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Sample records for activation cell migration

  1. Bursts of activity in collective cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Chepizhko, Oleksandr; Giampietro, Costanza; Mastrapasqua, Eleonora; Nourazar, Mehdi; Ascagni, Miriam; Sugni, Michela; Fascio, Umberto; Leggio, Livio; Malinverno, Chiara; Scita, Giorgio; Santucci, Stéphane; Alava, Mikko J.; Zapperi, Stefano; La Porta, Caterina A. M.

    2016-01-01

    Dense monolayers of living cells display intriguing relaxation dynamics, reminiscent of soft and glassy materials close to the jamming transition, and migrate collectively when space is available, as in wound healing or in cancer invasion. Here we show that collective cell migration occurs in bursts that are similar to those recorded in the propagation of cracks, fluid fronts in porous media, and ferromagnetic domain walls. In analogy with these systems, the distribution of activity bursts displays scaling laws that are universal in different cell types and for cells moving on different substrates. The main features of the invasion dynamics are quantitatively captured by a model of interacting active particles moving in a disordered landscape. Our results illustrate that collective motion of living cells is analogous to the corresponding dynamics in driven, but inanimate, systems. PMID:27681632

  2. Epac Activation Regulates Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells Migration and Adhesion.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jiao-Le; Deng, Ruixia; Chung, Sookja K; Chan, Godfrey Chi-Fung

    2016-04-01

    How to enhance the homing of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) to the target tissues remains a clinical challenge nowadays. To overcome this barrier, the mechanism responsible for the hMSCs migration and engraftment has to be defined. Currently, the exact mechanism involved in migration and adhesion of hMSCs remains unknown. Exchange protein directly activated by cAMP (Epac), a novel protein discovered in cAMP signaling pathway, may have a potential role in regulating cells adhesion and migration by triggering the downstream Rap family signaling cascades. However, the exact role of Epac in cells homing is elusive. Our study evaluated the role of Epac in the homing of hMSCs. We confirmed that hMSCs expressed functional Epac and its activation enhanced the migration and adhesion of hMSCs significantly. The Epac activation was further found to be contributed directly to the chemotactic responses induced by stromal cell derived factor-1 (SDF-1) which is a known chemokine in regulating hMSCs homing. These findings suggested Epac is connected to the SDF-1 signaling cascades. In conclusion, our study revealed that Epac plays a role in hMSCs homing by promoting adhesion and migration. Appropriate manipulation of Epac may enhance the homing of hMSCs and facilitate their future clinical applications.

  3. Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Trepat, Xavier; Chen, Zaozao; Jacobson, Ken

    2015-01-01

    Cell migration is fundamental to establishing and maintaining the proper organization of multicellular organisms. Morphogenesis can be viewed as a consequence, in part, of cell locomotion, from large-scale migrations of epithelial sheets during gastrulation, to the movement of individual cells during development of the nervous system. In an adult organism, cell migration is essential for proper immune response, wound repair, and tissue homeostasis, while aberrant cell migration is found in various pathologies. Indeed, as our knowledge of migration increases, we can look forward to, for example, abating the spread of highly malignant cancer cells, retarding the invasion of white cells in the inflammatory process, or enhancing the healing of wounds. This article is organized in two main sections. The first section is devoted to the single-cell migrating in isolation such as occurs when leukocytes migrate during the immune response or when fibroblasts squeeze through connective tissue. The second section is devoted to cells collectively migrating as part of multicellular clusters or sheets. This second type of migration is prevalent in development, wound healing, and in some forms of cancer metastasis. PMID:23720251

  4. RNase L Suppresses Androgen Receptor Signaling, Cell Migration and Matrix Metalloproteinase Activity in Prostate Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Dayal, Shubham; Zhou, Jun; Manivannan, Praveen; Siddiqui, Mohammad Adnan; Ahmad, Omaima Farid; Clark, Matthew; Awadia, Sahezeel; Garcia-Mata, Rafael; Shemshedini, Lirim; Malathi, Krishnamurthy

    2017-03-01

    The interferon antiviral pathways and prostate cancer genetics converge on a regulated endoribonuclease, RNase L. Positional cloning and linkage studies mapped Hereditary Prostate Cancer 1 (HPC1) to RNASEL. To date, there is no correlation of viral infections with prostate cancer, suggesting that RNase L may play additional roles in tumor suppression. Here, we demonstrate a role of RNase L as a suppressor of androgen receptor (AR) signaling, cell migration and matrix metalloproteinase activity. Using RNase L mutants, we show that its nucleolytic activity is dispensable for both AR signaling and migration. The most prevalent HPC1-associated mutations in RNase L, R462Q and E265X, enhance AR signaling and cell migration. RNase L negatively regulates cell migration and attachment on various extracellular matrices. We demonstrate that RNase L knockdown cells promote increased cell surface expression of integrin β1 which activates Focal Adhesion Kinase-Sarcoma (FAK-Src) pathway and Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1-guanosine triphosphatase (Rac1-GTPase) activity to increase cell migration. Activity of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and -9 is significantly increased in cells where RNase L levels are ablated. We show that mutations in RNase L found in HPC patients may promote prostate cancer by increasing expression of AR-responsive genes and cell motility and identify novel roles of RNase L as a prostate cancer susceptibility gene.

  5. RNase L Suppresses Androgen Receptor Signaling, Cell Migration and Matrix Metalloproteinase Activity in Prostate Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Dayal, Shubham; Zhou, Jun; Manivannan, Praveen; Siddiqui, Mohammad Adnan; Ahmad, Omaima Farid; Clark, Matthew; Awadia, Sahezeel; Garcia-Mata, Rafael; Shemshedini, Lirim; Malathi, Krishnamurthy

    2017-01-01

    The interferon antiviral pathways and prostate cancer genetics converge on a regulated endoribonuclease, RNase L. Positional cloning and linkage studies mapped Hereditary Prostate Cancer 1 (HPC1) to RNASEL. To date, there is no correlation of viral infections with prostate cancer, suggesting that RNase L may play additional roles in tumor suppression. Here, we demonstrate a role of RNase L as a suppressor of androgen receptor (AR) signaling, cell migration and matrix metalloproteinase activity. Using RNase L mutants, we show that its nucleolytic activity is dispensable for both AR signaling and migration. The most prevalent HPC1-associated mutations in RNase L, R462Q and E265X, enhance AR signaling and cell migration. RNase L negatively regulates cell migration and attachment on various extracellular matrices. We demonstrate that RNase L knockdown cells promote increased cell surface expression of integrin β1 which activates Focal Adhesion Kinase-Sarcoma (FAK-Src) pathway and Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1-guanosine triphosphatase (Rac1-GTPase) activity to increase cell migration. Activity of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and -9 is significantly increased in cells where RNase L levels are ablated. We show that mutations in RNase L found in HPC patients may promote prostate cancer by increasing expression of AR-responsive genes and cell motility and identify novel roles of RNase L as a prostate cancer susceptibility gene. PMID:28257035

  6. An essential role for platelet-activating factor in activating mast cell migration following ultraviolet irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Chacón-Salinas, Rommel; Chen, Limo; Chávez-Blanco, Alma D.; Limón-Flores, Alberto Y.; Ma, Ying; Ullrich, Stephen E.

    2014-01-01

    The UVB (290–320 nm) radiation in sunlight is responsible for inducing skin cancer. Exposure to UV radiation is also immunosuppressive, and the systemic immune suppression induced by UV is a well-recognized risk factor for cancer induction. As UVB radiation is absorbed within the upper layers of the skin, indirect mechanisms must play a role in activating systemic immune suppression. One prominent example is mast cell migration, which from the skin to the draining LN is an essential step in the cascade of events leading to immune suppression. What triggers mast cell migration is not entirely clear. Here, we tested the hypothesis that PAF, a lipid mediator of inflammation produced by the skin in response to UV exposure, is involved. Mast cell-deficient mice (KitW-sh/W-sh) are resistant to the suppressive effect of UV radiation, and reconstituting mast cell-deficient mice with normal bone marrow-derived mast cells restores susceptibility to immunosuppression. However, when mast cells from PAFR−/− mice were used, the reconstituted mice were not susceptible to the suppressive effects of UV. Furthermore, PAFR−/− mice showed impaired UV-induced mast cell migration when compared with WT mice. Finally, injecting PAF into WT mice mimicked the effect of UV irradiation and induced mast cell migration but not in PAFR−/− mice. Our findings indicate that PAFR binding induces mast cells to migrate from the skin to the LNs, where they mediate immune suppression. PMID:24009177

  7. Polydatin induces bone marrow stromal cells migration by activation of ERK1/2.

    PubMed

    Chen, ZhenQiu; Wei, QiuShi; Hong, GuoJu; Chen, Da; Liang, Jiang; He, Wei; Chen, Mei Hui

    2016-08-01

    Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) have proven to be useful for the treatment of numerous human diseases. However, the reparative ability of BMSCs is limited by their poor migration. Polydatin, widely used in traditional Chinese remedies, has proven to exert protective effects to BMSCs. However, little is known about its role in BMSCs migration. In this study, we studied the effects of polydatin on rat BMSCs migration using the scratch wound healing and transwell migration assays. Our results showed polydatin could promote BMSCs migration. Further experiments showed activation of ERK 1/2, but not JNK, was required for polydatin-induced BMSCs migration, suggesting that polydatin may promote BMSCs migration via the ERK 1/2 signaling pathways. Taken together, our results indicate that polydatin might be beneficial for stem cell replacement therapy by improving BMSCs migration.

  8. Urokinase-type plasminogen activator is induced in migrating capillary endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    1987-01-01

    Cellular migration is an essential component of invasive biological processes, many of which have been correlated with an increase in plasminogen activator production. Endothelial cell migration occurs in vivo during repair of vascular lesions and angiogenesis, and can be induced in vitro by wounding a confluent monolayer of cells. By combining the wounded monolayer model with a substrate overlay technique, we show that cells migrating from the edges of an experimental wound display an increase in urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) activity, and that this activity reverts to background levels upon cessation of movement, when the wound has closed. Our results demonstrate a direct temporal relationship between endothelial cell migration and uPA activity, and suggest that induction of uPA activity is a component of the migratory process. PMID:3121633

  9. Hypoxia promotes Rab5 activation, leading to tumor cell migration, invasion and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Silva, Patricio; Mendoza, Pablo; Rivas, Solange; Díaz, Jorge; Moraga, Carolina; Quest, Andrew F G; Torres, Vicente A

    2016-05-17

    Hypoxia, a common condition of the tumor microenvironment, is associated with poor patient prognosis, tumor cell migration, invasion and metastasis. Recent evidence suggests that hypoxia alters endosome dynamics in tumor cells, leading to augmented cell proliferation and migration and this is particularly relevant, because endosomal components have been shown to be deregulated in cancer. The early endosome protein Rab5 is a small GTPase that promotes integrin trafficking, focal adhesion turnover, Rac1 activation, tumor cell migration and invasion. However, the role of Rab5 and downstream events in hypoxia remain unknown. Here, we identify Rab5 as a critical player in hypoxia-driven tumor cell migration, invasion and metastasis. Exposure of A549 human lung carcinoma, ZR-75, MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 human breast cancer and B16-F10 mouse melanoma cells to hypoxia increased Rab5 activation, followed by its re-localization to the leading edge and association with focal adhesions. Importantly, Rab5 was required for hypoxia-driven cell migration, FAK phosphorylation and Rac1 activation, as shown by shRNA-targeting and transfection assays with Rab5 mutants. Intriguingly, the effect of hypoxia on both Rab5 activity and migration was substantially higher in metastatic B16-F10 cells than in poorly invasive B16-F0 cells. Furthermore, exogenous expression of Rab5 in B16-F0 cells predisposed to hypoxia-induced migration, whereas expression of the inactive mutant Rab5/S34N prevented the migration of B16-F10 cells induced by hypoxia. Finally, using an in vivo syngenic C57BL/6 mouse model, Rab5 expression was shown to be required for hypoxia-induced metastasis. In summary, these findings identify Rab5 as a key mediator of hypoxia-induced tumor cell migration, invasion and metastasis.

  10. Hypoxia promotes Rab5 activation, leading to tumor cell migration, invasion and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Patricio; Mendoza, Pablo; Rivas, Solange; Díaz, Jorge; Moraga, Carolina; Quest, Andrew F.G.; Torres, Vicente A.

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia, a common condition of the tumor microenvironment, is associated with poor patient prognosis, tumor cell migration, invasion and metastasis. Recent evidence suggests that hypoxia alters endosome dynamics in tumor cells, leading to augmented cell proliferation and migration and this is particularly relevant, because endosomal components have been shown to be deregulated in cancer. The early endosome protein Rab5 is a small GTPase that promotes integrin trafficking, focal adhesion turnover, Rac1 activation, tumor cell migration and invasion. However, the role of Rab5 and downstream events in hypoxia remain unknown. Here, we identify Rab5 as a critical player in hypoxia-driven tumor cell migration, invasion and metastasis. Exposure of A549 human lung carcinoma, ZR-75, MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 human breast cancer and B16-F10 mouse melanoma cells to hypoxia increased Rab5 activation, followed by its re-localization to the leading edge and association with focal adhesions. Importantly, Rab5 was required for hypoxia-driven cell migration, FAK phosphorylation and Rac1 activation, as shown by shRNA-targeting and transfection assays with Rab5 mutants. Intriguingly, the effect of hypoxia on both Rab5 activity and migration was substantially higher in metastatic B16-F10 cells than in poorly invasive B16-F0 cells. Furthermore, exogenous expression of Rab5 in B16-F0 cells predisposed to hypoxia-induced migration, whereas expression of the inactive mutant Rab5/S34N prevented the migration of B16-F10 cells induced by hypoxia. Finally, using an in vivo syngenic C57BL/6 mouse model, Rab5 expression was shown to be required for hypoxia-induced metastasis. In summary, these findings identify Rab5 as a key mediator of hypoxia-induced tumor cell migration, invasion and metastasis. PMID:27121131

  11. Matrix metalloproteinase 13 mediates nitric oxide activation of endothelial cell migration

    PubMed Central

    López-Rivera, Esther; Lizarbe, Tania R.; Martínez-Moreno, Mónica; López-Novoa, José Miguel; Rodríguez-Barbero, Alicia; Rodrigo, José; Fernández, Ana Patricia; Álvarez-Barrientos, Alberto; Lamas, Santiago; Zaragoza, Carlos

    2005-01-01

    To explore the mechanisms by which NO elicits endothelial cell (EC) migration we used murine and bovine aortic ECs in an in vitro wound-healing model. We found that exogenous or endogenous NO stimulated EC migration. Moreover, migration was significantly delayed in ECs derived from endothelial NO synthase-deficient mice compared with WT murine aortic EC. To assess the contribution of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-13 to NO-mediated EC migration, we used RNA interference to silence MMP-13 expression in ECs. Migration was delayed in cells in which MMP-13 was silenced. In untreated cells MMP-13 was localized to caveolae, forming a complex with caveolin-1. Stimulation with NO disrupted this complex and significantly increased extracellular MMP-13 abundance, leading to collagen breakdown. Our findings show that MMP-13 is an important effector of NO-activated endothelial migration. PMID:15728377

  12. PLEKHG3 enhances polarized cell migration by activating actin filaments at the cell front

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Trang Thi Thu; Park, Wei Sun; Park, Byung Ouk; Kim, Cha Yeon; Oh, Yohan; Kim, Jin Man; Choi, Hana; Kyung, Taeyoon; Kim, Cheol-Hee; Lee, Gabsang; Hahn, Klaus M.; Meyer, Tobias; Heo, Won Do

    2016-01-01

    Cells migrate by directing Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1 (Rac1) and cell division control protein 42 (Cdc42) activities and by polymerizing actin toward the leading edge of the cell. Previous studies have proposed that this polarization process requires a local positive feedback in the leading edge involving Rac small GTPase and actin polymerization with PI3K likely playing a coordinating role. Here, we show that the pleckstrin homology and RhoGEF domain containing G3 (PLEKHG3) is a PI3K-regulated Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor (RhoGEF) for Rac1 and Cdc42 that selectively binds to newly polymerized actin at the leading edge of migrating fibroblasts. Optogenetic inactivation of PLEKHG3 showed that PLEKHG3 is indispensable both for inducing and for maintaining cell polarity. By selectively binding to newly polymerized actin, PLEKHG3 promotes local Rac1/Cdc42 activation to induce more local actin polymerization, which in turn promotes the recruitment of more PLEKHG3 to induce and maintain cell front. Thus, autocatalytic reinforcement of PLEKHG3 localization to the leading edge of the cell provides a molecular basis for the proposed positive feedback loop that is required for cell polarization and directed migration. PMID:27555588

  13. Activated Rac1 requires gp130 for Stat3 activation, cell proliferation and migration

    SciTech Connect

    Arulanandam, Rozanne; Geletu, Mulu; Feracci, Helene; Raptis, Leda

    2010-03-10

    Rac1 (Rac) is a member of the Rho family of small GTPases which controls cell migration by regulating the organization of actin filaments. Previous results suggested that mutationally activated forms of the Rho GTPases can activate the Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription-3 (Stat3), but the exact mechanism is a matter of controversy. We recently demonstrated that Stat3 activity of cultured cells increases dramatically following E-cadherin engagement. To better understand this pathway, we now compared Stat3 activity levels in mouse HC11 cells before and after expression of the mutationally activated Rac1 (Rac{sup V12}), at different cell densities. The results revealed for the first time a dramatic increase in protein levels and activity of both the endogenous Rac and Rac{sup V12} with cell density, which was due to inhibition of proteasomal degradation. In addition, Rac{sup V12}-expressing cells had higher Stat3, tyrosine-705 phosphorylation and activity levels at all densities, indicating that Rac{sup V12} is able to activate Stat3. Further examination of the mechanism of Stat3 activation showed that Rac{sup V12} expression caused a surge in mRNA of Interleukin-6 (IL6) family cytokines, known potent Stat3 activators. Knockdown of gp130, the common subunit of this family reduced Stat3 activity, indicating that these cytokines may be responsible for the Stat3 activation by Rac{sup V12}. The upregulation of IL6 family cytokines was required for cell migration and proliferation induced by Rac{sup V12}, as shown by gp130 knockdown experiments, thus demonstrating that the gp130/Stat3 axis represents an essential effector of activated Rac for the regulation of key cellular functions.

  14. Enhancement of endothelial cell migration by constitutively active LPA{sub 1}-expressing tumor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kitayoshi, Misaho; Kato, Kohei; Tanabe, Eriko; Yoshikawa, Kyohei; Fukui, Rie; Fukushima, Nobuyuki; Tsujiuchi, Toshifumi

    2012-06-01

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mutated LPA{sub 1} stimulates cell migration of endothelial cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer VEGF expressions are increased by mutated LPA{sub 1}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer LPA signaling via mutated LPA{sub 1} is involved in angiogenesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mutated LPA{sub 1} promotes cancer cell progression. -- Abstract: Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) receptors belong to G protein-coupled transmembrane receptors (LPA receptors; LPA{sub 1} to LPA{sub 6}). They indicate a variety of cellular response by the interaction with LPA, including cell proliferation, migration and differentiation. Recently, we have reported that constitutive active mutated LPA{sub 1} induced the strong biological effects of rat neuroblastoma B103 cells. In the present study, we examined the effects of mutated LPA{sub 1} on the interaction between B103 cells and endothelial F-2 cells. Each LPA receptor expressing B103 cells were maintained in serum-free DMEM and cell motility assay was performed with a Cell Culture Insert. When F-2 cells were cultured with conditioned medium from Lpar1 and Lpar3-expressing cells, the cell motility of F-2 cells was significantly higher than control cells. Interestingly, the motile activity of F-2 cells was strongly induced by mutated LPA{sub 1} than other cells, correlating with the expression levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (Vegf)-A and Vegf-C. Pretreatment of LPA signaling inhibitors inhibited F-2 cell motility stimulated by mutated LPA{sub 1}. These results suggest that activation of LPA signaling via mutated LPA{sub 1} may play an important role in the promotion of angiogenesis in rat neuroblastoma cells.

  15. Activated protein C upregulates ovarian cancer cell migration and promotes unclottability of the cancer cell microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    ALTHAWADI, HAMDA; ALFARSI, HALEMA; BESBES, SAMAHER; MIRSHAHI, SHAHSOLTAN; DUCROS, ELODIE; RAFII, ARASH; POCARD, MARC; THERWATH, AMU; SORIA, JEANNETTE; MIRSHAHI, MASSOUD

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the role of activated protein C (aPC), known to be a physiological anticoagulant, in ovarian cancer cell activation as well as in loss of clotting of cancer ascitic fluid. The effect of aPC on an ovarian cancer cell line (OVCAR-3) was tested in regards to i) cell migration and adhesion with the use of adhesion and wound healing assays as well as a droplet test; ii) protein phosphorylation, evaluated by cyto-ELISA; iii) cell cycle modification assessed by flow cytometric DNA quantification; and iv) anticoagulant activity evaluated by the prolongation of partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) of normal plasma in the presence or absence of aPC-treated ovarian cancer cells. In addition, the soluble endothelial protein C receptor (sEPCR) was quantified by ELISA in ascitic fluid of patients with ovarian cancer. Our results showed that in the OVCAR-3 aPC-induced cells i) an increase in cell migration was noted, which was inhibited when anti-endothelial protein C receptor (EPCR) was added to the culture medium and which may act via MEK-ERK and Rho-GTPase pathways; ii) an increase in threonine, and to a lesser extent tyrosine phosphorylation; iii) cell cycle activation (G1 to S/G2); and iv) a 2-3-fold prolongation of aPTT of normal plasma. In the peritoneal fluid, the sEPCR concentration was 71±23 ng/ml. In conclusion, free aPC binds to membrane EPCR in ovarian cancer cells and induces cell migration via MEK-ERK and Rho-GTPase pathways. This binding could also explain the loss of clotting of peritoneal fluids. PMID:26082331

  16. Random migration contributes to cytotoxicity of activated CD8+ T-lymphocytes but not NK cells.

    PubMed

    Onishi, Hideya; Kiyota, Akifumi; Koya, Norihiro; Tanaka, Hiroto; Umebayashi, Masayo; Katano, Mitsuo; Morisaki, Takashi

    2014-08-01

    Activated lymphocytes have the ability to undergo non-directional cell movement known as random migration, although the biological role for this remains unclear. Herein, we investigated how random migration affects cytotoxicity of activated lymphocytes using time-lapse imaging analysis. The kinetics of random migration paralleled cytotoxicity in activated lymphocytes. Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) and its receptor-1 (S1PR1) play an important role in lymphocyte migration. Phosphorylated FTY720 (FTYP), a structural analog of S1P, significantly inhibited random migration and cytotoxicity of activated CD3(+)NKG2D(+)CD8(+) T-lymphocytes but not CD3(-)NKG2D(+)CD56(+) natural killer (NK) cells. In a mouse xenograft model, FTYP-treated activated lymphocytes exhibited lower cytotoxicity and less tumor infiltration for activated CD3(+)NKG2D(+) T-lymphocytes but not CD3(-)NKG2D(+) NK cells. These results suggest that random migration contributes to the cytotoxicity of activated CD8(+) T-cells but not of NK cells.

  17. Immature human dendritic cells enhance their migration through KCa3.1 channel activation.

    PubMed

    Crottès, David; Félix, Romain; Meley, Daniel; Chadet, Stéphanie; Herr, Florence; Audiger, Cindy; Soriani, Olivier; Vandier, Christophe; Roger, Sébastien; Angoulvant, Denis; Velge-Roussel, Florence

    2016-04-01

    Migration capacity is essential for dendritic cells (DCs) to present antigen to T cells for the induction of immune response. The DC migration is supposed to be a calcium-dependent process, while not fully understood. Here, we report a role of the KCa3.1/IK1/SK4 channels in the migration capacity of both immature (iDC) and mature (mDC) human CD14(+)-derived DCs. KCa3.1 channels were shown to control the membrane potential of human DC and the Ca(2+) entry, which is directly related to migration capacities. The expression of migration marker such as CCR5 and CCR7 was modified in both types of DCs by TRAM-34 (100nM). But, only the migration of iDC was decreased by use of both TRAM-34 and KCa3.1 siRNA. Confocal analyses showed a close localization of CCR5 with KCa3.1 in the steady state of iDC. Finally, the implication of KCa3.1 seems to be limited to the migration capacities as T cell activation of DCs appeared unchanged. Altogether, these results demonstrated that KCa3.1 channels have a pro-migratory effect on iDC migration. Our findings suggest that KCa3.1 in human iDC play a major role in their migration and constitute an attractive target for the cell therapy optimization.

  18. Lumican Inhibits SNAIL-Induced Melanoma Cell Migration Specifically by Blocking MMP-14 Activity

    PubMed Central

    Stasiak, Marta; Boncela, Joanna; Perreau, Corinne; Karamanou, Konstantina; Chatron-Colliet, Aurore; Proult, Isabelle; Przygodzka, Patrycja; Chakravarti, Shukti; Maquart, François-Xavier; Kowalska, M. Anna; Wegrowski, Yanusz; Brézillon, Stéphane

    2016-01-01

    Lumican, a small leucine rich proteoglycan, inhibits MMP-14 activity and melanoma cell migration in vitro and in vivo. Snail triggers epithelial-mesenchymal transitions endowing epithelial cells with migratory and invasive properties during tumor progression. The aim of this work was to investigate lumican effects on MMP-14 activity and migration of Snail overexpressing B16F1 (Snail-B16F1) melanoma cells and HT-29 colon adenocarcinoma cells. Lumican inhibits the Snail induced MMP-14 activity in B16F1 but not in HT-29 cells. In Snail-B16F1 cells, lumican inhibits migration, growth, and melanoma primary tumor development. A lumican-based strategy targeting Snail-induced MMP-14 activity might be useful for melanoma treatment. PMID:26930497

  19. Coordinated integrin activation by actin-dependent force during T-cell migration.

    PubMed

    Nordenfelt, Pontus; Elliott, Hunter L; Springer, Timothy A

    2016-10-10

    For a cell to move forward it must convert chemical energy into mechanical propulsion. Force produced by actin polymerization can generate traction across the plasma membrane by transmission through integrins to their ligands. However, the role this force plays in integrin activation is unknown. Here we show that integrin activity and cytoskeletal dynamics are reciprocally linked, where actin-dependent force itself appears to regulate integrin activity. We generated fluorescent tension-sensing constructs of integrin αLβ2 (LFA-1) to visualize intramolecular tension during cell migration. Using quantitative imaging of migrating T cells, we correlate tension in the αL or β2 subunit with cell and actin dynamics. We find that actin engagement produces tension within the β2 subunit to induce and stabilize an active integrin conformational state and that this requires intact talin and kindlin motifs. This supports a general mechanism where localized actin polymerization can coordinate activation of the complex machinery required for cell migration.

  20. Protein Kinase A Activity and Anchoring Are Required for Ovarian Cancer Cell Migration and Invasion

    PubMed Central

    McKenzie, Andrew J.; Campbell, Shirley L.; Howe, Alan K.

    2011-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is the deadliest of the gynecological malignancies, due in part to its clinically occult metastasis. Therefore, understanding the mechanisms governing EOC dissemination and invasion may provide new targets for antimetastatic therapies or new methods for detection of metastatic disease. The cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) is often dysregulated in EOC. Furthermore, PKA activity and subcellular localization by A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs) are important regulators of cytoskeletal dynamics and cell migration. Thus, we sought to study the role of PKA and AKAP function in both EOC cell migration and invasion. Using the plasma membrane-directed PKA biosensor, pmAKAR3, and an improved migration/invasion assay, we show that PKA is activated at the leading edge of migrating SKOV-3 EOC cells, and that inhibition of PKA activity blocks SKOV-3 cell migration. Furthermore, we show that while the PKA activity within the leading edge of these cells is mediated by anchoring of type-II regulatory PKA subunits (RII), inhibition of anchoring of either RI or RII PKA subunits blocks cell migration. Importantly, we also show – for the first time – that PKA activity is up-regulated at the leading edge of SKOV-3 cells during invasion of a three-dimensional extracellular matrix and, as seen for migration, inhibition of either PKA activity or AKAP-mediated PKA anchoring blocks matrix invasion. These data are the first to demonstrate that the invasion of extracellular matrix by cancer cells elicits activation of PKA within the invasive leading edge and that both PKA activity and anchoring are required for matrix invasion. These observations suggest a role for PKA and AKAP activity in EOC metastasis. PMID:22028904

  1. Activation of Dbl restores migration in polyamine-depleted intestinal epithelial cells via Rho-GTPases

    PubMed Central

    Bavaria, Mitulkumar N.; Bhattacharya, Sujoy; Johnson, Leonard R.

    2011-01-01

    Integrin binding to the extracellular matrix (ECM) activated Rho GTPases, Src, and focal adhesion kinase in intestinal epithelial cells (IEC)-6. Polyamine depletion inhibited activities of Rac1, RhoA, and Cdc42 and thereby migration. However, constitutively active (CA) Rac1 expression abolished the inhibitory effect of polyamine depletion, indicating that polyamines are involved in a process upstream of Rac1. In the present study, we examined the role of polyamines in the regulation of the guanine nucleotide exchange factor, diffuse B-cell lymphoma (Dbl), for Rho GTPases. Polyamine depletion decreased the level as well as the activation of Dbl protein. Dbl knockdown by siRNA altered cytoskeletal structure and decreased Rac1 activity and migration. Cells expressing CA-Dbl increased migration, Rac1 activity, and proliferation. CA-Dbl restored migration in polyamine-depleted cells by activating RhoA, Rac1, and Cdc42. CA-Dbl caused extensive reorganization of the F-actin cortex into stress fibers. Inhibition of Rac1 by NSC23766 significantly decreased migration of vector-transfected cells and CA-Dbl-transfected cells. However, the inhibition of migration was significantly higher in the vector-transfected cells compared with that seen in the CA-Dbl-transfected cells. Dbl localized in the perinuclear region in polyamine-depleted cells, whereas it localized with the stress fibers in control cells. CA-Dbl localized with stress fibers in both the control and polyamine-depleted cells. These results suggest that polyamines regulate the activation of Dbl, a membrane-proximal process upstream of Rac1. PMID:21372162

  2. Minimal model for spontaneous cell polarization and edge activity in oscillating, rotating and migrating cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raynaud, Franck; Ambühl, Mark E.; Gabella, Chiara; Bornert, Alicia; Sbalzarini, Ivo F.; Meister, Jean-Jacques; Verkhovsky, Alexander B.

    2016-04-01

    How cells break symmetry and organize activity at their edges to move directionally is a fundamental question in cell biology. Physical models of cell motility commonly incorporate gradients of regulatory proteins and/or feedback from the motion itself to describe the polarization of this edge activity. These approaches, however, fail to explain cell behaviour before the onset of polarization. We use polarizing and moving fish epidermal cells as a model system to bridge the gap between cell behaviours before and after polarization. Our analysis suggests a novel and simple principle of self-organizing cell activity, in which local cell-edge dynamics depends on the distance from the cell centre, but not on the orientation with respect to the front-back axis. We validate this principle with a stochastic model that faithfully reproduces a range of cell-migration behaviours. Our findings indicate that spontaneous polarization, persistent motion and cell shape are emergent properties of the local cell-edge dynamics controlled by the distance from the cell centre.

  3. AMPK activity regulates trafficking of mitochondria to the leading edge during cell migration and matrix invasion

    PubMed Central

    Cunniff, Brian; McKenzie, Andrew J.; Heintz, Nicholas H.; Howe, Alan K.

    2016-01-01

    Cell migration is a complex behavior involving many energy-expensive biochemical events that iteratively alter cell shape and location. Mitochondria, the principal producers of cellular ATP, are dynamic organelles that fuse, divide, and relocate to respond to cellular metabolic demands. Using ovarian cancer cells as a model, we show that mitochondria actively infiltrate leading edge lamellipodia, thereby increasing local mitochondrial mass and relative ATP concentration and supporting a localized reversal of the Warburg shift toward aerobic glycolysis. This correlates with increased pseudopodial activity of the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a critically important cellular energy sensor and metabolic regulator. Furthermore, localized pharmacological activation of AMPK increases leading edge mitochondrial flux, ATP content, and cytoskeletal dynamics, whereas optogenetic inhibition of AMPK halts mitochondrial trafficking during both migration and the invasion of three-dimensional extracellular matrix. These observations indicate that AMPK couples local energy demands to subcellular targeting of mitochondria during cell migration and invasion. PMID:27385336

  4. Spatial control of active CDC-42 during collective migration of hypodermal cells in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Ouellette, Marie-Hélène; Martin, Emmanuel; Lacoste-Caron, Germain; Hamiche, Karim; Jenna, Sarah

    2016-08-01

    Collective epithelial cell migration requires the maintenance of cell-cell junctions while enabling the generation of actin-rich protrusions at the leading edge of migrating cells. Ventral enclosure of Caenorhabditis elegans embryos depends on the collective migration of anterior-positioned leading hypodermal cells towards the ventral midline where they form new junctions with their contralateral neighbours. In this study, we characterized the zygotic function of RGA-7/SPV-1, a CDC-42/Cdc42 and RHO-1/RhoA-specific Rho GTPase-activating protein, which controls the formation of actin-rich protrusions at the leading edge of leading hypodermal cells and the formation of new junctions between contralateral cells. We show that RGA-7 controls these processes in an antagonistic manner with the CDC-42's effector WSP-1/N-WASP and the CDC-42-binding proteins TOCA-1/2/TOCA1. RGA-7 is recruited to spatially distinct locations at junctions between adjacent leading cells, where it promotes the accumulation of clusters of activated CDC-42. It also inhibits the spreading of these clusters towards the leading edge of the junctions and regulates their accumulation and distribution at new junctions formed between contralateral leading cells. Our study suggests that RGA-7 controls collective migration and junction formation between epithelial cells by spatially restricting active CDC-42 within cell-cell junctions.

  5. Activating the nuclear piston mechanism of 3D migration in tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Petrie, Ryan J; Harlin, Heather M; Korsak, Lulu I T; Yamada, Kenneth M

    2017-01-02

    Primary human fibroblasts have the remarkable ability to use their nucleus like a piston, switching from low- to high-pressure protrusions in response to the surrounding three-dimensional (3D) matrix. Although migrating tumor cells can also change how they migrate in response to the 3D matrix, it is not clear if they can switch between high- and low-pressure protrusions like primary fibroblasts. We report that unlike primary fibroblasts, the nuclear piston is not active in fibrosarcoma cells. Protease inhibition rescued the nuclear piston mechanism in polarized HT1080 and SW684 cells and generated compartmentalized pressure. Achieving compartmentalized pressure required the nucleoskeleton-cytoskeleton linker protein nesprin 3, actomyosin contractility, and integrin-mediated adhesion, consistent with lobopodia-based fibroblast migration. In addition, this activation of the nuclear piston mechanism slowed the 3D movement of HT1080 cells. Together, these data indicate that inhibiting protease activity during polarized tumor cell 3D migration is sufficient to restore the nuclear piston migration mechanism with compartmentalized pressure characteristic of nonmalignant cells.

  6. P-Rex1 links mammalian target of rapamycin signaling to Rac activation and cell migration.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Negrete, Ivette; Carretero-Ortega, Jorge; Rosenfeldt, Hans; Hernández-García, Ricardo; Calderón-Salinas, J Victor; Reyes-Cruz, Guadalupe; Gutkind, J Silvio; Vázquez-Prado, José

    2007-08-10

    Polarized cell migration results from the transduction of extra-cellular cues promoting the activation of Rho GTPases with the intervention of multidomain proteins, including guanine exchange factors. P-Rex1 and P-Rex2 are Rac GEFs connecting Gbetagamma and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase signaling to Rac activation. Their complex architecture suggests their regulation by protein-protein interactions. Novel mechanisms of activation of Rho GTPases are associated with mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), a serine/threonine kinase known as a central regulator of cell growth and proliferation. Recently, two independent multiprotein complexes containing mTOR have been described. mTORC1 links to the classical rapamycin-sensitive pathways relevant for protein synthesis; mTORC2 links to the activation of Rho GTPases and cytoskeletal events via undefined mechanisms. Here we demonstrate that P-Rex1 and P-Rex2 establish, through their tandem DEP domains, interactions with mTOR, suggesting their potential as effectors in the signaling of mTOR to Rac activation and cell migration. This possibility was consistent with the effect of dominant-negative constructs and short hairpin RNA-mediated knockdown of P-Rex1, which decreased mTOR-dependent leucine-induced activation of Rac and cell migration. Rapamycin, a widely used inhibitor of mTOR signaling, did not inhibit Rac activity and cell migration induced by leucine, indicating that P-Rex1, which we found associated to both mTOR complexes, is only active when in the mTORC2 complex. mTORC2 has been described as the catalytic complex that phosphorylates AKT/PKB at Ser-473 and elicits activation of Rho GTPases and cytoskeletal reorganization. Thus, P-Rex1 links mTOR signaling to Rac activation and cell migration.

  7. Nox4 and Duox1/2 Mediate Redox Activation of Mesenchymal Cell Migration by PDGF.

    PubMed

    Tyurin-Kuzmin, Pyotr A; Zhdanovskaya, Nadezhda D; Sukhova, Anna A; Sagaradze, George D; Albert, Eugene A; Ageeva, Ludmila V; Sharonov, George V; Vorotnikov, Alexander V; Tkachuk, Vsevolod A

    2016-01-01

    Platelet derived growth factor (PDGF) orchestrates wound healing and tissue regeneration by regulating recruitment of the precursor mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) and fibroblasts. PDGF stimulates generation of hydrogen peroxide that is required for cell migration, but the sources and intracellular targets of H2O2 remain obscure. Here we demonstrate sustained live responses of H2O2 to PDGF and identify PKB/Akt, but not Erk1/2, as the target for redox regulation in cultured 3T3 fibroblasts and MSC. Apocynin, cell-permeable catalase and LY294002 inhibited PDGF-induced migration and mitotic activity of these cells indicating involvement of PI3-kinase pathway and H2O2. Real-time PCR revealed Nox4 and Duox1/2 as the potential sources of H2O2. Silencing of Duox1/2 in fibroblasts or Nox4 in MSC reduced PDGF-stimulated intracellular H2O2, PKB/Akt phosphorylation and migration, but had no such effect on Erk1/2. In contrast to PDGF, EGF failed to increase cytoplasmic H2O2, phosphorylation of PKB/Akt and migration of fibroblasts and MSC, confirming the critical impact of redox signaling. We conclude that PDGF-induced migration of mesenchymal cells requires Nox4 and Duox1/2 enzymes, which mediate redox-sensitive activation of PI3-kinase pathway and PKB/Akt.

  8. Nox4 and Duox1/2 Mediate Redox Activation of Mesenchymal Cell Migration by PDGF

    PubMed Central

    Sukhova, Anna A.; Sagaradze, George D.; Albert, Eugene A.; Ageeva, Ludmila V.; Sharonov, George V.; Tkachuk, Vsevolod A.

    2016-01-01

    Platelet derived growth factor (PDGF) orchestrates wound healing and tissue regeneration by regulating recruitment of the precursor mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) and fibroblasts. PDGF stimulates generation of hydrogen peroxide that is required for cell migration, but the sources and intracellular targets of H2O2 remain obscure. Here we demonstrate sustained live responses of H2O2 to PDGF and identify PKB/Akt, but not Erk1/2, as the target for redox regulation in cultured 3T3 fibroblasts and MSC. Apocynin, cell-permeable catalase and LY294002 inhibited PDGF-induced migration and mitotic activity of these cells indicating involvement of PI3-kinase pathway and H2O2. Real-time PCR revealed Nox4 and Duox1/2 as the potential sources of H2O2. Silencing of Duox1/2 in fibroblasts or Nox4 in MSC reduced PDGF-stimulated intracellular H2O2, PKB/Akt phosphorylation and migration, but had no such effect on Erk1/2. In contrast to PDGF, EGF failed to increase cytoplasmic H2O2, phosphorylation of PKB/Akt and migration of fibroblasts and MSC, confirming the critical impact of redox signaling. We conclude that PDGF-induced migration of mesenchymal cells requires Nox4 and Duox1/2 enzymes, which mediate redox-sensitive activation of PI3-kinase pathway and PKB/Akt. PMID:27110716

  9. Migration and invasion of drug-resistant lung adenocarcinoma cells are dependent on mitochondrial activity

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Ji Hoon; Kim, Dong Keon; Shin, Youngmi; Kim, Hee Yeon; Song, Bomin; Lee, Eun Young; Kim, Jong Kwang; You, Hye Jin; Cheong, Heesun; Shin, Dong Hoon; Kim, Seong-Tae; Cheong, Jae-Ho; Kim, Soo Youl; Jang, Hyonchol

    2016-01-01

    A small proportion of cancer cells have stem-cell-like properties, are resistant to standard therapy and are associated with a poor prognosis. The metabolism of such drug-resistant cells differs from that of nearby non-resistant cells. In this study, the metabolism of drug-resistant lung adenocarcinoma cells was investigated. The expression of genes associated with oxidative phosphorylation in the mitochondrial membrane was negatively correlated with the prognosis of lung adenocarcinoma. Because the mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) reflects the functional status of mitochondria and metastasis is the principal cause of death due to cancer, the relationship between MMP and metastasis was evaluated. Cells with a higher MMP exhibited greater migration and invasion than those with a lower MMP. Cells that survived treatment with cisplatin, a standard chemotherapeutic drug for lung adenocarcinoma, exhibited increased MMP and enhanced migration and invasion compared with parental cells. Consistent with these findings, inhibition of mitochondrial activity significantly impeded the migration and invasion of cisplatin-resistant cells. RNA-sequencing analysis indicated that the expression of mitochondrial complex genes was upregulated in cisplatin-resistant cells. These results suggested that drug-resistant cells have a greater MMP and that inhibition of mitochondrial activity could be used to prevent metastasis of drug-resistant lung adenocarcinoma cells. PMID:27932791

  10. The biphasic nature of hypoxia-induced directional migration of activated human hepatic stellate cells.

    PubMed

    Novo, Erica; Povero, Davide; Busletta, Chiara; Paternostro, Claudia; di Bonzo, Lorenzo Valfrè; Cannito, Stefania; Compagnone, Alessandra; Bandino, Andrea; Marra, Fabio; Colombatto, Sebastiano; David, Ezio; Pinzani, Massimo; Parola, Maurizio

    2012-03-01

    Liver fibrogenesis is sustained by pro-fibrogenic myofibroblast-like cells (MFs), mainly originating from activated hepatic stellate cells (HSC/MFs) or portal (myo)fibroblasts, and is favoured by hypoxia-dependent angiogenesis. Human HSC/MFs were reported to express vascular-endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and VEGF-receptor type 2 and to migrate under hypoxic conditions. This study was designed to investigate early and delayed signalling mechanisms involved in hypoxia-induced migration of human HSC/MFs. Signal transduction pathways and intracellular generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) were evaluated by integrating morphological, cell, and molecular biology techniques. Non-oriented and oriented migration were evaluated by using wound healing assay and the modified Boyden's chamber assay, respectively. The data indicate that hypoxia-induced migration of HSC/MFs is a biphasic process characterized by the following sequence of events: (a) an early (15 min) and mitochondria-related increased generation of intracellular ROS which (b) was sufficient to switch on activation of ERK1/2 and JNK1/2 that were responsible for the early phase of oriented migration; (c) a delayed and HIF-1α-dependent increase in VEGF expression (facilitated by ROS) and its progressive, time-dependent release in the extracellular medium that (d) was mainly responsible for sustained migration of HSC/MFs. Finally, immunohistochemistry performed on HCV-related fibrotic/cirrhotic livers revealed HIF-2α and haem-oxygenase-1 positivity in hepatocytes and α-SMA-positive MFs, indicating that MFs were likely to be exposed in vivo to both hypoxia and oxidative stress. In conclusion, hypoxia-induced migration of HSC/MFs involves an early, mitochondrial-dependent ROS-mediated activation of ERK and JNK, followed by a delayed- and HIF-1α-dependent up-regulation and release of VEGF.

  11. BRAF activates PAX3 to control muscle precursor cell migration during forelimb muscle development

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Jaeyoung; Watanabe, Shuichi; Hoelper, Soraya; Krüger, Marcus; Kostin, Sawa; Pöling, Jochen; Kubin, Thomas; Braun, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Migration of skeletal muscle precursor cells is a key step during limb muscle development and depends on the activity of PAX3 and MET. Here, we demonstrate that BRAF serves a crucial function in formation of limb skeletal muscles during mouse embryogenesis downstream of MET and acts as a potent inducer of myoblast cell migration. We found that a fraction of BRAF accumulates in the nucleus after activation and endosomal transport to a perinuclear position. Mass spectrometry based screening for potential interaction partners revealed that BRAF interacts and phosphorylates PAX3. Mutation of BRAF dependent phosphorylation sites in PAX3 impaired the ability of PAX3 to promote migration of C2C12 myoblasts indicating that BRAF directly activates PAX3. Since PAX3 stimulates transcription of the Met gene we propose that MET signaling via BRAF fuels a positive feedback loop, which maintains high levels of PAX3 and MET activity required for limb muscle precursor cell migration. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18351.001 PMID:27906130

  12. Coordinated integrin activation by actin-dependent force during T-cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Nordenfelt, Pontus; Elliott, Hunter L.; Springer, Timothy A.

    2016-01-01

    For a cell to move forward it must convert chemical energy into mechanical propulsion. Force produced by actin polymerization can generate traction across the plasma membrane by transmission through integrins to their ligands. However, the role this force plays in integrin activation is unknown. Here we show that integrin activity and cytoskeletal dynamics are reciprocally linked, where actin-dependent force itself appears to regulate integrin activity. We generated fluorescent tension-sensing constructs of integrin αLβ2 (LFA-1) to visualize intramolecular tension during cell migration. Using quantitative imaging of migrating T cells, we correlate tension in the αL or β2 subunit with cell and actin dynamics. We find that actin engagement produces tension within the β2 subunit to induce and stabilize an active integrin conformational state and that this requires intact talin and kindlin motifs. This supports a general mechanism where localized actin polymerization can coordinate activation of the complex machinery required for cell migration. PMID:27721490

  13. Activated protein C promotes breast cancer cell migration through interactions with EPCR and PAR-1

    SciTech Connect

    Beaulieu, Lea M.; Church, Frank C. . E-mail: fchurch@email.unc.edu

    2007-02-15

    Activated protein C (APC) is a serine protease that regulates thrombin (IIa) production through inactivation of blood coagulation factors Va and VIIIa. APC also has non-hemostatic functions related to inflammation, proliferation, and apoptosis through various mechanisms. Using two breast cancer cell lines, MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-435, we investigated the role of APC in cell chemotaxis and invasion. Treatment of cells with increasing APC concentrations (1-50 {mu}g/ml) increased invasion and chemotaxis in a concentration-dependent manner. Only the active form of APC increased invasion and chemotaxis of the MDA-MB-231 cells when compared to 3 inactive APC derivatives. Using a modified 'checkerboard' analysis, APC was shown to only affect migration when plated with the cells; therefore, APC is not a chemoattractant. Blocking antibodies to endothelial protein C receptor (EPCR) and protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR-1) attenuated the effects of APC on chemotaxis in the MDA-MB-231 cells. Finally, treatment of the MDA-MB-231 cells with the proliferation inhibitor, Na butyrate, showed that APC did not increase migration by increasing cell number. Therefore, APC increases invasion and chemotaxis of cells by binding to the cell surface and activating specific signaling pathways through EPCR and PAR-1.

  14. Lysophosphatidic acid induces cell migration through the selective activation of Akt1

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun Kyoung; Yun, Sung Ji; Do, Kee Hun; Kim, Min Sung; Cho, Mong; Suh, Dong-Soo; Kim, Chi Dae; Kim, Jae Ho; Birnbaum, Morris J.

    2008-01-01

    Akt plays pivotal roles in many physiological responses including growth, proliferation, survival, metabolism, and migration. In the current studies, we have evaluated the isoform-specific role of akt in lysophosphatidic acid (LPA)-induced cell migration. Ascites from ovarian cancer patients (AOCP) induced mouse embryo fibroblast (MEF) cell migration in a dose-dependent manner. On the other hand, ascites from liver cirrhosis patients (ALCP) did not induce MEF cell migration. AOCP-induced MEF cell migration was completely blocked by pre-treatment of cells with LPA receptor antagonist, Ki16425. Both LPA- and AOCP-induced MEF cell migration was completely attenuated by PI3K inhibitor, LY294002. Furthermore, cells lacking Akt1 displayed defect in LPA-induced cell migration. Re-expression of Akt1 in DKO (Akt1-/-Akt2-/-) cells restored LPA-induced cell migration, whereas re-expression of Akt2 in DKO cells could not restore the LPA-induced cell migration. Finally, Akt1 was selectively phosphorylated by LPA and AOCP stimulation. These results suggest that LPA is a major factor responsible for AOCP-induced cell migration and signaling specificity of Akt1 may dictate LPA-induced cell migration. PMID:18779657

  15. Induction of pancreatic cancer cell migration by an autocrine epidermal growth factor receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Stock, Anna-Maria; Hahn, Stephan A; Troost, Gabriele; Niggemann, Bernd; Zänker, Kurt S; Entschladen, Frank

    2014-08-15

    Pancreatic cancer is characterized by aggressive local invasion and early metastasis formation. Active migration of the pancreatic cancer cells is essential for these processes. We have shown previously that the pancreatic cancer cells lines CFPAC1 and IMIM-PC2 show high migratory activity, and we have investigated herein the reason for this observation. Cell migration was assessed using a three-dimensional, collagen-based assay and computer-assisted cell tracking. The expression of receptor tyrosine kinases was determined by flow-cytometry and cytokine release was measured by an enzyme-linked immunoassay. Receptor function was blocked by antibodies or pharmacological enzyme inhibitors. Both cells lines express the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) as well as its family-member ErbB2 and the platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR)α, whereas only weak expression was detected for ErbB3 and no expression of PDGFRβ. Pharmacological inhibition of the EGFR or ErbB2 significantly reduced the migratory activity in both cell lines, as did an anti-EGFR antibody. Interestingly, combination of the latter with an anti-PDGFR antibody led to an even more pronounced reduction. Both cell lines release detectable amounts of EGF. Thus, the high migratory activity of the investigated pancreatic cancer cell lines is due to autocrine EGFR activation and possibly of other receptor tyrosine kinases.

  16. Slit3 inhibits activator protein 1-mediated migration of malignant melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Denk, Alexandra E; Braig, Simone; Schubert, Thomas; Bosserhoff, Anja K

    2011-11-01

    The repellent factor family of Slit molecules has been described to have repulsive function in the developing nervous system on growing axons expressing the Robo receptors. Alterations of the Slit/Robo system have been observed in various pathological conditions and in cancer. However, until today no detailed studies on Slit function on melanoma migration are available. Therefore, we analysed the mRNA expression in melanoma cells and found induction of Robo3 expression compared to normal melanocytes. Functional assays performed with melanoma cells revealed that treatment with Slit3 led to strong inhibition of migration. Interestingly, we observed down-regulation of AP-1 activity and target gene expression after Slit3 treatment contributing to the negative regulation of migration. Taken together, our data showed that Slit3 reduces the migratory activity of melanoma cells, potentially by repulsion of the cells in analogy to the neuronal system. Further studies will be necessary to prove Slit activity in vivo, but due to its function, Slit3 activity may be helpful in the treatment of melanoma.

  17. MYC-nick promotes cell migration by inducing fascin expression and Cdc42 activation

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Sarah; Poudel, Kumud Raj; Roh-Johnson, Minna; Brabletz, Thomas; Yu, Ming; Borenstein-Auerbach, Nofit; Grady, William N.; Bai, Jihong; Moens, Cecilia B.; Eisenman, Robert N.; Conacci-Sorrell, Maralice

    2016-01-01

    MYC-nick is a cytoplasmic, transcriptionally inactive member of the MYC oncoprotein family, generated by a proteolytic cleavage of full-length MYC. MYC-nick promotes migration and survival of cells in response to chemotherapeutic agents or withdrawal of glucose. Here we report that MYC-nick is abundant in colonic and intestinal tumors derived from mouse models with mutations in the Wnt, TGF-β, and PI3K pathways. Moreover, MYC-nick is elevated in colon cancer cells deleted for FBWX7, which encodes the major E3 ligase of full-length MYC frequently mutated in colorectal cancers. MYC-nick promotes the migration of colon cancer cells assayed in 3D cultures or grown as xenografts in a zebrafish metastasis model. MYC-nick accelerates migration by activating the Rho GTPase Cdc42 and inducing fascin expression. MYC-nick, fascin, and Cdc42 are frequently up-regulated in cells present at the invasive front of human colorectal tumors, suggesting a coordinated role for these proteins in tumor migration. PMID:27566402

  18. p53/PUMA expression in human pulmonary fibroblasts mediates cell activation and migration in silicosis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Liu, Haijun; Dai, Xiaoniu; Fang, Shencun; Wang, Xingang; Zhang, Yingming; Yao, Honghong; Zhang, Xilong; Chao, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Phagocytosis of SiO2 into the lung causes an inflammatory cascade that results in fibroblast proliferation and migration, followed by fibrosis. Clinical evidence has indicated that the activation of alveolar macrophages by SiO2 produces rapid and sustained inflammation characterized by the generation of monocyte chemotactic protein 1, which, in turn, induces fibrosis. However, the details of events downstream of monocyte chemotactic protein 1 activity in pulmonary fibroblasts remain unclear. Here, to elucidate the role of p53 in fibrosis induced by silica, both the upstream molecular mechanisms and the functional effects on cell proliferation and migration were investigated. Experiments using primary cultured adult human pulmonary fibroblasts led to the following results: 1) SiO2 treatment resulted in a rapid and sustained increase in p53 and PUMA protein levels; 2) the MAPK and PI3K pathways were involved in the SiO2-induced alteration of p53 and PUMA expression; and 3) RNA interference targeting p53 and PUMA prevented the SiO2-induced increases in fibroblast activation and migration. Our study elucidated a link between SiO2-induced p53/PUMA expression in fibroblasts and cell migration, thereby providing novel insight into the potential use of p53/PUMA in the development of novel therapeutic strategies for silicosis treatment. PMID:26576741

  19. Ena/VASP proteins regulate activated T-cell trafficking by promoting diapedesis during transendothelial migration.

    PubMed

    Estin, Miriam L; Thompson, Scott B; Traxinger, Brianna; Fisher, Marlie H; Friedman, Rachel S; Jacobelli, Jordan

    2017-04-04

    Vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) and Ena-VASP-like (EVL) are cytoskeletal effector proteins implicated in regulating cell morphology, adhesion, and migration in various cell types. However, the role of these proteins in T-cell motility, adhesion, and in vivo trafficking remains poorly understood. This study identifies a specific role for EVL and VASP in T-cell diapedesis and trafficking. We demonstrate that EVL and VASP are selectively required for activated T-cell trafficking but are not required for normal T-cell development or for naïve T-cell trafficking to lymph nodes and spleen. Using a model of multiple sclerosis, we show an impairment in trafficking of EVL/VASP-deficient activated T cells to the inflamed central nervous system of mice with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Additionally, we found a defect in trafficking of EVL/VASP double-knockout (dKO) T cells to the inflamed skin and secondary lymphoid organs. Deletion of EVL and VASP resulted in the impairment in α4 integrin (CD49d) expression and function. Unexpectedly, EVL/VASP dKO T cells did not exhibit alterations in shear-resistant adhesion to, or in crawling on, primary endothelial cells under physiologic shear forces. Instead, deletion of EVL and VASP impaired T-cell diapedesis. Furthermore, T-cell diapedesis became equivalent between control and EVL/VASP dKO T cells upon α4 integrin blockade. Overall, EVL and VASP selectively mediate activated T-cell trafficking by promoting the diapedesis step of transendothelial migration in a α4 integrin-dependent manner.

  20. Tetraspanins in Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Xupin; Zhang, Jiaping; Huang, Yuesheng

    2015-01-01

    Tetraspanins are a superfamily of small transmembrane proteins that are expressed in almost all eukaryotic cells. Through interacting with one another and with other membrane and intracellular proteins, tetraspanins regulate a wide range of proteins such as integrins, cell surface receptors, and signaling molecules, and thereby engage in diverse cellular processes ranging from cell adhesion and migration to proliferation and differentiation. In particular, tetraspanins modulate the function of proteins involved in all determining factors of cell migration including cell–cell adhesion, cell–ECM adhesion, cytoskeletal protrusion/contraction, and proteolytic ECM remodeling. We herein provide a brief overview of collective in vitro and in vivo studies of tetraspanins to illustrate their regulatory functions in the migration and trafficking of cancer cells, vascular endothelial cells, skin cells (keratinocytes and fibroblasts), and leukocytes. We also discuss the involvement of tetraspanins in various pathologic and remedial processes that rely on cell migration and their potential value as targets for therapeutic intervention. PMID:26091149

  1. Cell migration, freshly squeezed.

    PubMed

    Welch, Matthew D

    2015-02-12

    Migrating cells exhibit distinct motility modes and can switch between modes based on chemical or physical cues. Liu et al. and Ruprecht et al. now describe how confinement and contractility influence motility mode plasticity and instigate a mode termed stable bleb migration in embryonic and tumor cells.

  2. Putting the brakes on cancer cell migration: JAM-A restrains integrin activation.

    PubMed

    Naik, Ulhas P; Naik, Meghna U

    2008-01-01

    Junctional Adhesion Molecule A (JAM-A) is a member of the Ig superfamily of membrane proteins expressed in platelets, leukocytes, endothelial cells and epithelial cells. We have previously shown that in endothelial cells, JAM-A regulates basic fibroblast growth factor, (FGF-2)-induced angiogenesis via augmenting endothelial cell migration. Recently, we have revealed that in breast cancer cells, downregulation of JAM-A enhances cancer cell migration and invasion. Further, ectopic expression of JAM-A in highly metastatic MDA-MB-231 cells attenuates cell migration, and downregulation of JAM-A in low-metastatic T47D cells enhance migration. Interestingly, JAM-A expression is greatly diminished as breast cancer disease progresses. The molecular mechanism of this function of JAM-A is beyond its well-characterized barrier function at the tight junction. Our results point out that JAM-A differentially regulates migration of endothelial and cancer cells.

  3. Visualizing Chemokine-Dependent T Cell Activation and Migration in Response to Central Nervous System Infection

    PubMed Central

    Carson, Monica J.; Wilson, Emma H.

    2014-01-01

    In response to central nervous system (CNS) injury and infection, astrocytes, neurons, and CNS vasculature express several chemokines, including CCL21. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), western blot, and immunohistochemical methods can quantify mRNA and protein expression. However, these methods do not quantify chemokine bioavailability and bioactivity, variables modified by many environ mental factors including composition of extracellular matrix (ECM). Here we illustrate how two-photon microscopy and carboxyfluorescein succinimidyl ester (CFSE or CFDA SE) labeling of T cells coupled with flow cytometry can be used as tools to assess chemokine-mediated regulation of T cell proliferation, activation, and migration. PMID:23625499

  4. Epidermal growth factor stimulates Rac activation through Src and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase to promote colonic epithelial cell migration.

    PubMed

    Dise, Rebecca S; Frey, Mark R; Whitehead, Robert H; Polk, D Brent

    2008-01-01

    Regulated intestinal epithelial cell migration plays a key role in wound healing and maintenance of a healthy gastrointestinal tract. Epidermal growth factor (EGF) stimulates cell migration and wound closure in intestinal epithelial cells through incompletely understood mechanisms. In this study we investigated the role of the small GTPase Rac in EGF-induced cell migration using an in vitro wound-healing assay. In mouse colonic epithelial (MCE) cell lines, EGF-stimulated wound closure was accompanied by a doubling of the number of cells containing lamellipodial extensions at the wound margin, increased Rac membrane translocation in cells at the wound margin, and rapid Rac activation. Either Rac1 small interfering (si)RNA or a Rac1 inhibitor completely blocked EGF-stimulated wound closure. Whereas EGF failed to activate Rac in colon cells from EGF receptor (EGFR) knockout mice, stable expression of wild-type EGFR restored EGF-stimulated Rac activation and migration. Pharmacological inhibition of either phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) or Src family kinases reduced EGF-stimulated Rac activation. Cotreatment of cells with both inhibitors completely blocked EGF-stimulated Rac activation and localization to the leading edge of cells and lamellipodial extension. Our results present a novel mechanism by which the PI3K and Src signaling cascades cooperate to activate Rac and promote intestinal epithelial cell migration downstream of EGFR.

  5. Antioxidant activity of Coriandrum sativum and protection against DNA damage and cancer cell migration

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Coriandrum sativum is a popular culinary and medicinal herb of the Apiaceae family. Health promoting properties of this herb have been reported in pharmacognostical, phytochemical and pharmacological studies. However, studies on C. sativum have always focused on the aerial parts of the herb and scientific investigation on the root is limited. The aim of this research was to investigate the antioxidant and anticancer activities of C. sativum root, leaf and stem, including its effect on cancer cell migration, and its protection against DNA damage, with special focus on the roots. Methods Powdered roots, leaves and stems of C. sativum were extracted through sequential extraction using hexane, dichloromethane, ethyl acetate, methanol and water. Total phenolic content, FRAP and DPPH radical scavenging activities were measured. Anti-proliferative activitiy on the breast cancer cell line, MCF-7, was assayed using the MTT assay. Activities of the antioxidant enzymes, catalase, superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, and of the caspases-3, -8 and -9 were assayed on treatment with the extract. Cell cycle progression was analysed using flow cytometry. The scratch motility assay was used to assess inhibition of MCF-7 cell migration. DNA damage in 3 T3-L1 fibroblasts was evaluated by the comet assay. The components in the extract were identified by HPLC and GC-MS. Results The ethyl acetate extract of C. sativum roots showed the highest antiproliferative activity on MCF-7 cells (IC50 = 200.0 ± 2.6 μg/mL) and had the highest phenolic content, FRAP and DPPH scavenging activities among the extracts. C. sativum root inhibited DNA damage and prevented MCF-7 cell migration induced by H2O2, suggesting its potential in cancer prevention and inhibition of metastasis. The extract exhibited anticancer activity in MCF-7 cells by affecting antioxidant enzymes possibly leading to H2O2 accumulation, cell cycle arrest at the G2/M phase and apoptotic cell death by

  6. Mechano-growth factor induces migration of rat mesenchymal stem cells by altering its mechanical properties and activating ERK pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Jiamin; Wu, Kewen; Lin, Feng; Luo, Qing; Yang, Li; Shi, Yisong; Song, Guanbin; Sung, Kuo-Li Paul

    2013-11-08

    Highlights: •MGF induced the migration of rat MSC in a concentration-dependent manner. •MGF enhanced the mechanical properties of rMSC in inducing its migration. •MGF activated the ERK 1/2 signaling pathway of rMSC in inducing its migration. •rMSC mechanics may synergy with ERK 1/2 pathway in MGF-induced rMSC migration. -- Abstract: Mechano-growth factor (MGF) generated by cells in response to mechanical stimulation has been identified as a mechano effector molecule, playing a key role in regulating mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) function, including proliferation and migration. However, the mechanism(s) underlying how MGF-induced MSC migration occurs is still unclear. In the present study, MGF motivated migration of rat MSCs (rMSCs) in a concentration-dependent manner and optimal concentration of MGF at 50 ng/mL (defined as MGF treatment in this paper) was demonstrated. Notably, enhancement of mechanical properties that is pertinent to cell migration, such as cell traction force and cell stiffness were found to respond to MGF treatment. Furthermore, MGF increased phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), ERK inhibitor (i.e., PD98059) suppressed ERK phosphorylation, and abolished MGF-induced rMSC migration were found, demonstrating that ERK is involved molecule for MGF-induced rMSC migration. These in vitro evidences of MGF-induced rMSC migration and its direct link to altering rMSC mechanics and activating the ERK pathway, uncover the underlying biomechanical and biological mechanisms of MGF-induced rMSC migration, which may help find MGF-based application of MSC in clinical therapeutics.

  7. Reconciling the discrepancies on the involvement of large-conductance Ca(2+)-activated K channels in glioblastoma cell migration.

    PubMed

    Catacuzzeno, Luigi; Caramia, Martino; Sforna, Luigi; Belia, Silvia; Guglielmi, Luca; D'Adamo, Maria Cristina; Pessia, Mauro; Franciolini, Fabio

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common and aggressive primary brain tumor, and is notable for spreading so effectively through the brain parenchyma to make complete surgical resection virtually impossible, and prospect of life dismal. Several ion channels have been involved in GBM migration and invasion, due to their critical role in supporting volume changes and Ca(2+) influx occuring during the process. The large-conductance, Ca(2+)-activated K (BK) channels, markedly overexpressed in biopsies of patients with GBMs and in GBM cell lines, have attracted much interest and have been suggested to play a central role in cell migration and invasion as candidate channels for providing the ion efflux and consequent water extrusion that allow cell shrinkage during migration. Available experimental data on the role of BK channel in migration and invasion are not consistent though. While BK channels block typically resulted in inhibition of cell migration or in no effect, their activation would either enhance or inhibit the process. This short review reexamines the relevant available data on the topic, and presents a unifying paradigm capable of reconciling present discrepancies. According to this paradigm, BK channels would not contribute to migration under conditions where the [Ca(2+)] i is too low for their activation. They will instead positively contribute to migration for intermediate [Ca(2+)] i , insufficient as such to activate BK channels, but capable of predisposing them to cyclic activation following oscillatory [Ca(2+)] i increases. Finally, steadily active BK channels because of prolonged high [Ca(2+)] i would inhibit migration as their steady activity would be unsuitable to match the cyclic cell volume changes needed for proper cell migration.

  8. Increase of mesenchymal stem cell migration by cannabidiol via activation of p42/44 MAPK.

    PubMed

    Schmuhl, Ellen; Ramer, Robert; Salamon, Achim; Peters, Kirsten; Hinz, Burkhard

    2014-02-01

    Migration and differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are known to be involved in various regenerative processes such as bone healing. However, little is known about the pharmacotherapeutical options aiming at the mobilization and differentiation of MSCs. The present study therefore focussed on cannabinoids which have been demonstrated to exhibit tissue healing properties. Using Boyden chamber assays, the non-psychoactive phytocannabinoid cannabidiol (CBD) was found to increase the migration of adipose-derived MSCs in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. CBD-induced migration was inhibited by AM-630 (CB₂ receptor antagonist) and O-1602 (G protein-coupled receptor 55 [GRP55] agonist). Moreover, the promigratory effect of CBD was antagonized by inhibition of the p42/44 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway which became activated upon CBD treatment. In line with this data, AM-630 and O-1602 attenuated CBD-induced p42/44 MAPK phosphorylation. A p42/44 MAPK-dependent promigratory effect was likewise demonstrated for the GPR55 antagonist O-1918 and the selective CB₂ receptor agonist JWH-133. Additional evidence for a functional effect of CBD on MSCs was provided by experiments demonstrating long-term stimulation with CBD to induce differentiation of MSCs into the osteoblastic lineage as evidenced by increased mineralization assessed by cresolphthalein complexone assay and enhanced activity of alkaline phosphatase. Collectively, this study demonstrates CBD to promote the migration of MSCs via activation of the CB₂ receptor and inhibition of GPR55 and to induce osteoblastic differentiation. CBD may therefore recruit MSCs to sites of calcifying tissue regeneration and subsequently support bone regeneration via an osteoanabolic action on MSCs.

  9. Leader cells regulate collective cell migration via Rac activation in the downstream signaling of integrin β1 and PI3K.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Naoya; Mizutani, Takeomi; Kawabata, Kazushige; Haga, Hisashi

    2015-01-07

    Collective cell migration plays a crucial role in several biological processes, such as embryonic development, wound healing, and cancer metastasis. Here, we focused on collectively migrating Madin-Darby Canine Kidney (MDCK) epithelial cells that follow a leader cell on a collagen gel to clarify the mechanism of collective cell migration. First, we removed a leader cell from the migrating collective with a micromanipulator. This then caused disruption of the cohesive migration of cells that followed in movement, called "follower" cells, which showed the importance of leader cells. Next, we observed localization of active Rac, integrin β1, and PI3K. These molecules were clearly localized in the leading edge of leader cells, but not in follower cells. Live cell imaging using active Rac and active PI3K indicators was performed to elucidate the relationship between Rac, integrin β1, and PI3K. Finally, we demonstrated that the inhibition of these molecules resulted in the disruption of collective migration. Our findings not only demonstrated the significance of a leader cell in collective cell migration, but also showed that Rac, integrin β1, and PI3K are upregulated in leader cells and drive collective cell migration.

  10. Analysing immune cell migration.

    PubMed

    Beltman, Joost B; Marée, Athanasius F M; de Boer, Rob J

    2009-11-01

    The visualization of the dynamic behaviour of and interactions between immune cells using time-lapse video microscopy has an important role in modern immunology. To draw robust conclusions, quantification of such cell migration is required. However, imaging experiments are associated with various artefacts that can affect the estimated positions of the immune cells under analysis, which form the basis of any subsequent analysis. Here, we describe potential artefacts that could affect the interpretation of data sets on immune cell migration. We propose how these errors can be recognized and corrected, and suggest ways to prevent the data analysis itself leading to biased results.

  11. cAMP-induced Epac-Rap activation inhibits epithelial cell migration by modulating focal adhesion and leading edge dynamics.

    PubMed

    Lyle, Karen S; Raaijmakers, Judith H; Bruinsma, Wytse; Bos, Johannes L; de Rooij, Johan

    2008-06-01

    Epithelial cell migration is a complex process crucial for embryonic development, wound healing and tumor metastasis. It depends on alterations in cell-cell adhesion and integrin-extracellular matrix interactions and on actomyosin-driven, polarized leading edge protrusion. The small GTPase Rap is a known regulator of integrins and cadherins that has also been implicated in the regulation of actin and myosin, but a direct role in cell migration has not been investigated. Here, we report that activation of endogenous Rap by cAMP results in an inhibition of HGF- and TGFbeta-induced epithelial cell migration in several model systems, irrespective of the presence of E-cadherin adhesion. We show that Rap activation slows the dynamics of focal adhesions and inhibits polarized membrane protrusion. Importantly, forced integrin activation by antibodies does not mimic these effects of Rap on cell motility, even though it does mimic Rap effects in short-term cell adhesion assays. From these results, we conclude that Rap inhibits epithelial cell migration, by modulating focal adhesion dynamics and leading edge activity. This extends beyond the effect of integrin affinity modulation and argues for an additional function of Rap in controlling the migration machinery of epithelial cells.

  12. Urokinase type plasminogen activator mediates Interleukin-17-induced peripheral blood mesenchymal stem cell motility and transendothelial migration.

    PubMed

    Krstić, Jelena; Obradović, Hristina; Jauković, Aleksandra; Okić-Đorđević, Ivana; Trivanović, Drenka; Kukolj, Tamara; Mojsilović, Slavko; Ilić, Vesna; Santibañez, Juan F; Bugarski, Diana

    2015-02-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have the potential to migrate toward damaged tissues increasing tissue regeneration. Interleukin-17 (IL-17) is a proinflammatory cytokine with pleiotropic effects associated with many inflammatory diseases. Although IL-17 can modulate MSC functions, its capacity to regulate MSC migration is not well elucidated so far. Here, we studied the role of IL-17 on peripheral blood (PB) derived MSC migration and transmigration across endothelial cells. IL-17 increased PB-MSC migration in a wound healing assay as well as cell mobilization from collagen gel. Concomitantly IL-17 induced the expression of urokinase type plasminogen activator (uPA) without affecting matrix metalloproteinase expression. The incremented uPA expression mediated the capacity of IL-17 to enhance PB-MSC migration in a ERK1,2 MAPK dependent way. Also, IL-17 induced PB-MSC migration alongside with changes in cell polarization and uPA localization in cell protrusions. Moreover, IL-17 increased PB-MSC adhesion to endothelial cells and transendothelial migration, as well as increased the capacity of PB-MSC adhesion to fibronectin, in an uPA-dependent fashion. Therefore, our data suggested that IL-17 may act as chemotropic factor for PB-MSCs by incrementing cell motility and uPA expression during inflammation development.

