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Sample records for activation energy asymptotic

  1. Asymptotic modal analysis and statistical energy analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dowell, Earl H.

    1988-01-01

    Statistical Energy Analysis (SEA) is defined by considering the asymptotic limit of Classical Modal Analysis, an approach called Asymptotic Modal Analysis (AMA). The general approach is described for both structural and acoustical systems. The theoretical foundation is presented for structural systems, and experimental verification is presented for a structural plate responding to a random force. Work accomplished subsequent to the grant initiation focusses on the acoustic response of an interior cavity (i.e., an aircraft or spacecraft fuselage) with a portion of the wall vibrating in a large number of structural modes. First results were presented at the ASME Winter Annual Meeting in December, 1987, and accepted for publication in the Journal of Vibration, Acoustics, Stress and Reliability in Design. It is shown that asymptotically as the number of acoustic modes excited becomes large, the pressure level in the cavity becomes uniform except at the cavity boundaries. However, the mean square pressure at the cavity corner, edge and wall is, respectively, 8, 4, and 2 times the value in the cavity interior. Also it is shown that when the portion of the wall which is vibrating is near a cavity corner or edge, the response is significantly higher.

  2. Asymptotic modal analysis and statistical energy analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dowell, Earl H.

    1992-01-01

    Asymptotic Modal Analysis (AMA) is a method which is used to model linear dynamical systems with many participating modes. The AMA method was originally developed to show the relationship between statistical energy analysis (SEA) and classical modal analysis (CMA). In the limit of a large number of modes of a vibrating system, the classical modal analysis result can be shown to be equivalent to the statistical energy analysis result. As the CMA result evolves into the SEA result, a number of systematic assumptions are made. Most of these assumptions are based upon the supposition that the number of modes approaches infinity. It is for this reason that the term 'asymptotic' is used. AMA is the asymptotic result of taking the limit of CMA as the number of modes approaches infinity. AMA refers to any of the intermediate results between CMA and SEA, as well as the SEA result which is derived from CMA. The main advantage of the AMA method is that individual modal characteristics are not required in the model or computations. By contrast, CMA requires that each modal parameter be evaluated at each frequency. In the latter, contributions from each mode are computed and the final answer is obtained by summing over all the modes in the particular band of interest. AMA evaluates modal parameters only at their center frequency and does not sum the individual contributions from each mode in order to obtain a final result. The method is similar to SEA in this respect. However, SEA is only capable of obtaining spatial averages or means, as it is a statistical method. Since AMA is systematically derived from CMA, it can obtain local spatial information as well.

  3. Asymptotic modal analysis and statistical energy analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dowell, Earl H.; Peretti, Linda F.

    1990-01-01

    The sound field of a structural-acoustic enclosure was subject to experimental analysis and theoretical description in order to develop an efficient and accurate method for predicting sound pressure levels in enclosures such as aircraft fuselages. Asymptotic Modal Analysis (AMA) is the method under investigation. AMA is derived from classical modal analysis (CMA) by considering the asymptotic limit of the sound pressure level as the number of acoustic and/or structural modes approaches infinity. Using AMA, results identical to those of Statistical Energy Analysis (SEA) were obtained for the spatially-averaged sound pressure levels in the interior. AMA is systematically derived from CMA and therefore the degree of generality of the end result can be adjusted through the choice of appropriate simplifying assumptions. For example, AMA can be used to obtain local sound pressure levels at particular points inside the enclosure, or to include the effects of varying the size and/or location of the sound source. AMA theoretical results were compared with CMA theory and also with experiment for the case where the structural-acoustic enclosure is a rectangular cavity with part of one wall flexible and vibrating, while the rest of the cavity is rigid.

  4. An asymptotic expansion for energy eigenvalues of anharmonic oscillators

    SciTech Connect

    Gaudreau, Philippe; Slevinsky, Richard M.; Safouhi, Hassan

    2013-10-15

    In the present contribution, we derive an asymptotic expansion for the energy eigenvalues of anharmonic oscillators for potentials of the form V(x)=κx{sup 2q}+ωx{sup 2},q=2,3,… as the energy level n approaches infinity. The asymptotic expansion is obtained using the WKB theory and series reversion. Furthermore, we construct an algorithm for computing the coefficients of the asymptotic expansion for quartic anharmonic oscillators, leading to an efficient and accurate computation of the energy values for n≥6. -- Highlights: •We derived the asymptotic expansion for energy eigenvalues of anharmonic oscillators. •A highly efficient recursive algorithm for computing S{sub k}{sup ′}(z) for WKB. •We contributed to series reversion theory by reverting a new form of asymptotic series. •Our numerical algorithm achieves high accuracy for higher energy levels.

  5. Inverse scattering at fixed energy on asymptotically hyperbolic Liouville surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daudé, Thierry; Kamran, Niky; Nicoleau, Francois

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we study an inverse scattering problem on Liouville surfaces having two asymptotically hyperbolic ends. The main property of Liouville surfaces consists of the complete separability of the Hamilton-Jacobi equations for the geodesic flow. An important related consequence is the fact that the stationary wave equation can be separated into a system of radial and angular ODEs. The full scattering matrix at fixed energy associated to a scalar wave equation on asymptotically hyperbolic Liouville surfaces can be thus simplified by considering its restrictions onto the generalized harmonics corresponding to the angular separated ODE. The resulting partial scattering matrices consists in a countable set of 2 × 2 matrices whose coefficients are the so called transmission and reflection coefficients. It is shown that the reflection coefficients are nothing but generalized Weyl-Titchmarsh (WT) functions for the radial ODE in which the generalized angular momentum is seen as the spectral parameter. Using the complex angular momentum method and recent results on 1D inverse problem from generalized WT functions, we show that the knowledge of the reflection operators at a fixed non-zero energy is enough to determine uniquely the metric of the asymptotically hyperbolic Liouville surface under consideration.

  6. Asymptotic Energies and QED Shifts for Rydberg States of Helium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drake, G.W.F.

    2007-01-01

    This paper reviews progress that has been made in obtaining essentially exact solutions to the nonrelativistic three-body problem for helium by a combination of variational and asymptotic expansion methods. The calculation of relativistic and quantum electrodynamic corrections by perturbation theory is discussed, and in particular, methods for the accurate calculation of the Bethe logarithm part of the electron self energy are presented. As an example, the results are applied to the calculation of isotope shifts for the short-lived 'halo' nucleus He-6 relative to He-4 in order to determine the nuclear charge radius of He-6 from high precision spectroscopic measurements carried out at the Argonne National Laboratory. The results demonstrate that the high precision that is now available from atomic theory is creating new opportunities to create novel measurement tools, and helium, along with hydrogen, can be regarded as a fundamental atomic system whose spectrum is well understood for all practical purposes.

  7. Asymptotic behavior of the vacuum energy for small Skyrmions

    SciTech Connect

    Zuk, J.A. )

    1990-09-20

    Various schemes for deriving effective Lagrangians, involving both quark and meson degrees of freedom, which are intermediate between QCD and low-energy pion dynamics have been proposed. While integration over the fermion fields within the framework of renormalized field theory leads to a vacuum instability, physically reasonable results are obtained for the theory taken with finite cut-off. In principle, properties of the nucleon, such as its mass, can be obtained from a self-consistent calculation in the Skyrmion sector. This procedure can be simplified by implementing a analytical approximation for the fermion vacuum energy which plays a central role. The authors discuss such an approximation, and use it to calculate exactly the asymptotic behaviour of the vacuum energy for small Skyrmions. It is found that, unlike in the renormalized theory, its functional dependence on the Skyrmion radius in this limit depends on the characteristics of the Skyrmion profile and choice of regularization scheme; however, the cut-off field theory exhibits no vacuum instability.

  8. Self-similar cosmological solutions with dark energy. I. Formulation and asymptotic analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Harada, Tomohiro; Maeda, Hideki; Carr, B. J.

    2008-01-15

    Based on the asymptotic analysis of ordinary differential equations, we classify all spherically symmetric self-similar solutions to the Einstein equations which are asymptotically Friedmann at large distances and contain a perfect fluid with equation of state p=({gamma}-1){mu} with 0<{gamma}<2/3. This corresponds to a 'dark energy' fluid and the Friedmann solution is accelerated in this case due to antigravity. This extends the previous analysis of spherically symmetric self-similar solutions for fluids with positive pressure ({gamma}>1). However, in the latter case there is an additional parameter associated with the weak discontinuity at the sonic point and the solutions are only asymptotically 'quasi-Friedmann', in the sense that they exhibit an angle deficit at large distances. In the 0<{gamma}<2/3 case, there is no sonic point and there exists a one-parameter family of solutions which are genuinely asymptotically Friedmann at large distances. We find eight classes of asymptotic behavior: Friedmann or quasi-Friedmann or quasistatic or constant-velocity at large distances, quasi-Friedmann or positive-mass singular or negative-mass singular at small distances, and quasi-Kantowski-Sachs at intermediate distances. The self-similar asymptotically quasistatic and quasi-Kantowski-Sachs solutions are analytically extendible and of great cosmological interest. We also investigate their conformal diagrams. The results of the present analysis are utilized in an accompanying paper to obtain and physically interpret numerical solutions.

  9. Asymptotic domination of cold relativistic MHD winds by kinetic energy flux

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Begelman, Mitchell C.; Li, Zhi-Yun

    1994-01-01

    We study the conditions which lead to the conversion of most Poynting flux into kinetic energy flux in cold, relativistic hydromagnetic winds. It is shown that plasma acceleration along a precisely radial flow is extremely inefficient due to the near cancellation of the toroidal magnetic pressure and tension forces. However, if the flux tubes in a flow diverge even slightly faster than radially, the fast magnetosonic point moves inward from infinity to a few times the light cylinder radius. Once the flow becomes supermagnetosonic, further divergence of the flux tubes beyond the fast point can accelerate the flow via the 'magnetic nozzle' effect, thereby further converting Poynting flux to kinetic energy flux. We show that the Grad-Shafranov equation admits a generic family of kinetic energy-dominated asymptotic wind solutions with finite total magnetic flux. The Poynting flux in these solutions vanishes logarithmically with distance. The way in which the flux surfaces are nested within the flow depends only on the ratio of angular velocity to poliodal 4-velocity as a function of magnetic flux. Radial variations in flow structure can be expressed in terms of a pressure boundary condition on the outermost flux surface, provided that no external toriodal field surrounds the flow. For a special case, we show explicitly how the flux surfaces merge gradually to their asymptotes. For flows confined by an external medium of pressure decreasing to zero at infinity we show that, depending on how fast the ambient pressure declines, the final flow state could be either a collimated jet or a wind that fills the entire space. We discuss the astrophysical implications of our results for jets from active galactic nuclei and for free pulsar winds such as that believed to power the Crab Nebula.

  10. Asymptotically limitless quantum energy teleportation via qudit probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verdon-Akzam, Guillaume; Martín-Martínez, Eduardo; Kempf, Achim

    2016-02-01

    We propose a modified quantum energy teleportation scheme that uses arbitrary-dimensional qudit probes and polynomially localized Hamiltonians. We find that with an appropriate scaling of parameters, the teleported energy scales with the teleportation distance more favorably than the nonlocal tails of the Hamiltonians. We show that by allowing the exchange of arbitrary amounts of information between agents and in a suitable limit, an arbitrarily large amount of energy can be teleported through a massless quantum field.

  11. Generalized gradient approximation exchange energy functional with correct asymptotic behavior of the corresponding potential

    SciTech Connect

    Carmona-Espíndola, Javier; Gázquez, José L.; Vela, Alberto; Trickey, S. B.

    2015-02-07

    A new non-empirical exchange energy functional of the generalized gradient approximation (GGA) type, which gives an exchange potential with the correct asymptotic behavior, is developed and explored. In combination with the Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof (PBE) correlation energy functional, the new CAP-PBE (CAP stands for correct asymptotic potential) exchange-correlation functional gives heats of formation, ionization potentials, electron affinities, proton affinities, binding energies of weakly interacting systems, barrier heights for hydrogen and non-hydrogen transfer reactions, bond distances, and harmonic frequencies on standard test sets that are fully competitive with those obtained from other GGA-type functionals that do not have the correct asymptotic exchange potential behavior. Distinct from them, the new functional provides important improvements in quantities dependent upon response functions, e.g., static and dynamic polarizabilities and hyperpolarizabilities. CAP combined with the Lee-Yang-Parr correlation functional gives roughly equivalent results. Consideration of the computed dynamical polarizabilities in the context of the broad spectrum of other properties considered tips the balance to the non-empirical CAP-PBE combination. Intriguingly, these improvements arise primarily from improvements in the highest occupied and lowest unoccupied molecular orbitals, and not from shifts in the associated eigenvalues. Those eigenvalues do not change dramatically with respect to eigenvalues from other GGA-type functionals that do not provide the correct asymptotic behavior of the potential. Unexpected behavior of the potential at intermediate distances from the nucleus explains this unexpected result and indicates a clear route for improvement.

  12. Asymptotically Limitless Quantum Energy Teleportation via Qudit Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verdon-Akzam, Guillaume; Martín-Martínez, Eduardo; Kempf, Achim

    We propose a modified Quantum Energy Teleportation (QET) scheme that uses arbitrary-dimensional qudit probes and polynomially localized Hamiltonians. We find that with an appropriate scaling of parameters, the teleported energy scales with the teleportation distance more favourably than the nonlocal tails of the Hamiltonians. We show that by allowing the exchange of arbitrary amounts of information between agents and in a suitable limit, an arbitrarily large amount of energy can be teleported through a massless quantum field. arXiv:1510.03751 - E.M-M and AK acknowledge funding from the NSERC Discovery program.

  13. High-Energy QCD Asymptotics of Photon--Photon Collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, Stanley J.

    2002-07-26

    The high-energy behavior of the total cross section for highly virtual photons, as predicted by the BFKL equation at next-to-leading order (NLO) in QCD, is discussed. The NLO BFKL predictions, improved by the BLM optimal scale setting, are in good agreement with recent OPAL and L3 data at CERN LEP2. NLO BFKL predictions for future linear colliders are presented.

  14. Three-axis active magnetic attitude control asymptotical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ovchinnikov, M. Yu.; Roldugin, D. S.; Penkov, V. I.

    2015-05-01

    Active magnetic attitude control system providing given inertial attitude is considered. Control algorithm is constructed on the basis of a planar motion model. It decreases attitude discrepancy. Alternative approach is based on the PD-controller design. System behavior is analyzed for specific motion cases and sometimes for specific inertia tensor (axisymmetrical satellite) using averaging technique. Overall satellite angular motion is covered. Necessary attitude is found to be accessible for some control parameters. Stability is proven and optimal algorithm parameters are obtained. Floquet-based analysis is performed to verify and broaden analytical results.

  15. An asymptotic-preserving scheme for the semiconductor Boltzmann equation toward the energy-transport limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Jingwei; Wang, Li

    2015-01-01

    We design an asymptotic-preserving scheme for the semiconductor Boltzmann equation which leads to an energy-transport system for electron mass and energy as mean free path goes to zero. As opposed to the classical drift-diffusion limit where the stiff collisions are all in one scale, new difficulties arise in the two-scale stiff collision terms because the simple BGK penalization [15] fails to drive the solution to the correct limit. We propose to set up a spatially dependent threshold on the penalization of the stiffer collision operator such that the evolution of the solution resembles a Hilbert expansion at the continuous level. Formal asymptotic analysis and numerical results confirm the efficiency and accuracy of our scheme.

  16. Asymptotic forms for the energy of force-free magnetic field ion figurations of translational symmetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sturrock, P. A.; Antiochos, S. K.; Klinchuk, J. A.; Roumeliotis, G.

    1994-01-01

    It is known from computer calculations that if a force-free magnetic field configuration is stressed progressively by footpoint displacements, the configuration expands and approaches the open configuration with the same surface flux distribution and the energy of the field increases progressively. For configurations of translationalsymmetry, it has been found empirically that the energy tends asymptotically to a certain functional form. It is here shown that analysis of a simple model of the asymptotic form of force-free fields of translational symmetry leads to and therefore justifies this functional form. According to this model, the field evolves in a well-behaved manner with no indication of instability or loss of equilibrium.

  17. Polynomial Asymptotes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dobbs, David E.

    2010-01-01

    This note develops and implements the theory of polynomial asymptotes to (graphs of) rational functions, as a generalization of the classical topics of horizontal asymptotes and oblique/slant asymptotes. Applications are given to hyperbolic asymptotes. Prerequisites include the division algorithm for polynomials with coefficients in the field of…

  18. Asymptotic behavior of Laplacian-energy-like invariant of the 3.6.24 lattice with various boundary conditions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jia-Bao; Cao, Jinde; Hayat, Tasawar; Alsaadi, Fuad E

    2016-01-01

    Let G be a connected graph of order n with Laplacian eigenvalues [Formula: see text]. The Laplacian-energy-like invariant of G, is defined as [Formula: see text]. In this paper, we investigate the asymptotic behavior of the 3.6.24 lattice in terms of Laplacian-energy-like invariant as m, n approach infinity. Additionally, we derive that [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] have the same asymptotic Laplacian-energy-like invariants. PMID:27625970

  19. Extracting energy from a flow: An asymptotic approach using vortex-induced vibrations and feedback control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meliga, Philippe; Chomaz, Jean-Marc; Gallaire, François

    2011-07-01

    This paper considers vortex-induced vibrations of a cylinder in water streams for renewable energy production. We use an analytical model recently obtained by the authors from the asymptotic analysis of a coupled flow-cylinder system, and assess the ability of a control velocity applied at the cylinder wall to optimize the magnitude of dissipated energy at disposal to be harvested. The retained approach is that of proportional feedback control. When the system evolves on its limit cycle, we show that the control yields an increase in the mean dissipated energy by 3.5%, as well as a significant improvement of the robustness with respect to small inaccuracies of the structural parameters. However, we also show that the system is susceptible to converge to cycles of lower energy when subjected to external disturbances, as a result of the simultaneous existence of multiple stable cycles. Consequently, we propose a transient control algorithm meant to force the return of the system to its optimal cycle. Its efficiency is assessed for two feedback approaches relying on distinct types of measurements: we find significant differences in the time needed to reach convergence to the optimal cycle, which ultimately results in energy being spent when feedback is designed from cylinder measurements, and in energy being harnessed when feedback is designed from flow measurements.

  20. 5D supersymmetric domain wall solution with active hyperscalars and mixed AdS/non-AdS asymptotics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellorín, Jorge; Colonnello, Claudia

    2011-05-01

    We find a new supersymmetric 5D solution of {N} = 2 supergravity coupled to one hypermultiplet that depends only on the fifth dimension (the energy scale in a holographic context). In one asymptotic limit the domain wall approaches to the AdS5 form but in the other one it does not. Similarly, the hyperscalars, which are all proportional between them, go asymptotically to a critical point of the potential only in one direction. The quaternionic Kähler manifold of the model is the H4 hyperboloid. We use the standard metric of H4 in an explicit conformally flat form with several arbitrary parameters. We argue that the holographic dual of the domain wall is a RG flow of a D = 4, {N} = 1 gauge theory acquiring a conformal supersymmetry at the IR limit, which corresponds to the AdS5 asymptotic limit.

  1. Can we define an asymptotic value for the ice active surface site density for heterogeneous ice nucleation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niedermeier, Dennis; Augustin-Bauditz, Stefanie; Hartmann, Susan; Wex, Heike; Ignatius, Karoliina; Stratmann, Frank

    2015-05-01

    The immersion freezing behavior of droplets containing size-segregated, monodisperse feldspar particles was investigated. For all particle sizes investigated, a leveling off of the frozen droplet fraction was observed reaching a plateau within the heterogeneous freezing temperature regime (T >- 38°C). The frozen fraction in the plateau region was proportional to the particle surface area. Based on these findings, an asymptotic value for ice active surface site density ns, which we named ns⋆, could be determined for the investigated feldspar sample. The comparison of these results with those of other studies not only elucidates the general feasibility of determining such an asymptotic value but also shows that the value of ns⋆ strongly depends on the method of the particle surface area determination. However, such an asymptotic value might be an important input parameter for atmospheric modeling applications. At least it shows that care should be taken when ns is extrapolated to lower or higher temperature.

  2. An Asymptotic Analysis of a 2-D Model of Dynamically Active Compartments Coupled by Bulk Diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gou, J.; Ward, M. J.

    2016-04-01

    A class of coupled cell-bulk ODE-PDE models is formulated and analyzed in a two-dimensional domain, which is relevant to studying quorum-sensing behavior on thin substrates. In this model, spatially segregated dynamically active signaling cells of a common small radius ɛ ≪ 1 are coupled through a passive bulk diffusion field. For this coupled system, the method of matched asymptotic expansions is used to construct steady-state solutions and to formulate a spectral problem that characterizes the linear stability properties of the steady-state solutions, with the aim of predicting whether temporal oscillations can be triggered by the cell-bulk coupling. Phase diagrams in parameter space where such collective oscillations can occur, as obtained from our linear stability analysis, are illustrated for two specific choices of the intracellular kinetics. In the limit of very large bulk diffusion, it is shown that solutions to the ODE-PDE cell-bulk system can be approximated by a finite-dimensional dynamical system. This limiting system is studied both analytically, using a linear stability analysis and, globally, using numerical bifurcation software. For one illustrative example of the theory, it is shown that when the number of cells exceeds some critical number, i.e., when a quorum is attained, the passive bulk diffusion field can trigger oscillations through a Hopf bifurcation that would otherwise not occur without the coupling. Moreover, for two specific models for the intracellular dynamics, we show that there are rather wide regions in parameter space where these triggered oscillations are synchronous in nature. Unless the bulk diffusivity is asymptotically large, it is shown that a diffusion-sensing behavior is possible whereby more clustered spatial configurations of cells inside the domain lead to larger regions in parameter space where synchronous collective oscillations between the small cells can occur. Finally, the linear stability analysis for these cell

  3. An Asymptotic Analysis of a 2-D Model of Dynamically Active Compartments Coupled by Bulk Diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gou, J.; Ward, M. J.

    2016-08-01

    A class of coupled cell-bulk ODE-PDE models is formulated and analyzed in a two-dimensional domain, which is relevant to studying quorum-sensing behavior on thin substrates. In this model, spatially segregated dynamically active signaling cells of a common small radius ɛ ≪ 1 are coupled through a passive bulk diffusion field. For this coupled system, the method of matched asymptotic expansions is used to construct steady-state solutions and to formulate a spectral problem that characterizes the linear stability properties of the steady-state solutions, with the aim of predicting whether temporal oscillations can be triggered by the cell-bulk coupling. Phase diagrams in parameter space where such collective oscillations can occur, as obtained from our linear stability analysis, are illustrated for two specific choices of the intracellular kinetics. In the limit of very large bulk diffusion, it is shown that solutions to the ODE-PDE cell-bulk system can be approximated by a finite-dimensional dynamical system. This limiting system is studied both analytically, using a linear stability analysis and, globally, using numerical bifurcation software. For one illustrative example of the theory, it is shown that when the number of cells exceeds some critical number, i.e., when a quorum is attained, the passive bulk diffusion field can trigger oscillations through a Hopf bifurcation that would otherwise not occur without the coupling. Moreover, for two specific models for the intracellular dynamics, we show that there are rather wide regions in parameter space where these triggered oscillations are synchronous in nature. Unless the bulk diffusivity is asymptotically large, it is shown that a diffusion-sensing behavior is possible whereby more clustered spatial configurations of cells inside the domain lead to larger regions in parameter space where synchronous collective oscillations between the small cells can occur. Finally, the linear stability analysis for these cell

  4. Asymptotic entropy bounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bousso, Raphael

    2016-07-01

    We show that known entropy bounds constrain the information carried off by radiation to null infinity. We consider distant, planar null hypersurfaces in asymptotically flat spacetime. Their focusing and area loss can be computed perturbatively on a Minkowski background, yielding entropy bounds in terms of the energy flux of the outgoing radiation. In the asymptotic limit, we obtain boundary versions of the quantum null energy condition, of the generalized Second Law, and of the quantum Bousso bound.

  5. Self-similar cosmological solutions with dark energy. I. Formulation and asymptotic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harada, Tomohiro; Maeda, Hideki; Carr, B. J.

    2008-01-01

    Based on the asymptotic analysis of ordinary differential equations, we classify all spherically symmetric self-similar solutions to the Einstein equations which are asymptotically Friedmann at large distances and contain a perfect fluid with equation of state p=(γ-1)μ with 0<γ<2/3. This corresponds to a “dark energy” fluid and the Friedmann solution is accelerated in this case due to antigravity. This extends the previous analysis of spherically symmetric self-similar solutions for fluids with positive pressure (γ>1). However, in the latter case there is an additional parameter associated with the weak discontinuity at the sonic point and the solutions are only asymptotically “quasi-Friedmann,” in the sense that they exhibit an angle deficit at large distances. In the 0<γ<2/3 case, there is no sonic point and there exists a one-parameter family of solutions which are genuinely asymptotically Friedmann at large distances. We find eight classes of asymptotic behavior: Friedmann or quasi-Friedmann or quasistatic or constant-velocity at large distances, quasi-Friedmann or positive-mass singular or negative-mass singular at small distances, and quasi-Kantowski-Sachs at intermediate distances. The self-similar asymptotically quasistatic and quasi-Kantowski-Sachs solutions are analytically extendible and of great cosmological interest. We also investigate their conformal diagrams. The results of the present analysis are utilized in an accompanying paper to obtain and physically interpret numerical solutions.

  6. Asymptotic Eigenstructures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, P. M.; Stein, G.

    1980-01-01

    The behavior of the closed loop eigenstructure of a linear system with output feedback is analyzed as a single parameter multiplying the feedback gain is varied. An algorithm is presented that computes the asymptotically infinite eigenstructure, and it is shown how a system with high gain, feedback decouples into single input, single output systems. Then a synthesis algorithm is presented which uses full state feedback to achieve a desired asymptotic eigenstructure.

  7. Asymptotic modal analysis and statistical energy analysis of an acoustic cavity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kubota, Y.; Dionne, H. D.; Dowell, E. H.

    1988-01-01

    A basic asymptotic theory for structural wall/acoustic cavity interaction is presented, and the analysis is illustrated with examples of the acoustic cavity response to a prescribed wall motion. Although, when spatially averaged, the classical modal analysis (CMA) response approaches the asymptotic modal analysis (AMA) response more rapidly as the number of modes increases, it is shown that information about local response intensification is lost in the averaging process. A larger bandwidth at a given center frequency is found to contain more excited modes than a smaller bandwidth; however, the AMA is slightly more accurate in the smaller bandwidth. All AMA asymptotes were shown to be approached from below by a CMA with fixed bandwidth and increasing center frequency.

  8. Thin Interface Asymptotics for an Energy/Entropy Approach to Phase-Field Models with Unequal Conductivities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McFadden, G. B.; Wheeler, A. A.; Anderson, D. M.

    1999-01-01

    Karma and Rapped recently developed a new sharp interface asymptotic analysis of the phase-field equations that is especially appropriate for modeling dendritic growth at low undercoolings. Their approach relieves a stringent restriction on the interface thickness that applies in the conventional asymptotic analysis, and has the added advantage that interfacial kinetic effects can also be eliminated. However, their analysis focussed on the case of equal thermal conductivities in the solid and liquid phases; when applied to a standard phase-field model with unequal conductivities, anomalous terms arise in the limiting forms of the boundary conditions for the interfacial temperature that are not present in conventional sharp-interface solidification models, as discussed further by Almgren. In this paper we apply their asymptotic methodology to a generalized phase-field model which is derived using a thermodynamically consistent approach that is based on independent entropy and internal energy gradient functionals that include double wells in both the entropy and internal energy densities. The additional degrees of freedom associated with the generalized phased-field equations can be chosen to eliminate the anomalous terms that arise for unequal conductivities.

  9. Tsunami asymptotics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berry, M. V.

    2005-01-01

    By applying the technique of uniform asymptotic approximation to the oscillatory integrals representing tsunami wave profiles, the form of the travelling wave far from the source is calculated for arbitrary initial disturbances. The approximations reproduce the entire profiles very accurately, from the front to the tail, and their numerical computation is much faster than that of the oscillatory integrals. For one-dimensional propagation, the uniform asymptotics involve Airy functions and their derivatives; for two-dimensional propagation, the uniform asymptotics involve products of these functions. Separate analyses are required when the initial disturbance is specified as surface elevation or surface velocity as functions of position, and when these functions are even or odd. 'There was an awful rainbow once in heaven' (John Keats, 1820)

  10. Activation Energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gadeken, Owen

    2002-01-01

    Teaming is so common in today's project management environment that most of us assume it comes naturally. We further assume that when presented with meaningful and challenging work, project teams will naturally engage in productive activity to complete their tasks. This assumption is expressed in the simple (but false) equation: Team + Work = Teamwork. Although this equation appears simple and straightforward, it is far from true for most project organizations whose reality is a complex web of institutional norms based on individual achievement and rewards. This is illustrated by the very first successful team experience from my early Air Force career. As a young lieutenant, I was sent to Squadron Officer School, which was the first in the series of Air Force professional military education courses I was required to complete during my career. We were immediately formed into teams of twelve officers. Much of the course featured competition between these teams. As the most junior member of my team, I quickly observed the tremendous pressure to show individual leadership capability. At one point early in the course, almost everyone in our group was vying to become the team leader. This conflict was so intense that it caused us to fail miserably in our first outdoor team building exercise. We spent so much time fighting over leadership that we were unable to complete any of the events on the outdoor obstacle course. This complete lack of success was so disheartening to me that I gave our team little hope for future success. What followed was a very intense period of bickering, conflict, and even shouting matches as our dysfunctional team tried to cope with our early failures and find some way to succeed. British physician and researcher Wilfred Bion (Experiences in Groups, 1961) discovered that there are powerful psychological forces inherent in all groups that divert from accomplishing their primary tasks. To overcome these restraining forces and use the potential

  11. Rotating thin shells in (2 + 1)-dimensional asymptotically AdS spacetimes: Mechanical properties, machian effects, and energy conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemos, José P. S.; Lopes, Francisco J.; Minamitsuji, Masato

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, a rotating thin shell in a (2 + 1)-dimensional asymptotically AdS spacetime is studied. The spacetime exterior to the shell is the rotating BTZ spacetime and the interior is the empty spacetime with a cosmological constant. Through the Einstein equation in (2 + 1) dimensions and the corresponding junction conditions we calculate the dynamical relevant quantities, namely, the rest energy-density, the pressure, and the angular momentum flux density. We also analyze the matter in a frame where its energy-momentum tensor has a perfect fluid form. In addition, we show that Machian effects, such as the dragging of inertial frames, also occur in rotating (2 + 1)-dimensional spacetimes. The weak and the dominant energy condition for these shells are discussed.

  12. Asymptotically safe Higgs inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Xianyu, Zhong-Zhi; He, Hong-Jian E-mail: hjhe@tsinghua.edu.cn

    2014-10-01

    We construct a new inflation model in which the standard model Higgs boson couples minimally to gravity and acts as the inflaton. Our construction of Higgs inflation incorporates the standard model with Einstein gravity which exhibits asymptotic safety in the ultraviolet region. The slow roll condition is satisfied at large field value due to the asymptotically safe behavior of Higgs self-coupling at high energies. We find that this minimal construction is highly predictive, and is consistent with both cosmological observations and collider experiments.

  13. Can we define an asymptotic value for the ice active surface site density for heterogeneous ice nucleation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niedermeier, Dennis; Augustin-Bauditz, Stefanie; Hartmann, Susan; Wex, Heike; Ignatius, Karoliina; Stratmann, Frank

    2015-04-01

    The formation of ice in atmospheric clouds has a substantial influence on the radiative properties of clouds as well as on the formation of precipitation. Therefore much effort has been made to understand and quantify the major ice formation processes in clouds. Immersion freezing has been suggested to be a dominant primary ice formation process in low and mid-level clouds (mixed-phase cloud conditions). It also has been shown that mineral dust particles are the most abundant ice nucleating particles in the atmosphere and thus may play an important role for atmospheric ice nucleation (Murray et al., 2012). Additionally, biological particles like bacteria and pollen are suggested to be potentially involved in atmospheric ice formation, at least on a regional scale (Murray et al., 2012). In recent studies for biological particles (SNOMAX and birch pollen), it has been demonstrated that freezing is induced by ice nucleating macromolecules and that an asymptotic value for the mass density of these ice nucleating macromolecules can be determined (Hartmann et al., 2013; Augustin et al., 2013, Wex et al., 2014). The question arises whether such an asymptotic value can also be determined for the ice active surface site density ns, a parameter which is commonly used to describe the ice nucleation activity of e.g., mineral dust. Such an asymptotic value for ns could be an important input parameter for atmospheric modeling applications. In the presented study, we therefore investigated the immersion freezing behavior of droplets containing size-segregated, monodisperse feldspar particles utilizing the Leipzig Aerosol Cloud Interaction Simulator (LACIS). For all particle sizes considered in the experiments, we observed a leveling off of the frozen droplet fraction reaching a plateau within the heterogeneous freezing temperature regime (T > -38°C) which was proportional to the particle surface area. Based on these findings, we could determine an asymptotic value for the ice

  14. Comprehensive fits to high energy data for σ , ρ , and B , and the asymptotic black-disk limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Block, Martin M.; Durand, Loyal; Ha, Phuoc; Halzen, Francis

    2015-12-01

    We demonstrate that the entirety of the data on proton-proton and antiproton-proton scattering between 6 GeV and 57 TeV center-of-mass energy—the measured scattering cross sections, ρ values, and the forward slope parameters B for the differential cross sections—is sufficient to show that σelas/σtot→1 /2 and 8 π B /σtot→1 at very high energies. These relations demonstrate convincingly that the asymptotic p p and p ¯p scattering amplitudes approach those of scattering from a black disk. This result obviously introduces a constraint on any physics beyond the Standard Model that modifies the forward scattering amplitudes.

  15. On the asymptotic balance between electric and magnetic energies for hydromagnetic relativistic flows

    SciTech Connect

    Núñez, Manuel

    2013-06-15

    In the equations of classical magnetohydrodynamics, the displacement current is considered vanishingly small due to low plasma velocities. For velocities comparable to the speed of light, the full relativistic electromagnetic equations must be used. In the absence of gravitational forcings and with an isotropic Ohm's law, it is proved that for poloidal magnetic field and velocity and toroidal electric field, the electric and magnetic energies tend to be equivalent in average for large times. This represents a partial extension of Cowling's theorem for axisymmetric fields.

  16. STRONG VARIABLE ULTRAVIOLET EMISSION FROM Y GEM: ACCRETION ACTIVITY IN AN ASYMPTOTIC GIANT BRANCH STAR WITH A BINARY COMPANION?

    SciTech Connect

    Sahai, Raghvendra; Neill, James D.; Gil de Paz, Armando; Sanchez Contreras, Carmen

    2011-10-20

    Binarity is believed to dramatically affect the history and geometry of mass loss in asymptotic giant branch (AGB) and post-AGB stars, but observational evidence of binarity is sorely lacking. As part of a project to look for hot binary companions to cool AGB stars using the Galaxy Evolution Explorer archive, we have discovered a late-M star, Y Gem, to be a source of strong and variable UV emission. Y Gem is a prime example of the success of our technique of UV imaging of AGB stars in order to search for binary companions. Y Gem's large and variable UV flux makes it one of the most prominent examples of a late-AGB star with a mass accreting binary companion. The UV emission is most likely due to emission associated with accretion activity and a disk around a main-sequence companion star. The physical mechanism generating the UV emission is extremely energetic, with an integrated luminosity of a few x L{sub sun} at its peak. We also find weak CO J = 2-1 emission from Y Gem with a very narrow line profile (FWHM of 3.4 km s{sup -1}). Such a narrow line is unlikely to arise in an outflow and is consistent with emission from an orbiting, molecular reservoir of radius 300 AU. Y Gem may be the progenitor of the class of post-AGB stars which are binaries and possess disks but no outflows.

  17. Kohn-Sham kinetic energy density in the nuclear and asymptotic regions: Deviations from the von Weizsäcker behavior and applications to density functionals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Della Sala, Fabio; Fabiano, Eduardo; Constantin, Lucian A.

    2015-01-01

    We show that the Kohn-Sham positive-definite kinetic energy (KE) density significantly differs from the von Weizsäcker (VW) one at the nuclear cusp as well as in the asymptotic region. At the nuclear cusp, the VW functional is shown to be linear, and the contribution of p -type orbitals to the KE density is theoretically derived and numerically demonstrated in the limit of infinite nuclear charge as well in the semiclassical limit of neutral large atoms. In the latter case, it reaches 12% of the KE density. In the asymptotic region we find new exact constraints for meta-generalized gradient approximation (meta-GGA) exchange functionals: with an exchange enhancement factor proportional to √{α }, where α is the common meta-GGA ingredient, both the exchange energy density and the potential are proportional to the exact ones. In addition, this describes exactly the large-gradient limit of quasi-two-dimensional systems.

  18. Energy assessment: physical activity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Physical activity is an important component of total energy expenditure, contributing to energy intake needs; it also provides certain health benefits. This review chapter provides state-of-the-art information to researchers and clinicians who are interested in developing research studies or interv...

  19. Science Activities in Energy: Chemical Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oak Ridge Associated Universities, TN.

    Presented is a science activities in energy package which includes 15 activities relating to chemical energy. Activities are simple, concrete experiments for fourth, fifth and sixth grades which illustrate principles and problems relating to energy. Each activity is outlined on a single card which is introduced by a question. A teacher's…

  20. Science Activities in Energy: Electrical Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oak Ridge Associated Universities, TN.

    Presented is a science activities in energy package which includes 16 activities relating to electrical energy. Activities are simple, concrete experiments for fourth, fifth and sixth grades which illustrate principles and problems relating to energy. Each activity is outlined in a single card which is introduced by a question. A teacher's…

  1. Science Activities in Energy: Solar Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oak Ridge Associated Universities, TN.

    Presented is a science activities in energy package which includes 12 activities relating to solar energy. Activities are simple, concrete experiments for fourth, fifth, and sixth grades, which illustrate principles and problems relating to energy. Each activity is outlined on a single card which is introduced by a question. A teacher's supplement…

  2. SYNCHROTRON AND SYNCHROTRON SELF-ABSORPTION FOR A POWER-LAW PARTICLE DISTRIBUTION: ASYMPTOTIC FORMS FOR FINITE ENERGY RANGE

    SciTech Connect

    Fouka, M.; Ouichaoui, S.

    2009-12-10

    We calculate and plot the synchrotron power, P {sub n}u, the absorption coefficient, alpha{sub n}u, and the source function, S {sub n}u, for a power-law distribution of charged particles with Lorentz parameter values gamma{sub 1} <= gamma <= gamma{sub 2}. For this purpose, we define parametric functions Z{sub p} (x, eta), H{sub p} (x, eta), and Y{sub p} (x, eta) with eta = gamma{sub 2}/gamma{sub 1}, such that P {sub n}u propor to Z{sub p} (gamma{sup -2} {sub 1}nu/nu{sub 0}, eta), alpha{sub n}u propor to H{sub p} (gamma{sup -2} {sub 1}nu/nu{sub 0}, eta), and S {sub n}u propor to Y{sub p} (gamma{sup -2} {sub 1}nu/nu{sub 0}, eta). Corresponding asymptotic forms are also calculated and plotted for three frequency ranges, i.e., x << 1, 1 << x << eta{sup 2}, and x >> eta{sup 2}, especially in the case of finite parameter eta. Asymptotic forms of the middle range are possible for functions Z{sub p} and Y{sub p} for p>1/3, and for function H{sub p} for all positive values of index p. A characteristic value, eta {sub c}(p, epsilon) (with epsilon << 1), is then defined for each of the above functions so that for eta approx> eta {sub c}(p, epsilon) the middle range asymptotic forms could be considered. Further calculation details are also presented and discussed.

  3. Asymptotes in Polar Coordinates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fay, Temple H.

    1986-01-01

    An old way to determine asymptotes for curves described in polar coordinates is presented. Practice in solving trigonometric equations, in differentiation, and in calculating limits is involved. (MNS)

  4. Changing Conceptions of Activation Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pacey, Philip D.

    1981-01-01

    Provides background material which relates to the concept of activation energy, fundamental in the study of chemical kinetics. Compares the related concepts of the Arrhenius activation energy, the activation energy at absolute zero, the enthalpy of activation, and the threshold energy. (CS)

  5. Energy Adventure Center. Activity Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlton, Linda L.

    Energy activities are provided in this student activity book. They include: (1) an energy walk; (2) forms of energy in the home; (3) energy conversion; (4) constructing a solar hot dog cooker (with instructions for drawing a parabola); (5) interviewing senior citizens to learn about energy use in the past; (6) packaging materials; (7) insulation;…

  6. Activities Handbook for Energy Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeVito, Alfred; Krockover, Gerald H.

    The purpose of this handbook is to present information about energy and to translate this information into learning activities for children. Chapter 1, "Energy: A Delicate Dilemma," presents activities intended to provide an introduction to energy and energy usage. Chapter 2, "What are the Sources of Energy?" provides background information and…

  7. Science Activities in Energy: Conservation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oak Ridge Associated Universities, TN.

    Presented is a science activities in energy package which includes 14 activities relating to energy conservation. Activities are simple, concrete experiments for fourth, fifth and sixth grades, which illustrate principles and problems relating to energy. Each activity is outlined on a simple card which is introduced by a question. A teacher's…

  8. Asymptotic Safety in quantum gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nink, Andreas; Reuter, Martin; Saueressig, Frank

    2013-06-01

    Asymptotic Safety (sometimes also referred to as nonperturbative renormalizability) is a concept in quantum field theory which aims at finding a consistent and predictive quantum theory of the gravitational field. Its key ingredient is a nontrivial fixed point of the theory's renormalization group flow which controls the behavior of the coupling constants in the ultraviolet (UV) regime and renders physical quantities safe from divergences. Although originally proposed by Steven Weinberg to find a theory of quantum gravity the idea of a nontrivial fixed point providing a possible UV completion can be applied also to other field theories, in particular to perturbatively nonrenormalizable ones. The essence of Asymptotic Safety is the observation that nontrivial renormalization group fixed points can be used to generalize the procedure of perturbative renormalization. In an asymptotically safe theory the couplings do not need to be small or tend to zero in the high energy limit but rather tend to finite values: they approach a nontrivial UV fixed point. The running of the coupling constants, i.e. their scale dependence described by the renormalization group (RG), is thus special in its UV limit in the sense that all their dimensionless combinations remain finite. This suffices to avoid unphysical divergences, e.g. in scattering amplitudes. The requirement of a UV fixed point restricts the form of the bare action and the values of the bare coupling constants, which become predictions of the Asymptotic Safety program rather than inputs. As for gravity, the standard procedure of perturbative renormalization fails since Newton's constant, the relevant expansion parameter, has negative mass dimension rendering general relativity perturbatively nonrenormalizable. This has driven the search for nonperturbative frameworks describing quantum gravity, including Asymptotic Safety which -- in contrast to other approaches -- is characterized by its use of quantum field theory

  9. Science Activities in Energy: Wind Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oak Ridge Associated Universities, TN.

    Included in this science activities energy package are 12 activities related to wind energy for elementary students. Each activity is outlined on a single card and is introduced by a question. Topics include: (1) At what time of day is there enough wind to make electricity where you live?; (2) Where is the windiest spot on your schoolground?; and…

  10. Scaling and asymptotic properties of evaporated neutron inclusive cross sections in high energy hadron-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galoyan, A. S.; Ribon, A.; Uzhinsky, V. V.

    2015-09-01

    New properties of the evaporated neutron ( E < 30 MeV) energy spectra in hadron-nucleus interactions have been found. Particularly, the spectra approach the asymptotic regime, namely, they weakly depend on the collision energy at momenta of projectile protons larger than 5-6 GeV/ c; the spectra for various nuclei are similar, and can be approximately described by the function A n f( E). Experimental data on neutron spectra in the case of projectile π-mesons show analogous behavior, but the statistics of the data do not allow one to draw clear conclusions. In our analysis we used ITEP experimental data on inclusive cross sections of neutrons produced in interactions of π-mesons and protons with various nuclei in the energy range from 747 MeV up to 8.1 GeV. The observed properties allow one to predict neutron yields in the nucleus-nucleus interactions at high and super high energies. Predictions for the NICA/MPD experiment at JINR are presented. It is shown that the FTF (Fritiof)-model of the Geant4 toolkit qualitatively reproduces the observed regularities. For the first time estimates of the neutron energy flows are obtained at both RHIC and LHC energies.

  11. Science Activities in Energy: Solar Energy II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oak Ridge Associated Universities, TN.

    Included in this science activities energy package are 14 activities related to solar energy for secondary students. Each activity is outlined on a single card and is introduced by a question such as: (1) how much solar heat comes from the sun? or (2) how many times do you have to run water through a flat-plate collector to get a 10 degree rise in…

  12. Asymptotics for spherical needlets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldi, P.; Kerkyacharian, G.; Marinucci, D.; Picard, D.

    We investigate invariant random fields on the sphere using a new type of spherical wavelets, called needlets. These are compactly supported in frequency and enjoy excellent localization properties in real space, with quasi-exponentially decaying tails. We show that, for random fields on the sphere, the needlet coefficients are asymptotically uncorrelated for any fixed angular distance. This property is used to derive CLT and functional CLT convergence results for polynomial functionals of the needlet coefficients: here the asymptotic theory is considered in the high-frequency sense. Our proposals emerge from strong empirical motivations, especially in connection with the analysis of cosmological data sets.

  13. Activities for Teaching Solar Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mason, Jack Lee; Cantrell, Joseph S.

    1980-01-01

    Plans and activities are suggested for teaching elementary children about solar energy. Directions are included for constructing a flat plate collector and a solar oven. Activities for a solar field day are given. (SA)

  14. Asymptotic theory of relativistic, magnetized jets

    SciTech Connect

    Lyubarsky, Yuri

    2011-01-15

    The structure of a relativistically hot, strongly magnetized jet is investigated at large distances from the source. Asymptotic equations are derived describing collimation and acceleration of the externally confined jet. Conditions are found for the transformation of the thermal energy into the fluid kinetic energy or into the Poynting flux. Simple scalings are presented for the jet collimation angle and Lorentz factors.

  15. An asymptotical machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cristallini, Achille

    2016-07-01

    A new and intriguing machine may be obtained replacing the moving pulley of a gun tackle with a fixed point in the rope. Its most important feature is the asymptotic efficiency. Here we obtain a satisfactory description of this machine by means of vector calculus and elementary trigonometry. The mathematical model has been compared with experimental data and briefly discussed.

  16. The Effect of Disorder on the Free-Energy for the Random Walk Pinning Model: Smoothing of the Phase Transition and Low Temperature Asymptotics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, Quentin; Lacoin, Hubert

    2011-01-01

    We consider the continuous time version of the Random Walk Pinning Model (RWPM), studied in (Berger and Toninelli (Electron. J. Probab., to appear) and Birkner and Sun (Ann. Inst. Henri Poincaré Probab. Stat. 46:414-441, 2010; arXiv:0912.1663). Given a fixed realization of a random walk Y on ℤ d with jump rate ρ (that plays the role of the random medium), we modify the law of a random walk X on ℤ d with jump rate 1 by reweighting the paths, giving an energy reward proportional to the intersection time Lt(X,Y)=int0t {1}_{Xs=Ys} {d}s: the weight of the path under the new measure is exp ( βL t ( X, Y)), β∈ℝ. As β increases, the system exhibits a delocalization/localization transition: there is a critical value β c , such that if β> β c the two walks stick together for almost-all Y realizations. A natural question is that of disorder relevance, that is whether the quenched and annealed systems have the same behavior. In this paper we investigate how the disorder modifies the shape of the free energy curve: (1) We prove that, in dimension d≥3, the presence of disorder makes the phase transition at least of second order. This, in dimension d≥4, contrasts with the fact that the phase transition of the annealed system is of first order. (2) In any dimension, we prove that disorder modifies the low temperature asymptotic of the free energy.

  17. Asymptotically and exactly energy balanced augmented flux-ADER schemes with application to hyperbolic conservation laws with geometric source terms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navas-Montilla, A.; Murillo, J.

    2016-07-01

    In this work, an arbitrary order HLL-type numerical scheme is constructed using the flux-ADER methodology. The proposed scheme is based on an augmented Derivative Riemann solver that was used for the first time in Navas-Montilla and Murillo (2015) [1]. Such solver, hereafter referred to as Flux-Source (FS) solver, was conceived as a high order extension of the augmented Roe solver and led to the generation of a novel numerical scheme called AR-ADER scheme. Here, we provide a general definition of the FS solver independently of the Riemann solver used in it. Moreover, a simplified version of the solver, referred to as Linearized-Flux-Source (LFS) solver, is presented. This novel version of the FS solver allows to compute the solution without requiring reconstruction of derivatives of the fluxes, nevertheless some drawbacks are evidenced. In contrast to other previously defined Derivative Riemann solvers, the proposed FS and LFS solvers take into account the presence of the source term in the resolution of the Derivative Riemann Problem (DRP), which is of particular interest when dealing with geometric source terms. When applied to the shallow water equations, the proposed HLLS-ADER and AR-ADER schemes can be constructed to fulfill the exactly well-balanced property, showing that an arbitrary quadrature of the integral of the source inside the cell does not ensure energy balanced solutions. As a result of this work, energy balanced flux-ADER schemes that provide the exact solution for steady cases and that converge to the exact solution with arbitrary order for transient cases are constructed.

  18. Asymptotic Formula for Quantum Harmonic Oscillator Tunneling Probabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jadczyk, Arkadiusz

    2015-10-01

    Using simple methods of asymptotic analysis it is shown that for a quantum harmonic oscillator in n-th energy eigenstate the probability of tunneling into the classically forbidden region obeys an unexpected but simple asymptotic formula: the leading term is inversely proportional to the cube root of n.

  19. Asymptotic structure of hydromagnetically driven relativistic winds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiueh, Tzihong; Li, Zhi-Yun; Begelman, Mitchell C.

    1991-01-01

    A fully relativistic analysis has been performed of the asymptotic structure of stationary axisymmetric hydromagnetic winds. If a flow fills the region containing the rotation axis, then the flux surfaces in the flow must collimate to a set of current-carrying cylindrical surface extending to infinite transverse radius, collimate to a set of cylindrical surfaces extending to a finite radius, or collimate to a current-free paraboloidal field configuration which fills up the entire space. If an asymptotically cylindrical flow carries a finite current at radii well beyond the light cylinder, then the Lorentz factor of the terminal flow speed on a given flux surface is proportional to the total current enclosed within this flux surface. If a flow is of type II paraboloidal, then its asymptotic energy flux is carried entirely by the gas motion rather than the electromagnetic fields.

  20. Plane Wave and Coulomb Asymptotics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulligan, P. G.; Crothers, D. S. F.

    2004-01-01

    A simple plane wave solution of the Schrödinger Helmholtz equation is a quantum eigenfunction obeying both energy and linear momentum correspondence principles. Inclusion of the outgoing wave with scattering amplitude f obeys unitarity and the optical theorem. By closely considering the standard asymptotic development of the plane wave, we show that there is a problem with angular momentum when we consider forward scattering at the point of closest approach and at large impact parameter given semiclassically by (l + 1/2)/k where l is the azimuthal quantum number and may be large (J Leech et al, Phys. Rev. Lett. 88 257901 (2002)). The problem is resolved via non-uniform, non-standard analysis involving the Heaviside step function, unifying classical, semiclassical and quantum mechanics, and the treatment is extended to the case of pure Coulomb scattering.

  1. Asymptotic symmetries from finite boxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrade, Tomás; Marolf, Donald

    2016-01-01

    It is natural to regulate an infinite-sized system by imposing a boundary condition at finite distance, placing the system in a 'box.' This breaks symmetries, though the breaking is small when the box is large. One should thus be able to obtain the asymptotic symmetries of the infinite system by studying regulated systems. We provide concrete examples in the context of Einstein-Hilbert gravity (with negative or zero cosmological constant) by showing in 4 or more dimensions how the anti-de Sitter and Poincaré asymptotic symmetries can be extracted from gravity in a spherical box with Dirichlet boundary conditions. In 2 + 1 dimensions we obtain the full double-Virasoro algebra of asymptotic symmetries for AdS3 and, correspondingly, the full Bondi-Metzner-Sachs (BMS) algebra for asymptotically flat space. In higher dimensions, a related approach may continue to be useful for constructing a good asymptotically flat phase space with BMS asymptotic symmetries.

