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Sample records for activation energies estimated

  1. Estimating Physical Activity Energy Expenditure with the Kinect Sensor in an Exergaming Environment

    PubMed Central

    Nathan, David; Huynh, Du Q.; Rubenson, Jonas; Rosenberg, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Active video games that require physical exertion during game play have been shown to confer health benefits. Typically, energy expended during game play is measured using devices attached to players, such as accelerometers, or portable gas analyzers. Since 2010, active video gaming technology incorporates marker-less motion capture devices to simulate human movement into game play. Using the Kinect Sensor and Microsoft SDK this research aimed to estimate the mechanical work performed by the human body and estimate subsequent metabolic energy using predictive algorithmic models. Nineteen University students participated in a repeated measures experiment performing four fundamental movements (arm swings, standing jumps, body-weight squats, and jumping jacks). Metabolic energy was captured using a Cortex Metamax 3B automated gas analysis system with mechanical movement captured by the combined motion data from two Kinect cameras. Estimations of the body segment properties, such as segment mass, length, centre of mass position, and radius of gyration, were calculated from the Zatsiorsky-Seluyanov's equations of de Leva, with adjustment made for posture cost. GPML toolbox implementation of the Gaussian Process Regression, a locally weighted k-Nearest Neighbour Regression, and a linear regression technique were evaluated for their performance on predicting the metabolic cost from new feature vectors. The experimental results show that Gaussian Process Regression outperformed the other two techniques by a small margin. This study demonstrated that physical activity energy expenditure during exercise, using the Kinect camera as a motion capture system, can be estimated from segmental mechanical work. Estimates for high-energy activities, such as standing jumps and jumping jacks, can be made accurately, but for low-energy activities, such as squatting, the posture of static poses should be considered as a contributing factor. When translated into the active video gaming

  2. Estimating physical activity energy expenditure with the Kinect Sensor in an exergaming environment.

    PubMed

    Nathan, David; Huynh, Du Q; Rubenson, Jonas; Rosenberg, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Active video games that require physical exertion during game play have been shown to confer health benefits. Typically, energy expended during game play is measured using devices attached to players, such as accelerometers, or portable gas analyzers. Since 2010, active video gaming technology incorporates marker-less motion capture devices to simulate human movement into game play. Using the Kinect Sensor and Microsoft SDK this research aimed to estimate the mechanical work performed by the human body and estimate subsequent metabolic energy using predictive algorithmic models. Nineteen University students participated in a repeated measures experiment performing four fundamental movements (arm swings, standing jumps, body-weight squats, and jumping jacks). Metabolic energy was captured using a Cortex Metamax 3B automated gas analysis system with mechanical movement captured by the combined motion data from two Kinect cameras. Estimations of the body segment properties, such as segment mass, length, centre of mass position, and radius of gyration, were calculated from the Zatsiorsky-Seluyanov's equations of de Leva, with adjustment made for posture cost. GPML toolbox implementation of the Gaussian Process Regression, a locally weighted k-Nearest Neighbour Regression, and a linear regression technique were evaluated for their performance on predicting the metabolic cost from new feature vectors. The experimental results show that Gaussian Process Regression outperformed the other two techniques by a small margin. This study demonstrated that physical activity energy expenditure during exercise, using the Kinect camera as a motion capture system, can be estimated from segmental mechanical work. Estimates for high-energy activities, such as standing jumps and jumping jacks, can be made accurately, but for low-energy activities, such as squatting, the posture of static poses should be considered as a contributing factor. When translated into the active video gaming

  3. Personalizing energy expenditure estimation using physiological signals normalization during activities of daily living.

    PubMed

    Altini, Marco; Penders, Julien; Vullers, Ruud; Amft, Oliver

    2014-09-01

    In this paper we propose a generic approach to reduce inter-individual variability of different physiological signals (HR, GSR and respiration) by automatically estimating normalization parameters (e.g. baseline and range). The proposed normalization procedure does not require a dedicated personal calibration during system setup. On the other hand, normalization parameters are estimated at system runtime from sedentary and low intensity activities of daily living (ADLs), such as lying and walking. When combined with activity-specific energy expenditure (EE) models, our normalization procedure improved EE estimation by 15 to 33% in a study group of 18 participants, compared to state of the art activity-specific EE models combining accelerometer and non-normalized physiological signals. PMID:25120177

  4. Comparison of methods to estimate physical activity and energy expenditure in African American children.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Marrero, F A; Smith, B A; Sherman, W M; Kirby, T E

    2005-06-01

    Low levels of physical activity and high levels of obesity among children in the US is a public health concern. Accurate methods to estimate physical activity are needed to determine the efficacy of intervention programs and to explore relationships between daily physical activity and health status in children. The purpose of this study was to compare the simultaneous use of the Tritrac-R3D accelerometer (Tritrac), Yamax SW-200 Digiwalker step-counter (Digiwalker) and the Self Administered Physical Activity Checklist (SAPAC) to assess physical activity (PA) and energy expenditure (EE) in African-American children aged 7 to 10 years, using the doubly-labeled water (DLW) as the criterion method. Physical activity and energy expenditure were measured over seven consecutive days under free-living conditions. Resting metabolic rate and peak VO(2) were measured before the experimental period. There was no difference in physical activity energy expenditure (PAEE) measured by Tritrac or DLW (p > 0.05). Tritrac activity counts were highly correlated with DLW-PAEE (r = 0.81). High correlations between Digiwalker and DLW were observed when body weight was considered. A low correlation (r = 0.49) was observed between the physical activity energy expenditure by SAPAC and DLW. In conclusion, with some limitations the Tritrac and Digiwalker can provide useful and accurate information about PA and EE in 7- to 10-year-old children. PMID:15895319

  5. Accuracy of energy expenditure estimation by activity monitors differs with ethnicity.

    PubMed

    Brazeau, A-S; Suppere, C; Strychar, I; Belisle, V; Demers, S-P; Rabasa-Lhoret, R

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this project is to explore the accuracy of 2 activity monitors (SenseWear Armband & Actical) to estimate energy expenditure during rest and light to moderate intensity exercises in 2 ethnic groups. 18 Caucasian and 20 Black adults (age: 26.8±5.2 years; body mass index: 23.9±3.0 kg/m(2)) wore the 2 devices simultaneously during 3 standardised activities: 30-min rest, 45-min of treadmill at 40% of their V˙O2peak and 45-min of stationary cycling at 50% of their V˙O2peak. Energy estimated with the 2 devices was compared to indirect calorimetry measurements. Both devices overestimated energy expenditure during rest (SenseWear: 36% in Black vs. 16% in Caucasian; Actical: 26% vs. 11%, p<0.01 between groups) and treadmill (SenseWear: 50% vs. 25%; Actical: 67% vs. 32%, p<0.01 between groups). Both devices significantly underestimated energy expenditure during stationary cycling (SenseWear: 24% vs. 26%; Actical: 58% vs. 70%, p=NS between groups). Equations used to estimate energy expenditure from accelerometer data is less precise among Black adults than Caucasian adults. Ethnic-specific formulas are probably required. PMID:24816887

  6. Estimation of free-living energy expenditure using a novel activity monitor designed to minimize obtrusiveness.

    PubMed

    Bonomi, Alberto G; Plasqui, Guy; Goris, Annelies H C; Westerterp, Klass R

    2010-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the ability of a novel activity monitor designed to be minimally obtrusive in predicting free-living energy expenditure. Subjects were 18 men and 12 women (age: 41 +/- 11 years, BMI: 24.4 +/- 3 kg/m(2)). The habitual physical activity was monitored for 14 days using a DirectLife triaxial accelerometer for movement registration (Tracmor(D)) (Philips New Wellness Solutions, Lifestyle Incubator, the Netherlands). Tracmor(D) output was expressed as activity counts per day (Cnts/d). Simultaneously, total energy expenditure (TEE) was measured in free living conditions using doubly labeled water (DLW). Activity energy expenditure (AEE) and the physical activity level (PAL) were determined from TEE and sleeping metabolic rate (SMR). A multiple-linear regression model predicted 76% of the variance in TEE, using as independent variables SMR (partial-r(2) = 0.55, P < 0.001), and Cnts/d (partial r(2) = 0.21, P < 0.001). The s.e. of TEE estimates was 0.9 MJ/day or 7.4% of the average TEE. A model based on body mass (partial-r(2) = 0.31, P < 0.001) and Cnts/d (partial-r(2) = 0.23, P < 0.001) predicted 54% of the variance in TEE. Cnts/d were significantly and positively associated with AEE (r = 0.54, P < 0.01), PAL (r = 0.68, P < 0.001), and AEE corrected by body mass (r = 0.71, P < 0.001). This study showed that the Tracmor(D) is a highly accurate instrument for predicting free-living energy expenditure. The miniaturized design did not harm the ability of the instrument in measuring physical activity and in determining outcome parameters of physical activity such as TEE, AEE, and PAL. PMID:20186133

  7. Estimating energy expenditure in wildland fire fighters using a physical activity monitor.

    PubMed

    Heil, Daniel P

    2002-09-01

    This study piloted the use of an electronic activity monitor (MTI AM 7164-1.2) as a tool for estimating activity (EE(ACT), kcal day(-1)) and total (EE(TOT) kcal day(-1)) energy expenditure in wildland fire fighters during extended periods of wildland fire suppression. Ten Hot Shot fire fighters (9 men, 1 woman) volunteered to wear a MTI monitor during every work shift for 21 consecutive days. Summarizing whole-body motion data each 1 min, the raw activity data (counts min(-1)) were transformed into units of kcal min(-1) using a custom computer program with standard conversion equations. EE(TOT) averaged (Mean+/-SD) 4768+/-478 kcal day(-1), while EE(ACT) averaged 2585+/-406 kcal day(-1), neither of which differed significantly (P = 0.198 and 0.268, respectively) from literature values reported for Hot Shots using the doubly labeled water technique. These data suggest that the electronic activity monitor provided reasonable estimates of EE in wildland fire fighters. This study should be verified, however, with a more complete validation methodology to ensure these findings. PMID:12236649

  8. A smartphone-driven methodology for estimating physical activities and energy expenditure in free living conditions.

    PubMed

    Guidoux, Romain; Duclos, Martine; Fleury, Gérard; Lacomme, Philippe; Lamaudière, Nicolas; Manenq, Pierre-Henri; Paris, Ludivine; Ren, Libo; Rousset, Sylvie

    2014-12-01

    This paper introduces a function dedicated to the estimation of total energy expenditure (TEE) of daily activities based on data from accelerometers integrated into smartphones. The use of mass-market sensors such as accelerometers offers a promising solution for the general public due to the growing smartphone market over the last decade. The TEE estimation function quality was evaluated using data from intensive numerical experiments based, first, on 12 volunteers equipped with a smartphone and two research sensors (Armband and Actiheart) in controlled conditions (CC) and, then, on 30 other volunteers in free-living conditions (FLC). The TEE given by these two sensors in both conditions and estimated from the metabolic equivalent tasks (MET) in CC served as references during the creation and evaluation of the function. The TEE mean gap in absolute value between the function and the three references was 7.0%, 16.4% and 2.7% in CC, and 17.0% and 23.7% according to Armband and Actiheart, respectively, in FLC. This is the first step in the definition of a new feedback mechanism that promotes self-management and daily-efficiency evaluation of physical activity as part of an information system dedicated to the prevention of chronic diseases. PMID:25048352

  9. Estimating activity-related energy expenditure under sedentary conditions using a tri-axial seismic accelerometer.

    PubMed

    van Hees, Vincent T; van Lummel, Rob C; Westerterp, Klaas R

    2009-06-01

    Activity-related energy expenditure (AEE) is difficult to quantify, especially under sedentary conditions. Here, a model was developed using the detected type of physical activity (PA) and movement intensity (MI), based on a tri-axial seismic accelerometer (DynaPort MiniMod; McRoberts B.V., The Hague, the Netherlands), with energy expenditure for PA as a reference. The relation between AEE (J/min/kg), MI, and the type of PA was determined for standardized PAs as performed in a laboratory including: lying, sitting, standing, and walking. AEE (J/min/kg) was calculated from total energy expenditure (TEE) and sleeping metabolic rate (SMR) as assessed with indirect calorimetry ((TEEx0.9)-SMR). Subsequently, the model was validated over 23-h intervals in a respiration chamber. Subjects were 15 healthy women (age: 22+/-2 years; BMI: 24.0+/-4.0 kg/m2). Predicted AEE in the chamber was significantly related to measured AEE both within (r2=0.81+/-0.06, P<0.00001) and between (r2=0.70, P<0.001) subjects. The explained variation in AEE by the model was higher than the explained variation by MI alone. This shows that a tri-axial seismic accelerometer is a valid tool for estimating AEE under sedentary conditions. PMID:19282829

  10. CALCULATING SEPARATE MAGNETIC FREE ENERGY ESTIMATES FOR ACTIVE REGIONS PRODUCING MULTIPLE FLARES: NOAA AR11158

    SciTech Connect

    Tarr, Lucas; Longcope, Dana; Millhouse, Margaret

    2013-06-10

    It is well known that photospheric flux emergence is an important process for stressing coronal fields and storing magnetic free energy, which may then be released during a flare. The Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) captured the entire emergence of NOAA AR 11158. This region emerged as two distinct bipoles, possibly connected underneath the photosphere, yet characterized by different photospheric field evolutions and fluxes. The combined active region complex produced 15 GOES C-class, two M-class, and the X2.2 Valentine's Day Flare during the four days after initial emergence on 2011 February 12. The M and X class flares are of particular interest because they are nonhomologous, involving different subregions of the active region. We use a Magnetic Charge Topology together with the Minimum Current Corona model of the coronal field to model field evolution of the complex. Combining this with observations of flare ribbons in the 1600 A channel of the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on board SDO, we propose a minimization algorithm for estimating the amount of reconnected flux and resulting drop in magnetic free energy during a flare. For the M6.6, M2.2, and X2.2 flares, we find a flux exchange of 4.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 20} Mx, 2.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 20} Mx, and 21.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 20} Mx, respectively, resulting in free energy drops of 3.89 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 30} erg, 2.62 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 30} erg, and 1.68 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 32} erg.

  11. Evaluation of the ability of three physical activity monitors to predict weight change and estimate energy expenditure.

    PubMed

    Correa, John B; Apolzan, John W; Shepard, Desti N; Heil, Daniel P; Rood, Jennifer C; Martin, Corby K

    2016-07-01

    Activity monitors such as the Actical accelerometer, the Sensewear armband, and the Intelligent Device for Energy Expenditure and Activity (IDEEA) are commonly validated against gold standards (e.g., doubly labeled water, or DLW) to determine whether they accurately measure total daily energy expenditure (TEE) or activity energy expenditure (AEE). However, little research has assessed whether these parameters or others (e.g., posture allocation) predict body weight change over time. The aims of this study were to (i) test whether estimated energy expenditure or posture allocation from the devices was associated with weight change during and following a low-calorie diet (LCD) and (ii) compare free-living TEE and AEE predictions from the devices against DLW before weight change. Eighty-seven participants from 2 clinical trials wore 2 of the 3 devices simultaneously for 1 week of a 2-week DLW period. Participants then completed an 8-week LCD and were weighed at the start and end of the LCD and 6 and 12 months after the LCD. More time spent walking at baseline, measured by the IDEEA, significantly predicted greater weight loss during the 8-week LCD. Measures of posture allocation demonstrated medium effect sizes in their relationships with weight change. Bland-Altman analyses indicated that the Sensewear and the IDEEA accurately estimated TEE, and the IDEEA accurately measured AEE. The results suggest that the ability of energy expenditure and posture allocation to predict weight change is limited, and the accuracy of TEE and AEE measurements varies across activity monitoring devices, with multi-sensor monitors demonstrating stronger validity. PMID:27270210

  12. Improved estimates of boreal Fire Radiative Energy using high temporal resolution data and a modified active fire detection algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrett, Kirsten

    2016-04-01

    Reliable estimates of biomass combusted during wildfires can be obtained from satellite observations of fire radiative power (FRP). Total fire radiative energy (FRE) is typically estimated by integrating instantaneous measurements of fire radiative power (FRP) at the time of orbital satellite overpass or geostationary observation. Remotely-sensed FRP products from orbital satellites are usually global in extent, requiring several thresholding and filtering operations to reduce the number of false fire detections. Some filters required for a global product may not be appropriate to fire detection in the boreal forest resulting in errors of omission and increased data processing times. We evaluate the effect of a boreal-specific active fire detection algorithm and estimates of FRP/FRE. Boreal fires are more likely to escape detection due to lower intensity smouldering combustion and sub canopy fires, therefore improvements in boreal fire detection could substantially reduce the uncertainty of emissions from biomass combustion in the region. High temporal resolution data from geostationary satellites have led to improvements in FRE estimation in tropical and temperate forests, but such a perspective is not possible for high latitude ecosystems given the equatorial orbit of geostationary observation. The increased density of overpasses in high latitudes from polar-orbiting satellites, however, may provide adequate temporal sampling for estimating FRE.

  13. Perception and Accuracy of Hispanics in South Florida in Estimating Energy Expenditure for Physical Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    George, Valerie; Escobar, Su-Nui; Harris, Cristen

    2008-01-01

    Background: In 2004, in an attempt to address the current obesity epidemic, the United States Department of Health and Human Services announced a strategy to focus on educating the public on the concept of energy balance. The premise of "Calories Count" was that energy balance is primarily a function of calories in (energy in food) versus calories…

  14. Approach to theoretical estimation of the activation energy of particle aggregation taking ionic nonclassic polarization into account

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qinyi; Tang, Ying; He, Xinhua; Li, Hang

    2015-10-01

    The activation energy of particle aggregation in suspensions is a very important kinetic parameter in a wide range of science and engineering applications. At present, however, there is no theory that can theoretically predict the activation energy. Because the activation energy is often less than 10 kT (where k is the Boltzmann constant and T is the temperature), it is difficult to experimentally measure. In this study, a theory for calculating the activation energy is established. Experimental measurements of the activation energy of montmorillonite aggregation were performed with different electrolyte and particle concentrations using the dynamic light scattering (DLS) technique. The validity of the theory was verified by the experiments. This study confirmed that both the method for activation energy measurements by DLS and the theory for its calculation can be applied to suspensions of polydisperse nonspherical particles. The average kinetic energy at the moment of particle collision in the aggregation process was found to be 0.2 kT, which is less than the instantaneous kinetic energy of a Brownian particle (0.5 kT) because of the viscous resistance of the water medium. This study also shows that adsorbed Na+ is strongly polarized in the electric field near the particle surface, and the polarization increases the effective charge of Na+ from +1 to +1.18.

  15. Estimated United States Transportation Energy Use 2005

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, C A; Simon, A J; Belles, R D

    2011-11-09

    A flow chart depicting energy flow in the transportation sector of the United States economy in 2005 has been constructed from publicly available data and estimates of national energy use patterns. Approximately 31,000 trillion British Thermal Units (trBTUs) of energy were used throughout the United States in transportation activities. Vehicles used in these activities include automobiles, motorcycles, trucks, buses, airplanes, rail, and ships. The transportation sector is powered primarily by petroleum-derived fuels (gasoline, diesel and jet fuel). Biomass-derived fuels, electricity and natural gas-derived fuels are also used. The flow patterns represent a comprehensive systems view of energy used within the transportation sector.

  16. 2007 Estimated International Energy Flows

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, C A; Belles, R D; Simon, A J

    2011-03-10

    An energy flow chart or 'atlas' for 136 countries has been constructed from data maintained by the International Energy Agency (IEA) and estimates of energy use patterns for the year 2007. Approximately 490 exajoules (460 quadrillion BTU) of primary energy are used in aggregate by these countries each year. While the basic structure of the energy system is consistent from country to country, patterns of resource use and consumption vary. Energy can be visualized as it flows from resources (i.e. coal, petroleum, natural gas) through transformations such as electricity generation to end uses (i.e. residential, commercial, industrial, transportation). These flow patterns are visualized in this atlas of 136 country-level energy flow charts.

  17. Ocean Wave Energy Estimation Using Active Satellite Imagery as a Solution of Energy Scarce in Indonesia Case Study: Poteran Island's Water, Madura

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadzir, Z. A.; Karondia, L. A.; Jaelani, L. M.; Sulaiman, A.; Pamungkas, A.; Koenhardono, E. S.; Sulisetyono, A.

    2015-10-01

    Ocean wave energy is one of the ORE (Ocean Renewable Energies) sources, which potential, in which this energy has several advantages over fossil energy and being one of the most researched energy in developed countries nowadays. One of the efforts for mapping ORE potential is by computing energy potential generated from ocean wave, symbolized by Watt per area unit using various methods of observation. SAR (Synthetic Aperture Radar) is one of the hyped and most developed Remote Sensing method used to monitor and map the ocean wave energy potential effectively and fast. SAR imagery processing can be accomplished not only in remote sensing data applications, but using Matrices processing application as well such as MATLAB that utilizing Fast Fourier Transform and Band-Pass Filtering methods undergoing Pre-Processing stage. In this research, the processing and energy estimation from ALOSPALSAR satellite imagery acquired on the 5/12/2009 was accomplished using 2 methods (i.e Magnitude and Wavelength). This resulted in 9 potential locations of ocean wave energy between 0-228 W/m2, and 7 potential locations with ranged value between 182-1317 W/m2. After getting through buffering process with value of 2 km (to facilitate the construction of power plant installation), 9 sites of location were estimated to be the most potential location of ocean wave energy generation in the ocean with average depth of 8.058 m and annual wind speed of 6.553 knot.

  18. Estimation of defect activation energy around pn interfaces of Cu(In,Ga)Se2 solar cells using impedance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakakura, Hidenori; Itagaki, Masayuki; Sugiyama, Mutsumi

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the defect activation energy around the pn interface of Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS)-based solar cells using a simple electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. By applying AC and DC voltages to the solar cells, we observed an “inductive” element around the pn interface, which is ignored in conventional deep-level transient spectroscopy or admittance spectroscopy. A defect model is evaluated by proposing an equivalent circuit that includes a positive/negative constant phase element (CPE) to represent the area around the CdS/CIGS interface. By fitting the impedance data, the CPE index and CPE constant show a relationship with the defect activation energy or defect concentration. This result is significant because it may help reveal the defect properties of CIGS solar cells or any other semiconductor devices.

  19. Estimation of excess energies and activity coefficients for the penternary Ni-Cr-Co-Al-Mo system and its subsystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dogan, A.; Arslan, H.; Dogan, T.

    2015-06-01

    Using different prediction methods, such as the General Solution Model of Kohler and Muggianu, the excess energy and activities of molybdenum for the sections of the phase diagram for the penternary Ni-Cr-Co-Al-Mo system with mole ratios xNi/ xMo = 1, xCr/ xMo = 1, xCo/ xMo = 1, and xAl/ xMo = r = 0.5 and 1, were thermodynamically investigated at a temperature of 2000 K, whereas the excess energy and activities of Bi for the section corresponding to the ternary Bi-Ga-Sb system with mole ratio xGa/ xSb = 1/9 were thermodynamically investigated at a temperature of 1073 K. In the case of r = 0.5 and 1 in the alloys Ni-Cr-Co-Al-Mo, a positive deviation in the activity coefficient was revealed, as molybdenum content increased. Moreover, in the calculations performed in Chou's GSM model, the obtained values for excess Gibbs energies are negative in the whole concentration range of bismuth at 1073 K and exhibit the minimum of about -2.2 kJ/mol at the mole ratio xGa/ xSb = 1/9 in the alloy Bi-Ga-Sb.

  20. Activation Energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gadeken, Owen

    2002-01-01

    Teaming is so common in today's project management environment that most of us assume it comes naturally. We further assume that when presented with meaningful and challenging work, project teams will naturally engage in productive activity to complete their tasks. This assumption is expressed in the simple (but false) equation: Team + Work = Teamwork. Although this equation appears simple and straightforward, it is far from true for most project organizations whose reality is a complex web of institutional norms based on individual achievement and rewards. This is illustrated by the very first successful team experience from my early Air Force career. As a young lieutenant, I was sent to Squadron Officer School, which was the first in the series of Air Force professional military education courses I was required to complete during my career. We were immediately formed into teams of twelve officers. Much of the course featured competition between these teams. As the most junior member of my team, I quickly observed the tremendous pressure to show individual leadership capability. At one point early in the course, almost everyone in our group was vying to become the team leader. This conflict was so intense that it caused us to fail miserably in our first outdoor team building exercise. We spent so much time fighting over leadership that we were unable to complete any of the events on the outdoor obstacle course. This complete lack of success was so disheartening to me that I gave our team little hope for future success. What followed was a very intense period of bickering, conflict, and even shouting matches as our dysfunctional team tried to cope with our early failures and find some way to succeed. British physician and researcher Wilfred Bion (Experiences in Groups, 1961) discovered that there are powerful psychological forces inherent in all groups that divert from accomplishing their primary tasks. To overcome these restraining forces and use the potential

  1. Total-body calcium estimated by delayed gamma neutron activation analysis and dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry.

    PubMed

    Aloia, J F; Ma, R; Vaswani, A; Feuerman, M

    1999-01-01

    Total body calcium (TBCa) in 270 black and white women age 21-79 years was measured concurrently by delayed gamma neutron activation analysis (DGNA) and dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). The mean value for TBCa calculated from DXA was 933 g compared with 730 g for DGNA. By regression, TBCa(DXA(g)) = 1.35 x TBCa(DGNA(g)) -54 (r = 0. 90, r(2) = 81.4%, SEE = 66.9 g). This remarkable difference of 203 g suggests that one or both these methods is not accurate. Adjustment of the regression of DXA versus DGNA for body mass index or trunk thickness explained 8.5-10% of the variability between methods. The unadjusted slope for the DXA values regressed against the DGNA values was 1.35, indicating significant discordance between the methods. There is greater agreement between the two DGNA facilities (Brookhaven National Laboratory and Baylor College of Medicine) and between the various DXA instruments. Either DGNA underestimates TBCa or DXA overestimates total-body bone mineral content. Resolution of these disparate results may possibly be achieved by concurrent measurement of whole human cadavers of different sizes with chemical determination of the calcium content of the ash. In the interim, cross-calibration equations between DGNA and standardized values for DXA for total-body bone mineral content may be used, which will permit reporting of consistent values for TBCa from the two technologies. PMID:10663353

  2. State energy data report 1994: Consumption estimates

    SciTech Connect

    1996-10-01

    This document provides annual time series estimates of State-level energy consumption by major economic sector. The estimates are developed in the State Energy Data System (SEDS), operated by EIA. SEDS provides State energy consumption estimates to members of Congress, Federal and State agencies, and the general public, and provides the historical series needed for EIA`s energy models. Division is made for each energy type and end use sector. Nuclear electric power is included.

  3. Estimation of activation energy for electroporation and pore growth rate in liquid crystalline and gel phases of lipid bilayers using molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Majhi, Amit Kumar; Kanchi, Subbarao; Venkataraman, V; Ayappa, K G; Maiti, Prabal K

    2015-11-28

    Molecular dynamics simulations of electroporation in POPC and DPPC lipid bilayers have been carried out at different temperatures ranging from 230 K to 350 K for varying electric fields. The dynamics of pore formation, including threshold field, pore initiation time, pore growth rate, and pore closure rate after the field is switched off, was studied in both the gel and liquid crystalline (Lα) phases of the bilayers. Using an Arrhenius model of pore initiation kinetics, the activation energy for pore opening was estimated to be 25.6 kJ mol(-1) and 32.6 kJ mol(-1) in the Lα phase of POPC and DPPC lipids respectively at a field strength of 0.32 V nm(-1). The activation energy decreases to 24.2 kJ mol(-1) and 23.7 kJ mol(-1) respectively at a higher field strength of 1.1 V nm(-1). At temperatures below the melting point, the activation energy in the gel phase of POPC and DPPC increases to 28.8 kJ mol(-1) and 34.4 kJ mol(-1) respectively at the same field of 1.1 V nm(-1). The pore closing time was found to be higher in the gel than in the Lα phase. The pore growth rate increases linearly with temperature and quadratically with field, consistent with viscosity limited growth models. PMID:26372335

  4. State Energy Data Report, 1991: Consumption estimates

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    The State Energy Data Report (SEDR) provides annual time series estimates of State-level energy consumption by major economic sector. The estimates are developed in the State Energy Data System (SEDS), which is maintained and operated by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). The goal in maintaining SEDS is to create historical time series of energy consumption by State that are defined as consistently as possible over time and across sectors. SEDS exists for two principal reasons: (1) to provide State energy consumption estimates to the Government, policy makers, and the public; and (2) to provide the historical series necessary for EIA`s energy models.

  5. State energy data report 1993: Consumption estimates

    SciTech Connect

    1995-07-01

    The State Energy Data Report (SEDR) provides annual time series estimates of State-level energy consumption by major economic sector. The estimates are developed in the State Energy Data System (SEDS), which is maintained and operated by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). The goal in maintaining SEDS is to create historical time series of energy consumption by State that are defined as consistently as possible over time and across sectors. SEDS exists for two principal reasons: (1) to provide State energy consumption estimates to Members of Congress, Federal and State agencies, and the general public; and (2) to provide the historical series necessary for EIA`s energy models.

  6. State energy data report 1995 - consumption estimates

    SciTech Connect

    1997-12-01

    The State Energy Data Report (SEDR) provides annual time series estimates of State-level energy consumption by major economic sectors. The estimates are developed in the State Energy Data System (SEDS), which is maintained and operated by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). The goal in maintaining SEDS exists for two principal reasons: (1) to provide State energy consumption estimates to Members of Congress, Federal and State agencies, and the general public, and (2) to provide the historical series necessary for EIA`s energy models.

  7. State energy data report 1996: Consumption estimates

    SciTech Connect

    1999-02-01

    The State Energy Data Report (SEDR) provides annual time series estimates of State-level energy consumption by major economic sectors. The estimates are developed in the Combined State Energy Data System (CSEDS), which is maintained and operated by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). The goal in maintaining CSEDS is to create historical time series of energy consumption by State that are defined as consistently as possible over time and across sectors. CSEDS exists for two principal reasons: (1) to provide State energy consumption estimates to Members of Congress, Federal and State agencies, and the general public and (2) to provide the historical series necessary for EIA`s energy models. To the degree possible, energy consumption has been assigned to five sectors: residential, commercial, industrial, transportation, and electric utility sectors. Fuels covered are coal, natural gas, petroleum, nuclear electric power, hydroelectric power, biomass, and other, defined as electric power generated from geothermal, wind, photovoltaic, and solar thermal energy. 322 tabs.

  8. Estimates of US biomass energy consumption 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-05-06

    This report is the seventh in a series of publications developed by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to quantify the biomass-derived primary energy used by the US economy. It presents estimates of 1991 and 1992 consumption. The objective of this report is to provide updated estimates of biomass energy consumption for use by Congress, Federal and State agencies, biomass producers and end-use sectors, and the public at large.

  9. Estimates of US biomass energy consumption 1992

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1994-05-01

    This report is the seventh in a series of publications developed by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to quantify the biomass-derived primary energy used by the U.S. economy. It presents estimates of 1991 and 1992 consumption. The objective of this report is to provide updated estimates of biomass energy consumption for use by Congress, Federal and State agencies, biomass producers and end-use sectors, and the public at large.

  10. Kinetic Analysis of Isothermal Decomposition Process of Sodium Bicarbonate Using the Weibull Probability Function—Estimation of Density Distribution Functions of the Apparent Activation Energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janković, Bojan

    2009-10-01

    The decomposition process of sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) has been studied by thermogravimetry in isothermal conditions at four different operating temperatures (380 K, 400 K, 420 K, and 440 K). It was found that the experimental integral and differential conversion curves at the different operating temperatures can be successfully described by the isothermal Weibull distribution function with a unique value of the shape parameter ( β = 1.07). It was also established that the Weibull distribution parameters ( β and η) show independent behavior on the operating temperature. Using the integral and differential (Friedman) isoconversional methods, in the conversion (α) range of 0.20 ≤ α ≤ 0.80, the apparent activation energy ( E a ) value was approximately constant ( E a, int = 95.2 kJmol-1 and E a, diff = 96.6 kJmol-1, respectively). The values of E a calculated by both isoconversional methods are in good agreement with the value of E a evaluated from the Arrhenius equation (94.3 kJmol-1), which was expressed through the scale distribution parameter ( η). The Málek isothermal procedure was used for estimation of the kinetic model for the investigated decomposition process. It was found that the two-parameter Šesták-Berggren (SB) autocatalytic model best describes the NaHCO3 decomposition process with the conversion function f(α) = α0.18(1-α)1.19. It was also concluded that the calculated density distribution functions of the apparent activation energies ( ddfE a ’s) are not dependent on the operating temperature, which exhibit the highly symmetrical behavior (shape factor = 1.00). The obtained isothermal decomposition results were compared with corresponding results of the nonisothermal decomposition process of NaHCO3.

  11. Total body carbon and oxygen masses: evaluation of dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry estimation by in vivo neutron activation analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zimian; Pierson, Richard N

    2010-10-01

    Oxygen and carbon are the first and second abundant elements, respectively, in the human body by mass. Although many physiological and pathological processes are accompanied with alteration of total body oxygen (TBO) and carbon (TBC) masses, in vivo measurements of the two elements are limited. Up to now, almost all available information of TBC and TBO is based on in vivo neutron activation (IVNA) analysis which is very expensive and involves moderate radiation exposure. The aim of the present study was to develop and evaluate an alternative strategy for TBC and TBO estimation. Mechanistic models were derived for predicting TBC and TBO masses from dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) and total body water (TBW). Twenty-eight adult subjects were studied. IVNA-measured TBC and TBO masses were used as the criterion. TBC masses predicted by DXA-alone and by DXA-TBW models were 20.8 ± 7.1 kg and 20.6 ± 6.8 kg, respectively, close to the IVNA-measured value (19.5 ± 6.3 kg). There were strong correlations (both with r > 0.95, P < 0.001) between the predicted and measured TBC masses. TBO masses predicted by DXA-alone and by DXA-TBW models were 46.0 ± 9.8 kg and 46.5 ± 9.9 kg, respectively, close to the IVNA-measured value (48.0 ± 10.4 kg). Correlations (both with r > 0.97, P < 0.001) were strong between the predicted and measured TBO masses. Bland-Altman analysis validated the applicability of DXA-based models to predict TBC and TBO masses. As both DXA and TBW dilutions are widely available, low-risk, low-cost techniques, the present study provides a safe and practical method for estimating elemental composition in vivo. PMID:20858915

  12. Total body carbon and oxygen masses: evaluation of dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry estimation by in vivo neutron activation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, ZiMian; Pierson, Richard N., Jr.

    2010-10-01

    Oxygen and carbon are the first and second abundant elements, respectively, in the human body by mass. Although many physiological and pathological processes are accompanied with alteration of total body oxygen (TBO) and carbon (TBC) masses, in vivo measurements of the two elements are limited. Up to now, almost all available information of TBC and TBO is based on in vivo neutron activation (IVNA) analysis which is very expensive and involves moderate radiation exposure. The aim of the present study was to develop and evaluate an alternative strategy for TBC and TBO estimation. Mechanistic models were derived for predicting TBC and TBO masses from dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) and total body water (TBW). Twenty-eight adult subjects were studied. IVNA-measured TBC and TBO masses were used as the criterion. TBC masses predicted by DXA-alone and by DXA-TBW models were 20.8 ± 7.1 kg and 20.6 ± 6.8 kg, respectively, close to the IVNA-measured value (19.5 ± 6.3 kg). There were strong correlations (both with r > 0.95, P < 0.001) between the predicted and measured TBC masses. TBO masses predicted by DXA-alone and by DXA-TBW models were 46.0 ± 9.8 kg and 46.5 ± 9.9 kg, respectively, close to the IVNA-measured value (48.0 ± 10.4 kg). Correlations (both with r > 0.97, P < 0.001) were strong between the predicted and measured TBO masses. Bland-Altman analysis validated the applicability of DXA-based models to predict TBC and TBO masses. As both DXA and TBW dilutions are widely available, low-risk, low-cost techniques, the present study provides a safe and practical method for estimating elemental composition in vivo.

  13. State energy data report 1992: Consumption estimates

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-05-01

    This is a report of energy consumption by state for the years 1960 to 1992. The report contains summaries of energy consumption for the US and by state, consumption by source, comparisons to other energy use reports, consumption by energy use sector, and describes the estimation methodologies used in the preparation of the report. Some years are not listed specifically although they are included in the summary of data.

  14. Estimation of neural energy in microelectrode signals.

    PubMed

    Gaumond, R P; Clement, R; Silva, R; Sander, D

    2004-09-01

    We considered the problem of determining the neural contribution to the signal recorded by an intracortical electrode. We developed a linear least-squares approach to determine the energy fraction of a signal attributable to an arbitrary number of autocorrelation-defined signals buried in noise. Application of the method requires estimation of autocorrelation functions R(ap)(tau) characterizing the action potential (AP) waveforms and R(n)(tau) characterizing background noise. This method was applied to the analysis of chronically implanted microelectrode signals from motor cortex of rat. We found that neural (AP) energy consisted of a large-signal component which grows linearly with the number of threshold-detected neural events and a small-signal component unrelated to the count of threshold-detected AP signals. The addition of pseudorandom noise to electrode signals demonstrated the algorithm's effectiveness for a wide range of noise-to-signal energy ratios (0.08 to 39). We suggest, therefore, that the method could be of use in providing a measure of neural response in situations where clearly identified spike waveforms cannot be isolated, or in providing an additional 'background' measure of microelectrode neural activity to supplement the traditional AP spike count. PMID:15876631

  15. Estimation of neural energy in microelectrode signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaumond, R. P.; Clement, R.; Silva, R.; Sander, D.

    2004-09-01

    We considered the problem of determining the neural contribution to the signal recorded by an intracortical electrode. We developed a linear least-squares approach to determine the energy fraction of a signal attributable to an arbitrary number of autocorrelation-defined signals buried in noise. Application of the method requires estimation of autocorrelation functions Rap(tgr) characterizing the action potential (AP) waveforms and Rn(tgr) characterizing background noise. This method was applied to the analysis of chronically implanted microelectrode signals from motor cortex of rat. We found that neural (AP) energy consisted of a large-signal component which grows linearly with the number of threshold-detected neural events and a small-signal component unrelated to the count of threshold-detected AP signals. The addition of pseudorandom noise to electrode signals demonstrated the algorithm's effectiveness for a wide range of noise-to-signal energy ratios (0.08 to 39). We suggest, therefore, that the method could be of use in providing a measure of neural response in situations where clearly identified spike waveforms cannot be isolated, or in providing an additional 'background' measure of microelectrode neural activity to supplement the traditional AP spike count.

  16. Estimating Energy Expenditure with the RT3 Triaxial Accelerometer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maddison, Ralph; Jiang, Yannan; Vander Hoorn, Stephen; Mhurchu, Cliona Ni; Lawes, Carlene M. M.; Rodgers, Anthony; Rush, Elaine

    2009-01-01

    The RT3 is a relatively new triaxial accelerometer that has replaced the TriTrac. The aim of this study was to validate the RT3 against doubly labeled water (DLW) in a free-living, mixed weight sample of adults. Total energy expenditure (TEE) was measured over a 15-day period using DLW. Activity-related energy expenditure (AEE) was estimated by…

  17. Respiratory effort energy estimation using Doppler radar.

    PubMed

    Shahhaidar, Ehsaneh; Yavari, Ehsan; Young, Jared; Boric-Lubecke, Olga; Stickley, Cris

    2012-01-01

    Human respiratory effort can be harvested to power wearable biosensors and mobile electronic devices. The very first step toward designing a harvester is to estimate available energy and power. This paper describes an estimation of the available power and energy due to the movements of the torso during breathing, using Doppler radar by detecting breathing rate, torso displacement, torso movement velocity and acceleration along the sagittal movement of the torso. The accuracy of the detected variables is verified by two reference methods. The experimental result obtained from a healthy female human subject shows that the available power from circumferential movement can be higher than the power from the sagittal movement. PMID:23365993

  18. Energy assessment: physical activity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Physical activity is an important component of total energy expenditure, contributing to energy intake needs; it also provides certain health benefits. This review chapter provides state-of-the-art information to researchers and clinicians who are interested in developing research studies or interv...

  19. EIA Corrects Errors in Its Drilling Activity Estimates Series

    EIA Publications

    1998-01-01

    The Energy Information Administration (EIA) has published monthly and annual estimates of oil and gas drilling activity since 1978. These data are key information for many industry analysts, serving as a leading indicator of trends in the industry and a barometer of general industry status.

  20. EIA Completes Corrections to Drilling Activity Estimates Series

    EIA Publications

    1999-01-01

    The Energy Information Administration (EIA) has published monthly and annual estimates of oil and gas drilling activity since 1978. These data are key information for many industry analysts, serving as a leading indicator of trends in the industry and a barometer of general industry status.

  1. Revised activation estimates for silicon carbide

    SciTech Connect

    Heinisch, H.L.; Cheng, E.T.; Mann, F.M.

    1996-10-01

    Recent progress in nuclear data development for fusion energy systems includes a reevaluation of neutron activation cross sections for silicon and aluminum. Activation calculations using the newly compiled Fusion Evaluated Nuclear Data Library result in calculated levels of {sup 26}Al in irradiated silicon that are about an order of magnitude lower than the earlier calculated values. Thus, according to the latest internationally accepted nuclear data, SiC is much more attractive as a low activation material, even in first wall applications.

  2. Regional estimates of radiated seismic energy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boatwright, J.; Choy, G.L.; Seekins, L.C.

    2002-01-01

    We revise the spectral technique for estimating radiated energy from recordings of large earthquakes at regional distances (?? 27.5 km from the source, we model the geometrical spreading of the regional wavefield as r-?? where???? = 0.5 for f ??? 0.2 Hz and ?? = 0.7 for f ??? 0.25 Hz. We fit the spectral falloff with distance using a frequency-dependent attenuation Q = 400(f/1.5)0.6, where Q = 400 for f ??? 1.5 Hz. There is little directivity apparent in the corrected velocity spectra: the velocity spectra observed to the northwest along strike are amplified by a factor of 2.5 from 0.3 to 1.0 Hz and those to the southeast are amplified by a factor of 1.6 from 0.3 to 0.7 Hz. We group the stations in NEHRP site classes, using average 1-D velocity structures to estimate site amplification as a function of frequency and assuming 0.40 ??? ?? ??? 0.55 sec for the near-surface attenuation. We increase the amplification of the soft-soil sites from 0.1 to 1.0 Hz by a factor that reaches 1.7 at 0.3 Hz because they are more strongly amplified than the NEHRP-D velocity structure predicts. We combine the 65 single-station estimates of radiated energy using an equal-azimuth weighting scheme that compensates for station distribution and incorporates the observed directivity, yielding a regional estimate of Es = 3.4 ?? 0.7 ?? 1022 dyne cm. This regional estimate of radiated energy corresponds closely to the teleseismic estimate of Es = 3.2 ?? 1022 dyne cm.

  3. Estimating environmental benefits of energy programs

    SciTech Connect

    Baechler, M.C.; Schrock, D.W.

    1995-07-01

    Three national reporting programs that either collect or report information on energy savings and the associated emissions reductions from DSM programs are the Conservation Verification Protocols (CVP), the Greenhouse Gas Voluntary Reporting Program (VRP), and the Green Lights Program. The CVP were enacted to report the atmospheric emissions reductions of S0{sub 2} and N0{sub 2}. The VRP was mandated in the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPAct) Section 1605(b) to report CO{sub 2}, emissions reductions. Green Lights is a program designed to reduce emissions by encouraging energy-efficient lighting. In this paper we concentrate on how the verification methods, default emission factors and reporting mechanisms affect the accuracy of the reported energy and emissions savings. Additionally, we focus on the dynamic nature of predicted emissions reductions to gauge the accuracy of predictions over time. If conservation programs are designed to affect existing powerplants, if no load growth is anticipated, and if existing plants will not require replacement, a simple static analysis based on an existing resource mix may be acceptable. This approach is enhanced by defining base case, intermediate, and peak resources. However, if today`s decisions will affect tomorrow`s resource decisions, or if the estimates will be used to establish important milestones (such as emission credits), it is prudent to conduct an analysis that captures most incumbent uncertainties. These uncertainties include future resource decisions and the regional character of energy resources, which may not be captured by national estimates and simple extrapolation techniques. While some estimation methods, such as use of default emission factors, produce reasonable national average numbers, the estimates may not be applicable to specific regions. The environmental and economic value of programs may be misstated.

  4. Science Activities in Energy: Chemical Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oak Ridge Associated Universities, TN.

    Presented is a science activities in energy package which includes 15 activities relating to chemical energy. Activities are simple, concrete experiments for fourth, fifth and sixth grades which illustrate principles and problems relating to energy. Each activity is outlined on a single card which is introduced by a question. A teacher's…

  5. Science Activities in Energy: Electrical Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oak Ridge Associated Universities, TN.

    Presented is a science activities in energy package which includes 16 activities relating to electrical energy. Activities are simple, concrete experiments for fourth, fifth and sixth grades which illustrate principles and problems relating to energy. Each activity is outlined in a single card which is introduced by a question. A teacher's…

  6. Science Activities in Energy: Solar Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oak Ridge Associated Universities, TN.

    Presented is a science activities in energy package which includes 12 activities relating to solar energy. Activities are simple, concrete experiments for fourth, fifth, and sixth grades, which illustrate principles and problems relating to energy. Each activity is outlined on a single card which is introduced by a question. A teacher's supplement…

  7. Activity estimation in radioimmunotherapy using magnetic nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Rajabi, Hossein; Johari Daha, Fariba

    2015-01-01

    Objective Estimation of activity accumulated in tumor and organs is very important in predicting the response of radiopharmaceuticals treatment. In this study, we synthesized 177Lutetium (177Lu)-trastuzumab-iron oxide nanoparticles as a double radiopharmaceutical agent for treatment and better estimation of organ activity in a new way by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Methods 177Lu-trastuzumab-iron oxide nanoparticles were synthesized and all the quality control tests such as labeling yield, nanoparticle size determination, stability in buffer and blood serum up to 4 d, immunoreactivity and biodistribution in normal mice were determined. In mice bearing breast tumor, liver and tumor activities were calculated with three methods: single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), MRI and organ extraction, which were compared with each other. Results The good results of quality control tests (labeling yield: 61%±2%, mean nanoparticle hydrodynamic size: 41±15 nm, stability in buffer: 86%±5%, stability in blood serum: 80%±3%, immunoreactivity: 80%±2%) indicated that 177Lu-trastuzumab-iron oxide nanoparticles could be used as a double radiopharmaceutical agent in mice bearing tumor. Results showed that 177Lu-trastuzumab-iron oxide nanoparticles with MRI had the ability to measure organ activities more accurate than SPECT. Conclusions Co-conjugating radiopharmaceutical to MRI contrast agents such as iron oxide nanoparticles may be a good way for better dosimetry in nuclear medicine treatment. PMID:25937783

  8. Estimative of energy budget in Brazilian Savanna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santanna, F. B.; Arruda, P. H.; Pinto-Jr, O. B.; Nogueira, J. D.

    2013-12-01

    The main goal of this work was to estimate the sensible (H) and latent (LE) heat flux using the eddy covariance method in a Cerrado "Campo Sujo" area, basically with herb-shrub physiognomy, sparse woody vegetation and approximately 2m height. The geographical position of the Cerrado, altitude, latitude, longitude, climate and weather conditions are determined by the dynamics of the atmosphere that affects the whole South America and consequently influence the ecological framework of ecosystems. The results shown by the components considered in the energy balance were more significant during the day, which the atmospheric boundary layer extends from the ground to about 50 or 100 meters height, showing greater instability and turbulence (u* > 0.2 m / s), and this turbulence is what justifies the use of the eddy covariance method to estimate the sensible and latent heat flux. The Cerrado presents seasonal difference between the densities estimates of sensible (H) and latent (LE) heat flux. During the rainy season the sensible heat flux (H) was 25% and the latent heat flux (LE) 54%. During the dry season the sensible heat flux (H) was 42% and the latent heat flux (LE) 30% of the energy budget.

  9. 16 CFR 305.5 - Determinations of estimated annual energy consumption, estimated annual operating cost, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... consumption, estimated annual operating cost, and energy efficiency rating, and of water use rate. 305.5... energy efficiency rating, and of water use rate. (a) Procedures for determining the estimated annual energy consumption, the estimated annual operating costs, the energy efficiency ratings, and the...

  10. 16 CFR 305.5 - Determinations of estimated annual energy consumption, estimated annual operating cost, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... consumption, estimated annual operating cost, and energy efficiency rating, and of water use rate. 305.5... energy efficiency rating, and of water use rate. (a) Procedures for determining the estimated annual energy consumption, the estimated annual operating costs, the energy efficiency ratings, and the...

  11. 16 CFR 305.5 - Determinations of estimated annual energy consumption, estimated annual operating cost, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... consumption, estimated annual operating cost, and energy efficiency rating, and of water use rate. 305.5... energy efficiency rating, and of water use rate. (a) Procedures for determining the estimated annual energy consumption, the estimated annual operating costs, the energy efficiency ratings, and the...

  12. Changing Conceptions of Activation Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pacey, Philip D.

    1981-01-01

    Provides background material which relates to the concept of activation energy, fundamental in the study of chemical kinetics. Compares the related concepts of the Arrhenius activation energy, the activation energy at absolute zero, the enthalpy of activation, and the threshold energy. (CS)

  13. Using Smartphone Sensors for Improving Energy Expenditure Estimation.

    PubMed

    Pande, Amit; Zhu, Jindan; Das, Aveek K; Zeng, Yunze; Mohapatra, Prasant; Han, Jay J

    2015-01-01

    Energy expenditure (EE) estimation is an important factor in tracking personal activity and preventing chronic diseases, such as obesity and diabetes. Accurate and real-time EE estimation utilizing small wearable sensors is a difficult task, primarily because the most existing schemes work offline or use heuristics. In this paper, we focus on accurate EE estimation for tracking ambulatory activities (walking, standing, climbing upstairs, or downstairs) of a typical smartphone user. We used built-in smartphone sensors (accelerometer and barometer sensor), sampled at low frequency, to accurately estimate EE. Using a barometer sensor, in addition to an accelerometer sensor, greatly increases the accuracy of EE estimation. Using bagged regression trees, a machine learning technique, we developed a generic regression model for EE estimation that yields upto 96% correlation with actual EE. We compare our results against the state-of-the-art calorimetry equations and consumer electronics devices (Fitbit and Nike+ FuelBand). The newly developed EE estimation algorithm demonstrated superior accuracy compared with currently available methods. The results were calibrated against COSMED K4b2 calorimeter readings. PMID:27170901

  14. Using Smartphone Sensors for Improving Energy Expenditure Estimation

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jindan; Das, Aveek K.; Zeng, Yunze; Mohapatra, Prasant; Han, Jay J.

    2015-01-01

    Energy expenditure (EE) estimation is an important factor in tracking personal activity and preventing chronic diseases, such as obesity and diabetes. Accurate and real-time EE estimation utilizing small wearable sensors is a difficult task, primarily because the most existing schemes work offline or use heuristics. In this paper, we focus on accurate EE estimation for tracking ambulatory activities (walking, standing, climbing upstairs, or downstairs) of a typical smartphone user. We used built-in smartphone sensors (accelerometer and barometer sensor), sampled at low frequency, to accurately estimate EE. Using a barometer sensor, in addition to an accelerometer sensor, greatly increases the accuracy of EE estimation. Using bagged regression trees, a machine learning technique, we developed a generic regression model for EE estimation that yields upto 96% correlation with actual EE. We compare our results against the state-of-the-art calorimetry equations and consumer electronics devices (Fitbit and Nike+ FuelBand). The newly developed EE estimation algorithm demonstrated superior accuracy compared with currently available methods. The results were calibrated against COSMED K4b2 calorimeter readings. PMID:27170901

  15. A problem with estimating the pseudo- activation energy of kerogen thermal maturation from Connan's time-temperature relation in oil genesis.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barker, C.E.

    1984-01-01

    Connan's time-temperature relation in oil genesis as derived from first-order reaction kinetics is algebraically correct, but its application to natural petroleum generation is invalidated by the assumption that the ratio of initial kerogen concentration to degraded kerogen concentration is constant from deposition to the initiation of intense oil generation. The ratio can only remain constant if no reaction is occurring and, therefore, Connan's data on 'reaction time' in petroleum generation (assumed to be the age of the sediment) only measures the time elapsed since the system formed. Thus, the widely cited pseudo-activation energy of 11-14 kcal/mole computed from Connan's equation for the start of oil generation from kerogen is meaningless.-Author

  16. WAPA Daily Energy Accounting Activities

    1990-10-01

    ISA (Interchange, Scheduling, & Accounting) is the interchange scheduling system used by the DOE Western Area Power Administration to perform energy accounting functions associated with the daily activities of the Watertown Operations Office (WOO). The system's primary role is to provide accounting functions for scheduled energy which is exchanged with other power companies and power operating organizations. The system has a secondary role of providing a historical record of all scheduled interchange transactions. The followingmore » major functions are performed by ISA: scheduled energy accounting for received and delivered energy; generation scheduling accounting for both fossil and hydro-electric power plants; metered energy accounting for received and delivered totals; energy accounting for Direct Current (D.C.) Ties; regulation accounting; automatic generation control set calculations; accounting summaries for Basin, Heartland Consumers Power District, and the Missouri Basin Municipal Power Agency; calculation of estimated generation for the Laramie River Station plant; daily and monthly reports; and dual control areas.« less

  17. Energy Adventure Center. Activity Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlton, Linda L.

    Energy activities are provided in this student activity book. They include: (1) an energy walk; (2) forms of energy in the home; (3) energy conversion; (4) constructing a solar hot dog cooker (with instructions for drawing a parabola); (5) interviewing senior citizens to learn about energy use in the past; (6) packaging materials; (7) insulation;…

  18. Activities Handbook for Energy Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeVito, Alfred; Krockover, Gerald H.

    The purpose of this handbook is to present information about energy and to translate this information into learning activities for children. Chapter 1, "Energy: A Delicate Dilemma," presents activities intended to provide an introduction to energy and energy usage. Chapter 2, "What are the Sources of Energy?" provides background information and…

  19. Science Activities in Energy: Conservation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oak Ridge Associated Universities, TN.

    Presented is a science activities in energy package which includes 14 activities relating to energy conservation. Activities are simple, concrete experiments for fourth, fifth and sixth grades, which illustrate principles and problems relating to energy. Each activity is outlined on a simple card which is introduced by a question. A teacher's…

  20. Science Activities in Energy: Wind Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oak Ridge Associated Universities, TN.

    Included in this science activities energy package are 12 activities related to wind energy for elementary students. Each activity is outlined on a single card and is introduced by a question. Topics include: (1) At what time of day is there enough wind to make electricity where you live?; (2) Where is the windiest spot on your schoolground?; and…

  1. Total energy expenditure estimated using foot-ground contact pedometry.

    PubMed

    Hoyt, Reed W; Buller, Mark J; Santee, William R; Yokota, Miyo; Weyand, Peter G; Delany, James P

    2004-02-01

    Routine walking and running, by increasing daily total energy expenditure (TEE), can play a significant role in reducing the likelihood of obesity. The objective of this field study was to compare TEE estimated using foot-ground contact time (Tc)-pedometry (TEE(PEDO)) with that measured by the criterion doubly labeled water (DLW) method. Eight male U.S. Marine test volunteers [27 +/- 4 years of age (mean +/- SD); weight = 83.2 +/- 10.7 kg; height = 182.2 +/- 4.5 cm; body fat = 17.0 +/- 2.9%] engaged in a field training exercise were studied over 2 days. TEE(PEDO) was defined as (calculated resting energy expenditure + estimated thermic effect of food + metabolic cost of physical activity), where physical activity was estimated by Tc-pedometry. Tc-pedometry was used to differentiate inactivity, activity other than exercise (i.e., non-exercise activity thermogenesis, or NEAT), and the metabolic cost of locomotion (M(LOCO)), where M(LOCO) was derived from total weight (body weight + load weight) and accelerometric measurements of Tc. TEE(PEDO) data were compared with TEEs measured by the DLW (2H2(18)O) method (TEE(DLW)): TEE(DLW) = 15.27 +/- 1.65 MJ/day and TEE(PEDO) = 15.29 +/- 0.83 MJ/day. Mean bias (i.e., TEE(PEDO) - TEE(DLW)) was 0.02 MJ, and mean error (SD of individual differences between TEE(PEDO) and TEE(DLW)) was 1.83 MJ. The Tc-pedometry method provided a valid estimate of the average TEE of a small group of physically active subjects where walking was the dominant activity. PMID:15000774

  2. Systematic Error Estimation for Chemical Reaction Energies.

    PubMed

    Simm, Gregor N; Reiher, Markus

    2016-06-14

    For a theoretical understanding of the reactivity of complex chemical systems, accurate relative energies between intermediates and transition states are required. Despite its popularity, density functional theory (DFT) often fails to provide sufficiently accurate data, especially for molecules containing transition metals. Due to the huge number of intermediates that need to be studied for all but the simplest chemical processes, DFT is, to date, the only method that is computationally feasible. Here, we present a Bayesian framework for DFT that allows for error estimation of calculated properties. Since the optimal choice of parameters in present-day density functionals is strongly system dependent, we advocate for a system-focused reparameterization. While, at first sight, this approach conflicts with the first-principles character of DFT that should make it, in principle, system independent, we deliberately introduce system dependence to be able to assign a stochastically meaningful error to the system-dependent parametrization, which makes it nonarbitrary. By reparameterizing a functional that was derived on a sound physical basis to a chemical system of interest, we obtain a functional that yields reliable confidence intervals for reaction energies. We demonstrate our approach on the example of catalytic nitrogen fixation. PMID:27159007

  3. Practical aspects of estimating energy components in rodents

    PubMed Central

    van Klinken, Jan B.; van den Berg, Sjoerd A. A.; van Dijk, Ko Willems

    2013-01-01

    Recently there has been an increasing interest in exploiting computational and statistical techniques for the purpose of component analysis of indirect calorimetry data. Using these methods it becomes possible to dissect daily energy expenditure into its components and to assess the dynamic response of the resting metabolic rate (RMR) to nutritional and pharmacological manipulations. To perform robust component analysis, however, is not straightforward and typically requires the tuning of parameters and the preprocessing of data. Moreover the degree of accuracy that can be attained by these methods depends on the configuration of the system, which must be properly taken into account when setting up experimental studies. Here, we review the methods of Kalman filtering, linear, and penalized spline regression, and minimal energy expenditure estimation in the context of component analysis and discuss their results on high resolution datasets from mice and rats. In addition, we investigate the effect of the sample time, the accuracy of the activity sensor, and the washout time of the chamber on the estimation accuracy. We found that on the high resolution data there was a strong correlation between the results of Kalman filtering and penalized spline (P-spline) regression, except for the activity respiratory quotient (RQ). For low resolution data the basal metabolic rate (BMR) and resting RQ could still be estimated accurately with P-spline regression, having a strong correlation with the high resolution estimate (R2 > 0.997; sample time of 9 min). In contrast, the thermic effect of food (TEF) and activity related energy expenditure (AEE) were more sensitive to a reduction in the sample rate (R2 > 0.97). In conclusion, for component analysis on data generated by single channel systems with continuous data acquisition both Kalman filtering and P-spline regression can be used, while for low resolution data from multichannel systems P-spline regression gives more robust

  4. Estimation of Evapotranspiration as a function of Photosynthetic Active Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wesley, E.; Migliaccio, K.; Judge, J.

    2012-12-01

    The purpose of this research project is to more accurately measure the water balance and energy movements to properly allocate water resources at the Snapper Creek Site in Miami-Dade County, FL, by quantifying and estimating evapotranspiration (ET). ET is generally estimated using weather based equations, this project focused on estimating ET as a function of Photosynthetic Active Radiation (PAR). The project objectives were first to compose a function of PAR and calculated coefficients that can accurately estimate daily ET values with the least amount of variables used in its estimation equation, and second, to compare the newly identified ET estimation PAR function to TURC estimations, in comparison to our actual Eddy Covariance (EC) ET data and determine the differences in ET values. PAR, volumetric water content (VWC), and temperature (T) data were quality checked and used in developing singular and multiple variable regression models fit with SigmaPlot software. Fifteen different ET estimation equations were evaluated against EC ET and TURC estimated ET using R2 and slope factors. The selected equation that best estimated EC ET was cross validated using a 5 month data set; its daily and monthly ET values and sums were compared against the commonly used TURC equation. Using a multiple variable regression model, an equation with three variables (i.e., VWC, T, and PAR) was identified that best fit EC ET daily data. However, a regression was also found that used only PAR and provided ET predictions of similar accuracy. The PAR based regression model predicted daily EC ET more accurately than the traditional TURC method. Using only PAR to estimate ET reduces the input variables as compared to using the TURC model which requires T and solar radiation. Thus, not only is the PAR approach more accurate but also more cost effective. The PAR-based ET estimation equation derived in this study may be over fit considering only 5 months of data were used to produce the PAR

  5. 16 CFR 305.5 - Determinations of estimated annual energy consumption, estimated annual operating cost, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Determinations of estimated annual energy consumption, estimated annual operating cost, and energy efficiency rating, water use rate, and other required disclosure content. 305.5 Section 305.5 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION REGULATIONS UNDER SPECIFIC ACTS OF CONGRESS ENERGY...

  6. Science Activities in Energy: Solar Energy II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oak Ridge Associated Universities, TN.

    Included in this science activities energy package are 14 activities related to solar energy for secondary students. Each activity is outlined on a single card and is introduced by a question such as: (1) how much solar heat comes from the sun? or (2) how many times do you have to run water through a flat-plate collector to get a 10 degree rise in…

  7. Activities for Teaching Solar Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mason, Jack Lee; Cantrell, Joseph S.

    1980-01-01

    Plans and activities are suggested for teaching elementary children about solar energy. Directions are included for constructing a flat plate collector and a solar oven. Activities for a solar field day are given. (SA)

  8. Estimates of U.S. Biomass Energy Consumption 1992

    EIA Publications

    1994-01-01

    This report is the seventh in a series of publications developed by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to quantify the biomass derived primary energy used by the U.S. economy. It presents estimates of 1991 and 1992 consumption.

  9. Reported energy intake by weight status, day and estimated energy requirement among adults: NHANES 2003-2008

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objective: To describe energy intake reporting by gender, weight status, and interview sequence and to compare reported intakes to the Estimated Energy Requirement at different levels of physical activity. Methods: Energy intake was self-reported by 24-hour recall on two occasions (day 1 and day 2)...

  10. Incorporating energy trade into national greenhouse gas emission estimates

    SciTech Connect

    Ashton, W.B.; Kinzey, B.R.; Dailey, R.G.; Spencer, D.F.

    1994-12-31

    As negotiations aimed at establishing national emissions reductions targets proceed, it is very important to understand the differences between alternative methods of estimating and attributing emissions to the respective countries. Current estimates of national energy-related greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions frequently consider only domestic emissions sources. However, this approach may inaccurately reflect the true level of global emissions resulting from energy consumed by a particular economy, particularly if it engages in significant levels of energy trade. Alternative estimation methods may more accurately reflect these ``trade-based`` emissions. In this paper, the authors propose a method of estimating emissions, by country, that incorporates the effects of international energy trade. The paper shows that estimated trade-based emission levels for a country can significantly differ from domestic-based emissions estimates, depending on that country`s levels of fossil energy imports and exports relative to its domestic energy consumption. Four preliminary case studies are presented to demonstrate the impact of energy trade on emissions estimates, including the United States, Japan, France, and Saudi Arabia. Countries that are large exporters of fossil energy (like Saudi Arabia) tend to have reduced emissions attributable to their economy, while the converse is true for large energy importers (such as Japan).

  11. World Energy Projection System Plus (WEPS ): Global Activity Module

    EIA Publications

    2013-01-01

    World Energy Projection System Plus Model Documentation: Global Activity Module Documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the World Energy Projection Plus (WEPS ) Global Activity Module (GAM) used to develop the International Energy Outlook for 2013 (IEO2013). The report catalogues and describes the module assumptions, computations, methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and mainframe source code.

  12. Wind energy in China: Estimating the potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Jiahai

    2016-07-01

    Persistent and significant curtailment has cast concern over the prospects of wind power in China. A comprehensive assessment of the production of energy from wind has identified grid-integrated wind generation potential at 11.9–14% of China's projected energy demand by 2030.

  13. Improved fire radiative energy estimation in high latitude ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melchiorre, A.; Boschetti, L.

    2014-12-01

    Scientists, land managers, and policy makers are facing new challenges as fire regimes are evolving as a result of climate change (Westerling et al. 2006). In high latitudes fires are increasing in number and size as temperatures increase and precipitation decreases (Kasischke and Turetsky 2006). Peatlands, like the large complexes in the Alaskan tundra, are burning more frequently and severely as a result of these changes, releasing large amounts of greenhouse gases. Remotely sensed data are routinely used to monitor the location of active fires and the extent of burned areas, but they are not sensitive to the depth of the organic soil layer combusted, resulting in underestimation of peatland greenhouse gas emissions when employing the conventional 'bottom up' approach (Seiler and Crutzen 1980). An alternative approach would be the direct estimation of the biomass burned from the energy released by the fire (Fire Radiative Energy, FRE) (Wooster et al. 2003). Previous works (Boschetti and Roy 2009; Kumar et al. 2011) showed that the sampling interval of polar orbiting satellite systems severely limits the accuracy of the FRE in tropical ecosystems (up to four overpasses a day with MODIS), but because of the convergence of the orbits, more observations are available at higher latitudes. In this work, we used a combination of MODIS thermal data and Landsat optical data for the estimation of biomass burned in peatland ecosystems. First, the global MODIS active fire detection algorithm (Giglio et al. 2003) was modified, adapting the temperature thresholds to maximize the number of detections in boreal regions. Then, following the approach proposed by Boschetti and Roy (2009), the FRP point estimations were interpolated in time and space to cover the full temporal and spatial extent of the burned area, mapped with Landsat5 TM data. The methodology was tested on a large burned area in Alaska, and the results compared to published field measurements (Turetsky et al. 2011).