  13. Fibulin-5 binds urokinase-type plasminogen activator and mediates urokinase-stimulated β1-integrin-dependent cell migration.

    PubMed

    Kapustin, Alexander; Stepanova, Victoria; Aniol, Natalia; Cines, Douglas B; Poliakov, Alexei; Yarovoi, Serge; Lebedeva, Tatiana; Wait, Robin; Ryzhakov, Grigory; Parfyonova, Yelena; Gursky, Yaroslav; Yanagisawa, Hiromi; Minashkin, Mikhail; Beabealashvilli, Robert; Vorotnikov, Alexander; Bobik, Alex; Tkachuk, Vsevolod

    2012-04-15

    uPA (urokinase-type plasminogen activator) stimulates cell migration through multiple pathways, including formation of plasmin and extracellular metalloproteinases, and binding to the uPAR (uPA receptor; also known as CD87), integrins and LRP1 (low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1) which activate intracellular signalling pathways. In the present paper we report that uPA-mediated cell migration requires an interaction with fibulin-5. uPA stimulates migration of wild-type MEFs (mouse embryonic fibroblasts) (Fbln5+/+ MEFs), but has no effect on fibulin-5-deficient (Fbln5-/-) MEFs. Migration of MEFs in response to uPA requires an interaction of fibulin-5 with integrins, as MEFs expressing a mutant fibulin-5 incapable of binding integrins (Fbln(RGE/RGE) MEFs) do not migrate in response to uPA. Moreover, a blocking anti-(human β1-integrin) antibody inhibited the migration of PASMCs (pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells) in response to uPA. Binding of uPA to fibulin-5 generates plasmin, which excises the integrin-binding N-terminal cbEGF (Ca2+-binding epidermal growth factor)-like domain, leading to loss of β1-integrin binding. We suggest that uPA promotes cell migration by binding to fibulin-5, initiating its cleavage by plasmin, which leads to its dissociation from β1-integrin and thereby unblocks the capacity of integrin to facilitate cell motility.

  14. Fibulin-5 binds urokinase-type plasminogen activator and mediates urokinase-stimulated β1-integrin-dependent cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Kapustin, Alexander; Stepanova, Victoria; Aniol, Natalia; Cines, Douglas B.; Poliakov, Alexei; Yarovoi, Serge; Lebedeva, Tatiana; Wait, Robin; Ryzhakov, Grigory; Parfyonova, Yelena; Gursky, Yaroslav; Yanagisawa, Hiromi; Minashkin, Mikhail; Beabealashvilli, Robert; Vorotnikov, Alexander; Bobik, Alex; Tkachuk, Vsevolod

    2015-01-01

    uPA (urokinase-type plasminogen activator) stimulates cell migration through multiple pathways, including formation of plasmin and extracellular metalloproteinases, and binding to the uPAR (uPA receptor; also known as CD87), integrins and LRP1 (low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1) which activate intracellular signalling pathways. In the present paper we report that uPA-mediated cell migration requires an interaction with fibulin-5. uPA stimulates migration of wild-type MEFs (mouse embryonic fibroblasts) (Fbln5+/+ MEFs), but has no effect on fibulin-5-deficient (Fbln5−/−) MEFs. Migration of MEFs in response to uPA requires an interaction of fibulin-5 with integrins, as MEFs expressing a mutant fibulin-5 incapable of binding integrins (FblnRGE/RGE MEFs) do not migrate in response to uPA. Moreover, a blocking anti-(human β1-integrin) antibody inhibited the migration of PASMCs (pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells) in response to uPA. Binding of uPA to fibulin-5 generates plasmin, which excises the integrin-binding N-terminal cbEGF (Ca2+ -binding epidermal growth factor)-like domain, leading to loss of β1-integrin binding. We suggest that uPA promotes cell migration by binding to fibulin-5, initiating its cleavage by plasmin, which leads to its dissociation from β1-integrin and thereby unblocks the capacity of integrin to facilitate cell motility. PMID:22280367

  15. HMG-CoA reductase regulates CCL17-induced colon cancer cell migration via geranylgeranylation and RhoA activation

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Haidari, Amr A.; Syk, Ingvar; Thorlacius, Henrik

    2014-03-28

    Highlights: • Simvastatin blocked CCL17-induced and CCR4-dependent RhoA activation in HT29 cells. • CCL17/CCR4-mediated migration of colon cancer cells was antagonised by simvastatin. • Cell migration recovered by adding Mevalonate and geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate. • Targeting HMG-CoA reductase might be useful to inhibit colon cancer metastasis. - Abstract: Background: Simvastatin is widely used to lower cholesterol levels in patients with cardiovascular diseases, although accumulating evidence suggests that statins, such as simvastatin, also exert numerous anti-tumoral effects. Aim: The aim of this study was to examine the effect of simvastatin on colon cancer cell migration. Methods: Migration assays were performed to evaluate CCL17-induced colon cancer cell (HT-29) chemotaxis. In vitro tumor growth and apoptosis were assessed using a proliferation assay and annexin V assay, respectively. Active RhoA protein levels in CCL17-stimulated colon cancer cells were quantified using a G-LISA assay. Results: We found that simvastatin dose-dependently decreased CCL17-induced colon cancer cell migration. Simvastatin had no effect on colon cancer cell proliferation or apoptosis. Inhibition of beta chemokine receptor 4, CCR4, reduced CCL17-evoked activation of RhoA in colon cancer cells. Moreover, administration of mevalonate reversed the inhibitory effect of simvastatin on CCL17-induced colon cancer cell migration. Interestingly, co-incubation with geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate (GGPP) antagonized the inhibitory impact of simvastatin on colon cancer cell migration triggered by CCL17. Moreover, we observed that simvastatin decreased CCL17-induced activation of RhoA in colon cancer cells. Administration of mevalonate and GGPP reversed the inhibitory effect of simvastatin on CCL17-provoked RhoA activation in colon cancer cells. Conclusions: Taken together, our findings show for the first time that HMG-CoA reductase regulates CCL17-induced colon cancer cell migration via

  16. Spatial distribution of protein kinase A activity during cell migration is mediated by A-kinase anchoring protein AKAP Lbc.

    PubMed

    Paulucci-Holthauzen, Adriana A; Vergara, Leoncio A; Bellot, Larry J; Canton, David; Scott, John D; O'Connor, Kathleen L

    2009-02-27

    Protein kinase A (PKA) has been suggested to be spatially regulated in migrating cells due to its ability to control signaling events that are critical for polarized actin cytoskeletal dynamics. Here, using the fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based A-kinase activity reporter (AKAR1), we find that PKA activity gradients form with the strongest activity at the leading edge and are restricted to the basal surface in migrating cells. The existence of these gradients was confirmed using immunocytochemistry using phospho-PKA substrate antibodies. This observation holds true for carcinoma cells migrating randomly on laminin-1 or stimulated to migrate on collagen I with lysophosphatidic acid. Phosphodiesterase inhibition allows the formation of PKA activity gradients; however, these gradients are no longer polarized. PKA activity gradients are not detected when a non-phosphorylatable mutant of AKAR1 is used, if PKA activity is inhibited with H-89 or protein kinase inhibitor, or when PKA anchoring is perturbed. We further find that a specific A-kinase anchoring protein, AKAP-Lbc, is a major contributor to the formation of these gradients. In summary, our data show that PKA activity gradients are generated at the leading edge of migrating cells and provide additional insight into the mechanisms of PKA regulation of cell motility.

  17. Spatial Distribution of Protein Kinase A Activity during Cell Migration Is Mediated by A-kinase Anchoring Protein AKAP Lbc*

    PubMed Central

    Paulucci-Holthauzen, Adriana A.; Vergara, Leoncio A.; Bellot, Larry J.; Canton, David; Scott, John D.; O'Connor, Kathleen L.

    2009-01-01

    Protein kinase A (PKA) has been suggested to be spatially regulated in migrating cells due to its ability to control signaling events that are critical for polarized actin cytoskeletal dynamics. Here, using the fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based A-kinase activity reporter (AKAR1), we find that PKA activity gradients form with the strongest activity at the leading edge and are restricted to the basal surface in migrating cells. The existence of these gradients was confirmed using immunocytochemistry using phospho-PKA substrate antibodies. This observation holds true for carcinoma cells migrating randomly on laminin-1 or stimulated to migrate on collagen I with lysophosphatidic acid. Phosphodiesterase inhibition allows the formation of PKA activity gradients; however, these gradients are no longer polarized. PKA activity gradients are not detected when a non-phosphorylatable mutant of AKAR1 is used, if PKA activity is inhibited with H-89 or protein kinase inhibitor, or when PKA anchoring is perturbed. We further find that a specific A-kinase anchoring protein, AKAP-Lbc, is a major contributor to the formation of these gradients. In summary, our data show that PKA activity gradients are generated at the leading edge of migrating cells and provide additional insight into the mechanisms of PKA regulation of cell motility. PMID:19106088

  18. Piperlongumine Inhibits Migration of Glioblastoma Cells via Activation of ROS-Dependent p38 and JNK Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qian Rong; Liu, Ju Mei; Chen, Yong; Xie, Xiao Qiang; Xiong, Xin Xin; Qiu, Xin Yao; Pan, Feng; Liu, Di; Yu, Shang Bin; Chen, Xiao Qian

    2014-01-01

    Piperlongumine (PL) is recently found to kill cancer cells selectively and effectively via targeting reactive oxygen species (ROS) responses. To further explore the therapeutic effects of PL in cancers, we investigated the role and mechanisms of PL in cancer cell migration. PL effectively inhibited the migration of human glioma (LN229 or U87 MG) cells but not normal astrocytes in the scratch-wound culture model. PL did not alter EdU+-cells and cdc2, cdc25c, or cyclin D1 expression in our model. PL increased ROS (measured by DCFH-DA), reduced glutathione, activated p38 and JNK, increased IκBα, and suppressed NFκB in LN229 cells after scratching. All the biological effects of PL in scratched LN229 cells were completely abolished by the antioxidant N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC). Pharmacological administration of specific p38 (SB203580) or JNK (SP600125) inhibitors significantly reduced the inhibitory effects of PL on LN229 cell migration and NFκB activity in scratch-wound and/or transwell models. PL prevented the deformation of migrated LN229 cells while NAC, SB203580, or SP600125 reversed PL-induced morphological changes of migrated cells. These results suggest potential therapeutic effects of PL in the treatment and prevention of highly malignant tumors such as glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) in the brain by suppressing tumor invasion and metastasis. PMID:24967005

  19. Endothelial cell activation promotes foam cell formation by monocytes following transendothelial migration in an in vitro model.

    PubMed

    Westhorpe, Clare L V; Dufour, Eric M; Maisa, Anna; Jaworowski, Anthony; Crowe, Suzanne M; Muller, William A

    2012-10-01

    Foam cells are a pathological feature present at all stages of atherosclerosis. Foam cells develop from monocytes that enter the nascent atheroma and subsequently ingest modified low density lipoproteins (LDL). The regulation of this process has previously been studied in vitro using cultured macrophage fed modified LDL. We used our existing in vitro model of transendothelial migration (TEM) to study this process in a more physiologically relevant setting. In our model, monocytes undergo TEM across a primary endothelial monolayer into an underlying three-dimensional collagen matrix in the presence of 20% human serum. Foam cells were detected by Oil Red O staining for intracellular lipid droplets. We demonstrate that sub-endothelial monocytes can develop into foam cells within 48 h of TEM across TNF-α activated endothelium, in the absence of additional lipids. Our data indicate a role for both monocyte-endothelial interactions and soluble factors in the regulation of foam cell development, including oxidation of LDL in situ from lipid present in culture medium following TNF-α stimulation of the endothelial cells. Our study provides a simple model for investigating foam cell development in vitro that mimics cell migration in vivo, and demonstrates the critical role of inflammation in regulating early atherogenic events.

  20. Borrelia burgdorferi Induces TLR2-Mediated Migration of Activated Dendritic Cells in an Ex Vivo Human Skin Model

    PubMed Central

    Wagemakers, Alex; van ‘t Veer, Cornelis; Oei, Anneke; van der Pot, Wouter J.; Ahmed, Kalam; van der Poll, Tom; Geijtenbeek, Teunis B. H.; Hovius, Joppe W. R.

    2016-01-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi is transmitted into the skin of the host where it encounters and interacts with two dendritic cell (DC) subsets; Langerhans cells (LCs) and dermal DCs (DDCs). These cells recognize pathogens via pattern recognition receptors, mature and migrate out of the skin into draining lymph nodes, where they orchestrate adaptive immune responses. In order to investigate the response of skin DCs during the early immunopathogenesis of Lyme borreliosis, we injected B. burgdorferi intradermally into full-thickness human skin and studied the migration of DCs out of the skin, the activation profile and phenotype of migrated cells. We found a significant increase in the migration of LCs and DDCs in response to B. burgdorferi. Notably, migration was prevented by blocking TLR2. DCs migrated from skin inoculated with higher numbers of spirochetes expressed significantly higher levels of CD83 and produced pro-inflammatory cytokines. No difference was observed in the expression of HLA-DR, CD86, CD38, or CCR7. To conclude, we have established an ex vivo human skin model to study DC-B. burgdorferi interactions. Using this model, we have demonstrated that B. burgdorferi-induced DC migration is mediated by TLR2. Our findings underscore the utility of this model as a valuable tool to study immunity to spirochetal infections. PMID:27695100

  1. Smad4 inhibits cell migration via suppression of JNK activity in human pancreatic carcinoma PANC-1 cells

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, XUEYING; CAO, JUNXIA; PEI, YUJUN; ZHANG, JIYAN; WANG, QINGYANG

    2016-01-01

    Smad4 is a common Smad and is a key downstream regulator of the transforming growth factor-β signaling pathway, in which Smad4 often acts as a potent tumor suppressor and functions in a highly context-dependent manner, particularly in pancreatic cancer. However, little is known regarding whether Smad4 regulates other signaling pathways involved in pancreatic cancer. The present study demonstrated that Smad4 downregulates c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) activity using a Smad4 loss-of-function or gain-of-function analysis. Additionally, stable overexpression of Smad4 clearly affected the migration of human pancreatic epithelioid carcinoma PANC-1 cells, but did not affect cell growth. In addition, the present study revealed that upregulation of mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase-1 is required for the reduction of JNK activity by Smad4, leading to a decrease in vascular endothelial growth factor expression and inhibiting cell migration. Overall, the present findings indicate that Smad4 may suppress JNK activation and inhibit the tumor characteristics of pancreatic cancer cells. PMID:27123137

  2. Activated hepatic stellate cells play pivotal roles in hepatocellular carcinoma cell chemoresistance and migration in multicellular tumor spheroids

    PubMed Central

    Song, Yeonhwa; Kim, Se-hyuk; Kim, Kang Mo; Choi, Eun Kyung; Kim, Joon; Seo, Haeng Ran

    2016-01-01

    Most Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) are resistant to conventional chemotherapeutic agents and remain an unmet medical need. Recently, multiple studies on the crosstalk between HCC and their tumor microenvironment have been conducted to overcome chemoresistance in HCC. In this study, we formed multicellular tumor spheroids (MCTS) to elucidate the mechanisms of environment-mediated chemoresistance in HCC. We observed that hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) in MCTS significantly increased the compactness of spheroids and exhibited strong resistance to sorafenib and cisplatin relative to other types of stromal cells. Increased collagen 1A1 (COL1A1) expression was apparent in activated HSCs but not in fibroblasts or vascular endothelial cells in MCTS. Additionally, COL1A1 deficiency, which was increased by co-culture with HSCs, decreased the cell-cell interactions and thereby increased the therapeutic efficacy of anticancer therapies in MCTS. Furthermore, losartan, which can inhibit collagen I synthesis, attenuated the compactness of spheroids and increased the therapeutic efficacy of anticancer therapies in MCTS. Meanwhile, activated HSCs facilitated HCC migration by upregulating matrix metallopeptidase 9 (MMP9) in MCTS. Collectively, crosstalk between HCC cells and HSCs promoted HCC chemoresistance and migration by increasing the expression of COL1A1 and MMP9 in MCTS. Hence, targeting HSCs might represent a promising therapeutic strategy for liver cancer therapy. PMID:27853186

  3. Characterization of Collective Cell Migration Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Rachel; Yue, Haicen; Rappel, Wouter-Jan; Losert, Wolfgang

    2015-03-01

    During cancer progression, tumor cells invade the surrounding tissue and migrate throughout the body, forming clinically dangerous secondary tumors. This metastatic process begins when cells leave the primary tumor, either as individual cells or collectively migrating groups. Here we present data on the migration dynamics of epithelial sheets composed of many cells. Using quantitative image analysis techniques, we are able to extract motion information from time-lapse images of cell lines with varying malignancy. Adapting metrics originally used to study fluid flows we are able to characterize the migration dynamics of these cell lines. By describing the migration dynamics in great detail, we are able to make a clear comparison of our results to a simulation of collective cell migration. Specifically, we explore whether leader cells are required to describe our expanding sheets of cells and whether the answer depends on individual cell activity.

  4. Soluble tissue factor has unique angiogenic activities that selectively promote migration and differentiation but not proliferation of endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    He Yingbo; Chang Guodong; Zhan Shunli; Song Xiaomin; Wang Xiaofeng; Luo Yongzhang

    2008-06-06

    The level of circulating tissue factor (TF) is up-regulated in human angiogenesis-related malignancies. However, whether circulating TF has angiogenic activities has not been determined. Soluble TF (sTF) is the main domain of circulating TF. Here, using cell migration, wound healing, and tubule formation assays, human recombinant sTF was found to significantly promote the migration and differentiation of endothelial cells. The stress fiber formation and rearrangement induced by sTF observed through immunofluorescence microscope may be responsible for the stimulatory migration effect of sTF. Nevertheless, sTF had no effects on endothelial cell proliferation. Interestingly, sTF can be internalized by endothelial cells, which implies a novel mechanism for sTF in angiogenesis. These results suggest that sTF has unique angiogenic activities and may serve as a potential therapeutic target to treat diseases associated with angiogenesis such as cancer and rheumatoid arthritis.

  5. Low-Dose Curcumin Stimulates Proliferation, Migration and Phagocytic Activity of Olfactory Ensheathing Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tello Velasquez, Johana; Watts, Michelle E.; Todorovic, Michael; Nazareth, Lynnmaria; Pastrana, Erika; Diaz-Nido, Javier; Lim, Filip; Ekberg, Jenny A. K.; Quinn, Ronald J.; John, James A. St

    2014-01-01

    One of the promising strategies for neural repair therapies is the transplantation of olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs) which are the glial cells of the olfactory system. We evaluated the effects of curcumin on the behaviour of mouse OECs to determine if it could be of use to further enhance the therapeutic potential of OECs. Curcumin, a natural polyphenol compound found in the spice turmeric, is known for its anti-cancer properties at doses over 10 µM, and often at 50 µM, and it exerts its effects on cancer cells in part by activation of MAP kinases. In contrast, we found that low-dose curcumin (0.5 µM) applied to OECs strikingly modulated the dynamic morphology, increased the rate of migration by up to 4-fold, and promoted significant proliferation of the OECs. Most dramatically, low-dose curcumin stimulated a 10-fold increase in the phagocytic activity of OECs. All of these potently stimulated behavioural characteristics of OECs are favourable for neural repair therapies. Importantly, low-dose curcumin gave a transient activation of p38 kinases, which is in contrast to the high dose curcumin effects on cancer cells in which these MAP kinases tend to undergo prolonged activation. Low-dose curcumin mediated effects on OECs demonstrate cell-type specific stimulation of p38 and ERK kinases. These results constitute the first evidence that low-dose curcumin can modulate the behaviour of olfactory glia into a phenotype potentially more favourable for neural repair and thereby improve the therapeutic use of OECs for neural repair therapies. PMID:25360677

  6. Perfluorooctanoic acid induces human Ishikawa endometrial cancer cell migration and invasion through activation of ERK/mTOR signaling

    PubMed Central

    Li, Fujun; Wang, Yixong; Xu, Yang; Zhang, Mei; Zhang, Xiaoqian; Ying, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Xuesen

    2016-01-01

    Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) is a common environmental pollutant that has been associated with various diseases, including cancer. We explored the molecular mechanisms underlying PFOA-induced endometrial cancer cell invasion and migration. PFOA treatment enhanced migration and invasion by human Ishikawa endometrial cancer cells, which correlated with decreased E-cadherin expression, a marker of epithelial-mesenchymal transition. PFOA also induced activation of ERK1/2/mTOR signaling. Treatment with rapamycin, an mTOR inhibitor, antagonized the effects of PFOA and reversed the effects of PFOA activation in a xenograft mouse model of endometrial cancer. Consistent with these results, pre-treatment with rapamycin abolished PFOA-induced down-regulation of E-cadherin expression. These results indicate that PFOA is a carcinogen that promotes endometrial cancer cell migration and invasion through activation of ERK/mTOR signaling. PMID:27589685

  7. FOXP1 enhances tumor cell migration by repression of NFAT1 transcriptional activity in MDA-MB-231 cells.

    PubMed

    Oskay Halacli, Sevil

    2017-01-01

    Until now, forkhead box P1 (FOXP1) has been identified as a tumor suppressor in several correlation studies in breast cancer. Although FOXP1 is defined as a transcriptional repressor that interacts with other transcription factors in various mechanistic studies, there is no study that explains its repressor functions in breast cancer biology. This study demonstrated the repressor function of FOXP1 on nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT1) and the migratory effect of this repression in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments were performed for the investigation of protein-protein interaction between two transcription factors. Protein-protein interaction on DNA was investigated with EMSA and transcriptional effects of FOXP1 on NFAT1, luciferase reporter assay was performed. Wound healing assay was used to analyze the effects of overexpression of FOXP1 on tumor cell migration. This study showed that FOXP1 has protein-protein interaction with NFAT1 on DNA and enhances breast cancer cell migration by repressing NFAT1 transcriptional activity and FOXP1 shows oncogenic function by regulating breast cancer cell motility.

  8. Role of low voltage activated calcium channels in neuritogenesis and active migration of embryonic neural progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Louhivuori, Lauri M; Louhivuori, Verna; Wigren, Henna-Kaisa; Hakala, Elina; Jansson, Linda C; Nordström, Tommy; Castrén, Maija L; Akerman, Karl E

    2013-04-15

    The central role of calcium influx and electrical activity in embryonic development raises important questions about the role and regulation of voltage-dependent calcium influx. Using cultured neural progenitor cell (NPC) preparations, we recorded barium currents through voltage-activated channels using the whole-cell configuration of the patch-clamp technique and monitored intracellular free calcium concentrations with Fura-2 digital imaging. We found that NPCs as well as expressing high-voltage-activated (HVA) calcium channels express functional low-threshold voltage-dependent calcium channels in the very early stages of differentiation (5 h to 1 day). The size of the currents recorded at -50 versus -20 mV after 1 day in differentiation was dependent on the nature of the charge carrier. Peak currents measured at -20 mV in the presence 10 mM Ca2+ instead of 10 mM Ba2+ had a tendency to be smaller, whereas the nature of the divalent species did not influence the amplitude measured at -50 mV. The T-type channel blockers mibefradil and NNC 55-0396 significantly reduced the calcium responses elicited by depolarizing with extracellular potassium, while the overall effect of the HVA calcium channel blockers was small at differentiation day 1. At differentiation day 20, the calcium responses were effectively blocked by nifedipine. Time-lapse imaging of differentiating neurospheres cultured in the presence of low-voltage-activated (LVA) blockers showed a significant decrease in the number of active migrating neuron-like cells and neurite extensions. Together, these data provide evidence that LVA calcium channels are involved in the physiology of differentiating and migrating NPCs.

  9. Regulator of G protein signaling 1 suppresses CXCL12-mediated migration and AKT activation in RPMI 8226 human plasmacytoma cells and plasmablasts.

    PubMed

    Pak, Hyo-Kyung; Gil, Minchan; Lee, Yoonkyung; Lee, Hyunji; Lee, A-Neum; Roh, Jin; Park, Chan-Sik

    2015-01-01

    Migration of plasma cells to the bone marrow is critical factor to humoral immunity and controlled by chemokines. Regulator of G protein signaling 1 (RGS1) is a GTPase-activating protein that controls various crucial functions such as migration. Here, we show that RGS1 controls the chemotactic migration of RPMI 8226 human plasmacytoma cells and human plasmablasts. LPS strongly increased RGS1 expression and retarded the migration of RPMI 8226 cells by suppressing CXCL12-mediated AKT activation. RGS1 knockdown by siRNA abolished the retardation of migration and AKT suppression by LPS. RGS1-dependent regulation of migration via AKT is also observed in cultured plasmablasts. We propose novel functions of RGS1 that suppress AKT activation and the migration of RPMI 8226 cells and plasmablasts in CXCL12-mediated chemotaxis.

  10. GPR78 promotes lung cancer cell migration and metastasis by activation of Gαq-Rho GTPase pathway.

    PubMed

    Dong, Dan-Dan; Zhou, Hui; Li, Gao

    2016-11-01

    GPR78 is an orphan G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) that is predominantly expressed in human brain tissues. Currently, the function of GPR78 is unknown. This study revealed that GPR78 was expressed in lung cancer cells and functioned as a novel regulator of lung cancer cell migration and metastasis. We found that knockdown of GPR78 in lung cancer cells suppressed cell migration. Moreover, GPR78 modulated the formation of actin stress fibers in A549 cells, in a RhoA- and Rac1-dependent manner. At the molecular level, GPR78 regulated cell motility through the activation of Gαq-RhoA/Rac1 pathway. We further demonstrated that in vivo, the knockdown of GPR78 inhibited lung cancer cell metastasis. These findings suggest that GPR78 is a novel regulator for lung cancer metastasis and may serve as a potential drug target against metastatic human lung cancer. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(11): 623-628].

  11. GPR78 promotes lung cancer cell migration and metastasis by activation of Gαq-Rho GTPase pathway

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Dan-Dan; Zhou, Hui; Li, Gao

    2016-01-01

    GPR78 is an orphan G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) that is predominantly expressed in human brain tissues. Currently, the function of GPR78 is unknown. This study revealed that GPR78 was expressed in lung cancer cells and functioned as a novel regulator of lung cancer cell migration and metastasis. We found that knockdown of GPR78 in lung cancer cells suppressed cell migration. Moreover, GPR78 modulated the formation of actin stress fibers in A549 cells, in a RhoA- and Rac1-dependent manner. At the molecular level, GPR78 regulated cell motility through the activation of Gαq-RhoA/Rac1 pathway. We further demonstrated that in vivo, the knockdown of GPR78 inhibited lung cancer cell metastasis. These findings suggest that GPR78 is a novel regulator for lung cancer metastasis and may serve as a potential drug target against metastatic human lung cancer. PMID:27697106

  12. Discoidin domain receptor 1 promotes Th17 cell migration by activating the RhoA/ROCK/MAPK/ERK signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Azreq, Mohammed-Amine El; Kadiri, Maleck; Boisvert, Marc; Pagé, Nathalie; Tessier, Philippe A.; Aoudjit, Fawzi

    2016-01-01

    Effector T cell migration through the tissue extracellular matrix (ECM) is an important step of the adaptive immune response and in the development of inflammatory diseases. However, the mechanisms involved in this process are still poorly understood. In this study, we addressed the role of a collagen receptor, the discoidin domain receptor 1 (DDR1), in the migration of Th17 cells. We showed that the vast majority of human Th17 cells express DDR1 and that silencing DDR1 or using the blocking recombinant receptor DDR1:Fc significantly reduced their motility and invasion in three-dimensional (3D) collagen. DDR1 promoted Th17 migration by activating RhoA/ROCK and MAPK/ERK signaling pathways. Interestingly, the RhoA/ROCK signaling module was required for MAPK/ERK activation. Finally, we showed that DDR1 is important for the recruitment of Th17 cells into the mouse dorsal air pouch containing the chemoattractant CCL20. Collectively, our results indicate that DDR1, via the activation of RhoA/ROCK/MAPK/ERK signaling axis, is a key pathway of effector T cell migration through collagen of perivascular tissues. As such, DDR1 can contribute to the development of Th17-dependent inflammatory diseases. PMID:27391444

  13. Phosphatidic acid-mediated activation and translocation to the cell surface of sialidase NEU3, promoting signaling for cell migration.

    PubMed

    Shiozaki, Kazuhiro; Takahashi, Kohta; Hosono, Masahiro; Yamaguchi, Kazunori; Hata, Keiko; Shiozaki, Momo; Bassi, Rosaria; Prinetti, Alessandro; Sonnino, Sandro; Nitta, Kazuo; Miyagi, Taeko

    2015-05-01

    The plasma membrane-associated sialidase NEU3 plays crucial roles in regulation of transmembrane signaling, and its aberrant up-regulation in various cancers contributes to malignancy. However, it remains uncertain how NEU3 is naturally activated and locates to plasma membranes, because of its Triton X-100 requirement for the sialidase activity in vitro and its often changing subcellular location. Among phospholipids examined, we demonstrate that phosphatidic acid (PA) elevates its sialidase activity 4 to 5 times at 50 μM in vitro at neutral pH and promotes translocation to the cell surface and cell migration through Ras-signaling in HeLa and COS-1 cells. NEU3 was found to interact selectively with PA as assessed by phospholipid array, liposome coprecipitation, and ELISA assays and to colocalize with phospholipase D (PLD) 1 in response to epidermal growth factor (EGF) or serum stimulation. Studies using tagged NEU3 fragments with point mutations identified PA- and calmodulin (CaM)-binding sites around the N terminus and confirmed its participation in translocation and catalytic activity. EGF induced PLD1 activation concomitantly with enhanced NEU3 translocation to the cell surface, as assessed by confocal microscopy. These results suggest that interactions of NEU3 with PA produced by PLD1 are important for regulation of transmembrane signaling, this aberrant acceleration probably promoting malignancy in cancers.

  14. Snail promotes cell migration through PI3K/AKT-dependent Rac1 activation as well as PI3K/AKT-independent pathways during prostate cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Veronica; Smith, Basil; Burton, Liza J; Randle, Diandra; Morris, Marisha; Odero-Marah, Valerie A

    2015-01-01

    Snail, a zinc-finger transcription factor, induces epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), which is associated with increased cell migration and metastasis in cancer cells. Rac1 is a small G-protein which upon activation results in formation of lamellipodia, the first protrusions formed by migrating cells. We have previously shown that Snail promotes cell migration through down-regulation of maspin tumor suppressor. We hypothesized that Snail's regulation of cell migration may also involve Rac1 signaling regulated by PI3K/AKT and/or MAPK pathways. We found that Snail overexpression in LNCaP and 22Rv1 prostate cancer cells increased Rac1 activity associated with increased cell migration, and the Rac1 inhibitor, NSC23766, could inhibit Snail-mediated cell migration. Conversely, Snail downregulation using shRNA in the aggressive C4–2 prostate cancer cells decreased Rac1 activity and cell migration. Moreover, Snail overexpression increased ERK and PI3K/AKT activity in 22Rv1 prostate cancer cells. Treatment of Snail-overexpressing 22Rv1 cells with LY294002, PI3K/AKT inhibitor or U0126, MEK inhibitor, decreased cell migration significantly, but only LY294002 significantly reduced Rac1 activity, suggesting that Snail promotes Rac1 activation via the PI3K/AKT pathway. Furthermore, 22Rv1 cells overexpressing Snail displayed decreased maspin levels, while inhibition of maspin expression in 22Rv1 cells with siRNA, led to increased PI3K/AKT, Rac1 activity and cell migration, without affecting ERK activity, suggesting that maspin is upstream of PI3K/AKT. Overall, we have dissected signaling pathways by which Snail may promote cell migration through MAPK signaling or alternatively through PI3K/AKT-Rac1 signaling that involves Snail inhibition of maspin tumor suppressor. This may contribute to prostate cancer progression. PMID:26207671

  15. Hint1 suppresses migration and invasion of hepatocellular carcinoma cells in vitro by modulating girdin activity.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xue-Song; Bao, Tian-Hao; Ke, Yang; Sun, De-Yun; Shi, Zhi-Tian; Tang, Hao-Ran; Wang, Lin

    2016-11-01

    Histidine triad nucleotide-binding protein 1 (Hint1) is a haploinsufficient tumor suppressor gene. Its role in cancer cell migration has not been previously speculated. In the current study, we examined the expression of Hint1 in metastatic and non-metastatic lymph nodes of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients and further elucidated the effect of Hint1 expression on girdin expression and phosphorylation of AKT and ERK1/2 and on the migration of HCC cells in vitro. Expression of Hint1 and girdin in primary HCC tissues and metastatic and non-metastatic lymph nodes was determined by RT-PCR assays. HepG2 cells were transfected with plasmid vectors overexpressing Hint1 or small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting Hint1, girdin, Hint1 plus girdin, or the scrambled RNA. Migration and invasion of HCC cells were examined by wound and Transwell assays. Protein expression was detected by immunofluorescence and immunoblotting assays. RT-PCR assays revealed that the messenger RNA (mRNA) transcript levels of Hint1 were markedly lower than those of primary HCC tissues and non-metastatic lymph nodes (P < 0.01). By contrast, the mRNA transcript levels of girdin were significantly higher than non-metastatic lymph nodes (P < 0.05). Furthermore, siRNA knockdown of HINT1 resulted in a significant increase in the mRNA transcript levels of girdin in HepG2 cells (P < 0.05). Wound assays and Transwell assays showed that Hint1 knockdown by siRNA significantly enhanced the migration and invasion of HepG2 cells compared to HepG2 cells transfected with scrambled siRNA. Hint1 knockdown also led to significantly increased phosphorylation of girdin and AKT in HepG2 cells (P < 0.05), which, however, was effectively aborted by girdin knockdown by siRNA (P < 0.05). Hint1 is downregulated in metastatic lymph nodes and is implicated in migration and invasion of HCC cells in vitro by modulating girdin and AKT expression and phosphorylation. The Hint1-girdin-AKT signaling axis should be

  16. Gβ1 controls collective cell migration by regulating the protrusive activity of leader cells in the posterior lateral line primordium.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hui; Ye, Ding; Behra, Martine; Burgess, Shawn; Chen, Songhai; Lin, Fang

    2014-01-15

    Collective cell migration is critical for normal development, tissue repair and cancer metastasis. Migration of the posterior lateral line primordium (pLLP) generates the zebrafish sensory organs (neuromasts, NMs). This migration is promoted by the leader cells at the leading edge of the pLLP, which express the G protein-coupled chemokine receptor Cxcr4b and respond to the chemokine Cxcl12a. However, the mechanism by which Cxc112a/Cxcr4b signaling regulates pLLP migration remains unclear. Here we report that signal transduction by the heterotrimeric G protein subunit Gβ1 is essential for proper pLLP migration. Although both Gβ1 and Gβ4 are expressed in the pLLP and NMs, depletion of Gβ1 but not Gβ4 resulted in an arrest of pLLP migration. In embryos deficient for Gβ1, the pLLP cells migrated in an uncoordinated fashion and were unable to extend protrusions at the leading front, phenocopying those in embryos deficient for Cxcl12a or Cxcr4b. A transplantation assay showed that, like Cxcr4b, Gβ1 is required only in the leader cells of the pLLP. Analysis of F-actin dynamics in the pLLP revealed that whereas wild-type leader cells display extensive actin polymerization in the direction of pLLP migration, counterparts defective for Gβ1, Cxcr4b or Cxcl12a do not. Finally, synergy experiments revealed that Gβ1 and Cxcr4b interact genetically in regulating pLLP migration. Collectively, our data indicate that Gβ1 controls migration of the pLLP, likely by acting downstream of the Cxcl12a/Cxcr4b signaling. This study also provides compelling evidence for functional specificity among Gβ isoforms in vivo.

  17. Tuberin, the tuberous sclerosis complex 2 tumor suppressor gene product, regulates Rho activation, cell adhesion and migration.

    PubMed

    Astrinidis, Aristotelis; Cash, Timothy P; Hunter, Deborah S; Walker, Cheryl L; Chernoff, Jonathan; Henske, Elizabeth P

    2002-12-05

    Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is a tumor suppressor gene syndrome characterized by seizures, mental retardation, autism, and tumors of the brain, kidney, heart, retina, and skin. TSC is caused by mutations in either TSC1 or TSC2, both of which are tumor suppressor genes. Hamartin, the protein product of TSC1, was found to interact with the ezrin-radixin-moesin family of cytoskeletal proteins and to activate the small GTPase Rho. To determine whether tuberin, the TSC2 product, can also activate Rho, we stably expressed full-length human tuberin in two cell types: MDCK cells and ELT3 cells. ELT3 cells lack endogenous tuberin expression. We found that expression of human tuberin in both MDCK and ELT3 cells was associated with an increase in the amount of Rho-GTP, but not in Rac1-GTP or cdc42-GTP. Tuberin expression increased cell adhesion in both cell types, and decreased chemotactic cell migration in ELT3 cells. In MDCK cells, there was a decrease in the amount of total Focal Adhesion Kinase (FAK) and an increase in the fraction of phosphorylated FAK. These findings demonstrate for the first time that tuberin activates Rho and regulates cell adhesion and migration. Pathways involving Rho activation may have relevance to the clinical manifestations of TSC, including pulmonary lymphangioleiomyomatosis.

  18. Displacement correlations between a single mesenchymal-like cell and its nucleus effectively link subcellular activities and motility in cell migration analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lan, Tian; Cheng, Kai; Ren, Tina; Arce, Stephen Hugo; Tseng, Yiider

    2016-01-01

    Cell migration is an essential process in organism development and physiological maintenance. Although current methods permit accurate comparisons of the effects of molecular manipulations and drug applications on cell motility, effects of alterations in subcellular activities on motility cannot be fully elucidated from those methods. Here, we develop a strategy termed cell-nuclear (CN) correlation to parameterize represented dynamic subcellular activities and to quantify their contributions in mesenchymal-like migration. Based on the biophysical meaning of the CN correlation, we propose a cell migration potential index (CMPI) to measure cell motility. When the effectiveness of CMPI was evaluated with respect to one of the most popular cell migration analysis methods, Persistent Random Walk, we found that the cell motility estimates among six cell lines used in this study were highly consistent between these two approaches. Further evaluations indicated that CMPI can be determined using a shorter time period and smaller cell sample size, and it possesses excellent reliability and applicability, even in the presence of a wide range of noise, as might be generated from individual imaging acquisition systems. The novel approach outlined here introduces a robust strategy through an analysis of subcellular locomotion activities for single cell migration assessment. PMID:27670131

  19. Displacement correlations between a single mesenchymal-like cell and its nucleus effectively link subcellular activities and motility in cell migration analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Tian; Cheng, Kai; Ren, Tina; Arce, Stephen Hugo; Tseng, Yiider

    2016-09-01

    Cell migration is an essential process in organism development and physiological maintenance. Although current methods permit accurate comparisons of the effects of molecular manipulations and drug applications on cell motility, effects of alterations in subcellular activities on motility cannot be fully elucidated from those methods. Here, we develop a strategy termed cell-nuclear (CN) correlation to parameterize represented dynamic subcellular activities and to quantify their contributions in mesenchymal-like migration. Based on the biophysical meaning of the CN correlation, we propose a cell migration potential index (CMPI) to measure cell motility. When the effectiveness of CMPI was evaluated with respect to one of the most popular cell migration analysis methods, Persistent Random Walk, we found that the cell motility estimates among six cell lines used in this study were highly consistent between these two approaches. Further evaluations indicated that CMPI can be determined using a shorter time period and smaller cell sample size, and it possesses excellent reliability and applicability, even in the presence of a wide range of noise, as might be generated from individual imaging acquisition systems. The novel approach outlined here introduces a robust strategy through an analysis of subcellular locomotion activities for single cell migration assessment.

  20. Role of exchange protein directly activated by cAMP (EPAC1) in breast cancer cell migration and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Naveen; Gupta, Sonal; Dabral, Surbhi; Singh, Shailja; Sehrawat, Seema

    2017-02-16

    Despite the current progress in cancer research and therapy, breast cancer remains the leading cause of mortality among half a million women worldwide. Migration and invasion of cancer cells are associated with prevalent tumor metastasis as well as high mortality. Extensive studies have powerfully established the role of prototypic second messenger cAMP and its two ubiquitously expressed intracellular cAMP receptors namely the classic protein kinaseA/cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) and the more recently discovered exchange protein directly activated by cAMP/cAMP-regulated guanine nucleotide exchange factor (EPAC/cAMP-GEF) in cell migration, cell cycle regulation, and cell death. Herein, we performed the analysis of the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) dataset to evaluate the essential role of cAMP molecular network in breast cancer. We report that EPAC1, PKA, and AKAP9 along with other molecular partners are amplified in breast cancer patients, indicating the importance of this signaling network. To evaluate the functional role of few of these proteins, we used pharmacological modulators and analyzed their effect on cell migration and cell death in breast cancer cells. Hence, we report that inhibition of EPAC1 activity using pharmacological modulators leads to inhibition of cell migration and induces cell death. Additionally, we also observed that the inhibition of EPAC1 resulted in disruption of its association with the microtubule cytoskeleton and delocalization of AKAP9 from the centrosome as analyzed by in vitro imaging. Finally, this study suggests for the first time the mechanistic insights of mode of action of a primary cAMP-dependent sensor, Exchange protein activated by cAMP 1 (EPAC1), via its interaction with A-kinase anchoring protein 9 (AKAP9). This study provides a new cell signaling cAMP-EPAC1-AKAP9 direction to the development of additional biotherapeutics for breast cancer.

  1. Cardiac glycoside activities link Na(+)/K(+) ATPase ion-transport to breast cancer cell migration via correlative SAR.

    PubMed

    Magpusao, Anniefer N; Omolloh, George; Johnson, Joshua; Gascón, José; Peczuh, Mark W; Fenteany, Gabriel

    2015-02-20

    The cardiac glycosides ouabain and digitoxin, established Na(+)/K(+) ATPase inhibitors, were found to inhibit MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell migration through an unbiased chemical genetics screen for cell motility. The Na(+)/K(+) ATPase acts both as an ion-transporter and as a receptor for cardiac glycosides. To delineate which function is related to breast cancer cell migration, structure-activity relationship (SAR) profiles of cardiac glycosides were established at the cellular (cell migration inhibition), molecular (Na(+)/K(+) ATPase inhibition), and atomic (computational docking) levels. The SAR of cardiac glycosides and their analogs revealed a similar profile, a decrease in potency when the parent cardiac glycoside structure was modified, for each activity investigated. Since assays were done at the cellular, molecular, and atomic levels, correlation of SAR profiles across these multiple assays established links between cellular activity and specific protein-small molecule interactions. The observed antimigratory effects in breast cancer cells are directly related to the inhibition of Na(+)/K(+) transport. Specifically, the orientation of cardiac glycosides at the putative cation permeation path formed by transmembrane helices αM1-M6 correlates with the Na(+) pump activity and cell migration. Other Na(+)/K(+) ATPase inhibitors that are structurally distinct from cardiac glycosides also exhibit antimigratory activity, corroborating the conclusion that the antiport function of Na(+)/K(+) ATPase and not the receptor function is important for supporting the motility of MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. Correlative SAR can establish new relationships between specific biochemical functions and higher-level cellular processes, particularly for proteins with multiple functions and small molecules with unknown or various modes of action.

  2. α-Solanine inhibits human melanoma cell migration and invasion by reducing matrix metalloproteinase-2/9 activities.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ming-Kun; Shih, Yuan-Wei; Chang Chien, Tzu-Tsung; Fang, Li-Heng; Huang, Hsiang-Ching; Chen, Pin-Shern

    2010-01-01

    α-Solanine, a naturally occurring steroidal glycoalkaloid in potato sprouts, was found to possess anti-carcinogenic properties, such as inhibiting proliferation and inducing apoptosis of tumor cells. However, the effect of α-solanine on cancer metastasis remains unclear. In the present study, we examined the effect of α-solanine on metastasis in vitro. Data demonstrated that α-solanine inhibited proliferation of human melanoma cell line A2058 in a dose-dependent manner. When treated with non-toxic doses of α-solanine, cell migration and invasion were markedly suppressed. Furthermore, α-solanine reduced the activity of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) and MMP-9, which are involved in the migration and invasion of cancer cells. Our biochemical assays indicated that α-solanine potently suppressed the phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), phosphatidylinositide-3 kinase (PI3K) and Akt, while it did not affect phosphorylation of extracellular signal regulating kinase (ERK). In addition, α-solanine significantly decreased the nuclear level of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), suggesting that α-solanine inhibited NF-κB activity. Taken together, the results suggested that α-solanine inhibited migration and invasion of A2058 cells by reducing MMP-2/9 activities. It also inhibited JNK and PI3K/Akt signaling pathways as well as NF-κB activity. These findings reveal new therapeutic potential for α-solanine in anti-metastatic therapy.

  3. The hexane extract of Saussurea lappa and its active principle, dehydrocostus lactone, inhibit prostate cancer cell migration.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun Ji; Hong, Ji Eun; Lim, Soon Sung; Kwon, Gyoo Taik; Kim, Jongdai; Kim, Jong-Sang; Lee, Ki Won; Park, Jung Han Yoon

    2012-01-01

    Saussurea lappa has been used in Chinese traditional medicine for the treatment of abdominal pain, tenesmus, nausea, and cancer; previous studies have shown that S. lappa also induces G(2) growth arrest and apoptosis in gastric cancer cells. In this study, we investigated the effects of hexane extracts of S. lappa (HESLs) on the migration of DU145 and TRAMP-C2 prostate cancer cells. DU145 and TRAMP-C2 cells were cultured in the presence of 0-4 μg/mL HESL with or without 10 ng/mL epidermal growth factor (EGF). HESL inhibited the basal and EGF-induced migration of prostate cancer cells in a dose-dependent manner, whereas HESL did not influence the viability of these cancer cells under the conditions used in this study. Active fractions of HESL were separated via column chromatography, and the structure of the active principle was determined using (1)H and (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The active compound, dehydrocostus lactone (DHCL), in fraction 7 dose-dependently inhibited the basal and EGF-induced migration of prostate cancer cells. HESL and DHCL reduced matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9 and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP)-1 secretion but increased TIMP-2 levels in both the absence and presence of EGF. Our results demonstrate that the inhibition of MMP-9 secretion and the stimulation of TIMP-2 secretion contribute to reduced migration of DU145 cells treated with HESL and DHCL. These results indicate that HESL containing its active principle, DHCL, has potential as an antimetastatic agent for the treatment of prostate cancer.

  4. Effect of chloride channel activity on retinal pigment cell proliferation and migration.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jing; Zhong, Wei; Sun, Lixia; Yin, Yuan; Zheng, Yajuan

    2017-04-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the effects of chloride channels (ClC) on the proliferation and migration of retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells, a primary component of proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR) membranes. An RPE cell model of phagocytosis was established using fibronectin‑coated latex beads. Cell proliferation was measured by live cell counting. The cell cycle and phagocytosis index was assessed by flow cytometry. Intracellular calcium concentration was quantified using Fura‑2‑acetoxymethyl ester. ClCs were blocked using 5‑nitro‑2‑(3‑phenylpropylamino) benzoic acid (NPPB) and tamoxifen (TAM). NPPB and TAM were identified to inhibit the proliferation of ARPE‑19 human adult RPE cells by arresting them in the G0/G1 phase, inhibit the phagocytosis of fibronectin, and decrease intracellular calcium levels, in a dose‑dependent manner. ClCs serve important roles in mediating human RPE cell proliferation and migration. The underlying mechanisms of action of ClCs are associated with the regulation of calcium. Targeting ClCs may provide a novel strategy to inhibit PVR formation.

  5. Src family kinase activity regulates adhesion, spreading and migration of pancreatic endocrine tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Di Florio, Alessia; Capurso, Gabriele; Milione, Massimo; Panzuto, Francesco; Geremia, Raffaele; Delle Fave, Gianfranco; Sette, Claudio

    2007-03-01

    Pancreatic endocrine tumours (PETs) are rare and 'indolent' neoplasms that usually develop metastatic lesions and exhibit poor response to standard medical treatments. Few studies have investigated pathways responsible for PET cell growth and invasion and no alternative therapeutic strategies have been proposed. In a recent microarray analysis for genes up-regulated in PETs, we have described the up-regulation of soluble Src family tyrosine kinases in this neoplasia, which may represent potentially promising candidates for therapy. Herein, we have investigated the expression and function of Src family kinases in PETS and PET cell lines. Western blot analysis indicated that Src is highly abundant in the PET cell lines CM and QGP-1. Immunohistochemistry and Western blot analyses showed that Src is up-regulated also in human PET lesions. Pharmacological inhibition of Src family kinases by the specific inhibitor PP2 strongly interfered with adhesion, spreading and migration of PET cell lines. Accordingly, the actin cytoskeleton was profoundly altered after inhibition of Src kinases, whereas even prolonged incubation with PP2 exerted no effect on cell cycle progression and/or apoptosis of PET cells. A transient increase in tyrosine phosphorylation of a subset of proteins was observed in QGP-1 cells adhering to the plate, with a peak at 75 min after seeding, when approximately 80% of cells were attached. Inhibition of Src kinases caused a dramatic reduction in the phosphorylation of proteins with different molecular weight that were isolated from the cell extracts by anti-phosphotyrosine immunoprecipitation or pull-down with the SH2 domain of Src. Among them, the docking protein p130Cas interacted with Src and is a major substrate of the Src kinases in QGP-1 cells undergoing adhesion. Our results suggest that Src kinases play a specific role during adhesion, spreading and migration of PET cells and may indicate therapeutical approaches directed to limiting the metastatic

  6. Integrating focal adhesion dynamics, cytoskeleton remodeling, and actin motor activity for predicting cell migration on 3D curved surfaces of the extracellular matrix.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min-Cheol; Kim, Choong; Wood, Levi; Neal, Devin; Kamm, Roger D; Asada, H Harry

    2012-11-01

    An integrative cell migration model incorporating focal adhesion (FA) dynamics, cytoskeleton and nucleus remodeling and actin motor activity is developed for predicting cell migration behaviors on 3-dimensional curved surfaces, such as cylindrical lumens in the 3-D extracellular matrix (ECM). The work is motivated by 3-D microfluidic migration experiments suggesting that the migration speed and direction may vary depending on the cross sectional shape of the lumen along which the cell migrates. In this paper, the mechanical structure of the cell is modeled as double elastic membranes of cell and nucleus. The two elastic membranes are connected by stress fibers, which are extended from focal adhesions on the cell surface to the nuclear membrane. The cell deforms and gains traction as transmembrane integrins distributed over the outer cell membrane bind to ligands on the ECM, form focal adhesions, and activate stress fibers. Probabilities at which integrin ligand-receptor bonds are formed as well as ruptures are affected by the surface geometry, resulting in diverse migration behaviors that depend on the curvature of the surface. Monte Carlo simulations of the integrative model reveal that (a) the cell migration speed is dependent on the cross sectional area of the lumen with a maximum speed at a particular diameter or width, (b) as the lumen diameter increases, the cell tends to spread and migrate around the circumference of the lumen, while it moves in the longitudinal direction as the lumen diameter narrows, (c) once the cell moves in one direction, it tends to stay migrating in the same direction despite the stochastic nature of migration. The relationship between the cell migration speed and the lumen width agrees with microfluidic experimental data for cancer cell migration.

  7. Alcohol promotes migration and invasion of triple-negative breast cancer cells through activation of p38 MAPK and JNK.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ming; Howard, Erin W; Parris, Amanda B; Guo, Zhiying; Zhao, Qingxia; Yang, Xiaohe

    2017-03-01

    Although alcohol is an established breast cancer risk factor, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Previous studies examined the general association between alcohol consumption and breast cancer risk; however, the risk for different breast cancer subtypes has been rarely reported. Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is a subtype of breast cancer lacking hormone receptors and HER2 expression, and having poor prognosis. Understanding the molecular mechanisms of TNBC etiology remains a significant challenge. In this study, we investigated cellular responses to alcohol in two TNBC cell lines, MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-468. Our results showed that alcohol at low concentrations (0.025-0.1% v/v) induced cell proliferation, migration, and invasion in 1% FBS-containing medium. Molecular analysis indicated that these phenotypic changes were associated with alcohol-induced reactive oxygen species production and increased p38 and JNK phosphorylation. Likewise, p38 or JNK inhibition attenuated alcohol-induced cell migration and invasion. We revealed that alcohol treatment activated/phosphorylated NF-κB regulators and increased transcription of NF-κB-targeted genes. While examining the role of acetaldehyde, the major alcohol metabolite, in alcohol-associated responses in TNBC cells, we saw that acetaldehyde induced cell migration, invasion, and increased phospho-p38, phospho-JNK, and phospho-IκBα in a pattern similar to alcohol treatment. Taken together, we established that alcohol promotes TNBC cell proliferation, migration, and invasion in vitro. The underlying mechanisms involve the induction of oxidative stress and the activation of NF-κB signaling. In particular, the activation of p38 and JNK plays a pivotal role in alcohol-induced cellular responses. These results will advance our understanding of alcohol-mediated development and promotion of TNBC. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Thy-1 Regulates VEGF-Mediated Choroidal Endothelial Cell Activation and Migration: Implications in Neovascular Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Haibo; Han, Xiaokun; Kunz, Eric; Hartnett, M. Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study addresses the hypothesis that age-related stresses upregulate Thy-1 in choroidal endothelial cells (CECs) and contribute to CEC activation and migration, processes important in choroidal neovascularization (CNV). Methods Measurements were made of Thy-1 protein (Western blot) in CECs and Thy-1 mRNA (real time quantitative PCR) in CECs treated with VEGF, CCL11, or PBS or in RPE/choroids from young or old donors or lasered or nonlasered mice. Immunolabeled Thy-1 in ocular sections was compared from young versus old human donor eyes or those with or without neovascular AMD or from lasered versus nonlasered mice. Choroidal endothelial cells transfected with Thy-1 or control siRNA or pretreated with Thy-1 blocking peptide or control were stimulated with VEGF or 7-ketocholesterol (7-KC). Choroidal endothelial cell migration, proliferation, cytoskeletal stress fibers, Rac1 activation, and phosphorylated VEGF receptor 2 (VEGFR2), integrin β3, and Src were measured. Statistics were performed using ANOVA. Results Thy-1 was expressed in retinal ganglion cells and in vascular endothelial-cadherin–labeled choroid and localized to human or mouse laser-induced CNV lesions. Thy-1 protein and mRNA were significantly increased in CECs treated with VEGF or CCL11 and in RPE/choroids from aged versus young donor eyes or from lasered mice versus nonlasered controls. Knockdown or inhibition of Thy-1 in CECs significantly reduced VEGF-induced CEC migration and proliferation, stress fiber formation and VEGFR2, Src, integrin β3 and Rac1 activation, and 7-KC–induced Rac1 and Src activation. Conclusions Thy-1 in CECs regulates VEGF-induced CEC activation and migration and links extracellular 7-KC to intracellular signaling. Future studies elucidating Thy-1 mechanisms in neovascular AMD are warranted. PMID:27768790

  9. Multiscale Cues Drive Collective Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Ki-Hwan; Kim, Peter; Wood, David K.; Kwon, Sunghoon; Provenzano, Paolo P.; Kim, Deok-Ho

    2016-01-01

    To investigate complex biophysical relationships driving directed cell migration, we developed a biomimetic platform that allows perturbation of microscale geometric constraints with concomitant nanoscale contact guidance architectures. This permits us to elucidate the influence, and parse out the relative contribution, of multiscale features, and define how these physical inputs are jointly processed with oncogenic signaling. We demonstrate that collective cell migration is profoundly enhanced by the addition of contract guidance cues when not otherwise constrained. However, while nanoscale cues promoted migration in all cases, microscale directed migration cues are dominant as the geometric constraint narrows, a behavior that is well explained by stochastic diffusion anisotropy modeling. Further, oncogene activation (i.e. mutant PIK3CA) resulted in profoundly increased migration where extracellular multiscale directed migration cues and intrinsic signaling synergistically conspire to greatly outperform normal cells or any extracellular guidance cues in isolation. PMID:27460294

  10. Multiscale Cues Drive Collective Cell Migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nam, Ki-Hwan; Kim, Peter; Wood, David K.; Kwon, Sunghoon; Provenzano, Paolo P.; Kim, Deok-Ho

    2016-07-01

    To investigate complex biophysical relationships driving directed cell migration, we developed a biomimetic platform that allows perturbation of microscale geometric constraints with concomitant nanoscale contact guidance architectures. This permits us to elucidate the influence, and parse out the relative contribution, of multiscale features, and define how these physical inputs are jointly processed with oncogenic signaling. We demonstrate that collective cell migration is profoundly enhanced by the addition of contract guidance cues when not otherwise constrained. However, while nanoscale cues promoted migration in all cases, microscale directed migration cues are dominant as the geometric constraint narrows, a behavior that is well explained by stochastic diffusion anisotropy modeling. Further, oncogene activation (i.e. mutant PIK3CA) resulted in profoundly increased migration where extracellular multiscale directed migration cues and intrinsic signaling synergistically conspire to greatly outperform normal cells or any extracellular guidance cues in isolation.

  11. Neutrophil migration across monolayers of cytokine-prestimulated endothelial cells: a role for platelet-activating factor and IL-8

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    In a previous study we observed that neutrophils respond with a rapid rise in [Ca2+]i during adherence to cytokine-activated endothelial cells (EC), caused by EC membrane-associated platelet-activating factor (PAF). In the present study, we investigated whether this form of PAF was important in neutrophil adherence and migration across monolayers of rIL-1 beta- or rTNF alpha-prestimulated EC. PAF receptor antagonists prevented neutrophil migration across cytokine-pretreated EC by approximately 60% (P less than 0.005) without interfering with the process of adherence. The antagonists WEB 2086 and L-652,731 had no effect on neutrophil migration across resting EC induced by formylmethionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (FMLP). A murine anti-IL-8 antiserum was found to also partially inhibit the neutrophil transmigration across cytokine-activated EC. When the anti-IL-8 antiserum was used in combination with a PAF receptor antagonist, neutrophil migration across cytokine-pretreated monolayers of EC was completely prevented. During transmigration, LAM-1 and CD44 on the neutrophils were down-modulated; both WEB 2086 and anti-IL-8 antiserum partially prevented this down-modulation caused by cytokine- prestimulated EC. Our results indicate that human neutrophils are activated and guided by EC-associated PAF and EC-derived IL-8 during the in vitro diapedesis in between cytokine-stimulated EC. PMID:1315317

  12. Activation of TRPV2 and BKCa channels by the LL-37 enantiomers stimulates calcium entry and migration of cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Guéguinou, Maxime; Chourpa, Igor; Fromont, Gaëlle; Bouchet, Ana Maria; Burlaud-Gaillard, Julien; Potier-Cartereau, Marie; Roger, Sébastien; Aucagne, Vincent; Chevalier, Stéphan; Vandier, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Expression of the antimicrobial peptide hCAP18/LL-37 is associated to malignancy in various cancer forms, stimulating cell migration and metastasis. We report that LL-37 induces migration of three cancer cell lines by activating the TRPV2 calcium-permeable channel and recruiting it to pseudopodia through activation of the PI3K/AKT pathway. Ca2+ entry through TRPV2 cooperated with a K+ efflux through the BKCa channel. In a panel of human breast tumors, the expression of TRPV2 and LL-37 was found to be positively correlated. The D-enantiomer of LL-37 showed identical effects as the L-peptide, suggesting that no binding to a specific receptor was involved. LL-37 attached to caveolae and pseudopodia membranes and decreased membrane fluidity, suggesting that a modification of the physical properties of the lipid membrane bilayer was the underlying mechanism of its effects. PMID:26993604

  13. Farnesyl transferase inhibitor FTI-277 inhibits breast cell invasion and migration by blocking H-Ras activation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyung Hun; Koh, Minsoo; Moon, Aree

    2016-01-01

    Hyperactive Ras promotes proliferation and malignant phenotypic conversion of cells in cancer. Ras protein must be associated with cellular membranes for its oncogenic activities through post-translational modifications, including farnesylation. Farnesyltransferase (FTase) is essential for H-Ras membrane targeting, and H-Ras, but not N-Ras, has been demonstrated to cause an invasive phenotype in MCF10A breast epithelial cells. In the present study, it was observed that an FTase inhibitor (FTI), FTI-277, blocked epidermal growth factor (EGF)-induced H-Ras activation, but not N-Ras activation in MDA-MB-231 cells, which express wild-type H-Ras and N-Ras. FTI-277 exerted a more potent inhibitory effect on the proliferation of H-Ras-MCF10A cells and Hs578T breast cancer cells expressing an active mutant of H-Ras than that of MDA-MB-231 cells. The invasive/migratory phenotypes of the H-Ras-MCF10A and Hs578T cells were effectively inhibited by FTI-277 treatment. By contrast, FTI-277 did not affect the invasive/migratory phenotypes of MDA-MB-231 cells. However, the EGF-induced invasion of MDA-MB-231 cells was decreased by FTI-277, implicating that FTI-277 inhibits breast cell invasion and migration by blocking H-Ras activation. Taken together, the results of the present study suggest that FTase inhibition by FTI-277 may be an effective strategy for targeting H-Ras-mediated proliferation, migration and invasion of breast cells. PMID:27602167

  14. Paracoccidioides brasilinsis-Induced Migration of Dendritic Cells and Subsequent T-Cell Activation in the Lung-Draining Lymph Nodes

    PubMed Central

    Silvana dos Santos, Suelen; Ferreira, Karen Spadari; Almeida, Sandro Rogerio

    2011-01-01

    Paracoccidioidomycosis is a mycotic disease caused by a dimorphic fungus, Paracoccidioides brasiliensis (Pb), that starts with inhalation of the fungus; thus, lung cells such as DC are part of the first line of defense against this microorganism. Migration of DC to the lymph nodes is the first step in initiating T cell responses. The mechanisms involved in resistance to Pb infection are poorly understood, but it is likely that DC play a pivotal role in the induction of effector T cells that control Pb infection. In this study, we showed that after Pb Infection, an important modification of lung DC receptor expression occurred. We observed an increased expression of CCR7 and CD103 on lung DC after infection, as well as MHC-II. After Pb infection, bone marrow-derived DC as well lung DC, migrate to lymph nodes. Migration of lung DC could represent an important mechanism of pathogenesis during PCM infection. In resume our data showed that Pb induced DC migration. Furthermore, we demonstrated that bone marrow-derived DC stimulated by Pb migrate to the lymph nodes and activate a T helper (Th) response. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported data showing that Pb induces migration of DC and activate a T helper (Th) response. PMID:21611175

  15. Thymoquinone suppresses migration of LoVo human colon cancer cells by reducing prostaglandin E2 induced COX-2 activation

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Hsi-Hsien; Chen, Ming-Cheng; Day, Cecilia Hsuan; Lin, Yueh-Min; Li, Shin-Yi; Tu, Chuan-Chou; Padma, Viswanadha Vijaya; Shih, Hui-Nung; Kuo, Wei-Wen; Huang, Chih-Yang

    2017-01-01

    AIM To identify potential anti-cancer constituents in natural extracts that inhibit cancer cell growth and migration. METHODS Our experiments used high dose thymoquinone (TQ) as an inhibitor to arrest LoVo (a human colon adenocarcinoma cell line) cancer cell growth, which was detected by cell proliferation assay and immunoblotting assay. Low dose TQ did not significantly reduce LoVo cancer cell growth. Cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) is an enzyme that is involved in the conversion of arachidonic acid into prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) in humans. PGE2 can promote COX-2 protein expression and tumor cell proliferation and was used as a control. RESULTS Our results showed that 20 μmol/L TQ significantly reduced human LoVo colon cancer cell proliferation. TQ treatment reduced the levels of p-PI3K, p-Akt, p-GSK3β, and β-catenin and thereby inhibited the downstream COX-2 expression. Results also showed that the reduction in COX-2 expression resulted in a reduction in PGE2 levels and the suppression of EP2 and EP4 activation. Further analysis showed that TG treatment inhibited the nuclear translocation of β-catenin in LoVo cancer cells. The levels of the cofactors LEF-1 and TCF-4 were also decreased in the nucleus following TQ treatment in a dose-dependent manner. Treatment with low dose TQ inhibited the COX-2 expression at the transcriptional level and the regulation of COX-2 expression efficiently reduced LoVo cell migration. The results were further verified in vivo by confirming the effects of TQ and/or PGE2 using tumor xenografts in nude mice. CONCLUSION TQ inhibits LoVo cancer cell growth and migration, and this result highlights the therapeutic advantage of using TQ in combination therapy against colorectal cancer. PMID:28275297

  16. Prelamin A Accumulation Attenuates Rac1 Activity and Increases the Intrinsic Migrational Persistence of Aged Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Porter, Lauren J.; Holt, Mark R.; Soong, Daniel; Shanahan, Catherine M.; Warren, Derek T.

    2016-01-01

    Vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) motility is essential during both physiological and pathological vessel remodeling. Although ageing has emerged as a major risk factor in the development of cardiovascular disease, our understanding of the impact of ageing on VSMC motility remains limited. Prelamin A accumulation is known to drive VSMC ageing and we show that presenescent VSMCs, that have accumulated prelamin A, display increased focal adhesion dynamics, augmented migrational velocity/persistence and attenuated Rac1 activity. Importantly, prelamin A accumulation in proliferative VSMCs, induced by depletion of the prelamin A processing enzyme FACE1, recapitulated the focal adhesion, migrational persistence and Rac1 phenotypes observed in presenescent VSMCs. Moreover, lamin A/C-depleted VSMCs also display reduced Rac1 activity, suggesting that prelamin A influences Rac1 activity by interfering with lamin A/C function at the nuclear envelope. Taken together, these data demonstrate that lamin A/C maintains Rac1 activity in VSMCs and prelamin A disrupts lamin A/C function to reduce Rac1 activity and induce migrational persistence during VSMC ageing. PMID:27854297

  17. Cell migration in the forebrain.

    PubMed

    Marín, Oscar; Rubenstein, John L R

    2003-01-01

    The forebrain comprises an intricate set of structures that are required for some of the most complex and evolved functions of the mammalian brain. As a reflection of its complexity, cell migration in the forebrain is extremely elaborated, with widespread dispersion of cells across multiple functionally distinct areas. Two general modes of migration are distinguished in the forebrain: radial migration, which establishes the general cytoarchitectonical framework of the different forebrain subdivisions; and tangential migration, which increases the cellular complexity of forebrain circuits by allowing the dispersion of multiple neuronal types. Here, we review the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying each of these types of migrations and discuss how emerging concepts in neuronal migration are reshaping our understanding of forebrain development in normal and pathological situations.

  18. Solamargine inhibits migration and invasion of human hepatocellular carcinoma cells through down-regulation of matrix metalloproteinases 2 and 9 expression and activity.

    PubMed

    Sani, Iman Karimi; Marashi, Seyed Hassan; Kalalinia, Fatemeh

    2015-08-01

    Solamargine is a steroidal alkaloid glycoside isolated from Solanum nigrum. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of solamargine on tumor migration and invasion in aggressive human hepatocellular carcinoma cells. The MTT assay was used to assess the effects of solamargine on the viability of HepG2 cells. Migration and invasion ability of HepG2 cells under solamargine treatment were examined by a wound healing migration assay and Boyden chamber assay, respectively. Western blotting assays were used to detect the expression of MMP-2 and MMP-9 proteins and MMP-2 and MMP-9 activity were analyzed by gelatin zymography assay. Solamargine reduced HepG2 cell viability in a concentration-dependent manner. At 7.5μM solamargine decreased cell viability by less than 20% in HepG2 cells. A wound healing migration assay and Boyden chamber invasion assay showed that solamargine significantly inhibited in vitro migration and invasion of HepG2 cells. At the highest dose, solamargine decreased cell migration and invasion by more than 70% and 72% in HepG2 cells, respectively. Western blotting and gelatin zymography results showed that solamargine reduced expression and function of MMP-2 and MMP-9 proteins. In conclusion, the results showed that solamargine significantly inhibits migration and invasion of HepG2 cells by down-regulating MMP-2 and MMP-9 expression and activity.

  19. Multifunctional bioscaffolds for 3D culture of melanoma cells reveal increased MMP activity and migration with BRAF kinase inhibition.

    PubMed

    Leight, Jennifer L; Tokuda, Emi Y; Jones, Caitlin E; Lin, Austin J; Anseth, Kristi S

    2015-04-28

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are important for many different types of cancer-related processes, including metastasis. Understanding the functional impact of changes in MMP activity during cancer treatment is an important facet not typically evaluated as part of preclinical research. With MMP activity being a critical component of the metastatic cascade, we designed a 3D hydrogel system to probe whether pharmacological inhibition affected human melanoma cell proteolytic activity; metastatic melanoma is a highly aggressive and drug-resistant form of skin cancer. The relationship between MMP activity and drug treatment is unknown, and therefore we used an in situ fluorogenic MMP sensor peptide to determine how drug treatment affects melanoma cell MMP activity in three dimensions. We encapsulated melanoma cells from varying stages of progression within PEG-based hydrogels to examine the relationship between drug treatment and MMP activity. From these results, a metastatic melanoma cell line (A375) and two inhibitors that inhibit RAF (PLX4032 and sorafenib) were studied further to determine whether changes in MMP activity led to a functional change in cell behavior. A375 cells exhibited increased MMP activity despite an overall decrease in metabolic activity with PLX4032 treatment. The changes in proteolytic activity correlated with increased cell elongation and increased single-cell migration. In contrast, sorafenib did not alter MMP activity or cell motility, showing that the changes induced by PLX4032 were not a universal response to small-molecule inhibition. Therefore, we argue the importance of studying MMP activity with drug treatment and its possible implications for unwanted side effects.

  20. Dihydroartemisinin inhibits vascular endothelial growth factor-induced endothelial cell migration by a p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase-independent pathway.

    PubMed

    Guo, Ling; Dong, Fengyun; Hou, Yinglong; Cai, Weidong; Zhou, Xia; Huang, Ai-Ling; Yang, Min; Allen, Thaddeus D; Liu, Ju

    2014-12-01

    Dihydroartemisinin (DHA), a semi-synthetic derivative of artemisinin, has been demonstrated to possess a strong antiangiogenic activity. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying this effect remain unclear. Endothelial cell (EC) migration is an essential component of angiogenesis, and the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway plays a key role in the regulation of migration induced by vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of DHA on EC migration and the p38 MAPK signaling pathway. Human umbilical vein ECs (HUVECs) were treated with DHA and VEGF-induced migration was analyzed. The activation of p38 MAPK was detected by western blot analysis, and the migration assays were performed with a p38-specific inhibitor, SB203850. It was revealed that 20 μM DHA significantly reduced EC migration in the transwell migration assay, wound healing assay and electrical cell-substrate impedance sensing real-time analysis. However, DHA did not affect p38 MAPK phosphorylation or expression. In the absence or presence of SB203850, DHA induced a similar proportional reduction of EC migration in the three migration assays. Therefore, the present study demonstrated that DHA inhibits VEGF-induced EC migration via a p38 MAPK-independent pathway.