  2. Solar Energy Project, Activities: Biology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tullock, Bruce, Ed.; And Others

    This guide contains lesson plans and outlines of science activities which present concepts of solar energy in the context of biology experiments. Each unit presents an introduction; objectives; skills and knowledge needed; materials; methods; questions; recommendations for further work; and a teacher information sheet. The teacher information…

  3. Activation energy measurements of cheese

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Temperature sweeps of cheeses using small amplitude oscillatory shear tests produced values for activation energy of flow (Ea) between 30 and 44 deg C. Soft goat cheese and Queso Fresco, which are high-moisture cheeses and do not flow when heated, exhibited Ea values between 30 and 60 kJ/mol. The ...

  4. Activation Energies of Plasmonic Catalysts.

    PubMed

    Kim, Youngsoo; Dumett Torres, Daniel; Jain, Prashant K

    2016-05-11

    The activation energy of a catalytic reaction serves not only as a metric of the efficacy of a catalyst but also as a potential indicator of mechanistic differences between the catalytic and noncatalytic reaction. However, activation energies are quite underutilized in the field of photocatalysis. We characterize in detail the effect of visible light excitation on the activation enthalpy of an electron transfer reaction photocatalyzed by plasmonic Au nanoparticles. We find that in the presence of visible light photoexcitation, the activation enthalpy of the Au nanoparticle-catalyzed electron transfer reaction is significantly reduced. The reduction in the activation enthalpy depends on the excitation wavelength, the incident laser power, and the strength of a hole scavenger. On the basis of these results, we argue that the activation enthalpy reduction is directly related to the photoelectrochemical potential built-up on the Au nanoparticle under steady-state light excitation, analogous to electrochemical activation. Under optimum light excitation conditions, a potential as high as 240 mV is measured. The findings constitute more precise insights into the mechanistic role and energetic contribution of plasmonic excitation to chemical reactions catalyzed by transition metal nanoparticles. PMID:27064549

  5. Internal spin angular momentum of an asymptotically flat spacetime

    SciTech Connect

    Randono, Andrew; Sloan, David

    2009-08-15

    In this paper we investigate the manner in which the internal spin angular momentum of a spinor field is encoded in the gravitational field at asymptotic infinity. The inclusion of internal spin requires us to reanalyze our notion of asymptotic flatness. In particular, the Poincare symmetry at asymptotic infinity must be replaced by a spin-enlarged Poincare symmetry. Likewise, the generators of the asymptotic symmetry group must be supplemented to account for the internal spin. In the Hamiltonian framework of first-order Einstein-Cartan gravity, the extra generator comes from the boundary term of the Gauss constraint in the asymptotically flat context. With the additional term, we establish the relations among the Noether charges of a Dirac field, the Komar integral, and the asymptotic Arnowitt-Deser-Misner-like geometric integral. We show that by imposing mild restraints on the generating functionals of gauge transformations at asymptotic infinity, the phase space is rendered explicitly finite. We construct the energy-momentum and the new total (spin+orbital) angular momentum boundary integrals that satisfy the appropriate algebra to be the generators of the spin-enlarged Poincare symmetry. This demonstrates that the internal spin is encoded in the tetrad at asymptotic infinity. In addition, we find that a new conserved and (spin-enlarged) Poincare invariant charge emerges that is associated with the global structure of a gauge transformation.

  6. Dynamics of Dollard asymptotic variables. Asymptotic fields in Coulomb scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morchio, G.; Strocchi, F.

    2016-03-01

    Generalizing Dollard’s strategy, we investigate the structure of the scattering theory associated to any large time reference dynamics UD(t) allowing for the existence of Møller operators. We show that (for each scattering channel) UD(t) uniquely identifies, for t →±∞, asymptotic dynamics U±(t); they are unitary groups acting on the scattering spaces, satisfy the Møller interpolation formulas and are interpolated by the S-matrix. In view of the application to field theory models, we extend the result to the adiabatic procedure. In the Heisenberg picture, asymptotic variables are obtained as LSZ-like limits of Heisenberg variables; their time evolution is induced by U±(t), which replace the usual free asymptotic dynamics. On the asymptotic states, (for each channel) the Hamiltonian can by written in terms of the asymptotic variables as H = H±(qout/in,pout/in), H±(q,p) the generator of the asymptotic dynamics. As an application, we obtain the asymptotic fields ψout/in in repulsive Coulomb scattering by an LSZ modified formula; in this case, U±(t) = U0(t), so that ψout/in are free canonical fields and H = H0(ψout/in).

  7. WAPA Daily Energy Accounting Activities

    1990-10-01

    ISA (Interchange, Scheduling, & Accounting) is the interchange scheduling system used by the DOE Western Area Power Administration to perform energy accounting functions associated with the daily activities of the Watertown Operations Office (WOO). The system's primary role is to provide accounting functions for scheduled energy which is exchanged with other power companies and power operating organizations. The system has a secondary role of providing a historical record of all scheduled interchange transactions. The followingmore » major functions are performed by ISA: scheduled energy accounting for received and delivered energy; generation scheduling accounting for both fossil and hydro-electric power plants; metered energy accounting for received and delivered totals; energy accounting for Direct Current (D.C.) Ties; regulation accounting; automatic generation control set calculations; accounting summaries for Basin, Heartland Consumers Power District, and the Missouri Basin Municipal Power Agency; calculation of estimated generation for the Laramie River Station plant; daily and monthly reports; and dual control areas.« less

  8. Asymptotic entropic uncertainty relations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamczak, Radosław; Latała, Rafał; Puchała, Zbigniew; Życzkowski, Karol

    2016-03-01

    We analyze entropic uncertainty relations for two orthogonal measurements on a N-dimensional Hilbert space, performed in two generic bases. It is assumed that the unitary matrix U relating both bases is distributed according to the Haar measure on the unitary group. We provide lower bounds on the average Shannon entropy of probability distributions related to both measurements. The bounds are stronger than those obtained with use of the entropic uncertainty relation by Maassen and Uffink, and they are optimal up to additive constants. We also analyze the case of a large number of measurements and obtain strong entropic uncertainty relations, which hold with high probability with respect to the random choice of bases. The lower bounds we obtain are optimal up to additive constants and allow us to prove a conjecture by Wehner and Winter on the asymptotic behavior of constants in entropic uncertainty relations as the dimension tends to infinity. As a tool we develop estimates on the maximum operator norm of a submatrix of a fixed size of a random unitary matrix distributed according to the Haar measure, which are of independent interest.

  9. Asymptotic Parachute Performance Sensitivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Way, David W.; Powell, Richard W.; Chen, Allen; Steltzner, Adam D.

    2006-01-01

    In 2010, the Mars Science Laboratory mission will pioneer the next generation of robotic Entry, Descent, and Landing systems by delivering the largest and most capable rover to date to the surface of Mars. In addition to landing more mass than any other mission to Mars, Mars Science Laboratory will also provide scientists with unprecedented access to regions of Mars that have been previously unreachable. By providing an Entry, Descent, and Landing system capable of landing at altitudes as high as 2 km above the reference gravitational equipotential surface, or areoid, as defined by the Mars Orbiting Laser Altimeter program, Mars Science Laboratory will demonstrate sufficient performance to land on 83% of the planet s surface. By contrast, the highest altitude landing to date on Mars has been the Mars Exploration Rover at 1.3 km below the areoid. The coupling of this improved altitude performance with latitude limits as large as 60 degrees off of the equator and a precise delivery to within 10 km of a surface target, will allow the science community to select the Mars Science Laboratory landing site from thousands of scientifically interesting possibilities. In meeting these requirements, Mars Science Laboratory is extending the limits of the Entry, Descent, and Landing technologies qualified by the Mars Viking, Mars Pathfinder, and Mars Exploration Rover missions. Specifically, the drag deceleration provided by a Viking-heritage 16.15 m supersonic Disk-Gap-Band parachute in the thin atmosphere of Mars is insufficient, at the altitudes and ballistic coefficients under consideration by the Mars Science Laboratory project, to maintain necessary altitude performance and timeline margin. This paper defines and discusses the asymptotic parachute performance observed in Monte Carlo simulation and performance analysis and its effect on the Mars Science Laboratory Entry, Descent, and Landing architecture.

  10. Exponential tilting in Bayesian asymptotics

    PubMed Central

    Kharroubi, S. A.; Sweeting, T. J.

    2016-01-01

    We use exponential tilting to obtain versions of asymptotic formulae for Bayesian computation that do not involve conditional maxima of the likelihood function, yielding a more stable computational procedure and significantly reducing computational time. In particular we present an alternative version of the Laplace approximation for a marginal posterior density. Implementation of the asymptotic formulae and a modified signed root based importance sampler are illustrated with an example. PMID:27279661

  11. Asymptotic dynamics of monopole walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, R.

    2015-08-01

    We determine the asymptotic dynamics of the U(N) doubly periodic BPS monopole in Yang-Mills-Higgs theory, called a monopole wall, by exploring its Higgs curve using the Newton polytope and amoeba. In particular, we show that the monopole wall splits into subwalls when any of its moduli become large. The long-distance gauge and Higgs field interactions of these subwalls are Abelian, allowing us to derive an asymptotic metric for the monopole wall moduli space.

  12. Brane model with two asymptotic regions

    SciTech Connect

    Lubo, Musongela

    2005-02-15

    Some brane models rely on a generalization of the Melvin magnetic universe including a complex scalar field among the sources. We argue that the geometric interpretation of Kip. S. Thorne of this geometry restricts the kind of potential a complex scalar field can display to keep the same asymptotic behavior. While a finite energy is not obtained for a Mexican hat potential in this interpretation, this is the case for a potential displaying a broken phase and an unbroken one. We use for technical simplicity and illustrative purposes an ad hoc potential which however shares some features with those obtained in some supergravity models. We construct a sixth dimensional cylindrically symmetric solution which has two asymptotic regions: the Melvin-like metric on one side and a flat space displaying a conical singularity on the other. The causal structure of the configuration is discussed. Unfortunately, gravity is not localized on the brane.

  13. Brane model with two asymptotic regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubo, Musongela

    2005-02-01

    Some brane models rely on a generalization of the Melvin magnetic universe including a complex scalar field among the sources. We argue that the geometric interpretation of Kip. S. Thorne of this geometry restricts the kind of potential a complex scalar field can display to keep the same asymptotic behavior. While a finite energy is not obtained for a Mexican hat potential in this interpretation, this is the case for a potential displaying a broken phase and an unbroken one. We use for technical simplicity and illustrative purposes an ad hoc potential which however shares some features with those obtained in some supergravity models. We construct a sixth dimensional cylindrically symmetric solution which has two asymptotic regions: the Melvin-like metric on one side and a flat space displaying a conical singularity on the other. The causal structure of the configuration is discussed. Unfortunately, gravity is not localized on the brane.

  14. Energy Activities for the Primary Classroom. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tierney, Blue, Comp.

    An energy education program at the primary level should help students to understand the nature and importance of energy, consider different energy sources, learn about energy conservation, prepare for energy related careers, and become energy conscious in other career fields. The activities charts, readings, and experiments provided in this…

  15. Polynomial Asymptotes of the Second Kind

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dobbs, David E.

    2011-01-01

    This note uses the analytic notion of asymptotic functions to study when a function is asymptotic to a polynomial function. Along with associated existence and uniqueness results, this kind of asymptotic behaviour is related to the type of asymptote that was recently defined in a more geometric way. Applications are given to rational functions and…

  16. Semilocal density functional theory with correct surface asymptotics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Constantin, Lucian A.; Fabiano, Eduardo; Pitarke, J. M.; Della Sala, Fabio

    2016-03-01

    Semilocal density functional theory is the most used computational method for electronic structure calculations in theoretical solid-state physics and quantum chemistry of large systems, providing good accuracy with a very attractive computational cost. Nevertheless, because of the nonlocality of the exchange-correlation hole outside a metal surface, it was always considered inappropriate to describe the correct surface asymptotics. Here, we derive, within the semilocal density functional theory formalism, an exact condition for the imagelike surface asymptotics of both the exchange-correlation energy per particle and potential. We show that this condition can be easily incorporated into a practical computational tool, at the simple meta-generalized-gradient approximation level of theory. Using this tool, we also show that the Airy-gas model exhibits asymptotic properties that are closely related to those at metal surfaces. This result highlights the relevance of the linear effective potential model to the metal surface asymptotics.

  17. Energy Storage. Teachers Guide. Science Activities in Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, Mary Lynn, Ed.

    Included in this science activities energy package for students in grades 4-10 are 12 activities related to energy storage. Each activity is outlined on the front and back of a single sheet and is introduced by a key question. Most of the activities can be completed in the classroom with materials readily available in any community. Among the…

  18. Asymptotic analysis of rf-heated collisional plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Fisch, N.J.; Karney, C.F.F.

    1985-03-01

    It is shown that a distribution of electrons in resonance with traveling waves, but colliding with background distributions of electrons and ions, evolves to a steady state. Details of the steady state are given analytically in the asymptotic limit of high electron energy and are compared with numerical solutions. The asymptotic analytic solution may be useful for quickly relating emission data to likely excitations and is more reliable than conventional numerical solutions at high energy. A method of improving numerics at high energy is suggested.

  19. Asymptotic vacua with higher derivatives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cotsakis, Spiros; Kadry, Seifedine; Kolionis, Georgios; Tsokaros, Antonios

    2016-04-01

    We study limits of vacuum, isotropic universes in the full, effective, four-dimensional theory with higher derivatives. We show that all flat vacua as well as general curved ones are globally attracted by the standard, square root scaling solution at early times. Open vacua asymptote to horizon-free, Milne states in both directions while closed universes exhibit more complex logarithmic singularities, starting from initial data sets of a possibly smaller dimension. We also discuss the relation of our results to the asymptotic stability of the passage through the singularity in ekpyrotic and cyclic cosmologies.

  20. Asymptotic Rayleigh instantaneous unit hydrograph

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Troutman, B.M.; Karlinger, M.R.

    1988-01-01

    The instantaneous unit hydrograph for a channel network under general linear routing and conditioned on the network magnitude, N, tends asymptotically, as N grows large, to a Rayleigh probability density function. This behavior is identical to that of the width function of the network, and is proven under the assumption that the network link configuration is topologically random and the link hydraulic and geometric properties are independent and identically distributed random variables. The asymptotic distribution depends only on a scale factor, {Mathematical expression}, where ?? is a mean link wave travel time. ?? 1988 Springer-Verlag.

  1. Semiclassical asymptotic approximation of the two-dimensional Hartree operator spectrum near the upper boundaries of spectral clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereskokov, A. V.

    2016-04-01

    We consider an eigenvalue problem for the two-dimensional Hartree operator with a small parameter at the nonlinearity. We obtain the asymptotic eigenvalues and the asymptotic eigenfunctions near the upper boundaries of the spectral clusters formed near the energy levels of the unperturbed operator and construct an asymptotic expansion around the circle where the solution is localized.

  2. Energy Activities for Junior High Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beaver, David; And Others

    This document is a collection of six energy education activities for junior high school science. Its purpose is to help promote knowledge about energy, provide laboratory experiences, provoke inquiry, and relate energy to society through the science curriculum. The six activities are designed to take one to three class periods. Two of the…

  3. Energy Conservation Activity Packet, Grade 5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bakke, Ruth

    This activity packet for grade 5 is one of a series developed in response to concern for energy conservation. It contains activities that stress an energy conservation ethic and includes many values clarification activities for grade five. The packet is divided into two parts and provides the teacher with background information, concepts and…

  4. Asymptotic approach to special relativity compatible with a relativistic principle

    SciTech Connect

    Carmona, J. M.; Cortes, J. L.; Mazon, D.

    2010-10-15

    We propose a general framework to describe Planckian deviations from special relativity compatible with a relativistic principle. They are introduced as the leading corrections in an asymptotic approach to special relativity going beyond the energy power expansion of effective field theories. We discuss the conditions in which these Planckian effects might be experimentally observable in the near future, together with the nontrivial limits of applicability of this asymptotic approach that such a situation would produce, both at the very high (ultraviolet) and the very low (infrared) energy regimes.

  5. Intrinsic free energy in active nematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thampi, Sumesh P.; Doostmohammadi, Amin; Golestanian, Ramin; Yeomans, Julia M.

    2015-10-01

    Basing our arguments on the theory of active liquid crystals, we demonstrate, both analytically and numerically, that the activity can induce an effective free energy which enhances ordering in extensile systems of active rods and in contractile suspensions of active discs. We argue that this occurs because any ordering fluctuation is enhanced by the flow field it produces. A phase diagram in the temperature-activity plane compares ordering due to a thermodynamic free energy to that resulting from the activity. We also demonstrate that activity can drive variations in concentration, but for a different physical reason that relies on the separation of hydrodynamic and diffusive time scales.

  6. Asymptotically free scaling solutions in non-Abelian Higgs models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gies, Holger; Zambelli, Luca

    2015-07-01

    We construct asymptotically free renormalization group trajectories for the generic non-Abelian Higgs model in four-dimensional spacetime. These ultraviolet-complete trajectories become visible by generalizing the renormalization/boundary conditions in the definition of the correlation functions of the theory. Though they are accessible in a controlled weak-coupling analysis, these trajectories originate from threshold phenomena which are missed in a conventional perturbative analysis relying on the deep Euclidean region. We identify a candidate three-parameter family of renormalization group trajectories interconnecting the asymptotically free ultraviolet regime with a Higgs phase in the low-energy limit. We provide estimates of their low-energy properties in the light of a possible application to the standard model Higgs sector. Finally, we find a two-parameter subclass of asymptotically free Coleman-Weinberg-type trajectories that do not suffer from a naturalness problem.

  7. Stability of Non-Isolated Asymptotic Profiles for Fast Diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akagi, Goro

    2016-07-01

    The stability of asymptotic profiles of solutions to the Cauchy-Dirichlet problem for fast diffusion equation (FDE, for short) is discussed. The main result of the present paper is the stability of any asymptotic profiles of least energy. It is noteworthy that this result can cover non-isolated profiles, e.g., those for thin annular domain cases. The method of proof is based on the Łojasiewicz-Simon inequality, which is usually used to prove the convergence of solutions to prescribed limits, as well as a uniform extinction estimate for solutions to FDE. Besides, local minimizers of an energy functional associated with this issue are characterized. Furthermore, the instability of positive radial asymptotic profiles in thin annular domains is also proved by applying the Łojasiewicz-Simon inequality in a different way.

  8. Solar Energy Education. Renewable energy activities for biology

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-01-01

    An instructional aid for teachers is presented that will allow biology students the opportunity to learn about renewable energy sources. Some of the school activities include using leaves as collectors of solar energy, solar energy stored in wood, and a fuel value test for green and dry woods. A study of organic wastes as a source of fuel is included. (BCS)

  9. Solar energy education. Renewable energy activities for general science

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    Renewable energy topics are integrated with the study of general science. The literature is provided in the form of a teaching manual and includes such topics as passive solar homes, siting a home for solar energy, and wind power for the home. Other energy topics are explored through library research activities. (BCS)

  10. Energy-efficiency testing activities of the Mobile Energy Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, G.B.

    1991-01-01

    This report summarizes energy-efficiency testing activities during the first and second quarters of fiscal year 1990 applying the Mobile Energy Laboratory (MEL) testing capabilities. Four MELs, developed by the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), are administered by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for energy testing and program support functions at federal facilities. The using agencies principally fund MEL applications, while DOE/FEMP funds program administration and capability enhancement activities. This report fulfills the requirements established in the MEL Use Plan (PNL-6861) for semiannual reporting on energy-efficiency testing activities using the MEL capabilities. The MEL Use Committee, formally established in 1989, developed the MEL Use Plan and meets semiannually to establish priorities for energy-efficient testing applications using the MEL capabilities.

  11. Higher dimensional nonclassical eigenvalue asymptotics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camus, Brice; Rautenberg, Nils

    2015-02-01

    In this article, we extend Simon's construction and results [B. Simon, J. Funct. Anal. 53(1), 84-98 (1983)] for leading order eigenvalue asymptotics to n-dimensional Schrödinger operators with non-confining potentials given by Hn α = - Δ + ∏ i = 1 n |x i| α i on ℝn (n > 2), α ≔ ( α 1 , … , α n ) ∈ ( R+ ∗ ) n . We apply the results to also derive the leading order spectral asymptotics in the case of the Dirichlet Laplacian -ΔD on domains Ωn α = { x ∈ R n : ∏ j = 1 n }x j| /α j α n < 1 } .

  12. Asymptotic safety goes on shell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedetti, Dario

    2012-01-01

    It is well known in quantum field theory that the off-shell effective action depends on the gauge choice and field parametrization used in calculating it. Nevertheless, the typical scheme in which the scenario of asymptotically safe gravity is investigated is an off-shell version of the functional renormalization group equation. Working with the Einstein-Hilbert truncation as a test bed, we develop a new scheme for the analysis of asymptotically safe gravity in which the on-shell part of the effective action is singled out and we show that the beta function for the essential coupling has no explicit gauge dependence. In order to reach our goal, we introduce several technical novelties, including a different decomposition of the metric fluctuations, a new implementation of the ghost sector and a new cut-off scheme. We find a nontrivial fixed point, with a value of the cosmological constant that is independent of the gauge-fixing parameters.

  13. Solar Energy Project, Activities: General Solar Topics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tullock, Bruce, Ed.; And Others

    This guide contains lesson plans and outlines of activities which introduce students to concepts and issues relating to solar energy. Lessons frequently presented in the context of solar energy as it relates to contemporary energy problems. Each unit presents an introduction; objectives; necessary skills and knowledge; materials; method;…

  14. Asymptotic safety: A simple example

    SciTech Connect

    Braun, Jens; Gies, Holger; Scherer, Daniel D.

    2011-04-15

    We use the Gross-Neveu model in 2asymptotic safety scenario: despite being perturbatively nonrenormalizable, the model defines an interacting quantum field theory being valid to arbitrarily high momentum scales owing to the existence of a non-Gaussian fixed point. Using the functional renormalization group, we study the uv behavior of the model in both the purely fermionic as well as a partially bosonized language. We show that asymptotic safety is realized at non-Gaussian fixed points in both formulations, the universal critical exponents of which we determine quantitatively. The partially bosonized formulation allows to make contact to the large-N{sub f} expansion where the model is known to be renormalizable to all orders. In this limit, the fixed-point action as well as all universal critical exponents can be computed analytically. As asymptotic safety has become an important scenario for quantizing gravity, our description of a well-understood model is meant to provide for an easily accessible and controllable example of modern nonperturbative quantum field theory.

  15. Supersymmetric asymptotic safety is not guaranteed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Intriligator, Kenneth; Sannino, Francesco

    2015-11-01

    It was recently shown that certain perturbatively accessible, non-supersymmetric gauge-Yukawa theories have UV asymptotic safety, without asymptotic freedom: the UV theory is an interacting RG fixed point, and the IR theory is free. We here investigate the possibility of asymptotic safety in supersymmetric theories, and use unitarity bounds, and the a-theorem, to rule it out in broad classes of theories. The arguments apply without assuming perturbation theory. Therefore, the UV completion of a non-asymptotically free susy theory must have additional, non-obvious degrees of freedom, such as those of an asymptotically free (perhaps magnetic dual) extension.

  16. Asymptotic Linear Stability of Solitary Water Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pego, Robert L.; Sun, Shu-Ming

    2016-06-01

    We prove an asymptotic stability result for the water wave equations linearized around small solitary waves. The equations we consider govern irrotational flow of a fluid with constant density bounded below by a rigid horizontal bottom and above by a free surface under the influence of gravity neglecting surface tension. For sufficiently small amplitude waves, with waveform well-approximated by the well-known sech-squared shape of the KdV soliton, solutions of the linearized equations decay at an exponential rate in an energy norm with exponential weight translated with the wave profile. This holds for all solutions with no component in (that is, symplectically orthogonal to) the two-dimensional neutral-mode space arising from infinitesimal translational and wave-speed variation of solitary waves. We also obtain spectral stability in an unweighted energy norm.

  17. Chiral fermions in asymptotically safe quantum gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meibohm, J.; Pawlowski, J. M.

    2016-05-01

    We study the consistency of dynamical fermionic matter with the asymptotic safety scenario of quantum gravity using the functional renormalisation group. Since this scenario suggests strongly coupled quantum gravity in the UV, one expects gravity-induced fermion self-interactions at energies of the Planck scale. These could lead to chiral symmetry breaking at very high energies and thus to large fermion masses in the IR. The present analysis which is based on the previous works (Christiansen et al., Phys Rev D 92:121501, 2015; Meibohm et al., Phys Rev D 93:084035, 2016), concludes that gravity-induced chiral symmetry breaking at the Planck scale is avoided for a general class of NJL-type models. We find strong evidence that this feature is independent of the number of fermion fields. This finding suggests that the phase diagram for these models is topologically stable under the influence of gravitational interactions.

  18. Hybrid energy harvesting using active thermal backplane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyun-Wook; Lee, Dong-Gun

    2016-04-01

    In this study, we demonstrate the concept of a new hybrid energy harvesting system by combing solar cells with magneto-thermoelectric generator (MTG, i.e., thermal energy harvesting). The silicon solar cell can easily reach high temperature under normal operating conditions. Thus the heated solar cell becomes rapidly less efficient as the temperature of solar cell rises. To increase the efficiency of the solar cell, air or water-based cooling system is used. To surpass conventional cooling devices requiring additional power as well as large working space for air/water collectors, we develop a new technology of pairing an active thermal backplane (ATB) to solar cell. The ATB design is based on MTG technology utilizing the physics of the 2nd order phase transition of active ferromagnetic materials. The MTG is cost-effective conversion of thermal energy to electrical energy and is fundamentally different from Seebeck TEG devices. The ATB (MTG) is in addition to being an energy conversion system, a very good conveyor of heat through both conduction and convection. Therefore, the ATB can provide dual-mode for the proposed hybrid energy harvesting. One is active convective and conductive cooling for heated solar cell. Another is active thermal energy harvesting from heat of solar cell. These novel hybrid energy harvesting device have potentially simultaneous energy conversion capability of solar and thermal energy into electricity. The results presented can be used for better understanding of hybrid energy harvesting system that can be integrated into commercial applications.

  19. Energy and Energy Conservation Activities for High School Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bottinelli, Charles A., Ed.; Dow, John O., Ed.

    This manual contains fifteen energy activities suitable for high school physical and environmental science and mathematics classrooms. The activities are independent, each having its own objectives, introduction, and background information. A special section of each activity is written for the instructor and contains limits, sample data, and…

  20. Asymptotic falloff of local waveform measurements in numerical relativity

    SciTech Connect

    Pollney, Denis; Reisswig, Christian; Dorband, Nils; Schnetter, Erik; Diener, Peter

    2009-12-15

    We examine current numerical relativity computations of gravitational waves, which typically determine the asymptotic waves at infinity by extrapolation from finite (small) radii. Using simulations of a black hole binary with accurate wave extraction at r=1000M, we show that extrapolations from the near zone are self-consistent in approximating measurements at this radius, although with a somewhat reduced accuracy. We verify that {psi}{sub 4} is the dominant asymptotic contribution to the gravitational energy (as required by the peeling theorem) but point out that gauge effects may complicate the interpretation of the other Weyl components.

  1. Superradiant instabilities of asymptotically anti-de Sitter black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Stephen R.; Hollands, Stefan; Ishibashi, Akihiro; Wald, Robert M.

    2016-06-01

    We study the linear stability of asymptotically anti-de Sitter black holes in general relativity in spacetime dimension d≥slant 4. Our approach is an adaptation of the general framework of Hollands and Wald, which gives a stability criterion in terms of the sign of the canonical energy, { E }. The general framework was originally formulated for static or stationary and axisymmetric black holes in the asymptotically flat case, and the stability analysis for that case applies only to axisymmetric perturbations. However, in the asymptotically anti-de Sitter case, the stability analysis requires only that the black hole have a single Killing field normal to the horizon and there are no restrictions on the perturbations (apart from smoothness and appropriate behavior at infinity). For an asymptotically anti-de Sitter black hole, we define an ergoregion to be a region where the horizon Killing field is spacelike; such a region, if present, would normally occur near infinity. We show that for black holes with ergoregions, initial data can be constructed such that { E }\\lt 0, so all such black holes are unstable. To obtain such initial data, we first construct an approximate solution to the constraint equations using the WKB method, and then we use the Corvino–Schoen technique to obtain an exact solution. We also discuss the case of charged asymptotically anti-de Sitter black holes with generalized ergoregions.

  2. Complementary asymptotic results for the burning velocity of the ozone decomposition flame

    SciTech Connect

    Rogg, B.

    1986-07-01

    The merged regime of an ozone decomposition flame (Linan and Rodriguez, 1985) is investigated theoretically, applying the activation-energy asymptotic approach of Rogg and Wichman (1985). The structure and burning rate of the flame are characterized by carrying the analysis to the second order in the reciprocal of a Zel'dovich number, and numerical results based on the rate data and transport-coefficient correlations of Heimerl and Coffee (1980) are presented in tables. It is found that the two-term expansion reduces the errors of the one-term expansion to a few percent. 5 references.

  3. The maximum drag reduction asymptote

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choueiri, George H.; Hof, Bjorn

    2015-11-01

    Addition of long chain polymers is one of the most efficient ways to reduce the drag of turbulent flows. Already very low concentration of polymers can lead to a substantial drag and upon further increase of the concentration the drag reduces until it reaches an empirically found limit, the so called maximum drag reduction (MDR) asymptote, which is independent of the type of polymer used. We here carry out a detailed experimental study of the approach to this asymptote for pipe flow. Particular attention is paid to the recently observed state of elasto-inertial turbulence (EIT) which has been reported to occur in polymer solutions at sufficiently high shear. Our results show that upon the approach to MDR Newtonian turbulence becomes marginalized (hibernation) and eventually completely disappears and is replaced by EIT. In particular, spectra of high Reynolds number MDR flows are compared to flows at high shear rates in small diameter tubes where EIT is found at Re < 100. The research leading to these results has received funding from the People Programme (Marie Curie Actions) of the European Union's Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) under REA grant agreement n° [291734].

  4. Asymptotically Free Gauge Theories. I

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Wilczek, Frank; Gross, David J.

    1973-07-01

    Asymptotically free gauge theories of the strong interactions are constructed and analyzed. The reasons for doing this are recounted, including a review of renormalization group techniques and their application to scaling phenomena. The renormalization group equations are derived for Yang-Mills theories. The parameters that enter into the equations are calculated to lowest order and it is shown that these theories are asymptotically free. More specifically the effective coupling constant, which determines the ultraviolet behavior of the theory, vanishes for large space-like momenta. Fermions are incorporated and the construction of realistic models is discussed. We propose that the strong interactions be mediated by a "color" gauge group which commutes with SU(3)xSU(3). The problem of symmetry breaking is discussed. It appears likely that this would have a dynamical origin. It is suggested that the gauge symmetry might not be broken, and that the severe infrared singularities prevent the occurrence of non-color singlet physical states. The deep inelastic structure functions, as well as the electron position total annihilation cross section are analyzed. Scaling obtains up to calculable logarithmic corrections, and the naive lightcone or parton model results follow. The problems of incorporating scalar mesons and breaking the symmetry by the Higgs mechanism are explained in detail.

  5. Dissipation of atmospheric waves: An asymptotic approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godin, Oleg A.

    2014-05-01

    Wave energy dissipation through irreversible thermodynamic processes is a major factor influencing propagation of acoustic and gravity waves in the Earth's atmosphere. Accurate modeling of the wave dissipation is important in a wide range of problems from understanding the momentum and energy transport by waves into the upper atmosphere to predicting long-range propagation of infrasound to the acoustic remote sensing of mesospheric and thermospheric winds. Variations with height of the mass density, kinematic viscosity, and other physical parameters of the atmosphere have a profound effect on the wave dissipation and its frequency dependence. To characterize the wave dissipation, it is typical to consider an idealized environment, which admits plane-wave solutions. For instance, kinematic viscosity is often assumed to be constant in derivations of dispersion equations of acoustic-gravity waves in the atmosphere. While the assumption of constant shear viscosity coefficient would be much more realistic, it does not lead to plane-wave solutions. Here, we use an asymptotic approach to derivation of dispersion equations of acoustic-gravity waves in dissipative fluids. The approach does not presuppose existence of any plane-wave solutions and relies instead on the assumption that spatial variations of environmental parameters are gradual. The atmosphere is modeled as a neutral, horizontally stratified, moving ideal gas of variable composition. Linearized hydrodynamic equations for compressible fluids in a gravity field are solved asymptotically, leading to a self-consistent version of the Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin approximation for acoustic-gravity waves. Dissipative processes are found to affect both the eikonal and the geometric (Berry) phase of the wave. Newly found expressions for acoustic-gravity wave attenuation due to viscosity and thermal conductivity of the air are compared to results previously reported in the literature. Effects of the wind on the wave

  6. Numerical Asymptotic Solutions Of Differential Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thurston, Gaylen A.

    1992-01-01

    Numerical algorithms derived and compared with classical analytical methods. In method, expansions replaced with integrals evaluated numerically. Resulting numerical solutions retain linear independence, main advantage of asymptotic solutions.

  7. Nucleosynthesis in asymptotic giant branch stars

    SciTech Connect

    El Eid, Mounib F.

    2014-05-09

    The nucleosynthesis in asymptotic giant branch stars (briefly: AGB)is a challenging and fascinating subject in the theory of stellar evolution and important for observations as well. This is because about of half the heavy elements beyond iron are synthesized during thermal pulsation phases of these stars. Furthermore, the understanding of the production of the heavy elements and some light elements like carbon and fluorine represent a powerful tool to get more insight into the internal structure of these stars. The diversity of nuclear processing during the AGB phases may also motivate experimental activities in measuring important nuclear reactions. In this contribution, we emphasize several interesting feature of the nucleosynthesis in AGB stars which still needs further elaboration especially from theoretical point of view.

  8. Asymptotically optimal topological quantum compiling.

    PubMed

    Kliuchnikov, Vadym; Bocharov, Alex; Svore, Krysta M

    2014-04-11

    We address the problem of compiling quantum operations into braid representations for non-Abelian quasiparticles described by the Fibonacci anyon model. We classify the single-qubit unitaries that can be represented exactly by Fibonacci anyon braids and use the classification to develop a probabilistically polynomial algorithm that approximates any given single-qubit unitary to a desired precision by an asymptotically depth-optimal braid pattern. We extend our algorithm in two directions: to produce braids that allow only single-strand movement, called weaves, and to produce depth-optimal approximations of two-qubit gates. Our compiled braid patterns have depths that are 20 to 1000 times shorter than those output by prior state-of-the-art methods, for precisions ranging between 10(-10) and 10(-30). PMID:24765934

  9. Solar Energy Education. Renewable energy activities for earth science

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    A teaching manual is provided to aid teachers in introducing renewable energy topics to earth science students. The main emphasis is placed on solar energy. Activities for the student include a study of the greenhouse effect, solar gain for home heating, measuring solar radiation, and the construction of a model solar still to obtain fresh water. Instructions for the construction of apparatus to demonstrate a solar still, the greenhouse effect and measurement of the altitude and azimuth of the sun are included. (BCS)

  10. On the asymptotic similarity of rotating homogeneous turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Squires, K. D.; Chasnov, J. R.; Mansour, N. N.

    1994-01-01

    Asymptotic similarity states at large Reynolds numbers and small Rossby numbers in rotating homogeneous turbulence are investigated using the database obtained from large-eddy simulations of the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. Previous work has shown that the turbulence kinetic energy and integral length scales are accurately described by simple scaling laws based on the low wavenumbers part of the three-dimensional energy spectrum. The primary interest of the present study is to search for spectrum similarity in the asymptotic state. Four independent energy spectra are defined. It is shown that rescaling of these energy spectra in the asymptotic regime will collapse three out of the four spectra. The spectrum which does not collapse is a function only of the vertical wavenumber and corresponds to two-component motions in the plane normal to the rotation axis. Detailed investigation of the cause of this anomalous behavior reveals the existence of a strong reverse cascade of energy from small-to-large scales of the two-dimensional, two-component motions. This feature of the rotating flow is presumably linked to the lack of a complete similarity state, though further study of this issue is required.

  11. Conservation Activities Related to Energy: Energy Activities for Urban Elementary Students, K-6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, Joan S.; And Others

    Presented are simple activities, experiments, and demonstrations relating to energy conservation in the home. Activities are divided into four areas: (1) kitchen, (2) house, (3) transportation, and (4) heating and cooling. The material has been designed to require a minimum of preparation. Activity and game masters are provided. Activities may be…

  12. 8. Asymptotically Flat and Regular Cauchy Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dain, Sergio

    I describe the construction of a large class of asymptotically flat initial data with non-vanishing mass and angular momentum for which the metric and the extrinsic curvature have asymptotic expansions at space-like infinity in terms of powers of a radial coordinate. I emphasize the motivations and the main ideas behind the proofs.

  13. Einstein-Yang-Mills theory: Asymptotic symmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnich, Glenn; Lambert, Pierre-Henry

    2013-11-01

    Asymptotic symmetries of the Einstein-Yang-Mills system with or without cosmological constant are explicitly worked out in a unified manner. In agreement with a recent conjecture, one finds a Virasoro-Kac-Moody type algebra not only in three dimensions but also in the four-dimensional asymptotically flat case.

  14. An asymptotic model of the F layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliver, W. L.

    2012-01-01

    A model of the F layer of the ionosphere is presented that consists of a bottomside asymptote that ignores transport and a topside asymptote that ignores chemistry. The asymptotes connect at the balance height dividing the chemistry and transport regimes. A combination of these two asymptotes produces a good approximation to the true F layer. Analogously, a model of F layer response to an applied vertical drift is presented that consists of two asymptotic responses, one that ignores transport and one that ignores chemistry. The combination of these asymptotic responses produces a good approximation to the response of the true F layer. This latter response is identical to the “servo” response of Rishbeth et al. (1978), derived from the continuity equation. The asymptotic approach bypasses the continuity equation in favor of “force balance” arguments and so replaces a differential equation with simpler algebraic equations. This new approach provides a convenient and intuitive mean for first-order estimates of the change in F layer peak height and density in terms of changes in neutral density, composition, temperature, winds, and electric fields. It is applicable at midlatitudes and at magnetically quiet times at high latitudes. Forensic inverse relations are possible but are not unique. The validity of the asymptotic relations is shown through numerical simulation.

  15. Solar Energy Project, Activities: Chemistry & Physics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tullock, Bruce, Ed.; And Others

    This guide contains lesson plans and outlines of science activities which present concepts of solar energy in the context of chemistry and physics experiments. Each unit presents an introduction to the unit; objectives; required skills and knowledge; materials; method; questions; recommendations for further work; and a teacher information sheet.…

  16. Solar Energy Project, Activities: Junior High Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tullock, Bruce, Ed.; And Others

    This guide contains lesson plans and outlines of science activities which present concepts of solar energy in the context of the junior high science curriculum. Each unit presents an introduction; objectives; skills and knowledge needed; materials; methods; questions; recommendations for further work; and a teacher information sheet. The teacher…

  17. Solar Energy Project, Activities: Earth Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tullock, Bruce, Ed.; And Others

    This guide contains lesson plans and outlines of science activities which present concepts of solar energy in the context of earth science experiments. Each unit presents an introduction; objectives; skills and knowledge needed; materials; method; questions; recommendations for further study; and a teacher information sheet. The teacher…

  18. Energy Activities for Junior High Social Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minnesota State Energy Agency, St. Paul.

    The document contains seven learning activities for junior high students on the energy situation. Objectives are to help students gain understanding and knowledge about the relationships between humans and their social and physical environments; solve problems and clarify issues; examine personal beliefs and values; and recognize the relationships…

  19. Hardee County Energy Activities - Middle School Level.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Rodney F., Ed.

    Described are over 70 activities designed to help students develop writing skills by examining energy issues. Intended for middle school students, the lessons were developed by Hardee County, Florida teachers. Learning strategies employed include class discussions, analogies, word puzzles, letter writing, sentence completions, vocabulary building…

  20. Activation energy of water structural transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kholmanskiy, Alexander

    2015-06-01

    In this work, the nature of molecular motions that dominate in the thermodynamics of anomalies of liquid water properties in the range of 0-100 °C has been studied. Temperature dependencies of water properties have been approximated by exponential functions and the activation energies for water structure transitions have been evaluated. The activation energy values were compared with the energy spectra of characteristic vibrations and with those of cooperative molecular motion in the lattice-type structure of hydrogen bonds. It has been found that it is the reaction of hydrogen bond breaking that mainly limits the abnormal dynamics of water viscosity, self-diffusion, dielectric relaxation time and electric conductivity. It has been assumed that the thermodynamics of cooperative motion and resonance phenomena in water clusters form a basis for the differentiation mechanism of extrema points in temperature dependencies of water density, isobaric heat capacity, sound velocity, surface tension coefficient and compressibility.

  1. Asymptotic stability of relaxation shock profiles for hyperbolic conservation laws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hailiang

    This paper studies the asymptotic stability of traveling relaxation shock profiles for hyperbolic systems of conservation laws. Under a stability condition of subcharacteristic type the large time relaxation dynamics on the level of shocks is shown to be determined by the equilibrium conservation laws. The proof is due to the energy principle, using the weighted norms, the interaction of waves from various modes is treated by imposing suitable weight matrix.

  2. The Magnetic Free Energy in Active Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Metcalf, Thomas R.; Mickey, Donald L.; LaBonte, Barry J.

    2001-01-01

    The magnetic field permeating the solar atmosphere governs much of the structure, morphology, brightness, and dynamics observed on the Sun. The magnetic field, especially in active regions, is thought to provide the power for energetic events in the solar corona, such as solar flares and Coronal Mass Ejections (CME) and is believed to energize the hot coronal plasma seen in extreme ultraviolet or X-rays. The question remains what specific aspect of the magnetic flux governs the observed variability. To directly understand the role of the magnetic field in energizing the solar corona, it is necessary to measure the free magnetic energy available in active regions. The grant now expiring has demonstrated a new and valuable technique for observing the magnetic free energy in active regions as a function of time.

  3. Detecting communities using asymptotical surprise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Traag, V. A.; Aldecoa, R.; Delvenne, J.-C.

    2015-08-01

    Nodes in real-world networks are repeatedly observed to form dense clusters, often referred to as communities. Methods to detect these groups of nodes usually maximize an objective function, which implicitly contains the definition of a community. We here analyze a recently proposed measure called surprise, which assesses the quality of the partition of a network into communities. In its current form, the formulation of surprise is rather difficult to analyze. We here therefore develop an accurate asymptotic approximation. This allows for the development of an efficient algorithm for optimizing surprise. Incidentally, this leads to a straightforward extension of surprise to weighted graphs. Additionally, the approximation makes it possible to analyze surprise more closely and compare it to other methods, especially modularity. We show that surprise is (nearly) unaffected by the well-known resolution limit, a particular problem for modularity. However, surprise may tend to overestimate the number of communities, whereas they may be underestimated by modularity. In short, surprise works well in the limit of many small communities, whereas modularity works better in the limit of few large communities. In this sense, surprise is more discriminative than modularity and may find communities where modularity fails to discern any structure.

  4. Asymptotics with a positive cosmological constant: I. Basic framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashtekar, Abhay; Bonga, Béatrice; Kesavan, Aruna

    2015-01-01

    The asymptotic structure of the gravitational field of isolated systems has been analyzed in great detail in the case when the cosmological constant Λ is zero. The resulting framework lies at the foundation of research in diverse areas in gravitational science. Examples include: (i) positive energy theorems in geometric analysis; (ii) the coordinate invariant characterization of gravitational waves in full, nonlinear general relativity; (iii) computations of the energy-momentum emission in gravitational collapse and binary mergers in numerical relativity and relativistic astrophysics; and (iv) constructions of asymptotic Hilbert spaces to calculate S-matrices and analyze the issue of information loss in the quantum evaporation of black holes. However, by now observations have led to a strong consensus that Λ is positive in our universe. In this paper we show that, unfortunately, the standard framework does not extend from the Λ =0 case to the Λ \\gt 0 case in a physically useful manner. In particular, we do not have positive energy theorems, nor an invariant notion of gravitational waves in the nonlinear regime, nor asymptotic Hilbert spaces in dynamical situations of semi-classical gravity. A suitable framework to address these conceptual issues of direct physical importance is developed in subsequent papers.

  5. Energy Expenditure During Extravehicular Activity Through Apollo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paul, Heather L.

    2011-01-01

    Monitoring crew health during manned space missions has always been an important factor to ensure that the astronauts can complete the missions successfully and within safe physiological limits. The necessity of real-time metabolic rate monitoring during extravehicular activities (EVAs) came into question during the Gemini missions, when the energy expenditure required to complete EVA tasks exceeded the life support capabilities for cooling and humidity control and crewmembers (CMs) ended the EVAs fatigued and overworked. This paper discusses the importance of real-time monitoring of metabolic rate during EVA, and provides a historical look at energy expenditure during EVA through the Apollo program.

  6. Energy Expenditure During Extravehicular Activity Through Apollo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paul, Heather L.

    2012-01-01

    Monitoring crew health during manned space missions has always been an important factor to ensure that the astronauts can complete the missions successfully and within safe physiological limits. The necessity of real-time metabolic rate monitoring during extravehicular activities (EVAs) came into question during the Gemini missions, when the energy expenditure required to complete EVA tasks exceeded the life support capabilities for cooling and humidity control and, as a result, crew members ended the EVAs fatigued and overworked. This paper discusses the importance of real-time monitoring of metabolic rate during EVAs, and provides a historical look at energy expenditure during EVAs through the Apollo Program.

  7. Active Control by Conservation of Energy Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maestrello, Lucio

    2000-01-01

    Three unrelated experiments are discussed; each was extremely sensitive to initial conditions. The initial conditions are the beginnings of the origins of the information that nonlinearity displays. Initial conditions make the phenomenon unstable and unpredictable. With the knowledge of the initial conditions, active control requires far less power than that present in the system response. The first experiment is on the control of shocks from an axisymmetric supersonic jet; the second, control of a nonlinear panel response forced by turbulent boundary layer and sound; the third, control of subharmonic and harmonics of a panel forced by sound. In all three experiments, control is achieved by redistribution of periodic energy response such that the energy is nearly preserved from a previous uncontrolled state. This type of active control improves the performance of the system being controlled.

  8. EMC effect: asymptotic freedom with nuclear targets

    SciTech Connect

    West, G.B.

    1984-01-01

    General features of the EMC effect are discussed within the framework of quantum chromodynamics as expressed via the operator product expansion and asymptotic freedom. These techniques are reviewed with emphasis on the target dependence. 22 references.

  9. Hermite polynomials and quasi-classical asymptotics

    SciTech Connect

    Ali, S. Twareque; Engliš, Miroslav

    2014-04-15

    We study an unorthodox variant of the Berezin-Toeplitz type of quantization scheme, on a reproducing kernel Hilbert space generated by the real Hermite polynomials and work out the associated quasi-classical asymptotics.

  10. Get Current: Switch on Clean Energy Activity Book

    SciTech Connect

    2014-06-01

    Switching on clean energy technologies means strengthening the economy while protecting the environment. This activity book for all ages promotes energy awareness, with facts on different types of energy and a variety of puzzles in an energy theme.

  11. Asymptotically anomalous black hole configurations in gravitating nonlinear electrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz-Alonso, J.; Rubiera-Garcia, D.

    2010-10-15

    We analyze the class of nonlinear electrodynamics minimally coupled to gravitation supporting asymptotically flat non-Schwarzschild-like elementary solutions. The Lagrangian densities governing the dynamics of these models in flat space are defined and fully characterized as a subclass of the set of functions of the two standard field invariants, restricted by requirements of regularity, parity invariance and positivity of the energy, which are necessary conditions for the theories to be physically admissible. Such requirements allow for a complete characterization and classification of the geometrical structures of the elementary solutions for the corresponding gravity-coupled models. In particular, an immediate consequence of the requirement of positivity of the energy is the asymptotic flatness of gravitating elementary solutions for any admissible model. The present analysis, together with the (already published) one concerning the full class of admissible gravitating nonlinear electrodynamics supporting asymptotically flat Schwarzschild-like elementary solutions, completes and exhausts the study of the gravitating pointlike charge problem for this kind of models.

  12. To theory of asymptotically stable accelerating Universe in Riemann-Cartan spacetime

    SciTech Connect

    Garkun, A.S.; Kudin, V.I.; Minkevich, A.V. E-mail: kudzin_w@tut.by

    2014-12-01

    Homogeneous isotropic cosmological models built in the framework of the Poincar'e gauge theory of gravity based on general expression of gravitational Lagrangian with indefinite parameters are analyzed. Special points of cosmological solutions for flat cosmological models at asymptotics and conditions of their stability in dependence of indefinite parameters are found. Procedure of numerical integration of the system of gravitational equations at asymptotics is considered. Numerical solution for accelerating Universe without dark energy is obtained.

  13. Indirect methods of determination of the asymptotic normalization coefficients and their application for nuclear astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Yarmukhamedov, R.

    2014-05-09

    The basic methods of the determination of asymptotic normalization coefficient for A+a→B of astrophysical interest are briefly presented. The results of the application of the specific asymptotic normalization coefficients derived within these methods for the extrapolation of the astrophysical S factors to experimentally inaccessible energy regions (E ≤ 25 keV) for the some specific radiative capture A(a,γ)B reactions of the pp-chain and the CNO cycle are presented.

  14. High energy activation data library (HEAD-2009)

    SciTech Connect

    Mashnik, Stepan G; Korovin, Yury A; Natalenko, Anatoly A; Konobeyev, Alexander Yu; Stankovskiy, A Yu

    2010-01-01

    A proton activation data library for 682 nuclides from 1 H to 210Po in the energy range from 150 MeV up to 1 GeV was developed. To calculate proton activation data, the MCNPX 2.6.0 and CASCADE/INPE codes were chosen. Different intranuclear cascade, preequilibrium, and equilibrium nuclear reaction models and their combinations were used. The optimum calculation models have been chosen on the basis of statistical correlations for calculated and experimental proton data taken from the EXFOR library of experimental nuclear data. All the data are written in ENDF-6 format. The library is called HEPAD-2008 (High-Energy Proton Activation Data). A revision of IEAF-2005 neutron activation data library has been performed. A set of nuclides for which the cross-section data can be (and were) updated using more modern and improved models is specified, and the corresponding calculations have been made in the present work. The new version of the library is called IEAF-2009. The HEPAD-2008 and IEAF-2009 are merged to the final HEAD-2009 library.

  15. High energy activation data library (HEAD-2009)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korovin, Yu. A.; Natalenko, A. A.; Stankovskiy, A. Yu.; Mashnik, S. G.; Konobeyev, A. Yu.

    2010-12-01

    A proton activation data library for 682 nuclides from 1H to 210Po in the energy range from 150 MeV up to 1 GeV was developed. To calculate proton activation data, the MCNPX 2.6.0 and CASCADE/INPE codes were chosen. Different intranuclear cascade, preequilibrium, and equilibrium nuclear reaction models and their combinations were used. The optimum calculation models have been chosen on the basis of statistical correlations for calculated and experimental proton data taken from the EXFOR library of experimental nuclear data. All the data are written in ENDF-6 format. The library is called HEPAD-2008 (High-Energy Proton Activation Data). A revision of IEAF-2005 neutron activation data library has been performed. A set of nuclides for which the cross-section data can be (and were) updated using more modern and improved models is specified, and the corresponding calculations have been made in the present work. The new version of the library is called IEAF-2009. The HEPAD-2008 and IEAF-2009 are merged to the final HEAD-2009 library.

  16. Energy and Man's Environment: Activity Guide. An Interdisciplinary Teacher's Guide to Energy and Environmental Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, John, Ed.

    This publication provides the goals, concepts, objectives, and rationale for the six activity guides in this series of energy education materials. The organization of this series, as presented in this publication, centers around six goals which correspond to the activity guides. Under each goal are several concepts, which in turn, have several…

  17. Energy and Man's Environment Activity Guide: An Interdisciplinary Teacher's Guide to Energy and Environmental Activities, Section Four - Impacts of Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, John, Ed.

    This publication presents the activities pertaining to the fourth goal of this activity guide series. The activities in this publication focus on the socioeconomic effects of energy uses and crises and the understandings needed to assess those effects. These materials are appropriate for middle school and junior high school students. These…

  18. Energy and Man's Environment Activity Guide: An Interdisciplinary Teacher's Guide to Energy and Environmental Activities, Section One - Sources of Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, John, Ed.

