice was also normal. Finally, Erk activation by either depolarization or BDNF treatment was also normal in cultured neurons from Sos2 knockout mice. These results imply that Sos1 is the major regulator of these well-known neuronal Sos functions and suggest that a novel function for Sos2 in neurons remains to be determined. PMID:19429099

  8. Estrogen-mediated neuroprotection in the cortex may require NMDA receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Connell, B J; Crosby, K M; Richard, M J P; Mayne, M B; Saleh, T M

    2007-04-25

    Several studies have suggested that a potential mechanism for estrogen-mediated neuroprotection following experimental stroke is a result of modulating glutamate-mediated excitotoxicity. Our laboratory has shown that in male rats, estrogen injection (systemic or direct intracortical injection) resulted in an immediate depolarization of cortical neurons. Therefore, the present study was designed to investigate whether the estrogen-induced depolarization of cortical neurons was required in mediating the early events associated with this neuroprotection. We tested this hypothesis by co-injecting selective antagonists of the NMDA (MK-801) or AMPA (DNQX) glutamatergic receptors with estrogen. Systemic injection of estrogen significantly attenuated the MK-801-induced decrease in infarct volume following middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). Similarly, when estrogen and MK-801 were co-injected directly into the cortex, no neuroprotection was observed. However, when estrogen or MK-801 was injected centrally 10 min prior to the injection of the other drug, significant neuroprotection was observed. This led us to hypothesize that estrogen-mediated neuroprotection required an initial activation of NMDA receptors. Furthermore, our results suggest that this estrogen-mediated neuroprotection was also associated with a significant increase in m-calpain and activation of an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) specific caspase-12. Finally, the results of current clamp experiments showed that estrogen significantly depolarized cortical neurons as well as enhanced NMDA-induced depolarization. Taken together, these results suggest that estrogen pretreatment may activate NMDA receptors resulting in modification of ER-associated molecular mechanisms involved in neuroprotection following MCAO.

  9. Activation of the ζ receptor 1 suppresses NMDA responses in rat retinal ganglion cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, X-J; Liu, L-L; Jiang, S-X; Zhong, Y-M; Yang, X-L

    2011-03-17

    The sigma receptor 1 (σR1) has been shown to modulate the activity of several voltage- and ligand-gated channels. Using patch-clamp techniques in rat retinal slice preparations, we demonstrated that activation of σR1 by SKF10047 (SKF) or PRE-084 suppressed N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor-mediated current responses from both ON and OFF type ganglion cells (GCs), dose-dependently, and the effect could be blocked by the σR1 antagonist BD1047 or the σR antagonist haloperidol. The suppression by SKF of NMDA currents was abolished with pre-incubation of the G protein inhibitor GDP-β-S or the Gi/o activator mastoparan. We further explored the intracellular signaling pathway responsible for the SKF-induced suppression of NMDA responses. Application of either cAMP/the PKA inhibitor Rp-cAMP or cGMP/the PKG inhibitor KT5823 did not change the SKF-induced effect, suggesting the involvement of neither cAMP/PKA nor cGMP/PKG pathway. In contrast, suppression of NMDA responses by SKF was abolished by internal infusion of the phosphatidylinostiol-specific phospholipase C (PLC) inhibitor U73122, but not by the phosphatidylcholine-PLC inhibitor D609. SKF-induced suppression of NMDA responses was dependent on intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i), as evidenced by the fact that the effect was abolished when [Ca2+]i was buffered with 10 mM BAPTA. The SKF effect was blocked by xestospongin-C/heparin, IP3 receptor antagonists, but unchanged by ryanodine/caffeine, ryanodine receptor modulators. Furthermore, application of protein kinase C inhibitors Bis IV and Gö6976 eliminated the SKF effect. These results suggest that the suppression of NMDA responses of rat retinal GCs caused by the activation of σR1 may be mediated by a distinct [Ca2+]i-dependent PLC-PKC pathway. This effect of SKF could help ameliorate malfunction of GCs caused by excessive stimulation of NMDA receptors under pathological conditions.

  10. Bridge feedback for active damping augmentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, G.-S.; Lurie, B. J.

    1990-01-01

    A method is described for broadband damping augmentation of a structural system in which the active members (with feedback control) were developed such that their mechanical input impedance can be electrically adjusted to maximize the energy dissipation rate in the structural system. The active member consists of sensors, an actuator, and a control scheme. A mechanical/electrical analogy is described to model the passive structures and the active members in terms of their impedance representation. As a result, the problem of maximizing dissipative power is analogous to the problem of impedance matching in the electrical network. Closed-loop performance was demonstrated for single- and multiple-active-member controlled truss structure.

  11. Glycine Potentiates AMPA Receptor Function through Metabotropic Activation of GluN2A-Containing NMDA Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Li, Li-Jun; Hu, Rong; Lujan, Brendan; Chen, Juan; Zhang, Jian-Jian; Nakano, Yasuko; Cui, Tian-Yuan; Liao, Ming-Xia; Chen, Jin-Cao; Man, Heng-Ye; Feng, Hua; Wan, Qi

    2016-01-01

    NMDA receptors are Ca2+-permeable ion channels. The activation of NMDA receptors requires agonist glutamate and co-agonist glycine. Recent evidence indicates that NMDA receptor also has metabotropic function. Here we report that in cultured mouse hippocampal neurons, glycine increases AMPA receptor-mediated currents independent of the channel activity of NMDA receptors and the activation of glycine receptors. The potentiation of AMPA receptor function by glycine is antagonized by the inhibition of ERK1/2. In the hippocampal neurons and in the HEK293 cells transfected with different combinations of NMDA receptors, glycine preferentially acts on GluN2A-containing NMDA receptors (GluN2ARs), but not GluN2B-containing NMDA receptors (GluN2BRs), to enhance ERK1/2 phosphorylation independent of the channel activity of GluN2ARs. Without requiring the channel activity of GluN2ARs, glycine increases AMPA receptor-mediated currents through GluN2ARs. Thus, these results reveal a metabotropic function of GluN2ARs in mediating glycine-induced potentiation of AMPA receptor function via ERK1/2 activation. PMID:27807405

  12. Ethanol-withdrawal seizures are controlled by tissue plasminogen activator via modulation of NR2B-containing NMDA receptors.

    PubMed

    Pawlak, Robert; Melchor, Jerry P; Matys, Tomasz; Skrzypiec, Anna E; Strickland, Sidney

    2005-01-11

    Chronic ethanol abuse causes up-regulation of NMDA receptors, which underlies seizures and brain damage upon ethanol withdrawal (EW). Here we show that tissue-plasminogen activator (tPA), a protease implicated in neuronal plasticity and seizures, is induced in the limbic system by chronic ethanol consumption, temporally coinciding with up-regulation of NMDA receptors. tPA interacts with NR2B-containing NMDA receptors and is required for up-regulation of the NR2B subunit in response to ethanol. As a consequence, tPA-deficient mice have reduced NR2B, extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 phosphorylation, and seizures after EW. tPA-mediated facilitation of EW seizures is abolished by NR2B-specific NMDA antagonist ifenprodil. These results indicate that tPA mediates the development of physical dependence on ethanol by regulating NR2B-containing NMDA receptors.

  13. NMDA receptors are the basis for persistent network activity in neocortex slices.

    PubMed

    Castro-Alamancos, Manuel A; Favero, Morgana

    2015-06-01

    During behavioral quiescence the neocortex generates spontaneous slow oscillations that consist of Up and Down states. Up states are short epochs of persistent activity, but their underlying source is unclear. In neocortex slices of adult mice, we monitored several cellular and network variables during the transition between a traditional buffer, which does not cause Up states, and a lower-divalent cation buffer, which leads to the generation of Up states. We found that the resting membrane potential and input resistance of cortical cells did not change with the development of Up states. The synaptic efficacy of excitatory postsynaptic potentials mediated by non-NMDA receptors was slightly reduced, but this is unlikely to facilitate the generation of Up states. On the other hand, we identified two variables that are associated with the generation of Up states: an enhancement of the intrinsic firing excitability of cortical cells and an enhancement of NMDA-mediated responses evoked by electrical or optogenetic stimulation. The fact that blocking NMDA receptors abolishes Up states indicates that the enhancement in intrinsic firing excitability alone is insufficient to generate Up states. NMDA receptors have a crucial role in the generation of Up states in neocortex slices.

  14. Heterosynaptic GABAergic plasticity bidirectionally driven by the activity of pre- and postsynaptic NMDA receptors

    PubMed Central

    Gandolfi, Daniela; Vilella, Antonietta; Zoli, Michele; Bigiani, Albertino

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic changes of the strength of inhibitory synapses play a crucial role in processing neural information and in balancing network activity. Here, we report that the efficacy of GABAergic connections between Golgi cells and granule cells in the cerebellum is persistently altered by the activity of glutamatergic synapses. This form of plasticity is heterosynaptic and is expressed as an increase (long-term potentiation, LTPGABA) or a decrease (long-term depression, LTDGABA) of neurotransmitter release. LTPGABA is induced by postsynaptic NMDA receptor activation, leading to calcium increase and retrograde diffusion of nitric oxide, whereas LTDGABA depends on presynaptic NMDA receptor opening. The sign of plasticity is determined by the activation state of target granule and Golgi cells during the induction processes. By controlling the timing of spikes emitted by granule cells, this form of bidirectional plasticity provides a dynamic control of the granular layer encoding capacity. PMID:27531957

  15. Rhythmic delta activity represents a form of nonconvulsive status epilepticus in anti-NMDA receptor antibody encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Kirkpatrick, McNeill P; Clarke, Charles D; Sonmezturk, Hasan H; Abou-Khalil, Bassel

    2011-02-01

    Anti-NMDA receptor antibody encephalitis is a limbic encephalitis with psychiatric manifestations, abnormal movements, coma, and seizures. The coma and abnormal movements are not typically attributed to seizure activity, and slow activity is the most common EEG finding. We report drug-resistant nonconvulsive status epilepticus as the basis for coma in a 19-year-old woman with anti-NMDA receptor antibodies and a mediastinal teratoma. The EEG showed generalized rhythmic delta activity, with evolution in morphology, frequency, and field typical of nonconvulsive status epilepticus. The status was refractory to antiepileptic drugs, repeated drug-induced coma, resection of the tumor, intravenous steroids, rituximab, and plasmapheresis. She awoke after the addition of felbamate, and the rhythmic delta activity ceased. The rhythmic delta activity described with coma in anti-NMDA receptor antibody encephalitis may represent a pattern of status epilepticus in some patients. Felbamate, which has NMDA receptor antagonist activity, should be studied as a therapeutic agent in this condition.

  16. STEP activation by Gαq coupled GPCRs opposes Src regulation of NMDA receptors containing the GluN2A subunit

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Meng; Xu, Jian; Lei, Gang; Lombroso, Paul J.; Jackson, Michael F.; MacDonald, John F.

    2016-01-01

    N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) are necessary for the induction of synaptic plasticity and for the consolidation of learning and memory. NMDAR function is tightly regulated by functionally opposed families of kinases and phosphatases. Herein we show that the striatal-enriched protein tyrosine phosphatase (STEP) is recruited by Gαq-coupled receptors, including the M1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (M1R), and opposes the Src tyrosine kinase-mediated increase in the function of NMDARs composed of GluN2A. STEP activation by M1R stimulation requires IP3Rs and can depress NMDA-evoked currents with modest intracellular Ca2+ buffering. Src recruitment by M1R stimulation requires coincident NMDAR activation and can augment NMDA-evoked currents with high intracellular Ca2+ buffering. Our findings suggest that Src and STEP recruitment is contingent on differing intracellular Ca2+ dynamics that dictate whether NMDAR function is augmented or depressed following M1R stimulation. PMID:27857196

  17. Differential trafficking of AMPA receptors following activation of NMDA receptors and mGluRs.

    PubMed

    Sanderson, Thomas M; Collingridge, Graham L; Fitzjohn, Stephen M

    2011-07-27

    The removal of AMPA receptors from synapses is a major component of long-term depression (LTD). How this occurs, however, is still only partially understood. To investigate the trafficking of AMPA receptors in real-time we previously tagged the GluA2 subunit of AMPA receptors with ecliptic pHluorin and studied the effects of NMDA receptor activation. In the present study we have compared the effect of NMDA receptor and group I mGluR activation, using GluA2 tagged with super ecliptic pHluorin (SEP-GluA2) expressed in cultured hippocampal neurons. Surprisingly, agonists of the two receptors, which are both able to induce chemical forms of LTD, had clearly distinct effects on AMPA receptor trafficking. In agreement with our previous work we found that transient NMDA receptor activation results in an initial decrease in surface GluA2 from extrasynaptic sites followed by a delayed reduction in GluA2 from puncta (putative synapses). In contrast, transient activation of group I mGluRs, using DHPG, led to a pronounced but more delayed decrease in GluA2 from the dendritic shafts. Surprisingly, there was no average change in the fluorescence of the puncta. Examination of fluorescence at individual puncta, however, indicated that alterations did take place, with some puncta showing an increase and others a decrease in fluorescence. The effects of DHPG were, like DHPG-induced LTD, prevented by treatment with a protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) inhibitor. The electrophysiological correlate of the effects of DHPG in the SEP-GluA2 infected cultures was a reduction in mEPSC frequency with no change in amplitude. The implications of these findings for the initial mechanisms of expression of both NMDA receptor- and mGluR-induced LTD are discussed.

  18. Progressive Brain Damage, Synaptic Reorganization and NMDA Activation in a Model of Epileptogenic Cortical Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Colciaghi, Francesca; Finardi, Adele; Nobili, Paola; Locatelli, Denise; Spigolon, Giada; Battaglia, Giorgio Stefano

    2014-01-01

    Whether severe epilepsy could be a progressive disorder remains as yet unresolved. We previously demonstrated in a rat model of acquired focal cortical dysplasia, the methylazoxymethanol/pilocarpine - MAM/pilocarpine - rats, that the occurrence of status epilepticus (SE) and subsequent seizures fostered a pathologic process capable of modifying the morphology of cortical pyramidal neurons and NMDA receptor expression/localization. We have here extended our analysis by evaluating neocortical and hippocampal changes in MAM/pilocarpine rats at different epilepsy stages, from few days after onset up to six months of chronic epilepsy. Our findings indicate that the process triggered by SE and subsequent seizures in the malformed brain i) is steadily progressive, deeply altering neocortical and hippocampal morphology, with atrophy of neocortex and CA regions and progressive increase of granule cell layer dispersion; ii) changes dramatically the fine morphology of neurons in neocortex and hippocampus, by increasing cell size and decreasing both dendrite arborization and spine density; iii) induces reorganization of glutamatergic and GABAergic networks in both neocortex and hippocampus, favoring excitatory vs inhibitory input; iv) activates NMDA regulatory subunits. Taken together, our data indicate that, at least in experimental models of brain malformations, severe seizure activity, i.e., SE plus recurrent seizures, may lead to a widespread, steadily progressive architectural, neuronal and synaptic reorganization in the brain. They also suggest the mechanistic relevance of glutamate/NMDA hyper-activation in the seizure-related brain pathologic plasticity. PMID:24587109

  19. Attenuation of NMDA receptor activity and neurotoxicity by nitroxyl anion, NO-.

    PubMed

    Kim, W K; Choi, Y B; Rayudu, P V; Das, P; Asaad, W; Arnelle, D R; Stamler, J S; Lipton, S A

    1999-10-01

    Recent evidence indicates that the NO-related species, nitroxyl anion (NO), is produced in physiological systems by several redox metal-containing proteins, including hemoglobin, nitric oxide synthase (NOS), superoxide dismutase, and S-nitrosothiols (SNOs), which have recently been identified in brain. However, the chemical biology of NO- remains largely unknown. Here, we show that NO- -unlike NO*, but reminiscent of NO+ transfer (or S-nitrosylation)- -reacts mainly with Cys-399 in the NR2A subunit of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor to curtail excessive Ca2+ influx and thus provide neuroprotection from excitotoxic insults. This effect of NO- closely resembles that of NOS, which also downregulates NMDA receptor activity under similar conditions in culture.

  20. NMDA receptor activity and the transmission of sensory input into motor output in introverts and extraverts.

    PubMed

    Rammsayer, Thomas H

    2003-05-01

    Recent research suggests that individual differences in brain dopamine functioning may be related to the personality dimension of extraversion. The major goal of the present study was to answer the question of whether a pharmacologically induced change in glutamatergic NMDA receptor activity would also differentially affect the transmission of sensory input into motor out-put in introverts and extraverts. Therefore, in a double-blind within-subjects design, either 30 mg of the NMDA receptor antagonist memantine or placebo were administered to 48 healthy male volunteers before performing a choice reaction-time task. In introverts, memantine caused a pronounced increase in lift-off time (i.e., the time required to lift the finger from a home button) compared to that in extraverts, whereas movement time (i.e., the time required to move the finger from the home button to a response button) was decreased in both groups. The pattern of results suggests that extraversion-related differential sensitivity to pharmacologically induced changes in NMDA receptor activity is limited to functions that involve an interaction between the glutamatergic and dopaminergic systems.

  1. Synthesis of benzopolycyclic cage amines: NMDA receptor antagonist, trypanocidal and antiviral activities

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Eva; Duque, María D.; López-Querol, Marta; Taylor, Martin C.; Naesens, Lieve; Ma, Chunlong; Pinto, Lawrence H.; Sureda, Francesc X.; Kelly, John M.; Vázquez, Santiago

    2012-01-01

    The synthesis of several 6,7,8,9,10,11-hexahydro-9-methyl-5,7:9,11-dimethano-5H-benzocyclononen-7-amines is reported. Several of them display low micromolar NMDA receptor antagonist and/or trypanocidal activities. Two compounds are endowed with micromolar anti vesicular stomatitis virus activity, while only one compound shows micromolar anti-influenza activity. The anti-influenza activity of this compound does not seem to be mediated by blocking of the M2 protein. PMID:22178660

  2. Voltage-clamp frequency domain analysis of NMDA-activated neurons.

    PubMed

    Moore, L E; Hill, R H; Grillner, S

    1993-02-01

    1. Voltage and current-clamp steps were added to a sum of sine waves to measure the tetrodotoxin-insensitive membrane properties of neurons in the intact lamprey spinal cord. A systems analysis in the frequency domain was carried out on two types of cells that have very different morphologies in order to investigate the structural dependence of their electrophysiological properties. The method explicitly takes into account the geometrical shapes of (i) nearly spherical dorsal cells with one or two processes and (ii) motoneurons and interneurons that have branched dendritic structures. Impedance functions were analysed to obtain the cable properties of these in situ neurons. These measurements show that branched neurons are not isopotential and, therefore, a conventional voltage-clamp analysis is not valid. 2. The electrophysiological data from branched neurons were curve-fitted with a lumped soma-equivalent cylinder model consisting of eight equal compartments coupled to an isopotential cell body to obtain membrane parameters for both passive and active properties. The analysis provides a quantitative description of both the passive electrical properties imposed by the geometrical structure of neurons and the voltage-dependent ionic conductances determined by ion channel kinetics. The model fitting of dorsal cells was dominated by a one-compartment resistance and capacitance in parallel (RC) corresponding to the spherical, non-branched shape of these cells. Branched neurons required a model that contained both an RC compartment and a cable that reflected the structure of the cells. At rest, the electrotonic length of the cable was about two. Uniformly distributed voltage-dependent ionic conductance sites were adequate to describe the data at different membrane potentials. 3. The frequency domain admittance method in conjunction with a step voltage clamp was used to control and measure the oscillatory behavior induced by N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) on lamprey spinal

  3. PDI regulates seizure activity via NMDA receptor redox in rats

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji Yang; Ko, Ah-Rhem; Hyun, Hye-Won; Min, Su-Ji; Kim, Ji-Eun

    2017-01-01

    Redox modulation of cysteine residues is one of the post-translational modifications of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR). Protein disulfide isomerases (PDI), an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) chaperone, plays a crucial role in catalyzing disulfide bond formation, reduction, and isomerization. In the present study, we found that PDI bound to NMDAR in the normal hippocampus, and that this binding was increased in chronic epileptic rats. In vitro thiol reductase assay revealed that PDI increased the amount of thiols on full-length recombinant NR1 protein. PDI siRNA, 5–5′-dithio-bis(2-nitrobenzoic acid) (DTNB), bacitracin and PDI antibody reduced seizure susceptibility in response to pilocarpine. In addition, PDI knockdown effectively ameliorated spontaneous seizure activity in chronic epileptic rats. Anticonvulsive effects of PDI siRNA were correlated to the reduction of the amount of free- and nitrosothiols on NMDAR, accompanied by the inhibition of PDI activity. However, PDI knockdown did not lead to alteration in basal neurotransmission or ER stress under physiological condition. These findings provide mechanistic insight into sulfhydration of disulfide bonds on NMDAR by PDI, and suggest that PDI may represent a target of potential therapeutics for epilepsy, which avoids a possible side effect on physiological receptor functionality. PMID:28198441

  4. Tissue plasminogen activator inhibits NMDA-receptor-mediated increases in calcium levels in cultured hippocampal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Samuel D.; Lee, Tet Woo; Christie, David L.; Birch, Nigel P.

    2015-01-01

    NMDA receptors (NMDARs) play a critical role in neurotransmission, acting as essential mediators of many forms of synaptic plasticity, and also modulating aspects of development, synaptic transmission and cell death. NMDAR-induced responses are dependent on a range of factors including subunit composition and receptor location. Tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) is a serine protease that has been reported to interact with NMDARs and modulate NMDAR activity. In this study we report that tPA inhibits NMDAR-mediated changes in intracellular calcium levels in cultures of primary hippocampal neurons stimulated by low (5 μM) but not high (50 μM) concentrations of NMDA. tPA also inhibited changes in calcium levels stimulated by presynaptic release of glutamate following treatment with bicucculine/4-aminopyridine (4-AP). Inhibition was dependent on the proteolytic activity of tPA but was unaffected by α2-antiplasmin, an inhibitor of the tPA substrate plasmin, and receptor-associated protein (RAP), a pan-ligand blocker of the low-density lipoprotein receptor, two proteins previously reported to modulate NMDAR activity. These findings suggest that tPA can modulate changes in intracellular calcium levels in a subset of NMDARs expressed in cultured embryonic hippocampal neurons through a mechanism that involves the proteolytic activity of tPA and synaptic NMDARs. PMID:26500501

  5. Bilobalide, a constituent of Ginkgo biloba, inhibits NMDA-induced phospholipase A2 activation and phospholipid breakdown in rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Weichel, O; Hilgert, M; Chatterjee, S S; Lehr, M; Klein, J

    1999-12-01

    In rat hippocampal slices superfused with magnesium-free buffer, glutamate (1 mM) caused the release of large amounts of choline due to phospholipid breakdown. This phenomenon was mimicked by N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) in a calcium-sensitive manner and was blocked by NMDA receptor antagonists such as MK-801 and 7-chlorokynurenate. The NMDA-induced release of choline was not caused by activation of phospholipase D but was mediated by phospholipase A2 (PLA2) activation as the release of choline was accompanied by the formation of lyso-phosphatidylcholine (lyso-PC) and glycerophospho-choline (GPCh) and was blocked by 5-[2-(2-carboxyethyl)-4-dodecanoyl-3,5-dimethylpyrrol-1-yl]pentano ic acid, a PLA2 inhibitor. Bilobalide, a constituent of Ginkgo biloba, inhibited the NMDA-induced efflux of choline with an IC50 value of 2.3 microM and also prevented the formation of lyso-PC and GPCh. NMDA also caused a release of choline in vivo when infused into the hippocampus of freely moving rats by retrograde dialysis. Again, the effect was completely inhibited by bilobalide which was administered systemically (20 mg/kg i.p.). Interestingly, convulsions which were observed in the NMDA-treated rats were almost totally suppressed by bilobalide. We conclude that release of choline is a sensitive marker for NMDA-induced phospholipase A2 activation and phospholipid breakdown. Bilobalide inhibited the glutamatergic excitotoxic membrane breakdown both in vitro and in vivo, an effect which may be beneficial in the treatment of brain hypoxia and/or neuronal hyperactivity.

  6. Activation of Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 4 Increases NMDA-Activated Current in Hippocampal Pyramidal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lin; Qu, Weijun; Zhou, Libin; Lu, Zihong; Jie, Pinghui; Chen, Lei; Chen, Ling

    2013-01-01

    The glutamate excitotoxicity, mediated through N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors (NMDARs), plays an important role in cerebral ischemia injury. Transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4) can be activated by multiple stimuli that may happen during stroke. The present study evaluated the effect of TRPV4 activation on NMDA-activated current (INMDA) and that of blocking TRPV4 on brain injury after focal cerebral ischemia in mice. We herein report that activation of TRPV4 by 4α-PDD and hypotonic stimulation increased INMDA in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons, which was sensitive to TRPV4 antagonist HC-067047 and NMDAR antagonist AP-5, indicating that TRPV4 activation potentiates NMDAR response. In addition, the increase in INMDA by hypotonicity was sensitive to the antagonist of NMDAR NR2B subunit, but not of NR2A subunit. Furthermore, antagonists of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) significantly attenuated hypotonicity-induced increase in INMDA, while antagonists of protein kinase C or casein kinase II had no such effect, indicating that phosphorylation of NR2B subunit by CaMKII is responsible for TRPV4-potentiated NMDAR response. Finally, we found that intracerebroventricular injection of HC-067047 after 60 min middle cerebral artery occlusion reduced the cerebral infarction with at least a 12 h efficacious time-window. These findings indicate that activation of TRPV4 increases NMDAR function, which may facilitate glutamate excitotoxicity. Closing TRPV4 may exert potent neuroprotection against cerebral ischemia injury through many mechanisms at least including the prevention of NMDAR-mediated glutamate excitotoxicity. PMID:23459987

  7. NMDA receptor activation inhibits alpha-secretase and promotes neuronal amyloid-beta production.

    PubMed

    Lesné, Sylvain; Ali, Carine; Gabriel, Cecília; Croci, Nicole; MacKenzie, Eric T; Glabe, Charles G; Plotkine, Michel; Marchand-Verrecchia, Catherine; Vivien, Denis; Buisson, Alain

    2005-10-12

    Acute brain injuries have been identified as a risk factor for developing Alzheimer's disease (AD). Because glutamate plays a pivotal role in these pathologies, we studied the influence of glutamate receptor activation on amyloid-beta (Abeta) production in primary cultures of cortical neurons. We found that sublethal NMDA receptor activation increased the production and secretion of Abeta. This effect was preceded by an increased expression of neuronal Kunitz protease inhibitory domain (KPI) containing amyloid-beta precursor protein (KPI-APP) followed by a shift from alpha-secretase to beta-secretase-mediated APP processing. This shift is a result of the inhibition of the alpha-secretase candidate tumor necrosis factor-alpha converting enzyme (TACE) when associated with neuronal KPI-APPs. This KPI-APP/TACE interaction was also present in AD brains. Thus, our findings reveal a cellular mechanism linking NMDA receptor activation to neuronal Abeta secretion. These results suggest that even mild deregulation of the glutamatergic neurotransmission may increase Abeta production and represent a causal risk factor for developing AD.

  8. Synaptic NMDA receptor stimulation activates PP1 by inhibiting its phosphorylation by Cdk5

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Hailong; Sun, Lu; Siddoway, Benjamin A.; Petralia, Ronald S.; Yang, Hongtian; Gu, Hua; Nairn, Angus C.

    2013-01-01

    The serine/threonine protein phosphatase protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) is known to play an important role in learning and memory by mediating local and downstream aspects of synaptic signaling, but how PP1 activity is controlled in different forms of synaptic plasticity remains unknown. We find that synaptic N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor stimulation in neurons leads to activation of PP1 through a mechanism involving inhibitory phosphorylation at Thr320 by Cdk5. Synaptic stimulation led to proteasome-dependent degradation of the Cdk5 regulator p35, inactivation of Cdk5, and increased auto-dephosphorylation of Thr320 of PP1. We also found that neither inhibitor-1 nor calcineurin were involved in the control of PP1 activity in response to synaptic NMDA receptor stimulation. Rather, the PP1 regulatory protein, inhibitor-2, formed a complex with PP1 that was controlled by synaptic stimulation. Finally, we found that inhibitor-2 was critical for the induction of long-term depression in primary neurons. Our work fills a major gap regarding the regulation of PP1 in synaptic plasticity. PMID:24189275

  9. Memory retrieval requires ongoing protein synthesis and NMDA receptor activity-mediated AMPA receptor trafficking.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Joëlle; Gamache, Karine; Schneider, Rilla; Nader, Karim

    2015-02-11

    Whereas consolidation and reconsolidation are considered dynamic processes requiring protein synthesis, memory retrieval has long been considered a passive readout of previously established plasticity. However, previous findings suggest that memory retrieval may be more dynamic than previously thought. This study therefore aimed at investigating the molecular mechanisms underlying memory retrieval in the rat. Infusion of protein synthesis inhibitors (rapamycin or anisomycin) in the amygdala 10 min before memory retrieval transiently impaired auditory fear memory expression, suggesting ongoing protein synthesis is required to enable memory retrieval. We then investigated the role of protein synthesis in NMDA receptor activity-mediated AMPA receptor trafficking. Coinfusion of an NMDA receptor antagonist (ifenprodil) or infusion of an AMPA receptor endocytosis inhibitor (GluA23Y) before rapamycin prevented this memory impairment. Furthermore, rapamycin transiently decreased GluA1 levels at the postsynaptic density (PSD), but did not affect extrasynaptic sites. This effect at the PSD was prevented by an infusion of GluA23Y before rapamycin. Together, these data show that ongoing protein synthesis is required before memory retrieval is engaged, and suggest that this protein synthesis may be involved in the NMDAR activity-mediated trafficking of AMPA receptors that takes place during memory retrieval.

  10. Acceleration-Augmented LQG Control of an Active Magnetic Bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feeley, Joseph J.

    1993-01-01

    A linear-quadratic-gaussian (LQG) regulator controller design for an acceleration-augmented active magnetic bearing (AMB) is outlined. Acceleration augmentation is a key feature in providing improved dynamic performance of the controller. The optimal control formulation provides a convenient method of trading-off fast transient response and force attenuation as control objectives.

  11. Acceleration-augmented LQG control of an active magnetic bearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feeley, Joseph J.

    A linear-quadratic-gaussian (LQG) regulator controller design for an acceleration-augmented active magnetic bearing (AMB) is outlined. Acceleration augmentation is a key feature in providing improved dynamic performance of the controller. The optimal control formulation provides a convenient method of trading-off fast transient response and force attenuation as control objectives.

  12. Fast, non-competitive and reversible inhibition of NMDA-activated currents by 2-BFI confers neuroprotection.

    PubMed

    Han, Zhao; Yang, Jin-Long; Jiang, Susan X; Hou, Sheng-Tao; Zheng, Rong-Yuan

    2013-01-01

    Excessive activation of the N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) type glutamate receptors (NMDARs) causes excitotoxicity, a process important in stroke-induced neuronal death. Drugs that inhibit NMDA receptor-mediated [Ca(2+)]i influx are potential leads for development to treat excitotoxicity-induced brain damage. Our previous studies showed that 2-(2-benzofu-ranyl)-2-imidazoline (2-BFI), an immidazoline receptor ligand, dose-dependently protects rodent brains from cerebral ischemia injury. However, the molecular mechanisms remain unclear. In this study, we found that 2-BFI transiently and reversibly inhibits NMDA, but not AMPA currents, in a dose-dependent manner in cultured rat cortical neurons. The mechanism of 2-BFI inhibition of NMDAR is through a noncompetitive fashion with a faster on (Kon = 2.19±0.33×10(-9) M(-1) sec(-1)) and off rate (Koff = 0.67±0.02 sec(-1)) than those of memantine, a gold standard for therapeutic inhibition NMDAR-induced excitotoxicity. 2-BFI also transiently and reversibly blocked NMDA receptor-mediated calcium entry to cultured neurons and provided long-term neuroprotection against NMDA toxicity in vitro. Collectively, these studies demonstrated a potential mechanism of 2-BFI-mediated neuroprotection and indicated that 2-BFI is an excellent candidate for repositioning as a drug for stroke treatment.

  13. Homocysteine-NMDA receptor mediated activation of extracellular-signal regulated kinase leads to neuronal cell death

    PubMed Central

    Poddar, Ranjana; Paul, Surojit

    2009-01-01

    Hyper-homocysteinemia is an independent risk factor for stroke and neurological abnormalities. However the underlying cellular mechanisms by which elevated homocysteine can promote neuronal death is not clear. In the present study we have examined the role of NMDA receptor mediated activation of the extracellular-signal regulated mitogen activated protein (ERK MAP) kinase pathway in homocysteine-dependent neurotoxicity. The study demonstrates that in neurons L-homocysteine-induced cell death is mediated through activation of NMDA receptors. The study also shows that homocysteine-dependent NMDA receptor stimulation and resultant Ca2+ influx leads to rapid and sustained phosphorylation of ERK MAP kinase. Inhibition of ERK phosphorylation attenuates homocysteine mediated neuronal cell death thereby demonstrating that activation of ERK MAP kinase signaling pathway is an intermediate step that couples homocysteine mediated NMDA receptor stimulation to neuronal death. The findings also show that cAMP response-element binding protein (CREB), a pro-survival transcription factor and a downstream target of ERK, is only transiently activated following homocysteine exposure. The sustained activation of ERK but a transient activation of CREB together suggest that exposure to homocysteine initiates a feedback loop that shuts off CREB signaling without affecting ERK phosphorylation and thereby facilitates homocysteine mediated neurotoxicity. PMID:19508427

  14. Bradykinin Enhances AMPA and NMDA Receptor Activity in Spinal Cord Dorsal Horn Neurons by Activating Multiple Kinases to Produce Pain Hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Kohno, Tatsuro; Wang, Haibin; Amaya, Fumimasa; Brenner, Gary J.; Cheng, Jen-Kun; Ji, Ru-Rong; Woolf, Clifford J.

    2009-01-01

    Bradykinin potentiates synaptic glutamate release and action in the spinal cord via presynaptic and postsynaptic B2 receptors, contributing thereby to activity-dependent central sensitization and pain hypersensitivity (Wang et al., 2005). We have now examined the signaling pathways that are responsible for the postsynaptic modulatory actions of bradykinin on glutamatergic action and transmission in superficial dorsal horn neurons. B2 receptors are coexpressed in dorsal horn neurons with protein kinase A (PKA) and the δ isoform of protein kinase C (PKC), and we find that the augmentation by bradykinin of AMPA and NMDA receptor-mediated currents in lamina II neurons requires coactivation of both PKC and PKA. The activation of PKA is downstream of COX1 (cyclooxygenase-1). Extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activation is involved after the PKC and PKA coactivation, and intrathecal administration of bradykinin induces a thermal hyperalgesia in vivo, which is reduced by inhibition of ERK, PKA, and PKC. We conclude that bradykinin, by activating multiple kinases in dorsal horn neurons, potentiates glutamatergic synaptic transmission to produce pain hypersensitivity. PMID:18434532

  15. Phase Diversity and Polarization Augmented Techniques for Active Imaging

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-01

    Phase Diversity and Polarization Augmented Techniques for Active Imaging DISSERTATION Peter M. Johnson, Captain, USAF AFIT/DS/ENG/07-05 DEPARTMENT OF...Force, Department of Defense, or the United States Government. AFIT/DS/ENG/07-05 Phase Diversity and Polarization Augmented Techniques for Active Imaging...must be used. To facilitate this, a multi-frame active phase diversity imaging (APDI) algorithm is derived and demonstrated for the statistics of

  16. Ring finger protein 10 is a novel synaptonuclear messenger encoding activation of NMDA receptors in hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Dinamarca, Margarita C; Guzzetti, Francesca; Karpova, Anna; Lim, Dmitry; Mitro, Nico; Musardo, Stefano; Mellone, Manuela; Marcello, Elena; Stanic, Jennifer; Samaddar, Tanmoy; Burguière, Adeline; Caldarelli, Antonio; Genazzani, Armando A; Perroy, Julie; Fagni, Laurent; Canonico, Pier Luigi; Kreutz, Michael R; Gardoni, Fabrizio; Luca, Monica Di

    2016-01-01

    Synapses and nuclei are connected by bidirectional communication mechanisms that enable information transfer encoded by macromolecules. Here, we identified RNF10 as a novel synaptonuclear protein messenger. RNF10 is activated by calcium signals at the postsynaptic compartment and elicits discrete changes at the transcriptional level. RNF10 is enriched at the excitatory synapse where it associates with the GluN2A subunit of NMDA receptors (NMDARs). Activation of synaptic GluN2A-containing NMDARs and induction of long term potentiation (LTP) lead to the translocation of RNF10 from dendritic segments and dendritic spines to the nucleus. In particular, we provide evidence for importin-dependent long-distance transport from synapto-dendritic compartments to the nucleus. Notably, RNF10 silencing prevents the maintenance of LTP as well as LTP-dependent structural modifications of dendritic spines. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12430.001 PMID:26977767

  17. Gene regulation by NMDA receptor activation in the SDN-POA neurons of male rats during sexual development.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Hseng-Kuang; Shao, Pei-Lin; Tsai, Ke-Li; Shih, Huei-Chuan; Lee, Tzu-Ying; Hsu, Chin

    2005-04-01

    The present study was designed to identify possible signaling pathways, which may play a role in prevention of neuronal apoptosis in the sexually dimorphic nucleus of the preoptic area (SDN-POA) after physiological activation of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor. Gene response to the blockage of the NMDA receptor by an antagonist (dizocilpine hydrogen maleate; MK-801) was screened after suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH). The results showed that differential screening after SSH detected the presence of some neurotrophic genes (RNA binding motif protein 3 (RBM3), alpha-tubulin) as well as apoptosis-related genes (Bcl-2, cytochrome oxidase subunit II, cytochrome oxidase subunit III) in the SDN-POA of male rats, which were down-regulated by blocking the NMDA receptor. The RT-PCR products of the aforementioned genes in MK-801-treated males were significantly less than that in untreated males. In particular, the expression of Bcl-2 mRNA, including Bcl-2 protein, in male rats were significantly suppressed by MK-801 treatment. Moreover, the binding activity of nuclear factor kappaB (NFkappaB) was significantly higher in male rats than in females, but significantly diminished by blocking the NMDA receptor with MK-801 in male rats. No significant difference in cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) binding activity was observed among untreated male, MK-801-treated male, untreated female and MK-801-treated female groups. These results suggest that genes regulated by NMDA receptor activation might participate in neuronal growth and/or anti-apoptosis, and support an important signaling pathway of NFkappaB activation and its target gene, Bcl-2, in preventing neuronal apoptosis in the SDN-POA of male rats during sexual development.

  18. Active member bridge feedback control for damping augmentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Gun-Shing; Lurie, Boris J.

    1992-01-01

    An active damping augmentation approach using active members in a structural system is described. The problem of maximizing the vibration damping in a lightly damped structural system is considered using the analogy of impedance matching between the load and source impedances in an electrical network. The proposed active damping augmentation approach therefore consists of finding the desired active member impedances that maximize the vibration damping, and designing a feedback control in order to achieve desired active member impedances. This study uses a bridge feedback concept that feeds back a combination of signals from sensors of the axial force and relative velocity across the active member to realize the desired active member impedance. The proposed active damping augmentation approach and bridge feedback concept were demonstrated on a three-longeron softly suspended truss structure.

  19. Withanone, an Active Constituent from Withania somnifera, Affords Protection Against NMDA-Induced Excitotoxicity in Neuron-Like Cells.

    PubMed

    Dar, Nawab John; Bhat, Javeed Ahmad; Satti, Naresh Kumar; Sharma, Parduman Raj; Hamid, Abid; Ahmad, Muzamil

    2017-09-01

    Withania somnifera has immense pharmacologic and clinical uses. Owing to its similar pharmacologic activity as that of Korean Ginseng tea, it is popularly called as Indian ginseng. In most cases, extracts of this plant have been evaluated against various diseases or models of disease. However, little efforts have been made to evaluate individual constituents of this plant for neurodegenerative disorders. Present study was carried out to evaluate Withanone, one of the active constituents of Withania somnifera against NMDA-induced excitotoxicity in retinoic acid, differentiated Neuro2a cells. Cells were pre-treated with 5, 10 and 20 μM doses of Withanone and then exposed to 3-mM NMDA for 1 h. MK801, a specific NMDA receptor antagonist, was used as positive control. The results indicated that NMDA induces significant death of cells by accumulation of intracellular Ca(2+), generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, crashing of Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, release of cytochrome c, increased caspase expression, induction of lipid peroxidation as measured by malondialdehyde levels and cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (Parp-1), which is indicative of DNA damage. All these parameters were attenuated with various doses of Withanone pre-treatment. These results suggest that Withanone may serve as potential neuroprotective agent.

  20. Chronic administration of nicotine enhances NMDA-activated currents in the prefrontal cortex and core part of the nucleus accumbens of rats.

    PubMed

    Ávila-Ruiz, Tania; Carranza, Vladimir; Gustavo, López-López; Limón, Daniel I; Martínez, Isabel; Flores, Gonzalo; Flores-Hernández, Jorge

    2014-06-01

    Nicotine is an addictive substance of tobacco. It has been suggested that nicotine acts on glutamatergic (N-methyl-d-aspartate, NMDA) neurotransmission affecting dopamine release in the mesocorticolimbic system. This effect is reflected in neuroadaptative changes that can modulate neurotransmission in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and nucleus accumbens (NAcc) core (cNAcc) and shell (sNAcc) regions. We evaluated the effect of chronic administration of nicotine (4.23 mg/kg/day for 14 days) on NMDA activated currents in dissociated neurons from the PFC, and NAcc (from core and shell regions). We assessed nicotine blood levels by mass spectrophotometry and we confirmed that nicotine increases locomotor activity. An electrophysiological study showed an increase in NMDA currents in neurons from the PFC and core part of the NAcc in animals treated with nicotine compared to those of control rats. No change was observed in neurons from the shell part of the NAcc. The enhanced glutamatergic activity observed in the neurons of rats with chronic administration of nicotine may explain the increased locomotive activity also observed in such rats. To assess one of the possible causes of increased NMDA currents, we used magnesium, to block NMDA receptor that contains the NR2B subunit. If there is a change in percent block of NMDA currents, it means that there is a possible change in expression of NMDA receptor subunits. Our results showed that there is no difference in the blocking effect of magnesium on the NMDA currents. The magnesium lacks of effect after nicotinic treatment suggests that there is no change in expression of NR2B subunit of NMDA receptors, then, the effect of nicotine treatment on amplitude of NMDA currents may be due to an increase in the quantity of receptors or to a change in the unitary conductance, rather than a change in the expression of the subunits that constitute it.

  1. Relief learning requires a coincident activation of dopamine D1 and NMDA receptors within the nucleus accumbens.

    PubMed

    Bergado Acosta, Jorge R; Kahl, Evelyn; Kogias, Georgios; Uzuneser, Taygun C; Fendt, Markus

    2017-03-01

    Relief learning is the association of a stimulus with the offset of an aversive event. Later, the now conditioned relief stimulus induces appetitive-like behavioral changes. We previously demonstrated that the NMDA receptors within the nucleus accumbens (NAC) are involved in relief learning. The NAC is also important for reward learning and it has been shown that reward learning is mediated by an interaction of accumbal dopamine and NMDA glutamate receptors. Since conditioned relief has reward-like properties, we hypothesized that (a) acquisition of relief learning requires the activation of dopamine D1 receptors in the NAC, and (b) if D1 receptors are involved in this process as expected, a concurrent dopamine D1 and NMDA receptor activation may mediate this learning. The present study tested these hypotheses. Therefore, rats received intra-NAC injections of the dopamine D1 receptor antagonist SCH23390 and the NMDA antagonist AP5, either separately or together, at different time points of a relief conditioning procedure. First, we showed that SCH23390 dose-dependently blocked acquisition and the expression of conditioned relief. Next, we demonstrated that co-injections of SCH23390 and AP5 into the NAC, at doses that were ineffective when applied separately, blocked acquisition but not consolidation or expression of relief learning. Notably, neither of the injections affected the locomotor response of the animals to the aversive stimuli suggesting that their perception is not changed. This data indicates that a co-activation of dopamine D1 and NMDA receptors in the NAC is required for acquisition of relief learning.

  2. Early chronic blockade of NR2B subunits and transient activation of NMDA receptors modulate LTP in mouse auditory cortex.

    PubMed

    Mao, Yuting; Zang, Shaoyun; Zhang, Jiping; Sun, Xinde

    2006-02-16

    In the auditory cortex, the properties of NMDA receptors depend primarily on the ratio of NR2A and NR2B subunits. NR2B subunit expression is high at the beginning of critical period and lower in adulthood. Because NMDA receptors are crucial in triggering long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression, developmental or experience-dependent modification of NMDAR subunit composition is likely to influence synaptic plasticity. To examine how NMDA subunit change during postnatal development affect the adult synaptic plasticity, we employed chronic ifenprodil blockade of NR2B subunits and analyzed evoked field potentials in adult C57BL/6 mice auditory cortex (AC). We found that chronic loss of NR2B activity led to a decline in LTP magnitude in the AC of adult mice. Adding NMDA to the artificial cerebrospinal fluid (ACSF) in blocked mice had the opposite effect, producing LTP magnitudes at or exceeding those found in treated or untreated animals. These results suggest that, even in adulthood when NR2B expression is downregulated, these receptor subunits play an important role in experience-dependent plasticity of mouse auditory cortex. Blockade from P60 did not result in any decrease of LTP amplitude, suggesting that chronic block in postnatal period may permanently affect cortical circuits so that they cannot produce significant LTP in adulthood.

  3. Reciprocal and activity-dependent regulation of surface AMPA and NMDA receptors in cultured neurons

    PubMed Central

    Li, Guo Hua; Jackson, Michael F; Orser, Beverley A; MacDonald, John F

    2010-01-01

    Activation of NMDA receptors (NMDARs) can modulate excitatory synaptic transmission in the central nervous system by dynamically altering the number of synaptic AMPA receptors (AMPARs). The surface expression of NMDARs themselves is also subject to modulation in an activity-dependent manner. In addition to NMDAR-induced changes in AMPAR expression, AMPARs have also been found to regulate their own surface expression, independently of NMDARs. However, whether or not AMPARs and NMDARs might reciprocally regulate their surface expression has not previously been systematically explored. We utilized surface biotinylation assays and stimulation protocols intended to selectively stimulate various glutamate receptor subpopulations (e.g. AMPARs vs NMDARs; synaptic vs extrasynaptic). We reveal that activation of synaptic NMDARs increases the surface expression of both NMDAR and AMPAR subunits, while activation of extrasynaptic NMDAR produces the opposite effect. Surprisingly, we find that selective activation of AMPARs reduces the surface expression of not only AMPARs but also of NMDARs. These results suggest that both AMPARs and NMDARs at synaptic sites are subject to modulation by multiple signalling pathways in an activity-dependent way. PMID:21383896

  4. Cannabinoid Receptor Activation Modifies NMDA Receptor Mediated Release of Intracellular Calcium: Implications for Endocannabinoid Control of Hippocampal Neural Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Hampson, Robert E.; Miller, Frances; Palchik, Guillermo; Deadwyler, Sam A.

    2011-01-01

    Chronic activation or inhibition of cannabinoid receptors (CB1) leads to continuous suppression of neuronal plasticity in hippocampus and other brain regions, suggesting that endocannabinoids may have a functional role in synaptic processes that produce state-dependent transient modulation of hippocampal cell activity. In support of this, it has previously been shown in vitro that cannabinoid CB1 receptors modulate second messenger systems in hippocampal neurons that can modulate intracellular ion channels, including channels which release calcium from intracellular stores. Here we demonstrate in hippocampal slices a similar endocannabinoid action on excitatory glutamatergic synapses via modulation of NMDA-receptor mediated intracellular calcium levels in confocal imaged neurons. Calcium entry through glutamatergic NMDA-mediated ion channels increases intracellular calcium concentrations via modulation of release from ryanodine-sensitive channels in endoplasmic reticulum. The studies reported here show that NMDA-elicited increases in Calcium Green fluorescence are enhanced by CB1 receptor antagonists (i.e. rimonabant), and inhibited by CB1 agonists (i.e. WIN 55,212-2). Suppression of endocannabinoid breakdown by either reuptake inhibition (AM404) or fatty-acid amide hydrolase inhibition (URB597) produced suppression of NMDA elicited calcium increases comparable to WIN 55,212-2, while enhancement of calcium release provoked by endocannabinoid receptor antagonists (Rimonabant) was shown to depend on the blockade of CB1 receptor mediated de-phosphorylation of Ryanodine receptors. Such CB1 receptor modulation of NMDA elicited increases in intracellular calcium may account for the respective disruption and enhancement by CB1 agents of trial-specific hippocampal neuron ensemble firing patterns during performance of a short-term memory task, reported previously from this laboratory. PMID:21288475

  5. Astrocytic Ca(2+) waves mediate activation of extrasynaptic NMDA receptors in hippocampal neurons to aggravate brain damage during ischemia.

    PubMed

    Dong, Qi-Ping; He, Jing-Quan; Chai, Zhen

    2013-10-01

    Excitotoxicity plays a central role in the neuronal damage during ischemic stroke. Although growing evidence suggests that activation of extrasynaptic NMDA receptors initiates neuronal death, no direct evidence demonstrated their activation during ischemia. Using rat hippocampal slices, we detected oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) induced slow inward currents (SICs) mediated by extrasynaptic NMDA receptors in CA1 pyramidal neurons. Moreover, Ca(2+) chelator BAPTA dialysis into astrocytic network decreased the frequency of OGD induced SICs, indicating that the activation of extrasynaptic NMDA receptors depended on astrocytic Ca(2+) activity. To further demonstrate the importance of astrocytic Ca(2+) activity, we tested hippocampal slices from inositol triphosphate receptor type 2 (IP3R2) knock-out mice which abolished the astrocytic Ca(2+) activity. As expected, the frequency of OGD induced SICs was reduced. Using two-photon Ca(2+) imaging, we characterized the astrocytic Ca(2+) dynamics. By controlling Ca(2+) level in the individual astrocytes using targeted photolysis, we found that OGD facilitated the propagation of intercellular Ca(2+) waves, which were inhibited by gap junction blocker carbenoxolone (CBX). CBX also inhibited the Ca(2+) activity of the astrocytic network and decreased the SIC frequency during OGD. Functionally, the infarct volumes from brain ischemia were reduced in IP3R2 knock-out mice and in rat intracerebrally delivered with CBX. Our results demonstrate that enhanced Ca(2+) activity of the astrocytic network plays a key role on the activation of extrasynaptic NMDA receptors in hippocampal neurons, which enhances brain damage during ischemia. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. A Clickable Analogue of Ketamine Retains NMDA Receptor Activity, Psychoactivity, and Accumulates in Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Emnett, Christine; Li, Hairong; Jiang, Xiaoping; Benz, Ann; Boggiano, Joseph; Conyers, Sara; Wozniak, David F.; Zorumski, Charles F.; Reichert, David E.; Mennerick, Steven

    2016-01-01

    Ketamine is a psychotomimetic and antidepressant drug. Although antagonism of cell-surface NMDA receptors (NMDARs) may trigger ketamine’s psychoactive effects, ketamine or its major metabolite norketamine could act intracellularly to produce some behavioral effects. To explore the viability of this latter hypothesis, we examined intracellular accumulation of novel visualizable analogues of ketamine/norketamine. We introduced an alkyne “click” handle into norketamine (alkyne-norketamine, A-NK) at the key nitrogen atom. Ketamine, norketamine, and A-NK, but not A-NK-amide, showed acute and persisting psychoactive effects in mice. This psychoactivity profile paralleled activity of the compounds as NMDAR channel blockers; A-NK-amide was inactive at NMDARs, and norketamine and A-NK were active but ~4-fold less potent than ketamine. We incubated rat hippocampal cells with 10 μM A-NK or A-NK-amide then performed Cu2+ catalyzed cycloaddition of azide-Alexa Fluor 488, which covalently attaches the fluorophore to the alkyne moiety in the compounds. Fluorescent imaging revealed intracellular localization of A-NK but weak A-NK-amide labeling. Accumulation was not dependent on membrane potential, NMDAR expression, or NMDAR activity. Overall, the approach revealed a correlation among NMDAR activity, intracellular accumulation/retention, and behavioral effects. Thus, we advance first generation chemical biology tools to aid in the identification of ketamine targets. PMID:27982047

  7. Diazepam improves aspects of social behaviour and neuron activation in NMDA receptor-deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Mielnik, C. A.; Horsfall, W.; Ramsey, A. J.

    2017-01-01

    NR1 knockdown (NR1KD) mice are genetically modified to express low levels of the NR1 subunit of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors, and show deficits in affiliative social behaviour. In this study, we determined which brain regions were selectively activated in response to social stimulation and asked whether differences in neuronal activation could be observed in mice with reduced sociability. Furthermore, we aimed to determine whether brain activation patterns correlated with the amelioration of social deficits through pharmacological intervention. The cingulate cortex, lateral septal nuclei, hypothalamus, thalamus and amygdala showed an increase in c-Fos immunoreactivity that was selective for exposure to social stimuli. NR1KD mice displayed a reduction in social behaviour and a reduction in c-Fos immunoreactivity in the cingulate cortex and septal nuclei. Acute clozapine did not significantly alter sociability; however, diazepam treatment did increase sociability and neuronal activation in the lateral septal region. This study has identified the lateral septal region as a neural substrate of social behaviour and the GABA system as a potential therapeutic target for social dysfunction. PMID:25040071

  8. Non-Ionotropic NMDA Receptor Signaling Drives Activity-Induced Dendritic Spine Shrinkage.

    PubMed

    Stein, Ivar S; Gray, John A; Zito, Karen

    2015-09-02

    The elimination of dendritic spine synapses is a critical step in the refinement of neuronal circuits during development of the cerebral cortex. Several studies have shown that activity-induced shrinkage and retraction of dendritic spines depend on activation of the NMDA-type glutamate receptor (NMDAR), which leads to influx of extracellular calcium ions and activation of calcium-dependent phosphatases that modify regulators of the spine cytoskeleton, suggesting that influx of extracellular calcium ions drives spine shrinkage. Intriguingly, a recent report revealed a novel non-ionotropic function of the NMDAR in the regulation of synaptic strength, which relies on glutamate binding but is independent of ion flux through the receptor (Nabavi et al., 2013). Here, we tested whether non-ionotropic NMDAR signaling could also play a role in driving structural plasticity of dendritic spines. Using two-photon glutamate uncaging and time-lapse imaging of rat hippocampal CA1 neurons, we show that low-frequency glutamatergic stimulation results in shrinkage of dendritic spines even in the presence of the NMDAR d-serine/glycine binding site antagonist 7-chlorokynurenic acid (7CK), which fully blocks NMDAR-mediated currents and Ca(2+) transients. Notably, application of 7CK or MK-801 also converts spine enlargement resulting from a high-frequency uncaging stimulus into spine shrinkage, demonstrating that strong Ca(2+) influx through the NMDAR normally overcomes a non-ionotropic shrinkage signal to drive spine growth. Our results support a model in which NMDAR signaling, independent of ion flux, drives structural shrinkage at spiny synapses. Dendritic spine elimination is vital for the refinement of neural circuits during development and has been linked to improvements in behavioral performance in the adult. Spine shrinkage and elimination have been widely accepted to depend on Ca(2+) influx through NMDA-type glutamate receptors (NMDARs) in conjunction with long-term depression

  9. Selective 5-HT7 Receptor Activation May Enhance Synaptic Plasticity Through N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) Receptor Activity in the Visual Cortex.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Kangjian; Zhao, Xuefei; Li, Youjun; Zheng, Liang; Wang, Jue; Li, Yan-Hai

    2016-01-01

    Serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) is an important neurotransmitter that modulates N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor activity by binding to several different 5-HT receptor subtypes. In the present study, we used whole-cell patch-clamp recordings in transverse slice preparations to test the role of 5-HT receptors in modulating the NMDA receptor-mediated miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (mEPSCs) in layer II/III pyramidal neurons of the rat visual cortex. We found that the NMDA receptor-mediated component of mEPSCs could be potentiated by exogenously applied 5-HT. Similar results were obtained by exogenously applied 5-CT or 8-OH-DPAT (the 5-HT1A and 5-HT7 receptor agonist). A specific antagonist for the 5-HT7 receptor, SB-269970, completely blocked the increase in NMDA receptor-mediated component of mEPSCs by 5-CT or 8- OH-DPAT. Moreover, the selective 5-HT1A receptor antagonist, WAY-100135, displayed no influence on the enhancement in NMDA receptor-mediated component of mEPSCs by 5-CT or 8-OHDPAT. These results indicated that the increase in NMDA receptor-mediated component of mEPSCs by 5-HT in layer II/III pyramidal neurons of the young rat visual cortex requires activation of 5-HT7 receptors, but not 5-HT1A receptors. These observations might be clinically relevant to schizophrenia and Alzheimer's disease (AD), where enhancing NMDA receptor-mediated neurotransmission is considered to be a promising strategy for treatment of these diseases.

  10. DOPAMINE RECEPTOR ACTIVATION REVEALS A NOVEL, KYNURENATE-SENSITIVE COMPONENT OF STRIATAL NMDA NEUROTOXICITY

    PubMed Central

    Poeggeler, Burkhard; Rassoulpour, Arash; Wu, Hui-Qiu; Guidetti, Paolo; Roberts, Rosalinda C.; Schwarcz, Robert

    2007-01-01

    The N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) subtype of glutamate receptors plays an important role in brain physiology, but excessive receptor stimulation results in seizures and excitotoxic nerve cell death. NMDA receptor-mediated neuronal excitation and injury can be prevented by high, non-physiological concentrations of the neuroinhibitory tryptophan metabolite kynurenic acid (KYNA). Here we report that endogenous KYNA, which is formed in and released from astrocytes, controls NMDA receptors in vivo. This was revealed with the aid of the dopaminergic drugs d-amphetamine and apomorphine, which cause rapid, transient decreases in striatal KYNA levels in rats. Intrastriatal injections of the excitotoxins NMDA or quinolinate (but not the non-NMDA receptor agonist kainate) at the time of maximal KYNA reduction resulted in 2-3-fold increases in excitotoxic lesion size. Pre-treatment with kynurenine 3-hydroxylase inhibitors or dopamine receptor antagonists, two classes of pharmacological agents that prevented the reduction in brain KYNA caused by dopaminergic stimulation, abolished the potentiation of neurotoxicity. Thus, the present study identifies a previously unappreciated role of KYNA as a functional link between dopamine receptor stimulation and NMDA neurotoxicity in the striatum. PMID:17629627

  11. Synaptic NMDA receptor activity is coupled to the transcriptional control of the glutathione system

    PubMed Central

    Baxter, Paul S.; Bell, Karen F.S.; Hasel, Philip; Kaindl, Angela M.; Fricker, Michael; Thomson, Derek; Cregan, Sean P.; Gillingwater, Thomas H.; Hardingham, Giles E.

    2015-01-01

    How the brain's antioxidant defenses adapt to changing demand is incompletely understood. Here we show that synaptic activity is coupled, via the NMDA receptor (NMDAR), to control of the glutathione antioxidant system. This tunes antioxidant capacity to reflect the elevated needs of an active neuron, guards against future increased demand and maintains redox balance in the brain. This control is mediated via a programme of gene expression changes that boosts the synthesis, recycling and utilization of glutathione, facilitating ROS detoxification and preventing Puma-dependent neuronal apoptosis. Of particular importance to the developing brain is the direct NMDAR-dependent transcriptional control of glutathione biosynthesis, disruption of which can lead to degeneration. Notably, these activity-dependent cell-autonomous mechanisms were found to cooperate with non-cell-autonomous Nrf2-driven support from astrocytes to maintain neuronal GSH levels in the face of oxidative insults. Thus, developmental NMDAR hypofunction and glutathione system deficits, separately implicated in several neurodevelopmental disorders, are mechanistically linked. PMID:25854456

  12. Blockade of NMDA receptors decreased spinal microglia activation in bee venom induced acute inflammatory pain in rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Wu, Yongfang; Bai, Zhifeng; Hu, Yuyan; Li, Wenbin

    2017-03-01

    Microglial cells in spinal dorsal horn can be activated by nociceptive stimuli and the activated microglial cells release various cytokines enhancing the nociceptive transmission. However, the mechanisms underlying the activation of spinal microglia during nociceptive stimuli have not been well understood. In order to define the role of NMDA receptors in the activation of spinal microglia during nociceptive stimuli, the present study was undertaken to investigate the effect of blockade of NMDA receptors on the spinal microglial activation induced by acute peripheral inflammatory pain in rats. The acute inflammatory pain was induced by subcutaneous bee venom injection to the plantar surface of hind paw of rats. Spontaneous pain behavior, thermal withdrawal latency and mechanical withdrawal threshold were rated. The expression of specific microglia marker CD11b/c was assayed by immunohistochemistry and western blot. After bee venom treatment, it was found that rats produced a monophasic nociception characterized by constantly lifting and licking the injected hind paws, decreased thermal withdrawal latency and mechanical withdrawal threshold; immunohistochemistry displayed microglia with enlarged cell bodies, thickened, extended cellular processes with few ramifications, small spines, and intensive immunostaining; western blot showed upregulated expression level of CD11b/c within the period of hyperalgesia. Prior intrathecal injection of MK-801, a selective antagonist of NMDA receptors, attenuated the pain behaviors and suppressed up-regulation of CD11b/c induced by bee venom. It can be concluded that NMDA receptors take part in the mediation of spinal microglia activation in bee venom induced peripheral inflammatory pain and hyperalgesia in rats.

  13. Spinal leptin contributes to the development of morphine antinociceptive tolerance by activating the STAT3-NMDA receptor pathway in rats.

    PubMed

    Hu, Fen; Cui, Yu; Guo, Ruixian; Chen, Jingfu; Guo, Runming; Shen, Ning; Hua, Xiaoxiao; Mo, Liqiu; Feng, Jianqiang

    2014-08-01

    Leptin, an adipokine synthesized mainly by non‑neuronal tissues, has been reported to contribute to the pathogenesis of neuropathic pain. It has been hypothesized that morphine tolerance and neuropathic pain share some common pathological mechanisms. The present study was designed to examine whether spinal leptin is implicated in the development of morphine antinociceptive tolerance, and whether spinal leptin induces the activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) signaling pathway and the NR1 subunit of N‑methyl‑D‑aspartate (NMDA) receptor, in morphine antinociceptive tolerance in rats. The results demonstrated that intrathecal (i.t.) administration of a leptin antagonist (LA) prevented the development of morphine antinociceptive tolerance in rats. Further studies revealed that the levels of the spinal leptin and the leptin receptor (Ob‑R) were time‑dependently increased following chronic morphine treatment. Mechanistic examination indicated that chronic morphine triggered activation of the STAT3 pathway and an increase in the expression of the NR1 subunit of the NMDA receptor, which was ameliorated by i.t. administration of AG490 [a Janus kinase (JAK)‑STAT inhibitor]. The increased activation of STAT3 and the NR1 subunit was markedly attenuated by i.t. treatment with LA. In addition, the spinal administration of AG490 or MK‑801 (a non‑competitive NMDA receptor inhibitor) blocked the development of morphine antinociceptive tolerance. Taken together, these results have demonstrated, for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, that spinal leptin contributes to the development of morphine antinociceptive tolerance by activating the spinal STAT3‑NMDA receptor pathway.

  14. Enhanced GABAA receptor-mediated activity following activation of NMDA receptors in Cajal-Retzius cells in the developing mouse neocortex

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Chun-Hung; Yeh, Hermes H

    2003-01-01

    Cajal-Retzius (CR) cells are among the earliest generated population of neurons in the developing neocortex and have been implicated in regulating cortical lamination. In rodents, CR cells are transient, being present only up to 2–3 weeks after birth. Although previous electrophysiological studies have demonstrated the presence of NMDA and GABAA receptors in CR cells, little is known about the functional properties of these receptors. Using whole-cell patch-clamp techniques in neocortical slices, we confirmed the presence of D-aminophosphonovaleric acid (APV)- and ifenprodil-sensitive NMDA receptors, and found that the functional expression of this receptor subtype is strain specific. The NMDA-induced response was consistently accompanied by overriding current transients that were blocked by APV and ifenprodil. In addition, bicuculline readily abolished these transients without affecting the NMDA-induced current response. The generation of these overriding current transients was dependent upon intracellular Ca2+ and was prevented by dialysis with the high-affinity Ca2+-chelator BAPTA. Overall, this study uncovered a synergistic interaction between these receptors, whereby activation of NMDA receptors leads to enhanced GABAA receptor-mediated activity through a Ca2+-dependent mechanism. PMID:12730335

  15. Chronic intermittent ethanol exposure enhances NMDA-receptor-mediated synaptic responses and NMDA receptor expression in hippocampal CA1 region.

    PubMed

    Nelson, T E; Ur, C L; Gruol, D L

    2005-06-28

    In previous studies, we found that chronic intermittent ethanol (CIE) treatment-a model of ethanol consumption in which animals are exposed to and withdrawn from intoxicating levels of ethanol on a daily basis-produces neuroadaptive changes in hippocampal area CA1 excitatory synaptic transmission and plasticity. Synaptic responses mediated by N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors are known to be sensitive to ethanol and could play an important role in the neuroadaptive changes induced by CIE treatment. To address this issue, we compared electrophysiological recordings of pharmacologically isolated NMDA-receptor-mediated field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (fEPSPs) in the CA1 region of hippocampal slices prepared from control rats and rats exposed to 2 weeks of CIE treatment administered by vapor inhalation. We found that fEPSPs induced by NMDA receptor activation were unaltered in slices prepared shortly after cessation of CIE treatment (i.e., < or = 1 day of withdrawal from CIE). However, following 7 days of withdrawal from CIE treatment, NMDA-receptor-mediated fEPSPs were augmented relative to age-matched controls. Western blot analysis of NMDA receptor subunit expression showed that, at 7 days of withdrawal, the level of protein for NR2A and NR2B subunits was elevated in the CA1 region of hippocampal slices from CIE-treated animals compared with slices from age-matched controls. These results are consistent with an involvement of NMDA-receptor-mediated synaptic responses in the neuroadaptive effects of CIE on hippocampal physiology and suggest that such changes may contribute to ethanol-induced changes in processes dependent on NMDA-receptor-mediated synaptic responses such as learning and memory, neural development, hyperexcitability and seizures, and neurotoxicity.

  16. Pattern-dependent Role of NMDA receptors in Action Potential Generation: Consequences on ERK Activation

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Meilan; Adams, J. Paige

    2005-01-01

    Synaptic long-term potentiation is maintained through gene transcription, but how the nucleus is recruited remains controversial. Activation of extracellular-signal regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERKs) with synaptic stimulation has been shown to require NMDA receptors (NMDARs), yet stimulation intensities sufficient to recruit action potentials (APs) also appear to be required. This has led us to ask the question whether NMDARs are necessary for AP generation as they relate to ERK activation. To test this, we examined the effects of NMDAR blockade on APs induced with synaptic stimulation using whole-cell current clamp recordings from CA1 pyramidal cells in hippocampal slices. NMDAR antagonists were found to potently inhibit APs generated with 5 and 100 Hz synaptic stimulation. Blockade of APs, and ERK activation, could be overcome with the addition of the GABA-A antagonist bicuculline, indicating that APs are sufficient to activate signals such as ERK in the nucleus and throughout the neuron in the continued presence of NMDAR antagonists. Interestingly, no effects of the NMDAR antagonists were observed when theta-burst stimulation (TBS) was used. This resistance to the antagonists is conferred by temporal summation during the bursts. These results clarify findings from a previous study showing that ERK activation induced with TBS is resistant to APV, in contrast to that induced with 5 Hz or 100 Hz stimulation, which is sensitive. By showing that NMDAR blockade inhibits AP generation, we demonstrate that a major role NMDARs play in cell-wide and nuclear ERK activation is through their contribution to action potential generation. PMID:16049179

  17. Trace and contextual fear conditioning require neural activity and NMDA receptor-dependent transmission in the medial prefrontal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Gilmartin, Marieke R.; Helmstetter, Fred J.

    2010-01-01

    The contribution of the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) to the formation of memory is a subject of considerable recent interest. Notably, the mechanisms supporting memory acquisition in this structure are poorly understood. The mPFC has been implicated in the acquisition of trace fear conditioning, a task that requires the association of a conditional stimulus (CS) and an aversive unconditional stimulus (UCS) across a temporal gap. In both rat and human subjects, frontal regions show increased activity during the trace interval separating the CS and UCS. We investigated the contribution of prefrontal neural activity in the rat to the acquisition of trace fear conditioning using microinfusions of the γ-aminobutyric acid type A (GABAA) receptor agonist muscimol. We also investigated the role of prefrontal N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor-mediated signaling in trace fear conditioning using the NMDA receptor antagonist 2-amino-5-phosphonovaleric acid (APV). Temporary inactivation of prefrontal activity with muscimol or blockade of NMDA receptor-dependent transmission in mPFC impaired the acquisition of trace, but not delay, conditional fear responses. Simultaneously acquired contextual fear responses were also impaired in drug-treated rats exposed to trace or delay, but not unpaired, training protocols. Our results support the idea that synaptic plasticity within the mPFC is critical for the long-term storage of memory in trace fear conditioning. PMID:20504949

  18. Arcuate Src activation-induced phosphorylation of NR2B NMDA subunit contributes to inflammatory pain in rats.

    PubMed

    Xu, Longsheng; Pan, Yanyan; Zhu, Qi; Gong, Shan; Tao, Jin; Xu, Guang-Yin; Jiang, Xinghong

    2012-12-01

    The tyrosine kinases of Src family play an important role in the central sensitization following peripheral inflammation. However, whether the Src family in the arcuate nucleus (ARC) of mediobasal hypothalamus is involved in central sensitization remains unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the role and mechanisms of tyrosine kinases of Src family in N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor activity in the ARC following peripheral inflammation. Peripheral inflammation was induced by unilateral injection of complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) into rat hindpaw. The neuronal activities of the ARC were recorded using electrophysiological field recording from the in vitro mediobasal hypothalamic slices from control and CFA rats. Expression of total and phosphorylated Src and NR2B subunit protein was analyzed by Western blot and immuoprecipitation. Our results showed that CFA injection resulted in an increase in mechanical and thermal sensitivity, which was partially blocked by neonatal monosodium glutamate treatment. CFA injection also enhanced spontaneous firings of ARC neurons, which were reversed by the NMDA receptor NR2B subunit specific antagonist Ro25-6981 and by PP2, an Src family tyrosine kinase inhibitor. In addition, peripheral inflammation enhanced Src phosphorylation and NMDA receptor NR2B subunit phosphorylation without alteration of total NR2B subunit expression in the ARC. Peripheral inflammation also increased the association of NR2B protein with p-Src protein in the ARC. Administration of PP2 blocked the upregulation of NR2B phosphorylation induced by CFA injection. Taken together, our present results suggest that the arcuate Src activation-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of NR2B NMDA subunit may contribute to inflammatory pain.

  19. The triggering of astrocytic calcium waves by NMDA-induced neuronal activation.

    PubMed

    Dani, J W; Smith, S J

    1995-01-01

    It has been well established that astrocytes possess functional receptors for the excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate and respond to physiological concentrations of this substance with oscillations in cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentrations and spatially propagating Ca2+ waves. These findings strongly suggest that glutamate released during synaptic transmission triggers such phenomena within the perisynaptic astrocyte in situ. We test this hypothesis in two preparations, the organotypic hippocampal slice and hippocampal neuron-astrocyte co-cultures, using the Ca2+ indicator fluo-3 and confocal laser microscopy. An agonist for the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-preferring glutamate receptor is employed to stimulate neuronal populations specifically, leaving the astrocytic population unaffected as these cells appear to lack this glutamate receptor subtype. Such pharmacological stimulation initially elicits large Ca2+ transients within the neuronal populations, followed by Ca2+ spikes in surrounding astrocytes, presumably as the result of neuronal glutamate release. During continuous neuronal stimulation, the astrocyte's Ca2+ response becomes oscillatory, with a period averaging 33 s and ranging from 15 to 50 s at 21 degrees C. These findings establish another form of communication within the brain, that between neurons and astrocytes, which perhaps acts to couple astrocytic regulatory responses to neuronal activity.

  20. The Role of Hippocampal NMDA Receptors in Long-Term Emotional Responses following Muscarinic Receptor Activation.

    PubMed

    Hoeller, Alexandre A; Costa, Ana Paula R; Bicca, Maíra A; Matheus, Filipe C; Lach, Gilliard; Spiga, Francesca; Lightman, Stafford L; Walz, Roger; Collingridge, Graham L; Bortolotto, Zuner A; de Lima, Thereza C M

    2016-01-01

    Extensive evidence indicates the influence of the cholinergic system on emotional processing. Previous findings provided new insights into the underlying mechanisms of long-term anxiety, showing that rats injected with a single systemic dose of pilocarpine--a muscarinic receptor (mAChR) agonist--displayed persistent anxiogenic-like responses when evaluated in different behavioral tests and time-points (24 h up to 3 months later). Herein, we investigated whether the pilocarpine-induced long-term anxiogenesis modulates the HPA axis function and the putative involvement of NMDA receptors (NMDARs) following mAChRs activation. Accordingly, adult male Wistar rats presented anxiogenic-like behavior in the elevated plus-maze (EPM) after 24 h or 1 month of pilocarpine injection (150 mg/kg, i.p.). In these animals, mAChR activation disrupted HPA axis function inducing a long-term increase of corticosterone release associated with a reduced expression of hippocampal GRs, as well as consistently decreased NMDAR subunits expression. Furthermore, in another group of rats injected with memantine--an NMDARs antagonist (4 mg/kg, i.p.)--prior to pilocarpine, we found inhibition of anxiogenic-like behaviors in the EPM but no further alterations in the pilocarpine-induced NMDARs downregulation. Our data provide evidence that behavioral anxiogenesis induced by mAChR activation effectively yields short- and long-term alterations in hippocampal NMDARs expression associated with impairment of hippocampal inhibitory regulation of HPA axis activity. This is a novel mechanism associated with anxiety-like responses in rats, which comprise a putative target to future translational studies.

  1. Interaction between orexinergic neurons and NMDA receptors in the control of locus coeruleus-cerebrocortical noradrenergic activity of the rat.