  1. Modulation of tumor cell stiffness and migration by type IV collagen through direct activation of integrin signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Chen, Sheng-Yi; Lin, Jo-Shi; Yang, Bei-Chang

    2014-08-01

    Excessive collagen deposition plays a critical role in tumor progression and metastasis. To understand how type IV collagen affects mechanical stiffness and migration, low-collagen-IV-expressing transfectants of B16F10, U118MG, and Huh7 (denoted shCol cells) were established by the lentiviral-mediated delivery of small interfering RNA against type IV-α1 collagen (Col4A1). Although having similar growth rates, shCol cells showed a flatter morphology compared to that of the corresponding controls. Notably, knocking down the Col4A1 gene conferred the cells with higher levels of elasticity and lower motility. Exposure to blocking antibodies against human β1 integrin or α2β1 integrin or the pharmacological inhibition of Src and ERK activity by PP1 and U0126, respectively, effectively reduced cell motility and raised cell stiffness. Reduced Src and ERK activities in shCol cells indicate the involvement of a collagen IV/integrin signaling pathway. The forced expression of β1 integrin significantly stimulated Src and ERK phosphorylation, reduced cell stiffness, and accelerated cell motility. In an experimental metastasis assay using C57BL/6 mice, B16F10 shCol cells formed significantly fewer and smaller lung nodules, confirming the contribution of collagen to metastasis. In summary, the integrin signaling pathway activated in a tumor environment with collagen deposition is responsible for low cell elasticity and high metastatic ability.

  2. Epidermal growth factor-like domain 7 promotes migration and invasion of human trophoblast cells through activation of MAPK, PI3K and NOTCH signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Massimiani, M; Vecchione, L; Piccirilli, D; Spitalieri, P; Amati, F; Salvi, S; Ferrazzani, S; Stuhlmann, H; Campagnolo, L

    2015-05-01

    Epidermal growth factor-like domain 7 (Egfl7) is a gene that encodes a partially secreted protein and whose expression is largely restricted to the endothelia. We recently reported that EGFL7 is also expressed by trophoblast cells in mouse and human placentas. Here, we investigated the molecular pathways that are regulated by EGFL7 in trophoblast cells. Stable EGFL7 overexpression in a Jeg3 human choriocarcinoma cell line resulted in significantly increased cell migration and invasiveness, while cell proliferation was unaffected. Analysis of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) pathways showed that EGFL7 promotes Jeg3 cell motility by activating both pathways. We show that EGFL7 activates the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in Jeg3 cells, resulting in downstream activation of extracellular regulated kinases (ERKs). In addition, we provide evidence that EGFL7-triggered migration of Jeg3 cells involves activation of NOTCH signaling. EGFL7 and NOTCH1 are co-expressed in Jeg3 cells, and blocking of NOTCH activation abrogates enhanced migration of Jeg3 cells overexpressing EGFL7. We also demonstrate that signaling through EGFR and NOTCH converged to mediate EGFL7 effects. Reduction of endogenous EGFL7 expression in Jeg3 cells significantly decreased cell migration. We further confirmed that EGFL7 stimulates cell migration by using primary human first trimester trophoblast (PTB) cells overexpressing EGFL7. In conclusion, our data suggest that in trophoblast cells, EGFL7 regulates cell migration and invasion by activating multiple signaling pathways. Our results provide a possible explanation for the correlation between reduced expression of EGFL7 and inadequate trophoblast invasion observed in placentopathies.

  3. Hydrogen peroxide stimulates proliferation and migration of human prostate cancer cells through activation of activator protein-1 and up-regulation of the heparin affin regulatory peptide gene.

    PubMed

    Polytarchou, Christos; Hatziapostolou, Maria; Papadimitriou, Evangelia

    2005-12-09

    It is becoming increasingly recognized that hydrogen peroxide (HP) plays a role in cell proliferation and migration. In the present study we found that exogenous HP significantly induced human prostate cancer LNCaP cell proliferation and migration. Heparin affin regulatory peptide (HARP) seems to be involved in the stimulatory effect of HP, because the latter had no effect on stably transfected LNCaP cells that did not express HARP. Moreover, HP significantly increased HARP mRNA and protein amounts in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. Curcumin and activator protein-1 (AP-1) decoy oligonucleotides abrogated both HP-induced HARP expression and LNCaP cell proliferation and migration. HP increased luciferase activity of the 5'-flanking region of the HARP gene introduced in a reporter gene vector, an effect that was abolished when even one of the two putative AP-1 binding sites of the HARP promoter was mutated. The effect of HP seems to be due to the binding of Fra-1, JunD, and phospho-c-Jun to the HARP promoter. These results support the notion that HARP is important for human prostate cancer cell proliferation and migration, establish the role of AP-1 in the up-regulation of HARP expression by low concentrations of HP, and characterize the AP-1 dimers involved.

  4. Phospholipase C-gamma1 potentiates integrin-dependent cell spreading and migration through Pyk2/paxillin activation.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jang Hyun; Yang, Yong-Ryoul; Lee, Seul Ki; Kim, Il-Shin; Ha, Sang Hoon; Kim, Eung-Kyun; Bae, Yun Soo; Ryu, Sung Ho; Suh, Pann-Ghill

    2007-08-01

    Phospholipase C-gamma1 (PLC-gamma1), which generates two second messengers, namely, inositol-1, 4, 5-trisphosphate and diacylglycerol, is implicated in growth factor-mediated chemotaxis. However, the exact role of PLC-gamma1 in integrin-mediated cell adhesion and migration remains poorly understood. In this study, we demonstrate that PLC-gamma1 is required for actin cytoskeletal organization and cell motility through the regulation of Pyk2 and paxillin activation. After fibronectin stimulation, PLC-gamma1 directly interacted with the cytoplasmic tail of integrin beta1. In PLC-gamma1-silenced cells, integrin-induced Pyk2 and paxillin phosphorylation were significantly reduced and PLC-gamma1 potentiated the integrin-induced Pyk2/paxillin activation in its enzymatic activity-dependent manner. In addition, specific knock-down of PLC-gamma1 resulted in a failure to form focal adhesions dependent on fibronectin stimulation, which appeared to be caused by the suppression of Pyk2 and paxillin phosphorylation. Interestingly, PLC-gamma1 potentiated the activations of Rac, thus integrin-induced lamellipodia formation was up-regulated. Consequently, the strength of cell-substratum interaction and cell motility were profoundly up-regulated by PLC-gamma1. Taken together, these results suggest that PLC-gamma1 is a key player in integrin-mediated cell spreading and motility achieved by the activation of Pyk2/paxillin/Rac signaling.

  5. Synthesis of coumaperine derivatives: Their NF-κB inhibitory effect, inhibition of cell migration and their cytotoxic activity.

    PubMed

    Nandakumar, Natarajan; Muthuraman, Subramani; Gopinath, Pushparathinam; Nithya, Pattusamy; Gopas, Jacob; Kumar, Rajendran Saravana

    2017-01-05

    Coumaperine (an amide alkaloid, present in white piper) and its derivatives were synthesized and investigated for their cytotoxicity against L428 and A549 cells and their NF-κB inhibitory activity. It was found that the coumaperine derivatives CP-9 and CP-38 suppress NF-κB subunits p50 and p65 in nuclear fractions by western blot and by NF-κB luciferase reporter gene assay in a dose dependent manner. Confirmation of these results was obtained by confocal microscopy. CP-9, CP-32 and CP-38 also exhibited dose dependent cell cytotoxicity in a L428 cells expressing constitutively active NF-κB and in A549 cells, with an IC50 value of 43.25 μg/ml, 0.39 μg/ml and 16.85 μg/ml respectively against L428 cells and 57.15 μg/ml, 69.1 μg/ml and 63.2 μg/ml respectively against A549 cells. In addition, the coumaperine derivatives show remarkable inhibitory activity on the cancer cell migration assay against A549 lung adenocarcinoma cells at the concentrations of 5 μg/ml, 10 μg/ml, and 5 μg/ml of CP-9, CP-32 and CP-38 respectively. Aromatic substituents and number of olefinic double bond in coumaperine derivatives found to influence the inhibitory activity. In luciferase reporter gene assay, di-olefin conjugated coumaperine derivatives, CP-38, CP-32 and PIP exhibited higher inhibitory activity than their corresponding tri-olefin conjugated coumaperine derivatives, CP-102, CP-146 and PIP-155 respectively. CP-32 with a stronger electron donating group (-N(CH3)2) showed better inhibitory activity in luciferase reporter gene assay and in cell proliferation of L428 cells. Simple coumaperine derivative (CP-9, with no substituent) effectively inhibited A549 cells proliferation and migration than the other coumaperine derivatives. CP-9 and CP-38 diminish significantly the NF-κB subunits (p50 and p65) of L428 cells in nuclear fractions at the dosage of 10 μg/ml and 30 μg/ml respectively. Which clearly shows that CP-9 and CP-38 inactivate the NF-κB pathway

  6. Umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells promote proliferation and migration in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells through activation of the ERK pathway.

    PubMed

    Li, Tao; Zhang, Chunfu; Ding, Yanling; Zhai, Wei; Liu, Kui; Bu, Fan; Tu, Tao; Sun, Lingxian; Zhu, Wei; Zhou, Fangfang; Qi, Wenkai; Hu, Jiabo; Chen, Huabiao; Sun, Xiaochun

    2015-09-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are known to migrate to tumor tissues and to play an important role in cancer progression. However, the effects of MSCs on tumor progression remain controversial. The purpose of the present study was to detect the effects of human umbilical cord-derived MSCs (hUC‑MSCs) on the human breast cancer cell lines MDA-MB‑231 and MCF-7 in vitro and the underlying mechanisms. MSCs were isolated and identified from umbilical cord tissues. MDA-MB‑231 and MCF-7 cells were treated with conditioned medium (CM) from 10 and 20% umbilical cord MSCs (UC-MSCs), and the resulting changes in proliferation and migration were investigated. The 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)‑2,5-diphenyl‑2-H-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) and plate clone formation assays were used to assess the effect on proliferation, and the effects of CM on MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 migration were assessed through scratch wound and Transwell migration assays. The expression of cell proliferation- and metastasis-related genes and proteins and activation of the ERK signaling pathway were analyzed by RT-PCR and western blot assays. UC-MSCs are characteristically similar to bone marrow MSCs (BM-MSCs) and exhibit multipotential differentiation capability (i.e., osteoblasts and adipocytes). The MTT, plate clone formation, scratch wound and Transwell migration assay results revealed that 10 and 20% CM promoted the proliferation and migration to higher levels than those observed in the control group. Our findings showed that UC-MSC-CM inhibited E-cadherin expression, increased the expression of N-cadherin and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and enhanced the expression of ZEB1, a transcription factor involved in epithelial‑to‑mesenchymal transition (EMT), through activation of the ERK pathway. U0126, an inhibitor of ERK, reversed the effects of UC-MSC-CM on breast cancer cell proliferation and migration. We conclude that UC-MSCs promote the proliferation and migration of breast

  7. Emodin inhibits migration and invasion of DLD-1 (PRL-3) cells via inhibition of PRL-3 phosphatase activity.

    PubMed

    Han, Young-Min; Lee, Su-Kyung; Jeong, Dae Gwin; Ryu, Seong Eon; Han, Dong Cho; Kim, Dae Keun; Kwon, Byoung-Mog

    2012-01-01

    Anthraquinones have been reported as phosphatase inhibitors. Therefore, anthraquinone derivatives were screened to identify a potent phosphatase inhibitor against the phosphatase of regenerating liver-3 (PRL-3). Emodin strongly inhibited phosphatase activity of PRL-3 with IC(50) values of 3.5μM and blocked PRL-3-induced tumor cell migration and invasion in a dose-dependent manner. Emodin rescued the phosphorylation of ezrin, which is a known PRL-3 substrate. The results of this study reveal that emodin is a PRL-3 inhibitor and a good lead molecule for obtaining a selective PRL-3 inhibitor.

  8. Differing requirements for CCR4, E-selectin, and α4β1 for the migration of memory CD4 and activated T cells to dermal inflammation.

    PubMed

    Gehad, Ahmed; Al-Banna, Nadia A; Vaci, Maria; Issekutz, Andrew C; Mohan, Karkada; Latta, Markus; Issekutz, Thomas B

    2012-07-01

    CCR4 on T cells is suggested to mediate skin homing in mice. Our objective was to determine the interaction of CCR4, E-selectin ligand (ESL), and α(4)β(1) on memory and activated T cells in recruitment to dermal inflammation. mAbs to rat CCR4 were developed. CCR4 was on 5-21% of memory CD4 cells, and 20% were also ESL(+). Anti-TCR-activated CD4 and CD8 cells were 40-55% CCR4(+), and ∼75% of both CCR4(+) and CCR4(-) cells were ESL(+). CCR4(+) memory CD4 cells migrated 4- to 7-fold more to dermal inflammation induced by IFN-γ, TNF, TLR agonists, and delayed-type hypersensitivity than CCR4(-) cells. CCR4(+) activated CD4 cells migrated only 5-50% more than CCR4(-) cells to these sites. E-selectin blockade inhibited ∼60% of CCR4(+) activated CD4 cell migration but was less effective on memory cells where α(4)β(1) was more important. Anti-α(4)β(1) also inhibited CCR4(-) activated CD4 cells more than CCR4(+) cells. Anti-E-selectin reduced activated CD8 more than CD4 cell migration. These findings modify our understanding of CCR4, ESL, α(4)β(1), and dermal tropism. There is no strict relationship between CCR4 and ESL for skin homing of CD4 cells, because the activation state and inflammatory stimulus are critical determinants. Dermal homing memory CD4 cells express CCR4 and depend more on α(4)β(1) than ESL. Activated CD4 cells do not require CCR4, but CCR4(+) cells are more dependent on ESL than on α(4)β(1), and CCR4(-) cells preferentially use α(4)β(1). The differentiation from activated to memory CD4 cells increases the dependence on CCR4 for skin homing and decreases the requirement for ESL.

  9. Lamellipodial tension, not integrin/ligand binding, is the crucial factor to realise integrin activation and cell migration.

    PubMed

    Schulte, Carsten; Ferraris, Gian Maria Sarra; Oldani, Amanda; Galluzzi, Massimiliano; Podestà, Alessandro; Puricelli, Luca; de Lorenzi, Valentina; Lenardi, Cristina; Milani, Paolo; Sidenius, Nicolai

    2016-01-01

    The molecular clutch (MC) model proposes that actomyosin-driven force transmission permits integrin-dependent cell migration. To investigate the MC, we introduced diverse talin (TLN) and integrin variants into Flp-In™ T-Rex™ HEK293 cells stably expressing uPAR. Vitronectin variants served as substrate providing uPAR-mediated cell adhesion and optionally integrin binding. This particular system allowed us to selectively analyse key MC proteins and interactions, effectively from the extracellular matrix substrate to intracellular f-actin, and to therewith study mechanobiological aspects of MC engagement also uncoupled from integrin/ligand binding. With this experimental approach, we found that for the initial PIP2-dependent membrane/TLN/f-actin linkage and persistent lamellipodia formation the C-terminal TLN actin binding site (ABS) is dispensable. The establishment of an adequate MC-mediated lamellipodial tension instead depends predominantly on the coupling of this C-terminal TLN ABS to the actomyosin-driven retrograde actin flow force. This lamellipodial tension is crucial for full integrin activation eventually determining integrin-dependent cell migration. In the integrin/ligand-independent condition the frictional membrane resistance participates to these processes. Integrin/ligand binding can also contribute but is not necessarily required.

  10. The Sal-like 4 - integrin α6β1 network promotes cell migration for metastasis via activation of focal adhesion dynamics in basal-like breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Itou, Junji; Tanaka, Sunao; Li, Wenzhao; Iida, Atsuo; Sehara-Fujisawa, Atsuko; Sato, Fumiaki; Toi, Masakazu

    2017-01-01

    During metastasis, cancer cell migration is enhanced. However, the mechanisms underlying this process remain elusive. Here, we addressed this issue by functionally analyzing the transcription factor Sal-like 4 (SALL4) in basal-like breast cancer cells. Loss-of-function studies of SALL4 showed that this transcription factor is required for the spindle-shaped morphology and the enhanced migration of cancer cells. SALL4 also up-regulated integrin gene expression. The impaired cell migration observed in SALL4 knockdown cells was restored by overexpression of integrin α6 and β1. In addition, we clarified that integrin α6 and β1 formed a heterodimer. At the molecular level, loss of the SALL4 - integrin α6β1 network lost focal adhesion dynamics, which impairs cell migration. Over-activation of Rho is known to inhibit focal adhesion dynamics. We observed that SALL4 knockdown cells exhibited over-activation of Rho. Aberrant Rho activation was suppressed by integrin α6β1 expression, and pharmacological inhibition of Rho activity restored cell migration in SALL4 knockdown cells. These results indicated that the SALL4 - integrin α6β1 network promotes cell migration via modulation of Rho activity. Moreover, our zebrafish metastasis assays demonstrated that this gene network enhances cell migration in vivo. Our findings identify a potential new therapeutic target for the prevention of metastasis, and provide an improved understanding of cancer cell migration.

  11. Exogenous hydrogen sulfide exerts proliferation, anti-apoptosis, migration effects and accelerates cell cycle progression in multiple myeloma cells via activating the Akt pathway.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Dong; Chen, Ziang; Chen, Jingfu; Zhuang, Xiaomin; Feng, Jianqiang; Li, Juan

    2016-10-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S), regarded as the third gaseous transmitter, mediates and induces various biological effects. The present study investigated the effects of H2S on multiple myeloma cell progression via amplifying the activation of Akt pathway in multiple myeloma cells. The level of H2S produced in multiple myeloma (MM) patients and healthy subjects was measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). MM cells were treated with 500 µmol/l NaHS (a donor of H2S) for 24 h. The expression levels of phosphorylated-Akt (p-Akt), Bcl-2 and caspase-3 were measured by western blot assay. Cell viability was detected by Cell Counting Kit 8 (CCK-8). The cell cycle was analyzed by flow cytometry. Our results show that the concentration of H2S was higher in MM patients and that it increased in parallel with disease progression. Treating MM cells with 500 µmol/l NaHS for 24 h markedly increased the expression level of Bcl-2 and the activation of p-Akt, however, the expression level of caspase-3 was decreased, cell viability was increased, and cell cycle progression was accelerated in MM cells. NaHS also induced migration in MM cells in transwell migration assay. Furthermore, co-treatment of MM cells with 500 µmol/l NaHS and 50 µmol/l LY294002 for 24 h significantly overset these effects. In conclusion, our findings demonstrate that the Akt pathway contributes to NaHS-induced cell proliferation, migration and acceleration of cell cycle progression in MM cells.

  12. Alpha-fetoprotein activates AKT/mTOR signaling to promote CXCR4 expression and migration of hepatoma cells.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Mingyue; Guo, Junli; Xia, Hua; Li, Wei; Lu, Yan; Dong, Xu; Chen, Yi; Xie, Xieju; Fu, Shigan; Li, Mengsen

    2015-01-01

    CXCR4, stromal cell-derived factor-1α(SDF 1α) receptor, stimulates growth and metastasis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Alpha-fetoprotein(AFP) governs the expression of some metastasis-related genes. Here we report that AFP and CXCR4 levels correlated in HCC tissues. AFP-expressing vectors induced CXCR4. In agreement, AFP depletion by siRNA decreased CXCR4. AFP co-localized and interacted with PTEN, thus inducing CXCR4 by activating AKT(Ser473) phosphorylation. In turn, phospho-mTOR(Ser2448) entered the nucleus and bound the CXCR4 gene promoter. Thus, AFP promoted migration of HCC cells. In concusion, AFP induced CXCR4 by activating the AKT/mTOR signal pathway.

  13. Alpha-fetoprotein activates AKT/mTOR signaling to promote CXCR4 expression and migration of hepatoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wei; Lu, Yan; Dong, Xu; Chen, Yi; Xie, Xieju; Fu, Shigan; Li, Mengsen

    2015-01-01

    CXCR4, stromal cell-derived factor-1α(SDF 1α) receptor, stimulates growth and metastasis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Alpha-fetoprotein(AFP) governs the expression of some metastasis-related genes. Here we report that AFP and CXCR4 levels correlated in HCC tissues. AFP-expressing vectors induced CXCR4. In agreement, AFP depletion by siRNA decreased CXCR4. AFP co-localized and interacted with PTEN, thus inducing CXCR4 by activating AKT(Ser473) phosphorylation. In turn, phospho-mTOR(Ser2448) entered the nucleus and bound the CXCR4 gene promoter. Thus, AFP promoted migration of HCC cells. In concusion, AFP induced CXCR4 by activating the AKT/mTOR signal pathway. PMID:25815363

  14. Down-Regulation of ClC-3 Expression Reduces Epidermal Stem Cell Migration by Inhibiting Volume-Activated Chloride Currents.

    PubMed

    Guo, Rui; Pan, Fuqiang; Tian, Yanping; Li, Hongli; Li, Shirong; Cao, Chuan

    2016-06-01

    ClC-3, a member of the ClC chloride (Cl(-)) channel family, has recently been proposed as the primary Cl(-) channel involved in cell volume regulation. Changes in cell volume influence excitability, contraction, migration, pathogen-host interactions, cell proliferation, and cell death processes. In this study, expression and function of ClC-3 channels were investigated during epidermal stem cell (ESC) migration. We observed differential expression of CLC-3 regulates migration of ESCs. Further, whole-cell patch-clamp recordings and image analysis demonstrated ClC-3 expression affected volume-activated Cl(-) current (I Cl,Vol) within ESCs. Live cell imaging systems, designed to observe cellular responses to overexpression and suppression of ClC-3 in real time, indicated ClC-3 may regulate ESC migratory dynamics. We employed IMARIS software to analyze the velocity and distance of ESC migration in vitro to demonstrate the function of ClC-3 channel in ESCs. As our data suggest volume-activated Cl(-) channels play a vital role in migration of ESCs, which contribute to skin repair by migrating from neighboring unwounded epidermis infundibulum, hair follicle or sebaceous glands, ClC-3 may represent a new and valuable target for stem cell therapies.

  15. Progesterone promotes focal adhesion formation and migration in breast cancer cells through induction of protease-activated receptor-1.

    PubMed

    Diaz, Jorge; Aranda, Evelyn; Henriquez, Soledad; Quezada, Marisol; Espinoza, Estefanía; Bravo, Maria Loreto; Oliva, Bárbara; Lange, Soledad; Villalon, Manuel; Jones, Marius; Brosens, Jan J; Kato, Sumie; Cuello, Mauricio A; Knutson, Todd P; Lange, Carol A; Leyton, Lisette; Owen, Gareth I

    2012-08-01

    Progesterone and progestins have been demonstrated to enhance breast cancer cell migration, although the mechanisms are still not fully understood. The protease-activated receptors (PARs) are a family of membrane receptors that are activated by serine proteases in the blood coagulation cascade. PAR1 (F2R) has been reported to be involved in cancer cell migration and overexpressed in breast cancer. We herein demonstrate that PAR1 mRNA and protein are upregulated by progesterone treatment of the breast cancer cell lines ZR-75 and T47D. This regulation is dependent on the progesterone receptor (PR) but does not require PR phosphorylation at serine 294 or the PR proline-rich region mPRO. The increase in PAR1 mRNA was transient, being present at 3  h and returning to basal levels at 18  h. The addition of a PAR1-activating peptide (aPAR1) to cells treated with progesterone resulted in an increase in focal adhesion (FA) formation as measured by the cellular levels of phosphorylated FA kinase. The combined but not individual treatment of progesterone and aPAR1 also markedly increased stress fiber formation and the migratory capacity of breast cancer cells. In agreement with in vitro findings, data mining from the Oncomine platform revealed that PAR1 expression was significantly upregulated in PR-positive breast tumors. Our observation that PAR1 expression and signal transduction are modulated by progesterone provides new insight into how the progestin component in hormone therapies increases the risk of breast cancer in postmenopausal women.

  16. PCTK3/CDK18 regulates cell migration and adhesion by negatively modulating FAK activity

    PubMed Central

    Matsuda, Shinya; Kawamoto, Kohei; Miyamoto, Kenji; Tsuji, Akihiko; Yuasa, Keizo

    2017-01-01

    PCTAIRE kinase 3 (PCTK3) is a member of the cyclin dependent kinase family, but its physiological function remains unknown. We previously reported that PCTK3-knockdown HEK293T cells showed actin accumulation at the leading edge, suggesting that PCTK3 is involved in the regulation of actin reorganization. In this study, we investigated the physiological function and downstream signal transduction molecules of PCTK3. PCTK3 knockdown in HEK293T cells increased cell motility and RhoA/Rho-associated kinase activity as compared with control cells. We also found that phosphorylation at residue Tyr-397 in focal adhesion kinase (FAK) was increased in PCTK3-knockdown cells. FAK phosphorylation at Tyr-397 was increased in response to fibronectin stimulation, whereas its phosphorylation was suppressed by PCTK3. In addition, excessive expression of PCTK3 led to the formation of filopodia during the early stages of cell adhesion in HeLa cells. These results indicate that PCTK3 controls actin cytoskeleton dynamics by negatively regulating the FAK/Rho signaling pathway. PMID:28361970

  17. Cell migration in confined environments.

    PubMed

    Irimia, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    We describe a protocol for measuring the speed of human neutrophils migrating through small channels, in conditions of mechanical confinement comparable to those experienced by neutrophils migrating through tissues. In such conditions, we find that neutrophils move persistently, at constant speed for tens of minutes, enabling precise measurements at single cells resolution, for large number of cells. The protocol relies on microfluidic devices with small channels in which a solution of chemoattractant and a suspension of isolated neutrophils are loaded in sequence. The migration of neutrophils can be observed for several hours, starting within minutes after loading the neutrophils in the devices. The protocol is divided into four main steps: the fabrication of the microfluidic devices, the separation of neutrophils from whole blood, the preparation of the assay and cell loading, and the analysis of data. We discuss the practical steps for the implementation of the migration assays in biology labs, the adaptation of the protocols to various cell types, including cancer cells, and the supplementary device features required for precise measurements of directionality and persistence during migration.

  18. Activated T cell trans-endothelial migration relies on myosin-IIA contractility for squeezing the cell nucleus through endothelial cell barriers.

    PubMed

    Jacobelli, Jordan; Estin Matthews, Miriam; Chen, Stephanie; Krummel, Matthew F

    2013-01-01

    Following activation, T cells are released from lymph nodes to traffic via the blood to effector sites. The re-entry of these activated T cells into tissues represents a critical step for them to carry out local effector functions. Here we have assessed defects in effector T cells that are acutely depleted in Myosin-IIA (MyoIIA) and show a T cell intrinsic requirement for this motor to facilitate the diapedesis step of extravasation. We show that MyoIIA accumulates at the rear of T cells undergoing trans-endothelial migration. T cells can extend protrusions and project a substantial portion of their cytoplasm through the endothelial wall in the absence of MyoIIA. However, this motor protein plays a crucial role in allowing T cells to complete the movement of their relatively rigid nucleus through the endothelial junctions. In vivo, this defect manifests as poor entry into lymph nodes, tumors and into the spinal cord, during tissue-specific autoimmunity, but not the spleen. This suggests that therapeutic targeting of this molecule may allow for differential attenuation of tissue-specific inflammatory responses.

  19. Selected activities of Citrus maxima Merr. fruits on human endothelial cells: enhancing cell migration and delaying cellular aging.

    PubMed

    Buachan, Paiwan; Chularojmontri, Linda; Wattanapitayakul, Suvara K

    2014-04-21

    Endothelial injury and damage as well as accumulated reactive oxygen species (ROS) in aging play a significant role in the development of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Recent studies show an association of high citrus fruit intake with a lower risk of CVD and stroke but the mechanisms involved are not fully understood. This study investigated the effects of pummelo (Citrus maxima Merr. var. Tubtim Siam, CM) fruit extract on human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVECs) migration and aging. The freeze-dried powder of fruit extract was characterized for antioxidant capacity (FRAP assay) and certain natural antioxidants, including ascorbic acid, gallic acid, hesperidin, and naringin (HPLC). Short-term (48 h) co-cultivation of HUVECs with CM enhanced cell migration as evaluated by a scratch wound assay and Boyden chamber assay. A long-term treatment with CM for 35 days significantly increased HUVEC proliferation capability as indicated by population doubling level (PDL). CM also delayed the onset of aging phenotype shown by senescence-associated β-galactosidase (SA-β-gal) staining. Furthermore, CM was able to attenuate increased ROS levels in aged cells when determined by 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (DCDHF) while eNOS mRNA expression was increased but the eNOS protein level was not changed. Thus, further in vivo and clinical studies are warranted to support the use of pummelo as a functional fruit for endothelial health and CVD risk reduction.

  20. TGF-β1-induced EMT promotes targeted migration of breast cancer cells through the lymphatic system by the activation of CCR7/CCL21-mediated chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Pang, M-F; Georgoudaki, A-M; Lambut, L; Johansson, J; Tabor, V; Hagikura, K; Jin, Y; Jansson, M; Alexander, J S; Nelson, C M; Jakobsson, L; Betsholtz, C; Sund, M; Karlsson, M C I; Fuxe, J

    2016-02-11

    Tumor cells frequently disseminate through the lymphatic system during metastatic spread of breast cancer and many other types of cancer. Yet it is not clear how tumor cells make their way into the lymphatic system and how they choose between lymphatic and blood vessels for migration. Here we report that mammary tumor cells undergoing epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in response to transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β1) become activated for targeted migration through the lymphatic system, similar to dendritic cells (DCs) during inflammation. EMT cells preferentially migrated toward lymphatic vessels compared with blood vessels, both in vivo and in 3D cultures. A mechanism of this targeted migration was traced to the capacity of TGF-β1 to promote CCR7/CCL21-mediated crosstalk between tumor cells and lymphatic endothelial cells. On one hand, TGF-β1 promoted CCR7 expression in EMT cells through p38 MAP kinase-mediated activation of the JunB transcription factor. Blockade of CCR7, or treatment with a p38 MAP kinase inhibitor, reduced lymphatic dissemination of EMT cells in syngeneic mice. On the other hand, TGF-β1 promoted CCL21 expression in lymphatic endothelial cells. CCL21 acted in a paracrine fashion to mediate chemotactic migration of EMT cells toward lymphatic endothelial cells. The results identify TGF-β1-induced EMT as a mechanism, which activates tumor cells for targeted, DC-like migration through the lymphatic system. Furthermore, it suggests that p38 MAP kinase inhibition may be a useful strategy to inhibit EMT and lymphogenic spread of tumor cells.

  1. Benzo(a)pyrene inhibits migration and invasion of extravillous trophoblast HTR-8/SVneo cells via activation of the ERK and JNK pathway.

    PubMed

    Liu, Liyuan; Wang, Yingxiong; Shen, Cha; He, Junlin; Liu, Xueqing; Ding, Yubin; Gao, Rufei; Chen, Xuemei

    2016-07-01

    Benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) is a persistent organic pollutant (POP) that is a serious threat to human health. Numerous studies have shown that BaP causes adverse effects in pregnancy, but the mechanism remains unclear. The moderate invasion of trophoblast cells into the endometrium is an important factor during successful embryo implantation. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect and mechanism of BaP on the invasion and migration of trophoblast cells. HTR-8/SVneo cells were treated with different concentrations (1, 5, 10, 25, 50 and 100 μM) of BaP. The invasion and migration of HTR-8/SVneo cells were observed after BaP treatment. The protein levels related to migration and invasion was detected by Western blot. The results confirmed that BaP inhibits the migration and invasion of extravillous trophoblast HTR-8/SVneo cells. Further investigations indicated that the protein levels of MMP-2, MMP-9 and E-cadherin in HTR-8/SVneo cells were changed by BaP treatment. Moreover, the data demonstrated that BaP activated the MAPK signaling pathway. Pretreatment with specific inhibitors of MAPK rescued BaP-induced change in the migration and invasion of HTR-8/SVneo cells. Taken together, our results indicated that BaP inhibits invasion and the migration of HTR-8/SVneo cells, which might cause a failure in early pregnancy. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Conditioned media from human ovarian cancer endothelial progenitor cells induces ovarian cancer cell migration by activating epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition.

    PubMed

    Teng, L; Peng, S; Guo, H; Liang, H; Xu, Z; Su, Y; Gao, L

    2015-11-01

    Bone marrow-derived endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) migrate to and engraft at ovarian cancer sites. Understanding the interactions between ovarian cancer cells and EPCs is fundamental for determining whether to harness EPC-tumor interactions for delivery of therapeutic agents or target them for intervention. Ovarian cancer cell lines (SKOV-3 and OVCAR-3) were cultured alone or in EPC-conditioned media (EPC-CM). Migration of ovarian cancer cells was detected by transwell chamber. N-cadherin and E-cadherin expression were analyzed by real-time reverse transcription PCR and western blot. EPC-CM can increase transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) secretion in SKOV-3 and OVCAR-3 cells. EPC-CM induced loss of ovarian cancer cell-cell junctions, downregulation of E-cadherin, upregulation of N-cadherin and acquisition of a fibroblastic phenotype, consistent with an epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). The specific TGF-β inhibitor SB431542 abolished the SKOV-3 and OVCAR-3 ovarian cancer cell migration induced by EPC-CM. In SKOV-3 and OVCAR-3 cells, EPC-CM downregulated E-cadherin and concurrently upregulated N-cadherin. EPC-CM upregulated the expression of transcriptional repressors of E-cadherin, Snail and Twist. Treatment with SB431542 abolished the effects of EPC-CM on the relative expression levels of cadherin, Snail and Twist. This study demonstrates that TGF-β has a role in EPC-CM-induced ovarian cancer migration by activating EMT.

  3. Decorin-mediated inhibition of the migration of U87MG glioma cells involves activation of autophagy and suppression of TGF-β signaling.

    PubMed

    Yao, Ting; Zhang, Chen-Guang; Gong, Ming-Tao; Zhang, Min; Wang, Lei; Ding, Wei

    2016-07-01

    Decorin (DCN) is a major member of the small leucine-rich proteoglycan (SLRP) family that is critically involved in tumorigenesis and the development of metastasis of cancers, including glioma. Overexpression of DCN was indicated to suppress glioma cell growth. However, the role of DCN in the migration of glioma cells remain elusive. In this study, we found that treatment with exogenous DCN inhibited the adhesion and migration of U87MG glioma cells with down-regulation of TGF-β signaling. DCN also activated autophagy, as indicated by monodansylcadaverine (MDC) staining, increase in LC3 I/LC3 II conversion, and p62/SQSTM1 degradation in U87MG cells. The increased activity of autophagy was found to be connected to the inhibition on glioma cell migration. Knockdown of DCN expression or the disruption of autophagy with 3-methyladenine (3-MA) was able to reduce the suppression on cell adhesion and migration induced by DCN. When U87MG cells were treated with temozolomide (TMZ), induction of autophagy and up-regulation of DCN were observed, accompanied by suppressed cell adhesion and migration. Transfection of siRNA targeting DCN attenuated the suppressive effect of TMZ on glioma cell migration and adhesion. Our results indicated that the migration of glioma cells was under the control of the active status of autophagy, with DCN serving as a key player, as well as an indicator of the outcome. Therefore, it is suggested that autophagy-modulating reagents could be considered for the treatment of invasive glioma.

  4. Γ-Ionizing radiation-induced activation of the EGFR-p38/ERK-STAT3/CREB-1-EMT pathway promotes the migration/invasion of non-small cell lung cancer cells and is inhibited by podophyllotoxin acetate.

    PubMed

    Cho, Jeong Hyun; Hong, Wan Gi; Jung, Yu-Jin; Lee, Jaeseok; Lee, Eunah; Hwang, Sang-Gu; Um, Hong-Duck; Park, Jong Kuk

    2016-06-01

    Here, we report a new intracellular signaling pathway involved in γ-ionizing radiation (IR)-induced migration/invasion and show that podophyllotoxin acetate (PA) inhibits the IR-induced invasion and migration of A549 cells (a non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell line). Our results revealed that IR increased the invasion/migration of A549 cells, and this effect was decreased by 10 nM PA treatment. PA also inhibited the expressions/activities of matrix metalloprotase (MMP) -2, MMP-9, and vimentin, suggesting that PA could block the IR-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). The IR-induced increases in invasion/migration were associated with the activation of EGFR-AKT, and PA inhibited this effect. P38 and p44/42 ERK were also involved in IR-induced invasion/migration, and combined treatments with PA plus inhibitors of each MAPK synergistically blocked this invasion/migration. In terms of transcription factors (TFs), IR-induced increases in cyclic AMP response element-binding protein-1 (CREB-1) and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) increased invasion/migration and EMT. PA also inhibited these transcription factors and then blocked IR-induced invasion/migration. Collectively, these results indicate that IR induces cancer cell invasion/migration by activating the EGFR-p38/ERK-CREB-1/STAT3-EMT pathway and that PA blocks this pathway to inhibit IR-induced invasion/migration.

  5. Melatonin inhibits TPA-induced oral cancer cell migration by suppressing matrix metalloproteinase-9 activation through the histone acetylation

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Chia-Ming; Lin, Chiao-Wen; Yang, Jia-Sin; Yang, Wei-En; Su, Shih-Chi; Yang, Shun-Fa

    2016-01-01

    Melatonin exerts antimetastatic effects on liver and breast cancer and also inhibits matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity. However, the detailed impacts and underlying mechanisms of melatonin on oral cancer cell metastasis are still unclear. This study showed that melatonin attenuated the 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate-induced migration of oral cancer cell lines, HSC-3 and OECM-1. Zymography, quantitative real-time PCR, and Western blotting analyses revealed that melatonin lessened MMP-9 enzyme activity as well as the expression of MMP-9 mRNA and protein. Furthermore, melatonin suppressed the phosphorylation of the ERK1/2 signalling pathway, which dampened MMP-9 gene transcription by affecting the expression of transcriptional coactivators, such as CREB-binding protein (CREBBP) and E1A binding protein p300 (EP300), and decreasing histone acetylation in HSC-3 and OECM-1 cells. Examinations on clinical samples exhibited that MMP-9, CREBBP, and EP300 were significantly increased in oral cancer tissues. Moreover, the relative level of CREBBP was positively correlated with the expression of MMP-9 and EP300. In conclusion, we demonstrated that melatonin inhibits the motility of HSC-3 and OECM-1 cells in vitro through a molecular mechanism that involves attenuation of MMP-9 expression and activity mediated by decreased histone acetylation. PMID:26980735

  6. A Discrete Cell Migration Model

    SciTech Connect

    Nutaro, James J; Kruse, Kara L; Ward, Richard C; O'Quinn, Elizabeth; Woerner, Matthew M; Beckerman, Barbara G

    2007-01-01

    Migration of vascular smooth muscle cells is a fundamental process in the development of intimal hyperplasia, a precursor to development of cardiovascular disease and a potential response to injury of an arterial wall. Boyden chamber experiments are used to quantify the motion of cell populations in response to a chemoattractant gradient (i.e., cell chemotaxis). We are developing a mathematical model of cell migration within the Boyden chamber, while simultaneously conducting experiments to obtain parameter values for the migration process. In the future, the model and parameters will be used as building blocks for a detailed model of the process that causes intimal hyperplasia. The cell migration model presented in this paper is based on the notion of a cell as a moving sensor that responds to an evolving chemoattractant gradient. We compare the results of our three-dimensional hybrid model with results from a one-dimensional continuum model. Some preliminary experimental data that is being used to refine the model is also presented.

  7. Thyroid hormone receptor inhibits hepatoma cell migration through transcriptional activation of Dickkopf 4

    SciTech Connect

    Chi, Hsiang-Cheng; Liao, Chen-Hsin; Huang, Ya-Hui; Wu, Sheng-Ming; Tsai, Chung-Ying; Liao, Chia-Jung; Tseng, Yi-Hsin; Lin, Yang-Hsiang; Chen, Cheng-Yi; Chung, I-Hsiao; Wu, Tzu-I; Chen, Wei-Jan; Lin, Kwang-Huei

    2013-09-13

    Highlights: •T{sub 3} affects DKK4 mRNA and protein expression in HepG2-TR cells. •Regulation of DKK4 by T{sub 3} is at transcriptional level. •DKK4 overexpression suppresses hepatoma cell metastasis. -- Abstract: Triiodothyronine (T{sub 3}) is a potent form of thyroid hormone mediates several physiological processes including cellular growth, development, and differentiation via binding to the nuclear thyroid hormone receptor (TR). Recent studies have demonstrated critical roles of T{sub 3}/TR in tumor progression. Moreover, long-term hypothyroidism appears to be associated with the incidence of human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), independent of other major HCC risk factors. Dickkopf (DKK) 4, a secreted protein that antagonizes the canonical Wnt signaling pathway, is induced by T{sub 3} at both mRNA and protein levels in HCC cell lines. However, the mechanism underlying T{sub 3}-mediated regulation of DKK4 remains unknown. In the present study, the 5′ promoter region of DKK4 was serially deleted, and the reporter assay performed to localize the T{sub 3} response element (TRE). Consequently, we identified an atypical direct repeat TRE between nucleotides −1645 and −1629 conferring T{sub 3} responsiveness to the DKK4 gene. This region was further validated using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) and electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA). Stable DKK4 overexpression in SK-Hep-1 cells suppressed cell invasion and metastatic potential, both in vivo andin vitro, via reduction of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) expression. Our findings collectively suggest that DKK4 upregulated by T{sub 3}/TR antagonizes the Wnt signal pathway to suppress tumor cell progression, thus providing new insights into the molecular mechanism underlying thyroid hormone activity in HCC.

  8. Autocrine EGF receptor activation mediates endothelial cell migration and vascular morphogenesis induced by VEGF under interstitial flow

    SciTech Connect

    Semino, Carlos E. . E-mail: semino@mit.edu; Kamm, Roger D.; Lauffenburger, Douglas A.

    2006-02-01

    We show here that autocrine ligand activation of epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor in combination with interstitial flow is critically involved in the morphogenetic response of endothelial cells to VEGF stimulation. Human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) monolayers cultured on a collagen gel and exposed to low interstitial flow in the absence of EGF and VEGF remained viable and mitotic but exhibited little evidence of vascular morphogenesis. Addition of VEGF produced a flow-dependent morphogenetic response within 48 to 72 h, characterized by branched capillary-like structures. The response was substantially abolished by inhibitors related to the autocrine EGF receptor pathway including Galardin, AG1478, PD98059, and an EGF receptor-blocking antibody, indicating that regulation of the morphogenetic process operates via autocrine EGF receptor activation. Moreover, we observed that in our system the EGF receptor was always activated independently of the interstitial flow, and, in addition, the EGF receptor inhibitors used above reduced the phosphorylation state of the receptor, correlating with inhibition of capillary morphogenesis. Finally, 5'bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) labeling identified dividing cells at the monolayer but not in the extending capillary-like structures. EGF pathway inhibitors Galardin and AG1478 did not reduce BrdU incorporation in the monolayer, indicating that the EGF-receptor-mediated morphogenetic behavior is mainly due to cell migration rather than proliferation. Based on these results, we propose a two-step model for in vitro capillary morphogenesis in response to VEGF stimulation with interstitial fluid flow: monolayer maintenance by mitotic activity independent of EGF receptors and a migratory response mediated by autocrine EGF receptor activation wherein cells establish capillary-like structures.

  9. The cAMP-producing agonist beraprost inhibits human vascular smooth muscle cell migration via exchange protein directly activated by cAMP

    PubMed Central

    McKean, Jenny S.; Murray, Fiona; Gibson, George; Shewan, Derryck A.; Tucker, Steven J.; Nixon, Graeme F.

    2015-01-01

    Aims During restenosis, vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) migrate from the vascular media to the developing neointima. Preventing VSMC migration is therefore a therapeutic target for restenosis. Drugs, such as prostacyclin analogues, that increase the intracellular concentration of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) can inhibit VSMC migration, but the mechanisms via which this occurs are unknown. Two main downstream mediators of cAMP are protein kinase A (PKA) and exchange protein directly activated by cAMP (Epac). This study has examined the effects of the prostacyclin analogue beraprost on VSMC migration and investigated the intracellular pathways involved. Methods and results In a chemotaxis chamber, human saphenous vein VSMC migrated towards a platelet-derived growth-factor-BB (PDGF) chemogradient. Incubation with therapeutically relevant concentrations of cAMP-producing agonist beraprost significantly decreased PDGF-induced migration. Direct activation of either PKA or Epac inhibited migration whereas inhibition of PKA did not prevent the anti-migratory effect of beraprost. Direct activation of Epac also prevented hyperplasia in ex vivo serum-treated human veins. Using fluorescence resonance energy transfer, we demonstrated that beraprost activated Epac but not PKA. The mechanisms of this Epac-mediated effect involved activation of Rap1 with subsequent inhibition of RhoA. Cytoskeletal rearrangement at the leading edge of the cell was consequently inhibited. Interestingly, Epac1 was localized to the leading edge of migrating VSMC. Conclusions These results indicate that therapeutically relevant concentrations of beraprost can inhibit VSMC migration via a previously unknown mechanism involving the cAMP mediator Epac. This may provide a novel target that could blunt neointimal formation. PMID:26092100

  10. SYNTHESIS AND MIGRATION OF PROTEINS IN THE CELLS OF THE EXOCRINE PANCREAS AS REVEALED BY SPECIFIC ACTIVITY DETERMINATION FROM RADIOAUTOGRAPHS

    PubMed Central

    Warshawsky, H.; Leblond, C. P.; Droz, B.

    1963-01-01

    Radioautographs of pancreatic acinar cells were prepared in rats and mice sacrificed at various times after injection of leucine-, glycine-, or methionine-H3. Measurements of radioactivity concentration (number of silver grains per unit area) and relative protein concentration (by microspectrophotometry of Millon-treated sections) yielded the mean specific activity of proteins in various regions of the acinar cells. The 2 to 5 minute radioautographs as well as the specific activity time curves demonstrate protein synthesis in ergastoplasm. From there, most newly synthesized proteins migrate to and accumulate in the Golgi zone. Then they spread to the whole zymogen region and, finally, enter the excretory ducts. An attempt at estimating turnover times indicated that two classes of proteins are synthesized in the ergastoplasm: "sedentary" with a slow turnover (62.5 hours) and "exportable" with rapid turnover (4.7 minutes). It is estimated that the exportable proteins spend approximately 11.7 minutes in the Golgi zone where they are built up into zymogen granules, and thereafter 36.0 minutes as fully formed zymogen granules, before they are released outside the acinar cell as pancreatic secretion. The mean life span of a zymogen granule in the cell is estimated to be 47.7 minutes. PMID:13999005

  11. Schwann Cell Migration Induced by Earthworm Extract via Activation of PAs and MMP2/9 Mediated through ERK1/2 and p38

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Yung-Ming; Shih, Ying-Ting; Chen, Yueh-Sheng; Liu, Chien-Liang; Fang, Wen-Kuei; Tsai, Chang-Hai; Tsai, Fuu-Jen; Kuo, Wei-Wen; Lai, Tung-Yuan; Huang, Chih-Yang

    2011-01-01

    The earthworm, which has stasis removal and wound-healing functions, is a widely used Chinese herbal medicine in China. Schwann cell migration is critical for the regeneration of injured nerves. Schwann cells provide an essentially supportive activity for neuron regeneration. However, the molecular migration mechanisms induced by earthworms in Schwann cells remain unclear. Here, we investigate the roles of MAPK (ERK1/2, JNK and p38) pathways for earthworm-induced matrix-degrading proteolytic enzyme (PAs and MMP2/9) production in Schwann cells. Moreover, earthworm induced phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and p38, but not JNK, activate the downstream signaling expression of PAs and MMPs in a time-dependent manner. Earthworm-stimulated ERK1/2 and p38 phosphorylation was attenuated by pretreatment with U0126 and SB203580, resulting in migration and uPA-related signal pathway inhibition. The results were confirmed using small interfering ERK1/2 and p38 RNA. These results demonstrated that earthworms can stimulate Schwann cell migration and up-regulate PAs and MMP2/9 expression mediated through the MAPK pathways, ERK1/2 and p38. Taken together, our data suggests the MAPKs (ERK1/2, p38)-, PAs (uPA, tPA)-, MMP (MMP2, MMP9) signaling pathway of Schwann cells regulated by earthworms might play a major role in Schwann cell migration and nerve regeneration. PMID:19808845

  12. TNF-{alpha} promotes human retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cell migration by inducing matrix metallopeptidase 9 (MMP-9) expression through activation of Akt/mTORC1 signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Cheng-hu; Cao, Guo-Fan; Jiang, Qin; Yao, Jin

    2012-08-17

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TNF-{alpha} induces MMP-9 expression and secretion to promote RPE cell migration. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MAPK activation is not critical for TNF-{alpha}-induced MMP-9 expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Akt and mTORC1 signaling mediate TNF-{alpha}-induced MMP-9 expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SIN1 knockdown showed no significant effect on MMP-9 expression by TNF-{alpha}. -- Abstract: Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-{alpha}) promotes in vitro retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cell migration to initiate proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR). Here we report that TNF-{alpha} promotes human RPE cell migration by inducing matrix metallopeptidase 9 (MMP-9) expression. Inhibition of MMP-9 by its inhibitor or its neutralizing antibody inhibited TNF-{alpha}-induced in vitro RPE cell migration. Reversely, exogenously-added active MMP-9 promoted RPE cell migration. Suppression Akt/mTOR complex 1(mTORC1) activation by LY 294002 and rapamycin inhibited TNF-{alpha}-mediated MMP-9 expression. To introduce a constitutively active Akt (CA-Akt) in cultured RPE cells increased MMP-9 expression, and to block mTORC1 activation by rapamycin inhibited its effect. RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated silencing of SIN1, a key component of mTOR complex 2 (mTORC2), had no effect on MMP-9 expression or secretion. In conclusion, this study suggest that TNF-{alpha} promotes RPE cell migration by inducing MMP-9 expression through activation of Akt/ mTORC1, but not mTORC2 signaling.

  13. Ellagitannin-rich cloudberry inhibits hepatocyte growth factor induced cell migration and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/AKT activation in colon carcinoma cells and tumors in Min mice

    PubMed Central

    Pajari, Anne-Maria; Päivärinta, Essi; Paavolainen, Lassi; Vaara, Elina; Koivumäki, Tuuli; Garg, Ritu; Heiman-Lindh, Anu; Mutanen, Marja; Marjomäki, Varpu; Ridley, Anne J.

    2016-01-01

    Berries have been found to inhibit colon carcinogenesis in animal models, and thus represent a potential source of compounds for prevention and treatment of colorectal cancer. The mechanistic basis for their effects is not well understood. We used human colon carcinoma cells and Min mice to investigate the effects of ellagitannin-rich cloudberry (Rubus chamaemorus) extract on cancer cell migration and underlying cell signaling. Intrinsic and hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) -induced cell motility in human HT29 and HCA7 colon carcinoma cells was assessed carrying out cell scattering and scratch wound healing assays using time-lapse microscopy. Activation of Met, AKT, and ERK in cell lines and tumors of cloudberry-fed Min mice were determined using immunoprecipitation, Western blot and immunohistochemical analyses. Cloudberry extract significantly inhibited particularly HGF-induced cancer cell migration in both cell lines. Cloudberry extract inhibited the Met receptor tyrosine phosphorylation by HGF and strongly suppressed HGF-induced AKT and ERK activation in both HT29 and HCA7 cells. Consistently, cloudberry feeding (10% w/w freeze-dried berries in diet for 10 weeks) reduced the level of active AKT and prevented phosphoMet localization at the edges in tumors of Min mice. These results indicate that cloudberry reduces tumor growth and cancer cell motility by inhibiting Met signaling and consequent activation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/AKT in vitro and in tumors in vivo. As the Met receptor is recognized to be a major target in cancer treatment, our results suggest that dietary phytochemicals may have therapeutic value in reducing cancer progression and metastasis. PMID:27270323

  14. Role of I-TAC-binding receptors CXCR3 and CXCR7 in proliferation, activation of intracellular signaling pathways and migration of various tumor cell lines.

    PubMed

    Miekus, Katarzyna; Jarocha, Danuta; Trzyna, Elzbieta; Majka, Marcin

    2010-01-01

    Chemokines and its receptors stimulate tumor growth, migration and invasion. In this study we evaluated the expression and function of CXCR3 and CXCR7 receptors in cervical carcinoma, rhabdomyosarcoma and glioblastoma cell lines. We found that both receptors were expressed at different degree by tumor cells. CXCR7 was expressed at both mRNA and protein level by all tumor cell lines. The expression of CXCR7 differed between rhabdomyosarcoma subtypes. The receptor was highly expressed in alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma and the expression was low in embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma. The expression of CXCR3 was low in majority of the tumor cell lines. Upon I-TAC stimulation AKT and MAPK kinases were activated. However, the activation of growth promoting pathways did not increased the proliferation rate of tumor cells. Since chemokines stimulate the migration of various cell types the ability of I-TAC to stimulate migration of tumor cells were studied. We did not observe the migration of tumor cells toward I-TAC gradient alone. However, at the low dose, I-TAC sensitized tumor cells toward SDF-1beta gradient and synergized with SDF-1beta in activation of intracellular pathways. Our data suggest an important role of I-TAC and its receptors in biology of solid tumors and we postulate that I-TAC-binding receptors might be used as the potential targets for antitumor therapy.

  15. Hypoxia/reoxygenation-experienced cancer cell migration and metastasis are regulated by Rap1- and Rac1-GTPase activation via the expression of thymosin beta-4.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae-Wook; Ryu, Yun-Kyoung; Ji, Young-Hoon; Kang, Joo Hyun; Moon, Eun-Yi

    2015-01-01

    Signaling by small guanosine triphosphatases (GTPase), Rap1/Rac1, is one of the major pathways controlling cancer cell migration and tumor metastasis. Thymosin beta-4 (Tβ4), an actin-sequestering protein, has been shown to increase migration of cancer cells. Episodes of hypoxia and re-oxygenation (H/R) are an important phenomenon in tumor microenvironment (TME). We investigated whether Tβ4 could play as an intermediary to crosstalk between Rac1- and Rap1- GTPase activation under hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R) conditions. Inhibition of Tβ4 expression using transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALEN) significantly decreased lung metastasis of B16F10 cells. Rac1 and Rap1 activity, as well as cancer cell migration, increased following induction of Tβ4 expression in normoxia- or H/R-experienced cells, but were barely detectable in Tβ4-depleted cells. Rap1-regulated Rac1 activity was decreased by a dominant negative Rap1 (Rap1N17), and increased by 8-(4-chloro-phenylthio)-2'-O-methyladenosine-3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (CPT), a Rap1 activator. In contrast, a Rac1-specific inhibitor, NSC23766, and dominant negative Rac1 (Rac1N17) enhanced Tβ4 expression and aberrant Rap1 activity. While NSC23766 and Rac1N17 incompletely inhibited tumor metastasis in vivo, and H/R-experienced cancer cell migration in vitro, more efficient attenuation of cancer cell migration was accomplished by simultaneous inactivation of Rap1 and Rac1 with Rap1N17 and Rac1N17, respectively. These data suggest that a combination therapy targeting both Rap1 and Rac1 activity may be an effective method of inhibiting tumor metastasis.

  16. Activation of the Farnesoid X-receptor in breast cancer cell lines results in cytotoxicity but not increased migration potential.

    PubMed

    Alasmael, Noura; Mohan, Rati; Meira, Lisiane B; Swales, Karen E; Plant, Nick J

    2016-01-28

    Breast cancer is the commonest form of cancer in women, but successful treatment is confounded by the heterogeneous nature of breast tumours: Effective treatments exist for hormone-sensitive tumours, but triple-negative breast cancer results in poor survival. An area of increasing interest is metabolic reprogramming, whereby drug-induced alterations in the metabolic landscape of a tumour slow tumour growth and/or increase sensitivity to existing therapeutics. Nuclear receptors are transcription factors central to the expression of metabolic and transport proteins, and thus represent potential targets for metabolic reprogramming. We show that activation of the nuclear receptor FXR, either by its endogenous ligand CDCA or the synthetic GW4064, leads to cell death in four breast cancer cell lines with distinct phenotypes: MCF-10A (normal), MCF-7 (receptor positive), MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-468 (triple negative). Furthermore, we show that the mechanism of cell death is predominantly through the intrinsic apoptotic pathway. Finally, we demonstrate that FXR agonists do not stimulate migration in breast cancer cell lines, an important potential adverse effect. Together, our data support the continued examination of FXR agonists as a novel class of therapeutics for the treatment of breast cancer.

  17. Ca2+ signaling evoked by activation of Na+ channels and Na+/Ca2+ exchangers is required for GABA-induced NG2 cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Xiao-ping; Li, Xiang-yao; Zhou, Bing; Shen, Wanhua; Zhang, Zhi-jun; Xu, Tian-le

    2009-01-01

    NG2 cells originate from various brain regions and migrate to their destinations during early development. These cells express voltage-gated Na+ channels but fail to produce typical action potentials. The physiological role of Na+ channels in these cells is unclear. We found that GABA induces membrane depolarization and Ca2+ elevation in NG2 cells, a process requiring activation of GABAA receptors, Na+ channels, and Na+/Ca2+ exchangers (NCXs), but not Ca2+ channels. We have identified a persistent Na+ current in these cells that may underlie the GABA-induced pathway of prolonged Na+ elevation, which in turn triggers Ca2+ influx via NCXs. This unique Ca2+ signaling pathway is further shown to be involved in the migration of NG2 cells. Thus, GABAergic signaling mediated by sequential activation of GABAA receptors, noninactivating Na+ channels, and NCXs may play an important role in the development and function of NG2 glial cells in the brain. PMID:19596850

  18. Apamin inhibits PDGF-BB-induced vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation and migration through suppressions of activated Akt and Erk signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung-Yeon; Kim, Kyung-Hyun; Lee, Woo-Ram; An, Hyun-Jin; Lee, Sun-Jae; Han, Sang-Mi; Lee, Kwang-Gill; Park, Yoon-Yub; Kim, Kee-Sik; Lee, Young-Soo; Park, Kwan-Kyu

    2015-07-01

    The increased proliferation and migration of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) are key process in the development of atherosclerosis lesions. Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) initiates a multitude of biological effects that contribute to VSMC proliferation and migration. Apamin, a component of bee venom, has been known to block the Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels. However, the effects of apamin in the regulation PDGF-BB-induced VSMC proliferation and migration has not been identified. In this study, we investigate the inhibitory effect of apamin on PDGF-BB-induced VSMC proliferation and migration. Apamin suppressed the PDGF-BB-induced VSMC proliferation and migration with no apparent cytotoxic effect. In accordance with these findings, apamin induced the arrest of cell cycle progression at G0/G1 phase. Apamin also decreased the expressions of G0/G1 specific regulatory proteins including proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), cyclin D1, cyclin-dependent kinases (CDK) 4, cyclin E and CDK2, as well as increased the expression of p21(Cip1) in PDGF-BB-induced VSMC. Moreover, apamin inhibited PDGF-BB-induced phosphorylation of Akt and Erk1/2. These results suggest that apamin plays an important role in prevention of vascular proliferation and migration through the G0/G1 cell cycle arrest by PDGF signaling pathway. Thus, apamin may be a promising candidate for the therapy of atherosclerosis.

  19. Intermediate-conductance calcium-activated potassium channel KCa3.1 and chloride channel modulate chemokine ligand (CCL19/CCL21)-induced migration of dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Shao, Zhifei; Gaurav, Rohit; Agrawal, Devendra K

    2015-07-01

    The role of ion channels is largely unknown in chemokine-induced migration in nonexcitable cells such as dendritic cells (DCs). Here, we examined the role of intermediate-conductance calcium-activated potassium channel (KCa3.1) and chloride channel (CLC3) in lymphatic chemokine-induced migration of DCs. The amplitude and kinetics of chemokine ligand (CCL19/CCL21)-induced Ca(2+) influx were associated with chemokine receptor 7 expression levels, extracellular-free Ca(2+) and Cl(-), and independent of extracellular K(+). Chemokines (CCL19 and CCL21) and KCa3.1 activator (1-ethyl-1,3-dihydro-2H-benzimidazol-2-one) induced plasma membrane hyperpolarization and K(+) efflux, which was blocked by 1-[(2-chlorophenyl)diphenylmethyl]-1H-pyrazole, suggesting that KCa3.1 carried larger conductance than the inward calcium release-activated calcium channel. Blockade of KCa3.1, low Cl(-) in the medium, and low dose of 4,4'-diisothiocyano-2,2'-stilbenedisulfonic acid (DIDS) impaired CCL19/CCL21-induced Ca(2+) influx, cell volume change, and DC migration. High doses of DIDS completely blocked DC migration possibly by significantly disrupting mitochondrial membrane potential. In conclusion, KCa3.1 and CLC3 are critical in human DC migration by synergistically regulating membrane potential, chemokine-induced Ca(2+) influx, and cell volume.

  20. The effect of catalase on migration and invasion of lung cancer cells by regulating the activities of cathepsin S, L, and K.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Ju-Ying; Lee, Mon-Juan; Dah-Tsyr Chang, Margaret; Huang, Haimei

    2014-04-15

    Abundant clinical evidences indicate that up-regulation of several cathepsins in many human cancers is correlated with malignant progression and poor patient prognosis. In addition, a decrease in catalase activity or accumulation of hydrogen peroxide correlates with cancer metastasis. Recent studies indicate that cathepsin activation and expression can be modulated via H2O2 treatment. However, the actual relationship between catalase and cathepsins is not yet fully understood. In the present study, we found that catalase expression (or activity) was higher, while intracellular and extracellular Cat S, Cat L, and Cat K activities were lower in the non-invasive CL1-0 cells compared to the highly invasive CL1-5 cells. After CL1-0 cells were transfected with catalase-shRNA, the corresponding ROS (H2O2) level and Cat S, Cat L, or Cat K expression (or activity) was up-regulated, accompanied by an increase in cell migration and invasion. On the other hand, ROS (H2O2) level, cathepsin S, L, and K activities, cell migration and invasion were decreased in catalase-overexpressed CL1-5 cells. It is suggested that catalase may regulate cathepsin activity by controlling the production of ROS (H2O2), leading to variation in migration and invasion ability of lung cancer cells.

  1. The oncoprotein HBXIP up-regulates FGF4 through activating transcriptional factor Sp1 to promote the migration of breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Shi, Hui; Li, Yinghui; Feng, Guoxing; Li, Leilei; Fang, Runping; Wang, Zhen; Qu, Jie; Ding, Peijian; Zhang, Xiaodong; Ye, Lihong

    2016-02-26

    We have reported that the oncoprotein hepatitis B X-interacting protein (HBXIP) is able to promote migration of breast cancer cells. Fibroblast growth factor 4 (FGF4) is a multipotent growth factor and is highly expressed in various human cancers. However, the regulatory mechanism of FGF4 in breast cancer remains poorly understood. In the present study, we report that HBXIP is able to up-regulate FGF4 to enhance the migration of breast cancer cells. Immunohistochemistry staining showed that HBXIP and FGF4 were highly expressed in clinical metastatic lymph nodes of breast tumor. The expression levels of HBXIP were positively related to those of FGF4 in clinical breast cancer tissues. Then, we validated that HBXIP up-regulated the expression of FGF4 at the levels of promoter, mRNA and protein by luciferase reporter gene assays, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analysis. Moreover, we found that HBXIP was able to activate FGF4 promoter through transcriptional factor Sp1 by luciferase reporter gene assays. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays confirmed that HBXIP coactivated Sp1 to stimulate FGF4 promoter. In function, we showed that HBXIP promoted breast cancer cell migration through FGF4 by wound healing and transwell cell migration assays. Thus, we conclude that the oncoprotein HBXIP up-regulates FGF4 through activating transcriptional factor Sp1 to promote the migration of breast cancer cells. Therapeutically, HBXIP may serve as a novel target in breast cancer.

  2. T cell migration, search strategies and mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Krummel, Matthew F; Bartumeus, Frederic; Gérard, Audrey

    2016-03-01

    T cell migration is essential for T cell responses; it allows for the detection of cognate antigen at the surface of antigen-presenting cells and for interactions with other cells involved in the immune response. Although appearing random, growing evidence suggests that T cell motility patterns are strategic and governed by mechanisms that are optimized for both the activation stage of the cell and for environment-specific cues. In this Opinion article, we discuss how the combined effects of T cell-intrinsic and -extrinsic forces influence T cell motility patterns in the context of highly complex tissues that are filled with other cells involved in parallel motility. In particular, we examine how insights from 'search theory' can be used to describe T cell movement across an 'exploitation-exploration trade-off' in the context of activation versus effector function and lymph nodes versus peripheral tissues.

  3. Migrating Oligodendrocyte Progenitor Cells Swell Prior to Soma Dislocation

    PubMed Central

    Happel, Patrick; Möller, Kerstin; Schwering, Nina K.; Dietzel, Irmgard D.

    2013-01-01

    The migration of oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs) to the white matter is an indispensable requirement for an intact brain function. The mechanism of cell migration in general is not yet completely understood. Nevertheless, evidence is accumulating that besides the coordinated rearrangement of the cytoskeleton, a finetuned interplay of ion and water fluxes across the cell membrane is essential for cell migration. One part of a general hypothesis is that a local volume increase towards the direction of movement triggers a mechano-activated calcium influx that regulates various procedures at the rear end of a migrating cell. Here, we investigated cell volume changes of migrating OPCs using scanning ion conductance microscopy. We found that during accelerated migration OPCs undergo an increase in the frontal cell body volume. These findings are supplemented with time lapse calcium imaging data that hint an increase in calcium content the frontal part of the cell soma. PMID:23657670

  4. Initiation of Oligodendrocyte Progenitor Cell Migration by a PDGF-A Activated Extracellular Regulated Kinase (ERK) Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Frost, Emma E.; Zhou, ZhiCheng; Krasnesky, Kimberley; Armstrong, Regina C.

    2009-01-01

    During CNS development, oligodendrocyte progenitor (OP) cells migrate from germinal zones to presumptive white matter tracts to generate myelinating oligodendrocytes. In vitro and in vivo studies indicate that platelet-derived growth factor-A (PDGF-A) is a potent chemoattractant for OP cells and important for normal distribution throughout the developing CNS. However, PDGF-A does not localize in concentration gradients corresponding to OP migratory pathways, as would be expected for a chemoattractant to direct migration. Therefore, the mechanism by which PDGF-A regulates OP distribution remains to be clarified. Here we show that PDGF-A induces OP migration and continuous exposure to PDGF-A is not required to maintain migration. Using pharmacological inhibitors, we show that a self-sustaining extracellular-regulated-kinase signaling pathway drives OP migration for up to 72 hours after the initial PDGF stimulus. These findings indicate PDGF-A may act to mobilize OP cells that then respond to distinct directional signals to distribute appropriately within the CNS. PMID:18512152

  5. Leukotactin-1/CCL15 induces cell migration and differentiation of human eosinophilic leukemia EoL-1 cells through PKCdelta activation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji-Sook; Kim, In Sik

    2010-06-01

    Leukotactin-1 (Lkn-1)/CCL15 is a CC chemokine that binds to the CCR1 and CCR3. Lkn-1 functions as an essential factor in the migration of monocytes, lymphocytes, and neutrophils. Although eosinophils express both receptors, the role of Lkn-1 in immature eosinophils remains to be elucidated. In this present study, we investigated the contribution of the CCR1-binding chemokines to chemotactic activity and in the differentiation in the human eosinophilic leukemia cell line EoL-1. Lkn-1 induced the stronger migration of EoL-1 cells than other CCR1-binding chemokines such as RANTES/CCL5, MIP-1alpha/CCL3 and HCC-4/CCL16. Lkn-1-induced chemotaxis was inhibited by pertussis toxin, an inhibitor of G(i)/G(o) protein; U73122, an inhibitor of phospholipase C and rottlerin, an inhibitor of protein kinase C delta (PKCdelta). Lkn-1 increased PKCdelta activity, which was partially blocked by the pertussis toxin and U73122. Lkn-1 enhanced the butyric acid-induced differentiation via PKCdelta after binding to the increased CCR1 because Lkn-1 caused EoL-1 cells to change morphologically into mature eosinophil-like cells. Likewise, Lkn-1 increased the expression of both eosinophil peroxidase (EPO) and the major basic protein (MBP). PKCdelta activation due to Lkn-1 is involved in migration, as well as the butyric acid-induced differentiation. This finding contributes to an understanding of CC chemokines in eosinophil biology and to the development of novel therapies for the treatment of eosinophilic disorders. This study suggests the pivotal roles of Lkn-1 in the regulation of the movement and development of eosinophils.

  6. Transcription factor activity of estrogen receptor α activation upon nonylphenol or bisphenol A treatment enhances the in vitro proliferation, invasion, and migration of neuroblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Hongda; Yao, Yao; Wang, Changli; Zhang, Liyu; Cheng, Long; Wang, Yiren; Wang, Tao; Liang, Erguang; Jia, Hui; Ye, Qinong; Hou, Mingxiao; Feng, Fan

    2016-01-01

    Many kinds of endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs), for example, the environmental estrogens bisphenol A and nonylphenol, may regulate the activity of estrogen receptor α (ERα) and therefore induce potential disruption of normal endocrine function. However, the involvement of EDCs in human cancers, especially in endocrine-related cancer neuroblastoma regulation, is not very clear. In this work, results showed that upon bisphenol A or nonylphenol treatment, the transcription factor activity of ERα was significantly increased in neuroblastoma cell line SH-SY5Y. Bisphenol A and nonylphenol could enhance ERα activity via recruiting it to the target gene promoter. Furthermore, treatment of bisphenol A and nonylphenol enhanced the in vitro proliferation, invasion, and migration ability of neuroblastoma cells. By investigating the role of EDC-induced ERα upregulation, our data extend the understanding of the function of EDCs and further suggest that ERα might be a potential therapeutic target in human neuroblastoma treatment. PMID:27366082

  7. Exogenous hydrogen sulfide exerts proliferation, anti-apoptosis, angiopoiesis and migration effects via activating HSP90 pathway in EC109 cells.

    PubMed

    Lei, Yiyan; Zhen, Yulan; Zhang, Wei; Sun, Xiuting; Lin, Xiaoxiong; Feng, Jianqiang; Luo, Honghe; Chen, Zhenguang; Su, Chunhua; Zeng, Bo; Chen, Jingfu

    2016-06-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) participates in diverse physiological and pathophysiologic processes of cancer both in vitro and in vivo. We have previously reported the proliferation/anti-apoptosis/angiogenesis/migration effects of exogenous H2S on liver cancer and glioma via amplifying the activation of NF-κB and p38 MAPK/ERK1/2-COX-2 pathway. However, the effects of H2S on EC109 esophageal cells remain unclear. The present study demonstrated the effects of exogenous H2S on cancer cell growth via activating HSP90 pathways in EC109 esophageal cells. EC109 esophageal cells were treated with 400 µmol/l NaHS (a donor of H2S) for 24 h. The expression levels of HSP90, bcl-2, caspase-3, bax and MMP-2 were detected by western blot assay. Cell viability was detected by Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8). The migration rate was analyzed using a Transwell migration assay and ImageJ software. NaHS promoted cell proliferation, as evidenced by an increase in cell viability. In addition, NaHS treatment reduced apoptosis, as indicated by the increased bcl-2 expression and decreased cleaved caspase-3 and bax expression. Importantly, exposure of NaHS increased the expression of MMP-2, the migration rate and expression of VEGF. Notably, co-treatment of EC109 cells with NaHS and GA (an inhibitor of HSP90 pathway) largely suppressed the aforementioned NaHS-induced effects. The findings of the present study provided novel evidence that HSP90 pathway was involved in NaHS-induced cancer cell proliferation, anti-apoptosis, angiopoiesis and migration in EC109 esophageal cells.