    This publication presents the activities pertaining to the first goal of this activity guide series. The activities in this publication focus primarily on the availability of resources, forms of energy, natural laws, and socioeconomic considerations. These materials are appropriate for middle school and junior high school students. These…

  19. Energy Adventure Center. Activity Book. Revised [and Expanded] Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wichita Unified School District 259, KS.

    A variety of energy activities are provided, including instructions for and questions related to energy films. The activities are organized into five sections. Section 1 (work) includes an activity focusing on movement and change. Section 2 (forms of energy) includes activities related to mechanical (movement), radiant (light), chemical (burning),…

  20. Asymptotic normalization coefficients (nuclear vertex constants) for p + {sup 7}Be {yields} {sup 8}B and the direct {sup 7}Be(p, {gamma}){sup 8}B astrophysical S factors at solar energies

    SciTech Connect

    Igamov, S. B.; Yarmukhamedov, R.

    2008-10-15

    A new analysis of the precise experimental astrophysical S factors for the direct-capture reaction {sup 7}Be(p, {gamma}){sup 8}B [A.J. Junghans et al., Phys. Rev. C 68, 065803 (2003) and L.T. Baby et al., Phys. Rev. C 67, 065805 (2003)] is carried out on the basis of a modified two-body potential approach in which the direct astrophysical S factor, S{sub 17}(E), is expressed in terms of the asymptotic normalization constants for p + {sup 7}Be {yields} {sup 8}B and two additional conditions are involved to verify the peripheral character of the reaction under consideration. The Woods-Saxon potential form is used for the bound-(p + {sup 7}Be)-state wave function and for p{sup 7}Be-scattering wave function. New estimates are obtained for the 'indirectly measured' values of the asymptotic normalization constants (the nuclear vertex constants) for the p + {sup 7}Be {yields} {sup 8}B and S{sub 17}(E) at E {<=} 115 keV, including E = 0. These values of S{sub 17}(E) and asymptotic normalization constants have been used for obtaining the indirectly measured values of the s-wave average scattering length and the p-wave effective-range parameters for p{sup 7}Be scattering.

  1. MAGNETIC ENERGY SPECTRA IN SOLAR ACTIVE REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Abramenko, Valentyna; Yurchyshyn, Vasyl

    2010-09-01

    Line-of-sight magnetograms for 217 active regions (ARs) with different flare rates observed at the solar disk center from 1997 January until 2006 December are utilized to study the turbulence regime and its relationship to flare productivity. Data from the SOHO/MDI instrument recorded in the high-resolution mode and data from the BBSO magnetograph were used. The turbulence regime was probed via magnetic energy spectra and magnetic dissipation spectra. We found steeper energy spectra for ARs with higher flare productivity. We also report that both the power index, {alpha}, of the energy spectrum, E(k) {approx} k{sup -}{alpha}, and the total spectral energy, W = {integral}E(k)dk, are comparably correlated with the flare index, A, of an AR. The correlations are found to be stronger than those found between the flare index and the total unsigned flux. The flare index for an AR can be estimated based on measurements of {alpha} and W as A = 10{sup b}({alpha}W){sup c}, with b = -7.92 {+-} 0.58 and c = 1.85 {+-} 0.13. We found that the regime of the fully developed turbulence occurs in decaying ARs and in emerging ARs (at the very early stage of emergence). Well-developed ARs display underdeveloped turbulence with strong magnetic dissipation at all scales.

  2. ERP Energy and Cognitive Activity Correlates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schillaci, Michael Jay; Vendemia, Jennifer M. C.

    2014-03-01

    We propose a novel analysis approach for high-density event related scalp potential (ERP) data where the integrated channel-power is used to attain an energy density functional state for channel-clusters of neurophysiological significance. The method is applied to data recorded during a two-stimulus, directed lie paradigm and shows that deceptive responses emit between 8% and 10% less power. A time course analysis of these cognitive activity measures over posterior and anterior regions of the cortex suggests that neocortical interactions, reflecting the differing workload demands during executive and semantic processes, take about 50% longer for the case of deception. These results suggest that the proposed method may provide a useful tool for the analysis of ERP correlates of high-order cognitive functioning. We also report on a possible equivalence between the energy functional distribution and near-infrared signatures that have been measured with other modalities.

  3. Energy and power limits for microbial activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LaRowe, D.; Amend, J.

    2014-12-01

    The goal of this presentation is to describe a quantitative framework for determining how energy limits microbial activity, biomass and, ultimately, biogeochemical processes. Although this model can be applied to any environment, its utility is demonstrated in marine sediments, which are an attractive test habitat because they encompass a broad spectrum of energy levels, varying amounts of biomass and are ubiquitous. The potential number of active microbial cells in Arkonas Basin (Baltic Sea) sediments are estimated as a function of depth by quantifying the amount of energy that is available to them and the rate at which it is supplied: power. The amount of power supplied per cubic centimeter of sediment is determined by calculating the Gibbs energy of fermentation and sulfate reduction in combination with the rate of particulate organic carbon, POC, degradation. The Reactive Continuum Model (Boudreau and Ruddick, 1991), RCM, is used to determine the rate at which POC is made available for microbial consumption. The RCM represents POC as containing a range of different types of organic compounds whose ability to be consumed by microorganisms varies as a function of the age of the sediment and on the distribution of compound types that were initially deposited. The sediment age model and RCM parameters determined by (Mogollon et al., 2012) are used. The power available for fermentation and sulfate reduction coupled to H2 and acetate oxidation varies from 10-8 W cm-3 at the sediment water interface to between 10-11 - 10-12 W cm-3 at 3.5 meters below the seafloor, mbsf. Using values of maintenance powers for each of these catabolic activities taken from the literature, the total number of active cells in these sediments similarly decreases from just less than 108 cell cm-3 at the SWI to 4.6 x 104 cells cm-3 at 3.5 mbsf. The number of moles of POC decreases from 2.6 x 10-5 to 9.5 x 10-6, also becoming more recalcitrant with depth. Boudreau, B. P. and Ruddick, B. R

  4. Hydrogen Energy Storage (HES) Activities at NREL; NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect

    Eichman, J.

    2015-04-21

    This presentation provides an overview of hydrogen and energy storage, including hydrogen storage pathways and international power-to-gas activities, and summarizes the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's hydrogen energy storage activities and results.

  5. Oklahoma Energy Awareness Education, Energy Education Activities, Grades 4-12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Education, Oklahoma City.

    This publication contains energy education activities for grades 4 through 12 and is part of a set of three publications. These activities are organized under five energy concepts: (1) energy is so basic that nothing moves without it; (2) conservation of energy; (3) there are other energy alternatives; (4) society depends on energy; and (5) the…

  6. Asymptotic modelling of a thermopiezoelastic anisotropic smart plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Yufei

    Motivated by the requirement of modelling for space flexible reflectors as well as other applications of plate structures in engineering, a general anisotropic laminated thin plate model and a monoclinic Reissner-Mindlin plate model with thermal deformation, two-way coupled piezoelectric effect and pyroelectric effect is constructed using the variational asymptotic method, without any ad hoc assumptions. Total potential energy contains strain energy, electric potential energy and energy caused by temperature change. Three-dimensional strain field is built based on the concept of warping function and decomposition of the rotation tensor. The feature of small thickness and large in-plane dimension of plate structure helped to asymptotically simplify the three-dimensional analysis to a two-dimensional analysis on the reference surface and a one-dimensional analysis through the thickness. For the zeroth-order approximation, the asymptotically correct expression of energy is derived into the form of energetic equation in classical laminated plate theory, which will be enough to predict the behavior of plate structures as thin as a space flexible reflector. A through-the-thickness strain field can be expressed in terms of material constants and two-dimensional membrane and bending strains, while the transverse normal and shear stresses are not predictable yet. In the first-order approximation, the warping functions are further disturbed into a high order and an asymptotically correct energy expression with derivatives of the two-dimensional strains is acquired. For the convenience of practical use, the expression is transformed into a Reissner-Mindlin form with optimization implemented to minimize the error. Transverse stresses and strains are recovered using the in-plane strain variables. Several numerical examples of different laminations and shapes are studied with the help of analytical solutions or shell elements in finite element codes. The constitutive relation is

  7. A note on two-dimensional asymptotic magnetotail equilibria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voigt, Gerd-Hannes; Moore, Brian D.

    1994-01-01

    In order to understand, on the fluid level, the structure, the time evolution, and the stability of current sheets, such as the magnetotail plasma sheet in Earth's magnetosphere, one has to consider magnetic field configurations that are in magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) force equilibrium. Any reasonable MHD current sheet model has to be two-dimensional, at least in an asymptotic sense (B(sub z)/B (sub x)) = epsilon much less than 1. The necessary two-dimensionality is described by a rather arbitrary function f(x). We utilize the free function f(x) to construct two-dimensional magnetotail equilibria are 'equivalent' to current sheets in empirical three-dimensional models. We obtain a class of asymptotic magnetotail equilibria ordered with respect to the magnetic disturbance index Kp. For low Kp values the two-dimensional MHD equilibria reflect some of the realistic, observation-based, aspects of three-dimensional models. For high Kp values the three-dimensional models do not fit the asymptotic MHD equlibria, which is indicative of their inconsistency with the assumed pressure function. This, in turn, implies that high magnetic activity levels of the real magnetosphere might be ruled by thermodynamic conditions different from local thermodynamic equilibrium.

  8. Maximal hypersurfaces in asymptotically stationary spacetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chrusciel, Piotr T.; Wald, Robert M.

    1992-12-01

    The purpose of the work is to extend the results on the existence of maximal hypersurfaces to encompass some situations considered by other authors. The existence of maximal hypersurface in asymptotically stationary spacetimes is proven. Existence of maximal surface and of foliations by maximal hypersurfaces is proven in two classes of asymptotically flat spacetimes which possess a one parameter group of isometries whose orbits are timelike 'near infinity'. The first class consists of strongly causal asymptotically flat spacetimes which contain no 'blackhole or white hole' (but may contain 'ergoregions' where the Killing orbits fail to be timelike). The second class of space times possess a black hole and a white hole, with the black and white hole horizon intersecting in a compact 2-surface S.

  9. Dispersive shock wave interactions and asymptotics.

    PubMed

    Ablowitz, Mark J; Baldwin, Douglas E

    2013-02-01

    Dispersive shock waves (DSWs) are physically important phenomena that occur in systems dominated by weak dispersion and weak nonlinearity. The Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation is the universal model for systems with weak dispersion and weak, quadratic nonlinearity. Here we show that the long-time-asymptotic solution of the KdV equation for general, steplike data is a single-phase DSW; this DSW is the "largest" possible DSW based on the boundary data. We find this asymptotic solution using the inverse scattering transform and matched-asymptotic expansions. So while multistep data evolve to have multiphase dynamics at intermediate times, these interacting DSWs eventually merge to form a single-phase DSW at large time. PMID:23496590

  10. New measurements of the astrophysical S factor for {sup 12}C(p,{gamma}){sup 13}N reaction at low energies and the asymptotic normalization coefficient (nuclear vertex constant) for the p+{sup 12}C{yields}{sup 13}N reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Burtebaev, N.; Zazulin, D. M.; Igamov, S. B.; Yarmukhamedov, R.; Peterson, R. J.

    2008-09-15

    New measurements of differential and total cross sections for the {sup 12}C(p,{gamma}){sup 13}N reaction have been made at beam energies of E{sub p}=354,390,460,463,565,750, and 1061 keV. Analysis of the astrophysical S factor S(E) for the {sup 12}C(p,{gamma}){sup 13}N reaction at low energies and of the reaction rates has been carried out within the R-matrix approach by using the previously measured nuclear vertex constant (or the respective asymptotic normalization coefficient) for the virtual decay {sup 13}N{yields}p+{sup 12}C to fix the direct capture part of the amplitude in S(E). It is demonstrated that the R-matrix approach, using the measured asymptotic normalization coefficient, can be employed as an ideal tool, minimizing the uncertainties associated with a calculation of the direct capture cross section of the {sup 12}C(p,{gamma}){sup 13}N reaction at extremely low energies. New information on the proton and {gamma} width for the first excited state of {sup 13}N is obtained.

  11. Distributed Energy Communications & Controls, Lab Activities - Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Rizy, D Tom

    2010-01-01

    The purpose is to develop controls for inverter-based renewable and non-renewable distributed energy systems to provide local voltage, power and power quality support for loads and the power grid. The objectives are to (1) develop adaptive controls for inverter-based distributed energy (DE) systems when there are multiple inverters on the same feeder and (2) determine the impact of high penetration high seasonal energy efficiency ratio (SEER) air conditioning (A/C) units on power systems during sub-transmission faults which can result in an A/C compressor motor stall and assess how inverter-based DE can help to mitigate the stall event. The Distributed Energy Communications & Controls Laboratory (DECC) is a unique facility for studying dynamic voltage, active power (P), non-active power (Q) and power factor control from inverter-based renewable distributed energy (DE) resources. Conventionally, inverter-based DE systems have been designed to provide constant, close to unity power factor and thus not provide any voltage support. The DECC Lab interfaces with the ORNL campus distribution system to provide actual power system testing of the controls approach. Using mathematical software tools and the DECC Lab environment, we are developing and testing local, autonomous and adaptive controls for local voltage control and P & Q control for inverter-based DE. We successfully tested our active and non-active power (P,Q) controls at the DECC laboratory along with voltage regulation controls. The new PQ control along with current limiter controls has been tested on our existing inverter test system. We have tested both non-adaptive and adaptive control modes for the PQ control. We have completed several technical papers on the approaches and results. Electric power distribution systems are experiencing outages due to a phenomenon known as fault induced delayed voltage recovery (FIDVR) due to air conditioning (A/C) compressor motor stall. Local voltage collapse from FIDVR is

  12. Asymptotics of a horizontal liquid bridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haynes, M.; O'Brien, S. B. G.; Benilov, E. S.

    2016-04-01

    This paper uses asymptotic techniques to find the shape of a two dimensional liquid bridge suspended between two vertical walls. We model the equilibrium bridge shape using the Laplace-Young equation. We use the Bond number as a small parameter to deduce an asymptotic solution which is then compared with numerical solutions. The perturbation approach demonstrates that equilibrium is only possible if the contact angle lies within a hysteresis interval and the analysis relates the width of this interval to the Bond number. This result is verified by comparison with a global force balance. In addition, we examine the quasi-static evolution of such a two dimensional bridge.

  13. Asymptotic behavior of degenerate logistic equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arrieta, José M.; Pardo, Rosa; Rodríguez-Bernal, Aníbal

    2015-12-01

    We analyze the asymptotic behavior of positive solutions of parabolic equations with a class of degenerate logistic nonlinearities of the type λu - n (x)uρ. An important characteristic of this work is that the region where the logistic term n (ṡ) vanishes, that is K0 = { x : n (x) = 0 }, may be non-smooth. We analyze conditions on λ, ρ, n (ṡ) and K0 guaranteeing that the solution starting at a positive initial condition remains bounded or blows up as time goes to infinity. The asymptotic behavior may not be the same in different parts of K0.

  14. Exploring central opacity and asymptotic scenarios in elastic hadron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fagundes, D. A.; Menon, M. J.; Silva, P. V. R. G.

    2016-02-01

    In the absence of a global description of the experimental data on elastic and soft diffractive scattering from the first principles of QCD, model-independent analyses may provide useful phenomenological insights for the development of the theory in the soft sector. With that in mind, we present an empirical study on the energy dependence of the ratio X between the elastic and total cross sections; a quantity related to the evolution of the hadronic central opacity. The dataset comprises all the experimental information available on proton-proton and antiproton-proton scattering in the c.m. energy interval 5 GeV-8 TeV. Generalizing previous works, we discuss four model-independent analytical parameterizations for X, consisting of sigmoid functions composed with elementary functions of the energy and three distinct asymptotic scenarios: either the standard black disk limit or scenarios above or below that limit. Our two main conclusions are the following: (1) although consistent with the experimental data, the black disk does not represent an unique solution; (2) the data reductions favor a semi-transparent scenario, with asymptotic average value for the ratio X bar = 0.30 ± 0.12. In this case, within the uncertainty, the asymptotic regime may already be reached around 1000 TeV. We present a comparative study of the two scenarios, including predictions for the inelastic channel (diffraction dissociation) and the ratio associated with the total cross-section and the elastic slope. Details on the selection of our empirical ansatz for X and physical aspects related to a change of curvature in this quantity at 80-100 GeV, indicating the beginning of a saturation effect, are also presented and discussed.

  15. The Limit of Free Magnetic Energy in Active Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Ron; Falconer, David; Sterling, Alphonse

    2012-01-01

    By measuring from active-region magnetograms a proxy of the free energy in the active region fs magnetic field, it has been found previously that (1) there is an abrupt upper limit to the free energy the field can hold that increases with the amount of magnetic field in the active region, the active region fs magnetic flux content, and (2) the free energy is usually near its limit when the field explodes in a CME/flare eruption. That is, explosive active regions are concentrated in a main-sequence path bordering the free-energy ]limit line in (flux content, free-energy proxy) phase space. Here, from measurement of Marshall Space Flight Center vector magnetograms, we find the magnetic condition that underlies the free ]energy limit and the accompanying main sequence of explosive active regions. Using a suitable free ]energy proxy measured from vector magnetograms of 44 active regions, we find that (1) in active regions at and near their free ]energy limit, the ratio of magnetic-shear free energy to the non ]free magnetic energy the potential field would have is approximately 1 in the core field, the field rooted along the neutral line, and (2) this ratio is progressively less in active regions progressively farther below their free ]energy limit. This shows that most active regions in which this core-field energy ratio is much less than 1 cannot be triggered to explode; as this ratio approaches 1, most active regions become capable of exploding; and when this ratio is 1 or greater, most active regions are compelled to explode. From these results we surmise the magnetic condition that determines the free ]energy limit is the ratio of the free magnetic energy to the non-free energy the active region fs field would have were it completely relaxed to its potential ]field configuration, and that this ratio is approximately 1 at the free-energy limit and in the main sequence of explosive active regions.

  16. Asymptotic structure of the Einstein-Maxwell theory on AdS3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez, Alfredo; Riquelme, Miguel; Tempo, David; Troncoso, Ricardo

    2016-02-01

    The asymptotic structure of AdS spacetimes in the context of General Relativity coupled to the Maxwell field in three spacetime dimensions is analyzed. Although the fall-off of the fields is relaxed with respect to that of Brown and Henneaux, the variation of the canonical generators associated to the asymptotic Killing vectors can be shown to be finite once required to span the Lie derivative of the fields. The corresponding surface integrals then acquire explicit contributions from the electromagnetic field, and become well-defined provided they fulfill suitable integrability conditions, implying that the leading terms of the asymptotic form of the electromagnetic field are functionally related. Consequently, for a generic choice of boundary conditions, the asymptotic symmetries are broken down to {R}⊗ U(1)⊗ U(1) . Nonetheless, requiring compatibility of the boundary conditions with one of the asymptotic Virasoro symmetries, singles out the set to be characterized by an arbitrary function of a single variable, whose precise form depends on the choice of the chiral copy. Remarkably, requiring the asymptotic symmetries to contain the full conformal group selects a very special set of boundary conditions that is labeled by a unique constant parameter, so that the algebra of the canonical generators is given by the direct sum of two copies of the Virasoro algebra with the standard central extension and U (1). This special set of boundary conditions makes the energy spectrum of electrically charged rotating black holes to be well-behaved.

  17. Distributed activation energy model parameters of some Turkish coals

    SciTech Connect

    Gunes, M.; Gunes, S.K.

    2008-07-01

    A multi-reaction model based on distributed activation energy has been applied to some Turkish coals. The kinetic parameters of distributed activation energy model were calculated via computer program developed for this purpose. It was observed that the values of mean of activation energy distribution vary between 218 and 248 kJ/mol, and the values of standard deviation of activation energy distribution vary between 32 and 70 kJ/mol. The correlations between kinetic parameters of the distributed activation energy model and certain properties of coal have been investigated.

  18. Asymptotic behaviour of backward elastic scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Germond, J. F.; Lombard, R. J.

    1988-05-01

    We discuss a compact formula proposed by Dias de Deus and Pimenta for the asymptotic value of the elastic scattering amplitude at backward angles. Improvements and generalization are obtained by means of the saddle-point method which corroborate old calculations by Serber.

  19. Exponential asymptotics of the Voigt functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paris, R. B.

    2015-06-01

    We obtain the asymptotic expansion of the Voigt functionss K( x, y) and L( x, y) for large (real) values of the variables x and y, paying particular attention to the exponentially small contributions. A Stokes phenomenon is encountered as with x > 0 fixed. Numerical examples are presented to demonstrate the accuracy of these new expansions.

  20. Lectures on renormalization and asymptotic safety

    SciTech Connect

    Nagy, Sandor

    2014-11-15

    A short introduction is given on the functional renormalization group method, putting emphasis on its nonperturbative aspects. The method enables to find nontrivial fixed points in quantum field theoretic models which make them free from divergences and leads to the concept of asymptotic safety. It can be considered as a generalization of the asymptotic freedom which plays a key role in the perturbative renormalization. We summarize and give a short discussion of some important models, which are asymptotically safe such as the Gross–Neveu model, the nonlinear σ model, the sine–Gordon model, and we consider the model of quantum Einstein gravity which seems to show asymptotic safety, too. We also give a detailed analysis of infrared behavior of such scalar models where a spontaneous symmetry breaking takes place. The deep infrared behavior of the broken phase cannot be treated within the framework of perturbative calculations. We demonstrate that there exists an infrared fixed point in the broken phase which creates a new scaling regime there, however its structure is hidden by the singularity of the renormalization group equations. The theory spaces of these models show several similar properties, namely the models have the same phase and fixed point structure. The quantum Einstein gravity also exhibits similarities when considering the global aspects of its theory space since the appearing two phases there show analogies with the symmetric and the broken phases of the scalar models. These results be nicely uncovered by the functional renormalization group method.

  1. Layer tracking, asymptotics, and domain decomposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, D. L.; Chin, R. C. Y.; Hedstrom, G. W.; Manteuffel, T. A.

    1991-01-01

    A preliminary report is presented on the work on the tracking of internal layers in a singularly-perturbed convection-diffusion equation. It is shown why such tracking may be desirable, and it is also shown how to do it using domain decomposition based on asymptotic analysis.

  2. Eigenvalue asymptotics for Dirac-Bessel operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hryniv, Rostyslav O.; Mykytyuk, Yaroslav V.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we establish the eigenvalue asymptotics for non-self-adjoint Dirac-Bessel operators on (0, 1) with arbitrary real angular momenta and square integrable potentials, which gives the first step for solution of the related inverse problem. The approach is based on a careful examination of the corresponding characteristic functions and their zero distribution.

  3. On the Asymptotic Regimes and the Strongly Stratified Limit of Rotating Boussinesq Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Babin, A.; Mahalov, A.; Nicolaenko, B.; Zhou, Y.

    1997-01-01

    Asymptotic regimes of geophysical dynamics are described for different Burger number limits. Rotating Boussinesq equations are analyzed in the asymptotic limit, of strong stratification in the Burger number of order one situation as well as in the asymptotic regime of strong stratification and weak rotation. It is shown that in both regimes horizontally averaged buoyancy variable is an adiabatic invariant for the full Boussinesq system. Spectral phase shift corrections to the buoyancy time scale associated with vertical shearing of this invariant are deduced. Statistical dephasing effects induced by turbulent processes on inertial-gravity waves are evidenced. The 'split' of the energy transfer of the vortical and the wave components is established in the Craya-Herring cyclic basis. As the Burger number increases from zero to infinity, we demonstrate gradual unfreezing of energy cascades for ageostrophic dynamics. The energy spectrum and the anisotropic spectral eddy viscosity are deduced with an explicit dependence on the anisotropic rotation/stratification time scale which depends on the vertical aspect ratio parameter. Intermediate asymptotic regime corresponding to strong stratification and weak rotation is analyzed where the effects of weak rotation are accounted for by an asymptotic expansion with full control (saturation) of vertical shearing. The regularizing effect of weak rotation differs from regularizations based on vertical viscosity. Two scalar prognostic equations for ageostrophic components (divergent velocity potential and geostrophic departure ) are obtained.

  4. A study on the gate voltage dependence of the activation energy in Meyer-Neldel rule for charge mobility in pentacene OTFTs

    SciTech Connect

    Petrosino, Mario; Rubino, Alfredo; Miscioscia, Riccardo; Girolamo del Mauro, Anna de; Rega, Romina; Cerri, Valerio; Minarini, Carla

    2010-06-02

    A temperature analysis of the OTFT having pentacene as channel semiconductor and PMMA as gate dielectric has been performed. The experimental results have been studied by extracting the field-effect mobility of the TFTs and relating it to the sample's temperature. We have found the mobility to follow the Meyer-Neldel rule. This behavior can be considered imputable to the channel carrier hopping. The gate voltage effect on the thermal activation energy for the mobility and the asymptotic parameter has been also taken into account.

  5. Asymptotic dynamics on a singular chemotaxis system modeling onset of tumor angiogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhi-An; Xiang, Zhaoyin; Yu, Pei

    2016-02-01

    The asymptotic behavior of solutions to a singular chemotaxis system modeling the onset of tumor angiogenesis in two and three dimensional whole spaces is investigated in the paper. By a Cole-Hopf type transformation, the singular chemotaxis is converted into a non-singular hyperbolic system. Then we study the transformed system and establish the global existence, asymptotic decay rates and diffusion convergence rate of solutions by the method of energy estimates. The main novelty of our results is the finding of a hidden interactive dissipation structure in the system by which the energy dissipation is established.

  6. School District Energy Conservation Activities. R-96-J-2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Office of the Comptroller, Albany. Div. of Management Audit.

    To help New York's State Department of Education assess public school districts' energy conservation activities, the results of an audit of school districts' energy conservation activities are presented. The audit shows that most school districts have made some efforts toward energy conservation and that the Department does provide some assistance…

  7. Sample Energy Conservation Education Activities for Elementary School Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Rodney F., Ed.; LaHart, David E., Ed.

    The booklet contains learning activities for introducing energy and conservation concepts into the existing elementary school curriculum. The activities were developed by Palm Beach County teachers during a one-week workshop. A framework of ideas is divided into three functional categories: universe of energy, living systems and energy, and social…

  8. World Energy Projection System Plus (WEPS ): Global Activity Module

    EIA Publications

    2013-01-01

    World Energy Projection System Plus Model Documentation: Global Activity Module Documents the objectives, analytical approach, and development of the World Energy Projection Plus (WEPS ) Global Activity Module (GAM) used to develop the International Energy Outlook for 2013 (IEO2013). The report catalogues and describes the module assumptions, computations, methodology, parameter estimation techniques, and mainframe source code.

  9. Solar Energy Education. Renewable energy activities for chemistry and physics

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    Information on renewable energy sources is provided for students in this teachers' guide. With the chemistry and physics student in mind, solar energy topics such as absorber plate coatings for solar collectors and energy collection and storage methods are studied. (BCS)

  10. Asymptotic coefficients for one-interacting-level Voigt profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cope, D.; Lovett, R. J.

    1988-02-01

    The asymptotic behavior of general Voigt profiles with general width and shift functions has been determined by Cope and Lovett (1987). The resulting asymptotic coefficients are functions of the perturber/radiator mass ratio; also, the coefficients for the one-interacting-level (OIL) profiles proposed by Ward et al. (1974) were studied. In this paper, the behavior of the OIL asymptotic coefficients for large mass ratio values is determined, thereby providing a complete picture of OIL asymptotics for all mass ratios.

  11. Energy Conservation Activity Packet, Grade 5. Revised Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pohlman, Betty; And Others

    This activity notebook for grade 5 is one of a series developed in response to energy conservation. It contains activities that stress an energy conservation ethic and includes many values clarification activities for grade five. The packet is divided into two parts and provides the teacher with background information, concepts and objectives, and…

  12. Energy Conservation Activity Packet, Grade 4. Revised Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pohlman, Betty; And Others

    This activity notebook for grade 4 is one in a series developed in response to the concern for energy conservation. It contains activities that stress an energy conservation ethic and includes many values clarification activities for grade four. The packet is divided into two parts and provides the teacher with background information, concepts and…

  13. Energy Conservation Activity Packet, Grade 6. Revised Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pohlman, Betty; And Others

    This activity notebook for grade 6 is one of a series developed in response to the concern for energy conservation. It contains activities that stress an energy conservation ethic and includes many values clarification activities for grade six. The packet is divided into two parts and provides the teacher with background information, concepts and…

  14. Energy Conservation Activities for the Classroom K-12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kentucky Dept. of Energy, Frankfort.

    After a brief introduction entitled "Where Does the Energy We Use Come From," this unit presents 86 activities. Each activity gives the title, concept, objectives, subject area, level, time involved, materials needed, procedures, and related career activities. Topics cover everything from housing insulation to alternate sources of energy to energy…

  15. Determination of the 3He+α→7Be asymptotic normalization coefficients, the nuclear vertex constants, and their application for the extrapolation of the 3He(α,γ)7Be astrophysical S factors to the solar energy region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tursunmahatov, Q. I.; Yarmukhamedov, R.

    2012-04-01

    A new analysis of the modern astrophysical S factors for the direct-capture 3He(α,γ)7Be reaction, precisely measured in recent works [B.S. Nara Singh , Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.93.262503 93, 262503 (2004); D. Bemmerer , Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.97.122502 97, 122502 (2006);F. Confortola , Phys. Rev. CPRVCAN0556-281310.1103/PhysRevC.75.065803 75, 065803 (2007), Gy. Gyürky , Phys. Rev. CPRVCAN0556-281310.1103/PhysRevC.75.035805 75, 035805 (2007), T. A. D. Brown , Phys. Rev. CPRVCAN0556-281310.1103/PhysRevC.76.055801 76, 055801 (2007), and A. Di Leva, , Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.102.232502 102, 232502 (2009)], has been carried out within the modified two-body potential approach. New estimates are obtained for the “indirectly determined” values of the asymptotic normalization constants and the respective nuclear vertex constants for 3He+α→7Be(g.s.) and 3He+α→7Be(0.429 MeV) as well as the astrophysical S factors S34(E) at E≤90 keV, including E=0. The values of asymptotic normalization constants have been used to obtain the values of the ratio of the α-particle spectroscopic factors for the mirror (7Li7Be) pair.

  16. Simple Activity Demonstrates Wind Energy Principles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roman, Harry T.

    2012-01-01

    Wind energy is an exciting and clean energy option often described as the fastest-growing energy system on the planet. With some simple materials, teachers can easily demonstrate its key principles in their classroom. (Contains 1 figure and 2 tables.)

  17. National Alliance of Clean Energy Incubator Activities - Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Chris Downing, P.E.

    2004-12-14

    Summary of activity related to development of the Alliance of Clean Energy Business Incubators and incubation services provided to the clean energy sector by the Advanced Technology Development Center at the Georgia Institute of Technology.

  18. Solar-energy absorber: Active infrared (IR) trap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brantley, L. W., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    Efficiency of solar-energy absorbers may be improved to 95% by actively cooling their intermediate glass plates. This approach may be of interest to manufacturers of solar absorbers and to engineers and scientists developing new sources of energy.

  19. Asymptotics of Determinants of Bessel Operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basor, Estelle L.; Ehrhardt, Torsten

    For aL∞(+)∩L1(+) the truncated Bessel operator Bτ(a) is the integral operator acting on L2[0,τ] with the kernel where Jν stands for the Bessel function with ν>-1. In this paper we determine the asymptotics of the determinant det(I+Bτ(a)) as τ-->∞ for sufficiently smooth functions a for which a(x)≠1 for all x[0,∞). The asymptotic formula is of the form det(I+Bτ(a)) GτE with certain constants G and E, and thus similar to the well-known Szegö-Akhiezer-Kac formula for truncated Wiener-Hopf determinants.

  20. Asymptotically flat space–times: an enigma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, Ezra T.

    2016-07-01

    We begin by emphasizing that we are dealing with standard Einstein or Einstein–Maxwell theory—absolutely no new physics has been inserted. The fresh item is that the well-known asymptotically flat solutions of the Einstein–Maxwell theory are transformed to a new coordinate system with surprising and (seemingly) inexplicable results. We begin with the standard description of (Null) asymptotically flat space–times described in conventional Bondi-coordinates. After transforming the variables (mainly the asymptotic Weyl tensor components) to a very special set of Newman-Unti (NU) coordinates, we find a series of relations totally mimicking standard Newtonian classical mechanics and Maxwell theory. The surprising and troubling aspect of these relations is that the associated motion and radiation does not take place in physical space–time. Instead these relations takes place in an unusual inherited complex four-dimensional manifold referred to as H-space that has no immediate relationship with space–time. In fact these relations appear in two such spaces, H-space and its dual space \\bar{H}.

  1. Asymptotic dynamics of the exceptional Bianchi cosmologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hewitt, C. G.; Horwood, J. T.; Wainwright, J.

    2003-05-01

    In this paper we give, for the first time, a qualitative description of the asymptotic dynamics of a class of non-tilted spatially homogeneous (SH) cosmologies, the so-called exceptional Bianchi cosmologies, which are of Bianchi type VI$_{-1/9}$. This class is of interest for two reasons. Firstly, it is generic within the class of non-tilted SH cosmologies, being of the same generality as the models of Bianchi types VIII and IX. Secondly, it is the SH limit of a generic class of spatially inhomogeneous $G_{2}$ cosmologies. Using the orthonormal frame formalism and Hubble-normalized variables, we show that the exceptional Bianchi cosmologies differ from the non-exceptional Bianchi cosmologies of type VI$_{h}$ in two significant ways. Firstly, the models exhibit an oscillatory approach to the initial singularity and hence are not asymptotically self-similar. Secondly, at late times, although the models are asymptotically self-similar, the future attractor for the vacuum-dominated models is the so-called Robinson-Trautman SH model instead of the vacuum SH plane wave models.

  2. Asymptotic form of the Kohn-Sham correlation potential

    SciTech Connect

    Joubert, D. P.

    2007-07-15

    The density-functional correlation potential of a finite system is shown to asymptotically approach a nonzero constant along a nodal surface of the energetically highest occupied orbital and zero everywhere else. This nonuniform asymptotic form of the correlation potential exactly cancels the nonuniform asymptotic behavior of the exact exchange potential discussed by Della Sala and Goerling [Phys. Rev. Lett. 89, 33003 (2002)]. The sum of the exchange and correlation potentials therefore asymptotically tends to -1/r everywhere, consistent with the asymptotic form of the Kohn-Sham potential as analyzed by Almbladh and von Barth [Phys. Rev. B 31, 3231 (1985)].

  3. Using Tensor Momentum Dependent Deuteron Potential to Extract the Asymptotic D/S Ratio

    SciTech Connect

    Emad El-Deen, A. Sultan; Mustafa, Mustafa M.; Zahran, Elbadry S.

    2010-09-30

    A new value for the deuteron asymptotic D/S ratio {eta} = 0.02640{+-}0.00024 is extracted from an empirical linear {eta}-Q relation found for a class of deuteron momentum dependent potentials with tensor momentum dependent part. These potentials fit a recently published phase shift analysis and the binding energy of the deuteron.

  4. Asymptotic behavior of the Maupertuis action on a libration and tunneling in a double well

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anikin, A. Yu.

    2013-03-01

    This paper is devoted to an asymptotic formula for splitting of the lowest eigenvalues of a two-dimensional Schrödinger operator with a potential having two symmetric wells. We rigorously prove the corresponding formula, obtained earlier in a paper by J. Brüning, S. Yu. Dobrokhotov, and E. S. Semenov ["Unstable Closed Trajectories, Librations and Splitting of the Lowest Eigenvalues in Quantum Double Well Problem," Regul. Chaotic Dyn. 11 (2), 167-180 (2006)] at the physical level of rigor. The crucial role in our considerations is played by an asymptotic formula for the Maupertuis action (as a function of energy) on a periodic trajectory of the classical system (a libration) lying near a doubly asymptotic trajectory.

  5. Selected Energy Education Activities for Pennsylvania Middle School Grades. Draft.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hack, Nancy; And Others

    These activities are intended to help increase awareness and understanding of the energy situation and to encourage students to become energy conservationists. The document is divided into sections according to discipline area. A final section is devoted to interdisciplinary activities involving several discipline areas integrated with the energy…

  6. Fabric-based integrated energy devices for wearable activity monitors.

    PubMed

    Jung, Sungmook; Lee, Jongsu; Hyeon, Taeghwan; Lee, Minbaek; Kim, Dae-Hyeong

    2014-09-01

    A wearable fabric-based integrated power-supply system that generates energy triboelectrically using human activity and stores the generated energy in an integrated supercapacitor is developed. This system can be utilized as either a self-powered activity monitor or as a power supply for external wearable sensors. These demonstrations give new insights for the research of wearable electronics. PMID:25070873

  7. Lightstick Magic: Determination of the Activation Energy with PSL.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bindel, Thomas H.

    1996-01-01

    Presents experiments with lightsticks in which the activation energy for the light-producing reaction is determined. Involves monitoring the light intensity of the lightstick as a function of temperature. Gives students the opportunity to explore the concepts of kinetics and activation energies and the world of computer-interfaced experimentation…

  8. Biomass I. Science Activities in Energy [and] Teacher's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oak Ridge Associated Universities, TN.

    Designed for science students in fourth, fifth, and sixth grades, the activities in this unit illustrate principles and problems related to biomass as a form of energy. (The word biomass is used to describe all solid material of animal or vegetable origin from which energy may be extracted.) Twelve student activities using art, economics,…

  9. Okeechobee County Energy Education Activities--Middle School Level.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Rodney F., Ed.

    Over 60 energy education activities related to mathematics, science, social studies, and English comprise this manual for middle school teachers. Included are issues for discussion, puzzles, science investigations, story writing exercises, and energy cost calculation problems. Among the topics covered in these lessons are energy consumption…

  10. Solar Energy Education. Home economics: student activities. Field test edition

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-03-01

    A view of solar energy from the standpoint of home economics is taken in this book of activities. Students are provided information on solar energy resources while performing these classroom activities. Instructions for the construction of a solar food dryer and a solar cooker are provided. Topics for study include window treatments, clothing, the history of solar energy, vitamins from the sun, and how to choose the correct solar home. (BCS)

  11. Construction of space-time ray asymptotics from stationary high-frequency asymptotics in nonstationary problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plachenov, A. B.

    An algorithm is proposed for the transition from the short-wave asymptotics of stationary problems to the space-time asymptotics of nonstationary problems of linear wave propagation. The relationship between this algorithm and constructs of the spatial-temporal ray tracing method is examined. As an example, the algorithm is applied to the problem of the detection of a diffraction wave in the deep shade behind a smooth convex obstacle in the case where the incident wave is specified by its spatial-temporal ray expansion.

  12. Asymptotic symmetries of Yang-Mills theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strominger, Andrew

    2014-07-01

    Asymptotic symmetries at future null infinity ( +) of Minkowski space for electrodynamics with massless charged fields, as well as nonabelian gauge theories with gauge group G, are considered at the semiclassical level. The possibility of charge/color flux through + suggests the symmetry group is infinite-dimensional. It is conjectured that the symmetries include a G Kac-Moody symmetry whose generators are "large" gauge transformations which approach locally holomorphic functions on the conformal two-sphere at + and are invariant under null translations. The Kac-Moody currents are constructed from the gauge field at the future boundary of +. The current Ward identities include Weinberg's soft photon theorem and its colored extension.

  13. Exact and asymptotic distributions of LULU smoothers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conradie, W. J.; de Wet, T.; Jankowitz, M.

    2006-02-01

    This paper considers a class of non-linear smoothers, called LULU smoothers, introduced by Rohwer in the late eighties in the mathematics literature, and since then investigated fairly extensively by a number of authors for its mathematical properties. They have been successfully applied in various engineering and scientific problems. However, to date their distribution theory has not received any attention in the literature. In this paper we derive their exact as well as asymptotic distributions and show their relationship to the upper order statistics.

  14. Hybrid energy storage systems utilizing redox active organic compounds

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Wei; Xu, Wu; Li, Liyu; Yang, Zhenguo

    2015-09-08

    Redox flow batteries (RFB) have attracted considerable interest due to their ability to store large amounts of power and energy. Non-aqueous energy storage systems that utilize at least some aspects of RFB systems are attractive because they can offer an expansion of the operating potential window, which can improve on the system energy and power densities. One example of such systems has a separator separating first and second electrodes. The first electrode includes a first current collector and volume containing a first active material. The second electrode includes a second current collector and volume containing a second active material. During operation, the first source provides a flow of first active material to the first volume. The first active material includes a redox active organic compound dissolved in a non-aqueous, liquid electrolyte and the second active material includes a redox active metal.

  15. Energy utilization rates during shuttle extravehicular activities.

    PubMed

    Waligora, J M; Kumar, K V

    1995-01-01

    The work rates or energy utilization rates during EVA are major factors in sizing of life support systems. These rates also provide a measure of ease of EVA and its cost in crew fatigue. From the first Shuttle EVA on the STS-6 mission in 1983, we have conducted 59 man-EVA and 341 man-hours of EVA. Energy utilization rates have been measured on each of these EVA. Metabolic rate was measured during each EVA using oxygen utilization corrected for suit leakage. From 1981-1987, these data were available for average data over the EVA or over large segments of the EVA. Since 1987, EVA oxygen utilization data were available at 2-minute intervals. The average metabolic rate on Shuttle EVA (194 kcal/hr.) has been significantly lower than metabolic rates during Apollo and Skylab missions. Peak rates have been below design levels, infrequent, and of short duration. The data suggest that the energy cost of tasks may be inversely related to the degree of training for the task. The data provide insight on the safety margins provided by life support designs and on the energy cost of Station construction EVA. PMID:11540993

  16. Energy Around Us. A Fall Activity Packet for Fourth Grade.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson Community Coll., MI. Dahlem Environmental Education Center.

    This instructional packet is one of 14 school environmental education programs developed for use in the classroom and at the Dahlem Environmental Education Center (DEEC) of the Jackson Community College (Michigan). Provided in the packet are pre-trip activities, field trip activities, and post-trip activities which focus on energy uses, energy…

  17. THE MAGNETIC ENERGY-HELICITY DIAGRAM OF SOLAR ACTIVE REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Tziotziou, Kostas; Georgoulis, Manolis K.; Raouafi, Nour-Eddine

    2012-11-01

    Using a recently proposed nonlinear force-free method designed for single-vector magnetograms of solar active regions, we calculate the instantaneous free magnetic energy and relative magnetic helicity budgets in 162 vector magnetograms corresponding to 42 different active regions. We find a statistically robust, monotonic correlation between the free magnetic energy and the relative magnetic helicity in the studied regions. This correlation implies that magnetic helicity, in addition to free magnetic energy, may be an essential ingredient for major solar eruptions. Eruptive active regions appear well segregated from non-eruptive ones in both free energy and relative helicity with major (at least M-class) flares occurring in active regions with free energy and relative helicity exceeding 4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 31} erg and 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 42} Mx{sup 2}, respectively. The helicity threshold agrees well with estimates of the helicity contents of typical coronal mass ejections.

  18. The large Reynolds number - Asymptotic theory of turbulent boundary layers.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mellor, G. L.

    1972-01-01

    A self-consistent, asymptotic expansion of the one-point, mean turbulent equations of motion is obtained. Results such as the velocity defect law and the law of the wall evolve in a relatively rigorous manner, and a systematic ordering of the mean velocity boundary layer equations and their interaction with the main stream flow are obtained. The analysis is extended to the turbulent energy equation and to a treatment of the small scale equilibrium range of Kolmogoroff; in velocity correlation space the two-thirds power law is obtained. Thus, the two well-known 'laws' of turbulent flow are imbedded in an analysis which provides a great deal of other information.

  19. Localized travelling waves in the asymptotic suction boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreilos, Tobias; Gibson, John F.; Schneider, Tobias M.

    2016-05-01

    We present two spanwise-localized travelling wave solutions in the asymptotic suction boundary layer, obtained by continuation of solutions of plane Couette flow. One of the solutions has the vortical structures located close to the wall, similar to spanwise-localized edge states previously found for this system. The vortical structures of the second solution are located in the free stream far above the laminar boundary layer and are supported by a secondary shear gradient that is created by a large-scale low-speed streak. The dynamically relevant eigenmodes of this solution are concentrated in the free stream, and the departure into turbulence from this solution evolves in the free stream towards the walls. For invariant solutions in free-stream turbulence, this solution thus shows that that the source of energy of the vortical structures can be a dynamical structure of the solution itself, instead of the laminar boundary layer.

  20. Possibility of determination of the asymptotic level-density parameter

    SciTech Connect

    Kudyaev, G.A.; Ostapenko, Y.B.; Svirin, M.I.; Smirenkin, G.N.

    1988-02-01

    We investigate the sensitivity of the fissility of nuclei to the parameters of the density of excited levels and conclude that the nuclei in the region of Pb are most favorable for an experimental estimate of the asymptotic parameter a-italic-tilde = ..cap alpha..A. The mean value ..cap alpha.. = 0.086 +- 0.009 MeV/sup -1/ is found from analysis of the fission of seven nuclei from /sup 201/Tl to /sup 213/At. This value is in agreement with the phenomenological description of the energy dependence a(U) (..cap alpha.. = 0.093 MeV/sup -1/) and with the theoretical prediction ..cap alpha.. = 0.09 MeV/sup -1/ obtained for a Woods-Saxon potential.

  1. Asymptotic behavior of macroscopic observables in generic spin systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuwahara, Tomotaka

    2016-05-01

    This work clarifies a fundamental relationship between spectral gap and ground state properties, where the spectral gap means the energy difference between the ground state and the first excited state. In short-range interacting systems, the well-known exponential clustering theorem has been derived for the ground states: the bipartite correlations decay exponentially beyond a finite localization length, which is smaller than the inverse of the spectral gap. However, in more general systems including long-range interacting systems, the problem of how to characterize universal ground state structures by reference to the spectral gap is an ongoing challenge. Recently, for such systems, another fundamental constraint dubbed local reversibility has been proved for arbitrarily gapped ground states; as a consequence, it also results in the exponential concentration of the probability distribution of macroscopic observables. In this paper, we extend this kind of asymptotic behavior to more general setups.

  2. ON ASYMPTOTIC DISTRIBUTION AND ASYMPTOTIC EFFICIENCY OF LEAST SQUARES ESTIMATORS OF SPATIAL VARIOGRAM PARAMETERS. (R827257)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    In this article, we consider the least-squares approach for estimating parameters of a spatial variogram and establish consistency and asymptotic normality of these estimators under general conditions. Large-sample distributions are also established under a sp...

  3. Asymptotically Lifshitz brane-world black holes

    SciTech Connect

    Ranjbar, Arash Sepangi, Hamid Reza Shahidi, Shahab

    2012-12-15

    We study the gravity dual of a Lifshitz field theory in the context of a RSII brane-world scenario, taking into account the effects of the extra dimension through the contribution of the electric part of the Weyl tensor. We study the thermodynamical behavior of such asymptotically Lifshitz black holes. It is shown that the entropy imposes the critical exponent z to be bounded from above. This maximum value of z corresponds to a positive infinite entropy as long as the temperature is kept positive. The stability and phase transition for different spatial topologies are also discussed. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Studying the gravity dual of a Lifshitz field theory in the context of brane-world scenario. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Studying the thermodynamical behavior of asymptotically Lifshitz black holes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Showing that the entropy imposes the critical exponent z to be bounded from above. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Discussing the phase transition for different spatial topologies.

  4. Vacuum polarization in asymptotically Lifshitz black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinta, Gonçalo M.; Flachi, Antonino; Lemos, José P. S.

    2016-06-01

    There has been considerable interest in applying the gauge-gravity duality to condensed matter theories with particular attention being devoted to gravity duals (Lifshitz spacetimes) of theories that exhibit anisotropic scaling. In this context, black hole solutions with Lifshitz asymptotics have also been constructed, focused on incorporating finite temperature effects. The goal here is to look at quantum polarization effects in these spacetimes and, to this aim, we develop a way to compute the coincidence limit of the Green's function for massive, nonminimally coupled scalar fields, adapting to the present situation the analysis developed for the case of asymptotically anti-de Sitter black holes. The basics are similar to previous calculations; however, in the Lifshitz case, one needs to extend the previous results to include a more general form for the metric and dependence on the dynamical exponent. All formulas are shown to reduce to the anti-de Sitter (AdS) case studied before once the value of the dynamical exponent is set to unity and the metric functions are accordingly chosen. The analytical results we present are general and can be applied to a variety of cases, in fact, to all spherically symmetric Lifshitz black hole solutions. We also implement the numerical analysis choosing some known Lifshitz black hole solutions as illustration.

  5. Structural aspects of asymptotically safe black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, Benjamin; Saueressig, Frank

    2014-01-01

    We study the quantum modifications of classical, spherically symmetric Schwarzschild (anti-) de Sitter black holes within quantum Einstein gravity. The quantum effects are incorporated through the running coupling constants Gk and Λk, computed within the exact renormalization group approach, and a common scale-setting procedure. We find that, in contrast to common intuition, it is actually the cosmological constant that determines the short-distance structure of the RG-improved black hole: in the asymptotic UV the structure of the quantum solutions is universal and given by the classical Schwarzschild-de Sitter solution, entailing a self-similarity between the classical and quantum regime. As a consequence asymptotically safe black holes evaporate completely and no Planck-size remnants are formed. Moreover, the thermodynamic entropy of the critical Nariai black hole is shown to agree with the microstate count based on the effective average action, suggesting that the entropy originates from quantum fluctuations around the mean-field geometry.

  6. Asymptotic role of entanglement in quantum metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Augusiak, R.; Kołodyński, J.; Streltsov, A.; Bera, M. N.; Acín, A.; Lewenstein, M.

    2016-07-01

    Quantum systems allow one to sense physical parameters beyond the reach of classical statistics—with resolutions greater than 1 /N , where N is the number of constituent particles independently probing a parameter. In the canonical phase-sensing scenario the Heisenberg limit 1 /N2 may be reached, which requires, as we show, both the relative size of the largest entangled block and the geometric measure of entanglement to be nonvanishing as N →∞ . Yet, we also demonstrate that in the asymptotic N limit any precision scaling arbitrarily close to the Heisenberg limit (1 /N2 -ɛ with any ɛ >0 ) may be attained, even though the system gradually becomes noisier and separable, so that both the above entanglement quantifiers asymptotically vanish. Our work shows that sufficiently large quantum systems achieve nearly optimal resolutions despite their relative amount of entanglement being arbitrarily small. In deriving our results, we establish the continuity relation of the quantum Fisher information evaluated for a phaselike parameter, which lets us link it directly to the geometry of quantum states, and hence naturally to the geometric measure of entanglement.

  7. An asymptotic analysis of mixing loss

    SciTech Connect

    Fritsch, G.; Giles, M.B.

    1995-07-01

    The objective of this paper is to establish, in a rigorous mathematical manner, a link between the dissipation of unsteadiness in a two-dimensional compressible flow and the resulting mixing loss. A novel asymptotic approach and a control-volume argument are central to the analysis. It represents the first work clearly identifying the separate contributions to the mixing loss from simultaneous linear disturbances, i.e., from unsteady entropy, vorticity, and pressure waves. The results of the analysis have important implications for numerical simulations of turbomachinery flows; the mixing loss at the stator/rotor interface in steady simulations and numerical smoothing are discussed in depth. For a transonic turbine, the entropy rise through the stage is compared for a steady and an unsteady viscous simulation. The large interface mixing loss in the steady simulation is pointed out and its physical significance is discussed. The asymptotic approach is then applied to the first detailed analysis of interface mixing loss. Contributions from different wave types and wavelengths are quantified and discussed.

  8. Asymptotic accuracy of two-class discrimination

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, T.K.; Baird, H.S.

    1994-12-31

    Poor quality-e.g. sparse or unrepresentative-training data is widely suspected to be one cause of disappointing accuracy of isolated-character classification in modern OCR machines. We conjecture that, for many trainable classification techniques, it is in fact the dominant factor affecting accuracy. To test this, we have carried out a study of the asymptotic accuracy of three dissimilar classifiers on a difficult two-character recognition problem. We state this problem precisely in terms of high-quality prototype images and an explicit model of the distribution of image defects. So stated, the problem can be represented as a stochastic source of an indefinitely long sequence of simulated images labeled with ground truth. Using this sequence, we were able to train all three classifiers to high and statistically indistinguishable asymptotic accuracies (99.9%). This result suggests that the quality of training data was the dominant factor affecting accuracy. The speed of convergence during training, as well as time/space trade-offs during recognition, differed among the classifiers.

