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Sample records for activation dna damage

  1. Activation of ATM by DNA Damaging Agents

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-09-01

    serine 139. Pretreatment of cells with NAC partially, peroxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase - 1 (37). This but significantly, attenuated the... Gy , concentrations of wortmannin (lanes 3-5) for 30 min prior to the addi- 2 h) (Fig. 4A). tion of 1 gm doxorubicin (lanes 2-5) and further incubation...AD Award Number: DAMD17-02- 1 -0318 TITLE: Activation of ATM by DNA Damaging Agents PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Ebba U. Kurz, Ph.D. Susan P. Lees-Miller

  2. Acetylation of Werner syndrome protein (WRN): relationships with DNA damage, DNA replication and DNA metabolic activities

    PubMed Central

    Lozada, Enerlyn; Yi, Jingjie; Luo, Jianyuan; Orren, David K.

    2014-01-01

    Loss of WRN function causes Werner Syndrome, characterized by increased genomic instability, elevated cancer susceptibility and premature aging. Although WRN is subject to acetylation, phosphorylation and sumoylation, the impact of these modifications on WRN’s DNA metabolic function remains unclear. Here, we examined in further depth the relationship between WRN acetylation and its role in DNA metabolism, particularly in response to induced DNA damage. Our results demonstrate that endogenous WRN is acetylated somewhat under unperturbed conditions. However, levels of acetylated WRN significantly increase after treatment with certain DNA damaging agents or the replication inhibitor hydroxyurea. Use of DNA repair-deficient cells or repair pathway inhibitors further increase levels of acetylated WRN, indicating that induced DNA lesions and their persistence are at least partly responsible for increased acetylation. Notably, acetylation of WRN correlates with inhibition of DNA synthesis, suggesting that replication blockage might underlie this effect. Moreover, WRN acetylation modulates its affinity for and activity on certain DNA structures, in a manner that may enhance its relative specificity for physiological substrates. Our results also show that acetylation and deacetylation of endogenous WRN is a dynamic process, with sirtuins and other histone deacetylases contributing to WRN deacetylation. These findings advance our understanding of the dynamics of WRN acetylation under unperturbed conditions and following DNA damage induction, linking this modification not only to DNA damage persistence but also potentially to replication stalling caused by specific DNA lesions. Our results are consistent with proposed metabolic roles for WRN and genomic instability phenotypes associated with WRN deficiency. PMID:24965941

  3. Activation of DNA damage response signaling by condensed chromatin.

    PubMed

    Burgess, Rebecca C; Burman, Bharat; Kruhlak, Michael J; Misteli, Tom

    2014-12-11

    The DNA damage response (DDR) occurs in the context of chromatin, and architectural features of chromatin have been implicated in DNA damage signaling and repair. Whereas a role of chromatin decondensation in the DDR is well established, we show here that chromatin condensation is integral to DDR signaling. We find that, in response to DNA damage chromatin regions transiently expand before undergoing extensive compaction. Using a protein-chromatin-tethering system to create defined chromatin domains, we show that interference with chromatin condensation results in failure to fully activate DDR. Conversely, forced induction of local chromatin condensation promotes ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM)- and ATR-dependent activation of upstream DDR signaling in a break-independent manner. Whereas persistent chromatin compaction enhanced upstream DDR signaling from irradiation-induced breaks, it reduced recovery and survival after damage. Our results demonstrate that chromatin condensation is sufficient for activation of DDR signaling and is an integral part of physiological DDR signaling.

  4. Aven-dependent activation of ATM following DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Jessie Yanxiang; Yamada, Ayumi; Kajino, Taisuke; Wu, Judy Qiju; Tang, Wanli; Freel, Christopher D.; Feng, Junjie; Chau, B. Nelson; Wang, Michael Zhuo; Margolis, Seth; Yoo, Hae Yong; Wang, Xiao-Fan; Dunphy, William G.; Irusta, Pablo M.; Hardwick, J. Marie; Kornbluth, Sally

    2009-01-01

    Summary Background In response to DNA damage, cells either undergo cell cycle arrest or apoptosis, depending on the extent of damage and the cell’s capacity for DNA repair. Cell cycle arrest induced by double-stranded DNA breaks depends on activation of the ataxia-telangiectasia (ATM) protein kinase, which phosphorylates cell cycle effectors such as Chk2 and p53 to inhibit cell cycle progression. ATM is recruited to double stranded DNA breaks by a complex of sensor proteins including Mre11/Rad50/Nbs1, resulting in autophosphorylation, monomerization, and activation of ATM kinase. Results In characterizing Aven protein, a previously reported apoptotic inhibitor, we have found that Aven can function as an ATM activator to inhibit G2/M progression. Aven bound to ATM and Aven overexpression in cycling Xenopus egg extracts prevented mitotic entry and induced phosphorylation of ATM and its substrates. Immunodepletion of endogenous Aven allowed mitotic entry even in the presence of damaged DNA, and RNAi-mediated knock-down of Aven in human cells prevented autophosphorylation of ATM at an activating site (S1981) in response to DNA damage. Interestingly, Aven is also a substrate of the ATM kinase. Mutation of ATM-mediated phosphorylation sites on Aven reduced its ability to activate ATM, suggesting that Aven activation of ATM following DNA damage is enhanced by ATM-mediated Aven phosphorylation. Conclusions These results identify Aven as a new ATM activator and describe a positive feedback loop operating between Aven and ATM. In aggregate, these findings place Aven, a known apoptotic inhibitor, as a critical transducer of the DNA damage signal. PMID:18571408

  5. Activation of the DNA Damage Response by RNA Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Ellis L.; Hollingworth, Robert; Grand, Roger J.

    2016-01-01

    RNA viruses are a genetically diverse group of pathogens that are responsible for some of the most prevalent and lethal human diseases. Numerous viruses introduce DNA damage and genetic instability in host cells during their lifecycles and some species also manipulate components of the DNA damage response (DDR), a complex and sophisticated series of cellular pathways that have evolved to detect and repair DNA lesions. Activation and manipulation of the DDR by DNA viruses has been extensively studied. It is apparent, however, that many RNA viruses can also induce significant DNA damage, even in cases where viral replication takes place exclusively in the cytoplasm. DNA damage can contribute to the pathogenesis of RNA viruses through the triggering of apoptosis, stimulation of inflammatory immune responses and the introduction of deleterious mutations that can increase the risk of tumorigenesis. In addition, activation of DDR pathways can contribute positively to replication of viral RNA genomes. Elucidation of the interactions between RNA viruses and the DDR has provided important insights into modulation of host cell functions by these pathogens. This review summarises the current literature regarding activation and manipulation of the DDR by several medically important RNA viruses. PMID:26751489

  6. Viruses and the DNA Damage Response: Activation and Antagonism.

    PubMed

    Luftig, Micah A

    2014-11-01

    Viruses must interact with their hosts in order to replicate; these interactions often provoke the evolutionarily conserved response to DNA damage, known as the DNA damage response (DDR). The DDR can be activated by incoming viral DNA, during the integration of retroviruses, or in response to the aberrant DNA structures generated upon replication of DNA viruses. Furthermore, DNA and RNA viral proteins can induce the DDR by promoting inappropriate S phase entry, by modifying cellular DDR factors directly, or by unintentionally targeting host DNA. The DDR may be antiviral, although viruses often require proximal DDR activation of repair and recombination factors to facilitate replication as well as downstream DDR signaling suppression to ensure cell survival. An unintended consequence of DDR attenuation during infection is the long-term survival and proliferation of precancerous cells. Therefore, the molecular basis for DDR activation and attenuation by viruses remains an important area of study that will likely provide key insights into how viruses have evolved with their hosts.

  7. DNA-damaging activity of patulin in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, K S; Röschenthaler, R J

    1986-01-01

    At a concentration of 10 micrograms/ml, patulin caused single-strand DNA breaks in living cells of Escherichia coli. At 50 micrograms/ml, double-strand breaks were observed also. Single-strand breaks were repaired in the presence of 10 micrograms of patulin per ml within 90 min when the cells were incubated at 37 degrees C in M9-salts solution without a carbon source. The same concentration also induced temperature-sensitive lambda prophage and a prophage of Bacillus megaterium. When an in vitro system with permeabilized Escherichia coli cells was used, patulin at 10 micrograms/ml induced DNA repair synthesis and inhibited DNA replication. The in vivo occurrence of DNA strand breaks and DNA repair correlated with the in vitro induction of repair synthesis. In vitro the RNA synthesis was less affected, and overall protein synthesis was not inhibited at 10 micrograms/ml. Only at higher concentrations (250 to 500 micrograms/ml) was inhibition of in vitro protein synthesis observed. Thus, patulin must be regarded as a mycotoxin with selective DNA-damaging activity. PMID:2431653

  8. PARP-2 domain requirements for DNA damage-dependent activation and localization to sites of DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Riccio, Amanda A; Cingolani, Gino; Pascal, John M

    2016-02-29

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-2 (PARP-2) is one of three human PARP enzymes that are potently activated during the cellular DNA damage response (DDR). DDR-PARPs detect DNA strand breaks, leading to a dramatic increase in their catalytic production of the posttranslational modification poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) to facilitate repair. There are limited biochemical and structural insights into the functional domains of PARP-2, which has restricted our understanding of how PARP-2 is specialized toward specific repair pathways. PARP-2 has a modular architecture composed of a C-terminal catalytic domain (CAT), a central Trp-Gly-Arg (WGR) domain and an N-terminal region (NTR). Although the NTR is generally considered the key DNA-binding domain of PARP-2, we report here that all three domains of PARP-2 collectively contribute to interaction with DNA damage. Biophysical, structural and biochemical analyses indicate that the NTR is natively disordered, and is only required for activation on specific types of DNA damage. Interestingly, the NTR is not essential for PARP-2 localization to sites of DNA damage. Rather, the WGR and CAT domains function together to recruit PARP-2 to sites of DNA breaks. Our study differentiates the functions of PARP-2 domains from those of PARP-1, the other major DDR-PARP, and highlights the specialization of the multi-domain architectures of DDR-PARPs.

  9. PARP-2 domain requirements for DNA damage-dependent activation and localization to sites of DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Riccio, Amanda A.; Cingolani, Gino; Pascal, John M.

    2016-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-2 (PARP-2) is one of three human PARP enzymes that are potently activated during the cellular DNA damage response (DDR). DDR-PARPs detect DNA strand breaks, leading to a dramatic increase in their catalytic production of the posttranslational modification poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) to facilitate repair. There are limited biochemical and structural insights into the functional domains of PARP-2, which has restricted our understanding of how PARP-2 is specialized toward specific repair pathways. PARP-2 has a modular architecture composed of a C-terminal catalytic domain (CAT), a central Trp-Gly-Arg (WGR) domain and an N-terminal region (NTR). Although the NTR is generally considered the key DNA-binding domain of PARP-2, we report here that all three domains of PARP-2 collectively contribute to interaction with DNA damage. Biophysical, structural and biochemical analyses indicate that the NTR is natively disordered, and is only required for activation on specific types of DNA damage. Interestingly, the NTR is not essential for PARP-2 localization to sites of DNA damage. Rather, the WGR and CAT domains function together to recruit PARP-2 to sites of DNA breaks. Our study differentiates the functions of PARP-2 domains from those of PARP-1, the other major DDR-PARP, and highlights the specialization of the multi-domain architectures of DDR-PARPs. PMID:26704974

  10. Reconstitution of the cellular response to DNA damage in vitro using damage-activated extracts from mammalian cells

    SciTech Connect

    Roper, Katherine; Coverley, Dawn

    2012-03-10

    In proliferating mammalian cells, DNA damage is detected by sensors that elicit a cellular response which arrests the cell cycle and repairs the damage. As part of the DNA damage response, DNA replication is inhibited and, within seconds, histone H2AX is phosphorylated. Here we describe a cell-free system that reconstitutes the cellular response to DNA double strand breaks using damage-activated cell extracts and naieve nuclei. Using this system the effect of damage signalling on nuclei that do not contain DNA lesions can be studied, thereby uncoupling signalling and repair. Soluble extracts from G1/S phase cells that were treated with etoposide before isolation, or pre-incubated with nuclei from etoposide-treated cells during an in vitro activation reaction, restrain both initiation and elongation of DNA replication in naieve nuclei. At the same time, H2AX is phosphorylated in naieve nuclei in a manner that is dependent upon the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-like protein kinases. Notably, phosphorylated H2AX is not focal in naieve nuclei, but is evident throughout the nucleus suggesting that in the absence of DNA lesions the signal is not amplified such that discrete foci can be detected. This system offers a novel screening approach for inhibitors of DNA damage response kinases, which we demonstrate using the inhibitors wortmannin and LY294002. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A cell free system that reconstitutes the response to DNA damage in the absence of DNA lesions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Damage-activated extracts impose the cellular response to DNA damage on naieve nuclei. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PIKK-dependent response impacts positively and negatively on two separate fluorescent outputs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Can be used to screen for inhibitors that impact on the response to damage but not on DNA repair. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer LY294002 and wortmannin demonstrate the system's potential as a pathway focused screening

  11. Viral DNA Replication-Dependent DNA Damage Response Activation during BK Polyomavirus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Verhalen, Brandy; Justice, Joshua L.; Imperiale, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT BK polyomavirus (BKPyV) reactivation is associated with severe human disease in kidney and bone marrow transplant patients. The interplay between viral and host factors that regulates the productive infection process remains poorly understood. We have previously reported that the cellular DNA damage response (DDR) is activated upon lytic BKPyV infection and that its activation is required for optimal viral replication in primary kidney epithelial cells. In this report, we set out to determine what viral components are responsible for activating the two major phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-like kinases (PI3KKs) involved in the DDR: ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) kinase and ATM and Rad3-related (ATR) kinase. Using a combination of UV treatment, lentivirus transduction, and mutant virus infection experiments, our results demonstrate that neither the input virus nor the expression of large T antigen (TAg) alone is sufficient to trigger the activation of ATM or ATR in our primary culture model. Instead, our data suggest that the activation of both the ATM- and ATR-mediated DDR pathways is linked to viral DNA replication. Intriguingly, a TAg mutant virus that is unable to activate the DDR causes substantial host DNA damage. Our study provides insight into how DDRs are activated by polyomaviruses in primary cells with intact cell cycle checkpoints and how the activation might be linked to the maintenance of host genome stability. IMPORTANCE Polyomaviruses are opportunistic pathogens that are associated with several human diseases under immunosuppressed conditions. BK polyomavirus (BKPyV) affects mostly kidney and bone marrow transplant patients. The detailed replication mechanism of these viruses remains to be determined. We have previously reported that BKPyV activates the host DNA damage response (DDR), a response normally used by the host cell to combat genotoxic stress, to aid its own replication. In this study, we identified that the trigger for DDR

  12. Phosphorylation of Daxx by ATM Contributes to DNA Damage-Induced p53 Activation

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Qian; Qu, Like; Brewer, Michael D.; Chen, Jiandong; Yang, Xiaolu

    2013-01-01

    p53 plays a central role in tumor suppression. It does so by inducing anti-proliferative processes as a response to various tumor-promoting stresses. p53 is regulated by the ubiquitin ligase Mdm2. The optimal function of Mdm2 requires Daxx, which stabilizes Mdm2 through the deubiquitinase Hausp/USP7 and also directly promotes Mdm2’s ubiquitin ligase activity towards p53. The Daxx-Mdm2 interaction is disrupted upon DNA damage. However, both the mechanisms and the consequence of the Daxx-Mdm2 dissociation are not understood. Here we show that upon DNA damage Daxx is phosphorylated in a manner that is dependent on ATM, a member of the PI 3-kinase family that orchestrates the DNA damage response. The main phosphorylation site of Daxx is identified to be Ser564, which is a direct target of ATM. Phosphorylation of endogenous Daxx at Ser564 occurs rapidly during the DNA damage response and precedes p53 activation. Blockage of this phosphorylation event prevents the separation of Daxx from Mdm2, stabilizes Mdm2, and inhibits DNA damage-induced p53 activation. These results suggest that phosphorylation of Daxx by ATM upon DNA damage disrupts the Daxx-Mdm2 interaction and facilitates p53 activation. PMID:23405218

  13. Differential regulation of DNA damage response activation between somatic and germline cells in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Vermezovic, J; Stergiou, L; Hengartner, M O; d'Adda di Fagagna, F

    2012-01-01

    The germline of Caenorhabditis elegans is a well-established model for DNA damage response (DDR) studies. However, the molecular basis of the observed cell death resistance in the soma of these animals remains unknown. We established a set of techniques to study ionizing radiation-induced DNA damage generation and DDR activation in a whole intact worm. Our single-cell analyses reveal that, although germline and somatic cells show similar levels of inflicted DNA damage, somatic cells, differently from germline cells, do not activate the crucial apical DDR kinase ataxia-telengiectasia mutated (ATM). We also show that DDR signaling proteins are undetectable in all somatic cells and this is due to transcriptional repression. However, DNA repair genes are expressed and somatic cells retain the ability to efficiently repair DNA damage. Finally, we demonstrate that germline cells, when induced to transdifferentiate into somatic cells within the gonad, lose the ability to activate ATM. Overall, these observations provide a molecular mechanism for the known, but hitherto unexplained, resistance to DNA damage-induced cell death in C. elegans somatic cells. We propose that the observed lack of signaling and cell death but retention of DNA repair functions in the soma is a Caenorhabditis-specific evolutionary-selected strategy to cope with its lack of adult somatic stem cell pools and regenerative capacity. PMID:22705849

  14. Ku70 Serine 155 mediates Aurora B inhibition and activation of the DNA damage response

    PubMed Central

    Fell, Victoria L.; Walden, Elizabeth A.; Hoffer, Sarah M.; Rogers, Stephanie R.; Aitken, Amelia S.; Salemi, Louisa M.; Schild-Poulter, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    The Ku heterodimer (Ku70/Ku80) is the central DNA binding component of the classical non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) pathway that repairs DNA double-stranded breaks (DSBs), serving as the scaffold for the formation of the NHEJ complex. Here we show that Ku70 is phosphorylated on Serine 155 in response to DNA damage. Expression of Ku70 bearing a S155 phosphomimetic substitution (Ku70 S155D) in Ku70-deficient mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) triggered cell cycle arrest at multiple checkpoints and altered expression of several cell cycle regulators in absence of DNA damage. Cells expressing Ku70 S155D exhibited a constitutive DNA damage response, including ATM activation, H2AX phosphorylation and 53BP1 foci formation. Ku70 S155D was found to interact with Aurora B and to have an inhibitory effect on Aurora B kinase activity. Lastly, we demonstrate that Ku and Aurora B interact following ionizing radiation treatment and that Aurora B inhibition in response to DNA damage is dependent upon Ku70 S155 phosphorylation. This uncovers a new pathway where Ku may relay signaling to Aurora B to enforce cell cycle arrest in response to DNA damage. PMID:27849008

  15. DNA Damage-induced Heterogeneous Nuclear Ribonucleoprotein K SUMOylation Regulates p53 Transcriptional Activation*

    PubMed Central

    Pelisch, Federico; Pozzi, Berta; Risso, Guillermo; Muñoz, Manuel Javier; Srebrow, Anabella

    2012-01-01

    Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) K is a nucleocytoplasmic shuttling protein that is a key player in the p53-triggered DNA damage response, acting as a cofactor for p53 in response to DNA damage. hnRNP K is a substrate of the ubiquitin E3 ligase MDM2 and, upon DNA damage, is de-ubiquitylated. In sharp contrast with the role and consequences of the other post-translational modifications, nothing is known about the role of SUMO conjugation to hnRNP K in p53 transcriptional co-activation. In the present work, we show that hnRNP K is modified by SUMO in lysine 422 within its KH3 domain, and sumoylation is regulated by the E3 ligase Pc2/CBX4. Most interestingly, DNA damage stimulates hnRNP K sumoylation through Pc2 E3 activity, and this modification is required for p53 transcriptional activation. Abrogation of hnRNP K sumoylation leads to an aberrant regulation of the p53 target gene p21. Our findings link the DNA damage-induced Pc2 activation to the p53 transcriptional co-activation through hnRNP K sumoylation. PMID:22825850

  16. ERK kinases modulate the activation of PI3 kinase related kinases (PIKKs) in DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xiaozeng; Yan, Judy; Tang, Damu

    2013-12-01

    DNA damage response (DDR) is the critical surveillance mechanism in maintaining genome integrity. The mechanism activates checkpoints to prevent cell cycle progression in the presence of DNA lesions, and mediates lesion repair. DDR is coordinated by three apical PI3 kinase related kinases (PIKKs), including ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM), ATM- and Rad3-related (ATR), and DNA-PKcs (the catalytic subunit of the DNA dependent protein kinase). These kinases are activated in response to specific DNA damage or lesions, resulting in checkpoint activation and DNA lesion repair. While it is clear that the pathways of ATM, ATR, and DNA-PK are the core components of DDR, there is accumulating evidence revealing the involvement of other cellular pathways in regulating DDR; this is in line with the concept that in addition to being a nuclear event DDR is also a cellular process. One of these pathways is the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) pathway. ERK is a converging point of multiple signal transduction pathways involved in cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. Adding to this list of pathways is the recent development of ERK in DDR. The ERK kinases (ERK1 and ERK2) contribute to the proper execution of DDR in terms of checkpoint activation and the repair of DNA lesions. This review summarizes the contributions of ERK to DDR with emphasis on the relationship of ERK kinases with the activation of ATM, ATR, and DNA-PKcs.

  17. CUPRAC colorimetric and electroanalytical methods determining antioxidant activity based on prevention of oxidative DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Uzunboy, Seda; Çekiç, Sema Demirci; Eksin, Ece; Erdem, Arzum; Apak, Reşat

    2017-02-01

    An unbalanced excess of oxygen/nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) can give oxidative hazard to DNA and other biomacromolecules under oxidative stress conditions. While the 'comet' assay for measuring DNA damage is neither specific nor practical, monitoring oxidative changes on individual DNA bases and other oxidation products needs highly specialized equipment and operators. Thus, we developed a modified CUPRAC (cupric ion reducing antioxidant capacity) colorimetric method to determine the average total damage on DNA produced by Fenton oxidation, taking advantage of the fact that the degradation products of DNA but not the original macromolecule is CUPRAC-responsive. The DNA-protective effects of water-soluble antioxidants were used to devise a novel antioxidant activity assay, considered to be physiologically more realistic than those using artificial probes. Our method, based on the measurement of DNA oxidative products with CUPRAC colorimetry proved to be 2 orders-of-magnitude more sensitive than the widely used TBARS (thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances) colorimetric assay used as reference. Additionally, the DNA damage was electrochemically investigated using pencil graphite electrodes (PGEs) as DNA sensor platform in combination with differential pulse voltammetry (DPV). The interaction of the radical species with DNA in the absence/presence of antioxidants was detected according to the changes in guanine oxidation signal.

  18. A human cellular sequence implicated in trk oncogene activation is DNA damage inducible

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Ishai, R.; Scharf, R.; Sharon, R.; Kapten, I. )

    1990-08-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum cells, which are deficient in the repair of UV light-induced DNA damage, have been used to clone DNA-damage-inducible transcripts in human cells. The cDNA clone designated pC-5 hybridizes on RNA gel blots to a 1-kilobase transcript, which is moderately abundant in nontreated cells and whose synthesis is enhanced in human cells following UV irradiation or treatment with several other DNA-damaging agents. UV-enhanced transcription of C-5 RNA is transient and occurs at lower fluences and to a greater extent in DNA-repair-deficient than in DNA-repair-proficient cells. Southern blot analysis indicates that the C-5 gene belongs to a multigene family. A cDNA clone containing the complete coding sequence of C-5 was isolated. Sequence analysis revealed that it is homologous to a human cellular sequence encoding the amino-terminal activating sequence of the trk-2h chimeric oncogene. The presence of DNA-damage-responsive sequences at the 5' end of a chimeric oncogene could result in enhanced expression of the oncogene in response to carcinogens.

  19. Alcohol metabolism in human cells causes DNA damage and activates the Fanconi anemia – breast cancer susceptibility (FA-BRCA) DNA damage response network

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, Jessy; Balbo, Silvia; Crabb, David; Brooks, P.J.

    2011-01-01

    Background We recently reported that exposure of human cells in vitro to acetaldehyde resulted in activation of the Fanconi anemia-breast cancer associated (FA-BRCA) DNA damage response network. Methods To determine whether intracellular generation of acetaldehyde from ethanol metabolism can cause DNA damage and activate the FA-BRCA network, we engineered HeLa cells to metabolize alcohol by expression of human alcohol dehydrogenase 1B. Results Incubation of HeLa-ADH1B cells with ethanol (20 mM) resulted in acetaldehyde accumulation in the media which was prevented by co-incubation with 4-methyl pyrazole (4-MP), a specific inhibitor of ADH. Ethanol treatment of HeLa-ADH1B cells produced a 4-fold increase in the acetaldehyde-DNA adduct, N2-ethylidene-dGuo, and also resulted in activation of the Fanconi anemia -breast cancer susceptibility (FA-BRCA) DNA damage response network, as indicated by a monoubiquitination of FANCD2, and phosphorylation of BRCA1. Ser 1524 was identified as one site of BRCA1 phosphorylation. The increased levels of DNA adducts, FANCD2 monoubiquitination, and BRCA1 phosphorylation were all blocked by 4-MP, indicating that acetaldehyde, rather than ethanol itself, was responsible for all three responses. Importantly, the ethanol concentration we used is within the range that can be attained in the human body during social drinking. Conclusions Our results indicate that intracellular metabolism of ethanol to acetaldehyde results in DNA damage which activates the FA-BRCA DNA damage response network. PMID:21919919

  20. N-nitroso-N-ethylurea activates DNA damage surveillance pathways and induces transformation in mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The DNA damage checkpoint signalling cascade sense damaged DNA and coordinates cell cycle arrest, DNA repair, and/or apoptosis. However, it is still not well understood how the signalling system differentiates between different kinds of DNA damage. N-nitroso-N-ethylurea (NEU), a DNA ethylating agent induces both transversions and transition mutations. Methods Immunoblot and comet assays were performed to detect DNA breaks and activation of the canonical checkpoint signalling kinases following NEU damage upto 2 hours. To investigate whether mismatch repair played a role in checkpoint activation, knock-down studies were performed while flow cytometry analysis was done to understand whether the activation of the checkpoint kinases was cell cycle phase specific. Finally, breast epithelial cells were grown as 3-dimensional spheroid cultures to study whether NEU can induce upregulation of vimentin as well as disrupt cell polarity of the breast acini, thus causing transformation of epithelial cells in culture. Results We report a novel finding that NEU causes activation of major checkpoint signalling kinases, Chk1 and Chk2. This activation is temporally controlled with Chk2 activation preceding Chk1 phosphorylation, and absence of cross talk between the two parallel signalling pathways, ATM and ATR. Damage caused by NEU leads to the temporal formation of both double strand and single strand breaks. Activation of checkpoints following NEU damage is cell cycle phase dependent wherein Chk2 is primarily activated during G2-M phase whilst in S phase, there is immediate Chk1 phosphorylation and delayed Chk2 response. Surprisingly, the mismatch repair system does not play a role in checkpoint activation, at doses and duration of NEU used in the experiments. Interestingly, NEU caused disruption of the well-formed polarised spheroid archithecture and upregulation of vimentin in three-dimensional breast acini cultures of non-malignant breast epithelial cells upon NEU

  1. Monitoring the Activation of the DNA Damage Response Pathway in a 3D Spheroid Model.

    PubMed

    Mondesert, Odile; Frongia, Céline; Clayton, Olivia; Boizeau, Marie-Laure; Lobjois, Valérie; Ducommun, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    Monitoring the DNA-Damage Response (DDR) activated pathway in multicellular tumor spheroid models is an important challenge as these 3D models have demonstrated their major relevance in pharmacological evaluation. Herein we present DDR-Act-FP, a fluorescent biosensor that allows detection of DDR activation through monitoring of the p21 promoter p53-dependent activation. We show that cells expressing the DDR-Act-FP biosensor efficiently report activation of the DDR pathway after DNA damage and its pharmacological manipulation using ATM kinase inhibitors. We also report the successful use of this assay to screen a small compound library in order to identify activators of the DDR response. Finally, using multicellular spheroids expressing the DDR-Act-FP we demonstrate that DDR activation and its pharmacological manipulation with inhibitory and activatory compounds can be efficiently monitored in live 3D spheroid model. This study paves the way for the development of innovative screening and preclinical evaluation assays.

  2. Activation of DNA damage repair pathways in response to nitrogen mustard-induced DNA damage and toxicity in skin keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Inturi, Swetha; Tewari-Singh, Neera; Agarwal, Chapla; White, Carl W; Agarwal, Rajesh

    2014-01-01

    Nitrogen mustard (NM), a structural analog of chemical warfare agent sulfur mustard (SM), forms adducts and crosslinks with DNA, RNA and proteins. Here we studied the mechanism of NM-induced skin toxicity in response to double strand breaks (DSBs) resulting in cell cycle arrest to facilitate DNA repair, as a model for developing countermeasures against vesicant-induced skin injuries. NM exposure of mouse epidermal JB6 cells decreased cell growth and caused S-phase arrest. Consistent with these biological outcomes, NM exposure also increased comet tail extent moment and the levels of DNA DSB repair molecules phospho H2A.X Ser139 and p53 Ser15 indicating NM-induced DNA DSBs. Since DNA DSB repair occurs via non homologous end joining pathway (NHEJ) or homologous recombination repair (HRR) pathways, next we studied these two pathways and noted their activation as defined by an increase in phospho- and total DNA-PK levels, and the formation of Rad51 foci, respectively. To further analyze the role of these pathways in the cellular response to NM-induced cytotoxicity, NHEJ and HRR were inhibited by DNA-PK inhibitor NU7026 and Rad51 inhibitor BO2, respectively. Inhibition of NHEJ did not sensitize cells to NM-induced decrease in cell growth and cell cycle arrest. However, inhibition of the HRR pathway caused a significant increase in cell death, and prolonged G2M arrest following NM exposure. Together, our findings, indicating that HRR is the key pathway involved in the repair of NM-induced DNA DSBs, could be useful in developing new therapeutic strategies against vesicant-induced skin injury.

  3. Maximiscin Induces DNA Damage, Activates DNA Damage Response Pathways, and Has Selective Cytotoxic Activity against a Subtype of Triple-Negative Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Robles, Andrew J; Du, Lin; Cichewicz, Robert H; Mooberry, Susan L

    2016-07-22

    Triple-negative breast cancers are highly aggressive, and patients with these types of tumors have poor long-term survival. These breast cancers do not express estrogen or progesterone receptors and do not have gene amplification of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2; therefore, they do not respond to available targeted therapies. The lack of targeted therapies for triple-negative breast cancers stems from their heterogeneous nature and lack of a clear definition of driver defects. Studies have recently identified triple-negative breast cancer molecular subtypes based on gene expression profiling and representative cell lines, allowing for the identification of subtype-specific drug leads and molecular targets. We previously reported the identification of a new fungal metabolite named maximiscin (1) identified through a crowdsourcing program. New results show that 1 has selective cytotoxic efficacy against basal-like 1 MDA-MB-468 cells compared to cell lines modeling other triple-negative breast cancer molecular subtypes. This compound also exhibited antitumor efficacy in a xenograft mouse model. The mechanisms of action of 1 in MDA-MB-468 cells were investigated to identify potential molecular targets and affected pathways. Compound 1 caused accumulation of cells in the G1 phase of the cell cycle, suggesting induction of DNA damage. Indeed, treatment with 1 caused DNA double-strand breaks with concomitant activation of the DNA damage response pathways, indicated by phosphorylation of p53, Chk1, and Chk2. Collectively, these results suggest basal-like triple-negative breast cancer may be inherently sensitive to DNA-damaging agents relative to other triple-negative breast cancer subtypes. These results also demonstrate the potential of our citizen crowdsourcing program to identify new lead molecules for treating the subtypes of triple-negative breast cancer.

  4. DNA damage and estrogenic activity induced by the environmental pollutant 2-nitrotoluene and its metabolite

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Chigusa; Egami, Takashi; Midorikawa, Kaoru; Hiraku, Yusuke; Oikawa, Shinji; Kawanishi, Shosuke

    2010-01-01

    Objectives The environmental pollutant 2-nitrotoluene (2-NO2-T) is carcinogenic and reproductively toxic in animals. In this study, we elucidated the mechanisms of its carcinogenicity and reproductive toxicity. Methods We examined DNA damage induced by 2-NO2-T and its metabolite, 2-nitrosotoluene (2-NO-T), using 32P-5′-end-labeled DNA. We measured 8-oxo-7, 8-dihydro-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG), an indicator of oxidative DNA damage, in calf thymus DNA and cellular DNA in cultured human leukemia (HL-60) cells treated with 2-NO2-T and 2-NO-T. 8-Oxoguanine DNA glycosylase (OGG1) gene expression in HL-60 cells was measured by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). We examined estrogenic activity using an E-screen assay and a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensor. Results In experiments with isolated DNA fragments, 2-NO-T induced oxidative DNA damage in the presence of Cu (II) and β-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide disodium salt (reduced form) (NADH), while 2-NO2-T did not. 2-NO-T significantly increased levels of 8-oxodG in HL-60 cells. Real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis revealed upregulation of OGG1 gene expression induced by 2-NO-T. An E-screen assay using the human breast cancer cell line MCF-7 revealed that 2-NO2-T induced estrogen-dependent cell proliferation. In contrast, 2-NO-T decreased the cell number and suppressed 17β-estradiol-induced cell proliferation. The data obtained with the SPR sensor using estrogen receptor α and the estrogen response element supported the results of the E-screen assay. Conclusions Oxidative DNA damage caused by 2-NO-T and estrogen-disrupting effects caused by 2-NO2-T and 2-NO-T may play a role in the reproductive toxicity and carcinogenicity of these entities. PMID:21432561

  5. DNA Damage and Repair in Vascular Disease.

    PubMed

    Uryga, Anna; Gray, Kelly; Bennett, Martin

    2016-01-01

    DNA damage affecting both genomic and mitochondrial DNA is present in a variety of both inherited and acquired vascular diseases. Multiple cell types show persistent DNA damage and a range of lesions. In turn, DNA damage activates a variety of DNA repair mechanisms, many of which are activated in vascular disease. Such DNA repair mechanisms either stall the cell cycle to allow repair to occur or trigger apoptosis or cell senescence to prevent propagation of damaged DNA. Recent evidence has indicated that DNA damage occurs early, is progressive, and is sufficient to impair function of cells composing the vascular wall. The consequences of persistent genomic and mitochondrial DNA damage, including inflammation, cell senescence, and apoptosis, are present in vascular disease. DNA damage can thus directly cause vascular disease, opening up new possibilities for both prevention and treatment. We review the evidence for and the causes, types, and consequences of DNA damage in vascular disease.

  6. Ubiquitin-SUMO circuitry controls activated fanconi anemia ID complex dosage in response to DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Gibbs-Seymour, Ian; Oka, Yasuyoshi; Rajendra, Eeson; Weinert, Brian T; Passmore, Lori A; Patel, Ketan J; Olsen, Jesper V; Choudhary, Chunaram; Bekker-Jensen, Simon; Mailand, Niels

    2015-01-08

    We show that central components of the Fanconi anemia (FA) DNA repair pathway, the tumor suppressor proteins FANCI and FANCD2 (the ID complex), are SUMOylated in response to replication fork stalling. The ID complex is SUMOylated in a manner that depends on the ATR kinase, the FA ubiquitin ligase core complex, and the SUMO E3 ligases PIAS1/PIAS4 and is antagonized by the SUMO protease SENP6. SUMOylation of the ID complex drives substrate selectivity by triggering its polyubiquitylation by the SUMO-targeted ubiquitin ligase RNF4 to promote its removal from sites of DNA damage via the DVC1-p97 ubiquitin segregase complex. Deregulation of ID complex SUMOylation compromises cell survival following replication stress. Our results uncover a regulatory role for SUMOylation in the FA pathway, and we propose that ubiquitin-SUMO signaling circuitry is a mechanism that contributes to the balance of activated ID complex dosage at sites of DNA damage.

  7. Mismatch Repair Proteins Are Activators of Toxic Responses to Chromium-DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Peterson-Roth, Elizabeth; Reynolds, Mindy; Quievryn, George; Zhitkovich, Anatoly

    2005-01-01

    Chromium(VI) is a toxic and carcinogenic metal that causes the formation of DNA phosphate-based adducts. Cr-DNA adducts are genotoxic in human cells, although they do not block replication in vitro. Here, we report that induction of cytotoxicity in Cr(VI)-treated human colon cells and mouse embryonic fibroblasts requires the presence of all major mismatch repair (MMR) proteins. Cr-DNA adducts lost their ability to block replication of Cr-modified plasmids in human colon cells lacking MLH1 protein. The presence of functional mismatch repair caused induction of p53-independent apoptosis associated with activation of caspases 2 and 7. Processing of Cr-DNA damage by mismatch repair resulted in the extensive formation of γ-H2AX foci in G2 phase, indicating generation of double-stranded breaks as secondary toxic lesions. Induction of γ-H2AX foci was observed at 6 to 12 h postexposure, which was followed by activation of apoptosis in the absence of significant G2 arrest. Our results demonstrate that mismatch repair system triggers toxic responses to Cr-DNA backbone modifications through stress mechanisms that are significantly different from those for other forms of DNA damage. Selection for Cr(VI) resistant, MMR-deficient cells may explain the very high frequency of lung cancers with microsatellite instability among chromate workers. PMID:15831465

  8. YAP activation protects urothelial cell carcinoma from treatment-induced DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Ciamporcero, Eric; Shen, He; Ramakrishnan, Swathi; Ku, Sheng Yu; Chintala, Sreenivasulu; Shen, Li; Adelaiye, Remi; Miles, Kiersten Marie; Ullio, Chiara; Pizzimenti, Stefania; Daga, Martina; Azabdaftari, Gissou; Attwood, Kris; Johnson, Candace; Zhang, Jianmin; Barrera, Giuseppina; Pili, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Current standard of care for muscle-invasive urothelial cell carcinoma (UCC) is surgery along with perioperative platinum-based chemotherapy. UCC is sensitive to cisplatin-based regimens, but acquired resistance eventually occurs, and a subset of tumors is intrinsically resistant. Thus, there is an unmet need for new therapeutic approaches to target chemotherapy-resistant UCC. Yes-associated protein (YAP) is a transcriptional co-activator that has been associated with bladder cancer progression and cisplatin resistance in ovarian cancer. In contrast, YAP has been shown to induce DNA damage associated apoptosis in non-small cell lung carcinoma. However, no data have been reported on the YAP role in UCC chemo-resistance. Thus, we have investigated the potential dichotomous role of YAP in UCC response to chemotherapy utilizing two patient-derived xenograft models recently established. Constitutive expression and activation of YAP inversely correlated with in vitro and in vivo cisplatin sensitivity. YAP overexpression protected while YAP knock-down sensitized UCC cells to chemotherapy and radiation effects via increased accumulation of DNA damage and apoptosis. Furthermore, pharmacological YAP inhibition with verteporfin inhibited tumor cell proliferation and restored sensitivity to cisplatin. In addition, nuclear YAP expression was associated with poor outcome in UCC patients who received perioperative chemotherapy. In conclusion, these results suggest that YAP activation exerts a protective role and represents a pharmacological target to enhance the anti-tumor effects of DNA damaging modalities in the treatment of UCC. PMID:26119935

  9. Fhit loss in lung preneoplasia: relation to DNA damage response checkpoint activation

    PubMed Central

    Cirombella, Roberto; Montrone, Giuseppe; Stoppacciaro, Antonella; Giglio, Simona; Volinia, Stefano; Graziano, Paolo; Huebner, Kay; Vecchione, Andrea

    2009-01-01

    Loss of heterozygosity at the FHIT locus is coincident with activation of DNA damage response checkpoint proteins; thus damage at fragile loci may trigger checkpoint activation. We examined preneoplastic lesions adjacent to non-small cell lung carcinomas for alterations to expression of Fhit and activated checkpoint proteins. Expression scores were analyzed for pair-wise associations and correlations among proteins and type of lesion. Hyperplastic and dysplastic lesions were positive for nuclear H2AX expression; 12/20 dysplastic lesions were negative for Fhit expression. Fhit positive lesions showed expression of most checkpoint proteins examined, while Fhit negative lesions showed absence of expression of Chk1 and phosphoChk1. The results show that loss of expression of Fhit is significantly directly correlated with absence of activated Chk1 in dysplasia, and suggest a connection between loss of Fhit and modulation of checkpoint activity. PMID:19931269

  10. PARP activation regulates the RNA-binding protein NONO in the DNA damage response to DNA double-strand breaks.

    PubMed

    Krietsch, Jana; Caron, Marie-Christine; Gagné, Jean-Philippe; Ethier, Chantal; Vignard, Julien; Vincent, Michel; Rouleau, Michèle; Hendzel, Michael J; Poirier, Guy G; Masson, Jean-Yves

    2012-11-01

    After the generation of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) is one of the first proteins to be recruited and activated through its binding to the free DNA ends. Upon activation, PARP-1 uses NAD+ to generate large amounts of poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR), which facilitates the recruitment of DNA repair factors. Here, we identify the RNA-binding protein NONO, a partner protein of SFPQ, as a novel PAR-binding protein. The protein motif being primarily responsible for PAR-binding is the RNA recognition motif 1 (RRM1), which is also crucial for RNA-binding, highlighting a competition between RNA and PAR as they share the same binding site. Strikingly, the in vivo recruitment of NONO to DNA damage sites completely depends on PAR, generated by activated PARP-1. Furthermore, we show that upon PAR-dependent recruitment, NONO stimulates nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) and represses homologous recombination (HR) in vivo. Our results therefore place NONO after PARP activation in the context of DNA DSB repair pathway decision. Understanding the mechanism of action of proteins that act in the same pathway as PARP-1 is crucial to shed more light onto the effect of interference on PAR-mediated pathways with PARP inhibitors, which have already reached phase III clinical trials but are until date poorly understood.

  11. The single-strand DNA binding activity of human PC4 preventsmutagenesis and killing by oxidative DNA damage

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jen-Yeu; Sarker, Altaf Hossain; Cooper, Priscilla K.; Volkert, Michael R.

    2004-02-01

    Human positive cofactor 4 (PC4) is a transcriptional coactivator with a highly conserved single-strand DNA (ssDNA) binding domain of unknown function. We identified PC4 as a suppressor of the oxidative mutator phenotype of the Escherichia coli fpg mutY mutant and demonstrate that this suppression requires its ssDNA binding activity. Yeast mutants lacking their PC4 ortholog Sub1 are sensitive to hydrogen peroxide and exhibit spontaneous and peroxide induced hypermutability. PC4 expression suppresses the peroxide sensitivity of the yeast sub l{Delta} mutant, suggesting that the human protein has a similar function. A role for yeast and human proteins in DNA repair is suggested by the demonstration that Sub1 acts in a peroxide-resistance pathway involving Rad2 and by the physical interaction of PC4 with the human Rad2 homolog XPG. We show XPG recruits PC4 to a bubble-containing DNA substrate with resulting displacement of XPG and formation of a PC4-DNA complex. We discuss the possible requirement for PC4 in either global or transcription-coupled repair of oxidative DNA damage to mediate the release of XPG bound to its substrate.

  12. PTEN Activation by DNA Damage Induces Protective Autophagy in Response to Cucurbitacin B in Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Yanan; Sun, Wen; Lu, Jin-Jian; Pei, Lixia

    2016-01-01

    Cucurbitacin B (Cuc B), a natural product, induced both protective autophagy and DNA damage mediated by ROS while the detailed mechanisms remain unclear. This study explored the mechanism of Cuc B-induced DNA damage and autophagy. Cuc B decreased cell viability in concentration- and time-dependent manners. Cuc B caused long comet tails and increased expression of γ-H2AX, phosphorylation of ATM/ATR, and Chk1/Chk2. Cuc B induced autophagy as evidenced by monodansylcadaverine (MDC) staining, increased expression of LC3II, phosphorylated ULK1, and decreased expression of phosphorylated AKT, mTOR. Cuc B induced apoptosis mediated by Bcl-2 family proteins and caspase activation. Furthermore, Cuc B induced ROS formation, which was inhibited by N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC). NAC pretreatment dramatically reversed Cuc B-induced DNA damage, autophagy, and apoptosis. Cuc B-induced apoptosis was reversed by NAC but enhanced by 3-methyladenine (3-MA), chloroquine (CQ), and silencing phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN). 3-MA and CQ showed no effect on Cuc B-induced DNA damage. In addition, Cuc B increased PTEN phosphorylation and silence PTEN restored Cuc B-induced autophagic protein expressions without affecting DNA damage. In summary, Cuc B induced DNA damage, apoptosis, and protective autophagy mediated by ROS. PTEN activation in response to DNA damage bridged DNA damage and prosurvival autophagy. PMID:28042385

  13. Active destabilization of base pairs by a DNA glycosylase wedge initiates damage recognition.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsov, Nikita A; Bergonzo, Christina; Campbell, Arthur J; Li, Haoquan; Mechetin, Grigory V; de los Santos, Carlos; Grollman, Arthur P; Fedorova, Olga S; Zharkov, Dmitry O; Simmerling, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Formamidopyrimidine-DNA glycosylase (Fpg) excises 8-oxoguanine (oxoG) from DNA but ignores normal guanine. We combined molecular dynamics simulation and stopped-flow kinetics with fluorescence detection to track the events in the recognition of oxoG by Fpg and its mutants with a key phenylalanine residue, which intercalates next to the damaged base, changed to either alanine (F110A) or fluorescent reporter tryptophan (F110W). Guanine was sampled by Fpg, as evident from the F110W stopped-flow traces, but less extensively than oxoG. The wedgeless F110A enzyme could bend DNA but failed to proceed further in oxoG recognition. Modeling of the base eversion with energy decomposition suggested that the wedge destabilizes the intrahelical base primarily through buckling both surrounding base pairs. Replacement of oxoG with abasic (AP) site rescued the activity, and calculations suggested that wedge insertion is not required for AP site destabilization and eversion. Our results suggest that Fpg, and possibly other DNA glycosylases, convert part of the binding energy into active destabilization of their substrates, using the energy differences between normal and damaged bases for fast substrate discrimination.

  14. Regulation of zygotic genome activation and DNA damage checkpoint acquisition at the mid-blastula transition

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Maomao; Kothari, Priyanka; Mullins, Mary; Lampson, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    Following fertilization, oviparous embryos undergo rapid, mostly transcriptionally silent cleavage divisions until the mid-blastula transition (MBT), when large-scale developmental changes occur, including zygotic genome activation (ZGA) and cell cycle remodeling, via lengthening and checkpoint acquisition. Despite their concomitant appearance, whether these changes are co-regulated is unclear. Three models have been proposed to account for the timing of (ZGA). One model implicates a threshold nuclear to cytoplasmic (N:C) ratio, another stresses the importance cell cycle elongation, while the third model invokes a timer mechanism. We show that precocious Chk1 activity in pre-MBT zebrafish embryos elongates cleavage cycles, thereby slowing the increase in the N:C ratio. We find that cell cycle elongation does not lead to transcriptional activation. Rather, ZGA slows in parallel with the N:C ratio. We show further that the DNA damage checkpoint program is maternally supplied and independent of ZGA. Although pre-MBT embryos detect damage and activate Chk2 after induction of DNA double-strand breaks, the Chk1 arm of the DNA damage response is not activated, and the checkpoint is nonfunctional. Our results are consistent with the N:C ratio model for ZGA. Moreover, the ability of precocious Chk1 activity to delay pre-MBT cell cycles indicate that lack of Chk1 activity limits checkpoint function during cleavage cycles. We propose that Chk1 gain-of-function at the MBT underlies cell cycle remodeling, whereas ZGA is regulated independently by the N:C ratio. PMID:25558827

  15. CHK1 and RAD51 activation after DNA damage is regulated via urokinase receptor/TLR4 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Narayanaswamy, Pavan B; Tkachuk, Sergey; Haller, Hermann; Dumler, Inna; Kiyan, Yulia

    2016-01-01

    Mechanisms of DNA damage and repair signaling are not completely understood that hinder the efficiency of cancer therapy. Urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (PLAUR) is highly expressed in most solid cancers and serves as a marker of poor prognosis. We show that PLAUR actively promotes DNA repair in cancer cells. On the contrary, downregulation of PLAUR expression results in delayed DNA repair. We found PLAUR to be essential for activation of Checkpoint kinase 1 (CHK1); maintenance of cell cycle arrest after DNA damage in a TP53-dependent manner; expression, nuclear import and recruitment to DNA-damage foci of RAD51 recombinase, the principal protein involved in the homologous recombination repair pathway. Underlying mechanism implies auto-/paracrine signaling of PLAUR/TLR4 receptor complex leading to activation of CHK1 and DNA repair. The signaling is induced by a danger molecule released by DNA-damaged cells and mediates, at least partially, activation of DNA-damage response. This study describes a new mechanism of DNA repair activation initiated by auto-/paracrine signaling of membrane receptors PLAUR/TLR4. It adds to the understanding of role of PLAUR in cancer and provides a rationale for therapeutic targeting of PLAUR/TLR4 interaction in TP53-positive cancers. PMID:27685627

  16. Shape-dependent bactericidal activity of copper oxide nanoparticle mediated by DNA and membrane damage

    SciTech Connect

    Laha, Dipranjan; Pramanik, Arindam; Laskar, Aparna; Jana, Madhurya; Pramanik, Panchanan; Karmakar, Parimal

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • Spherical and sheet shaped copper oxide nanoparticles were synthesized. • Physical characterizations of these nanoparticles were done by TEM, DLS, XRD, FTIR. • They showed shape dependent antibacterial activity on different bacterial strain. • They induced both membrane damage and ROS mediated DNA damage in bacteria. - Abstract: In this work, we synthesized spherical and sheet shaped copper oxide nanoparticles and their physical characterizations were done by the X-ray diffraction, fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering. The antibacterial activity of these nanoparticles was determined on both gram positive and gram negative bacterial. Spherical shaped copper oxide nanoparticles showed more antibacterial property on gram positive bacteria where as sheet shaped copper oxide nanoparticles are more active on gram negative bacteria. We also demonstrated that copper oxide nanoparticles produced reactive oxygen species in both gram negative and gram positive bacteria. Furthermore, they induced membrane damage as determined by atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Thus production of and membrane damage are major mechanisms of the bactericidal activity of these copper oxide nanoparticles. Finally it was concluded that antibacterial activity of nanoparticles depend on physicochemical properties of copper oxide nanoparticles and bacterial strain.

  17. Autophagy in DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Czarny, Piotr; Pawlowska, Elzbieta; Bialkowska-Warzecha, Jolanta; Kaarniranta, Kai; Blasiak, Janusz

    2015-01-23

    DNA damage response (DDR) involves DNA repair, cell cycle regulation and apoptosis, but autophagy is also suggested to play a role in DDR. Autophagy can be activated in response to DNA-damaging agents, but the exact mechanism underlying this activation is not fully understood, although it is suggested that it involves the inhibition of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1). mTORC1 represses autophagy via phosphorylation of the ULK1/2-Atg13-FIP200 complex thus preventing maturation of pre-autophagosomal structures. When DNA damage occurs, it is recognized by some proteins or their complexes, such as poly(ADP)ribose polymerase 1 (PARP-1), Mre11-Rad50-Nbs1 (MRN) complex or FOXO3, which activate repressors of mTORC1. SQSTM1/p62 is one of the proteins whose levels are regulated via autophagic degradation. Inhibition of autophagy by knockout of FIP200 results in upregulation of SQSTM1/p62, enhanced DNA damage and less efficient damage repair. Mitophagy, one form of autophagy involved in the selective degradation of mitochondria, may also play role in DDR. It degrades abnormal mitochondria and can either repress or activate apoptosis, but the exact mechanism remains unknown. There is a need to clarify the role of autophagy in DDR, as this process may possess several important biomedical applications, involving also cancer therapy.

  18. Antioxidant Activity and Protection from DNA Damage by Water Extract from Pine (Pinus densiflora) Bark.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yunyao; Han, Woong; Shen, Ting; Wang, Myeong-Hyeon

    2012-06-01

    Water extract from Pinus densiflora (WPD) was investigated for its antioxidant activity and its ability to provide protection from DNA damage. A series of antioxidant assays, including a 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) free radical-scavenging assay, a reducing power assay, a metal-chelating assay, a superoxide radical scavenging assay, and a nitrite scavenging ability, as well as a DNA damage protection assay were performed. Total phenolic content was found to be 211.32 mg Tan/g WPD. The extract scavenged 50% DPPH free radical at a concentration of 21.35 μg/mL. At that same concentration, the reducing power ability of WPD was higher than that of α-tocopherol. The extract chelated 68.9% ferrous ion at the concentration of 4 mg/mL. WPD showed better nitrite scavenging effect at the lower pH. Meanwhile, WPD exhibited a strong capability for DNA damage protection at 1 mg/mL concentration. Taken together, these data suggest water extract from Pinus densiflora could be used as a suitable natural antioxidant.

  19. All-trans-retinal induces Bax activation via DNA damage to mediate retinal cell apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Sawada, Osamu; Perusek, Lindsay; Kohno, Hideo; Howell, Scott J.; Maeda, Akiko; Matsuyama, Shigemi; Maeda, Tadao

    2014-01-01

    The current study investigates the cellular events which trigger activation of proapoptotic Bcl-2-associated X protein (Bax) in retinal cell death induced by all-trans-retinal (atRAL). Cellular events which activate Bax, such as DNA damage by oxidative stress and phosphorylation of p53, were evaluated by immunochemical and biochemical methods using ARPE-19 cells, 661W cells, cultured neural retinas and a retinal degeneration model, Abca4−/−Rdh8−/− mice. atRAL-induced Bax activation in cultured neural retinas was examined by pharmacological and genetic methods. Other Bax-related cellular events were also evaluated by pharmacological and biochemical methods. Production of 8-OHdG, a DNA damage indicator, and the phosphorylation of p53 at Ser 46 were detected prior to Bax activation in ARPE-19 cells incubated with atRAL. Light exposure to Abca4−/−Rdh8−/− mice also caused the above mentioned events in conditions of short term intense light exposure and regular room lighting conditions. Incubation with Bax inhibiting peptide and deletion of the Bax gene partially protected retinal cells from atRAL toxicity in cultured neural retina. Necrosis was demonstrated not to be the main pathway in atRAL mediated cell death. Bcl-2-interacting mediator and Bcl-2 expression levels were not altered by atRAL in vitro. atRAL-induced oxidative stress results in DNA damage leading to the activation of Bax by phosphorylated p53. This cascade is closely associated with an apoptotic cell death mechanism rather than necrosis. PMID:24726920

  20. High-content fluorescent-based assay for screening activators of DNA damage checkpoint pathways.

    PubMed

    Bin Zhang; Xiubin Gu; Uppalapati, Uma; Ashwell, Mark A; Leggett, David S; Li, Chiang J

    2008-07-01

    Activation of DNA damage checkpoint pathways, including Chk2, serves as an anticancer barrier in precancerous lesions. In an effort to identify small-molecule activators of Chk2, the authors developed a quantitative cell-based assay using a high-content analysis (HCA) platform. Induction of phosphorylated Chk2 was evaluated using several different parameters, including fold induction, Kolmogorov-Smirnov score, and percentage of positively stained cells. These measurements were highly correlated and provided an accurate method for compound ranking/binning, structure-activity relationship studies, and lead identification. Screening for Chk2 activators was undertaken with a target-focused library and a diversified library from ArQule chemical space. Several compounds exhibited submicromolar EC( 50) values for phosphorylated Chk2 induction. These compounds were further analyzed for Chk2-dependent cytotoxicity, as assessed through a high-content cell death assay in combination with siRNA silencing of Chk2 expression. Several compounds were identified and showed specific inhibition or lethality in a target-dependent manner. Therefore, identification of DNA damage checkpoint pathway activators by HCA is an attractive approach for discovering the next generation of targeted cancer therapeutics.

  1. DNA damage induces N-acetyltransferase NAT10 gene expression through transcriptional activation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Haijing; Ling, Yun; Gong, Yilei; Sun, Ying; Hou, Lin; Zhang, Bo

    2007-06-01

    NAT10 (N-acetyltransferase 10) is a protein with histone acetylation activity and primarily identified to be involved in regulation of telomerase activity. The presented research shows its transcriptional activation by genotoxic agents and possible role in DNA damage. NAT10 mRNA could be markedly increased by using hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) or cisplatin in a dose- and time-dependent way, and the immunofluorescent staining revealed that the treatment of H2O2 or cisplatin induced focal accumulation of NAT10 protein in cellular nuclei. Both H2O2 and cisplatin could stimulate the transcriptional activity of the NAT10 promoter through the upstream sequences from -615 bp to +110 bp, with which some nuclear proteins interacted. Ectopic expression of NAT10 could enhance the number of survival cells in the presence of H2O2 or cisplatin. The above results suggested that NAT10 could be involved in DNA damage response and increased cellular resistance to genotoxicity.

  2. A DNA damage signal is required for p53 to activate gadd45.

    PubMed

    Xiao, G; Chicas, A; Olivier, M; Taya, Y; Tyagi, S; Kramer, F R; Bargonetti, J

    2000-03-15

    We provide direct evidence that overexpression of p53 is not sufficient for robust p53-dependent activation of the endogenous gadd45 gene. When p53 was induced in TR9-7 cells in the absence of DNA damage, waf1/p21 and mdm2 mRNA levels were increased, but a change in gadd45 mRNA was barely detectable. Activation of the gadd45 gene was observed when camptothecin was added to cells containing p53 in the absence of a further increase in the p53 level. Phosphorylation of p53 at serine 15 and acetylation at lysine 382 were detected after drug treatment. It has been suggested that p53 posttranslational modification is critical during activation. However, inhibition of these modifications by wortmannin was not sufficient to block the transactivation of gadd45. Interestingly, after camptothecin treatment, increased DNase I sensitivity was detected at the gadd45 promoter, suggesting that an undetermined DNA damage signal is involved in inducing chromatin remodeling at the gadd45 promoter while cooperating with p53 to activate gadd45 transcription.

  3. Determination of DNA damage and telomerase activity in stanozolol-treated rats

    PubMed Central

    Kara, Mehtap; Ozcagli, Eren; Fragkiadaki, Persefoni; Kotil, Tugba; Stivaktakis, Polychronis D.; Spandidos, Demetrios A.; Tsatsakis, Aristides M.; Alpertunga, Buket

    2017-01-01

    Anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) are performance-enhancing drugs commonly abused by atheletes. Stanozolol is a synthetic testosterone-derived anabolic steroid. Although it is well known that AAS have several side-effects, there are only few toxicological studies available on the toxic effects and mechanisms of action of stanozolol. The aim of this study was to investigate the genotoxic effects of stanozolol and to determine its effects on telomerase activity in Sprague-Dawley male rats. For this purpose, 34 male rats were divided into 5 groups as follows: i) the control group (n=5); ii) the propylene glycol (PG)-treated group (n=5); iii) the stanozolol-treated group (n=8); iv) the PG-treated group subjected to exercise (n=8); and v) the stanozolol-treated group subjected to exercise (n=8). PG is used as a solvent control in our study. Stanozolol (5 mg/kg) and PG (1 ml/kg) were injected subcutaneously 5 days/week for 28 days. After 28 days, the animals were sacrificed, and DNA damage evaluation (comet assay) and telomerase activity assays were then performed using peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Telomerase activity was measured by using the TeloTAGGG Telomerase PCR ELISA PLUS kit. The results of this study revealed that stanozolol treatment induced DNA damage, while exercise exerted a protective effect. Stanozolol treatment without exercise stimulation was associated with a significant increase in telomerase activity in the PBMCs. PMID:28352339

  4. Prevention of DNA damage and anticarcinogenic activity of Activia(®) in a preclinical model.

    PubMed

    Limeiras, S M A; Ogo, F M; Genez, L A L; Carreira, C M; Oliveira, E J T; Pessatto, L R; Neves, S C; Pesarini, J R; Schweich, L C; Silva, R A; Cantero, W B; Antoniolli-Silva, A C M B; Oliveira, R J

    2017-03-22

    Colorectal cancer is a global public health issue. Studies have pointed to the protective effect of probiotics on colorectal carcinogenesis. Activia(®) is a lacto probiotic product that is widely consumed all over the world and its beneficial properties are related, mainly, to the lineage of traditional yoghurt bacteria combined with a specific bacillus, DanRegularis, which gives the product a proven capacity to intestinal regulation in humans. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antigenotoxic, antimutagenic, and anticarcinogenic proprieties of the Activia product, in response to damage caused by 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH) in Swiss mice. Activia does not have shown antigenotoxic activity. However, the percent of DNA damage reduction, evaluated by the antimutagenicity assay, ranged from 69.23 to 96.15% indicating effective chemopreventive action. Activia reduced up to 79.82% the induction of aberrant crypt foci by DMH. Facing the results, it is inferred that Activia facilitates the weight loss, prevents DNA damage and pre-cancerous lesions in the intestinal mucosa.

  5. Biological Clues to Potent DNA-Damaging Activities in Food and Flavoring

    PubMed Central

    Hossain, M. Zulfiquer; Gilbert, Samuel F.; Patel, Kalpesh; Ghosh, Soma; Bhunia, Anil K.; Kern, Scott E.

    2013-01-01

    Population differences in age-related diseases and cancer could stem from differences in diet. To characterize DNA strand-breaking activities in selected foods/beverages, flavorings, and some of their constituent chemicals, we used p53R cells, a cellular assay sensitive to such breaks. Substances testing positive included reference chemicals: quinacrine (peak response, 51X) and etoposide (33X); flavonoids: EGCG (19X), curcumin (12X), apigenin (9X), and quercetin (7X); beverages: chamomile (11X), green (21X), and black tea (26X) and coffee (3 to 29X); and liquid smoke (4 to 28X). Damage occurred at dietary concentrations: etoposide near 5 μg/ml produced responses similar to a 1:1000 dilution of liquid smoke, a 1:20 dilution of coffee, and a 1:5 dilution of tea. Pyrogallol-related chemicals and tannins are present in dietary sources and individually produced strong activity: pyrogallol (30X), 3-methoxycatechol (25X), gallic acid (21X), and 1,2,4-benzenetriol (21X). From structure-activity relationships, high activities depended on specific orientations of hydroxyls on the benzene ring. Responses accompanied cellular signals characteristic of DNA breaks such as H2AX phosphorylation. Breaks were also directly detected by comet assay. Cellular toxicological effects of foods and flavorings could guide epidemiologic and experimental studies of potential disease risks from DNA strand-breaking chemicals in diets. PMID:23402862

  6. The effects of a wheat germ rich diet on oxidative mtDNA damage, mtDNA copy number and antioxidant enzyme activities in aging Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Mutlu, Ayse Gul

    2013-03-01

    The free radical theory of aging posits that the accumulation of macromolecular damage induced by toxic reactive oxygen species plays a central role in the aging process. Therefore consumption of dietary antioxidants appears to be of great importance. Wheat germ have strong antioxidant properties. Aim of this study is investigate the effects of a wheat germ rich diet on oxidative mtDNA damage, mtDNA copy number and antioxidant enzyme activities in Drosophila. Current results suggested that dietary wheat germ enhances the activities of antioxidant enzymes in Drosophila. There was no statistically difference in mtDNA damage and mtDNA copy number results of "Wheat Germ" and "Refined White Flour" feed groups. mtDNA damage slightly increased with aging in both groups but these changes were no statistically different.

  7. L-Serine deaminase activity is induced by exposure of Escherichia coli K-12 to DNA-damaging agents.

    PubMed Central

    Newman, E B; Ahmad, D; Walker, C

    1982-01-01

    The synthesis of L-serine deaminase in Escherichia coli K-12 was induced after exposure of cells to a variety of DNA-damaging agents, including UV irradiation, nalidixic acid, and mitomycin C. Synthesis was also induced during growth at high temperature. A mutant constitutive for SOS functions showed an elevated level of L-serine deaminase activity. The response to DNA-damaging agents thus may be mediated via the SOS system. PMID:6813312

  8. Phenolic profile, antioxidant potential and DNA damage protecting activity of sugarcane (Saccharum officinarum).

    PubMed

    Abbas, Syed Rizwan; Sabir, Syed Mubashar; Ahmad, Syed Dilnawaz; Boligon, Aline Augusti; Athayde, Margareth Linde

    2014-03-15

    The present study investigated the antioxidant and phenolic composition of sugarcane. The leaves and juices of thirteen varieties of sugarcane were studied for their antioxidant activity and protective effect on DNA damage. 2,2-Diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical (DPPH) assay was used to determine the radical scavenging activities in leaves and juices. Different varieties of sugarcane showed good antioxidant properties, IC50 values ranged from 20.82 to 27.47 μg/ml for leaves and from 63.95 to higher than 200 μg/ml for juice. The leaves and juice possess strong ability to protect against DNA damage induced by hydroxyl radical generated in Fenton reaction. The major phenolic acids, some flavonoid aglycone and glycosides were identified in leaves by high performance liquid chromatography. Ferulic acid (14.63 ± 0.03 mg/g), cumaric acid (11.65 ± 0.03 mg/g), quercetrin (10.96 ± 0.02 mg/g), caffeic acid (9.16 ± 0.01 mg/g) and ellagic acid (9.03 ± 0.02 mg/g) were prédominant in infusion of sugarcane.

  9. Prion-induced neurotoxicity: Possible role for cell cycle activity and DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Bujdoso, Raymond; Landgraf, Matthias; Jackson, Walker S; Thackray, Alana M

    2015-08-12

    Protein misfolding neurodegenerative diseases arise through neurotoxicity induced by aggregation of host proteins. These conditions include Alzheimer's disease, Huntington's disease, Parkinson's disease, motor neuron disease, tauopathies and prion diseases. Collectively, these conditions are a challenge to society because of the increasing aged population and through the real threat to human food security by animal prion diseases. It is therefore important to understand the cellular and molecular mechanisms that underlie protein misfolding-induced neurotoxicity as this will form the basis for designing strategies to alleviate their burden. Prion diseases are an important paradigm for neurodegenerative conditions in general since several of these maladies have now been shown to display prion-like phenomena. Increasingly, cell cycle activity and the DNA damage response are recognised as cellular events that participate in the neurotoxic process of various neurodegenerative diseases, and their associated animal models, which suggests they are truly involved in the pathogenic process and are not merely epiphenomena. Here we review the role of cell cycle activity and the DNA damage response in neurodegeneration associated with protein misfolding diseases, and suggest that these events contribute towards prion-induced neurotoxicity. In doing so, we highlight PrP transgenic Drosophila as a tractable model for the genetic analysis of transmissible mammalian prion disease.

  10. Oxidative DNA damage preventive activity and antioxidant potential of plants used in Unani system of medicine

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background There is increasing recognition that many of today's diseases are due to the "oxidative stress" that results from an imbalance between the formation and neutralization of reactive molecules such as reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS), which can be removed with antioxidants. The main objective of the present study was to evaluate the antioxidant activity of plants routinely used in the Unani system of medicine. Several plants were screened for radical scavenging activity, and the ten that showed promising results were selected for further evaluation. Methods Methanol (50%) extracts were prepared from ten Unani plants, namely Cleome icosandra, Rosa damascena, Cyperus scariosus, Gardenia gummifera, Abies pindrow, Valeriana wallichii, Holarrhena antidysenterica, Anacyclus pyrethrum, Asphodelus tenuifolius and Cyperus scariosus, and were used to determine their total phenolic, flavonoid and ascorbic acid contents, in vitro scavenging of DPPH·, ABTS·+, NO, ·OH, O2.- and ONOO-, and capacity to prevent oxidative DNA damage. Cytotoxic activity was also determined against the U937 cell line. Results IC50 values for scavenging DPPH·, ABTS·+, NO, ·OH, O2.- and ONOO- were in the ranges 0.007 ± 0.0001 - 2.006 ± 0.002 mg/ml, 2.54 ± 0.04 - 156.94 ± 5.28 μg/ml, 152.23 ± 3.51 - 286.59 ± 3.89 μg/ml, 18.23 ± 0.03 - 50.13 ± 0.04 μg/ml, 28.85 ± 0.23 - 537.87 ± 93 μg/ml and 0.532 ± 0.015 - 3.39 ± 0.032 mg/ml, respectively. The total phenolic, flavonoid and ascorbic acid contents were in the ranges 62.89 ± 0.43 - 166.13 ± 0.56 mg gallic acid equivalent (GAE)/g extract, 38.89 ± 0.52 - 172.23 ± 0.08 mg quercetin equivalent (QEE)/g extract and 0.14 ± 0.09 - 0.98 ± 0.21 mg AA/g extract. The activities of the different plant extracts against oxidative DNA damage were in the range 0.13-1.60 μg/ml. Of the ten selected plant extracts studied here, seven - C. icosandra, R. damascena, C. scariosus, G. gummifera, A. pindrow, V

  11. Antioxidant activity of Coriandrum sativum and protection against DNA damage and cancer cell migration

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Coriandrum sativum is a popular culinary and medicinal herb of the Apiaceae family. Health promoting properties of this herb have been reported in pharmacognostical, phytochemical and pharmacological studies. However, studies on C. sativum have always focused on the aerial parts of the herb and scientific investigation on the root is limited. The aim of this research was to investigate the antioxidant and anticancer activities of C. sativum root, leaf and stem, including its effect on cancer cell migration, and its protection against DNA damage, with special focus on the roots. Methods Powdered roots, leaves and stems of C. sativum were extracted through sequential extraction using hexane, dichloromethane, ethyl acetate, methanol and water. Total phenolic content, FRAP and DPPH radical scavenging activities were measured. Anti-proliferative activitiy on the breast cancer cell line, MCF-7, was assayed using the MTT assay. Activities of the antioxidant enzymes, catalase, superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, and of the caspases-3, -8 and -9 were assayed on treatment with the extract. Cell cycle progression was analysed using flow cytometry. The scratch motility assay was used to assess inhibition of MCF-7 cell migration. DNA damage in 3 T3-L1 fibroblasts was evaluated by the comet assay. The components in the extract were identified by HPLC and GC-MS. Results The ethyl acetate extract of C. sativum roots showed the highest antiproliferative activity on MCF-7 cells (IC50 = 200.0 ± 2.6 μg/mL) and had the highest phenolic content, FRAP and DPPH scavenging activities among the extracts. C. sativum root inhibited DNA damage and prevented MCF-7 cell migration induced by H2O2, suggesting its potential in cancer prevention and inhibition of metastasis. The extract exhibited anticancer activity in MCF-7 cells by affecting antioxidant enzymes possibly leading to H2O2 accumulation, cell cycle arrest at the G2/M phase and apoptotic cell death by

  12. In vivo antigenotoxic activity of watercress juice (Nasturtium officinale) against induced DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Casanova, Natalia A; Ariagno, Julia I; López Nigro, Marcela M; Mendeluk, Gabriela R; de los A Gette, María; Petenatti, Elisa; Palaoro, Luis A; Carballo, Marta A

    2013-09-01

    The present study was carried out to investigate the genotoxicity as well as possible protective activity against damage induced by cyclophosphamide (CP) of the aqueous juice of watercress (Nasturtium officinale, W.T. Aiton) in vivo. Male and female Swiss mice 7-8 weeks old (N = 48) were treated by gavage with 1 g kg(-1) body weight and 0.5 g kg(-1) body weight of watercress juice during 15 consecutive days. Genotoxicity and its possible protective effect were tested by the comet assay in peripheral blood cells and the micronucleus test in bone marrow. In addition, biopsies of the bladder, epididymis and testicles of mice were performed to extend the experimental design. Watercress juice per se did not induce genetic damage according to the comet assay and micronucleus study, exhibiting a protective activity against CP (P < 0.05 and P < 0.001, respectively). The comparative analysis of bladder histological changes obtained in the watercress plus CP group against those treated with CP alone suggests a probable protective effect. Further studies are needed in order to establish the protective role of watercress juice against DNA damage.