    PubMed

    Tose, Ryuji; Kushikata, Tetsuya; Yoshida, Hitoshi; Kudo, Mihoko; Furukawa, Kenichi; Ueno, Shinya; Hirota, Kazuyoshi

    2009-01-23

    Several studies suggest that NMDA glutamate receptors may play an important role in the activation of a number of brain regions by orexin (OX). We hypothesized that OX and NMDA receptors may interact with cerebrocortical noradrenergic neuron originating from the locus coeruleus (LC). To test this hypothesis, using rats as experimental animals, we examined (i) in vitro effects of MK801 on OXA-evoked norepinephrine release from rat cerebrocortical slices, (ii) in vivo interaction between OXA and the NMDA receptor antagonist, MK801 on norepinephrine release from the prefrontal cortex assessed using microdialysis and (iii) MK801 and OXA-modulation of the electroencephalogram (EEG). We have found that MK801 produced a concentration-dependent inhibition of OXA-evoked norepinephrine release from rat cerebrocortical slices with the IC(50) of 0.9 microM. Moreover, we have also found that icv OXA dose-dependently stimulated norepinephrine release from the rat prefrontal cortex saturating at 213% of baseline. In addition, ip MK801 0.1 mg/kg also significantly increased norepinephrine release in prefrontal cortex to 213%. However, these increases in norepinephrine release were significantly reduced by approximately 70% by simultaneous administration of icv OXA 1 nmol and ip MK801 0.1 mg/kg. Both OXA and MK801 decreased sleep and increased wakefulness, but co-administration caused a return to base-line sleep state. These findings strongly indicate that there is a significant interaction between orexinergic neurons and NMDA receptors in the control of LC-cerebrocortical noradrenergic activity.

  2. NMDA receptor subunit expression and PAR2 receptor activation in colospinal afferent neurons (CANs) during inflammation induced visceral hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Suckow, Shelby K; Caudle, Robert M

    2009-01-01

    Background Visceral hypersensitivity is a clinical observation made when diagnosing patients with functional bowel disorders. The cause of visceral hypersensitivity is unknown but is thought to be attributed to inflammation. Previously we demonstrated that a unique set of enteric neurons, colospinal afferent neurons (CANs), co-localize with the NR1 and NR2D subunits of the NMDA receptor as well as with the PAR2 receptor. The aim of this study was to determine if NMDA and PAR2 receptors expressed on CANs contribute to visceral hypersensitivity following inflammation. Recently, work has suggested that dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons expressing the transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) receptor mediate inflammation induced visceral hypersensitivity. Therefore, in order to study CAN involvement in visceral hypersensitivity, DRG neurons expressing the TRPV1 receptor were lesioned with resiniferatoxin (RTX) prior to inflammation and behavioural testing. Results CANs do not express the TRPV1 receptor; therefore, they survive following RTX injection. RTX treatment resulted in a significant decrease in TRPV1 expressing neurons in the colon and immunohistochemical analysis revealed no change in peptide or receptor expression in CANs following RTX lesioning as compared to control data. Behavioral studies determined that both inflamed non-RTX and RTX animals showed a decrease in balloon pressure threshold as compared to controls. Immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated that the NR1 cassettes, N1 and C1, of the NMDA receptor on CANs were up-regulated following inflammation. Furthermore, inflammation resulted in the activation of the PAR2 receptors expressed on CANs. Conclusion Our data show that inflammation causes an up-regulation of the NMDA receptor and the activation of the PAR2 receptor expressed on CANs. These changes are associated with a decrease in balloon pressure in response to colorectal distension in non-RTX and RTX lesioned animals. Therefore

  3. NMDA receptor subunit expression and PAR2 receptor activation in colospinal afferent neurons (CANs) during inflammation induced visceral hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Suckow, Shelby K; Caudle, Robert M

    2009-09-22

    Visceral hypersensitivity is a clinical observation made when diagnosing patients with functional bowel disorders. The cause of visceral hypersensitivity is unknown but is thought to be attributed to inflammation. Previously we demonstrated that a unique set of enteric neurons, colospinal afferent neurons (CANs), co-localize with the NR1 and NR2D subunits of the NMDA receptor as well as with the PAR2 receptor. The aim of this study was to determine if NMDA and PAR2 receptors expressed on CANs contribute to visceral hypersensitivity following inflammation. Recently, work has suggested that dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons expressing the transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) receptor mediate inflammation induced visceral hypersensitivity. Therefore, in order to study CAN involvement in visceral hypersensitivity, DRG neurons expressing the TRPV1 receptor were lesioned with resiniferatoxin (RTX) prior to inflammation and behavioural testing. CANs do not express the TRPV1 receptor; therefore, they survive following RTX injection. RTX treatment resulted in a significant decrease in TRPV1 expressing neurons in the colon and immunohistochemical analysis revealed no change in peptide or receptor expression in CANs following RTX lesioning as compared to control data. Behavioral studies determined that both inflamed non-RTX and RTX animals showed a decrease in balloon pressure threshold as compared to controls. Immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated that the NR1 cassettes, N1 and C1, of the NMDA receptor on CANs were up-regulated following inflammation. Furthermore, inflammation resulted in the activation of the PAR2 receptors expressed on CANs. Our data show that inflammation causes an up-regulation of the NMDA receptor and the activation of the PAR2 receptor expressed on CANs. These changes are associated with a decrease in balloon pressure in response to colorectal distension in non-RTX and RTX lesioned animals. Therefore, these data suggest that CANs

  4. Relief learning is dependent on NMDA receptor activation in the nucleus accumbens

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadi, Milad; Fendt, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Recently, we demonstrated that the nucleus accumbens (NAC) is required for the acquisition and expression of relief memory. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of NMDA receptors within the NAC in relief learning. Experimental Approach The NMDA receptor antagonist 2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid (AP-5) was injected into the NAC. The effects of these injections on the acquisition and expression of relief memory, as well as on the reactivity to aversive electric stimuli, were tested. Key Results Intra-accumbal AP-5 injections blocked the acquisition but not the expression of relief memory. Furthermore, reactivity to aversive electric stimuli was not affected by the AP-5 injections. Conclusion and Implication The present data indicate that NMDA-dependent plasticity within the NAC is crucial for the acquisition of relief memory. PMID:25572550

  5. Differential Involvement of Amygdala and Cortical NMDA Receptors Activation upon Encoding in Odor Fear Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hegoburu, Chloé; Parrot, Sandrine; Ferreira, Guilaume; Mouly, Anne-Marie

    2014-01-01

    Although the basolateral amygdala (BLA) plays a crucial role for the acquisition of fear memories, sensory cortices are involved in their long-term storage in rats. However, the time course of their respective involvement has received little investigation. Here we assessed the role of the glutamatergic N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors in the…

  6. Differential Involvement of Amygdala and Cortical NMDA Receptors Activation upon Encoding in Odor Fear Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hegoburu, Chloé; Parrot, Sandrine; Ferreira, Guilaume; Mouly, Anne-Marie

    2014-01-01

    Although the basolateral amygdala (BLA) plays a crucial role for the acquisition of fear memories, sensory cortices are involved in their long-term storage in rats. However, the time course of their respective involvement has received little investigation. Here we assessed the role of the glutamatergic N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors in the…

  7. Multiple faces elicit augmented neural activity

    PubMed Central

    Puce, Aina; McNeely, Marie E.; Berrebi, Michael E.; Thompson, James C.; Hardee, Jillian; Brefczynski-Lewis, Julie

    2013-01-01

    How do our brains respond when we are being watched by a group of people?Despite the large volume of literature devoted to face processing, this question has received very little attention. Here we measured the effects on the face-sensitive N170 and other ERPs to viewing displays of one, two and three faces in two experiments. In Experiment 1, overall image brightness and contrast were adjusted to be constant, whereas in Experiment 2 local contrast and brightness of individual faces were not manipulated. A robust positive-negative-positive (P100-N170-P250) ERP complex and an additional late positive ERP, the P400, were elicited to all stimulus types. As the number of faces in the display increased, N170 amplitude increased for both stimulus sets, and latency increased in Experiment 2. P100 latency and P250 amplitude were affected by changes in overall brightness and contrast, but not by the number of faces in the display per se. In Experiment 1 when overall brightness and contrast were adjusted to be constant, later ERP (P250 and P400) latencies showed differences as a function of hemisphere. Hence, our data indicate that N170 increases its magnitude when multiple faces are seen, apparently impervious to basic low-level stimulus features including stimulus size. Outstanding questions remain regarding category-sensitive neural activity that is elicited to viewing multiple items of stimulus categories other than faces. PMID:23785327

  8. Glucocorticoid receptor activation lowers the threshold for NMDA-receptor-dependent homosynaptic long-term depression in the hippocampus through activation of voltage-dependent calcium channels.

    PubMed

    Coussens, C M; Kerr, D S; Abraham, W C

    1997-07-01

    The effects of the glucocorticoid receptor agonist RU-28362 on homosynaptic long-term depression (LTD) were examined in hippocampal slices obtained from adrenal-intact adult male rats. Field excitatory postsynaptic potentials were evoked by stimulation of the Schaffer collateral/commissural pathway and recorded in stratum radiatum of area CA1. Low-frequency stimulation (LFS) was delivered at LTD threshold (2 bouts of 600 pulses, 1 Hz, at baseline stimulation intensity). LFS of the Schaffer collaterals did not produce significant homosynaptic LTD in control slices. However, identical conditioning in the presence of the glucocorticoid receptor agonist RU-28362 (10 microM) produced a robust LTD, which was blocked by the selective glucocorticoid antagonist RU-38486. The LTD induced by glucocorticoid receptor activation was dependent on N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor activity, because the specific NMDA receptor antagonist D(-)-2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid (D-AP5) blocked the facilitation. However, the facilitation of LTD was not due to a potentiation of the isolated NMDA receptor potential by RU-28362. The facilitation of LTD by RU-28362 was also blocked by coincubation of the L-type voltage-dependent calcium channel (VDCC) antagonist nimodipine. Selective activation of the L-type VDCCs by the agonist Bay K 8644 also facilitated LTD induction. Both nimodipine and D-AP5 were effective in blocking the facilitation of LTD by Bay K 8644. These results indicate that L-type VDCCs can contribute to NMDA-receptor-dependent LTD induction.

  9. Glutamatergic transmission in hydra: NMDA/D-serine affects the electrical activity of the body and tentacles of Hydra vulgaris (Cnidaria, Hydrozoa).

    PubMed

    Kay, J C; Kass-Simon, G

    2009-04-01

    Previous electrophysiological studies on the early-evolved metazoan Hydra vulgaris provided evidence that glutamate, acting through alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) and kainate receptors, affects hydra's pacemaker systems; immunocytochemical studies showed that N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors were present in hydra tentacles; behavioral studies demonstrated that NMDA/d-serine affected mouth opening induced by reduced glutathione, and with AMPA/kainate, discharge of nematocysts. In this study, extracellular recordings were made from the tentacle and peduncle of hydra during bath application of NMDA and d-serine (both at 1 x 10(-5) mol l(-1) to 1 x 10(-9) mol l(-1)) in the presence of 1 x 10(-7) mol l(-1) AMPA or kainate. NMDA/d-serine produced a significant increase in tentacle activity, increasing the rate of tentacle pacemaker pulses (TPs) at 1 x 10(-7) mol l(-1), and small, behaviorally uncorrelated tentacle pulses (SUTPs) at 1 x 10(-5) mol l(-1). The NMDA antagonist, d-2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid (D-AP5), counteracted the effects. NMDA/d-serine (1 x 10(-7) mol l(-1)) also caused a potentially significant (trend) decrease in the rate of small, behaviorally uncorrelated electrical body pulses (SUBPs) and rhythmic potentials (RPs). The effect was counteracted by D-AP5. The ectodermal contraction burst (CB) pacemaker system was unaffected by NMDA/d-serine. Our results indicate that glutamate, acting on NMDA/AMPA-kainate receptors, may cause opposing effects on the coordinating systems of tentacle and body-exciting the tentacle effectors and potentially causing an inhibition in the body column.

  10. Blockade of NMDA receptors in the prefrontal cortex increases dopamine and acetylcholine release in the nucleus accumbens and motor activity.

    PubMed

    Del Arco, Alberto; Segovia, Gregorio; Mora, Francisco

    2008-12-01

    The present study investigates the effects of injections of a specific N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) antagonist 3-[(R)-2-carboxypiperazin-4-yl]-propyl-1-phophonic acid (CPP) into the prefrontal cortex (PFC) on the extracellular concentrations of dopamine and acetylcholine in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) and on motor activity in the freely moving rat. Sprague-Dawley male rats were implanted with guide cannulas into the medial PFC and NAc to perform bilateral microinjections and microdialysis experiments. Spontaneous motor activity was monitored in the open field. Injections of CPP (1 microg/0.5 microL) into the PFC produced a significant increase of the baseline extracellular concentrations of dopamine (up to 130%), dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC; up to 120%), homovanillic acid (HVA; up to 130%), and acetylcholine (up to 190%) in the NAc as well as motor hyperactivity. In the NAc, perfusion of the NMDA and alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) glutamate antagonists CPP (50 microM)+6,7-dinitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (DNQX; 50 microM) through the microdialysis probe blocked acetylcholine release, but not DOPAC and HVA increases produced by CPP injections into the PFC. Also, increases in motor activity produced by prefrontal injections of CPP were significantly reduced by bilateral injections into the NAc of a mixed D1/D2 antagonist, flupenthixol (5 and 25 microg/0.5 microL). Injections into the NAc of the muscarinic antagonist scopolamine (1 and 10 microg/0.5 microL) further increased, and of the nicotinic antagonist mecamylamine (1 and 10 microg/0.5 microL) did not change, the increases in motor activity produced by prefrontal CPP injections. These results suggest that the dysfunction of NMDA receptors in the PFC could be a key factor in the neurochemical and motor effects associated with corticolimbic hyperactivity.

  11. Glucocorticoid acts on a putative G protein-coupled receptor to rapidly regulate the activity of NMDA receptors in hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanmin; Sheng, Hui; Qi, Jinshun; Ma, Bei; Sun, Jihu; Li, Shaofeng; Ni, Xin

    2012-04-01

    Glucocorticoids (GCs) have been demonstrated to act through both genomic and nongenomic mechanisms. The present study demonstrated that corticosterone rapidly suppressed the activity of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors in cultured hippocampal neurons. The effect was maintained with corticosterone conjugated to bovine serum albumin and blocked by inhibition of G protein activity with intracellular GDP-β-S application. Corticosterone increased GTP-bound G(s) protein and cyclic AMP (cAMP) production, activated phospholipase Cβ(3) (PLC-β(3)), and induced inositol-1,4,5-triphosphate (IP(3)) production. Blocking PLC and the downstream cascades with PLC inhibitor, IP(3) receptor antagonist, Ca(2+) chelator, and protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitors prevented the actions of corticosterone. Blocking adenylate cyclase (AC) and protein kinase A (PKA) caused a decrease in NMDA-evoked currents. Application of corticosterone partly reversed the inhibition of NMDA currents caused by blockage of AC and PKA. Intracerebroventricular administration of corticosterone significantly suppressed long-term potentiation (LTP) in the CA1 region of the hippocampus within 30 min in vivo, implicating the possibly physiological significance of rapid effects of GC on NMDA receptors. Taken together, our results indicate that GCs act on a putative G protein-coupled receptor to activate multiple signaling pathways in hippocampal neurons, and the rapid suppression of NMDA activity by GCs is dependent on PLC and downstream signaling.

  12. Neonatal olfactory bulbectomy enhances locomotor activity, exploratory behavior and binding of NMDA receptors in pre-pubertal rats.

    PubMed

    Flores, G; Ibañez-Sandoval, O; Silva-Gómez, A B; Camacho-Abrego, I; Rodríguez-Moreno, A; Morales-Medina, J C

    2014-02-14

    In this study, we investigated the effect of neonatal olfactory bulbectomy (nOBX) on behavioral paradigms related to olfaction such as exploratory behavior, locomotor activity in a novel environment and social interaction. We also studied the effect of nOBX on the activity of the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) subtype of glutamate receptors during development. The behavioral effects of nOBX (postnatal day 7, PD7) were investigated in pre- (PD30) and post-pubertal (PD60) Wistar rats. NMDA receptor activity was measured with [(125)I]MK-801 in the brain regions associated with the olfactory circuitry. A significant increase in the novelty-induced locomotion was seen in the pre-pubertal nOBX rats. Although the locomotor effect was less marked than in pre-pubertal rats, the nOBX rats tested post-pubertally failed to habituate to the novel situation as quickly as the sham- and normal- controls. Pre-pubertally, the head-dipping behavior was enhanced in nOBX rats compared with sham-operated and normal controls, while normal exploratory behavior was observed between groups in adulthood. In contrast, social interaction was increased in post-pubertal animals that underwent nOBX. Both pre- and post-pubertal nOBX rats recovered olfaction. Interestingly, pre-pubertal rats showed a significant increase in the [(125)I]MK-801 binding in the piriform cortex, dorsal hippocampus, inner and outer layers of the frontal cortex and outer layer of the cingulate cortex. At post-pubertal age, no significant differences in [(125)I]MK-801 binding were observed between groups at any of the brain regions analyzed. These results suggest that nOBX produces pre-pubertal behavioral disturbances and NMDA receptor changes that are transitory with recovery of olfaction early in adulthood.

  13. NMDA receptor blockade reduces TMJ-evoked activity of trigeminal subnucleus caudalis neurons in an estrogen-dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Tashiro, A.; Okamoto, K.; Bereiter, D.A.

    2009-01-01

    Estrogen status is a risk factor in painful temporomandibular disorders (TMJD). Previously we reported that estradiol (E2) enhanced nociceptive processing of TMJ input by neurons in superficial laminae at the spinomedullary (Vc/C1-2) region; however, the mechanisms for this enhancement are not known. The present study determined if ionotropic glutamate receptors contribute to TMJ nociceptive processing in an E2-dependent manner. Ovariectomized (OvX) female rats were treated with high E2 (HE2) or low dose E2 (LE2) for 2 days and neural activity was recorded in laminae I-II at the Vc/C1-2 region. TMJ-responsive units were activated by adenosine triphosphate (ATP) injections into the joint space. ATP-evoked unit responses in HE2 rats were reduced significantly by topical application of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist, D(−) -2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid (AP5) in a dose-related manner, while units from LE2 were not affected. Application of the non-NMDA receptor antagonist, 6,7-dinitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (DNQX), inhibited the ATP-evoked responses in both groups. Spontaneous activity of TMJ units was not influenced by AP5, whereas it was reduced by DNQX similarly in both groups. The high threshold convergent cutaneous receptive field area of TMJ units was not changed by AP5, whereas DNQX caused a significant reduction in both groups. These results suggest that NMDA-dependent mechanisms contribute to the enhanced ATP-evoked responses of TMJ units in superficial laminae at the Vc/C1-2 region under high E2 conditions, while non-NMDA-dependent mechanisms modify the encoding properties of TMJ units independent of E2 status. PMID:19799971

  14. NMDA receptor blockade reduces temporomandibular joint-evoked activity of trigeminal subnucleus caudalis neurons in an estrogen-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Tashiro, A; Okamoto, K; Bereiter, D A

    2009-12-29

    Estrogen status is a risk factor in painful temporomandibular disorders (TMJD). Previously we reported that estradiol (E2) enhanced nociceptive processing of TMJ input by neurons in superficial laminae at the spinomedullary (Vc/C(1-2)) region; however, the mechanisms for this enhancement are not known. The present study determined if ionotropic glutamate receptors contribute to TMJ nociceptive processing in an E2-dependent manner. Ovariectomized (OvX) female rats were treated with high E2 (HE2) or low dose E2 (LE2) for 2 days and neural activity was recorded in laminae I-II at the Vc/C(1-2) region. TMJ-responsive units were activated by ATP injections into the joint space. ATP-evoked unit responses in HE2 rats were reduced significantly by topical application of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist, D(-)-2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid (AP5) in a dose-related manner, while units from LE2 were not affected. Application of the non-NMDA receptor antagonist, 6,7-dinitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (DNQX), inhibited the ATP-evoked responses in both groups. Spontaneous activity of TMJ units was not influenced by AP5, whereas it was reduced by DNQX similarly in both groups. The high threshold convergent cutaneous receptive field area of TMJ units was not changed by AP5, whereas DNQX caused a significant reduction in both groups. These results suggest that NMDA-dependent mechanisms contribute to the enhanced ATP-evoked responses of TMJ units in superficial laminae at the Vc/C(1-2) region under high E2 conditions, while non-NMDA-dependent mechanisms modify the encoding properties of TMJ units independent of E2 status.

  15. Pathologically-activated therapeutics for neuroprotection: mechanism of NMDA receptor block by memantine and S-nitrosylation.

    PubMed

    Lipton, Stuart A

    2007-05-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Vascular dementia represent the most common forms of dementia. If left unabated, the economic cost of caring for patients with these maladies would consume the entire gross national product of the industrialized world by the middle of this century. Until recently, the only available drugs for this condition were cholinergic treatments, which symptomatically enhance cognitive state to some degree, but they were not neuroprotective. Many potential neuroprotective drugs tested in clinical trials failed because of intolerable side effects. However, after our discovery of its clinically-tolerated mechanism of action, one putatively neuroprotective drug, memantine, was recently approved by the European Union and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of dementia. Recent phase 3 clinical trials have shown that memantine is effective in the treatment of both mild and moderate-to-severe Alzheimer's disease and possibly Vascular dementia (multi-infarct dementia). Here we review the molecular mechanism of memantine's action and also the basis for the drug's use in these neurological diseases, which are mediated at least in part by excitotoxicity. Excitotoxicity is defined as excessive exposure to the neurotransmitter glutamate or overstimulation of its membrane receptors, leading to neuronal injury or death. Excitotoxic neuronal cell damage is mediated in part by overactivation of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-type glutamate receptors, which results in excessive Ca(2+) influx through the receptor associated ion channel and subsequent free radical formation. Physiological NMDA receptor activity, however, is also essential for normal neuronal function. This means that potential neuroprotective agents that block virtually all NMDA receptor activity will very likely have unacceptable clinical side effects. For this reason many previous NMDA receptor antagonists have disappointingly failed advanced clinical trials for a number of

  16. The balance of NMDA- and AMPA/kainate receptor-mediated activity in normal adult goldfish and during optic nerve regeneration.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Andrew L; Rodger, Jennifer; Stirling, R Victoria; Beazley, Lyn D; Dunlop, Sarah A

    2005-10-01

    Retinotectal topography is established during development and relies on the sequential recruitment of glutamate receptors within postsynaptic tectal cells. NMDA receptors underpin plastic changes at early stages when retinal ganglion cell (RGC) terminal arbors are widespread and topography is coarse; AMPA/kainate receptors mediate fast secure neurotransmission characteristic of mature circuits once topography is refined. Here, we have examined the relative contributions of these receptors to visually evoked activity in normal adult goldfish, in which retinotectal topography is constantly adjusted to compensate for the continual neurogenesis and the addition of new RGC arbors. Furthermore, we examined animals at two stages of optic nerve regeneration. In the first, RGC arbors are widespread and receptive fields large resulting in coarse topography; in the second, RGC arbors are pruned to reduce receptive fields leading to refined topography. Antagonists were applied to the tectum during multiunit recording of postsynaptic responses. Normal goldfish have low levels of NMDA receptor-mediated activity and high levels of AMPA/kainate. When coarse topography has been restored, NMDA receptor-mediated activity is increased and that of AMPA/kainate decreased. Once topography has been refined, the balance of NMDA and AMPA/kainate receptor-mediated activity returns to normal. The data suggest that glutamatergic neurotransmission in normal adult goldfish is dual with NMDA receptors fine-tuning topography and AMPA receptors allowing stable synaptic function. Furthermore, the normal operation of both receptors allows a response to injury in which the balance can be transiently reversed to restore topography and vision.

  17. Improved Chemical Structure-Activity Modeling Through Data Augmentation.

    PubMed

    Cortes-Ciriano, Isidro; Bender, Andreas

    2015-12-28

    Extending the original training data with simulated unobserved data points has proven powerful to increase both the generalization ability of predictive models and their robustness against changes in the structure of data (e.g., systematic drifts in the response variable) in diverse areas such as the analysis of spectroscopic data or the detection of conserved domains in protein sequences. In this contribution, we explore the effect of data augmentation in the predictive power of QSAR models, quantified by the RMSE values on the test set. We collected 8 diverse data sets from the literature and ChEMBL version 19 reporting compound activity as pIC50 values. The original training data were replicated (i.e., augmented) N times (N ∈ 0, 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10), and these replications were perturbed with Gaussian noise (μ = 0, σ = σnoise) on either (i) the pIC50 values, (ii) the compound descriptors, (iii) both the compound descriptors and the pIC50 values, or (iv) none of them. The effect of data augmentation was evaluated across three different algorithms (RF, GBM, and SVM radial) and two descriptor types (Morgan fingerprints and physicochemical-property-based descriptors). The influence of all factor levels was analyzed with a balanced fixed-effect full-factorial experiment. Overall, data augmentation constantly led to increased predictive power on the test set by 10-15%. Injecting noise on (i) compound descriptors or on (ii) both compound descriptors and pIC50 values led to the highest drop of RMSEtest values (from 0.67-0.72 to 0.60-0.63 pIC50 units). The maximum increase in predictive power provided by data augmentation is reached when the training data is replicated one time. Therefore, extending the original training data with one perturbed repetition thereof represents a reasonable trade-off between the increased performance of the models and the computational cost of data augmentation, namely increase of (i) model complexity due to the need for optimizing

  18. Modulating NMDA Receptor Function with D-Amino Acid Oxidase Inhibitors: Understanding Functional Activity in PCP-Treated Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Sershen, Henry; Hashim, Audrey; Dunlop, David S.; Suckow, Raymond F.; Cooper, Tom B.; Javitt, Daniel C.

    2016-01-01

    Deficits in N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) function are increasingly linked to persistent negative symptoms and cognitive deficits in schizophrenia. Accordingly, clinical studies have been targeting the modulatory site of the NMDA receptor, based on the decreased function of NMDA receptor, to see whether increasing NMDA function can potentially help treat the negative and cognitive deficits seen in the disease. Glycine and D-serine are endogenous ligands to the NMDA modulatory site, but since high doses are needed to affect brain levels, related compounds are being developed, for example glycine transport (GlyT) inhibitors to potentially elevate brain glycine or targeting enzymes, such as D-amino acid oxidase (DAAO) to slow the breakdown and increase the brain level of D-serine. In the present study we further evaluated the effect of DAAO inhibitors 5-chloro-benzo[d]isoxazol-3-ol (CBIO) and sodium benzoate (NaB) in a phencyclidine (PCP) rodent mouse model to see if the inhibitors affect PCP-induced locomotor activity, alter brain D-serine level, and thereby potentially enhance D-serine responses. D-Serine dose-dependently reduced the PCP-induced locomotor activity at doses above 1000 mg/kg. Acute CBIO (30 mg/kg) did not affect PCP-induced locomotor activity, but appeared to reduce locomotor activity when given with D-serine (600 mg/kg); a dose that by itself did not have an effect. However, the effect was also present when the vehicle (Trappsol®) was tested with D-serine, suggesting that the reduction in locomotor activity was not related to DAAO inhibition, but possibly reflected enhanced bioavailability of D-serine across the blood brain barrier related to the vehicle. With this acute dose of CBIO, D-serine level in brain and plasma were not increased. Another weaker DAAO inhibitor sodium benzoate (NaB) (400 mg/kg), and NaB plus D-serine also significantly reduced PCP-induced locomotor activity, but without affecting plasma or brain D-serine level

  19. Modulating NMDA Receptor Function with D-Amino Acid Oxidase Inhibitors: Understanding Functional Activity in PCP-Treated Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Sershen, Henry; Hashim, Audrey; Dunlop, David S; Suckow, Raymond F; Cooper, Tom B; Javitt, Daniel C

    2016-02-01

    Deficits in N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) function are increasingly linked to persistent negative symptoms and cognitive deficits in schizophrenia. Accordingly, clinical studies have been targeting the modulatory site of the NMDA receptor, based on the decreased function of NMDA receptor, to see whether increasing NMDA function can potentially help treat the negative and cognitive deficits seen in the disease. Glycine and D-serine are endogenous ligands to the NMDA modulatory site, but since high doses are needed to affect brain levels, related compounds are being developed, for example glycine transport (GlyT) inhibitors to potentially elevate brain glycine or targeting enzymes, such as D-amino acid oxidase (DAAO) to slow the breakdown and increase the brain level of D-serine. In the present study we further evaluated the effect of DAAO inhibitors 5-chloro-benzo[d]isoxazol-3-ol (CBIO) and sodium benzoate (NaB) in a phencyclidine (PCP) rodent mouse model to see if the inhibitors affect PCP-induced locomotor activity, alter brain D-serine level, and thereby potentially enhance D-serine responses. D-Serine dose-dependently reduced the PCP-induced locomotor activity at doses above 1000 mg/kg. Acute CBIO (30 mg/kg) did not affect PCP-induced locomotor activity, but appeared to reduce locomotor activity when given with D-serine (600 mg/kg); a dose that by itself did not have an effect. However, the effect was also present when the vehicle (Trappsol(®)) was tested with D-serine, suggesting that the reduction in locomotor activity was not related to DAAO inhibition, but possibly reflected enhanced bioavailability of D-serine across the blood brain barrier related to the vehicle. With this acute dose of CBIO, D-serine level in brain and plasma were not increased. Another weaker DAAO inhibitor NaB (400 mg/kg), and NaB plus D-serine also significantly reduced PCP-induced locomotor activity, but without affecting plasma or brain D-serine level, arguing against a DAAO

  20. Cleavage of the NR2B subunit amino terminus of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor by tissue plasminogen activator: identification of the cleavage site and characterization of ifenprodil and glycine affinities on truncated NMDA receptor.

    PubMed

    Ng, Kay-Siong; Leung, How-Wing; Wong, Peter T-H; Low, Chian-Ming

    2012-07-20

    Thrombolysis using tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) has been the key treatment for patients with acute ischemic stroke for the past decade. Recent studies, however, suggest that this clot-busting protease also plays various roles in brain physiological and pathophysiological glutamatergic-dependent processes, such as synaptic plasticity and neurodegeneration. In addition, increasing evidence implicates tPA as an important neuromodulator of the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors. Here, we demonstrate that recombinant human tPA cleaves the NR2B subunit of NMDA receptor. Analysis of NR2B in rat brain lysates and cortical neurons treated with tPA revealed concentration- and time-dependent degradation of NR2B proteins. Peptide sequencing studies performed on the cleaved-off products obtained from the tPA treatment on a recombinant fusion protein of the amino-terminal domain of NR2B revealed that tPA-mediated cleavage occurred at arginine 67 (Arg(67)). This cleavage is tPA-specific, plasmin-independent, and removes a predicted ~4-kDa fragment (Arg(27)-Arg(67)) from the amino-terminal domain of the NR2B protein. Site-directed mutagenesis of putative cleavage site Arg(67) to Ala(67) impeded tPA-mediated degradation of recombinant protein. This analysis revealed that NR2B is a novel substrate of tPA and suggested that an Arg(27)-Arg(67)-truncated NR2B-containing NMDA receptor could be formed. Heterologous expression of NR2B with Gln(29)-Arg(67) deleted is functional but exhibits reduced ifenprodil inhibition and increased glycine EC(50) with no change in glutamate EC(50). Our results confirmed NR2B as a novel proteolytic substrate of tPA, where tPA may directly interact with NR2B subunits leading to a change in pharmacological properties of NR2B-containing NMDA receptors.

  1. Astrocytic glutamate uptake is slow and does not limit neuronal NMDA receptor activation in the neonatal neocortex.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Elizabeth; Armbruster, Moritz; Cantu, David; Andresen, Lauren; Taylor, Amaro; Danbolt, Niels Christian; Dulla, Chris G

    2015-10-01

    Glutamate uptake by astrocytes controls the time course of glutamate in the extracellular space and affects neurotransmission, synaptogenesis, and circuit development. Astrocytic glutamate uptake has been shown to undergo post-natal maturation in the hippocampus, but has been largely unexplored in other brain regions. Notably, glutamate uptake has never been examined in the developing neocortex. In these studies, we investigated the development of astrocytic glutamate transport, intrinsic membrane properties, and control of neuronal NMDA receptor activation in the developing neocortex. Using astrocytic and neuronal electrophysiology, immunofluorescence, and Western blot analysis we show that: (1) glutamate uptake in the neonatal neocortex is slow relative to neonatal hippocampus; (2) astrocytes in the neonatal neocortex undergo a significant maturation of intrinsic membrane properties; (3) slow glutamate uptake is accompanied by lower expression of both GLT-1 and GLAST; (4) glutamate uptake is less dependent on GLT-1 in neonatal neocortex than in neonatal hippocampus; and (5) the slow glutamate uptake we report in the neonatal neocortex corresponds to minimal astrocytic control of neuronal NMDA receptor activation. Taken together, our results clearly show fundamental differences between astrocytic maturation in the developing neocortex and hippocampus, and corresponding changes in how astrocytes control glutamate signaling.

  2. Influences of NR2B-containing NMDA receptors knockdown on neural activity in hippocampal newborn neurons.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhi-jun; Zhang, Hui-wen; Tang, Na

    2013-08-01

    Adult-born neurons undergo a transient period of plasticity during their integration into the neural circuit. This transient plasticity may involve NMDA receptors containing NR2B, the major subunit expressed at early developmental stages. The main objective of the present study was to investigate the effects of NR2B gene knockdown on the functional integration of the adult-born granule cells generated from the subgranule zone (SGZ) in the hippocampus. The small interfering RNA (siRNA) was used to knock down the NR2B gene in the adult-born hippocampal neurons. In the functional integration test, the mice were exposed to a novel environment (open field arena), and the expression of c-fos was immunohistochemically detected in the hippocampus. After exposure to the novel environment, siRNA-NR2B mice were significantly different from control mice in either the number of squares or the number of rears they crossed, showing decreased horizontal and vertical activity (P<0.05). Moreover, the c-fos expression was increased in both control and siRNA-NR2B mice after open field test. But, it was significantly lower in siRNA-NR2B neurons than in control neurons. It was concluded that the neural activity of newborn neurons is regulated by their own NR2B-containing NMDA glutamate receptors during a short, critical period after neuronal birth.

  3. An activity systemic approach to augmentative and alternative communication.

    PubMed

    Hedvall, Per-Olof; Rydeman, Bitte

    2010-12-01

    The purpose of this paper is to discuss and highlight how Cultural-Historical Activity Theory (CHAT) can contribute to the understanding of the different factors at play when a person is using augmentative and alternative communication (AAC). It is based on data from a 3-year project concerning activity-based vocabulary design of voice output communication aids (VOCAs). Four persons who used AAC and their assistants were interviewed about shopping activities and their views about a vocabulary that included pre-stored phrases. A CHAT model, the Activity Diamond, was applied in an analysis of the data. The result was a multiplicity of human, artifactual, and natural factors, in which six themes were identified: Attitude/Preference, Expectation/Trust, Goal/Power, Place/Space, Time/Learning, and Usability/Accessibility. The themes are exemplified and discussed in relation to AAC.

  4. Usability Engineering: Domain Analysis Activities for Augmented Reality Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-01-01

    This paper discusses our usability engineering process for the Battlefield Augmented Reality System (BARS). Usability engineering is a structured...management principals and techniques, formal and semiformal evaluation techniques, and computerized tools. BARS is an outdoor augmented reality system...originally developed the process in the context of virtual reality applications, but in this work we are adapting the procedures to an augmented

  5. Augmented reality to enhance an active telepresence system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wheeler, Alison; Pretlove, John R. G.; Parker, Graham A.

    1996-12-01

    Tasks carried out remotely via a telerobotic system are typically complex, occur in hazardous environments and require fine control of the robot's movements. Telepresence systems provide the teleoperator with a feeling of being physically present at the remote site. Stereoscopic video has been successfully applied to telepresence vision systems to increase the operator's perception of depth in the remote scene and this sense of presence can be further enhanced using computer generated stereo graphics to augment the visual information presented to the operator. The Mechatronic Systems and Robotics Research Group have over seven years developed a number of high performance active stereo vision systems culminating in the latest, a four degree-of-freedom stereohead. This carries two miniature color cameras and is controlled in real time by the motion of the operator's head, who views the stereoscopic video images on an immersive head mounted display or stereo monitor. The stereohead is mounted on a mobile robot, the movement of which is controlled by a joystick interface. This paper describes the active telepresence system and the development of a prototype augmented reality (AR) application to enhance the operator's sense of presence at the remote site. The initial enhancements are a virtual map and compass to aid navigation in degraded visual conditions and a virtual cursor that provides a means for the operator to interact with the remote environment. The results of preliminary experiments using the initial enhancements are presented.

  6. Repeated ventral midbrain neurotensin injections sensitize to amphetamine-induced locomotion and ERK activation: A role for NMDA receptors.

    PubMed

    Voyer, David; Lévesque, Daniel; Rompré, Pierre-Paul

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that activation of ventral midbrain NMDA receptors is required to initiate sensitization by amphetamine. In view of the recent evidence that neurotensin modulates ventral midbrain glutamate neurotransmission, we tested the hypothesis that neurotensin is acting upstream to glutamate to initiate sensitization to the behavioral and neurochemical effects of amphetamine. During a first testing phase, adult male rats implanted with bilateral ventral midbrain cannulae were injected every second day for three days with D-[Tyr(11)]neurotensin (1.5 nmol/side), the preferred NMDA GluN2A/B antagonist, CPP (40 or 120 pmol/side), the selective GluN2B antagonist, Ro04-5595 (200 or 1200 pmol/side), CPP (40 or 120 pmol/side) + D-[Tyr(11)]neurotensin (1.5 nmol/side) or Ro04-5595 (200 or 1200 pmol/side) + D-[Tyr(11)]neurotensin (1.5 nmol/side) and locomotor activity was measured immediately after the injection. Five days after the last central injection, the locomotor response or the expression of phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (pERK1/2) in neurons of different limbic nuclei was measured following a systemic injection of amphetamine sulfate (0.75 mg/kg, i.p.). Results show that amphetamine induced significantly stronger locomotor activity and pERK1/2 expression in the nucleus accumbens shell and infralimbic cortex in neurotensin pre-exposed animals than in controls (vehicle pre-exposed). These sensitization effects initiated by neurotensin were prevented by CPP, but not Ro04-5595. These results support the hypothesis that neurotensin is stimulating glutamate neurotransmission to initiate neural changes that sub-serve amphetamine sensitization and that glutamate is acting on NMDA receptors that are mostly likely composed of GluN2A, but not GluN2B, subunits. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'Ionotropic glutamate receptors'. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. NMDA but not AMPA glutamatergic receptors are involved in the antidepressant-like activity of MTEP during the forced swim test in mice.

    PubMed

    Pomierny-Chamioło, Lucyna; Poleszak, Ewa; Pilc, Andrzej; Nowak, Gabriel

    2010-01-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest an antidepressant-like activity for 3-[(methyl-1,3-thiazol-4-yl)ethynyl]-pyridine (MTEP), a highly selective, non-competitive antagonist of metabotropic glutamate receptors subtype 5 (mGluR(5)). This effect has been observed following both acute and chronic MTEP treatments in behavioral tests and experimental models of depression, such as the forced swim test (FST), the tail suspension test, and the olfactory bulbectomy model of depression. However, the mechanism of action for mGluR(5) antagonists remains unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the antidepressant-like action of MTEPis dependent on ionotropic glutamatergic receptors. Male Albino Swiss mice were used, and antidepressant-like activity was evaluated using the FST. The antidepressant-like effect of MTEP (0.3 mg/kg) was significantly antagonized by pre-treatment with the NMDA receptor agonist N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA, 75 mg/kg, i.p.). The AMPA receptor antagonist NBQX (10 mg/kg, i.p.) did not affect the MTEP activity. Our results indicate that the antidepressant-like activity of MTEP in the FST involves NMDA but not AMPA receptors and suggest that the interaction between mGluR(5) and NMDA receptors plays an important role in the underlying antidepressant mechanism(s).

  8. Abdomen and spinal cord segmentation with augmented active shape models.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhoubing; Conrad, Benjamin N; Baucom, Rebeccah B; Smith, Seth A; Poulose, Benjamin K; Landman, Bennett A

    2016-07-01

    Active shape models (ASMs) have been widely used for extracting human anatomies in medical images given their capability for shape regularization of topology preservation. However, sensitivity to model initialization and local correspondence search often undermines their performances, especially around highly variable contexts in computed-tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) images. In this study, we propose an augmented ASM (AASM) by integrating the multiatlas label fusion (MALF) and level set (LS) techniques into the traditional ASM framework. Using AASM, landmark updates are optimized globally via a region-based LS evolution applied on the probability map generated from MALF. This augmentation effectively extends the searching range of correspondent landmarks while reducing sensitivity to the image contexts and improves the segmentation robustness. We propose the AASM framework as a two-dimensional segmentation technique targeting structures with one axis of regularity. We apply AASM approach to abdomen CT and spinal cord (SC) MR segmentation challenges. On 20 CT scans, the AASM segmentation of the whole abdominal wall enables the subcutaneous/visceral fat measurement, with high correlation to the measurement derived from manual segmentation. On 28 3T MR scans, AASM yields better performances than other state-of-the-art approaches in segmenting white/gray matter in SC.

  9. Decreasing nicotinic receptor activity and the spatial learning impairment caused by the NMDA glutamate antagonist dizocilpine in rats

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Dennis A.; Heshmati, Pooneh; Kholdebarin, Ehsan; Levin, Edward D.

    2014-01-01

    Nicotinic systems have been shown by a variety of studies to be involved in cognitive function. Nicotinic receptors have an inherent property to become desensitized after activation. The relative role of nicotinic receptor activation vs. net receptor inactivation by desensitization in the cognitive effects of nicotinic drugs remains to be fully understood. In these studies, we tested the effects of the α7 nicotinic receptor antagonist methyllycaconitine (MLA), the α4β2 nicotinic receptor antagonist dihydro-β-erythroidine (DHβE), the nonspecific nicotinic channel blocker mecamylamine and the α4β2 nicotinic receptor desensitizing agent sazetidine-A on learning in a repeated acquisition test. Adult female Sprague-Dawley rats were trained on a repeated acquisition learning procedure in an 8-arm radial maze. MLA (1–4 mg/kg), DHβE (1–4 mg/kg), mecamylamine (0.125–0.5 mg/kg) or sazetidine-A (1 and 3 mg/kg) were administered in four different studies either alone or together with the NMDA glutamate antagonist dizocilpine (0.05 and 0.10 mg/kg). MLA significantly counteracted the learning impairment caused by dizocilpine. The overall choice accuracy impairment caused by dizocilpine was significantly attenuated by co-administration of DHβE. Low doses of the non-specific nicotinic antagonist mecamylamine also reduced dizocilpine-induced repeated acquisition impairment. Sazetidine-A reversed the accuracy impairment caused by dizocilpine. These studies provide evidence that a net decrease in nicotinic receptor activity can improve learning by attenuating learning impairment induced by NMDA glutamate blockade. This adds to evidence in cognitive tests that nicotinic antagonists can improve cognitive function. Further research characterizing the efficacy and mechanisms underlying nicotinic antagonist and desensitization induced cognitive improvement is warranted. PMID:25064338

  10. Behavioural and neuronal activation after microinjections of AMPA and NMDA into the perifornical lateral hypothalamus in rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Frederick W; Deurveilher, Samuel; Semba, Kazue

    2011-10-31

    The perifornical lateral hypothalamic area (PeFLH), which houses orexin/hypocretin (OX) neurons, is thought to play an important role in arousal, feeding, and locomotor activity. The present study examined behavioural effects of activating PeFLH neurons with microinjections of ionotropic glutamate receptor agonists. Three separate unilateral microinjections of either (1) AMPA (1 and 2mM in 0.1 μL artificial cerebrospinal fluid, ACSF) and ACSF, or (2) NMDA (1 and 10mM in 0.1 μL ACSF), and ACSF were made into the PeFLH of adult male rats. Following each injection, the rats were placed into an open field for behavioural scoring for 45 min. Rats were perfused after the third injection for immunohistochemistry for c-Fos and OX to assess the level of activation of OX neurons. Behavioural analyses showed that, as compared to ACSF conditions, AMPA injections produced a dose-dependent increase in locomotion and rearing that persisted throughout the 45 min recording period, and an increase in drinking. Injection of NMDA at 10mM, but not 1mM, induced a transient increase in locomotion and an increase in feeding. Histological analyses showed that while both agonists increased the number of neurons immunoreactive for c-Fos in the PeFLH, only AMPA increased the number of neurons immunoreactive for both c-Fos and OX. There were positive correlations between the number of c-Fos/OX-immunoreactive neurons and the amounts of locomotion, rearing, and drinking. These results support the role of ionotropic glutamate receptors on OX and other neurons in the PeFLH in the regulation of locomotor and ingestive behaviours.

  11. Protease activated receptor 1 (PAR1) enhances Src-mediated tyrosine phosphorylation of NMDA receptor in intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH)

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Zhen-Zhen; Zhang, Feng; Li, Feng-Ying; Luan, Yi-Fei; Guo, Peng; Li, Yi-Hang; Liu, Yong; Qi, Su-Hua

    2016-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that Src could modulate NMDA receptor, and PAR1 could also affect NMDAR signaling. However, whether PAR1 could regulate NMDAR through Src under ICH has not yet been investigated. In this study, we demonstrated the role of Src-PSD95-GluN2A signaling cascades in rat ICH model and in vitro thrombin challenged model. Using the PAR1 agonist SFLLR, antagonist RLLFS and Src inhibitor PP2, electrophysiological analysis showed that PAR1 regulated NMDA-induced whole-cell currents (INMDA) though Src in primary cultured neurons. Both in vivo and in vitro results showed the elevated phosphorylation of tyrosine in Src and GluN2A and enhanced interaction of the Src-PSD95-GluN2A under model conditions. Treatment with the PAR1 antagonist RLLFS, AS-PSD95 (Antisense oligonucleotide against PSD95) and Src inhibitor PP2 inhibited the interaction among Src-PSD95-GluN2A, and p-Src, p-GluN2A. Co-application of SFLLR and AS-PSD95, PP2, or MK801 (NMDAR inhibitor) abolished the effect of SF. In conclusion, our results demonstrated that activated thrombin receptor PAR1 induced Src activation, enhanced the interaction among Src-PSD95-GluN2A signaling modules, and up-regulated GluN2A phosphorylation after ICH injury. Elucidation of such signaling cascades would possibly provide novel targets for ICH treatment. PMID:27385592

  12. Regulation of neuronal gene expression and survival by basal NMDA receptor activity: a role for histone deacetylase 4.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yelin; Wang, Yuanyuan; Modrusan, Zora; Sheng, Morgan; Kaminker, Joshua S

    2014-11-12

    Neuronal gene expression is modulated by activity via calcium-permeable receptors such as NMDA receptors (NMDARs). While gene expression changes downstream of evoked NMDAR activity have been well studied, much less is known about gene expression changes that occur under conditions of basal neuronal activity. In mouse dissociated hippocampal neuronal cultures, we found that a broad NMDAR antagonist, AP5, induced robust gene expression changes under basal activity, but subtype-specific antagonists did not. While some of the gene expression changes are also known to be downstream of stimulated NMDAR activity, others appear specific to basal NMDAR activity. The genes altered by AP5 treatment of basal cultures were enriched for pathways related to class IIa histone deacetylases (HDACs), apoptosis, and synapse-related signaling. Specifically, AP5 altered the expression of all three class IIa HDACs that are highly expressed in the brain, HDAC4, HDAC5, and HDAC9, and also induced nuclear accumulation of HDAC4. HDAC4 knockdown abolished a subset of the gene expression changes induced by AP5, and led to neuronal death under long-term tetrodotoxin or AP5 treatment in rat hippocampal organotypic slice cultures. These data suggest that basal, but not evoked, NMDAR activity regulates gene expression in part through HDAC4, and, that HDAC4 has neuroprotective functions under conditions of low NMDAR activity.

  13. Piper betle extracts exhibit antitumor activity by augmenting antioxidant potential.

    PubMed

    Alam, Badrul; Majumder, Rajib; Akter, Shahina; Lee, Sang-Han

    2015-02-01

    The present study was conducted to evaluate the methanolic extract of Piper betle leaves (MPBL) and its organic fractions with regard to antitumor activity against Ehrlich ascites carcinoma (EAC) in Swiss albino mice and to confirm their antioxidant activities. At 24 h post-intraperitoneal inoculation of tumor cells into mice, extracts were administered at 25, 50 and 100 mg/kg body weight for nine consecutive days. The antitumor effects of the extracts were then assessed according to tumor volume, packed cell count, viable and non-viable tumor cell count, median survival time and increase in life span of EAC-bearing mice. Next, hematological profiles and serum biochemical parameters were calculated, and antioxidant properties were assessed by estimating lipid peroxidation, reduced glutathione (GSH), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) levels. MPBL and the ethylacetate fraction (EPBL) at a dose of 100 mg/kg induced a significant decrease in tumor volume, packed cell volume and viable cell count and increased the life span of the EAC-bearing mice (P<0.05). Hematological and serum biochemical profiles were restored to normal levels in the extract-treated mice compared with the EAC control mice. MPBL and EPBL treatment significantly decreased lipid peroxidation (P<0.05) and restored GSH, SOD and CAT levels towards normal compared with the EAC control. Taken together, the results of the present study demonstrated that Piper betle extracts exhibit significant antitumor activity, which may be attributed to the augmentation of endogenous antioxidant potential.

  14. Activation of presynaptic NMDA receptors coupled to NaV1.8-resistant sodium channel C-fibers causes retrograde mechanical nociceptor sensitization

    PubMed Central

    Parada, Carlos Amílcar; Vivancos, Gustavo Gameiro; Tambeli, Claudia Herrera; de Queiróz Cunha, Fernando; Ferreira, Sérgio Henrique

    2003-01-01

    The present study investigated whether activation of presynaptic N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors in the spinal cord produces a retrograde nociceptor sensitization (hypernociception) to mechanical nonnoxious stimulus. By using an electronic version of the von Frey hair test (pressure meter), s.c. intraplantar administration of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) (50–400 ng per paw) evoked a dose-related ipsilateral paw hypernociception. In contrast, intrathecal (i.t.) administration of NMDA (5–80 ng) and PGE2 (15–150 ng) evoked dose-related bilateral paw hypernociception. The s.c. intraplantar administration of dipyrone (80–320 μg per paw) or morphine (3 and 9 μg per paw), usually used to antagonize peripheral PGE2 (100 ng per paw), induced hypernociception and also antagonized the ipsilateral (without affecting the contralateral) paw hypernociception induced by i.t. injections of NMDA (40 ng) or PGE2 (50 ng). These doses of drugs did not modify the basal mechanical sensitivity of control paws. This result shows that intraspinal NMDA or PGE2 produces sensitization of the primary sensory neuron in response to mechanical stimulation. In a second series of experiments it was shown that the i.t. treatment with NaV1.8 (SNS/PN3) sodium channel antisense oligodeoxynucleotides, but not mismatch oligodeoxynucleotides, decreased the mRNA expression of sodium tetrodotoxin-resistant channels on the dorsal root ganglia and abolished the mechanical hypernociception induced by i.t. administration of NMDA. Thus, our results support the suggestion that glutamate release in the spinal cord during inflammation causes retrograde hypernociception of nociceptors associated with sodium tetrodotoxin-resistant channels in primary nociceptive sensory neurons. PMID:12589028

  15. Autocrine activation of neuronal NMDA receptors by aspartate mediates dopamine- and cAMP-induced CREB-dependent gene transcription

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Luis E. F.; Murray, Peter D.; Zielke, H. Ronald; Roby, Clinton D.; Kingsbury, Tami J.; Krueger, Bruce K.

    2009-01-01

    Cyclic AMP can stimulate the transcription of many activity-dependent genes via activation of the transcription factor, CREB. However, in mouse cortical neuron cultures, prior to synaptogenesis, neither cAMP nor dopamine, which acts via cAMP, stimulated CREB-dependent gene transcription when NR2B-containing NMDA receptors (NMDARs) were blocked. Stimulation of transcription by cAMP was potentiated by inhibitors of excitatory amino acid uptake, suggesting a role for extracellular glutamate or aspartate in cAMP-induced transcription. Aspartate was identified as the extracellular messenger: enzymatic scavenging of L-aspartate, but not glutamate, blocked stimulation of CREB-dependent gene transcription by cAMP; moreover, cAMP induced aspartate but not glutamate release. Taken together, these results suggest that cAMP acts via an autocrine or paracrine pathway to release aspartate, which activates NR2B-containing NMDARs, leading to Ca2+ entry and activation of transcription. This cAMP/aspartate/NMDAR signaling pathway may mediate the effects of transmitters such as dopamine on axon growth and synaptogenesis in developing neurons or on synaptic plasticity in mature neural networks. PMID:19812345

  16. NMDA and AMPA receptors are involved in the antidepressant-like activity of tianeptine in the forced swim test in mice.

    PubMed

    Wlaź, Piotr; Kasperek, Regina; Wlaź, Aleksandra; Szumiło, Michał; Wróbel, Andrzej; Nowak, Gabriel; Poleszak, Ewa

    2011-01-01

    It is known that tianeptine exhibits antidepressant-like activity. Its influence on the glutamatergic system is also known, but the mechanisms involved in this activity remain to be established. The aim of this study was to investigate the involvement of the glutamate pathway in the antidepressant-like action of tianeptine. We investigated the effects of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) and α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionate (AMPA) receptor ligands on tianeptine-induced activity in the forced swim test (FST) in mice. The antidepressant-like activity of tianeptine (30 m/kg, ip) was significantly antagonized by D-serine (100 nmol/mouse icv) and NBQX (10 mg/kg, ip). Moreover, low, ineffective doses of the glycine/NMDA site antagonist L-701,324 (1 mg/kg, ip) administered together with low, ineffective doses of tianeptine (20 mg/kg, ip) exhibited a significant reduction of immobility time in the FST. These doses of the examined agents, which did have an effect in the FST, did not alter locomotor activity. The present study indicates that the antidepressant-like activity of tianeptine in the FST involves both NMDA and AMPA receptors and suggests that the interaction between serotonergic and glutamatergic transmission may play an important role in the action of tianeptine.

  17. Retinal cell death induced by TRPV1 activation involves NMDA signaling and upregulation of nitric oxide synthases.

    PubMed

    Leonelli, Mauro; Martins, Daniel O; Britto, Luiz R G

    2013-04-01

    The activation of the transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 channel (TRPV1) has been correlated with oxidative and nitrosative stress and cell death in the nervous system. Our previous results indicate that TRPV1 activation in the adult retina can lead to constitutive and inducible nitric oxide synthase-dependent protein nitration and apoptosis. In this report, we have investigated the potential effects of TRPV1 channel activation on nitric oxide synthase (NOS) expression and function, and the putative participation of ionotropic glutamate receptors in retinal TRPV1-induced protein nitration, lipid peroxidation, and DNA fragmentation. Intravitreal injections of the classical TRPV1 agonist capsaicin up-regulated the protein expression of the inducible and endothelial NOS isoforms. Using 4,5-diaminofluorescein diacetate for nitric oxide (NO) imaging, we found that capsaicin also increased the production of NO in retinal blood vessels. Processes and perikarya of TRPV1-expressing neurons in the inner nuclear layer of the retina were found in the vicinity of nNOS-positive neurons, but those two proteins did not colocalize. Retinal explants exposed to capsaicin presented high protein nitration, lipid peroxidation, and cell death, which were observed in the inner nuclear and plexiform layers and in ganglion cells. This effect was partially blocked by AP-5, a NMDA glutamate receptor antagonist, but not by CNQX, an AMPA/kainate receptor antagonist. These data support a potential role for TRPV1 channels in physiopathological retinal processes mediated by NO, which at least in part involve glutamate release.

  18. An EP2 Agonist Facilitates NMDA-Induced Outward Currents and Inhibits Dendritic Beading through Activation of BK Channels in Mouse Cortical Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Yoshinori; Morinaga, Saori; Liu, Xia; Zhang, Jing; Wu, Zhou; Yokoyama, Takeshi; Nakanishi, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), a major metabolite of arachidonic acid produced by cyclooxygenase pathways, exerts its bioactive responses by activating four E-prostanoid receptor subtypes, EP1, EP2, EP3, and EP4. PGE2 enables modulating N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor-mediated responses. However, the effect of E-prostanoid receptor agonists on large-conductance Ca2+-activated K+ (BK) channels, which are functionally coupled with NMDA receptors, remains unclear. Here, we showed that EP2 receptor-mediated signaling pathways increased NMDA-induced outward currents (INMDA-OUT), which are associated with the BK channel activation. Patch-clamp recordings from the acutely dissociated mouse cortical neurons revealed that an EP2 receptor agonist activated INMDA-OUT, whereas an EP3 receptor agonist reduced it. Agonists of EP1 or EP4 receptors showed no significant effects on INMDA-OUT. A direct perfusion of 3,5′-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) through the patch pipette facilitated INMDA-OUT, which was abolished by the presence of protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor. Furthermore, facilitation of INMDA-OUT caused by an EP2 receptor agonist was significantly suppressed by PKA inhibitor. Finally, the activation of BK channels through EP2 receptors facilitated the recovery phase of NMDA-induced dendritic beading in the primary cultured cortical neurons. These results suggest that a direct activation of BK channels by EP2 receptor-mediated signaling pathways plays neuroprotective roles in cortical neurons. PMID:27298516

  19. Activation of extrasynaptic, but not synaptic, NMDA receptors modifies amyloid precursor protein expression pattern and increases amyloid-ß production.

    PubMed

    Bordji, Karim; Becerril-Ortega, Javier; Nicole, Olivier; Buisson, Alain

    2010-11-24

    Calcium is a key mediator controlling essential neuronal functions depending on electrical activity. Altered neuronal calcium homeostasis affects metabolism of amyloid precursor protein (APP), leading to increased production of β-amyloid (Aβ), and contributing to the initiation of Alzheimer's disease (AD). A linkage between excessive glutamate receptor activation and neuronal Aβ release was established, and recent reports suggest that synaptic and extrasynaptic NMDA receptor (NMDAR) activation may have distinct consequences in plasticity, gene regulation, and neuronal death. Here, we report for the first time that prolonged activation of extrasynaptic NMDAR, but not synaptic NMDAR, dramatically increased the neuronal production of Aβ. This effect was preceded by a shift from APP695 to Kunitz protease inhibitory domain (KPI) containing APPs (KPI-APPs), isoforms exhibiting an important amyloidogenic potential. Conversely, after synaptic NMDAR activation, we failed to detect any KPI-APP expression and neuronal Aβ production was not modified. Calcium imaging data showed that intracellular calcium concentration after extrasynaptic NMDAR stimulation was lower than after synaptic activation. This suggests distinct signaling pathways for each pool of receptors. We found that modification of neuronal APP expression pattern triggered by extrasynaptic NMDAR activation was regulated at an alternative splicing level involving calcium-/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IV, but overall APP expression remained identical. Finally, memantine dose-dependently inhibited extrasynaptic NMDAR-induced KPI-APPs expression as well as neuronal Aβ release. Altogether, these data suggest that a chronic activation of extrasynaptic NMDAR promotes amyloidogenic KPI-APP expression leading to neuronal Aβ release, representing a causal risk factor for developing AD.

  20. HIV-1 gp120Bal down-regulates phosphorylated NMDA receptor subunit 1 in cortical neurons via activation of glutamate and chemokine receptors

    PubMed Central

    Ru, Wenjuan; Tang, Shao-Jun

    2015-01-01

    HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein gp120 (gp120) is a major virulence protein implicated in the pathogenesis of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND). Although gp120 has been suggested to cause synaptic and neuronal injuries by disrupting NMDA receptor (NMDAR) function, the underlying mechanism is unclear. Here, we show that gp120Bal down-regulates the phosphorylation of the NMDAR subunit 1 NR1 (at Ser896 and Ser897), which is essential for NMDAR function. This effect of gp120Bal is blocked by specific antagonists of both NMDA and AMPA receptors, indicating a critical role of synaptic activation. Furthermore, AMD3100 and maraviroc, antagonists of CCR5 and CXCR4 chemokine receptors, respectively, inhibit the effect of gp120Bal on NR1, suggesting that CXCR4 and CCR5 activation are involved. These findings may provide mechanistic insights into the synaptopathogenesis caused by HIV-1 infection. PMID:26582091

  1. Fasting activation of AgRP neurons requires NMDA receptors and involves spinogenesis and increased excitatory tone.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tiemin; Kong, Dong; Shah, Bhavik P; Ye, Chianping; Koda, Shuichi; Saunders, Arpiar; Ding, Jun B; Yang, Zongfang; Sabatini, Bernardo L; Lowell, Bradford B

    2012-02-09

    AgRP neuron activity drives feeding and weight gain whereas that of nearby POMC neurons does the opposite. However, the role of excitatory glutamatergic input in controlling these neurons is unknown. To address this question, we generated mice lacking NMDA receptors (NMDARs) on either AgRP or POMC neurons. Deletion of NMDARs from AgRP neurons markedly reduced weight, body fat and food intake whereas deletion from POMC neurons had no effect. Activation of AgRP neurons by fasting, as assessed by c-Fos, Agrp and Npy mRNA expression, AMPA receptor-mediated EPSCs, depolarization and firing rates, required NMDARs. Furthermore, AgRP but not POMC neurons have dendritic spines and increased glutamatergic input onto AgRP neurons caused by fasting was paralleled by an increase in spines, suggesting fasting induced synaptogenesis and spinogenesis. Thus glutamatergic synaptic transmission and its modulation by NMDARs play key roles in controlling AgRP neurons and determining the cellular and behavioral response to fasting.

  2. A risk variant for alcoholism in the NMDA receptor affects amygdala activity during fear conditioning in humans.

    PubMed

    Cacciaglia, Raffaele; Nees, Frauke; Pohlack, Sebastian T; Ruttorf, Michaela; Winkelmann, Tobias; Witt, Stephanie H; Nieratschker, Vanessa; Rietschel, Marcella; Flor, Herta

    2013-09-01

    People at high risk for alcoholism show deficits in aversive learning, as indicated by impaired electrodermal responses during fear conditioning, a basic form of associative learning that depends on the amygdala. A positive family history of alcohol dependence has also been related to decreased amygdala responses during emotional processing. In the present study we report reduced amygdala activity during the acquisition of conditioned fear in healthy carriers of a risk variant for alcoholism (rs2072450) in the NR2A subunit-containing N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA)-receptor. These results indicate that rs2072450 might confer risk for alcohol dependence through deficient fear acquisition indexed by a diminished amygdala response during aversive learning, and provide a neural basis for a weak behavioral inhibition previously documented in individuals at high risk for alcohol dependence. Carriers of the risk variant additionally exhibit dampened insula activation, a finding that further strengthens our data, given the importance of this brain region in fear conditioning. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Bidirectional effects of inhibiting or activating NMDA receptors on extinction after cocaine self-administration in rats

    PubMed Central

    Hafenbreidel, Madalyn; Todd, Carolynn Rafa; Twining, Robert C.; Tuscher, Jennifer J.; Mueller, Devin

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Extinction of drug seeking is facilitated by NMDA receptor (NMDAr) agonists, but it remains unclear whether extinction is dependent on NMDAr activity. Objectives We investigated the necessity of NMDArs for extinction of cocaine seeking, and whether extinction altered NMDAr expression within extinction-related neuroanatomical loci. Methods Rats were trained to lever press for i.v. infusions of cocaine or sucrose reinforcement prior to extinction training or withdrawal. Results Administration of the NMDAr competitive antagonist CPP prior to four brief extinction sessions impaired subsequent extinction retention. In contrast, post-extinction administration of the NMDAr coagonist D-serine attenuated lever pressing across days as compared to saline administration, indicative of facilitated consolidation of extinction. Furthermore, expression of the NMDAr subunits, GluN2A and GluN2B, was not altered in the ventromedial prefrontal cortex. However, both GluN2A and GluN2B subunit expression in the nucleus accumbens was increased following cocaine self-administration, and this increased expression was relatively resistant to modulation by extinction. Conclusions Our findings demonstrate that extinction of cocaine seeking is bidirectionally mediated by NMDArs and suggest that selective modulation of NMDAr activity could facilitate extinction-based therapies for treatment of cocaine abuse. PMID:24847958

  4. Effects of ifenprodil on the antidepressant-like activity of NMDA ligands in the forced swim test in mice.

    PubMed

    Poleszak, Ewa; Wośko, Sylwia; Serefko, Anna; Szopa, Aleksandra; Wlaź, Aleksandra; Szewczyk, Bernadeta; Nowak, Gabriel; Wlaź, Piotr

    2013-10-01

    Multiple pre-clinical and clinical studies clearly displayed implication of the NMDA receptors in development of depressive disorders since a variety of NMDA receptor antagonists exhibit an antidepressant-like effect. The main aim of our study was to assess the influence of ifenprodil - an allosteric modulator selectively binding at the NR2B subunit on the performance in the forced swim test in mice of various NMDA receptor ligands interacting with distinct components of the NMDA receptor complex. Ifenprodil at a dose of 10mg/kg enhanced the antidepressant-like effect of CGP 37849 (a competitive NMDA receptor antagonist, 0.312mg/kg), L-701,324 (an antagonist at glycine site, 1mg/kg), MK-801 (a non-competitive antagonist, 0.05mg/kg) and d-cycloserine (a partial agonist of a glycine site, 2.5mg/kg) but it did not shorten the immobility time of animals which concurrently received an inorganic modulator of the NMDA receptor complex, such as Zn(2+) (2.5mg/kg) or Mg(2+) (10mg/kg). On the other hand, the antidepressant-like effect of ifenprodil (20mg/kg) was reversed by N-methyl-d-aspartic acid (an agonist at the glutamate site, 75mg/kg) or d-serine (an agonist at the glycine site, 100nmol/mouse). In conclusion, the antidepressant-like potential of ifenprodil given concomitantly with NMDA ligands was either reinforced (in the case of both partial agonist and antagonists, except for magnesium and zinc) or diminished (in the case of conventional full agonists).

  5. Neuroprotective effect of Chuk-Me-Sun-Dan on NMDA- and AMPA-evoked nitric oxide synthase activity in mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Koo, Byung-Soo; Choi, Eun-Gyu; Park, Jae-Bok; Cho, Chang-Ho; Chung, Kang-Hyun; Kim, Cheorl-Ho

    2005-01-01

    Chukmesundan (CMSD) is composed of 8 medicinal herbs including Panex ginseng C.A. MEYER, Atractylodes macrocephala KOID, Poria cocos WOLF, Pinellia ternata BREIT, Brassica alba BOISS, Aconitum carmichaeli DEBX, Cynanchum atratum BGE, and Cuscuta chinensis LAM and used for the treatment of various symptoms accompanying hypertension and cerebrovascular disorders. This study was carried out to examine the effects of CMSD on N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-evoked, and alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA)-evoked nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity in mouse brain. In adult forebrain, CMSD influences neuronal maintenance and is neuroprotective in several injury models through mechanisms that are incompletely understood. Interaction is observed between CMSD and nitric oxide (NO). Because NO affects both neural plasticity and degeneration, we hypothesized that CMSD might rapidly modulate NO production. Using in vivo microdialysis we measured conversion of L-[14C] arginine to L-[14C] citrulline as an accurate reflection of NOS activity in adult mouse hippocampus. CMSD significantly reduced NOS activities to 62% of basal levels within 2 days of onset of delivery and maintained NOS activity at less than 45% of baseline throughout 3 days of delivery. These effects did not occur with control (distilled water) and were not mediated by effect of CMSD on glutamate levels. In addition, simultaneous delivery of CMSD treatment prevented significant increases in NOS activity triggered by the glutamate receptor agonists NMDA and AMPA. Rapid suppression by CMSD of basal and glutamate-stimulated NOS activity may regulate neuromodulatory functions of NO or protect neurons from NO toxicity and suggests a novel mechanism for rapidly mediating functions of CMSD. It is shown that NMDA receptor stimulation leads to activation of p21ras (Ras) through generation of NO via neuronal NOS. The competitive NOS inhibitor, L-nitroarginine methyl ester, and CMSD prevents Ras

  6. Pattern-dependent role of NMDA receptors in action potential generation: consequences on extracellular signal-regulated kinase activation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Meilan; Adams, J Paige; Dudek, Serena M

    2005-07-27

    Synaptic long-term potentiation is maintained through gene transcription, but how the nucleus is recruited remains controversial. Activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERKs) 1 and 2 with synaptic stimulation has been shown to require NMDA receptors (NMDARs), yet stimulation intensities sufficient to recruit action potentials (APs) also appear to be required. This has led us to ask the question of whether NMDARs are necessary for AP generation as they relate to ERK activation. To test this, we examined the effects of NMDAR blockade on APs induced with synaptic stimulation using whole-cell current-clamp recordings from CA1 pyramidal cells in hippocampal slices. NMDAR antagonists were found to potently inhibit APs generated with 5 and 100 Hz synaptic stimulation. Blockade of APs and ERK activation could be overcome with the addition of the GABAA antagonist bicuculline, indicating that APs are sufficient to activate signals such as ERK in the nucleus and throughout the neuron in the continued presence of NMDAR antagonists. Interestingly, no effects of the NMDAR antagonists were observed when theta-burst stimulation (TBS) was used. This resistance to the antagonists is conferred by temporal summation during the bursts. These results clarify findings from a previous study showing that ERK activation induced with TBS is resistant to 2-amino-5-phosphonovalerate, in contrast to that induced with 5 or 100 Hz stimulation, which is sensitive. By showing that NMDAR blockade inhibits AP generation, we demonstrate that a major role that NMDARs play in cell-wide and nuclear ERK activation is through their contribution to action potential generation.

  7. Dopamine promotes NMDA receptor hypofunction in the retina through D1 receptor-mediated Csk activation, Src inhibition and decrease of GluN2B phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Socodato, Renato; Santiago, Felipe N.; Portugal, Camila C.; Domith, Ivan; Encarnação, Thaísa G.; Loiola, Erick C.; Ventura, Ana L. M.; Cossenza, Marcelo; Relvas, João B.; Castro, Newton G.; Paes-de-Carvalho, Roberto

    2017-01-01

    Dopamine and glutamate are critical neurotransmitters involved in light-induced synaptic activity in the retina. In brain neurons, dopamine D1 receptors (D1Rs) and the cytosolic protein tyrosine kinase Src can, independently, modulate the behavior of NMDA-type glutamate receptors (NMDARs). Here we studied the interplay between D1Rs, Src and NMDARs in retinal neurons. We reveal that dopamine-mediated D1R stimulation provoked NMDAR hypofunction in retinal neurons by attenuating NMDA-gated currents, by preventing NMDA-elicited calcium mobilization and by decreasing the phosphorylation of NMDAR subunit GluN2B. This dopamine effect was dependent on upregulation of the canonical D1R/adenylyl cyclase/cAMP/PKA pathway, of PKA-induced activation of C-terminal Src kinase (Csk) and of Src inhibition. Accordingly, knocking down Csk or overexpressing a Csk phosphoresistant Src mutant abrogated the dopamine-induced NMDAR hypofunction. Overall, the interplay between dopamine and NMDAR hypofunction, through the D1R/Csk/Src/GluN2B pathway, might impact on light-regulated synaptic activity in retinal neurons. PMID:28098256

  8. The inverse link between genetic risk for schizophrenia and migraine through NMDA (N-methyl-D-aspartate) receptor activation via D-serine.

    PubMed

    Van der Auwera, Sandra; Teumer, Alexander; Hertel, Johannes; Homuth, Georg; Völker, Uwe; Lucht, Michael J; Degenhardt, Franziska; Schulze, Thomas; Rietschel, Marcella; Nöthen, Markus M; John, Ulrich; Nauck, Matthias; Grabe, Hans Jörgen

    2016-09-01

    Schizophrenia has a considerable genetic background. Epidemiological studies suggest an inverse clinical association between schizophrenia and migraine. However, it is unclear to what extent this inverse comorbidity can be explained by genetic mechanisms or by schizophrenia-related behavioral factors. For both disorders hypotheses of glutamate N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor dysfunction have been developed in the past. We hypothesized that both conditions share common genetic factors with inverse effects, primary in the glutamatergic system and genes involved in NMDA activation. Data from the population based Study of Health in Pomerania (N=3973) were used. Based on the results from the recent genome-wide association study for schizophrenia, we calculated polygenic scores (PRS) for subsets of SNPs with different p-value cutoffs and for biological sub-entities. These scores were tested for an association of distinct biological pathways with migraine. The PRS for schizophrenia was inversely associated with migraine in our sample. This association was exclusively based on the genome-wide hits and on single nucleotide polymorphisms near or within genes encoding proteins involved in glutamatergic neurotransmission. This association could be attributed to a single intronic variant rs4523957 in SRR encoding serine-racemase. Additional expression quantitative trait loci analyses of functional variants in SRR and gene-by-gene interaction analyses further supported the validity of this finding. SRR represents the rate limiting enzyme for the synthesis of D-serine, an important co-agonist of the NMDA receptor. According to our results, a decreased versus increased activation of NMDA receptors may play a role in the etiology of schizophrenia, as well as in migraine. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. and ECNP. All rights reserved.