  9. Energy monitoring system based on human activity in the workplace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mustafa, Nur Hanim; Husain, Mohd Nor; Aziz, Mohamad Zoinol Abidin Abdul; Othman, Mohd Azlishah; Malek, Fareq

    2015-05-01

    Human behaviors always related to day routine activities in a smart house directly give the significant factor to manage energy usage in human life. An Addition that, the factor will contribute to the best efficiency of the system. This paper will focus on the monitoring efficiency based on duration time in office hours around 8am until 5pm which depend on human behavior at working place. Besides that, the correlation coefficient method is used to show the relation between energy consumption and energy saving based on the total hours of time energy spent. In future, the percentages of energy monitoring system usage will be increase to manage energy saving based on human behaviors. This scenario will help to see the human activity in the workplace in order to get the energy saving and support world green environment.

  10. On the possibility of negative activation energies in bimolecular reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaffe, R. L.

    1978-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the rate constants for model reacting systems was studied to understand some recent experimental measurements which imply the existence of negative activation energies. A collision theory model and classical trajectory calculations are used to demonstrate that the reaction probability can vary inversely with collision energy for bimolecular reactions occurring on attractive potential energy surfaces. However, this is not a sufficient condition to ensure that the rate constant has a negative temperature dependence. On the basis of these calculations, it seems unlikely that a true bimolecular reaction between neutral molecules will have a negative activation energy.

  11. Asymptotic behaviour of solutions of semilinear parabolic equations

    SciTech Connect

    Egorov, Yu V; Kondratiev, V A

    2008-04-30

    The asymptotic behaviour of solutions of a second-order semilinear parabolic equation is analyzed in a cylindrical domain that is bounded in the space variables. The dominant term of the asymptotic expansion of the solution as t{yields}+{infinity} is found. It is shown that the solution of this problem is asymptotically equivalent to the solution of a certain non-linear ordinary differential equation. Bibliography: 8 titles.

  12. Numerical integration of asymptotic solutions of ordinary differential equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thurston, Gaylen A.

    1989-01-01

    Classical asymptotic analysis of ordinary differential equations derives approximate solutions that are numerically stable. However, the analysis also leads to tedious expansions in powers of the relevant parameter for a particular problem. The expansions are replaced with integrals that can be evaluated by numerical integration. The resulting numerical solutions retain the linear independence that is the main advantage of asymptotic solutions. Examples, including the Falkner-Skan equation from laminar boundary layer theory, illustrate the method of asymptotic analysis with numerical integration.

  13. Perturbed Coulomb potentials in the Klein-Gordon equation via the asymptotic iteration method

    SciTech Connect

    Barakat, T.

    2009-03-15

    The asymptotic iteration method is used to construct the exact energy eigenvalues for a Lorentz vector or a Lorentz scalar, and an equally mixed Lorentz vector and Lorentz scalar Coulombic potentials. Highly accurate and rapidly converging ground-state energies for Lorentz vector Coulomb with a Lorentz vector or a Lorentz scalar linear potential, V(r)=-{lambda}{sub 1}/r+krandV(r)=-{lambda}{sub 1}/randW(r)=kr, respectively, are obtained.

  14. Engagement, enjoyment, and energy expenditure during active video game play

    PubMed Central

    Lyons, Elizabeth J.; Tate, Deborah F.; Ward, Dianne S.; Ribisl, Kurt M.; Bowling, J. Michael; Kalyanaraman, Sriram

    2014-01-01

    Objective Playing active video games can produce moderate levels of physical activity, but little is known about how these games motivate players to be active. Several psychological predictors, such as perceptions of competence, control, and engagement, may be associated with enjoyment of a game, which has in turn been hypothesized to predict energy expended during play. However, these relationships have yet to be tested in active video games. Methods Young adults aged 18–35 (N = 97, 50 female) < 300 pounds played a Dance Dance Revolution game for 13 minutes while energy expenditure was measured using indirect calorimetry. Self-reported measures of engagement, perceived competence, perceived control, and enjoyment were taken immediately afterwards. Mediation was analyzed using path analysis. Results A path model in which enjoyment mediated the effects of engagement, perceived competence, and perceived control on energy expenditure and BMI directly affected energy expenditure was an adequate fit to the data, χ2(1, N = 97) = .199, p = .655; CFI = 1.00; RMSEA < .001; 90% CI = .000 - .206; p = .692. Enjoyment mediated the relationship between engagement and energy expenditure (indirect effect = .138, p = .028), but other mediated effects were not significant. Conclusion Engagement, enjoyment, and BMI affect energy expended during active video game play. Games that are more enjoyable and engaging may produce greater intensity activity. Developers, practitioners, and researchers should consider characteristics that influence these predictors when creating or recommending active video games. PMID:23527520

  15. Asymptotic stability of Riemann waves for conservation laws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, G.-Q.; Frid, H.; Marta

    We are concerned with the asymptotic behavior of entropy solutions of conservation laws. A new notion about the asymptotic stability of Riemann solutions is introduced, and corresponding analytical frameworks are developed. The correlation between the asymptotic problem and many important topics in conservation laws and nonlinear analysis is recognized and analyzed, such as zero dissipation limits, uniqueness of entropy solutions, entropy analysis, and divergence-measure fields in L∞ . Then this theory is applied to understanding the asymptotic behavior of entropy solutions for many important systems of conservation laws.

  16. Asymptotic modeling of synthetic aperture ladar sensor phenomenology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neuroth, Robert M.; Rigling, Brian D.; Zelnio, Edmund G.; Watson, Edward A.; Velten, Vincent J.; Rovito, Todd V.

    2015-05-01

    Interest in the use of active electro-optical(EO) sensors for non-cooperative target identification has steadily increased as the quality and availability of EO sources and detectors have improved. A unique and recent innovation has been the development of an airborne synthetic aperture imaging capability at optical wavelengths. To effectively exploit this new data source for target identification, one must develop an understanding of target-sensor phenomenology at those wavelengths. Current high-frequency, asymptotic EM predictors are computationally intractable for such conditions, as their ray density is inversely proportional to wavelength. As a more efficient alternative, we have developed a geometric optics based simulation for synthetic aperture ladar that seeks to model the second order statistics of the diffuse scattering commonly found at those wavelengths but with much lesser ray density. Code has been developed, ported to high-performance computing environments, and tested on a variety of target models.

  17. Energy Cost of Common Activities in Children and Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Lyden, Kate; Keadle, Sarah Kozey; Staudenmayer, John; Freedson, Patty; Alhassan, Sofiya

    2014-01-01

    Background The Compendium of Energy Expenditures for Youth assigns MET values to a wide range of activities. However, only 35% of activity MET values were derived from energy cost data measured in youth; the remaining activities were estimated from adult values. Purpose To determine the energy cost of common activities performed by children and adolescents and compare these data to similar activities reported in the compendium. Methods Thirty-two children (8–11 years old) and 28 adolescents (12–16 years) completed 4 locomotion activities on a treadmill (TRD) and 5 age-specific activities of daily living (ADL). Oxygen consumption was measured using a portable metabolic analyzer. Results In children, measured METs were significantly lower than compendium METs for 3 activities [basketball, bike riding, and Wii tennis (1.1–3.5 METs lower)]. In adolescents, measured METs were significantly lower than compendium METs for 4 ADLs [basketball, bike riding, board games, and Wii tennis (0.3–2.5 METs lower)] and 3 TRDs [2.24 m·s−1, 1.56 m·s−1, and 1.34 m·s−1 (0.4–0.8 METs lower)]. Conclusion The Compendium of Energy Expenditures for Youth is an invaluable resource to applied researchers. Inclusion of empirically derived data would improve the validity of the Compendium of Energy Expenditures for Youth. PMID:22398418

  18. Using Microcomputers in the Physical Chemistry Laboratory: Activation Energy Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Touvelle, Michele; Venugopalan, Mundiyath

    1986-01-01

    Describes a computer program, "Activation Energy," which is designed for use in physical chemistry classes and can be modified for kinetic experiments. Provides suggestions for instruction, sample program listings, and information on the availability of the program package. (ML)

  19. The Geography of Wind Energy: Problem Solving Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lahart, David E.; Allen, Rodney F.

    1985-01-01

    Today there are many attempts to use wind machines to confront the increasing costs of electricity. Described are activities to help secondary students understand wind energy, its distribution, applications, and limitations. (RM)

  20. Energy Consumption of Actively Beating Flagella

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Daniel; Nicastro, Daniela; Dogic, Zvonimir

    2012-02-01

    Motile cilia and flagella are important for propelling cells or driving fluid over tissues. The microtubule-based core in these organelles, the axoneme, has a nearly universal ``9+2'' arrangement of 9 outer doublet microtubules assembled around two singlet microtubules in the center. Thousands of molecular motor proteins are attached to the doublets and walk on neighboring outer doublets. The motors convert the chemical energy of ATP hydrolysis into sliding motion between adjacent doublet microtubules, resulting in precisely regulated oscillatory beating. Using demembranated sea urchin sperm flagella as an experimental platform, we simultaneously monitor the axoneme's consumption of ATP and its beating dynamics while key parameters, such as solution viscosity and ATP concentration, are varied. Insights into motor cooperativity during beating and energetic consequences of hydrodynamic interactions will be presented.

  1. Highlands County Energy Education Activities--High School Level.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Rodney F., Ed.

    Presented are five instructional units, developed by the Tri-County Teacher Education Center, for the purpose of educating secondary school students on Florida's unique energy problems. Unit one provides a series of value clarification and awareness activities as an introduction to energy. Unit two uses mathematics exercises to examine energy…

  2. 76 FR 65634 - Assistance to Foreign Atomic Energy Activities

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-24

    ... Proposed Rulemaking (76 FR 55278). FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Richard Goorevich, National Nuclear Security Administration, U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation (NA-20... assistance to foreign atomic energy activities (76 FR 55278). This regulation provides that persons...

  3. Energy Conservation Activity Guide, Grades 9-12. Bulletin 1602.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fraser, Mollie; And Others

    As an interdisciplinary, non-sequential teaching guide, this publication was developed to increase awareness and understanding of the energy situation and to encourage individuals to become energy conservationists. Sections provide background information for the teacher followed by a variety of student activities using different subject areas for…

  4. Effects of high activation energies on acoustic timescale detonation initiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regele, J. D.; Kassoy, D. R.; Vasilyev, O. V.

    2012-08-01

    Acoustic timescale Deflagration-to-Detonation Transition (DDT) has been shown to occur through the generation of compression waves emitted by a hot spot or reaction centre where the pressure and temperature increase with little diminution of density. In order to compensate for the multi-scale nature of the physico-chemical processes, previous numerical simulations in this area have been limited to relatively small activation energies. In this work, a computational study investigates the effect of increased activation energy on the time required to form a detonation wave and the change in behaviour of each hot spot as the activation energy is increased. The simulations use a localised spatially distributed thermal power deposition of limited duration into a finite volume of reactive gas to facilitate DDT. The Adaptive Wavelet-Collocation Method is used to solve efficiently the 1-D reactive Euler equations with one-step Arrhenius kinetics. The DDT process as described in previous work is characterised by the formation of hot spots during an initial transient period, explosion of the hot spots and creation of an accelerating reaction front that reaches the lead shock and forms an overdriven detonation wave. Current results indicate that as the activation energy is raised the chemical heat release becomes more temporally distributed. Hot spots that produce an accelerating reaction front with low activation energies change behaviour with increased activation energy so that no accelerating reaction front is created. An acoustic timescale ratio is defined that characterises the change in behaviour of each hot spot.

  5. The activation energy for creep of columbium /niobium/.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klein, M. J.; Gulden, M. E.

    1973-01-01

    The activation energy for creep of nominally pure columbium (niobium) was determined in the temperature range from 0.4 to 0.75 T sub M by measuring strain rate changes induced by temperature shifts at constant stress. A peak in the activation energy vs temperature curve was found with a maximum value of 160 kcal/mole. A pretest heat treatment of 3000 F for 30 min resulted in even higher values of activation energy (greater than 600 kcal/mole) in this temperature range. The activation energy for the heat-treated columbium (Nb) could not be determined near 0.5 T sub M because of unusual creep curves involving negligible steady-state creep rates and failure at less than 5% creep strain. It is suggested that the anomalous activation energy values and the unusual creep behavior in this temperature range are caused by dynamic strain aging involving substitutional atom impurities and that this type of strain aging may be in part responsible for the scatter in previously reported values of activation energy for creep of columbium (Nb) near 0.5 T sub M.

  6. Energy: Multidisciplinary Activities for the Classroom. Top Hit Energy Lesson Plans, K-1, 2-6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Energy Foundation, Salt Lake City, UT.

    This six-volume set of multidisciplinary instructional materials developed by the National Energy Foundation (NEF) presents energy activities for grades K-1, 2-6. The instructional materials are teacher-developed, teacher-tested, and multi-disciplinary. The lesson plans and activities are organized around seven goal areas of a NEF developed…

  7. Asymptotics for metamaterials and photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Antonakakis, T; Craster, R V; Guenneau, S

    2013-04-01

    Metamaterial and photonic crystal structures are central to modern optics and are typically created from multiple elementary repeating cells. We demonstrate how one replaces such structures asymptotically by a continuum, and therefore by a set of equations, that captures the behaviour of potentially high-frequency waves propagating through a periodic medium. The high-frequency homogenization that we use recovers the classical homogenization coefficients in the low-frequency long-wavelength limit. The theory is specifically developed in electromagnetics for two-dimensional square lattices where every cell contains an arbitrary hole with Neumann boundary conditions at its surface and implemented numerically for cylinders and split-ring resonators. Illustrative numerical examples include lensing via all-angle negative refraction, as well as omni-directive antenna, endoscope and cloaking effects. We also highlight the importance of choosing the correct Brillouin zone and the potential of missing interesting physical effects depending upon the path chosen. PMID:23633908

  8. Introduction to Asymptotic Giant Branch Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Eid, Mounib F.

    2016-04-01

    A brief introduction on the main characteristics of the asymptotic giant branch stars (briefly: AGB) is presented. We describe a link to observations and outline basic features of theoretical modeling of these important evolutionary phases of stars. The most important aspects of the AGB stars is not only because they are the progenitors of white dwarfs, but also they represent the site of almost half of the heavy element formation beyond iron in the galaxy. These elements and their isotopes are produced by the s-process nucleosynthesis, which is a neutron capture process competing with the β- radioactive decay. The neutron source is mainly due to the reaction 13C(α,n)16O reaction. It is still a challenging problem to obtain the right amount of 13 C that can lead to s-process abundances compatible with observation. Some ideas are presented in this context.

  9. Asymptotic theory of quantum statistical inference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Masahito

    Part I: Hypothesis Testing: Introduction to Part I -- Strong Converse and Stein's lemma in quantum hypothesis testing/Tomohiro Ogawa and Hiroshi Nagaoka -- The proper formula for relative entropy and its asymptotics in quantum probability/Fumio Hiai and Dénes Petz -- Strong Converse theorems in Quantum Information Theory/Hiroshi Nagaoka -- Asymptotics of quantum relative entropy from a representation theoretical viewpoint/Masahito Hayashi -- Quantum birthday problems: geometrical aspects of Quantum Random Coding/Akio Fujiwara -- Part II: Quantum Cramèr-Rao Bound in Mixed States Model: Introduction to Part II -- A new approach to Cramèr-Rao Bounds for quantum state estimation/Hiroshi Nagaoka -- On Fisher information of Quantum Statistical Models/Hiroshi Nagaoka -- On the parameter estimation problem for Quantum Statistical Models/Hiroshi Nagaoka -- A generalization of the simultaneous diagonalization of Hermitian matrices and its relation to Quantum Estimation Theory/Hiroshi Nagaoka -- A linear programming approach to Attainable Cramèr-Rao Type Bounds/Masahito Hayashi -- Statistical model with measurement degree of freedom and quantum physics/Masahito Hayashi and Keiji Matsumoto -- Asymptotic Quantum Theory for the Thermal States Family/Masahito Hayashi -- State estimation for large ensembles/Richard D. Gill and Serge Massar -- Part III: Quantum Cramèr-Rao Bound in Pure States Model: Introduction to Part III-- Quantum Fisher Metric and estimation for Pure State Models/Akio Fujiwara and Hiroshi Nagaoka -- Geometry of Quantum Estimation Theory/Akio Fujiwara -- An estimation theoretical characterization of coherent states/Akio Fujiwara and Hiroshi Nagaoka -- A geometrical approach to Quantum Estimation Theory/Keiji Matsumoto -- Part IV: Group symmetric approach to Pure States Model: Introduction to Part IV -- Optimal extraction of information from finite quantum ensembles/Serge Massar and Sandu Popescu -- Asymptotic Estimation Theory for a Finite-Dimensional Pure

  10. Rubidium-rich asymptotic giant branch stars.

    PubMed

    García-Hernández, D A; García-Lario, P; Plez, B; D'Antona, F; Manchado, A; Trigo-Rodríguez, J M

    2006-12-15

    A long-debated issue concerning the nucleosynthesis of neutron-rich elements in asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars is the identification of the neutron source. We report intermediate-mass (4 to 8 solar masses) AGB stars in our Galaxy that are rubidium-rich as a result of overproduction of the long-lived radioactive isotope (87)Rb, as predicted theoretically 40 years ago. This finding represents direct observational evidence that the (22)Ne(alpha,n)(25)Mg reaction must be the dominant neutron source in these stars. These stars challenge our understanding of the late stages of the evolution of intermediate-mass stars and would have promoted a highly variable Rb/Sr environment in the early solar nebula. PMID:17095658

  11. An asymptotic approach for assessing fatigue reliability

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, J.

    1996-12-01

    By applying the cumulative fatigue damage theory to the random process reliability problem, and the introduction of a new concept of unified equivalent stress level in fatigue life prediction, a technical reliability model for the random process reliability problem under fatigue failure is proposed. The technical model emphasizes efficiency in the design choice and also focuses on the accuracy of the results. Based on this model, an asymptotic method for fatigue reliability under stochastic process loadings is developed. The proposed method uses the recursive iteration algorithm to achieve results which include reliability and corresponding life. The method reconciles the requirement of accuracy and efficiency for the random process reliability problems under fatigue failure. The accuracy and analytical and numerical efforts required are compared. Through numerical example, the advantage of the proposed method is demonstrated.

  12. The asymptotics of large constrained graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radin, Charles; Ren, Kui; Sadun, Lorenzo

    2014-05-01

    We show, through local estimates and simulation, that if one constrains simple graphs by their densities ɛ of edges and τ of triangles, then asymptotically (in the number of vertices) for over 95% of the possible range of those densities there is a well-defined typical graph, and it has a very simple structure: the vertices are decomposed into two subsets V1 and V2 of fixed relative size c and 1 - c, and there are well-defined probabilities of edges, gjk, between vj ∈ Vj, and vk ∈ Vk. Furthermore the four parameters c, g11, g22 and g12 are smooth functions of (ɛ, τ) except at two smooth ‘phase transition’ curves.

  13. Global Asymptotic Behavior of Iterative Implicit Schemes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yee, H. C.; Sweby, P. K.

    1994-01-01

    The global asymptotic nonlinear behavior of some standard iterative procedures in solving nonlinear systems of algebraic equations arising from four implicit linear multistep methods (LMMs) in discretizing three models of 2 x 2 systems of first-order autonomous nonlinear ordinary differential equations (ODEs) is analyzed using the theory of dynamical systems. The iterative procedures include simple iteration and full and modified Newton iterations. The results are compared with standard Runge-Kutta explicit methods, a noniterative implicit procedure, and the Newton method of solving the steady part of the ODEs. Studies showed that aside from exhibiting spurious asymptotes, all of the four implicit LMMs can change the type and stability of the steady states of the differential equations (DEs). They also exhibit a drastic distortion but less shrinkage of the basin of attraction of the true solution than standard nonLMM explicit methods. The simple iteration procedure exhibits behavior which is similar to standard nonLMM explicit methods except that spurious steady-state numerical solutions cannot occur. The numerical basins of attraction of the noniterative implicit procedure mimic more closely the basins of attraction of the DEs and are more efficient than the three iterative implicit procedures for the four implicit LMMs. Contrary to popular belief, the initial data using the Newton method of solving the steady part of the DEs may not have to be close to the exact steady state for convergence. These results can be used as an explanation for possible causes and cures of slow convergence and nonconvergence of steady-state numerical solutions when using an implicit LMM time-dependent approach in computational fluid dynamics.

  14. Dusty Mass Loss from Galactic Asymptotic Giant Branch Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sargent, Benjamin A.; Srinivasan, Sundar; Meixner, Margaret; Kastner, Joel H.

    2016-06-01

    We are probing how mass loss from Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) stars depends upon their metallicity. Asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars are evolved stars that eject large parts of their mass in outflows of dust and gas in the final stages of their lives. Our previous studies focused on mass loss from AGB stars in lower metallicity galaxies: the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) and the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). In our present study, we analyze AGB star mass loss in the Galaxy, with special attention to the Bulge, to investigate how mass loss differs in an overall higher metallicity environment. We construct radiative transfer models of the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of stars in the Galaxy identified as AGB stars from infrared and optical surveys. Our Magellanic Cloud studies found that the AGB stars with the highest mass loss rates tended to have outflows with carbon-rich dust, and that overall more carbon-rich (C-rich) dust than oxygen-rich (O-rich) was produced by AGB stars in both LMC and SMC. Our radiative transfer models have enabled us to determine reliably the dust chemistry of the AGB star from the best-fit model. For our Galactic sample, we are investigating both the dust chemistries of the AGB stars and their mass-loss rates, to compare the balance of C-rich dust to O-rich dust between the Galactic bulge and the Magellanic Clouds. We are also constructing detailed dust opacity models of AGB stars in the Galaxy for which we have infrared spectra; e.g., from the Spitzer Space Telescope Infrared Spectrograph (IRS). This detailed dust modeling of spectra informs our choice of dust properties to use in radiative transfer modeling of SEDs of Galactic AGB stars. BAS acknowledges funding from NASA ADAP grant NNX15AF15G.

  15. Conservation II. Science Activities in Energy. [Student's and] Teacher's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oak Ridge Associated Universities, TN.

    Designed for science students in fourth, fifth, and sixth grades, the activities in this unit illustrate principles and problems related to the conservation of energy. Eleven student activities using art, economics, arithmetic, and other skills and disciplines help teachers directly involve students in exploring scientific questions and making…

  16. Energy effective approach for activation of metallurgical slag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazov, I. N.; Khaydarov, B. B.; Mamulat, S. L.; Suvorov, D. S.; Saltikova, Y. S.; Yudin, A. G.; Kuznetsov, D. V.

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents results of investigation of the process of mechanical activation of metallurgical slag using different approaches - ball milling and electromagnetic vortex apparatus. Particle size distribution and structure of mechanically activated slag samples were investigated, as well as energetic parameters of the activation process. It was shown that electromagnetic vortex activation is more energy effective and allows to produce microscale milled slag-based concrete using very short treatment time. Activated slag materials can be used as clinker-free cement in civilian and road construction, providing ecology-friendly technology and recycling of high-tonnage industrial waste.

  17. Asymptotic analysis, Working Note No. 1: Basic concepts and definitions

    SciTech Connect

    Garbey, M.; Kaper, H.G.

    1993-07-01

    In this note we introduce the basic concepts of asymptotic analysis. After some comments of historical interest we begin by defining the order relations O, o, and O{sup {number_sign}}, which enable us to compare the asymptotic behavior of functions of a small positive parameter {epsilon} as {epsilon} {down_arrow} 0. Next, we introduce order functions, asymptotic sequences of order functions and more general gauge sets of order functions and define the concepts of an asymptotic approximation and an asymptotic expansion with respect to a given gauge set. This string of definitions culminates in the introduction of the concept of a regular asymptotic expansion, also known as a Poincare expansion, of a function f : (0, {epsilon}{sub o}) {yields} X, where X is a normed vector space of functions defined on a domain D {epsilon} R{sup N}. We conclude the note with the asymptotic analysis of an initial value problem whose solution is obtained in the form of a regular asymptotic expansion.

  18. Asymptotic expansions for the reciprocal of the gamma function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Withers, Christopher S.; Nadarajah, Saralees

    2014-05-01

    Asymptotic expansions are derived for the reciprocal of the gamma function. We show that the coefficients of the expansion are the same, up to a sign change, as the asymptotic expansions for the gamma function obtained by exponentiating the expansions of its logarithm due to Stirling and de Moivre. Expressions for the coefficients are given in terms of Bell polynomials.

  19. Asymptotic distribution of stage-grouped population models.

    PubMed

    Zetlaoui, M; Picard, N; Bar-Hen, A

    2006-03-01

    Matrix models are often used to predict the dynamics of size-structured or age-structured populations. The asymptotic behaviour of such models is defined by their malthusian growth rate lambda, and by their stationary distribution w that gives the asymptotic proportion of individuals in each stage. As the coefficients of the transition matrix are estimated from a sample of observations, lambda and w can be considered as random variables whose law depends on the distribution of the observations. The goal of this study is to specify the asymptotic law of lambda and w when using the maximum likelihood estimators of the coefficients of the transition matrix. We prove that lambda and w are asymptotically normal, and the expressions of the asymptotic variance of lambda and of the asymptotic covariance matrix of w are given. The convergence speed of lambda and w towards their asymptotic law is studied using simulations. The results are applied to a real case study that consists of a Usher model for a tropical rain forest in French Guiana. They permit to assess the number of trees to measure to get a given precision on the estimated asymptotic diameter distribution, which is an important information on tropical forest management. PMID:16427655

  20. Analysis of leaching data using asymptotic expansion techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Simonson, S.A.; Machiels, A.J.

    1983-01-01

    Asymptotic analysis constitutes a useful technique to determine the adjustable parameters appearing in mathematical models attempting to reproduce some experimental data. In particular, asymptotic expansions of a leach model proposed by A.J. Machiels and C. Pescatore are used to interpret leaching data from PNL 76-68 glass in terms of corrosion velocities and diffusion coefficients.

  1. Asymptotic behaviour of the Boltzmann equation as a cosmological model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ho

    2016-08-01

    As a Newtonian cosmological model the Vlasov-Poisson-Boltzmann system is considered, and a slightly modified Boltzmann equation, which describes the stability of an expanding universe, is derived. Asymptotic behaviour of solutions turns out to depend on the expansion of the universe, and in this paper we consider the soft potential case and will obtain asymptotic behaviour.

  2. Scattering in an external electric field asymptotically constant in time

    SciTech Connect

    Adachi, Tadayoshi; Ishida, Atsuhide

    2011-06-15

    We show the asymptotic completeness for two-body quantum systems in an external electric field asymptotically non-zero constant in time. One of the main ingredients of this paper is to give some propagation estimates for physical propagators generated by time-dependent Hamiltonians which govern the systems under consideration.

  3. Low Energy Physical Activity Recognition System on Smartphones

    PubMed Central

    Morillo, Luis Miguel Soria; Gonzalez-Abril, Luis; Ramirez, Juan Antonio Ortega; de la Concepcion, Miguel Angel Alvarez

    2015-01-01

    An innovative approach to physical activity recognition based on the use of discrete variables obtained from accelerometer sensors is presented. The system first performs a discretization process for each variable, which allows efficient recognition of activities performed by users using as little energy as possible. To this end, an innovative discretization and classification technique is presented based on the χ2 distribution. Furthermore, the entire recognition process is executed on the smartphone, which determines not only the activity performed, but also the frequency at which it is carried out. These techniques and the new classification system presented reduce energy consumption caused by the activity monitoring system. The energy saved increases smartphone usage time to more than 27 h without recharging while maintaining accuracy. PMID:25742171

  4. Asymptotic Stability of High-dimensional Zakharov-Kuznetsov Solitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Côte, Raphaël; Muñoz, Claudio; Pilod, Didier; Simpson, Gideon

    2016-05-01

    We prove that solitons (or solitary waves) of the Zakharov-Kuznetsov (ZK) equation, a physically relevant high dimensional generalization of the Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation appearing in Plasma Physics, and having mixed KdV and nonlinear Schrödinger (NLS) dynamics, are strongly asymptotically stable in the energy space. We also prove that the sum of well-arranged solitons is stable in the same space. Orbital stability of ZK solitons is well-known since the work of de Bouard [Proc R Soc Edinburgh 126:89-112, 1996]. Our proofs follow the ideas of Martel [SIAM J Math Anal 157:759-781, 2006] and Martel and Merle [Math Ann 341:391-427, 2008], applied for generalized KdV equations in one dimension. In particular, we extend to the high dimensional case several monotonicity properties for suitable half-portions of mass and energy; we also prove a new Liouville type property that characterizes ZK solitons, and a key Virial identity for the linear and nonlinear part of the ZK dynamics, obtained independently of the mixed KdV-NLS dynamics. This last Virial identity relies on a simple sign condition which is numerically tested for the two and three dimensional cases with no additional spectral assumptions required. Possible extensions to higher dimensions and different nonlinearities could be obtained after a suitable local well-posedness theory in the energy space, and the verification of a corresponding sign condition.

  5. Predicting Activity Energy Expenditure Using the Actical[R] Activity Monitor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heil, Daniel P.

    2006-01-01

    This study developed algorithms for predicting activity energy expenditure (AEE) in children (n = 24) and adults (n = 24) from the Actical[R] activity monitor. Each participant performed 10 activities (supine resting, three sitting, three house cleaning, and three locomotion) while wearing monitors on the ankle, hip, and wrist; AEE was computed…

  6. Asymptotic approximations to posterior distributions via conditional moment equations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yee, J.L.; Johnson, W.O.; Samaniego, F.J.

    2002-01-01

    We consider asymptotic approximations to joint posterior distributions in situations where the full conditional distributions referred to in Gibbs sampling are asymptotically normal. Our development focuses on problems where data augmentation facilitates simpler calculations, but results hold more generally. Asymptotic mean vectors are obtained as simultaneous solutions to fixed point equations that arise naturally in the development. Asymptotic covariance matrices flow naturally from the work of Arnold & Press (1989) and involve the conditional asymptotic covariance matrices and first derivative matrices for conditional mean functions. When the fixed point equations admit an analytical solution, explicit formulae are subsequently obtained for the covariance structure of the joint limiting distribution, which may shed light on the use of the given statistical model. Two illustrations are given. ?? 2002 Biometrika Trust.

  7. An asymptotic homogenized neutron diffusion approximation. II. Numerical comparisons

    SciTech Connect

    Trahan, T. J.; Larsen, E. W.

    2012-07-01

    In a companion paper, a monoenergetic, homogenized, anisotropic diffusion equation is derived asymptotically for large, 3-D, multiplying systems with a periodic lattice structure [1]. In the present paper, this approximation is briefly compared to several other well known diffusion approximations. Although the derivation is different, the asymptotic diffusion approximation matches that proposed by Deniz and Gelbard, and is closely related to those proposed by Benoist. The focus of this paper, however, is a numerical comparison of the various methods for simple reactor analysis problems in 1-D. The comparisons show that the asymptotic diffusion approximation provides a more accurate estimate of the eigenvalue than the Benoist diffusion approximations. However, the Benoist diffusion approximations and the asymptotic diffusion approximation provide very similar estimates of the neutron flux. The asymptotic method and the Benoist methods both outperform the standard homogenized diffusion approximation, with flux weighted cross sections. (authors)

  8. Solution of Dirac equation for Eckart potential and trigonometric Manning Rosen potential using asymptotic iteration method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Resita Arum, Sari; A, Suparmi; C, Cari

    2016-01-01

    The Dirac equation for Eckart potential and trigonometric Manning Rosen potential with exact spin symmetry is obtained using an asymptotic iteration method. The combination of the two potentials is substituted into the Dirac equation, then the variables are separated into radial and angular parts. The Dirac equation is solved by using an asymptotic iteration method that can reduce the second order differential equation into a differential equation with substitution variables of hypergeometry type. The relativistic energy is calculated using Matlab 2011. This study is limited to the case of spin symmetry. With the asymptotic iteration method, the energy spectra of the relativistic equations and equations of orbital quantum number l can be obtained, where both are interrelated between quantum numbers. The energy spectrum is also numerically solved using the Matlab software, where the increase in the radial quantum number nr causes the energy to decrease. The radial part and the angular part of the wave function are defined as hypergeometry functions and visualized with Matlab 2011. The results show that the disturbance of a combination of the Eckart potential and trigonometric Manning Rosen potential can change the radial part and the angular part of the wave function. Project supported by the Higher Education Project (Grant No. 698/UN27.11/PN/2015).

  9. World Energy Projection System Plus (WEPS ): Global Activity Module

    EIA Publications

    2016-01-01

    The World Energy Projection System Plus (WEPS ) is a comprehensive, mid?term energy forecasting and policy analysis tool used by EIA. WEPS projects energy supply, demand, and prices by country or region, given assumptions about the state of various economies, international energy markets, and energy policies. The Global Activity Module (GLAM) provides projections of economic driver variables for use by the supply, demand, and conversion modules of WEPS . GLAM’s baseline economic projection contains the economic assumptions used in WEPS to help determine energy demand and supply. GLAM can also provide WEPS with alternative economic assumptions representing a range of uncertainty about economic growth. The resulting economic impacts of such assumptions are inputs to the remaining supply and demand modules of WEPS .

  10. Effects of activation energy and activation volume on the temperature-dependent viscosity of water.

    PubMed

    Kwang-Hua, Chu Rainer

    2016-08-01

    Water transport in a leaf is vulnerable to viscosity-induced changes. Recent research has suggested that these changes may be partially due to variation at the molecular scale, e.g., regulations via aquaporins, that induce reductions in leaf hydraulic conductance. What are the quantitative as well as qualitative changes in temperature-dependent viscosity due to the role of aquaporins in tuning activation energy and activation volume? Using the transition-state approach as well as the boundary perturbation method, we investigate temperature-dependent viscosity tuned by activation energy and activation volume. To validate our approach, we compare our numerical results with previous temperature-dependent viscosity measurements. The rather good fit between our calculations and measurements confirms our present approach. We have obtained critical parameters for the temperature-dependent (shear) viscosity of water that might be relevant to the increasing and reducing of leaf hydraulic conductance. These parameters are sensitive to temperature, activation energy, and activation volume. Once the activation energy increases, the (shear) viscosity of water increases. Our results also show that as the activation volume increases (say, 10^{-23}m^{3}), the (shear) viscosity of water decreases significantly and the latter induces the enhancing of leaf hydraulic conductance. Within the room-temperature regime, a small increase in the activation energy will increase the water viscosity or reduce the leaf hydraulic conductance. Our approach and results can be applied to diverse plant or leaf attributes. PMID:27627349

  11. Energy-aware Activity Classification using Wearable Sensor Networks.

    PubMed

    Dong, Bo; Montoye, Alexander; Moore, Rebecca; Pfeiffer, Karin; Biswas, Subir

    2013-05-29

    This paper presents implementation details, system characterization, and the performance of a wearable sensor network that was designed for human activity analysis. Specific machine learning mechanisms are implemented for recognizing a target set of activities with both out-of-body and on-body processing arrangements. Impacts of energy consumption by the on-body sensors are analyzed in terms of activity detection accuracy for out-of-body processing. Impacts of limited processing abilities for the on-body scenario are also characterized in terms of detection accuracy, by varying the background processing load in the sensor units. Impacts of varying number of sensors in terms of activity classification accuracy are also evaluated. Through a rigorous systems study, it is shown that an efficient human activity analytics system can be designed and operated even under energy and processing constraints of tiny on-body wearable sensors. PMID:25075266

  12. Approaching the Asymptotic Regime of Rapidly Rotating Convection: Boundary Layers versus Interior Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stellmach, S.; Lischper, M.; Julien, K.; Vasil, G.; Cheng, J. S.; Ribeiro, A.; King, E. M.; Aurnou, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    Rapidly rotating Rayleigh-Bénard convection is studied by combining results from direct numerical simulations (DNS), laboratory experiments, and asymptotic modeling. The asymptotic theory is shown to provide a good description of the bulk dynamics at low, but finite Rossby number. However, large deviations from the asymptotically predicted heat transfer scaling are found, with laboratory experiments and DNS consistently yielding much larger Nusselt numbers than expected. These deviations are traced down to dynamically active Ekman boundary layers, which are shown to play an integral part in controlling heat transfer even for Ekman numbers as small as 1 0-7. By adding an analytical parametrization of the Ekman transport to simulations using stress-free boundary conditions, we demonstrate that the heat transfer jumps from values broadly compatible with the asymptotic theory to states of strongly increased heat transfer, in good quantitative agreement with no-slip DNS and compatible with the experimental data. Finally, similarly to nonrotating convection, we find no single scaling behavior, but instead that multiple well-defined dynamical regimes exist in rapidly rotating convection systems.

  13. Asymptotic theory of double layer and shielding of electric field at the edge of illuminated plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Benilov, M. S.; Thomas, D. M.

    2014-04-15

    The method of matched asymptotic expansions is applied to the problem of a collisionless plasma generated by UV illumination localized in a central part of the plasma in the limiting case of small Debye length λ{sub D}. A second-approximation asymptotic solution is found for the double layer positioned at the boundary of the illuminated region and for the un-illuminated plasma for the plane geometry. Numerical calculations for different values of λ{sub D} are reported and found to confirm the asymptotic results. The net integral space charge of the double layer is asymptotically small, although in the plane geometry it is just sufficient to shield the ambipolar electric field existing in the illuminated region and thus to prevent it from penetrating into the un-illuminated region. The double layer has the same mathematical nature as the intermediate transition layer separating an active plasma and a collisionless sheath, and the underlying physics is also the same. In essence, the two layers represent the same physical object: a transonic layer.

  14. Cellular Links between Neuronal Activity and Energy Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Shetty, Pavan K.; Galeffi, Francesca; Turner, Dennis A.

    2012-01-01

    Neuronal activity, astrocytic responses to this activity, and energy homeostasis are linked together during baseline, conscious conditions, and short-term rapid activation (as occurs with sensory or motor function). Nervous system energy homeostasis also varies during long-term physiological conditions (i.e., development and aging) and with adaptation to pathological conditions, such as ischemia or low glucose. Neuronal activation requires increased metabolism (i.e., ATP generation) which leads initially to substrate depletion, induction of a variety of signals for enhanced astrocytic function, and increased local blood flow and substrate delivery. Energy generation (particularly in mitochondria) and use during ATP hydrolysis also lead to considerable heat generation. The local increases in blood flow noted following neuronal activation can both enhance local substrate delivery but also provides a heat sink to help cool the brain and removal of waste by-products. In this review we highlight the interactions between short-term neuronal activity and energy metabolism with an emphasis on signals and factors regulating astrocyte function and substrate supply. PMID:22470340

  15. Asymptotically-Equal-To 10 eV ionization shift in Ir K{alpha}{sub 2} from a near-coincident Lu K-edge

    SciTech Connect

    Pereira, N. R.; Weber, B. V.; Phipps, D.; Schumer, J. W.; Seely, J. F.; Carroll, J. J.; VanHoy, J. R.; Slabkowska, K.; Polasik, M.

    2012-10-15

    Close to an x-ray filter's K-edge the transmission depends strongly on the photon energy. For a few atom pairs, the K-edge of one is only a few tens of eV higher than a K-line energy of another, so that a small change in the line's energy becomes a measurable change in intensity behind such a matching filter. Lutetium's K-edge is Asymptotically-Equal-To 27 eV above iridium's K{alpha}{sub 2} line, Asymptotically-Equal-To 63.287 keV for cold Ir. A Lu filter reduces this line's intensity by Asymptotically-Equal-To 10 % when it is emitted by a plasma, indicating an ionization shift {Delta}E Asymptotically-Equal-To 10{+-}1 eV.

  16. Energy Expenditure during Sexual Activity in Young Healthy Couples

    PubMed Central

    Frappier, Julie; Toupin, Isabelle; Levy, Joseph J.; Aubertin-Leheudre, Mylene; Karelis, Antony D.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine energy expenditure in kilocalories (kcal) during sexual activity in young healthy couples in their natural environment and compare it to a session of endurance exercise. Methods The study population consisted of twenty one heterosexual couples (age: 22.6 ± 2.8 years old) from the Montreal region. Free living energy expenditure during sexual activity and the endurance exercise was measured using the portable mini SenseWear armband. Perceived energy expenditure, perception of effort, fatigue and pleasure were also assessed after sexual activity. All participants completed a 30 min endurance exercise session on a treadmill at a moderate intensity. Results Mean energy expenditure during sexual activity was 101 kCal or 4.2 kCal/min in men and 69.1 kCal or 3.1 kCal/min in women. In addition, mean intensity was 6.0 METS in men and 5.6 METS in women, which represents a moderate intensity. Moreover, the energy expenditure and intensity during the 30 min exercise session in men was 276 kCal or 9.2 kCal/min and 8.5 METS, respectively and in women 213 kCal or 7.1 kCal/min and 8.4 METS, respectively. Interestingly, the highest range value achieved by men for absolute energy expenditure can potentially be higher than that of the mean energy expenditure of the 30 min exercise session (i.e. 306.1 vs. 276 kCal, respectively) whereas this was not observed in women. Finally, perceived energy expenditure during sexual activity was similar in men (100 kCal) and in women (76.2 kCal) when compared to measured energy expenditure. Conclusion The present study indicates that energy expenditure during sexual activity appears to be approximately 85 kCal or 3.6 kCal/min and seems to be performed at a moderate intensity (5.8 METS) in young healthy men and women. These results suggest that sexual activity may potentially be considered, at times, as a significant exercise. PMID:24205382

  17. Characterization of activation energy for flow in metallic glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J. Q.; Wang, W. H.; Liu, Y. H.; Bai, H. Y.

    2011-01-15

    The molar volume (V{sub m}) scaled flow activation energy ({Delta}E), namely as the activation energy density {rho}{sub E}={Delta}E/V{sub m}, is proposed to describe the flow of metallic glasses. Based on the energy landscape, both the shear and bulk moduli are critical parameters accounting for the {rho}{sub E} of both homogeneous and inhomogeneous flows in metallic glasses. The expression of {rho}{sub E} is determined experimentally to be a simple expression of {rho}{sub E}=(10/11)G+(1/11)K. The energy density perspective depicts a realistic picture for the flow in metallic glasses and is suggestive for understanding the glass transition and deformation in metallic glasses.

  18. Stress versus temperature dependent activation energies in creep

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freed, A. D.; Raj, S. V.; Walker, K. P.

    1990-01-01

    The activation energy for creep at low stresses and elevated temperatures is lattice diffusion, where the rate controlling mechanism for deformation is dislocation climb. At higher stresses and intermediate temperatures, the rate controlling mechanism changes from that of dislocation climb to one of obstacle-controlled dislocation glide. Along with this change, there occurs a change in the activation energy. It is shown that a temperature-dependent Gibbs free energy does a good job of correlating steady-state creep data, while a stress-dependent Gibbs free energy does a less desirable job of correlating the same data. Applications are made to copper and a LiF-22 mol. percent CaF2 hypereutectic salt.

  19. Stress versus temperature dependence of activation energies for creep

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freed, A. D.; Raj, S. V.; Walker, K. P.

    1992-01-01

    The activation energy for creep at low stresses and elevated temperatures is associated with lattice diffusion, where the rate controlling mechanism for deformation is dislocation climb. At higher stresses and intermediate temperatures, the rate controlling mechanism changes from dislocation climb to obstacle-controlled dislocation glide. Along with this change in deformation mechanism occurs a change in the activation energy. When the rate controlling mechanism for deformation is obstacle-controlled dislocation glide, it is shown that a temperature-dependent Gibbs free energy does better than a stress-dependent Gibbs free energy in correlating steady-state creep data for both copper and LiF-22mol percent CaF2 hypereutectic salt.

  20. Asymptotics with a positive cosmological constant. III. The quadrupole formula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashtekar, Abhay; Bonga, Béatrice; Kesavan, Aruna

    2015-11-01

    Almost a century ago, Einstein used a weak field approximation around Minkowski spacetime to calculate the energy carried away by gravitational waves emitted by a time changing mass-quadrupole. However, by now there is strong observational evidence for a positive cosmological constant, Λ . To incorporate this fact, Einstein's celebrated derivation is generalized by replacing Minkowski spacetime with de Sitter spacetime. The investigation is motivated by the fact that, because of the significant differences between the asymptotic structures of Minkowski and de Sitter spacetimes, many of the standard techniques, including the usual 1 /r expansions, cannot be used for Λ >0 . Furthermore, since, e.g., the energy carried by gravitational waves is always positive in Minkowski spacetime but can be arbitrarily negative in de Sitter spacetime irrespective of how small Λ is, the limit Λ →0 can fail to be continuous. Therefore, a priori it is not clear that a small Λ would introduce only negligible corrections to Einstein's formula. We show that, while even a tiny cosmological constant does introduce qualitatively new features, in the end, corrections to Einstein's formula are negligible for astrophysical sources currently under consideration by gravitational wave observatories.

  1. Nonperturbative tests for asymptotic freedom in the PT-symmetric (-{phi}{sup 4}){sub 3+1} theory

    SciTech Connect

    Shalaby, Abouzeid; Al-Thoyaib, Suleiman S.

    2010-10-15

    In the literature, the asymptotic freedom property of the (-{phi}{sup 4}) theory is always concluded from real-line calculations while the theory is known to be a non-real-line one. In this article, we test the existence of the asymptotic freedom in the (-{phi}{sup 4}){sub 3+1} theory using the mean field approach. In this approach and contrary to the original Hamiltonian, the obtained effective Hamiltonian is rather a real-line one. Accordingly, this work resembles the first reasonable analysis for the existence of the asymptotic freedom property in the PT-symmetric (-{phi}{sup 4}) theory. In this respect, we calculated three different amplitudes of different positive dimensions (in mass units) and find that all of them go to very small values at high energy scales (small coupling) in agreement with the spirit of the asymptotic freedom property of the theory. To test the validity of our calculations, we obtained the asymptotic behavior of the vacuum condensate in terms of the coupling, analytically, and found that the controlling factor {Lambda} has the value ((4{pi}){sup 2}/6)=26.319 compared to the result {Lambda}=26.3209 from the literature, which was obtained via numerical predictions. We assert that the nonblowup of the massive quantities at high energy scales predicted in this work strongly suggests the possibility of the solution of the famous hierarchy puzzle in a standard model with the PT-symmetric Higgs mechanism.

  2. On the physical mechanism underlying asymptotic safety

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nink, Andreas; Reuter, Martin

    2013-01-01

    We identify a simple physical mechanism which is at the heart of Asymptotic Safety in Quantum Einstein Gravity (QEG) according to all available effective average action-based investigations. Upon linearization the gravitational field equations give rise to an inverse propagator for metric fluctuations comprising two pieces: a covariant Laplacian and a curvature dependent potential term. By analogy with elementary magnetic systems they lead to, respectively, dia- and paramagnetic-type interactions of the metric fluctuations with the background gravitational field. We show that above 3 spacetime dimensions the gravitational antiscreening occurring in QEG is entirely due to a strong dominance of the ultralocal paramagnetic interactions over the diamagnetic ones that favor screening. (Below 3 dimensions both the dia- and paramagnetic effects support antiscreening.) The spacetimes of QEG are interpreted as a polarizable medium with a "paramagnetic" response to external perturbations, and similarities with the vacuum state of Yang-Mills theory are pointed out. As a by-product, we resolve a longstanding puzzle concerning the beta function of Newton's constant in 2 + ɛ dimensional gravity.

  3. Asymptotic Dynamics of Inertial Particles with Memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langlois, Gabriel Provencher; Farazmand, Mohammad; Haller, George

    2015-12-01

    Recent experimental and numerical observations have shown the significance of the Basset-Boussinesq memory term on the dynamics of small spherical rigid particles (or inertial particles) suspended in an ambient fluid flow. These observations suggest an algebraic decay to an asymptotic state, as opposed to the exponential convergence in the absence of the memory term. Here, we prove that the observed algebraic decay is a universal property of the Maxey-Riley equation. Specifically, the particle velocity decays algebraically in time to a limit that is {O}(ɛ )-close to the fluid velocity, where 0<ɛ ≪ 1 is proportional to the square of the ratio of the particle radius to the fluid characteristic length scale. These results follow from a sharp analytic upper bound that we derive for the particle velocity. For completeness, we also present a first proof of the global existence and uniqueness of mild solutions to the Maxey-Riley equation, a nonlinear system of fractional differential equations.

  4. Asymptotic dynamics of reflecting spiral waves.

    PubMed

    Langham, Jacob; Biktasheva, Irina; Barkley, Dwight

    2014-12-01

    Resonantly forced spiral waves in excitable media drift in straight-line paths, their rotation centers behaving as pointlike objects moving along trajectories with a constant velocity. Interaction with medium boundaries alters this velocity and may often result in a reflection of the drift trajectory. Such reflections have diverse characteristics and are known to be highly nonspecular in general. In this context we apply the theory of response functions, which via numerically computable integrals, reduces the reaction-diffusion equations governing the whole excitable medium to the dynamics of just the rotation center and rotation phase of a spiral wave. Spiral reflection trajectories are computed by this method for both small- and large-core spiral waves in the Barkley model. Such calculations provide insight into the process of reflection as well as explanations for differences in trajectories across parameters, including the effects of incidence angle and forcing amplitude. Qualitative aspects of these results are preserved far beyond the asymptotic limit of weak boundary effects and slow resonant drift. PMID:25615159

  5. Asymptotic safety of gravity-matter systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meibohm, J.; Pawlowski, J. M.; Reichert, M.

    2016-04-01

    We study the ultraviolet stability of gravity-matter systems for general numbers of minimally coupled scalars and fermions. This is done within the functional renormalization group setup put forward in [N. Christiansen, B. Knorr, J. Meibohm, J. M. Pawlowski, and M. Reichert, Phys. Rev. D 92, 121501 (2015).] for pure gravity. It includes full dynamical propagators and a genuine dynamical Newton's coupling, which is extracted from the graviton three-point function. We find ultraviolet stability of general gravity-fermion systems. Gravity-scalar systems are also found to be ultraviolet stable within validity bounds for the chosen generic class of regulators, based on the size of the anomalous dimension. Remarkably, the ultraviolet fixed points for the dynamical couplings are found to be significantly different from those of their associated background counterparts, once matter fields are included. In summary, the asymptotic safety scenario does not put constraints on the matter content of the theory within the validity bounds for the chosen generic class of regulators.

  6. Extended Analytic Device Optimization Employing Asymptotic Expansion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackey, Jonathan; Sehirlioglu, Alp; Dynsys, Fred

    2013-01-01

    Analytic optimization of a thermoelectric junction often introduces several simplifying assumptionsincluding constant material properties, fixed known hot and cold shoe temperatures, and thermallyinsulated leg sides. In fact all of these simplifications will have an effect on device performance,ranging from negligible to significant depending on conditions. Numerical methods, such as FiniteElement Analysis or iterative techniques, are often used to perform more detailed analysis andaccount for these simplifications. While numerical methods may stand as a suitable solution scheme,they are weak in gaining physical understanding and only serve to optimize through iterativesearching techniques. Analytic and asymptotic expansion techniques can be used to solve thegoverning system of thermoelectric differential equations with fewer or less severe assumptionsthan the classic case. Analytic methods can provide meaningful closed form solutions and generatebetter physical understanding of the conditions for when simplifying assumptions may be valid.In obtaining the analytic solutions a set of dimensionless parameters, which characterize allthermoelectric couples, is formulated and provide the limiting cases for validating assumptions.Presentation includes optimization of both classic rectangular couples as well as practically andtheoretically interesting cylindrical couples using optimization parameters physically meaningful toa cylindrical couple. Solutions incorporate the physical behavior for i) thermal resistance of hot andcold shoes, ii) variable material properties with temperature, and iii) lateral heat transfer through legsides.

  7. Asymptotic unitary equivalence in C*-algebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, H.; Niu, Z.

    2015-07-01

    Let C = C( X) be the unital C*-algebra of all continuous functions on a finite CW complex X and let A be a unital simple C*-algebra with tracial rank at most one. We show that two unital monomorphisms φ, ψ: C → A are asymptotically unitarily equivalent, i.e., there exists a continuous path of unitaries { u t : t ∈ [0, 1)} ⊂ A such that lim t→1 u* t φ( f) u t = ψ( f) for all f ∈ C( X) if and only if [ φ] = [ ψ] in KK( C, A), τ ◦ φ = τ ◦ ψ for all τ ∈ T( A), and φ † = ψ †, where T( A) is the simplex of tracial states of A and φ †, ψ †: U ∞( C)/ DU ∞( C) → U ∞( A)/ DU ∞( A) are the induced homomorphisms and where U ∞( A) = ∪ k=1 ∞ U( M k ( A)) and U ∞(C) = ∪ k=1 ∞ ( M k ( C)) are usual infinite unitary groups, respectively, and DU ∞( A) and DU ∞( C) are the commutator subgroups of U ∞( A) and U ∞( C), respectively. We actually prove a more general result for the case in which C is any general unital AH-algebra.

