Science.gov

Sample records for activation cluster csmac

  1. Commerce Spectrum Management Advisory Committee (CSMAC) Working Group (WG) 3 Phase 2 Study Summary

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-05-29

    penalty for failing to comply with a collection of information if it does not display a currently valid OMB control number. PLEASE DO NOT RETURN YOUR...government uplink emissions from three Air Force Satellite Control Network sites (New Hampshire Station, Vandenberg Tracking Station, Hawaii...presentation format for the simulation outputs was specified by CSMAC Working Group 3. Uncertainties associated with each of the models used (mission

  2. Active matter clusters at interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Copenhagen, Katherine; Gopinathan, Ajay

    Collective and directed motility or swarming is an emergent phenomenon displayed by many self-organized assemblies of active biological matter such as clusters of embryonic cells during tissue development and flocks of birds. Such clusters typically encounter very heterogeneous environments. What happens when a cluster encounters an interface between two different environments has implications for its function and fate. Here we study this problem by using a mathematical model of a cluster that treats it as a single cohesive unit whose movement depends on the nature of the local environment. We find that low speed clusters which exert forces but no active torques, encountering an interface with a moderate difference in properties can lead to refraction or even total internal reflection of the cluster. For large speeds and clusters with active torques, they show more complex behaviors crossing the interface multiple times, becoming trapped at the interface and deviating from the predictable refraction and reflection of the low velocity clusters. Our results show a wide range of behaviors that occur when collectively moving active biological matter moves across interfaces and these insights can be used to control motion by patterning environments.

  3. Active matter clusters at interfaces.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Copenhagen, Katherine; Gopinathan, Ajay

    2016-03-01

    Collective and directed motility or swarming is an emergent phenomenon displayed by many self-organized assemblies of active biological matter such as clusters of embryonic cells during tissue development, cancerous cells during tumor formation and metastasis, colonies of bacteria in a biofilm, or even flocks of birds and schools of fish at the macro-scale. Such clusters typically encounter very heterogeneous environments. What happens when a cluster encounters an interface between two different environments has implications for its function and fate. Here we study this problem by using a mathematical model of a cluster that treats it as a single cohesive unit that moves in two dimensions by exerting a force/torque per unit area whose magnitude depends on the nature of the local environment. We find that low speed (overdamped) clusters encountering an interface with a moderate difference in properties can lead to refraction or even total internal reflection of the cluster. For large speeds (underdamped), where inertia dominates, the clusters show more complex behaviors crossing the interface multiple times and deviating from the predictable refraction and reflection for the low velocity clusters. We then present an extreme limit of the model in the absence of rotational damping where clusters can become stuck spiraling along the interface or move in large circular trajectories after leaving the interface. Our results show a wide range of behaviors that occur when collectively moving active biological matter moves across interfaces and these insights can be used to control motion by patterning environments.

  4. Active constrained clustering by examining spectral Eigenvectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagstaff, Kiri L.; desJardins, Marie; Xu, Qianjun

    2005-01-01

    This work focuses on the active selection of pairwise constraints for spectral clustering. We develop and analyze a technique for Active Constrained Clustering by Examining Spectral eigenvectorS (ACCESS) derived from a similarity matrix.

  5. Nano-clustering of ligands on surrogate antigen presenting cells modulates T cell membrane adhesion and organization.

    PubMed

    Dillard, Pierre; Pi, Fuwei; Lellouch, Annemarie C; Limozin, Laurent; Sengupta, Kheya

    2016-03-14

    We investigate the adhesion and molecular organization of the plasma membrane of T lymphocytes interacting with a surrogate antigen presenting cell comprising glass supported ordered arrays of antibody (α-CD3) nano-dots dispersed in a non-adhesive matrix of polyethylene glycol (PEG). The local membrane adhesion and topography, as well as the distribution of the T cell receptors (TCRs) and the kinase ZAP-70, are influenced by dot-geometry, whereas the cell spreading area is determined by the overall average density of the ligands rather than specific characteristics of the dots. TCR clusters are recruited preferentially to the nano-dots and the TCR cluster size distribution has a weak dot-size dependence. On the patterns, the clusters are larger, more numerous, and more enriched in TCRs, as compared to the homogeneously distributed ligands at comparable concentrations. These observations support the idea that non-ligated TCRs residing in the non-adhered parts of the proximal membrane are able to diffuse and enrich the existing clusters at the ligand dots. However, long distance transport is impaired and cluster centralization in the form of a central supramolecular cluster (cSMAC) is not observed. Time-lapse imaging of early cell-surface contacts indicates that the ZAP-70 microclusters are directly recruited to the site of the antibody dots and this process is concomitant with membrane adhesion. These results together point to a complex interplay of adhesion, molecular organization and activation in response to spatially modulated stimulation.

  6. Dynamic Regulation of TCR-Microclusters and the Microsynapse for T Cell Activation.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto-Tane, Akiko; Saito, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    The interaction between a T cell and an antigen-presenting cell is the initiating event in T cell-mediated adaptive immunity. The Immunological Synapse (IS) is formed at the interface between these two cell types, and is the site where antigen (Ag)-specific recognition and activation are induced through the T cell receptor (TCR). This occurs at the center of the IS, and cell adhesion is supported through integrins in the area surrounding the TCR. Recently, this model has been revised based on data indicating that the initial Ag-specific activation signal is triggered prior to IS formation at TCR-microclusters (MCs), sites where TCR, kinases and adaptors of TCR proximal downstream signaling molecules accumulate as an activation signaling cluster. TCR-MCs then move into the center of the cell-cell interface to generate the cSMAC. This translocation of TCR-MCs is mediated initially by the actin cytoskeleton and then by dynein-induced movement along microtubules. The translocation of TCR-MCs and cSMAC formation is induced upon strong TCR stimulation through the assembly of a TCR-dynein super complex with microtubules. The Ag-specific activation signal is induced at TCR-MCs, but the adhesion signal is now shown to be induced by generating a "microsynapse," which is composed of a core of TCR-MCs and the surrounding adhesion ring of integrin and focal adhesion molecules. Since the microsynapse is critical for activation, particularly under weak TCR stimulation, this structure supports a weak TCR signal through a cell-cell adhesion signal. The microsynapse has a structure similar to the IS but on a micro-scale and regulates Ag-specific activation as well as cell-cell adhesion. We describe here the dynamic regulation of TCR-MCs, responsible for inducing Ag-specific activation signals, and the microsynapse, responsible for adhesion signals critical for cell-cell interactions, and their interrelationship.

  7. Pattern Activity Clustering and Evaluation (PACE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blasch, Erik; Banas, Christopher; Paul, Michael; Bussjager, Becky; Seetharaman, Guna

    2012-06-01

    With the vast amount of network information available on activities of people (i.e. motions, transportation routes, and site visits) there is a need to explore the salient properties of data that detect and discriminate the behavior of individuals. Recent machine learning approaches include methods of data mining, statistical analysis, clustering, and estimation that support activity-based intelligence. We seek to explore contemporary methods in activity analysis using machine learning techniques that discover and characterize behaviors that enable grouping, anomaly detection, and adversarial intent prediction. To evaluate these methods, we describe the mathematics and potential information theory metrics to characterize behavior. A scenario is presented to demonstrate the concept and metrics that could be useful for layered sensing behavior pattern learning and analysis. We leverage work on group tracking, learning and clustering approaches; as well as utilize information theoretical metrics for classification, behavioral and event pattern recognition, and activity and entity analysis. The performance evaluation of activity analysis supports high-level information fusion of user alerts, data queries and sensor management for data extraction, relations discovery, and situation analysis of existing data.

  8. T cell activation.

    PubMed

    Smith-Garvin, Jennifer E; Koretzky, Gary A; Jordan, Martha S

    2009-01-01

    This year marks the 25th anniversary of the first Annual Review of Immunology article to describe features of the T cell antigen receptor (TCR). In celebration of this anniversary, we begin with a brief introduction outlining the chronology of the earliest studies that established the basic paradigm for how the engaged TCR transduces its signals. This review continues with a description of the current state of our understanding of TCR signaling, as well as a summary of recent findings examining other key aspects of T cell activation, including cross talk between the TCR and integrins, the role of costimulatory molecules, and how signals may negatively regulate T cell function.Acronyms and DefinitionsAdapter protein: cellular protein that functions to bridge molecular interactions via characteristic domains able to mediate protein/protein or protein/lipid interactions Costimulation: signals delivered to T cells by cell surface receptors other than the TCR itself that potentiate T cell activation cSMAC: central supramolecular activation cluster Immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM): a short peptide sequence in the cytoplasmic tails of key surface receptors on hematopoietic cells that is characterized by tyrosine residues that are phosphorylated by Src family PTKs, enabling the ITAM to recruit activated Syk family kinases Inside-out signaling: signals initiated by engagement of immunoreceptors that lead to conformational changes and clustering of integrins, thereby increasing the affinity and avidity of the integrins for their ligands NFAT: nuclear factor of activated T cells PI3K: phosphoinositide 3-kinase PKC: protein kinase C PLC: phospholipase C pMHC: peptide major histocompatibility complex (MHC) complex pSMAC: peripheral supramolecular activation cluster PTK: protein tyrosine kinase Signal transduction: biochemical events linking surface receptor engagement to cellular responses TCR: T cell antigen receptor

  9. Dynamic Regulation of TCR–Microclusters and the Microsynapse for T Cell Activation

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto-Tane, Akiko; Saito, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    The interaction between a T cell and an antigen-presenting cell is the initiating event in T cell-mediated adaptive immunity. The Immunological Synapse (IS) is formed at the interface between these two cell types, and is the site where antigen (Ag)-specific recognition and activation are induced through the T cell receptor (TCR). This occurs at the center of the IS, and cell adhesion is supported through integrins in the area surrounding the TCR. Recently, this model has been revised based on data indicating that the initial Ag-specific activation signal is triggered prior to IS formation at TCR–microclusters (MCs), sites where TCR, kinases and adaptors of TCR proximal downstream signaling molecules accumulate as an activation signaling cluster. TCR–MCs then move into the center of the cell–cell interface to generate the cSMAC. This translocation of TCR–MCs is mediated initially by the actin cytoskeleton and then by dynein-induced movement along microtubules. The translocation of TCR–MCs and cSMAC formation is induced upon strong TCR stimulation through the assembly of a TCR–dynein super complex with microtubules. The Ag-specific activation signal is induced at TCR–MCs, but the adhesion signal is now shown to be induced by generating a “microsynapse,” which is composed of a core of TCR–MCs and the surrounding adhesion ring of integrin and focal adhesion molecules. Since the microsynapse is critical for activation, particularly under weak TCR stimulation, this structure supports a weak TCR signal through a cell–cell adhesion signal. The microsynapse has a structure similar to the IS but on a micro-scale and regulates Ag-specific activation as well as cell–cell adhesion. We describe here the dynamic regulation of TCR–MCs, responsible for inducing Ag-specific activation signals, and the microsynapse, responsible for adhesion signals critical for cell–cell interactions, and their interrelationship. PMID:27446085

  10. Active galactic nucleus feedback in clusters of galaxies

    PubMed Central

    Blanton, Elizabeth L.; Clarke, T. E.; Sarazin, Craig L.; Randall, Scott W.; McNamara, Brian R.

    2010-01-01

    Observations made during the last ten years with the Chandra X-ray Observatory have shed much light on the cooling gas in the centers of clusters of galaxies and the role of active galactic nucleus (AGN) heating. Cooling of the hot intracluster medium in cluster centers can feed the supermassive black holes found in the nuclei of the dominant cluster galaxies leading to AGN outbursts which can reheat the gas, suppressing cooling and large amounts of star formation. AGN heating can come in the form of shocks, buoyantly rising bubbles that have been inflated by radio lobes, and the dissipation of sound waves. PMID:20351250

  11. Interaction of metallic clusters with biologically active curcumin molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Sanjeev K.; He, Haiying; Liu, Chunhui; Dutta, Ranu; Pandey, Ravindra

    2015-09-01

    We have investigated the interaction of subnano metallic Gd and Au clusters with curcumin, an important biomolecule having pharmacological activity. Gd clusters show different site preference to curcumin and much stronger interaction strength, in support of the successful synthesis of highly stable curcumin-coated Gd nanoparticles as reported recently. It can be attributed to significant charge transfer from the Gd cluster to curcumin together with a relatively strong hybridization of the Gd df-orbitals with curcumin p-orbitals. These results suggest that Gd nanoparticles can effectively be used as delivery carriers for curcumin at the cellular level for therapy and medical imaging applications.

  12. Thermal activation in statistical clusters of magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hovorka, O.

    2017-02-01

    This article presents a kinetic Monte-Carlo study of thermally activated magnetisation dynamics in clusters of statistically distributed magnetic nanoparticles. The structure of clusters is assumed to be of fractal nature, consistently with recent observations of magnetic particle aggregation in cellular environments. The computed magnetisation relaxation decay and frequency-dependent hysteresis loops are seen to significantly depend on the fractal dimension of aggregates, leading to accelerated magnetisation relaxation and reduction in the size of hysteresis loops as the fractal dimension increases from one-dimensional-like to three-dimensional-like clusters. Discussed are implications for applications in nanomedicine, such as magnetic hyperthermia or magnetic particle imaging.

  13. Active galactic nucleus feedback in clusters of galaxies.

    PubMed

    Blanton, Elizabeth L; Clarke, T E; Sarazin, Craig L; Randall, Scott W; McNamara, Brian R

    2010-04-20

    Observations made during the last ten years with the Chandra X-ray Observatory have shed much light on the cooling gas in the centers of clusters of galaxies and the role of active galactic nucleus (AGN) heating. Cooling of the hot intracluster medium in cluster centers can feed the supermassive black holes found in the nuclei of the dominant cluster galaxies leading to AGN outbursts which can reheat the gas, suppressing cooling and large amounts of star formation. AGN heating can come in the form of shocks, buoyantly rising bubbles that have been inflated by radio lobes, and the dissipation of sound waves.

  14. Active Clustering with Model-Based Uncertainty Reduction.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Caiming; Johnson, David M; Corso, Jason J

    2017-01-01

    Semi-supervised clustering seeks to augment traditional clustering methods by incorporating side information provided via human expertise in order to increase the semantic meaningfulness of the resulting clusters. However, most current methods are passive in the sense that the side information is provided beforehand and selected randomly. This may require a large number of constraints, some of which could be redundant, unnecessary, or even detrimental to the clustering results. Thus in order to scale such semi-supervised algorithms to larger problems it is desirable to pursue an active clustering method-i.e., an algorithm that maximizes the effectiveness of the available human labor by only requesting human input where it will have the greatest impact. Here, we propose a novel online framework for active semi-supervised spectral clustering that selects pairwise constraints as clustering proceeds, based on the principle of uncertainty reduction. Using a first-order Taylor expansion, we decompose the expected uncertainty reduction problem into a gradient and a step-scale, computed via an application of matrix perturbation theory and cluster-assignment entropy, respectively. The resulting model is used to estimate the uncertainty reduction potential of each sample in the dataset. We then present the human user with pairwise queries with respect to only the best candidate sample. We evaluate our method using three different image datasets (faces, leaves and dogs), a set of common UCI machine learning datasets and a gene dataset. The results validate our decomposition formulation and show that our method is consistently superior to existing state-of-the-art techniques, as well as being robust to noise and to unknown numbers of clusters.

  15. Active Clustering with Model-Based Uncertainty Reduction.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Caiming; Johnson, David M; Corso, Jason J

    2016-03-09

    Semi-supervised clustering seeks to augment traditional clustering methods by incorporating side information provided via human expertise in order to increase the semantic meaningfulness of the resulting clusters. However, most current methods are passive in the sense that the side information is provided beforehand and selected randomly. This may require a large number of constraints, some of which could be redundant, unnecessary, or even detrimental to the clustering results. Thus in order to scale such semi-supervised algorithms to larger problems it is desirable to pursue an active clustering method- i.e. an algorithm that maximizes the effectiveness of the available human labor by only requesting human input where it will have the greatest impact. Here, we propose a novel online framework for active semi-supervised spectral clustering that selects pairwise constraints as clustering proceeds, based on the principle of uncertainty reduction. Using a first-order Taylor expansion, we decompose the expected uncertainty reduction problem into a gradient and a step-scale, computed via an application of matrix perturbation theory and cluster-assignment entropy, respectively. The resulting model is used to estimate the uncertainty reduction potential of each sample in the dataset. We then present the human user with pairwise queries with respect to only the best candidate sample. We evaluate our method using three different image datasets (faces, leaves and dogs), a set of common UCI machine learning datasets and a gene dataset. The results validate our decomposition formulation and show that our method is consistently superior to existing state-of-the-art techniques, as well as being robust to noise and to unknown numbers of clusters.

  16. Digital Wave Processor Products in the Cluster Active Archive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yearby, K. H.; Alleyne, H. St. C.; Walker, S. N.; Bates, I.; Gough, M. P.; Buckley, A.; Carozzi, T. D.

    The Digital Wave Processor (DWP) is the central control and data processing instrument for the Cluster Wave Experiment Consortium. DWP products in the Cluster Active Archive (CAA) provide a mainly supporting function for the rest of the consortium. This includes a time correction dataset which allows the standard timing accuracy of 2 ms to be improved to around 20 μs, and experiment command and status datasets which show what commands have been sent to the experiments, and the resulting status. DWP also contains a particle correlator experiment that computes the auto-correlation of electron counts received by the PEACE electron experiment via an inter-experiment link.

  17. The WHISPER Relaxation Sounder and the CLUSTER Active Archive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trotignon, J. G.; Décréau, P. M. E.; Rauch, J. L.; Vallières, X.; Rochel, A.; Kougblénou, S.; Lointier, G.; Facskó, G.; Canu, P.; Darrouzet, F.; Masson, A.

    The Waves of HIgh frequency and Sounder for Probing of Electron density by Relaxation (WHISPER) instrument is part of the Wave Experiment Consortium (WEC) of the CLUSTER mission. With the help of the long double sphere antennae of the Electric Field and Wave (EFW) instrument and the Digital Wave Processor (DWP), it delivers active (sounding) and natural (transmitter off) electric field spectra, respectively from 4 to 82 kHz, and from 2 to 80 kHz. These frequency ranges have been chosen to include the electron plasma frequency, which is closely related to the total electron density, in most of the regions encountered by the CLUSTER spacecraft. Presented here is an overview of the WHISPER data products available in the CLUSTER Active Archive (CAA). The instrument and its performance are first recalled. The way the WHISPER products are obtained is then described, with particular attention being paid to the density determination. Both sounding and natural measurements are commonly used in this process, which depends on the ambient plasma regime. This is illustrated using drawings similar to the Bryant plots commonly used in the CLUSTER master science plan. These give a clear overview of typical density values and the parts of the orbits where they are obtained. More information on the applied software or on the quality/reliability of the density determination can also be highlighted.

  18. STAR FORMATION ACTIVITY IN CLASH BRIGHTEST CLUSTER GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Fogarty, Kevin; Postman, Marc; Connor, Thomas; Donahue, Megan; Moustakas, John

    2015-11-10

    The CLASH X-ray selected sample of 20 galaxy clusters contains 10 brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) that exhibit significant (>5σ) extinction-corrected star formation rates (SFRs). Star formation activity is inferred from photometric estimates of UV and Hα+[N ii] emission in knots and filaments detected in CLASH Hubble Space Telescope ACS and WFC3 observations. UV-derived SFRs in these BCGs span two orders of magnitude, including two with a SFR ≳ 100 M{sub ⊙} yr{sup −1}. These measurements are supplemented with [O ii], [O iii], and Hβ fluxes measured from spectra obtained with the SOAR telescope. We confirm that photoionization from ongoing star formation powers the line emission nebulae in these BCGs, although in many BCGs there is also evidence of a LINER-like contribution to the line emission. Coupling these data with Chandra X-ray measurements, we infer that the star formation occurs exclusively in low-entropy cluster cores and exhibits a correlation with gas properties related to cooling. We also perform an in-depth study of the starburst history of the BCG in the cluster RXJ1532.9+3021, and create 2D maps of stellar properties on scales down to ∼350 pc. These maps reveal evidence for an ongoing burst occurring in elongated filaments, generally on ∼0.5–1.0 Gyr timescales, although some filaments are consistent with much younger (≲100 Myr) burst timescales and may be correlated with recent activity from the active galactic nucleus. The relationship between BCG SFRs and the surrounding intracluster medium gas properties provide new support for the process of feedback-regulated cooling in galaxy clusters and is consistent with recent theoretical predictions.

  19. Emission line galaxies and active galactic nuclei in WINGS clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marziani, P.; D'Onofrio, M.; Bettoni, D.; Poggianti, B. M.; Moretti, A.; Fasano, G.; Fritz, J.; Cava, A.; Varela, J.; Omizzolo, A.

    2017-03-01

    We present the analysis of the emission line galaxies members of 46 low-redshift (0.04 < z < 0.07) clusters observed by WINGS (WIde-field Nearby Galaxy cluster Survey). Emission line galaxies were identified following criteria that are meant to minimize biases against non-star-forming galaxies and classified employing diagnostic diagrams. We examined the emission line properties and frequencies of star-forming galaxies, transition objects, and active galactic nuclei (AGNs: LINERs and Seyferts), unclassified galaxies with emission lines, and quiescent galaxies with no detectable line emission. A deficit of emission line galaxies in the cluster environment is indicated by both a lower frequency, and a systematically lower Balmer emission line equivalent width and luminosity with respect to control samples; this implies a lower amount of ionized gas per unit mass and a lower star formation rate if the source is classified as Hii region. A sizable population of transition objects and of low-luminosity LINERs (≈ 10-20% of all emission line galaxies) are detected among WINGS cluster galaxies. These sources are a factor of ≈1.5 more frequent, or at least as frequent, as in control samples with respect to Hii sources. Transition objects and LINERs in clusters are most affected in terms ofline equivalent width by the environment and appear predominantly consistent with so-called retired galaxies. Shock heating can be a possible gas excitation mechanism that is able to account for observed line ratios. Specific to the cluster environment, we suggest interaction between atomic and molecular gas and the intracluster medium as a possible physical cause of line-emitting shocks. The data whose description is provided in Table B.1, and emission line catalog of the WINGS database are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/599/A83

  20. Quenching of the star formation activity in cluster galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boselli, A.; Roehlly, Y.; Fossati, M.; Buat, V.; Boissier, S.; Boquien, M.; Burgarella, D.; Ciesla, L.; Gavazzi, G.; Serra, P.

    2016-11-01

    We study the star formation quenching mechanism in cluster galaxies by fitting the spectral energy distribution (SED) of the Herschel Reference Survey, a complete volume-limited K-band-selected sample of nearby galaxies including objects in different density regions, from the core of the Virgo cluster to the general field. The SEDs of the target galaxies were fitted using the CIGALE SED modelling code. The truncated activity of cluster galaxies was parametrised using a specific star formation history with two free parameters, the quenching age QA and the quenching factor QF. These two parameters are crucial for the identification of the quenching mechanism, which acts on long timescales when starvation processes are at work, but is rapid and efficient when ram pressure occurs. To be sensitive to an abrupt and recent variation of the star formation activity, we combined twenty photometric bands in the UV to far-infrared in a new way with three age-sensitive Balmer line absorption indices extracted from available medium-resolution (R 1000) integrated spectroscopy and with Hα narrow-band imaging data. The use of a truncated star formation history significantly increases the quality of the fit in HI-deficient galaxies of the sample, that is to say, in those objects whose atomic gas content has been removed during the interaction with the hostile cluster environment. The typical quenching age of the perturbed late-type galaxies is QA ≲ 300 Myr whenever the activity of star formation is reduced by 50% < QF ≤ 80% and QA ≲ 500 Myr for QF > 80%, while that of the quiescent early-type objects is QA ≃ 1-3 Gyr. The fraction of late-type galaxies with a star formation activity reduced by QF > 80% and with an HI-deficiency parameter HI-def > 0.4 drops by a factor of 5 from the inner half virial radius of the Virgo cluster (R/Rvir < 0.5), where the hot diffuse X-ray emitting gas of the cluster is located, to the outer regions (R/Rvir > 4). The efficient quenching of the

  1. Active spacecraft potential control: An ion emitter experiment. [Cluster mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riedler, W.; Goldstein, R.; Hamelin, M.; Maehlum, B. N.; Troim, J.; Olsen, R. C.; Pedersen, A.; Grard, R. J. L.; Schmidt, R.; Rudenauer, F.

    1988-01-01

    The cluster spacecraft are instrumented with ion emitters for charge neutralization. The emitters produce indium ions at 6 keV. The ion current is adjusted in a feedback loop with instruments measuring the spacecraft potential. The system is based on the evaporation of indium in the apex field of a needle. The design of the active spacecraft potential control instruments, and the ion emitters is presented.

  2. Composition and topology of activity cliff clusters formed by bioactive compounds.

    PubMed

    Stumpfe, Dagmar; Dimova, Dilyana; Bajorath, Jürgen

    2014-02-24

    The assessment of activity cliffs has thus far mostly focused on compound pairs, although the majority of activity cliffs are not formed in isolation but in a coordinated manner involving multiple active compounds and cliffs. However, the composition of coordinated activity cliff configurations and their topologies are unknown. Therefore, we have identified all activity cliff configurations formed by currently available bioactive compounds and analyzed them in network representations where activity cliff configurations occur as clusters. The composition, topology, frequency of occurrence, and target distribution of activity cliff clusters have been determined. A limited number of large cliff clusters with unique topologies were identified that were centers of activity cliff formation. These clusters originated from a small number of target sets. However, most clusters were of small to moderate size. Three basic topologies were sufficient to describe recurrent activity cliff cluster motifs/topologies. For example, frequently occurring clusters with star topology determined the scale-free character of the global activity cliff network and represented a characteristic activity cliff configuration. Large clusters with complex topology were often found to contain different combinations of basic topologies. Our study provides a first view of activity cliff configurations formed by currently available bioactive compounds and of the recurrent topologies of activity cliff clusters. Activity cliff clusters of defined topology can be selected, and from compounds forming the clusters, SAR information can be obtained. The SAR information of activity cliff clusters sharing a/one specific activity and topology can be compared.

  3. Cluster Ion Spectrometry (CIS) Data in the Cluster Active Archive (CAA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dandouras, I.; Barthe, A.; Penou, E.; Brunato, S.; Rème, H.; Kistler, L. M.; Bavassano-Cattaneo, M. B.; Blagau, A.

    The Cluster Active Archive (CAA) aims at preserving the four Cluster spacecraft data, so that they are usable in the long-term by the scientific community as well as by the instrument team PIs and Co-Is. This implies that the data are filed together with the descriptive and documentary elements making it possible to select and interpret them. The CIS (Cluster Ion Spectrometry) experiment is a comprehensive ionic plasma spectrometry package onboard the four Cluster spacecraft, capable of obtaining full three-dimensional ion distributions (about 0-40 keV/e) with a time resolution of one spacecraft spin (4 s) and with mass-per-charge composition determination. The CIS package consists of two different instruments, a Hot Ion Analyser (HIA) and a time-of-flight ion Composition Distribution Function (CODIF) analyser, plus a sophisticated dual-processor based instrument control and data processing system (DPS). For the archival of the CIS data a multi-level approach has been adopted. The CAA archival includes processed raw data (Level 1 data), moments of the ion distribution functions (Level 2 data), and calibrated high-resolution data in a variety of physical units (Level 3 data). The latter are 3-D ion distribution functions. In addition, a software package has been developed to allow the CAA user to interactively calculate partial or total moments of the ion distributions. The CIS data archive includes also experiment documentation, graphical products for browsing through the data, and data caveats. Given the complexity of an ion spectrometer, and the variety of its operational modes, each one being optimised for a different magnetospheric region or measurement objective, consultation of the data caveats by the end user will always be a necessary step in the data analysis.

  4. Star Formation Activity in CLASH Brightest Cluster Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fogarty, Kevin; Postman, Marc; Connor, Thomas; Donahue, Megan; Moustakas, John

    2015-11-01

    The CLASH X-ray selected sample of 20 galaxy clusters contains 10 brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) that exhibit significant (>5σ) extinction-corrected star formation rates (SFRs). Star formation activity is inferred from photometric estimates of UV and Hα+[N ii] emission in knots and filaments detected in CLASH Hubble Space Telescope ACS and WFC3 observations. UV-derived SFRs in these BCGs span two orders of magnitude, including two with a SFR ≳ 100 M⊙ yr-1. These measurements are supplemented with [O ii], [O iii], and Hβ fluxes measured from spectra obtained with the SOAR telescope. We confirm that photoionization from ongoing star formation powers the line emission nebulae in these BCGs, although in many BCGs there is also evidence of a LINER-like contribution to the line emission. Coupling these data with Chandra X-ray measurements, we infer that the star formation occurs exclusively in low-entropy cluster cores and exhibits a correlation with gas properties related to cooling. We also perform an in-depth study of the starburst history of the BCG in the cluster RXJ1532.9+3021, and create 2D maps of stellar properties on scales down to ˜350 pc. These maps reveal evidence for an ongoing burst occurring in elongated filaments, generally on ˜0.5-1.0 Gyr timescales, although some filaments are consistent with much younger (≲100 Myr) burst timescales and may be correlated with recent activity from the active galactic nucleus. The relationship between BCG SFRs and the surrounding intracluster medium gas properties provide new support for the process of feedback-regulated cooling in galaxy clusters and is consistent with recent theoretical predictions. Based on observations obtained at the Southern Astrophysical Research (SOAR) telescope, which is a joint project of the Ministério da Ciência, Tecnologia, e Inovação (MCTI) da República Federativa do Brasil, the U.S. National Optical Astronomy Observatory (NOAO), the University of North Carolina at Chapel

  5. Chandra Finds Surprising Black Hole Activity In Galaxy Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-09-01

    Scientists at the Carnegie Observatories in Pasadena, California, have uncovered six times the expected number of active, supermassive black holes in a single viewing of a cluster of galaxies, a finding that has profound implications for theories as to how old galaxies fuel the growth of their central black holes. The finding suggests that voracious, central black holes might be as common in old, red galaxies as they are in younger, blue galaxies, a surprise to many astronomers. The team made this discovery with NASA'S Chandra X-ray Observatory. They also used Carnegie's 6.5-meter Walter Baade Telescope at the Las Campanas Observatory in Chile for follow-up optical observations. "This changes our view of galaxy clusters as the retirement homes for old and quiet black holes," said Dr. Paul Martini, lead author on a paper describing the results that appears in the September 10 issue of The Astrophysical Journal Letters. "The question now is, how do these black holes produce bright X-ray sources, similar to what we see from much younger galaxies?" Typical of the black hole phenomenon, the cores of these active galaxies are luminous in X-ray radiation. Yet, they are obscured, and thus essentially undetectable in the radio, infrared and optical wavebands. "X rays can penetrate obscuring gas and dust as easily as they penetrate the soft tissue of the human body to look for broken bones," said co-author Dr. Dan Kelson. "So, with Chandra, we can peer through the dust and we have found that even ancient galaxies with 10-billion-year-old stars can have central black holes still actively pulling in copious amounts of interstellar gas. This activity has simply been hidden from us all this time. This means these galaxies aren't over the hill after all and our theories need to be revised." Scientists say that supermassive black holes -- having the mass of millions to billions of suns squeezed into a region about the size of our Solar System -- are the engines in the cores of

  6. Activity and Rotation in the young cluster h Per

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argiroffi, Costanza; Caramazza, Marilena; Micela, Giusi; Moraux, Estelle; Bouvier, Jerome

    2013-07-01

    We study the stellar rotation-activity relation in the crucial age at which stars reach the fastest rotation. To this aim we have analyzed data of the young cluster h Per, very rich and compact, located at 2300 pc, that at an age of 13 Myr should be mainly composed of stars that have ended their contraction phase and that have not lost significant angular momentum viamagnetic breaking. To constrain the activity level of h Per members we have analyzed a deep Chandra/ACIS-I observation. Rotational periods of h Per members have been derived by Moraux et al. (2013) in the framework of the MONITOR project (Aigrain et al. 2007; Irwin et al. 2007). In the Chandra observation we have detected 1010 X-ray sources located in the central field of h Persei. Assuming a distance of 2300 pc their X-ray luminosity ranges between 2x10^29 and 6x10^31 erg/s. Among the 1010 x-ray sources ~600 have as optical counterpart candidate members of the cluster with masses ranging down to 0.3 solar mass, and ˜150 have also measured rotational period. For this sample of ˜150 h Per members we have compared X-ray luminosity and rotational periods for different mass ranges. We have found that solar type stars (~1.3 solar mass) show evidence of supersaturation for short periods. This phenomenon is unobserved for lower mass stars.

  7. Active learning framework with iterative clustering for bioimage classification.

    PubMed

    Kutsuna, Natsumaro; Higaki, Takumi; Matsunaga, Sachihiro; Otsuki, Tomoshi; Yamaguchi, Masayuki; Fujii, Hirofumi; Hasezawa, Seiichiro

    2012-01-01

    Advances in imaging systems have yielded a flood of images into the research field. A semi-automated facility can reduce the laborious task of classifying this large number of images. Here we report the development of a novel framework, CARTA (Clustering-Aided Rapid Training Agent), applicable to bioimage classification that facilitates annotation and selection of features. CARTA comprises an active learning algorithm combined with a genetic algorithm and self-organizing map. The framework provides an easy and interactive annotation method and accurate classification. The CARTA framework enables classification of subcellular localization, mitotic phases and discrimination of apoptosis in images of plant and human cells with an accuracy level greater than or equal to annotators. CARTA can be applied to classification of magnetic resonance imaging of cancer cells or multicolour time-course images after surgery. Furthermore, CARTA can support development of customized features for classification, high-throughput phenotyping and application of various classification schemes dependent on the user's purpose.

  8. Lateralized activation of Cluster N in the brains of migratory songbirds.

    PubMed

    Liedvogel, Miriam; Feenders, Gesa; Wada, Kazuhiro; Troje, Nikolaus F; Jarvis, Erich D; Mouritsen, Henrik

    2007-02-01

    Cluster N is a cluster of forebrain regions found in night-migratory songbirds that shows high activation of activity-dependent gene expression during night-time vision. We have suggested that Cluster N may function as a specialized night-vision area in night-migratory birds and that it may be involved in processing light-mediated magnetic compass information. Here, we investigated these ideas. We found a significant lateralized dominance of Cluster N activation in the right hemisphere of European robins (Erithacus rubecula). Activation predominantly originated from the contralateral (left) eye. Garden warblers (Sylvia borin) tested under different magnetic field conditions and under monochromatic red light did not show significant differences in Cluster N activation. In the fairly sedentary Sardinian warbler (Sylvia melanocephala), which belongs to the same phyolgenetic clade, Cluster N showed prominent activation levels, similar to that observed in garden warblers and European robins. Thus, it seems that Cluster N activation occurs at night in all species within predominantly migratory groups of birds, probably because such birds have the capability of switching between migratory and sedentary life styles. The activation studies suggest that although Cluster N is lateralized, as is the dependence on magnetic compass orientation, either Cluster N is not involved in magnetic processing or the magnetic modulations of the primary visual signal, forming the basis for the currently supported light-dependent magnetic compass mechanism, are relatively small such that activity-dependent gene expression changes are not sensitive enough to pick them up.

  9. Synthesis and 5-lipoxygenase inhibitory activity of new cinnamoyl and caffeoyl clusters.

    PubMed

    Doiron, Jérémie; Boudreau, Luc H; Picot, Nadia; Villebonet, Benoît; Surette, Marc E; Touaibia, Mohamed

    2009-02-15

    Novel cinnamoyl and caffeoyl clusters were synthesized by multiple Cu(I)-catalyzed [1,3]-dipolar cycloadditions and their anti-5-lipoxygenase inhibitory activity was tested. Caffeoyl cluster showed an improved 5-lipoxygenase inhibitory activity compared to caffeic acid, with caffeoyl trimer 16 and tetramer 19 showing the best 5-lipoxygenase inhibitory activity.

  10. Charged particles and cluster ions produced during cooking activities.

    PubMed

    Stabile, L; Jayaratne, E R; Buonanno, G; Morawska, L

    2014-11-01

    Previous studies showed that a significant number of the particles present in indoor air are generated by cooking activities, and measured particle concentrations and exposures have been used to estimate the related human dose. The dose evaluation can be affected by the particle charge level which is usually not considered in particle deposition models. To this purpose, in this paper we show, for the very first time, the electric charge of particles generated during cooking activities and thus extending the interest on particle charging characterization to indoor micro-environments, so far essentially focused on outdoors. Particle number, together with positive and negative cluster ion concentrations, was monitored using a condensation particle counter and two air ion counters, respectively, during different cooking events. Positively-charged particle distribution fractions during gas combustion, bacon grilling, and eggplant grilling events were measured by two Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer spectrometers, used with and without a neutralizer. Finally, a Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer was used to measure the charge specific particle distributions of bacon and eggplant grilling experiments, selecting particles of 30, 50, 80 and 100 nm in mobility diameter. The total fraction of positively-charged particles was 4.0%, 7.9%, and 5.6% for gas combustion, bacon grilling, and eggplant grilling events, respectively, then lower than other typical outdoor combustion-generated particles.

  11. Mapping brain activity at scale with cluster computing.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Jeremy; Vladimirov, Nikita; Kawashima, Takashi; Mu, Yu; Sofroniew, Nicholas J; Bennett, Davis V; Rosen, Joshua; Yang, Chao-Tsung; Looger, Loren L; Ahrens, Misha B

    2014-09-01

    Understanding brain function requires monitoring and interpreting the activity of large networks of neurons during behavior. Advances in recording technology are greatly increasing the size and complexity of neural data. Analyzing such data will pose a fundamental bottleneck for neuroscience. We present a library of analytical tools called Thunder built on the open-source Apache Spark platform for large-scale distributed computing. The library implements a variety of univariate and multivariate analyses with a modular, extendable structure well-suited to interactive exploration and analysis development. We demonstrate how these analyses find structure in large-scale neural data, including whole-brain light-sheet imaging data from fictively behaving larval zebrafish, and two-photon imaging data from behaving mouse. The analyses relate neuronal responses to sensory input and behavior, run in minutes or less and can be used on a private cluster or in the cloud. Our open-source framework thus holds promise for turning brain activity mapping efforts into biological insights.

  12. Clustering and Pattern Formation in Chemorepulsive Active Colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebchen, Benno; Marenduzzo, Davide; Pagonabarraga, Ignacio; Cates, Michael E.

    2015-12-01

    We demonstrate that migration away from self-produced chemicals (chemorepulsion) generates a generic route to clustering and pattern formation among self-propelled colloids. The clustering instability can be caused either by anisotropic chemical production, or by a delayed orientational response to changes of the chemical environment. In each case, chemorepulsion creates clusters of a self-limiting area which grows linearly with self-propulsion speed. This agrees with recent observations of dynamic clusters in Janus colloids (albeit not yet known to be chemorepulsive). More generally, our results could inform design principles for the self-assembly of chemorepulsive synthetic swimmers and/or bacteria into nonequilibrium patterns.

  13. Adults' Physical Activity Patterns across Life Domains: Cluster Analysis with Replication

    PubMed Central

    Rovniak, Liza S.; Sallis, James F.; Saelens, Brian E.; Frank, Lawrence D.; Marshall, Simon J.; Norman, Gregory J.; Conway, Terry L.; Cain, Kelli L.; Hovell, Melbourne F.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Identifying adults' physical activity patterns across multiple life domains could inform the design of interventions and policies. Design Cluster analysis was conducted with adults in two US regions (Baltimore-Washington DC, n = 702; Seattle-King County, n = 987) to identify different physical activity patterns based on adults' reported physical activity across four life domains: leisure, occupation, transport, and home. Objectively measured physical activity, and psychosocial and built (physical) environment characteristics of activity patterns were examined. Main Outcome Measures Accelerometer-measured activity, reported domain-specific activity, psychosocial characteristics, built environment, body mass index (BMI). Results Three clusters replicated (kappa = .90-.93) across both regions: Low Activity, Active Leisure, and Active Job. The Low Activity and Active Leisure adults were demographically similar, but Active Leisure adults had the highest psychosocial and built environment support for activity, highest accelerometer-measured activity, and lowest BMI. Compared to the other clusters, the Active Job cluster had lower socioeconomic status and intermediate accelerometer-measured activity. Conclusion Adults can be clustered into groups based on their patterns of accumulating physical activity across life domains. Differences in psychosocial and built environment support between the identified clusters suggest that tailored interventions for different subgroups may be beneficial. PMID:20836604

  14. Effect of mitochondrial complex I inhibition on Fe-S cluster protein activity

    SciTech Connect

    Mena, Natalia P.; Bulteau, Anne Laure; Salazar, Julio; Hirsch, Etienne C.; Nunez, Marco T.

    2011-06-03

    Highlights: {yields} Mitochondrial complex I inhibition resulted in decreased activity of Fe-S containing enzymes mitochondrial aconitase and cytoplasmic aconitase and xanthine oxidase. {yields} Complex I inhibition resulted in the loss of Fe-S clusters in cytoplasmic aconitase and of glutamine phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate amidotransferase. {yields} Consistent with loss of cytoplasmic aconitase activity, an increase in iron regulatory protein 1 activity was found. {yields} Complex I inhibition resulted in an increase in the labile cytoplasmic iron pool. -- Abstract: Iron-sulfur (Fe-S) clusters are small inorganic cofactors formed by tetrahedral coordination of iron atoms with sulfur groups. Present in numerous proteins, these clusters are involved in key biological processes such as electron transfer, metabolic and regulatory processes, DNA synthesis and repair and protein structure stabilization. Fe-S clusters are synthesized mainly in the mitochondrion, where they are directly incorporated into mitochondrial Fe-S cluster-containing proteins or exported for cytoplasmic and nuclear cluster-protein assembly. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that inhibition of mitochondrial complex I by rotenone decreases Fe-S cluster synthesis and cluster content and activity of Fe-S cluster-containing enzymes. Inhibition of complex I resulted in decreased activity of three Fe-S cluster-containing enzymes: mitochondrial and cytosolic aconitases and xanthine oxidase. In addition, the Fe-S cluster content of glutamine phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate amidotransferase and mitochondrial aconitase was dramatically decreased. The reduction in cytosolic aconitase activity was associated with an increase in iron regulatory protein (IRP) mRNA binding activity and with an increase in the cytoplasmic labile iron pool. Since IRP activity post-transcriptionally regulates the expression of iron import proteins, Fe-S cluster inhibition may result in a false iron deficiency signal. Given that

  15. Exceptional oxidation activity with size-controlled supported gold clusters of low atomicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corma, Avelino; Concepción, Patricia; Boronat, Mercedes; Sabater, Maria J.; Navas, Javier; Yacaman, Miguel José; Larios, Eduardo; Posadas, Alvaro; López-Quintela, M. Arturo; Buceta, David; Mendoza, Ernest; Guilera, Gemma; Mayoral, Alvaro

    2013-09-01

    The catalytic activity of gold depends on particle size, with the reactivity increasing as the particle diameter decreases. However, investigations into behaviour in the subnanometre regime (where gold exists as small clusters of a few atoms) began only recently with advances in synthesis and characterization techniques. Here we report an easy method to prepare isolated gold atoms supported on functionalized carbon nanotubes and their performance in the oxidation of thiophenol with O2. We show that single gold atoms are not active, but they aggregate under reaction conditions into gold clusters of low atomicity that exhibit a catalytic activity comparable to that of sulfhydryl oxidase enzymes. When clusters grow into larger nanoparticles, catalyst activity drops to zero. Theoretical calculations show that gold clusters are able to activate thiophenol and O2 simultaneously, and larger nanoparticles are passivated by strongly adsorbed thiolates. The combination of both reactants activation and facile product desorption makes gold clusters excellent catalysts.

  16. Night-time neuronal activation of Cluster N in a day- and night-migrating songbird.

    PubMed

    Zapka, Manuela; Heyers, Dominik; Liedvogel, Miriam; Jarvis, Erich D; Mouritsen, Henrik

    2010-08-01

    Magnetic compass orientation in a night-migratory songbird requires that Cluster N, a cluster of forebrain regions, is functional. Cluster N, which receives input from the eyes via the thalamofugal pathway, shows high neuronal activity in night-migrants performing magnetic compass-guided behaviour at night, whereas no activation is observed during the day, and covering up the birds' eyes strongly reduces neuronal activation. These findings suggest that Cluster N processes light-dependent magnetic compass information in night-migrating songbirds. The aim of this study was to test if Cluster N is active during daytime migration. We used behavioural molecular mapping based on ZENK activation to investigate if Cluster N is active in the meadow pipit (Anthus pratensis), a day- and night-migratory species. We found that Cluster N of meadow pipits shows high neuronal activity under dim-light at night, but not under full room-light conditions during the day. These data suggest that, in day- and night-migratory meadow pipits, the light-dependent magnetic compass, which requires an active Cluster N, may only be used during night-time, whereas another magnetosensory mechanism and/or other reference system(s), like the sun or polarized light, may be used as primary orientation cues during the day.

  17. Night-time neuronal activation of Cluster N in a day- and night-migrating songbird

    PubMed Central

    Zapka, Manuela; Heyers, Dominik; Liedvogel, Miriam; Jarvis, Erich D; Mouritsen, Henrik

    2010-01-01

    Magnetic compass orientation in a night-migratory songbird requires that Cluster N, a cluster of forebrain regions, is functional. Cluster N, which receives input from the eyes via the thalamofugal pathway, shows high neuronal activity in night-migrants performing magnetic compass-guided behaviour at night, whereas no activation is observed during the day, and covering up the birds’ eyes strongly reduces neuronal activation. These findings suggest that Cluster N processes light-dependent magnetic compass information in night-migrating songbirds. The aim of this study was to test if Cluster N is active during daytime migration. We used behavioural molecular mapping based on ZENK activation to investigate if Cluster N is active in the meadow pipit (Anthus pratensis), a day- and night-migratory species. We found that Cluster N of meadow pipits shows high neuronal activity under dim-light at night, but not under full room-light conditions during the day. These data suggest that, in day- and night-migratory meadow pipits, the light-dependent magnetic compass, which requires an active Cluster N, may only be used during night-time, whereas another magnetosensory mechanism and/or other reference system(s), like the sun or polarized light, may be used as primary orientation cues during the day. PMID:20618826

  18. Removing Cool Cores and Central Metallicity Peaks in Galaxy Clusters with Powerful Active Galactic Nucleus Outbursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Fulai; Mathews, William G.

    2010-07-01

    Recent X-ray observations of galaxy clusters suggest that cluster populations are bimodally distributed according to central gas entropy and are separated into two distinct classes: cool core (CC) and non-cool core (NCC) clusters. While it is widely accepted that active galactic nucleus (AGN) feedback plays a key role in offsetting radiative losses and maintaining many clusters in the CC state, the origin of NCC clusters is much less clear. At the same time, a handful of extremely powerful AGN outbursts have recently been detected in clusters, with a total energy ~1061-1062 erg. Using two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations, we show that if a large fraction of this energy is deposited near the centers of CC clusters, which is likely common due to dense cores, these AGN outbursts can completely remove CCs, transforming them to NCC clusters. Our model also has interesting implications for cluster abundance profiles, which usually show a central peak in CC systems. Our calculations indicate that during the CC to NCC transformation, AGN outbursts efficiently mix metals in cluster central regions and may even remove central abundance peaks if they are not broad enough. For CC clusters with broad central abundance peaks, AGN outbursts decrease peak abundances, but cannot effectively destroy the peaks. Our model may simultaneously explain the contradictory (possibly bimodal) results of abundance profiles in NCC clusters, some of which are nearly flat, while others have strong central peaks similar to those in CC clusters. A statistical analysis of the sizes of central abundance peaks and their redshift evolution may shed interesting insights on the origin of both types of NCC clusters and the evolution history of thermodynamics and AGN activity in clusters.

  19. Career Cluster Activity Book, Intermediate Level. Learn About the Fifteen Career Clusters and Color the Pictures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White Hawk, Sharon, Ed.

    Simple black and white illustrations portray one occupation for each of 15 career clusters. Directed toward the Indian student and showing Indians at work in the occupations depicted, the illustrations are intended to create an awareness, understanding, and motivation for Indian students to become involved in work, both on and off the reservation.…

  20. Reactivity and Catalytic Activity of Hydrogen Atom Chemisorbed Silver Clusters.

    PubMed

    Manzoor, Dar; Pal, Sourav

    2015-06-18

    Metal clusters of silver have attracted recent interest of researchers as a result of their potential in different catalytic applications and low cost. However, due to the completely filled d orbital and very high first ionization potential of the silver atom, the silver-based catalysts interact very weakly with the reacting molecules. In the current work, density functional theory calculations were carried out to investigate the effect of hydrogen atom chemisorption on the reactivity and catalytic properties of inert silver clusters. Our results affirm that the hydrogen atom chemisorption leads to enhancement in the binding energy of the adsorbed O2 molecule on the inert silver clusters. The increase in the binding energy is also characterized by the decrease in the Ag-O and increase in the O-O bond lengths in the case of the AgnH silver clusters. Pertinent to the increase in the O-O bond length, a significant red shift in the O-O stretching frequency is also noted in the case of the AgnH silver clusters. Moreover, the hydrogen atom chemisorbed silver clusters show low reaction barriers and high heat of formation of the final products for the environmentally important CO oxidation reaction as compared to the parent catalytically inactive clusters. The obtained results were compared with those of the corresponding gold and hydrogen atom chemisorbed gold clusters obtained at the same level of theory. It is expected the current computational study will provide key insights for future advances in the design of efficient nanosilver-based catalysts through the adsorption of a small atom or a ligand.

  1. Dynamical quorum sensing and clustering dynamics in a population of spatially distributed active rotators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakaguchi, Hidetsugu; Maeyama, Satomi

    2013-02-01

    A model of clustering dynamics is proposed for a population of spatially distributed active rotators. A transition from excitable to oscillatory dynamics is induced by the increase of the local density of active rotators. It is interpreted as dynamical quorum sensing. In the oscillation regime, phase waves propagate without decay, which generates an effectively long-range interaction in the clustering dynamics. The clustering process becomes facilitated and only one dominant cluster appears rapidly as a result of the dynamical quorum sensing. An exact localized solution is found to a simplified model equation, and the competitive dynamics between two localized states is studied numerically.

  2. [Active monitoring of cancer clusters: comments from an epidemiological perspective].

    PubMed

    Becker, N

    2014-01-01

    Epidemiological cancer registries are responsible for the description of the occurrence of cancers in time and space in the respective Federal State(s). Their work also involves the work-up of suspected or obvious regional clusters of cancer cases. The current sequence of action - (a) to confirm the cluster by a statistical test, (b) to identify specific exposures as potential causes, (c) to potentially conduct etiologic-epidemiological studies to confirm a suspected association - fails because of methodological difficulties. This article outlines a different approach that focuses on (a) the explanation of these methodological limitations and (b) on the current epidemiological knowledge on cancer etiology in order to rule out misunderstandings on potential causes of cancer clusters. Collaboration with professional cancer registries is advised.

  3. Spontaneous cluster activity in the inferior olivary nucleus in brainstem slices from postnatal mice.

    PubMed

    Rekling, Jens C; Jensen, Kristian H R; Jahnsen, Henrik

    2012-04-01

    A distinctive property of the cerebellar system is olivocerebellar modules, where synchronized electrical activity in neurons in the inferior olivary nucleus (IO) evokes organized activity in the cerebellar cortex. However, the exact function of these modules, and how they are developed, is still largely unknown. Here we show that the IO in in vitro slices from postnatal mice spontaneously generates clusters of neurons with synchronous Ca(2+) transients. Neurons in the principal olive (PO), and the vestibular-related dorsomedial cell column (dmcc), showed an age-dependent increase in spontaneous calcium transients. The spatiotemporal activity pattern was occasionally organized in clusters of co-active neighbouring neurons,with regular (16 min-1) and irregular (2-3 min(-1)) repeating cluster activity in the dmcc and PO, respectively. IO clusters had a diameter of 100-170 μm, lasted~1 s, and increased in occurrence from postnatal day P5.5 to P12.5, followed by a sharp drop to near zero at P15.5. IO clusters were overlapping, and comprised nearly identical neurons at some time points, and a varied subset of neurons at others. Some neurons had hub-like properties, being co-active with many other neighbours, and some were co-active with separate clusters at different times. The coherence between calcium transients in IO neurons decreased with Euclidean distance between the cells reaching low values at 100-200 μm distances. Intracellular recordings from IO neurons during cluster formation revealed the presence of spikelet-like potentials, suggesting that electrical coupling between neighbouring IO neurons may serve as a synchronizing mechanism. In conclusion, the IO shows spontaneous cluster activity under in vitro conditions, coinciding with a critical postnatal period in olivocerebellar development. We propose that these clusters may be forerunners of the ensembles of IO neurons shown to be co-active in adult animals spontaneously and during motor acts.

  4. X-Ray Activity in the Open Cluster IC 4665

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giamapapa, Mark S.; Prosser, Charles F.; Fleming, Thomas A.

    1997-01-01

    We present the results of a joint ROSAT High Resolution Imager (HRI) and optical investigation of the open cluster IC 4665. The ROSAT data contains detections for 28 stellar sources in the field, including 22 cluster members and candidate members spanning the color range -0.18 less than or equal to (B - V(sub o)) less than or equal to +1.63 (approx. B3 - M3). Upper limits are given for the remaining members (or candidate members) in the HRI field. Keck HIRES spectra have been obtained that yield radial and rotational velocity measures, respectively, for faint, low mass candidate members located within the field of the ROSAT HRI observation. In addition, photometry of possible optical counterparts to previously uncatalogued X-ray sources in the HRI field is presented. The trends in X-ray properties with (B - V) color in IC 4665 are found to be quite similar to that for other, more nearby young clusters such as the Pleiades and alpha Persei. In particular, a maximum in normalized X-ray luminosity of log (L(sub x)/L(sub bol)) approx. equal 3 is observed, beginning in the color range of (B - V)(sub o) = 0.7 - 0.8. This is similar to the corresponding color range among Pleiades members, in agreement with the earlier estimate, that the age of IC 4665 is similar to the age of the Pleiades. The correlation of rotation and X-ray emission levels is consistent with that in other young clusters. Among the high mass stars in IC 4665, five B stars are detected as X-ray sources. Of these, one is a spectroscopic binary while the remaining objects are apparently single staxs. The level of intrinsic X-ray emission observed in the rapidly rotating (v sini greater than 200 km/ s), single B stars is consistent with an origin due to shock heating of the ambient medium by radiatively driven, rotationally enhanced winds. On the basis of these observations and the results for other clusters, we argue that observed levels of X-ray emission in high mass stars of log (L(sub x)/L(sub bol

  5. Activation and Characterization of a Cryptic Polycyclic Tetramate Macrolactam Biosynthetic Gene Cluster

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Yunzi; Huang, Hua; Liang, Jing; Wang, Meng; Lu, Lu; Shao, Zengyi; Cobb, Ryan E.; Zhao, Huimin

    2014-01-01

    Polycyclic tetramate macrolactams (PTMs) are a widely distributed class of natural products with important biological activities. However, many of them have not been characterized. Here we apply a plug and play synthetic biology strategy to activate a cryptic PTM biosynthetic gene cluster SGR810-815 from Streptomyces griseus and discover three potential PTMs. This gene cluster is highly conserved in phylogenetically diverse bacterial strains and contains an unusual hybrid polyketide synthase-nonribosomal peptide synthetase (PKS-NRPS) which resembles iterative PKSs known in fungi. To further characterize this gene cluster, we use the same synthetic biology approach to create a series of gene deletion constructs and elucidate the biosynthetic steps for the formation of the polycyclic system. The strategy we employ bypasses the traditional laborious processes to elicit gene cluster expression and should be generally applicable to many other silent or cryptic gene clusters for discovery and characterization of new natural products. PMID:24305602

  6. Multi-cellular natural killer (NK) cell clusters enhance NK cell activation through localizing IL-2 within the cluster

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Miju; Kim, Tae-Jin; Kim, Hye Mi; Doh, Junsang; Lee, Kyung-Mi

    2017-01-01

    Multi-cellular cluster formation of natural killer (NK) cells occurs during in vivo priming and potentiates their activation to IL-2. However, the precise mechanism underlying this synergy within NK cell clusters remains unclear. We employed lymphocyte-laden microwell technologies to modulate contact-mediated multi-cellular interactions among activating NK cells and to quantitatively assess the molecular events occurring in multi-cellular clusters of NK cells. NK cells in social microwells, which allow cell-to-cell contact, exhibited significantly higher levels of IL-2 receptor (IL-2R) signaling compared with those in lonesome microwells, which prevent intercellular contact. Further, CD25, an IL-2R α chain, and lytic granules of NK cells in social microwells were polarized toward MTOC. Live cell imaging of lytic granules revealed their dynamic and prolonged polarization toward neighboring NK cells without degranulation. These results suggest that IL-2 bound on CD25 of one NK cells triggered IL-2 signaling of neighboring NK cells. These results were further corroborated by findings that CD25-KO NK cells exhibited lower proliferation than WT NK cells, and when mixed with WT NK cells, underwent significantly higher level of proliferation. These data highlights the existence of IL-2 trans-presentation between NK cells in the local microenvironment where the availability of IL-2 is limited. PMID:28074895

  7. Multi-cellular natural killer (NK) cell clusters enhance NK cell activation through localizing IL-2 within the cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Miju; Kim, Tae-Jin; Kim, Hye Mi; Doh, Junsang; Lee, Kyung-Mi

    2017-01-01

    Multi-cellular cluster formation of natural killer (NK) cells occurs during in vivo priming and potentiates their activation to IL-2. However, the precise mechanism underlying this synergy within NK cell clusters remains unclear. We employed lymphocyte-laden microwell technologies to modulate contact-mediated multi-cellular interactions among activating NK cells and to quantitatively assess the molecular events occurring in multi-cellular clusters of NK cells. NK cells in social microwells, which allow cell-to-cell contact, exhibited significantly higher levels of IL-2 receptor (IL-2R) signaling compared with those in lonesome microwells, which prevent intercellular contact. Further, CD25, an IL-2R α chain, and lytic granules of NK cells in social microwells were polarized toward MTOC. Live cell imaging of lytic granules revealed their dynamic and prolonged polarization toward neighboring NK cells without degranulation. These results suggest that IL-2 bound on CD25 of one NK cells triggered IL-2 signaling of neighboring NK cells. These results were further corroborated by findings that CD25-KO NK cells exhibited lower proliferation than WT NK cells, and when mixed with WT NK cells, underwent significantly higher level of proliferation. These data highlights the existence of IL-2 trans-presentation between NK cells in the local microenvironment where the availability of IL-2 is limited.

  8. Living Clusters and Crystals from Low-Density Suspensions of Active Colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mognetti, B. M.; Šarić, A.; Angioletti-Uberti, S.; Cacciuto, A.; Valeriani, C.; Frenkel, D.

    2013-12-01

    Recent studies aimed at investigating artificial analogs of bacterial colonies have shown that low-density suspensions of self-propelled particles confined in two dimensions can assemble into finite aggregates that merge and split, but have a typical size that remains constant (living clusters). In this Letter, we address the problem of the formation of living clusters and crystals of active particles in three dimensions. We study two systems: self-propelled particles interacting via a generic attractive potential and colloids that can move toward each other as a result of active agents (e.g., by molecular motors). In both cases, fluidlike “living” clusters form. We explain this general feature in terms of the balance between active forces and regression to thermodynamic equilibrium. This balance can be quantified in terms of a dimensionless number that allows us to collapse the observed clustering behavior onto a universal curve. We also discuss how active motion affects the kinetics of crystal formation.

  9. The evolution of active galactic nuclei in clusters of galaxies from the Dark Energy Survey

    SciTech Connect

    Bufanda, E.; Hollowood, D.; Jeltema, T. E.; Rykoff, E. S.; Rozo, E.; Martini, P.; Abbott, T. M. C.; Abdalla, F. B.; Allam, S.; Banerji, M.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bertin, E.; Brooks, D.; Carnero Rosell, A.; Carrasco Kind, M.; Carretero, J.; Cunha, C. E.; da Costa, L. N.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Dietrich, J. P.; Evrard, A. E.; Fausti Neto, A.; Flaugher, B.; Frieman, J.; Gerdes, D. W.; Goldstein, D. A.; Gruen, D.; Gruendl, R. A.; Gutierrez, G.; Honscheid, K.; James, D. J.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Lima, M.; Maia, M. A. G.; Marshall, J. L.; Melchior, P.; Miquel, R.; Mohr, J. J.; Ogando, R.; Plazas, A. A.; Romer, A. K.; Rooney, P.; Sanchez, E.; Santiago, B.; Scarpine, V.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Smith, R. C.; Soares-Santos, M.; Sobreira, F.; Suchyta, E.; Tarle, G.; Thomas, D.; Tucker, D. L.; Walker, A. R.

    2016-12-13

    The correlation between active galactic nuclei (AGN) and environment provides important clues to AGN fueling and the relationship of black hole growth to galaxy evolution. In this paper, we analyze the fraction of galaxies in clusters hosting AGN as a function of redshift and cluster richness for X-ray detected AGN associated with clusters of galaxies in Dark Energy Survey (DES) Science Verification data. The present sample includes 33 AGN with L_X > 1043 ergs s-1 in non-central, host galaxies with luminosity greater than 0.5 L* from a total sample of 432 clusters in the redshift range of 0.1cluster members has a strong positive correlation with redshift such that the AGN fraction increases by a factor of ~8 from low to high redshift, and the fraction of cluster galaxies hosting AGN at high redshifts is greater than the low-redshift fraction at 3.6 sigma. In particular, the AGN fraction increases steeply at the highest redshifts in our sample at z>0.7. This result is in good agreement with previous work and parallels the increase in star formation in cluster galaxies over the same redshift range. However, the AGN fraction in clusters is observed to have no significant correlation with cluster mass. Future analyses with DES Year 1 through Year 3 data will be able to clarify whether AGN activity is correlated to cluster mass and will tightly constrain the relationship between cluster AGN populations and redshift.

  10. The evolution of active galactic nuclei in clusters of galaxies from the Dark Energy Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bufanda, E.; Hollowood, D.; Jeltema, T. E.; Rykoff, E. S.; Rozo, E.; Martini, P.; Abbott, T. M. C.; Abdalla, F. B.; Allam, S.; Banerji, M.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bertin, E.; Brooks, D.; Carnero Rosell, A.; Carrasco Kind, M.; Carretero, J.; Cunha, C. E.; da Costa, L. N.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Dietrich, J. P.; Evrard, A. E.; Fausti Neto, A.; Flaugher, B.; Frieman, J.; Gerdes, D. W.; Goldstein, D. A.; Gruen, D.; Gruendl, R. A.; Gutierrez, G.; Honscheid, K.; James, D. J.; Kuehn, K.; Kuropatkin, N.; Lima, M.; Maia, M. A. G.; Marshall, J. L.; Melchior, P.; Miquel, R.; Mohr, J. J.; Ogando, R.; Plazas, A. A.; Romer, A. K.; Rooney, P.; Sanchez, E.; Santiago, B.; Scarpine, V.; Sevilla-Noarbe, I.; Smith, R. C.; Soares-Santos, M.; Sobreira, F.; Suchyta, E.; Tarle, G.; Thomas, D.; Tucker, D. L.; Walker, A. R.; DES Collaboration

    2017-03-01

    The correlation between active galactic nuclei (AGNs) and environment provides important clues to AGN fuelling and the relationship of black hole growth to galaxy evolution. In this paper, we analyse the fraction of galaxies in clusters hosting AGN as a function of redshift and cluster richness for X-ray-detected AGN associated with clusters of galaxies in Dark Energy Survey (DES) Science Verification data. The present sample includes 33 AGNs with LX > 1043 erg s-1 in non-central, host galaxies with luminosity greater than 0.5L* from a total sample of 432 clusters in the redshift range of 0.1 < z < 0.95. Analysis of the present sample reveals that the AGN fraction in red-sequence cluster members has a strong positive correlation with redshift such that the AGN fraction increases by a factor of ∼8 from low to high redshift, and the fraction of cluster galaxies hosting AGN at high redshifts is greater than the low-redshift fraction at 3.6σ. In particular, the AGN fraction increases steeply at the highest redshifts in our sample at z > 0.7. This result is in good agreement with previous work and parallels the increase in star formation in cluster galaxies over the same redshift range. However, the AGN fraction in clusters is observed to have no significant correlation with cluster mass. Future analyses with DES Year 1 through Year 3 data will be able to clarify whether AGN activity is correlated to cluster mass and will tightly constrain the relationship between cluster AGN populations and redshift.

  11. Thermal Dihydrogen Activation by a Closed-Shell AuCeO2(+) Cluster.

    PubMed

    Meng, Jing-Heng; He, Sheng-Gui

    2014-11-06

    Laser-ablation-generated AuCeO2(+) and CeO2(+) oxide clusters were mass-selected using a quadrupole mass filter and reacted with H2 in an ion trap reactor at ambient conditions. The reactions were characterized by mass spectrometry and density functional theory calculations. The gold-cerium bimetallic oxide cluster AuCeO2(+) is more reactive in H2 activation than the pure cerium oxide cluster CeO2(+). The gold atom is the active adsorption site and facilitates the heterolytic cleavage of H2 in collaboration with the separated O(2-) ion of the CeO2 support. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first example of thermal H2 activation by a closed-shell atomic cluster, which provides molecular-level insights into the single gold atom catalysis over metal oxide supports.

  12. Communication: CO oxidation by silver and gold cluster cations: Identification of different active oxygen species

    SciTech Connect

    Popolan, Denisia M.; Bernhardt, Thorsten M.

    2011-03-07

    The oxidation of carbon monoxide with nitrous oxide on mass-selected Au{sub 3}{sup +} and Ag{sub 3}{sup +} clusters has been investigated under multicollision conditions in an octopole ion trap experiment. The comparative study reveals that for both gold and silver cations carbon dioxide is formed on the clusters. However, whereas in the case of Au{sub 3}{sup +} the cluster itself acts as reactive species that facilitates the formation of CO{sub 2} from N{sub 2}O and CO, for silver the oxidized clusters Ag{sub 3}O{sub x}{sup +} (n= 1-3) are identified as active in the CO oxidation reaction. Thus, in the case of the silver cluster cations N{sub 2}O is dissociated and one oxygen atom is suggested to directly react with CO, whereas a second kind of oxygen strongly bound to silver is acting as a substrate for the reaction.

  13. Identification of clusters of investors from their real trading activity in a financial market

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tumminello, Michele; Lillo, Fabrizio; Piilo, Jyrki; Mantegna, Rosario N.

    2012-01-01

    We use statistically validated networks, a recently introduced method of validating links in a bipartite system, to identify clusters of investors trading in a financial market. Specifically, we investigate a special database allowing us to track the trading activity of individual investors of Nokia stock. We find that many statistically detected clusters of investors show a very high degree of synchronization in time when they decide to trade and in the trading action taken. We investigate the composition of these clusters and find that several of them show an over-expression of specific categories of investors.

  14. Nitric oxide synthases activation and inhibition by metallacarborane-cluster-based isoform-specific affectors.

    PubMed

    Kaplánek, Robert; Martásek, Pavel; Grüner, Bohumír; Panda, Satya; Rak, Jakub; Masters, Bettie Sue Siler; Král, Vladimír; Roman, Linda J

    2012-11-26

    A small library of boron-cluster- and metallacarborane-cluster-based ligands was designed, prepared, and tested for isoform-selective activation or inhibition of the three nitric oxide synthase isoforms. On the basis of the concept of creating a hydrophobic analogue of a natural substrate, a stable and nontoxic basic boron cluster system, previously used for boron neutron capture therapy, was modified by the addition of positively charged moieties to its periphery, providing hydrophobic and nonclassical hydrogen bonding interactions with the protein. Several of these compounds show efficacy for inhibition of NO synthesis with differential effects on the various nitric oxide synthase isoforms.

  15. The Walking School Bus and children's physical activity: A pilot cluster randomized controlled trial

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To evaluate the impact of a "walking school bus" program on children's rates of active commuting to school and physical activity. We conducted a pilot cluster randomized controlled trial among 4th-graders from 8 schools in Houston, Texas (N = 149). Random allocation to treatment or control condition...

  16. Prediction of in vitro and in vivo oestrogen receptor activity using hierarchical clustering

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this study, hierarchical clustering classification models were developed to predict in vitro and in vivo oestrogen receptor (ER) activity. Classification models were developed for binding, agonist, and antagonist in vitro ER activity and for mouse in vivo uterotrophic ER bindi...

  17. An Extended Membrane System with Active Membranes to Solve Automatic Fuzzy Clustering Problems.

    PubMed

    Peng, Hong; Wang, Jun; Shi, Peng; Pérez-Jiménez, Mario J; Riscos-Núñez, Agustín

    2016-05-01

    This paper focuses on automatic fuzzy clustering problem and proposes a novel automatic fuzzy clustering method that employs an extended membrane system with active membranes that has been designed as its computing framework. The extended membrane system has a dynamic membrane structure; since membranes can evolve, it is particularly suitable for processing the automatic fuzzy clustering problem. A modification of a differential evolution (DE) mechanism was developed as evolution rules for objects according to membrane structure and object communication mechanisms. Under the control of both the object's evolution-communication mechanism and the membrane evolution mechanism, the extended membrane system can effectively determine the most appropriate number of clusters as well as the corresponding optimal cluster centers. The proposed method was evaluated over 13 benchmark problems and was compared with four state-of-the-art automatic clustering methods, two recently developed clustering methods and six classification techniques. The comparison results demonstrate the superiority of the proposed method in terms of effectiveness and robustness.

  18. Systematic assessment of coordinated activity cliffs formed by kinase inhibitors and detailed characterization of activity cliff clusters and associated SAR information.

    PubMed

    Dimova, Dilyana; Stumpfe, Dagmar; Bajorath, Jürgen

    2015-01-27

    From currently available kinase inhibitors and their activity data, clusters of coordinated activity cliffs were systematically derived and subjected to cluster index and index map analysis. Type I-like inhibitors with well-defined IC50 measurements were found to provide a large knowledge base of activity cliff clusters for 266 targets from nine kinase groups. On the basis of index map analysis, these clusters were systematically organized according to structural similarity of inhibitors and activity cliff diversity and prioritized for structure-activity relationship (SAR) analysis. From prioritized clusters, interpretable SAR information can be extracted. It is also shown that activity cliff clusters formed by ATP site-directed inhibitors often represent local SAR environments of rather different complexity and interpretability. In addition, activity cliff clusters including promiscuous kinase inhibitors have been determined. Only a small subset of inhibitors was found to change activity cliff roles in different clusters. The activity cliff clusters described herein and their index map organization substantially enrich SAR information associated with kinase inhibitors in compound subsets of limited size. The cluster and index map information is made available upon request to provide opportunities for further SAR exploration. On the basis of our analysis and the data provided, activity cliff clusters and corresponding inhibitor series for kinase targets of interest can be readily selected.

  19. Highly active subnano palladium clusters embedded in i-motif DNA.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jinli; Wang, Xian; Fu, Yan; Han, You; Cheng, Jingyao; Zhang, Yanqing; Li, Wei

    2013-11-26

    Highly active subnano Pd clusters were synthesized using i-motif DNA as the template through characterization via ESI MS, DLS, XPS, UV-vis, and FTIR. It is indicated that Pd1-Pd5 clusters are generated at a [Pd]/[base] ratio of 0.2, Pd8 to Pd9 clusters are generated at a [Pd]/[base] ratio of 0.5, and large nanoparticles with the size about 2.6 nm are formed at a [Pd]/[base] ratio of 2.0. The i-motif-stabilized Pd8-Pd9 clusters show high catalytic activity toward the reduction of 4-nitrophenol with a relative rate constant value of 2034 min(-1) (mM Pd)(-1). DFT calculations disclose that the unique structure of the i-motif with consecutive hemiprotonated CH(+)·C pairs can efficiently ligate Pd ions at the N3 sites of cytosines and that the synthesized Pd clusters consist of metallic Pd atoms as well as positively charged Pd that is ligated by nucleobases, which is capable of facilitating the activation of the nitryl group of 4-nitrophenol. This work suggests a promising pathway to preparing subnano metal catalysts with enhanced catalytic activity using programmable DNA scaffolds.

  20. Clustering-Based Ensemble Learning for Activity Recognition in Smart Homes

    PubMed Central

    Jurek, Anna; Nugent, Chris; Bi, Yaxin; Wu, Shengli

    2014-01-01

    Application of sensor-based technology within activity monitoring systems is becoming a popular technique within the smart environment paradigm. Nevertheless, the use of such an approach generates complex constructs of data, which subsequently requires the use of intricate activity recognition techniques to automatically infer the underlying activity. This paper explores a cluster-based ensemble method as a new solution for the purposes of activity recognition within smart environments. With this approach activities are modelled as collections of clusters built on different subsets of features. A classification process is performed by assigning a new instance to its closest cluster from each collection. Two different sensor data representations have been investigated, namely numeric and binary. Following the evaluation of the proposed methodology it has been demonstrated that the cluster-based ensemble method can be successfully applied as a viable option for activity recognition. Results following exposure to data collected from a range of activities indicated that the ensemble method had the ability to perform with accuracies of 94.2% and 97.5% for numeric and binary data, respectively. These results outperformed a range of single classifiers considered as benchmarks. PMID:25014095

  1. Clustering-based ensemble learning for activity recognition in smart homes.

    PubMed

    Jurek, Anna; Nugent, Chris; Bi, Yaxin; Wu, Shengli

    2014-07-10

    Application of sensor-based technology within activity monitoring systems is becoming a popular technique within the smart environment paradigm. Nevertheless, the use of such an approach generates complex constructs of data, which subsequently requires the use of intricate activity recognition techniques to automatically infer the underlying activity. This paper explores a cluster-based ensemble method as a new solution for the purposes of activity recognition within smart environments. With this approach activities are modelled as collections of clusters built on different subsets of features. A classification process is performed by assigning a new instance to its closest cluster from each collection. Two different sensor data representations have been investigated, namely numeric and binary. Following the evaluation of the proposed methodology it has been demonstrated that the cluster-based ensemble method can be successfully applied as a viable option for activity recognition. Results following exposure to data collected from a range of activities indicated that the ensemble method had the ability to perform with accuracies of 94.2% and 97.5% for numeric and binary data, respectively. These results outperformed a range of single classifiers considered as benchmarks.