  14. 16 CFR 305.5 - Determinations of estimated annual energy consumption, estimated annual operating cost, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... consumption, estimated annual operating cost, and energy efficiency rating, and of water use rate. 305.5... energy efficiency rating, and of water use rate. Link to an amendment published at 75 FR 41713, July 19... operating costs, the energy efficiency ratings, and the efficacy factors of the following covered...

  15. Implicit solvent methods for free energy estimation

    PubMed Central

    Decherchi, Sergio; Masetti, Matteo; Vyalov, Ivan; Rocchia, Walter

    2014-01-01

    Solvation is a fundamental contribution in many biological processes and especially in molecular binding. Its estimation can be performed by means of several computational approaches. The aim of this review is to give an overview of existing theories and methods to estimate solvent effects giving a specific focus on the category of implicit solvent models and their use in Molecular Dynamics. In many of these models, the solvent is considered as a continuum homogenous medium, while the solute can be represented at the atomic detail and at different levels of theory. Despite their degree of approximation, implicit methods are still widely employed due to their trade-off between accuracy and efficiency. Their derivation is rooted in the statistical mechanics and integral equations disciplines, some of the related details being provided here. Finally, methods that combine implicit solvent models and molecular dynamics simulation, are briefly described. PMID:25193298

  16. Estimating energy expenditure using body-worn accelerometers: a comparison of methods, sensors number and positioning.

    PubMed

    Altini, Marco; Penders, Julien; Vullers, Ruud; Amft, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    Several methods to estimate energy expenditure (EE) using body-worn sensors exist; however, quantifications of the differences in estimation error are missing. In this paper, we compare three prevalent EE estimation methods and five body locations to provide a basis for selecting among methods, sensors number, and positioning. We considered 1) counts-based estimation methods, 2) activity-specific estimation methods using METs lookup, and 3) activity-specific estimation methods using accelerometer features. The latter two estimation methods utilize subsequent activity classification and EE estimation steps. Furthermore, we analyzed accelerometer sensors number and on-body positioning to derive optimal EE estimation results during various daily activities. To evaluate our approach, we implemented a study with 15 participants that wore five accelerometer sensors while performing a wide range of sedentary, household, lifestyle, and gym activities at different intensities. Indirect calorimetry was used in parallel to obtain EE reference data. Results show that activity-specific estimation methods using accelerometer features can outperform counts-based methods by 88% and activity-specific methods using METs lookup for active clusters by 23%. No differences were found between activity-specific methods using METs lookup and using accelerometer features for sedentary clusters. For activity-specific estimation methods using accelerometer features, differences in EE estimation error between the best combinations of each number of sensors (1 to 5), analyzed with repeated measures ANOVA, were not significant. Thus, we conclude that choosing the best performing single sensor does not reduce EE estimation accuracy compared to a five sensors system and can reliably be used. However, EE estimation errors can increase up to 80% if a nonoptimal sensor location is chosen. PMID:24691168

  17. Physical Activity in Vietnam: Estimates and Measurement Issues

    PubMed Central

    Bui, Tan Van; Blizzard, Christopher Leigh; Luong, Khue Ngoc; Truong, Ngoc Le Van; Tran, Bao Quoc; Otahal, Petr; Srikanth, Velandai; Nelson, Mark Raymond; Au, Thuy Bich; Ha, Son Thai; Phung, Hai Ngoc; Tran, Mai Hoang; Callisaya, Michele; Gall, Seana

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Our aims were to provide the first national estimates of physical activity (PA) for Vietnam, and to investigate issues affecting their accuracy. Methods Measurements were made using the Global Physical Activity Questionnaire (GPAQ) on a nationally-representative sample of 14706 participants (46.5% males, response 64.1%) aged 25−64 years selected by multi-stage stratified cluster sampling. Results Approximately 20% of Vietnamese people had no measureable PA during a typical week, but 72.9% (men) and 69.1% (women) met WHO recommendations for PA by adults for their age. On average, 52.0 (men) and 28.0 (women) Metabolic Equivalent Task (MET)-hours/week (largely from work activities) were reported. Work and total PA were higher in rural areas and varied by season. Less than 2% of respondents provided incomplete information, but an additional one-in-six provided unrealistically high values of PA. Those responsible for reporting errors included persons from rural areas and all those with unstable work patterns. Box-Cox transformation (with an appropriate constant added) was the most successful method of reducing the influence of large values, but energy-scaled values were most strongly associated with pathophysiological outcomes. Conclusions Around seven-in-ten Vietnamese people aged 25–64 years met WHO recommendations for total PA, which was mainly from work activities and higher in rural areas. Nearly all respondents were able to report their activity using the GPAQ, but with some exaggerated values and seasonal variation in reporting. Data transformation provided plausible summary values, but energy-scaling fared best in association analyses. PMID:26485044

  18. Acoustic Energy Estimates in Inhomogeneous Moving Media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farassat, F.; Farris, Mark

    1999-01-01

    In ducted fan engine noise research, there is a need for defining a simple and easy to use acoustic energy conservation law to help in quantification of noise control techniques. There is a well known conservation law relating acoustic energy and acoustic energy flux in the case of an isentropic irrotational flow. Several different approaches have been taken to generalize this conservation law. For example, Morfey finds an identity by separating out the irrotational part of the perturbed flow. Myers is able to find a series of indentities by observing an algebraic relationship between the basic conservation of energy equation for a background flow and the underlying equations of motion. In an approximate sense, this algebraic relationship is preserved under perturbation. A third approach which seems to have not been pursued in the literature is a result known as Noether's theorem. There is a Lagrangian formulation for the Euler equation of fluid mechanics. Noether's theorem says that any group action that leaves the Lagrangian action invariant leads to a conserved quantity. This presentation will include a survey of current results regarding acoustic energy and preliminary results on the symmetries of the Lagrangian.

  19. Estimates of activation in arterial smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Singer, H A; Kamm, K E; Murphy, R A

    1986-09-01

    We have previously described the onset of a "latch" state in the swine carotid media after K+ depolarization. This state was characterized by maintained stress after a decrease in shortening velocities and in the level of cross-bridge phosphorylation. The present experiments were designed to determine whether there were changes in other mechanical properties in swine carotid media associated with the onset of the latch state. Medial strips (less than 500 microM thick), incubated in physiological salt solution (PSS) at 37 degrees C at their optimal length (Lo), were subjected to ramp stretches (5.86 mm/s) of 5% Lo. The active stress (Sa) response to stretch was computed by subtraction of the passive element contribution (as determined from identical stretches after 30 min incubation in Ca2+-free PSS) from the total response in the activated muscle. Transitions in the total and active stress responses to stretch were observed in strips stimulated with 109 mM K+ for 1 min or longer and were interpreted as yielding of the contractile apparatus. Active dynamic stiffness (dS/dLo) calculated from the initial 1% Lo portion of the stretch response, correlated linearly with active stress over a wide range. Maximal stress and dynamic stiffness were reached by 1 min and were maintained for at least 30 min in K+-depolarized preparations. However, yield stress increased significantly between 1 and 10 min, and there was a large increase in the length at which yield was observed (1.09 +/- 0.06 to 1.86 +/- 0.10% Lo; n = 9). These increases were maintained between 10 and 30 min.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3752237

  20. FIRST ORDER ESTIMATES OF ENERGY REQUIREMENTS FOR POLLUTION CONTROL

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report presents estimates of the energy demand attributable to environmental control of pollution from 'stationary point sources.' This class of pollution source includes powerplants, factories, refineries, municipal waste water treatment plants, etc., but excludes 'mobile s...

  1. Estimating phytoplankton photosynthesis by active fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Falkowski, P.G.; Kolber, Z.

    1992-01-01

    Photosynthesis can be described by target theory, At low photon flux densities, photosynthesis is a linear function of irradiance (I), The number of reaction centers (n), their effective absorption capture cross section {sigma}, and a quantum yield {phi}. As photosynthesis becomes increasingly light saturated, an increased fraction of reaction centers close. At light saturation the maximum photosynthetic rate is given as the product of the number of reaction centers (n) and their maximum electron transport rate (I/{tau}). Using active fluorometry it is possible to measure non-destructively and in real time the fraction of open or closed reaction centers under ambient irradiance conditions in situ, as well as {sigma} and {phi} {tau} can be readily, calculated from knowledge of the light saturation parameter, I{sub k} (which can be deduced by in situ by active fluorescence measurements) and {sigma}. We built a pump and probe fluorometer, which is interfaced with a CTD. The instrument measures the fluorescence yield of a weak probe flash preceding (f{sub 0}) and succeeding (f{sub 0}) a saturating pump flash. Profiles of the these fluorescence yields are used to derive the instantaneous rate of gross photosynthesis in natural phytoplankton communities without any incubation. Correlations with short-term simulated in situ radiocarbon measurements are extremely high. The average slope between photosynthesis derived from fluorescence and that measured by radiocarbon is 1.15 and corresponds to the average photosynthetic quotient. The intercept is about 15% of the maximum radiocarbon uptake and corresponds to the average net community respiration. Profiles of photosynthesis and sections showing the variability in its composite parameters reveal a significant effect of nutrient availability on biomass specific rates of photosynthesis in the ocean.

  2. Estimating phytoplankton photosynthesis by active fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Falkowski, P.G.; Kolber, Z.

    1992-10-01

    Photosynthesis can be described by target theory, At low photon flux densities, photosynthesis is a linear function of irradiance (I), The number of reaction centers (n), their effective absorption capture cross section {sigma}, and a quantum yield {phi}. As photosynthesis becomes increasingly light saturated, an increased fraction of reaction centers close. At light saturation the maximum photosynthetic rate is given as the product of the number of reaction centers (n) and their maximum electron transport rate (I/{tau}). Using active fluorometry it is possible to measure non-destructively and in real time the fraction of open or closed reaction centers under ambient irradiance conditions in situ, as well as {sigma} and {phi} {tau} can be readily, calculated from knowledge of the light saturation parameter, I{sub k} (which can be deduced by in situ by active fluorescence measurements) and {sigma}. We built a pump and probe fluorometer, which is interfaced with a CTD. The instrument measures the fluorescence yield of a weak probe flash preceding (f{sub 0}) and succeeding (f{sub 0}) a saturating pump flash. Profiles of the these fluorescence yields are used to derive the instantaneous rate of gross photosynthesis in natural phytoplankton communities without any incubation. Correlations with short-term simulated in situ radiocarbon measurements are extremely high. The average slope between photosynthesis derived from fluorescence and that measured by radiocarbon is 1.15 and corresponds to the average photosynthetic quotient. The intercept is about 15% of the maximum radiocarbon uptake and corresponds to the average net community respiration. Profiles of photosynthesis and sections showing the variability in its composite parameters reveal a significant effect of nutrient availability on biomass specific rates of photosynthesis in the ocean.

  3. Uncertainty Estimation Improves Energy Measurement and Verification Procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Walter, Travis; Price, Phillip N.; Sohn, Michael D.

    2014-05-14

    Implementing energy conservation measures in buildings can reduce energy costs and environmental impacts, but such measures cost money to implement so intelligent investment strategies require the ability to quantify the energy savings by comparing actual energy used to how much energy would have been used in absence of the conservation measures (known as the baseline energy use). Methods exist for predicting baseline energy use, but a limitation of most statistical methods reported in the literature is inadequate quantification of the uncertainty in baseline energy use predictions. However, estimation of uncertainty is essential for weighing the risks of investing in retrofits. Most commercial buildings have, or soon will have, electricity meters capable of providing data at short time intervals. These data provide new opportunities to quantify uncertainty in baseline predictions, and to do so after shorter measurement durations than are traditionally used. In this paper, we show that uncertainty estimation provides greater measurement and verification (M&V) information and helps to overcome some of the difficulties with deciding how much data is needed to develop baseline models and to confirm energy savings. We also show that cross-validation is an effective method for computing uncertainty. In so doing, we extend a simple regression-based method of predicting energy use using short-interval meter data. We demonstrate the methods by predicting energy use in 17 real commercial buildings. We discuss the benefits of uncertainty estimates which can provide actionable decision making information for investing in energy conservation measures.

  4. Be the Volume: A Classroom Activity to Visualize Volume Estimation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mikhaylov, Jessica

    2011-01-01

    A hands-on activity can help multivariable calculus students visualize surfaces and understand volume estimation. This activity can be extended to include the concepts of Fubini's Theorem and the visualization of the curves resulting from cross-sections of the surface. This activity uses students as pillars and a sheet or tablecloth for the…

  5. LPM effect and primary energy estimations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bourdeau, M. F.; Capdevielle, J. N.

    1985-01-01

    The distortion of the electron cascade development under LPM effects is now admitted; it consists of an increase of depth of showers origin, of shower maximum T sum max, a decrease of the number of particles at maximum N sub max and results in a flattening and a widening of the cascade transition curve. Connected with the influence of multiple Coulomb scattering on basic electromagnetic processes (bremsstrahlung, pair production), this effect appears at high energy with a threshold dependent on the density of the medium (more than 10 TeV for lead, more than 10 sup 6 TeV in air). Consequently, the electromagnetic components of hadron induced showers in lead and EAS in air calculated for the same hadronic cascades in the different alternative, including or not the LPM effect are examined here.

  6. Missing energy estimate in the light of the muon discrepancy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tueros, M.

    2013-06-01

    The determination of the primary energy of extensive air showers using the fluorescence technique requires an estimation of the energy carried away by the particles that do not deposit all their energy in the atmosphere. This estimation is typically made using Monte Carlo simulations and thus depends on the model predictions for neutrino and muon production. In this contribution we describe a new method that could be used to obtain the missing energy directly from events measured simultaneously with the fluorescence and the surface detectors of the Pierre Auger Observatory, based on a toy model of the shower cascade. The method is applied to a synthetic sample of events to show its robustness and we discuss how the results could be used to make an estimation of the number of high energy muons in the cascade.

  7. Estimating convective energy losses from solar central receivers

    SciTech Connect

    Siebers, D L; Kraabel, J S

    1984-04-01

    This report outlines a method for estimating the total convective energy loss from a receiver of a solar central receiver power plant. Two types of receivers are considered in detail: a cylindrical, external-type receiver and a cavity-type receiver. The method is intended to provide the designer with a tool for estimating the total convective energy loss that is based on current knowledge of convective heat transfer from receivers to the environment and that is adaptable to new information as it becomes available. The current knowledge consists of information from two recent large-scale experiments, as well as information already in the literature. Also outlined is a method for estimating the uncertainty in the convective loss estimates. Sample estimations of the total convective energy loss and the uncertainties in those convective energy loss estimates for the external receiver of the 10 MWe Solar Thermal Central Receiver Plant (Barstow, California) and the cavity receiver of the International Energy Agency Small Solar Power Systems Project (Almeria, Spain) are included in the appendices.

  8. Energy and maximum norm estimates for nonlinear conservation laws

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsson, Pelle; Oliger, Joseph

    1994-01-01

    We have devised a technique that makes it possible to obtain energy estimates for initial-boundary value problems for nonlinear conservation laws. The two major tools to achieve the energy estimates are a certain splitting of the flux vector derivative f(u)(sub x), and a structural hypothesis, referred to as a cone condition, on the flux vector f(u). These hypotheses are fulfilled for many equations that occur in practice, such as the Euler equations of gas dynamics. It should be noted that the energy estimates are obtained without any assumptions on the gradient of the solution u. The results extend to weak solutions that are obtained as point wise limits of vanishing viscosity solutions. As a byproduct we obtain explicit expressions for the entropy function and the entropy flux of symmetrizable systems of conservation laws. Under certain circumstances the proposed technique can be applied repeatedly so as to yield estimates in the maximum norm.

  9. Estimation of Energy Stores of Mentally Retarded Individuals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Litchford, Mary Demarest

    1987-01-01

    The study sought to identify reliable measurements for estimating energy stores of retarded adults (N=80) and possible correlations between energy intakes and obesity. Among results were a lack of significant correlations between caloric intake and anthropometric measures (e.g., tricepts skinfold). Body mass index is suggested as a more practical…

  10. Hybrid Simulation Modeling to Estimate U.S. Energy Elasticities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baylin-Stern, Adam C.

    This paper demonstrates how an U.S. application of CIMS, a technologically explicit and behaviourally realistic energy-economy simulation model which includes macro-economic feedbacks, can be used to derive estimates of elasticity of substitution (ESUB) and autonomous energy efficiency index (AEEI) parameters. The ability of economies to reduce greenhouse gas emissions depends on the potential for households and industry to decrease overall energy usage, and move from higher to lower emissions fuels. Energy economists commonly refer to ESUB estimates to understand the degree of responsiveness of various sectors of an economy, and use estimates to inform computable general equilibrium models used to study climate policies. Using CIMS, I have generated a set of future, 'pseudo-data' based on a series of simulations in which I vary energy and capital input prices over a wide range. I then used this data set to estimate the parameters for transcendental logarithmic production functions using regression techniques. From the production function parameter estimates, I calculated an array of elasticity of substitution values between input pairs. Additionally, this paper demonstrates how CIMS can be used to calculate price-independent changes in energy-efficiency in the form of the AEEI, by comparing energy consumption between technologically frozen and 'business as usual' simulations. The paper concludes with some ideas for model and methodological improvement, and how these might figure into future work in the estimation of ESUBs from CIMS. Keywords: Elasticity of substitution; hybrid energy-economy model; translog; autonomous energy efficiency index; rebound effect; fuel switching.

  11. Estimation of Characteristic Period for Energy Based Seismic Design

    SciTech Connect

    Hancloglu, Baykal; Polat, Zekeriya; Kircil, Murat Serdar

    2008-07-08

    Estimation of input energy using approximate methods has been always a considerable research topic of energy based seismic design. Therefore several approaches have been proposed by many researchers to estimate the energy input to SDOF systems in the last decades. The characteristic period is the key parameter of most of these approaches and it is defined as the period at which the peak value of the input energy occurs. In this study an equation is proposed for estimating the characteristic period considering an extensive earthquake ground motion database which includes a total of 268 far-field records, two horizontal components from 134 recording stations located on both soft and firm soil sites. For this purpose statistical regression analyses are performed to develop an equation in terms of a number of structural parameters, and it is found that the developed equation yields satisfactory results comparing the characteristic periods calculated from time history analyses of SDOF systems.

  12. Solar Energy Project, Activities: Biology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tullock, Bruce, Ed.; And Others

    This guide contains lesson plans and outlines of science activities which present concepts of solar energy in the context of biology experiments. Each unit presents an introduction; objectives; skills and knowledge needed; materials; methods; questions; recommendations for further work; and a teacher information sheet. The teacher information…

  13. Activation energy measurements of cheese

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Temperature sweeps of cheeses using small amplitude oscillatory shear tests produced values for activation energy of flow (Ea) between 30 and 44 deg C. Soft goat cheese and Queso Fresco, which are high-moisture cheeses and do not flow when heated, exhibited Ea values between 30 and 60 kJ/mol. The ...

  14. Activation Energies of Plasmonic Catalysts.

    PubMed

    Kim, Youngsoo; Dumett Torres, Daniel; Jain, Prashant K

    2016-05-11

    The activation energy of a catalytic reaction serves not only as a metric of the efficacy of a catalyst but also as a potential indicator of mechanistic differences between the catalytic and noncatalytic reaction. However, activation energies are quite underutilized in the field of photocatalysis. We characterize in detail the effect of visible light excitation on the activation enthalpy of an electron transfer reaction photocatalyzed by plasmonic Au nanoparticles. We find that in the presence of visible light photoexcitation, the activation enthalpy of the Au nanoparticle-catalyzed electron transfer reaction is significantly reduced. The reduction in the activation enthalpy depends on the excitation wavelength, the incident laser power, and the strength of a hole scavenger. On the basis of these results, we argue that the activation enthalpy reduction is directly related to the photoelectrochemical potential built-up on the Au nanoparticle under steady-state light excitation, analogous to electrochemical activation. Under optimum light excitation conditions, a potential as high as 240 mV is measured. The findings constitute more precise insights into the mechanistic role and energetic contribution of plasmonic excitation to chemical reactions catalyzed by transition metal nanoparticles. PMID:27064549

  15. Estimating Continental Energy Storage from CMIP5 Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    José Cuesta-Valero, Francisco; García-García, Almudena; Beltrami, Hugo; Smerdon, Jason

    2016-04-01

    The Earth's energy imbalance is a critical metric for understanding the current state of the Earth's climate system and its future evolution. Although much of the energy gained by the climate system over the last century has been stored in the oceans, the continental subsurface energy storage remains important because climate feedback processes such as soil carbon and permafrost stability depend on long-term subsurface energy storage. Here, for the first time, thirty two General Circulation Model (GCM) simulations from the fifth phase of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5) were examined to assess their ability to account for the continental energy storage. The magnitude of the subsurface heat content derived from GCM simulations are consistently lower than the estimates from borehole temperature data for the second half of the 20th century. The estimates of continental heat storage from CMIP5 simulations also display a large range of variability which may be partially due to (1) the different bottom boundary depth of each GCM land surface component, limiting the subsurface heat storage, (2) the different energy exchange parameterizations between the lower atmosphere and the ground within each model, and (3) the different sensitivity of models to external forcings. Our results suggest that a deeper bottom boundary placement in the land surface component could improve the estimates of subsurface energy content within the GCM simulations.

  16. ESTIMATION OF COMMERCIAL ENERGY CONSUMPTION CONSIDERING ENERGY SERVICE DEMAND AND SUPPLY STRUCTURE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanamori, Yuko; Matsuoka, Yuzuru

    To clarify energy consumption structure in commerci al sector is one of challenging issues. In commercial sector, energy consumption structure is very complex, because the structure depends on regional development level, industry composition, climate characteristics and energy accessibility. Therefore, we can partly know the structure in detail using survey and statistics. In this study, we used a method to estimate energy consumption and energy service supply using available statistics and references and applied it to commercial sector in world the regions, and estimated energy consumption by energy service and fuel type in 2005.

  17. Estimating Agricultural Water Use using the Operational Simplified Surface Energy Balance Evapotranspiration Estimation Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forbes, B. T.

    2015-12-01

    Due to the predominantly arid climate in Arizona, access to adequate water supply is vital to the economic development and livelihood of the State. Water supply has become increasingly important during periods of prolonged drought, which has strained reservoir water levels in the Desert Southwest over past years. Arizona's water use is dominated by agriculture, consuming about seventy-five percent of the total annual water demand. Tracking current agricultural water use is important for managers and policy makers so that current water demand can be assessed and current information can be used to forecast future demands. However, many croplands in Arizona are irrigated outside of areas where water use reporting is mandatory. To estimate irrigation withdrawals on these lands, we use a combination of field verification, evapotranspiration (ET) estimation, and irrigation system qualification. ET is typically estimated in Arizona using the Modified Blaney-Criddle method which uses meteorological data to estimate annual crop water requirements. The Modified Blaney-Criddle method assumes crops are irrigated to their full potential over the entire growing season, which may or may not be realistic. We now use the Operational Simplified Surface Energy Balance (SSEBop) ET data in a remote-sensing and energy-balance framework to estimate cropland ET. SSEBop data are of sufficient resolution (30m by 30m) for estimation of field-scale cropland water use. We evaluate our SSEBop-based estimates using ground-truth information and irrigation system qualification obtained in the field. Our approach gives the end user an estimate of crop consumptive use as well as inefficiencies in irrigation system performance—both of which are needed by water managers for tracking irrigated water use in Arizona.

  18. Consistent Estimation of Gibbs Energy Using Component Contributions

    PubMed Central

    Milo, Ron; Fleming, Ronan M. T.

    2013-01-01

    Standard Gibbs energies of reactions are increasingly being used in metabolic modeling for applying thermodynamic constraints on reaction rates, metabolite concentrations and kinetic parameters. The increasing scope and diversity of metabolic models has led scientists to look for genome-scale solutions that can estimate the standard Gibbs energy of all the reactions in metabolism. Group contribution methods greatly increase coverage, albeit at the price of decreased precision. We present here a way to combine the estimations of group contribution with the more accurate reactant contributions by decomposing each reaction into two parts and applying one of the methods on each of them. This method gives priority to the reactant contributions over group contributions while guaranteeing that all estimations will be consistent, i.e. will not violate the first law of thermodynamics. We show that there is a significant increase in the accuracy of our estimations compared to standard group contribution. Specifically, our cross-validation results show an 80% reduction in the median absolute residual for reactions that can be derived by reactant contributions only. We provide the full framework and source code for deriving estimates of standard reaction Gibbs energy, as well as confidence intervals, and believe this will facilitate the wide use of thermodynamic data for a better understanding of metabolism. PMID:23874165

  19. Estimating three-demensional energy transfer in isotropic turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, K. S.; Helland, K. N.; Rosenblatt, M.

    1980-01-01

    To obtain an estimate of the spectral transfer function that indicates the rate of decay of energy, an x-wire probe was set at a fixed position, and two single wire probes were set at a number of locations in the same plane perpendicular to the mean flow in the wind tunnel. The locations of the single wire probes are determined by pseudo-random numbers (Monte Carlo). Second order spectra and cross spectra are estimated. The assumption of isotropy relative to second order spectra is examined. Third order spectra are also estimated corresponding to the positions specified. A Monte Carlo Fourier transformation of the downstream bispectra corresponding to integration across the plane perpendicular to the flow is carried out assuming isotropy. Further integration is carried out over spherical energy shells.

  20. Estimation of Radiated Seismic Energy from Teleseismic P Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiuchi, R.; Mori, J. J.

    2013-12-01

    Earthquake radiated energy is a fundamental parameter for understanding source physics. Using teleseismic waveforms, we can estimate the radiated energy for a wide range of focal mechanisms and tectonic setting. We are especially interested in studying the apparent stress (rigidity multiplied by the ratio of radiated energy to seismic moment) of strike-slip earthquakes in the oceanic lithosphere, for which there are often high reported values (Choy and McGarr, 2002). Estimates of radiated energy from teleseismic P waves can be unstable, because take-off angles from the source are often close to nodes in the focal mechanisms, which can cause large variations in the estimated values of the apparent stress. In this study, we use only P waves for the teleseismic waveform, because of the strong attenuation of teleseismic S waves and interference with other phases. We use data recorded by teleseismic stations (epicentral distances of 30 to 90deg) recorded on the GSN network and focal mechanisms published by USGS and Global CMT Project. For the teleseismic waveforms, we need to account for the radiation pattern of the direct P and depth phase, pP and sP (Boatwright and Choy, 1986). For strike-slip events with where many data are close to nodes in the focal mechanisms, this is a large and often unstable correction. We use an improved method which takes into account a range of values for the strike, dip and rake angles. Also, we use station corrections determined from a selected set of well determined events. We show the result of estimated radiated seismic energy for 188 recent earthquakes (>Mw 7.0, since 2000 ). We discuss the differences of the radiated energy as a function of focal mechanisms, and oceanic/continental sources. Fig. Radiated seismic energy and correction for radiation pattern calculated using a range of focal mechanisms.

  1. On the use of Lineal Energy Measurements to Estimate Linear Energy Transfer Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, David A.; Howell, Leonard W., Jr.; Adam, James H., Jr.

    2007-01-01

    This paper examines the error resulting from using a lineal energy spectrum to represent a linear energy transfer spectrum for applications in the space radiation environment. Lineal energy and linear energy transfer spectra are compared in three diverse but typical space radiation environments. Different detector geometries are also studied to determine how they affect the error. LET spectra are typically used to compute dose equivalent for radiation hazard estimation and single event effect rates to estimate radiation effects on electronics. The errors in the estimations of dose equivalent and single event rates that result from substituting lineal energy spectra for linear energy spectra are examined. It is found that this substitution has little effect on dose equivalent estimates in interplanetary quiet-time environment regardless of detector shape. The substitution has more of an effect when the environment is dominated by solar energetic particles or trapped radiation, but even then the errors are minor especially if a spherical detector is used. For single event estimation, the effect of the substitution can be large if the threshold for the single event effect is near where the linear energy spectrum drops suddenly. It is judged that single event rate estimates made from lineal energy spectra are unreliable and the use of lineal energy spectra for single event rate estimation should be avoided.

  2. Energy Losses Estimation During Pulsed-Laser Seam Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sebestova, Hana; Havelkova, Martina; Chmelickova, Hana

    2014-06-01

    The finite-element tool SYSWELD (ESI Group, Paris, France) was adapted to simulate pulsed-laser seam welding. Besides temperature field distribution, one of the possible outputs of the welding simulation is the amount of absorbed power necessary to melt the required material volume including energy losses. Comparing absorbed or melting energy with applied laser energy, welding efficiencies can be calculated. This article presents achieved results of welding efficiency estimation based on the assimilation both experimental and simulation output data of the pulsed Nd:YAG laser bead on plate welding of 0.6-mm-thick AISI 304 stainless steel sheets using different beam powers.

  3. Human ECG signal parameters estimation during controlled physical activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maciejewski, Marcin; Surtel, Wojciech; Dzida, Grzegorz

    2015-09-01

    ECG signal parameters are commonly used indicators of human health condition. In most cases the patient should remain stationary during the examination to decrease the influence of muscle artifacts. During physical activity, the noise level increases significantly. The ECG signals were acquired during controlled physical activity on a stationary bicycle and during rest. Afterwards, the signals were processed using a method based on Pan-Tompkins algorithms to estimate their parameters and to test the method.

  4. Estimation of beryllium ground state energy by Monte Carlo simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabir, K. M. Ariful; Halder, Amal

    2015-05-01

    Quantum Monte Carlo method represent a powerful and broadly applicable computational tool for finding very accurate solution of the stationary Schrödinger equation for atoms, molecules, solids and a variety of model systems. Using variational Monte Carlo method we have calculated the ground state energy of the Beryllium atom. Our calculation are based on using a modified four parameters trial wave function which leads to good result comparing with the few parameters trial wave functions presented before. Based on random Numbers we can generate a large sample of electron locations to estimate the ground state energy of Beryllium. Our calculation gives good estimation for the ground state energy of the Beryllium atom comparing with the corresponding exact data.

  5. Estimation of beryllium ground state energy by Monte Carlo simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Kabir, K. M. Ariful; Halder, Amal

    2015-05-15

    Quantum Monte Carlo method represent a powerful and broadly applicable computational tool for finding very accurate solution of the stationary Schrödinger equation for atoms, molecules, solids and a variety of model systems. Using variational Monte Carlo method we have calculated the ground state energy of the Beryllium atom. Our calculation are based on using a modified four parameters trial wave function which leads to good result comparing with the few parameters trial wave functions presented before. Based on random Numbers we can generate a large sample of electron locations to estimate the ground state energy of Beryllium. Our calculation gives good estimation for the ground state energy of the Beryllium atom comparing with the corresponding exact data.

  6. Active learning applied for photometric redshift estimation of quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Bo; Zhang, Yanxia; Zhao, Yongheng

    2015-08-01

    For a long time the quasars’ photometric redshifts have been estimated by learning from all available training dataset. In the scenario of big data, the amount of available data is huge and the dataset may include noise. Consequently, a major research challenge is to design a learning process that gains the most informative data from the available dataset in terms of optimal learning of the underlying relationships. By filtering out noisy data and redundant data, the optimal learning can improve both estimation accuracy and speed. Towards this objective, in this study we figure out an active learning approach that automatically learns a series of suppport vector regression models based on small size of different sampling data chunks. These models are applied on a validation dataset. By active learning, those validation data with estimation results vary in a certain range are regarded as the informative data and are aggregated in multiple training datasets. Next, the aggregated training datasets are combined into an ensemble estimator through averaging and then applied on a test dataset. Our experimental results on SDSS data show that the proposed method is helpful to improve quasars’ photometric redshift estimation accuracy.

  7. Estimating evaporative vapor generation from automobiles based on parking activities.

    PubMed

    Dong, Xinyi; Tschantz, Michael; Fu, Joshua S

    2015-07-01

    A new approach is proposed to quantify the evaporative vapor generation based on real parking activity data. As compared to the existing methods, two improvements are applied in this new approach to reduce the uncertainties: First, evaporative vapor generation from diurnal parking events is usually calculated based on estimated average parking duration for the whole fleet, while in this study, vapor generation rate is calculated based on parking activities distribution. Second, rather than using the daily temperature gradient, this study uses hourly temperature observations to derive the hourly incremental vapor generation rates. The parking distribution and hourly incremental vapor generation rates are then adopted with Wade-Reddy's equation to estimate the weighted average evaporative generation. We find that hourly incremental rates can better describe the temporal variations of vapor generation, and the weighted vapor generation rate is 5-8% less than calculation without considering parking activity. PMID:25818089

  8. Total myrosinase activity estimates in brassica vegetable produce.

    PubMed

    Dosz, Edward B; Ku, Kang-Mo; Juvik, John A; Jeffery, Elizabeth H

    2014-08-13

    Isothiocyanates, generated from the hydrolysis of glucosinolates in plants of the Brassicaceae family, promote health, including anticancer bioactivity. Hydrolysis requires the plant enzyme myrosinase, giving myrosinase a key role in health promotion by brassica vegetables. Myrosinase measurement typically involves isolating crude protein, potentially underestimating activity in whole foods. Myrosinase activity was estimated using unextracted fresh tissues of five broccoli and three kale cultivars, measuring the formation of allyl isothiocyanate (AITC) and/or glucose from exogenous sinigrin. A correlation between AITC and glucose formation was found, although activity was substantially lower measured as glucose release. Using exogenous sinigrin or endogenous glucoraphanin, concentrations of the hydrolysis products AITC and sulforaphane correlated (r = 0.859; p = 0.006), suggesting that broccoli shows no myrosinase selectivity among sinigrin and glucoraphanin. Measurement of AITC formation provides a novel, reliable estimation of myrosinase-dependent isothiocyanate formation suitable for use with whole vegetable food samples. PMID:25051514

  9. Estimating ROI activity concentration with photon-processing and photon-counting SPECT imaging systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jha, Abhinav K.; Frey, Eric C.

    2015-03-01

    Recently a new class of imaging systems, referred to as photon-processing (PP) systems, are being developed that uses real-time maximum-likelihood (ML) methods to estimate multiple attributes per detected photon and store these attributes in a list format. PP systems could have a number of potential advantages compared to systems that bin photons based on attributes such as energy, projection angle, and position, referred to as photon-counting (PC) systems. For example, PP systems do not suffer from binning-related information loss and provide the potential to extract information from attributes such as energy deposited by the detected photon. To quantify the effects of this advantage on task performance, objective evaluation studies are required. We performed this study in the context of quantitative 2-dimensional single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging with the end task of estimating the mean activity concentration within a region of interest (ROI). We first theoretically outline the effect of null space on estimating the mean activity concentration, and argue that due to this effect, PP systems could have better estimation performance compared to PC systems with noise-free data. To evaluate the performance of PP and PC systems with noisy data, we developed a singular value decomposition (SVD)-based analytic method to estimate the activity concentration from PP systems. Using simulations, we studied the accuracy and precision of this technique in estimating the activity concentration. We used this framework to objectively compare PP and PC systems on the activity concentration estimation task. We investigated the effects of varying the size of the ROI and varying the number of bins for the attribute corresponding to the angular orientation of the detector in a continuously rotating SPECT system. The results indicate that in several cases, PP systems offer improved estimation performance compared to PC systems.

  10. Estimating Renewable Energy Resources of Russia: Goals and Perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiseleva, S.; Rafikova, J.; Shakun, V.

    2012-10-01

    During the last several years in some regions of Russian Federation one can observe a growing interest in renewable energy projects motivated by a necessity to have stable, affordable and autonomous energy sources. Besides, there has been an advance in legal initiatives designed to regulate the development of renewable energy sources in Russia. Some governmental regulations having for an object to stimulate this area, have already been accepted. The regulation contains the target value parameters of the output volume of the electric energy output volumes with the use of renewable energy sources (except hydroelectric power plants with the established capacity exceeding 25 MW. The work shows the results of resource estimating wind, solar, biomass energy resources for Russia, using GIS methods, which allow one to provide more exact predictions for the energy development, and therefore to prove investments and to pass to working out the equipment design of energy plants based on renewable energy sources. Current matters are relating to opportunities and perspectives of renewable sector in Russia.

  11. Energy Detection Based Estimation of Channel Occupancy Rate with Adaptive Noise Estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehtomäki, Janne J.; Vuohtoniemi, Risto; Umebayashi, Kenta; Mäkelä, Juha-Pekka

    Recently, there has been growing interest in opportunistically utilizing the 2.4GHz ISM-band. Numerous spectrum occupancy measurements covering the ISM-band have been performed to analyze the spectrum usage. However, in these campaigns the verification of the correctness of the obtained occupancy values for the highly dynamic ISM-band has not been presented. In this paper, we propose and verify channel occupancy rate (COR) estimation utilizing energy detection mechanism with a novel adaptive energy detection threshold setting method. The results are compared with the true reference COR values. Several different types of verification measurements showed that our setup can estimate the COR values of 802.11 traffic well, with negligible overestimation. The results from real-time real-life measurements also confirm that the proposed adaptive threshold setting method enables accurate thresholds even in the situations where multiple interferers are present in the received signal.

  12. The thermal tolerance of crayfish could be estimated from respiratory electron transport system activity.

    PubMed

    Simčič, Tatjana; Pajk, Franja; Jaklič, Martina; Brancelj, Anton; Vrezec, Al

    2014-04-01

    Whether electron transport system (ETS) activity could be used as an estimator of crayfish thermal tolerance has been investigated experimentally. Food consumption rate, respiration rates in the air and water, the difference between energy consumption and respiration costs at a given temperature ('potential growth scope', PGS), and ETS activity of Orconectes limosus and Pacifastacus leniusculus were determined over a temperature range of 5-30°C. All concerned parameters were found to be temperature dependent. The significant correlation between ETS activity and PGS indicates that they respond similarly to temperature change. The regression analysis of ETS activity as an estimator of thermal tolerance at the mitochondrial level and PGS as an indicator of thermal tolerance at the organismic level showed the shift of optimum temperature ranges of ETS activity to the right for 2° in O. limosus and for 3° in P. leniusculus. Thus, lower estimated temperature optima and temperatures of optimum ranges of PGS compared to ETS activity could indicate higher thermal sensitivity at the organismic level than at a lower level of complexity (i.e. at the mitochondrial level). The response of ETS activity to temperature change, especially at lower and higher temperatures, indicates differences in the characteristics of the ETSs in O. limosus and P. leniusculus. O. limosus is less sensitive to high temperature. The significant correlation between PGS and ETS activity supports our assumption that ETS activity could be used for the rapid estimation of thermal tolerance in crayfish species. PMID:24679968

  13. Energy Activities for the Primary Classroom. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tierney, Blue, Comp.

    An energy education program at the primary level should help students to understand the nature and importance of energy, consider different energy sources, learn about energy conservation, prepare for energy related careers, and become energy conscious in other career fields. The activities charts, readings, and experiments provided in this…

  14. Estimation of quality factors by energy ratio method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zong-Jun; Cao, Si-Yuan; Zhang, Hao-Ran; Qu, Ying-Ming; Yuan, Dian; Yang, Jin-Hao; Shao, Guan-Ming

    2015-03-01

    The quality factor Q, which reflects the energy attenuation of seismic waves in subsurface media, is a diagnostic tool for hydrocarbon detection and reservoir characterization. In this paper, we propose a new Q extraction method based on the energy ratio before and after the wavelet attenuation, named the energy-ratio method (ERM). The proposed method uses multipoint signal data in the time domain to estimate the wavelet energy without invoking the source wavelet spectrum, which is necessary in conventional Q extraction methods, and is applicable to any source wavelet spectrum; however, it requires high-precision seismic data. Forward zero-offset VSP modeling suggests that the ERM can be used for reliable Q inversion after nonintrinsic attenuation (geometric dispersion, reflection, and transmission loss) compensation. The application to real zero-offset VSP data shows that the Q values extracted by the ERM and spectral ratio methods are identical, which proves the reliability of the new method.

  15. Estimated United States Residential Energy Use in 2005

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, C A; Johnson, D M; Simon, A J; Belles, R D

    2011-12-12

    A flow chart depicting energy flow in the residential sector of the United States economy in 2005 has been constructed from publicly available data and estimates of national energy use patterns. Approximately 11,000 trillion British Thermal Units (trBTUs) of electricity and fuels were used throughout the United States residential sector in lighting, electronics, air conditioning, space heating, water heating, washing appliances, cooking appliances, refrigerators, and other appliances. The residential sector is powered mainly by electricity and natural gas. Other fuels used include petroleum products (fuel oil, liquefied petroleum gas and kerosene), biomass (wood), and on-premises solar, wind, and geothermal energy. The flow patterns represent a comprehensive systems view of energy used within the residential sector.

  16. Estimation of energy stores of mentally retarded individuals.

    PubMed

    Litchford, M D

    1987-03-01

    Average caloric intake over 6 days, age, sex, height, weight, mid arm circumference, and triceps skinfold were determined for 31 females and 49 males ages 17 to 36 living in a residential care facility for mentally retarded persons. Ideal body weight, body mass index (W/H2), percentiles for arm muscle area, arm fat area, and triceps skinfold were determined to interpret the anthropometric measurements. Pearson r correlation coefficients were calculated to compare relative merits of ideal body weight, body mass index, percentile for arm muscle area, arm fat area, and triceps skinfold as an estimation of energy stores. Correlations suggest that body mass index is a more practical tool for estimation of energy stores. PMID:3565496

  17. Estimates of radiated energy from global shallow subduction zone earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilek, S. L.; Lay, T.; Ruff, L.

    2002-12-01

    Previous studies used seismic energy to moment ratios for datasets of large earthquakes as a useful discriminant for tsunami earthquakes. We extend this idea of a "slowness" discriminant to a large dataset of subduction zone underthrusting earthquakes. We determined estimates of energy release in these shallow earthquakes using a large dataset of source time functions. This dataset contains source time functions for 418 shallow (< 70 km depth) earthquakes ranging from Mw 5.5 - 8.0 from 14 circum-Pacific subduction zones. Also included are tsunami earthquakes for which source time functions are available. We calculate energy using two methods, a substitution of a simplified triangle and integration of the original source time function. In the first method, we use a triangle substitution of peak moment and duration to find a minimum estimate of energy. The other method incorporates more of the source time function information and can be influenced by source time function complexity. We examine patterns in source time function complexity with respect to the energy estimates. For comparison with other earthquake parameters, it is useful to remove the effect of seismic moment on the energy estimates. We use the seismic energy to moment ratio (E/Mo) to highlight variations with depth, moment, and subduction zone. There is significant scatter in this ratio using both methods of energy calculation. We observe a slight increase in E/Mo with increasing Mw. There is not much variation in E/Mo with depth seen in entire dataset. However, a slight increase in E/Mo with depth is apparent in a few subduction zones such as Alaska, Central America, and Peru. An average E/Mo of 5x10e-6 roughly characterizes this shallow earthquake dataset, although with a factor of 10 scatter. This value is within about a factor of 2 of E/Mo ratios determined by Choy and Boatwright (1995). Tsunami earthquakes suggest an average E/Mo of 2x10e-7, significantly lower than the average for the shallow

  18. Heart rate and estimated energy expenditure of flapping and gliding in black-browed albatrosses.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Kentaro Q; Takahashi, Akinori; Iwata, Takashi; Yamamoto, Takashi; Yamamoto, Maki; Trathan, Philip N

    2013-08-15

    Albatrosses are known to expend only a small amount of energy during flight. The low energy cost of albatross flight has been attributed to energy-efficient gliding (soaring) with sporadic flapping, although little is known about how much time and energy albatrosses expend in flapping versus gliding during cruising flight. Here, we examined the heart rates (used as an instantaneous index of energy expenditure) and flapping activities of free-ranging black-browed albatrosses (Thalassarche melanophrys) to estimate the energy cost of flapping as well as time spent in flapping activities. The heart rate of albatrosses during flight (144 beats min(-1)) was similar to that while sitting on the water (150 beats min(-1)). In contrast, heart rate was much higher during takeoff and landing (ca. 200 beats min(-1)). Heart rate during cruising flight was linearly correlated with the number of wing flaps per minute, suggesting an extra energy burden of flapping. Albatrosses spend only 4.6±1.4% of their time flapping during cruising flight, which was significantly lower than during and shortly after takeoff (9.8±3.5%). Flapping activity, which amounted to just 4.6% of the time in flight, accounted for 13.3% of the total energy expenditure during cruising flight. These results support the idea that albatrosses achieve energy-efficient flight by reducing the time spent in flapping activity, which is associated with high energy expenditure. PMID:23661772

  19. Atmospheric water on Mars, energy estimates for extraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, Tom

    1991-01-01

    The Mars atmosphere is considered as a resource for water to support a human expedition. Information obtained from the Viking mission is used to estimate the near-surface water vapor level. The variability over the diurnal cycle is examined and periods of greatest water abundance are identified. Various methods for extracting atmospheric water are discussed including energy costs and the means for optimizing water extraction techniques.

  20. Estimating wave energy dissipation in the surf zone using thermal infrared imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carini, Roxanne J.; Chickadel, C. Chris; Jessup, Andrew T.; Thomson, Jim

    2015-06-01

    Thermal infrared (IR) imagery is used to quantify the high spatial and temporal variability of dissipation due to wave breaking in the surf zone. The foam produced in an actively breaking crest, or wave roller, has a distinct signature in IR imagery. A retrieval algorithm is developed to detect breaking waves and extract wave roller length using measurements taken during the Surf Zone Optics 2010 experiment at Duck, NC. The remotely derived roller length and an in situ estimate of wave slope are used to estimate dissipation due to wave breaking by means of the wave-resolving model by Duncan (1981). The wave energy dissipation rate estimates show a pattern of increased breaking during low tide over a sand bar, consistent with in situ turbulent kinetic energy dissipation rate estimates from fixed and drifting instruments over the bar. When integrated over the surf zone width, these dissipation rate estimates account for 40-69% of the incoming wave energy flux. The Duncan (1981) estimates agree with those from a dissipation parameterization by Janssen and Battjes (2007), a wave energy dissipation model commonly applied within nearshore circulation models.

  1. On-line, adaptive state estimator for active noise control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lim, Tae W.

    1994-01-01

    Dynamic characteristics of airframe structures are expected to vary as aircraft flight conditions change. Accurate knowledge of the changing dynamic characteristics is crucial to enhancing the performance of the active noise control system using feedback control. This research investigates the development of an adaptive, on-line state estimator using a neural network concept to conduct active noise control. In this research, an algorithm has been developed that can be used to estimate displacement and velocity responses at any locations on the structure from a limited number of acceleration measurements and input force information. The algorithm employs band-pass filters to extract from the measurement signal the frequency contents corresponding to a desired mode. The filtered signal is then used to train a neural network which consists of a linear neuron with three weights. The structure of the neural network is designed as simple as possible to increase the sampling frequency as much as possible. The weights obtained through neural network training are then used to construct the transfer function of a mode in z-domain and to identify modal properties of each mode. By using the identified transfer function and interpolating the mode shape obtained at sensor locations, the displacement and velocity responses are estimated with reasonable accuracy at any locations on the structure. The accuracy of the response estimates depends on the number of modes incorporated in the estimates and the number of sensors employed to conduct mode shape interpolation. Computer simulation demonstrates that the algorithm is capable of adapting to the varying dynamic characteristics of structural properties. Experimental implementation of the algorithm on a DSP (digital signal processing) board for a plate structure is underway. The algorithm is expected to reach the sampling frequency range of about 10 kHz to 20 kHz which needs to be maintained for a typical active noise control

  2. Energy intake estimation from counts of chews and swallows

    PubMed Central

    Fontana, Juan M.; Higgins, Janine A.; Schuckers, Stephanie C.; Bellisle, France; Pan, Zhaoxing; Melanson, Edward L.; Neuman, Michael R.; Sazonov, Edward

    2014-01-01

    Current, validated methods for dietary assessment rely on self-report, which tends to be inaccurate, time-consuming, and burdensome. The objective of this work was to demonstrate the suitability of estimating energy intake using individually-calibrated models based on Counts of Chews and Swallows (CCS models). In a laboratory setting, subjects consumed three identical meals (training meals) and a fourth meal with different content (validation meal). Energy intake was estimated by four different methods: weighed food records (gold standard), diet diaries, photographic food records, and CCS models. Counts of chews and swallows were measured using wearable sensors and video analysis. Results for the training meals demonstrated that CCS models presented the lowest reporting bias and a lower error as compared to diet diaries. For the validation meal, CCS models showed reporting errors that were not different from the diary or the photographic method. The increase in error for the validation meal may be attributed to differences in the physical properties of foods consumed during training and validation meals. However, this may be potentially compensated for by including correction factors into the models. This study suggests that estimation of energy intake from CCS may offer a promising alternative to overcome limitations of self-report. PMID:25447016

  3. High speed parameter estimation for a homogenized energy model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ernstberger, Jon M.

    Industrial, commercial, military, biomedical, and civilian uses of smart materials are increasingly investigated for high performance applications. These compounds couple applied field or thermal energy to mechanical forces that are generated within the material. The devices utilizing these compounds are often much smaller than their traditional counterparts and provide greater design capabilities and energy efficiency. The relations that couple field and mechanical energies are often hysteretic and nonlinear. To accurately control devices employing these compounds, models must quantify these effects. Further, since these compounds exhibit environment-dependent behavior, the models must be robust for accurate actuator quantification. In this dissertation, we investigate the construction of models that characterize these internal mechanisms and that manifest themselves in material deformation in a hysteretic fashion. Results of previously-presented model formulations are given. New techniques for generating model components are presented which reduce the computational load for parameter estimations. The use of various deterministic and stochastic search algorithms for parameter estimation are discussed with strengths and weaknesses of each examined. New end-user graphical tools for properly initiating the parameter estimation are also presented. Finally, results from model fits to data from ferroelectric---e.g., Lead Zirconate Titanate (PZT)---and ferromagnetic---e.g., Terfenol-D---materials are presented.

  4. Actual and Estimated Energy Savings Comparison for Deep Energy Retrofits in the Pacific Northwest

    SciTech Connect

    Blanchard, Jeremy; Widder, Sarah H.; Giever, Elisabeth L.; Baechler, Michael C.

    2012-10-01

    Seven homes from the Pacific Northwest were selected to evaluate the differences between estimated and actual energy savings achieved from deep energy retrofits. The energy savings resulting from these retrofits were estimated, using energy modeling software, to save at least 30% on a whole-house basis. The modeled pre-retrofit energy use was trued against monthly utility bills. After the retrofits were completed, each of the homes was extensively monitored, with the exception of one home which was monitored pre-retrofit. This work is being conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the U.S. Department of Energy Building Technologies Program as part of the Building America Program. This work found many discrepancies between actual and estimated energy savings and identified the potential causes for the discrepancies. The differences between actual energy use and modeled energy use also suggest improvements to improve model accuracy. The difference between monthly whole-house actual and estimated energy savings ranged from 75% more energy saved than predicted by the model to 16% less energy saved for all the monitored homes. Similarly, the annual energy savings difference was between 36% and -14%, which was estimated based on existing monitored savings because an entire year of data is not available. Thus, on average, for all six monitored homes the actual energy use is consistently less than estimates, indicating home owners are saving more energy than estimated. The average estimated savings for the eight month monitoring period is 43%, compared to an estimated savings average of 31%. Though this average difference is only 12%, the range of inaccuracies found for specific end-uses is far greater and are the values used to directly estimate energy savings from specific retrofits. Specifically, the monthly post-retrofit energy use differences for specific end-uses (i.e., heating, cooling, hot water, appliances, etc.) ranged from 131% under

  5. Global positioning system watches for estimating energy expenditure.

    PubMed

    Hongu, Nobuko; Orr, Barron J; Roe, Denise J; Reed, Rebecca G; Going, Scott B

    2013-11-01

    Global positioning system (GPS) watches have been introduced commercially, converting frequent measurements of time, location, speed (pace), and elevation into energy expenditure (EE) estimates. The purpose of this study was to compare EE estimates of 4 different GPS watches (Forerunner, Suunto, Polar, Adeo), at various walking speeds, with EE estimate from a triaxial accelerometer (RT3), which was used as a reference measure in this study. Sixteen healthy young adults completed the study. Participants wore 4 different GPS watches and an RT3 accelerometer and walked at 6-minute intervals on an outdoor track at 3 speeds (3, 5, and 7 km/hr). The statistical significance of differences in EE between the 3 watches was assessed using linear contrasts of the coefficients from the overall model. Reliability across trials for a given device was assessed using intraclass correlation coefficients as estimated in the mixed model. The GPS watches demonstrated lower reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient) across trials when compared with the RT3, particularly at the higher speed, 7 km/hr. Three GPS watches (Forerunner, Polar, and Suunto) significantly and consistently underestimated EE compared with the reference EE given by the RT3 accelerometer (average mean difference: Garmin, -50.5%; Polar, -41.7%; and Suunto, -41.7%; all p < 0.001). Results suggested that caution should be exercised when using commercial GPS watches to estimate EE in athletes during field-based testing and training. PMID:23439338

  6. Estimating Energy and Cost Savings and Emissions Reductions for the State Energy Program Based on Enumeration Indicators Data

    SciTech Connect

    Schweitzer, M.

    2003-02-06

    As part of an effort to produce metrics for quantifying the effects of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) State Energy Program (SEP), staff at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) developed a classification scheme for describing the various state activities supported by SEP funds. This involved identifying a number of distinct program areas into which all of the various state SEP activities could be placed. Then, a set of ''enumeration indicators'' was developed to describe key activities within each of those areas. Although originally developed to count program activities, the enumeration indicators are used here as a basis for estimating the savings and emissions reductions achieved by the SEP. While there are additional benefits associated with the SEP, such as increased energy security and economic well-being, they are not addressed in this study.

  7. MAGNETIC ENERGY SPECTRA IN SOLAR ACTIVE REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Abramenko, Valentyna; Yurchyshyn, Vasyl

    2010-09-01

    Line-of-sight magnetograms for 217 active regions (ARs) with different flare rates observed at the solar disk center from 1997 January until 2006 December are utilized to study the turbulence regime and its relationship to flare productivity. Data from the SOHO/MDI instrument recorded in the high-resolution mode and data from the BBSO magnetograph were used. The turbulence regime was probed via magnetic energy spectra and magnetic dissipation spectra. We found steeper energy spectra for ARs with higher flare productivity. We also report that both the power index, {alpha}, of the energy spectrum, E(k) {approx} k{sup -}{alpha}, and the total spectral energy, W = {integral}E(k)dk, are comparably correlated with the flare index, A, of an AR. The correlations are found to be stronger than those found between the flare index and the total unsigned flux. The flare index for an AR can be estimated based on measurements of {alpha} and W as A = 10{sup b}({alpha}W){sup c}, with b = -7.92 {+-} 0.58 and c = 1.85 {+-} 0.13. We found that the regime of the fully developed turbulence occurs in decaying ARs and in emerging ARs (at the very early stage of emergence). Well-developed ARs display underdeveloped turbulence with strong magnetic dissipation at all scales.

  8. Estimating carbon and energy fluxes in arctic tundra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gokkaya, K.; Jiang, Y.; Rastetter, E.; Shaver, G. R.; Rocha, A. V.

    2013-12-01

    Arctic ecosystems are undergoing a very rapid change due to climate change and their response to climate change has important implications for the global energy budget and carbon (C) cycling. Therefore, it is important to understand how (C) and energy fluxes in the Arctic will respond to climate change. However, attribution of these responses to climate is challenging because measured fluxes are the sum of multiple processes that respond differently to environmental factors. For example, net ecosystem exchange of CO2 (NEE) is the net result of gross (C) uptake by plant photosynthesis (GPP) and (C) loss by ecosystem respiration (ER) and similarly, evapotranspiration (i.e. latent energy, LE) is the sum of transpiration and evaporation. Partitioning of NEE into GPP and ER requires nighttime measurements of NEE, when photosynthesis does not take place, to be extrapolated to daytime. This is challenging in the Arctic because of the long photoperiod during the growing season and the errors involved during the extrapolation. Transpiration (energy), photosynthesis (carbon), and vegetation phenology are inherently coupled because leaf stomata are the primary regulators of gas exchange. Our objectives in this study are to i) estimate canopy resistance (Rc) based on a light use efficiency model, ii) utilize the estimated Rc to predict GPP and transpiration using a coupled C and energy model and thus improve the partitioning of NEE and LE, and iii) to test ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) to estimate model parameters and improve model predictions. Results from one growing season showed that the model predictions can explain 75 and 71% of the variance in GPP and LE in the Arctic tundra ecosystem, respectively. When the model was embedded within the EnKF for estimating Rc, the amount of variance explained for GPP increased to 81% but there was no improvement for the prediction of LE. This suggests that the factors controlling LE are not fully integrated in the model such as the

  9. Estimating daily energy expenditure in individuals with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis123

    PubMed Central

    Kasarskis, Edward J; Mendiondo, Marta S; Matthews, Dwight E; Mitsumoto, Hiroshi; Tandan, Rup; Simmons, Zachary; Bromberg, Mark B; Kryscio, Richard J

    2014-01-01

    Background: Patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) experience progressive limb weakness, muscle atrophy, and dysphagia, making them vulnerable to insufficient energy intake. Methods to estimate energy requirements have not been devised for this patient group. Objective: The goal was to develop equations to estimate energy requirements of ALS patients. Design: We enrolled 80 ALS participants at varying stages of their illness and studied them every 16 wk over 48 wk. At each time, we determined total daily energy expenditure (TDEE) in the home setting over a 10-d period by using the doubly labeled water method. We then developed statistical models to estimate TDEE by using factors easily obtained during a routine clinical visit. Results: The most practical TDEE models used the Harris-Benedict, Mifflin-St Jeor, or Owen equations to estimate resting metabolic rate (RMR) and 6 questions from the revised ALS Functional Rating Scale (ALSFRS-R) that relate to physical activity. We developed a Web-based calculator to facilitate its use. In the research setting, measuring body composition with bioelectrical impedance spectroscopy enabled the estimation of RMR with the Rosenbaum equation and the same 6 questions from the ALSFRS-R to estimate TDEE. By using these models, the estimate of TDEE for nutritional maintenance was ±500 kcal/d across the spectrum of ALS progression. Conclusions: Our results emphasize the importance of physical function and body composition in estimating TDEE. Our predictive equations can serve as a basis for recommending placement of a feeding gastrostomy in ALS patients who fail to meet their energy requirements by oral intake. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00116558. PMID:24522445

  10. Model estimation of energy flow in Oregon coastal seabird populations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wiens, J.A.; Scott, J.M.

    1976-01-01

    A computer simulation model was used to explore the patterns and magnitudes of population density changes and population energy demands in Oregon populations of Sooty Shear-waters, Leach?s Storm-Petrels, Brandt?s Cormorants, and Common Murres. The species differ in seasonal distribution and abundance, with shearwaters attaining high densities during their migratory movements through Oregon waters, and murres exhibiting the greatest seasonal stability in population numbers. On a unit area basis, annual energy flow is greatest through murre and cormorant populations. However, because shearwaters occupy a larger area during their transit, they dominate the total energy flow through the four-species seabird ?community.?.....Consumption of various prey types is estimated by coupling model output of energy demands with information on dietary habits. This analysis suggests that murres annually consume nearly twice as many herring as any other prey and consume approximately equal quantities of anchovy, smelt, cod, and rockfish. Cormorants consume a relatively small quantity of bottom-dwelling fish, while stormpetrels take roughly equal quantities of euphausiids and hydrozoans. Anchovies account for 43% of the 62,506 metric tons of prey the four species are estimated to consume annually; 86% of this anchovy consumption is by shearwaters. The consumption of pelagic fishes by these four populations within the neritic zone may represent as much as 22% of the annual production of these fish.

  11. Energy Storage. Teachers Guide. Science Activities in Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, Mary Lynn, Ed.

    Included in this science activities energy package for students in grades 4-10 are 12 activities related to energy storage. Each activity is outlined on the front and back of a single sheet and is introduced by a key question. Most of the activities can be completed in the classroom with materials readily available in any community. Among the…

  12. 2003 status report savings estimates for the energy star(R)voluntary labeling program

    SciTech Connect

    Webber, Carrie A.; Brown, Richard E.; McWhinney, Marla

    2004-11-09

    ENERGY STAR(R) is a voluntary labeling program designed to identify and promote energy-efficient products, buildings and practices. Operated jointly by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), ENERGY STAR labels exist for more than thirty products, spanning office equipment, residential heating and cooling equipment, commercial and residential lighting, home electronics, and major appliances. This report presents savings estimates for a subset of ENERGY STAR program activities, focused primarily on labeled products. We present estimates of the energy, dollar and carbon savings achieved by the program in the year 2002, what we expect in 2003, and provide savings forecasts for two market penetration scenarios for the period 2003 to 2020. The target market penetration forecast represents our best estimate of future ENERGY STAR savings. It is based on realistic market penetration goals for each of the products. We also provide a forecast under the assumption of 100 percent market penetration; that is, we assume that all purchasers buy ENERGY STAR-compliant products instead of standard efficiency products throughout the analysis period.

  13. Savings estimates for the ENERGY STAR (registered trademark) voluntary labeling program: 2001 status report

    SciTech Connect

    Webber, Carrie A.; Brown, Richard E.; Mahajan, Akshay; Koomey, Jonathan G.

    2002-02-15

    ENERGY STAR(Registered Trademark) is a voluntary labeling program designed to identify and promote energy-efficient products, buildings and practices. Operated jointly by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), ENERGY STAR labels exist for more than thirty products, spanning office equipment, residential heating and cooling equipment, commercial and residential lighting, home electronics, and major appliances. This report presents savings estimates for a subset of ENERGY STAR program activities, focused primarily on labeled products. We present estimates of the energy, dollar and carbon savings achieved by the program in the year 2000, what we expect in 2001, and provide savings forecasts for two market penetration scenarios for the period 2001 to 2020. The target market penetration forecast represents our best estimate of future ENERGY STAR savings. It is based on realistic market penetration goals for each of the products. We also provide a forecast under the assumption of 100 percent market penetration; that is, we assume that all purchasers buy ENERGY STAR-compliant products instead of standard efficiency products throughout the analysis period.

  14. 2002 status report: Savings estimates for the ENERGY STAR(R) voluntary labeling program

    SciTech Connect

    Webber, Carrie A.; Brown, Richard E.; McWhinney, Marla; Koomey, Jonathan

    2003-03-03

    ENERGY STAR [registered trademark] is a voluntary labeling program designed to identify and promote energy-efficient products, buildings and practices. Operated jointly by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), ENERGY STAR labels exist for more than thirty products, spanning office equipment, residential heating and cooling equipment, commercial and residential lighting, home electronics, and major appliances. This report presents savings estimates for a subset of ENERGY STAR program activities, focused primarily on labeled products. We present estimates of the energy, dollar and carbon savings achieved by the program in the year 2001, what we expect in 2002, and provide savings forecasts for two market penetration scenarios for the period 2002 to 2020. The target market penetration forecast represents our best estimate of future ENERGY STAR savings. It is based on realistic market penetration goals for each of the products. We also provide a forecast under the assumption of 100 percent market penetration; that is, we assume that all purchasers buy ENERGY STAR-compliant products instead of standard efficiency products throughout the analysis period.

  15. Estimating energy-augmenting technological change in developingcountry industries

    SciTech Connect

    Sanstad, Alan H.; Roy, Joyashree; Sathaye, Jayant A.

    2006-07-07

    Assumptions regarding the magnitude and direction ofenergy-related technological change have long beenrecognized as criticaldeterminants of the outputs and policy conclusions derived fromintegrated assessment models. Particularly in the case of developingcountries, however, empirical analysis of technological change has laggedbehind simulation modeling. This paper presents estimates of sectoralproductivity trends and energy-augmenting technological change forseveral energy-intensive industries in India and South Korea, and, forcomparison, the United States. The key findings are substantialheterogeneity among both industries and countries, and a number of casesof declining energy efficiency. The results are subject to certaintechnical qualifications both in regards to the methodology and to thedirect comparison to integrated assessment parameterizations.Nevertheless, they highlight the importance of closer attention to theempirical basis for common modeling assumptions.

  16. Estimation of Energy Savings Resulting From the BestPractices Program, Fiscal Year 2002

    SciTech Connect

    Truett, LF

    2003-09-24

    Within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) has a vision of a future with clean, abundant, reliable, and affordable energy. Within EERE, the Industrial Technologies Program (ITP), formerly the Office of Industrial Technologies, works in partnership with industry to increase energy efficiency, improve environmental performance, and boost productivity. The BestPractices (BP) Program, within ITP, works directly with industries to encourage energy efficiency. The purpose of the BP Program is to improve energy utilization and management practices in the industrial sector. The program targets distinct technology areas, including pumps, process heating, steam, compressed air, motors, and insulation. This targeting is accomplished with a variety of delivery channels, such as computer software, printed publications, Internet-based resources, technical training, technical assessments, and other technical assistance. A team of program evaluators from Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was tasked to evaluate the fiscal year 2002 (FY02) energy savings of the program. The ORNL assessment enumerates levels of program activity for technology areas across delivery channels. In addition, several mechanisms that target multiple technology areas--e.g., Plant-wide Assessments (PWAs), the ''Energy Matters'' newsletter, and special events--are also evaluated for their impacts. When possible, the assessment relies on published reports and the Industrial Assessment Center (IAC) database for estimates of energy savings that result from particular actions. Data were also provided by ORNL, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) and Project Performance Corporation (PPC), the ITP Clearinghouse at Washington State University, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Energetics Inc., and the Industrial Technologies Program Office. The estimated energy savings in FY02 resulting from activities of the BP Program are almost

  17. Study of State Energy Conservation Program: 1979 energy savings indicators. [Estimated Btu's and dollars

    SciTech Connect

    1980-06-01

    This study reviewed 1979 energy savings reports provided by states for conservation measures in four major categories of State Energy Conservation Program services, namely: (1) industrial, commercial, and institutional; (2) residential; (3) thermal and lighting; and (4) transportation. Conservation measures in these categories constitute a major portion of the total estimated 1980 savings for the State Energy Conservation Program. This study only addressed measures in these categories for which usable documentation had been submitted by states. Based on a review of measures supported by available documentation, the study estimates that energy savings associated with the conservation measures reviewed were 108 TBtu's for the calendar year 1979. These estimated energy savings for 1979 were converted into 540 million dollars for 1979 and 2.8 billion dollars over the projected life of the conservation measures.