  8. United States Department of Energy Thermally Activated Heat Pump Program

    SciTech Connect

    Fiskum, R.J.; Adcock, P.W.; DeVault, R.C.

    1996-06-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is working with partners from the gas heating and cooling industry to improve energy efficiency using advance absorption technologies, to eliminate chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) and hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs), to reduce global warming through more efficient combustion of natural gas, and to impact electric peak demand of air conditioning. To assist industry in developing these gas heating and cooling absorption technologies, the US DOE sponsors the Thermally Activated Heat Pump Program. It is divided into five key activities, addressing residential gas absorption heat pumps, large commercial chillers, advanced absorption fluids, computer-aided design, and advanced ``Hi-Cool`` heat pumps.

  9. Surface diffusion activation energy determination using ion beam microtexturing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rossnagel, S. M.; Robinson, R. S.

    1982-01-01

    The activation energy for impurity atom (adatom) surface diffusion can be determined from the temperature dependence of the spacing of sputter cones. These cones are formed on the surface during sputtering while simultaneously adding impurities. The impurities form clusters by means of surface diffusion, and these clusters in turn initiate cone formation. Values are given for the surface diffusion activation energies for various materials on polycrystalline Cu, Al, Pb, Au, and Ni. The values for different impurity species on each of these substrates are approximately independent of impurity species within the experimental uncertainty, suggesting the absence of strong chemical bonding effects on the diffusion.

  10. The aircraft energy efficiency active controls technology program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hood, R. V., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Broad outlines of the NASA Aircraft Energy Efficiency Program for expediting the application of active controls technology to civil transport aircraft are presented. Advances in propulsion and airframe technology to cut down on fuel consumption and fuel costs, a program for an energy-efficient transport, and integrated analysis and design technology in aerodynamics, structures, and active controls are envisaged. Fault-tolerant computer systems and fault-tolerant flight control system architectures are under study. Contracts with leading manufacturers for research and development work on wing-tip extensions and winglets for the B-747, a wing load alleviation system, elastic mode suppression, maneuver-load control, and gust alleviation are mentioned.

  11. A Fluorescent Reporter of AMPK activity and Cellular Energy Stress

    PubMed Central

    Tsou, Peiling; Zheng, Bin; Hsu, Chia-Hsien; Sasaki, Atsuo T; Cantley, Lewis C.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is activated when the AMP/ATP ratio in cells is elevated due to energy stress. Here we describe a biosensor, AMPKAR, which exhibits enhanced fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) in response to phosphorylation by AMPK, allowing spatio-temporal monitoring of AMPK activity in single cells. We show that this reporter responds to a variety of stimuli that are known to induce energy stress and that the response is dependent on AMPK α1 & α2 and on the upstream kinase, LKB1. Interestingly we found that AMPK activation is confined to the cytosol in response to energy stress but can be observed in both the cytosol and nucleus in response to calcium elevation. Finally, using this probe with U2OS cells in a microfluidics device, we observed a very high cell-to-cell variability in the amplitude and time course of AMPK activation and recovery in response to pulses of glucose deprivation. PMID:21459332

  12. Self-consistent field theory of collisions: Orbital equations with asymptotic sources and self-averaged potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, Y.K.

    2014-12-15

    The self-consistent field theory of collisions is formulated, incorporating the unique dynamics generated by the self-averaged potentials. The bound state Hartree–Fock approach is extended for the first time to scattering states, by properly resolving the principal difficulties of non-integrable continuum orbitals and imposing complex asymptotic conditions. The recently developed asymptotic source theory provides the natural theoretical basis, as the asymptotic conditions are completely transferred to the source terms and the new scattering function is made fullyintegrable. The scattering solutions can then be directly expressed in terms of bound state HF configurations, establishing the relationship between the bound and scattering state solutions. Alternatively, the integrable spin orbitals are generated by constructing the individual orbital equations that contain asymptotic sources and self-averaged potentials. However, the orbital energies are not determined by the equations, and a special channel energy fixing procedure is developed to secure the solutions. It is also shown that the variational construction of the orbital equations has intrinsic ambiguities that are generally associated with the self-consistent approach. On the other hand, when a small subset of open channels is included in the source term, the solutions are only partiallyintegrable, but the individual open channels can then be treated more simply by properly selecting the orbital energies. The configuration mixing and channel coupling are then necessary to complete the solution. The new theory improves the earlier continuum HF model. - Highlights: • First extension of HF to scattering states, with proper asymptotic conditions. • Orbital equations with asymptotic sources and integrable orbital solutions. • Construction of self-averaged potentials, and orbital energy fixing. • Channel coupling and configuration mixing, involving the new orbitals. • Critical evaluation of the

  13. Coulomb string tension, asymptotic string tension, and the gluon chain

    SciTech Connect

    Greensite, Jeff; Szczepaniak, Adam P.

    2015-02-01

    We compute, via numerical simulations, the non-perturbative Coulomb potential and position-space ghost propagator in pure SU(3) gauge theory in Coulomb gauge. We find that that the Coulomb potential scales nicely in accordance with asymptotic freedom, that the Coulomb potential is linear in the infrared, and that the Coulomb string tension is about four times larger than the asymptotic string tension. We explain how it is possible that the asymptotic string tension can be lower than the Coulomb string tension by a factor of four.

  14. The asymptotic distribution of maxima in bivariate samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, J. W.; Tsokos, C. P.

    1973-01-01

    The joint distribution (as n tends to infinity) of the maxima of a sample of n independent observations of a bivariate random variable (X,Y) is studied. A method is developed for deriving the asymptotic distribution of the maxima, assuming that X and Y possess asymptotic extreme-value distributions and that the probability element dF(x,y) can be expanded in a canonical series. Applied both to the bivariate normal distribution and to the bivariate gamma and compound correlated bivariate Poisson distributions, the method shows that maxima from all these distributions are asymptotically uncorrelated.

  15. Energy expended by boys playing active video games.

    PubMed

    White, Kate; Schofield, Grant; Kilding, Andrew E

    2011-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to: (1) determine energy expenditure (EE) during a range of active video games (AVGs) and (2) determine whether EE during AVGs is influenced by gaming experience or fitness. Twenty-six boys (11.4±0.8 years) participated and performed a range of sedentary activities (resting, watching television and sedentary gaming), playing AVGs (Nintendo® Wii Bowling, Boxing, Tennis, and Wii Fit Skiing and Step), walking and running including a maximal fitness test. During all activities, oxygen uptake, heart rate and EE were determined. The AVGs resulted in a significantly higher EE compared to rest (63-190%, p≤0.001) and sedentary screen-time activities (56-184%, p≤0.001). No significant differences in EE were found between the most active video games and walking. There was no evidence to suggest that gaming experience or aerobic fitness influenced EE when playing AVGs. In conclusion, boys expended more energy during active gaming compared to sedentary activities. Whilst EE during AVG is game-specific, AVGs are not intense enough to contribute towards the 60min of daily moderate-to-vigorous physical activity that is currently recommended for children. PMID:20810313

  16. Surface-Energy Dependent Contact Activation of Blood Factor XII

    PubMed Central

    Golas, Avantika; Parhi, Purnendu; Dimachkie, Ziad O.; Siedlecki, Christopher A.; Vogler, Erwin A.

    2009-01-01

    Contact activation of blood factor XII (FXII, Hageman factor) in neat-buffer solution exhibits a parabolic profile when scaled as a function of silanized-glass-particle activator surface energy (measured as advancing water adhesion tension τao=γlvocosθ in dyne/cm, where γlvo is water interfacial tension in dyne/cm and θ is the advancing contact angle). Nearly equal activation is observed at the extremes of activator water-wetting properties −36<τao<72 dyne/cm (0° ≤ θ < 120°), falling sharply through a broad minimum within the 20<τao<40 dyne/cm (55° < θ < 75°) range over which activation yield (putatively FXIIa) rises just above detection limits. Activation is very rapid upon contact with all activators tested and did not significantly vary over 30 minutes of continuous FXII-procoagulant contact. Results suggest that materials falling within the 20<τao<40 dyne/cm surface-energy range should exhibit minimal activation of blood-plasma coagulation through the intrinsic pathway. Surface chemistries falling within this range are, however, a perplexingly difficult target for surface engineering because of the critical balance that must be struck between hydrophobicity and hydrophilicity. Results are interpreted within the context of blood plasma coagulation and the role of water and proteins at procoagulant surfaces. PMID:19892397

  17. α-cluster asymptotic normalization coefficients for nuclear astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avila, M. L.; Rogachev, G. V.; Koshchiy, E.; Baby, L. T.; Belarge, J.; Kemper, K. W.; Kuchera, A. N.; Santiago-Gonzalez, D.

    2014-10-01

    Background: Many important α-particle induced reactions for nuclear astrophysics may only be measured using indirect techniques due to the small cross sections at the energy of interest. One such indirect technique is to determine the asymptotic normalization coefficients (ANCs) for near-threshold resonances extracted from sub-Coulomb α-transfer reactions. This approach provides a very valuable tool for studies of astrophysically important reaction rates since the results are practically model independent. However, the validity of the method has not been directly verified. Purpose: The aim of this Rapid Communication is to verify the technique using the O16(Li6,d)Ne20 reaction as a benchmark. The Ne20 nucleus has a well-known 1- state at an excitation energy of 5.79 MeV with a width of 28 eV. Reproducing the known value with this technique is an ideal opportunity to verify the method. Method: The 1- state at 5.79 MeV is studied using the α-transfer reaction O16(Li6,d)Ne20 at sub-Coulomb energies. Results: The partial α width for the 1- state at excitation energy of 5.79 MeV is extracted and compared with the known value, allowing the accuracy of the method to be evaluated. Conclusions: This study demonstrates that extracting the ANCs using sub-Coulomb α-transfer reactions is a powerful tool that can be used to determine the partial α width of near-threshold states that may dominate astrophysically important nuclear reaction rates.

  18. Determining characteristics of melting cheese by activation energy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Activation energy of flow (Ea) between 30 and 44 deg C was measured from temperature sweeps of various cheeses to determine its usefulness in predicting rheological behavior upon heating. Seven cheese varieties were heated in a rheometer from 22 to 70 deg C, and Ea was calculated from the resulting ...

  19. 78 FR 64414 - Assistance to Foreign Atomic Energy Activities

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-29

    ... concerning Assistance to Foreign Atomic Energy Activities since 1986. (76 FR 55278) The NOPR reflected a need.... ] DATES: DOE will continue to accept written comments on the SNOPR published August 2, 2013 (78 FR 46829... a second opportunity to comment. (78 FR 46829) II. Second Public Meeting A public meeting on...

  20. Solar Energy Education. Industrial arts: student activities. Field test edition

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-02-01

    In this teaching manual several activities are presented to introduce students to information on solar energy through classroom instruction. Wind power is also included. Instructions for constructing demonstration models for passive solar systems, photovoltaic cells, solar collectors and water heaters, and a bicycle wheel wind turbine are provided. (BCS)

  1. Activation energy measurements in rheological analysis of cheese

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Activation energy of flow (Ea) was calculated from temperature sweeps of cheeses with contrasting characteristics to determine its usefulness in predicting rheological behavior upon heating. Cheddar, Colby, whole milk Mozzarella, low moisture part skim Mozzarella, Parmesan, soft goat, and Queso Fre...

  2. Prediction of energy expenditure and physical activity in preschoolers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Accurate, nonintrusive, and feasible methods are needed to predict energy expenditure (EE) and physical activity (PA) levels in preschoolers. Herein, we validated cross-sectional time series (CSTS) and multivariate adaptive regression splines (MARS) models based on accelerometry and heart rate (HR) ...

  3. High energy expenditure masks low physical activity in obesity

    PubMed Central

    DeLany, James P.; Kelley, David E.; Hames, Kazanna C.; Jakicic, John M.; Goodpaster, Bret H.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate energy expenditure in lean and obese individuals, focusing particularly on physical activity and severely obese individuals. Design Total daily energy expenditure (TDEE) was assessed using doubly labeled water, resting metabolic rate (RMR) by indirect calorimetry, activity EE (AEE) by difference and time spent in physical activity by multisensor activity monitors. Subjects 177 lean, Class I and severely obese individuals (age 31–56, BMI 20–64 kg/m2). Results All components of EE were elevated in obese individuals. For example, TDEE was 2404±95 kcal/d in lean and 3244 ± 48 kcal/d in Class III obese. After appropriate adjustment, RMR was similar in all groups. Analysis of AEE by body weight and obesity class indicated a lower AEE in the obese. Confirming lower physical activity, obese individuals spent less time engaged in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (2.7±1.3, 1.8±0.6, 2.0±1.4 and 1.2±1.0 hr/d in lean, Class I, Class II and Class III), and more time in sedentary behaviors. Conclusions There was no indication of metabolic efficiency in even the severely obese, as adjusted RMR was similar across all groups. The higher AEE observed in the obese is consistent with a higher cost of activities due to higher body weight. However, the magnitude of the higher AEE (20 to 25% higher in obese) is lower than expected (weight approximately 100% higher in Class III). Confirming a lower volume of physical activity in the obese, the total time spent in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity and average daily MET level were lower with increasing obesity. These findings demonstrate that high body weight in obesity leads to a high TDEE and AEE which masks the fact that they are less physically active, which can be influenced by duration or intensity of activity, than lean individuals. PMID:23090575

  4. Energy and Man's Environment Activity Guide: An Interdisciplinary Teacher's Guide to Energy and Environmental Activities, Section Three - Conversion of Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, John, Ed.

    This publication presents the activities pertaining to the third goal of this activity guide series. The activities in this publication focus on understanding conservation processes, efficiencies, socioeconomic costs, and personal decision-making. These materials are appropriate for middle school and junior high school students. These activities,…

  5. Physical Modeling of Activation Energy in Organic Semiconductor Devices based on Energy and Momentum Conservations.

    PubMed

    Mao, Ling-Feng; Ning, H; Hu, Changjun; Lu, Zhaolin; Wang, Gaofeng

    2016-01-01

    Field effect mobility in an organic device is determined by the activation energy. A new physical model of the activation energy is proposed by virtue of the energy and momentum conservation equations. The dependencies of the activation energy on the gate voltage and the drain voltage, which were observed in the experiments in the previous independent literature, can be well explained using the proposed model. Moreover, the expression in the proposed model, which has clear physical meanings in all parameters, can have the same mathematical form as the well-known Meyer-Neldel relation, which lacks of clear physical meanings in some of its parameters since it is a phenomenological model. Thus it not only describes a physical mechanism but also offers a possibility to design the next generation of high-performance optoelectronics and integrated flexible circuits by optimizing device physical parameter. PMID:27103586

  6. Physical Modeling of Activation Energy in Organic Semiconductor Devices based on Energy and Momentum Conservations

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Ling-Feng; Ning, H.; Hu, Changjun; Lu, Zhaolin; Wang, Gaofeng

    2016-01-01

    Field effect mobility in an organic device is determined by the activation energy. A new physical model of the activation energy is proposed by virtue of the energy and momentum conservation equations. The dependencies of the activation energy on the gate voltage and the drain voltage, which were observed in the experiments in the previous independent literature, can be well explained using the proposed model. Moreover, the expression in the proposed model, which has clear physical meanings in all parameters, can have the same mathematical form as the well-known Meyer-Neldel relation, which lacks of clear physical meanings in some of its parameters since it is a phenomenological model. Thus it not only describes a physical mechanism but also offers a possibility to design the next generation of high-performance optoelectronics and integrated flexible circuits by optimizing device physical parameter. PMID:27103586

  7. Physical Modeling of Activation Energy in Organic Semiconductor Devices based on Energy and Momentum Conservations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Ling-Feng; Ning, H.; Hu, Changjun; Lu, Zhaolin; Wang, Gaofeng

    2016-04-01

    Field effect mobility in an organic device is determined by the activation energy. A new physical model of the activation energy is proposed by virtue of the energy and momentum conservation equations. The dependencies of the activation energy on the gate voltage and the drain voltage, which were observed in the experiments in the previous independent literature, can be well explained using the proposed model. Moreover, the expression in the proposed model, which has clear physical meanings in all parameters, can have the same mathematical form as the well-known Meyer-Neldel relation, which lacks of clear physical meanings in some of its parameters since it is a phenomenological model. Thus it not only describes a physical mechanism but also offers a possibility to design the next generation of high-performance optoelectronics and integrated flexible circuits by optimizing device physical parameter.

  8. Hepatic ERK activity plays a role in energy metabolism.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Ping; Feng, Bin; Li, Yujie; He, Qin; Xu, Haiyan

    2013-08-15

    Mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPKs), such as c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and P38, have been reported to play important roles in energy homeostasis. In this study, we show that the activity of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) is increased in the livers of diet induced and genetically obese mice. Activation of ERK in the livers of lean mice by over-expressing the constitutively active MAPK kinase 1 (MEK CA) results in decreased energy expenditure, lowered expression of genes involved in fatty acid oxidation, increases fasting hyperglycemia and causes systemic insulin resistance. Interestingly, hepatic glycogen content is markedly increased and expression of G6Pase gene is decreased in mice over-expressing MEK CA compared to control mice expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP), therefore hepatic glucose output is not likely the major contributor of hyperglycemia. One potential mechanism of decreased expression of G6Pase gene by MEK CA is likely due to ERK mediated phosphorylation and cytosolic retention of FOXO1. Adipocytes isolated from MEK CA mice display increased lipolysis. Circulating levels of free fatty acids (FFAs) in these mice are also increased, which possibly contribute to systemic insulin resistance and subsequent hyperglycemia. Consistent with these results, knocking down ERK expression in the liver of diet induced obese (DIO) mice improves systemic insulin and glucose tolerance. These results indicate that increased hepatic ERK activity in DIO mice may contribute to increased liver glycogen content and decreased energy expenditure in obesity. PMID:23732116

  9. Thermodynamic Derivation of the Activation Energy for Ice Nucleation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barahona, D.

    2015-01-01

    Cirrus clouds play a key role in the radiative and hydrological balance of the upper troposphere. Their correct representation in atmospheric models requires an understanding of the microscopic processes leading to ice nucleation. A key parameter in the theoretical description of ice nucleation is the activation energy, which controls the flux of water molecules from the bulk of the liquid to the solid during the early stages of ice formation. In most studies it is estimated by direct association with the bulk properties of water, typically viscosity and self-diffusivity. As the environment in the ice-liquid interface may differ from that of the bulk, this approach may introduce bias in calculated nucleation rates. In this work a theoretical model is proposed to describe the transfer of water molecules across the ice-liquid interface. Within this framework the activation energy naturally emerges from the combination of the energy required to break hydrogen bonds in the liquid, i.e., the bulk diffusion process, and the work dissipated from the molecular rearrangement of water molecules within the ice-liquid interface. The new expression is introduced into a generalized form of classical nucleation theory. Even though no nucleation rate measurements are used to fit any of the parameters of the theory the predicted nucleation rate is in good agreement with experimental results, even at temperature as low as 190 K, where it tends to be underestimated by most models. It is shown that the activation energy has a strong dependency on temperature and a weak dependency on water activity. Such dependencies are masked by thermodynamic effects at temperatures typical of homogeneous freezing of cloud droplets; however, they may affect the formation of ice in haze aerosol particles. The new model provides an independent estimation of the activation energy and the homogeneous ice nucleation rate, and it may help to improve the interpretation of experimental results and the

  10. Asymptotic behavior of curvature of surface elements in isotropic turbulence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Girimaji, S. S.

    1991-01-01

    The asymptotic behavior of the curvature of material elements in turbulence is investigated using Lagrangian velocity-gradient time series obtained from direct numerical simulations of isotropic turbulence. Several material-element ensembles of different initial curvatures and shapes are studied. It is found that, at long times, the (first five) moments of the logarithm of characteristic curvature and shape factor asymptote to values that are independent of the initial curvature or shape. This evidence strongly suggests that the asymptotic pdf's of the curvature and shape of material elements are stationary and independent of initial conditions. Irrespective of initial curvature or shape, the asymptotic shape of a material surface is cylindrical with a high probability.

  11. Asymptotic analysis of the Boltzmann equation for dark matter relics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bender, Carl M.; Sarkar, Sarben

    2012-10-01

    This paper presents an asymptotic analysis of the Boltzmann equations (Riccati differential equations) that describe the physics of thermal dark-matter-relic abundances. Two different asymptotic techniques are used, boundary-layer theory, which makes use of asymptotic matching, and the delta expansion, which is a powerful technique for solving nonlinear differential equations. Two different Boltzmann equations are considered. The first is derived from general relativistic considerations and the second arises in dilatonic string cosmology. The global asymptotic analysis presented here is used to find the long-time behavior of the solutions to these equations. In the first case, the nature of the so-called freeze-out region and the post-freeze-out behavior is explored. In the second case, the effect of the dilaton on cold dark-matter abundances is calculated and it is shown that there is a large-time power-law fall off of the dark-matter abundance.

  12. Asymptotic Safety of the CARTAN Induced Four-Fermion Interaction?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mielke, Eckehard W.

    2015-01-01

    The difference between Einstein's general relativity and its Cartan extension is analyzed within the scenario of asymptotic safety. In particular, the four-fermion interaction is studied which distinguishes the Einstein-Cartan theory from its Riemannian limit.

  13. Asymptotics for the Covariance of the Airy2 Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinault, Gregory; Tracy, Craig A.

    2011-04-01

    In this paper we compute some of the higher order terms in the asymptotic behavior of the two point function {P}({A}2(0)≤ s1,A2(t)≤ s2), extending the previous work of Adler and van Moerbeke (arXiv:math.PR/0302329; Ann. Probab. 33, 1326-1361, 2005) and Widom (J. Stat. Phys. 115, 1129-1134, 2004). We prove that it is possible to represent any order asymptotic approximation as a polynomial and integrals of the Painlevé II function q and its derivative q'. Further, for up to tenth order we give this asymptotic approximation as a linear combination of the Tracy-Widom GUE density function f 2 and its derivatives. As a corollary to this, the asymptotic covariance is expressed up to tenth order in terms of the moments of the Tracy-Widom GUE distribution.

  14. Asymptotic formula for eigenvalues of one dimensional Dirac system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulusoy, Ismail; Penahlı, Etibar

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we study the spectral problem for one dimensional Dirac system with Dirichlet boundary conditions. By using Counting lemma, we give an asymptotic formulas of eigenvalues of Dirac system.

  15. Extending the energy range of materials activation modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forrest, R. A.

    2004-08-01

    Activation calculations are an essential contribution to understanding the interactions of fusion materials with neutrons. The existing state-of-the-art tools such as EASY-2003 enable calculations to be carried out with neutrons up to 20 MeV. Plans to expose fusion components to high neutron fluxes include the IFMIF materials testing facility. This accelerator-based device will produce neutrons with a high-energy tail up to about 55 MeV. In order to carry out activation calculations on materials exposed to such neutrons it is necessary to extend the energy range of the data libraries. An extension of the European Activation System (EASY) to a new version, EASY-2004, for testing has been completed. The existing reactions have been extended up to 60 MeV and new classes of reactions added using calculated cross sections. Results of preliminary calculations in an IFMIF relevant neutron field are given.

  16. Physical Activity Energy Expenditure in Dutch Adolescents: Contribution of Active Transport to School, Physical Education, and Leisure Time Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slingerland, Menno; Borghouts, Lars B.; Hesselink, Matthijs K. C.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Detailed knowledge about physical activity energy expenditure (PAEE) can guide the development of school interventions aimed at reducing overweight in adolescents. However, relevant components of PAEE have never been objectively quantified in this population. This study investigated the contribution of active transport to and from…

  17. Quick asymptotic expansion aided by a variational principle

    SciTech Connect

    Hameiri, Eliezer

    2013-02-15

    It is shown how expanding asymptotically a variational functional can yield the asymptotic expansion of its Euler equation. The procedure is simple but novel and requires taking the variation of the expanded functional with respect to the leading order of the originally unknown function, even though the leading order of this function has already been determined in a previous order. An example is worked out that of a large aspect ratio tokamak plasma equilibrium state with relatively strong flows and high plasma beta.

  18. Asymptotic relation between Bell-inequality violations and entanglement distillability

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, Younghun

    2010-11-15

    We investigate the asymptotic relation between violations of the Mermin-Belinskii-Klyshko inequality and the entanglement distillability of multipartite entangled states, as the number of parties increases. We in particular consider noisy multiqubit GHZ and so-called Duer states in the Mermin-Belinskii-Klyshko inequality, and show that, in the asymptotic limit of the number of parties, the violation of the inequality implies the distillability in almost all bipartitions.

  19. Asymptotic-induced numerical methods for conservation laws

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garbey, Marc; Scroggs, Jeffrey S.

    1990-01-01

    Asymptotic-induced methods are presented for the numerical solution of hyperbolic conservation laws with or without viscosity. The methods consist of multiple stages. The first stage is to obtain a first approximation by using a first-order method, such as the Godunov scheme. Subsequent stages of the method involve solving internal-layer problems identified by using techniques derived via asymptotics. Finally, a residual correction increases the accuracy of the scheme. The method is derived and justified with singular perturbation techniques.

  20. Asymptotic model for shape resonance control of diatomics by intense non-resonant light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crubellier, Anne; González-Férez, Rosario; Koch, Christiane P.; Luc-Koenig, Eliane

    2015-04-01

    We derive a universal model for atom pairs interacting with non-resonant light via the polarizability anisotropy, based on the long range properties of the scattering. The corresponding dynamics can be obtained using a nodal line technique to solve the asymptotic Schrödinger equation. It consists of imposing physical boundary conditions at long range and vanishing the wavefunction at a position separating the inner zone and the asymptotic region. We show that nodal lines which depend on the intensity of the non-resonant light can satisfactorily account for the effect of the polarizability at short range. The approach allows to determine the resonance structure, energy, width, channel mixing and hybridization even for narrow resonances.

  1. Asymptotic diffusion limit of cell temperature discretisation schemes for thermal radiation transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smedley-Stevenson, Richard P.; McClarren, Ryan G.

    2015-04-01

    This paper attempts to unify the asymptotic diffusion limit analysis of thermal radiation transport schemes, for a linear-discontinuous representation of the material temperature reconstructed from cell centred temperature unknowns, in a process known as 'source tilting'. The asymptotic limits of both Monte Carlo (continuous in space) and deterministic approaches (based on linear-discontinuous finite elements) for solving the transport equation are investigated in slab geometry. The resulting discrete diffusion equations are found to have nonphysical terms that are proportional to any cell-edge discontinuity in the temperature representation. Based on this analysis it is possible to design accurate schemes for representing the material temperature, for coupling thermal radiation transport codes to a cell centred representation of internal energy favoured by ALE (arbitrary Lagrange-Eulerian) hydrodynamics schemes.

  2. Structure of Finite-RSB Asymptotic Gibbs Measures in the Diluted Spin Glass Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panchenko, Dmitry

    2016-01-01

    We suggest a possible approach to proving the Mézard-Parisi formula for the free energy in the diluted spin glass models, such as diluted K-spin or random K-sat model at any positive temperature. In the main contribution of the paper, we show that a certain small modification of the Hamiltonian in any of these models forces all finite-RSB asymptotic Gibbs measures in the sense of the overlaps to satisfy the Mézard-Parisi ansatz for the distribution of spins. Unfortunately, what is still missing is a description of the general full-RSB asymptotic Gibbs measures. If one could show that the general case can be approximated by finite-RSB case in the right sense then one could a posteriori remove the small modification of the Hamiltonian to recover the Mézard-Parisi formula for the original model.

  3. Asymptotic diffusion limit of cell temperature discretisation schemes for thermal radiation transport

    SciTech Connect

    Smedley-Stevenson, Richard P.; McClarren, Ryan G.

    2015-04-01

    This paper attempts to unify the asymptotic diffusion limit analysis of thermal radiation transport schemes, for a linear-discontinuous representation of the material temperature reconstructed from cell centred temperature unknowns, in a process known as ‘source tilting’. The asymptotic limits of both Monte Carlo (continuous in space) and deterministic approaches (based on linear-discontinuous finite elements) for solving the transport equation are investigated in slab geometry. The resulting discrete diffusion equations are found to have nonphysical terms that are proportional to any cell-edge discontinuity in the temperature representation. Based on this analysis it is possible to design accurate schemes for representing the material temperature, for coupling thermal radiation transport codes to a cell centred representation of internal energy favoured by ALE (arbitrary Lagrange–Eulerian) hydrodynamics schemes.

  4. Quasiclassical asymptotics and coherent states for bounded discrete spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Gorska, K.; Penson, K. A.; Horzela, A.; Blasiak, P.; Duchamp, G. H. E.; Solomon, A. I.

    2010-12-15

    We consider discrete spectra of bound states for nonrelativistic motion in attractive potentials V{sub {sigma}}(x)=-|V{sub 0}| |x|{sup -}{sigma}, 0<{sigma}{<=}2. For these potentials the quasiclassical approximation for n{yields}{infinity} predicts quantized energy levels e{sub {sigma}}(n) of a bounded spectrum varying as e{sub {sigma}}(n){approx}-n{sup -}2{sigma}/(2-{sigma}). We construct collective quantum states using the set of wavefunctions of the discrete spectrum assuming this asymptotic behavior. We give examples of states that are normalizable and satisfy the resolution of unity, using explicit positive functions. These are coherent states in the sense of Klauder and their completeness is achieved via exact solutions of Hausdorff moment problems, obtained by combining Laplace and Mellin transform methods. For {sigma} in the range 0 < {sigma}{<=} 2/3 we present exact implementations of such states for the parametrization {sigma}= 2(k-l)/(3k-l) with k and l positive integers satisfying k>l.

  5. Asymptotic homogenization of three-dimensional thermoelectric composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yang; Lei, Chihou; Gao, Cun-Fa; Li, Jiangyu

    2015-03-01

    Thermoelectric composites are promising for high efficiency energy conversion between thermal flows and electric conduction, though their effective behaviors remain poorly understood due to nonlinear thermoelectric coupling. In this paper, we develop an asymptotic homogenization theory to analyze the effective behavior of three-dimensional (3D) thermoelectric composites, built on the observation that the equations governing microscopic field fluctuations in the composite are actually linear instead of nonlinear after separation of length scales. A set of solutions similar to Green's function method are used to construct the unit cell problem, and appropriate interfacial continuity conditions and boundary conditions are derived. The homogenized governing equations are then developed for thermoelectric composites, and they are further reduced for a special case wherein the heat flow and electric conduction in the composite remains one-dimensional (1D) at macroscopic scale, even though the composite itself is 3D in general. The general homogenization theory is implemented using finite element method, and a key constant in the constructed solutions is determined using the reformulated eigenvalue problem. The algorithm is validated, and is applied for a number of case studies for the effective behavior of thermoelectric composites.

  6. Physical activity and physical activity induced energy expenditure in humans: measurement, determinants, and effects.

    PubMed

    Westerterp, Klaas R

    2013-01-01

    Physical activity is defined as any bodily movement produced by skeletal muscles that results in energy expenditure. The doubly labeled water method for the measurement of total energy expenditure (TEE), in combination with resting energy expenditure, is the reference for physical activity under free-living conditions. To compare the physical activity level (PAL) within and between species, TEE is divided by resting energy expenditure resulting in a figure without dimension. The PAL for sustainable lifestyles ranges between a minimum of 1.1-1.2 and a maximum of 2.0-2.5. The average PAL increases from 1.4 at age 1 year to 1.7-1.8 at reproductive age and declines again to 1.4 at age 90 year. Exercise training increases PAL in young adults when energy balance is maintained by increasing energy intake. Professional endurance athletes can reach PAL values around 4.0. Most of the variation in PAL between subjects can be ascribed to predisposition. A higher weight implicates higher movement costs and less body movement but not necessarily a lower PAL. Changes in physical activity primarily affect body composition and to a lesser extent body weight. Modern man has a similar PAL as a wild mammal of a similar body size. PMID:23637685

  7. Asymptotic study of pulsating evolution of overdriven and CJ detonation with a chain-branching kinetics model

    SciTech Connect

    Short, Mark; Chliquete, Carlos

    2011-01-20

    The pulsating dynamics of gaseous detonations with a model two-step chain-branching kinetic mechanism are studied both numerically and asymptotically. The model studied here was also used in [4], [3] and [2] and mimics the attributes of some chain-branching reaction mechanisms. Specifically, the model comprises a chain-initiationlbranching zone with an Arrhenius temperature-sensitive rate behind the detonation shock where fuel is converted into chain-radical with no heat release. This is followed by a chain-termination zone having a temperature insensitive rate where the exothermic heat of reaction is released. The lengths of these two zones depend on the relative rates of each stage. It was determined in [4] and [3] via asymptotic and numerical analysis that the ratio of the length of the chain-branching zone to that of the chain-initation zone relative to the size of the von Neumann state scaled activation energy in the chain initiation/branching zone has a primary influence of the stability of one-dimensional pulsating instability behavior for this model. In [2], the notion of a specific stability parameter related to this ratio was proposed that determines the boundary between stable and unstable waves. In [4], a slow-time varying asymptotic study was conducted of pulsating instability of Chapman-Jouguet (CJ) detonations with the above two-step rate model, assuming a large activation energy for the chain-initiation zone and a chain-termination zone longer than the chain-initiation zone. Deviations D{sub n}{sup (1)} ({tau}) of the detonation velocity from Chapman-Jouguet were of the order of the non-dimensional activation energy. Solutions were sought for a pulsation timescale of the order of the non-dimensional activation energy times the particle transit time through the induction zone. On this time-scale, the evolution of the chain-initation zone is quasi-steady. In [4], a time-dependent non-linear evolution equation for D{sub n}{sup (1)} ({tau}) was then

  8. Adolescent girls' energy expenditure during dance simulation active computer gaming.

    PubMed

    Fawkner, Samantha G; Niven, Alisa; Thin, Alasdair G; Macdonald, Mhairi J; Oakes, Jemma R

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the energy expended and intensity of physical activity achieved by adolescent girls while playing on a dance simulation game. Twenty adolescent girls were recruited from a local secondary school. Resting oxygen uptake (VO(2)) and heart rate were analysed while sitting quietly and subsequently during approximately 30 min of game play, with 10 min at each of three increasing levels of difficulty. Energy expenditure was predicted from VO(2) at rest and during game play at three levels of play, from which the metabolic equivalents (METS) of game playing were derived. Mean +/- standard deviation energy expenditure for levels 1, 2, and 3 was 3.63 +/- 0.58, 3.65 +/- 0.54, and 4.14 +/- 0.71 kcal . min(-1) respectively, while mean activity for each level of play was at least of moderate intensity (>3 METS). Dance simulation active computer games provide an opportunity for most adolescent girls to exercise at moderate intensity. Therefore, regular playing might contribute to daily physical activity recommendations for good health in this at-risk population. PMID:20013462

  9. 77 FR 46089 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; EPA's ENERGY STAR...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-02

    ... AGENCY Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; EPA's ENERGY STAR... this action are participants in EPA's ENERGY STAR Program in the Commercial and Industrial Sectors. Title: Information Collection Activities Associated with EPA's ENERGY STAR Program in the Commercial...

  10. High-energy neutrinos from active galactic nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, F. W.; Done, C.; Salamon, M. H.; Sommers, P.

    1991-01-01

    The spectrum and high-energy neutrino background flux from photomeson production in active galactic nuclei (AGN) is calculated using the recent UV and X-ray observations to define the photon fields and an accretion-disk shock-acceleration model for producing high-energy particles. Collectively, AGN produce the dominant isotropic neutrino background between 10,000 and 10 to the 10th GeV, detectable with current instruments. AGN neutrinos should produce a sphere of stellar disruption which may explain the 'broad-line region' seen in AGN.

  11. Stardust from Asymptotic Giant Branch Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gail, H.-P.; Zhukovska, S. V.; Hoppe, P.; Trieloff, M.

    2009-06-01

    The formation of dust in the outflows of low- and intermediate-mass stars on the first giant branch and asymptotic giant branch (AGB) is studied and the relative contributions of stars of different initial masses and metallicities to the interstellar medium (ISM) at the instant of solar system formation are derived. These predictions are compared with the characteristics of the parent stars of presolar dust grains found in primitive meteorites and interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) inferred from their isotopic compositions. For this purpose, model calculations for dust condensation in stellar outflows are combined with synthetic models of stellar evolution on the first giant branch and AGB and an evolution model of the Milky Way for the solar neighborhood. The dust components considered are olivine, pyroxene, carbon, SiC, and iron. The corresponding dust production rates are derived for the solar vicinity. From these rates and taking into account dust destruction by supernova shocks in the ISM, the contributions to the inventory of presolar dust grains in the solar system are derived for stars of different initial masses and metallicities. It is shown that stars on the first giant branch and the early AGB are not expected to form dust, in accord with astronomical observations. Dust formation is concentrated in the last phase of evolution, the thermally pulsing AGB. Due to the limited lifetime of dust grains in the ISM only parent stars from a narrow range of metallicities are expected to contribute to the population of presolar dust grains. Silicate and silicon carbide dust grains are predicted to come from parent stars with metallicities not less than about Z ≈ 0.008 (0.6 × solar). This metallicity limit is higher than that inferred from presolar SiC grain isotope data. The population of presolar carbon dust grains is predicted to originate from a wider range of metallicities, down to Z ≈ 0.004. Masses of AGB stars that produce C-rich dust are in the range

  12. AHEAD: Integrated Activities in the High Energy Astrophysics Domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piro, Luigi; Natalucci, Lorenzo; Ahead Consortium

    2015-09-01

    AHEAD (Integrated Activities in the High Energy Astrophysics Domain) is a forthcoming project approved in the framework of the European Horizon 2020 program (Research Infrastructures for High Energy Astrophysics). The overall objective of AHEAD is to integrate national efforts in high-energy Astrophysics and to promote the domain at the European level, to keep its community at the cutting edge of science and technology and ensure that space observatories for high-energy astrophysics, with particular regard to Athena, are at the state of the art. AHEAD will integrate key research infrastructures for on-ground test and calibration of space-based sensors and electronics and promote their coordinated use. In parallel, the best facilities for data analysis of high-energy astrophysical observatories will be made available to the European community. The technological development will focus on the improvement of selected critical technologies, background modeling, cross calibration, and feasibility studies of space-based instrumentation for the benefit of future high energy missions like Athena, and the best exploitation of existing observatories. AHEAD will support the community via grants for collaborative studies, dissemination of results, and promotion of workshops. A strong public outreach package will ensure that the domain is well publicized at national, European and International level. Networking, joint research activities and access to infrastructures as devised in AHEAD, will serve to establish strong connections between institutes and industry to create the basis for a more rapid advancement of high-energy astrophysical science, space oriented instrumentation and cutting-edge sensor technology in Europe. This enables the development of new technologies and the associated growth of the European technology market with a dedicated technology innovation package, as well as the creation of a new generation of researchers.

  13. Vorticity Fluctuations Require a Two-term Asymptotic Representtion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panton, Ronald

    2015-11-01

    Channel flow DNS data produced by several authors is analyzed. In the inner region, the vorticity fluctuations, < ωi ωi>, require two-term asymptotic expansions. The first terms are scaled by the mixed velocity (U0 u τ) 1/2. They are the viscous response to imposed potential fluctuations, decay exponetially, and therefore do not require matching terms in the outer region. The first term is zero for the normal component, < ωy ωy>. The second terms are scaled by u τ with a gauge function u τ + (Re τ). They are active in the turbulence. In the log region they have an overlap behavior ~ Ci / y + or Co / (y/ δ). This behavior demands a rescaling in the outer region where the proper vorticity scale is τη = ν / ɛ = (νh / u τ3)1/2. This is the Kolmogorov time scale appropriate for viscous dissipation. In the outer region all components scale nicely with Re τ and have similar magnitudes.

  14. Transcriptome Analysis of Liangshan Pig Muscle Development at the Growth Curve Inflection Point and Asymptotic Stages Using Digital Gene Expression Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Du, Jingjing; Liu, Chendong; Wu, Xiaoqian; Pu, Qiang; Fu, Yuhua; Tang, Qianzi; Liu, Yuanrui; Li, Qiang; Yang, Runlin; Li, Xuewei; Tang, Guoqing; Jiang, Yanzhi; Li, Mingzhou; Zhang, Shunhua; Zhu, Li

    2015-01-01

    Animal growth curves can provide essential information for animal breeders to optimize feeding and management strategies. However, the genetic mechanism underlying the phenotypic differentiation between the inflection point and asymptotic stages of the growth curve is not well characterized. Here, we employed Liangshan pigs in stages of growth at the inflection point (under inflection point: UIP) and the two asymptotic stages (before the inflection point: BIP, after the inflection point: AIP) as models to survey global gene expression in the longissimus dorsi muscle using digital gene expression (DGE) tag profiling. We found Liangshan pigs reached maximum growth rate (UIP) at 163.6 days of age and a weight of 134.6 kg. The DGE libraries generated 117 million reads of 5.89 gigabases in length. 21,331, 20,996 and 20,139 expressed transcripts were identified BIP, UIP and AIP, respectively. Among them, we identified 757 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) between BIP and UIP, and 271 DEGs between AIP and UIP. An enrichment analysis of DEGs proved the immune system was strengthened in the AIP stage. Energy metabolism rate, global transcriptional activity and bone development intensity were highest UIP. Meat from Liangshan pigs had the highest intramuscular fat content and most favorable fatty acid composition in the AIP. Three hundred eighty (27.70%) specific expression genes were highly enriched in QTL regions for growth and meat quality traits. This study completed a comprehensive analysis of diverse genetic mechanisms underlying the inflection point and asymptotic stages of growth. Our findings will serve as an important resource in the understanding of animal growth and development in indigenous pig breeds. PMID:26292092

  15. Transcriptome Analysis of Liangshan Pig Muscle Development at the Growth Curve Inflection Point and Asymptotic Stages Using Digital Gene Expression Profiling.

    PubMed

    Shen, Linyuan; Luo, Jia; Du, Jingjing; Liu, Chendong; Wu, Xiaoqian; Pu, Qiang; Fu, Yuhua; Tang, Qianzi; Liu, Yuanrui; Li, Qiang; Yang, Runlin; Li, Xuewei; Tang, Guoqing; Jiang, Yanzhi; Li, Mingzhou; Zhang, Shunhua; Zhu, Li

    2015-01-01

    Animal growth curves can provide essential information for animal breeders to optimize feeding and management strategies. However, the genetic mechanism underlying the phenotypic differentiation between the inflection point and asymptotic stages of the growth curve is not well characterized. Here, we employed Liangshan pigs in stages of growth at the inflection point (under inflection point: UIP) and the two asymptotic stages (before the inflection point: BIP, after the inflection point: AIP) as models to survey global gene expression in the longissimus dorsi muscle using digital gene expression (DGE) tag profiling. We found Liangshan pigs reached maximum growth rate (UIP) at 163.6 days of age and a weight of 134.6 kg. The DGE libraries generated 117 million reads of 5.89 gigabases in length. 21,331, 20,996 and 20,139 expressed transcripts were identified BIP, UIP and AIP, respectively. Among them, we identified 757 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) between BIP and UIP, and 271 DEGs between AIP and UIP. An enrichment analysis of DEGs proved the immune system was strengthened in the AIP stage. Energy metabolism rate, global transcriptional activity and bone development intensity were highest UIP. Meat from Liangshan pigs had the highest intramuscular fat content and most favorable fatty acid composition in the AIP. Three hundred eighty (27.70%) specific expression genes were highly enriched in QTL regions for growth and meat quality traits. This study completed a comprehensive analysis of diverse genetic mechanisms underlying the inflection point and asymptotic stages of growth. Our findings will serve as an important resource in the understanding of animal growth and development in indigenous pig breeds. PMID:26292092

  16. Active Noise Control Experiments using Sound Energy Flu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause, Uli

    2015-03-01

    This paper reports on the latest results concerning the active noise control approach using net flow of acoustic energy. The test set-up consists of two loudspeakers simulating the engine noise and two smaller loudspeakers which belong to the active noise system. The system is completed by two acceleration sensors and one microphone per loudspeaker. The microphones are located in the near sound field of the loudspeakers. The control algorithm including the update equation of the feed-forward controller is introduced. Numerical simulations are performed with a comparison to a state of the art method minimising the radiated sound power. The proposed approach is experimentally validated.

  17. Directed transport of active particles over asymmetric energy barriers.

    PubMed

    Koumakis, N; Maggi, C; Di Leonardo, R

    2014-08-21

    We theoretically and numerically investigate the transport of active colloids to target regions, delimited by asymmetric energy barriers. We show that it is possible to introduce a generalized effective temperature that is related to the local variance of particle velocities. The stationary probability distributions can be derived from a simple diffusion equation in the presence of an inhomogeneous effective temperature resulting from the action of external force fields. In particular, transition rates over asymmetric energy barriers can be unbalanced by having different effective temperatures over the two slopes of the barrier. By varying the type of active noise, we find that equal values of diffusivity and persistence time may produce strongly varied effective temperatures and thus stationary distributions. PMID:24978345

  18. Asymptotic analysis of force-free magnetic fields of cylindrical symmetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sturrock, P. A.; Antiochos, S. K.; Roumeliotis, G.

    1995-01-01

    It is known from computer calculations that if a force-free magnetic-field configuration is stressed progressively by footpoint displacements, the configuration expands and approaches the open configuration with the same surface flux distribution, and, in the process, the energy of the field increases progressively. Analysis of a simple model of force-free fields of cylindrical symmetry leads to simple asymptotic expressions for the extent and energy of such a configuration. The analysis is carried through for both spherical and planar source surfaces. According to this model, the field evolves in a well-behaved manner with no indication of instability or loss of equilibrium.

  19. Self-consistent field theory of collisions: Orbital equations with asymptotic sources and self-averaged potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, Y. K.

    2014-12-01

    The self-consistent field theory of collisions is formulated, incorporating the unique dynamics generated by the self-averaged potentials. The bound state Hartree-Fock approach is extended for the first time to scattering states, by properly resolving the principal difficulties of non-integrable continuum orbitals and imposing complex asymptotic conditions. The recently developed asymptotic source theory provides the natural theoretical basis, as the asymptotic conditions are completely transferred to the source terms and the new scattering function is made fullyintegrable. The scattering solutions can then be directly expressed in terms of bound state HF configurations, establishing the relationship between the bound and scattering state solutions. Alternatively, the integrable spin orbitals are generated by constructing the individual orbital equations that contain asymptotic sources and self-averaged potentials. However, the orbital energies are not determined by the equations, and a special channel energy fixing procedure is developed to secure the solutions. It is also shown that the variational construction of the orbital equations has intrinsic ambiguities that are generally associated with the self-consistent approach. On the other hand, when a small subset of open channels is included in the source term, the solutions are only partiallyintegrable, but the individual open channels can then be treated more simply by properly selecting the orbital energies. The configuration mixing and channel coupling are then necessary to complete the solution. The new theory improves the earlier continuum HF model.

  20. Energy Expenditure During Extravehicular Activity: Apollo Skylab Through STS-135

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paul, Heather L.

    2011-01-01

    The importance of real-time metabolic rate monitoring during extravehicular activities (EVAs) came into question during the Gemini missions, when the energy expenditure required to conduct an EVA over-tasked the crewmember and exceeded the capabilities of vehicle and space suit life support systems. Energy expenditure was closely evaluated through the Apollo lunar surface EVAs, resulting in modifications to space suit design and EVA operations. After the Apollo lunar surface missions were completed, the United States shifted its focus to long duration human space flight, to study the human response to living and working in a microgravity environment. This paper summarizes the energy expenditure during EVA from Apollo Skylab through STS-135.

  1. Size Matters: Individual Variation in Ectotherm Growth and Asymptotic Size

    PubMed Central

    King, Richard B.

    2016-01-01

    Body size, and, by extension, growth has impacts on physiology, survival, attainment of sexual maturity, fecundity, generation time, and population dynamics, especially in ectotherm animals that often exhibit extensive growth following attainment of sexual maturity. Frequently, growth is analyzed at the population level, providing useful population mean growth parameters but ignoring individual variation that is also of ecological and evolutionary significance. Our long-term study of Lake Erie Watersnakes, Nerodia sipedon insularum, provides data sufficient for a detailed analysis of population and individual growth. We describe population mean growth separately for males and females based on size of known age individuals (847 captures of 769 males, 748 captures of 684 females) and annual growth increments of individuals of unknown age (1,152 males, 730 females). We characterize individual variation in asymptotic size based on repeated measurements of 69 males and 71 females that were each captured in five to nine different years. The most striking result of our analyses is that asymptotic size varies dramatically among individuals, ranging from 631–820 mm snout-vent length in males and from 835–1125 mm in females. Because female fecundity increases with increasing body size, we explore the impact of individual variation in asymptotic size on lifetime reproductive success using a range of realistic estimates of annual survival. When all females commence reproduction at the same age, lifetime reproductive success is greatest for females with greater asymptotic size regardless of annual survival. But when reproduction is delayed in females with greater asymptotic size, lifetime reproductive success is greatest for females with lower asymptotic size when annual survival is low. Possible causes of individual variation in asymptotic size, including individual- and cohort-specific variation in size at birth and early growth, warrant further investigation. PMID

  2. Size Matters: Individual Variation in Ectotherm Growth and Asymptotic Size.

    PubMed

    King, Richard B; Stanford, Kristin M; Jones, Peter C; Bekker, Kent

    2016-01-01

    Body size, and, by extension, growth has impacts on physiology, survival, attainment of sexual maturity, fecundity, generation time, and population dynamics, especially in ectotherm animals that often exhibit extensive growth following attainment of sexual maturity. Frequently, growth is analyzed at the population level, providing useful population mean growth parameters but ignoring individual variation that is also of ecological and evolutionary significance. Our long-term study of Lake Erie Watersnakes, Nerodia sipedon insularum, provides data sufficient for a detailed analysis of population and individual growth. We describe population mean growth separately for males and females based on size of known age individuals (847 captures of 769 males, 748 captures of 684 females) and annual growth increments of individuals of unknown age (1,152 males, 730 females). We characterize individual variation in asymptotic size based on repeated measurements of 69 males and 71 females that were each captured in five to nine different years. The most striking result of our analyses is that asymptotic size varies dramatically among individuals, ranging from 631-820 mm snout-vent length in males and from 835-1125 mm in females. Because female fecundity increases with increasing body size, we explore the impact of individual variation in asymptotic size on lifetime reproductive success using a range of realistic estimates of annual survival. When all females commence reproduction at the same age, lifetime reproductive success is greatest for females with greater asymptotic size regardless of annual survival. But when reproduction is delayed in females with greater asymptotic size, lifetime reproductive success is greatest for females with lower asymptotic size when annual survival is low. Possible causes of individual variation in asymptotic size, including individual- and cohort-specific variation in size at birth and early growth, warrant further investigation. PMID:26730712

  3. Asymptotics of bivariate generating functions with algebraic singularities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenwood, Torin

    Flajolet and Odlyzko (1990) derived asymptotic formulae the coefficients of a class of uni- variate generating functions with algebraic singularities. Gao and Richmond (1992) and Hwang (1996, 1998) extended these results to classes of multivariate generating functions, in both cases by reducing to the univariate case. Pemantle and Wilson (2013) outlined new multivariate ana- lytic techniques and used them to analyze the coefficients of rational generating functions. After overviewing these methods, we use them to find asymptotic formulae for the coefficients of a broad class of bivariate generating functions with algebraic singularities. Beginning with the Cauchy integral formula, we explicity deform the contour of integration so that it hugs a set of critical points. The asymptotic contribution to the integral comes from analyzing the integrand near these points, leading to explicit asymptotic formulae. Next, we use this formula to analyze an example from current research. In the following chapter, we apply multivariate analytic techniques to quan- tum walks. Bressler and Pemantle (2007) found a (d + 1)-dimensional rational generating function whose coefficients described the amplitude of a particle at a position in the integer lattice after n steps. Here, the minimal critical points form a curve on the (d + 1)-dimensional unit torus. We find asymptotic formulae for the amplitude of a particle in a given position, normalized by the number of steps n, as n approaches infinity. Each critical point contributes to the asymptotics for a specific normalized position. Using Groebner bases in Maple again, we compute the explicit locations of peak amplitudes. In a scaling window of size the square root of n near the peaks, each amplitude is asymptotic to an Airy function.