  9. Modulation of NMDA receptor function by inhibition of D-amino acid oxidase in rodent brain.

    PubMed

    Strick, Christine A; Li, Cheryl; Scott, Liam; Harvey, Brian; Hajós, Mihály; Steyn, Stefanus J; Piotrowski, Mary A; James, Larry C; Downs, James T; Rago, Brian; Becker, Stacey L; El-Kattan, Ayman; Xu, Youfen; Ganong, Alan H; Tingley, F David; Ramirez, Andres D; Seymour, Patricia A; Guanowsky, Victor; Majchrzak, Mark J; Fox, Carol B; Schmidt, Christopher J; Duplantier, Allen J

    2011-01-01

    Observations that N-Methyl-D-Aspartate (NMDA) antagonists produce symptoms in humans that are similar to those seen in schizophrenia have led to the current hypothesis that schizophrenia might result from NMDA receptor hypofunction. Inhibition of D-amino acid oxidase (DAAO), the enzyme responsible for degradation of D-serine, should lead to increased levels of this co-agonist at the NMDA receptor, and thereby provide a therapeutic approach to schizophrenia. We have profiled some of the preclinical biochemical, electrophysiological, and behavioral consequences of administering potent and selective inhibitors of DAAO to rodents to begin to test this hypothesis. Inhibition of DAAO activity resulted in a significant dose and time dependent increase in D-serine only in the cerebellum, although a time delay was observed between peak plasma or brain drug concentration and cerebellum D-serine response. Pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) modeling employing a mechanism-based indirect response model was used to characterize the correlation between free brain drug concentration and D-serine accumulation. DAAO inhibitors had little or no activity in rodent models considered predictive for antipsychotic activity. The inhibitors did, however, affect cortical activity in the Mescaline-Induced Scratching model, produced a modest but significant increase in NMDA receptor-mediated synaptic currents in primary neuronal cultures from rat hippocampus, and resulted in a significant increase in evoked hippocampal theta rhythm, an in vivo electrophysiological model of hippocampal activity. These findings demonstrate that although DAAO inhibition did not cause a measurable increase in D-serine in forebrain, it did affect hippocampal and cortical activity, possibly through augmentation of NMDA receptor-mediated currents.

  10. Active and passive techniques for tiltrotor aeroelastic stability augmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hathaway, Eric L.

    Tiltrotors are susceptible to whirl flutter, an aeroelastic instability characterized by a coupling of rotor-generated aerodynamic forces and elastic wing modes in high speed airplane-mode flight. The conventional approach to ensuring adequate whirl flutter stability will not scale easily to larger tiltrotor designs. This study constitutes an investigation of several alternatives for improving tiltrotor aerolastic stability. A whirl flutter stability analysis is developed that does not rely on more complex models to determine the variations in crucial input parameters with flight condition. Variation of blade flap and lag frequency, and pitch-flap, pitch-lag, and flap-lag couplings, are calculated from physical parameters, such as blade structural flap and lag stiffness distribution (inboard or outboard of pitch bearing), collective pitch, and precone. The analysis is used to perform a study of the influence of various design parameters on whirl flutter stability. While previous studies have investigated the individual influence of various design parameters, the present investigation uses formal optimization techniques to determine a unique combination of parameters that maximizes whirl flutter stability. The optimal designs require only modest changes in the key rotor and wing design parameters to significantly increase flutter speed. When constraints on design parameters are relaxed, optimized configurations are obtained that allow large values of kinematic pitch-flap (delta3) coupling without degrading aeroelastic stability. Larger values of delta3 may be desirable for advanced tiltrotor configurations. An investigation of active control of wing flaperons for stability augmentation is also conducted. Both stiff- and soft-inplane tiltrotor configurations are examined. Control systems that increase flutter speed and wing mode sub-critical damping are designed while observing realistic limits on flaperon deflection. The flaperon is shown to be particularly

  11. RabGEF1/Rabex-5 Regulates TrkA-Mediated Neurite Outgrowth and NMDA-Induced Signaling Activation in NGF-Differentiated PC12 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tam, See-Ying; Lilla, Jennifer N.; Chen, Ching-Cheng; Kalesnikoff, Janet; Tsai, Mindy

    2015-01-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) binds to its cognate receptor TrkA and induces neuronal differentiation by activating distinct downstream signal transduction events. RabGEF1 (also known as Rabex-5) is a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for Rab5, which regulates early endosome fusion and vesicular trafficking in endocytic pathways. Here, we used the antisense (AS) expression approach to induce an NGF-dependent sustained knockdown of RabGEF1 protein expression in stable PC12 transfectants. We show that RabGEF1 is a negative regulator of NGF-induced neurite outgrowth and modulates other cellular and signaling processes that are activated by the interaction of NGF with TrkA receptors, such as cell cycle progression, cessation of proliferation, and activation of NGF-mediated downstream signaling responses. Moreover, RabGEF1 can bind to Rac1, and the activation of Rac1 upon NGF treatment is significantly enhanced in AS transfectants, suggesting that RabGEF1 is a negative regulator of NGF-induced Rac1 activation in PC12 cells. Furthermore, we show that RabGEF1 can also interact with NMDA receptors by binding to the NR2B subunit and its associated binding partner SynGAP, and negatively regulates activation of nitric oxide synthase activity induced by NMDA receptor stimulation in NGF-differentiated PC12 cells. Our data suggest that RabGEF1 is a negative regulator of TrkA-dependent neuronal differentiation and of NMDA receptor-mediated signaling activation in NGF-differentiated PC12 cells. PMID:26588713

  12. RabGEF1/Rabex-5 Regulates TrkA-Mediated Neurite Outgrowth and NMDA-Induced Signaling Activation in NGF-Differentiated PC12 Cells.

    PubMed

    Tam, See-Ying; Lilla, Jennifer N; Chen, Ching-Cheng; Kalesnikoff, Janet; Tsai, Mindy

    2015-01-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) binds to its cognate receptor TrkA and induces neuronal differentiation by activating distinct downstream signal transduction events. RabGEF1 (also known as Rabex-5) is a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for Rab5, which regulates early endosome fusion and vesicular trafficking in endocytic pathways. Here, we used the antisense (AS) expression approach to induce an NGF-dependent sustained knockdown of RabGEF1 protein expression in stable PC12 transfectants. We show that RabGEF1 is a negative regulator of NGF-induced neurite outgrowth and modulates other cellular and signaling processes that are activated by the interaction of NGF with TrkA receptors, such as cell cycle progression, cessation of proliferation, and activation of NGF-mediated downstream signaling responses. Moreover, RabGEF1 can bind to Rac1, and the activation of Rac1 upon NGF treatment is significantly enhanced in AS transfectants, suggesting that RabGEF1 is a negative regulator of NGF-induced Rac1 activation in PC12 cells. Furthermore, we show that RabGEF1 can also interact with NMDA receptors by binding to the NR2B subunit and its associated binding partner SynGAP, and negatively regulates activation of nitric oxide synthase activity induced by NMDA receptor stimulation in NGF-differentiated PC12 cells. Our data suggest that RabGEF1 is a negative regulator of TrkA-dependent neuronal differentiation and of NMDA receptor-mediated signaling activation in NGF-differentiated PC12 cells.

  13. Railgun current guard plates - Active current management and augmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beno, Joseph H.; Weldon, William F.

    1989-06-01

    A system of auxiliary conductors designed to reduce current density peaks in railgun rails is described, and the effects on rail current density and projectile force are discussed. Performance comparisons with simple railguns and typical augmented railguns are made. It is shown that the wrap-around design of the guard plates can produce four to eight times the force produced by the usual augmented railgun design, without increasing local peak current densities. The range of performance contained in the factors between four and eight is primarily a function of the complexity of design. The more complex designs involve allowing the guard plates to overhang the rail slightly (intruding into the bore space, similar to rifling in a conventional gun barrel), and the use of separate power supplies for the rail and guard-plate conductors. These added complexities represent unacceptable complications for many applications, but may be justifiable for others.

  14. NMDA Receptors Enhance Spontaneous Activity and Promote Neuronal Survival in the Developing Cochlea

    PubMed Central

    Zhang-Hooks, YingXin; Agarwal, Amit; Mishina, Masayoshi; Bergles, Dwight E.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Spontaneous bursts of activity in developing sensory pathways promote maturation of neurons, refinement of neuronal connections and assembly of appropriate functional networks. In the developing auditory system, inner hair cells (IHCs) spontaneously fire Ca2+ spikes, each of which is transformed into a mini-burst of action potentials in spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs). Here we show that NMDARs are expressed in SGN dendritic terminals and play a critical role during transmission of activity from IHCs to SGNs before hearing onset. NMDAR activation enhances glutamate-mediated Ca2+ influx at dendritic terminals, promotes repetitive firing of individual SGNs in response to each synaptic event, and enhances coincident activity of neighboring SGNs that will eventually encode similar frequencies of sound. Loss of NMDAR signaling from SGNs reduced their survival both in vivo and in vitro, revealing that spontaneous activity in the prehearing cochlea promotes maturation of auditory circuitry through periodic activation of NMDARs in SGNs. PMID:26774161

  15. NMDA receptor-mediated epileptiform persistent activity requires calcium release from intracellular stores in prefrontal neurons.

    PubMed

    Gao, Wen-Jun; Goldman-Rakic, Patricia S

    2006-02-01

    Various normal and pathological forms of synchronized population activity are generated by recurrent excitation among pyramidal neurons in the neocortex. However, the intracellular signaling mechanisms underlying this activity remain poorly understood. In this study, we have examined the cellular properties of synchronized epileptiform activity in the prefrontal cortex with particular emphasis on a potential role of intracellular calcium stores. We find that the zero-magnesium-induced synchronized activity is blocked by inhibition of sarco-endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPases, phospholipase C (PLC), the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) receptor, and the ryanodine receptor. This same activity is, however, not affected by application of metabotropic glutamatergic receptor (mGluR) agonists, nor by introduction of an mGluR antagonist. These results suggest that persistent synchronized activity in vitro is dependent upon calcium release from internal calcium stores through the activation of PLC-IP3 receptor pathway. Our findings also raise the possibility that intracellular calcium release may be involved in the generation of pathologic synchronized activity in epilepsy in vivo and in physiological forms of synchronized cortical activity.

  16. Quinolinic acid induces neuritogenesis in SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells independently of NMDA receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Hernandez-Martinez, Juan-Manuel; Forrest, Caroline M; Darlington, L Gail; Smith, Robert A; Stone, Trevor W

    2017-03-01

    Glutamate and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+) ) have been implicated in neuronal development and several types of cancer. The kynurenine pathway of tryptophan metabolism includes quinolinic acid (QA) which is both a selective agonist at N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors and also a precursor for the formation of NAD(+) . The effect of QA on cell survival and differentiation has therefore been examined on SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells. Retinoic acid (RA, 10 μm) induced differentiation of SH-SY5Y cells into a neuronal phenotype showing neurite growth. QA (50-150 nm) also caused a concentration-dependent increase in the neurite/soma ratio, indicating differentiation. Both RA and QA increased expression of the neuronal marker β3-tubulin in whole-cell homogenates and in the neuritic fraction assessed using a neurite outgrowth assay. Expression of the neuronal proliferation marker doublecortin revealed that, unlike RA, QA did not decrease the number of mitotic cells. QA-induced neuritogenesis coincided with an increase in the generation of reactive oxygen species. Neuritogenesis was prevented by diphenylene-iodonium (an inhibitor of NADPH oxidase) and superoxide dismutase, supporting the involvement of reactive oxygen species. NMDA itself did not promote neuritogenesis and the NMDA antagonist dizocilpine (MK-801) did not prevent quinolinate-induced neuritogenesis, indicating that the effects of QA were independent of NMDA receptors. Nicotinamide caused a significant increase in the neurite/soma ratio and the expression of β3-tubulin in the neuritic fraction. Taken together, these results suggest that QA induces neuritogenesis by promoting oxidizing conditions and affecting the availability of NAD(+) , independently of NMDA receptors.

  17. NR2D-containing NMDA receptors mediate tissue plasminogen activator-promoted neuronal excitotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Baron, A; Montagne, A; Cassé, F; Launay, S; Maubert, E; Ali, C; Vivien, D

    2010-05-01

    Although the molecular bases of its actions remain debated, tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) is a paradoxical brain protease, as it favours some learning/memory processes, but increases excitotoxic neuronal death. Here, we show that, in cultured cortical neurons, tPA selectively promotes NR2D-containing N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR)-dependent activation. We show that tPA-mediated signalling and neurotoxicity through the NMDAR are blocked by co-application of an NR2D antagonist (phenanthrene derivative (2S(*), 3R(*))-1-(phenanthrene-2-carbonyl)piperazine-2,3-dicarboxylic acid, PPDA) or knockdown of neuronal NR2D expression. In sharp contrast with cortical neurons, hippocampal neurons do not exhibit NR2D both in vitro and in vivo and are consequently resistant to tPA-promoted NMDAR-mediated neurotoxicity. Moreover, we have shown that activation of synaptic NMDAR prevents further tPA-dependent NMDAR-mediated neurotoxicity and sensitivity to PPDA. This study shows that the earlier described pro-neurotoxic effect of tPA is mediated by NR2D-containing NMDAR-dependent extracellular signal-regulated kinase activation, a deleterious effect prevented by synaptic pre-activation.

  18. Astrocyte NMDA receptors' activity sustains neuronal survival through a Cdk5–Nrf2 pathway

    PubMed Central

    Jimenez-Blasco, D; Santofimia-Castaño, P; Gonzalez, A; Almeida, A; Bolaños, J P

    2015-01-01

    Neurotransmission unavoidably increases mitochondrial reactive oxygen species. However, the intrinsic antioxidant defense of neurons is weak and hence the mechanism whereby these cells are physiologically protected against oxidative damage is unknown. Here we found that the antioxidant defense of neurons is repressed owing to the continuous protein destabilization of the master antioxidant transcriptional activator, nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor-2 (Nrf2). By contrast, Nrf2 is highly stable in neighbor astrocytes explaining their robust antioxidant defense and resistance against oxidative stress. We also show that subtle and persistent stimulation of N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors (NMDAR) in astrocytes, through a mechanism not requiring extracellular Ca2+ influx, upregulates a signal transduction pathway involving phospholipase C-mediated endoplasmic reticulum release of Ca2+ and protein kinase Cδ activation. Active protein kinase Cδ promotes, by phosphorylation, the stabilization of p35, a cyclin-dependent kinase-5 (Cdk5) cofactor. Active p35/Cdk5 complex in the cytosol phosphorylates Nrf2 at Thr395, Ser433 and Thr439 that is sufficient to promote Nrf2 translocation to the nucleus and induce the expression of antioxidant genes. Furthermore, this Cdk5–Nrf2 transduction pathway boosts glutathione metabolism in astrocytes efficiently protecting closely spaced neurons against oxidative damage. Thus, intercellular communication through NMDAR couples neurotransmission with neuronal survival. PMID:25909891

  19. Positive feedback of NR2B-containing NMDA receptor activity is the initial step toward visual imprinting: a model for juvenile learning.

    PubMed

    Nakamori, Tomoharu; Sato, Katsushige; Kinoshita, Masae; Kanamatsu, Tomoyuki; Sakagami, Hiroyuki; Tanaka, Kohichi; Ohki-Hamazaki, Hiroko

    2015-01-01

    Imprinting in chicks is a good model for elucidating the processes underlying neural plasticity changes during juvenile learning. We recently reported that neural activation of a telencephalic region, the core region of the hyperpallium densocellulare (HDCo), was critical for success of visual imprinting, and that N-Methyl-D-aspartic (NMDA) receptors containing the NR2B subunit (NR2B/NR1) in this region were essential for imprinting. Using electrophysiological and multiple-site optical imaging techniques with acute brain slices, we found that long-term potentiation (LTP) and enhancement of NR2B/NR1 currents in HDCo neurons were induced in imprinted chicks. Enhancement of NR2B/NR1 currents as well as an increase in surface NR2B expression occurred even following a brief training that was too weak to induce LTP or imprinting behavior. This means that NR2B/NR1 activation is the initial step of learning, well before the activation of alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionate receptors which induces LTP. We also showed that knockdown of NR2B/NR1 inhibited imprinting, and inversely, increasing the surface NR2B expression by treatment with a casein kinase 2 inhibitor successfully reduced training time required for imprinting. These results suggest that imprinting stimuli activate post-synaptic NR2B/NR1 in HDCo cells, increase NR2B/NR1 signaling through up-regulation of its expression, and induce LTP and memory acquisition. The study investigated the neural mechanism underlying juvenile learning. In the initial stage of chick imprinting, NMDA receptors containing the NMDA receptor subunit 2B (NR2B) are activated, surface expression of NR2B/NR1 (NMDA receptor subunit 1) is up-regulated, and consequently long-term potentiation is induced in the telencephalic neurons. We suggest that the positive feedback in the NR2B/NR1 activation is a unique process of juvenile learning, exhibiting rapid memory acquisition.

  20. Activity-dependent regulation of NMDA receptors in substantia nigra dopaminergic neurones

    PubMed Central

    Wild, Angela R; Jones, Susan; Gibb, Alasdair J

    2014-01-01

    N-Methyl-d-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) are Ca2+-permeable glutamate receptors that play a critical role in synaptic plasticity and promoting cell survival. However, overactive NMDARs can trigger cell death signalling pathways and have been implicated in substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc) pathology in Parkinson's disease. Calcium ion influx through NMDARs recruits Ca2+-dependent proteins that can regulate NMDAR activity. The surface density of NMDARs can also be regulated dynamically in response to receptor activity via Ca2+-independent mechanisms. We have investigated the activity-dependent regulation of NMDARs in SNc dopaminergic neurones. Repeated whole-cell agonist applications resulted in a decline in the amplitude of NMDAR currents (current run-down) that was use dependent and not readily reversible. Run-down was reduced by increasing intracellular Ca2+ buffering or by reducing Ca2+ influx but did not appear to be mediated by the same regulatory proteins that cause Ca2+-dependent run-down in hippocampal neurones. The NMDAR current run-down may be mediated in part by a Ca2+-independent mechanism, because intracellular dialysis with a dynamin-inhibitory peptide reduced run-down, suggesting a role for clathrin-mediated endocytosis in the regulation of the surface density of receptors. Synaptic NMDARs were also subject to current run-down during repeated low-frequency synaptic stimulation in a Ca2+-dependent but dynamin-independent manner. Thus, we report, for the first time, regulation of NMDARs in SNc dopaminergic neurones by changes in intracellular Ca2+ at both synaptic and extrasynaptic sites and provide evidence for activity-dependent changes in receptor trafficking. These mechanisms may contribute to intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis in dopaminergic neurones by limiting Ca2+ influx through the NMDAR. PMID:24344168

  1. NMDA receptor mediates tau-induced neurotoxicity by calpain and ERK/MAPK activation

    PubMed Central

    Amadoro, Giuseppina; Ciotti, Maria Teresa; Costanzi, Marco; Cestari, Vincenzo; Calissano, Pietro; Canu, Nadia

    2006-01-01

    The altered function and/or structure of tau protein is postulated to cause cell death in tauopathies and Alzheimer’s disease. However, the mechanisms by which tau induces neuronal death remain unclear. Here we show that overexpression of human tau and of some of its N-terminal fragments in primary neuronal cultures leads to an N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR)-mediated and caspase-independent cell death. Death signaling likely originates from stimulation of extrasynaptic NR2B-subunit-containing NMDARs because it is accompanied by dephosphorylation of cAMP-response-element-binding protein (CREB) and it is inhibited by ifenprodil. Interestingly, activation of NMDAR leads to a crucial, sustained, and delayed phosphorylation of extracellular-regulated kinases 1 and 2, whose inhibition largely prevents tau-induced neuronal death. Moreover, NMDAR involvement causes the fatal activation of calpain, which, in turn, degrades tau protein into a 17-kDa peptide and possibly other highly toxic N-terminal peptides. Some of these peptides are hypothesized, on the basis of our in vitro experiments, to initiate a negative loop, ultimately leading to cell death. Thus, inhibition of calpain largely prevents tau degradation and cell death. Our findings unravel a cellular mechanism linking tau toxicity to NMDAR activation and might be relevant to Alzheimer’s disease and tauopathies where NMDAR-mediated toxicity is postulated to play a pivotal role. PMID:16477009

  2. Nicotinic α7 receptor activation selectively potentiates the function of NMDA receptors in glutamatergic terminals of the nucleus accumbens

    PubMed Central

    Zappettini, Stefania; Grilli, Massimo; Olivero, Guendalina; Chen, Jiayang; Padolecchia, Cristina; Pittaluga, Anna; Tomé, Angelo R.; Cunha, Rodrigo A.; Marchi, Mario

    2014-01-01

    We here provide functional and immunocytochemical evidence supporting the co-localization and functional interaction between nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) and N-methyl-D-aspartic acid receptors (NMDARs) in glutamatergic terminals of the nucleus accumbens (NAc). Immunocytochemical studies showed that a significant percentage of NAc terminals were glutamatergic and possessed GluN1 and α7-containing nAChR. A short-term pre-exposure of synaptosomes to nicotine (30 µM) or choline (1 mM) caused a significant potentiation of the 100 µM NMDA-evoked [3H]D-aspartate ([3H]D-Asp) outflow, which was prevented by α-bungarotoxin (100 nM). The pre-exposure to nicotine (100 µM) or choline (1 mM) also enhanced the NMDA-induced cytosolic free calcium levels, as measured by FURA-2 fluorescence imaging in individual NAc terminals, an effect also prevented by α-bungarotoxin. Pre-exposure to the α4-nAChR agonists 5IA85380 (10 nM) or RJR2429 (1 µM) did not modify NMDA-evoked ([3H]D-Asp) outflow and calcium transients. The NMDA-evoked ([3H]D-Asp) overflow was partially antagonized by the NMDAR antagonists MK801, D-AP5, 5,7-DCKA and R(-)CPP and unaffected by the GluN2B-NMDAR antagonists Ro256981 and ifenprodil. Notably, pre-treatment with choline increased GluN2A biotin-tagged proteins. In conclusion, our results show that the GluN2A-NMDA receptor function can be positively regulated in NAc terminals in response to a brief incubation with α7 but not α4 nAChRs agonists. This might be a general feature in different brain areas since a similar nAChR-mediated bolstering of NMDA-induced ([3H]D-Asp) overflow was also observed in hippocampal synaptosomes. PMID:25360085

  3. State-dependent increase of cortical gamma activity during REM sleep after selective blockade of NR2B subunit containing NMDA receptors.

    PubMed

    Kocsis, Bernat

    2012-07-01

    Sub-anesthetic doses of NMDA receptor antagonists suppress sleep and elicit continuous high-power gamma oscillations lasting for hours. This effect is subunit-specific, as it was also seen after preferential blockade of the NR2A but not of the NR2B subunit-containing receptors. The objective of this study was to test whether NR2B receptor antagonists that do not induce lasting aberrant gamma elevation affect gamma activity during specific behaviors and states, including REM sleep, when gamma normally occurs. Gamma oscillations in cortical EEG were assessed in different vigilance states in rats and were compared before and after injection of nonselective (ketamine, 10 mg/kg, and MK801, 0.2 mg/kg), as well as NR2A-preferring (NVP-AAM077, 20 mg/kg), and NR2B-selective NMDA receptor antagonists (Ro25-6985, 10 mg), and vehicle. In contrast to nonselective and NR2A-preferring antagonists, Ro25-6985 did not disrupt sleep and had no effect on gamma activity during waking and slow wave sleep. It significantly increased, however, gamma power in the frontal (but not in occipital) cortex during REM sleep (by 37% ± 10%, average in the first 4 h). The effect had a short onset; enhanced gamma activity appeared as early as in the first REM sleep episode post-injection and lasted over 8 hours. Increased gamma power induced by MK-801 (46% ± 5%) and NVP-AAM077 (100% ± 8%) during REM sleep could also be detected several hours after injection when periodic alternation of sleep-wake states returned. By acting on gamma oscillations in a state-dependent manner, NMDA receptors might have subunit-specific role in REM sleep-associated cognitive processes.

  4. N-methyl-D-aspartate increases acetylcholine release from rat striatum and cortex: its effect is augmented by choline

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulus, I. H.; Buyukuysal, R. L.; Wurtman, R. J.

    1992-01-01

    We examined the effects of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA), a glutamate agonist, and of glutamate itself, on acetylcholine (ACh) release from superfused rat striatal slices. In a Mg(++)-free medium, NMDA (32-1000 microM) as well as glutamate (1 mM) increased basal ACh release by 35 to 100% (all indicated differences, P less than .05), without altering tissue ACh or choline contents. This augmentation was blocked by Mg++ (1.2 mM) or by MK-801 (10 microM). Electrical stimulation (15 Hz, 75 mA) increased ACh release 9-fold (from 400 to 3660 pmol/mg of protein): this was enhanced (to 4850 pmol/mg of protein) by NMDA (100 microM). ACh levels in stimulated slices fell by 50 or 65% depending on the absence or presence of NMDA. The addition of choline (40 microM) increased ACh release both basally (570 pmol/mg of protein) and with electrical stimulation (6900 pmol/mg of protein). In stimulated slices choline acted synergistically with NMDA, raising ACh release to 10,520 pmol/mg of protein. The presence of choline also blocked the fall in tissue ACh. No treatment affected tissue phospholipid or protein levels. NMDA (32-320 microM) also augmented basal ACh release from cortical but not hippocampal slices. Choline efflux from striatal and cortical (but not hippocampal) slices decreased by 34 to 50% in Mg(++)-free medium. These data indicate that NMDA-like drugs may be useful, particularly in combination with choline, to enhance striatal and cortical cholinergic activity. ACh release from rat hippocampus apparently is not affected by NMDA receptors.

  5. Antidepressant activity of fluoxetine in the zinc deficiency model in rats involves the NMDA receptor complex.

    PubMed

    Doboszewska, Urszula; Szewczyk, Bernadeta; Sowa-Kućma, Magdalena; Młyniec, Katarzyna; Rafało, Anna; Ostachowicz, Beata; Lankosz, Marek; Nowak, Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    The zinc deficiency animal model of depression has been proposed; however, it has not been validated in a detailed manner. We have recently shown that depression-like behavior induced by dietary zinc restriction is associated with up-regulation of hippocampal N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR). Here we examined the effects of chronic administration of a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, fluoxetine (FLX), on behavioral and biochemical alterations (within NMDAR signaling pathway) induced by zinc deficiency. Male Sprague Dawley rats were fed a zinc adequate diet (ZnA, 50mg Zn/kg) or a zinc deficient diet (ZnD, 3mg Zn/kg) for 4 weeks. Then, FLX treatment (10mg/kg, i.p.) begun. Following 2 weeks of FLX administration the behavior of the rats was examined in the forced swim test (FST) and the spontaneous locomotor activity test. Twenty four hours later tissue was harvested. The proteins of NMDAR (GluN1, GluN2A and GluN2B) or AMPAR (GluA1) subunits, p-CREB and BDNF in the hippocampus (Western blot) and serum zinc level (TXRF) were examined. Depression-like behavior induced by ZnD in the FST was sensitive to chronic treatment with FLX. ZnD increased levels of GluN1, GluN2A, GluN2B and decreased pS485-GluA1, p-CREB and BDNF proteins. Administration of FLX counteracted the zinc restriction-induced changes in serum zinc level and hippocampal GluN1, GluN2A, GluN2B and p-CREB but not BDNF or pS845-GluA1 protein levels. This finding adds new evidence to the predictive validity of the proposed zinc deficiency model of depression. Antidepressant-like activity of FLX in the zinc deficiency model is associated with NMDAR complex.

  6. An excessive increase in glutamate contributes to glucose-toxicity in β-cells via activation of pancreatic NMDA receptors in rodent diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xiao-Ting; Li, Chen; Peng, Xiang-Ping; Guo, Jia; Yue, Shao-Jie; Liu, Wei; Zhao, Fei-Yan; Han, Jian-Zhong; Huang, Yan-Hong; Yang-Li, Y -L; Cheng, Qing-Mei; Zhou, Zhi-Guang; Chen, Chen; Feng, Dan-Dan; Luo, Zi-Qiang

    2017-01-01

    In the nervous system, excessive activation of NMDA receptors causes neuronal injury. Although activation of NMDARs has been proposed to contribute to the progress of diabetes, little is known about the effect of excessive long-term activation of NMDARs on β-cells, especially under the challenge of hyperglycemia. Here we thoroughly investigated whether endogenous glutamate aggravated β-cell dysfunction under chronic exposure to high-glucose via activation of NMDARs. The glutamate level was increased in plasma of diabetic mice or patients and in the supernatant of β-cell lines after treatment with high-glucose for 72 h. Decomposing the released glutamate improved GSIS of β-cells under chronic high-glucose exposure. Long-term treatment of β-cells with NMDA inhibited cell viability and decreased GSIS. These effects were eliminated by GluN1 knockout. The NMDAR antagonist MK-801 or GluN1 knockout prevented high-glucose-induced dysfunction in β-cells. MK-801 also decreased the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, and inhibited I-κB degradation, ROS generation and NLRP3 inflammasome expression in β-cells exposed to high-glucose. Furthermore, another NMDAR antagonist, Memantine, improved β-cells function in diabetic mice. Taken together, these findings indicate that an increase of glutamate may contribute to the development of diabetes through excessive activation of NMDARs in β-cells, accelerating β-cells dysfunction and apoptosis induced by hyperglycemia. PMID:28303894

  7. The Downregulation of Somatic A-Type K(+) Channels Requires the Activation of Synaptic NMDA Receptors in Young Hippocampal Neurons of Rats.

    PubMed

    Kang, Moon-Seok; Yang, Yoon-Sil; Kim, Seon-Hee; Park, Joo-Min; Eun, Su-Yong; Jung, Sung-Cherl

    2014-04-01

    The downregulation of A-type K(+) channels (IA channels) accompanying enhanced somatic excitability can mediate epileptogenic conditions in mammalian central nervous system. As IA channels are dominantly targeted by dendritic and postsynaptic processings during synaptic plasticity, it is presumable that they may act as cellular linkers between synaptic responses and somatic processings under various excitable conditions. In the present study, we electrophysiologically tested if the downregulation of somatic IA channels was sensitive to synaptic activities in young hippocampal neurons. In primarily cultured hippocampal neurons (DIV 6~9), the peak of IA recorded by a whole-cell patch was significantly reduced by high KCl or exogenous glutamate treatment to enhance synaptic activities. However, the pretreatment of MK801 to block synaptic NMDA receptors abolished the glutamate-induced reduction of the IA peak, indicating the necessity of synaptic activation for the reduction of somatic IA. This was again confirmed by glycine treatment, showing a significant reduction of the somatic IA peak. Additionally, the gating property of IA channels was also sensitive to the activation of synaptic NMDA receptors, showing the hyperpolarizing shift in inactivation kinetics. These results suggest that synaptic LTP possibly potentiates somatic excitability via downregulating IA channels in expression and gating kinetics. The consequential changes of somatic excitability following the activity-dependent modulation of synaptic responses may be a series of processings for neuronal functions to determine outputs in memory mechanisms or pathogenic conditions.

  8. Antidepressant-like effects of ketamine, norketamine and dehydronorketamine in forced swim test: Role of activity at NMDA receptor.

    PubMed

    Sałat, Kinga; Siwek, Agata; Starowicz, Gabriela; Librowski, Tadeusz; Nowak, Gabriel; Drabik, Urszula; Gajdosz, Ryszard; Popik, Piotr

    2015-12-01

    Ketamine produces rapid and long-lasting antidepressant effects in patients. The involvement of ketamine metabolites in these actions has been proposed. The effects of ketamine and its metabolites norketamine and dehydronorketamine on ligand binding to 80 receptors, ion channels and transporters was investigated at a single concentration of 10 μM. The affinities of all three compounds were then assessed at NMDA receptors using [3H]MK-801 binding. The dose-response relationships of all 3 compounds in the forced swim test were also investigated in mice 30 min after IP administration. The effects of ketamine and norketamine (both 50 mg/kg) were then examined at 30 min, 3 days and 7 days post administration. Among the 80 potential targets examined, only NMDA receptors were affected with a magnitude of >50% by ketamine and norketamine at the concentration of 10 μM. The Ki values of ketamine, norketamine and dehydronorketamine at NMDA receptors were 0.119±0.01, 0.97±0.1 and 3.21±0.3 μM, respectively. Ketamine and norketamine reduced immobility with minimum effective doses (MEDs) of 10 and 50 mg/kg, respectively; dehydronorketamine did not affect immobility at doses of up to 50 mg/kg. Neither ketamine nor norketamine reduced immobility in the forced swim test 3 and 7 days following administration. Further, oral administration of ketamine (5-50 mg/kg) did not affect immobility. We demonstrate that ketamine and norketamine but not dehydronorketamine given acutely at subanesthetic doses reduced immobility in the forced swim test. These antidepressant-like effects appear attributable to NMDA receptor inhibition.

  9. Tissue-type plasminogen activator controls neuronal death by raising surface dynamics of extrasynaptic NMDA receptors

    PubMed Central

    Lesept, Flavie; Chevilley, Arnaud; Jezequel, Julie; Ladépêche, Laurent; Macrez, Richard; Aimable, Margaux; Lenoir, Sophie; Bertrand, Thomas; Rubrecht, Laëtitia; Galea, Pascale; Lebouvier, Laurent; Petersen, Karl-Uwe; Hommet, Yannick; Maubert, Eric; Ali, Carine; Groc, Laurent; Vivien, Denis

    2016-01-01

    N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) are ion channels whose synaptic versus extrasynaptic localization critically influences their functions. This distribution of NMDARs is highly dependent on their lateral diffusion at the cell membrane. Each obligatory subunit of NMDARs (GluN1 and GluN2) contains two extracellular clamshell-like domains with an agonist-binding domain and a distal N-terminal domain (NTD). To date, the roles and dynamics of the NTD of the GluN1 subunit in NMDAR allosteric signaling remain poorly understood. Using single nanoparticle tracking in mouse neurons, we demonstrate that the extracellular neuronal protease tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA), well known to have a role in the synaptic plasticity and neuronal survival, leads to a selective increase of the surface dynamics and subsequent diffusion of extrasynaptic NMDARs. This process explains the previously reported ability of tPA to promote NMDAR-mediated calcium influx. In parallel, we developed a monoclonal antibody capable of specifically blocking the interaction of tPA with the NTD of the GluN1 subunit of NMDAR. Using this original approach, we demonstrate that the tPA binds the NTD of the GluN1 subunit at a lysine in position 178. Accordingly, when applied to mouse neurons, our selected antibody (named Glunomab) leads to a selective reduction of the tPA-mediated surface dynamics of extrasynaptic NMDARs, subsequent signaling and neurotoxicity, both in vitro and in vivo. Altogether, we demonstrate that the tPA is a ligand of the NTD of the obligatory GluN1 subunit of NMDAR acting as a modulator of their dynamic distribution at the neuronal surface and subsequent signaling. PMID:27831563

  10. Synaptically activated Ca2+ waves and NMDA spikes locally suppress voltage-dependent Ca2+ signalling in rat pyramidal cell dendrites

    PubMed Central

    Manita, Satoshi; Miyazaki, Kenichi; Ross, William N

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Postsynaptic [Ca2+]i changes contribute to several kinds of plasticity in pyramidal neurons. We examined the effects of synaptically activated Ca2+ waves and NMDA spikes on subsequent Ca2+ signalling in CA1 pyramidal cell dendrites in hippocampal slices. Tetanic synaptic stimulation evoked a localized Ca2+ wave in the primary apical dendrites. The [Ca2+]i increase from a backpropagating action potential (bAP) or subthreshold depolarization was reduced if it was generated immediately after the wave. The suppression had a recovery time of 30–60 s. The suppression only occurred where the wave was generated and was not due to a change in bAP amplitude or shape. The suppression also could be generated by Ca2+ waves evoked by uncaging IP3, showing that other signalling pathways activated by the synaptic tetanus were not required. The suppression was proportional to the amplitude of the [Ca2+]i change of the Ca2+ wave and was not blocked by a spectrum of kinase or phosphatase inhibitors, consistent with suppression due to Ca2+-dependent inactivation of Ca2+ channels. The waves also reduced the frequency and amplitude of spontaneous, localized Ca2+ release events in the dendrites by a different mechanism, probably by depleting the stores at the site of wave generation. The same synaptic tetanus often evoked NMDA spike-mediated [Ca2+]i increases in the oblique dendrites where Ca2+ waves do not propagate. These NMDA spikes suppressed the [Ca2+]i increase caused by bAPs in those regions. [Ca2+]i increases by Ca2+ entry through voltage-gated Ca2+ channels also suppressed the [Ca2+]i increases from subsequent bAPs in regions where the voltage-gated [Ca2+]i increases were largest, showing that all ways of raising [Ca2+]i could cause suppression. PMID:21844002

  11. Human-in-the-loop evaluation of RMS Active Damping Augmentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demeo, Martha E.; Gilbert, Michael G.; Scott, Michael A.; Lepanto, Janet A.; Bains, Elizabeth M.; Jensen, Mary C.

    1993-01-01

    Active Damping Augmentation is the insertion of Controls-Structures Integration Technology to benefit the on-orbit performance of the Space Shuttle Remote Manipulator System. The goal is to reduce the vibration decay time of the Remote Manipulator System following normal payload maneuvers and operations. Simulation of Active Damping Augmentation was conducted in the realtime human-in-the-loop Systems Engineering Simulator at the NASA Johnson Space Center. The objective of this study was to obtain a qualitative measure of operational performance improvement from astronaut operators and to obtain supporting quantitative performance data. Sensing of vibratory motions was simulated using a three-axis accelerometer mounted at the end of the lower boom of the Remote Manipulator System. The sensed motions were used in a feedback control law to generate commands to the joint servo mechanisms which reduced the unwanted oscillations. Active damping of the Remote Manipulator System with an attached 3990 lb. payload was successfully demonstrated. Six astronaut operators examined the performance of an Active Damping Augmentation control law following single-joint and coordinated six-joint translational and rotational maneuvers. Active Damping Augmentation disturbance rejection of Orbiter thruster firings was also evaluated. Significant reductions in the dynamic response of the 3990 lb. payload were observed. Astronaut operators recommended investigation of Active Damping Augmentation benefits to heavier payloads where oscillations are a bigger problem (e.g. Space Station Freedom assembly operators).

  12. Human-in-the-loop evaluation of RMS Active Damping Augmentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demeo, Martha E.; Gilbert, Michael G.; Scott, Michael A.; Lepanto, Janet A.; Bains, Elizabeth M.; Jensen, Mary C.

    1993-01-01

    Active Damping Augmentation is the insertion of Controls-Structures Integration Technology to benefit the on-orbit performance of the Space Shuttle Remote Manipulator System. The goal is to reduce the vibration decay time of the Remote Manipulator System following normal payload maneuvers and operations. Simulation of Active Damping Augmentation was conducted in the realtime human-in-the-loop Systems Engineering Simulator at the NASA Johnson Space Center. The objective of this study was to obtain a qualitative measure of operational performance improvement from astronaut operators and to obtain supporting quantitative performance data. Sensing of vibratory motions was simulated using a three-axis accelerometer mounted at the end of the lower boom of the Remote Manipulator System. The sensed motions were used in a feedback control law to generate commands to the joint servo mechanisms which reduced the unwanted oscillations. Active damping of the Remote Manipulator System with an attached 3990 lb. payload was successfully demonstrated. Six astronaut operators examined the performance of an Active Damping Augmentation control law following single-joint and coordinated six-joint translational and rotational maneuvers. Active Damping Augmentation disturbance rejection of Orbiter thruster firings was also evaluated. Significant reductions in the dynamic response of the 3990 lb. payload were observed. Astronaut operators recommended investigation of Active Damping Augmentation benefits to heavier payloads where oscillations are a bigger problem (e.g. Space Station Freedom assembly operators).

  13. NMDA receptor/L-VGCC-dependent expression and AMPA/KA receptor-dependent activation of c-Jun induced by cerebral ischemia in rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Quan-Guang; Xu, Yong-Ling; Li, Hong-Chun; Han, Dong; Zhang, Guang-Yi

    2006-05-08

    Over-activation of ionotropic glutamate receptors can cause an excessive influx of calcium ions into neurons, which subsequently triggers the degeneration and death of cells in a process known as excitotoxicity. Here, we examined the effects of modulating ionotropic glutamate receptors and L-type voltage-gated calcium channels (L-VGCC) on the expression and activation of c-Jun in hippocampus of SD rats after transient global ischemia. The total protein of c-Jun was altered by ischemia-reperfusion and reached its high levels at 3-6 h of reperfusion. However, the increased expression was prevented by pretreatment of ketamine (a non-competitive N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors antagonist) or nifedipine (a blocker of L-VGCC), but not by 6,7-dinitroquinoxaline-2,3(1H,4H)-dione (DNQX), an AMPA/KA receptor antagonist. On the other hand, c-Jun phosphorylation was significantly increased 3 h after reperfusion, which was inhibited by DNQX, but not ketamine or nifedipine. AP-1 binding activity reactions were also performed by electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA), which detected similar results as those in Western blotting. Our results clearly showed that c-Jun expression is NMDA receptor/L-VGCC-dependent and c-Jun activation is AMPA/KA receptor-dependent, which expands our knowledge of the JNK-c-Jun signaling pathway in ischemic brain damage.

  14. A functional coupling between extrasynaptic NMDA receptors and A-type K+ channels under astrocyte control regulates hypothalamic neurosecretory neuronal activity

    PubMed Central

    Naskar, Krishna; Stern, Javier E

    2014-01-01

    Neuronal activity is controlled by a fine-tuned balance between intrinsic properties and extrinsic synaptic inputs. Moreover, neighbouring astrocytes are now recognized to influence a wide spectrum of neuronal functions. Yet, how these three key factors act in concert to modulate and fine-tune neuronal output is not well understood. Here, we show that in rat hypothalamic magnocellular neurosecretory cells (MNCs), glutamate NMDA receptors (NMDARs) are negatively coupled to the transient, voltage-gated A-type K+ current (IA). We found that activation of NMDARs by extracellular glutamate levels influenced by astrocyte glutamate transporters resulted in a significant inhibition of IA. The NMDAR–IA functional coupling resulted from activation of extrasynaptic NMDARs, was calcium- and protein kinase C-dependent, and involved enhanced steady-state, voltage-dependent inactivation of IA. The NMDAR–IA coupling diminished the latency to the first evoked spike in response to membrane depolarization and increased the total number of evoked action potentials, thus strengthening the neuronal input/output function. Finally, we found a blunted NMDA-mediated inhibition of IA in dehydrated rats. Together, our findings support a novel signalling mechanism that involves a functional coupling between extrasynaptic NMDARs and A-type K+ channels, which is influenced by local astrocytes. We show this signalling complex to play an important role in modulating hypothalamic neuronal excitability, which may contribute to adaptive responses during a sustained osmotic challenge such as dehydration. PMID:24835172

  15. Nucleus accumbens NMDA receptor activation regulates amphetamine cross-sensitization and deltaFosB expression following sexual experience in male rats.

    PubMed

    Beloate, Lauren N; Weems, Peyton W; Casey, Graham R; Webb, Ian C; Coolen, Lique M

    2016-02-01

    Sexual experience in male rats followed by a period of abstinence causes sensitization to d-Amphetamine (Amph) reward, evidenced by an increased conditioned place preference (CPP) for low doses of Amph. Moreover, sexual experience induces neural plasticity within the nucleus accumbens (NAc), including induction of deltaFosB, which plays a key role in Amph reward cross-sensitization. The NMDA receptor subunit NR1 is also upregulated by mating, but the functional relevance of NMDA receptors in sex experience-induced effects is unknown. Here, we examined the influence of intra-NAc MK 801 infusions on sex experience-induced NAc deltaFosB and cFos expression, as well as mating- and Amph-induced CPP in adult male rats. In experiment 1, males received MK 801 or saline into the NAc during each of 4 consecutive days of mating or handling and were tested for Amph CPP and experience-induced deltaFosB 10 days later. Intra-NAc MK 801 during sexual behavior prevented experience-induced increases in Amph CPP and NAc deltaFosB expression without affecting sexual behavior. In experiment 2, the effects of intra-NAc MK 801 on mating-induced CPP were examined by intra-NAc infusion of MK 801 or saline prior to mating on conditioning days. Intra-NAc MK 801 did not affect mating-induced CPP. Next, effects of intra-NAc MK 801 on mating-induced cFos immunoreactivity were examined. MK 801 prevented mating-induced cFos expression in NAc shell and core. Together, these results provide evidence that NAc NMDA receptor activation during sexual behavior plays a key role in mating-induced cFos and deltaFosB expression and subsequent experience-induced cross-sensitization to Amph reward. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. UVA radiation augments cytotoxic activity of psoralens in melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Wrześniok, Dorota; Beberok, Artur; Rok, Jakub; Delijewski, Marcin; Hechmann, Anna; Oprzondek, Martyna; Rzepka, Zuzanna; Bacler-Żbikowska, Barbara; Buszman, Ewa

    2017-07-01

    Melanoma is an aggressive form of skin cancer. The aim of the study was to evaluate the influence of UVA radiation and psoralens: 5-methoxypsoralen (5-MOP) or 8-methoxypsoralen (8-MOP) on melanoma cells viability. The amelanotic C32 and melanotic COLO829 human melanoma cell lines were exposed to increasing concentrations of psoralens (0.1-100 μM) in the presence or absence of UVA radiation. Cell viability was evaluated by the WST-1 assay. We demonstrated that 8-MOP, in contrast to 5-MOP, has no cytotoxic effect on both melanoma cell lines. Simultaneous exposure of cells to 8-MOP and UVA radiation caused significant cytotoxic response in C32 cells where the EC50 value was estimated to be 131.0 μM (UVA dose: 1.3 J/cm(2)) and 105.3 μM (UVA dose: 2.6 J/cm(2)). The cytotoxicity of 5-MOP on both C32 and COLO829 cells was significantly augmented by UVA radiation - the EC50 was estimated to be 22.7 or 7.9 μM (UVA dose: 1.3 J/cm(2)) and 24.2 or 7.0 μM (UVA dose: 2.6 J/cm(2)), respectively. The demonstrated high cytotoxic response after simultaneous exposure of melanoma cells to psoralens and UVA radiation in vitro suggests the usefulness of PUVA therapy to treat melanoma in vivo.

  17. Cleavage of the NR2B Subunit Amino Terminus of N-Methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) Receptor by Tissue Plasminogen Activator

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Kay-Siong; Leung, How-Wing; Wong, Peter T.-H.; Low, Chian-Ming

    2012-01-01

    Thrombolysis using tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) has been the key treatment for patients with acute ischemic stroke for the past decade. Recent studies, however, suggest that this clot-busting protease also plays various roles in brain physiological and pathophysiological glutamatergic-dependent processes, such as synaptic plasticity and neurodegeneration. In addition, increasing evidence implicates tPA as an important neuromodulator of the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors. Here, we demonstrate that recombinant human tPA cleaves the NR2B subunit of NMDA receptor. Analysis of NR2B in rat brain lysates and cortical neurons treated with tPA revealed concentration- and time-dependent degradation of NR2B proteins. Peptide sequencing studies performed on the cleaved-off products obtained from the tPA treatment on a recombinant fusion protein of the amino-terminal domain of NR2B revealed that tPA-mediated cleavage occurred at arginine 67 (Arg67). This cleavage is tPA-specific, plasmin-independent, and removes a predicted ∼4-kDa fragment (Arg27-Arg67) from the amino-terminal domain of the NR2B protein. Site-directed mutagenesis of putative cleavage site Arg67 to Ala67 impeded tPA-mediated degradation of recombinant protein. This analysis revealed that NR2B is a novel substrate of tPA and suggested that an Arg27–Arg67-truncated NR2B-containing NMDA receptor could be formed. Heterologous expression of NR2B with Gln29–Arg67 deleted is functional but exhibits reduced ifenprodil inhibition and increased glycine EC50 with no change in glutamate EC50. Our results confirmed NR2B as a novel proteolytic substrate of tPA, where tPA may directly interact with NR2B subunits leading to a change in pharmacological properties of NR2B-containing NMDA receptors. PMID:22610100

  18. Immobilized-cell-augmented activated sludge process for treating wastewater containing hazardous compounds.

    PubMed

    Jittawattanarat, Rungrod; Kostarelos, Konstantinos; Khan, Eakalak

    2007-05-01

    A novel bioaugmentation scheme called immobilized-cell-augmented activated sludge (ICAAS) was developed. Offline enricher reactors were used to maintain immobilized acclimated cells applied to augment completely mixed activated sludge (CMAS) treating a pentachlorophenol (PCP) pulse loading. Cellulose triacetate (CA) and powder activated carbon (PAC) combined with CA (PAC + CA) were the two media types used for entrapping the PCP-degrading culture. With ICAAS at 5% by volume augmentation, PCP removal of 73.1 and 75.1% via biodegradation, volatilization, and adsorption onto suspended cells, entrapped cells, and media was achieved for the systems with CA and PAC + CA media, respectively, while PCP removal in a control CMAS, which had a comparable level of combined PCP adsorption onto suspended cells and volatilization as the ICAAS, was 48.7%. Results further showed that the immobilized cells retained their PCP-degrading ability when they were fed with the inducer (PCP) once every 20 days.

  19. Polyphosphate colocalizes with factor XII on platelet-bound fibrin and augments its plasminogen activator activity

    PubMed Central

    Lionikiene, Ausra S.; Georgiev, Georgi; Klemmer, Anja; Brain, Chelsea; Kim, Paul Y.

    2016-01-01

    Activated factor XII (FXIIa) has plasminogen activator capacity but its relative contribution to fibrinolysis is considered marginal compared with urokinase and tissue plasminogen activator. Polyphosphate (polyP) is released from activated platelets and mediates FXII activation. Here, we investigate the contribution of polyP to the plasminogen activator function of αFXIIa. We show that both polyP70, of the chain length found in platelets (60-100 mer), and platelet-derived polyP significantly augment the plasminogen activation capacity of αFXIIa. PolyP70 stimulated the autoactivation of FXII and subsequent plasminogen activation, indicating that once activated, αFXIIa remains bound to polyP70. Indeed, complex formation between polyP70 and αFXIIa provides protection against autodegradation. Plasminogen activation by βFXIIa was minimal and not enhanced by polyP70, highlighting the importance of the anion binding site. PolyP70 did not modulate plasmin activity but stimulated activation of Glu and Lys forms of plasminogen by αFXIIa. Accordingly, polyP70 was found to bind to FXII, αFXIIa, and plasminogen, but not βFXIIa. Fibrin and polyP70 acted synergistically to enhance αFXIIa-mediated plasminogen activation. The plasminogen activator activity of the αFXIIa-polyP70 complex was modulated by C1 inhibitor and histidine-rich glycoprotein, but not plasminogen activator inhibitors 1 and 2. Platelet polyP and FXII were found to colocalize on the activated platelet membrane in a fibrin-dependent manner and decorated fibrin strands extending from platelet aggregates. We show that in the presence of platelet polyP and the downstream substrate fibrin, αFXIIa is a highly efficient and favorable plasminogen activator. Our data are the first to document a profibrinolytic function of platelet polyP. PMID:27694320

  20. Malonate-induced generation of reactive oxygen species in rat striatum depends on dopamine release but not on NMDA receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Ferger, B; Eberhardt, O; Teismann, P; de Groote, C; Schulz, J B

    1999-09-01

    Intrastriatal injection of the reversible succinate dehydrogenase inhibitor malonate produces both energy depletion and striatal lesions similar to that seen in cerebral ischemia and Huntington's disease. The mechanisms of neuronal cell death involve secondary excitotoxicity and the generation of reactive oxygen species. Here, we investigated the effects of dopamine on malonate-induced generation of hydroxyl radicals and striatal lesion volumes. Using in vivo microdialysis, we found that malonate induced a 94-fold increase in extracellular striatal dopamine concentrations. This was paralleled by an increase in the generation of hydroxyl radicals. Prior unilateral lesioning of the nigrostriatal dopaminergic pathway by focal injection of 6-hydroxydopamine blocked the malonate-induced increase in dopamine concentrations and the generation of hydroxyl radicals and attenuated the lesion volume. In contrast, the NMDA receptor antagonist MK-801 attenuated malonate-induced lesion volumes but did not block the generation of hydroxyl radicals. Thus, the dopaminergic and glutamatergic pathways are essential in the pathogenesis of malonate-induced striatal lesions. Our results suggest that the malonate-induced release of dopamine but not NMDA receptor activation mediates hydroxyl radical formation.

  1. Requirements for PKC-augmented JNK activation by MKK4/7

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Bergami, Pablo; Ronai, Ze'ev

    2008-01-01

    The c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNKs) are activated in response to stress, DNA damage, and cytokines by MKK4 and MKK7. We recently demonstrated that PKC can augment the degree of JNK activation by phosphorylating JNK, which requires the adaptor protein RACK1. Here we report on the conditions required for PKC-dependent JNK activation. In vitro kinase assays reveal that PKC phosphorylation of JNK is not sufficient for its activation but rather augments JNK activation by canonical JNK upstream kinases MKK4 or MKK7 alone or in combination. Further, to enhance JNK activity, PKC phosphorylation of JNK should precede its phosphorylation by MKK4/7. Inhibition of PKC phosphorylation of JNK affects both early and late phases of JNK activation following UV-irradiation and reduces the apoptotic response mediated by JNK. These data provide important insight into the requirements for PKC activation of JNK signaling. PMID:18182317

  2. Frontopolar activity and connectivity support dynamic conscious augmentation of creative state.

    PubMed

    Green, Adam E; Cohen, Michael S; Raab, Hillary A; Yedibalian, Christopher G; Gray, Jeremy R

    2015-03-01

    No ability is more valued in the modern innovation-fueled economy than thinking creatively on demand, and the "thinking cap" capacity to augment state creativity (i.e., to try and succeed at thinking more creatively) is of broad importance for education and a rich mental life. Although brain-based creativity research has focused on static individual differences in trait creativity, less is known about changes in creative state within an individual. How does the brain augment state creativity when creative thinking is required? Can augmented creative state be consciously engaged and disengaged dynamically across time? Using a novel "thin slice" creativity paradigm in 55 fMRI participants performing verb-generation, we successfully cued large, conscious, short-duration increases in state creativity, indexed quantitatively by a measure of semantic distance derived via latent semantic analysis. A region of left frontopolar cortex, previously associated with creative integration of semantic information, exhibited increased activity and functional connectivity to anterior cingulate gyrus and right frontopolar cortex during cued augmentation of state creativity. Individual differences in the extent of increased activity in this region predicted individual differences in the extent to which participants were able to successfully augment state creative performance after accounting for trait creativity and intelligence.

  3. Development and flight evaluation of an augmented stability active controls concept with a small tail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Parasite drag reduction evaluation is composed of wind tunnel tests with a standard L-1011 tail and two reduced area tail configurations. Trim drag reduction is evaluated by rebalancing the airplane for relaxed static stability. This is accomplished by pumping water to tanks in the forward and aft of the airplane to acheive desired center of gravity location. Also, the L-1011 is modified to incorporate term and advanced augmented systems. By using advanced wings and aircraft relaxed static stability significant fuel savings can be realized. An airplane's dynamic stability becomes more sensitive for decreased tail size, relaxed static stability, and advanced wing configurations. Active control pitch augmentation will be used to acheive the required handling qualities. Flight tests will be performed to evaluate the pitch augmentation systems. The effect of elevator downrig on stabilizer/elevator hinge moments will be measured. For control system analysis, the normal acceleration feedback and pitch rate feedback are analyzed.

  4. Massively augmented hippocampal dentate granule cell activation accompanies epilepsy development.

    PubMed

    Dengler, Christopher G; Yue, Cuiyong; Takano, Hajime; Coulter, Douglas A

    2017-02-20

    In a mouse model of temporal lobe epilepsy, multicellular calcium imaging revealed that disease emergence was accompanied by massive amplification in the normally sparse, afferent stimulation-induced activation of hippocampal dentate granule cells. Patch recordings demonstrated reductions in local inhibitory function within the dentate gyrus at time points where sparse activation was compromised. Mimicking changes in inhibitory synaptic function and transmembrane chloride regulation was sufficient to elicit the dentate gyrus circuit collapse evident during epilepsy development. Pharmacological blockade of outward chloride transport had no effect during epilepsy development, and significantly increased granule cell activation in both control and chronically epileptic animals. This apparent occlusion effect implicates reduction in chloride extrusion as a mechanism contributing to granule cell hyperactivation specifically during early epilepsy development. Glutamine plays a significant role in local synthesis of GABA in synapses. In epileptic mice, sparse granule cell activation could be restored by glutamine application, implicating compromised GABA synthesis. Glutamine had no effect on granule cell activation earlier, during epilepsy development. We conclude that compromised feedforward inhibition within the local circuit generates the massive dentate gyrus circuit hyperactivation evident in animals during and following epilepsy development. However, the mechanisms underlying this disinhibition diverge significantly as epilepsy progresses.

  5. Massively augmented hippocampal dentate granule cell activation accompanies epilepsy development

    PubMed Central

    Dengler, Christopher G.; Yue, Cuiyong; Takano, Hajime; Coulter, Douglas A.

    2017-01-01

    In a mouse model of temporal lobe epilepsy, multicellular calcium imaging revealed that disease emergence was accompanied by massive amplification in the normally sparse, afferent stimulation-induced activation of hippocampal dentate granule cells. Patch recordings demonstrated reductions in local inhibitory function within the dentate gyrus at time points where sparse activation was compromised. Mimicking changes in inhibitory synaptic function and transmembrane chloride regulation was sufficient to elicit the dentate gyrus circuit collapse evident during epilepsy development. Pharmacological blockade of outward chloride transport had no effect during epilepsy development, and significantly increased granule cell activation in both control and chronically epileptic animals. This apparent occlusion effect implicates reduction in chloride extrusion as a mechanism contributing to granule cell hyperactivation specifically during early epilepsy development. Glutamine plays a significant role in local synthesis of GABA in synapses. In epileptic mice, sparse granule cell activation could be restored by glutamine application, implicating compromised GABA synthesis. Glutamine had no effect on granule cell activation earlier, during epilepsy development. We conclude that compromised feedforward inhibition within the local circuit generates the massive dentate gyrus circuit hyperactivation evident in animals during and following epilepsy development. However, the mechanisms underlying this disinhibition diverge significantly as epilepsy progresses. PMID:28218241

  6. NMDA Receptors Mediate Synaptic Competition in Culture

    PubMed Central

    She, Kevin; Craig, Ann Marie

    2011-01-01

    Background Activity through NMDA type glutamate receptors sculpts connectivity in the developing nervous system. This topic is typically studied in the visual system in vivo, where activity of inputs can be differentially regulated, but in which individual synapses are difficult to visualize and mechanisms governing synaptic competition can be difficult to ascertain. Here, we develop a model of NMDA-receptor dependent synaptic competition in dissociated cultured hippocampal neurons. Methodology/Principal Findings GluN1 -/- (KO) mouse hippocampal neurons lacking the essential NMDA receptor subunit were cultured alone or cultured in defined ratios with wild type (WT) neurons. The absence of functional NMDA receptors did not alter neuron survival. Synapse development was assessed by immunofluorescence for postsynaptic PSD-95 family scaffold and apposed presynaptic vesicular glutamate transporter VGlut1. Synapse density was specifically enhanced onto minority wild type neurons co-cultured with a majority of GluN1 -/- neighbour neurons, both relative to the GluN1 -/- neighbours and relative to sister pure wild type cultures. This form of synaptic competition was dependent on NMDA receptor activity and not conferred by the mere physical presence of GluN1. In contrast to these results in 10% WT and 90% KO co-cultures, synapse density did not differ by genotype in 50% WT and 50% KO co-cultures or in 90% WT and 10% KO co-cultures. Conclusions/Significance The enhanced synaptic density onto NMDA receptor-competent neurons in minority coculture with GluN1 -/- neurons represents a cell culture paradigm for studying synaptic competition. Mechanisms involved may include a retrograde ‘reward’ signal generated by WT neurons, although in this paradigm there was no ‘punishment’ signal against GluN1 -/- neurons. Cell culture assays involving such defined circuits may help uncover the rules and mechanisms of activity-dependent synaptic competition in the developing nervous

  7. Optimal placement of active elements in control augmented structural synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sepulveda, A. E.; Jin, I. M.; Schmit, L. A., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    A methodology for structural/control synthesis is presented in which the optimal location of active members is treated in terms of (0,1) variables. Structural member sizes, control gains and (0,1) placement variables are treated simultaneously as design variables. Optimization is carried out by generating and solving a sequence of explicit approximate problems using a branch and bound strategy. Intermediate design variable and intermediate response quantity concepts are used to enhance the quality of the approximate design problems. Numerical results for example problems are presented to illustrate the efficacy of the design procedure set forth.

  8. 2,6-Disubstituted pyrazines and related analogs as NR2B site antagonists of the NMDA receptor with anti-depressant activity.

    PubMed

    Brown, Dean G; Maier, Donna L; Sylvester, Mark A; Hoerter, Tiffany N; Menhaji-Klotz, Elnaz; Lasota, Celina C; Hirata, Lee T; Wilkins, Deidre E; Scott, Clay W; Trivedi, Shephali; Chen, Tongming; McCarthy, Dennis J; Maciag, Carla M; Sutton, Evelynjeane J; Cumberledge, Jerry; Mathisen, Don; Roberts, John; Gupta, Anshul; Liu, Frank; Elmore, Charles S; Alhambra, Cristobal; Krumrine, Jennifer R; Wang, Xia; Ciaccio, Paul J; Wood, Michael W; Campbell, James B; Johansson, Magnus J; Xia, Jian; Wen, Xiaotian; Jiang, Ji; Wang, Xiaoping; Peng, Zuozhong; Hu, Tao; Wang, Jian

    2011-06-01

    Herein we describe the discovery of compounds that are competitive antagonists of the CP101-606 binding site within the NR2B subtype of the NMDA receptor. The compounds identified do not possess phenolic functional groups such as those in ifenprodil and related analogs. Initial identification of hits in this series focused on a basic, secondary amine side chain which led to good potency, but also presented a hERG liability. Further modifications led to examples of non-basic replacements which demonstrated much less liability in this regard. Finally, one compound in the series, 6a, was tested in the mouse forced swim depression assay and found to show activity (s.c. 60 mg/kg). Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Differential Diagnostics of Neoplastic and Inflammatory Processes in the Brain by Modifications NMDA Receptor Activity in Blood Cells with Verapamil and Ketamine.

    PubMed

    Syatkin, S P; Frolov, V A; Gridina, N Ya; Draguntseva, N G; Skorik, A S

    2016-09-01

    For the development of methods of additional differential diagnostics of gliomas of various grades of malignancy and gliomas and local inflammatory processes in the CNS we studied the intensity of aggregation of peripheral blood cells under the influence of channel blockers ketamine and verapamil. In in vitro experiments, verapamil and ketamine in various dilutions (from 10 to 100,000 times) were added to blood samples and the effects of these dilutions on the intensity of blood aggregation in patients with gliomas of different degree of malignancy, traumatic brain injuries, and other types of neurosurgical pathologies were studied. A correlation was revealed between the decrease in surface charge of blood cells and the type of neurosurgical pathology. The use of functional properties of potential-dependent inotropic NMDA receptors and calcium channels allowed indirect estimation of their activity via parameters of blood cell aggregation induced by channel blockers ketamine and verapamil.

  10. Osmotic Edema Rapidly Increases Neuronal Excitability Through Activation of NMDA Receptor-Dependent Slow Inward Currents in Juvenile and Adult Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Lauderdale, Kelli; Murphy, Thomas; Tung, Tina; Davila, David; Binder, Devin K.

    2015-01-01

    Cellular edema (cell swelling) is a principal component of numerous brain disorders including ischemia, cortical spreading depression, hyponatremia, and epilepsy. Cellular edema increases seizure-like activity in vitro and in vivo, largely through nonsynaptic mechanisms attributable to reduction of the extracellular space. However, the types of excitability changes occurring in individual neurons during the acute phase of cell volume increase remain unclear. Using whole-cell patch clamp techniques, we report that one of the first effects of osmotic edema on excitability of CA1 pyramidal cells is the generation of slow inward currents (SICs), which initiate after approximately 1 min. Frequency of SICs increased as osmolarity decreased in a dose-dependent manner. Imaging of real-time volume changes in astrocytes revealed that neuronal SICs occurred while astrocytes were still in the process of swelling. SICs evoked by cell swelling were mainly nonsynaptic in origin and NMDA receptor-dependent. To better understand the relationship between SICs and changes in neuronal excitability, recordings were performed in increasingly physiological conditions. In the absence of any added pharmacological reagents or imposed voltage clamp, osmotic edema induced excitatory postsynaptic potentials and burst firing over the same timecourse as SICs. Like SICs, action potentials were blocked by NMDAR antagonists. Effects were more pronounced in adult (8–20 weeks old) compared with juvenile (P15–P21) mice. Together, our results indicate that cell swelling triggered by reduced osmolarity rapidly increases neuronal excitability through activation of NMDA receptors. Our findings have important implications for understanding nonsynaptic mechanisms of epilepsy in relation to cell swelling and reduction of the extracellular space. PMID:26489684

  11. NMDA receptor gating of information flow through the striatum in vivo.

    PubMed

    Pomata, Pablo E; Belluscio, Mariano A; Riquelme, Luis A; Murer, M Gustavo

    2008-12-10

    A role of NMDA receptors in corticostriatal synaptic plasticity is widely acknowledged. However, the conditions that allow NMDA receptor activation in the striatum in vivo remain obscure. Here we show that NMDA receptors contribute to sustain the membrane potential of striatal medium spiny projection neurons close to threshold during spontaneous UP states in vivo. Moreover, we found that the blockade of striatal NMDA receptors reduces markedly the spontaneous firing of ensembles of medium spiny neurons during slow waves in urethane-anesthetized rats. We speculate that recurrent activation of NMDA receptors during UP states allows off-line information flow through the striatum and system level consolidation during habit formation.

  12. Food restriction increases NMDA receptor-mediated calcium-calmodulin kinase II and NMDA receptor/extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2-mediated cyclic amp response element-binding protein phosphorylation in nucleus accumbens upon D-1 dopamine receptor stimulation in rats.

    PubMed

    Haberny, S L; Carr, K D

    2005-01-01

    Biological drive states exert homeostatic control in part by increasing the reinforcing effects of environmental incentive stimuli. An apparent by-product of this adaptive response is the enhanced acquisition of drug self-administration behavior in food-restricted (FR) animals. While previous research has demonstrated increased central sensitivity to rewarding effects of abused drugs and direct dopamine (DA) receptor agonists in FR subjects, the underlying neurobiology is not well understood. Recently, it was demonstrated that intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injection of the D-1 DA receptor agonist, SKF-82958 produces a stronger activation of striatal extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 and cyclic AMP response element-binding protein (CREB) in FR relative to ad libitum (AL) fed rats. The main purpose of the present study was to characterize the involvement and mechanisms of interaction between NMDA receptor function and the augmented cellular responses to D-1 DA receptor stimulation in nucleus accumbens (NAc) of FR rats. In experiment 1, Western immunoblotting was used to demonstrate that i.c.v. injection of SKF-82958 (20 microg) produces greater phosphorylation of the NMDA NR1 subunit and calcium-calmodulin kinase II (CaMK II) in NAc of FR as compared with AL rats. In experiment 2, pretreatment of subjects with the NMDA antagonist, MK-801 (1.0 mg/kg, i.p.) decreased SKF-82958-induced activation of CaMK II, ERK1/2 and CREB, and reversed the augmenting effect of FR on activation of all three proteins. In experiment 3, pretreatment with the mitogen-activated protein kinase/ERK kinase inhibitor SL-327 (60 mg/kg, i.p.) suppressed SKF-82958- induced activation of ERK1/2 and reversed the augmenting effect of FR on CREB activation. These results point to specific neuroadaptations in the NAc of FR rats whereby D-1 DA receptor stimulation leads to increased NMDA NR1 subunit phosphorylation and consequent increases in NMDA receptor-dependent CaMK II and ERK1

  13. Moxibustion activates host defense against herpes simplex virus type I through augmentation of cytokine production.

    PubMed

    Takayama, Yuko; Itoi, Manami; Hamahashi, Takashi; Tsukamoto, Noriyuki; Mori, Kazuya; Morishita, Daisuke; Wada, Kumiko; Amagai, Takashi

    2010-09-01

    Moxibustion is a technique used in traditional oriental medicine, the aim of which is to cure and/or prevent illness by activating a person's ability for self-healing. In this study, we assessed how moxibustion would affect the immune system and whether it would augment protective immunity. Mice were treated with moxibustion at Zusanli (ST36) acupoints; we analyzed mortality and cytokine activity in sera after infection with herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1), and cytokine gene expression in the skin and the spleen without a virus challenge. Our study demonstrates that pretreatment of BALB/c mice with moxibustion resulted in a marked increase in the survival rate after infection with lethal doses of HSV-1, and elevated serum levels of IL-1β and IFN-γ on days 1 and 6 post-infection with HSV-1. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR assay showed that moxibustion treatment augmented the expression of IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-6, universal-IFN-α, MIP-1α, and TNF-α mRNA in the skin, and IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-12p40, IL-15, u-IFN-α, MIP-1α, and TNF-α mRNA in the spleen. Moreover, moxibustion induces augmentation of natural killer cell activity. Collectively, our study demonstrates that moxibustion activates protective responses against HSV-1 infection through the activation of cytokine production including IFN, and of NK cells.

  14. Propofol enhances facial stimulation-evoked responses in the cerebellar granule cell layer via NMDA receptor activation in mice in vivo.

    PubMed

    Jin, Wen-Zhe; Liu, Heng; Wan, Peng; Chu, Chun-Ping; Qiu, De-Lai

    2016-10-05

    We recently reported that propofol depressed facial stimulation-evoked gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transmission at cerebellar molecular layer interneuron-Purkinje cell (PC) synapses in mice in vivo, but facilitated excitatory parallel fiber inputs onto PCs. Here, we examine the effects of propofol on cerebellar granule cell layer (GCL) responses to facial stimulation in urethane-anesthetized mice, using electrophysiological and pharmacological methods. Cerebellar surface perfusion of propofol (50-1000μM) facilitated field potentials evoked in the cerebellar GCL by air-puff stimulation of the ipsilateral whisker pad, shown by increases in the half-width and area under the curve (AUC) of the stimulus onset response (Ron). Propofol also significantly increased the amplitude of the stimulus offset response (Roff) and Roff/Ron ratio. The propofol-induced increase in Ron AUC was dose-dependent, with a 50% effective concentration (EC50) of 242.4µM. Application of the GABAA receptor antagonist gabazine (20μM) significantly increased the amplitude, half-width, rise tau and AUC of Ron, but these parameters were further increased by additional application of propofol (300µM). Notably, application of the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor blocker D-APV (250µM) significantly attenuated the half-width and AUC of Ron and the amplitude of Roff, without significantly changing the amplitude of Ron. These results indicate that propofol enhanced facial stimulation-evoked responses in the cerebellar GCL via NMDA receptor activation, which resulted in the facilitation of excitatory parallel fiber inputs onto cerebellar PCs in mice in vivo. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Varenicline has antidepressant-like activity in the forced swim test and augments sertraline's effect.

    PubMed

    Rollema, Hans; Guanowsky, Victor; Mineur, Yann S; Shrikhande, Alka; Coe, Jotham W; Seymour, Patricia A; Picciotto, Marina R

    2009-03-01

    Varenicline, an alpha4beta2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor partial agonist developed as a smoking cessation aid, showed antidepressant-like activity in the forced swim test in two mouse strains. In addition, a low varenicline dose significantly enhanced the effects of moderately active doses of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor sertraline. These findings are consistent with the notion that reducing alpha4beta2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor activity either by antagonists or by partial agonists that can partially activate or desensitize acetylcholine receptors is associated with antidepressant-like properties. These data suggest that varenicline may have antidepressant potential and can, when combined, augment antidepressant responses of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors.

  16. The mGlu5 receptor antagonist MPEP activates specific stress-related brain regions and lacks neurotoxic effects of the NMDA receptor antagonist MK-801: significance for the use as anxiolytic/antidepressant drug.

    PubMed

    Inta, Dragos; Filipovic, Dragana; Lima-Ojeda, Juan M; Dormann, Christof; Pfeiffer, Natascha; Gasparini, Fabrizio; Gass, Peter

    2012-04-01

    Glutamatergic agents have been conceptualized as powerful, fast-acting alternatives to monoaminergic-based antidepressants. NMDA receptor antagonists such as ketamine or MK-801 are therapeutically effective, but their clinical use is hampered by psychotomimetic effects, accompanied by neurotoxicity in the retrosplenial and cingulate cortex. Antagonists of metabotropic mGlu5 receptors like MPEP elicit both robust antidepressant and anxiolytic effects; however, the underlying mechanisms are yet unknown. mGlu5 receptors closely interact with NMDA receptors, but whether MPEP induces neurotoxicity similar to NMDA receptor antagonists has not been elucidated. We show here using c-Fos brain mapping that MPEP administration results in a restricted activation of distinct stress-related brain areas, including the bed nucleus of stria terminalis (BNST), central nucleus of the amygdala, and paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVNH), in a pattern similar to that induced by classical antidepressants and anxiolytics. Unlike the NMDA antagonist MK-801, MPEP does not injure the adult retrosplenial cortex, in which it fails to induce heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70). Moreover, MPEP does not elicit to the same extent as MK-801 apoptosis in cortical areas at perinatal stages, as revealed by caspase 3 expression. These data identify new cellular targets for the anxiolytic and antidepressant effect of MPEP, indicating also in addition that in contrast to MK-801, it lacks the cortical neurotoxicity associated with psychotomimetic side-effects. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. D1/5 modulation of synaptic NMDA receptor currents

    PubMed Central

    Varela, Juan A.; Hirsch, Silke J.; Chapman, David; Leverich, Leah S.; Greene, Robert W.

    2009-01-01

    Converging evidence suggests that salience-associated modulation of behavior is mediated by the release of monoamines and that monoaminergic activation of D1/5 receptors is required for normal hippocampal-dependent learning and memory. However, it is not understood how D1/5 modulation of hippocampal circuits can affect salience-associated learning and memory. We have observed in CA1 pyramidal neurons that D1/5 receptor activation elicits a bi-directional long-term plasticity of NMDA receptor-mediated synaptic currents with the polarity of plasticity determined by NMDA receptor, NR2A/B subunit composition. This plasticity results in a decrease in the NR2A/NR2B ratio of subunit composition. Synaptic responses mediated by NMDA receptors that include NR2B subunits are potentiated by D1/5 receptor activation, while responses mediated by NMDA receptors that include NR2A subunits are depressed. Furthermore, these bidirectional, subunit-specific effects are mediated by distinctive intracellular signaling mechanisms. As there is a predominance of NMDA receptors composed of NR2A subunits observed in entorhinal-CA1 inputs and a predominance of NMDA receptors composed of NR2B subunits in CA3-CA1 synapses, potentiation of synaptic NMDA currents predominates in the proximal CA3-CA1 synapses, while depression of synaptic NMDA currents predominates in the distal entorhinal-CA1 synapses. Finally, all of these effects are reproduced by the release of endogenous monoamines through activation of D1/5 receptors. Thus, endogenous D1/5 activation can, 1) decrease the NR2A/B ratio of NMDAR subunit composition at glutamatergic synapses, a rejuvenation to a composition similar to developmentally immature synapses, and, 2) in CA1, bias NMDA receptor responsiveness towards the more highly processed tri-synaptic CA3-CA1 circuit and away from the direct entorhinal-CA1 input. PMID:19279248

  18. Natural killer (NK) and mitogen (OKT3) augmented NK activity in insulin-dependent diabetes (IDDM)

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, E.; Schwartz, S.