  13. PRP19 Transforms into a Sensor of RPA-ssDNA after DNA Damage and Drives ATR Activation via a Ubiquitin-Mediated Circuitry

    PubMed Central

    Maréchal, Alexandre; Wu, Ching-Shyi; Yazinski, Stephanie A.; Nguyen, Hai Dang; Liu, Shizhou; Jiménez, Amanda E.; Jin, Jianping; Zou, Lee

    2014-01-01

    Summary PRP19 is a ubiquitin ligase involved in pre-mRNA splicing and the DNA damage response (DDR). While the role for PRP19 in splicing is well characterized, its role in the DDR remains elusive. Through a proteomic screen for proteins that interact with RPA-coated single-stranded DNA (RPA-ssDNA), we identified PRP19 as a sensor of DNA damage. PRP19 binds RPA directly and localizes to DNA damage sites via RPA, promoting RPA ubiquitylation in a DNA damage-induced manner. PRP19 facilitates the accumulation of ATRIP, the regulatory partner of the ATR kinase, at DNA damage sites. Depletion of PRP19 compromised the phosphorylation of ATR substrates, the recovery of stalled replication forks, and the progression of replication forks on damaged DNA. Importantly, PRP19 mutants that cannot bind RPA or function as an E3 ligase failed to support the ATR response, revealing that PRP19 drives ATR activation by acting as an RPA-ssDNA-sensing ubiquitin ligase during the DDR. PMID:24332808

  14. Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) is essential for sulfur mustard-induced DNA damage repair, but has no role in DNA ligase activation.

    PubMed

    Bhat, K Ramachandra; Benton, Betty J; Ray, Radharaman

    2006-01-01

    Concurrent activation of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) and DNA ligase was observed in cultured human epidermal keratinocytes (HEK) exposed to the DNA alkylating compound sulfur mustard (SM), suggesting that DNA ligase activation could be due to its modification by PARP. Using HEK, intracellular 3H-labeled NAD+ (3H-adenine) was metabolically generated and then these cells were exposed to SM (1 mM). DNA ligase I isolated from these cells was not 3H-labeled, indicating that DNA ligase I is not a substrate for (ADP-ribosyl)ation by PARP. In HEK, when PARP was inhibited by 3-amino benzamide (3-AB, 2 mM), SM-activated DNA ligase had a half-life that was four-fold higher than that observed in the absence of 3-AB. These results suggest that DNA repair requires PARP, and that DNA ligase remains activated until DNA damage repair is complete. The results show that in SM-exposed HEK, DNA ligase I is activated by phosphorylation catalysed by DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK). Therefore, the role of PARP in DNA repair is other than that of DNA ligase I activation. By using the DNA ligase I phosphorylation assay and decreasing PARP chemically as well as by PARP anti-sense mRNA expression in the cells, it was confirmed that PARP does not modify DNA ligase I. In conclusion, it is proposed that PARP is essential for efficient DNA repair; however, PARP participates in DNA repair by altering the chromosomal structure to make the DNA damage site(s) accessible to the repair enzymes.

  15. MASTL(Greatwall) regulates DNA damage responses by coordinating mitotic entry after checkpoint recovery and APC/C activation

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Po Yee; Ma, Hoi Tang; Lee, Hyun-jung; Poon, Randy Y. C.

    2016-01-01

    The G2 DNA damage checkpoint is one of the most important mechanisms controlling G2–mitosis transition. The kinase Greatwall (MASTL in human) promotes normal G2–mitosis transition by inhibiting PP2A via ARPP19 and ENSA. In this study, we demonstrate that MASTL is critical for maintaining genome integrity after DNA damage. Although MASTL did not affect the activation of DNA damage responses and subsequent repair, it determined the timing of entry into mitosis and the subsequent fate of the recovering cells. Constitutively active MASTL promoted dephosphorylation of CDK1Tyr15 and accelerated mitotic entry after DNA damage. Conversely, downregulation of MASTL or ARPP19/ENSA delayed mitotic entry. Remarkably, APC/C was activated precociously, resulting in the damaged cells progressing from G2 directly to G1 and skipping mitosis all together. Collectively, these results established that precise control of MASTL is essential to couple DNA damage to mitosis through the rate of mitotic entry and APC/C activation. PMID:26923777

  16. Protein kinase Cη activates NF-κB in response to camptothecin-induced DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Raveh-Amit, Hadas; Hai, Naama; Rotem-Dai, Noa; Shahaf, Galit; Gopas, Jacob; Livneh, Etta

    2011-08-26

    The nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) family of transcription factors participates in the regulation of genes involved in innate- and adaptive-immune responses, cell death and inflammation. The involvement of the Protein kinase C (PKC) family in the regulation of NF-κB in inflammation and immune-related signaling has been extensively studied. However, not much is known on the role of PKC in NF-κB regulation in response to DNA damage. Here we demonstrate for the first time that PKC-eta (PKCη) regulates NF-κB upstream signaling by activating the IκB kinase (IKK) and the degradation of IκB. Furthermore, PKCη enhances the nuclear translocation and transactivation of NF-κB under non-stressed conditions and in response to the anticancer drug camptothecin. We and others have previously shown that PKCη confers protection against DNA damage-induced apoptosis. Our present study suggests that PKCη is involved in NF-κB signaling leading to drug resistance.

  17. Induction of ROS generation by fluconazole in Candida glabrata: activation of antioxidant enzymes and oxidative DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Mahl, Camila Donato; Behling, Camile Saul; Hackenhaar, Fernanda S; de Carvalho e Silva, Mélany Natuane; Putti, Jordana; Salomon, Tiago B; Alves, Sydney Hartz; Fuentefria, Alexandre; Benfato, Mara S

    2015-07-01

    In this study, we assessed the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) induced by subinhibitory concentration of fluconazole in susceptible and resistant Candida glabrata strains at stationary growth phase and measured their oxidative responses parameters: glutathione peroxidase (GPx), superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione-S-transferase (GST), consumption of hydrogen peroxide, and total glutathione, as well as oxidative damage in lipids, proteins, and DNA. Data showed that fluconazole increased generation of ROS and GPx and SOD enzymatic activity in treated cells; however, these enzymatic activities did not differ between resistant and susceptible strains. Susceptible strains exhibited higher GST activity than resistant, and when susceptible cells were treated with fluconazole, GST activity decreased. Fluconazole treatment cause oxidative damage only in DNA. There are a possible participation of ROS, as organic peroxides and O2(•-), in antifungal mechanism of fluconazole, which results in higher GPx and SOD enzymatic activities and oxidative DNA damage in C. glabrata.

  18. Camel milk lactoferrin reduces the proliferation of colorectal cancer cells and exerts antioxidant and DNA damage inhibitory activities.

    PubMed

    Habib, Hosam M; Ibrahim, Wissam H; Schneider-Stock, Regine; Hassan, Hassan M

    2013-11-01

    Lactoferrin (Lf), the main iron-binding protein of milk, has biological activities. We have evaluated the potential of camel milk lactoferrin for its ability to inhibit the proliferation of the colon cancer cell line, HCT-116, in vitro, DNA damage and its antioxidant activities for the first time. The antioxidant capacity of Lf was evaluated by different assays, including ferric-reducing/antioxidant power assay (FRAP), free radical-scavenging activity (DPPH), nitric oxide (NO) radical-scavenging assay, total antioxidant activity and DNA damage, compared with vitamin C and rutin.

  19. DNA-damage-inducible (din) loci are transcriptionally activated in competent Bacillus subtilis

    SciTech Connect

    Love, P.E.; Lyle, M.J.; Yasbin, R.E.

    1985-09-01

    DNA damage-inducible (din) operon fusions were generated in Bacillus subtilis by transpositional mutagenesis. These YB886(din::Tn917-lacZ) fusion isolates produced increased ..beta..-galactosidase when exposed to mitomycin C, UV radiation, or ethyl methanesulfonate, indicating that the lacZ structural gene had inserted into host transcriptional units that are induced by a variety of DNA-damaging agents. One of the fusion strains was DNA-repair deficient and phenotypically resembled a UV-sensitive mutant of B. subtilis. Induction of ..beta..-galactosidase also occurred in the competent subpopulation of each of the din fusion strains, independent of exposure to DNA-damaging agents. Both the DNA-damage-inducible and competence-inducible components of ..beta..-galactosidase expression were abolished by the recE4 mutation, which inhibits SOS-like (SOB) induction but does not interfere with the development of the component state. The results indicate that gene expression is stimulated at specific loci within the B. subtilis chromosome both by DNA-damaging agents and by the development of competence and that this response is under the control of the SOB regulatory system. Furthermore, they demonstrate that at the molecular level SOB induction and the development of competence are interrelated cellular events.

  20. Enhancement of anti-proliferative activities of Metformin, when combined with Celecoxib, without increasing DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Ullah, Asad; Ashraf, Muhammad; Javeed, Aqeel; Anjum, Aftab Ahmad; Attiq, Ali; Ali, Sarwat

    2016-07-01

    Pathophysiological changes in diabetes like hyperglycemia, oxidative stress, insulin resistance and compensatory hyperinsulinemia predispose cells to malignant transformation and damage DNA repair mechanism. This study was designed to explore the potential synergistic toxic effects of anti-diabetic drug (Metformin), and an analgesic drug (Celecoxib) at cellular level. MTT assay run on Vero cell line revealed that the combinations of Metformin and Celecoxib augment the anti-proliferative effects, whereas Single cell gel electrophoresis spotlighted that Metformin produce non-significant DNA damage with the threshold concentration of 400μg/ml in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (lymphocytes and monocytes), while Celecoxib produced significant (P<0.05) DNA damage (class III comets) above the concentration of 75μg/ml, however the DNA damage or DNA tail protrusions by combinations of both drugs were less than what was observed with Celecoxib alone. Metformin or Celecoxib did not appear mutagenic against any mutant strains (TA 100 and TA 98) but their combination exhibited slight mutagenicity at much higher concentration. The results obtained at concentrations higher than the therapeutic level of drugs and reflect that Metformin in combination with Celecoxib synergistically inhibits the cell proliferation in a concentration dependent pattern. Since, this increase in cytotoxicity did not confer an increase in DNA damage; this combination could be adopted to inhibit the growth of malignant cell without producing any genotoxic or mutagenic effects at cellular level.

  1. Estrogenic and DNA-damaging activity of Red No. 3 in human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed Central

    Dees, C; Askari, M; Garrett, S; Gehrs, K; Henley, D; Ardies, C M

    1997-01-01

    Exposure to pesticides, dyes, and pollutants that mimic the growth promoting effects of estrogen may cause breast cancer. The pesticide DDT and the food colorant Red No. 3 were found to increase the growth of HTB 133 but not estrogen receptor (ER) negative human breast cells (HTB 125) or rat liver epithelial cells (RLE). Red No. 3, beta-estradiol, and DDT increase ER site-specific DNA binding to the estrogen response element in HTB 133 cells and increase cyclin-dependent kinase 2 activity in MCF-7 breast cancer cells. Site-specific DNA binding by p53 in RLE, HTB 125, HTB 133, and MCF-7 cells was increased when they were treated with Red No. 3, which suggests that cellular DNA was damaged by this colorant. Red No. 3 increased binding of the ER from MCF-7 cells to the estrogen-responsive element. Consumption of Red No. 3, which has estrogenlike growth stimulatory properties and may be genotoxic, could be a significant risk factor in human breast carcinogenesis. Images Figure 4. A Figure 4. B Figure 5. A Figure 5. B Figure 6. Figure 7. A Figure 7. B Figure 7. C PMID:9168006

  2. Aberrant GLI1 Activation in DNA Damage Response, Carcinogenesis and Chemoresistance

    PubMed Central

    Palle, Komaraiah; Mani, Chinnadurai; Tripathi, Kaushlendra; Athar, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    The canonical hedgehog (HH) pathway is a multicomponent signaling cascade (HH, protein patched homolog 1 (PTCH1), smoothened (SMO)) that plays a pivotal role during embryonic development through activation of downstream effector molecules, namely glioma-associated oncogene homolog 1 (GLI1), GLI2 and GLI3. Activation of GLIs must be tightly regulated as they modulate target genes which control tissue patterning, stem cell maintenance, and differentiation during development. However, dysregulation or mutations in HH signaling leads to genomic instability (GI) and various cancers, for example, germline mutation in PTCH1 lead to Gorlin syndrome, a condition where patients develop numerous basal cell carcinomas and rarely rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS). Activating mutations in SMO have also been recognized in sporadic cases of medulloblastoma and SMO is overexpressed in many other cancers. Recently, studies in several human cancers have shown that GLI1 expression is independent from HH ligand and canonical intracellular signaling through PTCH and SMO. In fact, this aberrantly regulated GLI1 has been linked to several non-canonical oncogenic growth signals such as Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (KRAS), avian myelocytomatosis virus oncogene cellular homolog (C-MYC), transforming growth factor β (TGFβ), wingless-type MMTV integration site family (WNT) and β-catenin. Recent studies from our lab and other independent studies demonstrate that aberrantly expressed GLI1 influences the integrity of several DNA damage response and repair signals, and if altered, these networks can contribute to GI and impact tumor response to chemo- and radiation therapies. Furthermore, the ineffectiveness of SMO inhibitors in clinical studies argues for the development of GLI1-specific inhibitors in order to develop effective therapeutic modalities to treat these tumors. In this review, we focus on summarizing current understanding of the molecular, biochemical and cellular basis for

  3. Chromatin structure and DNA damage

    SciTech Connect

    Gale, J.M.

    1987-01-01

    This dissertation examines the structure and structural transitions of chromatin in relation to DNA damage. The ability of intact and histone H1 depleted chromatin fibers to fold into higher ordered structures in vitro was examined following DNA photodamage introduced by two different agents. (1) 254-nm UV radiation and (2) trimethylpsoralen (plus near-UV radiation). Both agents are highly specific for DNA and form adducts predicted to cause different degrees of distortion in the DNA helix. The salt-induced structural transitions of intact and histone H1 depleted chromatin fibers were monitored by both analytical ultracentrifugation and light scattering. Our results show that even in the presence of extremely large, nonphysiological amounts of photodamage by either agent the ability of chromatin to fold into higher ordered structures is not affected. The compact, 30 nm fiber must therefore be able to accommodate a large amount of DNA damage without any measurable changes in the overall size or degree of compaction of this structure. The distribution of pyrimidine dimers was mapped at the single nucleotide level in nucleosome core DNA from UV-irradiated mononucleosomes, chromatin fibers, and human cells in culture using the 3' ..-->.. 5' exonuclease activity of T4 DNA polymerase.

  4. Ginkgo biloba leaf extract induces DNA damage by inhibiting topoisomerase II activity in human hepatic cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhuhong; Chen, Si; Mei, Hu; Xuan, Jiekun; Guo, Xiaoqing; Couch, Letha; Dobrovolsky, Vasily N; Guo, Lei; Mei, Nan

    2015-09-30

    Ginkgo biloba leaf extract has been shown to increase the incidence in liver tumors in mice in a 2-year bioassay conducted by the National Toxicology Program. In this study, the DNA damaging effects of Ginkgo biloba leaf extract and many of its constituents were evaluated in human hepatic HepG2 cells and the underlying mechanism was determined. A molecular docking study revealed that quercetin, a flavonoid constituent of Ginkgo biloba, showed a higher potential to interact with topoisomerase II (Topo II) than did the other Ginkgo biloba constituents; this in silico prediction was confirmed by using a biochemical assay to study Topo II enzyme inhibition. Moreover, as measured by the Comet assay and the induction of γ-H2A.X, quercetin, followed by keampferol and isorhamnetin, appeared to be the most potent DNA damage inducer in HepG2 cells. In Topo II knockdown cells, DNA damage triggered by Ginkgo biloba leaf extract or quercetin was dramatically decreased, indicating that DNA damage is directly associated with Topo II. DNA damage was also observed when cells were treated with commercially available Ginkgo biloba extract product. Our findings suggest that Ginkgo biloba leaf extract- and quercetin-induced in vitro genotoxicity may be the result of Topo II inhibition.

  5. An alternative telomerase RNA in Arabidopsis modulates enzyme activity in response to DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Cifuentes-Rojas, Catherine; Nelson, Andrew D.L.; Boltz, Kara A.; Kannan, Kalpana; She, Xintao; Shippen, Dorothy E.

    2012-01-01

    Telomerase replenishes telomere tracts by reiteratively copying its RNA template, TER. Unlike other model organisms, Arabidopsis thaliana harbors two divergent TER genes. However, only TER1 is required for telomere maintenance. Here we examine the function of TER2. We show that TER2 is spliced and its 3′ end is truncated in vivo to generate a third TER isoform, TER2S. TERT preferentially associates with TER2 > TER1 > TER2S. Moreover, TER2 and TER2S assemble with Ku and POT1b (protection of telomeres), forming RNP (ribonucleoprotein) complexes distinct from TER1 RNP. Plants null for TER2 display increased telomerase enzyme activity, while TER2 overexpression inhibits telomere synthesis from TER1 and leads to telomere shortening. These findings argue that TER2 negatively regulates telomerase by sequestering TERT in a nonproductive RNP complex. Introduction of DNA double-strand breaks by zeocin leads to an immediate and specific spike in TER2 and a concomitant decrease in telomerase enzyme activity. This response is not triggered by replication stress or telomere dysfunction and is abrogated in ter2 mutants. We conclude that Arabidopsis telomerase is modulated by TER2, a novel DNA damage-induced noncoding RNA that works in concert with the canonical TER to promote genome integrity. PMID:23109676

  6. Dietary omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids induce plasminogen activator activity and DNA damage in rabbit spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Kokoli, A N; Lavrentiadou, S N; Zervos, I A; Tsantarliotou, M P; Georgiadis, M P; Nikolaidis, E A; Botsoglou, N; Boscos, C M; Taitzoglou, I A

    2017-02-20

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect(s) of dietary omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (ω-3 PUFA) on rabbit semen. Adult rabbit bucks were assigned to two groups that were given two diets, a standard diet (control) and a diet supplemented with ω-3 PUFA. Sperm samples were collected from all bucks with the use of an artificial vagina in 20-day intervals, for a total period of 120 days. The enrichment of membranes in ω-3 PUFA was manifested by the elevation of the 22:5 ω-3 (docosapentaenoic acid [DPA]) levels within 40 days. This increase in DPA content did not affect semen characteristics (i.e., concentration, motility and viability). However, it was associated with the induction of lipid peroxidation in spermatozoa, as determined on the basis of the malondialdehyde content. Lipid peroxidation was associated with DNA fragmentation in ω-3 PUFA-enriched spermatozoa and a concomitant increase in plasminogen activator (PA) activity. The effects of ω-3 PUFA on sperm cells were evident within 40 days of ω-3 PUFA dietary intake and exhibited peack values on day 120. Our findings suggest that an ω-3 PUFA-rich diet may not affect semen characteristics; however, it may have a negative impact on the oxidative status and DNA integrity of the spermatozoa, which was associated with an induction of PAs activity.

  7. A novel study of antibacterial activity of copper iodide nanoparticle mediated by DNA and membrane damage.

    PubMed

    Pramanik, Arindam; Laha, Dipranjan; Bhattacharya, Debalina; Pramanik, Panchanan; Karmakar, Parimal

    2012-08-01

    In this article potential activity of nanoparticles (NPs) of copper iodide (CuI) as an antibacterial agent has been presented. The nano particles are synthesized by co-precipitation method with an average size of 8 nm as determined by Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM). The average charge of the NPs is -21.5 mV at pH 7 as obtained by zeta potential measurement and purity is determined by XRD. These NPs are able to kill both gram positive and gram negative bacteria. Among the bacteria tested, DH5α is more sensitive but Bacillus subtilis is more resistant to NPs of CuI. Consequently, the MIC and MBC values of DH5α is least (0.066 mg/ml and 0.083 mg/ml respectively) and B. subtilis is highest (0.15 mg/ml and 0.18 mg/ml respectively) among the tested bacterial strains. From our studies it is inferred that CuI NPs produce reactive oxygen species (ROS) in both gram negative and gram positive bacteria and it also causes ROS mediated DNA damage for the suppression of transcription as revealed by reporter gene assay. Probably ROS is formed on the surface of NPs of CuI in presence of amine functional groups of various biological molecules. Furthermore they induce membrane damage as determined by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Thus production of ROS and membrane damage are major mechanisms of the bactericidal activity of these NPs of CuI.

  8. Susceptibility to bystander DNA damage is influenced by replication and transcriptional activity.

    PubMed

    Dickey, Jennifer S; Baird, Brandon J; Redon, Christophe E; Avdoshina, Valeriya; Palchik, Guillermo; Wu, Junfang; Kondratyev, Alexei; Bonner, William M; Martin, Olga A

    2012-11-01

    Direct cellular DNA damage may lead to genome destabilization in unexposed, bystander, cells sharing the same milieu with directly damaged cells by means of the bystander effect. One proposed mechanism involves double strand break (DSB) formation in S phase cells at sites of single strand lesions in the DNA of replication complexes, which has a more open structure compared with neighboring DNA. The DNA in transcription complexes also has a more open structure, and hence may be susceptible to bystander DSB formation from single strand lesions. To examine whether transcription predisposes non-replicating cells to bystander effect-induced DNA DSBs, we examined two types of primary cells that exhibit high levels of transcription in the absence of replication, rat neurons and human lymphocytes. We found that non-replicating bystander cells with high transcription rates exhibited substantial levels of DNA DSBs, as monitored by γ-H2AX foci formation. Additionally, as reported in proliferating cells, TGF-β and NO were found to mimic bystander effects in cell populations lacking DNA synthesis. These results indicate that cell vulnerability to bystander DSB damage may result from transcription as well as replication. The findings offer insights into which tissues may be vulnerable to bystander genomic destabilization in vivo.

  9. Deoxycholic acid causes DNA damage while inducing apoptotic resistance through NF-κB activation in benign Barrett's epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Huo, Xiaofang; Juergens, Stefanie; Zhang, Xi; Rezaei, Davood; Yu, Chunhua; Strauch, Eric D; Wang, Jian-Ying; Cheng, Edaire; Meyer, Frank; Wang, David H; Zhang, Qiuyang; Spechler, Stuart J; Souza, Rhonda F

    2011-08-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux is associated with adenocarcinoma in Barrett's esophagus, but the incidence of this tumor is rising, despite widespread use of acid-suppressing medications. This suggests that refluxed material other than acid might contribute to carcinogenesis. We looked for potentially carcinogenetic effects of two bile acids, deoxycholic acid (DCA) and ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA), on Barrett's epithelial cells in vitro and in vivo. We exposed Barrett's (BAR-T) cells to DCA or UDCA and studied the generation of reactive oxygen/nitrogen species (ROS/RNS); expression of phosphorylated H2AX (a marker of DNA damage), phosphorylated IkBα, and phosphorylated p65 (activated NF-κB pathway proteins); and apoptosis. During endoscopy in patients, we took biopsy specimens of Barrett's mucosa before and after esophageal perfusion with DCA or UDCA and assessed DNA damage and NF-κB activation. Exposure to DCA, but not UDCA, resulted in ROS/RNS production, DNA damage, and NF-κB activation but did not increase the rate of apoptosis in BAR-T cells. Pretreatment with N-acetyl-l-cysteine (a ROS scavenger) prevented DNA damage after DCA exposure, and DCA did induce apoptosis in cells treated with NF-κB inhibitors (BAY 11-7085 or AdIκB superrepressor). DNA damage and NF-κB activation were detected in biopsy specimens of Barrett's mucosa taken after esophageal perfusion with DCA, but not UDCA. These data show that, in Barrett's epithelial cells, DCA induces ROS/RNS production, which causes genotoxic injury, and simultaneously induces activation of the NF-κB pathway, which enables cells with DNA damage to resist apoptosis. We have demonstrated molecular mechanisms whereby bile reflux might contribute to carcinogenesis in Barrett's esophagus.

  10. Polo-like kinase 1 depletion induces DNA damage in early S prior to caspase activation.

    PubMed

    Yim, Hyungshin; Erikson, Raymond L

    2009-05-01

    Polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1) plays several roles in mitosis, and it has been suggested to have a role in tumorigenesis. We have previously reported that Plk1 depletion results in cell death in cancer cells, whereas normal cells survive similar depletion. However, Plk1 depletion together with p53 depletion induces cell death in normal cells as well. This communication presents evidence on the sequence of events that leads to cell death in cancer cells. DNA damage is detected at the first S phase following Plk1 depletion and is more severe in Plk1-depleted p53-null cancer cells. As a consequence of Plk1 depletion using lentivirus-based small interfering RNA techniques, prereplicative complex (pre-RC) formation is disrupted at the G(1)/S transition, and DNA synthesis is reduced during S phase of the first cycle after depletion. The levels of geminin, an inhibitor of DNA pre-RC, and Emi1, an inhibitor of anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome, are elevated in Plk1-depleted cells. The rate of cell cycling is slower in Plk1-depleted cells than in control cells when synchronized by serum starvation. Plk1 depletion results in disrupted DNA pre-RC formation, reduced DNA synthesis, and DNA damage before cells display severe mitotic catastrophe or apoptosis. Our data suggest that Plk1 is required for cell cycle progression not only in mitosis but also for DNA synthesis, maintenance of DNA integrity, and prevention of cell death.

  11. Inhibition of SIRT1 Catalytic Activity Increases p53 Acetylation but Does Not Alter Cell Survival following DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Solomon, Jonathan M.; Pasupuleti, Rao; Xu, Lei; McDonagh, Thomas; Curtis, Rory; DiStefano, Peter S.; Huber, L. Julie

    2006-01-01

    Human SIRT1 is an enzyme that deacetylates the p53 tumor suppressor protein and has been suggested to modulate p53-dependent functions including DNA damage-induced cell death. In this report, we used EX-527, a novel, potent, and specific small-molecule inhibitor of SIRT1 catalytic activity to examine the role of SIRT1 in p53 acetylation and cell survival after DNA damage. Treatment with EX-527 dramatically increased acetylation at lysine 382 of p53 after different types of DNA damage in primary human mammary epithelial cells and several cell lines. Significantly, inhibition of SIRT1 catalytic activity by EX-527 had no effect on cell growth, viability, or p53-controlled gene expression in cells treated with etoposide. Acetyl-p53 was also increased by the histone deacetylase (HDAC) class I/II inhibitor trichostatin A (TSA). EX-527 and TSA acted synergistically to increase acetyl-p53 levels, confirming that p53 acetylation is regulated by both SIRT1 and HDACs. While TSA alone reduced cell survival after DNA damage, the combination of EX-527 and TSA had no further effect on cell viability and growth. These results show that, although SIRT1 deacetylates p53, this does not play a role in cell survival following DNA damage in certain cell lines and primary human mammary epithelial cells. PMID:16354677

  12. Effects of simulated pulmonary surfactant on the cytotoxicity and DNA-damaging activity of respirable quartz and kaolin.

    PubMed

    Gao, N; Keane, M J; Ong, T; Wallace, W E

    2000-06-09

    Respirable-sized quartz and kaolin dusts were pretreated with simulated pulmonary surfactant dispersions of dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) in saline to model the conditioning of particles depositing in alveolar regions of the lung. DPPC-treated and untreated dusts were used to challenge lavaged rat pulmonary alveolar macrophages in vitro. Cytotoxicity was determined over a 5-d period using both total and viable cell counts from a fluorescence-based viability assay. DNA damage, as an indication of genotoxicity, was determined over a 7-d period by the single-cell gel electrophoresis assay. Untreated quartz and kaolin both expressed a significant and potent cytotoxicity, which increased with concentration and time. DPPC-surfactant pretreatment delayed significant expression of this cytotoxicity until 3 to 5 d after challenge. Untreated quartz also caused DNA damage, which increased with concentration and time. DPPC-surfactant treatment of quartz delayed most DNA damage expression to 5 and 7 d. Untreated kaolin expressed weaker activity for DNA damage, significant at the highest concentration through 5 d, and at the higher concentrations on d 7. Surfactant treatment delayed most kaolin activity for DNA damage to 7 d after challenge.

  13. Comparison of antioxidant enzyme activities and DNA damage in chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) genotypes exposed to vanadium.

    PubMed

    Imtiaz, Muhammad; Mushtaq, Muhammad Adnan; Rizwan, Muhammad Shahid; Arif, Muhammad Saleem; Yousaf, Balal; Ashraf, Muhammad; Shuanglian, Xiong; Rizwan, Muhammad; Mehmood, Sajid; Tu, Shuxin

    2016-10-01

    The present study was done to elucidate the effects of vanadium (V) on photosynthetic pigments, membrane damage, antioxidant enzymes, protein, and deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) integrity in the following chickpea genotypes: C-44 (tolerant) and Balkasar (sensitive). Changes in these parameters were strikingly dependent on levels of V, at 60 and 120 mg V L(-1) induced DNA damage in Balkasar only, while photosynthetic pigments and protein were decreased from 15 to 120 mg V L(-1) and membrane was also damaged. It was shown that photosynthetic pigments and protein production declined from 15 to 120 mg V L(-1) and the membrane was also damaged, while DNA damage was not observed at any level of V stress in C-44. Moreover, the antioxidant enzyme activities such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and peroxidase (POD) were increased in both genotypes of chickpea against V stress; however, more activities were observed in C-44 than Balkasar. The results suggest that DNA damage in sensitive genotypes can be triggered due to exposure of higher vanadium.

  14. Sirtuin 7 promotes cellular survival following genomic stress by attenuation of DNA damage, SAPK activation and p53 response

    SciTech Connect

    Kiran, Shashi; Oddi, Vineesha; Ramakrishna, Gayatri

    2015-02-01

    Maintaining the genomic integrity is a constant challenge in proliferating cells. Amongst various proteins involved in this process, Sirtuins play a key role in DNA damage repair mechanisms in yeast as well as mammals. In the present work we report the role of one of the least explored Sirtuin viz., SIRT7, under conditions of genomic stress when treated with doxorubicin. Knockdown of SIRT7 sensitized osteosarcoma (U2OS) cells to DNA damage induced cell death by doxorubicin. SIRT7 overexpression in NIH3T3 delayed cell cycle progression by causing delay in G1 to S transition. SIRT7 overexpressing cells when treated with low dose of doxorubicin (0.25 µM) showed delayed onset of senescence, lesser accumulation of DNA damage marker γH2AX and lowered levels of growth arrest markers viz., p53 and p21 when compared to doxorubicin treated control GFP expressing cells. Resistance to DNA damage following SIRT7 overexpression was also evident by EdU incorporation studies where cellular growth arrest was significantly delayed. When treated with higher dose of doxorubicin (>1 µM), SIRT7 conferred resistance to apoptosis by attenuating stress activated kinases (SAPK viz., p38 and JNK) and p53 response thereby shifting the cellular fate towards senescence. Interestingly, relocalization of SIRT7 from nucleolus to nucleoplasm together with its co-localization with SAPK was an important feature associated with DNA damage. SIRT7 mediated resistance to doxorubicin induced apoptosis and senescence was lost when p53 level was restored by nutlin treatment. Overall, we propose SIRT7 attenuates DNA damage, SAPK activation and p53 response thereby promoting cellular survival under conditions of genomic stress. - Highlights: • Knockdown of SIRT7 sensitized cells to DNA damage induced apoptosis. • SIRT7 delayed onset of premature senescence by attenuating DNA damage response. • Overexpression of SIRT7 delayed cell cycle progression by delaying G1/S transition. • Upon DNA damage SIRT

  15. WWOX, the common fragile site FRA16D gene product, regulates ATM activation and the DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Abu-Odeh, Mohammad; Salah, Zaidoun; Herbel, Christoph; Hofmann, Thomas G; Aqeilan, Rami I

    2014-11-04

    Genomic instability is a hallmark of cancer. The WW domain-containing oxidoreductase (WWOX) is a tumor suppressor spanning the common chromosomal fragile site FRA16D. Here, we report a direct role of WWOX in DNA damage response (DDR) and DNA repair. We show that Wwox deficiency results in reduced activation of the ataxia telangiectasia-mutated (ATM) checkpoint kinase, inefficient induction and maintenance of γ-H2AX foci, and impaired DNA repair. Mechanistically, we show that, upon DNA damage, WWOX accumulates in the cell nucleus, where it interacts with ATM and enhances its activation. Nuclear accumulation of WWOX is regulated by its K63-linked ubiquitination at lysine residue 274, which is mediated by the E3 ubiquitin ligase ITCH. These findings identify a novel role for the tumor suppressor WWOX and show that loss of WWOX expression may drive genomic instability and provide an advantage for clonal expansion of neoplastic cells.

  16. WWOX, the common fragile site FRA16D gene product, regulates ATM activation and the DNA damage response

    PubMed Central

    Abu-Odeh, Mohammad; Salah, Zaidoun; Herbel, Christoph; Hofmann, Thomas G.; Aqeilan, Rami I.

    2014-01-01

    Genomic instability is a hallmark of cancer. The WW domain-containing oxidoreductase (WWOX) is a tumor suppressor spanning the common chromosomal fragile site FRA16D. Here, we report a direct role of WWOX in DNA damage response (DDR) and DNA repair. We show that Wwox deficiency results in reduced activation of the ataxia telangiectasia-mutated (ATM) checkpoint kinase, inefficient induction and maintenance of γ-H2AX foci, and impaired DNA repair. Mechanistically, we show that, upon DNA damage, WWOX accumulates in the cell nucleus, where it interacts with ATM and enhances its activation. Nuclear accumulation of WWOX is regulated by its K63-linked ubiquitination at lysine residue 274, which is mediated by the E3 ubiquitin ligase ITCH. These findings identify a novel role for the tumor suppressor WWOX and show that loss of WWOX expression may drive genomic instability and provide an advantage for clonal expansion of neoplastic cells. PMID:25331887

  17. DNA Damage activates A Spatially Distinct Late Cytoplasmic Cell Cycle Checkpoint Network Controlled by MK2-mediated RNA Stabilization

    PubMed Central

    Reinhardt, H. Christian; Hasskamp, Pia; Schmedding, Ingolf; Morandell, Sandra; van Vugt, Marcel .A.T.M.; Wang, XiaoZhe; Linding, Rune; Ong, Shao-En; Weaver, David; Carr, Steven A.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Following genotoxic stress, cells activate a complex kinase-based signaling network to arrest the cell cycle and initiate DNA repair. p53-defective tumor cells rewire their checkpoint response and become dependent on the p38/MK2 pathway for survival after DNA damage, despite a functional ATR-Chk1 pathway. We used functional genetics to dissect the contributions of Chk1 and MK2 to checkpoint control. We show that nuclear Chk1 activity is essential to establish a G2/M checkpoint, while cytoplasmic MK2 activity is critical for prolonged checkpoint maintenance through a process of post-transcriptional mRNA stabilization. Following DNA damage, the p38/MK2 complex relocalizes from nucleus to cytoplasm where MK2, phosphorylates hnRNPA0, to stabilize Gadd45α mRNA, while p38 phosphorylates and releases the translational inhibitor TIAR. In addition, MK2 phosphorylates PARN, blocking Gadd45α mRNA degradation. Gadd45α functions within a positive feedback loop, sustaining the MK2-dependent cytoplasmic sequestration of Cdc25B/C to block mitotic entry in the presence of unrepaired DNA damage. Our findings demonstrate a critical role for the MK2 pathway in the post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression as part of the DNA damage response in cancer cells. PMID:20932473

  18. FAAP100 is essential for activation of the Fanconi anemia-associated DNA damage response pathway.

    PubMed

    Ling, Chen; Ishiai, Masamichi; Ali, Abdullah Mahmood; Medhurst, Annette L; Neveling, Kornelia; Kalb, Reinhard; Yan, Zhijiang; Xue, Yutong; Oostra, Anneke B; Auerbach, Arleen D; Hoatlin, Maureen E; Schindler, Detlev; Joenje, Hans; de Winter, Johan P; Takata, Minoru; Meetei, Amom Ruhikanta; Wang, Weidong

    2007-04-18

    The Fanconi anemia (FA) core complex plays a central role in the DNA damage response network involving breast cancer susceptibility gene products, BRCA1 and BRCA2. The complex consists of eight FA proteins, including a ubiquitin ligase (FANCL) and a DNA translocase (FANCM), and is essential for monoubiquitination of FANCD2 in response to DNA damage. Here, we report a novel component of this complex, termed FAAP100, which is essential for the stability of the core complex and directly interacts with FANCB and FANCL to form a stable subcomplex. Formation of this subcomplex protects each component from proteolytic degradation and also allows their coregulation by FANCA and FANCM during nuclear localization. Using siRNA depletion and gene knockout techniques, we show that FAAP100-deficient cells display hallmark features of FA cells, including defective FANCD2 monoubiquitination, hypersensitivity to DNA crosslinking agents, and genomic instability. Our study identifies FAAP100 as a new critical component of the FA-BRCA DNA damage response network.

  19. Acute DNA damage activates the tumour suppressor p53 to promote radiation-induced lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chang-Lung; Castle, Katherine D.; Moding, Everett J.; Blum, Jordan M.; Williams, Nerissa; Luo, Lixia; Ma, Yan; Borst, Luke B.; Kim, Yongbaek; Kirsch, David G.

    2015-01-01

    Genotoxic cancer therapies, such as chemoradiation, cause haematological toxicity primarily by activating the tumour suppressor p53. While inhibiting p53-mediated cell death during cancer therapy ameliorates haematologic toxicity, whether it also impacts carcinogenesis remains unclear. Here we utilize a mouse model of inducible p53 short hairpin RNA (shRNA) to show that temporarily blocking p53 during total-body irradiation (TBI) not only ameliorates acute toxicity, but also improves long-term survival by preventing lymphoma development. Using KrasLA1 mice, we show that TBI promotes the expansion of a rare population of thymocytes that express oncogenic KrasG12D. However, blocking p53 during TBI significantly suppresses the expansion of KrasG12D-expressing thymocytes. Mechanistically, bone marrow transplant experiments demonstrate that TBI activates p53 to decrease the ability of bone marrow cells to suppress lymphoma development through a non-cell-autonomous mechanism. Together, our results demonstrate that the p53 response to acute DNA damage promotes the development of radiation-induced lymphoma. PMID:26399548

  20. Ebselen attenuates oxidative DNA damage and enhances its repair activity in the thalamus after focal cortical infarction in hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    He, Meixia; Xing, Shihui; Yang, Bo; Zhao, Liqun; Hua, Haiying; Liang, Zhijian; Zhou, Wenliang; Zeng, Jinsheng; Pei, Zhong

    2007-11-21

    Oxidative DNA damage has been proposed to be a major contributor to focal cerebral ischemic injury. However, little is known about the role of oxidative DNA damage in remote damage secondary to the primary infarction. In the present study, we investigated oxidative damage within the ventroposterior nucleus (VPN) after distal middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) in hypertensive rats. We also examined the possible protective effect of ebselen, one glutathione peroxidase mimic, on delayed degeneration in the VPN after distal MCAO. Neuronal damage in the ipsilateral VPN was examined by Nissl staining. Oxidative DNA damage and base repair enzyme activity were assessed by analyzing immunoreactivity of 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-ohdG) and 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase (OGG1), respectively. The number of intact neurons in the ipsilateral VPN decreased by 52% compared to the contralateral side in ischemia group 2 weeks after distal cerebral cortical infarction. The immunoreactivity of 8-ohdG significantly increased while OGG1 immunoreactivity significantly decreased in the ipsilateral VPN 2 weeks after distal cortical infarction (all p<0.01). Compared with vehicle treatment, ebselen significantly attenuated the neuron loss, ameliorated ischemia-induced increase in 8-ohdG level as well as decrease in OGG1 level within the ipsilateral VPN (all p<0.01). OGG1 was further demonstrated to mainly express in neurons. These findings strongly suggest that oxidative DNA damage may be involved in the delayed neuronal death in the VPN region following distal MCAO. Furthermore, ebselen protects against the delayed damage in the VPN when given at 24 h following distal MCAO.

  1. Surviving the breakup: the DNA damage checkpoint.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Jacob C; Haber, James E

    2006-01-01

    In response to even a single chromosomal double-strand DNA break, cells enact the DNA damage checkpoint. This checkpoint triggers cell cycle arrest, providing time for the cell to repair damaged chromosomes before entering mitosis. This mechanism helps prevent the segregation of damaged or mutated chromosomes and thus promotes genomic stability. Recent work has elucidated the molecular mechanisms underlying several critical steps in checkpoint activation, notably the recruitment of the upstream checkpoint kinases of the ATM and ATR families to different damaged DNA structures and the molecular events through which these kinases activate their effectors. Chromatin modification has emerged as one important component of checkpoint activation and maintenance. Following DNA repair, the checkpoint pathway is inactivated in a process termed recovery. A related but genetically distinct process, adaptation, controls cell cycle re-entry in the face of unrepairable damage.

  2. Investigations of the DNA-damaging activity of human gastric juice.

    PubMed

    Kyrtopoulos, S A

    1987-01-01

    Human gastric juice previously treated with nitrite was examined for its ability to cause O6-alkylguanine-type modifications to 2'-deoxyguanosine or DNA in vitro. Analysis by radioimmunoassay indicated that, in five out of ten cases, incubation with 5 mM 2'-deoxyguanosine resulted in the formation of 375-1350 fmol/ml O6-ethyl-2'-deoxyguanosine (O6-etdGuo) or, in one case, 110 pmol/ml O6-methyl-2'-deoxyguanosine O6-medGuo). When gastric juice-treated calf-thymus DNA was examined for its ability to consume (through suicide repair of O6-alkylguanine-type damage) O6-alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase (AAT) from rat liver, eight out of eight samples could not. However, in four out of eight cases, a reduction in the rate of removal of O6-[3H]methylguanine from a 3H-methylated DNA substrate was observed. This finding is compatible with the presence, in gastric juice-treated DNA, of damage capable of binding to, but not undergoing repair by, the AAT.

  3. Molecular mechanisms involved in initiation of the DNA damage response

    PubMed Central

    Barnum, Kevin J; O’Connell, Matthew J

    2015-01-01

    DNA is subject to a wide variety of damage. In order to maintain genomic integrity, cells must respond to this damage by activating repair and cell cycle checkpoint pathways. The initiating events in the DNA damage response entail recognition of the lesion and the assembly of DNA damage response complexes at the DNA. Here, we review what is known about these processes for various DNA damage pathways. PMID:27308403

  4. Molecular mechanisms involved in initiation of the DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Barnum, Kevin J; O'Connell, Matthew J

    2015-01-01

    DNA is subject to a wide variety of damage. In order to maintain genomic integrity, cells must respond to this damage by activating repair and cell cycle checkpoint pathways. The initiating events in the DNA damage response entail recognition of the lesion and the assembly of DNA damage response complexes at the DNA. Here, we review what is known about these processes for various DNA damage pathways.

  5. Oxidative DNA Damage Mediated by Intranuclear MMP Activity Is Associated with Neuronal Apoptosis in Ischemic Stroke.

    PubMed

    Kimura-Ohba, Shihoko; Yang, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Evidence of the pathological roles of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) in various neurological disorders has made them attractive therapeutic targets. MMPs disrupt the blood-brain barrier and cause neuronal death and neuroinflammation in acute cerebral ischemia and are critical for angiogenesis during recovery. However, some challenges have to be overcome before MMPs can be further validated as drug targets in stroke injury. Identifying in vivo substrates of MMPs should greatly improve our understanding of the mechanisms of ischemic injury and is critical for providing more precise drug targets. Recent works have uncovered nontraditional roles for MMPs in the cytosol and nucleus. These have shed light on intracellular targets and biological actions of MMPs, adding additional layers of complexity for therapeutic MMP inhibition. In this review, we discussed the recent advances made in understanding nuclear location of MMPs, their regulation of intranuclear sorting, and their intranuclear proteolytic activity and substrates. In particular, we highlighted the roles of intranuclear MMPs in oxidative DNA damage, neuronal apoptosis, and neuroinflammation at an early stage of stroke insult. These novel data point to new putative MMP-mediated intranuclear actions in stroke-induced pathological processes and may lead to novel approaches to treatment of stroke and other neurological diseases.

  6. Tumor Suppressor Genes within Common Fragile Sites Are Active Players in the DNA Damage Response.

    PubMed

    Hazan, Idit; Hofmann, Thomas G; Aqeilan, Rami I

    2016-12-01

    The role of common fragile sites (CFSs) in cancer remains controversial. Two main views dominate the discussion: one suggests that CFS loci are hotspots of genomic instability leading to inactivation of genes encoded within them, while the other view proposes that CFSs are functional units and that loss of the encoded genes confers selective pressure, leading to cancer development. The latter view is supported by emerging evidence showing that expression of a given CFS is associated with genome integrity and that inactivation of CFS-resident tumor suppressor genes leads to dysregulation of the DNA damage response (DDR) and increased genomic instability. These two viewpoints of CFS function are not mutually exclusive but rather coexist; when breaks at CFSs are not repaired accurately, this can lead to deletions by which cells acquire growth advantage because of loss of tumor suppressor activities. Here, we review recent advances linking some CFS gene products with the DDR, genomic instability, and carcinogenesis and discuss how their inactivation might represent a selective advantage for cancer cells.

  7. Tumor Suppressor Genes within Common Fragile Sites Are Active Players in the DNA Damage Response

    PubMed Central

    Hazan, Idit; Hofmann, Thomas G.; Aqeilan, Rami I.

    2016-01-01

    The role of common fragile sites (CFSs) in cancer remains controversial. Two main views dominate the discussion: one suggests that CFS loci are hotspots of genomic instability leading to inactivation of genes encoded within them, while the other view proposes that CFSs are functional units and that loss of the encoded genes confers selective pressure, leading to cancer development. The latter view is supported by emerging evidence showing that expression of a given CFS is associated with genome integrity and that inactivation of CFS-resident tumor suppressor genes leads to dysregulation of the DNA damage response (DDR) and increased genomic instability. These two viewpoints of CFS function are not mutually exclusive but rather coexist; when breaks at CFSs are not repaired accurately, this can lead to deletions by which cells acquire growth advantage because of loss of tumor suppressor activities. Here, we review recent advances linking some CFS gene products with the DDR, genomic instability, and carcinogenesis and discuss how their inactivation might represent a selective advantage for cancer cells. PMID:27977694

  8. Activation of DNA Damage Response Induced by the Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpes Virus.

    PubMed

    Di Domenico, Enea Gino; Toma, Luigi; Bordignon, Valentina; Trento, Elisabetta; D'Agosto, Giovanna; Cordiali-Fei, Paola; Ensoli, Fabrizio

    2016-06-01

    The human herpes virus 8 (HHV-8), also known as Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpes virus (KSHV), can infect endothelial cells often leading to cell transformation and to the development of tumors, namely Kaposi's sarcoma (KS), primary effusion lymphoma (PEL), and the plasmablastic variant of multicentric Castleman's disease. KSHV is prevalent in areas such as sub-Saharan Africa and the Mediterranean region presenting distinct genotypes, which appear to be associated with differences in disease manifestation, according to geographical areas. In infected cells, KSHV persists in a latent episomal form. However, in a limited number of cells, it undergoes spontaneous lytic reactivation to ensure the production of new virions. During both the latent and the lytic cycle, KSHV is programmed to express genes which selectively modulate the DNA damage response (DDR) through the activation of the ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) pathway and by phosphorylating factors associated with the DDR, including the major tumor suppressor protein p53 tumor suppressor p53. This review will focus on the interplay between the KSHV and the DDR response pathway throughout the viral lifecycle, exploring the putative molecular mechanism/s that may contribute to malignant transformation of host cells.

  9. Apoptosis and DNA damage in human spermatozoa

    PubMed Central

    Aitken, R John; Koppers, Adam J

    2011-01-01

    DNA damage is frequently encountered in spermatozoa of subfertile males and is correlated with a range of adverse clinical outcomes including impaired fertilization, disrupted preimplantation embryonic development, increased rates of miscarriage and an enhanced risk of disease in the progeny. The etiology of DNA fragmentation in human spermatozoa is closely correlated with the appearance of oxidative base adducts and evidence of impaired spermiogenesis. We hypothesize that oxidative stress impedes spermiogenesis, resulting in the generation of spermatozoa with poorly remodelled chromatin. These defective cells have a tendency to default to an apoptotic pathway associated with motility loss, caspase activation, phosphatidylserine exteriorization and the activation of free radical generation by the mitochondria. The latter induces lipid peroxidation and oxidative DNA damage, which then leads to DNA fragmentation and cell death. The physical architecture of spermatozoa prevents any nucleases activated as a result of this apoptotic process from gaining access to the nuclear DNA and inducing its fragmentation. It is for this reason that a majority of the DNA damage encountered in human spermatozoa seems to be oxidative. Given the important role that oxidative stress seems to have in the etiology of DNA damage, there should be an important role for antioxidants in the treatment of this condition. If oxidative DNA damage in spermatozoa is providing a sensitive readout of systemic oxidative stress, the implications of these findings could stretch beyond our immediate goal of trying to minimize DNA damage in spermatozoa as a prelude to assisted conception therapy. PMID:20802502

  10. Persistent activation of DNA damage signaling in response to complex mixtures of PAHs in air particulate matter

    SciTech Connect

    Jarvis, Ian W.H.; Bergvall, Christoffer; Bottai, Matteo; Westerholm, Roger; Stenius, Ulla; Dreij, Kristian

    2013-02-01

    Complex mixtures of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are present in air particulate matter (PM) and have been associated with many adverse human health effects including cancer and respiratory disease. However, due to their complexity, the risk of exposure to mixtures is difficult to estimate. In the present study the effects of binary mixtures of benzo[a]pyrene (BP) and dibenzo[a,l]pyrene (DBP) and complex mixtures of PAHs in urban air PM extracts on DNA damage signaling was investigated. Applying a statistical model to the data we observed a more than additive response for binary mixtures of BP and DBP on activation of DNA damage signaling. Persistent activation of checkpoint kinase 1 (Chk1) was observed at significantly lower BP equivalent concentrations in air PM extracts than BP alone. Activation of DNA damage signaling was also more persistent in air PM fractions containing PAHs with more than four aromatic rings suggesting larger PAHs contribute a greater risk to human health. Altogether our data suggests that human health risk assessment based on additivity such as toxicity equivalency factor scales may significantly underestimate the risk of exposure to complex mixtures of PAHs. The data confirms our previous findings with PAH-contaminated soil (Niziolek-Kierecka et al., 2012) and suggests a possible role for Chk1 Ser317 phosphorylation as a biological marker for future analyses of complex mixtures of PAHs. -- Highlights: ► Benzo[a]pyrene (BP), dibenzo[a,l]pyrene (DBP) and air PM PAH extracts were compared. ► Binary mixture of BP and DBP induced a more than additive DNA damage response. ► Air PM PAH extracts were more potent than toxicity equivalency factor estimates. ► Larger PAHs (> 4 rings) contribute more to the genotoxicity of PAHs in air PM. ► Chk1 is a sensitive marker for persistent activation of DNA damage signaling from PAH mixtures.

  11. Pb-inhibited mitotic activity in onion roots involves DNA damage and disruption of oxidative metabolism.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Gurpreet; Singh, Harminder Pal; Batish, Daizy Rani; Kohli, Ravinder Kumar

    2014-09-01

    Plant responses to abiotic stress significantly affect the development of cells, tissues and organs. However, no studies correlating Pb-induced mitotic inhibition and DNA damage and the alterations in redox homeostasis during root division per se were found in the literature. Therefore, an experiment was conducted to evaluate the impact of Pb on mitotic activity and the associated changes in the oxidative metabolism in onion roots. The cytotoxic effect of Pb on cell division was assessed in the root meristems of Allium cepa (onion). The mitotic index (MI) was calculated and chromosomal abnormalities were sought. Pb-treatment induced a dose-dependent decrease in MI in the onion root tips and caused mitotic abnormalities such as distorted metaphase, fragments, sticky chromosomes, laggards, vagrant chromosomes and bridges. Single Cell Gel Electrophoresis was also performed to evaluate Pb induced genotoxicity. It was accompanied by altered oxidative metabolism in the onion root tips suggesting the interference of Pb with the redox homeostasis during cell division. There was a higher accumulation of malondialdehyde, conjugated dienes and hydrogen peroxide, and a significant increase in the activities of superoxide dismutases, ascorbate peroxidases, guaiacol peroxidases and glutathione reductases in Pb-treated onion roots, whereas catalases activity exhibited a decreasing pattern upon Pb exposure. The study concludes that Pb-induced cytotoxicity and genotoxicity in the onion roots is mediated through ROS and is also tightly linked to the cell cycle. The exposure to higher concentrations arrested cell cycle leading to cell death, whereas different repair responses are generated at lower concentrations, thereby allowing the cell to complete the cell cycle.

  12. Double-face activity of resveratrol in voluntary runners: assessment of DNA damage by comet assay.

    PubMed

    Tomasello, Barbara; Grasso, Salvatore; Malfa, Giuseppe; Stella, Stefania; Favetta, Marco; Renis, Marcella

    2012-05-01

    Voluntary runners are subjected to a massive increase in reactive oxygen/nitrogen species production, which can promote different oxidative stress-related diseases such as premature aging, neurodegenerative disorders, and cancer. The aims of this work were to evaluate the following in peripheral blood cells of voluntary runners: (i) DNA status; (ii) susceptibility to the in vitro insult induced by hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) as a breaking agent; (iii) capabilities of 3,5,4'-trihydroxystilbene (RESV) in counteracting DNA damage. Twenty-five male voluntary runners were compared with 20 sedentary men, as age-matched controls, and DNA status was evaluated with different versions of comet assay: alkaline, neutral, and Fpg enzyme-modified version to measure 8-OH-deoxyguanosine (8-oxo-dG) levels. The H(2)O(2) and/or RESV treatments were performed directly on agarose-embedded cells (atypical comet assay). The results evidenced DNA damage and levels of 8-oxo-dG higher in runners than in sedentary control subjects. The runners' DNA was more prone to the in vitro-induced oxidative insult (200 μM H(2)O(2)) than that of the control group. Resveratrol (100 μM), depending on the individual basal DNA status, was able to switch from antioxidant to pro-oxidant. Our results, on the one hand, validated the proposed in vitro experimental protocol in order to measure individual DNA status. On the other hand, our data point out the importance of monitoring the athletes' redox status before subjecting them to dietary supplementation treatment.

  13. DNA Damage, DNA Repair, Aging, and Neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Maynard, Scott; Fang, Evandro Fei; Scheibye-Knudsen, Morten; Croteau, Deborah L; Bohr, Vilhelm A

    2015-09-18

    Aging in mammals is accompanied by a progressive atrophy of tissues and organs, and stochastic damage accumulation to the macromolecules DNA, RNA, proteins, and lipids. The sequence of the human genome represents our genetic blueprint, and accumulating evidence suggests that loss of genomic maintenance may causally contribute to aging. Distinct evidence for a role of imperfect DNA repair in aging is that several premature aging syndromes have underlying genetic DNA repair defects. Accumulation of DNA damage may be particularly prevalent in the central nervous system owing to the low DNA repair capacity in postmitotic brain tissue. It is generally believed that the cumulative effects of the deleterious changes that occur in aging, mostly after the reproductive phase, contribute to species-specific rates of aging. In addition to nuclear DNA damage contributions to aging, there is also abundant evidence for a causative link between mitochondrial DNA damage and the major phenotypes associated with aging. Understanding the mechanistic basis for the association of DNA damage and DNA repair with aging and age-related diseases, such as neurodegeneration, would give insight into contravening age-related diseases and promoting a healthy life span.

  14. DNA Damage Response Checkpoint Activation Drives KP1019 Dependent Pre-Anaphase Cell Cycle Delay in S. cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Bierle, Lindsey A; Reich, Kira L; Taylor, Braden E; Blatt, Eliot B; Middleton, Sydney M; Burke, Shawnecca D; Stultz, Laura K; Hanson, Pamela K; Partridge, Janet F; Miller, Mary E

    2015-01-01

    Careful regulation of the cell cycle is required for proper replication, cell division, and DNA repair. DNA damage--including that induced by many anticancer drugs--results in cell cycle delay or arrest, which can allow time for repair of DNA lesions. Although its molecular mechanism of action remains a matter of debate, the anticancer ruthenium complex KP1019 has been shown to bind DNA in biophysical assays and to damage DNA of colorectal and ovarian cancer cells in vitro. KP1019 has also been shown to induce mutations and induce cell cycle arrest in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, suggesting that budding yeast can serve as an appropriate model for characterizing the cellular response to the drug. Here we use a transcriptomic approach to verify that KP1019 induces the DNA damage response (DDR) and find that KP1019 dependent expression of HUG1 requires the Dun1 checkpoint; both consistent with KP1019 DDR in budding yeast. We observe a robust KP1019 dependent delay in cell cycle progression as measured by increase in large budded cells, 2C DNA content, and accumulation of Pds1 which functions to inhibit anaphase. Importantly, we also find that deletion of RAD9, a gene required for the DDR, blocks drug-dependent changes in cell cycle progression, thereby establishing a causal link between the DDR and phenotypes induced by KP1019. Interestingly, yeast treated with KP1019 not only delay in G2/M, but also exhibit abnormal nuclear position, wherein the nucleus spans the bud neck. This morphology correlates with short, misaligned spindles and is dependent on the dynein heavy chain gene DYN1. We find that KP1019 creates an environment where cells respond to DNA damage through nuclear (transcriptional changes) and cytoplasmic (motor protein activity) events.

  15. DNA Damage Induced Neuronal Death

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-10-01

    Experiments are proposed to examine the molecular mechanism by which mustard chemical warfare agents induce neuronal cell death . DNA damage is the...proposed underlying mechanism of mustard-induced neuronal cell death . We propose a novel research strategy to test this hypothesis by using mice with...perturbed DNA repair to explore the relationship between mustard-induced DNA damage and neuronal cell death . Initial in vitro studies (Years 1, 2 & 3

  16. Aurora A kinase is required for activation of the Fanconi anemia/BRCA pathway upon DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Chun, Min Jeong; Hwang, Soo Kyung; Kim, Hyoun Geun; Goh, Sung-Ho; Kim, Sunshin; Lee, Chang-Hun

    2016-07-01

    Previous studies have linked the DNA damage response to mitotic progression machinery. Mitotic kinases, such as Aurora A kinase and Polo-like kinase, are involved in the phosphorylation of cell cycle regulators in response to DNA damage. Here, we investigated the potential involvement of Aurora A kinase in the activation of the Fanconi anemia (FA)/BRCA pathway, which participates in cellular response to DNA interstrand cross-link lesions (ICL). Initially, we detected interactions between Aurora A kinase and FANCA protein, one of the components of the FA nuclear core complex. Silencing of Aurora A kinase led to inhibition of monoubiquitination of FANCD2 and formation of nuclear foci, the final consequences of FA/BRCA pathway activation upon ICL induction. An in vitro kinase assay revealed that Aurora A kinase phosphorylates S165 of FANCA. Moreover, this phosphorylation event was induced by the treatment with mitomycin C (MMC), an ICL-inducing agent. In cells overexpressing S165A mutant FANCA, monoubiquitination of FANCD2 and nuclear foci formation was impaired and cellular sensitivity to MMC was enhanced. These results suggest that S165 phosphorylation by Aurora A kinase is required for proper activation of the FA/BRCA pathway in response to DNA damage.

  17. Gentiana asclepiadea exerts antioxidant activity and enhances DNA repair of hydrogen peroxide- and silver nanoparticles-induced DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Hudecová, Alexandra; Kusznierewicz, Barbara; Hašplová, Katarína; Huk, Anna; Magdolenová, Zuzana; Miadoková, Eva; Gálová, Eliška; Dušinská, Mária

    2012-09-01

    Exposure to high levels of different environmental pollutants is known to be associated with induction of DNA damage in humans. Thus DNA repair is of great importance in preventing mutations and contributes crucially to the prevention of cancer. In our study we have focused on quantitative analysis of Gentiana asclepiadea aqueous or methanolic extracts obtained from flower and haulm, their antioxidant potency in ABTS post-column derivatisation, and their potential ability to enhance DNA repair in human lymphocytes after hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) treatment (250 μM, 5 min). We also studied DNA repair in human kidney HEK 293 cells after exposure to 20 nm silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) (100 μg/ml, 30 min) in the presence and absence of the plant extract. We have found that mangiferin along with unidentified polar compounds are the most pronounced antioxidants in the studied extracts. Extract from haulm exhibited slightly stronger antioxidant properties compared to flower extracts. However, all four extracts showed significant ability to enhance DNA repair in both cell types after H(2)O(2) and AgNP treatments.

  18. DNA damage, apoptosis and langerhans cells--Activators of UV-induced immune tolerance.

    PubMed

    Timares, Laura; Katiyar, Santosh K; Elmets, Craig A

    2008-01-01

    Solar UVR is highly mutagenic but is only partially absorbed by the outer stratum corneum of the epidermis. UVR can penetrate into the deeper layers of the epidermis, depending on melanin content, where it induces DNA damage and apoptosis in epidermal cells, including those in the germinative basal layer. The cellular decision to initiate either cellular repair or undergo apoptosis has evolved to balance the acute need to maintain skin barrier function with the long-term risk of retaining precancerous cells. Langerhans cells (LCs) are positioned suprabasally, where they may sense UV damage directly, or indirectly through recognition of apoptotic vesicles and soluble mediators derived from surrounding keratinocytes. Apoptotic vesicles will contain UV-induced altered proteins that may be presented to the immune system as foreign. The observation that UVR induces immune tolerance to skin-associated antigens suggests that this photodamage response has evolved to preserve the skin barrier by protecting it from autoimmune attack. LC involvement in this process is not clear and controversial. We will highlight some basic concepts of photobiology and review recent advances pertaining to UV-induced DNA damage, apoptosis regulation, novel immunomodulatory mechanisms and the role of LCs in generating antigen-specific regulatory T cells.

  19. Effects of blueberry (Vaccinium ashei) on DNA damage, lipid peroxidation, and phase II enzyme activities in rats.

    PubMed

    Dulebohn, Rachel V; Yi, Weiguang; Srivastava, Anita; Akoh, Casimir C; Krewer, Gerard; Fischer, Joan G

    2008-12-24

    Blueberry extracts have high antioxidant potential and increase phase II enzyme activities in vitro. This study tested the hypothesis that blueberries would reduce DNA damage and lipid peroxidation and increase phase II enzyme activities in vivo. Young, healthy male Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 8 per group) were fed control AIN-93 diets or AIN-93 diets supplemented with blueberries or blueberry extracts for 3 weeks. Diets were supplemented with 10% freeze-dried whole blueberries, blueberry polyphenol extract and sugars to match the 10% blueberry diet, or 1 and 0.2% blueberry flavonoids, which were primarily anthocyanins. Liver and colon mucosa glutathione-S-transferase (GST), quinone reductase, and UDP-glucuronosyltransferase activities in colon mucosa and liver were not significantly increased by freeze-dried whole blueberries or blueberry fractions. Liver GST activity, however, was approximately 25% higher than controls for the freeze-dried whole blueberry, blueberry polyphenol, and 1% flavonoid groups. DNA damage was significantly lower than control only in the liver of animals fed the 1% flavonoid diet. The level of urinary F(2)-isoprostanes, a measure of lipid peroxidation, was unaffected. In summary, in healthy rats, short-term supplementation with freeze-dried whole blueberries, blueberry polyphenols, or blueberry flavonoids did not significantly increase phase II enzyme activities. However, supplementation with 1% blueberry flavonoids did decrease oxidative DNA damage in the liver.

  20. Structure-function relationships governing activity and stability of a DNA alkylation damage repair thermostable protein.

    PubMed

    Perugino, Giuseppe; Miggiano, Riccardo; Serpe, Mario; Vettone, Antonella; Valenti, Anna; Lahiri, Samarpita; Rossi, Franca; Rossi, Mosè; Rizzi, Menico; Ciaramella, Maria

    2015-10-15

    Alkylated DNA-protein alkyltransferases repair alkylated DNA bases, which are among the most common DNA lesions, and are evolutionary conserved, from prokaryotes to higher eukaryotes. The human ortholog, hAGT, is involved in resistance to alkylating chemotherapy drugs. We report here on the alkylated DNA-protein alkyltransferase, SsOGT, from an archaeal species living at high temperature, a condition that enhances the harmful effect of DNA alkylation. The exceptionally high stability of SsOGT gave us the unique opportunity to perform structural and biochemical analysis of a protein of this class in its post-reaction form. This analysis, along with those performed on SsOGT in its ligand-free and DNA-bound forms, provides insights in the structure-function relationships of the protein before, during and after DNA repair, suggesting a molecular basis for DNA recognition, catalytic activity and protein post-reaction fate, and giving hints on the mechanism of alkylation-induced inactivation of this class of proteins.

  1. DNA Damage Response Checkpoint Activation Drives KP1019 Dependent Pre-Anaphase Cell Cycle Delay in S. cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Bierle, Lindsey A.; Reich, Kira L.; Taylor, Braden E.; Blatt, Eliot B.; Middleton, Sydney M.; Burke, Shawnecca D.; Stultz, Laura K.; Hanson, Pamela K.; Partridge, Janet F.; Miller, Mary E.

    2015-01-01

    Careful regulation of the cell cycle is required for proper replication, cell division, and DNA repair. DNA damage–including that induced by many anticancer drugs–results in cell cycle delay or arrest, which can allow time for repair of DNA lesions. Although its molecular mechanism of action remains a matter of debate, the anticancer ruthenium complex KP1019 has been shown to bind DNA in biophysical assays and to damage DNA of colorectal and ovarian cancer cells in vitro. KP1019 has also been shown to induce mutations and induce cell cycle arrest in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, suggesting that budding yeast can serve as an appropriate model for characterizing the cellular response to the drug. Here we use a transcriptomic approach to verify that KP1019 induces the DNA damage response (DDR) and find that KP1019 dependent expression of HUG1 requires the Dun1 checkpoint; both consistent with KP1019 DDR in budding yeast. We observe a robust KP1019 dependent delay in cell cycle progression as measured by increase in large budded cells, 2C DNA content, and accumulation of Pds1 which functions to inhibit anaphase. Importantly, we also find that deletion of RAD9, a gene required for the DDR, blocks drug-dependent changes in cell cycle progression, thereby establishing a causal link between the DDR and phenotypes induced by KP1019. Interestingly, yeast treated with KP1019 not only delay in G2/M, but also exhibit abnormal nuclear position, wherein the nucleus spans the bud neck. This morphology correlates with short, misaligned spindles and is dependent on the dynein heavy chain gene DYN1. We find that KP1019 creates an environment where cells respond to DNA damage through nuclear (transcriptional changes) and cytoplasmic (motor protein activity) events. PMID:26375390

  2. Protective Effect against Hydroxyl-induced DNA Damage and Antioxidant Activity of Radix Glycyrrhizae (Liquorice Root)

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xican; Chen, Weikang; Chen, Dongfeng

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: As a typical Chinese herbal medicine, Radix Glycyrrhizae (RG) possesses various pharmacological effects involved in antioxidant ability. However, its antioxidant has not been explored so far. The aim of the study was to investigate its antioxidant ability, then further discuss the antioxidant mechanism. Methods: RG was extracted by ethanol to obtain ethanolic extract of Radix Glycyrrhizae (ERG). ERG was then determined by various antioxidant methods, including DNA damage assay, DPPH assay, ABTS assay, Fe3+-reducing assay and Cu2+-reducing assay. Finally, the contents of total phenolics and total flavonoids were analyzed by spectrophotometric methods. Results: Our results revealed that ERG could effectively protect against hydroxyl-induced DNA damage (IC50 517.28±26.61μg/mL). In addition, ERG could scavenge DPPH· radical (IC50165.18±6.48μg/mL) and ABTS+• radical (IC507.46±0.07μg/mL), reduce Fe3+ (IC50 97.23±2.88 μg/mL) and Cu2+ (IC50 59.21±0.18 μg/mL). Chemical analysis demonstrated that the contents of total phenolics and flavonoids in ERG were 111.48±0.88 and 218.26±8.57 mg quercetin/g, respectively. Conclusion: Radix Glycyrrhizae can effectively protect against hydroxyl-induced DNA damage. One mechanism of protective effect may be radical-scavenging which is via donating hydrogen atom (H·), donating electron (e). Its antioxidant ability can be mainly attributed to the flavonoids or total phenolics. PMID:24312831

  3. Protective Effect against Hydroxyl-induced DNA Damage and Antioxidant Activity of Citri reticulatae Pericarpium

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xican; Huang, Yanping; Chen, Dongfeng

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: As a typical Chinese herbal medicine, Citri reticulatae pericarpium (CRP) possesses various pharmacological effects involved in antioxidant ability. However, its antioxidant effects have not been reported yet. The objective of this work was to investigate its antioxidant ability, then further discuss the antioxidant mechanism. Methods: CRP was extracted by ethanol to obtain ethanol extract of Citri reticulatae pericarpium (ECRP). ECRP was then measured by various antioxidant methods, including DNA damage assay, DPPH assay, ABTS assay, Fe3+-reducing assay and Cu2+-reducing assay. Finally, the content of total flavonoids was analyzed by spectrophotometric method. Results: Our results revealed that ECRP could effectively protect against hydroxyl-induced DNA damage (IC50 944.47±147.74 μg/mL). In addition, it could also scavenge DPPH· radical (IC50349.67±1.91 μg/mL) and ABTS+• radical (IC5011.33±0.10 μg/mL), reduce Fe3+ (IC50 140.95±2.15 μg/mL) and Cu2+ (IC50 70.46±1.77 μg/mL). Chemical analysis demonstrated that the content of total flavonoids in ECRP was 198.29±12.24 mg quercetin/g. Conclusion: Citri reticulatae pericarpium can effectively protect against hydroxyl-induced DNA damage. One mechanism of protective effect may be radical-scavenging which is via donating hydrogen atom (H·), donating electron (e). Its antioxidant ability can be mainly attributed to the flavonoids, especially hesperidin and narirutin. PMID:24312832

  4. NF-kappaB activation by camptothecin. A linkage between nuclear DNA damage and cytoplasmic signaling events.

    PubMed

    Huang, T T; Wuerzberger-Davis, S M; Seufzer, B J; Shumway, S D; Kurama, T; Boothman, D A; Miyamoto, S

    2000-03-31

    Activation of the transcription factor NF-kappaB by extracellular signals involves its release from the inhibitor protein IkappaBalpha in the cytoplasm and subsequent nuclear translocation. NF-kappaB can also be activated by the anticancer agent camptothecin (CPT), which inhibits DNA topoisomerase (Topo) I activity and causes DNA double-strand breaks during DNA replication to induce S phase-dependent cytotoxicity. Here we show that CPT activates NF-kappaB by a mechanism that is dependent on initial nuclear DNA damage followed by cytoplasmic signaling events. NF-kappaB activation by CPT is dramatically diminished in cytoplasts and in CEM/C2 cells expressing a mutant Topo I protein that fails to bind CPT. This response is intensified in S phase cell populations and is prevented by the DNA polymerase inhibitor aphidicolin. In addition, CPT activation of NF-kappaB involves degradation of cytoplasmic IkappaBalpha by the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway in a manner that depends on the IkappaB kinase complex. Finally, inhibition of NF-kappaB activation augments CPT-induced apoptosis. These findings elucidate the progression of signaling events that initiates in the nucleus with CPT-Topo I interaction and continues in the cytoplasm resulting in degradation of IkappaBalpha and nuclear translocation of NF-kappaB to attenuate the apoptotic response.

  5. Optical detection of DNA damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Kim R.; Apostol, A.; Cembrano, J.

    1999-02-01

    A rapid and sensitive fluorescence assay for oxidative damage to calf thymus DNA is reported. A decrease in the transition temperature for strand separation resulted from exposure of the DNA to the reactive decomposition products of 3- morpholinosydnonimine (SIN-1) (i.e., nitric oxide, superoxide, peroxynitrite, hydrogen peroxide, and hydroxyl radicals). A decrease in melting temperature of 12 degrees Celsius was indicative of oxidative damage including single strand chain breaks. Double stranded (ds) and single stranded (ss) forms of DNA were determined using the indicator dyes ethidium bromide and PicoGreen. The change in DNA 'melting' curves was dependant on the concentration of SIN-1 and was most pronounced at 75 degrees Celsius. This chemically induced damage was significantly inhibited by sodium citrate, tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane (Tris), and diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA), but was unaffected by superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase, ethylenediamine tetraacietic acid (EDTA), or deferoxamine. Lowest observable effect level for SIN-1-induced damage was 200 (mu) M.