  2. Human frataxin activates Fe-S cluster biosynthesis by facilitating sulfur transfer chemistry.

    PubMed

    Bridwell-Rabb, Jennifer; Fox, Nicholas G; Tsai, Chi-Lin; Winn, Andrew M; Barondeau, David P

    2014-08-05

    Iron-sulfur clusters are ubiquitous protein cofactors with critical cellular functions. The mitochondrial Fe-S assembly complex, which consists of the cysteine desulfurase NFS1 and its accessory protein (ISD11), the Fe-S assembly protein (ISCU2), and frataxin (FXN), converts substrates l-cysteine, ferrous iron, and electrons into Fe-S clusters. The physiological function of FXN has received a tremendous amount of attention since the discovery that its loss is directly linked to the neurodegenerative disease Friedreich's ataxia. Previous in vitro results revealed a role for human FXN in activating the cysteine desulfurase and Fe-S cluster biosynthesis activities of the Fe-S assembly complex. Here we present radiolabeling experiments that indicate FXN accelerates the accumulation of sulfur on ISCU2 and that the resulting persulfide species is viable in the subsequent synthesis of Fe-S clusters. Additional mutagenesis, enzyme kinetic, UV-visible, and circular dichroism spectroscopic studies suggest conserved ISCU2 residue C104 is critical for FXN activation, whereas C35, C61, and C104 are all essential for Fe-S cluster formation on the assembly complex. These results cannot be fully explained by the hypothesis that FXN functions as an iron donor for Fe-S cluster biosynthesis, and further support an allosteric regulator role for FXN. Together, these results lead to an activation model in which FXN accelerates persulfide formation on NFS1 and favors a helix-to-coil interconversion on ISCU2 that facilitates the transfer of sulfur from NFS1 to ISCU2 as an initial step in Fe-S cluster biosynthesis.

  3. A Redox Active [2Fe-2S] Cluster on the Hydrogenase Maturase HydF.

    PubMed

    Shepard, Eric M; Byer, Amanda S; Betz, Jeremiah N; Peters, John W; Broderick, Joan B

    2016-06-28

    [FeFe]-hydrogenases are nature's most prolific hydrogen catalysts, excelling at facilely interconverting H2 and protons. The catalytic core common to all [FeFe]-hydrogenases is a complex metallocofactor, referred to as the H-cluster, which is composed of a standard [4Fe-4S] cluster linked through a bridging thiolate to a 2Fe subcluster harboring dithiomethylamine, carbon monoxide, and cyanide ligands. This 2Fe subcluster is synthesized and inserted into [FeFe]-hydrogenase by three maturase enzymes denoted HydE, HydF, and HydG. HydE and HydG are radical S-adenosylmethionine enzymes and synthesize the nonprotein ligands of the H-cluster. HydF is a GTPase that functions as a scaffold or carrier for 2Fe subcluster production. Herein, we utilize UV-visible, circular dichroism, and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopic studies to establish the existence of redox active [4Fe-4S] and [2Fe-2S] clusters bound to HydF. We have used spectroelectrochemical titrations to assign iron-sulfur cluster midpoint potentials, have shown that HydF purifies with a reduced [2Fe-2S] cluster in the absence of exogenous reducing agents, and have tracked iron-sulfur cluster spectroscopic changes with quaternary structural perturbations. Our results provide an important foundation for understanding the maturation process by defining the iron-sulfur cluster content of HydF prior to its interaction with HydE and HydG. We speculate that the [2Fe-2S] cluster of HydF either acts as a placeholder for HydG-derived Fe(CO)2CN species or serves as a scaffold for 2Fe subcluster assembly.

  4. Clustering of diet- and activity-related parenting practices: cross-sectional findings of the INPACT study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Various diet- and activity-related parenting practices are positive determinants of child dietary and activity behaviour, including home availability, parental modelling and parental policies. There is evidence that parenting practices cluster within the dietary domain and within the activity domain. This study explores whether diet- and activity-related parenting practices cluster across the dietary and activity domain. Also examined is whether the clusters are related to child and parental background characteristics. Finally, to indicate the relevance of the clusters in influencing child dietary and activity behaviour, we examined whether clusters of parenting practices are related to these behaviours. Methods Data were used from 1480 parent–child dyads participating in the Dutch IVO Nutrition and Physical Activity Child cohorT (INPACT). Parents of children aged 8–11 years completed questionnaires at home assessing their diet- and activity-related parenting practices, child and parental background characteristics, and child dietary and activity behaviours. Principal component analysis (PCA) was used to identify clusters of parenting practices. Backward regression analysis was used to examine the relationship between child and parental background characteristics with cluster scores, and partial correlations to examine associations between cluster scores and child dietary and activity behaviours. Results PCA revealed five clusters of parenting practices: 1) high visibility and accessibility of screens and unhealthy food, 2) diet- and activity-related rules, 3) low availability of unhealthy food, 4) diet- and activity-related positive modelling, and 5) positive modelling on sports and fruit. Low parental education was associated with unhealthy cluster 1, while high(er) education was associated with healthy clusters 2, 3 and 5. Separate clusters were related to both child dietary and activity behaviour in the hypothesized directions: healthy clusters

  5. Preparation of Aun quantum clusters with catalytic activity in β-cyclodextrin polyurethane nanosponges.

    PubMed

    Vasconcelos, Diego Andrade; Kubota, Tatiana; Santos, Douglas C; Araujo, Marcia V G; Teixeira, Zaine; Gimenez, Iara F

    2016-01-20

    Here we report the use of β-cyclodextrin polyurethane nanosponges cross-linked with 1,6-hexamethylene diisocyanate as a template for the preparation of Aun quantum clusters, by the core-etching of glutathione-capped Au nanoparticles. The study of temporal evolution of the core-etching process using different Au concentrations indicated that formation of Aun clusters embedded in the nanosponge is favored by the use of lower Au concentrations, since it began at shorter times and lead to higher cluster loading. An estimation of the number of Au atoms based on the maximum photoluminescence wavelength suggested that, depending on the Au concentration and the core etching time, clusters with 11-15 atoms were formed. After excluding the possibility of an inclusion complex formation, evaluation of the catalytic activity of nanosponge-loaded Aun clusters toward the reduction of 4-nitrophenol has shown that the reaction is catalyzed by the Aun clusters with no induction time, following the Langmuir-Hinshelwood kinetic model.

  6. Activation and adsorption of CO{sub 2} on copper surfaces and clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Gautam, Seema; Dharmvir, Keya; Goel, Neetu

    2014-04-24

    The activation and adsorption of CO{sub 2} over Cu{sub n} clusters have been investigated by first principle calculations. Results of these calculations are compared with the previous studies of adsorption of CO{sub 2} on Cu (hkl) surfaces [Wang et al. Surface Science 570 (2004) 205–217]. We find that CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed over the clusters in comparison with Cu (hkl) surfaces. The Cu13 cluster in particular dissociates the CO{sub 2} molecule adsorbed on the one of the caps of the icosahedron into CO and atomic oxygen. This activated configuration can act as a precursor to reactions leading to hydrocarbon fuels from CO{sub 2}.

  7. a Three-Step Spatial-Temporal Clustering Method for Human Activity Pattern Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, W.; Li, S.; Xu, S.

    2016-06-01

    How people move in cities and what they do in various locations at different times form human activity patterns. Human activity pattern plays a key role in in urban planning, traffic forecasting, public health and safety, emergency response, friend recommendation, and so on. Therefore, scholars from different fields, such as social science, geography, transportation, physics and computer science, have made great efforts in modelling and analysing human activity patterns or human mobility patterns. One of the essential tasks in such studies is to find the locations or places where individuals stay to perform some kind of activities before further activity pattern analysis. In the era of Big Data, the emerging of social media along with wearable devices enables human activity data to be collected more easily and efficiently. Furthermore, the dimension of the accessible human activity data has been extended from two to three (space or space-time) to four dimensions (space, time and semantics). More specifically, not only a location and time that people stay and spend are collected, but also what people "say" for in a location at a time can be obtained. The characteristics of these datasets shed new light on the analysis of human mobility, where some of new methodologies should be accordingly developed to handle them. Traditional methods such as neural networks, statistics and clustering have been applied to study human activity patterns using geosocial media data. Among them, clustering methods have been widely used to analyse spatiotemporal patterns. However, to our best knowledge, few of clustering algorithms are specifically developed for handling the datasets that contain spatial, temporal and semantic aspects all together. In this work, we propose a three-step human activity clustering method based on space, time and semantics to fill this gap. One-year Twitter data, posted in Toronto, Canada, is used to test the clustering-based method. The results show that the

  8. Star formation activity of intermediate redshift cluster galaxies out to the infall regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerken, B.; Ziegler, B.; Balogh, M.; Gilbank, D.; Fritz, A.; Jäger, K.

    2004-07-01

    We present a spectroscopic analysis of two galaxy clusters at z≈0.2, out to ˜4 Mpc. The two clusters VMF73 and VMF74 as identified by \\citet{VMFJQH98} were observed with multiple object spectroscopy using MOSCA at the Calar Alto 3.5 m telescope. Both clusters lie in the ROSAT Position Sensitive Proportional Counter field R285 and were selected from the X-ray Dark Cluster Survey \\citep{GBCZ04} that provides optical V- and I-band data. VMF73 and VMF74 are located at respective redshifts of z=0.25 and z=0.18 with velocity dispersions of 671 km s-1 and 442 km s-1, respectively. Both cluster velocity dispersions are consistent with Gaussians. The spectroscopic observations reach out to ˜2.5 virial radii. Line strength measurements of the emission lines Hα and [O II]λ3727 are used to assess the star formation activity of cluster galaxies which show radial and density dependences. The mean and median of both line strength distributions as well as the fraction of star forming galaxies increase with increasing clustercentric distance and decreasing local galaxy density. Except for two galaxies with strong Hα and [O II] emission, all of the cluster galaxies are normal star forming or passive galaxies. Our results are consistent with other studies that show the truncation in star formation occurs far from the cluster centre. Table A.1 is only available in electronic from at http//www.edpsciences.org

  9. Isotropic Heating of Galaxy Cluster Cores via Rapidly Reorienting Active Galactic Nucleus Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babul, Arif; Sharma, Prateek; Reynolds, Christopher S.

    2013-05-01

    Active galactic nucleus (AGN) jets carry more than sufficient energy to stave off catastrophic cooling of the intracluster medium (ICM) in the cores of cool-core clusters. However, in order to prevent catastrophic cooling, the ICM must be heated in a near-isotropic fashion and narrow bipolar jets with P jet = 1044 - 45 erg s-1, typical of radio AGNs at cluster centers, are inefficient in heating the gas in the transverse direction to the jets. We argue that due to existent conditions in cluster cores, the supermassive black holes (SMBHs) will, in addition to accreting gas via radiatively inefficient flows, experience short stochastic episodes of enhanced accretion via thin disks. In general, the orientation of these accretion disks will be misaligned with the spin axis of the black holes (BHs) and the ensuing torques will cause the BH's spin axis (and therefore the jet axis) to slew and rapidly change direction. This model not only explains recent observations showing successive generations of jet-lobes-bubbles in individual cool-core clusters that are offset from each other in the angular direction with respect to the cluster center, but also shows that AGN jets can heat the cluster core nearly isotropically on the gas cooling timescale. Our model does require that the SMBHs at the centers of cool-core clusters be spinning relatively slowly. Torques from individual misaligned disks are ineffective at tilting rapidly spinning BHs by more than a few degrees. Additionally, since SMBHs that host thin accretion disks will manifest as quasars, we predict that roughly 1-2 rich clusters within z < 0.5 should have quasars at their centers.

  10. User Activity Recognition in Smart Homes Using Pattern Clustering Applied to Temporal ANN Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Bourobou, Serge Thomas Mickala; Yoo, Younghwan

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses the possibility of recognizing and predicting user activities in the IoT (Internet of Things) based smart environment. The activity recognition is usually done through two steps: activity pattern clustering and activity type decision. Although many related works have been suggested, they had some limited performance because they focused only on one part between the two steps. This paper tries to find the best combination of a pattern clustering method and an activity decision algorithm among various existing works. For the first step, in order to classify so varied and complex user activities, we use a relevant and efficient unsupervised learning method called the K-pattern clustering algorithm. In the second step, the training of smart environment for recognizing and predicting user activities inside his/her personal space is done by utilizing the artificial neural network based on the Allen’s temporal relations. The experimental results show that our combined method provides the higher recognition accuracy for various activities, as compared with other data mining classification algorithms. Furthermore, it is more appropriate for a dynamic environment like an IoT based smart home. PMID:26007738

  11. User Activity Recognition in Smart Homes Using Pattern Clustering Applied to Temporal ANN Algorithm.

    PubMed

    Bourobou, Serge Thomas Mickala; Yoo, Younghwan

    2015-05-21

    This paper discusses the possibility of recognizing and predicting user activities in the IoT (Internet of Things) based smart environment. The activity recognition is usually done through two steps: activity pattern clustering and activity type decision. Although many related works have been suggested, they had some limited performance because they focused only on one part between the two steps. This paper tries to find the best combination of a pattern clustering method and an activity decision algorithm among various existing works. For the first step, in order to classify so varied and complex user activities, we use a relevant and efficient unsupervised learning method called the K-pattern clustering algorithm. In the second step, the training of smart environment for recognizing and predicting user activities inside his/her personal space is done by utilizing the artificial neural network based on the Allen's temporal relations. The experimental results show that our combined method provides the higher recognition accuracy for various activities, as compared with other data mining classification algorithms. Furthermore, it is more appropriate for a dynamic environment like an IoT based smart home.

  12. Yeast homologous recombination-based promoter engineering for the activation of silent natural product biosynthetic gene clusters.

    PubMed

    Montiel, Daniel; Kang, Hahk-Soo; Chang, Fang-Yuan; Charlop-Powers, Zachary; Brady, Sean F

    2015-07-21

    Large-scale sequencing of prokaryotic (meta)genomic DNA suggests that most bacterial natural product gene clusters are not expressed under common laboratory culture conditions. Silent gene clusters represent a promising resource for natural product discovery and the development of a new generation of therapeutics. Unfortunately, the characterization of molecules encoded by these clusters is hampered owing to our inability to express these gene clusters in the laboratory. To address this bottleneck, we have developed a promoter-engineering platform to transcriptionally activate silent gene clusters in a model heterologous host. Our approach uses yeast homologous recombination, an auxotrophy complementation-based yeast selection system and sequence orthogonal promoter cassettes to exchange all native promoters in silent gene clusters with constitutively active promoters. As part of this platform, we constructed and validated a set of bidirectional promoter cassettes consisting of orthogonal promoter sequences, Streptomyces ribosome binding sites, and yeast selectable marker genes. Using these tools we demonstrate the ability to simultaneously insert multiple promoter cassettes into a gene cluster, thereby expediting the reengineering process. We apply this method to model active and silent gene clusters (rebeccamycin and tetarimycin) and to the silent, cryptic pseudogene-containing, environmental DNA-derived Lzr gene cluster. Complete promoter refactoring and targeted gene exchange in this "dead" cluster led to the discovery of potent indolotryptoline antiproliferative agents, lazarimides A and B. This potentially scalable and cost-effective promoter reengineering platform should streamline the discovery of natural products from silent natural product biosynthetic gene clusters.

  13. Magnetic Field-Induced T Cell Receptor Clustering by Nanoparticles Enhances T Cell Activation and Stimulates Antitumor Activity

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Iron–dextran nanoparticles functionalized with T cell activating proteins have been used to study T cell receptor (TCR) signaling. However, nanoparticle triggering of membrane receptors is poorly understood and may be sensitive to physiologically regulated changes in TCR clustering that occur after T cell activation. Nano-aAPC bound 2-fold more TCR on activated T cells, which have clustered TCR, than on naive T cells, resulting in a lower threshold for activation. To enhance T cell activation, a magnetic field was used to drive aggregation of paramagnetic nano-aAPC, resulting in a doubling of TCR cluster size and increased T cell expansion in vitro and after adoptive transfer in vivo. T cells activated by nano-aAPC in a magnetic field inhibited growth of B16 melanoma, showing that this novel approach, using magnetic field-enhanced nano-aAPC stimulation, can generate large numbers of activated antigen-specific T cells and has clinically relevant applications for adoptive immunotherapy. PMID:24564881

  14. RADIO-LOUD ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS: IS THERE A LINK BETWEEN LUMINOSITY AND CLUSTER ENVIRONMENT?

    SciTech Connect

    Ineson, J.; Croston, J. H.; Hardcastle, M. J.; Jarvis, M.; Kraft, R. P.; Evans, D. A.

    2013-06-20

    We present here the first results from the Chandra ERA (Environments of Radio-loud AGN) Large Project, characterizing the cluster environments of a sample of 26 radio-loud active galactic nuclei (AGNs) at z {approx} 0.5 that covers three decades of radio luminosity. This is the first systematic X-ray environmental study at a single epoch, and has allowed us to examine the relationship between radio luminosity and cluster environment without the problems of Malmquist bias. We have found a weak correlation between radio luminosity and host cluster X-ray luminosity, as well as tentative evidence that this correlation is driven by the subpopulation of low-excitation radio galaxies, with high-excitation radio galaxies showing no significant correlation. The considerable scatter in the environments may be indicative of complex relationships not currently included in feedback models.

  15. Active galactic nuclei. II - The acceleration of relativistic particles in a cluster of accreting black holes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pacholczyk, A. G.; Stepinski, T. F.

    1988-01-01

    An accreting cluster of black holes in an active galactic nucleus is a natural site for a system of shock structures with a hierarchy of sizes, corresponding to the distribution of masses in the cluster. Accreted gas containing some magnetic fields and supersonically falling onto the core forms shocks on the outside of each hole and these shocks are capable of accelerating relativistic particles. The energies reached in a single shock are size rather than acceleration time limited and are proportional to the mass of the hole with a proportionality constant being a function of the position of the hole within a cluster and the model of the cluster and the shock formation. These energies are adequate to explain the observed properties of synchrotron and inverse-Compton radiation from these objects. The resulting energy spectrum of particles in the cluster in 'zeroth' approximation has the form of a doubly broken power law with indices of two and three on both extremes of the energy domain respectively, bridged by an index of about 2.5.

  16. Active learning for semi-supervised clustering based on locally linear propagation reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chin-Chun; Lin, Po-Yi

    2015-03-01

    The success of semi-supervised clustering relies on the effectiveness of side information. To get effective side information, a new active learner learning pairwise constraints known as must-link and cannot-link constraints is proposed in this paper. Three novel techniques are developed for learning effective pairwise constraints. The first technique is used to identify samples less important to cluster structures. This technique makes use of a kernel version of locally linear embedding for manifold learning. Samples neither important to locally linear propagation reconstructions of other samples nor on flat patches in the learned manifold are regarded as unimportant samples. The second is a novel criterion for query selection. This criterion considers not only the importance of a sample to expanding the space coverage of the learned samples but also the expected number of queries needed to learn the sample. To facilitate semi-supervised clustering, the third technique yields inferred must-links for passing information about flat patches in the learned manifold to semi-supervised clustering algorithms. Experimental results have shown that the learned pairwise constraints can capture the underlying cluster structures and proven the feasibility of the proposed approach.

  17. Anaerobic central metabolic pathways active during polyhydroxyalkanoate production in uncultured cluster 1 Defluviicoccus enriched in activated sludge communities.

    PubMed

    Burow, Luke C; Mabbett, Amanda N; Borrás, Luis; Blackall, Linda L

    2009-09-01

    A glycogen nonpolyphosphate-accumulating organism (GAO) enrichment culture dominated by the Alphaproteobacteria cluster 1 Defluviicoccus was investigated to determine the metabolic pathways involved in the anaerobic formation of polyhydroxyalkanoates, carbon storage polymers important for the proliferation of microorganisms in enhanced biological phosphorus removal processes. FISH-microautoradiography and post-FISH fluorescent chemical staining confirmed acetate assimilation as polyhydroxyalkanoates in cluster 1 Defluviicoccus under anaerobic conditions. Chemical inhibition of glycolysis using iodoacetate, and of isocitrate lyase by 3-nitropropionate and itaconate, indicated that carbon is likely to be channelled through both glycolysis and the glyoxylate cycle in cluster 1 Defluviicoccus. The effect of metabolic inhibitors of aconitase (monofluoroacetate) and succinate dehydrogenase (malonate) suggested that aconitase, but not succinate dehydrogenase, was active, providing further support for the role of the glyoxylate cycle in these GAOs. Metabolic inhibition of fumarate reductase using oxantel decreased polyhydroxyalkanoate production. This indicated reduction of fumarate to succinate and the operation of the reductive branch of the tricarboxylic acid cycle, which is possibly important in the production of the polyhydroxyvalerate component of polyhydroxyalkanoates observed in cluster 1 Defluviicoccus enrichment cultures. These findings were integrated with previous metabolic models for GAOs and enabled an anaerobic central metabolic pathway model for polyhydroxyalkanoate formation in cluster 1 Defluviicoccus to be proposed.

  18. Is the cluster environment quenching the Seyfert activity in elliptical and spiral galaxies?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Souza, R. S.; Dantas, M. L. L.; Krone-Martins, A.; Cameron, E.; Coelho, P.; Hattab, M. W.; de Val-Borro, M.; Hilbe, J. M.; Elliott, J.; Hagen, A.; COIN Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    We developed a hierarchical Bayesian model (HBM) to investigate how the presence of Seyfert activity relates to their environment, herein represented by the galaxy cluster mass, M200, and the normalized cluster centric distance, r/r200. We achieved this by constructing an unbiased sample of galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, with morphological classifications provided by the Galaxy Zoo Project. A propensity score matching approach is introduced to control the effects of confounding variables: stellar mass, galaxy colour, and star formation rate. The connection between Seyfert-activity and environmental properties in the de-biased sample is modelled within an HBM framework using the so-called logistic regression technique, suitable for the analysis of binary data (e.g. whether or not a galaxy hosts an AGN). Unlike standard ordinary least square fitting methods, our methodology naturally allows modelling the probability of Seyfert-AGN activity in galaxies on their natural scale, i.e. as a binary variable. Furthermore, we demonstrate how an HBM can incorporate information of each particular galaxy morphological type in an unified framework. In elliptical galaxies our analysis indicates a strong correlation of Seyfert-AGN activity with r/r200, and a weaker correlation with the mass of the host cluster. In spiral galaxies these trends do not appear, suggesting that the link between Seyfert activity and the properties of spiral galaxies are independent of the environment.

  19. Membership and Coronal Activity in the NGC 2232 and Cr 140 Open Clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patten, Brian M.; Oliversen, Ronald J. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This is the second annual performance report for our grant "Membership and Coronal Activity in the NGC 2232 and Cr 140 Open Clusters." We propose to identify X-ray sources and extract net source counts in 8 archival ROSAT HRI images in the regions of the NGC 2232 and Cr 140 open clusters. These X-ray data will be combined with ground-based photometry and spectroscopy in order to identify G, K, and early-M type cluster members. At present, no members later than approximately F5 are currently known for either cluster. With ages of approximately 25 Myr and at a distance of just 320 - 360 pc, the combined late-type membership of the NGC 2232 and Cr 140 clusters will yield an almost unique sample of solar-type stars in the post-T Tauri/pre-main sequence phase of evolution. These stars will be used to assess the level and dispersion in coronal activity levels, as part of a probe of the importance of magnetic braking and the level of magnetic dynamo activity, for solar-type stars just before they reach the ZAMS. Over the past year we have successfully acquired all of the ground-based data necessary to support the analysis of the archival ROSAT X-ray data in the regions around both of these clusters. By the end of 2001 we expect to have completed the reduction and analysis of the ground-based photometry and spectroscopy and will begin the integration of these data with the ROSAT X-ray data. A certain amount of pressure to complete the work on NGC 2232 is coming from the SIRTF project, as this cluster may be a key component to a circumstellar disk evolution GTO program. We are only too happy to try to help and have worked to speed the analysis as much as possible. The primary activity to be undertaken in the next few months is the integration of the groundbased photometry and spectroscopy with the archival ROSAT X-ray data and then writing the paper summarizing our results. The most time consuming portion of this next phase is, of course, seeing the paper through

  20. The Evolution of Star Formation Activity in Cluster Galaxies Over 0.15 < z < 1.5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Cory R.

    In this thesis, we explore 7.5 billion years of evolution in cluster galaxy star formation activity using a sample of 11 high-redshift (1 < z < 1.5) clusters from the IRAC Shallow Cluster Survey, and 25 low-redshift (0.15 < z < 1) clusters from The Cluster Lensing And Supernova survey with Hubble. We compare cluster galaxy star formation to that of the field over 0.15 < z < 1.5 using 8000 galaxies from the UltraVISTA survey. Mid-infrared star formation rates are measured using Spitzer 24 mum data for isolated high-redshift galaxies. We calculate rest-frame ultraviolet star formation rates for low-redshift cluster members using Hubble Space Telescope observations. Using publically available mid-infrared and ultraviolet data for our field sample, we empirically derive scaling relations to adjust low-redshift cluster galaxy ultraviolet star formation rates to mid-infrared levels. We classify cluster galaxy morphology by visual inspection, and use quantitatively measured morphologies for field galaxies. Cluster late-type galaxies at z > 1 show enhanced star formation activity relative to the field, and account for nearly 90% of the overall star formation activity in high-redshift clusters. While high-redshift early-type galaxies are substantially quenched relative to cluster late-types, they still contribute 13% of the total cluster star formation activity. With early-type fractions increasing from 34 to 56% from z 1.5 → 1.16, we find that new cluster early-type galaxies are likely being formed around z 1.4. The fraction of early-type galaxies that are star-forming drops from 29 to 11% over this period, yet their specific star formation rates are roughly constant. These factors suggest that the events that created these new galaxies, possibly mergers, were both recent and gas-rich. With typical coverages of 50% of z < 1 cluster virial radii, we can only probe the cores of low-redshift clusters. We find that in this regime, the star formation activity of cluster

  1. Role of hydroxyl groups on the stability and catalytic activity of Au clusters on rutile surface

    SciTech Connect

    Kent, Paul R

    2011-01-01

    Hydroxyls are present as surface terminations of transition metal oxides under ambient conditions and may modify the properties of supported catalysts. We perform first-principles density functional theory calculations to investigate the role of hydroxyls on the catalytic activity of supported gold clusters on TiO{sub 2} (rutile). We find that they have a long-range effect increasing the adhesion of gold clusters on rutile. While hydroxyls make one gold atom more electronegative, a more complex charge-transfer scenario is observed on larger clusters which are important for catalytic applications. This enhances the molecular adsorption and coadsorption energies of CO and O{sub 2}, thereby increasing the catalytic activity of gold clusters for CO oxidation, consistent with reported experiments. Hydroxyls at the interface between gold and rutile surface are most important to this process, even when not directly bound to gold. As such, accurate models of catalytic processes on gold and other catalysts should include the effect of surface hydroxyls.

  2. Discovery of Unusual Biaryl Polyketides by Activation of a Silent Streptomyces venezuelae Biosynthetic Gene Cluster.

    PubMed

    Thanapipatsiri, Anyarat; Gomez-Escribano, Juan Pablo; Song, Lijiang; Bibb, Maureen J; Al-Bassam, Mahmoud; Chandra, Govind; Thamchaipenet, Arinthip; Challis, Gregory L; Bibb, Mervyn J

    2016-11-17

    Comparative transcriptional profiling of a ΔbldM mutant of Streptomyces venezuelae with its unmodified progenitor revealed that the expression of a cryptic biosynthetic gene cluster containing both type I and type III polyketide synthase genes is activated in the mutant. The 29.5 kb gene cluster, which was predicted to encode an unusual biaryl metabolite, which we named venemycin, and potentially halogenated derivatives, contains 16 genes including one-vemR-that encodes a transcriptional activator of the large ATP-binding LuxR-like (LAL) family. Constitutive expression of vemR in the ΔbldM mutant led to the production of sufficient venemycin for structural characterisation, confirming its unusual biaryl structure. Co-expression of the venemycin biosynthetic gene cluster and vemR in the heterologous host Streptomyces coelicolor also resulted in venemycin production. Although the gene cluster encodes two halogenases and a flavin reductase, constitutive expression of all three genes led to the accumulation only of a monohalogenated venemycin derivative, both in the native producer and the heterologous host. A competition experiment in which equimolar quantities of sodium chloride and sodium bromide were fed to the venemycin-producing strains resulted in the preferential incorporation of bromine, thus suggesting that bromide is the preferred substrate for one or both halogenases.

  3. Discovery of Unusual Biaryl Polyketides by Activation of a Silent Streptomyces venezuelae Biosynthetic Gene Cluster

    PubMed Central

    Thanapipatsiri, Anyarat; Gomez‐Escribano, Juan Pablo; Song, Lijiang; Bibb, Maureen J.; Al‐Bassam, Mahmoud; Chandra, Govind

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Comparative transcriptional profiling of a ΔbldM mutant of Streptomyces venezuelae with its unmodified progenitor revealed that the expression of a cryptic biosynthetic gene cluster containing both type I and type III polyketide synthase genes is activated in the mutant. The 29.5 kb gene cluster, which was predicted to encode an unusual biaryl metabolite, which we named venemycin, and potentially halogenated derivatives, contains 16 genes including one—vemR—that encodes a transcriptional activator of the large ATP‐binding LuxR‐like (LAL) family. Constitutive expression of vemR in the ΔbldM mutant led to the production of sufficient venemycin for structural characterisation, confirming its unusual biaryl structure. Co‐expression of the venemycin biosynthetic gene cluster and vemR in the heterologous host Streptomyces coelicolor also resulted in venemycin production. Although the gene cluster encodes two halogenases and a flavin reductase, constitutive expression of all three genes led to the accumulation only of a monohalogenated venemycin derivative, both in the native producer and the heterologous host. A competition experiment in which equimolar quantities of sodium chloride and sodium bromide were fed to the venemycin‐producing strains resulted in the preferential incorporation of bromine, thus suggesting that bromide is the preferred substrate for one or both halogenases. PMID:27605017

  4. Membership and Coronal Activity in the NGC 2232 and Cr 140 Open Clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliversen, Ronald J. (Technical Monitor); Patten, Brian M.

    2004-01-01

    Making use of eight archival ROSAT HRI images in the regions of the NGC 2232 and Cr 140, this project's primary focus is to identify X-ray sources and to extract net source counts for these sources in these two open clusters. These X-ray data would be combined with ground-based photometry and spectroscopy in order to identify G, K, and early-M type cluster members. Such membership data are important because, at present, no members later than spectral type approx. F5 are currently known for either cluster. With ages estimated to be approx. 25 Myr and at distances of just approx. 350 pc, the combined late-type membership of the NGC 2232 and Cr 140 clusters would yield an almost unique sample of solar-type stars in the post-T Tauri/pre-main sequence phase of evolution. These stars could be used to assess the level and dispersion of coronal activity levels, as a part of a probe of the importance of magnetic braking and the level of magnetic dynamo activity, for solar-type stars just before they reach the zero-age main sequence.

  5. Using Light-at-Night (LAN) Satellite Data for Identifying Clusters of Economic Activities in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rybnikova, N. A.; Portnov, B. A.

    2015-04-01

    Enterprises organized in clusters are often efficient in stimulating urban development, productivity and profit outflows. Identifying clusters of economic activities (EAs) thus becomes an important step in devising regional development policies, aimed at facilitating regional economic development. However, a major problem with cluster identification stems from limited reporting of specific EAs by individual countries and administrative entities. Even Eurostat, which maintains most advances regional databases, provides data for less than 50% of all regional subdivisions of the 3rd tier of the Nomenclature of Territorial Units for Statistics (NUTS3). Such poor reporting impedes identification of EA clusters and economic forces behind them. In this study, we test a possibility that missing data on geographic concentrations of EAs can be reconstructed using Light-at-Night (LAN) satellite measurements, and that such reconstructed data can then be used for the identification of EA clusters. As we hypothesize, LAN, captured by satellite sensors, is characterized by different intensity, depending on its source - production facilities, services, etc., - and this information can be used for EA identification. The study was carried out in three stages. First, using nighttime satellite images, we determined what types of EAs can be identified, with a sufficient degree of accuracy, by LAN they emit. Second, we calculated multivariate statistical models, linking EAs concentrations with LAN intensities and several locational and development attributes of NUTS3 regions in Europe. Next, using the obtained statistical models, we restored missing data on EAs across NUTS3 regions in Europe and identified clusters of EAs, using spatial analysis tools.

  6. Using hierarchical clustering methods to classify motor activities of COPD patients from wearable sensor data

    PubMed Central

    Sherrill, Delsey M; Moy, Marilyn L; Reilly, John J; Bonato, Paolo

    2005-01-01

    Background Advances in miniature sensor technology have led to the development of wearable systems that allow one to monitor motor activities in the field. A variety of classifiers have been proposed in the past, but little has been done toward developing systematic approaches to assess the feasibility of discriminating the motor tasks of interest and to guide the choice of the classifier architecture. Methods A technique is introduced to address this problem according to a hierarchical framework and its use is demonstrated for the application of detecting motor activities in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) undergoing pulmonary rehabilitation. Accelerometers were used to collect data for 10 different classes of activity. Features were extracted to capture essential properties of the data set and reduce the dimensionality of the problem at hand. Cluster measures were utilized to find natural groupings in the data set and then construct a hierarchy of the relationships between clusters to guide the process of merging clusters that are too similar to distinguish reliably. It provides a means to assess whether the benefits of merging for performance of a classifier outweigh the loss of resolution incurred through merging. Results Analysis of the COPD data set demonstrated that motor tasks related to ambulation can be reliably discriminated from tasks performed in a seated position with the legs in motion or stationary using two features derived from one accelerometer. Classifying motor tasks within the category of activities related to ambulation requires more advanced techniques. While in certain cases all the tasks could be accurately classified, in others merging clusters associated with different motor tasks was necessary. When merging clusters, it was found that the proposed method could lead to more than 12% improvement in classifier accuracy while retaining resolution of 4 tasks. Conclusion Hierarchical clustering methods are relevant

  7. A multiwavelength photometric census of AGN and star formation activity in the brightest cluster galaxies of X-ray selected clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, T. S.; Edge, A. C.; Stott, J. P.; Ebeling, H.; Burgett, W. S.; Chambers, K. C.; Draper, P. W.; Metcalfe, N.; Kaiser, N.; Wainscoat, R. J.; Waters, C.

    2016-09-01

    Despite their reputation as being `red and dead', the unique environment inhabited by brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) can often lead to a self-regulated feedback cycle between radiatively cooling intracluster gas and star formation and active galactic nucleus (AGN) activity in the BCG. However the prevalence of `active' BCGs, and details of the feedback involved, are still uncertain. We have performed an optical, UV and mid-IR photometric analysis of the BCGs in 981 clusters at 0.03 < z < 0.5, selected from the ROSAT All Sky Survey. Using Pan-STARRS PS1 3π, GALEX and WISE survey data we look for BCGs with photometric colours which deviate from that of the bulk population of passive BCGs - indicative of AGN and/or star formation activity within the BCG. We find that whilst the majority of BCGs are consistent with being passive, at least 14 per cent of our BCGs show a significant colour offset from passivity in at least one colour index. And, where available, supplementary spectroscopy reveals the majority of these particular BCGs show strong optical emission lines. On comparing BCG `activity' with the X-ray luminosity of the host cluster, we find that BCGs showing a colour offset are preferentially found in the more X-ray luminous clusters, indicative of the connection between BCG `activity' and the intracluster medium.

  8. An approach to functionally relevant clustering of the protein universe: Active site profile‐based clustering of protein structures and sequences

    PubMed Central

    Knutson, Stacy T.; Westwood, Brian M.; Leuthaeuser, Janelle B.; Turner, Brandon E.; Nguyendac, Don; Shea, Gabrielle; Kumar, Kiran; Hayden, Julia D.; Harper, Angela F.; Brown, Shoshana D.; Morris, John H.; Ferrin, Thomas E.; Babbitt, Patricia C.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Protein function identification remains a significant problem. Solving this problem at the molecular functional level would allow mechanistic determinant identification—amino acids that distinguish details between functional families within a superfamily. Active site profiling was developed to identify mechanistic determinants. DASP and DASP2 were developed as tools to search sequence databases using active site profiling. Here, TuLIP (Two‐Level Iterative clustering Process) is introduced as an iterative, divisive clustering process that utilizes active site profiling to separate structurally characterized superfamily members into functionally relevant clusters. Underlying TuLIP is the observation that functionally relevant families (curated by Structure‐Function Linkage Database, SFLD) self‐identify in DASP2 searches; clusters containing multiple functional families do not. Each TuLIP iteration produces candidate clusters, each evaluated to determine if it self‐identifies using DASP2. If so, it is deemed a functionally relevant group. Divisive clustering continues until each structure is either a functionally relevant group member or a singlet. TuLIP is validated on enolase and glutathione transferase structures, superfamilies well‐curated by SFLD. Correlation is strong; small numbers of structures prevent statistically significant analysis. TuLIP‐identified enolase clusters are used in DASP2 GenBank searches to identify sequences sharing functional site features. Analysis shows a true positive rate of 96%, false negative rate of 4%, and maximum false positive rate of 4%. F‐measure and performance analysis on the enolase search results and comparison to GEMMA and SCI‐PHY demonstrate that TuLIP avoids the over‐division problem of these methods. Mechanistic determinants for enolase families are evaluated and shown to correlate well with literature results. PMID:28054422

  9. An approach to functionally relevant clustering of the protein universe: Active site profile-based clustering of protein structures and sequences.

    PubMed

    Knutson, Stacy T; Westwood, Brian M; Leuthaeuser, Janelle B; Turner, Brandon E; Nguyendac, Don; Shea, Gabrielle; Kumar, Kiran; Hayden, Julia D; Harper, Angela F; Brown, Shoshana D; Morris, John H; Ferrin, Thomas E; Babbitt, Patricia C; Fetrow, Jacquelyn S

    2017-04-01

    Protein function identification remains a significant problem. Solving this problem at the molecular functional level would allow mechanistic determinant identification-amino acids that distinguish details between functional families within a superfamily. Active site profiling was developed to identify mechanistic determinants. DASP and DASP2 were developed as tools to search sequence databases using active site profiling. Here, TuLIP (Two-Level Iterative clustering Process) is introduced as an iterative, divisive clustering process that utilizes active site profiling to separate structurally characterized superfamily members into functionally relevant clusters. Underlying TuLIP is the observation that functionally relevant families (curated by Structure-Function Linkage Database, SFLD) self-identify in DASP2 searches; clusters containing multiple functional families do not. Each TuLIP iteration produces candidate clusters, each evaluated to determine if it self-identifies using DASP2. If so, it is deemed a functionally relevant group. Divisive clustering continues until each structure is either a functionally relevant group member or a singlet. TuLIP is validated on enolase and glutathione transferase structures, superfamilies well-curated by SFLD. Correlation is strong; small numbers of structures prevent statistically significant analysis. TuLIP-identified enolase clusters are used in DASP2 GenBank searches to identify sequences sharing functional site features. Analysis shows a true positive rate of 96%, false negative rate of 4%, and maximum false positive rate of 4%. F-measure and performance analysis on the enolase search results and comparison to GEMMA and SCI-PHY demonstrate that TuLIP avoids the over-division problem of these methods. Mechanistic determinants for enolase families are evaluated and shown to correlate well with literature results.

  10. Activation-Dependent Rapid Postsynaptic Clustering of Glycine Receptors in Mature Spinal Cord Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Eto, Kei; Murakoshi, Hideji; Watanabe, Miho; Hirata, Hiromi; Moorhouse, Andrew J.; Ishibashi, Hitoshi

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Inhibitory synapses are established during development but continue to be generated and modulated in strength in the mature nervous system. In the spinal cord and brainstem, presynaptically released inhibitory neurotransmitter dominantly switches from GABA to glycine during normal development in vivo. While presynaptic mechanisms of the shift of inhibitory neurotransmission are well investigated, the contribution of postsynaptic neurotransmitter receptors to this shift is not fully elucidated. Synaptic clustering of glycine receptors (GlyRs) is regulated by activation-dependent depolarization in early development. However, GlyR activation induces hyperpolarization after the first postnatal week, and little is known whether and how presynaptically released glycine regulates postsynaptic receptors in a depolarization-independent manner in mature developmental stage. Here we developed spinal cord neuronal culture of rodents using chronic strychnine application to investigate whether initial activation of GlyRs in mature stage could change postsynaptic localization of GlyRs. Immunocytochemical analyses demonstrate that chronic blockade of GlyR activation until mature developmental stage resulted in smaller clusters of postsynaptic GlyRs that could be enlarged upon receptor activation for 1 h in the mature stage. Furthermore, live cell-imaging techniques show that GlyR activation decreases its lateral diffusion at synapses, and this phenomenon is dependent on PKC, but neither Ca2+ nor CaMKII activity. These results suggest that the GlyR activation can regulate receptor diffusion and cluster size at inhibitory synapses in mature stage, providing not only new insights into the postsynaptic mechanism of shifting inhibitory neurotransmission but also the inhibitory synaptic plasticity in mature nervous system. PMID:28197549

  11. AGN ACTIVITY AND IGM HEATING IN THE FOSSIL CLUSTER RX J1416.4+2315

    SciTech Connect

    Miraghaei, H.; Khosroshahi, H. G.; Abbassi, S.; Sengupta, C.; Raychaudhury, S.

    2015-12-15

    We study active galactic nucleus (AGN) activity in the fossil galaxy cluster RX J1416.4+2315. Radio observations were carried out using the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope at two frequencies, 1420 and 610 MHz. A weak radio lobe that extends from the central nucleus is detected in the 610 MHz map. Assuming the radio lobe originated from the central AGN, we show that the energy injection into the intergalactic medium is only sufficient to heat up the central 50 kpc within the cluster core, while the cooling radius is larger (∼130 kpc). In the hardness ratio map, three low energy cavities have been identified. No radio emission is detected for these regions. We evaluated the power required to inflate the cavities and showed that the total energy budget is sufficient to offset the radiative cooling. We showed that the initial conditions would change the results remarkably. Furthermore, the efficiency of the Bondi accretion in powering the AGN has been estimated.

  12. Enhanced catalytic activity of sub-nanometer titania clusters confined inside double-wall carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongbo; Pan, Xiulian; Liu, Jingyue Jimmy; Qian, Weizhong; Wei, Fei; Huang, Yuying; Bao, Xinhe

    2011-07-18

    Sub-nanometer titania clusters have been homogeneously dispersed within double-wall carbon nantubes (DWNTs) with an inner diameter ranging from 1.0 to 1.5 nm. The confined titania exhibits a much higher activity than the titania particles attached on the outside walls of the DWNTs (the outside titania) in the epoxidation of propylene by H(2)O(2). XPS, XANES and Raman spectroscopy data suggest electron transfer from titanium to the inner surfaces of the DWNTs. In contrast, no electron transfer has been observed for the outside titania. We also found that the extent of this confinement-induced electron transfer is temperature dependent. The enhanced activity of the confined titania clusters is likely attributed to their small sizes and the interaction with the DWNT surface. The synthesis method that we developed here can be readily applied to incorporation of other metal/metal oxide nanoparticles into carbon nanotubes.

  13. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN PARENTS' MOTIVATION FOR PHYSICAL ACTIVITY AND THEIR BELIEFS, AND SUPPORT OF THEIR CHILDREN'S PHYSICAL ACTIVITY: A CLUSTER ANALYSIS.

    PubMed

    Naisseh, Matilda; Martinent, Guillaume; Ferrand, Claude; Hautier, Christophe

    2015-08-01

    Previous studies have neglected the multivariate nature of motivation. The purpose of the current study was to first identify motivational profiles of parents' own physical activity. Second, the study examined if such profiles differ in the way in which parents perceive their children's competence in physical activity and the importance and support given to their children's physical activity. 711 physically active parents (57% mothers; M age = 39.7 yr.; children 6-11 years old) completed the Situational Motivation Scale, the Parents' Perceptions of Physical Activity Importance and their Children's Ability Questionnaire, and the Parental Support for Physical Activity Scale. Cluster analyses indicated four motivational profiles: Highly self-determined, Moderately self-determined, Non-self-determined, and Externally motivated profiles. Parents' beliefs and support toward their children's physical activity significantly differed across these profiles. It is the first study using Self-Determination Theory that provides evidence for the interpersonal outcomes of motivation.

  14. O2 and N2O activation by Bi-, Tri-, and tetranuclear Cu clusters in biology.

    PubMed

    Solomon, Edward I; Sarangi, Ritimukta; Woertink, Julia S; Augustine, Anthony J; Yoon, Jungjoo; Ghosh, Somdatta

    2007-07-01

    Copper-cluster sites in biology exhibit unique spectroscopic features reflecting exchange coupling between oxidized Cu's and e (-) delocalization in mixed valent sites. These novel electronic structures play critical roles in O 2 binding and activation for electrophilic aromatic attack and H-atom abstraction, the 4e (-)/4H (+) reduction of O 2 to H 2O, and in the 2e (-)/2H (+) reduction of N 2O. These electronic structure/reactivity correlations are summarized below.

  15. Automatic active space selection for the similarity transformed equations of motion coupled cluster method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, Achintya Kumar; Nooijen, Marcel; Neese, Frank; Izsák, Róbert

    2017-02-01

    An efficient scheme for the automatic selection of an active space for similarity transformed equations of motion (STEOM) coupled cluster method is proposed. It relies on state averaged configuration interaction singles (CIS) natural orbitals and makes it possible to use STEOM as a black box method. The performance of the new scheme is tested for singlet and triplet valence, charge transfer, and Rydberg excited states.

  16. Cooperativity between Integrin Activation and Mechanical Stress Leads to Integrin Clustering

    PubMed Central

    Ali, O.; Guillou, H.; Destaing, O.; Albigès-Rizo, C.; Block, M.R.; Fourcade, B.

    2011-01-01

    Integrins are transmembrane receptors involved in crucial cellular biological functions such as migration, adhesion, and spreading. Upon the modulation of integrin affinity toward their extracellular ligands by cytoplasmic proteins (inside-out signaling) these receptors bind to their ligands and cluster into nascent adhesions. This clustering results in the increase in the mechanical linkage among the cell and substratum, cytoskeleton rearrangements, and further outside-in signaling. Based on experimental observations of the distribution of focal adhesions in cells attached to micropatterned surfaces, we introduce a physical model relying on experimental numerical constants determined in the literature. In this model, allosteric integrin activation works in synergy with the stress build by adhesion and the membrane rigidity to allow the clustering to nascent adhesions independently of actin but dependent on the integrin diffusion onto adhesive surfaces. The initial clustering could provide a template to the mature adhesive structures. Predictions of our model for the organization of focal adhesions are discussed in comparison with experiments using adhesive protein microarrays. PMID:21641304

  17. Determining Distance, Age, and Activity in a New Benchmark Cluster: Ruprecht 147

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Jason T.

    2009-08-01

    This proposal seeks 0.7 night of time on Hectochelle to observe the F, G, and K dwarfs of Ruprecht 147, recently identified as the closest old stellar cluster. At only ~ 200 pc and at an age of ~ 1-2 Gyr, this will be an important benchmark in stellar astrophysics, providing the only sample of spectroscopically accessible old, late-type stars of determinable age. Hectochelle is the ideal instrument to study this cluster, with a FOV, fiber count, and telescope aperture well matched to the cluster's diameter (~ 1°), richness (~ 100 identified members), and distance modulus (6.5-7 mag., putting the G and K dwarfs at B=11-15). Hectochelle will measure the Ca II line strengths of members to establish, for the first time, the chromospheric activity levels of a statistically significant sample of single, G and K dwarfs of this modest age. Hectochelle will also vet background stars for suitability as astrometric reference stars for a forthcoming HST FGS proposal to robustly measure the cluster's distance.

  18. Iron binding activity is essential for the function of IscA in iron-sulphur cluster biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Landry, Aaron P; Cheng, Zishuo; Ding, Huangen

    2013-03-07

    Iron-sulphur cluster biogenesis requires coordinated delivery of iron and sulphur to scaffold proteins, followed by transfer of the assembled clusters from scaffold proteins to target proteins. This complex process is accomplished by a group of dedicated iron-sulphur cluster assembly proteins that are conserved from bacteria to humans. While sulphur in iron-sulphur clusters is provided by L-cysteine via cysteine desulfurase, the iron donor(s) for iron-sulphur cluster assembly remains largely elusive. Here we report that among the primary iron-sulphur cluster assembly proteins, IscA has a unique and strong binding activity for mononuclear iron in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, the ferric iron centre tightly bound in IscA can be readily extruded by l-cysteine, followed by reduction to ferrous iron for iron-sulphur cluster biogenesis. Substitution of the highly conserved residue tyrosine 40 with phenylalanine (Y40F) in IscA results in a mutant protein that has a diminished iron binding affinity but retains the iron-sulphur cluster binding activity. Genetic complementation studies show that the IscA Y40F mutant is inactive in vivo, suggesting that the iron binding activity is essential for the function of IscA in iron-sulphur cluster biogenesis.

  19. A Cluster-Analytical Approach towards Physical Activity and Eating Habits among 10-Year-Old Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sabbe, Dieter; De Bourdeaudhuij, I.; Legiest, E.; Maes, L.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose was to investigate whether clusters--based on physical activity (PA) and eating habits--can be found among children, and to explore subgroups' characteristics. A total of 1725 10-year olds completed a self-administered questionnaire. K-means cluster analysis was based on the weekly quantity of vigorous and moderate PA, the excess index…

  20. MHD SIMULATIONS OF ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS JETS IN A DYNAMIC GALAXY CLUSTER MEDIUM

    SciTech Connect

    Mendygral, P. J.; Jones, T. W.; Dolag, K.

    2012-05-10

    We present a pair of three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamical simulations of intermittent jets from a central active galactic nucleus (AGN) in a galaxy cluster extracted from a high-resolution cosmological simulation. The selected cluster was chosen as an apparently relatively relaxed system, not having undergone a major merger in almost 7 Gyr. Despite this characterization and history, the intracluster medium (ICM) contains quite active 'weather'. We explore the effects of this ICM weather on the morphological evolution of the AGN jets and lobes. The orientation of the jets is different in the two simulations so that they probe different aspects of the ICM structure and dynamics. We find that even for this cluster, which can be characterized as relaxed by an observational standard, the large-scale, bulk ICM motions can significantly distort the jets and lobes. Synthetic X-ray observations of the simulations show that the jets produce complex cavity systems, while synthetic radio observations reveal bending of the jets and lobes similar to wide-angle tail radio sources. The jets are cycled on and off with a 26 Myr period using a 50% duty cycle. This leads to morphological features similar to those in 'double-double' radio galaxies. While the jet and ICM magnetic fields are generally too weak in the simulations to play a major role in the dynamics, Maxwell stresses can still become locally significant.

  1. ANISOTROPIC METAL-ENRICHED OUTFLOWS DRIVEN BY ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI IN CLUSTERS OF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Kirkpatrick, C. C.; McNamara, B. R.; Cavagnolo, K. W.

    2011-04-20

    We present an analysis of the spatial distribution of metal-rich gas in 10 galaxy clusters using deep observations from the Chandra X-ray Observatory. The brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) have experienced recent active galactic nucleus activity in the forms of bright radio emission, cavities, and shock fronts embedded in the hot atmospheres. The heavy elements are distributed anisotropically and are aligned with the large-scale radio and cavity axes. They are apparently being transported from the halo of the BCG into the intracluster medium along large-scale outflows driven by the radio jets. The radial ranges of the metal-enriched outflows are found to scale with jet power as R{sub Fe} {proportional_to} P {sup 0.42}{sub jet}, with a scatter of only 0.5 dex. The heavy elements are transported beyond the extent of the inner cavities in all clusters, suggesting that this is a long-lasting effect sustained over multiple generations of outbursts. Black holes in BCGs will likely have difficulty ejecting metal-enriched gas beyond 1 Mpc unless their masses substantially exceed 10{sup 9} M{sub sun}.

  2. Multi-wavelength study of X-ray luminous clusters at z ~ 0.3. I. Star-formation activity of cluster galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braglia, F. G.; Pierini, D.; Biviano, A.; Böhringer, H.

    2009-06-01

    Context: The current paradigm of cosmic formation and evolution of galaxy clusters foresees growth mostly through merging. Galaxies in the infall region or in the core of a cluster undergo transformations owing to different environmental stresses. Aims: For two X-ray luminous clusters at redshift z 0.3 with opposite X-ray morphologies (i.e., dynamical states), RXCJ 0014.3-3022 and RXCJ 2308.3-0211, we assess differences in galaxy populations as a function of cluster topography. This is a pilot study for the joint X-ray and optical analysis of the REFLEX-DXL cluster sample. Methods: Cluster large-scale structure and substructure are determined from the combined photometry in the B, V, and R bands, and from multi-object optical spectroscopy at low resolution. Photometric redshifts and broad-band optical colours are determined. A spectral index analysis is performed, based on the [O II](λλ3726, 3728 Å) and Hδ(λ4102 Å) features, and the D4000 break, which are available for more than 100 member galaxies per cluster. Additional far-ultraviolet (FUV) photometry is retrieved from the GALEX archive. Combination of spectral indices and FUV-optical colours provides a picture of the star-formation history in galaxies. Results: In spite of the potential presence of a small fraction of galaxies with obscured star-formation activity, the average star-formation history of cluster members is found to depend on clustercentric distance and, more interestingly, on cluster substructure. The core regions of both clusters mainly host galaxies dominated by old, passively evolving stellar populations, which define the same red sequence in a (B-R) colour-R magnitude diagram. However, a sharp increase in star-formation activity is found along two clearly evident filamentary structures of the merging cluster RXCJ 0014.3-3022, out to its virial radius and beyond. It is produced by luminous (i.e., LR ≥ LRstar) and sub-Lstar galaxies. In contrast, the regular cool-core cluster RXCJ 2308

  3. Phosphorous transient enhanced diffusion suppression and activation enhancement with cluster carbon co-implantation

    SciTech Connect

    Nakashima, Yoshiki; Hamamoto, Nariaki; Nagayama, Tsutomu; Koga, Yuji; Umisedo, Sei; Kawamura, Yasunori; Hashimoto, Masahiro; Onoda, Hiroshi

    2012-11-06

    Carbon co-implantation is well known as an effective method for suppressing boron/phosphorous transient enhanced diffusion (TED). Germanium pre-amorphization implantation (PAI) is usually applied prior to carbon co-implantation for suppressing channeling tail of dopants. In this study, cluster carbon was applied instead of the combination of germanium PAI and monomer carbon co-implantation prior to phosphorous implantation. Dependence of phosphorous activation and TED on amorphous layer thickness, carbon dose, carbon distribution and substrate temperature have been investigated. Cluster carbon implantation enables thick amorphous layer formation and TED suppression at the same time and low temperature implantation enhances the ability of amorphous layer formation so that shallow junction and low Rs can be achieved without Ge implantation.

  4. Predicting Water Activity for Complex Wastes with Solvation Cluster Equilibria (SCE) - 12042

    SciTech Connect

    Agnew, S.F.; Reynolds, J.G.; Johnston, C.T.

    2012-07-01

    Predicting an electrolyte mixture's water activity, i.e. the ratio of water vapor pressure over a solution with that of pure water, in principle reveals both boiling point and solubilities for that mixture. Better predictions of these properties helps support the ongoing missions to concentrate complex nuclear waste mixtures in order to conserve tank space and improved predictions of water activity will help. A new approach for predicting water activity, the solvation cluster equilibria (SCE) model, uses pure electrolyte water activities to predict water activity for a complex mixture of those electrolytes. An SCE function based on electrolyte hydration free energy and a standard Debye- Hueckel (DH) charge compression fits each pure electrolyte's water activity with three parameters. Given these pure electrolyte water activities, the SCE predicts any mixture water activity over a large range of concentration with an additional parameter for each mixture vector, the multinarity. In contrast to ionic strength, which scales with concentration, multinarity is related to the relative proportion of electrolytes in a mixture and can either increase or decrease the water activity prediction over a broad range of concentration for that mixture. The SCE model predicts water activity for complex electrolyte mixtures based on the water activities of pure electrolytes. Three parameter SCE functions fit the water activities of pure electrolytes and along with a single multinarity parameter for each mixture vector then predict the mixture water activity. Predictions of water activity can in principle predict solution electrolyte activity and this relationship will be explored in the future. Predicting electrolyte activities for complex mixtures provides a means of determining solubilities for each electrolyte. Although there are a number of reports [9, 10, 11] of water activity models for pure and binary mixtures of electrolytes, none of them compare measured versus calculated

  5. Redox control of the DNA damage-inducible protein DinG helicase activity via its iron-sulfur cluster.

    PubMed

    Ren, Binbin; Duan, Xuewu; Ding, Huangen

    2009-02-20

    The Escherichia coli DNA damage-inducible protein DinG, a member of the superfamily 2 DNA helicases, has been implicated in the nucleotide excision repair and recombinational DNA repair pathways. Combining UV-visible absorption, EPR, and enzyme activity measurements, we demonstrate here that E. coli DinG contains a redox-active [4Fe-4S] cluster with a midpoint redox potential (E(m)) of -390 +/- 23 mV (pH 8.0) and that reduction of the [4Fe-4S] cluster reversibly switches off the DinG helicase activity. Unlike the [4Fe-4S] cluster in E. coli dihydroxyacid dehydratase, the DinG [4Fe-4S] cluster is stable, and the enzyme remains fully active after exposure to 100-fold excess of hydrogen peroxide, indicating that DinG could be functional under oxidative stress conditions. However, the DinG [4Fe-4S] cluster can be efficiently modified by nitric oxide (NO), forming the DinG-bound dinitrosyl iron complex with the concomitant inactivation of helicase activity in vitro and in vivo. Reassembly of the [4Fe-4S] cluster in NO-modified DinG restores helicase activity, indicating that the iron-sulfur cluster in DinG is the primary target of NO cytotoxicity. The results led us to propose that the iron-sulfur cluster in DinG may act as a sensor of intracellular redox potential to modulate its helicase activity and that modification of the iron-sulfur cluster in DinG and likely in other DNA repair enzymes by NO may contribute to NO-mediated genomic instability.

  6. The Walking School Bus and Children's Physical Activity: A Pilot Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Kathy; Baranowski, Tom; Nicklas, Theresa A.; Uscanga, Doris K.; Hanfling, Marcus J.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the impact of a “walking school bus” program on children's rates of active commuting to school and physical activity. METHODS: We conducted a pilot cluster randomized controlled trial among 4th-graders from 8 schools in Houston, Texas (N = 149). Random allocation to treatment or control conditions was at the school level. Study staff walked with children to and from school up to 5 days/week. Outcomes were measured the week before (time 1) and during weeks 4 and 5 of the intervention (time 2). The main outcome was the weekly rate of active commuting, and a secondary outcome was moderate-to-vigorous physical activity. Covariates included sociodemographics, distance from home to school, neighborhood safety, child BMI z score, parent self-efficacy/outcome expectations, and child self-efficacy for active commuting. A mixed-model repeated measures regression accounted for clustering by school, and stepwise procedures with backward elimination of nonsignificant covariates were used to identify significant predictors. RESULTS: Intervention children increased active commuting (mean ± SD) from 23.8% ± 9.2% (time 1) to 54% ± 9.2% (time 2), whereas control subjects decreased from 40.2% ± 8.9% (time 1) to 32.6% ± 8.9% (time 2) (P < .0001). Intervention children increased their minutes of daily moderate-to-vigorous physical activity from 46.6 ± 4.5 (time 1) to 48.8 ± 4.5 (time 2), whereas control children decreased from 46.1 ± 4.3 (time 1) to 41.3 ± 4.3 (time 2) (P = .029). CONCLUSIONS: The program improved children's active commuting to school and daily moderate-to-vigorous physical activity. PMID:21859920

  7. Prediction of in vitro and in vivo oestrogen receptor activity using hierarchical clustering.

    PubMed

    Martin, T M

    2016-01-01

    In this study, hierarchical clustering classification models were developed to predict in vitro and in vivo oestrogen receptor (ER) activity. Classification models were developed for binding, agonist, and antagonist in vitro ER activity and for mouse in vivo uterotrophic ER binding. In vitro classification models yielded balanced accuracies ranging from 0.65 to 0.85 for the external prediction set. In vivo ER classification models yielded balanced accuracies ranging from 0.72 to 0.83. If used as additional biological descriptors for in vivo models, in vitro scores were found to increase the prediction accuracy of in vivo ER models. If in vitro activity was used directly as a surrogate for in vivo activity, the results were poor (balanced accuracy ranged from 0.49 to 0.72). Under-sampling negative compounds in the training set was found to increase the coverage (fraction of chemicals which can be predicted) and increase prediction sensitivity.

  8. Modeling Active Galactic Nucleus Feedback in Cool-core Clusters: The Formation of Cold Clumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yuan; Bryan, Greg L.

    2014-07-01

    We perform high-resolution (15-30 pc) adaptive mesh simulations to study the impact of momentum-driven active galactic nucleus (AGN) feedback in cool-core clusters, focusing in this paper on the formation of cold clumps. The feedback is jet-driven with an energy determined by the amount of cold gas within 500 pc of the super-massive black hole. When the intracluster medium in the core of the cluster becomes marginally stable to radiative cooling, with the thermal instability to the free-fall timescale ratio t TI/t ff < 3-10, cold clumps of gas start to form along the propagation direction of the AGN jets. By tracing the particles in the simulations, we find that these cold clumps originate from low entropy (but still hot) gas that is accelerated by the jet to outward radial velocities of a few hundred km s-1. This gas is out of hydrostatic equilibrium and so can cool. The clumps then grow larger as they decelerate and fall toward the center of the cluster, eventually being accreted onto the super-massive black hole. The general morphology, spatial distribution, and estimated Hα morphology of the clumps are in reasonable agreement with observations, although we do not fully replicate the filamentary morphology of the clumps seen in the observations, probably due to missing physics.

  9. Visible-Light-Induced Olefin Activation Using 3D Aromatic Boron-Rich Cluster Photooxidants.

    PubMed

    Messina, Marco S; Axtell, Jonathan C; Wang, Yiqun; Chong, Paul; Wixtrom, Alex I; Kirlikovali, Kent O; Upton, Brianna M; Hunter, Bryan M; Shafaat, Oliver S; Khan, Saeed I; Winkler, Jay R; Gray, Harry B; Alexandrova, Anastassia N; Maynard, Heather D; Spokoyny, Alexander M

    2016-06-08

    We report a discovery that perfunctionalized icosahedral dodecaborate clusters of the type B12(OCH2Ar)12 (Ar = Ph or C6F5) can undergo photo-excitation with visible light, leading to a new class of metal-free photooxidants. Excitation in these species occurs as a result of the charge transfer between low-lying orbitals located on the benzyl substituents and an unoccupied orbital delocalized throughout the boron cluster core. Here we show how these species, photo-excited with a benchtop blue LED source, can exhibit excited-state reduction potentials as high as 3 V and can participate in electron-transfer processes with a broad range of styrene monomers, initiating their polymerization. Initiation is observed in cases of both electron-rich and electron-deficient styrene monomers at cluster loadings as low as 0.005 mol%. Furthermore, photo-excitation of B12(OCH2C6F5)12 in the presence of a less activated olefin such as isobutylene results in the production of highly branched poly(isobutylene). This work introduces a new class of air-stable, metal-free photo-redox reagents capable of mediating chemical transformations.

  10. Modeling active galactic nucleus feedback in cool-core clusters: The formation of cold clumps

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yuan; Bryan, Greg L.

    2014-07-10

    We perform high-resolution (15-30 pc) adaptive mesh simulations to study the impact of momentum-driven active galactic nucleus (AGN) feedback in cool-core clusters, focusing in this paper on the formation of cold clumps. The feedback is jet-driven with an energy determined by the amount of cold gas within 500 pc of the super-massive black hole. When the intracluster medium in the core of the cluster becomes marginally stable to radiative cooling, with the thermal instability to the free-fall timescale ratio t{sub TI}/t{sub ff} < 3-10, cold clumps of gas start to form along the propagation direction of the AGN jets. By tracing the particles in the simulations, we find that these cold clumps originate from low entropy (but still hot) gas that is accelerated by the jet to outward radial velocities of a few hundred km s{sup –1}. This gas is out of hydrostatic equilibrium and so can cool. The clumps then grow larger as they decelerate and fall toward the center of the cluster, eventually being accreted onto the super-massive black hole. The general morphology, spatial distribution, and estimated Hα morphology of the clumps are in reasonable agreement with observations, although we do not fully replicate the filamentary morphology of the clumps seen in the observations, probably due to missing physics.

  11. Identifying active faults in Switzerland using relocated earthquake catalogs and optimal anisotropic dynamic clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, M.; Wang, Y.; Husen, S.; Woessner, J.; Kissling, E. H.; Ouillon, G.; Giardini, D.; Sornette, D.

    2010-12-01

    Active fault zones are the causal locations of most earthquakes, which release tectonic stresses. Yet, identification and association of faults and earthquakes is not straightforward. On the one hand, many earthquakes occur on faults that are unknown. On the other hand, systematic biases and uncertainties in earthquake locations hamper the association of earthquakes and known faults. We tackle the problem of linking earthquakes to faults by relocating them in a non-linear probabilistic manner and by applying a three-dimensional optimal anisotropic dynamic clustering approach to the relocated events to map fault networks. Non-linear probabilistic earthquake location allows to compute probability density functions that provide the complete probabilistic solution to the earthquake hypocenter location problem, including improved information on location uncertainties. To improve absolute earthquake locations we use a newly developed combined controlled-source seismology and local earthquake tomography model, which allows the use of secondary phases, such as PmP. Dynamic clustering is a very general image processing technique that allows partitioning a set of data points. Our improved optimal anisotropic dynamic clustering technique accounts for uncertainties in earthquake locations by the use of probability density functions, as provided by non-linear probabilistic earthquake location. Hence, number and size of the reconstructed faults is controlled by earthquake location uncertainty. We apply our approach to seismicity in Switzerland to identify active faults in the region. Relocated earthquake catalogs and associated fault networks will be compared to already existing information on faults, such as geological and seismotectonic maps, to derive a more complete picture of active faulting in Switzerland.

  12. Voltage clustering in redox-active ligand complexes: mitigating electronic communication through choice of metal ion

    SciTech Connect

    Zarkesh, Ryan A.; Ichimura, Andrew S.; Monson, Todd C.; Tomson, Neil C.; Anstey, Mitchell R.

    2016-02-01

    We used the redox-active bis(imino)acenapthene (BIAN) ligand to synthesize homoleptic aluminum, chromium, and gallium complexes of the general formula (BIAN)3M. The resulting compounds were characterized using X-ray crystallography, NMR, EPR, magnetic susceptibility and cyclic voltammetry measurements and modeled using both DFT and ab initio wavefunction calculations to compare the orbital contributions of main group elements and transition metals in ligand-based redox events. Ultimately, complexes of this type have the potential to improve the energy density and electrolyte stability of grid-scale energy storage technologies, such as redox flow batteries, through thermodynamically-clustered redox events.

  13. Voltage clustering in redox-active ligand complexes: mitigating electronic communication through choice of metal ion

    DOE PAGES

    Zarkesh, Ryan A.; Ichimura, Andrew S.; Monson, Todd C.; ...

    2016-02-01

    We used the redox-active bis(imino)acenapthene (BIAN) ligand to synthesize homoleptic aluminum, chromium, and gallium complexes of the general formula (BIAN)3M. The resulting compounds were characterized using X-ray crystallography, NMR, EPR, magnetic susceptibility and cyclic voltammetry measurements and modeled using both DFT and ab initio wavefunction calculations to compare the orbital contributions of main group elements and transition metals in ligand-based redox events. Ultimately, complexes of this type have the potential to improve the energy density and electrolyte stability of grid-scale energy storage technologies, such as redox flow batteries, through thermodynamically-clustered redox events.

  14. Open clusters as laboratories for stellar spin-down and magnetic activity decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douglas, Stephanie; Agueros, Marcel A.; Covey, Kevin R.

    2017-01-01

    The oldest open clusters within 250 pc of the Sun, the Hyades and Praesepe, are important benchmarks for calibrating stellar properties such as rotation and magnetic activity. As they have the same age and roughly solar metallicity, these clusters serve as an ideal laboratory for testing the agreement between theoretical and empirical rotation-activity relations at ~600 Myr. The repurposed Kepler mission, K2, has allowed us to measure rotation periods for dozens of Hyads and hundreds of Praesepe members, including the first periods measured for fully convective Hyads. These data have enabled new tests of models describing the evolution of stellar rotation; discrepancies with these models imply that we still do not fully understand how magnetic fields affect stellar spin-down. I will present rotation periods measured for 48 Hyads and 699 Praesepe members with K2, along with associated Halpha and X-ray fluxes. I will also show how we can compare the dependence of H-alpha and X-ray emission on rotation in order to test theories of magnetic field topology and stellar dynamos. These tests inform models of stellar wind-driven angular momentum loss and the age-rotation-activity relation.

  15. Extracellular engagement of ADAM12 induces clusters of invadopodia with localized ectodomain shedding activity.

    PubMed

    Albrechtsen, Reidar; Stautz, Dorte; Sanjay, Archana; Kveiborg, Marie; Wewer, Ulla M

    2011-01-15

    Invadopodia are dynamic actin structures at the cell surface that degrade extracellular matrix and act as sites of signal transduction. The biogenesis of invadopodia, including the mechanisms regulating their formation, composition, and turnover is not entirely understood. Here, we demonstrate that antibody ligation of ADAM12, a transmembrane disintegrin and metalloprotease, resulted in the rapid accumulation of invadopodia with extracellular matrix-degrading capacity in epithelial cells expressing the αvβ3 integrin and active c-Src kinase. The induction of invadopodia clusters required an intact c-Src interaction site in the ADAM12 cytoplasmic domain, but was independent of the catalytic activity of ADAM12. Caveolin-1 and transmembrane protease MMP14/MT1-MMP were both present in the ADAM12-induced clusters of invadopodia, and cholesterol depletion prevented their formation, suggesting that lipid-raft microdomains are involved in the process. Importantly, our data demonstrate that ADAM12-mediated ectodomain shedding of epidermal growth factor receptor ligands can occur within these invadopodia. Such localized growth factor signalling offers an interesting novel biological concept highly relevant to the properties of carcinoma cells, which often show upregulated ADAM12 and β3 integrin expression, together with high levels of c-Src kinase activity.

  16. NanoCluster Beacons as reporter probes in rolling circle enhanced enzyme activity detection.

    PubMed

    Juul, Sissel; Obliosca, Judy M; Liu, Cong; Liu, Yen-Liang; Chen, Yu-An; Imphean, Darren M; Knudsen, Birgitta R; Ho, Yi-Ping; Leong, Kam W; Yeh, Hsin-Chih

    2015-05-14

    As a newly developed assay for the detection of endogenous enzyme activity at the single-catalytic-event level, Rolling Circle Enhanced Enzyme Activity Detection (REEAD) has been used to measure enzyme activity in both single human cells and malaria-causing parasites, Plasmodium sp. Current REEAD assays rely on organic dye-tagged linear DNA probes to report the rolling circle amplification products (RCPs), the cost of which may hinder the widespread use of REEAD. Here we show that a new class of activatable probes, NanoCluster Beacons (NCBs), can simplify the REEAD assays. Easily prepared without any need for purification and capable of large fluorescence enhancement upon hybridization, NCBs are cost-effective and sensitive. Compared to conventional fluorescent probes, NCBs are also more photostable. As demonstrated in reporting the human topoisomerases I (hTopI) cleavage-ligation reaction, the proposed NCBs suggest a read-out format attractive for future REEAD-based diagnostics.

  17. Overproduction of Ristomycin A by Activation of a Silent Gene Cluster in Amycolatopsis japonicum MG417-CF17

    PubMed Central

    Spohn, Marius; Kirchner, Norbert; Kulik, Andreas; Jochim, Angelika; Wolf, Felix; Muenzer, Patrick; Borst, Oliver; Gross, Harald; Wohlleben, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of antibiotic-resistant pathogenic bacteria within the last decades is one reason for the urgent need for new antibacterial agents. A strategy to discover new anti-infective compounds is the evaluation of the genetic capacity of secondary metabolite producers and the activation of cryptic gene clusters (genome mining). One genus known for its potential to synthesize medically important products is Amycolatopsis. However, Amycolatopsis japonicum does not produce an antibiotic under standard laboratory conditions. In contrast to most Amycolatopsis strains, A. japonicum is genetically tractable with different methods. In order to activate a possible silent glycopeptide cluster, we introduced a gene encoding the transcriptional activator of balhimycin biosynthesis, the bbr gene from Amycolatopsis balhimycina (bbrAba), into A. japonicum. This resulted in the production of an antibiotically active compound. Following whole-genome sequencing of A. japonicum, 29 cryptic gene clusters were identified by genome mining. One of these gene clusters is a putative glycopeptide biosynthesis gene cluster. Using bioinformatic tools, ristomycin (syn. ristocetin), a type III glycopeptide, which has antibacterial activity and which is used for the diagnosis of von Willebrand disease and Bernard-Soulier syndrome, was deduced as a possible product of the gene cluster. Chemical analyses by high-performance liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS), tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS), and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy confirmed the in silico prediction that the recombinant A. japonicum/pRM4-bbrAba synthesizes ristomycin A. PMID:25114137

  18. Cosmological Studies with Galaxy Clusters, Active Galactic Nuclei, and Strongly Lensed Quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rumbaugh, Nicholas Andrew

    The large-scale structure (LSS) of the universe provides scientists with one of the best laboratories for studying Lambda Cold Dark Matter (LambdaCDM) cosmology. Especially at high redshift, we see increased rates of galaxy cluster and galaxy merging in LSS relative to the field, which is useful for studying the hierarchical merging predicted by LambdaCDM. The largest identified bound structures, superclusters, have not yet virialized. Despite the wide range of dynamical states of their constituent galaxies, groups, and clusters, they are all still actively evolving, providing an ideal laboratory in which to study cluster and galaxy evolution. In this dissertation, I present original research on several aspects of LSS and LambdaCDM cosmology. Three separate studies are included, each one focusing on a different aspect. In the first study, we use X-ray and optical observations from nine galaxy clusters at high redshift, some embedded in larger structures and some isolated, to study their evolutionary states. We extract X-ray gas temperatures and luminosities as well as optical velocity dispersions. These cluster properties are compared using low-redshift scaling relations. In addition, we employ several tests of substructure, using velocity histograms, Dressler-Shectman tests, and centroiding offsets. We conclude that two clusters out of our sample are most likely unrelaxed, and find support for deviations from self-similarity in the redshift evolution of the Lx-T relation. Our numerous complementary tests of the evolutionary state of clusters suggest potential under-estimations of systematic error in studies employing only a single such test. In the second study, we use multi-band imaging and spectroscopy to study active galactic nuclei (AGN) in high-redshift LSS. The AGN were identified using X-ray imaging and matched to optical catalogs that contained spectroscopic redshifts to identify members of the structures. AGN host galaxies tended to be associated with the

  19. Changing ionization conditions in SDSS galaxies with active galactic nuclei as a function of environment from pairs to clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Khabiboulline, Emil T.; Steinhardt, Charles L.; Silverman, John D.; Ellison, Sara L.; Mendel, J. Trevor; Patton, David R.