  18. Comparison of energy estimation equations with measured energy expenditure in obese adolescent patients with cancer.

    PubMed

    Ringwald-Smith, K; Williams, R; Mackert, P; Stricklin, L; Sargent, T; Bowman, L

    1999-07-01

    Obesity is increasing in the US adolescent population. As the number of obese adolescents increases, obesity is becoming a more frequent problem in the hospital setting, sometimes causing patients to have complicated and prolonged hospital stays. Calculation of the energy requirements of obese adolescent patients with chronic diseases such as cancer is complicated by increased energy requirements as a result of disease state and growth. This study examined the accuracy of the commonly used equations for calculating energy requirements. Estimated energy expenditure was compared with measured energy expenditure determined by indirect calorimetry. All energy estimation equations were inaccurate, which indicates the need for a specific equation for determination of energy needs in this special patient population. Until further research is done, indirect calorimetry is recommended for all obese adolescent patients with cancer who require nutrition support. PMID:10405683

  19. Phase transition in the Jarzynski estimator of free energy differences.

    PubMed

    Suárez, Alberto; Silbey, Robert; Oppenheim, Irwin

    2012-05-01

    The transition between a regime in which thermodynamic relations apply only to ensembles of small systems coupled to a large environment and a regime in which they can be used to characterize individual macroscopic systems is analyzed in terms of the change in behavior of the Jarzynski estimator of equilibrium free energy differences from nonequilibrium work measurements. Given a fixed number of measurements, the Jarzynski estimator is unbiased for sufficiently small systems. In these systems the directionality of time is poorly defined and the configurations that dominate the empirical average, but which are in fact typical of the reverse process, are sufficiently well sampled. As the system size increases the arrow of time becomes better defined. The dominant atypical fluctuations become rare and eventually cannot be sampled with the limited resources that are available. Asymptotically, only typical work values are measured. The Jarzynski estimator becomes maximally biased and approaches the exponential of minus the average work, which is the result that is expected from standard macroscopic thermodynamics. In the proper scaling limit, this regime change has been recently described in terms of a phase transition in variants of the random energy model. In this paper this correspondence is further demonstrated in two examples of physical interest: the sudden compression of an ideal gas and adiabatic quasistatic volume changes in a dilute real gas. PMID:23004704

  20. Phase transition in the Jarzynski estimator of free energy differences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suárez, Alberto; Silbey, Robert; Oppenheim, Irwin

    2012-05-01

    The transition between a regime in which thermodynamic relations apply only to ensembles of small systems coupled to a large environment and a regime in which they can be used to characterize individual macroscopic systems is analyzed in terms of the change in behavior of the Jarzynski estimator of equilibrium free energy differences from nonequilibrium work measurements. Given a fixed number of measurements, the Jarzynski estimator is unbiased for sufficiently small systems. In these systems the directionality of time is poorly defined and the configurations that dominate the empirical average, but which are in fact typical of the reverse process, are sufficiently well sampled. As the system size increases the arrow of time becomes better defined. The dominant atypical fluctuations become rare and eventually cannot be sampled with the limited resources that are available. Asymptotically, only typical work values are measured. The Jarzynski estimator becomes maximally biased and approaches the exponential of minus the average work, which is the result that is expected from standard macroscopic thermodynamics. In the proper scaling limit, this regime change has been recently described in terms of a phase transition in variants of the random energy model. In this paper this correspondence is further demonstrated in two examples of physical interest: the sudden compression of an ideal gas and adiabatic quasistatic volume changes in a dilute real gas.

  1. A low-cost method for estimating energy expenditure during soccer refereeing.

    PubMed

    Ardigò, Luca Paolo; Padulo, Johnny; Zuliani, Andrea; Capelli, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to apply a validated bioenergetics model of sprint running to recordings obtained from commercial basic high-sensitivity global positioning system receivers to estimate energy expenditure and physical activity variables during soccer refereeing. We studied five Italian fifth division referees during 20 official matches while carrying the receivers. By applying the model to the recorded speed and acceleration data, we calculated energy consumption during activity, mass-normalised total energy consumption, total distance, metabolically equivalent distance and their ratio over the entire match and the two halves. Main results were as follows: (match) energy consumption = 4729 ± 608 kJ, mass normalised total energy consumption = 74 ± 8 kJ · kg(-1), total distance = 13,112 ± 1225 m, metabolically equivalent distance = 13,788 ± 1151 m and metabolically equivalent/total distance = 1.05 ± 0.05. By using a very low-cost device, it is possible to estimate the energy expenditure of soccer refereeing. The provided predicting mass-normalised total energy consumption versus total distance equation can supply information about soccer refereeing energy demand. PMID:25751742

  2. Estimation of restraint stress in rats using salivary amylase activity.

    PubMed

    Matsuura, Tetsuya; Takimura, Ryo; Yamaguchi, Masaki; Ichinose, Mitsuyuki

    2012-09-01

    The rat is an ideal model animal for studying physical and psychological stresses. Recent human studies have shown that salivary amylase activity is a useful biomarker of stress in our social life. To estimate the usefulness of amylase activity as a biomarker of stress in rats, we analyzed changes in physiological parameters including amylase activity and anatomical variables, which were induced by a mild restraint of paws (10 min, 3 times/week, 9 weeks). The quantities of food and water intake and excretion amount of the stress rats were smaller than those of the control rats during the experimental period (5-13 weeks). The body weight of the stress rats decreased compared with that of the control rats. Moreover, the enlargement of the adrenal gland was confirmed in the stress rats, indicating that the mild restraint caused a chronic stress response. The amylase activities of the stress rats were significantly greater than those of the control rats at 5 weeks of age. However, the amylase activity of the stress rats decreased compared with that of the control rats after 6 weeks of age. These results indicate that amylase activity is increased by acute stress and reduced by chronic stress, which is caused by repeated restraint stress. In conclusion, amylase activity is a useful biomarker of acute and chronic stresses in rats. PMID:22753135

  3. Machine Learning Estimates of Natural Product Conformational Energies

    PubMed Central

    Rupp, Matthias; Bauer, Matthias R.; Wilcken, Rainer; Lange, Andreas; Reutlinger, Michael; Boeckler, Frank M.; Schneider, Gisbert

    2014-01-01

    Machine learning has been used for estimation of potential energy surfaces to speed up molecular dynamics simulations of small systems. We demonstrate that this approach is feasible for significantly larger, structurally complex molecules, taking the natural product Archazolid A, a potent inhibitor of vacuolar-type ATPase, from the myxobacterium Archangium gephyra as an example. Our model estimates energies of new conformations by exploiting information from previous calculations via Gaussian process regression. Predictive variance is used to assess whether a conformation is in the interpolation region, allowing a controlled trade-off between prediction accuracy and computational speed-up. For energies of relaxed conformations at the density functional level of theory (implicit solvent, DFT/BLYP-disp3/def2-TZVP), mean absolute errors of less than 1 kcal/mol were achieved. The study demonstrates that predictive machine learning models can be developed for structurally complex, pharmaceutically relevant compounds, potentially enabling considerable speed-ups in simulations of larger molecular structures. PMID:24453952

  4. THE MAGNETIC ENERGY-HELICITY DIAGRAM OF SOLAR ACTIVE REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Tziotziou, Kostas; Georgoulis, Manolis K.; Raouafi, Nour-Eddine

    2012-11-01

    Using a recently proposed nonlinear force-free method designed for single-vector magnetograms of solar active regions, we calculate the instantaneous free magnetic energy and relative magnetic helicity budgets in 162 vector magnetograms corresponding to 42 different active regions. We find a statistically robust, monotonic correlation between the free magnetic energy and the relative magnetic helicity in the studied regions. This correlation implies that magnetic helicity, in addition to free magnetic energy, may be an essential ingredient for major solar eruptions. Eruptive active regions appear well segregated from non-eruptive ones in both free energy and relative helicity with major (at least M-class) flares occurring in active regions with free energy and relative helicity exceeding 4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 31} erg and 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 42} Mx{sup 2}, respectively. The helicity threshold agrees well with estimates of the helicity contents of typical coronal mass ejections.

  5. On the precision of automated activation time estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaplan, D. T.; Smith, J. M.; Rosenbaum, D. S.; Cohen, R. J.

    1988-01-01

    We examined how the assignment of local activation times in epicardial and endocardial electrograms is affected by sampling rate, ambient signal-to-noise ratio, and sinx/x waveform interpolation. Algorithms used for the estimation of fiducial point locations included dV/dtmax, and a matched filter detection algorithm. Test signals included epicardial and endocardial electrograms overlying both normal and infarcted regions of dog myocardium. Signal-to-noise levels were adjusted by combining known data sets with white noise "colored" to match the spectral characteristics of experimentally recorded noise. For typical signal-to-noise ratios and sampling rates, the template-matching algorithm provided the greatest precision in reproducibly estimating fiducial point location, and sinx/x interpolation allowed for an additional significant improvement. With few restrictions, combining these two techniques may allow for use of digitization rates below the Nyquist rate without significant loss of precision.

  6. CORONAL MASS EJECTION MASS, ENERGY, AND FORCE ESTIMATES USING STEREO

    SciTech Connect

    Carley, Eoin P.; Gallagher, Peter T.; McAteer, R. T. James

    2012-06-10

    Understanding coronal mass ejection (CME) energetics and dynamics has been a long-standing problem, and although previous observational estimates have been made, such studies have been hindered by large uncertainties in CME mass. Here, the two vantage points of the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) COR1 and COR2 coronagraphs were used to accurately estimate the mass of the 2008 December 12 CME. Acceleration estimates derived from the position of the CME front in three dimensions were combined with the mass estimates to calculate the magnitude of the kinetic energy and driving force at different stages of the CME evolution. The CME asymptotically approaches a mass of 3.4 {+-} 1.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 15} g beyond {approx}10 R{sub Sun }. The kinetic energy shows an initial rise toward 6.3 {+-} 3.7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 29} erg at {approx}3 R{sub Sun }, beyond which it rises steadily to 4.2 {+-} 2.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 30} erg at {approx}18 R{sub Sun }. The dynamics are described by an early phase of strong acceleration, dominated by a force of peak magnitude of 3.4 {+-} 2.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 14} N at {approx}3 R{sub Sun }, after which a force of 3.8 {+-} 5.4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 13} N takes effect between {approx}7 and 18 R{sub Sun }. These results are consistent with magnetic (Lorentz) forces acting at heliocentric distances of {approx}<7 R{sub Sun }, while solar wind drag forces dominate at larger distances ({approx}>7 R{sub Sun }).

  7. Estimating the energy contribution during single and repeated sprint swimming.

    PubMed

    Peyrebrune, M C; Toubekis, A G; Lakomy, H K A; Nevill, M E

    2014-04-01

    The extent to which aerobic processes contribute to energy supply during short duration sprint swimming is not known. Therefore, the energy contribution to a maximal 30 s fully tethered swim (FTS), and repeated 4 × 30 s high intensity semi-tethered swimming bouts (STS) with 30 s of passive rest at 95% of the 30 s FTS intensity was estimated in eight elite male swimmers. Blood lactate concentration and pH after the 4 × 30 s test were 12.1 ± 3.6 mmol/L and 7.2 ± 0.1, respectively. Accumulated oxygen demand was estimated to be 50.9 ± 9.6 mL/kg and 48.3 ± 8.4, 47.2 ± 8.5, 47.4 ± 8.3, and 45.6 ± 6.8 mL/kg for the 30 s FTS and 4 × 30 s bouts, respectively. Accumulated oxygen uptake was 16.6 ± 3.6 for the 30 s FTS and progressively increased during the 4 × 30 s bouts 12.2 ± 2.1, 21.6 ± 2.5, 22.8 ± 1.8, and 23.5 ± 2.0 mL/kg (P < 0.01). The estimated aerobic contribution therefore was 33 ± 8% for the 30 s FTS and 25 ± 4, 47 ± 9, 49 ± 8, 52 ± 9% for bouts 1-4 during the 4 × 30 s STS test (P < 0.01). The results underline the importance of aerobic energy contribution during single and repeated high intensity swimming, which should be considered when prescribing swimming training sets of this nature. PMID:22897515

  8. Improving consumption rate estimates by incorporating wild activity into a bioenergetics model.

    PubMed

    Brodie, Stephanie; Taylor, Matthew D; Smith, James A; Suthers, Iain M; Gray, Charles A; Payne, Nicholas L

    2016-04-01

    Consumption is the basis of metabolic and trophic ecology and is used to assess an animal's trophic impact. The contribution of activity to an animal's energy budget is an important parameter when estimating consumption, yet activity is usually measured in captive animals. Developments in telemetry have allowed the energetic costs of activity to be measured for wild animals; however, wild activity is seldom incorporated into estimates of consumption rates. We calculated the consumption rate of a free-ranging marine predator (yellowtail kingfish, Seriola lalandi) by integrating the energetic cost of free-ranging activity into a bioenergetics model. Accelerometry transmitters were used in conjunction with laboratory respirometry trials to estimate kingfish active metabolic rate in the wild. These field-derived consumption rate estimates were compared with those estimated by two traditional bioenergetics methods. The first method derived routine swimming speed from fish morphology as an index of activity (a "morphometric" method), and the second considered activity as a fixed proportion of standard metabolic rate (a "physiological" method). The mean consumption rate for free-ranging kingfish measured by accelerometry was 152 J·g(-1)·day(-1), which lay between the estimates from the morphometric method (μ = 134 J·g(-1)·day(-1)) and the physiological method (μ = 181 J·g(-1)·day(-1)). Incorporating field-derived activity values resulted in the smallest variance in log-normally distributed consumption rates (σ = 0.31), compared with the morphometric (σ = 0.57) and physiological (σ = 0.78) methods. Incorporating field-derived activity into bioenergetics models probably provided more realistic estimates of consumption rate compared with the traditional methods, which may further our understanding of trophic interactions that underpin ecosystem-based fisheries management. The general methods used to estimate active metabolic rates of free-ranging fish

  9. Why keep the pressure to estimate prokaryotic activities? (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamburini, C.

    2013-12-01

    Recent discoveries challenge the paradigm that cycling of organic matter is slow in the deep sea and mediated by microbial food webs of static structure and function. Data showing spatial variation in prokaryotic abundance and activity support the hypothesis that deep-sea microorganisms respond dynamically to variations in organic matter input to the bathypelagic realm. Moreover, almost half of the total water column heterotrophic prokaryotic production takes place below the epipelagic layer. Compiled global budgets suggest that the estimate of metabolic activity in the dark pelagic ocean exceeds the input of organic carbon. However, these conclusions are based mainly on measurements done at atmospheric pressure without taking into account pressure effects on natural prokaryotic assemblages. In this presentation, I will clarify the effect of hydrostatic pressure on prokaryotes living in the dark ocean and inform experimental design and the achievement of more accurate estimates of microbial activity in the deep ocean. Finally, their potential capabilities to degrade complex compounds as well as the chemolithoautrophy in the deep ocean represent examples of ways to explore deeper the role of deep-sea prokaryotes in the global cycles.

  10. Energy Activities for Junior High Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beaver, David; And Others

    This document is a collection of six energy education activities for junior high school science. Its purpose is to help promote knowledge about energy, provide laboratory experiences, provoke inquiry, and relate energy to society through the science curriculum. The six activities are designed to take one to three class periods. Two of the…

  11. Estimation of Energy Consumption and Greenhouse Gas Emissions considering Aging and Climate Change in Residential Sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, M.; Park, C.; Park, J. H.; Jung, T. Y.; Lee, D. K.

    2015-12-01

    The impacts of climate change, particularly that of rising temperatures, are being observed across the globe and are expected to further increase. To counter this phenomenon, numerous nations are focusing on the reduction of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Because energy demand management is considered as a key factor in emissions reduction, it is necessary to estimate energy consumption and GHG emissions in relation to climate change. Further, because South Korea is the world's fastest nation to become aged, demographics have also become instrumental in the accurate estimation of energy demands and emissions. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to estimate energy consumption and GHG emissions in the residential sectors of South Korea with regard to climate change and aging to build more accurate strategies for energy demand management and emissions reduction goals. This study, which was stablished with 2010 and 2050 as the base and target years, respectively, was divided into a two-step process. The first step evaluated the effects of aging and climate change on energy demand, and the second estimated future energy use and GHG emissions through projected scenarios. First, aging characteristics and climate change factors were analyzed by using the logarithmic mean divisia index (LMDI) decomposition analysis and the application of historical data. In the analysis of changes in energy use, the effects of activity, structure, and intensity were considered; the degrees of contribution were derived from each effect in addition to their relations to energy demand. Second, two types of scenarios were stablished based on this analysis. The aging scenarios are business as usual and future characteristics scenarios, and were used in combination with Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) 2.6 and 8.5. Finally, energy consumption and GHG emissions were estimated by using a combination of scenarios. The results of these scenarios show an increase in energy consumption

  12. Estimating Activity and Sedentary Behavior From an Accelerometer on the Hip or Wrist

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberger, Mary E.; Haskell, William L.; Albinali, Fahd; Mota, Selene; Nawyn, Jason; Intille, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Previously the National Health and Examination Survey measured physical activity with an accelerometer worn on the hip for seven days, but recently changed the location of the monitor to the wrist. PURPOSE This study compared estimates of physical activity intensity and type with an accelerometer on the hip versus the wrist. METHODS Healthy adults (n=37) wore triaxial accelerometers (Wockets) on the hip and dominant wrist along with a portable metabolic unit to measure energy expenditure during 20 activities. Motion summary counts were created, then receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were used to determine sedentary and activity intensity thresholds. Ambulatory activities were separated from other activities using the coefficient of variation (CV) of the counts. Mixed model predictions were used to estimate activity intensity. RESULTS The ROC for determining sedentary behavior had greater sensitivity and specificity (71% and 96%) at the hip than the wrist (53% and 76%), as did the ROC for moderate to vigorous physical activity on the hip (70% and 83%) versus the wrist (30% and 69%). The ROC for the CV associated with ambulation had a larger AUC at the hip compared to the wrist (0.83 and 0.74). The prediction model for activity energy expenditure (AEE) resulted in an average difference of 0.55 (+/− 0.55) METs on the hip and 0.82 (+/− 0.93) METs on the wrist. CONCLUSIONS Methods frequently used for estimating AEE and identifying activity intensity thresholds from an accelerometer on the hip generally do better than similar data from an accelerometer on the wrist. Accurately identifying sedentary behavior from a lack of wrist motion presents significant challenges. PMID:23247702

  13. Energy Conservation Activity Packet, Grade 5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bakke, Ruth

    This activity packet for grade 5 is one of a series developed in response to concern for energy conservation. It contains activities that stress an energy conservation ethic and includes many values clarification activities for grade five. The packet is divided into two parts and provides the teacher with background information, concepts and…

  14. Energy and power limits for microbial activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LaRowe, D.; Amend, J.

    2014-12-01

    The goal of this presentation is to describe a quantitative framework for determining how energy limits microbial activity, biomass and, ultimately, biogeochemical processes. Although this model can be applied to any environment, its utility is demonstrated in marine sediments, which are an attractive test habitat because they encompass a broad spectrum of energy levels, varying amounts of biomass and are ubiquitous. The potential number of active microbial cells in Arkonas Basin (Baltic Sea) sediments are estimated as a function of depth by quantifying the amount of energy that is available to them and the rate at which it is supplied: power. The amount of power supplied per cubic centimeter of sediment is determined by calculating the Gibbs energy of fermentation and sulfate reduction in combination with the rate of particulate organic carbon, POC, degradation. The Reactive Continuum Model (Boudreau and Ruddick, 1991), RCM, is used to determine the rate at which POC is made available for microbial consumption. The RCM represents POC as containing a range of different types of organic compounds whose ability to be consumed by microorganisms varies as a function of the age of the sediment and on the distribution of compound types that were initially deposited. The sediment age model and RCM parameters determined by (Mogollon et al., 2012) are used. The power available for fermentation and sulfate reduction coupled to H2 and acetate oxidation varies from 10-8 W cm-3 at the sediment water interface to between 10-11 - 10-12 W cm-3 at 3.5 meters below the seafloor, mbsf. Using values of maintenance powers for each of these catabolic activities taken from the literature, the total number of active cells in these sediments similarly decreases from just less than 108 cell cm-3 at the SWI to 4.6 x 104 cells cm-3 at 3.5 mbsf. The number of moles of POC decreases from 2.6 x 10-5 to 9.5 x 10-6, also becoming more recalcitrant with depth. Boudreau, B. P. and Ruddick, B. R

  15. Recent advances in telemetry for estimating the energy metabolism of wild fishes.

    PubMed

    Metcalfe, J D; Wright, S; Tudorache, C; Wilson, R P

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic rate is a critical factor in animal biology and ecology, providing an objective measure that can be used in attributing a cost to different activities and to assessing what animals do against some optimal behaviour. Ideally, metabolic rate would be estimated directly by measuring heat output but, until recently, this has not been easily tractable with fishes so instead metabolic rate is usually estimated using indirect methods. In the laboratory, oxygen consumption rate is the indirect method most frequently used for estimating metabolic rate, but technical requirements preclude the measurement of either heat output or oxygen consumption rate in free-ranging fishes. There are other field methods for estimating metabolic rate that can be used with mammals and birds but, again, these cannot be used with fishes. Here, the use of electronic devices that record body acceleration in three dimensions (accelerometry) is considered. Accelerometry is a comparatively new telemetric method for assessing energy metabolism in animals. Correlations between dynamic body acceleration (DBA) and oxygen consumption rate demonstrate that this will be a useful proxy for estimating activity-specific energy expenditure from fishes in mesocosm or field studies over extended periods where other methods (e.g. oxygen consumption rate) are not feasible. DBA therefore has potential as a valuable tool for attributing cost to different activities. This could help in gaining a full picture of how fishes make energy-based trade-offs between different levels of activity when faced with conflicting or competing demands arising from increased and combined environmental stressors. PMID:26592370

  16. Energy consumption estimation of an OMAP-based Android operating system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, Gabriel; Juárez, Eduardo; Castro, Juan José; Sanz, César

    2011-05-01

    System-level energy optimization of battery-powered multimedia embedded systems has recently become a design goal. The poor operational time of multimedia terminals makes computationally demanding applications impractical in real scenarios. For instance, the so-called smart-phones are currently unable to remain in operation longer than several hours. The OMAP3530 processor basically consists of two processing cores, a General Purpose Processor (GPP) and a Digital Signal Processor (DSP). The former, an ARM Cortex-A8 processor, is aimed to run a generic Operating System (OS) while the latter, a DSP core based on the C64x+, has architecture optimized for video processing. The BeagleBoard, a commercial prototyping board based on the OMAP processor, has been used to test the Android Operating System and measure its performance. The board has 128 MB of SDRAM external memory, 256 MB of Flash external memory and several interfaces. Note that the clock frequency of the ARM and DSP OMAP cores is 600 MHz and 430 MHz, respectively. This paper describes the energy consumption estimation of the processes and multimedia applications of an Android v1.6 (Donut) OS on the OMAP3530-Based BeagleBoard. In addition, tools to communicate the two processing cores have been employed. A test-bench to profile the OS resource usage has been developed. As far as the energy estimates concern, the OMAP processor energy consumption model provided by the manufacturer has been used. The model is basically divided in two energy components. The former, the baseline core energy, describes the energy consumption that is independent of any chip activity. The latter, the module active energy, describes the energy consumed by the active modules depending on resource usage.

  17. Energy and Safety: Science Activities for Elementary Students, Level III (Grades (5-6).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westcott, Dale; And Others

    Thirteen activities are presented that focus on a common phenomenon of a child's world: energy. These activities relate energy, how it occurs, how it is used, and how to use it safely. Each activity includes the purpose, introduction, background, procedure, materials, estimated time for the activity, typical results, safety notes, and more ideas.…

  18. Energy and Safety: Science Activities for Elementary Students, Level I (Grades (K-2).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westcott, Dale; And Others

    Twelve activities are presented that focus on a common phenomenon of a child's world: energy. These activities relate energy, how it occurs, how it is used, and how to use it safely. Each activity includes the purpose, introduction, background, procedure, materials, estimated time for the activity, typical results, safety notes, and more ideas.…

  19. Energy and Safety: Science Activities for Elementary Students, Level II (Grades (3-4).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westcott, Dale; And Others

    Thirteen activities are presented that focus on a common phenomenon of a child's world: energy. These activities relate energy, how it occurs, how it is used, and how to use it safely. Each activity includes the purpose, introduction, background, procedure, materials, estimated time for the activity, typical results, safety notes, and more ideas.…

  20. A new rapid method for rockfall energies and distances estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giacomini, Anna; Ferrari, Federica; Thoeni, Klaus; Lambert, Cedric

    2016-04-01

    Rockfalls are characterized by long travel distances and significant energies. Over the last decades, three main methods have been proposed in the literature to assess the rockfall runout: empirical, process-based and GIS-based methods (Dorren, 2003). Process-based methods take into account the physics of rockfall by simulating the motion of a falling rock along a slope and they are generally based on a probabilistic rockfall modelling approach that allows for taking into account the uncertainties associated with the rockfall phenomenon. Their application has the advantage of evaluating the energies, bounce heights and distances along the path of a falling block, hence providing valuable information for the design of mitigation measures (Agliardi et al., 2009), however, the implementation of rockfall simulations can be time-consuming and data-demanding. This work focuses on the development of a new methodology for estimating the expected kinetic energies and distances of the first impact at the base of a rock cliff, subject to the conditions that the geometry of the cliff and the properties of the representative block are known. The method is based on an extensive two-dimensional sensitivity analysis, conducted by means of kinematic simulations based on probabilistic modelling of two-dimensional rockfall trajectories (Ferrari et al., 2016). To take into account for the uncertainty associated with the estimation of the input parameters, the study was based on 78400 rockfall scenarios performed by systematically varying the input parameters that are likely to affect the block trajectory, its energy and distance at the base of the rock wall. The variation of the geometry of the rock cliff (in terms of height and slope angle), the roughness of the rock surface and the properties of the outcropping material were considered. A simplified and idealized rock wall geometry was adopted. The analysis of the results allowed finding empirical laws that relate impact energies

  1. Improved activity estimation with MC-JOSEM versus TEW-JOSEM in 111In SPECT

    PubMed Central

    Ouyang, Jinsong; Fakhri, Georges El; Moore, Stephen C.

    2008-01-01

    We have previously developed a fast Monte Carlo (MC)-based joint ordered-subset expectation maximization (JOSEM) iterative reconstruction algorithm, MC-JOSEM. A phantom study was performed to compare quantitative imaging performance of MC-JOSEM with that of a triple-energy-window approach (TEW) in which estimated scatter was also included additively within JOSEM, TEW-JOSEM. We acquired high-count projections of a 5.5 cm3 sphere of 111In at different locations in the water-filled torso phantom; high-count projections were then obtained with 111In only in the liver or only in the soft-tissue background compartment, so that we could generate synthetic projections for spheres surrounded by various activity distributions. MC scatter estimates used by MC-JOSEM were computed once after five iterations of TEW-JOSEM. Images of different combinations of liver∕background and sphere∕background activity concentration ratios were reconstructed by both TEW-JOSEM and MC-JOSEM for 40 iterations. For activity estimation in the sphere, MC-JOSEM always produced better relative bias and relative standard deviation than TEW-JOSEM for each sphere location, iteration number, and activity combination. The average relative bias of activity estimates in the sphere for MC-JOSEM after 40 iterations was −6.9%, versus −15.8% for TEW-JOSEM, while the average relative standard deviation of the sphere activity estimates was 16.1% for MC-JOSEM, versus 27.4% for TEW-JOSEM. Additionally, the average relative bias of activity concentration estimates in the liver and the background for MC-JOSEM after 40 iterations was −3.9%, versus −12.2% for TEW-JOSEM, while the average relative standard deviation of these estimates was 2.5% for MC-JOSEM, versus 3.4% for TEW-JOSEM. MC-JOSEM is a promising approach for quantitative activity estimation in 111In SPECT. PMID:18561679

  2. Intrinsic free energy in active nematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thampi, Sumesh P.; Doostmohammadi, Amin; Golestanian, Ramin; Yeomans, Julia M.

    2015-10-01

    Basing our arguments on the theory of active liquid crystals, we demonstrate, both analytically and numerically, that the activity can induce an effective free energy which enhances ordering in extensile systems of active rods and in contractile suspensions of active discs. We argue that this occurs because any ordering fluctuation is enhanced by the flow field it produces. A phase diagram in the temperature-activity plane compares ordering due to a thermodynamic free energy to that resulting from the activity. We also demonstrate that activity can drive variations in concentration, but for a different physical reason that relies on the separation of hydrodynamic and diffusive time scales.

  3. Heart rate and estimated energy expenditure during ballroom dancing.

    PubMed Central

    Blanksby, B A; Reidy, P W

    1988-01-01

    Ten competitive ballroom dance couples performed simulated competitive sequences of Modern and Latin American dance. Heart rate was telemetered during the dance sequences and related to direct measures of oxygen uptake and heart rate obtained while walking on a treadmill. Linear regression was employed to estimate gross and net energy expenditures of the dance sequences. A multivariate analysis of variance with repeated measures on the dance factor was applied to the data to test for interaction and main effects on the sex and dance factors. Overall mean heart rate values for the Modern dance sequence were 170 beats.min-1 and 173 beats.min-1 for males and females respectively. During the Latin American sequence mean overall heart rate for males was 168 beats.min-1 and 177 beats.min-1 for females. Predicted mean gross values of oxygen consumption for the males were 42.8 +/- 5.7 ml.kg-1 min-1 and 42.8 +/- 6.9 ml.kg-1 min-1 for the Modern and Latin American sequences respectively. Corresponding gross estimates of oxygen consumption for the females were 34.7 +/- 3.8 ml.kg-1 min-1 and 36.1 +/- 4.1 ml.kg-1 min-1. Males were estimated to expand 54.1 +/- 8.1 kJ.min-1 of energy during the Modern sequence and 54.0 +/- 9.6 kJ.min-1 during the Latin American sequence, while predicted energy expenditure for females was 34.7 +/- 3.8 kJ.min-1 and 36.1 +/- 4.1 kJ.min-1 for Modern and Latin American dance respectively. The results suggested that both males and females were dancing at greater than 80% of their maximum oxygen consumption. A significant difference between males and females was observed for predicted gross and net values of oxygen consumption (in L.min-1 and ml.kg-1 min-1). PMID:3167503

  4. Heart rate and estimated energy expenditure during ballroom dancing.

    PubMed

    Blanksby, B A; Reidy, P W

    1988-06-01

    Ten competitive ballroom dance couples performed simulated competitive sequences of Modern and Latin American dance. Heart rate was telemetered during the dance sequences and related to direct measures of oxygen uptake and heart rate obtained while walking on a treadmill. Linear regression was employed to estimate gross and net energy expenditures of the dance sequences. A multivariate analysis of variance with repeated measures on the dance factor was applied to the data to test for interaction and main effects on the sex and dance factors. Overall mean heart rate values for the Modern dance sequence were 170 beats.min-1 and 173 beats.min-1 for males and females respectively. During the Latin American sequence mean overall heart rate for males was 168 beats.min-1 and 177 beats.min-1 for females. Predicted mean gross values of oxygen consumption for the males were 42.8 +/- 5.7 ml.kg-1 min-1 and 42.8 +/- 6.9 ml.kg-1 min-1 for the Modern and Latin American sequences respectively. Corresponding gross estimates of oxygen consumption for the females were 34.7 +/- 3.8 ml.kg-1 min-1 and 36.1 +/- 4.1 ml.kg-1 min-1. Males were estimated to expand 54.1 +/- 8.1 kJ.min-1 of energy during the Modern sequence and 54.0 +/- 9.6 kJ.min-1 during the Latin American sequence, while predicted energy expenditure for females was 34.7 +/- 3.8 kJ.min-1 and 36.1 +/- 4.1 kJ.min-1 for Modern and Latin American dance respectively. The results suggested that both males and females were dancing at greater than 80% of their maximum oxygen consumption. A significant difference between males and females was observed for predicted gross and net values of oxygen consumption (in L.min-1 and ml.kg-1 min-1). PMID:3167503

  5. Spectral estimators of absorbed photosynthetically active radiation in corn canopies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallo, K. P.; Daughtry, C. S. T.; Bauer, M. E.

    1985-01-01

    Most models of crop growth and yield require an estimate of canopy leaf area index (LAI) or absorption of radiation. Relationships between photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) absorbed by corn canopies and the spectral reflectance of the canopies were investigated. Reflectance factor data were acquired with a Landsat MSS band radiometer. From planting to silking, the three spectrally predicted vegetation indices examined were associated with more than 95 percent of the variability in absorbed PAR. The relationships developed between absorbed PAR and the three indices were evaluated with reflectance factor data acquired from corn canopies planted in 1979 through 1982. Seasonal cumulations of measured LAI and each of the three indices were associated with greater than 50 percent of the variation in final grain yields from the test years. Seasonal cumulations of daily absorbed PAR were associated with up to 73 percent of the variation in final grain yields. Absorbed PAR, cumulated through the growing season, is a better indicator of yield than cumulated leaf area index. Absorbed PAR may be estimated reliably from spectral reflectance data of crop canopies.

  6. Spectral estimators of absorbed photosynthetically active radiation in corn canopies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallo, K. P.; Daughtry, C. S. T.; Bauer, M. E.

    1984-01-01

    Most models of crop growth and yield require an estimate of canopy leaf area index (LAI) or absorption of radiation. Relationships between photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) absorbed by corn canopies and the spectral reflectance of the canopies were investigated. Reflectance factor data were acquired with a LANDSAT MSS band radiometer. From planting to silking, the three spectrally predicted vegetation indices examined were associated with more than 95% of the variability in absorbed PAR. The relationships developed between absorbed PAR and the three indices were evaluated with reflectance factor data acquired from corn canopies planted in 1979 through 1982. Seasonal cumulations of measured LAI and each of the three indices were associated with greater than 50% of the variation in final grain yields from the test years. Seasonal cumulations of daily absorbed PAR were associated with up to 73% of the variation in final grain yields. Absorbed PAR, cumulated through the growing season, is a better indicator of yield than cumulated leaf area index. Absorbed PAR may be estimated reliably from spectral reflectance data of crop canopies.

  7. Intercepted photosynthetically active radiation estimated by spectral reflectance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hatfield, J. L.; Asrar, G.; Kanemasu, E. T.

    1984-01-01

    Interception of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) was evaluated relative to greenness and normalized difference (MSS (7-5)/(7+5) for five planting dates of wheat for 1978-79 and 1979-80 at Phoenix, Arizona. Intercepted PAR was calculated from leaf area index and stage of growth. Linear relatinships were found with greeness and normalized difference with separate relatinships describing growth and senescence of the crop. Normalized difference was significantly better than greenness for all planting dates. For the leaf area growth portion of the season the relation between PAR interception and normalized difference was the same over years and planting dates. For the leaf senescence phase the relationships showed more variability due to the lack of data on light interception in sparse and senescing canopies. Normalized difference could be used to estimate PAR interception throughout a growing season.

  8. Solar Energy Education. Renewable energy activities for biology

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-01-01

    An instructional aid for teachers is presented that will allow biology students the opportunity to learn about renewable energy sources. Some of the school activities include using leaves as collectors of solar energy, solar energy stored in wood, and a fuel value test for green and dry woods. A study of organic wastes as a source of fuel is included. (BCS)

  9. Solar energy education. Renewable energy activities for general science

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    Renewable energy topics are integrated with the study of general science. The literature is provided in the form of a teaching manual and includes such topics as passive solar homes, siting a home for solar energy, and wind power for the home. Other energy topics are explored through library research activities. (BCS)

  10. Energy-efficiency testing activities of the Mobile Energy Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, G.B.

    1991-01-01

    This report summarizes energy-efficiency testing activities during the first and second quarters of fiscal year 1990 applying the Mobile Energy Laboratory (MEL) testing capabilities. Four MELs, developed by the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), are administered by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for energy testing and program support functions at federal facilities. The using agencies principally fund MEL applications, while DOE/FEMP funds program administration and capability enhancement activities. This report fulfills the requirements established in the MEL Use Plan (PNL-6861) for semiannual reporting on energy-efficiency testing activities using the MEL capabilities. The MEL Use Committee, formally established in 1989, developed the MEL Use Plan and meets semiannually to establish priorities for energy-efficient testing applications using the MEL capabilities.

  11. Estimation and Monitoring of Wind/Wave energy potential in the Eastern Mediterranean Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zodiatis, George; Galanis, George; Galanis, George; Emmanouil, George; Emmanouil, George; Hayes, Dan; Nikolaidis, Andreas; Georgiou, Georgios; Kalogeri, Christina; Kallos, George

    2013-04-01

    Τhe adaptation and use of innovative methodologies for the exploitation of renewable energy marine resources is one of the main issues today for the environmental science community. Within this framework, the exploitation of wind and wave energy potential for coastal and island states seems to be one of the promising solutions and highly interesting from research and technological point of view. In this work, the activities of two projects focusing on the study of wind/wave energy over the area of Eastern Mediterranean Sea are presented. The "Integrated High Resolution System for Monitoring and Quantifying the Wave Energy Potential in the EEZ of Cyprus" (Ewave project) focuses on the estimation, monitoring and forecasting of the wave energy potential over the Levantine Basin with special emphasis to the Exclusive Economical Zone of Cyprus, while the "Development and application of new mathematical and physical models for Monitoring the wind and Sea wave Energy Potential" (MOSEP project) is a platform for developing new mathematical algorithms for the estimation of the wave energy over the Aegean Sea. In both projects, high resolution digital atlases of sea wave/wind climatological characteristics and the distribution of the wind and wave energy potential are developed for the coastal and offshore areas of the East Mediterranean sea . Moreover, new models for the prediction and quantification of wave energy in short and long forecast horizons are proposed. Statistical results concerning the probability density functions of the wind speed, the significant wave height, as well as the energy potential will be presented for selected sea areas in the Eastern Mediterranean Sea, while test case studies in certain regions favor to wind/wave renewable energy will be discussed.

  12. Estimating Am-241 activity in the body: comparison of direct measurements and radiochemical analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Lynch, Timothy P.; Tolmachev, Sergei Y.; James, Anthony C.

    2009-06-01

    The assessment of dose and ultimately the health risk from intakes of radioactive materials begins with estimating the amount actually taken into the body. An accurate estimate provides the basis to best assess the distribution in the body, the resulting dose, and ultimately the health risk. This study continues the time-honored practice of evaluating the accuracy of results obtained using in vivo measurement methods and techniques. Results from the radiochemical analyses of the 241Am activity content of tissues and organs from four donors to the United States Transuranium and Uranium Registries were compared to the results from direct measurements of radioactive material in the body performed in vivo and post mortem. Two were whole body donations and two were partial body donations The skeleton was the organ with the highest deposition of 241Am activity in all four cases. The activities ranged from 30 Bq to 300 Bq. The skeletal estimates obtained from measurements over the forehead were within 20% of the radiochemistry results in three cases and differed by 78% in one case. The 241Am lung activity estimates ranged from 1 Bq to 30 Bq in the four cases. The results from the direct measurements were within 40% of the radiochemistry results in 3 cases and within a factor of 3 for the other case. The direct measurement estimates of liver activity ranged from 2 Bq to 60 Bq and were generally lower than the radiochemistry results. The results from this study suggest that the measurement methods and calibration techniques used at the In Vivo Radiobioassay and Research Facility to quantify the activity in the lungs, skeleton and liver are reasonable under the most challenging conditions where there is 241Am activity in multiple organs. These methods and techniques are comparable to those used at other Department of Energy sites. This suggests that the current in vivo methods and calibration techniques provide reasonable estimates of radioactive material in the body. Not

  13. Radiative energy budget estimates for the 1979 southwest summer monsoon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ackerman, Steven A.; Cox, Stephen K.

    1987-01-01

    A major objective of the summer monsoon experiment (SMONEX) was the determination of the heat sources and sinks associated with the southwest summer monsoon. The radiative component is presented here. The vertically integrated tropospheric radiation energy budget is negative and varies significantly as a function of monsoon activity. The gradient in the latitudinal mean tropospheric cooling reverses between the winter periods and the late spring/early summer periods. The radiative component of the vertical profile of the diabatic heating is derived. These profiles are a strong function of the stage of the monsoon as well as the geographic region. In general, the surface experiences a net gain of radiative energy during the late spring and early summer periods. During the winter periods, areas northward of 25 N display net surface losses, while the remaining areas exhibit net gains.

  14. Solar Energy Project, Activities: General Solar Topics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tullock, Bruce, Ed.; And Others

    This guide contains lesson plans and outlines of activities which introduce students to concepts and issues relating to solar energy. Lessons frequently presented in the context of solar energy as it relates to contemporary energy problems. Each unit presents an introduction; objectives; necessary skills and knowledge; materials; method;…

  15. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer imaging by maximum likelihood estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yupeng; Yuan, Yumin; Holmes, Timothy J.

    2004-06-01

    Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) is a fluorescence microscope imaging process involving nonradiative energy transfer between two fluorophores (the donor and the acceptor). FRET is used to detect the chemical interactions and, in some cases, measure the distance between molecules. Existing approaches do not always well compensate for bleed-through in excitation, cross-talk in emission detection and electronic noise in image acquisition. We have developed a system to automatically search for maximum-likelihood estimates of the FRET image, donor concentration and acceptor concentration. It also produces other system parameters, such as excitation/emission filter efficiency and FRET conversion factor. The mathematical model is based upon a Poisson process since the CCD camera is a photon-counting device. The main advantage of the approach is that it automatically compensates for bleed-through and cross-talk degradations. Tests are presented with synthetic images and with real data referred to as positive and negative controls, where FRET is known to occur and to not occur, respectively. The test results verify the claimed advantages by showing consistent accuracy in detecting FRET and by showing improved accuracy in calculating FRET efficiency.

  16. Greenhouse gas emissions of an agro-biogas energy system: Estimation under the Renewable Energy Directive.

    PubMed

    Rana, Roberto; Ingrao, Carlo; Lombardi, Mariarosaria; Tricase, Caterina

    2016-04-15

    Agro-biogas from energy crops and by-products is a renewable energy carrier that can potentially contribute to climate change mitigation. In this context, application of the methodology defined by the Renewable Energy Directive 2009/28/EC (RED) was performed in order to estimate the 100-year Global Warming Potential (GWP100) associated with an agro-biogas supply chain (SC) in Southern Italy. Doing so enabled calculation of Greenhouse Gas (GHG) emission saving in order to verify if it is at least equal to 35% compared to the fossil fuel reference system, as specified by the RED. For the assessment, an attributional Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) approach (International Organization for Standardization (ISO), 2006a,b) was integrated with the RED methodology applied following the guidelines reported in COM(2010)11 and updated by SWD(2014)259 and Report EUR 27215 EN (2015). Moreover, primary data were collected with secondary data extrapolated from the Ecoinvent database system. Results showed that the GWP100 associated with electricity production through the biogas plant investigated was equal to 111.58gCO2eqMJe(-1) and so a 40.01% GHG-emission saving was recorded compared to the RED reference. The highest contribution comes from biomass production and, in particular, from crop cultivation due to production of ammonium nitrate in the overall amount used for crop cultivation. Based upon the findings of the study, the GHG saving calculated slightly exceeds the related minimum proposed by the RED: therefore, improvements are needed anyway. In particular, the authors documented that through replacement of ammonium nitrate with urea the GHG-emission saving would increase to almost 68%, thus largely satisfying the RED limit. In addition, the study highlighted that conservation practices, such as NT, can significantly enable reduction of the GHG-emissions coming from agricultural activities. Therefore, those practices should be increasingly adopted for cultivation of energy

  17. Energy Cost of Common Activities in Children and Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Lyden, Kate; Keadle, Sarah Kozey; Staudenmayer, John; Freedson, Patty; Alhassan, Sofiya

    2014-01-01

    Background The Compendium of Energy Expenditures for Youth assigns MET values to a wide range of activities. However, only 35% of activity MET values were derived from energy cost data measured in youth; the remaining activities were estimated from adult values. Purpose To determine the energy cost of common activities performed by children and adolescents and compare these data to similar activities reported in the compendium. Methods Thirty-two children (8–11 years old) and 28 adolescents (12–16 years) completed 4 locomotion activities on a treadmill (TRD) and 5 age-specific activities of daily living (ADL). Oxygen consumption was measured using a portable metabolic analyzer. Results In children, measured METs were significantly lower than compendium METs for 3 activities [basketball, bike riding, and Wii tennis (1.1–3.5 METs lower)]. In adolescents, measured METs were significantly lower than compendium METs for 4 ADLs [basketball, bike riding, board games, and Wii tennis (0.3–2.5 METs lower)] and 3 TRDs [2.24 m·s−1, 1.56 m·s−1, and 1.34 m·s−1 (0.4–0.8 METs lower)]. Conclusion The Compendium of Energy Expenditures for Youth is an invaluable resource to applied researchers. Inclusion of empirically derived data would improve the validity of the Compendium of Energy Expenditures for Youth. PMID:22398418

  18. FY 2000 Buildings Energy Savings Estimates under Uncertainty: Developing Approaches for Incorporating Risk into Buildings Program Energy Efficiency Estimates

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Dave M.

    2002-11-18

    This report is one of two that re-examines the forecasted impact of individual programs currently within the Buildings Technology Program (BT) and the Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program (WIP) that appeared in the FY2000 Presidential Budget request. This report develops potential methods for allowing inherent risk to be captured in the program benefits analysis. Note that the FY2000 budget request was originally analyzed under the former Office of Building Technology, State and Community Programs (BTS), where BT and WIP were previously combined. Throughout the document, reference will be made to the predecessor of the BT and WIP programs, BTS, as FY2000 reflected that organization. A companion report outlines the effects of re-estimating the FY 2000 budget request based on overlaying program data from subsequent years, essentially revised out-year forecasts. That report shows that year-to-year long-term projections of primary energy savings can vary widely as models improve and programs change. Those point estimates are not influenced by uncertainty or risk. This report develops potential methods for allowing inherent risk to affect the benefits analysis via Monte Carlo simulation.

  19. Hybrid energy harvesting using active thermal backplane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyun-Wook; Lee, Dong-Gun

    2016-04-01

    In this study, we demonstrate the concept of a new hybrid energy harvesting system by combing solar cells with magneto-thermoelectric generator (MTG, i.e., thermal energy harvesting). The silicon solar cell can easily reach high temperature under normal operating conditions. Thus the heated solar cell becomes rapidly less efficient as the temperature of solar cell rises. To increase the efficiency of the solar cell, air or water-based cooling system is used. To surpass conventional cooling devices requiring additional power as well as large working space for air/water collectors, we develop a new technology of pairing an active thermal backplane (ATB) to solar cell. The ATB design is based on MTG technology utilizing the physics of the 2nd order phase transition of active ferromagnetic materials. The MTG is cost-effective conversion of thermal energy to electrical energy and is fundamentally different from Seebeck TEG devices. The ATB (MTG) is in addition to being an energy conversion system, a very good conveyor of heat through both conduction and convection. Therefore, the ATB can provide dual-mode for the proposed hybrid energy harvesting. One is active convective and conductive cooling for heated solar cell. Another is active thermal energy harvesting from heat of solar cell. These novel hybrid energy harvesting device have potentially simultaneous energy conversion capability of solar and thermal energy into electricity. The results presented can be used for better understanding of hybrid energy harvesting system that can be integrated into commercial applications.

  20. Energy and Energy Conservation Activities for High School Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bottinelli, Charles A., Ed.; Dow, John O., Ed.

    This manual contains fifteen energy activities suitable for high school physical and environmental science and mathematics classrooms. The activities are independent, each having its own objectives, introduction, and background information. A special section of each activity is written for the instructor and contains limits, sample data, and…

  1. Spatial analysis of world energy markets: estimation of the demand for energy and variable supply simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Sahlawi, M.A.

    1985-01-01

    This study develops a theoretical and empirical model to estimate the demand for oil, natural gas, and coal in the developing countries and to then simulate the response of spatially separated world energy markets to supply shocks. It is found that the demands for oil, natural gas, and coal in the developing countries are highly priced inelastic in the short-run. This is in keeping with elasticity estimates for the developed countries. The model simulates two kinds of supply shocks, first; partial blocking of the Strait of Hormuz, and second; return of Iraq and Iran oil supplies to their pre-war levels. Additionally, the impact of economic growth on energy demand is simulated when supplies are variable. The simulation results reveals that the problem of having oil supply disruption or oil supply surplus seems to create problems that can be solved by varying the supplies of energy substitutes. However, the impact of economic growth appears to be minimal.

  2. Survey of conditional energy demand models for estimating residential unit energy consumption coefficients. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence, A.G.; Parti, M.

    1984-02-01

    Several recent econometric studies of residential energy use are reviewed. These studies specify residential energy use as the sum of energy use in each of several household appliances (including space conditioning systems). The energy used in each of the enumerated appliances (e.g., end-uses) is called its unit energy consumption (UEC) coefficient. Most of the studies use household survey data combined with utility billing records. In general, the UEC coefficients are parameterized as functions of weather conditions, household income, the size of the dwelling, the demographic composition of the household, the price of energy, and other variables from the survey data. A few of the studies have explored the econometric issues of demand analysis under the block tariff schedules prevalent in the utility industry. Some studies report price elasticities or income elasticities or both for specific end-uses. These studies show that such econometric estimation is a successful and efficient tool for measuring electricity consumption by end-use. Their results are compared with engineering estimates from other extant studies. Results from these econometric UEC models have improved the accuracy and end-use detail of the energy forecasting models of some utilities.

  3. Transverse energy scaling and energy density estimates from sup 16 O- and sup 32 S-induced reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    We discuss the dependence of transverse energy production on projectile mass, target mass, and on the impact parameter of the heavy ion reaction. The transverse energy is shown to scale with the number of participating nucleons. Various methods to estimate the attained energy density from the observed transverse energy are discussed. It is shown that the systematics of the energy density estimates suggest averages of 2--3 GeV/fm{sup 3} rather than the much higher values attained by assuming Landau-stopping initial conditions. Based on the observed scaling of the transverse energy, an initial energy density profile may be estimated. 14 refs., 4 figs.

  4. Transverse energy scaling and energy density estimates from /sup 16/O- and /sup 32/S-induced reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Awes, T.C.; Albrecht, R.; Baktash, C.; Beckmann, P.; Berger, F.; Bock, R.; Claesson, G.; Clewing, G.; Dragon, L.; Eklund, A.

    1989-01-01

    We discuss the dependence of transverse energy production on projectile mass, target mass, and on the impact parameter of the heavy ion reaction. The transverse energy is shown to scale with the number of participating nucleons. Various methods to estimate the attained energy density from the observed transverse energy are discussed. It is shown that the systematics of the energy density estimates suggest average of 2-3 GeV/fm/sup 3/ rather than the much higher values attained by assuming Landau-stopping initial conditions. Based on the observed scaling of the transverse energy, an initial energy density profile may be estimated. 11 refs., 4 figs.

  5. Reducing measurement scale mismatch to improve surface energy flux estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwema, Joost; Rosolem, Rafael; Rahman, Mostaquimur; Blyth, Eleanor; Wagener, Thorsten

    2016-04-01

    Soil moisture importantly controls land surface processes such as energy and water partitioning. A good understanding of these controls is needed especially when recognizing the challenges in providing accurate hyper-resolution hydrometeorological simulations at sub-kilometre scales. Soil moisture controlling factors can, however, differ at distinct scales. In addition, some parameters in land surface models are still often prescribed based on observations obtained at another scale not necessarily employed by such models (e.g., soil properties obtained from lab samples used in regional simulations). To minimize such effects, parameters can be constrained with local data from Eddy-Covariance (EC) towers (i.e., latent and sensible heat fluxes) and Point Scale (PS) soil moisture observations (e.g., TDR). However, measurement scales represented by EC and PS still differ substantially. Here we use the fact that Cosmic-Ray Neutron Sensors (CRNS) estimate soil moisture at horizontal footprint similar to that of EC fluxes to help answer the following question: Does reduced observation scale mismatch yield better soil moisture - surface fluxes representation in land surface models? To answer this question we analysed soil moisture and surface fluxes measurements from twelve COSMOS-Ameriflux sites in the USA characterized by distinct climate, soils and vegetation types. We calibrated model parameters of the Joint UK Land Environment Simulator (JULES) against PS and CRNS soil moisture data, respectively. We analysed the improvement in soil moisture estimation compared to uncalibrated model simulations and then evaluated the degree of improvement in surface fluxes before and after calibration experiments. Preliminary results suggest that a more accurate representation of soil moisture dynamics is achieved when calibrating against observed soil moisture and further improvement obtained with CRNS relative to PS. However, our results also suggest that a more accurate

  6. Estimating Physical Activity in Youth Using a Wrist Accelerometer

    PubMed Central

    Crouter, Scott E.; Flynn, Jennifer I.; Bassett, David R.

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE The purpose of this study was to develop and validate methods for analyzing wrist accelerometer data in youth. METHODS 181 youth (mean±SD; age, 12.0±1.5 yrs) completed 30-min of supine rest and 8-min each of 2 to 7 structured activities (selected from a list of 25). Receiver Operator Characteristic (ROC) curves and regression analyses were used to develop prediction equations for energy expenditure (child-METs; measured activity VO2 divided by measured resting VO2) and cut-points for computing time spent in sedentary behaviors (SB), light (LPA), moderate (MPA), and vigorous (VPA) physical activity. Both vertical axis (VA) and vector magnitude (VM) counts per 5 seconds were used for this purpose. The validation study included 42 youth (age, 12.6±0.8 yrs) who completed approximately 2-hrs of unstructured PA. During all measurements, activity data were collected using an ActiGraph GT3X or GT3X+, positioned on the dominant wrist. Oxygen consumption was measured using a Cosmed K4b2. Repeated measures ANOVAs were used to compare measured vs predicted child-METs (regression only), and time spent in SB, LPA, MPA, and VPA. RESULTS All ROC cut-points were similar for area under the curve (≥0.825), sensitivity (≥0.756), and specificity (≥0.634) and they significantly underestimated LPA and overestimated VPA (P<0.05). The VA and VM regression models were within ±0.21 child-METs of mean measured child-METs and ±2.5 minutes of measured time spent in SB, LPA, MPA, and VPA, respectively (P>0.05). CONCLUSION Compared to measured values, the VA and VM regression models developed on wrist accelerometer data had insignificant mean bias for child-METs and time spent in SB, LPA, MPA, and VPA; however they had large individual errors. PMID:25207928

  7. Estimating Energy Dissipation Due to Wave Breaking in the Surf Zone Using Infrared Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carini, Roxanne J.

    Wave breaking is the largest forcing mechanism in the surf zone. Therefore, quantifying energy dissipation due to wave breaking is important for improving models that seek to predict nearshore circulation, wave-current interactions, air-sea gas exchange, erosion and accretion of sediment, and storm surge. Wave energy dissipation is difficult to measure with in situ instruments, and even the most reliable estimates are limited to point measurements. Using remote sensing technologies, specifically infrared (IR) imagery, the high spatial and temporal variability of wave breaking may be sampled. Duncan (1981) proposed a model (D81) for dissipation on a wave-by-wave basis, based on wave slope and roller length, the crest-perpendicular length of the aerated region of a breaking wave. The wave roller is composed of active foam, which, in thermal IR images, appears brighter than the surrounding water and the residual foam, the foam left behind in the wake of a breaking wave. Using IR imagery taken during the Surf Zone Optics 2010 experiment at Duck, NC, and exploiting the distinct signature of active foam, a retrieval algorithm was developed to identify and extract breaking wave roller length. Roller length was then used to estimate dissipation rate via the D81 formulation. The D81 dissipation rate estimates compare reasonably to in situ dissipation estimates at a point. When the D81 estimates are compared to the bulk energy flux into the surf zone, it is found that wave breaking dissipates approximately 25-36% of the incoming wave energy. The D81 dissipation rate estimates also agree closely with those from a dissipation parameterization proposed by Janssen and Battjes (2007) (JB07) and commonly applied within larger nearshore circulation models. The JB07 formulation, however, requires additional physical parameters (wave height and water depth) that are often sparsely sampled and are difficult to attain from remote sensing alone. The power of the D81 formulation lies in

  8. Optimal stimulus scheduling for active estimation of evoked brain networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kafashan, MohammadMehdi; Ching, ShiNung

    2015-12-01

    Objective. We consider the problem of optimal probing to learn connections in an evoked dynamic network. Such a network, in which each edge measures an input-output relationship between sites in sensor/actuator-space, is relevant to emerging applications in neural mapping and neural connectivity estimation. Approach. We show that the problem of scheduling nodes to a probe (i.e., stimulate) amounts to a problem of optimal sensor scheduling. Main results. By formulating the evoked network in state-space, we show that the solution to the greedy probing strategy has a convenient form and, under certain conditions, is optimal over a finite horizon. We adopt an expectation maximization technique to update the state-space parameters in an online fashion and demonstrate the efficacy of the overall approach in a series of detailed numerical examples. Significance. The proposed method provides a principled means to actively probe time-varying connections in neuronal networks. The overall method can be implemented in real time and is particularly well-suited to applications in stimulation-based cortical mapping in which the underlying network dynamics are changing over time.

  9. Zero-Cost Estimation of Zero-Point Energies.

    PubMed

    Császár, Attila G; Furtenbacher, Tibor

    2015-10-01

    An additive, linear, atom-type-based (ATB) scheme is developed allowing no-cost estimation of zero-point vibrational energies (ZPVE) of neutral, closed-shell molecules in their ground electronic states. The atom types employed correspond to those defined within the MM2 molecular mechanics force field approach. The reference training set of 156 molecules cover chained and branched alkanes, alkenes, cycloalkanes and cycloalkenes, alkynes, alcohols, aldehydes, carboxylic acids, amines, amides, ethers, esters, ketones, benzene derivatives, heterocycles, nucleobases, all the natural amino acids, some dipeptides and sugars, as well as further simple molecules and ones containing several structural units, including several vitamins. A weighted linear least-squares fit of atom-type-based ZPVE increments results in recommended values for the following atoms, with the number of atom types defined in parentheses: H(8), D(1), B(1), C(6), N(7), O(3), F(1), Si(1), P(2), S(3), and Cl(1). The average accuracy of the ATB ZPVEs is considerably better than 1 kcal mol(-1), that is, better than chemical accuracy. The proposed ATB scheme could be extended to many more atoms and atom types, following a careful validation procedure; deviation from the MM2 atom types seems to be necessary, especially for third-row elements. PMID:26398318

  10. Estimating fire radiative power obscuration by tree canopies through laboratory experiments: Estimating fire radiative energy in a longleaf pine forest from airborne thermal imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathews, William

    Remote sensing has been proven as a useful tool in characterizing the effects of fire on a landscape scale. The radiant energy released during biomass burning can be measured remotely, and is directly related to the rate biomass consumed from the fire. This is an important measurement as it can characterize fire effects on the ground along with provide important information about the amount of gases produced by the fire. One source of error associated with estimating the fire radiative energy (FRE) remotely is the obscuration of the signal by the forest canopy. We quantify the relationship between canopy cover and the amount of energy observed by a sensor rom laboratory experiments. A prescribed fire was conducted in northwestern Florida and a suite of pre-, active, and post-fire measurements were taken by an interdisciplinary team. From those data we measured the amount of biomass consumed by the fire FRE estimates.

  11. Estimation of energy density of Li-S batteries with liquid and solid electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chunmei; Zhang, Heng; Otaegui, Laida; Singh, Gurpreet; Armand, Michel; Rodriguez-Martinez, Lide M.

    2016-09-01

    With the exponential growth of technology in mobile devices and the rapid expansion of electric vehicles into the market, it appears that the energy density of the state-of-the-art Li-ion batteries (LIBs) cannot satisfy the practical requirements. Sulfur has been one of the best cathode material choices due to its high charge storage (1675 mAh g-1), natural abundance and easy accessibility. In this paper, calculations are performed for different cell design parameters such as the active material loading, the amount/thickness of electrolyte, the sulfur utilization, etc. to predict the energy density of Li-S cells based on liquid, polymeric and ceramic electrolytes. It demonstrates that Li-S battery is most likely to be competitive in gravimetric energy density, but not volumetric energy density, with current technology, when comparing with LIBs. Furthermore, the cells with polymer and thin ceramic electrolytes show promising potential in terms of high gravimetric energy density, especially the cells with the polymer electrolyte. This estimation study of Li-S energy density can be used as a good guidance for controlling the key design parameters in order to get desirable energy density at cell-level.

  12. A generalized model for estimating the energy density of invertebrates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    James, Daniel A.; Csargo, Isak J.; Von Eschen, Aaron; Thul, Megan D.; Baker, James M.; Hayer, Cari-Ann; Howell, Jessica; Krause, Jacob; Letvin, Alex; Chipps, Steven R.

    2012-01-01

    Invertebrate energy density (ED) values are traditionally measured using bomb calorimetry. However, many researchers rely on a few published literature sources to obtain ED values because of time and sampling constraints on measuring ED with bomb calorimetry. Literature values often do not account for spatial or temporal variability associated with invertebrate ED. Thus, these values can be unreliable for use in models and other ecological applications. We evaluated the generality of the relationship between invertebrate ED and proportion of dry-to-wet mass (pDM). We then developed and tested a regression model to predict ED from pDM based on a taxonomically, spatially, and temporally diverse sample of invertebrates representing 28 orders in aquatic (freshwater, estuarine, and marine) and terrestrial (temperate and arid) habitats from 4 continents and 2 oceans. Samples included invertebrates collected in all seasons over the last 19 y. Evaluation of these data revealed a significant relationship between ED and pDM (r2  =  0.96, p < 0.0001), where ED (as J/g wet mass) was estimated from pDM as ED  =  22,960pDM − 174.2. Model evaluation showed that nearly all (98.8%) of the variability between observed and predicted values for invertebrate ED could be attributed to residual error in the model. Regression of observed on predicted values revealed that the 97.5% joint confidence region included the intercept of 0 (−103.0 ± 707.9) and slope of 1 (1.01 ± 0.12). Use of this model requires that only dry and wet mass measurements be obtained, resulting in significant time, sample size, and cost savings compared to traditional bomb calorimetry approaches. This model should prove useful for a wide range of ecological studies because it is unaffected by taxonomic, seasonal, or spatial variability.

  13. Energy and angular dependence of active-type personal dosemeter for high-energy neutron.

    PubMed

    Rito, Hirotaka; Yamauchi, Tomoya; Oda, Keiji

    2011-07-01

    In order to develop an active-type personal dosemeter having suitable sensitivity to high-energy neutrons, the characteristic response of silicon surface barrier detector has been investigated experimentally and theoretically. An agreement of the shape of pulse-height distribution, its change with radiator thickness and the relative sensitivity was confirmed between the calculated and experimental results for 14.8-MeV neutrons. The angular dependence was estimated for other neutron energies, and found that the angular dependence decreased with the incident energy. The reason was also discussed with regard to the radiator thickness relative to maximum range of recoil protons. PMID:21613268

  14. Linear solvation energy relationships: "rule of thumb" for estimation of variable values

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hickey, James P.; Passino-Reader, Dora R.

    1991-01-01

    For the linear solvation energy relationship (LSER), values are listed for each of the variables (Vi/100, π*, &betam, αm) for fundamental organic structures and functional groups. We give the guidelines to estimate LSER variable values quickly for a vast array of possible organic compounds such as those found in the environment. The difficulty in generating these variables has greatly discouraged the application of this quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) method. This paper present the first compilation of molecular functional group values together with a utilitarian set of the LSER variable estimation rules. The availability of these variable values and rules should facilitate widespread application of LSER for hazard evaluation of environmental contaminants.

  15. State energy data report: Consumption estimates, 1960--1988

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-04-30

    This volume is an annual report for 1988 by the Energy Information Administration giving energy consumption for each state. A summary is given for the USA as a whole. Consumption is broken down to transportation, industrial, and residential sectors. (FSD)

  16. Solar Energy Education. Renewable energy activities for earth science

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    A teaching manual is provided to aid teachers in introducing renewable energy topics to earth science students. The main emphasis is placed on solar energy. Activities for the student include a study of the greenhouse effect, solar gain for home heating, measuring solar radiation, and the construction of a model solar still to obtain fresh water. Instructions for the construction of apparatus to demonstrate a solar still, the greenhouse effect and measurement of the altitude and azimuth of the sun are included. (BCS)

  17. Thermodynamic Derivation of the Activation Energy for Ice Nucleation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barahona, D.

    2015-01-01

    Cirrus clouds play a key role in the radiative and hydrological balance of the upper troposphere. Their correct representation in atmospheric models requires an understanding of the microscopic processes leading to ice nucleation. A key parameter in the theoretical description of ice nucleation is the activation energy, which controls the flux of water molecules from the bulk of the liquid to the solid during the early stages of ice formation. In most studies it is estimated by direct association with the bulk properties of water, typically viscosity and self-diffusivity. As the environment in the ice-liquid interface may differ from that of the bulk, this approach may introduce bias in calculated nucleation rates. In this work a theoretical model is proposed to describe the transfer of water molecules across the ice-liquid interface. Within this framework the activation energy naturally emerges from the combination of the energy required to break hydrogen bonds in the liquid, i.e., the bulk diffusion process, and the work dissipated from the molecular rearrangement of water molecules within the ice-liquid interface. The new expression is introduced into a generalized form of classical nucleation theory. Even though no nucleation rate measurements are used to fit any of the parameters of the theory the predicted nucleation rate is in good agreement with experimental results, even at temperature as low as 190 K, where it tends to be underestimated by most models. It is shown that the activation energy has a strong dependency on temperature and a weak dependency on water activity. Such dependencies are masked by thermodynamic effects at temperatures typical of homogeneous freezing of cloud droplets; however, they may affect the formation of ice in haze aerosol particles. The new model provides an independent estimation of the activation energy and the homogeneous ice nucleation rate, and it may help to improve the interpretation of experimental results and the

  18. Conservation Activities Related to Energy: Energy Activities for Urban Elementary Students, K-6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, Joan S.; And Others

    Presented are simple activities, experiments, and demonstrations relating to energy conservation in the home. Activities are divided into four areas: (1) kitchen, (2) house, (3) transportation, and (4) heating and cooling. The material has been designed to require a minimum of preparation. Activity and game masters are provided. Activities may be…

  19. Combining observations in the reflective solar and thermal domains for improved carbon and energy flux estimation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study investigates the utility of integrating remotely sensed estimates of leaf chlorophyll (Cab) into a therma-based Two-Source Energy Balance (TSEB) model that estimates land-surface CO2 and energy fluxes using an analytical, light-use-efficiency (LUE) based model of canopy resistance. The LU...