  8. The RhoA effector mDia is induced during T cell activation and regulates actin polymerization and cell migration in T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Vicente-Manzanares, Miguel; Rey, Mercedes; Pérez-Martínez, Manuel; Yáñez-Mó, María; Sancho, David; Cabrero, José Román; Barreiro, Olga; de la Fuente, Hortensia; Itoh, Kazuyuki; Sánchez-Madrid, Francisco

    2003-07-15

    Regulation of actin polymerization is critical for many different functions of T lymphocytes, including cell migration. Here we show that the RhoA effector mDia is induced in vitro in activated PBL and is highly expressed in vivo in diseased tissue-infiltrating activated lymphocytes. mDia localizes at the leading edge of polarized T lymphoblasts in an area immediately posterior to the leading lamella, in which its effector protein profilin is also concentrated. Overexpression of an activated mutant of mDia results in an inhibition of both spontaneous and chemokine-directed T cell motility. mDia does not regulate the shape of the cell, which involves another RhoA effector, p160 Rho-coiled coil kinase, and is not involved in integrin-mediated cell adhesion. However, mDia activation blocked CD3- and PMA-mediated cell spreading. mDia activation increased polymerized actin levels, which resulted in the blockade of chemokine-induced actin polymerization by depletion of monomeric actin. Moreover, mDia was shown to regulate the function of the small GTPase Rac1 through the control of actin availability. Together, our data demonstrate that RhoA is involved in the control of the filamentous actin/monomeric actin balance through mDia, and that this balance is critical for T cell responses.

  9. Intermediate-conductance Calcium-activated Potassium Channel KCa3.1 and Chloride Channel Modulate Chemokine Ligand (CCL19/CCL21)-induced Migration of Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Zhifei; Gaurav, Rohit; Agrawal, Devendra K

    2014-01-01

    The role of ion channels is largely unknown in chemokine-induced migration in non-excitable cells such as dendritic cells. Here, we examined the role of KCa3.1 and chloride channels in lymphatic chemokines-induced migration of dendritic cells. The amplitude and kinetics of CCL19/21-induced Ca2+ influx were associated with CCR7 expression levels, extracellular free Ca2+ and Cl−, and independent of extracellular K+. Chemokines, CCL19 and CCL21, and KCa3.1 activator, 1-EBIO, induced plasma membrane hyperpolarization and K+ efflux, which was blocked by TRAM-34, suggesting that KCa3.1 carried larger conductance than the inward CRAC. Blockade of KCa3.1, low Cl− in the medium, and low dose of DIDS impaired CCL19/CCL21-induced Ca2+ influx, cell volume change, and DC migration. High doses of DIDS completely blocked DC migration possibly by significantly disrupting mitochondrial membrane potential. In conclusion, KCa3.1 and chloride channel are critical in human DC migration by synergistically regulating membrane potential, chemokine-induced Ca2+ influx, and cell volume. PMID:25583444

  10. Cell migration and invasion assays.

    PubMed

    Moutasim, Karwan A; Nystrom, Maria L; Thomas, Gareth J

    2011-01-01

    A number of in vitro assays have been developed to study tumor cell motility. Historically, assays have been mainly monocellular, where carcinoma cells are studied in isolation. Scratch assays can be used to study the collective and directional movement of populations of cells, whereas two chamber assays lend themselves to the analysis of chemotactic/haptotactic migration and cell invasion. However, an inherent disadvantage of these assays is that they grossly oversimplify the complex process of invasion, lacking the tumor structural architecture and stromal components. Organotypic assays, where tumor cells are grown at an air/liquid interface on gels populated with stromal cells, are a more physiologically relevant method for studying 3-dimensional tumor invasion.

  11. TGF-β effects on prostate cancer cell migration and invasion are mediated by PGE2 through activation of PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway.

    PubMed

    Vo, Baohan T; Morton, Derrick; Komaragiri, Shravan; Millena, Ana C; Leath, Chelesie; Khan, Shafiq A

    2013-05-01

    TGF-β plays an important role in the progression of prostate cancer. It exhibits both tumor suppressor and tumor-promoting activities. Correlations between cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 overexpression and enhanced production of prostaglandin (PG)E2 have been implicated in cancer progression; however, there are no studies indicating that TGF-β effects in prostate cancer cells involve PGE2 synthesis. In this study, we investigated TGF-β regulation of COX-1 and COX-2 expression in prostate cancer cells and whether the effects of TGF-β on cell proliferation and migration are mediated by PGE2. COX-1 protein was ubiquitously expressed in prostate cells; however, COX-2 protein levels were detected only in prostate cancer cells. TGF-β treatment increased COX-2 protein levels and PGE2 secretion in PC3 cells. Exogenous PGE2 and PGF2α had no effects on cell proliferation in LNCaP, DU145, and PC3 cells whereas PGE2 and TGF-β induced migration and invasive behavior in PC3 cells. Only EP2 and EP4 receptors were detected at mRNA levels in prostate cells. The EP4-targeting small interfering RNA inhibited PGE2 and TGF-β-induced migration of PC3 cells. TGF-β and PGE2 induce activation of PI3K/AKT/mammalian target of rapamycin pathway as indicated by increased AKT, p70S6K, and S6 phosphorylation. Rapamycin completely blocked the effects of TGF-β and PGE2 on phosphorylation of p70S6K and S6 but not on AKT phosphorylation. PGE2 and TGF-β induced phosphorylation of AKT, which was blocked by antagonists of PGE2 (EP4) receptors (L161982, AH23848) and PI3K inhibitor (LY294002) in PC3 cells. Pretreatment with L161982 or AH23848 blocked the stimulatory effects of PGE2 and TGF-β on cell migration, whereas LY294002 or rapamycin completely eliminated PGE2, TGF-β, and epidermal growth factor-induced migration in PC3 cells. We conclude that TGF-β increases COX-2 levels and PGE2 secretion in prostate cancer cells which, in turn, mediate TGF-β effects on cell migration and invasion through

  12. Sinomenine influences capacity for invasion and migration in activated human monocytic THP-1 cells by inhibiting the expression of MMP-2, MMP-9, and CD147

    PubMed Central

    Ou, Yang-qiong; Chen, Li-hua; Li, Xue-jun; Lin, Zhi-bin; Li, Wei-dong

    2009-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to investigate the mechanism of the effects of Sinomenine (SIN) on the invasion and migration ability of activated human monocytic THP-1 cells (A-THP-1). Sinomenine is a pure alkaloid extracted from the Chinese medical plant Sinomenium acutum. Methods: Human monocytic THP-1 cells were induced to differentiate into macrophages with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA). Cells were treated with different concentrations of SIN. The invasion and migration ability of cells was tested by in vitro transwell assays. The levels of CD147 and MMPs were evaluated by flow cytometric analysis and zymographic analysis, respectively. The mRNA expression of CD147, MMP-2, and MMP-9 was measured by RT-PCR. Results: The invasion and migration ability of A-THP-1 cells was significantly inhibited by SIN in a concentration-dependent fashion; at the same time, the levels of CD147, MMP-2, and MMP-9 were markedly down-regulated. This inhibitory effect was most notable at concentrations of 0.25 mmol/L and 1.00 mmol/L (P<0.01). Conclusion: A possible mechanism of the inhibitory effect of SIN on cell invasion and migration ability is repression of the expression of MMP-2 and MMP-9, which strongly correlates with the inhibition of CD147 activity. PMID:19305422

  13. Human chorionic gonadotropin β induces migration and invasion via activating ERK1/2 and MMP-2 in human prostate cancer DU145 cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Zongwen; Li, Chunliu; Du, Lianlian; Zhou, Yan; Wu, Wei

    2013-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that human chorionic gonadotropin β (hCGβ) induced migration and invasion in human prostate cancer cells. However, the involved molecular mechanisms are unclear. Here, we established a stable prostate cancer cell line overexpressing hCGβ and tested hCGβ-triggered signaling pathways causing cell migration and invasion. ELISA showed that the hCGβ amount secreted into medium increased with culture time after the hCGβ-transfected cells were incubated for 3, 6, 9, 12 and 24 h. More, hCGβ standards promoted MAPK (ERK1/2) phosphorylation and increased MMP-2 expression and activity in both dose- and time-dependent manners in hCGβ non-transfected cells. In addition, hCGβ promoted ERK1/2 phosphorylation and increased MMP-2 expression and activity significantly in hCGβ transfected DU145 cells. Whereas ERK1/2 blocker PD98059 (25 µM) significantly downregulated phosphorylated ERK1/2 and MMP-2. Particularly, hCGβ promoted cell migration and invasion, yet the PD98059 diminished the hCGβ-induced cell motility under those conditions. These results indicated that hCGβ induced cell motility via promoting ERK1/2 phosphorylation and MMP-2 upregulation in human prostate cancer DU145 cells.

  14. Adaxial cell migration in the zebrafish embryo is an active cell autonomous property that requires the Prdm1a transcription factor.

    PubMed

    Ono, Yosuke; Yu, Weimiao; Jackson, Harriet E; Parkin, Caroline A; Ingham, Philip W

    2015-01-01

    Adaxial cells, the progenitors of slow-twitch muscle fibres in zebrafish, exhibit a stereotypic migratory behaviour during somitogenesis. Although this process is known to be disrupted in various mutants, its precise nature has remained unclear. Here, using in vivo imaging and chimera analysis, we show that adaxial cell migration is a cell autonomous process, during which cells become polarised and extend filopodia at their leading edge. Loss of function of the Prdm1a transcription factor disrupts the polarisation and migration of adaxial cells, reflecting a role that is independent of its repression of sox6 expression. Expression of the M- and N-cadherins, previously implicated in driving adaxial cell migration, is largely unaffected by loss of Prdm1a function, suggesting that differential cadherin expression is not sufficient for adaxial cell migration.

  15. Force transmission in migrating cells

    PubMed Central

    Sauser, Roger; Ambrosi, Davide; Meister, Jean-Jacques; Verkhovsky, Alexander B.

    2010-01-01

    During cell migration, forces generated by the actin cytoskeleton are transmitted through adhesion complexes to the substrate. To investigate the mechanism of force generation and transmission, we analyzed the relationship between actin network velocity and traction forces at the substrate in a model system of persistently migrating fish epidermal keratocytes. Front and lateral sides of the cell exhibited much stronger coupling between actin motion and traction forces than the trailing cell body. Further analysis of the traction–velocity relationship suggested that the force transmission mechanisms were different in different cell regions: at the front, traction was generated by a gripping of the actin network to the substrate, whereas at the sides and back, it was produced by the network’s slipping over the substrate. Treatment with inhibitors of the actin–myosin system demonstrated that the cell body translocation could be powered by either of the two different processes, actomyosin contraction or actin assembly, with the former associated with significantly larger traction forces than the latter. PMID:20100912

  16. Expression/activation of α5β1 integrin is linked to the β-catenin signaling pathway to drive migration in glioma cells

    PubMed Central

    Renner, Guillaume; Noulet, Fanny; Mercier, Marie-Cécile; Choulier, Laurence; Etienne-Selloum, Nelly; Gies, Jean-Pierre; Lehmann, Maxime; Lelong-Rebel, Isabelle; Martin, Sophie; Dontenwill, Monique

    2016-01-01

    The Wnt/beta catenin pathway has been highlighted as an important player of brain tumors aggressiveness and resistance to therapies. Increasing knowledges of the regulation of beta-catenin transactivation point out its hub position in different pathophysiological outcomes in glioma such as survival and migration. Crosstalks between integrins and beta-catenin pathways have been suggested in several tumor tissues. As we demonstrated earlier that α5β1 integrin may be considered as a therapeutic target in high grade glioma through its contribution to glioma cell migration and resistance to chemotherapy, we addressed here the potential relationship between α5β1 integrin and beta-catenin activation in glioma cells. We demonstrated that overexpression and activation by fibronectin of α5β1 integrin allowed the transactivation of beta-catenin gene targets included in an EMT-like program that induced an increase in cell migration. Hampering of beta catenin activation and cell migration could be similarly achieved by a specific integrin antagonist. In addition we showed that α5β1 integrin/AKT axis is mainly involved in these processes. However, blockade of beta-catenin by XAV939 (tankyrase inhibitor leading to beta-catenin degradation) did not synergize with p53 activation aiming to cell apoptosis as was the case with integrin antagonists. We therefore propose a dual implication of α5β1 integrin/AKT axis in glioma cell resistance to therapies and migration each supported by different signaling pathways. Our data thus suggest that α5β1 integrin may be added to the growing list of beta-catenin modulators and provide new evidences to assign this integrin as a valuable target to fight high grade glioma. PMID:27613837

  17. Oleanolic acid induces migration in Mv1Lu and MDA-MB-231 epithelial cells involving EGF receptor and MAP kinases activation

    PubMed Central

    Ruzafa-Martínez, María; Ramos-Morcillo, Antonio Jesús

    2017-01-01

    During wound healing, skin function is restored by the action of several cell types that undergo differentiation, migration, proliferation and/or apoptosis. These dynamics are tightly regulated by the evolution of the extra cellular matrix (ECM) contents along the process. Pharmacologically active flavonoids have shown to exhibit useful physiological properties interesting in pathological states. Among them, oleanolic acid (OA), a pentacyclic triterpene, shows promising properties over wound healing, as increased cell migration in vitro and improved wound resolution in vivo. In this paper, we pursued to disclose the molecular mechanisms underlying those effects, by using an in vitro scratch assay in two epithelial cell lines of different linage: non-malignant mink lung epithelial cells, Mv1Lu; and human breast cancer cells, MDA-MB-231. In every case, we observed that OA clearly enhanced cell migration for in vitro scratch closure. This correlated with the stimulation of molecular pathways related to mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases, as ERK1,2 and Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) 1,2 activation and c-Jun phosphorylation. Moreover, MDA-MB-231 cells treated with OA displayed an altered gene expression profile affecting transcription factor genes (c-JUN) as well as proteins involved in migration and ECM dynamics (PAI1), in line with the development of an epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) status. Strikingly, upon OA treatment, we observed changes in the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) subcellular localization, while interfering with its signalling completely prevented migration effects. This data provides a physiological framework supporting the notion that lipophilic plant extracts used in traditional medicine, might modulate wound healing processes in vivo through its OA contents. The molecular implications of these observations are discussed. PMID:28231262

  18. Oleanolic acid induces migration in Mv1Lu and MDA-MB-231 epithelial cells involving EGF receptor and MAP kinases activation.

    PubMed

    Bernabé-García, Ángel; Armero-Barranco, David; Liarte, Sergio; Ruzafa-Martínez, María; Ramos-Morcillo, Antonio Jesús; Nicolás, Francisco José

    2017-01-01

    During wound healing, skin function is restored by the action of several cell types that undergo differentiation, migration, proliferation and/or apoptosis. These dynamics are tightly regulated by the evolution of the extra cellular matrix (ECM) contents along the process. Pharmacologically active flavonoids have shown to exhibit useful physiological properties interesting in pathological states. Among them, oleanolic acid (OA), a pentacyclic triterpene, shows promising properties over wound healing, as increased cell migration in vitro and improved wound resolution in vivo. In this paper, we pursued to disclose the molecular mechanisms underlying those effects, by using an in vitro scratch assay in two epithelial cell lines of different linage: non-malignant mink lung epithelial cells, Mv1Lu; and human breast cancer cells, MDA-MB-231. In every case, we observed that OA clearly enhanced cell migration for in vitro scratch closure. This correlated with the stimulation of molecular pathways related to mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases, as ERK1,2 and Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) 1,2 activation and c-Jun phosphorylation. Moreover, MDA-MB-231 cells treated with OA displayed an altered gene expression profile affecting transcription factor genes (c-JUN) as well as proteins involved in migration and ECM dynamics (PAI1), in line with the development of an epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) status. Strikingly, upon OA treatment, we observed changes in the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) subcellular localization, while interfering with its signalling completely prevented migration effects. This data provides a physiological framework supporting the notion that lipophilic plant extracts used in traditional medicine, might modulate wound healing processes in vivo through its OA contents. The molecular implications of these observations are discussed.

  19. Activated α2 -Macroglobulin Induces Mesenchymal Cellular Migration Of Raw264.7 Cells Through Low-Density Lipoprotein Receptor-Related Protein 1.

    PubMed

    Ferrer, Darío G; Dato, Virginia Actis; Fincati, Javier R Jaldín; Lorenc, Valeria E; Sánchez, María C; Chiabrando, Gustavo A

    2016-12-24

    Distinct modes of cell migration contribute to diverse types of cell movements. The mesenchymal mode is characterized by a multistep cycle of membrane protrusion, the formation of focal adhesion, and the stabilization at the leading edge associated with the degradation of extracellular matrix (ECM) components and with regulated extracellular proteolysis. Both α2 -Macroglobulin (α2 M) and its receptor, low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1), play important roles in inflammatory processes, by controlling the extracellular activity of several proteases. The binding of the active form of α2 M (α2 M*) to LRP1 can also activate different signaling pathways in macrophages, thus inducing extracellular matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) activation and cellular proliferation. In the present study, we investigated whether the α2 M*/LRP1 interaction induces cellular migration of the macrophage-derived cell line, Raw264.7. By using the wound-scratch migration assay and confocal microscopy, we demonstrate that α2 M* induces LRP1-mediated mesenchymal cellular migration. This migration exhibits the production of enlarged cellular protrusions, MT1-MMP distribution to these leading edge protrusions, actin polymerization, focal adhesion formation, and increased intracellular LRP1/β1-integrin colocalization. Moreover, the presence of calphostin-C blocked the α2 M*-stimulated cellular protrusions, suggesting that the PKC activation is involved in the cellular motility of Raw264.7 cells. These findings could constitute a therapeutic target for inflammatory processes with deleterious consequences for human health, such as rheumatoid arthritis, atherosclerosis and cancer. J. Cell. Biochem. 9999: 1-9, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Fine Tuning Cell Migration by a Disintegrin and Metalloproteinases

    PubMed Central

    Theodorou, K.

    2017-01-01

    Cell migration is an instrumental process involved in organ development, tissue homeostasis, and various physiological processes and also in numerous pathologies. Both basic cell migration and migration towards chemotactic stimulus consist of changes in cell polarity and cytoskeletal rearrangement, cell detachment from, invasion through, and reattachment to their neighboring cells, and numerous interactions with the extracellular matrix. The different steps of immune cell, tissue cell, or cancer cell migration are tightly coordinated in time and place by growth factors, cytokines/chemokines, adhesion molecules, and receptors for these ligands. This review describes how a disintegrin and metalloproteinases interfere with several steps of cell migration, either by proteolytic cleavage of such molecules or by functions independent of proteolytic activity. PMID:28260841

  1. Cadmium migration in aerospace nickel cadmium cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdermott, P. P.

    1976-01-01

    The effects of temperature, the nature of separator material, charge and discharge, carbonate contamination, and the mode of storage are studied with respect to the migration of active material from the negative toward the positive plate. A theoretical model is proposed which takes into account the solubility of cadmium in various concentrations of hydroxide and carbonate at different temperatures, the generation of the cadmiate ion, Cd(OH)3(-), during discharge, the migration of the cadmiate ion and particulate Cd(OH)2 due to electrophoretic effects and the movement of electrolyte in and out of the negative plate and, finally, the recrystallization of cadmiate ion in the separator as Cd(OH)2. Application of the theoretical model to observations of cadmium migration in cycled cells is also discussed.

  2. Migration in action: profiling border cells.

    PubMed

    Jasper, Heinrich

    2006-04-01

    Acquiring the ability to migrate is essential for cells taking part in many developmental and disease processes. Two studies in this issue of Developmental Cell use gene expression profiling of purified border cells from the Drosophila ovary to characterize the molecular changes required in cells to initiate migration in vivo. Their results offer interesting new insights into a moving cell's physiology.

  3. Overexpression of activin-A and -B in malignant mesothelioma – Attenuated Smad3 signaling responses and ERK activation promote cell migration and invasive growth

    SciTech Connect

    Tamminen, Jenni A.; Yin, Miao; Rönty, Mikko; Sutinen, Eva; Pasternack, Arja; Ritvos, Olli; Myllärniemi, Marjukka; Koli, Katri

    2015-03-01

    Activin-A and activin-B, members of the TGF-β superfamily, are regulators of reproductive functions, inflammation and wound healing. These dimeric molecules regulate various cellular activities such as proliferation, migration and suvival. Malignant mesothelioma is an asbestos exposure related tumor affecting mainly pleura and it usually has a dismal prognosis. Here, we demonstrate that both activin-A and -B are abundantly expressed in mesothelioma tumor tissue as well as in cultured primary and established mesothelioma cells. Migratory and invasive mesothelioma cells were also found to have attenuated activation of the Smad2/3 pathway in response to activins. Migration and invasive growth of the cells in three-dimentional matrix was prevented by inhibition of activin activity using a soluble activin receptor 2B (sActR2B-Fc). This was associated with decreased ERK activity. Furthermore, migration and invasive growth was significantly inhibited by blocking ERK phosphorylation. Mesothelioma tumors are locally invasive and our results clearly suggest that acivins have a tumor-promoting function in mesothelioma through increasing expression and switching from canonical Smad3 pathway to non-canonical ERK pathway signaling. Blocking activin activity offers a new therapeutic approach for inhibition of mesothelioma invasive growth. - Highlights: • Activin-A and activin-B are highly expressed in mesothelioma. • Mesothelioma cell migration and invasive growth can be blocked with sActR2B. • Activin induced Smad3 activity is attenuated in invasive mesothelioma cells. • Activins induce ERK activity in mesothelioma cells.

  4. Paxillin: a crossroad in pathological cell migration.

    PubMed

    López-Colomé, Ana María; Lee-Rivera, Irene; Benavides-Hidalgo, Regina; López, Edith

    2017-02-18

    Paxilllin is a multifunctional and multidomain focal adhesion adapter protein which serves an important scaffolding role at focal adhesions by recruiting structural and signaling molecules involved in cell movement and migration, when phosphorylated on specific Tyr and Ser residues. Upon integrin engagement with extracellular matrix, paxillin is phosphorylated at Tyr31, Tyr118, Ser188, and Ser190, activating numerous signaling cascades which promote cell migration, indicating that the regulation of adhesion dynamics is under the control of a complex display of signaling mechanisms. Among them, paxillin disassembly from focal adhesions induced by extracellular regulated kinase (ERK)-mediated phosphorylation of serines 106, 231, and 290 as well as the binding of the phosphatase PEST to paxillin have been shown to play a key role in cell migration. Paxillin also coordinates the spatiotemporal activation of signaling molecules, including Cdc42, Rac1, and RhoA GTPases, by recruiting GEFs, GAPs, and GITs to focal adhesions. As a major participant in the regulation of cell movement, paxillin plays distinct roles in specific tissues and developmental stages and is involved in immune response, epithelial morphogenesis, and embryonic development. Importantly, paxillin is also an essential player in pathological conditions including oxidative stress, inflammation, endothelial cell barrier dysfunction, and cancer development and metastasis.

  5. Lutein Inhibits the Migration of Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells via Cytosolic and Mitochondrial Akt Pathways (Lutein Inhibits RPE Cells Migration)

    PubMed Central

    Su, Ching-Chieh; Chan, Chi-Ming; Chen, Han-Min; Wu, Chia-Chun; Hsiao, Chien-Yu; Lee, Pei-Lan; Lin, Victor Chia-Hsiang; Hung, Chi-Feng

    2014-01-01

    During the course of proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR), the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells will de-differentiate, proliferate, and migrate onto the surfaces of the sensory retina. Several studies have shown that platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) can induce migration of RPE cells via an Akt-related pathway. In this study, the effect of lutein on PDGF-BB-induced RPE cells migration was examined using transwell migration assays and Western blot analyses. We found that both phosphorylation of Akt and mitochondrial translocation of Akt in RPE cells induced by PDGF-BB stimulation were suppressed by lutein. Furthermore, the increased migration observed in RPE cells with overexpressed mitochondrial Akt could also be suppressed by lutein. Our results demonstrate that lutein can inhibit PDGF-BB induced RPE cells migration through the inhibition of both cytoplasmic and mitochondrial Akt activation. PMID:25110866

  6. Focal Adhesion-Independent Cell Migration.

    PubMed

    Paluch, Ewa K; Aspalter, Irene M; Sixt, Michael

    2016-10-06

    Cell migration is central to a multitude of physiological processes, including embryonic development, immune surveillance, and wound healing, and deregulated migration is key to cancer dissemination. Decades of investigations have uncovered many of the molecular and physical mechanisms underlying cell migration. Together with protrusion extension and cell body retraction, adhesion to the substrate via specific focal adhesion points has long been considered an essential step in cell migration. Although this is true for cells moving on two-dimensional substrates, recent studies have demonstrated that focal adhesions are not required for cells moving in three dimensions, in which confinement is sufficient to maintain a cell in contact with its substrate. Here, we review the investigations that have led to challenging the requirement of specific adhesions for migration, discuss the physical mechanisms proposed for cell body translocation during focal adhesion-independent migration, and highlight the remaining open questions for the future.

  7. Luteolin exerts pro-apoptotic effect and anti-migration effects on A549 lung adenocarcinoma cells through the activation of MEK/ERK signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Meng, Guanmin; Chai, Kequn; Li, Xinda; Zhu, Yongqiang; Huang, Weihua

    2016-09-25

    An increasing amount of evidence suggests that luteolin, a common dietary flavonoid that is widely distributed in plants and foods, has been shown to be protective against cancer. However, the precise underlying mechanisms of its action against lung cancer are still poorly understood. In the present study, we investigated whether luteolin exhibits the anti-cancer effect in lung cancer through the induction of cell apoptosis and inhibition of cell migration, and whether mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and Akt signaling pathways are required. Results revealed that luteolin exerted an anti-proliferation effect in a dose- and time-dependent manner in A549 lung adenocarcinoma cells, and induced apoptosis with a concomitant increase in the activation of caspases-3 and -9, diminution of Bcl-2, elevation in Bax expression, and the phosphorylation of MEK and its down-stream kinase ERK, as well as the activation of Akt. Luteolin also dramatically inhibited cell motility and migration in A549 cells. The inhibitor of MEK-ERK pathway protected against luteolin-induced cell death and suppressed the apoptosis-inducing and anti-migratory effects of luteolin, suggesting MEK-ERK signaling pathway plays an important role in mediating the pro-apoptotic effect and anti-migration effects of luteolin. Taken together, this study provides a new insight into the mode of action of luteolin on lung cancer.

  8. GRANULOCYTE COLONY-STIMULATING FACTOR (G-CSF) UPREGULATES β1 INTEGRIN AND INCREASES MIGRATION OF HUMAN TROPHOBLAST SWAN 71 CELLS VIA PI3K AND MAPK ACTIVATION

    PubMed Central

    Furmento, Verónica A.; Marino, Julieta; Blank, Viviana C.; Cayrol, María Florencia; Cremaschi, Graciela A.; Aguilar, Rubén C.; Roguin, Leonor P.

    2017-01-01

    Multiple cytokines and growth factors expressed at the fetal-maternal interface are involved in the regulation of trophoblast functions and placental growth, but the role of G-CSF has not been completely established. Based on our previous study showing that G-CSF increases the activity of matrix metalloproteinase-2 and the release of vascular endothelial growth factor in Swan 71 human trophoblast cells, in this work we explore the possible contribution of G-CSF to cell migration and the G-CSF-triggered signaling pathway. We found that G-CSF induced morphological changes on actin cytoskeleton consistent with a migratory cell phenotype. G-CSF also up-regulated the expression levels of β1 integrin and promoted Swan 71 cell migration. By using selective pharmacological inhibitors and dominant negative mutants we showed that PI3K, Erk 1/2 and p38 pathways are required for promoting Swan 71 cell motility. It was also demonstrated that PI3K behaved as an upstream regulator of Erk 1/2 and p38 MAPK. In addition, the increase of β1 integrin expression was dependent on PI3K activation. In conclusion, our results indicate that G-CSF stimulates β1 integrin expression and Swan 71 cell migration by activating PI3K and MAPK signaling pathways, suggesting that G-CSF should be considered as an additional regulatory factor that contributes to a successful embryo implantation and to the placenta development. PMID:26992288

  9. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) upregulates β1 integrin and increases migration of human trophoblast Swan 71 cells via PI3K and MAPK activation.

    PubMed

    Furmento, Verónica A; Marino, Julieta; Blank, Viviana C; Cayrol, María Florencia; Cremaschi, Graciela A; Aguilar, Rubén C; Roguin, Leonor P

    2016-03-15

    Multiple cytokines and growth factors expressed at the fetal-maternal interface are involved in the regulation of trophoblast functions and placental growth, but the role of G-CSF has not been completely established. Based on our previous study showing that G-CSF increases the activity of matrix metalloproteinase-2 and the release of vascular endothelial growth factor in Swan 71 human trophoblast cells, in this work we explore the possible contribution of G-CSF to cell migration and the G-CSF-triggered signaling pathway. We found that G-CSF induced morphological changes on actin cytoskeleton consistent with a migratory cell phenotype. G-CSF also up-regulated the expression levels of β1 integrin and promoted Swan 71 cell migration. By using selective pharmacological inhibitors and dominant negative mutants we showed that PI3K, Erk 1/2 and p38 pathways are required for promoting Swan 71 cell motility. It was also demonstrated that PI3K behaved as an upstream regulator of Erk 1/2 and p38 MAPK. In addition, the increase of β1 integrin expression was dependent on PI3K activation. In conclusion, our results indicate that G-CSF stimulates β1 integrin expression and Swan 71 cell migration by activating PI3K and MAPK signaling pathways, suggesting that G-CSF should be considered as an additional regulatory factor that contributes to a successful embryo implantation and to the placenta development.

  10. ApoER2 and Reelin are expressed in regenerating peripheral nerve and regulate Schwann cell migration by activating the Rac1 GEF protein, Tiam1.

    PubMed

    Pasten, Consuelo; Cerda, Joaquín; Jausoro, Ignacio; Court, Felipe A; Cáceres, Alfredo; Marzolo, Maria-Paz

    2015-11-01

    ApoER2 and its ligand Reelin participate in neuronal migration during development. Upon receptor binding, Reelin induces the proteolytic processing of ApoER2 as well as the activation of signaling pathway, including small Rho GTPases. Besides its presence in the central nervous system (CNS), Reelin is also secreted by Schwann cells (SCs), the glial cells of the peripheral nervous system (PNS). Reelin deficient mice (reeler) show decreased axonal regeneration in the PNS; however neither the presence of ApoER2 nor the role of the Reelin signaling pathway in the PNS have been evaluated. Interestingly SC migration occurs during PNS development and during injury-induced regeneration and involves activation of small Rho GTPases. Thus, Reelin-ApoER2 might regulate SC migration during axon regeneration in the PNS. Here we demonstrate the presence of ApoER2 in PNS. After sciatic nerve injury Reelin was induced and its receptor ApoER2 was proteolytically processed. In vitro, SCs express both Reelin and ApoER2 and Reelin induces SC migration. To elucidate the molecular mechanism underlying Reelin-dependent SC migration, we examined the involvement of Rac1, a conspicuous small GTPase family member. FRET experiments revealed that Reelin activates Rac1 at the leading edge of SCs. In addition, Tiam1, a major Rac1-specific GEF was required for Reelin-induced SC migration. Moreover, Reelin-induced SC migration was decreased after suppression of the polarity protein PAR3, consistent with its association to Tiam1. Even more interesting, we demonstrated that PAR3 binds preferentially to the full-length cytoplasmic tail of ApoER2 corresponding to the splice-variant containing the exon 19 that encodes a proline-rich insert and that ApoER2 was required for SC migration. Our study reveals a novel function for Reelin/ApoER2 in PNS, inducing cell migration of SCs, a process relevant for PNS development and regeneration.

  11. Transplantation stimulates interstitial cell migration in hydra

    SciTech Connect

    Fujisawa, T.; David, C.N.; Bosch, T.C. )

    1990-04-01

    Migration of interstitial cells and nerve cell precursors was analyzed in Hydra magnipapillata and Hydra vulgaris (formerly Hydra attenuata). Axial grafts were made between ({sup 3}H)thymidine-labeled donor and unlabeled host tissue. Migration of labeled cells into the unlabeled half was followed for 4 days. The results indicate that the rate of migration was initially high and then slowed on Days 2-4. Regrafting fresh donor tissue on Days 2-4 maintained high levels of migration. Thus, migration appears to be stimulated by the grafting procedure itself.

  12. Random versus directionally persistent cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Petrie, Ryan J.; Doyle, Andrew D.; Yamada, Kenneth M.

    2009-01-01

    Directional migration is an important component of cell motility. Although the basic mechanisms of random cell movement are well characterized, no single model explains the complex regulation of directional migration. Multiple factors operate at each step of cell migration to stabilize lamellipodia and maintain directional migration. Factors such as topography of the extracellular matrix, the cellular polarity machinery, receptor signalling, integrin trafficking and co-receptors, and actin–myosin contraction converge on regulation of the Rho family of GTPases and control of lamellipodial protrusions to promote directional migration. PMID:19603038

  13. Microdroplet chain array for cell migration assays.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yan; Pan, Jian-Zhang; Zhao, Shi-Ping; Lou, Qi; Zhu, Ying; Fang, Qun

    2016-11-29

    Establishing cell migration assays in multiple different microenvironments is important in the study of tissue repair and regeneration, cancer progression, atherosclerosis, and arthritis. In this work, we developed a miniaturized and massive parallel microfluidic platform for multiple cell migration assays combining the traditional membrane-based cell migration technique and the droplet-based microfluidic technique. Nanoliter-scale droplets are flexibly assembled as building blocks based on a porous membrane to form microdroplet chains with diverse configurations for different assay modes. Multiple operations including in-droplet 2D/3D cell culture, cell co-culture and cell migration induced by a chemoattractant concentration gradient in droplet chains could be flexibly performed with reagent consumption in the nanoliter range for each assay and an assay scale-up to 81 assays in parallel in one microchip. We have applied the present platform to multiple modes of cell migration assays including the accurate cell migration assay, competitive cell migration assay, biomimetic chemotaxis assay, and multifactor cell migration assay based on the organ-on-a-chip concept, for demonstrating its versatility, applicability, and potential in cell migration-related research.

  14. The planar cell polarity pathway directs parietal endoderm migration.

    PubMed

    LaMonica, Kristi; Bass, Maya; Grabel, Laura

    2009-06-01

    Parietal endoderm (PE) contributes to the yolk sac and is the first migratory cell type in the mammalian embryo. We can visualize PE migration in vitro using the F9 teratocarcinoma derived embryoid body outgrowth system and, show here that PE migration is directed by the non-canonical Wnt planar cell polarity (PCP) pathway via Rho/ROCK. Based on golgi apparatus localization and microtubule orientation, 68.6% of cells in control outgrowths are oriented in the direction of migration. Perturbation of Wnt signaling via sFRP treatment results in a loss of orientation coupled with an increase in cell migration. Inhibition of the PCP pathway at the level of Daam1 also results in a loss of cell orientation along with an increase in cell migration, as seen with sFRP treatment. Constitutively active Daam can inhibit the loss of orientation that occurs with sFRP treatment. We previously demonstrated that ROCK inhibition leads to an increase in cell migration, and we now show that these cells also lack oriented migration. Canonical Wnt signaling or the Rac arm of the PCP pathway does not appear to play a role in PE oriented migration. These data suggest the PCP pathway via Rho/ROCK modulates migration of PE.

  15. Activation of G-Protein-Coupled Estrogen Receptor Inhibits the Migration of Human Nonsmall Cell Lung Cancer Cells via IKK-β/NF-κB Signals.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Guangfa; Huang, Yan; Wu, Chunting; Wei, Dong; Shi, Yingxin

    2016-08-01

    Estrogen signals have been suggested to modulate the progression and metastasis of nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC), which is one of the leading causes of cancer deaths worldwide. While there are limited data concerning the roles and effects of G-protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER) on the progression of NSCLC, our present study reveals that the expression of GPER in NSCLC cells is obviously greater than that in lung fibroblast cell line MRC-5. Activation of GPER via its specific agonist G-1 decreases the in vitro motility of A549 and H358 cells and the expression of matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2) and MMP-9. Further, G-1 treatment can rapidly decrease the phosphorylation, nuclear translocation, and promoter activities of NF-κB in NSCLC cells. BAY 11-7082, the inhibitor of NF-κB, also inhibits the expression of MMP-2/9, while overexpression of p65 significantly attenuates G-1-induced downregulation of MMP-2/9. It suggests that inhibition of NF-κB mediates G-1-induced MMP-2/9 downregulation. G-1 treatment significantly down regulates the phosphorylation of IκB kinase β (IKK-β) and IκBα, while not IKK-α, in both 549 and H358 cells. ACHP, the specific inhibitor of IKK-β, can reinforce G-1-induced MMP-2/9 downregulation and invasion suppression of A549 cells. Collectively, our results suggest that activation of GPER can inhibit the migration of human NSCLC cells via suppression of IKK-β/NF-κB signals. These findings will help to better understand the roles and mechanisms of GPER as a potential therapy target for NSCLC patients.

  16. Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Prevent Allostimulation In Vivo and Control Checkpoints of Th1 Priming: Migration of Human DC to Lymph Nodes and NK Cell Activation.

    PubMed

    Consentius, C; Akyüz, L; Schmidt-Lucke, J A; Tschöpe, C; Pinzur, L; Ofir, R; Reinke, P; Volk, H-D; Juelke, K

    2015-10-01

    Although the immunomodulatory potency of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) is well established, the mechanisms behind are still not clear. The crosstalk between myeloid dendritic cells (mDC) and natural killer (NK) cells and especially NK cell-derived interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) play a pivotal role in the development of type 1 helper (Th1) cell immune responses. While many studies explored the isolated impact of MSC on either in vitro generated DC, NK, or T cells, there are only few data available on the complex interplay between these cells. Here, we investigated the impact of MSC on the functionality of human mDC and the consequences for NK cell and Th1 priming in vitro and in vivo. In critical limb ischemia patients, who have been treated with allogeneic placenta-derived mesenchymal-like stromal cells (PLX-PAD), no in vivo priming of Th1 responses toward the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) mismatches could be detected. Further in vitro studies revealed that mDC reprogramming could play a central role for these effects. Following crosstalk with MSC, activated mDC acquired a tolerogenic phenotype characterized by reduced migration toward CCR7 ligand and impaired ability to stimulate NK cell-derived IFN-γ production. These effects, which were strongly related to an altered interleukin (IL)-12/IL-10 production by mDC, were accompanied by an effective prevention of Th1 priming in vivo. Our findings provide novel evidence for the regulation of Th1 priming by MSC via modulation of mDC and NK cell crosstalk and show that off-the-shelf produced MHC-mismatched PLX-PAD can be used in patients without any sign of immunogenicity.

  17. Morusin inhibits human cervical cancer stem cell growth and migration through attenuation of NF-κB activity and apoptosis induction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Guo, Huijie; Yang, Liuqi; Dong, Lihua; Lin, Caiyu; Zhang, Jie; Lin, Ping; Wang, Xiujie

    2013-07-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are believed to be responsible for tumor metastasis, recurrence, and high mortality of cancer patients due to their high tumorigenicity resistance to chemo-radiotherapy. Morusin possesses anti-cancer activity through attenuation of NF-κB activity, which is up-regulated in cancer stem cells. The purpose of this study is to confirm the growth and migration inhibition effect of morusin on human cervical CSCs, and to clarify its partial mechanism of activity. Human cervical CSCs were enriched using non-adhesive culture system. Their stemness characteristics were identified with tumor sphere formation, self-renewal, toluidine blue staining, migration assays, RT-PCR analysis, and immunofluorescence staining of putative stem cell markers, Oct4, SOX2, and ALDH1; the epithelial-to-mesenchymal (EMT) transition markers and relevant transcription factors were evaluated with Western blotting. The growth and migration inhibition effects of morusin on human cervical CSCs were tested by cell proliferation, tumor sphere formation, and transwell assay; apoptotic death of human cervical CSCs in response to morusin was measured with DAPI staining, apoptotic DNA fragmentation; NF-κBp65, Bcl-2, Bax, and caspase-3 protein expressions were detected through Western blotting. Under this non-adhesive culture system, typical tumor spheres appeared within 5-7 days, the tumor sphere formation, self-renewal, and cell migration, expressions of putative stem cell markers, EMT markers, and relevant transcription factors of the tumor sphere cells were increased significantly. After morusin treatment, the proliferation, tumor sphere formation, and migration of human cervical CSCs were decreased significantly, DAPI-stained apoptotic cells increased, apoptotic DNA fragmentations formed evidently; the expression levels of NF-κBp65 and Bcl-2 decreased significantly, Bax, and caspase-3 increased significantly in a dose-dependent manner. Using the non-adhesive culture system

  18. Rac1 activation driven by 14-3-3ζ dimerization promotes prostate cancer cell-matrix interactions, motility and transendothelial migration.

    PubMed

    Goc, Anna; Abdalla, Maha; Al-Azayzih, Ahmad; Somanath, Payaningal R

    2012-01-01

    14-3-3 proteins are ubiquitously expressed dimeric adaptor proteins that have emerged as key mediators of many cell signaling pathways in multiple cell types. Its effects are mainly mediated by binding to selective phosphoserine/threonine proteins. The importance of 14-3-3 proteins in cancer have only started to become apparent and its exact role in cancer progression as well as the mechanisms by which 14-3-3 proteins mediate cancer cell function remain unknown. While protein 14-3-3σ is widely accepted as a tumor suppressor, 14-3-3ζ, β and γ isoforms have been shown to have tumor promoting effects. Despite the importance of 14-3-3 family in mediating various cell processes, the exact role and mechanism of 14-3-3ζ remain unexplored. In the current study, we investigated the role of protein 14-3-3ζ in prostate cancer cell motility and transendothelial migration using biochemical, molecular biology and electric cell-substrate impedance sensing approaches as well as cell based functional assays. Our study indicated that expression with wild-type protein 14-3-3ζ significantly enhanced Rac activity in PC3 cells. In contrast, expression of dimer-resistant mutant of protein 14-3-3ζ (DM-14-3-3) inhibited Rac activity and associated phosphorylation of p21 activated kinase-1 and 2. Expression with wild-type 14-3-3ζ or constitutively active Rac1 enhanced extracellular matrix recognition, lamellipodia formation, cell migration and trans-endothelial migration by PC3 cells. In contrast, expression with DM 14-3-3ζ or DN-Rac1 in PC3 cells significantly inhibited these cell functions. Our results demonstrate for the first time that 14-3-3ζ enhances prostate cancer cell-matrix interactions, motility and transendothelial migration in vitro via activation of Rac1-GTPase and is an important target for therapeutic interventions for prostate cancer.

  19. The androgen derivative 5alpha-androstane-3beta,17beta-diol inhibits prostate cancer cell migration through activation of the estrogen receptor beta subtype.

    PubMed

    Guerini, Vittoria; Sau, Daniela; Scaccianoce, Eugenia; Rusmini, Paola; Ciana, Paolo; Maggi, Adriana; Martini, Paolo G V; Katzenellenbogen, Benita S; Martini, Luciano; Motta, Marcella; Poletti, Angelo

    2005-06-15

    Prostate cancer growth depends, in its earlier stages, on androgens and is usually pharmacologically modulated with androgen blockade. However, androgen-ablation therapy may generate androgen-independent prostate cancer, often characterized by an increased invasiveness. We have found that the 5alpha-reduced testosterone derivative, dihydrotestosterone (the most potent natural androgen) inhibits cell migration with an androgen receptor-independent mechanism. We have shown that the dihydrotestosterone metabolite 5alpha-androstane-3beta,17beta-diol (3beta-Adiol), a steroid which does not bind androgen receptors, but efficiently binds the estrogen receptor beta (ERbeta), exerts a potent inhibition of prostate cancer cell migration through the activation of the ERbeta signaling. Very surprisingly, estradiol is not active, suggesting the existence of different pathways for ERbeta activation in prostate cancer cells. Moreover, 3beta-Adiol, through ERbeta, induces the expression of E-cadherin, a protein known to be capable of blocking metastasis formation in breast and prostate cancer cells. The inhibitory effects of 3beta-Adiol on prostate cancer cell migration is counteracted by short interfering RNA against E-cadherin. Altogether, the data showed that (a) circulating testosterone may act with estrogenic effects downstream in the catabolic process present in the prostate, and (b) that the estrogenic effect of testosterone derivatives (ERbeta-dependent) results in the inhibition of cell migration, although it is apparently different from that linked to estradiol on the same receptor and may be protective against prostate cancer invasion and metastasis. These results also shed some light on clinical observations suggesting that alterations in genes coding for 3beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases (the enzymes responsible for 3beta-Adiol formation) are strongly correlated with hereditary prostate cancer.

  20. Oncogenic S1P signalling in EBV-associated nasopharyngeal carcinoma activates AKT and promotes cell migration through S1P receptor 3.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hui Min; Lo, Kwok-Wai; Wei, Wenbin; Tsao, Sai Wah; Chung, Grace Tin Yun; Ibrahim, Maha Hafez; Dawson, Christopher W; Murray, Paul G; Paterson, Ian C; Yap, Lee Fah

    2017-02-27

    Undifferentiated nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is a cancer with high metastatic potential that is consistently associated with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection. In this study, we have investigated the functional contribution of sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) signalling to the pathogenesis of NPC. We show that EBV infection or ectopic expression of the EBV-encoded latent genes (EBNA1, LMP1 and LMP2A) can up-regulate sphingosine kinase 1 (SPHK1), the key enzyme that produces S1P, in NPC cell lines. Exogenous addition of S1P promotes the migration of NPC cells through the activation of AKT; shRNA knockdown of SPHK1 resulted in a reduction in the levels of activated AKT and inhibition of cell migration. We also show that S1P receptor 3 (S1PR3) mRNA is over-expressed in EBV-positive NPC patient-derived xenografts and a subset of primary NPC tissues, and that knockdown of S1PR3 suppressed the activation of AKT and the S1P-induced migration of NPC cells. Taken together, our data point to a central role for EBV in mediating the oncogenic effects of S1P in NPC and identify S1P signalling as a potential therapeutic target in this disease.

  1. Collective cell migration during inflammatory response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Di; Stroka, Kimberly; Aranda-Espinoza, Helim

    2012-02-01

    Wound scratch healing assays of endothelial cell monolayers is a simple model to study collective cell migration as a function of biological signals. A signal of particular interest is the immune response, which after initial wounding in vivo causes the release of various inflammatory factors such as tumor necrosis alpha (TNF-α). TNF-α is an innate inflammatory cytokine that can induce cell growth, cell necrosis, and change cell morphology. We studied the effects of TNF-α on collective cell migration using the wound healing assays and measured several migration metrics, such as rate of scratch closure, velocities of leading edge and bulk cells, closure index, and velocity correlation functions between migrating cells. We observed that TNF-α alters all migratory metrics as a function of the size of the scratch and TNF-α content. The changes observed in migration correlate with actin reorganization upon TNF-α exposure.

  2. B-9-3, a novel β-carboline derivative exhibits anti-cancer activity via induction of apoptosis and inhibition of cell migration in vitro.

    PubMed

    Daoud, Abdelkader; Song, Jing; Xiao, Feiyang; Shang, Jing

    2014-02-05

    Peganum harmala L is an important medicinal plant that has been used from ancient time due to its alkaloids rich of ß-carbolines. Harmane is a naturally occurring ß-carboline extracted from Peganum harmala L, that exhibits a wide range of biological, psychopharmacological, and toxicological actions. The synthesis of novel derivatives with high anti-cancer activity and less side effects is necessary. In the present study, B-9-3-a semi-synthetic compound that is formed of two harmane molecules bound by a butyl group-showed a strong anti-cancer activity against a human lung cancer cell line, a human breast cancer cell line, and a human colorectal carcinoma cell line. B-9-3 anti-proliferative effect followed a similar pattern in the three cell lines. This pattern includes a dose-dependent induction of apoptosis, or necroptosis as confirmed by Hoechst staining, flow cytometry and western blot analyses, and the inhibition of cancer cells migration that was shown to be dependent on the drug׳s concentration as well. Moreover, B-9-3 inhibited tube formation in human umbilical vascular endothelial cell line (HUVEC), which indicates an anti-angiogenesis activity in vitro. In summary, B-9-3, a semi-synthetic derivative of ß-carboline, has an anti-proliferative effect against tumor cells via induction of apoptosis and inhibition of cell migration.

  3. Persimmon peel extract attenuates PDGF-BB-induced human aortic smooth muscle cell migration and invasion through inhibition of c-Src activity.

    PubMed

    Son, Joe Eun; Hwang, Mun Kyung; Lee, Eunjung; Seo, Sang Gwon; Kim, Jong-Eun; Jung, Sung Keun; Kim, Jong Rhan; Ahn, Gwang-Hwan; Lee, Ki Won; Lee, Hyong Joo

    2013-12-15

    The unregulated migration and invasion of human aortic smooth muscle cells (HASMCs) into the intima is a crucial step in the development of atherosclerosis. Recently, the oriental persimmon extract (Diospyros kaki Thunb. cv. Fuyu) has been investigated for its anti-atherogenic properties, but the molecular mechanisms involved remain unclear. We investigated the inhibitory effects of persimmon peel and flesh extract on the platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) BB-induced MMP-1 expression using Western blot, and abnormal migration and invasion of HASMCs using a modified Boyden chamber assay and a wound healing assay. We also evaluated the inhibitory effects of persimmon peel extract on aortic vessel thickening using a rat aortic sprouting assay. Persimmon peel (PPE), but not flesh extract (PFE), inhibited PDGF-BB-induced MMP-1 expression, cell migration and invasion in HASMCs, while suppressing the rat aortic sprouting. Western blot and in vitro kinase assay data demonstrated that PPE inhibited Src kinase activity and subsequently attenuated PDGF-BB-induced phosphorylation of MAPK and Akt signalling pathways. Taken together, our results indicate that persimmon peel might possess a potential anti-atherogenic effect through attenuation of ASMCs migration and invasion and aortic sprouting by direct inhibition of the c-Src kinase activity.

  4. Regulation of cell migration via the EGFR signaling pathway in oral squamous cell carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Ohnishi, Yuichi; Yasui, Hiroki; Kakudo, Kenji; Nozaki, Masami

    2017-01-01

    Cell migration potency is essential in cancer metastasis and is often regulated by extracellular stimuli. Oral squamous cell carcinoma cell lines include those that are sensitive, as well as resistant, to the effects of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitor cetuximab on cell migration. In the present study, the molecular differences in the EGFR response to cell migration between the SAS cetuximab-sensitive and HSC4 cetuximab-resistant cell lines was examined. Treatment with the EGFR inhibitors AG1478 and cetuximab reduced the migration potency of SAS cells, but not HSC4 cells. The migration of the two cell lines was inhibited under serum-free culture conditions, and the addition of EGF to the serum-free medium promoted the migration of SAS cells, but not HSC4 cells. In addition, SAS cell migration was reduced by the mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase and protein kinase B (Akt) inhibitors PD98059 and MK2206, whereas HSC4 cell migration was only inhibited by MK2206. EGF induced an increase in extracellular signal-regulated kinase phosphorylation levels in HSC4 cells, and stimulated Akt phosphorylation levels in SAS cells. Furthermore, the staining of actin filaments with phalloidin was significantly increased by the inhibition of EGFR in SAS cells, but was not observed as altered in HSC4 cells. Conversely, the addition of EGF to the culture medium decreased the accumulation of actin filaments in SAS cells. The results suggest that the EGF-EGFR signaling pathway has an important role in SAS cell migration via the modulation of actin dynamics, and that HSC4 cell migration is regulated by a serum component other than EGFR.

  5. Effect of Static Magnetic Field on Cell Migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, Yuichiro; Kawasumi, Masashi; Saito, Masao

    The effect of magnetic field on cell has long been investigated, but there are few quantitative investigations of the migration of cells. Cell-migration is important as one of the fundamental activities of the cell. This study proposes a method to evaluate quantitatively the cell-diffusion constant and the effect of static magnetic field on cell migration. The cell-lines are neuroblastoma (NG108-15), fibroblastoma (NIH/3T3) and osteoblastoma (MC3T3-E1). The static magnetic field of 30 mT or 120 mT is impressed by a permanent magnet in vertical or horizontal direction to the dish. It is shown that the cell-diffusion constant can represent the cell migration as the cell activity. It is found that the cell migration is enhanced by exposure to the magnetic field, depending on the kind of cell. It is conjectured that the effect of static magnetic field affects the cell migration, which is at the downstream of the information transmission.

  6. Effects of rosuvastatin on the production and activation of matrix metalloproteinase-2 and migration of cultured rat vascular smooth muscle cells induced by homocysteine*

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Ya-fei; Chi, Ju-fang; Tang, Wei-liang; Xu, Fu-kang; Liu, Long-bin; Ji, Zheng; Lv, Hai-tao; Guo, Hang-yuan

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To test the influence of homocysteine on the production and activation of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) and tissue inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (TIMP-2) and on cell migration of cultured rat vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Also, to explore whether rosuvastatin can alter the abnormal secretion and activation of MMP-2 and TIMP-2 and migration of VSMCs induced by homocysteine. Methods: Rat VSMCs were incubated with different concentrations of homocysteine (50–5 000 μmol/L). Western blotting and gelatin zymography were used to investigate the expressions and activities of MMP-2 and TIMP-2 in VSMCs in culture medium when induced with homocysteine for 24, 48, and 72 h. Transwell chambers were employed to test the migratory ability of VSMCs when incubated with homocysteine for 48 h. Different concentrations of rosuvastatin (10−9–10−5 mol/L) were added when VSMCs were induced with 1 000 μmol/L homocysteine. The expressions and activities of MMP-2 and TIMP-2 were examined after incubating for 24, 48, and 72 h, and the migration of VSMCs was also examined after incubating for 48 h. Results: Homocysteine (50–1 000 μmol/L) increased the production and activation of MMP-2 and expression of TIMP-2 in a dose-dependent manner. However, when incubated with 5 000 μmol/L homocysteine, the expression of MMP-2 was up-regulated, but its activity was down-regulated. Increased homocysteine-induced production and activation of MMP-2 were reduced by rosuvastatin in a dose-dependent manner whereas secretion of TIMP-2 was not significantly altered by rosuvastatin. Homocysteine (50–5 000 μmol/L) stimulated the migration of VSMCs in a dose-dependent manner, but this effect was eliminated by rosuvastatin. Conclusions: Homocysteine (50–1 000 μmol/L) significantly increased the production and activation of MMP-2, the expression of TIMP-2, and the migration of VSMCs in a dose-dependent manner. Additional extracellular rosuvastatin can decrease

  7. Arf proteins in cancer cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Casalou, Cristina; Faustino, Alexandra; Barral, Duarte C.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Members of the ADP-ribosylation factor (Arf) family of small GTP-binding (G) proteins regulate several aspects of membrane trafficking, such as vesicle budding, tethering and cytoskeleton organization. Arf family members, including Arf-like (Arl) proteins have been implicated in several essential cellular functions, like cell spreading and migration. These functions are used by cancer cells to disseminate and invade the tissues surrounding the primary tumor, leading to the formation of metastases. Indeed, Arf and Arl proteins, as well as their guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) and GTPase-activating proteins (GAPs) have been found to be abnormally expressed in different cancer cell types and human cancers. Here, we review the current evidence supporting the involvement of Arf family proteins and their GEFs and GAPs in cancer progression, focusing on 3 different mechanisms: cell-cell adhesion, integrin internalization and recycling, and actin cytoskeleton remodeling. PMID:27589148

  8. Amplification loop of the inflammatory process is induced by P2X7R activation in intestinal epithelial cells in response to neutrophil transepithelial migration.

    PubMed

    Cesaro, Annabelle; Brest, Patrick; Hofman, Véronique; Hébuterne, Xavier; Wildman, Scott; Ferrua, Bernard; Marchetti, Sandrine; Doglio, Alain; Vouret-Craviari, Valérie; Galland, Franck; Naquet, Philippe; Mograbi, Baharia; Unwin, Robert; Hofman, Paul

    2010-07-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) are characterized during their active phase by polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMNL) transepithelial migration. The efflux of PMNL into the mucosa is associated with the production of proinflammatory cytokines and the release of ATP from damaged and necrotic cells. The expression and function of purinergic P2X(7) receptor (P2X(7)R) in intestinal epithelial cells (IEC) and its potential role in the "cross talk" between IEC and PMNL have not been explored. The aims of the present study were 1) to examine P2X(7)R expression in IEC (T84 cells) and in human intestinal biopsies; 2) to detect any changes in P2X(7)R expression in T84 cells during PMNL transepithelial migration, and during the active and quiescent phases of IBD; and 3) to test whether P2X(7)R stimulation in T84 monolayers can induce caspase-1 activation and IL-1beta release by IEC. We found that a functional ATP-sensitive P2X(7)R is constitutively expressed at the apical surface of IEC T84 cells. PMNL transmigration regulates dynamically P2X(7)R expression and alters its distribution from the apical to basolateral surface of IEC during the early phase of PMNL transepithelial migration in vitro. P2X(7)R expression was weak in intestinal biopsies obtained during the active phase of IBD. We show that activation of epithelial P2X(7)R is mandatory for PMNL-induced caspase-1 activation and IL-1beta release by IEC. Overall, these changes in P2X(7)R function may serve to tailor the intensity of the inflammatory response and to prevent IL-1beta overproduction and inflammatory disease.

  9. Quantifying modes of 3D cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Driscoll, Meghan K.; Danuser, Gaudenz

    2015-01-01

    Although it is widely appreciated that cells migrate in a variety of diverse environments in vivo, we are only now beginning to use experimental workflows that yield images with sufficient spatiotemporal resolution to study the molecular processes governing cell migration in 3D environments. Since cell migration is a dynamic process, it is usually studied via microscopy, but 3D movies of 3D processes are difficult to interpret by visual inspection. In this review, we discuss the technologies required to study the diversity of 3D cell migration modes with a focus on the visualization and computational analysis tools needed to study cell migration quantitatively at a level comparable to the analyses performed today on cells crawling on flat substrates. PMID:26603943

  10. Quantifying Modes of 3D Cell Migration.

    PubMed

    Driscoll, Meghan K; Danuser, Gaudenz

    2015-12-01

    Although it is widely appreciated that cells migrate in a variety of diverse environments in vivo, we are only now beginning to use experimental workflows that yield images with sufficient spatiotemporal resolution to study the molecular processes governing cell migration in 3D environments. Since cell migration is a dynamic process, it is usually studied via microscopy, but 3D movies of 3D processes are difficult to interpret by visual inspection. In this review, we discuss the technologies required to study the diversity of 3D cell migration modes with a focus on the visualization and computational analysis tools needed to study cell migration quantitatively at a level comparable to the analyses performed today on cells crawling on flat substrates.

  11. Vitamin D Binding Protein-Macrophage Activating Factor Directly Inhibits Proliferation, Migration, and uPAR Expression of Prostate Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bielenberg, Diane R.; Dridi, Sami; Wu, Jason; Jiang, Weihua; Huang, Bin; Pirie-Shepherd, Steven; Fannon, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Background Vitamin D binding protein-macrophage activating factor (DBP-maf) is a potent inhibitor of tumor growth. Its activity, however, has been attributed to indirect mechanisms such as boosting the immune response by activating macrophages and inhibiting the blood vessel growth necessary for the growth of tumors. Methods and Findings In this study we show for the first time that DBP-maf exhibits a direct and potent effect on prostate tumor cells in the absence of macrophages. DBP-maf demonstrated inhibitory activity in proliferation studies of both LNCaP and PC3 prostate cancer cell lines as well as metastatic clones of these cells. Flow cytometry studies with annexin V and propidium iodide showed that this inhibitory activity is not due to apoptosis or cell death. DBP-maf also had the ability to inhibit migration of prostate cancer cells in vitro. Finally, DBP-maf was shown to cause a reduction in urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) expression in prostate tumor cells. There is evidence that activation of this receptor correlates with tumor metastasis. Conclusions These studies show strong inhibitory activity of DBP-maf on prostate tumor cells independent of its macrophage activation. PMID:20976141

  12. Dictyostelium cells migrate similarly on surfaces of varying chemical composition.

    PubMed

    McCann, Colin P; Rericha, Erin C; Wang, Chenlu; Losert, Wolfgang; Parent, Carole A

    2014-01-01

    During cell migration, cell-substrate binding is required for pseudopod anchoring to move the cell forward, yet the interactions with the substrate must be sufficiently weak to allow parts of the cell to de-adhere in a controlled manner during typical protrusion/retraction cycles. Mammalian cells actively control cell-substrate binding and respond to extracellular conditions with localized integrin-containing focal adhesions mediating mechanotransduction. We asked whether mechanotransduction also occurs during non-integrin mediated migration by examining the motion of the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum, which is thought to bind non-specifically to surfaces. We discovered that Dictyostelium cells are able to regulate forces generated by the actomyosin cortex to maintain optimal cell-surface contact area and adhesion on surfaces of various chemical composition and that individual cells migrate with similar speed and contact area on the different surfaces. In contrast, during collective migration, as observed in wound healing and metastasis, the balance between surface forces and protrusive forces is altered. We found that Dictyostelium collective migration dynamics are strongly affected when cells are plated on different surfaces. These results suggest that the presence of cell-cell contacts, which appear as Dictyostelium cells enter development, alter the mechanism cells use to migrate on surfaces of varying composition.

  13. Cell Shape Dynamics: From Waves to Migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Driscoll, Meghan; McCann, Colin; Sun, Xiaoyu; Fourkas, John; Parent, Carole; Losert, Wolfgang

    2012-02-01

    We observe and quantify wave-like characteristics of amoeboid migration. Using the amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum, a model system for the study of chemotaxis, we demonstrate that cell shape changes in a wave-like manner. Cells have regions of high boundary curvature that propagate from the leading edge toward the back, usually along alternating sides of the cell. Curvature waves are easily seen in cells that do not adhere to a surface, such as cells that are electrostatically repelled from surfaces or cells that extend over the edge of micro-fabricated cliffs. Without surface contact, curvature waves travel from the leading edge to the back of a cell at ˜35 μm/min. Non-adherent myosin II null cells do not exhibit these curvature waves. At the leading edge of adherent cells, curvature waves are associated with protrusive activity. Like regions of high curvature, protrusive activity travels along the boundary in a wave-like manner. Upon contact with a surface, the waves stop moving relative to the surface, and the boundary shape thus reflects the history of protrusive motion. The wave-like character of protrusions provides a plausible mechanism for the ability of cells to both swim in viscous fluids and to navigate complex 3-D topography.

  14. Cell Shape Dynamics: From Waves to Migration

    PubMed Central

    Driscoll, Meghan K.; McCann, Colin; Kopace, Rael; Homan, Tess; Fourkas, John T.; Parent, Carole; Losert, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    We observe and quantify wave-like characteristics of amoeboid migration. Using the amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum, a model system for the study of chemotaxis, we demonstrate that cell shape changes in a wave-like manner. Cells have regions of high boundary curvature that propagate from the leading edge toward the back, usually along alternating sides of the cell. Curvature waves are easily seen in cells that do not adhere to a surface, such as cells that are electrostatically repelled from surfaces or cells that extend over the edge of micro-fabricated cliffs. Without surface contact, curvature waves travel from the leading edge to the back of a cell at ∼35 µm/min. Non-adherent myosin II null cells do not exhibit these curvature waves. At the leading edge of adherent cells, curvature waves are associated with protrusive activity. Like regions of high curvature, protrusive activity travels along the boundary in a wave-like manner. Upon contact with a surface, the protrusions stop moving relative to the surface, and the boundary shape thus reflects the history of protrusive motion. The wave-like character of protrusions provides a plausible mechanism for the zig-zagging of pseudopods and for the ability of cells both to swim in viscous fluids and to navigate complex three dimensional topography. PMID:22438794

  15. Force mapping in epithelial cell migration

    PubMed Central

    du Roure, Olivia; Saez, Alexandre; Buguin, Axel; Austin, Robert H.; Chavrier, Philippe; Siberzan, Pascal; Ladoux, Benoit

    2005-01-01

    We measure dynamic traction forces exerted by epithelial cells on a substrate. The force sensor is a high-density array of elastomeric microfabricated pillars that support the cells. Traction forces induced by cell migration are deduced from the measurement of the bending of these pillars and are correlated with actin localization by fluorescence microscopy. We use a multiple-particle tracking method to estimate the mechanical activity of cells in real time with a high-spatial resolution (down to 2 μm) imposed by the periodicity of the post array. For these experiments, we use differentiated Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) epithelial cells. Our data provide definite information on mechanical forces exerted by a cellular assembly. The maximum intensity of the forces is localized on the edge of the epithelia. Hepatocyte growth factor promotes cell motility and induces strong scattering activity of MDCK cells. Thus, we compare forces generated by MDCK cells in subconfluent epithelia versus isolated cells after hepatocyte growth factor treatment. Maximal-traction stresses at the edge of a monolayer correspond to higher values than those measured for a single cell and may be due to a collective behavior. PMID:15695588

  16. RLIP76 regulates Arf6-dependent cell spreading and migration by linking ARNO with activated R-Ras at recycling endosomes

    PubMed Central

    Wurtzel, Jeremy G.T.; Lee, Seunghyung; Singhal, Sharad S.; Awasthi, Sanjay; Ginsberg, Mark H.; Goldfinger, Lawrence E.

    2015-01-01

    R-Ras small GTPase enhances cell spreading and motility via RalBP1/RLIP76, an R-Ras effector that links GTP-R-Ras to activation of Arf6 and Rac1 GTPases. Here, we report that RLIP76 performs these functions by binding cytohesin-2/ARNO, an Arf GTPase guanine exchange factor, and connecting it to R-Ras at recycling endosomes. RLIP76 formed a complex with R-Ras and ARNO by binding ARNO via its N-terminus (residues 1-180) and R-Ras via residues 180-192. This complex was present in Rab11-positive recycling endosomes and the presence of ARNO in recycling endosomes required RLIP76, and was not supported by RLIP76(Δ1-180) or RLIP76(Δ180-192). Spreading and migration required RLIP76(1-180), and RLIP76(Δ1-180) blocked ARNO recruitment to recycling endosomes, and spreading. Arf6 activation with an ArfGAP inhibitor overcame the spreading defects in RLIP76-depleted cells or cells expressing RLIP76(Δ1-180). Similarly, RLIP76(Δ1-180) or RLIP76(Δ180-192) suppressed Arf6 activation. Together these results demonstrate that RLIP76 acts as a scaffold at recycling endosomes by binding activated R-Ras, recruiting ARNO to activate Arf6, thereby contributing to cell spreading and migration. PMID:26498519

  17. Soluble guanylyl cyclase-activated cyclic GMP-dependent protein kinase inhibits arterial smooth muscle cell migration independent of VASP-serine 239 phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Holt, Andrew W; Martin, Danielle N; Shaver, Patti R; Adderley, Shaquria P; Stone, Joshua D; Joshi, Chintamani N; Francisco, Jake T; Lust, Robert M; Weidner, Douglas A; Shewchuk, Brian M; Tulis, David A

    2016-09-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) accounts for over half of all cardiovascular disease-related deaths. Uncontrolled arterial smooth muscle (ASM) cell migration is a major component of CAD pathogenesis and efforts aimed at attenuating its progression are clinically essential. Cyclic nucleotide signaling has long been studied for its growth-mitigating properties in the setting of CAD and other vascular disorders. Heme-containing soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) synthesizes cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) and maintains vascular homeostasis predominantly through cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG) signaling. Considering that reactive oxygen species (ROS) can interfere with appropriate sGC signaling by oxidizing the cyclase heme moiety and so are associated with several CVD pathologies, the current study was designed to test the hypothesis that heme-independent sGC activation by BAY 60-2770 (BAY60) maintains cGMP levels despite heme oxidation and inhibits ASM cell migration through phosphorylation of the PKG target and actin-binding vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP). First, using the heme oxidant ODQ, cGMP content was potentiated in the presence of BAY60. Using a rat model of arterial growth, BAY60 significantly reduced neointima formation and luminal narrowing compared to vehicle (VEH)-treated controls. In rat ASM cells BAY60 significantly attenuated cell migration, reduced G:F actin, and increased PKG activity and VASP Ser239 phosphorylation (pVASP·S239) compared to VEH controls. Site-directed mutagenesis was then used to generate overexpressing full-length wild type VASP (FL-VASP/WT), VASP Ser239 phosphorylation-mimetic (FL-VASP/239D) and VASP Ser239 phosphorylation-resistant (FL-VASP/239A) ASM cell mutants. Surprisingly, FL-VASP/239D negated the inhibitory effects of FL-VASP/WT and FL-VASP/239A cells on migration. Furthermore, when FL-VASP mutants were treated with BAY60, only the FL-VASP/239D group showed reduced migration compared to its VEH controls

  18. Analysis of primary cilia in directional cell migration in fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Søren T; Veland, Iben R; Schwab, Albrecht; Cammer, Michael; Satir, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Early studies of migrating fibroblasts showed that primary cilia orient in front of the nucleus and point toward the leading edge. Recent work has shown that primary cilia coordinate a series of signaling pathways critical to fibroblast cell migration during development and in wound healing. In particular, platelet-derived growth factor receptor alpha (PDGFRα) is compartmentalized to the primary cilium to activate signaling pathways that regulate reorganization of the cytoskeleton required for lamellipodium formation and directional migration in the presence of a specific ligand gradient. We summarize selected methods in analyzing ciliary function in directional cell migration, including immunofluorescence microscopy, scratch assay, and chemotaxis assay by micropipette addition of PDGFRα ligands to cultures of fibroblasts. These methods should be useful not only in studying cell migration but also more generally in delineating response pathways in cells with primary cilia.

  19. A non-mitotic role for Aurora kinase A as a direct activator of cell migration upon interaction with PLD, FAK and Src.

    PubMed

    Mahankali, Madhu; Henkels, Karen M; Speranza, Francis; Gomez-Cambronero, Julian

    2015-02-01

    Timely activation of Aurora kinase A (AURA, also known as AURKA) is vital for centrosome formation and the progression of mitosis. Nonetheless, it is still unclear if and when other cellular functions are activated by AURA. We report here that Src phosphorylates and activates AURA at T288, and AURA also activates focal adhesion kinase (FAK, also known as PTK2), leading to initiation of cell movement. An additional and new way by which AURA is regulated, is by phospholipase D2 (PLD2), which causes AURA activation. In addition, AURA phosphorylates PLD, so both proteins engage in a positive reinforcement loop. AURA and PLD2 form a protein–protein complex and colocalize to cytoplasmic regions in cells. The reason why PLD activates AURA is because of the production of phosphatidic acid by the lipase, which binds directly to AURA, with the region E171–E211 projected to be a phosphatidic-acid-binding pocket. Furthermore, this direct interaction with phosphatidic acid enhances tubulin polymerization and cooperates synergistically with AURA, FAK and Src in yielding a fully effectual cellular migration. Thus, Src and FAK, and PLD and phosphatidic acid are new upstream regulators of AURA that mediate its role in the non-mitotic cellular function of cell migration.