    1986-03-01

    The authors examined NK and OKT3 augmented NK activity in 14 IDDM patients and 15 age matched controls (28 +/- 6 vs 28.5 +/- 6 yrs respectively) to evaluate this aspect of antigen nonspecific immunity. NK and augmented NK function were examined at various target to effector cell ratios (E/T) using the K562 cell line (as target) in a 4 hr /sup 51/Cr release assay. Islet cell antibodies (ICA) were determined by standard methods. All of the diabetics (mean duration of disease 16 yrs) and controls were ICA (-). Their observations indicate that there is no significant difference between diabetic and control subjects in NK activity. The ability of OKT3 to augment NK activity (by a T-cell mediated process) is also not significantly different between the two groups. An abnormal immune response to beta cells has a central role in the pathogenesis of IDDM. The nature of this autoimmune defect is unclear. The authors' present observations indicate that antigen nonspecific immune function may be normal in patients with IDDM. They propose that IDDM is a disease only of abnormal antigen specific immunoregulation.

  19. Activation of metabotropic glutamate 5 and NMDA receptors underlies the induction of persistent bursting and associated long-lasting changes in CA3 recurrent connections.

    PubMed

    Stoop, Ron; Conquet, François; Zuber, Benoit; Voronin, Leon L; Pralong, Etienne

    2003-07-02

    The aim of this study was to describe the induction and expression mechanisms of a persistent bursting activity in a horizontal slice preparation of the rat limbic system that includes the ventral part of the hippocampus and the entorhinal cortex. Disinhibition of this preparation by bicuculline led to interictal-like bursts in the CA3 region that triggered synchronous activity in the entorhinal cortex. Washout of bicuculline after a 1 hr application resulted in a maintained production of hippocampal bursts that continued to spread to the entorhinal cortex. Separation of CA3 from the entorhinal cortex caused the activity in the latter to become asynchronous with CA3 activity in the presence of bicuculline and disappear after washout; however, in CA3, neither the induction of bursting nor its persistence were affected. Associated with the CA3 persistent bursting, a strengthening of recurrent collateral excitatory input to CA3 pyramidal cells and a decreased input to CA3 interneurons was found. Both the induction of the persistent bursting and the changes in synaptic strength were prevented by antagonists of metabotropic glutamate 5 (mGlu5) or NMDA receptors or protein synthesis inhibitors and did not occur in slices from mGlu5 receptor knock-out mice. The above findings suggest potential synaptic mechanisms by which the hippocampus switches to a persistent interictal bursting mode that may support a spread of interictal-like bursting to surrounding temporal lobe regions.

  20. Radioresistance of culture-induced augmented natural killer-like activity

    SciTech Connect

    Brovall, C.; Levitz, S.M.; Ellner, J.J.; Schacter, B.

    1983-07-01

    Human NK activity is radiosensitive under the control of X-linked genes. We have evaluated the expression of these genes in other forms of cellular cytotoxicity. The NK radioresistant and radiosensitive phenotype is expressed in ADCC. Specific cellular cytotoxicity, generated in a MLC with a radiosensitive donor as responder, was radioresistant. NK-like activity recruited from nonadherent cells of radiosensitive subjects stimulated with allogenic cells, mitogens (PHA, Con A or PWM), or recall antigens (TT or PPD) was radioresistant. The acquisition of radioresistance was relatively rapid, beginning within 24 hr after exposure to PHA, prior to detectable proliferation. Radioresistance of MLR augmented NK-like activity was maximal 3 days after initiation of the culture. MLR augmented NK-like activity was spared by the immunosuppressive polypeptide antibiotic CsA at doses up to 1 mu gm/ml. CsA did, however, reduce acquisition of radioresistance by the NK-like activity at doses above 0.01 mu gm/ml, a concentration which does not inhibit uptake of /sup 3/H-thymidine but does reduce the level of specific CML. These data suggest that mitogens and antigens, including allogeneic cells, are recruiting radioresistant NK-like activity which can be distinguished from the radiosensitive spontaneous NK activity of the cell donor. Further, in the MLR, both radiosensitive and radioresistant NK-like activity may be recruited.

  1. The possible involvement of NMDA glutamate receptor in the etiopathogenesis of bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Fountoulakis, Konstantinos N

    2012-01-01

    Glutamate is the most abundant excitatory neurotransmitter in the brain and the ionotropic NMDA receptor is one of the major classes of its receptors, thought to play an important role in schizophrenia and mood disorders. The current systematic review summarized the evidence concerning the involvement of NMDA receptors in the pathophysiology of bipolar disorder. Genetic studies point to the genes encoding the NMDA 1, 2A and 2B subunits while neuropathological studies suggest a possible region specific decrease in the density of NMDA receptor and more consistently a reduced NMDA-mediated glutamatergic activity in patients with bipolar disorder in the frame of slower NMDA kinetics because of lower contribution of NR2A subunits. However the literature is poor and incomplete; future research is necessary to elucidate the mechanisms underlying bipolar disorder and its specific relationship to a possible NMDA malfunction and to explore the possibility of developing novel therapeutic agents.

  2. Activation of NMDA receptors in the brainstem, RVM and NGC, mediates mechanical hyperalgesia produced by repeated intramuscular injections of acidic saline in rats

    PubMed Central

    Da Silva, LFS; DeSantana, JM; Sluka, KA

    2010-01-01

    Repeated injections of acidic saline into the gastrocnemius muscle induced both muscle and cutaneous hypersensitivity. We have previously shown that microinjection of local anesthetic into either the rostral ventromedial medulla (RVM) or the nucleus reticularis gigantocellularis (NGC) reverses this muscle and cutaneous hypersensitivity. Although prior studies show that NMDA receptors in the RVM play a clear role in mediating visceral and inflammatory hypersensitivity, the role of NMDA receptors in the NGC, or in non-inflammatory muscle pain is unclear. Therefore, the present study evaluated involvement of the NMDA receptors in the RVM and NGC in muscle and cutaneous hypersensitivity induced by repeated intramuscular injections of acidic saline. Repeated intramuscular injections of acidic saline, 5 days apart, resulted in a bilateral decrease in the withdrawal thresholds of the paw and muscle in all groups 24 h after the second injection. Microinjection of NMDA receptor antagonists into the RVM reversed both the muscle and cutaneous hypersensitivity. However, microinjection of NMDA receptor antagonists into the NGC only reversed cutaneous, but not muscle hypersensitivity. These results suggest that NMDA receptors in the RVM mediate both muscle and cutaneous hypersensitivity, but those in the NGC mediated only cutaneous hypersensitivity after muscle insult. PMID:19853525

  3. Ethanol induces long-term facilitation of NR2B-NMDA receptor activity in the dorsal striatum: implications for alcohol drinking behavior.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun; Carnicella, Sebastien; Phamluong, Khanhky; Jeanblanc, Jerome; Ronesi, Jennifer A; Chaudhri, Nadia; Janak, Patricia H; Lovinger, David M; Ron, Dorit

    2007-03-28

    Addiction is characterized by compulsive alcohol or drug taking and seeking, and the dorsal striatum has been implicated in such maladaptive persistent habits. The NMDA receptor (NMDAR), which is a major target of alcohol, is implicated in striatal-based habit learning. We found that, in the dorsal striatum, alcohol (ethanol) exposure produced an increase in the phosphorylation of the NR2B subunit of the NMDAR, and a corresponding increase in the activity of Fyn kinase, which phosphorylates NR2B. We further observed an ethanol-mediated long-term facilitation (LTF) of the activity of NR2B-containing NMDARs (NR2B-NMDARs) in the dorsal striatum. This LTF is Fyn kinase dependent, because it was observed in Fyn wild-type but not in Fyn knock-out mice. Importantly, none of these biochemical and physiological changes was observed in the ventral striatum. Finally, dorsal but not ventral striatum infusion of a Fyn or NR2B-NMDAR inhibitor reduced rat operant self-administration of ethanol. Our results suggest that the Fyn-mediated phosphorylation and LTF of NR2B-NMDAR activity in the dorsal striatum after exposure to ethanol may underlie aberrant plasticity that contributes to mechanisms underlying alcohol drinking behavior.

  4. Cellular prion protein and NMDA receptor modulation: protecting against excitotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Black, Stefanie A. G.; Stys, Peter K.; Zamponi, Gerald W.; Tsutsui, Shigeki

    2014-01-01

    Although it is well established that misfolding of the cellular prion protein (PrPC) into the β-sheet-rich, aggregated scrapie conformation (PrPSc) causes a variety of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs), the physiological roles of PrPC are still incompletely understood. There is accumulating evidence describing the roles of PrPC in neurodegeneration and neuroinflammation. Recently, we identified a functional regulation of NMDA receptors by PrPC that involves formation of a physical protein complex between these proteins. Excessive NMDA receptor activity during conditions such as ischemia mediates enhanced Ca2+ entry into cells and contributes to excitotoxic neuronal death. In addition, NMDA receptors and/or PrPC play critical roles in neuroinflammation and glial cell toxicity. Inhibition of NMDA receptor activity protects against PrPSc-induced neuronal death. Moreover, in mice lacking PrPC, infarct size is increased after focal cerebral ischemia, and absence of PrPC increases susceptibility of neurons to NMDA receptor-dependent death. Recently, PrPC was found to be a receptor for oligomeric beta-amyloid (Aβ) peptides, suggesting a role for PrPC in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Our recent findings suggest that Aβ peptides enhance NMDA receptor current by perturbing the normal copper- and PrPC-dependent regulation of these receptors. Here, we review evidence highlighting a role for PrPC in preventing NMDA receptor-mediated excitotoxicity and inflammation. There is a need for more detailed molecular characterization of PrPC-mediated regulation of NMDA receptors, such as determining which NMDA receptor subunits mediate pathogenic effects upon loss of PrPC-mediated regulation and identifying PrPC binding site(s) on the receptor. This knowledge will allow development of novel therapeutic interventions for not only TSEs, but also for AD and other neurodegenerative disorders involving dysfunction of PrPC. PMID:25364752

  5. Exogenous t-PA Administration Increases Hippocampal Mature BDNF Levels. Plasmin- or NMDA-Dependent Mechanism?

    PubMed Central

    Rodier, Marion; Prigent-Tessier, Anne; Béjot, Yannick; Jacquin, Agnès; Mossiat, Claude; Marie, Christine; Garnier, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) through TrkB activation is central for brain functioning. Since the demonstration that plasmin is able to process pro-BDNF to mature BDNF and that these two forms have opposite effects on neuronal survival and plasticity, a particular attention has been paid to the link between tissue plasminogen activator (tPA)/plasmin system and BDNF metabolism. However, t-PA via its action on different N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor subunits is also considered as a neuromodulator of glutamatergic transmission. In this context, the aim of our study was to investigate the effect of recombinant (r)t-PA administration on brain BDNF metabolism in rats. In the hippocampus, we found that rt-PA (10 mg/kg) administration induced a progressive increase in mature BDNF levels associated with TrkB activation. In order to delineate the mechanistic involved, plasmin activity was assessed and its inhibition was attempted using tranexamic acid (30 or 300 mg/kg, i.v.) while NMDA receptors were antagonized with MK801 (0.3 or 3 mg/kg, i.p.) in combination with rt-PA treatment. Our results showed that despite a rise in rt-PA activity, rt-PA administration failed to increase hippocampal plasmin activity suggesting that the plasminogen/plasmin system is not involved whereas MK801 abrogated the augmentation in mature BDNF levels observed after rt-PA administration. All together, our results show that rt-PA administration induces increase in hippocampal mature BDNF expression and suggests that rt-PA contributes to the control of brain BDNF synthesis through a plasmin-independent potentiation of NMDA receptors signaling. PMID:24670989

  6. Exogenous t-PA administration increases hippocampal mature BDNF levels. plasmin- or NMDA-dependent mechanism?

    PubMed

    Rodier, Marion; Prigent-Tessier, Anne; Béjot, Yannick; Jacquin, Agnès; Mossiat, Claude; Marie, Christine; Garnier, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) through TrkB activation is central for brain functioning. Since the demonstration that plasmin is able to process pro-BDNF to mature BDNF and that these two forms have opposite effects on neuronal survival and plasticity, a particular attention has been paid to the link between tissue plasminogen activator (tPA)/plasmin system and BDNF metabolism. However, t-PA via its action on different N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor subunits is also considered as a neuromodulator of glutamatergic transmission. In this context, the aim of our study was to investigate the effect of recombinant (r)t-PA administration on brain BDNF metabolism in rats. In the hippocampus, we found that rt-PA (10 mg/kg) administration induced a progressive increase in mature BDNF levels associated with TrkB activation. In order to delineate the mechanistic involved, plasmin activity was assessed and its inhibition was attempted using tranexamic acid (30 or 300 mg/kg, i.v.) while NMDA receptors were antagonized with MK801 (0.3 or 3 mg/kg, i.p.) in combination with rt-PA treatment. Our results showed that despite a rise in rt-PA activity, rt-PA administration failed to increase hippocampal plasmin activity suggesting that the plasminogen/plasmin system is not involved whereas MK801 abrogated the augmentation in mature BDNF levels observed after rt-PA administration. All together, our results show that rt-PA administration induces increase in hippocampal mature BDNF expression and suggests that rt-PA contributes to the control of brain BDNF synthesis through a plasmin-independent potentiation of NMDA receptors signaling.

  7. The Anticonvulsant Activity of a Flavonoid-Rich Extract from Orange Juice Involves both NMDA and GABA-Benzodiazepine Receptor Complexes.

    PubMed

    Citraro, Rita; Navarra, Michele; Leo, Antonio; Donato Di Paola, Eugenio; Santangelo, Ermenegildo; Lippiello, Pellegrino; Aiello, Rossana; Russo, Emilio; De Sarro, Giovambattista

    2016-09-21

    The usage of dietary supplements and other natural products to treat neurological diseases has been growing over time, and accumulating evidence suggests that flavonoids possess anticonvulsant properties. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of a flavonoid-rich extract from orange juice (OJe) in some rodent models of epilepsy and to explore its possible mechanism of action. The genetically audiogenic seizures (AGS)-susceptible DBA/2 mouse, the pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-induced seizures in ICR-CD1 mice and the WAG/Rij rat as a genetic model of absence epilepsy with comorbidity of depression were used. Our results demonstrate that OJe was able to exert anticonvulsant effects on AGS-sensible DBA/2 mice and to inhibit PTZ-induced tonic seizures, increasing their latency. Conversely, it did not have anti-absence effects on WAG/Rij rats. Our experimental findings suggest that the anti-convulsant effects of OJe are likely mediated by both an inhibition of NMDA receptors at the glycine-binding site and an agonistic activity on benzodiazepine-binding site at GABAA receptors. This study provides evidences for the antiepileptic activity of OJe, and its results could be used as scientific basis for further researches aimed to develop novel complementary therapy for the treatment of epilepsy in a context of a multitarget pharmacological strategy.

  8. Augmentation of macrophage growth-stimulating activity of lipids by their peroxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Yui, S.; Yamazaki, M. )

    1990-02-15

    Previously, we reported that some kinds of lipids (cholesterol esters, triglycerides, and some negatively charged phospholipids) that are constituents of lipoproteins or cell membranes induce growth of peripheral macrophages in vitro. In this paper, we examined the effect of peroxidation of lipids on their macrophage growth-stimulating activity because lipid peroxidation is observed in many pathological states such as inflammation. When phosphatidylserine, one of the phospholipids with growth-stimulating activity, was peroxidized by UV irradiation, its macrophage growth-stimulating activity was augmented in proportion to the extent of its peroxidation. The activity of phosphatidylethanolamine was also increased by UV irradiation. On the other hand, phosphatidylcholine or highly unsaturated free fatty acids, such as arachidonic acid and eicosapentaenoic acid, did not induce macrophage growth irrespective of whether they were peroxidized. The augmented activity of UV-irradiated phosphatidylserine was not affected by the coexistence of an antioxidant, vitamin E or BHT. These results suggest that some phospholipids included in damaged cells or denatured lipoproteins which are scavenged by macrophages in vivo may induce growth of peripheral macrophages more effectively when they are peroxidized by local pathological processes.

  9. Convulsions induced by centrally administered NMDA in mice: effects of NMDA antagonists, benzodiazepines, minor tranquilizers and anticonvulsants.

    PubMed Central

    Moreau, J. L.; Pieri, L.; Prud'hon, B.

    1989-01-01

    1. Convulsions were induced reproducibly by intracerebroventricular injection of N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) to conscious mice. 2. Competitive (carboxypiperazine-propylphosphonic acid, CPP; 2-amino-7-phosphonoheptanoic acid, AP7) and non-competitive (MK801; phencyclidine, PCP; thienylcyclohexylpiperidine, TCP; dextrorphan; dextromethorphan) NMDA antagonists prevented NMDA-induced convulsions. 3. Benzodiazepine receptor agonists and partial agonists (triazolam, diazepam, clonazepam, Ro 16-6028), classical anticonvulsants (diphenylhydantoin, phenobarbitone, sodium valproate) and meprobamate were also found to prevent NMDA-induced convulsions. 4. Flumazenil (a benzodiazepine receptor antagonist) and the GABA agonists THIP and muscimol (up to subtoxic doses) were without effect. 5. Flumazenil reversed the anticonvulsant action of diazepam, but not that of MK801. 6. Results obtained in this model differ somewhat from those described in a seizure model with systemic administration of NMDA. An explanation for this discrepancy is offered. 7. This model is a simple test for assessing the in vivo activity of NMDA antagonists and also expands the battery of chemically-induced seizure models for characterizing anticonvulsants not acting at NMDA receptors. PMID:2574061

  10. Troponin activator augments muscle force in nemaline myopathy patients with nebulin mutations.

    PubMed

    de Winter, Josine Marieke; Buck, Danielle; Hidalgo, Carlos; Jasper, Jeffrey R; Malik, Fady I; Clarke, Nigel F; Stienen, Ger J M; Lawlor, Michael W; Beggs, Alan H; Ottenheijm, Coen A C; Granzier, Henk

    2013-06-01

    Nemaline myopathy-the most common non-dystrophic congenital myopathy-is caused by mutations in thin filament genes, of which the nebulin gene is the most frequently affected one. The nebulin gene codes for the giant sarcomeric protein nebulin, which plays a crucial role in skeletal muscle contractile performance. Muscle weakness is a hallmark feature of nemaline myopathy patients with nebulin mutations, and is caused by changes in contractile protein function, including a lower calcium-sensitivity of force generation. To date no therapy exists to treat muscle weakness in nemaline myopathy. Here, we studied the ability of the novel fast skeletal muscle troponin activator, CK-2066260, to augment force generation at submaximal calcium levels in muscle cells from nemaline myopathy patients with nebulin mutations. Contractile protein function was determined in permeabilised muscle cells isolated from frozen patient biopsies. The effect of 5 μM CK-2066260 on force production was assessed. Nebulin protein concentrations were severely reduced in muscle cells from these patients compared to controls, while myofibrillar ultrastructure was largely preserved. Both maximal active tension and the calcium-sensitivity of force generation were lower in patients compared to controls. Importantly, CK-2066260 greatly increased the calcium-sensitivity of force generation-without affecting the cooperativity of activation-in patients to levels that exceed those observed in untreated control muscle. Fast skeletal troponin activation is a therapeutic mechanism to augment contractile protein function in nemaline myopathy patients with nebulin mutations and with other neuromuscular diseases.

  11. Emodin augments calcium activated chloride channel in colonic smooth muscle cells by Gi/Go protein.

    PubMed

    Xu, Long; Ting-Lou; Lv, Nonghua; Zhu, Xuan; Chen, Youxiang; Yang, Jing

    2009-08-01

    Emodin is a natural anthraquinone in rhubarb. It has been identified as a prokinetic drug for gastrointestinal motility in Chinese traditional medicine. Emodin contracts smooth muscle by increasing the concentration of intracellular Ca(2+). In many smooth muscles, increasing intracellular Ca(2+) activates Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) channels (ClCA). The study was aimed to investigate the effects of emodin on ClCA channels in colonic smooth muscle. 4 channel physiology signal acquire system was used to measure isometric contraction of smooth muscle strips. ClCA currents were recorded by EPC10 with perforated whole cell model. Emodin contracted strips and cells in colonic smooth muscle and augmented ClCA currents. Niflumic acid (NFA) and 4', 4'-diisothiostilbene-2, 2-disulfonic acid (DIDS) blocked the effects. Gi/Go protein inhibits protein kinase A (PKA) and protein kinase C (PKC), and PKA and PKC reduced ClCA currents. Pertussis toxin (PTX, a special inhibitor of Gi/Go protein), 8-bromoadenosine 38, 58-cyclic monophosphate (8-BrcAMP, a membrane-permeant protein kinase A activator) and Phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA, a membrane-permeant protein kinase C activator) inhibited the effects on ClCA currents significantly. Our findings suggest that emodin augments ClCA channels to contract smooth muscle in colon, and the effect is induced mostly by enhancement of membrane Gi/Go protein signal transducer pathway.

  12. Aquaporin-4 deficiency facilitates fear memory extinction in the hippocampus through excessive activation of extrasynaptic GluN2B-containing NMDA receptors.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xin; Zhang, Jie-Ting; Li, Di; Zhou, Jun; Yang, Jun; Zheng, Hui-Ling; Chen, Jian-Guo; Wang, Fang

    2017-01-01

    Aquaporin-4 (AQP-4) is the predominant water channel in the brain and primarily expressed in astrocytes. Astrocytes have been generally believed to play important roles in regulating synaptic plasticity and information processing. A growing number of evidence shows that AQP-4 plays a potential role in the regulation of astrocyte function. However, little is known about the function of AQP-4 for synaptic plasticity in the hippocampus. Therefore, we evaluated long-term depression (LTD) in the hippocampus and the extinction of fear memory of AQP-4 knockout (KO) and wild-type (WT) mice. We found that AQP-4 deficiency facilitated fear memory extinction and NMDA receptors (NMDARs)-dependent LTD in the CA3-CA1 pathway. Furthermore, AQP-4 deficiency selectively increased GluN2B-NMDAR-mediated excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs). The excessive activation of extrasynaptic GluN2B-NMDAR contributed to the facilitation of NMDAR-dependent LTD and enhancement of fear memory extinction in AQP-4 KO mice. Thus, it appears that AQP-4 may be a potential target for intervention in fear memory extinction. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'Ionotropic glutamate receptors'. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Neuroprotective activity of parawixin 10, a compound isolated from Parawixia bistriata spider venom (Araneidae: Araneae) in rats undergoing intrahippocampal NMDA microinjection

    PubMed Central

    Fachim, Helene Aparecida; Mortari, Marcia Renata; Gobbo-Netto, Leonardo; dos Santos, Wagner Ferreira

    2015-01-01

    Background: Parawixia bistriata is a semi-colonial spider found mainly in southeastern of Brazil. Parawixin 10 (Pwx 10) a compound isolated from this spider venom has been demonstrated to act as neuroprotective in models of injury regulating the glutamatergic neurotransmission through glutamate transporters. Objectives: The aim of this work was to evaluate the neuroprotective effect of Pwx 10 in a rat model of excitotoxic brain injury by N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) injection. Material and Methods: Male Wistar rats have been used, submitted to stereotaxic surgery for saline or NMDA microinjection into dorsal hippocampus. Two groups of animals were treated with Pwx 10. These treated groups received a daily injection of the Pwx 10 (2.5 mg/μL) in the right lateral ventricle into rats pretreated with NMDA, always at the same time, each one starting the treatment 1 h or 24 h. Nissl staining was performed for evaluating the extension and efficacy of the NMDA injury and the neuroprotective effect of Pwx 10. Results: The treatment with Pwx 10 showed neuroprotective effect, being most pronounced when the compound was administrated from 1 h after NMDA in all hippocampal subfields analyzed (CA1, CA3 and hilus). Conclusion: These results indicated that Pwx 10 may be a good template to develop therapeutic drugs for treating neurodegenerative diseases, reinforcing the importance of continuing studies on its effects in the central nervous system. PMID:26246735

  14. Opposing roles of synaptic and extrasynaptic NMDA receptors in neuronal calcium signalling and BDNF gene regulation.

    PubMed

    Vanhoutte, Peter; Bading, Hilmar

    2003-06-01

    Neuronal responses to electrical activity-induced calcium signals are specified by the localization of the calcium entry site and the spatial properties of the calcium transient. Calcium flux through NMDA receptors located in the synapse initiates changes in synaptic efficacy and promotes pro-survival events, whereas calcium flux through extrasynaptic NMDA receptors is coupled to cell death pathways. The dialogue between the synaptic NMDA receptors and the nucleus is also modulated by extrasynaptic NMDA receptors, which shut down activity of CRE-binding protein (CREB) and antagonize the increase in brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression induced by synaptic NMDA receptors. The specification of the biological response by the localization of the receptor activated is a new concept in neuronal calcium signalling that can explain many of the opposing roles of NMDA receptors.

  15. Amyloid precursor proteins inhibit heme oxygenase activity and augment neurotoxicity in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, M; Doré, S; Ferris, C D; Tomita, T; Sawa, A; Wolosker, H; Borchelt, D R; Iwatsubo, T; Kim, S H; Thinakaran, G; Sisodia, S S; Snyder, S H

    2000-11-01

    Amyloid precursor protein (APP) generates the beta-amyloid peptide, postulated to participate in the neurotoxicity of Alzheimer's disease. We report that APP and APLP bind to heme oxygenase (HO), an enzyme whose product, bilirubin, is antioxidant and neuroprotective. The binding of APP inhibits HO activity, and APP with mutations linked to the familial Alzheimer's disease (FAD) provides substantially greater inhibition of HO activity than wild-type APP. Cortical cultures from transgenic mice expressing Swedish mutant APP have greatly reduced bilirubin levels, establishing that mutant APP inhibits HO activity in vivo. Oxidative neurotoxicity is markedly greater in cerebral cortical cultures from APP Swedish mutant transgenic mice than wild-type cultures. These findings indicate that augmented neurotoxicity caused by APP-HO interactions may contribute to neuronal cell death in Alzheimer's disease.

  16. Active glass-type human augmented cognition system considering attention and intention

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Bumhwi; Ojha, Amitash; Lee, Minho

    2015-10-01

    Human cognition is the result of an interaction of several complex cognitive processes with limited capabilities. Therefore, the primary objective of human cognitive augmentation is to assist and expand these limited human cognitive capabilities independently or together. In this study, we propose a glass-type human augmented cognition system, which attempts to actively assist human memory functions by providing relevant, necessary and intended information by constantly assessing intention of the user. To achieve this, we exploit selective attention and intention processes. Although the system can be used in various real-life scenarios, we test the performance of the system in a person identity scenario. To detect the intended face, the system analyses the gaze points and change in pupil size to determine the intention of the user. An assessment of the gaze points and change in pupil size together indicates that the user intends to know the identity and information about the person in question. Then, the system retrieves several clues through speech recognition system and retrieves relevant information about the face, which is finally displayed through head-mounted display. We present the performance of several components of the system. Our results show that the active and relevant assistance based on users' intention significantly helps the enhancement of memory functions.

  17. Ethanol Augments PDGF-Induced NADPH Oxidase Activity and Proliferation in Rat Pancreatic Stellate Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Richard; Wang, Yan-Ling; Edderkaoui, Mouad; Lugea, Aurelia; Apte, Minoti V.; Pandol, Stephen J.

    2007-01-01

    Background/Aims Activated stellate cells are considered the principal mediators of chronic alcoholic pancreatitis/fibrosis. However the mechanisms of alcohol action on pancreatic stellate cells (PaSCs) are poorly understood. The aims of this study were to determine the presence and role of the NADPH oxidase system in mediating alcohol effects on PaSCs with specific emphasis on proliferation. Methods PaSC NADPH oxidase components mRNA and protein were determined by RT-PCR and Western blot. The NADPH oxidase activity was measured by detecting the production of reactive oxygen species using lucigenin-derived chemiluminescence assay. PaSC DNA synthesis, a measure of proliferation, was performed by determining the [3H] thymidine incorporation into DNA. Results mRNA for NADPH oxidase components Nox1, gp91phox, Nox4, p22phox, p47phox and p67phox and protein for NADPH oxidase subunits gp91phox, p22phox, p47phox and p67phox are present in PaSCs. Treatment with platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) significantly increased the NADPH oxidase activity and DNA synthesis in cultured PaSCs. Alcohol treatment markedly augmented both the NADPH oxidase activity and the DNA synthesis caused by PDGF, which was prevented by antioxidant N-acetyl-L-cysteine, ROS scavenger tiron, and the NADPH oxidase inhibitor diphenylene iodium. The effects of PDGF on NADPH oxidase activity and DNA synthesis were prevented in PaSCs isolated from the pancreas of mice with a genetic deficiency of p47phox. Conclusions Ethanol causes proliferation of stellate cells by augmenting the activation of the cell's NADPH oxidase system stimulated by PDGF. These results provide new insights into the mechanisms of alcohol-induced fibrosing disorders. PMID:17627098

  18. Dietary omega-3 deficiency reduces BDNF content and activation NMDA receptor and Fyn in dorsal hippocampus: implications on persistence of long-term memory in rats.

    PubMed

    Bach, Simone Azevedo; de Siqueira, Letícia V; Müller, Alexandre P; Oses, Jean P; Quatrim, Andreia; Emanuelli, Tatiana; Vinadé, Lúcia; Souza, Diogo O; Moreira, Júlia D

    2014-07-01

    Omega-3 (n-3) fatty acids are important for adequate brain function and cognition. The aim of the present study was to evaluate how n-3 fatty acids influence the persistence of long-term memory (LTM) in an aversive memory task and to explore the putative mechanism involved. Female rats received isocaloric diets that included n-3 (n-3 group) or not (D group). The adult litters were subjected to an inhibitory avoidance task (0.7 mA, 1.0 seconds foot shock) to elicit persistent LTM. Twelve hours after the training session, the fatty acid profile and the brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) content of the dorsal hippocampus were assessed. In addition, we measured the activation of the NR2B subunit of the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor and the SRC family protein Fyn. Despite pronounced learning in both groups, the persistence of LTM was abolished in the D group 7 days after the training session. We also observed that the D group presented reductions in hippocampal DHA (22:6 n-3) and BDNF content. Twelve hours after the training session, the D group showed decreased NR2B and Fyn phosphorylation in the dorsal hippocampus, with no change in the total content of these proteins. Further, there was a decrease in the interaction of Fyn with NR2B in the D group, as observed by co-immunoprecipitation. Taken together, these data suggest that n-3 fatty acids influence the persistence of LTM by maintaining adequate levels of DHA and BDNF as well as by influencing the activation of NR2B and Fyn during the period of memory formation.

  19. Location- and Subunit-Specific NMDA Receptors Determine the Developmental Sevoflurane Neurotoxicity Through ERK1/2 Signaling.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wen-Yuan; Jia, Li-Jie; Luo, Yan; Zhang, Hong-Hai; Cai, Fang; Mao, Hui; Xu, Wei-Cai; Fang, Jun-Biao; Peng, Zhi-You; Ma, Zheng-Wen; Chen, Yan-Hong; Zhang, Juan; Wei, Zhen; Yu, Bu-Wei; Hu, Shuang-Fei

    2016-01-01

    It is well established that developmental exposure of sevoflurane (an inhalational anesthetic) is capable of inducing neuronal apoptosis and subsequent learning and memory disorders. Synaptic NMDA receptors activity plays an essential role in cell survival, while the extra-synaptic NMDA receptors activation is usually associated with cell death. However, whether synaptic or extra-synaptic NMDA receptors mediate developmental sevoflurane neurotoxicity is largely unknown. Here, we show that developmental sevoflurane treatment decreased NR2A, but increased NR2B subunit expression both in vitro and in vivo. Sevoflurane-induced neuronal apoptosis was attenuated by synaptic NMDA receptors activation or low dose of exogenous NMDA in vitro. Interestingly, these effects could be abolished by NR2A inhibitor PEAQX, but not NR2B inhibitor Ifenprodil in vitro. In contrast, activation of extra-synaptic NMDA receptors alone had no effects on sevoflurane neurotoxicity. In the scenario of extra-synaptic NMDA receptors stimulation, however, sevoflurane-induced neuronal apoptosis could be prevented by addition of Ifenprodil, but not by PEAQX in vitro. In addition, sevoflurane neurotoxicity could also be rescued by memantine, an uncompetitive antagonist for preferential blockade of extra-synaptic NMDA receptors both in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, we found that developmental sevoflurane-induced phospho-ERK1/2 inhibition was restored by synaptic NMDA receptor activation (in vitro), low dose of NMDA (in vitro) or memantine (in vivo). And the neuroprotective role of synaptic NMDA activity was able to be reversed by MEK1/2 inhibitor U0126 in vitro. Finally, administration of memantine or NMDA significantly improved spatial learning and memory dysfunctions induced by developmental sevoflurane exposure without influence on locomotor activity. These results indicated that activation of synaptic NR2A-containing NMDA receptors, or inhibition of extra-synaptic NR2B-containing NMDA receptors

  20. Perlecan domain 1 recombinant proteoglycan augments BMP-2 activity and osteogenesis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Many growth factors, such as bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-2, have been shown to interact with polymers of sulfated disacharrides known as heparan sulfate (HS) glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), which are found on matrix and cell-surface proteoglycans throughout the body. HS GAGs, and some more highly sulfated forms of chondroitin sulfate (CS), regulate cell function by serving as co-factors, or co-receptors, in GF interactions with their receptors, and HS or CS GAGs have been shown to be necessary for inducing signaling and GF activity, even in the osteogenic lineage. Unlike recombinant proteins, however, HS and CS GAGs are quite heterogenous due, in large part, to post-translational addition, then removal, of sulfate groups to various positions along the GAG polymer. We have, therefore, investigated whether it would be feasible to deliver a DNA pro-drug to generate a soluble HS/CS proteoglycan in situ that would augment the activity of growth-factors, including BMP-2, in vivo. Results Utilizing a purified recombinant human perlecan domain 1 (rhPln.D1) expressed from HEK 293 cells with HS and CS GAGs, tight binding and dose-enhancement of rhBMP-2 activity was demonstrated in vitro. In vitro, the expressed rhPln.D1 was characterized by modification with sulfated HS and CS GAGs. Dose-enhancement of rhBMP-2 by a pln.D1 expression plasmid delivered together as a lyophilized single-phase on a particulate tricalcium phosphate scaffold for 6 or more weeks generated up to 9 fold more bone volume de novo on the maxillary ridge in a rat model than in control sites without the pln.D1 plasmid. Using a significantly lower BMP-2 dose, this combination provided more than 5 times as much maxillary ridge augmentation and greater density than rhBMP-2 delivered on a collagen sponge (InFuse™). Conclusions A recombinant HS/CS PG interacted strongly and functionally with BMP-2 in binding and cell-based assays, and, in vivo, the pln.247 expression plasmid significantly improved

  1. Non-NMDA receptor antagonist-induced drinking in rat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, Z.; Johnson, A. K.

    1998-01-01

    Glutamate has been implicated in the central control of mechanisms that maintain body fluid homeostasis. The present studies demonstrate that intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injections of the non-N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonists 6, 7-dinitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (DNQX) and 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3 dione (CNQX) induce drinking in rats. The dipsogenic effect of i.c.v. DNQX was antagonized by the non-NMDA receptor agonist alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid (AMPA). The water intake induced by DNQX was also blocked by pretreatment with a NMDA receptor antagonist, MK-801, but not by angiotensin type 1 (AT1) or acetylcholine muscarinic receptor antagonists (losartan and atropine). The results indicate that non-NMDA receptors may exert a tonic inhibitory effect within brain circuits that control dipsogenic activity and that functional integrity of NMDA receptors may be required for the non-NMDA receptor antagonists to induce water intake. Copyright 1998 Published by Elsevier Science B.V.

  2. The role of striatal NMDA receptors in drug addiction.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yao-Ying; Cepeda, Carlos; Cui, Cai-Lian

    2009-01-01

    The past decade has witnessed an impressive accumulation of evidence indicating that the excitatory amino acid glutamate and its receptors, in particular the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor subtype, play an important role in drug addiction. Various lines of research using animal models of drug addiction have demonstrated that drug-induced craving is accompanied by significant upregulation of NR2B subunit expression. Furthermore, selective blockade of NR2B-containing NMDA receptors in the striatum, especially in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) can inhibit drug craving and reinstatement. The purpose of this review is to examine the role of striatal NMDA receptors in drug addiction. After a brief description of glutamatergic innervation and NMDA receptor subunit distribution in the striatum, we discuss potential mechanisms to explain the role of striatal NMDA receptors in drug addiction by elucidating signaling cascades involved in the regulation of subunit expression and redistribution, phosphorylation of receptor subunits, as well as activation of intracellular signals triggered by drug experience. Understanding the mechanisms regulating striatal NMDA receptor changes in drug addiction will provide more specific and rational targets to counteract the deleterious effects of drug addiction.

  3. Targeting of NMDA receptors in new treatments for schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Kenji

    2014-09-01

    Abnormalities in glutamatergic neurotransmission mediated by N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) are implicated in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia, although the precise mechanisms are unknown. The author examines the role of the NMDA receptor in schizophrenia, focusing on results from preclinical and clinical studies that support the NMDA receptor hypothesis of schizophrenia. The author first reviewed papers detailing alterations in the levels of endogenous substances such as glutamine, glutamate, d-serine, l-serine, kynurenic acid and glutathione (GSH), all of which can affect NMDA receptor function. Next, the author reviewed clinical findings for glycine, d-serine, d-cycloserine, d-amino acid oxidase inhibitors (e.g., sodium benzoate) and glycine transporter-1 inhibitors (e.g., sarcosine, bitopertin), as potential therapeutic drugs. In addition, the author outlined how oxidative stress associated with decreased levels of the endogenous antioxidant GSH may play a role in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. Finally, the author reviewed N-acetylcysteine (NAC), a precursor of GSH and an activator of the cystine-glutamate antiporter, as a potential therapeutic drug. Given the NMDA receptor hypothesis of schizophrenia, the glycine modulatory site on NMDA receptors is the most attractive therapeutic target for this disease. In addition, both the kynurenine pathway and cystine-glutamate antiporter represent credible potential therapeutic targets for schizophrenia.

  4. Non-NMDA receptor antagonist-induced drinking in rat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, Z.; Johnson, A. K.

    1998-01-01

    Glutamate has been implicated in the central control of mechanisms that maintain body fluid homeostasis. The present studies demonstrate that intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injections of the non-N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonists 6, 7-dinitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (DNQX) and 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3 dione (CNQX) induce drinking in rats. The dipsogenic effect of i.c.v. DNQX was antagonized by the non-NMDA receptor agonist alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid (AMPA). The water intake induced by DNQX was also blocked by pretreatment with a NMDA receptor antagonist, MK-801, but not by angiotensin type 1 (AT1) or acetylcholine muscarinic receptor antagonists (losartan and atropine). The results indicate that non-NMDA receptors may exert a tonic inhibitory effect within brain circuits that control dipsogenic activity and that functional integrity of NMDA receptors may be required for the non-NMDA receptor antagonists to induce water intake. Copyright 1998 Published by Elsevier Science B.V.

  5. [Beta]-Adrenergic Receptor Activation Rescues Theta Frequency Stimulation-Induced LTP Deficits in Mice Expressing C-Terminally Truncated NMDA Receptor GluN2A Subunits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moody, Teena D.; Watabe, Ayako M.; Indersmitten, Tim; Komiyama, Noboru H.; Grant, Seth G. N.; O'Dell, Thomas J.

    2011-01-01

    Through protein interactions mediated by their cytoplasmic C termini the GluN2A and GluN2B subunits of NMDA receptors (NMDARs) have a key role in the formation of NMDAR signaling complexes at excitatory synapses. Although these signaling complexes are thought to have a crucial role in NMDAR-dependent forms of synaptic plasticity such as long-term…

  6. Extinction of Conditioned Taste Aversion Depends on Functional Protein Synthesis but Not on NMDA Receptor Activation in the Ventromedial Prefrontal Cortex

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akirav, Irit; Khatsrinov, Vicktoria; Vouimba, Rose-Marie; Merhav, Maayan; Ferreira, Guillaume; Rosenblum, Kobi; Maroun, Mouna

    2006-01-01

    We investigated the role of the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) in extinction of conditioned taste aversion (CTA) by microinfusing a protein synthesis inhibitor or N-methyl-d-asparate (NMDA) receptors antagonist into the vmPFC immediately following a non-reinforced extinction session. We found that the protein synthesis blocker anisomycin,…

  7. Extinction of Conditioned Taste Aversion Depends on Functional Protein Synthesis but Not on NMDA Receptor Activation in the Ventromedial Prefrontal Cortex

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akirav, Irit; Khatsrinov, Vicktoria; Vouimba, Rose-Marie; Merhav, Maayan; Ferreira, Guillaume; Rosenblum, Kobi; Maroun, Mouna

    2006-01-01

    We investigated the role of the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) in extinction of conditioned taste aversion (CTA) by microinfusing a protein synthesis inhibitor or N-methyl-d-asparate (NMDA) receptors antagonist into the vmPFC immediately following a non-reinforced extinction session. We found that the protein synthesis blocker anisomycin,…

  8. [Beta]-Adrenergic Receptor Activation Rescues Theta Frequency Stimulation-Induced LTP Deficits in Mice Expressing C-Terminally Truncated NMDA Receptor GluN2A Subunits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moody, Teena D.; Watabe, Ayako M.; Indersmitten, Tim; Komiyama, Noboru H.; Grant, Seth G. N.; O'Dell, Thomas J.

    2011-01-01

    Through protein interactions mediated by their cytoplasmic C termini the GluN2A and GluN2B subunits of NMDA receptors (NMDARs) have a key role in the formation of NMDAR signaling complexes at excitatory synapses. Although these signaling complexes are thought to have a crucial role in NMDAR-dependent forms of synaptic plasticity such as long-term…

  9. Costal and crural diaphragm, and intercostal and genioglossal electromyogram activities during spontaneous augmented breaths (sighs) in kittens.

    PubMed

    Watchko, J F; Brozanski, B S; O'Day, T L; Klesh, K W; Guthrie, R D

    1989-01-01

    Spontaneously occurring augmented breaths (sighs) are common in infants. The pattern of electrical activity of the inspiratory muscles of the thorax and upper airway during augmented breaths, however, has not been fully characterized in this less than fully mature age group. We therefore examined costal and crural diaphragm and external intercostal and genioglossal EMG activities during spontaneous augmented breaths (n = 46) in 10 anesthetized (1.35% halothane) 1-month-old kittens breathing room air. EMG responses were assessed by comparing the spontaneous augmented breaths (AB) to the five immediately preceding breaths (control). The peak moving time average EMG activity observed during the AB was 240 +/- 32% (mean +/- SD) of control for the costal diaphragm, 279 +/- 66% of control for the crural diaphragm, and 274 +/- 68% of control for the external intercostal muscle. The mean increase in EMG activity during the AB was not significantly different among these three muscle groups (P greater than 0.25). Genioglossal EMG activity during AB was observed in only 1 of 10 study animals. These results document that during AB in anesthetized kittens, activity of the thoracic inspiratory muscles (costal/crural diaphragm and external intercostal muscles) increase in parallel, suggesting that they are modulated in a uniform manner. The infrequent observance of genioglossal activity during AB suggests that either 1) halothane anesthesia depresses genioglossal activity more than diaphragmatic and intercostal activity during AB or 2) that genioglossal recruitment is not necessary to maintain upper airway patency during this period of heightened respiratory drive.

  10. NMDA receptor activation upstream of methyl farnesoate signaling for short day-induced male offspring production in the water flea, Daphnia pulex.

    PubMed

    Toyota, Kenji; Miyakawa, Hitoshi; Yamaguchi, Katsushi; Shigenobu, Shuji; Ogino, Yukiko; Tatarazako, Norihisa; Miyagawa, Shinichi; Iguchi, Taisen

    2015-03-14

    The cladoceran crustacean Daphnia pulex produces female offspring by parthenogenesis under favorable conditions, but in response to various unfavorable external stimuli, it produces male offspring (environmental sex determination: ESD). We recently established an innovative system for ESD studies using D. pulex WTN6 strain, in which the sex of the offspring can be controlled simply by changes in the photoperiod: the long-day and short-day conditions can induce female and male offspring, respectively. Taking advantage of this system, we demonstrated that de novo methyl farnesoate (MF) synthesis is necessary for male offspring production. These results indicate the key role of innate MF signaling as a conductor between external environmental stimuli and the endogenous male developmental pathway. Despite these findings, the molecular mechanisms underlying up- and downstream signaling of MF have not yet been well elucidated in D. pulex. To elucidate up- and downstream events of MF signaling during sex determination processes, we compared the transcriptomes of daphnids reared under the long-day (female) condition with short-day (male) and MF-treated (male) conditions. We found that genes involved in ionotropic glutamate receptors, known to mediate the vast majority of excitatory neurotransmitting processes in various organisms, were significantly activated in daphnids by the short-day condition but not by MF treatment. Administration of specific agonists and antagonists, especially for the N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor, strongly increased or decreased, respectively, the proportion of male-producing mothers. Moreover, we also identified genes responsible for male production (e.g., protein kinase C pathway-related genes). Such genes were generally shared between the short-day reared and MF-treated daphnids. We identified several candidate genes regulating ESD which strongly suggests that these genes may be essential factors for male offspring production as an

  11. Troponin activator augments muscle force in nemaline myopathy patients with nebulin mutations

    PubMed Central

    de Winter, Josine Marieke; Buck, Danielle; Hidalgo, Carlos; Jasper, Jeffrey R; Malik, Fady I; Clarke, Nigel F; Stienen, Ger J M; Lawlor, Michael W; Beggs, Alan H; Ottenheijm, Coen A C; Granzier, Henk

    2013-01-01

    Background Nemaline myopathy—the most common non-dystrophic congenital myopathy—is caused by mutations in thin filament genes, of which the nebulin gene is the most frequently affected one. The nebulin gene codes for the giant sarcomeric protein nebulin, which plays a crucial role in skeletal muscle contractile performance. Muscle weakness is a hallmark feature of nemaline myopathy patients with nebulin mutations, and is caused by changes in contractile protein function, including a lower calcium-sensitivity of force generation. To date no therapy exists to treat muscle weakness in nemaline myopathy. Here, we studied the ability of the novel fast skeletal muscle troponin activator, CK-2066260, to augment force generation at submaximal calcium levels in muscle cells from nemaline myopathy patients with nebulin mutations. Methods Contractile protein function was determined in permeabilised muscle cells isolated from frozen patient biopsies. The effect of 5 µM CK-2066260 on force production was assessed. Results Nebulin protein concentrations were severely reduced in muscle cells from these patients compared to controls, while myofibrillar ultrastructure was largely preserved. Both maximal active tension and the calcium-sensitivity of force generation were lower in patients compared to controls. Importantly, CK-2066260 greatly increased the calcium-sensitivity of force generation—without affecting the cooperativity of activation—in patients to levels that exceed those observed in untreated control muscle. Conclusions Fast skeletal troponin activation is a therapeutic mechanism to augment contractile protein function in nemaline myopathy patients with nebulin mutations and with other neuromuscular diseases. PMID:23572184

  12. Early NMDA receptor-driven waves of activity in the developing neocortex: physiological or pathological network oscillations?

    PubMed Central

    Allene, Camille; Cossart, Rosa

    2010-01-01

    Several patterns of coherent activity have been described in developing cortical structures, thus providing a general framework for network maturation. A detailed timely description of network patterns at circuit and cell levels is essential for the understanding of pathogenic processes occurring during brain development. Disturbances in the expression timetable of this pattern sequence are very likely to affect network maturation. This review focuses on the maturation of coherent activity patterns in developing neocortical structures. It emphasizes the intrinsic and synaptic cellular properties that are unique to the immature neocortex and, in particular, the critical role played by extracellular glutamate in controlling network excitability and triggering synchronous network waves of activity. PMID:19917570

  13. Berberine augments ATP-induced inflammasome activation in macrophages by enhancing AMPK signaling

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Li-Hui; Liang, Yi-Dan; Wei, Hong-Xia; Hu, Bo; Pan, Hao; Zha, Qing-Bing; Ouyang, Dong-Yun; He, Xian-Hui

    2017-01-01

    The isoquinoline alkaloid berberine possesses many pharmacological activities including antibacterial infection. Although the direct bactericidal effect of berberine has been documented, its influence on the antibacterial functions of macrophages is largely unknown. As inflammasome activation in macrophages is important for the defense against bacterial infection, we aimed to investigate the influence of berberine on inflammasome activation in murine macrophages. Our results showed that berberine significantly increased ATP-induced inflammasome activation as reflected by enhanced pyroptosis as well as increased release of caspase-1p10 and mature interleukin-1β (IL-1β) in macrophages. Such effects of berberine could be suppressed by AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) inhibitor compound C or by knockdown of AMPKα expression, indicating the involvement of AMPK signaling in this process. In line with increased IL-1β release, the ability of macrophages to kill engulfed bacteria was also intensified by berberine. This was corroborated by the in vivo finding that the peritoneal live bacterial load was decreased by berberine treatment. Moreover, berberine administration significantly improved survival of bacterial infected mice, concomitant with increased IL-1β levels and elevated neutrophil recruitment in the peritoneal cavity. Collectively, these data suggested that berberine could enhance bacterial killing by augmenting inflammasome activation in macrophages through AMPK signaling. PMID:27980220

  14. In vitro augmentation of natural killer cell activity by manganese chloride

    SciTech Connect

    Smialowicz, R.J.; Rogers, R.R.; Riddle, M.M.; Rowe, D.G.; Luebke, R.W.

    1986-01-01

    The in vitro cultivation of murine spleen cells with MnCl/sub 2/ resulted in the enhancement of natural killer (NK) cell activity as measured in a 4-h /sup 51/Cr-release assay. Optimal enhancement of NK activity was observed at concentrations of 10-20 ..mu..g MnCl/sub 2//culture (72-144 ..mu..M Mn/sup 2 +/). Enhancement of NK activity by MnCl/sub 2/ was not associated with any changes in the number or viability of cells following culture. The addition of antiasialo GM/sub 1/ antibody and complement to spleen cell cultures completely abrogated the enhancement of NK activity by MnCl/sub 2/. The enhancement of NK activity by MnCl/sub 2/ in vitro was accompanied by interferon induction. The addition of rabbit antimouse interferon to spleen cells cultured with MnCl/sub 2/ reduced NK activity. NK activity in cultures treated with MnCl/sub 2/ was also reduced upon removal of plastic adherent cells. However, restoration of enhanced NK activity by addition of adherent cells to nonadherent cells in the presence of MnCl/sub 2/ was not observed. Similar effects of NK activity were observed with polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid (Poly I x C), a known interferon inducer and NK enhancer. The results demonstrate that murine splenic NK activity is enhanced in vitro by MnCl/sub 2/ and that this enhancement may be mediated by interferon induction. The results also suggest that in vitro enhancement of NK activity by MnCl/sub 2/, as with Poly I x C, may require participation of an adherent cell population for NK augmentation.

  15. NMDA receptor binding in focal epilepsies.

    PubMed

    McGinnity, C J; Koepp, M J; Hammers, A; Riaño Barros, D A; Pressler, R M; Luthra, S; Jones, P A; Trigg, W; Micallef, C; Symms, M R; Brooks, D J; Duncan, J S

    2015-10-01

    To demonstrate altered N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor availability in patients with focal epilepsies using positron emission tomography (PET) and [(18)F]GE-179, a ligand that selectively binds to the open NMDA receptor ion channel, which is thought to be overactive in epilepsy. Eleven patients (median age 33 years, 6 males) with known frequent interictal epileptiform discharges had an [(18)F]GE-179 PET scan, in a cross-sectional study. MRI showed a focal lesion but discordant EEG changes in two, was non-localising with multifocal EEG abnormalities in two, and was normal in the remaining seven patients who all had multifocal EEG changes. Individual patient [(18)F]GE-179 volume-of-distribution (VT) images were compared between individual patients and a group of 10 healthy controls (47 years, 7 males) using Statistical Parametric Mapping. Individual analyses revealed a single cluster of focal VT increase in four patients; one with a single and one with multifocal MRI lesions, and two with normal MRIs. Post hoc analysis revealed that, relative to controls, patients not taking antidepressants had globally increased [(18)F]GE-179 VT (+28%; p<0.002), and the three patients taking an antidepressant drug had globally reduced [(18)F]GE-179 VT (-29%; p<0.002). There were no focal abnormalities common to the epilepsy group. In patients with focal epilepsies, we detected primarily global increases of [(18)F]GE-179 VT consistent with increased NMDA channel activation, but reduced availability in those taking antidepressant drugs, consistent with a possible mode of action of this class of drugs. [(18)F]GE-179 PET showed focal accentuations of NMDA binding in 4 out of 11 patients, with difficult to localise and treat focal epilepsy. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  16. Augmented vagal heart rate modulation in active hypoestrogenic pre-menopausal women with functional hypothalamic amenorrhoea.

    PubMed

    O'Donnell, Emma; Goodman, Jack M; Morris, Beverly L; Floras, John S; Harvey, Paula J

    2015-11-01

    Compared with eumenorrhoeic women, exercise-trained women with functional hypothalamic amenorrhoea (ExFHA) exhibit low heart rates (HRs) and absent reflex renin-angiotensin-system activation and augmentation of their muscle sympathetic nerve response to orthostatic stress. To test the hypothesis that their autonomic HR modulation is altered concurrently, three age-matched (pooled mean, 24 ± 1 years; mean ± S.E.M.) groups of women were studied: active with either FHA (ExFHA; n=11) or eumenorrhoeic cycles (ExOv; n=17) and sedentary with eumenorrhoeic cycles (SedOv; n=17). Blood pressure (BP), HR and HR variability (HRV) in the frequency domain were determined during both supine rest and graded lower body negative pressure (LBNP; -10, -20 and -40 mmHg). Very low (VLF), low (LF) and high (HF) frequency power spectra (ms(2)) were determined and, owing to skewness, log10-transformed. LF/HF ratio and total power (VLF + LF + HF) were calculated. At baseline, HR and systolic BP (SBP) were lower (P<0.05) and HF and total power were higher (P<0.05) in ExFHA than in eumenorrhoeic women. In all groups, LBNP decreased (P<0.05) SBP, HF and total power and increased (P<0.05) HR and LF/HF ratio. However, HF and total power remained higher (P<0.05) and HR, SBP and LF/HF ratio remained lower (P<0.05) in ExFHA than in eumenorrhoeic women, in whom measures did not differ (P>0.05). At each stage, HR correlated inversely (P<0.05) with HF. In conclusion, ExFHA women demonstrate augmented vagal yet unchanged sympathetic HR modulation, both at rest and during orthostatic stress. Although the role of oestrogen deficiency is unclear, these findings are in contrast with studies reporting decreased HRV in hypoestrogenic post-menopausal women.

  17. Can FES-Augmented Active Cycling Training Improve Locomotion in Post-Acute Elderly Stroke Patients?

    PubMed Central

    Peri, Elisabetta; Ambrosini, Emilia; Pedrocchi, Alessandra; Ferrigno, Giancarlo; Nava, Claudia; Longoni, Valentina; Monticone, Marco; Ferrante, Simona

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies advocated the use of active cycling coupled with functional electrical stimulation to induce neuroplasticity and enhance functional improvements in stroke adult patients. The aim of this work was to evaluate whether the benefits induced by such a treatment are superior to standard physiotherapy. A single-blinded randomized controlled trial has been performed on post-acute elderly stroke patients. Patients underwent FES-augmented cycling training combined with voluntary pedaling or standard physiotherapy. The intervention consisted of fifteen 30-minutes sessions carried out within 3 weeks. Patients were evaluated before and after training, through functional scales, gait analysis and a voluntary pedaling test. Results were compared with an age-matched healthy group. Sixteen patients completed the training. After treatment, a general improvement of all clinical scales was obtained for both groups. Only the mechanical efficiency highlighted a group effect in favor of the experimental group. Although a group effect was not found for any other cycling or gait parameters, the experimental group showed a higher percentage of change with respect to the control group (e.g. the gait velocity was improved of 35.4% and 25.4% respectively, and its variation over time was higher than minimal clinical difference for the experimental group only). This trend suggests that differences in terms of motor recovery between the two groups may be achieved increasing the training dose. In conclusion, this study, although preliminary, showed that FES-augmented active cycling training seems to be effective in improving cycling and walking ability in post-acute elderly stroke patients. A higher sample size is required to confirm results. PMID:27990234

  18. Can FES-Augmented Active Cycling Training Improve Locomotion in Post-Acute Elderly Stroke Patients?

    PubMed

    Peri, Elisabetta; Ambrosini, Emilia; Pedrocchi, Alessandra; Ferrigno, Giancarlo; Nava, Claudia; Longoni, Valentina; Monticone, Marco; Ferrante, Simona

    2016-06-13

    Recent studies advocated the use of active cycling coupled with functional electrical stimulation to induce neuroplasticity and enhance functional improvements in stroke adult patients. The aim of this work was to evaluate whether the benefits induced by such a treatment are superior to standard physiotherapy. A single-blinded randomized controlled trial has been performed on post-acute elderly stroke patients. Patients underwent FES-augmented cycling training combined with voluntary pedaling or standard physiotherapy. The intervention consisted of fifteen 30-minutes sessions carried out within 3 weeks. Patients were evaluated before and after training, through functional scales, gait analysis and a voluntary pedaling test. Results were compared with an age-matched healthy group. Sixteen patients completed the training. After treatment, a general improvement of all clinical scales was obtained for both groups. Only the mechanical efficiency highlighted a group effect in favor of the experimental group. Although a group effect was not found for any other cycling or gait parameters, the experimental group showed a higher percentage of change with respect to the control group (e.g. the gait velocity was improved of 35.4% and 25.4% respectively, and its variation over time was higher than minimal clinical difference for the experimental group only). This trend suggests that differences in terms of motor recovery between the two groups may be achieved increasing the training dose. In conclusion, this study, although preliminary, showed that FES-augmented active cycling training seems to be effective in improving cycling and walking ability in post-acute elderly stroke patients. A higher sample size is required to confirm results.

  19. A family of photoswitchable NMDA receptors

    PubMed Central

    Berlin, Shai; Szobota, Stephanie; Reiner, Andreas; Carroll, Elizabeth C; Kienzler, Michael A; Guyon, Alice; Xiao, Tong; Trauner, Dirk; Isacoff, Ehud Y

    2016-01-01

    NMDA receptors, which regulate synaptic strength and are implicated in learning and memory, consist of several subtypes with distinct subunit compositions and functional properties. To enable spatiotemporally defined, rapid and reproducible manipulation of function of specific subtypes, we engineered a set of photoswitchable GluN subunits ('LiGluNs'). Photo-agonism of GluN2A or GluN2B elicits an excitatory drive to hippocampal neurons that can be shaped in time to mimic synaptic activation. Photo-agonism of GluN2A at single dendritic spines evokes spine-specific calcium elevation and expansion, the morphological correlate of LTP. Photo-antagonism of GluN2A alone, or in combination with photo-antagonism of GluN1a, reversibly blocks excitatory synaptic currents, prevents the induction of long-term potentiation and prevents spine expansion. In addition, photo-antagonism in vivo disrupts synaptic pruning of developing retino-tectal projections in larval zebrafish. By providing precise and rapidly reversible optical control of NMDA receptor subtypes, LiGluNs should help unravel the contribution of specific NMDA receptors to synaptic transmission, integration and plasticity. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12040.001 PMID:26929991

  20. Underlying mechanism for NMDA receptor antagonism by the anti-inflammatory drug, sulfasalazine, in mouse cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Noh, Ji-Hyun; Gwag, Byoung-Joo; Chung, Jun-Mo

    2006-01-01

    Sulfasalazine (SULFA), of anti-inflammatory drugs, shows a protective action against NMDA-induced neuronal toxicity. Here, we used an electrophysiological study of the pharmacological effects of SULFA on NMDA receptors to examine the molecular mechanisms underlying the neuroprotective role of SULFA. The drug acted as a typical noncompetitive inhibitor with neither agonist- nor use-dependency, and antagonized NMDA-evoked responses in a voltage-independent manner, suggesting that SULFA is not an open channel blocker. Noise and single channel analyses showed that SULFA-blocked NMDA responses by reducing the number of NMDA channels available for activation, and also reduced the channel open probability without changing single channel conductance. Moreover, SULFA accelerated NMDA desensitization without affecting the affinity of the receptor for NMDA or glutamate. Taken together, these data indicate that SULFA blocks the NMDA response by reducing the number of NMDA channels available for activation. This appears to occur via a SULFA-induced decrease in the channel open probability, and a concomitant acceleration of the desensitization response, which is likely associated with a reduced affinity for glycine. SULFA indeed decreased the glycine-potentiated NMDA response without binding directly to the glycine site. Our results suggest that SULFA acts as a noncompetitive NMDA receptor antagonist with an allosteric glycine modulation.

  1. Spinal NMDA receptor activation constrains inactivity-induced phrenic motor facilitation in Charles River Sprague-Dawley rats

    PubMed Central

    Streeter, K. A.

    2014-01-01

    Reduced spinal synaptic inputs to phrenic motor neurons elicit a unique form of spinal plasticity known as inactivity-induced phrenic motor facilitation (iPMF). iPMF requires tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and atypical protein kinase C (aPKC) activity within spinal segments containing the phrenic motor nucleus to stabilize early, transient increases in phrenic burst amplitude into long-lasting iPMF. Here we tested the hypothesis that spinal N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) activation constrains long-lasting iPMF in some rat substrains. Phrenic motor output was recorded in anesthetized, ventilated Harlan (HSD) and Charles River (CRSD) Sprague-Dawley rats exposed to a 30-min central neural apnea. HSD rats expressed a robust, long-lasting (>60 min) increase in phrenic burst amplitude (i.e., long-lasting iPMF) when respiratory neural activity was restored. By contrast, CRSD rats expressed an attenuated, transient (∼15 min) iPMF. Spinal NMDAR inhibition with DL-2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid (APV) before neural apnea or shortly (4 min) prior to the resumption of respiratory neural activity revealed long-lasting iPMF in CRSD rats that was phenotypically similar to that in HSD rats. By contrast, APV did not alter iPMF expression in HSD rats. Spinal TNF-α or aPKC inhibition impaired long-lasting iPMF enabled by NMDAR inhibition in CRSD rats, suggesting that similar mechanisms give rise to long-lasting iPMF in CRSD rats with NMDAR inhibition as those giving rise to long-lasting iPMF in HSD rats. These results suggest that NMDAR activation can impose constraints on TNF-α-induced aPKC activation after neural apnea, impairing stabilization of transient iPMF into long-lasting iPMF. These data may have important implications for understanding differential responses to reduced respiratory neural activity in a heterogeneous human population. PMID:25103979

  2. Enhancing Effects of NMDA-Receptor Blockade on Extinction Learning and Related Brain Activation Are Modulated by BMI

    PubMed Central

    Golisch, Anne; Heba, Stefanie; Glaubitz, Benjamin; Tegenthoff, Martin; Lissek, Silke

    2017-01-01

    A distributed network including prefrontal and hippocampal regions is involved in context-related extinction learning as well as in renewal. Renewal describes the recovery of an extinguished response if the context of extinction differs from the context of recall. Animal studies have demonstrated that prefrontal, but not hippocampal N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) antagonism disrupted extinction learning and processing of task context. However, human studies of NMDAR in extinction learning are lacking, while NMDAR antagonism yielded contradictory results in other learning tasks. This fMRI study investigated the role of NMDAR for human behavioral and brain activation correlates of extinction and renewal. Healthy volunteers received a single dose of the NMDAR antagonist memantine prior to extinction of previously acquired stimulus-outcome associations presented in either identical or novel contexts. We observed better, and partly faster, extinction learning in participants receiving the NMDAR antagonist compared to placebo. However, memantine did not affect renewal. In both extinction and recall, the memantine group showed a deactivation in extinction-related brain regions, particularly in the prefrontal cortex, while hippocampal activity was increased. This higher hippocampal activation was in turn associated with the participants' body mass index (BMI) and extinction errors. Our results demonstrate potentially dose-related enhancing effects of memantine and highlight involvement of hippocampal NMDAR in context-related extinction learning. PMID:28326025

  3. CXCR4 and NMDA Receptors Are Functionally Coupled in Rat Hippocampal Noradrenergic and Glutamatergic Nerve Endings.

    PubMed

    Di Prisco, Silvia; Olivero, Guendalina; Merega, Elisa; Bonfiglio, Tommaso; Marchi, Mario; Pittaluga, Anna

    2016-12-01

    Previous studies had shown that the HIV-1 capsidic glycoprotein gp120 (strain IIIB) modulates presynaptic release-regulating NMDA receptors on noradrenergic and glutamatergic terminals. This study aims to assess whether the chemokine CXC4 receptors (CXCR4s) has a role in the gp120-mediated effects. The effect of CXCL12, the endogenous ligand at CXCR4, on the NMDA-mediated releasing activity was therefore investigated. Rat hippocampal synaptosomes were preloaded with [(3)H]noradrenaline ([(3)H]NA) or [(3)H]D-aspartate ([(3)H]D-Asp) and acutely exposed to CXCL12, to NMDA or to both agonists. CXCL12, inactive on its own, facilitated the NMDA-evoked tritium release. The NMDA antagonist MK-801 abolished the NMDA/CXCL12-evoked tritium release of both radiolabelled tracers, while the CXCR4 antagonist AMD 3100 halved it, suggesting that rat hippocampal nerve endings possess presynaptic release-regulating CXCR4 receptors colocalized with NMDA receptors. Accordingly, Western blot analysis confirmed the presence of CXCR4 proteins in synaptosomal plasmamembranes. In both synaptosomal preparations, CXCL12-induced facilitation of NMDA-mediated release was dependent upon PLC-mediated src-induced events leading to mobilization of Ca(2+) from intraterminal IP3-sensitive stores Finally, the gp120-induced facilitation of NMDA-mediated release of [(3)H]NA and [(3)H]D-Asp was prevented by AMD 3100. We propose that CXCR4s are functionally coupled to NMDA receptors in rat hippocampal noradrenergic and glutamatergic terminals and account for the gp120-induced modulation of the NMDA-mediated central effects. The NMDA/CXCR4 cross-talk could have a role in the neuropsychiatric symptoms often observed in HIV-1 positive patients.

  4. beta. -endorphin augments the cytolytic activity and interferon production of natural killer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Mandler, R.N.; Biddison, W.E.; Mandler, R.; Serrate, S.A.

    1986-02-01

    The in vitro effects of the neurohormone ..beta..-endorphin (b-end) on natural killer (NK) activity and interferon (IFN) production mediated by large granular lymphocytes (LGL) were investigated. LGL-enriched fractions from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from normal human volunteers were obtained by fractionation over discontinuous Percoll gradients. LGL were preincubated with or without various concentrations of b-end or the closely related peptides ..cap alpha..-endorphin (a-end), ..gamma..-endorphin (g-end), or D-ALA/sub 2/-..beta..-endorphin (D-ALA/sub 2/-b-end), a synthetic b-end analogue. NK activity was assayed on /sup 51/Cr-labeled K562 target cells. Preincubation of LGL effectors (but not K562 targets) for 2 to 18 hr with concentrations of b-end between 10/sup -7/ M and 10/sup -10/ M produced significant augmentation of NK cytolytic activity (mean percentage increase: 63%). The classic opiate antagonist naloxone blocked the enhancing effect when used at a 100-fold molar excess relative to b-end. These findings demonstrate that b-end enhances NK activity and IFN production of purified LGL, and suggests that b-end might bind to an opioid receptor on LGL that can be blocked by naloxone. These results lend support to the concepts of regulation of the immune response by neurohormones and the functional relationship between the nervous and immune systems.

  5. Nicotine-activated descending facilitation on spinal NMDA-dependent reflex potentiation from pontine tegmentum in rats.

    PubMed

    Pan, Shwu-Fen; Peng, Hsien-Yu; Chen, Chi-Chung; Chen, Mei-Jung; Lee, Shin-Da; Cheng, Chen-Li; Shyu, Jyh-Cherng; Liao, Jiuan-Miaw; Chen, Gin-Den; Lin, Tzer-Bin

    2008-05-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the possible neurotransmitter that activates the descending pathways coming from the dorsolateral pontine tegmentum (DPT) to modulate spinal pelvic-urethra reflex potentiation. External urethra sphincter electromyogram (EUSE) activity in response to test stimulation (TS, 1/30 Hz) and repetitive stimulation (RS, 1 Hz) on the pelvic afferent nerve of 63 anesthetized rats were recorded with or without microinjection of nicotinic cholinergic receptor (nAChR) agonists, ACh and nicotine, to the DPT. TS evoked a baseline reflex activity with a single action potential (1.00 +/- 0.00 spikes/stimulation, n = 40), whereas RS produced a long-lasting reflex potentiation (16.14 +/- 0.96 spikes/stimulation, n = 40) that was abolished by d-2-amino-5-phosphonovaleric acid (1.60 +/- 0.89 spikes/stimulation, n = 40) and was attenuated by 2,3-dihydroxy-6-nitro-7-sulfamoyl-benzo (F) quinoxaline (7.10 +/- 0.84 spikes/stimulation, n = 40). ACh and nicotine microinjections to DPT both produced facilitation on the RS-induced reflex potentiation (23.57 +/- 2.23 and 28.29 +/- 2.36 spikes/stimulation, P < 0.01, n = 10 and 20, respectively). Pretreatment of selective nicotinic receptor antagonist, chlorisondamine, reversed the facilitation on RS-induced reflex potentiation caused by nicotine (19.41 +/- 1.21 spikes/stimulation, P < 0.01, n = 10) Intrathecal WAY-100635 and spinal transection at the T(1) level both abolished the facilitation on reflex potentiation resulting from the DPT nicotine injection (12.86 +/- 3.13 and 15.57 +/- 1.72 spikes/stimulation, P < 0.01, n = 10 each). Our findings suggest that activation of nAChR at DPT may modulate N-methyl-d-aspartic acid-dependent reflex potentiation via descending serotonergic neurotransmission. This descending modulation may have physiological/pathological relevance in the neural controls of urethral closure.

  6. NMDA receptor antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Ramberger, Melanie; Bsteh, Gabriel; Schanda, Kathrin; Höftberger, Romana; Rostásy, Kevin; Baumann, Matthias; Aboulenein-Djamshidian, Fahmy; Lutterotti, Andreas; Deisenhammer, Florian; Berger, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To analyze the frequency of NMDA receptor (NMDAR) antibodies in patients with various inflammatory demyelinating diseases of the CNS and to determine their clinical correlates. Methods: Retrospective case-control study from 2005 to 2014 with the detection of serum IgG antibodies to NMDAR, aquaporin-4, and myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein by recombinant live cell-based immunofluorescence assays. Fifty-one patients with acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, 41 with neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders, 34 with clinically isolated syndrome, and 89 with multiple sclerosis (MS) were included. Due to a known association of NMDAR antibodies with seizures and behavioral symptoms, patients with those clinical manifestations were preferentially included and are therefore overrepresented in our cohort. Nine patients with NMDAR encephalitis, 94 patients with other neurologic diseases, and 48 healthy individuals were used as controls. Results: NMDAR antibodies were found in all 9 patients with NMDAR encephalitis but in only 1 of 215 (0.5%) patients with inflammatory demyelination and in none of the controls. This patient had relapsing-remitting MS with NMDAR antibodies present at disease onset, with an increase in NMDAR antibody titer with the onset of psychiatric symptoms and cognitive deficits. Conclusion: In demyelinating disorders, NMDAR antibodies are uncommon, even in those with symptoms seen in NMDAR encephalitis. PMID:26309901

  7. Modulation by glycine on vascular effects of NMDA:in vivo experimental research.

    PubMed

    Berrino, L; Vitagliano, S; Maione, S; Lampa, E; Rossi, F

    1993-06-01

    The present study has been carried out to determine if glycine, an allosteric modulator of NMDA receptor, is involved in the vascular effect induced by the activation of the CNS NMDA receptors.Icv NMDA (from 0.01 to 1µg/rat in the 3rd ventricle) caused a significant increase in arterial blood pressure in conscious freely moving rats. Moreover, the hypertension was associated with behavioural modifications (jumping, rearing, teething and running). Glycine pretreatment (1 and 10µg/raticv), significantly increased the NMDA hypertension. Glycine alone did not cause any arterial blood pressure modification while it induced a slight sedation. HA-966 (an antagonist of the glycine site on NMDA receptor) administration (1-10µg/raticv 5 min before glycine) significantly antagonized the glycine effects on NMDA hypertension.Alone HA-966 neither modified arterial blood pressure nor antagonized NMDA hypertension. In conclusion, our investigations confirm NMDA receptor involvement in cardiovascular function and they demonstrate thatin vivo glycine positively modulates NMDA receptors.

  8. Modulation by glycine on vascular effect of NMDA: in vivo experimental researches.

    PubMed

    Berrino, L; Vitagliano, S; Maione, S; Rossi, F

    1993-02-01

    The present study has been carried out to determine if glycine, an allosteric modulator of NMDA receptor, is involved in the vascular effect induced by the activation of the CNS NMDA receptors.Icv NMDA (from 0.01 to 1µg/rat in the 3rd ventricle) determined a significant increase in arterial blood pressure in conscious freely moving rats. Moreover, the hypertension was associated with behavioural modifications (jumping, rearing, teething and running). Glycine pretreatment (1 and 10µg/raticv), significantly increased the NMDA hypertension. Alone glycine did not cause any arterial blood pressure modification while it induced a slight sedation. HA-966 (an antagonist of the glycine site on NMDA receptor) administration (1-10µg/raticv 5 min before glycine) significantly antagonized the glycine effects on NMDA hypertension.Alone HA-966 neither modified arterial blood pressure nor antagonized NMDA hypertension. In conclusion, our investigations confirm NMDA receptor involvement in cardiovascular function and they demonstrate that in vivo glycine positively modulates NMDA receptor.