  20. Monocular distance estimation from optic flow during active landing maneuvers.

    PubMed

    van Breugel, Floris; Morgansen, Kristi; Dickinson, Michael H

    2014-06-01

    Vision is arguably the most widely used sensor for position and velocity estimation in animals, and it is increasingly used in robotic systems as well. Many animals use stereopsis and object recognition in order to make a true estimate of distance. For a tiny insect such as a fruit fly or honeybee, however, these methods fall short. Instead, an insect must rely on calculations of optic flow, which can provide a measure of the ratio of velocity to distance, but not either parameter independently. Nevertheless, flies and other insects are adept at landing on a variety of substrates, a behavior that inherently requires some form of distance estimation in order to trigger distance-appropriate motor actions such as deceleration or leg extension. Previous studies have shown that these behaviors are indeed under visual control, raising the question: how does an insect estimate distance solely using optic flow? In this paper we use a nonlinear control theoretic approach to propose a solution for this problem. Our algorithm takes advantage of visually controlled landing trajectories that have been observed in flies and honeybees. Finally, we implement our algorithm, which we term dynamic peering, using a camera mounted to a linear stage to demonstrate its real-world feasibility. PMID:24855045

  1. Arc Energy Estimations: Applications in Lightning-Induced Concrete Spall

    SciTech Connect

    Tully, L K; Ong, M M

    2008-06-03

    After lightning contacts a building, the possibility of a physical break in its conductive path to ground may exist. Given such a break, an electric field may develop across the gap until it exceeds the breakdown strength of the non-conducting, or dielectric, material. Breakdown subsequently occurs and energy is dissipated during the development of an arc channel. If the dielectric is concrete, a concern exists that the energy available for arc formation may be capable of launching pieces of spall into sensitive equipment. This paper discusses the mechanisms of energy dissipation in arc formation and quantifies the energy available for concrete spall.

  2. Estimation of the relationship between remotely sensed anthropogenic heat discharge and building energy use

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Yuyu; Weng, Qihao; Gurney, Kevin R.; Shuai, Yanmin; Hu, Xuefei

    2012-01-01

    This paper examined the relationship between remotely sensed anthropogenic heat discharge and energy use from residential and commercial buildings across multiple scales in the city of Indianapolis, Indiana, USA. Anthropogenic heat discharge was estimated based on a remote sensing-based surface energy balance model, which was parameterized using land cover, land surface temperature, albedo, and meteorological data. Building energy use was estimated using a GIS-based building energy simulation model in conjunction with Department of Energy/ Energy Information Administration survey data, Assessor's parcel data, GIS floor areas data, and remote sensing-derived building height data.

  3. Use of MODIS-Derived Fire Radiative Energy to Estimate Smoke Aerosol Emissions over Different Ecosystems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ichoku, Charles; Kaufman, Yoram J.

    2003-01-01

    Biomass burning is the main source of smoke aerosols and certain trace gases in the atmosphere. However, estimates of the rates of biomass consumption and emission of aerosols and trace gases from fires have not attained adequate reliability thus far. Traditional methods for deriving emission rates employ the use of emission factors e(sub x), (in g of species x per kg of biomass burned), which are difficult to measure from satellites. In this era of environmental monitoring from space, fire characterization was not a major consideration in the design of the early satellite-borne remote sensing instruments, such as AVHRR. Therefore, although they are able to provide fire location information, they were not adequately sensitive to variations in fire strength or size, because their thermal bands used for fire detection saturated at the lower end of fire radiative temperature range. As such, hitherto, satellite-based emission estimates employ proxy techniques using satellite derived fire pixel counts (which do not express the fire strength or rate of biomass consumption) or burned areas (which can only be obtained after the fire is over). The MODIS sensor, recently launched into orbit aboard EOS Terra (1999) and Aqua (2002) satellites, have a much higher saturation level and can, not only detect the fire locations 4 times daily, but also measures the at-satellite fire radiative energy (which is a measure of the fire strength) based on its 4 micron channel temperature. Also, MODIS measures the optical thickness of smoke and other aerosols. Preliminary analysis shows appreciable correlation between the MODIS-derived rates of emission of fire radiative energy and smoke over different regions across the globe. These relationships hold great promise for deriving emission coefficients, which can be used for estimating smoke aerosol emissions from MODIS active fire products. This procedure has the potential to provide more accurate emission estimates in near real

  4. On-farm estimation of energy balance in dairy cows using only frequent body weight measurements and body condition score.

    PubMed

    Thorup, V M; Edwards, D; Friggens, N C

    2012-04-01

    Precise energy balance estimates for individual cows are of great importance to monitor health, reproduction, and feed management. Energy balance is usually calculated as energy input minus output (EB(inout)), requiring measurements of feed intake and energy output sources (milk, maintenance, activity, growth, and pregnancy). Except for milk yield, direct measurements of the other sources are difficult to obtain in practice, and estimates contain considerable error sources, limiting on-farm use. Alternatively, energy balance can be estimated from body reserve changes (EB(body)) using body weight (BW) and body condition score (BCS). Automated weighing systems exist and new technology performing semi-automated body condition scoring has emerged, so frequent automated BW and BCS measurements are feasible. We present a method to derive individual EB(body) estimates from frequently measured BW and BCS and evaluate the performance of the estimated EB(body) against the traditional EB(inout) method. From 76 Danish Holstein and Jersey cows, parity 1 or 2+, on a glycerol-rich or a whole grain-rich total mixed ration, BW was measured automatically at each milking. The BW was corrected for the weight of milk produced and for gutfill. Changes in BW and BCS were used to calculate changes in body protein, body lipid, and EB(body) during the first 150 d in milk. The EB(body) was compared with the traditional EB(inout) by isolating the term within EB(inout) associated with most uncertainty; that is, feed energy content (FEC); FEC=(EB(body)+EMilk+EMaintenance+Eactivity)/dry matter intake, where the energy requirements are for milk produced (EMilk), maintenance (EMaintenance), and activity (EActivity). Estimated FEC agreed well with FEC values derived from tables (the mean estimate was 0.21 MJ of effective energy/kg of dry matter or 2.2% higher than the mean table value). Further, the FEC profile did not suggest systematic bias in EB(body) with stage of lactation. The EB

  5. Solar Energy Project, Activities: Chemistry & Physics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tullock, Bruce, Ed.; And Others

    This guide contains lesson plans and outlines of science activities which present concepts of solar energy in the context of chemistry and physics experiments. Each unit presents an introduction to the unit; objectives; required skills and knowledge; materials; method; questions; recommendations for further work; and a teacher information sheet.…

  6. Solar Energy Project, Activities: Junior High Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tullock, Bruce, Ed.; And Others

    This guide contains lesson plans and outlines of science activities which present concepts of solar energy in the context of the junior high science curriculum. Each unit presents an introduction; objectives; skills and knowledge needed; materials; methods; questions; recommendations for further work; and a teacher information sheet. The teacher…

  7. Solar Energy Project, Activities: Earth Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tullock, Bruce, Ed.; And Others

    This guide contains lesson plans and outlines of science activities which present concepts of solar energy in the context of earth science experiments. Each unit presents an introduction; objectives; skills and knowledge needed; materials; method; questions; recommendations for further study; and a teacher information sheet. The teacher…

  8. Energy Activities for Junior High Social Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minnesota State Energy Agency, St. Paul.

    The document contains seven learning activities for junior high students on the energy situation. Objectives are to help students gain understanding and knowledge about the relationships between humans and their social and physical environments; solve problems and clarify issues; examine personal beliefs and values; and recognize the relationships…

  9. Hardee County Energy Activities - Middle School Level.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Rodney F., Ed.

    Described are over 70 activities designed to help students develop writing skills by examining energy issues. Intended for middle school students, the lessons were developed by Hardee County, Florida teachers. Learning strategies employed include class discussions, analogies, word puzzles, letter writing, sentence completions, vocabulary building…

  10. Activation energy of water structural transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kholmanskiy, Alexander

    2015-06-01

    In this work, the nature of molecular motions that dominate in the thermodynamics of anomalies of liquid water properties in the range of 0-100 °C has been studied. Temperature dependencies of water properties have been approximated by exponential functions and the activation energies for water structure transitions have been evaluated. The activation energy values were compared with the energy spectra of characteristic vibrations and with those of cooperative molecular motion in the lattice-type structure of hydrogen bonds. It has been found that it is the reaction of hydrogen bond breaking that mainly limits the abnormal dynamics of water viscosity, self-diffusion, dielectric relaxation time and electric conductivity. It has been assumed that the thermodynamics of cooperative motion and resonance phenomena in water clusters form a basis for the differentiation mechanism of extrema points in temperature dependencies of water density, isobaric heat capacity, sound velocity, surface tension coefficient and compressibility.

  11. Procedure for estimating fracture energy from fracture surface roughness

    DOEpatents

    Williford, Ralph E.

    1989-01-01

    The fracture energy of a material is determined by first measuring the length of a profile of a section through a fractured surface of the material taken on a plane perpendicular to the mean plane of that surface, then determining the fractal dimensionality of the surface. From this, the yield strength of the material, and the Young's Modulus of that material, the fracture energy is calculated.

  12. The Magnetic Free Energy in Active Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Metcalf, Thomas R.; Mickey, Donald L.; LaBonte, Barry J.

    2001-01-01

    The magnetic field permeating the solar atmosphere governs much of the structure, morphology, brightness, and dynamics observed on the Sun. The magnetic field, especially in active regions, is thought to provide the power for energetic events in the solar corona, such as solar flares and Coronal Mass Ejections (CME) and is believed to energize the hot coronal plasma seen in extreme ultraviolet or X-rays. The question remains what specific aspect of the magnetic flux governs the observed variability. To directly understand the role of the magnetic field in energizing the solar corona, it is necessary to measure the free magnetic energy available in active regions. The grant now expiring has demonstrated a new and valuable technique for observing the magnetic free energy in active regions as a function of time.

  13. Using an Active Sensor to Estimate Orchard Grass (Dactylis glomerata L.) Dry Matter Yield and Quality

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Remote sensing in the form of active sensors could be used to estimate forage biomass on spatial and temporal scales. The objective of this study is to use canopy reflectance measurements from an active remote sensor to compare different vegetation indices as a means of estimating final dry matter y...

  14. Bread Basket: a gaming model for estimating home-energy costs

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-01-01

    An instructional manual for answering the twenty variables on COLORADO ENERGY's computerized program estimating home energy costs. The program will generate home-energy cost estimates based on individual household data, such as total square footage, number of windows and doors, number and variety of appliances, heating system design, etc., and will print out detailed costs, showing the percentages of the total household budget that energy costs will amount to over a twenty-year span. Using the program, homeowners and policymakers alike can predict the effects of rising energy prices on total spending by Colorado households.

  15. Estimating the energy deposition based on anisotropic fluxes measured by POES MEPED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandanger, Marit Irene; Stadsnes, Johan; Nesse Tyssøy, Hilde; Glesnes Ødegaard, Linn-Kristine; Åsnes, Arne

    2015-04-01

    The Medium Energy Proton and Electron Detector (MEPED) onboard the Polar Orbiting Operational Environmental Satellites (POES) consists of two electron telescopes, one viewing nearly radially outward from Earth (the 0o detector) and the other viewing antiparallel to the satellite's velocity (the 90o detector). Energetic particle measurements from POES are often used to estimate the energy deposition in the mesosphere. The electron fluxes usually show strong pitch angle anisotropy. Until now, it has been customary to derive a lower estimate of the energy deposition in the mesosphere from the 0o detector, while an upper estimate is derived from the 90odetector. We have developed a method using measurements from both the 0o and 90o telescopes in a combination with theoretically determined pitch angle distributions, in order to give a more precise estimate of the energy deposition in the upper atmosphere. The derived anisotropic flux distributions are used to calculate the energy deposition during Relativistic Electron Precipitation (REP) events.

  16. Estimating energy balance fluxes above a boreal forest from radiometric temperature observations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The great areal extent of boreal forests confers these ecosystems potential to impact on the global surface-atmosphere energy exchange. A modeling approach, based on a simplified two-source energy balance model, was proposed to estimate energy balance fluxes above boreal forests using thermal infrar...

  17. Estimation of energy budget of ionosphere-thermosphere system during two CIR-HSS events: observations and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verkhoglyadova, Olga; Meng, Xing; Mannucci, Anthony J.; Tsurutani, Bruce T.; Hunt, Linda A.; Mlynczak, Martin G.; Hajra, Rajkumar; Emery, Barbara A.

    2016-04-01

    We analyze the energy budget of the ionosphere-thermosphere (IT) system during two High-Speed Streams (HSSs) on 22-31 January, 2007 (in the descending phase of solar cycle 23) and 25 April-2 May, 2011 (in the ascending phase of solar cycle 24) to understand typical features, similarities, and differences in magnetosphere-ionosphere-thermosphere (IT) coupling during HSS geomagnetic activity. We focus on the solar wind energy input into the magnetosphere (by using coupling functions) and energy partitioning within the IT system during these intervals. The Joule heating is estimated empirically. Hemispheric power is estimated based on satellite measurements. We utilize observations from TIMED/SABER (Thermosphere-Ionosphere-Mesosphere Energetics and Dynamics/Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry) to estimate nitric oxide (NO) and carbon dioxide (CO2) cooling emission fluxes. We perform a detailed modeling study of these two similar HSS events with the Global Ionosphere-Thermosphere Model (GITM) and different external driving inputs to understand the IT response and to address how well the model reproduces the energy transport. GITM is run in a mode with forecastable inputs. It is shown that the model captures the main features of the energy coupling, but underestimates NO cooling and auroral heating in high latitudes. Lower thermospheric forcing at 100 km altitude is important for correct energy balance of the IT system. We discuss challenges for a physics-based general forecasting approach in modeling the energy budget of moderate IT storms caused by HSSs.

  18. Energy Expenditure During Extravehicular Activity Through Apollo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paul, Heather L.

    2011-01-01

    Monitoring crew health during manned space missions has always been an important factor to ensure that the astronauts can complete the missions successfully and within safe physiological limits. The necessity of real-time metabolic rate monitoring during extravehicular activities (EVAs) came into question during the Gemini missions, when the energy expenditure required to complete EVA tasks exceeded the life support capabilities for cooling and humidity control and crewmembers (CMs) ended the EVAs fatigued and overworked. This paper discusses the importance of real-time monitoring of metabolic rate during EVA, and provides a historical look at energy expenditure during EVA through the Apollo program.

  19. Energy Expenditure During Extravehicular Activity Through Apollo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paul, Heather L.

    2012-01-01

    Monitoring crew health during manned space missions has always been an important factor to ensure that the astronauts can complete the missions successfully and within safe physiological limits. The necessity of real-time metabolic rate monitoring during extravehicular activities (EVAs) came into question during the Gemini missions, when the energy expenditure required to complete EVA tasks exceeded the life support capabilities for cooling and humidity control and, as a result, crew members ended the EVAs fatigued and overworked. This paper discusses the importance of real-time monitoring of metabolic rate during EVAs, and provides a historical look at energy expenditure during EVAs through the Apollo Program.

  20. Optimum target source term estimation for high energy electron accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayak, M. K.; Sahu, T. K.; Nair, Haridas G.; Nandedkar, R. V.; Bandyopadhyay, Tapas; Tripathi, R. M.; Hannurkar, P. R.

    2016-05-01

    Optimum target for bremsstrahlung emission is defined as the thickness of the target material, which produces maximum bremsstrahlung yield, on interaction of electron with the target. The bremsstrahlung dose rate per unit electron beam power at a distance of 1 m from the target material gives the optimum target source term. In the present work, simulations were performed for three different electron energies, 450, 1000 and 2500 MeV using EGSnrc Monte-Carlo code to determine the optimum thickness. An empirical relation for optimum target as a function of electron energy and atomic number of the target materials is found out from results. Using the simulated optimum target thickness, experiments are conducted to determine the optimum target source term. For the experimental determination, two available electron energies, 450 MeV and 550 MeV from booster synchrotron of Indus facility is used. The optimum target source term for these two energies are also simulated. The experimental and simulated source term are found to be in very good agreement within ±3%. Based on the agreement of the simulated source term with the experimental source term at 450 MeV and 550 MeV, the same simulation methodology is used to simulate optimum target source term up to 2500 MeV. The paper describes the simulations and experiments carried out on optimum target bremsstrahlung source term and the results obtained.

  1. Energy Expenditure of the Physical Activity across the Curriculum Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Honas, Jeffery J.; Washburn, Richard A.; Smith, Bryan K.; Greene, Jerry L.; Donnelly, Joseph E.

    2013-01-01

    Physical activity is frequently a component of interventions designed to diminish weight gain in children. It is essential to determine whether the energy expenditure (EE) elicited by these interventions is sufficient to reduce the rate of weight gain. Purpose To quantify the EE of the Physical Activity across the Curriculum (PAAC) intervention. This intervention involved two 10-min physically active academic lessons per day, taught by classroom teachers. Methods We assessed EE of PAAC in 19 males and 19 females using both an indirect calorimeter (IC) (COSMED K4b2) and an accelerometer (ActiGraph) (AC). Independent t-tests were used to evaluate gender differences. Dependent t-tests were used to examine the difference between EE assessed by IC and AC. The agreement between EE measured by IC and estimated by AC was evaluated using a Bland-Altman plot. A Pearson correlation between EE measured by IC and estimated by AC was calculated. Results There were no significant gender differences for age, BMI, or EE; therefore, analyses by gender were not performed. The mean EE measured by IC was 3.1 ± 1.0 kcal/min(3.4 METs). Mean EE estimated by AC (1.8 ± 0.9 kcal/min) was significantly lower (P < 0.05) than EE measured by IC (mean underestimation = 1.3 kcal/min). The Bland-Altman plot suggested increased underestimation with increased levels of EE. The 95% limits of agreement were large (-2.8 to +0.3 kcal/min). The correlation between EE measured by IC and estimated by AC was r = 0.68 (P < 0.001). Conclusion PAAC elicited a level of EE that may prevent excessive weight gain in children. AC significantly underestimated the EE of PAAC lessons and may not provide useful EE estimates in this context. PMID:18614939

  2. Fast estimation of solvation free energies for diverse chemical species.

    PubMed

    Boyer, Robert D; Bryan, Richard L

    2012-03-29

    The free energy of solvation can play an important or even dominant role in the accurate prediction of binding affinities and various other molecular-scale interaction phenomena critical to the study of biochemical processes. Many research applications for solvation modeling, such as fragment-based drug design, require algorithms that are both accurate and computationally inexpensive. We have developed a calculation of solvation free energy which runs fast enough for interactive applications, functions for a wide range of chemical species relevant to simulating molecules for biological and pharmaceutical applications, and is readily extended when data for new species becomes available. We have also demonstrated that the incorporation of ab initio data provides necessary access to sufficient reference data for a broad range of chemical features. Our empirical model, including an electrostatic term and a different set of atom types, demonstrates improvements over a previous, solvent-accessible surface area-only model by Wang et al. when fit to identical training sets (mean absolute error of 0.513 kcal/mol versus the 0.538 kcal/mol reported by Wang). The incorporation of ab initio solvation free energies provides a significant increase in the breadth of chemical features for which the model can be applied by introducing classes of compounds for which little or no experimental data is available. The increased breadth and the speed of this solvation model allow for conformational minimization, conformational search, and ligand binding free energy calculations that economically account for the complex interplay of bonded, nonbonded, and solvation free energies as conformations with varying solvent-accessible surfaces are sampled. PMID:22339050

  3. ESTIMATING THE ''DARK'' ENERGY CONTENT OF THE SOLAR CORONA

    SciTech Connect

    McIntosh, Scott W.; De Pontieu, Bart

    2012-12-20

    The discovery of ubiquitous low-frequency (3-5 mHz) Alfvenic waves in the solar chromosphere (with Hinode/Solar Optical Telescope) and corona (with CoMP and SDO) has provided some insight into the non-thermal energy content of the outer solar atmosphere. However, many questions remain about the true magnitude of the energy flux carried by these waves. Here we explore the apparent discrepancy in the resolved coronal Alfvenic wave amplitude ({approx}0.5 km s{sup -1}) measured by the Coronal Multi-channel Polarimeter (CoMP) compared to those of the Hinode and the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) near the limb ({approx}20 km s{sup -1}). We use a blend of observational data and a simple forward model of Alfvenic wave propagation to resolve this discrepancy and determine the Alfvenic wave energy content of the corona. Our results indicate that enormous line-of-sight superposition within the coarse spatio-temporal sampling of CoMP hides the strong wave flux observed by Hinode and SDO and leads to the large non-thermal line broadening observed. While this scenario has been assumed in the past, our observations with CoMP of a strong correlation between the non-thermal line broadening with the low-amplitude, low-frequency Alfvenic waves observed in the corona provide the first direct evidence of a wave-related non-thermal line broadening. By reconciling the diverse measurements of Alfvenic waves, we establish large coronal non-thermal line widths as direct signatures of the hidden, or ''dark'', energy content in the corona and provide preliminary constraints on the energy content of the wave motions observed.

  4. Active Control by Conservation of Energy Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maestrello, Lucio

    2000-01-01

    Three unrelated experiments are discussed; each was extremely sensitive to initial conditions. The initial conditions are the beginnings of the origins of the information that nonlinearity displays. Initial conditions make the phenomenon unstable and unpredictable. With the knowledge of the initial conditions, active control requires far less power than that present in the system response. The first experiment is on the control of shocks from an axisymmetric supersonic jet; the second, control of a nonlinear panel response forced by turbulent boundary layer and sound; the third, control of subharmonic and harmonics of a panel forced by sound. In all three experiments, control is achieved by redistribution of periodic energy response such that the energy is nearly preserved from a previous uncontrolled state. This type of active control improves the performance of the system being controlled.

  5. "Help Wanted, Inquire Within": Estimation. Activities and Thoughts That Emphasize Dealing Sensibly with Numbers through the Processes of Estimation. (Grades 1-6). Title I Elementary Mathematics Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gronert, Joie; Marshall, Sally

    Developed for elementary teachers, this activity unit is designed to teach students the importance of estimation in developing quantitative thinking. Nine ways in which estimation is useful to students are listed, and five general guidelines are offered to the teacher for planning estimation activities. Specific guidelines are provided for…

  6. [Estimation of Fraction of Absorbed Photosynthetically Active Radiation for Winter Wheat Based on Hyperspectral Characteristic Parameters].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chao; Cai, Huan-jie; Li, Zhi-jun

    2015-09-01

    Estimating fraction of absorbed photosynthetically active radiation (FPAR) precisely has great importance for detecting vegetation water content, energy and carbon cycle balance. Based on this, ASD FieldSpec 3 and SunScan canopy analyzer were applied to measure the canopy spectral reflectance and photosynthetically active radiation over whole growth stage of winter wheat. Canopy reflectance spectral data was used to build up 24 hyperspectral characteristic parameters and the correlation between FPAR and different spectral characteristic parameters were analyzed to establish the estimation model of FPAR for winter wheat. The results indicated that there were extremely significant correlations (p<0.01) between FPAR and hyperspectral characteristic parameters except the slope of blue edge (Db). The correlation coefficient between FPAR and the ratio of red edge area to blue edge area (VI4) was the highest, reaching at 0.836. Seven spectral parameters with higher correlation coefficient were selected to establish optimal linear and nonlinear estimation models of FPAR, and the best estimating models of FPAR were obtained by accuracy analysis. For the linear model, the inversin model between green edge and FPAR was the best, with R2, RMSE and RRMSE of predicted model reaching 0.679, 0.111 and 20.82% respectively. For the nonlinear model, the inversion model between VI2 (normalized ratio of green peak to red valley of reflectivity) and FPAR was the best, with R2, RMSE and RRMSE of predicted model reaching 0.724, 0.088 and 21.84% for. In order to further improve the precision of the model, the multiple linear regression and BP neural network methods were used to establish models with multiple high spectral parameters BP neural network model (R2=0.906, RMSE=0.08, RRMSE=16.57%) could significantly improve the inversion precision compared with the single variable model. The results show that using hyperspectral characteristic parameters to estimate FPAR of winter wheat is

  7. Estimating the energy of intramolecular hydrogen bonds in chitosan oligomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhailov, G. P.; Lazarev, V. V.

    2016-07-01

    The effect the number of chitosan monomer units CTS n ( n = 1-5), the protonation of chitosan dimers, and the interaction between CTS n ( n = 1-3) and acetate ions have on the energy of intramolecular hydrogen bonds is investigated by means of QTAIM analysis and solving the vibrational problem within the cluster-continuum model. It is established that the number of H-bonds in CTS n is 2 n - 1 and the total energy of H-bonds grows by ~20 kJ/mol. It is concluded that the hydrogen bonds between CTS and acetate ions play a major role in the stabilization of polyelectrolyte complexes in dilute acetic acid solutions of CTS.

  8. Get Current: Switch on Clean Energy Activity Book

    SciTech Connect

    2014-06-01

    Switching on clean energy technologies means strengthening the economy while protecting the environment. This activity book for all ages promotes energy awareness, with facts on different types of energy and a variety of puzzles in an energy theme.

  9. Estimation of the Relationship Between Remotely Sensed Anthropogenic Heat Discharge and Building Energy Use

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, Yuyu; Weng, Qihao; Gurney, Kevin R.; Shuai, Yanmin; Hu, Xuefei

    2012-01-01

    This paper examined the relationship between remotely sensed anthropogenic heat discharge and energy use from residential and commercial buildings across multiple scales in the city of Indianapolis, Indiana, USA. The anthropogenic heat discharge was estimated with a remote sensing-based surface energy balance model, which was parameterized using land cover, land surface temperature, albedo, and meteorological data. The building energy use was estimated using a GIS-based building energy simulation model in conjunction with Department of Energy/Energy Information Administration survey data, the Assessor's parcel data, GIS floor areas data, and remote sensing-derived building height data. The spatial patterns of anthropogenic heat discharge and energy use from residential and commercial buildings were analyzed and compared. Quantitative relationships were evaluated across multiple scales from pixel aggregation to census block. The results indicate that anthropogenic heat discharge is consistent with building energy use in terms of the spatial pattern, and that building energy use accounts for a significant fraction of anthropogenic heat discharge. The research also implies that the relationship between anthropogenic heat discharge and building energy use is scale-dependent. The simultaneous estimation of anthropogenic heat discharge and building energy use via two independent methods improves the understanding of the surface energy balance in an urban landscape. The anthropogenic heat discharge derived from remote sensing and meteorological data may be able to serve as a spatial distribution proxy for spatially-resolved building energy use, and even for fossil-fuel CO2 emissions if additional factors are considered.

  10. An estimating rule for deep space station control room equipment energy costs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Younger, H. C.

    1980-01-01

    A rule is described which can be used to estimate power costs for new equipment under development, helping to reduce life-cycle costs and energy consumption by justifying design alternatives that are more costly, but more efficient.

  11. High energy activation data library (HEAD-2009)

    SciTech Connect

    Mashnik, Stepan G; Korovin, Yury A; Natalenko, Anatoly A; Konobeyev, Alexander Yu; Stankovskiy, A Yu

    2010-01-01

    A proton activation data library for 682 nuclides from 1 H to 210Po in the energy range from 150 MeV up to 1 GeV was developed. To calculate proton activation data, the MCNPX 2.6.0 and CASCADE/INPE codes were chosen. Different intranuclear cascade, preequilibrium, and equilibrium nuclear reaction models and their combinations were used. The optimum calculation models have been chosen on the basis of statistical correlations for calculated and experimental proton data taken from the EXFOR library of experimental nuclear data. All the data are written in ENDF-6 format. The library is called HEPAD-2008 (High-Energy Proton Activation Data). A revision of IEAF-2005 neutron activation data library has been performed. A set of nuclides for which the cross-section data can be (and were) updated using more modern and improved models is specified, and the corresponding calculations have been made in the present work. The new version of the library is called IEAF-2009. The HEPAD-2008 and IEAF-2009 are merged to the final HEAD-2009 library.

  12. High energy activation data library (HEAD-2009)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korovin, Yu. A.; Natalenko, A. A.; Stankovskiy, A. Yu.; Mashnik, S. G.; Konobeyev, A. Yu.

    2010-12-01

    A proton activation data library for 682 nuclides from 1H to 210Po in the energy range from 150 MeV up to 1 GeV was developed. To calculate proton activation data, the MCNPX 2.6.0 and CASCADE/INPE codes were chosen. Different intranuclear cascade, preequilibrium, and equilibrium nuclear reaction models and their combinations were used. The optimum calculation models have been chosen on the basis of statistical correlations for calculated and experimental proton data taken from the EXFOR library of experimental nuclear data. All the data are written in ENDF-6 format. The library is called HEPAD-2008 (High-Energy Proton Activation Data). A revision of IEAF-2005 neutron activation data library has been performed. A set of nuclides for which the cross-section data can be (and were) updated using more modern and improved models is specified, and the corresponding calculations have been made in the present work. The new version of the library is called IEAF-2009. The HEPAD-2008 and IEAF-2009 are merged to the final HEAD-2009 library.

  13. ARM Best Estimate Data (ARMBE) Products for Climate Science for a Sustainable Energy Future (CSSEF)

    DOE Data Explorer

    Riihimaki, Laura; Gaustad, Krista; McFarlane, Sally

    2014-06-12

    This data set was created for the Climate Science for a Sustainable Energy Future (CSSEF) model testbed project and is an extension of the hourly average ARMBE dataset to other extended facility sites and to include uncertainty estimates. Uncertainty estimates were needed in order to use uncertainty quantification (UQ) techniques with the data.

  14. Cost and size estimates for an electrochemical bulk energy storage concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warshay, M.; Wright, L. O.

    1975-01-01

    Preliminary capital cost and size estimates were made for an electrochemical bulk energy storage concept for a redox-flow-cell system. Preliminary calculations showed that the redox-flow-cell system has great promise as a bulk energy storage system for power load leveling. The size of the system was estimated to be less than 2 percent of the size of a comparable pumped hydroelectric storage plant.

  15. Energy and Man's Environment: Activity Guide. An Interdisciplinary Teacher's Guide to Energy and Environmental Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, John, Ed.

    This publication provides the goals, concepts, objectives, and rationale for the six activity guides in this series of energy education materials. The organization of this series, as presented in this publication, centers around six goals which correspond to the activity guides. Under each goal are several concepts, which in turn, have several…

  16. Evaluation of a two source snow-vegetation energy balance model for estimating surface energy fluxes in a rangeland ecosystem

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The utility of a two source snow-vegetation energy balance model for estimating surface energy fluxes is evaluated with field measurements at two sites in a rangeland ecosystem in southwestern Idaho during the winter of 2007: one site dominated by aspen vegetation and the other by sagebrush. Model ...

  17. Comparing Participants' Rating and Compendium Coding to Estimate Physical Activity Intensities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Masse, Louise C.; Eason, Karen E.; Tortolero, Susan R.; Kelder, Steven H.

    2005-01-01

    This study assessed agreement between participants' rating (PMET) and compendium coding (CMET) of estimating physical activity intensity in a population of older minority women. As part of the Women on the Move study, 224 women completed a 7-day activity diary and wore an accelerometer for 7 days. All activities recorded were coded using PMET and…

  18. Non-Exercise Estimation of VO[subscript 2]max Using the International Physical Activity Questionnaire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schembre, Susan M.; Riebe, Deborah A.

    2011-01-01

    Non-exercise equations developed from self-reported physical activity can estimate maximal oxygen uptake (VO[subscript 2]max) as well as sub-maximal exercise testing. The International Physical Activity Questionnaire is the most widely used and validated self-report measure of physical activity. This study aimed to develop and test a VO[subscript…

  19. Energy and Man's Environment Activity Guide: An Interdisciplinary Teacher's Guide to Energy and Environmental Activities, Section Four - Impacts of Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, John, Ed.

    This publication presents the activities pertaining to the fourth goal of this activity guide series. The activities in this publication focus on the socioeconomic effects of energy uses and crises and the understandings needed to assess those effects. These materials are appropriate for middle school and junior high school students. These…

  20. Energy and Man's Environment Activity Guide: An Interdisciplinary Teacher's Guide to Energy and Environmental Activities, Section One - Sources of Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, John, Ed.

    This publication presents the activities pertaining to the first goal of this activity guide series. The activities in this publication focus primarily on the availability of resources, forms of energy, natural laws, and socioeconomic considerations. These materials are appropriate for middle school and junior high school students. These…

  1. Energy Adventure Center. Activity Book. Revised [and Expanded] Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wichita Unified School District 259, KS.

    A variety of energy activities are provided, including instructions for and questions related to energy films. The activities are organized into five sections. Section 1 (work) includes an activity focusing on movement and change. Section 2 (forms of energy) includes activities related to mechanical (movement), radiant (light), chemical (burning),…

  2. Estimating Toxicity Pathway Activating Doses for High Throughput Chemical Risk Assessments

    EPA Science Inventory

    Estimating a Toxicity Pathway Activating Dose (TPAD) from in vitro assays as an analog to a reference dose (RfD) derived from in vivo toxicity tests would facilitate high throughput risk assessments of thousands of data-poor environmental chemicals. Estimating a TPAD requires def...

  3. Estimation of PV energy production based on satellite data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazurek, G.

    2015-09-01

    Photovoltaic (PV) technology is an attractive source of power for systems without connection to power grid. Because of seasonal variations of solar radiation, design of such a power system requires careful analysis in order to provide required reliability. In this paper we present results of three-year measurements of experimental PV system located in Poland and based on polycrystalline silicon module. Irradiation values calculated from results of ground measurements have been compared with data from solar radiation databases employ calculations from of satellite observations. Good convergence level of both data sources has been shown, especially during summer. When satellite data from the same time period is available, yearly and monthly production of PV energy can be calculated with 2% and 5% accuracy, respectively. However, monthly production during winter seems to be overestimated, especially in January. Results of this work may be helpful in forecasting performance of similar PV systems in Central Europe and allow to make more precise forecasts of PV system performance than based only on tables with long time averaged values.

  4. ERP Energy and Cognitive Activity Correlates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schillaci, Michael Jay; Vendemia, Jennifer M. C.

    2014-03-01

    We propose a novel analysis approach for high-density event related scalp potential (ERP) data where the integrated channel-power is used to attain an energy density functional state for channel-clusters of neurophysiological significance. The method is applied to data recorded during a two-stimulus, directed lie paradigm and shows that deceptive responses emit between 8% and 10% less power. A time course analysis of these cognitive activity measures over posterior and anterior regions of the cortex suggests that neocortical interactions, reflecting the differing workload demands during executive and semantic processes, take about 50% longer for the case of deception. These results suggest that the proposed method may provide a useful tool for the analysis of ERP correlates of high-order cognitive functioning. We also report on a possible equivalence between the energy functional distribution and near-infrared signatures that have been measured with other modalities.

  5. ESTIMATING RISK TO CALIFORNIA ENERGY INFRASTRUCTURE FROM PROJECTED CLIMATE CHANGE

    SciTech Connect

    Sathaye, Jayant; Dale, Larry; Larsen, Peter; Fitts, Gary; Koy, Kevin; Lewis, Sarah; Lucena, Andre

    2011-06-22

    This report outlines the results of a study of the impact of climate change on the energy infrastructure of California and the San Francisco Bay region, including impacts on power plant generation; transmission line and substation capacity during heat spells; wildfires near transmission lines; sea level encroachment upon power plants, substations, and natural gas facilities; and peak electrical demand. Some end-of-century impacts were projected:Expected warming will decrease gas-fired generator efficiency. The maximum statewide coincident loss is projected at 10.3 gigawatts (with current power plant infrastructure and population), an increase of 6.2 percent over current temperature-induced losses. By the end of the century, electricity demand for almost all summer days is expected to exceed the current ninetieth percentile per-capita peak load. As much as 21 percent growth is expected in ninetieth percentile peak demand (per-capita, exclusive of population growth). When generator losses are included in the demand, the ninetieth percentile peaks may increase up to 25 percent. As the climate warms, California's peak supply capacity will need to grow faster than the population.Substation capacity is projected to decrease an average of 2.7 percent. A 5C (9F) air temperature increase (the average increase predicted for hot days in August) will diminish the capacity of a fully-loaded transmission line by an average of 7.5 percent.The potential exposure of transmission lines to wildfire is expected to increase with time. We have identified some lines whose probability of exposure to fire are expected to increase by as much as 40 percent. Up to 25 coastal power plants and 86 substations are at risk of flooding (or partial flooding) due to sea level rise.

  6. Experimental validation of theoretical methods to estimate the energy radiated by elastic waves during an impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farin, Maxime; Mangeney, Anne; Rosny, Julien de; Toussaint, Renaud; Sainte-Marie, Jacques; Shapiro, Nikolaï M.

    2016-02-01

    Estimating the energy lost in elastic waves during an impact is an important problem in seismology and in industry. We propose three complementary methods to estimate the elastic energy radiated by bead impacts on thin plates and thick blocks from the generated vibration. The first two methods are based on the direct wave front and are shown to be equivalent. The third method makes use of the diffuse regime. These methods are tested for laboratory experiments of impacts and are shown to give the same results, with error bars of 40 percent and 300 percent for impacts on a smooth plate and on a rough block, respectively. We show that these methods are relevant to establish the energy budget of an impact. On plates of glass and PMMA, the radiated elastic energy increases from 2 percent to almost 100 percent of the total energy lost as the bead diameter approaches the plate thickness. The rest of the lost energy is dissipated by viscoelasticity. For beads larger than the plate thickness, plastic deformation occurs and reduces the amount of energy radiated in the form of elastic waves. On a concrete block, the energy dissipation during the impact is principally inelastic because only 0.2-2 percent of the energy lost by the bead is transported by elastic waves. The radiated elastic energy estimated with the presented methods is quantitatively validated by Hertz's model of elastic impact.

  7. Sea ice-atmosphere interaction: Application of multispectral satellite data in polar surface energy flux estimates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffen, K.; Schweiger, A.; Maslanik, J.; Key, J.; Weaver, R.; Barry, R.

    1990-01-01

    The application of multi-spectral satellite data to estimate polar surface energy fluxes is addressed. To what accuracy and over which geographic areas large scale energy budgets can be estimated are investigated based upon a combination of available remote sensing and climatological data sets. The general approach was to: (1) formulate parameterization schemes for the appropriate sea ice energy budget terms based upon the remotely sensed and/or in-situ data sets; (2) conduct sensitivity analyses using as input both natural variability (observed data in regional case studies) and theoretical variability based upon energy flux model concepts; (3) assess the applicability of these parameterization schemes to both regional and basin wide energy balance estimates using remote sensing data sets; and (4) assemble multi-spectral, multi-sensor data sets for at least two regions of the Arctic Basin and possibly one region of the Antarctic. The type of data needed for a basin-wide assessment is described and the temporal coverage of these data sets are determined by data availability and need as defined by parameterization scheme. The titles of the subjects are as follows: (1) Heat flux calculations from SSM/I and LANDSAT data in the Bering Sea; (2) Energy flux estimation using passive microwave data; (3) Fetch and stability sensitivity estimates of turbulent heat flux; and (4) Surface temperature algorithm.

  8. Hydrogen Energy Storage (HES) Activities at NREL; NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect

    Eichman, J.

    2015-04-21

    This presentation provides an overview of hydrogen and energy storage, including hydrogen storage pathways and international power-to-gas activities, and summarizes the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's hydrogen energy storage activities and results.

  9. Oklahoma Energy Awareness Education, Energy Education Activities, Grades 4-12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Education, Oklahoma City.

    This publication contains energy education activities for grades 4 through 12 and is part of a set of three publications. These activities are organized under five energy concepts: (1) energy is so basic that nothing moves without it; (2) conservation of energy; (3) there are other energy alternatives; (4) society depends on energy; and (5) the…

  10. Segmentation and tracking in echocardiographic sequences: active contours guided by optical flow estimates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikic, I.; Krucinski, S.; Thomas, J. D.

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents a method for segmentation and tracking of cardiac structures in ultrasound image sequences. The developed algorithm is based on the active contour framework. This approach requires initial placement of the contour close to the desired position in the image, usually an object outline. Best contour shape and position are then calculated, assuming that at this configuration a global energy function, associated with a contour, attains its minimum. Active contours can be used for tracking by selecting a solution from a previous frame as an initial position in a present frame. Such an approach, however, fails for large displacements of the object of interest. This paper presents a technique that incorporates the information on pixel velocities (optical flow) into the estimate of initial contour to enable tracking of fast-moving objects. The algorithm was tested on several ultrasound image sequences, each covering one complete cardiac cycle. The contour successfully tracked boundaries of mitral valve leaflets, aortic root and endocardial borders of the left ventricle. The algorithm-generated outlines were compared against manual tracings by expert physicians. The automated method resulted in contours that were within the boundaries of intraobserver variability.

  11. Estimating the impacts of federal efforts to improve energy efficiency: The case of buildings

    SciTech Connect

    LaMontagne, J; Jones, R; Nicholls, A; Shankle, S

    1994-09-01

    The US Department of Energy`s Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EE) has for more than a decade focused its efforts on research to develop new technologies for improving the efficiency of energy use and increasing the role of renewable energy; success has usually been measured in term of energy saved or displaced. Estimates of future energy savings remain an important factor in program planning and prioritization. A variety of internal and external factors are now radically changing the planning process, and in turn the composition and thrust of the EE program. The Energy Policy Act of 1992, the Framework Convention on Climate Change (and the Administration`s Climate Change Action Plan), and concerns for the future of the economy (especially employment and international competitiveness) are increasing emphasis on technology deployment and near-term results. The Reinventing Government Initiative, the Government Performance and Results Act, and the Executive Order on Environmental Justice are all forcing Federal programs to demonstrate that they are producing desired results in a cost-effective manner. The application of Total Quality management principles has increased the scope and importance of producing quantified measures of benefit. EE has established a process for estimating the benefits of DOE`s energy efficiency and renewable energy programs called ``Quality Metrics`` (QM). The ``metrics`` are: energy, employment, equity, environment, risk, economics. This paper describes the approach taken by EE`s Office of Building Technologies to prepare estimates of program benefits in terms of these metrics, presents the estimates, discusses their implications, and explores possible improvements to the QM process as it is currently configured.

  12. Estimating the impacts of federal efforts to improve energy efficiency: The case of building

    SciTech Connect

    Nicolls, A.K.; Shankle, S.A.; LaMontagne, J.; Jones, R.E.

    1994-11-01

    The US Department of Energy`s Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy [EE] has for more than a decade focused its efforts on research to develop new technologies for improving the efficiency of energy use and increasing the role of renewable energy; success has usually been measured in terms of energy saved or displaced. Estimates of future energy savings remain an important factor in program planning and prioritization. A variety of internal and external factors are now radically changing the planning process, and in turn the composition and thrust of the EE program. The Energy Policy Act of 1992, the Framework Convention on Climate Change (and the Administration`s Climate Change Action Plan), and concerns for the future of the economy (especially employment and international competitiveness) are increasing emphasis on technology deployment and near-term results. The Reinventing Government Initiative, the Government Performance and Results Act, and the Executive Order on Environmental Justice are all forcing Federal programs to demonstrate that they are producing desired results in a cost-effective manner. The application of Total Quality Management principles has increased the scope and importance of producing quantified measures of benefit. EE has established a process for estimating the benefits of DOE`s energy efficiency and renewable energy programs called `Quality Metrics` (QM). The ``metrics`` are: Energy; Environment; Employment; Risk; Equity; Economics. This paper describes the approach taken by EE`s Office of Building Technologies to prepare estimates of program benefits in terms of these metrics, presents the estimates, discusses their implications, and explores possible improvements to the QM process as it is currently configured.

  13. Regional earth-atmosphere energy balance estimates based on assimilations with a GCM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, Michael A.; Schubert, Siegfried D.

    1990-01-01

    The Oort and Vonder Haar (1976) column-budget technique is presently used to evaluate the physical consistency and accuracy of regional earth-atmosphere energy balance estimates for (1) atmospheric budget terms, (2) net radiation at the top of the atmosphere, and (3) time tendency and flux divergence of energy, for Special Observing Periods of the FGGE year. It is found that, during winter, the midlatitude oceans supply large quantities of energy to the overlying atmosphere, which then transports the energy to the continental heat-sinks; the energy flows in the opposite direction during summer.

  14. Influence of source composition and particle energy on the determination of gross alpha activity.

    PubMed

    Timón, A Fernández; Vargas, M Jurado; Sánchez, A B Ruano; Pérez, J de la Torre; Sánchez, A Martín

    2013-12-01

    The influence of different source compositions and α-particle energies on the detection efficiency of a gas-flow proportional counter was examined using experimental measurements and Monte Carlo simulations. Efficiency variation with alpha-particle energy was very marked, being less significant with the substrate composition. These results show that the determination of gross alpha activity in an unknown sample must be carried out very carefully in order to give a correct estimation of its activity. PMID:24184741

  15. Energy content estimation by collegians for portion standardized foods frequently consumed in Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin; Lee, Hee Jung; Lee, Hyun Jung; Lee, Sun Ha; Yun, Jee-Young; Choi, Mi-Kyeong; Kim, Mi-Hyun

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to estimate Korean collegians' knowledge of energy content in the standard portion size of foods frequently consumed in Korea and to investigate the differences in knowledge between gender groups. A total of 600 collegians participated in this study. Participants' knowledge was assessed based on their estimation on the energy content of 30 selected food items with their actual-size photo images. Standard portion size of food was based on 2010 Korean Dietary Reference Intakes, and the percentage of participants who accurately estimated (that is, within 20% of the true value) the energy content of the standard portion size was calculated for each food item. The food for which the most participants provided the accurate estimation was ramyun (instant noodles) (67.7%), followed by cooked rice (57.8%). The proportion of students who overestimated the energy content was highest for vegetables (68.8%) and beverages (68.1%). The proportion of students who underestimated the energy content was highest for grains and starches (42.0%) and fruits (37.1%). Female students were more likely to check energy content of foods that they consumed than male students. From these results, it was concluded that the knowledge on food energy content was poor among collegians, with some gender difference. Therefore, in the future, nutrition education programs should give greater attention to improving knowledge on calorie content and to helping them apply this knowledge in order to develop effective dietary plans. PMID:24527417

  16. Energy Content Estimation by Collegians for Portion Standardized Foods Frequently Consumed in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin; Lee, Hee Jung; Lee, Hyun Jung; Lee, Sun Ha; Yun, Jee-Young; Choi, Mi-Kyeong

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to estimate Korean collegians' knowledge of energy content in the standard portion size of foods frequently consumed in Korea and to investigate the differences in knowledge between gender groups. A total of 600 collegians participated in this study. Participants' knowledge was assessed based on their estimation on the energy content of 30 selected food items with their actual-size photo images. Standard portion size of food was based on 2010 Korean Dietary Reference Intakes, and the percentage of participants who accurately estimated (that is, within 20% of the true value) the energy content of the standard portion size was calculated for each food item. The food for which the most participants provided the accurate estimation was ramyun (instant noodles) (67.7%), followed by cooked rice (57.8%). The proportion of students who overestimated the energy content was highest for vegetables (68.8%) and beverages (68.1%). The proportion of students who underestimated the energy content was highest for grains and starches (42.0%) and fruits (37.1%). Female students were more likely to check energy content of foods that they consumed than male students. From these results, it was concluded that the knowledge on food energy content was poor among collegians, with some gender difference. Therefore, in the future, nutrition education programs should give greater attention to improving knowledge on calorie content and to helping them apply this knowledge in order to develop effective dietary plans. PMID:24527417

  17. A quantitative estimation of the energetic cost of brown ring disease in the Manila clam using Dynamic Energy Budget theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flye-Sainte-Marie, Jonathan; Jean, Fred; Paillard, Christine; Kooijman, Sebastiaan A. L. M.

    2009-08-01

    Brown ring disease (BRD) in the Manila clam, Ruditapes philippinarum, is a bacterial disease caused by the pathogen Vibrio tapetis. This disease induces the formation of a characteristic brown conchiolin deposit on the inner shell and is associated with a decrease in condition index indicating that the development of the disease affects the energy balance of the clam. A previous study showed that the energy budget of the host was affected by a decrease in filtration activity, and hypothesized that a second way to degrade the energy balance was the increase in maintenance costs associated to the cost of immune response and lesion repair. This paper focusses on this second way of degradation of the energy balance. A starvation experiment confirmed that the energy balance was affected by BRD, independently of the effects on filtration activity, indicating an increase in the maintenance costs. An energy budget model of the Manila clam, based on DEB theory, was developed and allowed to properly predict weight loss during starvation. Vibrio development and its effects on the energy budget of the host was theoretically introduced in the model. Coupling modelling and experimental observations allowed to provide a quantitative and dynamic estimation of the increase in maintenance costs associated with the development of BRD. The estimation which is given here, indicates that during an infection the maintenance cost can almost double compared to the uninfected situation. Further development of the model, especially focussed on Vibrio dynamics and its effects on filtration activity is needed to provide a more extensive description of the energetic cost of BRD in the Manila clam.

  18. Pyrolysis of activated sludge: energy analysis and its technical feasibility.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Manu; Tardio, James; Venkata Mohan, S

    2015-02-01

    A comprehensive study on the potential of pyrolysis of activated sludge to generate substances that can be used to produce energy was evaluated for its technical and environmental viability. The products of the process viz., pyrolysis gas, pyrolysis oil and char can readily be used by the major energy consumers viz., electricity and transportation. Based on the results obtained it is estimated that a 1 ton capacity process for pyrolysis of activated sludge can serve the electrical needs of a maximum of 239, 95 and 47 Indian houses per day, considering lower middle class, middle class and upper middle class, respectively. In addition the process would also produce the daily methane (CNG) requirement of 128 public transport buses. The process was determined to be technically feasible at low and medium temperatures for both, pyrolysis gas and electrical energy. The gas generated could be utilized as fuel directly while the oil generated would require pretreatment before its potential application. The process is potentially sustainable when commercialized and can self-sustain in continuous mode of operation in biorefinery context. PMID:25451771

  19. Validity of SenseWear® Armband v5.2 and v2.2 for estimating energy expenditure.

    PubMed

    Bhammar, Dharini M; Sawyer, Brandon J; Tucker, Wesley J; Lee, Jung-Min; Gaesser, Glenn A

    2016-10-01

    We compared SenseWear Armband versions (v) 2.2 and 5.2 for estimating energy expenditure in healthy adults. Thirty-four adults (26 women), 30.1 ± 8.7 years old, performed two trials that included light-, moderate- and vigorous-intensity activities: (1) structured routine: seven activities performed for 8-min each, with 4-min of rest between activities; (2) semi-structured routine: 12 activities performed for 5-min each, with no rest between activities. Energy expenditure was measured by indirect calorimetry and predicted using SenseWear v2.2 and v5.2. Compared to indirect calorimetry (297.8 ± 54.2 kcal), the total energy expenditure was overestimated (P < 0.05) by both SenseWear v2.2 (355.6 ± 64.3 kcal) and v5.2 (342.6 ± 63.8 kcal) during the structured routine. During the semi-structured routine, the total energy expenditure for SenseWear v5.2 (275.2 ± 63.0 kcal) was not different than indirect calorimetry (262.8 ± 52.9 kcal), and both were lower (P < 0.05) than v2.2 (312.2 ± 74.5 kcal). The average mean absolute per cent error was lower for the SenseWear v5.2 than for v2.2 (P < 0.001). SenseWear v5.2 improved energy expenditure estimation for some activities (sweeping, loading/unloading boxes, walking), but produced larger errors for others (cycling, rowing). Although both algorithms overestimated energy expenditure as well as time spent in moderate-intensity physical activity (P < 0.05), v5.2 offered better estimates than v2.2. PMID:26854829

  20. Segmentation-free x-ray energy spectrum estimation for computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Wei; Zhang, Qiude; Niu, Tianye

    2016-03-01

    X-ray energy spectrum plays an essential role in imaging and related tasks. Due to the high photon flux of clinical CT scanners, most of the spectrum estimation methods are indirect and are usually suffered from various limitations. The recently proposed indirect transmission measurement-based method requires at least the segmentation of one material, which is insufficient for CT images of highly noisy and with artifacts. To combat for the bottleneck of spectrum estimation using segmented CT images, in this study, we develop a segmentation-free indirect transmission measurement based energy spectrum estimation method using dual-energy material decomposition. The general principle of the method is to compare polychromatic forward projection with raw projection to calibrate a set of unknown weights which are used to express the unknown spectrum together with a set of model spectra. After applying dual-energy material decomposition using high-and low-energy raw projection data, polychromatic forward projection is conducted on material-specific images. The unknown weights are then iteratively updated to minimize the difference between the raw projection and estimated projection. Both numerical simulations and experimental head phantom are used to evaluate the proposed method. The results indicate that the method provides accurate estimate of the spectrum and it may be attractive for dose calculations, artifacts correction and other clinical applications.

  1. Distributed Energy Communications & Controls, Lab Activities - Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Rizy, D Tom

    2010-01-01

    The purpose is to develop controls for inverter-based renewable and non-renewable distributed energy systems to provide local voltage, power and power quality support for loads and the power grid. The objectives are to (1) develop adaptive controls for inverter-based distributed energy (DE) systems when there are multiple inverters on the same feeder and (2) determine the impact of high penetration high seasonal energy efficiency ratio (SEER) air conditioning (A/C) units on power systems during sub-transmission faults which can result in an A/C compressor motor stall and assess how inverter-based DE can help to mitigate the stall event. The Distributed Energy Communications & Controls Laboratory (DECC) is a unique facility for studying dynamic voltage, active power (P), non-active power (Q) and power factor control from inverter-based renewable distributed energy (DE) resources. Conventionally, inverter-based DE systems have been designed to provide constant, close to unity power factor and thus not provide any voltage support. The DECC Lab interfaces with the ORNL campus distribution system to provide actual power system testing of the controls approach. Using mathematical software tools and the DECC Lab environment, we are developing and testing local, autonomous and adaptive controls for local voltage control and P & Q control for inverter-based DE. We successfully tested our active and non-active power (P,Q) controls at the DECC laboratory along with voltage regulation controls. The new PQ control along with current limiter controls has been tested on our existing inverter test system. We have tested both non-adaptive and adaptive control modes for the PQ control. We have completed several technical papers on the approaches and results. Electric power distribution systems are experiencing outages due to a phenomenon known as fault induced delayed voltage recovery (FIDVR) due to air conditioning (A/C) compressor motor stall. Local voltage collapse from FIDVR is

  2. An estimation method for echo signal energy of pipe inner surface longitudinal crack detection by 2-D energy coefficients integration

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Shiyuan Sun, Haoyu Xu, Chunguang Cao, Xiandong Cui, Liming Xiao, Dingguo

    2015-03-31

    The echo signal energy is directly affected by the incident sound beam eccentricity or angle for thick-walled pipes inner longitudinal cracks detection. A method for analyzing the relationship between echo signal energy between the values of incident eccentricity is brought forward, which can be used to estimate echo signal energy when testing inside wall longitudinal crack of pipe, using mode-transformed compression wave adaptation of shear wave with water-immersion method, by making a two-dimension integration of “energy coefficient” in both circumferential and axial directions. The calculation model is founded for cylinder sound beam case, in which the refraction and reflection energy coefficients of different rays in the whole sound beam are considered different. The echo signal energy is calculated for a particular cylinder sound beam testing different pipes: a beam with a diameter of 0.5 inch (12.7mm) testing a φ279.4mm pipe and a φ79.4mm one. As a comparison, both the results of two-dimension integration and one-dimension (circumferential direction) integration are listed, and only the former agrees well with experimental results. The estimation method proves to be valid and shows that the usual method of simplifying the sound beam as a single ray for estimating echo signal energy and choosing optimal incident eccentricity is not so appropriate.

  3. An estimation method for echo signal energy of pipe inner surface longitudinal crack detection by 2-D energy coefficients integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Shiyuan; Sun, Haoyu; Xu, Chunguang; Cao, Xiandong; Cui, Liming; Xiao, Dingguo

    2015-03-01

    The echo signal energy is directly affected by the incident sound beam eccentricity or angle for thick-walled pipes inner longitudinal cracks detection. A method for analyzing the relationship between echo signal energy between the values of incident eccentricity is brought forward, which can be used to estimate echo signal energy when testing inside wall longitudinal crack of pipe, using mode-transformed compression wave adaptation of shear wave with water-immersion method, by making a two-dimension integration of "energy coefficient" in both circumferential and axial directions. The calculation model is founded for cylinder sound beam case, in which the refraction and reflection energy coefficients of different rays in the whole sound beam are considered different. The echo signal energy is calculated for a particular cylinder sound beam testing different pipes: a beam with a diameter of 0.5 inch (12.7mm) testing a φ279.4mm pipe and a φ79.4mm one. As a comparison, both the results of two-dimension integration and one-dimension (circumferential direction) integration are listed, and only the former agrees well with experimental results. The estimation method proves to be valid and shows that the usual method of simplifying the sound beam as a single ray for estimating echo signal energy and choosing optimal incident eccentricity is not so appropriate.

  4. Estimating bat and bird mortality occurring at wind energy turbines from covariates and carcass searches using mixture models.

    PubMed

    Korner-Nievergelt, Fränzi; Brinkmann, Robert; Niermann, Ivo; Behr, Oliver

    2013-01-01

    Environmental impacts of wind energy facilities increasingly cause concern, a central issue being bats and birds killed by rotor blades. Two approaches have been employed to assess collision rates: carcass searches and surveys of animals prone to collisions. Carcass searches can provide an estimate for the actual number of animals being killed but they offer little information on the relation between collision rates and, for example, weather parameters due to the time of death not being precisely known. In contrast, a density index of animals exposed to collision is sufficient to analyse the parameters influencing the collision rate. However, quantification of the collision rate from animal density indices (e.g. acoustic bat activity or bird migration traffic rates) remains difficult. We combine carcass search data with animal density indices in a mixture model to investigate collision rates. In a simulation study we show that the collision rates estimated by our model were at least as precise as conventional estimates based solely on carcass search data. Furthermore, if certain conditions are met, the model can be used to predict the collision rate from density indices alone, without data from carcass searches. This can reduce the time and effort required to estimate collision rates. We applied the model to bat carcass search data obtained at 30 wind turbines in 15 wind facilities in Germany. We used acoustic bat activity and wind speed as predictors for the collision rate. The model estimates correlated well with conventional estimators. Our model can be used to predict the average collision rate. It enables an analysis of the effect of parameters such as rotor diameter or turbine type on the collision rate. The model can also be used in turbine-specific curtailment algorithms that predict the collision rate and reduce this rate with a minimal loss of energy production. PMID:23844144

  5. Estimating Bat and Bird Mortality Occurring at Wind Energy Turbines from Covariates and Carcass Searches Using Mixture Models

    PubMed Central

    Korner-Nievergelt, Fränzi; Brinkmann, Robert; Niermann, Ivo; Behr, Oliver

    2013-01-01

    Environmental impacts of wind energy facilities increasingly cause concern, a central issue being bats and birds killed by rotor blades. Two approaches have been employed to assess collision rates: carcass searches and surveys of animals prone to collisions. Carcass searches can provide an estimate for the actual number of animals being killed but they offer little information on the relation between collision rates and, for example, weather parameters due to the time of death not being precisely known. In contrast, a density index of animals exposed to collision is sufficient to analyse the parameters influencing the collision rate. However, quantification of the collision rate from animal density indices (e.g. acoustic bat activity or bird migration traffic rates) remains difficult. We combine carcass search data with animal density indices in a mixture model to investigate collision rates. In a simulation study we show that the collision rates estimated by our model were at least as precise as conventional estimates based solely on carcass search data. Furthermore, if certain conditions are met, the model can be used to predict the collision rate from density indices alone, without data from carcass searches. This can reduce the time and effort required to estimate collision rates. We applied the model to bat carcass search data obtained at 30 wind turbines in 15 wind facilities in Germany. We used acoustic bat activity and wind speed as predictors for the collision rate. The model estimates correlated well with conventional estimators. Our model can be used to predict the average collision rate. It enables an analysis of the effect of parameters such as rotor diameter or turbine type on the collision rate. The model can also be used in turbine-specific curtailment algorithms that predict the collision rate and reduce this rate with a minimal loss of energy production. PMID:23844144

  6. Methane Production Quantification and Energy Estimation for Bangalore Municipal Solid Waste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, A.; Dand, R.; Lakshmikanthan, P.; Babu, G. L. Sivakumar

    2014-01-01

    Landfills are considered as cornerstone of solid waste management. Landfill gas (LFG) and leachate are principal outputs from landfills. Methane, occupying significant volume of landfill gas, has considerable potential as a source of energy replacing enormous amounts of fossil fuels currently in use. Gas extraction and utilization systems need to be designed and implemented in order to exploit this resource. Assessment of economic viability of these systems necessitates estimation of gas released and its energy potential. Gas quantification and energy estimation for municipal solid waste (MSW) of Bangalore city was carried out using five independent methodologies. A small scale experiment was conducted to monitor the gas generation and the results were compared and analysed. Results show that significant energy can be harnessed from the MSW if requisite LFG management systems are installed. The use of methane as an energy source maximizes the extraction of useful resources from landfills, minimizes the global warming and offsets significant amount of fossil fuels.

  7. 2005 Status Report Savings Estimates for the ENERGY STAR(R)Voluntary Labeling Program

    SciTech Connect

    Webber, Carrie A.; Brown, Richard E.; Sanchez, Marla

    2006-03-07

    ENERGY STAR(R) is a voluntary labeling program designed toidentify and promote energy-efficient products, buildings and practices.Operated jointly by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and theU.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Energy Star labels exist for more thanforty products, spanning office equipment, residential heating andcooling equipment, commercial and residential lighting, home electronics,and major appliances. This report presents savings estimates for a subsetof ENERGY STAR labeled products. We present estimates of the energy,dollar and carbon savings achieved by the program in the year 2004, whatwe expect in 2005, and provide savings forecasts for two marketpenetration scenarios for the periods 2005 to 2010 and 2005 to 2020. Thetarget market penetration forecast represents our best estimate of futureENERGY STAR savings. It is based on realistic market penetration goalsfor each of the products. We also provide a forecast under the assumptionof 100 percent market penetration; that is, we assume that all purchasersbuy ENERGY STAR-compliant products instead of standard efficiencyproducts throughout the analysis period.

  8. 2006 Status Report Savings Estimates for the ENERGY STAR(R)Voluntary Labeling Program

    SciTech Connect

    Webber, Carrie A.; Brown, Richard E.; Sanchez, Marla; Homan,Gregory K.

    2006-03-07

    ENERGY STAR(R) is a voluntary labeling program designed toidentify and promote energy-efficient products, buildings and practices.Operated jointly by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and theU.S. Department of Energy (DOE), ENERGY STAR labels exist for more thanthirty products, spanning office equipment, residential heating andcooling equipment, commercial and residential lighting, home electronics,and major appliances. This report presents savings estimates for a subsetof ENERGY STAR labeled products. We present estimates of the energy,dollar and carbon savings achieved by the program in the year 2005, whatwe expect in 2006, and provide savings forecasts for two marketpenetration scenarios for the periods 2006 to 2015 and 2006 to 2025. Thetarget market penetration forecast represents our best estimate of futureENERGY STAR savings. It is based on realistic market penetration goalsfor each of the products. We also provide a forecast under the assumptionof 100 percent market penetration; that is, we assume that all purchasersbuy ENERGY STAR-compliant products instead of standard efficiencyproducts throughout the analysis period.

  9. 2007 Status Report: Savings Estimates for the ENERGY STAR(R)VoluntaryLabeling Program

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez, Marla; Webber, Carrie A.; Brown, Richard E.; Homan,Gregory K.

    2007-03-23

    ENERGY STAR(R) is a voluntary labeling program designed toidentify and promote energy-efficient products, buildings and practices.Operated jointly by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and theU.S. Department of Energy (DOE), ENERGY STAR labels exist for more thanthirty products, spanning office equipment, residential heating andcooling equipment, commercial and residential lighting, home electronics,and major appliances. This report presents savings estimates for a subsetof ENERGY STAR labeled products. We present estimates of the energy,dollar and carbon savings achieved by the program in the year 2006, whatwe expect in 2007, and provide savings forecasts for two marketpenetration scenarios for the periods 2007 to 2015 and 2007 to 2025. Thetarget market penetration forecast represents our best estimate of futureENERGY STAR savings. It is based on realistic market penetration goalsfor each of the products. We also provide a forecast under the assumptionof 100 percent market penetration; that is, we assume that all purchasersbuy ENERGY STAR-compliant products instead of standard efficiencyproducts throughout the analysis period.

  10. 2004 status report: Savings estimates for the Energy Star(R)voluntarylabeling program

    SciTech Connect

    Webber, Carrie A.; Brown, Richard E.; McWhinney, Marla

    2004-03-09

    ENERGY STAR(R) is a voluntary labeling program designed toidentify and promote energy-efficient products, buildings and practices.Operated jointly by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and theU.S. Department of Energy (DOE), ENERGY STAR labels exist for more thanthirty products, spanning office equipment, residential heating andcooling equipment, commercial and residential lighting, home electronics,and major appliances. This report presents savings estimates for a subsetof ENERGY STAR labeled products. We present estimates of the energy,dollar and carbon savings achieved by the program in the year 2003, whatwe expect in 2004, and provide savings forecasts for two marketpenetration scenarios for the periods 2004 to 2010 and 2004 to 2020. Thetarget market penetration forecast represents our best estimate of futureENERGY STAR savings. It is based on realistic market penetration goalsfor each of the products. We also provide a forecast under the assumptionof 100 percent market penetration; that is, we assume that all purchasersbuy ENERGY STAR-compliant products instead of standard efficiencyproducts throughout the analysis period.

  11. Cost and size estimates for an electrochemical bulk energy storage concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warshay, M.; Wright, L. O.