  20. The planar polarity pathway promotes coordinated cell migration during Drosophila oogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Bastock, Rebecca; Strutt, David

    2007-01-01

    SUMMARY Cell migration is fundamental in both animal morphogenesis and disease. The migration of individual cells is relatively well-studied, however in vivo cells often remain joined by cell-cell junctions and migrate in cohesive groups. How such groups of cells coordinate their migration is poorly understood. The planar polarity pathway coordinates the polarity of non-migrating cells in epithelial sheets and is required for cell rearrangements during vertebrate morphogenesis. It is therefore a good candidate to play a role in collective migration of groups of cells. Drosophila border cell migration is a well-characterised and genetically tractable model of collective cell migration, during which a group of about 6-10 epithelial cells detaches from the anterior end of the developing egg chamber and migrates invasively towards the oocyte. We find that the planar polarity pathway promotes this invasive migration, acting both in the migrating cells themselves and in the non-migratory polar follicle cells they carry along. Disruption of planar polarity signalling causes abnormalities in actin rich processes on the cell surface and leads to less efficient migration. This is apparently due in part to loss of regulation of Rho GTPase activity by the planar polarity receptor Frizzled, which itself becomes localised to the migratory edge of the border cells. We conclude that during collective cell migration the planar polarity pathway can mediate communication between motile and non-motile cells, which enhances the efficiency of migration via the modulation of actin dynamics. PMID:17652348

  1. Role of plasminogen activator inhibitor in the reciprocal regulation of bovine aortic endothelial and smooth muscle cell migration by TGF-beta 1.

    PubMed Central

    Petzelbauer, E.; Springhorn, J. P.; Tucker, A. M.; Madri, J. A.

    1996-01-01

    Vascular endothelial and smooth muscle cells exhibit reciprocal migratory responses after transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta 1 treatment. Endothelial cells exhibit a decreased migratory rate and smooth muscle cells exhibit an increased migratory rate. Previous studies have demonstrated increases in extracellular matrix and integrin synthesis and expression in response to TGF-beta 1. In this report, we illustrate the roles of plasminogen activator inhibitor in modulating the migratory rates in these two cell types. Endothelial cells appear to require a proteolytic phenotype for rapid migration, whereas vascular smooth muscle cells appear to require an anti-proteolytic phenotype. Modulation of proteinase/anti-proteinase activity ratios was accomplished via TGF-beta 1 induction, addition of exogenous plasminogen activator inhibitor, addition of anti-catalytic antibodies directed against urokinase plasminogen activator, overexpression of plasminogen activator inhibitor utilizing stable transfectants, and the use of vitronectin as a substratum. The reciprocal migratory behaviors exhibited by these two vascular cell types in response to TGF-beta 1 is discussed in the context that these two vascular cell types utilize distinct adhesive and signaling pathways in their interactions with extracellular matrix components and responsiveness to proteolytic activity. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8780396

  2. Centrosome Positioning in 1D Cell Migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adlerz, Katrina; Aranda-Espinoza, Helim

    During cell migration, the positioning of the centrosome and nucleus define a cell's polarity. For a cell migrating on a two-dimensional substrate the centrosome is positioned in front of the nucleus. Under one-dimensional confinement, however, the centrosome is positioned behind the nucleus in 60% of cells. It is known that the centrosome is positioned by CDC42 and dynein for cells moving on a 2D substrate in a wound-healing assay. It is currently unknown, however, if this is also true for cells moving under 1D confinement, where the centrosome position is often reversed. Therefore, centrosome positioning was studied in cells migrating under 1D confinement, which mimics cells migrating through 3D matrices. 3 to 5 μm fibronectin lines were stamped onto a glass substrate and cells with fluorescently labeled nuclei and centrosomes migrated on the lines. Our results show that when a cell changes directions the centrosome position is maintained. That is, when the centrosome is between the nucleus and the cell's trailing edge and the cell changes direction, the centrosome will be translocated across the nucleus to the back of the cell again. A dynein inhibitor did have an influence on centrosome positioning in 1D migration and change of directions.

  3. Actin depolymerization mediated loss of SNTA1 phosphorylation and Rac1 activity has implications on ROS production, cell migration and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Sehar Saleem; Parray, Arif Ali; Mushtaq, Umar; Fazili, Khalid Majid; Khanday, Firdous Ahmad

    2016-06-01

    Alpha-1-syntrophin (SNTA1) and Rac1 are part of a signaling pathway via the dystrophin glycoprotein complex (DGC). Both SNTA1 and Rac1 proteins are over-expressed in various carcinomas. It is through the DGC signaling pathway that SNTA1 has been shown to act as a link between the extra cellular matrix, the internal cell signaling apparatus and the actin cytoskeleton. SNTA1 is involved in the modulation of the actin cytoskeleton and actin reorganization. Rac1 also controls actin cytoskeletal organization in the cell. In this study, we present the interplay between f-actin, SNTA1 and Rac1. We analyzed the effect of actin depolymerization on SNTA1 tyrosine phosphorylation and Rac1 activity using actin depolymerizing drugs, cytochalasin D and latrunculin A. Our results indicate a marked decrease in the tyrosine phosphorylation of SNTA1 upon actin depolymerization. Results suggest that actin depolymerization mediated loss of SNTA1 phosphorylation leads to loss of interaction between SNTA1 and Rac1, with a concomitant loss of Rac1 activation. The loss of SNTA1tyrosine phosphorylation and Rac1 activity by actin depolymerization results in increased apoptosis, decreased cell migration and decreased reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels in breast carcinoma cells. Collectively, our results present a possible role of f-actin in the SNTA1-Rac1 signaling pathway and implications of actin depolymerization on cell migration, ROS production and apoptosis.

  4. Gremlin promotes retinal pigmentation epithelial (RPE) cell proliferation, migration and VEGF production via activating VEGFR2-Akt-mTORC2 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yuan; Chen, Zhijun; Cheng, Haixia; Chen, Juan; Qian, Jing

    2017-01-01

    Retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) is characterized by late-phase pathologic retinal vasoproliferation. Gremlin is a novel vascular endothelial growth factors (VEGF) receptor 2 (VEGFR2) agonist and promotes angiogenic response. We demonstrated that gremlin expression was significantly increased in retinas of ROP model mice, which was correlated with VEGF upregulation. In retinal pigmentation epithelial (RPE) cells, gremlin activated VEGFR2-Akt-mTORC2 (mammalian target of rapamycin complex 2) signaling, and promoted cell proliferation, migration and VEGF production. VEGFR inhibition (by SU5416) or shRNA knockdown almost abolished gremlin-mediated pleiotropic functions in RPE cells. Further, pharmacological inhibition of Akt-mTOR, or shRNA knockdown of key mTORC2 component (Rictor or Sin1) also attenuated gremlin-exerted activities in RPE cells. We conclude that gremlin promotes RPE cell proliferation, migration and VEGF production possibly via activating VEGFR2-Akt-mTORC2 signaling. Gremlin could be a novel therapeutic target of ROP or other retinal vasoproliferation diseases. PMID:27894090

  5. S-Fms signalobody enhances myeloid cell growth and migration.

    PubMed

    Kawahara, Masahiro; Hitomi, Azusa; Nagamune, Teruyuki

    2014-07-01

    Since receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) control various cell fates in many types of cells, mimicry of RTK functions is promising for artificial control of cell fates. We have previously developed single-chain Fv (scFv)/receptor chimeras named signalobodies that can mimic receptor signaling in response to a specific antigen. While the RTK-based signalobodies enabled us to control cell growth and migration, further extension of applicability in another cell type would underlie the impact of the RTK-based signalobodies. In this study, we applied the scFv-c-Fms (S-Fms) signalobody in a murine myeloid progenitor cell line, FDC-P1. S-Fms transduced a fluorescein-conjugated BSA (BSA-FL)-dependent growth signal and activated downstream signaling molecules including MEK, ERK, Akt, and STAT3, which are major constituents of Ras/MAPK, PI3K/Akt, and JAK/STAT signaling pathways. In addition, S-Fms transduced a migration signal as demonstrated by the transwell-based migration assay. Direct real-time observation of the cells further confirmed that FDC/S-Fms cells underwent directional cell migration toward a positive gradient of BSA-FL. These results demonstrated the utility of the S-Fms signalobody for controlling growth and migration of myeloid cells. Further extension of our approach includes economical large-scale production of practically relevant blood cells as well as artificial control of cell migration for tissue regeneration and immune response.

  6. Pasteurella multocida toxin (PMT) activates RhoGTPases, induces actin polymerization and inhibits migration of human dendritic cells, but does not influence macropinocytosis.

    PubMed

    Blöcker, Dagmar; Berod, Luciana; Fluhr, Joachim W; Orth, Joachim; Idzko, Marco; Aktories, Klaus; Norgauer, Johannes

    2006-03-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are considered as one of the principal initiators of immune responses. In their immature state, they migrate into peripheral tissue in order to uptake antigen and to patrol for danger signals. Upon maturation, they acquire the ability to migrate to the lymph nodes and present the captured antigens to T cells in order to direct the development of specific immune responses. There is evidence that microbial compounds interfere with proper functions of DCs in order to block innate and specific immunity. Here we characterized the influence of Pasteurella multocida toxin (PMT) on monocyte-derived DCs. Using pull-down assays with recombinant rhotekin or p21-activated kinase, we demonstrated the activation of RhoGTPases by PMT in DCs. Moreover, PMT induced changes in DC morphology and actin polymerization, impaired chemotaxin-induced actin re-organization and inhibited their migration response. However, macropinocytosis was not influenced by PMT. In summary, these data indicate that PMT inhibits proper function of the motility machinery in DCs, which might limit the development of adaptive immune surveillance during infection with Pasteurella multocida.

  7. Nerve growth factor enhances voltage-gated Na+ channel activity and Transwell migration in Mat-LyLu rat prostate cancer cell line.

    PubMed

    Brackenbury, William J; Djamgoz, Mustafa B A

    2007-03-01

    The highly dynamic nature of voltage-gated Na+ channel (VGSC) expression and its controlling mechanism(s) are not well understood. In this study, we investigated the possible involvement of nerve growth factor (NGF) in regulating VGSC activity in the strongly metastatic Mat-LyLu cell model of rat prostate cancer (PCa). NGF increased peak VGSC current density in a time- and dose-dependent manner. NGF also shifted voltage to peak and the half-activation voltage to more positive potentials, and produced currents with faster kinetics of activation; sensitivity to the VGSC blocker tetrodotoxin (TTX) was not affected. The NGF-induced increase in peak VGSC current density was suppressed by both the pan-trk antagonist K252a, and the protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor KT5720. NGF did not affect the Nav1.7 mRNA level, but the total VGSC alpha-subunit protein level was upregulated. NGF potentiated the cells' migration in Transwell assays, and this was not affected by TTX. We concluded that NGF upregulated functional VGSC expression in Mat-LyLu cells, with PKA as a signaling intermediate, but enhancement of migration by NGF was independent of VGSC activity.

  8. A Customizable Chamber for Measuring Cell Migration.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Aniqa N; Vo, Huu Tri; Olang, Sharon; Mappus, Elliott; Peterson, Brian; Hlavac, Nora; Harvey, Tyler; Dean, Delphine

    2017-03-12

    Cell migration is a vital part of immune responses, growth, and wound healing. Cell migration is a complex process that involves interactions between cells, the extracellular matrix, and soluble and non-soluble chemical factors (e.g., chemoattractants). Standard methods for measuring the migration of cells, such as the Boyden chamber assay, work by counting cells on either side of a divider. These techniques are easy to use; however, they offer little geometric modification for different applications. In contrast, microfluidic devices can be used to observe cell migration with customizable concentration gradients of soluble factors(1)(,)(2). However, methods for making microfluidics based assays can be difficult to learn. Here, we describe an easy method for creating cell culture chambers to measure cell migration in response to chemical concentration gradients. Our cell migration chamber method can create different linear concentration gradients in order to study cell migration for a variety of applications. This method is relatively easy to use and is typically performed by undergraduate students. The microchannel chamber was created by placing an acrylic insert in the shape of the final microchannel chamber well into a Petri dish. After this, poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) was poured on top of the insert. The PDMS was allowed to harden and then the insert was removed. This allowed for the creation of wells in any desired shape or size. Cells may be subsequently added to the microchannel chamber, and soluble agents can be added to one of the wells by soaking an agarose block in the desired agent. The agarose block is added to one of the wells, and time-lapse images can be taken of the microchannel chamber in order to quantify cell migration. Variations to this method can be made for a given application, making this method highly customizable.

  9. Migration of epithelial cells on laminins: RhoA antagonizes directionally persistent migration.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhigang; Chometon, Gretel; Wen, Tingting; Qu, Haiyan; Mauch, Cornelia; Krieg, Thomas; Aumailley, Monique

    2011-01-01

    Spatial and temporal expression of laminin isoforms is assumed to provide specific local information to neighboring cells. Here, we report the remarkably selective presence of LM-111 at the very tip of hair follicles where LM-332 is absent, suggesting that epithelial cells lining the dermal-epidermal junction at this location may receive different signals from the two laminins. This hypothesis was tested in vitro by characterizing with functional and molecular assays the comportment of keratinocytes exposed to LM-111 and LM-332. The two laminins induced morphologically distinct focal adhesions, and LM-332, but not LM-111, elicited persistent migration of keratinocytes. The different impact on cellular behavior was associated with distinct activation patterns of Rho GTPases and other signaling intermediates. In particular, while LM-111 triggered a robust activation of Cdc42, LM-332 provoked a strong and sustained activation of FAK. Interestingly, activation of Rac1 was necessary but not sufficient to promote migration because there was no directed migration on LM-111 despite Rac1 activation. In contrast, RhoA antagonized directional migration, since silencing of RhoA by RNA interference boosted unidirectional migration on LM-332. Molecular analysis of the role of RhoA strongly suggested that the mechanisms involve disassembly of cell-cell contacts, loss of the cortical actin network, mobilization of α6β4 integrin out of stable adhesions, and displacement of the integrin from its association with the insoluble pool of intermediate filaments.

  10. Phosphorylation of the cool-1/beta-Pix protein serves as a regulatory signal for the migration and invasive activity of Src-transformed cells.

    PubMed

    Feng, Qiyu; Baird, Dan; Yoo, Sungsoo; Antonyak, Marc; Cerione, Richard A

    2010-06-11

    Previously we showed that Cool-1 (Cloned out of library-1)/beta-Pix (Pak-interactive exchange factor) is phosphorylated at a specific tyrosine residue (Tyr-442) in a Src-dependent manner and serves as a dual function guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF)/signaling-effector for Cdc42 that is essential for transformation by Src. Here, we show that knocking-down Cool-1 or overexpressing a Cool-1 mutant that contains substitutions within its Dbl homology domain and is defective for GEF activity, inhibits Src-promoted cell migration. Similarly, the expression of a Cool-1 mutant containing a tyrosine to phenylalanine substitution at position 442, making it incapable of being phosphorylated in response to serum, epidermal growth factor (EGF), or Src, also causes a significant inhibition of the migration and invasive activity of cells expressing oncogenic Src. We further demonstrate that the phosphorylation of Cool-1 at Tyr-442 weakens its ability to bind to one of its primary interaction-partners, Cat-1 (Cool-associated tyrosine phosphosubstrate-1)/Git-1 (G protein-coupled receptor kinase-interactor-1), thus making Cat more accessible for binding to paxillin. This enables cells to alternate between states where they contain large numbers of focal complexes (i.e. conditions favoring Cool-1-Cat interactions) versus reduced numbers of focal complexes (conditions favoring Cat-paxillin interactions). Overall, these findings show that the phosphorylation-dephosphorylation cycle of Cool-1 at Tyr-442 can serve as a key regulatory signal for focal complex assembly-disassembly, and consequently, for the migration and invasive activity of Src-transformed cells.

  11. Propagating Waves of Directionality and Coordination Orchestrate Collective Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Zaritsky, Assaf; Kaplan, Doron; Hecht, Inbal; Natan, Sari; Wolf, Lior; Gov, Nir S.; Ben-Jacob, Eshel; Tsarfaty, Ilan

    2014-01-01

    The ability of cells to coordinately migrate in groups is crucial to enable them to travel long distances during embryonic development, wound healing and tumorigenesis, but the fundamental mechanisms underlying intercellular coordination during collective cell migration remain elusive despite considerable research efforts. A novel analytical framework is introduced here to explicitly detect and quantify cell clusters that move coordinately in a monolayer. The analysis combines and associates vast amount of spatiotemporal data across multiple experiments into transparent quantitative measures to report the emergence of new modes of organized behavior during collective migration of tumor and epithelial cells in wound healing assays. First, we discovered the emergence of a wave of coordinated migration propagating backward from the wound front, which reflects formation of clusters of coordinately migrating cells that are generated further away from the wound edge and disintegrate close to the advancing front. This wave emerges in both normal and tumor cells, and is amplified by Met activation with hepatocyte growth factor/scatter factor. Second, Met activation was found to induce coinciding waves of cellular acceleration and stretching, which in turn trigger the emergence of a backward propagating wave of directional migration with about an hour phase lag. Assessments of the relations between the waves revealed that amplified coordinated migration is associated with the emergence of directional migration. Taken together, our data and simplified modeling-based assessments suggest that increased velocity leads to enhanced coordination: higher motility arises due to acceleration and stretching that seems to increase directionality by temporarily diminishing the velocity components orthogonal to the direction defined by the monolayer geometry. Spatial and temporal accumulation of directionality thus defines coordination. The findings offer new insight and suggest a basic

  12. Emerging role for nuclear rotation and orientation in cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Maninová, Miloslava; Iwanicki, Marcin P; Vomastek, Tomáš

    2014-01-01

    Nucleus movement, positioning, and orientation is precisely specified and actively regulated within cells, and it plays a critical role in many cellular and developmental processes. Mutation of proteins that regulate the nucleus anchoring and movement lead to diverse pathologies, laminopathies in particular, suggesting that the nucleus correct positioning and movement is essential for proper cellular function. In motile cells that polarize toward the direction of migration, the nucleus undergoes controlled rotation promoting the alignment of the nucleus with the axis of migration. Such spatial organization of the cell appears to be optimal for the cell migration. Nuclear reorientation requires the cytoskeleton to be anchored to the nuclear envelope, which exerts pulling or pushing torque on the nucleus. Here we discuss the possible molecular mechanisms regulating the nuclear rotation and reorientation and the significance of this type of nuclear movement for cell migration. PMID:24589621

  13. Inhibition of RUNX2 Transcriptional Activity Blocks the Proliferation, Migration and Invasion of Epithelial Ovarian Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bachvarova, Magdalena; Gobeil, Stephane; Morin, Chantale; Plante, Marie; Gregoire, Jean; Renaud, Marie-Claude; Sebastianelli, Alexandra; Trinh, Xuan Bich; Bachvarov, Dimcho

    2013-01-01

    Previously, we have identified the RUNX2 gene as hypomethylated and overexpressed in post-chemotherapy (CT) primary cultures derived from serous epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) patients, when compared to primary cultures derived from matched primary (prior to CT) tumors. However, we found no differences in the RUNX2 methylation in primary EOC tumors and EOC omental metastases, suggesting that DNA methylation-based epigenetic mechanisms have no impact on RUNX2 expression in advanced (metastatic) stage of the disease. Moreover, RUNX2 displayed significantly higher expression not only in metastatic tissue, but also in high-grade primary tumors and even in low malignant potential tumors. Knockdown of the RUNX2 expression in EOC cells led to a sharp decrease of cell proliferation and significantly inhibited EOC cell migration and invasion. Gene expression profiling and consecutive network and pathway analyses confirmed these findings, as various genes and pathways known previously to be implicated in ovarian tumorigenesis, including EOC tumor invasion and metastasis, were found to be downregulated upon RUNX2 suppression, while a number of pro-apoptotic genes and some EOC tumor suppressor genes were induced. Taken together, our data are indicative for a strong oncogenic potential of the RUNX2 gene in serous EOC progression and suggest that RUNX2 might be a novel EOC therapeutic target. Further studies are needed to more completely elucidate the functional implications of RUNX2 and other members of the RUNX gene family in ovarian tumorigenesis. PMID:24124450

  14. Rho GTPases and cancer cell transendothelial migration.

    PubMed

    Reymond, Nicolas; Riou, Philippe; Ridley, Anne J

    2012-01-01

    Small Rho GTPases are major regulators of actin cytoskeleton dynamics and influence cell shape and migration. The expression of several Rho GTPases is often up-regulated in tumors and this frequently correlates with a poor prognosis for patients. Migration of cancer cells through endothelial cells that line the blood vessels, called transendothelial migration or extravasation, is a critical step during the metastasis process. The use of siRNA technology to target specifically each Rho family member coupled with imaging techniques allows the roles of individual Rho GTPases to be investigated. In this chapter we describe methods to assess how Rho GTPases affect the different steps of cancer cell transendothelial cell migration in vitro.

  15. Protein kinase Cepsilon is important for migration of neuroblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Stensman, Helena; Larsson, Christer

    2008-01-01

    Background Migration is important for the metastatic capacity and thus for the malignancy of cancer cells. There is limited knowledge on regulatory factors that promote the migration of neuroblastoma cells. This study investigates the hypothesis that protein kinase C (PKC) isoforms regulate neuroblastoma cell motility. Methods PKC isoforms were downregulated with siRNA or modulated with activators and inhibitors. Migration was analyzed with scratch and transwell assays. Protein phosphorylation and expression levels were measured with Western blot. Results Stimulation with 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) induced migration of SK-N-BE(2)C neuroblastoma cells. Treatment with the general protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor GF109203X and the inhibitor of classical isoforms Gö6976 inhibited migration while an inhibitor of PKCβ isoforms did not have an effect. Downregulation of PKCε, but not of PKCα or PKCδ, with siRNA led to a suppression of both basal and TPA-stimulated migration. Experiments using PD98059 and LY294002, inhibitors of the Erk and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) pathways, respectively, showed that PI3K is not necessary for TPA-induced migration. The Erk pathway might be involved in TPA-induced migration but not in migration driven by PKCε. TPA induced phosphorylation of the PKC substrate myristoylated alanine-rich C kinase substrate (MARCKS) which was suppressed by the PKC inhibitors. Treatment with siRNA oligonucleotides against different PKC isoforms before stimulation with TPA did not influence the phosphorylation of MARCKS. Conclusion PKCε is important for migration of SK-N-BE(2)C neuroblastoma cells. Neither the Erk pathway nor MARCKS are critical downstream targets of PKCε but they may be involved in TPA-mediated migration. PMID:19077250

  16. Cyclosporin A promotes proliferating cell nuclear antigen expression and migration of human cytotrophoblast cells via the mitgen-activated protein kinase-3/1-mediated nuclear factor-κB signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Wang, Song-Cun; Yu, Min; Li, Yan-Hong; Piao, Hai-Lan; Tang, Chuan-Lin; Sun, Chan; Zhu, Rui; Li, Ming Qing; Jin, Li-Ping; Li, Da-Jin; Du, Mei-Rong

    2013-01-01

    Our previous studies have demonstrated that cyclosporin A (CsA) promotes the proliferation and migration of human trophoblasts via the mitgen-activated protein kinase-3/1 (MAPK3/1) pathway. In the present study, we further investigated the role of nuclear factor (NF)-κB in the CsA-induced trophoblast proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) expression and migration, and its relationship to MAPK3/1 signal. Flow cytometry was used to analyze the expression of PCNA in trophoblasts. The migration of human primary trophoblasts was determined by wound-healing assay and transwell migration assay. Western blot analysis was performed to evaluate the activation of NF-κB p65 and NF-κB inhibitory protein I-κB in human trophoblasts. We found that treatment with CsA promotes PCNA expression and migration of human trophoblast in a dose-associated manner. Blocking of the MAPK3/1 signal abrogated the enhanced PCNA expression and migration in trophoblasts by CsA. In addition, CsA increased the phosphorylation of NF-κB p65 and the inhibitor I-κB in human trophoblasts in a time-related manner. Pretreatment with MAPK3/1 inhibitor U0126 abrogated the phosphorylation of NF-κB p65 and I-κB. Accordingly, the CsA-induced enhancement of PCNA expression and migration in trophoblasts was also decreased. This CsA-induced enhancement in the expression and migration of trophoblasts was abolished by pretreatment with pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate, a specific NF-κB inhibitor. Thus, our results suggest that CsA promotes PCNA expression and migration of human trophoblasts via MAPK-mediated NF-κB activation.

  17. Clonorchis sinensis excretory-secretory products promote the migration and invasion of cholangiocarcinoma cells by activating the integrin β4-FAK/Src signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Pak, Jhang Ho; Bashir, Qudsia; Kim, In Ki; Hong, Sung-Jong; Maeng, Sejung; Bahk, Young Yil; Kim, Tong-Soo

    2017-03-08

    Cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) is a slow-growing but highly metastatic cancer. Its metastatic potential largely explains its high mortality rate. A recognized risk factor for CCA development is infection with the liver flukes Opisthorchis viverrini and Clonorchis sinensis. We previously reported that the excretory-secretory products (ESPs) of C. sinensis promoted the three-dimensional aggregation and invasion of CCA cells. In the present study, a quantitative real-time PCR array of extracellular matrix (ECM) and adhesion molecules was used to examine the regulatory mechanism of ESP-mediated CCA cell migration and invasion. In particular, the expression levels of integrin α isoforms and β4 were upregulated in response to ESPs. Increased expression of integrin β4 was probably correlated with activation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and the steroid receptor coactivator (Src) family kinase and the subsequent activation of two downstream focal adhesion molecules, paxillin and vinculin. Moreover, inhibition of FAK/Src activation reduced paxillin and vinculin phosphorylation and attenuated ESP-induced CCA cell migration and invasion. These findings suggest that the integrin β4-FAK/Src signaling axis may play a crucial role in clonorchiasis-associated CCA metastasis during tumor progression.

  18. Cell Shape Dynamics: From Waves to Migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Driscoll, Meghan; McCann, Colin; Kopace, Rael; Homan, Tess; Fourkas, John; Parent, Carole; Losert, Wolfgang

    2011-03-01

    We analyzed the dynamic shape of migrating Dictyostelium discoideum cells. We found that regions of high boundary curvature propagate from the front to the back of cells in an organized fashion. These waves of high curvature are stabilized by surface contact, and so, at the sides of cells, are stationary relative to the surface. The initiation of curvature waves, though, which usually occurs at the front of cells, is associated with protrusive motion. The protrusion location shifts rapidly in a ballistic manner at speeds nearly double that of cellular migration. To examine curvature waves in the absence of surface contact, we guided cells to extend over the edge of micro-cliffs. The curvature wave speed of cells extended over a cliff was triple the wave speed of cells migrating on a surface, which is consistent with the higher wave speeds observed near the non-adherent leading edge of cells.

  19. Emergence of oligarchy in collective cell migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumacher, Linus; Maini, Philip; Baker, Ruth

    Identifying the principles of collective cell migration has the potential to help prevent birth defects, improve regenerative therapies and develop model systems for cancer metastasis. In collaboration with experimental biologists, we use computational simulations of a hybrid model, comprising individual-based stochastic cell movement coupled to a reaction-diffusion equation for a chemoattractant, to explore the role of cell specialisation in the guidance of collective cell migration. In the neural crest, an important migratory cell population in vertebrate embryo development, we present evidence that just a few cells are guiding group migration in a cell-induced chemoattractant gradient that determines the switch between ``leader'' and ``follower'' behaviour in individual cells. This leads us to more generally consider under what conditions cell specialisation might become advantageous for collective migration. Alternatively, individual cell responses to locally different microenvironmental conditions could create the (artefactual) appearance of heterogeneity in a population of otherwise identical cellular agents. We explore these questions using a self-propelled particle model as a minimal description for collective cell migration in two and three dimensions.

  20. In vitro cell migration and invasion assays.

    PubMed

    Justus, Calvin R; Leffler, Nancy; Ruiz-Echevarria, Maria; Yang, Li V

    2014-06-01

    Migration is a key property of live cells and critical for normal development, immune response, and disease processes such as cancer metastasis and inflammation. Methods to examine cell migration are very useful and important for a wide range of biomedical research such as cancer biology, immunology, vascular biology, cell biology and developmental biology. Here we use tumor cell migration and invasion as an example and describe two related assays to illustrate the commonly used, easily accessible methods to measure these processes. The first method is the cell culture wound closure assay in which a scratch is generated on a confluent cell monolayer. The speed of wound closure and cell migration can be quantified by taking snapshot pictures with a regular inverted microscope at several time intervals. More detailed cell migratory behavior can be documented using the time-lapse microscopy system. The second method described in this paper is the transwell cell migration and invasion assay that measures the capacity of cell motility and invasiveness toward a chemo-attractant gradient. It is our goal to describe these methods in a highly accessible manner so that the procedures can be successfully performed in research laboratories even just with basic cell biology setup.

  1. The thioredoxin system in breast cancer cell invasion and migration.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Maneet; McGrath, Kelly L; Di Trapani, Giovanna; Charoentong, Pornpimol; Shah, Fenil; King, Mallory M; Clarke, Frank M; Tonissen, Kathryn F

    2016-08-01

    Metastasis is the most life threatening aspect of breast cancer. It is a multi-step process involving invasion and migration of primary tumor cells with a subsequent colonization of these cells at a secondary location. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of thioredoxin (Trx1) in the invasion and migration of breast cancer cells and to assess the strength of the association between high levels of Trx1 and thioredoxin reductase (TrxR1) expression with breast cancer patient survival. Our results indicate that the expression of both Trx1 and TrxR1 are statistically significantly increased in breast cancer patient cells compared with paired normal breast tissue from the same patient. Over-expression of Trx1 in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell lines enhanced cell invasion in in vitro assays while expression of a redox inactive mutant form of Trx1 (designated 1SS) or the antisense mRNA inhibited cell invasion. Addition of exogenous Trx1 also enhanced cell invasion, while addition of a specific monoclonal antibody that inhibits Trx1 redox function decreased cell invasion. Over-expression of intracellular Trx1 did not increase cell migration but expression of intracellular 1SS inhibited migration. Addition of exogenous Trx1 enhanced cell migration while 1SS had no effect. Treatment with auranofin inhibited TrxR activity, cell migration and clonogenic activity of MDA-MB-231 cells, while increasing reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels. Analysis of 25 independent cohorts with 5910 patients showed that Trx1 and TrxR1 were both associated with a poor patient prognosis in terms of overall survival, distant metastasis free survival and disease free survival. Therefore, targeting the Trx system with auranofin or other specific inhibitors may provide improved breast cancer patient outcomes through inhibition of cancer invasion and migration.

  2. Quantitative 3D analysis of complex single border cell behaviors in coordinated collective cell migration.

    PubMed

    Cliffe, Adam; Doupé, David P; Sung, HsinHo; Lim, Isaac Kok Hwee; Ong, Kok Haur; Cheng, Li; Yu, Weimiao

    2017-04-04

    Understanding the mechanisms of collective cell migration is crucial for cancer metastasis, wound healing and many developmental processes. Imaging a migrating cluster in vivo is feasible, but the quantification of individual cell behaviours remains challenging. We have developed an image analysis toolkit, CCMToolKit, to quantify the Drosophila border cell system. In addition to chaotic motion, previous studies reported that the migrating cells are able to migrate in a highly coordinated pattern. We quantify the rotating and running migration modes in 3D while also observing a range of intermediate behaviours. Running mode is driven by cluster external protrusions. Rotating mode is associated with cluster internal cell extensions that could not be easily characterized. Although the cluster moves slower while rotating, individual cells retain their mobility and are in fact slightly more active than in running mode. We also show that individual cells may exchange positions during migration.

  3. Entropy measures of collective cell migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitby, Ariadne; Parrinello, Simona; Faisal, Aldo

    2015-03-01

    Collective cell migration is a critical process during tissue formation and repair. To this end there is a need to develop tools to quantitatively measure the dynamics of collective cell migration obtained from microscopy data. Drawing on statistical physics we use entropy of velocity fields derived from dense optic flow to quantitatively measure collective migration. Using peripheral nerve repair after injury as experimental system, we study how Schwann cells, guided by fibroblasts, migrate in cord-like structures across the cut, paving a highway for neurons. This process of emergence of organised behaviour is key for successful repair, yet the emergence of leader cells and transition from a random to ordered state is not understood. We find fibroblasts induce correlated directionality in migrating Schwann cells as measured by a decrease in the entropy of motion vector. We show our method is robust with respect to image resolution in time and space, giving a principled assessment of how various molecular mechanisms affect macroscopic features of collective cell migration. Finally, the generality of our method allows us to process both simulated cell movement and microscopic data, enabling principled fitting and comparison of in silico to in vitro. ICCS, Imperial College London & MRC Clinical Sciences Centre.

  4. Cell density determines epithelial migration in culture.

    PubMed Central

    Rosen, P; Misfeldt, D S

    1980-01-01

    The dog kidney epithelial cell line (MDCK) has been shown to exhibit a density-correlated inhibition of growth at approxmately 6.6 X 10(5) cells per cm2. When a confluent monolayer at its maximal density was wounded by removal of a wide swath of cells, migration of the cell sheet into the denuded area occurred. Precise measurements of the rate of migration for 5 day showed that the cells accelerated at a uniform rate of 0.24 micrometer . hr-2 and, by extrapolation, possessed an apparent initial velocity of 2.8 micrometer . hr-1 at the time of wounding. The apparent initial velocity was considered to be the result of a brief (< 10 hr) and rapid acceleration dependent on cell density. To verify this, wounds were made at different densities below the maximum. In these experiments, the cells did not migrate until a "threshold" density of 2.0 X 10(5) cells per cm2 was reached regardless of the density at the time of wounding. At the threshold density, the cell sheet began to accelerate at the previously measured rate (0.24 micrometer . hr-2). Any increase in density by cell division was balanced by cell migration, so that the same threshold density was maintained by the migrating cells. Each migrating cell sustained the movement of the cell sheet at a constant rate of acceleration. It is proposed that an acceleration is, in general, characteristic of the vectorial movement of an epithelial cell sheet. Images PMID:6933523

  5. FZD6, targeted by miR-21, represses gastric cancer cell proliferation and migration via activating non-canonical wnt pathway.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jin; Liu, Tingyu; Zhou, Xiaoying; Dang, Yini; Yin, Chengqiang; Zhang, Guoxin

    2016-01-01

    FZD6 plays crucial roles in human tumorigenesis. However, its mechanism in regulating cancers has not been fully elucidated. In the study, we found that FZD6 repressed gastric cancer cell proliferation and migration via activating non-canonical wnt pathway. In addition, non-canonical wnt pathway ameliorated expression of canonical wnt pathway. We also demonstrated that the FZD6 was involved in miR-21-dependent effects in the canonical and non-canonical wnt pathways in gastric cancer. These findings provide a better understanding of the development and progression of gastric cancer and may be an important implication for future therapy.

  6. Downregulation of microRNA-122 promotes proliferation, migration, and invasion of human hepatocellular carcinoma cells by activating epithelial–mesenchymal transition

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Nanyao; Wang, Qiong; Shen, Dong; Sun, Xia; Cao, Xiangming; Wu, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of microRNA-122 (miR-122) on proliferation, migration, and invasion in human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells by activating epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) pathways. Methods miR-122 mimics, miR-122 inhibitors, relevant control oligonucleotides, and Wnt1 were transfected into HepG2 and huh7 cell lines which were then divided into six groups: miR-122 group, anti-miR-122 group, miR-negative control (NC) group, anti-miR-NC group, miR-122 + Wnt1 group, and miR-122 + vector group. The miR-122 expressions and mRNA expressions of Wnt1 and EMT-related genes (E-cadherin, vimentin, β-cadherin, and N-cadherin) were quantified by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). Protein expression levels of Wnt1, E-cadherin, vimentin, β-cadherin, and N-cadherin were measured by Western blot. Cell proliferation, migration, and invasion were evaluated using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay, wound-healing assay, and Transwell assay, respectively. Results Dual luciferase reporter gene results showed that Wnt1 is a direct target gene of miR-122 in both HepG2 and huh7 cell lines. Compared to miR-NC, anti-miR-NC, and miR-122 + Wnt1 groups, miR-122 expression was markedly higher in the miR-122 group and miR-122 + vector group, but was sharply decreased in anti-miR-122 group (both P<0.05), and the mRNA and protein levels of Wnt1, vimentin, β-cadherin, and N-cadherin decreased significantly; also E-cadherin increased, and cell proliferation, migration, and invasion decreased in the miR-122 group and miR-122 + vector group (all P<0.05), but the situation was totally reversed in the anti-miR-122 group (all P<0.05). Conclusion Downregulation of miR-122 promoted proliferation, migration, and invasion of human HCC cells by targeting Wnt1 and regulating Wnt/β-catenin pathway which activated the EMT pathways. PMID:27103830

  7. The receptor for urokinase-plasminogen activator (uPAR) controls plasticity of cancer cell movement in mesenchymal and amoeboid migration style

    PubMed Central

    Taddei, Maria Letizia; Giannoni, Elisa; Laurenzana, Anna; Biagioni, Alessio; Chillà, Anastasia; Chiarugi, Paola; Fibbi, Gabriella; Rosso1, Mario Del

    2014-01-01

    The receptor for the urokinase plasminogen activator (uPAR) is up-regulated in malignant tumors. Historically the function of uPAR in cancer cell invasion is strictly related to its property to promote uPA-dependent proteolysis of extracellular matrix and to open a path to malignant cells. These features are typical of mesenchymal motility. Here we show that the full-length form of uPAR is required when prostate and melanoma cancer cells convert their migration style from the “path generating” mesenchymal to the “path finding” amoeboid one, thus conferring a plasticity to tumor cell invasiveness across three-dimensional matrices. Indeed, in response to a protease inhibitors-rich milieu, prostate and melanoma cells activated an amoeboid invasion program connoted by retraction of cell protrusions, RhoA-mediated rounding of the cell body, formation of a cortical ring of actin and a reduction of Rac-1 activation. While the mesenchymal movement was reduced upon silencing of uPAR expression, the amoeboid one was almost completely abolished, in parallel with a deregulation of small Rho-GTPases activity. In melanoma and prostate cancer cells we have shown uPAR colocalization with β1/β3 integrins and actin cytoskeleton, as well integrins-actin co-localization under both mesenchymal and amoeboid conditions. Such co-localizations were lost upon treatment of cells with a peptide that inhibits uPAR-integrin interactions. Similarly to uPAR silencing, the peptide reduced mesenchymal invasion and almost abolished the amoeboid one. These results indicate that full-length uPAR bridges the mesenchymal and amoeboid style of movement by an inward-oriented activity based on its property to promote integrin-actin interactions and the following cytoskeleton assembly. PMID:24681666

  8. Dynamic activity of the filopodia of sea urchin embryonic cells and their role in directed migration of the primary mesenchyme in vitro.

    PubMed

    Karp, G C; Solursh, M

    1985-12-01

    Primary mesenchyme cells used in this study were isolated from Lytechinus pictus mesenchyme blastulae by their ability to preferentially adhere to the surface of a tissue culture dish in the presence of serum. Once isolated, primary mesenchyme cells were found to form thin, elongated, active filopodia which closely resemble the filopodia seen in vivo. The filopodia formed in vitro can move as stiffened bristles, bend gradually or very sharply, or be slowly withdrawn. The integrity of the filopodia is not affected by nocodazole but is totally disrupted by cytochalasin D. Filopodia exhibit several apparent functions in vitro: as organelles involved in contacting the external environment, as anchoring appendages that hold the cell bodies in place, and as intercellular connectives that can join cell bodies. The filopodia of primary mesenchyme cells appear to have similar roles within the embryo. The function of the filopodia has been explored by watching the behavior of isolated primary mesenchyme cells in close proximity to deposits of extracellular material (ECM) prepared from mesenchyme blastulae. When the filopodium from a mesenchyme cell makes contact with the nearby ECM, a response is initiated which causes the cell body to move in a directed manner toward the ECM deposit. The use of this type of response as a model system for the study of the migration of primary mesenchyme cells within the embryo is considered.

  9. Beta-Adrenoceptor Activation Reduces Both Dermal Microvascular Endothelial Cell Migration via a cAMP-Dependent Mechanism and Wound Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    O'Leary, Andrew P; Fox, James M; Pullar, Christine E

    2015-01-01

    Angiogenesis is an essential process during tissue regeneration; however, the amount of angiogenesis directly correlates with the level of wound scarring. Angiogenesis is lower in scar-free foetal wounds while angiogenesis is raised and abnormal in pathophysiological scarring such as hypertrophic scars and keloids. Delineating the mechanisms that modulate angiogenesis and could reduce scarring would be clinically useful. Beta-adrenoceptors (β-AR) are G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) expressed on all skin cell-types. They play a role in wound repair but their specific role in angiogenesis is unknown. In this study, a range of in vitro assays (single cell migration, scratch wound healing, ELISAs for angiogenic growth factors and tubule formation) were performed with human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HDMEC) to investigate and dissect mechanisms underpinning β-AR-mediated modulation of angiogenesis in chick chorioallantoic membranes (CAM) and murine excisional skin wounds. β-AR activation reduced HDMEC migration via cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)-dependent and protein kinase A (PKA)-independent mechanisms as demonstrated through use of an EPAC agonist that auto-inhibited the cAMP-mediated β-AR transduced reduction in HDMEC motility; a PKA inhibitor was, conversely, ineffective. ELISA studies demonstrated that β-AR activation reduced pro-angiogenic growth factor secretion from HDMECs (fibroblast growth factor 2) and keratinocytes (vascular endothelial growth factor A) revealing possible β-AR-mediated autocrine and paracrine anti-angiogenic mechanisms. In more complex environments, β-AR activation delayed HDMEC tubule formation and decreased angiogenesis both in the CAM assay and in murine excisional skin wounds in vivo. β-AR activation reduced HDMEC function in vitro and angiogenesis in vivo; therefore, β-AR agonists could be promising anti-angiogenic modulators in skin. J. Cell. Physiol. 230: 356–365, 2015. © 2014 The Authors. Journal

  10. Macrophage Migration Inhibition Studies with Cells from Mice Vaccinated with Cell Walls of Mycobacterium bovis BCG: Relationship Between Inhibitory Activity of Lung Cells and Resistance to Airborne Challenge with Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, K; Anacker, R L; Ribi, E

    1970-06-01

    In an effort to evaluate the role of delayed hypersensitivity in acquired resistance of mice to airborne infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv, the ability of lung and peritoneal cells from mice vaccinated in various ways with mycobacterial fractions or with M. bovis BCG to inhibit, in the presence of purified protein derivative, in vitro migration of normal peritoneal cells was determined. The degree of inhibition induced by lung cells was correlated with immunity, but that induced by peritoneal cells could not be associated with enhanced resistance. Live BCG given intravenously to mice stimulated greater resistance to infection and inhibitory activity of lung cells than did live BCG given subcutaneously. Vaccines with a protective index greater than 1 also induced a significant increase in lung weight. Although a correlation between ability of lung cells to inhibit cell migration and acquired resistance of the host to airborne infection with H37Rv was demonstrated, the data do not exclude the possibility that the two phenomena are independent responses to the immunologically complex mycobacterial antigens.

  11. The phosphatase of regenerating liver 3 (PRL-3) promotes cell migration through Arf-activity-dependent stimulation of integrin α5 recycling.

    PubMed

    Krndija, Denis; Münzberg, Christin; Maass, Ulrike; Hafner, Margit; Adler, Guido; Kestler, Hans A; Seufferlein, Thomas; Oswald, Franz; von Wichert, Götz

    2012-08-15

    The formation of metastasis is one of the most critical problems in oncology. The phosphatase of regenerating liver 3 (PRL-3) is a new target in colorectal cancer, mediating metastatic behavior through a promigratory function. However, detailed explanations for this effect have remained elusive. Here we show that PRL-3 interacts with the ADP-ribosylation factor 1 (Arf1). PRL-3 colocalizes with Arf1 in an endosomal compartment and associates with transmembrane proteins such as the transferrin receptor and α5 integrins. PRL-3 interacts with Arf1 through a distinct motif and regulates activation of Arf1. PRL-3-mediated migration depends on expression and activation of Arf1 and is sensitive to treatment with Brefeldin A. We also demonstrate that PRL-3 modulates recycling of α5 integrins and that its phosphatase activity as well as Arf activation and compartmentalization with Arf1 are required for this effect. In summary our data identify a new function for PRL-3 and show that Arf1 is a new PRL-3-dependent mediator of enhanced migration of cancer cells through enhanced recycling of matrix receptors.

  12. Cell migration in the postnatal subventricular zone.

    PubMed

    Menezes, J R L; Marins, M; Alves, J A J; Froes, M M; Hedin-Pereira, C

    2002-12-01

    New neurons are constantly added to the olfactory bulb of rodents from birth to adulthood. This accretion is not only dependent on sustained neurogenesis, but also on the migration of neuroblasts and immature neurons from the cortical and striatal subventricular zone (SVZ) to the olfactory bulb. Migration along this long tangential pathway, known as the rostral migratory stream (RMS), is in many ways opposite to the classical radial migration of immature neurons: it is faster, spans a longer distance, does not require radial glial guidance, and is not limited to postmitotic neurons. In recent years many molecules have been found to be expressed specifically in this pathway and to directly affect this migration. Soluble factors with inhibitory, attractive and inductive roles in migration have been described, as well as molecules mediating cell-to-cell and cell-substrate interactions. However, it is still unclear how the various molecules and cells interact to account for the special migratory behavior in the RMS. Here we will propose some candidate mechanisms for roles in initiating and stopping SVZ/RMS migration.

  13. Energy barriers and cell migration in confluent tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bi, Dapeng; Lopez, J. H.; Schwarz, J. M.; Manning, M. Lisa

    2014-03-01

    Biological processes such as embryogensis, tumorigenesis and wound healing require cells to move within a tissue. While the migration of single cells has been extensively studied, it has remained unclear how single cell properties control migration through a confluent tissue. We develop numerical and theoretical models to calculate energy barriers to cell rearrangements, which govern cell motility. In contrast to sheared foams where energy barriers are power-law distributed, energy barriers in tissues are exponentially distributed and depend systematically on the cell's number of neighbors. Using simple extensions of `trap' and `Soft Glassy Rheology' models, we demonstrate that these energy barrier distributions give rise to glassy behavior and use the models to make testable predictions for two-time correlation functions and caging times. We incorporate these ideas into a continuum model that combines glassy rheology with active polarization to better understand collective migration in epithelial sheets.

  14. Attraction rules: germ cell migration in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Raz, Erez; Reichman-Fried, Michal

    2006-08-01

    The migration of zebrafish primordial germ cell towards the region where the gonad develops is guided by the chemokine SDF-1a. Recent studies show that soon after their specification, the cells undergo a series of morphological alterations before they become motile and are able to respond to attractive cues. As migratory cells, primordial germ cells move towards their target while correcting their path upon exiting a cyclic phase in which morphological cell polarity is lost. In the following stages, the cells gather at specific locations and move as cell clusters towards their final target. In all of these stages, zebrafish germ cells respond as individual cells to alterations in the shape of the sdf-1a expression domain, by directed migration towards their target - the position where the gonad develops.

  15. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells express a restricted set of functionally active chemokine receptors capable of promoting migration to pancreatic islets.

    PubMed

    Sordi, Valeria; Malosio, Maria Luisa; Marchesi, Federica; Mercalli, Alessia; Melzi, Raffaella; Giordano, Tiziana; Belmonte, Nathalie; Ferrari, Giuliana; Leone, Biagio Eugenio; Bertuzzi, Federico; Zerbini, Gianpaolo; Allavena, Paola; Bonifacio, Ezio; Piemonti, Lorenzo

    2005-07-15

    Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) are stromal cells with the ability to proliferate and differentiate into many tissues. Although they represent powerful tools for several therapeutic settings, mechanisms regulating their migration to peripheral tissues are still unknown. Here, we report chemokine receptor expression on human BM-MSCs and their role in mediating migration to tissues. A minority of BM-MSCs (2% to 25%) expressed a restricted set of chemokine receptors (CXC receptor 4 [CXCR4], CX3C receptor 1 [CX3CR1], CXCR6, CC chemokine receptor 1 [CCR1], CCR7) and, accordingly, showed appreciable chemotactic migration in response to the chemokines CXC ligand 12 (CXCL12), CX3CL1, CXCL16, CC chemokine ligand 3 (CCL3), and CCL19. Using human pancreatic islets as an in vitro model of peripheral tissue, we showed that islet supernatants released factors able to attract BM-MSCs in vitro, and this attraction was principally mediated by CX3CL1 and CXCL12. Moreover, cells with features of BM-MSCs were detected within the pancreatic islets of mice injected with green fluorescent protein (GFP)-positive BM. A population of bona fide MSCs that also expressed CXCR4, CXCR6, CCR1, and CCR7 could be isolated from normal adult human pancreas. This study defines the chemokine receptor repertoire of human BM-MSCs that determines their migratory activity. Modulation of homing capacity may be instrumental for harnessing the therapeutic potential of BM-MSCs.

  16. RNase L is a negative regulator of cell migration.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Shuvojit; Li, Geqiang; Li, Yize; Gaughan, Christina; Baskar, Danika; Parker, Yvonne; Lindner, Daniel J; Weiss, Susan R; Silverman, Robert H

    2015-12-29

    RNase L is a regulated endoribonuclease that functions in the interferon antiviral response. Activation of RNase L by 2', 5'-oligoadenylates has been linked to apoptosis, autophagy and inflammation. Genetic studies have also suggested the possible involvement of the RNase L gene (RNASEL) on chromosome 1q25.3 in several types of cancer. Here we report that ablation of RNase L in human prostate cancer PC3 cells by CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing technology enhanced cell migration as determined both by transwell assays and scratch wound healing assays. In addition, RNase L knockdown by means of RNAi increased migration of PC3 and DU145 cells in response to either fibronectin or serum stimulation, as did homozygous disruption of the RNase L gene in mouse embryonic fibroblasts. Serum or fibronectin stimulation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) autophosphorylation on tyrosine-397 was increased by either knockdown or ablation of RNase L. In contrast, a missense mutant RNase L (R667A) lacking catalytic activity failed to suppress cell migration in PC3 cells. However, a nuclease-inactive mutant mouse RNase L (W630A) was able to partially inhibit migration of mouse fibroblasts. Consistent with a role for the catalytic activity of RNase L, transfection of PC3 cells with the RNase L activator, 2', 5'-oligoadenylate, suppressed cell migration. RNase L knockdown in PC3 cells enhanced tumor growth and metastasis following implantation in the mouse prostate. Our results suggest that naturally occurring mutations in the RNase L gene might promote enhanced cell migration and metastasis.

  17. RNase L is a negative regulator of cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Shuvojit; Li, Geqiang; Li, Yize; Gaughan, Christina; Baskar, Danika; Parker, Yvonne; Lindner, Daniel J.; Weiss, Susan R.; Silverman, Robert H.

    2015-01-01

    RNase L is a regulated endoribonuclease that functions in the interferon antiviral response. Activation of RNase L by 2′, 5′-oligoadenylates has been linked to apoptosis, autophagy and inflammation. Genetic studies have also suggested the possible involvement of the RNase L gene (RNASEL) on chromosome 1q25.3 in several types of cancer. Here we report that ablation of RNase L in human prostate cancer PC3 cells by CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing technology enhanced cell migration as determined both by transwell assays and scratch wound healing assays. In addition, RNase L knockdown by means of RNAi increased migration of PC3 and DU145 cells in response to either fibronectin or serum stimulation, as did homozygous disruption of the RNase L gene in mouse embryonic fibroblasts. Serum or fibronectin stimulation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) autophosphorylation on tyrosine-397 was increased by either knockdown or ablation of RNase L. In contrast, a missense mutant RNase L (R667A) lacking catalytic activity failed to suppress cell migration in PC3 cells. However, a nuclease-inactive mutant mouse RNase L (W630A) was able to partially inhibit migration of mouse fibroblasts. Consistent with a role for the catalytic activity of RNase L, transfection of PC3 cells with the RNase L activator, 2′, 5′-oligoadenylate, suppressed cell migration. RNase L knockdown in PC3 cells enhanced tumor growth and metastasis following implantation in the mouse prostate. Our results suggest that naturally occurring mutations in the RNase L gene might promote enhanced cell migration and metastasis. PMID:26517238

  18. Dissecting mesenchymal stem cell movement: migration assays for tracing and deducing cell migration.

    PubMed

    Spaeth, Erika L; Marini, Frank C

    2011-01-01

    Targeted migration is a necessary attribute for any gene delivery vehicle. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) have been used as effective delivery vehicles for treatments against cancer, graft versus host disease, -arthritis, multiple sclerosis, and many other diseases. MSC migrate toward sites of inflammation, however, the true migratory mechanism has yet to be elucidated. There are several receptors and respective chemokines known to be involved in the migration of the MSC. Further insight to MSC migration will be revealed both in vivo and in vitro through the application of migration assays from the most simple, to the more technologically demanding.

  19. The sGC activator inhibits the proliferation and migration, promotes the apoptosis of human pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells via the up regulation of plasminogen activator inhibitor-2

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Shuai; Zou, Lihui; Yang, Ting; Yang, Yuanhua; Zhai, Zhenguo; Xiao, Fei; Wang, Chen

    2015-03-15

    Background: Different types of pulmonary hypertension (PH) share the same process of pulmonary vascular remodeling, the molecular mechanism of which is not entirely clarified by far. The abnormal biological behaviors of pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) play an important role in this process. Objectives: We investigated the regulation of plasminogen activator inhibitor-2 (PAI-2) by the sGC activator, and explored the effect of PAI-2 on PASMCs proliferation, apoptosis and migration. Methods: After the transfection with PAI-2 overexpression vector and specific siRNAs or treatment with BAY 41-2272 (an activator of sGC), the mRNA and protein levels of PAI-2 in cultured human PASMCs were detected, and the proliferation, apoptosis and migration of PASMCs were investigated. Results: BAY 41-2272 up regulated the endogenous PAI-2 in PASMCs, on the mRNA and protein level. In PAI-2 overexpression group, the proliferation and migration of PASMCs were inhibited significantly, and the apoptosis of PASMCs was increased. In contrast, PAI-2 knockdown with siRNA increased PASMCs proliferation and migration, inhibited the apoptosis. Conclusions: PAI-2 overexpression inhibits the proliferation and migration and promotes the apoptosis of human PASMCs. Therefore, sGC activator might alleviate or reverse vascular remodeling in PH through the up-regulation of PAI-2. - Highlights: • sGC activator BAY41-2272 up regulated PAI-2 in PASMCs, on the mRNA and protein level. • PAI-2 overexpression inhibits the proliferation and migration of human PASMCs. • PAI-2 overexpression promotes the apoptosis of human PASMCs. • sGC activator might alleviate the vascular remodeling in pulmonary hypertension.

  20. Plectin deficiency in liver cancer cells promotes cell migration and sensitivity to sorafenib treatment.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Chiung-Chi; Chao, Wei-Ting; Liao, Chen-Chun; Tseng, Yu-Hui; Lai, Yen-Chang Clark; Lai, Yih-Shyong; Hsu, Yung-Hsiang; Liu, Yi-Hsiang

    2017-02-17

    Plectin involved in activation of kinases in cell signaling pathway and plays important role in cell morphology and migration. Plectin knockdown promotes cell migration by activating focal adhesion kinase and Rac1-GTPase activity in liver cells. Sorafenib is a multi-targeting tyrosine kinase inhibitor that improves patient survival on hepatocellular carcinoma. The aim of this study is to investigate the correlation between the expression of plectin and cell migration as well as the sensitivity of hepatoma cell lines exposing to sorafenib. Hepatoma cell lines PLC/PRF/5 and HepG2 were used to examine the level of plectin expression and cell migration in comparison with Chang liver cell line. In addition, sensitivity of the 3 cell lines to sorafenib treatment was also measured. Expression of plectin was lower in PLC/PRF/5 and HepG2 hepatoma cells than that of Chang liver cells whereas HepG2 and PLC/PRF/5 cells exhibit higher rate of cell migration in trans-well migration assay. Immunohistofluorecent staining on E-cadherin revealed the highest rate of collective cell migration in HepG2 cells and the lowest was found in Chang liver cells. Likewise, HepG2 cell line was most sensitive to sorafenib treatment and Chang liver cells exhibited the least sensitivity. The drug sensitivity to sorafenib treatment showed inverse correlation with the expression of plectin. We suggest that plectin deficiency and increased E-cadherin in hepatoma cells were associated with higher rates of cell motility, collective cell migration as well as higher drug sensitivity to sorafenib treatment.

  1. Modeling keratinocyte wound healing dynamics: Cell-cell adhesion promotes sustained collective migration.

    PubMed

    Nardini, John T; Chapnick, Douglas A; Liu, Xuedong; Bortz, David M

    2016-07-07

    The in vitro migration of keratinocyte cell sheets displays behavioral and biochemical similarities to the in vivo wound healing response of keratinocytes in animal model systems. In both cases, ligand-dependent Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) activation is sufficient to elicit collective cell migration into the wound. Previous mathematical modeling studies of in vitro wound healing assays assume that physical connections between cells have a hindering effect on cell migration, but biological literature suggests a more complicated story. By combining mathematical modeling and experimental observations of collectively migrating sheets of keratinocytes, we investigate the role of cell-cell adhesion during in vitro keratinocyte wound healing assays. We develop and compare two nonlinear diffusion models of the wound healing process in which cell-cell adhesion either hinders or promotes migration. Both models can accurately fit the leading edge propagation of cell sheets during wound healing when using a time-dependent rate of cell-cell adhesion strength. The model that assumes a positive role of cell-cell adhesion on migration, however, is robust to changes in the leading edge definition and yields a qualitatively accurate density profile. Using RNAi for the critical adherens junction protein, α-catenin, we demonstrate that cell sheets with wild type cell-cell adhesion expression maintain migration into the wound longer than cell sheets with decreased cell-cell adhesion expression, which fails to exhibit collective migration. Our modeling and experimental data thus suggest that cell-cell adhesion promotes sustained migration as cells pull neighboring cells into the wound during wound healing.

  2. Activation of P2X7 and P2Y11 purinergic receptors inhibits migration and normalizes tumor-derived endothelial cells via cAMP signaling

    PubMed Central

    Avanzato, D.; Genova, T.; Fiorio Pla, A.; Bernardini, M.; Bianco, S.; Bussolati, B.; Mancardi, D.; Giraudo, E.; Maione, F.; Cassoni, P.; Castellano, I.; Munaron, L.

    2016-01-01

    Purinergic signaling is involved in inflammation and cancer. Extracellular ATP accumulates in tumor interstitium, reaching hundreds micromolar concentrations, but its functional role on tumor vasculature and endothelium is unknown. Here we show that high ATP doses (>20 μM) strongly inhibit migration of endothelial cells from human breast carcinoma (BTEC), but not of normal human microvascular EC. Lower doses (1–10 mm result ineffective. The anti-migratory activity is associated with cytoskeleton remodeling and is significantly prevented by hypoxia. Pharmacological and molecular evidences suggest a major role for P2X7R and P2Y11R in ATP-mediated inhibition of TEC migration: selective activation of these purinergic receptors by BzATP mimics the anti-migratory effect of ATP, which is in turn impaired by their pharmacological or molecular silencing. Downstream pathway includes calcium-dependent Adenilyl Cyclase 10 (AC10) recruitment, cAMP release and EPAC-1 activation. Notably, high ATP enhances TEC-mediated attraction of human pericytes, leading to a decrease of endothelial permeability, a hallmark of vessel normalization. Finally, we provide the first evidence of in vivo P2X7R expression in blood vessels of murine and human breast carcinoma. In conclusion, we have identified a purinergic pathway selectively acting as an antiangiogenic and normalizing signal for human tumor-derived vascular endothelium. PMID:27586846

  3. Long non-coding RNA CCAT1 that can be activated by c-Myc promotes pancreatic cancer cell proliferation and migration

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Qiuyun; Zhou, Xinfeng; Xia, Qing; Shen, Jia; Yan, Jia; Zhu, Jiuting; Li, Xiang; Shu, Ming

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the potential role of lncRNA CCAT1 in the progression of pancreatic cancer (PC) and to reveal its possible molecular mechanism. The expression of CCAT1 was analyzed in PC tissues and their adjacent normal tissues from patients diagnosed with PC and in two pancreas cancer cell lines, namely PANC-1 and Aspc-1 using real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and western blot, respectively. The effects of CCAT1 expression on cell proliferation, cell cycle, and migration were analyzed using MTT assay, flow cytometry, and transwell assay, respectively. The effects of c-Myc expression on the expression of CCAT1 and E-box were also analyzed using RNA immunoprecipitation (RIP) and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays, respectively. The results showed that CCAT1 was highly expressed in PC tissues compared to the adjacent tissues (P<0.01) and was also overexpressed in PANC-1 and Aspc-1 cells (P<0.05). The silencing of CCAT1 significantly inhibited cell proliferation and migration (P<0.05), arrested cell cycle at G0/G1 stage, and decreased cyclin D1 expression (P<0.05). An increased expression of c-Myc was observed in the PC tissues compared to the adjacent tissues. We found that suppression of c-Myc altered CCAT1 expression by targeting its promoter at E-box. This study demonstrated that c-Myc-activated CCAT1 may contribute to tumorigenesis and metastasis of PC, which may serve as a potential target for the therapy of PC. PMID:28078015

  4. Regulator of calcineurin 1 modulates cancer cell migration in vitro.

    PubMed

    Espinosa, Allan V; Shinohara, Motoo; Porchia, Leonardo M; Chung, Yun Jae; McCarty, Samantha; Saji, Motoyasu; Ringel, Matthew D

    2009-01-01

    Metastasis suppressors and other regulators of cell motility play an important role in tumor invasion and metastases. We previously identified that activation of the G protein coupled receptor 54 (GPR54) by the metastasis suppressor metastin inhibits cell migration in association with overexpression of Regulator of calcineurin 1 (RCAN1), an endogenous regulator of calcineurin. Calcineurin inhibitors also blocked cell migration in vitro and RCAN1 protein levels were reduced in nodal metastases in thyroid cancer. The purpose of the current study was to determine directly if RCAN1 functions as a motility suppressor in vitro. Several cancer cell lines derived from different cancer types with different motility rates were evaluated for RCAN1 expression levels. Using these systems we determined that reduction of endogenous RCAN1 using siRNA resulted in an increase in cancer cell motility while expression of exogenous RCAN1 reduced cell motility. In one cell line with a high migratory rate, the stability of exogenously expressed RCAN1 protein was reduced and was rescued by treatment with a proteasome inhibitor. Finally, overexpression of RCAN1 was associated with an increase in cell adhesion to collagen IV and reduced calcineurin activity. In summary, we have demonstrated that the expression of exogenous RCAN1 reduces migration and alters adhesion; and that the loss of endogenous RCAN1 leads to an increase in migration in the examined cancer cell lines. These results are consistent with a regulatory role for RCAN1 in cancer cell motility in vitro.

  5. A Novel Collagen Dot Assay for Monitoring Cancer Cell Migration.

    PubMed

    Alford, Vincent M; Roth, Eric; Zhang, Qian; Cao, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Cell migration is a critical determinant of cancer invasion and metastasis. Drugs targeting cancer cell migration have been hindered due to the lack of effective assays for monitoring cancer cell migration. Here we describe a novel method to microscopically monitor cell migration in a quantitative fashion. This assay can be used to study genes involved in cancer cell migration, as well as screening anticancer drugs that target this cellular process.

  6. Guidance signalling regulates leading edge behaviour during collective cell migration of cardiac cells in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Raza, Qanber; Jacobs, J Roger

    2016-11-15

    Collective cell migration is the coordinated movement of cells, which organize tissues during morphogenesis, repair and some cancers. The motile cell membrane of the advancing front in collective cell migration is termed the Leading Edge. The embryonic development of the vertebrate and Drosophila hearts are both characterized by the coordinated medial migration of a bilateral cluster of mesodermal cells. In Drosophila, the cardioblasts form cohesive bilateral rows that migrate collectively as a unit towards the dorsal midline to form the dorsal vessel. We have characterized the collective cell migration of cardioblasts as an in vivo quantitative model to study the behaviour of the Leading Edge. We investigated whether guidance signalling through Slit and Netrin pathways plays a role in cell migration during heart development. Through time-lapse imaging and quantitative assessment of migratory behaviour of the cardioblasts in loss-of-function mutants, we demonstrate that both Slit and Netrin mediated signals are autonomously and concomitantly required to maximize migration velocity, filopodial and lamellipodial activities. Additionally, we show that another Slit and Netrin receptor, Dscam1, the role of which during heart development was previously unknown, is required for both normal migration of cardioblasts and luminal expansion. Leading edge behaviour analysis revealed a dosage dependent genetic interaction between Slit and Netrin receptors suggesting that downstream signalling through these receptors converge on a common output that increases leading edge activity of the cardioblasts. Finally, we found that guidance signalling maintains the balance between epithelial and mesenchymal characteristics of the migrating cardioblasts.

  7. Study of cell migration in microfabricated channels.

    PubMed

    Vargas, Pablo; Terriac, Emmanuel; Lennon-Duménil, Ana-Maria; Piel, Matthieu

    2014-02-21

    The method described here allows the study of cell migration under confinement in one dimension. It is based on the use of microfabricated channels, which impose a polarized phenotype to cells by physical constraints. Once inside channels, cells have only two possibilities: move forward or backward. This simplified migration in which directionality is restricted facilitates the automatic tracking of cells and the extraction of quantitative parameters to describe cell movement. These parameters include cell velocity, changes in direction, and pauses during motion. Microchannels are also compatible with the use of fluorescent markers and are therefore suitable to study localization of intracellular organelles and structures during cell migration at high resolution. Finally, the surface of the channels can be functionalized with different substrates, allowing the control of the adhesive properties of the channels or the study of haptotaxis. In summary, the system here described is intended to analyze the migration of large cell numbers in conditions in which both the geometry and the biochemical nature of the environment are controlled, facilitating the normalization and reproducibility of independent experiments.

  8. Cell-Substrate Interactions Feedback to Direct Cell Migration along or against Morphological Polarization

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Girish; Ho, Chia-Chi; Co, Carlos C.

    2015-01-01

    In response to external stimuli, cells polarize morphologically into teardrop shapes prior to moving in the direction of their blunt leading edge through lamellipodia extension and retraction of the rear tip. This textbook description of cell migration implies that the initial polarization sets the direction of cell migration. Using microfabrication techniques to control cell morphologies and the direction of migration without gradients, we demonstrate that after polarization, lamelipodia extension and attachment can feedback to change and even reverse the initial morphological polarization. Cells do indeed migrate faster in the direction of their morphologically polarization. However, feedback from subsequent lamellipodia extension and attachment can be so powerful as to induce cells to reverse and migrate against their initial polarization, albeit at a slower speed. Constitutively active mutants of RhoA show that RhoA stimulates cell motility when cells are guided either along or against their initial polarization. Cdc42 activation and inhibition, which results in loss of directional motility during chemotaxis, only reduces the speed of migration without altering the directionality of migration on the micropatterns. These results reveal significant differences between substrate directed cell migration and that induced by chemotactic gradients. PMID:26186588

  9. Collective cell migration: guidance principles and hierarchies.

    PubMed

    Haeger, Anna; Wolf, Katarina; Zegers, Mirjam M; Friedl, Peter

    2015-09-01

    Collective cell migration results from the establishment and maintenance of collective polarization, mechanocoupling, and cytoskeletal kinetics. The guidance of collective cell migration depends on a reciprocal process between cell-intrinsic multicellular organization with leader-follower cell behavior and results in mechanosensory integration of extracellular guidance cues. Important guidance mechanisms include chemotaxis, haptotaxis, durotaxis, and strain-induced mechanosensing to move cell groups along interfaces and paths of least resistance. Additional guidance mechanisms steering cell groups during specialized conditions comprise electrotaxis and passive drift. To form higher-order cell and tissue structures during morphogenesis and cancer invasion, these guidance principles act in parallel and are integrated for collective adaptation to and shaping of varying tissue environments. We review mechanochemical and electrical inputs and multiparameter signal integration underlying collective guidance, decision making, and outcome.

  10. In vitro cell migration and invasion assays.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Nina; Walzl, Angelika; Unger, Christine; Rosner, Margit; Krupitza, Georg; Hengstschläger, Markus; Dolznig, Helmut

    2013-01-01

    Determining the migratory and invasive capacity of tumor and stromal cells and clarifying the underlying mechanisms is most relevant for novel strategies in cancer diagnosis, prognosis, drug development and treatment. Here we shortly summarize the different modes of cell travelling and review in vitro methods, which can be used to evaluate migration and invasion. We provide a concise summary of established migration/invasion assays described in the literature, list advantages, limitations and drawbacks, give a tabular overview for convenience and depict the basic principles of the assays graphically. In many cases particular research problems and specific cell types do not leave a choice for a broad variety of usable assays. However, for most standard applications using adherent cells, based on our experience we suggest to use exclusion zone assays to evaluate migration/invasion. We substantiate our choice by demonstrating that the advantages outbalance the drawbacks e.g. the simple setup, the easy readout, the kinetic analysis, the evaluation of cell morphology and the feasibility to perform the assay with standard laboratory equipment. Finally, innovative 3D migration and invasion models including heterotypic cell interactions are discussed. These methods recapitulate the in vivo situation most closely. Results obtained with these assays have already shed new light on cancer cell spreading and potentially will uncover unknown mechanisms.

  11. The splicing activator DAZAP1 integrates splicing control into MEK/Erk-regulated cell proliferation and migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhury, Rajarshi; Roy, Sreerupa Ghose; Tsai, Yihsuan S.; Tripathy, Ashutosh; Graves, Lee M.; Wang, Zefeng

    2014-01-01

    Alternative splicing of pre-messenger RNA (mRNA) is a critical stage of gene regulation in response to environmental stimuli. Here we show that DAZAP1, an RNA-binding protein involved in mammalian development and spermatogenesis, promotes inclusion of weak exons through specific recognition of diverse cis-elements. The carboxy-terminal proline-rich domain of DAZAP1 interacts with and neutralizes general splicing inhibitors, and is sufficient to activate splicing when recruited to pre-mRNA. This domain is phosphorylated by the MEK/Erk (extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase) pathway and this modification is essential for the splicing regulatory activity and the nuclear/cytoplasmic translocation of DAZAP1. Using mRNA-seq, we identify endogenous splicing events regulated by DAZAP1, many of which are involved in maintaining cell growth. Knockdown or over-expression of DAZAP1 causes a cell proliferation defect. Taken together, these studies reveal a molecular mechanism that integrates splicing control into MEK/Erk-regulated cell proliferation.

  12. Controlled architectural and chemotactic studies of 3D cell migration.

    PubMed

    Tayalia, Prakriti; Mazur, Eric; Mooney, David J

    2011-04-01

    Chemotaxis plays a critical role in tissue development and wound repair, and is widely studied using ex vivo model systems in applications such as immunotherapy. However, typical chemotactic models employ 2D systems that are less physiologically relevant or use end-point assays, that reveal little about the stepwise dynamics of the migration process. To overcome these limitations, we developed a new model system using microfabrication techniques, sustained drug delivery approaches, and theoretical modeling of chemotactic agent diffusion. This model system allows us to study the effects of 3D architecture and chemotactic agent gradient on immune cell migration in real time. We find that dendritic cell migration is characterized by a strong interplay between matrix architecture and chemotactic gradients, and migration is also influenced dramatically by the cell activation state. Our results indicate that Lipopolysaccharide-activated dendritic cells studied in a traditional transwell system actually exhibit anomalous migration behavior. Such a 3D ex vivo system lends itself for analyzing cell migratory behavior in response to single or multiple competitive cues and could prove useful in vaccine development.