  9. Proteomic analysis of the mice hippocampus after preconditioning induced by N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA).

    PubMed

    do Amaral e Silva Müller, Gabrielle; Vandresen-Filho, Samuel; Tavares, Carolina Pereira; Menegatti, Angela C O; Terenzi, Hernán; Tasca, Carla Inês; Severino, Patricia Cardoso

    2013-05-01

    Preconditioning induced by N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) has been used as a therapeutic tool against later neuronal insults. NMDA preconditioning affords neuroprotection against convulsions and cellular damage induced by the NMDA receptor agonist, quinolinic acid (QA) with time-window dependence. This study aimed to evaluate the molecular alterations promoted by NMDA and to compare these alterations in different periods of time that are related to the presence or lack of neuroprotection. Putative mechanisms related to NMDA preconditioning were evaluated via a proteomic analysis by using a time-window study. After a subconvulsant and protective dose of NMDA administration mice, hippocampi were removed (1, 24 or 72 h) and total protein analyzed by 2DE gels and identified by MALDI-TOF. Differential protein expression among the time induction of NMDA preconditioning was observed. In the hippocampus of protected mice (24 h), four proteins: HSP70(B), aspartyl-tRNA synthetase, phosphatidylethanolamine binding protein and creatine kinase were found to be up-regulated. Two other proteins, HSP70(A) and V-type proton ATPase were found down-regulated. Proteomic analysis showed that the neuroprotection induced by NMDA preconditioning altered signaling pathways, cell energy maintenance and protein synthesis and processing. These events may occur in a sense to attenuate the excitotoxicity process during the activation of neuroprotection promoted by NMDA preconditioning.

  10. Nuclear Compartmentalization of Serine Racemase Regulates D-Serine Production: IMPLICATIONS FOR N-METHYL-D-ASPARTATE (NMDA) RECEPTOR ACTIVATION.

    PubMed

    Kolodney, Goren; Dumin, Elena; Safory, Hazem; Rosenberg, Dina; Mori, Hisashi; Radzishevsky, Inna; Radzishevisky, Inna; Wolosker, Herman

    2015-12-25

    D-Serine is a physiological co-agonist that activates N-methyl D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) and is essential for neurotransmission, synaptic plasticity, and behavior. D-Serine may also trigger NMDAR-mediated neurotoxicity, and its dysregulation may play a role in neurodegeneration. D-Serine is synthesized by the enzyme serine racemase (SR), which directly converts L-serine to D-serine. However, many aspects concerning the regulation of D-serine production under physiological and pathological conditions remain to be elucidated. Here, we investigate possible mechanisms regulating the synthesis of D-serine by SR in paradigms relevant to neurotoxicity. We report that SR undergoes nucleocytoplasmic shuttling and that this process is dysregulated by several insults leading to neuronal death, typically by apoptotic stimuli. Cell death induction promotes nuclear accumulation of SR, in parallel with the nuclear translocation of GAPDH and Siah proteins at an early stage of the cell death process. Mutations in putative SR nuclear export signals (NESs) elicit SR nuclear accumulation and its depletion from the cytosol. Following apoptotic insult, SR associates with nuclear GAPDH along with other nuclear components, and this is accompanied by complete inactivation of the enzyme. As a result, extracellular D-serine concentration is reduced, even though extracellular glutamate concentration increases severalfold. Our observations imply that nuclear translocation of SR provides a fail-safe mechanism to prevent or limit secondary NMDAR-mediated toxicity in nearby synapses. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  11. The role of active participation in interaction for children who use augmentative and alternative communication.

    PubMed

    Sundqvist, Annette; Plejert, Charlotta; Rönnberg, Jerker

    2010-01-01

    The present case-study investigates practices in interaction that manifest themselves as active participation for three Swedish children who use augmentative and alternative communication (AAC). Analyses are based on interaction data from three different settings, involving the children in dialogue with adults as well as peers. In-depth analysis of the data by means of Conversation Analysis revealed three practices conducive for active participation. The first one dealt with experiencing a sense of control, i.e. that the child who uses AAC was treated as a competent communicator, e.g. initiating topics and allocating turns, etc. The second practice revealed the importance of co-construction of communicative projects, and the possible negative effects of instances where adults attempted to impose an agenda on the children. Finally, analyses displayed different means by which participants could be included in the interaction, and the effects of such strategies. The study stresses the importance of communication partners' abilities to balance and counterbalance the necessity to follow, share or sometimes inhibit a need to shape contributions to interaction, in order to enhance active participation for the child who uses AAC.

  12. The expression of contextual fear conditioning involves activation of a NMDA receptor-nitric oxide-cGMP pathway in the dorsal hippocampus of rats.

    PubMed

    Fabri, Denise R S; Hott, Sara C; Reis, Daniel G; Biojone, Caroline; Corrêa, Fernando M A; Resstel, Leonardo B M

    2014-10-01

    The dorsal portion of the hippocampus is a limbic structure that is involved in fear conditioning modulation in rats. Moreover, evidence shows that the local dorsal hippocampus glutamatergic system, nitric oxide (NO) and cGMP modulate behavioral responses during aversive situations. Therefore, the present study investigated the involvement of dorsal hippocampus NMDA receptors and the NO/cGMP pathway in contextual fear conditioning expression. Male Wistar rats were submitted to an aversive contextual conditioning session and 48 h later they were re-exposed to the aversive context in which freezing, cardiovascular responses (increase of both arterial pressure and heart rate) and decrease of tail temperature were recorded. The intra-dorsal hippocampus administration of the NMDA receptor antagonist AP7, prior to the re-exposure to the aversive context, attenuated fear-conditioned responses. The re-exposure to the context evoked an increase in NO concentration in the dorsal hippocampus of conditioned animals. Similar to AP7 administration, we observed a reduction of contextual fear conditioning after dorsal hippocampus administration of either the neuronal NO synthase inhibitor N-propyl-L-arginine, the NO scavenger c-PTIO or the guanylate cyclase inhibitor ODQ. Therefore, the present findings suggest the possible existence of a dorsal hippocampus NMDA/NO/cGMP pathway modulating the expression of contextual fear conditioning in rats.

  13. Individual and combined manipulation of muscarinic, NMDA, and benzodiazepine receptor activity in the water maze task: implications for a rat model of Alzheimer dementia.

    PubMed

    Cain, D P; Ighanian, K; Boon, F

    2000-06-15

    Recent evidence indicates that Alzheimer disease typically involves different degrees of impairment in a variety of neurotransmitter systems, behaviors, and cognitive abilities in different patients. To investigate the relations between neurotransmitter system, behavioral, and cognitive impairments in an animal model of Alzheimer disease we studied spatial learning in a Morris water maze in male Long-Evans rats given neurochemical agents that targeted muscarinic cholinergic, NMDA, or benzodiazepine systems. Naive rats given a single agent or a combination of agents were severely impaired in place responding and had behavioral strategy impairments. Rats made familiar with the required water maze behavioral strategies by non-spatial pretraining performed as well as controls if given a single agent. Non-spatially pretrained rats with manipulation of both muscarinic cholinergic and NMDA or muscarinic cholinergic and benzodiazepine systems had a specific place response impairment but no behavioral strategy impairments. The results suggest that impairment of both muscarinic cholinergic and NMDA, or muscarinic cholinergic and benzodiazepine systems may model some aspects of human Alzheimer disease (impairments in navigation in familiar environments), but not other aspects of this disorder (global dementia leading to general loss of adaptive behavior). Previous research suggests that impairment of both muscarinic cholinergic and serotonergic systems may provide a better model of global dementia. The water maze testing and detailed behavioral analysis techniques used here appear to provide a means of investigating the contributions of various combinations of neurotransmitter system impairments to an animal model of Alzheimer disease.

  14. An Augmented Reality-Based Mobile Learning System to Improve Students' Learning Achievements and Motivations in Natural Science Inquiry Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chiang, Tosti H. C.; Yang, Stephen J. H.; Hwang, Gwo-Jen

    2014-01-01

    In this study, an augmented reality-based mobile learning system is proposed for conducting inquiry-based learning activities. An experiment has been conducted to examine the effectiveness of the proposed approach in terms of learning achievements and motivations. The subjects were 57 fourth graders from two classes taught by the same teacher in…

  15. An Augmented Reality-Based Mobile Learning System to Improve Students' Learning Achievements and Motivations in Natural Science Inquiry Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chiang, Tosti H. C.; Yang, Stephen J. H.; Hwang, Gwo-Jen

    2014-01-01

    In this study, an augmented reality-based mobile learning system is proposed for conducting inquiry-based learning activities. An experiment has been conducted to examine the effectiveness of the proposed approach in terms of learning achievements and motivations. The subjects were 57 fourth graders from two classes taught by the same teacher in…

  16. Activity-dependent anchoring of importin α at the synapse involves regulated binding to the cytoplasmic tail of the NR1-1a subunit of the NMDA receptor

    PubMed Central

    Jeffrey, Rachel A.; Ch'ng, Toh Hean; O'Dell, Thomas J.; Martin, Kelsey C.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Synaptic plasticity, the capacity of neurons to change the strength of their connections with experience, provides a mechanism for learning and memory in the brain. Long-term plasticity requires new transcription, indicating that synaptically generated signals must be transported to the nucleus. Previous studies have described a role for importin nuclear transport adaptors in mediating the retrograde transport of signals from synapse to nucleus during plasticity. Here, we investigated the possibility that stimulus-induced translocation of importins from synapse to nucleus involves activity-dependent anchoring of importins at the synapse. We show that importin a binds to a nuclear localization signal (NLS) present in the cytoplasmic tail of NR1-1a. This interaction is disrupted by activation of NMDA receptors in cultured neurons and by stimuli that trigger late-phase, but not early phase LTP, of CA3-CA1 synapses in acute hippocampal slices. In vitro PKC phosphorylation of GST-NR1-1a abolishes its ability to bind importin α in brain lysates, and the interaction of importin α and NR1 in neurons is modulated by PKC activity. Together, our results indicate that importin α is tethered at the PSD by binding to the NLS present in NR1-1a. This interaction is activity dependent, with importin α being released following NMDA receptor and phosphorylation rendering it available to bind soluble cargoes and transport them to the nucleus during transcription-dependent forms of neuronal plasticity. PMID:20016075

  17. Oligodendroglial NMDA Receptors Regulate Glucose Import and Axonal Energy Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Saab, Aiman S; Tzvetavona, Iva D; Trevisiol, Andrea; Baltan, Selva; Dibaj, Payam; Kusch, Kathrin; Möbius, Wiebke; Goetze, Bianka; Jahn, Hannah M; Huang, Wenhui; Steffens, Heinz; Schomburg, Eike D; Pérez-Samartín, Alberto; Pérez-Cerdá, Fernando; Bakhtiari, Davood; Matute, Carlos; Löwel, Siegrid; Griesinger, Christian; Hirrlinger, Johannes; Kirchhoff, Frank; Nave, Klaus-Armin

    2016-07-06

    Oligodendrocytes make myelin and support axons metabolically with lactate. However, it is unknown how glucose utilization and glycolysis are adapted to the different axonal energy demands. Spiking axons release glutamate and oligodendrocytes express NMDA receptors of unknown function. Here we show that the stimulation of oligodendroglial NMDA receptors mobilizes glucose transporter GLUT1, leading to its incorporation into the myelin compartment in vivo. When myelinated optic nerves from conditional NMDA receptor mutants are challenged with transient oxygen-glucose deprivation, they show a reduced functional recovery when returned to oxygen-glucose but are indistinguishable from wild-type when provided with oxygen-lactate. Moreover, the functional integrity of isolated optic nerves, which are electrically silent, is extended by preincubation with NMDA, mimicking axonal activity, and shortened by NMDA receptor blockers. This reveals a novel aspect of neuronal energy metabolism in which activity-dependent glutamate release enhances oligodendroglial glucose uptake and glycolytic support of fast spiking axons. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Increased lactate/pyruvate ratio augments blood flow in physiologically activated human brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mintun, Mark A.; Vlassenko, Andrei G.; Rundle, Melissa M.; Raichle, Marcus E.

    2004-01-01

    The factors regulating cerebral blood flow (CBF) changes in physiological activation remain the subject of great interest and debate. Recent experimental studies suggest that an increase in cytosolic NADH mediates increased blood flow in the working brain. Lactate injection should elevate NADH levels by increasing the lactate/pyruvate ratio, which is in near equilibrium with the NADH/NAD+ ratio. We studied CBF responses to bolus lactate injection at rest and in visual stimulation by using positron-emission tomography in seven healthy volunteers. Bolus lactate injection augmented the CBF response to visual stimulation by 38-53% in regions of the visual cortex but had no effect on the resting CBF or the whole-brain CBF. These lactate-induced CBF increases correlated with elevations in plasma lactate/pyruvate ratios and in plasma lactate levels but not with plasma pyruvate levels. Our observations support the hypothesis that an increase in the NADH/NAD+ ratio activates signaling pathways to selectively increase CBF in the physiologically stimulated brain regions.

  19. Transient potassium channels augment degeneracy in hippocampal active dendritic spectral tuning

    PubMed Central

    Rathour, Rahul Kumar; Malik, Ruchi; Narayanan, Rishikesh

    2016-01-01

    Hippocampal pyramidal neurons express an intraneuronal map of spectral tuning mediated by hyperpolarization-activated cyclic-nucleotide-gated nonspecific-cation channels. Modeling studies have predicted a critical regulatory role for A-type potassium (KA) channels towards augmenting functional robustness of this map. To test this, we performed patch-clamp recordings from soma and dendrites of rat hippocampal pyramidal neurons, and measured spectral tuning before and after blocking KA channels using two structurally distinct pharmacological agents. Consistent with computational predictions, we found that blocking KA channels resulted in a significant reduction in resonance frequency and significant increases in input resistance, impedance amplitude and action-potential firing frequency across the somato-apical trunk. Furthermore, across all measured locations, blocking KA channels enhanced temporal summation of postsynaptic potentials and critically altered the impedance phase profile, resulting in a significant reduction in total inductive phase. Finally, pair-wise correlations between intraneuronal percentage changes (after blocking KA channels) in different measurements were mostly weak, suggesting differential regulation of different physiological properties by KA channels. Our results unveil a pivotal role for fast transient channels in regulating theta-frequency spectral tuning and intrinsic phase response, and suggest that degeneracy with reference to several coexisting functional maps is mediated by cross-channel interactions across the active dendritic arbor. PMID:27094086

  20. FK506 augments activation-induced programmed cell death of T lymphocytes in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Migita, K; Eguchi, K; Kawabe, Y; Tsukada, T; Mizokami, A; Nagataki, S

    1995-01-01

    FK506 is an immunosuppressive drug that inhibits T cell receptor-mediated signal transduction. This drug can induce immunological tolerance in allograft recipients. In this study, we investigated the in vivo effects of FK506 on T cell receptor-mediated apoptosis induction. Injection of anti-CD3 antibody (Ab) in mice resulted in the elimination of CD4+ CD8+ thymocytes by DNA fragmentation. FK506 treatment significantly augmented thymic apoptosis induced by in vivo anti-CD3 Ab administration. Increased thymic apoptosis resulted in the disappearance of CD4+ CD8+ thymocytes after anti-CD3 Ab/FK506 treatment. DNA fragmentation triggered by FK506 was induced exclusively in antigen-stimulated T cells, since enhanced DNA fragmentation induced by in vivo staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB) injection was confirmed in SEB-reactive V beta 8+ thymocytes but not in SEB-nonreactive V beta 6+ thymocytes. In addition to thymocytes, mature peripheral T cells also die by activation-induced programmed cell death. A similar effect of FK506 on activation-induced programmed cell death was observed in SEB-activated peripheral spleen T cells. In contrast, cyclosporin A treatment did not enhance activation-induced programmed cell death of thymocytes and peripheral T cells. Apoptosis is required for the generation and maintenance of self-tolerance in the immune system. Our findings suggest that FK506-triggered apoptosis after elimination of antigen-activated T cells may represent a potential mechanism of the immunological tolerance achieved by FK506 treatment. Images PMID:7543492

  1. Lenalidomide augments actin remodeling and lowers NK-cell activation thresholds

    PubMed Central

    Lagrue, Kathryn; Carisey, Alex; Morgan, David J.; Chopra, Rajesh

    2015-01-01

    As multiple myeloma (MM) progresses, natural killer (NK)-cell responses decline against malignant plasma cells. The immunomodulatory drug lenalidomide is widely used for treatment of MM but its influence on NK-cell biology is unclear. Here, we report that lenalidomide lowers the threshold for NK-cell activation, causing a 66% decrease in the 50% effective concentration (EC50) for activation through CD16, and a 38% decrease in EC50 for NK group 2 member D (NKG2D)–mediated activation, allowing NK cells to respond to lower doses of ligand. In addition, lenalidomide augments NK-cell responses, causing a twofold increase in the proportion of primary NK cells producing interferon-γ (IFN-γ), and a 20-fold increase in the amount of IFN-γ produced per cell. Importantly, lenalidomide did not trigger IFN-γ production in unstimulated NK cells. Thus, lenalidomide enhances the NK-cell arm of the immune response, without activating NK cells inappropriately. Of particular clinical importance, lenalidomide also allowed NK cells to be activated by lower doses of rituximab, an anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody (mAb) widely used to treat B-cell malignancies. This supports combined use of lenalidomide and rituximab in a clinical setting. Finally, superresolution microscopy revealed that lenalidomide increased the periodicity of cortical actin at immune synapses, resulting in an increase in the area of the actin mesh predicted to be penetrable to vesicles containing IFN-γ. NK cells from MM patients also responded to lenalidomide in this way. This indicates that nanometer-scale rearrangements in cortical actin, a recently discovered step in immune synapse assembly, are a potential new target for therapeutic compounds. PMID:26002964

  2. Lenalidomide augments actin remodeling and lowers NK-cell activation thresholds.

    PubMed

    Lagrue, Kathryn; Carisey, Alex; Morgan, David J; Chopra, Rajesh; Davis, Daniel M

    2015-07-02

    As multiple myeloma (MM) progresses, natural killer (NK)-cell responses decline against malignant plasma cells. The immunomodulatory drug lenalidomide is widely used for treatment of MM but its influence on NK-cell biology is unclear. Here, we report that lenalidomide lowers the threshold for NK-cell activation, causing a 66% decrease in the 50% effective concentration (EC50) for activation through CD16, and a 38% decrease in EC50 for NK group 2 member D (NKG2D)-mediated activation, allowing NK cells to respond to lower doses of ligand. In addition, lenalidomide augments NK-cell responses, causing a twofold increase in the proportion of primary NK cells producing interferon-γ (IFN-γ), and a 20-fold increase in the amount of IFN-γ produced per cell. Importantly, lenalidomide did not trigger IFN-γ production in unstimulated NK cells. Thus, lenalidomide enhances the NK-cell arm of the immune response, without activating NK cells inappropriately. Of particular clinical importance, lenalidomide also allowed NK cells to be activated by lower doses of rituximab, an anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody (mAb) widely used to treat B-cell malignancies. This supports combined use of lenalidomide and rituximab in a clinical setting. Finally, superresolution microscopy revealed that lenalidomide increased the periodicity of cortical actin at immune synapses, resulting in an increase in the area of the actin mesh predicted to be penetrable to vesicles containing IFN-γ. NK cells from MM patients also responded to lenalidomide in this way. This indicates that nanometer-scale rearrangements in cortical actin, a recently discovered step in immune synapse assembly, are a potential new target for therapeutic compounds.

  3. Integrating a Mobile Augmented Reality Activity to Contextualize Student Learning of a Socioscienti?c Issue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Hsin-Yi; Wu, Hsin-Kai; Hsu, Ying-Shao

    2013-01-01

    virtual objects or information overlaying physical objects or environments, resulting in a mixed reality in which virtual objects and real environments coexist in a meaningful way to augment learning…

  4. Integrating a Mobile Augmented Reality Activity to Contextualize Student Learning of a Socioscienti?c Issue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Hsin-Yi; Wu, Hsin-Kai; Hsu, Ying-Shao

    2013-01-01

    virtual objects or information overlaying physical objects or environments, resulting in a mixed reality in which virtual objects and real environments coexist in a meaningful way to augment learning…

  5. NMDA receptors and the differential ischemic vulnerability of hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Gee, Christine E; Benquet, Pascal; Raineteau, Olivier; Rietschin, Lotty; Kirbach, Sebastian W; Gerber, Urs

    2006-05-01

    Transient cerebral ischemia causes an inhomogeneous pattern of cell death in the brain. We investigated mechanisms, which may underlie the greater susceptibility of hippocampal CA1 vs. CA3 pyramidal cells to ischemic insult. Using an in vitro oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) model of ischemia, we found that N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) responses were enhanced in the more susceptible CA1 pyramidal cells and transiently depressed in the resistant CA3 pyramidal cells. The long-lasting potentiation of NMDA responses in CA1 cells was associated with delayed cell death and was prevented by blocking tyrosine kinase-dependent up-regulation of NMDA receptor function. In CA3 cells, the energy deprivation-induced transient depression of NMDA responses was converted to potentiation by blocking protein phosphatase signalling. These results suggest that energy deprivation differentially shifts the intracellular equilibrium between the tyrosine kinase and phosphatase activities that modulate NMDA responses in CA1 and CA3 pyramidal cells. Therapeutic modulation of tyrosine phosphorylation may thus prove beneficial in mitigating ischemia-induced neuronal death in vulnerable brain areas.

  6. Copper-dependent regulation of NMDA receptors by cellular prion protein: implications for neurodegenerative disorders

    PubMed Central

    Stys, Peter K; You, Haitao; Zamponi, Gerald W

    2012-01-01

    Abstract N-Methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors mediate a wide range of important nervous system functions. Conversely, excessive NMDA receptor activity leads to cytotoxic calcium overload and neuronal damage in a wide variety of CNS disorders. It is well established that NMDA receptors are tightly regulated by a number of cell signalling pathways. Recently, it has been shown that NMDA receptor activity is modulated by cellular prion protein (PrPC) in a copper-dependent manner. Here we give an overview of the current state of knowledge concerning the novel concept of potent modulation of this receptor's kinetics by copper ions, and the interplay between NMDA receptors and PrPC in the context of neurological diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, epilepsy, pain and depression. PMID:22310309

  7. IGF-1-Involved Negative Feedback of NR2B NMDA Subunits Protects Cultured Hippocampal Neurons Against NMDA-Induced Excitotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Li, Yun; Sun, Wei; Han, Song; Li, Jianing; Ding, Shu; Wang, Wei; Yin, Yanling

    2017-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) is a multifunctional protein involved in neuronal polarity and axonal guidance. In our previous study, it was discovered that IGF-1 alleviated 50-μM NMDA-induced excitotoxicity against neuronal autophagy via depression of NR2B p-Ser1303 activation. However, it was found that NMDA at a higher dose did not cause neuronal autophagy. And, the performance of IGF-1 under severe excitotoxicity still needs to be clarified. In this study, we observed that IGF-1 can salvage the hippocampal neurons in an autophagy-independent manner after 150-μM NMDA exposure using thiazolyl blue tetrazolium bromide (MTT), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), Western blot assay, and transmission electron microscopy. In addition, over-activation of post-synaptic NMDARs was found with the whole-cell patch clamp recording method. In order to explore whether there is a positive feedback way for post-synaptic NMDARs and the different pathway caused by 150 μM NMDA, the phosphorylation level of Fyn and the phosphorylation site of NR2B were investigated. It was observed that NR2B p-Tyr1472 was increased by the activation of Fyn after 150-μM NMDA exposure. When the neutralizing antibody against NR2B p-Ser1303 was added into the medium, both the activations of Fyn and NR2B p-Tyr1472 were blocked, suggesting NR2B p-Ser1303 may be the initial step of NMDA-induced excitotoxicity. In addition, since IGF-1 can block the initial step of NR2B activation, its effect is concluded to continue with the development of excitotoxicity. Overall, this study strongly indicates that the relationship between different phosphorylation sites of NR2B should be laid more emphasis on, which may be a vital target for the NR2B-involved excitotoxicity.

  8. Functional heterogeneity of NMDA receptors in rat substantia nigra pars compacta and reticulata neurones

    PubMed Central

    Suárez, F.; Zhao, Q.; Monaghan, D. T.; Jane, D. E.; Jones, S.; Gibb, A. J.

    2014-01-01

    The nigra substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc) and substantia pars reticulata (SNr) form two major basal ganglia components with different functional roles. SNc dopaminergic (DA) neurones are vulnerable to cell death in Parkinson's disease, and NMDA receptor activation is a potential contributing mechanism. We have investigated the sensitivity of whole-cell and synaptic NMDA responses to intracellular ATP and GTP application in the SNc and SNr from rats on postnatal day (P) 7 and P28. Both NMDA current density (pA/pF) and desensitization to prolonged or repeated NMDA application were greater in the SNr than in the SNc. When ATP levels were not supplemented, responses to prolonged NMDA administration desensitized in P7 SNc DA neurones but not at P28. At P28, SNr neurones desensitized more than SNc neurones, with or without added ATP. Responses to brief NMDA applications and synaptic NMDA currents were not sensitive to inclusion of ATP in the pipette solution. To investigate these differences between the SNc and SNr, NR2 subunit-selective antagonists were tested. NMDA currents were inhibited by ifenprodil (10 μm) and UBP141 (4 μm), but not by Zn2+ (100 nm), in both the SNr and SNc, suggesting that SNc and SNr neurones express similar receptor subunits; NR2B and NR2D, but not NR2A. The different NMDA response properties in the SNc and SNr may be caused by differences in receptor modulation and/or trafficking. The vulnerability of SNc DA neurones to cell death is not correlated with NMDA current density or receptor subtypes, but could in part be related to inadequate NMDA receptor desensitization. PMID:20618827

  9. Prazosin Augmentation of Outpatient Treatment of Alcohol Use Disorders in Active Duty Soldiers with and without PTSD

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    Substance Abuse Program (ASAP) at Madigan Health Care System/Joint Base Lewis McChord. The aims of this trial are 1) to determine prazosin’s efficacy...Augmentation of Outpatient Treatment of AUD in Active Duty Soldiers with and without PTSD. Presented at Joint Army/NIH Substance Abuse IP – September 29...randomized controlled trial (RCT) of prazosin for AUD in active duty soldiers both with and without comorbid PTSD enrolled in the Alcohol and Substance

  10. The triterpenoid cucurbitacin B augments the antiproliferative activity of chemotherapy in human breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Aribi, Ahmed; Gery, Sigal; Lee, Dhong Hyun; Thoennissen, Nils H; Thoennissen, Gabriela B; Alvarez, Rocio; Ho, Quoc; Lee, Kunik; Doan, Ngan B; Chan, Kin T; Toh, Melvin; Said, Jonathan W; Koeffler, H Phillip

    2013-06-15

    Despite recent advances in therapy, breast cancer remains the second most common cause of death from malignancy in women. Chemotherapy plays a major role in breast cancer management, and combining chemotherapeutic agents with nonchemotherapeutic agents is of considerable clinical interest. Cucurbitacins are triterpenes compounds found in plants of the Cucurbitaceae family, reported to have anticancer and anti-inflammatory activities. Previously, we have shown antiproliferative activity of cucurbitacin B (CuB) in breast cancer, and we hypothesized that combining CuB with chemotherapeutic agents can augment their antitumor effect. Here, we show that a combination of CuB with either docetaxel (DOC) or gemcitabine (GEM) synergistically inhibited the proliferation of MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells in vitro. This antiproliferative effect was accompanied by an increase in apoptosis rates. Furthermore, in vivo treatment of human breast cancer orthotopic xenografts in immunodeficient mice with CuB at either low (0.5 mg/kg) or high (1 mg/kg) doses in combination with either DOC (20 mg/kg) or GEM (12.5mg/kg) significantly reduced tumor volume as compared with monotherapy of each drug. Importantly, no significant toxicity was noted with low-dose CuB in combination with either DOC or GEM. In conclusion, combination of CuB at a relatively low concentration with either of the chemotherapeutic agents, DOC or GEM, shows prominent antiproliferative activity against breast cancer cells without increased toxicity. This promising combination should be examined in therapeutic trials of breast cancer. Copyright © 2012 UICC.

  11. Lead inhibition of NMDA channels in native and recombinant receptors.

    PubMed

    Gavazzo, P; Gazzoli, A; Mazzolini, M; Marchetti, C

    2001-10-08

    NMDA channels are key targets for lead (Pb2+) neurotoxicity and Pb2+-induced inhibition of NMDA current is age- and subunit-dependent. In rat cerebellar granule cells maintained in high KCl, glycine affinity as well as sensitivity to ifenprodil change significantly with the days in vitro, indicating a reduction of NR2B subunit expression. Pb2+ blocked NMDA current with IC50 approximately 4 microM and this effect decreased significantly during the second week in vitro. In Xenopus laevis oocytes expressing recombinant NR1-NR2A, NR1-NR2B or NR1-NR2C receptors, Pb2+ inhibited glutamate-activated currents with IC50 of 3.3, 2.5 and 4.7 microM respectively. These data indicate that Pb2+ action is dependent on subunit composition and suggest that down-regulation of the NR2B subunit is correlated to a diminished sensitivity to Pb2+ inhibition.

  12. Heavy Resistance Training and Supplementation With the Alleged Testosterone Booster Nmda has No Effect on Body Composition, Muscle Performance, and Serum Hormones Associated With the Hypothalamo-Pituitary-Gonadal Axis in Resistance-Trained Males

    PubMed Central

    Willoughby, Darryn S.; Spillane, Mike; Schwarz, Neil

    2014-01-01

    The effects of 28 days of heavy resistance training while ingesting the alleged testosterone-boosting supplement, NMDA, were determined on body composition, muscle strength, serum cortisol, prolactin, and hormones associated with the hypothalamo-pituitary- gonadal (HPG) axis. Twenty resistance-trained males engaged in 28 days of resistance training 4 times/wk while orally ingesting daily either 1.78 g of placebo (PLAC) or NMDA. Data were analyzed with separate 2 x 2 ANOVA (p < 0.05). Criterion measures involved body composition, muscle strength, serum cortisol, prolactin, and gonadal hormone levels [free and total testosterone, luteininzing hormome (LH), gonadotrophin releasing hormone (GnRH), estradiol], and were assessed before (Day 0) and after (Day 29) resistance training and supplementation. No changes were noted for total body water and fat mass in response to resistance training (p > 0.05) or supplementation (p > 0.05). In regard to total body mass and fat-free mass, however, each was significantly increased in both groups in response to resistance training (p < 0.05), but were not affected by supplementation (p > 0.05). In both groups, lower-body muscle strength was significantly increased in response to resistance training (p < 0.05); however, supplementation had no effect (p > 0.05). All serum hormones (total and free testosterone, LH, GnRH, estradiol, cortisol, prolactin) were unaffected by resistance training (p > 0.05) or supplementation (p > 0.05). The gonadal hormones and cortisol and prolactin were unaffected by 28 days of NMDA supplementation and not associated with the observed increases in muscle strength and mass. At the dose provided, NMDA had no effect on HPG axis activity or ergogenic effects in skeletal muscle. Key Points In response to 28 days of heavy resistance training and NMDA supplementation, similar increases in muscle mass and strength in both groups occurred; however, the increases were not different between supplement groups. The

  13. Annexin A2 contributes to lung injury and fibrosis by augmenting factor Xa fibrogenic activity.

    PubMed

    Schuliga, Michael; Jaffar, Jade; Berhan, Asres; Langenbach, Shenna; Harris, Trudi; Waters, David; Lee, Peter V S; Grainge, Christopher; Westall, Glen; Knight, Darryl; Stewart, Alastair G

    2017-05-01

    In lung injury and disease, including idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), extravascular factor X is converted into factor Xa (FXa), a coagulant protease with fibrogenic actions. Extracellular annexin A2 binds to FXa, augmenting activation of the protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR-1). In this study, the contribution of annexin A2 in lung injury and fibrosis was investigated. Annexin A2 immunoreactivity was observed in regions of fibrosis, including those associated with fibroblasts in lung tissue of IPF patients. Furthermore, annexin A2 was detected in the conditioned media and an EGTA membrane wash of human lung fibroblast (LF) cultures. Incubation with human plasma (5% vol/vol) or purified FXa (15-50 nM) evoked fibrogenic responses in LF cultures, with FXa increasing interleukin-6 (IL-6) production and cell number by 270 and 46%, respectively (P < 0.05, n = 5-8). The fibrogenic actions of plasma or FXa were attenuated by the selective FXa inhibitor apixaban (10 μM, or antibodies raised against annexin A2 or PAR-1 (2 μg/ml). FXa-stimulated LFs from IPF patients (n = 6) produced twice as much IL-6 as controls (n = 10) (P < 0.05), corresponding with increased levels of extracellular annexin A2. Annexin A2 gene deletion in mice reduced bleomycin-induced increases in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) IL-6 levels and cell number (*P < 0.05; n = 4-12). Lung fibrogenic gene expression and dry weight were reduced by annexin A2 gene deletion, but lung levels of collagen were not. Our data suggest that annexin A2 contributes to lung injury and fibrotic disease by mediating the fibrogenic actions of FXa. Extracellular annexin A2 is a potential target for the treatment of IPF. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  14. Neurotoxic Abeta peptides increase oxidative stress in vivo through NMDA-receptor and nitric-oxide-synthase mechanisms, and inhibit complex IV activity and induce a mitochondrial permeability transition in vitro.

    PubMed

    Parks, J K; Smith, T S; Trimmer, P A; Bennett, J P; Parker, W D

    2001-02-01

    Beta amyloid (Abeta) peptides accumulate in Alzheimer's disease and are neurotoxic possibly through the production of oxygen free radicals. Using brain microdialysis we characterized the ability of Abeta to increase oxygen radical production in vivo. The 1-40 Abeta fragment increased 2,3-dehydroxybenzoic acid efflux more than the 1-28 fragment, in a manner dependent on nitric oxide synthase and NMDA receptor channels. We then examined the effects of Abeta peptides on mitochondrial function in vitro. Induction of the mitochondrial permeability transition in isolated rat liver mitochondria by Abeta(25-35) and Abeta(35-25) exhibited dose dependency and required calcium and phosphate. Cyclosporin A prevented the transition as did ruthenium red, chlorpromazine, or N-ethylmaleimide. ADP and magnesium delayed the onset of mitochondrial permeability transition. Electron microscopy confirmed the presence of Abeta aggregates and swollen mitochondria and preservation of mitochondrial structure by inhibitors of mitochondrial permeability transition. Cytochrome c oxidase (COX) activity was selectively inhibited by Abeta(25-35) but not by Abeta(35-25). Neurotoxic Abeta peptide can increase oxidative stress in vivo through mechanisms involving NMDA receptors and nitric oxide sythase. Increased intracellular Abeta levels can further exacerbate the genetically driven complex IV defect in sporadic Alzheimer's disease and may precipitate mitochondrial permeability transition opening. In combination, our results provide potential mechanisms to support the feed-forward hypothesis of Abeta neurotoxicity.

  15. Synaptic NMDA Receptors Mediate Hypoxic Excitotoxic Death

    PubMed Central

    Wroge, Christine M.; Hogins, Joshua; Eisenman, Larry; Mennerick, Steven

    2012-01-01

    Excessive NMDA receptor activation and excitotoxicity underlies pathology in many neuropsychiatric and neurological disorders, including hypoxia/ischemia. Thus, the development of effective therapeutics for these disorders demands a complete understanding of NMDA receptor (NMDAR) activation during excitotoxic insults. The extrasynaptic NMDAR hypothesis posits that synaptic NMDARs are neurotrophic/neuroprotective and extrasynaptic NMDARs are neurotoxic. In part, the extrasynaptic hypothesis is built on observed selectivity for extrasynaptic receptors of a neuroprotective use-dependent NMDAR channel blocker, memantine. In rat hippocampal neurons we found that a neuroprotective concentration of memantine shows little selectivity for extrasynaptic NMDARs when all receptors are tonically activated by exogenous glutamate. This led us to test the extrasynaptic NMDAR hypothesis using metabolic challenge, where the source of excitotoxic glutamate buildup may be largely synaptic. Three independent approaches suggest strongly that synaptic receptors participate prominently in hypoxic excitotoxicity. First, block of glutamate transporters with a non-substrate antagonist exacerbated rather than prevented damage, consistent with a primarily synaptic source of glutamate. Second, selective, preblock of synaptic NMDARs with a slowly reversible, use-dependent antagonist protected nearly fully against prolonged hypoxic insult. Third, glutamate pyruvate transaminase (GPT), which degrades ambient but not synaptic glutamate, did not protect against hypoxia but protected against exogenous glutamate damage. Together, these results suggest that synaptic NMDARs can mediate excitotoxicity, particularly when the glutamate source is synaptic and when synaptic receptor contributions are rigorously defined. Moreover, the results suggest that in some situations therapeutically targeting extrasynaptic receptors may be inappropriate. PMID:22573696

  16. Leptin reverses corticosterone-induced inhibition of neural stem cell proliferation through activating the NR2B subunits of NMDA receptors.

    PubMed

    Shi, Wen-Zhu; Miao, Yu-Liang; Guo, Wen-Zhi; Wu, Wei; Li, Bao-Wei; An, Li-Na; Fang, Wei-Wu; Mi, Wei-Dong

    2014-04-25

    Corticosterone inhibits the proliferation of hippocampal neural stem cells (NSCs). The removal of corticosterone-induced inhibition of NSCs proliferation has been reported to contribute to neural regeneration. Leptin has been shown to regulate brain development, improve angiogenesis, and promote neural regeneration; however, its effects on corticosterone-induced inhibition of NSCs proliferation remain unclear. Here we reported that leptin significantly promoted the proliferation of hippocampal NSCs in a concentration-dependent pattern. Also, leptin efficiently reversed the inhibition of NSCs proliferation induced by corticosterone. Interestingly, pre-treatment with non-specific NMDA antagonist MK-801, specific NR2B antagonist Ro 25-6981, or small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting NR2B, significantly blocked the effect of leptin on corticosterone-induced inhibition of NSCs proliferation. Furthermore, corticosterone significantly reduced the protein expression of NR2B, whereas pre-treatment with leptin greatly reversed the attenuation of NR2B expression caused by corticosterone in cultured hippocampal NSCs. Our findings demonstrate that leptin reverses the corticosterone-induced inhibition of NSCs proliferation. This process is, at least partially mediated by increased expression of NR2B subunits of NMDA receptors.

  17. Leptin reverses corticosterone-induced inhibition of neural stem cell proliferation through activating the NR2B subunits of NMDA receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Wen-Zhu; Miao, Yu-Liang; Guo, Wen-Zhi; Wu, Wei; Li, Bao-Wei; An, Li-Na; Fang, Wei-Wu; Mi, Wei-Dong

    2014-04-25

    Highlights: • Leptin promotes the proliferation of neural stem cells isolated from embryonic mouse hippocampus. • Leptin reverses corticosterone-induced inhibition of neural stem cell proliferation. • The effects of leptin are partially mediated by upregulating NR2B subunits. - Abstract: Corticosterone inhibits the proliferation of hippocampal neural stem cells (NSCs). The removal of corticosterone-induced inhibition of NSCs proliferation has been reported to contribute to neural regeneration. Leptin has been shown to regulate brain development, improve angiogenesis, and promote neural regeneration; however, its effects on corticosterone-induced inhibition of NSCs proliferation remain unclear. Here we reported that leptin significantly promoted the proliferation of hippocampal NSCs in a concentration-dependent pattern. Also, leptin efficiently reversed the inhibition of NSCs proliferation induced by corticosterone. Interestingly, pre-treatment with non-specific NMDA antagonist MK-801, specific NR2B antagonist Ro 25-6981, or small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting NR2B, significantly blocked the effect of leptin on corticosterone-induced inhibition of NSCs proliferation. Furthermore, corticosterone significantly reduced the protein expression of NR2B, whereas pre-treatment with leptin greatly reversed the attenuation of NR2B expression caused by corticosterone in cultured hippocampal NSCs. Our findings demonstrate that leptin reverses the corticosterone-induced inhibition of NSCs proliferation. This process is, at least partially mediated by increased expression of NR2B subunits of NMDA receptors.

  18. Cytosolic phospholipase A(2) alpha mediates electrophysiologic responses of hippocampal pyramidal neurons to neurotoxic NMDA treatment.

    PubMed

    Shen, Ying; Kishimoto, Koji; Linden, David J; Sapirstein, Adam

    2007-04-03

    The arachidonic acid-generating enzyme cytosolic phospholipase A(2) alpha (cPLA(2)alpha) has been implicated in the progression of excitotoxic neuronal injury. However, the mechanisms of cPLA(2)alpha toxicity have yet to be determined. Here, we used a model system exposing mouse hippocampal slices to NMDA as an excitotoxic injury, in combination with simultaneous patch-clamp recording and confocal Ca(2+) imaging of CA1 pyramidal neurons. NMDA treatment caused significantly greater injury in wild-type (WT) than in cPLA(2)alpha null CA1 neurons. Bath application of NMDA evoked a slow inward current in voltage-clamped neurons (composed of both NMDA receptor-mediated and other conductances) that was smaller in cPLA(2)alpha null than in WT slices. This was not due to down-regulation of NMDA receptor function because NMDA receptor-mediated currents were equivalent in each genotype following brief photolysis of caged glutamate. Current-clamp recordings were made during and following NMDA exposure by eliciting a single action potential with a brief current injection. After NMDA exposure, WT CA1 neurons developed a spike-evoked plateau potential and an increased spike-evoked dendritic Ca(2+) transient. These effects were absent in CA1 neurons from cPLA(2)alpha null mice and WT neurons treated with a cPLA(2)alpha inhibitor. The Ca-sensitive K-channel toxins, apamin and paxilline, caused spike broadening and Ca(2+) enhancement in WT and cPLA(2)alpha null slices. NMDA application in WT and arachidonate applied to cPLA(2)alpha null cells occluded the effects of apamin/paxilline. These results indicate that cPLA(2)alpha activity is required for development of aberrant electrophysiologic events triggered by NMDA receptor activation, in part through attenuation of K-channel function.

  19. Studies on the mechanism of natural killer cytotoxicity. III. Activation of NK cells by interferon augments the lytic activity of released natural killer cytotoxic factors (NKCF).

    PubMed

    Wright, S C; Bonavida, B

    1983-06-01

    The mechanism by which interferon (IFN) pretreatment of effector cells augments natural killer (NK) cell-mediated cytotoxicity (CMC) was examined by determining whether IFN has any effect on the production of natural killer cytotoxic factors (NKCF). NKCF are released into the supernatant of co-cultures of murine spleen cells and YAC-1 stimulator cells, and their lytic activity is measured against YAC-1 target cells. It was demonstrated that pretreatment of effector cells with murine fibroblast IFN or polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid (pIC) resulted in the release of NKCF with augmented lytic activity. Evidence indicated that the IFN-induced augmentation of NKCF activity required protein synthesis during the IFN pretreatment period, because concurrent pretreatment with both IFN and cycloheximide abrogated the IFN effect. Protein synthesis, however, is not required for the production of base levels of NKCF because emetine pretreatment of normal spleen cells did not result in a decrease in NKCF production. Furthermore, substantial levels of NKCF activity could be detected in freeze-thaw lysates of freshly isolated spleen cells. Cell populations enriched for NK effector cells, such as nylon wool-nonadherent nude mouse spleen cells, produced lysates with high levels of NKCF activity, whereas lysates of CBA thymocytes were devoid of NKCF activity. Pretreatment of spleen cells with either IFN or pIC resulted in an augmentation of the NKCF activity present in their cell lysates. Taken altogether, these findings suggest that freshly isolated NK cells contain preformed pools of NKCF. Pretreatment of these cells with IFN causes de novo synthesis of additional NKCF and/or activation of preexisting NKCF. According to our model for the mechanism of NK CMC, target cell lysis is ultimately the result of transfer of NKCF from the effector cell to the target cell. The evidence presented here suggests that the IFN-induced augmentation of NK activity could be accounted for by an

  20. Augmented supraorbital skin sympathetic nerve activity responses to symptom trigger events in rosacea patients.

    PubMed

    Metzler-Wilson, Kristen; Toma, Kumika; Sammons, Dawn L; Mann, Sarah; Jurovcik, Andrew J; Demidova, Olga; Wilson, Thad E

    2015-09-01

    Facial flushing in rosacea is often induced by trigger events. However, trigger causation mechanisms are currently unclear. This study tested the central hypothesis that rosacea causes sympathetic and axon reflex-mediated alterations resulting in trigger-induced symptomatology. Twenty rosacea patients and age/sex-matched controls participated in one or a combination of symptom triggering stressors. In protocol 1, forehead skin sympathetic nerve activity (SSNA; supraorbital microneurography) was measured during sympathoexcitatory mental (2-min serial subtraction of novel numbers) and physical (2-min isometric handgrip) stress. In protocol 2, forehead skin blood flow (laser-Doppler flowmetry) and transepithelial water loss/sweat rate (capacitance hygrometry) were measured during sympathoexcitatory heat stress (whole body heating by perfusing 50°C water through a tube-lined suit). In protocol 3, cheek, forehead, forearm, and palm skin blood flow were measured during nonpainful local heating to induce axon reflex vasodilation. Heart rate (HR) and mean arterial pressure (MAP) were recorded via finger photoplethysmography to calculate cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC; flux·100/MAP). Higher patient transepithelial water loss was observed (rosacea 0.20 ± 0.02 vs. control 0.10 ± 0.01 mg·cm(-2)·min(-1), P < 0.05). HR and MAP changes were not different between groups during sympathoexcitatory stressors or local heating. SSNA during early mental (32 ± 9 and 9 ± 4% increase) and physical (25 ± 4 and 5 ± 1% increase, rosacea and controls, respectively) stress was augmented in rosacea (both P < 0.05). Heat stress induced more rapid sweating and cutaneous vasodilation onset in rosacea compared with controls. No axon reflex vasodilation differences were observed between groups. These data indicate that rosacea affects SSNA and that hyperresponsiveness to trigger events appears to have a sympathetic component.

  1. Augmented photocatalytic activity and luminescence response of Tb³⁺ doped nanoscale titania systems

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, Nibedita; Deka, Amrita; Mohanta, Dambarudhar

    2014-10-14

    The present work reports on the effect of Tb³⁺ doping on the luminescence and photocatalytic performance of nano-structured titania derived through a sol-gel route. X-ray diffraction patterns have revealed the existence of anatase phase with and without Tb³⁺ doping and with an improved orientation factor along (004) and (200) planes. Transmission electron microscopy and selective area electron diffraction studies, while exhibiting ample poly-crystallinity feature, have predicted an average particle size of ~9 nm and ~6 nm for the un-doped and 5% Tb³⁺ doped nano-titania samples; respectively. Apart from emissions accompanied by different types of defects, Tb³⁺ related transitions, such as, ⁵D₃ → ⁷F₅, ⁵D₃ → ⁷F₄, and ⁵D₄ → ⁷F₆ were identified in the photoluminescence spectra. Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface area analysis, as carried out on a Tb³⁺ doped nano-titania system, has demonstrated a more-open hysteretic loop owing to significant difference of N₂ adsorption/desorption rates. The photocatalytic activity of nano-titania, as evaluated from the nature of degradation of methyl orange under UV illumination, exhibited the highest efficiency for a Tb³⁺ doping level of 2.5%. The augmented photocatalytic degradation has also been discussed in the light of a model based on pseudo first-order kinetics.

  2. Augmented supraorbital skin sympathetic nerve activity responses to symptom trigger events in rosacea patients

    PubMed Central

    Metzler-Wilson, Kristen; Toma, Kumika; Sammons, Dawn L.; Mann, Sarah; Jurovcik, Andrew J.; Demidova, Olga

    2015-01-01

    Facial flushing in rosacea is often induced by trigger events. However, trigger causation mechanisms are currently unclear. This study tested the central hypothesis that rosacea causes sympathetic and axon reflex-mediated alterations resulting in trigger-induced symptomatology. Twenty rosacea patients and age/sex-matched controls participated in one or a combination of symptom triggering stressors. In protocol 1, forehead skin sympathetic nerve activity (SSNA; supraorbital microneurography) was measured during sympathoexcitatory mental (2-min serial subtraction of novel numbers) and physical (2-min isometric handgrip) stress. In protocol 2, forehead skin blood flow (laser-Doppler flowmetry) and transepithelial water loss/sweat rate (capacitance hygrometry) were measured during sympathoexcitatory heat stress (whole body heating by perfusing 50°C water through a tube-lined suit). In protocol 3, cheek, forehead, forearm, and palm skin blood flow were measured during nonpainful local heating to induce axon reflex vasodilation. Heart rate (HR) and mean arterial pressure (MAP) were recorded via finger photoplethysmography to calculate cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC; flux·100/MAP). Higher patient transepithelial water loss was observed (rosacea 0.20 ± 0.02 vs. control 0.10 ± 0.01 mg·cm−2·min−1, P < 0.05). HR and MAP changes were not different between groups during sympathoexcitatory stressors or local heating. SSNA during early mental (32 ± 9 and 9 ± 4% increase) and physical (25 ± 4 and 5 ± 1% increase, rosacea and controls, respectively) stress was augmented in rosacea (both P < 0.05). Heat stress induced more rapid sweating and cutaneous vasodilation onset in rosacea compared with controls. No axon reflex vasodilation differences were observed between groups. These data indicate that rosacea affects SSNA and that hyperresponsiveness to trigger events appears to have a sympathetic component. PMID:26133800

  3. Asparagus racemosus ameliorates cisplatin induced toxicities and augments its antileishmanial activity by immunomodulation in vivo.

    PubMed

    Sachdeva, Heena; Sehgal, Rakesh; Kaur, Sukhbir

    2014-02-01

    Current drugs for the treatment of visceral leishmaniasis are inadequate and their efficacies are also compromised due to suppression of immune function associated during the course of infection. To overcome this problem, efforts are needed to develop therapies with effective immunomodulatory agents where decrease of parasitic burden and simultaneous enhancement of adaptive immunity can be achieved. In this study we have evaluated a new therapeutic approach based on combination of Asparagus racemosus, an immunomodulatory drug, in combination with cisplatin against Leishmania donovani infected BALB/c mice. We demonstrate that A. racemosus (650 mg/kg b.wt./day for 15 days, orally) in combination with cisplatin (5 mg/kg b.wt./day for 5 days, intraperitoneally) enhanced the clearance of parasites as determined by Giemsa-stained liver impression smears. Besides having better killing activity, this combination group achieved increased production of disease resolving Th-1 response (IFN-gamma, IL-2), heightened DTH (delayed type hypersensitivity) response and augmented levels of IgG2a. Moreover, A. racemosus in combination with cisplatin not only provided enhanced protective immune response but also resulted in remarkable improved kidney and liver function tests as manifested by normal levels of SGOT, SGPT, alkaline phosphatase, creatinine and urea in blood plasma with normal histological observations as compared to only cisplatin treated L. donovani infected BALB/c mice. Through this study we have ascertained that A. racemosus in combination with cisplatin in L. donovani infected BALB/c mice boosted as well as restored both cellular and humoral immunity. Thus in view of severe immunosuppression in visceral leishmaniasis, a better and effective strategy for optimum efficacy of future antileishmanial drugs would direct not only killing of parasite by the drug, but also simultaneous generation of immunity against the disease. © 2013.

  4. NR2B-NMDA receptor mediated modulation of the tyrosine phosphatase STEP regulates glutamate induced neuronal cell death

    PubMed Central

    Poddar, Ranjana; Deb, Ishani; Mukherjee, Saibal; Paul, Surojit

    2011-01-01

    The present study examines the role of a neuron-specific tyrosine phosphatase (STEP) in excitotoxic cell death. Our findings demonstrate that p38 MAPK, a stress-activated kinase that is known to play a role in the etiology of excitotoxic cell death is a substrate of STEP. Glutamate-mediated NMDA receptor stimulation leads to rapid but transient activation of p38 MAPK, which is primarily dependent on NR2A-NMDA receptor activation. Conversely, activation of NR2B-NMDA receptors leads to dephosphorylation and subsequent activation of STEP, which in turn leads to inactivation of p38 MAPK. Thus during transient NMDA receptor stimulation, increases in STEP activity appears to limit the duration of activation of p38 MAPK and improves neuronal survival. However, if NR2B-NMDA receptor stimulation is sustained, protective effects of STEP activation are lost, as these stimuli cause significant degradation of active STEP, leading to secondary activation of p38 MAP kinase. Consistent with this observation, a cell transducible TAT-STEP peptide that constitutively binds to p38 MAPK attenuated neuronal cell death caused by sustained NMDA receptor stimulation. The findings imply that the activation and levels of STEP are dependent on the duration and magnitude of NR2B-NMDA receptor stimulation and STEP serves as a modulator of NMDA receptor dependent neuronal injury, through its regulation of p38 MAPK. PMID:21029094

  5. A critical role of spinal Shank2 proteins in NMDA-induced pain hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Seo-Yeon; Kwon, Soon-Gu; Kim, Yong Ho; Yeo, Ji-Hee; Ko, Hyoung-Gon; Roh, Dae-Hyun; Kaang, Bong-Kiun; Beitz, Alvin J; Lee, Jang-Hern

    2017-01-01

    Background Self-injurious behaviors (SIBs) are devastating traits in autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Although deficits in pain sensation might be one of the contributing factors underlying the development of SIBs, the mechanisms have yet to be addressed. Recently, the Shank2 synaptic protein has been considered to be a key component in ASD, and mutations of SHANK2 gene induce the dysfunction of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors, suggesting a link between Shank2 and NMDA receptors in ASD. Given that spinal NMDA receptors play a pivotal role in pain hypersensitivity, we investigated the possible role of Shank2 in nociceptive hypersensitivity by examining changes in spontaneous pain following intrathecal NMDA injection in Shank2−/− (Shank2 knock-out, KO) mice. Results Intrathecal NMDA injection evoked spontaneous nociceptive behaviors. These NMDA-induced nociceptive responses were significantly reduced in Shank2 KO mice. We also observed a significant decrease of NMDA currents in the spinal dorsal horn of Shank2 KO mice. Subsequently, we examined whether mitogen-activated protein kinase or AKT signaling is involved in this reduced pain behavior in Shank2 KO mice because the NMDA receptor is closely related to these signaling molecules. Western blotting and immunohistochemistry revealed that spinally administered NMDA increased the expression of a phosphorylated form of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (p-ERK) which was significantly reduced in Shank2 KO mice. However, p38, JNK, or AKT were not changed by NMDA administration. The ERK inhibitor, PD98059, decreased NMDA-induced spontaneous pain behaviors in a dose-dependent manner in wild-type mice. Moreover, it was found that the NMDA-induced increase in p-ERK was primarily colocalized with Shank2 proteins in the spinal cord dorsal horn. Conclusion Shank2 protein is involved in spinal NMDA receptor-mediated pain, and mutations of Shank2 may suppress NMDA-ERK signaling in spinal pain transmission. This study

  6. Advanced structure-activity relationships applied to Mentha spicata L. subsp. spicata essential oil compounds as AChE and NMDA ligands, in comparison with donepezil, galantamine and memantine - new approach in brain disorders pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Avram, Speranta; Maria, Mernea; Bagci, Eyup; Hritcu, Lucian; Borcan, Livia-Cristina; Mihailescu, Dan

    2017-01-13

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) therapy is based on several natural and synthetic compounds that act as acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDA) ligands that have limited efficiency in relieving AD symptoms. Recent studies show that inhibitors isolated from Mentha spicata L. subsp. spicata are promising for AD therapy. We aimed to identify novel and more potent phytopharmaceutical compounds for AD treatment by taking into account the compounds from Mentha spicata L. subsp. spicata essential oil. We generated structure-activity relationship (SAR) models that predict the biological activities of 14 Mentha spicata L. subsp. spicata compounds on AChE and NMDA by comparing their molecular features with those of the three conventional ligands: donepezil, galantamine and memantine. The most relevant descriptors for predicting the biological activities of considered compounds are solvent accessible area and their subdivided, hydrophobicity, energy of frontier molecular orbitals and counts of the aromatic ring and rotatable bounds. 1,8-cineole, the main compound from Mentha spicata L. subsp. spicata essential oil, resulted to be similar with memantine and dissimilar with donepezil in respect to hidrophobicity (logP1,8-cineole=2.95, logPmemantine=2.81, logPdonepezil=4.11), the energy of LUMO (eLUMO1,8-cineole=3.01 eV, eLUMOmemantine=3.35 eV, eLUMOdonepezil=-0.35 eV) and the solvent accessible surface areas over all hydrophobic (SA_H1,8-cineole= 350 Å2, SA_Hmemantine= 358 Å2, SA_Hdonepezil= 655 Å2) or polar atoms (SA_P1,8-cineole= 4 Å2, SA_Pmemantine=10 Å2, SA_Pdonepezil=44.62 Å2). Our results point towards 1,8-cineole as a good candidate for NMDA antagonism, with a weaker AChE inhibitory effect. Our results may be useful in establishing new therapeutic strategies for neurological disorders.

  7. Augmentative and Alternative Communication and Language: Evidence-Based Practice and Language Activity Monitoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Katya

    2004-01-01

    The goal of augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) is the most effective communication possible. Speech-language pathologists are obligated to collect data, measure communication, and apply the principles of evidence-based practice (EBP). This article presents a model for EBP that represents how collecting and evaluating performance data…

  8. Augmentative and Alternative Communication and Language: Evidence-Based Practice and Language Activity Monitoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Katya

    2004-01-01

    The goal of augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) is the most effective communication possible. Speech-language pathologists are obligated to collect data, measure communication, and apply the principles of evidence-based practice (EBP). This article presents a model for EBP that represents how collecting and evaluating performance data…

  9. CNQX and DNQX block non-NMDA synaptic transmission but not NMDA-evoked locomotion in lamprey spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Alford, S; Grillner, S

    1990-01-08

    The motor pattern underlying locomotion in the lamprey is activated and maintained by excitatory amino acid neurotransmission. The quinoxalinediones 6,7-dinitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (DNQX) and 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX) are potent and selective antagonists of non-N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors in the mammalian central nervous system. In the lamprey, these compounds are now shown to block fast excitatory synaptic potentials elicited in neurones of the spinal ventral horn. They selectively antagonise responses to the application of selective kainate and quisqualate receptor agonists (kainate and alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxalone (AMPA)) but do not influence NMDA receptor-mediated responses. Additionally, it is shown that the activation of NMDA receptors is sufficient to elicit and maintain fictive locomotion after blockade of non-NMDA receptors with either DNQX or CNQX. Conversely, activation of quisqualate receptors with AMPA, but not quisqualate leads to fictive locomotion with properties much like that activated by kainate.

  10. Functional Interaction Between Na/K-ATPase and NMDA Receptor in Cerebellar Neurons.

    PubMed

    Akkuratov, Evgeny E; Lopacheva, Olga M; Kruusmägi, Markus; Lopachev, Alexandr V; Shah, Zahoor A; Boldyrev, Alexander A; Liu, Lijun

    2015-12-01

    NMDA receptors play a crucial role in regulating synaptic plasticity and memory. Activation of NMDA receptors changes intracellular concentrations of Na(+) and K(+), which are subsequently restored by Na/K-ATPase. We used immunochemical and biochemical methods to elucidate the potential mechanisms of interaction between these two proteins. We observed that NMDA receptor and Na/K-ATPase interact with each other and this interaction was shown for both isoforms of α subunit (α1 and α3) of Na/K-ATPase expressed in neurons. Using Western blotting, we showed that long-term exposure of the primary culture of cerebellar neurons to nanomolar concentrations of ouabain (a cardiotonic steroid, a specific ligand of Na/K-ATPase) leads to a decrease in the levels of NMDA receptors which is likely mediated by the α3 subunit of Na/K-ATPase. We also observed a decrease in enzymatic activity of the α1 subunit of Na/K-ATPase caused by NMDA receptor activation. This effect is mediated by an increase in intracellular Ca(2+). Thus, Na/K-ATPase and NMDA receptor can interact functionally by forming a macromolecular complex which can be important for restoring ionic balance after neuronal excitation. Furthermore, this interaction suggests that NMDA receptor function can be regulated by endogenous cardiotonic steroids which recently have been found in cerebrospinal fluid or by pharmacological drugs affecting Na/K-ATPase function.

  11. Alendronate augments interleukin-1{beta} release from macrophages infected with periodontal pathogenic bacteria through activation of caspase-1

    SciTech Connect

    Deng Xue; Tamai, Riyoko; Endo, Yasuo; Kiyoura, Yusuke

    2009-02-15

    Nitrogen-containing bisphosphonates (NBPs) are anti-bone-resorptive drugs with inflammatory side effects that include osteomyelitis and osteonecrosis of the jaw. Oral bacteria have been considered to be a trigger for these NBP-associated jaw bone diseases. The present study examined the effects of alendronate (a typical NBP) and clodronate (a non-NBP) on the production of proinflammatory cytokines by macrophages infected with Porphyromonas gingivalis and Tannerella forsythia, which are important pathogens of periodontal diseases. Pretreatment with alendronate augmented IL-1{beta}, but not TNF{alpha}, production by macrophages infected with P. gingivalis or T. forsythia. This augmentation of IL-1{beta} production was inhibited by clodronate. Furthermore, caspase-1, a promoter of IL-1{beta} production, was activated by treatment with alendronate, and caspase-1 inhibitor reduced the production of IL-1{beta} induced by alendronate and P. gingivalis. These results suggest that NBPs augment periodontal pathogenic bacteria-induced IL-1{beta} release via caspase-1 activation, and this phenomenon may contribute to the development of NBP-associated inflammatory side effects including jaw osteomyelitis. Co-treatment with clodronate may prevent and/or reduce these inflammatory effects induced by NBPs.

  12. Effects of Neural Morphology and Input Distribution on Synaptic Processing by Global and Focal NMDA-Spikes

    PubMed Central

    Poleg-Polsky, Alon

    2015-01-01

    Cortical neurons can respond to glutamatergic stimulation with regenerative N-Methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA)-spikes. NMDA-spikes were initially thought to depend on clustered synaptic activation. Recent work had shown however a new variety of a global NMDA-spike, which can be generated by randomly distributed inputs. Very little is known about the factors that influence the generation of these global NMDA-spikes, as well the potentially distinct rules of synaptic integration and the computational significance conferred by the two types of NMDA-spikes. Here I show that the input resistance (RIN) plays a major role in influencing spike initiation; while the classical, focal NMDA-spike depended upon the local (dendritic) RIN, the threshold of global NMDA-spike generation was set by the somatic RIN. As cellular morphology can exert a large influence on RIN, morphologically distinct neuron types can have dissimilar rules for NMDA-spikes generation. For example, cortical neurons in superficial layers were found to be generally prone to global NMDA-spike generation. In contrast, electric properties of cortical layer 5b cells clearly favor focal NMDA-spikes. These differences can translate into diverse synaptic integration rules for the different classes of cortical cells; simulated superficial layers neurons were found to exhibit strong synaptic interactions between different dendritic branches, giving rise to a single integrative compartment mediated by the global NMDA-spike. In these cells, efficiency of postsynaptic activation was relatively little dependent on synaptic distribution. By contrast, layer 5b neurons were capable of true multi-unit computation involving independent integrative compartments formed by clustered synaptic input which could trigger focal NMDA-spikes. In a sharp contrast to superficial layers neurons, randomly distributed synaptic inputs were not very effective in driving firing the layer 5b cells, indicating a possibility for different

  13. [Anti-NMDA-receptor encephalitis].

    PubMed

    Engen, Kristine; Agartz, Ingrid

    2016-06-01

    BACKGROUND In 2007 a clinical disease caused by autoantibodies directed against the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor was described for the first time. Anti-NMDA-receptor encephalitis is a subacute, autoimmune neurological disorder with psychiatric manifestations. The disease is a form of limbic encephalitis and is often paraneoplastic. The condition is also treatable. In this review article we examine the development of the disease, clinical practice, diagnostics and treatment.MATERIAL AND METHOD The article is based on references retrieved from searches in PubMed, and a discretionary selection of articles from the authors' own literature archive.RESULTS The disease most frequently affects young women. It may initially be perceived as a psychiatric condition, as it usually presents in the form of delusions, hallucinations or mania. The diagnosis should be suspected in patients who later develop neurological symptoms such as various movement disorders, epileptic seizures and autonomic instability. Examination of serum or cerebrospinal fluid for NMDA receptor antibodies should be included in the assessment of patients with suspected encephalitis. MRI, EEG and assessment for tumours are important tools in diagnosing the condition and any underlying malignancy.INTERPRETATION If treatment is initiated early, the prognosis is good. Altogether 75 % of patients will fully recover or experience significant improvement. Apart from surgical resection of a possible tumour, the treatment consists of immunotherapy. Because of good possibilities for treatment, it is important that clinicians, particularly those in acute psychiatry, are aware of and alert to this condition.

  14. NADH augments blood flow in physiologically activated retina and visual cortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ido, Yasuo; Chang, Katherine; Williamson, Joseph R.

    2004-01-01

    The mechanism(s) that increase retinal and visual cortex blood flows in response to visual stimulation are poorly understood. We tested the hypothesis that increased transfer of electrons and protons from glucose to cytosolic free NAD+, reducing it to NADH, evoked by increased energy metabolism, fuels redox-signaling pathways that augment flow. The near-equilibrium between free cytosolic NADH/NAD+ and lactate/pyruvate ratios established by lactate dehydrogenase predicts that transfer of additional electrons and protons from injected lactate to NAD+ will augment the elevated blood flows in stimulated retina and cortex, whereas transfer of electrons and protons from NADH to injected pyruvate will attenuate the elevated flows. These predictions were tested and confirmed in rats. Increased flows evoked by stimulation also were prevented by inhibition of nitric oxide synthase. These findings support an important role for cytosolic free NADH in fueling a signaling cascade that increases NO production, which augments blood flow in photostimulated retina and visual cortex.

  15. Mitochondrial dysfunction and lipid peroxidation in rat frontal cortex by chronic NMDA administration can be partially prevented by lithium treatment.

    PubMed

    Kim, Helena K; Isaacs-Trepanier, Cameron; Elmi, Nika; Rapoport, Stanley I; Andreazza, Ana C

    2016-05-01

    Chronic N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) administration to rats may be a model to investigate excitotoxicity mediated by glutamatergic hyperactivity, and lithium has been reported to be neuroprotective. We hypothesized that glutamatergic hyperactivity in chronic NMDA injected rats would cause mitochondrial dysfunction and lipid peroxidation in the brain, and that chronic lithium treatment would ameliorate some of these NMDA-induced alterations. Rats treated with lithium for 6 weeks were injected i.p. 25 mg/kg NMDA on a daily basis for the last 21 days of lithium treatment. Brain was removed and frontal cortex was analyzed. Chronic NMDA decreased brain levels of mitochondrial complex I and III, and increased levels of the lipid oxidation products, 8-isoprostane and 4-hydroxynonenal, compared with non-NMDA injected rats. Lithium treatment prevented the NMDA-induced increments in 8-isoprostane and 4-hydroxynonenal. Our findings suggest that increased chronic activation of NMDA receptors can induce alterations in electron transport chain complexes I and III and in lipid peroxidation in brain. The NMDA-induced changes may contribute to glutamate-mediated excitotoxicity, which plays a role in brain diseases such as bipolar disorder. Lithium treatment prevented changes in 8-isoprostane and 4-hydroxynonenal, which may contribute to lithium's reported neuroprotective effect and efficacy in bipolar disorder. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Adult forebrain NMDA receptors gate social motivation and social memory.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Stephanie; Tsien, Joe Z

    2017-02-01

    Motivation to engage in social interaction is critical to ensure normal social behaviors, whereas dysregulation in social motivation can contribute to psychiatric diseases such as schizophrenia, autism, social anxiety disorders and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). While dopamine is well known to regulate motivation, its downstream targets are poorly understood. Given the fact that the dopamine 1 (D1) receptors are often physically coupled with the NMDA receptors, we hypothesize that the NMDA receptor activity in the adult forebrain principal neurons are crucial not only for learning and memory, but also for the proper gating of social motivation. Here, we tested this hypothesis by examining sociability and social memory in inducible forebrain-specific NR1 knockout mice. These mice are ideal for exploring the role of the NR1 subunit in social behavior because the NR1 subunit can be selectively knocked out after the critical developmental period, in which NR1 is required for normal development. We found that the inducible deletion of the NMDA receptors prior to behavioral assays impaired, not only object and social recognition memory tests, but also resulted in profound deficits in social motivation. Mice with ablated NR1 subunits in the forebrain demonstrated significant decreases in sociability compared to their wild type counterparts. These results suggest that in addition to its crucial role in learning and memory, the NMDA receptors in the adult forebrain principal neurons gate social motivation, independent of neuronal development.

  17. BDNF released during neuropathic pain potentiates NMDA receptors in primary afferent terminals.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wenling; Walwyn, Wendy; Ennes, Helena S; Kim, Hyeyoung; McRoberts, James A; Marvizón, Juan Carlos G

    2014-05-01

    NMDA receptors in primary afferent terminals can contribute to hyperalgesia by increasing neurotransmitter release. In rats and mice, we found that the ability of intrathecal NMDA to induce neurokinin 1 receptor (NK1R) internalization (a measure of substance P release) required a previous injection of BDNF. Selective knock-down of NMDA receptors in primary afferents decreased NMDA-induced NK1R internalization, confirming the presynaptic location of these receptors. The effect of BDNF was mediated by tropomyosin-related kinase B (trkB) receptors and not p75 neurotrophin receptors (p75(NTR) ), because it was not produced by proBDNF and was inhibited by the trkB antagonist ANA-12 but not by the p75(NTR) inhibitor TAT-Pep5. These effects are probably mediated through the truncated form of the trkB receptor as there is little expression of full-length trkB in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. Src family kinase inhibitors blocked the effect of BDNF, suggesting that trkB receptors promote the activation of these NMDA receptors by Src family kinase phosphorylation. Western blots of cultured DRG neurons revealed that BDNF increased Tyr(1472) phosphorylation of the NR2B subunit of the NMDA receptor, known to have a potentiating effect. Patch-clamp recordings showed that BDNF, but not proBDNF, increased NMDA receptor currents in cultured DRG neurons. NMDA-induced NK1R internalization was also enabled in a neuropathic pain model or by activating dorsal horn microglia with lipopolysaccharide. These effects were decreased by a BDNF scavenger, a trkB receptor antagonist and a Src family kinase inhibitor, indicating that BDNF released by microglia potentiates NMDA receptors in primary afferents during neuropathic pain. Published 2014. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  18. BDNF released during neuropathic pain potentiates NMDA receptors in primary afferent terminals

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wenling; Walwyn, Wendy; Ennes, Helena S.; Kim, Hyeyoung; McRoberts, James A.; Marvizón, Juan Carlos G.

    2014-01-01

    NMDA receptors in primary afferent terminals can contribute to hyperalgesia by increasing neurotransmitter release. In rats and mice, we found that the ability of intrathecal NMDA to induce neurokinin 1 receptor (NK1R) internalization (a measure of substance P release) required a previous injection of BDNF. Selective knock-down of NMDA receptors in primary afferents decreased NMDA-induced NK1R internalization, confirming the presynaptic location of these receptors. The effect of BDNF was mediated by tropomyosin-related kinase B (trkB) receptors and not p75 neurotrophin receptors (p75NTR), because it was not produced by proBDNF and was inhibited by the trkB antagonist ANA-12 but not by the p75NTR inhibitor TAT-Pep5. These effects are probably mediated through the truncated form of the trkB receptor as there is little expression of full-length trkB in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. Src family kinase inhibitors blocked the effect of BDNF, suggesting that trkB receptors promote the activation of these NMDA receptors by Src family kinase phosphorylation. Western blots of cultured DRG neurons revealed that BDNF increased Tyr1472 phosphorylation of the NR2B subunit of the NMDA receptor, known to have a potentiating effect. Patch-clamp recordings showed that BDNF, but not proBDNF, increased NMDA receptor currents in cultured DRG neurons. NMDA-induced NK1R internalization was also enabled in a neuropathic pain model or by activating dorsal horn microglia with lipopolysaccharide. These effects were decreased by a BDNF scavenger, a trkB receptor antagonist and an Src family kinase inhibitor, indicating that BDNF released by microglia potentiates NMDA receptors in primary afferents during neuropathic pain. PMID:24611998

  19. PPARα deficiency augments a ketogenic diet-induced circadian PAI-1 expression possibly through PPARγ activation in the liver.

    PubMed

    Oishi, Katsutaka; Uchida, Daisuke; Ohkura, Naoki; Horie, Shuichi

    2010-10-15

    An increased level of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) is considered a risk factor for cardiovascular diseases, and PAI-1 gene expression is under the control of molecular circadian clocks in mammals. We recently showed that PAI-1 expression is augmented in a phase-advanced circadian manner in mice fed with a ketogenic diet (KD). To determine whether peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) is involved in hypofibrinolytic status induced by a KD, we examined the expression profiles of PAI-1 and circadian clock genes in PPARα-null KD mice. Chronic administration of bezafibrate induced the PAI-1 gene expression in a PPARα-dependent manner. Feeding with a KD augmented the circadian expression of PAI-1 mRNA in the hearts and livers of wild-type (WT) mice as previously described. The KD-induced mRNA expression of typical PPARα target genes such as Cyp4A10 and FGF21 was damped in PPARα-null mice. However, plasma PAI-1 concentrations were significantly more elevated in PPARα-null KD mice in accordance with hepatic mRNA levels. These observations suggest that PPARα activation is dispensable for KD-induced PAI-1 expression. We also found that hyperlipidemia, fatty liver, and the hepatic expressions of PPARγ and its coactivator PCG-1α were more effectively induced in PPARα-null, than in WT mice on a KD. Furthermore, KD-induced hepatic PAI-1 expression was significantly suppressed by supplementation with bisphenol A diglycidyl ether, a PPARγ antagonist, in both WT and PPARα-null mice. PPARγ activation seems to be involved in KD-induced hypofibrinolysis by augmenting PAI-1 gene expression in the fatty liver.