    1975-01-01

    Preliminary capital cost and size estimates were made for an electrochemical bulk energy storage concept. The electrochemical system considered was an electrically rechargeable flow cell with a redox couple. On the basis of preliminary capital cost estimates, size estimates, and several other important considerations, the redox-flow-cell system emerges as having great promise as a bulk energy storage system for power load leveling. The size of this system would be less than 2 percent of that of a comparable pumped hydroelectric plant. The capital cost of a 10-megawatt, 60- and 85-megawatt-hour redox system is estimated to be $190 to $330 per kilowatt. The other important features of the redox system contributing to its load leveling application are its low adverse environmental impact, its high efficiency, its apparent absence of electrochemically-related cycle life limitations, and its fast response.

  12. The Limit of Free Magnetic Energy in Active Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Ron; Falconer, David; Sterling, Alphonse

    2012-01-01

    By measuring from active-region magnetograms a proxy of the free energy in the active region fs magnetic field, it has been found previously that (1) there is an abrupt upper limit to the free energy the field can hold that increases with the amount of magnetic field in the active region, the active region fs magnetic flux content, and (2) the free energy is usually near its limit when the field explodes in a CME/flare eruption. That is, explosive active regions are concentrated in a main-sequence path bordering the free-energy ]limit line in (flux content, free-energy proxy) phase space. Here, from measurement of Marshall Space Flight Center vector magnetograms, we find the magnetic condition that underlies the free ]energy limit and the accompanying main sequence of explosive active regions. Using a suitable free ]energy proxy measured from vector magnetograms of 44 active regions, we find that (1) in active regions at and near their free ]energy limit, the ratio of magnetic-shear free energy to the non ]free magnetic energy the potential field would have is approximately 1 in the core field, the field rooted along the neutral line, and (2) this ratio is progressively less in active regions progressively farther below their free ]energy limit. This shows that most active regions in which this core-field energy ratio is much less than 1 cannot be triggered to explode; as this ratio approaches 1, most active regions become capable of exploding; and when this ratio is 1 or greater, most active regions are compelled to explode. From these results we surmise the magnetic condition that determines the free ]energy limit is the ratio of the free magnetic energy to the non-free energy the active region fs field would have were it completely relaxed to its potential ]field configuration, and that this ratio is approximately 1 at the free-energy limit and in the main sequence of explosive active regions.

  13. About accuracy of the discrimination parameter estimation for the dual high-energy method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osipov, S. P.; Chakhlov, S. V.; Osipov, O. S.; Shtein, A. M.; Strugovtsev, D. V.

    2015-04-01

    A set of the mathematical formulas to estimate the accuracy of discrimination parameters for two implementations of the dual high energy method - by the effective atomic number and by the level lines is given. The hardware parameters which influenced on the accuracy of the discrimination parameters are stated. The recommendations to form the structure of the high energy X-ray radiation impulses are formulated. To prove the applicability of the proposed procedure there were calculated the statistical errors of the discrimination parameters for the cargo inspection system of the Tomsk polytechnic university on base of the portable betatron MIB-9. The comparison of the experimental estimations and the theoretical ones of the discrimination parameter errors was carried out. It proved the practical applicability of the algorithm to estimate the discrimination parameter errors for the dual high energy method.

  14. Method of empirical dependences in estimation and prediction of activity of creatine kinase isoenzymes in cerebral ischemia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergeeva, Tatiana F.; Moshkova, Albina N.; Erlykina, Elena I.; Khvatova, Elena M.

    2016-04-01

    Creatine kinase is a key enzyme of energy metabolism in the brain. There are known cytoplasmic and mitochondrial creatine kinase isoenzymes. Mitochondrial creatine kinase exists as a mixture of two oligomeric forms - dimer and octamer. The aim of investigation was to study catalytic properties of cytoplasmic and mitochondrial creatine kinase and using of the method of empirical dependences for the possible prediction of the activity of these enzymes in cerebral ischemia. Ischemia was revealed to be accompanied with the changes of the activity of creatine kinase isoenzymes and oligomeric state of mitochondrial isoform. There were made the models of multiple regression that permit to study the activity of creatine kinase system in cerebral ischemia using a calculating method. Therefore, the mathematical method of empirical dependences can be applied for estimation and prediction of the functional state of the brain by the activity of creatine kinase isoenzymes in cerebral ischemia.

  15. Distributed activation energy model parameters of some Turkish coals

    SciTech Connect

    Gunes, M.; Gunes, S.K.

    2008-07-01

    A multi-reaction model based on distributed activation energy has been applied to some Turkish coals. The kinetic parameters of distributed activation energy model were calculated via computer program developed for this purpose. It was observed that the values of mean of activation energy distribution vary between 218 and 248 kJ/mol, and the values of standard deviation of activation energy distribution vary between 32 and 70 kJ/mol. The correlations between kinetic parameters of the distributed activation energy model and certain properties of coal have been investigated.

  16. Impact of the Fano Factor on Position and Energy Estimation in Scintillation Detectors

    PubMed Central

    Bora, Vaibhav; Barrett, Harrison H.; Jha, Abhinav K.; Clarkson, Eric

    2015-01-01

    The Fano factor for an integer-valued random variable is defined as the ratio of its variance to its mean. Light from various scintillation crystals have been reported to have Fano factors from sub-Poisson (Fano factor < 1) to super-Poisson (Fano factor > 1). For a given mean, a smaller Fano factor implies a smaller variance and thus less noise. We investigated if lower noise in the scintillation light will result in better spatial and energy resolutions. The impact of Fano factor on the estimation of position of interaction and energy deposited in simple gamma-camera geometries is estimated by two methods - calculating the Cramér-Rao bound and estimating the variance of a maximum likelihood estimator. The methods are consistent with each other and indicate that when estimating the position of interaction and energy deposited by a gamma-ray photon, the Fano factor of a scintillator does not affect the spatial resolution. A smaller Fano factor results in a better energy resolution. PMID:26523069

  17. Impact of the Fano Factor on Position and Energy Estimation in Scintillation Detectors.

    PubMed

    Bora, Vaibhav; Barrett, Harrison H; Jha, Abhinav K; Clarkson, Eric

    2015-02-01

    The Fano factor for an integer-valued random variable is defined as the ratio of its variance to its mean. Light from various scintillation crystals have been reported to have Fano factors from sub-Poisson (Fano factor < 1) to super-Poisson (Fano factor > 1). For a given mean, a smaller Fano factor implies a smaller variance and thus less noise. We investigated if lower noise in the scintillation light will result in better spatial and energy resolutions. The impact of Fano factor on the estimation of position of interaction and energy deposited in simple gamma-camera geometries is estimated by two methods - calculating the Cramér-Rao bound and estimating the variance of a maximum likelihood estimator. The methods are consistent with each other and indicate that when estimating the position of interaction and energy deposited by a gamma-ray photon, the Fano factor of a scintillator does not affect the spatial resolution. A smaller Fano factor results in a better energy resolution. PMID:26523069

  18. PBSA_E: A PBSA-Based Free Energy Estimator for Protein-Ligand Binding Affinity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao; Liu, Jinfeng; Zhu, Tong; Zhang, Lujia; He, Xiao; Zhang, John Z H

    2016-05-23

    Improving the accuracy of scoring functions for estimating protein-ligand binding affinity is of significant interest as well as practical utility in drug discovery. In this work, PBSA_E, a new free energy estimator based on the molecular mechanics/Poisson-Boltzmann surface area (MM/PBSA) descriptors, has been developed. This free energy estimator was optimized using high-quality experimental data from a training set consisting of 145 protein-ligand complexes. The method was validated on two separate test sets containing 121 and 130 complexes. Comparison of the binding affinities predicted using the present method with those obtained using three popular scoring functions, i.e., GlideXP, GlideSP, and SYBYL_F, demonstrated that the PBSA_E method is more accurate. This new energy estimator requires a MM/PBSA calculation of the protein-ligand binding energy for a single complex configuration, which is typically obtained by optimizing the crystal structure. The present study shows that PBSA_E has the potential to become a robust tool for more reliable estimation of protein-ligand binding affinity in structure-based drug design. PMID:27088302

  19. Estimates of M2 Tidal Energy Dissipation from TOPEX/Poseidon Altimeter Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Egbert, Gary D.; Ray, Richard D.

    2001-01-01

    Most of the tidal energy dissipation in the ocean occurs in shallow seas, as has long been recognized. However, recent work has suggested that a significant fraction of the dissipation, perhaps 1 TW or more, occurs in the deep ocean. This paper builds further evidence for that conclusion. More than 6 years of data from the TOPEX/Poseidon satellite altimeter are used to map the tidal dissipation rate throughout the world ocean. The dissipation rate is estimated as a balance between the rate of working by tidal forces and the energy flux divergence, computed using currents derived by least squares fitting of the altimeter data and the shallow water equations. Such calculations require dynamical assumptions, in particular about the nature of dissipation. To assess sensitivity of dissipation estimates to input assumptions, a large suite of tidal inversions based on a wide range of drag parameterizations and employing both real and synthetic altimeter data are compared. These experiments and Monte Carlo error fields from a generalized inverse model are used to establish error uncertainties for the dissipation estimates. Owing to the tight constraints on tidal elevation fields provided by the altimeter, area integrals of the energy balance are remarkably insensitive to required dynamical assumptions. Tidal energy dissipation is estimated for all major shallow seas (excluding individual polar seas) and compared with previous model and data-based estimates. Dissipation in the open ocean is significantly tnhanced around major bathymetric features, in a manner consistent with simple theories the generation of baroclinic tides.

  20. Alpha particles energy estimation from track diameter development in a CR-39 detector.

    PubMed

    Azooz, Aassim A; Al-Jubbori, Mushtaq A

    2016-09-01

    The slight nonlinearity in temporal development of tracks diameter in CR-39 nuclear track detectors is examined with the aim of attempting to find if such nonlinearity can be directly related to the charged particle energy. Narrowly spaced etching time-diameter experimental data for alpha particles at five energy values and for one additional energy value etched at five different temperatures are obtained. Initial results show good indication that measuring such time-diameter relationship can form a useful energy estimation tool. Good consistency with other independent published results is obtained. PMID:27341133

  1. Cost and size estimates for an electrochemical bulk energy storage concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warshay, M.; Wright, L. O.

    1975-01-01

    Preliminary capital cost and size estimates were made for a titanium trichloride, titanium tetrachloride, ferric chloride, ferrous chloride redox-flow-cell electric power system. On the basis of these preliminary estimates plus other important considerations, this electrochemical system emerged as having great promise as a bulk energy storage system for power load leveling. The size of this system is less than two per cent of that of a comparable pumped hydroelectric plant. The estimated capital cost of a 10 MW, 60- and 85-MWh redox-flow system compared well with that of competing systems.

  2. Uniform stable observer for the disturbance estimation in two renewable energy systems.

    PubMed

    Rubio, José de Jesús; Ochoa, Genaro; Balcazar, Ricardo; Pacheco, Jaime

    2015-09-01

    In this study, an observer for the states and disturbance estimation in two renewable energy systems is introduced. The restrictions of the gains in the proposed observer are found to guarantee its stability and the convergence of its error; furthermore, these results are utilized to obtain a good estimation. The introduced technique is applied for the states and disturbance estimation in a wind turbine and an electric vehicle. The wind turbine has a rotatory tower to catch the incoming air to be transformed in electricity and the electric vehicle has generators connected with its wheels to catch the vehicle movement to be transformed in electricity. PMID:26032509

  3. Active/passive microwave sensor comparison of MIZ-ice concentration estimates. [Marginal Ice Zone (MIZ)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, B. A.; Cavalieri, D. J.; Keller, M. R.

    1986-01-01

    Active and passive microwave data collected during the 1984 summer Marginal Ice Zone Experiment in the Fram Strait (MIZEX 84) are used to compare ice concentration estimates derived from synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data to those obtained from passive microwave imagery at several frequencies. The comparison is carried out to evaluate SAR performance against the more established passive microwave technique, and to investigate discrepancies in terms of how ice surface conditions, imaging geometry, and choice of algorithm parameters affect each sensor. Active and passive estimates of ice concentration agree on average to within 12%. Estimates from the multichannel passive microwave data show best agreement with the SAR estimates because the multichannel algorithm effectively accounts for the range in ice floe brightness temperatures observed in the MIZ.

  4. Estimating food portions. Influence of unit number, meal type and energy density☆☆☆☆

    PubMed Central

    Almiron-Roig, Eva; Solis-Trapala, Ivonne; Dodd, Jessica; Jebb, Susan A.

    2013-01-01

    Estimating how much is appropriate to consume can be difficult, especially for foods presented in multiple units, those with ambiguous energy content and for snacks. This study tested the hypothesis that the number of units (single vs. multi-unit), meal type and food energy density disrupts accurate estimates of portion size. Thirty-two healthy weight men and women attended the laboratory on 3 separate occasions to assess the number of portions contained in 33 foods or beverages of varying energy density (1.7–26.8 kJ/g). Items included 12 multi-unit and 21 single unit foods; 13 were labelled “meal”, 4 “drink” and 16 “snack”. Departures in portion estimates from reference amounts were analysed with negative binomial regression. Overall participants tended to underestimate the number of portions displayed. Males showed greater errors in estimation than females (p = 0.01). Single unit foods and those labelled as ‘meal’ or ‘beverage’ were estimated with greater error than multi-unit and ‘snack’ foods (p = 0.02 and p < 0.001 respectively). The number of portions of high energy density foods was overestimated while the number of portions of beverages and medium energy density foods were underestimated by 30–46%. In conclusion, participants tended to underestimate the reference portion size for a range of food and beverages, especially single unit foods and foods of low energy density and, unexpectedly, overestimated the reference portion of high energy density items. There is a need for better consumer education of appropriate portion sizes to aid adherence to a healthy diet. PMID:23932948

  5. Urban energy consumption and related carbon emission estimation: a study at the sector scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Weiwei; Chen, Chen; Su, Meirong; Chen, Bin; Cai, Yanpeng; Xing, Tao

    2013-12-01

    With rapid economic development and energy consumption growth, China has become the largest energy consumer in the world. Impelled by extensive international concern, there is an urgent need to analyze the characteristics of energy consumption and related carbon emission, with the objective of saving energy, reducing carbon emission, and lessening environmental impact. Focusing on urban ecosystems, the biggest energy consumer, a method for estimating energy consumption and related carbon emission was established at the urban sector scale in this paper. Based on data for 1996-2010, the proposed method was applied to Beijing in a case study to analyze the consumption of different energy resources (i.e., coal, oil, gas, and electricity) and related carbon emission in different sectors (i.e., agriculture, industry, construction, transportation, household, and service sectors). The results showed that coal and oil contributed most to energy consumption and carbon emission among different energy resources during the study period, while the industrial sector consumed the most energy and emitted the most carbon among different sectors. Suggestions were put forward for energy conservation and emission reduction in Beijing. The analysis of energy consumption and related carbon emission at the sector scale is helpful for practical energy saving and emission reduction in urban ecosystems.

  6. Estimating Total Energy Consumption and Emissions of China's Commercial and Office Buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Fridley, David; Fridley, David G.; Zheng, Nina; Zhou, Nan

    2008-03-01

    Buildings represent an increasingly important component of China's total energy consumption mix. However, accurately assessing the total volume of energy consumed in buildings is difficult owing to deficiencies in China's statistical collection system and a lack of national surveys. Official statistics suggest that buildings account for about 19% of China's total energy consumption, while others estimate the proportion at 23%, rising to 30% over the next few years. In addition to operational energy, buildings embody the energy used in the in the mining, extraction, harvesting, processing, manufacturing and transport of building materials as well as the energy used in the construction and decommissioning of buildings. This embodied energy, along with a building's operational energy, constitutes the building's life-cycle energy and emissions footprint. This report first provides a review of international studies on commercial building life-cycle energy use from which data are derived to develop an assessment of Chinese commercial building life-cycle energy use, then examines in detail two cases for the development of office building operational energy consumption to 2020. Finally, the energy and emissions implications of the two cases are presented.

  7. End-use energy consumption estimates for U.S. commercial buildings, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Belzer, D.B.; Wrench, L.E.

    1997-03-01

    An accurate picture of how energy is used in the nation`s stock of commercial buildings can serve a variety of program planning and policy needs of the US Department of Energy, utilities, and other groups seeking to improve the efficiency of energy use in the building sector. This report describes an estimation of energy consumption by end use based upon data from the 1992 Commercial Building Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS). The methodology used in the study combines elements of engineering simulations and statistical analysis to estimate end-use intensities for heating, cooling, ventilation, lighting, refrigeration, hot water, cooking, and miscellaneous equipment. Statistical Adjusted Engineering (SAE) models were estimated by building type. The nonlinear SAE models used variables such as building size, vintage, climate region, weekly operating hours, and employee density to adjust the engineering model predicted loads to the observed consumption (based upon utility billing information). End-use consumption by fuel was estimated for each of the 6,751 buildings in the 1992 CBECS. The report displays the summary results for 11 separate building types as well as for the total US commercial building stock. 4 figs., 15 tabs.

  8. End-use energy consumption estimates for US commercial buildings, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Belzer, D.B.; Wrench, L.E.; Marsh, T.L.

    1993-11-01

    An accurate picture of how energy is used in the nation`s stock of commercial buildings can serve a variety of program planning and policy needs within the Department of Energy, by utilities, and other groups seeking to improve the efficiency of energy use in the building sector. This report describes an estimation of energy consumption by end use based upon data from the 1989 Commercial Building Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS). The methodology used in the study combines elements of engineering simulations and statistical analysis to estimate end-use intensities for heating, cooling, ventilation, lighting, refrigeration, hot water, cooking, and miscellaneous equipment. Billing data for electricity and natural gas were first decomposed into weather and nonweather dependent loads. Subsequently, Statistical Adjusted Engineering (SAE) models were estimated by building type with annual data. The SAE models used variables such as building size, vintage, climate region, weekly operating hours, and employee density to adjust the engineering model predicted loads to the observed consumption. End-use consumption by fuel was estimated for each of the 5,876 buildings in the 1989 CBECS. The report displays the summary results for eleven separate building types as well as for the total US commercial building stock.

  9. First Order Estimates of Energy Requirements for Pollution Control. Interagency Energy-Environment Research and Development Program Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barker, James L.; And Others

    This U.S. Environmental Protection Agency report presents estimates of the energy demand attributable to environmental control of pollution from stationary point sources. This class of pollution source includes powerplants, factories, refineries, municipal waste water treatment plants, etc., but excludes mobile sources such as trucks, and…

  10. Effects of activity and energy budget balancing algorithm on laboratory performance of a fish bioenergetics model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Madenjian, Charles P.; David, Solomon R.; Pothoven, Steven A.

    2012-01-01

    We evaluated the performance of the Wisconsin bioenergetics model for lake trout Salvelinus namaycush that were fed ad libitum in laboratory tanks under regimes of low activity and high activity. In addition, we compared model performance under two different model algorithms: (1) balancing the lake trout energy budget on day t based on lake trout energy density on day t and (2) balancing the lake trout energy budget on day t based on lake trout energy density on day t + 1. Results indicated that the model significantly underestimated consumption for both inactive and active lake trout when algorithm 1 was used and that the degree of underestimation was similar for the two activity levels. In contrast, model performance substantially improved when using algorithm 2, as no detectable bias was found in model predictions of consumption for inactive fish and only a slight degree of overestimation was detected for active fish. The energy budget was accurately balanced by using algorithm 2 but not by using algorithm 1. Based on the results of this study, we recommend the use of algorithm 2 to estimate food consumption by fish in the field. Our study results highlight the importance of accurately accounting for changes in fish energy density when balancing the energy budget; furthermore, these results have implications for the science of evaluating fish bioenergetics model performance and for more accurate estimation of food consumption by fish in the field when fish energy density undergoes relatively rapid changes.

  11. Non-exercise estimation of VO2max using the International Physical Activity Questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Schembre, Susan M.; Riebe, Deborah A.

    2011-01-01

    Non-exercise equations developed from self-reported physical activity can estimate maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) as well as submaximal exercise testing. The International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ) is the most widely used and validated self-report measure of physical activity. This study aimed to develop and test a VO2max estimation equation derived from the IPAQ-Short Form (IPAQ-S). College-aged males and females (n = 80) completed the IPAQ-S and performed a maximal exercise test. The estimation equation was created with multivariate regression in a gender-balanced subsample of participants, equally representing five levels of fitness (n = 50) and validated in the remaining participants (n = 30). The resulting equation explained 43% of the variance in measured VO2max (SEE = 5.45 ml·kg-1·min-1). Estimated VO2max for 87% of individuals fell within acceptable limits of error observed with submaximal exercise testing (20% error). The IPAQ-S can be used to successfully estimate VO2max as well as submaximal exercise tests. Development of other population-specific estimation equations is warranted. PMID:21927551

  12. Counting calories: partitioning energy intake estimates from a food frequency questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Flegal, K M; Larkin, F A; Metzner, H L; Thompson, F E; Guire, K E

    1988-10-01

    Differences in energy estimates between a food frequency questionnaire and a multi-day dietary record can be partitioned into distinct components due to differences in reported frequency of consumption and in reported serving size, and to differences in nutrient composition between the questionnaire standards and the foods reported on the records. The effect of each component on the relative validity of the questionnaire can be assessed by examining its contribution to the differences between the two methods in estimated group intake and in the relative ranking of individual respondents. This methodology was used for the 1984-1985 University of Michigan Food Frequency Study, in which the estimated energy intake from a quantitative food frequency questionnaire was compared with that from 16 days of food records collected over the course of a year from 228 white and black men and women aged 24-51 years. For all race-sex subgroups, mean energy intake estimated from the questionnaire was significantly greater than mean intake estimated from the record. Within race-sex subgroups, the correlations between estimates from the two methods were low, and agreement in classification by tertiles was poor. The differences in group mean energy intake between the methods were due to the effects of discrepancies in both serving size and frequency of consumption. However, the low correlations and poor agreement in classification for individual respondents were due principally to the effect of discrepancies in frequency. These results suggest that improving the accuracy of frequency estimation is a key element in increasing the relative validity of food frequency questionnaires used for epidemiologic research. PMID:3421241

  13. Shielding and activity estimator for template-based nuclide identification methods

    DOEpatents

    Nelson, Karl Einar

    2013-04-09

    According to one embodiment, a method for estimating an activity of one or more radio-nuclides includes receiving one or more templates, the one or more templates corresponding to one or more radio-nuclides which contribute to a probable solution, receiving one or more weighting factors, each weighting factor representing a contribution of one radio-nuclide to the probable solution, computing an effective areal density for each of the one more radio-nuclides, computing an effective atomic number (Z) for each of the one more radio-nuclides, computing an effective metric for each of the one or more radio-nuclides, and computing an estimated activity for each of the one or more radio-nuclides. In other embodiments, computer program products, systems, and other methods are presented for estimating an activity of one or more radio-nuclides.

  14. Estimated economic impact of the levonorgestrel intrauterine system on unintended pregnancy in active duty women.

    PubMed

    Heitmann, Ryan J; Mumford, Sunni L; Hill, Micah J; Armstrong, Alicia Y

    2014-10-01

    Unintended pregnancy is reportedly higher in active duty women; therefore, we sought to estimate the potential impact of the levonorgestrel-containing intrauterine system (LNG-IUS) could have on unintended pregnancy in active duty women. A decision tree model with sensitivity analysis was used to estimate the number of unintentional pregnancies in active duty women which could be prevented. A secondary cost analysis was performed to analyze the direct cost savings to the U.S. Government. The total number of Armed Services members is estimated to be over 1.3 million, with an estimated 208,146 being women. Assuming an age-standardized unintended pregnancy rate of 78 per 1,000 women, 16,235 unintended pregnancies occur each year. Using a combined LNG-IUS failure and expulsion rate of 2.2%, a decrease of 794, 1588, and 3970 unintended pregnancies was estimated to occur with 5%, 10% and 25% usage, respectively. Annual cost savings from LNG-IUS use range from $3,387,107 to $47,352,295 with 5% to 25% intrauterine device usage. One-way sensitivity analysis demonstrated LNG-IUS to be cost-effective when the cost associated with pregnancy and delivery exceeded $11,000. Use of LNG-IUS could result in significant reductions in unintended pregnancy among active duty women, resulting in substantial cost savings to the government health care system. PMID:25269131

  15. Estimating repetitive spatiotemporal patterns from resting-state brain activity data.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Yusuke; Hiroe, Nobuo; Yamashita, Okito; Sato, Masa-Aki

    2016-06-01

    Repetitive spatiotemporal patterns in spontaneous brain activities have been widely examined in non-human studies. These studies have reported that such patterns reflect past experiences embedded in neural circuits. In human magnetoencephalography (MEG) and electroencephalography (EEG) studies, however, spatiotemporal patterns in resting-state brain activities have not been extensively examined. This is because estimating spatiotemporal patterns from resting-state MEG/EEG data is difficult due to their unknown onsets. Here, we propose a method to estimate repetitive spatiotemporal patterns from resting-state brain activity data, including MEG/EEG. Without the information of onsets, the proposed method can estimate several spatiotemporal patterns, even if they are overlapping. We verified the performance of the method by detailed simulation tests. Furthermore, we examined whether the proposed method could estimate the visual evoked magnetic fields (VEFs) without using stimulus onset information. The proposed method successfully detected the stimulus onsets and estimated the VEFs, implying the applicability of this method to real MEG data. The proposed method was applied to resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data and MEG data. The results revealed informative spatiotemporal patterns representing consecutive brain activities that dynamically change with time. Using this method, it is possible to reveal discrete events spontaneously occurring in our brains, such as memory retrieval. PMID:26979127

  16. Development of an energy-use estimation methodology for the revised Navy Manual MO-303

    SciTech Connect

    Richman, E.E.; Keller, J.M.; Wood, A.G.; Dittmer, A.L.

    1995-01-01

    The U.S. Navy commissioned Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to revise and/or update the Navy Utilities Targets Manual, NAVFAC MO-303 (U.S. Navy 1972b). The purpose of the project was to produce a current, applicable, and easy-to-use version of the manual for use by energy and facility engineers and staff at all Navy Public Works Centers (PWCs), Public Works Departments (PWDs), Engineering Field Divisions (EFDs), and other related organizations. The revision of the MO-303 manual involved developing a methodology for estimating energy consumption in buildings and ships. This methodology can account for, and equitably allocate, energy consumption within Navy installations. The analyses used to develop this methodology included developing end-use intensities (EUIs) from a vast collection of Navy base metering and billing data. A statistical analysis of the metering data, weather data, and building energy-use characteristics was used to develop appropriate EUI values for use at all Navy bases. A complete Navy base energy reconciliation process was also created for use in allocating all known energy consumption. Initial attempts to use total Navy base consumption values did not produce usable results. A parallel effort using individual building consumption data provided an estimating method that incorporated weather effects. This method produced a set of building EUI values and weather adjustments for use in estimating building energy use. A method of reconciling total site energy consumption was developed based on a {open_quotes}zero-sum{close_quotes} principle. This method provides a way to account for all energy use and apportion part or all of it to buildings and other energy uses when actual consumption is not known. The entire text of the manual was also revised to present a more easily read understood and usable document.

  17. Estimating the magnitude of near-membrane PDE4 activity in living cells.

    PubMed

    Xin, Wenkuan; Feinstein, Wei P; Britain, Andrea L; Ochoa, Cristhiaan D; Zhu, Bing; Richter, Wito; Leavesley, Silas J; Rich, Thomas C

    2015-09-15

    Recent studies have demonstrated that functionally discrete pools of phosphodiesterase (PDE) activity regulate distinct cellular functions. While the importance of localized pools of enzyme activity has become apparent, few studies have estimated enzyme activity within discrete subcellular compartments. Here we present an approach to estimate near-membrane PDE activity. First, total PDE activity is measured using traditional PDE activity assays. Second, known cAMP concentrations are dialyzed into single cells and the spatial spread of cAMP is monitored using cyclic nucleotide-gated channels. Third, mathematical models are used to estimate the spatial distribution of PDE activity within cells. Using this three-tiered approach, we observed two pharmacologically distinct pools of PDE activity, a rolipram-sensitive pool and an 8-methoxymethyl IBMX (8MM-IBMX)-sensitive pool. We observed that the rolipram-sensitive PDE (PDE4) was primarily responsible for cAMP hydrolysis near the plasma membrane. Finally, we observed that PDE4 was capable of blunting cAMP levels near the plasma membrane even when 100 μM cAMP were introduced into the cell via a patch pipette. Two compartment models predict that PDE activity near the plasma membrane, near cyclic nucleotide-gated channels, was significantly lower than total cellular PDE activity and that a slow spatial spread of cAMP allowed PDE activity to effectively hydrolyze near-membrane cAMP. These results imply that cAMP levels near the plasma membrane are distinct from those in other subcellular compartments; PDE activity is not uniform within cells; and localized pools of AC and PDE activities are responsible for controlling cAMP levels within distinct subcellular compartments. PMID:26201952

  18. On the study of energy imbalance and its influence on estimation of heat fluxes using energy balance based models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, L.; Zhang, T.; Su, Z.

    2003-04-01

    The modeling of evapotranspiration from land surface has long been an important issue in many research fields, e.g. the energy partition and water cycles of the global climate system. Two methods are widely used to estimate evapotranspiration in hydrology and climatology. In the residual method the latent heat flux is estimated as the residual of energy balance equation, while in the combination equation the energy balance is combined with a transfer equation to calculate the evaporative fraction. Both methods are built up on the basis of energy balance between the available energy and the sum of sensible and latent heat fluxes if photosynthesis, the heat storage and the advection are neglected. However, the imbalance between the available energy (the residual of net radiation and the soil heat flux) and the sum of sensible and latent heat fluxes has been often observed during several field experiments, such as FIFE, HEIFE, and GAME-Tibet and the TIPEX. The reasons of the lack of closure in energy balance may attribute to various sources and can be put into two categories: (1) incompleteness in measurements including inadequate instrumentation and less representative fetch and insufficient sampling and too short averaging time; (2) incompleteness in the consideration of energy balance terms because many other processes may have non negligible contributions to the energy budget to some degrees depending on the complexity of the land surface. These may bring problem both to the evaluation of energy balance based models and to the framework on which the model is constructed. In this study, the imbalance problem is investigated by the analysis of the data collected in the filed measurements during GAME-Tibet and TIPEX. As a further study, a validated model SEBS using many other datasets is used to clarify the impact of such imbalance to the energy-balance based models. A correction method is proposed to solve the imbalance problems existing in collected data.

  19. Improving assessment of daily energy expenditure by identifying types of physical activity with a single accelerometer.

    PubMed

    Bonomi, A G; Plasqui, G; Goris, A H C; Westerterp, K R

    2009-09-01

    Accelerometers are often used to quantify the acceleration of the body in arbitrary units (counts) to measure physical activity (PA) and to estimate energy expenditure. The present study investigated whether the identification of types of PA with one accelerometer could improve the estimation of energy expenditure compared with activity counts. Total energy expenditure (TEE) of 15 subjects was measured with the use of double-labeled water. The physical activity level (PAL) was derived by dividing TEE by sleeping metabolic rate. Simultaneously, PA was measured with one accelerometer. Accelerometer output was processed to calculate activity counts per day (AC(D)) and to determine the daily duration of six types of common activities identified with a classification tree model. A daily metabolic value (MET(D)) was calculated as mean of the MET compendium value of each activity type weighed by the daily duration. TEE was predicted by AC(D) and body weight and by AC(D) and fat-free mass, with a standard error of estimate (SEE) of 1.47 MJ/day, and 1.2 MJ/day, respectively. The replacement in these models of AC(D) with MET(D) increased the explained variation in TEE by 9%, decreasing SEE by 0.14 MJ/day and 0.18 MJ/day, respectively. The correlation between PAL and MET(D) (R(2) = 51%) was higher than that between PAL and AC(D) (R(2) = 46%). We conclude that identification of activity types combined with MET intensity values improves the assessment of energy expenditure compared with activity counts. Future studies could develop models to objectively assess activity type and intensity to further increase accuracy of the energy expenditure estimation. PMID:19556460

  20. Estimation of dynamic time activity curves from dynamic cardiac SPECT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossain, J.; Du, Y.; Links, J.; Rahmim, A.; Karakatsanis, N.; Akhbardeh, A.; Lyons, J.; Frey, E. C.

    2015-04-01

    Whole-heart coronary flow reserve (CFR) may be useful as an early predictor of cardiovascular disease or heart failure. Here we propose a simple method to extract the time-activity curve, an essential component needed for estimating the CFR, for a small number of compartments in the body, such as normal myocardium, blood pool, and ischemic myocardial regions, from SPECT data acquired with conventional cameras using slow rotation. We evaluated the method using a realistic simulation of 99mTc-teboroxime imaging. Uptake of 99mTc-teboroxime based on data from the literature were modeled. Data were simulated using the anatomically-realistic 3D NCAT phantom and an analytic projection code that realistically models attenuation, scatter, and the collimator-detector response. The proposed method was then applied to estimate time activity curves (TACs) for a set of 3D volumes of interest (VOIs) directly from the projections. We evaluated the accuracy and precision of estimated TACs and studied the effects of the presence of perfusion defects that were and were not modeled in the estimation procedure. The method produced good estimates of the myocardial and blood-pool TACS organ VOIs, with average weighted absolute biases of less than 5% for the myocardium and 10% for the blood pool when the true organ boundaries were known and the activity distributions in the organs were uniform. In the presence of unknown perfusion defects, the myocardial TAC was still estimated well (average weighted absolute bias <10%) when the total reduction in myocardial uptake (product of defect extent and severity) was ≤5%. This indicates that the method was robust to modest model mismatch such as the presence of moderate perfusion defects and uptake nonuniformities. With larger defects where the defect VOI was included in the estimation procedure, the estimated normal myocardial and defect TACs were accurate (average weighted absolute bias ≈5% for a defect with 25% extent and 100% severity).

  1. Unbiased Estimate of Dark Energy Density from Type Ia Supernova Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yun; Lovelace, Geoffrey

    2001-12-01

    Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) are currently the best probes of the dark energy in the universe. To constrain the nature of dark energy, we assume a flat universe and that the weak energy condition is satisfied, and we allow the density of dark energy, ρX(z), to be an arbitrary function of redshift. Using simulated data from a space-based SN pencil-beam survey, we find that by optimizing the number of parameters used to parameterize the dimensionless dark energy density, f(z)=ρX(z)/ρX(z=0), we can obtain an unbiased estimate of both f(z) and the fractional matter density of the universe, Ωm. A plausible SN pencil-beam survey (with a square degree field of view and for an observational duration of 1 yr) can yield about 2000 SNe Ia with 0<=z<=2. Such a survey in space would yield SN peak luminosities with a combined intrinsic and observational dispersion of σ(mint)=0.16 mag. We find that for such an idealized survey, Ωm can be measured to 10% accuracy, and the dark energy density can be estimated to ~20% to z~1.5, and ~20%-40% to z~2, depending on the time dependence of the true dark energy density. Dark energy densities that vary more slowly can be more accurately measured. For the anticipated Supernova/Acceleration Probe (SNAP) mission, Ωm can be measured to 14% accuracy, and the dark energy density can be estimated to ~20% to z~1.2. Our results suggest that SNAP may gain much sensitivity to the time dependence of the dark energy density and Ωm by devoting more observational time to the central pencil-beam fields to obtain more SNe Ia at z>1.2. We use both a maximum likelihood analysis and a Monte Carlo analysis (when appropriate) to determine the errors of estimated parameters. We find that the Monte Carlo analysis gives a more accurate estimate of the dark energy density than the maximum likelihood analysis.

  2. Does choice of estimators influence conclusions from true metabolizable energy feeding trials?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sherfy, M.H.; Kirkpatrick, R.L.; Webb, K.E., Jr.

    2005-01-01

    True metabolizable energy (TME) is a measure of avian dietary quality that accounts for metabolic fecal and endogenous urinary energy losses (EL) of non-dietary origin. The TME is calculated using a bird fed the test diet and an estimate of EL derived from another bird (Paired Bird Correction), the same bird (Self Correction), or several other birds (Group Mean Correction). We evaluated precision of these estimators by using each to calculate TME of three seed diets in blue-winged teal (Anas discors). The TME varied by <2% among estimators for all three diets, and Self Correction produced the least variable TMEs for each. The TME did not differ between estimators in nine paired comparisons within diets, but variation between estimators within individual birds was sufficient to be of practical consequence. Although differences in precision among methods were slight, Self Correction required the lowest sample size to achieve a given precision. Feeding trial methods that minimize variation among individuals have several desirable properties, including higher precision of TME estimates and more rigorous experimental control. Consequently, we believe that Self Correction is most likely to accurately represent nutritional value of food items and should be considered the standard method for TME feeding trials. ?? Dt. Ornithologen-Gesellschaft e.V. 2005.

  3. Estimating the energy deposition in the mesosphere from anisotropic electron fluxes during REP events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stadsnes, Johan; Sandanger, Marit; Nesse Tyssoy, Hilde; Odegaard, Linn-Kristine; Asnes, Arne

    Data from the MEPED particle spectrometers on the Polar Orbiting Operational Environmental Satellites (POES) are often used for estimating the energy deposition in the upper atmosphere from electrons in the energy range 30 keV - 2.5 MeV. MEPED includes two collimated electron detectors, which are pointing approximately towards zenith (0 degree detector) and in the horizontal plane (90 degree detector). At medium and high geomagnetic latitudes the 0 degree detector measures particles within a limited part of the bounce loss cone and the 90 degree detector measures particles outside or near the edge of the loss cone. The electron fluxes often show strong pitch angle anisotropy which causes large uncertainty in the estimate of energy deposition based on these measurements. An upper estimate is derived from the 90 degree detector and a lower estimate from the 0 degree detector. The electron anisotropy is to a large extent determined by wave-particle interactions causing pitch angle diffusion driving electrons into the bounce loss cone. The pitch angle anisotropy is dependent on the strength of the diffusion. We are developing a method for calculating the flux versus pitch angle in the loss cone based on the measured electron fluxes and modeled flux profiles from pitch angle scattering by whistler mode waves. We will present results from calculation of the energy deposition using the derived anisotropic flux distribution during a REP event in 2008.

  4. Practical energy response estimation of photon counting detectors for spectral X-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Dong-Goo; Lee, Jongha; Sung, Younghun; Lee, SeongDeok

    2010-04-01

    Spectral X-ray imaging is a promising technique to drastically improve the diagnostic quality of radiography and computed tomography (CT), since it enables material decomposition and/or identification based on the energy dependency of material-specific X-ray attenuation. Unlike the charge-integration based X-ray detectors, photon counting X-ray detectors (PCXDs) can discriminate the energies of incident X-ray photons and thereby multi-energy images can be obtained in single exposure. However, the measured data are not accurate since the spectra of incident X-rays are distorted according to the energy response function (ERF) of a PCXD. Thus ERF should be properly estimated in advance for accurate spectral imaging. This paper presents a simple method for ERF estimation based on a polychromatic X-ray source that is widely used for medical imaging. The method consists of three steps: source spectra measurement, detector spectra reconstruction, and ERF inverse estimation. Real spectra of an X-ray tube are first measured at all kVs by using an X-ray spectrometer. The corresponding detector spectra are obtained by threshold scans. The ERF is then estimated by solving the inverse problem. Simulations are conducted to demonstrate the concept of the proposed method.

  5. Estimates of the climatological land surface energy- and water balance derived from thermodynamic constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleidon, Axel; Renner, Maik; Porada, Philipp

    2015-04-01

    The land surface energy and water balances are tightly coupled by the partitioning of absorbed solar radiation into terrestrial radiation and the turbulent fluxes of sensible and latent heat, as well as the partitioning of precipitation into evaporation and runoff. Evaporation forms the critical link between these two balances. Its rate is strongly affected by turbulent exchange as it provides the means to efficiently exchange moisture between the heated, moist surface and the cooled, dry atmosphere. Here, we use the constraint that this mass exchange operates at the thermodynamic limit of maximum power to derive analytical expressions for the partitioning of the surface energy and water balances on land. We use satellite-derived forcing of absorbed solar radiation, surface temperature and precipitation to derive simple spatial estimates for the annual mean fluxes of sensible and latent heat and evaluate these estimates with the ERA-Interim reanalysis data set and observations of the discharge of large river basins. Given the extremely simple approach, we find that our estimates explain the climatic mean variations in net radiation, evaporation, and river discharge reasonably well. We conclude that our analytical, minimum approach provides adequate first order estimates of the surface energy and water balance on land and that the thermodynamic limit of maximum power provides a useful closure assumption to constrain the energy partitioning at the land surface.

  6. Two-source energy balance model estimates of evapotranspiration using component and composite surface temperatures

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The two-source energy balance model (TSEB) can estimate evaporation (E), transpiration (T), and evapotranspiration (ET) of vegetated surfaces, which has important applications in water resources management for irrigated crops. The TSEB requires soil (TS) and canopy (TC) surface temperatures to solv...

  7. Cortical connective field estimates from resting state fMRI activity

    PubMed Central

    Gravel, Nicolás; Harvey, Ben; Nordhjem, Barbara; Haak, Koen V.; Dumoulin, Serge O.; Renken, Remco; Ćurčić-Blake, Branislava; Cornelissen, Frans W.

    2014-01-01

    One way to study connectivity in visual cortical areas is by examining spontaneous neural activity. In the absence of visual input, such activity remains shaped by the underlying neural architecture and, presumably, may still reflect visuotopic organization. Here, we applied population connective field (CF) modeling to estimate the spatial profile of functional connectivity in the early visual cortex during resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (RS-fMRI). This model-based analysis estimates the spatial integration between blood-oxygen level dependent (BOLD) signals in distinct cortical visual field maps using fMRI. Just as population receptive field (pRF) mapping predicts the collective neural activity in a voxel as a function of response selectivity to stimulus position in visual space, CF modeling predicts the activity of voxels in one visual area as a function of the aggregate activity in voxels in another visual area. In combination with pRF mapping, CF locations on the cortical surface can be interpreted in visual space, thus enabling reconstruction of visuotopic maps from resting state data. We demonstrate that V1 ➤ V2 and V1 ➤ V3 CF maps estimated from resting state fMRI data show visuotopic organization. Therefore, we conclude that—despite some variability in CF estimates between RS scans—neural properties such as CF maps and CF size can be derived from resting state data. PMID:25400541

  8. School District Energy Conservation Activities. R-96-J-2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Office of the Comptroller, Albany. Div. of Management Audit.

    To help New York's State Department of Education assess public school districts' energy conservation activities, the results of an audit of school districts' energy conservation activities are presented. The audit shows that most school districts have made some efforts toward energy conservation and that the Department does provide some assistance…

  9. Sample Energy Conservation Education Activities for Elementary School Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Rodney F., Ed.; LaHart, David E., Ed.

    The booklet contains learning activities for introducing energy and conservation concepts into the existing elementary school curriculum. The activities were developed by Palm Beach County teachers during a one-week workshop. A framework of ideas is divided into three functional categories: universe of energy, living systems and energy, and social…

  10. Estimation of the energy release and thermal properties of ejected clasts from explosive eruptions using a thermal imaging camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De la Cruz-Reyna, S.; Cárdenas-Sánchez, E.

    2012-04-01

    Thermal images were obtained at Popocatépetl, central Mexico, during the period of high lava-dome destruction activity between 1998 and 2002. Similarly, thermal cameras have operated at Colima volcano, western Mexico during episodes of similar explosive activity in 2005 and 2007. We have developed a method to estimate the relative thermal energy release among explosions, and the degree of conversion into mechanical energy spent in the fragmentation of the ejecta, based on the cooling rate inferred from successive thermal images obtained immediately after each explosion. The thermal imaging cameras were located at about 11 km from the crater at Popocatépetl, and at about 6 km from the crater at Colima. The selected explosions threw significant amounts of hot debris on the volcano flanks. The cooling rate was then measured on selected pixels of the thermal images, and compared with different possible distributions of fragment sizes considering weighted averages of fragments in the pixels. The optimal fitting of fragment distributions reveals the degree of fragmentation of individual explosions, and along with a model for the cooling process, permitted to estimate the relative thermal energy release on the area covered by the image. Additionally, the results indicate that the radiative thermal conductivity plays a significant role on the outer shell of the fragments, suggesting a free mean path of thermal infrared photons that may reach several millimeters or even a few centimeters.

  11. Evaluating ET estimates from the Simplified Surface Energy Balance (SSEB) model using METRIC model output

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senay, G. B.; Budde, M. E.; Allen, R. G.; Verdin, J. P.

    2008-12-01

    Evapotranspiration (ET) is an important component of the hydrologic budget because it expresses the exchange of mass and energy between the soil-water-vegetation system and the atmosphere. Since direct measurement of ET is difficult, various modeling methods are used to estimate actual ET (ETa). Generally, the choice of method for ET estimation depends on the objective of the study and is further limited by the availability of data and desired accuracy of the ET estimate. Operational monitoring of crop performance requires processing large data sets and a quick response time. A Simplified Surface Energy Balance (SSEB) model was developed by the U.S. Geological Survey's Famine Early Warning Systems Network to estimate irrigation water use in remote places of the world. In this study, we evaluated the performance of the SSEB model with the METRIC (Mapping Evapotranspiration at high Resolution and with Internalized Calibration) model that has been evaluated by several researchers using the Lysimeter data. The METRIC model has been proven to provide reliable ET estimates in different regions of the world. Reference ET fractions of both models (ETrF of METRIC vs. ETf of SSEB) were generated and compared using individual Landsat thermal images collected from 2000 though 2005 in Idaho, New Mexico, and California. In addition, the models were compared using monthly and seasonal total ETa estimates. The SSEB model reproduced both the spatial and temporal variability exhibited by METRIC on land surfaces, explaining up to 80 percent of the spatial variability. However, the ETa estimates over water bodies were systematically higher in the SSEB output, which could be improved by using a correction coefficient to take into account the absorption of solar energy by deeper water layers that has little contribution to the ET process. This study demonstrated the usefulness of the SSEB method for large-scale agro-hydrologic applications for operational monitoring and assessing of

  12. Impact of borehole depths on reconstructed estimates of ground surface temperature histories and energy storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beltrami, Hugo; Matharoo, Gurpreet S.; Smerdon, Jason E.

    2015-05-01

    Estimates of ground surface temperature changes and continental energy storage from geothermal data have become well-accepted indicators of climatic changes. These estimates are independent contributions to the ensemble of paleoclimatic reconstructions and have been used for the validation of general circulation models, and as a component of the energy budget accounting of the global climate system. Recent global and hemispheric analyses of geothermal data were based on data available in the borehole paleoclimatology database, which contains subsurface temperature profiles from a minimum depth of 200 m to about 600 m. Because of the nature of heat conduction, different depth ranges contain the record of past and persistent changes in the energy balance between the lower atmosphere and the ground for different time periods. Here we examine the dependency of estimated ground surface temperature histories and the magnitude of the subsurface heat content on the depth of borehole temperature profiles. Our results show that uncertainties in the estimates of the long-term surface temperature are in the range of ±0.5K. We conclude that previous estimates of ground surface temperature change remain valid for the period since industrialization, but longer-term estimates are subject to considerable uncertainties. The subsurface heat content shows a larger range of variability arising from differences in depth of the borehole temperature profiles, as well as from differences in the time of data acquisition, spanning four decades. These results indicate that estimates of subsurface heat should be carried out with caution to decrease cumulative errors in any spatial analysis.

  13. Regional and National Estimates of the PotentialEnergy Use, Energy Cost, and CO{sub 2} Emissions Associated with Radon Mitigation by Sub-slab Depressurization

    SciTech Connect

    Riley, W.J.; Fisk, W.J.; Gadgil, A.J.

    1996-03-01

    Active sub-slab depressurization (SSD) systems are an effective means of reducing indoor radon concentrations in residential buildings. However, energy is required to operate the system fan and to heat or cool the resulting increased building ventilation. We present regional and national estimates of the energy requirements, operating expenses, and CO{sub 2} emissions associated with using SSD systems at saturation (i.e., in all U.S. homes with radon concentrations above the EPA remediation guideline and either basement or slab-on-grade construction). The primary source of uncertainty in these estimates is the impact of the SSD system on house ventilation rate. Overall, individual SSD system operating expenses are highest in the Northeast and Midwest at about $99 y{sup -1}, and lowest in the South and West at about $66 y{sup -1}. The fan consumes, on average, about 40% of the end-use energy used to operate the SSD system and accounts for about 60% of the annual expense. At saturation, regional impacts are largest in the Midwest because this area has a large number of mitigable houses and a relatively high heating load. We estimate that operating SSD systems in U.S. houses where it is both appropriate and possible (about 2.6 million houses), will annually consume 1.7 x 10{sup 4} (6.4 x 10{sup 3} to 3.9 x 10{sup 4}) TJ of end-use energy, cost $230 (130 to 400) million (at current energy prices), and generate 2.0 x 10{sup 9} (1.2 x 10{sup 9} to 3.5 x 10{sup 9}) kg of CO{sub 2}. Passive or energy efficient radon mitigation systems currently being developed offer opportunities to substantially reduce these impacts.

  14. Estimating the Benefits of Government-Sponsored Energy R&D: Synthesis of Conference Discussions

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, R.

    2003-11-14

    In 2001, a National Research Council (NRC) committee conducted a retrospective study of the benefits of some of the energy efficiency and fossil energy programs in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). As part of its study, the NRC committee developed a methodological framework for estimating these benefits. Following the NRC report, a conference was organized by Oak Ridge National Laboratory to discuss ways of adapting and refining the NRC framework for possible use by DOE offices to help plan and manage their R&D. This report is a synthesis of the discussions at the conference.

  15. Solar Energy Education. Renewable energy activities for chemistry and physics

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    Information on renewable energy sources is provided for students in this teachers' guide. With the chemistry and physics student in mind, solar energy topics such as absorber plate coatings for solar collectors and energy collection and storage methods are studied. (BCS)

  16. Video-Quality Estimation Based on Reduced-Reference Model Employing Activity-Difference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Toru; Miyamoto, Yoshihiro; Senda, Yuzo; Serizawa, Masahiro

    This paper presents a Reduced-reference based video-quality estimation method suitable for individual end-user quality monitoring of IPTV services. With the proposed method, the activity values for individual given-size pixel blocks of an original video are transmitted to end-user terminals. At the end-user terminals, the video quality of a received video is estimated on the basis of the activity-difference between the original video and the received video. Psychovisual weightings and video-quality score adjustments for fatal degradations are applied to improve estimation accuracy. In addition, low-bit-rate transmission is achieved by using temporal sub-sampling and by transmitting only the lower six bits of each activity value. The proposed method achieves accurate video quality estimation using only low-bit-rate original video information (15kbps for SDTV). The correlation coefficient between actual subjective video quality and estimated quality is 0.901 with 15kbps side information. The proposed method does not need computationally demanding spatial and gain-and-offset registrations. Therefore, it is suitable for real-time video-quality monitoring in IPTV services.

  17. Energy Conservation Activity Packet, Grade 5. Revised Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pohlman, Betty; And Others

    This activity notebook for grade 5 is one of a series developed in response to energy conservation. It contains activities that stress an energy conservation ethic and includes many values clarification activities for grade five. The packet is divided into two parts and provides the teacher with background information, concepts and objectives, and…

  18. Energy Conservation Activity Packet, Grade 4. Revised Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pohlman, Betty; And Others

    This activity notebook for grade 4 is one in a series developed in response to the concern for energy conservation. It contains activities that stress an energy conservation ethic and includes many values clarification activities for grade four. The packet is divided into two parts and provides the teacher with background information, concepts and…

  19. Energy Conservation Activity Packet, Grade 6. Revised Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pohlman, Betty; And Others

    This activity notebook for grade 6 is one of a series developed in response to the concern for energy conservation. It contains activities that stress an energy conservation ethic and includes many values clarification activities for grade six. The packet is divided into two parts and provides the teacher with background information, concepts and…

  20. Energy Conservation Activities for the Classroom K-12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kentucky Dept. of Energy, Frankfort.

    After a brief introduction entitled "Where Does the Energy We Use Come From," this unit presents 86 activities. Each activity gives the title, concept, objectives, subject area, level, time involved, materials needed, procedures, and related career activities. Topics cover everything from housing insulation to alternate sources of energy to energy…

  1. Number of trials required to estimate a free-energy difference, using fluctuation relations.

    PubMed

    Yunger Halpern, Nicole; Jarzynski, Christopher

    2016-05-01

    The difference ΔF between free energies has applications in biology, chemistry, and pharmacology. The value of ΔF can be estimated from experiments or simulations, via fluctuation theorems developed in statistical mechanics. Calculating the error in a ΔF estimate is difficult. Worse, atypical trials dominate estimates. How many trials one should perform was estimated roughly by Jarzynski [Phys. Rev. E 73, 046105 (2006)PLEEE81539-375510.1103/PhysRevE.73.046105]. We enhance the approximation with the following information-theoretic strategies. We quantify "dominance" with a tolerance parameter chosen by the experimenter or simulator. We bound the number of trials one should expect to perform, using the order-∞ Rényi entropy. The bound can be estimated if one implements the "good practice" of bidirectionality, known to improve estimates of ΔF. Estimating ΔF from this number of trials leads to an error that we bound approximately. Numerical experiments on a weakly interacting dilute classical gas support our analytical calculations. PMID:27300866

  2. Number of trials required to estimate a free-energy difference, using fluctuation relations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yunger Halpern, Nicole; Jarzynski, Christopher

    2016-05-01

    The difference Δ F between free energies has applications in biology, chemistry, and pharmacology. The value of Δ F can be estimated from experiments or simulations, via fluctuation theorems developed in statistical mechanics. Calculating the error in a Δ F estimate is difficult. Worse, atypical trials dominate estimates. How many trials one should perform was estimated roughly by Jarzynski [Phys. Rev. E 73, 046105 (2006), 10.1103/PhysRevE.73.046105]. We enhance the approximation with the following information-theoretic strategies. We quantify "dominance" with a tolerance parameter chosen by the experimenter or simulator. We bound the number of trials one should expect to perform, using the order-∞ Rényi entropy. The bound can be estimated if one implements the "good practice" of bidirectionality, known to improve estimates of Δ F . Estimating Δ F from this number of trials leads to an error that we bound approximately. Numerical experiments on a weakly interacting dilute classical gas support our analytical calculations.

  3. Energy budget closure and field scale estimation of canopy energy storage with increased and sustained turbulence

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Eddy Covariance (EC) is widely used for direct, non-invasive observations of land-atmosphere energy and mass fluxes. However, EC observations of available energy fluxes are usually less than fluxes inferred from radiometer and soil heat flux observations; thus introducing additional uncertainty in u...

  4. Energy budget closure and field scale estimation of canopy energy storage with increased and sustained turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, R. G.; Wang, D.

    2012-12-01

    Eddy Covariance (EC) is widely used for direct, non-invasive observations of land-atmosphere energy and mass fluxes. However, EC observations of available energy fluxes are usually less than fluxes inferred from radiometer and soil heat flux observations; thus introducing additional uncertainty in using and interpreting EC flux measurements. We compare EC observations from two towers established over sugarcane (Saccharum officinarum L.) in Hawai'i, USA under similar cultivation, temperature, sunlight, and precipitation, but drastically different wind conditions due to orographic effects. At a daily scale, we find that energy closure for both towers occurs on days when the entire 24 hours has sufficient turbulence. At our windier site, this turbulence condition occurs over 60% of the time, which contributes to substantially better daily energy closure (~98%) than at the calmer site (~75%). At our windy site, we then invert the daily energy closure for continuously windy days to calculate canopy energy storage. At full canopy, peak daily canopy energy storage fluxes (200-400 Wm-2) are approximately an order of magnitude larger than soil heat flux (20-40 Wm-2). As a fraction of net radiation, canopy energy storage appears to vary seasonally and shows substantially greater variability than soil heat flux. The results illustrate the importance of sustained turbulence for accurate, direct measurement of land-atmosphere fluxes. As increasing number of EC towers are established in complex terrain, these results indicate the need for preliminary wind studies to optimize tower placement where orography enhances, rather than suppresses, turbulence.

  5. Self-selection and the estimation of energy conservation program benefits

    SciTech Connect

    Horowitz, M.J.

    1995-12-31

    The necessity to correct behavioral models for selectivity bias has long been recognized within the economics profession as critical to deriving parameter estimates that are unbiased and consistent. The purpose of this paper is to examine the problem of selectivity bias, specifically self-selection and free riders, in the estimation of behavioral models of energy conservation program benefits. Like for all social programs, objective assessment of the social and private value of energy conservation programs requires accurate quantification of their direct benefits. Particular attention is given in this paper to the nature of energy conservation program self-selection when these programs provide goods and services that are capable of being purchased privately in competitive markets. In this case, the source of the selectivity problem can be traced to two interrelated decisions, that is, the decision to participate in energy efficiency programs and the decision to invest in energy efficiency measures that are promoted by the program. This paper describes why it is necessary to recognize, and correct for, both forms of selectivity. It also offers suggestions for what the underlying determinants of self-selection might be and how they may affect the estimates of program impacts.

  6. Empirical estimates of kinetic energy from some recent U.S. tornadoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fricker, T.; Elsner, J. B.; Camp, P.; Jagger, T. H.

    2014-06-01

    Data from some recent tornado damage assessments are used to compute the percentage of damage path area by enhanced Fujita (EF) rating and to estimate kinetic energy. Only a small fraction of the damage area gets the highest damage rating, and this fraction is lower than a model used by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. However, estimates of kinetic energy derived from a characteristic wind speed for each EF rating and the fraction of area with that rating match kinetic energy estimates using the model percentages. On average, the higher the EF rating, the larger the kinetic energy, but there is large variability in the relationship. The average total kinetic energy over the EF1 tornadoes examined in the study is 0.61 TJ, which compares with an average of 2.37 TJ, 40.1 TJ, 36.5 TJ, and 50.4 TJ for the EF2, EF3, EF4, and EF5 tornadoes, respectively. The most energetic tornado examined had a maximum damage rating of EF3.

  7. Consistent estimation of complete neuronal connectivity in large neuronal populations using sparse "shotgun" neuronal activity sampling.

    PubMed

    Mishchenko, Yuriy

    2016-10-01

    We investigate the properties of recently proposed "shotgun" sampling approach for the common inputs problem in the functional estimation of neuronal connectivity. We study the asymptotic correctness, the speed of convergence, and the data size requirements of such an approach. We show that the shotgun approach can be expected to allow the inference of complete connectivity matrix in large neuronal populations under some rather general conditions. However, we find that the posterior error of the shotgun connectivity estimator grows quickly with the size of unobserved neuronal populations, the square of average connectivity strength, and the square of observation sparseness. This implies that the shotgun connectivity estimation will require significantly larger amounts of neuronal activity data whenever the number of neurons in observed neuronal populations remains small. We present a numerical approach for solving the shotgun estimation problem in general settings and use it to demonstrate the shotgun connectivity inference in the examples of simulated synfire and weakly coupled cortical neuronal networks. PMID:27515518

  8. Estimating the Passage of Minutes: Deviant Oscillatory Frontal Activity in Medicated and Un-Medicated ADHD

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Tony W.; Heinrichs-Graham, Elizabeth; White, Matthew L.; Knott, Nichole L.; Wetzel, Martin W.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a common and extensively treated psychiatric disorder in children, which often persists into adulthood. The core diagnostic symptoms include inappropriate levels of hyperactivity, impulsivity, and/or pervasive inattention. Another crucial aspect of the disorder involves aberrations in temporal perception, which have been well documented in behavioral studies and recently have been the focus of neuroimaging studies. These fMRI studies have shown reduced activation in anterior cingulate and prefrontal cortices in ADHD using a time-interval discrimination task, whereby participants distinguish intervals differing by only hundreds of milliseconds. Method We utilized magnetoencephalography (MEG) to evaluate the cortical network serving temporal perception during a continuous, long-duration (minutes) time estimation experiment. Briefly, medicated and un-medicated persons with ADHD, and a control group responded each time they estimated 60 s had elapsed for an undisclosed amount of time in two separate MEG sessions. All MEG data were transformed into regional source activity, and subjected to spectral analyses to derive amplitude estimates of gamma-band activity. Results Compared to controls, un-medicated patients were less accurate time estimators and had weaker gamma activity in the anterior cingulate, supplementary motor area, and left prefrontal cortices. Following medication, these patients exhibited small but significant increases in gamma across these same neural regions and significant improvements in time estimation accuracy, which correlated with the gamma activity increases. Conclusions We found deficient gamma activity in brain areas known to be crucial for timing functions, which may underlie the day-to-day abnormalities in time perception that are common in ADHD. PMID:24040925

  9. Renewable energy rebound effect?: Estimating the impact of state renewable energy financial incentives on residential electricity consumption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephenson, Beth A.

    Climate change is a well-documented phenomenon. If left unchecked greenhouse gas emissions will continue global surface warming, likely leading to severe and irreversible impacts. Generating renewable energy has become an increasingly salient topic in energy policy as it may mitigate the impact of climate change. State renewable energy financial incentives have been in place since the mid-1970s in some states and over 40 states have adopted one or more incentives at some point since then. Using multivariate linear and fixed effects regression for the years 2002 through 2012, I estimate the relationship between state renewable energy financial incentives and residential electricity consumption, along with the associated policy implications. My hypothesis is that a renewable energy rebound effect is present; therefore, states with renewable energy financial incentives have a higher rate of residential electricity consumption. I find a renewable energy rebound effect is present in varying degrees for each model, but the results do not definitively indicate how particular incentives influence consumer behavior. States should use caution when adopting and keeping renewable energy financial incentives as this may increase consumption in the short-term. The long-term impact is unclear, making it worthwhile for policymakers to continue studying the potential for renewable energy financial incentives to alter consumer behavior.

  10. On the estimation of particle energies and fluxes incident over Boston during a daytime auroral event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duggirala, P.; Chakrabarti, S.; Solomon, S.

    2008-12-01

    The earth's upper atmosphere gets affected by the influence of particles of solar wind origin, especially during space weather events. Estimating the energy inputs into the upper atmosphere is very essential to be able to eventually quantify the energy budget into the upper atmosphere and also to understand the coupling between atmospheric regions. During space weather events the incidence of energy flux shows significant spatial and temporal variation. Particle energies have predominantly been measured from instruments onboard satellites. Estimation of energies using radar-based inversion techniques are quiet involved and even when possible, particle energies at only higher energy range (around keV and beyond) can be inferred. In the present paper, we present the results on particle fluxes and energies that we obtained from combined investigations of optical, radar and modeling techniques. The storm of October 30, 2003 was considered for analysis. On that day we had carried out one of the first daytime auroral observations of the OI red emission line from Boston using the BU-built High Resolution Echelle spectrograph. We had measured the peak brightness of aurora to be 38 kR, which is not predicted by the GLOW model. However, the match between the measured brightness and the model prediction during non-storm period of that day is very good. Therefore, assuming the discrepancy in the measured and the model emissions during the storm time to be only due to the particle inputs, we inferred the particle energy fluxes for given characteristic energies as obtained from the peak ionospheric heights observed by the Millstone Hill Incoherent Scatter radar. The energy fluxes vary between 2 to 12 mWm-2. Results such as these add to the credence of the capability of the daytime measurement technique in understanding the upper atmospheric dynamics.

  11. Factors that promote renewable energy production in U.S. states: A fixed effect estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nwokeji, Ekwuniru Chika

    2011-12-01

    The unsustainability of conventional energy sources and its environmental destructions are well-known; the sustainability of renewable energy and its environmental benefits are also well-documented. The United States in common with many other countries is increasingly focused on developing renewable energy. At first, the pursuit of this strategy in U.S. was seen more as a way to reduce dependence on oil importation. With increased awareness of environmental challenges resulting from the consumption and production of conventional energy, an additional strategy for the continued interest in renewable energy development in the United States was as a result of its potential to ameliorate environmental problems. The U.S. government are utilizing policy measures and dedicating funding to encourage the development of renewable energy technologies. Beside government policies, there are contextual factors that also affect renewable energy production. These include, but not limited to population growth, energy demand, economic growth, and public acceptance. Given the pressing need to develop a sustainable energy, this study embarks on an outcome assessment of the nature of relationship of renewable energy policy incentives, and selected contextual factors on renewable energy production in the United States. The policy incentive evaluated in this study is the Renewable Energy Production Incentive program. The contextual factors evaluated in this study are energy consumption, population growth, employment, and poverty. Understanding the contextual factors within which policies are placed is essential to defining the most appropriate policy features. The methodological approach to the study is quantitative, using panel data from 1976 to 2007. The study tested two hypotheses using fixed effect estimation with robust standard error as a statistical model. Statistical analyses reveal several interesting results which lend support that besides policy incentives, contextual factors

  12. Toward an Accurate Estimate of the Exfoliation Energy of Black Phosphorus: A Periodic Quantum Chemical Approach.

    PubMed

    Sansone, Giuseppe; Maschio, Lorenzo; Usvyat, Denis; Schütz, Martin; Karttunen, Antti

    2016-01-01

    The black phosphorus (black-P) crystal is formed of covalently bound layers of phosphorene stacked together by weak van der Waals interactions. An experimental measurement of the exfoliation energy of black-P is not available presently, making theoretical studies the most important source of information for the optimization of phosphorene production. Here, we provide an accurate estimate of the exfoliation energy of black-P on the basis of multilevel quantum chemical calculations, which include the periodic local Møller-Plesset perturbation theory of second order, augmented by higher-order corrections, which are evaluated with finite clusters mimicking the crystal. Very similar results are also obtained by density functional theory with the D3-version of Grimme's empirical dispersion correction. Our estimate of the exfoliation energy for black-P of -151 meV/atom is substantially larger than that of graphite, suggesting the need for different strategies to generate isolated layers for these two systems. PMID:26651397

  13. Consistent Estimates of Tsunami Energy Show Promise for Improved Early Warning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titov, V.; Song, Y. Tony; Tang, L.; Bernard, E. N.; Bar-Sever, Y.; Wei, Y.

    2016-05-01

    Early tsunami warning critically hinges on rapid determination of the tsunami hazard potential in real-time, before waves inundate critical coastlines. Tsunami energy can quickly characterize the destructive potential of generated waves. Traditional seismic analysis is inadequate to accurately predict a tsunami's energy. Recently, two independent approaches have been proposed to determine tsunami source energy: one inverted from the Deep-ocean Assessment and Reporting of Tsunamis (DART) data during the tsunami propagation, and the other derived from the land-based coastal global positioning system (GPS) during tsunami generation. Here, we focus on assessing these two approaches with data from the March 11, 2011 Japanese tsunami. While the GPS approach takes into consideration the dynamic earthquake process, the DART inversion approach provides the actual tsunami energy estimation of the propagating tsunami waves; both approaches lead to consistent energy scales for previously studied tsunamis. Encouraged by these promising results, we examined a real-time approach to determine tsunami source energy by combining these two methods: first, determine the tsunami source from the globally expanding GPS network immediately after an earthquake for near-field early warnings; and then to refine the tsunami energy estimate from nearby DART measurements for improving forecast accuracy and early cancelations. The combination of these two real-time networks may offer an appealing opportunity for: early determination of the tsunami threat for the purpose of saving more lives, and early cancelation of tsunami warnings to avoid unnecessary false alarms.