    2014-11-01

    We study how active galactic nucleus (AGN) activity changes across environments from galaxy pairs to clusters using 143,843 galaxies with z < 0.2 from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Using a refined technique, we apply a continuous measure of AGN activity, characteristic of the ionization state of the narrow-line emitting gas. Changes in key emission-line ratios ([N II] λ6548/Hα, [O III] λ5007/Hβ) between different samples allow us to disentangle different environmental effects while removing contamination. We confirm that galaxy interactions enhance AGN activity. However, conditions in the central regions of clusters are inhospitable for AGN activity even if galaxies are in pairs. These results can be explained through models of gas dynamics in which pair interactions stimulate the transfer of gas to the nucleus and clusters suppress gas availability for accretion onto the central black hole.

  20. Photocatalytic activity of nanostructured TiO2 films produced by supersonic cluster beam deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Della Foglia, Flavio; Losco, Tonia; Piseri, Paolo; Milani, Paolo; Selli, Elena

    2009-08-01

    The photocatalytic activity of thin, nanostructured films of titanium dioxide, synthesized by supersonic cluster beam deposition (SCBD) from the gas phase, has been investigated employing the photodegradation of salicylic acid as test reaction. Because of the low deposition energy, the so-deposited highly porous TiO2 films are composed of nanoparticles maintaining their original properties in the film, which can be fully controlled by tuning the deposition and post-deposition treatment conditions. A systematic investigation on the evolution of light absorption properties and photoactivity of the films in relation to their morphology, determined by AFM analysis, and phase composition, determined by Raman spectroscopy, has been performed. The absorption and photocatalytic activity of the nanostructured films in the visible region could be enhanced either through post-deposition annealing treatment in ammonia containing atmosphere or employing mild oxidation conditions, followed by annealing in N2 at 600 °C.

  1. Stable and solubilized active Au atom clusters for selective epoxidation of cis-cyclooctene with molecular oxygen

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Linping; Wang, Zhen; Beletskiy, Evgeny V.; Liu, Jingyue; dos Santos, Haroldo J.; Li, Tiehu; Rangel, Maria do C.; Kung, Mayfair C.; Kung, Harold H.

    2017-01-01

    The ability of Au catalysts to effect the challenging task of utilizing molecular oxygen for the selective epoxidation of cyclooctene is fascinating. Although supported nanometre-size Au particles are poorly active, here we show that solubilized atomic Au clusters, present in ng ml−1 concentrations and stabilized by ligands derived from the oxidized hydrocarbon products, are active. They can be formed from various Au sources. They generate initiators and propagators to trigger the onset of the auto-oxidation reaction with an apparent turnover frequency of 440 s−1, and continue to generate additional initiators throughout the auto-oxidation cycle without direct participation in the cycle. Spectroscopic characterization suggests that 7–8 atom clusters are effective catalytically. Extension of work based on these understandings leads to the demonstration that these Au clusters are also effective in selective oxidation of cyclohexene, and that solubilized Pt clusters are also capable of generating initiators for cyclooctene epoxidation. PMID:28348389

  2. Application of space-time scan statistics to describe geographic and temporal clustering of visible drug activity.

    PubMed

    Linton, Sabriya L; Jennings, Jacky M; Latkin, Carl A; Gomez, Marisela B; Mehta, Shruti H

    2014-10-01

    Knowledge of the geographic and temporal clustering of drug activity can inform where health and social services are needed and can provide insight on the potential impact of local policies on drug activity. This ecologic study assessed the spatial and temporal distribution of drug activity in Baltimore, Maryland, prior to and following the implementation of a large urban redevelopment project in East Baltimore, which began in 2003. Drug activity was measured by narcotic calls for service at the neighborhood level. A space-time scan statistic approach was used to identify statistically significant clusters of narcotic calls for service across space and time, using a discrete Poisson model. After adjusting for economic deprivation and housing vacancy, clusters of narcotic calls for service were identified among neighborhoods located in Southeast, Northeast, Northwest, and West Baltimore from 2001 to 2010. Clusters of narcotic calls for service were identified among neighborhoods located in East Baltimore from 2001 to 2003, indicating a decrease in narcotic calls thereafter. A large proportion of clusters occurred among neighborhoods located in North and Northeast Baltimore after 2003, which indicated a potential spike during this time frame. These findings suggest potential displacement of drug activity coinciding with the initiation of urban redevelopment in East Baltimore. Space-time scan statistics should be used in future research to describe the potential implications of local policies on drug activity.

  3. Modeling active galactic nucleus feedback in cool-core clusters: The balance between heating and cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yuan; Bryan, Greg L.

    2014-07-01

    We study the long-term evolution of an idealized cool-core galaxy cluster under the influence of momentum-driven active galactic nucleus (AGN) feedback using three-dimensional high-resolution (60 pc) adaptive mesh refinement simulations. The feedback is modeled with a pair of precessing jets whose power is calculated based on the accretion rate of the cold gas surrounding the supermassive black hole (SMBH). The intracluster medium first cools into clumps along the propagation direction of the jets. As the jet power increases, gas condensation occurs isotropically, forming spatially extended structures that resemble the observed Hα filaments in Perseus and many other cool-core clusters. Jet heating elevates the gas entropy, halting clump formation. The cold gas that is not accreted onto the SMBH settles into a rotating disk of ∼10{sup 11} M {sub ☉}. The hot gas cools directly onto the disk while the SMBH accretes from its innermost region, powering the AGN that maintains a thermally balanced state for a few Gyr. The mass cooling rate averaged over 7 Gyr is ∼30 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}, an order of magnitude lower than the classic cooling flow value. Medium resolution simulations produce similar results, while in low resolution runs, the cluster experiences cycles of gas condensation and AGN outbursts. Owing to its self-regulating mechanism, AGN feedback can successfully balance cooling with a wide range of model parameters. Our model also produces cold structures in early stages that are in good agreement with the observations. However, the long-lived massive cold disk is unrealistic, suggesting that additional physical processes are still needed.

  4. Associations between dimensions of anxiety sensitivity and PTSD symptom clusters in active-duty police officers.

    PubMed

    Asmundson, Gordon J G; Stapleton, Jennifer A

    2008-01-01

    Prior studies have shown that anxiety sensitivity (AS) plays an important role in posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptom severity. The purpose of this study was to evaluate associations between empirically supported PTSD symptom clusters (i.e. reexperiencing, avoidance, numbing, hyperarousal) and AS dimensions (i.e. psychological concerns, social concerns, somatic concerns). Participants were 138 active-duty police officers (70.7% female; mean age = 38.9 years; mean time policing = 173.8 months) who, as a part of a larger study, completed measures of trauma exposure, PTSD symptoms, AS, and depressive symptoms. All participants reported experiencing at least one event that they perceived as traumatic, and 44 (31.9%) screened positive for PTSD. Officers with probable PTSD scored significantly higher on AS total as well as the somatic and psychological concerns dimensional scores than did those without PTSD. As well, a higher percentage of officers with probable PTSD scored positively on the AS-derived Brief Screen for Panic Disorder (Apfeldorf et al., 1994) compared with those without PTSD. A series of regression analyses revealed that depressive symptoms, number of reported traumas, and AS somatic concerns were significant predictors of PTSD total symptom severity as well as severity of reexperiencing. Avoidance was predicted by depressive symptoms and AS somatic concerns. Only depressive symptoms were significantly predictive of numbing and hyperarousal cluster scores. These findings contribute to understanding the nature of association between AS and PTSD symptom clusters. Implications for the treatment of individuals having PTSD with and without panic-related symptomatology are discussed.

  5. Nanoparticle cluster gas sensor: Pt activated SnO2 nanoparticles for NH3 detection with ultrahigh sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xu; Chen, Nan; Han, Bingqian; Xiao, Xuechun; Chen, Gang; Djerdj, Igor; Wang, Yude

    2015-09-28

    Pt activated SnO2 nanoparticle clusters were synthesized by a simple solvothermal method. The structure, morphology, chemical state and specific surface area were analyzed by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and N2-sorption studies, respectively. The SnO2 nanoparticle cluster matrix consists of tens of thousands of SnO2 nanoparticles with an ultra-small grain size estimated to be 3.0 nm. And there are abundant random-packed wormhole-like pores, caused by the inter-connection of the SnO2 nanoparticles, throughout each cluster. The platinum element is present in two forms including metal (Pt) and tetravalent metal oxide (PtO2) in the Pt activated SnO2 nanoparticle clusters. The as-synthesized pure and Pt activated SnO2 nanoparticle clusters were used to fabricate gas sensor devices. It was found that the gas response toward 500 ppm of ammonia was improved from 6.48 to 203.44 through the activation by Pt. And the results indicate that the sensor based on Pt activated SnO2 not only has ultrahigh sensitivity but also possesses good response-recovery properties, linear dependence, repeatability, selectivity and long-term stability, demonstrating the potential to use Pt activated SnO2 nanoparticle clusters as ammonia gas sensors. At the same time, the formation mechanisms of the unique nanoparticle clusters and highly enhanced sensitivity are also discussed.

  6. Discovery of five low-luminosity active galactic nuclei at the centre of the Perseus cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Songyoun; Yang, Jun; Oonk, J. B. Raymond; Paragi, Zsolt

    2017-03-01

    According to optical stellar kinematics observations, an overmassive black hole candidate has been reported by van den Bosch et al. in the normal early-type galaxy NGC 1277. This galaxy is located in the central region of the Perseus cluster. Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope observations have shown that NGC 1277 and other early-type galaxies in the neighbourhood have radio counterparts. These nuclear radio sources have stable flux densities on a time-scale of years. In order to investigate the origin of the radio emission from these normal galaxies, we selected five sources (NGC 1270, NGC 1272, NGC 1277, NGC 1278 and VZw 339) residing in the central 10-arcmin region of the Perseus cluster and requested to re-correlate the data of an existing very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) experiment at these new positions. With the re-correlation data provided by the European VLBI Network (EVN), we imaged the five sources with a resolution of about 8 mas and detected all of them with a confidence level above 5σ at 1.4 GHz. They show compact structure and brightness temperatures above 107 K, which implies that the radio emission is non-thermal. We rule out ongoing nuclear star formation and conclude that these VLBI-detected radio sources are parsec-scale jet activity associated with the supermassive black holes in low-luminosity active galactic nuclei, although there are no clear signs of nuclear activity observed in the optical and infrared bands. Using the Fundamental Plane relation in black holes, we find no significant evidence for or against an extremely massive black hole hiding in NGC 1277.

  7. Eastern region represents a worrying cluster of active hepatitis C in Algeria in 2012.

    PubMed

    Bensalem, Aïcha; Selmani, Karima; Hihi, Narjes; Bencherifa, Nesrine; Mostefaoui, Fatma; Kerioui, Cherif; Pineau, Pascal; Debzi, Nabil; Berkane, Saadi

    2016-08-01

    Algeria is the largest country of Africa, peopled with populations living a range of traditional/rural and modern/urban lifestyles. The variations of prevalence of chronic active hepatitis care poorly known on the Algerian territory. We conducted a retrospective survey on all patients (n = 998) referred to our institution in 2012 and confirmed by us for an active hepatitis C. Half of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) isolates were genotyped. Forty Algerian regions out of the 48 were represented in our study. Three geographical clusters (Aïn-Temouchent/SidiBelAbbes, Algiers, and a large Eastern region) with an excess of active hepatitis C were observed. Patients coming from the Eastern cluster (Batna, Khenchela, Oum el Bouaghi, and Tebessa) were strongly over-represented (49% of cases, OR = 14.5, P < 0.0001). The hallmarks of Eastern region were an excess of women (65% vs. 46% in the remaining population, P < 0.0001) and the almost exclusive presence of HCV genotype 1 (93% vs. 63%, P = 0.0001). The core of the epidemics was apparently located in Khenchela (odds ratio = 24.6, P < 0.0001). This situation is plausibly connected with nosocomial transmission or traditional practices as scarification (Hijama), piercing or tattooing, very lively in this region. Distinct hepatitis C epidemics are currently affecting Algerian population. The most worrying situation is observed in rural regions located east of Algeria. J. Med. Virol. 88:1394-1403, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. THE CLUSTERING OF GALAXIES AROUND RADIO-LOUD ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    SciTech Connect

    Worpel, Hauke; Brown, Michael J. I.; Jones, D. Heath; Floyd, David J. E.; Beutler, Florian

    2013-07-20

    We examine the hypothesis that mergers and close encounters between galaxies can fuel active galactic nuclei (AGNs) by increasing the rate at which gas accretes toward the central black hole. We compare the clustering of galaxies around radio-loud AGNs with the clustering around a population of radio-quiet galaxies with similar masses, colors, and luminosities. Our catalog contains 2178 elliptical radio galaxies with flux densities greater than 2.8 mJy at 1.4 GHz from the Six Degree Field Galaxy Survey. We find tentative evidence that radio AGNs with more than 200 times the median radio power have, on average, more close (r < 160 kpc) companions than their radio-quiet counterparts, suggesting that mergers play a role in forming the most powerful radio galaxies. For ellipticals of fixed stellar mass, the radio power is neither a function of large-scale environment nor halo mass, consistent with the radio powers of ellipticals varying by orders of magnitude over billions of years.

  9. Mechanistically distinct cancer-associated mTOR activation clusters predict sensitivity to rapamycin

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jianing; Pham, Can G.; Albanese, Steven K.; Dong, Yiyu; Lee, Chung-Han; Yao, Zhan; Han, Song; Chen, David; Parton, Daniel L.; Chodera, John D.; Rosen, Neal; Cheng, Emily H.; Hsieh, James J.

    2016-01-01

    Genomic studies have linked mTORC1 pathway–activating mutations with exceptional response to treatment with allosteric inhibitors of mTORC1 called rapalogs. Rapalogs are approved for selected cancer types, including kidney and breast cancers. Here, we used sequencing data from 22 human kidney cancer cases to identify the activating mechanisms conferred by mTOR mutations observed in human cancers and advance precision therapeutics. mTOR mutations that clustered in focal adhesion kinase targeting domain (FAT) and kinase domains enhanced mTORC1 kinase activity, decreased nutrient reliance, and increased cell size. We identified 3 distinct mechanisms of hyperactivation, including reduced binding to DEP domain–containing MTOR-interacting protein (DEPTOR), resistance to regulatory associated protein of mTOR–mediated (RAPTOR-mediated) suppression, and altered kinase kinetics. Of the 28 mTOR double mutants, activating mutations could be divided into 6 complementation groups, resulting in synergistic Rag- and Ras homolog enriched in brain–independent (RHEB-independent) mTORC1 activation. mTOR mutants were resistant to DNA damage–inducible transcript 1–mediated (REDD1-mediated) inhibition, confirming that activating mutations can bypass the negative feedback pathway formed between HIF1 and mTORC1 in the absence of von Hippel–Lindau (VHL) tumor suppressor expression. Moreover, VHL-deficient cells that expressed activating mTOR mutants grew tumors that were sensitive to rapamycin treatment. These data may explain the high incidence of mTOR mutations observed in clear cell kidney cancer, where VHL loss and HIF activation is pathognomonic. Our study provides mechanistic and therapeutic insights concerning mTOR mutations in human diseases. PMID:27482884

  10. Using Targeted Active-Learning Exercises and Diagnostic Question Clusters to Improve Students' Understanding of Carbon Cycling in Ecosystems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maskiewicz, April Cordero; Griscom, Heather Peckham; Welch, Nicole Turrill

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we used targeted active-learning activities to help students improve their ways of reasoning about carbon flow in ecosystems. The results of a validated ecology conceptual inventory (diagnostic question clusters [DQCs]) provided us with information about students' understanding of and reasoning about transformation of inorganic and…

  11. NanoCluster Beacons as reporter probes in rolling circle enhanced enzyme activity detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juul, Sissel; Obliosca, Judy M.; Liu, Cong; Liu, Yen-Liang; Chen, Yu-An; Imphean, Darren M.; Knudsen, Birgitta R.; Ho, Yi-Ping; Leong, Kam W.; Yeh, Hsin-Chih

    2015-04-01

    As a newly developed assay for the detection of endogenous enzyme activity at the single-catalytic-event level, Rolling Circle Enhanced Enzyme Activity Detection (REEAD) has been used to measure enzyme activity in both single human cells and malaria-causing parasites, Plasmodium sp. Current REEAD assays rely on organic dye-tagged linear DNA probes to report the rolling circle amplification products (RCPs), the cost of which may hinder the widespread use of REEAD. Here we show that a new class of activatable probes, NanoCluster Beacons (NCBs), can simplify the REEAD assays. Easily prepared without any need for purification and capable of large fluorescence enhancement upon hybridization, NCBs are cost-effective and sensitive. Compared to conventional fluorescent probes, NCBs are also more photostable. As demonstrated in reporting the human topoisomerases I (hTopI) cleavage-ligation reaction, the proposed NCBs suggest a read-out format attractive for future REEAD-based diagnostics.As a newly developed assay for the detection of endogenous enzyme activity at the single-catalytic-event level, Rolling Circle Enhanced Enzyme Activity Detection (REEAD) has been used to measure enzyme activity in both single human cells and malaria-causing parasites, Plasmodium sp. Current REEAD assays rely on organic dye-tagged linear DNA probes to report the rolling circle amplification products (RCPs), the cost of which may hinder the widespread use of REEAD. Here we show that a new class of activatable probes, NanoCluster Beacons (NCBs), can simplify the REEAD assays. Easily prepared without any need for purification and capable of large fluorescence enhancement upon hybridization, NCBs are cost-effective and sensitive. Compared to conventional fluorescent probes, NCBs are also more photostable. As demonstrated in reporting the human topoisomerases I (hTopI) cleavage-ligation reaction, the proposed NCBs suggest a read-out format attractive for future REEAD-based diagnostics. Electronic

  12. A cluster of noncoding RNAs activates the ESR1 locus during breast cancer adaptation.

    PubMed

    Tomita, Saori; Abdalla, Mohamed Osama Ali; Fujiwara, Saori; Matsumori, Haruka; Maehara, Kazumitsu; Ohkawa, Yasuyuki; Iwase, Hirotaka; Saitoh, Noriko; Nakao, Mitsuyoshi

    2015-04-29

    Estrogen receptor-α (ER)-positive breast cancer cells undergo hormone-independent proliferation after deprivation of oestrogen, leading to endocrine therapy resistance. Up-regulation of the ER gene (ESR1) is critical for this process, but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Here we show that the combination of transcriptome and fluorescence in situ hybridization analyses revealed that oestrogen deprivation induced a cluster of noncoding RNAs that defined a large chromatin domain containing the ESR1 locus. We termed these RNAs as Eleanors (ESR1 locus enhancing and activating noncoding RNAs). Eleanors were present in ER-positive breast cancer tissues and localized at the transcriptionally active ESR1 locus to form RNA foci. Depletion of one Eleanor, upstream (u)-Eleanor, impaired cell growth and transcription of intragenic Eleanors and ESR1 mRNA, indicating that Eleanors cis-activate the ESR1 gene. Eleanor-mediated gene activation represents a new type of locus control mechanism and plays an essential role in the adaptation of breast cancer cells.

  13. A cluster of noncoding RNAs activates the ESR1 locus during breast cancer adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Tomita, Saori; Abdalla, Mohamed Osama Ali; Fujiwara, Saori; Matsumori, Haruka; Maehara, Kazumitsu; Ohkawa, Yasuyuki; Iwase, Hirotaka; Saitoh, Noriko; Nakao, Mitsuyoshi

    2015-01-01

    Estrogen receptor-α (ER)-positive breast cancer cells undergo hormone-independent proliferation after deprivation of oestrogen, leading to endocrine therapy resistance. Up-regulation of the ER gene (ESR1) is critical for this process, but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Here we show that the combination of transcriptome and fluorescence in situ hybridization analyses revealed that oestrogen deprivation induced a cluster of noncoding RNAs that defined a large chromatin domain containing the ESR1 locus. We termed these RNAs as Eleanors (ESR1 locus enhancing and activating noncoding RNAs). Eleanors were present in ER-positive breast cancer tissues and localized at the transcriptionally active ESR1 locus to form RNA foci. Depletion of one Eleanor, upstream (u)-Eleanor, impaired cell growth and transcription of intragenic Eleanors and ESR1 mRNA, indicating that Eleanors cis-activate the ESR1 gene. Eleanor-mediated gene activation represents a new type of locus control mechanism and plays an essential role in the adaptation of breast cancer cells. PMID:25923108

  14. Hydrogen activation by unsaturated mixed-metal cluster complexes: new directions.

    PubMed

    Adams, Richard D; Captain, Burjor

    2008-01-01

    There has been a renewed interest in the chemistry of hydrogen as a result of the ever-increasing global demands for energy. Recent studies have revealed new electronically unsaturated polynuclear metal complexes containing bulky ligands that exhibit a variety of reactions with hydrogen, including facile addition and elimination under mild conditions. Materials and molecules that can reversibly absorb large quantities of hydrogen are very attractive for hydrogen storage and hydrogenation catalysis. This Minireview summarizes recent studies of reactions of hydrogen with unsaturated mixed-metal cluster complexes containing platinum and bulky phosphine ligands. Some related studies on bimetallic cooperativity and the synthesis of trimetallic nanoparticles on mesoporous supports that exhibit high activity and selectivity for catalytic hydrogenations are also discussed.

  15. Graphdiyne oxides as excellent substrate for electroless deposition of Pd clusters with high catalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Qi, Hetong; Yu, Ping; Wang, Yuexiang; Han, Guangchao; Liu, Huibiao; Yi, Yuanping; Li, Yuliang; Mao, Lanqun

    2015-04-29

    Graphdiyne (GDY), a novel kind of two-dimensional carbon allotrope consisting of sp- and sp(2)-hybridized carbon atoms, is found to be able to serve as the reducing agent and stabilizer for electroless deposition of highly dispersed Pd nanoparticles owing to its low reduction potential and highly conjugated electronic structure. Furthermore, we observe that graphdiyne oxide (GDYO), the oxidation form of GDY, can be used as an even excellent substrate for electroless deposition of ultrafine Pd clusters to form Pd/GDYO nanocomposite that exhibits a high catalytic performance toward the reduction of 4-nitrophenol. The high catalytic performance is considered to benefit from the rational design and electroless deposition of active metal catalysts with GDYO as the support.

  16. Antimicrobial surfaces containing cationic nanoparticles: how immobilized, clustered, and protruding cationic charge presentation affects killing activity and kinetics.

    PubMed

    Fang, Bing; Jiang, Ying; Nüsslein, Klaus; Rotello, Vincent M; Santore, Maria M

    2015-01-01

    This work examines how the antimicrobial (killing) activity of net-negative surfaces depends on the presentation of antimicrobial cationic functionality: distributed versus clustered, and flat clusters versus raised clusters. Specifically, the ability to kill Staphylococcus aureus by sparsely distributed 10 nm cationic nanoparticles, immobilized on a negative surface and backfilled with a PEG (polyethylene glycol) brush, was compared with that for a dense layer of the same immobilized nanoparticles. Additionally, sparsely distributed 10 nm poly-L-lysine (PLL) coils, adsorbed to a surface to produce flat cationic "patches" and backfilled with a PEG brush were compared to a saturated adsorbed layer of PLL. The latter resembled classical uniformly cationic antimicrobial surfaces. The protrusion of the cationic clusters substantially influenced killing but the surface concentration of the clusters had minor impact, as long as bacteria adhered. When surfaces were functionalized at the minimum nanoparticle and patch densities needed for bacterial adhesion, killing activity was substantial within 30 min and nearly complete within 2 h. Essentially identical killing was observed on more densely functionalized surfaces. Surfaces containing protruding (by about 8 nm) nanoparticles accomplished rapid killing (at 30 min) compared with surfaces containing similarly cationic but flat features (PLL patches). Importantly, the overall surface density of cationic functionality within the clusters was lower than reported thresholds for antimicrobial action. Also surprising, the nanoparticles were far more deadly when surface-immobilized compared with free in solution. These findings support a killing mechanism involving interfacial stress.

  17. The Sound of Silence: Activating Silent Biosynthetic Gene Clusters in Marine Microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Reen, F Jerry; Romano, Stefano; Dobson, Alan D W; O'Gara, Fergal

    2015-07-31

    Unlocking the rich harvest of marine microbial ecosystems has the potential to both safeguard the existence of our species for the future, while also presenting significant lifestyle benefits for commercial gain. However, while significant advances have been made in the field of marine biodiscovery, leading to the introduction of new classes of therapeutics for clinical medicine, cosmetics and industrial products, much of what this natural ecosystem has to offer is locked in, and essentially hidden from our screening methods. Releasing this silent potential represents a significant technological challenge, the key to which is a comprehensive understanding of what controls these systems. Heterologous expression systems have been successful in awakening a number of these cryptic marine biosynthetic gene clusters (BGCs). However, this approach is limited by the typically large size of the encoding sequences. More recently, focus has shifted to the regulatory proteins associated with each BGC, many of which are signal responsive raising the possibility of exogenous activation. Abundant among these are the LysR-type family of transcriptional regulators, which are known to control production of microbial aromatic systems. Although the environmental signals that activate these regulatory systems remain unknown, it offers the exciting possibility of evoking mimic molecules and synthetic expression systems to drive production of potentially novel natural products in microorganisms. Success in this field has the potential to provide a quantum leap forward in medical and industrial bio-product development. To achieve these new endpoints, it is clear that the integrated efforts of bioinformaticians and natural product chemists will be required as we strive to uncover new and potentially unique structures from silent or cryptic marine gene clusters.

  18. Transcriptional pausing and stalling causes multiple clustered mutations by human activation-induced deaminase

    PubMed Central

    Canugovi, Chandrika; Samaranayake, Mala; Bhagwat, Ashok S.

    2009-01-01

    Transcription of the rearranged immunoglobulin gene and expression of the enzyme activation-induced deaminase (AID) are essential for somatic hypermutations of this gene during antibody maturation. While AID acts as a single-strand DNA-cytosine deaminase creating U · G mispairs that lead to mutations, the role played by transcription in this process is less clear. We have used in vitro transcription of the kan gene by the T7 RNA polymerase (RNAP) in the presence of AID and a genetic reversion assay for kanamycin-resistance to investigate the causes of multiple clustered mutations (MCMs) during somatic hypermutations. We find that, depending on transcription conditions, AID can cause single-base substitutions or MCMs. When wild-type RNAP is used for transcription at physiologically relevant concentrations of ribonucleoside triphosphates (NTPs), few MCMs are found. In contrast, slowing the rate of elongation by reducing the NTP concentration or using a mutant RNAP increases several-fold the percent of revertants containing MCMs. Arresting the elongation complexes by a quick removal of NTPs leads to formation of RNA-DNA hybrids (R-loops). Treatment of these structures with AID results in a high percentage of KanR revertants with MCMs. Furthermore, selecting for transcription elongation complexes stalled near the codon that suffers mutations during acquisition of kanamycin-resistance results in an overwhelming majority of revertants with MCMs. These results show that if RNAP II pauses or stalls during transcription of immunoglobulin gene, AID is likely to promote MCMs. As changes in physiological conditions such as occurrence of certain DNA primary or secondary structures or DNA adducts are known to cause transcriptional pausing and stalling in mammalian cells, this process may cause MCMs during somatic hypermutation.—Canugovi, C., Samaranayake, M., Bhagwat, A. S. Transcriptional pausing and stalling causes multiple clustered mutations by human activation

  19. The Sound of Silence: Activating Silent Biosynthetic Gene Clusters in Marine Microorganisms

    PubMed Central

    Reen, F. Jerry; Romano, Stefano; Dobson, Alan D.W.; O’Gara, Fergal

    2015-01-01

    Unlocking the rich harvest of marine microbial ecosystems has the potential to both safeguard the existence of our species for the future, while also presenting significant lifestyle benefits for commercial gain. However, while significant advances have been made in the field of marine biodiscovery, leading to the introduction of new classes of therapeutics for clinical medicine, cosmetics and industrial products, much of what this natural ecosystem has to offer is locked in, and essentially hidden from our screening methods. Releasing this silent potential represents a significant technological challenge, the key to which is a comprehensive understanding of what controls these systems. Heterologous expression systems have been successful in awakening a number of these cryptic marine biosynthetic gene clusters (BGCs). However, this approach is limited by the typically large size of the encoding sequences. More recently, focus has shifted to the regulatory proteins associated with each BGC, many of which are signal responsive raising the possibility of exogenous activation. Abundant among these are the LysR-type family of transcriptional regulators, which are known to control production of microbial aromatic systems. Although the environmental signals that activate these regulatory systems remain unknown, it offers the exciting possibility of evoking mimic molecules and synthetic expression systems to drive production of potentially novel natural products in microorganisms. Success in this field has the potential to provide a quantum leap forward in medical and industrial bio-product development. To achieve these new endpoints, it is clear that the integrated efforts of bioinformaticians and natural product chemists will be required as we strive to uncover new and potentially unique structures from silent or cryptic marine gene clusters. PMID:26264003

  20. N2O reduction by the mu4-sulfide-bridged tetranuclear CuZ cluster active site.

    PubMed

    Chen, Peng; Gorelsky, Serge I; Ghosh, Somdatta; Solomon, Edward I

    2004-08-13

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) reduction is a chemical challenge both in the selective oxidation of organic substrates by N2O and in the removal of N2O as a green-house gas. The reduction of N2O is thermodynamically favorable but kinetically inert, and requires activating transition-metal centers. In biological systems, N2O reduction is the last step in the denitrification process of the bacterial nitrogen cycle and is accomplished by the enzyme nitrous oxide reductase, whose active site consists of a micro4-sulfide-bridged tetranuclear CuZ cluster which has many unusual spectroscopic features. Recent studies have developed a detailed electronic-structure description of the resting CuZ cluster, determined its catalytically relevant state, and provided insight into the role of this tetranuclear copper cluster in N2O activation and reduction.

  1. Anti-tumor and immunomodulatory activity of iron hepta-tungsten phosphate oxygen clusters complex.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bisong; Qiu, Jianping; Wu, Changsheng; Li, Yunxia; Liu, Zhenxiang

    2015-12-01

    Polyoxometalates (POMs) have attracted a considerable attention due to their unique structural characteristics, physicochemical properties and biological activities. In this study, iron hepta-tungsten phosphate oxygen clusters complex Na12H[Fe(HPW7O28)2]·44H2O (IHTPO) was synthesized and evaluated for in vitro cytotoxic activities on human hepatoma HepG2, leukemia K562, lung carcinoma A549, and large cell lung cancer NCI-H460 cells, therapeutic efficacies on mice transplantable tumor, and immunomodulatory potentials on the immune response in tumor-bearing mice. IHTPO exhibited lower in vitro cytotoxic activities against four human tumor cell lines, with the IC50 values being higher than 62.5μM (ca. 300μg/ml). IHTPO, however, significantly inhibited the growth of S180 sarcoma transplanted in mice. It was further showed that IHTPO could not only significantly promote splenocytes proliferation, NK cell and CTL activity from splenocytes, but remarkably enhance serum antigen-specific IgG, IgG2a and IgG2b antibody levels in S180-bearing mice. IHTPO also significantly promoted Th1 cytokines IFN-γ and IL-2 production, and up-regulated the mRNA expression levels of IFN-γ, IL-2 and Th1 transcription factors T-bet and STAT-4 in splenocytes from the S180-bearing mice. These results suggested that IHTPO significantly inhibited the growth of mice transplantable tumor, and that its in vivo antitumor activity might be achieved by improving Th1 protective cell-mediated immunity. IHTPO could act as antitumor agent with immunomodulatory activity.

  2. Cluster Analysis of Tumor Suppressor Genes in Canine Leukocytes Identifies Activation State

    PubMed Central

    Daly, Julie-Anne; Mortlock, Sally-Anne; Taylor, Rosanne M.; Williamson, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Cells of the immune system undergo activation and subsequent proliferation in the normal course of an immune response. Infrequently, the molecular and cellular events that underlie the mechanisms of proliferation are dysregulated and may lead to oncogenesis, leading to tumor formation. The most common forms of immunological cancers are lymphomas, which in dogs account for 8%–20% of all cancers, affecting up to 1.2% of the dog population. Key genes involved in negatively regulating proliferation of lymphocytes include a group classified as tumor suppressor genes (TSGs). These genes are also known to be associated with progression of lymphoma in humans, mice, and dogs and are potential candidates for pathological grading and diagnosis. The aim of the present study was to analyze TSG profiles in stimulated leukocytes from dogs to identify genes that discriminate an activated phenotype. A total of 554 TSGs and three gene set collections were analyzed from microarray data. Cluster analysis of three subsets of genes discriminated between stimulated and unstimulated cells. These included 20 most upregulated and downregulated TSGs, TSG in hallmark gene sets significantly enriched in active cells, and a selection of candidate TSGs, p15 (CDKN2B), p18 (CDKN2C), p19 (CDKN1A), p21 (CDKN2A), p27 (CDKN1B), and p53 (TP53) in the third set. Analysis of two subsets suggested that these genes or a subset of these genes may be used as a specialized PCR set for additional analysis. PMID:27478369

  3. Temporal clustering analysis of cerebral blood flow activation maps measured by laser speckle contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zheng; Luo, Qingming

    2004-05-01

    Temporal and spatial orchestration of neurovascular coupling in the brain neuronal activity is crucial for us to comprehend mechanism of functional cerebral metabolism and pathophysiology. Laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI) through a thinned skull over the somatosensory cortex was utilized to map the spatiotemporal characteristics of local cerebral blood flow (CBF) in anesthetized rats during sciatic nerve stimulation. Since the time course of signals from all spatial loci among the massive dataset is hard to analyze, especially for the thousands of images each of which composes of millions of pixels, we introduced a temporal clustering analysis (TCA) method, which was proved as an efficient method to analyze functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data in the temporal domain. The timing and location of CBF activation showed that contralateral hindlimb sensory cortical microflow was activated to increase promptly in less than 1 s after the onset of 2 s electrical stimulation then evolved in different discrete regions. This pattern is similar but slightly elaborated to the results obtained from laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF) and fMRI. We presented this combination to investigate interacting brain regions and provided network-level analyses, which might possibly lead to a better understanding of the nature of brain parcellation and effective connectivity.

  4. Activity and age from Kepler and K2 observations of field and cluster stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soderblom, David R.

    2017-01-01

    Kepler and K2 are providing key insights into activity-related phenomena on late-type stars. Kepler observations showed that highly energetic flares can be seen on many more types of stars than the M dwarfs that have been the traditional focus of flare studies. Some stars similar to the Sun have been seen to exhibit flares with $\\sim10^4$ times the energy of the largest solar flares ever seen, for example. The K2 extension of Kepler has been especially valuable by providing data for several open clusters, including the Pleiades, Praesepe, Hyades, and M67.In this review I will summarize the flaring behavior seen with Kepler and K2, from A stars through Ms and from the pre-main sequence to solar age. The Pleiades and M67 provide useful examples to illustrate what is seen and not seen.Other aspects of Kepler and K2 light curves have been studied as indicators of activity, and some results from that will be presented. Finally, these indicators of activity will be placed into an age context using indicators and measurements of age from Kepler/K2.

  5. Enzyme activity of α-chymotrypsin: Deactivation by gold nano-cluster and reactivation by glutathione.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Catherine; Mondal, Tridib; Bhattacharyya, Kankan

    2017-05-15

    Effect of gold nanoclusters (Au-NCs) on the circular dichroism (CD) spectra and enzymatic activity of α-chymotrypsin (ChT) (towards hydrolysis of a substrate, N-succinyl-l-phenylalanine p-nitroanilide) are studied. The CD spectra indicate that on binding to Au-NC, ChT is completely unfolded, resulting in nearly zero ellipticity. α-chymotrypsin (ChT) coated gold nano-clusters exhibit almost no enzymatic activity. Addition of glutathione (GSH) or oxidized glutathione (GSSG) restore the enzyme activity of α-chymotrypsin by 30-45%. ChT coated Au-NC exhibits two emission maxima-one at 480nm (corresponding to Au10) and one at 640nm (Au25). On addition of glutathione (GSH) or oxidized glutathione (GSSG) the emission peak at 640nm vanishes and only one peak at 480nm (Au10) remains. MALDI mass spectrometry studies suggest addition of glutathione (GSH) to α-chymotrypsin capped Au-NCs results in the formation of glutathione-capped Au-NCs and α-chymotrypsin is released from Au-NCs. CD spectroscopy indicates that the conformation of the released α-chymotrypsin is different from that of the native α-chymotrypsin.

  6. Suppressing cluster cooling flows by self-regulated heating from a spatially distributed population of active galactic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nusser, Adi; Silk, Joseph; Babul, Arif

    2006-12-01

    Existing models invoking active galactic nucleus (AGN) activity to resolve the cooling flow conundrum in galaxy clusters focus exclusively on the role of the central galaxy. Such models require fine-tuning of highly uncertain microscopic transport properties to distribute the thermal over the entire cluster cooling core. We propose that the intracluster medium (ICM) is instead heated by multiple, spatially distributed AGN. The central regions of galaxy clusters are rich in spheroidal systems, all of which are thought to host black holes and could participate in the heating of the ICM via AGN activity of varying strengths, and they do. There is mounting observational evidence for multiple AGN in cluster environments. AGN drive bubbles into the ICM. We identify three distinct interactions between the bubble and the ICM: (1) upon injection, the bubbles expand rapidly in situ to reach pressure equilibrium with their surroundings, generating shocks and waves whose dissipation is the principal source of ICM heating; (2) once inflated, the bubbles rise buoyantly at a rate determined by a balance with the viscous drag force, which itself results in some additional heating; and (3) rising bubbles expand and compress their surroundings. This process is adiabatic and does not contribute to any additional heating; rather, the increased ICM density due to compression enhances cooling. Our model sidesteps the `transport' issue by relying on the spatially distributed galaxies to heat the cluster core. We include self-regulation in our model by linking AGN activity in a galaxy to cooling characteristics of the surrounding ICM. We use a spherically symmetric one-dimensional hydrodynamical code to carry out a preliminary study illustrating the efficacy of the model. Our self-regulating scenario predicts that there should be enhanced AGN activity of galaxies inside the cooling regions compared to galaxies in the outer parts of the cluster. This prediction remains to be confirmed or

  7. Identification of the nik Gene Cluster of Brucella suis: Regulation and Contribution to Urease Activity

    PubMed Central

    Jubier-Maurin, Véronique; Rodrigue, Agnès; Ouahrani-Bettache, Safia; Layssac, Marion; Mandrand-Berthelot, Marie-Andrée; Köhler, Stephan; Liautard, Jean-Pierre

    2001-01-01

    Analysis of a Brucella suis 1330 gene fused to a gfp reporter, and identified as being induced in J774 murine macrophage-like cells, allowed the isolation of a gene homologous to nikA, the first gene of the Escherichia coli operon encoding the specific transport system for nickel. DNA sequence analysis of the corresponding B. suis nik locus showed that it was highly similar to that of E. coli except for localization of the nikR regulatory gene, which lies upstream from the structural nikABCDE genes and in the opposite orientation. Protein sequence comparisons suggested that the deduced nikABCDE gene products belong to a periplasmic binding protein-dependent transport system. The nikA promoter-gfp fusion was activated in vitro by low oxygen tension and metal ion deficiency and was repressed by NiCl2 excess. Insertional inactivation of nikA strongly reduced the activity of the nickel metalloenzyme urease, which was restored by addition of a nickel excess. Moreover, the nikA mutant of B. suis was functionally complemented with the E. coli nik gene cluster, leading to the recovery of urease activity. Reciprocally, an E. coli strain harboring a deleted nik operon recovered hydrogenase activity by heterologous complementation with the B. suis nik locus. Taking into account these results, we propose that the nik locus of B. suis encodes a nickel transport system. The results further suggest that nickel could enter B. suis via other transport systems. Intracellular growth rates of the B. suis wild-type and nikA mutant strains in human monocytes were similar, indicating that nikA was not essential for this step of infection. We discuss a possible role of nickel transport in maintaining enzymatic activities which could be crucial for survival of the bacteria under the environmental conditions encountered within the host. PMID:11133934

  8. The Role of Collagen Charge Clusters in the Modulation of Matrix Metalloproteinase Activity*

    PubMed Central

    Lauer, Janelle L.; Bhowmick, Manishabrata; Tokmina-Roszyk, Dorota; Lin, Yan; Van Doren, Steven R.; Fields, Gregg B.

    2014-01-01

    Members of the matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) family selectively cleave collagens in vivo. Several substrate structural features that direct MMP collagenolysis have been identified. The present study evaluated the role of charged residue clusters in the regulation of MMP collagenolysis. A series of 10 triple-helical peptide (THP) substrates were constructed in which either Lys-Gly-Asp or Gly-Asp-Lys motifs replaced Gly-Pro-Hyp (where Hyp is 4-hydroxy-l-proline) repeats. The stabilities of THPs containing the two different motifs were analyzed, and kinetic parameters for substrate hydrolysis by six MMPs were determined. A general trend for virtually all enzymes was that, as Gly-Asp-Lys motifs were moved from the extreme N and C termini to the interior next to the cleavage site sequence, kcat/Km values increased. Additionally, all Gly-Asp-Lys THPs were as good or better substrates than the parent THP in which Gly-Asp-Lys was not present. In turn, the Lys-Gly-Asp THPs were also always better substrates than the parent THP, but the magnitude of the difference was considerably less compared with the Gly-Asp-Lys series. Of the MMPs tested, MMP-2 and MMP-9 most greatly favored the presence of charged residues with preference for the Gly-Asp-Lys series. Lys-Gly-(Asp/Glu) motifs are more commonly found near potential MMP cleavage sites than Gly-(Asp/Glu)-Lys motifs. As Lys-Gly-Asp is not as favored by MMPs as Gly-Asp-Lys, the Lys-Gly-Asp motif appears advantageous over the Gly-Asp-Lys motif by preventing unwanted MMP hydrolysis. More specifically, the lack of Gly-Asp-Lys clusters may diminish potential MMP-2 and MMP-9 collagenolytic activity. The present study indicates that MMPs have interactions spanning the P23–P23′ subsites of collagenous substrates. PMID:24297171

  9. The role of collagen charge clusters in the modulation of matrix metalloproteinase activity.

    PubMed

    Lauer, Janelle L; Bhowmick, Manishabrata; Tokmina-Roszyk, Dorota; Lin, Yan; Van Doren, Steven R; Fields, Gregg B

    2014-01-24

    Members of the matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) family selectively cleave collagens in vivo. Several substrate structural features that direct MMP collagenolysis have been identified. The present study evaluated the role of charged residue clusters in the regulation of MMP collagenolysis. A series of 10 triple-helical peptide (THP) substrates were constructed in which either Lys-Gly-Asp or Gly-Asp-Lys motifs replaced Gly-Pro-Hyp (where Hyp is 4-hydroxy-L-proline) repeats. The stabilities of THPs containing the two different motifs were analyzed, and kinetic parameters for substrate hydrolysis by six MMPs were determined. A general trend for virtually all enzymes was that, as Gly-Asp-Lys motifs were moved from the extreme N and C termini to the interior next to the cleavage site sequence, kcat/Km values increased. Additionally, all Gly-Asp-Lys THPs were as good or better substrates than the parent THP in which Gly-Asp-Lys was not present. In turn, the Lys-Gly-Asp THPs were also always better substrates than the parent THP, but the magnitude of the difference was considerably less compared with the Gly-Asp-Lys series. Of the MMPs tested, MMP-2 and MMP-9 most greatly favored the presence of charged residues with preference for the Gly-Asp-Lys series. Lys-Gly-(Asp/Glu) motifs are more commonly found near potential MMP cleavage sites than Gly-(Asp/Glu)-Lys motifs. As Lys-Gly-Asp is not as favored by MMPs as Gly-Asp-Lys, the Lys-Gly-Asp motif appears advantageous over the Gly-Asp-Lys motif by preventing unwanted MMP hydrolysis. More specifically, the lack of Gly-Asp-Lys clusters may diminish potential MMP-2 and MMP-9 collagenolytic activity. The present study indicates that MMPs have interactions spanning the P23-P23' subsites of collagenous substrates.

  10. Coronal Mass Ejections from the Same Active Region Cluster: Two Different Perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cremades, H.; Mandrini, C. H.; Schmieder, B.; Crescitelli, A. M.

    2015-06-01

    The cluster formed by active regions (ARs) NOAA 11121 and 11123, approximately located on the solar central meridian on 11 November 2010, is of great scientific interest. This complex was the site of violent flux emergence and the source of a series of Earth-directed events on the same day. The onset of the events was nearly simultaneously observed by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) telescope onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) and the Extreme-Ultraviolet Imagers (EUVI) on the Sun-Earth Connection Coronal and Heliospheric Investigation (SECCHI) suite of telescopes onboard the Solar-Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) twin spacecraft. The progression of these events in the low corona was tracked by the Large Angle Spectroscopic Coronagraphs (LASCO) onboard the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) and the SECCHI/COR coronagraphs on STEREO. SDO and SOHO imagers provided data from the Earth's perspective, whilst the STEREO twin instruments procured images from the orthogonal directions. This spatial configuration of spacecraft allowed optimum simultaneous observations of the AR cluster and the coronal mass ejections that originated in it. Quadrature coronal observations provided by STEREO revealed many more ejective events than were detected from Earth. Furthermore, joint observations by SDO/AIA and STEREO/SECCHI EUVI of the source region indicate that all events classified by GOES as X-ray flares had an ejective coronal counterpart in quadrature observations. These results directly affect current space weather forecasting because alarms might be missed when there is a lack of solar observations in a view direction perpendicular to the Sun-Earth line.

  11. Identification and activation of novel biosynthetic gene clusters by genome mining in the kirromycin producer Streptomyces collinus Tü 365.

    PubMed

    Iftime, Dumitrita; Kulik, Andreas; Härtner, Thomas; Rohrer, Sabrina; Niedermeyer, Timo Horst Johannes; Stegmann, Evi; Weber, Tilmann; Wohlleben, Wolfgang

    2016-03-01

    Streptomycetes are prolific sources of novel biologically active secondary metabolites with pharmaceutical potential. S. collinus Tü 365 is a Streptomyces strain, isolated 1972 from Kouroussa (Guinea). It is best known as producer of the antibiotic kirromycin, an inhibitor of the protein biosynthesis interacting with elongation factor EF-Tu. Genome Mining revealed 32 gene clusters encoding the biosynthesis of diverse secondary metabolites in the genome of Streptomyces collinus Tü 365, indicating an enormous biosynthetic potential of this strain. The structural diversity of secondary metabolisms predicted for S. collinus Tü 365 includes PKS, NRPS, PKS-NRPS hybrids, a lanthipeptide, terpenes and siderophores. While some of these gene clusters were found to contain genes related to known secondary metabolites, which also could be detected in HPLC-MS analyses, most of the uncharacterized gene clusters are not expressed under standard laboratory conditions. With this study we aimed to characterize the genome information of S. collinus Tü 365 to make use of gene clusters, which previously have not been described for this strain. We were able to connect the gene clusters of a lanthipeptide, a carotenoid, five terpenoid compounds, an ectoine, a siderophore and a spore pigment-associated gene cluster to their respective biosynthesis products.

  12. Search for α -Cluster Structure in Exotic Nuclei with the Prototype Active-Target Time-Projection Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritsch, A.; Ayyad, Y.; Bazin, D.; Beceiro-Novo, S.; Bradt, J.; Carpenter, L.; Cortesi, M.; Mittig, W.; Suzuki, D.; Ahn, T.; Kolata, J. J.; Howard, A. M.; Becchetti, F. D.; Wolff, M.

    Some exotic nuclei appear to exhibit α -cluster structure, which may impact nucleosynthesis reaction rates. While various theoretical models currently describe such clustering, more experimental data are needed to constrain model predictions. The Prototype Active-Target Time-Projection Chamber (PAT-TPC) has low-energy thresholds for charged-particle decay and a high detection efficiency due to its thick gaseous active target volume, making it well-suited to search for low-energy α -cluster reactions. Radioactive-ion beams produced by the TwinSol facility at the University of Notre Dame were delivered to the PAT-TPC to study 14C via α -resonant scattering. Differential cross sections and excitation functions were measured and show evidence of three-body exit channels. Additional data were measured with an updated Micromegas detector more sensitive to three-body decay. Preliminary results are presented.

  13. A stereoscopic system for viewing the temporal evolution of brain activity clusters in response to linguistic stimuli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forbes, Angus; Villegas, Javier; Almryde, Kyle R.; Plante, Elena

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, we present a novel application, 3D+Time Brain View, for the stereoscopic visualization of functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) data gathered from participants exposed to unfamiliar spoken languages. An analysis technique based on Independent Component Analysis (ICA) is used to identify statistically significant clusters of brain activity and their changes over time during different testing sessions. That is, our system illustrates the temporal evolution of participants' brain activity as they are introduced to a foreign language through displaying these clusters as they change over time. The raw fMRI data is presented as a stereoscopic pair in an immersive environment utilizing passive stereo rendering. The clusters are presented using a ray casting technique for volume rendering. Our system incorporates the temporal information and the results of the ICA into the stereoscopic 3D rendering, making it easier for domain experts to explore and analyze the data.

  14. A stereoscopic system for viewing the temporal evolution of brain activity clusters in response to linguistic stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Forbes, Angus; Villegas, Javier; Almryde, Kyle R.; Plante, Elena

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we present a novel application, 3D+Time Brain View, for the stereoscopic visualization of functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) data gathered from participants exposed to unfamiliar spoken languages. An analysis technique based on Independent Component Analysis (ICA) is used to identify statistically significant clusters of brain activity and their changes over time during different testing sessions. That is, our system illustrates the temporal evolution of participants’ brain activity as they are introduced to a foreign language through displaying these clusters as they change over time. The raw fMRI data is presented as a stereoscopic pair in an immersive environment utilizing passive stereo rendering. The clusters are presented using a ray casting technique for volume rendering. Our system incorporates the temporal information and the results of the ICA into the stereoscopic 3D rendering, making it easier for domain experts to explore and analyze the data. PMID:25075268

  15. Symmetry adapted cluster-configuration interaction calculation of the photoelectron spectra of famous biological active steroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abyar, Fatemeh; Farrokhpour, Hossein

    2014-11-01

    The photoelectron spectra of some famous steroids, important in biology, were calculated in the gas phase. The selected steroids were 5α-androstane-3,11,17-trione, 4-androstane-3,11,17-trione, cortisol, cortisone, corticosterone, dexamethasone, estradiol and cholesterol. The calculations were performed employing symmetry-adapted cluster/configuration interaction (SAC-CI) method using the 6-311++G(2df,pd) basis set. The population ratios of conformers of each steroid were calculated and used for simulating the photoelectron spectrum of steroid. It was found that more than one conformer contribute to the photoelectron spectra of some steroids. To confirm the calculated photoelectron spectra, they compared with their corresponding experimental spectra. There were no experimental gas phase Hesbnd I photoelectron spectra for some of the steroids of this work in the literature and their calculated spectra can show a part of intrinsic characteristics of this molecules in the gas phase. The canonical molecular orbitals involved in the ionization of each steroid were calculated at the HF/6-311++g(d,p) level of theory. The spectral bands of each steroid were assigned by natural bonding orbital (NBO) calculations. Knowing the electronic structures of steroids helps us to understand their biological activities and find which sites of steroid become active when a modification is performing under a biological pathway.

  16. Pair and Cluster Formation in Hybrid Active-Passive Matter Suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krafnick, Ryan; Garcia, Angel

    2015-03-01

    Systems composed of self-propelling entities, dubbed active matter, are ubiquitous in nature, from flocks of birds and schools of fish to swarms of bacteria and catalytic nanomotors. These systems (both biological and industrial) have applications ranging from micron-scale cargo manipulation and directed transport to water remediation and material processing. When added to a solution with passive (non-self-propelling) particles, active matter leads to new and altered system properties. For example, the diffusion of passive particles increases by orders of magnitude in typical systems, leading to a raised effective temperature. Additionally, particles that normally repel each other exhibit effective attractions which can lead to pair formation and clustering. The nature of these effects depends on both the mechanical collisions of swimmers and the hydrodynamic flow fields they propagate. We computationally examine the effect and dependence of various system parameters, such as particle shape and density, on these properties. This work was funded by NIH grant GM086801 and NSF grant MCB-1050966.

  17. {Ta12}/{Ta16} cluster-containing polytantalotungstates with remarkable photocatalytic H2 evolution activity.

    PubMed

    Li, Shujun; Liu, Shumei; Liu, Shuxia; Liu, Yiwei; Tang, Qun; Shi, Zhan; Ouyang, Shuxin; Ye, Jinhua

    2012-12-05

    Four novel polytantalotungstates K(5)Na(4)[P(2)W(15)O(59)(TaO(2))(3)]·17H(2)O (1), K(8)Na(8)H(4)[P(8)W(60)Ta(12)(H(2)O)(4)(OH)(8)O(236)]·42H(2)O (2), Cs(3)K(3.5)H(0.5)[SiW(9)(TaO(2))(3)O(37)]·9H(2)O (3), and Cs(10.5)K(4)H(5.5)[Ta(4)O(6)(SiW(9)Ta(3)O(40))(4)]·30H(2)O (4) were synthesized. Compounds 1 and 3 are tris-(peroxotantalum)-substituted Dawson- and Keggin-type derivatives, whereas 2 and 4 are tetrameric oligomers containing respectively an unprecedented {Ta(12)} and {Ta(16)} cluster core. The photocatalytic activities of 2 and 4 for H(2) evolution from water were evaluated. The significantly enhanced performance against the control K(6)[P(2)W(18)O(62)] can be attributed to the modulation of the electronic structures of these novel POMs by Ta incorporation. The highest activity observed so far with the use of 2 can be further rationalized by the presence of distorted heptacoordinate Ta atoms in the form of TaO(7) pentagonal bipyramid.

  18. Redox Control of the Human Iron-Sulfur Repair Protein MitoNEET Activity via Its Iron-Sulfur Cluster*

    PubMed Central

    Golinelli-Cohen, Marie-Pierre; Lescop, Ewen; Mons, Cécile; Gonçalves, Sergio; Clémancey, Martin; Santolini, Jérôme; Guittet, Eric; Blondin, Geneviève; Latour, Jean-Marc; Bouton, Cécile

    2016-01-01

    Human mitoNEET (mNT) is the first identified Fe-S protein of the mammalian outer mitochondrial membrane. Recently, mNT has been implicated in cytosolic Fe-S repair of a key regulator of cellular iron homeostasis. Here, we aimed to decipher the mechanism by which mNT triggers its Fe-S repair capacity. By using tightly controlled reactions combined with complementary spectroscopic approaches, we have determined the differential roles played by both the redox state of the mNT cluster and dioxygen in cluster transfer and protein stability. We unambiguously demonstrated that only the oxidized state of the mNT cluster triggers cluster transfer to a generic acceptor protein and that dioxygen is neither required for the cluster transfer reaction nor does it affect the transfer rate. In the absence of apo-acceptors, a large fraction of the oxidized holo-mNT form is converted back to reduced holo-mNT under low oxygen tension. Reduced holo-mNT, which holds a [2Fe-2S]+ with a global protein fold similar to that of the oxidized form is, by contrast, resistant in losing its cluster or in transferring it. Our findings thus demonstrate that mNT uses an iron-based redox switch mechanism to regulate the transfer of its cluster. The oxidized state is the “active state,” which reacts promptly to initiate Fe-S transfer independently of dioxygen, whereas the reduced state is a “dormant form.” Finally, we propose that the redox-sensing function of mNT is a key component of the cellular adaptive response to help stress-sensitive Fe-S proteins recover from oxidative injury. PMID:26887944

  19. Identification and characterization of the spiruchostatin biosynthetic gene cluster enables yield improvement by overexpressing a transcriptional activator

    PubMed Central

    Potharla, Vishwakanth Y.; Wang, Cheng; Cheng, Yi-Qiang

    2014-01-01

    Spiruchostatins A and B are members of the FK228-family of natural products with potent histone deacetylase inhibitory activities and antineoplastic activities. However, their production in the wild-type strain of Pseudomonas sp. Q71576 is low. To improve the yield, the spiruchostatin biosynthetic gene cluster (spi) was first identified by rapid genome sequencing and characterized by genetic mutations. This spi gene cluster encodes a hybrid biosynthetic pathway similar to that encoded by the FK228 biosynthetic gene cluster (dep) in Chromobacterium violaceum No. 968. Each gene cluster contains a pathway regulatory gene (spiR vs. depR) but these two genes encode transcriptional activators of different classes. Overexpression of native spiR or heterologous depR in the wild-type strain of Pseudomonas sp. Q71576 resulted in 268% or 1,285% increase of the combined titer of spiruchostatins A and B, respectively. RT-PCR analysis indicates that overexpression of heterologous depR upregulates the expression of native spiR. PMID:24973954

  20. High interfacial activity of polymers "grafted through" functionalized iron oxide nanoparticle clusters.

    PubMed

    Foster, Lynn M; Worthen, Andrew J; Foster, Edward L; Dong, Jiannan; Roach, Clarissa M; Metaxas, Athena E; Hardy, Clifford D; Larsen, Eric S; Bollinger, Jonathan A; Truskett, Thomas M; Bielawski, Christopher W; Johnston, Keith P

    2014-09-02

    The mechanism by which polymers, when grafted to inorganic nanoparticles, lower the interfacial tension at the oil-water interface is not well understood, despite the great interest in particle stabilized emulsions and foams. A simple and highly versatile free radical "grafting through" technique was used to bond high organic fractions (by weight) of poly(oligo(ethylene oxide) monomethyl ether methacrylate) onto iron oxide clusters, without the need for catalysts. In the resulting ∼1 μm hybrid particles, the inorganic cores and grafting architecture contribute to the high local concentration of grafted polymer chains to the dodecane/water interface to produce low interfacial tensions of only 0.003 w/v % (polymer and particle core). This "critical particle concentration" (CPC) for these hybrid inorganic/polymer amphiphilic particles to lower the interfacial tension by 36 mN/m was over 30-fold lower than the critical micelle concentration of the free polymer (without inorganic cores) to produce nearly the same interfacial tension. The low CPC is favored by the high adsorption energy (∼10(6) kBT) for the large ∼1 μm hybrid particles, the high local polymer concentration on the particles surfaces, and the ability of the deformable hybrid nanocluster cores as well as the polymer chains to conform to the interface. The nanocluster cores also increased the entanglement of the polymer chains in bulk DI water or synthetic seawater, producing a viscosity up to 35,000 cP at 0.01 s(-1), in contrast with only 600 cP for the free polymer. As a consequence of these interfacial and rheological properties, the hybrid particles stabilized oil-in-water emulsions at concentrations as low as 0.01 w/v %, with average drop sizes down to 30 μm. In contrast, the bulk viscosity was low for the free polymer, and it did not stabilize the emulsions. The ability to influence the interfacial activity and rheology of polymers upon grafting them to inorganic particles, including clusters

  1. The m-chlorophenylpiperazine test in cluster headache: a study on central serotoninergic activity.

    PubMed

    Leone, M; Attanasio, A; Croci, D; Libro, G; Grazzi, L; D'Amico, D; Nespolo, A; Bussone, G

    1997-10-01

    The central serotoninergic agonist m-chlorophenylpiperazine (m-CPP) stimulates several 5HT receptor subtypes. It induces the release of both cortisol and prolactin (PRL). In this study we investigated central serotoninergic responsiveness in cluster headache by monitoring cortisol and PRL responses to m-CPP administration. Twenty-three patients with episodic cluster headache and 17 sex-matched and age-matched healthy subjects were studied. The cluster headache patients were tested during a cluster period, and none were receiving prophylaxis. A single oral dose of m-CPP, 0.5 mg/kg, was given at time 0. Blood samples were drawn at -30, 0, 30, 60, 90, 120, 150 and 180 min. PRL and cortisol levels were assayed in the samples. PRL and cortisol delta maxima (delta maximum = maximum response - baseline level at time 0/baseline level at time 0) were evaluated in each patient and mean values compared. Serum levels of m-CPP were detected by HPLC and correlated to hormonal responses. Reduced cortisol (p < 0.02) and increased PRL (p < 0.05) delta maxima were observed in cluster headache patients. Increased basal cortisol plasma levels (p < 0.05) and reduced basal PRL plasma levels (p = 0.06) also characterized cluster headache patients. This is the first study evaluating central serotoninergic responsiveness to m-CPP in cluster headache and these data suggest impaired central serotoninergic function in this pathology.

  2. The effects of baryon physics, black holes and active galactic nucleus feedback on the mass distribution in clusters of galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martizzi, Davide; Teyssier, Romain; Moore, Ben; Wentz, Tina

    2012-06-01

    The spatial distribution of matter in clusters of galaxies is mainly determined by the dominant dark matter component; however, physical processes involving baryonic matter are able to modify it significantly. We analyse a set of 500 pc resolution cosmological simulations of a cluster of galaxies with mass comparable to Virgo, performed with the AMR code RAMSES. We compare the mass density profiles of the dark, stellar and gaseous matter components of the cluster that result from different assumptions for the subgrid baryonic physics and galaxy formation processes. First, the prediction of a gravity-only N-body simulation is compared to that of a hydrodynamical simulation with standard galaxy formation recipes, and then all results are compared to a hydrodynamical simulation which includes thermal active galactic nucleus (AGN) feedback from supermassive black holes (SMBHs). We find the usual effects of overcooling and adiabatic contraction in the run with standard galaxy formation physics, but very different results are found when implementing SMBHs and AGN feedback. Star formation is strongly quenched, producing lower stellar densities throughout the cluster, and much less cold gas is available for star formation at low redshifts. At redshift z= 0 we find a flat density core of radius 10 kpc in both the dark and stellar matter density profiles. We speculate on the possible formation mechanisms able to produce such cores and we conclude that they can be produced through the coupling of different processes: (I) dynamical friction from the decay of black hole orbits during galaxy mergers; (II) AGN-driven gas outflows producing fluctuations of the gravitational potential causing the removal of collisionless matter from the central region of the cluster; (III) adiabatic expansion in response to the slow expulsion of gas from the central region of the cluster during the quiescent mode of AGN activity.

  3. Mitochondrial Iron-Sulfur Cluster Activity and Cytosolic Iron Regulate Iron Traffic in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Wofford, Joshua D; Lindahl, Paul A

    2015-11-06

    An ordinary differential equation-based mathematical model was developed to describe trafficking and regulation of iron in growing fermenting budding yeast. Accordingly, environmental iron enters the cytosol and moves into mitochondria and vacuoles. Dilution caused by increasing cell volume is included. Four sites are regulated, including those in which iron is imported into the cytosol, mitochondria, and vacuoles, and the site at which vacuolar Fe(II) is oxidized to Fe(III). The objective of this study was to determine whether cytosolic iron (Fecyt) and/or a putative sulfur-based product of iron-sulfur cluster (ISC) activity was/were being sensed in regulation. The model assumes that the matrix of healthy mitochondria is anaerobic, and that in ISC mutants, O2 diffuses into the matrix where it reacts with nonheme high spin Fe(II) ions, oxidizing them to nanoparticles and generating reactive oxygen species. This reactivity causes a further decline in ISC/heme biosynthesis, which ultimately gives rise to the diseased state. The ordinary differential equations that define this model were numerically integrated, and concentrations of each component were plotted versus the concentration of iron in the growth medium and versus the rate of ISC/heme biosynthesis. Model parameters were optimized by fitting simulations to literature data. The model variant that assumed that both Fecyt and ISC biosynthesis activity were sensed in regulation mimicked observed behavior best. Such "dual sensing" probably arises in real cells because regulation involves assembly of an ISC on a cytosolic protein using Fecyt and a sulfur species generated in mitochondria during ISC biosynthesis and exported into the cytosol.

  4. Mitochondrial Iron-Sulfur Cluster Activity and Cytosolic Iron Regulate Iron Traffic in Saccharomyces cerevisiae*

    PubMed Central

    Wofford, Joshua D.; Lindahl, Paul A.

    2015-01-01

    An ordinary differential equation-based mathematical model was developed to describe trafficking and regulation of iron in growing fermenting budding yeast. Accordingly, environmental iron enters the cytosol and moves into mitochondria and vacuoles. Dilution caused by increasing cell volume is included. Four sites are regulated, including those in which iron is imported into the cytosol, mitochondria, and vacuoles, and the site at which vacuolar FeII is oxidized to FeIII. The objective of this study was to determine whether cytosolic iron (Fecyt) and/or a putative sulfur-based product of iron-sulfur cluster (ISC) activity was/were being sensed in regulation. The model assumes that the matrix of healthy mitochondria is anaerobic, and that in ISC mutants, O2 diffuses into the matrix where it reacts with nonheme high spin FeII ions, oxidizing them to nanoparticles and generating reactive oxygen species. This reactivity causes a further decline in ISC/heme biosynthesis, which ultimately gives rise to the diseased state. The ordinary differential equations that define this model were numerically integrated, and concentrations of each component were plotted versus the concentration of iron in the growth medium and versus the rate of ISC/heme biosynthesis. Model parameters were optimized by fitting simulations to literature data. The model variant that assumed that both Fecyt and ISC biosynthesis activity were sensed in regulation mimicked observed behavior best. Such “dual sensing” probably arises in real cells because regulation involves assembly of an ISC on a cytosolic protein using Fecyt and a sulfur species generated in mitochondria during ISC biosynthesis and exported into the cytosol. PMID:26306041

  5. Screen-based media use clusters are related to other activity behaviours and health indicators in adolescents

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Screen-based media (SBM) occupy a considerable portion of young peoples’ discretionary leisure time. The aim of this paper was to investigate whether distinct clusters of SBM use exist, and if so, to examine the relationship of any identified clusters with other activity/sedentary behaviours and physical and mental health indicators. Methods The data for this study come from 643 adolescents, aged 14 years, who were participating in the longitudinal Western Australian Pregnancy Cohort (Raine) Study through May 2003 to June 2006. Time spent on SBM, phone use and reading was assessed using the Multimedia Activity Recall for Children and Adults. Height, weight, muscle strength were measured at a clinic visit and the adolescents also completed questionnaires on their physical activity and psychosocial health. Latent class analysis (LCA) was used to analyse groupings of SBM use. Results Three clusters of SBM use were found; C1 ‘instrumental computer users’ (high email use, general computer use), C2 ‘multi-modal e-gamers’ (both high console and computer game use) and C3 ‘computer e-gamers’ (high computer game use only). Television viewing was moderately high amongst all the clusters. C2 males took fewer steps than their male peers in C1 and C3 (-13,787/week, 95% CI: -4619 to -22957, p = 0.003 and -14,806, 95% CI: -5,306 to -24,305, p = 0.002) and recorded less MVPA than the C1 males (-3.5 h, 95% CI: -1.0 to -5.9, p = 0.005). There was no difference in activity levels between females in clusters C1 and C3. Conclusion SBM use by adolescents did cluster and these clusters related differently to activity/sedentary behaviours and both physical and psychosocial health indicators. It is clear that SBM use is not a single construct and future research needs to take consideration of this if it intends to understand the impact SBM has on health. PMID:24330626

  6. THE SPATIAL CLUSTERING OF ROSAT ALL-SKY SURVEY ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI. III. EXPANDED SAMPLE AND COMPARISON WITH OPTICAL ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    SciTech Connect

    Krumpe, Mirko; Coil, Alison L.; Miyaji, Takamitsu; Aceves, Hector

    2012-02-10

    This is the third paper in a series that reports on our investigation of the clustering properties of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) identified in the ROSAT All-Sky Survey (RASS) and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). In this paper, we extend the redshift range to 0.07 < z < 0.50 and measure the clustering amplitudes of both X-ray-selected and optically selected SDSS broad-line AGNs with and without radio detections as well as for X-ray-selected narrow-line RASS/SDSS AGNs. We measure the clustering amplitude through cross-correlation functions (CCFs) with SDSS galaxies and derive the bias by applying a halo occupation distribution model directly to the CCFs. We find no statistically convincing difference in the clustering of X-ray-selected and optically selected broad-line AGNs, as well as with samples in which radio-detected AGNs are excluded. This is in contrast to low-redshift optically selected narrow-line AGNs, where radio-loud AGNs are found in more massive halos than optical AGNs without a radio detection. The typical dark matter halo masses of our broad-line AGNs are log (M{sub DMH}/[h{sup -1} M{sub Sun }]) {approx} 12.4-13.4, consistent with the halo mass range of typical non-AGN galaxies at low redshifts. We find no significant difference between the clustering of X-ray-selected narrow-line AGNs and broad-line AGNs. We confirm the weak dependence of the clustering strength on AGN X-ray luminosity at a {approx}2{sigma} level. Finally, we summarize the current picture of AGN clustering to z {approx} 1.5 based on three-dimensional clustering measurements.

  7. Asp1 from Schizosaccharomyces pombe binds a [2Fe-2S](2+) cluster which inhibits inositol pyrophosphate 1-phosphatase activity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huanchen; Nair, Vasudha S; Holland, Ashley A; Capolicchio, Samanta; Jessen, Henning J; Johnson, Michael K; Shears, Stephen B

    2015-10-27

    Iron-sulfur (Fe-S) clusters are widely distributed protein cofactors that are vital to cellular biochemistry and the maintenance of bioenergetic homeostasis, but to our knowledge, they have never been identified in any phosphatase. Here, we describe an iron-sulfur cluster in Asp1, a dual-function kinase/phosphatase that regulates cell morphogenesis in Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Full-length Asp1, and its phosphatase domain (Asp1(371-920)), were each heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli. The phosphatase activity is exquisitely specific: it hydrolyzes the 1-diphosphate from just two members of the inositol pyrophosphate (PP-InsP) signaling family, namely, 1-InsP7 and 1,5-InsP8. We demonstrate that Asp1 does not hydrolyze either InsP6, 2-InsP7, 3-InsP7, 4-InsP7, 5-InsP7, 6-InsP7, or 3,5-InsP8. We also recorded 1-phosphatase activity in a human homologue of Asp1, hPPIP5K1, which was heterologously expressed in Drosophila S3 cells with a biotinylated N-terminal tag, and then isolated from cell lysates with avidin beads. Purified, recombinant Asp1(371-920) contained iron and acid-labile sulfide, but the stoichiometry (0.8 atoms of each per protein molecule) indicates incomplete iron-sulfur cluster assembly. We reconstituted the Fe-S cluster in vitro under anaerobic conditions, which increased the stoichiometry to approximately 2 atoms of iron and acid-labile sulfide per Asp1 molecule. The presence of a [2Fe-2S](2+) cluster in Asp1(371-920) was demonstrated by UV-visible absorption, resonance Raman spectroscopy, and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. We determined that this [2Fe-2S](2+) cluster is unlikely to participate in redox chemistry, since it rapidly degraded upon reduction by dithionite. Biochemical and mutagenic studies demonstrated that the [2Fe-2S](2+) cluster substantially inhibits the phosphatase activity of Asp1, thereby increasing its net kinase activity.

  8. Highly Active Gold(I)-Silver(I) Oxo Cluster Activating sp³ C-H Bonds of Methyl Ketones under Mild Conditions.

    PubMed

    Pei, Xiao-Li; Yang, Yang; Lei, Zhen; Chang, Shan-Shan; Guan, Zong-Jie; Wan, Xian-Kai; Wen, Ting-Bin; Wang, Quan-Ming

    2015-04-29

    The activation of C(sp(3))-H bonds is challenging, due to their high bond dissociation energy, low proton acidity, and highly nonpolar character. Herein we report a unique gold(I)-silver(I) oxo cluster protected by hemilabile phosphine ligands [OAu3Ag3(PPhpy2)3](BF4)4 (1), which can activate C(sp(3))-H bonds under mild conditions for a broad scope of methyl ketones (RCOCH3, R = methyl, phenyl, 2-methylphenyl, 2-aminophenyl, 2-hydroxylphenyl, 2-pyridyl, 2-thiazolyl, tert-butyl, ethyl, isopropyl). Activation happens via triple deprotonation of the methyl group, leading to formation of heterometallic Au(I)-Ag(I) clusters with formula RCOCAu4Ag4(PPhpy2)4(BF4)5 (PPhpy2 = bis(2-pyridyl)phenylphosphine). Cluster 1 can be generated in situ via the reaction of [OAu3Ag(PPhpy2)3](BF4)2 with 2 equiv of AgBF4. The oxo ion and the metal centers are found to be essential in the cleavage of sp(3) C-H bonds of methyl ketones. Interestingly, cluster 1 selectively activates the C-H bonds in -CH3 rather than the N-H bonds in -NH2 or the O-H bond in -OH which is traditionally thought to be more reactive than C-H bonds. Control experiments with butanone, 3-methylbutanone, and cyclopentanone as substrates show that the auration of the C-H bond of the terminal methyl group is preferred over secondary or tertiary sp(3) C-H bonds; in other words, the C-H bond activation is influenced by steric effect. This work highlights the powerful reactivity of metal clusters toward C-H activation and sheds new light on gold(I)-mediated catalysis.

  9. Solvent-Induced Reductive Activation in Gas Phase [Bi(CO2)n]- Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Michael C.; Ramsay, Jacob Sondergaard; Weber, J. Mathias

    2016-06-01

    We report infrared photodissociation spectra of [Bi(CO2)n]- (n=2-9) cluster anions. We determine the charge carrier geometry by comparing calculated vibrational frequencies based on density functional theory to the experimental spectra. The vibrational frequencies and the charge carrier geometry depend strongly on the solvation environment present in the cluster. We discuss the interaction of bismuth and CO_2 in the presence of an excess electron in the context of heterogeneous catalytic reduction of CO_2.

  10. High reactivity of nanosized niobium oxide cluster cations in methane activation: A comparison with vanadium oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Xun-Lei E-mail: chemzyx@iccas.ac.cn; Wang, Dan; Wu, Xiao-Nan; Li, Zi-Yu; Zhao, Yan-Xia E-mail: chemzyx@iccas.ac.cn; He, Sheng-Gui

    2015-09-28

    The reactions between methane and niobium oxide cluster cations were studied and compared to those employing vanadium oxides. Hydrogen atom abstraction (HAA) reactions were identified over stoichiometric (Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}){sub N}{sup +} clusters for N as large as 14 with a time-of-flight mass spectrometer. The reactivity of (Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}){sub N}{sup +} clusters decreases as the N increases, and it is higher than that of (V {sub 2}O{sub 5}){sub N}{sup +} for N ≥ 4. Theoretical studies were conducted on (Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}){sub N}{sup +} (N = 2–6) by density functional calculations. HAA reactions on these clusters are all favorable thermodynamically and kinetically. The difference of the reactivity with respect to the cluster size and metal type (Nb vs V) was attributed to thermodynamics, kinetics, the electron capture ability, and the distribution of the unpaired spin density. Nanosized Nb oxide clusters show higher HAA reactivity than V oxides, indicating that niobia may serve as promising catalysts for practical methane conversion.