  4. Energy and angular dependence of active-type personal dosemeter for high-energy neutron.

    PubMed

    Rito, Hirotaka; Yamauchi, Tomoya; Oda, Keiji

    2011-07-01

    In order to develop an active-type personal dosemeter having suitable sensitivity to high-energy neutrons, the characteristic response of silicon surface barrier detector has been investigated experimentally and theoretically. An agreement of the shape of pulse-height distribution, its change with radiator thickness and the relative sensitivity was confirmed between the calculated and experimental results for 14.8-MeV neutrons. The angular dependence was estimated for other neutron energies, and found that the angular dependence decreased with the incident energy. The reason was also discussed with regard to the radiator thickness relative to maximum range of recoil protons. PMID:21613268

  5. Analysis of transverse shear strains in pre-twisted thick beams using variational asymptotic method

    SciTech Connect

    Ameen, Maqsood M.; Harursampath, Dineshkumar E-mail: dinesh@aero.iisc.ernet.in

    2015-03-10

    The cross-sectional stiffness matrix is derived for a pre-twisted, moderately thick beam made of transversely isotropic materials and having rectangular cross sections. An asymptotically-exact methodology is used to model the anisotropic beam from 3-D elasticity, without any further assumptions. The beam is allowed to have large displacements and rotations, but small strain is assumed. The strain energy is computed making use of the beam constitutive law and kinematical relations derived with the inclusion of geometrical nonlinearities and an initial twist. The energy functional is minimized making use of the Variational Asymptotic Method (VAM), thereby reducing the cross section to a point on the beam reference line with appropriate properties, forming a 1-D constitutive law. VAM is a mathematical technique employed in the current problem to rigorously split the 3-D analysis of beams into two: a 2-D analysis over the beam cross-sectional domain, which provides a compact semi-analytical form of the properties of the cross sections, and a nonlinear 1-D analysis of the beam ref-erence curve. In this method, as applied herein, the cross-sectional analysis is performed asymptotically by taking advantage of a material small parameter and two geometric small parameters. 3-D strain components are derived using kinematics and arranged in orders of the small parameters. Closed-form expressions are derived for the 3-D non-linear warping and stress fields. Warping functions are obtained by the minimization of strain energy subject to certain set of constraints that render the 1-D strain measures well-defined. The zeroth-order 3-D warping field thus yielded is then used to integrate the 3-D strain energy density over the cross section, resulting in the 1-D strain energy density, which in turn helps identify the corresponding cross-sectional stiffness matrix. The model is capable of predicting interlaminar and transverse shear stresses accurately up to first order.

  6. Optimal estimators and asymptotic variances for nonequilibrium path-ensemble averages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minh, David D. L.; Chodera, John D.

    2009-10-01

    Existing optimal estimators of nonequilibrium path-ensemble averages are shown to fall within the framework of extended bridge sampling. Using this framework, we derive a general minimal-variance estimator that can combine nonequilibrium trajectory data sampled from multiple path-ensembles to estimate arbitrary functions of nonequilibrium expectations. The framework is also applied to obtain asymptotic variance estimates, which are a useful measure of statistical uncertainty. In particular, we develop asymptotic variance estimates pertaining to Jarzynski's equality for free energies and the Hummer-Szabo expressions for the potential of mean force, calculated from uni- or bidirectional path samples. These estimators are demonstrated on a model single-molecule pulling experiment. In these simulations, the asymptotic variance expression is found to accurately characterize the confidence intervals around estimators when the bias is small. Hence, the confidence intervals are inaccurately described for unidirectional estimates with large bias, but for this model it largely reflects the true error in a bidirectional estimator derived by Minh and Adib.

  7. Asymptotic and near-target direct breakup of 6Li and 7Li

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalkal, Sunil; Simpson, E. C.; Luong, D. H.; Cook, K. J.; Dasgupta, M.; Hinde, D. J.; Carter, I. P.; Jeung, D. Y.; Mohanto, G.; Palshetkar, C. S.; Prasad, E.; Rafferty, D. C.; Simenel, C.; Vo-Phuoc, K.; Williams, E.; Gasques, L. R.; Gomes, P. R. S.; Linares, R.

    2016-04-01

    Background: Li,76 and 9Be are weakly bound against breakup into their cluster constituents. Breakup location is important for determining the role of breakup in above-barrier complete fusion suppression. Recent works have pointed out that experimental observables can be used to separate near-target and asymptotic breakup. Purpose: Our purpose is to distinguish near-target and asymptotic direct breakup of Li,76 in reactions with nuclei in different mass regions. Method: Charged particle coincidence measurements are carried out with pulsed Li,76 beams on 58Ni and 64Zn targets at sub-barrier energies and compared with previous measurements using 208Pb and 209Bi targets. A detector array providing a large angular coverage is used, along with time-of-flight information to give definitive particle identification of the direct breakup fragments. Results: In interactions of 6Li with 58Ni and 64Zn, direct breakup occurs only asymptotically far away from the target. However, in interactions with 208Pb and 209Bi, near-target breakup occurs in addition to asymptotic breakup. Direct breakup of 7Li into α -t is not observed in interactions with 58Ni and 64Zn. However, near-target dominated direct breakup was observed in measurements with 208Pb and 209Bi. A modified version of the Monte Carlo classical trajectory model code platypus, which explicitly takes into account lifetimes associated with unbound states, is used to simulate sub-barrier breakup reactions. Conclusions: Near-target breakup in interactions with Li,76 is an important mechanism only for the heavy targets 208Pb and 209Bi. There is insignificant near-target direct breakup of 6Li and no direct breakup of 7Li in reactions with 58Ni and 64Zn. Therefore, direct breakup is unlikely to suppress the above-barrier fusion cross section in reactions of Li,76 with 58Ni and 64Zn nuclei.

  8. Conserved Charges in Asymptotically (Locally) AdS Spacetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marolf, Donald; Kelly, William; Fischetti, Sebastian

    When a physical system is complicated and nonlinear, global symmetries and the associated conserved quantities provide some of the most powerful analytic tools to understand its behavior. This is as true in theories with a dynamical spacetime metric as for systems defined on a fixed spacetime background. Chapter 17, 10.1007/978-3-642-41992-8_17 has already discussed the so-called Arnowitt-Deser-Misner (ADM) conserved quantities for asymptotically flat dynamical spacetimes, exploring in detail certain subtleties related to diffeomorphism invariance. In particular, it showed that the correct notion of global symmetry is given by the so-called asymptotic symmetries; equivalence classes of diffeomorphisms with the same asymptotic behavior at infinity. It was also noted that the notion of asymptotic symmetry depends critically on the choice of boundary conditions. Indeed, it is the imposition of boundary conditions that causes the true gauge symmetries to be only a subset of the full diffeomorphism group and thus allows the existence of nontrivial asymptotic symmetries at all.

  9. Black hole thermodynamics from a variational principle: asymptotically conical backgrounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Ok Song; Cvetič, Mirjam; Papadimitriou, Ioannis

    2016-03-01

    The variational problem of gravity theories is directly related to black hole thermodynamics. For asymptotically locally AdS backgrounds it is known that holographic renormalization results in a variational principle in terms of equivalence classes of boundary data under the local asymptotic symmetries of the theory, which automatically leads to finite conserved charges satisfying the first law of thermodynamics. We show that this connection holds well beyond asymptotically AdS black holes. In particular, we formulate the variational problem for {N}=2 STU supergravity in four dimensions with boundary conditions corresponding to those obeyed by the so called `subtracted geometries'. We show that such boundary conditions can be imposed covariantly in terms of a set of asymptotic second class constraints, and we derive the appropriate boundary terms that render the variational problem well posed in two different duality frames of the STU model. This allows us to define finite conserved charges associated with any asymptotic Killing vector and to demonstrate that these charges satisfy the Smarr formula and the first law of thermodynamics. Moreover, by uplifting the theory to five dimensions and then reducing on a 2-sphere, we provide a precise map between the thermodynamic observables of the subtracted geometries and those of the BTZ black hole. Surface terms play a crucial role in this identification.

  10. Stellar activity effects on high energy exoplanet transits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llama, Joe; Shkolnik, Evgenya

    2016-01-01

    High energy (X-ray / UV) observations of transiting exoplanets have revealed the presence of extended atmospheres around a number of systems. At such high energies, stellar radiation is absorbed high up in the planetary atmosphere, making X-ray and UV observations a potential tool for investigating the upper atmospheres of exoplanets. At these high energies, stellar activity can dramatically impact the observations. At short wavelengths the stellar disk appears limb-brightened, and active regions appear as extended bright features that evolve on a much shorter timescale than in the optical making it difficult . These features impact both the transit depth and shape, affecting our ability to measure the true planet-to-star radius ratio.I will show results of simulated exoplanet transit light curves using Solar data obtained in the soft X-ray and UV by NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory to investigate the impact of stellar activity at these wavelengths. By using a limb-brightened transit model coupled with disk resolved Solar images in the X-ray, extreme- and far-UV I will show how both occulted and unocculted active regions can mimic an inflated planetary atmosphere by changing the depth and shape of the transit profile. I will also show how the disk integrated Lyman-alpha Solar irradiance varies on both short and long timescales and how this variability can impact our ability to recover the true radius ratio of a transiting exoplanet.Finally, I will present techniques on how to overcome these effects to determine the true planet-to-star radius in X-ray and UV observations.

  11. Iowa Developed Energy Activity Sampler (IDEAS), Grades 7-12: Language Arts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simonis, Doris G.

    Presented is the Language Arts component of the Iowa Developed Energy Activity Sampler (IDEAS), a multidisciplinary energy education program designed for infusion into the curriculum of grades 7-12. Among the lessons included are an energy debate, puzzles, energy poetry, and energy life styles. Also contained in the IDEAS program are activity sets…

  12. Energy management and control of active distribution systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shariatzadeh, Farshid

    Advancements in the communication, control, computation and information technologies have driven the transition to the next generation active power distribution systems. Novel control techniques and management strategies are required to achieve the efficient, economic and reliable grid. The focus of this work is energy management and control of active distribution systems (ADS) with integrated renewable energy sources (RESs) and demand response (DR). Here, ADS mean automated distribution system with remotely operated controllers and distributed energy resources (DERs). DER as active part of the next generation future distribution system includes: distributed generations (DGs), RESs, energy storage system (ESS), plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEV) and DR. Integration of DR and RESs into ADS is critical to realize the vision of sustainability. The objective of this dissertation is the development of management architecture to control and operate ADS in the presence of DR and RES. One of the most challenging issues for operating ADS is the inherent uncertainty of DR and RES as well as conflicting objective of DER and electric utilities. ADS can consist of different layers such as system layer and building layer and coordination between these layers is essential. In order to address these challenges, multi-layer energy management and control architecture is proposed with robust algorithms in this work. First layer of proposed multi-layer architecture have been implemented at the system layer. Developed AC optimal power flow (AC-OPF) generates fair price for all DR and non-DR loads which is used as a control signal for second layer. Second layer controls DR load at buildings using a developed look-ahead robust controller. Load aggregator collects information from all buildings and send aggregated load to the system optimizer. Due to the different time scale at these two management layers, time coordination scheme is developed. Robust and deterministic controllers

  13. Pyrolysis of activated sludge: energy analysis and its technical feasibility.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Manu; Tardio, James; Venkata Mohan, S

    2015-02-01

    A comprehensive study on the potential of pyrolysis of activated sludge to generate substances that can be used to produce energy was evaluated for its technical and environmental viability. The products of the process viz., pyrolysis gas, pyrolysis oil and char can readily be used by the major energy consumers viz., electricity and transportation. Based on the results obtained it is estimated that a 1 ton capacity process for pyrolysis of activated sludge can serve the electrical needs of a maximum of 239, 95 and 47 Indian houses per day, considering lower middle class, middle class and upper middle class, respectively. In addition the process would also produce the daily methane (CNG) requirement of 128 public transport buses. The process was determined to be technically feasible at low and medium temperatures for both, pyrolysis gas and electrical energy. The gas generated could be utilized as fuel directly while the oil generated would require pretreatment before its potential application. The process is potentially sustainable when commercialized and can self-sustain in continuous mode of operation in biorefinery context. PMID:25451771

  14. Energy Conservation Education for New York State. Interdisciplinary Learning Activities. Grades 7-12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany.

    Provided in this document are 18 energy conservation activities designed to supplement regular classroom learning activities. A matrix correlating activity number with grade level and subject areas is included. Titles of activities are: puzzles; energy quiz; energy-related careers; reading a meter; trading calories for kilo-watts; conserving home…

  15. Fracture strength of disordered media: universality, interactions, and tail asymptotics.

    PubMed

    Manzato, Claudio; Shekhawat, Ashivni; Nukala, Phani K V V; Alava, Mikko J; Sethna, James P; Zapperi, Stefano

    2012-02-10

    We study the asymptotic properties of fracture strength distributions of disordered elastic media by a combination of renormalization group, extreme value theory, and numerical simulation. We investigate the validity of the "weakest-link hypothesis" in the presence of realistic long-ranged interactions in the random fuse model. Numerical simulations indicate that the fracture strength is well-described by the Duxbury-Leath-Beale (DLB) distribution which is shown to flow asymptotically to the Gumbel distribution. We explore the relation between the extreme value distributions and the DLB-type asymptotic distributions and show that the universal extreme value forms may not be appropriate to describe the nonuniversal low-strength tail. PMID:22401086

  16. Equivariant spectral asymptotics for h-pseudodifferential operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weich, Tobias

    2014-10-01

    We prove equivariant spectral asymptotics for h-pseudodifferential operators for compact orthogonal group actions generalizing results of El Houakmi and Helffer ["Comportement semi-classique en présence de symétries: Action d'un groupe de Lie compact," Asymp. Anal. 5(2), 91-113 (1991)] and Cassanas ["Reduced Gutzwiller formula with symmetry: Case of a Lie group," J. Math. Pures Appl. 85(6), 719-742 (2006)]. Using recent results for certain oscillatory integrals with singular critical sets [P. Ramacher, "Singular equivariant asymptotics and Weyl's law: On the distribution of eigenvalues of an invariant elliptic operator," J. Reine Angew. Math. (Crelles J.) (to be published)], we can deduce a weak equivariant Weyl law. Furthermore, we can prove a complete asymptotic expansion for the Gutzwiller trace formula without any additional condition on the group action by a suitable generalization of the dynamical assumptions on the Hamilton flow.

  17. Adaptive neural PD control with semiglobal asymptotic stabilization guarantee.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yongping; Yu, Haoyong; Er, Meng Joo

    2014-12-01

    This paper proves that adaptive neural plus proportional-derivative (PD) control can lead to semiglobal asymptotic stabilization rather than uniform ultimate boundedness for a class of uncertain affine nonlinear systems. An integral Lyapunov function-based ideal control law is introduced to avoid the control singularity problem. A variable-gain PD control term without the knowledge of plant bounds is presented to semiglobally stabilize the closed-loop system. Based on a linearly parameterized raised-cosine radial basis function neural network, a key property of optimal approximation is exploited to facilitate stability analysis. It is proved that the closed-loop system achieves semiglobal asymptotic stability by the appropriate choice of control parameters. Compared with previous adaptive approximation-based semiglobal or asymptotic stabilization approaches, our approach not only significantly simplifies control design, but also relaxes constraint conditions on the plant. Two illustrative examples have been provided to verify the theoretical results. PMID:25420247

  18. Asymptotic behavior and inverse problem in layered scattering media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tualle, Jean-Michel; Nghiem, Ha Lien; Ettori, Dominique; Sablong, Raphael; Tinet, Eric; Avrillier, Sigrid

    2004-01-01

    The main challenge of noninvasive optical biopsy is to obtain an accurate value of the optical coefficients of an encapsulated organ (muscle, brain, etc.). The idea developed by us is that some interesting information could be deduced from the long-time behavior of the reflectance function. This asymptotic behavior is analyzed for layered media in the framework of the diffusion approximation. A new method is derived to obtain accurate values for the optical parameters of the deepest layers. This method is designed to work in a specific long-time regime that is still within the scope of standard time-of-flight experiments but far from being included in the mathematically defined asymptotic region. The limits of this method, linked to the cases where the asymptotic behavior is no longer governed by the deepest layer, are then discussed.

  19. Asymptotically Jλ -statistical equivalent sequences of weight g

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savaş, Ekrem

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents the following definition which is a natural combination of the definition for asymptotically equivalent of weight g, J -statistically limit, and λ - statistical convergence, where g :ℕ →[0 , ∞ ) is a function satisfying g (n) → ∞ and g(n) ↛ 0. The two nonnegative sequences x = (xk) and y = (yk) are said to be asymptotically Jg -statistical equivalent of weight g to multiple L provided that for every ɛ > 0, and δ > 0, {n ∈ℕ : 1/g (λn) |{k ∈In:|x/k yk -L | ≥ɛ }| ≥δ }∈J , (denoted by x ˜SλL(I) g y ) and simply asymptotically Jg -statistical equivalent of weight g if L = 1. In addition, we shall also present some inclusion theorems.

  20. Detailed ultraviolet asymptotics for AdS scalar field perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evnin, Oleg; Jai-akson, Puttarak

    2016-04-01

    We present a range of methods suitable for accurate evaluation of the leading asymptotics for integrals of products of Jacobi polynomials in limits when the degrees of some or all polynomials inside the integral become large. The structures in question have recently emerged in the context of effective descriptions of small amplitude perturbations in anti-de Sitter (AdS) spacetime. The limit of high degree polynomials corresponds in this situation to effective interactions involving extreme short-wavelength modes, whose dynamics is crucial for the turbulent instabilities that determine the ultimate fate of small AdS perturbations. We explicitly apply the relevant asymptotic techniques to the case of a self-interacting probe scalar field in AdS and extract a detailed form of the leading large degree behavior, including closed form analytic expressions for the numerical coefficients appearing in the asymptotics.

  1. Stable parabolic Higgs bundles as asymptotically stable decorated swamps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Nikolai

    2016-06-01

    Parabolic Higgs bundles can be described in terms of decorated swamps, which we studied in a recent paper. This description induces a notion of stability of parabolic Higgs bundles depending on a parameter, and we construct their moduli space inside the moduli space of decorated swamps. We then introduce asymptotic stability of decorated swamps in order to study the behaviour of the stability condition as one parameter approaches infinity. The main result is the existence of a constant, such that stability with respect to parameters greater than this constant is equivalent to asymptotic stability. This implies boundedness of all decorated swamps which are semistable with respect to some parameter. Finally, we recover the usual stability condition of parabolic Higgs bundles as asymptotic stability.

  2. Holography of 3D asymptotically flat black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fareghbal, Reza; Hosseini, Seyed Morteza

    2015-04-01

    We study the asymptotically flat rotating hairy black hole solution of a three-dimensional gravity theory which is given by taking the flat-space limit (zero cosmological constant limit) of new massive gravity. We propose that the dual field theory of the flat-space limit of new massive gravity can be described by a contracted conformal field theory which is invariant under the action of the BMS3 group. Using the flat/contracted conformal field theory correspondence, we construct a stress tensor which yields the conserved charges of the asymptotically flat black hole solution. We check that our expressions of the mass and angular momentum fit with the first law of black hole thermodynamics. Furthermore, by taking the appropriate limit of the Cardy formula in the parent conformal field theory, we find a Cardy-like formula which reproduces the Wald's entropy of the 3D asymptotically flat black hole.

  3. The asymptotic asymmetric-top rotational partition function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, James K. G.

    The high-temperature asymptotic expansion of the rotational partition function of a rigid asymmetric-top molecule can be written in the form where g is the mean nuclear statistical weight and gζ is a nuclear statistical weight factor associated with the principal axis ζ. The asymptotic expansion of Q', which is calculated by two different methods, is expressed in the formulation of McDowell as where tMPH1377_images Here, α, β and γ are the dimensionless temperature-reduced rotational constants hcA/kT, hcB/kT and hcC/kT, and each sum is over the three cyclic permutations of (α, β, γ). For the Q'ζ, the principal asymptotic approximations tMPH1377_images are obtained, confirming results in the 1955 dissertation of Woolley.

  4. Nanoscale friction as a function of activation energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chong, W. W. F.; Rahnejat, H.

    2015-12-01

    Understanding the scale-dependence of friction is increasingly viewed as a critical quest. With progressively thinner films, mixed and boundary regimes of lubrication have become commonplace. Therefore, at the micro-scale a greater need for mitigating friction is desired in order to improve operational efficiency of many machines and mechanisms. Furthermore, there is a growing tendency to use low friction hard wear-resistant advanced coatings to guard against wear. In parallel, there has been much attention paid to lubricant rheology and formulation. However, only in recent times there has been an emerging view of lubricant-surface combination as a system. In this perspective it is essential to relate the observed and measured friction at component level to the underlying interactions in micro/nano-scales. This is the approach in this paper. Observed phenomenon at micro-scale are related back to the activation energies of lubricant-surface system, providing in particular results for surface modified Ni-SiC coated specimen in combination with formulated lubricants, the combination of which represent the lubricant-surface system of choice in cylinders of high performance race engine. The nano-scale conjunction of an AFM tip with lubricated surface-engineered specimen, subjected to various conjunctional loading and sliding kinematics is investigated. It is shown that the measured frictional characteristics can be adequately described in terms of activation energies in line with the Eyring’s thermal activation model for cases of fairly smooth asperity tip contact conjunctions.

  5. Onset of Asymptotic Scaling in Deuteron Photodisintegration

    SciTech Connect

    P. Rossi; et. Al.

    2005-01-01

    We investigate the transition from the nucleon-meson to quark-gluon description of the strong interaction using the photon energy dependence of the d({gamma},p)n differential cross section for photon energies above 0.5 GeV and center-of-mass proton angles between 30{sup o} and 150{sup o}. A possible signature for this transition is the onset of cross section s{sup 11} scaling with the total energy squared, s, at some proton transverse momentum, P{sub T}. The results show that the scaling has been reached for proton transverse momentum above about 1.1 GeV/c. This may indicate that the quark-gluon regime is reached above this momentum.

  6. Onset of asymptotic scaling in deuteron photodisintegration.

    PubMed

    Rossi, P; Mirazita, M; Ronchetti, F; De Sanctis, E; Adams, G; Ambrozewicz, P; Anciant, E; Anghinolfi, M; Asavapibhop, B; Audit, G; Avakian, H; Bagdasaryan, H; Ball, J P; Barrow, S; Battaglieri, M; Beard, K; Bektasoglu, M; Bellis, M; Benmouna, N; Berman, B L; Bertozzi, W; Bianchi, N; Biselli, A S; Boiarinov, S; Bonner, B E; Bouchigny, S; Bradford, R; Branford, D; Briscoe, W J; Brooks, W K; Burkert, V D; Butuceanu, C; Calarco, J R; Carman, D S; Carnahan, B; Chen, S; Cole, P L; Cords, D; Corvisiero, P; Crabb, D; Crannell, H; Cummings, J P; De Vita, R; Degtyarenko, P V; Denizli, H; Dennis, L; Deppman, A; Dharmawardane, K V; Dhuga, K S; Djalali, C; Dodge, G E; Doughty, D; Dragovitsch, P; Dugger, M; Dytman, S; Dzyubak, O P; Egiyan, H; Egiyan, K S; Elouadrhiri, L; Empl, A; Eugenio, P; Fatemi, R; Feuerbach, R J; Ficenec, J; Forest, T A; Funsten, H; Gai, M; Gavalian, G; Gilad, S; Gilfoyle, G P; Giovanetti, K L; Gordon, C I O; Griffioen, K; Guidal, M; Guillo, M; Guo, L; Gyurjyan, V; Hadjidakis, C; Hakobyan, R S; Hardie, J; Heddle, D; Hersman, F W; Hicks, K; Hicks, R S; Holtrop, M; Hu, J; Hyde-Wright, C E; Ilieva, Y; Ito, M M; Jenkins, D; Jo, H S; Joo, K; Kellie, J D; Khandaker, M; Kim, K Y; Kim, K; Kim, W; Klein, A; Klein, F J; Klimenko, A V; Klusman, M; Kossov, M; Kramer, L H; Kuhn, J; Kuhn, S E; Lachniet, J; Laget, J M; Lawrence, D; Li, Ji; Lima, A C S; Livingston, K; Lukashin, K; Manak, J J; Marchand, C; McAleer, S; McCarthy, J; McNabb, J W C; Mecking, B A; Mehrabyan, S; Melone, J J; Mestayer, M D; Meyer, C A; Mikhailov, K; Miskimen, R; Mokeev, V; Morand, L; Morrow, S A; Muccifora, V; Mueller, J; Mutchler, G S; Napolitano, J; Nasseripour, R; Niccolai, S; Niculescu, G; Niculescu, I; Niczyporuk, B B; Niyazov, R A; Nozar, M; O'Brien, J T; O'Rielly, G V; Osipenko, M; Ostrovidov, A; Park, K; Pasyuk, E; Peterson, G; Philips, S A; Pivnyuk, N; Pocanic, D; Pogorelko, O; Polli, E; Pozdniakov, S; Preedom, B M; Price, J W; Prok, Y; Protopopescu, D; Qin, L M; Raue, B A; Riccardi, G; Ricco, G; Ripani, M; Ritchie, B G; Rosner, G; Rowntree, D; Rubin, P D; Sabatié, F; Salgado, C; Santoro, J P; Sapunenko, V; Schumacher, R A; Serov, V S; Sharabian, Y G; Shaw, J; Simionatto, S; Skabelin, A V; Smith, E S; Smith, L C; Sober, D I; Spraker, M; Stavinsky, A; Stepanyan, S; Stokes, B; Stoler, P; Strakovsky, I I; Strauch, S; Taiuti, M; Taylor, S; Tedeschi, D J; Thoma, U; Thompson, R; Tkabladze, A; Todor, L; Tur, C; Ungaro, M; Vineyard, M F; Vlassov, A V; Wang, K; Weinstein, L B; Weller, H; Weygand, D P; Whisnant, C S; Wolin, E; Wood, M H; Yegneswaran, A; Yun, J; Zhang, B; Zhou, Z

    2005-01-14

    We investigate the transition from the nucleon-meson to the quark-gluon description of the strong interaction using the photon energy dependence of the d(gamma,p)n differential cross section for photon energies above 0.5 GeV and center-of-mass proton angles between 30 degrees and 150 degrees. A possible signature for this transition is the onset of cross-section s(-11) scaling with the total energy squared, s, at some proton transverse momentum P(T). The results show that the scaling has been reached for proton transverse momentum above about 1.1 GeV/c. This may indicate that the quark-gluon regime is reached above this momentum. PMID:15698073

  7. DOD-DOE Workshop on Joint Energy Activities

    SciTech Connect

    1980-01-01

    The general conditions for DOD-DOE interactions were delineated in an October 1978, Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) that identified two basic goals: improving energy efficiency and availability within DOD, and utilizing DOD and DOE expertise and facilities to carry out projects of mutual interest. There has been considerable interaction between DOD and DOE, including a number of proposed joint initiatives but a systematic and coordinated approach for nurturing, maintaining, and expanding these relationships has not been developed. A DOD-DOE Workshop on Joint Energy Activities was held on March 10-12, 1980. The workshop was structured into five working groups - Mobility Fuels, Conservation, Fossil Fuels for Fixed Facilities, Solar and Renewable Energy Sources, and Special Projects - with DOD and DOE cochairmen for each. Over a hundred DOD and DOE management, program, and policymaking representatives were brought together by the workshop Steering Committee to identify specific programs for inclusion in an overall plan for implementing the MOU and to deal with fundamental issues and problems of maintaining future communications. The workshop accomplished its goals, these being to: (1) improve communication among the appropriate key DOD and DOE personnel at all levels and promote information exchange; (2) review ongoing and already-proposed joint DOD and DOE programs; (3) initiate a coordinated, systematic effort to establish joint DOD-DOE energy-security programs; and (4) propose specific programs and projects of mutual interest for inclusion in a follow-on joint-implementation plan.

  8. Active minimization of energy density in three-dimensional enclosures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sommerfeldt, Scott D.

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this study was to further investigate and develop a novel approach for actively controlling the sound field in enclosures that is based on the acoustic energy density. Typically the acoustic field in an enclosure has been controlled by minimizing the sum of the squared pressures from several microphones distributed throughout the enclosure. The approach investigated in this study involved minimizing the acoustic energy density at the sensor locations, rather than the squared pressure. Research previous to this study in a simple one-dimensional enclosure showed that improved global attenuation of the acoustic field is often obtained by minimizing the energy density, rather than the pressure. The current study built on the previous research by extending the method of controlling the acoustic energy density to three-dimensional enclosures. The study was intended to help establish if improved control can still be expected in a more general enclosure. The study was designed to be both analytical/numerical and experimental in nature.

  9. Analysing domestic activity to reduce household energy consumption.

    PubMed

    Fréjus, Myriam; Guibourdenche, Julien

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents our reflections on the issue of behavioral change according to energy conservation constraints and on the status of sustainability in the design of ambient interactive systems at home. We point out how ergonomics contributes to the study of human factors underlying energy consumption. Relating to situated cognition and human computer interaction, our approach relies both on the ergonomic evaluation of feedback consumption displays and on the modeling of domestic activities in order to identify household concerns in real settings. We present empirical results to illustrate this global approach. The results of those studies allow the design of interactive systems: informative and pedagogical systems as well as pervasive and adaptive ambient systems. In our approach, sustainability is taken into account as a design criterion, as security could be, whereas the main design purpose is to aid households in their daily life in order to build a "sustainable situation". PMID:22316779

  10. Asymptotic/numerical analysis of supersonic propeller noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, M. K.; Wydeven, R.

    1989-01-01

    An asymptotic analysis based on the Mach surface structure of the field of a supersonic helical source distribution is applied to predict thickness and loading noise radiated by high speed propeller blades. The theory utilizes an integral representation of the Ffowcs-Williams Hawkings equation in a fully linearized form. The asymptotic results are used for chordwise strips of the blade, while required spanwise integrations are performed numerically. The form of the analysis enables predicted waveforms to be interpreted in terms of Mach surface propagation. A computer code developed to implement the theory is described and found to yield results in close agreement with more exact computations.

  11. Asymptotic entanglement transformation between W and GHZ states

    SciTech Connect

    Vrana, Péter; Christandl, Matthias

    2015-02-15

    We investigate entanglement transformations with stochastic local operations and classical communication in an asymptotic setting using the concepts of degeneration and border rank of tensors from algebraic complexity theory. Results well-known in that field imply that GHZ states can be transformed into W states at rate 1 for any number of parties. As a generalization, we find that the asymptotic conversion rate from GHZ states to Dicke states is bounded as the number of subsystems increases and the number of excitations is fixed. By generalizing constructions of Coppersmith and Winograd and by using monotones introduced by Strassen, we also compute the conversion rate from W to GHZ states.

  12. Large Time Asymptotics for the Kadomtsev-Petviashvili Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Nakao; Naumkin, Pavel I.

    2014-08-01

    We study the large time asymptotic behavior of solutions to the Kadomtsev-Petviashvili equations ut + u_{xxx} + σ partialx^{-1}u_{yy} = -partialxu2, quad quad (x, y) in {R}2, t in {R},\\ u(0, x, y) = u0( x, y), quad quad qquad qquad (x, y) in {R}2, where σ = ±1 and {partialx^{-1} = int_{-infty}xdx^' } . We prove that the large time asymptotics of the derivative u x of the solution has a quasilinear character.

  13. Asymptotic analysis of spatial discretizations in implicit Monte Carlo

    SciTech Connect

    Densmore, Jeffery D

    2008-01-01

    We perform an asymptotic analysis of spatial discretizations in Implicit Monte Carlo (IMC). We consider two asymptotic scalings: one that represents a time step that resolves the mean-free time, and one that corresponds to a fixed, optically large time step. We show that only the latter scaling results in a valid spatial discretization of the proper diffusion equation, and thus we conclude that IMC only yields accurate solutions when using optically large spatial cells if time steps are also optically large, We demonstrate the validity of our analysis with a set of numerical examples.

  14. Asymptotic analysis of spatial discretizations in implicit Monte Carlo

    SciTech Connect

    Densmore, Jeffery D

    2009-01-01

    We perform an asymptotic analysis of spatial discretizations in Implicit Monte Carlo (IMC). We consider two asymptotic scalings: one that represents a time step that resolves the mean-free time, and one that corresponds to a fixed, optically large time step. We show that only the latter scaling results in a valid spatial discretization of the proper diffusion equation, and thus we conclude that IMC only yields accurate solutions when using optically large spatial cells if time steps are also optically large. We demonstrate the validity of our analysis with a set of numerical examples.

  15. On the asymptotic distribution of block-modified random matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arizmendi, Octavio; Nechita, Ion; Vargas, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    We study random matrices acting on tensor product spaces which have been transformed by a linear block operation. Using operator-valued free probability theory, under some mild assumptions on the linear map acting on the blocks, we compute the asymptotic eigenvalue distribution of the modified matrices in terms of the initial asymptotic distribution. Moreover, using recent results on operator-valued subordination, we present an algorithm that computes, numerically but in full generality, the limiting eigenvalue distribution of the modified matrices. Our analytical results cover many cases of interest in quantum information theory: we unify some known results and we obtain new distributions and various generalizations.

  16. Counting spanning trees on fractal graphs and their asymptotic complexity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anema, Jason A.; Tsougkas, Konstantinos

    2016-09-01

    Using the method of spectral decimation and a modified version of Kirchhoff's matrix-tree theorem, a closed form solution to the number of spanning trees on approximating graphs to a fully symmetric self-similar structure on a finitely ramified fractal is given in theorem 3.4. We show how spectral decimation implies the existence of the asymptotic complexity constant and obtain some bounds for it. Examples calculated include the Sierpiński gasket, a non-post critically finite analog of the Sierpiński gasket, the Diamond fractal, and the hexagasket. For each example, the asymptotic complexity constant is found.

  17. Asymptotic traveling wave solution for a credit rating migration problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Jin; Wu, Yuan; Hu, Bei

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, an asymptotic traveling wave solution of a free boundary model for pricing a corporate bond with credit rating migration risk is studied. This is the first study to associate the asymptotic traveling wave solution to the credit rating migration problem. The pricing problem with credit rating migration risk is modeled by a free boundary problem. The existence, uniqueness and regularity of the solution are obtained. Under some condition, we proved that the solution of our credit rating problem is convergent to a traveling wave solution, which has an explicit form. Furthermore, numerical examples are presented.

  18. Actively controlled vehicle suspension with energy regeneration capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bar David, Sagiv; Zion Bobrovsky, Ben

    2011-06-01

    The paper presents an innovative dual purpose automotive suspension topology, combining for the first time the active damping qualities with mechanical vibrations power regeneration capabilities. The new configuration consists of a linear generator as an actuator, a power processing stage based on a gyrator operating under sliding mode control and dynamics controllers. The researched design is simple and energetically efficient, enables an accurate force-velocity suspension characteristic control as well as energy regeneration control, with no practical implementation constraints imposed over the theoretical design. Active damping is based on Skyhook suspension control scheme, which enables overcoming the passive damping tradeoff between high- and low-frequency performance, improving both body isolation and the tire's road grip. The system-level design includes configuration of three system operation modes: passive, semi-active or fully active damping, all using the same electro-mechanical infrastructure, and each focusing on different objective: dynamics improvement or power regeneration. Conclusively, the innovative hybrid suspension is theoretically researched, practically designed and analysed, and proven to be feasible as well as profitable in the aspects of power regeneration, vehicle dynamics improvement and human health risks reduction.

  19. Modeling of moisture diffusivity, activation energy and energy consumption in fluidized bed drying of rough rice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khanali, Majid; Banisharif, Alireza; Rafiee, Shahin

    2016-01-01

    The present work was an attempt to assess the effective moisture diffusivity, activation energy, and energy consumption of rough rice in a batch fluidized bed dryer. Drying experiments were conducted at drying air temperatures of 50, 60, and 70 °C, superficial fluidization velocities of 2.3, 2.5, and 2.8 m/s, and solids holdup of 1.32 kg. Drying kinetics showed that the whole fluidized bed drying of rough rice occurred in the falling rate period. The effective moisture diffusivity was described by an Arrhenius equation. The evaluated effective moisture diffusivity increased with drying air temperature and superficial fluidization velocity and was found to vary from 4.78 × 10-11 to 1.364 × 10-10 m2/s with R2 higher than 0.9643. The activation energy and the pre-exponential factor of Arrhenius equation were found to be in the range of 36.59-44.31 kJ/mol and 4.71 × 10-5-7.15 × 10-4 m2/s, respectively. Both maximum values of the specific energy consumption of 74.73 MJ/kg and the total energy need of 12.43 MJ were obtained at 60 °C drying air temperature and 2.8 m/s superficial fluidization velocity. Both minimum values of the specific energy consumption of 29.98 MJ/kg and the total energy need of 4.85 MJ were obtained under drying air temperature of 70 °C and superficial fluidization velocity of 2.3 m/s.

  20. Asymptotic analysis of hierarchical martensitic microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cesana, Pierluigi; Porta, Marcel; Lookman, Turab

    2014-12-01

    We consider a hierarchical nested microstructure, which also contains a point of singularity (disclination) at the origin, observed in lead orthovanadate. We show how to exactly compute the energy cost and associated displacement field within linearized elasticity by enforcing geometric compatibility of strains across interfaces of the three-phase mixture of distortions (variants) in the microstructure. We prove that the mechanical deformation is purely elastic and discuss the behavior of the system close to the origin.

  1. The Energy Challenge: An Activity Master Program About our Energy Past, Present, and Future for Grades 5 Through 8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federal Energy Administration, Washington, DC.

    This publication presents 24 spirit duplicating activity masters and background materials for energy education in grades 5 through 8. These interdisciplinary materials are arranged in 6 units. Unit titles are: (1) Energy Overview; (2) Fossil Fuels - Coal, Oil, and Natural Gas; (3) Energy Resources for Today and Tomorrow; (4) Energy Conservation;…

  2. Asymptotic analysis of the longitudinal instability of a heavy ion induction linac

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, E.P.; Smith, L.

    1990-09-01

    An Induction Linac accelerating high ion currents at sub-relativistic energies is predicted to exhibit unstable growth of current fluctuations at low frequencies. The instability is driven by the interaction between the beam and complex impedance of the induction modules. In general, the detailed form of the growing disturbance depends on the initial perturbation and ratio of pulse length to accelerator length, as well as the specific form of the impedance. An asymptotic analysis of the several regimes of interest is presented. 1 ref.

  3. Variational Determination of the Neutron Integral Transport Equation Eigenvalues Using Space Asymptotic Trial Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colombo, V.; Ravetto, P.; Sumini, M.

    1988-08-01

    An approximate determination of the critical eigenvalue of the neutron transport equation in integral form, within both the one speed and energy multigroup models, for a homogeneous medium, is achieved by means of a variational technique. The space asymptotic solutions for both the direct and adjoint problems are used as trial functions. A variational procedure is also developed and numerically exploited within the Fourier transformed domain, where noticeable theoretical features can be demonstrated. It is evidenced that excellent results can be obtained with little computational effort, and a set of critical calculations in plane geometry is presented and discussed.

  4. Variational determination of the neutron integral transport equation eigenvalues using space asymptotic trial functions

    SciTech Connect

    Colombo, V.; Ravetto, P.; Sumini, M.

    1988-08-01

    An approximate determination of the critical eigenvalue of the neutron transport equation in integral form, within both the one speed and energy multigroup models, for a homogeneous medium, is achieved by means of a variational technique. The space asymptotic solutions for both the direct and adjoint problems are used as trial functions. A variational procedure is also developed and numerically exploited within the Fourier transformed domain, where noticeable theoretical features can be demonstrated. It is evidenced that excellent results can be obtained with little computational effort, and a set of critical calculations in plane geometry is presented and discussed. copyright 1988 Academic Press, Inc.

  5. Asymptotic nonlinear stability of traveling waves to conservation laws arising from chemotaxis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Tong; Wang, Zhi-An

    In this paper, we establish the existence and the nonlinear stability of traveling wave solutions to a system of conservation laws which is transformed, by a change of variable, from the well-known Keller-Segel model describing cell (bacteria) movement toward the concentration gradient of the chemical that is consumed by the cells. We prove the existence of traveling fronts by the phase plane analysis and show the asymptotic nonlinear stability of traveling wave solutions without the smallness assumption on the wave strengths by the method of energy estimates.

  6. Activation Energy of Tantalum-Tungsten Oxide Thermite Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Cervantes, O; Kuntz, J; Gash, A; Munir, Z

    2010-02-25

    The activation energy of a high melting temperature sol-gel (SG) derived tantalum-tungsten oxide thermite composite was determined using the Kissinger isoconversion method. The SG derived powder was consolidated using the High Pressure Spark Plasma Sintering (HPSPS) technique to 300 and 400 C to produce pellets with dimensions of 5 mm diameter by 1.5 mm height. A custom built ignition setup was developed to measure ignition temperatures at high heating rates (500-2000 C {center_dot} min{sup -1}). Such heating rates were required in order to ignite the thermite composite. Unlike the 400 C samples, results show that the samples consolidated to 300 C undergo an abrupt change in temperature response prior to ignition. This change in temperature response has been attributed to the crystallization of the amorphous WO{sub 3} in the SG derived Ta-WO{sub 3} thermite composite and not to a pre-ignition reaction between the constituents. Ignition temperatures for the Ta-WO{sub 3} thermite ranged from approximately 465-670 C. The activation energy of the SG derived Ta-WO{sup 3} thermite composite consolidated to 300 and 400 C were determined to be 37.787 {+-} 1.58 kJ {center_dot} mol{sup -1} and 57.381 {+-} 2.26 kJ {center_dot} mol{sup -1}, respectively.

  7. High-energy gamma-ray observations of active galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fichtel, Carl E.

    1994-01-01

    During the period from 1992 May to early 1992 November, the Energetic Gamma-Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) on board the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory obtained high-energy gamma-ray data for most of the sky. A total of 18 active galaxies have been seen with high certainty, and it is expected that more will be found in the data when a more thorough analysis is complete. All of those that have been seen are radio-loud quasars or BL Lacertae objects; most have already been identified as blazars. No Seyfert galaxies have been found thus far. If the spectra are represented as a power law in energy, spectral slopes ranging from approximately -1.7 to -2.4 are found. A wide range of z-values exits in the observed sample, eight having values in excess of 1.0. Time variations have been seen, with the timescale for a significant change being as short as days in at least one case. These results imply the existence of very large numbers of relativistic particles, probably close to the central object. Although a large extrapolation is required, their existence also suggests that these active galactic nuclei may be the source of the extragalactic cosmic rays.

  8. Activation energy of tantalum-tungsten oxide thermite reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Cervantes, Octavio G.; Munir, Zuhair A.; Kuntz, Joshua D.; Gash, Alexander E.

    2011-01-15

    The activation energy of a sol-gel (SG) derived tantalum-tungsten oxide thermite composite was determined using the Kissinger isoconversion method. The SG derived powder was consolidated using the high-pressure spark plasma sintering (HPSPS) technique at 300 and 400 C. The ignition temperatures were investigated under high heating rates (500-2000 C min{sup -1}). Such heating rates were required in order to ignite the thermite composite. Samples consolidated at 300 C exhibit an abrupt change in temperature response prior to the main ignition temperature. This change in temperature response is attributed to the crystallization of the amorphous WO{sub 3} in the SG derived Ta-WO{sub 3} thermite composite and not to a pre-ignition reaction between the constituents. Ignition temperatures for the Ta-WO{sub 3} thermite ranged from approximately 465 to 670 C. The activation energies of the SG derived Ta-WO{sub 3} thermite composite consolidated at 300 and 400 C were determined to be 38{+-} 2 kJ mol{sup -1} and 57 {+-} 2 kJ mol{sup -1}, respectively. (author)

  9. Directed energy active illumination for near-Earth object detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riley, Jordan; Lubin, Philip; Hughes, Gary B.; O'Neill, Hugh; Meinhold, Peter; Suen, Jonathan; Bible, Johanna; Johansson, Isabella E.; Griswold, Janelle; Cook, Brianna

    2014-09-01

    On 15 February 2013, a previously unknown ~20 m asteroid struck Earth near Chelyabinsk, Russia, releasing kinetic energy equivalent to ~570 kt TNT. Detecting objects like the Chelyabinsk impactor that are orbiting near Earth is a difficult task, in part because such objects spend much of their own orbits in the direction of the Sun when viewed from Earth. Efforts aimed at protecting Earth from future impacts will rely heavily on continued discovery. Ground-based optical observatory networks and Earth-orbiting spacecraft with infrared sensors have dramatically increased the pace of discovery. Still, less than 5% of near-Earth objects (NEOs) >=100 m/~100 Mt TNT have been identified, and the proportion of known objects decreases rapidly for smaller sizes. Low emissivity of some objects also makes detection by passive sensors difficult. A proposed orbiting laser phased array directed energy system could be used for active illumination of NEOs, enhancing discovery particularly for smaller and lower emissivity objects. Laser fiber amplifiers emit very narrow-band energy, simplifying detection. Results of simulated illumination scenarios are presented based on an orbiting emitter array with specified characteristics. Simulations indicate that return signals from small and low emissivity objects is strong enough to detect. The possibility for both directed and full sky blind surveys is discussed, and the resulting diameter and mass limits for objects in different observational scenarios. The ability to determine both position and speed of detected objects is also discussed.

  10. Standing wave tube electro active polymer wave energy converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jean, Philippe; Wattez, Ambroise; Ardoise, Guillaume; Melis, C.; Van Kessel, R.; Fourmon, A.; Barrabino, E.; Heemskerk, J.; Queau, J. P.

    2012-04-01

    Over the past 4 years SBM has developed a revolutionary Wave Energy Converter (WEC): the S3. Floating under the ocean surface, the S3 amplifies pressure waves similarly to a Ruben's tube. Only made of elastomers, the system is entirely flexible, environmentally friendly and silent. Thanks to a multimodal resonant behavior, the S3 is capable of efficiently harvesting wave energy from a wide range of wave periods, naturally smoothing the irregularities of ocean wave amplitudes and periods. In the S3 system, Electro Active Polymer (EAP) generators are distributed along an elastomeric tube over several wave lengths, they convert wave induced deformations directly into electricity. The output is high voltage multiphase Direct Current with low ripple. Unlike other conventional WECs, the S3 requires no maintenance of moving parts. The conception and operating principle will eventually lead to a reduction of both CAPEX and OPEX. By integrating EAP generators into a small scale S3, SBM achieved a world first: direct conversion of wave energy in electricity with a moored flexible submerged EAP WEC in a wave tank test. Through an extensive testing program on large scale EAP generators, SBM identified challenges in scaling up to a utility grid device. French Government supports the consortium consisting of SBM, IFREMER and ECN in their efforts to deploy a full scale prototype at the SEMREV test center in France at the horizon 2014-2015. SBM will be seeking strategic as well as financial partners to unleash the true potentials of the S3 Standing Wave Tube Electro Active Polymer WEC.

  11. Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Online-Offline, 1998

    1998-01-01

    This issue focuses on the theme of "Energy," and describes several educational resources (Web sites, CD-ROMs and software, videos, books, activities, and other resources). Sidebars offer features on alternative energy, animal energy, internal combustion engines, and energy from food. Subthemes include harnessing energy, human energy, and natural…

  12. Daily energy expenditure, physical activity, and weight loss in Parkinson's disease patients

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) commonly exhibit weight loss (WL) which investigators attribute to various factors, including elevated energy expenditure. We tested the hypothesis that daily energy expenditure (DEE) and its components, resting energy expenditure (REE) and physical activity (P...

  13. Asymptotics of surface-plasmon redshift saturation at subnanometric separations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnitzer, Ory; Giannini, Vincenzo; Craster, Richard V.; Maier, Stefan A.

    2016-01-01

    Many promising nanophotonics endeavors hinge upon the unique plasmonic properties of nanometallic structures with narrow nonmetallic gaps, which support superconcentrated bonding modes that singularly redshift with decreasing separations. In this Rapid Communication, we present a descriptive physical picture, complemented by elementary asymptotic formulas, of a nonlocal mechanism for plasmon redshift saturation at subnanometric gap widths. Thus, by considering the electron-charge and field distributions in the close vicinity of the metal-vacuum interface, we show that nonlocality is asymptotically manifested as an effective potential discontinuity. For bonding modes in the near-contact limit, the latter discontinuity is shown to be effectively equivalent to a widening of the gap. As a consequence, the resonance-frequency near-contact asymptotics are a renormalization of the corresponding local ones. Specifically, the renormalization furnishes an asymptotic plasmon-frequency lower bound that scales with the 1 /4 power of the Fermi wavelength. We demonstrate these remarkable features in the prototypical cases of nanowire and nanosphere dimers, showing agreement between our elementary expressions and previously reported numerical computations.

  14. Surface family with a common involute asymptotic curve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayram, Ergi˙n; Bi˙li˙ci˙, Mustafa

    2016-03-01

    We construct a surface family possessing an involute of a given curve as an asymptotic curve. We express necessary and sufficient conditions for that curve with the above property. We also present natural results for such ruled surfaces. Finally, we illustrate the method with some examples, e.g. circles and helices as given curves.

  15. Asymptotically robust variance estimation for person-time incidence rates.

    PubMed

    Scosyrev, Emil

    2016-05-01

    Person-time incidence rates are frequently used in medical research. However, standard estimation theory for this measure of event occurrence is based on the assumption of independent and identically distributed (iid) exponential event times, which implies that the hazard function remains constant over time. Under this assumption and assuming independent censoring, observed person-time incidence rate is the maximum-likelihood estimator of the constant hazard, and asymptotic variance of the log rate can be estimated consistently by the inverse of the number of events. However, in many practical applications, the assumption of constant hazard is not very plausible. In the present paper, an average rate parameter is defined as the ratio of expected event count to the expected total time at risk. This rate parameter is equal to the hazard function under constant hazard. For inference about the average rate parameter, an asymptotically robust variance estimator of the log rate is proposed. Given some very general conditions, the robust variance estimator is consistent under arbitrary iid event times, and is also consistent or asymptotically conservative when event times are independent but nonidentically distributed. In contrast, the standard maximum-likelihood estimator may become anticonservative under nonconstant hazard, producing confidence intervals with less-than-nominal asymptotic coverage. These results are derived analytically and illustrated with simulations. The two estimators are also compared in five datasets from oncology studies. PMID:26439107

  16. Asymptotic stability on slow time scales from periodic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Persek, S.C.

    1981-08-01

    Asymptotic stability for a periodic system of ordinary differential equations with a small parameter is shown to follow from the stability of the corresponding iterated-average system. Applications are made to biological systems experiencing varying seasonal factors, to large scale dynamical systems that are principally irrotational and to nuclear reactor dynamics. 7 refs.

  17. Cosmological attractors and asymptotic freedom of the inflaton field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kallosh, Renata; Linde, Andrei

    2016-06-01

    We show that the inflaton coupling to all other fields is exponentially suppressed during inflation in the cosmological α-attractor models. In the context of supergravity, this feature is a consequence of the underlying hyperbolic geometry of the moduli space which has a flat direction corresponding to the inflaton field. A combination of these factors protects the asymptotic flatness of the inflaton potential.

  18. Scattering asymptotic conditions in Euclidean relativistic quantum theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aiello, Gordon J.; Polyzou, W. N.

    2016-03-01

    We discuss the formulation of the scattering asymptotic condition as a strong limit in Euclidean quantum theories satisfying the Osterwalder-Schrader axioms. When used with the invariance principle this provides a constructive method to compute scattering observables directly in the Euclidean formulation of the theory, without an explicit analytic continuation.

  19. Asymptotic Behavior of Anomalous Diffusions Driven by alpha -Stable Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michna, Z.

    2008-08-01

    In this paper we discuss decomposition principle for alpha -stable Lévy processes. We investigate asymptotic properties of components and stochastic integrals driven by such processes providing an important class of anomalous diffusions. We consider two case studies with integrands being fractional Brownian motion and gamma process.

  20. Asymptotic Analysis of Fiber-Reinforced Composites of Hexagonal Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalamkarov, Alexander L.; Andrianov, Igor V.; Pacheco, Pedro M. C. L.; Savi, Marcelo A.; Starushenko, Galina A.