  6. The DNA damage response during mitosis.

    PubMed

    Heijink, Anne Margriet; Krajewska, Małgorzata; van Vugt, Marcel A T M

    2013-10-01

    Cells are equipped with a cell-intrinsic signaling network called the DNA damage response (DDR). This signaling network recognizes DNA lesions and initiates various downstream pathways to coordinate a cell cycle arrest with the repair of the damaged DNA. Alternatively, the DDR can mediate clearance of affected cells that are beyond repair through apoptosis or senescence. The DDR can be activated in response to DNA damage throughout the cell cycle, although the extent of DDR signaling is different in each cell cycle phase. Especially in response to DNA double strand breaks, only a very marginal response was observed during mitosis. Early on it was recognized that cells which are irradiated during mitosis continued division without repairing broken chromosomes. Although these initial observations indicated diminished DNA repair and lack of an acute DNA damage-induced cell cycle arrest, insight into the mechanistic re-wiring of DDR signaling during mitosis was only recently provided. Different mechanisms appear to be at play to inactivate specific signaling axes of the DDR network in mitosis. Importantly, mitotic cells not simply inactivate the entire DDR, but appear to mark their DNA damage for repair after mitotic exit. Since the treatment of cancer frequently involves agents that induce DNA damage as well as agents that block mitotic progression, it is clinically relevant to obtain a better understanding of how cancer cells deal with DNA damage during interphase versus mitosis. In this review, the molecular details concerning DDR signaling during mitosis as well as the consequences of encountering DNA damage during mitosis for cellular fate are discussed.

  7. Replicating damaged DNA in eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Nimrat; Siede, Wolfram

    2013-12-01

    DNA damage is one of many possible perturbations that challenge the mechanisms that preserve genetic stability during the copying of the eukaryotic genome in S phase. This short review provides, in the first part, a general introduction to the topic and an overview of checkpoint responses. In the second part, the mechanisms of error-free tolerance in response to fork-arresting DNA damage will be discussed in some detail.

  8. Protein kinase C{eta} activates NF-{kappa}B in response to camptothecin-induced DNA damage

    SciTech Connect

    Raveh-Amit, Hadas; Hai, Naama; Rotem-Dai, Noa; Shahaf, Galit; Gopas, Jacob; Livneh, Etta

    2011-08-26

    Highlights: {yields} Protein kinase C-eta (PKC{eta}) is an upstream regulator of the NF-{kappa}B signaling pathway. {yields} PKC{eta} activates NF-{kappa}B in non-stressed conditions and in response to DNA damage. {yields} PKC{eta} regulates NF-{kappa}B by activating I{kappa}B kinase (IKK) and inducing I{kappa}B degradation. -- Abstract: The nuclear factor {kappa}B (NF-{kappa}B) family of transcription factors participates in the regulation of genes involved in innate- and adaptive-immune responses, cell death and inflammation. The involvement of the Protein kinase C (PKC) family in the regulation of NF-{kappa}B in inflammation and immune-related signaling has been extensively studied. However, not much is known on the role of PKC in NF-{kappa}B regulation in response to DNA damage. Here we demonstrate for the first time that PKC-eta (PKC{eta}) regulates NF-{kappa}B upstream signaling by activating the I{kappa}B kinase (IKK) and the degradation of I{kappa}B. Furthermore, PKC{eta} enhances the nuclear translocation and transactivation of NF-{kappa}B under non-stressed conditions and in response to the anticancer drug camptothecin. We and others have previously shown that PKC{eta} confers protection against DNA damage-induced apoptosis. Our present study suggests that PKC{eta} is involved in NF-{kappa}B signaling leading to drug resistance.

  9. DNA Repair by Reversal of DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Chengqi; He, Chuan

    2013-01-01

    Endogenous and exogenous factors constantly challenge cellular DNA, generating cytotoxic and/or mutagenic DNA adducts. As a result, organisms have evolved different mechanisms to defend against the deleterious effects of DNA damage. Among these diverse repair pathways, direct DNA-repair systems provide cells with simple yet efficient solutions to reverse covalent DNA adducts. In this review, we focus on recent advances in the field of direct DNA repair, namely, photolyase-, alkyltransferase-, and dioxygenase-mediated repair processes. We present specific examples to describe new findings of known enzymes and appealing discoveries of new proteins. At the end of this article, we also briefly discuss the influence of direct DNA repair on other fields of biology and its implication on the discovery of new biology. PMID:23284047

  10. Activation of EGFR and ERBB2 by Helicobacter pylori Results in Survival of Gastric Epithelial Cells with DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Chaturvedi, Rupesh; Asim, Mohammad; Piazuelo, M. Blanca; Yan, Fang; Barry, Daniel P.; Sierra, Johanna Carolina; Delgado, Alberto G.; Hill, Salisha; Casero, Robert A.; Bravo, Luis E.; Dominguez, Ricardo L.; Correa, Pelayo; Polk, D. Brent; Washington, M. Kay; Rose, Kristie L.; Schey, Kevin L.; Morgan, Douglas R.; Peek, Richard M.; Wilson, Keith T.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS The gastric cancer-causing pathogen Helicobacter pylori upregulates spermine oxidase (SMOX) in gastric epithelial cells, causing oxidative stress-induced apoptosis and DNA damage. A subpopulation of SMOXhigh cells are resistant to apoptosis, despite their high levels of DNA damage. Because epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) activation can regulate apoptosis, we determined its role in SMOX-mediated effects. METHODS SMOX, apoptosis, and DNA damage were measured in gastric epithelial cells from H pylori-infected Egfrwa5 mice (which have attenuated EGFR activity), Egfr wild-type mice, or in infected cells incubated with EGFR inhibitors or deficient in EGFR. Phosphoproteomic analysis was performed. Two independent tissue microarrays containing each stage of disease, from gastritis to carcinoma, and gastric biopsies from Colombian and Honduran cohorts were analyzed by immunohistochemistry. RESULTS SMOX expression and DNA damage were decreased, and apoptosis increased in H pylori-infected Egfrwa5 mice. H pylori-infected cells with deletion or inhibition of EGFR had reduced levels of SMOX, DNA damage, and DNA damagehigh apoptosislow cells. Phosphoproteomic analysis revealed increased EGFR and ERBB2 signaling. Immunoblot analysis demonstrated the presence of a phosphorylated (p)EGFR–ERBB2 heterodimer and pERBB2; knockdown of ErbB2 facilitated apoptosis of DNA damagehigh apoptosislow cells. SMOX was increased in all stages of gastric disease, peaking in tissues with intestinal metaplasia, whereas pEGFR, pEGFR–ERBB2, and pERBB2 were increased predominantly in tissues demonstrating gastritis or atrophic gastritis. Principal component analysis separated gastritis tissues from patients with cancer vs those without cancer. pEGFR, pEGFR–ERBB2, pERBB2, and SMOX were increased in gastric samples from patients whose disease progressed to intestinal metaplasia or dysplasia, compared with patients whose disease did not progress. CONCLUSIONS In an analysis

  11. DNA damage and carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Stelow, R B

    1980-01-01

    Although cancer may arise as a result of many different types of molecular changes, there is little reason to doubt that changes to DNA are one of the more important ones in cancer initiation. Although DNA repair mechanisms seem able to eliminate a very large fraction of deleterious changes to DNA, we not only have little insight into the molecular mechanisms involved in such repair, but have a negligible amount of information to permit us to estimate the shape of dose response relations at low doses. The case of skin cancer is a special one, in that the average population is exposed to sufficient solar uv so that the effects of small increments in uv dose may be estimated. An approximate 85% reduction in DNA repair increases skin cancer incidence 10/sup 4/ fold.

  12. Lovastatin prevents cisplatin-induced activation of pro-apoptotic DNA damage response (DDR) of renal tubular epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Krüger, Katharina; Ziegler, Verena; Hartmann, Christina; Henninger, Christian; Thomale, Jürgen; Schupp, Nicole; Fritz, Gerhard

    2016-02-01

    The platinating agent cisplatin (CisPt) is commonly used in the therapy of various types of solid tumors. The anticancer efficacy of CisPt largely depends on the formation of bivalent DNA intrastrand crosslinks, which stimulate mechanisms of the DNA damage response (DDR), thereby triggering checkpoint activation, gene expression and cell death. The clinically most relevant adverse effect associated with CisPt treatment is nephrotoxicity that results from damage to renal tubular epithelial cells. Here, we addressed the question whether the HMG-CoA-reductase inhibitor lovastatin affects the DDR of renal cells by employing rat renal proximal tubular epithelial (NRK-52E) cells as in vitro model. The data show that lovastatin has extensive inhibitory effects on CisPt-stimulated DDR of NRK-52E cells as reflected on the levels of phosphorylated ATM, Chk1, Chk2, p53 and Kap1. Mitigation of CisPt-induced DDR by lovastatin was independent of the formation of DNA damage as demonstrated by (i) the analysis of Pt-(GpG) intrastrand crosslink formation by Southwestern blot analyses and (ii) the generation of DNA strand breaks as analyzed on the level of nuclear γH2AX foci and employing the alkaline comet assay. Lovastatin protected NRK-52E cells from the cytotoxicity of high CisPt doses as shown by measuring cell viability, cellular impedance and flow cytometry-based analyses of cell death. Importantly, the statin also reduced the level of kidney DNA damage and apoptosis triggered by CisPt treatment of mice. The data show that the lipid-lowering drug lovastatin extensively counteracts pro-apoptotic signal mechanisms of the DDR of tubular epithelial cells following CisPt injury.

  13. Evaluation of the Toxicity, AChE Activity and DNA Damage Caused by Imidacloprid on Earthworms, Eisenia fetida.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kai; Qi, Suzhen; Mu, Xiyan; Chai, Tingting; Yang, Yang; Wang, Dandan; Li, Dongzhi; Che, Wunan; Wang, Chengju

    2015-10-01

    Imidacloprid is a well-known pesticide and it is timely to evaluate its toxicity to earthworms (Eisenia fetida). In the present study, the effect of imidacloprid on reproduction, growth, acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and DNA damage in earthworms was assessed using an artificial soil medium. The median lethal concentration (LC50) and the median number of hatched cocoons (EC50) of imidacloprid to earthworms was 3.05 and 0.92 mg/kg respectively, the lowest observed effect concentration of imidacloprid about hatchability, growth, AChE activity and DNA damage was 0.02, 0.5, 0.1 and 0.5 mg/kg, respectively.

  14. DNA damage and activated caspase-3 expression in neurons and astrocytes: evidence for apoptosis in frontotemporal dementia.

    PubMed

    Su, J H; Nichol, K E; Sitch, T; Sheu, P; Chubb, C; Miller, B L; Tomaselli, K J; Kim, R C; Cotman, C W

    2000-05-01

    Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is a neurodegenerative disease which affects mainly the frontal and anterior temporal cortex. It is associated with neuronal loss, gliosis, and microvacuolation of lamina I to III in these brain regions. In previous studies we have described neurons with DNA damage in the absence of tangle formation and suggested this may result in tangle-independent mechanisms of neurodegeneration in the AD brain. In the present study, we sought to examine DNA fragmentation and activated caspase-3 expression in FTD brain where tangle formation is largely absent. The results demonstrate that numerous nuclei were TdT positive in all FTD brains examined. Activated caspase-3 immunoreactivity was detected in both neurons and astrocytes and was elevated in FTD cases as compared to control cases. A subset of activated caspase-3-positive cells were also TdT positive. In addition, the cell bodies of a subset of astrocytes showed enlarged, irregular shapes, and vacuolation and their processes appeared fragmented. These degenerating astrocytes were positive for activated caspase-3 and colocalized with robust TdT-labeled nuclei. These findings suggest that a subset of astrocytes exhibit degeneration and that DNA damage and activated caspase-3 may contribute to neuronal cell death and astrocyte degeneration in the FTD brain. Our results suggest that apoptosis may be a mechanism of neuronal cell death in FTD as well as in AD (228).

  15. Targeting neddylation induces DNA damage and checkpoint activation and sensitizes chronic lymphocytic leukemia B cells to alkylating agents.

    PubMed

    Paiva, C; Godbersen, J C; Berger, A; Brown, J R; Danilov, A V

    2015-07-09

    Microenvironment-mediated upregulation of the B-cell receptor (BCR) and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) signaling in CLL cells resident in the lymph node and bone marrow promotes apoptosis evasion and clonal expansion. We recently reported that MLN4924 (pevonedistat), an investigational agent that inhibits the NEDD8-activating enzyme (NAE), abrogates stromal-mediated NF-κB pathway activity and CLL cell survival. However, the NAE pathway also assists degradation of multiple other substrates. MLN4924 has been shown to induce DNA damage and cell cycle arrest, but the importance of this mechanism in primary neoplastic B cells has not been studied. Here we mimicked the lymph node microenvironment using CD40 ligand (CD40L)-expressing stroma and interleukin-21 (IL-21) to find that inducing proliferation of the primary CLL cells conferred enhanced sensitivity to NAE inhibition. Treatment of the CD40-stimulated CLL cells with MLN4924 resulted in deregulation of Cdt1, a DNA replication licensing factor, and cell cycle inhibitors p21 and p27. This led to DNA damage, checkpoint activation and G2 arrest. Alkylating agents bendamustine and chlorambucil enhanced MLN4924-mediated DNA damage and apoptosis. These events were more prominent in cells stimulated with IL-21 compared with CD40L alone, indicating that, following NAE inhibition, the culture conditions were able to direct CLL cell fate from an NF-κB inhibition to a Cdt1 induction program. Our data provide insight into the biological consequences of targeting NAE in CLL and serves as further rationale for studying the clinical activity of MLN4924 in CLL, particularly in combination with alkylating agents.

  16. Sperm DNA oxidative damage and DNA adducts

    PubMed Central

    Jeng, Hueiwang Anna; Pan, Chih-Hong; Chao, Mu-Rong; Lin, Wen-Yi

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate DNA damage and adducts in sperm from coke oven workers who have been exposed to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. A longitudinal study was conducted with repeated measurements during spermatogenesis. Coke-oven workers (n=112) from a coke-oven plant served the PAH-exposed group, while administrators and security personnel (n=67) served the control. Routine semen parameters (concentration, motility, vitality, and morphology) were analyzed simultaneously; the assessment of sperm DNA integrity endpoints included DNA fragmentation, bulky DNA adducts, and 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-oxo-dGuo). The degree of sperm DNA fragmentation was measured using the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling (TUNEL) assay and sperm chromatin structure assay (SCSA). The PAH-exposed group had a significant increase in bulky DNA adducts and 8-oxo-dGuo compared to the control subjects (Ps = 0.002 and 0.045, respectively). Coke oven workers' percentages of DNA fragmentation and denaturation from the PAH-exposed group were not significantly different from those of the control subjects (Ps = 0.232 and 0.245, respectively). Routine semen parameters and DNA integrity endpoints were not correlated. Concentrations of 8-oxo-dGuo were positively correlated with percentages of DNA fragmentation measured by both TUNEL and SCSA (Ps = 0.045 and 0.034, respectively). However, the concentrations of 8-oxo-dGuo and percentages of DNA fragmentation did not correlate with concentrations of bulky DNA adducts. In summary, coke oven workers with chronic exposure to PAHs experienced decreased sperm DNA integrity. Oxidative stress could contribute to the degree of DNA fragmentation. Bulky DNA adducts may be independent of the formation of DNA fragmentation and oxidative adducts in sperm. Monitoring sperm DNA integrity is recommended as a part of the process of assessing the impact of occupational and environmental toxins on

  17. The RNA Splicing Response to DNA Damage.

    PubMed

    Shkreta, Lulzim; Chabot, Benoit

    2015-10-29

    The number of factors known to participate in the DNA damage response (DDR) has expanded considerably in recent years to include splicing and alternative splicing factors. While the binding of splicing proteins and ribonucleoprotein complexes to nascent transcripts prevents genomic instability by deterring the formation of RNA/DNA duplexes, splicing factors are also recruited to, or removed from, sites of DNA damage. The first steps of the DDR promote the post-translational modification of splicing factors to affect their localization and activity, while more downstream DDR events alter their expression. Although descriptions of molecular mechanisms remain limited, an emerging trend is that DNA damage disrupts the coupling of constitutive and alternative splicing with the transcription of genes involved in DNA repair, cell-cycle control and apoptosis. A better understanding of how changes in splice site selection are integrated into the DDR may provide new avenues to combat cancer and delay aging.

  18. Oxidative DNA damage levels and catalase activity in the clam Ruditapes decussatus as pollution biomarkers of Tunisian marine environment.

    PubMed

    Jebali, Jamel; Banni, Mohamed; de Almeida, Eduardo Alves; Boussetta, Hamadi

    2007-01-01

    Levels of the oxidative DNA damage 7, 8-dihydro-8-oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) and catalase (CAT) activity were measured in the digestive gland and gills of clams Ruditapes decussatus, related to the presence of pollutants along Tunisian marine environment. Increased levels of CAT were observed in tissues of clams from all the sites studied, compared to control values, and elevated 8-oxodG levels were observed at specific sites. Results obtained in this work indicate that the measurement of 8-oxodG levels and CAT activity in tissues of R. decussatus is promising in pollution monitoring studies of the Tunisian marine environment.

  19. Types and Consequences of DNA Damage

    EPA Science Inventory

    This review provides a concise overview of the types of DNA damage and the molecular mechanisms by which a cell senses DNA damage, repairs the damage, converts the damage into a mutation, or dies as a consequence of unrepaired DNA damage. Such information is important in consid...

  20. Protective activity of C-geranylflavonoid analogs from Paulownia tomentosa against DNA damage in 137Cs irradiated AHH-1 cells.

    PubMed

    Moon, Hyung-In; Jeong, Min Ho; Jo, Wol Soon

    2014-09-01

    Radiotherapy is an important form of treatment for a wide range of cancers, but it can damage DNA and cause adverse effects. We investigated if the diplacone analogs of P. tomentosa were radio-protective in a human lymphoblastoid cell line (AHH-1). Four geranylated flavonoids, diplacone, 3'-O-methyl-5'-hydroxydiplacone, 3'-O-methyl-5'-O-methyldiplacone and 3'-O-methyldiplacol, were tested for their antioxidant and radio-protective effects. Diplacone analogs effectively scavenged free radicals and inhibited radiation-induced DNA strand breaks in vitro. They significantly decreased levels of reactive oxygen species and cellular DNA damage in 2 Gy-irradiated AHH-1 cells. Glutathione levels and superoxide dismutase activity in irradiated AHH-1 cells increased significantly after treatment with these analogs. The enhanced biological anti-oxidant activity and radioprotective activity of diplacone analogs maintained the survival of irradiated AHH-1 cells in a clonogenic assay. These data suggest that diplacone analogs may protect healthy tissue surrounding tumor cells during radiotherapy to ensure better control of radiotherapy and allow higher doses of radiotherapy to be employed.

  1. New orally active DNA minor groove binding small molecule CT-1 acts against breast cancer by targeting tumor DNA damage leading to p53-dependent apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Saini, Karan Singh; Hamidullah; Ashraf, Raghib; Mandalapu, Dhanaraju; Das, Sharmistha; Siddiqui, Mohd Quadir; Dwivedi, Sonam; Sarkar, Jayanta; Sharma, Vishnu Lal; Konwar, Rituraj

    2017-04-01

    Targeting tumor DNA damage and p53 pathway is a clinically established strategy in the development of cancer chemotherapeutics. Majority of anti-cancer drugs are delivered through parenteral route for reasons like severe toxicity, lack of stability, and poor enteral absorption. Current DNA targeting drugs in clinical like anthracycline suffers from major drawbacks like cardiotoxicity. Here, we report identification of a new orally active small molecule curcumin-triazole conjugate (CT-1) with significant anti-breast cancer activity in vitro and in vivo. CT-1 selectively and significantly inhibits viability of breast cancer cell lines; retards cells cycle progression at S phase and induce mitochondrial-mediated cell apoptosis. CT-1 selectively binds to minor groove of DNA and induces DNA damage leading to increase in p53 along with decrease in its ubiquitination. Inhibition of p53 with pharmacological inhibitor as well as siRNA revealed the necessity of p53 in CT-1-mediated anti-cancer effects in breast cancer cells. Studies using several other intact p53 and deficient p53 cancer cell lines further confirmed necessity of p53 in CT-1-mediated anti-cancer response. Pharmacological inhibition of pan-caspase showed CT-1 induces caspase-dependent cell death in breast cancer cells. Most interestingly, oral administration of CT-1 induces significant inhibition of tumor growth in LA-7 syngeneic orthotropic rat mammary tumor model. CT-1 treated mammary tumor shows enhancement in DNA damage, p53 upregulation, and apoptosis. Collectively, CT-1 exhibits potent anti-cancer effect both in vitro and in vivo and could serve as a safe orally active lead for anti-cancer drug development. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Maternal diabetes triggers DNA damage and DNA damage response in neurulation stage embryos through oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Daoyin; Yu, Jingwen; Wu, Yanqing; Fu, Noah; Villela, Natalia Arias; Yang, Peixin

    2015-01-01

    DNA damage and DNA damage response (DDR) in neurulation stage embryos under maternal diabetes conditions are not well understood. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether maternal diabetes and high glucose in vitro induce DNA damage and DDR in the developing embryo through oxidative stress. In vivo experiments were conducted by mating superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) transgenic male mice with wild-type (WT) female mice with or without diabetes. Embryonic day 8.75 (E8.75) embryos were tested for the DNA damage markers, phosphorylated histone H2A.X (p-H2A.X) and DDR signaling intermediates, including phosphorylated checkpoint 1 (p-Chk1), phosphorylated checkpoint 2 (p-Chk2), and p53. Levels of the same DNA damage markers and DDR signaling intermediates were also determined in the mouse C17.2 neural stem cell line. Maternal diabetes and high glucose in vitro significantly increased the levels of p-H2A.X. Levels of p-Chk1, p-Chk2, and p53, were elevated under both maternal diabetic and high glucose conditions. SOD1 overexpression blocked maternal diabetes-induced DNA damage and DDR in vivo. Tempol, a SOD1 mimetic, diminished high glucose-induced DNA damage and DDR in vitro. In conclusion, maternal diabetes and high glucose in vitro induce DNA damage and activates DDR through oxidative stress, which may contribute to the pathogenesis of diabetes-associated embryopathy. PMID:26427872

  3. Effects of Chlorophenoxy Herbicides and Their Main Transformation Products on DNA Damage and Acetylcholinesterase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Benfeito, Sofia; Silva, Tiago; Garrido, Jorge; Andrade, Paula B.; Sottomayor, M. J.; Borges, Fernanda; Garrido, E. Manuela

    2014-01-01

    Persistent pesticide transformation products (TPs) are increasingly being detected among different environmental compartments, including groundwater and surface water. However, there is no sufficient experimental data on their toxicological potential to assess the risk associated with TPs, even if their occurrence is known. In this study, the interaction of chlorophenoxy herbicides (MCPA, mecoprop, 2,4-D and dichlorprop) and their main transformation products with calf thymus DNA by UV-visible absorption spectroscopy has been assessed. Additionally, the toxicity of the chlorophenoxy herbicides and TPs was also assessed evaluating the inhibition of acetylcholinesterase activity. On the basis of the results found, it seems that AChE is not the main target of chlorophenoxy herbicides and their TPs. However, the results found showed that the transformation products displayed a higher inhibitory activity when compared with the parent herbicides. The results obtained in the DNA interaction studies showed, in general, a slight effect on the stability of the double helix. However, the data found for 4-chloro-2-methyl-6-nitrophenol suggest that this transformation product can interact with DNA through a noncovalent mode. PMID:24795892

  4. Phorate-induced oxidative stress, DNA damage and transcriptional activation of p53 and caspase genes in male Wistar rats

    SciTech Connect

    Saquib, Quaiser; Attia, Sabry M.; Siddiqui, Maqsood A.; Aboul-Soud, Mourad A.M.; Al-Khedhairy, Abdulaziz A.; Giesy, John P.; Musarrat, Javed

    2012-02-15

    Male Wistar rats exposed to a systemic organophosphorus insecticide, phorate [O,O-diethyl S-[(ethylthio) methyl] phosphorothioate] at varying oral doses of 0.046, 0.092 or 0.184 mg phorate/kg bw for 14 days, exhibited substantial oxidative stress, cellular DNA damage and activation of apoptosis-related p53, caspase 3 and 9 genes. The histopathological changes including the pyknotic nuclei, inflammatory leukocyte infiltrations, renal necrosis, and cardiac myofiber degeneration were observed in the liver, kidney and heart tissues. Biochemical analysis of catalase and glutathione revealed significantly lesser activities of antioxidative enzymes and lipid peroxidation in tissues of phorate exposed rats. Furthermore, generation of intracellular reactive oxygen species and reduced mitochondrial membrane potential in bone marrow cells confirmed phorate-induced oxidative stress. Significant DNA damage was measured through comet assay in terms of the Olive tail moment in bone marrow cells of treated animals as compared to control. Cell cycle analysis also demonstrated the G{sub 2}/M arrest and appearance of a distinctive SubG{sub 1} peak, which signified induction of apoptosis. Up-regulation of tumor suppressor p53 and caspase 3 and 9 genes, determined by quantitative real-time PCR and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, elucidated the activation of intrinsic apoptotic pathways in response to cellular stress. Overall, the results suggest that phorate induces genetic alterations and cellular toxicity, which can adversely affect the normal cellular functioning in rats. -- Highlights: ► This is the first report on molecular toxicity of phorate in an in vivo test system. ► Phorate induces biochemical and histological changes in liver, kidney and heart. ► Rats treated with phorate exhibited DNA damage in bone marrow cells. ► Phorate induces apoptosis, oxidative stress and alters mitochondrial fluorescence. ► Phorate induces transcriptional changes and enhanced

  5. Chemical Composition, Antioxidant, DNA Damage Protective, Cytotoxic and Antibacterial Activities of Cyperus rotundus Rhizomes Essential Oil against Foodborne Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Qing-Ping; Cao, Xin-Ming; Hao, Dong-Lin; Zhang, Liang-Liang

    2017-01-01

    Cyperus rotundus L. (Cyperaceae) is a medicinal herb traditionally used to treat various clinical conditions at home. In this study, chemical composition of Cyperus rotundus rhizomes essential oil, and in vitro antioxidant, DNA damage protective and cytotoxic activities as well as antibacterial activity against foodborne pathogens were investigated. Results showed that α-cyperone (38.46%), cyperene (12.84%) and α-selinene (11.66%) were the major components of the essential oil. The essential oil had an excellent antioxidant activity, the protective effect against DNA damage, and cytotoxic effects on the human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cell, as well as antibacterial activity against several foodborne pathogens. These biological activities were dose-dependent, increasing with higher dosage in a certain concentration range. The antibacterial effects of essential oil were greater against Gram-positive bacteria as compared to Gram-negative bacteria, and the antibacterial effects were significantly influenced by incubation time and concentration. These results may provide biological evidence for the practical application of the C. rotundus rhizomes essential oil in food and pharmaceutical industries. PMID:28338066

  6. Historical perspective on the DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Hanawalt, Philip C

    2015-12-01

    The DNA damage response (DDR) has been broadly defined as a complex network of cellular pathways that cooperate to sense and repair lesions in DNA. Multiple types of DNA damage, some natural DNA sequences, nucleotide pool deficiencies and collisions with transcription complexes can cause replication arrest to elicit the DDR. However, in practice, the term DDR as applied to eukaryotic/mammalian cells often refers more specifically to pathways involving the activation of the ATM (ataxia-telangiectasia mutated) and ATR (ATM-Rad3-related) kinases in response to double-strand breaks or arrested replication forks, respectively. Nevertheless, there are distinct responses to particular types of DNA damage that do not involve ATM or ATR. In addition, some of the aberrations that cause replication arrest and elicit the DDR cannot be categorized as direct DNA damage. These include nucleotide pool deficiencies, nucleotide sequences that can adopt non-canonical DNA structures, and collisions between replication forks and transcription complexes. The response to these aberrations can be called the genomic stress response (GSR), a term that is meant to encompass the sensing of all types of DNA aberrations together with the mechanisms involved in coping with them. In addition to fully functional cells, the consequences of processing genomic aberrations may include mutagenesis, genomic rearrangements and lethality.

  7. Historical Perspective on the DNA Damage Response

    PubMed Central

    Hanawalt, Philip C.

    2015-01-01

    The DNA damage response (DDR) has been broadly defined as a complex network of cellular pathways that cooperate to sense and repair lesions in DNA. Multiple types of DNA damage, some natural DNA sequences, nucleotide pool deficiencies and collisions with transcription complexes can cause replication arrest to elicit the DDR. However, in practice, the term DDR as applied to eukaryotic/mammalian cells often refers more specifically to pathways involving the activation of the ATM (ataxia-telangiectasia mutated) and ATR (ATM-Rad3-related) kinases in response to double-strand breaks or arrested replication forks, respectively. Nevertheless, there are distinct responses to particular types of DNA damage that do not involve ATM or ATR. In addition, some of the aberrations that cause replication arrest and elicit the DDR cannot be categorized as direct DNA damage. These include nucleotide pool deficiencies, nucleotide sequences that can adopt non-canonical DNA structures, and collisions between replication forks and transcription complexes. The response to these aberrations can be called the genomic stress response (GSR), a term that is meant to encompass the sensing of all types of DNA aberrations together with the mechanisms involved in coping with them. In addition to fully functional cells, the consequences of processing genomic aberrations may include mutagenesis, genomic rearrangements and lethality. PMID:26507443

  8. DNA Damage and Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Ranchoux, Benoît; Meloche, Jolyane; Paulin, Roxane; Boucherat, Olivier; Provencher, Steeve; Bonnet, Sébastien

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is defined by a mean pulmonary arterial pressure over 25 mmHg at rest and is diagnosed by right heart catheterization. Among the different groups of PH, pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is characterized by a progressive obstruction of distal pulmonary arteries, related to endothelial cell dysfunction and vascular cell proliferation, which leads to an increased pulmonary vascular resistance, right ventricular hypertrophy, and right heart failure. Although the primary trigger of PAH remains unknown, oxidative stress and inflammation have been shown to play a key role in the development and progression of vascular remodeling. These factors are known to increase DNA damage that might favor the emergence of the proliferative and apoptosis-resistant phenotype observed in PAH vascular cells. High levels of DNA damage were reported to occur in PAH lungs and remodeled arteries as well as in animal models of PH. Moreover, recent studies have demonstrated that impaired DNA-response mechanisms may lead to an increased mutagen sensitivity in PAH patients. Finally, PAH was linked with decreased breast cancer 1 protein (BRCA1) and DNA topoisomerase 2-binding protein 1 (TopBP1) expression, both involved in maintaining genome integrity. This review aims to provide an overview of recent evidence of DNA damage and DNA repair deficiency and their implication in PAH pathogenesis. PMID:27338373

  9. Ferulic acid (FA) abrogates γ-radiation induced oxidative stress and DNA damage by up-regulating nuclear translocation of Nrf2 and activation of NHEJ pathway.

    PubMed

    Das, Ujjal; Manna, Krishnendu; Khan, Amitava; Sinha, Mahuya; Biswas, Sushobhan; Sengupta, Aaveri; Chakraborty, Anindita; Dey, Sanjit

    2017-01-01

    The present study was aimed to evaluate the radioprotective effect of ferulic acid (FA), a naturally occurring plant flavonoid in terms of DNA damage and damage related alterations of repair pathways by gamma radiation. FA was administered at a dose of 50 mg/kg body weight for five consecutive days prior to exposing the swiss albino mice to a single dose of 10 Gy gamma radiation. Ionising radiation induces oxidative damage manifested by decreased expression of Cu, Zn-SOD (SOD stands for super oxide dismutase), Mn-SOD and catalase. Gamma radiation promulgated reactive oxygen species (ROS) mediated DNA damage and modified repair pathways. ROS enhanced nuclear translocation of p53, activated ATM (ataxia telangiectasia-mutated protein), increased expression of GADD45a (growth arrest and DNA-damage-inducible protein) gene and inactivated Non homologous end joining (NHEJ) repair pathway. The comet formation in irradiated mice peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) reiterated the DNA damage in IR exposed groups. FA pretreatment significantly prevented the comet formation and regulated the nuclear translocation of p53, inhibited ATM activation and expression of GADD45a gene. FA promoted the nuclear translocation of nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2) and activated NHEJ repair pathway to overcome ROS mediated oxidative stress and DNA damage. Therefore, the current study stated that FA can challenge the oxidative stress by (i) inducing nuclear translocation of Nrf2, (ii) scavenging ROS, and (iii) activating NHEJ DNA repair process.

  10. Polyphenols and DNA Damage: A Mixed Blessing

    PubMed Central

    Azqueta, Amaya; Collins, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Polyphenols are a very broad group of chemicals, widely distributed in plant foods, and endowed with antioxidant activity by virtue of their numerous phenol groups. They are widely studied as putative cancer-protective agents, potentially contributing to the cancer preventive properties of fruits and vegetables. We review recent publications relating to human trials, animal experiments and cell culture, grouping them according to whether polyphenols are investigated in whole foods and drinks, in plant extracts, or as individual compounds. A variety of assays are in use to study genetic damage endpoints. Human trials, of which there are rather few, tend to show decreases in endogenous DNA damage and protection against DNA damage induced ex vivo in blood cells. Most animal experiments have investigated the effects of polyphenols (often at high doses) in combination with known DNA-damaging agents, and generally they show protection. High concentrations can themselves induce DNA damage, as demonstrated in numerous cell culture experiments; low concentrations, on the other hand, tend to decrease DNA damage. PMID:27918471

  11. Endothelin-1 protects human melanocytes from UV-induced DNA damage by activating JNK and p38 signalling pathways.

    PubMed

    von Koschembahr, Anne M; Swope, Viki B; Starner, Renny J; Abdel-Malek, Zalfa A

    2015-04-01

    Endothelin-1 is a paracrine factor with mitogenic, melanogenic and survival effects on cultured human melanocytes. We report that endothelin-1 signalling reduced the generation and enhanced the repair of ultraviolet radiation (UV)-induced DNA photoproducts, and inhibited apoptosis of human melanocytes, without increasing cAMP levels, melanin content or proliferation. Treatment with endothelin-1 activated the MAP kinases JNK and p38, as evidenced by phosphorylation of their target, activating transcription factor-2 (ATF-2). Endothelin-1 also enhanced the phosphorylation of JNK, p38 and ATF-2 by UV. The effects of endothelin-1 were dependent on increasing intracellular calcium mobilization by endothelin B receptor signalling. Activation of both JNK and p38 was required for reducing DNA photoproducts, but only JNK partially contributed to the survival effect of endothelin-1. ATF-2 activation depended mainly on JNK, yet was not sufficient for the effect of endothelin-1 on UV-induced DNA damage, suggesting the requirement for other JNK and p38 targets for this effect. Our results underscore the significance of endothelin-1 and endothelin B receptor signalling in reducing the genotoxic effects of UV via activating JNK and p38, hence restoring genomic stability of melanocytes.

  12. SIRT4 has tumor suppressive activity and regulates the cellular metabolic response to DNA damage by inhibiting mitochondrial glutamine metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Seung Min; Xiao, Cuiying; Finley, Lydia W.S; Lahusen, Tyler; Souza, Amanda L.; Pierce, Kerry; Li, Ying-Hua; Wang, Xiaoxu; Laurent, Gaëlle; German, Natalie J.; Xu, Xiaoling; Li, Cuiling; Wang, Rui-Hong; Lee, Jaewon; Csibi, Alfredo; Cerione, Richard; Blenis, John; Clish, Clary B.; Kimmelman, Alec; Deng, Chu-Xia; Haigis, Marcia C.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY DNA damage elicits a cellular signaling response that initiates cell cycle arrest and DNA repair. Here we find that DNA damage triggers a critical block in glutamine metabolism, which is required for proper DNA damage responses. This block requires the mitochondrial SIRT4, which is induced by numerous genotoxic agents and represses the metabolism of glutamine into TCA cycle. SIRT4 loss leads to both increased glutamine-dependent proliferation and stress-induced genomic instability, resulting in tumorigenic phenotypes. Moreover, SIRT4 knockout mice spontaneously develop lung tumors. Our data uncover SIRT4 as an important component of the DNA damage response pathway that orchestrates a metabolic block in glutamine metabolism, cell cycle arrest and tumor suppression. PMID:23562301

  13. Redox control of the DNA damage-inducible protein DinG helicase activity via its iron-sulfur cluster.

    PubMed

    Ren, Binbin; Duan, Xuewu; Ding, Huangen

    2009-02-20

    The Escherichia coli DNA damage-inducible protein DinG, a member of the superfamily 2 DNA helicases, has been implicated in the nucleotide excision repair and recombinational DNA repair pathways. Combining UV-visible absorption, EPR, and enzyme activity measurements, we demonstrate here that E. coli DinG contains a redox-active [4Fe-4S] cluster with a midpoint redox potential (E(m)) of -390 +/- 23 mV (pH 8.0) and that reduction of the [4Fe-4S] cluster reversibly switches off the DinG helicase activity. Unlike the [4Fe-4S] cluster in E. coli dihydroxyacid dehydratase, the DinG [4Fe-4S] cluster is stable, and the enzyme remains fully active after exposure to 100-fold excess of hydrogen peroxide, indicating that DinG could be functional under oxidative stress conditions. However, the DinG [4Fe-4S] cluster can be efficiently modified by nitric oxide (NO), forming the DinG-bound dinitrosyl iron complex with the concomitant inactivation of helicase activity in vitro and in vivo. Reassembly of the [4Fe-4S] cluster in NO-modified DinG restores helicase activity, indicating that the iron-sulfur cluster in DinG is the primary target of NO cytotoxicity. The results led us to propose that the iron-sulfur cluster in DinG may act as a sensor of intracellular redox potential to modulate its helicase activity and that modification of the iron-sulfur cluster in DinG and likely in other DNA repair enzymes by NO may contribute to NO-mediated genomic instability.

  14. In-vitro Evaluation of Protective Effects on DNA Damage and Antioxidative Activities of Ilex Spinigera Loes. Extracts

    PubMed Central

    Mohadjerani, Maryam; Vosoghi Roodgar, Mina

    2016-01-01

    Ilex spinigera (Aquifoliaceae) plant is an evergreen tree or shrub with thick glossy dark green leaves and red fruits. This plant has medicinal properties and has been used traditionally in northern Iran for malaria treatment. The aim of this work is to evaluate the antioxidative activities and the inhibitory effect of I. spinigera on the oxidation of DNA. We have found no reports about the popular use of I. spinigera in terms of its chemistry and biology. In this study we report the antioxidant activity of I. spinigera extracts for the first time. Water, ethanol and methanol were used as extraction solvents. Various experimental models including iron (III) reducing power, total antioxidant capacity, DPPH radical scavenging activity, PAB assay and in-vitro inhibition of AAPH-induced oxidation of DNA were used for characterization of antioxidant activity of the extracts. The three extracts showed varying degrees of efficacy in each assay in a dose-dependent manner. The aqueous extract with the highest content of total phenolics, was the most potent antioxidant in all assays except in DPPH assay. The methanol extract with the highest amount of total flavonoids was the potent scavenger of DPPH radical with an IC50 value of 102.22 ± 0.001 μg/mL. Aqueous extract of I. spinigera also showed the protective effect on DNA damage-induced by AAPH. According to our results, I. spinigera leaves extract have the potential for chemoprotective studies. PMID:27610169

  15. DNA damage response inhibition at dysfunctional telomeres by modulation of telomeric DNA damage response RNAs.

    PubMed

    Rossiello, Francesca; Aguado, Julio; Sepe, Sara; Iannelli, Fabio; Nguyen, Quan; Pitchiaya, Sethuramasundaram; Carninci, Piero; d'Adda di Fagagna, Fabrizio

    2017-02-27

    The DNA damage response (DDR) is a set of cellular events that follows the generation of DNA damage. Recently, site-specific small non-coding RNAs, also termed DNA damage response RNAs (DDRNAs), have been shown to play a role in DDR signalling and DNA repair. Dysfunctional telomeres activate DDR in ageing, cancer and an increasing number of identified pathological conditions. Here we show that, in mammals, telomere dysfunction induces the transcription of telomeric DDRNAs (tDDRNAs) and their longer precursors from both DNA strands. DDR activation and maintenance at telomeres depend on the biogenesis and functions of tDDRNAs. Their functional inhibition by sequence-specific antisense oligonucleotides allows the unprecedented telomere-specific DDR inactivation in cultured cells and in vivo in mouse tissues. In summary, these results demonstrate that tDDRNAs are induced at dysfunctional telomeres and are necessary for DDR activation and they validate the viability of locus-specific DDR inhibition by targeting DDRNAs.

  16. DNA Damage Response and Immune Defense: Links and Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Nakad, Rania; Schumacher, Björn

    2016-01-01

    DNA damage plays a causal role in numerous human pathologies including cancer, premature aging, and chronic inflammatory conditions. In response to genotoxic insults, the DNA damage response (DDR) orchestrates DNA damage checkpoint activation and facilitates the removal of DNA lesions. The DDR can also arouse the immune system by for example inducing the expression of antimicrobial peptides as well as ligands for receptors found on immune cells. The activation of immune signaling is triggered by different components of the DDR including DNA damage sensors, transducer kinases, and effectors. In this review, we describe recent advances on the understanding of the role of DDR in activating immune signaling. We highlight evidence gained into (i) which molecular and cellular pathways of DDR activate immune signaling, (ii) how DNA damage drives chronic inflammation, and (iii) how chronic inflammation causes DNA damage and pathology in humans. PMID:27555866

  17. Method for assaying clustered DNA damages

    DOEpatents

    Sutherland, Betsy M.

    2004-09-07

    Disclosed is a method for detecting and quantifying clustered damages in DNA. In this method, a first aliquot of the DNA to be tested for clustered damages with one or more lesion-specific cleaving reagents under conditions appropriate for cleavage of the DNA to produce single-strand nicks in the DNA at sites of damage lesions. The number average molecular length (Ln) of double stranded DNA is then quantitatively determined for the treated DNA. The number average molecular length (Ln) of double stranded DNA is also quantitatively determined for a second, untreated aliquot of the DNA. The frequency of clustered damages (.PHI..sub.c) in the DNA is then calculated.

  18. Oxidative DNA damage preventive activity and antioxidant potential of Stevia rebaudiana (Bertoni) Bertoni, a natural sweetener.

    PubMed

    Ghanta, Srijani; Banerjee, Anindita; Poddar, Avijit; Chattopadhyay, Sharmila

    2007-12-26

    At 0.1 mg/mL, the ethyl acetate extract (EAE) of the crude 85% methanolic extract (CAE) of Stevia rebaudiana leaves exhibited preventive activity against DNA strand scission by *OH generated in Fenton's reaction on pBluescript II SK (-) DNA. Its efficacy is better than that of quercetin. The radical scavenging capacity of CAE was evaluated by the DPPH test (IC50=47.66+/-1.04 microg/mL). EAE was derived from CAE scavenged DPPH (IC50=9.26+/-0.04 microg/mL), ABTS+ (IC50=3.04+/-0.22 microg/mL) and *OH (IC50=3.08+/-0.19 microg/mL). Additionally, inhibition of lipid peroxidation induced with 25 mM FeSO 4 on rat liver homogenate as a lipid source was noted with CAE (IC50=2.1+/-1.07 mg/mL). The total polyphenols and total flavonoids of EAE were 0.86 mg gallic acid equivalents/mg and 0.83 mg of quercetin equivalents/mg, respectively. Flavonoids, isolated from EAE, were characterized as quercetin-3-O-arabinoside, quercitrin, apigenin, apigenin-4-O-glucoside, luteolin, and kaempferol-3-O-rhamnoside by LC-MS and NMR analysis. These results indicate that Stevia rebaudiana may be useful as a potential source of natural antioxidants.

  19. alpha-MSH tripeptide analogs activate the melanocortin 1 receptor and reduce UV-induced DNA damage in human melanocytes.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Malek, Zalfa A; Ruwe, Andrew; Kavanagh-Starner, Renny; Kadekaro, Ana Luisa; Swope, Viki; Haskell-Luevano, Carrie; Koikov, Leonid; Knittel, James J

    2009-10-01

    One skin cancer prevention strategy that we are developing is based on synthesizing and testing melanocortin analogs that reduce and repair DNA damage resulting from exposure to solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation, in addition to stimulating pigmentation. Previously, we reported the effects of tetrapeptide analogs of alpha-melanocortin (alpha-MSH) that were more potent and stable than the physiological alpha-MSH, and mimicked its photoprotective effects against UV-induced DNA damage in human melanocytes. Here, we report on a panel of tripeptide analogs consisting of a modified alpha-MSH core His(6)-d-Phe(7)-Arg(8), which contained different N-capping groups, C-terminal modifications, or arginine mimics. The most potent tripeptides in activating cAMP formation and tyrosinase of human melanocytes were three analogs with C-terminal modifications. The most effective C-terminal tripeptide mimicked alpha-MSH in reducing hydrogen peroxide generation and enhancing nucleotide excision repair following UV irradiation. The effects of these three analogs required functional MC1R, as they were absent in human melanocytes that expressed non-functional receptor. These results demonstrate activation of the MC1R by tripeptide melanocortin analogs. Designing small analogs for topical delivery should prove practical and efficacious for skin cancer prevention.

  20. The effects of dietary boric acid and borax supplementation on lipid peroxidation, antioxidant activity, and DNA damage in rats.

    PubMed

    Ince, Sinan; Kucukkurt, Ismail; Cigerci, Ibrahim Hakki; Fatih Fidan, A; Eryavuz, Abdullah

    2010-07-01

    The aims of this study were to clarify the effects of high dietary supplementation with boric acid and borax, called boron (B) compounds, on lipid peroxidation (LPO), antioxidant activity, some vitamin levels, and DNA damage in rats. Thirty Sprague Dawley male rats were divided into three equal groups: the animals in the first group (control) were fed with a standard rodent diet containing 6.4 mg B/kg, and the animals in the experimental group were fed with a standard rodent diet added with a supra-nutritional amount of boric acid and borax (100 mg B/kg) throughout the experimental period of 28 days. The B compounds decreased malondialdehyde (MDA), DNA damage, the protein carbonyl content (PCO) level in blood, and glutathione (GSH) concentration in the liver, Cu-Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD), and catalase (CAT) activity in the kidney. The B compounds increased GSH concentration in blood and the vitamin C level in plasma. Consequently, our results demonstrate that B supplementation (100 mg/kg) in diet decreases LPO, and enhances the antioxidant defense mechanism and vitamin status. There are no differences in oxidant/antioxidant balance and biochemical parameters except for serum vitamin A and liver GSH concentration, between the boron compounds used in this study.

  1. Potential effects of environmental contaminants on P450 aromatase activity and DNA damage in swallows from the Rio Grande and Somerville, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sitzlar, M.A.; Mora, M.A.; Fleming, J.G.W.; Bazer, F.W.; Bickham, J.W.; Matson, C.W.

    2009-01-01

    Cliff swallows (Petrochelidon pyrrhonota) and cave swallows (P. fulva) were sampled during the breeding season at several locations in the Rio Grande, Texas, to evaluate the potential effects of environmental contaminants on P450 aromatase activity in brain and gonads and DNA damage in blood cells. The tritiated water-release aromatase assay was used to measure aromatase activity and flow cytometry was used to measure DNA damage in nucleated blood cells. There were no significant differences in brain and gonadal aromatase activities or in estimates of DNA damage (HPCV values) among cave swallow colonies from the Lower Rio Grande Valley (LRGV) and Somerville. However, both brain and gonadal aromatase activities were significantly higher (P < 0.05) in male cliff swallows from Laredo than in those from Somerville. Also, DNA damage estimates were significantly higher (P < 0.05) in cliff swallows (males and females combined) from Laredo than in those from Somerville. Contaminants of current high use in the LRGV, such as atrazine, and some of the highly persistent organochlorines, such as toxaphene and DDE, could be potentially associated with modulation of aromatase activity in avian tissues. Previous studies have indicated possible DNA damage in cliff swallows. We did not observe any differences in aromatase activity or DNA damage in cave swallows that could be associated with contaminant exposure. Also, the differences in aromatase activity and DNA damage between male cliff swallows from Laredo and Somerville could not be explained by contaminants measured at each site in previous studies. Our study provides baseline information on brain and gonadal aromatase activity in swallows that could be useful in future studies. ?? 2008 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

  2. Positive regulation of meiotic DNA double-strand break formation by activation of the DNA damage checkpoint kinase Mec1(ATR).

    PubMed

    Gray, Stephen; Allison, Rachal M; Garcia, Valerie; Goldman, Alastair S H; Neale, Matthew J

    2013-07-31

    During meiosis, formation and repair of programmed DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) create genetic exchange between homologous chromosomes-a process that is critical for reductional meiotic chromosome segregation and the production of genetically diverse sexually reproducing populations. Meiotic DSB formation is a complex process, requiring numerous proteins, of which Spo11 is the evolutionarily conserved catalytic subunit. Precisely how Spo11 and its accessory proteins function or are regulated is unclear. Here, we use Saccharomyces cerevisiae to reveal that meiotic DSB formation is modulated by the Mec1(ATR) branch of the DNA damage signalling cascade, promoting DSB formation when Spo11-mediated catalysis is compromised. Activation of the positive feedback pathway correlates with the formation of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) recombination intermediates and activation of the downstream kinase, Mek1. We show that the requirement for checkpoint activation can be rescued by prolonging meiotic prophase by deleting the NDT80 transcription factor, and that even transient prophase arrest caused by Ndt80 depletion is sufficient to restore meiotic spore viability in checkpoint mutants. Our observations are unexpected given recent reports that the complementary kinase pathway Tel1(ATM) acts to inhibit DSB formation. We propose that such antagonistic regulation of DSB formation by Mec1 and Tel1 creates a regulatory mechanism, where the absolute frequency of DSBs is maintained at a level optimal for genetic exchange and efficient chromosome segregation.

  3. Activation of 3-nitrobenzanthrone and its metabolites to DNA-damaging species in human B lymphoblastoid MCL-5 cells.

    PubMed

    Arlt, Volker M; Cole, Kathleen J; Phillips, David H

    2004-03-01

    3-Nitrobenzanthrone (3-NBA) is one of the most potent mutagens in the Ames Salmonella typhimurium assay and a suspected human carcinogen recently identified in diesel exhaust and in airborne particulate matter. 3-Aminobenzanthrone (3-ABA), 3-acetylaminobenzanthrone (3-Ac-ABA) and N-acetyl-N-hydroxy-3-aminobenzanthrone (N-Ac-N-OH-ABA) have been identified as 3-NBA metabolites. In the present study we investigated the genotoxic effects of 3-NBA and its metabolites in the human B lymphoblastoid cell line MCL-5. DNA strand breaks were measured using the Comet assay, chromosomal damage was assessed using the micronucleus assay and DNA adduct formation was determined by 32P-post-labelling analysis. DNA strand-breaking activity was observed with each compound in a concentration-dependent manner (1-50 microM, 2 h incubation time). At 50 microM median comet tail lengths (CTLs) were 25.0 microm for 3-NBA, 48.0 microm for 3-ABA, 54.5 microm for 3-Ac-ABA and 65.0 microm for N-Ac-N-OH-ABA. Median CTLs in control incubations were in the range 7.7-13.1 micro m. Moreover, the strand-breaking activity of 3-NBA was more pronounced in the presence of a DNA repair inhibitor, hydroxyurea. Depending on the concentration used (1-20 microM, 24 h incubation time), 3-NBA and its metabolites also showed clastogenic activity in the micronucleus assay. 3-NBA and N-Ac-N-OH-ABA were the most active at low concentrations; at 1 microM the total number of micronuclei per 500 binucleate cells was 4.7 +/- 0.6 in both cases, compared with 1.7-3.0 for controls (P < 0.05). Furthermore, multiple DNA adducts were detected with each compound (1 microM, 24 h incubation time), essentially similar to those found recently in vivo in rats treated with 3-NBA or its metabolites. DNA adduct levels ranged from 1.3 to 42.8 and from 2.0 to 39.8 adducts/10(8) nt using the nuclease P1 and butanol enrichment procedures, respectively. DNA binding was highest for N-Ac-N-OH-ABA, followed by 3-NBA, and much lower for 3-ABA

  4. DNA damage by various radiations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, K.; Yoshioka, H.; Yoshioka, H.

    1997-01-01

    In an attempt to shed light on the influence of tritiated water on DNA we have investigated the post-irradiation damage with a simple plasmid DNA, pBR322 and pUC18. The survival of covalently closed circular (CCC) DNA form was directly followed by agarose gel electrophoresis. The survival percentage of DNA in tritiated water was almost the same as with the irradiation with X-rays at the same absorbed dose. For irradiation with γ-rays, on the other hand, the decay rate was larger than those observed with both tritiated water and X-rays. The percentages of breakage for DNA in tritiated water, X-rays and γ-rays were found to be 34, 38 and 33% at 100 Gy of absorbed dose. The effect of dose rate was not observed for irradiation with tritiated water, X-rays and γ-rays. In order to study protection of DNA against radiation, we investigated the protecting effect of tea catechin which is the main component of (-)-epigallocatechin gallate (EGCg). The protection mechanism for DNA against radiation-induced scission has been studied using ESR spin-trapping method.

  5. Protection of mammalian cells by o-phenanthroline from lethal and DNA-damaging effects produced by active oxygen species.

    PubMed

    de Mello Filho, A C; Meneghini, R

    1985-10-30

    Active oxygen species are suspected as being a cause of the cellular damage that occurs at the site of inflammation. Phagocytic cells accumulate at these sites and produce superoxide ion, hydrogen peroxide and hydroxyl radical. The ultimate killing species, the cellular target and the mechanism whereby the lethal injury is produced are unknown. We exposed mouse fibroblasts to xanthine oxidase and acetaldehyde, a system which mimics the membrane of phagocytic cells in terms of production of oxygen species. We observed that the generation of these species produced DNA strand breaks and cellular death. The metal chelator o-phenanthroline completely abolished the former effect, and at the same time it effectively protected the cells from lethal injuries. Because complexing iron o-phenanthroline prevents the formation of hydroxyl radical by the Fendon reaction (Fe(II) + H2O2----Fe(III) + OH- + OH.), it is proposed that most of the cell death and DNA damage are brought about by OH radical, produced from other species by iron-mediated reactions.

  6. Intense THz pulses cause H2AX phosphorylation and activate DNA damage response in human skin tissue

    PubMed Central

    Titova, Lyubov V.; Ayesheshim, Ayesheshim K.; Golubov, Andrey; Fogen, Dawson; Rodriguez-Juarez, Rocio; Hegmann, Frank A.; Kovalchuk, Olga

    2013-01-01

    Recent emergence and growing use of terahertz (THz) radiation for medical imaging and public security screening raise questions on reasonable levels of exposure and health consequences of this form of electromagnetic radiation. In particular, picosecond-duration THz pulses have shown promise for novel diagnostic imaging techniques. However, the effects of THz pulses on human cells and tissues thus far remain largely unknown. We report on the investigation of the biological effects of pulsed THz radiation on artificial human skin tissues. We observe that exposure to intense THz pulses for ten minutes leads to a significant induction of H2AX phosphorylation, indicating that THz pulse irradiation may cause DNA damage in exposed skin tissue. At the same time, we find a THz-pulse-induced increase in the levels of several proteins responsible for cell-cycle regulation and tumor suppression, suggesting that DNA damage repair mechanisms are quickly activated. Furthermore, we find that the cellular response to pulsed THz radiation is significantly different from that induced by exposure to UVA (400 nm). PMID:23577291

  7. New arylated benzo[h]quinolines induce anti-cancer activity by oxidative stress-mediated DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Dharmendra K.; Rai, Reeta; Kumar, Naresh; Singh, Surjeet; Misra, Sanjeev; Sharma, Praveen; Shaw, Priyanka; Pérez-Sánchez, Horacio; Mancera, Ricardo L.; Choi, Eun Ha; Kim, Mi-hyun; Pratap, Ramendra

    2016-01-01

    The anti-cancer activity of the benzo[h]quinolines was evaluated on cultured human skin cancer (G361), lung cancer (H460), breast cancer (MCF7) and colon cancer (HCT116) cell lines. The inhibitory effect of these compounds on the cell growth was determined by the MTT assay. The compounds 3e, 3f, 3h and 3j showed potential cytotoxicity against these human cancer cell lines. Effect of active compounds on DNA oxidation and expression of apoptosis related gene was studied. We also developed a quantitative method to measure the activity of cyclin-dependent kinases-2 (CDK2) by western blotting in the presence of active compound. In addition, molecular docking revealed that benzo[h]quinolines can correctly dock into the hydrophobic pocket of the targets receptor protein aromatase and CDK2, while their bioavailability/drug-likeness was predicted to be acceptable but requires future optimization. These findings reveal that benzo[h]quinolines act as anti-cancer agents by inducing oxidative stress-mediated DNA damage. PMID:27922047

  8. Sphingolipids in the DNA Damage Response

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, Brittany; Donaldson, Cat; Obeid, Lina

    2014-01-01

    Recently, sphingolipid metabolizing enzymes have emerged as important targets of many chemotherapeutics and DNA damaging agents and therefore play significant roles in mediating the physiological response of the cell to DNA damage. In this review we will highlight points of connection between the DNA damage response (DDR) and sphingolipid metabolism; specifically how certain sphingolipid enzymes are regulated in response to DNA damage and how the bioactive lipids produced by these enzymes affect cell fate. PMID:25434743

  9. DNA damage, cell kinetics and ODC activities studied in CBA mice exposed to electromagnetic fields generated by transmission lines.

    PubMed

    Svedenstål, B M; Johanson, K J; Mattsson, M O; Paulsson, L E

    1999-01-01

    CBA mice were exposed outdoors to 50 Hz electromagnetic fields (EMF), with a flux density of about 8 microT rms (root mean square), generated by a 220 kV transmission line. Assays were performed in order to investigate, the possible genotoxic effects after 11, 20 and 32 days of exposure, as well as the effects on body weight, leukocytes, erythrocytes, and the level of ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) activity in spleen and testis. DNA migration was studied on brain cells by single cell electrophoresis (comet assay). After 32 days of exposure a highly significant change of the tail/head ratio of the comets was observed (p < 0.001), showing DNA-damage. Further, a decreased number of mononuclear leukocytes (0.02 < p < 0.05) was observed in mice EMF-exposed for 20 days. In summary, our data indicate that transmission lines of this type may induce genotoxic effects in mice, seen as changes in the DNA migration. These results might have an important implication for health effects.

  10. Polychlorinated biphenyl quinone induces oxidative DNA damage and repair responses: The activations of NHEJ, BER and NER via ATM-p53 signaling axis

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Hui; Shi, Qiong; Song, Xiufang; Fu, Juanli; Hu, Lihua; Xu, Demei; Su, Chuanyang; Xia, Xiaomin; Song, Erqun; Song, Yang

    2015-07-01

    Our previous studies demonstrated that polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) quinone induced oxidative DNA damage in HepG2 cells. To promote genomic integrity, DNA damage response (DDR) coordinates cell-cycle transitions, DNA repair and apoptosis. PCB quinone-induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis have been documented, however, whether PCB quinone insult induce DNA repair signaling is still unknown. In this study, we identified the activation of DDR and corresponding signaling events in HepG2 cells upon the exposure to a synthetic PCB quinone, PCB29-pQ. Our data illustrated that PCB29-pQ induces the phosphorylation of p53, which was mediated by ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) protein kinase. The observed phosphorylated histone H2AX (γ-H2AX) foci and the elevation of 8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) indicated that DDR was stimulated by PCB29-pQ treatment. Additionally, we found PCB29-pQ activates non-homologous end joining (NHEJ), base excision repair (BER) and nucleotide excision repair (NER) signalings. However, these repair pathways are not error-free processes and aberrant repair of DNA damage may cause the potential risk of carcinogenesis and mutagenesis. - Highlights: • Polychlorinated biphenyl quinone induces oxidative DNA damage in HepG2 cells. • The elevation of γ-H2AX and 8-OHdG indicates the activation of DNA damage response. • ATM-p53 signaling acts as the DNA damage sensor and effector. • Polychlorinated biphenyl quinone activates NHEJ, BER and NER signalings.

  11. Chimeric proteins for detection and quantitation of DNA mutations, DNA sequence variations, DNA damage and DNA mismatches

    DOEpatents

    McCutchen-Maloney, Sandra L.

    2002-01-01

    Chimeric proteins having both DNA mutation binding activity and nuclease activity are synthesized by recombinant technology. The proteins are of the general formula A-L-B and B-L-A where A is a peptide having DNA mutation binding activity, L is a linker and B is a peptide having nuclease activity. The chimeric proteins are useful for detection and identification of DNA sequence variations including DNA mutations (including DNA damage and mismatches) by binding to the DNA mutation and cutting the DNA once the DNA mutation is detected.

  12. Activation of the DNA Damage Response Is a Conserved Function of HIV-1 and HIV-2 Vpr That Is Independent of SLX4 Recruitment

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT There has been extraordinary progress in understanding the roles of lentiviral accessory proteins in antagonizing host antiviral defense proteins. However, the precise primary function of the accessory gene Vpr remains elusive. Here we suggest that engagement with the DNA damage response is an important function of primate lentiviral Vpr proteins because of its conserved function among diverse lentiviral lineages. In contrast, we show that, for HIV-1, HIV-2, and related Vpr isolates and orthologs, there is a lack of correlation between DNA damage response activation and interaction with the host SLX4 protein complex of structure specific endonucleases; some Vpr proteins are able to interact with SLX4, but the majority are not. Using the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)/Cas9 method to knock out SLX4, we formally showed that HIV-1 and HIV-2 Vpr orthologs can still activate the DNA damage response and cell cycle arrest in the absence of SLX4. Together, our data suggest that activation of the DNA damage response, but not SLX4 interaction, is conserved and therefore indicative of an important function of Vpr. Our data also indicate that Vpr activates the DNA damage response through an SLX4-independent mechanism that remains uncharacterized. PMID:27624129

  13. Maternal diabetes triggers DNA damage and DNA damage response in neurulation stage embryos through oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Dong, Daoyin; Yu, Jingwen; Wu, Yanqing; Fu, Noah; Villela, Natalia Arias; Yang, Peixin

    2015-11-13

    DNA damage and DNA damage response (DDR) in neurulation stage embryos under maternal diabetes conditions are not well understood. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether maternal diabetes and high glucose in vitro induce DNA damage and DDR in the developing embryo through oxidative stress. In vivo experiments were conducted by mating superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) transgenic male mice with wild-type (WT) female mice with or without diabetes. Embryonic day 8.75 (E8.75) embryos were tested for the DNA damage markers, phosphorylated histone H2A.X (p-H2A.X) and DDR signaling intermediates, including phosphorylated checkpoint 1 (p-Chk1), phosphorylated checkpoint 2 (p-Chk2), and p53. Levels of the same DNA damage markers and DDR signaling intermediates were also determined in the mouse C17.2 neural stem cell line. Maternal diabetes and high glucose in vitro significantly increased the levels of p-H2A.X. Levels of p-Chk1, p-Chk2, and p53, were elevated under both maternal diabetic and high glucose conditions. SOD1 overexpression blocked maternal diabetes-induced DNA damage and DDR in vivo. Tempol, a SOD1 mimetic, diminished high glucose-induced DNA damage and DDR in vitro. In conclusion, maternal diabetes and high glucose in vitro induce DNA damage and activates DDR through oxidative stress, which may contribute to the pathogenesis of diabetes-associated embryopathy.

  14. Study of DNA damage via the comet assay and base excision repair activities in rat brain neurons and astrocytes during aging.

    PubMed

    Swain, Umakanta; Subba Rao, Kalluri

    2011-08-01

    Earlier we have used biochemical approach to assess the number of single (SSBs) and double (DSBs) strand breaks in brain cellular DNA. However, a quick method to obtain a reliable measure of DNA damage in cells was in need for population studies. Therefore, single cell gel electrophoresis technique (popularly known as "comet" assay) has been standardized using the Trevigen protocol. DNA damage was assessed in isolated neurons and astrocytes from the cortex of young (7 days), adult (6 months) and old (2 years). Marked increase is seen in DNA damage in terms SSBs and DSBs in both types of cells by 6 months of age, which increased further by 2 years of age. The number of 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase (OGG1) and uracil DNA glycosylase (UDG) sensitive sites also increased in DNA with age with the simultaneous decrease in OGG1, UDG and AP endonuclease (APE1) activities. Thus the comet assay adapted to our lab conditions has proven to be useful for a quick assessment of DNA damage in a large number of samples that constitute our future studies.

  15. Human Apurinic/Apyrimidinic Endonuclease (APE1) Is Acetylated at DNA Damage Sites in Chromatin, and Acetylation Modulates Its DNA Repair Activity

    PubMed Central

    Roychoudhury, Shrabasti; Nath, Somsubhra; Song, Heyu; Hegde, Muralidhar L.; Bellot, Larry J.; Mantha, Anil K.; Sengupta, Shiladitya; Ray, Sutapa; Natarajan, Amarnath

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) sites, the most frequently formed DNA lesions in the genome, inhibit transcription and block replication. The primary enzyme that repairs AP sites in mammalian cells is the AP endonuclease (APE1), which functions through the base excision repair (BER) pathway. Although the mechanism by which APE1 repairs AP sites in vitro has been extensively investigated, it is largely unknown how APE1 repairs AP sites in cells. Here, we show that APE1 is acetylated (AcAPE1) after binding to the AP sites in chromatin and that AcAPE1 is exclusively present on chromatin throughout the cell cycle. Positive charges of acetylable lysine residues in the N-terminal domain of APE1 are essential for chromatin association. Acetylation-mediated neutralization of the positive charges of the lysine residues in the N-terminal domain of APE1 induces a conformational change; this in turn enhances the AP endonuclease activity of APE1. In the absence of APE1 acetylation, cells accumulated AP sites in the genome and showed higher sensitivity to DNA-damaging agents. Thus, mammalian cells, unlike Saccharomyces cerevisiae or Escherichia coli cells, require acetylation of APE1 for the efficient repair of AP sites and base damage in the genome. Our study reveals that APE1 acetylation is an integral part of the BER pathway for maintaining genomic integrity. PMID:27994014

  16. DNA damage checkpoint recovery and cancer development

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Haiyong; Zhang, Xiaoshan; Teng, Lisong; Legerski, Randy J.

    2015-06-10

    Cell cycle checkpoints were initially presumed to function as a regulator of cell cycle machinery in response to different genotoxic stresses, and later found to play an important role in the process of tumorigenesis by acting as a guard against DNA over-replication. As a counterpart of checkpoint activation, the checkpoint recovery machinery is working in opposition, aiming to reverse the checkpoint activation and resume the normal cell cycle. The DNA damage response (DDR) and oncogene induced senescence (OIS) are frequently found in precancerous lesions, and believed to constitute a barrier to tumorigenesis, however, the DDR and OIS have been observed to be diminished in advanced cancers of most tissue origins. These findings suggest that when progressing from pre-neoplastic lesions to cancer, DNA damage checkpoint barriers are overridden. How the DDR checkpoint is bypassed in this process remains largely unknown. Activated cytokine and growth factor-signaling pathways were very recently shown to suppress the DDR and to promote uncontrolled cell proliferation in the context of oncovirus infection. In recent decades, data from cell line and tumor models showed that a group of checkpoint recovery proteins function in promoting tumor progression; data from patient samples also showed overexpression of checkpoint recovery proteins in human cancer tissues and a correlation with patients' poor prognosis. In this review, the known cell cycle checkpoint recovery proteins and their roles in DNA damage checkpoint recovery are reviewed, as well as their implications in cancer development. This review also provides insight into the mechanism by which the DDR suppresses oncogene-driven tumorigenesis and tumor progression. - Highlights: • DNA damage checkpoint works as a barrier to cancer initiation. • DDR machinary response to genotoxic and oncogenic stress in similar way. • Checkpoint recovery pathways provide active signaling in cell cycle control. • Checkpoint

  17. Maintenance of Genome Stability and Breast Cancer: Molecular Analysis of DNA Damage-Activated Kinases

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-01

    286:1162-1166. 9. Ding, S. L., L. F. Sheu, J. C. Yu, T. L. Yang, B. F. Chen, F. J. Leu, and C. Y. Shen. 2004. Abnormality of the DNA double-strand...Soustelle, C., M. Vedel, R. Kolodner, and A. Nicolas. 2002. Replication protein A is required for meiotic recombination in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

  18. Poly (ADP-Ribose) Polymerase is Involved in the Repair of DNA Damage Due to Sulfur Mustard by a Mechanism Other Than DNA Ligase I Activation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-11-16

    agents including sulfur mustard (SM). We observed concurrent activation of PARP and DNA ligase in SM-exposed human epidermal keratinocytes (HEK...Previous reports from other laboratories suggested that DNA ligase activation could be due to its modification by PARP. In humans, there are three distinct...DNA ligases, I, II and IV of which DNA ligase I participates in DNA replication and repair. By metabolically labeling HEK using 3H-adenosine

  19. The Role of Replication in Activation of the DNA Damage Checkpoint

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-03-01

    mL, gressively inhibited as the concentration of aphidicolin a dramatic decrease in the level of Chkl phosphorylation was increased. The appearance of...sistent with findings in Schizosaccharomyces pombe vide the cell with a mechanism of amplifying the level of that show a requirement for the DNA polymerase...was ethanol precipitated, washed with 70% ethanol , Rate te of., Rate of Rate of dried, and resuspended in TE to a final concentration of 0.3 MCMmediate

  20. DNA damage in Fabry patients: An investigation of oxidative damage and repair.

    PubMed

    Biancini, Giovana Brondani; Moura, Dinara Jaqueline; Manini, Paula Regina; Faverzani, Jéssica Lamberty; Netto, Cristina Brinckmann Oliveira; Deon, Marion; Giugliani, Roberto; Saffi, Jenifer; Vargas, Carmen Regla

    2015-06-01

    Fabry disease (FD) is a lysosomal storage disorder associated with loss of activity of the enzyme α-galactosidase A. In addition to accumulation of α-galactosidase A substrates, other mechanisms may be involved in FD pathophysiology, such as inflammation and oxidative stress. Higher levels of oxidative damage to proteins and lipids in Fabry patients were previously reported. However, DNA damage by oxidative species in FD has not yet been studied. We investigated basal DNA damage, oxidative DNA damage, DNA repair capacity, and reactive species generation in Fabry patients and controls. To measure oxidative damage to purines and pyrimidines, the alkaline version of the comet assay was used with two endonucleases, formamidopyrimidine DNA-glycosylase (FPG) and endonuclease III (EndoIII). To evaluate DNA repair, a challenge assay with hydrogen peroxide was performed. Patients presented significantly higher levels of basal DNA damage and oxidative damage to purines. Oxidative DNA damage was induced in both DNA bases by H2O2 in patients. Fabry patients presented efficient DNA repair in both assays (with and without endonucleases) as well as significantly higher levels of oxidative species (measured by dichlorofluorescein content). Even if DNA repair be induced in Fabry patients (as a consequence of continuous exposure to oxidative species), the repair is not sufficient to reduce DNA damage to control levels.