  20. Kinetic Contributions to Gating by Interactions Unique to N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) Receptors*

    PubMed Central

    Borschel, William F.; Cummings, Kirstie A.; Tindell, LeeAnn K.; Popescu, Gabriela K.

    2015-01-01

    Among glutamate-gated channels, NMDA receptors produce currents that subside with unusually slow kinetics, and this feature is essential to the physiology of central excitatory synapses. Relative to the homologous AMPA and kainate receptors, NMDA receptors have additional intersubunit contacts in the ligand binding domain that occur at both conserved and non-conserved sites. We examined GluN1/GluN2A single-channel currents with kinetic analyses and modeling to probe these class-specific intersubunit interactions for their role in glutamate binding and receptor gating. We found that substitutions that eliminate such interactions at non-conserved sites reduced stationary gating, accelerated deactivation, and imparted sensitivity to aniracetam, an AMPA receptor-selective positive modulator. Abolishing unique contacts at conserved sites also reduced stationary gating and accelerated deactivation. These results show that contacts specific to NMDA receptors, which brace the heterodimer interface within the ligand binding domain, stabilize actively gating receptor conformations and result in longer bursts and slower deactivations. They support the view that the strength of the heterodimer interface modulates gating in both NMDA and non-NMDA receptors and that unique interactions at this interface are responsible in part for basic differences between the kinetics of NMDA and non-NMDA currents at glutamatergic synapses. PMID:26370091

  1. In search of augmentation at human SI: Somatosensory cortical responses to stimulus trains and their modulation by motor activity.

    PubMed

    Huttunen, Juha

    2010-05-17

    In many animal preparations, repeated stimulation at ca. 10 Hz in thalamic nuclei leads to rapid changes in the cortical evoked responses, known as the augmenting response. The present study was undertaken to evaluate whether anything similar to the augmenting response can be observed in awake human subjects when a peripheral nerve is stimulated, and whether a possible human correlate of augmenting would be modified when the subject is engaged in an active motor task. Somatosensory-evoked magnetic fields (SEFs) were recorded in healthy human subjects in response to stimulus trains (15 pulses at 10 Hz) applied to the left median nerve. SEFs were recorded in a resting condition and during a finger-tapping task performed with the stimulated hand. In the resting condition, the most marked change in the SEF configuration was a reduction of the P35m deflection and a concurrent enhancement of the N45m deflection during the 1st few stimuli of the trains. Another conspicuous feature was a prolongation of the latencies of the N45m and P60m deflections toward the end of the train. In the motor task, the response modulation during the pulse trains was in general similar to the resting condition. The most notable difference was that the P35m amplitude was markedly reduced already for the 1st pulse of the train when compared with rest. Also, the latencies of N45m and P60m were not prolonged during the train. We discuss the possibility that the reduction of P35m and a concurrent increase of N45m during a pulse train constitute a human analogue to the augmenting response, and suggest that these changes may reflect a decrease of inhibitory postsynaptic potentials (IPSPs, P35m) and an increase of secondary excitatory postsynaptic potentials (N45m) during stimulus train presentation. The reduction of P35m during motor activity compared with rest already at the beginning of stimulus trains suggests that postsynaptic IPSPs in response to afferent stimulation are reduced during active

  2. Augmentation of Voluntary Locomotor Activity by Transcutaneous Spinal Cord Stimulation in Motor-Incomplete Spinal Cord-Injured Individuals.

    PubMed

    Hofstoetter, Ursula S; Krenn, Matthias; Danner, Simon M; Hofer, Christian; Kern, Helmut; McKay, William B; Mayr, Winfried; Minassian, Karen

    2015-10-01

    The level of sustainable excitability within lumbar spinal cord circuitries is one of the factors determining the functional outcome of locomotor therapy after motor-incomplete spinal cord injury. Here, we present initial data using noninvasive transcutaneous lumbar spinal cord stimulation (tSCS) to modulate this central state of excitability during voluntary treadmill stepping in three motor-incomplete spinal cord-injured individuals. Stimulation was applied at 30 Hz with an intensity that generated tingling sensations in the lower limb dermatomes, yet without producing muscle reflex activity. This stimulation changed muscle activation, gait kinematics, and the amount of manual assistance required from the therapists to maintain stepping with some interindividual differences. The effect on motor outputs during treadmill-stepping was essentially augmentative and step-phase dependent despite the invariant tonic stimulation. The most consistent modification was found in the gait kinematics, with the hip flexion during swing increased by 11.3° ± 5.6° across all subjects. This preliminary work suggests that tSCS provides for a background increase in activation of the lumbar spinal locomotor circuitry that has partially lost its descending drive. Voluntary inputs and step-related feedback build upon the stimulation-induced increased state of excitability in the generation of locomotor activity. Thus, tSCS essentially works as an electrical neuroprosthesis augmenting remaining motor control. Copyright © 2015 International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Acute p38-mediated inhibition of NMDA-induced outward currents in hippocampal CA1 neurons by interleukin-1beta.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ruoyu; Sun, Li; Hayashi, Yoshinori; Liu, Xia; Koyama, Susumu; Wu, Zhou; Nakanishi, Hiroshi

    2010-04-01

    Interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) is a potent pro-inflammatory cytokine that is primarily produced by microglia in the brain. IL-1beta inhibits N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA)-induced outward currents (I(NMDA-OUT)) through IL-1 type I receptor (IL-1RI) in hippocampal CA1 neurons (Zhang, R., Yamada, J., Hayashi, Y., Wu, Z, Koyama, S., Nakanishi, H., 2008. Inhibition of NMDA-induced outward currents by interleukin-1beta in hippocampal neurons, Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 372, 816-820). Although IL-1RI is associated with mitogen-activated protein kinases, their involvement in the effect of IL-1beta on I(NMDA-OUT) remains unclear. In the present study, we demonstrate that IL-1beta caused activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase and that the p38 inhibitor SB203580 significantly blocked the effect of IL-1beta on I(NMDA-OUT) in hippocampal CA1 neurons. Furthermore, the intracellular perfusion of active recombinant p38alpha significantly decreased the mean amplitude of I(NMDA-OUT). In neurons prepared from inflamed hippocampus, the mean amplitude of I(NMDA-OUT) was significantly reduced. In the inflamed hippocampus, IL-1beta and IL-1RI were expressed mainly in microglia and neurons, respectively. These results suggest that IL-1beta increases the excitability of hippocampal CA1 neurons in the p38-dependent inhibition of I(NMDA-OUT).

  4. Theta/gamma networks with slow NMDA channels learn sequences and encode episodic memory: role of NMDA channels in recall.

    PubMed

    Jensen, O; Lisman, J E

    1996-01-01

    This paper examines the role of slow N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) channels (deactivation approximately 150 msec) in networks that multiplex different memories in different gamma subcycles of a low frequency theta oscillation. The NMDA channels are in the synapses of recurrent collaterals and govern synaptic modification in accord with known physiological properties. Because slow NMDA channels have a time constant that spans several gamma cycles, synaptic connections will form between cells that represent different memories. This enables brain structures that have slow NMDA channels to store heteroassociative sequence information in long-term memory. Recall of this stored sequence information can be initiated by presentation of initial elements of the sequence. The remaining sequence is then recalled at a rate of one memory every gamma cycle. A new role for the NMDA channel suggested by our finding is that recall at gamma frequency works well if slow NMDA channels provide the dominant component of the EPSP at the synapse of recurrent collaterals: The slow onset of these channels and their long duration allows the firing of one memory during one gamma cycle to trigger the next memory during the subsequent gamma cycle. An interesting feature of the readout mechanism is that the activation of a given memory is due to cumulative input from multiple previous memories in the stored sequence, not just the previous one. The network thus stores sequence information in a doubly redundant way: Activation of a memory depends on the strength of synaptic inputs from multiple cells of multiple previous memories. The cumulative property of sequence storage has support from the psychophysical literature. Cumulative learning also provides a solution to the disambiguation problem that occurs when different sequences have a region of overlap. In a final set of simulations, we show how coupling an autoassociative network to a heteroassociative network allows the storage of episodic

  5. Apelin protects against NMDA-induced retinal neuronal death via an APJ receptor by activating Akt and ERK1/2, and suppressing TNF-α expression in mice.

    PubMed

    Ishimaru, Yuki; Sumino, Akihide; Kajioka, Daiki; Shibagaki, Fumiya; Yamamuro, Akiko; Yoshioka, Yasuhiro; Maeda, Sadaaki

    2017-01-01

    Glutamate excitotoxicity mediated by N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors is an important cause of retinal ganglion cell death in glaucoma. To elucidate whether apelin protects against retinal neuronal cell death, we examined protective effects of exogenous and endogenous apelin on neuronal cell death induced by intravitreal injection of NMDA in the retinas of mice. An intravitreal injection of NMDA induced neuronal cell death in both the retinal ganglion cell layer and inner nuclear layer, and reduced the amplitudes of scotopic threshold response (STR) in electroretinography studies. Both cell death and STR amplitudes decrease induced by NMDA were prevented by a co-injection of [Pyr(1)]-apelin-13, and were facilitated by apelin deficiency. The neuroprotective effects of [Pyr(1)]-apelin-13 were blocked by an apelin receptor APJ antagonist, and by inhibitors of Akt and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 signaling pathways. Additionally, an intravitreal injection of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) neutralizing antibody prevented NMDA-induced retinal neuronal cell death, and exogenous and endogenous apelin suppressed NMDA-induced upregulation of TNF-α in the retina. These results suggest that apelin protects neuronal cells against NMDA-induced death via an APJ receptor in the retina, and that apelin may have beneficial effects in the treatment of glaucoma. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Statin attenuates experimental anti-glomerular basement membrane glomerulonephritis together with the augmentation of alternatively activated macrophages.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Emiko; Shimizu, Akira; Masuda, Yukinari; Kuwahara, Naomi; Arai, Takashi; Nagasaka, Shinya; Aki, Kaoru; Mii, Akiko; Natori, Yasuhiro; Iino, Yasuhiko; Katayama, Yasuo; Fukuda, Yuh

    2010-09-01

    Macrophages are heterogeneous and include classically activated M1 and alternatively activated M2 macrophages, characterized by pro- and anti-inflammatory functions, respectively. Macrophages that express heme oxygenase-1 also exhibit anti-inflammatory effects. We assessed the anti-inflammatory effects of statin in experimental anti-glomerular basement membrane glomerulonephritis and in vitro, focusing on the macrophage heterogeneity. Rats were induced anti-glomerular basement membrane glomerulonephritis and treated with atorvastatin (20 mg/kg/day) or vehicle (control). Control rats showed infiltration of macrophages in the glomeruli at day 3 and developed crescentic glomerulonephritis by day 7, together with increased mRNA levels of the M1 macrophage-associated cytokines, interferon-gamma, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and interleukin-12. In contrast, statin reduced the level of proteinuria, reduced infiltration of macrophages in glomeruli with suppression of monocyte chemotactic protein-1 expression, and inhibited the formation of necrotizing and crescentic lesions. The number of glomerular ED3-positive macrophages decreased with down-regulation of M1 macrophage-associated cytokines. Furthermore, statin augmented ED2-positive M2 macrophages with up-regulation of the M2 macrophage-associated chemokines and cytokines, chemokine (C-C motif) Iigand-17 and interleukin-10. Statin also increased the glomerular interleukin-10-expressing heme oxygenase-1-positive macrophages. Statin inhibited macrophage development, and suppressed ED3-positive macrophages, but augmented ED2-positive macrophages in M2-associated cytokine environment in vitro. We conclude that the anti-inflammatory effects of statin in glomerulonephritis are mediated through inhibition of macrophage infiltration as well as augmentation of anti-inflammatory macrophages.

  7. NMDA receptors on the surface of cancer cells: Target for chemotherapy?

    PubMed Central

    Deutsch, Stephen I.; Tang, Amy H.; Burket, Jessica A.; Benson, Andrew D.

    2017-01-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), a serine/threonine kinase, is a therapeutic target for many types of cancers. NMDA receptors regulate mTOR signalling activity; their inappropriate expression on several human cancer cell lines represents a potential therapeutic avenue to control dysregulated growth, division and invasiveness. Targeting these receptors with selective ligands (e.g., glycineB site ligands) may be a less toxic and more tolerable approach than administering compounds acting at the mTORC1 complex itself, such as rapamycin and its derivatives. Thus, testing glycineB site ligands in relevant in vitro and in vivo paradigms with established human cancer cells that express NMDA receptors on their surface could provide proofs of concept/principle that would encourage exploration of these and other “non-toxic” strategies. Interestingly, in some cancer models that express NMDA receptors on their surface, NMDA receptor antagonists, such as MK-801 (dizocilpine), were shown to possess anti-proliferative and anti-invasive effects, which conflict with hypotheses about promoting NMDA receptor activation as a cancer chemotherapeutic strategy. Whether NMDA receptor activation or antagonism is associated with anti-proliferative and anti-invasive effects may reflect differences between cancer cell lines in terms of the proteins associated with the NMDA receptors on their cell surfaces, which, in turn, could lead to different “downstream” effects on cascades of intracellular phosphorylations. Irrespective of whether activation or antagonism is associated with anti-proliferative and anti-invasive effects for specific types of cancer, data are emerging that support exploration of targeting NMDA receptors expressed on the surface of cancer cells as a therapeutic strategy. PMID:24751001

  8. The role of NR2B containing NMDA receptor in place preference conditioned with morphine and natural reinforcers in rats.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yao-Ying; Guo, Chang-Yong; Yu, Peng; Lee, David Yue-Wei; Han, Ji-Sheng; Cui, Cai-Lian

    2006-08-01

    It has been reported that N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor is implicated in drug addiction and antagonists of the NMDA receptor complex can inhibit the development and expression of conditioned place preference (CPP) induced by several addictive drugs, implying that this class of compounds might be considered as candidate for the treatment of substance abuse. To explore this possibility, it is important to evaluate whether the inhibitory effect of NMDA receptor antagonists would be confined to behaviors produced by drugs of abuse only, but not by natural reinforcers. According to the quantitative changes of NMDA receptor subunits, including NR1, NR2A, and NR2B, induced by diverse types of reinforcers, we chose NR2B subunit as the target of research. Experimental results showed that (1) an augmented expression of NR2B subunit was revealed by Western blotting in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) and the hippocampus in rats with CPP induced by morphine, but not by natural rewards such as food, novel environment and social interaction. (2) Ifenprodil, an antagonist highly selective for NR2B subunit of the NMDA receptor, produced a dose-dependent reduction in CPP induced by morphine and novel environment, but not that by food consumption and social interaction. Taking together, these findings suggested that NR2B containing NMDA receptor may be more involved with morphine reward rather than natural rewards, and that antagonism of NR2B may have a potential for the treatment of morphine abuse.

  9. Human Augmentics: augmenting human evolution.

    PubMed

    Kenyon, Robert V; Leigh, Jason

    2011-01-01

    Human Augmentics (HA) refers to technologies for expanding the capabilities, and characteristics of humans. One can think of Human Augmentics as the driving force in the non-biological evolution of humans. HA devices will provide technology to compensate for human biological limitations either natural or acquired. The strengths of HA lie in its applicability to all humans. Its interoperability enables the formation of ecosystems whereby augmented humans can draw from other realms such as "the Cloud" and other augmented humans for strength. The exponential growth in new technologies portends such a system but must be designed for interaction through the use of open-standards and open-APIs for system development. We discuss the conditions needed for HA to flourish with an emphasis on devices that provide non-biological rehabilitation.

  10. Fatty acid augmentation of the cardiac slowly activating delayed rectifier current (IKs) is conferred by hminK.

    PubMed

    Doolan, Gavin K; Panchal, Rekha G; Fonnes, Eva L; Clarke, Alison L; Williams, David A; Petrou, Steven

    2002-10-01

    The mechanism by which dietary fatty acids confer protection against cardiac arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death is not resolved. Here, we study the effects of several known cardio-protective and arrhythmogenic fatty acids on the slowly activating delayed rectifier potassium current (IKs), which is responsible for the repolarization phase of the cardiac action potential. cRNAs encoding either or both of the two subunits, KvLQT1 and hminK, that together produce IKs, were injected into Xenopus oocytes, and the effects of various fatty acids were determined. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) significantly augmented IKs as did the short-chained fully saturated lauric acid, and to a lesser extent the cis-unsaturated oleic acid. Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) was without significant effect on current magnitude, although it reduced the rate of activation. These results suggest that not all "antiarrhythmic" fatty acids target the same channel. To examine the role of hminK in this response, KvLQT1 was expressed alone. In this case, DHA, lauric acid, and oleic acid did not augment current, suggesting that hminK confers fatty acid sensitivity to IKs.

  11. Glycine Transporter-1 Inhibition Promotes Striatal Axon Sprouting via NMDA Receptors in Dopamine Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Castagna, Candace; Mrejeru, Ana; Lizardi-Ortiz, José E.; Klein, Zoe; Lindsley, Craig W.

    2013-01-01

    NMDA receptor activity is involved in shaping synaptic connections throughout development and adulthood. We recently reported that brief activation of NMDA receptors on cultured ventral midbrain dopamine neurons enhanced their axon growth rate and induced axonal branching. To test whether this mechanism was relevant to axon regrowth in adult animals, we examined the reinnervation of dorsal striatum following nigral dopamine neuron loss induced by unilateral intrastriatal injections of the toxin 6-hydroxydopamine. We used a pharmacological approach to enhance NMDA receptor-dependent signaling by treatment with an inhibitor of glycine transporter-1 that elevates levels of extracellular glycine, a coagonist required for NMDA receptor activation. All mice displayed sprouting of dopaminergic axons from spared fibers in the ventral striatum to the denervated dorsal striatum at 7 weeks post-lesion, but the reinnervation in mice treated for 4 weeks with glycine uptake inhibitor was approximately twice as dense as in untreated mice. The treated mice also displayed higher levels of striatal dopamine and a complete recovery from lateralization in a test of sensorimotor behavior. We confirmed that the actions of glycine uptake inhibition on reinnervation and behavioral recovery required NMDA receptors in dopamine neurons using targeted deletion of the NR1 NMDA receptor subunit in dopamine neurons. Glycine transport inhibitors promote functionally relevant sprouting of surviving dopamine axons and could provide clinical treatment for disorders such as Parkinson's disease. PMID:24133278

  12. Dexras1, a small GTPase, is required for glutamate-NMDA neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yong; Khan, Reas S.; Cwanger, Alyssa; Song, Ying; Steenstra, Katie; Bang, Sookhee; Cheah, Jaime H.; Dunaief, Joshua; Shindler, Kenneth S.; Snyder, Solomon H.; Kim, Sangwon F.

    2013-01-01

    Dexras1, a small G-protein localized predominantly to the brain, is transcriptionally upregulated by the synthetic glucocorticoid dexamethasone. It has close homology to the Ras subfamily, but differs in that Dexras1 contains an extended 7 kDa C-terminal tail. Previous studies in our laboratory showed that NMDA receptor activation, via NO and Dexras1, physiologically stimulates DMT1, the major iron importer. A membrane permeable iron chelator substantially reduces NMDA-excitotoxicity suggesting that Dexras1-mediated iron influx plays a crucial role in NMDA/NO-mediated cell death. We here report that iron influx is elicited by nitric oxide but not by other pro-apoptotic stimuli such as H2O2 or staurosporine. Deletion of Dexras1 in mice attenuates NO-mediated cell death in dissociated primary cortical neurons and retinal ganglion cells in vivo. Thus Dexras1 appears to mediate NMDA-elicited neurotoxicity via NO and iron influx. PMID:23426685

  13. Lesion of the pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus in rat augments cortical activation and disturbs sleep/wake state transitions structure.

    PubMed

    Petrovic, Jelena; Ciric, Jelena; Lazic, Katarina; Kalauzi, Aleksandar; Saponjic, Jasna

    2013-09-01

    that the PPT cholinergic neuronal loss sustainably increased the number of the Wake/REM and REM/Wake transitions and augmented sleep-states related cortical activation that was simultaneously expressed by the high frequency amplitude augmentation, as well as Wake and NREM delta frequency attenuation.

  14. NMDA receptors in the rat VTA: a critical site for social stress to intensify cocaine taking.

    PubMed

    Covington, Herbert E; Tropea, Thomas F; Rajadhyaksha, Anjali M; Kosofsky, Barry E; Miczek, Klaus A

    2008-04-01

    Cocaine strengthens behaviors associated with its administration. The stress response by individuals that are defeated in a brief aggressive confrontation can also promote enduring behavioral consequences similar to those of stimulants. The study intends to find whether intermittent episodes of defeat promote cocaine's reinforcing effects by triggering N-methyl-D: -aspartic acid (NMDA)-receptor-mediated plasticity in the ventral tegmental area (VTA). Long-Evans rats were investigated after four social defeats in three experiments. Two experiments examined systemic or intra-VTA antagonism of NMDA receptors during stress on the later expression of behavioral sensitization and cocaine self-administration during fixed and progressive ratio (PR) schedules of reinforcement (0.3 mg/kg/infusion), including a novel 24-h variable-dose continuous access binge (0.2, 0.4, and 0.8 mg/kg/infusion, delivered in an irregular sequence). Third, the expression of receptor proteins NR1 (NMDA) and GluR1 [alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid (AMPA)] were examined in VTA and nucleus accumbens. Intermittent defeats augment locomotor responses to cocaine and increase cocaine taking. Rates of responding during binges are increased after defeat stress. These effects are prevented when NMDA or AMPA receptor antagonists are administered before defeats. VTA infusions of the NMDA antagonist AP-5 (5 nmol/side) before stress prevents locomotor sensitization to cocaine and intensified responding for cocaine during a PR schedule or binge. Episodic defeats increase GluR1 AMPA subunit protein expression in the VTA. Social stress stimulates NMDA receptors in the VTA, and this neural action of defeat may be essential for prompting a later increase in cocaine intake during binges.

  15. Effect of 2-amino-5-phosphopentanoic acid (AP5), a glutamate NMDA receptor blocker, on neuron activity in the cat motor cortex during performance of a paw placement conditioned reflex.

    PubMed

    Maiorov, V I; Chernyshev, B V; Moskvitin, A A

    1998-01-01

    Two types of stimulus-associated response were recorded in the contralateral motor cortex during performance of a condition reflex consisting of placing the forepaw on a support in response to a short electrical stimulus (4 msec, 500 Hz) applied to the contralateral parietal cortex (field 5). Primary short-latency responses (peak latent period about 10 msec, duration 30-50 msec) showed little sensitivity to the application of AP5, a blocker of glutamate NMDA receptors; secondary long-latency responses (peak latent period 65 msec, duration 150-200 msec) were inhibited in 44% of cases. Excitatory neuron responses associated with movement were inhibited by AP5 in 18% of cases. Increases in the latent period of the movement itself were seen in 19% of cases. AP5 decreased background activity in 46% of background-active neurons. The number of cases in which individual components of the response and neuron background activity were increased and latent periods of movement were decreased after application of AP5 was no more than expected from a random spread of data.

  16. CGX-1007 prevents excitotoxic cell death via actions at multiple types of NMDA receptors.

    PubMed

    Alex, Anitha B; Saunders, Gerald W; Dalpé-Charron, Alexandre; Reilly, Christopher A; Wilcox, Karen S

    2011-08-01

    Glutamate induced excitotoxic injury through over-activation of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) plays a critical role in the development of many neurodegenerative diseases. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the role of CGX-1007 (Conantokin G) as a neuroprotective agent against NMDA-induced excitotoxicity. Conantokin G, a cone snail peptide isolated from Conus geographus is reported to selectively inhibit NR2B containing NMDARs with high specificity and is shown to have potent anticonvulsant and antinociceptive effects. CGX-1007 significantly reduced the excitotoxic cell death induced by NMDA in organotypic hippocampal brain slice cultures in a concentration-dependent manner. In contrast, ifenprodil, another NR2B specific antagonist failed to offer neuroprotection against NMDA-induced excitotoxicity. We further determined that the neuroprotection observed is likely due to the action of CGX-1007 at multiple NMDA receptor subtypes. In a series of electrophysiology experiments, CGX-1007 inhibited NMDA-gated currents in human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells expressing NMDA receptors containing either NR1a/NR2B or NR1a/NR2A subunit combinations. CGX-1007 produced a weak inhibition at NR1a/NR2C receptors, whereas it had no effect on NR1a/NR2D receptors. Further, the inhibition of NMDA receptors by CGX-1007 was voltage-dependent with greater inhibition seen at hyperpolarized membrane potentials. The voltage-dependence of CGX-1007 activity was also observed in recordings of NMDA-gated currents evoked in native receptors expressed in cortical neurons in culture. Based on our results, we conclude that CGX-1007 is a potent neuroprotective agent that acts as an antagonist at both NR2A and NR2B containing receptors.

  17. Role of motor cortex NMDA receptors in learning-dependent synaptic plasticity of behaving mice.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Mazahir T; Hernández-González, Samuel; Dogbevia, Godwin; Treviño, Mario; Bertocchi, Ilaria; Gruart, Agnès; Delgado-García, José M

    2013-01-01

    The primary motor cortex has an important role in the precise execution of learned motor responses. During motor learning, synaptic efficacy between sensory and primary motor cortical neurons is enhanced, possibly involving long-term potentiation and N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-specific glutamate receptor function. To investigate whether NMDA receptor in the primary motor cortex can act as a coincidence detector for activity-dependent changes in synaptic strength and associative learning, here we generate mice with deletion of the Grin1 gene, encoding the essential NMDA receptor subunit 1 (GluN1), specifically in the primary motor cortex. The loss of NMDA receptor function impairs primary motor cortex long-term potentiation in vivo. Importantly, it impairs the synaptic efficacy between the primary somatosensory and primary motor cortices and significantly reduces classically conditioned eyeblink responses. Furthermore, compared with wild-type littermates, mice lacking NMDA receptors in the [corrected] primary motor cortex show slower learning in Skinner-box tasks. Thus, primary motor cortex NMDA receptors are necessary for activity-dependent synaptic strengthening and associative learning.

  18. Involvement of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) in the short and long-lasting antidepressant-like activity of NMDA receptor antagonists (zinc and Ro 25-6981) in the forced swim test in rats.

    PubMed

    Pochwat, Bartłomiej; Rafało-Ulińska, Anna; Domin, Helena; Misztak, Paulina; Nowak, Gabriel; Szewczyk, Bernadeta

    2017-10-01

    Short and long acting NMDA receptor (NMDAR) antagonists exert their antidepressant-like effects by activating signaling pathways involved in the synthesis of synaptic proteins and formation of new synaptic connections in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) of rats. The blockade of the ERK pathway abolishes ketamine and Ro 25-6981 antidepressant potency. However, the role of ERK in the antidepressant-like activity of short acting NMDAR antagonists is still unclear. More puzzling is the fact that the precise role of ERK in the short and long lasting effects of long-acting NMDAR antagonists is unknown. In this study, we show that zinc, (Zn) a short-acting NMDAR antagonist evokes only transient ERK activation, which is observed 7 min after its administration in the PFC of rats. In contrast to Zn, the long acting NMDAR antagonist Ro 25-6981 produces persistent ERK activation lasting up to 24 h. Pretreatment with the MAPK/ERK inhibitor (U0126) totally abolished Zn and Ro 25-6981 antidepressant-like activities in the forced swim test in rats. However, when U0126 is administered 15 min after Zn or Ro 25-6981 both compounds maintain their short-lasting antidepressant-like activity. On the other hand, posttreatment with U0126 significantly attenuated the long lasting antidepressant-like activity of Ro 25-6981. These results indicate that the activation of ERK is crucial for the short- and long lasting antidepressant-like activity observed in the FST in rats. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Chronic nicotine exposure augments renal oxidative stress and injury through transcriptional activation of p66shc.

    PubMed

    Arany, Istvan; Clark, Jeb; Reed, Dustin K; Juncos, Luis A

    2013-06-01

    Chronic nicotine (Ch-NIC) exposure exacerbates ischemia/reperfusion (I/R)-induced oxidative stress and acute kidney injury (AKI), and mitochondrial production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cultured renal proximal tubule cells (RPTCs). Because Ser36-phosphorylated p66shc modulates mitochondrial ROS production and injury of RPTCs, we hypothesized that Ch-NIC exacerbates AKI by increasing stress-induced phosphorylation of p66shc. We first tested whether Ch-NIC augments I/R-AKI-induced expression and phosphorylation of p66shc in vivo. We then examined whether knocking down p66shc, or impairing its Ser36 phosphorylation or binding to cytochrome c, alters the effects of Ch-NIC on oxidative stress (H₂O₂)-induced production of ROS, mitochondrial depolarization and injury in RPTCs in vitro. We found that Ch-NIC increased the expression of p66shc in the control and ischemic kidneys, but only increased its Ser36 phosphorylation after renal I/R. Knocking down p66shc or impairing phosphorylation of its Ser36 residue, via the S36A mutation (but not the phosphomimetic S36D mutation), blunted Ch-NIC + H2O2-dependent ROS production, mitochondrial depolarization and injury in RPTCs. Additionally, Ch-NIC + H2O2-dependent binding of p66shc to mitochondrial cytochrome c was attenuated by S36A mutation of p66shc, and impairing cytochrome c binding (via W134F mutation) abolished ROS production, mitochondrial depolarization and injury, while ectopic overexpression of p66shc (which mimics Ch-NIC treatment) augmented oxidant injury. We determined that Ch-NIC stimulates the p66shc promoter through p53- and epigenetic modification (promoter hypomethylation). Ch-NIC worsens oxidative stress-dependent acute renal injury by increasing expression and consequent oxidative stress-dependent Ser36 phosphorylation of p66shc. Thus, targeting this pathway may have therapeutic relevance in preventing/ameliorating tobacco-related kidney injury.

  20. Chronic nicotine exposure augments renal oxidative stress and injury through transcriptional activation of p66shc

    PubMed Central

    Arany, Istvan; Clark, Jeb; Reed, Dustin K.; Juncos, Luis A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Chronic nicotine (Ch-NIC) exposure exacerbates ischemia/reperfusion (I/R)-induced oxidative stress and acute kidney injury (AKI), and mitochondrial production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cultured renal proximal tubule cells (RPTCs). Because Ser36-phosphorylated p66shc modulates mitochondrial ROS production and injury of RPTCs, we hypothesized that Ch-NIC exacerbates AKI by increasing stress-induced phosphorylation of p66shc. Methods We first tested whether Ch-NIC augments I/R-AKI-induced expression and phosphorylation of p66shc in vivo. We then examined whether knocking down p66shc, or impairing its Ser36 phosphorylation or binding to cytochrome c, alters the effects of Ch-NIC on oxidative stress (H2O2)-induced production of ROS, mitochondrial depolarization and injury in RPTCs in vitro. Results We found that Ch-NIC increased the expression of p66shc in the control and ischemic kidneys, but only increased its Ser36 phosphorylation after renal I/R. Knocking down p66shc or impairing phosphorylation of its Ser36 residue, via the S36A mutation (but not the phosphomimetic S36D mutation), blunted Ch-NIC + H2O2-dependent ROS production, mitochondrial depolarization and injury in RPTCs. Additionally, Ch-NIC + H2O2-dependent binding of p66shc to mitochondrial cytochrome c was attenuated by S36A mutation of p66shc, and impairing cytochrome c binding (via W134F mutation) abolished ROS production, mitochondrial depolarization and injury, while ectopic overexpression of p66shc (which mimics Ch-NIC treatment) augmented oxidant injury. We determined that Ch-NIC stimulates the p66shc promoter through p53- and epigenetic modification (promoter hypomethylation). Conclusions Ch-NIC worsens oxidative stress-dependent acute renal injury by increasing expression and consequent oxidative stress-dependent Ser36 phosphorylation of p66shc. Thus, targeting this pathway may have therapeutic relevance in preventing/ameliorating tobacco-related kidney injury. PMID:23328708

  1. The N-terminal domain of the GluN3A subunit determines the efficacy of glycine-activated NMDA receptors.

    PubMed

    Mesic, Ivana; Madry, Christian; Geider, Kirsten; Bernhard, Max; Betz, Heinrich; Laube, Bodo

    2016-06-01

    N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors composed of glycine-binding GluN1 and GluN3 subunits function as excitatory glycine receptors that respond to agonist application only with a very low efficacy. Binding of glycine to the high-affinity GluN3 subunits triggers channel opening, whereas glycine binding to the low-affinity GluN1 subunits causes an auto-inhibition of the maximal glycine-inducible receptor current (Imax). Hence, competitive antagonists of the GluN1 subunit strongly potentiate glycine responses of wild type (wt) GluN1/GluN3 receptors. Here, we show that co-expression of N-terminal domain (NTD) deleted GluN1 (GluN1(ΔNTD)) and GluN3 (GluN3(ΔNTD)) subunits in Xenopus oocytes generates GluN1/GluN3 receptors with a large increase in the glycine-inducible Imax accompanied by a strongly impaired GluN1 antagonist-mediated potentiation. Affinity purification after metabolic or surface labeling revealed no differences in subunit stoichiometry and surface expression between wt GluN1/GluN3A and mutant GluN1(ΔNTD)/GluN3A(ΔNTD) receptors, indicating a specific effect of NTD deletions on the efficacy of receptor opening. Notably, GluN1/GluN3A(ΔNTD) receptors showed a similar increase in Imax and a greatly reduced GluN1 antagonist-mediated current potentiation as GluN1(ΔNTD)/GluN3A(ΔNTD) receptors, whereas the glycine-induced currents of GluN1(ΔNTD)/GluN3A receptors resembled those of wt GluN1/GluN3A receptors. Furthermore, oxidative crosslinking of the homophilic GluN3A NTD intersubunit interface in mutant GluN1/GluN3A(R319C) receptors caused both a decrease in the glycine-induced Imax concomitantly with a marked increase in GluN1 antagonist-mediated current potentiation, whilst mutations within the intrasubunit region linking the GluN3A NTD to the ligand binding domain had opposite effects. Together these results show that the GluN3A NTD constitutes a crucial regulatory determinant of GluN1/GluN3A receptor function. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  2. [The effect of 2-amino-5-phosphopentanoic acid (AP5)--a NMDA glutamate receptor blocker--on the neuronal activity of the motor cortex in a cat performing the conditioned reflex of placing its paw on a lever].

    PubMed

    Maĭorov, V I; Chernyshev, B V; Moskvitin, A A

    1997-01-01

    During cats' performance of the forepaw placing reaction, which was conditioned by a short electrical stimulation (4 msec, 500 Hz) of the contralateral parietal cortex (area 5), two types of stimulus-related responses could be recorded in the contralateral motor cortex. The primary short-latency responses (peak latency about 10 msec, duration up to 30-50 msec) were little sensitive to the application of AP5, a glutamate-NMDA-receptor blocker. The secondary long-latency responses (peak latency 65 msec, duration up to 150-200 msec) were suppressed in 44% of cases of AP5 application. The excitatory movement-related responses were suppressed by AP5 in 18% of cases. An increase in the latency of the conditioned movement itself was observed in 19% of cases. AP5 caused a decrease in the background firing in 46% of spontaneously active neurons. The number of cases of enhancement of separate response components and background neuronal activity and the number of cases of a decrease in the movement latency under the action of AP5 did not exceed those expected at random data distribution.

  3. Role of glutathione in augmenting the anticancer activity of pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ).

    PubMed

    Shankar, Bhavani S; Pandey, Ruchi; Amin, Prayag; Misra, Hari S; Sainis, Krishna B

    2010-01-01

    Pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ), a bacterial redox co-factor and antioxidant, is highly reactive with nucleophilic compounds present in biological fluids. PQQ induced apoptosis in human promonocytic leukemia U937 cells and this was accompanied by depletion of the major cellular antioxidant glutathione and increase in intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). Treatment with glutathione (GSH) or N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) did not spare PQQ toxicity but resulted in a 2-5-fold increase in PQQ-induced apoptosis in U937 cells. Cellular GSH levels increased following treatment by NAC alone but were severely depleted by co-treatment with NAC and PQQ. This was accompanied by an increase in intracellular ROS. Alternatively, depletion of glutathione also resulted in increased PQQ cytotoxicity. However, the cells underwent necrosis as evidenced by dual labeling with annexin V and propidium iodide. PQQ-induced cytotoxicity is thus critically regulated by the cellular redox status. An increase in GSH can augment apoptosis and its depletion can switch the mode of cell death to necrosis in the presence of PQQ. Our data suggest that modulation of intracellular GSH can be used as an effective strategy to potentiate cytotoxicity of quinones like PQQ.

  4. The HIV coat protein gp120 promotes forward trafficking and surface clustering of NMDA receptors in membrane microdomains

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hangxiu; Bae, Mihyun; Tovar-y-Romo, Luis B.; Patel, Neha; Bandaru, Veera Venkata Ratnam; Pomerantz, Daniel; Steiner, Joseph; Haughey, Norman J.

    2011-01-01

    Infection by the Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) can result in debilitating neurological syndromes collectively known as HIV associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND). While the HIV coat protein gp120 has been identified as a potent neurotoxin that enhances NMDA receptor function, the exact mechanisms for effect are not known. Here we provide evidence that gp120 activates two separate signaling pathways that converge to enhance NMDA-evoked calcium flux by clustering NMDA receptors in modified membrane microdomains. HIV gp120 enlarged, and stabilized the structure of lipid rafts on neuronal dendrites by mechanisms that involved a redox-regulated translocation of a sphingomyelin hydrolase (neutral sphingomyelinase-2; nSMase2) to the plasma membrane. A concurrent pathway was activated that enhanced the forward traffic of NMDA receptors by promoting a PKA-dependent phopshorylation of the NR1 C-terminal serine 897 (that masks an ER retention signal), followed by a PKC-dependent phosphorylation of serine 896 (important for surface expression). NMDA receptors were preferentially targeted to synapses, and clustered in modified membrane microdomains. In these conditions, NMDA receptors were unable to laterally disperse, and did not internalize, even in response to strong agonist induction. Focal NMDA-evoked calcium bursts were enhanced three-fold in these regions. Inhibiting membrane modification or NR1 phosphorylation prevented gp120 from enhancing the surface localization and clustering of NMDA receptors, while disrupting the structure of membrane microdomains restored the ability of NMDA receptors to disperse and internalize following gp120. These findings demonstrate that gp120 contributes to synaptic dysfunction in the setting of HIV-infection by interfering with the traffic of NMDA receptors. PMID:22114277

  5. The human immunodeficiency virus coat protein gp120 promotes forward trafficking and surface clustering of NMDA receptors in membrane microdomains.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hangxiu; Bae, Mihyun; Tovar-y-Romo, Luis B; Patel, Neha; Bandaru, Veera Venkata Ratnam; Pomerantz, Daniel; Steiner, Joseph P; Haughey, Norman J

    2011-11-23

    Infection by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) can result in debilitating neurological syndromes collectively known as HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders. Although the HIV coat protein gp120 has been identified as a potent neurotoxin that enhances NMDA receptor function, the exact mechanisms for this effect are not known. Here we provide evidence that gp120 activates two separate signaling pathways that converge to enhance NMDA-evoked calcium flux by clustering NMDA receptors in modified membrane microdomains. gp120 enlarged and stabilized the structure of lipid microdomains on dendrites by mechanisms that involved a redox-regulated translocation of a sphingomyelin hydrolase (neutral sphingomyelinase-2) to the plasma membrane. A concurrent pathway was activated that accelerated the forward traffic of NMDA receptors by a PKA-dependent phosphorylation of the NR1 C-terminal serine 897 (masks an ER retention signal), followed by a PKC-dependent phosphorylation of serine 896 (important for surface expression). NMDA receptors were preferentially targeted to synapses and clustered in modified membrane microdomains. In these conditions, NMDA receptors were unable to laterally disperse and did not internalize, even in response to strong agonist induction. Focal NMDA-evoked calcium bursts were enhanced by threefold in these regions. Inhibiting membrane modification or NR1 phosphorylation prevented gp120 from accelerating the surface localization of NMDA receptors. Disrupting the structure of membrane microdomains after gp120 treatments restored the ability of NMDA receptors to disperse and internalize. These findings demonstrate that gp120 contributes to synaptic dysfunction in the setting of HIV infection by interfering with NMDA receptor trafficking.

  6. Healthy older humans exhibit augmented carotid-cardiac baroreflex sensitivity with aspirin during muscle mechanoreflex and metaboreflex activation

    PubMed Central

    Blaha, Cheryl A.; Herr, Michael D.; Stocker, Sean D.; Sinoway, Lawrence I.

    2015-01-01

    Low-dose aspirin inhibits thromboxane production and augments the sensitivity of carotid baroreflex (CBR) control of heart rate (HR) during concurrent muscle mechanoreflex and metaboreflex activation in healthy young humans. However, it is unknown how aging affects this response. Therefore, the effect of low-dose aspirin on carotid-cardiac baroreflex sensitivity during muscle mechanoreflex with and without metaboreflex activation in healthy older humans was examined. Twelve older subjects (6 men and 6 women, mean age: 62 ± 1 yr) performed two trials during two visits preceded by 7 days of low-dose aspirin (81 mg) or placebo. One trial involved 3 min of passive calf stretch (mechanoreflex) during 7.5 min of limb circulatory occlusion (CO). In another trial, CO was preceded by 1.5 min of 70% maximal voluntary contraction isometric calf exercise (mechanoreflex and metaboreflex). HR (ECG) and mean arterial blood pressure (MAP; Finometer) were recorded. CBR function was assessed using rapid neck pressure application (+40 to −80 mmHg). Aspirin significantly decreased baseline thromboxane B2 production by 83 ± 4% (P < 0.05) but did not affect 6-keto-PGF1α. After aspirin, CBR-HR maximal gain and operating point gain were significantly higher during stretch with metabolite accumulation compared with placebo (maximal gain: −0.23 ± 0.03 vs. −0.14 ± 0.02 and operating point gain: −0.11 ± 0.03 vs. −0.04 ± 0.01 beats·min−1·mmHg−1 for aspirin and placebo, respectively, P < 0.05). In conclusion, these findings suggest that low-dose aspirin augments CBR-HR sensitivity during concurrent muscle mechanoreflex and metaboreflex activation in healthy older humans. This increased sensitivity appears linked to reduced thromboxane sensitization of muscle mechanoreceptors, which consequently improves CBR-HR control. PMID:26371168

  7. Healthy older humans exhibit augmented carotid-cardiac baroreflex sensitivity with aspirin during muscle mechanoreflex and metaboreflex activation.

    PubMed

    Drew, Rachel C; Blaha, Cheryl A; Herr, Michael D; Stocker, Sean D; Sinoway, Lawrence I

    2015-10-01

    Low-dose aspirin inhibits thromboxane production and augments the sensitivity of carotid baroreflex (CBR) control of heart rate (HR) during concurrent muscle mechanoreflex and metaboreflex activation in healthy young humans. However, it is unknown how aging affects this response. Therefore, the effect of low-dose aspirin on carotid-cardiac baroreflex sensitivity during muscle mechanoreflex with and without metaboreflex activation in healthy older humans was examined. Twelve older subjects (6 men and 6 women, mean age: 62 ± 1 yr) performed two trials during two visits preceded by 7 days of low-dose aspirin (81 mg) or placebo. One trial involved 3 min of passive calf stretch (mechanoreflex) during 7.5 min of limb circulatory occlusion (CO). In another trial, CO was preceded by 1.5 min of 70% maximal voluntary contraction isometric calf exercise (mechanoreflex and metaboreflex). HR (ECG) and mean arterial blood pressure (MAP; Finometer) were recorded. CBR function was assessed using rapid neck pressure application (+40 to -80 mmHg). Aspirin significantly decreased baseline thromboxane B2 production by 83 ± 4% (P < 0.05) but did not affect 6-keto-PGF1α. After aspirin, CBR-HR maximal gain and operating point gain were significantly higher during stretch with metabolite accumulation compared with placebo (maximal gain: -0.23 ± 0.03 vs. -0.14 ± 0.02 and operating point gain: -0.11 ± 0.03 vs. -0.04 ± 0.01 beats·min(-1)·mmHg(-1) for aspirin and placebo, respectively, P < 0.05). In conclusion, these findings suggest that low-dose aspirin augments CBR-HR sensitivity during concurrent muscle mechanoreflex and metaboreflex activation in healthy older humans. This increased sensitivity appears linked to reduced thromboxane sensitization of muscle mechanoreceptors, which consequently improves CBR-HR control.

  8. A translational approach for NMDA receptor profiling as a vulnerability biomarker for depression and schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Gunduz-Bruce, Handan; Kenney, Joshua; Changlani, Suravi; Peixoto, Aldo; Gueorguieva, Ralitza; Leone, Cheryl; Stachenfeld, Nina

    2017-03-13

    Altered N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor activity and glutamate signaling may underlie the pathogenesis of both schizophrenia and depression in subgroups of patients. In schizophrenia, pharmacologic modeling, postmortem and imaging data suggest reduced NMDA signaling. In contrast, recent clinical trials demonstrating the efficacy of the NMDA antagonist ketamine in severely depressed patients suggest increased NMDA receptor signaling. We conducted a proof of concept study to assess whether there is any in vivo evidence for an inverse association in depression and schizophrenia with respect to the NMDA receptor function. For this purpose we used a translational approach, based on findings from animal studies that NMDA receptor is a key mediator of arginine-vasopressin (AVP) release into the bloodstream. Using hypertonic saline to induce AVP release, as done in animal studies, we found that in depressed patients, NMDA receptor mediated AVP release induced by hypertonic saline infusion was significantly increased 0.24 (0.15) pg/ml P[AVP] /mOsmol POsm , P< 0.05 compared to schizophrenia patients 0.07 (0.07) pg/ml P[AVP] /mOsmol POsm , in whom same response was abnormally low. Slopes for healthy control were 0.11 (0.09) pg/ml P[AVP] /mOsmol POsm , and not different than either group. These findings are consistent with implicated NMDA receptor related abnormalities in depression and schizophrenia in subgroups of patients, and provide the first in vivo evidence towards this dichotomy. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  9. Quantification of amino acid neurochemistry secondary to NMDA or betaxolol application.

    PubMed

    Sun, Daniel; Kalloniatis, Michael

    2004-10-01

    Alterations in retinal amino acid neurochemistry are an indicator of metabolic function. Glutamate is the primary excitatory amino acid neurotransmitter within the retina, and excessive levels of glutamate can potentially cause excitotoxicity, in particular, through the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) subtype of glutamate receptor. Anomalies in NMDA receptor function have been implicated as causing many neurodegenerative disorders, and overactivation leads to neuronal death secondary to metabolic insult. Several pharmaceutical agents have been proposed as potential neuroprotective agents against excitotoxicity (e.g. betaxolol), yet any effects such drugs have on retinal neurochemistry have not been determined. Therefore, the aim of this study was to quantify the changes in retinal amino acid neurochemistry secondary to the application of NMDA with and without betaxolol. Functional NMDA channel activation was confirmed in both amacrine and ganglion cells by quantifying the entry into these neurones of a channel permeable probe (agmatine: 1-amino-4-guanidobutane [AGB]). By probing serial thin sections with immunoglobulins targeting AGB, glutamate, gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and glycine, it was possible to simultaneously study the neurochemical characteristic as well as the NMDA-evoked AGB responses of different neurochemical populations of inner retinal neurones. The authors have previously shown no accumulation of glutamate or GABA within Muller cells following NMDA application. Herein they report altered GABA and glycine immunoreactivity, but not glutamate immunoreactivity within neurones of the amacrine and ganglion cell layers following NMDA application. Finally, the addition of betaxolol did not significantly alter the normal neurochemistry of the retina. The retina possesses intrinsic mechanisms that allow it to maintain metabolic integrity during short periods of high NMDA application.

  10. Role of ventral hippocampal NMDA receptors in anxiolytic-like effect of morphine.

    PubMed

    Motevasseli, Tahmineh; Rezayof, Ameneh; Zarrindast, Mohammad-Reza; Nayer-Nouri, Touraj

    2010-12-02

    The possible role of ventral hippocampal N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors on morphine-induced anxiolytic-like behavior in an elevated plus maze (EPM) task was investigated in the present study. Adult male mice (7 per group) with cannulas aimed at the ventral hippocampus (VH) received NMDA or a competitive NMDA receptor antagonist D-AP5 with or without morphine and 30min later were subjected to an EPM task. Intraperitoneal injection (i.p.) of morphine (3-9mg/kg) increased the percentage of open arm time (%OAT) and open arm entries (%OAE), which suggested an anxiolytic-like effect. Intra-VH microinjection of NMDA (0.5-1μg/mouse) with an ineffective dose of morphine (3mg/kg, i.p.) significantly increased %OAT and %OAE. However, microinjections of the same doses of NMDA into the VH in the absence of morphine had no effect on %OAT and %OAE. Intra-VH microinjection of D-AP5 (0.5-2μg/mouse) decreased the anxiolytic-like effect of morphine, while intra-VH microinjection of the same doses of D-AP5 alone increased %OAT and %OAE, which indicated an anxiolytic response. Furthermore, intra-VH microinjection of D-AP5 reversed the effect of NMDA response to the administration of a lower morphine dose as seen in the EPM task. It should be noted that intra-VH microinjection of D-AP5 plus NMDA, 5min before morphine increased locomotor activity, while other treatments had no effect on this parameter. The results suggest that VH-NMDA receptors participate in the mediation of morphine-induced anxiolytic-like behavior.

  11. Pharmacological characterization of NMDA-like receptors in the single-celled organism Paramecium primaurelia.

    PubMed

    Ramoino, Paola; Candiani, Simona; Pittaluga, Anna Maria; Usai, Cesare; Gallus, Lorenzo; Ferrando, Sara; Milanese, Marco; Faimali, Marco; Bonanno, Giambattista

    2014-02-01

    Paramecium primaurelia is a unicellular eukaryote that moves in freshwater by ciliary beating and responds to environmental stimuli by altering motile behaviour. The movements of the cilia are controlled by the electrical changes of the cell membrane: when the intraciliary Ca(2+) concentration associated with plasma membrane depolarization increases, the ciliary beating reverses its direction, and consequently the swimming direction changes. The ciliary reversal duration is correlated with the amount of Ca(2+) influx. Here, we evaluated the effects due to the activation or blockade of N-methyl-d-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptors on swimming behaviour in Paramecium. Paramecia normally swim forward, drawing almost linear tracks. We observed that the simultaneous administration of NMDA and glycine induced a partial ciliary reversal (PaCR) leading to a continuous spiral-like swim. Furthermore, the duration of continuous ciliary reversal (CCR), triggered by high external KCl concentrations, was longer in NMDA+glycine-treated cells. NMDA action required the presence of Ca(2+), as the normal forward swimming was restored when the ion was omitted from the extracellular milieu. The PaCR and the enhancement of CCR duration significantly decreased when the antagonists of the glutamate site D-AP5 or CGS19755, the NMDA channel blocker MK-801 or the glycine site antagonist DCKA was added. The action of NMDA+glycine was also abolished by Zn(2+) or ifenprodil, the GluN2A and the GluN2B NMDA-containing subunit blockers, respectively. Searches of the Paramecium genome database currently available indicate that the NMDA-like receptor with ligand-binding characteristics of an NMDA receptor-like complex, purified from rat brain synaptic membranes and found in some metazoan genomes, is also present in Paramecium. These results provide evidence that functional NMDA receptors similar to those typical of mammalian neuronal cells are present in the single-celled organism Paramecium and thus

  12. Interactive augmented reality using Scratch 2.0 to improve physical activities for children with developmental disabilities.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chien-Yu; Chang, Yu-Ming

    2015-02-01

    This study uses a body motion interactive game developed in Scratch 2.0 to enhance the body strength of children with disabilities. Scratch 2.0, using an augmented-reality function on a program platform, creates real world and virtual reality displays at the same time. This study uses a webcam integration that tracks movements and allows participants to interact physically with the project, to enhance the motivation of children with developmental disabilities to perform physical activities. This study follows a single-case research using an ABAB structure, in which A is the baseline and B is the intervention. The experimental period was 2 months. The experimental results demonstrated that the scores for 3 children with developmental disabilities increased considerably during the intervention phrases. The developmental applications of these results are also discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. NMDA receptor and schizophrenia: a brief history.

    PubMed

    Coyle, Joseph T

    2012-09-01

    Although glutamate was first hypothesized to be involved in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia in the 1980s, it was the demonstration that N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonists, the dissociative anesthetics, could replicate the full range of psychotic, negative, cognitive, and physiologic features of schizophrenia in normal subjects that placed the "NMDA receptor hypofunction hypothesis" on firm footing. Additional support came from the demonstration that a variety of agents that enhanced NMDA receptor function at the glycine modulatory site significantly reduced negative symptoms and variably improved cognition in patients with schizophrenia receiving antipsychotic drugs. Finally, persistent blockade of NMDA receptors recreates in experimental animals the critical pathologic features of schizophrenia including downregulation of parvalbumin-positive cortical GABAergic neurons, pyramidal neuron dendritic dysgenesis, and reduced spine density.

  14. Stochastic hybrid model of spontaneous dendritic NMDA spikes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bressloff, Paul C.; Newby, Jay M.

    2014-02-01

    Following recent advances in imaging techniques and methods of dendritic stimulation, active voltage spikes have been observed in thin dendritic branches of excitatory pyramidal neurons, where the majority of synapses occur. The generation of these dendritic spikes involves both Na+ ion channels and M-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) channels. During strong stimulation of a thin dendrite, the resulting high levels of glutamate, the main excitatory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system and an NMDA agonist, modify the current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of an NMDAR so that it behaves like a voltage-gated Na+ channel. Hence, the NMDARs can fire a regenerative dendritic spike, just as Na+ channels support the initiation of an action potential following membrane depolarization. However, the duration of the dendritic spike is of the order 100 ms rather than 1 ms, since it involves slow unbinding of glutamate from NMDARs rather than activation of hyperpolarizing K+ channels. It has been suggested that dendritic NMDA spikes may play an important role in dendritic computations and provide a cellular substrate for short-term memory. In this paper, we consider a stochastic, conductance-based model of dendritic NMDA spikes, in which the noise originates from the stochastic opening and closing of a finite number of Na+ and NMDA receptor ion channels. The resulting model takes the form of a stochastic hybrid system, in which membrane voltage evolves according to a piecewise deterministic dynamics that is coupled to a jump Markov process describing the opening and closing of the ion channels. We formulate the noise-induced initiation and termination of a dendritic spike in terms of a first-passage time problem, under the assumption that glutamate unbinding is negligible, which we then solve using a combination of WKB methods and singular perturbation theory. Using a stochastic phase-plane analysis we then extend our analysis to take proper account of the combined

  15. Two distinct mechanisms of augmented antitumor activity by modulation of immunostimulatory/inhibitory signals.

    PubMed

    Mitsui, Jun; Nishikawa, Hiroyoshi; Muraoka, Daisuke; Wang, Linan; Noguchi, Takuro; Sato, Eiichi; Kondo, Satoshi; Allison, James P; Sakaguchi, Shimon; Old, Lloyd J; Kato, Takuma; Shiku, Hiroshi

    2010-05-15

    Blockade of CTL-associated antigen-4 (CTLA-4), an inhibitory immunomodulatory molecule on T cells, has been shown to enhance T-cell responses and induce tumor rejection, and a number of clinical trials with anti-CTLA-4 blocking monoclonal antibody (mAb) are under way. However, accumulating evidence indicates that anti-CTLA-4 mAb increases the number of CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Treg) and that anti-CTLA4 mAb alone is often insufficient to reject established tumors in mice and humans. Thus, finding maneuvers to control Tregs and other immunosuppressive mechanisms remains a critical challenge. The potential to enhance antitumor immune responses by combining anti-CTLA-4 mAb with anti-glucocorticoid-induced tumor necrosis factor receptor family related gene (GITR) mAb, a costimulatory molecule that abrogates directly/indirectly Treg-mediated immune suppression or anti-CD25 mAb that depletes Tregs was analyzed with two tumor models, CT26 (a murine colon carcinoma cell line) and CMS5a (a murine fibrosarcoma cell line). Anti-CTLA-4/anti-GITR mAb combination treatment exhibited far stronger antitumor effects compared with either antibody alone. This strong antitumor effect was attributed to (a) increased numbers of CD8+ T cells infiltrating tumor sites in anti-CTLA-4 mAb-treated mice and (b) increased cytokine secretion and Treg resistance of tumor-specific CD8+ T cells with strongly upregulated CD25 expression in anti-GITR mAb-treated mice, indicating distinct quantitative/qualitative changes induced by modulating CTLA-4 and GITR signaling. This study shows that combined treatment with different immune modulators can augment antitumor immune responses and provides justification for exploring anti-CTLA-4/anti-GITR mAb combination treatment in the clinic. Copyright (c) 2010 AACR.

  16. Spirulina prevents memory dysfunction, reduces oxidative stress damage and augments antioxidant activity in senescence-accelerated mice.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Juen-Haur; Lee, I-Te; Jeng, Kee-Ching; Wang, Ming-Fu; Hou, Rolis Chien-Wei; Wu, Su-Mei; Chan, Yin-Ching

    2011-01-01

    Spirulina has proven to be effective in treating certain cancers, hyperlipidemia, immunodeficiency, and inflammatory processes. In this study, we aimed to investigate the effects of Spirulina on memory dysfunction, oxidative stress damage and antioxidant enzyme activity. Three-month-old male senescence-accelerated prone-8 (SAMP8) mice were randomly assigned to either a control group or to one of two experimental groups (one receiving daily dietary supplementation with 50 mg/kg BW and one with 200 mg/kg BW of Spirulina platensis water extract). Senescence-accelerated-resistant (SAMR1) mice were used as the external control. Results showed that the Spirulina-treated groups had better passive and avoidance scores than the control group. The amyloid β-protein (Aβ) deposition was significantly reduced at the hippocampus and whole brain in both Spirulina groups. The levels of lipid peroxidation were significantly reduced at the hippocampus, striatum, and cortex in both Spirulina groups, while catalase activity was significantly higher only in the 200 mg/kg BW Spirulina group than in the control group. Glutathione peroxidase activity was significantly higher only in the cortex of the 200 mg/kg group than in that of the SAMP8 control group. However, superoxide dismutase activity in all parts of the brain did not significantly differ among all groups. In conclusion, Spirulina platensis may prevent the loss of memory possibly by lessening Aβ protein accumulation, reducing oxidative damage and mainly augmenting the catalase activity.

  17. Activity Augmentation of Amphioxus Peptidoglycan Recognition Protein BbtPGRP3 via Fusion with a Chitin Binding Domain

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wen-Jie; Cheng, Wang; Luo, Ming; Yan, Qingyu; Yu, Hong-Mei; Li, Qiong; Cao, Dong-Dong; Huang, Shengfeng; Xu, Anlong; Mariuzza, Roy A.; Chen, Yuxing; Zhou, Cong-Zhao

    2015-01-01

    Peptidoglycan recognition proteins (PGRPs), which have been identified in most animals, are pattern recognition molecules that involve antimicrobial defense. Resulting from extraordinary expansion of innate immune genes, the amphioxus encodes many PGRPs of diverse functions. For instance, three isoforms of PGRP encoded by Branchiostoma belcheri tsingtauense, termed BbtPGRP1~3, are fused with a chitin binding domain (CBD) at the N-terminus. Here we report the 2.7 Å crystal structure of BbtPGRP3, revealing an overall structure of an N-terminal hevein-like CBD followed by a catalytic PGRP domain. Activity assays combined with site-directed mutagenesis indicated that the individual PGRP domain exhibits amidase activity towards both DAP-type and Lys-type peptidoglycans (PGNs), the former of which is favored. The N-terminal CBD not only has the chitin-binding activity, but also enables BbtPGRP3 to gain a five-fold increase of amidase activity towards the Lys-type PGNs, leading to a significantly broadened substrate spectrum. Together, we propose that modular evolution via domain shuffling combined with gene horizontal transfer makes BbtPGRP1~3 novel PGRPs of augmented catalytic activity and broad recognition spectrum. PMID:26479246

  18. NMDA receptor blockade attenuates locomotion elicited by intrastriatal dopamine D1-receptor stimulation.

    PubMed

    Kreipke, Christian W; Walker, Paul D

    2004-07-01

    Previous behavioral studies suggest that the striatum mediates a hyperactive response to systemic NMDA receptor antagonism in combination with systemic D1 receptor stimulation. However, many experiments conducted at the cellular level suggest that inhibition of NMDA receptors should block D1 receptor-mediated locomotor activity. Therefore, we investigated the consequences of NMDA receptor blockade on the ability of striatal D1 receptors to elicit locomotor activity using systemic and intrastriatal injections of the NMDA antagonist MK-801 combined with intrastriatal injections of the D1 full agonist SKF 82958. Following drug treatment locomotor activity was measured via computerized activity monitors designed to quantify multiple parameters of rodent open-field behavior. Both systemic (0.1 mg/kg) and intrastriatal (1.0 microg) MK-801 pretreatments completely blocked locomotor and stereotypic activity elicited by 10 microg of SKF 82958 directly infused into the striatum. Further, increased activity triggered by intrastriatal SKF 82958 was attenuated by a posttreatment with intrastriatal infusion of 1 microg MK-801. These data suggest that D1-stimulated locomotor behaviors controlled by the striatum require functional NMDA channels.

  19. NMDA Receptors Containing the GluN2D Subunit Control Neuronal Function in the Subthalamic Nucleus.

    PubMed

    Swanger, Sharon A; Vance, Katie M; Pare, Jean-François; Sotty, Florence; Fog, Karina; Smith, Yoland; Traynelis, Stephen F

    2015-12-02

    The GluN2D subunit of the NMDA receptor is prominently expressed in the basal ganglia and associated brainstem nuclei, including the subthalamic nucleus (STN), globus pallidus, striatum, and substantia nigra. However, little is known about how GluN2D-containing NMDA receptors contribute to synaptic activity in these regions. Using Western blotting of STN tissue punches, we demonstrated that GluN2D is expressed in the rat STN throughout development [age postnatal day 7 (P7)-P60] and in the adult (age P120). Immunoelectron microscopy of the adult rat brain showed that GluN2D is predominantly expressed in dendrites, unmyelinated axons, and axon terminals within the STN. Using subunit-selective allosteric modulators of NMDA receptors (TCN-201, ifenprodil, CIQ, and DQP-1105), we provide evidence that receptors containing the GluN2B and GluN2D subunits mediate responses to exogenously applied NMDA and glycine, as well as synaptic NMDA receptor activation in the STN of rat brain slices. EPSCs in the STN were mediated primarily by AMPA and NMDA receptors and GluN2D-containing NMDA receptors controlled the slow deactivation time course of EPSCs in the STN. In vivo recordings from the STN of anesthetized adult rats demonstrated that the spike firing rate was increased by the GluN2C/D potentiator CIQ and decreased by the GluN2C/D antagonist DQP-1105, suggesting that NMDA receptor activity can influence STN output. These data indicate that the GluN2B and GluN2D NMDA receptor subunits contribute to synaptic activity in the STN and may represent potential therapeutic targets for modulating subthalamic neuron activity in neurological disorders such as Parkinson's disease. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/3515971-13$15.00/0.

  20. Striatopallidal Neuron NMDA Receptors Control Synaptic Connectivity, Locomotor, and Goal-Directed Behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Lambot, Laurie; Chaves Rodriguez, Elena; Houtteman, Delphine; Li, Yuquing; Schiffmann, Serge N.; Gall, David

    2016-01-01

    The basal ganglia (BG) control action selection, motor programs, habits, and goal-directed learning. The striatum, the principal input structure of BG, is predominantly composed of medium-sized spiny neurons (MSNs). Arising from these spatially intermixed MSNs, two inhibitory outputs form two main efferent pathways, the direct and indirect pathways. Striatonigral MSNs give rise to the activating, direct pathway MSNs and striatopallidal MSNs to the inhibitory, indirect pathway (iMSNs). BG output nuclei integrate information from both pathways to fine-tune motor procedures and to acquire complex habits and skills. Therefore, balanced activity between both pathways is crucial for harmonious functions of the BG. Despite the increase in knowledge concerning the role of glutamate NMDA receptors (NMDA-Rs) in the striatum, understanding of the specific functions of NMDA-R iMSNs is still lacking. For this purpose, we generated a conditional knock-out mouse to address the functions of the NMDA-R in the indirect pathway. At the cellular level, deletion of GluN1 in iMSNs leads to a reduction in the number and strength of the excitatory corticostriatopallidal synapses. The subsequent scaling down in input integration leads to dysfunctional changes in BG output, which is seen as reduced habituation, delay in goal-directed learning, lack of associative behavior, and impairment in action selection or skill learning. The NMDA-R deletion in iMSNs causes a decrease in the synaptic strength of striatopallidal neurons, which in turn might lead to a imbalanced integration between direct and indirect MSN pathways, making mice less sensitive to environmental change. Therefore, their ability to learn and adapt to the environment-based experience was significantly affected. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The striatum controls habits, locomotion, and goal-directed behaviors by coordinated activation of two antagonistic pathways. Insofar as NMDA receptors (NMDA-Rs) play a key role in synaptic

  1. Musical Peddy-Paper: A Collaborative Learning Activity Suported by Augmented Reality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gomes, José Duarte Cardoso; Figueiredo, Mauro Jorge Guerreiro; Amante, Lúcia da Graça Cruz Domingues; Gomes, Cristina Maria Cardoso

    2014-01-01

    Gaming activities are an integral part of the human learning process, in particular for children. Game-based learning focuses on motivation and children's engagement towards learning. Educational game-based activities are becoming effective strategies to enhance the learning process. This paper presents an educational activity focusing to merge…

  2. NMDA/glutamate mechanism of antidepressant-like action of magnesium in forced swim test in mice.

    PubMed

    Poleszak, Ewa; Wlaź, Piotr; Kedzierska, Ewa; Nieoczym, Dorota; Wróbel, Andrzej; Fidecka, Sylwia; Pilc, Andrzej; Nowak, Gabriel

    2007-12-01

    Antidepressant-like activity of magnesium in forced swim test (FST) was demonstrated previously. Also, enhancement of such activity by joint administration of magnesium and antidepressants was shown. However, the mechanism(s) involved in such activity remain to be established. In the present study we examined the involvement of NMDA/glutamate pathway in the magnesium activity in FST in mice. In the present study we investigated the effect of NMDA agonists on magnesium-induced activity in FST and the influence of NMDA antagonists with sub-effective doses of magnesium in this test. Magnesium-induced antidepressant-like activity was antagonized by N-methyl-d-aspartic acid (NMDA). Moreover, low, ineffective doses of NMDA antagonists (CGP 37849, L-701,324, d-cycloserine, and MK-801) administered together with low and ineffective doses of magnesium exhibit significant reduction of immobility time in FST. The active in FST doses of examined agents did not alter the locomotor activity (with an exception of increased activity induced by MK-801). The present study indicates the involvement of NMDA/glutamate pathway in the antidepressant-like activity of magnesium in mouse FST and further suggests antidepressant properties of magnesium.

  3. Redoxal, an Inhibitor of De Novo Pyrimidine Biosynthesis, Augments APOBEC3G Antiviral Activity Against Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1

    PubMed Central

    Pery, Erez; Sheehy, Ann; Nebane, N. Miranda; Misra, Vikas; Mankowski, Marie K.; Rasmussen, Lynn; White, E. Lucile; Ptak, Roger G.; Gabuzda, Dana

    2015-01-01

    APOBEC3G (A3G) is a cytidine deaminase that restricts HIV-1 replication by inducing G-to-A hypermutation in viral DNA; deamination-independent mechanisms are also implicated. HIV-1 Vif protein counteracts A3G by inducing its proteasomal degradation. Thus, the Vif-A3G axis is a potential therapeutic target. To identify compounds that inhibit Vif:A3G interaction, a 307,520 compound library was tested in a TR-FRET screen.. Two identified compounds, redoxal and lomofungin, inhibited HIV-1 replication in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Lomofungin activity was linked to A3G, but not pursued further due to cytotoxicity. Redoxal displayed A3G-dependent restriction, inhibiting viral replication by stabilizing A3G protein levels and increasing A3G in virions. A3G-independent activity was also detected. Treatment with uridine or orotate, intermediates of pyrimidine synthesis, diminished redoxal-induced stabilization of A3G and antiviral activity. These results identify redoxal as an inhibitor of HIV-1 replication and suggest its ability to inhibit pyrimidine biosynthesis suppresses viral replication by augmenting A3G antiviral activity. PMID:26141568

  4. 5-Desmethylnobiletin augments synaptic ACh levels and nicotinic ACh receptor activity: A potential candidate for alleviation of cholinergic dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Trivedi, Shalini; Maurya, Priyanka; Sammi, Shreesh Raj; Gupta, Madan Mohan; Pandey, Rakesh

    2017-09-14

    Cholinergic function is compromised in plethora of neurodegenerative disorders especially Alzheimer's disease. Increasing acetylcholine (ACh) levels has been the mainstay in majority of the therapeutic regimens, accepted for management of disease. The present study investigates the efficacy of 5-Desmethylnobiletin (DN), a polymethoxyflavone in augmenting cholinergic function using Caenorhabditis elegans as a model organism. The studies revealed significant elevation in cholinergic transmission mediated through increased levels of ACh and activity of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR). Further investigation into the mechanistic aspects indicated that DN enhanced cholinergic function through down modulation of acetylcholinesterase activity at enzyme and transcript level along with upregulation of non alpha subunit, unc-29 which could be linked with enhanced nAChR activity as evident from levamisole assay. Additionally, studies on antioxidant properties, implicated significant potential of DN in curtailing ROS, both in vivo and in vitro. Our studies present DN as a phytomolecule with novel biological activities which could be exploited and researched upon for therapeutic avenues in terms of cholinergic function and antioxidant potential. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Role of AMPA and NMDA receptors and back-propagating action potentials in spike timing-dependent plasticity.

    PubMed

    Fuenzalida, Marco; Fernández de Sevilla, David; Couve, Alejandro; Buño, Washington

    2010-01-01

    The cellular mechanisms that mediate spike timing-dependent plasticity (STDP) are largely unknown. We studied in vitro in CA1 pyramidal neurons the contribution of AMPA and N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) components of Schaffer collateral (SC) excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs; EPSP(AMPA) and EPSP(NMDA)) and of the back-propagating action potential (BAP) to the long-term potentiation (LTP) induced by a STDP protocol that consisted in pairing an EPSP and a BAP. Transient blockade of EPSP(AMPA) with 7-nitro-2,3-dioxo-1,4-dihydroquinoxaline-6-carbonitrile (CNQX) during the STDP protocol prevented LTP. Contrastingly LTP was induced under transient inhibition of EPSP(AMPA) by combining SC stimulation, an imposed EPSP(AMPA)-like depolarization, and BAP or by coupling the EPSP(NMDA) evoked under sustained depolarization (approximately -40 mV) and BAP. In Mg(2+)-free solution EPSP(NMDA) and BAP also produced LTP. Suppression of EPSP(NMDA) or BAP always prevented LTP. Thus activation of NMDA receptors and BAPs are needed but not sufficient because AMPA receptor activation is also obligatory for STDP. However, a transient depolarization of another origin that unblocks NMDA receptors and a BAP may also trigger LTP.

  6. Advanced Intellect-Augmentation Techniques.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engelbart, D. C.

    This progress report covers a two-year project which is part of a program that is exploring the value of computer aids in augmenting human intellectual capability. The background and nature of the program, its resources, and the activities it has undertaken are outlined. User experience in applying augmentation tools and techniques to various…

  7. Supplemental nitric oxide augments satellite cell activity on cultured myofibers from aged mice.

    PubMed

    Betters, Jenna L; Lira, Vitor A; Soltow, Quinlyn A; Drenning, Jason A; Criswell, David S

    2008-12-01

    Skeletal muscle regenerative potential is reduced with aging. We hypothesized that in vitro activation of muscle satellite cells would be compromised, and that nitric oxide (NO) supplementation would improve satellite cell activity in old muscle. Single intact myofibers were isolated from the gastrocnemius muscles of young (2 mo), adult (10 mo), and aged (22 mo) mice. Fibers were centrifuged to stimulate satellite cells and incubated with L-arginine (2mM), the NO donor, diethylenetriamine NONOate (DETA-NO; 10 microM), or control media for 48 h. The number of activated satellite cells after centrifugation was reduced in aged fibers compared to young and adult. L-arginine or DETA-NO treatment increased satellite cell activation in all age groups. However, an age-dependent deficit in satellite cell activity persisted within treatment groups. In separate fibers, exogenous HGF was equally effective in activating satellite cells across age groups, indicating that events downstream of HGF release are intact in aged muscle. These data suggest that l-arginine bioavailability and NO production limit muscle satellite cell activity in response to a submaximal mechanical stimulus, regardless of age. Further, the decline in satellite cell activity in early senescence can be partially abrogated by exogenous L-arginine or an NO donor.

  8. Supplemental Immobilization of Hanford Low-Activity Waste: Cast Stone Augmented Formulation Matrix Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Cozzi, A.; Crawford, C.; Fox, K.; Hansen, E.; Roberts, K.

    2015-07-20

    Matrix tests. A set of Cast Stone formulations were devised to augment the original screening test matrix and focus on the range of the test conditions. Fly ash and blast furnace slag were limited to either northwest or southeast and the salt solutions were narrowed to the Average and the SST Blend at the 7.8M Na concentration. To fill in the matrix, a mix ratio of 0.5 was added. In addition, two admixtures, Xypex Admix C-500 and Rheomac SF100 (silica fume), were added as an additional dry material binder in select compositions. As in the Screening Matrix, both fresh and cured properties were evaluated for the formulations. In this study, properties that were influenced by the W/DM ratio in the Screening Matrix; flow diameter, plastic viscosity, density, and compressive strength, showed consistent behavior with respect to W/DM. The leach index for highly soluble components, sodium and nitrate, were not influenced by changes in formulation or the admixtures. The leach index for both iodine and Tc-99 show an influence from the addition of the admixture, Xypex Admix C-500. Additional testing should be performed to further evaluate the influence of Xypex Admix C-500 on the leach index over a range of admixture concentrations, Cast Stone formulations, and curing and storage conditions.