  14. Dorsomedial prefrontal cortex activity predicts the accuracy in estimating others' preferences

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Pyungwon; Lee, Jongbin; Sul, Sunhae; Kim, Hackjin

    2013-01-01

    The ability to accurately estimate another person's preferences is crucial for a successful social life. In daily interactions, we often do this on the basis of minimal information. The aims of the present study were (a) to examine whether people can accurately judge others based only on a brief exposure to their appearances, and (b) to reveal the underlying neural mechanisms with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Participants were asked to make guesses about unfamiliar target individuals' preferences for various items after looking at their faces for 3 s. The behavioral results showed that participants estimated others' preferences above chance level. The fMRI data revealed that higher accuracy in preference estimation was associated with greater activity in the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex (DMPFC) when participants were guessing the targets' preferences relative to thinking about their own preferences. These findings suggest that accurate estimations of others' preferences may require increased activity in the DMPFC. A functional connectivity analysis revealed that higher accuracy in preference estimation was related to increased functional connectivity between the DMPFC and the brain regions that are known to be involved in theory of mind processing, such as the temporoparietal junction (TPJ) and the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC)/precuneus, during correct vs. incorrect guessing trials. On the contrary, the tendency to refer to self-preferences when estimating others' preference was related to greater activity in the ventromedial prefrontal cortex. These findings imply that the DMPFC may be a core region in estimating the preferences of others and that higher accuracy may require stronger communication between the DMPFC and the TPJ and PCC/precuneus, part of a neural network known to be engaged in mentalizing. PMID:24324419

  15. Simple Activity Demonstrates Wind Energy Principles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roman, Harry T.

    2012-01-01

    Wind energy is an exciting and clean energy option often described as the fastest-growing energy system on the planet. With some simple materials, teachers can easily demonstrate its key principles in their classroom. (Contains 1 figure and 2 tables.)

  16. Assimilation of active and passive microwave observations for improved estimates of soil moisture and crop growth

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An Ensemble Kalman Filter-based data assimilation framework that links a crop growth model with active and passive (AP) microwave models was developed to improve estimates of soil moisture (SM) and vegetation biomass over a growing season of soybean. Complementarities in AP observations were incorpo...

  17. Estimates of genetic parameters among scale activity scores, growth, and fatness in pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genetic parameters for scale activity score were estimated from generations 5, 6, and 7 of a randomly selected, composite population composed of Duroc, Large White, and two sources of Landrace (n = 2,186). At approximately 156 d of age, pigs were weighed (WT) and ultrasound backfat measurements (BF1...

  18. 78 FR 46597 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Comment Request for the Production Estimate (2 Forms)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-01

    ....S. Geological Survey Agency Information Collection Activities: Comment Request for the Production...). SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. Abstract This collection is needed to provide data on mineral production for... OMB Control Number: 1028-0065. Form Numbers: 9-4042-A and 9-4124-A. Title: Production Estimate....

  19. National Alliance of Clean Energy Incubator Activities - Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Chris Downing, P.E.

    2004-12-14

    Summary of activity related to development of the Alliance of Clean Energy Business Incubators and incubation services provided to the clean energy sector by the Advanced Technology Development Center at the Georgia Institute of Technology.

  20. Solar-energy absorber: Active infrared (IR) trap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brantley, L. W., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    Efficiency of solar-energy absorbers may be improved to 95% by actively cooling their intermediate glass plates. This approach may be of interest to manufacturers of solar absorbers and to engineers and scientists developing new sources of energy.

  1. Validity of estimating minute-by-minute energy expenditure of continuous walking bouts by accelerometry

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Objective measurement of physical activity remains an important challenge. For wearable monitors such as accelerometer-based physical activity monitors, more accurate methods are needed to convert activity counts into energy expenditure (EE). Purpose The purpose of this study was to examine the accuracy of the refined Crouter 2-Regression Model (C2RM) for estimating EE during the transition from rest to walking and walking to rest. A secondary purpose was to determine the extent of overestimation in minute-by-minute EE between the refined C2RM and the 2006 C2RM. Methods Thirty volunteers (age, 28 ± 7.7 yrs) performed 15 minutes of seated rest, 8 minutes of over-ground walking, and 8 minutes of seated rest. An ActiGraph GT1M accelerometer and Cosmed K4b2 portable metabolic system were worn during all activities. Participants were randomly assigned to start the walking bout at 0, 20, or 40 s into the minute (according to the ActiGraph clock). Acceleration data were analyzed by two methods: 2006 Crouter model and a new refined model. Results The 2006 Crouter 2-Regression model over-predicted measured kcal kg-1 hr-1 during the first and last transitional minutes of the 20-s and 40-s walking conditions (P < 0.001). It also over-predicted the average EE for a walking bout (4.0 ± 0.5 kcal kg-1 hr-1), compared to both the measured kcal kg-1 hr-1 (3.6 ± 0.7 kcal kg-1 hr-1) and the refined Crouter model (3.5 ± 0.5 kcal kg-1 hr-1) (P < 0.05). Conclusion The 2006 Crouter 2-regression model over-predicts EE at the beginning and end of walking bouts, due to high variability in accelerometer counts during the transitional minutes. The new refined model eliminates this problem and results in a more accurate prediction of EE during walking. PMID:21864359

  2. An Estimate of Energy Use in Laboratories, Cleanrooms, and Data Centers in New York

    SciTech Connect

    Mathew, Paul

    2008-10-01

    Laboratories, cleanrooms and data centers are very energy-intensive. For example, laboratories are typically three to eight times as energy intensive as a typical office building, and a data center may be as much as 20-50 times as energy intensive as a typical office building. This technical note presents an estimate of the total energy use in laboratories, cleanrooms and data centers in New York. There is generally very limited data on energy use in the high tech sector, both at the national and state level. Since it was beyond the scope of this project to develop primary data through surveys, the analysis relied primarily on the use of proxy indicators and extrapolation from national data where available. The results for each building type are summarized below in table E-1 and figure E-1.

  3. Attempting to bridge the gap between laboratory and seismic estimates of fracture energy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGarr, A.; Fletcher, Joe B.; Beeler, N.M.

    2004-01-01

    To investigate the behavior of the fracture energy associated with expanding the rupture zone of an earthquake, we have used the results of a large-scale, biaxial stick-slip friction experiment to set the parameters of an equivalent dynamic rupture model. This model is determined by matching the fault slip, the static stress drop and the apparent stress. After confirming that the fracture energy associated with this model earthquake is in reasonable agreement with corresponding laboratory values, we can use it to determine fracture energies for earthquakes as functions of stress drop, rupture velocity and fault slip. If we take account of the state of stress at seismogenic depths, the model extrapolation to larger fault slips yields fracture energies that agree with independent estimates by others based on dynamic rupture models for large earthquakes. For fixed stress drop and rupture speed, the fracture energy scales linearly with fault slip.

  4. Improving global fire carbon emissions estimates by combining moderate resolution burned area and active fire observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randerson, J. T.; Chen, Y.; Giglio, L.; Rogers, B. M.; van der Werf, G.

    2011-12-01

    In several important biomes, including croplands and tropical forests, many small fires exist that have sizes that are well below the detection limit for the current generation of burned area products derived from moderate resolution spectroradiometers. These fires likely have important effects on greenhouse gas and aerosol emissions and regional air quality. Here we developed an approach for combining 1km thermal anomalies (active fires; MOD14A2) and 500m burned area observations (MCD64A1) to estimate the prevalence of these fires and their likely contribution to burned area and carbon emissions. We first estimated active fires within and outside of 500m burn scars in 0.5 degree grid cells during 2001-2010 for which MCD64A1 burned area observations were available. For these two sets of active fires we then examined mean fire radiative power (FRP) and changes in enhanced vegetation index (EVI) derived from 16-day intervals immediately before and after each active fire observation. To estimate the burned area associated with sub-500m fires, we first applied burned area to active fire ratios derived solely from within burned area perimeters to active fires outside of burn perimeters. In a second step, we further modified our sub-500m burned area estimates using EVI changes from active fires outside and within of burned areas (after subtracting EVI changes derived from control regions). We found that in northern and southern Africa savanna regions and in Central and South America dry forest regions, the number of active fires outside of MCD64A1 burned areas increased considerably towards the end of the fire season. EVI changes for active fires outside of burn perimeters were, on average, considerably smaller than EVI changes associated with active fires inside burn scars, providing evidence for burn scars that were substantially smaller than the 25 ha area of a single 500m pixel. FRP estimates also were lower for active fires outside of burn perimeters. In our

  5. The TileCal Online Energy Estimation for the Next LHC Operation Period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotto-Maior Peralva, B.; ATLAS Collaboration

    2015-05-01

    The ATLAS Tile Calorimeter (TileCal) is the detector used in the reconstruction of hadrons, jets and missing transverse energy from the proton-proton collisions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). It covers the central part of the ATLAS detector (|η| < 1.6). The energy deposited by the particles is read out by approximately 5,000 cells, with double readout channels. The signal provided by the readout electronics for each channel is digitized at 40 MHz and its amplitude is estimated by an optimal filtering algorithm, which expects a single signal with a well-defined shape. However, the LHC luminosity is expected to increase leading to pile-up that deforms the signal of interest. Due to limited resources, the current hardware setup, which is based on Digital Signal Processors (DSP), does not allow the implementation of sophisticated energy estimation methods that deal with the pile-up. Therefore, the technique to be employed for online energy estimation in TileCal for next LHC operation period must be based on fast filters such as the Optimal Filter (OF) and the Matched Filter (MF). Both the OF and MF methods envisage the use of the background second order statistics in its design, more precisely the covariance matrix. However, the identity matrix has been used to describe this quantity. Although this approximation can be valid for low luminosity LHC, it leads to biased estimators under pile- up conditions. Since most of the TileCal cell present low occupancy, the pile-up, which is often modeled by a non-Gaussian distribution, can be seen as outlier events. Consequently, the classical covariance matrix estimation does not describe correctly the second order statistics of the background for the majority of the events, as this approach is very sensitive to outliers. As a result, the OF (or MF) coefficients are miscalculated leading to a larger variance and biased energy estimator. This work evaluates the usage of a robust covariance estimator, namely the Minimum

  6. Energy Estimation of Cosmic Rays with the Engineering Radio Array of the Pierre Auger Observatory

    SciTech Connect

    Aab, Alexander

    2015-08-19

    The Auger Engineering Radio Array (AERA) is part of the Pierre Auger Observatory and is used to detect the radio emission of cosmic-ray air showers. These observations are compared to the data of the surface detector stations of the Observatory, which provide well-calibrated information on the cosmic-ray energies and arrival directions. The response of the radio stations in the 30 to 80MHz regime has been thoroughly calibrated to enable the reconstruction of the incoming electric field. For the latter, the energy density is determined from the radio pulses at each observer position and is interpolated using a two dimensional function that takes into account signal asymmetries due to interference between the geomagnetic and charge excess emission components. We found that the spatial integral over the signal distribution gives a direct measurement of the energy transferred from the primary cosmic ray into radio emission in the AERA frequency range. We measure 15.8MeV of radiation energy for a 1 EeV air shower arriving perpendicularly to the geomagnetic field. This radiation energy – corrected for geometrical effects – is used as a cosmic-ray energy estimator. Performing an absolute energy calibration against the surface-detector information, we observe that this radio-energy estimator scales quadratically with the cosmic-ray energy as expected for coherent emission. Finally we find an energy resolution of the radio reconstruction of 22% for the data set and 17% for a high-quality subset containing only events with at least five radio stations with signal.

  7. Energy Estimation of Cosmic Rays with the Engineering Radio Array of the Pierre Auger Observatory

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Aab, Alexander

    2016-06-14

    The Auger Engineering Radio Array (AERA) is part of the Pierre Auger Observatory and is used to detect the radio emission of cosmic-ray air showers. These observations are compared to the data of the surface detector stations of the Observatory, which provide well-calibrated information on the cosmic-ray energies and arrival directions. The response of the radio stations in the 30 to 80MHz regime has been thoroughly calibrated to enable the reconstruction of the incoming electric field. For the latter, the energy density is determined from the radio pulses at each observer position and is interpolated using a two dimensional functionmore » that takes into account signal asymmetries due to interference between the geomagnetic and charge excess emission components. We found that the spatial integral over the signal distribution gives a direct measurement of the energy transferred from the primary cosmic ray into radio emission in the AERA frequency range. We measure 15.8MeV of radiation energy for a 1 EeV air shower arriving perpendicularly to the geomagnetic field. This radiation energy – corrected for geometrical effects – is used as a cosmic-ray energy estimator. Performing an absolute energy calibration against the surface-detector information, we observe that this radio-energy estimator scales quadratically with the cosmic-ray energy as expected for coherent emission. Finally we find an energy resolution of the radio reconstruction of 22% for the data set and 17% for a high-quality subset containing only events with at least five radio stations with signal.« less

  8. Potential of Solar Energy in Kota Kinabalu, Sabah: An Estimate Using a Photovoltaic System Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markos, F. M.; Sentian, J.

    2016-04-01

    Solar energy is becoming popular as an alternative renewable energy to conventional energy source, particularly in the tropics, where duration and intensity of solar radiation are longer. This study is to assess the potential of solar energy generated from solar for Kota Kinabalu, a rapidly developing city in the State of Sabah, Malaysia. A year data of solar radiation was obtained using pyranometer, which was located at Universiti Malaysia Sabah (6.0367° N, 116.1186° E). It was concluded that the annual average solar radiation received in Kota Kinabalu was 182 W/m2. In estimating the potential energy generated from solar for Kota Kinabalu city area, a photovoltaic (PV) system model was used. The results showed that, Kota Kinabalu is estimated to produce 29,794 kWh/m2 of electricity from the solar radiation received in a year. This is equivalent to 0.014 MW of electricity produced just by using one solar panel. Considering the power demand in Sabah by 2020 is 1,331 MW, this model showed that the solar energy can contribute around 4% of energy for power demand, with 1 MW capacity of the PV system. 1 MW of PV system installation will require about 0.0328% from total area of the city. This assessment could suggest that, exploration for solar power energy as an alternative source of renewable energy in the city can be optimised and designed to attain significant higher percentage of contribution to the energy demand in the state.

  9. Effects of Activation Energy to Transient Response of Semiconductor Gas Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimoto, Akira; Ohtani, Tatsuki

    The smell classifiable gas sensor will be desired for many applications such as gas detection alarms, process controls for food production and so on. We have tried to realize the sensor using transient responses of semiconductor gas sensor consisting of tin dioxide and pointed out that the sensor gave us different transient responses for kinds of gas. Results of model calculation showed the activation energy of chemical reaction on the sensor surface strongly depended on the transient response. We tried to estimate the activation energies by molecular orbital calculation with SnO2 Cluster. The results show that there is a liner relationship between the gradient of the transient responses and activation energies for carboxylic and alcoholic gases. Transient response will be predicted from activation energy in the same kind of gas and the smell discrimination by single semiconductor gas sensor will be realized by this relationship.

  10. How number line estimation skills relate to neural activations in single digit subtraction problems.

    PubMed

    Berteletti, I; Man, G; Booth, J R

    2015-02-15

    The Number Line (NL) task requires judging the relative numerical magnitude of a number and estimating its value spatially on a continuous line. Children's skill on this task has been shown to correlate with and predict future mathematical competence. Neurofunctionally, this task has been shown to rely on brain regions involved in numerical processing. However, there is no direct evidence that performance on the NL task is related to brain areas recruited during arithmetical processing and that these areas are domain-specific to numerical processing. In this study, we test whether 8- to 14-year-old's behavioral performance on the NL task is related to fMRI activation during small and large single-digit subtraction problems. Domain-specific areas for numerical processing were independently localized through a numerosity judgment task. Results show a direct relation between NL estimation performance and the amount of the activation in key areas for arithmetical processing. Better NL estimators showed a larger problem size effect than poorer NL estimators in numerical magnitude (i.e., intraparietal sulcus) and visuospatial areas (i.e., posterior superior parietal lobules), marked by less activation for small problems. In addition, the direction of the activation with problem size within the IPS was associated with differences in accuracies for small subtraction problems. This study is the first to show that performance in the NL task, i.e. estimating the spatial position of a number on an interval, correlates with brain activity observed during single-digit subtraction problem in regions thought to be involved in numerical magnitude and spatial processes. PMID:25497398

  11. Updated estimation of energy efficiencies of U.S. petroleum refineries.

    SciTech Connect

    Palou-Rivera, I.; Wang, M. Q.

    2010-12-08

    Evaluation of life-cycle (or well-to-wheels, WTW) energy and emission impacts of vehicle/fuel systems requires energy use (or energy efficiencies) of energy processing or conversion activities. In most such studies, petroleum fuels are included. Thus, determination of energy efficiencies of petroleum refineries becomes a necessary step for life-cycle analyses of vehicle/fuel systems. Petroleum refinery energy efficiencies can then be used to determine the total amount of process energy use for refinery operation. Furthermore, since refineries produce multiple products, allocation of energy use and emissions associated with petroleum refineries to various petroleum products is needed for WTW analysis of individual fuels such as gasoline and diesel. In particular, GREET, the life-cycle model developed at Argonne National Laboratory with DOE sponsorship, compares energy use and emissions of various transportation fuels including gasoline and diesel. Energy use in petroleum refineries is key components of well-to-pump (WTP) energy use and emissions of gasoline and diesel. In GREET, petroleum refinery overall energy efficiencies are used to determine petroleum product specific energy efficiencies. Argonne has developed petroleum refining efficiencies from LP simulations of petroleum refineries and EIA survey data of petroleum refineries up to 2006 (see Wang, 2008). This memo documents Argonne's most recent update of petroleum refining efficiencies.

  12. Simplifications of Simulation on Energy Balances and Estimations of a Hybrid Renewable Energy System for Use in Cold Climate Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akpan, Itoro Etim; Sasaki, Masafumi; Endoh, Noboru

    A simplified double grade meteorological data model for the simulation of the annual performance of a domestic-size renewable energy system is proposed. With the model, only two representative days (clearest and cloudiest) during each season of the year are necessary to estimate annual energy balances, carbon emissions and the running costs. The model was chosen in preference to other simplified models based on the error distributions from the results of the continuous simulations in a test period. Detailed numerical simulation studies show that the carbon emissions from the renewable energy system are about 16%of a comparable conventional system. The thermal energy produced by a solar collector during the winter season, however, is insufficient to meet all the loads so that frequent heat pump operations and the auxiliary boiler are necessary in cold climate regions.

  13. Quadratic Zeeman effect in hydrogen Rydberg states: Rigorous error estimates for energy eigenvalues, energy eigenfunctions, and oscillator strengths

    SciTech Connect

    Falsaperla, P.; Fonte, G. Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Catania, Corso Italia 57, I-95129 Catania )

    1994-10-01

    A variational method, based on some results due to T. Kato [Proc. Phys. Soc. Jpn. 4, 334 (1949)], and previously discussed is here applied to the hydrogen atom in uniform magnetic fields of tesla in order to calculate, with a rigorous error estimate, energy eigenvalues, energy eigenfunctions, and oscillator strengths relative to Rydberg states up to just below the field-free ionization threshold. Making use of a basis (parabolic Sturmian basis) with a size varying from 990 up to 5050, we obtain, over the energy range of [minus]190 to [minus]24 cm[sup [minus]1], all of the eigenvalues and a good part of the oscillator strengths with a remarkable accuracy. This, however, decreases with increasing excitation energy and, thus, above [similar to][minus]24 cm[sup [minus]1], we obtain results of good accuracy only for eigenvalues ranging up to [similar to][minus]12 cm[sup [minus]1].

  14. Review of Evaluation, Measurement and Verification Approaches Used to Estimate the Load Impacts and Effectiveness of Energy Efficiency Programs

    SciTech Connect

    Messenger, Mike; Bharvirkar, Ranjit; Golemboski, Bill; Goldman, Charles A.; Schiller, Steven R.

    2010-04-14

    Public and private funding for end-use energy efficiency actions is expected to increase significantly in the United States over the next decade. For example, Barbose et al (2009) estimate that spending on ratepayer-funded energy efficiency programs in the U.S. could increase from $3.1 billion in 2008 to $7.5 and 12.4 billion by 2020 under their medium and high scenarios. This increase in spending could yield annual electric energy savings ranging from 0.58% - 0.93% of total U.S. retail sales in 2020, up from 0.34% of retail sales in 2008. Interest in and support for energy efficiency has broadened among national and state policymakers. Prominent examples include {approx}$18 billion in new funding for energy efficiency programs (e.g., State Energy Program, Weatherization, and Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grants) in the 2009 American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). Increased funding for energy efficiency should result in more benefits as well as more scrutiny of these results. As energy efficiency becomes a more prominent component of the U.S. national energy strategy and policies, assessing the effectiveness and energy saving impacts of energy efficiency programs is likely to become increasingly important for policymakers and private and public funders of efficiency actions. Thus, it is critical that evaluation, measurement, and verification (EM&V) is carried out effectively and efficiently, which implies that: (1) Effective program evaluation, measurement, and verification (EM&V) methodologies and tools are available to key stakeholders (e.g., regulatory agencies, program administrators, consumers, and evaluation consultants); and (2) Capacity (people and infrastructure resources) is available to conduct EM&V activities and report results in ways that support program improvement and provide data that reliably compares achieved results against goals and similar programs in other jurisdictions (benchmarking). The National Action Plan for Energy

  15. Comparison of Four Different Energy Balance Models for Estimating Evapotranspiration in the Midwest United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, R. K.; Senay, G. B.; Verdin, J. P.

    2015-12-01

    Availability of no-cost satellite images helped in development and utilization of remotely sensed images for water use estimation. Remotely sensed images are increasingly used for estimating evapotranspiration (ET) at different temporal and spatial scales. However, selecting any particular model from a plethora of energy balance models for estimating ET is challenging as each different model has its strengths and limitations. We compared four commonly used ET models, namely, Mapping EvapoTranspiration at high Resolution with Internalized Calibration (METRIC) model, Surface Energy Balance Algorithm for Land (SEBAL) model, Surface Energy Balance System (SEBS) model, and Operational Simplified Surface Energy Balance (SSEBop) model using Landsat images for estimating ET in the Midwest United States. We validated our model results using three AmeriFlux cropland sites at Mead, Nebraska. Our results showed that the METRIC and the SSEBop model worked very well at these sites with a root mean square error (RMSE) of less than 1 mm/day and an R2 of 0.96 (N=24). The mean bias error (MBE) was less than 10% for both the METRIC and the SSEBop models. In contrast, the SEBAL and the SEBS models have relatively higher RMSE (> 1.7 mm/day) and MBE (> 27%). However, all four models captured the spatial and temporal variation of ET reasonably well (R2 > 0.80). We found that the model simplification of the SSEBop for operational capability was not at the expense of model accuracy. Since the SSEBop model is relatively less data intensive and independent of user/automatic selection of anchor (hot/dry and cold/wet) pixels, it is more user friendly and operationally efficient. The SSEBop model can be reliably used for estimating water use using Landsat and MODIS images at daily, weekly, monthly, or annual time scale even in data scarce regions for sustainable use of limited water resources.

  16. Resource Evaluation and Energy Production Estimate for a Tidal Energy Conversion Installation using Acoustic Flow Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagnon, Ian; Baldwin, Ken; Wosnik, Martin

    2015-11-01

    The ``Living Bridge'' project plans to install a tidal turbine at Memorial Bridge in the Piscataqua River at Portsmouth, NH. A spatio-temporal tidal energy resource assessment was performed using long term bottom-deployed Acoustic Doppler Current Profilers ADCP. Two locations were evaluated: at the planned deployment location and mid-channel. The goal was to determine the amount of available kinetic energy that can be converted into usable electrical energy on the bridge. Changes in available kinetic energy with ebb/flood and spring/neap tidal cycles and electrical energy demand were analyzed. A system model is used to calculate the net energy savings using various tidal generator and battery bank configurations. Differences in the tidal characteristics between the two measurement locations are highlighted. Different resource evaluation methodologies were also analyzed, e.g., using a representative ADCP ``bin'' vs. a more refined, turbine-geometry-specific methodology, and using static bin height vs. bin height that move w.r.t. the free surface throughout a tidal cycle (representative of a bottom-fixed or floating turbine deployment, respectively). ADCP operating frequencies and bin sizes affect the standard deviation of measurements, and measurement uncertainties are evaluated. Supported by NSF-IIP grant 1430260.

  17. Methods to estimate aspects of physical activity and sedentary behavior from high-frequency wrist accelerometer measurements.

    PubMed

    Staudenmayer, John; He, Shai; Hickey, Amanda; Sasaki, Jeffer; Freedson, Patty

    2015-08-15

    This investigation developed models to estimate aspects of physical activity and sedentary behavior from three-axis high-frequency wrist-worn accelerometer data. The models were developed and tested on 20 participants (n = 10 males, n = 10 females, mean age = 24.1, mean body mass index = 23.9), who wore an ActiGraph GT3X+ accelerometer on their dominant wrist and an ActiGraph GT3X on the hip while performing a variety of scripted activities. Energy expenditure was concurrently measured by a portable indirect calorimetry system. Those calibration data were then used to develop and assess both machine-learning and simpler models with fewer unknown parameters (linear regression and decision trees) to estimate metabolic equivalent scores (METs) and to classify activity intensity, sedentary time, and locomotion time. The wrist models, applied to 15-s windows, estimated METs [random forest: root mean squared error (rSME) = 1.21 METs, hip: rMSE = 1.67 METs] and activity intensity (random forest: 75% correct, hip: 60% correct) better than a previously developed model that used counts per minute measured at the hip. In a separate set of comparisons, the simpler decision trees classified activity intensity (random forest: 75% correct, tree: 74% correct), sedentary time (random forest: 96% correct, decision tree: 97% correct), and locomotion time (random forest: 99% correct, decision tree: 96% correct) nearly as well or better than the machine-learning approaches. Preliminary investigation of the models' performance on two free-living people suggests that they may work well outside of controlled conditions. PMID:26112238

  18. Sea ice-atmospheric interaction: Application of multispectral satellite data in polar surface energy flux estimates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffen, Konrad; Key, J.; Maslanik, J.; Schweiger, A.

    1993-01-01

    This is the third annual report on: Sea Ice-Atmosphere Interaction - Application of Multispectral Satellite Data in Polar Surface Energy Flux Estimates. The main emphasis during the past year was on: radiative flux estimates from satellite data; intercomparison of satellite and ground-based cloud amounts; radiative cloud forcing; calibration of the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) visible channels and comparison of two satellite derived albedo data sets; and on flux modeling for leads. Major topics covered are arctic clouds and radiation; snow and ice albedo, and leads and modeling.

  19. Seismic Wave Attenuation Estimated from Tectonic Tremor and Radiated Energy in Tremor for Various Subduction Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yabe, S.; Baltay, A.; Ide, S.; Beroza, G. C.

    2013-12-01

    Ground motion prediction is an essential component of earthquake hazard assessment. Seismic wave attenuation with distance is an important, yet difficult to constrain, factor for such estimation. Using the empirical method of ground motion prediction equations (GMPEs), seismic wave attenuation with distance, which includes both the effect of anelastic attenuation and scattering, can be estimated from the distance decay of peak ground velocity (PGV) or peak ground acceleration (PGA) of ordinary earthquakes; however, in some regions where plate-boundary earthquakes are infrequent, such as Cascadia and Nankai, there are fewer data with which to constrain the empirical parameters. In both of those subduction zones, tectonic tremor occurs often. In this study, we use tectonic tremor to estimate the seismic wave attenuation with distance, and in turn use the attenuation results to estimate the radiated seismic energy of tremor. Our primary interest is in the variations among subduction zones. Ground motion attenuation and the distribution of released seismic energy from tremors are two important subduction zone characteristics. Therefore, it is very interesting to see whether there are variations of these parameters in different subduction zones, or regionally within the same subduction zone. It is also useful to estimate how much energy is released by tectonic tremor from accumulated energy to help understand subduction dynamics and the difference between ordinary earthquakes and tremor. We use the tectonic tremor catalog of Ide (2012) in Nankai, Cascadia, Mexico and southern Chile. We measured PGV and PGA of individual tremor bursts at each station. We assume a simple GMPE relationship and estimate seismic attenuation and relative site amplification factors from the data. In the Nankai subduction zone, there are almost no earthquakes on the plate interface, but intra-slab earthquakes occur frequently. Both the seismic wave attenuation with distance and the site

  20. NREL Study Finds U.S. Wind Energy Potential Triples Previous Estimates (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-02-01

    The maximum potential to generate wind power in the contiguous United States is more than three times greater than previously estimated, according to a National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) study. The new analysis is based on the latest computer models and examines the wind potential at wind turbine hub heights of 80 meters and 100 meters. These hub heights, which reflect current and future models of wind turbines, are higher than those used in previous national estimates and are mainly responsible for the increased wind potential in the study.

  1. Estimation of bone Calcium-to-Phosphorous mass ratio using dual-energy nonlinear polynomial functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotiropoulou, P.; Koukou, V.; Martini, N.; Michail, C.; Kounadi, E.; Kandarakis, I.; Nikiforidis, G.; Fountos, G.

    2015-09-01

    In this study an analytical approximation of dual-energy inverse functions is presented for the estimation of the calcium-to-phosphorous (Ca/P) mass ratio, which is a crucial parameter in bone health. Bone quality could be examined by the X-ray dual-energy method (XDEM), in terms of bone tissue material properties. Low- and high-energy, log- intensity measurements were combined by using a nonlinear function, to cancel out the soft tissue structures and generate the dual energy bone Ca/P mass ratio. The dual-energy simulated data were obtained using variable Ca and PO4 thicknesses on a fixed total tissue thickness. The XDEM simulations were based on a bone phantom. Inverse fitting functions with least-squares estimation were used to obtain the fitting coefficients and to calculate the thickness of each material. The examined inverse mapping functions were linear, quadratic, and cubic. For every thickness, the nonlinear quadratic function provided the optimal fitting accuracy while requiring relative few terms. The dual-energy method, simulated in this work could be used to quantify bone Ca/P mass ratio with photon-counting detectors.

  2. Tidal Energy Conversion Installation at an Estuarine Bridge Site: Resource Evaluation and Energy Production Estimate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wosnik, M.; Gagnon, I.; Baldwin, K.; Bell, E.

    2015-12-01

    The "Living Bridge" project aims to create a self-diagnosing, self-reporting "smart bridge" powered by a local renewable energy source, tidal energy - transforming Memorial Bridge, a vertical lift bridge over the tidal Piscataqua River connecting Portsmouth, NH and Kittery, ME, into a living laboratory for researchers, engineers, scientists, and the community. The Living Bridge project includes the installation of a tidal turbine at the Memorial Bridge. The energy converted by the turbine will power structural health monitoring, environmental and underwater instrumentation. Utilizing locally available tidal energy can make bridge operation more sustainable, can "harden" transportation infrastructure against prolonged grid outages and can demonstrate a prototype of an "estuarine bridge of the future". A spatio-temporal tidal energy resource assessment was performed using long term bottom-deployed Acoustic Doppler Current Profilers (ADCP) at two locations: near the planned deployment location in 2013-14 for 123 days and mid-channel in 2007 for 35 days. Data were evaluated to determine the amount of available kinetic energy that can be converted into usable electrical energy on the bridge. Changes in available kinetic energy with ebb/flood and spring/neap tidal cycles and electrical energy demand were analyzed. The target deployment site exhibited significantly more energetic ebb tides than flood tides, which can be explained by the local bathymetry of the tidal estuary. A system model is used to calculate the net energy savings using various tidal generator and battery bank configurations. Different resource evaluation methodologies were also analyzed, e.g., using a representative ADCP "bin" vs. a more refined, turbine-geometry-specific methodology, and using static bin height vs. bin height that move w.r.t. the free surface throughout a tidal cycle (representative of a bottom-fixed or floating turbine deployment, respectively). ADCP operating frequencies and bin

  3. Robust system state estimation for active suspension control in high-speed tilting trains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Ronghui; Zolotas, Argyrios; Goodall, Roger

    2014-05-01

    The interaction between the railway vehicle body roll and lateral dynamics substantially influences the tilting system performance in high-speed tilting trains, which results in a potential poor ride comfort and high risk of motion sickness. Integrating active lateral secondary suspension into the tilting control system is one of the solutions to provide a remedy to roll-lateral interaction. It improves the design trade-off for the local tilt control (based only upon local vehicle measurements) between straight track ride comfort and curving performance. Advanced system state estimation technology can be applied to further enhance the system performance, i.e. by using the estimated vehicle body lateral acceleration (relative to the track) and true cant deficiency in the configuration of the tilt and lateral active suspension controllers, thus to further attenuate the system dynamics coupling. Robust H∞ filtering is investigated in this paper aiming to offer a robust estimation (i.e. estimation in the presence of uncertainty) for the required variables, In particular, it can minimise the maximum estimation error and thus be more robust to system parametric uncertainty. Simulation results illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed schemes.

  4. Sea ice - atmosphere interaction: Application of multispectral satellite data in polar surface energy flux estimates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffen, Konrad; Schweiger, A.; Maslanik, J.; Key, J.; Haefliger, M.; Weaver, R.

    1991-01-01

    In the past six months, work has continued on energy flux sensitivity studies, ice surface temperature retrievals, corrections to Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) thermal infrared data, modelling of cloud fraction retrievals, and radiation climatologies. We tentatively conclude that the SSM/I may not provide accurate enough estimates of ice concentration and type to improve our shorter term energy flux estimates. SSM/I derived parameters may still be applicable in longer term climatological flux characterizations. We hold promise for a system coupling observation to a ice deformation model. Such a model may provide information on ice distribution which can be used in energy flux calculations. Considerable variation was found in modelled energy flux estimates when bulk transfer coefficients are modulated by lead fetch. It is still unclear what the optimum formulation is and this will be the subject of further work. Data sets for ice surface temperature retrievals were assembled and preliminary data analysis was started. Finally, construction of a conceptual framework for further modelling of the Arctic radiation flux climatology was started.

  5. Comparison of four different energy balance models for estimating evapotranspiration in the Midwestern United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Singh, Ramesh K.; Senay, Gabriel B.

    2016-01-01

    The development of different energy balance models has allowed users to choose a model based on its suitability in a region. We compared four commonly used models—Mapping EvapoTranspiration at high Resolution with Internalized Calibration (METRIC) model, Surface Energy Balance Algorithm for Land (SEBAL) model, Surface Energy Balance System (SEBS) model, and the Operational Simplified Surface Energy Balance (SSEBop) model—using Landsat images to estimate evapotranspiration (ET) in the Midwestern United States. Our models validation using three AmeriFlux cropland sites at Mead, Nebraska, showed that all four models captured the spatial and temporal variation of ET reasonably well with an R2 of more than 0.81. Both the METRIC and SSEBop models showed a low root mean square error (<0.93 mm·day−1) and a high Nash–Sutcliffe coefficient of efficiency (>0.80), whereas the SEBAL and SEBS models resulted in relatively higher bias for estimating daily ET. The empirical equation of daily average net radiation used in the SEBAL and SEBS models for upscaling instantaneous ET to daily ET resulted in underestimation of daily ET, particularly when the daily average net radiation was more than 100 W·m−2. Estimated daily ET for both cropland and grassland had some degree of linearity with METRIC, SEBAL, and SEBS, but linearity was stronger for evaporative fraction. Thus, these ET models have strengths and limitations for applications in water resource management.

  6. Joint maximum likelihood estimation of activation and Hemodynamic Response Function for fMRI.

    PubMed

    Bazargani, Negar; Nosratinia, Aria

    2014-07-01

    Blood Oxygen Level Dependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) maps the brain activity by measuring blood oxygenation level, which is related to brain activity via a temporal impulse response function known as the Hemodynamic Response Function (HRF). The HRF varies from subject to subject and within areas of the brain, therefore a knowledge of HRF is necessary for accurately computing voxel activations. Conversely a knowledge of active voxels is highly beneficial for estimating the HRF. This work presents a joint maximum likelihood estimation of HRF and activation based on low-rank matrix approximations operating on regions of interest (ROI). Since each ROI has limited data, a smoothing constraint on the HRF is employed via Tikhonov regularization. The method is analyzed under both white noise and colored noise. Experiments with synthetic data show that accurate estimation of the HRF is possible with this method without prior assumptions on the exact shape of the HRF. Further experiments involving real fMRI experiments with auditory stimuli are used to validate the proposed method. PMID:24835179

  7. Waste-recycling Monte Carlo with optimal estimates: application to free energy calculations in alloys.

    PubMed

    Adjanor, Gilles; Athènes, Manuel; Rodgers, Jocelyn M

    2011-07-28

    The estimator proposed recently by Delmas and Jourdain for waste-recycling Monte Carlo achieves variance reduction optimally with respect to a control variate that is evaluated directly using the simulation data. Here, the performance of this estimator is assessed numerically for free energy calculations in generic binary alloys and is compared to those of other estimators taken from the literature. A systematic investigation with varying simulation parameters of a simplified system, the anti-ferromagnetic Ising model, is first carried out in the transmutation ensemble using path-sampling. We observe numerically that (i) the variance of the Delmas-Jourdain estimator is indeed reduced compared to that of other estimators; and that (ii) the resulting reduction is close to the maximal possible one, despite the inaccuracy in the estimated control variate. More extensive path-sampling simulations involving an FeCr alloy system described by a many-body potential additionally show that (iii) gradual transmutations accommodate the atomic frustrations; thus, alleviating the numerical ergodicity issue present in numerous alloy systems and eventually enabling the determination of phase coexistence conditions. PMID:21806110

  8. Active galactic nucleus black hole mass estimates in the era of time domain astronomy

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, Brandon C.; Treu, Tommaso; Pancoast, Anna; Malkan, Matthew; Woo, Jong-Hak

    2013-12-20

    We investigate the dependence of the normalization of the high-frequency part of the X-ray and optical power spectral densities (PSDs) on black hole mass for a sample of 39 active galactic nuclei (AGNs) with black hole masses estimated from reverberation mapping or dynamical modeling. We obtained new Swift observations of PG 1426+015, which has the largest estimated black hole mass of the AGNs in our sample. We develop a novel statistical method to estimate the PSD from a light curve of photon counts with arbitrary sampling, eliminating the need to bin a light curve to achieve Gaussian statistics, and we use this technique to estimate the X-ray variability parameters for the faint AGNs in our sample. We find that the normalization of the high-frequency X-ray PSD is inversely proportional to black hole mass. We discuss how to use this scaling relationship to obtain black hole mass estimates from the short timescale X-ray variability amplitude with precision ∼0.38 dex. The amplitude of optical variability on timescales of days is also anticorrelated with black hole mass, but with larger scatter. Instead, the optical variability amplitude exhibits the strongest anticorrelation with luminosity. We conclude with a discussion of the implications of our results for estimating black hole mass from the amplitude of AGN variability.

  9. Energy estimation of cosmic rays with the Engineering Radio Array of the Pierre Auger Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aab, A.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Ahn, E. J.; Al Samarai, I.; Albuquerque, I. F. M.; Allekotte, I.; Allison, P.; Almela, A.; Alvarez Castillo, J.; Alvarez-Muñiz, J.; Alves Batista, R.; Ambrosio, M.; Aminaei, A.; Anastasi, G. A.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andringa, S.; Aramo, C.; Arqueros, F.; Arsene, N.; Asorey, H.; Assis, P.; Aublin, J.; Avila, G.; Awal, N.; Badescu, A. M.; Baus, C.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker, K. H.; Bellido, J. A.; Berat, C.; Bertaina, M. E.; Bertou, X.; Biermann, P. L.; Billoir, P.; Blaess, S. G.; Blanco, A.; Blanco, M.; Blazek, J.; Bleve, C.; Blümer, H.; Boháčová, M.; Boncioli, D.; Bonifazi, C.; Borodai, N.; Brack, J.; Brancus, I.; Bretz, T.; Bridgeman, A.; Brogueira, P.; Buchholz, P.; Bueno, A.; Buitink, S.; Buscemi, M.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Caccianiga, B.; Caccianiga, L.; Candusso, M.; Caramete, L.; Caruso, R.; Castellina, A.; Cataldi, G.; Cazon, L.; Cester, R.; Chavez, A. G.; Chiavassa, A.; Chinellato, J. A.; Chudoba, J.; Cilmo, M.; Clay, R. W.; Cocciolo, G.; Colalillo, R.; Coleman, A.; Collica, L.; Coluccia, M. R.; Conceição, R.; Contreras, F.; Cooper, M. J.; Cordier, A.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Cronin, J.; Dallier, R.; Daniel, B.; Dasso, S.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; de Almeida, R. M.; de Jong, S. J.; De Mauro, G.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; De Mitri, I.; de Oliveira, J.; de Souza, V.; del Peral, L.; Deligny, O.; Dhital, N.; Di Giulio, C.; Di Matteo, A.; Diaz, J. C.; Díaz Castro, M. L.; Diogo, F.; Dobrigkeit, C.; Docters, W.; D'Olivo, J. C.; Dorofeev, A.; Dorosti Hasankiadeh, Q.; dos Anjos, R. C.; Dova, M. T.; Ebr, J.; Engel, R.; Erdmann, M.; Erfani, M.; Escobar, C. O.; Espadanal, J.; Etchegoyen, A.; Falcke, H.; Fang, K.; Farrar, G.; Fauth, A. C.; Fazzini, N.; Ferguson, A. P.; Fick, B.; Figueira, J. M.; Filevich, A.; Filipčič, A.; Fratu, O.; Freire, M. M.; Fujii, T.; García, B.; Garcia-Gamez, D.; Garcia-Pinto, D.; Gate, F.; Gemmeke, H.; Gherghel-Lascu, A.; Ghia, P. L.; Giaccari, U.; Giammarchi, M.; Giller, M.; Głas, D.; Glaser, C.; Glass, H.; Golup, G.; Gómez Berisso, M.; Gómez Vitale, P. F.; González, N.; Gookin, B.; Gordon, J.; Gorgi, A.; Gorham, P.; Gouffon, P.; Griffith, N.; Grillo, A. F.; Grubb, T. D.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G. P.; Hampel, M. R.; Hansen, P.; Harari, D.; Harrison, T. A.; Hartmann, S.; Harton, J. L.; Haungs, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heck, D.; Heimann, P.; Herve, A. E.; Hill, G. C.; Hojvat, C.; Hollon, N.; Holt, E.; Homola, P.; Hörandel, J. R.; Horvath, P.; Hrabovský, M.; Huber, D.; Huege, T.; Insolia, A.; Isar, P. G.; Jandt, I.; Jansen, S.; Jarne, C.; Johnsen, J. A.; Josebachuili, M.; Kääpä, A.; Kambeitz, O.; Kampert, K. H.; Kasper, P.; Katkov, I.; Keilhauer, B.; Kemp, E.; Kieckhafer, R. M.; Klages, H. O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Krause, R.; Krohm, N.; Kuempel, D.; Kukec Mezek, G.; Kunka, N.; Kuotb Awad, A. W.; LaHurd, D.; Latronico, L.; Lauer, R.; Lauscher, M.; Lautridou, P.; Le Coz, S.; Lebrun, D.; Lebrun, P.; Leigui de Oliveira, M. A.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; Link, K.; Lopes, L.; López, R.; López Casado, A.; Louedec, K.; Lucero, A.; Malacari, M.; Mallamaci, M.; Maller, J.; Mandat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A. G.; Marin, V.; Mariş, I. C.; Marsella, G.; Martello, D.; Martinez, H.; Martínez Bravo, O.; Martraire, D.; Masías Meza, J. J.; Mathes, H. J.; Mathys, S.; Matthews, J.; Matthews, J. A. J.; Matthiae, G.; Maurizio, D.; Mayotte, E.; Mazur, P. O.; Medina, C.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Meissner, R.; Mello, V. B. B.; Melo, D.; Menshikov, A.; Messina, S.; Micheletti, M. I.; Middendorf, L.; Minaya, I. A.; Miramonti, L.; Mitrica, B.; Molina-Bueno, L.; Mollerach, S.; Montanet, F.; Morello, C.; Mostafá, M.; Moura, C. A.; Muller, M. A.; Müller, G.; Müller, S.; Navas, S.; Necesal, P.; Nellen, L.; Nelles, A.; Neuser, J.; Nguyen, P. H.; Niculescu-Oglinzanu, M.; Niechciol, M.; Niemietz, L.; Niggemann, T.; Nitz, D.; Nosek, D.; Novotny, V.; Nožka, L.; Núñez, L. A.; Ochilo, L.; Oikonomou, F.; Olinto, A.; Pacheco, N.; Pakk Selmi-Dei, D.; Palatka, M.; Pallotta, J.; Papenbreer, P.; Parente, G.; Parra, A.; Paul, T.; Pech, M.; PÈ©kala, J.; Pelayo, R.; Pepe, I. M.; Perrone, L.; Petermann, E.; Peters, C.; Petrera, S.; Petrov, Y.; Phuntsok, J.; Piegaia, R.; Pierog, T.; Pieroni, P.; Pimenta, M.; Pirronello, V.; Platino, M.; Plum, M.; Porcelli, A.; Porowski, C.; Prado, R. R.; Privitera, P.; Prouza, M.; Quel, E. J.; Querchfeld, S.; Quinn, S.; Rautenberg, J.; Ravel, O.; Ravignani, D.; Reinert, D.; Revenu, B.; Ridky, J.; Risse, M.; Ristori, P.; Rizi, V.; Rodrigues de Carvalho, W.; Rodriguez Rojo, J.; Rodríguez-Frías, M. D.; Rogozin, D.; Rosado, J.; Roth, M.; Roulet, E.; Rovero, A. C.; Saffi, S. J.; Saftoiu, A.; Salazar, H.; Saleh, A.; Salesa Greus, F.; Salina, G.; Sanabria Gomez, J. D.; Sánchez, F.; Sanchez-Lucas, P.; Santos, E.; Santos, E. M.; Sarazin, F.; Sarkar, B.; Sarmento, R.; Sarmiento-Cano, C.; Sato, R.; Scarso, C.; Schauer, M.; Scherini, V.; Schieler, H.; Schmidt, D.; Scholten, O.; Schoorlemmer, H.; Schovánek, P.; Schröder, F. G.; Schulz, A.; Schulz, J.; Schumacher, J.; Sciutto, S. J.; Segreto, A.; Settimo, M.; Shadkam, A.; Shellard, R. C.; Sigl, G.; Sima, O.; Śmiałkowski, A.; Šmída, R.; Snow, G. R.; Sommers, P.; Sonntag, S.; Sorokin, J.; Squartini, R.; Srivastava, Y. N.; Stanca, D.; Stanič, S.; Stapleton, J.; Stasielak, J.; Stephan, M.; Stutz, A.; Suarez, F.; Suarez Durán, M.; Suomijärvi, T.; Supanitsky, A. D.; Sutherland, M. S.; Swain, J.; Szadkowski, Z.; Taborda, O. A.; Tapia, A.; Tepe, A.; Theodoro, V. M.; Timmermans, C.; Todero Peixoto, C. J.; Toma, G.; Tomankova, L.; Tomé, B.; Tonachini, A.; Torralba Elipe, G.; Torres Machado, D.; Travnicek, P.; Trini, M.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M.; Urban, M.; Valdés Galicia, J. F.; Valiño, I.; Valore, L.; van Aar, G.; van Bodegom, P.; van den Berg, A. M.; van Velzen, S.; van Vliet, A.; Varela, E.; Vargas Cárdenas, B.; Varner, G.; Vasquez, R.; Vázquez, J. R.; Vázquez, R. A.; Veberič, D.; Verzi, V.; Vicha, J.; Videla, M.; Villaseñor, L.; Vlcek, B.; Vorobiov, S.; Wahlberg, H.; Wainberg, O.; Walz, D.; Watson, A. A.; Weber, M.; Weidenhaupt, K.; Weindl, A.; Welling, C.; Werner, F.; Widom, A.; Wiencke, L.; Wilczyński, H.; Winchen, T.; Wittkowski, D.; Wundheiler, B.; Wykes, S.; Yang, L.; Yapici, T.; Yushkov, A.; Zas, E.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zavrtanik, M.; Zepeda, A.; Zimmermann, B.; Ziolkowski, M.; Zuccarello, F.; Pierre Auger Collaboration

    2016-06-01

    The Auger Engineering Radio Array (AERA) is part of the Pierre Auger Observatory and is used to detect the radio emission of cosmic-ray air showers. These observations are compared to the data of the surface detector stations of the Observatory, which provide well-calibrated information on the cosmic-ray energies and arrival directions. The response of the radio stations in the 30-80 MHz regime has been thoroughly calibrated to enable the reconstruction of the incoming electric field. For the latter, the energy deposit per area is determined from the radio pulses at each observer position and is interpolated using a two-dimensional function that takes into account signal asymmetries due to interference between the geomagnetic and charge-excess emission components. The spatial integral over the signal distribution gives a direct measurement of the energy transferred from the primary cosmic ray into radio emission in the AERA frequency range. We measure 15.8 MeV of radiation energy for a 1 EeV air shower arriving perpendicularly to the geomagnetic field. This radiation energy—corrected for geometrical effects—is used as a cosmic-ray energy estimator. Performing an absolute energy calibration against the surface-detector information, we observe that this radio-energy estimator scales quadratically with the cosmic-ray energy as expected for coherent emission. We find an energy resolution of the radio reconstruction of 22% for the data set and 17% for a high-quality subset containing only events with at least five radio stations with signal.

  10. Using Photosynthetically Active Radiation (PAR) Observations to Estimate Potential Evaporation with Combination Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J.; Freyberg, D. L.

    2011-12-01

    Estimating potential evaporation with combination equations typically depends on observations of solar radiation. In situations where only photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) observations are available, a conversion model is required. We use coincident observations of solar radiation and PAR to build a conversion model for the Santa Cruz Mountains region of California, USA. The model takes advantage of the strong seasonality in cloud cover and albedo, using two seasonal sub-models to improve performance. We examine the uncertainty induced by model error in predictions of potential evaporation and reference crop evaporation using locally calibrated combination equations, and compare with direct observations of pan evaporation and inferred estimates of lake evaporation.

  11. Altered sensorimotor activation patterns in idiopathic dystonia—an activation likelihood estimation meta‐analysis of functional brain imaging studies

    PubMed Central

    Herz, Damian M.; Haagensen, Brian N.; Lorentzen, Anne K.; Eickhoff, Simon B.; Siebner, Hartwig R.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Dystonia is characterized by sustained or intermittent muscle contractions causing abnormal, often repetitive, movements or postures. Functional neuroimaging studies have yielded abnormal task‐related sensorimotor activation in dystonia, but the results appear to be rather variable across studies. Further, study size was usually small including different types of dystonia. Here we performed an activation likelihood estimation (ALE) meta‐analysis of functional neuroimaging studies in patients with primary dystonia to test for convergence of dystonia‐related alterations in task‐related activity across studies. Activation likelihood estimates were based on previously reported regional maxima of task‐related increases or decreases in dystonia patients compared to healthy controls. The meta‐analyses encompassed data from 179 patients with dystonia reported in 18 functional neuroimaging studies using a range of sensorimotor tasks. Patients with dystonia showed bilateral increases in task‐related activation in the parietal operculum and ventral postcentral gyrus as well as right middle temporal gyrus. Decreases in task‐related activation converged in left supplementary motor area and left postcentral gyrus, right superior temporal gyrus and dorsal midbrain. Apart from the midbrain cluster, all between‐group differences in task‐related activity were retrieved in a sub‐analysis including only the 14 studies on patients with focal dystonia. For focal dystonia, an additional cluster of increased sensorimotor activation emerged in the caudal cingulate motor zone. The results show that dystonia is consistently associated with abnormal somatosensory processing in the primary and secondary somatosensory cortex along with abnormal sensorimotor activation of mesial premotor and right lateral temporal cortex. Hum Brain Mapp 37:547–557, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26549606

  12. Altered sensorimotor activation patterns in idiopathic dystonia-an activation likelihood estimation meta-analysis of functional brain imaging studies.

    PubMed

    Løkkegaard, Annemette; Herz, Damian M; Haagensen, Brian N; Lorentzen, Anne K; Eickhoff, Simon B; Siebner, Hartwig R

    2016-02-01

    Dystonia is characterized by sustained or intermittent muscle contractions causing abnormal, often repetitive, movements or postures. Functional neuroimaging studies have yielded abnormal task-related sensorimotor activation in dystonia, but the results appear to be rather variable across studies. Further, study size was usually small including different types of dystonia. Here we performed an activation likelihood estimation (ALE) meta-analysis of functional neuroimaging studies in patients with primary dystonia to test for convergence of dystonia-related alterations in task-related activity across studies. Activation likelihood estimates were based on previously reported regional maxima of task-related increases or decreases in dystonia patients compared to healthy controls. The meta-analyses encompassed data from 179 patients with dystonia reported in 18 functional neuroimaging studies using a range of sensorimotor tasks. Patients with dystonia showed bilateral increases in task-related activation in the parietal operculum and ventral postcentral gyrus as well as right middle temporal gyrus. Decreases in task-related activation converged in left supplementary motor area and left postcentral gyrus, right superior temporal gyrus and dorsal midbrain. Apart from the midbrain cluster, all between-group differences in task-related activity were retrieved in a sub-analysis including only the 14 studies on patients with focal dystonia. For focal dystonia, an additional cluster of increased sensorimotor activation emerged in the caudal cingulate motor zone. The results show that dystonia is consistently associated with abnormal somatosensory processing in the primary and secondary somatosensory cortex along with abnormal sensorimotor activation of mesial premotor and right lateral temporal cortex. Hum Brain Mapp 37:547-557, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26549606

  13. A Network-Based Multi-Target Computational Estimation Scheme for Anticoagulant Activities of Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Li, Canghai; Chen, Lirong; Song, Jun; Tang, Yalin; Xu, Xiaojie

    2011-01-01

    Background Traditional virtual screening method pays more attention on predicted binding affinity between drug molecule and target related to a certain disease instead of phenotypic data of drug molecule against disease system, as is often less effective on discovery of the drug which is used to treat many types of complex diseases. Virtual screening against a complex disease by general network estimation has become feasible with the development of network biology and system biology. More effective methods of computational estimation for the whole efficacy of a compound in a complex disease system are needed, given the distinct weightiness of the different target in a biological process and the standpoint that partial inhibition of several targets can be more efficient than the complete inhibition of a single target. Methodology We developed a novel approach by integrating the affinity predictions from multi-target docking studies with biological network efficiency analysis to estimate the anticoagulant activities of compounds. From results of network efficiency calculation for human clotting cascade, factor Xa and thrombin were identified as the two most fragile enzymes, while the catalytic reaction mediated by complex IXa:VIIIa and the formation of the complex VIIIa:IXa were recognized as the two most fragile biological matter in the human clotting cascade system. Furthermore, the method which combined network efficiency with molecular docking scores was applied to estimate the anticoagulant activities of a serial of argatroban intermediates and eight natural products respectively. The better correlation (r = 0.671) between the experimental data and the decrease of the network deficiency suggests that the approach could be a promising computational systems biology tool to aid identification of anticoagulant activities of compounds in drug discovery. Conclusions This article proposes a network-based multi-target computational estimation method for

  14. Effect of Volume-of-Interest Misregistration on Quantitative Planar Activity and Dose Estimation

    PubMed Central

    Song, N.; He, B.; Frey, E. C.

    2010-01-01

    In targeted radionuclide therapy (TRT), dose estimation is essential for treatment planning and tumor dose response studies. Dose estimates are typically based on a time series of whole body conjugate view planar or SPECT scans of the patient acquired after administration of a planning dose. Quantifying the activity in the organs from these studies is an essential part of dose estimation. The Quantitative Planar (QPlanar) processing method involves accurate compensation for image degrading factors and correction for organ and background overlap via the combination of computational models of the image formation process and 3D volumes of interest defining the organs to be quantified. When the organ VOIs are accurately defined, the method intrinsically compensates for attenuation, scatter, and partial volume effects, as well as overlap with other organs and the background. However, alignment between the 3D organ volume of interest (VOIs) used in QPlanar processing and the true organ projections in the planar images is required. The goal of this research was to study the effects of VOI misregistration on the accuracy and precision of organ activity estimates obtained using the QPlanar method. In this work, we modeled the degree of residual misregistration that would be expected after an automated registration procedure by randomly misaligning 3D SPECT/CT images, from which the VOI information was derived, and planar images. Mutual information based image registration was used to align the realistic simulated 3D SPECT images with the 2D planar images. The residual image misregistration was used to simulate realistic levels of misregistration and allow investigation of the effects of misregistration on the accuracy and precision of the QPlanar method. We observed that accurate registration is especially important for small organs or ones with low activity concentrations compared to neighboring organs. In addition, residual misregistration gave rise to a loss of precision

  15. Cost estimation and economical evaluation of three configurations of activated sludge process for a wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) using simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jafarinejad, Shahryar

    2016-07-01

    The activated sludge (AS) process is a type of suspended growth biological wastewater treatment that is used for treating both municipal sewage and a variety of industrial wastewaters. Economical modeling and cost estimation of activated sludge processes are crucial for designing, construction, and forecasting future economical requirements of wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). In this study, three configurations containing conventional activated sludge (CAS), extended aeration activated sludge (EAAS), and sequencing batch reactor (SBR) processes for a wastewater treatment plant in Tehran city were proposed and the total project construction, operation labor, maintenance, material, chemical, energy and amortization costs of these WWTPs were calculated and compared. Besides, effect of mixed liquor suspended solid (MLSS) amounts on costs of WWTPs was investigated. Results demonstrated that increase of MLSS decreases the total project construction, material and amortization costs of WWTPs containing EAAS and CAS. In addition, increase of this value increases the total operation, maintenance and energy costs, but does not affect chemical cost of WWTPs containing EAAS and CAS.

  16. Convergence and error estimation in free energy calculations using the weighted histogram analysis method

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Fangqiang; Hummer, Gerhard

    2012-01-01

    The weighted histogram analysis method (WHAM) has become the standard technique for the analysis of umbrella sampling simulations. In this paper, we address the challenges (1) of obtaining fast and accurate solutions of the coupled nonlinear WHAM equations, (2) of quantifying the statistical errors of the resulting free energies, (3) of diagnosing possible systematic errors, and (4) of optimal allocation of the computational resources. Traditionally, the WHAM equations are solved by a fixed-point direct iteration method, despite poor convergence and possible numerical inaccuracies in the solutions. Here we instead solve the mathematically equivalent problem of maximizing a target likelihood function, by using superlinear numerical optimization algorithms with a significantly faster convergence rate. To estimate the statistical errors in one-dimensional free energy profiles obtained from WHAM, we note that for densely spaced umbrella windows with harmonic biasing potentials, the WHAM free energy profile can be approximated by a coarse-grained free energy obtained by integrating the mean restraining forces. The statistical errors of the coarse-grained free energies can be estimated straightforwardly and then used for the WHAM results. A generalization to multidimensional WHAM is described. We also propose two simple statistical criteria to test the consistency between the histograms of adjacent umbrella windows, which help identify inadequate sampling and hysteresis in the degrees of freedom orthogonal to the reaction coordinate. Together, the estimates of the statistical errors and the diagnostics of inconsistencies in the potentials of mean force provide a basis for the efficient allocation of computational resources in free energy simulations. PMID:22109354

  17. Price and income elasticities of energy demand: Some estimates for Kuwait using two econometric models

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Mutairi, N.H.; Eltony, M.N.

    1995-12-31

    This paper estimates the demand for energy in Kuwait for the period 1965-1989 using two econometric models: a cointegration and error correction model (ECM) and a simultaneous-equation model (SEM). The results obtained from both models are similar. It is found that the energy demand is inelastic with respect to price in the short and long run, and while it is elastic in the long run, the energy demand is inelastic with respect to income in the short run. Both models` validation shows that the ECM performed better in replicating the past than the simultaneous model, suggesting the need to use the ECM to identify future prospects for energy demand in Kuwait.

  18. Solar thermal technology development: Estimated market size and energy cost savings. Volume 1: Executive summary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gates, W. R.

    1983-02-01

    Estimated future energy cost savings associated with the development of cost-competitive solar thermal technologies (STT) are discussed. Analysis is restricted to STT in electric applications for 16 high-insolation/high-energy-price states. The fuel price scenarios and three 1990 STT system costs are considered, reflecting uncertainty over future fuel prices and STT cost projections. STT R&D is found to be unacceptably risky for private industry in the absence of federal support. Energy cost savings were projected to range from $0 to $10 billion (1990 values in 1981 dollars), dependng on the system cost and fuel price scenario. Normal R&D investment risks are accentuated because the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) cartel can artificially manipulate oil prices and undercut growth of alternative energy sources. Federal participation in STT R&D to help capture the potential benefits of developing cost-competitive STT was found to be in the national interest.

  19. Solar thermal technology development: Estimated market size and energy cost savings. Volume 1: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gates, W. R.

    1983-01-01

    Estimated future energy cost savings associated with the development of cost-competitive solar thermal technologies (STT) are discussed. Analysis is restricted to STT in electric applications for 16 high-insolation/high-energy-price states. The fuel price scenarios and three 1990 STT system costs are considered, reflecting uncertainty over future fuel prices and STT cost projections. STT R&D is found to be unacceptably risky for private industry in the absence of federal support. Energy cost savings were projected to range from $0 to $10 billion (1990 values in 1981 dollars), dependng on the system cost and fuel price scenario. Normal R&D investment risks are accentuated because the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) cartel can artificially manipulate oil prices and undercut growth of alternative energy sources. Federal participation in STT R&D to help capture the potential benefits of developing cost-competitive STT was found to be in the national interest.

  20. An Energy-Efficient Strategy for Accurate Distance Estimation in Wireless Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Tarrío, Paula; Bernardos, Ana M.; Casar, José R.

    2012-01-01

    In line with recent research efforts made to conceive energy saving protocols and algorithms and power sensitive network architectures, in this paper we propose a transmission strategy to minimize the energy consumption in a sensor network when using a localization technique based on the measurement of the strength (RSS) or the time of arrival (TOA) of the received signal. In particular, we find the transmission power and the packet transmission rate that jointly minimize the total consumed energy, while ensuring at the same time a desired accuracy in the RSS or TOA measurements. We also propose some corrections to these theoretical results to take into account the effects of shadowing and packet loss in the propagation channel. The proposed strategy is shown to be effective in realistic scenarios providing energy savings with respect to other transmission strategies, and also guaranteeing a given accuracy in the distance estimations, which will serve to guarantee a desired accuracy in the localization result. PMID:23202218

  1. Recoverable Resource Estimate of Identified Onshore Geopressured Geothermal Energy in Texas and Louisiana (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Esposito, A.; Augustine, C.

    2012-04-01

    Geopressured geothermal reservoirs are characterized by high temperatures and high pressures with correspondingly large quantities of dissolved methane. Due to these characteristics, the reservoirs provide two sources of energy: chemical energy from the recovered methane, and thermal energy from the recovered fluid at temperatures high enough to operate a binary power plant for electricity production. Formations with the greatest potential for recoverable energy are located in the gulf coastal region of Texas and Louisiana where significantly overpressured and hot formations are abundant. This study estimates the total recoverable onshore geopressured geothermal resource for identified sites in Texas and Louisiana. In this study a geopressured geothermal resource is defined as a brine reservoir with fluid temperature greater than 212 degrees F and a pressure gradient greater than 0.7 psi/ft.

  2. Head-centric disparity and epipolar geometry estimation from a population of binocular energy neurons.

    PubMed

    Pauwels, Karl; VAN Hulle, Marc M

    2012-06-01

    We present a hybrid neural network architecture that supports the estimation of binocular disparity in a cyclopean, head-centric coordinate system without explicitly establishing retinal correspondences. Instead the responses of binocular energy neurons are gain-modulated by oculomotor signals. The network can handle the full six degrees of freedom of binocular gaze and operates directly on image pairs of possibly varying contrast. Furthermore, we show that in the absence of an oculomotor signal the same architecture is capable of estimating the epipolar geometry directly from the population response. The increased complexity of the scenarios considered in this work provides an important step towards the application of computational models centered on gain modulation mechanisms in real-world robotic applications. The proposed network is shown to outperform a standard computer vision technique on a disparity estimation task involving real-world stereo images. PMID:23627623

  3. Estimating future energy use and CO₂ emissions of the world's cities.

    PubMed

    Singh, Shweta; Kennedy, Chris

    2015-08-01

    This paper develops a tool for estimating energy-related CO2 emissions from the world's cities based on regression models. The models are developed considering climatic (heating-degree-days) and urban design (land area per person) independent variables. The tool is applied on 3646 urban areas for estimating impacts on urban emissions of a) global transitioning to Electric Vehicles, b) urban density change and c) IPCC climate change scenarios. Results show that urban density decline can lead to significant increase in energy emissions (upto 346% in electricity & 428% in transportation at 2% density decline by 2050). Among the IPCC climate scenarios tested, A1B is the most effective in reducing growth of emissions (upto 12% in electricity & 35% in heating). The tool can further be improved by including more data in the regression models along with inclusion of other relevant emissions and climatic variables. PMID:25857431

  4. A simple tool for estimating city-wide annual electrical energy savings from cooler surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Pomerantz, Melvin; Rosado, Pablo J.; Levinson, Ronnen M.

    2015-06-27

    We present a simple method to estimate the maximum possible electrical energy saving that might be achieved by increasing the albedo of surfaces in a large city. We restrict this to the “indirect effect”, the cooling of outside air that lessens the demand for air conditioning (AC). Given the power demand of the electric utilities and data about the city, we can use a single linear equation to estimate the maximum savings. For example, the result for an albedo change of 0.2 of pavements in a typical warm city in California, such as Sacramento, is that the saving is less than about 2 kWh per m2 per year. This may help decision makers choose which heat island mitigation techniques are economical from an energy-saving perspective.