  11. LoCuSS: A DYNAMICAL ANALYSIS OF X-RAY ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI IN LOCAL CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Haines, C. P.; Pereira, M. J.; Egami, E.; Sanderson, A. J. R.; Smith, G. P.; Babul, A.; Edge, A. C.; Finoguenov, A.; Moran, S. M.; Okabe, N.

    2012-08-01

    We present a study of the distribution of X-ray active galactic nuclei (AGNs) in a representative sample of 26 massive clusters at 0.15 < z < 0.30, combining Chandra observations sensitive to X-ray point sources of luminosity L{sub X} {approx} 10{sup 42} erg s{sup -1} at the cluster redshift with extensive and highly complete spectroscopy of cluster members down to {approx}M*{sub K} + 2. In total we identify 48 X-ray AGNs among the cluster members, with luminosities 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 41}-1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 44} erg s{sup -1}. Based on these identifications, we estimate that 0.73% {+-} 0.14% of cluster galaxies brighter than M{sub K} = -23.1 (M*{sub K} + 1.5) host an X-ray AGN with L{sub X} > 10{sup 42} erg s{sup -1}. In the stacked caustic diagram that shows (v{sub los} - (v))/{sigma}{sub v} versus r{sub proj}/r{sub 500}, the X-ray AGN appear to preferentially lie along the caustics, suggestive of an infalling population. They also appear to avoid the region with lowest cluster-centric radii and relative velocities (r{sub proj} < 0.4r{sub 500}; |v - (v)|/{sigma}{sub v} < 0.8), which is dominated by the virialized population of galaxies accreted earliest into the clusters. The line-of-sight velocity histogram of the X-ray AGN shows a relatively flat distribution, and is inconsistent with the Gaussian distribution expected for a virialized population at 98.9% confidence. Moreover, the velocity dispersion of the 48 X-ray AGNs is 1.51 times that of the overall cluster population, which is consistent with the {radical}2 ratio expected by simple energetic arguments when comparing infalling versus virialized populations. This kinematic segregation is significant at the 4.66{sigma} level. When splitting the X-ray AGN sample into two according to X-ray or infrared (IR) luminosity, both X-ray bright (L{sub X} > 10{sup 42}) and IR-bright (L{sub TIR} > 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10} L{sub Sun }) subsamples show higher velocity dispersions than their X

  12. MC2: boosted AGN and star formation activity in CIZA J2242.8+5301, a massive post-merger cluster at z = 0.19

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobral, David; Stroe, Andra; Dawson, William A.; Wittman, David; Jee, M. James; Röttgering, Huub; van Weeren, Reinout J.; Brüggen, Marcus

    2015-06-01

    Cluster mergers may play a fundamental role in the formation and evolution of cluster galaxies. Stroe et al. revealed unexpected overdensities of candidate Hα emitters near the ˜1-Mpc-wide shock fronts of the massive (˜2 × 1015 M⊙) `Sausage' merging cluster, CIZA J2242.8+5301. We used the Keck/Deep Imaging Multi-Object Spectrograph and the William Herschel Telescope/AutoFib2+WYFFOS to confirm 83 Hα emitters in and around the merging cluster. We find that cluster star-forming galaxies in the hottest X-ray gas and/or in the cluster subcores (away from the shock fronts) show high [S II]6716/[S II]6761 and high [S II] 6716/Hα, implying very low electron densities (<30 × lower than all other star-forming galaxies outside the cluster) and/or significant contribution from supernovae, respectively. All cluster star-forming galaxies near the cluster centre show evidence of significant outflows (blueshifted Na D ˜200-300 km s-1), likely driven by supernovae. Strong outflows are also found for the clusteractive galactic nucleus (AGN). Hα star-forming galaxies in the merging cluster follow the z ˜ 0 mass-metallicity relation, showing systematically higher metallicity (˜0.15-0.2 dex) than Hα emitters outside the cluster (projected R > 2.5 Mpc). This suggests that the shock front may have triggered remaining metal-rich gas which galaxies were able to retain into forming stars. Our observations show that the merger of impressively massive (˜1015 M⊙) clusters can provide the conditions for significant star formation and AGN activity, but, as we witness strong feedback by star-forming galaxies and AGN (and given how massive the merging cluster is), such sources will likely quench in a few 100 Myr.

  13. A cluster analysis of neuronal activity in the dorsal premotor cortical area for neuroprosthetic control.

    PubMed

    Ye, N; Roontiva, A; He, J

    2008-01-01

    With the use of the neuronal data acquisition technology, millisecond-level multi-electrode data from several regions of the premotor area were obtained from two rhesus monkeys trained to perform arm-reach tasks with visual cues in virtual reality. In each trial, animals were required to select and perform one of the four possible arm reaching movements to the target on the top-left or top-right of the virtual reality space. They were also required to decide whether they would move their arms straight to the target or curve them in order to avoid the obstacle that was presented. After the acquired neuronal signals were processed, unsupervised Hierarchical clustering and K-means clustering were performed to uncover the similarity and difference in the average firing rate of spike train data between neurons and phases for each experiment condition. The clustering results indicate the similarity of neuronal data in the movement planning and actual movement phases, and the difference of such data from the data in information processing phases. Furthermore, the clustering results show that when the target location is on the right, the move planning started earlier. The analysis of variance (ANOVA) on the neuronal data confirms the results from the hierarchical clustering.

  14. Copper speciation in sulfidic solutions at low sulfur activity: Further evidence for cluster complexes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Richard A.; Helz, George R.

    1994-07-01

    The solubility of two as0-buffering assemblages in the Cu-S system have been studied: chalcocite-djurleite (Cc-Dj) and anilite-covellite (An-Cv). Ion activity products, [Cu +]HS -] 1/2[H +] - 1/2 (25°C, I = 0) at equilibrium, derived from solubility measurements in penicillamine solutions, are 10 -17.01 ± 0.05 (Cc-Dj) and 10 -17.14 ± 0.10 (An-Cv), from which ΔG° f = -82.11 kJ/mol for Cc and -74.77 kJ/mol for An. In the An-Cv assemblage, aCu2S = 0.55 (2 σ = 0.2) vs. 1.00 in the Cc-containing assemblage. The difference in aCu2S between the two assemblages is used in a novel way to estimate stoichiometry of Cu-HS complexes. The solubility of both assemblages (0.7-0.01 M NaHS, pH 7-12.5, 25°C) can be fit with a model incorporating the same two chemical species, one containing an odd number of Cu atoms (Cu(HS) 2-3, CU 3S 4H 2-3, or a higher multimer) and the other containing an even number of Cu atoms (Cu 2S(HS) 22-, Cu 4S 4H 22-, etc.). The trimer-tetramer model fits the combined data for the two assemblages distinctly better than the monomer-dimer model, but this result is very sensitive to uncertainty in aCu2S. Along with EXAFS results, the weight of the evidence favors small cluster complexes (2-5 Cu atoms), but is inconclusive at the present level of resolution. Multimers can be rationalized because condensation of metal-centered monomers to clusters provides a means for soft acid/base elements to maintain favored coordination geometries at low ligand to metal ratios. Based on the fitting methods developed here, previous covellite solubility data from this laboratory are reinterpreted in terms of Cu 2S 2(HS) 33-, Cu 2S 3)(S 4) 2-, and Cu(S 9)S 10) 3-; the last of these could also be represented by the trimer, Cu 3(S 7) 33-, which is homologous with a known complex. With the measured equilibrium constants, the speciation of Cu in the sulfidic zone of the Black Sea is calculated. Covellite is the stable Cu-S mineral, but the sulfidic water column is vastly

  15. Interaction of potassium cyanide with the [Ni-4Fe-5S] active site cluster of CO dehydrogenase from Carboxydothermus hydrogenoformans.

    PubMed

    Ha, Seung-Wook; Korbas, Malgorzata; Klepsch, Mirjam; Meyer-Klaucke, Wolfram; Meyer, Ortwin; Svetlitchnyi, Vitali

    2007-04-06

    The Ni-Fe carbon monoxide (CO) dehydrogenase II (CODHII(Ch)) from the anaerobic CO-utilizing hydrogenogenic bacterium Carboxydothermus hydrogenoformans catalyzes the oxidation of CO, presumably at the Ni-(micro(2)S)-Fe1 subsite of the [Ni-4S-5S] cluster in the active site. The CO oxidation mechanism proposed on the basis of several CODHII(Ch) crystal structures involved the apical binding of CO at the nickel ion and the activation of water at the Fe1 ion of the cluster. To understand how CO interacts with the active site, we have studied the reactivity of the cluster with potassium cyanide and analyzed the resulting type of nickel coordination by x-ray absorption spectroscopy. Cyanide acts as a competitive inhibitor of reduced CODHII(Ch) with respect to the substrate CO and is therefore expected to mimic the substrate. It inhibits the enzyme reversibly, forming a nickel cyanide. In this reaction, one of the four square-planar sulfur ligands of nickel is replaced by the carbon atom of cyanide, suggesting removal of the micro(2)S from the Ni-(micro(2)S)-Fe1 subsite. Upon reactivation of the inhibited enzyme, cyanide is released, and the square-planar coordination of nickel by 4S ligands is recovered, which includes the reformation of the Ni-(micro(2)S)-Fe1 bridge. The results are summarized in a model of the CO oxidation mechanism at the [Ni-4Fe-5S] active site cluster of CODHII(Ch) from C. hydrogenoformans.

  16. Spitzer Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krick, Kessica

    This proposal is a specific response to the strategic goal of NASA's research program to "discover how the universe works and explore how the universe evolved into its present form." Towards this goal, we propose to mine the Spitzer archive for all observations of galaxy groups and clusters for the purpose of studying galaxy evolution in clusters, contamination rates for Sunyaev Zeldovich cluster surveys, and to provide a database of Spitzer observed clusters to the broader community. Funding from this proposal will go towards two years of support for a Postdoc to do this work. After searching the Spitzer Heritage Archive, we have found 194 unique galaxy groups and clusters that have data from both the Infrared array camera (IRAC; Fazio et al. 2004) at 3.6 - 8 microns and the multiband imaging photometer for Spitzer (MIPS; Rieke et al. 2004) at 24microns. This large sample will add value beyond the individual datasets because it will be a larger sample of IR clusters than ever before and will have sufficient diversity in mass, redshift, and dynamical state to allow us to differentiate amongst the effects of these cluster properties. An infrared sample is important because it is unaffected by dust extinction while at the same time is an excellent measure of both stellar mass (IRAC wavelengths) and star formation rate (MIPS wavelengths). Additionally, IRAC can be used to differentiate star forming galaxies (SFG) from active galactic nuclei (AGN), due to their different spectral shapes in this wavelength regime. Specifically, we intend to identify SFG and AGN in galaxy groups and clusters. Groups and clusters differ from the field because the galaxy densities are higher, there is a large potential well due mainly to the mass of the dark matter, and there is hot X-ray gas (the intracluster medium; ICM). We will examine the impact of these differences in environment on galaxy formation by comparing cluster properties of AGN and SFG to those in the field. Also, we will

  17. Communication activity in a social network: relation between long-term correlations and inter-event clustering.

    PubMed

    Rybski, Diego; Buldyrev, Sergey V; Havlin, Shlomo; Liljeros, Fredrik; Makse, Hernán A

    2012-01-01

    Human communication in social networks is dominated by emergent statistical laws such as non-trivial correlations and temporal clustering. Recently, we found long-term correlations in the user's activity in social communities. Here, we extend this work to study the collective behavior of the whole community with the goal of understanding the origin of clustering and long-term persistence. At the individual level, we find that the correlations in activity are a byproduct of the clustering expressed in the power-law distribution of inter-event times of single users, i.e. short periods of many events are separated by long periods of no events. On the contrary, the activity of the whole community presents long-term correlations that are a true emergent property of the system, i.e. they are not related to the distribution of inter-event times. This result suggests the existence of collective behavior, possibly arising from nontrivial communication patterns through the embedding social network.

  18. Activation and Transformation of Ethane by Au2 VO3(+) Clusters with Closed-Shell Electronic Structures.

    PubMed

    Li, Ya-Ke; Li, Zi-Yu; Zhao, Yan-Xia; Liu, Qing-Yu; Meng, Jing-Heng; He, Sheng-Gui

    2016-01-26

    The study of chemical reactions between gold-containing heteronuclear oxide clusters and small molecules can provide molecular level mechanisms to understand the excellent activity of gold supported by metal oxides. While the promotion role of gold in alkane transformation was identified in the clusters with atomic oxygen radicals (O(-.)), the role of gold in the systems without O(-.) is not clear. By employing mass spectrometry and quantum chemistry calculations, the reactivity of Au2 VO3(+) clusters with closed-shell electronic structures toward ethane was explored. Both the dehydrogenation and ethene elimination channels were identified. It is gold rather than oxygen species initiating the C-H activation. The Au-Au dimer formed during the reactions plays important roles in ethane transformation. The reactivity comparison between Au2 VO3(+) and bare Au2(+) demonstrates that Au2 VO3(+) not only retains the property of bare Au2(+) that transforming ethane to dihydrogen, but also exhibits new functions in converting ethane to ethene, which reveals the importance of the composite system. This study provides a further understanding of the reactivity of metal oxide supported gold in alkane activation and transformation.

  19. Identification of a Cellobiose Utilization Gene Cluster with Cryptic β-Galactosidase Activity in Vibrio fischeri▿

    PubMed Central

    Adin, Dawn M.; Visick, Karen L.; Stabb, Eric V.

    2008-01-01

    Cellobiose utilization is a variable trait that is often used to differentiate members of the family Vibrionaceae. We investigated how Vibrio fischeri ES114 utilizes cellobiose and found a cluster of genes required for growth on this β-1,4-linked glucose disaccharide. This cluster includes genes annotated as a phosphotransferase system II (celA, celB, and celC), a glucokinase (celK), and a glucosidase (celG). Directly downstream of celCBGKA is celI, which encodes a LacI family regulator that represses cel transcription in the absence of cellobiose. When the celCBGKAI gene cluster was transferred to cellobiose-negative strains of Vibrio and Photobacterium, the cluster conferred the ability to utilize cellobiose. Genomic analyses of naturally cellobiose-positive Vibrio species revealed that V. salmonicida has a homolog of the celCBGKAI cluster, but V. vulnificus does not. Moreover, bioinformatic analyses revealed that CelG and CelK share the greatest homology with glucosidases and glucokinases in the phylum Firmicutes. These observations suggest that distinct genes for cellobiose utilization have been acquired by different lineages within the family Vibrionaceae. In addition, the loss of the celI regulator, but not the structural genes, attenuated the ability of V. fischeri to compete for colonization of its natural host, Euprymna scolopes, suggesting that repression of the cel gene cluster is important in this symbiosis. Finally, we show that the V. fischeri cellobioase (CelG) preferentially cleaves β-d-glucose linkages but also cleaves β-d-galactose-linked substrates such as 5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl-β-d-galactoside (X-gal), a finding that has important implications for the use of lacZ as a marker or reporter gene in V. fischeri. PMID:18487409

  20. eNOS S-nitrosylates β-actin on Cys374 and regulates PKC-θ at the immune synapse by impairing actin binding to profilin-1.

    PubMed

    García-Ortiz, Almudena; Martín-Cofreces, Noa B; Ibiza, Sales; Ortega, Ángel; Izquierdo-Álvarez, Alicia; Trullo, Antonio; Victor, Víctor M; Calvo, Enrique; Sot, Begoña; Martínez-Ruiz, Antonio; Vázquez, Jesús; Sánchez-Madrid, Francisco; Serrador, Juan M

    2017-04-01

    The actin cytoskeleton coordinates the organization of signaling microclusters at the immune synapse (IS); however, the mechanisms involved remain poorly understood. We show here that nitric oxide (NO) generated by endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) controls the coalescence of protein kinase C-θ (PKC-θ) at the central supramolecular activation cluster (c-SMAC) of the IS. eNOS translocated with the Golgi to the IS and partially colocalized with F-actin around the c-SMAC. This resulted in reduced actin polymerization and centripetal retrograde flow of β-actin and PKC-θ from the lamellipodium-like distal (d)-SMAC, promoting PKC-θ activation. Furthermore, eNOS-derived NO S-nitrosylated β-actin on Cys374 and impaired actin binding to profilin-1 (PFN1), as confirmed with the transnitrosylating agent S-nitroso-L-cysteine (Cys-NO). The importance of NO and the formation of PFN1-actin complexes on the regulation of PKC-θ was corroborated by overexpression of PFN1- and actin-binding defective mutants of β-actin (C374S) and PFN1 (H119E), respectively, which reduced the coalescence of PKC-θ at the c-SMAC. These findings unveil a novel NO-dependent mechanism by which the actin cytoskeleton controls the organization and activation of signaling microclusters at the IS.

  1. The evolution of dust-obscured star formation activity in galaxy clusters relative to the field over the last 9 billion years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alberts, Stacey; Pope, Alexandra; Brodwin, Mark; Atlee, David W.; Lin, Yen-Ting; Dey, Arjun; Eisenhardt, Peter R. M.; Gettings, Daniel P.; Gonzalez, Anthony H.; Jannuzi, Buell T.; Mancone, Conor L.; Moustakas, John; Snyder, Gregory F.; Stanford, S. Adam; Stern, Daniel; Weiner, Benjamin J.; Zeimann, Gregory R.

    2014-01-01

    We compare the star formation (SF) activity in cluster galaxies to the field from z = 0.3 to 1.5 using Herschel Spectral and Photometric Imaging REceiver 250 μm imaging and utilizing 274 clusters from the IRAC Shallow Cluster Survey (ISCS). These clusters were selected as rest-frame near-infrared overdensities over the 9 square degree Boötes field. This sample allows us to quantify the evolution of SF in clusters over a long redshift baseline without bias against active cluster systems. Using a stacking analysis, we determine the average star formation rates (SFRs) and specific SFRs (SSFR = SFR/M⋆) of stellar mass-limited (M ≥ 1.3 × 1010 M⊙), statistical samples of cluster and field galaxies, probing both the star-forming and quiescent populations. We find a clear indication that the average SF in cluster galaxies is evolving more rapidly than in the field, with field SF levels at z ≳ 1.2 in the cluster cores (r < 0.5 Mpc), in good agreement with previous ISCS studies. By quantifying the SF in cluster and field galaxies as an exponential function of cosmic time, we determine that cluster galaxies are evolving approximately two times faster than the field. Additionally, we see enhanced SF above the field level at z ˜ 1.4 in the cluster outskirts (r > 0.5 Mpc). These general trends in the cluster cores and outskirts are driven by the lower mass galaxies in our sample. Blue cluster galaxies have systematically lower SSFRs than blue field galaxies, but otherwise show no strong differential evolution with respect to the field over our redshift range. This suggests that the cluster environment is both suppressing the SF in blue galaxies on long time-scales and rapidly transitioning some fraction of blue galaxies to the quiescent galaxy population on short time-scales. We argue that our results are consistent with both strangulation and ram pressure stripping acting in these clusters, with merger activity occurring in the cluster outskirts.

  2. Nuclear respiratory factors 1 and 2 utilize similar glutamine-containing clusters of hydrophobic residues to activate transcription.

    PubMed Central

    Gugneja, S; Virbasius, C M; Scarpulla, R C

    1996-01-01

    Nuclear respiratory factors 1 and 2 (NRF-1 and NRF-2) are ubiquitous transcription factors that have been implicated in the control of nuclear genes required for respiration, heme biosynthesis, and mitochondrial DNA transcription and replication. Recently, both factors have been found to be major transcriptional determinants for a subset of these genes that define a class of simple promoters involved in respiratory chain expression. Here, functional domains required for transactivation by NRF-1 have been defined. An atypical nuclear localization signal resides in a conserved amino-terminal region adjacent to the DNA binding domain and consists of functionally redundant clusters of basic residues. A second domain in the carboxy-terminal half of the molecule is necessary for transcriptional activation. The activation domains of both NRF-1 and NRF-2 were extensively characterized by both deletion and alanine substitution mutagenesis. The results show that these domains do not fall into known classes defined by a preponderance of amino acid residues, including glutamines, prolines, or isoleucines, as found in other eukaryotic activators. Rather, in both factors, a series of tandemly arranged clusters of hydrophobic amino acids were required for activation. Although all of the functional clusters contain glutamines, the glutamines differ from the hydrophobic residues in that they are inconsequential for activation. Unlike the NRF-2 domain, which contains its essential hydrophobic motifs within 40 residues, the NRF-1 domain spans about 40% of the molecule and appears to have a bipartite structure. The findings indicate that NRF-1 and NRF-2 utilize similar hydrophobic structural motifs for activating transcription. PMID:8816484

  3. Cavitation bubble cluster activity in the breakage of stones by shock wave lithotripsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pishchalnikov, Yuriy A.; Sapozhnikov, Oleg A.; Williams, James C.; Evan, Andrew P.; McAteer, James A.; Cleveland, Robin O.; Colonius, Tim; Bailey, Michael R.; Crum, Lawrence A.

    2002-05-01

    High-speed photography was used to investigate cavitation at the surface of artificial and natural kidney stones during exposure to lithotripter shock pulses in vitro. It was observed that numerous individual bubbles formed over virtually the entire surface of the stone, but these bubbles did not remain independent and combined with one another to form larger bubbles and bubble clusters. The movement of bubble boundaries across the surface left portions of the stone bubble free. The biggest cluster grew to envelop the proximal end of the stone (6.5 mm diameter artificial stone) then collapsed to a small spot that over multiple shots formed a crater in that face of the stone. The bubble clusters that developed at the sides of stones tended to align along fractures and to collapse into these cracks. High-speed camera images demonstrated that cavitation-mediated damage to stones was due not to the action of solitary, individual bubbles, but to the forceful collapse of dynamic clusters of bubbles. [Work supported by NIH DK43881.

  4. Near infrared emission from molecule-like silver clusters confined in zeolite A assisted by thermal activation

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Hui Imakita, Kenji; Rong Gui, Sa Chu; Fujii, Minoru

    2014-07-07

    Strong and broad near infrared (NIR) emission peaked at ~855 nm upon optimal excitation at 342 nm has been observed from molecule-like silver clusters (MLSCs) confined in zeolite A assisted by thermal activation. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first observation of NIR emission peaked at longer than 800 nm from MLSCs confined in solid matrices. The decay time of the NIR emission is over 10 μs, which indicates that it is a spin-forbidden transition. The ~855 nm NIR emission shows strong dependence on the silver loading concentration and the thermal activation temperature.

  5. Advancing Water and Water-Energy-Food Cluster Activities within Future Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawford, R. G.; Bhaduri, A.; Pahl-Wostl, C.

    2014-12-01

    In building its emerging program, Future Earth has encouraged former Earth System Science Partnership (ESSP) projects to redefine their objectives, priorities and problem approaches so they are aligned with those of Future Earth. These new projects will be characterized by more integrated applications of natural and social sciences as well as dialogue and science integrated across disciplinary boundaries to address a wide range of environmental and social issues. The Global Water System Project (GWSP) has had a heritage of integrating natural and social sciences, and recently started to also look at issues within the Water-Energy-Food (WEF) cluster using similar integrated approaches. As part of the growth of the scientific elements of this cluster, GWSP has approached Future Earth opportunities by addressing the sustainability for Water, Energy, and Food through integrated water information and improved governance.In this presentation the approaches being considered for promoting integration in both water and the WEF cluster will be discussed. In particular, potential contributions of Future Earth to research related to the use and management of water and to issues and science underpinning the W-E-F nexus deliberations will be identified. In both cases the increasing ability to utilize Earth observations and big data will advance this research agenda. In addition, the better understanding of the implications of governance structures in addressing these issues and the options for harmonizing the use of scientific knowledge and technological advances will be explored. For example, insights gained from water management studies undertaken within the GWSP are helping to focus plans for a "sustainable water futures" project and a WEF cluster within Future Earth. The potential role of the Sustainable Development Goals in bringing together the monitoring and science capabilities, and understanding of governance approaches, will be discussed as a framework for facilitating

  6. GRB2 Nucleates T Cell Receptor-Mediated LAT Clusters That Control PLC-γ1 Activation and Cytokine Production

    PubMed Central

    Bilal, Mahmood Yousif; Houtman, Jon C. D.

    2015-01-01

    GRB2 is a ubiquitously expressed adaptor protein required for signaling downstream of multiple receptors. To address the role of GRB2 in receptor-mediated signaling, the expression of GRB2 was suppressed in human CD4+ T cells and its role downstream of the T cell receptor (TCR) was examined. Interestingly, GRB2 deficient T cells had enhanced signaling from complexes containing the TCR. However, GRB2 deficient T cells had substantially reduced production of IL-2 and IFN-γ. This defect was attributed to diminished formation of linker for activation of T cells (LAT) signaling clusters, which resulted in reduced MAP kinase activation, calcium flux, and PLC-γ1 recruitment to LAT signaling clusters. Add back of wild-type GRB2, but not a novel N-terminal SH3 domain mutant, rescued LAT microcluster formation, calcium mobilization, and cytokine release, providing the first direct evidence that GRB2, and its ability to bind to SH3 domain ligands, is required for establishing LAT microclusters. Our data demonstrate that the ability of GRB2 to facilitate protein clusters is equally important in regulating TCR-mediated functions as its capacity to recruit effector proteins. This highlights that GRB2 regulates signaling downstream of adaptors and receptors by both recruiting effector proteins and regulating the formation of signaling complexes. PMID:25870599

  7. GRB2 Nucleates T Cell Receptor-Mediated LAT Clusters That Control PLC-γ1 Activation and Cytokine Production.

    PubMed

    Bilal, Mahmood Yousif; Houtman, Jon C D

    2015-01-01

    GRB2 is a ubiquitously expressed adaptor protein required for signaling downstream of multiple receptors. To address the role of GRB2 in receptor-mediated signaling, the expression of GRB2 was suppressed in human CD4+ T cells and its role downstream of the T cell receptor (TCR) was examined. Interestingly, GRB2 deficient T cells had enhanced signaling from complexes containing the TCR. However, GRB2 deficient T cells had substantially reduced production of IL-2 and IFN-γ. This defect was attributed to diminished formation of linker for activation of T cells (LAT) signaling clusters, which resulted in reduced MAP kinase activation, calcium flux, and PLC-γ1 recruitment to LAT signaling clusters. Add back of wild-type GRB2, but not a novel N-terminal SH3 domain mutant, rescued LAT microcluster formation, calcium mobilization, and cytokine release, providing the first direct evidence that GRB2, and its ability to bind to SH3 domain ligands, is required for establishing LAT microclusters. Our data demonstrate that the ability of GRB2 to facilitate protein clusters is equally important in regulating TCR-mediated functions as its capacity to recruit effector proteins. This highlights that GRB2 regulates signaling downstream of adaptors and receptors by both recruiting effector proteins and regulating the formation of signaling complexes.

  8. High-resolution imaging of the immunological synapse and T-cell receptor microclustering through microfabricated substrates

    PubMed Central

    Biggs, M. J. P.; Milone, M. C.; Santos, L. C.; Gondarenko, A.; Wind, S. J.

    2011-01-01

    T-cell activation via antigen presentation is associated with the formation of a macromolecular membrane assembly termed the immunological synapse (IS). The genesis of the IS and the onset of juxtacrine signalling is characterized by the formation of cell membrane microclusters and the organization of such into segregated microdomains. A central zone rich in T-cell receptor (TCR)–major histocompatibility complex microclusters termed the central supramolecular activation cluster (cSMAC) forms the bullseye of this structure, while the cellular interface surrounding the cSMAC is characterized by regions enriched in adhesion and co-stimulatory molecules. In vitro, the study of dynamic TCR microcluster coalescence and IS genesis in T-cell populations is hampered by cell migration within the culture system and resolution constraints resulting from lateral cell–cell contact. Here, we detail a novel system describing the fabrication of micropit arrays designed to sequester single T-cell–antigen presenting cell (APC) conjugates and promote IS formation in the horizontal imaging plane for high-resolution studies of microcluster dynamics. We subsequently use this system to describe the formation of the cSMAC in T-cell populations and to investigate the morphology of the interfacial APC membrane. PMID:21490003

  9. A new L5 brown dwarf member of the Hyades cluster with chromospheric activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Garrido, A.; Lodieu, N.; Rebolo, R.

    2017-03-01

    Aims: Our aim is to identify brown dwarf members of the nearby Hyades open star cluster to determine the photometric and spectroscopic properties of brown dwarfs at moderately old ages and extend the knowledge of the substellar mass function of the cluster. Methods: We cross-matched the 2MASS and AllWISE public catalogues and measured proper motions to identify low-mass stars and brown dwarf candidates in an area of radius eight degrees around the central region of the Hyades cluster. We identified objects with photometry and proper motions consistent with cluster membership. For the faintest (J = 17.2 mag) most promising astrometric and photometric low-mass candidate 2MASS J04183483+2131275, with a membership probability of 94.5%, we obtained low-resolution (R = 300-1000) and intermediate-resolution (R = 2500) spectroscopy with the 10.4m Gran Telescopio Canarias. Results: From the low-resolution spectra we determined a L5.0 ± 0.5 spectral type, consistent with the available photometry. In the intermediate dispersion spectrum we detected Hα in emission (marginally resolved with a full width half maximum of 2.8 Å) and determined a log (LHα/Lbol) = -6.0 dex. From Hα we obtained a radial velocity of 38.0 ± 2.9 km s-1, which combined with the proper motion leads to space velocities which are fully consistent with membership in the Hyades cluster. We also report a detection in the H2 band by the UKIDSS Galactic Plane Survey. Using evolutionary models we determine from the available photometry of the object a mass in the range 0.039-0.055 M⊙. Brown dwarfs with masses below 0.055 M⊙ should fully preserve its initial lithium content, and indeed the spectrum at 6708 Å may show a feature consistent with lithium preservation; however, a higher S/N is needed to confirm this point. Conclusions: We have identified a new high-probability L5 brown dwarf member of the Hyades cluster. This is the first relatively old L5 brown dwarf with a well-determined age (500-700 Myr

  10. Evidence that Plasmodium falciparum chromosome end clusters are cross-linked by protein and are the sites of both virulence gene silencing and activation.

    PubMed

    Marty, Allison J; Thompson, Jennifer K; Duffy, Michael F; Voss, Till S; Cowman, Alan F; Crabb, Brendan S

    2006-10-01

    The malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum undergoes antigenic variation through allelic exclusion and variant expression of surface proteins encoded by the var gene family. Regulation of var genes is under epigenetic control and involves reversible silencing and activation that requires the physical repositioning of a var locus into a transcriptionally permissive zone of the nuclear periphery. P. falciparum chromosome ends appear to aggregate into large perinuclear clusters which house both subtelomeric and chromosome central var genes. In this study we further define the composition of telomeric clusters using fluorescent in situ hybridization, and provide evidence that chromosome end clusters are formed by cross-linking protein. In addition, we demonstrate that a subtelomeric reporter gene and a var gene remain within clusters regardless of their transcriptional status. Our findings support a model whereby a highly localized structure dedicated to the activation of a single var gene can be housed within a gene dense chromosome end cluster that is otherwise transcriptionally silent.

  11. Clustering Analysis of OFFICER'S Behaviours in London Police Foot Patrol Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, J.; Cheng, T.

    2015-07-01

    In this small paper we aim at presenting a framework of conceptual representation and clustering analysis of police officers' patrol pattern obtained from mining their raw movement trajectory data. This have been achieved by a model developed to accounts for the spatio-temporal dynamics human movements by incorporating both the behaviour features of the travellers and the semantic meaning of the environment they are moving in. Hence, the similarity metric of traveller behaviours is jointly defined according to the stay time allocation in each Spatio-temporal region of interests (ST-ROI) to support clustering analysis of patrol behaviours. The proposed framework enables the analysis of behaviour and preferences on higher level based on raw moment trajectories. The model is firstly applied to police patrol data provided by the Metropolitan Police and will be tested by other type of dataset afterwards.

  12. Inhibition of retinoic acid-induced activation of 3' human HOXB genes by antisense oligonucleotides affects sequential activation of genes located upstream in the four HOX clusters.

    PubMed Central

    Faiella, A; Zappavigna, V; Mavilio, F; Boncinelli, E

    1994-01-01

    Most homeobox genes belonging to the Hox family are sequentially activated in embryonal carcinoma cells upon treatment with retinoic acid. Genes located at the 3' end of each one of the four Hox clusters are activated first, whereas upstream Hox genes are activated progressively later. This activation has been extensively studied for human HOX genes in the NT2/D1 cell line and shown to take place at the transcriptional level. To understand the molecular mechanisms of sequential HOX gene activation in these cells, we tried to modulate the expression of 3' HOX genes through the use of antisense oligonucleotides added to the culture medium. We chose the HOXB locus. A 5- to 15-fold reduction of the expression of HOXB1 and HOXB3 was sufficient to produce a significant inhibition of the activation of the upstream HOXB genes, as well as of their paralogs in the HOXA, HOXC, and HOXD clusters. Conversely, no effect was detectable on downstream HOX genes. The extent of this inhibition increased for progressively more-5' genes. The stability of the corresponding mRNAs appeared to be unaffected, supporting the idea that the observed effect might be mediated at the transcriptional level. These data suggest a cascade model of progressive activation of Hox genes, with a 3'-to-5' polarity. Images PMID:7911240

  13. Let's Not Waste Time: Using Temporal Information in Clustered Activity Estimation with Spatial Adjacency Restrictions (CAESAR) for Parcellating FMRI Data.

    PubMed

    Janssen, Ronald J; Jylänki, Pasi; van Gerven, Marcel A J

    2016-01-01

    We have proposed a Bayesian approach for functional parcellation of whole-brain FMRI measurements which we call Clustered Activity Estimation with Spatial Adjacency Restrictions (CAESAR). We use distance-dependent Chinese restaurant processes (dd-CRPs) to define a flexible prior which partitions the voxel measurements into clusters whose number and shapes are unknown a priori. With dd-CRPs we can conveniently implement spatial constraints to ensure that our parcellations remain spatially contiguous and thereby physiologically meaningful. In the present work, we extend CAESAR by using Gaussian process (GP) priors to model the temporally smooth haemodynamic signals that give rise to the measured FMRI data. A challenge for GP inference in our setting is the cubic scaling with respect to the number of time points, which can become computationally prohibitive with FMRI measurements, potentially consisting of long time series. As a solution we describe an efficient implementation that is practically as fast as the corresponding time-independent non-GP model with typically-sized FMRI data sets. We also employ a population Monte-Carlo algorithm that can significantly speed up convergence compared to traditional single-chain methods. First we illustrate the benefits of CAESAR and the GP priors with simulated experiments. Next, we demonstrate our approach by parcellating resting state FMRI data measured from twenty participants as taken from the Human Connectome Project data repository. Results show that CAESAR affords highly robust and scalable whole-brain clustering of FMRI timecourses.

  14. General Practitioners’ Barriers to Prescribe Physical Activity: The Dark Side of the Cluster Effects on the Physical Activity of Their Type 2 Diabetes Patients

    PubMed Central

    Lanhers, Charlotte; Duclos, Martine; Guttmann, Aline; Coudeyre, Emmanuel; Pereira, Bruno; Ouchchane, Lemlih

    2015-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis To describe barriers to physical activity (PA) in type 2 diabetes patients and their general practitioners (GPs), looking for practitioner’s influence on PA practice of their patients. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional study on GPs (n = 48) and their type 2 diabetes patients (n = 369) measuring respectively barriers to prescribe and practice PA using a self-assessment questionnaire: barriers to physical activity in diabetes (BAPAD). Statistical analysis was performed accounting hierarchical data structure. Similar practitioner’s patients were considered a cluster sharing common patterns. Results The higher the patient’s BAPAD score, the higher the barriers to PA, the higher the risk to declare practicing no PA (p<0.001), low frequency and low duration of PA (p<0.001). A high patient’s BAPAD score was also associated with a higher risk to have HbA1c ≥7% (53 mmol/mol) (p = 0.001). The intra-class correlation coefficient between type 2 diabetes patients and GPs was 34%, indicating a high cluster effect. A high GP’s BAPAD score, regarding the PA prescription, is predictive of a high BAPAD score with their patients, regarding their practice (p = 0.03). Conclusion/interpretation Type 2 diabetes patients with lower BAPAD score, thus lower barriers to physical activity, have a higher PA level and a better glycemic control. An important and deleterious cluster effect between GPs and their patients is demonstrated: the higher the GP’s BAPAD score, the higher the type 2 diabetes patients’ BAPAD score. This important cluster effect might designate GPs as a relevant lever for future interventions regarding patient’s education towards PA and type 2 diabetes management. PMID:26468874

  15. Activity-dependent formation and location of voltage-gated sodium channel clusters at a CNS nerve terminal during postnatal development.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jie; Berret, Emmanuelle; Kim, Jun Hee

    2017-02-01

    In auditory pathways, the precision of action potential (AP) propagation depends on axon myelination and high densities of voltage-gated Na (Nav) channels clustered at nodes of Ranvier. Changes in Nav channel expression at the heminode, the final node before the nerve terminal, can alter AP invasion into the presynaptic terminal. We studied the activity-dependent formation of Nav channel clusters before and after hearing onset at postnatal day 12 in the rat and mouse auditory brain stem. In rats, the Nav channel cluster at the heminode formed progressively during the second postnatal week, around hearing onset, whereas the Nav channel cluster at the nodes was present before hearing onset. Initiation of heminodal Nav channel clustering was correlated with the expression of scaffolding protein ankyrinG and paranodal protein Caspr. However, in whirler mice with congenital deafness, heminodal Nav channels did not form clusters and maintained broad expression, but Nav channel clustering was normal at the nodes. In addition, a clear difference in the distance from the heminodal Nav channel to the calyx across the mediolateral axis of the medial nucleus of the trapezoid body (MNTB) developed after hearing onset. In the medial MNTB, where neurons respond best to high-frequency sounds, the heminodal Nav channel cluster was located closer to the terminal than in the lateral MNTB, where neurons respond best to low-frequency sounds. Thus sound-mediated neuronal activities are potentially associated with the refinement of the heminode adjacent to the presynaptic terminal in the auditory brain stem.

  16. A minimal nitrogen fixation gene cluster from Paenibacillus sp. WLY78 enables expression of active nitrogenase in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liying; Zhang, Lihong; Liu, Zhanzhi; Liu, Zhangzhi; Zhao, Dehua; Liu, Xiaomeng; Zhang, Bo; Xie, Jianbo; Hong, Yuanyuan; Li, Pengfei; Chen, Sanfeng; Dixon, Ray; Li, Jilun

    2013-01-01

    Most biological nitrogen fixation is catalyzed by molybdenum-dependent nitrogenase, an enzyme complex comprising two component proteins that contains three different metalloclusters. Diazotrophs contain a common core of nitrogen fixation nif genes that encode the structural subunits of the enzyme and components required to synthesize the metalloclusters. However, the complement of nif genes required to enable diazotrophic growth varies significantly amongst nitrogen fixing bacteria and archaea. In this study, we identified a minimal nif gene cluster consisting of nine nif genes in the genome of Paenibacillus sp. WLY78, a gram-positive, facultative anaerobe isolated from the rhizosphere of bamboo. We demonstrate that the nif genes in this organism are organized as an operon comprising nifB, nifH, nifD, nifK, nifE, nifN, nifX, hesA and nifV and that the nif cluster is under the control of a σ(70) (σ(A))-dependent promoter located upstream of nifB. To investigate genetic requirements for diazotrophy, we transferred the Paenibacillus nif cluster to Escherichia coli. The minimal nif gene cluster enables synthesis of catalytically active nitrogenase in this host, when expressed either from the native nifB promoter or from the T7 promoter. Deletion analysis indicates that in addition to the core nif genes, hesA plays an important role in nitrogen fixation and is responsive to the availability of molybdenum. Whereas nif transcription in Paenibacillus is regulated in response to nitrogen availability and by the external oxygen concentration, transcription from the nifB promoter is constitutive in E. coli, indicating that negative regulation of nif transcription is bypassed in the heterologous host. This study demonstrates the potential for engineering nitrogen fixation in a non-nitrogen fixing organism with a minimum set of nine nif genes.

  17. Cluster Headache

    MedlinePlus

    Cluster headache Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Cluster headaches, which occur in cyclical patterns or clusters, are one of the most painful types of headache. A cluster headache commonly awakens you ...

  18. A Cluster Of Activities On Coma From The Hubble Space Telescope, StarDate, And McDonald Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemenway, Mary Kay; Jogee, S.; Fricke, K.; Preston, S.

    2011-01-01

    With a goal of providing a vast audience of students, teachers, the general public, and Spanish-speakers with activities to learn about research on the Coma cluster of galaxies based on the HST ACS Treasury survey of Coma, McDonald Observatory used a many-faceted approach. Since this research offered an unprecedented legacy dataset, part of the challenge was to convey the importance of this project to a diverse audience. The methodology was to create different products for different (overlapping) audiences. Five radio programs were produced in English and Spanish for distribution on over 500 radio stations in the US and Mexico with a listening audience of over 2 million; in addition to the radio listeners, there were over 13,000 downloads of the English scripts and almost 6000 of the Spanish. Images were prepared for use in the StarDate Online Astronomy Picture of the Week, for ViewSpace (used in museums), and for the StarDate/Universo Teacher Guide. A high-school level activity on the Coma Cluster was prepared and distributed both on-line and in an upgraded printed version of the StarDate/Universo Teacher Guide. This guide has been distributed to over 1700 teachers nationally. A YouTube video about careers and research in astronomy using the Coma cluster as an example was produced. Just as the activities were varied, so were the evaluation methods. This material is based upon work supported by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration under Grant/Contract/Agreement No. HST-EO-10861.35-A issued through the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS5-26555.

  19. Large-conductance calcium-activated potassium channels in purkinje cell plasma membranes are clustered at sites of hypolemmal microdomains.

    PubMed

    Kaufmann, Walter A; Ferraguti, Francesco; Fukazawa, Yugo; Kasugai, Yu; Shigemoto, Ryuichi; Laake, Petter; Sexton, Joseph A; Ruth, Peter; Wietzorrek, Georg; Knaus, Hans-Günther; Storm, Johan F; Ottersen, Ole Petter

    2009-07-10

    Calcium-activated potassium channels have been shown to be critically involved in neuronal function, but an elucidation of their detailed roles awaits identification of the microdomains where they are located. This study was undertaken to unravel the precise subcellular distribution of the large-conductance calcium-activated potassium channels (called BK, KCa1.1, or Slo1) in the somatodendritic compartment of cerebellar Purkinje cells by means of postembedding immunogold cytochemistry and SDS-digested freeze-fracture replica labeling (SDS-FRL). We found BK channels to be unevenly distributed over the Purkinje cell plasma membrane. At distal dendritic compartments, BK channels were scattered over the plasma membrane of dendritic shafts and spines but absent from postsynaptic densities. At the soma and proximal dendrites, BK channels formed two distinct pools. One pool was scattered over the plasma membrane, whereas the other pool was clustered in plasma membrane domains overlying subsurface cisterns. The labeling density ratio of clustered to scattered channels was about 60:1, established in SDS-FRL. Subsurface cisterns, also called hypolemmal cisterns, are subcompartments of the endoplasmic reticulum likely representing calciosomes that unload and refill Ca2+ independently. Purkinje cell subsurface cisterns are enriched in inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate receptors that mediate the effects of several neurotransmitters, hormones, and growth factors by releasing Ca2+ into the cytosol, generating local Ca2+ sparks. Such increases in cytosolic [Ca2+] may be sufficient for BK channel activation. Clustered BK channels in the plasma membrane may thus participate in building a functional unit (plasmerosome) with the underlying calciosome that contributes significantly to local signaling in Purkinje cells.

  20. Acoustic Cluster Therapy: In Vitro and Ex Vivo Measurement of Activated Bubble Size Distribution and Temporal Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Healey, Andrew John; Sontum, Per Christian; Kvåle, Svein; Eriksen, Morten; Bendiksen, Ragnar; Tornes, Audun; Østensen, Jonny

    2016-05-01

    Acoustic cluster technology (ACT) is a two-component, microparticle formulation platform being developed for ultrasound-mediated drug delivery. Sonazoid microbubbles, which have a negative surface charge, are mixed with micron-sized perfluoromethylcyclopentane droplets stabilized with a positively charged surface membrane to form microbubble/microdroplet clusters. On exposure to ultrasound, the oil undergoes a phase change to the gaseous state, generating 20- to 40-μm ACT bubbles. An acoustic transmission technique is used to measure absorption and velocity dispersion of the ACT bubbles. An inversion technique computes bubble size population with temporal resolution of seconds. Bubble populations are measured both in vitro and in vivo after activation within the cardiac chambers of a dog model, with catheter-based flow through an extracorporeal measurement flow chamber. Volume-weighted mean diameter in arterial blood after activation in the left ventricle was 22 μm, with no bubbles >44 μm in diameter. After intravenous administration, 24.4% of the oil is activated in the cardiac chambers.

  1. Does cluster-root activity benefit nutrient uptake and growth of co-existing species?

    PubMed

    Muler, Ana L; Oliveira, Rafael S; Lambers, Hans; Veneklaas, Erik J

    2014-01-01

    Species that inhabit phosphorus- (P) and micronutrient-impoverished soils typically have adaptations to enhance the acquisition of these nutrients, for example cluster roots in Proteaceae. However, there are several species co-occurring in the same environment that do not produce similar specialised roots. This study aims to investigate whether one of these species (Scholtzia involucrata) can benefit from the mobilisation of P or micronutrients by the cluster roots of co-occurring Banksia attenuata, and also to examine the response of B. attenuata to the presence of S. involucrata. We conducted a greenhouse experiment, using a replacement series design, where B. attenuata and S. involucrata shared a pot at proportions of 2:0, 1:2 and 0:4. S. involucrata plants grew more in length, were heavier and had higher manganese (Mn) concentrations in their young leaves when grown next to one individual of B. attenuata and one individual of S. involucrata than when grown with three conspecifics. All S. involucrata individuals were colonised by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi, and possibly Rhizoctonia. Additionally, P concentration was higher in the young leaves of B. attenuata when grown with another B. attenuata than when grown with two individuals of S. involucrata, despite the smaller size of the S. involucrata individuals. Our results demonstrate that intraspecific competition was stronger than interspecific competition for S. involucrata, but not for B. attenuata. We conclude that cluster roots of B. attenuata facilitate the acquisition of nutrients by neighbouring shrubs by making P and Mn more available for their neighbours.

  2. Timing and duration of hydrothermal activity at the Los Bronces porphyry cluster: an update

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deckart, K.; Silva, W.; Spröhnle, C.; Vela, I.

    2014-06-01

    New geochronological data from the Los Bronces cluster of the Río Blanco-Los Bronces mega-porphyry Cu-Mo district establish a wide range of magmatism, hydrothermal alteration, and mineralization ages, both in terms of areal extent and time. The northern El Plomo and southernmost Los Piches exploration areas contain the oldest barren porphyritic intrusions with U-Pb ages of 10.8 ± 0.1 Ma and 13.4 ± 0.1 Ma, respectively. A hypabyssal barren intrusion adjacent northwesterly to the main pit area yields a slightly younger age of 10.2 ± 0.3 Ma (San Manuel sector, U-Pb), whereas in the Los Bronces (LB) open-pit area, the present day mineral extraction zone, porphyries range from 8.49 to 6.02 Ma (U-Pb). Hydrothermal biotite and sericite ages are up to 0.5 Ma younger but consistent with the cooling of the corresponding intrusion events of each area. Two quartz-molybdenite B-type veins from the LB open pit have Re-Os molybdenite ages of 5.65 ± 0.03 Ma and 5.35 ± 0.03 Ma consistent with published data for the contiguous Río Blanco cluster. The San Manuel exploration area within the Los Bronces cluster, located about 1.5-2 km southeast of the open-pit extraction zone, shows both the oldest hydrothermal biotite (7.70 ± 0.07 Ma; 40Ar/39Ar) and breccia cement molybdenite ages (8.36 ± 0.06 Ma; Re-Os) registered in the entire Río Blanco-Los Bronces district. These are also older than those reported from the El Teniente porphyry Cu(-Mo) deposit, suggesting that mineralization in the late Miocene to early Pliocene porphyry belt of Central Chile commenced 2 Ma before the previously accepted age of 6.3 Ma.

  3. Activation and products of the cryptic secondary metabolite biosynthetic gene clusters by rifampin resistance (rpoB) mutations in actinomycetes.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yukinori; Kasahara, Ken; Hirose, Yutaka; Murakami, Kiriko; Kugimiya, Rie; Ochi, Kozo

    2013-07-01

    A subset of rifampin resistance (rpoB) mutations result in the overproduction of antibiotics in various actinomycetes, including Streptomyces, Saccharopolyspora, and Amycolatopsis, with H437Y and H437R rpoB mutations effective most frequently. Moreover, the rpoB mutations markedly activate (up to 70-fold at the transcriptional level) the cryptic/silent secondary metabolite biosynthetic gene clusters of these actinomycetes, which are not activated under general stressful conditions, with the exception of treatment with rare earth elements. Analysis of the metabolite profile demonstrated that the rpoB mutants produced many metabolites, which were not detected in the wild-type strains. This approach utilizing rifampin resistance mutations is characterized by its feasibility and potential scalability to high-throughput studies and would be useful to activate and to enhance the yields of metabolites for discovery and biochemical characterization.

  4. Capturing local atomic environment dependence of activation barriers in metals using cluster expansion models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, Nimish; Chatterjee, Abhijit

    2016-10-01

    It is well known that surface diffusion in metals can proceed via multiple mechanisms, such as hop, exchange and other types of concerted moves. However, the manner in which kinetic rates associated with a mechanism can depend sensitively on local atomic environment is relatively less understood. We describe recent attempts in our research group to capture the atomic environment dependence using the cluster expansion model (CEM). In particular, we focus on hop and exchange moves at the (001) surface in homoepitaxy, and show that while CEM can work remarkably well in most cases, it can sometimes provide inaccurate predictions for concerted moves.

  5. Calibrating the Age-Rotation-Activity Relation in Low-Mass Stars: Chromospheric and Coronal Activity in the 500 Myr-old M37 Open Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Núñez, Alejandro; Agueros, Marcel A.

    2017-01-01

    In low-mass stars, the strength of the magnetic dynamo decreases over time as stars spin down through the loss of angular momentum via magnetized winds. Both coronal X-ray emission and chromospheric Hα emission trace the strength of the changing dynamo and, when combined with rotation periods in a single-aged population, can therefore be used to examine the dependence of magnetic activity on rotation across a range of masses. We observed the 500-Myr-old open cluster M37 with Chandra and Hectospec on the MMT to obtain X-ray and Hα measurements for its low-mass stars. We obtained a sample of ≈280 cluster members with X-ray detections, ≈290 with Hα measurements, and ≈80 with both. This is the largest sample available for analyzing the dependence of coronal and chromospheric emission on rotation for a single-aged population. We used published rotation periods (Prot) to calculate Rossby numbers, Ro = Prot / τ, where τ is the convective turnover time, for all of the known rotators. We also determined the ratios of X-ray and Hα luminosities to bolometric luminosities to minimize mass dependencies when characterizing the rotation-activity relation at 500 Myr. With these data we explored how X-ray and Hα luminosity depend on Ro, and whether the behavior in the unsaturated regime (i.e., when increasing or decreasing Ro changes the measured activity) differ for these two tracers of magnetic activity. Finally, we examine the age-activity relation as measured in the X ray using seven open clusters spanning the age range 6-600 Myr.

  6. The cytosolic Fe-S cluster assembly component MET18 is required for the full enzymatic activity of ROS1 in active DNA demethylation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaokang; Li, Qi; Yuan, Wei; Cao, Zhendong; Qi, Bei; Kumar, Suresh; Li, Yan; Qian, Weiqiang

    2016-01-01

    DNA methylation patterns in plants are dynamically regulated by DNA methylation and active DNA demethylation in response to both environmental changes and development of plant. Beginning with the removal of methylated cytosine by ROS1/DME family of 5-methylcytosine DNA glycosylases, active DNA demethylation in plants occurs through base excision repair. So far, many components involved in active DNA demethylation remain undiscovered. Through a forward genetic screening of Arabidopsis mutants showing DNA hypermethylation at the EPF2 promoter region, we identified the conserved iron-sulfur cluster assembly protein MET18. MET18 dysfunction caused DNA hypermethylation at more than 1000 loci as well as the silencing of reporter genes and some endogenous genes. MET18 can directly interact with ROS1 in vitro and in vivo. ROS1 activity was reduced in the met18 mutant plants and point mutation in the conserved Fe-S cluster binding motif of ROS1 disrupted its biological function. Interestingly, a large number of DNA hypomethylated loci, especially in the CHH context, were identified from the met18 mutants and most of the hypo-DMRs were from TE regions. Our results suggest that MET18 can regulate both active DNA demethylation and DNA methylation pathways in Arabidopsis. PMID:27193999

  7. [Pathophysiology of cluster headache].

    PubMed

    Donnet, Anne

    2015-11-01

    The aetiology of cluster headache is partially unknown. Three areas are involved in the pathogenesis of cluster headache: the trigeminal nociceptive pathways, the autonomic system and the hypothalamus. The cluster headache attack involves activation of the trigeminal autonomic reflex. A dysfunction located in posterior hypothalamic gray matter is probably pivotal in the process. There is a probable association between smoke exposure, a possible genetic predisposition and the development of cluster headache.

  8. The mechanism of emerging catalytic activity of gold nano-clusters on rutile TiO2(110) in CO oxidation reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitsuhara, K.; Tagami, M.; Matsuda, T.; Visikovskiy, A.; Takizawa, M.; Kido, Y.

    2012-03-01

    This paper reveals the fact that the O adatoms (Oad) adsorbed on the 5-fold Ti rows of rutile TiO2(110) react with CO to form CO2 at room temperature and the oxidation reaction is pronouncedly enhanced by Au nano-clusters deposited on the above O-rich TiO2(110) surfaces. The optimum activity is obtained for 2D clusters with a lateral size of ˜1.5 nm and two-atomic layer height corresponding to ˜50 Au atoms/cluster. This strong activity emerging is attributed to an electronic charge transfer from Au clusters to O-rich TiO2(110) supports observed clearly by work function measurement, which results in an interface dipole. The interface dipoles lower the potential barrier for dissociative O2 adsorption on the surface and also enhance the reaction of CO with the Oad atoms to form CO2 owing to the electric field of the interface dipoles, which generate an attractive force upon polar CO molecules and thus prolong the duration time on the Au nano-clusters. This electric field is screened by the valence electrons of Au clusters except near the perimeter interfaces, thereby the activity is diminished for three-dimensional clusters with a larger size.

  9. The mechanism of emerging catalytic activity of gold nano-clusters on rutile TiO{sub 2}(110) in CO oxidation reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Mitsuhara, K.; Tagami, M.; Matsuda, T.; Visikovskiy, A.; Kido, Y.; Takizawa, M.

    2012-03-28

    This paper reveals the fact that the O adatoms (O{sub ad}) adsorbed on the 5-fold Ti rows of rutile TiO{sub 2}(110) react with CO to form CO{sub 2} at room temperature and the oxidation reaction is pronouncedly enhanced by Au nano-clusters deposited on the above O-rich TiO{sub 2}(110) surfaces. The optimum activity is obtained for 2D clusters with a lateral size of {approx}1.5 nm and two-atomic layer height corresponding to {approx}50 Au atoms/cluster. This strong activity emerging is attributed to an electronic charge transfer from Au clusters to O-rich TiO{sub 2}(110) supports observed clearly by work function measurement, which results in an interface dipole. The interface dipoles lower the potential barrier for dissociative O{sub 2} adsorption on the surface and also enhance the reaction of CO with the O{sub ad} atoms to form CO{sub 2} owing to the electric field of the interface dipoles, which generate an attractive force upon polar CO molecules and thus prolong the duration time on the Au nano-clusters. This electric field is screened by the valence electrons of Au clusters except near the perimeter interfaces, thereby the activity is diminished for three-dimensional clusters with a larger size.

  10. The mechanism of emerging catalytic activity of gold nano-clusters on rutile TiO2(110) in CO oxidation reaction.

    PubMed

    Mitsuhara, K; Tagami, M; Matsuda, T; Visikovskiy, A; Takizawa, M; Kido, Y

    2012-03-28

    This paper reveals the fact that the O adatoms (O(ad)) adsorbed on the 5-fold Ti rows of rutile TiO(2)(110) react with CO to form CO(2) at room temperature and the oxidation reaction is pronouncedly enhanced by Au nano-clusters deposited on the above O-rich TiO(2)(110) surfaces. The optimum activity is obtained for 2D clusters with a lateral size of ∼1.5 nm and two-atomic layer height corresponding to ∼50 Au atoms∕cluster. This strong activity emerging is attributed to an electronic charge transfer from Au clusters to O-rich TiO(2)(110) supports observed clearly by work function measurement, which results in an interface dipole. The interface dipoles lower the potential barrier for dissociative O(2) adsorption on the surface and also enhance the reaction of CO with the O(ad) atoms to form CO(2) owing to the electric field of the interface dipoles, which generate an attractive force upon polar CO molecules and thus prolong the duration time on the Au nano-clusters. This electric field is screened by the valence electrons of Au clusters except near the perimeter interfaces, thereby the activity is diminished for three-dimensional clusters with a larger size.

  11. Efficient active waveguiding properties of Mo6 nano-cluster-doped polymer nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bigeon, J.; Huby, N.; Amela-Cortes, M.; Molard, Y.; Garreau, A.; Cordier, S.; Bêche, B.; Duvail, J.-L.

    2016-06-01

    We investigate 1D nanostructures based on a Mo6@SU8 hybrid nanocomposite in which photoluminescent Mo6 clusters are embedded in the photosensitive SU8 resist. Tens of micrometers long Mo6@SU8-based tubular nanostructures were fabricated by the wetting template method, enabling the control of the inner and outer diameter to about 190 nm and 240 nm respectively, as supported by structural and optical characterizations. The image plane optical study of these nanotubes under optical pumping highlights the efficient waveguiding phenomenon of the red luminescence emitted by the clusters. Moreover, the wave vector distribution in the Fourier plane determined by leakage radiation microscopy gives additional features of the emission and waveguiding. First, the anisotropic red luminescence of the whole system can be attributed to the guided mode along the nanotube. Then, a low-loss propagation behavior is evidenced in the Mo6@SU8-based nanotubes. This result contrasts with the weaker waveguiding signature in the case of UV210-based nanotubes embedding PFO (poly(9,9-di-n-octylfluorenyl-2,7-diyl)). It is attributed to the strong reabsorption phenomenon, owing to overlapping between absorption and emission bands in the semi-conducting conjugated polymer PFO. These results make this Mo6@SU8 original class of nanocomposite a promising candidate as nanosources for submicronic photonic integration.

  12. Theoretical investigation of the hetero-junction effect in PVP-stabilized Au 13 clusters. The role of PVP in their catalytic activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okumura, Mitsutaka; Kitagawa, Yasutaka; Kawakami, Takashi; Haruta, Masatake

    2008-06-01

    Hybrid density functional calculations have been carried out for Au 13-poly( N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidone), abbreviated as Au 13-PVP, and related model clusters, Au 13-PVP 4, Au 13-PVP-O 2 and Au 13-PVP 4-O 2, to discuss the variation in the electronic structure of Au 13 clusters by PVP adsorption. The calculations have shown that the charge transfer from the adsorbed PVP to Au 13 produces negatively charged O 2 on Au 13-PVP 4. These findings suggest that PVP acts not only as a stabilizer to prevent the aggregation of Au clusters but also as an electron donor to Au clusters. Thus we conclude that the catalytic activities of Au clusters are affected by the adsorbed PVPs.

  13. Rhenium Complexes and Clusters Supported on c-Al2O3: Effects of Rhenium Oxidation State and Rhenium Cluster Size on Catalytic Activity for n-butane Hydrogenolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Lobo Lapidus, R.; Gates, B

    2009-01-01

    Supported metals prepared from H{sub 3}Re{sub 3}(CO){sub 12} on {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} were treated under conditions that led to various rhenium structures on the support and were tested as catalysts for n-butane conversion in the presence of H{sub 2} in a flow reactor at 533 K and 1 atm. After use, two samples were characterized by X-ray absorption edge positions of approximately 5.6 eV (relative to rhenium metal), indicating that the rhenium was cationic and essentially in the same average oxidation state in each. But the Re-Re coordination numbers found by extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (2.2 and 5.1) show that the clusters in the two samples were significantly different in average nuclearity despite their indistinguishable rhenium oxidation states. Spectra of a third sample after catalysis indicate approximately Re{sub 3} clusters, on average, and an edge position of 4.5 eV. Thus, two samples contained clusters approximated as Re{sub 3} (on the basis of the Re-Re coordination number), on average, with different average rhenium oxidation states. The data allow resolution of the effects of rhenium oxidation state and cluster size, both of which affect the catalytic activity; larger clusters and a greater degree of reduction lead to increased activity.

  14. Clustering of 3D-Structure Similarity Based Network of Secondary Metabolites Reveals Their Relationships with Biological Activities.

    PubMed

    Ohtana, Yuki; Abdullah, Azian Azamimi; Altaf-Ul-Amin, Md; Huang, Ming; Ono, Naoaki; Sato, Tetsuo; Sugiura, Tadao; Horai, Hisayuki; Nakamura, Yukiko; Morita Hirai, Aki; Lange, Klaus W; Kibinge, Nelson K; Katsuragi, Tetsuo; Shirai, Tsuyoshi; Kanaya, Shigehiko

    2014-12-01

    Developing database systems connecting diverse species based on omics is the most important theme in big data biology. To attain this purpose, we have developed KNApSAcK Family Databases, which are utilized in a number of researches in metabolomics. In the present study, we have developed a network-based approach to analyze relationships between 3D structure and biological activity of metabolites consisting of four steps as follows: construction of a network of metabolites based on structural similarity (Step 1), classification of metabolites into structure groups (Step 2), assessment of statistically significant relations between structure groups and biological activities (Step 3), and 2-dimensional clustering of the constructed data matrix based on statistically significant relations between structure groups and biological activities (Step 4). Applying this method to a data set consisting of 2072 secondary metabolites and 140 biological activities reported in KNApSAcK Metabolite Activity DB, we obtained 983 statistically significant structure group-biological activity pairs. As a whole, we systematically analyzed the relationship between 3D-chemical structures of metabolites and biological activities.

  15. The relationship between activating affects, inhibitory affects, and self-compassion in patients with Cluster C personality disorders.

    PubMed

    Schanche, Elisabeth; Stiles, Tore C; McCullough, Leigh; Svartberg, Martin; Nielsen, Geir Høstmark

    2011-09-01

    In the short-term dynamic psychotherapy model termed "Affect Phobia Treatment," it is assumed that increase in patients' defense recognition, decrease in inhibitory affects (e.g., anxiety, shame, guilt), and increase in the experience of activating affects (e.g., sadness, anger, closeness) are related to enhanced self-compassion across therapeutic approaches. The present study aimed to test this assumption on the basis of data from a randomized controlled trial, which compared a 40-session short-term dynamic psychotherapy (N = 25) with 40-session cognitive treatment (N = 25) for outpatients with Cluster C personality disorders. Patients' defense recognition, inhibitory affects, activating affects, and self-compassion were rated with the Achievement of Therapeutic Objectives Scale (McCullough et al., 2003b) in Sessions 6 and 36. Results showed that increase in self-compassion from early to late in therapy significantly predicted pre- to post-decrease in psychiatric symptoms, interpersonal problems, and personality pathology. Decrease in levels of inhibitory affects and increase in levels of activating affects during therapy were significantly associated with higher self-compassion toward the end of treatment. Increased levels of defense recognition did not predict higher self-compassion when changes in inhibitory and activating affects were statistically controlled for. There were no significant interaction effects with type of treatment. These findings support self-compassion as an important goal of psychotherapy and indicate that increase in the experience of activating affects and decrease in inhibitory affects seem to be worthwhile therapeutic targets when working to enhance self-compassion in patients with Cluster C personality disorders.

  16. Highly active Ag clusters stabilized on TiO2 nanocrystals for catalytic reduction of p-nitrophenol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xin; Zhao, Zhe; Ou, Dingrong; Tu, Baofeng; Cui, Daan; Wei, Xuming; Cheng, Mojie

    2016-11-01

    Ag/TiO2 nanocomposites comprising of Ag clusters on TiO2 nanocrystal surfaces are of great significance in catalysts and advanced functional materials. Herein a novel method to synthesize Ag/TiO2 nanocomposites with Ag clusters under 2 nm on TiO2 nanocrystal surfaces have been developed. The success of this method relies on a silver mirror reaction in toluene, which refers to the reduction of silver-dodecylamine complexes by acetaldehyde in the presence of mono-dispersed TiO2 nanocrystals. The prepared Ag/TiO2 nanocomposites have been characterized by FT-IR spectra, UV-vis absorption spectra, X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis, ultra high resolution scanning electron microscope (Ultra-HRSEM), high resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS). Catalytic activity of Ag/TiO2 nanocomposites is evaluated for the reduction of p-nitrophenol (4-NP) into p-aminophenol (4-AP) by NaBH4. Results demonstrate that Ag/TiO2 nanocomposites have shown an outstanding catalytic activity as well as a good stability in successive reduction of 4-NP. Noticeably, TOF of Ag/TiO2-0.75 nanocomposites obtained in this work is the highest among Ag based catalysts previously reported.

  17. Generation of spectral clusters in a mixture of noble and Raman-active gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseini, Pooria; Abdolvand, Amir; St. J. Russell, Philip

    2016-12-01

    We report a novel scheme for the generation of dense clusters of Raman sidebands. The scheme uses a broadband-guiding hollow-core photonic crystal fiber (HC-PCF) filled with a mixture of H2, D2, and Xe for efficient interaction between the gas mixture and a green laser pump pulse (532 nm, 1 ns) of only 5 uJ energy. This results in the generation from noise of more than 135 ro-vibrational Raman sidebands covering the visible spectral region with an average spacing of only 2 THz. Such a spectrally dense and compact fiber-based source is ideal for applications where closely spaced narrow-band laser lines with high spectral power density are required, such as in spectroscopy and sensing. When the HC-PCF is filled with a H2-D2 mixture the Raman comb spans the spectral region from the deep UV (280 nm) to the near infrared (1000 nm).

  18. The Devon Active Villages Evaluation (DAVE) trial of a community-level physical activity intervention in rural south-west England: a stepped wedge cluster randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The majority of adults are not meeting the guidelines for physical activity despite activity being linked with numerous improvements to long-term health. In light of this, researchers have called for more community-level interventions. The main objective of the present study was to evaluate whether a community-level physical activity intervention increased the activity levels of rural communities. Methods 128 rural villages (clusters) were randomised to receive the intervention in one of four time periods between April 2011 and December 2012. The Devon Active Villages intervention provided villages with 12 weeks of physical activity opportunities for all age groups, including at least three different types of activities per village. Each village received an individually tailored intervention, incorporating a local needs-led approach. Support was provided for a further 12 months following the intervention. The evaluation study used a stepped wedge cluster randomised controlled trial design. All 128 villages were measured at each of five data collection periods using a postal survey. The primary outcome of interest was the proportion of adults reporting sufficient physical activity to meet internationally recognised guidelines. Minutes spent in moderate-and-vigorous activity per week was analysed as a secondary outcome. To compare between intervention and control modes, random effects linear regression and marginal logistic regression models were implemented for continuous and binary outcomes respectively. Results 10,412 adults (4693 intervention, 5719 control) completed the postal survey (response rate 32.2%). The intervention did not increase the odds of adults meeting the physical activity guideline (adjusted OR 1.02, 95% CI: 0.88 to 1.17; P = 0.80), although there was weak evidence of an increase in minutes of moderate-and-vigorous-intensity activity per week (adjusted mean difference = 171, 95% CI: -16 to 358; P = 0.07). The

  19. Membership, lithium and chromospheric activity of the young open clusters IC 2391, IC 2602 and IC 4665 from GES (Gaia-ESO Survey) observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez Garrido, M.; Montes, D.; Gutiérrez Albarrán, M. L.; Tabernero, H. M.; Gónzalez Hernández, J. I.; GES Survey Builders

    2017-03-01

    We conduct a comparative study of the main properties of the of the young open clusters IC 2391, IC 2602 and IC 4665, focusing on their membership, lithium abundance and level of chromospheric activity and possible accretion. We use the fundamental parameters (effective temperature, surface gravity, and radial velocity) delivered by the Gaia-ESO survey (GES - https://www.gaia-eso.eu/) consortium in the four internal data release (iDR4) to select the members of these clusters among the UVES and GIRAFFE spectroscopic observations. Chromospheric activity criterium, and iterative process between radial velocity distribution and lithium-temperature diagram are applied to determinate what objects are members or non members of the clusters. All this information allowed us to characterize the properties of the members of these clusters and identify some field contaminant lithium-rich giants.

  20. Improvements on GPS Location Cluster Analysis for the Prediction of Large Carnivore Feeding Activities: Ground-Truth Detection Probability and Inclusion of Activity Sensor Measures

    PubMed Central

    Blecha, Kevin A.; Alldredge, Mat W.

    2015-01-01

    Animal space use studies using GPS collar technology are increasingly incorporating behavior based analysis of spatio-temporal data in order to expand inferences of resource use. GPS location cluster analysis is one such technique applied to large carnivores to identify the timing and location of feeding events. For logistical and financial reasons, researchers often implement predictive models for identifying these events. We present two separate improvements for predictive models that future practitioners can implement. Thus far, feeding prediction models have incorporated a small range of covariates, usually limited to spatio-temporal characteristics of the GPS data. Using GPS collared cougar (Puma concolor) we include activity sensor data as an additional covariate to increase prediction performance of feeding presence/absence. Integral to the predictive modeling of feeding events is a ground-truthing component, in which GPS location clusters are visited by human observers to confirm the presence or absence of feeding remains. Failing to account for sources of ground-truthing false-absences can bias the number of predicted feeding events to be low. Thus we account for some ground-truthing error sources directly in the model with covariates and when applying model predictions. Accounting for these errors resulted in a 10% increase in the number of clusters predicted to be feeding events. Using a double-observer design, we show that the ground-truthing false-absence rate is relatively low (4%) using a search delay of 2–60 days. Overall, we provide two separate improvements to the GPS cluster analysis techniques that can be expanded upon and implemented in future studies interested in identifying feeding behaviors of large carnivores. PMID:26398546

  1. Improvements on GPS Location Cluster Analysis for the Prediction of Large Carnivore Feeding Activities: Ground-Truth Detection Probability and Inclusion of Activity Sensor Measures.

    PubMed

    Blecha, Kevin A; Alldredge, Mat W

    2015-01-01

    Animal space use studies using GPS collar technology are increasingly incorporating behavior based analysis of spatio-temporal data in order to expand inferences of resource use. GPS location cluster analysis is one such technique applied to large carnivores to identify the timing and location of feeding events. For logistical and financial reasons, researchers often implement predictive models for identifying these events. We present two separate improvements for predictive models that future practitioners can implement. Thus far, feeding prediction models have incorporated a small range of covariates, usually limited to spatio-temporal characteristics of the GPS data. Using GPS collared cougar (Puma concolor) we include activity sensor data as an additional covariate to increase prediction performance of feeding presence/absence. Integral to the predictive modeling of feeding events is a ground-truthing component, in which GPS location clusters are visited by human observers to confirm the presence or absence of feeding remains. Failing to account for sources of ground-truthing false-absences can bias the number of predicted feeding events to be low. Thus we account for some ground-truthing error sources directly in the model with covariates and when applying model predictions. Accounting for these errors resulted in a 10% increase in the number of clusters predicted to be feeding events. Using a double-observer design, we show that the ground-truthing false-absence rate is relatively low (4%) using a search delay of 2-60 days. Overall, we provide two separate improvements to the GPS cluster analysis techniques that can be expanded upon and implemented in future studies interested in identifying feeding behaviors of large carnivores.

  2. Metastable β-Bi2O3 nanoparticles with high photocatalytic activity from polynuclear bismuth oxido clusters.

    PubMed

    Schlesinger, Maik; Schulze, Steffen; Hietschold, Michael; Mehring, Michael

    2013-01-28

    The synthesis of nanoscaled β-Bi(2)O(3) starting from the bismuth oxido clusters [Bi(6)O(4)(OH)(4)](NO(3))(6)·H(2)O, [Bi(22)O(26)(OSiMe(2)(t)Bu)(14)], [Bi(38)O(45)(NO(3))(20)(DMSO)(28)](NO(3))(4)·4DMSO and [Bi(38)O(45)(OMc)(24)(DMSO)(9)]·2DMSO·7H(2)O (OMc = O(2)CC(3)H(5)) under ambient conditions is reported. The metal oxido clusters are regarded as ideal precursors for β-Bi(2)O(3) due to their structural relationship with the latter. Nevertheless, different bismuth oxide polymorphs are accessible dependent on the hydrolysis protocol. Hydrolysis over a period of 18 h gave stable α-Bi(2)O(3) whereas after 3 min an amorphous material is observed. Annealing of the amorphous material at 370 °C gave nanoscaled β-Bi(2)O(3). An unusual high reactivity of the β-Bi(2)O(3) particles with SiO(2) and Al(2)O(3) is observed at temperatures above 400 °C. Powder X-ray diffraction studies, transmission electron microscopy, diffuse reflectance UV/Vis spectroscopy and nitrogen adsorption measurements are used for characterization of the as-prepared β-Bi(2)O(3) nanoparticles. The properties of the β-Bi(2)O(3) nanoparticles depend on the starting bismuth oxido clusters with regard to particle size and optical band gap. The β-Bi(2)O(3) nanoparticles show excellent photocatalytic activity as demonstrated by dye decomposition (rhodamine B, methyl orange, methylene blue and orange G) under visible light.