  9. Augmenting the Activity of Monoterpenoid Phenols against Fungal Pathogens Using 2-Hydroxy-4-methoxybenzaldehyde that Target Cell Wall Integrity

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jong H.; Chan, Kathleen L.; Mahoney, Noreen

    2015-01-01

    Disruption of cell wall integrity system should be an effective strategy for control of fungal pathogens. To augment the cell wall disruption efficacy of monoterpenoid phenols (carvacrol, thymol), antimycotic potency of benzaldehyde derivatives that can serve as chemosensitizing agents were evaluated against strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae wild type (WT), slt2Δ and bck1Δ (mutants of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and MAPK kinase kinase, respectively, in the cell wall integrity pathway). Among fourteen compounds investigated, slt2Δ and bck1Δ showed higher susceptibility to nine benzaldehydes, compared to WT. Differential antimycotic activity of screened compounds indicated “structure-activity relationship” for targeting the cell wall integrity, where 2-hydroxy-4-methoxybenzaldehyde (2H4M) exhibited the highest antimycotic potency. The efficacy of 2H4M as an effective chemosensitizer to monoterpenoid phenols (viz., 2H4M + carvacrol or thymol) was assessed in yeasts or filamentous fungi (Aspergillus, Penicillium) according to European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing or Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute M38-A protocols, respectively. Synergistic chemosensitization greatly lowers minimum inhibitory or fungicidal concentrations of the co-administered compounds. 2H4M also overcame the tolerance of two MAPK mutants (sakAΔ, mpkCΔ) of Aspergillus fumigatus to fludioxonil (phenylpyrrole fungicide). Collectively, 2H4M possesses chemosensitizing capability to magnify the efficacy of monoterpenoid phenols, which improves target-based (viz., cell wall disruption) antifungal intervention. PMID:26569223

  10. Activation of mu opioid receptors in the striatum differentially augments methamphetamine-induced gene expression and enhances stereotypic behavior.

    PubMed

    Horner, Kristen A; Hebbard, John C; Logan, Anna S; Vanchipurakel, Golda A; Gilbert, Yamiece E

    2012-03-01

    Mu opioid receptors are densely expressed in the patch compartment of striatum and contribute to methamphetamine-induced patch-enhanced gene expression and stereotypy. To further elucidate the role of mu opioid receptor activation in these phenomena, we examined whether activation of mu opioid receptors would enhance methamphetamine-induced stereotypy and prodynorphin, c-fos, arc and zif/268 expression in the patch and/or matrix compartments of striatum, as well as the impact of mu opioid receptor activation on the relationship between patch-enhanced gene expression and stereotypy. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were intrastriatally infused with d-Ala(2)-N-Me-Phe(4),Gly(5)-ol]enkephalin (DAMGO; 1 μg/μL), treated with methamphetamine (0.5 mg/kg) and killed at 45 min or 2 h later. DAMGO augmented methamphetamine-induced zif/268 mRNA expression in the patch and matrix compartments, while prodynorphin expression was increased in the dorsolateral patch compartment. DAMGO pre-treatment did not affect methamphetamine-induced arc and c-fos expression. DAMGO enhanced methamphetamine-induced stereotypy and resulted in greater patch versus matrix expression of prodynorphin in the dorsolateral striatum, leading to a negative correlation between the two. These findings indicate that mu opioid receptors contribute to methamphetamine-induced stereotypy, but can differentially influence the genomic responses to methamphetamine. These data also suggest that prodynorphin may offset the overstimulation of striatal neurons by methamphetamine.

  11. Maternal inflammation activated ROS-p38 MAPK predisposes offspring to heart damages caused by isoproterenol via augmenting ROS generation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qi; Deng, Yafei; Lai, Wenjing; Guan, Xiao; Sun, Xiongshan; Han, Qi; Wang, Fangjie; Pan, Xiaodong; Ji, Yan; Luo, Hongqin; Huang, Pei; Tang, Yuan; Gu, Liangqi; Dan, Guorong; Yu, Jianhua; Namaka, Michael; Zhang, Jianxiang; Deng, Youcai; Li, Xiaohui

    2016-01-01

    Maternal inflammation contributes to the increased incidence of adult cardiovascular disease. The current study investigated the susceptibility of cardiac damage responding to isoproterenol (ISO) in adult offspring that underwent maternal inflammation (modeled by pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats with lipopolysaccharides (LPS) challenge). We found that 2 weeks of ISO treatment in adult offspring of LPS-treated mothers led to augmented heart damage, characterized by left-ventricular systolic dysfunction, cardiac hypertrophy and myocardial fibrosis. Mechanistically, prenatal exposure to LPS led to up-regulated expression of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidases, antioxidant enzymes, and p38 MAPK activity in left ventricular of adult offspring at resting state. ISO treatment exaggerated ROS generation, p38 MAPK activation but down-regulated reactive oxygen species (ROS) elimination capacity in the left ventricular of offspring from LPS-treated mothers, while antioxidant N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) reversed these changes together with improved cardiac functions. The p38 inhibitor SB202190 alleviated the heart damage only via inhibiting the expression of NADPH oxidases. Collectively, our data demonstrated that prenatal inflammation programs pre-existed ROS activation in the heart tissue, which switches on the early process of oxidative damages on heart rapidly through a ROS-p38 MAPK-NADPH oxidase-ROS positive feedback loop in response to a myocardial hypertrophic challenge in adulthood. PMID:27443826

  12. ACTIVATION OF MU OPIOID RECEPTORS IN THE STRIATUM DIFFERENTIALLY AUGMENTS METHAMPHETAMINE-INDUCED GENE EXPRESSION AND ENHANCES STEREOTYPIC BEHAVIOR

    PubMed Central

    Horner, Kristen A.; Hebbard, John C.; Logan, Anna S.; Vanchipurakel, Golda A.; Gilbert, Yamiece E.

    2013-01-01

    Mu opioid receptors are densely expressed in the patch compartment of striatum and contribute to methamphetamine-induced patch-enhanced gene expression and stereotypy. In order to further elucidate the role of mu opioid receptor activation in these phenomena, we examined whether activation of mu opioid receptors would enhance methamphetamine-induced stereotypy and prodynorphin, c-fos, arc and zif/268 expression in the patch and/or matrix compartments of striatum, as well as the impact of mu opioid receptor activation on the relationship between patch-enhanced gene expression and stereotypy. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were intrastriatally infused with D-Ala(2)-N-Me-Phe(4),Gly(5)-ol]enkephalin (DAMGO; 1 μg/μl), treated with methamphetamine (0.5 mg/kg) and sacrificed at 45 minutes or 2 hours later. DAMGO augmented methamphetamine-induced zif/268 mRNA expression in the patch and matrix compartments, while prodynorphin expression was increased in the dorsolateral patch compartment. DAMGO pretreatment did not affect methamphetamine-induced arc and c-fos expression. DAMGO enhanced methamphetamine-induced stereotypy and resulted in greater patch versus matrix expression of prodynorphin in the dorsolateral striatum, leading to a negative correlation between the two. These findings indicate that mu opioid receptors contribute to methamphetamine-induced stereotypy, but can differentially influence the genomic responses to methamphetamine. These data also suggest that prodynorphin may offset the overstimulation of striatal neurons by methamphetamine. PMID:22150526

  13. Augmenting the Activity of Monoterpenoid Phenols against Fungal Pathogens Using 2-Hydroxy-4-methoxybenzaldehyde that Target Cell Wall Integrity.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jong H; Chan, Kathleen L; Mahoney, Noreen

    2015-11-10

    Disruption of cell wall integrity system should be an effective strategy for control of fungal pathogens. To augment the cell wall disruption efficacy of monoterpenoid phenols (carvacrol, thymol), antimycotic potency of benzaldehyde derivatives that can serve as chemosensitizing agents were evaluated against strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae wild type (WT), slt2Δ and bck1Δ (mutants of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and MAPK kinase kinase, respectively, in the cell wall integrity pathway). Among fourteen compounds investigated, slt2Δ and bck1Δ showed higher susceptibility to nine benzaldehydes, compared to WT. Differential antimycotic activity of screened compounds indicated "structure-activity relationship" for targeting the cell wall integrity, where 2-hydroxy-4-methoxybenzaldehyde (2H4M) exhibited the highest antimycotic potency. The efficacy of 2H4M as an effective chemosensitizer to monoterpenoid phenols (viz., 2H4M + carvacrol or thymol) was assessed in yeasts or filamentous fungi (Aspergillus, Penicillium) according to European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing or Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute M38-A protocols, respectively. Synergistic chemosensitization greatly lowers minimum inhibitory or fungicidal concentrations of the co-administered compounds. 2H4M also overcame the tolerance of two MAPK mutants (sakAΔ, mpkCΔ) of Aspergillus fumigatus to fludioxonil (phenylpyrrole fungicide). Collectively, 2H4M possesses chemosensitizing capability to magnify the efficacy of monoterpenoid phenols, which improves target-based (viz., cell wall disruption) antifungal intervention.

  14. Manganese inhibits NMDA receptor channel function: implications to psychiatric and cognitive effects.

    PubMed

    Guilarte, Tomás R; Chen, Ming-Kai

    2007-11-01

    Humans exposed to excess levels of manganese (Mn(2+)) express psychiatric problems and deficits in attention and learning and memory. However, there is a paucity of knowledge on molecular mechanisms by which Mn(2+) produces such effects. We now report that Mn(2+) is a potent inhibitor of [(3)H]-MK-801 binding to the NMDA receptor channel in rat neuronal membrane preparations. The inhibition of [(3)H]-MK-801 to the NMDA receptor channel by Mn(2+) was activity-dependent since Mn(2+) was a more potent inhibitor in the presence of the NMDA receptor co-agonists glutamate and glycine (K(i)=35.9+/-3.1 microM) than in their absence (K(i)=157.1+/-6.5 microM). We also show that Mn(2+) is a NMDA receptor channel blocker since its inhibition of [(3)H]-MK-801 binding to the NMDA receptor channel is competitive in nature. That is, Mn(2+) significantly increased the affinity constant (K(d)) with no significant effect on the maximal number of [(3)H]-MK-801 binding sites (B(max)). Under stimulating conditions, Mn(2+) was equipotent in inhibiting [(3)H]-MK-801 binding to NMDA receptors expressed in neuronal membrane preparations from different brain regions. However, under basal, non-stimulated conditions, Mn(2+) was more potent in inhibiting NMDA receptors in the cerebellum than other brain regions. We have previously shown that chronic Mn(2+) exposure in non-human primates increases Cu(2+), but not zinc or iron concentrations in the basal ganglia [Guilarte TR, Chen M-K, McGlothan JL, Verina T, Wong DF, Zhou Y, Alexander M, Rohde CA, Syversen T, Decamp E, Koser AJ, Fritz S, Gonczi H, Anderson DW, Schneider JS. Nigrostriatal dopamine system dysfunction and subtle motor deficits in manganese-exposed non-human primates. Exp Neurol 2006a;202:381-90]. Therefore, we also tested the inhibitory effects of Cu(2+) on [(3)H]-MK-801 binding to the NMDA receptor channel. The data shows that Cu(2+) in the presence of glutamate and glycine is a more potent inhibitor of the NMDA receptor than Mn(2

  15. Real-time RMS active damping augmentation: Heavy and very light payload evaluations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demeo, Martha E.; Gilbert, Michael G.; Lepanto, Janet A.; Flueckiger, Karl W.; Bains, Elizabeth M.; Jensen, Mary C.

    1994-01-01

    Controls-Structures Integration Technology has been applied to the Space Shuttle Remote Manipulator System (RMS) to improve on-orbit performance. The objective was to actively damp undesired oscillatory motions of the RMS following routine payload maneuvering and Shuttle attitude control thruster firings. Simulation of active damping was conducted in the real-time, man-in-the-loop Systems Engineering Simulator at NASA's Johnson Space Center. The simulator was used to obtain qualitative and quantitative data on active damping performance from astronaut operators. Using a simulated three-axis accelerometer mounted on the RMS, 'sensed' vibration motions were used to generate joint motor commands that reduced the unwanted oscillations. Active damping of the RMS with heavy and light attached payloads was demonstrated in this study. Five astronaut operators examined the performance of active damping following operator commanded RMS maneuvers and Shuttle thruster firings. Noticeable improvements in the damping response of the RMS with the heavy, Hubble Space Telescope payload and the very light, astronaut in Manipulator Foot Restraint payload were observed. The potential of active damping to aid in precisely maneuvering payloads was deemed significant.

  16. Downregulation of RND3/RhoE in glioblastoma patients promotes tumorigenesis through augmentation of notch transcriptional complex activity

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Baohui; Lin, Xi; Yang, Xiangsheng; Dong, Huimin; Yue, Xiaojing; Andrade, Kelsey C; Guo, Zhentao; Yang, Jian; Wu, Liquan; Zhu, Xiaonan; Zhang, Shenqi; Tian, Daofeng; Wang, Junmin; Cai, Qiang; Chen, Qizuan; Mao, Shanping; Chen, Qianxue; Chang, Jiang

    2015-01-01

    Activation of Notch signaling contributes to glioblastoma multiform (GBM) tumorigenesis. However, the molecular mechanism that promotes the Notch signaling augmentation during GBM genesis remains largely unknown. Identification of new factors that regulate Notch signaling is critical for tumor treatment. The expression levels of RND3 and its clinical implication were analyzed in GBM patients. Identification of RND3 as a novel factor in GBM genesis was demonstrated in vitro by cell experiments and in vivo by a GBM xenograft model. We found that RND3 expression was significantly decreased in human glioblastoma. The levels of RND3 expression were inversely correlated with Notch activity, tumor size, and tumor cell proliferation, and positively correlated with patient survival time. We demonstrated that RND3 functioned as an endogenous repressor of the Notch transcriptional complex. RND3 physically interacted with NICD, CSL, and MAML1, the Notch transcriptional complex factors, promoted NICD ubiquitination, and facilitated the degradation of these cofactor proteins. We further revealed that RND3 facilitated the binding of NICD to FBW7, a ubiquitin ligase, and consequently enhanced NICD protein degradation. Therefore, Notch transcriptional activity was inhibited. Forced expression of RND3 repressed Notch signaling, which led to the inhibition of glioblastoma cell proliferation in vitro and tumor growth in the xenograft mice in vivo. Downregulation of RND3, however, enhanced Notch signaling activity, and subsequently promoted glioma cell proliferation. Inhibition of Notch activity abolished RND3 deficiency-mediated GBM cell proliferation. We conclude that downregulation of RND3 is responsible for the enhancement of Notch activity that promotes glioblastoma genesis. PMID:26108681

  17. Modulation of NMDA receptor expression in the rat spinal cord by peripheral nerve injury and adrenal medullary grafting.

    PubMed

    Hama, A T; Unnerstall, J R; Siegan, J B; Sagen, J

    1995-07-31

    Excessive activation of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors in the spinal cord consequent to peripheral injury has been implicated in the initiation of neuropathologic events leading to a state of chronic hyperexcitability and persistence of exaggerated sensory processing. In other CNS disease or injury states, NMDA-mediated neurotoxic damage is associated with a loss of NMDA receptors, and outcome may be improved by agents reducing NMDA activation. Previous findings in our laboratory have demonstrated that the transplantation of adrenal medullary tissue into the spinal subarachnoid space can alleviate sensory abnormalities and reduce the induction of a putative nitric oxide synthase consequent to peripheral nerve injury. In order to determine changes in NMDA receptor expression in the spinal cord following peripheral nerve injury and adrenal medullary grafting, NMDA receptor binding using a high-affinity competitive NMDA receptor antagonist, CGP-39653, and NMDAR1 subunit distribution using immunocytochemistry were investigated. Two weeks following peripheral nerve injury by loose ligation of the right sciatic nerve, either adrenal medullary or striated muscle (control) tissue pieces were implanted in the spinal subarachnoid space. Binding studies revealed a marked reduction in [3H]CGP-39653 binding at L4-L5 levels ipsilateral to peripheral nerve injury in control transplanted animals. In contrast, NMDA binding was normalized in adrenal medullary grafted animals. In addition, NMDAR1 immunoreactivity was reduced in both the dorsal horn neuropil and motor neurons of the ventral horn in animals with peripheral nerve injury, while levels in adrenal medullary grafted animals appeared similar to intact controls. These results suggest that adrenal medullary transplants reduce abnormal sensory processing resulting from peripheral injury by intervening in the spinal NMDA-excitotoxicity cascade.

  18. Nontrivial augmentations in mixing performance through integrated active and passive mixing in serpentine microchannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, Sujay K.; Das, Tamal; Chakraborty, Suman

    2012-03-01

    Achievement of efficient mixing in microfluidic systems appears to be a highly challenging proposition, as attributable to typical low Reynolds number hydrodynamics over small scales. To circumvent these constraints, numerous strategies, either relying upon a modulation in the microchannel geometry or involving active flow perturbations have been proposed in the literature. However, while the geometric or passive means suffer from a lack of dynamic control on the mixing process, the active methods can be unfavorably energy expensive. Here we show that the problem of controllability and energy efficiency can be optimized to a large extent by combining the active and passive strategies within an integrated microfluidic platform, in the form of serpentine microchannel geometry with embedded electrodes. We demonstrate, both theoretically and experimentally, that in specific operating regimes, the mixing effectiveness (expressed in terms of a quantifiable index) of the designed system can be nontrivially higher than the algebraic sum of effectivenesses realized from pure active and passive mixing configurations, leading to a nonlinear amplification in the separation efficiency. Results of our experiments may be used a generic design principle for optimized mixing performance of lab-on-a-chip microdevices, with a judicious combination of the active and passive mixing paradigms.

  19. Loss of NMDA receptors in dopamine neurons leads to the development of affective disorder-like symptoms in mice

    PubMed Central

    Jastrzębska, Kamila; Walczak, Magdalena; Cieślak, Przemysław Eligiusz; Szumiec, Łukasz; Turbasa, Mateusz; Engblom, David; Błasiak, Tomasz; Parkitna, Jan Rodriguez

    2016-01-01

    The role of changes in dopamine neuronal activity during the development of symptoms in affective disorders remains controversial. Here, we show that inactivation of NMDA receptors on dopaminergic neurons in adult mice led to the development of affective disorder-like symptoms. The loss of NMDA receptors altered activity and caused complete NMDA-insensitivity in dopamine-like neurons. Mutant mice exhibited increased immobility in the forced swim test and a decrease in social interactions. Mutation also led to reduced saccharin intake, however the preference of sweet taste was not significantly decreased. Additionally, we found that while mutant mice were slower to learn instrumental tasks, they were able to reach the same performance levels, had normal sensitivity to feedback and showed similar motivation to exert effort as control animals. Taken together these results show that inducing the loss of NMDA receptor-dependent activity in dopamine neurons is associated with development of affective disorder-like symptoms. PMID:27853270

  20. Indomethacin augments lymphokine-activated killer cell generation by patients with malignant mesothelioma

    SciTech Connect

    Manning, L.S.; Bowman, R.V.; Davis, M.R.; Musk, A.W.; Robinson, B.W. )

    1989-10-01

    Human malignant mesothelioma (MM) cells are resistant to natural killer (NK) cell lysis but susceptible to lysis by lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) cells from control individuals. The present study was performed to determine the capacity of patients with MM (n = 22) and individuals occupationally exposed to asbestos (the major population at risk of developing this disease, n = 52) to generate LAK cells capable of effectively lysing human mesothelioma cells. Compared to controls (n = 20), both patient groups demonstrated significantly depressed LAK cell activity against mesothelioma tumor cell targets (55 +/- 3% lysis by controls vs 34 +/- 3% lysis by patients with MM, P less than 0.005; and 45 +/- 3% lysis by asbestos-exposed individuals, P less than 0.025). Addition of 10 micrograms/ml indomethacin during LAK cell generation restored normal LAK cell activity for patients with MM (52 +/- 6% lysis of cultured human MM cells, P = NS compared to controls), suggesting that the defective cytolytic cell function observed in some patients with MM is a result of prostaglandin-induced immunosuppression. The ability of indomethacin to restore suppressed LAK cell activity in patients with MM suggests that the concomitant use of this agent in ex vivo LAK cell generation and in patients undergoing interleukin/LAK cell therapy may be beneficial.

  1. 32 CFR 724.223 - NDRB support and augmentation by regular and reserve activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... travels for the purpose of conducting hearings, it shall normally select Navy or Marine Corps installations in the area visited as review sites. (b) The NDRB Traveling Board shall normally consist of.... (c) Navy and Marine Corps activities in the geographical vicinity of selected review sites...

  2. 32 CFR 724.223 - NDRB support and augmentation by regular and reserve activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... travels for the purpose of conducting hearings, it shall normally select Navy or Marine Corps installations in the area visited as review sites. (b) The NDRB Traveling Board shall normally consist of.... (c) Navy and Marine Corps activities in the geographical vicinity of selected review sites...

  3. 32 CFR 724.223 - NDRB support and augmentation by regular and reserve activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... travels for the purpose of conducting hearings, it shall normally select Navy or Marine Corps installations in the area visited as review sites. (b) The NDRB Traveling Board shall normally consist of.... (c) Navy and Marine Corps activities in the geographical vicinity of selected review sites...

  4. 32 CFR 724.223 - NDRB support and augmentation by regular and reserve activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... travels for the purpose of conducting hearings, it shall normally select Navy or Marine Corps installations in the area visited as review sites. (b) The NDRB Traveling Board shall normally consist of.... (c) Navy and Marine Corps activities in the geographical vicinity of selected review sites...

  5. Dectin-2 Recognizes Mannosylated O-antigens of Human Opportunistic Pathogens and Augments Lipopolysaccharide Activation of Myeloid Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Wittmann, Alexandra; Lamprinaki, Dimitra; Bowles, Kristian M.; Katzenellenbogen, Ewa; Knirel, Yuriy A.; Whitfield, Chris; Nishimura, Takashi; Matsumoto, Naoki; Yamamoto, Kazuo; Iwakura, Yoichiro; Saijo, Shinobu; Kawasaki, Norihito

    2016-01-01

    LPS consists of a relatively conserved region of lipid A and core oligosaccharide and a highly variable region of O-antigen polysaccharide. Whereas lipid A is known to bind to the Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)-myeloid differentiation factor 2 (MD2) complex, the role of the O-antigen remains unclear. Here we report a novel molecular interaction between dendritic cell-associated C-type lectin-2 (Dectin-2) and mannosylated O-antigen found in a human opportunistic pathogen, Hafnia alvei PCM 1223, which has a repeating unit of [-Man-α1,3-Man-α1,2-Man-α1,2-Man-α1,2-Man-α1,3-]. H. alvei LPS induced higher levels of TNFα and IL-10 from mouse bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BM-DCs), when compared with Salmonella enterica O66 LPS, which has a repeat of [-Gal-α1,6-Gal-α1,4-[Glc-β1,3]GalNAc-α1,3-GalNAc-β1,3-]. In a cell-based reporter assay, Dectin-2 was shown to recognize H. alvei LPS. This binding was inhibited by mannosidase treatment of H. alvei LPS and by mutations in the carbohydrate-binding domain of Dectin-2, demonstrating that H. alvei LPS is a novel glycan ligand of Dectin-2. The enhanced cytokine production by H. alvei LPS was Dectin-2-dependent, because Dectin-2 knock-out BM-DCs failed to do so. This receptor cross-talk between Dectin-2 and TLR4 involved events including spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk) activation and receptor juxtaposition. Furthermore, another mannosylated LPS from Escherichia coli O9a also bound to Dectin-2 and augmented TLR4 activation of BM-DCs. Taken together, these data indicate that mannosylated O-antigens from several Gram-negative bacteria augment TLR4 responses through interaction with Dectin-2. PMID:27358401

  6. NMDA Receptor Antagonists for Treatment of Depression

    PubMed Central

    Ates-Alagoz, Zeynep; Adejare, Adeboye

    2013-01-01

    Depression is a psychiatric disorder that affects millions of people worldwide. Individuals battling this disorder commonly experience high rates of relapse, persistent residual symptoms, functional impairment, and diminished well-being. Medications have important utility in stabilizing moods and daily functions of many individuals. However, only one third of patients had considerable improvement with a standard antidepressant after 2 months and all patients had to deal with numerous side effects. The N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor family has received special attention because of its critical role in psychiatric disorders. Direct targeting of the NMDA receptor could result in more rapid antidepressant effects. Antidepressant-like effects of NMDA receptor antagonists have been demonstrated in different animal models. MK-801 (a use-dependent channel blocker), and CGP 37849 (an NMDA receptor antagonist) have shown antidepressant properties in preclinical studies, either alone or combined with traditional antidepressants. A recent development is use of ketamine clinically for refractory depression. The purpose of this review is to examine and analyze current literature on the role of NMDA receptor antagonists for treatment of depression and whether this is a feasible route in drug discovery. PMID:24276119

  7. Novel NMDA Receptor Modulators: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Santangelo, Rose M.; Acker, Timothy M.; Zimmerman, Sommer S.; Katzman, Brooke M.; Strong, Katie L.; Traynelis, Stephen F.; Liotta, Dennis C.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Introduction The NMDA receptor is a ligand-gated ion channel that plays a critical role in higher level brain processes and has been implicated in a range of neurological and psychiatric conditions. Although initial studies for the use of NMDA receptor antagonists in neuroprotection were unsuccessful, more recently, NMDA receptor antagonists have shown clinical promise in other indications such as Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, pain and depression. Based on the clinical observations and more recent insights into receptor pharmacology, new modulatory approaches are beginning to emerge, with potential therapeutic benefit. Areas Covered The article covers the known pharmacology and important features regarding NMDA receptors and their function. A discussion of pre-clinical and clinical relevance is included, as well. The subsequent patent literature review highlights the current state of the art targeting the receptor since the last review in 2010. Expert Opinion The complex nature of the NMDA receptor structure and function is becoming better understood. As knowledge about this receptor increases, it opens up new opportunities for targeting the receptor for many therapeutic indications. New strategies and advances in older technologies will need to be further developed before clinical success can be achieved. First-in-class potentiators and subunit-selective agents form the basis for most new strategies, complemented by efforts to limit off-target liability and fine-tune on-target properties. PMID:23009122

  8. An application of active surface heating for augmenting lift and reducing drag of an airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maestrello, Lucio; Badavi, Forooz F.; Noonan, Kevin W.

    1988-01-01

    Application of active control to separated flow on the RC(6)-08 airfoil at high angle of attack by localized surface heating is numerically simulated by integrating the compressible 2-D nonlinear Navier-Stokes equation solver. Active control is simulated by local modification of the temperature boundary condition over a narrow strip of the upper surface of the airfoil. Both mean and perturbed profiles are favorably altered when excited with the same natural frequency of the shear layer by moderate surface heating for both laminar and turbulent separation. The shear layer is found to be very sensitive to localized surface heating in the vicinity of the separation point. The excitation field at the surface sufficiently altered both the local as well as the global circulation to cause a significant increase in lift and reduction in drag.

  9. Benzodiazepines: rat pinealocyte binding sites and augmentation of norepinephrine-stimulated N-acetyltransferase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Matthew, E.; Parfitt, A.G.; Sugden, D.; Engelhardt, D.L.; Zimmerman, E.A.; Klein, D.C.

    1984-02-01

    Studies of (/sup 3/H)diazepam binding to intact rat pineal cells were carried out in tissue culture preparations. The binding was saturable, reversible and proportional to the number of cells used. Scatchard analysis resulted in a linear plot (Kd . 23 nM, maximum binding sites (Bmax) . 1.56 pmol/mg of protein for cells in monolayer culture; Kd . 7 nM, Bmax . 1.3 pmol/mg of protein for cells in suspension culture). Inhibition constants (Ki) for clonazepam (500 nM), flunitrazepam (38 nM) and Ro-5-4864 (5 nM) indicated that the binding sites were probably of the ''peripheral'' type. In addition, the effects of diazepam on norepinephrine-stimulated N-acetyltransferase (NAT) activity were studied in organ culture and dissociated cell culture. Diazepam (10-50 microM) both prolonged and increased the magnitude of the norepinephrine-induced increase in NAT activity but did not affect the initial rate of rise of enzyme activity. The effect was dose-dependent and was also seen with clonazepam, flunitrazepam and Ro-5-4864, but not with Ro-15-1788. Diazepam, by itself, at these concentrations, had no effect on NAT, but enzyme activity was increased by higher concentrations (0.1-1 mM). Although a relationship between the (/sup 3/H)diazepam binding sites described here and the effect of benzodiazepines on NAT cannot be established from these studies, the data suggest that the benzodiazepines may alter melatonin levels through their action on NAT.

  10. Apatite and Chitin Amendments Promote Microbial Activity and Augment Metal Removal in Marine Sediments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-07-01

    Activated Carbon as a Reactive Cap Sorbent for Sequestration of Polychlorinated Bi- phenyls in the Presence of Humic Acid,” Environmental Engineering...isolated both attached and free-living marine bacteria that were able to solubilize phos- phate compounds when given suitable carbon sources...from chitin degradation may serve as ideal carbon sources for anaerobic and facultative microorganisms capable of metal reduction [20]. It is thus

  11. Chronic optogenetic activation augments aβ pathology in a mouse model of Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Kaoru; Tanei, Zen-Ichi; Hashimoto, Tadafumi; Wakabayashi, Tomoko; Okuno, Hiroyuki; Naka, Yasushi; Yizhar, Ofer; Fenno, Lief E; Fukayama, Masashi; Bito, Haruhiko; Cirrito, John R; Holtzman, David M; Deisseroth, Karl; Iwatsubo, Takeshi

    2015-05-12

    In vivo experimental evidence indicates that acute neuronal activation increases Aβ release from presynaptic terminals, whereas long-term effects of chronic synaptic activation on Aβ pathology remain unclear. To address this issue, we adopted optogenetics and transduced stabilized step-function opsin, a channelrhodopsin engineered to elicit a long-lasting neuronal hyperexcitability, into the hippocampal perforant pathway of APP transgenic mice. In vivo microdialysis revealed a ∼24% increase in the hippocampal interstitial fluid Aβ42 levels immediately after acute light activation. Five months of chronic optogenetic stimulation increased Aβ burden specifically in the projection area of the perforant pathway (i.e., outer molecular layer of the dentate gyrus) of the stimulated side by ∼2.5-fold compared with that in the contralateral side. Epileptic seizures were observed during the course of chronic stimulation, which might have partly contributed to the Aβ pathology. These findings implicate functional abnormalities of specific neuronal circuitry in Aβ pathology and Alzheimer disease. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Donor immunization with WT1 peptide augments antileukemic activity after MHC-matched bone marrow transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Kohrt, Holbrook E.; Müller, Antonia; Baker, Jeanette; Goldstein, Matthew J.; Newell, Evan; Dutt, Suparna; Czerwinski, Debra; Lowsky, Robert

    2011-01-01

    The curative potential of MHC-matched allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT) is in part because of immunologic graft-versus-tumor (GvT) reactions mediated by donor T cells that recognize host minor histocompatibility antigens. Immunization with leukemia-associated antigens, such as Wilms Tumor 1 (WT1) peptides, induces a T-cell population that is tumor antigen specific. We determined whether allogeneic BMT combined with immunotherapy using WT1 peptide vaccination of donors induced more potent antitumor activity than either therapy alone. WT1 peptide vaccinations of healthy donor mice induced CD8+ T cells that were specifically reactive to WT1-expressing FBL3 leukemia cells. We found that peptide immunization was effective as a prophylactic vaccination before tumor challenge, yet was ineffective as a therapeutic vaccination in tumor-bearing mice. BMT from vaccinated healthy MHC-matched donors, but not syngeneic donors, into recipient tumor-bearing mice was effective as a therapeutic maneuver and resulted in eradication of FBL3 leukemia. The transfer of total CD8+ T cells from immunized donors was more effective than the transfer of WT1-tetramer+CD8+ T cells and both required CD4+ T-cell help for maximal antitumor activity. These findings show that WT1 peptide vaccination of donor mice can dramatically enhance GvT activity after MHC-matched allogeneic BMT. PMID:21868578

  13. Donor immunization with WT1 peptide augments antileukemic activity after MHC-matched bone marrow transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kohrt, Holbrook E; Müller, Antonia; Baker, Jeanette; Goldstein, Matthew J; Newell, Evan; Dutt, Suparna; Czerwinski, Debra; Lowsky, Robert; Strober, Samuel

    2011-11-10

    The curative potential of MHC-matched allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT) is in part because of immunologic graft-versus-tumor (GvT) reactions mediated by donor T cells that recognize host minor histocompatibility antigens. Immunization with leukemia-associated antigens, such as Wilms Tumor 1 (WT1) peptides, induces a T-cell population that is tumor antigen specific. We determined whether allogeneic BMT combined with immunotherapy using WT1 peptide vaccination of donors induced more potent antitumor activity than either therapy alone. WT1 peptide vaccinations of healthy donor mice induced CD8(+) T cells that were specifically reactive to WT1-expressing FBL3 leukemia cells. We found that peptide immunization was effective as a prophylactic vaccination before tumor challenge, yet was ineffective as a therapeutic vaccination in tumor-bearing mice. BMT from vaccinated healthy MHC-matched donors, but not syngeneic donors, into recipient tumor-bearing mice was effective as a therapeutic maneuver and resulted in eradication of FBL3 leukemia. The transfer of total CD8(+) T cells from immunized donors was more effective than the transfer of WT1-tetramer(+)CD8(+) T cells and both required CD4(+) T-cell help for maximal antitumor activity. These findings show that WT1 peptide vaccination of donor mice can dramatically enhance GvT activity after MHC-matched allogeneic BMT.

  14. Intracellular calcium elevation during plateau potentials mediated by extrasynaptic NMDA receptor activation in rat hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons is primarily due to calcium entry through voltage-gated calcium channels.

    PubMed

    Oda, Yoshiaki; Kodama, Satoshi; Tsuchiya, Sadahiro; Inoue, Masashi; Miyakawa, Hiroyoshi

    2014-05-01

    We reported previously that plateau potentials mediated by extrasynaptic N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) can be induced either by synaptic stimulation in the presence of glutamate transporter antagonist or by iontophoresis of NMDA in rat hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons. To examine whether the plateau potentials are accompanied by an elevation of intracellular Ca2+ and to determine the source of Ca2+ elevation, we performed Ca2+ imaging during the plateau potential. Neurons were loaded with Ca2+ indicator fluo-4, and the plateau potentials were generated either synaptically in the presence of glutamate transporter antagonist or by iontophoretically applying NMDA. We have found that a transient elevation in intracellular Ca2+ accompanies the plateau potential. The synaptically induced plateau potential and the Ca2+ elevation were blocked by 5,7-dichlorokynurenic acid (5,7-dCK), an antagonist for the glycine-binding sites of NMDAR. A mixture of Cd2+ and tetrodotoxin did not block NMDA-induced plateau potentials, but completely abolished the accompanying Ca2+ elevation in both the presence and absence of Mg2+ ions in the bathing solution. The NMDA-induced plateau potential was blocked by further adding 5,7-dCK. Our results show that the NMDAR-mediated plateau potential is accompanied by elevation of intracellular Ca2+ that is primarily caused by the influx of Ca2+ through voltage-gated Ca2+ channels. © 2014 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Aeromechanical stability augmentation using semi-active friction-based lead-lag damper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwal, Sandeep

    2005-11-01

    Lead-lag dampers are present in most rotors to provide the required level of damping in all flight conditions. These dampers are a critical component of the rotor system, but they also represent a major source of maintenance cost. In present rotor systems, both hydraulic and elastomeric lead-lag dampers have been used. Hydraulic dampers are complex mechanical components that require hydraulic fluids and have high associated maintenance costs. Elastomeric dampers are conceptually simpler and provide a "dry" rotor, but are rather costly. Furthermore, their damping characteristics can degrade with time without showing external signs of failure. Hence, the dampers must be replaced on a regular basis. A semi-active friction based lead-lag damper is proposed as a replacement for hydraulic and elastomeric dampers. Damping is provided by optimized energy dissipation due to frictional forces in semi-active joints. An actuator in the joint modulates the normal force that controls energy dissipation at the frictional interfaces, resulting in large hysteretic loops. Various selective damping strategies are developed and tested for a simple system containing two different frequency modes in its response, one of which needs to be damped out. The system reflects the situation encountered in rotor response where 1P excitation is present along with the potentially unstable regressive lag motion. Simulation of the system response is obtained to compare their effectiveness. Next, a control law governing the actuation in the lag damper is designed to generate the desired level of damping for performing adaptive selective damping of individual blade lag motion. Further, conceptual design of a piezoelectric friction based lag damper for a full-scale rotor is presented and various factors affecting size, design and maintenance cost, damping capacity, and power requirements of the damper are discussed. The selective semi-active damping strategy is then studied in the context of classical

  16. PKCepsilon activation augments cardiac mitochondrial respiratory post-anoxic reserve--a putative mechanism in PKCepsilon cardioprotection.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Joy; McLeod, Christopher J; Minners, Jan; Essop, M Faadiel; Ping, Peipei; Sack, Michael N

    2005-04-01

    Modest cardiac-overexpression of constitutively active PKCepsilon (aPKCepsilon) in transgenic mice evokes cardioprotection against ischemia. As aPKCepsilon interacts with mitochondrial respiratory-chain proteins we hypothesized that aPKCepsilon modulates respiration to induce cardioprotection. Using isolated cardiac mitochondria wild-type and aPKCepsilon mice display similar basal mitochondrial respiration, rate of ATP synthesis and adenosine nucleotide translocase (ANT) functional content. Conversely, the aPKCepsilon mitochondria exhibit modest hyperpolarization of their inner mitochondrial membrane potential (DeltaPsi(m)) compared to wild-type mitochondrial by flow cytometry. To assess whether this hyperpolarization engenders resilience to simulated ischemia, anoxia-reoxygenation experiments were performed. Mitochondria were exposed to 45 min anoxia followed by reoxygenation. At reoxygenation, aPKCepsilon mitochondria recovered ADP-dependent respiration to 44 +/- 3% of baseline compared to 28 +/- 2% in WT controls (P = 0.03) in parallel with enhanced ATP synthesis. This preservation in oxidative phosphorylation is coupled to greater ANT functional content [42% > concentration of atractyloside for inhibition in the aPKCepsilon mitochondria vs. WT control (P < 0.0001)], retention of mitochondrial cytochrome c and conservation of DeltaPsi(m). These data demonstrate that mitochondria from PKCepsilon activated mice are intrinsically resilient to anoxia-reoxygenation compared to WT controls. This resilience is in part due to enhanced recovery of oxidative phosphorylation coupled to maintained ANT activity. As maintenance of ATP is a prerequisite for cellular viability we conclude that PKCepsilon activation augmented mitochondrial respiratory capacity in response to anoxia-reoxygenation may contribute to the PKCepsilon cardioprotective program.

  17. Targeting autophagy augments the activity of DHA-E3 to overcome p-gp mediated multi-drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Xi, Guangmin; Wang, Ming; Sun, Bing; Shaikh, Abdul Sami; Liu, Yongqing; Wang, Wei; Lou, Hongxiang; Yuan, Huiqing

    2016-12-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is a major obstacle for successful chemotherapy treatment. Searching for effective MDR modulators and combining them with anticancer drug therapies has been a promising strategy against clinical MDR. In our previous study, we have found that DHA-E3, a synthetic derivative of DHA, has the ability to modulate the function of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and reverse MDR in cancer cells. In this study, we further evaluated the reversal effect of DHA-E3 on MDR and explored its mechanism of action in vitro. Our findings showed that DHA-E3 significantly potentiated the cytotoxicity of vincristine(VCR) and adriamycin(ADR) in the P-gp over-expressing KB/VCR and A02 cells. The mechanistic study found that DHA-E3 increased the intracellular accumulation of ADR and rhodamine-123 by directly inhibiting the drug-transport activity of P-gp. In the present study, we found that DHA-E3 not only reversed MDR, but also induced autophagy in MDR cancer cells. To determine whether DHA-E3-induced autophagy is an adaptive survival response or contributes to cell death, we manipulated autophagic activity using autophagy inhibitor 3-MA or siRNA targeting Beclin1. We found that the reversal activity of DHA-E3 was significantly exacerbated in the presence of 3-MA or blocking the expression of Beclin1. These results suggest that DHA-E3 is capable of reversing MDR, induction of autophagy represents a defense mechanism and inhibiting this process may be an effective strategy to augment the reversal activity of reversal agents. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Testing the Push-Pull Hypothesis: Lewis Acid Augmented N2 Activation at Iron.

    PubMed

    Geri, Jacob B; Shanahan, James P; Szymczak, Nathaniel K

    2017-04-26

    We present a systematic investigation of the structural and electronic changes that occur in an Fe(0)-N2 unit (Fe(depe)2(N2); depe = 1,2-bis(diethylphosphino)ethane) upon the addition of exogenous Lewis acids. Addition of neutral boranes, alkali metal cations, and an Fe(2+) complex increases the N-N bond activation (Δ νNN up to 172 cm(-1)), decreases the Fe(0)-N2 redox potential, polarizes the N-N bond, and enables -N protonation at uncommonly anodic potentials. These effects were rationalized using combined experimental and theoretical studies.

  19. Augmenting Trastuzumab Therapy against Breast Cancer through Selective Activation of NK Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-12-01

    via their Fc receptor (FcγRIII, CD16 ) to the IgG1 Fc, heavy-chain, portion of trastuzumab(3). This leads to the activation of the NK cells, release...was associated with a concurrent decrease in the expression of the FcγRIII ( CD16 )(Figure 1C). Despite a similar decrease in NK cell expression of... CD16 following culture with trastuzumab- bound HER2-expressing tumor cells (Supplementary Figure 2A), NK cells from healthy donors with high affinity

  20. The effects of GABAA and NMDA receptors in the shell-accumbens on spatial memory of METH-treated rats.

    PubMed

    Heysieattalab, Soomaayeh; Naghdi, Nasser; Zarrindast, Mohammad-Reza; Haghparast, Abbas; Mehr, Shahram Ejtemaei; Khoshbouei, Habibeh

    2016-03-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) is a highly addictive and neurotoxic psychostimulant. Its use in humans is often associated with neurocognitive impairment and deficits in hippocampal plasticity. Striatal dopamine system is one of the main targets of METH. The dopamine neurons in the striatum directly or indirectly regulate the GABA and glutamatergic signaling in this region and thus their outputs. This is consistent with previous reports showing modification of neuronal activity in the striatum modulates the expression of hippocampal LTP and hippocampal-dependent memory tasks such as Morris water maze (MWM). Therefore, reversing or preventing METH-induced synaptic modifications via pharmacological manipulations of the shell-nucleus accumbens (shell-NAc) may introduce a viable therapeutic target to attenuate the METH-induced memory deficits. This study is designed to investigate the role of intra-shell NAc manipulation of GABAA and NMDA receptors and their interaction with METH on memory performance in MWM task. Pharmacological manipulations were performed in rats received METH or saline. We found systemic saline plus intra-shell NAc infusions of muscimol dose-dependently impaired performance, while bicuculline had no effect. Surprisingly, the intra-NAc infusions of 0.005μg/rat muscimol that has no effect on memory performance (ineffective dose) prevented METH-induced memory impairment. In the contrary, the intra-NAc infusions of bicuculline (0.2μg/rat) increased METH-induced memory impairment. However, pre-training intra-NAc infusions of D-AP5 dose-dependently impaired performance, while NMDA had no effect in rats received systemic saline (control group). The intra-NAc infusions with an ineffective dose of NMDA (0.1μg/rat) increased METH-induced memory impairment. Furthermore, intra-NAc infusions of D-AP5 with an ineffective dose (0.1μg/rat) prevented METH-induced memory impairment. Our result is consistent with the interpretation that METH-mediated learning deficit

  1. Mitochondrial Ca(2+) Uniporter Is a Mitochondrial Luminal Redox Sensor that Augments MCU Channel Activity.

    PubMed

    Dong, Zhiwei; Shanmughapriya, Santhanam; Tomar, Dhanendra; Siddiqui, Naveed; Lynch, Solomon; Nemani, Neeharika; Breves, Sarah L; Zhang, Xueqian; Tripathi, Aparna; Palaniappan, Palaniappan; Riitano, Massimo F; Worth, Alison M; Seelam, Ajay; Carvalho, Edmund; Subbiah, Ramasamy; Jaña, Fabián; Soboloff, Jonathan; Peng, Yizhi; Cheung, Joseph Y; Joseph, Suresh K; Caplan, Jeffrey; Rajan, Sudarsan; Stathopulos, Peter B; Madesh, Muniswamy

    2017-03-16

    Ca(2+) dynamics and oxidative signaling are fundamental mechanisms for mitochondrial bioenergetics and cell function. The MCU complex is the major pathway by which these signals are integrated in mitochondria. Whether and how these coactive elements interact with MCU have not been established. As an approach toward understanding the regulation of MCU channel by oxidative milieu, we adapted inflammatory and hypoxia models. We identified the conserved cysteine 97 (Cys-97) to be the only reactive thiol in human MCU that undergoes S-glutathionylation. Furthermore, biochemical, structural, and superresolution imaging analysis revealed that MCU oxidation promotes MCU higher order oligomer formation. Both oxidation and mutation of MCU Cys-97 exhibited persistent MCU channel activity with higher [Ca(2+)]m uptake rate, elevated mROS, and enhanced [Ca(2+)]m overload-induced cell death. In contrast, these effects were largely independent of MCU interaction with its regulators. These findings reveal a distinct functional role for Cys-97 in ROS sensing and regulation of MCU activity.

  2. Parkinson's disease-associated mutations in leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 augment kinase activity

    PubMed Central

    West, Andrew B.; Moore, Darren J.; Biskup, Saskia; Bugayenko, Artem; Smith, Wanli W.; Ross, Christopher A.; Dawson, Valina L.; Dawson, Ted M.

    2005-01-01

    Mutations in the leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 gene (LRRK2) cause late-onset Parkinson's disease (PD) with a clinical appearance indistinguishable from idiopathic PD. Initial studies suggest that LRRK2 mutations are the most common yet identified determinant of PD susceptibility, transmitted in an autosomal-dominant mode of inheritance. Herein, we characterize the LRRK2 gene and transcript in human brain and subclone the predominant ORF. Exogenously expressed LRRK2 protein migrates at ≈280 kDa and is present largely in the cytoplasm but also associates with the mitochondrial outer membrane. Familial-linked mutations G2019S or R1441C do not have an obvious effect on protein steady-state levels, turnover, or localization. However, in vitro kinase assays using full-length recombinant LRRK2 reveal an increase in activity caused by familial-linked mutations in both autophosphorylation and the phosphorylation of a generic substrate. These results suggest a gain-of-function mechanism for LRRK2-linked disease with a central role for kinase activity in the development of PD. PMID:16269541

  3. Aeromechanical stability augmentation of helicopters using enhanced active constrained layer damping treatment on rotor flex beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badre Alam, Askari

    This thesis presents a study conducted to explore the feasibility of employing Enhanced Active Constrained Layer (EACL) damping treatment in helicopter rotor systems to alleviate aeromechanical instability. The central idea is to apply the EACL treatment on the flexbeams of soft in-plane bearingless main rotors (BMRs) and increase the damping of the first lag mode. In this research, it is explored whether EACL damping treatment can provide sufficient damping in rotor system without exceeding the physical design limits of actuators. To study the feasibility of the EACL damping treatment, a finite element based mathematical model of a rotor with EACL damping treatment on flexbeam is developed. A bench top experiment is conducted to verify the mathematical model. It is shown that the experimental results correlate well with the analytical results. A derivative controller, with control voltage based on the flexbeam tip transverse velocity, is used in this investigation. A filter is developed to remove 1/rev component of the feedback signal. An optimization study is conducted to understand the influence of EACL design parameters on the performance of the damping treatment. A study is conducted to analyze delamination of EACL damping treatment. In this study, a new finite element model is developed that is capable of accurately predicting both, the performance and interlaminar stresses in EACL damping treatment. A new configuration of PCL damping treatment is developed by tapering the constraining layer at the free ends. As compared to a conventional PCL, this configuration has significantly lower interlaminar stresses and similar damping performance. A study is conducted to compare ACL with purely active configuration. It was shown that in ACL configuration, the interlaminar stresses are an-order-of-magnitude lower than the purely active configuration for similar damping levels. A new ACL configuration is designed by changing the poling direction of the PZT constraining

  4. NMDA Receptors Containing the GluN2D Subunit Control Neuronal Function in the Subthalamic Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Swanger, Sharon A.; Vance, Katie M.; Pare, Jean-François; Sotty, Florence; Fog, Karina; Smith, Yoland

    2015-01-01

    The GluN2D subunit of the NMDA receptor is prominently expressed in the basal ganglia and associated brainstem nuclei, including the subthalamic nucleus (STN), globus pallidus, striatum, and substantia nigra. However, little is known about how GluN2D-containing NMDA receptors contribute to synaptic activity in these regions. Using Western blotting of STN tissue punches, we demonstrated that GluN2D is expressed in the rat STN throughout development [age postnatal day 7 (P7)–P60] and in the adult (age P120). Immunoelectron microscopy of the adult rat brain showed that GluN2D is predominantly expressed in dendrites, unmyelinated axons, and axon terminals within the STN. Using subunit-selective allosteric modulators of NMDA receptors (TCN-201, ifenprodil, CIQ, and DQP-1105), we provide evidence that receptors containing the GluN2B and GluN2D subunits mediate responses to exogenously applied NMDA and glycine, as well as synaptic NMDA receptor activation in the STN of rat brain slices. EPSCs in the STN were mediated primarily by AMPA and NMDA receptors and GluN2D-containing NMDA receptors controlled the slow deactivation time course of EPSCs in the STN. In vivo recordings from the STN of anesthetized adult rats demonstrated that the spike firing rate was increased by the GluN2C/D potentiator CIQ and decreased by the GluN2C/D antagonist DQP-1105, suggesting that NMDA receptor activity can influence STN output. These data indicate that the GluN2B and GluN2D NMDA receptor subunits contribute to synaptic activity in the STN and may represent potential therapeutic targets for modulating subthalamic neuron activity in neurological disorders such as Parkinson's disease. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The subthalamic nucleus (STN) is a key component of the basal ganglia, a group of subcortical nuclei that control movement and are dysregulated in movement disorders such as Parkinson's disease. Subthalamic neurons receive direct excitatory input, but the pharmacology of excitatory

  5. Augmented TLR9-induced Btk activation in PIR-B–deficient B-1 cells provokes excessive autoantibody production and autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Kubo, Tomohiro; Uchida, Yuki; Watanabe, Yuko; Abe, Masahiro; Nakamura, Akira; Ono, Masao; Akira, Shizuo

    2009-01-01

    Pathogens are sensed by Toll-like receptors (TLRs) expressed in leukocytes in the innate immune system. However, excess stimulation of TLR pathways is supposed to be connected with provocation of autoimmunity. We show that paired immunoglobulin (Ig)-like receptor B (PIR-B), an immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motif–harboring receptor for major histocompatibility class I molecules, on relatively primitive B cells, B-1 cells, suppresses TLR9 signaling via Bruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk) dephosphorylation, which leads to attenuated activation of nuclear factor κB p65RelA but not p38 or Erk, and blocks the production of natural IgM antibodies, including anti-IgG Fc autoantibodies, particularly rheumatoid factor. The autoantibody production in PIR-B–deficient (Pirb−/−) mice was further augmented in combination with the Faslpr mutation, which might be linked to the development of autoimmune glomerulonephritis. These results show the critical link between TLR9-mediated sensing and a simultaneously evoked, PIR-B–mediated inhibitory circuit with a Btk intersection in B-1 cells, and suggest a novel way toward preventing pathogenic natural autoantibody production. PMID:19687229

  6. Whole abdominal wall segmentation using augmented active shape models (AASM) with multi-atlas label fusion and level set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhoubing; Baucom, Rebeccah B.; Abramson, Richard G.; Poulose, Benjamin K.; Landman, Bennett A.

    2016-03-01

    The abdominal wall is an important structure differentiating subcutaneous and visceral compartments and intimately involved with maintaining abdominal structure. Segmentation of the whole abdominal wall on routinely acquired computed tomography (CT) scans remains challenging due to variations and complexities of the wall and surrounding tissues. In this study, we propose a slice-wise augmented active shape model (AASM) approach to robustly segment both the outer and inner surfaces of the abdominal wall. Multi-atlas label fusion (MALF) and level set (LS) techniques are integrated into the traditional ASM framework. The AASM approach globally optimizes the landmark updates in the presence of complicated underlying local anatomical contexts. The proposed approach was validated on 184 axial slices of 20 CT scans. The Hausdorff distance against the manual segmentation was significantly reduced using proposed approach compared to that using ASM, MALF, and LS individually. Our segmentation of the whole abdominal wall enables the subcutaneous and visceral fat measurement, with high correlation to the measurement derived from manual segmentation. This study presents the first generic algorithm that combines ASM, MALF, and LS, and demonstrates practical application for automatically capturing visceral and subcutaneous fat volumes.

  7. Whole Abdominal Wall Segmentation using Augmented Active Shape Models (AASM) with Multi-Atlas Label Fusion and Level Set

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zhoubing; Baucom, Rebeccah B.; Abramson, Richard G.; Poulose, Benjamin K.; Landman, Bennett A.

    2016-01-01

    The abdominal wall is an important structure differentiating subcutaneous and visceral compartments and intimately involved with maintaining abdominal structure. Segmentation of the whole abdominal wall on routinely acquired computed tomography (CT) scans remains challenging due to variations and complexities of the wall and surrounding tissues. In this study, we propose a slice-wise augmented active shape model (AASM) approach to robustly segment both the outer and inner surfaces of the abdominal wall. Multi-atlas label fusion (MALF) and level set (LS) techniques are integrated into the traditional ASM framework. The AASM approach globally optimizes the landmark updates in the presence of complicated underlying local anatomical contexts. The proposed approach was validated on 184 axial slices of 20 CT scans. The Hausdorff distance against the manual segmentation was significantly reduced using proposed approach compared to that using ASM, MALF, and LS individually. Our segmentation of the whole abdominal wall enables the subcutaneous and visceral fat measurement, with high correlation to the measurement derived from manual segmentation. This study presents the first generic algorithm that combines ASM, MALF, and LS, and demonstrates practical application for automatically capturing visceral and subcutaneous fat volumes. PMID:27127333

  8. Endothelial IL-33 Expression Is Augmented by Adenoviral Activation of the DNA Damage Machinery.

    PubMed

    Stav-Noraas, Tor Espen; Edelmann, Reidunn J; Poulsen, Lars La Cour; Sundnes, Olav; Phung, Danh; Küchler, Axel M; Müller, Fredrik; Kamen, Amine A; Haraldsen, Guttorm; Kaarbø, Mari; Hol, Johanna

    2017-04-15

    IL-33, required for viral clearance by cytotoxic T cells, is generally expressed in vascular endothelial cells in healthy human tissues. We discovered that endothelial IL-33 expression was stimulated as a response to adenoviral transduction. This response was dependent on MRE11, a sensor of DNA damage that can also be activated by adenoviral DNA, and on IRF1, a transcriptional regulator of cellular responses to viral invasion and DNA damage. Accordingly, we observed that endothelial cells responded to adenoviral DNA by phosphorylation of ATM and CHK2 and that depletion or inhibition of MRE11, but not depletion of ATM, abrogated IL-33 stimulation. In conclusion, we show that adenoviral transduction stimulates IL-33 expression in endothelial cells in a manner that is dependent on the DNA-binding protein MRE11 and the antiviral factor IRF1 but not on downstream DNA damage response signaling. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  9. Aspirin prevention of NMDA-induced neuronal death by direct protein kinase Czeta inhibition.

    PubMed

    Crisanti, P; Leon, A; Lim, D M; Omri, B

    2005-06-01

    Abstract Aspirin has been shown to protect against glutamate neurotoxicity via the nuclear factor kappaB pathway. Some studies have implicated the atypical protein kinase C (PKC) zeta (zeta) isoform in cell protection, but the mechanism involved remains unclear. We show here that aspirin exerts at least some of its effects through PKCzeta, decreasing the NMDA-induced activation, cleavage and nuclear translocation of this molecule. Aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid) directly inhibited the protein kinase activity of PKCzeta, whereas salicylic acid did not. This direct effect of aspirin on purified human PKCzeta is consistent with PKCzeta inhibition preventing the NMDA-induced death of cortical neurones. Caspase-3 inhibition blocked the cleavage and nuclear translocation of PKCzeta, whereas caspase-1-inhibition did not. Thus, PKCzeta (protein kinase Mzeta) regulates nuclear events essential for the initiation of the apoptotic pathway. Aspirin protects cells against NMDA-induced apoptosis by means of a novel mechanism targeting PKCzeta, a key molecule in inflammatory responses and neurodegeneration.

  10. Presynaptic c-Jun N-terminal Kinase 2 regulates NMDA receptor-dependent glutamate release

    PubMed Central

    Nisticò, Robert; Florenzano, Fulvio; Mango, Dalila; Ferraina, Caterina; Grilli, Massimo; Di Prisco, Silvia; Nobili, Annalisa; Saccucci, Stefania; D'Amelio, Marcello; Morbin, Michela; Marchi, Mario; Mercuri, Nicola B.; Davis, Roger J.; Pittaluga, Anna; Feligioni, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling pathway is a critical step for neuronal death occurring in several neurological conditions. JNKs can be activated via receptor tyrosine kinases, cytokine receptors, G-protein coupled receptors and ligand-gated ion channels, including the NMDA glutamate receptors. While JNK has been generally associated with postsynaptic NMDA receptors, its presynaptic role remains largely unexplored. Here, by means of biochemical, morphological and functional approaches, we demonstrate that JNK and its scaffold protein JIP1 are also expressed at the presynaptic level and that the NMDA-evoked glutamate release is controlled by presynaptic JNK-JIP1 interaction. Moreover, using knockout mice for single JNK isoforms, we proved that JNK2 is the essential isoform in mediating this presynaptic event. Overall the present findings unveil a novel JNK2 localization and function, which is likely to play a role in different physiological and pathological conditions. PMID:25762148

  11. Unique palindromic sequences in synthetic oligonucleotides are required to induce IFN [correction of INF] and augment IFN-mediated [correction of INF] natural killer activity.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, S; Yamamoto, T; Kataoka, T; Kuramoto, E; Yano, O; Tokunaga, T

    1992-06-15

    Thirty-mer single-stranded oligonucleotides, with a sequence chosen from the known cDNA encoding the 64-kDa protein named Ag A or the MPB-70 protein of Mycobacterium bovis BCG and the human cellular proteins such as complement component 1 inhibitor and Ig rearranged lambda-chain, were used to dissect the capability to induce IFN and to augment NK cell activity of mouse spleen cells by coincubation in vitro. Three with the hexamer palindromic sequence as GACGTC were active, whereas two kinds of oligonucleotides with no palindrome were inactive. The oligonucleotides containing at least one of the different palindromic sequences showed no activity. When a portion of the sequence of the inactive oligonucleotides was substituted with either palindromic sequence of GACGTC, AGCGCT, or AACGTT, the oligonucleotide acquired the ability to augment NK activity. In contrast, the oligonucleotides substituted with another palindromic sequence such as ACCGGT was without effect. Furthermore, exchange of two neighboring mononucleotides within, but not outside, the active palindromic sequence destroyed the ability of the oligonucleotides to augment NK cell activity. Stimulation of spleen cells with the substituted oligonucleotide, A4a-AAC, induced production of significant amounts of IFN-alpha/beta and small amounts of IFN-gamma. Augmentation of NK activity of the cells by the oligonucleotide was ascribed to IFN-alpha/beta production. These results strongly suggest that the presence of the unique palindromic sequences, such as GACGTC, AGCGCT, and AACGTT, but not ACCGGT, is essential for the immunostimulatory activity of oligonucleotides.

  12. Physical activity prevents augmented body fat accretion in moderately iron-deficient rats.

    PubMed

    McClung, James P; Andersen, Nancy E; Tarr, Tyson N; Stahl, Chad H; Young, Andrew J

    2008-07-01

    Recent studies describe an association between poor iron status and obesity in humans, although the mechanism explaining this relationship is unclear. The present study aimed to determine the effect of moderate iron deficiency and physical activity (PA) on body composition in an animal model. Male Sprague-Dawley rats consumed iron-adequate (IA; 40 mg/kg) or moderately iron-deficient (ID; 9 mg/kg) diets ad libitum for 12 wk. Rats were assigned to 4 treatment groups (n = 10 per group): IA, sedentary (IAS); IA, PA (IAPA); ID, sedentary (IDS); or ID, PA (IDPA). Activity involved running on motorized running wheels at 4 m/min for 1 h/d for 5 d/wk. After 12 wk, ID rats were not anemic, but body iron stores were reduced as indicated by diminished (P < 0.05) femur iron compared with IA rats. Treatment group did not affect body weight or feed consumption. However, fat mass was greater (P < 0.05) in IDS rats (38.6 +/- 6.7%) than IAS (31.8 +/- 2.9%), IAPA (31.8 +/- 2.0%), and IDPA (32.8 +/- 4.5%) rats. Furthermore, lean body mass was diminished in IDS rats (58.7 +/- 6.8%) compared with IAS (65.6 +/- 3.0%), IAPA (65.6 +/- 2.1%), and IDPA (64.7 +/- 4.5%) rats. Thus, moderate iron deficiency may cause increased body fat accretion in rats and PA attenuates that effect.

  13. Metformin augments doxorubicin cytotoxicity in mammary carcinoma through activation of adenosine monophosphate protein kinase pathway.

    PubMed

    El-Ashmawy, Nahla E; Khedr, Naglaa F; El-Bahrawy, Hoda A; Abo Mansour, Hend E

    2017-05-01

    Since the incidence of breast cancer increases dramatically all over the world, the search for effective treatment is an urgent need. Metformin has demonstrated anti-tumorigenic effect both in vivo and in vitro in different cancer types. This work was designed to examine on molecular level the mode of action of metformin in mice bearing solid Ehrlich carcinoma and to evaluate the use of metformin in conjunction with doxorubicin as a combined therapy against solid Ehrlich carcinoma. Ehrlich ascites carcinoma cells were inoculated in 60 female mice as a model of breast cancer. The mice were divided into four equal groups: Control tumor, metformin, doxorubicin, and co-treatment. Metformin (15 mg/kg) and doxorubicin (4 mg/kg) were given intraperitoneally (i.p.) for four cycles every 5 days starting on day 12 of inoculation. The anti-tumorigenic effect of metformin was mediated by enhancement of adenosine monophosphate protein kinase activity and elevation of P53 protein as well as the suppression of nuclear factor-kappa B, DNA contents, and cyclin D1 gene expression. Metformin and doxorubicin mono-treatments exhibited opposing action regarding cyclin D1 gene expression, phosphorylated adenosine monophosphate protein kinase, and nuclear factor-kappa B levels. Co-treatment markedly decreased tumor volume, increased survival rate, and improved other parameters compared to doxorubicin group. In parallel, the histopathological findings demonstrated enhanced apoptosis and absence of necrosis in tumor tissue of co-treatment group. Metformin proved chemotherapeutic effect which could be mediated by the activation of adenosine monophosphate protein kinase and related pathways. Combining metformin and doxorubicin, which exhibited different mechanisms of action, produced greater efficacy as anticancer therapeutic regimen.

  14. Augmentation of 5-lipoxygenase activity and expression during dengue serotype-2 infection

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Leukotriene B4, a 5-lipoxygenase product of arachidonic acid with potent chemotactic effects on neutrophils, has not been assessed in dengue patients. In this study, plasma leukotriene B4 and serum high-sensitivity C-reactive protein levels were determined in adult patients during the febrile, convalescent and defervescent stages of dengue serotype-2 (DENV-2) infection, and compared with those of age--matched healthy and non-dengue febrile subjects. In vitro studies were performed to examine the effects of live and heat-inactivated DENV-2 on the activities and expression of 5-lipoxygenase in human neutrophils. Results Plasma leukotriene B4 was elevated during the febrile stages of dengue infection compared to levels during convalescence and in study controls. Plasma leukotriene B4 also correlated with serum high-sensitivity C-reactive protein in dengue patients (febrile, r = 0.91, p < 0.001; defervescence, r = 0.87, p < 0.001; convalescence, r = 0.87, p < 0.001). Exposure of human neutrophils to DENV-2 resulted in a significant rise in leukotriene B4; the extent of increase, however, did not differ between exposure to live and heat-inactivated DENV-2. Pre-incubation of either live or heat-inactivated DENV-2 resulted in reduced leukotriene B4 release by neutrophils, indicating that contact with dengue antigens (and not replication) triggers the neutrophil response. Production of leukotriene B4 was associated with an increase in 5-lipoxygenase expression in human neutrophils; addition of MK886 (a 5-lipoxygenase activating protein inhibitor) attenuated further increase in leukotriene B4 production. Conclusion These findings provide important clinical and mechanistic data on the involvement of 5-lipoxygenase and its metabolites in dengue infection. Further studies are needed to elucidate the therapeutic implications of these findings. PMID:24168271

  15. Cigarette smoking augments sympathetic nerve activity in patients with coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Shinozaki, Norihiko; Yuasa, Toyoshi; Takata, Shigeo

    2008-05-01

    It has been shown that cigarette smoking increases blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR), and decreases muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) in healthy young smokers. The decrease in MSNA might be secondary to baroreflex responses to the pressor effect. We tested the hypothesis that cigarette smoking increases MSNA in smokers with impaired baroreflex function. The effects of cigarette smoking on BP, HR, forearm blood flow (FBF), forearm vascular resistance (FVR), and MSNA were examined in 14 patients with stable effort angina (59+/-3 years, group CAD) and 10 healthy smokers (23+/-1 years, group C). In group CAD, the arterial baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) was significantly lower than in group C (4.7+/-0.8 versus 15.1+/-2.2 msec/mmHg, P<0.01). In both groups, cigarette smoking increased the plasma concentration of nicotine, systolic and diastolic BP, HR, and FVR significantly (P<0.01), but decreased FBF significantly (P<0.01). After smoking, MSNA was decreased significantly in group C (from 35.2+/-3.5 to 23.5+/-3.2 bursts/100 beats, P<0.01), but increased significantly in group CAD (from 48.8+/-5.4 to 57.3+/-5.5 bursts/100 beats, P<0.01). There was significant correlation between BRS and changes in MSNA (r= -0.62, P<0.01). Cigarette smoking increased MSNA in smokers with impaired baroreflex function. This demonstrates that cigarette smoking stimulates sympathetic nerve activity by both a direct peripheral effect and a centrally mediated effect.

  16. [CCL21-CD40L fusion gene induce augmented antitumor activity in colon cancer].

    PubMed

    Gong, Ting; Zhou, Hong-Li; Ba, Yi

    2013-09-01

    To investigate the anti-tumor activity of CCL21-exCD40L eukaryotic expression vector. CCL21-exCD40L fusion gene were constructed by overlap PCR connecting CCL21 and exCD40L through a flexible linker (Gly3Ser)4, and then was cloned into expression vector pcDNA3.1(+). pcDNA3.1(+)/CCL21 and pcDNA3.1(+)/exCD were constructed as negative control. Wsestern blot was used to identify the fusion protein. CHO cells was transfected with pcDNA3.1(+)/CCL21-exCD, pcDNA3.1(+)/CCL21 and pcDNA3.1(+), respectively. The chemotatic function of the expressed product was detected by Transwell method and its anti-tumor activity was tested with vivo transfection. Gene sequencing and restrictive digestion proved the successful construction of pcDNA3.1(+)/CCL21-exCD40L,and its expression was conformed by western blot. The transfectant supernantes of pcDNA3.1(+)/CCL21-exCD40 group had a significant chmotactic function to DCs, of which the cell numbers passing through the film was 14.95 times of blank control every high power microscope visual field. After tumor orthotoic injection of plasmid carrying fusion gene in Balb/c mouse, the tumor mass reduced remarkablely, and all the mouse in fusion gene group survived after 4 weeks. CCL21-exCD40L fusion protein had a remarkable function to DCs and it can inhibit tumor growth and prolong the mouse survival time, which is more effective than all control group.

  17. Adaptation to short photoperiods augments circadian food anticipatory activity in Siberian hamsters.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Sean P; Prendergast, Brian J

    2014-06-01

    This article is part of a Special Issue "Energy Balance". Both the light-dark cycle and the timing of food intake can entrain circadian rhythms. Entrainment to food is mediated by a food entrainable circadian oscillator (FEO) that is formally and mechanistically separable from the hypothalamic light-entrainable oscillator. This experiment examined whether seasonal changes in day length affect the function of the FEO in male Siberian hamsters (Phodopus sungorus). Hamsters housed in long (LD; 15 h light/day) or short (SD; 9h light/day) photoperiods were subjected to a timed-feeding schedule for 10 days, during which food was available only during a 5h interval of the light phase. Running wheel activity occurring within a 3h window immediately prior to actual or anticipated food delivery was operationally-defined as food anticipatory activity (FAA). After the timed-feeding interval, hamsters were fed ad libitum, and FAA was assessed 2 and 7 days later via probe trials of total food deprivation. During timed-feeding, all hamsters exhibited increases FAA, but FAA emerged more rapidly in SD; in probe trials, FAA was greater in magnitude and persistence in SD. Gonadectomy in LD did not induce the SD-like FAA phenotype, indicating that withdrawal of gonadal hormones is not sufficient to mediate the effects of photoperiod on FAA. Entrainment of the circadian system to light markedly affects the functional output of the FEO via gonadal hormone-independent mechanisms. Rapid emergence and persistent expression of FAA in SD may reflect a seasonal adaptation that directs behavior toward sources of nutrition with high temporal precision at times of year when food is scarce. © 2013.

  18. Adaptation to short photoperiods augments circadian food anticipatory activity in Siberian hamsters

    PubMed Central

    Bradley, Sean P.; Prendergast, Brian J.

    2014-01-01

    Both the light-dark cycle and the timing of food intake can entrain circadian rhythms. Entrainment to food is mediated by a food entrainable circadian oscillator (FEO) that is formally and mechanistically separable from the hypothalamic light-entrainable oscillator. This experiment examined whether seasonal changes in day length affect the function of the FEO in male Siberian hamsters (Phodopus sungorus). Hamsters housed in long (LD; 15 h light/day) or short (SD; 9 h light/day) photoperiods were subjected to a timed-feeding schedule for 10 days, during which food was available only during a 5 h interval of the light phase. Running wheel activity occurring within a 3 h window immediately prior to actual or anticipated food delivery was operationally-defined as food anticipatory activity (FAA). After the timed-feeding interval, hamsters were fed ad libitum, and FAA was assessed 2 and 7 days later via probe trials of total food deprivation. During timed-feeding, all hamsters exhibited increases FAA, but FAA emerged more rapidly in SD; in probe trials, FAA was greater in magnitude and persistence in SD. Gonadectomy in LD did not induce the SD-like FAA phenotype, indicating that withdrawal of gonadal hormones is not sufficient to mediate the effects of photoperiod on FAA. Entrainment of the circadian system to light markedly affects the functional output of the FEO via gonadal hormone-independent mechanisms. Rapid emergence and persistent expression of FAA in SD may reflect a seasonal adaptation that directs behavior toward sources of nutrition with high temporal precision at times of year when food is scarce. PMID:24666779

  19. Triheteromeric NMDA Receptors at Hippocampal Synapses

    PubMed Central

    Tovar, Kenneth R.; McGinley, Matthew J.; Westbrook, Gary L.

    2013-01-01

    NMDA receptors are composed of two GluN1 (N1) and two GluN2 (N2) subunits. Constituent N2 subunits control the pharmacological and kinetic characteristics of the receptor. NMDA receptors in hippocampal or cortical neurons are often thought of as diheteromeric, i.e., containing only one type of N2 subunit. However, triheteromeric receptors with more than one type of N2 subunit also have been reported and the relative contribution of di- and triheteromeric NMDA receptors at synapses has been difficult to assess. Because wild-type hippocampal principal neurons express N1, N2A and N2B, we used cultured hippocampal principal neurons from N2A and N2B-knockout mice as templates for diheteromeric synaptic receptors. Summation of N1/N2B and N1/N2A excitatory postsynaptic currents could not account for the deactivation kinetics of wild-type excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) however. To make a quantitative estimate of NMDA receptor subtypes at wild-type synapses, we used the deactivation kinetics, as well as the effects of the competitive antagonist NVP-AAM077. Our results indicate that three types of NMDA receptors contribute to the wild-type EPSC, with at least two-thirds being triheteromeric receptors. Functional isolation of synaptic triheteromeric receptors revealed deactivation kinetics and pharmacology distinct from either diheteromeric receptor subtype. Because of differences in open probability, synaptic triheteromeric receptors outnumbered N1/N2A receptors by 5.8 to 1 and N1/N2B receptors by 3.2 to 1. Our results suggest that triheteromeric NMDA receptors must be either preferentially assembled or preferentially localized at synapses. PMID:23699525

  20. Interleukin-27 and interleukin-12 augment activation of distinct cord blood natural killer cells responses via STAT3 pathways.

    PubMed

    Chen, Juei-Chang; Huang, Ai-Ju; Chen, Shih-Chang; Wu, Jia-Long; Wu, Wen-Mein; Chiang, Han-Sun; Chan, Chia-Hao; Lin, Chih-Ming; Huang, Yu-Tzu

    2012-05-01

    Umbilical cord blood is rich in primitive natural killer (NK) cells, which are activated by interleukin (IL)-12. It was previously reported that a novel IL-12 family cytokine, IL-27 comprised of EBI3 and p28, was elevated in maternal serum during normal pregnancy. Thus, we compared the immune regulatory functions of IL-27 and IL-12 on mononuclear cells derived from cord blood and adult peripheral blood. After stimulation with IL-27, IL-12, and IL-27 combined with IL-12, the cytotoxicity against BJAB lymphoma cells by blood mononuclear cells was performed. Then immunofluorescence staining, reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting were used to detect the effects of IL-27 and IL-12 in isolated NK cells. IL-27, IL-12, and IL-27 combined with IL-12 enhanced the cytotoxicity of adult peripheral blood cells and cord blood cells, but the proliferation of distinct subpopulations of cells was not evident. Similar results were also obtained with purified cord blood NK cells. Interestingly, distinct from IL-12, IL-27 could induce aggregation and morphological changes of umbilical cord blood cells. Finally, IL-27 combined with IL-12 could stimulate increased IL-27 receptor (gp130 and WSX-1) transcripts in purified cord blood NK cells. However, the activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) in NK cells was only detected in the presence of IL-27, but not IL-12 alone. From previous results, we summarize our current understanding of the augmentation of distinct regulation of NK cells by IL-27 and IL-12. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Augmentation by interleukin-18 of MHC-nonrestricted killer activity of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells in response to interleukin-12.