  1. Oxidative DNA damage induced by activation of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs): implications for PCB-induced oxidative stress in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Oakley, G G; Devanaboyina, U; Robertson, L W; Gupta, R C

    1996-12-01

    We have previously reported that mono- and dichlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) can be metabolized to dihydroxy compounds and further oxidized to reactive metabolites which form adducts with nitrogen and sulfur nucleophiles including DNA [Amaro et al. (1966) Chem. Res. Toxicol. 9, 623-629; Oakley et al. (1996) Carcinogenesis 17, 109-114]. The former studies also demonstrated that during the metabolism of PCBs superoxide may be produced. We have therefore examined the abilities of PCB metabolites to induce free radical-mediated oxidative DNA damage using a newly developed, highly sensitive, 32P-postlabeling assay for 8-oxode-oxyguanosine (8-oxodG) [Devanaboyina, U., and Gupta, R. (1996) Carcinogenesis 17, 917-924]. The incubation of 3,4-dichloro-2'5'-dihydroxybiphenyl (100 microM) with calf thymus DNA (300 micrograms/microL) in the presence of the breast tissue and milk-associated enzyme, lactoperoxidase (10 mU/mL), and H2O2 (0.5 mM) resulted in a significant increase in free radical-induced DNA damage (253 8-oxodG/10(6) nucleotides) as compared to vehicle-treated DNA (118 8-oxodG/10(6) nucleotides). Substituting CuCl(2) (100 microM) for lactoperoxidase/H2O2, however, resulted in a substantial increase in 8-oxodG content (2669 8-oxodG/10(6) nucleotides). FeCl(3) was ineffective, suggesting that CuCl(2) but not FeCl(3) mediates oxidation of PCB dihydroxy metabolites, resulting in oxidative DNA damage. The addition of catalase (100 U/mL) and sodium azide (0.1 M) reduced the effect of CuCl(2) (849 and 896 8-oxodG/10(6) nucleotides, respectively), while superoxide dismutase (600 U/mL) moderately stimulated and glutathione (100 microM) substantially stimulated 8-oxodG formation (3014 and 4415 8-oxodG/10(6) nucleotides, respectively). The effect of various buffers as well as the effects of PCB structure on Cu(II)-mediated oxidative DNA damage were examined. These results demonstrate that free radicals and oxidative DNA damage are produced during oxidation of lower chlorinated

  2. The antihypertensive drug hydralazine activates the intrinsic pathway of apoptosis and causes DNA damage in leukemic T cells

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Magaña, María J.; Martínez-Aguilar, Rocío; Lucendo, Estefanía; Campillo-Davo, Diana; Schulze-Osthoff, Klaus; Ruiz-Ruiz, Carmen

    2016-01-01

    Epigenetic therapies have emerged as promising anticancer approaches, since epigenetic modifications play a major role in tumor initiation and progression. Hydralazine, an approved vasodilator and antihypertensive drug, has been recently shown to act as a DNA methylation inhibitor. Even though hydralazine is already tested in clinical cancer trials, its mechanism of antitumor action remains undefined. Here, we show that hydralazine induced caspase-dependent apoptotic cell death in human p53-mutant leukemic T cells. Moreover, we demonstrate that hydralazine triggered the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis by inducing Bak activation and loss of the mitochondrial membrane potential. Hydralazine treatment further resulted in the accumulation of reactive oxygen species, whereas a superoxide dismutase mimetic inhibited hydralazine-induced cell death. Interestingly, caspase-9-deficient Jurkat cells or Bcl-2- and Bcl-xL-overexpressing cells were strongly resistant to hydralazine treatment, thereby demonstrating the dependence of hydralazine-induced apoptosis on the mitochondrial death pathway. Furthermore, we demonstrate that hydralazine treatment triggered DNA damage which might contribute to its antitumor effect. PMID:26942461

  3. Rapid Approaches Towards DNA Damage Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Crews, N.; Paidipalli, Manasa

    2013-01-01

    The severe effects of DNA damage on human health have led to a tremendous amount of research being focused. Owing to the importance of damage detection, different approaches for the detection and quantification of the damaged DNA will be presented. In this work, we have modeled DNA damage using well-known mutagens: UV radiation to create photoproducts and restriction enzyme digestion to create double strand breaks. We will show that quantitative PCR (qPCR), a widely known measure of detecting the presence of the target DNA can be used to quantify photoproducts/intramolecular DNA damage. Our results indicate that a comparison of the initial concentration available in the undamaged and the damaged samples can be used to reveal the effect of damaged DNA in its amplification. By analyzing multiple regions using this technique, their relative susceptibility to damage can be measured. We also show that high-resolution melting analysis (HRMA), a measure of the bond energy between two DNA strands, can be used to quantify double strand breaks. The strand breaks resulted in a change in the overall distribution of the bond energy thus causing variations in the melting profile. HRMA has also been examined to compare DNA damage resulting from UV-A, UV-B and UV-C irradiation. The evaluation techniques demonstrated can potentially be extended to various types of DNA damage.

  4. E1A enhances cellular sensitivity to DNA-damage-induced apoptosis through PIDD-dependent caspase-2 activation

    PubMed Central

    Radke, Jay R; Siddiqui, Zeba K; Figueroa, Iris; Cook, James L

    2016-01-01

    Expression of the adenoviral protein, E1A, sensitizes mammalian cells to a wide variety of apoptosis-inducing agents through multiple cellular pathways. For example, E1A sensitizes cells to apoptosis induced by TNF-superfamily members by inhibiting NF-kappa B (NF-κB)-dependent gene expression. In contrast, E1A sensitization to nitric oxide, an inducer of the intrinsic apoptotic pathway, is not dependent upon repression of NF-κB-dependent transcription but rather is dependent upon caspase-2 activation. The latter observation suggested that E1A-induced enhancement of caspase-2 activation might be a critical factor in cellular sensitization to other intrinsic apoptosis pathway-inducing agents. Etoposide and gemcitabine are two DNA damaging agents that induce intrinsic apoptosis. Here we report that E1A-induced sensitization to both of these agents, like NO, is independent of NF-κB activation but dependent on caspase-2 activation. The results show that caspase-2 is a key mitochondrial-injuring caspase during etoposide and gemcitabine-induced apoptosis of E1A-positive cells, and that caspase-2 is required for induction of caspase-3 activity by both chemotherapeutic agents. Expression of PIDD was required for caspase-2 activation, mitochondrial injury and enhanced apoptotic cell death. Furthermore, E1A-enhanced sensitivity to injury-induced apoptosis required PIDD cleavage to PIDD-CC. These results define the PIDD/caspase-2 pathway as a key apical, mitochondrial-injuring mechanism in E1A-induced sensitivity of mammalian cells to chemotherapeutic agents. PMID:27833761

  5. E1A enhances cellular sensitivity to DNA-damage-induced apoptosis through PIDD-dependent caspase-2 activation.

    PubMed

    Radke, Jay R; Siddiqui, Zeba K; Figueroa, Iris; Cook, James L

    2016-01-01

    Expression of the adenoviral protein, E1A, sensitizes mammalian cells to a wide variety of apoptosis-inducing agents through multiple cellular pathways. For example, E1A sensitizes cells to apoptosis induced by TNF-superfamily members by inhibiting NF-kappa B (NF-κB)-dependent gene expression. In contrast, E1A sensitization to nitric oxide, an inducer of the intrinsic apoptotic pathway, is not dependent upon repression of NF-κB-dependent transcription but rather is dependent upon caspase-2 activation. The latter observation suggested that E1A-induced enhancement of caspase-2 activation might be a critical factor in cellular sensitization to other intrinsic apoptosis pathway-inducing agents. Etoposide and gemcitabine are two DNA damaging agents that induce intrinsic apoptosis. Here we report that E1A-induced sensitization to both of these agents, like NO, is independent of NF-κB activation but dependent on caspase-2 activation. The results show that caspase-2 is a key mitochondrial-injuring caspase during etoposide and gemcitabine-induced apoptosis of E1A-positive cells, and that caspase-2 is required for induction of caspase-3 activity by both chemotherapeutic agents. Expression of PIDD was required for caspase-2 activation, mitochondrial injury and enhanced apoptotic cell death. Furthermore, E1A-enhanced sensitivity to injury-induced apoptosis required PIDD cleavage to PIDD-CC. These results define the PIDD/caspase-2 pathway as a key apical, mitochondrial-injuring mechanism in E1A-induced sensitivity of mammalian cells to chemotherapeutic agents.

  6. Inflammation, DNA Damage, Helicobacter pylori and Gastric Tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kalisperati, Polyxeni; Spanou, Evangelia; Pateras, Ioannis S.; Korkolopoulou, Penelope; Varvarigou, Anastasia; Karavokyros, Ioannis; Gorgoulis, Vassilis G.; Vlachoyiannopoulos, Panayiotis G.; Sougioultzis, Stavros

    2017-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a Gram negative bacterium that colonizes the stomach of almost half human population. It has evolved to escape immune surveillance, establishes lifelong inflammation, predisposing to genomic instability and DNA damage, notably double strand breaks. The epithelial host cell responds by activation of DNA damage repair (DDR) machinery that seems to be compromised by the infection. It is therefore now accepted that genetic damage is a major mechanism operating in cases of H. pylori induced carcinogenesis. Here, we review the data on the molecular pathways involved in DNA damage and DDR activation during H. pylori infection. PMID:28289428

  7. Ruta Graveolens Extract Induces DNA Damage Pathways and Blocks Akt Activation to Inhibit Cancer Cell Proliferation and Survival

    PubMed Central

    FADLALLA, KHALDA; WATSON, ANGELA; YEHUALAESHET, TESHOME; TURNER, TIMOTHY; SAMUEL, TEMESGEN

    2011-01-01

    Background Ruta graveolens is a medicinal herb that has been used for centuries against various ailments. This study examined the anticancer properties of the herb using cancer cell lines. Materials and Methods Methanolic extract of R. graveolens was tested on colon, breast and prostate cancer cells. Viability, cell cycle profiles, clonogenicity and capase activation were measured. Induction and subcellular localizations of p53, 53BP1 and γ-H2AX proteins were examined. Results the extract dose-dependently decreased the viability and the clonogenicity of treated cells and induced G2/M arrest, aberrant mitoses, and caspase-3 activation. It also induced the p53 pathway and focal concentration of the DNA damage response proteins 53BP1 and γ-H2AX. Moreover, the levels of phospho-Akt and cyclin B1 were reduced by treatment, whereas only cyclin B1 was reduced in normal dermal fibroblasts. Conclusion R. graveolens extract contains bioactive compounds which, independently of known photoactivatable mechanisms, potently inhibit cancer cell proliferation and survival through multiple targets. PMID:21273604

  8. Sodium tungstate modulates ATM function upon DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Hernandez, C J; Llorens-Agost, M; Calbó, J; Murguia, J R; Guinovart, J J

    2013-05-21

    Both radiotherapy and most effective chemotherapeutic agents induce different types of DNA damage. Here we show that tungstate modulates cell response to DNA damaging agents. Cells treated with tungstate were more sensitive to etoposide, phleomycin and ionizing radiation (IR), all of which induce DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). Tungstate also modulated the activation of the central DSB signalling kinase, ATM, in response to these agents. These effects required the functionality of the Mre11-Nbs1-Rad50 (MRN) complex and were mimicked by the inhibition of PP2A phosphatase. Therefore, tungstate may have adjuvant activity when combined with DNA-damaging agents in the treatment of several malignancies.

  9. NSC666715 and Its Analogs Inhibit Strand-Displacement Activity of DNA Polymerase β and Potentiate Temozolomide-Induced DNA Damage, Senescence and Apoptosis in Colorectal Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Jaiswal, Aruna S; Panda, Harekrushna; Law, Brian K; Sharma, Jay; Jani, Jitesh; Hromas, Robert; Narayan, Satya

    2015-01-01

    Recently approved chemotherapeutic agents to treat colorectal cancer (CRC) have made some impact; however, there is an urgent need for newer targeted agents and strategies to circumvent CRC growth and metastasis. CRC frequently exhibits natural resistance to chemotherapy and those who do respond initially later acquire drug resistance. A mechanism to potentially sensitize CRC cells is by blocking the DNA polymerase β (Pol-β) activity. Temozolomide (TMZ), an alkylating agent, and other DNA-interacting agents exert DNA damage primarily repaired by a Pol-β-directed base excision repair (BER) pathway. In previous studies, we used structure-based molecular docking of Pol-β and identified a potent small molecule inhibitor (NSC666715). In the present study, we have determined the mechanism by which NSC666715 and its analogs block Fen1-induced strand-displacement activity of Pol-β-directed LP-BER, cause apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) site accumulation and induce S-phase cell cycle arrest. Induction of S-phase cell cycle arrest leads to senescence and apoptosis of CRC cells through the p53/p21 pathway. Our initial findings also show a 10-fold reduction of the IC50 of TMZ when combined with NSC666715. These results provide a guide for the development of a target-defined strategy for CRC chemotherapy that will be based on the mechanisms of action of NSC666715 and TMZ. This combination strategy can be used as a framework to further reduce the TMZ dosages and resistance in CRC patients.

  10. DNA damage response, redox status and hematopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Cary N; Ito, Keisuke

    2014-01-01

    The ability of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) to self-renew and differentiate into progenitors is essential for homeostasis of the hematopoietic system. The longevity of HSCs makes them vulnerable to accumulating DNA damage, which may be leukemogenic or result in senescence and cell death. Additionally, the ability of HSCs to self-renew and differentiate allows DNA damage to spread throughout the hematologic system, leaving the organism vulnerable to disease. In this review we discuss cell fate decisions made in the face of DNA damage and other cellular stresses, and the role of reactive oxygen species in the long-term maintenance of HSCs and their DNA damage response.

  11. Amphetamines promote mitochondrial dysfunction and DNA damage in pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Pin-I; Cao, Aiqin; Miyagawa, Kazuya; Tojais, Nancy F.; Hennigs, Jan K.; Li, Caiyun G.; Sweeney, Nathaly M.; Inglis, Audrey S.; Wang, Lingli; Li, Dan; Ye, Matthew; Feldman, Brian J.

    2017-01-01

    Amphetamine (AMPH) or methamphetamine (METH) abuse can cause oxidative damage and is a risk factor for diseases including pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Pulmonary artery endothelial cells (PAECs) from AMPH-associated-PAH patients show DNA damage as judged by γH2AX foci and DNA comet tails. We therefore hypothesized that AMPH induces DNA damage and vascular pathology by interfering with normal adaptation to an environmental perturbation causing oxidative stress. Consistent with this, we found that AMPH alone does not cause DNA damage in normoxic PAECs, but greatly amplifies DNA damage in hypoxic PAECs. The mechanism involves AMPH activation of protein phosphatase 2A, which potentiates inhibition of Akt. This increases sirtuin 1, causing deacetylation and degradation of HIF1α, thereby impairing its transcriptional activity, resulting in a reduction in pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 1 and impaired cytochrome c oxidase 4 isoform switch. Mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation is inappropriately enhanced and, as a result of impaired electron transport and mitochondrial ROS increase, caspase-3 is activated and DNA damage is induced. In mice given binge doses of METH followed by hypoxia, HIF1α is suppressed and pulmonary artery DNA damage foci are associated with worse pulmonary vascular remodeling. Thus, chronic AMPH/METH can induce DNA damage associated with vascular disease by subverting the adaptive responses to oxidative stress. PMID:28138562

  12. Novel DNA damage checkpoints mediating cell death induced by the NEDD8-activating enzyme inhibitor MLN4924.

    PubMed

    Blank, Jonathan L; Liu, Xiaozhen J; Cosmopoulos, Katherine; Bouck, David C; Garcia, Khristofer; Bernard, Hugues; Tayber, Olga; Hather, Greg; Liu, Ray; Narayanan, Usha; Milhollen, Michael A; Lightcap, Eric S

    2013-01-01

    MLN4924 is an investigational small-molecule inhibitor of the NEDD8-activating enzyme (NAE) in phase I clinical trials. NAE inhibition prevents the ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation of substrates for cullin-RING ubiquitin E3 ligases that support cancer pathophysiology, but the genetic determinants conferring sensitivity to NAE inhibition are unknown. To address this gap in knowledge, we conducted a genome-wide siRNA screen to identify genes and pathways that affect the lethality of MLN4924 in melanoma cells. Of the 154 genes identified, approximately one-half interfered with components of the cell cycle, apoptotic machinery, ubiquitin system, and DNA damage response pathways. In particular, genes involved in DNA replication, p53, BRCA1/BRCA2, transcription-coupled repair, and base excision repair seemed to be important for MLN4924 lethality. In contrast, genes within the G(2)-M checkpoint affected sensitivity to MLN4924 in colon cancer cells. Cell-cycle analysis in melanoma cells by flow cytometry following RNAi-mediated silencing showed that MLN4924 prevented the transition of cells from S-G(2) phase after induction of rereplication stress. Our analysis suggested an important role for the p21-dependent intra-S-phase checkpoint and extensive rereplication, whereas the ATR-dependent intra-S-phase checkpoint seemed to play a less dominant role. Unexpectedly, induction of the p21-dependent intra-S-phase checkpoint seemed to be independent of both Cdt1 stabilization and ATR signaling. Collectively, these data enhance our understanding of the mechanisms by which inhibition of NEDD8-dependent ubiquitination causes cell death, informing clinical development of MLN4924.

  13. Obtusilactone A and (-)-sesamin induce apoptosis in human lung cancer cells by inhibiting mitochondrial Lon protease and activating DNA damage checkpoints.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui-Min; Cheng, Kuo-Chen; Lin, Cheng-Jung; Hsu, Shu-Wei; Fang, Wei-Cheng; Hsu, Tai-Feng; Chiu, Chien-Chih; Chang, Hsueh-Wei; Hsu, Chun-Hua; Lee, Alan Yueh-Luen

    2010-12-01

    Several compounds from Cinnamomum kotoense show anticancer activities. However, the detailed mechanisms of most compounds from C. kotoense remain unknown. In this study, we investigated the anticancer activity of obtusilactone A (OA) and (-)-sesamin in lung cancer. Our results show that human Lon is upregulated in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines, and downregulation of Lon triggers caspase-3 mediated apoptosis. Through enzyme-based screening, we identified two small-molecule compounds, obtusilactone A (OA) and (-)-sesamin from C. kotoense, as potent Lon protease inhibitors. Obtusilactone A and (-)-sesamin interact with Ser855 and Lys898 residues in the active site of the Lon protease according to molecular docking analysis. Thus, we suggest that cancer cytotoxicity of the compounds is partly due to the inhibitory effects on Lon protease. In addition, the compounds are able to cause DNA double-strand breaks and activate checkpoints. Treatment with OA and (-)-sesamin induced p53-independent DNA damage responses in NSCLC cells, including G(1) /S checkpoint activation and apoptosis, as evidenced by phosphorylation of checkpoint proteins (H2AX, Nbs1, and Chk2), caspase-3 cleavage, and sub-G(1) accumulation. In conclusion, OA and (-)-sesamin act as both inhibitors of human mitochondrial Lon protease and DNA damage agents to activate the DNA damage checkpoints as well induce apoptosis in NSCLC cells. These dual functions open a bright avenue to develop more selective chemotherapy agents to overcome chemoresistance and sensitize cancer cells to other chemotherapeutics.

  14. An inducible long noncoding RNA amplifies DNA damage signaling

    PubMed Central

    Schmitt, Adam M.; Garcia, Julia T.; Hung, Tiffany; Flynn, Ryan A.; Shen, Ying; Qu, Kun; Payumo, Alexander Y.; Peres-da-Silva, Ashwin; Broz, Daniela Kenzelmann; Baum, Rachel; Guo, Shuling; Chen, James K.; Attardi, Laura D.; Chang, Howard Y.

    2016-01-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are prevalent genes with frequently exquisite regulation but mostly unknown functions. Here we demonstrate a role of lncRNAs in guiding organismal DNA damage response. DNA damage activates transcription of DINO (Damage Induced NOncoding) via p53. DINO is required for p53-dependent gene expression, cell cycle arrest, and apoptosis in response to DNA damage, and DINO expression suffice to activate damage signaling and cell cycle arrest in the absence of DNA damage. DINO binds to and promotes p53 protein stabilization, mediating a p53 auto-amplification loop. Dino knockout or promoter inactivation in mice dampens p53 signaling and ameliorates acute radiation syndrome in vivo. Thus, inducible lncRNA can create a feedback loop with its cognate transcription factor to amplify cellular signaling networks. PMID:27668660

  15. CHK2 kinase in the DNA damage response and beyond

    PubMed Central

    Zannini, Laura; Delia, Domenico; Buscemi, Giacomo

    2014-01-01

    The serine/threonine kinase CHK2 is a key component of the DNA damage response. In human cells, following genotoxic stress, CHK2 is activated and phosphorylates >20 proteins to induce the appropriate cellular response, which, depending on the extent of damage, the cell type, and other factors, could be cell cycle checkpoint activation, induction of apoptosis or senescence, DNA repair, or tolerance of the damage. Recently, CHK2 has also been found to have cellular functions independent of the presence of nuclear DNA lesions. In particular, CHK2 participates in several molecular processes involved in DNA structure modification and cell cycle progression. In this review, we discuss the activity of CHK2 in response to DNA damage and in the maintenance of the biological functions in unstressed cells. These activities are also considered in relation to a possible role of CHK2 in tumorigenesis and, as a consequence, as a target of cancer therapy. PMID:25404613

  16. Effects of physical exercise training in DNA damage and repair activity in humans with different genetic polymorphisms of hOGG1 (Ser326Cys).

    PubMed

    Soares, Jorge Pinto; Silva, Ana Inês; Silva, Amélia M; Almeida, Vanessa; Teixeira, João Paulo; Matos, Manuela; Gaivão, Isabel; Mota, Maria Paula

    2015-12-01

    The main purpose of this pilot study was to investigate the possible influence of genetic polymorphisms of the hOGG1 (Ser326Cys) gene in DNA damage and repair activity by 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase 1 (OGG1 enzyme) in response to 16 weeks of combined physical exercise training. Thirty-two healthy Caucasian men (40-74 years old) were enrolled in this study. All the subjects were submitted to a training of 16 weeks of combined physical exercise. The subjects with Ser/Ser genotype were considered as wild-type group (WTG), and Ser/Cys and Cys/Cys genotype were analysed together as mutant group (MG). We used comet assay in conjunction with formamidopyrimidine DNA glycoslyase (FPG) to analyse both strand breaks and FPG-sensitive sites. DNA repair activity were also analysed with the comet assay technique. Our results showed no differences between DNA damage (both strand breaks and FPG-sensitive sites) and repair activity (OGG1) between genotype groups (in the pre-training condition). Regarding the possible influence of genotype in the response to 16 weeks of physical exercise training, the results revealed a decrease in DNA strand breaks in both groups, a decrease in FPG-sensitive sites and an increase in total antioxidant capacity in the WTG, but no changes were found in MG. No significant changes in DNA repair activity was observed in both genotype groups with physical exercise training. This preliminary study suggests the possibility of different responses in DNA damage to the physical exercise training, considering the hOGG1 Ser326Cys polymorphism.

  17. Reduced ATM kinase activity and an attenuated p53 response to DNA damage in carcinogen-induced preneoplastic hepatic lesions in the rat.

    PubMed

    Silins, I; Finnberg, N; Ståhl, A; Högberg, J; Stenius, U

    2001-12-01

    In previous studies we have demonstrated that the p53 response to DNA damage in preneoplastic liver lesions, referred to as enzyme-altered foci (EAF), is attenuated. In the present investigation comparative quantitative RT-PCR revealed no major difference in the p53 mRNA levels in EAF and non-EAF tissue. When CoCl(2) was employed to induce hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF-1alpha), both non-EAF and EAF hepatocytes readily accumulated p53, whereas EAF hepatocytes did not accumulate p53 upon treatment with diethylnitrosamine (DEN). The p53 response was also induced in EAF hepatocytes by the inhibitor of nuclear export, leptomycin B. An inhibitor of DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) and ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM), wortmannin, blocked the DEN-induced p53 response in non-EAF hepatocytes. Assay of kinase activity in immunoprecipitated material from EAF and non-EAF tissue revealed attenuated ATM activity in EAF. Immunohistological and western blot analysis of the level of ATM protein was in agreement with the activity measurements and no phosphorylation of Ser15 in p53 was detected in EAF tissue 24 h after a challenging dose of DEN. Taken together with previously published data, these data indicate selective attenuation of the DNA damage pathway in EAF hepatocytes. Down-regulation of DNA damage-induced and ATM-mediated phosphorylation of p53 may confer a growth advantage on EAF hepatocytes.

  18. Top1- and Top2-mediated topological transitions at replication forks ensure fork progression and stability and prevent DNA damage checkpoint activation.

    PubMed

    Bermejo, Rodrigo; Doksani, Ylli; Capra, Thelma; Katou, Yuki-Mori; Tanaka, Hirokazu; Shirahige, Katsuhiko; Foiani, Marco

    2007-08-01

    DNA topoisomerases solve topological problems during chromosome metabolism. We investigated where and when Top1 and Top2 are recruited on replicating chromosomes and how their inactivation affects fork integrity and DNA damage checkpoint activation. We show that, in the context of replicating chromatin, Top1 and Top2 act within a 600-base-pair (bp) region spanning the moving forks. Top2 exhibits additional S-phase clusters at specific intergenic loci, mostly containing promoters. TOP1 ablation does not affect fork progression and stability and does not cause activation of the Rad53 checkpoint kinase. top2 mutants accumulate sister chromatid junctions in S phase without affecting fork progression and activate Rad53 at the M-G1 transition. top1 top2 double mutants exhibit fork block and processing and phosphorylation of Rad53 and gamma H2A in S phase. The exonuclease Exo1 influences fork processing and DNA damage checkpoint activation in top1 top2 mutants. Our data are consistent with a coordinated action of Top1 and Top2 in counteracting the accumulation of torsional stress and sister chromatid entanglement at replication forks, thus preventing the diffusion of topological changes along large chromosomal regions. A failure in resolving fork-related topological constrains during S phase may therefore result in abnormal chromosome transitions, DNA damage checkpoint activation, and chromosome breakage during segregation.

  19. Chromatin perturbations during the DNA damage response in higher eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Bakkenist, Christopher J; Kastan, Michael B

    2015-12-01

    The DNA damage response is a widely used term that encompasses all signaling initiated at DNA lesions and damaged replication forks as it extends to orchestrate DNA repair, cell cycle checkpoints, cell death and senescence. ATM, an apical DNA damage signaling kinase, is virtually instantaneously activated following the introduction of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). The MRE11-RAD50-NBS1 (MRN) complex, which has a catalytic role in DNA repair, and the KAT5 (Tip60) acetyltransferase are required for maximal ATM kinase activation in cells exposed to low doses of ionizing radiation. The sensing of DNA lesions occurs within a highly complex and heterogeneous chromatin environment. Chromatin decondensation and histone eviction at DSBs may be permissive for KAT5 binding to H3K9me3 and H3K36me3, ATM kinase acetylation and activation. Furthermore, chromatin perturbation may be a prerequisite for most DNA repair. Nucleosome disassembly during DNA repair was first reported in the 1970s by Smerdon and colleagues when nucleosome rearrangement was noted during the process of nucleotide excision repair of UV-induced DNA damage in human cells. Recently, the multi-functional protein nucleolin was identified as the relevant histone chaperone required for partial nucleosome disruption at DBSs, the recruitment of repair enzymes and for DNA repair. Notably, ATM kinase is activated by chromatin perturbations induced by a variety of treatments that do not directly cause DSBs, including treatment with histone deacetylase inhibitors. Central to the mechanisms that activate ATR, the second apical DNA damage signaling kinase, outside of a stalled and collapsed replication fork in S-phase, is chromatin decondensation and histone eviction associated with DNA end resection at DSBs. Thus, a stress that is common to both ATM and ATR kinase activation is chromatin perturbations, and we argue that chromatin perturbations are both sufficient and required for induction of the DNA damage response.

  20. Cdk5 activator-binding protein C53 regulates apoptosis induced by genotoxic stress via modulating the G2/M DNA damage checkpoint.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hai; Luo, Shouqing; Li, Honglin

    2005-05-27

    In response to DNA damage, the cellular decision of life versus death involves an intricate network of multiple factors that play critical roles in regulation of DNA repair, cell cycle, and cell death. DNA damage checkpoint proteins are crucial for maintaining DNA integrity and normal cellular functions, but they may also reduce the effectiveness of cancer treatment. Here we report the involvement of Cdk5 activator p35-binding protein C53 in regulation of apoptosis induced by genotoxic stress through modulating Cdk1-cyclin B1 function. C53 was originally identified as a Cdk5 activator p35-binding protein and a caspase substrate. Importantly, our results demonstrated that C53 deficiency conferred partial resistance to genotoxic agents such as etoposide and x-ray irradiation, whereas ectopic expression of C53 rendered cells susceptible to multiple genotoxins that usually trigger G(2)/M arrest. Furthermore, we found that Cdk1 activity was required for etoposide-induced apoptosis of HeLa cells. Overexpression of C53 promoted Cdk1 activity and nuclear accumulation of cyclin B1, whereas C53 deficiency led to more cytoplasmic retention of cyclin B1, suggesting that C53 acts as a pivotal player in modulating the G(2)/M DNA damage checkpoint. Finally, C53 and cyclin B1 co-localize and associate in vivo, indicating a direct role of C53 in regulating the Cdk1-cyclin B1 complex. Taken together, our results strongly indicate that in response to genotoxic stress, C53 serves as an important regulatory component of the G(2)/M DNA damage checkpoint. By overriding the G(2)/M checkpoint-mediated inhibition of Cdk1-cyclin B1 function, ectopic expression of C53 may represent a novel approach for chemo- and radio-sensitization of cancer cells.

  1. DNA Damage Response and Autophagy: A Meaningful Partnership

    PubMed Central

    Eliopoulos, Aristides G.; Havaki, Sophia; Gorgoulis, Vassilis G.

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy and the DNA damage response (DDR) are biological processes essential for cellular and organismal homeostasis. Herein, we summarize and discuss emerging evidence linking DDR to autophagy. We highlight published data suggesting that autophagy is activated by DNA damage and is required for several functional outcomes of DDR signaling, including repair of DNA lesions, senescence, cell death, and cytokine secretion. Uncovering the mechanisms by which autophagy and DDR are intertwined provides novel insight into the pathobiology of conditions associated with accumulation of DNA damage, including cancer and aging, and novel concepts for the development of improved therapeutic strategies against these pathologies. PMID:27917193

  2. Assessment of polyphenolic content, antioxidant activity, protection against ROS-induced DNA damage and anticancer activity of Vitis vinifera stem extracts.

    PubMed

    Apostolou, Anna; Stagos, Dimitrios; Galitsiou, Elissavet; Spyrou, Argiris; Haroutounian, Serko; Portesis, Nikolaos; Trizoglou, Ioanna; Wallace Hayes, A; Tsatsakis, Aristides M; Kouretas, Dimitrios

    2013-11-01

    Grape extracts and wine have been studied widely due to their beneficial effects on human health. However, there are only few studies from grape stems extracts. Therefore, the main objective of the present study was the assessment in stem extracts from Greek Vitis vinifera varieties of the total polyphenolic content (TPC), the identification of the polyphenols present in them, and the evaluation of their antioxidant activity, protection against ROS-induced DNA damage and inhibition of liver (HepG2) and cervical (HeLa) cancer cell growth. The range of the TPC in grape stem extracts was from 345 to 584 mg GAE/g dry weight. Moreover, stem extracts contained different classes of polyphenols as flavonols, flavanols, procyanidins, phenolic acids and stilbenes. In DPPH and ABTS assays, the IC50 values of the stem extracts had an average of 7.8 ± 2.8 and 5.4 ± 2.6 μg/mL respectively. Also, all stem extracts inhibited OH- and ROO-induced DNA damage dose dependent with average IC50 values of 478 ± 217 and 1.15 ± 0.85 μg/mL respectively. Furthermore, stem extracts inhibited at low concentrations the growth of HepG2 and HeLa cancer cells with average IC50 values of 50 ± 12 and 32 ± 16 μg/mL respectively. The above activities of grape stem extracts were comparable to those of seed extracts.

  3. Novel DNA damage checkpoint in mitosis: Mitotic DNA damage induces re-replication without cell division in various cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Hyun, Sun-Yi; Rosen, Eliot M; Jang, Young-Joo

    2012-07-06

    DNA damage induces multiple checkpoint pathways to arrest cell cycle progression until damage is repaired. In our previous reports, when DNA damage occurred in prometaphase, cells were accumulated in 4 N-DNA G1 phase, and mitosis-specific kinases were inactivated in dependent on ATM/Chk1 after a short incubation for repair. We investigated whether or not mitotic DNA damage causes cells to skip-over late mitotic periods under prolonged incubation in a time-lapse study. 4 N-DNA-damaged cells re-replicated without cell division and accumulated in 8 N-DNA content, and the activities of apoptotic factors were increased. The inhibition of DNA replication reduced the 8 N-DNA cell population dramatically. Induction of replication without cell division was not observed upon depletion of Chk1 or ATM. Finally, mitotic DNA damage induces mitotic slippage and that cells enter G1 phase with 4 N-DNA content and then DNA replication is occurred to 8 N-DNA content before completion of mitosis in the ATM/Chk1-dependent manner, followed by caspase-dependent apoptosis during long-term repair.

  4. DNA Damage Signals and Space Radiation Risk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2011-01-01

    Space radiation is comprised of high-energy and charge (HZE) nuclei and protons. The initial DNA damage from HZE nuclei is qualitatively different from X-rays or gamma rays due to the clustering of damage sites which increases their complexity. Clustering of DNA damage occurs on several scales. First there is clustering of single strand breaks (SSB), double strand breaks (DSB), and base damage within a few to several hundred base pairs (bp). A second form of damage clustering occurs on the scale of a few kbp where several DSB?s may be induced by single HZE nuclei. These forms of damage clusters do not occur at low to moderate doses of X-rays or gamma rays thus presenting new challenges to DNA repair systems. We review current knowledge of differences that occur in DNA repair pathways for different types of radiation and possible relationships to mutations, chromosomal aberrations and cancer risks.

  5. Cellular responses to environmental DNA damage

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-08-01

    This volume contains the proceedings of the conference entitled Cellular Responses to Environmental DNA Damage held in Banff,Alberta December 1--6, 1991. The conference addresses various aspects of DNA repair in sessions titled DNA repair; Basic Mechanisms; Lesions; Systems; Inducible Responses; Mutagenesis; Human Population Response Heterogeneity; Intragenomic DNA Repair Heterogeneity; DNA Repair Gene Cloning; Aging; Human Genetic Disease; and Carcinogenesis. Individual papers are represented as abstracts of about one page in length.

  6. DNA Damage in Plant Herbarium Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Staats, Martijn; Cuenca, Argelia; Richardson, James E.; Vrielink-van Ginkel, Ria; Petersen, Gitte; Seberg, Ole; Bakker, Freek T.

    2011-01-01

    Dried plant herbarium specimens are potentially a valuable source of DNA. Efforts to obtain genetic information from this source are often hindered by an inability to obtain amplifiable DNA as herbarium DNA is typically highly degraded. DNA post-mortem damage may not only reduce the number of amplifiable template molecules, but may also lead to the generation of erroneous sequence information. A qualitative and quantitative assessment of DNA post-mortem damage is essential to determine the accuracy of molecular data from herbarium specimens. In this study we present an assessment of DNA damage as miscoding lesions in herbarium specimens using 454-sequencing of amplicons derived from plastid, mitochondrial, and nuclear DNA. In addition, we assess DNA degradation as a result of strand breaks and other types of polymerase non-bypassable damage by quantitative real-time PCR. Comparing four pairs of fresh and herbarium specimens of the same individuals we quantitatively assess post-mortem DNA damage, directly after specimen preparation, as well as after long-term herbarium storage. After specimen preparation we estimate the proportion of gene copy numbers of plastid, mitochondrial, and nuclear DNA to be 2.4–3.8% of fresh control DNA and 1.0–1.3% after long-term herbarium storage, indicating that nearly all DNA damage occurs on specimen preparation. In addition, there is no evidence of preferential degradation of organelle versus nuclear genomes. Increased levels of C→T/G→A transitions were observed in old herbarium plastid DNA, representing 21.8% of observed miscoding lesions. We interpret this type of post-mortem DNA damage-derived modification to have arisen from the hydrolytic deamination of cytosine during long-term herbarium storage. Our results suggest that reliable sequence data can be obtained from herbarium specimens. PMID:22163018

  7. DNA damage and repair in mutagenesis and carcinogenesis: implications of structure-activity relationships for cross-species extrapolation.

    PubMed

    Vogel, E W; Nivard, M J; Ballering, L A; Bartsch, H; Barbin, A; Nair, J; Comendador, M A; Sierra, L M; Aguirrezabalaga, I; Tosal, L; Ehrenberg, L; Fuchs, R P; Janel-Bintz, R; Maenhaut-Michel, G; Montesano, R; Hall, J; Kang, H; Miele, M; Thomale, J; Bender, K; Engelbergs, J; Rajewsky, M F

    1996-06-12

    Previous studies on structure-activity relationships (SARs) between types of DNA modifications and tumour incidence revealed linear positive relationships between the log TD50 estimates and s-values for a series of mostly monofunctional alkylating agents. The overall objective of this STEP project was to further elucidate the mechanistic principles underlying these correlations, because detailed knowledge on mechanisms underlying the formation of genotoxic damage is an absolute necessity for establishing guidance values for exposures to genotoxic agents. The analysis included: (1) the re-calculation and further extension of TD50 values in mmol/kg body weight for chemicals carcinogenic in rodents. This part further included the checking up data for Swain-Scott s-values and the use of the covalent binding index (CBI); (2) the elaboration of genetic toxicity including an analysis of induced mutation spectra in specific genes at the DNA level, i.e., the vermilion gene of Drosophila, a plasmid system (pX2 assay) and the HPRT gene in cultured mammalian cells (CHO-9); and (3) the measurement of specific DNA alkylation adducts in animal models (mouse, rat, hamster) and mammalian cells in culture. The analysis of mechanisms controlling the expression of mammalian DNA repair genes (alkyltransferases, glycosylases) as a function of the cell type, differentiation stage, and cellular microenvironment in mammalian cells. The 3 classes of genotoxic carcinogens selected for the project were: (1) chemicals forming monoalkyl adducts upon interaction with DNA; (2) genotoxins capable of forming DNA etheno-adducts; and (3) N-substituted aryl compounds forming covalent adducts at the C8 position of guanine in DNA. In general, clear SARs and AARs (activity-activity relationships) between physiochemical parameters (s-values, O6/N7-alkylguanine ratios, CBI), carcinogenic potency in rodents and several descriptors of genotoxic activity in germ cells (mouse, Drosophila) became apparent when

  8. HDAC inhibitors: roles of DNA damage and repair.

    PubMed

    Robert, Carine; Rassool, Feyruz V

    2012-01-01

    Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACis) increase gene expression through induction of histone acetylation. However, it remains unclear whether specific gene expression changes determine the apoptotic response following HDACis administration. Herein, we discuss evidence that HDACis trigger in cancer and leukemia cells not only widespread histone acetylation but also actual increases in reactive oxygen species (ROS) and DNA damage that are further increased following treatment with DNA-damaging chemotherapies. While the origins of ROS production are not completely understood, mechanisms, including inflammation and altered antioxidant signaling, have been reported. While the generation of ROS is an explanation, at least in part, for the source of DNA damage observed with HDACi treatment, DNA damage can also be independently induced by changes in the DNA repair activity and chromatin remodeling factors. Recent development of sirtuin inhibitors (SIRTis) has shown that, similar to HDACis, these drugs induce increases in ROS and DNA damage used singly, or in combination with HDACis and other drugs. Thus, induction of apoptosis by HDACis/SIRTis may result through oxidative stress and DNA damage mechanisms in addition to direct activation of apoptosis-inducing genes. Nevertheless, while DNA damage and stress responses could be of interest as markers for clinical responses, they have yet to be validated as markers for responses to HDACi treatment in clinical trials, alone, and in combination.

  9. Damage-specific DNA-binding proteins from human cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kanjilal, S.

    1992-01-01

    The primary objective of the study was to detect and characterize factors from human cells that bind DNA damaged by ultraviolet radiation. An application of the gel-shift assay was devised in which a DNA probe was UV-irradiated and compared with non-irradiated probe DNA for the ability to bind to such factors in cell extracts. UV-dose dependent binding proteins were identified. Formation of the DNA-protein complexes was independent of the specific sequence, form or source of the DNA. There was a marked preference for lesions on double stranded DNA over those on single stranded DNA. DNA irradiated with gamma rays did not compete with UV-irradiated DNA for the binding activities. Cell lines from patients with genetic diseases associated with disorders of the DNA repair system were screened for the presence of damaged-DNA-binding activities. Simultaneous occurrence of the clinical symptoms of some of these diseases had been previously documented and possible links between the syndromes proposed. However, supporting biochemical or molecular evidence for such associations were lacking. The data from the present investigations indicate that some cases of Xeroderma Pigmentosum group A, Cockayne's Syndrome, Bloom's Syndrome and Ataxia Telangiectasia, all of which exhibit sensitivity to UV or gamma radiation, share an aberrant damaged-DNA-binding factor. These findings support the hypothesis that some of the repair disorder diseases are closely related and may have arisen from a common defect. Partial purification of the binding activities from HeLa cells was achieved. Size-exclusion chromatography resolved the activities into various peaks, one of which was less damage-specific than the others as determined by competition studies using native or UV-irradiated DNA. Some of the activities were further separated by ion-exchange chromatography. On using affinity chromatography methods, the major damage-binding factor could be eluted in the presence of 2 M KCl and 1% NP-40.

  10. Ubiquitylation, neddylation and the DNA damage response

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Jessica S.; Jackson, Stephen P.

    2015-01-01

    Failure of accurate DNA damage sensing and repair mechanisms manifests as a variety of human diseases, including neurodegenerative disorders, immunodeficiency, infertility and cancer. The accuracy and efficiency of DNA damage detection and repair, collectively termed the DNA damage response (DDR), requires the recruitment and subsequent post-translational modification (PTM) of a complex network of proteins. Ubiquitin and the ubiquitin-like protein (UBL) SUMO have established roles in regulating the cellular response to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). A role for other UBLs, such as NEDD8, is also now emerging. This article provides an overview of the DDR, discusses our current understanding of the process and function of PTM by ubiquitin and NEDD8, and reviews the literature surrounding the role of ubiquitylation and neddylation in DNA repair processes, focusing particularly on DNA DSB repair. PMID:25833379

  11. Mitogen-activated protein kinase signal transduction and DNA repair network are involved in aluminum-induced DNA damage and adaptive response in root cells of Allium cepa L.

    PubMed Central

    Panda, Brahma B.; Achary, V. Mohan M.

    2014-01-01

    In the current study, we studied the role of signal transduction in aluminum (Al3+)-induced DNA damage and adaptive response in root cells of Allium cepa L. The root cells in planta were treated with Al3+ (800 μM) for 3 h without or with 2 h pre-treatment of inhibitors of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), and protein phosphatase. Also, root cells in planta were conditioned with Al3+ (10 μM) for 2 h and then subjected to genotoxic challenge of ethyl methane sulfonate (EMS; 5 mM) for 3 h without or with the pre-treatment of the aforementioned inhibitors as well as the inhibitors of translation, transcription, DNA replication and repair. At the end of treatments, roots cells were assayed for cell death and/or DNA damage. The results revealed that Al3+ (800 μM)-induced significant DNA damage and cell death. On the other hand, conditioning with low dose of Al3+ induced adaptive response conferring protection of root cells from genotoxic stress caused by EMS-challenge. Pre-treatment of roots cells with the chosen inhibitors prior to Al3+-conditioning prevented or reduced the adaptive response to EMS genotoxicity. The results of this study suggested the involvement of MAPK and DNA repair network underlying Al-induced DNA damage and adaptive response to genotoxic stress in root cells of A. cepa. PMID:24926302

  12. PCR-based analysis of mitochondrial DNA copy number, mitochondrial DNA damage, and nuclear DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Hunt, Claudia P.; Rooney, John P.; Ryde, Ian T.; Anbalagan, Charumathi; Joglekar, Rashmi

    2016-01-01

    Because of the role DNA damage and depletion play in human disease, it is important to develop and improve tools to assess these endpoints. This unit describes PCR-based methods to measure nuclear and mitochondrial DNA damage and copy number. Long amplicon quantitative polymerase chain reaction (LA-QPCR) is used to detect DNA damage by measuring the number of polymerase-inhibiting lesions present based on the amount of PCR amplification; real-time PCR (RT-PCR) is used to calculate genome content. In this unit we provide step-by-step instructions to perform these assays in Homo sapiens, Mus musculus, Rattus norvegicus, Caenorhabditis elegans, Drosophila melanogaster, Danio rerio, Oryzias latipes, Fundulus grandis, and Fundulus heteroclitus, and discuss the advantages and disadvantages of these assays. PMID:26828332

  13. DNA damage in cancer therapeutics: a boon or a curse?

    PubMed

    Khanna, Anchit

    2015-06-01

    Millions of DNA-damaging lesions occur every day in each cell of our bodies due to various stresses. The failure to detect and accurately repair these lesions can give rise to cells with high levels of endogenous DNA damage, deleterious mutations, or genomic aberrations. Such genomic instability can lead to the activation of specific signaling pathways, including the DNA damage response (DDR) pathway. Constitutive activation of DDR proteins has been observed in human tumor specimens from different cancer stages, including precancerous and metastatic cancers, although not in normal tissues. The tumor-suppressive role of DDR activity during the premalignant stage has been studied, and strong evidence is emerging for an oncogenic role for DDR proteins such as DNA-PK and CHK1 during the later stages of tumor development. However, the majority of current cancer therapies induce DNA damage, potentially exacerbating protumorigenic genomic instability and enabling the development of resistance. Therefore, elucidating the molecular basis of DNA damage-mediated genomic instability and its role in tumorigenesis is critical. Finally, I discuss the potential existence of distinct DNA damage thresholds at various stages of tumorigenesis and what the ramifications of such thresholds would be, including the ambiguous role of the DDR pathway in human cancers, therapy-induced malignancies, and enhanced therapies.

  14. RAD51B Activity and Cell Cycle Regulation in Response to DNA Damage in Breast Cancer Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Phoebe S; Fang, Jun; Jessop, Lea; Myers, Timothy; Raj, Preethi; Hu, Nan; Wang, Chaoyu; Taylor, Philip R; Wang, Jianjun; Khan, Javed; Jasin, Maria; Chanock, Stephen J

    2014-01-01

    Common genetic variants mapping to two distinct regions of RAD51B, a paralog of RAD51, have been associated with breast cancer risk in genome-wide association studies (GWAS). RAD51B is a plausible candidate gene because of its established role in the homologous recombination (HR) process. How germline genetic variation in RAD51B confers susceptibility to breast cancer is not well understood. Here, we investigate the molecular function of RAD51B in breast cancer cell lines by knocking down RAD51B expression by small interfering RNA and treating cells with DNA-damaging agents, namely cisplatin, hydroxyurea, or methyl-methanesulfonate. Our results show that RAD51B-depleted breast cancer cells have increased sensitivity to DNA damage, reduced efficiency of HR, and altered cell cycle checkpoint responses. The influence of RAD51B on the cell cycle checkpoint is independent of its role in HR and further studies are required to determine whether these functions can explain the RAD51B breast cancer susceptibility alleles. PMID:25368520

  15. Alkaline Comet Assay for Assessing DNA Damage in Individual Cells.

    PubMed

    Pu, Xinzhu; Wang, Zemin; Klaunig, James E

    2015-08-06

    Single-cell gel electrophoresis, commonly called a comet assay, is a simple and sensitive method for assessing DNA damage at the single-cell level. It is an important technique in genetic toxicological studies. The comet assay performed under alkaline conditions (pH >13) is considered the optimal version for identifying agents with genotoxic activity. The alkaline comet assay is capable of detecting DNA double-strand breaks, single-strand breaks, alkali-labile sites, DNA-DNA/DNA-protein cross-linking, and incomplete excision repair sites. The inclusion of digestion of lesion-specific DNA repair enzymes in the procedure allows the detection of various DNA base alterations, such as oxidative base damage. This unit describes alkaline comet assay procedures for assessing DNA strand breaks and oxidative base alterations. These methods can be applied in a variety of cells from in vitro and in vivo experiments, as well as human studies.

  16. Grapefruit juice intake does not enhance but rather protects against aflatoxin B1-induced liver DNA damage through a reduction in hepatic CYP3A activity.

    PubMed

    Miyata, Masaaki; Takano, Hiroki; Guo, Lian Q; Nagata, Kiyoshi; Yamazoe, Yasushi

    2004-02-01

    Influence of grapefruit juice intake on aflatoxin B1 (AFB1)-induced liver DNA damage was examined using a Comet assay in F344 rats given 5 mg/kg AFB1 by gavage. Rats allowed free access to grapefruit juice for 5 days prior to AFB1 administration resulted in clearly reduced DNA damage in liver, to 65% of the level in rats that did not receive grapefruit juice. Furthermore, rats treated with grapefruit juice extract (100 mg/kg per os) for 5 days prior to AFB1 treatment also reduced the DNA damage to 74% of the level in rats that did not receive grapefruit juice. No significant differences in the portal blood and liver concentrations of AFB1 were observed between grapefruit juice intake rats and the controls. In an Ames assay with AFB1 using Salmonella typhimurium TA98, lower numbers of revertant colonies were detected with hepatic microsomes prepared from rats administered grapefruit juice, compared with those from control rats. Microsomal testosterone 6beta-hydroxylation was also lower with rats given grapefruit juice than with control rats. Immunoblot analyses showed a significant decrease in hepatic CYP3A content, but not CYP1A and CYP2C content, in microsomes of grapefruit juice-treated rats than in non-treated rats. No significant difference in hepatic glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity and glutathione content was observed in the two groups. GSTA5 protein was not detected in hepatic cytosol of the two groups. In microsomal systems, grapefruit juice extract inhibited AFB1-induced mutagenesis in the presence of a microsomal activation system from livers of humans as well as rats. These results suggest that grapefruit juice intake suppresses AFB1-induced liver DNA damage through inactivation of the metabolic activation potency for AFB1 in rat liver.

  17. Camptothecin enhances the frequency of oligonucleotide-directed gene repair in mammalian cells by inducing DNA damage and activating homologous recombination.

    PubMed

    Ferrara, Luciana; Kmiec, Eric B

    2004-01-01

    Camptothecin (CPT) is an anticancer drug that promotes DNA breakage at replication forks and the formation of lesions that activate the processes of homologous recombination (HR) and nonhomologous end joining. We have taken advantage of the CPT-induced damage response by coupling it to gene repair directed by synthetic oligonucleotides, a process in which a mutant base pair is converted into a wild-type one. Here, we show that pretreating DLD-1 cells with CPT leads to a significant stimulation in the frequency of correction of an integrated mutant enhanced green fluorescent protein gene. The stimulation is dose-dependent and coincident with the formation of double-strand DNA breaks. Caffeine, but not vanillin, blocks the enhancement of gene repair suggesting that, in this system, HR is the pathway most responsible for elevating the frequency of correction. The involvement of HR is further proven by studies in which wortmannin was seen to inhibit gene repair at high concentrations but not at lower levels that are known to inhibit DNA-PK activity. Taken together, our results suggest that DNA damage induced by CPT activates a cellular response that stimulates gene repair in mammalian cells.

  18. In vitro effects of simultaneous exposure to platinum and cadmium on the activity of antioxidant enzymes and DNA damage and potential protective effects of selenium and zinc.

    PubMed

    Tariba, Blanka; Živković, Tanja; Gajski, Goran; Gerić, Marko; Gluščić, Valentina; Garaj-Vrhovac, Vera; Peraica, Maja; Pizent, Alica

    2017-04-01

    Circulating platinum (Pt) is detectable in the blood of Pt-treated cancer patients for over a decade after the treatment. Prolonged exposure to Pt, in combination with adverse compounds from nutrition and lifestyle, such as cadmium (Cd), could increase the risk from second cancers. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of simultaneous exposure to Cd- and Pt-compounds on oxidative and DNA damage and the possible protective effects of zinc (Zn) and selenium (Se). The aqueous solutions of PtCl4, CdCl2 × H2O, ZnCl2 and Na2SeO3 were added, alone or in combination, to whole blood and isolated erythrocytes to produce the final concentrations of 2000 μg/L of Pt, 8 μg/L of Cd, 100 μg/L of Se, and 1000 μg/L of Zn. The activity of copper, zinc-superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase and glutathione in whole blood was determined after 1 h exposure in in vitro conditions. The induction of DNA strand-breaks in human peripheral blood leukocytes was determined with the alkaline comet assay after 24 h exposure. Exposure to Pt and/or Cd decreased the activities of antioxidant enzymes and elevated DNA damage compared to control. A statistically significant change in the activity of both enzymes and in the induction of DNA strand-breaks was observed in the cells treated with Pt + Cd combination, while the addition of Se and/or Zn resulted in partial recovery of these effects. The results indicate that combined exposure to Pt and Cd could disrupt antioxidant protection of the organism and increase DNA damage, whereas Se and Zn could partially ameliorate these harmful effects.

  19. Aging: not all DNA damage is equal.

    PubMed

    Vermeij, Wilbert P; Hoeijmakers, Jan H J; Pothof, Joris

    2014-06-01

    Recent advances have identified accumulation of DNA damage as a major driver of aging. However, there are numerous kinds of DNA lesions each with their own characteristics and cellular outcome, which highly depends on cellular context: proliferation (cell cycle), differentiation, propensity for survival/death, cell condition and systemic hormonal and immunological parameters. In addition, DNA damage is strongly influenced by cellular metabolism, anti-oxidant status and exogenous factors, consistent with the multi-factorial nature of aging. Notably, DNA lesions interfering with replication have very different outcomes compared to transcription. These considerations provide a conceptual framework in which different types of DNA damage and their setting contribute to the aging process in differential manners.

  20. Enhanced radiation-induced cytotoxic effect by 2-ME in glioma cells is mediated by induction of cell cycle arrest and DNA damage via activation of ATM pathways.

    PubMed

    Zou, Huichao; Zhao, Shiguang; Zhang, Jianhua; Lv, Gongwei; Zhang, Xu; Yu, Hongwei; Wang, Huibo; Wang, Ligang

    2007-12-14

    Glioblastoma multiform is the most common malignant primary brain tumor in adults, but there remains no effective therapeutic approach. 2-methoxyestradiol (2-ME), which is a naturally occurring metabolite of 17beta-estradiol, was shown to enhance radiotherapeutic effect in certain tumors; however, whether 2-ME can also enhance the sensitivity of glioma cells to radiotherapy remains unknown. The present study, therefore, was to address this issue using two human glioma cell lines (T98G and U251MG). These cells were irradiated with and without 2-ME and then clonogenic assay, apoptosis assay, DNA damage, and cell cycle change were examined. Results showed that 2-ME significantly enhances radiation-induced cell death in both glioma cells, shown by decreasing cell viability and increasing apoptotic cell death. No such radiosensitizing effect was observed if cells pre-treated with Estrodiol, suggesting the specifically radiosensitizing effect of 2-ME rather than a general effect of estrodials. The enhanced radio-cytotoxic effect in glioma cells by 2-ME was found to be associated with its enhancement of G(2)/M arrest and DNA damage, and phosphorylated ATM protein kinases as well as cell cycle checkpoint protein Chk2. Furthermore, inhibition of ATM by ATM inhibitor abolished 2-ME-activated Chk2 and enhanced radio-cytotoxic effects. These results suggest that 2-ME enhancement of the sensitivity of glioma cell lines to radiotherapy is mediated by induction of G2/M cell cycle arrest and increased DNA damage via activation of ATM kinases.

  1. Copper(II) complexes with new fluoroquinolones: Synthesis, structure, spectroscopic and theoretical study, DNA damage, cytotoxicity and antiviral activity.

    PubMed

    Dorotíková, Sandra; Kožíšková, Júlia; Malček, Michal; Jomová, Klaudia; Herich, Peter; Plevová, Kristína; Briestenská, Katarína; Chalupková, Anna; Mistríková, Jela; Milata, Viktor; Dvoranová, Dana; Bučinský, Lukáš

    2015-09-01

    Copper(II) complexes with fluoroquinolones in the presence of the nitrogen donor heterocyclic ligands 1,10-phenanthroline have been considered in detail. The phenanthroline moiety was introduced into the ligand environment with the aim to determine whether the nuclease activity is feasible. All suitable X-ray structures of the complexes under study reveal a distorted square pyramidal coordination geometry for Cu(II) atom. The conformational and spectroscopic (FT-IR and UV-visible) behavior has been analyzed and has been interpreted with respect to B3LYP/6-311G* calculations including molecular dynamics. The ability of the complexes to cleave DNA was studied by agarose gel electrophoresis with plasmid DNA pBSK+. The results have confirmed that the complexes under study behave as the chemical nucleases. Nuclease like activity in the absence of hydrogen peroxide allows us to deduce an interaction of the complexes with the DNA resulting in the conversion of supercoiled circular DNA to the nicked form. The DNA cleavage activity enhanced by the presence of hydrogen peroxide demonstrates the participation of reactive oxygen species, such as superoxide radical anions and hydroxyl radicals which presence was confirmed independently using the standard radical scavenging agents. It has been suggested that the radical formation through the Fenton/Haber-Weiss reaction is mediated by the redox cycling mechanisms with the participation of cupric/cuprous ions. Cytotoxic activity was evaluated as the 50% cytotoxic concentration (CC50). The potential effects of tested compounds on replication of murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (MHV-68) under in vitro conditions were also evaluated. However, no antiviral activity against MHV-68 was observed.

  2. DNA DAMAGE QUANTITATION BY ALKALINE GEL ELECTROPHORESIS.

    SciTech Connect

    SUTHERLAND,B.M.; BENNETT,P.V.; SUTHERLAND, J.C.

    2004-03-24

    Physical and chemical agents in the environment, those used in clinical applications, or encountered during recreational exposures to sunlight, induce damages in DNA. Understanding the biological impact of these agents requires quantitation of the levels of such damages in laboratory test systems as well as in field or clinical samples. Alkaline gel electrophoresis provides a sensitive (down to {approx} a few lesions/5Mb), rapid method of direct quantitation of a wide variety of DNA damages in nanogram quantities of non-radioactive DNAs from laboratory, field, or clinical specimens, including higher plants and animals. This method stems from velocity sedimentation studies of DNA populations, and from the simple methods of agarose gel electrophoresis. Our laboratories have developed quantitative agarose gel methods, analytical descriptions of DNA migration during electrophoresis on agarose gels (1-6), and electronic imaging for accurate determinations of DNA mass (7-9). Although all these components improve sensitivity and throughput of large numbers of samples (7,8,10), a simple version using only standard molecular biology equipment allows routine analysis of DNA damages at moderate frequencies. We present here a description of the methods, as well as a brief description of the underlying principles, required for a simplified approach to quantitation of DNA damages by alkaline gel electrophoresis.

  3. Single-molecule visualization of ROS-induced DNA damage in large DNA molecules.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jinyong; Kim, Yongkyun; Lim, Sangyong; Jo, Kyubong

    2016-02-07

    We present a single molecule visualization approach for the quantitative analysis of reactive oxygen species (ROS) induced DNA damage, such as base oxidation and single stranded breaks in large DNA molecules. We utilized the Fenton reaction to generate DNA damage with subsequent enzymatic treatment using a mixture of three types of glycosylases to remove oxidized bases, and then fluorescent labeling on damaged lesions via nick translation. This single molecule analytical platform provided the capability to count one or two damaged sites per λ DNA molecule (48.5 kb), which were reliably dependent on the concentrations of hydrogen peroxide and ferrous ion at the micromolar level. More importantly, the labeled damaged sites that were visualized under a microscope provided positional information, which offered the capability of comparing DNA damaged sites with the in silico genomic map to reveal sequence specificity that GTGR is more sensitive to oxidative damage. Consequently, single DNA molecule analysis provides a sensitive analytical platform for ROS-induced DNA damage and suggests an interesting biochemical insight that the genome primarily active during the lysogenic cycle may have less probability for oxidative DNA damage.

  4. DNA damage may drive nucleosomal reorganization to facilitate damage detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LeGresley, Sarah E.; Wilt, Jamie; Antonik, Matthew

    2014-03-01

    One issue in genome maintenance is how DNA repair proteins find lesions at rates that seem to exceed diffusion-limited search rates. We propose a phenomenon where DNA damage induces nucleosomal rearrangements which move lesions to potential rendezvous points in the chromatin structure. These rendezvous points are the dyad and the linker DNA between histones, positions in the chromatin which are more likely to be accessible by repair proteins engaged in a random search. The feasibility of this mechanism is tested by considering the statistical mechanics of DNA containing a single lesion wrapped onto the nucleosome. We consider lesions which make the DNA either more flexible or more rigid by modeling the lesion as either a decrease or an increase in the bending energy. We include this energy in a partition function model of nucleosome breathing. Our results indicate that the steady state for a breathing nucleosome will most likely position the lesion at the dyad or in the linker, depending on the energy of the lesion. A role for DNA binding proteins and chromatin remodelers is suggested based on their ability to alter the mechanical properties of the DNA and DNA-histone binding, respectively. We speculate that these positions around the nucleosome potentially serve as rendezvous points where DNA lesions may be encountered by repair proteins which may be sterically hindered from searching the rest of the nucleosomal DNA. The strength of the repositioning is strongly dependent on the structural details of the DNA lesion and the wrapping and breathing of the nucleosome. A more sophisticated evaluation of this proposed mechanism will require detailed information about breathing dynamics, the structure of partially wrapped nucleosomes, and the structural properties of damaged DNA.

  5. Aging processes, DNA damage, and repair.

    PubMed

    Gilchrest, B A; Bohr, V A

    1997-04-01

    The second triennial FASEB Summer Research Conference on "Clonal Senescence and Differentiation" (August 17-22, 1996) focused on the interrelationships between aging processes and DNA damage and repair. The attendees represented a cross section of senior and junior investigators working in fields ranging from classic cellular gerontology to yeast and nematode models of aging to basic mechanisms of DNA damage and repair. The meeting opened with a keynote address by Dr. Bruce Ames that emphasized the documented relationships between oxidative damage, cancer, and aging. This was followed by eight platform sessions, one poster discussion, one featured presentation, and an after-dinner address. The following sections highlight the key points discussed.

  6. DNA damage response to the Mdm2 inhibitor Nutlin-3

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Rajeev; Rigatti, Marc J.; Belinsky, Glenn S.; Godman, Cassandra A.; Giardina, Charles

    2009-01-01

    Mdm2 inhibitors represent a promising class of p53 activating compounds that may be useful in cancer treatment and prevention. However, the consequences of pharmacological p53 activation are not entirely clear. We observed that Nutlin-3 triggered a DNA damage response in azoxymethane-induced mouse AJ02-NM0 colon cancer cells, characterized by the phosphorylation of H2AX (at Ser-139) and p53 (at Ser-15). The DNA damage response was highest in cells showing robust p53 stabilization, it could be triggered by the active but not the inactive Nutlin-3 enantiomer, and it was also activated by another pharmacological Mdm2 inhibitor (Caylin). Quantification of γH2AX-positive cells following Nutlin-3 exposure showed that approximately 17% of cells in late S and G2/M were mounting a DNA damage response (compared to a ~50% response to 5-fluorouracil). Nutlin-3 treatment caused the formation of double strand DNA strand breaks, promoted the formation of micronuclei, accentuated strand breakage induced by doxorubicin and sensitized the mouse colon cancer cells to DNA break-inducing topoisomerase II inhibitors. Although the HCT116 colon cancer cells did not mount a significant DNA damage response following Nutlin-3 treatment, Nutlin-3 enhanced the DNA damage response to the nucleotide synthesis inhibitor hydroxyurea in a p53-dependent manner. Finally, p21 deletion also sensitized HCT116 cells to the Nutlin-3-induced DNA damage response, suggesting that cell cycle checkpoint abnormalities may promote this response. We propose that p53 activation by Mdm2 inhibitors can result in the slowing of double stranded DNA repair. Although this effect may suppress illegitimate homologous recombination repair, it may also increase the risk of clastogenic events. PMID:19788889

  7. Homologous recombination maintenance of genome integrity during DNA damage tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Prado, Félix

    2014-01-01

    The DNA strand exchange protein Rad51 provides a safe mechanism for the repair of DNA breaks using the information of a homologous DNA template. Homologous recombination (HR) also plays a key role in the response to DNA damage that impairs the advance of the replication forks by providing mechanisms to circumvent the lesion and fill in the tracks of single-stranded DNA that are generated during the process of lesion bypass. These activities postpone repair of the blocking lesion to ensure that DNA replication is completed in a timely manner. Experimental evidence generated over the last few years indicates that HR participates in this DNA damage tolerance response together with additional error-free (template switch) and error-prone (translesion synthesis) mechanisms through intricate connections, which are presented here. The choice between repair and tolerance, and the mechanism of tolerance, is critical to avoid increased mutagenesis and/or genome rearrangements, which are both hallmarks of cancer. PMID:27308329

  8. Targeting the DNA Damage Response in Cancer.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Mark J

    2015-11-19

    An underlying hallmark of cancers is their genomic instability, which is associated with a greater propensity to accumulate DNA damage. Historical treatment of cancer by radiotherapy and DNA-damaging chemotherapy is based on this principle, yet it is accompanied by significant collateral damage to normal tissue and unwanted side effects. Targeted therapy based on inhibiting the DNA damage response (DDR) in cancers offers the potential for a greater therapeutic window by tailoring treatment to patients with tumors lacking specific DDR functions. The recent approval of olaparib (Lynparza), the poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitor for treating tumors harboring BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations, represents the first medicine based on this principle, exploiting an underlying cause of tumor formation that also represents an Achilles' heel. This review highlights the different concepts behind targeting DDR in cancer and how this can provide significant opportunities for DDR-based therapies in the future.

  9. Fern spore extracts can damage DNA

    PubMed Central

    Simán, S E; Povey, A C; Ward, T H; Margison, G P; Sheffield, E

    2000-01-01

    The carcinogenicity of the vegetative tissues of bracken fern (Pteridium) has long been established. More recently, the carcinogenic effects of the spores of bracken have also been recognized. Both vegetative tissues and spores of bracken can induce adducts in DNA in animal tissues, but the possible genotoxic or carcinogenic effects of spores from fern species other than bracken are unknown. The single-cell gel electrophoresis (‘comet’) assay was used to investigate whether fern spores can cause DNA damage in vitro. Extracts of spores from six fern species were administered to cultured human premyeloid leukaemia (K562) cells. Spore extracts of five fern species: Anemia phyllitidis, Dicksonia antarctica, Pteridium aquilinum, Pteris vittata and Sadleria pallida, induced significantly more DNA strand breaks than those in the control groups. Only in one species, Osmunda regalis, was the effect no different from that in the control groups. Using extracts from A. phyllitidis and P. vittata, the extent of DNA damage was increased by increasing the original dose 10 times, whereas an experiment in which exposure times were varied suggested that the highest levels of strand breaks appear after 2 h exposure. Simultaneous incubation with human S9 liver enzyme mix ablated the damaging effect of the extracts. Our data show that fern spore extracts can cause DNA damage in human cells in vitro. Considering the strong correlation between DNA damage and carcinogenic events, the observations made in this report may well have some implications for human health. © 2000 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10883670

  10. Antiproliferative activity of goniothalamin enantiomers involves DNA damage, cell cycle arrest and apoptosis induction in MCF-7 and HB4a cells.

    PubMed

    Semprebon, Simone Cristine; Marques, Lilian Areal; D'Epiro, Gláucia Fernanda Rocha; de Camargo, Elaine Aparecida; da Silva, Glenda Nicioli; Niwa, Andressa Megumi; Macedo Junior, Fernando; Mantovani, Mário Sérgio

    2015-12-25

    (R)-goniothalamin (R-GNT) is a styryl lactone that exhibits antiproliferative property against several tumor cell lines. (S)-goniothalamin (S-GNT) is the synthetic enantiomer of R-GNT, and their biological properties are poorly understood. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antiproliferative mechanisms of (R)-goniothalamin and (S)-goniothalamin in MCF-7 breast cancer cells and HB4a epithelial mammary cells. To determine the mechanisms of cell growth inhibition, we analyzed the ability of R-GNT and S-GNT to induce DNA damage, cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Moreover, the gene expression of cell cycle components, including cyclin, CDKs and CKIs, as well as of genes involved in apoptosis and the DNA damage response were evaluated. The natural enantiomer R-GNT proved more effective in both cell lines than did the synthetic enantiomer S-GNT, inhibiting cell proliferation via cell cycle arrest and apoptosis induction, likely in response to DNA damage. The cell cycle inhibition caused by R-GNT was mediated through the upregulation of CIP/KIP cyclin-kinase inhibitors and through the downregulation of cyclins and CDKs. S-GNT, in turn, was able to cause G0/G1 cell cycle arrest and DNA damage in MCF-7 cells and apoptosis induction only in HB4a cells. Therefore, goniothalamin presents potent antiproliferative activity to breast cancer cells MCF-7. However, exposure to goniothalamin brings some undesirable effects to non-tumor cells HB4a, including genotoxicity and apoptosis induction.

  11. The nucleosome: orchestrating DNA damage signaling and repair within chromatin.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Poonam; Miller, Kyle M

    2016-10-01

    DNA damage occurs within the chromatin environment, which ultimately participates in regulating DNA damage response (DDR) pathways and repair of the lesion. DNA damage activates a cascade of signaling events that extensively modulates chromatin structure and organization to coordinate DDR factor recruitment to the break and repair, whilst also promoting the maintenance of normal chromatin functions within the damaged region. For example, DDR pathways must avoid conflicts between other DNA-based processes that function within the context of chromatin, including transcription and replication. The molecular mechanisms governing the recognition, target specificity, and recruitment of DDR factors and enzymes to the fundamental repeating unit of chromatin, i.e., the nucleosome, are poorly understood. Here we present our current view of how chromatin recognition by DDR factors is achieved at the level of the nucleosome. Emerging evidence suggests that the nucleosome surface, including the nucleosome acidic patch, promotes the binding and activity of several DNA damage factors on chromatin. Thus, in addition to interactions with damaged DNA and histone modifications, nucleosome recognition by DDR factors plays a key role in orchestrating the requisite chromatin response to maintain both genome and epigenome integrity.

  12. DNA Damage Protecting Activity and Free Radical Scavenging Activity of Anthocyanins from Red Sorghum (Sorghum bicolor) Bran

    PubMed Central

    Devi, P. Suganya; Kumar, M. Saravana; Das, S. Mohan

    2012-01-01

    There is increasing interest in natural food colorants like carotenoids and anthocyanins with functional properties. Red sorghum bran is known as a rich source for anthocyanins. The anthocyanin contents extracted from red sorghum bran were evaluated by biochemical analysis. Among the three solvent system used, the acidified methanol extract showed a highest anthocyanin content (4.7 mg/g of sorghum bran) followed by methanol (1.95 mg/g) and acetone (1 mg/g). Similarly, the highest total flavonoids (143 mg/g) and total phenolic contents (0.93 mg/g) were obtained in acidified methanol extracts than methanol and acetone extracts. To study the health benefits of anthocyanin from red sorghum bran, the total antioxidant activity was evaluated by biochemical and molecular methods. The highest antioxidant activity was observed in acidified methanol extracts of anthocyanin in dose-dependent manner. The antioxidant activity of the red sorghum bran was directly related to the total anthocyanin found in red sorghum bran. PMID:22400119

  13. NF-κB and AKT signaling prevent DNA damage in transformed pre-B cells by suppressing RAG1/2 expression and activity.

    PubMed

    Ochodnicka-Mackovicova, Katarina; Bahjat, Mahnoush; Bloedjes, Timon A; Maas, Chiel; de Bruin, Alexander M; Bende, Richard J; van Noesel, Carel J M; Guikema, Jeroen E J

    2015-09-10

    In developing lymphocytes, expression and activity of the recombination activation gene protein 1 (RAG1) and RAG2 endonuclease complex is tightly regulated to ensure ordered recombination of the immunoglobulin genes and to avoid genomic instability. Aberrant RAG activity has been implicated in the generation of secondary genetic events in human B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemias (B-ALLs), illustrating the oncogenic potential of the RAG complex. Several layers of regulation prevent collateral genomic DNA damage by restricting RAG activity to the G1 phase of the cell cycle. In this study, we show a novel pathway that suppresses RAG expression in cycling-transformed mouse pre-B cells and human pre-B B-ALL cells that involves the negative regulation of FOXO1 by nuclear factor κB (NF-κB). Inhibition of NF-κB in cycling pre-B cells resulted in upregulation of RAG expression and recombination activity, which provoked RAG-dependent DNA damage. In agreement, we observe a negative correlation between NF-κB activity and the expression of RAG1, RAG2, and TdT in B-ALL patients. Our data suggest that targeting NF-κB in B-ALL increases the risk of RAG-dependent genomic instability.

  14. Chromatin Remodeling, DNA Damage Repair and Aging

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Baohua; Yip, Raymond KH; Zhou, Zhongjun

    2012-01-01

    Cells are constantly exposed to a variety of environmental and endogenous conditions causing DNA damage, which is detected and repaired by conserved DNA repair pathways to maintain genomic integrity. Chromatin remodeling is critical in this process, as the organization of eukaryotic DNA into compact chromatin presents a natural barrier to all DNA-related events. Studies on human premature aging syndromes together with normal aging have suggested that accumulated damages might lead to exhaustion of resources that are required for physiological functions and thus accelerate aging. In this manuscript, combining the present understandings and latest findings, we focus mainly on discussing the role of chromatin remodeling in the repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) and regulation of aging. PMID:23633913

  15. Assessment of free radical scavenging potential and oxidative DNA damage preventive activity of Trachyspermum ammi L. (carom) and Foeniculum vulgare Mill. (fennel) seed extracts.