    2016-08-01

    The fiber-reinforced composite materials with periodic cylindrical inclusions of a circular cross-section arranged in a hexagonal array are analyzed. The governing analytical relations of the thermal conductivity problem for such composites are obtained using the asymptotic homogenization method. The lubrication theory is applied for the asymptotic solution of the unit cell problems in the cases of inclusions of large and close to limit diameters, and for inclusions with high conductivity. The lubrication method is further generalized to the cases of finite values of the physical properties of inclusions, as well as for the cases of medium-sized inclusions. The analytical formulas for the effective coefficient of thermal conductivity of the fiber-reinforced composite materials of a hexagonal structure are derived in the cases of small conductivity of inclusions, as well as in the cases of extremely low conductivity of inclusions. The three-phase composite model (TPhM) is applied for solving the unit cell problems in the cases of the inclusions with small diameters, and the asymptotic analysis of the obtained solutions is performed for inclusions of small sizes. The obtained results are analyzed and illustrated graphically, and the limits of their applicability are evaluated. They are compared with the known numerical and asymptotic data in some particular cases, and very good agreement is demonstrated.

  1. Propagating gravitons vs. `dark matter' in asymptotically safe quantum gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Daniel; Reuter, Martin

    2014-12-01

    Within the Asymptotic Safety scenario, we discuss whether Quantum Einstein Gravity (QEG) can give rise to a semi-classical regime of propagating physical gravitons (gravitational waves) governed by an effective theory which complies with the standard rules of local quantum field theory. According to earlier investigations based on single-metric truncations there is a tension between this requirement and the condition of Asymptotic Safety since the former (latter) requires a positive (negative) anomalous dimension of Newton's constant. We show that the problem disappears using the bi-metric renormalization group flows that became available recently: they admit an asymptotically safe UV limit and, at the same time, a genuine semi-classical regime with a positive anomalous dimension. This brings the gravitons of QEG on a par with arbitrary (standard model, etc.) particles which exist as asymptotic states. We also argue that metric perturbations on almost Planckian scales might not be propagating, and we propose an interpretation as a form of `dark matter'.

  2. Asymptotic Learning of Alphanumeric Coding in Autobiographical Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Maryanne; Jones, Gregory V.

    2007-01-01

    Studies of autobiographical memory have shown that observed levels of incidental learning are often relatively low. Do low levels of retention result simply from a low learning rate, or is learning also asymptotic? To address this question, it is necessary to trace performance over a large number of learning opportunities, and this was carried out…

  3. Asymptotic Stability of Rarefaction Wave for the Navier-Stokes Equations for a Compressible Fluid in the Half Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawashima, Shuichi; Zhu, Peicheng

    2009-10-01

    This paper is concerned with the asymptotic stability towards a rarefaction wave of the solution to an outflow problem for the Navier-Stokes equations in a compressible fluid in the Eulerian coordinate in the half space. This is the second one of our series of papers on this subject. In this paper, firstly we classify completely the time-asymptotic states, according to some parameters, that is the spatial-asymptotic states and boundary conditions, for this initial boundary value problem, and some pictures for the classification of time-asymptotic states are drawn in the state space. In order to prove the stability of the rarefaction wave, we use the solution to Burgers’ equation to construct a suitably smooth approximation of the rarefaction wave and establish some time-decay estimates in L p -norm for the smoothed rarefaction wave. We then employ the L 2-energy method to prove that the rarefaction wave is non-linearly stable under a small perturbation, as time goes to infinity.

  4. Simultaneous determination of interfacial energy and growth activation energy from induction time measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiau, Lie-Ding; Wang, Hsu-Pei

    2016-05-01

    A model is developed in this work to calculate the interfacial energy and growth activation energy of a crystallized substance from induction time data without the knowledge of the actual growth rate. Induction time data for αL-glutamic acid measured with a turbidity probe for various supersaturations at temperatures from 293 to 313 K are employed to verify the developed model. In the model a simple empirical growth rate with growth order 2 is assumed because experiments are conducted at low supersaturation. The results indicate for αL-glutamic acid that the growth activation energy is 39 kJ/mol, which suggests that the growth rate of small nuclei in the agitated induction time experiments is integration controlled. The interfacial energy obtained from the current model is in the range of 5.2-7.4 mJ/m2, which is slightly greater than that obtained from the traditional method (ti-1∝ J) for which the value is in the range 4.1-5.7 mJ/m2.

  5. Solar Energy Education. Humanities: activities and teacher's guide. Field test edition

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-01-01

    Activities are outlined to introduce students to information on solar energy while performing ordinary classroom work. In this teaching manual solar energy is integrated with the humanities. The activities include such things as stories, newspapers, writing assignments, and art and musical presentations all filled with energy related terms. An energy glossary is provided. (BCS)

  6. Asymptotic sideslip angle and yaw rate decoupling control in four-wheel steering vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marino, Riccardo; Scalzi, Stefano

    2010-09-01

    This paper shows that, for a four-wheel steering vehicle, a proportional-integral (PI) active front steering control and a PI active rear steering control from the yaw rate error together with an additive feedforward reference signal for the vehicle sideslip angle can asymptotically decouple the lateral velocity and the yaw rate dynamics; that is the control can set arbitrary steady state values for lateral speed and yaw rate at any longitudinal speed. Moreover, the PI controls can suppress oscillatory behaviours by assigning real stable eigenvalues to a widely used linearised model of the vehicle steering dynamics for any value of longitudinal speed in understeering vehicles. In particular, the four PI control parameters are explicitly expressed in terms of the three real eigenvalues to be assigned. No lateral acceleration and no lateral speed measurements are required. The controlled system maintains the well-known advantages of both front and rear active steering controls: higher controllability, enlarged bandwidth for the yaw rate dynamics, suppressed resonances, new stable cornering manoeuvres and improved manoeuvrability. In particular, zero lateral speed may be asymptotically achieved while controlling the yaw rate: in this case comfort is improved since the phase lag between lateral acceleration and yaw rate is reduced. Also zero yaw rate can be asymptotically achieved: in this case additional stable manoeuvres are obtained in obstacle avoidance. Several simulations, including step references and moose tests, are carried out on a standard small SUV CarSim model to explore the robustness with respect to unmodelled effects such as combined lateral and longitudinal tyre forces, pitch, roll and driver dynamics. The simulations confirm the decoupling between the lateral velocity and the yaw rate and show the advantages obtained by the proposed control: reduced lateral speed or reduced yaw rate, suppressed oscillations and new stable manoeuvres.

  7. Fast evaluation of asymptotic waveforms from gravitational perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedict, Alex G.; Field, Scott E.; Lau, Stephen R.

    2013-03-01

    In the context of black hole perturbation theory, we describe both exact evaluation of an asymptotic waveform from a time series recorded at a finite radial location and its numerical approximation. From the user’s standpoint our technique is easy to implement, affords high accuracy, and works for both axial (Regge-Wheeler) and polar (Zerilli) sectors. Our focus is on the ease of implementation with publicly available numerical tables, either as part of an existing evolution code or a post-processing step. Nevertheless, we also present a thorough theoretical discussion of asymptotic waveform evaluation and radiation boundary conditions, which need not be understood by a user of our methods. In particular, we identify (both in the time and frequency domains) analytical asymptotic waveform evaluation kernels, and describe their approximation by techniques developed by Alpert, Greengard, and Hagstrom. This paper also presents new results on the evaluation of far-field signals for the ordinary (acoustic) wave equation. We apply our method to study late-time decay tails at null-infinity, ‘teleportation’ of a signal between two finite radial values, and luminosities from extreme-mass-ratio binaries. Through numerical simulations with the outer boundary as close in as r = 30M, we compute asymptotic waveforms with late-time t-4 decay (ℓ = 2 perturbations), and also luminosities from circular and eccentric particle-orbits that respectively match frequency domain results to relative errors of better than 10-12 and 10-9. Furthermore, we find that asymptotic waveforms are especially prone to contamination by spurious junk radiation.

  8. Active galactic nuclei at gamma-ray energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dermer, Charles Dennison; Giebels, Berrie

    2016-06-01

    Active Galactic Nuclei can be copious extragalactic emitters of MeV-GeV-TeV γ rays, a phenomenon linked to the presence of relativistic jets powered by a super-massive black hole in the center of the host galaxy. Most of γ-ray emitting active galactic nuclei, with more than 1500 known at GeV energies, and more than 60 at TeV energies, are called "blazars". The standard blazar paradigm features a jet of relativistic magnetized plasma ejected from the neighborhood of a spinning and accreting super-massive black hole, close to the observer direction. Two classes of blazars are distinguished from observations: the flat-spectrum radio-quasar class (FSRQ) is characterized by strong external radiation fields, emission of broad optical lines, and dust tori. The BL Lac class (from the name of one of its members, BL Lacertae) corresponds to weaker advection-dominated flows with γ-ray spectra dominated by the inverse Compton effect on synchrotron photons. This paradigm has been very successful for modeling the broadband spectral energy distributions of blazars. However, many fundamental issues remain, including the role of hadronic processes and the rapid variability of a few FSRQs and several BL Lac objects whose synchrotron spectrum peaks at UV or X-ray frequencies. A class of γ-ray-emitting radio galaxies, which are thought to be the misaligned counterparts of blazars, has emerged from the results of the Fermi-Large Area Telescope and of ground-based Cherenkov telescopes. Soft γ-ray emission has been detected from a few nearby Seyfert galaxies, though it is not clear whether those γ rays originate from the nucleus. Blazars and their misaligned counterparts make up most of the ≳100 MeV extragalactic γ-ray background (EGB), and are suspected of being the sources of ultra-high energy cosmic rays. The future "Cherenkov Telescope Array", in synergy with the Fermi-Large Area Telescope and a wide range of telescopes in space and on the ground, will write the next chapter

  9. Asymptotic equivalence of the shell-model and local-density descriptions of Coulombic systems confined by radially symmetric potentials in two and three dimensions.

    PubMed

    Cioslowski, Jerzy; Albin, Joanna

    2013-09-21

    Asymptotic equivalence of the shell-model and local-density (LDA) descriptions of Coulombic systems confined by radially symmetric potentials in two and three dimensions is demonstrated. Tight upper bounds to the numerical constants that enter the LDA expressions for the Madelung energy are derived and found to differ by less than 0.5% from the previously known approximate values. Thanks to the variational nature of the shell-model approximate energies, asymptotic expressions for other properties, such as mean radial positions of the particles and number densities, are also obtained. A conjecture that generalizes the present results to confining potentials with arbitrary symmetries is formulated. PMID:24070281

  10. Status of Safety& Environmental Activities for Inertial Fusion Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Latkowski, J F; Reyes, S; Cadwallader, L C; Sharpe, J P; Marshall, T D; Merrill, B J; Moore, R L; Petti, D A; Falquina, R; Rodriguez, A; Sanz, J; Cabellos, O

    2002-11-25

    Over the past several years, significant progress has been made in the analysis of safety and environmental (S&E) issues for inertial fusion energy (IFE). Detailed safety assessments have been performed for the baseline power plant concepts, as well as for a conceptual target fabrication facility. Safety analysis results are helping to drive the agenda for experiments. A survey of the S&E characteristics--both radiological and chemical--of candidate target materials has been completed. Accident initiating events have been identified and incorporated into master logic diagrams, which will be essential to the detailed safety analyses that will be needed in the future. Studies of aerosol generation and transport will have important safety implications. A Monte Carlo-based uncertainty analysis procedure has been developed for use in neutron activation calculations. Finally, waste management issues are receiving increased attention and are deserving of further discussion.

  11. Quantitative determination of activation energies in mechanochemical reactions.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Franziska; Wenzel, Klaus-Jürgen; Rademann, Klaus; Emmerling, Franziska

    2016-08-17

    Mechanochemical reactions often result in 100% yields of single products, making purifying procedures obsolete. Mechanochemistry is also a sustainable and eco-friendly method. The ever increasing interest in this method is contrasted by a lack in mechanistic understanding of the mechanochemical reactivity and selectivity. Recent in situ investigations provided direct insight into formation pathways. However, the currently available theories do not predict temperature T as an influential factor. Here, we report the first determination of an apparent activation energy for a mechanochemical reaction. In a temperature-dependent in situ study the cocrystallisation of ibuprofen and nicotinamide was investigated as a model system. These experiments provide a pivotal step towards a comprehensive understanding of milling reaction mechanisms. PMID:27498986

  12. Integrable nonlinear coupled waves with an exact asymptotic singular solution in the context of laser–plasma interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latifi, A.

    2016-07-01

    A special case of coupled integrable nonlinear equations with a singular dispersion law is derived in the context of the small amplitude limit of general wave equations in a fluid-type warm electrons/cold ions plasma irradiated by a continuous laser beam. This model accounts for a nonlinear mode coupling of the electrostatic wave with the ion sound wave and is shown to be highly unstable. Its instability is understood as a continuous secular transfer of energy from the electrostatic wave to the ion sound wave through the ponderomotive force. The exact asymptotic solution of the system is constructed and shows that the dynamics of the energy transfer results in a singular asymptotic behavior of the ion sound wave, which explains the low penetration of the incident laser beam.

  13. Industrial Technology. Iowa Developed Energy Activity Sampler, 6-12. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iowa State Dept. of Education, Des Moines.

    The revised Iowa Developed Energy Activity Sampler (IDEAS) was compiled using the original IDEAS program and the Energy Conservation Activity Packets (ECAPS). This document is one of the series of revised IDEAS booklets, and provides activities for teaching industrial arts/technology education. The activities are intended to present energy…

  14. Energy and Safety: Science Activities for Elementary Students, Level III (Grades (5-6).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westcott, Dale; And Others

    Thirteen activities are presented that focus on a common phenomenon of a child's world: energy. These activities relate energy, how it occurs, how it is used, and how to use it safely. Each activity includes the purpose, introduction, background, procedure, materials, estimated time for the activity, typical results, safety notes, and more ideas.…

  15. Energy and Safety: Science Activities for Elementary Students, Level I (Grades (K-2).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westcott, Dale; And Others

    Twelve activities are presented that focus on a common phenomenon of a child's world: energy. These activities relate energy, how it occurs, how it is used, and how to use it safely. Each activity includes the purpose, introduction, background, procedure, materials, estimated time for the activity, typical results, safety notes, and more ideas.…

  16. Energy and Safety: Science Activities for Elementary Students, Level II (Grades (3-4).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westcott, Dale; And Others

    Thirteen activities are presented that focus on a common phenomenon of a child's world: energy. These activities relate energy, how it occurs, how it is used, and how to use it safely. Each activity includes the purpose, introduction, background, procedure, materials, estimated time for the activity, typical results, safety notes, and more ideas.…

  17. Ideas and Activities for Teaching Energy Conservation: Grades 7-12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wert, Jonathan; And Others

    This publication contains a variety of ideas and materials for teaching about energy in grades 7-12. Topic areas include: (1) Historical Perspective on Energy; (2) Energy Resources; (3) Energy Conservation; (4) Ideas and Activities; and (5) Appendices. The first three sections provide background information on energy and conservation. The…

  18. Solar Energy Education. Social studies: activities and teacher's guide. Field test edition

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-01-01

    Solar energy information is made available to students through classroom instruction by way of the Solar Energy Education teaching manuals. In this manual solar energy, as well as other energy sources like wind power, is introduced by performing school activities in the area of social studies. A glossary of energy related terms is included. (BCS)

  19. MAGNETIC HELICITY AND ENERGY SPECTRA OF A SOLAR ACTIVE REGION

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Hongqi; Brandenburg, Axel; Sokoloff, D. D.

    2014-04-01

    We compute for the first time the magnetic helicity and energy spectra of the solar active region NOAA 11158 during 2011 February 11-15 at 20° southern heliographic latitude using observational photospheric vector magnetograms. We adopt the isotropic representation of the Fourier-transformed two-point correlation tensor of the magnetic field. The sign of the magnetic helicity turns out to be predominantly positive at all wavenumbers. This sign is consistent with what is theoretically expected for the southern hemisphere. The magnetic helicity normalized to its theoretical maximum value, here referred to as relative helicity, is around 4% and strongest at intermediate wavenumbers of k ≈ 0.4 Mm{sup –1}, corresponding to a scale of 2π/k ≈ 16 Mm. The same sign and a similar value are also found for the relative current helicity evaluated in real space based on the vertical components of magnetic field and current density. The modulus of the magnetic helicity spectrum shows a k {sup –11/3} power law at large wavenumbers, which implies a k {sup –5/3} spectrum for the modulus of the current helicity. A k {sup –5/3} spectrum is also obtained for the magnetic energy. The energy spectra evaluated separately from the horizontal and vertical fields agree for wavenumbers below 3 Mm{sup –1}, corresponding to scales above 2 Mm. This gives some justification to our assumption of isotropy and places limits resulting from possible instrumental artifacts at small scales.

  20. Fragmentation efficiencies of peptide ions following low energy collisional activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Summerfield, Scott G.; Gaskell, Simon J.

    1997-11-01

    Low energy fragmentations of protonated peptides in the gas phase are generally attributed to charge-directed processes. The extent and location of peptide backbone fragmentation is accordingly influenced by the extent to which charge is sequestered on amino acid side-chains. We describe systematic studies of the efficiencies of decomposition of peptide ions to assess in particular the influence of the presence of basic amino acid residues and of the protonation state. In a set of analogues containing two arginine, two histidine or two lysine residues, the extent of fragmentation of [M + 2H]2+ ions decreases with increased basicity, reflecting decreased backbone protonation. The collisionally activated dissociation of multiply protonated melittin ions shows an increase in fragmentation efficiency with higher charge state (using activation conditions which are similar for each charge state). For a single charge state, acetylation of primary amine groups increases fragmentation efficiency, consistent with the reduction in basicity of lysine side-chains. Conversion of arginine residues to the less basic dimethylpyrimidylornithine, however, decreases fragmentation efficiency, suggesting more effective sequestering of ionizing protons; the effect may be attributable to a disfavouring of proton-bridged structures but this hypothesis requires further study. Preliminary data for the decompositions of [M- 2H]2- ions derived from peptides containing two acidic residues suggest that the sequestration of charge away from the backbone is again detrimental to efficient fragmentation. Apparently diagnostic cleavages adjacent to aspartic acid residues are observed.

  1. Asymptotics of the discrete spectrum of a model operator associated with a system of three particles on a lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasulov, T. Kh.

    2010-04-01

    We consider a model Schrödinger operator Hμ associated with a system of three particles on the threedimensional lattice ℤ 3 with a functional parameter of special form. We prove that if the corresponding Friedrichs model has a zero-energy resonance, then the operator Hμ has infinitely many negative eigenvalues accumulating at zero (the Efimov effect). We obtain the asymptotic expression for the number of eigenvalues of Hμ below z as z → -0.

  2. Asymptotic analysis of mathematical models for elastic composite media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serkov, S. K.

    The main subject of the thesis is the asymptotic analysis of models in mechanics of composite materials. It is based on the extension of the theory of the Polya-Szego tensors to the problems of homogenization and fracture. Such a technique allows one to obtain an asymptotic solution to a problem where most of numerical algorithms fail due to the presence of a singular perturbation. As a result of this work, a number of interesting effects have been found in optimization of composites and inverse problems of crack-inclusion interaction. Chapter 1 is an introductory chapter that contains the main definitions and bibliographical remarks. In Chapter 2 the Polya-Szego dipole tensors are employed for analysis of plane elasticity problems in non-homogeneous media. Classes of equivalence for defects (cavities and rigid inclusions) are specified for the Laplace and Navier operators: composite materials with defects of the same class have the same effective elastic moduli. Explicit asymptotic formulae for the effective compliance matrices of dilute composites are obtained. The problem of the optimal cavity shape is analyzed in Chapter 3. The analysis uses the Polya-Szego tensors calculated in Chapter 2. A new type of structure which is optimal for shear loading has been found. Properties of the optimal cavity are described. The crack-inclusion interaction problem considered in Chapter 4 has been solved by the asymptotic methods. An analysis of crack trajectories is performed in Chapter 5 for different types of defects and interface conditions. The algorithm employs the Polya-Szego tensors as integral characteristics describing the defect. Comparison with experimental data (Ceramic Centre, Bologna) is presented. In Chapter 6 we use the method of compound asymptotic expansions to treat the homogenization problem for thin-walled composites. The technique of boundary layer fields is employed to derive the junction condition in the region connecting thin walls. The asymptotic

  3. Energy in Mexico: a profile of solar energy activity in its national context

    SciTech Connect

    Hawkins, D.

    1980-04-01

    The geopolitical, economic, and cultural aspects of the United States of Mexico are presented. Mexico's energy profile includes the following: energy policy objectives, government energy structure, organizations for implementation, indigeneous energy sources, imported energy sources, solar energy research and development, solar energy organizations and solar energy related legislation and administrative policies. International agreements, contacts, manufacturers, and projects are listed. (MRH)

  4. Energy Expenditure of the Physical Activity across the Curriculum Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Honas, Jeffery J.; Washburn, Richard A.; Smith, Bryan K.; Greene, Jerry L.; Donnelly, Joseph E.

    2013-01-01

    Physical activity is frequently a component of interventions designed to diminish weight gain in children. It is essential to determine whether the energy expenditure (EE) elicited by these interventions is sufficient to reduce the rate of weight gain. Purpose To quantify the EE of the Physical Activity across the Curriculum (PAAC) intervention. This intervention involved two 10-min physically active academic lessons per day, taught by classroom teachers. Methods We assessed EE of PAAC in 19 males and 19 females using both an indirect calorimeter (IC) (COSMED K4b2) and an accelerometer (ActiGraph) (AC). Independent t-tests were used to evaluate gender differences. Dependent t-tests were used to examine the difference between EE assessed by IC and AC. The agreement between EE measured by IC and estimated by AC was evaluated using a Bland-Altman plot. A Pearson correlation between EE measured by IC and estimated by AC was calculated. Results There were no significant gender differences for age, BMI, or EE; therefore, analyses by gender were not performed. The mean EE measured by IC was 3.1 ± 1.0 kcal/min(3.4 METs). Mean EE estimated by AC (1.8 ± 0.9 kcal/min) was significantly lower (P < 0.05) than EE measured by IC (mean underestimation = 1.3 kcal/min). The Bland-Altman plot suggested increased underestimation with increased levels of EE. The 95% limits of agreement were large (-2.8 to +0.3 kcal/min). The correlation between EE measured by IC and estimated by AC was r = 0.68 (P < 0.001). Conclusion PAAC elicited a level of EE that may prevent excessive weight gain in children. AC significantly underestimated the EE of PAAC lessons and may not provide useful EE estimates in this context. PMID:18614939

  5. QCD and Asymptotic Freedom:. Perspectives and Prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilczek, Frank

    QCD is now a mature theory, and it is possible to begin to view its place in the conceptual universe of physics with an appropriate perspective. There is a certain irony in the achievements of QCD. For the problems which initially drove its development — specifically, the desire to understand in detail the force that holds atomic nuclei together, and later the desire to calculate the spectrum of hadrons and their interactions — only limited insight has been achieved. However, I shall argue that QCD is actually more special and important a theory than one had any right to anticipate. In many ways, the importance of the solution transcends that of the original motivating problems. After elaborating on these quasiphilosophical remarks, I discuss two current frontiers of physics that illustrate the continuing vitality of the ideas. The recent wealth of beautiful precision experiments measuring the parameters of the standard model have made it possible to consider the unification of couplings in unprecedented quantitative detail. One central result emerging from these developments is a tantalizing hint of virtual supersymmetry. The possibility of phase transitions in matter at temperatures of order ~102 MeV, governed by QCD dynamics, is of interest from several points of view. Besides having a certain intrinsic grandeur, the question “Does the nature of matter change qualitatively, as it is radically heated?” is important for cosmology, relevant to planned high-energy heavy-ion collision experiments, and provides a promising arena for numerical simulations of QCD. Recent numerical work seems to be consistent with expectations suggested by renormalization group analysis of the potential universality classes of the QCD chiral phase transition; specifically, that the transition is second-order for two species of massless quarks but first order otherwise. There is an interesting possibility of long-range correlations in heavy ion collisions due to the creation of

  6. Asymptotic Fitness Distribution in the Bak-Sneppen Model of Biological Evolution with Four Species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlemm, Eckhard

    2012-08-01

    We suggest a new method to compute the asymptotic fitness distribution in the Bak-Sneppen model of biological evolution. As applications we derive the full asymptotic distribution in the four-species model, and give an explicit linear recurrence relation for a set of coefficients determining the asymptotic distribution in the five-species model.

  7. Constrained Total Energy Expenditure and Metabolic Adaptation to Physical Activity in Adult Humans.

    PubMed

    Pontzer, Herman; Durazo-Arvizu, Ramon; Dugas, Lara R; Plange-Rhule, Jacob; Bovet, Pascal; Forrester, Terrence E; Lambert, Estelle V; Cooper, Richard S; Schoeller, Dale A; Luke, Amy

    2016-02-01

    Current obesity prevention strategies recommend increasing daily physical activity, assuming that increased activity will lead to corresponding increases in total energy expenditure and prevent or reverse energy imbalance and weight gain [1-3]. Such Additive total energy expenditure models are supported by exercise intervention and accelerometry studies reporting positive correlations between physical activity and total energy expenditure [4] but are challenged by ecological studies in humans and other species showing that more active populations do not have higher total energy expenditure [5-8]. Here we tested a Constrained total energy expenditure model, in which total energy expenditure increases with physical activity at low activity levels but plateaus at higher activity levels as the body adapts to maintain total energy expenditure within a narrow range. We compared total energy expenditure, measured using doubly labeled water, against physical activity, measured using accelerometry, for a large (n = 332) sample of adults living in five populations [9]. After adjusting for body size and composition, total energy expenditure was positively correlated with physical activity, but the relationship was markedly stronger over the lower range of physical activity. For subjects in the upper range of physical activity, total energy expenditure plateaued, supporting a Constrained total energy expenditure model. Body fat percentage and activity intensity appear to modulate the metabolic response to physical activity. Models of energy balance employed in public health [1-3] should be revised to better reflect the constrained nature of total energy expenditure and the complex effects of physical activity on metabolic physiology. PMID:26832439

  8. Ghost anomalous dimension in asymptotically safe quantum gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Eichhorn, Astrid; Gies, Holger

    2010-05-15

    We compute the ghost anomalous dimension within the asymptotic-safety scenario for quantum gravity. For a class of covariant gauge fixings and using a functional renormalization group scheme, the anomalous dimension {eta}{sub c} is negative, implying an improved UV behavior of ghost fluctuations. At the non-Gaussian UV fixed point, we observe a maximum value of {eta}{sub c{approx_equal}}-0.78 for the Landau-deWitt gauge within the given scheme and truncation. Most importantly, the backreaction of the ghost flow onto the Einstein-Hilbert sector preserves the non-Gaussian fixed point with only mild modifications of the fixed-point values for the gravitational coupling and cosmological constant and the associated critical exponents; also their gauge dependence is slightly reduced. Our results provide further evidence for the asymptotic-safety scenario of quantum gravity.

  9. Asymptotic state discrimination and a strict hierarchy in distinguishability norms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chitambar, Eric; Hsieh, Min-Hsiu

    2014-11-01

    In this paper, we consider the problem of discriminating quantum states by local operations and classical communication (LOCC) when an arbitrarily small amount of error is permitted. This paradigm is known as asymptotic state discrimination, and we derive necessary conditions for when two multipartite states of any size can be discriminated perfectly by asymptotic LOCC. We use this new criterion to prove a gap in the LOCC and separable distinguishability norms. We then turn to the operational advantage of using two-way classical communication over one-way communication in LOCC processing. With a simple two-qubit product state ensemble, we demonstrate a strict majorization of the two-way LOCC norm over the one-way norm.

  10. Gravitational Two-Loop Counterterm Is Asymptotically Safe.

    PubMed

    Gies, Holger; Knorr, Benjamin; Lippoldt, Stefan; Saueressig, Frank

    2016-05-27

    Weinberg's asymptotic safety scenario provides an elegant mechanism to construct a quantum theory of gravity within the framework of quantum field theory based on a non-Gaussian fixed point of the renormalization group flow. In this work we report novel evidence for the validity of this scenario, using functional renormalization group techniques to determine the renormalization group flow of the Einstein-Hilbert action supplemented by the two-loop counterterm found by Goroff and Sagnotti. The resulting system of beta functions comprises three scale-dependent coupling constants and exhibits a non-Gaussian fixed point which constitutes the natural extension of the one found at the level of the Einstein-Hilbert action. The fixed point exhibits two ultraviolet attractive and one repulsive direction supporting a low-dimensional UV-critical hypersurface. Our result vanquishes the long-standing criticism that asymptotic safety will not survive once a "proper perturbative counterterm" is included in the projection space. PMID:27284643

  11. Hadronic Form Factors in Asymptotically Free Field Theories

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Gross, D. J.; Treiman, S. B.

    1974-01-01

    The breakdown of Bjorken scaling in asymptotically free gauge theories of the strong interactions is explored for its implications on the large q{sup 2} behavior of nucleon form factors. Duality arguments of Bloom and Gilman suggest a connection between the form factors and the threshold properties of the deep inelastic structure functions. The latter are addressed directly in an analysis of asymptotically free theories; and through the duality connection we are then led to statements about the form factors. For very large q{sup 2} the form factors are predicted to fall faster than any inverse power of q{sup 2}. For the more modest range of q{sup 2} reached in existing experiments the agreement with data is fairly good, though this may well be fortuitous. Extrapolations beyond this range are presented.

  12. Asymptotic boundary conditions for dissipative waves: General theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagstrom, Thomas

    1990-01-01

    An outstanding issue in the computational analysis of time dependent problems is the imposition of appropriate radiation boundary conditions at artificial boundaries. Accurate conditions are developed which are based on the asymptotic analysis of wave propagation over long ranges. Employing the method of steepest descents, dominant wave groups are identified and simple approximations to the dispersion relation are considered in order to derive local boundary operators. The existence of a small number of dominant wave groups may be expected for systems with dissipation. Estimates of the error as a function of domain size are derived under general hypotheses, leading to convergence results. Some practical aspects of the numerical construction of the asymptotic boundary operators are also discussed.

  13. Asymptotic periodicity in networks of degrade-and-fire oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blumenthal, Alex; Fernandez, Bastien

    2016-06-01

    Networks of coupled degrade-and-fire (DF) oscillators are simple dynamical models of assemblies of interacting self-repressing genes. For mean-field interactions, which most mathematical studies have assumed so far, every trajectory must approach a periodic orbit. Moreover, asymptotic cluster distributions can be computed explicitly in terms of coupling intensity, and a massive collection of distributions collapses when this intensity passes a threshold. Here, we show that most of these dynamical features persist for an arbitrary coupling topology. In particular, we prove that, in any system of DF oscillators for which in and out coupling weights balance, trajectories with reasonable firing sequences must be asymptotically periodic, and periodic orbits are uniquely determined by their firing sequence. In addition to these structural results, illustrative examples are presented, for which the dynamics can be entirely described.

  14. Asymptotic learning of alphanumeric coding in autobiographical memory.

    PubMed

    Martin, Maryanne; Jones, Gregory V

    2007-02-01

    Studies of autobiographical memory have shown that observed levels of incidental learning are often relatively low. Do low levels of retention result simply from a low learning rate, or is learning also asymptotic? To address this question, it is necessary to trace performance over a large number of learning opportunities, and this was carried out in the context of the recent development of widespread texting behaviour. It was found that memory for the alphanumeric layout of a phone improved as a function of sending approximately the first 500 texts, but then the improvement stopped. The incidence of memory error was incompatible with a simple power-law relation but was modelled closely by an asymptotic relation. It is suggested that this pattern reflects a movement towards automaticity in the primary task which progressively closes down the possibility that incidental learning can occur. PMID:16554044

  15. Asymptotically Lifshitz spacetimes with universal horizons in (1 +2 ) dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, Sayandeb; Bhattacharyya, Jishnu; Mattingly, David; Roberson, Matthew

    2016-03-01

    Hořava gravity theory possesses global Lifshitz space as a solution and has been conjectured to provide a natural framework for Lifshitz holography. We derive the conditions on the two-derivative Hořava gravity Lagrangian that are necessary for static, asymptotically Lifshitz spacetimes with flat transverse dimensions to contain a universal horizon, which plays a similar thermodynamic role as the Killing horizon in general relativity. Specializing to z =2 in 1 +2 dimensions, we then numerically construct such regular solutions over the whole spacetime. We calculate the mass for these solutions and show that, unlike the asymptotically anti-de Sitter case, the first law applied to the universal horizon is straightforwardly compatible with a thermodynamic interpretation.

  16. The asymptotic convergence factor for a polygon under a perturbation

    SciTech Connect

    Li, X.

    1994-12-31

    Let Ax = b be a large system of linear equations, where A {element_of} C{sup NxN}, nonsingular and b {element_of} C{sup N}. A few iterative methods for solving have recently been presented in the case where A is nonsymmetric. Many of their algorithms consist of two phases: Phase I: estimate the extreme eigenvalues of A; Phase II: construct and apply an iterative method based on the estimates. For convenience, it is rewritten as an equivalent fixed-point form, x = Tx + c. Let {Omega} be a compact set excluding 1 in the complex plane, and let its complement in the extended complex plane be simply connected. The asymptotic convergence factor (ACF) for {Omega}, denoted by {kappa}({Omega}), measures the rate of convergence for the asymptotically optimal semiiterative methods for solving, where {sigma}(T) {contained_in} {Omega}.

  17. Inspiralling, nonprecessing, spinning black hole binary spacetime via asymptotic matching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ireland, Brennan; Mundim, Bruno C.; Nakano, Hiroyuki; Campanelli, Manuela

    2016-05-01

    We construct a new global, fully analytic, approximate spacetime which accurately describes the dynamics of nonprecessing, spinning black hole binaries during the inspiral phase of the relativistic merger process. This approximate solution of the vacuum Einstein's equations can be obtained by asymptotically matching perturbed Kerr solutions near the two black holes to a post-Newtonian metric valid far from the two black holes. This metric is then matched to a post-Minkowskian metric even farther out in the wave zone. The procedure of asymptotic matching is generalized to be valid on all spatial hypersurfaces, instead of a small group of initial hypersurfaces discussed in previous works. This metric is well suited for long term dynamical simulations of spinning black hole binary spacetimes prior to merger, such as studies of circumbinary gas accretion which requires hundreds of binary orbits.

  18. Asymptotic formulae for the zeros of orthogonal polynomials

    SciTech Connect

    Badkov, V M

    2012-09-30

    Let p{sub n}(t) be an algebraic polynomial that is orthonormal with weight p(t) on the interval [-1, 1]. When p(t) is a perturbation (in certain limits) of the Chebyshev weight of the first kind, the zeros of the polynomial p{sub n}( cos {tau}) and the differences between pairs of (not necessarily consecutive) zeros are shown to satisfy asymptotic formulae as n{yields}{infinity}, which hold uniformly with respect to the indices of the zeros. Similar results are also obtained for perturbations of the Chebyshev weight of the second kind. First, some preliminary results on the asymptotic behaviour of the difference between two zeros of an orthogonal trigonometric polynomial, which are needed, are established. Bibliography: 15 titles.

  19. Asymptotic Reissner-Nordström solution within nonlinear electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruglov, S. I.

    2016-08-01

    A model of nonlinear electrodynamics coupled with the gravitational field is studied. We obtain the asymptotic black hole solutions at r →0 and r →∞ . The asymptotic at r →0 is shown, and we find corrections to the Reissner-Nordström solution and Coulomb's law at r →∞ . The mass of the black hole is evaluated having the electromagnetic origin. We investigate the thermodynamics of charged black holes and their thermal stability. The critical point corresponding to the second-order phase transition (where heat capacity diverges) is found. If the mass of the black hole is greater than the critical mass, the black hole becomes unstable.

  20. Asymptotic boundary conditions for dissipative waves - General theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagstrom, Thomas

    1991-01-01

    An outstanding issue in computational analysis of time dependent problems is the imposition of appropriate radiation boundary conditions at artificial boundaries. Accurate conditions are developed which are based on the asymptotic analysis of wave propagation over long ranges. Employing the method of steepest descents, dominant wave groups are identified and simple approximations to the dispersion relation are considered in order to derive local boundary operators. The existence of a small number of dominant wave groups may be expected for systems with dissipation. Estimates of the error as a function of domain size are derived under general hypotheses, leading to convergence results. Some practical aspects of the numerical construction of the asymptotic boundary operators are also discussed.

  1. Correspondence between Asymptotically Flat Spacetimes and Nonrelativistic Conformal Field Theories

    SciTech Connect

    Bagchi, Arjun

    2010-10-22

    We find a surprising connection between asymptotically flat spacetimes and nonrelativistic conformal systems in one lower dimension. The Bondi-Metzner-Sachs (BMS) group is the group of asymptotic isometries of flat Minkowski space at null infinity. This is known to be infinite dimensional in three and four dimensions. We show that the BMS algebra in 3 dimensions is the same as the 2D Galilean conformal algebra (GCA) which is of relevance to nonrelativistic conformal symmetries. We further justify our proposal by looking at a Penrose limit on a radially infalling null ray inspired by nonrelativistic scaling and obtain a flat metric. The BMS{sub 4} algebra is also discussed and found to be the same as another class of GCA, called semi-GCA, in three dimensions. We propose a general BMS-GCA correspondence. Some consequences are discussed.

  2. Gravitational Two-Loop Counterterm Is Asymptotically Safe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gies, Holger; Knorr, Benjamin; Lippoldt, Stefan; Saueressig, Frank

    2016-05-01

    Weinberg's asymptotic safety scenario provides an elegant mechanism to construct a quantum theory of gravity within the framework of quantum field theory based on a non-Gaussian fixed point of the renormalization group flow. In this work we report novel evidence for the validity of this scenario, using functional renormalization group techniques to determine the renormalization group flow of the Einstein-Hilbert action supplemented by the two-loop counterterm found by Goroff and Sagnotti. The resulting system of beta functions comprises three scale-dependent coupling constants and exhibits a non-Gaussian fixed point which constitutes the natural extension of the one found at the level of the Einstein-Hilbert action. The fixed point exhibits two ultraviolet attractive and one repulsive direction supporting a low-dimensional UV-critical hypersurface. Our result vanquishes the long-standing criticism that asymptotic safety will not survive once a "proper perturbative counterterm" is included in the projection space.

  3. The Moduli Space of Asymptotically Cylindrical Calabi-Yau Manifolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conlon, Ronan J.; Mazzeo, Rafe; Rochon, Frédéric

    2015-09-01

    We prove that the deformation theory of compactifiable asymptotically cylindrical Calabi-Yau manifolds is unobstructed. This relies on a detailed study of the Dolbeault-Hodge theory and its description in terms of the cohomology of the compactification. We also show that these Calabi-Yau metrics admit a polyhomogeneous expansion at infinity, a result that we extend to asymptotically conical Calabi-Yau metrics as well. We then study the moduli space of Calabi-Yau deformations that fix the complex structure at infinity. There is a Weil-Petersson metric on this space, which we show is Kähler. By proving a local families L 2-index theorem, we exhibit its Kähler form as a multiple of the curvature of a certain determinant line bundle.

  4. Asymptotic state discrimination and a strict hierarchy in distinguishability norms

    SciTech Connect

    Chitambar, Eric; Hsieh, Min-Hsiu

    2014-11-15

    In this paper, we consider the problem of discriminating quantum states by local operations and classical communication (LOCC) when an arbitrarily small amount of error is permitted. This paradigm is known as asymptotic state discrimination, and we derive necessary conditions for when two multipartite states of any size can be discriminated perfectly by asymptotic LOCC. We use this new criterion to prove a gap in the LOCC and separable distinguishability norms. We then turn to the operational advantage of using two-way classical communication over one-way communication in LOCC processing. With a simple two-qubit product state ensemble, we demonstrate a strict majorization of the two-way LOCC norm over the one-way norm.

  5. Asymptotically flat black holes in 2 +1 dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alkaç, Gökhan; Kilicarslan, Ercan; Tekin, Bayram

    2016-04-01

    Asymptotically flat black holes in 2 +1 dimensions are a rarity. We study the recently found black flower solutions (asymptotically flat black holes with deformed horizons), static black holes, rotating black holes and the dynamical black flowers (black holes with radiative gravitons) of the purely quadratic version of new massive gravity. We show how they appear in this theory and we also show that they are also solutions to the infinite order extended version of the new massive gravity, that is the Born-Infeld extension of new massive gravity with an amputated Einsteinian piece. The same metrics also solve the topologically extended versions of these theories, with modified conserved charges and the thermodynamical quantities, such as the Wald entropy. Besides these we find new conformally flat radiating type solutions to these extended gravity models. We also show that these metrics do not arise in Einstein's gravity coupled to physical perfect fluids.

  6. Asymptotic behavior of the entropy of chains placed on cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dantas, W. G.; de Oliveira, M. J.; Stilck, J. F.

    2007-09-01

    By using the transfer matrix approach, we investigate the asymptotic behavior of the entropy of flexible chains with M monomers each placed on strips with periodic boundary conditions (cylinders). In the limit of high density of monomers, we study the behavior of the entropy as a function of the density of monomers and the width of the strip, inspired by recent analytical studies of this problem for the particular case of dimers (M=2) . We obtain the entropy in the asymptotic regime of high densities for chains with M=2,…,9 monomers, as well as for the special case of polymers, where M→∞ , and find that the results show a regular behavior similar to the one found analytically for dimers. We also verify that in the low-density limit the mean-field expression for the entropy is followed by the results from our transfer matrix calculations.

  7. The Barrett-Crane model: asymptotic measure factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamiński, Wojciech; Steinhaus, Sebastian

    2014-04-01

    The original spin foam model construction for 4D gravity by Barrett and Crane suffers from a few troubling issues. In the simple examples of the vertex amplitude they can be summarized as the existence of contributions to the asymptotics from non-geometric configurations. Even restricted to geometric contributions the amplitude is not completely worked out. While the phase is known to be the Regge action, the so-called measure factor has remained mysterious for a decade. In the toy model case of the 6j symbol this measure factor has a nice geometric interpretation of V-1/2 leading to speculations that a similar interpretation should be possible also in the 4D case. In this paper we provide the first geometric interpretation of the geometric part of the asymptotic for the spin foam consisting of two glued 4-simplices (decomposition of the 4-sphere) in the Barrett-Crane model in the large internal spin regime.

  8. Simplicial and asymptotical aspects of the holographic principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dappiaggi, Claudio

    2004-03-01

    In this thesis, we study some aspects of a possible holographic correspondence in two different systems: three dimensional Chern-Simons theory and asymptotically flat space-times. In the former we use simplicial techniques to study CS/WZW correspondence and in particular we construct the discretized WZW partition function for SU(2) group at level 1. In the latter we outline the main characteristics of a field theory living at null infinity invariant under the action of the asymptotic symmetry group: the BMS group. In particular, using fibre bundle techniques, we derive the covariant wave equations for fields carrying BMS representations in order to investigate the nature of boundary degrees of freedom.

  9. Asymptotic expansions of Mellin convolution integrals: An oscillatory case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López, José L.; Pagola, Pedro

    2010-01-01

    In a recent paper [J.L. López, Asymptotic expansions of Mellin convolution integrals, SIAM Rev. 50 (2) (2008) 275-293], we have presented a new, very general and simple method for deriving asymptotic expansions of for small x. It contains Watson's Lemma and other classical methods, Mellin transform techniques, McClure and Wong's distributional approach and the method of analytic continuation used in this approach as particular cases. In this paper we generalize that idea to the case of oscillatory kernels, that is, to integrals of the form , with c[set membership, variant]R, and we give a method as simple as the one given in the above cited reference for the case c=0. We show that McClure and Wong's distributional approach for oscillatory kernels and the summability method for oscillatory integrals are particular cases of this method. Some examples are given as illustration.

  10. Asymptotic analysis of a vibrating cantilever with a nonlinear boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Liqun; Lim, C. W.; Hu, Qingquan; Ding, Hu

    2009-09-01

    Nonlinear vibration of a cantilever in a contact atomic force microscope is analyzed via an asymptotic approach. The asymptotic solution is sought for a beam equation with a nonlinear boundary condition. The steady-state responses are determined in primary resonance and subharmonic resonance. The relations between the response amplitudes and the excitation frequencies and amplitudes are derived from the solvability condition. Multivaluedness occurs in the relations as a consequence of the nonlinearity. The stability of steady-state responses is analyzed by use of the Lyapunov linearized stability theory. The stability analysis predicts the jumping phenomenon for certain parameters. The curves of the response amplitudes changing with the excitation frequencies are numerically compared with those obtained via the method of multiple scales. The calculation results demonstrate that the two methods predict the same varying tendencies while there are small quantitative differences.

  11. Complete LQG propagator. II. Asymptotic behavior of the vertex

    SciTech Connect

    Alesci, Emanuele; Rovelli, Carlo

    2008-02-15

    In a previous article we have shown that there are difficulties in obtaining the correct graviton propagator from the loop-quantum-gravity dynamics defined by the Barrett-Crane vertex amplitude. Here we show that a vertex amplitude that depends nontrivially on the intertwiners can yield the correct propagator. We give an explicit example of asymptotic behavior of a vertex amplitude that gives the correct full graviton propagator in the large distance limit.

  12. Asymptotic behavior of the supremum tail probability for anomalous diffusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michna, Zbigniew

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we investigate asymptotic behavior of the tail probability for subordinated self-similar processes with regularly varying tail probability. We show that the tail probability of the one-dimensional distributions and the supremum tail probability are regularly varying with the pre-factor depending on the moments of the subordinating process. We can apply our result to the so-called anomalous diffusion.

  13. Asymptotic behavior of tidal damping in alluvial estuaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Huayang; Savenije, Hubert H. G.

    2013-11-01

    Tidal wave propagation can be described analytically by a set of four implicit equations, i.e., the phase lag equation, the scaling equation, the damping equation, and the celerity equation. It is demonstrated that this system of equations has an asymptotic solution for an infinite channel, reflecting the balance between friction and channel convergence. Subsequently, explicit expressions for the tidal amplitude and velocity amplitude are derived, which are different from the generally assumed exponential damping equation that follows from linearizing the friction term. Analysis of the asymptotic behavior demonstrates that exponential damping of the tidal amplitude is only correct for a frictionless wave or an ideal estuary (no damping). However, in estuaries with modest damping (near ideal) it provides a reasonable approximation. In natural estuaries, there is generally a need to take account of local variability of, e.g., depth and friction, by subdividing the estuary into multiple reaches. This is illustrated with an example of the Scheldt estuary, which has been gradually deepened for navigation purpose over the last half century. The analytical model is used to study the effect of this deepening on the tidal dynamics in the main navigation channel, demonstrating that the navigation channel will become "overamplified" when it reaches a depth larger than the critical depth. In the case of overamplification, a further increase of the depth reduces the amplification until critical convergence (condition for a frictionless standing wave) is reached asymptotically. Finally, based on the ratio between the tidal amplitude at the seaward boundary and the asymptotic tidal amplitude, estuaries can be classified into damped, amplified, or ideal estuaries, which is illustrated with 23 real estuaries.

  14. Exact asymptotic form for the {beta} function in quantum electrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Suslov, I. M.

    2009-06-15

    It is shown that the asymptotic form of the Gell-Mann-Low function in quantum electrodynamics can be determined exactly: {beta}(g) = g for g {sup {yields}} {infinity}, where g = e{sup 2} is the running fine-structure constant. This solves the problem of electrodynamics at small distances L (for which dependence g {infinity} L{sup -2} holds) and completely eliminates the problem of 'zero charge.'.

  15. Modeling broadband poroelastic propagation using an asymptotic approach

    SciTech Connect

    Vasco, Donald W.

    2009-05-01

    An asymptotic method, valid in the presence of smoothly-varying heterogeneity, is used to derive a semi-analytic solution to the equations for fluid and solid displacements in a poroelastic medium. The solution is defined along trajectories through the porous medium model, in the manner of ray theory. The lowest order expression in the asymptotic expansion provides an eikonal equation for the phase. There are three modes of propagation, two modes of longitudinal displacement and a single mode of transverse displacement. The two longitudinal modes define the Biot fast and slow waves which have very different propagation characteristics. In the limit of low frequency, the Biot slow wave propagates as a diffusive disturbance, in essence a transient pressure pulse. Conversely, at low frequencies the Biot fast wave and the transverse mode are modified elastic waves. At intermediate frequencies the wave characteristics of the longitudinal modes are mixed. A comparison of the asymptotic solution with analytic and numerical solutions shows reasonably good agreement for both homogeneous and heterogeneous Earth models.

  16. Nonlocal Reformulations of Water and Internal Waves and Asymptotic Reductions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ablowitz, Mark J.

    2009-09-01

    Nonlocal reformulations of the classical equations of water waves and two ideal fluids separated by a free interface, bounded above by either a rigid lid or a free surface, are obtained. The kinematic equations may be written in terms of integral equations with a free parameter. By expressing the pressure, or Bernoulli, equation in terms of the surface/interface variables, a closed system is obtained. An advantage of this formulation, referred to as the nonlocal spectral (NSP) formulation, is that the vertical component is eliminated, thus reducing the dimensionality and fixing the domain in which the equations are posed. The NSP equations and the Dirichlet-Neumann operators associated with the water wave or two-fluid equations can be related to each other and the Dirichlet-Neumann series can be obtained from the NSP equations. Important asymptotic reductions obtained from the two-fluid nonlocal system include the generalizations of the Benney-Luke and Kadomtsev-Petviashvili (KP) equations, referred to as intermediate-long wave (ILW) generalizations. These 2+1 dimensional equations possess lump type solutions. In the water wave problem high-order asymptotic series are obtained for two and three dimensional gravity-capillary solitary waves. In two dimensions, the first term in the asymptotic series is the well-known hyperbolic secant squared solution of the KdV equation; in three dimensions, the first term is the rational lump solution of the KP equation.

  17. Global, uniform, asymptotic wave-equation solutions for large wavenumbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klauder, John R.

    1987-11-01

    For each of a large class of linear wave equations-relevant, for example, to very general acoustical or optical propagation problems-we develop within a single expression a global, uniform, asymptotic solution for large wavenumbers (small wavelengths) based on coherentstate transformation techniques. Such techniques effectively separate the configuration-space field into its orientational components, and are thus analogous to a phase-space description of rays by their position and direction. The resultant coherent-state approximation offers distinct advantages over more traditional asymptotic approximations based on direct or Fourier transform techniques. In particular, coherent-state methods lead to an everywhere well-defined approximation independent of the complexity of the caustic structure, independent of whether there are a few or a vast number of relevant rays, or even in shadow regions where no conventional rays exist. For propagation in random media it is shown that coherent-state techniques also offer certain advantages. Approximations are developed for wave equations in an arbitrary number of space dimensions for single component fields as well as multicomponent fields that, for example, can account for backscattering. It is noteworthy that the coherentstate asymptotic approximation should lend itself to numerical studies as well.

  18. Better band gaps with asymptotically corrected local exchange potentials

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Singh, Prashant; Harbola, Manoj K.; Hemanadhan, M.; Mookerjee, Abhijit; Johnson, D. D.

    2016-02-22

    In this study, we formulate a spin-polarized van Leeuwen and Baerends (vLB) correction to the local density approximation (LDA) exchange potential [R. van Leeuwen and E. J. Baerends, Phys. Rev. A 49, 2421 (1994)] that enforces the ionization potential (IP) theorem following T. Stein et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 266802 (2010)]. For electronic-structure problems, the vLB correction replicates the behavior of exact-exchange potentials, with improved scaling and well-behaved asymptotics, but with the computational cost of semilocal functionals. The vLB + IP correction produces a large improvement in the eigenvalues over those from the LDA due to correct asymptotic behaviormore » and atomic shell structures, as shown in rare-gas, alkaline-earth, zinc-based oxides, alkali halides, sulfides, and nitrides. In half-Heusler alloys, this asymptotically corrected LDA reproduces the spin-polarized properties correctly, including magnetism and half-metallicity. We also consider finite-sized systems [e.g., ringed boron nitride (B12N12) and graphene (C24)] to emphasize the wide applicability of the method.« less

  19. Asymptotic Diffusion-Limit Accuracy of Sn Angular Differencing Schemes

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, T S; Morel, J E; Chang, J H

    2009-11-05

    In a previous paper, Morel and Montry used a Galerkin-based diffusion analysis to define a particular weighted diamond angular discretization for S{sub n}n calculations in curvilinear geometries. The weighting factors were chosen to ensure that the Galerkin diffusion approximation was preserved, which eliminated the discrete-ordinates flux dip. It was also shown that the step and diamond angular differencing schemes, which both suffer from the flux dip, do not preserve the diffusion approximation in the Galerkin sense. In this paper we re-derive the Morel and Montry weighted diamond scheme using a formal asymptotic diffusion-limit analysis. The asymptotic analysis yields more information than the Galerkin analysis and demonstrates that the step and diamond schemes do in fact formally preserve the diffusion limit to leading order, while the Morel and Montry weighted diamond scheme preserves it to first order, which is required for full consistency in this limit. Nonetheless, the fact that the step and diamond differencing schemes preserve the diffusion limit to leading order suggests that the flux dip should disappear as the diffusion limit is approached for these schemes. Computational results are presented that confirm this conjecture. We further conjecture that preserving the Galerkin diffusion approximation is equivalent to preserving the asymptotic diffusion limit to first order.