  5. Estimates of the generation of available potential energy by infrared radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, A. R.; Nagle, R. L.

    1984-01-01

    Data from the National Meteorological Center and net outgoing infrared radiation (IR) data measured by NOAA satellites for January 1977 are used to compute estimates of the spectral and spatial contributions to the net generation of available potential energy in the Northern Hemisphere due to infrared radiation. Although these estimates are necessarily crude, the results obtained indicate that IR causes destruction of both zonal and eddy available potential energy. The contributions from midlatitudes to the zonal and eddy generation are about -5.0 W/sq m and about -0.6 W/sq m, respectively. The eddy generation is due almost entirely to stationary wavenumbers one and two. Comparison with earlier studies and computation of Newtonian cooling coefficients are discussed.

  6. Estimation of muscle activity using higher-order derivatives, static optimization, and forward-inverse dynamics.

    PubMed

    Yamasaki, Taiga; Idehara, Katsutoshi; Xin, Xin

    2016-07-01

    We propose a new method to estimate muscle activity in a straightforward manner with high accuracy and relatively small computational costs by using the external input of the joint angle and its first to fourth derivatives with respect to time. The method solves the inverse dynamics problem of the skeletal system, the forward dynamics problem of the muscular system, and the load-sharing problem of muscles as a static optimization of neural excitation signals. The external input including the higher-order derivatives is required for a calculation of constraints imposed on the load-sharing problem. The feasibility of the method is demonstrated by the simulation of a simple musculoskeletal model with a single joint. Moreover, the influences of the muscular dynamics, and the higher-order derivatives on the estimation of the muscle activity are demonstrated, showing the results when the time constants of the activation dynamics are very small, and the third and fourth derivatives of the external input are ignored, respectively. It is concluded that the method can have the potential to improve estimation accuracy of muscle activity of highly dynamic motions. PMID:27211782

  7. Free energy calculations to estimate ligand-binding affinities in structure-based drug design.

    PubMed

    Reddy, M Rami; Reddy, C Ravikumar; Rathore, R S; Erion, Mark D; Aparoy, P; Reddy, R Nageswara; Reddanna, P

    2014-01-01

    Post-genomic era has led to the discovery of several new targets posing challenges for structure-based drug design efforts to identify lead compounds. Multiple computational methodologies exist to predict the high ranking hit/lead compounds. Among them, free energy methods provide the most accurate estimate of predicted binding affinity. Pathway-based Free Energy Perturbation (FEP), Thermodynamic Integration (TI) and Slow Growth (SG) as well as less rigorous end-point methods such as Linear interaction energy (LIE), Molecular Mechanics-Poisson Boltzmann./Generalized Born Surface Area (MM-PBSA/GBSA) and λ-dynamics have been applied to a variety of biologically relevant problems. The recent advances in free energy methods and their applications including the prediction of protein-ligand binding affinity for some of the important drug targets have been elaborated. Results using a recently developed Quantum Mechanics (QM)/Molecular Mechanics (MM) based Free Energy Perturbation (FEP) method, which has the potential to provide a very accurate estimation of binding affinities to date has been discussed. A case study for the optimization of inhibitors for the fructose 1,6- bisphosphatase inhibitors has been described. PMID:23947646

  8. Estimating the continuous-time dynamics of energy and fat metabolism in mice.

    PubMed

    Guo, Juen; Hall, Kevin D

    2009-09-01

    The mouse has become the most popular organism for investigating molecular mechanisms of body weight regulation. But understanding the physiological context by which a molecule exerts its effect on body weight requires knowledge of energy intake, energy expenditure, and fuel selection. Furthermore, measurements of these variables made at an isolated time point cannot explain why body weight has its present value since body weight is determined by the past history of energy and macronutrient imbalance. While food intake and body weight changes can be frequently measured over several weeks (the relevant time scale for mice), correspondingly frequent measurements of energy expenditure and fuel selection are not currently feasible. To address this issue, we developed a mathematical method based on the law of energy conservation that uses the measured time course of body weight and food intake to estimate the underlying continuous-time dynamics of energy output and net fat oxidation. We applied our methodology to male C57BL/6 mice consuming various ad libitum diets during weight gain and loss over several weeks and present the first continuous-time estimates of energy output and net fat oxidation rates underlying the observed body composition changes. We show that transient energy and fat imbalances in the first several days following a diet switch can account for a significant fraction of the total body weight change. We also discovered a time-invariant curve relating body fat and fat-free masses in male C57BL/6 mice, and the shape of this curve determines how diet, fuel selection, and body composition are interrelated. PMID:19763167

  9. Scale dependency of fracture energy and estimates thereof via dynamic rupture solutions with strong thermal weakening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viesca, R. C.; Garagash, D.

    2013-12-01

    Seismological estimates of fracture energy show a scaling with the total slip of an earthquake [e.g., Abercrombie and Rice, GJI 2005]. Potential sources for this scale dependency are coseismic fault strength reductions that continue with increasing slip or an increasing amount of off-fault inelastic deformation with dynamic rupture propagation [e.g., Andrews, JGR 2005; Rice, JGR 2006]. Here, we investigate the former mechanism by solving for the slip dependence of fracture energy at the crack tip of a dynamically propagating rupture in which weakening takes place by strong reductions of friction via flash heating of asperity contacts and thermal pressurization of pore fluid leading to reductions in effective normal stress. Laboratory measurements of small characteristic slip evolution distances for friction (~10 μm at low slip rates of μm-mm/s, possibly up to 1 mm for slip rates near 0.1 m/s) [e.g., Marone and Kilgore, Nature 1993; Kohli et al., JGR 2011] imply that flash weakening of friction occurs at small slips before any significant thermal pressurization and may thus have a negligible contribution to the total fracture energy [Brantut and Rice, GRL 2011; Garagash, AGU 2011]. The subsequent manner of weakening under thermal pressurization (the dominant contributor to fracture energy) spans a range of behavior from the deformation of a finite-thickness shear zone in which diffusion is negligible (i.e., undrained-adiabatic) to that in which large-scale diffusion obscures the existence of a thin shear zone and thermal pressurization effectively occurs by the heating of slip on a plane. Separating the contribution of flash heating, the dynamic rupture solutions reduce to a problem with a single parameter, which is the ratio of the undrained-adiabatic slip-weakening distance (δc) to the characteristic slip-on-a-plane slip-weakening distance (L*). However, for any value of the parameter, there are two end-member scalings of the fracture energy: for small slip

  10. Determining the required accuracy of LST products for estimating surface energy fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinheiro, A. C.; Reichle, R.; Sujay, K.; Arsenault, K.; Privette, J. L.; Yu, Y.

    2006-12-01

    Land Surface Temperature (LST) is an important parameter to assess the energy state of a surface. Synoptic satellite observations of LST must be used when attempting to estimate fluxes over large spatial scales. Due to the close coupling between LST, root level water availability, and mass and energy fluxes at the surface, LST is particularly useful over agricultural areas to help determine crop water demands and facilitate water management decisions (e.g., irrigation). Further, LST can be assimilated into land surface models to help improve estimates of latent and sensible heat fluxes. However, the accuracy of LST products and its impact on surface flux estimation is not well known. In this study, we quantify the uncertainty limits in LST products for accurately estimating latent heat fluxes over agricultural fields in the Rio Grande River basin of central New Mexico. We use the Community Land Model (CLM) within the Land Information Systems (LIS), and adopt an Ensemble Kalman Filter approach to assimilate the LST fields into the model. We evaluate the LST and assimilation performance against field measurements of evapotranspiration collected at two eddy-covariance towers in semi-arid cropland areas. Our results will help clarify sensor and LST product requirements for future remote sensing systems.

  11. World nonrenewable energy resources. [Based on published estimates of recognized authors and agencies

    SciTech Connect

    Parent, J.D.

    1981-10-26

    Up-to-date estimates are presented for world proved reserves, remaining recoverable resources, annual production rates, and cumulative production of the nonrenewable energy resources: coal, natural gas, crude oil, natural gas liquids, bitumens, shale oil, and uranium oxide. Life indices for world fossil fuels are also presented for several annual growth rates. Nonconventional gas and oil, such as exist in formations of very low permeability, are not included. 4 tables.

  12. Contradicting Estimates of Location, Geometry, and Rupture History of Highly Active Faults in Central Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okumura, K.

    2011-12-01

    Accurate location and geometry of seismic sources are critical to estimate strong ground motion. Complete and precise rupture history is also critical to estimate the probability of the future events. In order to better forecast future earthquakes and to reduce seismic hazards, we should consider over all options and choose the most likely parameter. Multiple options for logic trees are acceptable only after thorough examination of contradicting estimates and should not be a result from easy compromise or epoche. In the process of preparation and revisions of Japanese probabilistic and deterministic earthquake hazard maps by Headquarters for Earthquake Research Promotion since 1996, many decisions were made to select plausible parameters, but many contradicting estimates have been left without thorough examinations. There are several highly-active faults in central Japan such as Itoigawa-Shizuoka Tectonic Line active fault system (ISTL), West Nagano Basin fault system (WNBF), Inadani fault system (INFS), and Atera fault system (ATFS). The highest slip rate and the shortest recurrence interval are respectively ~1 cm/yr and 500 to 800 years, and estimated maximum magnitude is 7.5 to 8.5. Those faults are very hazardous because almost entire population and industries are located above the fault within tectonic depressions. As to the fault location, most uncertainties arises from interpretation of geomorphic features. Geomorphological interpretation without geological and structural insight often leads to wrong mapping. Though non-existent longer fault may be a safer estimate, incorrectness harm reliability of the forecast. Also this does not greatly affect strong motion estimates, but misleading to surface displacement issues. Fault geometry, on the other hand, is very important to estimate intensity distribution. For the middle portion of the ISTL, fast-moving left-lateral strike-slip up to 1 cm/yr is obvious. Recent seismicity possibly induced by 2011 Tohoku

  13. Dynamic Energy Budget model parameter estimation for the bivalve Mytilus californianus: Application of the covariation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matzelle, A.; Montalto, V.; Sarà, G.; Zippay, M.; Helmuth, B.

    2014-11-01

    Dynamic Energy Budget (DEB) models serve as a powerful tool for describing the flow of energy through organisms from assimilation of food to utilization for maintenance, growth and reproduction. The DEB theory has been successfully applied to several bivalve species to compare bioenergetic and physiological strategies for the utilization of energy. In particular, mussels within the Mytilus edulis complex (M. edulis, M. galloprovincialis, and M. trossulus) have been the focus of many studies due to their economic and ecological importance, and their worldwide distribution. However, DEB parameter values have never been estimated for Mytilus californianus, a species that is an ecological dominant on rocky intertidal shores on the west coast of North America and which likely varies considerably from mussels in the M. edulis complex in its physiology. We estimated a set of DEB parameters for M. californianus using the covariation method estimation procedure and compared these to parameter values from other bivalve species. Model parameters were used to compare sensitivity to environmental variability among species, as a first examination of how strategies for physiologically contending with environmental change by M. californianus may differ from those of other bivalves. Results suggest that based on the parameter set obtained, M. californianus has favorable energetic strategies enabling it to contend with a range of environmental conditions. For instance, the allocation fraction of reserve to soma (κ) is among the highest of any bivalves, which is consistent with the observation that this species can survive over a wide range of environmental conditions, including prolonged periods of starvation.

  14. Selected Energy Education Activities for Pennsylvania Middle School Grades. Draft.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hack, Nancy; And Others

    These activities are intended to help increase awareness and understanding of the energy situation and to encourage students to become energy conservationists. The document is divided into sections according to discipline area. A final section is devoted to interdisciplinary activities involving several discipline areas integrated with the energy…

  15. Fabric-based integrated energy devices for wearable activity monitors.

    PubMed

    Jung, Sungmook; Lee, Jongsu; Hyeon, Taeghwan; Lee, Minbaek; Kim, Dae-Hyeong

    2014-09-01

    A wearable fabric-based integrated power-supply system that generates energy triboelectrically using human activity and stores the generated energy in an integrated supercapacitor is developed. This system can be utilized as either a self-powered activity monitor or as a power supply for external wearable sensors. These demonstrations give new insights for the research of wearable electronics. PMID:25070873

  16. Lightstick Magic: Determination of the Activation Energy with PSL.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bindel, Thomas H.

    1996-01-01

    Presents experiments with lightsticks in which the activation energy for the light-producing reaction is determined. Involves monitoring the light intensity of the lightstick as a function of temperature. Gives students the opportunity to explore the concepts of kinetics and activation energies and the world of computer-interfaced experimentation…

  17. Biomass I. Science Activities in Energy [and] Teacher's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oak Ridge Associated Universities, TN.

    Designed for science students in fourth, fifth, and sixth grades, the activities in this unit illustrate principles and problems related to biomass as a form of energy. (The word biomass is used to describe all solid material of animal or vegetable origin from which energy may be extracted.) Twelve student activities using art, economics,…

  18. Assessment of Physical Activity and Energy Expenditure: An Overview of Objective Measures

    PubMed Central

    Hills, Andrew P.; Mokhtar, Najat; Byrne, Nuala M.

    2014-01-01

    The ability to assess energy expenditure (EE) and estimate physical activity (PA) in free-living individuals is extremely important in the global context of non-communicable diseases including malnutrition, overnutrition (obesity), and diabetes. It is also important to appreciate that PA and EE are different constructs with PA defined as any bodily movement that results in EE and accordingly, energy is expended as a result of PA. However, total energy expenditure, best assessed using the criterion doubly labeled water (DLW) technique, includes components in addition to physical activity energy expenditure, namely resting energy expenditure and the thermic effect of food. Given the large number of assessment techniques currently used to estimate PA in humans, it is imperative to understand the relative merits of each. The goal of this review is to provide information on the utility and limitations of a range of objective measures of PA and their relationship with EE. The measures discussed include those based on EE or oxygen uptake including DLW, activity energy expenditure, physical activity level, and metabolic equivalent; those based on heart rate monitoring and motion sensors; and because of their widespread use, selected subjective measures. PMID:25988109

  19. Okeechobee County Energy Education Activities--Middle School Level.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Rodney F., Ed.

    Over 60 energy education activities related to mathematics, science, social studies, and English comprise this manual for middle school teachers. Included are issues for discussion, puzzles, science investigations, story writing exercises, and energy cost calculation problems. Among the topics covered in these lessons are energy consumption…

  20. Estimation of active pharmaceutical ingredients content using locally weighted partial least squares and statistical wavelength selection.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sanghong; Kano, Manabu; Nakagawa, Hiroshi; Hasebe, Shinji

    2011-12-15

    Development of quality estimation models using near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) and multivariate analysis has been accelerated as a process analytical technology (PAT) tool in the pharmaceutical industry. Although linear regression methods such as partial least squares (PLS) are widely used, they cannot always achieve high estimation accuracy because physical and chemical properties of a measuring object have a complex effect on NIR spectra. In this research, locally weighted PLS (LW-PLS) which utilizes a newly defined similarity between samples is proposed to estimate active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) content in granules for tableting. In addition, a statistical wavelength selection method which quantifies the effect of API content and other factors on NIR spectra is proposed. LW-PLS and the proposed wavelength selection method were applied to real process data provided by Daiichi Sankyo Co., Ltd., and the estimation accuracy was improved by 38.6% in root mean square error of prediction (RMSEP) compared to the conventional PLS using wavelengths selected on the basis of variable importance on the projection (VIP). The results clearly show that the proposed calibration modeling technique is useful for API content estimation and is superior to the conventional one. PMID:22001843

  1. A hand speed-duty cycle equation for estimating the ACGIH hand activity level rating.

    PubMed

    Akkas, Oguz; Azari, David P; Chen, Chia-Hsiung Eric; Hu, Yu Hen; Ulin, Sheryl S; Armstrong, Thomas J; Rempel, David; Radwin, Robert G

    2015-01-01

    An equation was developed for estimating hand activity level (HAL) directly from tracked root mean square (RMS) hand speed (S) and duty cycle (D). Table lookup, equation or marker-less video tracking can estimate HAL from motion/exertion frequency (F) and D. Since automatically estimating F is sometimes complex, HAL may be more readily assessed using S. Hands from 33 videos originally used for the HAL rating were tracked to estimate S, scaled relative to hand breadth (HB), and single-frame analysis was used to measure D. Since HBs were unknown, a Monte Carlo method was employed for iteratively estimating the regression coefficients from US Army anthropometry survey data. The equation: HAL = 10[e(-15:87+0:02D+2:25 ln S)/(1+e(-15:87+0:02D+2:25 ln S)], R(2) = 0.97, had a residual range ± 0.5 HAL. The S equation superiorly fits the Latko et al. ( 1997 ) data and predicted independently observed HAL values (Harris 2011) better (MSE = 0.16) than the F equation (MSE = 1.28). PMID:25343278

  2. Estimation and Monitoring of Wind-Wave energy potential over the Greek seas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emmanouil, G.; Galanis, G.; Zodiatis, G.; Kalogeri, C.

    2013-12-01

    The exploitation of renewable energy resources is today on the top of the interest for the environmental and political community. In particular, wind and wave energy seems to be promising solutions with great potential from research and technological point of view. This kind of energy is mostly a matter of coastal and island countries, like Greece. In this work, the first results of a project whose main target is the development of an integrated, high resolution system for quantifying and monitoring the energy potential from wind and sea waves in the region of Eastern Mediterranean Sea, with special emphasis to the Greek area, are presented. More specifically, the models for the estimation of the energy potential, from wind and waves over sea areas, will be discussed. Moreover, atmospheric and sea wave numerical models used for the simulation of the environmental parameters that directly affect the wind-wave energy potential will be evaluated. Based on these tools, high resolution maps for the coastal and offshore areas of Greece will be produced, in which sea wave and wind climatological characteristics as well as the relevant distribution of the wave energy potential will be monitoring.

  3. Estimating the Impact (Energy, Emissions and Economics) of the US Fluid Power Industry

    SciTech Connect

    Love, Lonnie J

    2012-12-01

    The objective of this report is to estimate the impact (energy, emissions and economics) of United Fluid power (hydraulic and pneumatic actuation) is the generation, control, and application of pumped or compressed fluids when this power is used to provide force and motion to mechanisms. This form of mechanical power is an integral part of United States (U.S.) manufacturing and transportation. In 2008, according to the U.S. Census Bureau, sales of fluid power components exceeded $17.7B, sales of systems using fluid power exceeded $226B. As large as the industry is, it has had little fundamental research that could lead to improved efficiency since the late 1960s (prior to the 1970 energy crisis). While there have been some attempts to replace fluid powered components with electric systems, its performance and rugged operating condition limit the impact of simple part replacement. Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the National Fluid Power Association (NFPA) collaborated with 31 industrial partners to collect and consolidate energy specific measurements (consumption, emissions, efficiency) of deployed fluid power systems. The objective of this study was to establish a rudimentary order of magnitude estimate of the energy consumed by fluid powered systems. The analysis conducted in this study shows that fluid powered systems consumed between 2.0 and 2.9 Quadrillion (1015) Btus (Quads) of energy per year; producing between 310 and 380 million metric tons (MMT) of Carbon Dioxide (CO2). In terms of efficiency, the study indicates that, across all industries, fluid power system efficiencies range from less than 9% to as high as 60% (depending upon the application), with an average efficiency of 22%. A review of case studies shows that there are many opportunities to impact energy savings in both the manufacturing and transportation sectors by the development and deployment of energy efficient fluid power components and systems.

  4. Solar Energy Education. Home economics: student activities. Field test edition

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-03-01

    A view of solar energy from the standpoint of home economics is taken in this book of activities. Students are provided information on solar energy resources while performing these classroom activities. Instructions for the construction of a solar food dryer and a solar cooker are provided. Topics for study include window treatments, clothing, the history of solar energy, vitamins from the sun, and how to choose the correct solar home. (BCS)

  5. Evaluation of activity images in dynamics speckle in search of objective estimators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avendaño Montecinos, Marcos; Mora Canales, Victor; Cap, Nelly; Grumel, Eduardo; Rabal, Hector; Trivi, Marcelo; Baradit, Erik

    2015-08-01

    We explore the performance of two algorithms to screen loci of equal activity in dynamic speckle images. Dynamic speckle images are currently applied to several applications in medicine, biology, agriculture and other disciplines. Nevertheless, no objective standard has been proposed so far to evaluate the performance of the algorithms, which must be then relied on subjective appreciations. We use two case studies of activity that do not bear the biologic inherent variability to test the methods: "Generalized Differences" and "Fujii", looking for a standard to evaluate their performance in an objective way. As study cases, we use the drying of paint on an (assumed) unknown topography, namely the surface of a coin, and the activity due to pre heating a piece of paper that hides writings in the surface under the paper. A known object of simple topography is included in the image, besides of the painted coin, consisting in a paint pool where the depth is a linear function of its position. Both algorithms are applied to the images and the intensity profile of the results along the linear region of the pool activity is used to estimate the depth of the geometric topography hidden under paint in the coin. The accuracy of the result is used as a merit estimation of the corresponding algorithm. In the other experiment, a hidden dark bar printed on paper is covered with one or two paper leaves, slightly pre heated with a lamp and activity images registered and processed with both algorithms. The intensity profile of the activity images is used to estimate which method gives a better description of the bar edges images and their deterioration. Experimental results are shown.

  6. Estimating Energy Expenditure from Heart Rate in Older Adults: A Case for Calibration

    PubMed Central

    Schrack, Jennifer A.; Zipunnikov, Vadim; Goldsmith, Jeff; Bandeen-Roche, Karen; Crainiceanu, Ciprian M.; Ferrucci, Luigi

    2014-01-01

    Background Accurate measurement of free-living energy expenditure is vital to understanding changes in energy metabolism with aging. The efficacy of heart rate as a surrogate for energy expenditure is rooted in the assumption of a linear function between heart rate and energy expenditure, but its validity and reliability in older adults remains unclear. Objective To assess the validity and reliability of the linear function between heart rate and energy expenditure in older adults using different levels of calibration. Design Heart rate and energy expenditure were assessed across five levels of exertion in 290 adults participating in the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging. Correlation and random effects regression analyses assessed the linearity of the relationship between heart rate and energy expenditure and cross-validation models assessed predictive performance. Results Heart rate and energy expenditure were highly correlated (r = 0.98) and linear regardless of age or sex. Intra-person variability was low but inter-person variability was high, with substantial heterogeneity of the random intercept (s.d. = 0.372) despite similar slopes. Cross-validation models indicated individual calibration data substantially improves accuracy predictions of energy expenditure from heart rate, reducing the potential for considerable measurement bias. Although using five calibration measures provided the greatest reduction in the standard deviation of prediction errors (1.08 kcals/min), substantial improvement was also noted with two (0.75 kcals/min). Conclusion These findings indicate standard regression equations may be used to make population-level inferences when estimating energy expenditure from heart rate in older adults but caution should be exercised when making inferences at the individual level without proper calibration. PMID:24787146

  7. Estimation of percentage body fat by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry: evaluation by in vivo human elemental composition.

    PubMed

    Wang, ZiMian; Heymsfield, Steven B; Chen, Zhao; Zhu, Shankuan; Pierson, Richard N

    2010-05-01

    Dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) is widely applied for estimating body fat. The percentage of body mass as fat (%fat) is predicted from a DXA-estimated R(ST) value defined as the ratio of soft tissue attenuation at two photon energies (e.g., 40 keV and 70 keV). Theoretically, the R(ST) concept depends on the mass of each major element in the human body. The DXA R(ST) values, however, have never been fully evaluated by measured human elemental composition. The present investigation evaluated the DXA R(ST) value by the total body mass of 11 major elements and the DXA %fat by the five-component (5C) model, respectively. Six elements (i.e. C, N, Na, P, Cl and Ca) were measured by in vivo neutron activation analysis, and potassium (i.e. K) by whole-body (40)K counting in 27 healthy adults. Models were developed for predicting the total body mass of four additional elements (i.e. H, O, Mg and S). The elemental content of soft tissue, after correction for bone mineral elements, was used to predict the R(ST) values. The DXA R(ST) values were strongly associated with the R(ST) values predicted from elemental content (r = 0.976, P < 0.001), although there was a tendency for the elemental-predicted R(ST) to systematically exceed the DXA-measured R(ST) (mean +/- SD, 1.389 +/- 0.024 versus 1.341 +/- 0.024). DXA-estimated %fat was strongly associated with 5C %fat (24.4 +/- 12.0% versus 24.9 +/- 11.1%, r = 0.983, P < 0.001). DXA R(ST) is evaluated by in vivo elemental composition, and the present study supports the underlying physical concept and accuracy of the DXA method for estimating %fat. PMID:20393230

  8. Estimation of percentage body fat by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry: evaluation by in vivo human elemental composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, ZiMian; Heymsfield, Steven B.; Chen, Zhao; Zhu, Shankuan; Pierson, Richard N.

    2010-05-01

    Dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) is widely applied for estimating body fat. The percentage of body mass as fat (%fat) is predicted from a DXA-estimated RST value defined as the ratio of soft tissue attenuation at two photon energies (e.g., 40 keV and 70 keV). Theoretically, the RST concept depends on the mass of each major element in the human body. The DXA RST values, however, have never been fully evaluated by measured human elemental composition. The present investigation evaluated the DXA RST value by the total body mass of 11 major elements and the DXA %fat by the five-component (5C) model, respectively. Six elements (i.e. C, N, Na, P, Cl and Ca) were measured by in vivo neutron activation analysis, and potassium (i.e. K) by whole-body 40K counting in 27 healthy adults. Models were developed for predicting the total body mass of four additional elements (i.e. H, O, Mg and S). The elemental content of soft tissue, after correction for bone mineral elements, was used to predict the RST values. The DXA RST values were strongly associated with the RST values predicted from elemental content (r = 0.976, P < 0.001), although there was a tendency for the elemental-predicted RST to systematically exceed the DXA-measured RST (mean ± SD, 1.389 ± 0.024 versus 1.341 ± 0.024). DXA-estimated %fat was strongly associated with 5C %fat (24.4 ± 12.0% versus 24.9 ± 11.1%, r = 0.983, P < 0.001). DXA RST is evaluated by in vivo elemental composition, and the present study supports the underlying physical concept and accuracy of the DXA method for estimating %fat.

  9. Estimation of percentage body fat by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry: evaluation by in vivo human elemental composition

    PubMed Central

    Wang, ZiMian; Heymsfield, Steven B; Chen, Zhao; Zhu, Shankuan; Pierson, Richard N

    2010-01-01

    Dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) is widely applied for estimating body fat. The percentage of body mass as fat (%fat) is predicted from a DXA-estimated RST value defined as the ratio of soft tissue attenuation at two photon energies (e.g., 40 keV and 70 keV). Theoretically, the RST concept depends on the mass of each major element in the human body. The DXA RST values, however, have never been fully evaluated by measured human elemental composition. The present investigation evaluated the DXA RST value by the total body mass of 11 major elements and the DXA %fat by the five-component (5C) model, respectively. Six elements (i.e. C, N, Na, P, Cl and Ca) were measured by in vivo neutron activation analysis, and potassium (i.e. K) by whole-body 40K counting in 27 healthy adults. Models were developed for predicting the total body mass of four additional elements (i.e. H, O, Mg and S). The elemental content of soft tissue, after correction for bone mineral elements, was used to predict the RST values. The DXA RST values were strongly associated with the RST values predicted from elemental content (r = 0.976, P < 0.001), although there was a tendency for the elemental-predicted RST to systematically exceed the DXA-measured RST (mean ± SD, 1.389 ± 0.024 versus 1.341 ± 0.024). DXA-estimated %fat was strongly associated with 5C %fat (24.4 ± 12.0% versus 24.9 ± 11.1%, r = 0.983, P < 0.001). DXA RST evaluated by in vivo elemental composition, and the present study supports the underlying physical concept and accuracy of the DXA method for estimating %fat. PMID:20393230

  10. Development of weight and cost estimates for lifting surfaces with active controls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, R. D.; Flora, C. C.; Nelson, R. M.; Raymond, E. T.; Vincent, J. H.

    1976-01-01

    Equations and methodology were developed for estimating the weight and cost incrementals due to active controls added to the wing and horizontal tail of a subsonic transport airplane. The methods are sufficiently generalized to be suitable for preliminary design. Supporting methodology and input specifications for the weight and cost equations are provided. The weight and cost equations are structured to be flexible in terms of the active control technology (ACT) flight control system specification. In order to present a self-contained package, methodology is also presented for generating ACT flight control system characteristics for the weight and cost equations. Use of the methodology is illustrated.

  11. Estimation of phytochemicals and antioxidant activity of underutilized fruits of Andaman Islands (India).

    PubMed

    Singh, D R; Singh, Shrawan; Salim, K M; Srivastava, R C

    2012-06-01

    The present study aimed to determine the antioxidant activity and phytochemical contents in 10 underutilized fruits of Andaman Islands (India) namely Malpighia glabra L., Mangifera andamanica L., Morinda citrifolia L., Syzygium aqueum (Burm.f) Alst., Annona squamosa L., Averrhoa carambola L., Averrhoa bilimbi L., Dillenia indica L., Annona muricata L. and Ficus racemosa L. The antioxidant activity varied from 74.27% to 98.77%, and the methanol extract of M. glabra showed the highest antioxidant activity (98.77%; inhibitory concentration, IC(50) = 262.46 μg/ml). Methanol was found to be a better solvent than acetone and aqueous for estimating the antioxidant activity. M. glabra was found to be rich in phytochemicals viz. polyphenol (355.74 mg/100 g), anthocyanin (91.31 mg/100 g), carotenoids (109.16 mg/100 g), tannin (24.39 mg/100 g) and ascorbic acid (394.23 mg/100 g). Carbohydrate content was estimated to be highest in M. glabra (548 mg/100 g). Phenols, tannins, anthocyanins and carotenoids contents showed positive correlation (r² = 0.846, r² = 0.864, r² = 0.915 and r² = 0.806, respectively) with antioxidant activity. The information generated in present study will be useful for bioprospecting of underutilized fruits of Andaman Islands. PMID:22080844

  12. Estimating Active Transportation Behaviors to Support Health Impact Assessment in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Mansfield, Theodore J.; Gibson, Jacqueline MacDonald

    2016-01-01

    Health impact assessment (HIA) has been promoted as a means to encourage transportation and city planners to incorporate health considerations into their decision-making. Ideally, HIAs would include quantitative estimates of the population health effects of alternative planning scenarios, such as scenarios with and without infrastructure to support walking and cycling. However, the lack of baseline estimates of time spent walking or biking for transportation (together known as “active transportation”), which are critically related to health, often prevents planners from developing such quantitative estimates. To address this gap, we use data from the 2009 US National Household Travel Survey to develop a statistical model that estimates baseline time spent walking and biking as a function of the type of transportation used to commute to work along with demographic and built environment variables. We validate the model using survey data from the Raleigh–Durham–Chapel Hill, NC, USA, metropolitan area. We illustrate how the validated model could be used to support transportation-related HIAs by estimating the potential health benefits of built environment modifications that support walking and cycling. Our statistical model estimates that on average, individuals who commute on foot spend an additional 19.8 (95% CI 16.9–23.2) minutes per day walking compared to automobile commuters. Public transit riders walk an additional 5.0 (95% CI 3.5–6.4) minutes per day compared to automobile commuters. Bicycle commuters cycle for an additional 28.0 (95% CI 17.5–38.1) minutes per day compared to automobile commuters. The statistical model was able to predict observed transportation physical activity in the Raleigh–Durham–Chapel Hill region to within 0.5 MET-hours per day (equivalent to about 9 min of daily walking time) for 83% of observations. Across the Raleigh–Durham–Chapel Hill region, an estimated 38 (95% CI 15–59) premature deaths potentially could

  13. Estimating Active Transportation Behaviors to Support Health Impact Assessment in the United States.

    PubMed

    Mansfield, Theodore J; Gibson, Jacqueline MacDonald

    2016-01-01

    Health impact assessment (HIA) has been promoted as a means to encourage transportation and city planners to incorporate health considerations into their decision-making. Ideally, HIAs would include quantitative estimates of the population health effects of alternative planning scenarios, such as scenarios with and without infrastructure to support walking and cycling. However, the lack of baseline estimates of time spent walking or biking for transportation (together known as "active transportation"), which are critically related to health, often prevents planners from developing such quantitative estimates. To address this gap, we use data from the 2009 US National Household Travel Survey to develop a statistical model that estimates baseline time spent walking and biking as a function of the type of transportation used to commute to work along with demographic and built environment variables. We validate the model using survey data from the Raleigh-Durham-Chapel Hill, NC, USA, metropolitan area. We illustrate how the validated model could be used to support transportation-related HIAs by estimating the potential health benefits of built environment modifications that support walking and cycling. Our statistical model estimates that on average, individuals who commute on foot spend an additional 19.8 (95% CI 16.9-23.2) minutes per day walking compared to automobile commuters. Public transit riders walk an additional 5.0 (95% CI 3.5-6.4) minutes per day compared to automobile commuters. Bicycle commuters cycle for an additional 28.0 (95% CI 17.5-38.1) minutes per day compared to automobile commuters. The statistical model was able to predict observed transportation physical activity in the Raleigh-Durham-Chapel Hill region to within 0.5 MET-hours per day (equivalent to about 9 min of daily walking time) for 83% of observations. Across the Raleigh-Durham-Chapel Hill region, an estimated 38 (95% CI 15-59) premature deaths potentially could be avoided if the entire

  14. RESEARCH PAPER: A logistic model for magnetic energy storage in solar active regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hua-Ning; Cui, Yan-Mei; He, Han

    2009-06-01

    Previous statistical analyses of a large number of SOHO/MDI full disk longitudinal magnetograms provided a result that demonstrated how responses of solar flares to photospheric magnetic properties can be fitted with sigmoid functions. A logistic model reveals that these fitted sigmoid functions might be related to the free energy storage process in solar active regions. Although this suggested model is rather simple, the free energy level of active regions can be estimated and the probability of a solar flare with importance over a threshold can be forecast within a given time window.

  15. Merging satellite measurements of fire radiative energy and burned area products to estimate biomass burning: A European case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bistinas, I.; Saldaña, G. L.; Oom, D.; Sá, A. C.; Silva, J. M.; Pereira, J.

    2013-05-01

    Biomass burning is a key element of the terrestrial carbon cycle that influences the global radiation budget through the biomass consumption and the subsequently release of aerosols and trace gases into the atmosphere having huge impacts on the global climate. Recently, global products of daily fire activity have recorded Fire Radiative Power (FRP), providing a quantitative assessment of fire intensity across the globe. Several studies showed that FRP is proportional to the fire's fuel consumption and smoke emission rates through integration of the FRP over time, deriving the Fire Radiative Energy (FRE), which can be assumed as the total energy released over a spatio-temporal unit and used to infer total emissions from biomass burning in various ecosystems, omitting fuel load and combustion completeness information that are characterized by significant uncertainties at continental and global scale, and at the same time simplifying the computation of spatially explicit fuel consumption estimates. This study integrates spatial and temporal analysis using FRP data from the geostationary Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI) for the year 2008 and burned area from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) sensor (MCD64A1) for the same year focusing on Europe. An intercomparison assessment of the emission estimates with the Global Fire Data Emissions Database (GFED) followed, due to lack of FRE and combustion measurements in large scale for validation. We show that the fire-emitted energy approach can be used in continental scale reducing uncertainties in emission estimates which may lead to simplification of the fire parameterization in fire modelling, yet in more robust simulations.

  16. Cost and energy consumption estimates for the aluminum-air battery anode fuel cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1990-01-01

    At the request of DOE's Office of Energy Storage and Distribution (OESD), Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) conducted a study to generate estimates of the energy use and costs associated with the aluminum anode fuel cycle of the aluminum-air (Al-air) battery. The results of this analysis indicate that the cost and energy consumption characteristics of the mechanically rechargeable Al-air battery system are not as attractive as some other electrically rechargeable electric vehicle battery systems being developed by OESD. However, there are distinct advantages to mechanically rechargeable batteries, which may make the Al-air battery (or other mechanically rechargeable batteries) attractive for other uses, such as stand-alone applications. Fuel cells, such as the proton exchange membrane (PEM), and advanced secondary batteries may be better suited to electric vehicle applications.

  17. The Smart Grid: An Estimation of the Energy and CO2 Benefits

    SciTech Connect

    Pratt, Robert G.; Balducci, Patrick J.; Gerkensmeyer, Clint; Katipamula, Srinivas; Kintner-Meyer, Michael CW; Sanquist, Thomas F.; Schneider, Kevin P.; Secrest, Thomas J.

    2010-01-15

    This report articulates nine mechanisms by which the smart grid can reduce energy use and carbon impacts associated with electricity generation and delivery. The quantitative estimates of potential reductions in electricity sector energy and associated CO2 emissions presented are based on a survey of published results and simple analyses. This report does not attempt to justify the cost effectiveness of the smart grid, which to date has been based primarily upon the twin pillars of cost-effective operation and improved reliability. Rather, it attempts to quantify the additional energy and CO2 emission benefits inherent in the smart grid’s potential contribution to the nation’s goal of mitigating climate change by reducing the carbon footprint of the electric power system.

  18. The Smart Grid: An Estimation of the Energy and CO2 Benefits

    SciTech Connect

    Pratt, Robert G.; Balducci, Patrick J.; Gerkensmeyer, Clint; Katipamula, Srinivas; Kintner-Meyer, Michael CW; Sanquist, Thomas F.; Schneider, Kevin P.; Secrest, Thomas J.

    2010-01-27

    This report articulates nine mechanisms by which the smart grid can reduce energy use and carbon impacts associated with electricity generation and delivery. The quantitative estimates of potential reductions in electricity sector energy and associated CO2 emissions presented are based on a survey of published results and simple analyses. This report does not attempt to justify the cost effectiveness of the smart grid, which to date has been based primarily upon the twin pillars of cost-effective operation and improved reliability. Rather, it attempts to quantify the additional energy and CO2 emission benefits inherent in the smart grid’s potential contribution to the nation’s goal of mitigating climate change by reducing the carbon footprint of the electric power system.

  19. Cost and energy consumption estimates for the aluminum-air battery anode fuel cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Humphreys, K.K.; Brown, D.R.

    1990-01-01

    At the request of DOE's Office of Energy Storage and Distribution (OESD), Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) conducted a study to generate estimates of the energy use and costs associated with the aluminum anode fuel cycle of the aluminum-air (Al-air) battery. The results of this analysis indicate that the cost and energy consumption characteristics of the mechanically rechargeable Al-air battery system are not as attractive as some other electrically rechargeable electric vehicle battery systems being developed by OESD. However, there are distinct advantages to mechanically rechargeable batteries, which may make the Al-air battery (or other mechanically rechargeable batteries) attractive for other uses, such as stand-alone applications. Fuel cells, such as the proton exchange membrane (PEM), and advanced secondary batteries may be better suited to electric vehicle applications. 26 refs., 3 figs., 25 tabs.

  20. Estimation of Temporary Change of Brain Activities in Auditory Oddball Paradigm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukami, Tadanori; Koyanagi, Yusuke; Tanno, Yukinori; Shimada, Takamasa; Akatsuka, Takao; Saito, Yoichi

    In this research, we estimated temporary change of brain activities in auditory oddball paradigm by moving an analysis time window. An advantage of this method is that it can acquire rough changes of activated areas even with data having low time resolution. Eight normal subjects participated in the study, which consisted of a random series of 30 target and 70 nontarget stimuli. We investigated the activated area in three kinds of analysis time sections, from stimulus onset to 5 seconds after the stimulus (time section A), from 2 to 7 seconds after (B) and from 4 to 9 seconds after (C). In time section A, representative activated areas were regions including superior temporal gyrus centered around inferior frontal gyrus, left precentral gyrus corresponding to Broadmann area 6 (BA 6), right fusiform gyrus corresponding to BA 20, bilaterally medial frontal gyrus and right inferior temporal gyrus were activated. In B, we could see the activations in bilatelally cerebellum, inferior frontal gyrus, and region including left motor area. In C, bilatelally postcentral gyrus, left cingulate gyrus , right cerebellum and right insula were activated. Most activations were consistent with previous studies.

  1. Equating accelerometer estimates of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity: in search of the Rosetta Stone.

    PubMed

    Bornstein, Daniel B; Beets, Michael W; Byun, Wonwoo; Welk, Greg; Bottai, Matteo; Dowda, Marsha; Pate, Russell

    2011-09-01

    No universally accepted ActiGraph accelerometer cutpoints for quantifying moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) exist. Estimates of MVPA from one set of cutpoints cannot be directly compared to MVPA estimates using different cutpoints, even when the same outcome units are reported (MVPA mind(-1)). The purpose of this study was to illustrate the utility of an equating system that translates reported MVPA estimates from one set of cutpoints into another, to better inform public health policy. Secondary data analysis. ActiGraph data from a large preschool project (N=419, 3-6-yr-olds, CHAMPS) was used to conduct the analyses. Conversions were made among five different published MVPA cutpoints for children: Pate (PT), Sirard (SR), Puyau (PY), Van Cauwengerghe (VC), and Freedson Equation (FR). A 10-fold cross-validation procedure was used to develop prediction equations using MVPA estimated from each of the five sets of cutpoints as the dependent variable, with estimated MVPA from one of the other four sets of cutpoints (e.g., PT MVPA predicted from FR MVPA). The mean levels of MVPA for the total sample ranged from 22.5 (PY) to 269.0 (FR) mind(-1). Across the prediction models (5 total), the median proportion of variance explained (R(2)) was 0.76 (range 0.48-0.97). The median absolute percent error was 17.2% (range 6.3-38.4%). The prediction equations developed here allow for direct comparisons between studies employing different ActiGraph cutpoints in preschool-age children. These prediction equations give public health researchers and policy makers a more concise picture of physical activity levels of preschool-aged children. PMID:21524938

  2. Greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste characterization: Estimated volumes, radionuclide activities, and other characteristics. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-09-01

    The Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) planning for the disposal of greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste (GTCC LLW) requires characterization of the waste. This report estimates volumes, radionuclide activities, and waste forms of GTCC LLW to the year 2035. It groups the waste into four categories, representative of the type of generator or holder of the waste: Nuclear Utilities, Sealed Sources, DOE-Held, and Other Generator. GTCC LLW includes activated metals (activation hardware from reactor operation and decommissioning), process wastes (i.e., resins, filters, etc.), sealed sources, and other wastes routinely generated by users of radioactive material. Estimates reflect the possible effect that packaging and concentration averaging may have on the total volume of GTCC LLW. Possible GTCC mixed LLW is also addressed. Nuclear utilities will probably generate the largest future volume of GTCC LLW with 65--83% of the total volume. The other generators will generate 17--23% of the waste volume, while GTCC sealed sources are expected to contribute 1--12%. A legal review of DOE`s obligations indicates that the current DOE-Held wastes described in this report will not require management as GTCC LLW because of the contractual circumstances under which they were accepted for storage. This report concludes that the volume of GTCC LLW should not pose a significant management problem from a scientific or technical standpoint. The projected volume is small enough to indicate that a dedicated GTCC LLW disposal facility may not be justified. Instead, co-disposal with other waste types is being considered as an option.

  3. Hybrid energy storage systems utilizing redox active organic compounds

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Wei; Xu, Wu; Li, Liyu; Yang, Zhenguo

    2015-09-08

    Redox flow batteries (RFB) have attracted considerable interest due to their ability to store large amounts of power and energy. Non-aqueous energy storage systems that utilize at least some aspects of RFB systems are attractive because they can offer an expansion of the operating potential window, which can improve on the system energy and power densities. One example of such systems has a separator separating first and second electrodes. The first electrode includes a first current collector and volume containing a first active material. The second electrode includes a second current collector and volume containing a second active material. During operation, the first source provides a flow of first active material to the first volume. The first active material includes a redox active organic compound dissolved in a non-aqueous, liquid electrolyte and the second active material includes a redox active metal.

  4. Energy utilization rates during shuttle extravehicular activities.

    PubMed

    Waligora, J M; Kumar, K V

    1995-01-01

    The work rates or energy utilization rates during EVA are major factors in sizing of life support systems. These rates also provide a measure of ease of EVA and its cost in crew fatigue. From the first Shuttle EVA on the STS-6 mission in 1983, we have conducted 59 man-EVA and 341 man-hours of EVA. Energy utilization rates have been measured on each of these EVA. Metabolic rate was measured during each EVA using oxygen utilization corrected for suit leakage. From 1981-1987, these data were available for average data over the EVA or over large segments of the EVA. Since 1987, EVA oxygen utilization data were available at 2-minute intervals. The average metabolic rate on Shuttle EVA (194 kcal/hr.) has been significantly lower than metabolic rates during Apollo and Skylab missions. Peak rates have been below design levels, infrequent, and of short duration. The data suggest that the energy cost of tasks may be inversely related to the degree of training for the task. The data provide insight on the safety margins provided by life support designs and on the energy cost of Station construction EVA. PMID:11540993

  5. Extending the Diffuse Layer Model of Surface Acidity Behavior: III. Estimating Bound Site Activity Coefficients

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although detailed thermodynamic analyses of the 2-pK diffuse layer surface complexation model generally specify bound site activity coefficients for the purpose of accounting for those non-ideal excess free energies contributing to bound site electrochemical potentials, in applic...

  6. Estimation of Rainfall Kinetic Energy by Rain Intensity and/or Radar Reflectivity Factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, N.; Delrieu, G.; Boudevillain, B.; Hazenberg, P.; Uijlenhoet, R.

    2011-12-01

    This study presents an approach to estimate the rainfall kinetic energy (KE) by rain intensity (R) and radar reflectivity factor (Z) separately, or jointly, on the basis of a one- or two-moment scaled formulation. This formulation considers the raindrop size distribution (DSD) as a combination of bulk rainfall variable(s) (R or/and Z) and an intrinsic distribution g(x), which is in function of the scaled raindrop diameter x. Results from previous studies showed that g(x) remains more or less constant, hence the variability of DSD is mainly explained by the bulk rainfall variable(s). In this study, the Gamma probability density function (pdf) with two parameters is used to model the g(x). Considered the self-consistent relationships between parameters, a robust method is proposed to estimate three climatological g(x), in R-, Z- and RZ-scaled formulation respectively, with a 28-month DSD dataset collected in the Cevennes-Vivarais region, France. Three relationships (KE-R, KE-Z and KE-(R,Z)), which link the observations (R and/or Z) to rainfall kinetic energy (KE), are established based on three climatological g(x). As expected, the combination of R and Z yields a significant improvement of the estimation of KE compared to the single-moment formulations. And Z yields a better performance in KE estimating compared to the KE-R relationship. In terms of the application of these relationships based on real radar reflectivity factors and/or rain gauge measurements, the combination of R and Z yields also the best performance in estimation of KE among the three relationships. Different from the application of the disdrometer data, the performance of the real KE-Z relationship degrades compared to the real KE-R relationship, which is probably due to the sampling error of radar. However, KE estimated by radar possess the advantages in spatialization of kinetic energy over that based on rain gauge stations. This study was supported financially by the HYDRATE project of the

  7. Estimating evapotranspiration with thermal UAV data and two source energy balance models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, H.; Nieto, H.; Jensen, R.; Guzinski, R.; Zarco-Tejada, P. J.; Friborg, T.

    2015-08-01

    Estimating evapotranspiration is important when managing water resources and cultivating crops. Evapotranspiration can be estimated using land surface heat flux models and remotely sensed land surface temperatures (LST) which recently have become obtainable in very high resolution using Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs). Very high resolution LST can give insight into e.g. distributed crop conditions within cultivated fields. In this study evapotranspiration is estimated using LST retrieved with a UAV and the physically-based, two source energy balance models: the Priestley-Taylor TSEB (TSEB-PT) and the Dual-Temperature-Difference (DTD). A fixed-wing UAV was flown over a barley field in western Denmark during the spring and summer in 2014 and retrieved images of LST is successfully processed into thermal mosaics which serve as model input for both TSEB-PT and DTD. The aim is to assess whether a lightweight thermal camera mounted on a UAV is able to provide data of sufficient quality to obtain high spatial and temporal resolution surface energy heat fluxes. Furthermore, this study evaluates the performance of the two source energy balance (TSEB) model scheme during cloudy and overcast weather conditions. This is feasible due to the low data retrieval altitude compared to satellite thermal data that are only available during clear skies and sunny conditions. Flux estimates from TSEB-PT and DTD are compared and validated against field data collected using an eddy covariance system located at same site at which the UAV flights were conducted. Furthermore, spatially distributed evapotranspiration patterns are evaluated using known irrigation patterns. Evapotranspiration is well estimated by both TSEB-PT and DTD with DTD as the best predictor. The DTD model provides results comparable to studies estimating evapotranspiration with satellite retrieved LST and physical land-surface models. This study shows that the UAV platform and the lightweight thermal camera provide high

  8. A New Black Hole Mass Estimate for Obscured Active Galactic Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minezaki, Takeo; Matsushita, Kyoko

    2015-04-01

    We propose a new method for estimating the mass of a supermassive black hole, applicable to obscured active galactic nuclei (AGNs). This method estimates the black hole mass using the width of the narrow core of the neutral FeKα emission line in X-rays and the distance of its emitting region from the black hole based on the isotropic luminosity indicator via the luminosity scaling relation. Assuming the virial relation between the locations and the velocity widths of the neutral FeKα line core and the broad Hβ emission line, the luminosity scaling relation of the neutral FeKα line core emitting region is estimated. We find that the velocity width of the neutral FeKα line core falls between that of the broad Balmer emission lines and the corresponding value at the dust reverberation radius for most of the target AGNs. The black hole mass {{M}BH,FeKα } estimated with this method is then compared with other black hole mass estimates, such as the broad emission-line reverberation mass {{M}BH,rev} for type 1 AGNs, the mass {{M}BH,{{H2}O}} based on the H2O maser, and the single-epoch mass estimate {{M}BH,pol} based on the polarized broad Balmer lines for type 2 AGNs. We find that {{M}BH,FeKα } is consistent with {{M}BH,rev} and {{M}BH,pol}, and find that {{M}BH,FeKα } correlates well with {{M}BH,{{H2}O}}. These results suggest that {{M}BH,FeKα } is a potential indicator of the black hole mass for obscured AGNs. In contrast, {{M}BH,FeKα } is systematically larger than {{M}BH,{{H2}O}} by about a factor of 5, and the possible origins are discussed.

  9. Critical analysis of the Hanford spent nuclear fuel project activity based cost estimate

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, R.N.

    1998-09-29

    In 1997, the SNFP developed a baseline change request (BCR) and submitted it to DOE-RL for approval. The schedule was formally evaluated to have a 19% probability of success [Williams, 1998]. In December 1997, DOE-RL Manager John Wagoner approved the BCR contingent upon a subsequent independent review of the new baseline. The SNFP took several actions during the first quarter of 1998 to prepare for the independent review. The project developed the Estimating Requirements and Implementation Guide [DESH, 1998] and trained cost account managers (CAMS) and other personnel involved in the estimating process in activity-based cost (ABC) estimating techniques. The SNFP then applied ABC estimating techniques to develop the basis for the December Baseline (DB) and documented that basis in Basis of Estimate (BOE) books. These BOEs were provided to DOE in April 1998. DOE commissioned Professional Analysis, Inc. (PAI) to perform a critical analysis (CA) of the DB. PAI`s review formally began on April 13. PAI performed the CA, provided three sets of findings to the SNFP contractor, and initiated reconciliation meetings. During the course of PAI`s review, DOE directed the SNFP to develop a new baseline with a higher probability of success. The contractor transmitted the new baseline, which is referred to as the High Probability Baseline (HPB), to DOE on April 15, 1998 [Williams, 1998]. The HPB was estimated to approach a 90% confidence level on the start of fuel movement [Williams, 1998]. This high probability resulted in an increased cost and a schedule extension. To implement the new baseline, the contractor initiated 26 BCRs with supporting BOES. PAI`s scope was revised on April 28 to add reviewing the HPB and the associated BCRs and BOES.

  10. Energy Around Us. A Fall Activity Packet for Fourth Grade.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson Community Coll., MI. Dahlem Environmental Education Center.

    This instructional packet is one of 14 school environmental education programs developed for use in the classroom and at the Dahlem Environmental Education Center (DEEC) of the Jackson Community College (Michigan). Provided in the packet are pre-trip activities, field trip activities, and post-trip activities which focus on energy uses, energy…

  11. Estimation of capacity of suspended load considering effects of preservation of turbulent kinetic energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naruse, H.; Sugawara, D.; Goto, K.

    2014-12-01

    Quantitative estimation of capacity of suspended sediment load is critical for reconstruction of flows such as tsunamis or turbidity currents. Capacity of suspended load is a layer-averaged concentration at which suspended sediments are saturated in flows, and it works as a threshold between erosion and deposition from suspended sediments. Capacity of suspended load varies depending on sediment grain-size, flow velocity and flow height, and therefore it is useful for reconstructing paleohydraulic conditions of suspension-rich flows.Generally, suspension capacity has been calculated from a simple equilibrium conditions of rates of sediment entrainment and suspension fallout. Various empirical functions of sediment entrainment are available, and suspension fallout rates can be estimated from theoretical distribution. However, Goto et al. (2014) recently revealed that sediment concentration of actual run-up flows of large-scale tsunamis is far below the estimated value based on the field observations of 2011 Tohoku-Oki Tsunami. Thus, it is necessary to reconsider existing models of suspension capacity. Here we propose a new method to estimate capacity of suspended load considering preservation of kinetic energy of turbulence. Density stratification caused by suspended sediments expends energy of turbulence in flows, but most of previous methods did not consider this effect. We employed a model to calculate preservation of turbulent kinetic energy proposed by Parker et al. (1986). As a result, it was revealed that capacity of high-velocity flows (e.g. 10 m/s) is quite low (e.g. 2 %) although previous models predict very high-concentration (e.g. ~20 %). Our estimation is quite conformable to the result of the observation of 2011 Tohoku-Oki Tsunami. Also, our model predict that friction of flows remarkably decrease due to expended turbulence energy. Decrease of Reynolds stress causes apparently low friction coefficient of flows.Our new method is especially important for

  12. Estimation of ballistic block landing energy during 2014 Mount Ontake eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsunematsu, Kae; Ishimine, Yasuhiro; Kaneko, Takayuki; Yoshimoto, Mitsuhiro; Fujii, Toshitsugu; Yamaoka, Koshun

    2016-05-01

    The 2014 Mount Ontake eruption started just before noon on September 27, 2014. It killed 58 people, and five are still missing (as of January 1, 2016). The casualties were mainly caused by the impact of ballistic blocks around the summit area. It is necessary to know the magnitude of the block velocity and energy to construct a hazard map of ballistic projectiles and design effective shelters and mountain huts. The ejection velocities of the ballistic projectiles were estimated by comparing the observed distribution of the ballistic impact craters on the ground with simulated distributions of landing positions under various sets of conditions. A three-dimensional numerical multiparticle ballistic model adapted to account for topographic effect was used to estimate the ejection angles. From these simulations, we have obtained an ejection angle of γ = 20° from vertical to horizontal and α = 20° from north to east. With these ejection angle conditions, the ejection speed was estimated to be between 145 and 185 m/s for a previously obtained range of drag coefficients of 0.62-1.01. The order of magnitude of the mean landing energy obtained using our numerical simulation was 104 J.

  13. Efficient dynamical correction of the transition state theory rate estimate for a flat energy barrier.

    PubMed

    Mökkönen, Harri; Ala-Nissila, Tapio; Jónsson, Hannes

    2016-09-01

    The recrossing correction to the transition state theory estimate of a thermal rate can be difficult to calculate when the energy barrier is flat. This problem arises, for example, in polymer escape if the polymer is long enough to stretch between the initial and final state energy wells while the polymer beads undergo diffusive motion back and forth over the barrier. We present an efficient method for evaluating the correction factor by constructing a sequence of hyperplanes starting at the transition state and calculating the probability that the system advances from one hyperplane to another towards the product. This is analogous to what is done in forward flux sampling except that there the hyperplane sequence starts at the initial state. The method is applied to the escape of polymers with up to 64 beads from a potential well. For high temperature, the results are compared with direct Langevin dynamics simulations as well as forward flux sampling and excellent agreement between the three rate estimates is found. The use of a sequence of hyperplanes in the evaluation of the recrossing correction speeds up the calculation by an order of magnitude as compared with the traditional approach. As the temperature is lowered, the direct Langevin dynamics simulations as well as the forward flux simulations become computationally too demanding, while the harmonic transition state theory estimate corrected for recrossings can be calculated without significant increase in the computational effort. PMID:27609008

  14. EFFECT OF POLARIMETRIC NOISE ON THE ESTIMATION OF TWIST AND MAGNETIC ENERGY OF FORCE-FREE FIELDS

    SciTech Connect

    Tiwari, Sanjiv Kumar; Venkatakrishnan, P.; Gosain, Sanjay; Joshi, Jayant E-mail: pvk@prl.res.in E-mail: jayant@prl.res.in

    2009-07-20

    The force-free parameter {alpha}, also known as helicity parameter or twist parameter, bears the same sign as the magnetic helicity under some restrictive conditions. The single global value of {alpha} for a whole active region gives the degree of twist per unit axial length. We investigate the effect of polarimetric noise on the calculation of global {alpha} value and magnetic energy of an analytical bipole. The analytical bipole has been generated using the force-free field approximation with a known value of constant {alpha} and magnetic energy. The magnetic parameters obtained from the analytical bipole are used to generate Stokes profiles from the Unno-Rachkovsky solutions for polarized radiative transfer equations. Then we add random noise of the order of 10{sup -3} of the continuum intensity (I {sub c}) in these profiles to simulate the real profiles obtained by modern spectropolarimeters such as Hinode (SOT/SP), SVM (USO), ASP, DLSP, POLIS, and SOLIS etc. These noisy profiles are then inverted using a Milne-Eddington inversion code to retrieve the magnetic parameters. Hundred realizations of this process of adding random noise and polarimetric inversion is repeated to study the distribution of error in global {alpha} and magnetic energy values. The results show that (1) the sign of {alpha} is not influenced by polarimetric noise and very accurate values of global twist can be calculated, and (2) accurate estimation of magnetic energy with uncertainty as low as 0.5% is possible under the force-free condition.

  15. Fuzzy Discrimination Analysis Method for Earthquake Energy K-Class Estimation with respect to Local Magnitude Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mumladze, T.; Gachechiladze, J.

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of the present study is to establish relation between earthquake energy K-class (the relative energy characteristic) defined as logarithm of seismic waves energy E in joules obtained from analog stations data and local (Richter) magnitude ML obtained from digital seismograms. As for these data contain uncertainties the effective tools of fuzzy discrimination analysis are suggested for subjective estimates. Application of fuzzy analysis methods is an innovative approach to solving a complicated problem of constracting a uniform energy scale through the whole earthquake catalogue, also it avoids many of the data collection problems associated with probabilistic approaches; and it can handle incomplete information, partial inconsistency and fuzzy descriptions of data in a natural way. Another important task is to obtain frequency-magnitude relation based on K parameter, calculation of the Gutenberg-Richter parameters (a, b) and examining seismic activity in Georgia. Earthquake data files are using for periods: from 1985 to 1990 and from 2004 to 2009 for area j=410 - 430.5, l=410 - 470.

  16. Greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste characterization: Estimated volumes, radionuclide activities, and other characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Hulse, R.A.

    1991-08-01

    Planning for storage or disposal of greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste (GTCC LLW) requires characterization of that waste to estimate volumes, radionuclide activities, and waste forms. Data from existing literature, disposal records, and original research were used to estimate the characteristics and project volumes and radionuclide activities to the year 2035. GTCC LLW is categorized as: nuclear utilities waste, sealed sources waste, DOE-held potential GTCC LLW; and, other generator waste. It has been determined that the largest volume of those wastes, approximately 57%, is generated by nuclear power plants. The Other Generator waste category contributes approximately 10% of the total GTCC LLW volume projected to the year 2035. Waste held by the Department of Energy, which is potential GTCC LLW, accounts for nearly 33% of all waste projected to the year 2035; however, no disposal determination has been made for that waste. Sealed sources are less than 0.2% of the total projected volume of GTCC LLW.

  17. Estimation of Free-Living Energy Expenditure by Heart Rate and Movement Sensing: A Doubly-Labelled Water Study

    PubMed Central

    Brage, Søren; Westgate, Kate; Franks, Paul W.; Stegle, Oliver; Wright, Antony; Ekelund, Ulf; Wareham, Nicholas J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Accurate assessment of energy expenditure (EE) is important for the study of energy balance and metabolic disorders. Combined heart rate (HR) and acceleration (ACC) sensing may increase precision of physical activity EE (PAEE) which is the most variable component of total EE (TEE). Objective To evaluate estimates of EE using ACC and HR data with or without individual calibration against doubly-labelled water (DLW) estimates of EE. Design 23 women and 23 men (22–55 yrs, 48–104 kg, 8–46%body fat) underwent 45-min resting EE (REE) measurement and completed a 20-min treadmill test, an 8-min step test, and a 3-min walk test for individual calibration. ACC and HR were monitored and TEE measured over 14 days using DLW. Diet-induced thermogenesis (DIT) was calculated from food-frequency questionnaire. PAEE (TEE ÷ REE ÷ DIT) and TEE were compared to estimates from ACC and HR using bias, root mean square error (RMSE), and correlation statistics. Results Mean(SD) measured PAEE and TEE were 66(25) kJ·day-1·kg-1, and 12(2.6) MJ·day-1, respectively. Estimated PAEE from ACC was 54(15) kJ·day-1·kg-1 (p<0.001), with RMSE 24 kJ·day-1·kg-1 and correlation r = 0.52. PAEE estimated from HR and ACC+HR with treadmill calibration were 67(42) and 69(25) kJ·day-1·kg-1 (bias non-significant), with RMSE 34 and 20 kJ·day-1·kg-1 and correlations r = 0.58 and r = 0.67, respectively. Similar results were obtained with step-calibrated and walk-calibrated models, whereas non-calibrated models were less precise (RMSE: 37 and 24 kJ·day-1·kg-1, r = 0.40 and r = 0.55). TEE models also had high validity, with biases <5%, and correlations r = 0.71 (ACC), r = 0.66–0.76 (HR), and r = 0.76–0.83 (ACC+HR). Conclusions Both accelerometry and heart rate may be used to estimate EE in adult European men and women, with improved precision if combined and if heart rate is individually calibrated. PMID:26349056

  18. Testing an Energy Balance Model for Estimating Actual Evapotranspiration Using Remotely Sensed Data. [Hannover, West Germany barley and wheat fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurney, R. J.; Camillo, P. J.

    1985-01-01

    An energy-balance model is used to estimate daily evapotranspiration for 3 days for a barley field and a wheat field near Hannover, Federal Republic of Germany. The model was calibrated using once-daily estimates of surface temperatures, which may be remotely sensed. The evaporation estimates were within the 95% error bounds of independent eddy correlation estimates for the daytime periods for all three days for both sites, but the energy-balance estimates are generally higher; it is unclear which estimate is biassed. Soil moisture in the top 2 cm of soil, which may be remotely sensed, may be used to improve these evaporation estimates under partial ground cover. Sensitivity studies indicate the amount of ground data required is not excessive.

  19. The use of high spectral resolution bands for estimating absorbed photosynthetically active radiation (A par)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Moon S.; Daughtry, C. S. T.; Chappelle, E. W.; Mcmurtrey, J. E.; Walthall, C. L.

    1994-01-01

    Most remote sensing estimations of vegetation variables such as Leaf Area Index (LAI), Absorbed Photosynthetically Active Radiation (APAR), and phytomass are made using broad band sensors with a bandwidth of approximately 100 nm. However, high resolution spectrometers are available and have not been fully exploited for the purpose of improving estimates of vegetation variables. A study directed to investigate the use of high spectral resolution spectroscopy for remote sensing estimates of APAR in vegetation canopies in the presence of nonphotosynthetic background materials such as soil and leaf litter is presented. A high spectral resolution method defined as the Chlorophyll Absorption Ratio Index (CARI) was developed for minimizing the effects of nonphotosynthetic materials in the remote estimates of APAR. CARI utilizes three bands at 550, 670, and 700 nm with bandwidth of 10 nm. Simulated canopy reflectance of a range of LAI were generated with the SAIL model using measurements of 42 different soil types as canopy background. CARI obtained from the simulated canopy reflectance was compared with the broad band vegetation indices (Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), Soil Adjusted Vegetation Index (SAVI), and Simple Ratio (SR)). CARI reduced the effect of nonphotosynthetic background materials in the assessment of vegetation canopy APAR more effectively than broad band vegetation indices.

  20. Estimating forest and woodland aboveground biomass using active and passive remote sensing

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wu, Zhuoting; Dye, Dennis G.; Vogel, John M.; Middleton, Barry R.

    2016-01-01

    Aboveground biomass was estimated from active and passive remote sensing sources, including airborne lidar and Landsat-8 satellites, in an eastern Arizona (USA) study area comprised of forest and woodland ecosystems. Compared to field measurements, airborne lidar enabled direct estimation of individual tree height with a slope of 0.98 (R2 = 0.98). At the plot-level, lidar-derived height and intensity metrics provided the most robust estimate for aboveground biomass, producing dominant species-based aboveground models with errors ranging from 4 to 14Mg ha –1 across all woodland and forest species. Landsat-8 imagery produced dominant species-based aboveground biomass models with errors ranging from 10 to 28 Mg ha –1. Thus, airborne lidar allowed for estimates for fine-scale aboveground biomass mapping with low uncertainty, while Landsat-8 seems best suited for broader spatial scale products such as a national biomass essential climate variable (ECV) based on land cover types for the United States.

  1. Photosynthetically active radiation and comparison of methods for its estimation in equatorial Singapore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Puay Yok; Ismail, Mirza Rifqi Bin

    2016-02-01

    Photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) is an important input variable for urban climate, crop modelling and ecosystem services studies. Despite its importance, only a few empirical studies have been conducted on PAR, its relationship to global solar radiation and sky conditions and its estimation in the tropics. We report in this study, the characterisation of PAR in Singapore through direct measurements and development of models for its estimation using input variables of global solar radiation ( H), photometric radiation ( L), clearness index ( k t ) and sky view factor (SVF). Daily PAR showed a good correlation with daily H and had a comparatively small seasonal variation in PAR due to Singapore's equatorial position. The ratio of PAR to H ( PAR/ H) showed a slight depression in midyear from May to August, which correlated well with seasonal patterns in rainfall over the study period. Hourly PAR/ H increased throughout the day. Three empirical models developed in this study were able to predict daily PAR satisfactorily, with the most accurate model being one which included both H and k t as independent variables. A regression model for estimation of PAR under shaded conditions using SVF produced satisfactory estimation of daily PAR but was prone to high mean percentage error at low PAR levels.