    PubMed

    Goswami, Nandini; Chatterjee, Sreemoyee

    2014-01-01

    Oxidation of biomolecules such as carbohydrates, proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids results in generation of free radicals in an organism which is the major cause of onset of various degenerative diseases. Antioxidants scavenge these free radicals, thereby protecting the cell from damage. The present study was designed to examine the free radical scavenging potential and oxidative DNA damage preventive activity of traditionally used spices Trachyspermum ammi L. (carom) and Foeniculum vulgare Mill. (fennel). The aqueous, methanolic, and acetonic extracts of T. ammi and F. vulgare seeds were prepared using soxhlet extraction assembly and subjected to qualitative and quantitative estimation of phytochemical constituents. Free radical scavenging potential was investigated using standard methods, namely, DPPH radical scavenging assay and ferric reducing antioxidant power assay along with the protection against oxidative DNA damage. The results stated that acetonic seed extracts (AAcSE and FAcSE) of both the spices possessed comparatively high amount of total phenolics whereas methanolic seed extracts (AMSE and FMSE) were found to have highest amount of total flavonoids. At 1 mg/mL concentration, highest DPPH radical scavenging activity was shown by FMSE (96.2%), AAcSE was recorded with highest FRAP value (2270.27 ± 0.005 μmol/L), and all the seed extracts have been shown to mitigate the damage induced by Fenton reaction on calf thymus DNA. Therefore, the study suggests that T. ammi and F. vulgare seed extracts could contribute as a highly significant bioresource of antioxidants to be used in our day-to-day life and in food and pharmaceutical industry.

  16. Assessment of Free Radical Scavenging Potential and Oxidative DNA Damage Preventive Activity of Trachyspermum ammi L. (Carom) and Foeniculum vulgare Mill. (Fennel) Seed Extracts

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Oxidation of biomolecules such as carbohydrates, proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids results in generation of free radicals in an organism which is the major cause of onset of various degenerative diseases. Antioxidants scavenge these free radicals, thereby protecting the cell from damage. The present study was designed to examine the free radical scavenging potential and oxidative DNA damage preventive activity of traditionally used spices Trachyspermum ammi L. (carom) and Foeniculum vulgare Mill. (fennel). The aqueous, methanolic, and acetonic extracts of T. ammi and F. vulgare seeds were prepared using soxhlet extraction assembly and subjected to qualitative and quantitative estimation of phytochemical constituents. Free radical scavenging potential was investigated using standard methods, namely, DPPH radical scavenging assay and ferric reducing antioxidant power assay along with the protection against oxidative DNA damage. The results stated that acetonic seed extracts (AAcSE and FAcSE) of both the spices possessed comparatively high amount of total phenolics whereas methanolic seed extracts (AMSE and FMSE) were found to have highest amount of total flavonoids. At 1 mg/mL concentration, highest DPPH radical scavenging activity was shown by FMSE (96.2%), AAcSE was recorded with highest FRAP value (2270.27 ± 0.005 μmol/L), and all the seed extracts have been shown to mitigate the damage induced by Fenton reaction on calf thymus DNA. Therefore, the study suggests that T. ammi and F. vulgare seed extracts could contribute as a highly significant bioresource of antioxidants to be used in our day-to-day life and in food and pharmaceutical industry. PMID:25143939

  17. Hydroxyl radical Thymine adduct induced DNA damages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schyman, Patric; Eriksson, Leif A.; Zhang, Ru bo; Laaksonen, Aatto

    2008-06-01

    DNA damages caused by a 5-hydroxy-5,6-dihydrothymine-6-yl radical (5-OHT-6yl) abstracting a C2‧ hydrogen from a neighboring sugar (inter-H abstraction) have been theoretically investigated using hybrid DFT in gas phase and in water solution. The inter-H abstraction was here shown to be comparable in energy (24 kcal mol-1) with the intra-H abstraction in which the 5-OHT-6yl abstracts a C2‧ hydrogen from its own sugar. The effect of a neutrally or a negatively charged phosphate group was also studied and the results show no significant impact on the activation energy of the hydrogen abstraction whereas base release and strand break reactions are affected.

  18. Combustion products of 1,3-butadiene inhibit catalase activity and induce expression of oxidative DNA damage repair enzymes in human bronchial epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Christopher H; Catallo, W James; Wilson, Vincent L; Mitchell, James B

    2009-10-01

    1,3-Butadiene, an important petrochemical, is commonly burned off when excess amounts need to be destroyed. This combustion process produces butadiene soot (BDS), which is composed of a complex mixture of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in particulates ranging in size from <1 microm to 1 mm. An organic extract of BDS is both cytotoxic and genotoxic to normal human bronchial epithelial (NHBE) cells. Based on the oxidizing potential of BDS, we hypothesized that an organic extract of this particulate matter would (1) cause enzyme inactivation due to protein amino acid oxidation and (2) induce oxidative DNA damage in NHBE cells. Thus, our aims were to determine the effect of butadiene soot ethanol extract (BSEE) on both enzyme activity and the expression of proteins involved in the repair of oxidative DNA damage. Catalase was found to be sensitive to BDS as catalase activity was potently diminished in the presence of BSEE. Using Western analysis, both the alpha isoform of human 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase (alpha-hOGG1) and human apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease (APE-1) were shown to be significantly overexpressed as compared to untreated controls after exposure of NHBE cells to BSEE. Our results indicate that BSEE is capable of effectively inactivating the antioxidant enzyme catalase, presumably via oxidation of protein amino acids. The presence of oxidized biomolecules may partially explain the extranuclear fluorescence that is detected when NHBE cells are treated with an organic extract of BDS. Overexpression of both alpha-hOGG1 and APE-1 proteins following treatment of NHBE cells with BSEE suggests that this mixture causes oxidative DNA damage.

  19. DNA damage induced by resveratrol and its synthetic analogues in the presence of Cu (II) ions: mechanism and structure-activity relationship.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Li-Fang; Wei, Qing-Yi; Cai, Yu-Jun; Fang, Jian-Guo; Zhou, Bo; Yang, Li; Liu, Zhong-Li

    2006-12-15

    The prooxidant effect of resveratrol (3,5,4'-trihydroxy-trans-stibene) and its synthetic analogues (ArOH), that is, 3,4,4'-trihydroxy-trans-stibene (3,4,4'-THS), 3,4,5-trihydroxy-trans-stibene (3,4,5-THS), 3,4-dihydroxy-trans-stibene (3,4-DHS), 4,4'-dihydroxy-trans-stibene (4,4'-DHS), 2,4-dihydroxy-trans-stilbene (2,4-DHS), 3,5-dihydroxy-trans-stilbene (3,5-DHS) and 3,5,4'-trimethoxy-trans-stibene (3,5,4'-TMS), on supercoiled pBR322 plasmid DNA strand breakage and calf thymus DNA damage in the presence of Cu (II) ions has been studied. It was found that the compounds bearing ortho-dihydroxyl groups (3,4-DHS, 3,4,4'-THS, and 3,4,5-THS) or bearing 4-hydroxyl groups (2,4-DHS, 4,4'-DHS, and resveratrol) exhibit remarkably higher activity in the DNA damage than the ones bearing no such functionalities. Kinetic analysis by UV-visible spectra demonstrates that the formation of ArOH-Cu (II) complexes, the stabilization of oxidative intermediate derived from ArOH and Cu (II)/Cu (I) redox cycles, might be responsible for the DNA damage. This study also reveals a good correlation between antioxidant and prooxidant activity, as well as cytotoxicity against human leukemia (HL-60 and Jurkat) cell lines. The mechanisms and implications of these observations are discussed.

  20. DNA damage, oxidative mutagen sensitivity, and repair of oxidative DNA damage in nonmelanoma skin cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Bendesky, Andrés; Michel, Alejandra; Sordo, Monserrat; Calderón-Aranda, Emma S; Acosta-Saavedra, Leonor C; Salazar, Ana M; Podoswa, Nancy; Ostrosky-Wegman, Patricia

    2006-08-01

    Nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC) is the most frequent type of cancer in humans. Exposure to UV radiation is a major risk factor for NMSC, and oxidative DNA damage, caused either by UV radiation itself or by other agents, may be involved in its induction. Increased sensitivity to oxidative damage and an altered DNA repair capacity (DRC) increase the risk of many types of cancer; however, sensitivity to oxidizing agents has not been evaluated for NMSC, and results regarding DRC in NMSC are inconclusive. In the present study, we evaluated DNA damage and repair in leukocytes from 41 NMSC patients and 45 controls. The Comet assay was used to measure basal and H(2)O(2)-induced DNA damage, as well as the DRC, while the cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay was used to measure the basal level of chromosome damage. Although basal DNA damage was higher for the controls than for the patients, this finding was mainly due to sampling more controls in the summer, which was associated with longer comet tails. In contrast, H(2)O(2)-induced DNA damage was significantly higher in cases than in controls, and this parameter was not influenced by the season of the year. The DRC for the H(2)O(2)-induced damage was similar for cases and controls and unrelated to seasonality. Finally, the frequency of binucleated lymphocytes with micronuclei was similar for cases and controls. The results of this study indicate that NMSC patients are distinguished from controls by an increased sensitivity to oxidative DNA damage.

  1. Triplex technology in studies of DNA damage, DNA repair, and mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Anirban; Vasquez, Karen M

    2011-08-01

    Triplex-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) can bind to the major groove of homopurine-homopyrimidine stretches of double-stranded DNA in a sequence-specific manner through Hoogsteen hydrogen bonding to form DNA triplexes. TFOs by themselves or conjugated to reactive molecules can be used to direct sequence-specific DNA damage, which in turn results in the induction of several DNA metabolic activities. Triplex technology is highly utilized as a tool to study gene regulation, molecular mechanisms of DNA repair, recombination, and mutagenesis. In addition, TFO targeting of specific genes has been exploited in the development of therapeutic strategies to modulate DNA structure and function. In this review, we discuss advances made in studies of DNA damage, DNA repair, recombination, and mutagenesis by using triplex technology to target specific DNA sequences.

  2. Insight into the ERVK Integrase – Propensity for DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Bray, Samantha; Turnbull, Matthew; Hebert, Sherry; Douville, Renée N.

    2016-01-01

    Retroviruses create permanently integrated proviruses that exist in the host genome. Retroviral genomes encode for functionally conserved gag, pro, pol, and env regions, as well as integrase (IN), which is required for retroviral integration. IN mediates viral genome insertion through 3′ end processing of the viral DNA and the strand transfer reaction. This process requires the formation of a pre-integration complex, comprised of IN, viral DNA, and cellular proteins. Viral insertion causes DNA damage, leading to the requirement of host DNA repair mechanisms. Therefore, a failure of DNA repair pathways may result in genomic instability and potentially cause host cell death. Considering the numerous human diseases associated with genomic instability, the endogenous retrovirus-K (ERVK) IN should be considered as a putative contributor to DNA damage in human cells. Future research and drug discovery should focus on ERVK IN activity and its role in human conditions, such as neurological disease and cancers. PMID:27990140

  3. Molecular Models for DNA Damaged by Photoreaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearlman, David A.; Holbrook, Stephen R.; Pirkle, David H.; Kim, Sung-Hou

    1985-03-01

    Structural models of a DNA molecule containing a radiation-induced psoralen cross-link and of a DNA containing a thymine photodimer were constructed by applying energy-minimization techniques and model-building procedures to data from x-ray crystallographic studies. The helical axes of the models show substantial kinking and unwinding at the sites of the damage, which may have long-range as well as local effects arising from the concomitant changes in the supercoiling and overall structure of the DNA. The damaged areas may also serve as recognition sites for repair enzymes. These results should help in understanding the biologic effects of radiation-induced damage on cells.

  4. Molecular models for DNA damaged by photoreaction

    SciTech Connect

    Pearlman, D.A.; Holbrook, S.R.; Pirkle, D.H.; Kim, S.H.

    1985-03-15

    Structural models of a DNA molecule containing a radiation-induced psoralen cross-link and of a DNA containing a thymine photodimer were constructed by applying energy-minimization techniques and model-building procedures to data from x-ray crystallographic studies. The helical axes of the models show substantial kinking and unwinding at the sites of the damage, which may have long-range as well as local effects arising from the concomitant changes in the supercoiling and overall structure of the DNA. The damaged areas may also serve as recognition sites for repair enzymes. These results should help in understanding the biologic effects of radiation-induced damage on cells.

  5. Assessment of the Antioxidant Activity of Silybum marianum Seed Extract and Its Protective Effect against DNA Oxidation, Protein Damage and Lipid Peroxidation

    PubMed Central

    Serçe, Aynur; Toptancı, Bircan Çeken; Tanrıkut, Sevil Emen; Altaş, Sevcan; Kızıl, Göksel; Kızıl, Süleyman

    2016-01-01

    Summary Antioxidant properties of ethanol extract of Silybum marianum (milk thistle) seeds was investigated. We have also investigated the protein damage activated by oxidative Fenton reaction and its prevention by Silybum marianum seed extract. Antioxidant potential of Silybum marianum seed ethanol extract was measured using different in vitro methods, such as lipid peroxidation, 1,1–diphenyl–2–picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and ferric reducing power assays. The extract significantly decreased DNA damage caused by hydroxyl radicals. Protein damage induced by hydroxyl radicals was also efficiently inhibited, which was confirmed by the presence of protein damage markers, such as protein carbonyl formation and by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS–PAGE). The present study shows that milk thistle seeds have good DPPH free radical scavenging activity and can prevent lipid peroxidation. Therefore, Silybum marianum can be used as potentially rich source of antioxidants and food preservatives. The results suggest that the seeds may have potential beneficial health effects providing opportunities to develop value-added products. PMID:28115903

  6. The RNA Response to DNA Damage.

    PubMed

    Giono, Luciana E; Nieto Moreno, Nicolás; Cambindo Botto, Adrián E; Dujardin, Gwendal; Muñoz, Manuel J; Kornblihtt, Alberto R

    2016-06-19

    Multicellular organisms must ensure genome integrity to prevent accumulation of mutations, cell death, and cancer. The DNA damage response (DDR) is a complex network that senses, signals, and executes multiple programs including DNA repair, cell cycle arrest, senescence, and apoptosis. This entails regulation of a variety of cellular processes: DNA replication and transcription, RNA processing, mRNA translation and turnover, and post-translational modification, degradation, and relocalization of proteins. Accumulated evidence over the past decades has shown that RNAs and RNA metabolism are both regulators and regulated actors of the DDR. This review aims to present a comprehensive overview of the current knowledge on the many interactions between the DNA damage and RNA fields.

  7. Nutritional Status DNA Damage and Tumor Pathology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-08-01

    Periconceptional multivitamin folic acid use, dietary folate , total folate and risk of neural tube defects in South Carolina. Ann. Epidemiol. 13:412-418... folate metabolism and colorectal neoplasia: a HuGE review. Am. J. Epidemiol. 159:423-443 (2004). 9 APPENDIX Central Role of 5,10...cancer (1). Breast cancer is associated with defects in DNA damage surveillance and repair. Polymorphism in genes encoding proteins involved in DNA repair

  8. Chicken fetal liver DNA damage and adduct formation by activation-dependent DNA-reactive carcinogens and related compounds of several structural classes.

    PubMed

    Williams, Gary M; Duan, Jian-Dong; Brunnemann, Klaus D; Iatropoulos, Michael J; Vock, Esther; Deschl, Ulrich

    2014-09-01

    The chicken egg genotoxicity assay (CEGA), which utilizes the liver of an intact and aseptic embryo-fetal test organism, was evaluated using four activation-dependent DNA-reactive carcinogens and four structurally related less potent carcinogens or non-carcinogens. In the assay, three daily doses of test substances were administered to eggs containing 9-11-day-old fetuses and the fetal livers were assessed for two endpoints, DNA breaks using the alkaline single cell gel electrophoresis (comet) assay and DNA adducts using the (32)P-nucleotide postlabeling (NPL) assay. The effects of four carcinogens of different structures requiring distinct pathways of bioactivation, i.e., 2-acetylaminofluorene (AAF), aflatoxin B1 (AFB1), benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P), and diethylnitrosamine (DEN), were compared with structurally related non-carcinogens fluorene (FLU) and benzo[e]pyrene (B[e]P) or weak carcinogens, aflatoxin B2 (AFB2) and N-nitrosodiethanolamine (NDELA). The four carcinogens all produced DNA breaks at microgram or low milligram total doses, whereas less potent carcinogens and non-carcinogens yielded borderline or negative results, respectively, at higher doses. AAF and B[a]P produced DNA adducts, whereas none was found with the related comparators FLU or B[e]P, consistent with comet results. DEN and NDELA were also negative for adducts, as expected in the case of DEN for an alkylating agent in the standard NPL assay. Also, AFB1 and AFB2 were negative in NPL, as expected, due to the nature of ring opened aflatoxin adducts, which are resistant to enzymatic digestion. Thus, the CEGA, using comet and NPL, is capable of detection of the genotoxicity of diverse DNA-reactive carcinogens, while not yielding false positives for non-carcinogens.

  9. DICER, DROSHA and DNA damage response RNAs are necessary for the secondary recruitment of DNA damage response factors.

    PubMed

    Francia, Sofia; Cabrini, Matteo; Matti, Valentina; Oldani, Amanda; d'Adda di Fagagna, Fabrizio

    2016-04-01

    The DNA damage response (DDR) plays a central role in preserving genome integrity. Recently, we reported that the endoribonucleases DICER and DROSHA contribute to DDR activation by generating small non-coding RNAs, termed DNA damage response RNA (DDRNA), carrying the sequence of the damaged locus. It is presently unclear whether DDRNAs act by promoting the primary recognition of DNA lesions or the secondary recruitment of DDR factors into cytologically detectable foci and consequent signal amplification. Here, we demonstrate that DICER and DROSHA are dispensable for primary recruitment of the DDR sensor NBS1 to DNA damage sites. Instead, the accumulation of the DDR mediators MDC1 and 53BP1 (also known as TP53BP1), markers of secondary recruitment, is reduced in DICER- or DROSHA-inactivated cells. In addition, NBS1 (also known as NBN) primary recruitment is resistant to RNA degradation, consistent with the notion that RNA is dispensable for primary recognition of DNA lesions. We propose that DICER, DROSHA and DDRNAs act in the response to DNA damage after primary recognition of DNA lesions and, together with γH2AX, are essential for enabling the secondary recruitment of DDR factors and fuel the amplification of DDR signaling.

  10. Detecting ATM-Dependent Chromatin Modification in DNA Damage Response

    PubMed Central

    Udayakumar, Durga; Horikoshi, Nobuo; Mishra, Lope; Hunt, Clayton; Pandita, Tej K.

    2015-01-01

    Loss of function or mutation of the ataxia–telangiectasia mutated gene product (ATM) results in inherited genetic disorders characterized by neurodegeneration, immunodeficiency, and cancer. Ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) gene product belongs to the PI3K-like protein kinase (PIKKs) family and is functionally implicated in mitogenic signal transduction, chromosome condensation, meiotic recombination, cell-cycle control, and telomere maintenance. The ATM protein kinase is primarily activated in response to DNA double strand breaks (DSBs), the most deleterious form of DNA damage produced by ionizing radiation (IR) or radiomimetic drugs. It is detected at DNA damage sites, where ATM autophosphorylation causes dissociation of the inactive homodimeric form to the activated monomeric form. Interestingly, heat shock can activate ATM independent of the presence of DNA strand breaks. ATM is an integral part of the sensory machinery that detects DSBs during meiosis, mitosis, or DNA breaks mediated by free radicals. These DNA lesions can trigger higher order chromatin reorganization fuelled by posttranslational modifications of histones and histone binding proteins. Our group, and others, have shown that ATM activation is tightly regulated by chromatin modifications. This review summarizes the multiple approaches used to discern the role of ATM and other associated proteins in chromatin modification in response to DNA damage. PMID:25827888

  11. Cu(II)-coumestrol interaction leads to ROS-mediated DNA damage and cell death: a putative mechanism for anticancer activity.

    PubMed

    Zafar, Atif; Singh, Swarnendra; Naseem, Imrana

    2016-07-01

    Phytoestrogens have attracted considerable interest as natural alternatives to hormone replacement therapy and their potential as cancer therapeutic agents. Among phytoestrogens, coumestrol has shown multipharmacological properties such as antiinflammatory, neuroprotective, osteoblastic differentiation and anticancer. Though several studies have described anticancer effects of coumestrol, a clear underlying molecular mechanism has not been elucidated. Unlike normal cells, cancer cells contain elevated copper levels that play an integral role in angiogenesis. Copper is an important metal ion associated with the chromatin DNA, particularly with guanine. Thus, targeting copper in cancer cells can serve as effective anticancer strategy. Using human peripheral lymphocytes, we assessed lipid peroxidation, protein carbonylation, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, DNA damage and apoptosis by coumestrol in the presence of exogenously added Cu(II) in cells to simulate malignancy-like condition. Results showed that Cu(II)-coumestrol interaction leads to lipid peroxidation and protein carbonylation (markers of oxidative stress), DNA fragmentation and apoptosis in treated lymphocytes. Further, incubation of lymphocytes with ROS scavengers and membrane-permeant copper chelator, neocuproine, resulted in inhibition of DNA damage and apoptosis. This suggests that coumestrol engages in redox cycling of Cu(II) to generate ROS that leads to DNA fragmentation and apoptosis. In conclusion, this is the first report showing that coumestrol targets cellular copper to induce prooxidant death in malignant cells. We believe that such a prooxidant cytotoxic mechanism better explains the anticancer activity of coumestrol. These findings will provide significant insights into the development of new chemical molecules with better copper-chelating and prooxidant properties against cancer cells.

  12. APOBEC3A damages the cellular genome during DNA replication

    PubMed Central

    Green, Abby M.; Landry, Sébastien; Budagyan, Konstantin; Avgousti, Daphne C.; Shalhout, Sophia; Bhagwat, Ashok S.; Weitzman, Matthew D.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The human APOBEC3 family of DNA-cytosine deaminases comprises 7 members (A3A-A3H) that act on single-stranded DNA (ssDNA). The APOBEC3 proteins function within the innate immune system by mutating DNA of viral genomes and retroelements to restrict infection and retrotransposition. Recent evidence suggests that APOBEC3 enzymes can also cause damage to the cellular genome. Mutational patterns consistent with APOBEC3 activity have been identified by bioinformatic analysis of tumor genome sequences. These mutational signatures include clusters of base substitutions that are proposed to occur due to APOBEC3 deamination. It has been suggested that transiently exposed ssDNA segments provide substrate for APOBEC3 deamination leading to mutation signatures within the genome. However, the mechanisms that produce single-stranded substrates for APOBEC3 deamination in mammalian cells have not been demonstrated. We investigated ssDNA at replication forks as a substrate for APOBEC3 deamination. We found that APOBEC3A (A3A) expression leads to DNA damage in replicating cells but this is reduced in quiescent cells. Upon A3A expression, cycling cells activate the DNA replication checkpoint and undergo cell cycle arrest. Additionally, we find that replication stress leaves cells vulnerable to A3A-induced DNA damage. We propose a model to explain A3A-induced damage to the cellular genome in which cytosine deamination at replication forks and other ssDNA substrates results in mutations and DNA breaks. This model highlights the risk of mutagenesis by A3A expression in replicating progenitor cells, and supports the emerging hypothesis that APOBEC3 enzymes contribute to genome instability in human tumors. PMID:26918916

  13. APOBEC3A damages the cellular genome during DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Green, Abby M; Landry, Sébastien; Budagyan, Konstantin; Avgousti, Daphne C; Shalhout, Sophia; Bhagwat, Ashok S; Weitzman, Matthew D

    2016-01-01

    The human APOBEC3 family of DNA-cytosine deaminases comprises 7 members (A3A-A3H) that act on single-stranded DNA (ssDNA). The APOBEC3 proteins function within the innate immune system by mutating DNA of viral genomes and retroelements to restrict infection and retrotransposition. Recent evidence suggests that APOBEC3 enzymes can also cause damage to the cellular genome. Mutational patterns consistent with APOBEC3 activity have been identified by bioinformatic analysis of tumor genome sequences. These mutational signatures include clusters of base substitutions that are proposed to occur due to APOBEC3 deamination. It has been suggested that transiently exposed ssDNA segments provide substrate for APOBEC3 deamination leading to mutation signatures within the genome. However, the mechanisms that produce single-stranded substrates for APOBEC3 deamination in mammalian cells have not been demonstrated. We investigated ssDNA at replication forks as a substrate for APOBEC3 deamination. We found that APOBEC3A (A3A) expression leads to DNA damage in replicating cells but this is reduced in quiescent cells. Upon A3A expression, cycling cells activate the DNA replication checkpoint and undergo cell cycle arrest. Additionally, we find that replication stress leaves cells vulnerable to A3A-induced DNA damage. We propose a model to explain A3A-induced damage to the cellular genome in which cytosine deamination at replication forks and other ssDNA substrates results in mutations and DNA breaks. This model highlights the risk of mutagenesis by A3A expression in replicating progenitor cells, and supports the emerging hypothesis that APOBEC3 enzymes contribute to genome instability in human tumors.

  14. Cidofovir is active against human papillomavirus positive and negative head and neck and cervical tumor cells by causing DNA damage as one of its working mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Mertens, Barbara; Nogueira, Tatiane; Stranska, Ruzena; Naesens, Lieve; Andrei, Graciela; Snoeck, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) causes cervical cancer and a large fraction of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC). Cidofovir (CDV) proved efficacious in the treatment of several HPV-induced benign and malignant hyper proliferations. To provide a better insight into how CDV selectively eradicates transformed cells, HPV+ and HPV− cervical carcinoma and HNSCC cell lines were compared to normal cells for antiproliferative effects, CDV metabolism, drug incorporation into cellular DNA, and DNA damage. Incorporation of CDV into cellular DNA was higher in tumor cells than in normal cells and correlated with CDV antiproliferative effects, which were independent of HPV status. Increase in phospho-ATM levels was detected following CDV exposure and higher levels of γ-H2AX (a quantitative marker of double-strand breaks) were measured in tumor cells compared to normal cells. A correlation between DNA damage and CDV incorporation into DNA was found but not between DNA damage and CDV antiproliferative effects. These data indicate that CDV antiproliferative effects result from incorporation of the drug into DNA causing DNA damage. However, the anti-tumor effects of CDV cannot be exclusively ascribed to DNA damage. Furthermore, CDV can be considered a promising broad spectrum anti-cancer agent, not restricted to HPV+ lesions. PMID:27331622

  15. FIBER OPTIC BIOSENSOR FOR DNA DAMAGE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper describes a fiber optic biosensor for the rapid and sensitive detection of radiation-induced or chemically-induced oxidative DNA damage. The assay is based on the hybridization and temperature-induced dissociation (melting curves) of synthetic oligonucleotides. The...

  16. Modulation of irinotecan-induced genomic DNA damage by theanine.

    PubMed

    Attia, Sabry

    2012-05-01

    The possible chemoprotective activity of theanine against irinotecan-induced genomic DNA damage towards mouse bone marrow cells was investigated. Chromosomal aberrations, DNA damage, micronuclei formation and mitotic activity were studied in the current study as markers of genomic damage. Oxidative DNA stress markers such as 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine, lipid peroxidation, reduced and oxidized glutathione levels were assessed as a possible mechanism underlying this amelioration. Theanine was neither genotoxic nor cytotoxic in mice at doses equivalent to 30 or 60 mg/kg for 12 days. Pretreatment of mice with theanine significantly reduced irinotecan-induced genomic damage in the bone marrow cells and these effects were dose dependent. Irinotecan induced marked biochemical alterations characteristic of oxidative DNA stress, including increased 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine, enhanced lipid peroxidation and reduction in the reduced/oxidized glutathione ratio. Prior administration of theanine ahead of irinotecan challenge ameliorated these oxidative DNA stress markers. Overall, this study provides for the first time that theanine has a protective role in the abatement of irinotecan-induced genomic damage in the bone marrow cells of mice that resides, at least in part, on its ability to modulate the cellular antioxidant levels and consequently protect bone marrow from irinotecan genotoxicity.

  17. Profiling DNA damage response following mitotic perturbations

    PubMed Central

    S. Pedersen, Ronni; Karemore, Gopal; Gudjonsson, Thorkell; Rask, Maj-Britt; Neumann, Beate; Hériché, Jean-Karim; Pepperkok, Rainer; Ellenberg, Jan; Gerlich, Daniel W.; Lukas, Jiri; Lukas, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Genome integrity relies on precise coordination between DNA replication and chromosome segregation. Whereas replication stress attracted much attention, the consequences of mitotic perturbations for genome integrity are less understood. Here, we knockdown 47 validated mitotic regulators to show that a broad spectrum of mitotic errors correlates with increased DNA breakage in daughter cells. Unexpectedly, we find that only a subset of these correlations are functionally linked. We identify the genuine mitosis-born DNA damage events and sub-classify them according to penetrance of the observed phenotypes. To demonstrate the potential of this resource, we show that DNA breakage after cytokinesis failure is preceded by replication stress, which mounts during consecutive cell cycles and coincides with decreased proliferation. Together, our results provide a resource to gauge the magnitude and dynamics of DNA breakage associated with mitotic aberrations and suggest that replication stress might limit propagation of cells with abnormal karyotypes. PMID:27976684

  18. DNA damage response in nephrotoxic and ischemic kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Yan, Mingjuan; Tang, Chengyuan; Ma, Zhengwei; Huang, Shuang; Dong, Zheng

    2016-10-27

    DNA damage activates specific cell signaling cascades for DNA repair, cell cycle arrest, senescence, and/or cell death. Recent studies have demonstrated DNA damage response (DDR) in experimental models of acute kidney injury (AKI). In cisplatin-induced AKI or nephrotoxicity, the DDR pathway of ATR/Chk2/p53 is activated and contributes to renal tubular cell apoptosis. In ischemic AKI, DDR seems more complex and involves at least the ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM), a member of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-related kinase (PIKK) family, and p53; however, while ATM may promote DNA repair, p53 may trigger cell death. Targeting DDR for kidney protection in AKI therefore relies on a thorough elucidation of the DDR pathways in various forms of AKI.

  19. DNA damage in storage cells of anhydrobiotic tardigrades.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Simon; Reuner, Andy; Brümmer, Franz; Schill, Ralph O

    2009-08-01

    In order to recover without any apparent damage, tardigrades have evolved effective adaptations to preserve the integrity of cells and tissues in the anhydrobiotic state. Despite those adaptations and the fact that the process of biological ageing comes to a stop during anhydrobiosis, the time animals can persist in this state is limited; after exceedingly long anhydrobiotic periods tardigrades fail to recover. Using the single cell gel electrophoresis (comet assay) technique to study the effect of anhydrobiosis on the integrity of deoxyribonucleic acid, we showed that the DNA in storage cells of the tardigrade Milnesium tardigradum was well protected during transition from the active into the anhydrobiotic state. Specimens of M. tardigradum that had been desiccated for two days had only accumulated minor DNA damage (2.09 +/- 1.98% DNA in tail, compared to 0.44 +/- 0.74% DNA in tail for the negative control with active, hydrated animals). Yet the longer the anhydrobiotic phase lasted, the more damage was inflicted on the DNA. After six weeks in anhydrobiosis, 13.63 +/- 6.41% of DNA was found in the comet tail. After ten months, 23.66 +/- 7.56% of DNA was detected in the comet tail. The cause for this deterioration is unknown, but oxidative processes mediated by reactive oxygen species are a possible explanation.

  20. The Effect of Leonurus sibiricus Plant Extracts on Stimulating Repair and Protective Activity against Oxidative DNA Damage in CHO Cells and Content of Phenolic Compounds.

    PubMed

    Sitarek, Przemysław; Skała, Ewa; Wysokińska, Halina; Wielanek, Marzena; Szemraj, Janusz; Toma, Monika; Śliwiński, Tomasz

    2016-01-01

    Leonurus sibiricus L. has been used as a traditional and medicinal herb for many years in Asia and Europe. This species is known to have antibacterial, anti-inflammatory, and antioxidant activity and has demonstrated a reduction of intracellular reactive oxygen species. All tested extracts of L. sibiricus showed protective and DNA repair stimulating effects in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells exposed to H2O2. Preincubation of the CHO cells with 0.5 mg/mL of plant extracts showed increased expression level of antioxidant genes (SOD2, CAT, and GPx). LC-MS/MS and HPLC analyses revealed the presence of nine phenolic compounds in L. sibiricus plant extracts: catechin, verbascoside, two flavonoids (quercetin and rutin), and five phenolic acids (4-hydroxybenzoic acid, chlorogenic acid, caffeic acid, p-coumaric acid, and ferulic acid). The roots and aerial parts of in vitro L. sibiricus plant extracts, which had the strongest antioxidant properties, may be responsible for stimulating CHO cells to repair oxidatively induced DNA damage, as well as protecting DNA via enhanced activation of the antioxidant genes (SOD2, CAT, and GPx) regulating intracellular antioxidant capacity. The content of phenolic compounds in in vitro raised plants was greater than the levels found in plants propagated from seeds.

  1. The Effect of Leonurus sibiricus Plant Extracts on Stimulating Repair and Protective Activity against Oxidative DNA Damage in CHO Cells and Content of Phenolic Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Sitarek, Przemysław; Skała, Ewa; Wysokińska, Halina; Wielanek, Marzena; Szemraj, Janusz; Toma, Monika; Śliwiński, Tomasz

    2016-01-01

    Leonurus sibiricus L. has been used as a traditional and medicinal herb for many years in Asia and Europe. This species is known to have antibacterial, anti-inflammatory, and antioxidant activity and has demonstrated a reduction of intracellular reactive oxygen species. All tested extracts of L. sibiricus showed protective and DNA repair stimulating effects in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells exposed to H2O2. Preincubation of the CHO cells with 0.5 mg/mL of plant extracts showed increased expression level of antioxidant genes (SOD2, CAT, and GPx). LC-MS/MS and HPLC analyses revealed the presence of nine phenolic compounds in L. sibiricus plant extracts: catechin, verbascoside, two flavonoids (quercetin and rutin), and five phenolic acids (4-hydroxybenzoic acid, chlorogenic acid, caffeic acid, p-coumaric acid, and ferulic acid). The roots and aerial parts of in vitro L. sibiricus plant extracts, which had the strongest antioxidant properties, may be responsible for stimulating CHO cells to repair oxidatively induced DNA damage, as well as protecting DNA via enhanced activation of the antioxidant genes (SOD2, CAT, and GPx) regulating intracellular antioxidant capacity. The content of phenolic compounds in in vitro raised plants was greater than the levels found in plants propagated from seeds. PMID:26788249

  2. Effect of highly lipolyzed goat cheese on HL-60 human leukemia cells: antiproliferative activity and induction of apoptotic DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, S; Kuwata, H; Kawamoto, K; Shirakawa, J; Atobe, S; Hoshi, Y; Yamasaki, M; Nishiyama, K; Tachibana, H; Yamada, K; Kobayashi, H; Igoshi, K

    2012-05-01

    To establish cheese as a dairy product with health benefits, we embarked on examining the multifunctional role of cheeses, especially in the field of cancer prevention. The current study was designed to investigate whether different types of commercial goat cheeses may possess antiproliferative activity, using an HL-60 human promyelocytic leukemia cell line as a cancer cell model. Among 11 cheese extracts tested at 500μg/mL, 6 (Crottin de Chavignol, Pouligny Saint-Pierre, Chabichou du Poitou, Valencay, Kavli, and Sainte-Maure de Touraine) resulted in a significant decrease of cell viability, which is consistent with a decrease in viable cell number. Compared with the half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC(50)) value of individual cheeses in cellular proliferation assays, the Pouligny Saint-Pierre extract showed strong inhibition. Incubation of cells in the presence of Pouligny Saint-Pierre extract resulted in induction of cellular morphological changes and apoptotic DNA fragmentation as well as expression of the active form of caspase-3 protein. Based on the quantification of the ratio of free fatty acids to triglycerides in different cheese samples, a significant correlation was detected between lipolytic ripeness and IC(50) values for antiproliferative capacity tested in HL-60 cells. Collectively, these results support a potential role of highly lipolyzed goat cheeses in the prevention of leukemic cell proliferation.

  3. Electrochemical DNA biosensor for detection of DNA damage induced by hydroxyl radicals.

    PubMed

    Hájková, Andrea; Barek, Jiří; Vyskočil, Vlastimil

    2017-03-01

    A simple electrochemical DNA biosensor based on a glassy carbon electrode (GCE) was prepared by adsorbing double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) onto the GCE surface and subsequently used for the detection of dsDNA damage induced by hydroxyl radicals. Investigation of the mutual interaction between hydroxyl radicals and dsDNA was conducted using a combination of several electrochemical detection techniques: square-wave voltammetry for direct monitoring the oxidation of dsDNA bases, and cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy as indirect electrochemical methods making use of the redox-active indicator [Fe(CN)6](4-/3-). Hydroxyl radicals were generated electrochemically on the surface of a boron-doped diamond electrode and chemically (via the Fenton's reaction or the auto-oxidation of Fe(II)). The extent of dsDNA damage by electrochemically generated hydroxyl radicals depended on the current density applied to the generating electrode: by applying 5, 10, and 50mAcm(-2), selected relative biosensor responses decreased after 3min incubation from 100% to 38%, 27%, and 3%, respectively. Chemically generated hydroxyl radicals caused less pronounced dsDNA damage, and their damaging activity depended on the form of Fe(II) ions: decreases to 49% (Fenton's reaction; Fe(II) complexed with EDTA) and 33% (auto-oxidation of Fe(II); Fe(II) complexed with dsDNA) were observed after 10min incubation.

  4. Diphenylarsinic acid, a chemical warfare-related neurotoxicant, promotes liver carcinogenesis via activation of aryl hydrocarbon receptor signaling and consequent induction of oxidative DNA damage in rats.

    PubMed

    Wei, Min; Yamada, Takanori; Yamano, Shotaro; Kato, Minoru; Kakehashi, Anna; Fujioka, Masaki; Tago, Yoshiyuki; Kitano, Mistuaki; Wanibuchi, Hideki

    2013-11-15

    Diphenylarsinic acid (DPAA), a chemical warfare-related neurotoxic organic arsenical, is present in the groundwater and soil in some regions of Japan due to illegal dumping after World War II. Inorganic arsenic is carcinogenic in humans and its organic arsenic metabolites are carcinogenic in animal studies, raising serious concerns about the carcinogenicity of DPAA. However, the carcinogenic potential of DPAA has not yet been evaluated. In the present study we found that DPAA significantly enhanced the development of diethylnitrosamine-induced preneoplastic lesions in the liver in a medium-term rat liver carcinogenesis assay. Evaluation of the expression of cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes in the liver revealed that DPAA induced the expression of CYP1B1, but not any other CYP1, CYP2, or CYP3 enzymes, suggesting that CYP1B1 might be the enzyme responsible for the metabolic activation of DPAA. We also found increased oxidative DNA damage, possibly due to elevated CYP1B1 expression. Induction of CYP1B1 has generally been linked with the activation of AhR, and we found that DPAA activates the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). Importantly, the promotion effect of DPAA was observed only at a dose that activated the AhR, suggesting that activation of AhR and consequent induction of AhR target genes and oxidative DNA damage plays a vital role in the promotion effects of DPAA. The present study provides, for the first time, evidence regarding the carcinogenicity of DPAA and indicates the necessity of comprehensive evaluation of its carcinogenic potential using long-term carcinogenicity studies.

  5. Low-Dose Formaldehyde Delays DNA Damage Recognition and DNA Excision Repair in Human Cells

    PubMed Central

    Luch, Andreas; Frey, Flurina C. Clement; Meier, Regula; Fei, Jia; Naegeli, Hanspeter

    2014-01-01

    Objective Formaldehyde is still widely employed as a universal crosslinking agent, preservative and disinfectant, despite its proven carcinogenicity in occupationally exposed workers. Therefore, it is of paramount importance to understand the possible impact of low-dose formaldehyde exposures in the general population. Due to the concomitant occurrence of multiple indoor and outdoor toxicants, we tested how formaldehyde, at micromolar concentrations, interferes with general DNA damage recognition and excision processes that remove some of the most frequently inflicted DNA lesions. Methodology/Principal Findings The overall mobility of the DNA damage sensors UV-DDB (ultraviolet-damaged DNA-binding) and XPC (xeroderma pigmentosum group C) was analyzed by assessing real-time protein dynamics in the nucleus of cultured human cells exposed to non-cytotoxic (<100 μM) formaldehyde concentrations. The DNA lesion-specific recruitment of these damage sensors was tested by monitoring their accumulation at local irradiation spots. DNA repair activity was determined in host-cell reactivation assays and, more directly, by measuring the excision of DNA lesions from chromosomes. Taken together, these assays demonstrated that formaldehyde obstructs the rapid nuclear trafficking of DNA damage sensors and, consequently, slows down their relocation to DNA damage sites thus delaying the excision repair of target lesions. A concentration-dependent effect relationship established a threshold concentration of as low as 25 micromolar for the inhibition of DNA excision repair. Conclusions/Significance A main implication of the retarded repair activity is that low-dose formaldehyde may exert an adjuvant role in carcinogenesis by impeding the excision of multiple mutagenic base lesions. In view of this generally disruptive effect on DNA repair, we propose that formaldehyde exposures in the general population should be further decreased to help reducing cancer risks. PMID:24722772

  6. The chemopreventive activity of the histone deacetylase inhibitor tributyrin in colon carcinogenesis involves the induction of apoptosis and reduction of DNA damage

    SciTech Connect

    Heidor, Renato; Furtado, Kelly Silva; Ortega, Juliana Festa; Oliveira, Tiago Franco de; Tavares, Paulo Eduardo Latorre Martins; Vieira, Alessandra; Miranda, Mayara Lilian Paulino; Purgatto, Eduardo; Moreno, Fernando Salvador

    2014-04-15

    The chemopreventive activity of the histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi) tributyrin (TB), a prodrug of butyric acid (BA), was evaluated in a rat model of colon carcinogenesis. The animals were treated with TB (TB group: 200 mg/100 g of body weight, b.w.) or maltodextrin (MD isocaloric control group: 300 mg/100 g b.w.) daily for 9 consecutive weeks. In the 3rd and 4th weeks of treatment, the rats in the TB and MD groups were given DMH (40 mg/kg b.w.) twice a week. After 9 weeks, the animals were euthanized, and the distal colon was examined. Compared with the control group (MD group), TB treatment reduced the total number of aberrant crypt foci (ACF; p < 0.05) as well as the ACF with ≥ 4 crypts (p < 0.05), which are considered more aggressive, but not inhibited the formation of DMH-induced O6-methyldeoxyguanosine DNA adducts. The TB group also showed a higher apoptotic index (p < 0.05) and reduced DNA damage (p < 0.05) compared with MD group. TB acted as a HDACi, as rats treated with the prodrug of BA had higher levels of histone H3K9 acetylation compared with the MD group (p < 0.05). TB administration resulted in increased colonic tissue concentrations of BA (p < 0.05) compared with the control animals. These results suggest that TB can be considered a promising chemopreventive agent for colon carcinogenesis because it reduced the number of ACF, including those that were more aggressive. Induction of apoptosis and reduction of DNA damage are cellular mechanisms that appear to be involved in the chemopreventive activity of TB. - Highlights: • Tributyrin is a chemopreventive agent for rat colon aberrant crypt foci. • Tributyrin increased apoptosis in an experimental rat colon carcinogenesis model. • Tributyrin treatment in a rat colon carcinogenesis model decreased DNA damage. • Tributyrin treatment induced H3K9 acetylation in a rat colon carcinogenesis model.

  7. Rose myrtle (Rhodomyrtus tomentosa) extract and its component, piceatannol, enhance the activity of DNA polymerase and suppress the inflammatory response elicited by UVB‑induced DNA damage in skin cells.

    PubMed

    Shiratake, Sawako; Nakahara, Tatsuo; Iwahashi, Hiroyasu; Onodera, Takefumi; Mizushina, Yoshiyuki

    2015-10-01

    A number of naturally occurring agents are hypothesized to protect against ultraviolet (UV)‑induced skin damage. The present study screened >50 plant extracts for inhibitors of UVB‑induced cytotoxicity, using cultured normal human epidermal keratinocytes (NHEK), and identified that the fruit of rose myrtle (Rhodomyrtus tomentosa) was the most marked inhibitor of cell death. The protective effect of rose myrtle extract and the two key components, piceatannol and piceatannol‑4'‑O‑β‑D‑glucopyranoside, on UVB‑induced damage and inflammation in cultured NHEK was investigated. The 80% ethanol extract from rose myrtle fruit with piceatannol exhibited protection of UVB‑induced cytotoxicity in NHEK; however, piceatannol‑4'‑O‑β‑D‑glucopyranoside exhibited no protection, as determined by a 3‑(4,5‑dimethylthiazol‑2‑yl)‑2,5‑diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. This extract and piceatannol reduced the production of UVB‑induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers and enhanced the cellular enzyme activity of the DNA polymerases in UVB‑irradiated NHEK, suggesting that UVB‑stimulated DNA damage was repaired by the polymerases. In addition, the secretion of prostaglandin E2, which is an inflammatory mediator, was decreased. These results indicated that rose myrtle fruit extract and its key constituent, piceatannol, are potential photoprotective candidates for UV‑induced skin damage.

  8. Involvement of DNA Damage Response Pathways in Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Sheau-Fang; Wei, Ren-Jie; Shiue, Yow-Ling; Wang, Shen-Nien

    2014-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) has been known as one of the most lethal human malignancies, due to the difficulty of early detection, chemoresistance, and radioresistance, and is characterized by active angiogenesis and metastasis, which account for rapid recurrence and poor survival. Its development has been closely associated with multiple risk factors, including hepatitis B and C virus infection, alcohol consumption, obesity, and diet contamination. Genetic alterations and genomic instability, probably resulted from unrepaired DNA lesions, are increasingly recognized as a common feature of human HCC. Dysregulation of DNA damage repair and signaling to cell cycle checkpoints, known as the DNA damage response (DDR), is associated with a predisposition to cancer and affects responses to DNA-damaging anticancer therapy. It has been demonstrated that various HCC-associated risk factors are able to promote DNA damages, formation of DNA adducts, and chromosomal aberrations. Hence, alterations in the DDR pathways may accumulate these lesions to trigger hepatocarcinogenesis and also to facilitate advanced HCC progression. This review collects some of the most known information about the link between HCC-associated risk factors and DDR pathways in HCC. Hopefully, the review will remind the researchers and clinicians of further characterizing and validating the roles of these DDR pathways in HCC. PMID:24877058

  9. SOS processing of unique oxidative DNA damages in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Laspia, M F; Wallace, S S

    1989-05-05

    phi X174 replicative form (RF) I transfecting DNA containing thymine glycols (5,6-dihydroxy-5,6-dihydrothymine), urea glycosides or apurinic (AP) sites was used to study SOS processing of unique DNA damages in Escherichia coli. All three lesions can be found in DNA damaged by chemical oxidants or radiation and are representative of several common structural modifications of DNA bases. When phi X DNA containing thymine glycols was transfected into host cells that were ultraviolet-irradiated to induce the SOS response, a substantial increase in survival was observed compared to transfection into uninduced hosts. Studies with mutants demonstrated that both the activated form of RecA and UmuDC proteins were required for this reactivation. In contrast, no increase in survival was observed when DNA containing urea glycosides or AP sites was transfected into ultraviolet-induced hosts. These data suggest that SOS-induced reactivation does not reflect a generalized repair system for all replication-blocking, lethal lesions but rather that the efficiency of reactivation is damage dependent. Further, we found that a significant fraction of potentially lethal thymine glycols could be ultraviolet-reactivated in an umuC lexA recA-independent manner, suggesting the existence of an as yet uncharacterized damage-inducible SOS-independent mode of thymine glycol repair.

  10. Distinct functional consequences of MUTYH variants associated with colorectal cancer: Damaged DNA affinity, glycosylase activity and interaction with PCNA and Hus1.

    PubMed

    Brinkmeyer, Megan K; David, Sheila S

    2015-10-01

    MUTYH is a base excision repair (BER) enzyme that prevents mutations in DNA associated with 8-oxoguanine (OG) by catalyzing the removal of adenine from inappropriately formed OG:A base-pairs. Germline mutations in the MUTYH gene are linked to colorectal polyposis and a high risk of colorectal cancer, a syndrome referred to as MUTYH-associated polyposis (MAP). There are over 300 different MUTYH mutations associated with MAP and a large fraction of these gene changes code for missense MUTYH variants. Herein, the adenine glycosylase activity, mismatch recognition properties, and interaction with relevant protein partners of human MUTYH and five MAP variants (R295C, P281L, Q324H, P502L, and R520Q) were examined. P281L MUTYH was found to be severely compromised both in DNA binding and base excision activity, consistent with the location of this variation in the iron-sulfur cluster (FCL) DNA binding motif of MUTYH. Both R295C and R520Q MUTYH were found to have low fractions of active enzyme, compromised affinity for damaged DNA, and reduced rates for adenine excision. In contrast, both Q324H and P502L MUTYH function relatively similarly to WT MUTYH in both binding and glycosylase assays. However, P502L and R520Q exhibited reduced affinity for PCNA (proliferation cell nuclear antigen), consistent with their location in the PCNA-binding motif of MUTYH. Whereas, only Q324H, and not R295C, was found to have reduced affinity for Hus1 of the Rad9-Hus1-Rad1 complex, despite both being localized to the same region implicated for interaction with Hus1. These results underscore the diversity of functional consequences due to MUTYH variants that may impact the progression of MAP.

  11. The Interaction between Polynucleotide Kinase Phosphatase and the DNA Repair Protein XRCC1 Is Critical for Repair of DNA Alkylation Damage and Stable Association at DNA Damage Sites*

    PubMed Central

    Della-Maria, Julie; Hegde, Muralidhar L.; McNeill, Daniel R.; Matsumoto, Yoshihiro; Tsai, Miaw-Sheue; Ellenberger, Tom; Wilson, David M.; Mitra, Sankar; Tomkinson, Alan E.

    2012-01-01

    XRCC1 plays a key role in the repair of DNA base damage and single-strand breaks. Although it has no known enzymatic activity, XRCC1 interacts with multiple DNA repair proteins and is a subunit of distinct DNA repair protein complexes. Here we used the yeast two-hybrid genetic assay to identify mutant versions of XRCC1 that are selectively defective in interacting with a single protein partner. One XRCC1 mutant, A482T, that was defective in binding to polynucleotide kinase phosphatase (PNKP) not only retained the ability to interact with partner proteins that bind to different regions of XRCC1 but also with aprataxin and aprataxin-like factor whose binding sites overlap with that of PNKP. Disruption of the interaction between PNKP and XRCC1 did not impact their initial recruitment to localized DNA damage sites but dramatically reduced their retention there. Furthermore, the interaction between PNKP and the DNA ligase IIIα-XRCC1 complex significantly increased the efficiency of reconstituted repair reactions and was required for complementation of the DNA damage sensitivity to DNA alkylation agents of xrcc1 mutant cells. Together our results reveal novel roles for the interaction between PNKP and XRCC1 in the retention of XRCC1 at DNA damage sites and in DNA alkylation damage repair. PMID:22992732

  12. Telomeres, histone code, and DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Misri, S; Pandita, S; Kumar, R; Pandita, T K

    2008-01-01

    Genomic stability is maintained by telomeres, the end terminal structures that protect chromosomes from fusion or degradation. Shortening or loss of telomeric repeats or altered telomere chromatin structure is correlated with telomere dysfunction such as chromosome end-to-end associations that could lead to genomic instability and gene amplification. The structure at the end of telomeres is such that its DNA differs from DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) to avoid nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ), which is accomplished by forming a unique higher order nucleoprotein structure. Telomeres are attached to the nuclear matrix and have a unique chromatin structure. Whether this special structure is maintained by specific chromatin changes is yet to be thoroughly investigated. Chromatin modifications implicated in transcriptional regulation are thought to be the result of a code on the histone proteins (histone code). This code, involving phosphorylation, acetylation, methylation, ubiquitylation, and sumoylation of histones, is believed to regulate chromatin accessibility either by disrupting chromatin contacts or by recruiting non-histone proteins to chromatin. The histone code in which distinct histone tail-protein interactions promote engagement may be the deciding factor for choosing specific DSB repair pathways. Recent evidence suggests that such mechanisms are involved in DNA damage detection and repair. Altered telomere chromatin structure has been linked to defective DNA damage response (DDR), and eukaryotic cells have evolved DDR mechanisms utilizing proficient DNA repair and cell cycle checkpoints in order to maintain genomic stability. Recent studies suggest that chromatin modifying factors play a critical role in the maintenance of genomic stability. This review will summarize the role of DNA damage repair proteins specifically ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) and its effectors and the telomere complex in maintaining genome stability.

  13. The dynamic behavior of Ect2 in response to DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    He, Dan; Xiang, Jinnan; Li, Baojie; Liu, Huijuan

    2016-01-01

    Ect2 is a BRCT-containing guanidine exchange factor for Rho GTPases. It is essential for cytokinesis and is also involved in tumorigenesis. Since most BRCT-containing proteins are involved in DNA damage response and/or DNA repair, we tested whether Ect2 plays similar roles. We report that in primary mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs), DNA damage quickly led to Ect2 relocalization to the chromatin and DNA damage foci-like structures. Ect2 knockdown did not affect foci localization of γH2AX, TopBP1, or Brca1, or activation of Atm, yet it impeded p53 Ser15 phosphorylation and activation, and resulted in defects in apoptosis and activation of S and G2/M checkpoints in response to DNA damage. These results suggest that Ect2 plays a role in DNA damage response. Interestingly, Ect2 is down-regulated at late stages of DNA damage response. Although p53 and E2F1 have been shown to regulate Ect2 transcription, DNA damage-induced Ect2 down-regulation occurred in p53−/− or Atm−/− MEFs and E2F1 knockdown cells. Instead, DNA damage-induced Ect2 down-regulation is mainly attributable to decreased protein stability. Like Ect2 knockdown, Ect2 destabilization may help the cell to recover from DNA damage response. These results suggest that Ect2 plays roles in multiple aspects of DNA damage response. PMID:27074761

  14. DNA mismatch repair and the DNA damage response

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhongdao; Pearlman, Alexander H.; Hsieh, Peggy

    2015-01-01

    This review discusses the role of DNA mismatch repair (MMR) in the DNA damage response (DDR) that triggers cell cycle arrest and, in some cases, apoptosis. Although the focus is on findings from mammalian cells, much has been learned from studies in other organisms including bacteria and yeast [1,2]. MMR promotes a DDR mediated by a key signaling kinase, ATM and Rad3-related (ATR), in response to various types of DNA damage including some encountered in widely used chemotherapy regimes. An introduction to the DDR mediated by ATR reveals its immense complexity and highlights the many biological and mechanistic questions that remain. Recent findings and future directions are highlighted. PMID:26704428

  15. Mechanistic studies of copper(II)-aminoglycoside mediated DNA damage and magnesium catalyzed nuclease activity of hammerhead ribozyme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patwardhan, Anjali A.

    The antibacterial activity of aminoglycosides stems from their high affinity binding to the 16S rRNA in bacteria resulting in inhibition of protein synthesis. Used to treat acute bacterial infections these antibiotics have limited applications due to their high dosage requirements and the emergence of resistant strains. We have synthesized and characterized Cu(II) derivatives of the aminoglycosides, kanamycin A, tobramycin, neamine, kanamycin B, neomycin B, and paromomycin. The first three exhibit preferential and tight binding to Cu(II) as against neomycin B and kanamycin B and paromomycin. EPR of frozen solutions and UV-visible spectroscopy suggest a change in geometry around the Cu(II) but the stabilities of the complexes in water differ. These copper derivatives efficiently cleave plasmid DNA at micromolar concentrations (hydrolytic) and at nanomolar concentrations in the presence co-reactants like hydrogen peroxide or ascorbic acid. Hydrolysis is multi turnover and exhibits Michelis-Menten kinetics with enzyme-like behavior whereas oxidative cleavage is highly specific with C-4' H abstraction resulting in characteristic base propenal and nucleotide base products. Hydroxyl radicals generated are copper based and are generated in close proximity of the substrate. Hammerhead ribozymes are selectively hydrolyzed in the presence of divalent ions with Mg2+ being the metal ion of choice in vivo . Our studies with complex ions like cobalt hexaammine and fac-triamminetriaquochromium(III) establish outer sphere interactions of Mg2+ with the hammerhead in the catalytic site. There are two sets of sites, one structural and one catalytic. Complex ions in the catalytic site and divalent ions in the structural site result in a slow but active hammerhead ribozyme suggesting that the complex ions are not inhibitory, contrary to what was suggested previously.

  16. Immunofluorescence Imaging of DNA Damage Response Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Brian T.; Bewersdorf, Jörg; Knight, Kendall L.

    2013-01-01

    Immunofluorescence imaging has provided captivating visual evidence for numerous cellular events, from vesicular trafficking, organelle maturation and cell division to nuclear processes including the appearance of various proteins and chromatin components in distinct foci in response to DNA damaging agents. With the advent of new super-resolution microscope technologies such as 4Pi microscopy, standard immunofluorescence protocols deserve some reevaluation in order to take full advantage of these new technological accomplishments. Here we describe several methodological considerations that will help overcome some of the limitations that may result from the use of currently applied procedures, with particular attention paid to the analysis of possible colocalization of fluorescent signals. We conclude with an example of how application of optimized methods led to a breakthrough in super-resolution imaging of nuclear events occurring in response to DNA damage. PMID:19245833

  17. Dihydroxyacetone, the active browning ingredient in sunless tanning lotions, induces DNA damage, cell-cycle block and apoptosis in cultured HaCaT keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Anita B; Wulf, Hans Christian; Gniadecki, Robert; Gajkowska, Barbara

    2004-06-13

    Dihydroxyacetone (DHA), the active substance in sunless tanning lotions reacts with the amino groups of proteins to form a brown-colored complex. This non-enzymatic glycation, known as the Maillard reaction, can also occur with free amino groups in DNA, raising the possibility that DHA may be genotoxic. To address this issue we investigated the effects of DHA on cell survival and proliferation of a human keratinocyte cell line, HaCaT. Dose- and time-dependent morphological changes, chromatin condensation, cytoplasmic budding and cell detachment were seen in cells treated with DHA. Several dead cells were observed after long-time (24 h) incubation with 25 mM DHA or more. Furthermore, an extensive decline in proliferation was observed 1 day after DHA exposure for 24 h. When applied in different concentrations (5-50 mM) and for different time periods (1, 3 or 24 h) DHA caused a G(2)/M block after the cyclin B(1) restriction point. Exit from this cell-cycle block was associated with massive apoptosis, as revealed by a clonogenic assay, TUNEL staining and electron microscopy. Furthermore, DHA caused DNA damage as revealed by the alkaline comet assay. Preincubation with antioxidants prevented the formation of DNA strand breaks. The DHA toxicity may be caused by direct redox reactions, with formation of ROS as the crucial intermediates. The genotoxic capacity of DHA raises a question about the long-term clinical consequences of treatment of the skin with this commonly used compound.

  18. Hyperactivation of DNA-PK by double-strand break mimicking molecules disorganizes DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Quanz, Maria; Chassoux, Danielle; Berthault, Nathalie; Agrario, Céline; Sun, Jian-Sheng; Dutreix, Marie

    2009-07-21

    Cellular response to DNA damage involves the coordinated activation of cell cycle checkpoints and DNA repair. The early steps of DNA damage recognition and signaling in mammalian cells are not yet fully understood. To investigate the regulation of the DNA damage response (DDR), we designed short and stabilized double stranded DNA molecules (Dbait) mimicking double-strand breaks. We compared the response induced by these molecules to the response induced by ionizing radiation. We show that stable 32-bp long Dbait, induce pan-nuclear phosphorylation of DDR components such as H2AX, Rpa32, Chk1, Chk2, Nbs1 and p53 in various cell lines. However, individual cell analyses reveal that differences exist in the cellular responses to Dbait compared to irradiation. Responses to Dbait: (i) are dependent only on DNA-PK kinase activity and not on ATM, (ii) result in a phosphorylation signal lasting several days and (iii) are distributed in the treated population in an "all-or-none" pattern, in a Dbait-concentration threshold dependant manner. Moreover, despite extensive phosphorylation of the DNA-PK downstream targets, Dbait treated cells continue to proliferate without showing cell cycle delay or apoptosis. Dbait treatment prior to irradiation impaired foci formation of Nbs1, 53BP1 and Rad51 at DNA damage sites and inhibited non-homologous end joining as well as homologous recombination. Together, our results suggest that the hyperactivation of DNA-PK is insufficient for complete execution of the DDR but induces a "false" DNA damage signaling that disorganizes the DNA repair system.

  19. Functional interplay between ATM/ATR-mediated DNA damage response and DNA repair pathways in oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Sorrell, Melanie; Berman, Zachary

    2014-01-01

    To maintain genome stability, cells have evolved various DNA repair pathways to deal with oxidative DNA damage. DNA damage response (DDR) pathways, including ATM-Chk2 and ATR-Chk1 checkpoints, are also activated in oxidative stress to coordinate DNA repair, cell cycle progression, transcription, apoptosis, and senescence. Several studies demonstrate that DDR pathways can regulate DNA repair pathways. On the other hand, accumulating evidence suggests that DNA repair pathways may modulate DDR pathway activation as well. In this review, we summarize our current understanding of how various DNA repair and DDR pathways are activated in response to oxidative DNA damage primarily from studies in eukaryotes. In particular, we analyze the functional interplay between DNA repair and DDR pathways in oxidative stress. A better understanding of cellular response to oxidative stress may provide novel avenues of treating human diseases, such as cancer and neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:24947324

  20. Regulation of the DNA Damage Response by DNA-PKcs Inhibitory Phosphorylation of ATM.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yi; Lee, Ji-Hoon; Jiang, Wenxia; Crowe, Jennie L; Zha, Shan; Paull, Tanya T

    2017-01-05

    Ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) regulates the DNA damage response as well as DNA double-strand break repair through homologous recombination. Here we show that ATM is hyperactive when the catalytic subunit of DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PKcs) is chemically inhibited or when the DNA-PKcs gene is deleted in human cells. Pre-incubation of ATM protein with active DNA-PKcs also significantly reduces ATM activity in vitro. We characterize several phosphorylation sites in ATM that are targets of DNA-PKcs and show that phospho-mimetic mutations at these residues significantly inhibit ATM activity and impair ATM signaling upon DNA damage. In contrast, phospho-blocking mutations at one cluster of sites increase the frequency of apoptosis during normal cell growth. DNA-PKcs, which is integral to the non-homologous end joining pathway, thus negatively regulates ATM activity through phosphorylation of ATM. These observations illuminate an important regulatory mechanism for ATM that also controls DNA repair pathway choice.

  1. Dynamical signature of abasic damage in DNA.

    PubMed

    Furse, Kristina E; Corcelli, Steven A

    2011-02-02

    Time-dependent Stokes shift (TDSS) responses in proteins and DNA exhibit a broad range of long time scales (>10 ps) that are not present in bulk aqueous solution. The physical interpretation of the long TDSS time scales in biomolecular systems is a matter of considerable debate because of the many different components present in the sample (water, biomolecule, counterions), which have highly correlated motions and intrinsically different abilities to adapt to local perturbations. Here we use molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to show that the surprisingly slow (∼10 ns) TDSS response of coumarin 102 (C102), a base pair replacement, reflects a distinct dynamical signature for DNA damage. When the C102 molecule is covalently incorporated into DNA, an abasic site is created on the strand opposite the C102 probe. The abasic sugar exhibits a reversible interchange between intra- and extrahelical conformations that are kinetically stable on a nanosecond time scale. This conformational change, only possible in damaged DNA, was found to be responsible for the long time scales in the measured TDSS response. For the first time, a TDSS measurement has been attributed to a specific biomolecular motion. This finding directly contradicts the prevailing notion that the TDSS response in biomolecular contexts is dominated by hydration dynamics. It also suggests that TDSS experiments can be used to study ultrafast biomolecular dynamics that are inaccessible to other techniques.

  2. Profiling oxidative DNA damage: effects of antioxidants.

    PubMed

    Box, Harold C; Patrzyc, Helen B; Budzinski, Edwin E; Dawidzik, Jean B; Freund, Harold G; Zeitouni, Nathalie C; Mahoney, Martin C

    2012-11-01

    The goal of this research was to determine whether antioxidant usage could be correlated with changes in DNA damage levels. Liquid Chromatography-tandem Mass Spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) was used to simultaneously measure five different oxidatively-induced base modifications in the DNA of WBC. Measurements of the five modifications were made before and after an 8-week trial during which participants took the SU.VI.MAX supplement. Levels of the five DNA modifications were compared among different groupings: users versus non-users of antioxidant supplements, before versus after the supplement intervention and men versus women. The statistical significance of differences between groups was most significant for pyrimidine base modifications and the observed trends reflect trends reported in epidemiological studies of antioxidant usage. A combination of modifications derived from pyrimidine bases is suggested as a superior indicator of oxidative stress.

  3. Involvement of oxidatively damaged DNA and repair in cancer development and aging

    PubMed Central

    Tudek, Barbara; Winczura, Alicja; Janik, Justyna; Siomek, Agnieszka; Foksinski, Marek; Oliński, Ryszard

    2010-01-01

    DNA damage and DNA repair may mediate several cellular processes, like replication and transcription, mutagenesis and apoptosis and thus may be important factors in the development and pathology of an organism, including cancer. DNA is constantly damaged by reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) directly and also by products of lipid peroxidation (LPO), which form exocyclic adducts to DNA bases. A wide variety of oxidatively-generated DNA lesions are present in living cells. 8-oxoguanine (8-oxoGua) is one of the best known DNA lesions due to its mutagenic properties. Among LPO-derived DNA base modifications the most intensively studied are ethenoadenine and ethenocytosine, highly miscoding DNA lesions considered as markers of oxidative stress and promutagenic DNA damage. Although at present it is impossible to directly answer the question concerning involvement of oxidatively damaged DNA in cancer etiology, it is likely that oxidatively modified DNA bases may serve as a source of mutations that initiate carcinogenesis and are involved in aging (i.e. they may be causal factors responsible for these processes). To counteract the deleterious effect of oxidatively damaged DNA, all organisms have developed several DNA repair mechanisms. The efficiency of oxidatively damaged DNA repair was frequently found to be decreased in cancer patients. The present work reviews the basis for the biological significance of DNA damage, particularly effects of 8-oxoGua and ethenoadduct occurrence in DNA in the aspect of cancer development, drawing attention to the multiplicity of proteins with repair activities. PMID:20589166

  4. Dual inhibition of ATR and ATM potentiates the activity of trabectedin and lurbinectedin by perturbing the DNA damage response and homologous recombination repair

    PubMed Central

    Soares, Daniele G.; Selle, Frédéric; Morel, Claire; Galmarini, Carlos M.; Henriques, João A. P.; Larsen, Annette K.; Escargueil, Alexandre E.

    2016-01-01

    Trabectedin (Yondelis®, ecteinascidin-743, ET-743) is a marine-derived natural product approved for treatment of advanced soft tissue sarcoma and relapsed platinum-sensitive ovarian cancer. Lurbinectedin is a novel anticancer agent structurally related to trabectedin. Both ecteinascidins generate DNA double-strand breaks that are processed through homologous recombination repair (HRR), thereby rendering HRR-deficient cells particularly sensitive. We here characterize the DNA damage response (DDR) to trabectedin and lurbinectedin in HeLa cells. Our results show that both compounds activate the ATM/Chk2 (ataxia-telangiectasia mutated/checkpoint kinase 2) and ATR/Chk1 (ATM and RAD3-related/checkpoint kinase 1) pathways. Interestingly, pharmacological inhibition of Chk1/2, ATR or ATM is not accompanied by any significant improvement of the cytotoxic activity of the ecteinascidins while dual inhibition of ATM and ATR strongly potentiates it. Accordingly, concomitant inhibition of both ATR and ATM is an absolute requirement to efficiently block the formation of γ-H2AX, MDC1, BRCA1 and Rad51 foci following exposure to the ecteinascidins. These results are not restricted to HeLa cells, but are shared by cisplatin-sensitive and -resistant ovarian carcinoma cells. Together, our data identify ATR and ATM as central coordinators of the DDR to ecteinascidins and provide a mechanistic rationale for combining these compounds with ATR and ATM inhibitors. PMID:27029031

  5. Dual inhibition of ATR and ATM potentiates the activity of trabectedin and lurbinectedin by perturbing the DNA damage response and homologous recombination repair.

    PubMed

    Lima, Michelle; Bouzid, Hana; Soares, Daniele G; Selle, Frédéric; Morel, Claire; Galmarini, Carlos M; Henriques, João A P; Larsen, Annette K; Escargueil, Alexandre E

    2016-05-03

    Trabectedin (Yondelis®, ecteinascidin-743, ET-743) is a marine-derived natural product approved for treatment of advanced soft tissue sarcoma and relapsed platinum-sensitive ovarian cancer. Lurbinectedin is a novel anticancer agent structurally related to trabectedin. Both ecteinascidins generate DNA double-strand breaks that are processed through homologous recombination repair (HRR), thereby rendering HRR-deficient cells particularly sensitive. We here characterize the DNA damage response (DDR) to trabectedin and lurbinectedin in HeLa cells. Our results show that both compounds activate the ATM/Chk2 (ataxia-telangiectasia mutated/checkpoint kinase 2) and ATR/Chk1 (ATM and RAD3-related/checkpoint kinase 1) pathways. Interestingly, pharmacological inhibition of Chk1/2, ATR or ATM is not accompanied by any significant improvement of the cytotoxic activity of the ecteinascidins while dual inhibition of ATM and ATR strongly potentiates it. Accordingly, concomitant inhibition of both ATR and ATM is an absolute requirement to efficiently block the formation of γ-H2AX, MDC1, BRCA1 and Rad51 foci following exposure to the ecteinascidins. These results are not restricted to HeLa cells, but are shared by cisplatin-sensitive and -resistant ovarian carcinoma cells. Together, our data identify ATR and ATM as central coordinators of the DDR to ecteinascidins and provide a mechanistic rationale for combining these compounds with ATR and ATM inhibitors.

  6. DNA damage, neuronal and glial cell death and neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Barzilai, Ari

    2010-11-01

    The DNA damage response (DDR) is a key factor in the maintenance of genome stability. As such, it is a central axis in sustaining cellular homeostasis in a variety of contexts: development, growth, differentiation, and maintenance of the normal life cycle of the cell. It is now clear that diverse mechanisms encompassing cell cycle regulation, repair pathways, many aspects of cellular metabolism, and cell death are inter-linked and act in concert in response to DNA damage. Defects in the DDR in proliferating cells can lead to cancer, while DDR defects in neurons may result in neurodegeneration. Mature neurons are highly differentiated, post-mitotic cells that cannot be replenished after disease or trauma. Their high metabolic activity generates large amounts of reactive oxygen species with DNA damaging capacity. Moreover, their intense transcriptional activity increases the potential for genomic DNA damage. Respectively, neurons have elaborate mechanisms to defend the integrity of their genome, thus ensuring their longevity and functionality in the face of these threats. Over the course of the past two decades, there has been a substantial increase in our understanding of the role of glial cells in supporting the neuronal cell DDR and longevity. This review article focuses on the potential role of the DDR in the etiology and pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases, and in addition, it describes various aspects of glial cell functionality in two genomic instability disorders: ataxia telangiectasia (A-T) and Nijmegen breakage syndrome.

  7. JS-K, a GST-activated nitric oxide generator, induces DNA double-strand breaks, activates DNA damage response pathways, and induces apoptosis in vitro and in vivo in human multiple myeloma cells.