  13. Active migration and passive transport of malaria parasites.

    PubMed

    Douglas, Ross G; Amino, Rogerio; Sinnis, Photini; Frischknecht, Freddy

    2015-08-01

    Malaria parasites undergo a complex life cycle between their hosts and vectors. During this cycle the parasites invade different types of cells, migrate across barriers, and transfer from one host to another. Recent literature hints at a misunderstanding of the difference between active, parasite-driven migration and passive, circulation-driven movement of the parasite or parasite-infected cells in the various bodily fluids of mosquito and mammalian hosts. Because both active migration and passive transport could be targeted in different ways to interfere with the parasite, a distinction between the two ways the parasite uses to get from one location to another is essential. We discuss the two types of motion needed for parasite dissemination and elaborate on how they could be targeted by future vaccines or drugs.

  14. Protein kinase A and regulation of neonatal Nav1.5 expression in human breast cancer cells: activity-dependent positive feedback and cellular migration.

    PubMed

    Chioni, Athina-Myrto; Shao, Dongmin; Grose, Richard; Djamgoz, Mustafa B A

    2010-02-01

    Voltage-gated Na(+) channels (VGSCs) are expressed in excitable cells (e.g. neurons and muscles), as well as in some classically 'non-excitable' cells (e.g. fibroblasts), and in carcinomas. In general, functional expression of VGSCs in plasma membrane (PM) is hierarchical and dynamic. Previously, we have shown that an activity-dependent positive feedback mechanism involving cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) plays a significant role in upregulation of VGSCs in strongly metastatic rat prostate cancer Mat-LyLu cells expressing Nav1.7. Here, we investigated the possible role of PKA in VGSC regulation and its functional consequences in strongly metastatic human breast cancer (BCa) MDA-MB-231 cells, where the neonatal splice form of Nav1.5 (nNav1.5) is the predominant VGSC present. Treatment with the PKA activator forskolin for 24h increased mRNA and PM protein levels of nNav1.5, without changing the total VGSC protein level. Opposite effects were obtained by application of the PKA inhibitor KT5720 or the highly specific VGSC blocker tetrodotoxin (TTX), the latter implying activity-dependent upregulation. We tested the possibility, therefore, that the activity dependence of VGSC (nNav1.5) expression involved PKA. Indeed, TTX pretreatment reduced the level of phosphorylated PKA and eliminated basal and PKA-stimulated cellular migration. These data suggested that activity-dependent positive feedback mediated by PKA plays an important role in the functional expression of nNav1.5 in BCa, and in turn, this enhances the cells' metastatic potential.

  15. Engineered Models of Confined Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Colin D.; Hung, Wei-Chien; Wirtz, Denis; Konstantopoulos, Konstantinos

    2017-01-01

    Cells in the body are physically confined by neighboring cells, tissues, and the extracellular matrix. Although physical confinement modulates intracellular signaling and the underlying mechanisms of cell migration, it is difficult to study in vivo. Furthermore, traditional two-dimensional cell migration assays do not recapitulate the complex topographies found in the body. Therefore, a number of experimental in vitro models that confine and impose forces on cells in well-defined microenvironments have been engineered. We describe the design and use of microfluidic microchannel devices, grooved substrates, micropatterned lines, vertical confinement devices, patterned hydrogels, and micropipette aspiration assays for studying cell responses to confinement. Use of these devices has enabled the delineation of changes in cytoskeletal reorganization, cell–substrate adhesions, intracellular signaling, nuclear shape, and gene expression that result from physical confinement. These assays and the physiologically relevant signaling pathways that have been elucidated are beginning to have a translational and clinical impact. PMID:27420571

  16. Glial chain migration requires pioneer cells.

    PubMed

    Aigouy, Benoît; Lepelletier, Léa; Giangrande, Angela

    2008-11-05

    The migration of glial chains along the nerve entails directional and coordinated movement. Despite its importance in the formation of the nervous system, this process remains poorly understood, because of the difficulty of manipulating identified cells. Using confocal time-lapse and cell ablation in the whole animal, we provide direct evidence for a discrete number of Drosophila peripheral glial cells acting as pioneers and guiding the rest of the migratory chain. These cells are in direct contact with several follower cells through a very long and stable cytoplasmic extension. The presence of pioneer cells and homotypic interactions at the tip of the chain allows coordinated movement and the formation of a continuous sheath around the nerve. These in vivo data open novel perspectives for understanding the cellular bases of vertebrate glial migration in physiological and pathological conditions.

  17. Chemokine Oligomerization in Cell Signaling and Migration

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xu; Sharp, Joshua S.; Handel, Tracy M.; Prestegard, James H.

    2014-01-01

    Chemokines are small proteins best known for their role in controlling the migration of diverse cells, particularly leukocytes. Upon binding to their G-protein-coupled receptors on the leukocytes, chemokines stimulate the signaling events that cause cytoskeletal rearrangements involved in cell movement, and migration of the cells along chemokine gradients. Depending on the cell type, chemokines also induce many other types of cellular responses including those related to defense mechanisms, cell proliferation, survival, and development. Historically, most research efforts have focused on the interaction of chemokines with their receptors, where monomeric forms of the ligands are the functionally relevant state. More recently, however, the importance of chemokine interactions with cell surface glycosaminoglycans has come to light, and in most cases appears to involve oligomeric chemokine structures. This review summarizes existing knowledge relating to the structure and function of chemokine oligomers, and emerging methodology for determining structures of complex chemokine assemblies in the future. PMID:23663982

  18. Protrusive waves guide 3D cell migration along nanofibers

    PubMed Central

    Guetta-Terrier, Charlotte; Monzo, Pascale; Zhu, Jie; Long, Hongyan; Venkatraman, Lakshmi; Zhou, Yue; Wang, PeiPei; Chew, Sing Yian; Mogilner, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    In vivo, cells migrate on complex three-dimensional (3D) fibrous matrices, which has made investigation of the key molecular and physical mechanisms that drive cell migration difficult. Using reductionist approaches based on 3D electrospun fibers, we report for various cell types that single-cell migration along fibronectin-coated nanofibers is associated with lateral actin-based waves. These cyclical waves have a fin-like shape and propagate up to several hundred micrometers from the cell body, extending the leading edge and promoting highly persistent directional movement. Cells generate these waves through balanced activation of the Rac1/N-WASP/Arp2/3 and Rho/formins pathways. The waves originate from one major adhesion site at leading end of the cell body, which is linked through actomyosin contractility to another site at the back of the cell, allowing force generation, matrix deformation and cell translocation. By combining experimental and modeling data, we demonstrate that cell migration in a fibrous environment requires the formation and propagation of dynamic, actin based fin-like protrusions. PMID:26553933

  19. Protrusive waves guide 3D cell migration along nanofibers.

    PubMed

    Guetta-Terrier, Charlotte; Monzo, Pascale; Zhu, Jie; Long, Hongyan; Venkatraman, Lakshmi; Zhou, Yue; Wang, PeiPei; Chew, Sing Yian; Mogilner, Alexander; Ladoux, Benoit; Gauthier, Nils C

    2015-11-09

    In vivo, cells migrate on complex three-dimensional (3D) fibrous matrices, which has made investigation of the key molecular and physical mechanisms that drive cell migration difficult. Using reductionist approaches based on 3D electrospun fibers, we report for various cell types that single-cell migration along fibronectin-coated nanofibers is associated with lateral actin-based waves. These cyclical waves have a fin-like shape and propagate up to several hundred micrometers from the cell body, extending the leading edge and promoting highly persistent directional movement. Cells generate these waves through balanced activation of the Rac1/N-WASP/Arp2/3 and Rho/formins pathways. The waves originate from one major adhesion site at leading end of the cell body, which is linked through actomyosin contractility to another site at the back of the cell, allowing force generation, matrix deformation and cell translocation. By combining experimental and modeling data, we demonstrate that cell migration in a fibrous environment requires the formation and propagation of dynamic, actin based fin-like protrusions.

  20. Tumor cell migration is a superstatistical process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabry, Ben

    2014-03-01

    Over short time scales, cell migration can be well described as a homogeneous correlated random walk with a fixed average step length and a certain degree of directional persistence. On time scales of up to 24 h, however, the migration process is highly inhomogeneous. Superstatistical fluctuations of step length and directional persistence lead to ``anomalous'' features, such as an exponential step width distribution (SWD) and a superdiffusive mean squared displacement (MSD). These features are quantitatively reproduced by a correlated random walk with temporally varying persistence. By comparing cell migration on planar substrates and in a 3D collagen matrix, we demonstrate that the globally averaged MSD and SWD are not sensitive to the microscopic migration mechanism of the cells and can therefore yield identical results in these different environments. By contrast, the temporal fluctuations of step length and directional persistence, and their mutual correlations, provide a characteristic fingerprint of the migration process in different environments. In collaboration with Julian Steinwachs and Claus Metzner, Department of Physics, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg.

  1. Sphingolipids inhibit vimentin-dependent cell migration.

    PubMed

    Hyder, Claire L; Kemppainen, Kati; Isoniemi, Kimmo O; Imanishi, Susumu Y; Goto, Hidemasa; Inagaki, Masaki; Fazeli, Elnaz; Eriksson, John E; Törnquist, Kid

    2015-06-01

    The sphingolipids, sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) and sphingosylphosphorylcholine (SPC), can induce or inhibit cellular migration. The intermediate filament protein vimentin is an inducer of migration and a marker for epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Given that keratin intermediate filaments are regulated by SPC, with consequences for cell motility, we wanted to determine whether vimentin is also regulated by sphingolipid signalling and whether it is a determinant for sphingolipid-mediated functions. In cancer cells where S1P and SPC inhibited migration, we observed that S1P and SPC induced phosphorylation of vimentin on S71, leading to a corresponding reorganization of vimentin filaments. These effects were sphingolipid-signalling-dependent, because inhibition of either the S1P2 receptor (also known as S1PR2) or its downstream effector Rho-associated kinase (ROCK, for which there are two isoforms ROCK1 and ROCK2) nullified the sphingolipid-induced effects on vimentin organization and S71 phosphorylation. Furthermore, the anti-migratory effect of S1P and SPC could be prevented by expressing S71-phosphorylation-deficient vimentin. In addition, we demonstrated, by using wild-type and vimentin-knockout mouse embryonic fibroblasts, that the sphingolipid-mediated inhibition of migration is dependent on vimentin. These results imply that this newly discovered sphingolipid-vimentin signalling axis exerts brake-and-throttle functions in the regulation of cell migration.

  2. Saussurea lappa Clarke-Derived Costunolide Prevents TNF α -Induced Breast Cancer Cell Migration and Invasion by Inhibiting NF- κ B Activity.

    PubMed

    Choi, Youn Kyung; Cho, Sung-Gook; Woo, Sang-Mi; Yun, Yee Jin; Jo, Jeakyung; Kim, Wooyoung; Shin, Yong Cheol; Ko, Seong-Gyu

    2013-01-01

    Saussurea lappa Clarke (SLC) has been used as a traditional medicine in Korea, China, and Japan for the treatment of abdominal pain and tenesmus. Costunolide, a sesquiterpene lactone isolated from SLC, has diverse medicinal effects. However, the anticancer effects of costunolide are still unclear in breast cancer. In this study, we demonstrate that costunolide suppresses tumor growth and metastases of MDA-MB-231 highly metastatic human breast cancer cells via inhibiting TNFα-induced NF-κB activation. Costunolide inhibited MDA-MB-231 tumor growth and metastases without affecting body weights in the in vivo mouse orthotopic tumor growth assays. In addition, costunolide inhibited in vitro TNFα-induced invasion and migration of MDA-MB-231 cells. Costunolide further suppressed TNFα-induced NF-κB signaling activation, resulting in a reduced expression of MMP-9, a well-known NF-κB-dependent gene to mediate breast cancer cell growth and metastases. Therefore, we conclude that SLC and its derivative costunolide suppress breast cancer growth and metastases by inhibiting TNFα-induced NF-κB activation, suggesting that costunolide as well as SLC may be promising anticancer drugs, especially for metastatic breast cancer.

  3. NEU1 and NEU3 sialidase activity expressed in human lung microvascular endothelia: NEU1 restrains endothelial cell migration, whereas NEU3 does not.

    PubMed

    Cross, Alan S; Hyun, Sang Won; Miranda-Ribera, Alba; Feng, Chiguang; Liu, Anguo; Nguyen, Chinh; Zhang, Lei; Luzina, Irina G; Atamas, Sergei P; Twaddell, William S; Guang, Wei; Lillehoj, Erik P; Puché, Adam C; Huang, Wei; Wang, Lai-Xi; Passaniti, Antonino; Goldblum, Simeon E

    2012-05-04

    The microvascular endothelial surface expresses multiple molecules whose sialylation state regulates multiple aspects of endothelial function. To better regulate these sialoproteins, we asked whether endothelial cells (ECs) might express one or more catalytically active sialidases. Human lung microvascular EC lysates contained heat-labile sialidase activity for a fluorogenic substrate, 2'-(4-methylumbelliferyl)-α-D-N-acetylneuraminic acid (4-MU-NANA), that was dose-dependently inhibited by the competitive sialidase inhibitor, 2,3-dehydro-2-deoxy-N-acetylneuraminic acid but not its negative control. The EC lysates also contained sialidase activity for a ganglioside mixture. Using real time RT-PCR to detect mRNAs for the four known mammalian sialidases, NEU1, -2, -3, and -4, NEU1 mRNA was expressed at levels 2700-fold higher that those found for NEU2, -3, or -4. Western analyses indicated NEU1 and -3 protein expression. Using confocal microscopy and flow cytometry, NEU1 was immunolocalized to both the plasma membrane and the perinuclear region. NEU3 was detected both in the cytosol and nucleus. Prior siRNA-mediated knockdown of NEU1 and NEU3 each decreased EC sialidase activity for 4-MU-NANA by >65 and >17%, respectively, and for the ganglioside mixture by 0 and 40%, respectively. NEU1 overexpression in ECs reduced their migration into a wound by >40%, whereas NEU3 overexpression did not. Immunohistochemical studies of normal human tissues immunolocalized NEU1 and NEU3 proteins to both pulmonary and extrapulmonary vascular endothelia. These combined data indicate that human lung microvascular ECs as well as other endothelia express catalytically active NEU1 and NEU3. NEU1 restrains EC migration, whereas NEU3 does not.

  4. HMGCR positively regulated the growth and migration of glioblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Zhihua; Yuan, Wen; Chen, Tao; Zhou, Chenzhi; Liu, Chao; Huang, Yongkai; Han, Deqing; Huang, Qinghui

    2016-01-15

    The metabolic program of cancer cells is significant different from the normal cells, which makes it possible to develop novel strategies targeting cancer cells. Mevalonate pathway and its rate-limiting enzyme HMG-CoA reductase (HMGCR) have shown important roles in the progression of several cancer types. However, their roles in glioblastoma cells remain unknown. In this study, up-regulation of HMGCR in the clinical glioblastoma samples was observed. Forced expression of HMGCR promoted the growth and migration of U251 and U373 cells, while knocking down the expression of HMGCR inhibited the growth, migration and metastasis of glioblastoma cells. Molecular mechanism studies revealed that HMGCR positively regulated the expression of TAZ, an important mediator of Hippo pathway, and the downstream target gene connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), suggesting HMGCR might activate Hippo pathway in glioblastoma cells. Taken together, our study demonstrated the oncogenic roles of HMGCR in glioblastoma cells and HMGCR might be a promising therapeutic target.

  5. Cell migration on ridges and cliffs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Driscoll, Meghan; McCann, Colin; Kopace, Rael; Watts, John; Homan, Tess; Losert, Wolfgang

    2009-03-01

    The amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum is a model system for the study of cellular migration, an important physiological process that occurs in embryonic development, wound healing, and cancer metastasis. We study the motion of D. discoideum on surfaces with various topographies, particularly those that affect the direction of cellular migration. Topographical features, such as ridges and cliffs, were fabricated using multiphoton absorption polymerization. As the cells encountered these topographical features, we tracked their overall motions and shapes, as well as the locations and intensities of certain intracellular signals. We found that when cells undergoing chemokinesis, random migration in response to a chemical signal, encounter a ridge, they tend to move along that ridge, even if the ridge is shorter than the cell. When cells undergoing chemotaxis, directed migration in response to a chemical signal, are directed off of a cliff, they do not fall off the cliff. Instead, they search for new attachment points, eventually change direction, and continue moving along the edge of the cliff. Both ridges and cliffs affect more than just the motion of a cell; they also affect its shape.

  6. High concentration of branched-chain amino acids promotes oxidative stress, inflammation and migration of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells via mTORC1 activation.

    PubMed

    Zhenyukh, Olha; Civantos, Esther; Ruiz-Ortega, Marta; Sánchez, Maria Soledad; Vázquez, Clotilde; Peiró, Concepción; Egido, Jesús; Mas, Sebastián

    2017-03-01

    Leucine, isoleucine and valine are essential aminoacids termed branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) due to its aliphatic side-chain. In several pathological and physiological conditions increased BCAA plasma concentrations have been described. Elevated BCAA levels predict insulin resistance development. Moreover, BCAA levels higher than 2mmol/L are neurotoxic by inducing microglial activation in maple syrup urine disease. However, there are no studies about the direct effects of BCAA in circulating cells. We have explored whether BCAA could promote oxidative stress and pro-inflammatory status in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) obtained from healthy donors. In cultured PBMCs, 10mmol/L BCAA increased the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) via both NADPH oxidase and the mitochondria, and activated Akt-mTOR signalling. By using several inhibitors and activators of these molecular pathways we have described that mTOR activation by BCAA is linked to ROS production and mitochondrial dysfunction. BCAA stimulated the activation of the redox-sensitive transcription factor NF-κB, which resulted in the release of pro-inflammatory molecules, such as interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-α, intracellular adhesion molecule-1 or CD40L, and the migration of PBMCs. In conclusion, elevated BCAA blood levels can promote the activation of circulating PBMCs, by a mechanism that involving ROS production and NF-κB pathway activation. These data suggest that high concentrations of BCAA could exert deleterious effects on circulating blood cells and therefore contribute to the pro-inflammatory and oxidative status observed in several pathophysiological conditions.

  7. Exogenous hydrogen sulfide exerts proliferation/anti-apoptosis/angiogenesis/migration effects via amplifying the activation of NF-κB pathway in PLC/PRF/5 hepatoma cells.

    PubMed

    Zhen, Yulan; Pan, Wanying; Hu, Fen; Wu, Hongfu; Feng, Jianqiang; Zhang, Ying; Chen, Jingfu

    2015-05-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) takes part in a diverse range of intracellular pathways and hss physical and pathological properties in vitro and in vivo. However, the effects of H2S on cancer are controversial and remain unclear. The present study investigates the effects of H2S on liver cancer progression via activating NF-κB pathway in PLC/PRF/5 hepatoma cells. PLC/PRF/5 hepatoma cells were pretreated with 500 µmol/l NaHS (a donor of H2S) for 24 h. The expression levels of CSE, CBS, phosphosphorylate (p)-NF-κB p65, caspase-3, COX-2, p-IκB and MMP-2 were measured by western blot assay. Cell viability was detected by cell counter kit 8 (CCK-8). Apoptotic cells were observed by Hoechst 33258 staining assay. The production level of H2S in cell culture medium was measured by using the sulfur-sensitive electrode method. The production of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) was tested by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Our results showed that the production of H2S was dramatically increased in the PLC/PRF/5 hepatoma cells, compared with human LO2 hepatocyte cells group, along with the overexpression levels of CSE and CBS. Treatment of PLC/PRF/5 hepatoma cells with 500 µmol/l NaHS (a donor of H2S) for 24 h markedly increased the expression levels of CSE, CBS, p-IκB and NF-κB activation, leading to COX-2 and MMP-2 overexpression, and decreased caspase-3 production, as well as increased cell viability and decreased number of apoptotic cells. Otherwise, the production level of H2S and VEGF were also significantly increased. Furthermore, co-treatment of PLC/PRF/5 hepatoma cells with 500 µmol/l NaHS and 200 µmol/l PDTC for 24 h significantly overturned these indexes. The findings of the present study provide evidence that the NF-κB is involved in the NaHS-induced cell proliferation, anti-apoptisis, angiogenesis, and migration in PLC/PRF/5 hepatoma cells, and that the PDTC against the NaHS-induced effects were by inhibition of the NF-κB pathway.

  8. Towing of sensory axons by their migrating target cells in vivo.

    PubMed

    Gilmour, Darren; Knaut, Holger; Maischein, Hans-Martin; Nüsslein-Volhard, Christiane

    2004-05-01

    Many pathfinding axons must locate target fields that are themselves positioned by active migration. A hypothetical method for ensuring that these migrations are coordinated is towing, whereby the extension of axons is entirely dependent on the migration of their target cells. Here we combine genetics and time-lapse imaging in the zebrafish to show that towing by migrating cells is a bona fide mechanism for guiding pathfinding axons in vivo.

  9. Impact of jamming on collective cell migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nnetu, Kenechukwu David; Knorr, Melanie; Pawlizak, Steve; Fuhs, Thomas; Zink, Mareike; KäS, Josef A.

    2012-02-01

    Multi-cellular migration plays an important role in physiological processes such as embryogenesis, cancer metastasis and tissue repair. During migration, single cells undergo cycles of extension, adhesion and retraction resulting in morphological changes. In a confluent monolayer, there are inter-cellular interactions and crowding, however, the impact of these interactions on the dynamics and elasticity of the monolayer at the multi-cellular and single cell level is not well understood. Here we study the dynamics of a confluent epithelial monolayer by simultaneously measuring cell motion at the multi-cellular and single cell level for various cell densities and tensile elasticity. At the multi-cellular level, the system exhibited spatial kinetic transitions from isotropic to anisotropic migration on long times and the velocity of the monolayer decreased with increasing cell density. Moreover, the dynamics was spatially and temporally heterogeneous. Interestingly, the dynamics was also heterogeneous in wound-healing assays and the correlation length was fitted by compressed exponential. On the single cell scale, we observed transient caging effects with increasing cage rearrangement times as the system age due to an increase in density. Also, the density dependent elastic modulus of the monolayer scaled as a weak power law. Together, these findings suggest that caging effects at the single cell level initiates a slow and heterogeneous dynamics at the multi-cellular level which is similar to the glassy dynamics of deformable colloidal systems.

  10. How Tissue Mechanical Properties Affect Enteric Neural Crest Cell Migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chevalier, N. R.; Gazguez, E.; Bidault, L.; Guilbert, T.; Vias, C.; Vian, E.; Watanabe, Y.; Muller, L.; Germain, S.; Bondurand, N.; Dufour, S.; Fleury, V.

    2016-02-01

    Neural crest cells (NCCs) are a population of multipotent cells that migrate extensively during vertebrate development. Alterations to neural crest ontogenesis cause several diseases, including cancers and congenital defects, such as Hirschprung disease, which results from incomplete colonization of the colon by enteric NCCs (ENCCs). We investigated the influence of the stiffness and structure of the environment on ENCC migration in vitro and during colonization of the gastrointestinal tract in chicken and mouse embryos. We showed using tensile stretching and atomic force microscopy (AFM) that the mesenchyme of the gut was initially soft but gradually stiffened during the period of ENCC colonization. Second-harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy revealed that this stiffening was associated with a gradual organization and enrichment of collagen fibers in the developing gut. Ex-vivo 2D cell migration assays showed that ENCCs migrated on substrates with very low levels of stiffness. In 3D collagen gels, the speed of the ENCC migratory front decreased with increasing gel stiffness, whereas no correlation was found between porosity and ENCC migration behavior. Metalloprotease inhibition experiments showed that ENCCs actively degraded collagen in order to progress. These results shed light on the role of the mechanical properties of tissues in ENCC migration during development.

  11. How Tissue Mechanical Properties Affect Enteric Neural Crest Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Chevalier, N.R.; Gazguez, E.; Bidault, L.; Guilbert, T.; Vias, C.; Vian, E.; Watanabe, Y.; Muller, L.; Germain, S.; Bondurand, N.; Dufour, S.; Fleury, V.

    2016-01-01

    Neural crest cells (NCCs) are a population of multipotent cells that migrate extensively during vertebrate development. Alterations to neural crest ontogenesis cause several diseases, including cancers and congenital defects, such as Hirschprung disease, which results from incomplete colonization of the colon by enteric NCCs (ENCCs). We investigated the influence of the stiffness and structure of the environment on ENCC migration in vitro and during colonization of the gastrointestinal tract in chicken and mouse embryos. We showed using tensile stretching and atomic force microscopy (AFM) that the mesenchyme of the gut was initially soft but gradually stiffened during the period of ENCC colonization. Second-harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy revealed that this stiffening was associated with a gradual organization and enrichment of collagen fibers in the developing gut. Ex-vivo 2D cell migration assays showed that ENCCs migrated on substrates with very low levels of stiffness. In 3D collagen gels, the speed of the ENCC migratory front decreased with increasing gel stiffness, whereas no correlation was found between porosity and ENCC migration behavior. Metalloprotease inhibition experiments showed that ENCCs actively degraded collagen in order to progress. These results shed light on the role of the mechanical properties of tissues in ENCC migration during development. PMID:26887292

  12. Signal Relay During Cell Migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guven, Can; Rericha, Erin; Ott, Edward; Losert, Wolfgang

    2012-02-01

    We developed a signal relay model to quantify the effect of intercellular communication in presence of an external signal, during the motion of groups of Dictyostelium discoideum cells. A key parameter is the ratio of amplitude of the cAMP (cyclic adenosine monophosphate) a signaling chemical secreted from individual cells versus the external cAMP field, which defines a time scale. Another time scale is set by the degradation rate of the cAMP. In our simulations, the competition between these two time scales results rich dynamics including uniform motion, as well as streaming and clustering instabilities. The simulations are compared to experiments for a wide range of different external signal strengths for both cells that secrete cAMP and a mutant which cannot relay cAMP. Under different strength of external linear cAMP gradient, the wild type cells form streams and exhibit clustering due to the intercellular signaling through individual cAMP secretion. In contrast, cells lacking signal relay move relatively straight. We find that the model captures both independent motion and the formation of aggregates when cells relay the signal.

  13. Myosin IIA dependent retrograde flow drives 3D cell migration.

    PubMed

    Shih, Wenting; Yamada, Soichiro

    2010-04-21

    Epithelial cell migration is an essential part of embryogenesis and tissue regeneration, yet their migration is least understood. Using our three-dimensional (3D) motility analysis, migrating epithelial cells formed an atypical polarized cell shape with the nucleus leading the cell front and a contractile cell rear. Migrating epithelial cells exerted traction forces to deform both the anterior and posterior extracellular matrix toward the cell body. The cell leading edge exhibited a myosin II-dependent retrograde flow with the magnitude and direction consistent with surrounding network deformation. Interestingly, on a two-dimensional substrate, myosin IIA-deficient cells migrated faster than wild-type cells, but in a 3D gel, these myosin IIA-deficient cells were unpolarized and immobile. In contrast, the migration rates of myosin IIB-deficient cells were similar to wild-type cells. Therefore, myosin IIA, not myosin IIB, is required for 3D epithelial cell migration.

  14. DLC-1, a GTPase-activating protein for Rho, is associated with cell proliferation, morphology, and migration in human hepatocellular carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Tai Young; Lee, Jung Weon; Kim, Hwang-Phill; Jong, Hyun-Soon; Kim, Tae-You; Jung, Mira; Bang, Yung-Jue; E-mail: bangyj@plaza.snu.ac.kr

    2007-03-30

    DLC-1 (deleted in liver cancer-1) is a tumor suppressor gene for hepatocellular carcinoma and other cancers. To characterize its functions, we constructed recombinant adenovirus encoding the wild-type DLC-1 and examined its effects on behaviors of a hepatocellular carcinoma cell line (SNU-368), which does not express DLC-1. Here, we found that restoration of DLC-1 expression in the SNU-368 cells caused an inhibition of cell proliferation with an increase of a subG1 population. Furthermore, DLC-1 overexpression induced disassembly of stress fibers and extensive membrane protrusions around cells on laminin-1. DLC-1 overexpression also inhibited cell migration and dephosphorylated focal adhesion proteins such as focal adhesion kinase (FAK), Cas (p130Cas; Crk-associated substrate), and paxillin. These observations suggest that DLC-1 plays important roles in signal transduction pathway regulating cell proliferation, cell morphology, and cell migration by affecting Rho family GTPases and focal adhesion proteins.

  15. Inflammatory Levels of Nitric Oxide Inhibit Airway Epithelial Cell Migration by Inhibition of the Kinase ERK1/2 and Activation of Hypoxia-inducible Factor-1α*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Bove, Peter F.; Hristova, Milena; Wesley, Umadevi V.; Olson, Nels; Lounsbury, Karen M.; van der Vliet, Albert

    2008-01-01

    Increased synthesis of NO during airway inflammation, caused by induction of nitric-oxide synthase 2 in several lung cell types, may contribute to epithelial injury and permeability. To investigate the consequence of elevated NO production on epithelial function, we exposed cultured monolayers of human bronchial epithelial cells to the NO donor diethylenetriaamine NONOate. At concentrations generating high nanomolar levels of NO, representative of inflammatory conditions, diethylenetriaamine NONOate markedly reduced wound closure in an in vitro scratch injury model, primarily by inhibiting epithelial cell migration. Analysis of signaling pathways and gene expression profiles indicated a rapid induction of the mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase (MPK)-1 and decrease in extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2 activation, as well as marked stabilization of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α and activation of hypoxia-responsive genes, under these conditions. Inhibition of ERK1/2 signaling using U0126 enhanced HIF-1α stabilization, implicating ERK1/2 dephosphorylation as a contributing mechanism in NO-mediated HIF-1α activation. Activation of HIF-1α by the hypoxia mimic cobalt chloride, or cell transfection with a degradation-resistant HIF-1α mutant construct inhibited epithelial wound repair, implicating HIF-1α in NO-mediated inhibition of cell migration. Conversely, NO-mediated inhibition of epithelial wound closure was largely prevented after small interfering RNA suppression of HIF-1α. Finally, NO-mediated inhibition of cell migration was associated with HIF-1α-dependent induction of PAI-1 and activation of p53, both negative regulators of epithelial cell migration. Collectively, our results demonstrate that inflammatory levels of NO inhibit epithelial cell migration, because of suppression of ERK1/2 signaling, and activation of HIF-1α and p53, with potential consequences for epithelial repair and remodeling during airway inflammation. PMID

  16. Paxillin-kinase-linker tyrosine phosphorylation regulates directional cell migration.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jianxin A; Deakin, Nicholas O; Turner, Christopher E

    2009-11-01

    Directed cell migration requires the coordination of growth factor and cell adhesion signaling and is of fundamental importance during embryonic development, wound repair, and pathological conditions such as tumor metastasis. Herein, we demonstrate that the ArfGAP, paxillin-kinase-linker (PKL/GIT2), is tyrosine phosphorylated in response to platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) stimulation, in an adhesion dependent manner and is necessary for directed cell migration. Using a combination of pharmacological inhibitors, knockout cells and kinase mutants, FAK, and Src family kinases were shown to mediate PDGF-dependent PKL tyrosine phosphorylation. In fibroblasts, expression of a PKL mutant lacking the principal tyrosine phosphorylation sites resulted in loss of wound-induced cell polarization as well as directional migration. PKL phosphorylation was necessary for PDGF-stimulated PKL binding to the focal adhesion protein paxillin and expression of paxillin or PKL mutants defective in their respective binding motifs recapitulated the polarization defects. RNA interference or expression of phosphorylation mutants of PKL resulted in disregulation of PDGF-stimulated Rac1 and PAK activities, reduction of Cdc42 and Erk signaling, as well as mislocalization of betaPIX. Together these studies position PKL as an integral component of growth factor and cell adhesion cross-talk signaling, controlling the development of front-rear cell polarity and directional cell migration.

  17. Magnolol suppresses metastasis via inhibition of invasion, migration, and matrix metalloproteinase-2/-9 activities in PC-3 human prostate carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Eun-Sun; Park, Kwang-Kyun

    2010-01-01

    Magnolol, a hydroxylated biphenyl compound isolated from the root and stem bark of Magnolia officinalis, has been reported to have anticancer activity, but little is known about its molecular mechanisms of action. Increased expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), a key enzyme in arachidonic acid metabolism, has been identified in many cancer types. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are enzymes involved in various steps of metastasis development. The objective of this study was to study the effects of magnolol on cancer invasion and metastasis using PC-3 human prostate carcinoma cells. Cellular proliferation was determined by MTT colorimetric assay. Magnolol inhibited cell growth in a dose-dependent manner. In an invasion assay conducted in Transwell chambers, magnolol showed 33 and 98% inhibition of cancer cell at 10 microM and 20 microM concentrations, respectively, compared to the control. The expression of MMP-2/-9 and COX-1/-2 was assessed by gelatin zymography and Western blot respectively. The protein and mRNA levels of both MMP-2 and MMP-9 were down-regulated by magnolol treatment in a dose-dependent manner. These results demonstrate the antimetastatic properties of magnolol in inhibiting the adhesion, invasion, and migration of PC-3 human prostate cancer cells.

  18. H3K27 acetylation activated-long non-coding RNA CCAT1 affects cell proliferation and migration by regulating SPRY4 and HOXB13 expression in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Erbao; Han, Liang; Yin, Dandan; He, Xuezhi; Hong, Linzhi; Si, Xinxin; Qiu, Mantang; Xu, Tongpeng; De, Wei; Xu, Lin; Shu, Yongqian; Chen, Jinfei

    2016-12-11

    Recently, long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been shown to have important regulatory roles in human cancer biology. In our study, we found that lncRNA CCAT1, whose expression is significantly increased and is correlated with outcomes in Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma (ESCC). Consecutive experiments confirmed that H3K27-acetylation could activate expression of colon cancer associated transcript-1 (CCAT1). Further experiments revealed that CCAT1 knockdown significantly repressed the proliferation and migration both in vitro and in vivo RNA-seq analysis revealed that CCAT1 knockdown preferentially affected genes that are linked to cell proliferation, cell migration and cell adhesion. Mechanistic investigations found that CCAT1 could serve as a scaffold for two distinct epigenetic modification complexes (5' domain of CCAT1 binding Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 (PRC2) while 3' domain of CCAT1 binding SUV39H1) and modulate the histone methylation of promoter of SPRY4 (sprouty RTK signaling antagonist 4) in nucleus. In cytoplasm, CCAT1 regulates HOXB13 as a molecular decoy for miR-7, a microRNA that targets both CCAT1 and HOXB13, thus facilitating cell growth and migration. Together, our data demonstrated the important roles of CCAT1 in ESCC oncogenesis and might serve as targets for ESCC diagnosis and therapy.

  19. Uridine adenosine tetraphosphate (Up{sub 4}A) is a strong inductor of smooth muscle cell migration via activation of the P2Y{sub 2} receptor and cross-communication to the PDGF receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Wiedon, Annette; Toelle, Markus; Bastine, Joschika; Schuchardt, Mirjam; Huang, Tao; Jankowski, Vera; Jankowski, Joachim; Zidek, Walter; Giet, Markus van der

    2012-01-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Up{sub 4}A induces VSMC migration. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer VSMC migration towards Up{sub 4}A involves P2Y{sub 2} activation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Up{sub 4}A-induced VSMC migration is OPN-dependent. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Activation of ERK1/2 pathway is necessary for VSMC migration towards Up{sub 4}A. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Up{sub 4}A-directed VSMC migration cross-communicates with the PDGFR. -- Abstract: The recently discovered dinucleotide uridine adenosine tetraphosphate (Up{sub 4}A) was found in human plasma and characterized as endothelium-derived vasoconstrictive factor (EDCF). A further study revealed a positive correlation between Up{sub 4}A and vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation. Due to the dominant role of migration in the formation of atherosclerotic lesions our aim was to investigate the migration stimulating potential of Up{sub 4}A. Indeed, we found a strong chemoattractant effect of Up{sub 4}A on VSMC by using a modified Boyden chamber. This migration dramatically depends on osteopontin secretion (OPN) revealed by the reduction of the migration signal down to 23% during simultaneous incubation with an OPN-blocking antibody. Due to inhibitory patterns using specific and unspecific purinoreceptor inhibitors, Up{sub 4}A mediates it's migratory signal mainly via the P2Y{sub 2}. The signaling behind the receptor was investigated with luminex technique and revealed an activation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) pathway. By use of the specific PDGF receptor (PDGFR) inhibitor AG1296 and siRNA technique against PDGFR-{beta} we found a strongly reduced migration signal after Up{sub 4}A stimulation in the PDGFR-{beta} knockdown cells compared to control cells. In this study, we present substantiate data that Up{sub 4}A exhibits migration stimulating potential probably involving the signaling cascade of MEK1 and ERK1/2 as well as the matrix protein OPN. We

  20. IDH1 R132H Mutation Enhances Cell Migration by Activating AKT-mTOR Signaling Pathway, but Sensitizes Cells to 5-FU Treatment as NADPH and GSH Are Reduced

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Jiangdong; Huang, Keting; Wu, Mindan; Xia, Chunlin

    2017-01-01

    Aim of study Mutations of isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 and 2 (IDH1 and IDH2) gene were recently discovered in vast majority of World Health Organization (WHO) grade II/III gliomas. This study is to understand the effects of IDH1 R132H mutation in gliomagenesis and to develop new strategies to treat glioma with IDH1 R132H mutation. Materials and methods Over expression of IDH1 R132H in U87MG cells was done by transfecting cells with IDH1 R132H plasmid. MTT assay, scratch repair assay and western blot were performed to study effects of IDH1 R132H mutation on cell proliferation, migration, regulating AKT-mTOR signaling pathway and cell death respectively. NADP+/NADPH and GSH quantification assays were performed to evaluate effects of IDH1 R132H mutation on the production of antioxidant NADPH and GSH. Results We found that over expression of IDH1 R132H mutation decreased cell proliferation consistent with previous reports; however, it increased cell migration and enhanced AKT-mTOR signaling pathway activation. Mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) 1 also change the function of the enzymes and cause them to produce 2-hydroxyglutarate and not produce NADPH. We tested the level of NADPH and GSH and demonstrated that IDH1 R132H mutant stable cells had significantly low NADPH and GSH level compared to control or IDH1 wild type stable cells. The reduced antioxidants (NADPH and GSH) sensitized U87MG cells with IDH R132H mutant to 5-FU treatment. Conclusion Our study highlights the important role of IHD1 R132H mutant in up- regulating AKT-mTOR signaling pathway and enhancing cell migration. Furthermore, we demonstrate that IDH1 R132H mutation affects cellular redox status and sensitizes gliomas cells with IDH1 R132H mutation to 5FU treatment. PMID:28052098

  1. Exit Strategies: S1P Signaling and T Cell Migration.

    PubMed

    Baeyens, Audrey; Fang, Victoria; Chen, Cynthia; Schwab, Susan R

    2015-12-01

    Whereas the role of sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor 1 (S1PR1) in T cell egress and the regulation of S1P gradients between lymphoid organs and circulatory fluids in homeostasis are increasingly well understood, much remains to be learned about S1P signaling and distribution during an immune response. Recent data suggest that the role of S1PR1 in directing cells from tissues into circulatory fluids is reprised again and again, particularly in guiding activated T cells from non-lymphoid tissues into lymphatics. Conversely, S1P receptor 2 (S1PR2), which antagonizes migration towards chemokines, confines cells within tissues. Here we review the current understanding of the roles of S1P signaling in activated T cell migration. In this context, we outline open questions, particularly regarding the shape of S1P gradients in different tissues in homeostasis and inflammation, and discuss recent strategies to measure S1P.

  2. Metformin Inhibits Migration and Invasion of Cholangiocarcinoma Cells

    PubMed

    Trinh, Son Xuan; Nguyen, Huyen Thi Bich; Saimuang, Kween; Prachayasittikul, Virapong; Chan On, Waraporn

    2017-02-01

    Background: Metformin is an oral anti-diabetic agent that has been widely prescribed for treatment of type II diabetes. Anti-cancer properties of metformin have been revealed for numerous human malignancies including cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) with anti-proliferative effects in vitro. However, effects on CCA cell migration and invasion have not been fully investigated. The present study aimed to explore the inhibitory effects of metformin on motility, migration and invasion of the CCA cell line HuCCT1, and examine molecular mechanisms underlying metformin effects. Methods: HuCCT1 cells were exposed to increasing doses of metformin. Viability and growth of HuCCT1 cells were assessed by MTS and colony formation assays, respectively. Motility, migration and invasion of metformin-treated HuCCT1 cells were determined in vitro using wound healing, transwell migration and matrigel invasion assays. Expression of signaling molecules and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) markers was assessed by Western blotting. Results: It was observed that metformin significantly decreased HuCCT1 cell viability and colony formation. The agent also markedly reduced wound closure, migration and invasion of HuCCT1 cells. Furthermore, metformin exposure resulted in decreased STAT3 activation and down-regulation of anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 and Mcl-1 expression. In addition, it upregulated the expression of E-cadherin, while downregulating that of N-cadherin, Snail, and MMP-2. Conclusion: These results demonstrated inhibitory effects of metformin on CCA cell migration and invasion, possibly involving the STAT3 pathway and reversal of EMT markers expression. They further suggest that metformin may be useful for CCA management.

  3. Cell Chirality Induces Collective Cell Migration in Epithelial Sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Katsuhiko; Hiraiwa, Tetsuya; Shibata, Tatsuo

    2015-10-01

    During early development, epithelial cells form a monolayer sheet and migrate in a uniform direction. Here, we address how this collective migration can occur without breaking the cell-to-cell attachments. Repeated contraction and expansion of the cell-to-cell interfaces enables the cells to rearrange their positions autonomously within the sheet. We show that when the interface tension is strengthened in a direction that is tilted from the body axis, cell rearrangements occur in such a way that unidirectional movement is induced. We use a vertex model to demonstrate that such anisotropic tension can generate the unidirectional motion of cell sheets. Our results suggest that cell chirality facilitates collective cell migration during tissue morphogenesis.

  4. ERK-dependent and -independent pathways trigger human neural progenitor cell migration

    SciTech Connect

    Moors, Michaela . E-mail: moors@uni-duesseldorf.de; Cline, Jason E. . E-mail: jason.cline@uni-duesseldorf.de; Abel, Josef . E-mail: josef.abel@uni-duesseldorf.de; Fritsche, Ellen . E-mail: ellen.fritsche@uni-duesseldorf.de

    2007-05-15

    Besides differentiation and apoptosis, cell migration is a basic process in brain development in which neural cells migrate several centimeters within the developing brain before reaching their proper positions and forming the right connections. For identifying signaling events that control neural migration and are therefore potential targets of chemicals to disturb normal brain development, we developed a human neurosphere-based migration assay based on normal human neural progenitor (NHNP) cells, in which the distance is measured that cells wander over time. Applying this assay, we investigated the role of the extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) in the regulation of NHNP cell migration. Exposure to model substances like ethanol or phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) revealed a correlation between ERK1/2 activation and cell migration. The participation of phospho-(P-) ERK1/2 was confirmed by exposure of the cells to the MEK inhibitor PD98059, which directly prohibits ERK1/2 phosphorylation and inhibited cell migration. We identified protein kinase C (PKC) and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) as upstream signaling kinases governing ERK1/2 activation, thereby controlling NHNP cell migration. Additionally, treatments with src kinase inhibitors led to a diminished cell migration without affecting ERK1/2 phosphorylation. Based on these results, we postulate that migration of NHNP cells is controlled via ERK1/2-dependent and -independent pathways.

  5. Nestin(+) cells direct inflammatory cell migration in atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Del Toro, Raquel; Chèvre, Raphael; Rodríguez, Cristina; Ordóñez, Antonio; Martínez-González, José; Andrés, Vicente; Méndez-Ferrer, Simón

    2016-09-02

    Atherosclerosis is a leading death cause. Endothelial and smooth muscle cells participate in atherogenesis, but it is unclear whether other mesenchymal cells contribute to this process. Bone marrow (BM) nestin(+) cells cooperate with endothelial cells in directing monocyte egress to bloodstream in response to infections. However, it remains unknown whether nestin(+) cells regulate inflammatory cells in chronic inflammatory diseases, such as atherosclerosis. Here, we show that nestin(+) cells direct inflammatory cell migration during chronic inflammation. In Apolipoprotein E (ApoE) knockout mice fed with high-fat diet, BM nestin(+) cells regulate the egress of inflammatory monocytes and neutrophils. In the aorta, nestin(+) stromal cells increase ∼30 times and contribute to the atheroma plaque. Mcp1 deletion in nestin(+) cells-but not in endothelial cells only- increases circulating inflammatory cells, but decreases their aortic infiltration, delaying atheroma plaque formation and aortic valve calcification. Therefore, nestin expression marks cells that regulate inflammatory cell migration during atherosclerosis.

  6. Primary mesenchyme cell migration requires a chondroitin sulfate/dermatan sulfate proteoglycan.

    PubMed

    Lane, M C; Solursh, M

    1991-02-01

    Primary mesenchyme cell migration in the sea urchin embryo is inhibited by sulfate deprivation and exposure to exogenous beta-D-xylosides, two treatments known to disrupt proteoglycan synthesis. We show that in the developing sea urchin, exogenous xyloside affects the synthesis by the primary mesenchyme cells of a very large, cell surface chondroitin sulfate/dermatan sulfate proteoglycan. This proteoglycan is present in a partially purified fraction that restores migratory ability to defective cells in vitro. The integrity of this chondroitin sulfate/dermatan sulfate proteoglycan appears essential for primary mesenchyme cell migration since treatment of actively migrating cells with chondroitinase ABC reversibly inhibited their migration in vitro.

  7. Ellagic Acid, a Dietary Polyphenol, Inhibits Tautomerase Activity of Human Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor and Its Pro-inflammatory Responses in Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Souvik; Siddiqui, Asim A; Mazumder, Somnath; De, Rudranil; Saha, Shubhra J; Banerjee, Chinmoy; Iqbal, Mohd S; Adhikari, Susanta; Alam, Athar; Roy, Siddhartha; Bandyopadhyay, Uday

    2015-05-27

    Ellagic acid (EA), a phenolic lactone, inhibited tautomerase activity of human macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) noncompetitively (Ki = 1.97 ± 0.7 μM). The binding of EA to MIF was determined by following the quenching of tryptophan fluorescence. We synthesized several EA derivatives, and their structure-activity relationship studies indicated that the planar conjugated lactone moiety of EA was essential for MIF inhibition. MIF induces nuclear translocation of NF-κB and chemotaxis of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) to promote inflammation. We were interested in evaluating the effect of EA on nuclear translocation of NF-κB and chemotactic activity in human PBMCs in the presence of MIF. The results showed that EA inhibited MIF-induced NF-κB nuclear translocation in PBMCs, as evident from confocal immunofluorescence microscopic data. EA also inhibited MIF-mediated chemotaxis of PBMCs. Thus, we report MIF-inhibitory activity of EA and inhibition of MIF-mediated proinflammatory responses in PBMCs by EA.

  8. Collective cell migration: leadership, invasion and segregation.

    PubMed

    Kabla, Alexandre J

    2012-12-07

    A number of biological processes, such as embryo development, cancer metastasis or wound healing, rely on cells moving in concert. The mechanisms leading to the emergence of coordinated motion remain however largely unexplored. Although biomolecular signalling is known to be involved in most occurrences of collective migration, the role of physical and mechanical interactions has only been recently investigated. In this study, a versatile framework for cell motility is implemented in silico in order to study the minimal requirements for the coordination of a group of epithelial cells. We find that cell motility and cell-cell mechanical interactions are sufficient to generate a broad array of behaviours commonly observed in vitro and in vivo. Cell streaming, sheet migration and susceptibility to leader cells are examples of behaviours spontaneously emerging from these simple assumptions, which might explain why collective effects are so ubiquitous in nature. The size of the population and its confinement appear, in particular, to play an important role in the coordination process. In all cases, the complex response of the population can be predicted from the knowledge of the correlation length of the velocity field measured in the bulk of the epithelial layer. This analysis provides also new insights into cancer metastasis and cell sorting, suggesting, in particular, that collective invasion might result from an emerging coordination in a system where single cells are mechanically unable to invade.

  9. Flow and Diffusion in Channel-Guided Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Marel, Anna-Kristina; Zorn, Matthias; Klingner, Christoph; Wedlich-Söldner, Roland; Frey, Erwin; Rädler, Joachim O.

    2014-01-01

    Collective migration of mechanically coupled cell layers is a notable feature of wound healing, embryonic development, and cancer progression. In confluent epithelial sheets, the dynamics have been found to be highly heterogeneous, exhibiting spontaneous formation of swirls, long-range correlations, and glass-like dynamic arrest as a function of cell density. In contrast, the flow-like properties of one-sided cell-sheet expansion in confining geometries are not well understood. Here, we studied the short- and long-term flow of Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells as they moved through microchannels. Using single-cell tracking and particle image velocimetry (PIV), we found that a defined averaged stationary cell current emerged that exhibited a velocity gradient in the direction of migration and a plug-flow-like profile across the advancing sheet. The observed flow velocity can be decomposed into a constant term of directed cell migration and a diffusion-like contribution that increases with density gradient. The diffusive component is consistent with the cell-density profile and front propagation speed predicted by the Fisher-Kolmogorov equation. To connect diffusion-mediated transport to underlying cellular motility, we studied single-cell trajectories and occurrence of vorticity. We discovered that the directed large-scale cell flow altered fluctuations in cellular motion at short length scales: vorticity maps showed a reduced frequency of swirl formation in channel flow compared with resting sheets of equal cell density. Furthermore, under flow, single-cell trajectories showed persistent long-range, random-walk behavior superimposed on drift, whereas cells in resting tissue did not show significant displacements with respect to neighboring cells. Our work thus suggests that active cell migration manifests itself in an underlying, spatially uniform drift as well as in randomized bursts of short-range correlated motion that lead to a diffusion-mediated transport

  10. Cell volume regulatory ion transport in the regulation of cell migration.

    PubMed

    Jakab, M; Ritter, M

    2006-01-01

    Cell migration is typically accomplished by the generation of protrusive mechanical forces and is achieved by repeated spatially and temporally coordinated cycles including the formation of a leading edge, the formation of new and disruption of older adhesions to the substratum, actomyosin based contractions and retraction of the trailing edge. Beside the well-described roles of the cytoskeleton and cell adhesions during these processes, a growing body of evidence indicates that the precise regulation of the cell volume is an indispensable prerequisite for coordinated cell migration. On the one hand during cell migration cell volume is continuously tormented by mechanical and morphological alterations, which pose changes to the intracellular hydrostatic pressure, metabolic changes and the formation or degradation of macromolecules like actin, which distort the osmotic equilibrium and the action of chemoattractants, hormones and transmitters, which frequently alter the electrical properties of a cell and thus cause cell swelling or shrinkage, respectively. On the other hand, a migrating cell actively has to govern cell volume regulatory ion transport mechanisms in order to create the appropriate micro- or even nanoenvironment in the intra- and/or extracellular space, which is necessary to guarantee the correct polarity and hence direction of movement of a migrating cell. This chapter will focus on the role of the cell volume regulatory ion transport mechanisms as they participate in the regulation of cell migration and special emphasis is given to their interplay with the cytoskeleton, their meaning for substrate adhesion and to the polarized fashion of their subcellular distribution.

  11. Nestin+ cells direct inflammatory cell migration in atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    del Toro, Raquel; Chèvre, Raphael; Rodríguez, Cristina; Ordóñez, Antonio; Martínez-González, José; Andrés, Vicente; Méndez-Ferrer, Simón

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a leading death cause. Endothelial and smooth muscle cells participate in atherogenesis, but it is unclear whether other mesenchymal cells contribute to this process. Bone marrow (BM) nestin+ cells cooperate with endothelial cells in directing monocyte egress to bloodstream in response to infections. However, it remains unknown whether nestin+ cells regulate inflammatory cells in chronic inflammatory diseases, such as atherosclerosis. Here, we show that nestin+ cells direct inflammatory cell migration during chronic inflammation. In Apolipoprotein E (ApoE) knockout mice fed with high-fat diet, BM nestin+ cells regulate the egress of inflammatory monocytes and neutrophils. In the aorta, nestin+ stromal cells increase ∼30 times and contribute to the atheroma plaque. Mcp1 deletion in nestin+ cells—but not in endothelial cells only— increases circulating inflammatory cells, but decreases their aortic infiltration, delaying atheroma plaque formation and aortic valve calcification. Therefore, nestin expression marks cells that regulate inflammatory cell migration during atherosclerosis. PMID:27586429

  12. Down-regulation of mir-221 and mir-222 restrain prostate cancer cell proliferation and migration that is partly mediated by activation of SIRT1.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiao; Yang, Yingmei; Gan, Rong; Zhao, Lingxu; Li, Wei; Zhou, Huaibin; Wang, Xiaojuan; Lu, Jianxin; Meng, Qing H

    2014-01-01

    Studies have shown that miR-221 and miR-222 are deregulated in many cancers, including prostate cancer. Nevertheless, the biological role and the underlying mechanisms of miR-221 and miR-222 in the pathogenesis of androgen-independent prostate cancer are still not clear. The proliferation, apoptosis, cell cycle distinction, and migration capacity of prostate cells were determined following transfection of miR-221 or miR-222 inhibitor. The biological impact and regulation of SIRT1 on prostate cancer cells were investigated. MiR-221 and miR-222 were highly expressed in PC-3 cells compared with in LNCap cells. After miR-221 or miR-222 expression was inhibited, the proliferation and migration rates of PC-3 cells decreased and the apoptosis rate increased. Moreover, SIRT1 protein was up-regulated in cells after they were transfected with miR-221 or miR-222 inhibitor. Cells transfected with siSIRT1 showed increased migration and a decreased apoptosis rate, but there was no significant effect on cell proliferation compared with the controls. There was a negative correlation between miR-221 or miR-222 and SIRT1, but no direct target relationship was identified. These data demonstrate that miR-221 and miR-222 are highly expressed in PC-3 cells. Their inhibition leads to reduced cell proliferation and migration and increased apoptosis in prostate cancer cells. These effects are potentially mediated by up-regulation of SIRT1.

  13. Nuclear factor of activated T cells c1 mediates p21-activated kinase 1 activation in the modulation of chemokine-induced human aortic smooth muscle cell F-actin stress fiber formation, migration, and proliferation and injury-induced vascular wall remodeling.

    PubMed

    Kundumani-Sridharan, Venkatesh; Singh, Nikhlesh K; Kumar, Sanjay; Gadepalli, Ravisekhar; Rao, Gadiparthi N

    2013-07-26

    Recent literature suggests that cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) mediate cell migration. However, the mechanisms were not known. Therefore, the objective of this study is to test whether cyclin/CDKs activate Pak1, an effector of Rac1, whose involvement in the modulation of cell migration and proliferation is well established. Monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP1) induced Pak1 phosphorylation/activation in human aortic smooth muscle cells (HASMCs) in a delayed time-dependent manner. MCP1 also stimulated F-actin stress fiber formation in a delayed manner in HASMCs, as well as the migration and proliferation of these cells. Inhibition of Pak1 suppressed MCP1-induced HASMC F-actin stress fiber formation, migration, and proliferation. MCP1 induced cyclin D1 expression as well as CDK6 and CDK4 activities, and these effects were dependent on activation of NFATc1. Depletion of NFATc1, cyclin D1, CDK6, or CDK4 levels attenuated MCP1-induced Pak1 phosphorylation/activation and resulted in decreased HASMC F-actin stress fiber formation, migration, and proliferation. CDK4, which appeared to be activated downstream of CDK6, formed a complex with Pak1 in response to MCP1. MCP1 also activated Rac1 in a time-dependent manner, and depletion/inhibition of its levels/activation abrogated MCP1-induced NFATc1-cyclin D1-CDK6-CDK4-Pak1 signaling and, thereby, decreased HASMC F-actin stress fiber formation, migration, and proliferation. In addition, smooth muscle-specific deletion of NFATc1 led to decreased cyclin D1 expression and CDK6, CDK4, and Pak1 activities, resulting in reduced neointima formation in response to injury. Thus, these observations reveal that Pak1 is a downstream effector of CDK4 and Rac1-dependent, NFATc1-mediated cyclin D1 expression and CDK6 activity mediate this effect. In addition, smooth muscle-specific deletion of NFATc1 prevented the capacity of vascular smooth muscle cells for MCP-1-induced activation of the cyclin D1-CDK6-CDK4-Pak1 signaling axis, affecting

  14. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor promotes cardiac stem cell proliferation and endothelial differentiation through the activation of the PI3K/Akt/mTOR and AMPK pathways

    PubMed Central

    CUI, JINJIN; ZHANG, FENGYUN; WANG, YONGSHUN; LIU, JINGJIN; MING, XING; HOU, JINGBO; LV, BO; FANG, SHAOHONG; YU, BO

    2016-01-01

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) has pleiotropic immune functions in a number of inflammatory diseases. Recent evidence from expression and functional studies has indicated that MIF is involved in various aspects of cardiovascular disease. In this study, we aimed to determine whether MIF supports in vitro c-kit+CD45− cardiac stem cell (CSC) survival, proliferation and differentiation into endothelial cells, as well as the possible mechanisms involved. We observed MIF receptor (CD74) expression in mouse CSCs (mCSCs) using PCR and immunofluorescence staining, and MIF secretion by mCSCs using PCR and ELISA in vitro. Increasing amounts of exogenous MIF did not affect CD74 expression, but promoted mCSC survival, proliferation and endothelial differentiation. By contrast, treatment with an MIF inhibitor (ISO-1) or siRNA targeting CD74 (CD74-siRNA) suppressed the biological changes induced by MIF in the mCSCs. Increasing amounts of MIF increased the phosphorylation of Akt and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), which are known to support cell survival, proliferation and differentiation. These effects of MIF on the mCSCs were abolished by LY294002 [a phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor] and MK-2206 (an Akt inhibitor). Moreover, adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) phosphorylation increased following treatment with MIF. The AMPK inhibitor, compound C, partly blocked the pro-proliferative effects of MIF on the mCSCs. In conclusion, our results suggest that MIF promotes mCSC survival, proliferation and endothelial differentiation through the activation of the PI3K/Akt/mTOR and AMPK signaling pathways. Thus, MIF may prove to be a potential therapeutic factor in the treatment of heart failure and myocardial infarction by activating CSCs. PMID:27035848

  15. The Afa/Dr adhesins of diffusely adhering Escherichia coli stimulate interleukin-8 secretion, activate mitogen-activated protein kinases, and promote polymorphonuclear transepithelial migration in T84 polarized epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Bétis, Fréderic; Brest, Patrick; Hofman, Véronique; Guignot, Julie; Bernet-Camard, Marie-Françoise; Rossi, Bernard; Servin, Alain; Hofman, Paul

    2003-03-01

    Afa/Dr diffusely adhering Escherichia coli (Afa/Dr DAEC) strains cause symptomatic urinary tract and intestinal infections. The proinflammatory effects of Afa/Dr DAEC strains in vitro have been not investigated to date. In the present study, we used confluent polarized monolayers of intestinal cell line T84 to evaluate the consequences of epithelial infection by Afa/Dr DAEC strains in terms of proinflammatory response. Polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMNL) migration across the epithelial barrier was induced after incubation of the T84 monolayers with the wild-type Afa/Dr DAEC strain C1845 harboring the fimbrial F1845 adhesin and strain IH11128 harboring the Dr hemagglutinin, and the E. coli laboratory strain HB101 was transformed with the pSSS1 plasmid, producing Afa/Dr F1845 adhesin. PMNL migrations were correlated with a basolateral secretion of interleukin-8 by T84 cells and were abolished after incubation of epithelial cells with an anti-decay accelerating factor (DAF) antibody that recognized the short consensus repeat 3 domain of DAF (monoclonal antibody 1H4). Moreover, Afa/Dr DAEC strains induced tyrosine phosphorylation of several T84 proteins and activated the mitogen-activated protein kinases (ERK1/2 mitogen-activated protein, P38, and Jun-C kinases). These data demonstrated for the first time that, in vitro, Afa/Dr DAEC strains exert a proinflammatory signal in intestinal epithelial cells.

  16. Study of dendritic cell migration using micro-fabrication.

    PubMed

    Vargas, Pablo; Chabaud, Mélanie; Thiam, Hawa-Racine; Lankar, Danielle; Piel, Matthieu; Lennon-Dumenil, Ana-Maria

    2016-05-01

    Cell migration is a hallmark of dendritic cells (DCs) function. It is needed for DCs to scan their environment in search for antigens as well as to reach lymphatic organs in order to trigger T lymphocyte's activation. Such interaction leads to tolerance in the case of DCs migrating under homeostatic conditions or to immunity in the case of DCs migrating upon encounter with pathogen-associated molecular patterns. Cell migration is therefore essential for DCs to transfer information from peripheral tissues to lymphoid organs, thereby linking innate to adaptive immunity. This stresses the need to unravel the molecular mechanisms involved. However, the tremendous complexity of the tissue microenvironment as well as the limited spatio-temporal resolution of in vivo imaging techniques has made this task difficult. To bypass this problem, we have developed microfabrication-based experimental tools that are compatible with high-resolution imaging. Here, we will discuss how such devices can be used to study DC migration under controlled conditions that mimic their physiological environment in a robust quantitative manner.

  17. Pancreatic tumor cell secreted CCN1/Cyr61 promotes endothelial cell migration and aberrant neovascularization.

    PubMed

    Maity, Gargi; Mehta, Smita; Haque, Inamul; Dhar, Kakali; Sarkar, Sandipto; Banerjee, Sushanta K; Banerjee, Snigdha

    2014-05-16

    The complex signaling networks between cancer cells and adjacent endothelial cells make it challenging to unravel how cancer cells send extracellular messages to promote aberrant vascularization or tumor angiogenesis. Here, in vitro and in vivo models show that pancreatic cancer cell generated unique microenvironments can underlie endothelial cell migration and tumor angiogenesis. Mechanistically, we find that pancreatic cancer cell secreted CCN1/Cyr61 matricellular protein rewires the microenvironment to promote endothelial cell migration and tumor angiogenesis. This event can be overcome by Sonic Hedgehog (SHh) antibody treatment. Collectively, these studies identify a novel CCN1 signaling program in pancreatic cancer cells which activates SHh through autocrine-paracrine circuits to promote endothelial cell migration and tumor angiogenesis and suggests that CCN1 signaling of pancreatic cancer cells is vital for the regulation of tumor angiogenesis. Thus CCN1 signaling could be an ideal target for tumor vascular disruption in pancreatic cancer.

  18. The MRL proteins: adapting cell adhesion, migration and growth.

    PubMed

    Coló, Georgina P; Lafuente, Esther M; Teixidó, Joaquin

    2012-01-01

    MIG-10, RIAM and Lamellipodin (Lpd) are the founding members of the MRL family of multi-adaptor molecules. These proteins have common domain structures but display distinct functions in cell migration and adhesion, signaling, and in cell growth. The binding of RIAM with active Rap1 and with talin provides these MRL molecules with important regulatory roles on integrin-mediated cell adhesion and migration. Furthermore, RIAM and Lpd can regulate actin dynamics through their binding to actin regulatory Ena/VASP proteins. Recent data generated with the Drosophila MRL ortholog called Pico and with RIAM in melanoma cells indicate that these proteins can also regulate cell growth. As MRL proteins represent a relatively new family, many questions on their structure-function relationships remain unanswered, including regulation of their expression, post-translational modifications, new interactions, involvement in signaling and their knockout mice phenotype.

  19. Tre1, a G Protein-Coupled Receptor, Directs Transepithelial Migration of Drosophila Germ Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bainton, Roland J; Heberlein, Ulrike

    2003-01-01

    In most organisms, germ cells are formed distant from the somatic part of the gonad and thus have to migrate along and through a variety of tissues to reach the gonad. Transepithelial migration through the posterior midgut (PMG) is the first active step during Drosophila germ cell migration. Here we report the identification of a novel G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR), Tre1, that is essential for this migration step. Maternal tre1 RNA is localized to germ cells, and tre1 is required cell autonomously in germ cells. In tre1 mutant embryos, most germ cells do not exit the PMG. The few germ cells that do leave the midgut early migrate normally to the gonad, suggesting that this gene is specifically required for transepithelial migration and that mutant germ cells are still able to recognize other guidance cues. Additionally, inhibiting small Rho GTPases in germ cells affects transepithelial migration, suggesting that Tre1 signals through Rho1. We propose that Tre1 acts in a manner similar to chemokine receptors required during transepithelial migration of leukocytes, implying an evolutionarily conserved mechanism of transepithelial migration. Recently, the chemokine receptor CXCR4 was shown to direct migration in vertebrate germ cells. Thus, germ cells may more generally use GPCR signaling to navigate the embryo toward their target. PMID:14691551

  20. Endothelial cell migration during murine yolk sac vascular remodeling occurs by means of a Rac1 and FAK activation pathway in vivo

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The molecular mechanism(s) controlling cell migration during vascular morphogenesis in vivo remain largely undefined. To address this within a physiological context, we used retinaldehyde dehydrogenase-2 (Raldh2) null mouse embryos and demonstrate that retinoic acid (RA) deficiency results in abnorm...

  1. Aloe emodin inhibits colon cancer cell migration/angiogenesis by downregulating MMP-2/9, RhoB and VEGF via reduced DNA binding activity of NF-κB.

    PubMed

    Suboj, Priya; Babykutty, Suboj; Valiyaparambil Gopi, Deepak Roshan; Nair, Rakesh S; Srinivas, Priya; Gopala, Srinivas

    2012-04-11

    Aloe emodin (AE), a natural anthraquinone, is reported to have antiproliferative activity in various cancer cell lines. In this study we analyzed molecular mechanisms involved in the antimigratory and antiangiogenic activity of this hydroxy anthraquinone in colon cancer cell, WiDr. Our results show that a relatively non toxic concentration of AE suppressed the phorbol-12-myristyl-13-acetate (PMA) induced migration and invasion of tumor cells. On analysis for the molecules involved in the migration/invasion, we found AE downregulated mRNA expression and promoter/gelatinolytic activity of Matrix Metalloproteinase (MMP)-2/9, as well as the RhoB expression at gene and protein level. It was also a strong inhibitor of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) expression, promoter activity and endothelial cell migration/invasion and in vitro angiogenesis. AE suppressed the nuclear translocation and DNA binding of NF-κB, which is an important transcription factor for controlling MMP-2/9 and VEGF gene expression. Taken together these data indicate that AE target multiple molecules responsible for cellular invasion, migration and angiogenesis. Inhibitory effect on angiogenic and metastatic regulatory processes make AE a sensible candidate as a specific blocker of tumor associated events.

  2. A lateral signalling pathway coordinates shape volatility during cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Liang; Luga, Valbona; Armitage, Sarah K.; Musiol, Martin; Won, Amy; Yip, Christopher M.; Plotnikov, Sergey V.; Wrana, Jeffrey L.

    2016-01-01

    Cell migration is fundamental for both physiological and pathological processes. Migrating cells usually display high dynamics in morphology, which is orchestrated by an integrative array of signalling pathways. Here we identify a novel pathway, we term lateral signalling, comprised of the planar cell polarity (PCP) protein Pk1 and the RhoGAPs, Arhgap21/23. We show that the Pk1–Arhgap21/23 complex inhibits RhoA, is localized on the non-protrusive lateral membrane cortex and its disruption leads to the disorganization of the actomyosin network and altered focal adhesion dynamics. Pk1-mediated lateral signalling confines protrusive activity and is regulated by Smurf2, an E3 ubiquitin ligase in the PCP pathway. Furthermore, we demonstrate that dynamic interplay between lateral and protrusive signalling generates cyclical fluctuations in cell shape that we quantify here as shape volatility, which strongly correlates with migration speed. These studies uncover a previously unrecognized lateral signalling pathway that coordinates shape volatility during productive cell migration. PMID:27226243

  3. The core planar cell polarity gene, Vangl2, directs adult corneal epithelial cell alignment and migration

    PubMed Central

    Findlay, Amy S.; Panzica, D. Alessio; Walczysko, Petr; Holt, Amy B.; Henderson, Deborah J.; West, John D.; Rajnicek, Ann M.

    2016-01-01

    This study shows that the core planar cell polarity (PCP) genes direct the aligned cell migration in the adult corneal epithelium, a stratified squamous epithelium on the outer surface of the vertebrate eye. Expression of multiple core PCP genes was demonstrated in the adult corneal epithelium. PCP components were manipulated genetically and pharmacologically in human and mouse corneal epithelial cells in vivo and in vitro. Knockdown of VANGL2 reduced the directional component of migration of human corneal epithelial (HCE) cells without affecting speed. It was shown that signalling through PCP mediators, dishevelled, dishevelled-associated activator of morphogenesis and Rho-associated protein kinase directs the alignment of HCE cells by affecting cytoskeletal reorganization. Cells in which VANGL2 was disrupted tended to misalign on grooved surfaces and migrate across, rather than parallel to the grooves. Adult corneal epithelial cells in which Vangl2 had been conditionally deleted showed a reduced rate of wound-healing migration. Conditional deletion of Vangl2 in the mouse corneal epithelium ablated the normal highly stereotyped patterns of centripetal cell migration in vivo from the periphery (limbus) to the centre of the cornea. Corneal opacity owing to chronic wounding is a major cause of degenerative blindness across the world, and this study shows that Vangl2 activity is required for directional corneal epithelial migration. PMID:27853583

  4. Cathepsin L derived from skeletal muscle cells transfected with bFGF promotes endothelial cell migration.

    PubMed

    Chung, Ji Hyung; Im, Eun Kyoung; Jin, Tae Won; Lee, Seung-Min; Kim, Soo Hyuk; Choi, Eun Young; Shin, Min-Jeong; Lee, Kyung Hye; Jang, Yangsoo

    2011-04-30

    Gene transfer of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) has been shown to induce significant endothelial migration and angiogenesis in ischemic disease models. Here, we investigate what factors are secreted from skeletal muscle cells (SkMCs) transfected with bFGF gene and whether they participate in endothelial cell migration. We constructed replication-defective adenovirus vectors containing the human bFGF gene (Ad/bFGF) or a control LacZ gene (Ad/LacZ) and obtained conditioned media, bFGF-CM and LacZ-CM, from SkMCs infected by Ad/bFGF or Ad/LacZ, respectively. Cell migration significantly increased in HUVECs incubated with bFGF-CM compared to cells incubated with LacZ-CM. Interestingly, HUVEC migration in response to bFGF-CM was only partially blocked by the addition of bFGF-neutralizing antibody, suggesting that bFGF-CM contains other factors that stimulate endothelial cell migration. Several proteins, matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1), plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), and cathepsin L, increased in bFGF-CM compared to LacZ-CM; based on 1-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry. Their increased mRNA and protein levels were confirmed by RT-PCR and immunoblot analysis. The recombinant human bFGF protein induced MMP-1, PAI-1, and cathepsin L expression in SkMCs. Endothelial cell migration was reduced in groups treated with bFGF-CM containing neutralizing antibodies against MMP-1 or PAI-1. In particular, HUVECs treated with bFGF-CM containing cell-impermeable cathepsin L inhibitor showed the most significant decrease in cell migration. Cathepsin L protein directly promotes endothelial cell migration through the JNK pathway. These results indicate that cathepsin L released from SkMCs transfected with the bFGF gene can promote endothelial cell migration.