  2. Effects of Intense Physical Activity with Free Water Replacement on Bioimpedance Parameters and Body Fluid Estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neves, E. B.; Ulbricht, L.; Krueger, E.; Romaneli, E. F. R.; Souza, M. N.

    2012-12-01

    Authors have emphasized the need for previous care in order to perform reliable bioimpedance acquisition. Despite of this need some authors have reported that intense physical training has little effect on Bioimpedance Analysis (BIA), while other ones have observed significant effects on bioimpedance parameters in the same condition, leading to body composition estimates considered incompatible with human physiology. The aim of this work was to quantify the changes in bioimpedance parameters, as well as in body fluids estimates by BIA, after four hours of intense physical activity with free water replacement in young males. Xitron Hydra 4200 equipment was used to acquire bioimpedance data before and immediately after the physical training. After data acquisition body fluids were estimates from bioimpedance parameters. Height and weight of all subjects were also acquired to the nearest 0.1 cm and 0.1 kg, respectively. Results point that among the bioimpedance parameter, extracellular resistance presented the most coherent behavior, leading to reliable estimates of the extracellular fluid and part of the total body water. Results also show decreases in height and weight of the participants, which were associated to the decrease in body hydration and in intervertebral discs.

  3. Energy monitoring system based on human activity in the workplace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mustafa, Nur Hanim; Husain, Mohd Nor; Aziz, Mohamad Zoinol Abidin Abdul; Othman, Mohd Azlishah; Malek, Fareq

    2015-05-01

    Human behaviors always related to day routine activities in a smart house directly give the significant factor to manage energy usage in human life. An Addition that, the factor will contribute to the best efficiency of the system. This paper will focus on the monitoring efficiency based on duration time in office hours around 8am until 5pm which depend on human behavior at working place. Besides that, the correlation coefficient method is used to show the relation between energy consumption and energy saving based on the total hours of time energy spent. In future, the percentages of energy monitoring system usage will be increase to manage energy saving based on human behaviors. This scenario will help to see the human activity in the workplace in order to get the energy saving and support world green environment.

  4. Probabilistic parameter estimation of activated sludge processes using Markov Chain Monte Carlo.

    PubMed

    Sharifi, Soroosh; Murthy, Sudhir; Takács, Imre; Massoudieh, Arash

    2014-03-01

    One of the most important challenges in making activated sludge models (ASMs) applicable to design problems is identifying the values of its many stoichiometric and kinetic parameters. When wastewater characteristics data from full-scale biological treatment systems are used for parameter estimation, several sources of uncertainty, including uncertainty in measured data, external forcing (e.g. influent characteristics), and model structural errors influence the value of the estimated parameters. This paper presents a Bayesian hierarchical modeling framework for the probabilistic estimation of activated sludge process parameters. The method provides the joint probability density functions (JPDFs) of stoichiometric and kinetic parameters by updating prior information regarding the parameters obtained from expert knowledge and literature. The method also provides the posterior correlations between the parameters, as well as a measure of sensitivity of the different constituents with respect to the parameters. This information can be used to design experiments to provide higher information content regarding certain parameters. The method is illustrated using the ASM1 model to describe synthetically generated data from a hypothetical biological treatment system. The results indicate that data from full-scale systems can narrow down the ranges of some parameters substantially whereas the amount of information they provide regarding other parameters is small, due to either large correlations between some of the parameters or a lack of sensitivity with respect to the parameters. PMID:24384542

  5. On the possibility of negative activation energies in bimolecular reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaffe, R. L.

    1978-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the rate constants for model reacting systems was studied to understand some recent experimental measurements which imply the existence of negative activation energies. A collision theory model and classical trajectory calculations are used to demonstrate that the reaction probability can vary inversely with collision energy for bimolecular reactions occurring on attractive potential energy surfaces. However, this is not a sufficient condition to ensure that the rate constant has a negative temperature dependence. On the basis of these calculations, it seems unlikely that a true bimolecular reaction between neutral molecules will have a negative activation energy.

  6. Estimating youth locomotion ground reaction forces using an accelerometer-based activity monitor.

    PubMed

    Neugebauer, Jennifer M; Hawkins, David A; Beckett, Laurel

    2012-01-01

    To address a variety of questions pertaining to the interactions between physical activity, musculoskeletal loading and musculoskeletal health/injury/adaptation, simple methods are needed to quantify, outside a laboratory setting, the forces acting on the human body during daily activities. The purpose of this study was to develop a statistically based model to estimate peak vertical ground reaction force (pVGRF) during youth gait. 20 girls (10.9 ± 0.9 years) and 15 boys (12.5 ± 0.6 years) wore a Biotrainer AM over their right hip. Six walking and six running trials were completed after a standard warm-up. Average AM intensity (g) and pVGRF (N) during stance were determined. Repeated measures mixed effects regression models to estimate pVGRF from Biotrainer activity monitor acceleration in youth (girls 10-12, boys 12-14 years) while walking and running were developed. Log transformed pVGRF had a statistically significant relationship with activity monitor acceleration, centered mass, sex (girl), type of locomotion (run), and locomotion type-acceleration interaction controlling for subject as a random effect. A generalized regression model without subject specific random effects was also developed. The average absolute differences between the actual and predicted pVGRF were 5.2% (1.6% standard deviation) and 9% (4.2% standard deviation) using the mixed and generalized models, respectively. The results of this study support the use of estimating pVGRF from hip acceleration using a mixed model regression equation. PMID:23133564

  7. Bayesian Estimates of Free Energies from Nonequilibrium Work Data in the Presence of Instrument Noise

    SciTech Connect

    Maragakis, Paul; Ritort, Felix; Bustamante, Carlos; Karplus, Martin; Crooks, Gavin E.

    2008-07-08

    The Jarzynski equality and the fluctuation theorem relate equilibrium free energy differences to nonequilibrium measurements of the work. These relations extend to single-molecule experiments that have probed the finite-time thermodynamics of proteins and nucleic acids. The effects of experimental error and instrument noise have not been considered previously. Here, we present a Bayesian formalism for estimating free energy changes from nonequilibrium work measurements that compensates for instrument noise and combines data from multiple driving protocols. We reanalyze a recent set of experiments in which a single RNA hairpin is unfolded and refolded using optical tweezers at three different rates. Interestingly, the fastest and farthest-from-equilibrium measurements contain the least instrumental noise and, therefore, provide a more accurate estimate of the free energies than a few slow, more noisy, near-equilibrium measurements. The methods we propose here will extend the scope of single-molecule experiments; they can be used in the analysis of data from measurements with atomic force microscopy, optical, and magnetic tweezers

  8. X-ray dual energy spectral parameter optimization for bone Calcium/Phosphorus mass ratio estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotiropoulou, P. I.; Fountos, G. P.; Martini, N. D.; Koukou, V. N.; Michail, C. M.; Valais, I. G.; Kandarakis, I. S.; Nikiforidis, G. C.

    2015-09-01

    Calcium (Ca) and Phosphorus (P) bone mass ratio has been identified as an important, yet underutilized, risk factor in osteoporosis diagnosis. The purpose of this simulation study is to investigate the use of effective or mean mass attenuation coefficient in Ca/P mass ratio estimation with the use of a dual-energy method. The investigation was based on the minimization of the accuracy of Ca/P ratio, with respect to the Coefficient of Variation of the ratio. Different set-ups were examined, based on the K-edge filtering technique and single X-ray exposure. The modified X-ray output was attenuated by various Ca/P mass ratios resulting in nine calibration points, while keeping constant the total bone thickness. The simulated data were obtained considering a photon counting energy discriminating detector. The standard deviation of the residuals was used to compare and evaluate the accuracy between the different dual energy set-ups. The optimum mass attenuation coefficient for the Ca/P mass ratio estimation was the effective coefficient in all the examined set-ups. The variation of the residuals between the different set-ups was not significant.

  9. Estimating Renewable Energy Economic Potential in the United States. Methodology and Initial Results

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Austin; Beiter, Philipp; Heimiller, Donna; Davidson, Carolyn; Denholm, Paul; Melius, Jennifer; Lopez, Anthony; Hettinger, Dylan; Mulcahy, David; Porro, Gian

    2015-07-30

    This report describes a geospatial analysis method to estimate the economic potential of several renewable resources available for electricity generation in the United States. Economic potential, one measure of renewable generation potential, may be defined in several ways. For example, one definition might be expected revenues (based on local market prices) minus generation costs, considered over the expected lifetime of the generation asset. Another definition might be generation costs relative to a benchmark (e.g., a natural gas combined cycle plant) using assumptions of fuel prices, capital cost, and plant efficiency. Economic potential in this report is defined as the subset of the available resource technical potential where the cost required to generate the electricity (which determines the minimum revenue requirements for development of the resource) is below the revenue available in terms of displaced energy and displaced capacity. The assessment is conducted at a high geospatial resolution (more than 150,000 technology-specific sites in the continental United States) to capture the significant variation in local resource, costs, and revenue potential. This metric can be a useful screening factor for understanding the economic viability of renewable generation technologies at a specific location. In contrast to many common estimates of renewable energy potential, economic potential does not consider market dynamics, customer demand, or most policy drivers that may incent renewable energy generation.

  10. Design of an expert system for estimating the cost of new knowledge in high energy astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bosworth, Edward L., Jr.; Fennelly, A. J.

    1988-01-01

    The High Energy Astrophysics Costing Tool (HEACT) is a combined Expert System/Numerical Simulation to evaluate sensors and experiments proposed for space platforms in order to determine their expected performance and to assess the amount and quality of scientific information likely to be gathered by such experiments. The end product of this tool will be both a cost estimate for the experiment package as deployed and also an estimate of the amount of new scientific knowledge (both new data and reductions in the uncertainties of previous measurements) which would result from the actual deployment and operation of that experiment package. The numerical simulation part of HEACT will contain components to: (1) calculate the high energy signatures of both actual and proposed classes of astrophysical objects, and (2) model the response and resolution of the candidate sensors for observing those objects. The rule based part of the HEACT will be based on knowledge in the areas of experiment design, instrument selection, and system integration developed from experience with existing high energy astrophysics observatories, both orbiting and lofted by rockets or balloons. This paper presents mainly results from the design of the rule-based part of HEACT. It focuses on the structure of the rules and the structures used to represent the knowledge related to the design and integration of such experiments. Methods for integrating the results from numerical simulations into the expert system will also be discussed.

  11. Practical method for estimating wind characteristics at potential wind-energy-conversion sites

    SciTech Connect

    Endlich, R. M.; Ludwig, F. L.; Bhumralkar, C. M.; Estoque, M. A.

    1980-08-01

    Terrain features and variations in the depth of the atmospheric boundary layer produce local variations in wind, and these variations are not depicted well by standard weather reports. A method is developed to compute local winds for use in estimating the wind energy available at any potential site for a wind turbine. The method uses the terrain heights for an area surrounding the site and a series of wind and pressure reports from the nearest four or five national Weather Service stations. An initial estimate of the winds in the atmospheric boundary layer is made, then these winds are adjusted to satisfy the continuity equation. In this manner the flow is made to reflect the influences of the terrain and the shape of the boundary-layer top. This report describes in detail the methodology and results, and provides descriptions of the computer programs, instructions for using them, and complete program listings.

  12. ANN based Estimation of Ultra High Energy (UHE) Shower Size using Radio Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Kalpana Roy; Datta, Pranayee; Sarma, Kandarpa Kumar

    2013-02-01

    Size estimation is a challenging area in the field of Ultra High Energy (UHE) showers where actual measurements are always associated with uncertainty of events and imperfections in detection mechanisms. The subtle variations resulting out of such factors incorporate certain random behaviour in the readings provided by shower detectors for subsequent processing. Field strength recorded by radio detectors may also be affected by this statistical nature. Hence there is a necessity of development of a system which can remain immune to such random behaviour and provide resilient readings to subsequent stages. Here, we propose a system based on Artificial Neural Network (ANN) which accepts radio field strength recorded by radio detectors and provides estimates of shower sizes in the UHE region. The ANN in feed-forward form is trained with a range of shower events with which it can effectively handle the randomness observed in the detector reading due to imperfections in the experimental apparatus and related set-up.

  13. A NEW MODEL TO ESTIMATE DAILY ENERGY EXPENDITURE FOR WINTERING WATERFOWL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Activity budgets of wintering waterfowl have been widely used to assess habitat quality. However, when factors such as prey abundance or protection from exposure to cold or wind determine quality, measures of daily energy expenditure (DEE) may be more appropriate for this purpos...

  14. Improving Maryland's Offshore Wind Energy Resource Estimate Using Doppler Wind Lidar Technology to Assess Microtmeteorology Controls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    St. Pé, Alexandra; Wesloh, Daniel; Antoszewski, Graham; Daham, Farrah; Goudarzi, Navid; Rabenhorst, Scott; Delgado, Ruben

    2016-06-01

    There is enormous potential to harness the kinetic energy of offshore wind and produce power. However significant uncertainties are introduced in the offshore wind resource assessment process, due in part to limited observational networks and a poor understanding of the marine atmosphere's complexity. Given the cubic relationship between a turbine's power output and wind speed, a relatively small error in the wind speed estimate translates to a significant error in expected power production. The University of Maryland Baltimore County (UMBC) collected in-situ measurements offshore, within Maryland's Wind Energy Area (WEA) from July-August 2013. This research demonstrates the ability of Doppler wind lidar technology to reduce uncertainty in estimating an offshore wind resource, compared to traditional resource assessment techniques, by providing a more accurate representation of the wind profile and associated hub-height wind speed variability. The second objective of this research is to elucidate the impact of offshore micrometeorology controls (stability, wind shear, turbulence) on a turbine's ability to produce power. Compared to lidar measurements, power law extrapolation estimates and operational National Weather Service models underestimated hub-height wind speeds in the WEA. In addition, lidar observations suggest the frequent development of a low-level wind maximum (LLWM), with high turbinelayer wind shear and low turbulence intensity within a turbine's rotor layer (40m-160m). Results elucidate the advantages of using Doppler wind lidar technology to improve offshore wind resource estimates and its ability to monitor under-sampled offshore meteorological controls impact on a potential turbine's ability to produce power.

  15. Influence of time scale on performance of a psychrometric energy balance method to estimate precipitation phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harder, P.; Pomeroy, J. W.

    2012-12-01

    Precipitation phase determination is fundamental to estimating catchment hydrological response to precipitation in cold regions and is especially variable over time and space in mountains. Hydrological methods to estimate phase are predominantly calibrated, depend on air temperature and use daily time steps. Air temperature is not physically related to phase and precipitation events are very dynamic, adding significant uncertainty to the use of daily air temperature indices to estimate phase. Data for this study comes from high quality, high temporal resolution precipitation phase and meteorological observations at multiple elevations in a small Canadian Rockies catchment, the Marmot Creek Research Basin, from 2005 to 2012. The psychrometric energy balance of a falling hydrometeor, requiring air temperature and humidity observations, was employed to examine precipitation phase with respect to meteorological conditions via calculation of a hydrometeor temperature. The hydrometeor temperature-precipitation phase relationship was used to quantify temporal scaling in phase observations and to develop a method to estimate precipitation phase. Temporal scaling results show that the transition range of the distribution of hydrometeor temperatures associated with mixed rainfall and snowfall decreases with decreasing time interval. The amount of precipitation also has an influence as larger events lead to smaller transition ranges across all time scales. The uncertainty of the relationship between the hydrometeor temperature and phase was quantified and degrades significantly with an increase in time interval. The errors associated with the 15 minute and hourly intervals are small. Comparisons with other methods indicate that the psychrometric energy balance method performs much better than air temperature methods and that this improvement increases with decreasing time interval. These findings suggest that the physically based psychrometric method, employed on sub

  16. Application of Overall Dynamic Body Acceleration as a Proxy for Estimating the Energy Expenditure of Grazing Farm Animals: Relationship with Heart Rate

    PubMed Central

    Miwa, Masafumi; Oishi, Kazato; Nakagawa, Yasuhiro; Maeno, Hiromichi; Anzai, Hiroki; Kumagai, Hajime; Okano, Kanji; Tobioka, Hisaya; Hirooka, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Estimating the energy expenditure of farm animals at pasture is important for efficient animal management. In recent years, an alternative technique for estimating energy expenditure by measuring body acceleration has been widely performed in wildlife and human studies, but the availability of the technique in farm animals has not yet been examined. In the present study, we tested the potential use of an acceleration index, overall dynamic body acceleration (ODBA), as a new proxy for estimating the energy expenditure of grazing farm animals (cattle, goats and sheep) at pasture with the simultaneous evaluation of a conventional proxy, heart rate. Body accelerations in three axes and heart rate for cows (n = 8, two breeds), goats (n = 6) and sheep (n = 5) were recorded, and the effect of ODBA calculated from the body accelerations on heart rate was analyzed. In addition, the effects of the two other activity indices, the number of steps and vectorial dynamic body acceleration (VeDBA), on heart rate were also investigated. The results of the comparison among three activity indices indicated that ODBA was the best predictor for heart rate. Although the relationship between ODBA and heart rate was different between the groups of species and breeds and between individuals (P<0.01), the difference could be explained by different body weights; a common equation could be established by correcting the body weights (M: kg): heart rate (beats/min) = 147.263∙M-0.141 + 889.640∙M-0.179∙ODBA (g). Combining this equation with the previously reported energy expenditure per heartbeat, we estimated the energy expenditure of the tested animals, and the results indicated that ODBA is a good proxy for estimating the energy expenditure of grazing farm animals across species and breeds. The utility and simplicity of the procedure with acceleration loggers could make the accelerometry technique a worthwhile option in field research and commercial farm use. PMID:26030931

  17. R&D program benefits estimation: DOE Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2006-12-04

    The overall mission of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE) is to lead national efforts to modernize the electric grid, enhance the security and reliability of the energy infrastructure, and facilitate recovery from disruptions to the energy supply. In support of this mission, OE conducts a portfolio of research and development (R&D) activities to advance technologies to enhance electric power delivery. Multiple benefits are anticipated to result from the deployment of these technologies, including higher quality and more reliable power, energy savings, and lower cost electricity. In addition, OE engages State and local government decision-makers and the private sector to address issues related to the reliability and security of the grid, including responding to national emergencies that affect energy delivery. The OE R&D activities are comprised of four R&D lines: High Temperature Superconductivity (HTS), Visualization and Controls (V&C), Energy Storage and Power Electronics (ES&PE), and Distributed Systems Integration (DSI).

  18. Trunk Muscle Activation and Estimating Spinal Compressive Force in Rope and Harness Vertical Dance.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Margaret; Dai, Boyi; Zhu, Qin; Humphrey, Neil

    2015-12-01

    Rope and harness vertical dance takes place off the floor with the dancer suspended from his or her center of mass in a harness attached to a rope from a point overhead. Vertical dance represents a novel environment for training and performing in which expected stresses on the dancer's body are different from those that take place during dance on the floor. Two male and eleven female dancers with training in vertical dance performed six typical vertical dance movements with electromyography (EMG) electrodes placed bilaterally on rectus abdominus, external oblique, erector spinae, and latissimus dorsi. EMG data were expressed as a percentage of maximum voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC). A simplified musculoskeletal model based on muscle activation for these four muscle groups was used to estimate the compressive force on the spine. The greatest muscle activation for erector spinae and latissimus dorsi and the greatest trunk compressive forces were seen in vertical axis positions where the dancer was moving the trunk into a hyper-extended position. The greatest muscle activation for rectus abdominus and external oblique and the second highest compressive force were seen in a supine position with the arms and legs extended away from the center of mass (COM). The least muscle activation occurred in positions where the limbs were hanging below the torso. These movements also showed relatively low muscle activation compression forces. Post-test survey results revealed that dancers felt comfortable in these positions; however, observation of some positions indicated insufficient muscular control. Computing the relative contribution of muscles, expressed as muscle activation and estimated spinal compression, provided a measure of how much the muscle groups were working to support the spine and the rest of the dancer's body in the different movements tested. Additionally, identifying typical muscle recruitment patterns in each movement will help identify key exercises

  19. An online model-based method for state of energy estimation of lithium-ion batteries using dual filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Guangzhong; Chen, Zonghai; Wei, Jingwen; Zhang, Chenbin; Wang, Peng

    2016-01-01

    The state-of-energy of lithium-ion batteries is an important evaluation index for energy storage systems in electric vehicles and smart grids. To improve the battery state-of-energy estimation accuracy and reliability, an online model-based estimation approach is proposed against uncertain dynamic load currents and environment temperatures. Firstly, a three-dimensional response surface open-circuit-voltage model is built up to improve the battery state-of-energy estimation accuracy, taking various temperatures into account. Secondly, a total-available-energy-capacity model that involves temperatures and discharge rates is reconstructed to improve the accuracy of the battery model. An extended-Kalman-filter and particle-filter based dual filters algorithm is then developed to establish an online model-based estimator for the battery state-of-energy. The extended-Kalman-filter is employed to update parameters of the battery model using real-time battery current and voltage at each sampling interval, while the particle-filter is applied to estimate the battery state-of-energy. Finally, the proposed approach is verified by experiments conducted on a LiFePO4 lithium-ion battery under different operating currents and temperatures. Experimental results indicate that the battery model simulates battery dynamics robustly with high accuracy, and the estimates of the dual filters converge to the real state-of-energy within an error of ±4%.

  20. Solar-thermal technology development: estimated market size and energy cost savings. Volume I. Executive summary

    SciTech Connect

    Gates, W.R.

    1983-02-01

    Estimated future energy cost savings associated with the development of cost-competitive solar thermal technologies (STT) are discussed. Analysis is restricted to STT in electric applications for 16 high-insolation/high-energy-price states. Three fuel price scenarios and three 1990 STT system costs are considered, reflecting uncertainty over future fuel prices and STT cost projections. STT R and D is found to be unacceptably risky for private industry in the absence of federal support. Energy cost savings were projected to range from $0 to $10 billion (1990 values in 1981 dollars), depending on the system cost and fuel price scenario. Normal R and D investment risks are accentuated because the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) cartel can artifically manipulate oil prices and undercut growth of alternative energy sources. Federal participation in STT R and D to help capture the potential benefits of developing cost-competitive STT was found to be in the national interest. Analysis is also provided regarding two federal incentives currently in use: the Federal Business Energy Tax Credit and direct R and D funding. These mecahnisms can be expected to provide the required incentives to establish a viable self-sustaining private STT industry. Discussions of STT impacts on the environment and oil imports are also included.

  1. Estimating the neutrally buoyant energy density of a Rankine-cycle/fuel-cell underwater propulsion system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waters, Daniel F.; Cadou, Christopher P.

    2014-02-01

    A unique requirement of underwater vehicles' power/energy systems is that they remain neutrally buoyant over the course of a mission. Previous work published in the Journal of Power Sources reported gross as opposed to neutrally-buoyant energy densities of an integrated solid oxide fuel cell/Rankine-cycle based power system based on the exothermic reaction of aluminum with seawater. This paper corrects this shortcoming by presenting a model for estimating system mass and using it to update the key findings of the original paper in the context of the neutral buoyancy requirement. It also presents an expanded sensitivity analysis to illustrate the influence of various design and modeling assumptions. While energy density is very sensitive to turbine efficiency (sensitivity coefficient in excess of 0.60), it is relatively insensitive to all other major design parameters (sensitivity coefficients < 0.15) like compressor efficiency, inlet water temperature, scaling methodology, etc. The neutral buoyancy requirement introduces a significant (˜15%) energy density penalty but overall the system still appears to offer factors of five to eight improvements in energy density (i.e., vehicle range/endurance) over present battery-based technologies.

  2. Analysing global food waste problem: pinpointing the facts and estimating the energy content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melikoglu, Mehmet; Lin, Carol; Webb, Colin

    2013-06-01

    Food waste is a global problem. Each year food worth billions of dollars is wasted by the developed economies of the world. When food is wasted, the problem does not end at that point. More than 95% of the food waste ends at landfill sites, where converted into methane, carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gasses by anaerobic digestion. The impact of food waste to climate change is catastrophic. Food waste problem tends to increase in next 25 years due to economic and population growth mainly in Asian countries. In addition, when food wastes buried at landfill sites their energy content is lost. Although food waste is a huge problem, its global size and extent has recently become a hot topic in the academic community. This paper summarises the size of the global food waste problem together with the estimation of the amount of energy lost when food wastes dumped at landfill sites. Calculations in this study also revealed that energy lost at landfill sites equals to 43% of the delivered energy used for the preparation of foods in the US, 37% of the hydroelectric power generation of Japan, and more than 100% of the current annual renewable energy demand of UK industries.

  3. Cloud Effects on Meridional Atmospheric Energy Budget Estimated from Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kato, Seiji; Rose, Fred G.; Rutan, David A.; Charlock, Thomas P.

    2008-01-01

    The zonal mean atmospheric cloud radiative effect, defined as the difference of the top-of-atmosphere (TOA) and surface cloud radiative effects, is estimated from three years of Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) data. The zonal mean shortwave effect is small, though it tends to be positive (warming). This indicates that clouds increase shortwave absorption in the atmosphere, especially in midlatitudes. The zonal mean atmospheric cloud radiative effect is, however, dominated by the longwave effect. The zonal mean longwave effect is positive in the tropics and decreases with latitude to negative values (cooling) in polar regions. The meridional gradient of cloud effect between midlatitude and polar regions exists even when uncertainties in the cloud effect on the surface enthalpy flux and in the modeled irradiances are taken into account. This indicates that clouds increase the rate of generation of mean zonal available potential energy. Because the atmospheric cooling effect in polar regions is predominately caused by low level clouds, which tend to be stationary, we postulate that the meridional and vertical gradients of cloud effect increase the rate of meridional energy transport by dynamics in the atmosphere from midlatitude to polar region, especially in fall and winter. Clouds then warm the surface in polar regions except in the Arctic in summer. Clouds, therefore, contribute in increasing the rate of meridional energy transport from midlatitude to polar regions through the atmosphere.

  4. Event triggered state estimation techniques for power systems with integrated variable energy resources.

    PubMed

    Francy, Reshma C; Farid, Amro M; Youcef-Toumi, Kamal

    2015-05-01

    For many decades, state estimation (SE) has been a critical technology for energy management systems utilized by power system operators. Over time, it has become a mature technology that provides an accurate representation of system state under fairly stable and well understood system operation. The integration of variable energy resources (VERs) such as wind and solar generation, however, introduces new fast frequency dynamics and uncertainties into the system. Furthermore, such renewable energy is often integrated into the distribution system thus requiring real-time monitoring all the way to the periphery of the power grid topology and not just the (central) transmission system. The conventional solution is two fold: solve the SE problem (1) at a faster rate in accordance with the newly added VER dynamics and (2) for the entire power grid topology including the transmission and distribution systems. Such an approach results in exponentially growing problem sets which need to be solver at faster rates. This work seeks to address these two simultaneous requirements and builds upon two recent SE methods which incorporate event-triggering such that the state estimator is only called in the case of considerable novelty in the evolution of the system state. The first method incorporates only event-triggering while the second adds the concept of tracking. Both SE methods are demonstrated on the standard IEEE 14-bus system and the results are observed for a specific bus for two difference scenarios: (1) a spike in the wind power injection and (2) ramp events with higher variability. Relative to traditional state estimation, the numerical case studies showed that the proposed methods can result in computational time reductions of 90%. These results were supported by a theoretical discussion of the computational complexity of three SE techniques. The work concludes that the proposed SE techniques demonstrate practical improvements to the computational complexity of

  5. Synergism of active and passive microwave data for estimating bare surface soil moisture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saatchi, Sasan S.; Njoku, Eni G.; Wegmueller, Urs

    1993-01-01

    Active and passive microwave sensors were applied effectively to the problem of estimating the surface soil moisture in a variety of environmental conditions. Research to date has shown that both types of sensors are also sensitive to the surface roughness and the vegetation cover. In estimating the soil moisture, the effect of the vegetation and roughness are often corrected either by acquiring multi-configuration (frequency and polarization) data or by adjusting the surface parameters in order to match the model predictions to the measured data. Due to the limitations on multi-configuration spaceborne data and the lack of a priori knowledge of the surface characteristics for parameter adjustments, it was suggested that the synergistic use of the sensors may improve the estimation of the soil moisture over the extreme range of naturally occurring soil and vegetation conditions. To investigate this problem, the backscattering and emission from a bare soil surface using the classical rough surface scattering theory were modeled. The model combines the small perturbation and the Kirchhoff approximations in conjunction with the Peak formulation to cover a wide range of surface roughness parameters with respect to frequency for both active and passive measurements. In this approach, the same analytical method was used to calculate the backscattering and emissivity. Therefore, the active and passive simulations can be combined at various polarizations and frequencies in order to estimate the soil moisture more actively. As a result, it is shown that (1) the emissivity is less dependent on the surface correlation length, (2) the ratio of the backscattering coefficient (HH) over the surface reflectivity (H) is almost independent of the soil moisture for a wide range of surface roughness, and (3) this ratio can be approximated as a linear function of the surface rms height. The results were compared with the data obtained by a multi-frequency radiometer

  6. Cross-sectional associations of food consumption with plasma fatty acid composition and estimated desaturase activities in Finnish children.

    PubMed

    Venäläinen, Taisa; Schwab, Ursula; Ågren, Jyrki; de Mello, Vanessa; Lindi, Virpi; Eloranta, Aino-Maija; Kiiskinen, Sanna; Laaksonen, David; Lakka, Timo A

    2014-05-01

    Plasma fatty acid (FA) composition is known to be an indicator of dietary fat quality, but the associations of other dietary factors with plasma FA composition remain unknown in children. We investigated the cross-sectional associations of food consumption with the proportions of FA and estimated desaturase activities in plasma cholesteryl esters (CE) and phospholipids (PL) among children. The subjects were a population sample of 423 children aged 6–8 years examined at baseline of The Physical Activity and Nutrition in Children (PANIC) Study. We assessed food consumption by food records and plasma FA composition by gas chromatography. We used linear regression models adjusted for age, sex, physical activity and total energy intake to analyze the associations. A higher consumption of vegetable oil-based margarine (fat 60–80 %) was associated with a higher proportion of linoleic and α-linolenic acids in plasma CE and PL. A higher consumption of high-fiber grain products was related to a lower proportion of oleic acid in CE and PL. The consumption of candy was directly associated with the proportion of palmitoleic and oleic acid in plasma CE. The consumption of vegetable oil-based margarine was inversely associated with estimated stearoyl-CoA-desaturase activity in plasma CE and PL and the consumption of candy was directly related to it in plasma CE. The results of our study suggest that plasma FA composition is not only a biomarker for dietary fat quality but also reflects the consumption of high-fiber grain products and foods high in sugar among children. PMID:24659110

  7. A new approach to estimate commercial sector end-use load shapes and energy use intensities

    SciTech Connect

    Akbari, H.; Eto, J.; Konopacki, S.; Afzal, A.; Heinemeier, K.; Rainer, L.

    1994-08-01

    We discuss the application of an end-use load shape estimation technique to develop annual energy use intensities (EUIs) and hourly end-use load shapes (LSs) for commercial buildings in the Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E) service territory. Results will update inputs for the commercial sector energy and peak demand forecasting models used by PG&E and the California Energy Commission (CEC). EUIs were estimated for 11 building types, up to 10 end uses, 3 fuel types, 2 building vintages, and up to 5 climate regions. The integrated methodology consists of two major parts. The first part is the reconciliation of initial end-use load-shape estimates with measured whole-building load data to produce intermediate EUIs and load shapes, using LBL`s End-use Disaggregation Algorithm, EDA. EDA is a deterministic hourly algorithm that relies on the observed characteristics of the measured hourly whole-building electricity use and disaggregates it into major end-use components. The end-use EUIs developed through the EDA procedure represent a snap-shot of electricity use by building type and end-use for two regions of the PG&E service territory, for the year that disaggregation is performed. In the second part of the methodology, we adjust the EUIs for direct application to forecasting models based on factors such as climatic impacts on space-conditioning EUIs, fuel saturation effects, building and equipment vintage, and price impacts. Core data for the project are detailed on-site surveys for about 800 buildings, mail surveys ({approximately}6000), load research data for over 1000 accounts, and hourly weather data for five climate regions.

  8. Estimating pumping time and ground-water withdrawals using energy- consumption data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hurr, R.T.; Litke, D.W.

    1989-01-01

    Evaluation of the hydrology of an aquifer requires knowledge about the volume of groundwater in storage and also about the volume of groundwater withdrawals. Totalizer flow meters may be installed at pumping plants to measure withdrawals; however, it generally is impractical to equip all pumping plants in an area with meters. A viable alternative is the use of rate-time methods. Rate-time methods may be used at individual pumping plants to decrease the data collection necessary for determining withdrawals. At sites where pumping-time measurement devices are not installed, pumping time may be determined on the basis of energy consumption and power demand. At pumping plants where energy consumption is metered, data acquired by reading of meters is used to estimate pumping time. Care needs to be taken to read these meters correctly. At pumping plants powered by electricity, the calculations need to be modified if transformers are present. At pumping plants powered by natural gas, the effects of the pressure-correction factor need to be included in the calculations. At pumping plants powered by gasoline, diesel oil, or liquid petroleum gas, the geometry of storage tanks needs to be analyzed as part of the calculations. The relation between power demand and pumping rate at a pumping plant can be described through the use of the power-consumption coefficient. Where equipment and hydrologic conditions are stable, this coefficient can be applied to total energy consumption at a site to estimate total groundwater withdrawals. Random sampling of power consumption coefficients can be used to estimate area-wide groundwater withdrawal. (USGS)

  9. Engagement, enjoyment, and energy expenditure during active video game play

    PubMed Central

    Lyons, Elizabeth J.; Tate, Deborah F.; Ward, Dianne S.; Ribisl, Kurt M.; Bowling, J. Michael; Kalyanaraman, Sriram

    2014-01-01

    Objective Playing active video games can produce moderate levels of physical activity, but little is known about how these games motivate players to be active. Several psychological predictors, such as perceptions of competence, control, and engagement, may be associated with enjoyment of a game, which has in turn been hypothesized to predict energy expended during play. However, these relationships have yet to be tested in active video games. Methods Young adults aged 18–35 (N = 97, 50 female) < 300 pounds played a Dance Dance Revolution game for 13 minutes while energy expenditure was measured using indirect calorimetry. Self-reported measures of engagement, perceived competence, perceived control, and enjoyment were taken immediately afterwards. Mediation was analyzed using path analysis. Results A path model in which enjoyment mediated the effects of engagement, perceived competence, and perceived control on energy expenditure and BMI directly affected energy expenditure was an adequate fit to the data, χ2(1, N = 97) = .199, p = .655; CFI = 1.00; RMSEA < .001; 90% CI = .000 - .206; p = .692. Enjoyment mediated the relationship between engagement and energy expenditure (indirect effect = .138, p = .028), but other mediated effects were not significant. Conclusion Engagement, enjoyment, and BMI affect energy expended during active video game play. Games that are more enjoyable and engaging may produce greater intensity activity. Developers, practitioners, and researchers should consider characteristics that influence these predictors when creating or recommending active video games. PMID:23527520

  10. Estimates of turbulent kinetic energy dissipation rate for a stratified flow in a wind tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puhales, Franciano Scremin; Demarco, Giuliano; Martins, Luis Gustavo Nogueira; Acevedo, Otávio Costa; Degrazia, Gervásio Annes; Welter, Guilherme Sausen; Costa, Felipe Denardin; Fisch, Gilberto Fernando; Avelar, Ana Cristina

    2015-08-01

    In this work a method to estimate turbulent kinetic energy dissipation rate (TKEDR) was presented. The technique uses the second-order structure function and Kolmogorov's law for inertial subrange. This methodology was applied on both neutral and stable stratification wind tunnel data, where the frozen turbulence hypothesis was assumed. The experiments were made with Reynolds Number ranging from 103 up to 104. The results show difference between the neutral and stable cases, but this gap decreases with the mean wind speed. Furthermore, TKEDR evaluated was used to describe the inertial subrange in the longitudinal velocity spectrum with a good agreement with the experimental data.

  11. Geothermal -- The Energy Under Our Feet: Geothermal Resource Estimates for the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Green, B. D.; Nix, R. G.

    2006-11-01

    On May 16, 2006, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in Golden, Colorado hosted a geothermal resources workshop with experts from the geothermal community. The purpose of the workshop was to re-examine domestic geothermal resource estimates. The participating experts were organized into five working groups based on their primary area of expertise in the following types of geothermal resource or application: (1) Hydrothermal, (2) Deep Geothermal Systems, (3) Direct Use, (4) Geothermal Heat Pumps (GHPs), and (5) Co-Produced and Geopressured. The workshop found that the domestic geothermal resource is very large, with significant benefits.

  12. Optimal Position Estimation for the Automatic Alignment of a High Energy Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Candy, J V; Mcclay, W A; Awwal, A S; Ferguson, S W

    2004-07-20

    The alignment of high energy laser beams for potential fusion experiments demand high precision and accuracy by the underlying positioning algorithms whether it be for actuator control or monitoring the beam line for potential anomalies. This paper discusses the feasibility of employing on-line optimal position estimators in the form of model-based processors to achieve the desired results. Here we discuss the modeling, development, implementation and processing of model-based processors applied to both simulated and actual beam line data.

  13. New approaches to estimation of peat deposits for production of biologically active compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepchenko, L. M.; Yurchenko, V. I.; Krasnik, V. G.; Syedykh, N. J.

    2009-04-01

    It is known, that biologically active preparations from peat increase animals productivity as well as resistance against stress-factors and have adaptogeneous, antioxidant, immunomodulative properties. Optymal choice of peat deposits for the production of biologically active preparations supposes the detailed comparative analysis of peat properties from different deposits. For this the cadastre of peat of Ukraine is developed in the humic substances laboratory named after prof. Khristeva L.A. (Dnipropetrovsk Agrarian University, Ukraine). It based on the research of its physical and chemical properties, toxicity and biological activity, and called Biocadastre. The Biocadastre is based on the set of parameters, including the descriptions of physical and chemical properties (active acidity, degree of decomposition, botanical composition etc.), toxicity estimation (by parabyotyc, infusorial, inhibitor and other tests), biological activity indexes (growth-promoting, antioxidative, adaptogeneous, immunomodulative antistress and other actions). The blocks of Biocadastre indexes are differentiated, taking into account their use for creation the preparations for vegetable, animals and microorganisms. The Biocadastre will allow to choose the peat deposits, most suitable for the production of different biologically active preparations, both wide directed and narrow spectrum of action, depending on application fields (medicine, agriculture, veterinary medicine, microbiological industry, balneology, cosmetology).

  14. Adaptive unscented Kalman filter based state of energy and power capability estimation approach for lithium-ion battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Weige; Shi, Wei; Ma, Zeyu

    2015-09-01

    Accurate estimations of battery energy and available power capability are of great of importance for realizing an efficient and reliable operation of electric vehicles. To improve the estimation accuracy and reliability for battery state of energy and power capability, a novel model-based joint estimation approach has been proposed against uncertain external operating conditions and internal degradation status of battery cells. Firstly, it proposes a three-dimensional response surface open circuit voltage model to calibrate the estimation inaccuracies of battery state of energy. Secondly, the adaptive unscented Kalman filter (AUKF) is employed to develop a novel model-based joint state estimator for battery state of energy and power capability. The AUKF algorithm utilizes the well-known features of the Kalman filter but employs the method of unscented transform (UT) and adaptive error covariance matching technology to improve the state estimation accuracy. Thirdly, the proposed joint estimator has been verified by a LiFePO4 lithium-ion battery cell under different operating temperatures and aging levels. The result indicates that the estimation errors of battery voltage and state-of-energy are less than 2% even if given a large erroneous initial value, which makes the state of available power capability predict more accurate and reliable for the electric vehicles application.

  15. Estimation of immunization providers' activities cost, medication cost, and immunization dose errors cost in Iraq.

    PubMed

    Al-lela, Omer Qutaiba B; Bahari, Mohd Baidi; Al-abbassi, Mustafa G; Salih, Muhannad R M; Basher, Amena Y

    2012-06-01

    The immunization status of children is improved by interventions that increase community demand for compulsory and non-compulsory vaccines, one of the most important interventions related to immunization providers. The aim of this study is to evaluate the activities of immunization providers in terms of activities time and cost, to calculate the immunization doses cost, and to determine the immunization dose errors cost. Time-motion and cost analysis study design was used. Five public health clinics in Mosul-Iraq participated in the study. Fifty (50) vaccine doses were required to estimate activities time and cost. Micro-costing method was used; time and cost data were collected for each immunization-related activity performed by the clinic staff. A stopwatch was used to measure the duration of activity interactions between the parents and clinic staff. The immunization service cost was calculated by multiplying the average salary/min by activity time per minute. 528 immunization cards of Iraqi children were scanned to determine the number and the cost of immunization doses errors (extraimmunization doses and invalid doses). The average time for child registration was 6.7 min per each immunization dose, and the physician spent more than 10 min per dose. Nurses needed more than 5 min to complete child vaccination. The total cost of immunization activities was 1.67 US$ per each immunization dose. Measles vaccine (fifth dose) has a lower price (0.42 US$) than all other immunization doses. The cost of a total of 288 invalid doses was 744.55 US$ and the cost of a total of 195 extra immunization doses was 503.85 US$. The time spent on physicians' activities was longer than that spent on registrars' and nurses' activities. Physician total cost was higher than registrar cost and nurse cost. The total immunization cost will increase by about 13.3% owing to dose errors. PMID:22521848

  16. Evaluation of a method for activity estimation in Sm-153 EDTMP imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Vanzi, Eleonora; Genovesi, Dario; Di Martino, Fabio

    2009-04-15

    Absolute activity evaluation is fundamental for internal radionuclide dosimetry when patient-specific therapy optimization is wanted. Often, quantification is attempted with 3D SPECT image based (IB) methods, but the true concentration values can be underestimated due to the partial volume effect (PVE). This is especially true when small diffuse lesions are present. In this paper, we describe a 3D region of interest (ROI) based quantification method (LS-ROI), which estimates the ROI concentration values directly from the projection data acquired in the tomographic scan once ROIs have been segmented on a CT and/or a SPECT image. The method, which has inherent PVE correction capabilities, was applied both on simulated and on real phantom data. Simulations reflected the case of a patient with bone metastases treated with {sup 153}Sm-EDTMP: Both the activity in the metastases and the total retention in the skeleton were evaluated. Thirty noisy data sets were produced in order to evaluate the accuracy and precision of the method. The effect of region segmentation errors on estimated concentrations was thoroughly investigated. Real data were acquired on a NEMA phantom, where a cylindrical central region (283 cm{sup 3}) simulated the bone and two spheres (10.3 and 25.5 cm{sup 3}) simulated the metastases. The results obtained with the LS-ROI method were compared with those of a conventional 3D IB method and those of a quantitative conjugate view approach derived from LS-ROI and applied to the anterior and posterior views acquired in the tomographic scan (LS-ROI anterior-posterior: LS-ROI-AP). Simulations showed that when the geometry of regions is known, the LS-ROI method recovered the simulated concentration values within 20%, while the IB method underestimated the concentration in high activity small lesions by as much as 49%. Segmentation errors, up to 44% of the true region volume, produced a higher variation in LS-ROI estimates than in IB ones; however, the overall

  17. Effects of shortened acquisition time on accuracy and precision of quantitative estimates of organ activity1

    PubMed Central

    He, Bin; Frey, Eric C.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Quantitative estimation of in vivo organ uptake is an essential part of treatment planning for targeted radionuclide therapy. This usually involves the use of planar or SPECT scans with acquisition times chosen based more on image quality considerations rather than the minimum needed for precise quantification. In previous simulation studies at clinical count levels (185 MBq 111In), the authors observed larger variations in accuracy of organ activity estimates resulting from anatomical and uptake differences than statistical noise. This suggests that it is possible to reduce the acquisition time without substantially increasing the variation in accuracy. Methods: To test this hypothesis, the authors compared the accuracy and variation in accuracy of organ activity estimates obtained from planar and SPECT scans at various count levels. A simulated phantom population with realistic variations in anatomy and biodistribution was used to model variability in a patient population. Planar and SPECT projections were simulated using previously validated Monte Carlo simulation tools. The authors simulated the projections at count levels approximately corresponding to 1.5–30 min of total acquisition time. The projections were processed using previously described quantitative SPECT (QSPECT) and planar (QPlanar) methods. The QSPECT method was based on the OS-EM algorithm with compensations for attenuation, scatter, and collimator-detector response. The QPlanar method is based on the ML-EM algorithm using the same model-based compensation for all the image degrading effects as the QSPECT method. The volumes of interests (VOIs) were defined based on the true organ configuration in the phantoms. The errors in organ activity estimates from different count levels and processing methods were compared in terms of mean and standard deviation over the simulated phantom population. Results: There was little degradation in quantitative reliability when the acquisition time was

  18. Using Microcomputers in the Physical Chemistry Laboratory: Activation Energy Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Touvelle, Michele; Venugopalan, Mundiyath

    1986-01-01

    Describes a computer program, "Activation Energy," which is designed for use in physical chemistry classes and can be modified for kinetic experiments. Provides suggestions for instruction, sample program listings, and information on the availability of the program package. (ML)

  19. The Geography of Wind Energy: Problem Solving Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lahart, David E.; Allen, Rodney F.

    1985-01-01

    Today there are many attempts to use wind machines to confront the increasing costs of electricity. Described are activities to help secondary students understand wind energy, its distribution, applications, and limitations. (RM)

  20. An automated technique for estimating patient-specific regional imparted energy and dose in TCM CT exams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, Jeremiah W.; Tian, Xiaoyu; Segars, W. Paul; Boone, John; Samei, Ehsan

    2016-03-01

    Currently computed tomography (CT) dosimetry relies on CT dose index (CTDI) and size specific dose estimates (SSDE). Organ dose is a better metric of radiation burden. However, organ dose estimation requires precise knowledge of organ locations. Regional imparted energy and dose can also be used to quantify radiation burden. Estimating the imparted energy from CT exams is beneficial in that it does not require precise estimates of the organ size or location. This work investigated an automated technique for retrospectively estimating the imparted energy from chest and abdominopelvic tube current modulated (TCM) CT exams. Monte Carlo simulations of chest and abdominopelvic TCM CT examinations across various tube potentials and TCM strengths were performed on 58 adult computational extended cardiac-torso (XCAT) phantoms to develop relationships between scanned mass and imparted energy normalized by dose length product (DLP). An automated algorithm for calculating the scanned patient volume was further developed using an open source mesh generation toolbox. The scanned patient volume was then used to estimate the scanned mass accounting for diverse density within the scan region. The scanned mass and DLP from the exam were used to estimate the imparted energy to the patient using the knowledgebase developed from the Monte Carlo simulations. Patientspecific imparted energy estimates were made from 20 chest and 20 abdominopelvic clinical CT exams. The average imparted energy was 274 +/- 141 mJ and 681 +/- 376 mJ for the chest and abdominopelvic exams, respectively. This method can be used to estimate the regional imparted energy and/or regional dose in chest and abdominopelvic TCM CT exams across clinical operations.

  1. Effects of scatter modeling on time-activity curves estimated directly from dynamic SPECT projections

    SciTech Connect

    Reutter, Bryan W.; Gullberg, Grant T.; Huesman, Ronald H.

    2003-10-29

    Quantitative analysis of uptake and washout of cardiac single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) radiopharmaceuticals has the potential to provide better contrast between healthy and diseased tissue, compared to conventional reconstruction of static images. Previously, we used B-splines to model time-activity curves (TACs) for segmented volumes of interest and developed fast least-squares algorithms to estimate spline TAC coefficients and their statistical uncertainties directly from dynamic SPECT projection data. This previous work incorporated physical effects of attenuation and depth-dependent collimator response. In the present work, we incorporate scatter and use a computer simulation to study how scatter modeling affects directly estimated TACs and subsequent estimates of compartmental model parameters. An idealized single-slice emission phantom was used to simulate a 15 min dynamic {sup 99m}Tc-teboroxime cardiac patient study in which 500,000 events containing scatter were detected from the slice. When scatter was modeled, unweighted least-squares estimates of TACs had root mean square (RMS) error that was less than 0.6% for normal left ventricular myocardium, blood pool, liver, and background tissue volumes and averaged 3% for two small myocardial defects. When scatter was not modeled, RMS error increased to average values of 16% for the four larger volumes and 35% for the small defects. Noise-to-signal ratios (NSRs) for TACs ranged between 1-18% for the larger volumes and averaged 110% for the small defects when scatter was modeled. When scatter was not modeled, NSR improved by average factors of 1.04 for the larger volumes and 1.25 for the small defects, as a result of the better-posed (though more biased) inverse problem. Weighted least-squares estimates of TACs had slightly better NSR and worse RMS error, compared to unweighted least-squares estimates. Compartmental model uptake and washout parameter estimates obtained from the TACs were less

  2. Estimated heats of fusion of fluoride salt mixtures suitable for thermal energy storage applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Misra, A. K.; Whittenberger, J. D.

    1986-01-01

    The heats of fusion of several fluoride salt mixtures with melting points greater than 973 K were estimated from a coupled analysis of the available thermodynamic data and phase diagrams. Simple binary eutectic systems with and without terminal solid solutions, binary eutectics with congruent melting intermediate phases, and ternary eutectic systems were considered. Several combinations of salts were identified, most notable the eutectics LiF-22CaF2 and NaF-60MgF2 which melt at 1039 and 1273 K respectively which posses relatively high heats of fusion/gm (greater than 0.7 kJ/g). Such systems would seemingly be ideal candidates for the light weight, high energy storage media required by the thermal energy storage unit in advanced solar dynamic power systems envisioned for the future space missions.

  3. Estimating outdoor thermal comfort using a cylindrical radiation thermometer and an energy budget model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, R. D.; Gillespie, T. J.

    1986-03-01

    A mathematical model to estimate outdoor thermal comfort for humans from micrometeorological data has been formulated using the energy balance concept and the simultaneous satisfaction of four criteria for comfort from the literature: (a) a comfortable perspiration rate, (b) a comfortable core body temperature, (c) a comfortable skin temperature, and (d) a near-zero energy budget. A cylindrical modification of the globe thermometer is proposed as a simple monitor of outdoor radiation absorption for a person, and the effect of windspeed on the thermal resistance of clothing is considered. Results show a correlation coefficient of 0.91 between model output and subjective comfort ratings of 59 different situations with a variety of temperatures, insolations and windspeeds.

  4. Energy Estimation for the NOvA Electron Neutrino Appearance Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Psihas, Fernanda

    2016-03-01

    The NOvA experiment measures long baseline νμ -->νe oscillations in Fermilab's NuMI beam. Measurement of this oscillation probability enables determination of the neutrino mass ordering and opens a window to observation of charge-parity violation in the neutrino sector. NOvA started taking data in 2014 and has already observed νe appearance at the 3.3 σ level with the first 7 % of the total projected dataset last year. Future analyses will exploit the expected energy dependence of oscillation to improve sensitivity. A new method to estimate energy for νe events and its impact on the next analysis will be discussed.

  5. Unbiased free energy estimates in fast nonequilibrium transformations using Gaussian mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Procacci, Piero

    2015-04-21

    In this paper, we present an improved method for obtaining unbiased estimates of the free energy difference between two thermodynamic states using the work distribution measured in nonequilibrium driven experiments connecting these states. The method is based on the assumption that any observed work distribution is given by a mixture of Gaussian distributions, whose normal components are identical in either direction of the nonequilibrium process, with weights regulated by the Crooks theorem. Using the prototypical example for the driven unfolding/folding of deca-alanine, we show that the predicted behavior of the forward and reverse work distributions, assuming a combination of only two Gaussian components with Crooks derived weights, explains surprisingly well the striking asymmetry in the observed distributions at fast pulling speeds. The proposed methodology opens the way for a perfectly parallel implementation of Jarzynski-based free energy calculations in complex systems.

  6. Activity concentrations of 222Rn, 220Rn, and their decay products in german dwellings, dose calculations and estimate of risk.

    PubMed

    Keller, G; Folkerts, K H; Muth, H

    1982-01-01

    Measurements of the concentrations of 222Rn, its short-lived decay products and of 212Pb - 212Bi were performed in 150 dwellings and in the open air in the Federal Republic of Germany. The concentrations of 222Rn was measured by electrostatic deposition of 218Po. The concentration of the short-lived decay products were measured by air sampling and alpha-spectroscopy. It was found that inside dwellings the average potential alpha-energy concentration of the short-lived daughters is about three times higher than in the open air. The total potential alpha-energy concentration indoors amounts to 2.6 . 10(-3) Working Level (W.L.). Direct measurements of the equilibrium factor inside dwellings gave a mean value of 0.3. A strong dependence of the potential alpha energy concentration on the ventilation rate in dwellings has been observed. These ventilation effects exceed the effects caused by differences in the activity concentrations due to different building materials. The dose calculation results in an average dose to the whole lung due to the inhalation of short-lived radon daughters of about 0.05-0.2 m/Gy/a. An estimate of risk - based on the risk factors for uranium miners - shows an average lifetime risk of about 6 . 10(-4) for the incidence of lung cancer caused by inhalation of radon and thoron daughters in dwellings in the Federal Republic of Germany. PMID:7146318

  7. A modification of the generalized Born theory for improved estimates of solvation energies and pK shifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayaram, B.; Liu, Y.; Beveridge, D. L.

    1998-07-01

    We present herein an appraisal on the performance of the generalized Born (GB) model in estimating the solvation energies of small molecules and pKa shifts of dicarboxylic acids. The quality of the solvation energy results obtained with the GB model was exceedingly good as already reported in the literature but the pKa shift estimates fell short of expectations. Analysis of the problem on a simple prototype system revealed that with the GB model, the estimates of the two components, viz. the shielding and the self-energy terms, to be somewhat in error. These errors compensate each other in the calculation of solvation energies but affect the intramolecular interaction energies and hence pK shifts differently. We examine here the feasibility of introducing modifications to the GB model for a simultaneous evaluation of both solvation and intramolecular interaction energies.

  8. Energy Consumption of Actively Beating Flagella

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Daniel; Nicastro, Daniela; Dogic, Zvonimir

    2012-02-01

    Motile cilia and flagella are important for propelling cells or driving fluid over tissues. The microtubule-based core in these organelles, the axoneme, has a nearly universal ``9+2'' arrangement of 9 outer doublet microtubules assembled around two singlet microtubules in the center. Thousands of molecular motor proteins are attached to the doublets and walk on neighboring outer doublets. The motors convert the chemical energy of ATP hydrolysis into sliding motion between adjacent doublet microtubules, resulting in precisely regulated oscillatory beating. Using demembranated sea urchin sperm flagella as an experimental platform, we simultaneously monitor the axoneme's consumption of ATP and its beating dynamics while key parameters, such as solution viscosity and ATP concentration, are varied. Insights into motor cooperativity during beating and energetic consequences of hydrodynamic interactions will be presented.

  9. Highlands County Energy Education Activities--High School Level.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Rodney F., Ed.

    Presented are five instructional units, developed by the Tri-County Teacher Education Center, for the purpose of educating secondary school students on Florida's unique energy problems. Unit one provides a series of value clarification and awareness activities as an introduction to energy. Unit two uses mathematics exercises to examine energy…

  10. 76 FR 65634 - Assistance to Foreign Atomic Energy Activities

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-24

    ... Proposed Rulemaking (76 FR 55278). FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Richard Goorevich, National Nuclear Security Administration, U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation (NA-20... assistance to foreign atomic energy activities (76 FR 55278). This regulation provides that persons...

  11. Energy Conservation Activity Guide, Grades 9-12. Bulletin 1602.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fraser, Mollie; And Others

    As an interdisciplinary, non-sequential teaching guide, this publication was developed to increase awareness and understanding of the energy situation and to encourage individuals to become energy conservationists. Sections provide background information for the teacher followed by a variety of student activities using different subject areas for…

  12. Effects of high activation energies on acoustic timescale detonation initiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regele, J. D.; Kassoy, D. R.; Vasilyev, O. V.

    2012-08-01

    Acoustic timescale Deflagration-to-Detonation Transition (DDT) has been shown to occur through the generation of compression waves emitted by a hot spot or reaction centre where the pressure and temperature increase with little diminution of density. In order to compensate for the multi-scale nature of the physico-chemical processes, previous numerical simulations in this area have been limited to relatively small activation energies. In this work, a computational study investigates the effect of increased activation energy on the time required to form a detonation wave and the change in behaviour of each hot spot as the activation energy is increased. The simulations use a localised spatially distributed thermal power deposition of limited duration into a finite volume of reactive gas to facilitate DDT. The Adaptive Wavelet-Collocation Method is used to solve efficiently the 1-D reactive Euler equations with one-step Arrhenius kinetics. The DDT process as described in previous work is characterised by the formation of hot spots during an initial transient period, explosion of the hot spots and creation of an accelerating reaction front that reaches the lead shock and forms an overdriven detonation wave. Current results indicate that as the activation energy is raised the chemical heat release becomes more temporally distributed. Hot spots that produce an accelerating reaction front with low activation energies change behaviour with increased activation energy so that no accelerating reaction front is created. An acoustic timescale ratio is defined that characterises the change in behaviour of each hot spot.

  13. The activation energy for creep of columbium /niobium/.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klein, M. J.; Gulden, M. E.

    1973-01-01

    The activation energy for creep of nominally pure columbium (niobium) was determined in the temperature range from 0.4 to 0.75 T sub M by measuring strain rate changes induced by temperature shifts at constant stress. A peak in the activation energy vs temperature curve was found with a maximum value of 160 kcal/mole. A pretest heat treatment of 3000 F for 30 min resulted in even higher values of activation energy (greater than 600 kcal/mole) in this temperature range. The activation energy for the heat-treated columbium (Nb) could not be determined near 0.5 T sub M because of unusual creep curves involving negligible steady-state creep rates and failure at less than 5% creep strain. It is suggested that the anomalous activation energy values and the unusual creep behavior in this temperature range are caused by dynamic strain aging involving substitutional atom impurities and that this type of strain aging may be in part responsible for the scatter in previously reported values of activation energy for creep of columbium (Nb) near 0.5 T sub M.

  14. Energy: Multidisciplinary Activities for the Classroom. Top Hit Energy Lesson Plans, K-1, 2-6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Energy Foundation, Salt Lake City, UT.

    This six-volume set of multidisciplinary instructional materials developed by the National Energy Foundation (NEF) presents energy activities for grades K-1, 2-6. The instructional materials are teacher-developed, teacher-tested, and multi-disciplinary. The lesson plans and activities are organized around seven goal areas of a NEF developed…

  15. Estimating regional auroral electron energy deposition using ground-based optical measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hampton, D. L.; Conde, M.; Ahrns, M. J.; Bristow, W.; Lynch, K. A.; Zettergren, M. D.

    2014-12-01

    Two key parameters for understanding the coupling between the magnetosphere and the thermosphere/ionosphere in polar regions are the characteristic energy and the total energy flux of precipitating auroral electrons. Ionization due to precipitating electrons modifies the ionospheric electron density profile and thereby the height-dependent conductivity in a complex manner in both time and space. Global or regional thermospheric dynamics models typically rely on empirical models (Ovation) or low-resolution global EUV imagery (POLAR) for electron precipitation input which smear out the mesoscale detail of the location and timing of auroral arcs. We have developed a method for measuring the time-dependent auroral electron energy deposition over a several-hundred km range with 25 km resolution using a combination of two ground-based optical instruments - a scanning-doppler imager observing green-line temperatures and a filtered all-sky imager measuring the N2+ first negative emission at 427.8 nm. We will discuss the details of the method, and show several examples including those from the MICA sounding rocket experiment as well as several events from the AMISR PINOT campaign. We will also show comparisons with alternate optical and radar techniques, compare our estimated energy flux to those from Ovation, and discuss limitations and advantages of the technique when examining mesoscale dynamics in the auroral zone.

  16. PHEV Energy Use Estimation: Validating the Gamma Distribution for Representing the Random Daily Driving Distance

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Zhenhong; Dong, Jing; Liu, Changzheng; Greene, David L

    2012-01-01

    The petroleum and electricity consumptions of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) are sensitive to the variation of daily vehicle miles traveled (DVMT). Some studies assume DVMT to follow a Gamma distribution, but such a Gamma assumption is yet to be validated. This study finds the Gamma assumption valid in the context of PHEV energy analysis, based on continuous GPS travel data of 382 vehicles, each tracked for at least 183 days. The validity conclusion is based on the found small prediction errors, resulting from the Gamma assumption, in PHEV petroleum use, electricity use, and energy cost. The finding that the Gamma distribution is valid and reliable is important. It paves the way for the Gamma distribution to be assumed for analyzing energy uses of PHEVs in the real world. The Gamma distribution can be easily specified with very few pieces of driver information and is relatively easy for mathematical manipulation. Given the validation in this study, the Gamma distribution can now be used with better confidence in a variety of applications, such as improving vehicle consumer choice models, quantifying range anxiety for battery electric vehicles, investigating roles of charging infrastructure, and constructing online calculators that provide personal estimates of PHEV energy use.

  17. Free-energy formula for emittance-growth estimation in intense mismatched beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osaki, Kazuya; Okamoto, Hiromi

    2015-09-01

    We construct a theoretical model that allows a quick estimate of emittance growth in an intense charged-particle beam initially mismatched to an external linear focusing potential. The present theory is a natural generalization of Reiser's free-energy model for coasting round beams in a uniform focusing channel. The free energy generated by a spatial mismatch, i.e. a discrepancy between the ideal beam size and an actual beam size, is calculated for an ellipsoidal bunch with an arbitrary aspect ratio. Following Reiser's prescription, we assume that the excess free energy is converted into root-mean-squared emittance growth. Multi-particle simulations are performed for comparison with theoretical predictions, which indicates that an initially mismatched bunch eventually settles into a sort of thermally anisotropic state when the mismatch is large. It is shown that the free-energy formula can explain simulation results over a wide range of parameters if the degree of the temperature anisotropy in the final state is properly incorporated into the theory.

  18. Anaerobic digestion of stillage fractions - estimation of the potential for energy recovery in bioethanol plants.

    PubMed

    Drosg, B; Fuchs, W; Meixner, K; Waltenberger, R; Kirchmayr, R; Braun, R; Bochmann, G

    2013-01-01

    Stillage processing can require more than one third of the thermal energy demand of a dry-grind bioethanol production plant. Therefore, for every stillage fraction occurring in stillage processing the potential of energy recovery by anaerobic digestion (AD) was estimated. In the case of whole stillage up to 128% of the thermal energy demand in the process can be provided, so even an energetically self-sufficient bioethanol production process is possible. For wet cake the recovery potential of thermal energy is 57%, for thin stillage 41%, for syrup 40% and for the evaporation condensate 2.5%. Specific issues for establishing AD of stillage fractions are evaluated in detail; these are high nitrogen concentrations, digestate treatment and trace element supply. If animal feed is co-produced at the bioethanol plant and digestate fractions are to be reused as process water, a sufficient quality is necessary. Most interesting stillage fractions as substrates for AD are whole stillage, thin stillage and the evaporation condensate. For these fractions process details are presented. PMID:23202552

  19. Neuroimaging of reading intervention: a systematic review and activation likelihood estimate meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Barquero, Laura A; Davis, Nicole; Cutting, Laurie E

    2014-01-01

    A growing number of studies examine instructional training and brain activity. The purpose of this paper is to review the literature regarding neuroimaging of reading intervention, with a particular focus on reading difficulties (RD). To locate relevant studies, searches of peer-reviewed literature were conducted using electronic databases to search for studies from the imaging modalities of fMRI and MEG (including MSI) that explored reading intervention. Of the 96 identified studies, 22 met the inclusion criteria for descriptive analysis. A subset of these (8 fMRI experiments with post-intervention data) was subjected to activation likelihood estimate (ALE) meta-analysis to investigate differences in functional activation following reading intervention. Findings from the literature review suggest differences in functional activation of numerous brain regions associated with reading intervention, including bilateral inferior frontal, superior temporal, middle temporal, middle frontal, superior frontal, and postcentral gyri, as well as bilateral occipital cortex, inferior parietal lobules, thalami, and insulae. Findings from the meta-analysis indicate change in functional activation following reading intervention in the left thalamus, right insula/inferior frontal, left inferior frontal, right posterior cingulate, and left middle occipital gyri. Though these findings should be interpreted with caution due to the small number of studies and the disparate methodologies used, this paper is an effort to synthesize across studies and to guide future exploration of neuroimaging and reading intervention. PMID:24427278

  20. Neuroimaging of Reading Intervention: A Systematic Review and Activation Likelihood Estimate Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Barquero, Laura A.; Davis, Nicole; Cutting, Laurie E.

    2014-01-01

    A growing number of studies examine instructional training and brain activity. The purpose of this paper is to review the literature regarding neuroimaging of reading intervention, with a particular focus on reading difficulties (RD). To locate relevant studies, searches of peer-reviewed literature were conducted using electronic databases to search for studies from the imaging modalities of fMRI and MEG (including MSI) that explored reading intervention. Of the 96 identified studies, 22 met the inclusion criteria for descriptive analysis. A subset of these (8 fMRI experiments with post-intervention data) was subjected to activation likelihood estimate (ALE) meta-analysis to investigate differences in functional activation following reading intervention. Findings from the literature review suggest differences in functional activation of numerous brain regions associated with reading intervention, including bilateral inferior frontal, superior temporal, middle temporal, middle frontal, superior frontal, and postcentral gyri, as well as bilateral occipital cortex, inferior parietal lobules, thalami, and insulae. Findings from the meta-analysis indicate change in functional activation following reading intervention in the left thalamus, right insula/inferior frontal, left inferior frontal, right posterior cingulate, and left middle occipital gyri. Though these findings should be interpreted with caution due to the small number of studies and the disparate methodologies used, this paper is an effort to synthesize across studies and to guide future exploration of neuroimaging and reading intervention. PMID:24427278