    PubMed

    Kiziltepe, Tanyel; Hideshima, Teru; Ishitsuka, Kenji; Ocio, Enrique M; Raje, Noopur; Catley, Laurence; Li, Chun-Qi; Trudel, Laura J; Yasui, Hiroshi; Vallet, Sonia; Kutok, Jeffery L; Chauhan, Dharminder; Mitsiades, Constantine S; Saavedra, Joseph E; Wogan, Gerald N; Keefer, Larry K; Shami, Paul J; Anderson, Kenneth C

    2007-07-15

    Here we investigated the cytotoxicity of JS-K, a prodrug designed to release nitric oxide (NO(*)) following reaction with glutathione S-transferases, in multiple myeloma (MM). JS-K showed significant cytotoxicity in both conventional therapy-sensitive and -resistant MM cell lines, as well as patient-derived MM cells. JS-K induced apoptosis in MM cells, which was associated with PARP, caspase-8, and caspase-9 cleavage; increased Fas/CD95 expression; Mcl-1 cleavage; and Bcl-2 phosphorylation, as well as cytochrome c, apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF), and endonuclease G (EndoG) release. Moreover, JS-K overcame the survival advantages conferred by interleukin-6 (IL-6) and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), or by adherence of MM cells to bone marrow stromal cells. Mechanistic studies revealed that JS-K-induced cytotoxicity was mediated via NO(*) in MM cells. Furthermore, JS-K induced DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) and activated DNA damage responses, as evidenced by neutral comet assay, as well as H2AX, Chk2 and p53 phosphorylation. JS-K also activated c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase (JNK) in MM cells; conversely, inhibition of JNK markedly decreased JS-K-induced cytotoxicity. Importantly, bortezomib significantly enhanced JS-K-induced cytotoxicity. Finally, JS-K is well tolerated, inhibits tumor growth, and prolongs survival in a human MM xenograft mouse model. Taken together, these data provide the preclinical rationale for the clinical evaluation of JS-K to improve patient outcome in MM.

  8. Design, synthesis, and characterization of nucleosomes containing site-specific DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Taylor, John-Stephen

    2015-12-01

    How DNA damaged is formed, recognized, and repaired in chromatin is an area of intense study. To better understand the structure activity relationships of damaged chromatin, mono and dinucleosomes containing site-specific damage have been prepared and studied. This review will focus on the design, synthesis, and characterization of model systems of damaged chromatin for structural, physical, and enzymatic studies.

  9. The ATM Kinase Induces MicroRNA Biogenesis in the DNA Damage Response

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xinna; Wan, Guohui; Berger, Franklin G.; He, Xiaoming; Lu, Xiongbin

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY The DNA damage response involves a complex network of processes that detect and repair DNA damage. Here we show that miRNA biogenesis is globally induced upon DNA damage in an ATM-dependent manner. About one fourth of miRNAs are significantly up-regulated after DNA damage, while loss of ATM abolishes their induction. KSRP (KH-type splicing regulatory protein) is a key player that translates DNA damage signaling to miRNA biogenesis. The ATM kinase directly binds to and phosphorylates KSRP, leading to enhanced interaction between KSRP and pri-miRNAs and increased KSRP activity in miRNA processing. Mutations of the ATM phosphorylation sites of KSRP impaired its activity in regulating miRNAs. These findings reveal a mechanism by which DNA damage signaling is linked to miRNA biogenesis. PMID:21329876

  10. Phototoxicity mechanisms: chlorpromazine photosensitized damage to DNA and cell membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Kochevar, K.E.

    1981-07-01

    Photosensitized damage to biological molecules is the initial process in phototoxic responses. It is now recognized that many phototoxic compounds can photosensitize damage to more than one type of biological substrate. The in vitro light-initiated reactions of phototoxic compounds with DNA, soluble proteins and membrane components can be classified by their molecular mechanisms: (1) those in which an excited state of the phototoxic compound (or an unstable species derived from it) reacts directly with the biological substrate and (2) those in which a molecule derived from the phototoxic compound (a photoproduct or an activated oxygen species) reacts with the biological substrate. This paper describes the mechanisms by which chlorpromazine photosensitizes damage to membranes, protein and DNA and compares them to the mechanisms of photosensitization by psoralens, porphyrins, dyes, and other molecules.

  11. Acrylonitrile-induced oxidative DNA damage in rat astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Pu, Xinzhu; Kamendulis, Lisa M; Klaunig, James E

    2006-10-01

    Chronic administration of acrylonitrile results in a dose-related increase in astrocytomas in rat brain, but the mechanism of acrylonitrile carcinogenicity is not fully understood. The potential of acrylonitrile or its metabolites to induce direct DNA damage as a mechanism for acrylonitrile carcinogenicity has been questioned, and recent studies indicate that the mechanism involves the induction of oxidative stress in rat brain. The present study examined the ability of acrylonitrile to induce DNA damage in the DI TNC1 rat astrocyte cell line using the alkaline Comet assay. Oxidized DNA damage also was evaluated using formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase treatment in the modified Comet assay. No increase in direct DNA damage was seen in astrocytes exposed to sublethal concentrations of acrylonitrile (0-1.0 mM) for 24 hr. However, acrylonitrile treatment resulted in a concentration-related increase in oxidative DNA damage after 24 hr. Antioxidant supplementation in the culture media (alpha-tocopherol, (-)-epigallocathechin-3 gallate, or trolox) reduced acrylonitrile-induced oxidative DNA damage. Depletion of glutathione using 0.1 mM DL-buthionine-[S,R]-sulfoximine increased acrylonitrile-induced oxidative DNA damage (22-46%), while cotreatment of acrylonitrile with 2.5 mM L-2-oxothiazolidine-4-carboxylic acid, a precursor for glutathione biosynthesis, significantly reduced acrylonitrile-induced oxidative DNA damage (7-47%). Cotreatment of acrylonitrile with 0.5 mM 1-aminobenzotriazole, a suicidal inhibitor of cytochrome P450, prevented the oxidative DNA damage produced by acrylonitrile. Cyanide (0.1-0.5 mM) increased oxidative DNA damage (44-160%) in astrocytes. These studies demonstrate that while acrylonitrile does not directly damage astrocyte DNA, it does increase oxidative DNA damage. The oxidative DNA damage following acrylonitrile exposure appears to arise mainly through the P450 metabolic pathway; moreover, glutathione depletion may contribute to the

  12. Autophagy positively regulates DNA damage recognition by nucleotide excision repair.

    PubMed

    Qiang, Lei; Zhao, Baozhong; Shah, Palak; Sample, Ashley; Yang, Seungwon; He, Yu-Ying

    2016-01-01

    Macroautophagy (hereafter autophagy) is a cellular catabolic process that is essential for maintaining tissue homeostasis and regulating various normal and pathologic processes in human diseases including cancer. One cancer-driving process is accumulation of genetic mutations due to impaired DNA damage repair, including nucleotide excision repair. Here we show that autophagy positively regulates nucleotide excision repair through enhancing DNA damage recognition by the DNA damage sensor proteins XPC and DDB2 via 2 pathways. First, autophagy deficiency downregulates the transcription of XPC through TWIST1-dependent activation of the transcription repressor complex E2F4-RBL2. Second, autophagy deficiency impairs the recruitment of DDB2 to ultraviolet radiation (UV)-induced DNA damage sites through TWIST1-mediated inhibition of EP300. In mice, the pharmacological autophagy inhibitor Spautin-1 promotes UVB-induced tumorigenesis, whereas the autophagy inducer rapamycin reduces UVB-induced tumorigenesis. These findings demonstrate the crucial role of autophagy in maintaining proper nucleotide excision repair in mammalian cells and suggest a previously unrecognized tumor-suppressive mechanism of autophagy in cancer.

  13. Mitochondrial DNA damage induces apoptosis in senescent cells

    PubMed Central

    Laberge, R-M; Adler, D; DeMaria, M; Mechtouf, N; Teachenor, R; Cardin, G B; Desprez, P-Y; Campisi, J; Rodier, F

    2013-01-01

    Senescence is a cellular response to damage and stress. The senescence response prevents cancer by suppressing the proliferation of cells with a compromised genome and contributes to optimal wound healing in normal tissues. Persistent senescent cells are also thought to drive aging and age-associated pathologies through their secretion of inflammatory factors that modify the tissue microenvironment and alter the function of nearby normal or transformed cells. Understanding how senescent cells alter the microenvironment would be aided by the ability to induce or eliminate senescent cells at will in vivo. Here, we combine the use of the synthetic nucleoside analog ganciclovir (GCV) with herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSVtk) activity to create or eliminate senescent human cells. We show that low concentrations of GCV induce senescence through the accumulation of nuclear DNA damage while higher concentrations of GCV, similar to those used in vivo, kill non-dividing senescent cells via mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) damage and caspase-dependent apoptosis. Using this system, we effectively eliminated xenografted normal human senescent fibroblasts or induced senescence in human breast cancer cells in vivo. Thus, cellular senescence and mtDNA damage are outcomes of synthetic nucleoside analog treatment, indicating that the GCV–HSVtk combination can be used effectively to promote the targeted formation or eradication of senescent cells. PMID:23868060

  14. Mitochondrial DNA damage induces apoptosis in senescent cells.

    PubMed

    Laberge, R-M; Adler, D; DeMaria, M; Mechtouf, N; Teachenor, R; Cardin, G B; Desprez, P-Y; Campisi, J; Rodier, F

    2013-07-18

    Senescence is a cellular response to damage and stress. The senescence response prevents cancer by suppressing the proliferation of cells with a compromised genome and contributes to optimal wound healing in normal tissues. Persistent senescent cells are also thought to drive aging and age-associated pathologies through their secretion of inflammatory factors that modify the tissue microenvironment and alter the function of nearby normal or transformed cells. Understanding how senescent cells alter the microenvironment would be aided by the ability to induce or eliminate senescent cells at will in vivo. Here, we combine the use of the synthetic nucleoside analog ganciclovir (GCV) with herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSVtk) activity to create or eliminate senescent human cells. We show that low concentrations of GCV induce senescence through the accumulation of nuclear DNA damage while higher concentrations of GCV, similar to those used in vivo, kill non-dividing senescent cells via mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) damage and caspase-dependent apoptosis. Using this system, we effectively eliminated xenografted normal human senescent fibroblasts or induced senescence in human breast cancer cells in vivo. Thus, cellular senescence and mtDNA damage are outcomes of synthetic nucleoside analog treatment, indicating that the GCV-HSVtk combination can be used effectively to promote the targeted formation or eradication of senescent cells.

  15. Inflammation, oxidative DNA damage, and carcinogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, J G; Adams, D O

    1987-01-01

    Inflammation has long been associated with carcinogenesis, especially in the promotion phase. The mechanism of action of the potent inflammatory agent and skin promoter 12-tetradecanoyl phorbol-13-acetate (TPA) is unknown. It is thought that TPA selectively enhances the growth of initiated cells, and during this process, initiated cells progress to the preneoplastic state and eventually to the malignant phenotype. Many studies support the multistep nature of carcinogenesis, and a significant amount of evidence indicates that more than one genetic event is necessary for neoplastic transformation. Selective growth stimulation of initiated cells by TPA does not explain how further genetic events may occur by chronic exposure to this nongenotoxic agent. We and others have proposed that TPA may work, in part, by inciting inflammation and stimulating inflammatory cells to release powerful oxidants which then induce DNA damage in epidermal cells. Macrophages cocultured with target cells and TPA induce oxidized thymine bases in the target cells. This process is inhibited by both catalase and inhibitors of lipoxygenases, suggesting the involvement of both H2O2 and oxidized lipid products. Furthermore, macrophage populations that release both H2O2 and metabolites of arachidonic acid (AA) are more efficient at inducing oxidative DNA damage in surrounding cells than populations which only release H2O2 or metabolites of AA. In vivo studies demonstrated that SENCAR mice, which are sensitive to promotion by TPA, have a more intense inflammatory reaction in skin than C57LB/6 mice, which are resistant to promotion by TPA. In addition, macrophages from SENCAR mice release more H2O2 and metabolites of AA, and induce more oxidative DNA damage in cocultured cells than macrophages from C57LB/6 mice.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images FIGURE 8. A FIGURE 8. B PMID:3129286

  16. Proteasome inhibition enhances resistance to DNA damage via upregulation of Rpn4-dependent DNA repair genes.

    PubMed

    Karpov, Dmitry S; Spasskaya, Daria S; Tutyaeva, Vera V; Mironov, Alexander S; Karpov, Vadim L

    2013-09-17

    The 26S proteasome is an ATP-dependent multi-subunit protease complex and the major regulator of intracellular protein turnover and quality control. However, its role in the DNA damage response is controversial. We addressed this question in yeast by disrupting the transcriptional regulation of the PRE1 proteasomal gene. The mutant strain has decreased proteasome activity and is hyper-resistant to various DNA-damaging agents. We found that Rpn4-target genes MAG1, RAD23, and RAD52 are overexpressed in this strain due to Rpn4 stabilisation. These genes represent three different pathways of base excision, nucleotide excision and double strand break repair by homologous recombination (DSB-HR). Consistently, the proteasome mutant displays increased DSB-HR activity. Our data imply that the proteasome may have a negative role in DNA damage response.

  17. Reversal of DNA damage induced Topoisomerase 2 DNA-protein crosslinks by Tdp2.

    PubMed

    Schellenberg, Matthew J; Perera, Lalith; Strom, Christina N; Waters, Crystal A; Monian, Brinda; Appel, C Denise; Vilas, Caroline K; Williams, Jason G; Ramsden, Dale A; Williams, R Scott

    2016-05-05

    Mammalian Tyrosyl-DNA phosphodiesterase 2 (Tdp2) reverses Topoisomerase 2 (Top2) DNA-protein crosslinks triggered by Top2 engagement of DNA damage or poisoning by anticancer drugs. Tdp2 deficiencies are linked to neurological disease and cellular sensitivity to Top2 poisons. Herein, we report X-ray crystal structures of ligand-free Tdp2 and Tdp2-DNA complexes with alkylated and abasic DNA that unveil a dynamic Tdp2 active site lid and deep substrate binding trench well-suited for engaging the diverse DNA damage triggers of abortive Top2 reactions. Modeling of a proposed Tdp2 reaction coordinate, combined with mutagenesis and biochemical studies support a single Mg(2+)-ion mechanism assisted by a phosphotyrosyl-arginine cation-π interface. We further identify a Tdp2 active site SNP that ablates Tdp2 Mg(2+) binding and catalytic activity, impairs Tdp2 mediated NHEJ of tyrosine blocked termini, and renders cells sensitive to the anticancer agent etoposide. Collectively, our results provide a structural mechanism for Tdp2 engagement of heterogeneous DNA damage that causes Top2 poisoning, and indicate that evaluation of Tdp2 status may be an important personalized medicine biomarker informing on individual sensitivities to chemotherapeutic Top2 poisons.

  18. DNA Damage: A Main Determinant of Vascular Aging.

    PubMed

    Bautista-Niño, Paula K; Portilla-Fernandez, Eliana; Vaughan, Douglas E; Danser, A H Jan; Roks, Anton J M

    2016-05-18

    Vascular aging plays a central role in health problems and mortality in older people. Apart from the impact of several classical cardiovascular risk factors on the vasculature, chronological aging remains the single most important determinant of cardiovascular problems. The causative mechanisms by which chronological aging mediates its impact, independently from classical risk factors, remain to be elucidated. In recent years evidence has accumulated that unrepaired DNA damage may play an important role. Observations in animal models and in humans indicate that under conditions during which DNA damage accumulates in an accelerated rate, functional decline of the vasculature takes place in a similar but more rapid or more exaggerated way than occurs in the absence of such conditions. Also epidemiological studies suggest a relationship between DNA maintenance and age-related cardiovascular disease. Accordingly, mouse models of defective DNA repair are means to study the mechanisms involved in biological aging of the vasculature. We here review the evidence of the role of DNA damage in vascular aging, and present mechanisms by which genomic instability interferes with regulation of the vascular tone. In addition, we present potential remedies against vascular aging induced by genomic instability. Central to this review is the role of diverse types of DNA damage (telomeric, non-telomeric and mitochondrial), of cellular changes (apoptosis, senescence, autophagy), mediators of senescence and cell growth (plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors, senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP)/senescence-messaging secretome (SMS), insulin and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) signaling), the adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK)-mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR)-nuclear factor kappa B (NFκB) axis, reactive oxygen species (ROS) vs. endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS)-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (c

  19. DNA Damage: A Main Determinant of Vascular Aging

    PubMed Central

    Bautista-Niño, Paula K.; Portilla-Fernandez, Eliana; Vaughan, Douglas E.; Danser, A. H. Jan; Roks, Anton J. M.

    2016-01-01

    Vascular aging plays a central role in health problems and mortality in older people. Apart from the impact of several classical cardiovascular risk factors on the vasculature, chronological aging remains the single most important determinant of cardiovascular problems. The causative mechanisms by which chronological aging mediates its impact, independently from classical risk factors, remain to be elucidated. In recent years evidence has accumulated that unrepaired DNA damage may play an important role. Observations in animal models and in humans indicate that under conditions during which DNA damage accumulates in an accelerated rate, functional decline of the vasculature takes place in a similar but more rapid or more exaggerated way than occurs in the absence of such conditions. Also epidemiological studies suggest a relationship between DNA maintenance and age-related cardiovascular disease. Accordingly, mouse models of defective DNA repair are means to study the mechanisms involved in biological aging of the vasculature. We here review the evidence of the role of DNA damage in vascular aging, and present mechanisms by which genomic instability interferes with regulation of the vascular tone. In addition, we present potential remedies against vascular aging induced by genomic instability. Central to this review is the role of diverse types of DNA damage (telomeric, non-telomeric and mitochondrial), of cellular changes (apoptosis, senescence, autophagy), mediators of senescence and cell growth (plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors, senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP)/senescence-messaging secretome (SMS), insulin and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) signaling), the adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK)-mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR)-nuclear factor kappa B (NFκB) axis, reactive oxygen species (ROS) vs. endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS)-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (c

  20. DNA damage, EROD activity, condition indices, and their linkages with contaminants in female flounder (Platichthys flesus) from the southern Baltic Sea.

    PubMed

    Dabrowska, Henryka; Kopko, Orest; Góra, Agnieszka; Waszak, Ilona; Walkusz-Miotk, Jolanta

    2014-10-15

    The Baltic Sea is considered as one of the marine areas most exposed to human impacts. A variety of chemical contaminants pose a threat to the habitants. Female flounder (Platichthys flesus) collected from three locations in the southern Baltic Sea in February 2010 were examined for biomarkers of exposure to genotoxic agents (DNA damage), AhR-active contaminants (ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase, EROD activity), and somatic condition indexes. Organochlorine contaminants (OCs) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) metabolites were also measured in individual flounder to evaluate the biological responses in the context of contaminant burden. The genotoxicity, mildly exceeding a background level, revealed a significant relationship with mono-ortho substituted PCB (m-oPCB). Hepatic EROD activity was highly induced, yet showed no association with any of the contaminants measured other than biliary 1-OH pyrene normalized to pigment absorbance. Significant negative relationships were observed for lipid-based OCs and the gonado-somatic index (GSI) as well as for Ʃm-oPCB concentrations and the condition factor (CF). Principal component analysis (PCA) revealed an overall connection between somatic condition indexes, biomarkers, and chemical variables. Of the three locations, flounder inhabiting the Gulf of Gdańsk had the greatest contaminant burden and appeared to be the most affected. Of great concern is the reduced GSI in this location which can be attributed to the effects of contaminants and warrants further investigation.

  1. Development of a Fish Cell Biosensor System for Genotoxicity Detection Based on DNA Damage-Induced Trans-Activation of p21 Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Deyu; Zhang, Zhixia; Guo, Huarong

    2012-01-01

    p21CIP1/WAF1 is a p53-target gene in response to cellular DNA damage. Here we report the development of a fish cell biosensor system for high throughput genotoxicity detection of new drugs, by stably integrating two reporter plasmids of pGL3-p21-luc (human p21 promoter linked to firefly luciferase) and pRL-CMV-luc (CMV promoter linked to Renilla luciferase) into marine flatfish flounder gill (FG) cells, referred to as p21FGLuc. Initial validation of this genotoxicity biosensor system showed that p21FGLuc cells had a wild-type p53 signaling pathway and responded positively to the challenge of both directly acting genotoxic agents (bleomycin and mitomycin C) and indirectly acting genotoxic agents (cyclophosphamide with metabolic activation), but negatively to cyclophosphamide without metabolic activation and the non-genotoxic agents ethanol and D-mannitol, thus confirming a high specificity and sensitivity, fast and stable response to genotoxic agents for this easily maintained fish cell biosensor system. This system was especially useful in the genotoxicity detection of Di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP), a rodent carcinogen, but negatively reported in most non-mammalian in vitro mutation assays, by providing a strong indication of genotoxicity for DEHP. A limitation for this biosensor system was that it might give false positive results in response to sodium butyrate and any other agents, which can trans-activate the p21 gene in a p53-independent manner. PMID:25585933

  2. Gilvocarcin V, a Photodynamic DNA Damaging Agent Of Unusual Potency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elespuru, Rosalie K.; Look, Sally A.

    1988-02-01

    Gilvocarcin V (GV) is a planar, aromatic DNA-intercalating C-glycoside isolated as a natural product antibiotic. In the presence of UVA or visible radiation, it becomes a DNA damaging agent at low doses in both bacterial and mammalian cells. In mice treated without regard to light exposure, GV exhibited antitumor activity at high doses, with little accompanying toxicity. Wavelength-dependence studies showed that lambda prophage induction profiles were similar to (part of) the absorption spectrum of GV, with a peak near 400 nm. However, significant induction at a higher wavelength (546 nm), was observed at relatively high (e.g. 1 μg/m1) concentrations of GV. The DNA damaging activity of GV was dependent on both the concentration of antibiotic and the fluence of radiation in a reciprocal manner. Mutagenesis and DNA binding experiments suggest a preference for interaction with AT-rich regions of DNA, but multiple modes of interaction seem likely. The presence of different C-glycosides on the gilvocarcin V chromophore may alter the pharmacological properties of the molecule, but photoactivation appears to be independent of these groups. The therapeutic possibilities of gilvocarcins remain largely unexplored; the demonstrated potency of these compounds when activated, the reciprocity effect, possibility of structural variation, and apparent lack of toxicity in mammalian systems are properties which could be exploited in therapeutic development.

  3. DNA strand breaks: the DNA template alterations that trigger p53-dependent DNA damage response pathways.

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, W G; Kastan, M B

    1994-01-01

    The tumor suppressor protein p53 serves as a critical regulator of a G1 cell cycle checkpoint and of apoptosis following exposure of cells to DNA-damaging agents. The mechanism by which DNA-damaging agents elevate p53 protein levels to trigger G1/S arrest or cell death remains to be elucidated. In fact, whether damage to the DNA template itself participates in transducing the signal leading to p53 induction has not yet been demonstrated. We exposed human cell lines containing wild-type p53 alleles to several different DNA-damaging agents and found that agents which rapidly induce DNA strand breaks, such as ionizing radiation, bleomycin, and DNA topoisomerase-targeted drugs, rapidly triggered p53 protein elevations. In addition, we determined that camptothecin-stimulated trapping of topoisomerase I-DNA complexes was not sufficient to elevate p53 protein levels; rather, replication-associated DNA strand breaks were required. Furthermore, treatment of cells with the antimetabolite N(phosphonoacetyl)-L-aspartate (PALA) did not cause rapid p53 protein increases but resulted in delayed increases in p53 protein levels temporally correlated with the appearance of DNA strand breaks. Finally, we concluded that DNA strand breaks were sufficient for initiating p53-dependent signal transduction after finding that introduction of nucleases into cells by electroporation stimulated rapid p53 protein elevations. While DNA strand breaks appeared to be capable of triggering p53 induction, DNA lesions other than strand breaks did not. Exposure of normal cells and excision repair-deficient xeroderma pigmentosum cells to low doses of UV light, under conditions in which thymine dimers appear but DNA replication-associated strand breaks were prevented, resulted in p53 induction attributable to DNA strand breaks associated with excision repair. Our data indicate that DNA strand breaks are sufficient and probably necessary for p53 induction in cells with wild-type p53 alleles exposed to DNA-damaging

  4. DNA polymerase III requirement for repair of DNA damage caused by methyl methanesulfonate and hydrogen peroxide

    SciTech Connect

    Hagensee, M.E.; Bryan, S.K.; Moses, R.E.

    1987-10-01

    The pcbA1 mutation allows DNA replication dependent on DNA polymerase I at the restrictive temperature in polC(Ts) strains. Cells which carry pcbA1, a functional DNA polymerase I, and a temperature-sensitive DNA polymerase III gene were used to study the role of DNA polymerase III in DNA repair. At the restrictive temperature for DNA polymerase III, these strains were more sensitive to the alkylating agent methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) and hydrogen peroxide than normal cells. The same strains showed no increase in sensitivity to bleomycin, UV light, or psoralen at the restrictive temperature. The sensitivity of these strains to MMS and hydrogen peroxide was not due to the pcbAl allele, and normal sensitivity was restored by the introduction of a chromosomal or cloned DNA polymerase III gene, verifying that the sensitivity was due to loss of DNA polymerase III alpha-subunit activity. A functional DNA polymerase III is required for the reformation of high-molecular-weight DNA after treatment of cells with MMS or hydrogen peroxide, as demonstrated by alkaline sucrose sedimentation results. Thus, it appears that a functional DNA polymerase III is required for the optimal repair of DNA damage by MMS or hydrogen peroxide.

  5. Modulation of DNA damage checkpoint; patenting and possible application for cancer medicine.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Kazuhiro; Ishii, Hideshi; Ichimura, Keiichi

    2008-01-01

    Eukaryote cells survey genomic integrity for DNA damage or incomplete replication. Aberrant structures being detected, checkpoint mechanisms are activated to slow down or arrest cell cycle progression, which allow the DNA damage to be repaired and the replication to be completed. In cancer development, precancerous cells overcome selective pressure to escape from blocked cell cycle progression, induced by checkpoint responses to DNA damage. Medical applications targeting the process of DNA damage would lead to efficient repairs of DNA damage or induction of cell death, which contributes to cancer detection, diagnosis and therapeutic approaches. In this article, the recent progress of our knowledge and patenting in modulation of DNA damage checkpoint especially by Rad9-Chk1 pathway is noted and possible application for cancer medicine is discussed.

  6. DNA damage during glycation of lysine by methylglyoxal: assessment of vitamins in preventing damage.

    PubMed

    Suji, G; Sivakami, S

    2007-11-01

    Amino acids react with methylglyoxal to form advanced glycation end products. This reaction is known to produce free radicals. In this study, cleavage to plasmid DNA was induced by the glycation of lysine with methylglyoxal in the presence of iron(III). This system was found to produce superoxide as well as hydroxyl radicals. The abilities of various vitamins to prevent damage to plasmid DNA were evaluated. Pyridoxal-5-phosphate showed maximum protection, while pyridoxamine showed no protection. The protective abilities could be directly correlated to inhibition of production of hydroxyl and superoxide radicals. Pyridoxal-5-phosphate exhibited low radical scavenging ability as evaluated by its TEAC, but showed maximum protection probably by interfering in free radical production. Pyridoxamine did not inhibit free radical production. Thiamine and thiamine pyrophosphate, both showed protective effects albeit to different extents. Tetrahydrofolic acid showed better antioxidant activity than folic acid but was found to damage DNA by itself probably by superoxide generation.

  7. Inflammation, oxidative DNA damage, and carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, J.G.; Adams, D.O.

    1987-12-01

    Inflammation has long been associated with carcinogenesis, especially in the promotion phase. The mechanism of action of the potent inflammatory agent and skin promoter 12-tetradecanoyl phorbol-13-acetate (TPA) is unknown. It is though that TPA selectively enhances the growth of initiated cells, and during this process, initiated cells progress to the preneoplastic state and eventually to the malignant phenotype. The authors and others have proposed that TPA may work, in part, by inciting inflammation and stimulating inflammatory cells to release powerful oxidants which then induce DNA damage in epidermal cells. Macrophages cocultured with target cells and TPA induce oxidized thymine bases in the target cells. This process is inhibited by both catalase and inhibitors of lipoxygenases, suggesting the involvement of both H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ and oxidized lipid products. In vivo studies demonstrated that SENCAR mice, which are sensitive to promotion by TPA, have a more intense inflammatory reaction in skin that C57LB/6 mice, which are resistant to promotion by TPA. In addition, macrophages from SENCAR mice release more H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ and metabolites of AA, and induce more oxidative DNA damage in cocultured cells than macrophages from C57LB/6 mice. These data support the hypothesis that inflammation and the release of genotoxic oxidants may be one mechanism whereby initiated cells receive further genetic insults. They also further complicate risk assessment by suggesting that some environmental agents may work indirectly by subverting host systems to induce damage rather than maintaining homeostasis.

  8. Activation of eNOS in endothelial cells exposed to ionizing radiation involves components of the DNA damage response pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Nagane, Masaki; Yasui, Hironobu; Sakai, Yuri; Yamamori, Tohru; Niwa, Koichi; Hattori, Yuichi; Kondo, Takashi; Inanami, Osamu

    2015-01-02

    Highlights: • eNOS activity is increased in BAECs exposed to X-rays. • ATM is involved in this increased eNOS activity. • HSP90 modulates the radiation-induced activation of ATM and eNOS. - Abstract: In this study, the involvement of ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) kinase and heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) in endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activation was investigated in X-irradiated bovine aortic endothelial cells. The activity of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and the phosphorylation of serine 1179 of eNOS (eNOS-Ser1179) were significantly increased in irradiated cells. The radiation-induced increases in NOS activity and eNOS-Ser1179 phosphorylation levels were significantly reduced by treatment with either an ATM inhibitor (Ku-60019) or an HSP90 inhibitor (geldanamycin). Geldanamycin was furthermore found to suppress the radiation-induced phosphorylation of ATM-Ser1181. Our results indicate that the radiation-induced eNOS activation in bovine aortic endothelial cells is regulated by ATM and HSP90.

  9. Flavonoids from Agrimonia pilosa Ledeb: Free Radical Scavenging and DNA Oxidative Damage Protection Activities and Analysis of Bioactivity-Structure Relationship Based on Molecular and Electronic Structures.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Liancai; Chen, Jinqiu; Tan, Jun; Liu, Xi; Wang, Bochu

    2017-02-26

    To clarify the substantial basis of the excellent antioxidant capacity of Agrimonia pilosa Ledeb. Fourteen flavonoids were isolated and identified from Agrimonia pilosa Ledeb, seven of which have notable DPPH radical scavenging activities, i.e., catechin, luteolin, quercetin, quercitrin, hyperoside, rutin, luteolin-7-O-β-glucoside with IC50 values of 5.06, 7.29, 4.36, 7.12, 6.34, 6.36 and 8.12 µM, respectively. The DNA nicking assay showed that five flavonoids from Agrimonia pilosa Ledeb-taxifolin, catechin, hyperoside, quercitrin and rutin-have good protective activity against DNA oxidative damage. Further, we analyzed the bioactivity-structure relationship of these 14 flavonoids by applying quantum theory. According to their O-H bond dissociation enthalpy (BDE), C ring's spin density and stable molecular structure, the relationship between their structures and radical scavenging capacities was evaluated and clarified. We found that among flavonoid aglycones from Agrimonia pilosa Ledeb, the O-H BDE of quercetin is lowest with the values of 69.02 and the O-H BDE of apigenin is highest with the values of 79.77. It is interesting that the O-H BDE value of isovitexin (78.55) with glycoside at C-6 position is lower than that of its aglycone (79.77) and vitexin (99.20) with glycoside at C-8 position. Further analysis indicated that the glycosidation of flavonoids at C-6 in the A-ring makes a more uniform distribution of spin density and improves the stability of free radicals leading to the increase in antioxidant capacity. Flavonoids with good antioxidant capacity might contribute to the pharmacological effects of Agrimonia pilosa Ledeb.

  10. Replication fork dynamics and the DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Jones, Rebecca M; Petermann, Eva

    2012-04-01

    Prevention and repair of DNA damage is essential for maintenance of genomic stability and cell survival. DNA replication during S-phase can be a source of DNA damage if endogenous or exogenous stresses impair the progression of replication forks. It has become increasingly clear that DNA-damage-response pathways do not only respond to the presence of damaged DNA, but also modulate DNA replication dynamics to prevent DNA damage formation during S-phase. Such observations may help explain the developmental defects or cancer predisposition caused by mutations in DNA-damage-response genes. The present review focuses on molecular mechanisms by which DNA-damage-response pathways control and promote replication dynamics in vertebrate cells. In particular, DNA damage pathways contribute to proper replication by regulating replication initiation, stabilizing transiently stalled forks, promoting replication restart and facilitating fork movement on difficult-to-replicate templates. If replication fork progression fails to be rescued, this may lead to DNA damage and genomic instability via nuclease processing of aberrant fork structures or incomplete sister chromatid separation during mitosis.

  11. p53 in the DNA damage repair process

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Ashley B.; Schumacher, Björn

    2016-01-01

    The cells in the human body are continuously challenged by a variety of genotoxic attacks. Erroneous repair of the DNA can lead to mutations and chromosomal aberrations that can alter the functions of tumor suppressor genes or oncogenes, thus causing cancer development. As a central tumor suppressor, p53 guards the genome by orchestrating a variety of DNA damage response (DDR) mechanisms. Already early in metazoan evolution, p53 started controlling the apoptotic demise of genomically compromised cells. p53 plays a prominent role as a facilitator of DNA repair by halting the cell cycle to allow time for the repair machineries to restore genome stability. In addition, p53 took on diverse roles to also directly impact the activity of various DNA repair systems. It thus appears as if p53 is multitasking in protecting from cancer development by maintaining genome stability. PMID:27048304

  12. Oxidative damage to DNA during aging: 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine in rat organ DNA and urine.

    PubMed Central

    Fraga, C G; Shigenaga, M K; Park, J W; Degan, P; Ames, B N

    1990-01-01

    Oxidative damage to DNA is shown to be extensive and could be a major cause of the physiological changes associated with aging and the degenerative diseases related to aging such as cancer. The oxidized nucleoside, 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (oh8dG), one of the approximately 20 known oxidative DNA damage products, has been measured in DNA isolated from various organs of Fischer 344 rats of different ages. oh8dG was present in the DNA isolated from all the organs studied: liver, brain, kidney, intestine, and testes. Steady-state levels of oh8dG ranged from 8 to 73 residues per 10(6) deoxyguanosine residues or 0.2-2.0 x 10(5) residues per cell. Levels of oh8dG in DNA increased with age in liver, kidney, and intestine but remained unchanged in brain and testes. The urinary excretion of oh8dG, which presumably reflects its repair from DNA by nuclease activity, decreased with age from 481 to 165 pmol per kg of body weight per day for urine obtained from 2-month- and 25-month-old rats, respectively. 8-Hydroxyguanine, the proposed repair product of a glycosylase activity, was also assayed in the urine. We estimate approximately 9 x 10(4) oxidative hits to DNA per cell per day in the rat. The results suggest that the age-dependent accumulation of oh8dG residues observed in DNA from liver, kidney, and intestine is principally due to the slow loss of DNA nuclease activity; however, an increase in the rate of oxidative DNA damage cannot be ruled out. PMID:2352934

  13. Cestrum nocturnum Flower Extracts Attenuate Proliferation and Induce Apoptosis in Malignant Cells through Inducing DNA Damage and Inhibiting Topoisomerase II Activity

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Deng-Pan; Lin, Tian-Yu; Lv, Jin-Yan; Chen, Wen-Ya; Bai, Li-Ru; Zhou, Yan

    2017-01-01

    Most of the existing chemotherapeutic drugs have plenty of side effects. Chinese herbal medicine has been used for pharmaceutical and dietary therapy for thousands of years with more effective and fewer side effects. Cestrum nocturnum (CN) has long been used to treat digestive diseases for centuries in China. Our previous study first proved that the n-butanol part isolated from the flowers of CN produced an inhibitory effect on the proliferation of malignant cells. However, the fractions responsible for the antiproliferation effect of n-butanol part from CN flowers and related mechanisms remain unknown. Thus, in this study, we extracted fractions C4 and C5 from n-butanol part of CN flowers and investigated their immune toxicity and antitumor activities. It was found that fractions C4 and C5 exhibited great cytotoxicity to cancer cell lines but had low immune toxicity towards T and B lymphocytes in vitro. The tested fractions also attenuated proliferation and induced apoptosis at G0/G1 and G2/M phases in Bel-7404 cells through inducing DNA damage and inhibiting topoisomerase II relaxation activity. These results suggest that fractions C4 and C5 may represent important sources of potential antitumor agents due to their pronounced antitumor effects and low immune toxicity. PMID:28250789

  14. Cestrum nocturnum Flower Extracts Attenuate Proliferation and Induce Apoptosis in Malignant Cells through Inducing DNA Damage and Inhibiting Topoisomerase II Activity.

    PubMed

    Wu, Deng-Pan; Lin, Tian-Yu; Lv, Jin-Yan; Chen, Wen-Ya; Bai, Li-Ru; Zhou, Yan; Huang, Jin-Lan; Zhong, Zhen-Guo

    2017-01-01

    Most of the existing chemotherapeutic drugs have plenty of side effects. Chinese herbal medicine has been used for pharmaceutical and dietary therapy for thousands of years with more effective and fewer side effects. Cestrum nocturnum (CN) has long been used to treat digestive diseases for centuries in China. Our previous study first proved that the n-butanol part isolated from the flowers of CN produced an inhibitory effect on the proliferation of malignant cells. However, the fractions responsible for the antiproliferation effect of n-butanol part from CN flowers and related mechanisms remain unknown. Thus, in this study, we extracted fractions C4 and C5 from n-butanol part of CN flowers and investigated their immune toxicity and antitumor activities. It was found that fractions C4 and C5 exhibited great cytotoxicity to cancer cell lines but had low immune toxicity towards T and B lymphocytes in vitro. The tested fractions also attenuated proliferation and induced apoptosis at G0/G1 and G2/M phases in Bel-7404 cells through inducing DNA damage and inhibiting topoisomerase II relaxation activity. These results suggest that fractions C4 and C5 may represent important sources of potential antitumor agents due to their pronounced antitumor effects and low immune toxicity.

  15. Fluorescent sensors of PARP-1 structural dynamics and allosteric regulation in response to DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Steffen, Jamin D.; McCauley, Michael M.; Pascal, John M.

    2016-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) is a posttranslational modification predominantly synthesized by PAR polymerase-1 (PARP-1) in genome maintenance. PARP-1 detects DNA damage, and damage detection is coupled to a massive increase PAR production, primarily attached to PARP-1 (automodification). Automodified PARP-1 then recruits repair factors to DNA damage sites. PARP-1 automodification eventually leads to release from DNA damage thus turning off catalytic activity, although the effects of PAR on PARP-1 structure are poorly understood. The multiple domains of PARP-1 are organized upon detecting DNA damage, creating a network of domain contacts that imposes a major conformational transition in the catalytic domain that increases PAR production. Presented here are two novel fluorescent sensors that monitor the global and local structural transitions of PARP-1 that are associated with DNA damage detection and catalytic activation. These sensors display real-time monitoring of PARP-1 structural transitions upon DNA damage detection, and their reversal upon PARP-1 automodification. The fluorescent sensors are further used to investigate intramolecular and intermolecular PARP-1 activation, followed by the observation that intramolecular activation of PARP-1 is the predominant response to DNA strand breaks in cells. These results provide a unique perspective on the interplay between PARP-1 DNA damage recognition, allosteric regulation, and catalytic activity. PMID:27530425

  16. Fluorescent sensors of PARP-1 structural dynamics and allosteric regulation in response to DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Steffen, Jamin D; McCauley, Michael M; Pascal, John M

    2016-11-16

    Poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) is a posttranslational modification predominantly synthesized by PAR polymerase-1 (PARP-1) in genome maintenance. PARP-1 detects DNA damage, and damage detection is coupled to a massive increase PAR production, primarily attached to PARP-1 (automodification). Automodified PARP-1 then recruits repair factors to DNA damage sites. PARP-1 automodification eventually leads to release from DNA damage thus turning off catalytic activity, although the effects of PAR on PARP-1 structure are poorly understood. The multiple domains of PARP-1 are organized upon detecting DNA damage, creating a network of domain contacts that imposes a major conformational transition in the catalytic domain that increases PAR production. Presented here are two novel fluorescent sensors that monitor the global and local structural transitions of PARP-1 that are associated with DNA damage detection and catalytic activation. These sensors display real-time monitoring of PARP-1 structural transitions upon DNA damage detection, and their reversal upon PARP-1 automodification. The fluorescent sensors are further used to investigate intramolecular and intermolecular PARP-1 activation, followed by the observation that intramolecular activation of PARP-1 is the predominant response to DNA strand breaks in cells. These results provide a unique perspective on the interplay between PARP-1 DNA damage recognition, allosteric regulation, and catalytic activity.

  17. The Intra-S Checkpoint Responses to DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Divya Ramalingam; Rhind, Nicholas

    2017-01-01

    Faithful duplication of the genome is a challenge because DNA is susceptible to damage by a number of intrinsic and extrinsic genotoxins, such as free radicals and UV light. Cells activate the intra-S checkpoint in response to damage during S phase to protect genomic integrity and ensure replication fidelity. The checkpoint prevents genomic instability mainly by regulating origin firing, fork progression, and transcription of G1/S genes in response to DNA damage. Several studies hint that regulation of forks is perhaps the most critical function of the intra-S checkpoint. However, the exact role of the checkpoint at replication forks has remained elusive and controversial. Is the checkpoint required for fork stability, or fork restart, or to prevent fork reversal or fork collapse, or activate repair at replication forks? What are the factors that the checkpoint targets at stalled replication forks? In this review, we will discuss the various pathways activated by the intra-S checkpoint in response to damage to prevent genomic instability. PMID:28218681

  18. Targeting ATR in DNA damage response and cancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Fokas, Emmanouil; Prevo, Remko; Hammond, Ester M; Brunner, Thomas B; McKenna, W Gillies; Muschel, Ruth J

    2014-02-01

    The ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3-related (ATR) plays an important role in maintaining genome integrity during DNA replication through the phosphorylation and activation of Chk1 and regulation of the DNA damage response. Preclinical studies have shown that disruption of ATR pathway can exacerbate the levels of replication stress in oncogene-driven murine tumors to promote cell killing. Additionally, inhibition of ATR can sensitise tumor cells to radiation or chemotherapy. Accumulating evidence suggests that targeting ATR can selectively sensitize cancer cells but not normal cells to DNA damage. Furthermore, in hypoxic conditions, ATR blockade results in overloading replication stress and DNA damage response causing cell death. Despite the attractiveness of ATR inhibition in the treatment of cancer, specific ATR inhibitors have remained elusive. In the last two years however, selective ATR inhibitors suitable for in vitro and - most recently - in vivo studies have been identified. In this article, we will review the literature on ATR function, its role in DDR and the potential of ATR inhibition to enhance the efficacy of radiation and chemotherapy.

  19. RNase H enables efficient repair of R-loop induced DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Amon, Jeremy D; Koshland, Douglas

    2016-01-01

    R-loops, three-stranded structures that form when transcripts hybridize to chromosomal DNA, are potent agents of genome instability. This instability has been explained by the ability of R-loops to induce DNA damage. Here, we show that persistent R-loops also compromise DNA repair. Depleting endogenous RNase H activity impairs R-loop removal in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, causing DNA damage that occurs preferentially in the repetitive ribosomal DNA locus (rDNA). We analyzed the repair kinetics of this damage and identified mutants that modulate repair. We present a model that the persistence of R-loops at sites of DNA damage induces repair by break-induced replication (BIR). This R-loop induced BIR is particularly susceptible to the formation of lethal repair intermediates at the rDNA because of a barrier imposed by RNA polymerase I. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.20533.001 PMID:27938663

  20. Akt-mediated phosphorylation of Bmi1 modulates its oncogenic potential, E3 ligase activity, and DNA damage repair activity in mouse prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nacerddine, Karim; Beaudry, Jean-Bernard; Ginjala, Vasudeva; Westerman, Bart; Mattiroli, Francesca; Song, Ji-Ying; van der Poel, Henk; Ponz, Olga Balagué; Pritchard, Colin; Cornelissen-Steijger, Paulien; Zevenhoven, John; Tanger, Ellen; Sixma, Titia K.; Ganesan, Shridar; van Lohuizen, Maarten

    2012-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is a major lethal malignancy in men, but the molecular events and their interplay underlying prostate carcinogenesis remain poorly understood. Epigenetic events and the upregulation of polycomb group silencing proteins including Bmi1 have been described to occur during PCa progression. Here, we found that conditional overexpression of Bmi1 in mice induced prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia, and elicited invasive adenocarcinoma when combined with PTEN haploinsufficiency. In addition, Bmi1 and the PI3K/Akt pathway were coactivated in a substantial fraction of human high-grade tumors. We found that Akt mediated Bmi1 phosphorylation, enhancing its oncogenic potential in an Ink4a/Arf-independent manner. This process also modulated the DNA damage response and affected genomic stability. Together, our findings demonstrate the etiological role of Bmi1 in PCa, unravel an oncogenic collaboration between Bmi1 and the PI3K/Akt pathway, and provide mechanistic insights into the modulation of Bmi1 function by phosphorylation during prostate carcinogenesis. PMID:22505453

  1. Mitochondrial DNA Damage and its Consequences for Mitochondrial Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Cline, Susan D.

    2012-01-01

    How mitochondria process DNA damage and whether a change in the steady-state level of mitochondrial DNA damage (mtDNA) contributes to mitochondrial dysfunction are questions that fuel burgeoning areas of research into aging and disease pathogenesis. Over the past decade, researchers have identified and measured various forms of endogenous and environmental mtDNA damage and have elucidated mtDNA repair pathways. Interestingly, mitochondria do not appear to contain the full range of DNA repair mechanisms that operate in the nucleus, although mtDNA contains types of damage that are targets of each nuclear DNA repair pathway. The reduced repair capacity may, in part, explain the high mutation frequency of the mitochondrial chromosome. Since mtDNA replication is dependent on transcription, mtDNA damage may alter mitochondrial gene expression at three levels: by causing DNA polymerase γ nucleotide incorporation errors leading to mutations, by interfering with the priming of mtDNA replication by the mitochondrial RNA polymerase, or by inducing transcriptional mutagenesis or premature transcript termination. This review summarizes our current knowledge of mtDNA damage, its repair, and its effects on mtDNA integrity and gene expression. PMID:22728831

  2. Two coffins and a funeral: early or late caspase activation determines two types of apoptosis induced by DNA damaging agents.

    PubMed

    Oropesa-Ávila, Manuel; de la Cruz-Ojeda, Patricia; Porcuna, Jesús; Villanueva-Paz, Marina; Fernández-Vega, Alejandro; de la Mata, Mario; de Lavera, Isabel; Rivero, Juan Miguel Suarez; Luzón-Hidalgo, Raquel; Álvarez-Córdoba, Mónica; Cotán, David; Zaderenko, Ana Paula; Cordero, Mario D; Sánchez-Alcázar, José A

    2017-03-01

    Cell cytoskeleton makes profound changes during apoptosis including the organization of an Apoptotic Microtubule Network (AMN). AMN forms a cortical structure which plays an important role in preserving plasma membrane integrity during apoptosis. Here, we examined the cytoskeleton rearrangements during apoptosis induced by camptothecin (CPT), a topoisomerase I inhibitor, in human H460 and porcine LLCPK-1α cells. Using fixed and living cell imaging, we showed that CPT induced two dose- and cell cycle-dependent types of apoptosis characterized by different cytoskeleton reorganizations, time-dependent caspase activation and final apoptotic cell morphology. In the one referred as "slow" (~h) or round-shaped, apoptosis was characterized by a slow contraction of the actinomyosin ring and late caspase activation. In "slow" apoptosis the γ-tubulin complexes were not disorganized and microtubules were not depolymerized at early stages. In contrast, "fast" (~min) or irregular-shaped apoptosis was characterized by early caspase activation followed by full contraction of the actinomyosin ring. In fast apoptosis γ-tubulin complexes were disorganized and microtubules were initially depolymerized. However, after actinomyosin contraction, microtubules were reformed adopting a cortical but irregular disposition near plasma membrane. In addition to distinctive cytoskeleton reorganization kinetics, round and irregular-shaped apoptosis showed different biological properties with respect to AMN maintenance, plasma membrane integrity and phagocytes response. Our results suggest that the knowledge and modulation of the type of apoptosis promoted by genotoxic agents may be important for deciding a better therapeutic option and predicting the immune response in cancer treatment.

  3. Partial sleep deprivation activates the DNA damage response (DDR) and the senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP) in aged adult humans.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Judith E; Cole, Steven W; Seeman, Teresa E; Breen, Elizabeth C; Witarama, Tuff; Arevalo, Jesusa M G; Ma, Jeffrey; Irwin, Michael R

    2016-01-01

    Age-related disease risk has been linked to short sleep duration and sleep disturbances; however, the specific molecular pathways linking sleep loss with diseases of aging are poorly defined. Key cellular events seen with aging, which are thought to contribute to disease, may be particularly sensitive to sleep loss. We tested whether one night of partial sleep deprivation (PSD) would increase leukocyte gene expression indicative of DNA damage responses (DDR), the senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP), and senescence indicator p16(INK4a) in older adult humans, who are at increased risk for cellular senescence. Community-dwelling older adults aged 61-86years (n=29; 48% male) underwent an experimental partial sleep deprivation (PSD) protocol over 4 nights, including adaptation, an uninterrupted night of sleep, partial sleep deprivation (sleep restricted 3-7AM), and a subsequent full night of sleep. Blood samples were obtained each morning to assess peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) gene expression using Illumina HT-12 arrays. Analyses of microarray results revealed that SASP (p<.05) and DDR (p=.08) gene expression were elevated from baseline to PSD nights. Gene expression changes were also observed from baseline to PSD in NFKB2, NBS1 and CHK2 (all p's<.05). The senescence marker p16(INK4a) (CDKN2A) was increased 1day after PSD compared to baseline (p<.01), however confirmatory RT-PCR did not replicate this finding. One night of partial sleep deprivation activates PBMC gene expression patterns consistent with biological aging in this older adult sample. PSD enhanced the SASP and increased the accumulation of damage that initiates cell cycle arrest and promotes cellular senescence. These findings causally link sleep deprivation to the molecular processes associated with biological aging.

  4. Partial Sleep Deprivation Activates the DNA Damage Response (DDR) and the Senescence-Associated Secretory Phenotype (SASP) in Aged Adult Humans

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, Judith E.; Cole, Steven W.; Seeman, Teresa E.; Breen, Elizabeth C.; Witarama, Tuff; Arevalo, Jesusa M.G.; Ma, Jeffrey; Irwin, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    Age-related disease risk has been linked to short sleep duration and sleep disturbances; however, the specific molecular pathways linking sleep loss with diseases of aging are poorly defined. Key cellular events seen with aging, which are thought to contribute to disease, may be particularly sensitive to sleep loss. We tested whether one night of partial sleep deprivation (PSD) would increase leukocyte gene expression indicative of DNA damage responses (DDR), the senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP), and senescence indicator p16INK4a in older adult humans, who are at increased risk for cellular senescence. Community-dwelling older adults aged 61-86 years (n=29; 48% male) underwent an experimental partial sleep deprivation (PSD) protocol over 4 nights, including adaptation, an uninterrupted night of sleep, partial sleep deprivation (sleep restricted 3 AM to 7 AM), and a subsequent full night of sleep. Blood samples were obtained each morning to assess peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) gene expression using Illumina HT-12 arrays. Analyses of microarray results revealed that SASP (p < .05) and DDR (p = .08) gene expression were elevated from baseline to PSD nights. Gene expression changes were also observed from baseline to PSD in NFKB2, NBS1 and CHK2 (all p's < .05). The senescence marker p16INK4a (CDKN2A) was increased one day after PSD compared to baseline (p < .01), however confirmatory RT-PCR did not replicate this finding. One night of partial sleep deprivation activates PBMC gene expression patterns consistent with biological aging in this older adult sample. PSD enhanced the SASP and increased the accumulation of damage that initiates cell cycle arrest and promotes cellular senescence. These findings causally link sleep deprivation to the molecular processes associated with biological aging. PMID:26336034

  5. Evaluation of cytogenetic and DNA damage induced by the antidepressant drug-active ingredients, trazodone and milnacipran, in vitro.

    PubMed

    Avuloglu Yilmaz, Ece; Unal, Fatma; Yuzbasioglu, Deniz

    2017-01-01

    Trazodone and milnacipran are the active antidepressant drugs that are being used in the treatment of psychiatric disorders. In this study, the in vitro genotoxic effects of trazodone and milnacipran have been determined in human peripheral blood lymphocytes by using chromosomal aberrations (CAs), sister chromatid exchanges (SCEs), micronuclei (MN), and comet assays. 3.13; 6.25; 12.50; 25.00; 50.00; and 75.00 μg/mL concentrations of trazodone and 2.50; 5.00; 10.00; 20.00; 30.00; and 40.00 μg/mL concentrations of milnacipran were used. Trazodone and milnacipran significantly increased the frequency of CAs and SCEs compared with the control. Both of the active ingredients raised the MN frequency in a dose-dependent manner. Mitotic index was significantly decreased, but replication and nuclear division indices were not affected at all treatments. Trazodone was statistically increased the mean comet tail intensity, tail length, and tail moment at three concentrations (6.25; 12.50; and 25.00 μg/mL) compared with control. Two highest concentrations (50 and 75 μg/mL) of trazodone were toxic in the comet assay. Milnacipran increased the comet tail intensity, tail length, and tail moment at all concentrations. It is concluded that trazodone and milnacipran have clastogenic, mutagenic, and cytotoxic effects on human lymphocytes in vitro.

  6. Microvesicles Contribute to the Bystander Effect of DNA Damage.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xiaozeng; Wei, Fengxiang; Major, Pierre; Al-Nedawi, Khalid; Al Saleh, Hassan A; Tang, Damu

    2017-04-07

    Genotoxic treatments elicit DNA damage response (DDR) not only in cells that are directly exposed but also in cells that are not in the field of treatment (bystander cells), a phenomenon that is commonly referred to as the bystander effect (BE). However, mechanisms underlying the BE remain elusive. We report here that etoposide and ultraviolet (UV) exposure stimulate the production of microvesicles (MVs) in DU145 prostate cancer cells. MVs isolated from UV-treated DU145 and A431 epidermoid carcinoma cells as well as etoposide-treated DU145 cells induced phosphorylation of ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) at serine 1981 (indicative of ATM activation) and phosphorylation of histone H2AX at serine 139 (γH2AX) in naïve DU145 cells. Importantly, neutralization of MVs derived from UV-treated cells with annexin V significantly reduced the MV-associated BE activities. Etoposide and UV are known to induce DDR primarily through the ATM and ATM- and Rad3-related (ATR) pathways, respectively. In this regard, MV is likely a common source for the DNA damage-induced bystander effect. However, pre-treatment of DU145 naïve cells with an ATM (KU55933) inhibitor does not affect the BE elicited by MVs isolated from etoposide-treated cells, indicating that the BE is induced upstream of ATM actions. Taken together, we provide evidence supporting that MVs are a source of the DNA damage-induced bystander effect.

  7. Melanin photosensitizes ultraviolet light (UVC) DNA damage in pigmented cells

    SciTech Connect

    Huselton, C.A.; Hill, H.Z. )

    1990-01-01

    Melanins, pigments of photoprotection and camouflage, are very photoreactive and can both absorb and emit active oxygen species. Nevertheless, black skinned individuals rarely develop skin cancer and melanin is assumed to act as a solar screen. Since DNA is the target for solar carcinogenesis, the effect of melanin on Ultraviolet (UV)-induced thymine lesions was examined in mouse melanoma and carcinoma cells that varied in melanin content. Cells prelabeled with 14C-dThd were irradiated with UVC; DNA was isolated, purified, degraded to bases by acid hydrolysis and analyzed by HPLC. Thymine dimers were detected in all of the extracts of irradiated cells. Melanotic and hypomelanotic but not mammary carcinoma cell DNA from irradiated cells contained hydrophilic thymine derivatives. The quantity of these damaged bases was a function of both the UVC dose and the cellular melanin content. One such derivative was identified by gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy as thymine glycol. The other appears to be derived from thymine glycol by further oxidation during acid hydrolysis of the DNA. The finding of oxidative DNA damage in melanin-containing cells suggests that melanin may be implicated in the etiology of caucasian skin cancer, particularly melanoma. Furthermore, the projected decrease in stratospheric ozone could impact in an unanticipated deleterious manner on dark-skinned individuals.

  8. Melanin photosensitizes ultraviolet light (UVC) DNA damage in pigmented cells.

    PubMed

    Huselton, C A; Hill, H Z

    1990-01-01

    Melanins, pigments of photoprotection and camouflage, are very photoreactive and can both absorb and emit active oxygen species. Nevertheless, black skinned individuals rarely develop skin cancer and melanin is assumed to act as a solar screen. Since DNA is the target for solar carcinogenesis, the effect of melanin on Ultraviolet (UV)-induced thymine lesions was examined in mouse melanoma and carcinoma cells that varied in melanin content. Cells prelabeled with 14C-dThd were irradiated with UVC; DNA was isolated, purified, degraded to bases by acid hydrolysis and analyzed by HPLC. Thymine dimers were detected in all of the extracts of irradiated cells. Melanotic and hypomelanotic but not mammary carcinoma cell DNA from irradiated cells contained hydrophilic thymine derivatives. The quantity of these damaged bases was a function of both the UVC dose and the cellular melanin content. One such derivative was identified by gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy as thymine glycol. The other appears to be derived from thymine glycol by further oxidation during acid hydrolysis of the DNA. The finding of oxidative DNA damage in melanin-containing cells suggests that melanin may be implicated in the etiology of caucasian skin cancer, particularly melanoma. Furthermore, the projected decrease in stratospheric ozone could impact in an unanticipated deleterious manner on dark-skinned individuals.

  9. Reduction of arsenite-enhanced ultraviolet radiation-induced DNA damage by supplemental zinc

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, Karen L.; King, Brenee S.; Sandoval, Monica M.; Liu, Ke Jian; Hudson, Laurie G.

    2013-06-01

    Arsenic is a recognized human carcinogen and there is evidence that arsenic augments the carcinogenicity of DNA damaging agents such as ultraviolet radiation (UVR) thereby acting as a co-carcinogen. Inhibition of DNA repair is one proposed mechanism to account for the co-carcinogenic actions of arsenic. We and others find that arsenite interferes with the function of certain zinc finger DNA repair proteins. Furthermore, we reported that zinc reverses the effects of arsenite in cultured cells and a DNA repair target protein, poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase-1. In order to determine whether zinc ameliorates the effects of arsenite on UVR-induced DNA damage in human keratinocytes and in an in vivo model, normal human epidermal keratinocytes and SKH-1 hairless mice were exposed to arsenite, zinc or both before solar-simulated (ss) UVR exposure. Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase activity, DNA damage and mutation frequencies at the Hprt locus were measured in each treatment group in normal human keratinocytes. DNA damage was assessed in vivo by immunohistochemical staining of skin sections isolated from SKH-1 hairless mice. Cell-based findings demonstrate that ssUVR-induced DNA damage and mutagenesis are enhanced by arsenite, and supplemental zinc partially reverses the arsenite effect. In vivo studies confirm that zinc supplementation decreases arsenite-enhanced DNA damage in response to ssUVR exposure. From these data we can conclude that zinc offsets the impact of arsenic on ssUVR-stimulated DNA damage in cells and in vivo suggesting that zinc supplementation may provide a strategy to improve DNA repair capacity in arsenic exposed human populations. - Highlights: • Low levels of arsenite enhance UV-induced DNA damage in human keratinocytes. • UV-initiated HPRT mutation frequency is enhanced by arsenite. • Zinc supplementation offsets DNA damage and mutation frequency enhanced by arsenite. • Zinc-dependent reduction of arsenite enhanced DNA damage is confirmed in vivo.

  10. Modulation of inflammation and disease tolerance by DNA damage response pathways.

    PubMed

    Neves-Costa, Ana; Moita, Luis F

    2016-09-30

    The accurate replication and repair of DNA is central to organismal survival. This process is challenged by the many factors that can change genetic information such as replication errors and direct damage to the DNA molecule by chemical and physical agents. DNA damage can also result from microorganism invasion as an integral step of their life cycle or as collateral damage from host defense mechanisms against pathogens. Here we review the complex crosstalk of DNA damage response and immune response pathways that might be evolutionarily connected and argue that DNA damage response pathways can be explored therapeutically to induce disease tolerance through the activation of tissue damage control processes. Such approach may constitute the missing pillar in the treatment of critical illnesses caused by multiple organ failure, such as sepsis and septic shock.

  11. Mitochondrial DNA damage by bleomycin induces AML cell death.

    PubMed

    Yeung, ManTek; Hurren, Rose; Nemr, Carine; Wang, Xiaoming; Hershenfeld, Samantha; Gronda, Marcela; Liyanage, Sanduni; Wu, Yan; Augustine, Jeevan; Lee, Eric A; Spagnuolo, Paul A; Southall, Noel; Chen, Catherine; Zheng, Wei; Jeyaraju, Danny V; Minden, Mark D; Laposa, Rebecca; Schimmer, Aaron D

    2015-06-01

    Mitochondria contain multiple copies of their own 16.6 kb circular genome. To explore the impact of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) damage on mitochondrial (mt) function and viability of AML cells, we screened a panel of DNA damaging chemotherapeutic agents to identify drugs that could damage mtDNA. We identified bleomycin as an agent that damaged mtDNA in AML cells at concentrations that induced cell death. Bleomycin also induced mtDNA damage in primary AML samples. Consistent with the observed mtDNA damage, bleomycin reduced mt mass and basal oxygen consumption in AML cells. We also demonstrated that the observed mtDNA damage was functionally important for bleomycin-induced cell death. Finally, bleomycin delayed tumor growth in xenograft mouse models of AML and anti-leukemic concentrations of the drug induced mtDNA damage in AML cells preferentially over normal lung tissue. Taken together, mtDNA-targeted therapy may be an effective strategy to target AML cells and bleomycin could be useful in the treatment of this disease.

  12. DNA damage by smoke: Protection by turmeric and other inhibitors of ROS

    SciTech Connect

    Srinivas, L.; Shalini, V.K. )

    1991-01-01

    Twigs-dry leaves smoke condensate (TDS), as a source of clastogenic ROS and carcinogenic PAH, was investigated for its in vitro DNA-damaging effect in calf thymus DNA and human peripheral lymphocytes. An aqueous turmeric component--Aq.T--with an established antioxidant activity, was tested as a DNA protectant. TDS induced 13-fold damage to calf thymus DNA as judged by the emergence of a DNA damage specific, fluorescent product (em: 405 nm). Aq.T at 800 ng/microL extended 69% protection to calf thymus DNA and was comparable to the other protectants such as curcumin, BHA, vitamin E, SOD, and CAT. In human peripheral lymphocytes, TDS induced extensive DNA damage in comparison with the tumor promoter TPA, as judged by FADU. Aq.T at 300 ng/microL extended 90% protection to human lymphocyte DNA against TDS-induced damage, and was more effective than the other protectants--DABCO, D-mannitol, sodium benzoate, vitamin E (ROS quenchers), SOD, CAT (antioxidant enzymes), tannic acid, flufenamic acid, BHA, BHT, n-PG, curcumin and quercetin (antioxidants). Aq.T offered 65% protection to human lymphocyte DNA against TPA-induced damage and was comparable to SOD. The above results indicate that TDS induces substantial DNA damage in calf thymus DNA and human lymphocytes and Aq.T is an efficient protectant.

  13. Commentary: Mitochondrial DNA damage and loss in diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Gilkerson, Robert

    2017-01-01

    This commentary discusses damage and loss of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in type 2 diabetes mellitus from both the clinical and experimental perspectives. Increasingly, an array of studies in experimental models and patients suggests that the cellular stresses of insulin resistance in type 2 diabetes damage mtDNA, leading to loss of mitochondrial genetic content. As such, mtDNA is emerging as both a valuable monitoring tool and translational preventive target for metabolic disease. PMID:27253402

  14. Impact of Alternative DNA Structures on DNA Damage, DNA Repair, and Genetic Instability

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guliang; Vasquez, Karen M.

    2014-01-01

    Repetitive genomic sequences can adopt a number of alternative DNA structures that differ from the canonical B-form duplex (i.e. non-B DNA). These non-B DNA-forming sequences have been shown to have many important biological functions related to DNA metabolic processes; for example, they may have regulatory roles in DNA transcription and replication. In addition to these regulatory functions, non-B DNA can stimulate genetic instability in the presence or absence of DNA damage, via replication-dependent and/or replication-independent pathways. This review focuses on the interactions of non-B DNA conformations with DNA repair proteins and how these interactions impact genetic instability. PMID:24767258

  15. PI3K/AKT and Mdm2 activation are associated with inhibitory effect of cAMP increasing agents on DNA damage-induced cell death in human pre-B NALM-6 cells.

    PubMed

    Ghorbani, Arman; Jeddi-Tehrani, Mahmood; Saidpour, Atoosa; Safa, Majid; Bayat, Ahmad Ali; Zand, Hamid

    2015-01-15

    DNA damage response (DDR) consists of both proapoptotic and prosurvival signaling branches. Superiority of each signaling branch determines the outcome of DNA damage: death or allowing the repair. The present authors have previously shown that an increased intracellular level of cAMP disrupts p53-mediated apoptosis in human pre-B NALM-6 cells and inhibition of NF-κB prevents prosurvival effect of cAMP during DNA damage. AKT/PKB (protein kinase B) is a general mediator of survival signaling. AKT signaling inhibits p53-mediated transcription and apoptosis. The results of present study showed that cAMP disrupted DNA damage/p53-mediated apoptosis through AKT and subsequent NF-κB activation. These results suggested that AKT may be found as part of a complex with scaffolding proteins, beta-arrestins and PDE4D. cAMP disarticulated the complex through binding to PDE4D compartment. It seems that release of AKT protein potentiated DDR activated pro-survival AKT in NALM-6 cells. Taken together, the present data indicated that regulation of AKT signaling may determine the fate of cells exposed to genotoxic stress.

  16. Saccharomyces cerevisiae-based system for studying clustered DNA damages

    SciTech Connect

    Moscariello, M.M.; Sutherland, B.

    2010-08-01

    DNA-damaging agents can induce clustered lesions or multiply damaged sites (MDSs) on the same or opposing DNA strands. In the latter, attempts to repair MDS can generate closely opposed single-strand break intermediates that may convert non-lethal or mutagenic base damage into double-strand breaks (DSBs). We constructed a diploid S. cerevisiae yeast strain with a chromosomal context targeted by integrative DNA fragments carrying different damages to determine whether closely opposed base damages are converted to DSBs following the outcomes of the homologous recombination repair pathway. As a model of MDS, we studied clustered uracil DNA damages with a known location and a defined distance separating the lesions. The system we describe might well be extended to assessing the repair of MDSs with different compositions, and to most of the complex DNA lesions induced by physical and chemical agents.

  17. Systemic DNA damage responses in aging and diseases

    PubMed Central

    Ribezzo, Flavia; Shiloh, Yosef; Schumacher, Björn

    2016-01-01

    The genome is constantly attacked by a variety of genotoxic insults. The causal role for DNA damage in aging and cancer is exemplified by genetic defects in DNA repair that underlie a broad spectrum of acute and chronic human disorders that are characterized by developmental abnormalities, premature aging, and cancer predisposition. The disease symptoms are typically tissue-specific with uncertain genotype-phenotype correlation. The cellular DNA damage response (DDR) has been extensively investigated ever since yeast geneticists discovered DNA damage checkpoint mechanisms, several decades ago. In recent years, it has become apparent that not only cell-autonomous but also systemic DNA damage responses determine the outcome of genome instability in organisms. Understanding the mechanisms of non-cell-autonomous DNA damage responses will provide important new insights into the role of genome instability in human aging and a host of diseases including cancer and might better explain the complex phenotypes caused by genome instability. PMID:26773346

  18. The DNA Damage Response: Making it safe to play with knives

    PubMed Central

    Ciccia, Alberto; Elledge, Stephen J.

    2010-01-01

    Damage to our genetic material is an ongoing threat to both our ability to faithfully transmit genetic information to our offspring as well as our own survival. To respond to these threats, eukaryotes have evolved the DNA Damage Response (DDR). The DDR is a complex signal transduction pathway that has the ability to sense DNA damage and transduce this information to the cell to influence cellular responses to DNA damage. Cells possess an arsenal of enzymatic tools capable of remodeling and repairing DNA, however, their activities must be tightly regulated in a temporal, spatial and DNA lesion-appropriate fashion to optimize repair and prevent unnecessary and potentially deleterious alterations in the structure of DNA during normal cellular processes. This review will focus on how the DDR controls DNA repair and the phenotypic consequences of defects in these critical regulatory functions in mammals. PMID:20965415

  19. An Integrated Approach for Analysis of the DNA Damage Response in Mammalian Cells: NUCLEOTIDE EXCISION REPAIR, DNA DAMAGE CHECKPOINT, AND APOPTOSIS.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jun-Hyuk; Kim, So-Young; Kim, Sook-Kyung; Kemp, Michael G; Sancar, Aziz

    2015-11-27

    DNA damage by UV and UV-mimetic agents elicits a set of inter-related responses in mammalian cells, including DNA repair, DNA damage checkpoints, and apoptosis. Conventionally, these responses are analyzed separately using different methodologies. Here we describe a unified approach that is capable of quantifying all three responses in parallel using lysates from the same population of cells. We show that a highly sensitive in vivo excision repair assay is capable of detecting nucleotide excision repair of a wide spectrum of DNA lesions (UV damage, chemical carcinogens, and chemotherapeutic drugs) within minutes of damage induction. This method therefore allows for a real-time measure of nucleotide excision repair activity that can be monitored in conjunction with other components of the DNA damage response, including DNA damage checkpoint and apoptotic signaling. This approach therefore provides a convenient and reliable platform for simultaneously examining multiple aspects of the DNA damage response in a single population of cells that can be applied for a diverse array of carcinogenic and chemotherapeutic agents.

  20. Breaking the DNA damage response to improve cervical cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Wieringa, Hylke W; van der Zee, Ate G J; de Vries, Elisabeth G E; van Vugt, Marcel A T M

    2016-01-01

    Every year, cervical cancer affects ∼500,000 women worldwide, and ∼275,000 patients die of this disease. The addition of platin-based chemotherapy to primary radiotherapy has increased 5-year survival of advanced-stage cervical cancer patients, which is, however, still only 66%. One of the factors thought to contribute to treatment failure is the ability of tumor cells to repair chemoradiotherapy-induced DNA damage. Therefore, sensitization of tumor cells for chemoradiotherapy via inhibition of the DNA damage response (DDR) as a novel strategy to improve therapy effect, is currently studied pre-clinically as well as in the clinic. Almost invariably, cervical carcinogenesis involves infection with the human papillomavirus (HPV), which inactivates part of the DNA damage response. This HPV-mediated partial inactivation of the DDR presents therapeutic targeting of the residual DDR as an interesting approach to achieve chemoradio-sensitization for cervical cancer. How the DDR can be most efficiently targeted, however, remains unclear. The fact that cisplatin and radiotherapy activate multiple signaling axes within the DDR further complicates a rational choice of therapeutic targets within the DDR. In this review, we provide an overview of the current preclinical and clinical knowledge about targeting the DDR in cervical cancer.

  1. UV and ionizing radiations induced DNA damage, differences and similarities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravanat, Jean-Luc; Douki, Thierry

    2016-11-01

    Both UV and ionizing radiations damage DNA. Two main mechanisms, so-called direct and indirect pathways, are involved in the degradation of DNA induced by ionizing radiations. The direct effect of radiation corresponds to direct ionization of DNA (one electron ejection) whereas indirect effects are produced by reactive oxygen species generated through water radiolysis, including the highly reactive hydroxyl radicals, which damage DNA. UV (and visible) light damages DNA by again two distinct mechanisms. UVC and to a lesser extend UVB photons are directly absorbed by DNA bases, generating their excited states that are at the origin of the formation of pyrimidine dimers. UVA (and visible) light by interaction with endogenous or exogenous photosensitizers induce the formation of DNA damage through photosensitization reactions. The excited photosensitizer is able to induce either a one-electron oxidation of DNA (type I) or to produce singlet oxygen (type II) that reacts with DNA. In addition, through an energy transfer from the excited photosensitizer to DNA bases (sometime called type III mechanism) formation of pyrimidine dimers could be produced. Interestingly it has been shown recently that pyrimidine dimers are also produced by direct absorption of UVA light by DNA, even if absorption of DNA bases at these wavelengths is very low. It should be stressed that some excited photosensitizers (such as psoralens) could add directly to DNA bases to generate adducts. The review will described the differences and similarities in terms of damage formation (structure and mechanisms) between these two physical genotoxic agents.