  5. Dynamic filopodia are required for chemokine-dependent intracellular polarization during guided cell migration in vivo.

    PubMed

    Meyen, Dana; Tarbashevich, Katsiaryna; Banisch, Torsten U; Wittwer, Carolina; Reichman-Fried, Michal; Maugis, Benoît; Grimaldi, Cecilia; Messerschmidt, Esther-Maria; Raz, Erez

    2015-04-15

    Cell migration and polarization is controlled by signals in the environment. Migrating cells typically form filopodia that extend from the cell surface, but the precise function of these structures in cell polarization and guided migration is poorly understood. Using the in vivo model of zebrafish primordial germ cells for studying chemokine-directed single cell migration, we show that filopodia distribution and their dynamics are dictated by the gradient of the chemokine Cxcl12a. By specifically interfering with filopodia formation, we demonstrate for the first time that these protrusions play an important role in cell polarization by Cxcl12a, as manifested by elevation of intracellular pH and Rac1 activity at the cell front. The establishment of this polarity is at the basis of effective cell migration towards the target. Together, we show that filopodia allow the interpretation of the chemotactic gradient in vivo by directing single-cell polarization in response to the guidance cue.

  6. Lumican induces human corneal epithelial cell migration and integrin expression via ERK 1/2 signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Seomun, Young; Joo, Choun-Ki

    2008-07-18

    Lumican is a major proteoglycans of the human cornea. Lumican knock-out mice have been shown to lose corneal transparency and to display delayed wound healing. The purpose of this study was to define the role of lumican in corneal epithelial cell migration. Over-expression of lumican in human corneal epithelial (HCE-T) cells increased both cell migration and proliferation, and increased levels of integrins {alpha}2 and {beta}1. ERK 1/2 was also activated in lumican over-expressed cells. When we treated HCE-T cells with the ERK-specific inhibitor U0126, cell migration and the expression of integrin {beta}1 were completely blocked. These data provide evidence that lumican stimulates cell migration in the corneal epithelium by activating ERK 1/2, and point to a novel signaling pathway implicated in corneal epithelial cell migration.

  7. Over-expression of TRIM37 promotes cell migration and metastasis in hepatocellular carcinoma by activating Wnt/β-catenin signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Jianxin; Yu, Chao; Chen, Meiyuan; Tian, She; Sun, Chengyi

    2015-09-04

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the most common cancer in the world especially in East Asia and Africa. Advanced stage, metastasis and frequent relapse are responsible for the poor prognosis of HCC. However, the precise mechanisms underlying HCC remained unclear. So it is urgent to identify the pathological processes and relevant molecules of HCC. TRIM37 is an E3 ligase and has been observed deregulated expression in various tumors. Recent studies of TRIM37 have implicated that TRIM37 played critical roles in cell proliferation and other processes. In the present study, we demonstrated that TRIM37 expression was notably up-regulated in HCC samples and was associated with advanced stage and tumor volume, which all indicating the poor outcomes. We also found that TRIM37 could serve as an independent prognostic factor of HCC. During the course of in vitro and in vivo work, we showed that TRIM37 promoted HCC cells migration and metastasis by inducing EMT. Furthermore, we revealed that the effect of TRIM37 mediated EMT in HCC cells was achieved by the activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling. These finding may provide insight into the understanding of TRIM37 as a novel critical factor of HCC and a candidate target for HCC treatment. - Highlights: • Highly expression of TRIM37 is found in HCC samples compared with nontumorous samples. • TRIM37 expression is correlated with advanced HCC stages and could be an independent prognostic factor. • TRIM37 promotes cell proliferation and metastasis. • We report an E3 ligase TRIM37 affects Wnt/β-catenin signaling.

  8. T-cell Migration, Search Strategies and Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Krummel, Matthew F; Bartumeus, Frederic; Gérard, Audrey

    2016-01-01

    T cell migration is essential for T cell responses, allowing for detection of cognate antigen at the surface of an Antigen-Presenting Cell (APC) and for interactions with other cells involved in the immune response. Although appearing random, growing evidence supports that T cell motility patterns are strategic and governed by mechanisms that are optimized for both activation-stage and environment-specific attributes. In this Opinion Article, we will discuss how to understand the combined effects of T cell- intrinsic and -extrinsic forces upon these motility patterns when viewed in highly complex tissues filled with other cells involved in parallel motility. In particular, we will examine how insights from ‘search theory’ describe T cell movement across exploitation-exploration gradients, in the context of activation versus effector function and in the context of lymph nodes versus peripheral tissues. PMID:26852928

  9. VEGF induces proliferation, migration, and TGF-{beta}1 expression in mouse glomerular endothelial cells via mitogen-activated protein kinase and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Li Zhaodong; Bork, Jens Peter; Krueger, Bettina; Patsenker, Eleonora; Schulze-Krebs, Anja; Hahn, Eckhart G.; Schuppan, Detlef; E-mail: dschuppa@bidmc.harvard.edu

    2005-09-09

    The role of glomerular endothelial cells in kidney fibrosis remains incompletely understood. While endothelia are indispensable for repair of acute damage, they can produce extracellular matrix proteins and profibrogenic cytokines that promote fibrogenesis. We used a murine cell line with all features of glomerular endothelial cells (glEND.2), which dissected the effects of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) on cell migration, proliferation, and profibrogenic cytokine production. VEGF dose-dependently induced glEND.2 cell migration and proliferation, accompanied by up-regulation of VEGFR-2 phosphorylation and mRNA expression. VEGF induced a profibrogenic gene expression profile, including up-regulation of TGF-{beta}1 mRNA, enhanced TGF-{beta}1 secretion, and bioactivity. VEGF-induced endothelial cell migration and TGF-{beta}1 induction were mediated by the phosphatidyl-inositol-3 kinase pathway, while proliferation was dependent on the Erk1/2 MAP kinase pathway. This suggests that differential modulation of glomerular angiogenesis by selective inhibition of the two identified VEGF-induced signaling pathways could be a therapeutic approach to treat kidney fibrosis.

  10. Dynamic contact guidance of migrating cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Losert, Wolfgang; Sun, Xiaoyu; Guven, Can; Driscoll, Meghan; Fourkas, John

    2014-03-01

    We investigate the effects of nanotopographical surfaces on the cell migration and cell shape dynamics of the amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum. Amoeboid motion exhibits significant contact guidance along surfaces with nanoscale ridges or grooves. We show quantitatively that nanoridges spaced 1.5 μm apart exhibit the greatest contact guidance efficiency. Using principal component analysis, we characterize the dynamics of the cell shape modulated by the coupling between the cell membrane and ridges. We show that motion parallel to the ridges is enhanced, while the turning, at the largest spatial scales, is suppressed. Since protrusion dynamics are principally governed by actin dynamics, we imaged the actin polymerization of cells on ridges. We found that actin polymerization occurs preferentially along nanoridges in a ``monorail'' like fashion. The ridges then provide us with a tool to study actin dynamics in an effectively reduced dimensional system.

  11. Activation of myeloid and endothelial cells by CD40L gene therapy supports T-cell expansion and migration into the tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Eriksson, E; Moreno, R; Milenova, I; Liljenfeldt, L; Dieterich, L C; Christiansson, L; Karlsson, H; Ullenhag, G; Mangsbo, S M; Dimberg, A; Alemany, R; Loskog, A

    2017-02-01

    CD40 is an interesting target in cancer immunotherapy due to its ability to stimulate T-helper 1 immunity via maturation of dendritic cells and to drive M2 to M1 macrophage differentiation. Pancreatic cancer has a high M2 content that has shown responsive to anti-CD40 agonist therapy and CD40 may thus be a suitable target for immune activation in these patients. In this study, a novel oncolytic adenovirus armed with a trimerized membrane-bound extracellular CD40L (TMZ-CD40L) was evaluated as a treatment of pancreatic cancer. Further, the CD40L mechanisms of action were elucidated in cancer models. The results demonstrated that the virus transferring TMZ-CD40L had oncolytic capacity in pancreatic cancer cells and could control tumor progression. TMZ-CD40L was a potent stimulator of human myeloid cells and T-cell responses. Further, CD40L-mediated stimulation increased tumor-infiltrating T cells in vivo, which may be due to a direct activation of endothelial cells to upregulate receptors for lymphocyte attachment and transmigration. In conclusion, CD40L-mediated gene therapy is an interesting concept for the treatment of tumors with high levels of M2 macrophages, such as pancreatic cancer, and an oncolytic virus as carrier of CD40L may further boost tumor killing and immune activation.

  12. Anticancer activity of taraxerol acetate in human glioblastoma cells and a mouse xenograft model via induction of autophagy and apoptotic cell death, cell cycle arrest and inhibition of cell migration.

    PubMed

    Hong, Jing-Fang; Song, Ying-Fang; Liu, Zheng; Zheng, Zhao-Cong; Chen, Hong-Jie; Wang, Shou-Sen

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the in vitro and in vivo anticancer and apoptotic effects of taraxerol acetate in U87 human glioblastoma cells. The effects on cell cycle phase distribution, cell cycle-associated proteins, autophagy, DNA fragmentation and cell migration were assessed. Cell viability was determined using the MTT assay, and phase contrast and fluorescence microscopy was utilized to determine the viability and apoptotic morphological features of the U87 cells. Flow cytometry using propidium iodide and Annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate demonstrated the effect of taraxerol acetate on the cell cycle phase distribution and apoptosis induction. Western blot analysis was performed to investigate the effect of the taraxerol acetate on cell cycle‑associated proteins and autophagy‑linked LC3B‑II proteins. The results demonstrated that taraxerol acetate induced dose‑ and time‑dependent cytotoxic effects in the U87 cells. Apoptotic induction following taraxerol acetate treatment was observed and the percentage of apoptotic cells increased from 7.3% in the control cells, to 16.1, 44.1 and 76.7% in the 10, 50 and 150 µM taraxerol acetate‑treated cells, respectively. Furthermore, taraxerol acetate treatment led to sub‑G1 cell cycle arrest with a corresponding decrease in the number of S‑phase cells. DNA fragments were observed as a result of the gel electrophoresis experiment following taraxerol acetate treatment. To investigate the inhibitory effects of taraxerol acetate on the migration of U87 cell, a wound healing assay was conducted. The number of cells that migrated to the scratched area decreased significantly following treatment with taraxerol acetate. In addition, taraxerol acetate inhibited tumor growth in a mouse xenograft model. Administration of 0.25 and 0.75 µg/g taraxerol acetate reduced the tumor weight from 1.2 g in the phosphate‑buffered saline (PBS)‑treated group (control) to 0.81 and 0.42

  13. BMP2 rescues deficient cell migration in Tgfbr3(-/-) epicardial cells and requires Src kinase.

    PubMed

    Allison, Patrick; Espiritu, Daniella; Camenisch, Todd D

    2016-05-03

    During embryogenesis, the epicardium undergoes proliferation, migration, and differentiation into several cardiac cell types which contribute to the coronary vessels. The type III transforming growth factor-β receptor (TGFβR3) is required for epicardial cell invasion and development of coronary vasculature in vivo. Bone Morphogenic Protein-2 (BMP2) is a driver of epicardial cell migration. Utilizing a primary epicardial cell line derived from Tgfbr3(+/+) and Tgfbr3(-/-) mouse embryos, we show that Tgfbr3(-/-) epicardial cells are deficient in BMP2 mRNA expression. Tgfbr3(-/-) epicardial cells are deficient in 2-dimensional migration relative to Tgfbr3(+/+) cells; BMP2 induces cellular migration to Tgfbr3(+/+) levels without affecting proliferation. We further demonstrate that Src kinase activity is required for BMP2 driven Tgfbr3(-/-) migration. BMP2 also requires Src for filamentous actin polymerization in Tgfbr3(-/-) epicardial cells. Taken together, our data identifies a novel pathway in epicardial cell migration required for development of the coronary vessels.

  14. Desmoglein 3 promotes cancer cell migration and invasion by regulating activator protein 1 and protein kinase C-dependent-Ezrin activation.

    PubMed

    Brown, L; Waseem, A; Cruz, I N; Szary, J; Gunic, E; Mannan, T; Unadkat, M; Yang, M; Valderrama, F; O'Toole, E A; Wan, H

    2014-05-01

    Desmoglein 3 (Dsg3), the pemphigus vulgaris antigen, has recently been shown to be upregulated in squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and has been identified as a good tumor-specific marker for clinical staging of cervical sentinel lymph nodes in head and neck SCC. However, little is known about its biological function in cancer. The actin-binding protein Ezrin and the activator protein 1 (AP-1) transcription factor are implicated in cancer progression and metastasis. Here, we report that Dsg3 regulates the activity of c-Jun/AP-1 as well as protein kinase C (PKC)-mediated phosphorylation of Ezrin-Thr567, which contributes to the accelerated motility of cancer cells. Ectopic expression of Dsg3 in cancer cell lines caused enhanced phosphorylation at Ezrin-Thr567 with concomitant augmented membrane protrusions, cell spreading and invasive phenotype. We showed that Dsg3 formed a complex with Ezrin at the plasma membrane that was required for its proper function of interacting with F-actin and CD44 as Dsg3 knockdown impaired these associations. The increased Ezrin phosphorylation in Dsg3-overexpressing cells could be abrogated substantially by various pharmacological inhibitors for Ser/Thr kinases, including PKC and Rho kinase that are known to activate Ezrin. Furthermore, a marked increase in c-Jun S63 phosphorylation, among others, was found in Dsg3-overexpressing cells and the activation of c-Jun/AP-1 was further supported by a luciferase reporter assay. Taken together, our study identifies a novel Dsg3-mediated c-Jun/AP-1 regulatory mechanism and PKC-dependent Ezrin phosphorylation that could be responsible for Dsg3-associated cancer metastasis.

  15. Senescent fibroblast-derived Chemerin promotes squamous cell carcinoma migration

    PubMed Central

    Gatzka, Martina; Treiber, Nicolai; Schneider, Lars A.; Mulaw, Medhanie A.; Lucas, Tanja; Kochanek, Stefan; Dummer, Reinhard; Levesque, Mitchell P.; Wlaschek, Meinhard; Scharffetter-Kochanek, Karin

    2016-01-01

    Aging is associated with a rising incidence of cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (cSCC), an aggressive skin cancer with the potential for local invasion and metastasis. Acquisition of a senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP) in dermal fibroblasts has been postulated to promote skin cancer progression in elderly individuals. The underlying molecular mechanisms are largely unexplored. We show that Chemerin, a previously unreported SASP factor released from senescent human dermal fibroblasts, promotes cSCC cell migration, a key feature driving tumor progression. Whereas the Chemerin abundance is downregulated in malignant cSCC cells, increased Chemerin transcripts and protein concentrations are detected in replicative senescent fibroblasts in vitro and in the fibroblast of skin sections from old donors, indicating that a Chemerin gradient is built up in the dermis of elderly. Using Transwell® migration assays, we show that Chemerin enhances the chemotaxis of different cSCC cell lines. Notably, the Chemerin receptor CCRL2 is remarkably upregulated in cSCC cell lines and human patient biopsies. Silencing Chemerin in senescent fibroblasts or the CCRL2 and GPR1 receptors in the SCL-1 cSCC cell line abrogates the Chemerin-mediated chemotaxis. Chemerin triggers the MAPK cascade via JNK and ERK1 activation, whereby the inhibition impairs the SASP- or Chemerin-mediated cSCC cell migration. Taken together, we uncover a key role for Chemerin, as a major factor in the secretome of senescent fibroblasts, promoting cSCC cell migration and possibly progression, relaying its signals through CCRL2 and GPR1 receptors with subsequent MAPK activation. These findings might have implications for targeted therapeutic interventions in elderly patients. PMID:27907906

  16. Spatial and temporal action of chicken primordial germ cells during initial migration.

    PubMed

    Kang, Kyung Soo; Lee, Hyung Chul; Kim, Hyun Jeong; Lee, Hyo Gun; Kim, Young Min; Lee, Hong Jo; Park, Young Hyun; Yang, Seo Yeong; Rengaraj, Deivendran; Park, Tae Sub; Han, Jae Yong

    2015-02-01

    In most animals, primordial germ cells (PGCs) originate from an extragonadal region and migrate across the embryo to the gonads, where they differentiate and function. During their migration, PGCs move passively by morphogenetic movement of the embryo or move actively through signaling molecules. To uncover the underlying mechanism of first-phase PGC migration toward the germinal crescent in chickens, we investigated the spatial and temporal action of PGCs during primitive streak formation. Exogenously transplanted PGCs migrated toward the anterior region of the embryo and the embryonic gonads when they were transplanted into the subgerminal cavity, but not into the posterior marginal zone, in Eyal-Giladi and Kochav stage X embryos. These results indicate that for passive migration toward the anterior region the initial location of PGCs should be the central region. Notably, although PGCs and DF-1 cells migrated passively toward the anterior region, only PGCs migrated to the germinal crescent, where endogenous PGCs mainly reside, by active movement. In a live-imaging experiment with green fluorescence protein-expressing transgenic embryos, exogenous PGCs demonstrated markedly faster migration when they reached the anterior one-third of the embryo, while somatic cells showed epiblast movement with constant speed. Also, migrating PGCs exhibited successive contraction and expansion indicating their active migration. Our results suggest that chicken PGCs use sequential passive and active forces to migrate toward the germinal crescent.

  17. Overexpression of Dishevelled-2 contributes to proliferation and migration of human esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Guoren; Ye, Jinjun; Sun, Lei; Zhang, Zhi; Feng, Jifeng

    2016-06-01

    Dishevelled-2 (Dvl2) was associated with tumor cell proliferation and migration. We aimed to examine the mechanism of Dvl2 in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). Dvl2 was overexpressed in human ESCC tissues and cell lines ECA109 and TE1 cells. CCK-8 and colony formation assay was performed to evaluate the proliferation in ECA109 cells transfected with Dvl2-shRNA. Wound-healing assay and transwell assay were used to examine the activities of migration and invasion in Dvl2-silenced ESCC cells. Knockdown of Dvl2 significantly reduced ECA109 cell proliferation and migration. Moreover, we demonstrated that the proliferation and migration ability of Dvl2 might through the activation of Wnt pathway by targeting the Cyclin D1 and MMP-9. We came to the conclusion that the proliferation and migration effects of Dvl2 might contribute to malignant development of human ESCC.

  18. Interplay of RhoA and mechanical forces in collective cell migration driven by leader cells.

    PubMed

    Reffay, M; Parrini, M C; Cochet-Escartin, O; Ladoux, B; Buguin, A; Coscoy, S; Amblard, F; Camonis, J; Silberzan, P

    2014-03-01

    The leading front of a collectively migrating epithelium often destabilizes into multicellular migration fingers where a cell initially similar to the others becomes a leader cell while its neighbours do not alter. The determinants of these leader cells include mechanical and biochemical cues, often under the control of small GTPases. However, an accurate dynamic cartography of both mechanical and biochemical activities remains to be established. Here, by mapping the mechanical traction forces exerted on the surface by MDCK migration fingers, we show that these structures are mechanical global entities with the leader cells exerting a large traction force. Moreover, the spatial distribution of RhoA differential activity at the basal plane strikingly mirrors this force cartography. We propose that RhoA controls the development of these fingers through mechanical cues: the leader cell drags the structure and the peripheral pluricellular acto-myosin cable prevents the initiation of new leader cells.

  19. Ion channels in control of pancreatic stellate cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Storck, Hannah; Hild, Benedikt; Schimmelpfennig, Sandra; Sargin, Sarah; Nielsen, Nikolaj; Zaccagnino, Angela; Budde, Thomas; Novak, Ivana; Kalthoff, Holger; Schwab, Albrecht

    2017-01-01

    Pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) play a critical role in the progression of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). Once activated, PSCs support proliferation and metastasis of carcinoma cells. PSCs even co-metastasise with carcinoma cells. This requires the ability of PSCs to migrate. In recent years, it has been established that almost all “hallmarks of cancer” such as proliferation or migration/invasion also rely on the expression and function of ion channels. So far, there is only very limited information about the function of ion channels in PSCs. Yet, there is growing evidence that ion channels in stromal cells also contribute to tumor progression. Here we investigated the function of KCa3.1 channels in PSCs. KCa3.1 channels are also found in many tumor cells of different origin. We revealed the functional expression of KCa3.1 channels by means of Western blot, immunofluorescence and patch clamp analysis. The impact of KCa3.1 channel activity on PSC function was determined with live-cell imaging and by measuring the intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i). KCa3.1 channel blockade or knockout prevents the stimulation of PSC migration and chemotaxis by reducing the [Ca2+]i and calpain activity. KCa3.1 channels functionally cooperate with TRPC3 channels that are upregulated in PDAC stroma. Knockdown of TRPC3 channels largely abolishes the impact of KCa3.1 channels on PSC migration. In summary, our results clearly show that ion channels are crucial players in PSC physiology and pathophysiology. PMID:27903970

  20. Modeling cell migration in 3D: Status and challenges.

    PubMed

    Rangarajan, Rajagopal; Zaman, Muhammad H

    2008-01-01

    Cell migration is a multi-scale process that integrates signaling, mechanics and biochemical reaction kinetics. Various mathematical models accurately predict cell migration on 2D surfaces, but are unable to capture the complexities of 3D migration. Additionally, quantitative 3D cell migration models have been few and far between. In this review we look and characterize various mathematical models available in literature to predict cell migration in 3D matrices and analyze their strengths and possible changes to these models that could improve their predictive capabilities.

  1. Migration and Proliferative Activity of Mesenchymal Stem Cells in 3D Polylactide Scaffolds Depends on Cell Seeding Technique and Collagen Modification.

    PubMed

    Rodina, A V; Tenchurin, T Kh; Saprykin, V P; Shepelev, A D; Mamagulashvili, V G; Grigor'ev, T E; Lukanina, K I; Orekhov, A S; Moskaleva, E Yu; Chvalun, S N

    2016-11-01

    We analyzed viability of mesenchymal stem cells seeded by static and dynamic methods to highly porous fibrous 3D poly-L-lactide scaffolds with similar physical and chemical properties, but different spatial organization modified with collagen. Standard collagen coating promoted protein adsorption on the scaffold surface and improved adhesive properties of 100 μ-thick scaffolds. Modification of 600-μ scaffolds with collagen under pressure increased proliferative activity of mesenchymal stem cells seeded under static and dynamic (delivery of 100,000 cells in 10 ml medium in a perfusion system at a rate of 1 ml/min) conditions by 47 and 648%, respectively (measured after 120-h culturing by MTT test). Dynamic conditions provide more uniform distribution of collagen on scaffold fibers and promote cell penetration into 3D poly-L-lactide scaffolds with thickness >600 μ.

  2. Alignment of cell division axes in directed epithelial cell migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marel, Anna-Kristina; Podewitz, Nils; Zorn, Matthias; Oskar Rädler, Joachim; Elgeti, Jens

    2014-11-01

    Cell division is an essential dynamic event in tissue remodeling during wound healing, cancer and embryogenesis. In collective migration, tensile stresses affect cell shape and polarity, hence, the orientation of the cell division axis is expected to depend on cellular flow patterns. Here, we study the degree of orientation of cell division axes in migrating and resting epithelial cell sheets. We use microstructured channels to create a defined scenario of directed cell invasion and compare this situation to resting but proliferating cell monolayers. In experiments, we find a strong alignment of the axis due to directed flow while resting sheets show very weak global order, but local flow gradients still correlate strongly with the cell division axis. We compare experimental results with a previously published mesoscopic particle based simulation model. Most of the observed effects are reproduced by the simulations.

  3. Flow-driven cell migration under external electric fields

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yizeng; Mori, Yoichiro; Sun, Sean X.

    2016-01-01

    Electric fields influence many aspects of cell physiology, including various forms of cell migration. Many cells are sensitive to electric fields, and can migrate toward a cathode or an anode, depending on the cell type. In this paper, we examine an actomyosin-independent mode of cell migration under electrical fields. Our theory considers a one-dimensional cell with water and ionic fluxes at the cell boundary. Water fluxes through the membrane are governed by the osmotic pressure difference across the cell membrane. Fluxes of cations and anions across the cell membrane are determined by the properties of the ion channels as well as the external electric field. Results show that without actin polymerization and myosin contraction, electric fields can also drive cell migration, even when the cell is not polarized. The direction of migration with respect to the electric field direction is influenced by the properties of ion channels, and are cell-type dependent. PMID:26765031

  4. Flow-Driven Cell Migration under External Electric Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yizeng; Mori, Yoichiro; Sun, Sean X.

    2015-12-01

    Electric fields influence many aspects of cell physiology, including various forms of cell migration. Many cells are sensitive to electric fields, and they can migrate toward a cathode or an anode, depending on the cell type. In this Letter, we examine an actomyosin-independent mode of cell migration under electrical fields. Our theory considers a one-dimensional cell with water and ionic fluxes at the cell boundary. Water fluxes through the membrane are governed by the osmotic pressure difference across the cell membrane. Fluxes of cations and anions across the cell membrane are determined by the properties of the ion channels as well as the external electric field. Results show that without actin polymerization and myosin contraction, electric fields can also drive cell migration, even when the cell is not polarized. The direction of migration with respect to the electric field direction is influenced by the properties of ion channels, and are cell-type dependent.

  5. Mutant huntingtin impairs immune cell migration in Huntington disease

    PubMed Central

    Kwan, Wanda; Träger, Ulrike; Davalos, Dimitrios; Chou, Austin; Bouchard, Jill; Andre, Ralph; Miller, Aaron; Weiss, Andreas; Giorgini, Flaviano; Cheah, Christine; Möller, Thomas; Stella, Nephi; Akassoglou, Katerina; Tabrizi, Sarah J.; Muchowski, Paul J.

    2012-01-01

    In Huntington disease (HD), immune cells are activated before symptoms arise; however, it is unclear how the expression of mutant huntingtin (htt) compromises the normal functions of immune cells. Here we report that primary microglia from early postnatal HD mice were profoundly impaired in their migration to chemotactic stimuli, and expression of a mutant htt fragment in microglial cell lines was sufficient to reproduce these deficits. Microglia expressing mutant htt had a retarded response to a laser-induced brain injury in vivo. Leukocyte recruitment was defective upon induction of peritonitis in HD mice at early disease stages and was normalized upon genetic deletion of mutant htt in immune cells. Migration was also strongly impaired in peripheral immune cells from pre-manifest human HD patients. Defective actin remodeling in immune cells expressing mutant htt likely contributed to their migration deficit. Our results suggest that these functional changes may contribute to immune dysfunction and neurodegeneration in HD, and may have implications for other polyglutamine expansion diseases in which mutant proteins are ubiquitously expressed. PMID:23160193

  6. COMP-angiopoietin 1 increases proliferation, differentiation, and migration of stem-like cells through Tie-2-mediated activation of p38 MAPK and PI3K/Akt signal transduction pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Kook, Sung-Ho; Lim, Shin-Saeng; Cho, Eui-Sic; Lee, Young-Hoon; Han, Seong-Kyu; Lee, Kyung-Yeol; Kwon, Jungkee; Hwang, Jae-Won; Bae, Cheol-Hyeon; Seo, Young-Kwon; Lee, Jeong-Chae

    2014-12-12

    Highlights: • COMP-Ang1 induces Tie-2 activation in BMMSCs, but not in primary osteoblasts. • Tie-2 knockdown inhibits COMP-Ang1-stimulated proliferation and osteoblastogenesis. • Tie-2 knockdown prevents COMP-Ang1-induced activation of PI3K/Akt and p38 MAPK. • COMP-Ang1 induces migration of cells via activation of PI3K/Akt and CXCR4 pathways. • COMP-Ang1 stimulates in vivo migration of PDLSCs into a calvarial defect site of rats. - Abstract: Recombinant COMP-Ang1, a chimera of angiopoietin-1 (Ang1) and a short coiled-coil domain of cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP), is under consideration as a therapeutic agent capable of inducing the homing of cells with increased angiogenesis. However, the potentials of COMP-Ang1 to stimulate migration of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and the associated mechanisms are not completely understood. We examined the potential of COMP-Ang1 on bone marrow (BM)-MSCs, human periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs), and calvarial osteoblasts. COMP-Ang1 augmented Tie-2 induction at protein and mRNA levels and increased proliferation and expression of runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2), osterix, and CXCR4 in BMMSCs, but not in osteoblasts. The COMP-Ang1-mediated increases were inhibited by Tie-2 knockdown and by treating inhibitors of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K), LY294002, or p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), SB203580. Phosphorylation of p38 MAPK and Akt was prevented by siRNA-mediated silencing of Tie-2. COMP-Ang1 also induced in vitro migration of BMMSCs and PDLSCs. The induced migration was suppressed by Tie-2 knockdown and by CXCR4-specific peptide antagonist or LY294002, but not by SB203580. Furthermore, COMP-Ang1 stimulated the migration of PDLSCs into calvarial defect site of rats. Collectively, our results demonstrate that COMP-Ang1-stimulated proliferation, differentiation, and migration of progenitor cells may involve the Tie-2-mediated activation of p38 MAPK and PI3K/Akt pathways.

  7. Integrin-mediated cell migration is blocked by inhibitors of human neuraminidase.

    PubMed

    Jia, Feng; Howlader, Md Amran; Cairo, Christopher W

    2016-09-01

    Integrins are critical receptors in cell migration and adhesion. A number of mechanisms are known to regulate the function of integrins, including phosphorylation, conformational change, and cytoskeletal anchoring. We investigated whether native neuraminidase (Neu, or sialidase) enzymes which modify glycolipids could play a role in regulating integrin-mediated cell migration. Using a scratch assay, we found that exogenously added Neu3 and Neu4 activity altered rates of cell migration. We observed that Neu4 increased the rate of migration in two cell lines (HeLa, A549); while Neu3 only increased migration in HeLa cells. A bacterial neuraminidase was able to increase the rate of migration in HeLa, but not in A549 cells. Treatment of cells with complex gangliosides (GM1, GD1a, GD1b, and GT1b) resulted in decreased cell migration rates, while LacCer was able to increase rates of migration in both lines. Importantly, our results show that treatment of cells with inhibitors of native Neu enzymes had a dramatic effect on the rates of cell migration. The most potent compound tested targeted the human Neu4 isoenzyme, and was able to substantially reduce the rate of cell migration. We found that the lateral mobility of integrins was reduced by treatment of cells with Neu3, suggesting that Neu3 enzyme activity resulted in changes to integrin-co-receptor or integrin-cytoskeleton interactions. Finally, our results support the hypothesis that inhibitors of human Neu can be used to investigate mechanisms of cell migration and for the development of anti-adhesive therapies.

  8. Nonpolarized signaling reveals two distinct modes of 3D cell migration.

    PubMed

    Petrie, Ryan J; Gavara, Núria; Chadwick, Richard S; Yamada, Kenneth M

    2012-04-30

    We search in this paper for context-specific modes of three-dimensional (3D) cell migration using imaging for phosphatidylinositol (3,4,5)-trisphosphate (PIP3) and active Rac1 and Cdc42 in primary fibroblasts migrating within different 3D environments. In 3D collagen, PIP3 and active Rac1 and Cdc42 were targeted to the leading edge, consistent with lamellipodia-based migration. In contrast, elongated cells migrating inside dermal explants and the cell-derived matrix (CDM) formed blunt, cylindrical protrusions, termed lobopodia, and Rac1, Cdc42, and PIP3 signaling was nonpolarized. Reducing RhoA, Rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK), or myosin II activity switched the cells to lamellipodia-based 3D migration. These modes of 3D migration were regulated by matrix physical properties. Specifically, experimentally modifying the elasticity of the CDM or collagen gels established that nonlinear elasticity supported lamellipodia-based migration, whereas linear elasticity switched cells to lobopodia-based migration. Thus, the relative polarization of intracellular signaling identifies two distinct modes of 3D cell migration governed intrinsically by RhoA, ROCK, and myosin II and extrinsically by the elastic behavior of the 3D extracellular matrix.

  9. Angiotensin Converting Enzyme Regulates Cell Proliferation and Migration

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Clarissa Coelho; Florentino, Rodrigo Machado; França, Andressa; Matias, Eveline; Guimarães, Paola Bianchi; Batista, Carolina; Freire, Valder; Carmona, Adriana Karaoglanovic; Pesquero, João Bosco; de Paula, Ana Maria; Foureaux, Giselle; Leite, Maria de Fatima

    2016-01-01

    Background The angiotensin-I converting enzyme (ACE) plays a central role in the renin-angiotensin system, acting by converting the hormone angiotensin-I to the active peptide angiotensin-II (Ang-II). More recently, ACE was shown to act as a receptor for Ang-II, and its expression level was demonstrated to be higher in melanoma cells compared to their normal counterparts. However, the function that ACE plays as an Ang-II receptor in melanoma cells has not been defined yet. Aim Therefore, our aim was to examine the role of ACE in tumor cell proliferation and migration. Results We found that upon binding to ACE, Ang-II internalizes with a faster onset compared to the binding of Ang-II to its classical AT1 receptor. We also found that the complex Ang-II/ACE translocates to the nucleus, through a clathrin-mediated process, triggering a transient nuclear Ca2+ signal. In silico studies revealed a possible interaction site between ACE and phospholipase C (PLC), and experimental results in CHO cells, demonstrated that the β3 isoform of PLC is the one involved in the Ca2+ signals induced by Ang-II/ACE interaction. Further studies in melanoma cells (TM-5) showed that Ang-II induced cell proliferation through ACE activation, an event that could be inhibited either by ACE inhibitor (Lisinopril) or by the silencing of ACE. In addition, we found that stimulation of ACE by Ang-II caused the melanoma cells to migrate, at least in part due to decreased vinculin expression, a focal adhesion structural protein. Conclusion ACE activation regulates melanoma cell proliferation and migration. PMID:27992423

  10. Honokiol induces autophagy of neuroblastoma cells through activating the PI3K/Akt/mTOR and endoplasmic reticular stress/ERK1/2 signaling pathways and suppressing cell migration.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Poh-Shiow; Wang, Weu; Chang, Ya-An; Lin, Chien-Ju; Wang, Jhi-Joung; Chen, Ruei-Ming

    2016-01-01

    autophagy of neuroblastoma cells and consequent apoptosis through activating the PI3K/Akt/mTOR and ERS/ROS/ERK1/2 signaling pathways and suppressing cell migration. Thus, honokiol has potential for treating neuroblastomas.

  11. Silencing of VAMP3 inhibits cell migration and integrin-mediated adhesion

    SciTech Connect

    Luftman, Kevin; Hasan, Nazarul; Day, Paul; Hardee, Deborah; Hu Chuan

    2009-02-27

    Integrins are transmembrane receptors for cell adhesion to the extracellular matrix. In cell migration, integrins are endocytosed from the plasma membrane or the cell surface, transported in vesicles and exocytosed actively at the cell front. In the present study, we examined the roles of VAMP3, a SNARE protein that mediates exocytosis, in cell migration and integrin trafficking. Small interfering RNA (siRNA)-induced silencing of VAMP3 inhibited chemotactic cell migration by more than 60% without affecting cell proliferation. VAMP3 silencing reduced the levels of {beta}1 integrin at the cell surface but had no effect on total cellular {beta}1 integrin, indicating that VAMP3 is required for trafficking of {beta}1 integrin to the plasma membrane. Furthermore, VAMP3 silencing diminished cell adhesion to laminin but not to fibronectin or collagen. Taken together, these data suggest that VAMP3-dependent integrin trafficking is crucial in cell migration and cell adhesion to laminin.

  12. Alkylindole-sensitive receptors modulate microglial cell migration and proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Fung, Susan; Cherry, Allison E.; Xu, Cong; Stella, Nephi

    2015-01-01

    Ligands targeting G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR) expressed by microglia have been shown to regulate distinct components of their activation process, including cell proliferation, migration and differentiation into M1 or M2 phenotypes. Cannabinoids, including the active component of the Cannabis plant, tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), and the synthetic alkylindole (AI) compound, WIN55212-2 (WIN-2), activate two molecularly identified GPCRs: CB1 and CB2. Previous studies reported that WIN-2 activates an additional unknown GPCR that is not activated by plant-derived cannabinoids, and evidence indicates that microglia express these receptors. Detailed studies on the role of AI-sensitive receptors in microglial cell activation were difficult as no selective pharmacological tools were available. Here, three newly-developed AI analogues allowed us to determine if microglia express AI-sensitive receptors and if so, study how they regulate the microglial cell activation process. We found that mouse microglia in primary culture express functional AI-sensitive receptors as measured by radioligand binding and changes in intracellular cAMP levels, and that these receptors control both basal and ATP-stimulated migration. AI analogues inhibit cell proliferation stimulated by macrophage-colony stimulating factor (M-CSF) without affecting basal cell proliferation. Remarkably, AI analogues do not control the expression of effector proteins characteristic of M1 or M2 phenotypes; yet activating microglia with M1 and M2 cytokines reduces the microglial response to AI analogues. Our results suggest that microglia express functional AI-sensitive receptors that control select components of their activation process. Agonists of these novel targets might represent a novel class of therapeutics to influence the microglial cell activation process. PMID:25914169

  13. LXR activation inhibits chemokine-induced CD4-positive lymphocyte migration.

    PubMed

    Walcher, Daniel; Vasic, Dusica; Heinz, Philipp; Bach, Helga; Durst, Renate; Hausauer, Angelina; Hombach, Vinzenz; Marx, Nikolaus

    2010-07-01

    Migration of CD4-positive lymphocytes into the vessel wall is a critical step in atherogenesis. Recent data suggest that CD4-positive lymphocytes express the nuclear transcription factors Liver-X-Receptor (LXR) alpha and beta with an effect of LXR activators on TH1-cytokine release from these cells. However, the role of LXR in lymphocyte migration remains currently unexplored. Therefore, the present study investigated whether LXR activation might modulate chemokine-induced migration of these cells. Stimulation of CD4-positive lymphocytes with SDF-1 leads to a 2.5 +/- 0.8-fold increase in cell migration (P < 0.05; n = 12). Pretreatment of cells with the LXR activator T0901317 reduces this effect in a concentration-dependent manner to a maximal 0.9 +/- 0.4-fold induction at 1 micromol/L T0901317 (P < 0.05 compared to SDF-1-treated cells; n = 12). Similar results were obtained with the LXR activator GW3965. The effect of LXR activators on CD4-positive lymphocyte migration was mediated through an early inhibition of chemokine-induced PI-3 kinase activity as determined by PI-3 kinase activity assays. Downstream, T0901317 inhibited activation of the small GTPase Rac and phosphorylation of the myosin light chain (MLC). Moreover, LXR activator treatment reduced f-actin formation as well as ICAM3 translocation to the uropod of the cell, thus interfering with two important steps in T cell migration. Transfection of CD4-positive lymphocytes with LXRalpha/beta siRNA abolished T0901317 inhibitory effect on MLC phosphorylation and ICAM3 translocation. LXR activation by T0901317 or GW3965 inhibits chemokine-induced migration of CD4-positive lymphocytes. Given the crucial importance of chemokine-induced T cell migration in early atherogenesis, LXR activators may be promising tools to modulate this effect.

  14. Anandamide inhibits adhesion and migration of breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Grimaldi, Claudia; Pisanti, Simona; Laezza, Chiara; Malfitano, Anna Maria; Santoro, Antonietta; Vitale, Mario; Caruso, Maria Gabriella; Notarnicola, Maria; Iacuzzo, Irma; Portella, Giuseppe; Di Marzo, Vincenzo . E-mail: vdimarzo@icmib.na.cnr.it; Bifulco, Maurizio . E-mail: maubiful@unina.it

    2006-02-15

    The endocannabinoid system regulates cell proliferation in human breast cancer cells. We reasoned that stimulation of cannabinoid CB{sub 1} receptors could induce a non-invasive phenotype in breast mtastatic cells. In a model of metastatic spreading in vivo, the metabolically stable anandamide analogue, 2-methyl-2'-F-anandamide (Met-F-AEA), significantly reduced the number and dimension of metastatic nodes, this effect being antagonized by the selective CB{sub 1} antagonist SR141716A. In MDA-MB-231 cells, a highly invasive human breast cancer cell line, and in TSA-E1 cells, a murine breast cancer cell line, Met-F-AEA inhibited adhesion and migration on type IV collagen in vitro without modifying integrin expression: both these effects were antagonized by SR141716A. In order to understand the molecular mechanism involved in these processes, we analyzed the phosphorylation of FAK and Src, two tyrosine kinases involved in migration and adhesion. In Met-F-AEA-treated cells, we observed a decreased tyrosine phosphorylation of both FAK and Src, this effect being attenuated by SR141716A. We propose that CB{sub 1} receptor agonists inhibit tumor cell invasion and metastasis by modulating FAK phosphorylation, and that CB{sub 1} receptor activation might represent a novel therapeutic strategy to slow down the growth of breast carcinoma and to inhibit its metastatic diffusion in vivo.

  15. Differential migration and proliferation of geometrical ensembles of cell clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Girish; Chen, Bo; Co, Carlos C.; Ho, Chia-Chi

    2011-06-10

    Differential cell migration and growth drives the organization of specific tissue forms and plays a critical role in embryonic development, tissue morphogenesis, and tumor invasion. Localized gradients of soluble factors and extracellular matrix have been shown to modulate cell migration and proliferation. Here we show that in addition to these factors, initial tissue geometry can feedback to generate differential proliferation, cell polarity, and migration patterns. We apply layer by layer polyelectrolyte assembly to confine multicellular organization and subsequently release cells to demonstrate the spatial patterns of cell migration and growth. The cell shapes, spreading areas, and cell-cell contacts are influenced strongly by the confining geometry. Cells within geometric ensembles are morphologically polarized. Symmetry breaking was observed for cells on the circular pattern and cells migrate toward the corners and in the direction parallel to the longest dimension of the geometric shapes. This migration pattern is disrupted when actomyosin based tension was inhibited. Cells near the edge or corner of geometric shapes proliferate while cells within do not. Regions of higher rate of cell migration corresponded to regions of concentrated growth. These findings demonstrate that multicellular organization can result in spatial patterns of migration and proliferation.

  16. FH535 inhibited migration and growth of breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Iida, Joji; Dorchak, Jesse; Lehman, John R; Clancy, Rebecca; Luo, Chunqing; Chen, Yaqin; Somiari, Stella; Ellsworth, Rachel E; Hu, Hai; Mural, Richard J; Shriver, Craig D

    2012-01-01

    There is substantial evidence indicating that the WNT signaling pathway is activated in various cancer cell types including breast cancer. Previous studies reported that FH535, a small molecule inhibitor of the WNT signaling pathway, decreased growth of cancer cells but not normal fibroblasts, suggesting this pathway plays a role in tumor progression and metastasis. In this study, we tested FH535 as a potential inhibitor for malignant phenotypes of breast cancer cells including migration, invasion, and growth. FH535 significantly inhibited growth, migration, and invasion of triple negative (TN) breast cancer cell lines (MDA-MB231 and HCC38) in vitro. We demonstrate that FH535 was a potent growth inhibitor for TN breast cancer cell lines (HCC38 and MDA-MB-231) but not for other, non-TN breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7, T47D or SK-Br3) when cultured in three dimensional (3D) type I collagen gels. Western blotting analyses suggest that treatment of MDA-MB-231 cells with FH535 markedly inhibited the expression of NEDD9 but not activations of FAK, Src, or downstream targets such as p38 and Erk1/2. We demonstrated that NEDD9 was specifically associated with CSPG4 but not with β1 integrin or CD44 in MDA-MB-231 cells. Analyses of gene expression profiles in breast cancer tissues suggest that CSPG4 expression is higher in Basal-type breast cancers, many of which are TN, than any other subtypes. These results suggest not only a mechanism for migration and invasion involving the canonical WNT-signaling pathways but also novel strategies for treating patients who develop TN breast cancer.

  17. Water permeation drives tumor cell migration in confined microenvironments.

    PubMed

    Stroka, Kimberly M; Jiang, Hongyuan; Chen, Shih-Hsun; Tong, Ziqiu; Wirtz, Denis; Sun, Sean X; Konstantopoulos, Konstantinos

    2014-04-24

    Cell migration is a critical process for diverse (patho)physiological phenomena. Intriguingly, cell migration through physically confined spaces can persist even when typical hallmarks of 2D planar migration, such as actin polymerization and myosin II-mediated contractility, are inhibited. Here, we present an integrated experimental and theoretical approach ("Osmotic Engine Model") and demonstrate that directed water permeation is a major mechanism of cell migration in confined microenvironments. Using microfluidic and imaging techniques along with mathematical modeling, we show that tumor cells confined in a narrow channel establish a polarized distribution of Na+/H+ pumps and aquaporins in the cell membrane, which creates a net inflow of water and ions at the cell leading edge and a net outflow of water and ions at the trailing edge, leading to net cell displacement. Collectively, this study presents an alternate mechanism of cell migration in confinement that depends on cell-volume regulation via water permeation.

  18. Voltage-gated sodium channel Nav1.7 maintains the membrane potential and regulates the activation and chemokine-induced migration of a monocyte-derived dendritic cell subset.

    PubMed

    Kis-Toth, Katalin; Hajdu, Peter; Bacskai, Ildiko; Szilagyi, Orsolya; Papp, Ferenc; Szanto, Attila; Posta, Edit; Gogolak, Peter; Panyi, Gyorgy; Rajnavolgyi, Eva

    2011-08-01

    Expression of CD1a protein defines a human dendritic cell (DC) subset with unique functional activities. We aimed to study the expression of the Nav1.7 sodium channel and the functional consequences of its activity in CD1a(-) and CD1a(+) DC. Single-cell electrophysiology (patch-clamp) and quantitative PCR experiments performed on sorted CD1a(-) and CD1a(+) immature DC (IDC) showed that the frequency of cells expressing Na(+) current, current density, and the relative expression of the SCN9A gene encoding Nav1.7 were significantly higher in CD1a(+) cells than in their CD1a(-) counterparts. The activity of Nav1.7 results in a depolarized resting membrane potential (-8.7 ± 1.5 mV) in CD1a(+) IDC as compared with CD1a(-) cells lacking Nav1.7 (-47 ± 6.2 mV). Stimulation of DC by inflammatory signals or by increased intracellular Ca(2+) levels resulted in reduced Nav1.7 expression. Silencing of the SCN9A gene shifted the membrane potential to a hyperpolarizing direction in CD1a(+) IDC, resulting in decreased cell migration, whereas pharmacological inhibition of Nav1.7 by tetrodotoxin sensitized the cells for activation signals. Fine-tuning of IDC functions by a voltage-gated sodium channel emerges as a new regulatory mechanism modulating the migration and cytokine responses of these DC subsets.

  19. Studying Neutrophil Migration In Vivo Using Adoptive Cell Transfer.

    PubMed

    Miyabe, Yoshishige; Kim, Nancy D; Miyabe, Chie; Luster, Andrew D

    2016-01-01

    Adoptive cell transfer experiments can be used to study the roles of cell trafficking molecules on the migratory behavior of specific immune cell populations in vivo. Chemoattractants and their G protein-coupled seven-transmembrane-spanning receptors regulate migration of cells in vivo, and dysregulated expression of chemoattractants and their receptors is implicated in autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. Inflammatory arthritides, such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA), are characterized by the recruitment of inflammatory cells into joints. The K/BxN serum transfer mouse model of inflammatory arthritis shares many similar features with RA. In this autoantibody-induced model of arthritis, neutrophils are the critical immune cells necessary for the development of joint inflammation and damage. We have used adoptive neutrophil transfer to define the contributions of chemoattractant receptors, cytokines, and activation receptors expressed on neutrophils that critically regulate their entry into the inflamed joint. In this review, we describe the procedure of neutrophil adoptive transfer to study the influence of neutrophil-specific receptors or mediators upon the their recruitment into the joint using the K/BxN model of inflammatory arthritis as a model of how adoptive cell transfer studies can be used to study immune cell migration in vivo.

  20. The NANIVID: a new device for cancer cell migration studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raja, Waseem K.; Cady, Nathaniel C.; Castracane, James; Gligorijevic, Bojana; van Rheenen, Jacobus W.; Condeelis, John S.

    2008-02-01

    Cancerous tumors are dynamic microenvironments that require unique analytical tools for their study. Better understanding of tumor microenvironments may reveal mechanisms behind tumor progression and generate new strategies for diagnostic marker development, which can be used routinely in histopathological analysis. Previous studies have shown that cell invasion and intravasation are related to metastatic potential and have linked these activities to gene expression patterns seen in migratory and invasive tumor cells in vivo. Existing analytical methods for tumor microenvironments include collection of tumor cells through a catheter needle loaded with a chemical or protein attractant (chemoattractant). This method has some limitations and restrictions, including time constraints of cell collection, long term anesthetization, and in vivo imaging inside the catheter. In this study, a novel implantable device was designed to replace the catheter-based method. The 1.5mm x 0.5mm x 0.24mm device is designed to controllably release chemoattractants for stimulation of tumor cell migration and subsequent cell capture. Devices were fabricated using standard microfabrication techniques and have been shown to mediate controlled release of bovine serum albumin (BSA) and epidermal growth factor (EGF). Optically transparent indium tin oxide (ITO) electrodes have been incorporated into the device for impedance-based measurement of cell density and have been shown to be compatible with in vivo multi-photon imaging of cell migration.

  1. Texture sensing of cytoskeletal dynamics in cell migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Satarupa; Lee, Rachel; Hourwitz, Matthew J.; Sun, Xiaoyu; Parent, Carole; Fourkas, John T.; Losert, Wolfgang

    Migrating cells can be directed towards a target by gradients in properties such as chemical concentration or mechanical properties of the surrounding microenvironment. In previous studies we have shown that micro/nanotopographical features on scales comparable to those of natural collagen fibers can guide fast migrating amoeboid cells by aligning actin polymerization waves to such nanostructures. We find that actin microfilaments and microtubules are aligned along the nanoridge topographies, modulating overall cell polarity and directional migration in epithelial cells. This work shows that topographic features on a biologically relevant length scale can modulate migration outcomes by affecting the texture sensing property of the cytoskeleton.

  2. Cinnamtannin B-1 Promotes Migration of Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Accelerates Wound Healing in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Kosuke; Kuge, Katsunori; Ozawa, Noriyasu; Sahara, Shunya; Zaiki, Kaori; Nakaoji, Koichi; Hamada, Kazuhiko; Takenaka, Yukiko; Tanahashi, Takao; Tamai, Katsuto; Kaneda, Yasufumi; Maeda, Akito

    2015-01-01

    Substances that enhance the migration of mesenchymal stem cells to damaged sites have the potential to improve the effectiveness of tissue repair. We previously found that ethanol extracts of Mallotus philippinensis bark promoted migration of mesenchymal stem cells and improved wound healing in a mouse model. We also demonstrated that bark extracts contain cinnamtannin B-1, a flavonoid with in vitro migratory activity against mesenchymal stem cells. However, the in vivo effects of cinnamtannin B-1 on the migration of mesenchymal stem cells and underlying mechanism of this action remain unknown. Therefore, we examined the effects of cinnamtannin B-1 on in vivo migration of mesenchymal stem cells and wound healing in mice. In addition, we characterized cinnamtannin B-1-induced migration of mesenchymal stem cells pharmacologically and structurally. The mobilization of endogenous mesenchymal stem cells into the blood circulation was enhanced in cinnamtannin B-1-treated mice as shown by flow cytometric analysis of peripheral blood cells. Whole animal imaging analysis using luciferase-expressing mesenchymal stem cells as a tracer revealed that cinnamtannin B-1 increased the homing of mesenchymal stem cells to wounds and accelerated healing in a diabetic mouse model. Additionally, the cinnamtannin B-1-induced migration of mesenchymal stem cells was pharmacologically susceptible to inhibitors of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, phospholipase C, lipoxygenase, and purines. Furthermore, biflavonoids with similar structural features to cinnamtannin B-1 also augmented the migration of mesenchymal stem cells by similar pharmacological mechanisms. These results demonstrate that cinnamtannin B-1 promoted mesenchymal stem cell migration in vivo and improved wound healing in mice. Furthermore, the results reveal that cinnamtannin B-1-induced migration of mesenchymal stem cells may be mediated by specific signaling pathways, and the flavonoid skeleton may be relevant to its effects on

  3. Cinnamtannin B-1 Promotes Migration of Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Accelerates Wound Healing in Mice.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Kosuke; Kuge, Katsunori; Ozawa, Noriyasu; Sahara, Shunya; Zaiki, Kaori; Nakaoji, Koichi; Hamada, Kazuhiko; Takenaka, Yukiko; Tanahashi, Takao; Tamai, Katsuto; Kaneda, Yasufumi; Maeda, Akito

    2015-01-01

    Substances that enhance the migration of mesenchymal stem cells to damaged sites have the potential to improve the effectiveness of tissue repair. We previously found that ethanol extracts of Mallotus philippinensis bark promoted migration of mesenchymal stem cells and improved wound healing in a mouse model. We also demonstrated that bark extracts contain cinnamtannin B-1, a flavonoid with in vitro migratory activity against mesenchymal stem cells. However, the in vivo effects of cinnamtannin B-1 on the migration of mesenchymal stem cells and underlying mechanism of this action remain unknown. Therefore, we examined the effects of cinnamtannin B-1 on in vivo migration of mesenchymal stem cells and wound healing in mice. In addition, we characterized cinnamtannin B-1-induced migration of mesenchymal stem cells pharmacologically and structurally. The mobilization of endogenous mesenchymal stem cells into the blood circulation was enhanced in cinnamtannin B-1-treated mice as shown by flow cytometric analysis of peripheral blood cells. Whole animal imaging analysis using luciferase-expressing mesenchymal stem cells as a tracer revealed that cinnamtannin B-1 increased the homing of mesenchymal stem cells to wounds and accelerated healing in a diabetic mouse model. Additionally, the cinnamtannin B-1-induced migration of mesenchymal stem cells was pharmacologically susceptible to inhibitors of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, phospholipase C, lipoxygenase, and purines. Furthermore, biflavonoids with similar structural features to cinnamtannin B-1 also augmented the migration of mesenchymal stem cells by similar pharmacological mechanisms. These results demonstrate that cinnamtannin B-1 promoted mesenchymal stem cell migration in vivo and improved wound healing in mice. Furthermore, the results reveal that cinnamtannin B-1-induced migration of mesenchymal stem cells may be mediated by specific signaling pathways, and the flavonoid skeleton may be relevant to its effects on

  4. Control of glioma cell migration and invasiveness by GDF-15.

    PubMed

    Codó, Paula; Weller, Michael; Kaulich, Kerstin; Schraivogel, Daniel; Silginer, Manuela; Reifenberger, Guido; Meister, Gunter; Roth, Patrick

    2016-02-16

    Growth and differentiation factor (GDF)-15 is a member of the transforming growth factor (TGF)-β family of proteins. GDF-15 levels are increased in the blood and cerebrospinal fluid of glioblastoma patients. Using a TCGA database interrogation, we demonstrate that high GDF-15 expression levels are associated with poor survival of glioblastoma patients. To elucidate the role of GDF-15 in glioblastoma in detail, we confirmed that glioma cells express GDF-15 mRNA and protein in vitro. To allow for a detailed functional characterization, GDF-15 expression was silenced using RNA interference in LNT-229 and LN-308 glioma cells. Depletion of GDF-15 had no effect on cell viability. In contrast, GDF-15-deficient cells displayed reduced migration and invasion, in the absence of changes in Smad2 or Smad1/5/8 phosphorylation. Conversely, exogenous GDF-15 stimulated migration and invasiveness. Large-scale expression profiling revealed that GDF-15 gene silencing resulted in minor changes in the miRNA profile whereas several genes, including members of the plasminogen activator/inhibitor complex, were deregulated at the mRNA level. One of the newly identified genes induced by GDF-15 gene silencing was the serpin peptidase inhibitor, clade E nexin group 1 (serpine1) which is induced by TGF-β and known to inhibit migration and invasiveness. However, serpine1 down-regulation alone did not mediate GDF-15-induced promotion of migration and invasiveness. Our findings highlight the complex contributions of GDF-15 to the invasive phenotype of glioma cells and suggest anti-GDF-15 approaches as a promising therapeutic strategy.

  5. Control of glioma cell migration and invasiveness by GDF-15

    PubMed Central

    Codó, Paula; Weller, Michael; Kaulich, Kerstin; Schraivogel, Daniel; Silginer, Manuela; Reifenberger, Guido; Meister, Gunter; Roth, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Growth and differentiation factor (GDF)-15 is a member of the transforming growth factor (TGF)-β family of proteins. GDF-15 levels are increased in the blood and cerebrospinal fluid of glioblastoma patients. Using a TCGA database interrogation, we demonstrate that high GDF-15 expression levels are associated with poor survival of glioblastoma patients. To elucidate the role of GDF-15 in glioblastoma in detail, we confirmed that glioma cells express GDF-15 mRNA and protein in vitro. To allow for a detailed functional characterization, GDF-15 expression was silenced using RNA interference in LNT-229 and LN-308 glioma cells. Depletion of GDF-15 had no effect on cell viability. In contrast, GDF-15-deficient cells displayed reduced migration and invasion, in the absence of changes in Smad2 or Smad1/5/8 phosphorylation. Conversely, exogenous GDF-15 stimulated migration and invasiveness. Large-scale expression profiling revealed that GDF-15 gene silencing resulted in minor changes in the miRNA profile whereas several genes, including members of the plasminogen activator/inhibitor complex, were deregulated at the mRNA level. One of the newly identified genes induced by GDF-15 gene silencing was the serpin peptidase inhibitor, clade E nexin group 1 (serpine1) which is induced by TGF-β and known to inhibit migration and invasiveness. However, serpine1 down-regulation alone did not mediate GDF-15-induced promotion of migration and invasiveness. Our findings highlight the complex contributions of GDF-15 to the invasive phenotype of glioma cells and suggest anti-GDF-15 approaches as a promising therapeutic strategy. PMID:26741507

  6. Overexpression of Rac1 in leukemia patients and its role in leukemia cell migration and growth

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jiying; Rao, Qing; Wang, Min; Wei, Hui; Xing, Haiyan; Liu, Hang; Wang, Yanzhong; Tang, Kejing; Peng, Leiwen; Tian, Zheng; Wang, Jianxiang

    2009-09-04

    Rac1 belongs to the Rho family that act as critical mediators of signaling pathways controlling cell migration and proliferation and contributes to the interactions of hematopoietic stem cells with their microenvironment. Alteration of Rac1 might result in unbalanced interactions and ultimately lead to leukemogenesis. In this study, we analyze the expression of Rac1 protein in leukemia patients and determine its role in the abnormal behaviours of leukemic cells. Rac1 protein is overexpressed in primary acute myeloid leukemia cells as compared to normal bone marrow mononuclear cells. siRNA-mediated silencing of Rac1 in leukemia cell lines induced inhibition of cell migration, proliferation, and colony formation. Additionally, blocking Rac1 activity by an inhibitor of Rac1-GTPase, NSC23766, suppressed cell migration and growth. We conclude that overexpression of Rac1 contributes to the accelerated migration and high proliferation potential of leukemia cells, which could be implicated in leukemia development and progression.

  7. Fibronectin Modulates Cell Adhesion and Signaling to Promote Single Cell Migration of Highly Invasive Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Grasieli de Oliveira; Bernardi, Lisiane; Lauxen, Isabel; Sant’Ana Filho, Manoel; Horwitz, Alan Rick; Lamers, Marcelo Lazzaron

    2016-01-01

    Cell migration is regulated by adhesion to the extracellular matrix (ECM) through integrins and activation of small RhoGTPases, such as RhoA and Rac1, resulting in changes to actomyosin organization. During invasion, epithelial-derived tumor cells switch from laminin-enriched basal membrane to collagen and fibronectin-enriched connective tissue. How this switch affects the tumor migration is still unclear. We tested the hypothesis that ECM dictates the invasiveness of Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma (OSCC). We analyzed the migratory properties of two OSCC lines, a low invasive cell line with high e-cadherin levels (Linv/HE-cad) or a highly invasive cell line with low e-cadherin levels (Hinv/LE-cad), plated on different ECM components. Compared to laminin, fibronectin induced non-directional collective migration and decreased RhoA activity in Linv/HE-cad OSCC. For Hinv/LE-cad OSCC, fibronectin increased Rac1 activity and induced smaller adhesions, resulting in a fast single cell migration in both 2D and 3D environments. Consistent with these observations, human OSCC biopsies exhibited similar changes in cell-ECM adhesion distribution at the invasive front of the tumor, where cells encounter fibronectin. Our results indicate that ECM composition might induce a switch from collective to single cell migration according to tumor invasiveness due to changes in cell-ECM adhesion and the resulting signaling pathways that alter actomyosin organization. PMID:26978651

  8. Constitutive activation of p38 and ERK1/2 MAPKs in epithelial cells of myasthenic thymus leads to IL-6 and RANTES overexpression: effects on survival and migration of peripheral T and B cells.

    PubMed

    Colombara, Michaela; Antonini, Valeria; Riviera, Anna Pia; Mainiero, Fabrizio; Strippoli, Raffaele; Merola, Marcello; Fracasso, Giulio; Poffe, Ornella; Brutti, Nadia; Tridente, Giuseppe; Colombatti, Marco; Ramarli, Dunia

    2005-11-15

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is an autoimmune disease of neuromuscular junctions where thymus plays a pathogenetic role. Thymectomy benefits patients, and thymic hyperplasia, a lymphoid infiltration of perivascular spaces becoming site of autoantibody production, is recurrently observed. Cytokines and chemokines, produced by thymic epithelium and supporting survival and migration of T and B cells, are likely to be of great relevance in pathogenesis of thymic hyperplasia. In thymic epithelial cell (TEC) cultures derived "in vitro" from normal or hyperplastic age-matched MG thymuses, we demonstrate by gene profiling analysis that MG-TEC basally overexpress genes coding for p38 and ERK1/2 MAPKs and for components of their signaling pathways. Immunoblotting experiments confirmed that p38 and ERK1/2 proteins were overexpressed in MG-TEC and, in addition, constitutively activated. Pharmacological blockage with specific inhibitors confirmed their role in the control of IL-6 and RANTES gene expression. According to our results, IL-6 and RANTES levels were abnormally augmented in MG-TEC, either basally or upon induction by adhesion-related stimuli. The finding that IL-6 and RANTES modulate, respectively, survival and migration of peripheral lymphocytes of myasthenic patients point to MAPK transcriptional and posttranscriptional abnormalities of MG-TEC as a key step in the pathological remodelling of myasthenic thymus.

  9. Down-regulation of β-catenin and the associated migration ability by Taiwanin C in arecoline and 4-NQO-induced oral cancer cells via GSK-3β activation.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Cheng-Hong; Hsu, Hsi-Hsien; Shibu, Marthandam Asokan; Day, Cecilia-Hsuan; Bau, Da-Tian; Ho, Chih-Chu; Lin, Yueh-Min; Chen, Ming-Cheng; Wang, Shu-Huai; Huang, Chih-Yang

    2017-03-01

    Cancer is one of the leading causes of death worldwide, and oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) accounts for almost a sixth of all reported cancers. Arecoline, from areca nut is known to enhance carcinogenesis in oral squamous cells. The objective of this study is to determine the effect of Taiwanin C, from Taiwania cryptomerioides Hayata against Arecoline-associated carcinogenesis. An OSCC model was created in C57BL/6J Narl mice by administrating 0.5 mg mL(-1) arecoline with 0.2 mg mL(-1) 4-NQO carcinogen for 8 and 28 wk to mimic the etiology of oral cancer patients in Asia. Mice were sacrificed and two cell lines, T28 from the tumor and N28 cancerous cell line from the surrounding non tumor area, were established. Taiwanin C showed effective anti-tumor activity in nude mice models. Taiwanin C significantly inhibited the cell viability of T28 cells in a dose dependent manner, but did not inflict any effect on N28 normal cells. Taiwanin C treatment inhibited the migration ability of T28 cells in a dose dependent manner as determined by wound healing and migration assays. Taiwanin C also reduced the levels of β-catenin and its downstream metastatic proteins, Tbx3 and c-Myc. Besides, Taiwanin C inhibited the nuclear accumulation of β-catenin and induced β-catenin degradation via proteasome-mediated pathway. Moreover, Taiwanin C enhanced GSK-3β and reduced the p-ser(9) GSK-3β protein level to inactivate Wnt signaling. Taken together, Taiwanin C blocked the cell migration effects of T28 cells mediated through the activation of GSK-3β to enhance protein degradation and reduce nuclear accumulation of β-catenin. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. G protein-coupled receptor signaling through Gq and JNK negatively regulates neural progenitor cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Mizuno, Norikazu; Kokubu, Hiroshi; Sato, Maiko; Nishimura, Akiyuki; Yamauchi, Junji; Kurose, Hitoshi; Itoh, Hiroshi

    2005-01-01

    In the early development of the central nervous system, neural progenitor cells divide in an asymmetric manner and migrate along the radial glia cells. The radial migration is an important process for the proper lamination of the cerebral cortex. Recently, a new mode of the radial migration was found at the intermediate zone where the neural progenitor cells become multipolar and reduce the migration rate. However, the regulatory signals for the radial migration are unknown. Using the migration assay in vitro, we examined how neural progenitor cell migration is regulated. Neural progenitor cells derived from embryonic mouse telencephalon migrated on laminin-coated dishes. Endothelin (ET)-1 inhibited the neural progenitor cell migration. This ET-1 effect was blocked by BQ788, a specific inhibitor of the ETB receptor, and by the expression of a carboxyl-terminal peptide of Gαq but not Gαi. The expression of constitutively active mutant of Gαq, GαqR183C, inhibited the migration of neural progenitor cells. Moreover, the inhibitory effect of ET-1 was suppressed by the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) inhibitor SP600125 and the expression of the JNK-binding domain of JNK-interacting protein-1, a specific inhibitor of the JNK pathway. Using the slice culture system of embryonic brain, we demonstrated that ET-1 and the constitutively active mutant of Gαq caused the retention of the neural progenitor cells in the intermediate zone and JNK-binding domain of JNK-interacting protein-1 abrogated the effect of ET-1. These results indicated that G protein-coupled receptor signaling negatively regulates neural progenitor cell migration through Gq and JNK. PMID:16116085

  11. TGF-β1 stimulates migration of type II endometrial cancer cells by down-regulating PTEN via activation of SMAD and ERK1/2 signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Siyuan; Cheng, Jung-Chien; Klausen, Christian; Zhao, Jianfang; Leung, Peter C K

    2016-09-20

    PTEN acts as a tumor suppressor primarily by antagonizing the PI3K/AKT signaling pathway. PTEN is frequently mutated in human cancers; however, in type II endometrial cancers its mutation rate is very low. Overexpression of TGF-β1 and its receptors has been reported to correlate with metastasis of human cancers and reduced survival rates. Although TGF-β1 has been shown to regulate PTEN expression through various mechanisms, it is not yet known if the same is true in type II endometrial cancer. In the present study, we show that treatment with TGF-β1 stimulates the migration of two type II endometrial cancer cell lines, KLE and HEC-50. In addition, TGF-β1 treatment down-regulates both mRNA and protein levels of PTEN. Overexpression of PTEN or inhibition of PI3K abolishes TGF-β1-stimulated cell migration. TGF-β1 induces SMAD2/3 phosphorylation and knockdown of common SMAD4 inhibits the suppressive effects of TGF-β1 on PTEN mRNA and protein. Interestingly, TGF-β1 induces ERK1/2 phosphorylation and pre-treatment with a MEK inhibitor attenuates the suppression of PTEN protein, but not mRNA, by TGF-β1. This study provides important insights into the molecular mechanisms mediating TGF-β1-induced down-regulation of PTEN and demonstrates an important role of PTEN in the regulation of type II endometrial cancer cell migration.

  12. TGF-β1 stimulates migration of type II endometrial cancer cells by down-regulating PTEN via activation of SMAD and ERK1/2 signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Siyuan; Cheng, Jung-Chien; Klausen, Christian; Zhao, Jianfang; Leung, Peter C.K.

    2016-01-01

    PTEN acts as a tumor suppressor primarily by antagonizing the PI3K/AKT signaling pathway. PTEN is frequently mutated in human cancers; however, in type II endometrial cancers its mutation rate is very low. Overexpression of TGF-β1 and its receptors has been reported to correlate with metastasis of human cancers and reduced survival rates. Although TGF-β1 has been shown to regulate PTEN expression through various mechanisms, it is not yet known if the same is true in type II endometrial cancer. In the present study, we show that treatment with TGF-β1 stimulates the migration of two type II endometrial cancer cell lines, KLE and HEC-50. In addition, TGF-β1 treatment down-regulates both mRNA and protein levels of PTEN. Overexpression of PTEN or inhibition of PI3K abolishes TGF-β1-stimulated cell migration. TGF-β1 induces SMAD2/3 phosphorylation and knockdown of common SMAD4 inhibits the suppressive effects of TGF-β1 on PTEN mRNA and protein. Interestingly, TGF-β1 induces ERK1/2 phosphorylation and pre-treatment with a MEK inhibitor attenuates the suppression of PTEN protein, but not mRNA, by TGF-β1. This study provides important insights into the molecular mechanisms mediating TGF-β1-induced down-regulation of PTEN and demonstrates an important role of PTEN in the regulation of type II endometrial cancer cell migration. PMID:27542208

  13. Vinculin is required for cell polarization, migration, and extracellular matrix remodeling in 3D collagen.

    PubMed

    Thievessen, Ingo; Fakhri, Nikta; Steinwachs, Julian; Kraus, Viola; McIsaac, R Scott; Gao, Liang; Chen, Bi-Chang; Baird, Michelle A; Davidson, Michael W; Betzig, Eric; Oldenbourg, Rudolf; Waterman, Clare M; Fabry, Ben

    2015-11-01

    Vinculin is filamentous (F)-actin-binding protein enriched in integrin-based adhesions to the extracellular matrix (ECM). Whereas studies in 2-dimensional (2D) tissue culture models have suggested that vinculin negatively regulates cell migration by promoting cytoskeleton-ECM coupling to strengthen and stabilize adhesions, its role in regulating cell migration in more physiologic, 3-dimensional (3D) environments is unclear. To address the role of vinculin in 3D cell migration, we analyzed the morphodynamics, migration, and ECM remodeling of primary murine embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) with cre/loxP-mediated vinculin gene disruption in 3D collagen I cultures. We found that vinculin promoted 3D cell migration by increasing directional persistence. Vinculin was necessary for persistent cell protrusion, cell elongation, and stable cell orientation in 3D collagen, but was dispensable for lamellipodia formation, suggesting that vinculin-mediated cell adhesion to the ECM is needed to convert actin-based cell protrusion into persistent cell shape change and migration. Consistent with this finding, vinculin was necessary for efficient traction force generation in 3D collagen without affecting myosin II activity and promoted 3D collagen fiber alignment and macroscopical gel contraction. Our results suggest that vinculin promotes directionally persistent cell migration and tension-dependent ECM remodeling in complex 3D environments by increasing cell-ECM adhesion and traction force generation.