  3. Saturated fatty acids induce c-Src clustering within membrane subdomains leading to JNK activation

    PubMed Central

    Holzer, Ryan G.; Park, Eek-Joong; Li, Ning; Tran, Helen; Chen, Monica; Choi, Crystal; Solinas, Giovanni; Karin, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Saturated fatty acids (FA) exert adverse health effects and are more likely to cause insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes than unsaturated FA, some of which exert protective and beneficial effects. Saturated FA, but not unsaturated FA, activate Jun N terminal kinase (JNK), which has been linked to obesity and insulin resistance in mice and men. However, it is unknown how saturated and unsaturated FA are discriminated. We now demonstrate that saturated FA activate JNK and induce insulin resistance by altering the membrane distribution of c-Src, causing it to partition into intracellular membrane subdomains where it may become activated. Conversely, unsaturated FA with known beneficial effects on glucose metabolism prevent c-Src membrane partitioning and activation, which are dependent on its myristoylation, and block JNK activation. Consumption of a diabetogenic high fat diet causes the partitioning and activation of c-Src within detergent insoluble membrane subdomains of adipocytes. PMID:21962514

  4. Generation of spectral clusters in a mixture of noble and Raman-active gases.

    PubMed

    Hosseini, Pooria; Abdolvand, Amir; St J Russell, Philip

    2016-12-01

    We report a novel scheme for the generation of dense clusters of Raman sidebands. The scheme uses a broadband-guiding hollow-core photonic crystal fiber (HC-PCF) filled with a mixture of H2, D2, and Xe for efficient interaction between the gas mixture and a green laser pump pulse (532 nm, 1 ns) of only 5 μJ of energy. This results in the generation from noise of more than 135 rovibrational Raman sidebands covering the visible spectral region with an average spacing of only 2.2 THz. Such a spectrally dense and compact fiber-based source is ideal for applications where closely spaced narrow-band laser lines with high spectral power density are required, such as in spectroscopy and sensing. When the HC-PCF is filled with a H2-D2 mixture, the Raman comb spans the spectral region from the deep UV (280 nm) to the near infrared (1000 nm).

  5. Bond Activation and Hydrogen Evolution from Water through Reactions with M3S4 (M = Mo, W) and W3S3 Anionic Clusters.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Corrine A; Saha, Arjun; Raghavachari, Krishnan

    2017-03-02

    Transition metal sulfides (TMS) are being investigated with increased frequency because of their ability to efficiently catalyze the hydrogen evolution reaction. We have studied the trimetallic TMS cluster ions, Mo3S4(-), W3S4(-), and W3S3(-), and probed their efficiency for bond activation and hydrogen evolution from water. These clusters have geometries that are related to the edge sites on bulk MoS2 surfaces that are known to play a role in hydrogen evolution. Using density functional theory, the electronic structures of these clusters and their chemical reactivity with water have been investigated. The reaction mechanism involves the initial formation of hydroxyl and thiol groups, hydrogen migration to form an intermediate with a metal hydride bond, and finally, combination of a hydride and a proton to eliminate H2. Using this mechanism, free energy profiles of the reactions of the three metal clusters with water have been constructed. Unlike previous reactivity studies of other related cluster systems, there is no overall energy barrier in the reactions involving the M3S4 systems. The energy required for the rate-determining step of the reaction (the initial addition of the cluster by water) is lower than the separated reactants (-0.8 kcal/mol for Mo and -5.1 kcal/mol for W). They confirm the M3S4(-) cluster's ability to efficiently activate the chemical bonds in water to release H2. Though the W3S3(-) cluster is not as efficient at bond activation, it provides insights into the factors that contribute to the success of the M3S4 anionic systems in hydrogen evolution.

  6. The Evolution of Star formation Activity in Cluster Galaxies over 0.15 < z < 1.5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Cory R.; Courteau, Stéphane; Brodwin, Mark; Stanford, S. A.; Snyder, Gregory F.; Stern, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    We explore 7.5 billion years of evolution in the star formation activity of massive ({M}\\star > {10}10.1 {M}ȯ ) cluster galaxies using a sample of 25 clusters over 0.15< z< 1 from the Cluster Lensing And Supernova survey with Hubble and 11 clusters over 1< z< 1.5 from the IRAC Shallow Cluster Survey. Galaxy morphologies are determined visually using high-resolution Hubble Space Telescope images. Using the spectral energy distribution fitting code Code Investigating GALaxy Emission, we measure star formation rates, stellar masses, and 4000 Å break strengths. The latter are used to separate quiescent and star-forming galaxies (SFGs). From z∼ 1.3 to z∼ 0.2, the specific star formation rate (sSFR) of cluster SFGs and quiescent galaxies decreases by factors of three and four, respectively. Over the same redshift range, the sSFR of the entire cluster population declines by a factor of 11, from 0.48+/- 0.06 {{Gyr}}-1 to 0.043+/- 0.009 {{Gyr}}-1. This strong overall sSFR evolution is driven by the growth of the quiescent population over time; the fraction of quiescent cluster galaxies increases from {28}-19+8 % to {88}-4+5 % over z ∼ 1.3 to 0.2. The majority of the growth occurs at z≳ 0.9, where the quiescent fraction increases by 0.41. While the sSFR of the majority of star-forming cluster galaxies is at the level of the field, a small subset of cluster SFGs have low field-relative star formation activity, suggestive of long-timescale quenching. The large increase in the fraction of quiescent galaxies above z∼ 0.9, coupled with the field-level sSFRs of cluster SFGs, suggests that higher-redshift cluster galaxies are likely being quenched quickly. Assessing those timescales will require more accurate stellar population ages and star formation histories.

  7. THE CLUSTER AND FIELD GALAXY ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS FRACTION AT z = 1-1.5: EVIDENCE FOR A REVERSAL OF THE LOCAL ANTICORRELATION BETWEEN ENVIRONMENT AND AGN FRACTION

    SciTech Connect

    Martini, Paul; Miller, E. D.; Bautz, M.; Brodwin, M.; Stanford, S. A.; Gonzalez, Anthony H.; Hickox, R. C.; Stern, D.; Eisenhardt, P. R.; Galametz, A.; Norman, D.; Dey, A.; Jannuzi, B. T.; Murray, S.; Jones, C.; Brown, M. J. I.

    2013-05-01

    The fraction of cluster galaxies that host luminous active galactic nuclei (AGNs) is an important probe of AGN fueling processes, the cold interstellar medium at the centers of galaxies, and how tightly black holes and galaxies co-evolve. We present a new measurement of the AGN fraction in a sample of 13 clusters of galaxies (M {>=} 10{sup 14} M{sub Sun }) at 1 < z < 1.5 selected from the Spitzer/IRAC Shallow Cluster Survey, as well as the field fraction in the immediate vicinity of these clusters, and combine these data with measurements from the literature to quantify the relative evolution of cluster and field AGN from the present to z {approx} 3. We estimate that the cluster AGN fraction at 1 < z < 1.5 is f{sub A} = 3.0{sup +2.4}{sub -1.4}% for AGNs with a rest-frame, hard X-ray luminosity greater than L{sub X,{sub H}} {>=} 10{sup 44} erg s{sup -1}. This fraction is measured relative to all cluster galaxies more luminous than M{sup *}{sub 3.6}(z) + 1, where M{sup *}{sub 3.6}(z) is the absolute magnitude of the break in the galaxy luminosity function at the cluster redshift in the IRAC 3.6 {mu}m bandpass. The cluster AGN fraction is 30 times greater than the 3{sigma} upper limit on the value for AGNs of similar luminosity at z {approx} 0.25, as well as more than an order of magnitude greater than the AGN fraction at z {approx} 0.75. AGNs with L{sub X,{sub H}} {>=} 10{sup 43} erg s{sup -1} exhibit similarly pronounced evolution with redshift. In contrast to the local universe, where the luminous AGN fraction is higher in the field than in clusters, the X-ray and MIR-selected AGN fractions in the field and clusters are consistent at 1 < z < 1.5. This is evidence that the cluster AGN population has evolved more rapidly than the field population from z {approx} 1.5 to the present. This environment-dependent AGN evolution mimics the more rapid evolution of star-forming galaxies in clusters relative to the field.

  8. Fuel mediated solution combustion synthesis of ZnO supported gold clusters and nanoparticles and their catalytic activity and in vitro cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Chanu, T Inakhunbi; Muthukumar, Thangavelu; Manoharan, Periakaruppan T

    2014-11-21

    Nanocomposites of gold nanoparticles and semiconductor ZnO with wurtzite structure, made by solution combustion synthesis (SCS), as a function of the Zn/fuel ratio with polyethylene glycol (PEG) as fuel exhibit the presence of both nanoparticles and clusters. Atomic gold clusters present on the surface of ZnO nanorods which can be identified by XPS and SEM are easily monitored and characterized by positive ion MALDI experiments as mostly odd numbered clusters, Au3 to Au11 in decreasing amounts. Low concentrations of the fuel produce AuClO and nanoparticles (NPs), with no clusters. Au-ZnO nanocomposites at all [Au] exhibit single blue shifted plasmon absorption and corresponding photoluminescence (PL). Increasing particle size prefers surface plasmon resonance (SPR) scattering of metal that could lead to PL enhancement; however, available ZnO surface in the Au-ZnO composite becomes more important than the particle size of the composite with higher [Au]. The catalytic activity of these Au-ZnO nanocomposites tested on 4-nitrophenol clearly revealed the presence of an intermediate with both NPs and clusters playing different roles. An in vitro study of cytotoxicity on MCF-7 cell lines revealed that these gold nanostructures have turned out to be powerful nanoagents for destruction of cancer cells even with small amounts of gold particles/clusters. The nanorods of ZnO, known to be nontoxic to normal cells, play a lesser role in the anticancer activity of these Au-ZnO nanocomposites.

  9. CLUSTER CHEMISTRY

    SciTech Connect

    Muetterties, Earl L.

    1980-05-01

    Metal cluster chemistry is one of the most rapidly developing areas of inorganic and organometallic chemistry. Prior to 1960 only a few metal clusters were well characterized. However, shortly after the early development of boron cluster chemistry, the field of metal cluster chemistry began to grow at a very rapid rate and a structural and a qualitative theoretical understanding of clusters came quickly. Analyzed here is the chemistry and the general significance of clusters with particular emphasis on the cluster research within my group. The importance of coordinately unsaturated, very reactive metal clusters is the major subject of discussion.

  10. Computational evaluation of sub-nanometer cluster activity of singly exposed copper atom with various coordinative environment in catalytic CO2 transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanmugam, Ramasamy; Thamaraichelvan, Arunachalam; Ganesan, Tharumeya Kuppusamy; Viswanathan, Balasubramanian

    2017-02-01

    Metal cluster, at sub-nanometer level has a unique property in the activation of small molecules, in contrast to that of bulk surface. In the present work, singly exposed active site of copper metal cluster at sub-nanometer level was designed to arrive at the energy minimised configurations, binding energy, electrostatic potential map, frontier molecular orbitals and partial density of states. The ab initio molecular dynamics was carried out to probe the catalytic nature of the cluster. Further, the stability of the metal cluster and its catalytic activity in the electrochemical reduction of CO2 to CO were evaluated by means of computational hydrogen electrode via calculation of the free energy profile using DFT/B3LYP level of theory in vacuum. The activity of the cluster is ascertained from the fact that the copper atom, present in a two coordinative environment, performs a more selective conversion of CO2 to CO at an applied potential of -0.35 V which is comparatively lower than that of higher coordinative sites. The present study helps to design any sub-nano level metal catalyst for electrochemical reduction of CO2 to various value added chemicals.

  11. Goal-setting intervention in patients with active asthma: protocol for a pilot cluster-randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Supporting self-management behaviours is recommended guidance for people with asthma. Preliminary work suggests that a brief, intensive, patient-centred intervention may be successful in supporting people with asthma to participate in life roles and activities they value. We seek to assess the feasibility of undertaking a cluster-randomised controlled trial (cRCT) of a brief, goal-setting intervention delivered in the context of an asthma review consultation. Methods/design A two armed, single-blinded, multi-centre, cluster-randomised controlled feasibility trial will be conducted in UK primary care. Randomisation will take place at the practice level. We aim to recruit a total of 80 primary care patients with active asthma from at least eight practices across two health boards in Scotland (10 patients per practice resulting in ~40 in each arm). Patients in the intervention arm will be asked to complete a novel goal-setting tool immediately prior to an asthma review consultation. This will be used to underpin a focussed discussion about their goals during the asthma review. A tailored management plan will then be negotiated to facilitate achieving their prioritised goals. Patients in the control arm will receive a usual care guideline-based review of asthma. Data on quality of life, asthma control and patient confidence will be collected from both arms at baseline and 3 and 6 months post-intervention. Data on health services resource use will be collected from all patient records 6 months pre- and post-intervention. Semi-structured interviews will be carried out with healthcare staff and a purposive sample of patients to elicit their views and experiences of the trial. The outcomes of interest in this feasibility trial are the ability to recruit patients and healthcare staff, the optimal method of delivering the intervention within routine clinical practice, and acceptability and perceived utility of the intervention among patients and staff. Trial

  12. EVOLUTION AND DISTRIBUTION OF MAGNETIC FIELDS FROM ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI IN GALAXY CLUSTERS. I. THE EFFECT OF INJECTION ENERGY AND REDSHIFT

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Hao; Li Hui; Li Shengtai; Collins, David C.; Norman, Michael L. E-mail: hli@lanl.go E-mail: dcollins@physics.ucsd.ed

    2010-12-20

    We present a series of cosmological magnetohydrodynamic simulations that simultaneously follow the formation of a galaxy cluster and evolution of magnetic fields ejected by an active galactic nucleus (AGN). Specifically, we investigate the influence of both the epoch of the AGN (z {approx} 3-0.5) and the AGN energy ({approx}3 x 10{sup 57}- 2 x 10{sup 60} erg) on the final magnetic field distribution in a relatively massive cluster (M{sub vir} {approx} 10{sup 15} M{sub sun}). We find that as long as the AGN magnetic fields are ejected before the major mergers in the cluster formation history, magnetic fields can be transported throughout the cluster and can be further amplified by the intracluster medium (ICM) turbulence caused by hierarchical mergers during the cluster formation process. The total magnetic energy in the cluster can reach {approx}10{sup 61} erg, with micro Gauss fields distributed over the {approx}Mpc scale. The amplification of the total magnetic energy by the ICM turbulence can be significant, up to {approx}1000 times in some cases. Therefore even weak magnetic fields from AGNs can be used to magnetize the cluster to the observed level. The final magnetic energy in the ICM is determined by the ICM turbulent energy, with a weak dependence on the AGN injection energy. We discuss the properties of magnetic fields throughout the cluster and the synthetic Faraday rotation measure maps they produce. We also show that high spatial resolution over most of the magnetic regions of the cluster is very important to capture the small-scale dynamo process and maintain the magnetic field structure in our simulations.

  13. Active Currents and Stresses on the cell surface: Clustering, Instabilities and Budding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Madan

    2011-03-01

    We study the contractile dynamics of a collection of active polar filaments, such as actin, on a two dimensional substrate, using a continuum hydrodynamic description in the presence of spatiotemporal noise. The steady states, characterized by a variety of phases generically consisting of a transient collection of inward pointing asters. We next study the dynamics of particles advected along these active filaments. This is relevant to the dynamics and organization of a large class of cell surface molecules. We make several predictions regarding the statistics of fluctuations of these passive advective particles which we confirm using fluorescence based experiments. We then show how such active patterning of filaments can give rise to membrane stresses leading to membrane shape deformations. In collaboration with Kripa Gowrishankar and Satyajit Mayor.

  14. Clustering of mammalian Hox genes with other H3K27me3 targets within an active nuclear domain.

    PubMed

    Vieux-Rochas, Maxence; Fabre, Pierre J; Leleu, Marion; Duboule, Denis; Noordermeer, Daan

    2015-04-14

    Embryogenesis requires the precise activation and repression of many transcriptional regulators. The Polycomb group proteins and the associated H3K27me3 histone mark are essential to maintain the inactive state of many of these genes. Mammalian Hox genes are targets of Polycomb proteins and form local 3D clusters centered on the H3K27me3 mark. More distal contacts have also been described, yet their selectivity, dynamics, and relation to other layers of chromatin organization remained elusive. We report that repressed Hox genes form mutual intra- and interchromosomal interactions with other genes located in strong domains labeled by H3K27me3. These interactions occur in a central and active nuclear environment that consists of the HiC compartment A, away from peripheral lamina-associated domains. Interactions are independent of nearby H3K27me3-marked loci and determined by chromosomal distance and cell-type-specific scaling factors, thus inducing a moderate reorganization during embryogenesis. These results provide a simplified view of nuclear organization whereby Polycomb proteins may have evolved to repress genes located in gene-dense regions whose position is restricted to central, active, nuclear environments.

  15. Antibiotic discovery throughout the Small World Initiative: A molecular strategy to identify biosynthetic gene clusters involved in antagonistic activity.

    PubMed

    Davis, Elizabeth; Sloan, Tyler; Aurelius, Krista; Barbour, Angela; Bodey, Elijah; Clark, Brigette; Dennis, Celeste; Drown, Rachel; Fleming, Megan; Humbert, Allison; Glasgo, Elizabeth; Kerns, Trent; Lingro, Kelly; McMillin, MacKenzie; Meyer, Aaron; Pope, Breanna; Stalevicz, April; Steffen, Brittney; Steindl, Austin; Williams, Carolyn; Wimberley, Carmen; Zenas, Robert; Butela, Kristen; Wildschutte, Hans

    2017-01-22

    The emergence of bacterial pathogens resistant to all known antibiotics is a global health crisis. Adding to this problem is that major pharmaceutical companies have shifted away from antibiotic discovery due to low profitability. As a result, the pipeline of new antibiotics is essentially dry and many bacteria now resist the effects of most commonly used drugs. To address this global health concern, citizen science through the Small World Initiative (SWI) was formed in 2012. As part of SWI, students isolate bacteria from their local environments, characterize the strains, and assay for antibiotic production. During the 2015 fall semester at Bowling Green State University, students isolated 77 soil-derived bacteria and genetically characterized strains using the 16S rRNA gene, identified strains exhibiting antagonistic activity, and performed an expanded SWI workflow using transposon mutagenesis to identify a biosynthetic gene cluster involved in toxigenic compound production. We identified one mutant with loss of antagonistic activity and through subsequent whole-genome sequencing and linker-mediated PCR identified a 24.9 kb biosynthetic gene locus likely involved in inhibitory activity in that mutant. Further assessment against human pathogens demonstrated the inhibition of Bacillus cereus, Listeria monocytogenes, and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in the presence of this compound, thus supporting our molecular strategy as an effective research pipeline for SWI antibiotic discovery and genetic characterization.

  16. Identification of a genetic cluster influencing memory performance and hippocampal activity in humans.

    PubMed

    de Quervain, Dominique J-F; Papassotiropoulos, Andreas

    2006-03-14

    Experimental work in animals has shown that memory formation depends on a cascade of molecular events. Here we show that variability of human memory performance is related to variability in genes encoding proteins of this signaling cascade, including the NMDA and metabotrobic glutamate receptors, adenylyl cyclase, CAMKII, PKA, and PKC. The individual profile of genetic variability in these signaling molecules correlated significantly with episodic memory performance (P < 0.00001). Moreover, functional MRI during memory formation revealed that this genetic profile correlated with activations in memory-related brain regions, including the hippocampus and parahippocampal gyrus. The present study indicates that genetic variability in the human homologues of memory-related signaling molecules contributes to interindividual differences in human memory performance and memory-related brain activations.

  17. Probing the Extreme Realm of Active Galactic Nucleus Feedback in the Massive Galaxy Cluster, RX J1532.9+3021

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hlavacek-Larrondo, J.; Allen, S. W.; Taylor, G. B.; Fabian, A. C.; Canning, R. E. A.; Werner, N.; Sanders, J. S.; Grimes, C. K.; Ehlert, S.; von der Linden, A.

    2013-11-01

    We present a detailed Chandra, XMM-Newton, Very Large Array (VLA) and Hubble Space Telescope analysis of one of the strongest cool core clusters known, RX J1532.9+3021 (z = 0.3613). Using new, deep 90 ks Chandra observations, we confirm the presence of a western X-ray cavity or bubble, and report on a newly discovered eastern X-ray cavity. The total mechanical power associated with these active galactic nucleus (AGN) driven outflows is (22 ± 9) × 1044 erg s-1, and is sufficient to offset the cooling, indicating that AGN feedback still provides a viable solution to the cooling flow problem even in the strongest cool core clusters. Based on the distribution of the optical filaments, as well as a jet-like structure seen in the 325 MHz VLA radio map, we suggest that the cluster harbors older outflows along the north to south direction. The jet of the central AGN is therefore either precessing or sloshing-induced motions have caused the outflows to change directions. There are also hints of an X-ray depression to the north aligned with the 325 MHz jet-like structure, which might represent the highest redshift ghost cavity discovered to date. We further find evidence of a cold front (r ≈ 65 kpc) that coincides with the outermost edge of the western X-ray cavity and the edge of the radio mini-halo. The common location of the cold front with the edge of the radio mini-halo supports the idea that the latter originates from electrons being reaccelerated due to sloshing-induced turbulence. Alternatively, its coexistence with the edge of the X-ray cavity may be due to cool gas being dragged out by the outburst. We confirm that the central AGN is highly sub-Eddington and conclude that a >1010 M ⊙ or a rapidly spinning black hole is favored to explain both the radiative-inefficiency of the AGN and the powerful X-ray cavities.

  18. PROBING THE EXTREME REALM OF ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS FEEDBACK IN THE MASSIVE GALAXY CLUSTER, RX J1532.9+3021

    SciTech Connect

    Hlavacek-Larrondo, J.; Allen, S. W.; Canning, R. E. A.; Werner, N.; Ehlert, S.; Von der Linden, A.; Taylor, G. B.; Grimes, C. K.; Fabian, A. C.; Sanders, J. S.

    2013-11-10

    We present a detailed Chandra, XMM-Newton, Very Large Array (VLA) and Hubble Space Telescope analysis of one of the strongest cool core clusters known, RX J1532.9+3021 (z = 0.3613). Using new, deep 90 ks Chandra observations, we confirm the presence of a western X-ray cavity or bubble, and report on a newly discovered eastern X-ray cavity. The total mechanical power associated with these active galactic nucleus (AGN) driven outflows is (22 ± 9) × 10{sup 44} erg s{sup –1}, and is sufficient to offset the cooling, indicating that AGN feedback still provides a viable solution to the cooling flow problem even in the strongest cool core clusters. Based on the distribution of the optical filaments, as well as a jet-like structure seen in the 325 MHz VLA radio map, we suggest that the cluster harbors older outflows along the north to south direction. The jet of the central AGN is therefore either precessing or sloshing-induced motions have caused the outflows to change directions. There are also hints of an X-ray depression to the north aligned with the 325 MHz jet-like structure, which might represent the highest redshift ghost cavity discovered to date. We further find evidence of a cold front (r ≈ 65 kpc) that coincides with the outermost edge of the western X-ray cavity and the edge of the radio mini-halo. The common location of the cold front with the edge of the radio mini-halo supports the idea that the latter originates from electrons being reaccelerated due to sloshing-induced turbulence. Alternatively, its coexistence with the edge of the X-ray cavity may be due to cool gas being dragged out by the outburst. We confirm that the central AGN is highly sub-Eddington and conclude that a >10{sup 10} M{sub ☉} or a rapidly spinning black hole is favored to explain both the radiative-inefficiency of the AGN and the powerful X-ray cavities.

  19. Analysis of Transcriptionally Active Gene Clusters of Major Outer Membrane Protein Multigene Family in Ehrlichia canis and E. chaffeensis

    PubMed Central

    Ohashi, Norio; Rikihisa, Yasuko; Unver, Ahmet

    2001-01-01

    Ehrlichia canis and E. chaffeensis are tick-borne obligatory intramonocytic ehrlichiae that cause febrile systemic illness in humans and dogs, respectively. The current study analyzed the pleomorphic multigene family encoding approximately 30-kDa major outer membrane proteins (OMPs) of E. canis and E. chaffeensis. Upstream from secA and downstream of hypothetical transcriptional regulator, 22 paralogs of the omp gene family were found to be tandemly arranged except for one or two genes with opposite orientations in a 28- and a 27-kb locus in the E. canis and E. chaffeensis genomes, respectively. Each locus consisted of three highly repetitive regions with four nonrepetitive intervening regions. E. canis, in addition, had a 6.9-kb locus which contained a repeat of three tandem paralogs in the 28-kb locus. These total 47 paralogous and orthologous genes encoded OMPs of approximately 30 to 35 kDa consisting of several hypervariable regions alternating with conserved regions. In the 5′-end half of the 27-kb locus or the 28-kb locus of each Ehrlichia species, 14 paralogs were linked by short intergenic spaces ranging from −8 bp (overlapped) to 27 bp, and 8 remaining paralogs in the 3′-end half were connected by longer intergenic spaces ranging from 213 to 632 bp. All 22 paralogs, five unknown genes, and secA in the omp cluster in E. canis were transcriptionally active in the monocyte culture, and the paralogs with short intergenic spaces were cotranscribed with their adjacent genes, including the respective intergenic spaces at both the 5′ and the 3′ sides. Although omp genes are diverse, our results suggest that the gene organization of the clusters and the gene locus are conserved between two species of Ehrlichia to maintain a unique transcriptional mechanism for adaptation to environmental changes common to them. PMID:11254561

  20. Spectroscopic and electronic structure studies of the trinuclear Cu cluster active site of the multicopper oxidase laccase: nature of its coordination unsaturation.

    PubMed

    Quintanar, Liliana; Yoon, Jungjoo; Aznar, Constantino P; Palmer, Amy E; Andersson, K Kristoffer; Britt, R David; Solomon, Edward I

    2005-10-12

    Laccase is a multicopper oxidase that contains four Cu ions, one type 1 (T1), one type 2 (T2), and a coupled binuclear type 3 Cu pair (T3). The T2 and T3 centers form a trinuclear Cu cluster that is the active site for O2 reduction to H2O. A combination of spectroscopic and DFT studies on a derivative where the T1 Cu has been replaced by a spectroscopically innocent Hg2+ ion has led to a detailed geometric and electronic structure description of the resting trinuclear Cu cluster, complementing crystallographic results. The nature of the T2 Cu ligation has been elucidated; this site is three-coordinate with two histidines and a hydroxide over its functional pH range (stabilized by a large inductive effect, cluster charge, and a hydrogen-bonding network). Both the T2 and T3 Cu centers have open coordination positions oriented toward the center of the cluster. DFT calculations show that the negative protein pocket (four conserved Asp/Glu residues within 12 A) and the dielectric of the protein play important roles in the electrostatic stability and integrity of the highly charged, coordinatively unsaturated trinuclear cupric cluster. These tune the ligand binding properties of the cluster, leading to its high affinity for fluoride and its coordination unsaturation in aqueous media, which play a key role in its O2 reactivity.

  1. Chromospheric and Coronal Activity in the 500 Myr old Open Cluster M37: Evidence for Coronal Stripping?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Núñez, Alejandro; Agüeros, Marcel A.; Covey, Kevin R.; López-Morales, Mercedes

    2017-01-01

    We present the results of a spectroscopic survey to characterize chromospheric activity, as measured by {{H}}α emission, in low-mass members of the 500 Myr old open cluster M37. Combining our new measurements of {{H}}α luminosities ({L}{{H}α }) with previously cataloged stellar properties, we identify saturated and unsaturated regimes in the dependence of the {L}{{H}α }-to-bolometric luminosity ratio, {L}{{H}α }/{L}{bol}, on the Rossby number Ro. All rotators with Ro smaller than 0.03 ± 0.01 converge to an activity level of {L}{{H}α }/{L}{bol}=(1.27+/- 0.02)× {10}-4. This saturation threshold ({R}o,{sat}=0.03+/- 0.01) is statistically smaller than that found in most studies of the rotation–activity relation. In the unsaturated regime, slower rotators have lower levels of chromospheric activity, with {L}{{H}α }/{L}{bol}(Ro) following a power-law of index β =-0.51+/- 0.02, slightly shallower than that found for a combined ≈650 Myr old sample of Hyades and Praesepe stars. By comparing this unsaturated behavior to that previously found for coronal activity in M37 (as measured via the X-ray luminosity, {L}{{X}}), we confirm that chromospheric activity decays at a much slower rate than coronal activity with increasing Ro. While a comparison of {L}{{H}α } and {L}{{X}} for M37 members with measurements of both reveals a nearly 1:1 relation, removing the mass-dependencies by comparing instead {L}{{H}α }/{L}{bol} and {L}{{X}}/{L}{bol} does not provide clear evidence for such a relation. Finally, we find that {R}o,{sat} is smaller for our chromospheric than for our coronal indicator of activity ({R}o,{sat}=0.03+/- 0.01 versus 0.09 ± 0.01). We interpret this as possible evidence for coronal stripping.

  2. Double-stranded endonuclease activity in Bacillus halodurans clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-associated Cas2 protein.

    PubMed

    Nam, Ki Hyun; Ding, Fran; Haitjema, Charles; Huang, Qingqiu; DeLisa, Matthew P; Ke, Ailong

    2012-10-19

    The CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats) system is a prokaryotic RNA-based adaptive immune system against extrachromosomal genetic elements. Cas2 is a universally conserved core CRISPR-associated protein required for the acquisition of new spacers for CRISPR adaptation. It was previously characterized as an endoribonuclease with preference for single-stranded (ss)RNA. Here, we show using crystallography, mutagenesis, and isothermal titration calorimetry that the Bacillus halodurans Cas2 (Bha_Cas2) from the subtype I-C/Dvulg CRISPR instead possesses metal-dependent endonuclease activity against double-stranded (ds)DNA. This activity is consistent with its putative function in producing new spacers for insertion into the 5'-end of the CRISPR locus. Mutagenesis and isothermal titration calorimetry studies revealed that a single divalent metal ion (Mg(2+) or Mn(2+)), coordinated by a symmetric Asp pair in the Bha_Cas2 dimer, is involved in the catalysis. We envision that a pH-dependent conformational change switches Cas2 into a metal-binding competent conformation for catalysis. We further propose that the distinct substrate preferences among Cas2 proteins may be determined by the sequence and structure in the β1-α1 loop.

  3. Self-assembled monolayer of organic iodine on a Au surface for attachment of redox-active metal clusters.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ying; Dubey, Manish; Bernasek, Steven L; Dismukes, G Charles

    2007-07-17

    The attachment of a bifunctional iodo-organo-phosphinate compound to gold (Au) surfaces via chemisorption of the iodine atom is described and used to chelate a redox-active metal cluster via the phosphinate group. XPS, AFM, and electrochemical measurements show that (4-iodo-phenyl)phenyl phosphinic acid (IPPA) forms a tightly bound self-assembled monolayer (SAM) on Au surfaces. The surface coverage of an IPPA monolayer on Au was quantified by an electrochemical method and found to be 0.40 +/- 0.03 nmol/cm2, roughly corresponding to 0.4 monolayers. We show that the Au/IPPA SAM, but not the underivatized Au, adsorbs Mn4O4(Ph2PO2)6 from solution by a phosphinate exchange reaction to yield Au/IPPA/Mn4O4(Ph2PO2)5 SAM. The resulting SAM is firmly bound and not removed by sonication, as confirmed by manganese XPS (Mn 2p1/2) and by AFM. Electrochemistry confirms that Mn4O4(Ph2PO2)6 is anchored on the Au/IPPA surface and that redox chemistry can be mediated between the electrode and the surface-attached complex. Mn4O4(Ph2PO2)6 contains the reactive Mn4O46+ cubane core, a redox-active bioinspired catalyst.

  4. Importance of clustered 2'-O-(2-aminoethyl) residues for the gene targeting activity of triple helix-forming oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Puri, Nitin; Majumdar, Alokes; Cuenoud, Bernard; Miller, Paul S; Seidman, Michael M

    2004-02-10

    We are developing triple helix-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) as gene targeting reagents in living mammalian cells. We have described psoralen-linked TFOs with 2'-O-methyl and 2'-O-(2-aminoethyl) (2'-AE) substitutions that are active in a gene knockout assay in cultured cells. The assay is based on mutagenesis by psoralen, a photoactive DNA cross-linker. Previous work showed that TFOs with three or four 2'-AE residues were disproportionately more active than those with one or two substitutions. Here we demonstrate that for optimal bioactivity the 2'-AE residues must be clustered rather than dispersed. We have further characterized bioactive and inactive TFOs in an effort to identify biochemical and biophysical correlates of biological activity. While thermal stability is a standard monitor of TFO biophysical activity, we find that T(m) values do not distinguish bioactive and inactive TFOs. In contrast, measurements of TFO association rates appear to correlate well with bioactivity, in that triplex formation occurs disproportionately faster with the TFOs containing three or four 2'-AE residues. We asked if extending the incubation time prior to photoactivation would enhance the bioactivity of a TFO with a slow on rate relative to the TFO with a faster association rate. However, there was no change in bioactivity differential. These results are compatible with a model in which TFO binding in vivo is followed by relatively rapid elution by cellular functions, similar to that described for transcription factors. Under these circumstances, TFOs with faster on rates would be favored because they would be more likely to be in triplexes at the time of photoactivation.

  5. Hierarchical clustering of brain activity during human nonrapid eye movement sleep.

    PubMed

    Boly, Mélanie; Perlbarg, Vincent; Marrelec, Guillaume; Schabus, Manuel; Laureys, Steven; Doyon, Julien; Pélégrini-Issac, Mélanie; Maquet, Pierre; Benali, Habib

    2012-04-10

    Consciousness is reduced during nonrapid eye movement (NREM) sleep due to changes in brain function that are still poorly understood. Here, we tested the hypothesis that impaired consciousness during NREM sleep is associated with an increased modularity of brain activity. Cerebral connectivity was quantified in resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging times series acquired in 13 healthy volunteers during wakefulness and NREM sleep. The analysis revealed a modification of the hierarchical organization of large-scale networks into smaller independent modules during NREM sleep, independently from EEG markers of the slow oscillation. Such modifications in brain connectivity, possibly driven by sleep ultraslow oscillations, could hinder the brain's ability to integrate information and account for decreased consciousness during NREM sleep.

  6. Feasibility study and pilot cluster-randomised controlled trial of the GoActive intervention aiming to promote physical activity among adolescents: outcomes and lessons learnt

    PubMed Central

    Corder, Kirsten; Brown, Helen E; Schiff, Annie; van Sluijs, Esther M F

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Assess the feasibility of implementing the GoActive intervention in secondary schools, to identify improvements, test study procedures, determine preliminary effectiveness to increase moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA), and inform power calculations to establish programme effectiveness. Setting Feasibility study (1 school) and pilot cluster-randomised controlled trial (CRCT; 2 intervention; 1 control school(s)). Participants 460 participants (46.6% female; 13.2 (0.4) years old). Interventions 8-week intervention (2013) involved: classes choosing weekly activities encouraged by mentors (older adolescents) and in-class peer leaders. Students gain points for trying activities which are entered into an intramural competition. Primary and secondary outcome measures Planned quantitative (questionnaire) and qualitative (focus groups) process evaluation addressed enjoyment, confidence, participation, suggested improvements. Outcomes were assessed at baseline and follow-up (week 8) in pilot CRCT and included accelerometer-assessed MVPA; adolescent-reported activity type, well-being, peer support, shyness, sociability. Analysis of covariance was used to assess preliminary effectiveness as change in MVPA adjusted for baseline. Results All year 9 students in intervention schools were exposed to the intervention; over all schools 77% of eligible students were measured. 71% boys and 74% girls found GoActive ‘fun’; 38% boys and 32% girls said it increased confidence, and 64% boys and 59% girls said they would continue with a GoActive activity. Suggested improvements included more mentorship; improved training; streamlined points recording. Pilot results indicated potential effectiveness ((adjusted mean difference (95% CI) p value; MVPA mins; 5.1 (1.1 to 9.2) p=0.014)) and suggest recruitment of 16 schools (2400 adolescents) for a full trial. Compared with control, intervention students reported greater peer support 0.5 (0.1 to 0.9) p=0.03, well-being 1

  7. Two-Year Longitudinal Analysis of a Cluster Randomized Trial of Physical Activity Promotion by General Practitioners

    PubMed Central

    Grandes, Gonzalo; Sanchez, Alvaro; Montoya, Imanol; Ortega Sanchez-Pinilla, Ricardo; Torcal, Jesús

    2011-01-01

    Background We evaluate the effectiveness of a physical activity promotion programme carried out by general practitioners with inactive patients in routine care. Methods and Findings Pragmatic, cluster randomised clinical trial conducted in eleven public primary care centres in Spain. Fifty-six general practitioners (GPs) were randomly assigned to intervention (29) or standard care (27) groups. They assessed the physical activity level of a systematic sample of patients in routine practice and recruited 4317 individuals (2248 intervention and 2069 control) who did not meet minimum physical activity recommendations. Intervention GPs provided advice to all patients and a physical activity prescription to the subgroup attending an additional appointment (30%). A third of these prescriptions were opportunistically repeated. Control GPs provided standard care. Primary outcome measure was the change in self-reported physical activity from baseline to six, 12 and 24 months. Secondary outcomes included cardiorespiratory fitness and health-related quality of life. A total of 3691 patients (85%) were included in the longitudinal analysis and overall trends over the whole 24 month follow-up were significantly better in the intervention group (p<0.01). The greatest differences with the control group were observed at six months (adjusted difference 1.7 MET*hr/wk [95% CI, 0.8 to 2.6], 25 min/wk [95% CI, 11.3 to 38.4], and a 5.3% higher percentage of patients meeting minimum recommendations [95% CI: 2.1% to 8.8%] NNT = 19). These differences were not statistically significant at 12 and 24 months. No differences were found in secondary outcomes. A significant difference was maintained until 24 months in the proportion of patients achieving minimum recommendation in the subgroup that received a repeat prescription (adjusted difference 10.2%, 95% CI 1.5% to 19.4%). Conclusions General practitioners are effective at increasing the level of physical activity among their inactive

  8. Triruthenium carbonyl clusters derived from chiral aminooxazolines: synthesis and catalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Cabeza, Javier A; da Silva, Iván; del Río, Ignacio; Gossage, Robert A; Miguel, Daniel; Suárez, Marta

    2006-05-28

    Treatment of [Ru3(CO)12] with the chiral aminooxazolines (+)-2-amino-(4R)-phenyl-2-oxazoline (H2amphox), (+)-2-amino-(4R,5S)-indanyl-2-oxazoline (H2aminox) and (+)-2-(2-anilinyl)-(4R,5S)-indanyl-2-oxazoline (H2aninox) in THF at reflux temperature, affords the complexes [Ru3(mu-H)(mu3-kappa2-Hox-N,N)(CO)9] (H2ox = H2amphox, 1; H2aminox, 2) and [Ru3(mu-H)(mu-kappa2-Haninox-N,N)(CO)9] (3). In all cases, the activation of an N-H bond has occurred and the resulting amido fragment spans an edge of the metal triangle, while the N atom of the oxazoline ring is attached to the remaining metal atom (as in 1 and 2), or to one of the metal atoms of the bridged edge (as in 3). The use of 1-3 as catalyst precursors in the asymmetric hydrogen-transfer reduction of acetophenone and in the asymmetric cycloaddition of cyclopentadiene and acroleine is reported.

  9. Dynamin2 controls Rap1 activation and integrin clustering in human T lymphocyte adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Eppler, Felix J.

    2017-01-01

    Leukocyte trafficking is crucial to facilitate efficient immune responses. Here, we report that the large GTPase dynamin2, which is generally considered to have a key role in endocytosis and membrane remodeling, is an essential regulator of integrin-dependent human T lymphocyte adhesion and migration. Chemical inhibition or knockdown of dynamin2 expression significantly reduced integrin-dependent T cell adhesion in vitro. This phenotype was not observed when T cells were treated with various chemical inhibitors which abrogate endocytosis or actin polymerization. We furthermore detected dynamin2 in signaling complexes and propose that it controls T cell adhesion via FAK/Pyk2- and RapGEF1-mediated Rap1 activation. In addition, the dynamin2 inhibitor-induced reduction of lymphocyte adhesion can be rescued by Rap1a overexpression. We demonstrate that the dynamin2 effect on T cell adhesion does not involve integrin affinity regulation but instead relies on its ability to modulate integrin valency. Taken together, we suggest a previously unidentified role of dynamin2 in the regulation of integrin-mediated lymphocyte adhesion via a Rap1 signaling pathway. PMID:28273099

  10. Transcriptional Activation of Pericentromeric Satellite Repeats and Disruption of Centromeric Clustering upon Proteasome Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Natisvili, Theona; Yandim, Cihangir; Silva, Raquel; Emanuelli, Giulia; Krueger, Felix; Nageshwaran, Sathiji; Festenstein, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Heterochromatinisation of pericentromeres, which in mice consist of arrays of major satellite repeats, are important for centromere formation and maintenance of genome stability. The dysregulation of this process has been linked to genomic stress and various cancers. Here we show in mice that the proteasome binds to major satellite repeats and proteasome inhibition by MG132 results in their transcriptional de-repression; this de-repression is independent of cell-cycle perturbation. The transcriptional activation of major satellite repeats upon proteasome inhibition is accompanied by delocalisation of heterochromatin protein 1 alpha (HP1α) from chromocentres, without detectable change in the levels of histone H3K9me3, H3K4me3, H3K36me3 and H3 acetylation on the major satellite repeats. Moreover, inhibition of the proteasome was found to increase the number of chromocentres per cell, reflecting destabilisation of the chromocentre structures. Our findings suggest that the proteasome plays a role in maintaining heterochromatin integrity of pericentromeres.

  11. Transcriptional Activation of Pericentromeric Satellite Repeats and Disruption of Centromeric Clustering upon Proteasome Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Natisvili, Theona; Yandim, Cihangir; Silva, Raquel; Emanuelli, Giulia; Krueger, Felix; Nageshwaran, Sathiji; Festenstein, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Heterochromatinisation of pericentromeres, which in mice consist of arrays of major satellite repeats, are important for centromere formation and maintenance of genome stability. The dysregulation of this process has been linked to genomic stress and various cancers. Here we show in mice that the proteasome binds to major satellite repeats and proteasome inhibition by MG132 results in their transcriptional de-repression; this de-repression is independent of cell-cycle perturbation. The transcriptional activation of major satellite repeats upon proteasome inhibition is accompanied by delocalisation of heterochromatin protein 1 alpha (HP1α) from chromocentres, without detectable change in the levels of histone H3K9me3, H3K4me3, H3K36me3 and H3 acetylation on the major satellite repeats. Moreover, inhibition of the proteasome was found to increase the number of chromocentres per cell, reflecting destabilisation of the chromocentre structures. Our findings suggest that the proteasome plays a role in maintaining heterochromatin integrity of pericentromeres. PMID:27806100

  12. Cost-Effectiveness of a Long-Term Internet-Delivered Worksite Health Promotion Programme on Physical Activity and Nutrition: A Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robroek, Suzan J. W.; Polinder, Suzanne; Bredt, Folef J.; Burdorf, Alex

    2012-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of a long-term workplace health promotion programme on physical activity (PA) and nutrition. In total, 924 participants enrolled in a 2-year cluster randomized controlled trial, with departments (n = 74) within companies (n = 6) as the unit of randomization. The intervention was compared with a…

  13. Correction: A strongly greenish-blue-emitting Cu4Cl4 cluster with an efficient spin-orbit coupling (SOC): fast phosphorescence versus thermally activated delayed fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xu-Lin; Yu, Rongmin; Wu, Xiao-Yuan; Liang, Dong; Jia, Ji-Hui; Lu, Can-Zhong

    2016-06-21

    Correction for 'A strongly greenish-blue-emitting Cu4Cl4 cluster with an efficient spin-orbit coupling (SOC): fast phosphorescence versus thermally activated delayed fluorescence' by Xu-Lin Chen et al., Chem. Commun., 2016, 52, 6288-6291.

  14. Cluster Randomized Trial of a Church-Based Peer Counselor and Tailored Newsletter Intervention to Promote Colorectal Cancer Screening and Physical Activity among Older African Americans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leone, Lucia A.; Allicock, Marlyn; Pignone, Michael P.; Walsh, Joan F.; Johnson, La-Shell; Armstrong-Brown, Janelle; Carr, Carol C.; Langford, Aisha; Ni, Andy; Resnicow, Ken; Campbell, Marci K.

    2016-01-01

    Action Through Churches in Time to Save Lives (ACTS) of Wellness was a cluster randomized controlled trial developed to promote colorectal cancer screening and physical activity (PA) within urban African American churches. Churches were recruited from North Carolina (n = 12) and Michigan (n = 7) and were randomized to intervention (n = 10) or…

  15. The bacterial Entner-Doudoroff pathway does not replace glycolysis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae due to the lack of activity of iron-sulfur cluster enzyme 6-phosphogluconate dehydratase.

    PubMed

    Benisch, Feline; Boles, Eckhard

    2014-02-10

    Replacement of the glycolytic pathway of Saccharomyces cerevisiae by a bacterial Entner-Doudoroff pathway (EDP) would result in lower ATP production and therefore a lower biomass yield is expected that would further allow higher products yields in the fermentation of sugars. To establish catabolism of glucose via the EDP in S. cerevisiae requires expression of only two additional enzyme activities, 6-phosphogluconate dehydratase (PGDH) and KDPG aldolase. In this work, KDPG aldolase from Escherichia coli could be successfully expressed in the yeast cytosol with very high enzyme activity. Nevertheless, simultaneous expression of KDPG aldolase and a codon optimized PGDH gene of E. coli could not replace glycolysis or the pentose phosphate pathway in growth experiments. It could be shown that this was due to the very low enzyme activity of PGDH. This bacterial enzyme is a [4Fe-4S] iron-sulfur cluster protein. Several attempts to improve the availability of iron-sulfur clusters or iron in the yeast cells, to attract the iron-sulfur cluster assembly machinery to Leu1-PGDH fusion proteins or to localize the PGDH in the mitochondria did not result in improved enzyme activities. From our results we conclude that establishing functional expression of iron-sulfur cluster enzymes will be a major task for the integration of the EDP and other biochemical pathways in yeast.

  16. Career Education: Learning with a Purpose. Secondary Guide-Vol. 5. Mathematics and Career Clusters, Mathematics Related Activity Suggestions, Field Trip Sites and Guest Speakers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atkinson, Marilyn; And Others

    The guide offers a compilation of teacher-developed career education materials which may be integrated with secondary level curriculum in mathematics. Suggested activities and ideas present the following units based on career clusters as they relate to mathematics: construction, communications and media, hospitality and recreation, public service,…

  17. Activation of a Silent Fungal Polyketide Biosynthesis Pathway through Regulatory Cross Talk with a Cryptic Nonribosomal Peptide Synthetase Gene Cluster ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Bergmann, Sebastian; Funk, Alexander N.; Scherlach, Kirstin; Schroeckh, Volker; Shelest, Ekaterina; Horn, Uwe; Hertweck, Christian; Brakhage, Axel A.

    2010-01-01

    Filamentous fungi produce numerous natural products that constitute a consistent source of potential drug leads, yet it seems that the majority of natural products are overlooked since most biosynthesis gene clusters are silent under standard cultivation conditions. Screening secondary metabolite genes of the model fungus Aspergillus nidulans, we noted a silent gene cluster on chromosome II comprising two nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) genes, inpA and inpB, flanked by a regulatory gene that we named scpR for secondary metabolism cross-pathway regulator. The induced expression of the scpR gene using the promoter of the alcohol dehydrogenase AlcA led to the transcriptional activation of both the endogenous scpR gene and the NRPS genes. Surprisingly, metabolic profiling of the supernatant of mycelia overexpressing scpR revealed the production of the polyketide asperfuranone. Through transcriptome analysis we found that another silent secondary metabolite gene cluster located on chromosome VIII coding for asperfuranone biosynthesis was specifically induced. Quantitative reverse transcription-PCR proved the transcription not only of the corresponding polyketide synthase (PKS) biosynthesis genes, afoE and afoG, but also of their activator, afoA, under alcAp-scpR-inducing conditions. To exclude the possibility that the product of the inp cluster induced the asperfuranone gene cluster, a strain carrying a deletion of the NRPS gene inpB and, in addition, the alcAp-scpR overexpression cassette was generated. In this strain, under inducing conditions, transcripts of the biosynthesis genes of both the NRPS-containing gene cluster inp and the asperfuranone gene cluster except gene inpB were detected. Moreover, the existence of the polyketide product asperfuranone indicates that the transcription factor ScpR controls the expression of the asperfuranone biosynthesis gene cluster. This expression as well as the biosynthesis of asperfuranone was abolished after the deletion

  18. A participatory parent-focused intervention promoting physical activity in preschools: design of a cluster-randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background With rates of childhood obesity increasing, physical activity (PA) promotion especially in young children has assumed greater importance. Given the limited effectiveness of most interventions to date, new approaches are needed. The General Systems theory suggests that involving parents as intervention targets may be effective in fostering healthier life styles in children. We describe the development of a parent-focused participatory intervention and the procedures used to evaluate its effectiveness in increasing daily PA in preschoolers. Methods/Design Thirty-seven South German preschools were identified for this study and agreed to participate. Using a two-armed, controlled cluster-randomized trial design we test a participatory intervention with parents as the primary target group and potential agents of behavioural change. Specifically, the intervention is designed to engage parents in the development, refinement and selection of project ideas to promote PA and in incorporating these ideas into daily routines within the preschool community, consisting of children, teachers and parents. Our study is embedded within an existing state-sponsored programme providing structured gym lessons to preschool children. Thus, child-based PA outcomes from the study arm with the parent-focused intervention and the state-sponsored programme are compared with those from the study arm with the state-sponsored programme alone. The evaluation entails baseline measurements of study outcomes as well as follow-up measurements at 6 and 12 months. Accelerometry measures PA intensity over a period of six days, with the mean over six days used as the primary outcome measure. Secondary outcomes include childrens' BMI, a sum of averaged skin fold thickness measurements across multiple sites, and PA behaviour. Longitudinal multilevel models are used to assess within-subject change and between-group differences in study outcomes, adjusted for covariates at the preschool and

  19. Physical activity and academic achievement across the curriculum: Results from a 3-year cluster-randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Donnelly, Joseph E; Hillman, Charles H; Greene, Jerry L; Hansen, David M; Gibson, Cheryl A; Sullivan, Debra K; Poggio, John; Mayo, Matthew S; Lambourne, Kate; Szabo-Reed, Amanda N; Herrmann, Stephen D; Honas, Jeffery J; Scudder, Mark R; Betts, Jessica L; Henley, Katherine; Hunt, Suzanne L; Washburn, Richard A

    2017-02-11

    We compared changes in academic achievement across 3years between children in elementary schools receiving the Academic Achievement and Physical Activity Across the Curriculum intervention (A+PAAC), in which classroom teachers were trained to deliver academic lessons using moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) compared to a non-intervention control. Elementary schools in eastern Kansas (n=17) were cluster randomized to A+PAAC (N=9, target ≥100min/week) or control (N=8). Academic achievement (math, reading, spelling) was assessed using the Wechsler Individual Achievement Test-Third Edition (WIAT-III) in a sample of children (A+PAAC=316, Control=268) in grades 2 and 3 at baseline (Fall 2011) and repeated each spring across 3years. On average 55min/week of A+PACC lessons were delivered each week across the intervention. Baseline WIAT-III scores (math, reading, spelling) were significantly higher in students in A+PAAC compared with control schools and improved in both groups across 3years. However, linear mixed modeling, accounting for baseline between group differences in WIAT-III scores, ethnicity, family income, and cardiovascular fitness, found no significant impact of A+PAAC on any of the academic achievement outcomes as determined by non-significant group by time interactions. A+PAAC neither diminished or improved academic achievement across 3-years in elementary school children compared with controls. Our target of 100min/week of active lessons was not achieved; however, students attending A+PAAC schools received an additional 55min/week of MVPA which may be associated with both physical and mental health benefits, without a reduction in time devoted to academic instruction.

  20. Flare And Starspot-Induced Variabilities Of Red Dwarf Stars In The Open Cluster M37: Photometric Study On Stellar Magnetic Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Seo-Won; Byun, Yong-Ik; Hartman, Joel D.

    2016-07-01

    We investigate the statistical properties of flare and starspot-induced variabilities of red dwarf stars in the open cluster M37, particularly (1) understanding magnetic activity phenomena that are seen in groups of stars (with the same age and mass) and (2) the correlations among activity indicators. The use of both tracers is particularly useful for statistical studies since it can provide more homogeneous information about their activity behaviors. We recalibrate the archival imaging data of the M37 obtained by one-month observing run with MMT/Megacam camera, i.e., Deep, High-cadence and Long-term monitoring survey. To detect any significant variability from cool objects, forced photometry with our multi-aperture indexing technique is applied to the entire time-series images. In this contributed talk, we present an update on flare and rotational statistics of this cluster and further strong evidences that support the classical age-rotation-activity paradigm.

  1. Theory-Based Behavioral Intervention Increases Self-Reported Physical Activity in South African Men: A Cluster-Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Jemmott, John B.; Jemmott, Loretta S.; Ngwane, Zolani; Zhang, Jingwen; Heeren, G. Anita; Icard, Larry D.; O’Leary, Ann; Mtose, Xoliswa; Teitelman, Anne; Carty, Craig

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine whether a health-promotion intervention increases South African men’s adherence to physical-activity guidelines. Method We utilized a cluster-randomized controlled trial design. Eligible clusters, residential neighborhoods near East London, South Africa, were matched in pairs. Within randomly selected pairs, neighborhoods were randomized to theory-based, culturally congruent health-promotion intervention encouraging physical activity or attention-matched HIV/STI risk-reduction control intervention. Men residing in the neighborhoods and reporting coitus in the previous 3 months were eligible. Primary outcome was self-reported individual-level adherence to physical-activity guidelines averaged over 6-month and 12-month post-intervention assessments. Data were collected in 2007–2010. Data collectors, but not facilitators or participants, were blind to group assignment. Results Primary outcome intention-to-treat analysis included 22 of 22 clusters and 537 of 572 men in the health-promotion intervention and 22 of 22 clusters and 569 of 609 men in the attention-control intervention. Model-estimated probability of meeting physical-activity guidelines was 51.0% in the health-promotion intervention and 44.7% in attention-matched control (OR = 1.34; 95% CI, 1.09–1.63), adjusting for baseline prevalence and clustering from 44 neighborhoods. Conclusion A theory-based culturally congruent intervention increased South African men’s self-reported physical activity, a key contributor to deaths from non-communicable diseases in South Africa. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01490359. PMID:24736094

  2. Geomorphological activity at a rock glacier front detected with a 3D density-based clustering algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Micheletti, Natan; Tonini, Marj; Lane, Stuart N.

    2017-02-01

    Acquisition of high density point clouds using terrestrial laser scanners (TLSs) has become commonplace in geomorphic science. The derived point clouds are often interpolated onto regular grids and the grids compared to detect change (i.e. erosion and deposition/advancement movements). This procedure is necessary for some applications (e.g. digital terrain analysis), but it inevitably leads to a certain loss of potentially valuable information contained within the point clouds. In the present study, an alternative methodology for geomorphological analysis and feature detection from point clouds is proposed. It rests on the use of the Density-Based Spatial Clustering of Applications with Noise (DBSCAN), applied to TLS data for a rock glacier front slope in the Swiss Alps. The proposed methods allowed the detection and isolation of movements directly from point clouds which yield to accuracies in the following computation of volumes that depend only on the actual registered distance between points. We demonstrated that these values are more conservative than volumes computed with the traditional DEM comparison. The results are illustrated for the summer of 2015, a season of enhanced geomorphic activity associated with exceptionally high temperatures.

  3. Ion-exchanged binuclear Ca2OX clusters, X = 1-4, as active sites of selective oxidation over MOR and FAU zeolites.

    PubMed

    Larin, A V; Zhidomirov, G M; Trubnikov, D N; Vercauteren, D P

    2010-01-30

    A new series of calcium oxide clusters Ca(2)O(X) (X = 1-4) at cationic positions of mordenite (MOR) and faujasite (FAU) is studied via the isolated cluster approach. Active oxide framework fragments are represented via 8-membered window (8R) in MOR, and two 6R and 4R windows (6R+4R) possessing one common Si-O-Si moiety in FAU. Structural similarities between the Ca(2)O(X)(8R) and Ca(2)O(X)(6R+4R) moieties are considered up to X = 4. High oxidation possibilities of the Ca(2)O(2)(nR) and Ca(2)O(3)(nR) systems are demonstrated relative to CO, whose oxidation over the Ca-exchanged zeolite forms is well studied experimentally. Relevance of the oxide cluster models with respect to trapping and desorption of singlet dioxygen is discussed.

  4. Cocaine users with comorbid Cluster B personality disorders show dysfunctional brain activation and connectivity in the emotional regulation networks during negative emotion maintenance and reappraisal.

    PubMed

    Albein-Urios, Natalia; Verdejo-Román, Juan; Soriano-Mas, Carles; Asensio, Samuel; Martínez-González, José Miguel; Verdejo-García, Antonio

    2013-12-01

    Cocaine dependence often co-occurs with Cluster B personality disorders. Since both disorders are characterized by emotion regulation deficits, we predicted that cocaine comorbid patients would exhibit dysfunctional patterns of brain activation and connectivity during reappraisal of negative emotions. We recruited 18 cocaine users with comorbid Cluster B personality disorders, 17 cocaine users without comorbidities and 21 controls to be scanned using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) during performance on a reappraisal task in which they had to maintain or suppress the emotions induced by negative affective stimuli. We followed region of interest (ROI) and whole-brain approaches to investigate brain activations and connectivity associated with negative emotion experience and reappraisal. Results showed that cocaine users with comorbid personality disorders had reduced activation of the subgenual anterior cingulate cortex during negative emotion maintenance and increased activation of the lateral orbitofrontal cortex and the amygdala during reappraisal. Amygdala activation correlated with impulsivity and antisocial beliefs in the comorbid group. Connectivity analyses showed that in the cocaine comorbid group the subgenual cingulate was less efficiently connected with the amygdala and the fusiform gyri and more efficiently connected with the anterior insula during maintenance, whereas during reappraisal the left orbitofrontal cortex was more efficiently connected with the amygdala and the right orbitofrontal cortex was less efficiently connected with the dorsal striatum. We conclude that cocaine users with comorbid Cluster B personality disorders have distinctive patterns of brain activation and connectivity during maintenance and reappraisal of negative emotions, which correlate with impulsivity and dysfunctional beliefs.

  5. Cluster headache

    MedlinePlus

    Histamine headache; Headache - histamine; Migrainous neuralgia; Headache - cluster; Horton's headache; Vascular headache - cluster ... be related to the body's sudden release of histamine (chemical in the body released during an allergic ...

  6. Nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy reveals the FeS cluster composition and active site vibrational properties of an O2-tolerant NAD+-reducing [NiFe] hydrogenase

    DOE PAGES

    Lauterbach, Lars; Wang, Hongxin; Horch, Marius; ...

    2014-10-30

    Hydrogenases are complex metalloenzymes that catalyze the reversible splitting of molecular hydrogen into protons and electrons essentially without overpotential. The NAD+-reducing soluble hydrogenase (SH) from Ralstonia eutropha is capable of H2 conversion even in the presence of usually toxic dioxygen. The molecular details of the underlying reactions are largely unknown, mainly because of limited knowledge of the structure and function of the various metal cofactors present in the enzyme. Here, all iron-containing cofactors of the SH were investigated by 57Fe specific nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS). Our data provide experimental evidence for one [2Fe2S] center and four [4Fe4S] clusters, whichmore » is consistent with the amino acid sequence composition. Only the [2Fe2S] cluster and one of the four [4Fe4S] clusters were reduced upon incubation of the SH with NADH. This finding explains the discrepancy between the large number of FeS clusters and the small amount of FeS cluster-related signals as detected by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopic analysis of several NAD+-reducing hydrogenases. For the first time, Fe–CO and Fe–CN modes derived from the [NiFe] active site could be distinguished by NRVS through selective 13C labeling of the CO ligand. This strategy also revealed the molecular coordinates that dominate the individual Fe–CO modes. The present approach explores the complex vibrational signature of the Fe–S clusters and the hydrogenase active site, thereby showing that NRVS represents a powerful tool for the elucidation of complex biocatalysts containing multiple cofactors.« less

  7. A Career Guidance Curriculum for Ninth Grade Students. Occupational Cluster Learning Activities. Business-Environmental. Part 1 of 2. Ninth Grade Guidance Project. Project Duration: July 16, 1979, to June 30, 1980.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cape May County Vocational Schools, NJ.

    This first of two parts presents learning activities for four occupational clusters of a ninth-grade cluster program. It contains theory and hands-on activities that explore the occupational requirements and working environment of these areas to help students make intelligent decisions of possible career choices based on levels of interest and…

  8. A Career Guidance Curriculum for Ninth Grade Students. Occupational Cluster Learning Activities. Health-Technical. Part 2 of 2. Ninth Grade Career Guidance Project. Project Duration: July 16, 1979, to June 30, 1980.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cape May County Vocational Schools, NJ.

    This second of two parts presents learning activities for four occupational clusters of a ninth-grade cluster program. It contains theory and hands-on activities that explore the occupational requirements and working environment of these areas to help students make intelligent decisions of possible career choices based on levels of interest and…

  9. Meaningful Clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Sanfilippo, Antonio P.; Calapristi, Augustin J.; Crow, Vernon L.; Hetzler, Elizabeth G.; Turner, Alan E.

    2004-05-26

    We present an approach to the disambiguation of cluster labels that capitalizes on the notion of semantic similarity to assign WordNet senses to cluster labels. The approach provides interesting insights on how document clustering can provide the basis for developing a novel approach to word sense disambiguation.

  10. Cluster B personality symptoms in persons at genetic risk for schizophrenia are associated with social competence and activation of the right temporo-parietal junction during emotion processing.

    PubMed

    Goldschmidt, Micaela Giuliana; Villarreal, Mirta Fabiana; de Achával, Delfina; Drucaroff, Lucas Javier; Costanzo, Elsa Yolanda; Castro, Mariana Nair; Pahissa, Jaime; Camprodon, Joan; Nemeroff, Charles; Guinjoan, Salvador Martín

    2014-01-30

    Personality disorders are common in nonpsychotic siblings of patients with schizophrenia, and some personality traits in this group may be associated with an increased risk for full-blown psychosis. We sought to establish if faulty right-hemisphere activation induced by social cognitive tasks, as previously described in patients with schizophrenia, is associated with specific personality symptoms in their unaffected siblings. We observed that cluster B personality symptoms in this group were inversely related to activation in the right temporo parietal junction (rTPJ, a structure critical in social cognitive processing) in response to a basic emotion processing task and also to social competence, whereas in contrast to our initial hypothesis, cluster A traits were not associated with right hemisphere activation during emotion processing or with social competence. These findings suggest the existence of clinical traits in at-risk individuals which share a common neurobiological substrate with schizophrenia, in regards to social performance.

  11. Origin of high oxygen reduction reaction activity of Pt12 and strategy to obtain better catalyst using sub-nanosized Pt-alloy clusters

    PubMed Central

    Miyazaki, Kasumi; Mori, Hirotoshi

    2017-01-01

    In the present study, methods to enhance the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity of sub-nanosized Pt clusters were investigated in a theoretical manner. Using ab initio molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo simulations based on density functional theory, we have succeeded in determining the origin of the superior ORR activity of Pt12 compared to that of Pt13. That is, it was clarified that the electronic structure of Pt12 fluctuates to a greater extent compared to that of Pt13, which leads to stronger resistance against catalyst poisoning by O/OH. Based on this conclusion, a set of sub-nanosized Pt-alloy clusters was also explored to find catalysts with better ORR activities and lower financial costs. It was suggested that Ga4Pt8, Ge4Pt8, and Sn4Pt8 would be good candidates for ORR catalysts. PMID:28349985

  12. Emission of Thermally Activated Electrons from Rare Gas Clusters Irradiated with Intense VUV Light Pulses from a Free Electron Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Laarmann, T.; Rusek, M.; Schulz, J.; Castro, A.R.B. de; Guertler, P.; Laasch, W.; Moeller, T.

    2005-08-05

    The ionization dynamics of Ar and Xe clusters irradiated with intense vacuum ultraviolet light from a free-electron laser is investigated using photoelectron spectroscopy. Clusters comprising between 70 and 900 atoms were irradiated with femtosecond pulses at 95 nm wavelength ({approx}13 eV photon energy) and a peak intensity of {approx}4x10{sup 12} W/cm{sup 2}. A broad thermal distribution of emitted electrons from clusters with a maximum kinetic energy up to 30-40 eV is observed. The observation of relatively low-energy photoelectrons is in good agreement with calculations using a time-dependent Thomas-Fermi model and gives experimental evidence of an outer ionization process of the clusters, due to delayed thermoelectronic emission.

  13. Emission of thermally activated electrons from rare gas clusters irradiated with intense VUV light pulses from a free electron laser.

    PubMed

    Laarmann, T; Rusek, M; Wabnitz, H; Schulz, J; de Castro, A R B; Gürtler, P; Laasch, W; Möller, T

    2005-08-05

    The ionization dynamics of Ar and Xe clusters irradiated with intense vacuum ultraviolet light from a free-electron laser is investigated using photoelectron spectroscopy. Clusters comprising between 70 and 900 atoms were irradiated with femtosecond pulses at 95 nm wavelength (approximately 13 eV photon energy) and a peak intensity of approximately 4 x 10(12) W/cm2. A broad thermal distribution of emitted electrons from clusters with a maximum kinetic energy up to 30-40 eV is observed. The observation of relatively low-energy photoelectrons is in good agreement with calculations using a time-dependent Thomas-Fermi model and gives experimental evidence of an outer ionization process of the clusters, due to delayed thermoelectronic emission.

  14. Comparison of topological clustering within protein networks using edge metrics that evaluate full sequence, full structure, and active site microenvironment similarity

    PubMed Central

    Leuthaeuser, Janelle B; Knutson, Stacy T; Kumar, Kiran; Babbitt, Patricia C; Fetrow, Jacquelyn S

    2015-01-01

    The development of accurate protein function annotation methods has emerged as a major unsolved biological problem. Protein similarity networks, one approach to function annotation via annotation transfer, group proteins into similarity-based clusters. An underlying assumption is that the edge metric used to identify such clusters correlates with functional information. In this contribution, this assumption is evaluated by observing topologies in similarity networks using three different edge metrics: sequence (BLAST), structure (TM-Align), and active site similarity (active site profiling, implemented in DASP). Network topologies for four well-studied protein superfamilies (enolase, peroxiredoxin (Prx), glutathione transferase (GST), and crotonase) were compared with curated functional hierarchies and structure. As expected, network topology differs, depending on edge metric; comparison of topologies provides valuable information on structure/function relationships. Subnetworks based on active site similarity correlate with known functional hierarchies at a single edge threshold more often than sequence- or structure-based networks. Sequence- and structure-based networks are useful for identifying sequence and domain similarities and differences; therefore, it is important to consider the clustering goal before deciding appropriate edge metric. Further, conserved active site residues identified in enolase and GST active site subnetworks correspond with published functionally important residues. Extension of this analysis yields predictions of functionally determinant residues for GST subgroups. These results support the hypothesis that active site similarity-based networks reveal clusters that share functional details and lay the foundation for capturing functionally relevant hierarchies using an approach that is both automatable and can deliver greater precision in function annotation than current similarity-based methods. PMID:26073648

  15. About the Clusters Program

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Environmental Technology Innovation Clusters Program advises cluster organizations, encourages collaboration between clusters, tracks U.S. environmental technology clusters, and connects EPA programs to cluster needs.

  16. A cluster-randomised, controlled trial to assess the impact of a workplace osteoporosis prevention intervention on the dietary and physical activity behaviours of working women: study protocol

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Osteoporosis is a debilitating disease and its risk can be reduced through adequate calcium consumption and physical activity. This protocol paper describes a workplace-based intervention targeting behaviour change in premenopausal women working in sedentary occupations. Method/Design A cluster-randomised design was used, comparing the efficacy of a tailored intervention to standard care. Workplaces were the clusters and units of randomisation and intervention. Sample size calculations incorporated the cluster design. Final number of clusters was determined to be 16, based on a cluster size of 20 and calcium intake parameters (effect size 250 mg, ICC 0.5 and standard deviation 290 mg) as it required the highest number of clusters. Sixteen workplaces were recruited from a pool of 97 workplaces and randomly assigned to intervention and control arms (eight in each). Women meeting specified inclusion criteria were then recruited to participate. Workplaces in the intervention arm received three participatory workshops and organisation wide educational activities. Workplaces in the control/standard care arm received print resources. Intervention workshops were guided by self-efficacy theory and included participatory activities such as goal setting, problem solving, local food sampling, exercise trials, group discussion and behaviour feedback. Outcomes measures were calcium intake (milligrams/day) and physical activity level (duration: minutes/week), measured at baseline, four weeks and six months post intervention. Discussion This study addresses the current lack of evidence for behaviour change interventions focussing on osteoporosis prevention. It addresses missed opportunities of using workplaces as a platform to target high-risk individuals with sedentary occupations. The intervention was designed to modify behaviour levels to bring about risk reduction. It is the first to address dietary and physical activity components each with unique intervention

  17. Clustering, cosmology and a new era of black hole demographics- I. The conditional luminosity function of active galactic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballantyne, D. R.

    2017-01-01

    Deep X-ray surveys have provided a comprehensive and largely unbiased view of active galactic nuclei (AGN) evolution stretching back to z ˜ 5. However, it has been challenging to use the survey results to connect this evolution to the cosmological environment that AGN inhabit. Exploring this connection will be crucial to understanding the triggering mechanisms of AGN and how these processes manifest in observations at all wavelengths. In anticipation of upcoming wide-field X-ray surveys that will allow quantitative analysis of AGN environments, this paper presents a method to observationally constrain the conditional luminosity function (CLF) of AGN at a specific z. Once measured, the CLF allows the calculation of the AGN bias, mean dark matter halo mass, AGN lifetime, halo occupation number, and AGN correlation function- all as a function of luminosity. The CLF can be constrained using a measurement of the X-ray luminosity function and the correlation length at different luminosities. The method is illustrated at z ≈ 0 and 0.9 using the limited data that are currently available, and a clear luminosity dependence in the AGN bias and mean halo mass is predicted at both z, supporting the idea that there are at least two different modes of AGN triggering. In addition, the CLF predicts that z ≈ 0.9 quasars may be commonly hosted by haloes with Mh ˜ 1014 M⊙. These `young cluster' environments may provide the necessary interactions between gas-rich galaxies to fuel luminous accretion. The results derived from this method will be useful to populate AGN of different luminosities in cosmological simulations.

  18. Cdx is crucial for the timing mechanism driving colinear Hox activation and defines a trunk segment in the Hox cluster topology.

    PubMed

    Neijts, Roel; Amin, Shilu; van Rooijen, Carina; Deschamps, Jacqueline

    2017-02-15

    Cdx and Hox transcription factors are important regulators of axial patterning and are required for tissue generation along the vertebrate body axis. Cdx genes have been demonstrated to act upstream of Hox genes in midgestation embryos. Here, we investigate the role of Cdx transcription factors in the gradual colinear activation of the Hox clusters. We found that Hox temporally colinear expression is severely affected in epiblast stem cells derived from Cdx null embryos. We demonstrate that after initiation of 3' Hox gene transcription, Cdx activity is crucial for H3K27ac deposition and for accessibility of cis-regulatory elements around the central - or 'trunk' - Hox genes. We thereby identify a Cdx-responsive segment of HoxA, immediately 5' to the recently defined regulatory domain orchestrating initial transcription of the first Hox gene. We propose that this partition of HoxA into a Wnt-driven 3' part and the newly found Cdx-dependent middle segment of the cluster, forms a structural fundament of Hox colinearity of expression. Subsequently to initial Wnt-induced activation of 3' Hox genes, Cdx transcription factors would act as crucial effectors for activating central Hox genes, until the last gene of the cluster arrests the process.

  19. Hierarchical chlorine-doped rutile TiO{sub 2} spherical clusters of nanorods: Large-scale synthesis and high photocatalytic activity

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Hua; Zheng Zhi; Zhang Lizhi Zhang Hailu; Deng Feng

    2008-09-15

    In this study, we report the synthesis of hierarchical chlorine-doped rutile TiO{sub 2} spherical clusters of nanorods photocatalyst on a large scale via a soft interface approach. This catalyst showed much higher photocatalytic activity than the famous commercial titania (Degussa P25) under visible light ({lambda}>420 nm). The resulting sample was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high-resolution TEM (HRTEM), nitrogen adsorption, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy, {sup 1}H solid magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS-NMR) and photoluminescence spectroscopy. On the basis of characterization results, we found that the doping of chlorine resulted in red shift of absorption and higher surface acidity as well as crystal defects in the photocatalyst, which were the reasons for high photocatalytic activity of chlorine-doped TiO{sub 2} under visible light ({lambda}>420 nm). These hierarchical chlorine-doped rutile TiO{sub 2} spherical clusters of nanorods are very attractive in the fields of environmental pollutants removal and solar cell because of their easy separation and high activity. - Graphical abstract: Hierarchical chlorine-doped rutile TiO{sub 2} spherical clusters of nanorods photocatalyst were synthesized on a large scale via a soft interface approach. This catalyst showed much higher photocatalytic activity than the famous commercial titania (Degussa P25) under visible light ({lambda}>420 nm)

  20. ROLE OF C AND P SITES ON THE CHEMICAL ACTIVITY OF METAL CARBIDE AND PHOSPHIDES: FROM CLUSTERS TO SINGLE-CRYSTAL SURFACES

    SciTech Connect

    RODRIGUEZ,J.A.; VINES, F.; LIU, P.; ILLAS, F.

    2007-07-01

    Transition metal carbides and phosphides have shown tremendous potential as highly active catalysts. At a microscopic level, it is not well understood how these new catalysts work. Their high activity is usually attributed to ligand or/and ensemble effects. Here, we review recent studies that examine the chemical activity of metal carbide and phosphides as a function of size, from clusters to extended surfaces, and metal/carbon or metal/phosphorous ratio. These studies reveal that the C and P sites in these compounds cannot be considered as simple spectators. They moderate the reactivity of the metal centers and provide bonding sites for adsorbates.

  1. Ab initio molecular-orbital study on successive hydrogen-elimination reactions with low activation energies in the a-Si:H formation process: Cluster-size dependence of activation energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Kota; Honna, Hiroshi; Iwabuchi, Susumu; Hirano, Tsuneo; Koinuma, Hideomi

    1994-07-01

    Successive hydrogen-elimination reactions with low activation energies during the formation of a-Si:H by silane plasma chemical-vapor deposition proposed by us were studied by using a larger cluster model on the basis of an ab initio molecular-orbital method. The activation energy of the first step, the reaction of a dangling-bond site with an adjacent tetrahedrally coordinated silicon, was found to be 18.2 kcal/mol (0.79 eV) by employing a larger cluster model. The total process was also shown to be thermodynamically more favorable by using larger cluster models. Thus, the successive process is considered to play an important role in a-Si:H formation processes.