  2. FM19G11: A new modulator of HIF that links mTOR activation with the DNA damage checkpoint pathways.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Jiménez, Francisco Javier; Moreno-Manzano, Victoria; Mateos-Gregorio, Pablo; Royo, Inmaculada; Erceg, Slaven; Murguia, José Ramón; Sánchez-Puelles, Jose María

    2010-07-15

    The network consisting of mTOR and p53 pathways is crucial to understanding a wide variety of physiological and pathological events, including cancer and aging. In addition, the HIF1alpha protein, a downstream target of mTOR, is a hallmark of different tumor types and was the desired strategy of many drug discovery efforts. Here we present the novel chemical entity FM19G11, a new modulator of HIF1alpha expression, which was used as a molecular tool to dissect and further characterize the cross-talk between these signaling cascades in human colon carcinoma cell lines. To our knowledge, FM19G11 is the first drug that triggers a DNA damage response (DDR) associated with G(1)/S-phase arrest in a p53-dependent manner, due to rapid hyper-activation of the growth signaling pathway through mTOR. Assessment of colonies demonstrated that FM19G11 decreases the clonogenicity of HT29, HCT116/p53(+/+) and HCT116/p53(-/-) cells. Moreover, FM19G11 causes significant lower colony growth in soft agar of p53-proficient human colon cancer cells. Consequently, p53 sensitizes human colon cancer cells to FM19G11 by significant reduction of their viability, lessening their colony formation capability and shrinking their anchorage-independent growth. Cell signaling studies served to assign a new mode of action to FM19G11, whose tumor-suppressant activity compromises the survival of functional p53 malignant cells.

  3. Oxidative DNA Damage Response in Helicobacter pylori-Infected Mongolian Gerbils.

    PubMed

    Bae, Minkyung; Lim, Joo Weon; Kim, Hyeyoung

    2013-09-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) induced DNA damage which may be related to gastric cancer development. The DNA damage response coordinates DNA repair, cell-cycle transition, and apoptosis through activation of DNA damage response molecules. The damaged DNA is repaired through non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) or homologous recombination (HR). In the present study, we investigated the changes of HR DNA repair proteins (ataxia-telangiectasia-mutated; ATM, ATM and Rad3-related; ATR), NHEJ repair proteins (Ku70/80), cell cycle regulators (Chk1, Chk2), and apoptosis marker (p53/p-p53) were determined in H. pylori-infected Mongolian gerbils. In addition, the effect of an antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC) on H. pylori-induced DNA damage response was determined to assess the involvement of oxidative stress on DNA damage of the animals infected with H. pylori. One week after intragastric inoculation with H. pylori, Mongolian gerbils were fed with basal diet with or without 3% NAC for 6 weeks. After 6 week, the expression levels of DNA repair proteins (Ku70/80, ATM, ATR), cell cycle regulators (Chk1, Chk2) and apoptosis marker (p-p53/p53) were increased in gastric mucosa of Mongolian gerbils, which was suppressed by NAC treatment. In conclusion, oxidative stress mediates H. pylori-induced DNA damage response including NHEJ and HR repairing processes, cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in gastric mucosa of Mongolian gerbils.

  4. DNA damage induced by low energy electron collision and new experimental setup for further studying DNA damage by plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Yeunsoo; Sanche, Leon; Wagner, Richard

    2013-09-01

    Low energy electrons (LEEs; below 10 eV) are the most abundant among the radiolytic species generated along the high energy radiation track in living cell. And these electrons are also one of major components with ions and photon in plasma. Interestingly, it has turned out that LEEs can create DNA damages such as base release, single- and double- strand breaks (SSB and DSB) via indirect action named dissociative electron attachment (DEA). The purposes of this study are to further find out exact mechanisms of DNA damage by LEEs at the molecular level and to verify new DNA damage like structural alteration on DNA subunits. And we will expand our study to DNA damage by plasma source to develop plasma-based new medical and biological applications. We are currently setting new experimental system for reaching our goals. We will show some recent results about new finding DNA modification damage and some experimental designs and working principles.

  5. Oxidative DNA damage in osteoarthritic porcine articular cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Antonia F.; Davies, Catrin M.; De Lin, Ming; Fermor, Beverley

    2008-01-01

    Purpose Osteoarthritis (OA) is associated with increased levels of reactive oxygen species. This study investigated if increased oxidative DNA damage accumulates in OA articular cartilage compared with non-OA articular cartilage from pigs with spontaneous OA. Additionally, the ability of nitric oxide (NO) or peroxynitrite (ONOO-) induced DNA damage in non-OA chondrocytes to undergo endogenous repair was investigated. Methods Porcine femoral condyles were graded for the stage of OA, macroscopically by the Collins Scale, and histologically by the modified Mankin Grade. Levels of DNA damage were determined in non-OA and OA cartilage, using the comet assay. For calibration, DNA damage was measured by exposing non-OA chondrocytes to 0-12 Gray of x-ray irradiation. Non-OA articular chondrocytes were treated with 0-500 μM of NO donors (NOC-18 or SIN-1), and DNA damage assessed after treatment and 5 days recovery. Results A significant increase (p<0.01) in oxidative DNA damage occurred in OA chondrocytes in joints with Mankin Grades 3 or greater, compared to non-OA chondrocytes. The percentage of nuclei containing DNA damage increased significantly (p<0.001) from early to late grades of OA. An increase of approximately 0.65-1.7 breaks/1000kB of DNA occurred in OA, compared to non-OA nuclei. NOC-18 or SIN-1 caused significant DNA damage (p<0.001) in non-OA chondrocytes that did not undergo full endogenous repair after 5 days (p<0.05). Conclusion Our data suggest significant levels of oxidative DNA damage occur in OA chondrocytes that accumulates with OA progression. Additionally, DNA damage induced by NO and ONOO- in non-OA chondrocytes does not undergo full endogenous repair. PMID:18720406

  6. DNA damage in cells exhibiting radiation-induced genomic instability

    DOE PAGES

    Keszenman, Deborah J.; Kolodiuk, Lucia; Baulch, Janet E.

    2015-02-22

    Cells exhibiting radiation induced genomic instability exhibit varied spectra of genetic and chromosomal aberrations. Even so, oxidative stress remains a common theme in the initiation and/or perpetuation of this phenomenon. Isolated oxidatively modified bases, abasic sites, DNA single strand breaks and clustered DNA damage are induced in normal mammalian cultured cells and tissues due to endogenous reactive oxygen species generated during normal cellular metabolism in an aerobic environment. While sparse DNA damage may be easily repaired, clustered DNA damage may lead to persistent cytotoxic or mutagenic events that can lead to genomic instability. In this study, we tested the hypothesismore » that DNA damage signatures characterised by altered levels of endogenous, potentially mutagenic, types of DNA damage and chromosomal breakage are related to radiation-induced genomic instability and persistent oxidative stress phenotypes observed in the chromosomally unstable progeny of irradiated cells. The measurement of oxypurine, oxypyrimidine and abasic site endogenous DNA damage showed differences in non-double-strand breaks (DSB) clusters among the three of the four unstable clones evaluated as compared to genomically stable clones and the parental cell line. These three unstable clones also had increased levels of DSB clusters. The results of this study demonstrate that each unstable cell line has a unique spectrum of persistent damage and lead us to speculate that alterations in DNA damage signaling and repair may be related to the perpetuation of genomic instability.« less

  7. DNA damage in cells exhibiting radiation-induced genomic instability

    SciTech Connect

    Keszenman, Deborah J.; Kolodiuk, Lucia; Baulch, Janet E.

    2015-02-22

    Cells exhibiting radiation induced genomic instability exhibit varied spectra of genetic and chromosomal aberrations. Even so, oxidative stress remains a common theme in the initiation and/or perpetuation of this phenomenon. Isolated oxidatively modified bases, abasic sites, DNA single strand breaks and clustered DNA damage are induced in normal mammalian cultured cells and tissues due to endogenous reactive oxygen species generated during normal cellular metabolism in an aerobic environment. While sparse DNA damage may be easily repaired, clustered DNA damage may lead to persistent cytotoxic or mutagenic events that can lead to genomic instability. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that DNA damage signatures characterised by altered levels of endogenous, potentially mutagenic, types of DNA damage and chromosomal breakage are related to radiation-induced genomic instability and persistent oxidative stress phenotypes observed in the chromosomally unstable progeny of irradiated cells. The measurement of oxypurine, oxypyrimidine and abasic site endogenous DNA damage showed differences in non-double-strand breaks (DSB) clusters among the three of the four unstable clones evaluated as compared to genomically stable clones and the parental cell line. These three unstable clones also had increased levels of DSB clusters. The results of this study demonstrate that each unstable cell line has a unique spectrum of persistent damage and lead us to speculate that alterations in DNA damage signaling and repair may be related to the perpetuation of genomic instability.

  8. ATM-dependent telomere loss in aging human diploid fibroblasts and DNA damage lead to the post-translational activation of p53 protein involving poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase.

    PubMed Central

    Vaziri, H; West, M D; Allsopp, R C; Davison, T S; Wu, Y S; Arrowsmith, C H; Poirier, G G; Benchimol, S

    1997-01-01

    Telomere loss has been proposed as a mechanism for counting cell divisions during aging in normal somatic cells. How such a mitotic clock initiates the intracellular signalling events that culminate in G1 cell cycle arrest and senescence to restrict the lifespan of normal human cells is not known. We investigated the possibility that critically short telomere length activates a DNA damage response pathway involving p53 and p21(WAF1) in aging cells. We show that the DNA binding and transcriptional activity of p53 protein increases with cell age in the absence of any marked increase in the level of p53 protein, and that p21(WAF1) promoter activity in senescent cells is dependent on both p53 and the transcriptional co-activator p300. Moreover, we detected increased specific activity of p53 protein in AT fibroblasts, which exhibit accelerated telomere loss and undergo premature senescence, compared with normal fibroblasts. We investigated the possibility that poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase is involved in the post-translational activation of p53 protein in aging cells. We show that p53 protein can associate with PARP and inhibition of PARP activity leads to abrogation of p21 and mdm2 expression in response to DNA damage. Moreover, inhibition of PARP activity leads to extension of cellular lifespan. In contrast, hyperoxia, an activator of PARP, is associated with accelerated telomere loss, activation of p53 and premature senescence. We propose that p53 is post-translationally activated not only in response to DNA damage but also in response to the critical shortening of telomeres that occurs during cellular aging. PMID:9312059

  9. Pathophysiology of Bronchoconstriction: Role of Oxidatively Damaged DNA Repair

    PubMed Central

    Bacsi, Attila; Pan, Lang; Ba, Xueqing; Boldogh, Istvan

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review To provide an overview on the present understanding of roles of oxidative DNA damage repair in cell signaling underlying bronchoconstriction common to, but not restricted to various forms of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease Recent findings Bronchoconstriction is a tightening of smooth muscle surrounding the bronchi and bronchioles with consequent wheezing and shortness of breath. Key stimuli include air pollutants, viral infections, allergens, thermal and osmotic changes, and shear stress of mucosal epithelium, triggering a wide range of cellular, vascular and neural events. Although activation of nerve fibers, the role of G-proteins, protein kinases and Ca++, and molecular interaction within contracting filaments of muscle are well defined, the overarching mechanisms by which a wide range of stimuli initiate these events are not fully understood. Many, if not all, stimuli increase levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which are signaling and oxidatively modifying macromolecules, including DNA. The primary ROS target in DNA is guanine, and 8-oxoguanine is one of the most abundant base lesions. It is repaired by 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase1 (OGG1) during base excision repair processes. The product, free 8-oxoG base, is bound by OGG1 with high affinity, and the complex then functions as an activator of small GTPases, triggering pathways for inducing gene expression and contraction of intracellular filaments in mast and smooth muscle cells. Summary Oxidative DNA damage repair-mediated cell activation signaling result in gene expression that “primes” the mucosal epithelium and submucosal tissues to generate mediators of airway smooth muscle contractions. PMID:26694039

  10. Poly (ADP-Ribose) Polymerase (PARP) is Essential for Sulfur Mustard-Induced DNA Damage Repair, But Has No Role in DNA Ligase Activation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    ligase activation could be due to its modification by PARP. Using HEK, intracellular "H-labeled NAD÷ (H-adenine) was metabolically generated and then... acetic acid methyl ester) (Bhat et al., 1998). These observations indicate a Stock HEK from adult skin of a single donor at passage need for a better...0.76 HEK were used in which NAD’ was metabolically 3H- Z-VAD-FMK (4 pm) 0.55CDO5 antibodly (2 pag ml )/(.( labeled at adenine (Malanga and Althaus

  11. DNA Damage among Wood Workers Assessed with the Comet Assay.

    PubMed

    Bruschweiler, Evin Danisman; Wild, Pascal; Huynh, Cong Khanh; Savova-Bianchi, Dessislava; Danuser, Brigitta; Hopf, Nancy B

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to wood dust, a human carcinogen, is common in wood-related industries, and millions of workers are occupationally exposed to wood dust worldwide. The comet assay is a rapid, simple, and sensitive method for determining DNA damage. The objective of this study was to investigate the DNA damage associated with occupational exposure to wood dust using the comet assay (peripheral blood samples) among nonsmoking wood workers (n = 31, furniture and construction workers) and controls (n = 19). DNA damage was greater in the group exposed to composite wood products compared to the group exposed to natural woods and controls (P < 0.001). No difference in DNA damage was observed between workers exposed to natural woods and controls (P = 0.13). Duration of exposure and current dust concentrations had no effect on DNA damage. In future studies, workers' exposures should include cumulative dust concentrations and exposures originating from the binders used in composite wood products.

  12. DNA Damage among Wood Workers Assessed with the Comet Assay

    PubMed Central

    Bruschweiler, Evin Danisman; Wild, Pascal; Huynh, Cong Khanh; Savova-Bianchi, Dessislava; Danuser, Brigitta; Hopf, Nancy B.

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to wood dust, a human carcinogen, is common in wood-related industries, and millions of workers are occupationally exposed to wood dust worldwide. The comet assay is a rapid, simple, and sensitive method for determining DNA damage. The objective of this study was to investigate the DNA damage associated with occupational exposure to wood dust using the comet assay (peripheral blood samples) among nonsmoking wood workers (n = 31, furniture and construction workers) and controls (n = 19). DNA damage was greater in the group exposed to composite wood products compared to the group exposed to natural woods and controls (P < 0.001). No difference in DNA damage was observed between workers exposed to natural woods and controls (P = 0.13). Duration of exposure and current dust concentrations had no effect on DNA damage. In future studies, workers’ exposures should include cumulative dust concentrations and exposures originating from the binders used in composite wood products. PMID:27398027

  13. Ultraviolet induced DNA damage and hereditary skin cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Regan, J.D.; Carrier, W.L.; Francis, A.A.

    1984-01-01

    Clearly, cells from normal individuals possess the ability to repair a variety of damage to DNA. Numerous studies indicate that defects in DNA repair may increase an individual's susceptibility to cancer. It is hoped that continued studies of the exact structural changes produced in the DNA by environmental insults, and the correlation of specific DNA changes with particulr cellular events, such as DNA repair, will lead to a better understanding of cell-killing, mutagenesis and carbinogenesis. 1 figure, 2 tables.

  14. Cytometric assessment of DNA damage in relation to cell cycle phase and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xuan; Halicka, H Dorota; Traganos, Frank; Tanaka, Toshiki; Kurose, Akira; Darzynkiewicz, Zbigniew

    2005-08-01

    Reviewed are the methods aimed to detect DNA damage in individual cells, estimate its extent and relate it to cell cycle phase and induction of apoptosis. They include the assays that reveal DNA fragmentation during apoptosis, as well as DNA damage induced by genotoxic agents. DNA fragmentation that occurs in the course of apoptosis is detected by selective extraction of degraded DNA. DNA in chromatin of apoptotic cells shows also increased propensity to undergo denaturation. The most common assay of DNA fragmentation relies on labelling DNA strand breaks with fluorochrome-tagged deoxynucleotides. The induction of double-strand DNA breaks (DSBs) by genotoxic agents provides a signal for histone H2AX phosphorylation on Ser139; the phosphorylated H2AX is named gammaH2AX. Also, ATM-kinase is activated through its autophosphorylation on Ser1981. Immunocytochemical detection of gammaH2AX and/or ATM-Ser1981(P) are sensitive probes to reveal induction of DSBs. When used concurrently with analysis of cellular DNA content and caspase-3 activation, they allow one to correlate the extent of DNA damage with the cell cycle phase and with activation of the apoptotic pathway. The presented data reveal cell cycle phase-specific patterns of H2AX phosphorylation and ATM autophosphorylation in response to induction of DSBs by ionizing radiation, topoisomerase I and II inhibitors and carcinogens. Detection of DNA damage in tumour cells during radio- or chemotherapy may provide an early marker predictive of response to treatment.

  15. Comparative Analysis of Interaction of Human and Yeast DNA Damage Recognition Complexes with Damaged DNA in Nucleotide Excision Repair*

    PubMed Central

    Krasikova, Yuliya S.; Rechkunova, Nadejda I.; Maltseva, Ekaterina A.; Pestryakov, Pavel E.; Petruseva, Irina O.; Sugasawa, Kaoru; Chen, Xuejing; Min, Jung-Hyun; Lavrik, Olga I.

    2013-01-01

    The human XPC-RAD23B complex and its yeast ortholog, Rad4-Rad23, are the primary initiators of global genome nucleotide excision repair. The interaction of these proteins with damaged DNA was analyzed using model DNA duplexes containing a single fluorescein-substituted dUMP analog as a lesion. An electrophoretic mobility shift assay revealed similarity between human and yeast proteins in DNA binding. Quantitative analyses of XPC/Rad4 binding to the model DNA structures were performed by fluorescent depolarization measurements. XPC-RAD23B and Rad4-Rad23 proteins demonstrate approximately equal binding affinity to the damaged DNA duplex (KD ∼ (0.5 ± 0.1) and (0.6 ± 0.3) nm, respectively). Using photoreactive DNA containing 5-iodo-dUMP in defined positions, XPC/Rad4 location on damaged DNA was shown. Under conditions of equimolar binding to DNA both proteins exhibited the highest level of cross-links to 5I-dUMP located exactly opposite the damaged nucleotide. The positioning of the XPC and Rad4 proteins on damaged DNA by photocross-linking footprinting is consistent with x-ray analysis of the Rad4-DNA crystal complex. The identity of the XPC and Rad4 location illustrates the common principles of structure organization of DNA damage-scanning proteins from different Eukarya organisms. PMID:23443653

  16. Reshaping chromatin after DNA damage: the choreography of histone proteins.

    PubMed

    Polo, Sophie E

    2015-02-13

    DNA damage signaling and repair machineries operate in a nuclear environment where DNA is wrapped around histone proteins and packaged into chromatin. Understanding how chromatin structure is restored together with the DNA sequence during DNA damage repair has been a topic of intense research. Indeed, chromatin integrity is central to cell functions and identity. However, chromatin shows remarkable plasticity in response to DNA damage. This review presents our current knowledge of chromatin dynamics in the mammalian cell nucleus in response to DNA double strand breaks and UV lesions. I provide an overview of the key players involved in regulating histone dynamics in damaged chromatin regions, focusing on histone chaperones and their concerted action with histone modifiers, chromatin remodelers and repair factors. I also discuss how these dynamics contribute to reshaping chromatin and, by altering the chromatin landscape, may affect the maintenance of epigenetic information.

  17. Cross-talk between carbon metabolism and the DNA damage response in S. cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Simpson-Lavy, Kobi J.; Bronstein, Alex; Kupiec, Martin; Johnston, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Yeast cells with DNA damage avoid respiration, presumably because products of oxidative metabolism can be harmful to DNA. We show that DNA damage inhibits the activity of the Snf1 (AMP-activated) protein kinase (AMPK), which activates expression of genes required for respiration. Glucose and DNA damage upregulate SUMOylation of Snf1, catalyzed by the SUMO E3-ligase Mms21, which inhibits SNF1 activity. The DNA damage checkpoint kinases Mec1/ATR and Tel1/ATM, as well as the nutrient sensing protein kinase A (PKA), regulate Mms21 activity towards Snf1. Mec1 and Tel1 are required for two SNF1-regulated processes—glucose sensing and ADH2 gene expression—even without exogenous genotoxic stress. Our results imply that inhibition of Snf1 by SUMOylation is a mechanism by which cells lower their respiration in response to DNA damage. This raises the possibility that activation of DNA damage checkpoint mechanisms could contribute to aerobic fermentation (Warburg effect), a hallmark of cancer cells. PMID:26344768

  18. Expression Profile of DNA Damage Signaling Genes in Proton Exposed Mouse Brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramesh, Govindarajan; Wu, Honglu

    Exposure of living systems to radiation results in a wide assortment of lesions, the most signif-icant of is damage to genomic DNA which induce several cellular functions such as cell cycle arrest, repair, apoptosis etc. The radiation induced DNA damage investigation is one of the im-portant area in biology, but still the information available regarding the effects of proton is very limited. In this report, we investigated the differential gene expression pattern of DNA damage signaling genes particularly, damaged DNA binding, repair, cell cycle arrest, checkpoints and apoptosis using quantitative real-time RT-PCR array in proton exposed mouse brain tissues. The expression profiles showed significant changes in DNA damage related genes in 2Gy proton exposed mouse brain tissues as compared with control brain tissues. Furthermore, we also show that significantly increased levels of apoptotic related genes, caspase-3 and 8 activities in these cells, suggesting that in addition to differential expression of DNA damage genes, the alteration of apoptosis related genes may also contribute to the radiation induced DNA damage followed by programmed cell death. In summary, our findings suggest that proton exposed brain tissue undergo severe DNA damage which in turn destabilize the chromatin stability.

  19. Stress-induced DNA damage biomarkers: applications and limitations

    PubMed Central

    Nikitaki, Zacharenia; Hellweg, Christine E.; Georgakilas, Alexandros G.; Ravanat, Jean-Luc

    2015-01-01

    A variety of environmental stresses like chemicals, UV and ionizing radiation and organism's endogenous processes such as replication stress and metabolism can lead to the generation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) that can attack cellular vital components like DNA, proteins and lipid membranes. Among them, much attention has been focused on DNA since DNA damage plays a role in several biological disorders and aging processes. Thus, DNA damage can be used as a biomarker in a reliable and accurate way to quantify for example radiation exposure and can indicate its possible long term effects and cancer risk. Based on the type of DNA lesions detected one can hypothesize on the most probable mechanisms involved in the formation of these lesions for example in the case of UV and ionizing radiation (e.g., X- or α-, γ-rays, energetic ions, neutrons). In this review we describe the most accepted chemical pathways for DNA damage induction and the different types of DNA lesions, i.e., single, complex DNA lesions etc. that can be used as DNA damage biomarkers. We critically compare DNA damage detection methods and their limitations. In addition, we suggest the use of DNA repair gene products as biomarkes for identification of different types of stresses i.e., radiation, oxidative, or replication stress, based on bioinformatic approaches and meta-analysis of literature data. PMID:26082923

  20. DNA damage response during mouse oocyte maturation

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, Alexandra; Baran, Vladimir; Sakakibara, Yogo; Brzakova, Adela; Ferencova, Ivana; Motlik, Jan; Kitajima, Tomoya S.; Schultz, Richard M.; Solc, Petr

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Because low levels of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) appear not to activate the ATM-mediated prophase I checkpoint in full-grown oocytes, there may exist mechanisms to protect chromosome integrity during meiotic maturation. Using live imaging we demonstrate that low levels of DSBs induced by the radiomimetic drug Neocarzinostatin (NCS) increase the incidence of chromosome fragments and lagging chromosomes but do not lead to APC/C activation and anaphase onset delay. The number of DSBs, represented by γH2AX foci, significantly decreases between prophase I and metaphase II in both control and NCS-treated oocytes. Transient treatment with NCS increases >2-fold the number of DSBs in prophase I oocytes, but less than 30% of these oocytes enter anaphase with segregation errors. MRE11, but not ATM, is essential to detect DSBs in prophase I and is involved in H2AX phosphorylation during metaphase I. Inhibiting MRE11 by mirin during meiotic maturation results in anaphase bridges and also increases the number of γH2AX foci in metaphase II.  Compromised DNA integrity in mirin-treated oocytes indicates a role for MRE11 in chromosome integrity during meiotic maturation. PMID:26745237

  1. Comet assays to assess DNA damage and repair in grass shrimp embryos exposed to phototoxicants.

    PubMed

    Lee, R; Kim, G B

    2002-01-01

    Exposure of grass shrimp (Palaemonetes pugio) embryos to four compounds (anthracene, pyrene, alpha-terthienyl, methylene blue) along with solar exposure resulted in extensive DNA strand damage using the comet assay. DNA tail moments of embryos exposed to these chemicals in the dark ranged from 1.8 to 4.3, while exposure to chemicals and solar resulted in tail moments of 14.3-15.3. Reduction of DNA tail moments when solar exposed embryos were transferred to the dark, suggested DNA repair systems were active. The comet assay can be used to follow both DNA damage and repair following exposure to phototoxic chemicals.

  2. alpha-Terthienyl photosensitizes damage to pBR322 DNA.

    PubMed

    Wang, T P; Kagan, J; Tuveson, R W; Wang, G R

    1991-04-01

    alpha-Terthienyl photosensitizes single strand breaks in pBR322 DNA. Almost identical results were observed under oxygen and under argon. In the presence of oxygen, this DNA nicking was enhanced by histidine and was not affected by superoxide dismutase, catalase, or the antioxidant BHT. Although chemical damage to DNA treated with alpha-terthienyl plus near-UV was clearly demonstrated in vitro, transformation in E. coli with this damaged pBR322 DNA still took place. Likewise, Haemophilus influenzae DNA transforming activity was not significantly decreased by photosensitization with alpha-terthienyl.

  3. RNA m(6)A methylation regulates the ultraviolet-induced DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Yang; Laurent, Benoit; Hsu, Chih-Hung; Nachtergaele, Sigrid; Lu, Zhike; Sheng, Wanqiang; Xu, Chuanyun; Chen, Hao; Ouyang, Jian; Wang, Siqing; Ling, Dominic; Hsu, Pang-Hung; Zou, Lee; Jambhekar, Ashwini; He, Chuan; Shi, Yang

    2017-03-23

    Cell proliferation and survival require the faithful maintenance and propagation of genetic information, which are threatened by the ubiquitous sources of DNA damage present intracellularly and in the external environment. A system of DNA repair, called the DNA damage response, detects and repairs damaged DNA and prevents cell division until the repair is complete. Here we report that methylation at the 6 position of adenosine (m(6)A) in RNA is rapidly (within 2 min) and transiently induced at DNA damage sites in response to ultraviolet irradiation. This modification occurs on numerous poly(A)(+) transcripts and is regulated by the methyltransferase METTL3 (methyltransferase-like 3) and the demethylase FTO (fat mass and obesity-associated protein). In the absence of METTL3 catalytic activity, cells showed delayed repair of ultraviolet-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine adducts and elevated sensitivity to ultraviolet, demonstrating the importance of m(6)A in the ultraviolet-responsive DNA damage response. Multiple DNA polymerases are involved in the ultraviolet response, some of which resynthesize DNA after the lesion has been excised by the nucleotide excision repair pathway, while others participate in trans-lesion synthesis to allow replication past damaged lesions in S phase. DNA polymerase κ (Pol κ), which has been implicated in both nucleotide excision repair and trans-lesion synthesis, required the catalytic activity of METTL3 for immediate localization to ultraviolet-induced DNA damage sites. Importantly, Pol κ overexpression qualitatively suppressed the cyclobutane pyrimidine removal defect associated with METTL3 loss. Thus, we have uncovered a novel function for RNA m(6)A modification in the ultraviolet-induced DNA damage response, and our findings collectively support a model in which m(6)A RNA serves as a beacon for the selective, rapid recruitment of Pol κ to damage sites to facilitate repair and cell survival.

  4. Chimeric Proteins to Detect DNA Damage and Mismatches

    SciTech Connect

    McCutchen-Maloney, S; Malfatti, M; Robbins, K M

    2002-01-14

    The goal of this project was to develop chimeric proteins composed of a DNA mismatch or damage binding protein and a nuclease, as well as methods to detect DNA mismatches and damage. We accomplished this through protein engineering based on using polymerase chain reactions (PCRs) to create chimeras with novel functions for damage and mismatch detection. This project addressed fundamental questions relating to disease susceptibility and radiation-induced damage in cells. It also supported and enhanced LLNL's competency in the emerging field of proteomics. In nature, DNA is constantly being subjected to damaging agents such as exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation and various environmental and dietary carcinogens. If DNA damage is not repaired however, mutations in DNA result that can eventually manifest in cancer and other diseases. In addition to damage-induced DNA mutations, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), which are variations in the genetic sequence between individuals, may predispose some to disease. As a result of the Human Genome Project, the integrity of a person's DNA can now be monitored. Therefore, methods to detect DNA damage, mutations, and SNPs are useful not only in basic research but also in the health and biotechnology industries. Current methods of detection often use radioactive labeling and rely on expensive instrumentation that is not readily available in many research settings. Our methods to detect DNA damage and mismatches employ simple gel electrophoresis and flow cytometry, thereby alleviating the need for radioactive labeling and expensive equipment. In FY2001, we explored SNP detection by developing methods based on the ability of the chimeric proteins to detect mismatches. Using multiplex assays with flow cytometry and fluorescent beads to which the DNA substrates where attached, we showed that several of the chimeras possess greater affinity for damaged and mismatched DNA than for native DNA. This affinity was demonstrated in

  5. Bisdemethoxycurcumin induces DNA damage and inhibits DNA repair associated protein expressions in NCI-H460 human lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chien-Chih; Yang, Su-Tso; Huang, Wen-Wen; Peng, Shu-Fen; Huang, An-Cheng; Tang, Nou-Ying; Liu, Hsin-Chung; Yang, Mei-Due; Lai, Kuang-Chi; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2015-08-30

    Nonsmall cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) is a devastating primary lung tumor resistant to conventional therapies. Bisdemethoxycurcumin (BDMC) is one of curcumin derivate from Turmeric and has been shown to induce NSCLC cell death. Although there is one report to show BDMC induced DNA double strand breaks, however, no available information to show BDMC induced DNA damage action with inhibited DNA repair protein in lung cancer cells in detail. In this study, we tested BDMC-induced DNA damage and condensation in NCI-H460 cells by using Comet assay and DAPI staining examinations, respectively and we found BDMC induced DNA damage and condension. Western blotting was used to examine the effects of BDMC on protein expression associated with DNA damage and repair and results indicated that BDMC suppressed the protein levels associated with DNA damage and repair, such as 14-3-3σ (an important checkpoint keeper of DDR), O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase, DNA repair proteins breast cancer 1, early onset, mediator of DNA damage checkpoint 1 but activate phosphorylated p53 and p-H2A.X (phospho Ser140) in NCI-H460 cells. Confocal laser systems microscopy was used for examining the protein translocation and results show that BDMC increased the translocation of p-p53 and p-H2A.X (phospho Ser140) from cytosol to nuclei in NCI-H460 cells. In conclusion, BDMC induced DNA damage and condension and affect DNA repair proteins in NCI-H460 cells in vitro. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol, 2015.

  6. Plasmid DNA damage induced by helium atmospheric pressure plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Xu; Cantrell, William A.; Escobar, Erika E.; Ptasinska, Sylwia

    2014-03-01

    A helium atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) is applied to induce damage to aqueous plasmid DNA. The resulting fractions of the DNA conformers, which indicate intact molecules or DNA with single- or double-strand breaks, are determined using agarose gel electrophoresis. The DNA strand breaks increase with a decrease in the distance between the APPJ and DNA samples under two working conditions of the plasma source with different parameters of applied electric pulses. The damage level induced in the plasmid DNA is also enhanced with increased plasma irradiation time. The reactive species generated in the APPJ are characterized by optical emission spectra, and their roles in possible DNA damage processes occurring in an aqueous environment are also discussed.

  7. The Yeast Copper Response Is Regulated by DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Kangzhen; Addinall, Stephen G.; Lydall, David

    2013-01-01

    Copper is an essential but potentially toxic redox-active metal, so the levels and distribution of this metal are carefully regulated to ensure that it binds to the correct proteins. Previous studies of copper-dependent transcription in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae have focused on the response of genes to changes in the exogenous levels of copper. We now report that yeast copper genes are regulated in response to the DNA-damaging agents methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) and hydroxyurea by a mechanism(s) that requires the copper-responsive transcription factors Mac1 and AceI, copper superoxide dismutase (Sod1) activity, and the Rad53 checkpoint kinase. Furthermore, in copper-starved yeast, the response of the Rad53 pathway to MMS is compromised due to a loss of Sod1 activity, consistent with the model that yeast imports copper to ensure Sod1 activity and Rad53 signaling. Crucially, the Mac1 transcription factor undergoes changes in its redox state in response to changing levels of copper or MMS. This study has therefore identified a novel regulatory relationship between cellular redox, copper homeostasis, and the DNA damage response in yeast. PMID:23959798

  8. DETECTION OF DNA DAMAGE USING MELTING ANALYSIS TECHNIQUES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A rapid and simple fluorescence screening assay for UV radiation-, chemical-, and enzyme-induced DNA damage is reported. This assay is based on a melting/annealing analysis technique and has been used with both calf thymus DNA and plasmid DNA (puc 19 plasmid from E. coli). DN...

  9. Capturing Snapshots of APE1 Processing DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Freudenthal, Bret D.; Beard, William A.; Cuneo, Matthew J.; Dyrkheeva, Nadezhda S.; Wilson, Samuel H.

    2015-01-01

    DNA apurinic-apyrimidinic (AP) sites are prevalent non-coding threats to genomic stability and are processed by AP endonuclease 1 (APE1). APE1 incises the AP-site phosphodiester backbone, generating a DNA repair intermediate that is potentially cytotoxic. The molecular events of the incision reaction remain elusive due in part to limited structural information. We report multiple high-resolution human APE1:DNA structures that divulge novel features of the APE1 reaction, including the metal binding site, nucleophile, and arginine clamps that mediate product release. We also report APE1:DNA structures with a T:G mismatch 5′ to the AP-site, representing a clustered lesion occurring in methylated CpG dinucleotides. These reveal that APE1 molds the T:G mismatch into a unique Watson-Crick like geometry that distorts the active site reducing incision. These snapshots provide mechanistic clarity for APE1, while affording a rational framework to manipulate biological responses to DNA damage. PMID:26458045

  10. Capturing snapshots of APE1 processing DNA damage

    DOE PAGES

    Freudenthal, Bret D.; Beard, William A.; Cuneo, Matthew J.; ...

    2015-10-12

    DNA apurinic-apyrimidinic (AP) sites are prevalent noncoding threats to genomic stability and are processed by AP endonuclease 1 (APE1). APE1 incises the AP-site phosphodiester backbone, generating a DNA-repair intermediate that is potentially cytotoxic. The molecular events of the incision reaction remain elusive, owing in part to limited structural information. Here we report multiple high-resolution human APE1-DNA structures that divulge new features of the APE1 reaction, including the metal-binding site, the nucleophile and the arginine clamps that mediate product release. We also report APE1-DNA structures with a T-G mismatch 5' to the AP site, representing a clustered lesion occurring in methylatedmore » CpG dinucleotides. Moreover, these structures reveal that APE1 molds the T-G mismatch into a unique Watson-Crick-like geometry that distorts the active site, thus reducing incision. Finally, these snapshots provide mechanistic clarity for APE1 while affording a rational framework to manipulate biological responses to DNA damage.« less

  11. Capturing snapshots of APE1 processing DNA damage

    SciTech Connect

    Freudenthal, Bret D.; Beard, William A.; Cuneo, Matthew J.; Dyrkheeva, Nadezhda S.; Wilson, Samuel H.

    2015-10-12

    DNA apurinic-apyrimidinic (AP) sites are prevalent noncoding threats to genomic stability and are processed by AP endonuclease 1 (APE1). APE1 incises the AP-site phosphodiester backbone, generating a DNA-repair intermediate that is potentially cytotoxic. The molecular events of the incision reaction remain elusive, owing in part to limited structural information. Here we report multiple high-resolution human APE1-DNA structures that divulge new features of the APE1 reaction, including the metal-binding site, the nucleophile and the arginine clamps that mediate product release. We also report APE1-DNA structures with a T-G mismatch 5' to the AP site, representing a clustered lesion occurring in methylated CpG dinucleotides. Moreover, these structures reveal that APE1 molds the T-G mismatch into a unique Watson-Crick-like geometry that distorts the active site, thus reducing incision. Finally, these snapshots provide mechanistic clarity for APE1 while affording a rational framework to manipulate biological responses to DNA damage.

  12. Stress-induced DNA Damage biomarkers: Applications and limitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikitaki, Zacharenia; Hellweg, Christine; Georgakilas, Alexandros; Ravanat, Jean-Luc

    2015-06-01

    A variety of environmental stresses like chemicals, UV and ionizing radiation and organism’s endogenous processes like replication stress and metabolism can lead to the generation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) that can attack cellular vital components like DNA, proteins and lipid membranes. Among them, much attention has been focused on DNA since DNA damages play a role in several biological disorders and aging processes. Thus, DNA damage can be used as a biomarker in a reliable and accurate way to quantify for example radiation exposure and can indicate its possible long term effects and cancer risk. Based on the type of DNA lesions detected one can hypothesize on the most probable mechanisms involved in the formation of these lesions for example in the case of UV and ionizing radiation (e.g. X- or α-, γ-rays, energetic ions, neutrons). In this review we describe the most accepted chemical pathways for DNA damage induction and the different types of DNA lesions, i.e. single, complex DNA lesions etc. that can be used as biomarkers. We critically compare DNA damage detection methods and their limitations. In addition to such DNA damage products, we suggest possible gene inductions that can be used to characterize responses to different types of stresses i.e. radiation, oxidative and replication stress, based on bioinformatic approaches and stringent meta-analysis of literature data.

  13. The multifaceted influence of histone deacetylases on DNA damage signalling and DNA repair

    PubMed Central

    Roos, Wynand Paul; Krumm, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Histone/protein deacetylases play multiple roles in regulating gene expression and protein activation and stability. Their deregulation during cancer initiation and progression cause resistance to therapy. Here, we review the role of histone deacetylases (HDACs) and the NAD+ dependent sirtuins (SIRTs) in the DNA damage response (DDR). These lysine deacetylases contribute to DNA repair by base excision repair (BER), nucleotide excision repair (NER), mismatch repair (MMR), non-homologous end joining (NHEJ), homologous recombination (HR) and interstrand crosslink (ICL) repair. Furthermore, we discuss possible mechanisms whereby these histone/protein deacetylases facilitate the switch between DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair pathways, how SIRTs play a central role in the crosstalk between DNA repair and cell death pathways due to their dependence on NAD+, and the influence of small molecule HDAC inhibitors (HDACi) on cancer cell resistance to genotoxin based therapies. Throughout the review, we endeavor to identify the specific HDAC targeted by HDACi leading to therapy sensitization. PMID:27738139

  14. The production and repair of aflatoxin B sub 1 -induced DNA damage

    SciTech Connect

    Leadon, S.A.

    1990-05-01

    To investigate the influence of function or activity of a DNA sequence on its repair, we have studied excision repair of aflatoxin B{sub 1} (AFB{sub 1})-induced damage in the nontranscribed, heterochromatic alpha DNA of monkey cells and in the metallothionein genes of human cells. In confluent cells, AFB{sub 1} adducts are produced in similar frequencies in alpha and in the rest of the DNA, but removal from alpha DNA is severely deficient, however, removal of AFB{sub 1} adducts from alpha DNA is enhanced by small doses of UV. The repair deficiencies are not observed in actively growing cells. We have also shown that there is preferential repair of AFB{sub 1} damage in active genes. AFB{sub 1} damage is efficiently repaired in the active human metallothionein (hMT) genes, but deficiently repaired in inactive hMT genes. 51 refs., 3 tabs.

  15. A new compound, withangulatin A, promotes type II DNA topoisomerase-mediated DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Juang, J K; Huang, H W; Chen, C M; Liu, H J

    1989-03-31

    Withangulatin A, a new compound with a known chemical structure and from the antitumor Chinese herb Physalis angulata L, was found to act on topoisomerase II to induce topoisomerase II-mediated DNA damage in vitro. It has two effective dosage ranges of approximate 0.5 and 20 microM, with about one-third the activity of 20 microM VM-26.

  16. GSE4, a Small Dyskerin- and GSE24.2-Related Peptide, Induces Telomerase Activity, Cell Proliferation and Reduces DNA Damage, Oxidative Stress and Cell Senescence in Dyskerin Mutant Cells

    PubMed Central

    Iarriccio, Laura; Manguán-García, Cristina; Pintado-Berninches, Laura; Mancheño, José Miguel; Molina, Antonio; Perona, Rosario; Sastre, Leandro

    2015-01-01

    Dyskeratosis congenita is an inherited disease caused by mutations in genes coding for telomeric components. It was previously reported that expression of a dyskerin-derived peptide, GSE24.2, increases telomerase activity, regulates gene expression and decreases DNA damage and oxidative stress in dyskeratosis congenita patient cells. The biological activity of short peptides derived from GSE24.2 was tested and one of them, GSE4, that probed to be active, was further characterized in this article. Expression of this eleven amino acids long peptide increased telomerase activity and reduced DNA damage, oxidative stress and cell senescence in dyskerin-mutated cells. GSE4 expression also activated c-myc and TERT promoters and increase of c-myc, TERT and TERC expression. The level of biological activity of GSE4 was similar to that obtained by GSE24.2 expression. Incorporation of a dyskerin nuclear localization signal to GSE24.2 did not change its activity on promoter regulation and DNA damage protection. However, incorporation of a signal that increases the rate of nucleolar localization impaired GSE24.2 activity. Incorporation of the dyskerin nuclear localization signal to GSE4 did not alter its biological activity. Mutation of the Aspartic Acid residue that is conserved in the pseudouridine synthase domain present in GSE4 did not impair its activity, except for the repression of c-myc promoter activity and the decrease of c-myc, TERT and TERC gene expression in dyskerin-mutated cells. These results indicated that GSE4 could be of great therapeutic interest for treatment of dyskeratosis congenita patients. PMID:26571381

  17. Docosahexaenoic Acid Induces Oxidative DNA Damage and Apoptosis, and Enhances the Chemosensitivity of Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Song, Eun Ah; Kim, Hyeyoung

    2016-01-01

    The human diet contains low amounts of ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) and high amounts of ω-6 PUFAs, which has been reported to contribute to the incidence of cancer. Epidemiological studies have shown that a high consumption of fish oil or ω-3 PUFAs reduced the risk of colon, pancreatic, and endometrial cancers. The ω-3 PUFA, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), shows anticancer activity by inducing apoptosis of some human cancer cells without toxicity against normal cells. DHA induces oxidative stress and oxidative DNA adduct formation by depleting intracellular glutathione (GSH) and decreasing the mitochondrial function of cancer cells. Oxidative DNA damage and DNA strand breaks activate DNA damage responses to repair the damaged DNA. However, excessive DNA damage beyond the capacity of the DNA repair processes may initiate apoptotic signaling pathways and cell cycle arrest in cancer cells. DHA shows a variable inhibitory effect on cancer cell growth depending on the cells’ molecular properties and degree of malignancy. It has been shown to affect DNA repair processes including DNA-dependent protein kinases and mismatch repair in cancer cells. Moreover, DHA enhanced the efficacy of anticancer drugs by increasing drug uptake and suppressing survival pathways in cancer cells. In this review, DHA-induced oxidative DNA damage, apoptotic signaling, and enhancement of chemosensitivity in cancer cells will be discussed based on recent studies. PMID:27527148

  18. Oxidative and non-oxidative DNA damage and cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Malik, Qudsia; Herbert, Karl E

    2012-04-01

    Evidence for the association of DNA damage with cardiovascular disease has been obtained from in vitro cell culture models, experimental cardiovascular disease and analysis of samples obtained from humans with disease. There is general acceptance that several factors associated with the risk of developing cardiovascular disease cause oxidative damage to DNA in cell culture models with both nuclear and mitochondrial DNA as targets. Moreover, evidence obtained over the past 10 years points to a possible mechanistic role for DNA damage in experimental atherosclerosis culminating in recent studies challenging the assumption that DNA damage is merely a biomarker of the disease process. This kind of mechanistic insight provides a renewed impetus for further studies in this area.

  19. Single-step intercalating dye strategies for DNA damage studies.

    PubMed

    Paidipalli, Manasa; Pjescic, Ilija; Hindmarsh, Patrick L; Crews, Niel D

    2013-08-01

    Many analytical protocols exist for the quantification of varied types of DNA damage, which span a range of complexity and sensitivity. As an alternative or companion to existing procedures, this article demonstrates the application of quantitative PCR (qPCR) and high-resolution DNA melting analysis (HRMA) to the detection and quantification of intramolecular DNA damage and/or strand breaks. These proven molecular biology methods are essentially single-step processes. When implemented with a third-generation saturating DNA dye, high sensitivity can be obtained. The experiments presented here demonstrate how DNA damage can inhibit amplification of the affected molecules. This corresponding decrease in the initial concentration of amplifiable DNA can be measured with qPCR. In addition, damage in the form of intramolecular dimerization and strand breaks alters the stored energy in the hydrogen bonds between the two strands in the dsDNA molecule. This significantly affects the thermal stability, which can be measured with extreme precision using HRMA. Simplified damage models were used in these experiments: UV-C irradiation to produce photoproducts, and restriction enzyme digestion to simulate double-strand breaks. The findings of this work, however, can be intuitively applied to the broad scope of DNA damage mechanisms.

  20. DNA damage and repair after high LET radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Neill, Peter; Cucinotta, Francis; Anderson, Jennifer

    Predictions from biophysical models of interactions of radiation tracks with cellular DNA indicate that clustered DNA damage sites, defined as two or more lesions formed within one or two helical turns of the DNA by passage of a single radiation track, are formed in mammalian cells. These complex DNA damage sites are regarded as a signature of ionizing radiation exposure particularly as the likelihood of clustered damage sites arising endogenously is low. For instance, it was predicted from biophysical modelling that 30-40% of low LET-induced double strand breaks (DSB), a form of clustered damage, are complex with the yield increasing to >90% for high LET radiation, consistent with the reduced reparability of DSB with increasing ionization density of the radiation. The question arises whether the increased biological effects such as mutagenesis, carcinogenesis and lethality is in part related to DNA damage complexity and/or spatial distribution of the damage sites, which may lead to small DNA fragments. With particle radiation it is also important to consider not only delta-rays which may cause clustered damaged sites and may be highly mutagenic but the non-random spatial distribution of DSB which may lead to deletions. In this overview I will concentrate on the molecular aspects of the variation of the complexity of DNA damage on radiation quality and the challenges this complexity presents the DNA damage repair pathways. I will draw on data from micro-irradiations which indicate that the repair of DSBs by non-homologous end joining is highly regulated with pathway choice and kinetics of repair dependent on the chemical complexity of the DSB. In summary the aim is to emphasis the link between the spatial distribution of energy deposition events related to the track, the molecular products formed and the consequence of damage complexity contributing to biological effects and to present some of the outstanding molecular challenges with particle radiation.

  1. DNA damage tolerance pathway involving DNA polymerase ι and the tumor suppressor p53 regulates DNA replication fork progression

    PubMed Central

    Hampp, Stephanie; Kiessling, Tina; Buechle, Kerstin; Mansilla, Sabrina F.; Thomale, Jürgen; Rall, Melanie; Ahn, Jinwoo; Pospiech, Helmut; Gottifredi, Vanesa; Wiesmüller, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    DNA damage tolerance facilitates the progression of replication forks that have encountered obstacles on the template strands. It involves either translesion DNA synthesis initiated by proliferating cell nuclear antigen monoubiquitination or less well-characterized fork reversal and template switch mechanisms. Herein, we characterize a novel tolerance pathway requiring the tumor suppressor p53, the translesion polymerase ι (POLι), the ubiquitin ligase Rad5-related helicase-like transcription factor (HLTF), and the SWI/SNF catalytic subunit (SNF2) translocase zinc finger ran-binding domain containing 3 (ZRANB3). This novel p53 activity is lost in the exonuclease-deficient but transcriptionally active p53(H115N) mutant. Wild-type p53, but not p53(H115N), associates with POLι in vivo. Strikingly, the concerted action of p53 and POLι decelerates nascent DNA elongation and promotes HLTF/ZRANB3-dependent recombination during unperturbed DNA replication. Particularly after cross-linker–induced replication stress, p53 and POLι also act together to promote meiotic recombination enzyme 11 (MRE11)-dependent accumulation of (phospho-)replication protein A (RPA)-coated ssDNA. These results implicate a direct role of p53 in the processing of replication forks encountering obstacles on the template strand. Our findings define an unprecedented function of p53 and POLι in the DNA damage response to endogenous or exogenous replication stress. PMID:27407148

  2. Biomarkers of oxidative stress and DNA damage in agricultural workers: A pilot study

    SciTech Connect

    Muniz, Juan F. McCauley, Linda; Scherer, J.; Lasarev, M.; Koshy, M.; Kow, Y.W.; Nazar-Stewart, Valle; Kisby, G.E.

    2008-02-15

    Oxidative stress and DNA damage have been proposed as mechanisms linking pesticide exposure to health effects such as cancer and neurological diseases. A study of pesticide applicators and farmworkers was conducted to examine the relationship between organophosphate pesticide exposure and biomarkers of oxidative stress and DNA damage. Urine samples were analyzed for OP metabolites and 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OH-dG). Lymphocytes were analyzed for oxidative DNA repair activity and DNA damage (Comet assay), and serum was analyzed for lipid peroxides (i.e., malondialdehyde, MDA). Cellular damage in agricultural workers was validated using lymphocyte cell cultures. Urinary OP metabolites were significantly higher in farmworkers and applicators (p < 0.001) when compared to controls. 8-OH-dG levels were 8.5 times and 2.3 times higher in farmworkers or applicators (respectively) than in controls. Serum MDA levels were 4.9 times and 24 times higher in farmworkers or applicators (respectively) than in controls. DNA damage (Comet assay) and oxidative DNA repair were significantly greater in lymphocytes from applicators and farmworkers when compared with controls. Markers of oxidative stress (i.e., increased reactive oxygen species and reduced glutathione levels) and DNA damage were also observed in lymphocyte cell cultures treated with an OP. The findings from these in vivo and in vitro studies indicate that organophosphate pesticides induce oxidative stress and DNA damage in agricultural workers. These biomarkers may be useful for increasing our understanding of the link between pesticides and a number of health effects.

  3. Link between DNA damage and centriole disengagement/reduplication in untransformed human cells.

    PubMed

    Douthwright, Stephen; Sluder, Greenfield

    2014-10-01

    The radiation and radiomimetic drugs used to treat human tumors damage DNA in both cancer cells and normal proliferating cells. Centrosome amplification after DNA damage is well established for transformed cell types but is sparsely reported and not fully understood in untransformed cells. We characterize centriole behavior after DNA damage in synchronized untransformed human cells. One hour treatment of S phase cells with the radiomimetic drug, Doxorubicin, prolongs G2 by at least 72 h, though 14% of the cells eventually go through mitosis in that time. By 72 h after DNA damage we observe a 52% incidence of centriole disengagement plus a 10% incidence of extra centrioles. We find that either APC/C or Plk activities can disengage centrioles after DNA damage, though they normally work in concert. All disengaged centrioles are associated with γ-tubulin and maturation markers and thus, should in principle be capable of reduplicating and organizing spindle poles. The low incidence of reduplication of disengaged centrioles during G2 is due to the p53-dependent expression of p21 and the consequent loss of Cdk2 activity. We find that 26% of the cells going through mitosis after DNA damage contain disengaged or extra centrioles. This could produce genomic instability through transient or persistent spindle multipolarity. Thus, for cancer patients the use of DNA damaging therapies raises the chances of genomic instability and evolution of transformed characteristics in proliferating normal cell populations.

  4. Olaquindox induces DNA damage via the lysosomal and mitochondrial pathway involving ROS production and p53 activation in HEK293 cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; Jiang, Liping; She, Yan; Chen, Min; Li, Qiujuan; Yang, Guang; Geng, Chengyan; Tang, Liyun; Zhong, Laifu; Jiang, Lijie; Liu, Xiaofang

    2015-11-01

    Olaquindox (OLA) is a potent antibacterial agent used as a feed additive and growth promoter. In this study, the genotoxic potential of OLA was investigated in the human embryonic kidney cell line 293 (HEK293). Results showed that OLA caused significant increases of DNA migration. Lysosomal membrane permeability and mitochondrial membrane potential were reduced after treatment with OLA. OLA was shown to induce ROS production and GSH depletion. The expression of p53 protein is increased in cells incubated with OLA. The activation of p53 and ATM gene was assessed by exposure to OLA. Furthermore, NAC reduced DNA migration, ROS formation, GSH depletion and the expression of the p53 protein and gene. And desipramine significantly decreased AO fluorescence intensity and the expression of the p53 protein and gene. These results support the assumption that OLA exerted genotoxic effects and induced DNA strand breaks in HEK293 cells, possibly through lysosomal-mitochondrial pathway involving ROS production and p53 activation.

  5. Inducible repair of oxidative DNA damage in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Demple, B; Halbrook, J

    Hydrogen peroxide is lethal to many cell types, including the bacterium Escherichia coli. Peroxides yield transient radical species that can damage DNA and cause mutations. Such partially reduced oxygen species are occasionally released during cellular respiration and are generated by lethal and mutagenic ionizing radiation. Because cells live in an environment where the threat of oxidative DNA damage is continual, cellular mechanisms may have evolved to avoid and repair this damage. Enzymes are known which evidently perform these functions. We report here that resistance to hydrogen peroxide toxicity can be induced in E. coli, that this novel induction is specific and occurs, in part, at the level of DNA repair.

  6. Superoxide and the production of oxidative DNA damage.

    PubMed Central

    Keyer, K; Gort, A S; Imlay, J A

    1995-01-01

    The conventional model of oxidative DNA damage posits a role for superoxide (O2-) as a reductant for iron, which subsequently generates a hydroxyl radical by transferring the electron to H2O2. The hydroxyl radical then attacks DNA. Indeed, mutants of Escherichia coli that lack superoxide dismutase (SOD) were 10-fold more vulnerable to DNA oxidation by H2O2 than were wild-type cells. Even the pace of DNA damage by endogenous oxidants was great enough that the SOD mutants could not tolerate air if enzymes that repair oxidative DNA lesions were inactive. However, DNA oxidation proceeds in SOD-proficient cells without the involvement of O2-, as evidenced by the failure of SOD overproduction or anaerobiosis to suppress damage by H2O2. Furthermore, the mechanism by which excess O2- causes damage was called into question when the hypersensitivity of SOD mutants to DNA damage persisted for at least 20 min after O2- had been dispelled through the imposition of anaerobiosis. That behavior contradicted the standard model, which requires that O2- be present to rereduce cellular iron during the period of exposure to H2O2. Evidently, DNA oxidation is driven by a reductant other than O2-, which leaves the mechanism of damage promotion by O2- unsettled. One possibility is that, through its well-established ability to leach iron from iron-sulfur clusters, O2- increases the amount of free iron that is available to catalyze hydroxyl radical production. Experiments with iron transport mutants confirmed that increases in free-iron concentration have the effect of accelerating DNA oxidation. Thus, O2- may be genotoxic only in doses that exceed those found in SOD-proficient cells, and in those limited circumstances it may promote DNA damage by increasing the amount of DNA-bound iron. PMID:7592468

  7. A fluorescence enhancement assay for cellular DNA damage. [X Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kanter, P.M.; Schwartz, H.S.

    1982-07-01

    A fluorescence procedure is described for quantitative measurement of DNA damage in mammalian cells. The technique is based upon the time-dependent partial alkaline unwinding of cellular DNA followed by determination of duplex:total DNA ratios with bisbenzamide, which has a differential molar fluorescence with single-stranded and duplex DNA. The method is rapid, does not require radioactive labeling of DNA, and is sufficiently sensitive to detect damage induced with 100 rads of X-irradiation. This method is standardized with respect to the alkaline unwinding unit, Mn0, and the unwinding constant, beta. Results obtained with this new technique and with hydroxylapatite chromatography for physical separation of single- and double-stranded DNA were confirmatory. The utility of the technique was demonstrated by detection of dose-related damage with X-irradiation and a variety of antineoplastic agents in unlabeled murine leukemia cells.

  8. Radiation-induced DNA damage and chromatin structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rydberg, B.; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    DNA lesions induced by ionizing radiation in cells are clustered and not randomly distributed. For low linear energy transfer (LET) radiation this clustering occurs mainly on the small scales of DNA molecules and nucleosomes. For example, experimental evidence suggests that both strands of DNA on the nucleosomal surface can be damaged in single events and that this damage occurs with a 10-bp modulation because of protection by histones. For high LET radiation, clustering also occurs on a larger scale and depends on chromatin organization. A particularly significant clustering occurs when an ionizing particle traverses the 30 nm chromatin fiber with generation of heavily damaged DNA regions with an average size of about 2 kbp. On an even larger scale, high LET radiation can produce several DNA double-strand breaks in closer proximity than expected from randomness. It is suggested that this increases the probability of misrejoining of DNA ends and generation of lethal chromosome aberrations.

  9. Modification of tumour cell metabolism modulates sensitivity to Chk1 inhibitor-induced DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Massey, Andrew J.

    2017-01-01

    Chk1 kinase inhibitors are currently under clinical investigation as potentiators of cytotoxic chemotherapy and demonstrate potent activity in combination with anti-metabolite drugs that increase replication stress through the inhibition of nucleotide or deoxyribonucleotide biosynthesis. Inhibiting other metabolic pathways critical for the supply of building blocks necessary to support DNA replication may lead to increased DNA damage and synergy with an inhibitor of Chk1. A screen of small molecule metabolism modulators identified combinatorial activity between a Chk1 inhibitor and chloroquine or the LDHA/LDHB inhibitor GSK 2837808A. Compounds, such as 2-deoxyglucose or 6-aminonicotinamide, that reduced the fraction of cells undergoing active replication rendered tumour cells more resistant to Chk1 inhibitor-induced DNA damage. Withdrawal of glucose or glutamine induced G1 and G2/M arrest without increasing DNA damage and reduced Chk1 expression and activation through autophosphorylation. This suggests the expression and activation of Chk1 kinase is associated with cells undergoing active DNA replication. Glutamine starvation rendered tumour cells more resistant to Chk1 inhibitor-induced DNA damage and reversal of the glutamine starvation restored the sensitivity of tumour cells to Chk1 inhibitor-induced DNA damage. Chk1 inhibitors may be a potentially useful therapeutic treatment for patients whose tumours contain a high fraction of replicating cells. PMID:28106079

  10. Oxidatively induced DNA damage and its repair in cancer.

    PubMed

    Dizdaroglu, Miral

    2015-01-01

    Oxidatively induced DNA damage is caused in living organisms by endogenous and exogenous reactive species. DNA lesions resulting from this type of damage are mutagenic and cytotoxic and, if not repaired, can cause genetic instability that may lead to disease processes including carcinogenesis. Living organisms possess DNA repair mechanisms that include a variety of pathways to repair multiple DNA lesions. Mutations and polymorphisms also occur in DNA repair genes adversely affecting DNA repair systems. Cancer tissues overexpress DNA repair proteins and thus develop greater DNA repair capacity than normal tissues. Increased DNA repair in tumors that removes DNA lesions before they become toxic is a major mechanism for development of resistance to therapy, affecting patient survival. Accumulated evidence suggests that DNA repair capacity may be a predictive biomarker for patient response to therapy. Thus, knowledge of DNA protein expressions in normal and cancerous tissues may help predict and guide development of treatments and yield the best therapeutic response. DNA repair proteins constitute targets for inhibitors to overcome the resistance of tumors to therapy. Inhibitors of DNA repair for combination therapy or as single agents for monotherapy may help selectively kill tumors, potentially leading to personalized therapy. Numerous inhibitors have been developed and are being tested in clinical trials. The efficacy of some inhibitors in therapy has been demonstrated in patients. Further development of inhibitors of DNA repair proteins is globally underway to help eradicate cancer.

  11. Hypersensitivity to DNA damage in antephase as a safeguard for genome stability

    PubMed Central

    Feringa, Femke M.; Krenning, Lenno; Koch, André; van den Berg, Jeroen; van den Broek, Bram; Jalink, Kees; Medema, René H.

    2016-01-01

    Activation of the DNA-damage response can lead to the induction of an arrest at various stages in the cell cycle. These arrests are reversible in nature, unless the damage is too excessive. Here we find that checkpoint reversibility is lost in cells that are in very late G2, but not yet fully committed to enter mitosis (antephase). We show that antephase cells exit the cell cycle and enter senescence at levels of DNA damage that induce a reversible arrest in early G2. We show that checkpoint reversibility critically depends on the presence of the APC/C inhibitor Emi1, which is degraded just before mitosis. Importantly, ablation of the cell cycle withdrawal mechanism in antephase promotes cell division in the presence of broken chromosomes. Thus, our data uncover a novel, but irreversible, DNA-damage response in antephase that is required to prevent the propagation of DNA damage during cell division. PMID:27561326

  12. LOX-1, oxidant stress, mtDNA damage, autophagy, and immune response in atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Ding, Zufeng; Liu, Shijie; Wang, Xianwei; Dai, Yao; Khaidakov, Magomed; Romeo, Francesco; Mehta, Jawahar L

    2014-07-01

    As a major receptor for oxidized low density lipoprotein (ox-LDL), lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 (LOX-1) is upregulated in many pathophysiological events, including endothelial cell dysfunction and smooth muscle cell growth, as well as monocyte migration and transformation into foam cells, which are present in atherosclerosis and myocardial ischemia. Excessive production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) increases LOX-1 expression, induces mitochondrial DNA damage, and activates autophagy. Damaged mitochondrial DNA that escapes from autophagy induces an inflammatory response. This paper reviews the potential link between LOX-1, mitochondrial DNA damage, autophagy, and immune response in atherosclerosis.

  13. Detection and quantitation of single nucleotide polymorphisms, DNA sequence variations, DNA mutations, DNA damage and DNA mismatches

    DOEpatents

    McCutchen-Maloney, Sandra L.

    2002-01-01

    DNA mutation binding proteins alone and as chimeric proteins with nucleases are used with solid supports to detect DNA sequence variations, DNA mutations and single nucleotide polymorphisms. The solid supports may be flow cytometry beads, DNA chips, glass slides or DNA dips sticks. DNA molecules are coupled to solid supports to form DNA-support complexes. Labeled DNA is used with unlabeled DNA mutation binding proteins such at TthMutS to detect DNA sequence variations, DNA mutations and single nucleotide length polymorphisms by binding which gives an increase in signal. Unlabeled DNA is utilized with labeled chimeras to detect DNA sequence variations, DNA mutations and single nucleotide length polymorphisms by nuclease activity of the chimera which gives a decrease in signal.

  14. Interplay between DNA tumor viruses and the host DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    McFadden, Karyn; Luftig, Micah A

    2013-01-01

    Viruses encounter many challenges within host cells in order to replicate their nucleic acid. In the case of DNA viruses, one challenge that must be overcome is recognition of viral DNA structures by the host DNA damage response (DDR) machinery. This is accomplished in elegant and unique ways by different viruses as each has specific needs and sensitivities dependent on its life cycle. In this review, we focus on three DNA tumor viruses and their interactions with the DDR. The viruses Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), and human papillomavirus (HPV) account for nearly all of the virus-associated human cancers worldwide. These viruses have also been excellent models for the study of oncogenic virus-mediated cell transformation. In this review, we will discuss how each of these viruses engage and subvert aspects of the host DDR. The first level of DDR engagement is a result of the genetic linkage between the oncogenic potential of these viruses and their ability to replicate. Namely, the promotion of cells from quiescence into the cell cycle to facilitate virus replication can be sensed through aberrant cellular DNA replication structures which activate the DDR and hinder cell transformation. DNA tumor viruses subvert this growth-suppressive DDR through changes in viral oncoprotein expression which ultimately facilitate virus replication. An additional level of DDR engagement is through direct detection of replicating viral DNA. These interactions parallel those observed in other DNA virus systems in that the need to subvert these intrinsic sensors of aberrant DNA structure in order to replicate must be in place. DNA tumor viruses are no exception. This review will cover the molecular features of DNA tumor virus interactions with the host DDR and the consequences for virus replication.

  15. Global chromatin fibre compaction in response to DNA damage

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, Charlotte; Hayward, Richard L.; Gilbert, Nick

    2011-11-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Robust KAP1 phosphorylation in response to DNA damage in HCT116 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DNA repair foci are found in soluble chromatin. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Biophysical analysis reveals global chromatin fibre compaction after DNA damage. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DNA damage is accompanied by rapid linker histone dephosphorylation. -- Abstract: DNA is protected by packaging it into higher order chromatin fibres, but this can impede nuclear processes like DNA repair. Despite considerable research into the factors required for signalling and repairing DNA damage, it is unclear if there are concomitant changes in global chromatin fibre structure. In human cells DNA double strand break (DSB) formation triggers a signalling cascade resulting in H2AX phosphorylation ({gamma}H2AX), the rapid recruitment of chromatin associated proteins and the subsequent repair of damaged sites. KAP1 is a transcriptional corepressor and in HCT116 cells we found that after DSB formation by chemicals or ionising radiation there was a wave of, predominantly ATM dependent, KAP1 phosphorylation. Both KAP1 and phosphorylated KAP1 were readily extracted from cells indicating they do not have a structural role and {gamma}H2AX was extracted in soluble chromatin indicating that sites of damage are not attached to an underlying structural matrix. After DSB formation we did not find a concomitant change in the sensitivity of chromatin fibres to micrococcal nuclease digestion. Therefore to directly investigate higher order chromatin fibre structures we used a biophysical sedimentation technique based on sucrose gradient centrifugation to compare the conformation of chromatin fibres isolated from cells before and after DNA DSB formation. After damage we found global chromatin fibre compaction, accompanied by rapid linker histone dephosphorylation, consistent with fibres being more regularly folded or fibre deformation being stabilized by

  16. Bayesian estimation of sequence damage in ancient DNA.

    PubMed

    Ho, Simon Y W; Heupink, Tim H; Rambaut, Andrew; Shapiro, Beth

    2007-06-01

    DNA extracted from archaeological and paleontological remains is usually damaged by biochemical processes postmortem. Some of these processes lead to changes in the structure of the DNA molecule, which can result in the incorporation of incorrect nucleotides during polymerase chain reaction. These base misincorporations, or miscoding lesions, can lead to the inclusion of spurious additional mutations in ancient DNA (aDNA) data sets. This has the potential to affect the outcome of phylogenetic and population genetic analyses, including estimates of mutation rates and genetic diversity. We present a novel model, termed the delta model, which estimates the amount of damage in DNA data and accounts for its effects in a Bayesian phylogenetic framework. The ability of the delta model to estimate damage is first investigated using a simulation study. The model is then applied to 13 aDNA data sets. The amount of damage in these data sets is shown to be significant but low (about 1 damaged base per 750 nt), suggesting that precautions for limiting the influence of damaged sites, such as cloning and enzymatic treatment, are worthwhile. The results also suggest that relatively high rates of mutation previously estimated from aDNA data are not entirely an artifact of sequence damage and are likely to be due to other factors such as the persistence of transient polymorphisms. The delta model appears to be particularly useful for placing upper credibility limits on the amount of sequence damage in an alignment, and this capacity might be beneficial for future aDNA studies or for the estimation of sequencing errors in modern DNA.

  17. Clusters of DNA damage induced by ionizing radiation: formation of short DNA fragments. II. Experimental detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rydberg, B.; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    The basic 30-nm chromatin fiber in the mammalian cell consists of an unknown (possibly helical) arrangement of nucleosomes, with about 1.2 kb of DNA per 10-nm length of fiber. Track-structure considerations suggest that interactions of single delta rays or high-LET particles with the chromatin fiber might result in the formation of multiple lesions spread over a few kilobases of DNA (see the accompanying paper: W.R. Holley and A. Chatterjee, Radiat. Res. 145, 188-199, 1996). In particular, multiple DNA double-strand breaks and single-strand breaks may form. To test this experimentally, primary human fibroblasts were labeled with [3H]thymidine and exposed at 0 degrees C to X rays or accelerated nitrogen or iron ions in the LET range of 97-440 keV/microns. DNA was isolated inside agarose plugs and subjected to agarose gel electrophoresis under conditions that allowed good separation of 0.1-2 kb size DNA. The bulk of DNA remained in the well or migrated only a small distance into the gel. It was found that DNA fragments in the expected size range were formed linearly with dose with an efficiency that increased with LET. A comparison of the yield of such fragments with the yield of total DNA double-strand breaks suggests that for the high-LET ions a substantial proportion (20-90%) of DNA double-strand breaks are accompanied within 0.1-2 kb by at least one additional DNA double-strand break. It is shown that these results are in good agreement with theoretical calculations based on treating the 30-nm chromatin fiber as the target for ionizing particles. Theoretical considerations also predict that the clusters will contain numerous single-strand breaks and base damages. It is proposed that such clusters be designated "regionally multiply damaged sites." Postirradiation incubation at 37 degrees C resulted in a decline in the number of short DNA fragments, suggesting a repair activity. The biological significance of regionally multiply damaged sites is presently unknown.

  18. Clusters of DNA damage induced by ionizing radiation: Formation of short DNA fragments. II. Experimental detection

    SciTech Connect

    Rydberg, B.

    1996-02-01

    The basic 30-nm chromatin fiber in the mammalian cell consists of an unknown (possibly helical) arrangement of nucleosomes, with about 1.2 kb of DNA per 10-nm length of fiber. Track-structure considerations suggest that interactions of single {delta} rays or high-LET particles with the chromatin fiber might result in the formation of multiple lesions spread over a few kilobases of DNA. In particular, multiple DNA double-strand breaks and single-strand breaks may form. To test this experimentally, primary human fibroblasts were labeled with [{sup 3}H]thymidine and exposed at 0{degrees}C to X rays or accelerated nitrogen or iron ions in the LET range of 97-440 keV/pm. DNA was isolated inside agarose plugs and subjected to agarose gel electrophoresis under conditions that allowed good separation of 0.1-2 kb size DNA. The bulk of DNA remained in the well or migrated only a small distance into the gel. It was found that DNA fragments in the expected size range were formed linearly with dose with an efficiency that increased with LET. A comparison of the yield of such fragments with the yield of total DNA double-strand breaks suggests that for the high-LET ions a substantial proportion (20-90%) of DNA double-strand breaks are accompanied within 0.1-2 kb by at least one additional DNA double-strand break. It is shown that these results are in good agreement with theoretical calculations based on treating the 30-nm chromatin fiber as the target for ionizing particles. Theoretical considerations also predict that the clusters will contain numerous single-strand breaks and base damages. It is proposed that such clusters be designated {open_quotes}regionally multiply damaged sites.{close_quotes} Postirradiation incubation at 37{degrees}C resulted in a decline in the number of short DNA fragments, suggesting a repair activity. The biological significance of regionally multiply damaged sites is presently unknown. 34 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Commentary: Mitochondrial DNA damage and loss in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Gilkerson, Robert

    2016-10-01

    This commentary discusses damage and loss of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in type 2 diabetes mellitus from both the clinical and experimental perspectives. Increasingly, an array of studies in experimental models and patients suggests that the cellular stresses of insulin resistance in type 2 diabetes damage mtDNA, leading to loss of mitochondrial genetic content. As such, mtDNA is emerging as both a valuable monitoring tool and translational preventive target for metabolic disease. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Electrochemical study of DNA damaged by oxidation stress.