    PubMed

    Singh, S M; Yanagawa, H; Hanibuchi, M; Miki, T; Okamura, H; Sone, S

    2000-01-01

    Interleukin (IL)-18 is a novel cytokine with pleiotropic functions. In the present study, we examined the induction of the killer activity of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (MNC) against lung cancer cell lines upon treatment with IL-18 in combination with IL-12. Cytotoxic activity was measured by standard (51)Cr release assay. IL-18 (100 ng/ml) was found to significantly augment IL-12-induced killer activity in a MHC-nonrestricted manner against allogeneic NK-resistant Daudi cells and lung cancer cell lines: SBC-3, RERF-LC-AI and A549. IL-18 could augment IL-12-induced killer activity both at the optimal as well as suboptimal doses of the latter. However, IL-18 was found to have little effect on the killer activity of MNC induced by optimal or suboptimal dose of IL-2 or IL-15. Treatment of MNC with IL-18 in combination with IL-12 for a period of more than 4 days was observed to optimally induce the killer activity. As for induction of IFN-gamma production by MNC, IL-18 augmented that induced by IL-2 and IL-15, as well as that induced by IL-12. These results show the potential of IL-18 in combination with IL-12 for clinical application in treatment of cancer.

  2. Aloe-emodin suppressed NMDA-induced apoptosis of retinal ganglion cells through regulation of ERK phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hui-Ju; Chao, Pei-Dawn Lee; Huang, Shiuan-Yi; Wan, Lai; Wu, Chen-Ju; Tsai, Fuu-Jen

    2007-11-01

    A high concentration of glutamate in the vitreous body and optic nerves of the eyes activates N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors and is toxic to retina ganglion cells (RGCs) in glaucomatous patients. Aloe-emodin sulfates/glucuronides (s/g), the major metabolites of aloe-emodin, was found to be effective in decreasing NMDA-induced apoptosis in RGCs. In order to elucidate the mechanisms, an in vitro optic neuropathy model adding NMDA to N18 RGCs was used in this study. The phosphorylation level of extra-cellular signal-regulated kinase1/2 (ERK1/2), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 kinase (cytokines-suppressive antiinflammatory drug binding protein kinase) were measured by western blotting and luciferase reporter assay. The results showed that aloe-emodin metabolites significantly decreased the activation of three major mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase pathways and the activation of downstream genes in nucleus induced by NMDA, which were verified by the addition of the respective inhibitors. Comparing the effect of the inhibitors of the three MAP kinase pathways, the ERK pathway was found to be the major route of aloe-emodin metabolites in decreasing the apoptosis of NMDA-treated RGCs. Besides, cfos rather then cjun was the target downstream gene. Aloe-emodin emodin metabolites could regulate the phosphorylation of ERK kinases and it was a promising candidate for NMDA-induced apoptosis of RGCs.

  3. Adoptively transferred TRAIL+ T cells suppress GVHD and augment antitumor activity

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Arnab; Dogan, Yildirim; Moroz, Maxim; Holland, Amanda M.; Yim, Nury L.; Rao, Uttam K.; Young, Lauren F.; Tannenbaum, Daniel; Masih, Durva; Velardi, Enrico; Tsai, Jennifer J.; Jenq, Robert R.; Penack, Olaf; Hanash, Alan M.; Smith, Odette M.; Piersanti, Kelly; Lezcano, Cecilia; Murphy, George F.; Liu, Chen; Palomba, M. Lia; Sauer, Martin G.; Sadelain, Michel; Ponomarev, Vladimir; van den Brink, Marcel R.M.

    2013-01-01

    Current strategies to suppress graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) also compromise graft-versus-tumor (GVT) responses. Furthermore, most experimental strategies to separate GVHD and GVT responses merely spare GVT function without actually enhancing it. We have previously shown that endogenously expressed TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) is required for optimal GVT activity against certain malignancies in recipients of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT). In order to model a donor-derived cellular therapy, we genetically engineered T cells to overexpress TRAIL and adoptively transferred donor-type unsorted TRAIL+ T cells into mouse models of allo-HSCT. We found that murine TRAIL+ T cells induced apoptosis of alloreactive T cells, thereby reducing GVHD in a DR5-dependent manner. Furthermore, murine TRAIL+ T cells mediated enhanced in vitro and in vivo antilymphoma GVT response. Moreover, human TRAIL+ T cells mediated enhanced in vitro cytotoxicity against both human leukemia cell lines and against freshly isolated chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) cells. Finally, as a model of off-the-shelf, donor-unrestricted antitumor cellular therapy, in vitro–generated TRAIL+ precursor T cells from third-party donors also mediated enhanced GVT response in the absence of GVHD. These data indicate that TRAIL-overexpressing donor T cells could potentially enhance the curative potential of allo-HSCT by increasing GVT response and suppressing GVHD. PMID:23676461

  4. Development and flight evaluation of an augmented stability active controls concept: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guinn, W. A.

    1982-01-01

    A pitch active control system (PACS) was developed and flight tested on a wide body jet transport (L-1011) with a flying horizontal stabilizer. Two dual channel digital computers and the associated software provide command signals to a dual channel series servo which controls the stabilizer power actuators. Input sensor signals to the computer are pitch rate, column trim position, and dynamic pressure. Control laws are given for the PACS and the system architecture is defined. Discussions are given regarding piloted flight simulation and vehicle system simulation and vehicle system simulation tests that are performed to verify control laws and system operation prior to installation on the aircraft. Modifications to the basic aircraft included installation of the PACS, addition of a c.g. management system to provide a c.g. range from 25 to 39% mac, and downrigging of the geared elevator to provide the required nose down control authority for aft c.g. flight test conditions. Three pilots used the Cooper-Harper Rating Scale to judge flying qualities of the aircraft with PACS on and off. The handling qualities with the c.g. at 39% mac (41% stability margin) and PACS operating were judged to be as good as the handling qualities with the c.g. at 25% mac (+15% stability margin) and PACS off.

  5. Development and flight evaluation of an augmented stability active controls concept with a small horizontal tail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rising, J. J.; Kairys, A. A.; Maass, C. A.; Siegart, C. D.; Rakness, W. L.; Mijares, R. D.; King, R. W.; Peterson, R. S.; Hurley, S. R.; Wickson, D.

    1982-01-01

    A limited authority pitch active control system (PACS) was developed for a wide body jet transport (L-1011) with a flying horizontal stabilizer. Two dual channel digital computers and the associated software provide command signals to a dual channel series servo which controls the stabilizer power actuators. Input sensor signals to the computer are pitch rate, column-trim position, and dynamic pressure. Control laws are given for the PACS and the system architecture is defined. The piloted flight simulation and vehicle system simulation tests performed to verify control laws and system operation prior to installation on the aircraft are discussed. Modifications to the basic aircraft are described. Flying qualities of the aircraft with the PACS on and off were evaluated. Handling qualities for cruise and high speed flight conditions with the c.g. at 39% mac ( + 1% stability margin) and PACS operating were judged to be as good as the handling qualities with the c.g. at 25% (+15% stability margin) and PACS off.

  6. The NMDA receptor functions independently and as an LRP1 co-receptor to promote Schwann cell survival and migration

    PubMed Central

    Mantuano, Elisabetta; Lam, Michael S.; Shibayama, Masataka; Campana, W. Marie; Gonias, Steven L.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT NMDA receptors (NMDA-Rs) are ionotropic glutamate receptors, which associate with LDL-receptor-related protein-1 (LRP1) to trigger cell signaling in response to protein ligands in neurons. Here, we demonstrate for the first time that the NMDA-R is expressed by rat Schwann cells and functions independently and with LRP1 to regulate Schwann cell physiology. The NR1 (encoded by GRIN1) and NR2b (encoded by GRIN2B) NMDA-R subunits were expressed by cultured Schwann cells and upregulated in sciatic nerves following crush injury. The ability of LRP1 ligands to activate ERK1/2 (also known as MAPK3 and MAPK1, respectively) and promote Schwann cell migration required the NMDA-R. NR1 gene silencing compromised Schwann cell survival. Injection of the LRP1 ligands tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA, also known as PLAT) or MMP9-PEX into crush-injured sciatic nerves activated ERK1/2 in Schwann cells in vivo, and the response was blocked by systemic treatment with the NMDA-R inhibitor MK801. tPA was unique among the LRP1 ligands examined because tPA activated cell signaling and promoted Schwann cell migration by interacting with the NMDA-R independently of LRP1, albeit with delayed kinetics. These results define the NMDA-R as a Schwann cell signaling receptor for protein ligands and a major regulator of Schwann cell physiology, which may be particularly important in peripheral nervous system (PNS) injury. PMID:26272917

  7. Inflammation and activity augment brain-derived neurotrophic factor peripheral release.

    PubMed

    Qiao, L Y; Shen, S; Liu, M; Xia, C; Kay, J C; Zhang, Q L

    2016-03-24

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) release to nerve terminals in the central nervous system is crucial in synaptic transmission and neuronal plasticity. However, BDNF release peripherally from primary afferent neurons has not been investigated. In the present study, we show that BDNF is synthesized by primary afferent neurons located in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) in rat, and releases to spinal nerve terminals in response to depolarization or visceral inflammation. In two-compartmented culture that separates DRG neuronal cell bodies and spinal nerve terminals, application of 50mM K(+) to either the nerve terminal or the cell body evokes BDNF release to the terminal compartment. Inflammatory stimulation of the visceral organ (e.g. the urinary bladder) also facilitates an increase in spontaneous BDNF release from the primary afferent neurons to the axonal terminals. In the inflamed viscera, we show that BDNF immunoreactivity is increased in nerve fibers that are immuno-positive to the neuronal marker PGP9.5. Both BDNF and pro-BDNF levels are increased, however, pro-BDNF immunoreactivity is not expressed in PGP9.5-positive nerve-fiber-like structures. Determination of receptor profiles in the inflamed bladder demonstrates that BDNF high affinity receptor TrkB and general receptor p75 expression levels are elevated, with an increased level of TrkB tyrosine phosphorylation/activity. These results suggest a possibility of pro-proliferative effect in the inflamed bladder. Consistently we show that the proliferation marker Ki67 expression levels are enhanced in the inflamed organ. Our results imply that in vivo BDNF release to the peripheral organ is an important event in neurogenic inflammatory state.

  8. Sympathetic neural activation in nondiabetic metabolic syndrome and its further augmentation by hypertension.

    PubMed

    Huggett, Robert J; Burns, Joanna; Mackintosh, Alan F; Mary, David A S G

    2004-12-01

    Hypertension is a major cardiovascular risk factor in the metabolic syndrome (MS) in which the presence of insulin resistance, glucose intolerance, abnormal lipoprotein metabolism, and central obesity all confer an increased risk. Because essential hypertension (EHT), insulinemia, and visceral fat are associated with sympathetic hyperactivity, which is itself known to increase cardiovascular risk, the aim of this study was to see if MS is a state of sympathetic nerve hyperactivity and if the additional presence of EHT intensifies this hyperactivity. In 69 closely matched subjects, comprising hypertensive MS (MS+EHT, 18), normotensive MS (MS-EHT, 17), hypertensives without MS (EHT, 16), and normotensive controls without MS (NC, 18), we measured resting muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) as assessed from multiunit discharges and from single units with defined vasoconstrictor properties (s-MSNA). The s-MSNA in MS+EHT (76+/-3.1 impulses/100 beats) was greater (at least P<0.01) than in MS-EHT (62+/-3.2 impulses/100 beats) and in EHT (60+/-2.3 impulses/100 beats), and all these were significantly greater (at least P<0.01) than in NC (46+/-2.7 impulse/100 beats). The multi-unit MSNA followed a similar trend. These findings suggest that MS is a state of sympathetic nerve hyperactivity and that the additional presence of hypertension further intensifies this hyperactivity. The degree of sympathetic hyperactivity seen in this study could be argued at least partly to contribute to the higher cardiovascular risk and metabolic abnormalities seen in MS+EHT patients.

  9. TRPV4 channels augment macrophage activation and ventilator-induced lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Hamanaka, Kazutoshi; Jian, Ming-Yuan; Townsley, Mary I.; King, Judy A.; Liedtke, Wolfgang; Weber, David S.; Eyal, Fabien G.; Clapp, Mary M.

    2010-01-01

    We have previously implicated transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4) channels and alveolar macrophages in initiating the permeability increase in response to high peak inflation pressure (PIP) ventilation. Alveolar macrophages were harvested from TRPV4−/− and TRPV4+/+ mice and instilled in the lungs of mice of the opposite genotype. Filtration coefficients (Kf) measured in isolated perfused lungs after ventilation with successive 30-min periods of 9, 25, and 35 cmH2O PIP did not significantly increase in lungs from TRPV4−/− mice but increased >2.2-fold in TRPV4+/+ lungs, TRPV4+/+ lungs instilled with TRPV4−/− macrophages, and TRPV4−/− lungs instilled with TRPV4+/+ macrophages after ventilation with 35 cmH2O PIP. Activation of TRPV4 with 4-α-phorbol didecanoate (4αPDD) significantly increased intracellular calcium, superoxide, and nitric oxide production in TRPV4+/+ macrophages but not TRPV4−/− macrophages. Cross-sectional areas increased nearly 3-fold in TRPV4+/+ macrophages compared with TRPV4−/− macrophages after 4αPDD. Immunohistochemistry staining of lung tissue for nitrotyrosine revealed increased amounts in high PIP ventilated TRPV4+/+ lungs compared with low PIP ventilated TRPV4+/+ or high PIP ventilated TRPV4−/− lungs. Thus TRPV4+/+ macrophages restored susceptibility of TRPV4−/− lungs to mechanical injury. A TRPV4 agonist increased intracellular calcium and reactive oxygen and nitrogen species in harvested TRPV4+/+ macrophages but not TRPV4−/− macrophages. Kf increases correlated with tissue nitrotyrosine, a marker of peroxynitrite production. PMID:20562229

  10. Vitamin C-enriched gelatin supplementation before intermittent activity augments collagen synthesis.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Gregory; Lee-Barthel, Ann; Ross, Megan Lr; Wang, Bing; Baar, Keith

    2017-01-01

    Musculoskeletal injuries are the most common complaint in active populations. More than 50% of all injuries in sports can be classified as sprains, strains, ruptures, or breaks of musculoskeletal tissues. Nutritional and/or exercise interventions that increase collagen synthesis and strengthen these tissues could have an important effect on injury rates. This study was designed to determine whether gelatin supplementation could increase collagen synthesis. Eight healthy male subjects completed a randomized, double-blinded, crossover-design study in which they consumed either 5 or 15 g of vitamin C-enriched gelatin or a placebo control. After the initial drink, blood was taken every 30 min to determine amino acid content in the blood. A larger blood sample was taken before and 1 h after consumption of gelatin for treatment of engineered ligaments. One hour after the initial supplement, the subjects completed 6 min of rope-skipping to stimulate collagen synthesis. This pattern of supplementation was repeated 3 times/d with ≥6 h between exercise bouts for 3 d. Blood was drawn before and 4, 24, 48, and 72 h after the first exercise bout for determination of amino-terminal propeptide of collagen I content. Supplementation with increasing amounts of gelatin increased circulating glycine, proline, hydroxyproline, and hydroxylysine, peaking 1 h after the supplement was given. Engineered ligaments treated for 6 d with serum from samples collected before or 1 h after subjects consumed a placebo or 5 or 15 g gelatin showed increased collagen content and improved mechanics. Subjects who took 15 g gelatin 1 h before exercise showed double the amino-terminal propeptide of collagen I in their blood, indicating increased collagen synthesis. These data suggest that adding gelatin to an intermittent exercise program improves collagen synthesis and could play a beneficial role in injury prevention and tissue repair. This trial was registered at the Australian New Zealand Clinical

  11. Scaffolding protein Homer1a protects against NMDA-induced neuronal injury

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Y; Rao, W; Zhang, C; Zhang, C; Liu, M-d; Han, F; Yao, L-b; Han, H; Luo, P; Su, N; Fei, Z

    2015-01-01

    Excessive N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) activation and the resulting activation of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) cause neuronal injury. Homer1b/c facilitates NMDAR-PSD95-nNOS complex interactions, and Homer1a is a negative competitor of Homer1b/c. We report that Homer1a was both upregulated by and protected against NMDA-induced neuronal injury in vitro and in vivo. The neuroprotective activity of Homer1a was associated with NMDA-induced Ca2+ influx, oxidative stress and the resultant downstream signaling activation. Additionally, we found that Homer1a functionally regulated NMDAR channel properties in neurons, but did not regulate recombinant NR1/NR2B receptors in HEK293 cells. Furthermore, we found that Homer1a detached the physical links among NR2B, PSD95 and nNOS and reduced the membrane distribution of NMDAR. NMDA-induced neuronal injury was more severe in Homer1a homozygous knockout mice (KO, Homer1a−/−) when compared with NMDA-induced neuronal injury in wild-type mice (WT, Homer1a+/+). Additionally, Homer1a overexpression in the cortex of Homer1a−/− mice alleviated NMDA-induced neuronal injury. These findings suggest that Homer1a may be a key neuroprotective endogenous molecule that protects against NMDA-induced neuronal injury by disassembling NR2B-PSD95-nNOS complexes and reducing the membrane distribution of NMDARs. PMID:26247728

  12. Depressive behavior in the forced swim test can be induced by TRPV1 receptor activity and is dependent on NMDA receptors.

    PubMed

    Abdelhamid, Ramy E; Kovács, Katalin J; Nunez, Myra G; Larson, Alice A

    2014-01-01

    Blocking, desensitizing, or knocking out transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) receptors decreases immobility in the forced swim test, a measure of depressive behavior. We questioned whether enhancing TRPV1 activity promotes immobility in a fashion that is prevented by antidepressants. To test this we activated heat-sensitive TRPV1 receptors in mice by water that is warmer than body temperature (41 °C) or a low dose of resiniferatoxin (RTX). Water at 41 °C elicited less immobility than cooler water (26 °C), indicating that thermoregulatory sites do not contribute to immobility. Although a desensitizing regimen of RTX (3-5 injections of 0.1 mg/kg s.c.) decreased immobility during swims at 26 °C, it did not during swims at 41 °C. In contrast, low dose of RTX (0.02 mg/kg s.c.) enhanced immobility, but only during swims at 41 °C. Thus, activation of TRPV1 receptors, endogenously or exogenously, enhances immobility and these sites are activated by cold rather than warmth. Two distinct types of antidepressants, amitriptyline (10mg/kg i.p.) and ketamine (50 mg/kg i.p.), each inhibited the increase in immobility induced by the low dose of RTX, verifying its mediation by TRPV1 sites. When desensitization was limited to central populations using intrathecal injections of RTX (0.25 μg/kg i.t.), immobility was attenuated at both temperatures and the increase in immobility produced by the low dose of RTX was inhibited. This demonstrates a role for central TRPV1 receptors in depressive behavior, activated by conditions (cold stress) distinct from those that activate TRPV1 receptors along thermosensory afferents (heat).

  13. Altered Excitatory-Inhibitory Balance in the NMDA-Hypofunction Model of Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Kehrer, Colin; Maziashvili, Nino; Dugladze, Tamar; Gloveli, Tengis

    2008-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a common psychiatric disorder of high incidence, affecting approximately 1% of the world population. The essential neurotransmitter pathology of schizophrenia remains poorly defined, despite huge advances over the past half-century in identifying neurochemical and pathological abnormalities in the disease. The dopamine/serotonin hypothesis has originally provided much of the momentum for neurochemical research in schizophrenia. In recent years, the attention has, however, shifted to the glutamate system, the major excitatory neurotransmitter in the CNS and towards a concept of functional imbalance between excitatory and inhibitory transmission at the network level in various brain regions in schizophrenia. The evidence indicating a central role for the NMDA-receptor subtype in the aetiology of schizophrenia has led to the NMDA-hypofunction model of this disease and the use of phencyclidines as a means to induce the NMDA-hypofunction state in animal models. The purpose of this review is to discuss recent findings highlighting the importance of the NMDA-hypofunction model of schizophrenia, both from a clinical perspective, as well as in opening a line of research, which enables electrophysiological studies at the cellular and network level in vitro. In particular, changes in excitation–inhibition (E/I) balance in the NMDA-hypofunction model of the disease and the resulting changes in network behaviours, particularly in gamma frequency oscillatory activity, will be discussed. PMID:18946539

  14. Blockade of NMDA receptors prevents analgesic tolerance to repeated transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) in rats

    PubMed Central

    Hingne, Priyanka M.; Sluka, Kathleen A.

    2008-01-01

    Repeated daily application transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) results in tolerance, at spinal opioid receptors, to the anti-hyperalgesia produced by TENS. Since N-Methyl-D-Aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonists prevent analgesic tolerance to opioid agonists we hypothesized that blockade of NMDA receptors will prevent tolerance to TENS. In rats with knee joint inflammation, TENS was applied for 20 minute daily at high frequency (100 Hz), low frequency (4 Hz), or sham TENS. Rats were treated with the NMDA antagonist MK-801 (0.01 mg/kg-0.1 mg/kg) or vehicle daily before TENS. Paw withdrawal thresholds were tested before and after inflammation, and before and after TENS treatment for 4 days. On day 1 TENS reversed the decreased mechanical withdrawal threshold induced by joint inflammation. On day 4 TENS had no effect on the decreased withdrawal threshold in the group treated with vehicle demonstrating development of tolerance. However, in the group treated with 0.1 mg/kg MK-801, TENS significantly reversed the mechanical withdrawal thresholds on day 4 demonstrating that tolerance did not develop. Vehicle treated animals developed cross-tolerance at spinal opioid receptors. Treatment with MK-801 reversed this cross-tolerance at spinal opioid receptors. In summary, blockade of NMDA receptors prevents analgesic tolerance to daily TENS by preventing tolerance at spinal opioid receptors. Perspective Tolerance observed to the clinical treatment of TENS could be prevented by administration of pharmaceutical agents with NMDA receptors activity such as ketamine or dextromethorphan. PMID:18061543

  15. Effects of Anti-NMDA Antibodies on Functional Recovery and Synaptic Rearrangement Following Hemicerebellectomy.

    PubMed

    Laricchiuta, Daniela; Cavallucci, Virve; Cutuli, Debora; De Bartolo, Paola; Caporali, Paola; Foti, Francesca; Finke, Carsten; D'Amelio, Marcello; Manto, Mario; Petrosini, Laura

    2016-06-01

    The compensation that follows cerebellar lesions is based on synaptic modifications in many cortical and subcortical regions, although its cellular mechanisms are still unclear. Changes in glutamatergic receptor expression may represent the synaptic basis of the compensated state. We analyzed in rats the involvement of glutamatergic system of the cerebello-frontal network in the compensation following a right hemicerebellectomy. We evaluated motor performances, spatial competencies and molecular correlates in compensated hemicerebellectomized rats which in the frontal cortex contralateral to the hemicerebellectomy side received injections of anti-NMDA antibodies from patients affected by anti-NMDA encephalitis. In the compensated hemicerebellectomized rats, the frontal injections of anti-NMDA antibodies elicited a marked decompensation state characterized by slight worsening of the motor symptoms as well as severe impairment of spatial mnesic and procedural performances. Conversely, in the sham-operated group the frontal injections of anti-NMDA antibodies elicited slight motor and spatial impairment. The molecular analyses indicated that cerebellar compensatory processes were related to a relevant rearrangement of glutamatergic synapses (NMDA and AMPA receptors and other glutamatergic components) along the entire cortico-cerebellar network. The long-term maintenance of the rearranged glutamatergic activity plays a crucial role in the maintenance of recovered function.

  16. Forgetting of long-term memory requires activation of NMDA receptors, L-type voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels, and calcineurin

    PubMed Central

    Sachser, Ricardo Marcelo; Santana, Fabiana; Crestani, Ana Paula; Lunardi, Paula; Pedraza, Lizeth Katherine; Quillfeldt, Jorge Alberto; Hardt, Oliver; de Oliveira Alvares, Lucas

    2016-01-01

    In the past decades, the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying memory consolidation, reconsolidation, and extinction have been well characterized. However, the neurobiological underpinnings of forgetting processes remain to be elucidated. Here we used behavioral, pharmacological and electrophysiological approaches to explore mechanisms controlling forgetting. We found that post-acquisition chronic inhibition of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR), L-type voltage-dependent Ca2+ channel (LVDCC), and protein phosphatase calcineurin (CaN), maintains long-term object location memory that otherwise would have been forgotten. We further show that NMDAR activation is necessary to induce forgetting of object recognition memory. Studying the role of NMDAR activation in the decay of the early phase of long-term potentiation (E-LTP) in the hippocampus, we found that ifenprodil infused 30 min after LTP induction in vivo blocks the decay of CA1-evoked postsynaptic plasticity, suggesting that GluN2B-containing NMDARs activation are critical to promote LTP decay. Taken together, these findings indicate that a well-regulated forgetting process, initiated by Ca2+ influx through LVDCCs and GluN2B-NMDARs followed by CaN activation, controls the maintenance of hippocampal LTP and long-term memories over time. PMID:26947131

  17. Appetitive Cue-Evoked ERK Signaling in the Nucleus Accumbens Requires NMDA and D1 Dopamine Receptor Activation and Regulates CREB Phosphorylation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirschmann, Erin K. Z.; Mauna, Jocelyn C.; Willis, Cory M.; Foster, Rebecca L.; Chipman, Amanda M.; Thiels, Edda

    2014-01-01

    Conditioned stimuli (CS) can modulate reward-seeking behavior. This modulatory effect can be maladaptive and has been implicated in excessive reward seeking and relapse to drug addiction. We previously demonstrated that exposure to an appetitive CS causes an increase in the activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and cyclic-AMP…

  18. Forgetting of long-term memory requires activation of NMDA receptors, L-type voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels, and calcineurin.

    PubMed

    Sachser, Ricardo Marcelo; Santana, Fabiana; Crestani, Ana Paula; Lunardi, Paula; Pedraza, Lizeth Katherine; Quillfeldt, Jorge Alberto; Hardt, Oliver; Alvares, Lucas de Oliveira

    2016-03-07

    In the past decades, the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying memory consolidation, reconsolidation, and extinction have been well characterized. However, the neurobiological underpinnings of forgetting processes remain to be elucidated. Here we used behavioral, pharmacological and electrophysiological approaches to explore mechanisms controlling forgetting. We found that post-acquisition chronic inhibition of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR), L-type voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channel (LVDCC), and protein phosphatase calcineurin (CaN), maintains long-term object location memory that otherwise would have been forgotten. We further show that NMDAR activation is necessary to induce forgetting of object recognition memory. Studying the role of NMDAR activation in the decay of the early phase of long-term potentiation (E-LTP) in the hippocampus, we found that ifenprodil infused 30 min after LTP induction in vivo blocks the decay of CA1-evoked postsynaptic plasticity, suggesting that GluN2B-containing NMDARs activation are critical to promote LTP decay. Taken together, these findings indicate that a well-regulated forgetting process, initiated by Ca(2+) influx through LVDCCs and GluN2B-NMDARs followed by CaN activation, controls the maintenance of hippocampal LTP and long-term memories over time.

  19. Appetitive Cue-Evoked ERK Signaling in the Nucleus Accumbens Requires NMDA and D1 Dopamine Receptor Activation and Regulates CREB Phosphorylation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirschmann, Erin K. Z.; Mauna, Jocelyn C.; Willis, Cory M.; Foster, Rebecca L.; Chipman, Amanda M.; Thiels, Edda

    2014-01-01

    Conditioned stimuli (CS) can modulate reward-seeking behavior. This modulatory effect can be maladaptive and has been implicated in excessive reward seeking and relapse to drug addiction. We previously demonstrated that exposure to an appetitive CS causes an increase in the activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and cyclic-AMP…

  20. The NMDA receptor ‘glycine modulatory site’ in schizophrenia: d-serine, glycine, and beyond

    PubMed Central

    Balu, Darrick T; Coyle, Joseph T

    2016-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a severe psychiatric illness that is characterized by reduced cortical connectivity, for which the underlying biological and genetic causes are not well understood. Although the currently approved antipsychotic drug treatments, which primarily modulate dopaminergic function, are effective at reducing positive symptoms (i.e. delusions and hallucinations), they do little to improve the disabling cognitive and negative (i.e. anhedonia) symptoms of patients with schizophrenia. This review details the recent genetic and neurobiological findings that link N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) hypofunction to the etiology of schizophrenia. It also highlights potential treatment strategies that augment NMDA receptor function to treat the synaptic deficits and cognitive impairments. PMID:25540902

  1. Synaptic excitation of individual rat cerebellar granule cells in situ: evidence for the role of NMDA receptors.

    PubMed Central

    D'Angelo, E; De Filippi, G; Rossi, P; Taglietti, V

    1995-01-01

    1. Current-clamp recordings were made in whole-cell patch-clamp configuration from ninety-one granule cells in parasagittal cerebellar slices obtained from 21- to 31-day-old rats. Recordings were performed at 30 degrees C. 2. Resting membrane potential was -58 +/- 6 mV (n = 43). The membrane voltage response to step current injection showed inward rectification consistent with increasing input resistance during membrane depolarization. Over -35 +/- 7 mV (n = 14) repetitive firing with little or no adaptation was activated. Spike frequency increased nearly linearly with injected current. 3. Unitary EPSPs obtained by stimulating the mossy fibre bundle had an amplitude of 11.4 +/- 2.1 mV (n = 22, holding potential = -75 mV). Synchronous activation of greater than one to two mossy fibres was needed to elicit action potentials. Antidromic stimulation elicited antidromic spikes and also EPSPs, presumably through a mossy fibre 'axon reflex'. 4. EPSPs were brought about by NMDA and non-NMDA receptor activation, accounting for about 70 and 30%, respectively, of peak amplitude at the holding potential of -70 mV. The EPSP decay conformed to passive membrane discharge after blocking the NMDA receptors. 5. No appreciable correlation was found between the time-to-peak and decay time constant of the EPSPs, consistent with the compact electrotonic structure of these neurons. 6. During membrane depolarization EPSP amplitude increased transiently, due to both a voltage-dependent increase of the NMDA component and inward rectification. In addition, EPSPs slowed down due to a slowdown of the NMDA component. 7. Temporal summation during high-frequency stimulation was sustained by NMDA receptors, whose contribution to depolarization tended to prevail over that of non-NMDA receptors during the trains. A block of the NMDA receptors resulted in reduced depolarization and output spike frequency. 8. This study, as well as extending previous knowledge to the intracellular level in vivo

  2. Pharmacological characterization of metabotropic glutamate receptors potentiating NMDA responses in mouse cortical wedge preparations.

    PubMed Central

    Mannaioni, G.; Carlà, V.; Moroni, F.

    1996-01-01

    1. Mouse cortical wedge preparations were used in order to study the effects of metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR) agonists and antagonists on the depolarization induced by N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) or by (S)-alpha-amino-4-bromo-3-hydroxy-5-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA). 2. (1S,3R)-1-aminocyclopentane-1,3-dicarboxylic acid (1S,3R-ACPD) (30-300 microM) significantly potentiated the depolarizations induced by NMDA, leaving unchanged those mediated by AMPA. This potentiation developed slowly and lasted for up to 60 min provided that the slices were continuously perfused with the mGluR agonist. 3. Concentration-response curves to NMDA in the absence and in the presence of 1S,3R-ACPD (100 microM) indicated that the potentiation was due to increased affinity of the NMDA receptor complex for its agonist. The maximal responses to NMDA were not potentiated. 4. Selective agonists of group 1 mGluR such as quisqualate (Quis) (30 microM) or (RS)-3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine (DHPG) (300 microM) did not potentiate NMDA responses. Similarly, selective agonists of group 2 mGluRs, such as (2S,3S,4S)-alpha-carboxycyclopropyl-glycine (L-CCG-I) (3-30 microM), and of group 3, such as L-2-amino-4-phosphonobutyric acid (L-AP4) (100 microM) were inactive in our test. A number of other putative mGluR agents having partial agonist activity on mGluRs in brain slices and in expression systems, such as 1R,3S-ACPD (500 microM), DL-2-amino-3-phosphonopropionic acid (DL-AP3) (300 microM) and (S)-4-carboxy-3-hydroxyphenylglycine (S-4C3HPG; 500 microM), when placed in the experimental protocol we used, did not change NMDA responses. 5. Available mGluR antagonists, such as DL-AP3 (1 mM), (+)-alpha-methyl-4-carboxyphenylglycine (MCPG) (500 microM), S-4-carboxyphenylglycine (4CPG; 500 microM) and S-4-carboxy-3-hydroxyphenylglycine (S-4C3HPG; 500 microM), did not reduce 1S,3R-ACPD potentiation of NMDA responses. 6. It is concluded that the potentiation of NMDA currents induced by the mGluR agonist

  3. B7-H3 Augments Inflammatory Responses and Exacerbates Brain Damage via Amplifying NF-κB p65 and MAPK p38 Activation during Experimental Pneumococcal Meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xuqin; Li, Yan; Blankson, Siobhan; Liu, Min; Huang, Danping; Redmond, H. Paul; Huang, Jing; Wang, Jiang Huai; Wang, Jian

    2017-01-01

    The costimulatory protein B7-H3 has been shown to play a contributory role in the development and progression of experimental pneumococcal meningitis by augmentation of the innate immunity-associated inflammatory response via a TLR2-dependent manner. This study aimed to clarify the component(s) of TLR2-mediated signal transduction pathways responsible for B7-H3-augmented inflammatory response and subsequent brain damage during experimental pneumococcal meningitis. Administration of B7-H3 did not augment expression of TLR2 and other TLR2 upstream components, but led to an enhanced formation of MyD88-IRAK immunocomplex in the brain of S. pneumoniae-infected mice. Furthermore, B7-H3 substantially augmented S. pneumoniae-induced activation of TLR2 downstream NF-κB p65 and MAPK p38 pathways in the brain of S. pneumoniae-infected mice. Notably, blockage of NF-κB p65 and/or MAPK p38 with their specific inhibitors strongly attenuated B7-H3-amplified inflammatory response with significantly reduced proinflammatory cytokine and chemokine production, and markedly ameliorated B7-H3-exacerbated disruption of blood-brain barrier and severity of disease status in S. pneumoniae-infected mice. These results indicate that targeting NF-κB p65 and/or MAPK p38 may represent a promising therapeutic option for amelioration of overwhelming inflammatory response-associated brain injury frequently observed during pneumococcal meningitis. PMID:28141831

  4. The opioid peptide dynorphin directly blocks NMDA receptor channels in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, L; Gu, Y; Huang, L Y

    1995-01-01

    1. The actions of dynorphin on N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) responses were examined in acutely dissociated trigeminal neurons in rat. Whole-cell and single-channel currents were recorded using the patch clamp technique. 2. Dynorphins reduced NMDA-activated currents (INMDA). The IC50 was 0.25 microM for dynorphin (1-32), 1.65 microM for dynorphin (1-17) and 1.8 microM for dynorphin (1-13). 3. The blocking action of dynorphin is voltage independent. 4. The inhibitory action of dynorphin cannot be blocked by high concentration of the non-selective opioid receptor antagonist naloxone, nor by the specific kappa-opioid receptor antagonist nor-Binaltorphimine (nor-BNI). 5. Single-channel analyses indicate that dynorphin reduces the fraction of time the channel is open without altering the channel conductance. 6. We propose that dynorphin acts directly on NMDA receptors. PMID:7537820

  5. Mechanisms for Antagonistic Regulation of AMPA and NMDA-D1 Receptor Complexes at Postsynaptic Sites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schumann, Johann; Scheler, Gabriele

    2004-01-01

    From the analysis of these pathways we conclude that postsynaptic processes that regulate synaptic transmission undergo significant cross-talk with respect to glutamatergic and neuromodulatory (dopamine) signals. The main hypothesis is that of a compensatory regulation, a competitive switch between the induction of increased AMPA conductance by CaMKII-dependent phosphorylation and reduced expression of PP2A, and increased D1 receptor sensitivity and expression by increased PKA, PP2A and decreased PP-1/calcineurin expression. Both types of plasticity are induced by NMDA receptor activation and increased internal calcium, they require different internal conditions to become expressed. Specifically we propose that AMPA regulation and D1 regulation are inversely coupled;The net result may be a bifurcation of synaptic state into predominantly AMPA or NMDA-D1 synapses. This could have functional consequences: stable connections for AMPA and conditional gating for NMDA-D1 synapses.

  6. Reconsolidation of Reminder-Induced Amnesia: Role of NMDA and AMPA Glutamate Receptors.

    PubMed

    Nikitin, V P; Kozyrev, S A; Solntseva, S V

    2015-11-01

    We studied the role of glutamate receptors and reminder in the mechanisms of amnesia maintenance caused by disruption of conditioned food aversion reconsolidation with an antagonist of NMDA glutamate receptor in snails. At the early stage of amnesia (day 3 after induction), injection or NMDA of AMPA glutamate receptor antagonists prior to reminder (presentation of the conditioned food stimulus) led to memory recovery. Reminder alone or injection of antagonists without reminder or after reminder was ineffective. At the late stage of amnesia (day 10), antagonists/reminder had no effect on amnesia maintenance. It was hypothesized that reminder at the early stage of amnesia led to reactivation and reconsolidation of the molecular processes of amnesia including activation NMDA and AMPA glutamate receptors. Injection of antagonists of these receptors prior to reminder led to disruption of reactivation/reconsolidation of amnesia and recovery of the conditioned food aversion memory.

  7. Fast cortical oscillation after thalamic degeneration: pivotal role of NMDA receptor.

    PubMed

    Kyuhou, Shin-ichi; Gemba, Hisae

    2007-04-27

    We examined electrophysiological and molecular changes of the thalamocortical system after thalamic degeneration in Purkinje cell degeneration (pcd) mice. In pcd mice, neurons in specific thalamic nuclei including the ventral medial geniculate nucleus began to degenerate around postnatal day 50, whereas the visual thalamic nucleus and nonspecific thalamic nuclei remained almost intact. In association with the morphological changes, auditory evoked potentials in the primary auditory cortex (AC) began to decrease gradually. Fast Fourier transform analysis of spontaneous cortical field potentials revealed that fast oscillation (FO) around 25 Hz occurred in the AC but not in the visual cortex. Quantitative mRNA analysis demonstrated that expression of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor was up-regulated in the AC but not in the visual cortex. Systemic administration of an NMDA antagonist abolished the FO in the AC. These results indicate that increased NMDA activity may cause the FO in the AC of pcd mice.

  8. Differential modulation of gene expression in the NMDA postsynaptic density of schizophrenic and control smokers.

    PubMed

    Mexal, S; Frank, M; Berger, R; Adams, C E; Ross, R G; Freedman, R; Leonard, S

    2005-10-03

    Nicotine is known to induce the release of multiple neurotransmitters, including glutamate and dopamine, through activation of nicotinic receptors. Gene expression in the N-methyl-d-aspartate postsynaptic density (NMDA-PSD), as well as other functional groups, was compared in postmortem hippocampus of schizophrenic and nonmentally ill smokers and nonsmokers utilizing a microarray and quantitative RT-PCR approach. The expression of 277 genes was significantly changed between all smokers and nonsmokers. Specific gene groups, most notably genes expressed in the NMDA-PSD, were prevalent among these transcripts. Analysis of the interaction between smoking and schizophrenia identified several genes in the NMDA-PSD that were differentially affected by smoking in patients. The present findings suggest that smoking may differentially modulate glutamatergic function in schizophrenic patients and control subjects. The biological mechanisms underlying chronic tobacco use are likely to differ substantially between these two groups.

  9. Activity-induced synaptic delivery of the GluN2A-containing NMDA receptor is dependent on endoplasmic reticulum chaperone Bip and involved in fear memory

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiao-min; Yan, Xun-yi; Zhang, Bin; Yang, Qian; Ye, Mao; Cao, Wei; Qiang, Wen-bin; Zhu, Li-jun; Du, Yong-lan; Xu, Xing-xing; Wang, Jia-sheng; Xu, Fei; Lu, Wei; Qiu, Shuang; Yang, Wei; Luo, Jian-hong

    2015-01-01

    The N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) in adult forebrain is a heterotetramer mainly composed of two GluN1 subunits and two GluN2A and/or GluN2B subunits. The synaptic expression and relative numbers of GluN2A- and GluN2B-containing NMDARs play critical roles in controlling Ca2+-dependent signaling and synaptic plasticity. Previous studies have suggested that the synaptic trafficking of NMDAR subtypes is differentially regulated, but the precise molecular mechanism is not yet clear. In this study, we demonstrated that Bip, an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) chaperone, selectively interacted with GluN2A and mediated the neuronal activity-induced assembly and synaptic incorporation of the GluN2A-containing NMDAR from dendritic ER. Furthermore, the GluN2A-specific synaptic trafficking was effectively disrupted by peptides interrupting the interaction between Bip and GluN2A. Interestingly, fear conditioning in mice was disrupted by intraperitoneal injection of the interfering peptide before training. In summary, we have uncovered a novel mechanism for the activity-dependent supply of synaptic GluN2A-containing NMDARs, and demonstrated its relevance to memory formation. PMID:26088419

  10. Anti-NMDA Receptor Encephalitis and Vaccination.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hsiuying

    2017-01-18

    Anti-N-methyl-d-aspartate (Anti-NMDA) receptor encephalitis is an acute autoimmune neurological disorder. The cause of this disease is often unknown, and previous studies revealed that it might be caused by a virus, vaccine or tumor. It occurs more often in females than in males. Several cases were reported to be related to vaccination such as the H1N1 vaccine and tetanus/diphtheria/pertussis and polio vaccines. In this study, we reported an anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis case that may be caused by Japanese encephalitis vaccination. To investigate the association between anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis and vaccination, we analyzed the phylogenetic relationship of the microRNAs, which significantly regulate these vaccine viruses or bacteria, and the phylogenetic relationship of these viruses and bacteria. This reveals that anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis may be caused by Japanese encephalitis vaccination, as well as H1N1 vaccination or tetanus/diphtheria/pertussis and polio vaccinations, from the phylogenetic viewpoint.

  11. Modulation of the NMDA receptor by polyamines

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, K.; Romano, C.; Dichter, M.A.; Molinoff, P.B. )

    1991-01-01

    Results of recent biochemical and electrophysiological studies have suggested that a recognition site for polyamines exists as part of the NMDA receptor complex. The endogenous polyamines spermine and spermidine increase the binding of open-channel blockers and increase NMDA-elicited currents in cultured neutrons. These polyamines have been termed agonists at the polyamine recognition site. Studies of the effects of natural and synthetic polyamines on the binding of ({sup 3}H)MK-801 and on NMDA-elicited currents in cultured neurons have led to the identification of compounds classified as partial agonists, antagonists, and inverse agonists at the polyamine recognition site. Polyamines have also been found to affect the binding of ligands to the recognition sites for glutamate and glycine. However, these effects may be mediated at a site distinct from that at which polyamines act to modulate the binding of open-channel blockers. Endogenous polyamines may modulate excitatory synaptic transmission by acting at the polyamine recognition site of the NMDA receptor. This site could represent a novel therapeutic target for the treatment of ischemia-induced neurotoxicity, epilepsy, and neurodegenerative diseases.

  12. Anti-NMDA Receptor Encephalitis and Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hsiuying

    2017-01-01

    Anti-N-methyl-d-aspartate (Anti-NMDA) receptor encephalitis is an acute autoimmune neurological disorder. The cause of this disease is often unknown, and previous studies revealed that it might be caused by a virus, vaccine or tumor. It occurs more often in females than in males. Several cases were reported to be related to vaccination such as the H1N1 vaccine and tetanus/diphtheria/pertussis and polio vaccines. In this study, we reported an anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis case that may be caused by Japanese encephalitis vaccination. To investigate the association between anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis and vaccination, we analyzed the phylogenetic relationship of the microRNAs, which significantly regulate these vaccine viruses or bacteria, and the phylogenetic relationship of these viruses and bacteria. This reveals that anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis may be caused by Japanese encephalitis vaccination, as well as H1N1 vaccination or tetanus/diphtheria/pertussis and polio vaccinations, from the phylogenetic viewpoint. PMID:28106787

  13. Peripheral NMDA and non-NMDA receptors contribute to nociception: an electrophysiological study.

    PubMed

    Wang, C; Wang, Y; Zhao, Z

    2000-05-01

    The present study investigated the effects of peripheral administration of N-methy-D-aspartate (NMDA) and non-NMDA receptor antagonists on C-fiber evoked responses of the spinal dorsal horn neurons in the spinalized rats. When DL-2-amino-5-phosphonovaleric acid (AP5) (10 mM, 1 mM, 0.1 mM, 20 microl) or 6, 7-dinitroquinoxaline-2, 3-dione (DNQX) (1 mM, 0.1 mM, 0.01 mM, 20 microl) was subcutaneously injected into the receptive field on the hindplantar region, C-fiber evoked responses of the dorsal horn neurons were profoundly inhibited in a dose-dependent manner. Three hours after subcutaneous injection of carrageenan into the ipsilateral hindpaw, NMDA and non-NMDA antagonist-induced inhibition of C-fiber evoked responses was more potent than that in the normal rat (Student's t-test, p < 0.05). In the carragenan-treated rats, DNQX-induced inhibition was stronger than AP-5-induced one (Student's t-test, p < 0.05). The results suggest that peripheral NMDA and non-NMDA receptors are involved in mediating excitation of nociceptors.

  14. A G316A mutation of manganese lipoxygenase augments hydroperoxide isomerase activity: mechanism of biosynthesis of epoxyalcohols.

    PubMed

    Cristea, Mirela; Oliw, Ernst H

    2006-06-30

    Lipoxygenases with R stereospecificity have a conserved Gly residue, whereas (S)-lipoxygenases have an Ala residue. Site-directed mutagenesis has shown that these residues control position and S/R stereospecificity of oxygenation. Recombinant Mn-LO was expressed in Pichia pastoris, and its conserved Gly-316 residue was mutated to Ala, Ser, Val, and Thr. The G316A mutant was catalytically active. We compared the catalytic properties of Mn-LO and the G316A mutant with 17:3n-3, 18:2n-6, 18:3n-3, and 19:3n-3 as substrates. Increasing the fatty acid chain length from C17 to C19 shifted the oxygenation by Mn-LO from the n-6 toward the n-8 carbon. The G316A mutant increased the oxygenation at the n-8 carbon of 17:3n-3 and at the n-10 carbon of the C17 and C18 fatty acids (from 1-2% to 7-11%). The most striking effect of the G316A mutant was a 2-, 7-, and 15-fold increase in transformation of the n-6 hydroperoxides of 19:3n-3, 18:3n-3, and 17:3n-3, respectively, to keto fatty acids and epoxyalcohols. The n-3 double bond was essential. An experiment under an oxygen-18 atmosphere showed that both oxygen atoms were retained in the epoxyalcohols. (R)-Hydroperoxides at n-6 of C17:3, 18:3, and 19:3 were transformed 5 times faster than S stereoisomers. The G316A mutant converted (13R)-hydroperoxylinolenic acid to 13-ketolinolenic acid (with an apparent K(m) of 0.01 mm) and to epoxyalcohols (viz. erythro- and threo-11-hydroxy-(12R,13R)-epoxy-(9Z,15Z)-octadecadienoic acids and one of the corresponding cis-epoxides as major products). A reducing lipoxygenase inhibitor stimulated the hydroperoxide isomerase activity, whereas a suicide-type lipoxygenase inhibitor reduced this activity. The n-3 double bond also appeared to influence the anaerobic formation of epoxyalcohols by Mn-LO, since 18:2n-6 and 18:3n-3 yielded different profiles of epoxyalcohols. Our results suggest that the G316A mutant augmented the hydroperoxide isomerase activity by positioning the hydroperoxy group at the n

  15. Synergy of AMPA and NMDA Receptor Currents in Dopaminergic Neurons: A Modeling Study

    PubMed Central

    Zakharov, Denis; Lapish, Christopher; Gutkin, Boris; Kuznetsov, Alexey

    2016-01-01

    Dopaminergic (DA) neurons display two modes of firing: low-frequency tonic and high-frequency bursts. The high frequency firing within the bursts is attributed to NMDA, but not AMPA receptor activation. In our models of the DA neuron, both biophysical and abstract, the NMDA receptor current can significantly increase their firing frequency, whereas the AMPA receptor current is not able to evoke high-frequency activity and usually suppresses firing. However, both currents are produced by glutamate receptors and, consequently, are often co-activated. Here we consider combined influence of AMPA and NMDA synaptic input in the models of the DA neuron. Different types of neuronal activity (resting state, low frequency, or high frequency firing) are observed depending on the conductance of the AMPAR and NMDAR currents. In two models, biophysical and reduced, we show that the firing frequency increases more effectively if both receptors are co-activated for certain parameter values. In particular, in the more quantitative biophysical model, the maximal frequency is 40% greater than that with NMDAR alone. The dynamical mechanism of such frequency growth is explained in the framework of phase space evolution using the reduced model. In short, both the AMPAR and NMDAR currents flatten the voltage nullcline, providing the frequency increase, whereas only NMDA prevents complete unfolding of the nullcline, providing robust firing. Thus, we confirm a major role of the NMDAR in generating high-frequency firing and conclude that AMPAR activation further significantly increases the frequency. PMID:27252643

  16. The NEDD8-activating enzyme inhibitor MLN4924 disrupts nucleotide metabolism and augments the efficacy of cytarabine

    PubMed Central

    Nawrocki, Steffan T.; Kelly, Kevin R.; Smith, Peter G.; Keaton, Mignon; Carraway, Hetty; Sekeres, Mikkael A.; Maciejewski, Jaroslaw P.; Carew, Jennifer S.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose New therapies are urgently needed for patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The novel NEDDylation inhibitor MLN4924 (pevonedistat) has demonstrated significant preclinical anti-leukemic activity and preliminary efficacy in patients with AML in a Phase I trial. Based on its anti-myeloid and DNA-damaging properties, we investigated the ability of MLN4924 to augment conventional cytarabine (ara-C) therapy. Experimental Design The effects of MLN4924/ara-C on viability, clonogenic survival, apoptosis, DNA damage and relevant pharmacodynamic targets were determined. The efficacy and pharmacodynamics of MLN4924/ara-C were assessed in an AML xenograft model. Results Co-treatment of AML cell lines and primary patient specimens with MLN4924 and ara-C led to diminished clonogenic survival, increased apoptosis, and synergistic levels of DNA damage. RNA interference demonstrated that stabilization of CDT-1, an event previously shown to mediate the DNA damaging effects of MLN4924, was not a key regulator of sensitivity to the MLN4924/ara-C combination. Global metabolic profiling revealed that MLN4924 disrupts nucleotide metabolism and depletes intracellular nucleotide pools in AML cells. Subsequent experiments showed that MLN4924 promoted increased incorporation of ara-C into the DNA of AML cells. This effect as well as the therapeutic benefit of the MLN4924/ara-C combination were antagonized by supplementation with the nucleotide building block ribose. Co-administration of MLN4924 and ara-C to mice bearing FLT3-ITD+ AML xenografts stably inhibited disease progression and increased DNA damage in vivo. Conclusions Our findings provide strong rationale for clinical investigation of the MLN4924/ara-C combination and establish a new link between therapeutic inhibition of NEDDylation and alterations in nucleotide metabolism. PMID:25388161

  17. Histamine H3-receptor activation augments voltage-dependent Ca2+ current via GTP hydrolysis in rabbit saphenous artery.

    PubMed

    Oike, M; Kitamura, K; Kuriyama, H

    1992-03-01

    1. Actions of histamine on the voltage-dependent Ba2+(Ca2+) currents (IBa, ICa) were investigated using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique on dispersed smooth muscle cells from the rabbit saphenous artery. 2. Histamine (half-maximal dose, EC50 = 530 nM) augmented the IBa evoked by a brief depolarizing pulse (100 ms duration; to +10 mV from a holding potential of -80 mV) in a concentration-dependent manner. The maximum augmentation was obtained with 30 microM-histamine (1.29 times control). This augmentation of IBa was inhibited by the H3-antagonist, thioperamide (Ki = 30 nM, slope of the Schild plot = 1.0), but not by H1- or H2-antagonists (mepyramine or diphenhydramine, or cimetidine, respectively). 3. An H3-agonist, R alpha-methylhistamine (EC50 = 93 nM), also augmented IBa in a concentration-dependent manner at a holding potential of -80 mV and the maximum augmentation (1.25 times control) was obtained with 10 microM. This augmentation was also inhibited by thioperamide, but not by the above H1- and H2- antagonists. 4. Intracellularly applied 500 microM-guanosine 5'-triphosphate (GTP) enhanced, but 1 mM-guanosine 5'-O-(2-thiodiphosphate) (GDP beta S) abolished, the histamine-induced augmentation of IBa. When one of the non-hydrolysable GTP analogues, guanosine 5'-O-(3-thiotriphosphate) (GTP gamma S; greater than 5 microM), guanylyl-imidodiphosphate (GMP-PNP; 200 microM) or guanylyl (beta, gamma-methylene)-diphosphonate (GMP-PCP; 1 mM) was intracellularly applied, the IBa amplitude evoked without the application of histamine was not affected, but the excitatory effect of histamine on IBa was reversed to an inhibition. Pre-treatment with pertussis toxin (PTX: 300 ng/ml and 3 micrograms/ml) did not modify the histamine-induced responses in the absence or presence of GTP gamma S. 5. 4 beta-Phorbol 12,13-dibutylate (PDBu) increased the amplitude of IBa. However, this action of PDBu was not enhanced by the application of GTP (500 microM) in the pipette, but

  18. Ethanol Extract of Ganoderma lucidum Augments Cellular Anti-oxidant Defense through Activation of Nrf2/HO-1

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yoo-hwan; Kim, Jung-hee; Song, Choon-ho; Jang, Kyung-jeon; kim, Cheol-hong; Kang, Ji- Sook; Choi, Yung-hyun

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The mushroom Ganoderma lucidum has been widely used as a traditional herbal medicine for many years. Although several studies have focused on the anti-oxidative activity of this mushroom, the molecular mechanisms underlying its activity have not yet been clearly established. The present study investigated the cytoprotective effect of ethanol extract of Ganoderma lucidum (EGL) against oxidative stress (hydrogen peroxide, H2O2) and elucidated the underlying mechanisms in a C2C12 myoblast cell line. Methods: Oxidative stress markers were determined by using the comet assay to measure reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) damage. Cell viability and Western blotting analyses were employed to evaluate the cellular response to EGL and H2O2 in C2C12 cells. Transfection with nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)-specific small interfering ribonucleic acid (siRNA) was conducted to understand the relationship between Nrf2 expression and H2O2-induced growth inhibition. Results: The results showed that EGL effectively inhibited H2O2-induced growth and the generation of ROS. EGL markedly suppressed H2O2-induced comet-like DNA formation and phosphorylation of histone H2AX at serine 139 (p-γH2AX), a widely used marker of DNA damage, suggesting that EGL prevented H2O2-induced DNA damage. Furthermore, the EGL treatment effectively induced the expression of Nrf2, as well as heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), with parallel phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of Nrf2 in the C2C12 myoblasts. However, zinc protoporphyrin IX, a HO-1 inhibitor, significantly abolished the protective effects of EGL against H2O2-induced accumulation of ROS and reduced cell growth. Notably, transient transfection with Nrf2-specific siRNA attenuated the cytoprotective effects and HO-1 induction by EGL, indicating that EGL induced the expression of HO-1 in an Nrf2-dependent manner. Conclusion: Collectively, these results demonstrate that EGL augments the

  19. Identification of a single amino acid in GluN1 that is critical for glycine-primed internalization of NMDA receptors

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background NMDA receptors are ligand-gated ion channels with essential roles in glutamatergic synaptic transmission and plasticity in the CNS. As co-receptors for glutamate and glycine, gating of the NMDA receptor/channel pore requires agonist binding to the glycine sites, as well as to the glutamate sites, on the ligand-binding domains of the receptor. In addition to channel gating, glycine has been found to prime NMDA receptors for internalization upon subsequent stimulation of glutamate and glycine sites. Results Here we address the key issue of identifying molecular determinants in the glycine-binding subunit, GluN1, that are essential for priming of NMDA receptors. We found that glycine treatment of wild-type NMDA receptors led to recruitment of the adaptor protein 2 (AP-2), and subsequent internalization after activating the receptors by NMDA plus glycine. However, with a glycine-binding mutant of GluN1 – N710R/Y711R/E712A/A714L – we found that treating with glycine did not promote recruitment of AP-2 nor were glycine-treated receptors internalized when subsequently activated with NMDA plus glycine. Likewise, GluN1 carrying a single point mutation – A714L – did not prime upon glycine treatment. Importantly, both of the mutant receptors were functional, as stimulating with NMDA plus glycine evoked inward currents. Conclusions Thus, we have identified a single amino acid in GluN1 that is critical for priming of NMDA receptors by glycine. Moreover, we have demonstrated the principle that while NMDA receptor gating and priming share a common requirement for glycine binding, the molecular constraints in GluN1 for gating are distinct from those for priming. PMID:23941530

  20. Inhibition of NMDA-gated ion channels by the P2 purinoceptor antagonists suramin and reactive blue 2 in mouse hippocampal neurones

    PubMed Central

    Peoples, Robert W; Li, Chaoying

    1998-01-01

    The action of suramin and reactive blue 2 on N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-activated ion current was studied in mouse hippocampal neurones in culture by use of whole-cell patch-clamp recording.Suramin and reactive blue 2 inhibited steady-state current activated by 25 μM NMDA with IC50 values of 68 and 11 μM, respectively.Reactive blue 2 produced a gradual decline of NMDA-activated current to a steady-state, but this slow onset was not an indication of use-dependence, as it could be eliminated by exposure to reactive blue 2 before NMDA application. In addition, NMDA-activated current recovered completely from inhibition by reactive blue 2 in the absence of agonist.The slow onset of inhibition by reactive blue 2 was not apparently due to an action at an intracellular site, as inclusion of 250 μM reactive blue 2 in the recording pipette did not alter inhibition by 25 μM reactive blue 2 applied externally.Reactive blue 2 and suramin inhibited NMDA-gated channels in a voltage-independent manner.Reactive blue 2, 25 μM, decreased the maximal response to NMDA from 1441 to 598 pA without changing its EC50. In contrast, 75 μM suramin increased the EC50 for NMDA from 13 to 35 μM, and decreased the maximal response to NMDA from 1822 to 1498 pA. Schild analysis of suramin inhibition of NMDA-activated current yielded a nonlinear plot.Both agents decreased the maximal response to glycine without altering its EC50.Suramin and reactive blue 2 appear to inhibit NMDA receptor-channels in a manner that is noncompetitive with respect to both NMDA and glycine. However, inhibition by suramin differed from that by reactive blue 2, in that suramin significantly increased the EC50 of NMDA. PMID:9641559

  1. Aberrant NMDA-dependent LTD after perinatal ethanol exposure in young adult rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Kervern, Myriam; Silvestre de Ferron, Benoît; Alaux-Cantin, Stéphanie; Fedorenko, Olena; Antol, Johann; Naassila, Mickael; Pierrefiche, Olivier

    2015-08-01

    Irreversible cognitive deficits induced by ethanol exposure during fetal life have been ascribed to a lower NMDA-dependent synaptic long-term potentiation (LTP) in the hippocampus. Whether NMDA-dependent long-term depression (LTD) may also play a critical role in those deficits remains unknown. Here, we show that in vitro LTD induced with paired-pulse low frequency stimulation is enhanced in CA1 hippocampus field of young adult rats exposed to ethanol during brain development. Furthermore, single pulse low frequency stimulation, ineffective at this age (LFS600), induced LTD after ethanol exposure accompanied with a stronger response than controls during LFS600, thus revealing an aberrant form of activity-dependent plasticity at this age. Blocking NMDA receptor or GluN2B containing NMDA receptor prevented both the stronger response during LFS600 and LTD whereas Zinc, an antagonist of GluN2A containing NMDA receptor, was ineffective on both responses. In addition, LFS600-induced LTD was revealed in controls only with a reduced-Mg(2+) medium. In whole dissected hippocampus CA1 field, perinatal ethanol exposure increased GluN2B subunit expression in the synaptic compartment whereas GluN2A was unaltered. Using pharmacological tools, we suggest that LFS600 LTD was of synaptic origin. Altogether, we describe a new mechanism by which ethanol exposure during fetal life induces a long-term alteration of synaptic plasticity involving NMDA receptors, leading to an aberrant LTD. We suggest this effect of ethanol may reflect a delayed maturation of the synapse and that aberrant LTD may also participates to long-lasting cognitive deficits in fetal alcohol spectrum disorder. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. The Impact of NMDA Receptor Blockade on Human Working Memory-Related Prefrontal Function and Connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Driesen, Naomi R; McCarthy, Gregory; Bhagwagar, Zubin; Bloch, Michael H; Calhoun, Vincent D; D'Souza, Deepak C; Gueorguieva, Ralitza; He, George; Leung, Hoi-Chung; Ramani, Ramachandran; Anticevic, Alan; Suckow, Raymond F; Morgan, Peter T; Krystal, John H

    2013-01-01

    Preclinical research suggests that N-methyl-D-aspartate glutamate receptors (NMDA-Rs) have a crucial role in working memory (WM). In this study, we investigated the role of NMDA-Rs in the brain activation and connectivity that subserve WM. Because of its importance in WM, the lateral prefrontal cortex, particularly the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and its connections, were the focus of analyses. Healthy participants (n=22) participated in a single functional magnetic resonance imaging session. They received saline and then the NMDA-R antagonist ketamine while performing a spatial WM task. Time-course analysis was used to compare lateral prefrontal activation during saline and ketamine administration. Seed-based functional connectivity analysis was used to compare dorsolateral prefrontal connectivity during the two conditions and global-based connectivity was used to test for laterality in these effects. Ketamine reduced accuracy on the spatial WM task and brain activation during the encoding and early maintenance (EEM) period of task trials. Decrements in task-related activation during EEM were related to performance deficits. Ketamine reduced connectivity in the DPFC network bilaterally, and region-specific reductions in connectivity were related to performance. These results support the hypothesis that NMDA-Rs are critical for WM. The knowledge gained may be helpful in understanding disorders that might involve glutamatergic deficits such as schizophrenia and developing better treatments. PMID:23856634

  3. The impact of NMDA receptor blockade on human working memory-related prefrontal function and connectivity.

    PubMed

    Driesen, Naomi R; McCarthy, Gregory; Bhagwagar, Zubin; Bloch, Michael H; Calhoun, Vincent D; D'Souza, Deepak C; Gueorguieva, Ralitza; He, George; Leung, Hoi-Chung; Ramani, Ramachandran; Anticevic, Alan; Suckow, Raymond F; Morgan, Peter T; Krystal, John H

    2013-12-01

    Preclinical research suggests that N-methyl-D-aspartate glutamate receptors (NMDA-Rs) have a crucial role in working memory (WM). In this study, we investigated the role of NMDA-Rs in the brain activation and connectivity that subserve WM. Because of its importance in WM, the lateral prefrontal cortex, particularly the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and its connections, were the focus of analyses. Healthy participants (n=22) participated in a single functional magnetic resonance imaging session. They received saline and then the NMDA-R antagonist ketamine while performing a spatial WM task. Time-course analysis was used to compare lateral prefrontal activation during saline and ketamine administration. Seed-based functional connectivity analysis was used to compare dorsolateral prefrontal connectivity during the two conditions and global-based connectivity was used to test for laterality in these effects. Ketamine reduced accuracy on the spatial WM task and brain activation during the encoding and early maintenance (EEM) period of task trials. Decrements in task-related activation during EEM were related to performance deficits. Ketamine reduced connectivity in the DPFC network bilaterally, and region-specific reductions in connectivity were related to performance. These results support the hypothesis that NMDA-Rs are critical for WM. The knowledge gained may be helpful in understanding disorders that might involve glutamatergic deficits such as schizophrenia and developing better treatments.

  4. Characterising seizures in anti-NMDA-receptor encephalitis with dynamic causal modelling.

    PubMed

    Cooray, Gerald K; Sengupta, Biswa; Douglas, Pamela; Englund, Marita; Wickstrom, Ronny; Friston, Karl

    2015-09-01

    We characterised the pathophysiology of seizure onset in terms of slow fluctuations in synaptic efficacy using EEG in patients with anti-N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDA-R) encephalitis. EEG recordings were obtained from two female patients with anti-NMDA-R encephalitis with recurrent partial seizures (ages 19 and 31). Focal electrographic seizure activity was localised using an empirical Bayes beamformer. The spectral density of reconstructed source activity was then characterised with dynamic causal modelling (DCM). Eight models were compared for each patient, to evaluate the relative contribution of changes in intrinsic (excitatory and inhibitory) connectivity and endogenous afferent input. Bayesian model comparison established a role for changes in both excitatory and inhibitory connectivity during seizure activity (in addition to changes in the exogenous input). Seizures in both patients were associated with a sequence of changes in inhibitory and excitatory connectivity; a transient increase in inhibitory connectivity followed by a transient increase in excitatory connectivity and a final peak of excitatory-inhibitory balance at seizure offset. These systematic fluctuations in excitatory and inhibitory gain may be characteristic of (anti NMDA-R encephalitis) seizures. We present these results as a case study and replication to motivate analyses of larger patient cohorts, to see whether our findings generalise and further characterise the mechanisms of seizure activity in anti-NMDA-R encephalitis.

  5. HPV E7 contributes to the telomerase activity of immortalized and tumorigenic cells and augments E6-induced hTERT promoter function.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xuefeng; Roberts, Jeffrey; Dakic, Aleksandra; Zhang, Yiyu; Schlegel, Richard

    2008-06-05

    The E6 and E7 proteins of high-risk HPVs are both required for the immortalization of primary human keratinocytes and the maintenance of the malignant phenotype of HPV-positive cancer cell lines. Our previous studies have shown that E6 protein binds Myc protein and that both E6 and Myc associate with and cooperatively activate the hTERT promoter, thereby increasing cellular telomerase activity. In this study, we evaluated the role of E7 in the maintenance and activation of telomerase in immortalized and tumorigenic cells. siRNA knockdown of either E6 or E7 (or both) in HPV-immortalized cells or an HPV-positive cancer cell line reduced hTERT transcription and telomerase activity. Since telomerase was inhibited by E7 siRNA in cells that independently expressed the E6 and E7 genes, our results reveal an independent role for E7 in the maintenance of telomerase activity. However, E7 alone was insufficient to increase endogenous hTERT mRNA or telomerase activity, although it significantly augmented E6-induced hTERT transcription and telomerase activity. To further explore this apparent E7-induced promoter augmentation, we analyzed an exogenous hTERT core promoter in transduced keratinocytes. E7 alone induced the wt hTERT promoter and augmented E6-induced hTERT promoter activity. Mutation of the E2F site in the hTERT promoter abrogated the ability of E7 to induce the hTERT promoter or to enhance the ability of E6 to induce the promoter. Correspondingly, keratinocytes expressing E6 and a mutant E7 (defective for binding pRb pocket proteins) showed lower telomerase activity than cells expressing wt E6 and wt E7. Thus, HPV E7 plays a role in the maintenance of telomerase activity in stable cell lines and augments acute, E6-induced hTERT promoter activity.

  6. NMDA receptor NR2B subunits contribute to PTZ-kindling-induced hippocampal astrocytosis and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xinjian; Dong, Jingde; Shen, Kai; Bai, Ying; Zhang, Yuan; Lv, Xuan; Chao, Jie; Yao, Honghong

    2015-05-01

    The N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor plays an important role in the pathophysiology of several neurological diseases, including epilepsy. The present study investigated the effect of NMDA receptor NR2B subunits on pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-kindling-induced pathological and biochemical events in mice. Our results showed that PTZ-kindling up-regulates the expression of NMDA receptor NR2B subunits in the hippocampus and that kindled mice were characterized by significant astrocytosis and neuron loss in the hippocampus. Oxidative stress, including excessive malondialdehyde (MDA) production and decreased enzymatic activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-PX), were detected in the hippocampus after the mice were fully kindled. Additionally, expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the hippocampus was found to be up-regulated in PTZ-kindled mice. However, selectively blocking NMDA receptor NR2B subunits by ifenprodil significantly suppressed PTZ-kindling-induced hippocampal astrocytosis, oxidative stress and neuron loss. Furthermore, blocking NMDA receptor NR2B subunits also abolished PTZ-kindling-induced BDNF expression. These results indicate that NMDA receptor NR2B subunits contribute to epilepsy-associated pathological and biochemical events, including hippocampal astrocytosis, oxidative stress and neuron loss, and these events might be correlated with up-regulation of BDNF expression.

  7. Direct inhibition of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-receptor function by antiglaucomatous beta-antagonists.

    PubMed

    Nagata, Tatsuo; Ueno, Susumu; Morita, Hirofumi; Kubota, Toshiaki; Toyohira, Yumiko; Tsutsui, Masato; Tawara, Akihiko; Yanagihara, Nobuyuki

    2008-03-01

    In the present study, we investigated the direct effects of antiglaucoma drugs (timolol, betaxolol, pilocarpine, and latanoprost) on N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-receptor function using a Xenopus oocytes expression system and electrophysiological techniques. In oocytes expressing wild-type NMDA (NR1a/NR2A) receptors, timolol and betaxolol significantly inhibited glutamate-evoked currents, whereas less inhibition was obtained with pilocarpine, and latanoprost had few effects. Moreover, the effect of timolol and betaxolol was noncompetitive with respect to glutamate. Mutations that changed Asn616 of the NR1a subunit, a critical residue for Mg(2+) blocking of NMDA receptors, to Arg (N616R) or Gln (N616Q) almost eliminated the inhibitory effects of timolol and betaxolol, as well as the blocking effect of Mg(2+). Experiments were also carried out to examine the protective effects of timolol and betaxolol against death of oocytes expressing NMDA receptors. During incubation of oocytes, especially in Mg(2+)-free medium, cell death was induced by addition of glutamate because of the continuous activation of the NMDA receptors expressed. Timolol and betaxolol significantly improved oocyte viability when they were added during the incubation period. These results suggest that timolol and betaxolol may have an additional role that they directly inhibit NMDA-receptor function, possibly via N616 of the NR1a subunit.

  8. CaV3.2 calcium channels control NMDA receptor-mediated transmission: a new mechanism for absence epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guangfu; Bochorishvili, Genrieta; Chen, Yucai; Salvati, Kathryn A; Zhang, Peng; Dubel, Steve J; Perez-Reyes, Edward; Snutch, Terrance P; Stornetta, Ruth L; Deisseroth, Karl; Erisir, Alev; Todorovic, Slobodan M; Luo, Jian-Hong; Kapur, Jaideep; Beenhakker, Mark P; Zhu, J Julius

    2015-07-15

    CaV3.2 T-type calcium channels, encoded by CACNA1H, are expressed throughout the brain, yet their general function remains unclear. We discovered that CaV3.2 channels control NMDA-sensitive glutamatergic receptor (NMDA-R)-mediated transmission and subsequent NMDA-R-dependent plasticity of AMPA-R-mediated transmission at rat central synapses. Interestingly, functional CaV3.2 channels primarily incorporate into synapses, replace existing CaV3.2 channels, and can induce local calcium influx to control NMDA transmission strength in an activity-dependent manner. Moreover, human childhood absence epilepsy (CAE)-linked hCaV3.2(C456S) mutant channels have a higher channel open probability, induce more calcium influx, and enhance glutamatergic transmission. Remarkably, cortical expression of hCaV3.2(C456S) channels in rats induces 2- to 4-Hz spike and wave discharges and absence-like epilepsy characteristic of CAE patients, which can be suppressed by AMPA-R and NMDA-R antagonists but not T-type calcium channel antagonists. These results reveal an unexpected role of CaV3.2 channels in regulating NMDA-R-mediated transmission and a novel epileptogenic mechanism for human CAE.

  9. CaV3.2 calcium channels control NMDA receptor-mediated transmission: a new mechanism for absence epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guangfu; Bochorishvili, Genrieta; Chen, Yucai; Salvati, Kathryn A.; Zhang, Peng; Dubel, Steve J.; Perez-Reyes, Edward; Snutch, Terrance P.; Stornetta, Ruth L.; Deisseroth, Karl; Erisir, Alev; Todorovic, Slobodan M.; Luo, Jian-Hong; Kapur, Jaideep; Beenhakker, Mark P.; Zhu, J. Julius

    2015-01-01

    CaV3.2 T-type calcium channels, encoded by CACNA1H, are expressed throughout the brain, yet their general function remains unclear. We discovered that CaV3.2 channels control NMDA-sensitive glutamatergic receptor (NMDA-R)-mediated transmission and subsequent NMDA-R-dependent plasticity of AMPA-R-mediated transmission at rat central synapses. Interestingly, functional CaV3.2 channels primarily incorporate into synapses, replace existing CaV3.2 channels, and can induce local calcium influx to control NMDA transmission strength in an activity-dependent manner. Moreover, human childhood absence epilepsy (CAE)-linked hCaV3.2(C456S) mutant channels have a higher channel open probability, induce more calcium influx, and enhance glutamatergic transmission. Remarkably, cortical expression of hCaV3.2(C456S) channels in rats induces 2- to 4-Hz spike and wave discharges and absence-like epilepsy characteristic of CAE patients, which can be suppressed by AMPA-R and NMDA-R antagonists but not T-type calcium channel antagonists. These results reveal an unexpected role of CaV3.2 channels in regulating NMDA-R-mediated transmission and a novel epileptogenic mechanism for human CAE. PMID:26220996

  10. Acute Ethanol Exposure Prevents PMA-mediated Augmentation of N-methyl-d-aspartate Receptor Function in Primary Cultured Cerebellar Granule Cells

    PubMed Central

    Reneau, Jason; Reyland, Mary E.; Popp, R. Lisa

    2011-01-01

    Many intracellular proteins and signaling cascades contribute to the ethanol sensitivity of native N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors (NMDARs). One putative protein is the serine / threonine kinase, Protein kinase C (PKC). The purpose of this study was to assess if PKC modulates the ethanol sensitivity of native NMDARs expressed in primary cultured cerebellar granule cel