  2. Imaging active faulting in a region of distributed deformation from the joint clustering of focal mechanisms and hypocentres: Application to the Azores-western Mediterranean region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Custódio, Susana; Lima, Vânia; Vales, Dina; Cesca, Simone; Carrilho, Fernando

    2016-04-01

    The matching between linear trends of hypocentres and fault planes indicated by focal mechanisms (FMs) is frequently used to infer the location and geometry of active faults. This practice works well in regions of fast lithospheric deformation, where earthquake patterns are clear and major structures accommodate the bulk of deformation, but typically fails in regions of slow and distributed deformation. We present a new joint FM and hypocentre cluster algorithm that is able to detect systematically the consistency between hypocentre lineations and FMs, even in regions of distributed deformation. We apply the method to the Azores-western Mediterranean region, with particular emphasis on western Iberia. The analysis relies on a compilation of hypocentres and FMs taken from regional and global earthquake catalogues, academic theses and technical reports, complemented by new FMs for western Iberia. The joint clustering algorithm images both well-known and new seismo-tectonic features. The Azores triple junction is characterised by FMs with vertical pressure (P) axes, in good agreement with the divergent setting, and the Iberian domain is characterised by NW-SE oriented P axes, indicating a response of the lithosphere to the ongoing oblique convergence between Nubia and Eurasia. Several earthquakes remain unclustered in the western Mediterranean domain, which may indicate a response to local stresses. The major regions of consistent faulting that we identify are the mid-Atlantic ridge, the Terceira rift, the Trans-Alboran shear zone and the north coast of Algeria. In addition, other smaller earthquake clusters present a good match between epicentre lineations and FM fault planes. These clusters may signal single active faults or wide zones of distributed but consistent faulting. Mainland Portugal is dominated by strike-slip earthquakes with fault planes coincident with the predominant NNE-SSW and WNW-ESE oriented earthquake lineations. Clusters offshore SW Iberia are

  3. Hydrogen activation, diffusion, and clustering on CeO{sub 2}(111): A DFT+U study

    SciTech Connect

    Fernández-Torre, Delia

    2014-07-07

    We present a comprehensive density functional theory+U study of the mechanisms underlying the dissociation of molecular hydrogen, and diffusion and clustering of the resulting atomic species on the CeO{sub 2}(111) surface. Contrary to a widely held view based solely on a previous theoretical prediction, our results show conclusively that H{sub 2} dissociation is an activated process with a large energy barrier ∼1.0 eV that is not significantly affected by coverage or the presence of surface oxygen vacancies. The reaction proceeds through a local energy minimum – where the molecule is located close to one of the surface oxygen atoms and the H–H bond has been substantially weaken by the interaction with the substrate –, and a transition state where one H atom is attached to a surface O atom and the other H atom sits on-top of a Ce{sup 4+} ion. In addition, we have explored how several factors, including H coverage, the location of Ce{sup 3+} ions as well as the U value, may affect the chemisorption energy and the relative stability of isolated OH groups versus pair and trimer structures. The trimer stability at low H coverages and the larger upward relaxation of the surface O atoms within the OH groups are consistent with the assignment of the frequent experimental observation by non-contact atomic force and scanning tunneling microscopies of bright protrusions on three neighboring surface O atoms to a triple OH group. The diffusion path of isolated H atoms on the surface goes through the adsorption on-top of an oxygen in the third atomic layer with a large energy barrier of ∼1.8 eV. Overall, the large energy barriers for both, molecular dissociation and atomic diffusion, are consistent with the high activity and selectivity found recently in the partial hydrogenation of acetylene catalyzed by ceria at high H{sub 2}/C{sub 2}H{sub 2} ratios.

  4. A CENSUS OF MID-INFRARED-SELECTED ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI IN MASSIVE GALAXY CLUSTERS AT 0 {approx}< z {approx}< 1.3

    SciTech Connect

    Tomczak, Adam R.; Tran, Kim-Vy H.; Saintonge, Amelie

    2011-09-01

    We conduct a deep mid-infrared (mid-IR) census of nine massive galaxy clusters at (0 < z < 1.3) with a total of {approx}1500 spectroscopically confirmed member galaxies using Spitzer/IRAC photometry and established mid-IR color selection techniques. Of the 949 cluster galaxies that are detected in at least three of the four IRAC channels at the {>=}3{sigma} level, we identify 12 that host mid-IR-selected active galactic nuclei (IR-AGNs). To compare the IR-AGNs across our redshift range, we define two complete samples of cluster galaxies: (1) optically selected members with rest-frame V{sub AB} magnitude < - 21.5 and (2) mid-IR-selected members brighter than (M*{sub 3.6} + 0.5), i.e., essentially a stellar mass cut. In both samples, we measure f{sub IR-AGN} {approx} 1% with a strong upper limit of {approx}3% at z < 1. This uniformly low IR-AGN fraction at z < 1 is surprising given that the fraction of 24 {mu}m sources in the same galaxy clusters is observed to increase by about a factor of four from z {approx} 0 to z {approx} 1; this indicates that most of the detected 24 {mu}m flux is due to star formation. Only in our single galaxy cluster at z = 1.24 is the IR-AGN fraction measurably higher at {approx}15% (all members; {approx}70% for late-types only). In agreement with recent studies, we find that the cluster IR-AGNs are predominantly hosted by late-type galaxies with blue optical colors, i.e., members with recent/ongoing star formation. The four brightest IR-AGNs are also X-ray sources; these IR+X-ray AGNs all lie outside the cluster core (R{sub proj} {approx}> 0.5 Mpc) and are hosted by highly morphologically disturbed members. Although our sample is limited, our results suggest that f{sub IR-AGN} in massive galaxy clusters is not strongly correlated with star formation at z < 1 and that IR-AGNs have a more prominent role at z {approx}> 1.

  5. Active galactic nuclei. IV - Supplying black hole clusters by tidal disruption and by tidal capture of stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoeger, W. R.; Pacholczyk, A. G.; Stepinski, T. F.

    1992-01-01

    The extent to which individual holes in a cluster of black holes with a mass spectrum can liberate and accrete the resulting material by tidally disrupting stars they encounter, or by capturing stars as binary companions is studied. It is found that the smaller black holes in 'the halo' of such clusters can adequately supply themselves to the level M-dot sub h or greater than 0.0001(M-dot sub h) sub crit, and up to 0.05(M-dot sub h)sub crit for the smallest holes, by tidal disruption, as long as the cluster is embedded in a distribution of stars of relatively high density (not less than 0.1M sub cl/cu pc), and as long as the entire cluster of stars is not too compact (not less than 0.5 pc). Consideration is given to modifications this 'internal' mode of supply introduces in the spectrum emitted by such black hole clusters, and to the current status of their viability as models for AGN and QSOs in light of dynamical studies by Quinlan and Shapiro (1987, 1989).

  6. Effect of a Nutrition Supplement and Physical Activity Program on Pneumonia and Walking Capacity in Chilean Older People: A Factorial Cluster Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Dangour, Alan D.; Albala, Cecilia; Allen, Elizabeth; Grundy, Emily; Walker, Damian G.; Aedo, Cristian; Sanchez, Hugo; Fletcher, Olivia; Elbourne, Diana; Uauy, Ricardo

    2011-01-01

    Background Ageing is associated with increased risk of poor health and functional decline. Uncertainties about the health-related benefits of nutrition and physical activity for older people have precluded their widespread implementation. We investigated the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of a national nutritional supplementation program and/or a physical activity intervention among older people in Chile. Methods and Findings We conducted a cluster randomized factorial trial among low to middle socioeconomic status adults aged 65–67.9 years living in Santiago, Chile. We randomized 28 clusters (health centers) into the study and recruited 2,799 individuals in 2005 (∼100 per cluster). The interventions were a daily micronutrient-rich nutritional supplement, or two 1-hour physical activity classes per week, or both interventions, or neither, for 24 months. The primary outcomes, assessed blind to allocation, were incidence of pneumonia over 24 months, and physical function assessed by walking capacity 24 months after enrolment. Adherence was good for the nutritional supplement (∼75%), and moderate for the physical activity intervention (∼43%). Over 24 months the incidence rate of pneumonia did not differ between intervention and control clusters (32.5 versus 32.6 per 1,000 person years respectively; risk ratio = 1.00; 95% confidence interval 0.61–1.63; p = 0.99). In intention-to-treat analysis, after 24 months there was a significant difference in walking capacity between the intervention and control clusters (mean difference 33.8 meters; 95% confidence interval 13.9–53.8; p = 0.001). The overall cost of the physical activity intervention over 24 months was US$164/participant; equivalent to US$4.84/extra meter walked. The number of falls and fractures was balanced across physical activity intervention arms and no serious adverse events were reported for either intervention. Conclusions Chile's nutritional supplementation program for older

  7. Data Clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagstaff, Kiri L.

    2012-03-01

    On obtaining a new data set, the researcher is immediately faced with the challenge of obtaining a high-level understanding from the observations. What does a typical item look like? What are the dominant trends? How many distinct groups are included in the data set, and how is each one characterized? Which observable values are common, and which rarely occur? Which items stand out as anomalies or outliers from the rest of the data? This challenge is exacerbated by the steady growth in data set size [11] as new instruments push into new frontiers of parameter space, via improvements in temporal, spatial, and spectral resolution, or by the desire to "fuse" observations from different modalities and instruments into a larger-picture understanding of the same underlying phenomenon. Data clustering algorithms provide a variety of solutions for this task. They can generate summaries, locate outliers, compress data, identify dense or sparse regions of feature space, and build data models. It is useful to note up front that "clusters" in this context refer to groups of items within some descriptive feature space, not (necessarily) to "galaxy clusters" which are dense regions in physical space. The goal of this chapter is to survey a variety of data clustering methods, with an eye toward their applicability to astronomical data analysis. In addition to improving the individual researcher’s understanding of a given data set, clustering has led directly to scientific advances, such as the discovery of new subclasses of stars [14] and gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) [38]. All clustering algorithms seek to identify groups within a data set that reflect some observed, quantifiable structure. Clustering is traditionally an unsupervised approach to data analysis, in the sense that it operates without any direct guidance about which items should be assigned to which clusters. There has been a recent trend in the clustering literature toward supporting semisupervised or constrained

  8. The origin of the selectivity and activity of ruthenium-cluster catalysts for fuel-cell feed-gas purification: a gas-phase approach.

    PubMed

    Lang, Sandra M; Bernhardt, Thorsten M; Krstić, Marjan; Bonačić-Koutecký, Vlasta

    2014-05-19

    Gas-phase ruthenium clusters Ru(n)(+) (n=2-6) are employed as model systems to discover the origin of the outstanding performance of supported sub-nanometer ruthenium particles in the catalytic CO methanation reaction with relevance to the hydrogen feed-gas purification for advanced fuel-cell applications. Using ion-trap mass spectrometry in conjunction with first-principles density functional theory calculations three fundamental properties of these clusters are identified which determine the selectivity and catalytic activity: high reactivity toward CO in contrast to inertness in the reaction with CO2; promotion of cooperatively enhanced H2 coadsorption and dissociation on pre-formed ruthenium carbonyl clusters, that is, no CO poisoning occurs; and the presence of Ru-atom sites with a low number of metal-metal bonds, which are particularly active for H2 coadsorption and activation. Furthermore, comprehensive theoretical investigations provide mechanistic insight into the CO methanation reaction and discover a reaction route involving the formation of a formyl-type intermediate.

  9. TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles incorporated with CuInS{sub 2} clusters: preparation and photocatalytic activity for degradation of 4-nitrophenol

    SciTech Connect

    Kang Shizhao; Yang Yikai; Bu Wenbo; Mu Jin

    2009-11-15

    TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles incorporated with CuInS{sub 2} clusters were prepared in a solvothermal process and characterized with X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and energy-dispersion X-ray analysis (EDX). Compared with pure TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles, the TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles incorporated with CuInS{sub 2} clusters display higher photocatalytic activity with 99.9% of degradation ratio of 4-nitrophenol after 2 h irradiation. In order to investigate the effect of the CuInS{sub 2} clusters on the photocatalytic activity of TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles, diffuse reflectance UV-Vis spectra (DRS), photoluminescence (PL) spectra, and photocurrent action spectra were measured. The results indicate that the enhanced photocatalytic activity is probably due to the interface between TiO{sub 2} and CuInS{sub 2} as a trap of the photogenerated electrons to decrease the recombination of electrons and holes. - Graphical abstract: Kinetic curves of 4-nitrophenol (1.44x10{sup -4} mol L{sup -1}) degradation under UV irradiation.

  10. Activation of two C-H bonds of NHC N-methyl groups on triosmium and triruthenium carbonyl clusters.

    PubMed

    Cabeza, Javier A; Del Río, Ignacio; Miguel, Daniel; Pérez-Carreño, Enrique; Sánchez-Vega, M Gabriela

    2008-04-14

    The thermolysis of the NHC triosmium cluster [Os3(Me2Im)(CO)11] (1a; Me2Im = 1,3-dimethylimidazol-2-ylidene) in toluene at reflux temperature sequentially affords the edge-bridged cluster [Os3(micro-H)(micro-kappa2-MeImCH2)(CO)10] () and the face-capped derivative [Os3(micro-H)2(micro3-kappa2-MeImCH)(CO)9] (3a). These products result from the sequential oxidative addition of one (2a) and two (3a) N-methyl C-H bonds of the original NHC ligand. The related face-capped triruthenium cluster [Ru3(micro-H)2(micro3-kappa2-MeImCH)(CO)9] (3b) has been prepared by heating the NHC triruthenium cluster [Ru3(Me2Im)(CO)11] (1b) in THF at reflux temperature. In this case, the pentanuclear derivatives [Ru5(Me2Im)(micro4-kappa2-CO)(CO)14] (4b) and [Ru5(Me2Im)2(micro4-kappa2-CO)(CO)13] (5b) are minor reaction products, but a ruthenium cluster analogous to has not been obtained. The face-capped oxazole-derived NHC triruthenium cluster [Ru3(micro-H)2(micro3-kappa2-OxCH)(CO)9] (3c; MeOx = N-methyloxazol-2-ylidene) is the only isolated product of the thermolysis of [Ru3(MeOx)(CO)11] (1c) in THF at reflux temperature.

  11. Activation of human naïve Th cells increases surface expression of GD3 and induces neoexpression of GD2 that colocalize with TCR clusters.

    PubMed

    Villanueva-Cabello, Tania M; Mollicone, Rosella; Cruz-Muñoz, Mario E; López-Guerrero, Delia V; Martínez-Duncker, Iván

    2015-12-01

    CD4+ T helper lymphocytes (Th) orchestrate the immune response after their activation by antigen-presenting cells. Activation of naïve Th cells is reported to generate the reduction in surface epitopes of sialic acid (Sia) in α2,3 and α2,6 linkages. In this work, we report that in spite of this glycophenotype, anti-CD3/anti-CD28-activated purified human naïve Th cells show a significant increase in surface Sia, as assessed by metabolic labeling, compared with resting naïve Th cells, suggesting an increased flux of Sia toward Siaα2,8 glycoconjugates. To understand this increase as a result of ganglioside up-regulation, we observed that very early after activation, human naïve Th cells show an increased expression in surface GD3 and neoexpression of surface GD2 gangliosides, the latter clustering with the T cell receptor (TCR). Also, we report that in contrast to GM2/GD2 synthase null mice, lentiviral vector-mediated silencing of the GM2/GD2 synthase in activated human naïve Th cells reduced efficient TCR clustering and downstream signaling, as assessed by proliferation assays and IL-2 and IL-2R expression, pointing to an important role of this enzyme in activation of human naive Th cells.

  12. Suppression of hepatic stellate cell activation through downregulation of gremlin1 expression by the miR-23b/27b cluster

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hu; Ni, Yi-Ran; Wang, Jie; Wu, Jiang-Feng; Liu, Chang-Bai

    2016-01-01

    The imbalance between transforming growth factor β and bone morphogenetic protein 7 signaling pathways is a critical step in promoting hepatic stellate cell activation during hepatic fibrogenesis. Gremlin1 may impair the balance. Something remains unclear about the regulatory mechanisms of gremlin1 action on hepatic stellate cell activation and hepatic fibrosis. In the current study, gremlin1 overexpression promotes activation of hepatic stellate cells. Knockdown of gremlin1 with siRNAs suppresses hepatic stellate cell activation and attenuates hepatic fibrosis in rat model. Our results also show that miR-23b/27b cluster members bind to 3′-untranslated region of gremlin1 resulting in reduction of transforming growth factor β, α-smooth muscle actin and collagenI α1/2 gene expression. Our findings suggest that gremlin1 promotes hepatic stellate cell activation and hepatic fibrogenesis through impairment of the balance between transforming growth factor β and bone morphogenetic protein 7 signaling pathways. The miR-23b/27b cluster suppresses activation of hepatic stellate cells through binding gremlin1 to rectify the imbalance. PMID:27863390

  13. The age-mass-metallicity-activity relation for solar-type stars: comparisons with asteroseismology and the NGC 188 open cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenzo-Oliveira, D.; Porto de Mello, G. F.; Schiavon, R. P.

    2016-10-01

    Context. The Mount Wilson Ca ii index log(R'_HK) is the accepted standard metric of calibration for the chromospheric activity versus age relation for FGK stars. Recent results claim its inability to discern activity levels, and thus ages, for stars older than ~2 Gyr, which would severely hamper its application to date disk stars older than the Sun. Aims: We present a new activity-age calibration of the Mt. Wilson index that explicitly takes mass and [Fe/H] biases into account; these biases are implicit in samples of stars selected to have precise ages, which have so far not been appreciated. Methods: We show that these selection biases tend to blur the activity-age relation for large age ranges. We calibrate the Mt. Wilson index for a sample of field FGK stars with precise ages, covering a wide range of mass and [Fe/H] , augmented with data from the Pleiades, Hyades, M 67 clusters, and the Ursa Major moving group. Results: We further test the calibration with extensive new Gemini/GMOS log ()R'HK) data of the old, solar [Fe/H] clusters, M 67 and NGC 188. The observed NGC 188 activity level is clearly lower than M 67. We correctly recover the isochronal age of both clusters and establish the viability of deriving usable chromospheric ages for solar-type stars up to at least ~6 Gyr, where average errors are ~0.14 dex provided that we explicitly account for the mass and [Fe/H] dimensions. We test our calibration against asteroseismological ages, finding excellent correlation (ρ = + 0.89). We show that our calibration improves the chromospheric age determination for a wide range of ages, masses, and metallicities in comparison to previous age-activity relations.

  14. IscS from Archaeoglobus fulgidus has no desulfurase activity but may provide a cysteine ligand for [Fe2S2] cluster assembly.

    PubMed

    Pagnier, Adrien; Nicolet, Yvain; Fontecilla-Camps, Juan C

    2015-06-01

    Iron sulfur ([Fe-S]) clusters are essential prosthetic groups involved in fundamental cell processes such as gene expression regulation, electron transfer and Lewis acid base chemistry. Central components of their biogenesis are pyridoxal-5'-phosphate (PLP) dependent l-cysteine desulfurases, which provide the necessary S atoms for [Fe-S] cluster assembly. The archaeon Archaeoglobus fulgidus (Af) has two ORFs, which although annotated as l-cysteine desulfurases of the ISC type (IscS), lack the essential Lys residue (K199 in Af) that forms a Schiff base with PLP. We have previously determined the structure of an Af(IscU-D35A-IscS)2 complex heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli and found it to contain a [Fe2S2] cluster. In order to understand the origin of sulfide in that structure we have performed a series of functional tests using wild type and mutated forms of AfIscS. In addition, we have determined the crystal structure of an AfIscS-D199K mutant. From these studies we conclude that: i) AfIscS has no desulfurase activity; ii) in our in vitro [Fe2S2] cluster assembly experiments, sulfide ions are non-enzymatically generated by a mixture of iron, l-cysteine and PLP and iii) the physiological role of AfIscS may be to provide a cysteine ligand to the nascent cluster as observed in the [Fe2S2]-Af(IscU-D35A-IscS)2 complex. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Fe/S proteins: Analysis, structure, function, biogenesis and diseases.

  15. An Atlas of Peroxiredoxins Created Using an Active Site Profile-Based Approach to Functionally Relevant Clustering of Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Babbitt, Patricia C.; Ferrin, Thomas E.

    2017-01-01

    Peroxiredoxins (Prxs or Prdxs) are a large protein superfamily of antioxidant enzymes that rapidly detoxify damaging peroxides and/or affect signal transduction and, thus, have roles in proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. Prx superfamily members are widespread across phylogeny and multiple methods have been developed to classify them. Here we present an updated atlas of the Prx superfamily identified using a novel method called MISST (Multi-level Iterative Sequence Searching Technique). MISST is an iterative search process developed to be both agglomerative, to add sequences containing similar functional site features, and divisive, to split groups when functional site features suggest distinct functionally-relevant clusters. Superfamily members need not be identified initially—MISST begins with a minimal representative set of known structures and searches GenBank iteratively. Further, the method’s novelty lies in the manner in which isofunctional groups are selected; rather than use a single or shifting threshold to identify clusters, the groups are deemed isofunctional when they pass a self-identification criterion, such that the group identifies itself and nothing else in a search of GenBank. The method was preliminarily validated on the Prxs, as the Prxs presented challenges of both agglomeration and division. For example, previous sequence analysis clustered the Prx functional families Prx1 and Prx6 into one group. Subsequent expert analysis clearly identified Prx6 as a distinct functionally relevant group. The MISST process distinguishes these two closely related, though functionally distinct, families. Through MISST search iterations, over 38,000 Prx sequences were identified, which the method divided into six isofunctional clusters, consistent with previous expert analysis. The results represent the most complete computational functional analysis of proteins comprising the Prx superfamily. The feasibility of this novel method is demonstrated

  16. Demonstration That Mast Cells, T Cells, and B Cells Bearing the Activating Kit Mutation D816V Occur in Clusters within the Marrow of Patients with Mastocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Marcia L.; Sehgal, Devinder; Raffeld, Mark; Obiakor, Harold; Akin, Cem; Mage, Rose G.; Metcalfe, Dean D.

    2004-01-01

    Mastocytosis is characterized by focal heterotypic clusters of mast cells and lymphocytes in the bone marrow and by a somatically acquired activating Kit mutation, D816V. The relationship of the occurrence of this mutation to the heterotypic clusters of mast cells and lymphocytes in bone marrow is unknown. We hypothesized that these two unique features of mastocytosis were related. To explore this hypothesis, laser capture microdissected mast cells, B cells, and T cells, from both lesional and non-lesional areas of bone marrow biopsy tissues from patients with mastocytosis, were examined for the D816V mutation in their DNA, using HinfI restriction digestion of nested PCR products amplified from extracts of dissected cells. The D816V mutation was detected in mast cells, B cells, and T cells from lesional but not non-lesional areas of bone marrow tissues. B cells obtained from lesional areas of tissue were also assessed for clonality and were found to at least represent an oligoclonal population. Thus, mast cells and lymphocytes within focal aggregates in the bone marrow of those with mastocytosis are more frequently positive for the codon 816 activating mutation. Further, the B cell population is oligoclonal, suggesting that clonal proliferation is unlikely to be the basis of clustering. PMID:15507672

  17. Violent interaction between the active galactic nucleus and the hot gas in the core of the galaxy cluster Sérsic 159-03

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, N.; Sun, M.; Bagchi, J.; Allen, S. W.; Taylor, G. B.; Sirothia, S. K.; Simionescu, A.; Million, E. T.; Jacob, J.; Donahue, M.

    2011-08-01

    We present a multiwavelength study of the energetic interaction between the central active galactic nucleus (AGN), the intracluster medium (ICM) and the optical emission-line nebula in the galaxy cluster Sérsic 159-03. We use X-ray data from Chandra, high-resolution X-ray spectra and ultraviolet (UV) images from XMM-Newton, Hα images from the Southern Astrophysics Research Telescope, Hubble Space Telescope optical imaging, and Very Large Array and Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope radio data. The cluster centre displays signs of powerful AGN feedback, which has cleared the central regions (r < 7.5 kpc) of a dense, X-ray-emitting ICM. X-ray spectral maps reveal a high-pressure ring surrounding the central AGN at a radius of r˜ 15 kpc, indicating an AGN-driven weak shock. The cluster harbours a bright, 44 kpc long Hα+[N II] filament extending from the centre of the cD galaxy to the north. Along the filament, we see low-entropy, high-metallicity, cooling X-ray gas. The gas in the filament has most likely been uplifted by 'radio mode' AGN activity and subsequently stripped from the galaxy due to its relative southward motion. Because this X-ray gas has been removed from the direct influence of the AGN jets, part of it cools and forms stars as indicated by the observed dust lanes, molecular and ionized emission-line nebulae and the excess UV emission.

  18. The Clusters-in-a-Liquid Approach for Solvation: New Insights from the Conformer Specific Gas Phase Spectroscopy and Vibrational Optical Activity Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Perera, Angelo S.; Thomas, Javix; Poopari, Mohammad R.; Xu, Yunjie

    2016-01-01

    Vibrational optical activity spectroscopies, namely vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) and Raman optical activity (ROA), have been emerged in the past decade as powerful spectroscopic tools for stereochemical information of a wide range of chiral compounds in solution directly. More recently, their applications in unveiling solvent effects, especially those associated with water solvent, have been explored. In this review article, we first select a few examples to demonstrate the unique sensitivity of VCD spectral signatures to both bulk solvent effects and explicit hydrogen-bonding interactions in solution. Second, we discuss the induced solvent chirality, or chiral transfer, VCD spectral features observed in the water bending band region in detail. From these chirality transfer spectral data, the related conformer specific gas phase spectroscopic studies of small chiral hydration clusters, and the associated matrix isolation VCD experiments of hydrogen-bonded complexes in cold rare gas matrices, a general picture of solvation in aqueous solution emerges. In such an aqueous solution, some small chiral hydration clusters, rather than the chiral solutes themselves, are the dominant species and are the ones that contribute mainly to the experimentally observed VCD features. We then review a series of VCD studies of amino acids and their derivatives in aqueous solution under different pHs to emphasize the importance of the inclusion of the bulk solvent effects. These experimental data and the associated theoretical analyses are the foundation for the proposed “clusters-in-a-liquid” approach to account for solvent effects effectively. We present several approaches to identify and build such representative chiral hydration clusters. Recent studies which applied molecular dynamics simulations and the subsequent snapshot averaging approach to generate the ROA, VCD, electronic CD, and optical rotatory dispersion spectra are also reviewed. Challenges associated with

  19. The clusters-in-a-liquid approach for solvation: New insights from the conformer specific gas phase spectroscopy and vibrational optical activity spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yunjie; Perera, Angelo; Thomas, Javix; Poopari, Mohammad

    2016-02-01

    Vibrational optical activity spectroscopies, namely vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) and Raman optical activity (ROA), have been emerged in the past decade as a powerful spectroscopic tool for stereochemical information of a wide range of chiral compounds in solution directly. More recently, their applications in unveiling solvent effects, especially those associated with water solvent, have been explored. In this review article, we first select a few examples to demonstrate the unique sensitivity of VCD spectral signatures to both bulk solvent effects and explicit hydrogen-bonding interactions in solution. Second, we discuss the induced solvent chirality, or chiral transfer, VCD spectral features observed at the water bending band region in detail. From these chirality transfer spectral data, the related conformer specific gas phase spectroscopic studies of small chiral hydration clusters, and the associated matrix isolation VCD experiments of hydrogen-bonded complexes in cold rare gas matrices, a general picture of solvation in aqueous solution emerges. In such an aqueous solution, some small chiral hydration clusters, rather than the chiral solutes themselves, are the dominant species and are the ones who contribute mainly to the experimentally observed VCD features. We then review a series of VCD studies of amino acids and their derivatives in aqueous solution under different pHs to emphasize the importance of the inclusion of the bulk solvent effects. These experimental data and the associated theoretical analyses are the foundation for the proposed “clusters-in-a-liquid” approach to account for solvent effects effectively. We present several approaches to identify and build such representative chiral hydration clusters. Recent studies which applied molecular dynamics simulations and the subsequent snapshot averaging approach to generate the ROA, electronic CD, and optical rotatory dispersion spectra are also reviewed. Challenges associated with the

  20. Absorption and fluorescence characteristics of photo-activated adenylate cyclase nano-clusters from the amoeboflagellate Naegleria gruberi NEG-M strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penzkofer, A.; Stierl, M.; Hegemann, P.; Kateriya, S.

    2012-01-01

    The spectroscopic characteristics of BLUF (BLUF = sensor of blue light using flavin) domain containing soluble adenylate cyclase (nPAC = Naegleria photo-activated cyclase) samples from the amoeboflagellate Naegleria gruberi NEG-M strain is studied at room temperature. The absorption and fluorescence spectroscopic development in the dark was investigated over two weeks. Attenuation coefficient spectra, fluorescence quantum distributions, fluorescence quantum yields, and fluorescence excitation distributions were measured. Thawing of frozen nPAC samples gave solutions with varying protein nano-cluster size and varying flavin, tyrosine, tryptophan, and protein color-center emission. Protein color-center emission was observed in the wavelength range of 360-900 nm with narrow emission bands of small Stokes shift and broad emission bands of large Stokes shift. The emission spectra evolved in time with protein nano-cluster aging.

  1. Activation and silencing of secondary metabolites in Streptomyces albus and Streptomyces lividans after transformation with cosmids containing the thienamycin gene cluster from Streptomyces cattleya.

    PubMed

    Braña, Alfredo F; Rodríguez, Miriam; Pahari, Pallab; Rohr, Jurgen; García, Luis A; Blanco, Gloria

    2014-05-01

    Activation and silencing of antibiotic production was achieved in Streptomyces albus J1074 and Streptomyces lividans TK21 after introduction of genes within the thienamycin cluster from S. cattleya. Dramatic phenotypic and metabolic changes, involving activation of multiple silent secondary metabolites and silencing of others normally produced, were found in recombinant strains harbouring the thienamycin cluster in comparison to the parental strains. In S. albus, ultra-performance liquid chromatography purification and NMR structural elucidation revealed the identity of four structurally related activated compounds: the antibiotics paulomycins A, B and the paulomenols A and B. Four volatile compounds whose biosynthesis was switched off were identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analyses and databases comparison as pyrazines; including tetramethylpyrazine, a compound with important clinical applications to our knowledge never reported to be produced by Streptomyces. In addition, this work revealed the potential of S. albus to produce many others secondary metabolites normally obtained from plants, including compounds of medical relevance as dihydro-β-agarofuran and of interest in perfume industry as β-patchoulene, suggesting that it might be an alternative model for their industrial production. In S. lividans, actinorhodins production was strongly activated in the recombinant strains whereas undecylprodigiosins were significantly reduced. Activation of cryptic metabolites in Streptomyces species might represent an alternative approach for pharmaceutical drug discovery.

  2. Friedreich's Ataxia Variants I154F and W155R Diminish Frataxin-Based Activation of the Iron-Sulfur Cluster Assembly Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, Chi-Lin; Bridwell-Rabb, Jennifer; Barondeau, David P

    2011-11-07

    Friedreich's ataxia (FRDA) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that has been linked to defects in the protein frataxin (Fxn). Most FRDA patients have a GAA expansion in the first intron of their Fxn gene that decreases protein expression. Some FRDA patients have a GAA expansion on one allele and a missense mutation on the other allele. Few functional details are known for the ~15 different missense mutations identified in FRDA patients. Here in vitro evidence is presented that indicates the FRDA I154F and W155R variants bind more weakly to the complex of Nfs1, Isd11, and Isu2 and thereby are defective in forming the four-component SDUF complex that constitutes the core of the Fe-S cluster assembly machine. The binding affinities follow the trend Fxn ~ I154F > W155F > W155A ~ W155R. The Fxn variants also have diminished ability to function as part of the SDUF complex to stimulate the cysteine desulfurase reaction and facilitate Fe-S cluster assembly. Four crystal structures, including the first for a FRDA variant, reveal specific rearrangements associated with the loss of function and lead to a model for Fxn-based activation of the Fe-S cluster assembly complex. Importantly, the weaker binding and lower activity for FRDA variants correlate with the severity of disease progression. Together, these results suggest that Fxn facilitates sulfur transfer from Nfs1 to Isu2 and that these in vitro assays are sensitive and appropriate for deciphering functional defects and mechanistic details for human Fe-S cluster biosynthesis.

  3. Cool Cluster Correctly Correlated

    SciTech Connect

    Varganov, Sergey Aleksandrovich

    2005-01-01

    Atomic clusters are unique objects, which occupy an intermediate position between atoms and condensed matter systems. For a long time it was thought that physical and chemical properties of atomic dusters monotonically change with increasing size of the cluster from a single atom to a condensed matter system. However, recently it has become clear that many properties of atomic clusters can change drastically with the size of the clusters. Because physical and chemical properties of clusters can be adjusted simply by changing the cluster's size, different applications of atomic clusters were proposed. One example is the catalytic activity of clusters of specific sizes in different chemical reactions. Another example is a potential application of atomic clusters in microelectronics, where their band gaps can be adjusted by simply changing cluster sizes. In recent years significant advances in experimental techniques allow one to synthesize and study atomic clusters of specified sizes. However, the interpretation of the results is often difficult. The theoretical methods are frequently used to help in interpretation of complex experimental data. Most of the theoretical approaches have been based on empirical or semiempirical methods. These methods allow one to study large and small dusters using the same approximations. However, since empirical and semiempirical methods rely on simple models with many parameters, it is often difficult to estimate the quantitative and even qualitative accuracy of the results. On the other hand, because of significant advances in quantum chemical methods and computer capabilities, it is now possible to do high quality ab-initio calculations not only on systems of few atoms but on clusters of practical interest as well. In addition to accurate results for specific clusters, such methods can be used for benchmarking of different empirical and semiempirical approaches. The atomic clusters studied in this work contain from a few atoms to

  4. Cluster headache

    PubMed Central

    Leroux, Elizabeth; Ducros, Anne

    2008-01-01

    Cluster headache (CH) is a primary headache disease characterized by recurrent short-lasting attacks (15 to 180 minutes) of excruciating unilateral periorbital pain accompanied by ipsilateral autonomic signs (lacrimation, nasal congestion, ptosis, miosis, lid edema, redness of the eye). It affects young adults, predominantly males. Prevalence is estimated at 0.5–1.0/1,000. CH has a circannual and circadian periodicity, attacks being clustered (hence the name) in bouts that can occur during specific months of the year. Alcohol is the only dietary trigger of CH, strong odors (mainly solvents and cigarette smoke) and napping may also trigger CH attacks. During bouts, attacks may happen at precise hours, especially during the night. During the attacks, patients tend to be restless. CH may be episodic or chronic, depending on the presence of remission periods. CH is associated with trigeminovascular activation and neuroendocrine and vegetative disturbances, however, the precise cautive mechanisms remain unknown. Involvement of the hypothalamus (a structure regulating endocrine function and sleep-wake rhythms) has been confirmed, explaining, at least in part, the cyclic aspects of CH. The disease is familial in about 10% of cases. Genetic factors play a role in CH susceptibility, and a causative role has been suggested for the hypocretin receptor gene. Diagnosis is clinical. Differential diagnoses include other primary headache diseases such as migraine, paroxysmal hemicrania and SUNCT syndrome. At present, there is no curative treatment. There are efficient treatments to shorten the painful attacks (acute treatments) and to reduce the number of daily attacks (prophylactic treatments). Acute treatment is based on subcutaneous administration of sumatriptan and high-flow oxygen. Verapamil, lithium, methysergide, prednisone, greater occipital nerve blocks and topiramate may be used for prophylaxis. In refractory cases, deep-brain stimulation of the hypothalamus and

  5. Quintuplet Cluster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Penetrating 25,000 light-years of obscuring dust and myriad stars, NASA's Hubble Space Telescope has provided the clearest view yet of one of the largest young clusters of stars inside our Milky Way galaxy, located less than 100 light-years from the very center of the Galaxy. Having the equivalent mass greater than 10,000 stars like our sun, the monster cluster is ten times larger than typical young star clusters scattered throughout our Milky Way. It is destined to be ripped apart in just a few million years by gravitational tidal forces in the galaxy's core. But in its brief lifetime it shines more brightly than any other star cluster in the Galaxy. Quintuplet Cluster is 4 million years old. It has stars on the verge of blowing up as supernovae. It is the home of the brightest star seen in the galaxy, called the Pistol star. This image was taken in infrared light by Hubble's NICMOS camera in September 1997. The false colors correspond to infrared wavelengths. The galactic center stars are white, the red stars are enshrouded in dust or behind dust, and the blue stars are foreground stars between us and the Milky Way's center. The cluster is hidden from direct view behind black dust clouds in the constellation Sagittarius. If the cluster could be seen from earth it would appear to the naked eye as a 3rd magnitude star, 1/6th of a full moon's diameter apart.

  6. Rotational Periods and Starspot Activity of Young Solar-Type Dwarfs in the Open Cluster IC 4665

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allain, S.; Bouvier, J.; Prosser, C.; Marschall, L. A.; Laaksonen, B. D.

    1995-01-01

    We present the results of a V-band photometric monitoring survey of 15 late-type dwarfs in the young open cluster IC 4665. Low-amplitude periodic light variations are found for 8 stars and ascribed to the modulation by starspots that cover typically a few percent of the stellar disk. Periods range from 0.6 to 3.7 d, translating to equatorial velocities between 13 and 93 km/s. That no period longer than 4 d was detected suggests a relative paucity of extremely slow rotators (V(sub eq) much less than 10 km/s) among late-type dwarfs in IC 4665. The fractional number of slow rotators in IC 4665 is similar to that of Alpha Per cluster, suggesting that IC 4665 is close in age to Alpha Per (approx. 50 Myr).

  7. A Flexible Method for Production of Stable Atomic Clusters with Variable Size for Chemical and Catalytic Activity Studies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-12-01

    predicted, as it does not correspond to a magic number and the less stable sizes were likely etched away by oxidizing impurities. Both problems appear... oxidizing impurities. Both problems appear solvable for future research. Thus up to date, we were neither able to prove nor to disprove the...specific numbers of atoms of a number of metallic elements. The paper predicts the highest transition temperatures for clusters of zinc and gallium

  8. Inter-MAR association contributes to transcriptionally active looping events in human beta-globin gene cluster.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Di, Li-Jun; Lv, Xiang; Zheng, Wei; Xue, Zheng; Guo, Zhi-Chen; Liu, De-Pei; Liang, Chi-Chuan

    2009-01-01

    Matrix attachment regions (MARs) are important in chromatin organization and gene regulation. Although it is known that there are a number of MAR elements in the beta-globin gene cluster, it is unclear that how these MAR elements are involved in regulating beta-globin genes expression. Here, we report the identification of a new MAR element at the LCR (locus control region) of human beta-globin gene cluster and the detection of the inter-MAR association within the beta-globin gene cluster. Also, we demonstrate that SATB1, a protein factor that has been implicated in the formation of network like higher order chromatin structures at some gene loci, takes part in beta-globin specific inter-MAR association through binding the specific MARs. Knocking down of SATB1 obviously reduces the binding of SATB1 to the MARs and diminishes the frequency of the inter-MAR association. As a result, the ACH establishment and the alpha-like globin genes and beta-like globin genes expressions are affected either. In summary, our results suggest that SATB1 is a regulatory factor of hemoglobin genes, especially the early differentiation genes at least through affecting the higher order chromatin structure.

  9. Seismic activities of earthquake clusters and small repeating earthquakes in Japan before and after the 2011 off the Pacific coast of Tohoku earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Igarashi, T.

    2011-12-01

    The 2011 off the Pacific coast of Tohoku earthquake (M9.0) had a great effect on seismic activities over vast areas. In this study, we investigated spatio-temporal changes of seismic activities of earthquake clusters and small repeating earthquakes before and after the main shock. We have already reported many small repeating earthquakes occur at the upper boundary of the subducting plates in Japan. From these sequences, we can estimate the space-time characteristics of the inter-plate slip. In the 21st century, the resultant slip-rates correspond to relative plate motion in the Ryukyu-arc. In contrast, the shallow part and the southern part of the northeastern Japan arc indicated slip deficits. There were few after-slips following the 2005 off Miyagi earthquake (M7.2), which located near the hypocenter of the 2011 main shock. On the other hand, slip deficits of the southern shallow part were slightly decreased by after-slips following the 2003 and 2008 M7 class earthquakes. We also identified quasi-static slips associated with foreshocks off Miyagi that started from February 2011. After the main shock, we detect many small repeating earthquakes in the aftershocks. The distributions suggest after-slips near the trench of the southeastern part as well as in the deep part of the source region estimated by GPS data analysis. However, some of them are burst-type repeating sequences which occurred only after the main shock. Many continual-type repeating sequences are distributed in the southern part of the source region, and it is difficult to estimate slip-rates in the northern part at present. This uneven distribution may have been caused because observed seismograms are distorted by the multiplicity of the waves to come from various locations, the seismic velocity changes at the propagation path or site, or changes of physical properties at the plate interface. Furthermore, we automatically extracted earthquake clusters by using the unified JMA hypocenter catalogue

  10. Stellar populations in star clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Cheng-Yuan; de Grijs, Richard; Deng, Li-Cai

    2016-12-01

    Stellar populations contain the most important information about star cluster formation and evolution. Until several decades ago, star clusters were believed to be ideal laboratories for studies of simple stellar populations (SSPs). However, discoveries of multiple stellar populations in Galactic globular clusters have expanded our view on stellar populations in star clusters. They have simultaneously generated a number of controversies, particularly as to whether young star clusters may have the same origin as old globular clusters. In addition, extensive studies have revealed that the SSP scenario does not seem to hold for some intermediate-age and young star clusters either, thus making the origin of multiple stellar populations in star clusters even more complicated. Stellar population anomalies in numerous star clusters are well-documented, implying that the notion of star clusters as true SSPs faces serious challenges. In this review, we focus on stellar populations in massive clusters with different ages. We present the history and progress of research in this active field, as well as some of the most recent improvements, including observational results and scenarios that have been proposed to explain the observations. Although our current ability to determine the origin of multiple stellar populations in star clusters is unsatisfactory, we propose a number of promising projects that may contribute to a significantly improved understanding of this subject.

  11. Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Christopher J. Miller

    2012-03-01

    There are many examples of clustering in astronomy. Stars in our own galaxy are often seen as being gravitationally bound into tight globular or open clusters. The Solar System's Trojan asteroids cluster at the gravitational Langrangian in front of Jupiter’s orbit. On the largest of scales, we find gravitationally bound clusters of galaxies, the Virgo cluster (in the constellation of Virgo at a distance of ˜50 million light years) being a prime nearby example. The Virgo cluster subtends an angle of nearly 8◦ on the sky and is known to contain over a thousand member galaxies. Galaxy clusters play an important role in our understanding of theUniverse. Clusters exist at peaks in the three-dimensional large-scale matter density field. Their sky (2D) locations are easy to detect in astronomical imaging data and their mean galaxy redshifts (redshift is related to the third spatial dimension: distance) are often better (spectroscopically) and cheaper (photometrically) when compared with the entire galaxy population in large sky surveys. Photometric redshift (z) [Photometric techniques use the broad band filter magnitudes of a galaxy to estimate the redshift. Spectroscopic techniques use the galaxy spectra and emission/absorption line features to measure the redshift] determinations of galaxies within clusters are accurate to better than delta_z = 0.05 [7] and when studied as a cluster population, the central galaxies form a line in color-magnitude space (called the the E/S0 ridgeline and visible in Figure 16.3) that contains galaxies with similar stellar populations [15]. The shape of this E/S0 ridgeline enables astronomers to measure the cluster redshift to within delta_z = 0.01 [23]. The most accurate cluster redshift determinations come from spectroscopy of the member galaxies, where only a fraction of the members need to be spectroscopically observed [25,42] to get an accurate redshift to the whole system. If light traces mass in the Universe, then the locations

  12. The mitochondrial fission factor dynamin-related protein 1 modulates T-cell receptor signalling at the immune synapse

    PubMed Central

    Baixauli, Francesc; Martín-Cófreces, Noa B; Morlino, Giulia; Carrasco, Yolanda R; Calabia-Linares, Carmen; Veiga, Esteban; Serrador, Juan M; Sánchez-Madrid, Francisco

    2011-01-01

    During antigen-specific T-cell activation, mitochondria mobilize towards the vicinity of the immune synapse. We show here that the mitochondrial fission factor dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1) docks at mitochondria, regulating their positioning and activity near the actin-rich ring of the peripheral supramolecular activation cluster (pSMAC) of the immune synapse. Mitochondrial redistribution in response to T-cell receptor engagement was abolished by Drp1 silencing, expression of the phosphomimetic mutant Drp1S637D and the Drp1-specific inhibitor mdivi-1. Moreover, Drp1 knockdown enhanced mitochondrial depolarization and T-cell receptor signal strength, but decreased myosin phosphorylation, ATP production and T-cell receptor assembly at the central supramolecular activation cluster (cSMAC). Our results indicate that Drp1-dependent mitochondrial positioning and activity controls T-cell activation by fuelling central supramolecular activation cluster assembly at the immune synapse. PMID:21326213

  13. The mitochondrial fission factor dynamin-related protein 1 modulates T-cell receptor signalling at the immune synapse.

    PubMed

    Baixauli, Francesc; Martín-Cófreces, Noa B; Morlino, Giulia; Carrasco, Yolanda R; Calabia-Linares, Carmen; Veiga, Esteban; Serrador, Juan M; Sánchez-Madrid, Francisco

    2011-04-06

    During antigen-specific T-cell activation, mitochondria mobilize towards the vicinity of the immune synapse. We show here that the mitochondrial fission factor dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1) docks at mitochondria, regulating their positioning and activity near the actin-rich ring of the peripheral supramolecular activation cluster (pSMAC) of the immune synapse. Mitochondrial redistribution in response to T-cell receptor engagement was abolished by Drp1 silencing, expression of the phosphomimetic mutant Drp1S637D and the Drp1-specific inhibitor mdivi-1. Moreover, Drp1 knockdown enhanced mitochondrial depolarization and T-cell receptor signal strength, but decreased myosin phosphorylation, ATP production and T-cell receptor assembly at the central supramolecular activation cluster (cSMAC). Our results indicate that Drp1-dependent mitochondrial positioning and activity controls T-cell activation by fuelling central supramolecular activation cluster assembly at the immune synapse.

  14. Let’s Not Waste Time: Using Temporal Information in Clustered Activity Estimation with Spatial Adjacency Restrictions (CAESAR) for Parcellating FMRI Data

    PubMed Central

    Jylänki, Pasi; van Gerven, Marcel A. J.

    2016-01-01

    We have proposed a Bayesian approach for functional parcellation of whole-brain FMRI measurements which we call Clustered Activity Estimation with Spatial Adjacency Restrictions (CAESAR). We use distance-dependent Chinese restaurant processes (dd-CRPs) to define a flexible prior which partitions the voxel measurements into clusters whose number and shapes are unknown a priori. With dd-CRPs we can conveniently implement spatial constraints to ensure that our parcellations remain spatially contiguous and thereby physiologically meaningful. In the present work, we extend CAESAR by using Gaussian process (GP) priors to model the temporally smooth haemodynamic signals that give rise to the measured FMRI data. A challenge for GP inference in our setting is the cubic scaling with respect to the number of time points, which can become computationally prohibitive with FMRI measurements, potentially consisting of long time series. As a solution we describe an efficient implementation that is practically as fast as the corresponding time-independent non-GP model with typically-sized FMRI data sets. We also employ a population Monte-Carlo algorithm that can significantly speed up convergence compared to traditional single-chain methods. First we illustrate the benefits of CAESAR and the GP priors with simulated experiments. Next, we demonstrate our approach by parcellating resting state FMRI data measured from twenty participants as taken from the Human Connectome Project data repository. Results show that CAESAR affords highly robust and scalable whole-brain clustering of FMRI timecourses. PMID:27935937

  15. Star clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labhardt, Lukas; Binggeli, Bruno

    Star clusters are at the heart of astronomy, being key objects for our understanding of stellar evolution and galactic structure. Observations with the Hubble Space Telescope and other modern equipment have revealed fascinating new facts about these galactic building blocks. This book provides two comprehensive and up-to-date, pedagogically designed reviews on star clusters by two well-known experts in the field. Bruce Carney presents our current knowledge of the relative and absolute ages of globular clusters and the chemical history of our Galaxy. Bill Harris addresses globular clusters in external galaxies and their use as tracers of galaxy formation and cosmic distance indicators. The book is written for graduate students as well as professionals in astronomy and astrophysics.

  16. Occupational Clusters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pottawattamie County School System, Council Bluffs, IA.

    The 15 occupational clusters (transportation, fine arts and humanities, communications and media, personal service occupations, construction, hospitality and recreation, health occupations, marine science occupations, consumer and homemaking-related occupations, agribusiness and natural resources, environment, public service, business and office…

  17. Cluster generator

    DOEpatents

    Donchev, Todor I.; Petrov, Ivan G.

    2011-05-31

    Described herein is an apparatus and a method for producing atom clusters based on a gas discharge within a hollow cathode. The hollow cathode includes one or more walls. The one or more walls define a sputtering chamber within the hollow cathode and include a material to be sputtered. A hollow anode is positioned at an end of the sputtering chamber, and atom clusters are formed when a gas discharge is generated between the hollow anode and the hollow cathode.

  18. Organizational-Level Strategies With or Without an Activity Tracker to Reduce Office Workers’ Sitting Time: Rationale and Study Design of a Pilot Cluster-Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Fjeldsoe, Brianna S; Young, Duncan C; Winkler, Elisabeth A H; Dunstan, David W; Straker, Leon M; Brakenridge, Christian J; Healy, Genevieve N

    2016-01-01

    Background The office workplace is a key setting in which to address excessive sitting time and inadequate physical activity. One major influence on workplace sitting is the organizational environment. However, the impact of organizational-level strategies on individual level activity change is unknown. Further, the emergence of sophisticated, consumer-targeted wearable activity trackers that facilitate real-time self-monitoring of activity, may be a useful adjunct to support organizational-level strategies, but to date have received little evaluation in this workplace setting. Objective The aim of this study is to evaluate the feasibility, acceptability, and effectiveness of organizational-level strategies with or without an activity tracker on sitting, standing, and stepping in office workers in the short (3 months, primary aim) and long-term (12 months, secondary aim). Methods This study is a pilot, cluster-randomized trial (with work teams as the unit of clustering) of two interventions in office workers: organizational-level support strategies (eg, visible management support, emails) or organizational-level strategies plus the use of a waist-worn activity tracker (the LUMOback) that enables self-monitoring of sitting, standing, and stepping time and enables users to set sitting and posture alerts. The key intervention message is to ‘Stand Up, Sit Less, and Move More.’ Intervention elements will be implemented from within the organization by the Head of Workplace Wellbeing. Participants will be recruited via email and enrolled face-to-face. Assessments will occur at baseline, 3, and 12 months. Time spent sitting, sitting in prolonged (≥30 minute) bouts, standing, and stepping during work hours and across the day will be measured with activPAL3 activity monitors (7 days, 24 hours/day protocol), with total sitting time and sitting time during work hours the primary outcomes. Web-based questionnaires, LUMOback recorded data, telephone interviews, and focus

  19. Gene targeting technologies in rats: zinc finger nucleases, transcription activator-like effector nucleases, and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats.

    PubMed

    Mashimo, Tomoji

    2014-01-01

    The laboratory rat has been widely used as an animal model in biomedical science for more than 150 years. Applying zinc-finger nucleases or transcription activator-like effector nucleases to rat embryos via microinjection is an efficient genome editing tool for generating targeted knockout rats. Recently, clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated endonucleases have been used as an effective tool for precise and multiplex genome editing in mice and rats. In this review, the advantages and disadvantages of these site-specific nuclease technologies for genetic analysis and manipulation in rats are discussed.

  20. Community-based physical activity and nutrition programme for adults with metabolic syndrome in Vietnam: study protocol for a cluster-randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Van Dinh; Lee, Andy H; Jancey, Jonine; James, Anthony P; Howat, Peter; Thi Phuong Mai, Le

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a cluster of risk factors for cardiovascular diseases and type II diabetes. In Vietnam, more than one-quarter of its population aged 50–65 have MetS. This cluster-randomised controlled trial aims to evaluate the effectiveness of interventions to increase levels of physical activity and improve dietary behaviours among Vietnamese adults aged 50–65 years with MetS. Method and analysis This 6-month community-based intervention includes a range of strategies to improve physical activity and nutrition for adults with MetS in Hanam, a province located in northern Vietnam. 600 participants will be recruited from 6 communes with 100 participants per commune. The 6 selected communes will be randomly allocated to either an intervention group (m=3; n=300) or a control group (m=3; n=300). The intervention comprises booklets, education sessions, resistance bands and attending local walking groups that provide information and encourage participants to improve their physical activity and healthy eating behaviours during the 6-month period. The control group participants will receive standard and 1-time advice. Social cognitive theory is the theoretical concept underpinning this study. Measurements will be taken at baseline and postintervention to evaluate programme effectiveness. Ethics and dissemination The research protocol was approved by the Curtin University Human Research Ethics Committee (approval number: HR139/2014). The results of the study will be disseminated through publications, reports and conference presentations. Trial registration number ACTRN12614000811606. PMID:27256094

  1. Combining active-space coupled-cluster methods with moment energy corrections via the CC(P;Q) methodology, with benchmark calculations for biradical transition states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Jun; Piecuch, Piotr

    2012-04-01

    We have recently suggested the CC(P;Q) methodology that can correct energies obtained in the active-space coupled-cluster (CC) or equation-of-motion (EOM) CC calculations, which recover much of the nondynamical and some dynamical electron correlation effects, for the higher-order, mostly dynamical, correlations missing in the active-space CC/EOMCC considerations. It is shown that one can greatly improve the description of biradical transition states, both in terms of the resulting energy barriers and total energies, by combining the CC approach with singles, doubles, and active-space triples, termed CCSDt, with the CC(P;Q)-style correction due to missing triple excitations defining the CC(t;3) approximation.

  2. Combining active-space coupled-cluster methods with moment energy corrections via the CC(P;Q) methodology, with benchmark calculations for biradical transition states.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jun; Piecuch, Piotr

    2012-04-14

    We have recently suggested the CC(P;Q) methodology that can correct energies obtained in the active-space coupled-cluster (CC) or equation-of-motion (EOM) CC calculations, which recover much of the nondynamical and some dynamical electron correlation effects, for the higher-order, mostly dynamical, correlations missing in the active-space CC/EOMCC considerations. It is shown that one can greatly improve the description of biradical transition states, both in terms of the resulting energy barriers and total energies, by combining the CC approach with singles, doubles, and active-space triples, termed CCSDt, with the CC(P;Q)-style correction due to missing triple excitations defining the CC(t;3) approximation.

  3. Activation of the C-I and C-OH bonds of 2-iodoethanol by gas phase silver cluster cations yields subvalent silver-iodide and -hydroxide cluster cations.

    PubMed

    Khairallah, George N; O'Hair, Richard A J

    2007-08-07

    The gas phase ion-molecule reactions of silver cluster cations (Ag(n)(+)) and silver hydride cluster cations (Ag(m)H(+)) with 2-iodoethanol have been examined using multistage mass spectrometry experiments in a quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer. These clusters exhibit size selective reactivity: Ag(2)H(+), Ag(3)(+), and Ag(4)H(+) undergo sequential ligand addition only, while Ag(5)(+) and Ag(6)H(+) also promote both C-I and C-OH bond activation of 2-iodoethanol. Collision induced dissociation (CID) of Ag(5)HIO(+), the product of C-I and C-OH bond activation by Ag(5)(+), yielded Ag(4)OH(+), Ag(4)I(+) and Ag(3)(+), consistent with a structure containing AgI and AgOH moieties. Ag(6)H(+) promotes both C-I and C-OH bond activation of 2-iodoethanol to yield the metathesis product Ag(6)I(+) as well as Ag(6)H(2)IO(+). The metathesis product Ag(6)I(+) also promotes C-I and C-OH bond activation.DFT calculations were carried out to gain insights into the reaction of Ag(5)(+) with ICH(2)CH(2)OH by calculating possible structures and their energies for the following species: (i) initial adducts of Ag(5)(+) and ICH(2)CH(2)OH, (ii) the subsequent Ag(5)HIO(+) product, (iii) CID products of Ag(5)HIO(+). Potential adducts were probed by allowing ICH(2)CH(2)OH to bind in different ways (monodentate through I, monodentate through OH, bidentate) at different sites for two isomers of Ag(5)(+): the global minimum "bowtie" structure, 1, and the higher energy trigonal bipyramidal isomer, 2. The following structural trends emerged: (i) ICH(2)CH(2)OH binds in a monodentate fashion to the silver core with little distortion, (ii) ICH(2)CH(2)OH binds to 1 in a bidentate fashion with some distortion to the silver core, and (iii) ICH(2)CH(2)OH binds to 2 and results in a significant distortion or rearrangement of the silver core. The DFT calculated minimum energy structure of Ag(5)HIO(+) consists of an OH ligated to the face of a distorted trigonal bipyramid with I located at a vertex, while

  4. A Histidine Cluster in the Cytoplasmic Domain of the Na-H Exchanger NHE1 Confers pH-sensitive Phospholipid Binding and Regulates Transporter Activity.

    PubMed

    Webb, Bradley A; White, Katharine A; Grillo-Hill, Bree K; Schönichen, André; Choi, Changhoon; Barber, Diane L

    2016-11-11

    The Na-H exchanger NHE1 contributes to intracellular pH (pHi) homeostasis in normal cells and the constitutively increased pHi in cancer. NHE1 activity is allosterically regulated by intracellular protons, with greater activity at lower pHi However, the molecular mechanism for pH-dependent NHE1 activity remains incompletely resolved. We report that an evolutionarily conserved cluster of histidine residues located in the C-terminal cytoplasmic domain between two phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate binding sites (PI(4,5)P2) of NHE1 confers pH-dependent PI(4,5)P2 binding and regulates NHE1 activity. A GST fusion of the wild type C-terminal cytoplasmic domain of NHE1 showed increased maximum PI(4,5)P2 binding at pH 7.0 compared with pH 7.5. However, pH-sensitive binding is abolished by substitutions of the His-rich cluster to arginine (RXXR3) or alanine (AXXA3), mimicking protonated and neutral histidine residues, respectively, and the RXXR3 mutant had significantly greater PI(4,5)P2 binding than AXXA3. When expressed in cells, NHE1 activity and pHi were significantly increased with NHE1-RXXR3 and decreased with NHE1-AXXA3 compared with wild type NHE1. Additionally, fibroblasts expressing NHE1-RXXR3 had significantly more contractile actin filaments and focal adhesions compared with fibroblasts expressing wild type NHE1, consistent with increased pHi enabling cytoskeletal remodeling. These data identify a molecular mechanism for pH-sensitive PI(4,5)P2 binding regulating NHE1 activity and suggest that the evolutionarily conserved cluster of four histidines in the proximal cytoplasmic domain of NHE1 may constitute a proton modifier site. Moreover, a constitutively activated NHE1-RXXR3 mutant is a new tool that will be useful for studying how increased pHi contributes to cell behaviors, most notably the biology of cancer cells.

  5. Real-time analysis of T cell receptors in naive cells in vitro and in vivo reveals flexibility in synapse and signaling dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Rachel S.; Beemiller, Peter; Sorensen, Caitlin M.; Jacobelli, Jordan

    2010-01-01

    The real-time dynamics of the T cell receptor (TCR) reflect antigen detection and T cell signaling, providing valuable insight into the evolving events of the immune response. Despite considerable advances in studying TCR dynamics in simplified systems in vitro, live imaging of subcellular signaling complexes expressed at physiological densities in intact tissues has been challenging. In this study, we generated a transgenic mouse with a TCR fused to green fluorescent protein to provide insight into the early signaling events of the immune response. To enable imaging of TCR dynamics in naive T cells in the lymph node, we enhanced signal detection of the fluorescent TCR fusion protein and used volumetric masking with a second fluorophore to mark the T cells expressing the fluorescent TCR. These in vivo analyses and parallel experiments in vitro show minimal and transient incorporation of TCRs into a stable central supramolecular activating cluster (cSMAC) structure but strong evidence for rapid, antigen-dependent TCR internalization that was not contingent on T cell motility arrest or cSMAC formation. Short-lived antigen-independent TCR clustering was also occasionally observed. These in vivo observations demonstrate that varied TCR trafficking and cell arrest dynamics occur during early T cell activation. PMID:21041455

  6. Amy as a reporter gene for promoter activity in Nocardia lactamdurans: comparison of promoters of the cephamycin cluster.

    PubMed Central

    Chary, V K; de la Fuente, J L; Liras, P; Martin, J F

    1997-01-01

    Promoter probe vectors containing the pA origin of replication and the Streptomyces griseus promoterless amy gene (encoding alpha-amylase) as reporter have been constructed to study transcription initiation regions in Nocardia lactamdurans. In some of the promoter probe vectors the phage fd terminator has been introduced to avoid readthrough expression from upstream sequences. By using these vectors, four different transcription initiation regions of the cephamycin gene cluster have been studied in N. lactamdurans. The bla gene encoding a beta-lactamase has a relatively strong promoter. Two other separate promoters corresponding to the lat and cefD genes (encoding, respectively, lysine-6-aminotransferase and isopenicillin N-epimerase) showed weak transcription initiation ability. These two promoters are arranged in a bidirectional transcription initiation region located in the center of the cephamycin gene cluster. The cmcH gene (encoding 3-hydroxymethylcephem carbamoyltransferase) upstream region did not contain a functional promoter, suggesting that cmcH is transcribed as a part of a polycistronic mRNA. The native amy promoter is used very efficiently in N. lactamdurans, resulting in secretion of high levels of extracellular alpha-amylase. PMID:9251185

  7. Hedgehog Signaling Pathway Is Active in GBM with GLI1 mRNA Expression Showing a Single Continuous Distribution Rather than Discrete High/Low Clusters

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Nidhan K.; Rote, Sarang; Chatterjee, Uttara; Ghosh, Samarendra N.; Deb, Sumit; Saha, Suniti K.; Chowdhury, Anup K.; Ghosh, Subhashish; Rudin, Charles M.; Mukherjee, Ankur; Basu, Analabha; Dhara, Surajit

    2015-01-01

    Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway is a valid therapeutic target in a wide range of malignancies. We focus here on glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), a lethal malignancy of the central nervous system (CNS). By analyzing RNA-sequencing based transcriptomics data on 149 clinical cases of TCGA-GBM database we show here a strong correlation (r = 0.7) between GLI1 and PTCH1 mRNA expression—as a hallmark of the canonical Hh-pathway activity in this malignancy. GLI1 mRNA expression varied in 3 orders of magnitude among the GBM patients of the same cohort showing a single continuous distribution—unlike the discrete high/low-GLI1 mRNA expressing clusters of medulloblastoma (MB). When compared with MB as a reference, the median GLI1 mRNA expression in GBM appeared 14.8 fold lower than that of the “high-Hh” cluster of MB but 5.6 fold higher than that of the “low-Hh” cluster of MB. Next, we demonstrated statistically significant up- and down-regulation of GLI1 mRNA expressions in GBM patient-derived low-passage neurospheres in vitro by sonic hedgehog ligand-enriched conditioned media (shh-CM) and by Hh-inhibitor drug vismodegib respectively. We also showed clinically achievable dose (50 μM) of vismodegib alone to be sufficient to induce apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in these low-passage GBM neurospheres in vitro. Vismodegib showed an effect on the neurospheres, both by down-regulating GLI1 mRNA expression and by inducing apoptosis/cell cycle arrest, irrespective of their relative endogenous levels of GLI1 mRNA expression. We conclude from our study that this single continuous distribution pattern of GLI1 mRNA expression technically puts almost all GBM patients in a single group rather than discrete high- or low-clusters in terms of Hh-pathway activity. That is suggestive of therapies with Hh-pathway inhibitor drugs in this malignancy without a need for further stratification of patients on the basis of relative levels of Hh-pathway activity among them. PMID:25775002

  8. Binding of IgG-opsonized particles to Fc gamma R is an active stage of phagocytosis that involves receptor clustering and phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Sobota, Andrzej; Strzelecka-Kiliszek, Agnieszka; Gładkowska, Ewelina; Yoshida, Kiyotsugu; Mrozińska, Kazimiera; Kwiatkowska, Katarzyna

    2005-10-01

    Fc gammaR mediate the phagocytosis of IgG-coated particles and the clearance of IgG immune complexes. By dissecting binding from internalization of the particles, we found that the binding stage, rather than particle internalization, triggered tyrosine phosphorylation of Fc gammaR and accompanying proteins. High amounts of Lyn kinase were found to associate with particles isolated at the binding stage from J774 cells. PP2 (4-amino-5-(4-chlorophenyl)-7-(t-butyl)pyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidine), an Src kinase inhibitor, but not piceatannol, an inhibitor of Syk kinase, reduced the amount of Lyn associated with the bound particles and simultaneously diminished the binding of IgG-coated particles. Studies of baby hamster kidney cells transfected with wild-type and mutant Fc gammaRIIA revealed that the ability of the receptor to bind particles was significantly reduced when phosphorylation of the receptor was abrogated by Y298F substitution in the receptor signaling motif. Under these conditions, binding of immune complexes of aggregated IgG was depressed to a lesser extent. A similar effect was exerted on the binding ability of wild-type Fc gammaRIIA by PP2. Moreover, expression of mutant kinase-inactive Lyn K275R inhibited both Fc gammaRIIA phosphorylation and IgG-opsonized particle binding. To gain insight into the mechanism by which protein tyrosine phosphorylation can control Fc gammaR-mediated binding, we investigated the efficiency of clustering of wild-type and Y298F-substituted Fc gammaRIIA upon binding of immune complexes. We found that a lack of Fc gammaRIIA phosphorylation led to an impairment of receptor clustering. The results indicate that phosphorylation of Fc gammaR and accompanying proteins, dependent on Src kinase activity, facilitates the clustering of activated receptors that is required for efficient particle binding.

  9. A community-wide campaign to promote physical activity in middle-aged and elderly people: a cluster randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background We aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of a community-wide campaign (CWC) for promoting physical activity in middle-aged and elderly people. Methods A cluster randomized controlled trial (RCT) with a community as the unit of randomization was performed using a population-based random-sampled evaluation by self-administered questionnaires in the city of Unnan, Shimane Prefecture, Japan. The evaluation sample included 6000 residents aged 40 to 79 years. We randomly allocated nine communities to the intervention group and three to the control group. The intervention was a CWC from 2009 to 2010 to promote physical activity, and it comprised information, education, and support delivery. The primary outcome was a change in engaging in regular aerobic, flexibility, and/or muscle-strengthening activities evaluated at the individual level. Results In total, 4414 residents aged 40–79 years responded to a self-administered questionnaire (73.6% response rate). Awareness of the CWC was 79% in the intervention group. Awareness and knowledge were significantly different between the intervention and control groups, although there were no significant differences in belief and intention. The 1-year CWC did not significantly promote the recommended level of physical activity (adjusted odds ratio: 0.97; 95% confidence interval: 0.84–1.14). Conclusions This cluster RCT showed that the CWC did not promote physical activity in 1 year. Significant differences were observed in awareness and knowledge between intervention and control groups as short-term impacts of the campaign. Trial registration UMIN-CTR UMIN000002683 PMID:23570536

  10. A high-resolution map of the regulator of the complement activation gene cluster on 1q32 that integrates new genes and markers.

    PubMed

    Heine-Suñer, D; Díaz-Guillén, M A; de Villena, F P; Robledo, M; Benítez, J; Rodríguez de Córdoba, S

    1997-01-01

    Sixteen microsatellite markers, including two described here, were used to construct a high-resolution map of the 1q32 region encompassing the regulator of the complement activation (RCA) gene cluster. The RCA genes are a group of related genes coding for plasma and membrane associated proteins that collectively control activation of the complement component C3. We provide here the location of two new genes within the RCA gene cluster. These genes are PFKFB2 that maps 15 kilobases (kb) upstream of the C4BPB gene, and a gene located 4 kb downstream of C4BPA, which seems to code for the 72 000 Mr component of the signal recognition particle (SRP72). Neither of these two genes is related structurally or functionally to the RCA genes. In addition, our map shows the centromere-telomere orientation of the C4BPB/MCP linkage group, which is: centromere-PFKFB2-C4BPB-C4BPA-SRP72-C4BPAL1++ +-C4BPAL2-telomere, and outlines an interval with a significant female-male recombination difference which suggests the presence of a female-specific hotspot(s) of recombination.

  11. mraW, an essential gene at the dcw cluster of Escherichia coli codes for a cytoplasmic protein with methyltransferase activity.

    PubMed

    Carrión, M; Gómez, M J; Merchante-Schubert, R; Dongarrá, S; Ayala, J A

    1999-01-01

    Three new open reading frames, mraZ, mraW and mraR (also called ftsL), were revealed by DNA sequencing immediately upstream of gene pbpB in the dcw cluster of Escherichia coli. We have found that mraW and mraZ are active genes, coding for two proteins with relative molecular masses of 34 800 and 17 300, respectively. MraW is a cytoplasmic protein that under overproduction condition is also loosely bound to the membrane. Soluble MraW was purified up to 90% by a single high performance electrophoresis (HPEC) step from an extract of an overproducing strain. The protein exhibits a S-adenosyl-dependent methyltransferase activity on membrane-located substrates.

  12. Efficient Room-Temperature Methane Activation by the Closed-Shell, Metal-Free Cluster [OSiOH](+) : A Novel Mechanistic Variant.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiaoyan; Zhou, Shaodong; Schlangen, Maria; Schwarz, Helmut

    2016-09-26

    The closed-shell cluster ion [OSiOH](+) is generated in the gas phase and its reactivity towards the thermal activation of CH4 has been examined using Fourier transform-ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometry in conjunction with state-of-the-art quantum chemical calculations. Quite unexpectedly at room temperature, [OSiOH](+) efficiently mediates C-H bond activation, giving rise to [SiOH](+) and [SiOCH3 ](+) with the concomitant formation of methanol and water, respectively. Mechanistic aspects for this unprecedented reactivity pattern are presented, and the properties of the [OSiOH](+) /CH4 couple are compared with those of the closed-shell systems [OCOH](+) /CH4 and [MgOH](+) /CH4 ; the last two couples exhibit an entirely different reactivity scenario.

  13. The Spatial Clustering of ROSAT All-Sky Survey Active Galactic Nuclei. IV. More Massive Black Holes Reside in More Massive Dark Matter Halos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krumpe, Mirko; Miyaji, Takamitsu; Husemann, Bernd; Fanidakis, Nikos; Coil, Alison L.; Aceves, Hector

    2015-12-01

    This is the fourth paper in a series that reports on our investigation of the clustering properties of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) identified in the ROSAT All-Sky Survey and Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). In this paper we investigate the cause of the X-ray luminosity dependence of the clustering of broad-line, luminous AGNs at 0.16\\lt z\\lt 0.36. We fit the Hα line profile in the SDSS spectra for all X-ray and optically selected broad-line AGNs, determine the mass of the supermassive black hole (SMBH), {M}{BH}, and infer the accretion rate relative to Eddington (L/{L}{EDD}). Since {M}{BH} and L/{L}{EDD} are correlated, we create AGN subsamples in one parameter while maintaining the same distribution in the other parameter. In both the X-ray and optically selected AGN samples, we detect a weak clustering dependence with {M}{BH} and no statistically significant dependence on L/{L}{EDD}. We find a difference of up to 2.7σ when comparing the objects that belong to the 30% least and 30% most massive {M}{BH} subsamples, in that luminous broad-line AGNs with more massive black holes reside in more massive parent dark matter halos at these redshifts. These results provide evidence that higher accretion rates in AGNs do not necessarily require dense galaxy environments, in which more galaxy mergers and interactions are expected to channel large amounts of gas onto the SMBH. We also present semianalytic models that predict a positive {M}{DMH} dependence on {M}{BH}, which is most prominent at {M}{BH}˜ {10}8-9 {M}⊙ .

  14. An active immune defense with a minimal CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats) RNA and without the Cas6 protein.

    PubMed

    Maier, Lisa-Katharina; Stachler, Aris-Edda; Saunders, Sita J; Backofen, Rolf; Marchfelder, Anita

    2015-02-13

    The prokaryotic immune system CRISPR-Cas (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats-CRISPR-associated) is a defense system that protects prokaryotes against foreign DNA. The short CRISPR RNAs (crRNAs) are central components of this immune system. In CRISPR-Cas systems type I and III, crRNAs are generated by the endonuclease Cas6. We developed a Cas6b-independent crRNA maturation pathway for the Haloferax type I-B system in vivo that expresses a functional crRNA, which we termed independently generated crRNA (icrRNA). The icrRNA is effective in triggering degradation of an invader plasmid carrying the matching protospacer sequence. The Cas6b-independent maturation of the icrRNA allowed mutation of the repeat sequence without interfering with signals important for Cas6b processing. We generated 23 variants of the icrRNA and analyzed them for activity in the interference reaction. icrRNAs with deletions or mutations of the 3' handle are still active in triggering an interference reaction. The complete 3' handle could be removed without loss of activity. However, manipulations of the 5' handle mostly led to loss of interference activity. Furthermore, we could show that in the presence of an icrRNA a strain without Cas6b (Δcas6b) is still active in interference.

  15. The effect of metal cluster deposition route on structure and photocatalytic activity of mono- and bimetallic nanoparticles supported on TiO2 by radiolytic method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, Marek; Nadolna, Joanna; Gołąbiewska, Anna; Mazierski, Paweł; Klimczuk, Tomasz; Remita, Hynd; Zaleska-Medynska, Adriana

    2016-08-01

    TiO2 (P25) was modified with small and relatively monodisperse mono- and bimetallic clusters (Ag, Pd, Pt, Ag/Pd, Ag/Pt and Pd/Pt) induced by radiolysis to improve its photocatalytic activity. The as-prepared samples were characterized by X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (XRF), photoluminescence spectrometry (PL), diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS), X-ray powder diffractometry (XRD), scanning transition electron microscopy (STEM) and BET surface area analysis. The effect of metal type (mono- and bimetallic modification) as well as deposition method (simultaneous or subsequent deposition of two metals) on the photocatalytic activity in toluene removal in gas phase under UV-vis irradiation (light-emitting diodes- LEDs) and phenol degradation in liquid phase under visible light irradiation (λ > 420 nm) were investigated. The highest photoactivity under Vis light was observed for TiO2 co-loaded with platinum (0.1%) and palladium (0.1%) clusters. Simultaneous addition of metal precursors results in formation of larger metal nanoparticles (15-30 nm) on TiO2 surface and enhances the Vis-induced activity of Ag/Pd-TiO2 up to four times, while the subsequent metal ions addition results in formation of metal particle size ranging from 4 to 20 nm. Subsequent addition of metal precursors results in formation of BNPs (bimetallic nanoparticle) composites showing higher stability in four cycles of toluene degradation under UV-vis. Obtained results indicated that direct electron transfer from the BNPs to the conduction band of the semiconductor is responsible for visible light photoactivity, whereas superoxide radicals (such as O2rad- and rad OOH) are responsible for pollutants degradation over metal-TiO2 composites.