    PubMed

    Zitka, Ondrej; Krizkova, Sona; Skalickova, Sylvie; Kopel, Pavel; Babula, Petr; Adam, Vojtech; Kizek, Rene

    2013-02-01

    Many compounds can interact with DNA leading to changes of DNA structure as point mutation and bases excision, which could trigger some metabolic failures, which leads to the changes in DNA structure resulting in cancer. Oxidation of nucleic acid bases belongs to the one of the mostly occurred type of DNA damaging leading to the above mentioned phenomena. The investigation of processes of DNA oxidation damage is topical and electrochemical methods include a versatile and sensitive tool for these purposes. 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) is the most widely accepted marker of DNA damage. Oxidative damage to DNA by free radicals and exposure to ionizing radiation generate several other products within the double helix besides mentioned oxidation products of nucleic acid bases. The basic electrochemical behaviour of nucleic acids bases on various types of carbon electrodes is reviewed. Further, we address our attention on description of oxidation mechanisms and on detection of the most important products of nucleic bases oxidation. The miniaturization of detector coupled with some microfluidic devices is suggested and discussed. The main aim of this review is to report the advantages and features of the electrochemical detection of guanine oxidation product as 8-OHdG and other similarly produced molecules as markers for DNA damage.

  1. Chemopreventive activity of compounds extracted from Casearia sylvestris (Salicaceae) Sw against DNA damage induced by particulate matter emitted by sugarcane burning near Araraquara, Brazil

    SciTech Connect

    Prieto, A.M.; Santos, A.G.; Csipak, A.R.; Caliri, C.M.; Silva, I.C.; Arbex, M.A.; Silva, F.S.; Marchi, M.R.R.

    2012-12-15

    Ethanolic extract of Casearia sylvestris is thought to be antimutagenic. In this study, we attempted to determine whether this extract and casearin X (a clerodane diterpene from C. sylvestris) are protective against the harmful effects of airborne pollutants from sugarcane burning. To that end, we used the Tradescantia micronucleus test in meiotic pollen cells of Tradescantia pallida, the micronucleus test in mouse bone marrow cells, and the comet assay in mouse blood cells. The mutagenic compound was total suspended particulate (TSP) from air. For the Tradescantia micronucleus test, T. pallida cuttings were treated with the extract at 0.13, 0.25, or 0.50 mg/ml. Subsequently, TSP was added at 0.3 mg/ml, and tetrads from the inflorescences were examined for micronuclei. For the micronucleus test in mouse bone marrow cells and the comet assay in mouse blood cells, Balb/c mice were treated for 15 days with the extract—3.9, 7.5, or 15.0 mg/kg body weight (BW)—or with casearin X—0.3, 0.25, or 1.2 mg/kg BW—after which they received TSP (3.75 mg/kg BW). In T. pallida and mouse bone marrow cells, the extract was antimutagenic at all concentrations tested. In mouse blood cells, the extract was antigenotoxic at all concentrations, whereas casearin X was not antimutagenic but was antigenotoxic at all concentrations. We conclude that C. sylvestris ethanolic extract and casearin X protect DNA from damage induced by airborne pollutants from sugarcane burning. -- Highlights: ► We assessed DNA protection of C. sylvestris ethanolic extract. ► We assessed DNA protection of casearin X. ► We used Tradescantia pallida micronucleus test as screening. ► We used comet assay and micronucleus test in mice. ► The compounds protected DNA against sugar cane burning pollutants.

  2. ARRB1 enhances the chemosensitivity of lung cancer through the mediation of DNA damage response

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Hongchang; Wang, Liguang; Zhang, Jiangang; Dong, Wei; Zhang, Tiehong; Ni, Yang; Cao, Hongxin; Wang, Kai; Li, Yun; Wang, Yibing; Du, Jiajun

    2017-01-01

    ARRB1 (also known as β-arrestin-1) serves as a multifunctional adaptor contributing to the regulation of signaling pathways. ARRB1 may be involved in DNA damage accumulation; however the underlying mechanism involved is unclear. In the present study, non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines (H520 and SK-MES-1) were transfected with ARRB1 plasmids or small interfering ribonucleic acid (siRNA) and received treatment with DNA-damaging agents (cisplatin and etoposide). A mouse xenograft model was used to assess the impact of ARRB1 on the efficacy of cisplatin in vivo. A total of 30 surgically resected NSCLC patients were recruited for the present study and qRT-PCR was performed to determine the mRNA levels in cancer tissues compared with para-carcinoma tissues. Our data showed that DNA damage was abrogated in the ARRB1-knockdown cells and enhanced in the ARRB1-overexpressing cells. ATR and Chk1 were more activated in the ARRB1-overexpressing cells compared to the ARRB1-knockdown cells, followed by increased H2AX phosphorylation. DNA damage and apoptosis were increased in the ARRB1-overexpressing cells treated with cisplatin. These data provided strong evidence that ARRB1 contributes to the response of NSCLC to DNA-damaging agents and is essential for DNA damage response (DDR). ARRB1 may enhance the efficacy of DNA-damaging agents in NSCLC. PMID:28035404

  3. Carbamate insecticide methomyl confers cytotoxicity through DNA damage induction.

    PubMed

    Guanggang, Xiang; Diqiu, Li; Jianzhong, Yuan; Jingmin, Guan; Huifeng, Zhai; Mingan, Shi; Liming, Tao

    2013-03-01

    Carbamate insecticide methomyl could induce genotoxic effects, including micronuclei, chromosome aberrations and sister-chromatid exchanges. However, methomyl induction of cytotoxicity through DNA damage is largely unknown. Here we identify cytotoxicity and potential genotoxicity of methomyl in vitro. We have employed alkaline comet assay, γH2AX foci formation and DNA ladder assay to detected DNA damage and apoptosis of Drosophila S2, HeLa and HEK293 cells. The alkaline comet assay was used to evaluate total DNA single strand breaks (SSBs) in the target cells exposed in vitro to sublethal concentrations of methomyl. As expected, methomyl induced significant concentration-dependent increases in DNA damage of target cells compared with the negative control, as measured by increases in tail length (μm), tail DNA (percentage of the comet tail) and tail moment (arbitrary units). In agreement with the comet assay data, the percentage of γH2AX positive reaction in HeLa cells also revealed methomyl caused DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) in a time-dependent manner. Moreover, methomyl induced a significant increase of apoptosis in Drosophila S2, HeLa and HEK293 cells in a concentration- and time-dependent manner, as determined by Urea PAGE DNA fragmentation analysis. In conclusion, methomyl is a strongly genotoxic agent that induces cell DNA damage and apoptosis in vitro at these sublethal concentrations.

  4. Mechanisms of mutagenesis: DNA replication in the presence of DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Binyan; Xue, Qizhen; Tang, Yong; Cao, Jia; Guengerich, F. Peter; Zhang, Huidong

    2017-01-01

    Environmental mutagens cause DNA damage that disturbs replication and produces mutations, leading to cancer and other diseases. We discuss mechanisms of mutagenesis resulting from DNA damage, from the level of DNA replication by a single polymerase to the complex DNA replisome of some typical model organisms (including bacteriophage T7, T4, Sulfolobus solfataricus, E. coli, yeast and human). For a single DNA polymerase, DNA damage can affect replication in three major ways: reducing replication fidelity, causing frameshift mutations, and blocking replication. For the DNA replisome, protein interactions and the functions of accessory proteins can yield rather different results even with a single DNA polymerase. The mechanism of mutation during replication performed by the DNA replisome is a long-standing question. Using new methods and techniques, the replisomes of certain organisms and human cell extracts can now be investigated with regard to the bypass of DNA damage. In this review, we consider the molecular mechanism of mutagenesis resulting from DNA damage in replication at the levels of single DNA polymerases and complex DNA replisomes, including translesion DNA synthesis. PMID:27234563

  5. Assessment of the significance of mitochondrial DNA damage by chemotherapeutic agents.

    PubMed

    Lo, Soo; Tolner, Berend; Taanman, Jan-Willem; Cooper, J Mark; Gu, Mei; Hartley, John A; Schapira, Anthony H V; Hochhauser, Daniel

    2005-08-01

    The pathways which are activated following damage to nuclear DNA in cancer cells are well understood. There is evidence that treatment with several chemotherapeutic agents may result in damage to mitochondrial DNA. This study investigated the contribution of mitochondrial DNA to cytotoxicity of DNA-interactive agents. To understand the significance of drug interactions with mitochondrial DNA, we investigated A549 non-small cell lung cancer cell lines and their rho0 derivatives in which mitochondrial DNA has been eradicated. The parental cell line showed increased sensitivity to the anthracycline daunorubicin when compared with the A549 rho0 line. In addition, the A549 rho0 line was resistant to the rhodacyanine derivative, MKT-077, which has been shown to interact with mitochondrial DNA. Southern blotting demonstrated that MKT-077 mediated damage to mitochondrial but not nuclear DNA. Restoration of mitochondrial DNA by formation of cybrids restored sensitivity to these agents. The mitochondrial DNA damage, following treatment of A549 rho0 cells with MKT-077, resulted in G2 arrest which was not mediated by expression of p53. Mitochondrial DNA is a critical target for MKT-077 and daunorubicin, and is a potential target for novel chemotherapeutic agents.

  6. Increasing sensitivity to DNA damage is a potential driver for human ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Yimei; Xu, Xin; Wang, Xuemeng; Kuang, Henry; Osterman, Michael; Feng, Shi; Han, Deqiang; Wu, Yu; Li, Mo; Guo, Hongyan

    2016-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is one of the most common cancers among women, accounting for more deaths than any other gynecological diseases. However, the survival rate for ovarian cancer has not essentially improved over the past thirty years. Thus, to understand the molecular mechanism of ovarian tumorigenesis is important for optimizing the early diagnosis and treating this disease. In this study, we observed obvious DNA lesions, especially DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) accompanying cell cycle checkpoint activation, in the human epithelial ovarian cancer samples, which could be due to the impaired DNA response machinery. Following this line, we found that these DNA damage response-deficient primary cancer cells were hypersensitive to DNA damage and lost their ability to repair the DNA breaks, leading to genomic instability. Of note, three key DNA damage response factors, RNF8, Ku70, and FEN1 exhibited dramatically decreased expression level, implying the dysfunctional DNA repair pathways. Re-expression of wild type RNF8, Ku70, or FEN1 in these cells restored the DNA lesions and also partially rescued the cells from death. Our current study therefore proposes that accumulated DNA lesions might be a potential driver of ovarian cancer and the impaired DNA damage responders could be the targets for clinical treatment. PMID:27391345

  7. Sam68 Is Required for DNA Damage Responses via Regulating Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation

    PubMed Central

    Hodgson, Andrea; Wier, Eric M.; Wen, Matthew G.; Kamenyeva, Olena; Xia, Xue; Koo, Lily Y.

    2016-01-01

    The rapid and robust synthesis of polymers of adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-ribose (PAR) chains, primarily catalyzed by poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1), is crucial for cellular responses to DNA damage. However, the precise mechanisms through which PARP1 is activated and PAR is robustly synthesized are not fully understood. Here, we identified Src-associated substrate during mitosis of 68 kDa (Sam68) as a novel signaling molecule in DNA damage responses (DDRs). In the absence of Sam68, DNA damage-triggered PAR production and PAR-dependent DNA repair signaling were dramatically diminished. With serial cellular and biochemical assays, we demonstrated that Sam68 is recruited to and significantly overlaps with PARP1 at DNA lesions and that the interaction between Sam68 and PARP1 is crucial for DNA damage-initiated and PARP1-conferred PAR production. Utilizing cell lines and knockout mice, we illustrated that Sam68-deleted cells and animals are hypersensitive to genotoxicity caused by DNA-damaging agents. Together, our findings suggest that Sam68 plays a crucial role in DDR via regulating DNA damage-initiated PAR production. PMID:27635653

  8. Hyperglycemia Differentially Affects Maternal and Fetal DNA Integrity and DNA Damage Response

    PubMed Central

    Moreli, Jusciele B.; Santos, Janine H.; Lorenzon-Ojea, Aline Rodrigues; Corrêa-Silva, Simone; Fortunato, Rodrigo S.; Rocha, Clarissa Ribeiro; Rudge, Marilza V.; Damasceno, Débora C.; Bevilacqua, Estela; Calderon, Iracema M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Investigate the DNA damage and its cellular response in blood samples from both mother and the umbilical cord of pregnancies complicated by hyperglycemia. Methods: A total of 144 subjects were divided into 4 groups: normoglycemia (ND; 46 cases), mild gestational hyperglycemia (MGH; 30 cases), gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM; 45 cases) and type-2 diabetes mellitus (DM2; 23 cases). Peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) isolation and/or leukocytes from whole maternal and umbilical cord blood were obtained from all groups at delivery. Nuclear and mitochondrial DNA damage were measured by gene-specific quantitative PCR, and the expression of mRNA and proteins involved in the base excision repair (BER) pathway were assessed by real-time qPCR and Western blot, respectively. Apoptosis was measured in vitro experiments by caspase 3/7 activity and ATP levels. Results: GDM and DM2 groups were characterized by an increase in oxidative stress biomarkers, an increase in nuclear and mitochondrial DNA damage, and decreased expression of mRNA (APE1, POLβ and FEN1) and proteins (hOGG1, APE1) involved in BER. The levels of hyperglycemia were associated with the in vitro apoptosis pathway. Blood levels of DNA damage in umbilical cord were similar among the groups. Newborns of diabetic mothers had increased expression of BER mRNA (APE1, POLβ and FEN1) and proteins (hOGG1, APE1, POLβ and FEN1). A diabetes-like environment was unable to induce apoptosis in the umbilical cord blood cells. Conclusions: Our data show relevant asymmetry between maternal and fetal blood cell susceptibility to DNA damage and apoptosis induction. Maternal cells seem to be more predisposed to changes in an adverse glucose environment. This may be due to differential ability in upregulating multiple genes involved in the activation of DNA repair response, especially the BER mechanism. However if this study shows a more effective adaptive response by the fetal organism, it also calls for

  9. Oxidative DNA damage and repair in teratogenesis and neurodevelopmental deficits.

    PubMed

    Wells, Peter G; McCallum, Gordon P; Lam, Kyla C H; Henderson, Jeffrey T; Ondovcik, Stephanie L

    2010-06-01

    Several teratogenic agents, including ionizing radiation and xenobiotics such as phenytoin, benzo[a]pyrene, thalidomide, and methamphetamine, can initiate the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that oxidatively damage cellular macromolecules including DNA. Oxidative DNA damage, and particularly the most prevalent 8-oxoguanine lesion, may adversely affect development, likely via alterations in gene transcription rather than via a mutational mechanism. Contributions from oxidative DNA damage do not exclude roles for alternative mechanisms of initiation like receptor-mediated processes or the formation of covalent xenobiotic-macromolecular adducts, damage to other macromolecular targets like proteins and lipids, and other effects of ROS like altered signal transduction. Even in the absence of teratogen exposure, endogenous developmental oxidative stress can have embryopathic consequences in the absence of key pathways for detoxifying ROS or repairing DNA damage. Critical proteins in pathways for DNA damage detection/repair signaling, like p53 and ataxia telangiectasia mutated, and DNA repair itself, like oxoguanine glycosylase 1 and Cockayne syndrome B, can often, but not always, protect the embryo from ROS-initiating teratogens. Protection may be variably dependent upon such factors as the nature of the teratogen and its concentration within the embryo, the stage of development, the species, strain, gender, target tissue and cell type, among other factors.

  10. Host DNA damage response facilitates African swine fever virus infection.

    PubMed

    Simões, Margarida; Martins, Carlos; Ferreira, Fernando

    2013-07-26

    Studies with different viral infection models on virus interactions with the host cell nucleus have opened new perspectives on our understanding of the molecular basis of these interactions in African swine fever virus (ASFV) infection. The present study aims to characterize the host DNA damage response (DDR) occurring upon in vitro infection with the ASFV-Ba71V isolate. We evaluated protein levels during ASFV time-course infection, of several signalling cascade factors belonging to DDR pathways involved in double strand break repair - Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated (ATM), ATM-Rad 3 related (ATR) and DNA dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs). DDR inhibitory trials using caffeine and wortmannin and ATR inducible-expression cell lines were used to confirm specific pathway activation during viral infection. Our results show that ASFV specifically elicits ATR-mediated pathway activation from the early phase of infection with increased levels of H2AX, RPA32, p53, ATR and Chk1 phosphorylated forms. Viral p72 synthesis was abrogated by ATR kinase inhibitors and also in ATR-kd cells. Furthermore, a reduction of viral progeny was identified in these cells when compared to the outcome of infection in ATR-wt. Overall, our results strongly suggest that the ATR pathway plays an essential role for successful ASFV infection of host cells.

  11. The Cartography of UV-induced DNA Damage Formation and DNA Repair.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jinchuan; Adar, Sheera

    2017-01-01

    DNA damage presents a barrier to DNA-templated biochemical processes, including gene expression and faithful DNA replication. Compromised DNA repair leads to mutations, enhancing the risk for genetic diseases and cancer development. Conventional experimental approaches to study DNA damage required a researcher to choose between measuring bulk damage over the entire genome, with little or no resolution regarding a specific location, and obtaining data specific to a locus of interest, without a global perspective. Recent advances in high-throughput genomic tools overcame these limitations and provide high-resolution measurements simultaneously across the genome. In this review, we discuss the available methods for measuring DNA damage and their repair, focusing on genomewide assays for pyrimidine photodimers, the major types of damage induced by ultraviolet irradiation. These new genomic assays will be a powerful tool in identifying key components of genome stability and carcinogenesis.

  12. DNA damage in mouse lymphocytes exposed to curcumin and copper.

    PubMed

    Urbina-Cano, Patricia; Bobadilla-Morales, Lucina; Ramírez-Herrera, Mario A; Corona-Rivera, Jorge R; Mendoza-Magaña, Maria L; Troyo-Sanromán, Rogelio; Corona-Rivera, Alfredo

    2006-01-01

    Dietary polyphenolics, such as curcumin, have shown antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects. Some antioxidants cause DNA strand breaks in excess of transition metal ions, such as copper. The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vitro effect of curcumin in the presence of increasing concentrations of copper to induce DNA damage in murine leukocytes by the comet assay. Balb-C mouse lymphocytes were exposed to 50 microM curcumin and various concentrations of copper (10 microM, 100 microM and 200 microM). Cellular DNA damage was detected by means of the alkaline comet assay. Our results show that 50 microM curcumin in the presence of 100-200 microM copper induced DNA damage in murine lymphocytes. Curcumin did not inhibit the oxidative DNA damage caused by 50 microM H2O2 in mouse lymphocytes. Moreover, 50 microM curcumin alone was capable of inducing DNA strand breaks under the tested conditions. The increased DNA damage by 50 mM curcumin was observed in the presence of various concentrations of copper, as detected by the alkaline comet assay.

  13. Global deformation facilitates flipping of damaged 8-oxo-guanine and guanine in DNA

    PubMed Central

    La Rosa, Giuseppe; Zacharias, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Oxidation of guanine (Gua) to form 7,8-dihydro-8-oxoguanine (8oxoG) is a frequent mutagenic DNA lesion. DNA repair glycosylases such as the bacterial MutM can effciently recognize and eliminate the 8oxoG damage by base excision. The base excision requires a 8oxoG looping out (flipping) from an intrahelical base paired to an extrahelical state where the damaged base is in the enzyme active site. It is still unclear how the damage is identified and flipped from an energetically stable stacked and paired state without any external energy source. Free energy simulations have been employed to study the flipping process for globally deformed DNA conformational states. DNA deformations were generated by systematically untwisting the DNA to mimic its conformation in repair enzyme encounter complex. The simulations indicate that global DNA untwisting deformation toward the enzyme bound form alone (without protein) significantly reduces the penalty for damage flipping to about half of the penalty observed in regular DNA. The finding offers a mechanistic explanation how binding free energy that is transformed to binding induced DNA deformation facilitates flipping and helps to rapidly detect a damaged base. It is likely of general relevance since repair enzyme binding frequently results in significant deformation of the target DNA. PMID:27651459

  14. MECHANISTIC AND BIOLOGICAL ASPECTS OF HELICASE ACTION ON DAMAGED DNA

    PubMed Central

    Suhasini, Avvaru N.; Brosh, Robert M.

    2010-01-01

    Helicases catalytically unwind structured nucleic acids in a nucleoside-triphosphate-dependent and directionally specific manner, and are essential for virtually all aspects of nucleic acid metabolism. ATPase-driven helicases which translocate along nucleic acids play a role in damage recognition or unwinding of a DNA tract containing the lesion. Although classical biochemical experiments provided evidence that bulky covalent adducts inhibit DNA unwinding catalyzed by certain DNA helicases in a strand-specific manner (i.e. , block to DNA unwinding restricted to adduct residence in the strand the helicase translocates), recent studies suggest more complex arrangements that may depend on the helicase under study, its assembly in a protein complex, and the type of structural DNA perturbation. Moreover, base and sugar phosphate backbone modifications exert effects on DNA helicases that suggest specialized tracking mechanisms. As a component of the replication stress response, the single-stranded DNA binding protein Replication Protein A (RPA) may serve to enable eukaryotic DNA helicases to overcome certain base lesions. Helicases play important roles in DNA damage signaling which also involve their partnership with RPA. In this review, we will discuss our current understanding of mechanistic and biological aspects of helicase action on damaged DNA. PMID:20574162

  15. Hydroxytyrosol Protects against Oxidative DNA Damage in Human Breast Cells

    PubMed Central

    Warleta, Fernando; Quesada, Cristina Sánchez; Campos, María; Allouche, Yosra; Beltrán, Gabriel; Gaforio, José J.

    2011-01-01

    Over recent years, several studies have related olive oil ingestion to a low incidence of several diseases, including breast cancer. Hydroxytyrosol and tyrosol are two of the major phenols present in virgin olive oils. Despite the fact that they have been linked to cancer prevention, there is no evidence that clarifies their effect in human breast tumor and non-tumor cells. In the present work, we present hydroxytyrosol and tyrosol’s effects in human breast cell lines. Our results show that hydroxytyrosol acts as a more efficient free radical scavenger than tyrosol, but both fail to affect cell proliferation rates, cell cycle profile or cell apoptosis in human mammary epithelial cells (MCF10A) or breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231 and MCF7). We found that hydroxytyrosol decreases the intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) level in MCF10A cells but not in MCF7 or MDA-MB-231 cells while very high amounts of tyrosol is needed to decrease the ROS level in MCF10A cells. Interestingly, hydroxytyrosol prevents oxidative DNA damage in the three breast cell lines. Therefore, our data suggest that simple phenol hydroxytyrosol could contribute to a lower incidence of breast cancer in populations that consume virgin olive oil due to its antioxidant activity and its protection against oxidative DNA damage in mammary cells. PMID:22254082

  16. Hydroxytyrosol protects against oxidative DNA damage in human breast cells.

    PubMed

    Warleta, Fernando; Quesada, Cristina Sánchez; Campos, María; Allouche, Yosra; Beltrán, Gabriel; Gaforio, José J

    2011-10-01

    Over recent years, several studies have related olive oil ingestion to a low incidence of several diseases, including breast cancer. Hydroxytyrosol and tyrosol are two of the major phenols present in virgin olive oils. Despite the fact that they have been linked to cancer prevention, there is no evidence that clarifies their effect in human breast tumor and non-tumor cells. In the present work, we present hydroxytyrosol and tyrosol's effects in human breast cell lines. Our results show that hydroxytyrosol acts as a more efficient free radical scavenger than tyrosol, but both fail to affect cell proliferation rates, cell cycle profile or cell apoptosis in human mammary epithelial cells (MCF10A) or breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231 and MCF7). We found that hydroxytyrosol decreases the intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) level in MCF10A cells but not in MCF7 or MDA-MB-231 cells while very high amounts of tyrosol is needed to decrease the ROS level in MCF10A cells. Interestingly, hydroxytyrosol prevents oxidative DNA damage in the three breast cell lines. Therefore, our data suggest that simple phenol hydroxytyrosol could contribute to a lower incidence of breast cancer in populations that consume virgin olive oil due to its antioxidant activity and its protection against oxidative DNA damage in mammary cells.

  17. WWOX modulates the ATR-mediated DNA damage checkpoint response.

    PubMed

    Abu-Odeh, Mohammad; Hereema, Nyla A; Aqeilan, Rami I

    2016-01-26

    For many decades genomic instability is considered one of the hallmarks of cancer. Role of the tumor suppressor WWOX (WW domain-containing oxidoreductase) in DNA damage response upon double strand breaks has been recently revealed. Here we demonstrate unforeseen functions for WWOX upon DNA single strand breaks (SSBs) checkpoint activation. We found that WWOX levels are induced following SSBs and accumulate in the nucleus. WWOX deficiency is associated with reduced activation of ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3-related protein (ATR) checkpoint proteins and increased chromosomal breaks. At the molecular level, we show that upon SSBs WWOX is modified at lysine 274 by ubiquitination mediated by the ubiquitin E3 ligase ITCH and interacts with ataxia telangiectasia-mutated (ATM). Interestingly, ATM inhibition was associated with reduced activation of ATR checkpoint proteins suggesting that WWOX manipulation of ATR checkpoint proteins is ATM-dependent. Taken together, the present findings indicate that WWOX plays a key role in ATR checkpoint activation, while its absence might facilitate genomic instability.

  18. WWOX modulates the ATR-mediated DNA damage checkpoint response

    PubMed Central

    Abu-Odeh, Mohammad; Hereema, Nyla A.; Aqeilan, Rami I.

    2016-01-01

    For many decades genomic instability is considered one of the hallmarks of cancer. Role of the tumor suppressor WWOX (WW domain-containing oxidoreductase) in DNA damage response upon double strand breaks has been recently revealed. Here we demonstrate unforeseen functions for WWOX upon DNA single strand breaks (SSBs) checkpoint activation. We found that WWOX levels are induced following SSBs and accumulate in the nucleus. WWOX deficiency is associated with reduced activation of ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3-related protein (ATR) checkpoint proteins and increased chromosomal breaks. At the molecular level, we show that upon SSBs WWOX is modified at lysine 274 by ubiquitination mediated by the ubiquitin E3 ligase ITCH and interacts with ataxia telangiectasia-mutated (ATM). Interestingly, ATM inhibition was associated with reduced activation of ATR checkpoint proteins suggesting that WWOX manipulation of ATR checkpoint proteins is ATM-dependent. Taken together, the present findings indicate that WWOX plays a key role in ATR checkpoint activation, while its absence might facilitate genomic instability. PMID:26675548

  19. T7 replisome directly overcomes DNA damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Bo; Pandey, Manjula; Inman, James T.; Yang, Yi; Kashlev, Mikhail; Patel, Smita S.; Wang, Michelle D.

    2015-12-01

    Cells and viruses possess several known `restart' pathways to overcome lesions during DNA replication. However, these `bypass' pathways leave a gap in replicated DNA or require recruitment of accessory proteins, resulting in significant delays to fork movement or even cell division arrest. Using single-molecule and ensemble methods, we demonstrate that the bacteriophage T7 replisome is able to directly replicate through a leading-strand cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer (CPD) lesion. We show that when a replisome encounters the lesion, a substantial fraction of DNA polymerase (DNAP) and helicase stay together at the lesion, the replisome does not dissociate and the helicase does not move forward on its own. The DNAP is able to directly replicate through the lesion by working in conjunction with helicase through specific helicase-DNAP interactions. These observations suggest that the T7 replisome is fundamentally permissive of DNA lesions via pathways that do not require fork adjustment or replisome reassembly.

  20. Reduction of arsenite-enhanced ultraviolet radiation-induced DNA damage by supplemental zinc

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Karen L.; King, Brenee S.; Sandoval, Monica M.; Liu, Ke Jian; Hudson, Laurie G.

    2013-01-01

    Arsenic is a recognized human carcinogen and there is evidence that arsenic augments the carcinogenicity of DNA damaging agents such as ultraviolet radiation (UVR) thereby acting as a co-carcinogen. Inhibition of DNA repair is one proposed mechanism to account for the co-carcinogenic actions of arsenic. We and others find that arsenite interferes with the function of certain zinc finger DNA repair proteins. Furthermore, we reported that zinc reverses the effects of arsenite in cultured cells and a DNA repair target protein, poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase-1. In order to determine whether zinc ameliorates the effects of arsenite on UVR-induced DNA damage in human keratinocytes and in an in vivo model, normal human epidermal keratinocytes and SKH-1 hairless mice were exposed to arsenite, zinc or both before solar-simulated (ss) UVR exposure. Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase activity, DNA damage and mutation frequencies at the hprt locus were measured in each treatment group in normal human keratinocytes. DNA damage was assessed in vivo by immunohistochemical staining of skin sections isolated from SKH-1 hairless mice. Cell-based findings demonstrate that ssUVR-induced DNA damage and mutagenesis are enhanced by arsenite, and supplemental zinc partially reverses the arsenite effect. In vivo studies confirm that zinc supplementation decreases arsenite-enhanced DNA damage in response to ssUVR exposure. From these data we can conclude that zinc offsets the impact of arsenic on ssUVR-stimulated DNA damage in cells and in vivo suggesting that zinc supplementation may provide a strategy to improve DNA repair capacity in arsenic exposed human populations. PMID:23523584

  1. Measurement of Postreplicative DNA Metabolism and Damage in the Rodent Brain.

    PubMed

    Patel, Jay P; Sowers, Mark L; Herring, Jason L; Theruvathu, Jacob A; Emmett, Mark R; Hawkins, Bridget E; Zhang, Kangling; DeWitt, Douglas S; Prough, Donald S; Sowers, Lawrence C

    2015-12-21

    The DNA of all organisms is metabolically active due to persistent endogenous DNA damage, repair, and enzyme-mediated base modification pathways important for epigenetic reprogramming and antibody diversity. The free bases released from DNA either spontaneously or by base excision repair pathways constitute DNA metabolites in living tissues. In this study, we have synthesized and characterized the stable-isotope standards for a series of pyrimidines derived from the normal DNA bases by oxidation and deamination. We have used these standards to measure free bases in small molecule extracts from rat brain. Free bases are observed in extracts, consistent with both endogenous DNA damage and 5-methylcytosine demethylation pathways. The most abundant free base observed is uracil, and the potential sources of uracil are discussed. The free bases measured in tissue extracts constitute the end product of DNA metabolism and could be used to reveal metabolic disturbances in human disease.

  2. DNA damage in dihydroartemisinin-resistant Molt-4 cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Jungsoo; Lai, Henry C; Sasaki, Tomikazu; Singh, Narendra P

    2015-03-01

    Artemisinin generates carbon-based free radicals when it reacts with iron, and induces molecular damage and apoptosis. Its toxicity is more selective toward cancer cells because cancer cells contain a higher level of intracellular free iron. Dihydroartemisinin (DHA), an analog of artemisinin, has selective cytotoxicity toward Molt-4 human lymphoblastoid cells. A major concern is whether cancer cells could develop resistance to DHA, thus limiting its therapeutic efficacy. We have developed a DHA-resistant Molt-4 cell line (RTN) and found out that these cells exhibited resistance to DHA but no significant cross- resistance to artemisinin-tagged holotransferrin (ART-TF), a synthetic artemisinin compound. In the present study, we investigated DNA damage induced by DHA and ART-TF in both Molt-4 and RTN cells using the comet assay. RTN cells exhibited a significantly lower level of basal and X-ray-induced DNA damage compared to Molt-4 cells. Both DHA and ART-TF induced DNA damage in Molt-4 cells, whereas DNA damage was induced in RTN cells by ART-TF, and not DHA. The result of this study shows that by the cell selection method, it is possible to generate a Molt-4 cell line which is not sensitive to DHA, but sensitive to ART-TF, as measured by DNA damage.

  3. The solute carrier SLC35F2 enables YM155-mediated DNA damage toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Winter, Georg E.; Blomen, Vincent A; Trefzer, Claudia; Kandasamy, Richard K.; Huber, Kilian V.M.; Gridling, Manuela; Chen, Doris; Klampfl, Thorsten; Kralovics, Robert; Kubicek, Stefan; Fernandez-Capetillo, Oscar; Brummelkamp, Thijn R.; Superti-Furga, Giulio

    2016-01-01

    Genotoxic chemotherapy is the most common cancer treatment strategy. However, its untargeted generic DNA-damaging nature and associated systemic cytotoxicity greatly limit the therapeutic applications. Here, we employed a haploid genetic screen in human cells to discover an absolute dependency of the clinically evaluated anti-cancer compound YM155 on SLC35F2, an uncharacterized member of the solute carrier protein family that is highly expressed in a variety of human cancers. YM155 generated DNA damage through intercalation, which was contingent on the expression of SLC35F2 and its drug importing activity. SLC35F2 expression and YM155 sensitivity correlated across a panel of cancer cell lines and targeted genome editing verified SLC35F2 as the main determinant of YM155-mediated DNA damage toxicity in vitro and in vivo. These findings suggest a novel route to targeted DNA damage by exploiting tumor and patient-specific import of YM155. PMID:25064833

  4. Deficient DNA damage signaling leads to chemoresistance to cisplatin in oral cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ling; Mosel, Adam J.; Oakley, Gregory G.; Peng, Aimin

    2012-01-01

    Activation of the cellular DNA damage response (DDR) is an important determinant of cell sensitivity to cisplatin and other chemotherapeutic drugs that eliminate tumor cells through induction of DNA damage. It is therefore important to investigate whether alterations of the DNA damage signaling pathway confer chemoresistance in cancer cells, and whether pharmacological manipulation of the DDR pathway can re-sensitize these cells to cancer therapy. In a panel of oral/laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) cell lines, we observed deficiencies in DNA damage signaling in correlation with cisplatin-resistance, but not with DNA repair. These deficiencies are consistent with reduced expression of components of the ATM-dependent signaling pathway and, in particular, strong up-regulation of Wip1, a negative regulator of the ATM pathway. Wip1 knockdown or inhibition enhanced DNA damage signaling and re-sensitized oral SCC cells to cisplatin. In contrast to the previously reported involvement of Wip1 in cancer, Wip1 up-regulation and function in these SCC cells is independent of p53. Finally, using xenograft tumor models, we demonstrated that Wip1 up-regulation promotes tumorigenesis and its inhibition improves the tumor response to cisplatin. Thus, this study reveals that chemoresistance in oral SCCs is partially attributed to deficiencies in DNA damage signaling, and Wip1 is an effective drug target for enhanced cancer therapy. PMID:22973056

  5. The mef/elf4 transcription factor fine tunes the DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Sashida, Goro; Bae, Narae; Di Giandomenico, Silvana; Asai, Takashi; Gurvich, Nadia; Bazzoli, Elena; Liu, Yan; Huang, Gang; Zhao, Xinyang; Menendez, Silvia; Nimer, Stephen D

    2011-07-15

    The ATM kinase plays a critical role in initiating the DNA damage response that is triggered by genotoxic stresses capable of inducing DNA double-strand breaks. Here, we show that ELF4/MEF, a member of the ETS family of transcription factors, contributes to the persistence of γH2AX DNA damage foci and promotes the DNA damage response leading to the induction of apoptosis. Conversely, the absence of ELF4 promotes the faster repair of damaged DNA and more rapid disappearance of γH2AX foci in response to γ-irradiation, leading to a radio-resistant phenotype despite normal ATM phosphorylation. Following γ-irradiation, ATM phosphorylates ELF4, leading to its degradation; a mutant form of ELF4 that cannot be phosphorylated by ATM persists following γ-irradiation, delaying the resolution of γH2AX foci and triggering an excessive DNA damage response. Thus, although ELF4 promotes the phosphorylation of H2AX by ATM, its activity must be dampened by ATM-dependent phosphorylation and degradation to avoid an excessive DNA damage response.

  6. Bacterial natural transformation by highly fragmented and damaged DNA.

    PubMed

    Overballe-Petersen, Søren; Harms, Klaus; Orlando, Ludovic A A; Mayar, J Victor Moreno; Rasmussen, Simon; Dahl, Tais W; Rosing, Minik T; Poole, Anthony M; Sicheritz-Ponten, Thomas; Brunak, Søren; Inselmann, Sabrina; de Vries, Johann; Wackernagel, Wilfried; Pybus, Oliver G; Nielsen, Rasmus; Johnsen, Pål Jarle; Nielsen, Kaare Magne; Willerslev, Eske

    2013-12-03

    DNA molecules are continuously released through decomposition of organic matter and are ubiquitous in most environments. Such DNA becomes fragmented and damaged (often <100 bp) and may persist in the environment for more than half a million years. Fragmented DNA is recognized as nutrient source for microbes, but not as potential substrate for bacterial evolution. Here, we show that fragmented DNA molecules (≥ 20 bp) that additionally may contain abasic sites, cross-links, or miscoding lesions are acquired by the environmental bacterium Acinetobacter baylyi through natural transformation. With uptake of DNA from a 43,000-y-old woolly mammoth bone, we further demonstrate that such natural transformation events include ancient DNA molecules. We find that the DNA recombination is RecA recombinase independent and is directly linked to DNA replication. We show that the adjacent nucleotide variations generated by uptake of short DNA fragments escape mismatch repair. Moreover, double-nucleotide polymorphisms appear more common among genomes of transformable than nontransformable bacteria. Our findings reveal that short and damaged, including truly ancient, DNA molecules, which are present in large quantities in the environment, can be acquired by bacteria through natural transformation. Our findings open for the possibility that natural genetic exchange can occur with DNA up to several hundreds of thousands years old.

  7. Investigating DNA Radiation Damage Using X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Czapla-Masztafiak, Joanna; Szlachetko, Jakub; Milne, Christopher J.; Lipiec, Ewelina; Sá, Jacinto; Penfold, Thomas J.; Huthwelker, Thomas; Borca, Camelia; Abela, Rafael; Kwiatek, Wojciech M.

    2016-01-01

    The biological influence of radiation on living matter has been studied for years; however, several questions about the detailed mechanism of radiation damage formation remain largely unanswered. Among all biomolecules exposed to radiation, DNA plays an important role because any damage to its molecular structure can affect the whole cell and may lead to chromosomal rearrangements resulting in genomic instability or cell death. To identify and characterize damage induced in the DNA sugar-phosphate backbone, in this work we performed x-ray absorption spectroscopy at the P K-edge on DNA irradiated with either UVA light or protons. By combining the experimental results with theoretical calculations, we were able to establish the types and relative ratio of lesions produced by both UVA and protons around the phosphorus atoms in DNA. PMID:27028640

  8. [Photoreactivating Activity of Bioluminescence: Repair of UV-damaged DNA of Escherichia coli Occurs with Assistance of lux-Genes of Marine Bacteria].

    PubMed

    Zavilgelsky, G B; Melkina, O E; Kotova, V Yu; Konopleva, M N; Manukhov, I V; Pustovoit, K Ss

    2015-01-01

    The UV resistance of luminescent bacteria Escherichia coli AB1886 uvrA6 (pLeo1) containing the plasmid with luxCDABE genes of marine bacteria Photobacterium leiognathi is approximately two times higher than the UV resistance of non-luminous bacteria E. coli AB1886 uvrA6. Introduction of phr::kan(r) mutations (a defect in the functional activity of photolyase) into the genome of E. coli AB1886 uvrA6 (pLeo1) completely removes the high UV resistance of the cells. Therefore, photoreactivation that involves bacterial photolyase contributes mainly to the bioluminescence-induced DNA repair. It is shown that photoreactivating activity of bioluminescence of P. leiognathi is about 2.5 times lower compared with that one induced by a light source with λ > 385 nm. It is also shown that an increase in the bioluminescence intensity, induced by UV radiation in E. coli bacterial cells with a plasmid containing the luxCD ABE genes under RecA-LexA-regulated promoters, occurs only 25-30 min later after UV irradiation of cells and does not contribute to DNA repair. A quorum sensing regulatory system is not involved in the DNA repair by photolyase.

  9. Oxidative DNA Damage in Blood of CVD Patients Taking Detralex

    PubMed Central

    Krzyściak, Wirginia; Cierniak, Agnieszka; Kózka, Mariusz; Kozieł, Joanna

    2011-01-01

    The main goal of the work reported here was to determine the degree of oxidative/alkali-labile DNA damages in peripheral blood as well as in the blood stasis from varicose vein of (chronic venous disorder) CVD patients. Moreover, determination of the impact of Detralex usage on the level of (oxidative) DNA damages in CVD patients was evaluated as well. The degree of oxidative DNA damages was studied in a group consisted of thirty patients with diagnosed chronic venous insufficiency (CVI) in the 2nd and 3rd degree, according to clinical state, etiology, anatomy and pathophysiology (CEAP), and qualified to surgical procedure. The control group consisted of normal volunteers (blood donors) qualified during standard examinations at Regional Centers of Blood Donation and Blood Therapy. The comet assay was used for determination of DNA damages. Analyses of the obtained results showed increase in the level of oxidative/alkali-labile DNA damages in lymphocytes originating from antebrachial blood of CVD patients as compared to the control group (Control) (p < 0.002; ANOVA). In addition, it was demonstrated that the usage of Detralex® resulted in decrease of the level of oxidative/alkali-labile DNA damages in CVD patients as compared to patients without Detralex® treatment (p < 0.001; ANOVA). Based on findings from the study, it may be hypothesized about occurrence of significant oxidative DNA damages as the consequence of strong oxidative stress in CVD. In addition, antioxidative effectiveness of Detralexu® was observed at the recommended dose, one tablet twice daily. PMID:21912579

  10. Inhibitors of Histone Deacetylases Enhance Neurotoxicity of DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Vashishta, A.

    2014-01-01

    The nonselective inhibitors of class I/II histone deacetylases (HDACs) including trichostatin A and the clinically used suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA, vorinostat) are neuroprotective in several models of neuronal injury. Here, we report that in cultured cortical neurons from newborn rats and in the cerebral cortex of whole neonate rats, these HDAC inhibitors exacerbated cytotoxicity of the DNA double-strand break (DSB)-inducing anticancer drug etoposide by enhancing apoptosis. Similar neurotoxic interactions were also observed in neurons that were treated with other DNA damaging drugs including cisplatin and camptothecin. In addition, in rat neonates, SAHA increased cortical neuron apoptosis that was induced by a single injection of the NMDA receptor antagonist dizocilpine (MK801). In etoposide-treated neurons, the nonselective HDAC inhibition resulted in more DSBs. It also potentiated etoposide-induced accumulation and phosphorylation of the pro-apoptotic transcription factor p53. Moreover, nonselective HDAC inhibition exacerbated neuronal apoptosis that was induced by the overexpressed p53. Importantly, such effects cannot be fully explained by inhibition of HDAC1, which is known to play a role in DSB repair and regulation of p53. The specific HDAC1 inhibitor MS275 only moderately enhanced etoposide-induced neuronal death. Although in etoposide-treated neurons MS275 increased DSBs, it did not affect activation of p53. Our findings suggest that besides HDAC1, there are other class I/II HDACs that participate in neuronal DNA damage response attenuating neurotoxic consequences of genotoxic insults to the developing brain. PMID:25063076

  11. The sensitivity of the DNA damage checkpoint prevents oocyte maturation in endometriosis

    PubMed Central

    Hamdan, Mukhri; Jones, Keith T.; Cheong, Ying; Lane, Simon I. R.

    2016-01-01

    Mouse oocytes respond to DNA damage by arresting in meiosis I through activity of the Spindle Assembly Checkpoint (SAC) and DNA Damage Response (DDR) pathways. It is currently not known if DNA damage is the primary trigger for arrest, or if the pathway is sensitive to levels of DNA damage experienced physiologically. Here, using follicular fluid from patients with the disease endometriosis, which affects 10% of women and is associated with reduced fertility, we find raised levels of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS), which generate DNA damage and turn on the DDR-SAC pathway. Only follicular fluid from patients with endometriosis, and not controls, produced ROS and damaged DNA in the oocyte. This activated ATM kinase, leading to SAC mediated metaphase I arrest. Completion of meiosis I could be restored by ROS scavengers, showing this is the primary trigger for arrest and offering a novel clinical therapeutic treatment. This study establishes a clinical relevance to the DDR induced SAC in oocytes. It helps explain how oocytes respond to a highly prevalent human disease and the reduced fertility associated with endometriosis. PMID:27841311

  12. Retinoblastoma loss modulates DNA damage response favoring tumor progression.

    PubMed

    Seoane, Marcos; Iglesias, Pablo; Gonzalez, Teresa; Dominguez, Fernando; Fraga, Maximo; Aliste, Carlos; Forteza, Jeronimo; Costoya, Jose A

    2008-01-01

    Senescence is one of the main barriers against tumor progression. Oncogenic signals in primary cells result in oncogene-induced senescence (OIS), crucial for protection against cancer development. It has been described in premalignant lesions that OIS requires DNA damage response (DDR) activation, safeguard of the integrity of the genome. Here we demonstrate how the cellular mechanisms involved in oncogenic transformation in a model of glioma uncouple OIS and DDR. We use this tumor type as a paradigm of oncogenic transformation. In human gliomas most of the genetic alterations that have been previously identified result in abnormal activation of cell growth signaling pathways and deregulation of cell cycle, features recapitulated in our model by oncogenic Ras expression and retinoblastoma (Rb) inactivation respectively. In this scenario, the absence of pRb confers a proliferative advantage and activates DDR to a greater extent in a DNA lesion-independent fashion than cells that express only HRas(V12). Moreover, Rb loss inactivates the stress kinase DDR-associated p38MAPK by specific Wip1-dependent dephosphorylation. Thus, Rb loss acts as a switch mediating the transition between premalignant lesions and cancer through DDR modulation. These findings may have important implications for the understanding the biology of gliomas and anticipate a new target, Wip1 phosphatase, for novel therapeutic strategies.

  13. The DNA damage response in viral-induced cellular transformation.

    PubMed

    Nikitin, P A; Luftig, M A

    2012-01-31

    The DNA damage response (DDR) has emerged as a critical tumour suppressor pathway responding to cellular DNA replicative stress downstream of aberrant oncogene over-expression. Recent studies have now implicated the DDR as a sensor of oncogenic virus infection. In this review, we discuss the mechanisms by which tumour viruses activate and also suppress the host DDR. The mechanism of tumour virus induction of the DDR is intrinsically linked to the need for these viruses to promote an S-phase environment to replicate their nucleic acid during infection. However, inappropriate expression of viral oncoproteins can also activate the DDR through various mechanisms including replicative stress, direct interaction with DDR components and induction of reactive oxygen species. Given the growth-suppressive consequences of activating the DDR, tumour viruses have also evolved mechanisms to attenuate these pathways. Aberrant expression of viral oncoproteins may therefore promote tumourigenesis through increased somatic mutation and aneuploidy due to DDR inactivation. This review will focus on the interplay between oncogenic viruses and the DDR with respect to cellular checkpoint control and transformation.

  14. Fluorescent reports for detection and measurement of DNA damage

    SciTech Connect

    Uziel, M.; Houck, K. )

    1993-01-01

    Epidemiological studies of real populations are complicated by the inevitable coexistence of exposure to multiple agents within the target population. An alternative method for characterizing these types of exposures is to use the reactive chemical functional group as the toxic agent identify the corresponding classes (families) of damage as markers of effects. We have begun studies to develop spectrometric reporters of DNA damage that can be measured on intact DNA. The direct measurement of adducts on microgram levels of DNA from tissue biopsy may succeed because of the high sensitivity and selectivity of different reporter compounds. While one cannot readily distinguish between recent or persistent exposures, baseline values for individuals may be constructed. For example, normal oxidative metabolism and environmental radiation create oxidation processes that continually damage DNA. These reactions create lesions that can be measured with the reporter compound FABA [N- (5- fluoresceinyl), N[prime]-(3-boronatophenyl)thioureal]. We report preliminary observations with binding FABA (selective for cis, vicdiol structures) to damage sites present on intact nonirradiated and irradiated DNA from C3H10T[sub 1/2] cells. We have observed binding of 42,000 FABA per mouse tetraploid genome (9 billion base pairs) to the putative thymidylic glycol resulting from normal oxidative processes in nonirradiated DNA. Additional binding of FABA to DNA from cells exposed to 100, 300, and 500 rad shows an exponential increase in binding sites of up to 140,000 with 500 rad exposure. This damage reporter may prove useful in characterizing levels of nonovert and overt oxidative damage to DNA.

  15. DNA breakage and induction of DNA damage response proteins precede the appearance of visible mutant huntingtin aggregates.

    PubMed

    Illuzzi, Jennifer; Yerkes, Sarah; Parekh-Olmedo, Hetal; Kmiec, Eric B

    2009-02-15

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a neurodegenerative disorder that follows an autosomal-dominant inheritance pattern. The pathogenesis of the disease depends on the degree of expansion of triplet (CAG) repeats located in the first exon on the gene. An expanded polyglutamine tract within the protein huntingtin (Htt) enables a gain-of-function phenotype that is often exhibited by a dysfunctional oligomerization process and the formation of protein aggregates. How this process leads to neurodegeneration remains undefined. We report that expression of a Htt-fragment containing an expanded glutamine tract induces DNA damage and activates the DNA damage response pathway. Both single-strand and double-strand breaks are observed as the mutant protein accumulates in the cell; these breaks precede the appearance of detectable protein aggregates containing mutant Htt. We also observe activation of H2AX, ATM, and p53 in cells expressing mutant Htt, a predictable response in cells containing chromosomal breakage. Expression of wild-type Htt does not affect the integrity of DNA, nor does it activate the same pathway. Furthermore, DNA damage and activated H2AX are present in HD transgenic mice before the formation of mutant Htt aggregates and HD pathogenesis. Taken together, our data suggest that the expression of mutant Htt causes an accumulation of DNA breaks that activates the DNA damage response pathway, a process that can disable cell function. Because these events can lead to apoptosis, it is possible that the DNA damage response pathway activated by single- and double-strand breaks that we found contributes to neurodegeneration.

  16. CTCF participates in DNA damage response via poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation

    PubMed Central

    Han, Deqiang; Chen, Qian; Shi, Jiazhong; Zhang, Feng; Yu, Xiaochun

    2017-01-01

    CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF) plays an essential role in regulating the structure of chromatin by binding DNA strands for defining the boundary between active and heterochromatic DNA. However, the role of CTCF in DNA damage response remains elusive. Here, we show that CTCF is quickly recruited to the sites of DNA damage. The fast recruitment is mediated by the zinc finger domain and poly (ADP-ribose) (PAR). Further analyses show that only three zinc finger motifs are essential for PAR recognition. Moreover, CTCF-deficient cells are hypersensitive to genotoxic stress such as ionizing radiation (IR). Taken together, these results suggest that CTCF participate in DNA damage response via poly(ADP-ribosylation). PMID:28262757

  17. Persistence of DNA damage following exposure of human bladder cells to chronic monomethylarsonous acid

    SciTech Connect

    Wnek, S.M.; Medeiros, M.K.; Eblin, K.E.; Gandolfi, A.J.

    2009-12-01

    Malignant transformation was demonstrated in UROtsa cells following 52-weeks of exposure to 50 nM monomethylarsonous acid (MMA{sup III}); the result was the malignantly transformed cell line, URO-MSC. URO-MSC cells were used to study the induction of DNA damage and the alteration of DNA repair enzymes in both the presence of MMA{sup III} [URO-MSC(+)] and after subsequent removal of MMA{sup III} [URO-MSC(-)] following chronic, low-level exposure. In the presence of MMA{sup III}, URO-MSC(+) cells demonstrated a sustained increase in DNA damage following 12-weeks of exposure; in particular, a significant increase in DNA single-strand breaks at 12-weeks of exposure consistently elevated through 52 weeks. The persistence of DNA damage in URO-MSC cells was assessed after a 2-week removal of MMA{sup III}. URO-MSC(-) cells demonstrated a decrease in DNA damage compared to URO-MSC(+); however, DNA damage in URO-MSC(-) remained significantly elevated when compared to untreated UROtsa and increased in a time-dependent manner. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) were demonstrated to be a critical component in the generation of DNA damage determined through the incubation of ROS scavengers with URO-MSC cells. Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) is a key repair enzyme in DNA single-strand break repair. URO-MSC(+) resulted in a slight increase in PARP activity after 36-weeks of MMA{sup III} exposure, suggesting the presence of MMA{sup III} is inhibiting the increase in PARP activity. In support, PARP activity in URO-MSC(-) increased significantly, coinciding with a subsequent decrease in DNA damage demonstrated in URO-MSC(-) compared to URO-MSC(+). These data demonstrate that chronic, low-level exposure of UROtsa cells to 50 nM MMA{sup III} results in: the induction of DNA damage that remains elevated upon removal of MMA{sup III}; increased levels of ROS that play a role in MMA{sup III} induced-DNA damage; and decreased PARP activity in the presence of MMA{sup III}.

  18. Assessment of okadaic acid effects on cytotoxicity, DNA damage and DNA repair in human cells.

    PubMed

    Valdiglesias, Vanessa; Méndez, Josefina; Pásaro, Eduardo; Cemeli, Eduardo; Anderson, Diana; Laffon, Blanca

    2010-07-07

    Okadaic acid (OA) is a phycotoxin produced by several types of dinoflagellates causing diarrheic shellfish poisoning (DSP) in humans. Symptoms induced by DSP toxins are mainly gastrointestinal, but the intoxication does not appear to be fatal. Despite this, this toxin presents a potential threat to human health even at concentrations too low to induce acute toxicity, since previous animal studies have shown that OA has very potent tumour promoting activity. However, its concrete action mechanism has not been described yet and the results reported with regard to OA cytotoxicity and genotoxicity are often contradictory. In the present study, the genotoxic and cytotoxic effects of OA on three different types of human cells (peripheral blood leukocytes, HepG2 hepatoma cells, and SHSY5Y neuroblastoma cells) were evaluated. Cells were treated with a range of OA concentrations in the presence and absence of S9 fraction, and MTT test and Comet assay were performed in order to evaluate cytotoxicity and genotoxicity, respectively. The possible effects of OA on DNA repair were also studied by means of the DNA repair competence assay, using bleomycin as DNA damage inductor. Treatment with OA in absence of S9 fraction induced not statistically significant decrease in cell viability and significant increase in DNA damage in all cell types at the highest concentrations investigated. However, only SHSY5Y cells showed OA induced genotoxic and cytotoxic effects in presence of S9 fraction. Furthermore, we found that OA can induce modulations in DNA repair processes when exposure was performed prior to BLM treatment, in co-exposure, or during the subsequent DNA repair process.

  19. Monoubiquitylation of histone H2B contributes to the bypass of DNA damage during and after DNA replication

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Shih-Hsun; Wong, Ronald P.; Ulrich, Helle D.; Kao, Cheng-Fu

    2017-01-01

    DNA lesion bypass is mediated by DNA damage tolerance (DDT) pathways and homologous recombination (HR). The DDT pathways, which involve translesion synthesis and template switching (TS), are activated by the ubiquitylation (ub) of PCNA through components of the RAD6-RAD18 pathway, whereas the HR pathway is independent of RAD18. However, it is unclear how these processes are coordinated within the context of chromatin. Here we show that Bre1, an ubiquitin ligase specific for histone H2B, is recruited to chromatin in a manner coupled to replication of damaged DNA. In the absence of Bre1 or H2Bub, cells exhibit accumulation of unrepaired DNA lesions. Consequently, the damaged forks become unstable and resistant to repair. We provide physical, genetic, and cytological evidence that H2Bub contributes toward both Rad18-dependent TS and replication fork repair by HR. Using an inducible system of DNA damage bypass, we further show that H2Bub is required for the regulation of DDT after genome duplication. We propose that Bre1-H2Bub facilitates fork recovery and gap-filling repair by controlling chromatin dynamics in response to replicative DNA damage. PMID:28246327

  20. NBS1 and multiple regulations of DNA damage response

    PubMed Central

    Komatsu, Kenshi

    2016-01-01

    DNA damage response is finely tuned, with several pathways including those for DNA repair, chromatin remodeling and cell cycle checkpoint, although most studies to date have focused on single pathways. Genetic diseases characterized by genome instability have provided novel insights into the underlying mechanisms of DNA damage response. NBS1, a protein responsible for the radiation-sensitive autosomal recessive disorder Nijmegen breakage syndrome, is one of the first factors to accumulate at sites of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). NBS1 binds to at least five key proteins, including ATM, RPA, MRE11, RAD18 and RNF20, in the conserved regions within a limited span of the C terminus, functioning in the regulation of chromatin remodeling, cell cycle checkpoint and DNA repair in response to DSBs. In this article, we reviewed the functions of these binding proteins and their comprehensive association with NBS1. PMID:27068998

  1. Connecting the Dots: From DNA Damage and Repair to Aging

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Mei-Ren; Li, Kaiyi; Lin, Shiaw-Yih; Hung, Wen-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian cells evolve a delicate system, the DNA damage response (DDR) pathway, to monitor genomic integrity and to prevent the damage from both endogenous end exogenous insults. Emerging evidence suggests that aberrant DDR and deficient DNA repair are strongly associated with cancer and aging. Our understanding of the core program of DDR has made tremendous progress in the past two decades. However, the long list of the molecules involved in the DDR and DNA repair continues to grow and the roles of the new “dots” are under intensive investigation. Here, we review the connection between DDR and DNA repair and aging and discuss the potential mechanisms by which deficient DNA repair triggers systemic effects to promote physiological or pathological aging. PMID:27164092

  2. DNA Damage in Chronic Kidney Disease: Evaluation of Clinical Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Schupp, Nicole; Stopper, Helga; Heidland, August

    2016-01-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) exhibit an increased cancer risk compared to a healthy control population. To be able to estimate the cancer risk of the patients and to assess the impact of interventional therapies thereon, it is of particular interest to measure the patients' burden of genomic damage. Chromosomal abnormalities, reduced DNA repair, and DNA lesions were found indeed in cells of patients with CKD. Biomarkers for DNA damage measurable in easily accessible cells like peripheral blood lymphocytes are chromosomal aberrations, structural DNA lesions, and oxidatively modified DNA bases. In this review the most common methods quantifying the three parameters mentioned above, the cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay, the comet assay, and the quantification of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2′-deoxyguanosine, are evaluated concerning the feasibility of the analysis and regarding the marker's potential to predict clinical outcomes. PMID:27313827

  3. Sensitive voltammetric detection of DNA damage at carbon electrodes using DNA repair enzymes and an electroactive osmium marker.

    PubMed

    Havran, Ludek; Vacek, Jan; Cahová, Katerina; Fojta, Miroslav

    2008-07-01

    This paper presents a new approach to electrochemical sensing of DNA damage, using osmium DNA markers and voltammetric detection at the pyrolytic graphite electrode. The technique is based on enzymatic digestion of DNA with a DNA repair enzyme exonuclease III (exoIII), followed by single-strand (ss) selective DNA modification by a complex of osmium tetroxide with 2,2'-bipyridine. In double-stranded DNA possessing free 3'-ends, the exoIII creates ss regions that can accommodate the electroactive osmium marker. Intensity of the marker signal measured at the pyrolytic graphite electrode responded well to the extent of DNA damage. The technique was successfully applied for the detection of (1) single-strand breaks (ssb) introduced in plasmid DNA by deoxyribonuclease I, and (2) apurinic sites generated in chromosomal calf thymus DNA upon treatment with the alkylating agent dimethyl sulfate. The apurinic sites were converted into the ssb by DNA repair endonuclease activity of the exoIII enzyme. We show that the presented technique is capable of detection of one lesion per approximately 10(5) nucleotides in supercoiled plasmid DNA.

  4. Common Fragile Sites: Genomic Hotspots of DNA Damage and Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Ke; Qiu, Li; Mrasek, Kristin; Zhang, Jun; Liehr, Thomas; Quintana, Luciana Gonçalves; Li, Zheng

    2012-01-01

    Genomic instability, a hallmark of cancer, occurs preferentially at specific genomic regions known as common fragile sites (CFSs). CFSs are evolutionarily conserved and late replicating regions with AT-rich sequences, and CFS instability is correlated with cancer. In the last decade, much progress has been made toward understanding the mechanisms of chromosomal instability at CFSs. However, despite tremendous efforts, identifying a cancer-associated CFS gene (CACG) remains a challenge and little is known about the function of CACGs at most CFS loci. Recent studies of FATS (for Fragile-site Associated Tumor Suppressor), a new CACG at FRA10F, reveal an active role of this CACG in regulating DNA damage checkpoints and suppressing tumorigenesis. The identification of FATS may inspire more discoveries of other uncharacterized CACGs. Further elucidation of the biological functions and clinical significance of CACGs may be exploited for cancer biomarkers and therapeutic benefits. PMID:23109895

  5. Antimalarial action of artesunate involves DNA damage mediated by reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Gopalakrishnan, Anusha M; Kumar, Nirbhay

    2015-01-01

    Artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) is the recommended first-line treatment for Plasmodium falciparum malaria. It has been suggested that the cytotoxic effect of artemisinin is mediated by free radicals followed by the alkylation of P. falciparum proteins. The endoperoxide bridge, the active moiety of artemisinin derivatives, is cleaved in the presence of ferrous iron, generating reactive oxygen species (ROS) and other free radicals. However, the emergence of resistance to artemisinin in P. falciparum underscores the need for new insights into the molecular mechanisms of antimalarial activity of artemisinin. Here we show that artesunate (ART) induces DNA double-strand breaks in P. falciparum in a physiologically relevant dose- and time-dependent manner. DNA damage induced by ART was accompanied by an increase in the intracellular ROS level in the parasites. Mannitol, a ROS scavenger, reversed the cytotoxic effect of ART and reduced DNA damage, and modulation of glutathione (GSH) levels was found to impact ROS and DNA damage induced by ART. Accumulation of ROS, increased DNA damage, and the resulting antiparasite effect suggest a causal relationship between ROS, DNA damage, and parasite death. Finally, we also show that ART-induced ROS production involves a potential role for NADPH oxidase, an enzyme involved in the production of superoxide anions. Our results with P. falciparum provide novel insights into previously unknown molecular mechanisms underlying the antimalarial activity of artemisinin derivatives and may help in the design of next-generation antimalarial drugs against the most virulent Plasmodium species.

  6. Autophagy confers DNA damage repair pathways to protect the hematopoietic system from nuclear radiation injury

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Weiwei; Yuan, Na; Wang, Zhen; Cao, Yan; Fang, Yixuan; Li, Xin; Xu, Fei; Song, Lin; Wang, Jian; Zhang, Han; Yan, Lili; Xu, Li; Zhang, Xiaoying; Zhang, Suping; Wang, Jianrong

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy is essentially a metabolic process, but its in vivo role in nuclear radioprotection remains unexplored. We observed that ex vivo autophagy activation reversed the proliferation inhibition, apoptosis, and DNA damage in irradiated hematopoietic cells. In vivo autophagy activation improved bone marrow cellularity following nuclear radiation exposure. In contrast, defective autophagy in the hematopoietic conditional mouse model worsened the hematopoietic injury, reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation and DNA damage caused by nuclear radiation exposure. Strikingly, in vivo defective autophagy caused an absence or reduction in regulatory proteins critical to both homologous recombination (HR) and non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) DNA damage repair pathways, as well as a failure to induce these proteins in response to nuclear radiation. In contrast, in vivo autophagy activation increased most of these proteins in hematopoietic cells. DNA damage assays confirmed the role of in vivo autophagy in the resolution of double-stranded DNA breaks in total bone marrow cells as well as bone marrow stem and progenitor cells upon whole body irradiation. Hence, autophagy protects the hematopoietic system against nuclear radiation injury by conferring and intensifying the HR and NHEJ DNA damage repair pathways and by removing ROS and inhibiting apoptosis. PMID:26197097

  7. A damage-responsive DNA binding protein regulates transcription of the yeast DNA repair gene PHR1.

    PubMed Central

    Sebastian, J; Sancar, G B

    1991-01-01

    The PHR1 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae encodes the DNA repair enzyme photolyase. Transcription of PHR1 increases in response to treatment of cells with 254-nm radiation and chemical agents that damage DNA. We report here the identification of a damage-responsive DNA binding protein, termed photolyase regulatory protein (PRP), and its cognate binding site, termed the PHR1 upstream repression sequence, that together regulate induction of PHR1 transcription after DNA damage. PRP activity, monitored by electrophoretic-mobility-shift assay, was detected in cells during normal growth but disappeared within 30 min after irradiation. Copper-phenanthroline footprinting of PRP-DNA complexes revealed that PRP protects a 39-base-pair region of PHR1 5' flanking sequence beginning 40 base pairs upstream from the coding sequence. A prominent feature of the foot-printed region is a 22-base-pair palindrome. Deletion of the PHR1 upstream repression sequence increased the basal level expression of PHR1 in vivo and decreased induction after exposure of cells to UV radiation or methyl methanesulfonate, whereas insertion of the PRP binding site between the CYC1 upstream activation sequence and "TATA" sequence reduced basal level expression and conferred damage responsiveness upon a reporter gene. Thus these observations establish that PRP is a damage-responsive repressor of PHR1 transcription. Images PMID:1763039

  8. TGF-{beta}{sub 1}-induced cardiac myofibroblasts are nonproliferating functional cells carrying DNA damages

    SciTech Connect

    Petrov, Victor V. Pelt, Jos F. van; Vermeesch, Joris R.; Van Duppen, Viktor J.; Vekemans, Katrien; Fagard, Robert H.; Lijnen, Paul J.

    2008-04-15

    TGF-{beta}{sub 1} induces differentiation and total inhibition of cardiac MyoFb cell division and DNA synthesis. These effects of TGF-{beta}{sub 1} are irreversible. Inhibition of MyoFb proliferation is accompanied with the expression of Smad1, Mad1, p15Ink4B and total inhibition of telomerase activity. Surprisingly, TGF-{beta}{sub 1}-activated MyoFbs are growth-arrested not only at G1-phase but also at S-phase of the cell cycle. Staining with TUNEL indicates that these cells carry DNA damages. However, the absolute majority of MyoFbs are non-apoptotic cells as established with two apoptosis-specific methods, flow cytometry and caspase-dependent cleavage of cytokeratin 18. Expression in MyoFbs of proliferative cell nuclear antigen even in the absence of serum confirms that these MyoFbs perform repair of DNA damages. These results suggest that TGF-{beta}{sub 1}-activated MyoFbs can be growth-arrested by two checkpoints, the G1/S checkpoint, which prevents cells from entering S-phase and the intra-S checkpoint, which is activated by encountering DNA damage during the S phase or by unrepaired damage that escapes the G1/S checkpoint. Despite carrying of the DNA damages TGF-{beta}{sub 1}-activated MyoFbs are highly functional cells producing lysyl oxidase and contracting the collagen matrix.

  9. Repair of oxidatively induced DNA damage by DNA glycosylases: Mechanisms of action, substrate specificities and excision kinetics.

    PubMed

    Dizdaroglu, Miral; Coskun, Erdem; Jaruga, Pawel

    Endogenous and exogenous reactive species cause oxidatively induced DNA damage in living organisms by a variety of mechanisms. As a result, a plethora of mutagenic and/or cytotoxic products are formed in cellular DNA. This type of DNA damage is repaired by base excision repair, although nucleotide excision repair also plays a limited role. DNA glycosylases remove modified DNA bases from DNA by hydrolyzing the glycosidic bond leaving behind an apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) site. Some of them also possess an accompanying AP-lyase activity that cleaves the sugar-phosphate chain of DNA. Since the first discovery of a DNA glycosylase, many studies have elucidated the mechanisms of action, substrate specificities and excision kinetics of these enzymes present in all living organisms. For this purpose, most studies used single- or double-stranded oligodeoxynucleotides with a single DNA lesion embedded at a defined position. High-molecular weight DNA with multiple base lesions has been used in other studies with the advantage of the simultaneous investigation of many DNA base lesions as substrates. Differences between the substrate specificities and excision kinetics of DNA glycosylases have been found when these two different substrates were used. Some DNA glycosylases possess varying substrate specificities for either purine-derived lesions or pyrimidine-derived lesions, whereas others exhibit cross-activity for both types of lesions. Laboratory animals with knockouts of the genes of DNA glycosylases have also been used to provide unequivocal evidence for the substrates, which had previously been found in in vitro studies, to be the actual substrates in vivo as well. On the basis of the knowledge gained from the past studies, efforts are being made to discover small molecule inhibitors of DNA glycosylases that may be used as potential drugs in cancer therapy.

  10. A constitutive damage specific DNA-binding protein is synthesized at higher levels in UV-irradiated primate cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hirschfeld, S.; Levine, A.S.; Ozato, K.; Protic, M. )

    1990-05-01

    Using a DNA band shift assay, we have identified a DNA-binding protein complex in primate cells which is present constitutively and has a high affinity for UV-irradiated, double-stranded DNA. Cells pretreated with UV light, mitomycin C, or aphidicolin have higher levels of this damage-specific DNA-binding protein complex, suggesting that the signal for induction can either be damage to the DNA or interference with cellular DNA replication. Physiochemical modifications of the DNA and competition analysis with defined substrates suggest that the most probable target site for the damage-specific DNA-binding protein complex is a 6-4'-(pyrimidine-2'-one)-pyrimidine dimer: specific binding could not be detected with probes which contain -TT- cyclobutane dimers, and damage-specific DNA binding did not decrease after photoreactivation of UV-irradiated DNA. This damage-specific DNA-binding protein complex is the first such inducible protein complex identified in primate cells. Cells from patients with the sun-sensitive cancer-prone disease, xeroderma pigmentosum (group E), are lacking both the constitutive and the induced damage-specific DNA-binding activities. These findings suggest a possible role for this DNA-binding protein complex in lesion recognition and DNA repair of UV-light-induced photoproducts.

  11. Liver ultrastructural morphology and mitochondrial DNA levels in HIV/hepatitis C virus coinfection: no evidence of mitochondrial damage with highly active antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Matsukura, Motoi; Chu, Fanny F S; Au, May; Lu, Helen; Chen, Jennifer; Rietkerk, Sonja; Barrios, Rolando; Farley, John D; Montaner, Julio S; Montessori, Valentina C; Walker, David C; Côté, Hélène C F

    2008-06-19

    Liver mitochondrial toxicity is a concern, particularly in HIV/hepatitis C virus (HCV) coinfection. Liver biopsies from HIV/HCV co-infected patients, 14 ON-highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) and nine OFF-HAART, were assessed by electron microscopy quantitative morphometric analyses. Hepatocytes tended to be larger ON-HAART than OFF-HAART (P = 0.05), but mitochondrial volume, cristae density, lipid volume, mitochondrial DNA and RNA levels were similar. We found no evidence of increased mitochondrial toxicity in individuals currently on HAART, suggesting that concomitant HAART should not delay HCV therapy.

  12. Kaempferol induces DNA damage and inhibits DNA repair associated protein expressions in human promyelocytic leukemia HL-60 cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lung-Yuan; Lu, Hsu-Feng; Chou, Yu-Cheng; Shih, Yung-Luen; Bau, Da-Tian; Chen, Jaw-Chyun; Hsu, Shu-Chun; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2015-01-01

    Numerous evidences have shown that plant flavonoids (naturally occurring substances) have been reported to have chemopreventive activities and protect against experimental carcinogenesis. Kaempferol, one of the flavonoids, is widely distributed in fruits and vegetables, and may have cancer chemopreventive properties. However, the precise underlying mechanism regarding induced DNA damage and suppressed DNA repair system are poorly understood. In this study, we investigated whether kaempferol induced DNA damage and affected DNA repair associated protein expression in human leukemia HL-60 cells in vitro. Percentages of viable cells were measured via a flow cytometry assay. DNA damage was examined by Comet assay and DAPI staining. DNA fragmentation (ladder) was examined by DNA gel electrophoresis. The changes of protein levels associated with DNA repair were examined by Western blotting. Results showed that kaempferol dose-dependently decreased the viable cells. Comet assay indicated that kaempferol induced DNA damage (Comet tail) in a dose-dependent manner and DAPI staining also showed increased doses of kaempferol which led to increased DNA condensation, these effects are all of dose-dependent manners. Western blotting indicated that kaempferol-decreased protein expression associated with DNA repair system, such as phosphate-ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (p-ATM), phosphate-ataxia-telangiectasia and Rad3-related (p-ATR), 14-3-3 proteins sigma (14-3-3σ), DNA-dependent serine/threonine protein kinase (DNA-PK), O(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT), p53 and MDC1 protein expressions, but increased the protein expression of p-p53 and p-H2AX. Protein translocation was examined by confocal laser microscopy, and we found that kaempferol increased the levels of p-H2AX and p-p53 in HL-60 cells. Taken together, in the present study, we found that kaempferol induced DNA damage and suppressed DNA repair and inhibited DNA repair associated protein expression in HL-60

  13. Mfd is required for rapid recovery of transcription following UV-induced DNA damage but not oxidative DNA damage in Escherichia coli.