  14. A ring barrier-based migration assay to assess cell migration in vitro.

    PubMed

    Das, Asha M; Eggermont, Alexander M M; ten Hagen, Timo L M

    2015-06-01

    Cell migration is a key feature of virtually every biological process, and it can be studied in a variety of ways. Here we outline a protocol for the in vitro study of cell migration using a ring barrier-based assay. A 'barrier' is inserted in the culture chamber, which prevents cells from entering a defined area. Cells of interest are seeded around this barrier, and after the formation of a peripheral monolayer the barrier is removed and migration into the cell-free area is monitored. This assay is highly reproducible and convenient to perform, and it allows the deduction of several parameters of migration, including total and effective migration, velocity and cell polarization. An advantage of this assay over the conventional scratch assay is that the cells move over an unaltered and virgin surface, and thus the effect of matrix components on cell migration can be studied. In addition, the cells are not harmed at the onset of the assay. Through computer automation, four individual barrier assays can be monitored at the same time. The procedure can be used in a 12-well standard plate allowing higher throughput, or it can be modified to perform invasion assays. The basic procedure takes 2-3 d to complete.

  15. STRIPAK components determine mode of cancer cell migration and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Madsen, Chris D.; Hooper, Steven; Tozluoglu, Melda; Bruckbauer, Andreas; Fletcher, Georgina; Erler, Janine T.; Bates, Paul A.; Thompson, Barry; Sahai, Erik

    2017-01-01

    The contractile actomyosin cytoskeleton and its connection to the plasma membrane are critical for control of cell shape and migration. We identify three STRIPAK complex components, FAM40A, FAM40B, and STRN3, as regulators of the actomyosin cortex. We show that FAM40A negatively regulates the MST3 and MST4 kinases, which promote the co-localisation of the contractile actomyosin machinery with the Ezrin/Radixin/Moesin family proteins by phosphorylating the inhibitors of PPP1CB, PPP1R14A-D. Using computational modelling, in vitro cell migration assays and in vivo breast cancer metastasis assays we demonstrate that co-localisation of contractile activity and actin-plasma membrane linkage reduces cell speed on planar surfaces, but favours migration in confined environments similar to those observed in vivo. We further show that FAM40B mutations found in human tumours uncouple it from PP2A and enable it to drive a contractile phenotype, which may underlie its role in human cancer. PMID:25531779

  16. Immature myeloid Gr-1+ CD11b+ cells from lipopolysaccharide-immunosuppressed mice acquire inhibitory activity in the bone marrow and migrate to lymph nodes to exert their suppressive function.

    PubMed

    Landoni, Veronica I; Martire-Greco, Daiana; Rodriguez-Rodrigues, Nahuel; Chiarella, Paula; Schierloh, Pablo; Isturiz, Martin A; Fernández, Gabriela C

    2016-02-01

    Secondary infections due to post-sepsis immunosuppression are a major cause of death in patients with sepsis. Repetitive inoculation of increasing doses of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) into mice mimics the immunosuppression associated with sepsis. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs, Gr-1(+) CD11b(+)) are considered a major component of the immunosuppressive network, interfering with T-cell responses in many pathological conditions. We used LPS-immunosuppressed (IS) mice to address whether MDSCs acquired their suppressive ability in the bone marrow (BM) and whether they could migrate to lymph nodes (LNs) to exert their suppressive function. Our results showed that Gr-1(+) CD11b(+) cells of IS mice already had the potential to inhibit T-cell proliferation in the BM. Moreover, soluble factors present in the BM from IS mice were responsible for inducing this inhibitory ability in control BM cells. In addition, migration of Gr-1(+) CD11b(+) to LNs in vivo was maximal when cells obtained from the BM of IS mice were inoculated into an IS context. In this regard, we found chemoattractant activity in cell-free LN extracts (LNEs) from IS mice and an increased expression of the LN-homing chemokine receptor C-C chemokine receptor type 7 (CCR7) in IS BM Gr-1(+) CD11b(+) cells. These results indicate that Gr-1(+) CD11b(+) cells found in BM from IS mice acquire their suppressive activity in the same niche where they are generated, and migrate to LNs to exert their inhibitory role. A better understanding of MDSC generation and/or regulation of factors able to induce their inhibitory function may provide new and more effective tools for the treatment of sepsis-associated immunosuppression.

  17. Inhibition of fatty acid synthase suppresses U-2 OS cell invasion and migration via downregulating the activity of HER2/PI3K/AKT signaling pathway in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Tao Fang; Wang, Heng; Peng, Ai Fen; Luo, Qing Feng; Liu, Zhi Li; Zhou, Rong Ping; Gao, Song; Zhou, Yang; Chen, Wen Zhao

    2013-10-18

    Highlights: •We investigate the relationship between FASN and HER2 or p-HER2 by IHC in OS tissues. •We construct FASN-specific RNAi plasmid. •Inhibiting FASN down-regulates HER2/PI3K/AKT cell signaling in U-2 OS. •Inhibiting FASN blocks U-2 OS cell invasion and migration. -- Abstract: FASN plays an important role in the malignant phenotype of various tumors. Our previous studies show that inhibition FASN could induce apoptosis and inhibit proliferation in human osteosarcoma (OS) cell in vivo and vitro. The aim in this study was to investigate the effect of inhibition FASN on the activity of HER2/PI3K/AKT axis and invasion and migration of OS cell. The expression of FASN, HER2 and p-HER2(Y1248) proteins was detected by immunohistochemistry in OS tissues from 24 patients with pulmonary metastatic disease, and the relationship between FASN and p-HER2 as well as HER2 was investigated. The results showed that there was a positive correlation between FASN and HER2 as well as p-HER2 protein expression. The U-2 OS cells were transfected with either the FASN specific RNAi plasmid or the negative control RNAi plasmid. FASN mRNA was measured by RT-PCR. Western blot assays was performed to examine the protein expression of FASN, HER2, p-HER2(Y1248), PI3K, Akt and p-Akt (Ser473). Migration and invasion of cells were investigated by wound healing and transwell invasion assays. The results showed that the activity of HER2/PI3K/AKT signaling pathway was suppressed by inhibiting FASN. Meanwhile, the U-2OS cells migration and invasion were also impaired by inhibiting the activity of FASN/HER2/PI3K/AKT. Our results indicated that inhibition of FASN suppresses OS cell invasion and migration via down-regulation of the “HER2/PI3K/AKT” axis in vitro. FASN blocker may be a new therapeutic strategy in OS management.

  18. Modulation of Cell Migration and Invasiveness by Tumor Suppressor TSC2 in Lymphangioleiomyomatosis

    PubMed Central

    Goncharova, Elena A.; Goncharov, Dmitriy A.; Lim, Poay N.; Noonan, Daniel; Krymskaya, Vera P.

    2006-01-01

    The loss of TSC2 function is associated with the pathobiology of lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM), which is characterized by the abnormal proliferation, migration, and differentiation of smooth muscle–like cells within the lungs. Although the etiology of LAM remains unknown, clinical and genetic evidence provides support for the neoplastic nature of LAM. The goal of this study was to determine the role of tumor suppressor TSC2 in the neoplastic potential of LAM cells. We show that primary cultures of human LAM cells exhibit increased migratory activity and invasiveness, which is abolished by TSC2 re-expression. We found that TSC2 also inhibits cell migration through its N-terminus, independent of its GTPase-activating protein activity. LAM cells show increased stress fiber and focal adhesion formation, which is attenuated by TSC2 re-expression. The small GTPase RhoA is activated in LAM cells compared with normal human mesenchymal cells. Pharmacologic inhibition of Rho activity abrogates LAM cell migration; RhoA activity was also abolished by TSC2 re-expression or TSC1 knockdown with specific siRNA. These data demonstrate that TSC2 controls cell migration through its N-terminus by associating with TSC1 and regulating RhoA activity, suggesting that TSC2 may play a critical role in modulating cell migration and invasiveness, which contributes to the pathobiology of LAM. PMID:16388022

  19. Memo is a cofilin-interacting protein that influences PLCgamma1 and cofilin activities, and is essential for maintaining directionality during ErbB2-induced tumor-cell migration.

    PubMed

    Meira, Maria; Masson, Régis; Stagljar, Igor; Lienhard, Susanne; Maurer, Francisca; Boulay, Anne; Hynes, Nancy E

    2009-03-15

    Heregulin (HRG) activates ErbB2-ErbB3 heterodimers thereby stimulating many cellular responses, including motility. Memo and PLCgamma1 interact with ErbB2 autophosphorylation sites and are essential for HRG-induced chemotaxis. By tracing HRG-stimulated cell migration in Dunn chambers, we found that Memo- or PLCgamma1 knockdown (KD) strongly impairs cell directionality. Memo has no obvious enzymatic activity and was discovered via its ability to complex with ErbB2. Using the yeast two-hybrid approach to gain insight into Memo function, an interaction between Memo and cofilin, a regulator of actin dynamics, was uncovered. The interaction was confirmed in vitro using recombinant proteins and in vivo in co-immunoprecipitation experiments where Memo was detected in complexes with cofilin, ErbB2 and PLCgamma1. Interestingly, in Memo KD cells, HRG-induced PLCgamma1 phosphorylation was decreased, suggesting that Memo regulates PLCgamma1 activation. Furthermore, HRG-induced recruitment of GFP-cofilin to lamellipodia is impaired in Memo and in PLCgamma1 KD cells, suggesting that both proteins lie upstream of cofilin in models of ErbB2-driven tumor-cell migration. Finally, in vitro F-actin binding and depolymerization assays showed that Memo enhances cofilin depolymerizing and severing activity. In summary, these data indicate that Memo also regulates actin dynamics by interacting with cofilin and enhancing its function.

  20. 3D cancer cell migration in a confined matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alobaidi, Amani; Sun, Bo

    Cancer cell migration is widely studied in 2D motion, which does not mimic the invasion processes in vivo. More recently, 3D cell migration studies have been performed. The ability of cancer cells to migrate within the extracellular matrix depends on the physical and biochemical features of the extracellular matrix. We present a model of cell motility in confined matrix geometry. The aim of the study is to study cancer migration in collagen matrix, as a soft tissue, to investigate their motility within the confined and surrounding collagen environment. Different collagen concentrations have been used to show the ability of these cancer cells to move through such a complex structure by measuring Cancer cell migration velocity as well as the displacement. Graduate student physics department.

  1. Vaccination against canine leishmaniosis increases the phagocytic activity, nitric oxide production and expression of cell activation/migration molecules in neutrophils and monocytes.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Marcela L; Costa-Pereira, Christiane; Alves, Marina Luiza Rodrigues; Marteleto, Bruno H; Ribeiro, Vitor M; Peruhype-Magalhães, Vanessa; Giunchetti, Rodolfo C; Martins-Filho, Olindo A; Araújo, Márcio S S

    2016-04-15

    Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) is transmitted by phlebotomine sandfly vectors and domestic dogs serve as a reservoir. The elimination of seropositive dogs has been a recommended strategy for managing the disease in Brazil. A protective canine vaccine would be an important tool for controlling the disease, reducing the parasites available to sandfly vectors and, consequently, reducing the number of human VL cases. Leishmune(®) is an anti-canine Leishmaniosis (VL Canine) vaccine produced by Zoetis (Pfizer, Brazil) that was commercially available in Brazil until 2014. The main goal of the present study was to investigate the protective immunological events induced by vaccination with Leishmune(®) in the time frame of one year. Healthy, non-vaccinated dogs and dogs of 1, 6 and 10 months post-vaccination were evaluated. Results showed that Leishmune(®) induced an increase in phagocytic activity of neutrophils and monocytes and also increased NO production. Immunological events were correlated with functional responses, as high levels of IgG and an increase of the receptor Fcγ were detected. Vaccination induced an increased expression of TLR (2, 4, 5, 9), integrin (CD29, CD49f), activation (MHCII) and co-stimulatory (CD80, CD81) molecules by neutrophils and monocytes. Vaccination led to decrease of IL-4 and an increase of IL-8 production by monocytes and higher IFN-γ and IL-17 production by T-cells. The results suggested that Leishmune(®) was able to induce a long-lasting change in immune response, mediated by supportive immunological events that may be participating in protective immunity against CL.

  2. Leader Cells Define Directionality of Trunk, but Not Cranial, Neural Crest Cell Migration.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Jo; Gauert, Anton; Briones Montecinos, Luis; Fanlo, Lucía; Alhashem, Zainalabdeen Mohmammed; Assar, Rodrigo; Marti, Elisa; Kabla, Alexandre; Härtel, Steffen; Linker, Claudia

    2016-05-31

    Collective cell migration is fundamental for life and a hallmark of cancer. Neural crest (NC) cells migrate collectively, but the mechanisms governing this process remain controversial. Previous analyses in Xenopus indicate that cranial NC (CNC) cells are a homogeneous population relying on cell-cell interactions for directional migration, while chick embryo analyses suggest a heterogeneous population with leader cells instructing directionality. Our data in chick and zebrafish embryos show that CNC cells do not require leader cells for migration and all cells present similar migratory capacities. In contrast, laser ablation of trunk NC (TNC) cells shows that leader cells direct movement and cell-cell contacts are required for migration. Moreover, leader and follower identities are acquired before the initiation of migration and remain fixed thereafter. Thus, two distinct mechanisms establish the directionality of CNC cells and TNC cells. This implies the existence of multiple molecular mechanisms for collective cell migration.

  3. Time-lapse cinematography of the capillary tube cell migration inhibition test.

    PubMed

    Bray, M A

    1980-01-01

    The kinetics of human and guinea pig cell migration inhibition have been studied using time-lapse cinematography of cells migrating from capillary tubes. Guinea pig and human cells exhibit markedly different kinetics in the absence of inhibitors. Specific antigen causes a dose-related inhibition of migration for up to 60 h using guinea pig cells and a peak of inhibition after 18 h using the human leucocyte system. The timing of measurement of maximum activity more critical for the latter test. The kinetics of lymphokine generation have been examined and the migration inhibitory activity of the plant mitogen (PHA), a Kurloff cell product and a continuous cell line supernatant have been compared with the inhibitory profiles of lymphokine preparations and specific antigen.

  4. [Role of GAGA Factor in Drosophila Primordial Germ Cell Migration and Gonad Development].

    PubMed

    Dorogova, N V; Khrushcheva, A S; Fedorova, E V; Ogienko, A A; Baricheva, E M

    2016-01-01

    The GAGA protein of drosophila is a factor involved in epigenetic transcription regulation of a large gene group controlling developmental processes. In this paper, the role of GAGA factor in germ cell migration is demonstrated as well as its effect on the gonad development in drosophila embryogenesis. Mutations in the Trl gene, encoding GAGA factor, prematurely induces the active migration program and relocation of the primordial cells inward the embryo before the beginning of gastrulation. The germ cells that prematurely separated from the main group migrate ectopically, lose orientation, and stay out of gonad development. Expression pattern of the Trl gene suggests its activity in epithelial cells of the embryonic blastoderm, part of which contact primordial cells. Thus, GAGA factor influences migration of these cells in an indirect manner via their somatic environment.

  5. Cell migration or cytokinesis and proliferation? – Revisiting the “go or grow” hypothesis in cancer cells in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Garay, Tamás; Juhász, Éva; Molnár, Eszter; Eisenbauer, Maria; Czirók, András; Dekan, Barbara; László, Viktória; Hoda, Mir Alireza; Döme, Balázs; Tímár, József; Klepetko, Walter; Berger, Walter; Hegedűs, Balázs

    2013-12-10

    The mortality of patients with solid tumors is mostly due to metastasis that relies on the interplay between migration and proliferation. The “go or grow” hypothesis postulates that migration and proliferation spatiotemporally excludes each other. We evaluated this hypothesis on 35 cell lines (12 mesothelioma, 13 melanoma and 10 lung cancer) on both the individual cell and population levels. Following three-day-long videomicroscopy, migration, proliferation and cytokinesis-length were quantified. We found a significantly higher migration in mesothelioma cells compared to melanoma and lung cancer while tumor types did not differ in mean proliferation or duration of cytokinesis. Strikingly, we found in melanoma and lung cancer a significant positive correlation between mean proliferation and migration. Furthermore, non-dividing melanoma and lung cancer cells displayed slower migration. In contrast, in mesothelioma there were no such correlations. Interestingly, negative correlation was found between cytokinesis-length and migration in melanoma. FAK activation was higher in melanoma cells with high motility. We demonstrate that the cancer cells studied do not defer proliferation for migration. Of note, tumor cells from various organ systems may differently regulate migration and proliferation. Furthermore, our data is in line with the observation of pathologists that highly proliferative tumors are often highly invasive. - Highlights: • We investigated the “go or grow” hypothesis in human cancer cells in vitro. • Proliferation and migration positively correlate in melanoma and lung cancer cells. • Duration of cytokinesis and migration shows inverse correlation. • Increased FAK activation is present in highly motile melanoma cells.

  6. Tumor treating fields inhibit glioblastoma cell migration, invasion and angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun Ho; Song, Hyo Sook; Yoo, Seung Hoon; Yoon, Myonggeun

    2016-01-01

    Treatment with alternating electric fields at an intermediate frequency (100–300 kHz), referred to as tumor treating fields (TTF) therapy, inhibits cancer cell proliferation. In the present study, we demonstrated that TTF application suppressed the metastatic potential of U87 and U373 glioblastoma cell lines via the NF-kB, MAPK and PI3K/AKT signaling pathways. Wound-healing and transwell assays showed that TTF suppressed cell migration and invasion compared with controls. Soft agar and three-dimensional culture assays showed that TTF inhibited both anchorage-dependent (cell proliferation) and anchorage-independent (colony formation) GBM cell growth. TTF dysregulated epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition-related genes, such as vimentin and E-cadherin, which partially accounted for TTF inhibition of cell migration and invasion. We further demonstrated that TTF application suppressed angiogenesis by downregulating VEGF, HIF1α and matrix metalloproteinases 2 and 9. TTF also inhibited NF-kB transcriptional activity. Collectively, our findings show that TTF represents a promising novel anti-invasion and anti-angiogenesis therapeutic strategy for use in GBM patients. PMID:27556184

  7. FASN, ErbB2-mediated glycolysis is required for breast cancer cell migration.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Lan; Jiang, Sufang; Fu, Qiang; Smith, Kelly; Tu, Kailing; Li, Hua; Zhao, Yuhua

    2016-05-01

    Both fatty acid synthase (FASN) and ErbB2 have been shown to promote breast cancer cell migration. However, the underlying molecular mechanism remains poorly understood and there is no reported evidence that directly links glycolysis to breast cancer cell migration. In this study, we investigated the role of FASN, ErbB2-mediated glycolysis in breast cancer cell migration. First, we compared lactate dehydrogenase A (LDHA) protein levels, glycolysis and cell migration between FASN, ErbB2-overexpressing SK-BR-3 cells and FASN, ErbB2-low-expressing MCF7 cells. Then, SK-BR-3 cells were treated with cerulenin (Cer), an inhibitor of FASN, and ErbB2, LDHA protein levels, glycolysis, and cell migration were detected. Next, we transiently transfected ErbB2 plasmid into MCF7 cells and detected FASN, LDHA protein levels, glycolysis and cell migration. Heregulin-β1 (HRG-β1) is an activator of ErbB2 and 2-deoxyglucose (2-DG) and oxamate (OX) are inhibitors of glycolysis. MCF7 cells were treated with HRG-β1 alone, HRG-β1 plus 2-DG, OX or cerulenin and glycolysis, and cell migration were measured. We found that FASN, ErbB2-high-expressing SK-BR-3 cells displayed higher levels of glycolysis and migration than FASN, ErbB2-low-expressing MCF7 cells. Inhibition of FASN by cerulenin impaired glycolysis and migration in SK-BR-3 cells. Transient overexpression of ErbB2 in MCF7 cells promotes glycolysis and migration. Moreover, 2-deoxyglucose (2-DG), oxamate (OX), or cerulenin partially reverses heregulin-β1 (HRG-β1)-induced glycolysis and migration in MCF7 cells. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that FASN, ErbB2-mediated glycolysis is required for breast cancer cell migration. These novel findings indicate that targeting FASN, ErbB2-mediated glycolysis may be a new approach to reverse breast cancer cell migration.

  8. Quantitative analysis of cell migration using optical flow.

    PubMed

    Boric, Katica; Orio, Patricio; Viéville, Thierry; Whitlock, Kathleen

    2013-01-01

    Neural crest cells exhibit dramatic migration behaviors as they populate their distant targets. Using a line of zebrafish expressing green fluorescent protein (sox10:EGFP) in neural crest cells we developed an assay to analyze and quantify cell migration as a population, and use it here to characterize in detail the subtle defects in cell migration caused by ethanol exposure during early development. The challenge was to quantify changes in the in vivo migration of all Sox10:EGFP expressing cells in the visual field of time-lapse movies. To perform this analysis we used an Optical Flow algorithm for motion detection and combined the analysis with a fit to an affine transformation. Through this analysis we detected and quantified significant differences in the cell migrations of Sox10:EGFP positive cranial neural crest populations in ethanol treated versus untreated embryos. Specifically, treatment affected migration by increasing the left-right asymmetry of the migrating cells and by altering the direction of cell movements. Thus, by applying this novel computational analysis, we were able to quantify the movements of populations of cells, allowing us to detect subtle changes in cell behaviors. Because cranial neural crest cells contribute to the formation of the frontal mass these subtle differences may underlie commonly observed facial asymmetries in normal human populations.

  9. Follow-the-leader cell migration requires biased cell-cell contact and local microenvironmental signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wynn, Michelle L.; Rupp, Paul; Trainor, Paul A.; Schnell, Santiago; Kulesa, Paul M.

    2013-06-01

    Directed cell migration often involves at least two types of cell motility that include multicellular streaming and chain migration. However, what is unclear is how cell contact dynamics and the distinct microenvironments through which cells travel influence the selection of one migratory mode or the other. The embryonic and highly invasive neural crest (NC) are an excellent model system to study this question since NC cells have been observed in vivo to display both of these types of cell motility. Here, we present data from tissue transplantation experiments in chick and in silico modeling that test our hypothesis that cell contact dynamics with each other and the microenvironment promote and sustain either multicellular stream or chain migration. We show that when premigratory cranial NC cells (at the pre-otic level) are transplanted into a more caudal region in the head (at the post-otic level), cells alter their characteristic stream behavior and migrate in chains. Similarly, post-otic NC cells migrate in streams after transplantation into the pre-otic hindbrain, suggesting that local microenvironmental signals dictate the mode of NC cell migration. Simulations of an agent-based model (ABM) that integrates the NC cell behavioral data predict that chain migration critically depends on the interplay of biased cell-cell contact and local microenvironment signals. Together, this integrated modeling and experimental approach suggests new experiments and offers a powerful tool to examine mechanisms that underlie complex cell migration patterns.

  10. Lipid raft association restricts CD44-ezrin interaction and promotion of breast cancer cell migration.

    PubMed

    Donatello, Simona; Babina, Irina S; Hazelwood, Lee D; Hill, Arnold D K; Nabi, Ivan R; Hopkins, Ann M

    2012-12-01

    Cancer cell migration is an early event in metastasis, the main cause of breast cancer-related deaths. Cholesterol-enriched membrane domains called lipid rafts influence the function of many molecules, including the raft-associated protein CD44. We describe a novel mechanism whereby rafts regulate interactions between CD44 and its binding partner ezrin in migrating breast cancer cells. Specifically, in nonmigrating cells, CD44 and ezrin localized to different membranous compartments: CD44 predominantly in rafts, and ezrin in nonraft compartments. After the induction of migration (either nonspecific or CD44-driven), CD44 affiliation with lipid rafts was decreased. This was accompanied by increased coprecipitation of CD44 and active (threonine-phosphorylated) ezrin-radixin-moesin (ERM) proteins in nonraft compartments and increased colocalization of CD44 with the nonraft protein, transferrin receptor. Pharmacological raft disruption using methyl-β-cyclodextrin also increased CD44-ezrin coprecipitation and colocalization, further suggesting that CD44 interacts with ezrin outside rafts during migration. Conversely, promoting CD44 retention inside lipid rafts by pharmacological inhibition of depalmitoylation virtually abolished CD44-ezrin interactions. However, transient single or double knockdown of flotillin-1 or caveolin-1 was not sufficient to increase cell migration over a short time course, suggesting complex crosstalk mechanisms. We propose a new model for CD44-dependent breast cancer cell migration, where CD44 must relocalize outside lipid rafts to drive cell migration. This could have implications for rafts as pharmacological targets to down-regulate cancer cell migration.

  11. GABA(B) receptors mediate motility signals for migrating embryonic cortical cells.

    PubMed

    Behar, T N; Smith, S V; Kennedy, R T; McKenzie, J M; Maric, I; Barker, J L

    2001-08-01

    During development, postmitotic neurons migrate from germinal regions into the cortical plate (cp), where lamination occurs. In rats, GABA is transiently expressed in the cp, near target destinations for migrating neurons. In vitro GABA stimulates neuronal motility, suggesting cp cells release GABA, which acts as a chemoattractant during corticogenesis. Pharmacological studies indicate GABA stimulates migration via GABA(B)-receptor (GABA(B)-R) activation. Using immunohistochemistry, RT-PCR and Western blotting, we examined embryonic cortical cell expression of GABA(B)-Rs in vivo. At E17, GABA(B)-R1(+) cells were identified in the ventricular zone (vz) and cp. RT-PCR and Western blotting demonstrated the presence of GABA(B)-R1a and GABA(B)-R1b mRNA and proteins. Using immuno- cytochemistry, GABA(B)-R expression was examined in vz and cp cell dissociates before and after migration to GABA in an in vitro chemotaxis assay. GABA-induced migration resulted in an increase of GABA(B)-R(+) cells in the migrated population. While <20% of each starting dissociate was GABA(B)-R(+), >70% of migrated cells were immunopositive. We used a microchemotaxis assay to analyze cp cell release of diffusible chemotropic factor(s). In vitro, cp dissociates induced vz cell migration in a cell density-dependent manner that was blocked by micromolar saclofen (a GABA(B)-R antagonist). HPLC demonstrated cp cells release micromolar levels of GABA and taurine in several hours. Micromolar levels of both molecules stimulated cell migration that was blocked by micromolar saclofen. Thus, migratory cortical cells express GABA(B)-Rs, cp cells release GABA and taurine, and both molecules stimulate cortical cell movement. Together these findings suggest GABA and/or taurine act as chemoattractants for neurons during rat cortical histogenesis via mechanisms involving GABA(B)-Rs.

  12. Impaired SIRT1 promotes the migration of vascular smooth muscle cell-derived foam cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ming-Jie; Zhou, Yi; Chen, Lei; Wang, Xu; Pi, Yan; Long, Chun-Yan; Sun, Meng-Jiao; Chen, Xue; Gao, Chang-Yue; Li, Jing-Cheng; Zhang, Li-Li

    2016-07-01

    The formation of fat-laden foam cells, contributing to the fatty streaks of the plaques of atheroma, is the critical early process in atherosclerosis. The previous study demonstrated that vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) contain a much larger burden of the excess cholesterol in comparison with monocyte-derived macrophages in human coronary atherosclerosis, as the main origin of foam cells. It is noteworthy that VSMC-derived foam cells are deposited in subintima but not media, where VSMCs normally deposit in. Therefore, migration from media to intima is an indispensable step for a VSMC to accrue neutral lipids and form foam cell. Whether this migration occurs paralleled with or prior to the formation of foam cell is still unclear. Herein, the present study was designed to test the VSMC migratory capability in the process of foam cell formation induced by oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL). In conclusion, we provide evidence that oxLDL induces the VSMC-derived foam cells formation with increased migration ability and MMP-9 expression, which were partly attributed to the impaired SIRT1 and enhanced nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) activity. As activation of transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) has been reported to have anti-atherosclerotic effects, we investigated its role in oxLDL-treated VSMC migration. It is found that activating TRPV1 by capsaicin inhibits VSMC foam cell formation and the accompanied migration through rescuing the SIRT1 and suppressing NF-κB signaling. The present study provides evidence that SIRT1 may be a promising intervention target of atherosclerosis, and raises the prospect of TRPV1 in prevention and treatment of atherosclerosis.

  13. Receptor-interacting protein kinase 2 promotes triple-negative breast cancer cell migration and invasion via activation of nuclear factor-kappaB and c-Jun N-terminal kinase pathways

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Metastasis is the main cause of breast cancer morbidity and mortality. Processes that allow for tumor cell migration and invasion are important therapeutic targets. Here we demonstrate that receptor-interacting protein kinase 2 (RIP2), a kinase known to be involved in inflammatory processes, also has novel roles in cancer cell migration and invasion. Methods A total of six breast cancer expression databases, including The Cancer Genome Atlas, were assessed for RIP2 expression among various clinical subtypes and its role as a prognostic biomarker. mRNA fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) for RIP2 was performed on 17 stage III breast cancers to determine if there was a correlation between RIP2 expression and lymph node involvement. RNA-interference was used to knock-down RIP2 expression in MDA-MB-231, Htb126, SUM149PT, MCF7, T47D, and HCC1428 cells. Cell migration and invasion were measured in vitro by scratch/wound healing and transwell migration assays. A xenograft mouse model was used to assess tumor growth and chemosensitivity to docetaxel in vivo in MDA-MB-231 cells with and without RIP2 small hairpin RNA knockdown. Western blot and immunofluorescence imaging were used to evaluate protein expressions. Results Interrogation of expression databases showed that RIP2 expression is significantly over-expressed in triple-negative breast cancers (TNBC: estrogen-receptor (ER) negative, progesterone-receptor (PR) negative, Her2/neu- (Her2) negative), compared to other clinical subtypes. High RIP2 expression correlates with worse progression-free survival using a combined breast cancer expression array dataset consisting of 946 patients. Multivariate analysis shows RIP2 as an independent prognostic biomarker. Knock-down of RIP2 significantly decreases migration in both scratch/wound healing and transwell migration assays in MDA-MB-231, Htb126, SUM149PT, MCF7, and T47D cells and is correlated with decreased Nuclear Factor-kappaB and c-Jun N

  14. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-mediated upregulation of hepatic microRNA-181 family promotes cancer cell migration by targeting MAPK phosphatase-5, regulating the activation of p38 MAPK

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Mi-Kyung; Park, Yong-Keun; Ryu, Jae-Chun

    2013-11-15

    Growing evidence indicates that changes in microRNA (miRNA) expression in cancer induced by chemical carcinogens play an important role in cancer development and progression by regulating related genes. However, the mechanisms underlying miRNA involvement in hepatocarcinogenesis induced by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) remain unclear. Thus, the identification of aberrant miRNA expression during PAH-induced cancer cell migration will lead to a better understanding of the substantial role of miRNAs in cancer progression. In the present study, miRNA expression profiling showed significant upregulation of miR-181a, -181b, and -181d in human hepatocellular carcinoma cells (HepG2 line) exposed to benzo[a]anthracene (BA) and benzo[k]fluoranthene (BF). MAPK phosphatase-5 (MKP-5), a validated miR-181 target that deactivates MAPKs, was markedly suppressed while phosphorylation of p38 MAPK was increased after BA and BF exposure. The migration of HepG2 cells, observed using the scratch wound-healing assay, also increased in a dose-dependent manner. Depletion of miR-181 family members by miRNA inhibitors enhanced the expression of MKP-5 and suppressed the phosphorylation of p38 MAPK. Furthermore, the depletion of the miR-181 family inhibited cancer cell migration. Based on these results, we conclude that the miR-181 family plays a critical role in PAH-induced hepatocarcinogenesis by targeting MKP-5, resulting in the regulation of p38 MAPK activation. - Highlights: • We found significant upregulation of miR-181 family in HCC exposed to BA and BF. • We identified the MKP-5 as a putative target of miR-181 family. • MKP-5 was suppressed while p-P38 was increased after BA and BF exposure. • The migration of HepG2 cells increased in a dose-dependent manner.

  15. Toad skin extract cinobufatini inhibits migration of human breast carcinoma MDA-MB-231 cells into a model stromal tissue.

    PubMed

    Nakata, Munehiro; Mori, Shuya; Kamoshida, Yo; Kawaguchi, Shota; Fujita-Yamaguchi, Yoko; Gao, Bo; Tang, Wei

    2015-08-01

    Toad skin extract cinobufatini study has been focused on anticancer activity, especially apoptosis-inducing activity by bufosteroids. The present study examined effect of the toad skin extract on cancer cell migration into model stromal tissues. Human breast carcinoma cell line MDA-MB-231 was incubated in the presence or absence of toad skin extract on a surface of reconstituted type I collagen gel as a model stromal tissue allowing the cells to migrate into the gel. Frozen sections were microscopically observed after azan staining. Data showed a decrease of cell number in a microscopic field and shortening of cell migration into the model stromal tissue in a dose dependent manner. This suggests that toad skin extract may possess migration-preventing activity in addition to cell toxicity such as apoptosis-inducing activity. The multifaceted effects including apoptosis-inducing and cancer cell migration-preventing activities would improve usefulness of toad skin extract cinobufatini as an anticancer medicine.

  16. Cell surface beta 1,4-galactosyltransferase functions during neural crest cell migration and neurulation in vivo

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    Mesenchymal cell migration and neurite outgrowth are mediated in part by binding of cell surface beta 1,4-galactosyltransferase (GalTase) to N-linked oligosaccharides within the E8 domain of laminin. In this study, we determined whether cell surface GalTase functions during neural crest cell migration and neural development in vivo using antibodies raised against affinity-purified chicken serum GalTase. The antibodies specifically recognized two embryonic proteins of 77 and 67 kD, both of which express GalTase activity. The antibodies also immunoprecipitated and inhibited chick embryo GalTase activity, and inhibited neural crest cell migration on laminin matrices in vitro. Anti-GalTase antibodies were microinjected into the head mesenchyme of stage 7-9 chick embryos or cranial to Henson's node of stage 6 embryos. Anti-avian GalTase IgG decreased cranial neural crest cell migration on the injected side but did not cross the embryonic midline and did not affect neural crest cell migration on the uninjected side. Anti-avian GalTase Fab crossed the embryonic midline and perturbed cranial neural crest cell migration throughout the head. Neural fold elevation and neural tube closure were also disrupted by Fab fragments. Cell surface GalTase was localized to migrating neural crest cells and to the basal surfaces of neural epithelia by indirect immunofluorescence, whereas GalTase was undetectable on neural crest cells prior to migration. These results suggest that, during early embryogenesis, cell surface GalTase participates during neural crest cell migration, perhaps by interacting with laminin, a major component of the basal lamina. Cell surface GalTase also appears to play a role in neural tube formation, possibly by mediating neural epithelial adhesion to the underlying basal lamina. PMID:1560031

  17. Functional transcriptomics of a migrating cell in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Erich M; Kato, Mihoko; Sternberg, Paul W

    2012-10-02

    In both metazoan development and metastatic cancer, migrating cells must carry out a detailed, complex program of sensing cues, binding substrates, and moving their cytoskeletons. The linker cell in Caenorhabditis elegans males undergoes a stereotyped migration that guides gonad organogenesis, occurs with precise timing, and requires the nuclear hormone receptor NHR-67. To better understand how this occurs, we performed RNA-seq of individually staged and dissected linker cells, comparing transcriptomes from linker cells of third-stage (L3) larvae, fourth-stage (L4) larvae, and nhr-67-RNAi-treated L4 larvae. We observed expression of 8,000-10,000 genes in the linker cell, 22-25% of which were up- or down-regulated 20-fold during development by NHR-67. Of genes that we tested by RNAi, 22% (45 of 204) were required for normal shape and migration, suggesting that many NHR-67-dependent, linker cell-enriched genes play roles in this migration. One unexpected class of genes up-regulated by NHR-67 was tandem pore potassium channels, which are required for normal linker-cell migration. We also found phenotypes for genes with human orthologs but no previously described migratory function. Our results provide an extensive catalog of genes that act in a migrating cell, identify unique molecular functions involved in nematode cell migration, and suggest similar functions in humans.

  18. Hedgehog is a positive regulator of FGF signalling during embryonic tracheal cell migration.

    PubMed

    Butí, Elisenda; Mesquita, Duarte; Araújo, Sofia J

    2014-01-01

    Cell migration is a widespread and complex process that is crucial for morphogenesis and for the underlying invasion and metastasis of human cancers. During migration, cells are steered toward target sites by guidance molecules that induce cell direction and movement through complex intracellular mechanisms. The spatio-temporal regulation of the expression of these guidance molecules is of extreme importance for both normal morphogenesis and human disease. One way to achieve this precise regulation is by combinatorial inputs of different transcription factors. Here we used Drosophila melanogaster mutants with migration defects in the ganglionic branches of the tracheal system to further clarify guidance regulation during cell migration. By studying the cellular consequences of overactivated Hh signalling, using ptc mutants, we found that Hh positively regulates Bnl/FGF levels during embryonic stages. Our results show that Hh modulates cell migration non-autonomously in the tissues surrounding the action of its activity. We further demonstrate that the Hh signalling pathway regulates bnl expression via Stripe (Sr), a zinc-finger transcription factor with homology to the Early Growth Response (EGR) family of vertebrate transcription factors. We propose that Hh modulates embryonic cell migration by participating in the spatio-temporal regulation of bnl expression in a permissive mode. By doing so, we provide a molecular link between the activation of Hh signalling and increased chemotactic responses during cell migration.

  19. Molecular signatures of cell migration in C. elegans Q neuroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Ou, Guangshuo

    2009-01-01

    Metazoan cell movement has been studied extensively in vitro, but cell migration in living animals is much less well understood. In this report, we have studied the Caenorhabditis elegans Q neuroblast lineage during larval development, developing live animal imaging methods for following neuroblast migration with single cell resolution. We find that each of the Q descendants migrates at different speeds and for distinct distances. By quantitative green fluorescent protein imaging, we find that Q descendants that migrate faster and longer than their sisters up-regulate protein levels of MIG-2, a Rho family guanosine triphosphatase, and/or down-regulate INA-1, an integrin α subunit, during migration. We also show that Q neuroblasts bearing mutations in either MIG-2 or INA-1 migrate at reduced speeds. The migration defect of the mig-2 mutants, but not ina-1, appears to result from a lack of persistent polarization in the direction of cell migration. Thus, MIG-2 and INA-1 function distinctly to control Q neuroblast migration in living C. elegans. PMID:19349580

  20. A Quorum-Sensing Factor in Vegetative Dictyostelium Discoideum Cells Revealed by Quantitative Migration Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Golé, Laurent; Rivière, Charlotte; Hayakawa, Yoshinori; Rieu, Jean-Paul

    2011-01-01

    Background Many cells communicate through the production of diffusible signaling molecules that accumulate and once a critical concentration has been reached, can activate or repress a number of target genes in a process termed quorum sensing (QS). In the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum, QS plays an important role during development. However little is known about its effect on cell migration especially in the growth phase. Methods and Findings To investigate the role of cell density on cell migration in the growth phase, we use multisite timelapse microscopy and automated cell tracking. This analysis reveals a high heterogeneity within a given cell population, and the necessity to use large data sets to draw reliable conclusions on cell motion. In average, motion is persistent for short periods of time (), but normal diffusive behavior is recovered over longer time periods. The persistence times are positively correlated with the migrated distances. Interestingly, the migrated distance decreases as well with cell density. The adaptation of cell migration to cell density highlights the role of a secreted quorum sensing factor (QSF) on cell migration. Using a simple model describing the balance between the rate of QSF generation and the rate of QSF dilution, we were able to gather all experimental results into a single master curve, showing a sharp cell transition between high and low motile behaviors with increasing QSF. Conclusion This study unambiguously demonstrates the central role played by QSF on amoeboid motion in the growth phase. PMID:22073217

  1. Cancer cell motility: lessons from migration in confined spaces

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Colin D.; Mistriotis, Panagiotis; Konstantopoulos, Konstantinos

    2017-01-01

    Time-lapse, deep-tissue imaging made possible by advances in intravital microscopy has demonstrated the importance of tumour cell migration through confining tracks in vivo. These tracks may either be endogenous features of tissues or be created by tumour or tumour-associated cells. Importantly, migration mechanisms through confining microenvironments are not predicted by 2D migration assays. Engineered in vitro models have been used to delineate the mechanisms of cell motility through confining spaces encountered in vivo. Understanding cancer cell locomotion through physiologically relevant confining tracks could be useful in developing therapeutic strategies to combat metastasis. PMID:27909339

  2. Cancer cell motility: lessons from migration in confined spaces.

    PubMed

    Paul, Colin D; Mistriotis, Panagiotis; Konstantopoulos, Konstantinos

    2017-02-01

    Time-lapse, deep-tissue imaging made possible by advances in intravital microscopy has demonstrated the importance of tumour cell migration through confining tracks in vivo. These tracks may either be endogenous features of tissues or be created by tumour or tumour-associated cells. Importantly, migration mechanisms through confining microenvironments are not predicted by 2D migration assays. Engineered in vitro models have been used to delineate the mechanisms of cell motility through confining spaces encountered in vivo. Understanding cancer cell locomotion through physiologically relevant confining tracks could be useful in developing therapeutic strategies to combat metastasis.

  3. Y-27632 Increases Sensitivity of PANC-1 Cells to EGCG in Regulating Cell Proliferation and Migration.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xing; Bi, Yongyi

    2016-10-03

    BACKGROUND The study aimed to investigate the inhibitory effect of (1R,4r)-4-((R)-1-aminoethyl)-N-(pyridin-4-yl) cyclohexanecarboxamide (Y-27632) and (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) on the proliferation and migration of PANC-1 cells. EGCG, found in green tea, has been previously shown to be one of the most abundant and powerful catechins in cancer prevention and treatment. Y-27632, a selective inhibitor of rho-associated protein kinase 1, is widely used in treating cardiovascular disease, inflammation, and cancer. MATERIAL AND METHODS PANC-1 cells, maintained in Dulbecco's Modified Eagle's Medium, were treated with dimethyl sulfoxide (control) as well as different concentrations (20, 40, 60, and 80 μg/mL) of EGCG for 48 h. In addition, PANC-1 cells were treated separately with 60 μg/mL EGCG, 20 μM Y-27632, and EGCG combined with Y-27632 (60 μg/mL EGCG + 20 μM Y-27632) for 48 h. The effect of EGCG and Y-27632 on the proliferation and migration of PANC-1 cells was evaluated using Cell Counting Kit-8 and transwell migration assays. The expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα) and Caspase-3 mRNA was determined by Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR). RESULTS EGCG (20-80 μg/mL) inhibited cell viability in a dose-dependent manner. Y-27632 enhanced the sensitivity of PANC-1 cells to EGCG (by increasing the expression of PPARa and Caspase-3 mRNA) and suppressed cell proliferation. PANC-1 cell migration was inhibited by treatment with a combination of EGCG and Y-27632. CONCLUSIONS Y-27632 increases the sensitivity of PANC-1 cells to EGCG in regulating cell proliferation and migration, which is likely to be related to the expression of PPARa mRNA and Caspase-3 mRNA.

  4. Chemokine-Dependent pH Elevation at the Cell Front Sustains Polarity in Directionally Migrating Zebrafish Germ Cells.

    PubMed

    Tarbashevich, Katsiaryna; Reichman-Fried, Michal; Grimaldi, Cecilia; Raz, Erez

    2015-04-20

    Directional cell migration requires cell polarization with respect to the distribution of the guidance cue. Cell polarization often includes asymmetric distribution of response components as well as elements of the motility machinery. Importantly, the function and regulation of most of these molecules are known to be pH dependent. Intracellular pH gradients were shown to occur in certain cells migrating in vitro, but the functional relevance of such gradients for cell migration and for the response to directional cues, particularly in the intact organism, is currently unknown. In this study, we find that primordial germ cells migrating in the context of the developing embryo respond to the graded distribution of the chemokine Cxcl12 by establishing elevated intracellular pH at the cell front. We provide insight into the mechanisms by which a polar pH distribution contributes to efficient cell migration. Specifically, we show that Carbonic Anhydrase 15b, an enzyme controlling the pH in many cell types, including metastatic cancer cells, is expressed in migrating germ cells and is crucial for establishing and maintaining an asymmetric pH distribution within them. Reducing the level of the protein and thereby erasing the pH elevation at the cell front resulted in abnormal cell migration and impaired arrival at the target. The basis for the disrupted migration is found in the stringent requirement for pH conditions in the cell for regulating contractility, for the polarization of Rac1 activity, and hence for the formation of actin-rich structures at the leading edge of the migrating cells.

  5. Inhibition of FAAH confers increased stem cell migration via PPARα.

    PubMed

    Wollank, Yvonne; Ramer, Robert; Ivanov, Igor; Salamon, Achim; Peters, Kirsten; Hinz, Burkhard

    2015-10-01

    Regenerative activity in tissues of mesenchymal origin depends on the migratory potential of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). The present study focused on inhibitors of the enzyme fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), which catalyzes the degradation of endocannabinoids (anandamide, 2-arachidonoylglycerol) and endocannabinoid-like substances (N-oleoylethanolamine, N-palmitoylethanolamine). Boyden chamber assays, the FAAH inhibitors, URB597 and arachidonoyl serotonin (AA-5HT), were found to increase the migration of human adipose-derived MSCs. LC-MS analyses revealed increased levels of all four aforementioned FAAH substrates in MSCs incubated with either FAAH inhibitor. Following addition to MSCs, all FAAH substrates mimicked the promigratory action of FAAH inhibitors. Promigratory effects of FAAH inhibitors and substrates were causally linked to activation of p42/44 MAPKs, as well as to cytosol-to-nucleus translocation of the transcription factor, PPARα. Whereas PPARα activation by FAAH inhibitors and substrates became reversed upon inhibition of p42/44 MAPK activation, a blockade of PPARα left p42/44 MAPK phosphorylation unaltered. Collectively, these data demonstrate FAAH inhibitors and substrates to cause p42/44 MAPK phosphorylation, which subsequently activates PPARα to confer increased migration of MSCs. This novel pathway may be involved in regenerative effects of endocannabinoids whose degradation could be a target of pharmacological intervention by FAAH inhibitors.

  6. Inhibition of FAAH confers increased stem cell migration via PPARα

    PubMed Central

    Wollank, Yvonne; Ramer, Robert; Ivanov, Igor; Salamon, Achim; Peters, Kirsten; Hinz, Burkhard

    2015-01-01

    Regenerative activity in tissues of mesenchymal origin depends on the migratory potential of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). The present study focused on inhibitors of the enzyme fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), which catalyzes the degradation of endocannabinoids (anandamide, 2-arachidonoylglycerol) and endocannabinoid-like substances (N-oleoylethanolamine, N-palmitoylethanolamine). Boyden chamber assays, the FAAH inhibitors, URB597 and arachidonoyl serotonin (AA-5HT), were found to increase the migration of human adipose-derived MSCs. LC-MS analyses revealed increased levels of all four aforementioned FAAH substrates in MSCs incubated with either FAAH inhibitor. Following addition to MSCs, all FAAH substrates mimicked the promigratory action of FAAH inhibitors. Promigratory effects of FAAH inhibitors and substrates were causally linked to activation of p42/44 MAPKs, as well as to cytosol-to-nucleus translocation of the transcription factor, PPARα. Whereas PPARα activation by FAAH inhibitors and substrates became reversed upon inhibition of p42/44 MAPK activation, a blockade of PPARα left p42/44 MAPK phosphorylation unaltered. Collectively, these data demonstrate FAAH inhibitors and substrates to cause p42/44 MAPK phosphorylation, which subsequently activates PPARα to confer increased migration of MSCs. This novel pathway may be involved in regenerative effects of endocannabinoids whose degradation could be a target of pharmacological intervention by FAAH inhibitors. PMID:26263913

  7. The Rap GTPases regulate the migration, invasiveness and in vivo dissemination of B-cell lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Lin, K B L; Tan, P; Freeman, S A; Lam, M; McNagny, K M; Gold, M R

    2010-01-28

    B-cell lymphomas are common malignancies in which transformed B cells enter the circulation, extravasate into tissues and form tumors in multiple organs. Lymphoma cells are thought to exit the vasculature and enter tissues through the same chemokine- and adhesion molecule-dependent mechanisms as normal B cells. We have previously shown that activation of the Rap GTPases, proteins that control cytoskeletal organization and integrin activation, is critical for chemokine-induced migration and adhesion in B-lymphoma cell lines. Using the A20 murine B-lymphoma cell line as a model, we now show that Rap activation is important for circulating lymphoma cells to enter tissues and form tumors in vivo. In vitro assays showed that Rap activation is required for A20 cells to efficiently adhere to vascular endothelial cells and undergo transendothelial migration. These findings suggest that Rap or its effectors could be novel targets for treating B-cell lymphomas.

  8. Culturing of cerebellar granule cells to study neuronal migration: gradient and local perfusion assays.

    PubMed

    Guijarro, Patricia; Jiang, Jian; Yuan, Xiao-bing

    2012-07-01

    Cultures of cerebellar granule cells are a suitable model to analyze the mechanisms governing neuronal migration. In this unit, we describe a protocol to obtain cultures of dissociated granule cells at a low density, where individual cells can be easily observed. In addition, we include a protocol for studying neuronal migration in these cultures, using single, actively migrating cerebellar granule cells. Following this protocol, a factor of interest can be applied either in a gradient concentration by means of a micropipet located near the neuron, or in a homogeneous concentration by locally perfusing a certain region of the neuron. Time-lapse images are taken to analyze changes in the speed and/or directionality of the observed neuron. Overall, the two protocols take more or less a day and a half to perform, and are a useful way to evaluate a certain factor/drug for its chemotactic activity or its capacity to alter migration speed.

  9. Proliferating cells in suborbital tissue drive eye migration in flatfish.

    PubMed

    Bao, Baolong; Ke, Zhonghe; Xing, Jubin; Peatman, Eric; Liu, Zhanjiang; Xie, Caixia; Xu, Bing; Gai, Junwei; Gong, Xiaoling; Yang, Guimei; Jiang, Yan; Tang, Wenqiao; Ren, Daming

    2011-03-01

    The left/right asymmetry of adult flatfishes (Pleuronectiformes) is remarkable given the external body symmetry of the larval fish. The best-known change is the migration of their eyes: one eye migrates from one side to the other. Two extinct primitive pleuronectiformes with incomplete orbital migration have again attracted public attention to the mechanism of eye migration, a subject of speculation and research for over a century. Cranial asymmetry is currently believed to be responsible for eye migration. Contrary to that hypothesis, we show here that the initial migration of the eye is caused by cell proliferation in the suborbital tissue of the blind side and that the twist of frontal bone is dependent on eye migration. The inhibition of cell proliferation in the suborbital area of the blind side by microinjected colchicine was able to prevent eye migration and, thereafter, cranial asymmetry in juvenile Solea senegalensis (right sideness, Soleidae), Cynoglossus semilaevis (left sideness, Cynoglossidae), and Paralichthys olivaceus (left sideness, Paralichthyidae) with a bottom-dwelling lifestyle. Our results correct the current misunderstanding that eye migration is driven by the cranial asymmetry and simplify the explanation for broken left/right eye-symmetry. Our findings should help to focus the search on eye migration-related genes associated with cell proliferation. Finally, a novel model is proposed in this research which provides a reasonable explanation for differences in the migrating eye between, and sometimes within, different species of flatfish and which should aid in our overall understanding of eye migration in the ontogenesis and evolution of Pleuronectiformes.

  10. Bm-TFF2, a toad trefoil factor, promotes cell migration, survival and wound healing

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yong; Yu, Guoyu; Xiang, Yang; Wu, Jianbo; Jiang, Ping; Lee, Wenhui; Zhang, Yun

    2010-07-30

    Research highlights: {yields} Bm-TFF2 binds to epithelial cells and induces cell migration and wound healing. {yields} Bm-TFF2 suppresses cell apoptosis. {yields} Bm-TFF2 has no effect on cell proliferation. -- Abstract: Toad skin is naked and continually confronted by various injurious factors. Constant skin renewal and repairs occur frequently. However, the mechanisms of the renewal and repair have not clearly elucidated. In our previous work, a trefoil factor (TFF), Bm-TFF2, has been purified from the Bombina maxima skin and characterized as a platelet agonist. The mRNA of TFFs in toad skin was up-regulated greatly during the metamorphosis, indicating a pivotal role of TFFs in amphibian skin. Here, we presented the effects of Bm-TFF2 on the cell migration, apoptosis and proliferation. Bm-TFF2 bound to epithelial cells and showed strong cell motility activity. At the concentrations of 1-100 nM, Bm-TFF2-induced migration of human epithelial AGS and HT-29 cells, and rat intestinal epithelial IEC-6 cell lines. The in vitro wound healing assay also verified the activity of Bm-TFF2. Bm-TFF2 could also inhibit cell apoptosis induced by ceramide and sodium butyrate. The cell migration-promoting activity was abolished by MEK1 inhibitors, U0126 and PD98059, suggesting that ERK1/2 activation is crucial for Bm-TFF2 to stimulate cell migration. Taken together, Bm-TFF2 promoted wound healing by stimulating cell migration via MAPK pathway and preventing cell apoptosis. The potent biological activity of Bm-TFF2 makes it a useful molecular tool for further studies of structure-function relationship of the related human TFFs.

  11. Suppression of Calpain Expression by NSAIDs is Associated with Inhibition of Cell Migration in Rat Duodenum.

    PubMed

    Silver, Kristopher; Littlejohn, A; Thomas, Laurel; Bawa, Bhupinder; Lillich, James D

    2017-03-22

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are widely used for the alleviation of pain and inflammation, but these drugs are also associated with a suite of negative side effects. Gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity is particularly concerning since it affects an estimated 70% of individuals taking NSAIDs routinely, and evidence suggests the majority of toxicity is occurring in the small intestine. Traditionally, NSAID-induced GI toxicity has been associated with indiscriminate inhibition of cyclooxygenase isoforms, but other mechanisms, including inhibition of cell migration, intestinal restitution, and wound healing, are likely to contribute to toxicity. Previous efforts demonstrated that treatment of cultured intestinal epithelial cells (IEC) with NSAIDs inhibits expression and activity of calpain proteases, but the effects of specific inhibition of calpain expression in vitro or the effects of NSAIDs on intestinal cell migration in vivo remain to be determined. Accordingly, we examined the effect of suppression of calpain protease expression with siRNA on cell migration in cultured IECs and evaluated the effects of NSAID treatment on epithelial cell migration and calpain protease expression in rat duodenum. Our results show that calpain siRNA inhibits protease expression and slows migration in cultured IECs. Additionally, NSAID treatment of rats slowed migration up the villus axis and suppressed calpain expression in duodenal epithelial cells. Our results are supportive of the hypothesis that suppression of calpain expression leading to slowing of cell migration is a potential mechanism through which NSAIDs cause GI toxicity.

  12. Cell-autonomous and environmental contributions to the interstitial migration of T cells

    PubMed Central

    Petravic, Janka; Davenport, Miles P.

    2010-01-01

    A key to understanding the functioning of the immune system is to define the mechanisms that facilitate directed lymphocyte migration to and within tissues. The recent development of improved imaging technologies, most prominently multi-photon microscopy, has enabled the dynamic visualization of immune cells in real-time directly within intact tissues. Intravital imaging approaches have revealed high spontaneous migratory activity of T cells in secondary lymphoid organs and inflamed tissues. Experimental evidence points towards both environmental and cell-intrinsic cues involved in the regulation of lymphocyte motility in the interstitial space. Based on these data, several conceptually distinct models have been proposed in order to explain the coordination of lymphocyte migration both at the single cell and population level. These range from “stochastic” models, where chance is the major driving force, to “deterministic” models, where the architecture of the microenvironment dictates the migratory trajectory of cells. In this review, we focus on recent advances in understanding naïve and effector T cell migration in vivo. In addition, we discuss some of the contradictory experimental findings in the context of theoretical models of migrating leukocytes. PMID:20623124

  13. Cell-autonomous and environmental contributions to the interstitial migration of T cells.

    PubMed

    Mrass, Paulus; Petravic, Janka; Davenport, Miles P; Weninger, Wolfgang

    2010-09-01

    A key to understanding the functioning of the immune system is to define the mechanisms that facilitate directed lymphocyte migration to and within tissues. The recent development of improved imaging technologies, most prominently multi-photon microscopy, has enabled the dynamic visualization of immune cells in real-time directly within intact tissues. Intravital imaging approaches have revealed high spontaneous migratory activity of T cells in secondary lymphoid organs and inflamed tissues. Experimental evidence points towards both environmental and cell-intrinsic cues involved in the regulation of lymphocyte motility in the interstitial space. Based on these data, several conceptually distinct models have been proposed in order to explain the coordination of lymphocyte migration both at the single cell and population level. These range from "stochastic" models, where chance is the major driving force, to "deterministic" models, where the architecture of the microenvironment dictates the migratory trajectory of cells. In this review, we focus on recent advances in understanding naïve and effector T cell migration in vivo. In addition, we discuss some of the contradictory experimental findings in the context of theoretical models of migrating leukocytes.

  14. Balanced cortical stiffness is important for efficient migration of Dictyostelium cells in confined environments.

    PubMed

    Roth, Heike; Samereier, Matthias; Trommler, Gudrun; Noegel, Angelika A; Schleicher, Michael; Müller-Taubenberger, Annette

    2015-11-27

    Dictyostelium discoideum cells resemble in many aspects human leukocytes and serve as a model to study actin cytoskeleton dynamics and cell migration of highly motile cells. Dictyostelium cells deficient in the actin-binding protein filamin (ddFLN) showed a surprisingly subtle change in phenotype with no or only minor effects in single cell motility. These findings were in contrast to the strong actin-crosslinking activities measured for filamin in vitro. In the present study, we set out to revisit the role of ddFLN in cell migration. For this purpose, we examined migration of wild-type, ddFLN-null and ddFLN-overexpressing cells under different conditions. In addition to cyclic-AMP chemotaxis assays using micropipettes, we explored cell migration under more confined conditions: an under-agarose 2D assay and a 3D assay employing a collagen matrix that was adapted from assays for leukocytes. Using 3D migration conditions, cells deficient in ddFLN displayed only a minor impairment of motility, similar to the results obtained for migration in 2D. However, cells overexpressing ddFLN showed a remarkable decrease in the speed of migration in particular in 3D environments. We suggest that these results are in line with an increased stiffening of the cortex due to the crosslinking activity of overexpressed ddFLN. Our conclusion is that the absolute level of ddFLN is critical for efficient migration. Furthermore, our results show that under conditions of increased mechanical stress, Dictyostelium cells, like leukocytes, switch to a bleb-based mode of movement.

  15. Apocynin Derivatives Interrupt Intracellular Signaling Resulting in Decreased Migration in Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Klees, Robert F.; De Marco, Paul C.; Salasznyk, Roman M.; Ahuja, Disha; Hogg, Michael; Antoniotti, Sylvain; Kamath, Lakshmi; Dordick, Jonathan S.; Plopper, George E.

    2006-01-01

    Cancer cells are defined by their ability to divide uncontrollably and metastasize to secondary sites in the body. Consequently, tumor cell migration represents a promising target for anticancer drug development. Using our high-throughput cell migration assay, we have screened several classes of compounds for noncytotoxic tumor cell migration inhibiting activity. One such compound, apocynin (4-acetovanillone), is oxidized by peroxidases to yield a variety of oligophenolic and quinone-type compounds that are recognized inhibitors of NADPH oxidase and may be inhibitors of the small G protein Rac1 that controls cell migration. We report here that while apocynin itself is not effective, apocynin derivatives inhibit migration of the breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-435 at subtoxic concentrations; the migration of nonmalignant MCF10A breast cells is unaffected. These compounds also cause a significant rearrangement of the actin cytoskeleton, cell rounding, and decreased levels of active Rac1 and its related G protein Cdc42. These results may suggest a promising new route to the development of novel anticancer therapeutics. PMID:16883056

  16. Bioengineering paradigms for cell migration in confined microenvironments.

    PubMed

    Stroka, Kimberly M; Gu, Zhizhan; Sun, Sean X; Konstantopoulos, Konstantinos

    2014-10-01

    Cell migration is a fundamental process underlying diverse (patho)physiological phenomena. The classical understanding of the molecular mechanisms of cell migration has been based on in vitro studies on two-dimensional substrates. More recently, mounting evidence from intravital studies has shown that during metastasis, tumor cells must navigate complex microenvironments in vivo, including narrow, pre-existing microtracks created by anatomical structures. It is becoming apparent that unraveling the mechanisms of confined cell migration in this context requires a multi-disciplinary approach through integration of in vivo and in vitro studies, along with sophisticated bioengineering techniques and mathematical modeling. Here, we highlight such an approach that has led to discovery of a new model for cell migration in confined microenvironments (i.e., the Osmotic Engine Model).

  17. Cell-surface proteoglycan in sea urchin primary mesenchyme cell migration

    SciTech Connect

    Lane, M.C.

    1989-01-01

    Early in the development of the sea urchin embryo, the primary mesenchyme cells (PMC) migrate along the basal lamina of the blastocoel. Migration is inhibited in L. pictus embryos cultured in sulfate-free seawater and in S. purpuratus embryos exposed to exogenous {beta}-D-xylosides. An in vitro assay was developed to test the migratory capacity of normal PMC on normal and treated blastocoelic matrix. Sulfate deprivation and exposure to exogenous xyloside render PMC nonmotile on either matrix. Materials removed from the surface of normal PMC by treatment with 1 M urea restored migratory ability to defective cells, whereas a similar preparation isolated from the surface of epithelial cells at the same stage did not. Migration also resumed when cells were removed from the xyloside or returned to normal seawater. The urea extract was partially purified and characterized by radiolabeling, gel electrophoresis, fluorography, ion exchange chromatography, and western blotting. The PMC synthesize a large chondroitin sulfate/dermatan sulfate proteoglycan that is present in an active fraction isolated by chromatography. Chondroitinase ABC digestion of live cells blocked migration reversibly, further supporting the identification of the chondroitin sulfate/dermatan sulfate proteoglycan as the active component in the urea extract. Much of the incorporated sulfate was distributed along the filopodia in {sup 35}SO{sub 4}-labelled PMC by autoradiography. The morphology of normal and treated S. purpuratus PMC was examined by scanning electron microscopy, and differences in spreading, particularly of the extensive filopodia present on the cells, was observed. A model for the role of the chondroitin sulfate/dermatan sulfate proteoglycan in cell detachment during migration is proposed.

  18. Cell-cell interactions stabilize emerging collective migration modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, Joshua; Guven, Can; Wang, Chenlu; Ott, Ed; Losert, Wolfgang

    2014-03-01

    We propose a coarse-grained mechanistic model for simulating the dynamics of the biological model organism Dictyostelium discoideum, incorporating gradient sensing, random motility via actin protrusions, persistent random motion and signal relay. We demonstrate that our simple cell model does result in the macroscopic group migration patterns seen in no-flow gradient chambers, namely a transition from individual motion to multi-cell ``streaming'' to aggregation as the external signal is decreased. We also find that cell-cell adhesion further stabilizes the contact network independent of chemical signaling, suggesting no indirect feedback between mechanical forces and gradient sensing. We discuss further modifications to the model and as well as further applications to quantifying dynamics using spatio-temporal contact networks. Co-first author

  19. Bimodal Analysis of Mammary Epithelial Cell Migration in Two Dimensions

    PubMed Central

    Potdar, Alka A.; Lu, Jenny; Jeon, Junhwan; Weaver, Alissa M.; Cummings, Peter T.

    2013-01-01

    Cell migration paths of mammary epithelial cells (expressing different versions of the promigratory tyrosine kinase receptor Her2/Neu) were analyzed within a bimodal framework that is a generalization of the run-and-tumble description applicable to bacterial migration. The mammalian cell trajectories were segregated into two types of alternating modes, namely, the “directional-mode” (mode I, the more persistent mode, analogous to the bacterial run phase) and the “re-orientation-mode” (mode II, the less persistent mode, analogous to the bacterial tumble phase). Higher resolution (more pixel information, relative to cell size) and smaller sampling intervals (time between images) were found to give a better estimate of the deduced single cell dynamics (such as directional-mode time and turn angle distribution) of the various cell types from the bimodal analysis. The bimodal analysis tool permits the deduction of short-time dynamics of cell motion such as the turn angle distributions and turn frequencies during the course of cell migration compared to standard methods of cell migration analysis. We find that the two-hour mammalian cell tracking data do not fall into the diffusive regime implying that the often-used random motility expressions for mammalian cell motion (based on assuming diffusive motion) are invalid over the time steps (fraction of minute) typically used in modeling mammalian cell migration. PMID:18982450

  20. Quantitative evaluation of the transplanted lin(-) hematopoietic cell migration kinetics.

    PubMed

    Kašėta, Vytautas; Vaitkuvienė, Aida; Liubavičiūtė, Aušra; Maciulevičienė, Rūta; Stirkė, Arūnas; Biziulevičienė, Genė

    2016-02-01

    Stem cells take part in organogenesis, cell maturation and injury repair. The migration is necessary for each of these functions to occur. The aim of this study was to investigate the kinetics of transplanted hematopoietic lin(-) cell population (which consists mainly of the stem and progenitor cells) in BALB/c mouse contact hypersensitivity model and quantify the migration to the site of inflammation in the affected foot and other healthy organs. Quantitative analysis was carried out with the real-time polymerase chain reaction method. Spleen, kidney, bone marrow, lung, liver, damaged and healthy foot tissue samples at different time points were collected for analysis. The quantitative data normalization was performed according to the comparative quantification method. The analysis of foot samples shows the significant migration of transplanted cells to the recipient mice affected foot. The quantity was more than 1000 times higher, as compared with that of the untreated foot. Due to the inflammation, the number of donor origin cells migrating to the lungs, liver, spleen and bone marrow was found to be decreased. Our data shows that transplanted cells selectively migrated into the inflammation areas of the foot edema. Also, the inflammation caused a secondary migration in ectopic spleen of hematopoietic stem cell niches and re-homing from the spleen to the bone marrow took place.

  1. Microscopy assays for evaluation of mast cell migration and chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Bambousková, Monika; Hájková, Zuzana; Dráber, Pavel; Dráber, Petr

    2014-01-01

    A better understanding of the molecular mechanisms leading to mast cell migration and chemotaxis is the long-term goal in mast cell research and is essential for comprehension of mast cell function in health and disease. Various techniques have been developed in recent decades for in vitro and in vivo assessment of mast cell motility and chemotaxis. In this chapter three microscopy assays facilitating real-time quantification of mast cell chemotaxis and migration are described, focusing on individual cell tracking and data analysis.

  2. Probing the mechanosensitivity in cell adhesion and migration: Experiments and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Bao-Hua; Huo, Bo

    2013-08-01

    Cell adhesion and migration are basic physiological processes in living organisms. Cells can actively probe their mechanical micro-environment and respond to the external stimuli through cell adhesion. Cells need to move to the targeting place to perform function via cell migration. For adherent cells, cell migration is mediated by cell-matrix adhesion and cell-cell adhesion. Experimental approaches, especially at early stage of investigation, are indispensable to studies of cell mechanics when even qualitative behaviors of cell as well as fundamental factors in cell behaviors are unclear. Currently, there is increasingly accumulation of experimental data of measurement, thus a quantitative formulation of cell behaviors and the relationship among these fundamental factors are highly needed. This quantitative understanding should be crucial to tissue engineering and biomedical engineering when people want to accurately regulate or control cell behaviors from single cell level to tissue level. In this review, we will elaborate recent advances in the experimental and theoretical studies on cell adhesion and migration, with particular focuses laid on recent advances in experimental techniques and theoretical modeling, through which challenging problems in the cell mechanics are suggested.

  3. Dynamic myosin activation promotes collective morphology and migration by locally balancing oppositional forces from surrounding tissue.

    PubMed

    Aranjuez, George; Burtscher, Ashley; Sawant, Ketki; Majumder, Pralay; McDonald, Jocelyn A

    2016-06-15

    Migrating cells need to overcome physical constraints from the local microenvironment to navigate their way through tissues. Cells that move collectively have the additional challenge of negotiating complex environments in vivo while maintaining cohesion of the group as a whole. The mechanisms by which collectives maintain a migratory morphology while resisting physical constraints from the surrounding tissue are poorly understood. Drosophila border cells represent a genetic model of collective migration within a cell-dense tissue. Border cells move as a cohesive group of 6-10 cells, traversing a network of large germ line-derived nurse cells within the ovary. Here we show that the border cell cluster is compact and round throughout their entire migration, a shape that is maintained despite the mechanical pressure imposed by the surrounding nurse cells. Nonmuscle myosin II (Myo-II) activity at the cluster periphery becomes elevated in response to increased constriction by nurse cells. Furthermore, the distinctive border cell collective morphology requires highly dynamic and localized enrichment of Myo-II. Thus, activated Myo-II promotes cortical tension at the outer edge of the migrating border cell cluster to resist compressive forces from nurse cells. We propose that dynamic actomyosin tension at the periphery of collectives facilitates their movement through restrictive tissues.

  4. MNT inhibits the migration of human hepatocellular carcinoma SMMC7721 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Jian; Zhou, Qi; Wang, Yafeng; Zhou, Xiangbing; Li, Jiaping

    2012-02-03

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MNT is a member of the Myc/Max/Mad network that plays a role in cell proliferation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Our study further emphasized the role of MNT in migration inhibition of SMMC7721 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MNT might be a promising target for HCC chemotherapy. -- Abstract: Max binding protein (MNT) is a member of the Myc/Max/Mad network that plays a role in cell proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. We previously observed that MNT was differentially expressed in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and interacted with Nck1 by 2-DE. Nck family adaptor proteins function to couple tyrosine phosphorylation signals, regulate actin cytoskeletal reorganization and lead to cell motility. In order to investigate the regulatory role of MNT in HCC migration, we used transient transfection with a MNT expressing vector to overexpress MNT protein in SMMC7721 cells, and MNT siRNA to knockdown MNT expression. Rho Family Small GTPase activation assay, Western blots and transwell assay were used to determine the migration potential of cells. We found that knockdown of MNT expression might promote SMMC7721 cell migration, while the overexpressed MNT could significantly inhibit cell migration. It further emphasized the role of MNT in inhibition of cell migration that might be a promising target for HCC chemotherapy.

  5. Extracellular vesicles from malignant effusions induce tumor cell migration: inhibitory effect of LMWH tinzaparin.

    PubMed

    Gamperl, Hans; Plattfaut, Corinna; Freund, Annika; Quecke, Tabea; Theophil, Friederike; Gieseler, Frank

    2016-10-01

    Elevated levels of extracellular vesicles (EVs) have been correlated with inflammatory diseases as well as progressive and metastatic cancer. By presenting tissue factor (TF) on their membrane surface, cellular microparticles (MPs) activate both the coagulation system and cell-signaling pathways such as the PAR/ERK pathway. We have shown before that malignant effusions are a rich source of tumor cell-derived EVs. Here, we used EVs from malignant effusions from three different patients after serial low-speed centrifugation steps as recommended by the ISTH (lsEV). Significant migration of human pancreatic carcinoma cells could be induced by lsEVs and was effectively inhibited by pre-incubation with tinzaparin, a low-molecular-weight heparin. Tinzaparin induced tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI) release from tumor cells, and recombinant TFPI inhibited EV-induced tumor cell migration. EVs also induced ERK phosphorylation, whereas inhibitors of PAR2 and ERK suppressed EV-induced tumor cell migration. LsEVs have been characterized by high-resolution flow cytometry and, after elimination of smaller vesicles including exosomes, by further high-speed centrifugation (hsEV). The remaining population consisting primarily of MPs is indeed the main migration-inducing population with tenase activity. Compared to other LMWHs, tinzaparin is suggested to have high potency to induce TFPI release from epithelial cells. The migration-inhibitory effect of TFPI and the interruption of tumor cell migration by inhibitors of PAR2 and ERK suggest that lsEVs induce tumor cell migration by activating the PAR2 signaling pathway. Tinzaparin might inhibit this process at least partly by inducing the release of TFPI from tumor cells, which blocks PAR-activating TF complexes. The clinical relevance of the results is discussed.

  6. Proepithelin R