  16. Merging Active-Space and Renormalized Coupled-Cluster Methods via the CC(P;Q) Formalism, with Benchmark Calculations for Singlet-Triplet Gaps in Biradical Systems.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jun; Piecuch, Piotr

    2012-12-11

    We have recently developed a flexible form of the method of moments of coupled-cluster (CC) equations and the CC(P;Q) hierarchy, which enable one to correct the CC and equation-of-motion CC energies obtained with unconventional truncations in the cluster and excitation operators [Shen, J.; Piecuch, P. Chem. Phys.2012, 401, 180; J. Chem. Phys.2012, 136, 144104]. One of the CC(P;Q) methods is a novel hybrid scheme, abbreviated as CC(t;3), in which the results of CC calculations with singles, doubles, and active-space triples, termed CCSDt, are corrected for the triple excitations missing in CCSDt using the expressions that are reminiscent of the completely renormalized (CR) CC approach known as CR-CC(2,3). We demonstrate that the total electronic energies of the lowest singlet and triplet states, and the singlet-triplet gaps in biradical systems, including methylene, (HFH)(-), and trimethylenemethane, resulting from the CC(t;3) calculations agree with those obtained with the full CC approach with singles, doubles, and triples to within fractions of a millihartree, improving the results of the noniterative triples CCSD(T), CCSD(2)T, and CR-CC(2,3) and hybrid CCSD(T)-h calculations, and competing with the best multireference CC data.

  17. Mediating effects of resistance training skill competency on health-related fitness and physical activity: the ATLAS cluster randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Smith, Jordan J; Morgan, Philip J; Plotnikoff, Ronald C; Stodden, David F; Lubans, David R

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the mediating effect of resistance training skill competency on percentage of body fat, muscular fitness and physical activity among a sample of adolescent boys participating in a school-based obesity prevention intervention. Participants were 361 adolescent boys taking part in the Active Teen Leaders Avoiding Screen-time (ATLAS) cluster randomised controlled trial: a school-based program targeting the health behaviours of economically disadvantaged adolescent males considered "at-risk" of obesity. Body fat percentage (bioelectrical impedance), muscular fitness (hand grip dynamometry and push-ups), physical activity (accelerometry) and resistance training skill competency were assessed at baseline and post-intervention (i.e., 8 months). Three separate multi-level mediation models were analysed to investigate the potential mediating effects of resistance training skill competency on each of the study outcomes using a product-of-coefficients test. Analyses followed the intention-to-treat principle. The intervention had a significant impact on the resistance training skill competency of the boys, and improvements in skill competency significantly mediated the effect of the intervention on percentage of body fat and the combined muscular fitness score. No significant mediated effects were found for physical activity. Improving resistance training skill competency may be an effective strategy for achieving improvements in body composition and muscular fitness in adolescent boys.

  18. Cluster bulleticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massey, Richard; Kitching, Thomas; Nagai, Daisuke

    2011-05-01

    The unique properties of dark matter are revealed during collisions between clusters of galaxies, such as the bullet cluster (1E 0657-56) and baby bullet (MACS J0025-12). These systems provide evidence for an additional, invisible mass in the separation between the distributions of their total mass, measured via gravitational lensing, and their ordinary 'baryonic' matter, measured via its X-ray emission. Unfortunately, the information available from these systems is limited by their rarity. Constraints on the properties of dark matter, such as its interaction cross-section, are therefore restricted by uncertainties in the individual systems' impact velocity, impact parameter and orientation with respect to the line of sight. Here we develop a complementary, statistical measurement in which every piece of substructure falling into every massive cluster is treated as a bullet. We define 'bulleticity' as the mean separation between dark matter and ordinary matter, and we measure the signal in hydrodynamical simulations. The phase space of substructure orbits also exhibits symmetries that provide an equivalent control test. Any detection of bulleticity in real data would indicate a difference in the interaction cross-sections of baryonic and dark matter that may rule out hypotheses of non-particulate dark matter that are otherwise able to model individual systems. A subsequent measurement of bulleticity could constrain the dark matter cross-section. Even with conservative estimates, the existing Hubble Space Telescope archive should yield an independent constraint tighter than that from the bullet cluster. This technique is then trivially extendable to and benefits enormously from larger, future surveys.

  19. A comparison of the cluster-span threshold and the union of shortest paths as objective thresholds of EEG functional connectivity networks from Beta activity in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Smith, Keith; Abasolo, Daniel; Escudero, Javier; Smith, Keith; Abasolo, Daniel; Escudero, Javier; Escudero, Javier; Smith, Keith; Abasolo, Daniel

    2016-08-01

    The Cluster-Span Threshold (CST) is a recently introduced unbiased threshold for functional connectivity networks. This binarisation technique offers a natural trade-off of sparsity and density of information by balancing the ratio of closed to open triples in the network topology. Here we present findings comparing it with the Union of Shortest Paths (USP), another recently proposed objective method. We analyse standard network metrics of binarised networks for sensitivity to clinical Alzheimer's disease in the Beta band of Electroencephalogram activity. We find that the CST outperforms the USP, as well as subjective thresholds based on fixing the network density, as a sensitive threshold for distinguishing differences in the functional connectivity between Alzheimer's disease patients and control. This study provides the first evidence of the usefulness of the CST for clinical research purposes.

  20. Self-assembly of nanosized 0D clusters: CdS quantum dot-polyoxotungstate nanohybrids with strongly coupled electronic structures and visible-light-active photofunctions.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyo Na; Kim, Tae Woo; Choi, Kyong-Hoon; Kim, In Young; Kim, Yong-Rok; Hwang, Seong-Ju

    2011-08-22

    Nanohybrids of CdS-polyoxotungstate with strongly coupled electronic structures and visible-light-active photofunctions can be synthesized by electrostatically derived self-assembly of very small CdS quantum dots, or QDs, (particle size ≈ 2.5 nm) and polyoxotungstate nanoclusters (cluster size ≈1 nm). The formation of CdS-polyoxotungstate nanohybrids is confirmed by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, elemental mapping, and powder X-ray diffraction analysis. Due to the strong electronic coupling between two semiconductors, the CdS-polyoxotungstate nanohybrids show a narrow bandgap energy of around 1.9-2.7 eV, thus reflecting their ability to harvest visible light. Time-resolved photoluminescence experiments indicate that the self-assembly between nanosized CdS and polyoxotungstate is very effective in increasing the lifetime of holes and electrons, thus indicating an efficient electron transfer between two-component semiconductors. The hybridization results not only in a significant improvement in the photostability of CdS QD but also in the creation of visible-light-induced photochromism. Of particular importance is that the present nanohybrids show visible-light-driven photocatalytic activity to produce H(2) and O(2) , which is superior to those of the unhybridized CdS and polyoxotungstate. The self-assembly of nanometer-level semiconductor clusters can provide a powerful way of optimizing the photoinduced functionalities of each component (i.e., visible-induced photochromism and photocatalysis) by means of strong electronic coupling.

  1. Acute Whiplash Injury Study (AWIS): a protocol for a cluster randomised pilot and feasibility trial of an Active Behavioural Physiotherapy Intervention in an insurance private setting

    PubMed Central

    Wiangkham, Taweewat; Duda, Joan; Haque, M Sayeed; Price, Jonathan; Rushton, Alison

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Whiplash-associated disorder (WAD) causes substantial social and economic burden internationally. Up to 60% of patients with WAD progress to chronicity. Research therefore needs to focus on effective management in the acute stage to prevent the development of chronicity. Approximately 93% of patients are classified as WADII (neck complaint and musculoskeletal sign(s)), and in the UK, most are managed in the private sector. In our recent systematic review, a combination of active and behavioural physiotherapy was identified as potentially effective in the acute stage. An Active Behavioural Physiotherapy Intervention (ABPI) was developed through combining empirical (modified Delphi study) and theoretical (social cognitive theory focusing on self-efficacy) evidence. This pilot and feasibility trial has been designed to inform the design of an adequately powered definitive randomised controlled trial. Methods and analysis Two parallel phases. (1) An external pilot and feasibility cluster randomised double-blind (assessor and participants), parallel two-arm (ABPI vs standard physiotherapy) clinical trial to evaluate procedures and feasibility. Six UK private physiotherapy clinics will be recruited and cluster randomised by a computer-generated randomisation sequence. Sixty participants (30 each arm) will be assessed at recruitment (baseline) and at 3 months postbaseline. The planned primary outcome measure is the neck disability index. (2) An embedded exploratory qualitative study using semistructured indepth interviews (n=3–4 physiotherapists) and a focus group (n=6–8 patients) and entailing the recruitment of purposive samples will explore perceptions of the ABPI. Quantitative data will be analysed descriptively. Qualitative data will be coded and analysed deductively (identify themes) and inductively (identify additional themes). Ethics and dissemination This trial is approved by the University of Birmingham Ethics Committee (ERN_15-0542). Trial

  2. Mechanistic Insights on C-O and C-C Bond Activation and Hydrogen Insertion during Acetic Acid Hydrogenation Catalyzed by Ruthenium Clusters in Aqueous Medium

    SciTech Connect

    Shangguan, Junnan; Olarte, Mariefel V.; Chin, Ya-Huei

    2016-06-07

    Catalytic pathways for acetic acid (CH3COOH) and hydrogen (H2) reactions on dispersed Ru clusters in the aqueous medium and the associated kinetic requirements for C-O and C-C bond cleavages and hydrogen insertion are established from rate and isotopic assessments. CH3COOH reacts with H2 in steps that either retain its carbon backbone and lead to ethanol, ethyl acetate, and ethane (47-95 %, 1-23 %, and 2-17 % carbon selectivities, respectively) or break its C-C bond and form methane (1-43 % carbon selectivities) at moderate temperatures (413-523 K) and H2 pressures (10-60 bar, 298 K). Initial CH3COOH activation is the kinetically relevant step, during which CH3C(O)-OH bond cleaves on a metal site pair at Ru cluster surfaces nearly saturated with adsorbed hydroxyl (OH*) and acetate (CH3COO*) intermediates, forming an adsorbed acetyl (CH3CO*) and hydroxyl (OH*) species. Acetic acid turnover rates increase proportionally with both H2 (10-60 bar) and CH3COOH concentrations at low CH3COOH concentrations (<0.83 M), but decrease from first to zero order as the CH3COOH concentration and the CH3COO* coverages increase and the vacant Ru sites concomitantly decrease. Beyond the initial CH3C(O)-OH bond activation, sequential H-insertions on the surface acetyl species (CH3CO*) lead to C2 products and their derivative (ethanol, ethane, and ethyl acetate) and the competitive C-C bond cleavage of CH3CO* causes the eventual methane formation. The instantaneous carbon selectivities towards C2 species (ethanol, ethane, and ethyl acetate) increase linearly with the concentration of proton-type Hδ+ (derived from carboxylic acid dissociation) and chemisorbed H*. The selectivities towards C2 products decrease with increasing temperature, because of higher observed barriers for C-C bond cleavage than H-insertion. This study offers an interpretation of mechanism and energetics and provides kinetic evidence of carboxylic acid assisted proton-type hydrogen (Hδ+) shuffling during H

  3. Chaos theory perspective for industry clusters development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Haiying; Jiang, Minghui; Li, Chengzhang

    2016-03-01

    Industry clusters have outperformed in economic development in most developing countries. The contributions of industrial clusters have been recognized as promotion of regional business and the alleviation of economic and social costs. It is no doubt globalization is rendering clusters in accelerating the competitiveness of economic activities. In accordance, many ideas and concepts involve in illustrating evolution tendency, stimulating the clusters development, meanwhile, avoiding industrial clusters recession. The term chaos theory is introduced to explain inherent relationship of features within industry clusters. A preferred life cycle approach is proposed for industrial cluster recessive theory analysis. Lyapunov exponents and Wolf model are presented for chaotic identification and examination. A case study of Tianjin, China has verified the model effectiveness. The investigations indicate that the approaches outperform in explaining chaos properties in industrial clusters, which demonstrates industrial clusters evolution, solves empirical issues and generates corresponding strategies.

  4. The SMART CLUSTER METHOD - adaptive earthquake cluster analysis and declustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, Andreas; Daniell, James; Wenzel, Friedemann

    2016-04-01

    Earthquake declustering is an essential part of almost any statistical analysis of spatial and temporal properties of seismic activity with usual applications comprising of probabilistic seismic hazard assessments (PSHAs) and earthquake prediction methods. The nature of earthquake clusters and subsequent declustering of earthquake catalogues plays a crucial role in determining the magnitude-dependent earthquake return period and its respective spatial variation. Various methods have been developed to address this issue from other researchers. These have differing ranges of complexity ranging from rather simple statistical window methods to complex epidemic models. This study introduces the smart cluster method (SCM), a new methodology to identify earthquake clusters, which uses an adaptive point process for spatio-temporal identification. Hereby, an adaptive search algorithm for data point clusters is adopted. It uses the earthquake density in the spatio-temporal neighbourhood of each event to adjust the search properties. The identified clusters are subsequently analysed to determine directional anisotropy, focussing on a strong correlation along the rupture plane and adjusts its search space with respect to directional properties. In the case of rapid subsequent ruptures like the 1992 Landers sequence or the 2010/2011 Darfield-Christchurch events, an adaptive classification procedure is applied to disassemble subsequent ruptures which may have been grouped into an individual cluster using near-field searches, support vector machines and temporal splitting. The steering parameters of the search behaviour are linked to local earthquake properties like magnitude of completeness, earthquake density and Gutenberg-Richter parameters. The method is capable of identifying and classifying earthquake clusters in space and time. It is tested and validated using earthquake data from California and New Zealand. As a result of the cluster identification process, each event in

  5. Nano-sized clusters of a teicoplanin ψ-aglycon-fullerene conjugate. Synthesis, antibacterial activity and aggregation studies.

    PubMed

    Tollas, Szilvia; Bereczki, Ilona; Sipos, Attila; Rőth, Erzsébet; Batta, Gyula; Daróczi, Lajos; Kéki, Sándor; Ostorházi, Eszter; Rozgonyi, Ferenc; Herczegh, Pál

    2012-08-01

    Glycopeptide antibiotic derivative teicoplanin ψ-aglycone has been bound covalently to a fullerenopyrrolidine derivative using azide-alkyne 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reaction. The aggregation of the antibiotic-fullerene conjugate in aqueous solution has been studied. The conjugate exhibited antibacterial activity against enterococci resistant to teicoplanin.

  6. Self-propelled rods exhibit a phase-separated state characterized by the presence of active stresses and the ejection of polar clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weitz, Sebastian; Deutsch, Andreas; Peruani, Fernando

    2015-07-01

    We study collections of self-propelled rods (SPR) moving in two dimensions for packing fractions less than or equal to 0.3. We find that in the thermodynamical limit the SPR undergo a phase transition between a disordered gas and a novel phase-separated system state. Interestingly, (global) orientational order patterns—contrary to what has been suggested—vanish in this limit. In the found novel state, the SPR self-organize into a highly dynamical, high-density, compact region—which we call aggregate—which is surrounded by a disordered gas. Active stresses build inside aggregates as a result of the combined effect of local orientational order and active forces. This leads to the most distinctive feature of these aggregates: constant ejection of polar clusters of SPR. This novel phase-separated state represents a novel state of matter characterized by large fluctuations in volume and shape, related to mass ejection, and exhibits positional as well as orientational local order. SPR systems display new physics unseen in other active matter systems.

  7. High-temperature protein G is essential for activity of the Escherichia coli clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/Cas system.

    PubMed

    Yosef, Ido; Goren, Moran G; Kiro, Ruth; Edgar, Rotem; Qimron, Udi

    2011-12-13

    Prokaryotic DNA arrays arranged as clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR), along with their associated proteins, provide prokaryotes with adaptive immunity by RNA-mediated targeting of alien DNA or RNA matching the sequences between the repeats. Here, we present a thorough screening system for the identification of bacterial proteins participating in immunity conferred by the Escherichia coli CRISPR system. We describe the identification of one such protein, high-temperature protein G (HtpG), a homolog of the eukaryotic chaperone heat-shock protein 90. We demonstrate that in the absence of htpG, the E. coli CRISPR system loses its suicidal activity against λ prophage and its ability to provide immunity from lysogenization. Transcomplementation of htpG restores CRISPR activity. We further show that inactivity of the CRISPR system attributable to htpG deficiency can be suppressed by expression of Cas3, a protein that is essential for its activity. Accordingly, we also find that the steady-state level of overexpressed Cas3 is significantly enhanced following HtpG expression. We conclude that HtpG is a newly identified positive modulator of the CRISPR system that is essential for maintaining functional levels of Cas3.

  8. OBSERVED SCALING RELATIONS FOR STRONG LENSING CLUSTERS: CONSEQUENCES FOR COSMOLOGY AND CLUSTER ASSEMBLY

    SciTech Connect

    Comerford, Julia M.; Moustakas, Leonidas A.; Natarajan, Priyamvada

    2010-05-20

    Scaling relations of observed galaxy cluster properties are useful tools for constraining cosmological parameters as well as cluster formation histories. One of the key cosmological parameters, {sigma}{sub 8}, is constrained using observed clusters of galaxies, although current estimates of {sigma}{sub 8} from the scaling relations of dynamically relaxed galaxy clusters are limited by the large scatter in the observed cluster mass-temperature (M-T) relation. With a sample of eight strong lensing clusters at 0.3 < z < 0.8, we find that the observed cluster concentration-mass relation can be used to reduce the M-T scatter by a factor of 6. Typically only relaxed clusters are used to estimate {sigma}{sub 8}, but combining the cluster concentration-mass relation with the M-T relation enables the inclusion of unrelaxed clusters as well. Thus, the resultant gains in the accuracy of {sigma}{sub 8} measurements from clusters are twofold: the errors on {sigma}{sub 8} are reduced and the cluster sample size is increased. Therefore, the statistics on {sigma}{sub 8} determination from clusters are greatly improved by the inclusion of unrelaxed clusters. Exploring cluster scaling relations further, we find that the correlation between brightest cluster galaxy (BCG) luminosity and cluster mass offers insight into the assembly histories of clusters. We find preliminary evidence for a steeper BCG luminosity-cluster mass relation for strong lensing clusters than the general cluster population, hinting that strong lensing clusters may have had more active merging histories.

  9. Systematic Perturbation of the Trinuclear Copper Cluster in the Multicopper Oxidases: The Role of Active Site Asymmetry in its Reduction of O2 to H2O

    PubMed Central

    Augustine, Anthony J.; Kjaergaard, Christian; Qayyum, Munzarin; Ziegler, Lynn; Kosman, Daniel J.; Hodgson, Keith O.; Hedman, Britt; Solomon, Edward I.

    2010-01-01

    The multicopper oxidase Fet3p catalyzes the four-electron reduction of dioxygen to water, coupled to the one-electron oxidation of four equivalents of substrate. To carry out this process the enzyme utilizes four Cu atoms: a type 1, a type 2, and a coupled binuclear, type 3 site. Substrates are oxidized at the T1 Cu, which rapidly transfers electrons, 13 Å away, to a trinuclear copper cluster composed of the T2 and T3 sites where dioxygen is reduced to water in two sequential 2e− steps. This study focuses on two variants of Fet3p, H126Q and H483Q, that perturb the two T3 Cu's, T3α and T3β, respectively. The variants have been isolated in both holo and type 1 depleted (T1D) forms, T1DT3αQ and T1DT3βQ, and their trinuclear copper clusters have been characterized in their oxidized and reduced states. While the variants are only mildly perturbed relative to T1D in the resting oxidized state, in contrast to T1D they are both found to have lost a ligand in their reduced states. Importantly, T1DT3αQ reacts with O2 but T1DT3βQ does not. Thus loss of a ligand at T3β, but not at T3α, turns off O2 reactivity, indicating that T3β and T2 are required for the 2e− reduction of O2 to form the peroxide intermediate (PI), whereas T3α remains reduced. This is supported by the spectroscopic features of PI in T1DT3αQ, which are identical to T1D PI. This selective redox activity of one edge of the trinuclear cluster demonstrates its asymmetry in O2 reactivity. The structural origin of this asymmetry between the T3α and T3β is discussed as is its contribution to reactivity. PMID:20377263

  10. GALAXY CLUSTERS AROUND RADIO-LOUD ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI AT 1.3 < z < 3.2 AS SEEN BY SPITZER

    SciTech Connect

    Wylezalek, Dominika; Stern, Daniel; Eisenhardt, Peter R. M.; Galametz, Audrey; Vernet, Joeel; De Breuck, Carlos; Seymour, Nick; Brodwin, Mark; Gonzalez, Anthony H.; Hatch, Nina; Jarvis, Matt; Rettura, Alessandro; Stanford, Spencer A.; Stevens, Jason A.

    2013-05-20

    We report the first results from the Clusters Around Radio-Loud AGN program, a Cycle 7 and 8 Spitzer Space Telescope snapshot program to investigate the environments of a large sample of obscured and unobscured luminous radio-loud active galactic nuclei (AGNs) at 1.2 < z < 3.2. These data, obtained for 387 fields, reach 3.6 and 4.5 {mu}m depths of [3.6]{sub AB} = 22.6 and [4.5]{sub AB} = 22.9 at the 95% completeness level, which is two to three times fainter than L* in this redshift range. By using the color cut [3.6] - [4.5] > -0.1 (AB), which efficiently selects high-redshift (z > 1.3) galaxies of all types, we identify galaxy cluster member candidates in the fields of the radio-loud AGN. The local density of these Infrared Array Camera (IRAC)-selected sources is compared to the density of similarly selected sources in blank fields. We find that 92% of the radio-loud AGN reside in environments richer than average. The majority (55%) of the radio-loud AGN fields are found to be overdense at a {>=}2{sigma} level; 10% are overdense at a {>=}5{sigma} level. A clear rise in surface density of IRAC-selected sources toward the position of the radio-loud AGN strongly supports an association of the majority of the IRAC-selected sources with the radio-loud AGN. Our results provide solid statistical evidence that radio-loud AGN are likely beacons for finding high-redshift galaxy (proto-)clusters. We investigate how environment depends on AGN type (unobscured radio-loud quasars versus obscured radio galaxies), radio luminosity and redshift, finding no correlation with either AGN type or radio luminosity. We find a decrease in density with redshift, consistent with galaxy evolution for this uniform, flux-limited survey. These results are consistent with expectations from the orientation-driven AGN unification model, at least for the high radio luminosity regimes considered in this sample.

  11. Spectroscopic active IVFe3+-VIFe3+ clusters in spinel-magnesioferrite solid solution crystals: a potential monitor for ordering in oxide spinels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreozzi, G. B.; Hålenius, U.; Skogby, H.

    Optical absorption spectra (OAS) of synthetic single crystals of the solid solution spinel sensu stricto (s.s.)-magnesioferrite, Mg(Fe3+Al1-y)2O4 (0Al substitution. Prominent and relatively sharp absorption bands are observed at 25 300 and 21 300cm-1, while less intense bands occur at 22 350, 18 900, 17 900 and 15 100cm-1. On the basis of band energies, band intensities and the compositional effect on band intensity, as well as structural considerations, we assign the observed bands to electronic transitions in IVFe3+-VIFe3+clusters. A linear relationship (R2= 0.99) between the αnet value of the absorption band at 21 300cm-1 and [IVFe3+].[VIFe3+] concentration product has been defined: αnet=2.2+15.8 [IVFe3+].[VIFe3+]. Some of the samples have been heat-treated between 700 and 1000°C to investigate the relation between Fe3+ ordering and absorption spectra. Increase of cation disorder with temperature is observed, which corresponds to a 4% reduction in the number of active clusters. Due to the high spatial resolution ( 10μm), the OAS technique may be used as a microprobe for determination of Fe3+ concentration or site partitioning. Potential applications of the technique include analysis of small crystals and of samples showing zonation with respect to total Fe3+ and/or ordering.

  12. Thermal and electrochemical C-X activation (X = Cl, Br, I) by the strong Lewis acid Pd3(dppm)3(CO)2+ cluster and its catalytic applications.

    PubMed

    Lemaître, Frédéric; Lucas, Dominique; Groison, Katherine; Richard, Philippe; Mugnier, Yves; Harvey, Pierre D

    2003-05-07

    The stoichiometric and catalytic activations of alkyl halides and acid chlorides by the unsatured Pd(3)(dppm)(3)(CO)(2+) cluster (Pd(3)(2+)) are investigated in detail. A series of alkyl halides (R-X; R = t-Bu, Et, Pr, Bu, allyl; X = Cl, Br, I) react slowly with Pd(3)(2+) to form the corresponding Pd(3)(X)(+) adduct and "R(+)". This activation can proceed much faster if it is electrochemically induced via the formation of the paramagnetic species Pd(3)(+). The latter is the first confidently identified paramagnetic Pd cluster. The kinetic constants extracted from the evolution of the UV-vis spectra for the thermal activation, as well as the amount of electricity to bring the activation to completion for the electrochemically induced reactions, correlate the relative C-X bond strength and the steric factors. The highly reactive "R(+)" species has been trapped using phenol to afford the corresponding ether. On the other hand, the acid chlorides react rapidly with Pd(3)(2+) where no induction is necessary. The analysis of the cyclic voltammograms (CV) establishes that a dissociative mechanism operates (RCOCl --> RCO(+) + Cl(-); R = t-Bu, Ph) prior to Cl(-) scavenging by the Pd(3)(2+) species. For the other acid chlorides (R = n-C(6)H(13), Me(2)CH, Et, Me, Pr), a second associative process (Pd(3)(2+) + RCOCl --> Pd(3)(2+.....)Cl(CO)(R)) is seen. Addition of Cu(NCMe)(4)(+) or Ag(+) leads to the abstraction of Cl(-) from Pd(3)(Cl)(+) to form Pd(3)(2+) and the insoluble MCl materials (M = Cu, Ag) allowing to regenerate the starting unsaturated cluster, where the precipitation of MX drives the reaction. By using a copper anode, the quasi-quantitative catalytic generation of the acylium ion ("RCO(+)") operates cleanly and rapidly. The trapping of "RCO(+)" with PF(6)(-) or BF(4)(-) leads to the corresponding acid fluorides and, with an alcohol (R'OH), to the corresponding ester catalytically, under mild conditions. Attempts were made to trap the key intermediates "Pd(3)(Cl

  13. Cognitive-Behavioral Health-Promotion Intervention Increases Fruit and Vegetable Consumption and Physical Activity among South African Adolescents: A Cluster-Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Jemmott, John B.; Jemmott, Loretta S.; O’Leary, Ann; Ngwane, Zolani; Icard, Larry; Bellamy, Scarlett; Jones, Shasta; Landis, J. Richard; Heeren, G. Anita; Tyler, Joanne; Makiwane, Monde B.

    2015-01-01

    Rates of chronic diseases are high among Black South Africans. Few studies have tested cognitive-behavioral health-promotion interventions to reduce chronic diseases in South Africa. We tested the efficacy of such an intervention among adolescents in a cluster-randomized controlled trial. We randomly selected 9 of 17 matched-pairs of schools and randomized one school in each pair to the cognitive-behavioral health-promotion intervention designed to encourage health-related behaviors and the other to a HIV/STD risk-reduction intervention that served as the control. Interventions were based on social cognitive theory, the theory of planned behavior, and qualitative data from the target population. Data collectors, blind to participants’ intervention, administered confidential assessments at baseline and 3, 6, and 12 months post-intervention. Primary outcomes were fruit and vegetable consumption and physical activity. Participants were 1,057 grade 6 learners (mean age = 12.4 years), with 96.7% retained at 12-month follow-up. Generalized estimating equations revealed that averaged over the follow-ups, a greater percentage of health-promotion intervention participants than HIV/STD control participants met 5-a-Day fruit and vegetable and physical activity guidelines. The intervention also increased health-promotion knowledge, attitude, and intention, but did not decrease substance use or substance-use attitude and intention. The findings suggest that theory-based, contextually appropriate interventions may increase health behaviors among young adolescents in sub-Saharan Africa. PMID:21318928

  14. Identification of an Iron-Sulfur Cluster That Modulates the Enzymatic Activity in NarE, a Neisseria meningitidis ADP-ribosyltransferase*

    PubMed Central

    Del Vecchio, Mariangela; Pogni, Rebecca; Baratto, Maria Camilla; Nobbs, Angela; Rappuoli, Rino; Pizza, Mariagrazia; Balducci, Enrico

    2009-01-01

    In prokaryotes, mono-ADP-ribose transfer enzymes represent a family of exotoxins that display activity in a variety of bacterial pathogens responsible for causing disease in plants and animals, including those affecting mankind, such as diphtheria, cholera, and whooping cough. We report here that NarE, a putative ADP-ribosylating toxin previously identified from Neisseria meningitidis, which shares structural homologies with Escherichia coli heat labile enterotoxin and toxin from Vibrio cholerae, possesses an iron-sulfur center. The recombinant protein was expressed in E. coli, and when purified at high concentration, NarE is a distinctive golden brown in color. Evidence from UV-visible spectrophotometry and EPR spectroscopy revealed characteristics consistent of an iron-binding protein. The presence of iron was determined by colorimetric method and by an atomic absorption spectrophotometer. To identify the amino acids involved in binding iron, a combination of site-directed mutagenesis and UV-visible and enzymatic assays were performed. All four cysteine residues were individually replaced by serine. Substitution of Cys67 and Cys128 into serine caused a drastic reduction in the E420/E280 ratio, suggesting that these two residues are essential for the formation of a stable coordination. This modification led to a consistent loss in ADP-ribosyltransferase activity, while decrease in NAD-glycohydrolase activity was less dramatic in these mutants, indicating that the correct assembly of the iron-binding site is essential for transferase but not hydrolase activity. This is the first observation suggesting that a member of the ADP-ribosyltransferase family contains an Fe-S cluster implicated in catalysis. This observation may unravel novel functions exerted by this class of enzymes. PMID:19744927

  15. Molecular characterization of the alpha-glucosidase activity in Enterobacter sakazakii reveals the presence of a putative gene cluster for palatinose metabolism.

    PubMed

    Lehner, Angelika; Riedel, Kathrin; Rattei, Thomas; Ruepp, Andreas; Frishman, Dimitrij; Breeuwer, Pieter; Diep, Benjamin; Eberl, Leo; Stephan, Roger

    2006-12-01

    Enterobacter sakazakii is considered an opportunistic pathogen for premature infants and neonates. Although E. sakazakii has been isolated from various types of food, recontaminated dried infant formula has been epidemiologically identified as the major source of infection. Amongst others, alpha-glucosidase activity is one of the most important biochemical features, which differentiates E. sakazakii from other species in the family Enterobacteriaceae and has therefore been used as a selective marker in the development of differential media. However, it has been shown, that methods based on this biochemical feature are prone to producing false-positive results for presumptive E. sakazakii colonies due to the presence of this enzymatic activity in other species of the Enterobacteriaceae. Therefore, elucidation of the molecular basis responsible for the biochemical feature in E. sakazakii would provide novel targets suitable for the development of more specific and direct identification systems for this organism. By applying the bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) approach, along with heterologous gene expression in Escherichia coli, the molecular basis of the alpha-glucosidase activity in E. sakazakii was characterized. Here we report the identification of two different alpha-glucosidase encoding genes. Homology searches of the deduced amino acid sequences revealed that the proteins belong to a cluster of gene products putatively responsible for the metabolism of isomaltulose (palatinose; 6-O-alpha-d-glucopyranosyl-d-fructose). The glycosyl-hydrolyzing activity of each protein was demonstrated by subcloning the respective open reading frames and screening of E. coli transformants for their ability to hydrolyze 4-methyl-umbelliferyl-alpha-d-glucoside. Analysis at the protein level revealed that both enzymes belong to the intracellular fraction of cell proteins. The presence of the postulated palatinose metabolism was proven by growth experiments using this sugar as

  16. Effectiveness of a School-Based Physical Activity Intervention on Cognitive Performance in Danish Adolescents: LCoMotion—Learning, Cognition and Motion – A Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Domazet, Sidsel Louise; Froberg, Karsten; Hillman, Charles H.; Andersen, Lars Bo; Bugge, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Background Physical activity is associated not only with health-related parameters, but also with cognitive and academic performance. However, no large scale school-based physical activity interventions have investigated effects on cognitive performance in adolescents. The aim of this study was to describe the effectiveness of a school-based physical activity intervention in enhancing cognitive performance in 12–14 years old adolescents. Methods A 20 week cluster randomized controlled trial was conducted including seven intervention and seven control schools. A total of 632 students (mean (SD) age: 12.9 (0.6) years) completed the trial with baseline and follow-up data on primary or secondary outcomes (74% of randomized subjects). The intervention targeted physical activity during academic subjects, recess, school transportation and leisure-time. Cognitive performance was assessed using an executive functions test of inhibition (flanker task) with the primary outcomes being accuracy and reaction time on congruent and incongruent trials. Secondary outcomes included mathematics performance, physical activity levels, body-mass index, waist-circumference and cardiorespiratory fitness. Results No significant difference in change, comparing the intervention group to the control group, was observed on the primary outcomes (p’s>0.05) or mathematics skills (p>0.05). An intervention effect was found for cardiorespiratory fitness in girls (21 meters (95% CI: 4.4–38.6) and body-mass index in boys (-0.22 kg/m2 (95% CI: -0.39–0.05). Contrary to our predictions, a significantly larger change in interference control for reaction time was found in favor of the control group (5.0 milliseconds (95% CI: 0–9). Baseline to mid-intervention changes in physical activity levels did not differ significantly between groups (all p’s>0.05). Conclusions No evidence was found for effectiveness of a 20-week multi-faceted school-based physical activity intervention for enhancing

  17. Genetic organization of the hrp genes cluster in Erwinia pyrifoliae and characterization of HR active domains in HrpNEp protein by mutational analysis.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, Rosemary; Park, Duck Hwan; Cho, Jun Mo; Cho, Saeyoull; Wilson, Calum; Hwang, Ingyu; Hur, Jang Hyun; Lim, Chun Keun

    2008-02-29

    The disease-specific (dsp) region and the hypersensitive response and pathogenicity (hrp) genes, including the hrpW, hrpNEp, and hrpC operons have previously been sequenced in Erwinia pyrifoliae WT3 [Shrestha et al. (2005a)]. In this study, the remaining hrp genes, including the hrpC, hrpA, hrpS, hrpXY, hrpL and hrpJ operons, were determined. The hrp genes cluster (ca. 38 kb) was comprised of eight transcriptional units and contained nine hrc (hrp conserved) genes. The genetic organization of the hrp/hrc genes and their orientation for the transcriptions were also similar to and collinear with those of E. amylovora, showing > or = 80% homologies. However, ORFU1 and ORFU2 of unknown functions, present between the hrpA and hrpS operons of E. amylovora, were absent in E. pyrifoliae. To determine the HR active domains, several proteins were prepared from truncated fragments of the N-terminal and the C-terminal regions of HrpN(Ep) protein of E. pyrifoliae. The proteins prepared from the N-terminal region elicited HR, but not from those of the C-terminal region indicating that HR active domains are located in only N-terminal region of the HrpN(Ep) protein. Two synthetic oligopeptides produced HR on tobacco confirming presence of two HR active domains in the HrpN(Ep). The HR positive N-terminal fragment (HN delta C187) was further narrowed down by deleting C-terminal amino acids and internal amino acids to investigate whether amino acid insertion region have role in faster and stronger HR activity in HrpN(Ep) than HrpN(Ea). The HrpN(Ep) mutant proteins HN delta C187 (D1AIR), HN delta C187 (D2AIR) and HN delta C187 (DM41) retained similar HR activation to that of wild-type HrpN(Ep). However, the HrpN(Ep) mutant protein HN delta C187 (D3AIR) lacking third amino acid insertion region (102 to 113 aa) reduced HR when compared to that of wild-type HrpN(Ep). Reduction in HR elicitation could not be observed when single amino acids at different positions were substituted at third

  18. The study protocol of a cluster-randomised controlled trial of family-mediated personalised activities for nursing home residents with dementia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Following admission to a nursing home, the feelings of depression and burden that family carers may experience do not necessarily diminish. Additionally, they may experience feelings of guilt and grief for the loss of a previously close relationship. At the same time, individuals with dementia may develop symptoms of depression and agitation (BPSD) that may be related to changes in family relationships, social interaction and stimulation. Until now, interventions to alleviate carer stress and BPSD have treated carers and relatives separately rather than focusing on maintaining or enhancing their relationships. One-to-one structured activities have been shown to reduce BPSD and also improve the caring experience, but barriers such as a lack of resources impede the implementation of activities in aged care facilities. The current study will investigate the effect of individualised activities based on the Montessori methodology administered by family carers in residential care. Methods/Design We will conduct a cluster-randomised trial to train family carers in conducting personalised one-to-one activities based on the Montessori methodology with their relatives. Montessori activities derive from the principles espoused by Maria Montessori and subsequent educational theorists to promote engagement in learning, namely task breakdown, guided repetition, progression in difficulty from simple to complex, and the careful matching of demands to levels of competence. Persons with dementia living in aged care facilities and frequently visiting family carers will be included in the study. Consented, willing participants will be randomly assigned by facility to a treatment condition using the Montessori approach or a control waiting list condition. We hypothesise that family carers conducting Montessori-based activities will experience improvements in quality of visits and overall relationship with the resident as well as higher self-rated mastery, fewer depressive

  19. Physical activity and academic achievement across the curriculum (A + PAAC): rationale and design of a 3-year, cluster-randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Improving academic achievement and reducing the rates of obesity in elementary school students are both of considerable interest. Increased physical activity during academic instruction time during school offers a potential intervention to address both issues. A program titled “Physical Activity Across the Curriculum” (PAAC) was developed in which classroom teachers in 22 elementary schools were trained to deliver academic instruction using physical activity with a primary aim of preventing increased BMI. A secondary analysis of data assessed the impact of PAAC on academic achievement using the Weschler Individual Achievement Test-II and significant improvements were shown for reading, math and spelling in students who participated in PAAC. Based on the results from PAAC, an adequately powered trial will be conducted to assess differences in academic achievement between intervention and control schools called, “Academic Achievement and Physical Activity Across the Curriculum (A + PAAC).” Methods/design Seventeen elementary schools were cluster randomized to A + PAAC or control for a 3-year trial. Classroom teachers were trained to deliver academic instruction through moderate-to-vigorous physical activity with a target of 100+ minutes of A + PAAC activities per week. The primary outcome measure is academic achievement measured by the Weschler Individual Achievement Test-III, which was administered at baseline (Fall 2011) and will be repeated in the spring of each year by assessors blinded to condition. Potential mediators of any association between A + PAAC and academic achievement will be examined on the same schedule and include changes in cognitive function, cardiovascular fitness, daily physical activity, BMI, and attention-to-task. An extensive process analysis will be conducted to document the fidelity of the intervention. School and student recruitment/randomization, teacher training, and baseline testing for A

  20. Interstitial Fluid Flow Intensity Modulates Endothelial Sprouting in Restricted Src-Activated Cell Clusters During Capillary Morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Hernández Vera, Rodrigo; Genové, Elsa; Alvarez, Lery; Borrós, Salvador; Kamm, Roger; Lauffenburger, Douglas

    2009-01-01

    Development of tissues in vitro with dimensions larger than 150 to 200 μm requires the presence of a functional vascular network. Therefore, we have studied capillary morphogenesis under controlled biological and biophysical conditions with the aim of promoting vascular structures in tissue constructs. We and others have previously demonstrated that physiological values of interstitial fluid flow normal to an endothelial monolayer in combination with vascular endothelial growth factor play a critical role during capillary morphogenesis by promoting cell sprouting. In the present work, we studied the effect that a range of interstitial flow velocities (0–50 μm/min) has in promoting the amount, length, and branching of developing sprouts during capillary morphogenesis. The number of capillary-like structures developed from human umbilical vein endothelial cell monolayers across the interstitial flow values tested was not significantly affected. Instead, the length and branching degree of the sprouts presented a significant maximum at flow velocities of 10 to 20 μm/min. More-over, at these same flow values, the phosphorylation level of Src also showed its peak. We discovered that capillary morphogenesis is restricted to patches of Src-activated cells (phosphorylated Src (pSrc)) at the monolayer, suggesting that the transduction pathway in charge of sensing the mechanical stimulus induced by flow is promoting predetermined mechanically sensitive areas (pSrc) to undergo capillary morphogenesis. PMID:18636940

  1. Impact of Booster Breaks and Computer Prompts on Physical Activity and Sedentary Behavior Among Desk-Based Workers: A Cluster-Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Paxton, Raheem J.; Shegog, Ross; Coan, Sharon P.; Dubin, Allison; Page, Timothy F.; Rempel, David M.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The 15-minute work break provides an opportunity to promote health, yet few studies have examined this part of the workday. We studied physical activity and sedentary behavior among office workers and compared the results of the Booster Break program with those of a second intervention and a control group to determine whether the Booster Break program improved physical and behavioral health outcomes. Methods We conducted a 3-arm, cluster-randomized controlled trial at 4 worksites in Texas from 2010 through 2013 to compare a group-based, structured Booster Break program to an individual-based computer-prompt intervention and a usual-break control group; we analyzed physiologic, behavioral, and employee measures such as work social support, quality of life, and perceived stress. We also identified consistent and inconsistent attendees of the Booster Break sessions. Results We obtained data from 175 participants (mean age, 43 y; 67% racial/ethnic minority). Compared with the other groups, the consistent Booster Break attendees had greater weekly pedometer counts (P < .001), significant decreases in sedentary behavior and self-reported leisure-time physical activity (P < .001), and a significant increase in triglyceride concentrations (P = .02) (levels remained within the normal range). Usual-break participants significantly increased their body mass index, whereas Booster Break participants maintained body mass index status during the 6 months. Overall, Booster Break participants were 6.8 and 4.3 times more likely to have decreases in BMI and weekend sedentary time, respectively, than usual-break participants. Conclusion Findings varied among the 3 study groups; however, results indicate the potential for consistent attendees of the Booster Break intervention to achieve significant, positive changes related to physical activity, sedentary behavior, and body mass index. PMID:27854422

  2. ‘Physical Activity 4 Everyone’ school-based intervention to prevent decline in adolescent physical activity levels: 12 month (mid-intervention) report on a cluster randomised trial

    PubMed Central

    Sutherland, Rachel; Campbell, Elizabeth; Lubans, David R; Morgan, Philip J; Okely, Anthony D; Nathan, Nicole; Wolfenden, Luke; Wiese, Jarrod; Gillham, Karen; Hollis, Jenna; Wiggers, John

    2016-01-01

    Background Adolescence is a recognised period of physical activity decline, particularly among low-income communities. We report the 12-month (midpoint) effects of a 2-year multicomponent physical activity intervention implemented in disadvantaged secondary schools. Methods A cluster randomised trial was undertaken in 10 secondary schools located in disadvantaged areas in New South Wales, Australia. Students in Grade 7 were recruited, with follow-up in Grade 8. The intervention was guided by socioecological theory and included seven physical activity strategies, and six implementation adoption strategies. The primary outcome was mean minutes of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) per day assessed using Actigraph GT3X accelerometers. Outcome data were analysed using repeated measures linear mixed models. Results At baseline, 1150 (93%) students participated in the data collection (mean age 12 years, 48% boys) and 1050 (79%) students participated at 12-month follow-up. By the 12-month follow-up, the six implementation adoption strategies had been used to support schools to deliver four of the seven physical activity elements. There was a significant group-by-time interaction for mean minutes of MVPA per day in favour of the intervention group (adjusted difference between groups at follow-up=3.85 min, 95% CI (0.79 to 6.91), p≤0.01), including significantly more vigorous physical activity (2.45 min, p≤0.01), equating to 27 min more MVPA per week. Summary At 12-month follow-up, the intervention had reduced the decline in physical activity among adolescents from disadvantaged schools. The intervention may assist students to meet physical activity guidelines. PMID:26359346

  3. Properties of Solar Flare Clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Title, Alan; DeRosa, Marc

    The continuous full disk observations provided by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) give an observer the impression that flare and filament eruptions are related. However, both detailed analysis of a number of events as well as a number of statistical studies have provided only rare examples of clear causal behavior. But the mechanisms of flare triggering are not well understood, so the lack of hard evidence is not surprising. Here we have examined the waiting-time statistics of GOES X-ray flares of magnitude C5 or greater during the last sunspot cycle with the aim of assessing the degree to which flares are clustered in time. Clusters are groups of flares in which all successive flares occur within a fixed separation time - the linking window. While many of the flares in a cluster may come from the same active region, the clusters that last more than a disk passage must result from flares in multiple active regions. The longest cluster of the last cycle lasted more than 42 days. None of the flares were separated by more than 36 hours. Since that cluster lasted more than three disk passages, it could not have been caused by a single region. We find that during the last maximum, eight clusters contributed 44% of all flares. All of these clusters spanned multiple disk passages, but occupied only 16.5% of the cycle duration. Two of the clusters provided 34% of the flares. We suggest that this behavior implies that a component of the observed coordinated behavior has its origin in the solar dynamo.

  4. Formation of Cluster Complexes by Cluster-Cluster-Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichihashi, Masahiko; Odaka, Hideho

    2015-03-01

    Multi-element clusters are interested in their chemical and physical properties, and it is expected that they are utilized as catalysts, for example. Their properties critically depend on the size, composition and atomic ordering, and it should be important to adjust the above parameters for their functionality. One of the ways to form a multi-element cluster is to employ a low-energy collision between clusters. Here, we show characteristic results obtained in the collision between a neutral Ar cluster and a size-selected Co cluster ion. Low-energy collision experiment was accomplished by using a newly developed merging-beam apparatus. Cobalt cluster ions were produced by laser ablation, and mass-selected. On the other hand, argon clusters were prepared by the supersonic expansion of Ar gas. Both cluster beams were merged together in an ion guide, and ionic cluster complexes were mass-analyzed. In the collision of Co2+ and ArN, Co2Arn+ (n = 1 - 30) were observed, and the total intensity of Co2Arn+ (n >= 1) is inversely proportional to the relative velocity between Co2+ and ArN. This suggests that the charge-induced dipole interaction between Co2+ and a neutral Ar cluster is dominant in the formation of the cluster complex, Co2+Arn.

  5. Bismuth(III) complexes derived from α-amino acids: the impact of hydrolysis and oxido-cluster formation on their activity against Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Busse, Madleen; Border, Emily; Junk, Peter C; Ferrero, Richard L; Andrews, Philip C

    2014-12-28

    Eight bismuth(III) complexes derived from a variety of α-amino acids covering a range of physico-chemical properties (L-phenylalanine (Phe), L-proline (Pro), L-methionine (Met), L-cysteine (Cys), D,L-serine (Ser), L-tyrosine (Tyr), l-aspartic acid (Asp) and L-glutamic acid (Glu)) have been synthesised, characterised, and evaluated for their activity against Helicobacter pylori. The optimal synthetic procedure utilises [Bi(O(t)Bu)3], giving the complexes [BiL3] (L = Phe 1, Pro 2, Met 3, Ser 5, Tyr 6) and [Bi2L3] (L = Cys 4, Asp 7, Glu 8) cleanly and in good yield. However, the synthesis is sensitive to both temperature and moisture. The solubility and stability of the bismuth(III) complexes was investigated using ESI-MS. Almost all compounds (except for [Bi(Phe)3] and [Bi(Pro)3]) were found to be partially or completely soluble in aqueous solution giving a pH 2.5-5.0, indicating the presence of free α-amino acid and hydrolysis of the bismuth(III) complexes to polynuclear bismuth oxido-clusters. The results of the bactericidal studies against Helicobacter pylori demonstrate that this hydrolysis process impacts significantly on the observed Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MICs) which are increased substantially, often by many orders of magnitude, when the complexes are initially prepared in water rather than DMSO.

  6. How Accurate Can a Local Coupled Cluster Approach Be in Computing the Activation Energies of Late-Transition-Metal-Catalyzed Reactions with Au, Pt, and Ir?

    PubMed

    Kang, Runhua; Lai, Wenzhen; Yao, Jiannian; Shaik, Sason; Chen, Hui

    2012-09-11

    To improve the accuracy of local coupled cluster (LCC) methods in computing activation energies, we propose herein a new computational scheme. Its applications to various types of late-transition-metal-catalyzed reactions involving Au, Pt, and Ir indicate that the new corrective approach for LCC methods can downsize the mean unsigned deviation and maximum deviation, from the CCSD(T)/CBS reference, to about 0.3 and 0.9 kcal/mol. Using this method, we also calibrated the performance of popular density functionals, with respect to the same test set of reactions. It is concluded that the best functional is the general-purpose double hybrid functional B2GP-PLYP. Other well-performing functionals include the "kinetic" functionals M06-2X and BMK, which have a large percentage of HF exchange, and general-purpose functionals like PBE0 and wB97X. Comparatively, general-purpose functionals like PBE0 and TPSSh perform much better than the tested "kinetic" functionals for Pt-/Ir-catalyzed reactions, while the opposite is true for Au-catalyzed reactions. In contrast, wB97X performs more uniformly in these two classes of reactions. These findings hint that even within the scope of late transition metals, different types of reactions may require different types of optimal DFT methods. Empirical dispersion correction of DFT was found to have a small or no effect on the studied reactions barriers.

  7. The bla gene of the cephamycin cluster of Streptomyces clavuligerus encodes a class A beta-lactamase of low enzymatic activity.

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Llarena, F; Martín, J F; Galleni, M; Coque, J J; Fuente, J L; Frère, J M; Liras, P

    1997-01-01

    A gene (bla) encoding a beta-lactamase is present in the cephamycin gene cluster of Streptomyces clavuligerus, the strain producing clavulanic acid and a beta-lactamase inhibitory protein. The bla gene is located 5.1 kb downstream from and in the opposite orientation to cefE, encoding the deacetoxycephalosporin C synthase. The bla gene encodes a 332-residue protein (Mr, 35,218), similar to other class A beta-lactamases produced by actinomycetes. Modification (to SDG) of the SDN conserved motif of class A beta-lactamases as well as of amino acids in otherwise conserved regions in the molecule may explain the low penicillinase and cephalosporinase activities of the protein. The beta-lactamase has been purified to homogeneity and found to bind [3H]benzylpenicillin, a result reflecting a rate-limiting deacylation step. Nucleotide sequences homologous to bla were found in all tested cephamycin producers, but several other Streptomyces species which produce a beta-lactamase do not contain genes for beta-lactam antibiotic biosynthesis. PMID:9324249

  8. CXCR6-CXCL16 axis promotes prostate cancer by mediating cytoskeleton rearrangement via Ezrin activation and αvβ3 integrin clustering

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Rajesh; Kapur, Neeraj; Mir, Hina; Singh, Nalinaksha; Lillard, James W.; Singh, Shailesh

    2016-01-01

    Cytoskeletal rearrangement is required for migration and invasion, which are the key steps of cancer metastasis. Ezrin and integrin co-ordinate these processes by regulating cellular adhesion and cytoskeletal polymerization-depolymerization. It is also well established that chemokine-chemokine receptor axis plays a crucial role in regulating cancer cell migration and invasion. In this study, we show involvement of CXC chemokine receptor 6 (CXCR6) and its only natural ligand CXCL16 in pathobiology of prostate cancer (PCa). CXCR6 is highly expressed in PCa tissues and cell lines (LNCaP and PC3), relative to normal tissue and cells. CXCR6 expression in PCa tissues correlated with higher Gleason score. Similarly, aggressive PCa cells (PC3) show high CXCR6 compared to less aggressive LNCaP. Besides, PC3 cells show higher MMPs expression compared to LNCaP cells following CXCL16 stimulation. Intriguingly, CXCR6-CXCL16 interaction in PCa cells promotes Ezrin activation, αvβ3 integrin clustering and capping at the leading edge in FAK/PI3K/PKC dependent manner, thereby modifying cellular adhesion as well as motility. Together these results demonstrate that CXCL16 stimulation changes cytoskeletal dynamics resulting in enhanced migration, invasion and adhesion to endothelial cells, ultimately enabling PCa cells to achieve their metastatic goal. PMID:26799186

  9. Increased masticatory activity and quality of life in elderly persons with dementia-a longitudinal matched cluster randomized single-blind multicenter intervention study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Worldwide, millions of people are suffering from dementia and this number is rising. An index of quality of life (QoL) can describe the impact a disease or treatment has on a person’s wellbeing. QoL comprises many variables, including physical health and function, and mental health and function. QoL is related to masticatory ability and physical activity. Animal studies show that disruption of mastication due to loss of teeth or a soft diet leads to memory loss and learning problems. Since these are common complaints in dementia, it is hypothesized that improvement of masticatory function and normalization of diet consistency can increase QoL in elderly persons suffering from dementia. Therefore, the goal of the present study is to examine whether an increase in masticatory activity, achieved by increased food consistency and enhancement of masticatory function through improved oral health care has a positive effect on QoL, including cognition, mood, activities of daily living (ADL), and circadian rhythm in elderly persons with dementia. Methods and design The described study is a prospective longitudinal matched cluster randomized single-blind multicenter study. Participants are elderly persons living in the Netherlands, suffering from dementia and receiving psychogeriatric care. An intervention group will receive improved oral health care and a diet of increased consistency. A control group receives care as usual. Participants will be assessed four times; outcome variables besides QoL are cognition, mood, independence, rest-activity rhythm, blood pressure, and masticatory function. Discussion This research protocol investigates the effect of an intervention executed by daily caregivers. The intervention will increase masticatory activity, which is achieved by three different actions, (providing oral health care, increasing food consistency, or a combination of both). There is a certain amount of variety in the nature of the interventions due to local

  10. Nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy reveals the FeS cluster composition and active site vibrational properties of an O2-tolerant NAD+-reducing [NiFe] hydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Lauterbach, Lars; Wang, Hongxin; Horch, Marius; Gee, Leland B.; Yoda, Yoshitaka; Tanaka, Yoshihito; Zebger, Ingo; Lenz, Oliver; Cramer, Stephen P.

    2014-10-30

    Hydrogenases are complex metalloenzymes that catalyze the reversible splitting of molecular hydrogen into protons and electrons essentially without overpotential. The NAD+-reducing soluble hydrogenase (SH) from Ralstonia eutropha is capable of H2 conversion even in the presence of usually toxic dioxygen. The molecular details of the underlying reactions are largely unknown, mainly because of limited knowledge of the structure and function of the various metal cofactors present in the enzyme. Here, all iron-containing cofactors of the SH were investigated by 57Fe specific nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS). Our data provide experimental evidence for one [2Fe2S] center and four [4Fe4S] clusters, which is consistent with the amino acid sequence composition. Only the [2Fe2S] cluster and one of the four [4Fe4S] clusters were reduced upon incubation of the SH with NADH. This finding explains the discrepancy between the large number of FeS clusters and the small amount of FeS cluster-related signals as detected by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopic analysis of several NAD+-reducing hydrogenases. For the first time, Fe–CO and Fe–CN modes derived from the [NiFe] active site could be distinguished by NRVS through selective 13C labeling of the CO ligand. This strategy also revealed the molecular coordinates that dominate the individual Fe–CO modes. The present approach explores the complex vibrational signature of the Fe–S clusters and the hydrogenase active site, thereby showing that NRVS represents a powerful tool for the elucidation of complex biocatalysts containing multiple cofactors.

  11. The Neural Cell Adhesion Molecule (NCAM) Promotes Clustering and Activation of EphA3 Receptors in GABAergic Interneurons to Induce Ras Homolog Gene Family, Member A (RhoA)/Rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK)-mediated Growth Cone Collapse.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Chelsea S; Kümper, Maike; Temple, Brenda S; Maness, Patricia F

    2016-12-16

    Establishment of a proper balance of excitatory and inhibitory connectivity is achieved during development of cortical networks and adjusted through synaptic plasticity. The neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) and the receptor tyrosine kinase EphA3 regulate the perisomatic synapse density of inhibitory GABAergic interneurons in the mouse frontal cortex through ephrin-A5-induced growth cone collapse. In this study, it was demonstrated that binding of NCAM and EphA3 occurred between the NCAM Ig2 domain and EphA3 cysteine-rich domain (CRD). The binding interface was further refined through molecular modeling and mutagenesis and shown to be comprised of complementary charged residues in the NCAM Ig2 domain (Arg-156 and Lys-162) and the EphA3 CRD (Glu-248 and Glu-264). Ephrin-A5 induced co-clustering of surface-bound NCAM and EphA3 in GABAergic cortical interneurons in culture. Receptor clustering was impaired by a charge reversal mutation that disrupted NCAM/EphA3 association, emphasizing the importance of the NCAM/EphA3 binding interface for cluster formation. NCAM enhanced ephrin-A5-induced EphA3 autophosphorylation and activation of RhoA GTPase, indicating a role for NCAM in activating EphA3 signaling through clustering. NCAM-mediated clustering of EphA3 was essential for ephrin-A5-induced growth cone collapse in cortical GABAergic interneurons, and RhoA and a principal effector, Rho-associated protein kinase, mediated the collapse response. This study delineates a mechanism in which NCAM promotes ephrin-A5-dependent clustering of EphA3 through interaction of the NCAM Ig2 domain and the EphA3 CRD, stimulating EphA3 autophosphorylation and RhoA signaling necessary for growth cone repulsion in GABAergic interneurons in vitro, which may extend to remodeling of axonal terminals of interneurons in vivo.

  12. Family-Based Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial Enhancing Physical Activity and Motor Competence in 4–7-Year-Old Children

    PubMed Central

    Laukkanen, Arto; Pesola, Arto Juhani; Heikkinen, Risto; Sääkslahti, Arja Kaarina; Finni, Taija

    2015-01-01

    Little is known of how to involve families in physical activity (PA) interventions for children. In this cluster randomized controlled trial, we recruited families with four- to seven-year-old children to participate in a year-long study where parents in the intervention group families (n = 46) received tailored counseling to increase children’s PA. Structured PA was not served. Control group families (n = 45) did not receive any counseling. PA in all children (n = 91; mean age 6.16 ± 1.13 years at the baseline) was measured by accelerometers at the baseline and after three, six, nine and 12 months. Motor competence (MC) (n = 89) was measured at the baseline and after six and 12 months by a KTK (KörperkoordinationsTest für Kinder) and throwing and catching a ball (TCB) protocols. The effect of parental counseling on study outcomes was analyzed by a linear mixed-effects model fit by REML and by a Mann-Whitney U test in the case of the TCB. As season was hypothesized to affect counseling effect, an interaction of season on the study outcomes was examined. The results show significant decrease of MVPA in the intervention group when compared to the control group (p < .05). The TCB showed a nearly significant improvement at six months in the intervention group compared to the controls (p = .051), but not at 12 months. The intervention group had a steadier development of the KTK when the interaction of season was taken into account. In conclusion, more knowledge of family constructs associating with the effectiveness of counseling is needed for understanding how to enhance PA in children by parents. However, a hypothesis may be put forward that family-based counseling during an inactive season rather than an active season may provide a more lasting effect on the development of KTK in children. Trial Registration Controlled-Trials.com ISRCTN28668090 PMID:26502183

  13. Protocol for the ‘Virtual Traveller’ cluster-randomised controlled trial: a behaviour change intervention to increase physical activity in primary-school Maths and English lessons

    PubMed Central

    Norris, E; Dunsmuir, S; Duke-Williams, O; Stamatakis, E; Shelton, N

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Physical activity (PA) has been shown to be an important factor for health and educational outcomes in children. However, a large proportion of children's school day is spent in sedentary lesson-time. There is emerging evidence about the effectiveness of physically active lessons: integrating physical movements and educational content in the classroom. ‘Virtual Traveller’ is a novel 6-week intervention of 10-min sessions performed 3 days per week, using classroom interactive whiteboards to integrate movement into primary-school Maths and English teaching. The primary aim of this project is to evaluate the effect of the Virtual Traveller intervention on children's PA, on-task behaviour and student engagement. Methods and analysis This study will be a cluster-randomised controlled trial with a waiting-list control group. Ten year 4 (aged 8–9 years) classes across 10 primary schools will be randomised by class to either the 6-week Virtual Traveller intervention or the waiting-list control group. Data will be collected 5 times: at baseline, at weeks 2 and 4 of the intervention, and 1 week and 3 months postintervention. At baseline, anthropometric measures, 4-day objective PA monitoring (including 2 weekend days; Actigraph accelerometer), PA and on-task behaviour observations and student engagement questionnaires will be performed. All but anthropometric measures will be repeated at all other data collection points. Changes in overall PA levels and levels during different time-periods (eg, lesson-time) will be examined. Changes in on-task behaviour and student engagement between intervention groups will also be examined. Multilevel regression modelling will be used to analyse the data. Process evaluation will be carried out during the intervention period. Ethics and dissemination The results of this study will be disseminated through peer-review publications and conference presentations. Ethical approval was obtained through the University

  14. Assessment of the impact of anthropogenic activities on the groundwater hydrology and chemistry in Tarsus coastal plain (Mersin, SE Turkey) using fuzzy clustering, multivariate statistics and GIS techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Güler, Cüneyt; Kurt, Mehmet Ali; Alpaslan, Musa; Akbulut, Can

    2012-01-01

    SummaryTarsus coastal plain (TCP) is an economically and ecologically important area situated in between the fertile fluvio-deltaic plains of two rivers, Deliçay and Tarsus (Mersin, SE Turkey), where anthropogenic activities (agricultural, industrial, and domestic) are very intense. Twenty-four water quality parameters were surveyed at 193 groundwater and 10 surface water sites during August 2008. The objective was to characterize the physico-chemical properties of groundwaters in TCP, assess the impact of anthropogenic activities on the groundwater hydrology and chemistry, and identify the major hydrogeochemical processes occurring in the area. Groundwater samples were grouped into hydrochemically distinct and spatially continuous four water classes (i.e., C1, C2, C3, and C4) using the fuzzy c-means (FCM) clustering method, where membership values were interpolated using the ordinary kriging technique. Principal components analysis (PCA) was used to decipher various underlying natural and anthropogenic processes creating these distinct water classes. Four principal components (PCs) were extracted in PCA which explained more than 73% of the total variance in water quality. Major factors responsible for the variations in chemistries of water classes are identified as: (1) water-rock interaction and nitrate contamination; (2) salinization by seawater intrusion and evaporite dissolution; (3) geogenic/anthropogenic Cr, Fe, and Mn; and (4) anthropogenic Zn pollution. Overexploitation of the aquifer is clearly evident, especially at settlements located near the coastal zone, where the water table is lowered 2-5 m below the sea level. Salinization is well known in the area and is attributed not only to seawater intrusion, but also to dissolution of evaporitic series from the Handere formation. Hydrochemical evidence also suggest that in the area subsurface paleo-river channels and the deposits infilling the ancient lagoon area within Quaternary-Recent alluvial deposits

  15. SACS: Spitzer Archival Cluster Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stern, Daniel

    combined, providing a high-purity, uniform sample. Matching the Spitzer/IRAC-selected clusters with data at similar and longer wavelengths available in the archive (WISE 3- 5μm, Spitzer/MIPS 24μm or Herschel/SPIRE 250μm data) we will be also able to study the dependence on the environment of star formation and AGN activity out to z~2, and to study the effect of star-forming galaxies and AGNs on cosmological results from ongoing Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) and X-ray cluster surveys. The identified clusters will be valuable for both astrophysics and cosmology. In terms of astrophysics, the redshift probed by the MIR color selection targets a key epoch in cluster development, when star formation is shutting down and the galaxies are becoming passive. Massive clusters also distort space-time around them, creating powerful gravitational telescopes that lens the distant universe. This both allows detailed studies of the lensed objects with otherwise unachievable sensitivity, as well as provides a unique probe of the mass distribution in the lensing cluster. In terms of cosmology, clusters are the most massive structures in the universe, and their space density is sensitive to basic cosmological parameters. Clusters identified by this program will become a lasting legacy of Spitzer, providing exciting targets for Chandra, Hubble, James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), Astro-H, Athena, as well as future 30-m class ground-based telescopes (e.g., GMT, ELT, TMT). The upcoming large-scale, space-based surveys of eROSITA, Euclid, and WFIRST all have distant cluster studies as key scientific goals. Our proposed survey will provide new high redshift targets for those satellites, enabling unique, exciting multi-wavelength studies of the Spitzer-selected sample, as well as a training set to identify additional high-redshift clusters outside of the Spitzer footprint.

  16. Density functional theory calculations on the active site of biotin synthase: mechanism of S transfer from the Fe(2)S(2) cluster and the role of 1st and 2nd sphere residues.

    PubMed

    Rana, Atanu; Dey, Subal; Agrawal, Amita; Dey, Abhishek

    2015-10-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) calculations are performed on the active site of biotin synthase (BS) to investigate the sulfur transfer from the Fe(2)S(2) cluster to dethiobiotin (DTB). The active site is modeled to include both the 1st and 2nd sphere residues. Molecular orbital theory considerations and calculation on smaller models indicate that only an S atom (not S²⁻) transfer from an oxidized Fe(2)S(2) cluster leads to the formation of biotin from the DTB using two adenosyl radicals generated from S-adenosyl-L-methionine. The calculations on larger protein active site model indicate that a 9-monothiobiotin bound reduced cluster should be an intermediate during the S atom insertion from the Fe(2)S(2) cluster consistent with experimental data. The Arg260 bound to Fe1, being a weaker donor than cysteine bound to Fe(2), determines the geometry and the electronic structure of this intermediate. The formation of this intermediate containing the C9-S bond is estimated to have a ΔG(≠) of 17.1 kcal/mol while its decay by the formation of the 2nd C6-S bond is calculated to have a ΔG(≠) of 29.8 kcal/mol, i.e. the 2nd C-S bond formation is calculated to be the rate determining step in the cycle and it leads to the decay of the Fe(2)S(2) cluster. Significant configuration interaction (CI), present in these transition states, helps lower the barrier of these reactions by ~30-25 kcal/mol relative to a hypothetical outer-sphere reaction. The conserved Phe285 residue near the Fe(2)S(2) active site determines the stereo selectivity at the C6 center of this radical coupling reaction. Reaction mechanism of BS investigated using DFT calculations. Strong CI and the Phe285 residue control the kinetic rate and stereochemistry of the product.

  17. Evaluating the effectiveness of psychosocial resilience training for heart health, and the added value of promoting physical activity: a cluster randomized trial of the READY program

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Depression and poor social support are significant risk factors for coronary heart disease (CHD), and stress and anxiety can trigger coronary events. People experiencing such psychosocial difficulties are more likely to be physically inactive, which is also an independent risk factor for CHD. Resilience training can target these risk factors, but there is little research evaluating the effectiveness of such programs. This paper describes the design and measures of a study to evaluate a resilience training program (READY) to promote psychosocial well-being for heart health, and the added value of integrating physical activity promotion. Methods/Design In a cluster randomized trial, 95 participants will be allocated to either a waitlist or one of two intervention conditions. Both intervention conditions will receive a 10 × 2.5 hour group resilience training program (READY) over 13 weeks. The program targets five protective factors identified from empirical evidence and analyzed as mediating variables: positive emotions, cognitive flexibility, social support, life meaning, and active coping. Resilience enhancement strategies reflect the six core Acceptance and Commitment Therapy processes (values, mindfulness, defusion, acceptance, self-as-context, committed action) and Cognitive Behavior Therapy strategies such as relaxation training and social support building skills. Sessions include psychoeducation, discussions, experiential exercises, and home assignments. One intervention condition will include an additional session and ongoing content promoting physical activity. Measurement will occur at baseline, two weeks post intervention, and at eight weeks follow-up, and will include questionnaires, pedometer step logs, and physical and hematological measures. Primary outcome measures will include self-reported indicators of psychosocial well-being and depression. Secondary outcome measures will include self-reported indicators of stress, anxiety and physical

  18. Synthesis of the Stereoisomeric Clusters 1,2-Os3(CO)10(trans-dpmn) and 1,2-Os3(CO)10(cis-dpmn) [where dpmn = 2,3-bis(diphenylphosphinomethyl)-5-norbornene]: DFT Evaluation of the Isomeric Clusters 1,2-Os3(CO)10(dpmn) and Isomer-Dependent Diphosphine Ligand Activation

    DOE PAGES

    Yang, Li; Nesterov, Vladimir N.; Wang, Xiaoping; ...

    2014-07-23

    The bicyclic diphosphines trans- and cis-2,3-bis(diphenylphosphinomethyl)-5-norbornene (dpmn) react with 1,2-Os3(CO)10(MeCN)2 (1) to furnish the corresponding ligand-bridged clusters Os3(CO)10(trans-dpmn) (2) and Os3(CO)10(cis-dpmn) (3). Both new products have been isolated and the molecular structures established by X-ray diffraction analyses. The dihydroxyl-bridged cluster 1,2-Os3(CO)8(μ-OH)2(cis-dpmn) (4), which accompanied the formation of 3 in one reaction, has been isolated and characterized by mass spectrometry and X-ray crystallography. Whereas cluster 2 is stable in toluene at 373 K, 3 is thermally sensitive under identical conditions and undergoes loss of CO (2 equiv), coupled with the activation of three norbornene C-H bonds and one P-C(phenyl) bond, tomore » furnish the dihydride cluster H2Os3(CO)8[μ3-2-PhPC-3-endo-Ph2PCH2(C7H7)] (5). The solid-state structure of 5 confirms the multiple activation of the cis-dpmn ligand and accompanying formation of the face-capping 2-PhPC-3-endo-Ph2PCH2(C7H7) moiety in the product. DFT calculations on 2 and 3 indicate that the former cluster is the thermodynamically more stable isomer, and the conversion of 3→ 5 + 2CO + benzene is computed to be exergonic by 12.7 kcal/mol and is entropically favored due to the release of the CO and benzene by-products.« less

  19. Collective thermoregulation in bee clusters.

    PubMed

    Ocko, Samuel A; Mahadevan, L

    2014-02-06

    Swarming is an essential part of honeybee behaviour, wherein thousands of bees cling onto each other to form a dense cluster that may be exposed to the environment for several days. This cluster has the ability to maintain its core temperature actively without a central controller. We suggest that the swarm cluster is akin to an active porous structure whose functional requirement is to adjust to outside conditions by varying its porosity to control its core temperature. Using a continuum model that takes the form of a set of advection-diffusion equations for heat transfer in a mobile porous medium, we show that the equalization of an effective 'behavioural pressure', which propagates information about the ambient temperature through variations in density, leads to effective thermoregulation. Our model extends and generalizes previous models by focusing the question of mechanism on the form and role of the behavioural pressure, and allows us to explain the vertical asymmetry of the cluster (as a consequence of buoyancy-driven flows), the ability of the cluster to overpack at low ambient temperatures without breaking up at high ambient temperatures, and the relative insensitivity to large variations in the ambient temperature. Our theory also makes testable hypotheses for the response of the cluster to external temperature inhomogeneities and suggests strategies for biomimetic thermoregulation.

  20. Reduction of nitrite to NO in an organised triphasic medium by platinum carbonyl clusters and redox active dyes as electron carriers.

    PubMed

    Sen Gupta, Nalinava; Basu, Susmit; Payra, Pramatha; Mathur, Pradeep; Bhaduri, Sumit; Lahiri, Goutam Kumar

    2007-06-28

    Artificial electron donors such as leuco methylene blue and leuco safranin O reduce nitrite ion to nitric oxide. The reaction is effected in a U-tube where nitrite ion and dye in two aqueous layers are separated by a layer of dichloromethane (a close model for a biological liquid membrane) that contains the platinum carbonyl cluster ([Bu(4)N]2[Pt12(CO)24], Chini cluster). On passing dihydrogen an electron transfer chain involving dihydrogen, the dye, the clusters and the nitrite ion is initiated. The cluster catalytically reduces the dye in the presence of dihydrogen, the reduced dye migrates across the phase boundaries and in turn reduces the nitrite ions. The resultant nitric oxide in the effluent gas has been identified by its reactions with cobalamine and myoglobin. When safranin O is the dye, an adduct is formed between the reduced dye and NO. It has been identified by spectroscopic techniques and its probable structure investigated by DFT calculations.

  1. Astrophysics of galaxy clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ettori, Stefano

    2016-07-01

    As the nodes of the cosmic web, clusters of galaxies trace the large-scale distribution of matter in the Universe. They are thus privileged sites in which to investigate the complex physics of structure formation. However, the complete story of how these structures grow, and how they dissipate the gravitational and non-thermal components of their energy budget over cosmic time, is still beyond our grasp. Most of the baryons gravitationally bound to the cluster's halo is in the form of a diffuse, hot, metal-enriched plasma that radiates primarily in the X-ray band. X-ray observations of the evolving cluster population provide a unique opportunity to address such fundamental open questions as: How do hot diffuse baryons accrete and dynamically evolve in dark matter potentials? How and when was the energy that we observe in the ICM generated and distributed? Where and when are heavy elements produced and how are they circulated? We will present the ongoing activities to define the strategy on how an X-ray observatory with large collecting area and an unprecedented combination of high spectral and angular resolution, such as Athena, can address these questions.

  2. Long-term effects of the Active for Life Year 5 (AFLY5) school-based cluster-randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Emma L; Howe, Laura D; Kipping, Ruth R; Campbell, Rona; Jago, Russell; Noble, Sian M; Wells, Sian; Chittleborough, Catherine; Peters, Tim J; Lawlor, Debbie A

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the long-term effectiveness of a school-based intervention to improve physical activity and diet in children. Design Cluster-randomised controlled trial. Setting 60 primary schools in the southwest of England. Participants Primary school children who were aged 8–9 years at recruitment, 9–10 years during the intervention and 10–11 years at the long-term follow-up assessment. Intervention Teacher training, provision of lesson and child–parent interactive homework plans and teaching materials. Main outcome measures Primary outcomes were accelerometer-assessed minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA) per day, accelerometer-assessed minutes of sedentary behaviour per day and reported daily consumption of servings of fruit and vegetables. Results 60 schools with 2221 eligible children were recruited. As in the previously published assessment immediately after the end of the intervention, none of the three primary outcomes differed between children in schools allocated to the intervention, compared with those in control schools at the end of the long-term follow-up (1 year after the end of the intervention). Differences in secondary outcomes were consistent with those at the immediate follow-up, with no evidence that these had diminished over time. Comparing intervention with control schools, the difference in mean child-reported screen viewing at the weekend was −16.03 min (95% CI −32.82 to 0.73), for servings of snacks per day, the difference was −0.11 (95% CI −0.39 to 0.06), in servings of high-energy drinks per day −0.20 (95% CI −0.39 to −0.01) and in servings of high-fat foods per day −0.12 (95% CI −0.39 to 0.00). None of these reached our predefined level of statistical significance, especially after accounting for multiple testing. Conclusions School-based curriculum interventions alone are unlikely to have a major public health impact on children's diet and physical activity. Trial

  3. Electronic Origins of the Variable Efficiency of Room-Temperature Methane Activation by Homo- and Heteronuclear Cluster Oxide Cations [XYO2](+) (X, Y = Al, Si, Mg): Competition between Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer and Hydrogen-Atom Transfer.

    PubMed

    Li, Jilai; Zhou, Shaodong; Zhang, Jun; Schlangen, Maria; Weiske, Thomas; Usharani, Dandamudi; Shaik, Sason; Schwarz, Helmut

    2016-06-29

    The reactivity of the homo- and heteronuclear oxide clusters [XYO2](+) (X, Y = Al, Si, Mg) toward methane was studied using Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry, in conjunction with high-level quantum mechanical calculations. The most reactive cluster by both experiment and theory is [Al2O2](•+). In its favorable pathway, this cluster abstracts a hydrogen atom by means of proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) instead of following the conventional hydrogen-atom transfer (HAT) route. This mechanistic choice originates in the strong Lewis acidity of the aluminum site of [Al2O2](•+), which cleaves the C-H bond heterolytically to form an Al-CH3 entity, while the proton is transferred to the bridging oxygen atom of the cluster ion. In addition, a comparison of the reactivity of heteronuclear and homonuclear oxide clusters [XYO2](+) (X, Y = Al, Si, Mg) reveals a striking doping effect by aluminum. Thus, the vacant s-p hybrid orbital on Al acts as an acceptor of the electron pair from methyl anion (CH3(-)) and is therefore eminently important for bringing about thermal methane activation by PCET. For the Al-doped cluster ions, the spin density at an oxygen atom, which is crucial for the HAT mechanism, acts here as a spectator during the course of the PCET mediated C-H bond cleavage. A diagnostic plot of the deformation energy vis-à-vis the barrier shows the different HAT/PCET reactivity map for the entire series. This is a strong connection to the recently discussed mechanism of oxidative coupling of methane on magnesium oxide surfaces proceeding through Grignard-type intermediates.

  4. A New Mother-Child Play Activity Program to Decrease Parenting Stress and Improve Child Cognitive Abilities: A Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Tachibana, Yoshiyuki; Fukushima, Ai; Saito, Hitomi; Yoneyama, Satoshi; Ushida, Kazuo; Yoneyama, Susumu; Kawashima, Ryuta

    2012-01-01

    Background We propose a new play activity intervention program for mothers and children. Our interdisciplinary program integrates four fields of child-related sciences: neuroscience, preschool pedagogy, developmental psychology, and child and maternal psychiatry. To determine the effect of this intervention on child and mother psychosocial problems related to parenting stress and on the children's cognitive abilities, we performed a cluster randomized controlled trial. Methodology/Principal Findings Participants were 238 pairs of mothers and typically developing preschool children (ages 4–6 years old) from Wakakusa kindergarten in Japan. The pairs were asked to play at home for about 10 min a day, 5 days a week for 3 months. Participants were randomly assigned to the intervention or control group by class unit. The Parenting Stress Index (PSI) (for mothers), the Goodenough Draw-a-Man intelligence test (DAM), and the new S-S intelligence test (NS-SIT) (for children) were administered prior to and 3 months after the intervention period. Pre–post changes in test scores were compared between the groups using a linear mixed-effects model analysis. The primary outcomes were the Total score on the child domain of the PSI (for child psychosocial problems related to parenting stress), Total score on the parent domain of the PSI (for maternal psychosocial problems related to parenting stress), and the score on the DAM (for child cognitive abilities). The results of the PSI suggested that the program may reduce parenting stress. The results of the cognitive tests suggested that the program may improve the children's fluid intelligence, working memory, and processing speed. Conclusions/Significance Our intervention program may ameliorate the children's psychosocial problems related to parenting stress and increase their cognitive abilities. Trial Registration UMIN Clinical Trials Registry UMIN000002265 PMID:22848340

  5. Effects of a Clinician Referral and Exercise Program for Men Who Have Completed Active Treatment for Prostate Cancer: A Multicenter Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial (ENGAGE)

    PubMed Central

    Livingston, Patricia M; Craike, Melinda J; Salmon, Jo; Courneya, Kerry S; Gaskin, Cadeyrn J; Fraser, Steve F; Mohebbi, Mohammadreza; Broadbent, Suzanne; Botti, Mari; Kent, Bridie

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND The purpose of this study was to determine the efficacy of a clinician referral and exercise program in improving exercise levels and quality of life for men with prostate cancer. METHODS This was a multicenter cluster randomized controlled trial in Melbourne, Australia comprising 15 clinicians: 8 clinicians were randomized to refer eligible participants (n = 54) to a 12-week exercise program comprising 2 supervised gym sessions and 1 home-based session per week, and 7 clinicians were randomized to follow usual care (n = 93). The primary outcome was self-reported physical activity; the secondary outcomes were quality of life, anxiety, and symptoms of depression. RESULTS A significant intervention effect was observed for vigorous-intensity exercise (effect size: Cohen's d, 0.46; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.09-0.82; P = .010) but not for combined moderate and vigorous exercise levels (effect size: d, 0.08; 95% CI, −0.28 to 0.45; P = .48). Significant intervention effects were also observed for meeting exercise guidelines (≥150 min/wk; odds ratio, 3.9; 95% CI, 1.9-7.8; P = .002); positive intervention effects were observed in the intervention group for cognitive functioning (effect size: d, 0.34; 95% CI, −0.02 to 0.70; P = .06) and depression symptoms (effect size: d, −0.35; 95% CI, −0.71 to 0.02; P = .06). Eighty percent of participants reported that the clinician's referral influenced their decision to participate in the exercise program. CONCLUSIONS The clinician referral and 12-week exercise program significantly improved vigorous exercise levels and had a positive impact on mental health outcomes for men living with prostate cancer. Further research is needed to determine the sustainability of the exercise program and its generalizability to other cancer populations. Cancer 2015;121:2646–2654. © 2015 American Cancer Society. PMID:25877784

  6. Clustering, cosmology and a new era of black hole demographics- II. The conditional luminosity functions of Type 2 and Type 1 active galactic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballantyne, D. R.

    2017-01-01

    The orientation-based unification model of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) posits that the principle difference between obscured (Type 2) and unobscured (Type 1) AGNs is the line of sight into the central engine. If this model is correct then there should be no difference in many of the properties of AGN host galaxies (e.g. the mass of the surrounding dark matter haloes). However, recent clustering analyses of Type 1 and Type 2 AGNs have provided some evidence for a difference in the halo mass, in conflict with the orientation-based unified model. In this work, a method to compute the conditional luminosity function (CLF) of Type 2 and Type 1 AGNs is presented. The CLF allows many fundamental halo properties to be computed as a function of AGN luminosity, which we apply to the question of the host halo masses of Type 1 and 2 AGNs. By making use of the total AGN CLF, the Type 1 X-ray luminosity function, and the luminosity-dependent Type 2 AGN fraction, the CLFs of Type 1 and 2 AGNs are calculated at z ≈ 0 and 0.9. At both z, there is no statistically significant difference in the mean halo mass of Type 2 and 1 AGNs at any luminosity. There is marginal evidence that Type 1 AGNs may have larger halo masses than Type 2s, which would be consistent with an evolutionary picture where quasars are initially obscured and then subsequently reveal themselves as Type 1s. As the Type 1 lifetime is longer, the host halo will increase somewhat in mass during the Type 1 phase. The CLF technique will be a powerful way to study the properties of many AGNs subsets (e.g. radio-loud, Compton-thick) as future wide-area X-ray and optical surveys substantially increase our ability to place AGNs in their cosmological context.

  7. The dance of heating and cooling in galaxy clusters: three-dimensional simulations of self-regulated active galactic nuclei outflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaspari, M.; Melioli, C.; Brighenti, F.; D'Ercole, A.

    2011-02-01

    It is now widely accepted that heating processes play a fundamental role in galaxy clusters, struggling in an intricate but fascinating ‘dance' with its antagonist, radiative cooling. Last-generation observations, especially X-ray, are giving us tiny hints about the notes of this endless ballet. Cavities, shocks, turbulence and wide absorption lines indicate that the central active nucleus is injecting a huge amount of energy in the intracluster medium. However, which is the real dominant engine of self-regulated heating? One of the models we propose is massive subrelativistic outflows, probably generated by a wind disc or just the result of the entrainment on kpc scale by the fast radio jet. Using a modified version of the adaptive mesh refinement code FLASH 3.2, we have explored several feedback mechanisms that self-regulate the mechanical power. Two are the best schemes that answer our primary question, that is, quenching cooling flow and at the same time preserving a cool core appearance for a long-term evolution (7 Gyr): one is more explosive (with efficiencies ˜ 5 × 10-3-10-2), triggered by central cooled gas, and the other is gentler, ignited by hot gas Bondi accretion (with ɛ= 0.1). These three-dimensional simulations show that the total energy injected is not the key aspect, but the results strongly depend on how energy is given to the intracluster medium. We follow the dynamics of the best models (temperature, density, surface brightness maps and profiles) and produce many observable predictions: buoyant bubbles, ripples, turbulence, iron abundance maps and hydrostatic equilibrium deviation. We present an in-depth discussion of the merits and flaws of all our models, with a critical eye towards observational concordance.

  8. A cluster-randomized controlled trial to reduce sedentary behavior and promote physical activity and health of 8-9 year olds: The Transform-Us! Study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Physical activity (PA) is associated with positive cardio-metabolic health and emerging evidence suggests sedentary behavior (SB) may be detrimental to children's health independent of PA. The primary aim of the Transform-Us! study is to determine whether an 18-month, behavioral and environmental intervention in the school and family settings results in higher levels of PA and lower rates of SB among 8-9 year old children compared with usual practice (post-intervention and 12-months follow-up). The secondary aims are to determine the independent and combined effects of PA and SB on children's cardio-metabolic health risk factors; identify the factors that mediate the success of the intervention; and determine whether the intervention is cost-effective. Methods/design A four-arm cluster-randomized controlled trial (RCT) with a 2 × 2 factorial design, with schools as the unit of randomization. Twenty schools will be allocated to one of four intervention groups, sedentary behavior (SB-I), physical activity (PA-I), combined SB and PA (SB+PA-I) or current practice control (C), which will be evaluated among approximately 600 children aged 8-9 years in school year 3 living in Melbourne, Australia. All children in year 3 at intervention schools in 2010 (8-9 years) will receive the intervention over an 18-month period with a maintenance 'booster' delivered in 2012 and children at all schools will be invited to participate in the evaluation assessments. To maximize the sample and to capture new students arriving at intervention and control schools, recruitment will be on-going up to the post-intervention time point. Primary outcomes are time spent sitting and in PA assessed via accelerometers and inclinometers and survey. Discussion To our knowledge, Transform-Us! is the first RCT to examine the effectiveness of intervention strategies for reducing children's overall sedentary time, promoting PA and optimizing health outcomes. The integration of consistent

  9. Ethane C-H bond activation on the Fe(iv)-oxo species in a Zn-based cluster of metal-organic frameworks: a density functional theory study.

    PubMed

    Impeng, Sarawoot; Siwaipram, Siwarut; Bureekaew, Sareeya; Probst, Michael

    2017-02-01

    We first investigate the feasibility of designing a Fe-oxo complex for the activation of alkane C-H bonds by (a) incorporating an Fe ion into a Zn-based cluster derived from a metal-organic framework (MOF) and (b) creating the Fe-oxo complex via decomposition of N2O over a Fe(2+)-substituted Zn-based cluster (Fe-Zn3O(pyrazole)6). From the energy profile, it turns out that both steps should be feasible and that the resulting Fe-oxo complex is stable. In the main step, we then investigate the reactivity of this Fe-oxo cluster for the C-H bond cleavage of ethane by calculating the reaction energy profile and analyzing the electronic structure along the relevant steps. Two mechanisms, namely the σ and π pathways on the triplet and quintet potential energy surfaces, were unraveled for this study of catalytic activity. It is shown that the σ pathway on the quintet surface is kinetically and thermodynamically favorable with an energy barrier of 22.5 kcal mol(-1). The π pathway on the quintet and triplet surfaces has activation energies of 26.9 kcal mol(-1) and 24.9 kcal mol(-1), respectively. An alternative unusual pathway called the δ mechanism on the triplet surface is also observed with an energy barrier of 12.6 kcal mol(-1). It is, however, thermodynamically at a disadvantage compared to the σ pathway on the quintet surface. Favorable d-d interaction on the Fe center and less steric hindrance from the equatorial ligands at the transition state are the key factors that cause the σ pathway on the quintet surface to have the lowest activation energy. All our calculations are of the cluster type and have been performed at the B3LYP-D3/def2-TZVP level of theory.

  10. GSFC Contributions to the NATO X-ray Astronomy Institute, Erice, July 1979. [X-ray spectra of supernova remants, galactic X-ray sources, active galactic nuclei, and clusters of galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holt, S. S.; Mushotzky, R. F.

    1979-01-01

    An overview of X-ray astronomical spectroscopy in general is presented and results obtained by HEAO 1 and 2 as well as earlier spacecraft are examined. Particular emphasis is given to the spectra of supernova remnants; galactic binary X-ray sources, cataclysmic variables, bulges, pulsars, and stars; the active nuclei of Seyfert 1 galaxy, BL Lac, and quasars; the diffuse X-ray background; and galactic clusters.

  11. In situ electro-deposition of Pt micro-nano clusters on the surface of {[PMo12O40]3-/PAMAM}n multilayer composite films and their electrocatalytic activities regarding methanol oxidation.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhong-Shui; Lin, Shen; Chen, Zu-liang; Shi, Yuan-De; Huang, Xiao-Mei

    2012-02-15

    The {[PMo(12)O(40)](3-)/PAMAM}(n) multilayer films are prepared by LBL electrostatic assembly technique, and their uniform and homogeneous traits have been verified by cyclic voltammetry. The {[PMo(12)O(40)](3-)/PAMAM}(n) multilayer films with PAMAM as the outmost layer, having an open structure and exhibiting good penetrability for the solvent molecules at low pH, are used as matrices for electro-deposition of Pt micro-nano clusters in situ. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis and field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM) characterization show that the unique Pt micro-nano clusters with flower-like structure have been immobilized on the surface of {[PMo(12)O(40)](3-)/PAMAM}(n) multilayer films. The morphologies of Pt micro-nano clusters are influenced by electro-deposition conditions such as deposition potential, deposition time, and the number of layers of {[PMo(12)O(40)](3-)/PAMAM}(n) multilayer films. Pt(-clusters)-{PMo(12)/PAMAM}(3) composite films demonstrate good electrocatalytic activities regarding methanol oxidation and improved tolerance of CO.

  12. PREFACE: Nuclear Cluster Conference; Cluster'07

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freer, Martin

    2008-05-01

    The Cluster Conference is a long-running conference series dating back to the 1960's, the first being initiated by Wildermuth in Bochum, Germany, in 1969. The most recent meeting was held in Nara, Japan, in 2003, and in 2007 the 9th Cluster Conference was held in Stratford-upon-Avon, UK. As the name suggests the town of Stratford lies upon the River Avon, and shortly before the conference, due to unprecedented rainfall in the area (approximately 10 cm within half a day), lay in the River Avon! Stratford is the birthplace of the `Bard of Avon' William Shakespeare, and this formed an intriguing conference backdrop. The meeting was attended by some 90 delegates and the programme contained 65 70 oral presentations, and was opened by a historical perspective presented by Professor Brink (Oxford) and closed by Professor Horiuchi (RCNP) with an overview of the conference and future perspectives. In between, the conference covered aspects of clustering in exotic nuclei (both neutron and proton-rich), molecular structures in which valence neutrons are exchanged between cluster cores, condensates in nuclei, neutron-clusters, superheavy nuclei, clusters in nuclear astrophysical processes and exotic cluster decays such as 2p and ternary cluster decay. The field of nuclear clustering has become strongly influenced by the physics of radioactive beam facilities (reflected in the programme), and by the excitement that clustering may have an important impact on the structure of nuclei at the neutron drip-line. It was clear that since Nara the field had progressed substantially and that new themes had emerged and others had crystallized. Two particular topics resonated strongly condensates and nuclear molecules. These topics are thus likely to be central in the next cluster conference which will be held in 2011 in the Hungarian city of Debrechen. Martin Freer Participants and Cluster'07

  13. Simultaneous analysis of T helper subsets (Th1, Th2, Th9, Th17, Th22, Tfh, Tr1 and Tregs) markers expression in periapical lesions reveals multiple cytokine clusters accountable for lesions activity and inactivity status

    PubMed Central

    ARAUJO-PIRES, Ana Claudia; FRANCISCONI, Carolina Favaro; BIGUETTI, Claudia Cristina; CAVALLA, Franco; ARANHA, Andreza Maria Fabio; LETRA, Ariadne; TROMBONE, Ana Paula Favaro; FAVERI, Marcelo; SILVA, Renato Menezes; GARLET, Gustavo Pompermaier

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies demonstrate that the balance between pro- and anti-inflammatory mediators determines the stable or progressive nature of periapical granulomas by modulating the balance of the osteoclastogenic factor RANKL and its antagonist OPG. However, the cytokine networks operating in the development of periapical lesions are quite more complex than what the simple pro- versus anti-inflammatory mediators' paradigm suggests. Here we simultaneously investigated the patterns of Th1, Th2, Th9, Th17, Th22, Thf, Tr1 and Tregs cytokines/markers expression in human periapical granulomas. Methods The expression of TNF-α, IFN-γ, IL-17A, IL23, IL21, IL-33, IL-10, IL-4, IL-9, IL-22, FOXp3 markers (via RealTimePCR array) was accessed in active/progressive (N=40) versus inactive/stable (N=70) periapical granulomas (as determined by RANKL/OPG expression ratio), and also to compare these samples with a panel of control specimens (N=26). A cluster analysis of 13 cytokine levels was performed to examine possible clustering between the cytokines in a total of 110 granulomas. Results The expression of all target cytokines was higher in the granulomas than in control samples. TNF-α, IFN-γ, IL-17A and IL-21 mRNA levels were significantly higher in active granulomas, while in inactive lesions the expression levels of IL-4, IL-9, IL-10, IL-22 and FOXp3 were higher than in active granulomas. Five clusters were identified in inactive lesion groups, being the variance in the expression levels of IL-17, IL-10, FOXp3, IFN-γ, IL-9, IL-33 and IL-4 statistically significant (KW p<0.05). Three clusters were identified in active lesions, being the variance in the expression levels of IL-22, IL-10, IFN-γ, IL-17, IL-33, FOXp3, IL-21 and RANKL statistically significant (KW p<0.05). Conclusion There is a clear dichotomy in the profile of cytokine expression in inactive and active periapical lesions. While the widespread cytokine expression seems to be a feature of chronic lesions

  14. A Hierarchical Clustering Methodology for the Estimation of Toxicity

    EPA Science Inventory

    A Quantitative Structure Activity Relationship (QSAR) methodology based on hierarchical clustering was developed to predict toxicological endpoints. This methodology utilizes Ward's method to divide a training set into a series of structurally similar clusters. The structural sim...

  15. Stellar Snowflake Cluster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1 Stellar Snowflake Cluster Combined Image [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 2 Infrared Array CameraFigure 3 Multiband Imaging Photometer

    Newborn stars, hidden behind thick dust, are revealed in this image of a section of the Christmas Tree cluster from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope, created in joint effort between Spitzer's infrared array camera and multiband imaging photometer instruments.

    The newly revealed infant stars appear as pink and red specks toward the center of the combined image (fig. 1). The stars appear to have formed in regularly spaced intervals along linear structures in a configuration that resembles the spokes of a wheel or the pattern of a snowflake. Hence, astronomers have nicknamed this the 'Snowflake' cluster.

    Star-forming clouds like this one are dynamic and evolving structures. Since the stars trace the straight line pattern of spokes of a wheel, scientists believe that these are newborn stars, or 'protostars.' At a mere 100,000 years old, these infant structures have yet to 'crawl' away from their location of birth. Over time, the natural drifting motions of each star will break this order, and the snowflake design will be no more.

    While most of the visible-light stars that give the Christmas Tree cluster its name and triangular shape do not shine brightly in Spitzer's infrared eyes, all of the stars forming from this dusty cloud are considered part of the cluster.

    Like a dusty cosmic finger pointing up to the newborn clusters, Spitzer also illuminates the optically dark and dense Cone nebula, the tip of which can be seen towards the bottom left corner of each image.

    This combined image shows the presence of organic molecules mixed with dust as wisps of green, which have been illuminated by nearby star formation. The larger yellowish dots neighboring the baby red stars in the Snowflake Cluster are massive stellar infants forming

  16. Reducing Tobacco Use among Low Socio-Economic Status Youth in Delhi, India: Outcomes from Project ACTIVITY, a Cluster Randomized Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrell, Melissa B.; Arora, Monika; Bassi, Shalini; Gupta, Vinay K.; Perry, Cheryl L.; Reddy, K. Srinath

    2016-01-01

    To test the efficacy of an intervention to reduce tobacco use among youth (10-19 years old) in slum communities in Delhi, India. This community-based cluster-randomized trial included 14 slums composed of purposely built resettlement colonies and adjacent inhabitant-built Jhuggi Jhopris. Youth in the intervention received a 2 year…

  17. Semantic Clustering of Search Engine Results

    PubMed Central

    Soliman, Sara Saad; El-Sayed, Maged F.; Hassan, Yasser F.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a novel approach for search engine results clustering that relies on the semantics of the retrieved documents rather than the terms in those documents. The proposed approach takes into consideration both lexical and semantics similarities among documents and applies activation spreading technique in order to generate semantically meaningful clusters. This approach allows documents that are semantically similar to be clustered together rather than clustering documents based on similar terms. A prototype is implemented and several experiments are conducted to test the prospered solution. The result of the experiment confirmed that the proposed solution achieves remarkable results in terms of precision. PMID:26933673

  18. The Dependence of Cluster Galaxy Properties on the Central Entropy of their Host Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jae-Woo; Ko, Jongwan; Hwang, Ho Seong; Edge, Alastair C.; Lee, Joon Hyeop; Lee, Jong Chul; Jeong, Hyunjin

    2017-02-01

    We present a study of the connection between brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) and their host galaxy clusters. Using galaxy clusters at 0.1< z< 0.3 from the Hectospec Cluster Survey (HeCS) with X-ray information from the Archive of Chandra Cluster Entropy Profile Tables (ACCEPT), we confirm that BCGs in low central entropy clusters are well aligned with the X-ray center. Additionally, the magnitude difference between BCG and the second brightest galaxy also correlates with the central entropy of the intracluster medium. From the red-sequence (RS) galaxies, we cannot find significant dependence of RS color scatter and stellar population on the central entropy of the intracluster medium of their host cluster. However, BCGs in low-entropy clusters are systematically less massive than those in high-entropy clusters, although this is dependent on the method used to derive the stellar mass of BCGs. In contrast, the stellar velocity dispersion of BCGs shows no dependence on BCG activity and cluster central entropy. This implies that the potential of the BCG is established earlier and the activity leading to optical emission lines is dictated by the properties of the intracluster medium in the cluster core.

  19. The High-mass Truncation of the Star Cluster Mass Function: Limits on Massive Cluster Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, L. C.; PHAT Team

    2017-01-01

    Long-lived star clusters serve as useful tracers of star formation, and massive clusters in particular are often associated with vigorous star formation activity. We examine how massive cluster formation varies as a function of star formation surface density (ΣSFR) by comparing cluster populations from galaxies that span a wide range of characteristic ΣSFR values. The Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury (PHAT) survey yielded an unparalleled census of young star clusters in M31 and allows us to examine massive cluster formation in a low intensity star formation environment. We measure the cluster mass function for a sample of 840 young star clusters with ages between 10-300 Myr. The data show clear evidence of a high-mass truncation: only 15 clusters more massive than 104 M⊙ are observed, compared to ~100 expected for a canonical M-2 power-law mass function with the same total number of clusters above the catalog completeness limit. Adopting a Schechter function parameterization, we fit a characteristic truncation mass (Mc) of 8.5×103 M⊙ — the lowest truncation mass ever reported. When combined with previous mass function results, we find that the cluster mass function truncation correlates strongly with the star formation rate surface density, where Mc ∝ ΣSFR1.3. We also find evidence that suggests the observed Mc-ΣSFR relation also holds for globular clusters, linking the two populations via a common formation pathway.

  20. Cluster Physics with Merging Galaxy Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molnar, Sandor

    Collisions between galaxy clusters provide a unique opportunity to study matter in a parameter space which cannot be explored in our laboratories on Earth. In the standard ΛCDM model, where the total density is dominated by the cosmological constant (Λ) and the matter density by cold dark matter (CDM), structure formation is hierarchical, and clusters grow mostly by merging. Mergers of two massive clusters are the most energetic events in the universe after the Big Bang, hence they provide a unique laboratory to study cluster physics. The two main mass components in clusters behave differently during collisions: the dark matter is nearly collisionless, responding only to gravity, while the gas is subject to pressure forces and dissipation, and shocks and turbulence are developed during collisions. In the present contribution we review the different methods used to derive the physical properties of merging clusters. Different physical processes leave their signatures on different wavelengths, thus our review is based on a multifrequency analysis. In principle, the best way to analyze multifrequency observations of merging clusters is to model them using N-body/HYDRO numerical simulations. We discuss the results of such detailed analyses. New high spatial and spectral resolution ground and space based telescopes will come online in the near future. Motivated by these new opportunities, we briefly discuss methods which will be feasible in the near future in studying merging clusters.

  1. Benzo[1,2-c]1,2,5-oxadiazole N-oxide derivatives as potential antitrypanosomal drugs. Part 3: Substituents-clustering methodology in the search for new active compounds.

    PubMed

    Aguirre, Gabriela; Boiani, Lucía; Cerecetto, Hugo; Di Maio, Rossanna; González, Mercedes; Porcal, Williams; Denicola, Ana; Möller, Matías; Thomson, Leonor; Tórtora, Verónica

    2005-12-01

    The results of a study on the use of Hansch's series design, cluster methodology, for the generation of new benzo[1,2-c]1,2,5-oxadiazole N-oxide derivatives as antitrypanosomal compounds are described. In vitro activity of these compounds was tested against Tulahuen 2 strain of Trypanosoma cruzi. Clearly, the Hansch methodology allowed identifying two cluster-substituents suitable for further structural modifications. The most effective drugs, derivatives 11, 18, and 21, with 50% inhibitory concentration (IC(50)) of the same order as that of the reference drug, represent an excellent structural point of chemical modifications for the design of future drugs. Preliminary results from the study of the mechanism of action of these benzofuroxans point to perturbation of the mitochondrial electron chain, inhibiting parasite respiration.

  2. Gold-bismuth clusters.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Ana

    2014-08-07

    Metal clusters have interesting characteristics, such as the relationship between properties and size of the cluster. This is not always apparent, so theoretical studies can provide relevant information. In this report, optimized structures and electron donor-acceptor properties of AunBim clusters are reported (n + m = 2-7, 20). Density functional theory calculations were performed to obtain optimized structures. The ground states of gold clusters formed with up to seven atoms are planar. The presence of Bi modifies the structure, and the clusters become 3-D. Several optimized geometries have at least one Bi atom bonded to gold or bismuth atoms and form structures similar to NH3. This fragment is also present in clusters with 20 atoms, where the formation of Au3Bi stabilizes the structures. Bismuth clusters are better electron donors and worse electron acceptors than gold clusters. Mixed clusters fall in between these two extremes. The presence of Bi atoms in gold clusters modifies the electron donor-acceptor properties of the clusters, but there is no correlation between the number of Bi atoms present in the cluster and the capacity for donating electrons. The effect of planarity in Au19Bi clusters is the same as that in Au20 clusters. The properties of pure gold clusters are certainly interesting, but clusters formed by Bi and Au are more important because the introduction of different atoms modifies the geometry, the stability, and consequently the physical and chemical properties. Apparently, the presence of Bi may increase the reactivity of gold clusters, but further studies are necessary to corroborate this hypothesis.

  3. A 21-amino acid peptide from the cysteine cluster II of the family D DNA polymerase from Pyrococcus horikoshii stimulates its nuclease activity which is Mre11-like and prefers manganese ion as the cofactor.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yulong; Tang, Xiao-Feng; Yokoyama, Hideshi; Matsui, Eriko; Matsui, Ikuo

    2004-01-01

    Family D DNA polymerase (PolD) is a new type of DNA polymerase possessing polymerization and 3'-5' exonuclease activities. Here we report the characterization of the nuclease activity of PolD from Pyrococcus horikoshii. By site-directed mutagenesis, we verified that the putative Mre11-like nuclease domain in the small subunit (DP1), predicted according to computer analysis and structure inference reported previously, is the catalytic domain. We show that D363, H365 and H454 are the essential residues, while D407, N453, H500, H563 and H565 are critical residues for the activity. We provide experimental evidence demonstrating that manganese, rather than magnesium, is the preferable metal ion for the nuclease activity of PolD. We also show that DP1 alone is insufficient to perform full catalysis, which additionally requires the formation of the PolD complex and manganese ion. We found that a 21 amino acid, subunit-interacting peptide of the sequence from cysteine cluster II of the large subunit (DP2) stimulates the exonuclease activity of DP1 and the internal deletion mutants of PolD lacking the 21-aa sequence. This indicates that the putative zinc finger motif of the cysteine cluster II is deeply involved in the nucleolytic catalysis.

  4. Nuclear Clusters in Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubono, S.; Binh, Dam N.; Hayakawa, S.; Hashimoto, H.; Kahl, D.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Yamaguchi, H.; Teranishi, T.; Iwasa, N.; Komatsubara, T.; Kato, S.; Khiem, Le H.

    2010-03-01

    The role of nuclear clustering is discussed for nucleosynthesis in stellar evolution with Cluster Nucleosynthesis Diagram (CND) proposed before. Special emphasis is placed on α-induced stellar reactions together with molecular states for O and C burning.

  5. Matlab Cluster Ensemble Toolbox

    SciTech Connect

    Sapio, Vincent De; Kegelmeyer, Philip

    2009-04-27

    This is a Matlab toolbox for investigating the application of cluster ensembles to data classification, with the objective of improving the accuracy and/or speed of clustering. The toolbox divides the cluster ensemble problem into four areas, providing functionality for each. These include, (1) synthetic data generation, (2) clustering to generate individual data partitions and similarity matrices, (3) consensus function generation and final clustering to generate ensemble data partitioning, and (4) implementation of accuracy metrics. With regard to data generation, Gaussian data of arbitrary dimension can be generated. The kcenters algorithm can then be used to generate individual data partitions by either, (a) subsampling the data and clustering each subsample, or by (b) randomly initializing the algorithm and generating a clustering for each initialization. In either case an overall similarity matrix can be computed using a consensus function operating on the individual similarity matrices. A final clustering can be performed and performance metrics are provided for evaluation purposes.

  6. Adaptive cluster detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedenberg, David

    2010-10-01

    the rate of falsely detected active regions. Additionally we examine the more general field of clustering and develop a framework for clustering algorithms based around diffusion maps. Diffusion maps can be used to project high-dimensional data into a lower dimensional space while preserving much of the structure in the data. We demonstrate how diffusion maps can be used to solve clustering problems and examine the influence of tuning parameters on the results. We introduce two novel methods, the self-tuning diffusion map which replaces the global scaling parameter in the typical diffusion map framework with a local scaling parameter and an algorithm for automatically selecting tuning parameters based on a cross-validation style score called prediction strength. The methods are tested on several example datasets.

  7. A Close Association of RyRs with Highly Dense Clusters of Ca2+-activated Cl− Channels Underlies the Activation of STICs by Ca2+ Sparks in Mouse Airway Smooth Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Rongfeng; Lifshitz, Lawrence M.; Tuft, Richard A.; Bellvé, Karl; Fogarty, Kevin E.; ZhuGe, Ronghua

    2008-01-01

    Ca2+ sparks are highly localized, transient releases of Ca2+ from sarcoplasmic reticulum through ryanodine receptors (RyRs). In smooth muscle, Ca2+ sparks trigger spontaneous transient outward currents (STOCs) by opening nearby clusters of large-conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channels, and also gate Ca2+-activated Cl− (Cl(Ca)) channels to induce spontaneous transient inward currents (STICs). While the molecular mechanisms underlying the activation of STOCs by Ca2+ sparks is well understood, little information is available on how Ca2+ sparks activate STICs. In the present study, we investigated the spatial organization of RyRs and Cl(Ca) channels in spark sites in airway myocytes from mouse. Ca2+ sparks and STICs were simultaneously recorded, respectively, with high-speed, widefield digital microscopy and whole-cell patch-clamp. An image-based approach was applied to measure the Ca2+ current underlying a Ca2+ spark (ICa(spark)), with an appropriate correction for endogenous fixed Ca2+ buffer, which was characterized by flash photolysis of NPEGTA. We found that ICa(spark) rises to a peak in 9 ms and decays with a single exponential with a time constant of 12 ms, suggesting that Ca2+ sparks result from the nonsimultaneous opening and closure of multiple RyRs. The onset of the STIC lags the onset of the ICa(spark) by less than 3 ms, and its rising phase matches the duration of the ICa(spark). We further determined that Cl(Ca) channels on average are exposed to a [Ca2+] of 2.4 μM or greater during Ca2+ sparks. The area of the plasma membrane reaching this level is <600 nm in radius, as revealed by the spatiotemporal profile of [Ca2+] produced by a reaction-diffusion simulation with measured ICa(spark). Finally we estimated that the number of Cl(Ca) channels localized in Ca2+ spark sites could account for all the Cl(Ca) channels in the entire cell. Taken together these results lead us to propose a model in which RyRs and Cl(Ca) channels in Ca2+ spark sites localize

  8. Spectroscopic Studies of Abell Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Way, Michael Joseph

    The objectives of this work are to use spectroscopic techniques to accurately categorize galaxies as either HII region star forming galaxies or as Active Galactic Nuclei powered via a black hole, and to use radial velocities and projected positions of galaxies in clusters to obtain the total cluster mass and its distribution. The masses and distributions compare well to X-ray mass measurements. The commonly used Dressler, A., Thompson, I. & Shectman, S. 1985, ApJ, 288, 481 technique for discriminating between Active Galactic Nuclei and HII region galaxies uses the measurement of the equivalent width of the emission lines (OII) 3727 A, H/beta, and (OIII) 5007 A. High quality spectra from 42 galaxies were taken and it is shown that their method is not capable of distinguishing between Active Galactic Nuclei and HII region galaxies. The emission line flux from H/beta, (OIII) 5007 A, (OI) 6300 A, Hα, (NII) 6583 A, and (SII) 6716+6731 A in combination with the method of Veilleux, S. & Osterbrock, D. E. 1987, ApJS, 63, 295 must be used to accurately distinguish between Active Galactic Nuclei and HII region galaxies. Galaxy radial velocities from spectroscopic data and their projected 2-D positions in clusters are used to obtain robust estimates of the total mass and mass distribution in two clusters. The total mass is calculated using the Virial theorem after removing substructure. The mass distribution is estimated via several robust statistical tests for 1-D, 2-D and 3-D structure. It is shown that the derived mass estimates agree well with those found independently from hot X-ray gas emission in clusters.

  9. Clustering algorithm studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graf, Norman A.

    2001-07-01

    An object-oriented framework for undertaking clustering algorithm studies has been developed. We present here the definitions for the abstract Cells and Clusters as well as the interface for the algorithm. We intend to use this framework to investigate the interplay between various clustering algorithms and the resulting jet reconstruction efficiency and energy resolutions to assist in the design of the calorimeter detector.

  10. EdAl-2 (Educació en Alimentació) programme: reproducibility of a cluster randomised, interventional, primary-school-based study to induce healthier lifestyle activities in children

    PubMed Central

    Llauradó, Elisabet; Tarro, Lucia; Moriña, David; Queral, Rosa; Giralt, Montse; Solà, Rosa

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To assess the reproducibility of an educational intervention EdAl-2 (Educació en Alimentació) programme in ‘Terres de l'Ebre’ (Spain), over 22 months, to improve lifestyles, including diet and physical activity (PA). Design Reproduction of a cluster randomised controlled trial. Setting Two semi-rural town-group primary-school clusters were randomly assigned to the intervention or control group. Participants Pupils (n=690) of whom 320 constituted the intervention group (1 cluster) and 370 constituted the control group (1 cluster). Ethnicity was 78% Western European. The mean age (±SD) was 8.04±0.6 years (47.7% females) at baseline. Inclusion criteria for clusters were towns from the southern part of Catalonia having a minimum of 500 children aged 7–8 year; complete data for participants, including name, gender, date and place of birth, and written informed consent from parents or guardians. Intervention The intervention focused on eight lifestyle topics covered in 12 activities (1 h/activity/session) implemented by health promoting agents in the primary school over three academic years. Primary and secondary outcomes The primary outcome was obesity (OB) prevalence and the secondary outcomes were body mass index (BMI) collected every year and dietary habits and lifestyles collected by questionnaires filled in by parents at baseline and end-of-study. Results At 22 months, the OB prevalence and BMI values were similar in intervention and control groups. Relative to children in control schools, the percentage of boys in the intervention group who performed ≥4 after-school PA h/week was 15% higher (p=0.027), whereas the percentage of girls in both groups remained similar. Also, 16.6% more boys in the intervention group watched ≤2 television (TV) h/day (p=0.009), compared to controls; and no changes were observed in girls in both groups. Conclusions Our school-based intervention is feasible and reproducible by increasing after-school PA

  11. Voting-based consensus clustering for combining multiple clusterings of chemical structures

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Although many consensus clustering methods have been successfully used for combining multiple classifiers in many areas such as machine learning, applied statistics, pattern recognition and bioinformatics, few consensus clustering methods have been applied for combining multiple clusterings of chemical structures. It is known that any individual clustering method will not always give the best results for all types of applications. So, in this paper, three voting and graph-based consensus clusterings were used for combining multiple clusterings of chemical structures to enhance the ability of separating biologically active molecules from inactive ones in each cluster. Results The cumulative voting-based aggregation algorithm (CVAA), cluster-based similarity partitioning algorithm (CSPA) and hyper-graph partitioning algorithm (HGPA) were examined. The F-measure and Quality Partition Index method (QPI) were used to evaluate the clusterings and the results were compared to the Ward’s clustering method. The MDL Drug Data Report (MDDR) dataset was used for experiments and was represented by two 2D fingerprints, ALOGP and ECFP_4. The performance of voting-based consensus clustering method outperformed the Ward’s method using F-measure and QPI method for both ALOGP and ECFP_4 fingerprints, while the graph-based consensus clustering methods outperformed the Ward’s method only for ALOGP using QPI. The Jaccard and Euclidean distance measures were the methods of choice to generate the ensembles, which give the highest values for both criteria. Conclusions The results of the experiments show that consensus clustering methods can improve the effectiveness of chemical structures clusterings. The cumulative voting-based aggregation algorithm (CVAA) was the method of choice among consensus clustering methods. PMID:23244782

  12. Adapting interrelated two-way clustering method for quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) modeling of mutagenicity/non- mutagenicity of a diverse set of chemicals.

    PubMed

    Majumdar, Subhabrata; Basak, Subhash C; Grunwald, Gregory D

    2013-12-01

    Interrelated Two-way Clustering (ITC) is an unsupervised clustering method developed to divide samples into two groups in gene expression data obtained through microarrays, selecting important genes simultaneously in the process. This has been found to be a better approach than conventional clustering methods like K-means or selforganizing map for the scenarios when number of samples is much smaller than number of variables (n«p). In this paper we used the ITC approach for classification of a diverse set of 508 chemicals regarding mutagenicity. A large number of topological indices (TIs), 3-dimensional, and quantum chemical descriptors, as well as atom pairs (APs) has been used as explanatory variables. In this paper, ITC has been used only for predictor selection, after which ridge regression is employed to build the final predictive model. The proper leave-one-out (LOO) method of cross-validation in this scenario is to take as holdout each of the 508 compounds before predictor thinning and compare the predicted values with the experimental data. ITC based results obtained here are comparable to those developed earlier.

  13. The Evolution of Total Phenolic Compounds and Antioxidant Activities during Ripening of Grapes (Vitis vinifera L., cv. Tempranillo) Grown in Semiarid Region: Effects of Cluster Thinning and Water Deficit

    PubMed Central

    Garrido, Inmaculada; Uriarte, David; Hernández, Marcos; Llerena, José Luis; Valdés, María Esperanza; Espinosa, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    A study was made of how water status (rainfed vs. irrigated) and crop load (no cluster thinning vs. cluster thinning) can together affect the grapes of Vitis vinifera cv. Tempranillo vines growing in a semiarid zone of Extremadura (Spain). The grapes were monitored at different stages of ripening, measuring the peroxidase (POX) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) antioxidant activities and the phenolic content (flavonoids and phenylpropanoids), together with other parameters. The irrigation regime was adjusted to provide 100% of crop evapotranspiration (ETc). The findings confirmed previous results that both thinning and water deficit advance ripening, while irrigation and high crop load (no thinning) lengthen the growth cycle. The SOD activity remained practically constant throughout ripening in the thinned treatments and was always lower than in the unthinned treatments, an aspect which could have been the cause of the observed greater level of lipid peroxidation in the water deficit, thinned treatment. The nonspecific peroxidase activity was very low, especially in the thinned treatments. The effect of thinning was enhanced when combined with water deficit, inducing increases in phenylpropanoids and, above all, flavonoids at the harvest stage of ripening, while leaving the polyphenol oxidase activity (PPO) unaffected. PMID:27869671

  14. The Evolution of Total Phenolic Compounds and Antioxidant Activities during Ripening of Grapes (Vitis vinifera L., cv. Tempranillo) Grown in Semiarid Region: Effects of Cluster Thinning and Water Deficit.

    PubMed

    Garrido, Inmaculada; Uriarte, David; Hernández, Marcos; Llerena, José Luis; Valdés, María Esperanza; Espinosa, Francisco

    2016-11-17

    A study was made of how water status (rainfed vs. irrigated) and crop load (no cluster thinning vs. cluster thinning) can together affect the grapes of Vitis vinifera cv. Tempranillo vines growing in a semiarid zone of Extremadura (Spain). The grapes were monitored at different stages of ripening, measuring the peroxidase (POX) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) antioxidant activities and the phenolic content (flavonoids and phenylpropanoids), together with other parameters. The irrigation regime was adjusted to provide 100% of crop evapotranspiration (ETc). The findings confirmed previous results that both thinning and water deficit advance ripening, while irrigation and high crop load (no thinning) lengthen the growth cycle. The SOD activity remained practically constant throughout ripening in the thinned treatments and was always lower than in the unthinned treatments, an aspect which could have been the cause of the observed greater level of lipid peroxidation in the water deficit, thinned treatment. The nonspecific peroxidase activity was very low, especially in the thinned treatments. The effect of thinning was enhanced when combined with water deficit, inducing increases in phenylpropanoids and, above all, flavonoids at the harvest stage of ripening, while leaving the polyphenol oxidase activity (PPO) unaffected.

  15. Ionized cluster beam deposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirkpatrick, A. R.

    1983-01-01

    Ionized Cluster Beam (ICB) deposition, a new technique originated by Takagi of Kyoto University in Japan, offers a number of unique capabilities for thin film metallization as well as for deposition of active semiconductor materials. ICB allows average energy per deposited atom to be controlled and involves impact kinetics which result in high diffusion energies of atoms on the growth surface. To a greater degree than in other techniques, ICB involves quantitative process parameters which can be utilized to strongly control the characteristics of films being deposited. In the ICB deposition process, material to be deposited is vaporized into a vacuum chamber from a confinement crucible at high temperature. Crucible nozzle configuration and operating temperature are such that emerging vapor undergoes supercondensation following adiabatic expansion through the nozzle.

  16. LacR is a repressor of lacABCD and LacT is an activator of lacTFEG, constituting the lac gene cluster in Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Afzal, Muhammad; Shafeeq, Sulman; Kuipers, Oscar P

    2014-09-01

    Comparison of the transcriptome of Streptococcus pneumoniae strain D39 grown in the presence of either lactose or galactose with that of the strain grown in the presence of glucose revealed the elevated expression of various genes and operons, including the lac gene cluster, which is organized into two operons, i.e., lac operon I (lacABCD) and lac operon II (lacTFEG). Deletion of the DeoR family transcriptional regulator lacR that is present downstream of the lac gene cluster revealed elevated expression of lac operon I even in the absence of lactose. This suggests a function of LacR as a transcriptional repressor of lac operon I, which encodes enzymes involved in the phosphorylated tagatose pathway in the absence of lactose or galactose. Deletion of lacR did not affect the expression of lac operon II, which encodes a lactose-specific phosphotransferase. This finding was further confirmed by β-galactosidase assays with PlacA-lacZ and PlacT-lacZ in the presence of either lactose or glucose as the sole carbon source in the medium. This suggests the involvement of another transcriptional regulator in the regulation of lac operon II, which is the BglG-family transcriptional antiterminator LacT. We demonstrate the role of LacT as a transcriptional activator of lac operon II in the presence of lactose and CcpA-independent regulation of the lac gene cluster in S. pneumoniae.

  17. A new clustering strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Jian-xin; Tang, Jia-fu; Wang, Guang-xing

    2007-04-01

    On the basis of the analysis of clustering algorithm that had been proposed for MANET, a novel clustering strategy was proposed in this paper. With the trust defined by statistical hypothesis in probability theory and the cluster head selected by node trust and node mobility, this strategy can realize the function of the malicious nodes detection which was neglected by other clustering algorithms and overcome the deficiency of being incapable of implementing the relative mobility metric of corresponding nodes in the MOBIC algorithm caused by the fact that the receiving power of two consecutive HELLO packet cannot be measured. It's an effective solution to cluster MANET securely.

  18. Star cluster dynamics.

    PubMed

    Vesperini, Enrico

    2010-02-28

    Dynamical evolution plays a key role in shaping the current properties of star clusters and star cluster systems. A detailed understanding of the effects of evolutionary processes is essential to be able to disentangle the properties that result from dynamical evolution from those imprinted at the time of cluster formation. In this review, I focus my attention on globular clusters, and review the main physical ingredients driving their early and long-term evolution, describe the possible evolutionary routes and show how cluster structure and stellar content are affected by dynamical evolution.

  19. Quantum Monte Carlo methods and lithium cluster properties. [Atomic clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Owen, R.K.

    1990-12-01

    Properties of small lithium clusters with sizes ranging from n = 1 to 5 atoms were investigated using quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) methods. Cluster geometries were found from complete active space self consistent field (CASSCF) calculations. A detailed development of the QMC method leading to the variational QMC (V-QMC) and diffusion QMC (D-QMC) methods is shown. The many-body aspect of electron correlation is introduced into the QMC importance sampling electron-electron correlation functions by using density dependent parameters, and are shown to increase the amount of correlation energy obtained in V-QMC calculations. A detailed analysis of D-QMC time-step bias is made and is found to be at least linear with respect to the time-step. The D-QMC calculations determined the lithium cluster ionization potentials to be 0.1982(14) (0.1981), 0.1895(9) (0.1874(4)), 0.1530(34) (0.1599(73)), 0.1664(37) (0.1724(110)), 0.1613(43) (0.1675(110)) Hartrees for lithium clusters n = 1 through 5, respectively; in good agreement with experimental results shown in the brackets. Also, the binding energies per atom was computed to be 0.0177(8) (0.0203(12)), 0.0188(10) (0.0220(21)), 0.0247(8) (0.0310(12)), 0.0253(8) (0.0351(8)) Hartrees for lithium clusters n = 2 through 5, respectively. The lithium cluster one-electron density is shown to have charge concentrations corresponding to nonnuclear attractors. The overall shape of the electronic charge density also bears a remarkable similarity with the anisotropic harmonic oscillator model shape for the given number of valence electrons.

  20. Complementary ensemble clustering of biomedical data.

    PubMed

    Fodeh, Samah Jamal; Brandt, Cynthia; Luong, Thai Binh; Haddad, Ali; Schultz, Martin; Murphy, Terrence; Krauthammer, Michael

    2013-06-01

    The rapidly growing availability of electronic biomedical data has increased the need for innovative data mining methods. Clustering in particular has been an active area of research in many different application areas, with existing clustering algorithms mostly focusing on one modality or representation of the data. Complementary ensemble clustering (CEC) is a recently introduced framework in which Kmeans is applied to a weighted, linear combination of the coassociation matrices obtained from separate ensemble clustering of different data modalities. The strength of CEC is its extraction of information from multiple aspects of the data when forming the final clusters. This study assesses the utility of CEC in biomedical data, which often have multiple data modalities, e.g., text and images, by applying CEC to two distinct biomedical datasets (PubMed images and radiology reports) that each have two modalities. Referent to five different clustering approaches based on the Kmeans algorithm, CEC exhibited equal or better performance in the metrics of micro-averaged precision and Normalized Mutual Information across both datasets. The reference methods included clustering of single modalities as well as ensemble clustering of separate and merged data modalities. Our experimental results suggest that CEC is equivalent or more efficient than comparable Kmeans based clustering methods using either single or merged data modalities.

  1. Unconventional methods for clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotyrba, Martin

    2016-06-01

    Cluster analysis or clustering is a task of grouping a set of objects in such a way that objects in the same group (called a cluster) are more similar (in some sense or another) to each other than to those in other groups (clusters). It is the main task of exploratory data mining and a common technique for statistical data analysis used in many fields, including machine learning, pattern recognition, image analysis, information retrieval, and bioinformatics. The topic of this paper is one of the modern methods of clustering namely SOM (Self Organising Map). The paper describes the theory needed to understand the principle of clustering and descriptions of algorithm used with clustering in our experiments.

  2. A rare tetranuclear thorium(IV) μ4 -oxo cluster and dinuclear thorium(IV) complex assembled by carbon-oxygen bond activation of 1,2-dimethoxyethane (DME).

    PubMed

    Travia, Nicholas E; Scott, Brian L; Kiplinger, Jaqueline L

    2014-12-15

    The synthesis and X-ray crystal structure of two new multinuclear thorium complexes are reported. The tetranuclear μ4 -oxo cluster complex Th4 (μ4 -O)(μ-Cl)2 I6 [κ(2) (O,O')-μ-O(CH2 )2 OCH3 ]6 and the dinuclear complex Th2 I5 [κ(2) (O,O')-μ-O(CH2 )2 OCH3 ]3 (DME) (DME=dimethoxyethane) are formed by CO bond activation of 1,2-dimethoxyethane (DME) mediated by thorium iodide complexes.

  3. Kinetic evaluation of highly active supported gold catalysts prepared from monolayer-protected clusters: an experimental Michaelis-Menten approach for determining the oxygen binding constant during CO oxidation catalysis.

    PubMed

    Long, Cormac G; Gilbertson, John D; Vijayaraghavan, Ganesh; Stevenson, Keith J; Pursell, Christopher J; Chandler, Bert D

    2008-08-06

    Thiol monolayer-protected Au clusters (MPCs) were prepared using dendrimer templates, deposited onto a high-surface-area titania, and then the thiol stabilizers were removed under H2/N2. The resulting Au catalysts were characterized with transmission electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and infrared spectroscopy of adsorbed CO. The Au catalysts prepared via this route displayed minimal particle agglomeration during the deposition and activation steps. Structural data obtained from the physical characterization of the Au catalysts were comparable to features exhibited from a traditionally prepared standard Au catalyst obtained from the World Gold Council (WGC). A differential kinetic study of CO oxidation catalysis by the MPC-prepared Au and the standard WGC catalyst showed that these two catalyst systems have essentially the same reaction order and Arrhenius apparent activation energies (28 kJ/mol). However, the MPC-prepared Au catalyst shows 50% greater activity for CO oxidation. Using a Michaelis-Menten approach, the oxygen binding constants for the two catalyst systems were determined and found to be essentially the same within experimental error. To our knowledge, this kinetic evaluation is the first experimental determination of oxygen binding by supported Au nanoparticle catalysts under working conditions. The values for the oxygen binding equilibrium constant obtained from the Michaelis-Menten treatment (ca. 29-39) are consistent with ultra-high-vacuum measurements on model catalyst systems and support density functional theory calculations for oxygen binding at corner or edge atoms on Au nanoparticles and clusters.

  4. Estrogen Mediated-Activation of miR-191/425 Cluster Modulates Tumorigenicity of Breast Cancer Cells Depending on Estrogen Receptor Status

    PubMed Central

    Gasparini, Pierluigi; Ngankeu, Apollinaire; Taccioli, Cristian; Briskin, Daniel; Cheung, Douglas G.; Bolon, Brad; Anderlucci, Laura; Alder, Hansjuerg; Nuovo, Gerard; Li, Meng; Iorio, Marilena V.; Galasso, Marco; Ramasamy, Santhanam; Marcucci, Guido; Perrotti, Danilo; Powell, Kimerly A.; Bratasz, Anna; Garofalo, Michela; Nephew, Kenneth P.; Croce, Carlo M.

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs), single-stranded non-coding RNAs, influence myriad biological processes that can contribute to cancer. Although tumor-suppressive and oncogenic functions have been characterized for some miRNAs, the majority of microRNAs have not been investigated for their ability to promote and modulate tumorigenesis. Here, we established that the miR-191/425 cluster is transcriptionally dependent on the host gene, DALRD3, and that the hormone 17β-estradiol (estrogen or E2) controls expression of both miR-191/425 and DALRD3. MiR-191/425 locus characterization revealed that the recruitment of estrogen receptor α (ERα) to the regulatory region of the miR-191/425-DALRD3 unit resulted in the accumulation of miR-191 and miR-425 and subsequent decrease in DALRD3 expression levels. We demonstrated that miR-191 protects ERα positive breast cancer cells from hormone starvation-induced apoptosis through the suppression of tumor-suppressor EGR1. Furthermore, enforced expression of the miR-191/425 cluster in aggressive breast cancer cells altered global gene expression profiles and enabled us to identify important tumor promoting genes, including SATB1, CCND2, and FSCN1, as targets of miR-191 and miR-425. Finally, in vitro and in vivo experiments demonstrated that miR-191 and miR-425 reduced proliferation, impaired tumorigenesis and metastasis, and increased expression of epithelial markers in aggressive breast cancer cells. Our data provide compelling evidence for the transcriptional regulation of the miR-191/425 cluster and for its context-specific biological determinants in breast cancers. Importantly, we demonstrated that the miR-191/425 cluster, by reducing the expression of an extensive network of genes, has a fundamental impact on cancer initiation and progression of breast cancer cells. PMID:23505378

  5. Fuzzy Subspace Clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borgelt, Christian

    In clustering we often face the situation that only a subset of the available attributes is relevant for forming clusters, even though this may not be known beforehand. In such cases it is desirable to have a clustering algorithm that automatically weights attributes or even selects a proper subset. In this paper I study such an approach for fuzzy clustering, which is based on the idea to transfer an alternative to the fuzzifier (Klawonn and Höppner, What is fuzzy about fuzzy clustering? Understanding and improving the concept of the fuzzifier, In: Proc. 5th Int. Symp. on Intelligent Data Analysis, 254-264, Springer, Berlin, 2003) to attribute weighting fuzzy clustering (Keller and Klawonn, Int J Uncertain Fuzziness Knowl Based Syst 8:735-746, 2000). In addition, by reformulating Gustafson-Kessel fuzzy clustering, a scheme for weighting and selecting principal axes can be obtained. While in Borgelt (Feature weighting and feature selection in fuzzy clustering, In: Proc. 17th IEEE Int. Conf. on Fuzzy Systems, IEEE Press, Piscataway, NJ, 2008) I already presented such an approach for a global selection of attributes and principal axes, this paper extends it to a cluster-specific selection, thus arriving at a fuzzy subspace clustering algorithm (Parsons, Haque, and Liu, 2004).

  6. Electron injection through a specific pathway determines the outcome of oxygen activation at the diiron cluster in the F208Y mutant of Escherichia coli ribonucleotide reductase protein R2.

    PubMed

    Parkin, S E; Chen, S; Ley, B A; Mangravite, L; Edmondson, D E; Huynh, B H; Bollinger, J M

    1998-01-27

    Protein R2 of ribonucleotide reductase from Escherichia coli contains a dinuclear iron cluster, which reductively activates O2 to produce the enzyme's functionally essential tyrosyl radical by one-electron oxidation of residue Y122. A key step in this reaction is the rapid injection of a single electron from an exogenous reductant (Fe2+ or ascorbate) during formation of the radical-generating intermediate, cluster X, from the diiron(II) cluster and O2. As this step leaves only one of the two oxidizing equivalents of the initial diiron(II)-O2 adduct, it commits the reaction to a one-electron oxidation outcome and precludes possible two-electron alternatives (as occur in the related diiron bacterial alkane hydroxylases and fatty acyl desaturases). In the F208Y site-directed mutant of R2, Y208 is hydroxylated (a two-electron oxidation) in preference to the normal reaction [Aberg, A., Ormö, M., Nordlund, P., & Sjöberg, B. M. (1993) Biochemistry 32, 9845-9850], implying that this substitution blocks electron injection or (more likely) introduces an endogenous reductant (Y208) that effectively competes. Here we demonstrate that O2 activation in the F208Y mutant of R2 partitions between these two-electron (Y208 hydroxylation) and one-electron (Y122 radical production) outcomes and that the latter becomes predominant under conditions which favor electron injection (namely, high concentration of the reductant ascorbate). Moreover, we show that the sensitivity of the partition ratio to ascorbate concentration is strictly dependent on the integrity of a hydrogen-bond network involving the near surface residue W48: when this residue is substituted with F, Y208 hydroxylation predominates irrespective of ascorbate concentration. These data suggest that the hydrogen-bond network involving W48 is a specific electron-transfer pathway between the cofactor site and the protein surface.

  7. Alkali Metal Cluster Theory.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jian

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Requires signed TDF. In this thesis, we apply the tight-binding Hubbard model to alkali metal clusters with Hartree-Fock self-consistent methods and perturbation methods for the numerical calculations. We have studied the relation between the equilibrium structures and the range of the hopping matrix elements in the Hubbard Hamiltonian. The results show that the structures are not sensitive to the interaction range but are determined by the number of valence electrons each atom has. Inertia tensors are used to analyse the symmetries of the clusters. The principal axes of the clusters are determined and they are the axes of rotational symmetries of clusters if the clusters have any. The eigenvalues of inertia tensors which are the indication of the deformation of clusters are compared between our model and the ellipsoidal jellium model. The agreement is good for large clusters. At a finite temperature, the thermal motion fluctuates the structures. We defined a fluctuation function with the distance matrix of a cluster. The fluctuation has been studied with the Monte-Carlo simulation method. Our studies show that the clusters remain in the solid state when temperature is low. The small values of fluctuation functions indicates the thermal vibration of atoms around their equilibrium positions. If the temperature is high, the atoms are delocalized. The cluster melts and enters the liquid region. The cluster melting is simulated by the Monte-Carlo simulation with the fluctuation function we defined. Energy levels of clusters are calculated from the Hubbard model. Ionization potentials and magic numbers are also obtained from these energy levels. The results confirm that the Hubbard model is a good approximation for a small cluster. The excitation energy is presented by the difference between the original level and excited level, and the electron-hole interactions. We also have studied cooling of clusters

  8. Information-based clustering

    PubMed Central

    Slonim, Noam; Atwal, Gurinder Singh; Tkačik, Gašper; Bialek, William

    2005-01-01

    In an age of increasingly large data sets, investigators in many different disciplines have turned to clustering as a tool for data analysis and exploration. Existing clustering methods, however, typically depend on several nontrivial assumptions about the structure of data. Here, we reformulate the clustering problem from an information theoretic perspective that avoids many of these assumptions. In particular, our formulation obviates the need for defining a cluster “prototype,” does not require an a priori similarity metric, is invariant to changes in the representation of the data, and naturally captures nonlinear relations. We apply this approach to different domains and find that it consistently produces clusters that are more coherent than those extracted by existing algorithms. Finally, our approach provides a way of clustering based on collective notions of similarity rather than the traditional pairwise measures. PMID:16352721

  9. Clusters of galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vikhlinin, A. A.; Kravtsov, A. V.; Markevich, M. L.; Sunyaev, R. A.; Churazov, E. M.

    2014-04-01

    Galaxy clusters are formed via nonlinear growth of primordial density fluctuations and are the most massive gravitationally bound objects in the present Universe. Their number density at different epochs and their properties depend strongly on the properties of dark matter and dark energy, making clusters a powerful tool for observational cosmology. Observations of the hot gas filling the gravitational potential well of a cluster allows studying gasdynamic and plasma effects and the effect of supermassive black holes on the heating and cooling of gas on cluster scales. The work of Yakov Borisovich Zeldovich has had a profound impact on virtually all cosmological and astrophysical studies of galaxy clusters, introducing concepts such as the Harrison-Zeldovich spectrum, the Zeldovich approximation, baryon acoustic peaks, and the Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect. Here, we review the most basic properties of clusters and their role in modern astrophysics and cosmology.

  10. Chemistry Within Molecular Clusters

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-01-01

    DME )nCH3OCH 2 +). We speculate that this is due to the fragments being consumed by an ion-molecule reaction within the cluster. One likely candidate is...the ion-molecule reaction of the fragment cations with a neutral DME , within the bulk cluster to form a trimethyloxonlum cation intermediate. This...the observed products. We therefore speculate that the DME cluster reactions leading to the same products, should involve the same mechanism found to

  11. Chemistry Within Molecular Clusters

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-06-01

    and ( DME ).CH 3OCH2+). We speculate that this is due to the fragments being consumed by an ion-molecule reaction within the cluster. A likely candidate...is the ion-molecule reaction of the fragment cations with a neutral DME within the bulk cluster, to form a trimethyloxonium cation intermediate...a trimethyloxonium intermediate as the common intermediate for the observed products. We therefore speculate that the DME cluster reactions leading to

  12. Cluster State Quantum Computation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-02-01

    nearest neighbor cluster state has been shown to be a universal resource for MBQC thus we can say our quantum computer is universal. We note that...CLUSTER STATE QUANTUM COMPUTATION FEBRUARY 2014 FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE; DISTRIBUTION UNLIMITED STINFO COPY AIR FORCE...TITLE AND SUBTITLE CLUSTER STATE QUANTUM COMPUTATION 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER IN-HOUSE 5b. GRANT NUMBER N/A 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 62788F 6

  13. Chemical Reactions in Clusters

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-11-04

    NH 3)n, n _> 4, clusters has been attributed to the (solvated) naphtholate anion.3a A single picosecond decay measurement has been reported which...vibrational energy in the cluster Sl state. The data are summarized in Table I. A model to explain these decay results can be constructed based on a proton...11 TITLE (Include Security Classification) Chemical Reactions in Clusters 12 PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Elliot R. Bernstein 13a TYPE OF REPORT 13b TIME COVERED

  14. Cluster Inter-Spacecraft Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, Brian

    2008-01-01

    A document describes a radio communication system being developed for exchanging data and sharing data-processing capabilities among spacecraft flying in formation. The system would establish a high-speed, low-latency, deterministic loop communication path connecting all the spacecraft in a cluster. The system would be a wireless version of a ring bus that complies with the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) standard 1393 (which pertains to a spaceborne fiber-optic data bus enhancement to the IEEE standard developed at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory). Every spacecraft in the cluster would be equipped with a ring-bus radio transceiver. The identity of a spacecraft would be established upon connection into the ring bus, and the spacecraft could be at any location in the ring communication sequence. In the event of failure of a spacecraft, the ring bus would reconfigure itself, bypassing a failed spacecraft. Similarly, the ring bus would reconfigure itself to accommodate a spacecraft newly added to the cluster or newly enabled or re-enabled. Thus, the ring bus would be scalable and robust. Reliability could be increased by launching, into the cluster, spare spacecraft to be activated in the event of failure of other spacecraft.

  15. Modeling the active site of [NiFe] hydrogenases and the [NiFeu] subsite of the C-cluster of carbon monoxide dehydrogenases: low-spin iron(II) versus high-spin iron(II).

    PubMed

    Weber, Katharina; Erdem, Özlen F; Bill, Eckhard; Weyhermüller, Thomas; Lubitz, Wolfgang

    2014-06-16

    A series of four [S2Ni(μ-S)2FeCp*Cl] compounds with different tetradentate thiolate/thioether ligands bound to the Ni(II) ion is reported (Cp* = C5Me5). The {S2Ni(μ-S)2Fe} core of these compounds resembles structural features of the active site of [NiFe] hydrogenases. Detailed analyses of the electronic structures of these compounds by Mössbauer and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy, magnetic measurements, and density functional theory calculations reveal the oxidation states Ni(II) low spin and Fe(II) high spin for the metal ions. The same electronic configurations have been suggested for the Cred1 state of the C-cluster [NiFeu] subsite in carbon monoxide dehydrogenases (CODH). The Ni-Fe distance of ∼3 Å excludes a metal-metal bond between nickel and iron, which is in agreement with the computational results. Electrochemical experiments show that iron is the redox active site in these complexes, performing a reversible one-electron oxidation. The four complexes are discussed with regard to their similarities and differences both to the [NiFe] hydrogenases and the C-cluster of Ni-containing CODH.

  16. Star Clusters within FIRE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez, Adrianna; Moreno, Jorge; Naiman, Jill; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico; Hopkins, Philip F.

    2017-01-01

    In this work, we analyze the environments surrounding star clusters of simulated merging galaxies. Our framework employs Feedback In Realistic Environments (FIRE) model (Hopkins et al., 2014). The FIRE project is a high resolution cosmological simulation that resolves star forming regions and incorporates stellar feedback in a physically realistic way. The project focuses on analyzing the properties of the star clusters formed in merging galaxies. The locations of these star clusters are identified with astrodendro.py, a publicly available dendrogram algorithm. Once star cluster properties are extracted, they will be used to create a sub-grid (smaller than the resolution scale of FIRE) of gas confinement in these clusters. Then, we can examine how the star clusters interact with these available gas reservoirs (either by accreting this mass or blowing it out via feedback), which will determine many properties of the cluster (star formation history, compact object accretion, etc). These simulations will further our understanding of star formation within stellar clusters during galaxy evolution. In the future, we aim to enhance sub-grid prescriptions for feedback specific to processes within star clusters; such as, interaction with stellar winds and gas accretion onto black holes and neutron stars.

  17. Melting of nickel clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Garzon, I.L.; Jellinek, J.

    1991-12-31

    The meltinglike phenomenon in Ni{sub n}, n = 19,20,55, clusters is studied using microcanonical molecular dynamics simulations. The interaction between the atoms in the clusters is modelled by a size-dependent Gupta-like potential that incorporates many-body effects. The clusters display the ``usual`` stages in their meltinglike transition, which characterize also Lennard-Jones (e.g., noble gas) and ionic clusters. In addition, Ni{sub 20} passes through a so-called premelting stage found earlier also for Ni{sub 14}. 11 ref., 3 figs.

  18. Melting of nickel clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Garzon, I.L. . Inst. de Fisica); Jellinek, J. )

    1991-01-01

    The meltinglike phenomenon in Ni{sub n}, n = 19,20,55, clusters is studied using microcanonical molecular dynamics simulations. The interaction between the atoms in the clusters is modelled by a size-dependent Gupta-like potential that incorporates many-body effects. The clusters display the usual'' stages in their meltinglike transition, which characterize also Lennard-Jones (e.g., noble gas) and ionic clusters. In addition, Ni{sub 20} passes through a so-called premelting stage found earlier also for Ni{sub 14}. 11 ref., 3 figs.

  19. Mini-clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chinellato, J. A.; Dobrigkeit, C.; Bellandifilho, J.; Lattes, C. M. G.; Menon, M. J.; Navia, C. E.; Pamilaju, A.; Sawayanagi, K.; Shibuya, E. H.; Turtelli, A., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Experimental results of mini-clusters observed in Chacaltaya emulsion chamber no.19 are summarized. The study was made on 54 single core shower upper and 91 shower clusters of E(gamma) 10 TeV from 30 families which are visible energy greater than 80 TeV and penetrate through both upper and lower detectors of the two-story chamber. The association of hadrons in mini-cluster is made clear from their penetrative nature and microscopic observation of shower continuation in lower chamber. Small P sub t (gamma) of hadrons in mini-clusters remained in puzzle.

  20. Searching for the missing baryons in clusters

    PubMed Central

    Rasheed, Bilhuda; Bahcall, Neta; Bode, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Observations of clusters of galaxies suggest that they contain fewer baryons (gas plus stars) than the cosmic baryon fraction. This “missing baryon” puzzle is especially surprising for the most massive clusters, which are expected to be representative of the cosmic matter content of the universe (baryons and dark matter). Here we show that the baryons may not actually be missing from clusters, but rather are extended to larger radii than typically observed. The baryon deficiency is typically observed in the central regions of clusters (∼0.5 the virial radius). However, the observed gas-density profile is significantly shallower than the mass-density profile, implying that the gas is more extended than the mass and that the gas fraction increases with radius. We use the observed density profiles of gas and mass in clusters to extrapolate the measured baryon fraction as a function of radius and as a function of cluster mass. We find that the baryon fraction reaches the cosmic value near the virial radius for all groups and clusters above . This suggests that the baryons are not missing, they are simply located in cluster outskirts. Heating processes (such as shock-heating of the intracluster gas, supernovae, and Active Galactic Nuclei feedback) likely contribute to this expanded distribution. Upcoming observations should be able to detect these baryons. PMID:21321229

  1. Mass Distribution in Galaxy Cluster Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogan, M. T.; McNamara, B. R.; Pulido, F.; Nulsen, P. E. J.; Russell, H. R.; Vantyghem, A. N.; Edge, A. C.; Main, R. A.

    2017-03-01

    Many processes within galaxy clusters, such as those believed to govern the onset of thermally unstable cooling and active galactic nucleus feedback, are dependent upon local dynamical timescales. However, accurate mapping of the mass distribution within individual clusters is challenging, particularly toward cluster centers where the total mass budget has substantial radially dependent contributions from the stellar (M *), gas (M gas), and dark matter (M DM) components. In this paper we use a small sample of galaxy clusters with deep Chandra observations and good ancillary tracers of their gravitating mass at both large and small radii to develop a method for determining mass profiles that span a wide radial range and extend down into the central galaxy. We also consider potential observational pitfalls in understanding cooling in hot cluster atmospheres, and find tentative evidence for a relationship between the radial extent of cooling X-ray gas and nebular Hα emission in cool-core clusters. At large radii the entropy profiles of our clusters agree with the baseline power law of K ∝ r 1.1 expected from gravity alone. At smaller radii our entropy profiles become shallower but continue with a power law of the form K ∝ r 0.67 down to our resolution limit. Among this small sample of cool-core clusters we therefore find no support for the existence of a central flat “entropy floor.”

  2. Clustering versus non-clustering phase synchronizations

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Shuai; Zhan, Meng

    2014-03-15

    Clustering phase synchronization (CPS) is a common scenario to the global phase synchronization of coupled dynamical systems. In this work, a novel scenario, the non-clustering phase synchronization (NPS), is reported. It is found that coupled systems do not transit to the global synchronization until a certain sufficiently large coupling is attained, and there is no clustering prior to the global synchronization. To reveal the relationship between CPS and NPS, we further analyze the noise effect on coupled phase oscillators and find that the coupled oscillator system can change from CPS to NPS with the increase of noise intensity or system disorder. These findings are expected to shed light on the mechanism of various intriguing self-organized behaviors in coupled systems.

  3. Quantitative real-time reverse transcription-PCR analysis reveals stable and prolonged neurotoxin cluster gene activity in a Clostridium botulinum type E strain at refrigeration temperature.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ying; Korkeala, Hannu; Lindén, Jere; Lindström, Miia

    2008-10-01

    The relative expression levels of six botulinum neurotoxin cluster genes in a group II Clostridium botulinum type E strain grown at 10 or 30 degrees C were investigated using quantitative real-time reverse transcription-PCR. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used to confirm neurotoxin expression. Distinct mRNA and toxin production patterns were observed at the two temperatures. The average relative mRNA levels at 10 degrees C were higher than (ntnh and p47), similar to (botE), or lower than (orfx1, orfx2, orfx3) those at 30 degrees C. The maximum botE expression levels and average neurotoxin levels at 10 degrees C were 45 to 65% of those at 30 degrees C. The relative mRNA levels at 10 degrees C declined generally slowly within 8 days, as opposed to the rapid decline observed at 30 degrees C within 24 h. Distinct expression patterns of the six genes at the two temperatures suggest that the type E neurotoxin cluster genes are transcribed as two tricistronic operons at 30 degrees C, whereas at 10 degrees C monocistronic (botE or orfx1 alone) and bicistronic (ntnh-p47 and orfx2-orfx3) transcription may dominate. Thus, type E botulinum neurotoxin production may be involved with various temperature-dependent regulatory events. In light of group II C. botulinum type E being a dangerous food-borne pathogen, these findings may be important in terms of the safety of refrigerated packaged foods of extended durability.

  4. Health coaching and pedometers to enhance physical activity and prevent falls in community-dwelling people aged 60 years and over: study protocol for the Coaching for Healthy AGEing (CHAnGE) cluster randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Tiedemann, Anne; Rissel, Chris; Howard, Kirsten; Tong, Allison; Merom, Dafna; Smith, Stuart; Wickham, James; Bauman, Adrian; Lord, Stephen R; Vogler, Constance; Lindley, Richard I; Simpson, Judy M; Allman-Farinelli, Margaret; Sherrington, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Prevention of falls and promotion of physical activity are essential for maximising well-being in older age. However, there is evidence that promoting physical activity among older people without providing fall prevention advice may increase fall rates. This trial aims to establish the impact of a physical activity and fall prevention programme compared with a healthy eating programme on physical activity and falls among people aged 60+ years. Methods and analysis This cluster randomised controlled trial will involve 60 groups of community-dwelling people aged 60+ years. Participating groups will be randomised to: (1) a physical activity and fall prevention intervention (30 groups), involving written information, fall risk assessment and prevention advice, a pedometer-based physical activity tracker and telephone-based health coaching; or (2) a healthy eating intervention (30 groups) involving written information and telephone-based dietary coaching. Primary outcomes will be objectively measured physical activity at 12 months post-randomisation and self-reported falls throughout the 12-month trial period. Secondary outcomes include: the proportion of fallers, the proportion of people meeting the Australian physical activity guidelines, body mass index, eating habits, mobility goal attainment, mobility-related confidence, quality of life, fear of falling, risk-taking behaviour, mood, well-being, self-reported physical activity, disability, and health and community service use. The between-group difference in the number of falls per person-year will be analysed using negative binomial regression models. For the continuously scored primary and secondary outcome measures, linear regression adjusted for corresponding baseline scores will assess the effect of group allocation. Analyses will be preplanned, conducted while masked to group allocation, will take into account cluster randomisation, and will use an intention-to-treat approach. Ethics and

  5. A nonparametric clustering technique which estimates the number of clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NT