  20. Better band gaps with asymptotically corrected local exchange potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Prashant; Harbola, Manoj K.; Hemanadhan, M.; Mookerjee, Abhijit; Johnson, D. D.

    2016-02-01

    We formulate a spin-polarized van Leeuwen and Baerends (vLB) correction to the local density approximation (LDA) exchange potential [R. van Leeuwen and E. J. Baerends, Phys. Rev. A 49, 2421 (1994), 10.1103/PhysRevA.49.2421] that enforces the ionization potential (IP) theorem following T. Stein et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 266802 (2010), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.105.266802]. For electronic-structure problems, the vLB correction replicates the behavior of exact-exchange potentials, with improved scaling and well-behaved asymptotics, but with the computational cost of semilocal functionals. The vLB + IP correction produces a large improvement in the eigenvalues over those from the LDA due to correct asymptotic behavior and atomic shell structures, as shown in rare-gas, alkaline-earth, zinc-based oxides, alkali halides, sulfides, and nitrides. In half-Heusler alloys, this asymptotically corrected LDA reproduces the spin-polarized properties correctly, including magnetism and half-metallicity. We also consider finite-sized systems [e.g., ringed boron nitride (B12N12 ) and graphene (C24)] to emphasize the wide applicability of the method.

  1. Asymptotic, multigroup flux reconstruction and consistent discontinuity factors

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Trahan, Travis J.; Larsen, Edward W.

    2015-05-12

    Recent theoretical work has led to an asymptotically derived expression for reconstructing the neutron flux from lattice functions and multigroup diffusion solutions. The leading-order asymptotic term is the standard expression for flux reconstruction, i.e., it is the product of a shape function, obtained through a lattice calculation, and the multigroup diffusion solution. The first-order asymptotic correction term is significant only where the gradient of the diffusion solution is not small. Inclusion of this first-order correction term can significantly improve the accuracy of the reconstructed flux. One may define discontinuity factors (DFs) to make certain angular moments of the reconstructed fluxmore » continuous across interfaces between assemblies in 1-D. Indeed, the standard assembly discontinuity factors make the zeroth moment (scalar flux) of the reconstructed flux continuous. The inclusion of the correction term in the flux reconstruction provides an additional degree of freedom that can be used to make two angular moments of the reconstructed flux continuous across interfaces by using current DFs in addition to flux DFs. Thus, numerical results demonstrate that using flux and current DFs together can be more accurate than using only flux DFs, and that making the second angular moment continuous can be more accurate than making the zeroth moment continuous.« less

  2. Asymptotic, multigroup flux reconstruction and consistent discontinuity factors

    SciTech Connect

    Trahan, Travis J.; Larsen, Edward W.

    2015-05-12

    Recent theoretical work has led to an asymptotically derived expression for reconstructing the neutron flux from lattice functions and multigroup diffusion solutions. The leading-order asymptotic term is the standard expression for flux reconstruction, i.e., it is the product of a shape function, obtained through a lattice calculation, and the multigroup diffusion solution. The first-order asymptotic correction term is significant only where the gradient of the diffusion solution is not small. Inclusion of this first-order correction term can significantly improve the accuracy of the reconstructed flux. One may define discontinuity factors (DFs) to make certain angular moments of the reconstructed flux continuous across interfaces between assemblies in 1-D. Indeed, the standard assembly discontinuity factors make the zeroth moment (scalar flux) of the reconstructed flux continuous. The inclusion of the correction term in the flux reconstruction provides an additional degree of freedom that can be used to make two angular moments of the reconstructed flux continuous across interfaces by using current DFs in addition to flux DFs. Thus, numerical results demonstrate that using flux and current DFs together can be more accurate than using only flux DFs, and that making the second angular moment continuous can be more accurate than making the zeroth moment continuous.

  3. Trapping phenomenon of the parameter estimation in asymptotic quantum states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berrada, K.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we study in detail the behavior of the precision of the parameter estimation in open quantum systems using the quantum Fisher information (QFI). In particular, we study the sensitivity of the estimation on a two-qubit system evolving under Kossakowski-type quantum dynamical semigroups of completely positive maps. In such an environment, the precision of the estimation can even persist asymptotically for different effects of the initial parameters. We find that the QFI can be resistant to the action of the environment with respect to the initial asymptotic states, and it can persist even in the asymptotic long-time regime. In addition, our results provide further evidence that the initial pure and separable mixed states of the input state may enhance quantum metrology. These features make quantum states in this kind of environment a good candidate for the implementation of different schemes of quantum optics and information with high precision. Finally, we show that this quantity may be proposed to detect the amount of the total quantum information that the whole state contains with respect to projective measurements.

  4. Asymptotic theory of two-dimensional trailing-edge flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melnik, R. E.; Chow, R.

    1975-01-01

    Problems of laminar and turbulent viscous interaction near trailing edges of streamlined bodies are considered. Asymptotic expansions of the Navier-Stokes equations in the limit of large Reynolds numbers are used to describe the local solution near the trailing edge of cusped or nearly cusped airfoils at small angles of attack in compressible flow. A complicated inverse iterative procedure, involving finite-difference solutions of the triple-deck equations coupled with asymptotic solutions of the boundary values, is used to accurately solve the viscous interaction problem. Results are given for the correction to the boundary-layer solution for drag of a finite flat plate at zero angle of attack and for the viscous correction to the lift of an airfoil at incidence. A rational asymptotic theory is developed for treating turbulent interactions near trailing edges and is shown to lead to a multilayer structure of turbulent boundary layers. The flow over most of the boundary layer is described by a Lighthill model of inviscid rotational flow. The main features of the model are discussed and a sample solution for the skin friction is obtained and compared with the data of Schubauer and Klebanoff for a turbulent flow in a moderately large adverse pressure gradient.

  5. Robust asymptotic sampling theory for correlations in pedigrees.

    PubMed

    Keen, K J; Elston, Robert C

    2003-10-30

    Methods to unravel the genetic determinants of non-Mendelian diseases lie at the next frontier of statistical approaches for human genetics. It is generally agreed that, before proceeding with segregation or linkage analysis, the trait under study ought to be shown to exhibit familial correlation. By coding dichotomous traits as binary variables, a single robust approach in the estimation of pedigree correlations, rather than two distinct approaches, can be used to assess the potential heritability of a trait, and, latterly, to examine the mode of inheritance. The asymptotic theory to conduct hypothesis tests and confidence intervals for correlations among different members of nuclear families is well established but is applicable only if the nuclear families are independent. As a further contribution to the literature, we derive the asymptotic sampling distribution of correlations between random variables among arbitrary pairs of members in extended families for the Pearson product-moment estimator with generalized weights. This derivation is done without assuming normality of the traits. The sampling distribution is shown to be asymptotically normal to first order, and hence large-sample hypothesis tests and confidence intervals with estimates of the variances and correlation coefficients are proposed. Discussion concludes with an example and a suggestion for future research. PMID:14518025

  6. Asymptotic Statistics of Cycles in Surrogate-Spatial Permutations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogachev, Leonid V.; Zeindler, Dirk

    2015-02-01

    We propose an extension of the Ewens measure on permutations by choosing the cycle weights to be asymptotically proportional to the degree of the symmetric group. This model is primarily motivated by a natural approximation to the so-called spatial random permutations recently studied by Betz and Ueltschi (hence the name "surrogate-spatial"), but it is of substantial interest in its own right. We show that under the suitable (thermodynamic) limit both measures have the similar critical behaviour of the cycle statistics characterized by the emergence of infinitely long cycles. Moreover, using a greater analytic tractability of the surrogate-spatial model, we obtain a number of new results about the asymptotic distribution of the cycle lengths (both small and large) in the full range of subcritical, critical, and supercritical domains. In particular, in the supercritical regime there is a parametric "phase transition" from the Poisson-Dirichlet limiting distribution of ordered cycles to the occurrence of a single giant cycle. Our techniques are based on the asymptotic analysis of the corresponding generating functions using Pólya's Enumeration Theorem and complex variable methods.

  7. The unitary conformal field theory behind 2D Asymptotic Safety

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nink, Andreas; Reuter, Martin

    2016-02-01

    Being interested in the compatibility of Asymptotic Safety with Hilbert space positivity (unitarity), we consider a local truncation of the functional RG flow which describes quantum gravity in d > 2 dimensions and construct its limit of exactly two dimensions. We find that in this limit the flow displays a nontrivial fixed point whose effective average action is a non-local functional of the metric. Its pure gravity sector is shown to correspond to a unitary conformal field theory with positive central charge c = 25. Representing the fixed point CFT by a Liouville theory in the conformal gauge, we investigate its general properties and their implications for the Asymptotic Safety program. In particular, we discuss its field parametrization dependence and argue that there might exist more than one universality class of metric gravity theories in two dimensions. Furthermore, studying the gravitational dressing in 2D asymptotically safe gravity coupled to conformal matter we uncover a mechanism which leads to a complete quenching of the a priori expected Knizhnik-Polyakov-Zamolodchikov (KPZ) scaling. A possible connection of this prediction to Monte Carlo results obtained in the discrete approach to 2D quantum gravity based upon causal dynamical triangulations is mentioned. Similarities of the fixed point theory to, and differences from, non-critical string theory are also described. On the technical side, we provide a detailed analysis of an intriguing connection between the Einstein-Hilbert action in d > 2 dimensions and Polyakov's induced gravity action in two dimensions.

  8. Holonomy spin foam models: asymptotic geometry of the partition function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellmann, Frank; Kaminski, Wojciech

    2013-10-01

    We study the asymptotic geometry of the spin foam partition function for a large class of models, including the models of Barrett and Crane, Engle, Pereira, Rovelli and Livine, and, Freidel and Krasnov. The asymptotics is taken with respect to the boundary spins only, no assumption of large spins is made in the interior. We give a sufficient criterion for the existence of the partition function. We find that geometric boundary data is suppressed unless its interior continuation satisfies certain accidental curvature constraints. This means in particular that most Regge manifolds are suppressed in the asymptotic regime. We discuss this explicitly for the case of the configurations arising in the 3-3 Pachner move. We identify the origin of these accidental curvature constraints as an incorrect twisting of the face amplitude upon introduction of the Immirzi parameter and propose a way to resolve this problem, albeit at the price of losing the connection to the SU(2) boundary Hilbert space. The key methodological innovation that enables these results is the introduction of the notion of wave front sets, and the adaptation of tools for their study from micro local analysis to the case of spin foam partition functions.

  9. Activation Energy of Extracellular Enzymes in Soils from Different Biomes

    PubMed Central

    Steinweg, J. Megan; Jagadamma, Sindhu; Frerichs, Joshua; Mayes, Melanie A.

    2013-01-01

    Enzyme dynamics are being incorporated into soil carbon cycling models and accurate representation of enzyme kinetics is an important step in predicting belowground nutrient dynamics. A scarce number of studies have measured activation energy (Ea) in soils and fewer studies have measured Ea in arctic and tropical soils, or in subsurface soils. We determined the Ea for four typical lignocellulose degrading enzymes in the A and B horizons of seven soils covering six different soil orders. We also elucidated which soil properties predicted any measurable differences in Ea. β-glucosidase, cellobiohydrolase, phenol oxidase and peroxidase activities were measured at five temperatures, 4, 21, 30, 40, and 60°C. Ea was calculated using the Arrhenius equation. β-glucosidase and cellobiohydrolase Ea values for both A and B horizons in this study were similar to previously reported values, however we could not make a direct comparison for B horizon soils because of the lack of data. There was no consistent relationship between hydrolase enzyme Ea and the environmental variables we measured. Phenol oxidase was the only enzyme that had a consistent positive relationship between Ea and pH in both horizons. The Ea in the arctic and subarctic zones for peroxidase was lower than the hydrolases and phenol oxidase values, indicating peroxidase may be a rate limited enzyme in environments under warming conditions. By including these six soil types we have increased the number of soil oxidative enzyme Ea values reported in the literature by 50%. This study is a step towards better quantifying enzyme kinetics in different climate zones. PMID:23536898

  10. Activities of the U. S. Department of Energy in education. Annual status report, FY 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-04-01

    The energy-related education activities administered in FY 1979 by DOE are described: projections for FY 1980 are also given. This document provides assistance for DOE program managers who wish to use the educational process in their operations, and it provides guidance and information to educators and the general public about DOE energy-related education activities. The education activities are classified as energy information (curriculum packages, studies, workshops and forums conferences, other materials), energy skills development, institutional resource enhancement, and other activities. A chart gives the category of activity, type of audience, and type of services provided. (RWR)

  11. Young Scientists Explore an Encyclopedia of Energy Activities. Book 8--Intermediate Level. A Good Apple Activity Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeBruin, Jerry

    Designed to develop creativity in young learners, this book contains interdisciplinary activities which focus on the theme of energy. Activity pages are provided that can serve as front and back covers of a student booklet and the suggested activities can be duplicated for insertion between the covers resulting in a booklet for each student. A…

  12. Active Galactic Nuclei:. Sources for Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biermann, P. L.; Becker, J. K.; Caramete, L.; Gergely, L.; Mariş, I. C.; Meli, A.; de Souza, V.; Stanev, T.

    Ultra high energy cosmic ray events presently show a spectrum, which we interpret here as galactic cosmic rays due to a starburst, in the radio galaxy Cen A which is pushed up in energy by the shock of a relativistic jet. The knee feature and the particles with energy immediately higher in galactic cosmic rays then turn into the bulk of ultra high energy cosmic rays. This entails that all ultra high energy cosmic rays are heavy nuclei. This picture is viable if the majority of the observed ultra high energy events come from the radio galaxy Cen A, and are scattered by intergalactic magnetic fields across much of the sky.

  13. Calculating activation energies for temperature compensation in circadian rhythms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodenstein, C.; Heiland, I.; Schuster, S.

    2011-10-01

    Many biological species possess a circadian clock, which helps them anticipate daily variations in the environment. In the absence of external stimuli, the rhythm persists autonomously with a period of approximately 24 h. However, single pulses of light, nutrients, chemicals or temperature can shift the clock phase. In the case of light- and temperature-cycles, this allows entrainment of the clock to cycles of exactly 24 h. Circadian clocks have the remarkable property of temperature compensation, that is, the period of the circadian rhythm remains relatively constant within a physiological range of temperatures. For several organisms, temperature-regulated processes within the circadian clock have been identified in recent years. However, how these processes contribute to temperature compensation is not fully understood. Here, we theoretically investigate temperature compensation in general oscillatory systems. It is known that every oscillator can be locally temperature compensated around a reference temperature, if reactions are appropriately balanced. A balancing is always possible if the control coefficient with respect to the oscillation period of at least one reaction in the oscillator network is positive. However, for global temperature compensation, the whole physiological temperature range is relevant. Here, we use an approach which leads to an optimization problem subject to the local balancing principle. We use this approach to analyse different circadian clock models proposed in the literature and calculate activation energies that lead to temperature compensation.

  14. High-energy spectra of active nuclei. 1: The catalog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malaguti, G.; Bassani, L.; Caroli, E.

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents a catalog of high-energy spectra (E is greater than or equal to 0.01 keV) of active galactic nuclei (AGNs). The catalog contains 209 objects (140 Seyfert galaxies, 65 quasars, and 4 objects otherwise classified), for a total of 1030 spectra. Most of the data have been collected from the literature over a period spanning more than 20 yr starting from the early 1970s up to the end of 1992. For a numbner of objects (17), EXOSAT/ME data have been extracted and analyzed, and the 27 spectra obtained have been added to the database. For each object we report individual observation spectral fit parameters using a power-law model corrected for cold gas absorption along the line of sight (photon index, 1 keV intensity and hydrogen column density), plus other relevant data. It is hoped that this database can become a useful tool for the study of the AGN phenomenon in its various aspects.

  15. Industrial Technology. Iowa Developed Energy Activity Sampler, 6-12. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iowa State Dept. of Education, Des Moines. Div. of Instructional Services.

    The revised Iowa Developed Energy Activity Sampler (IDEAS) was compiled using the original IDEAS program and the Energy Conservation Activity Packets (ECAPS). This document is one of a series of revised IDEAS booklets, and provides learning activities for teachers to use with students in industrial arts/technology education. Each of the 17…

  16. High Energy Physics Division semiannual report of research activities, July 1, 1996 - December 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Norem, J.; Rezmer, R.; Wagner, R.

    1997-12-01

    This report is divided into the following areas: (1) experimental research program; (2) theoretical research program; (3) accelerator research and development; (4) divisional computing activities; (5) publications; (6) colloquia and conference talks; (7) high energy physics community activities; and (7) High Energy Physics Division research personnel. Summaries are given for individual research programs for activities (1), (2) and (3).

  17. Asymptotic and Numerical Methods for Rapidly Rotating Buoyant Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grooms, Ian G.

    This thesis documents three investigations carried out in pursuance of a doctoral degree in applied mathematics at the University of Colorado (Boulder). The first investigation concerns the properties of rotating Rayleigh-Benard convection -- thermal convection in a rotating infinite plane layer between two constant-temperature boundaries. It is noted that in certain parameter regimes convective Taylor columns appear which dominate the dynamics, and a semi-analytical model of these is presented. Investigation of the columns and of various other properties of the flow is ongoing. The second investigation concerns the interactions between planetary-scale and mesoscale dynamics in the oceans. Using multiple-scale asymptotics the possible connections between planetary geostrophic and quasigeostrophic dynamics are investigated, and three different systems of coupled equations are derived. Possible use of these equations in conjunction with the method of superparameterization, and extension of the asymptotic methods to the interactions between mesoscale and submesoscale dynamics is ongoing. The third investigation concerns the linear stability properties of semi-implicit methods for the numerical integration of ordinary differential equations, focusing in particular on the linear stability of IMEX (Implicit-Explicit) methods and exponential integrators applied to systems of ordinary differential equations arising in the numerical solution of spatially discretized nonlinear partial differential equations containing both dispersive and dissipative linear terms. While these investigations may seem unrelated at first glance, some reflection shows that they are in fact closely linked. The investigation of rotating convection makes use of single-space, multiple-time-scale asymptotics to deal with dynamics strongly constrained by rotation. Although the context of thermal convection in an infinite layer seems somewhat removed from large-scale ocean dynamics, the asymptotic

  18. On the Spectrum of an Hamiltonian in Fock Space. Discrete Spectrum Asymptotics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albeverio, Sergio; Lakaev, Saidakhmat N.; Rasulov, Tulkin H.

    2007-04-01

    A model operator H associated with the energy operator of a system describing three particles in interaction, without conservation of the number of particles, is considered. The location of the essential spectrum of H is described. The existence of infinitely many eigenvalues (resp. the finiteness of eigenvalues) below the bottom τess( H) of the essential spectrum of H is proved for the case where the associated Friedrichs model has a threshold energy resonance (resp. a threshold eigenvalue). For the number N( z) of eigenvalues of H lying below z < τess( H) the following asymptotics is found limlimits_{z to tau_ess(H)-0}N(z)/|log |z-tau_ess(H)||={U}_0 (0<{U}_0

  19. Mimicking enzymatic active sites on surfaces for energy conversion chemistry.

    PubMed

    Gutzler, Rico; Stepanow, Sebastian; Grumelli, Doris; Lingenfelder, Magalí; Kern, Klaus

    2015-07-21

    centers are adequately separated by the linking molecules and constitute promising candiates for heterogeneous catalysts. Recent advances in synthesis, characterization, and catalytic performance of metal-organic networks are highlighted in this Account. Experimental results like structure determination of the networks, charge and spin distribution in the metal centers, and catalytic mechanisms for electrochemical reactions are presented. In particular, we describe the activity of two networks for the oxygen reduction reaction in a combined scanning tunneling microscopy and electrochemical study. The similarities and differences of the networks compared to metallo-enzymes will be discussed, such as the metal surface that operates as a geometric template and concomitantly functions as an electron reservoir, and how this leads to a new class of bioinspired catalysts. The possibility to create functional two-dimensional coordination complexes at surfaces taking inspiration from nature opens up a new route for the design of potent nanocatalyst materials for energy conversion. PMID:26121410

  20. Energy-efficiency testing activities of the Mobile Energy Laboratory - Semiannual Report: April 1, 1990, Through September 30, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, G.B.; Currie, J.W.

    1991-03-01

    This report summarizes energy-efficiency testing activities applying the Mobile Energy Laboratory (MEL) testing capabilities during the third and fourth quarters of fiscal year (FY) 1990. The MELs, developed by the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), are administered by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and the Naval Energy and Environmental Support Activity (NEESA) for energy testing and energy conservation program support functions at federal facilities. MELs are equipped for the on-site evaluation of energy use efficiency. The using agencies principally fund MEL applications, while DOE/FEMP funds program administration and capability enhancement activities. This report fulfills the requirements established in Section 8 of the MEL Use Plan (PNL-6861) for semiannual reporting on energy-efficiency testing activities using the MEL capabilities. The MEL Use Committee, formally established in 1989, developed the MEL Use Plan and meets semiannually to establish priorities for energy-efficient testing applications using the MEL capabilities. This report describes the testing, test results, and suggested courses of action.

  1. K.E.E.P. - Kentucky's Energy Education Program Activities for the Classroom, K-6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Theiss, Nancy Stearns, Ed.; And Others

    Seventy-seven multidisciplinary activities for grades K-6 are contained in this revised edition of energy education lessons for Kentucky students. Section I introduces students to the topic of energy by emphasizing human interaction with the environment. It focuses on personal energy, food as the source of human energy, food chains, and the sun as…

  2. Solar energy in Italy: a profile of renewable energy activity in its national context

    SciTech Connect

    Shea, C.A.

    1980-12-01

    The following are included: country overview; energy summary; Italian Republic-geopolitical, economic, and cultural aspects; the energy profile; imported energy sources; solar energy research and development; solar energy organizations; solar energy related legislation and administration policies; and international agreements, contacts, manufacturers, and projects. (MHR)

  3. Asymptotic stability of traveling waves for scalar viscous conservation laws with non-convex nonlinearity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumura, Akitaka; Nishihara, Kenji

    1994-10-01

    The asymptotic stability of traveling wave solutions with shock profile is considered for scalar viscous conservation laws u t + f(u) x = μu xx with the initial data u 0 which tend to the constant states u ± as x→±∞. Stability theorems are obtained in the absence of the convexity of f and in the allowance of s (shock speed)= f'( u ±). Moreover, the rate of asymptotics in time is investigated. For the case f'(u+) energy method to the integrated equation of the original one. The selection of the weight plays a crucial role in those procedures.

  4. Asymptotic discontinuities in the RKKY interaction in the graphene Bernal bilayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klier, N.; Shallcross, S.; Pankratov, O.

    2014-12-01

    We derive the asymptotics of the Ruderman-Kittel-Kasuya-Yosida (RKKY) interaction between magnetic impurities in the graphene Bernal bilayer using a four-band model of the bilayer spectrum. We find three distinct regimes depending on the position of the Fermi energy in the bilayer spectrum: in the bonding-antibonding gap, at the gap edge, and outside the gap. In particular, for impurities on the bilayer bonding sublattice (the "A " sublattice) and Fermi energies close to the bonding-antibonding gap edge Eg, we identify a (integrable) logarithmic divergence of the integrand of the RKKY exchange integral. This divergence drives a number of novel RKKY effects for impurities on the A sublattice: (i) an asymptotic R-5 /2 term at the gap edge and (ii) a derivative discontinuity in RKKY interaction as a function of the Fermi energy at the gap edge. In the case of intercalated impurities (impurities between the two layers of the bilayer), we find a remarkable discontinuity in the period of the RKKY oscillation at the gap edge. The period of the oscillation limits to λ =√{2 }π ℏ vF/t⊥ as EF→Eg from below the gap edge, while it limits to λ →∞ if EF→Eg from above the gap edge (t⊥ is the interlayer coupling, vF the Fermi velocity of graphene). The origin of this discontinuity we attribute to (i) the A sublattice divergence and (ii) interference effects driven by the intrinsic valley degree of freedom of graphene. On this basis, we predict that the magnetic response of intercalated bilayer graphene will show a profound sensitivity to doping for Fermi energies near the bonding-antibonding gap edge.

  5. Energy data collection as a necessary activity for developing countries

    SciTech Connect

    Loebl, A.S.; Cagle, J.D.

    1980-01-01

    This paper examines the reasons for energy data collection by developing countries and includes an examination of the special requirements of Costa Rica for energy data collection. A primary reason for national data collection is to support the planning function, and this is particularly significant where energy planning and economic development are concerned. Energy data are necessary to support all phases of planning: short-term; mid-term; and long-range and/or strategic planning. These different planning requirements are discussed. Energy data are also necessary to support national management, as well as the economic-development functions. These latter requirements are also discussed briefly.

  6. Energy monitoring based on human activity in the workplace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mustafa, N. H.; Husain, M. N.; Abd Aziz, M. Z. A.; Othman, M. A.; Malek, F.

    2014-04-01

    Human behavior is the most important factor in order to manage energy usage. Nowadays, smart house technology offers a better quality of life by introducing automated appliance control and assistive services. However, human behaviors will contribute to the efficiency of the system. This paper will focus on monitoring efficiency based on duration time in office hours around 8am until 5pm which depend on human behavior atb the workplace. Then, the correlation coefficient method is used to show the relation between energy consumption and energy saving based on the total hours of time energy spent. In future, the percentages of energy monitoring system usage will be increase to manage energy in efficient ways based on human behaviours. This scenario will lead to the positive impact in order to achieve the energy saving in the building and support the green environment.

  7. Prediction of Energy Expenditure and Physical Activity in Preschoolers

    PubMed Central

    Butte, Nancy F.; Wong, William W.; Lee, Jong Soo; Adolph, Anne L.; Puyau, Maurice R.; Zakeri, Issa F.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Accurate, nonintrusive and feasible methods are needed to predict energy expenditure (EE) and physical activity (PA) levels in preschoolers. Herein, we validated cross-sectional time series (CSTS) and multivariate adaptive regression splines (MARS) models based on accelerometry and heart rate (HR) for prediction of EE using room calorimetry and doubly labeled water (DLW), and established accelerometry cut-points for PA levels. Methods Fifty preschoolers, mean±SD age 4.5±0.8 y, participated in room calorimetry for minute-by-minute measurements of EE, accelerometer counts (AC) (Actiheart and ActiGraph GT3X+) and HR (Actiheart). Free-living, 105 children, aged 4.6±0.9 years, completed the 7-d DLW procedure while wearing the devices. AC cut-points for PA levels were established using smoothing splines and receiver operating characteristic curves. Results Based on calorimetry, mean percent errors for EE were -2.9±10.8% and -1.1±7.4% for CSTS models, and -1.9±9.6 and 1.3±8.1% for MARS models using the Actiheart and ActiGraph+HR devices, respectively. Based on DLW, mean percent errors were -0.5±9.7% and 4.1±8.5% for CSTS models and 3.2±10.1% and 7.5±10.0% for MARS models using the Actiheart and ActiGraph+HR devices, respectively. Applying activity EE thresholds, final accelerometer cut-points were determined: 41, 449, and 1,297 cpm for Actiheart x-axis; 820, 3,908, and 6,112 cpm for ActiGraph vector magnitude; and 240, 2,120, and 4,450 cpm for ActiGraph x-axis for sedentary/light, light/moderate, and moderate/vigorous PA (MVPA). Based on confusion matrices, correctly classified rates were 81–83% for sedentary PA, 58–64% for light PA and 62–73% for MVPA. Conclusion The lack of bias and acceptable limits of agreement affirm the validity of the CSTS and MARS models for the prediction of EE in preschool-aged children. Accelerometer cut-points are satisfactory for classification of sedentary, light and moderate-vigorous levels of PA in preschoolers

  8. THE LIMIT OF MAGNETIC-SHEAR ENERGY IN SOLAR ACTIVE REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, Ronald L.; Falconer, David A.; Sterling, Alphonse C.

    2012-05-01

    It has been found previously, by measuring from active-region magnetograms a proxy of the free energy in the active region's magnetic field, (1) that there is a sharp upper limit to the free energy the field can hold that increases with the amount of magnetic field in the active region, the active region's magnetic flux content, and (2) that most active regions are near this limit when their field explodes in a coronal mass ejection/flare eruption. That is, explosive active regions are concentrated in a main-sequence path bordering the free-energy-limit line in (flux content, free-energy proxy) phase space. Here, we present evidence that specifies the underlying magnetic condition that gives rise to the free-energy limit and the accompanying main sequence of explosive active regions. Using a suitable free-energy proxy measured from vector magnetograms of 44 active regions, we find evidence that (1) in active regions at and near their free-energy limit, the ratio of magnetic-shear free energy to the non-free magnetic energy the potential field would have is of the order of one in the core field, the field rooted along the neutral line, and (2) this ratio is progressively less in active regions progressively farther below their free-energy limit. Evidently, most active regions in which this core-field energy ratio is much less than one cannot be triggered to explode; as this ratio approaches one, most active regions become capable of exploding; and when this ratio is one, most active regions are compelled to explode.

  9. The Limit of Magnetic-Shear Energy in Solar Active Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Ronald; Falconer, David; Sterling, Alphonse

    2012-01-01

    It has been found previously, by measuring from active-region magnetograms a proxy of the free energy in the active region's magnetic field, (1) that there is a sharp upper limit to the free energy the field can hold that increases with the amount of magnetic field in the active region, the active region's magnetic flux content, and (2) that most active regions are near this limit when their field explodes in a coronal mass ejection/flare eruption. That is, explosive active regions are concentrated in a main-sequence path bordering the free-energy-limit line in (flux content, free-energy proxy) phase space. Here, we present evidence that specifies the underlying magnetic condition that gives rise to the free-energy limit and the accompanying main sequence of explosive active regions. Using a suitable free-energy proxy measured from vector magnetograms of 44 active regions, we find evidence that (1) in active regions at and near their free-energy limit, the ratio of magnetic-shear free energy to the non-free magnetic energy the potential field would have is of the order of one in the core field, the field rooted along the neutral line, and (2) this ratio is progressively less in active regions progressively farther below their free-energy limit. Evidently, most active regions in which this core-field energy ratio is much less than one cannot be triggered to explode; as this ratio approaches one, most active regions become capable of exploding; and when this ratio is one, most active regions are compelled to explode.

  10. The Limit of Magnetic-Shear Energy in Solar Active Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Ronald L.; Falconer, David A.; Sterling, Alphonse C.

    2013-01-01

    It has been found previously, by measuring from active ]region magnetograms a proxy of the free energy in the active region fs magnetic field, (1) that there is a sharp upper limit to the free energy the field can hold that increases with the amount of magnetic field in the active region, the active region fs magnetic flux content, and (2) that most active regions are near this limit when their field explodes in a CME/flare eruption. That is, explosive active regions are concentrated in a main ]sequence path bordering the free ]energy ]limit line in (flux content, free ]energy proxy) phase space. Here we present evidence that specifies the underlying magnetic condition that gives rise to the free ]energy limit and the accompanying main sequence of explosive active regions. Using a suitable free energy proxy measured from vector magnetograms of 44 active regions, we find evidence that (1) in active regions at and near their free ]energy limit, the ratio of magnetic ]shear free energy to the non ]free magnetic energy the potential field would have is of order 1 in the core field, the field rooted along the neutral line, and (2) this ratio is progressively less in active regions progressively farther below their free ]energy limit. Evidently, most active regions in which this core ]field energy ratio is much less than 1 cannot be triggered to explode; as this ratio approaches 1, most active regions become capable of exploding; and when this ratio is 1, most active regions are compelled to explode.

  11. High-energy laser activities at MBDA Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohring, Bernd; Dietrich, Stephan; Tassini, Leonardo; Protz, Rudolf; Geidek, Franz; Zoz, Jürgen

    2013-05-01

    At MBDA Germany a concept for a high-energy laser weapon system is investigated, which is based on existing industrial laser sources. Due to the enormous progress in the field of high-power fiber lasers, commercial industrial fiber lasers are now available delivering a nearly-diffraction limited beam quality with power levels of up to 10 kW. By using a geometric beam coupling scheme, a number of individual high-power fiber laser beams are combined together using one common beam director telescope. A total laser beam power of more than 100 kW can be achieved, which is sufficient for an operational laser weapon system. The individual beams from the different lasers are steered by servo-loops using fast tip-tilt mirrors. This principle enables the concentration of the total laser beam power at one common focal point on a distant target, also allowing fine tracking of target movements and first-order compensation of turbulence effects on laser beam propagation. The proposed beam combination concept was demonstrated by using different experimental set-ups. A number of experiments were performed successfully to investigate laser beam target interaction and target fine tracking, also at large distances and at moving targets. Content and results of these investigations are reported, which demonstrate the complete engagement sequence for a C-RAM scenario. This includes subsequent steps of target acquisition by radar and IR optics, followed by large angle coarse tracking, active fine tracking and destruction of the target by the laser system. This successful implementation of geometric beam combining is an important step for the realization of a laser weapon system in the near future.

  12. 78 FR 47677 - DOE Activities and Methodology for Assessing Compliance With Building Energy Codes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-06

    .... Buildings that demonstrated compliance using software tools showed a strong correlation with higher... account for the correlation with higher compliance rates. Other Recent DOE Activity Related to Energy...

  13. Activation energy for a model ferrous-ferric half reaction from transition path sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drechsel-Grau, Christof; Sprik, Michiel

    2012-01-01

    Activation parameters for the model oxidation half reaction of the classical aqueous ferrous ion are compared for different molecular simulation techniques. In particular, activation free energies are obtained from umbrella integration and Marcus theory based thermodynamic integration, which rely on the diabatic gap as the reaction coordinate. The latter method also assumes linear response, and both methods obtain the activation entropy and the activation energy from the temperature dependence of the activation free energy. In contrast, transition path sampling does not require knowledge of the reaction coordinate and directly yields the activation energy [C. Dellago and P. G. Bolhuis, Mol. Simul. 30, 795 (2004), 10.1080/08927020412331294869]. Benchmark activation energies from transition path sampling agree within statistical uncertainty with activation energies obtained from standard techniques requiring knowledge of the reaction coordinate. In addition, it is found that the activation energy for this model system is significantly smaller than the activation free energy for the Marcus model, approximately half the value, implying an equally large entropy contribution.

  14. Activity Related Energy Expenditure, Appetite and Energy Intake: Potential Implications for Weight Management

    PubMed Central

    Harrington, D.M.; Martin, C.K.; Ravussin, E.; Katzmarzyk, P.T.

    2013-01-01

    The aim was to investigate relationships between activity related energy expenditure (AREE), appetite ratings and energy intake (EI) in a sample of 40 male (26.4 years; BMI 23.5 kg/m2) and 42 female (26.9 years; BMI 22.4 kg/m2) participants. AREE was expressed as the residual value of the regression between total daily EE (by doubly labeled water) and resting EE (by indirect calorimetry). EI was measured using an ad libitum buffet meal and visual analogue scales measured subjective appetite ratings before and after the meal. AREE was divided into low, middle and high sex-specific tertiles. General linear models were used to investigate differences in appetite ratings and EI across AREE tertiles. Before the meal, males in the high AREE tertile had significantly lower desire to eat and lower prospective food consumption and higher feelings of fullness compared to those in the low tertile. Males in the middle tertile had significantly higher satiety quotients after the meal and lower EI compared to the other tertiles. No significant differences across tertiles were found in females. Sex differences in relationships between AREE, appetite ratings and EI may lead to differing patterns of EI and subsequent weight maintenance. PMID:23523668

  15. Energy dependence on the electric activities of a neuron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Xin-Lin; Jin, Wu-Yin; Ma, Jun

    2015-12-01

    A nonlinear circuit can be designed by using inductor, resistor, capacitor and other electric devices, and the electromagnetic field energy can be released from the circuit in the oscillating state. The generation of spikes or bursting states in neurons could be energetically a costly process. Based on the Helmholtz’s theorem, a Hamilton energy function is defined to detect the energy shift induced by transition of electric modes in a Hindmarsh-Rose neuron. It is found that the energy storage is dependent on the external forcing, and energy release is associated with the electric mode. As a result, the bursting state and chaotic state could be helpful to release the energy in the neuron quickly. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11372122 and 11365014).

  16. The use of a running wheel to measure activity in rodents: relationship to energy balance, general activity, and reward.

    PubMed

    Novak, Colleen M; Burghardt, Paul R; Levine, James A

    2012-03-01

    Running wheels are commonly employed to measure rodent physical activity in a variety of contexts, including studies of energy balance and obesity. There is no consensus on the nature of wheel-running activity or its underlying causes, however. Here, we will begin by systematically reviewing how running wheel availability affects physical activity and other aspects of energy balance in laboratory rodents. While wheel running and physical activity in the absence of a wheel commonly correlate in a general sense, in many specific aspects the two do not correspond. In fact, the presence of running wheels alters several aspects of energy balance, including body weight and composition, food intake, and energy expenditure of activity. We contend that wheel-running activity should be considered a behavior in and of itself, reflecting several underlying behavioral processes in addition to a rodent's general, spontaneous activity. These behavioral processes include defensive behavior, predatory aggression, and depression- and anxiety-like behaviors. As it relates to energy balance, wheel running engages several brain systems-including those related to the stress response, mood, and reward, and those responsive to growth factors-that influence energy balance indirectly. We contend that wheel-running behavior represents factors in addition to rodents' tendency to be physically active, engaging additional neural and physiological mechanisms which can then independently alter energy balance and behavior. Given the impact of wheel-running behavior on numerous overlapping systems that influence behavior and physiology, this review outlines the need for careful design and interpretation of studies that utilize running wheels as a means for exercise or as a measurement of general physical activity. PMID:22230703

  17. New experimental evidence that the proton develops asymptotically into a black disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Block, Martin M.; Halzen, Francis

    2012-09-01

    Recently, the Auger group has extracted the proton-air cross section from observations of air showers produced by cosmic ray protons (and nuclei) interacting in the atmosphere, and converted it into measurements of the total and inelastic pp cross sections σtot and σinel at the super-LHC energy of 57 TeV. Their results reinforce our earlier conclusions that the proton becomes a black disk at asymptotic energies, a prediction reached on the basis of sub-LHC p¯p and pp measurements of σtot and ρ, the ratio of the real to the imaginary part of the forward scattering amplitude [M. M. Block and F. Halzen, Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 212002 (2011)PRLTAO0031-9007]. The same black disk description of the proton anticipated the values of σtot and σinel measured by the TOTEM experiment at the LHC c.m. (center of mass) energy of s=7TeV, as well as those of σinel measured by ALICE, ATLAS and CMS, as well as the ALICE measurement at 2.76 TeV. All data are consistent with a proton that is asymptotically a black disk of gluons: (i) both σtot and σinel behave as ln⁡2s, saturating the Froissart bound; (ii) the forward scattering amplitude becomes pure imaginary; (iii) the ratio σinel/σtot=0.509±0.021, compatible with the black disk value of (1)/(2); and (iv) proton interactions become flavor blind.

  18. "asymptotic Parabola" FITS for Smoothing Generally Asymmetric Light Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrych, K. D.; Andronov, I. L.; Chinarova, L. L.; Marsakova, V. I.

    A computer program is introduced, which allows to determine statistically optimal approximation using the "Asymptotic Parabola" fit, or, in other words, the spline consisting of polynomials of order 1,2,1, or two lines ("asymptotes") connected with a parabola. The function itself and its derivative is continuous. There are 5 parameters: two points, where a line switches to a parabola and vice versa, the slopes of the line and the curvature of the parabola. Extreme cases are either the parabola without lines (i.e.the parabola of width of the whole interval), or lines without a parabola (zero width of the parabola), or "line+parabola" without a second line. Such an approximation is especially effective for pulsating variables, for which the slopes of the ascending and descending branches are generally different, so the maxima and minima have asymmetric shapes. The method was initially introduced by Marsakova and Andronov (1996OAP.....9...127M) and realized as a computer program written in QBasic under DOS. It was used for dozens of variable stars, particularly, for the catalogs of the individual characteristics of pulsations of the Mira (1998OAP....11...79M) and semi-regular (200OAP....13..116C) pulsating variables. For the eclipsing variables with nearly symmetric shapes of the minima, we use a "symmetric" version of the "Asymptotic parabola". Here we introduce a Windows-based program, which does not have DOS limitation for the memory (number of observations) and screen resolution. The program has an user-friendly interface and is illustrated by an application to the test signal and to the pulsating variable AC Her.

  19. Binary black hole initial data from matched asymptotic expansions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yunes, Nicolás; Tichy, Wolfgang; Owen, Benjamin J.; Brügmann, Bernd

    2006-11-01

    We present an approximate metric for a binary black-hole spacetime to construct initial data for numerical relativity. This metric is obtained by asymptotically matching a post-Newtonian metric for a binary system to a perturbed Schwarzschild metric for each hole. In the inner zone near each hole, the metric is given by the Schwarzschild solution plus a quadrupolar perturbation corresponding to an external tidal gravitational field. In the near zone, well outside each black hole but less than a reduced wavelength from the center of mass of the binary, the metric is given by a post-Newtonian expansion including the lowest-order deviations from flat spacetime. When the near zone overlaps each inner zone in a buffer zone, the post-Newtonian and perturbed Schwarzschild metrics can be asymptotically matched to each other. By demanding matching (over a 4-volume in the buffer zone) rather than patching (choosing a particular 2-surface in the buffer zone), we guarantee that the errors are small in all zones. The resulting piecewise metric is made formally C∞ with smooth transition functions so as to obtain the finite extrinsic curvature of a 3-slice. In addition to the metric and extrinsic curvature, we present explicit results for the lapse and the shift, which can be used as initial data for numerical simulations. This initial data is not accurate all the way to the asymptotically flat ends inside each hole, and therefore must be used with evolution codes which employ black hole excision rather than puncture methods. This paper lays the foundations of a method that can be straightforwardly iterated to obtain initial data to higher perturbative order.

  20. Rotating spacetimes with asymptotic nonflat structure and the gyromagnetic ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aliev, Alikram N.

    2008-02-01

    In general relativity, the gyromagnetic ratio for all stationary, axisymmetric, and asymptotically flat Einstein-Maxwell fields is known to be g=2. In this paper, we continue our previous works of examination of this result for rotating charged spacetimes with asymptotic nonflat structure. We first consider two instructive examples of these spacetimes: The spacetime of a Kerr-Newman black hole with a straight cosmic string on its axis of symmetry and the Kerr-Newman Taub-NUT (Newman-Unti-Tamburino) spacetime. We show that for both spacetimes the gyromagnetic ratio g=2 independent of their asymptotic structure. We also extend this result to a general class of metrics which admit separation of variables for the Hamilton-Jacobi and wave equations. We proceed with the study of the gyromagnetic ratio in higher dimensions by considering the general solution for rotating charged black holes in minimal five-dimensional gauged supergravity. We obtain the analytic expressions for two distinct gyromagnetic ratios of these black holes that are associated with their two independent rotation parameters. These expressions reveal the dependence of the gyromagnetic ratio on both the curvature radius of the AdS background and the parameters of the black holes: The mass, electric charge, and two rotation parameters. We explore some special cases of interest and show that when the two rotation parameters are equal to each other and the rotation occurs at the maximum angular velocity, the gyromagnetic ratio g=4 regardless of the value of the electric charge. This agrees precisely with our earlier result obtained for general Kerr-AdS black holes with a test electric charge. We also show that in the Bogomol’nyi-Prasad-Sommerfield (BPS) limit the gyromagnetic ratio for a supersymmetric black hole with equal rotation parameters ranges between 2 and 4.

  1. Rotating spacetimes with asymptotic nonflat structure and the gyromagnetic ratio

    SciTech Connect

    Aliev, Alikram N.

    2008-02-15

    In general relativity, the gyromagnetic ratio for all stationary, axisymmetric, and asymptotically flat Einstein-Maxwell fields is known to be g=2. In this paper, we continue our previous works of examination of this result for rotating charged spacetimes with asymptotic nonflat structure. We first consider two instructive examples of these spacetimes: The spacetime of a Kerr-Newman black hole with a straight cosmic string on its axis of symmetry and the Kerr-Newman Taub-NUT (Newman-Unti-Tamburino) spacetime. We show that for both spacetimes the gyromagnetic ratio g=2 independent of their asymptotic structure. We also extend this result to a general class of metrics which admit separation of variables for the Hamilton-Jacobi and wave equations. We proceed with the study of the gyromagnetic ratio in higher dimensions by considering the general solution for rotating charged black holes in minimal five-dimensional gauged supergravity. We obtain the analytic expressions for two distinct gyromagnetic ratios of these black holes that are associated with their two independent rotation parameters. These expressions reveal the dependence of the gyromagnetic ratio on both the curvature radius of the AdS background and the parameters of the black holes: The mass, electric charge, and two rotation parameters. We explore some special cases of interest and show that when the two rotation parameters are equal to each other and the rotation occurs at the maximum angular velocity, the gyromagnetic ratio g=4 regardless of the value of the electric charge. This agrees precisely with our earlier result obtained for general Kerr-AdS black holes with a test electric charge. We also show that in the Bogomol'nyi-Prasad-Sommerfield (BPS) limit the gyromagnetic ratio for a supersymmetric black hole with equal rotation parameters ranges between 2 and 4.

  2. Energy Expenditure of Selected Household Activities during Pregnancy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chasan-Taber, Lisa; Freedson, Patty S.; Roberts, Dawn E.; Schmidt, Michael D.; Fragala, Maren S.

    2007-01-01

    Accurately measuring pregnancy physical activity is critical to assess the percentage of pregnant women meeting the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) guidelines. In addition, valid assessment of pregnancy physical activity is important for epidemiologic studies assessing the relationship between physical activity and…

  3. Energy and Change. Elementary Science Activity Series, Volume 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blackwell, Frank F.

    This book is number 3 of a series of elementary science books that presents a wealth of ideas for science activities for the elementary school teacher. Each activity includes a standard set of information designed to help teachers determine the activity's appropriateness for their students, plan its implementation, and help children focus on a…

  4. Three-dimensional asymptotically flat Einstein-Maxwell theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnich, Glenn; Lambert, Pierre-Henry; Mao, Pujian

    2015-12-01

    Three-dimensional Einstein-Maxwell theory with non-trivial asymptotics at null infinity is solved. The symmetry algebra is a Virasoro-Kac-Moody type algebra that extends the bms3 algebra of the purely gravitational case. Solution space involves logarithms and provides a tractable example of a polyhomogeneous solution space. The associated surface charges are non-integrable and non-conserved due to the presence of electromagnetic news. As in the four-dimensional purely gravitational case, their algebra involves a field-dependent central charge.

  5. Domain wall motion in magnetic nanowires: an asymptotic approach.

    PubMed

    Goussev, Arseni; Lund, Ross G; Robbins, J M; Slastikov, Valeriy; Sonnenberg, Charles

    2013-12-01

    We develop a systematic asymptotic description for domain wall motion in one-dimensional magnetic nanowires under the influence of small applied magnetic fields and currents and small material anisotropy. The magnetization dynamics, as governed by the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation, is investigated via a perturbation expansion. We compute leading-order behaviour, propagation velocities and first-order corrections of both travelling waves and oscillatory solutions, and find bifurcations between these two types of solutions. This treatment provides a sound mathematical foundation for numerous results in the literature obtained through more ad hoc arguments. PMID:24353468

  6. Domain wall motion in magnetic nanowires: an asymptotic approach

    PubMed Central

    Goussev, Arseni; Lund, Ross G.; Robbins, J. M.; Slastikov, Valeriy; Sonnenberg, Charles

    2013-01-01

    We develop a systematic asymptotic description for domain wall motion in one-dimensional magnetic nanowires under the influence of small applied magnetic fields and currents and small material anisotropy. The magnetization dynamics, as governed by the Landau–Lifshitz–Gilbert equation, is investigated via a perturbation expansion. We compute leading-order behaviour, propagation velocities and first-order corrections of both travelling waves and oscillatory solutions, and find bifurcations between these two types of solutions. This treatment provides a sound mathematical foundation for numerous results in the literature obtained through more ad hoc arguments. PMID:24353468

  7. On one asymptotic property of time-shift quantum cryptography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molotkov, S. N.

    2009-12-01

    One of the basic results of classical information theory is that error-free information transmission is possible even through an imperfect binary communication channel with noise up to an error of Q c = 1/2. There is a fundamental and applied question of whether quantum-mechanical constraints can ensure error-free classical-information transmission with quantum states and, moreover, guarantee the security of distributed keys up to the theoretical limit in the error Q c. It has been shown that the secure key distribution is possible up to the error Q c in the asymptotic limit of a large number of bases.

  8. On Quantum Gravity, Asymptotic Safety and Paramagnetic Dominance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nink, Andreas; Reuter, Martin

    2013-04-01

    We discuss the conceptual ideas underlying the Asymptotic Safety approach to the nonperturbative renormalization of gravity. By now numerous functional renormalization group (RG) studies predict the existence of a suitable nontrivial ultraviolet (UV) fixed point. We use an analogy to elementary magnetic systems to uncover the physical mechanism behind the emergence of this fixed point. It is seen to result from the dominance of certain paramagnetic-type interactions over diamagnetic ones. Furthermore, the spacetimes of quantum Einstein gravity (QEG) behave like a polarizable medium with a "paramagnetic" response to external perturbations. Similarities with the vacuum state of Yang-Mills theory are pointed out.

  9. Luminous asymptotic giant branch stars in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, Neill; Tinney, Chris; Mould, Jeremy

    1990-01-01

    A search has been conducted for optically obscured asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars in the LMC. The results obtained are noted to rule out the presence of sufficient high-luminosity 'cocoon' stars to explain the observed deficit of several hundred luminous AGB stars between the predictions of standard AGB evolution models and the observed luminosity function. Bolometric magnitudes as low as -5 are inferred for these sources; it is suggested that this phase can be triggered at low luminosities, truncating AGB evolution and leading to the observed scarcity of AGBs with M(bol) greater than -6.0 mag.

  10. Asymptotical modeling of initially curved and twisted composite rotor blades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodges, Dewey H.; Atilgan, Ali R.

    1991-05-01

    A methodology is presented for asymptotically exact analysis of initially curved and twisted, nonhomogeneous, anisotropic blades. The application of the methods is shown to result in two sets of equations: namely, cross-sectional and beam global analyses. For the former, 2D functionals can be derived, facilitating the determination of sectional elastic constants for the beam. Relations between the beam displacement and generalized strain measures and the 3D displacement and strain fields can also be obtained. The global behavior is governed by published exact intrinsic equilibrium equations and exact kinematical equations based on relations between the generalized strain measures and suitable displacement and rotational variables.

  11. Asymptotic Reissner–Nordström black holes

    SciTech Connect

    Hendi, S.H.

    2013-06-15

    We consider two types of Born–Infeld like nonlinear electromagnetic fields and obtain their interesting black hole solutions. The asymptotic behavior of these solutions is the same as that of a Reissner–Nordström black hole. We investigate the geometric properties of the solutions and find that depending on the value of the nonlinearity parameter, the singularity covered with various horizons. -- Highlights: •We investigate two types of the BI-like nonlinear electromagnetic fields in the Einsteinian gravity. •We analyze the effects of nonlinearity on the electromagnetic field. •We examine the influences of the nonlinearity on the geometric properties of the black hole solutions.

  12. Improved asymptotic expansions of time domain antenna current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Kenneth C.; Warne, Larry K.

    1991-09-01

    An improved asymptotic series for an integral representing transient current on an infinite cylindrical antenna caused by a step voltage source, applied at the gap, is given. A generating function for obtaining the general coefficient is derived. The method is applicable to types of integrals whose integrands consist of a product of a slowly varying function and a rapidly varying function. A simple accurate formula obtained before, by the averaging method, is shown to be the leading term of this infinite series. The averaging used in evaluating integrals is shown to improve the accuracy of the leading term.

  13. Asymptotically matched quasicircular binary black hole initial data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Throwe, William

    2015-04-01

    We demonstrate initial data for binary black hole simulations based on asymptotically matching a generic post-Newtonian binary metric with tidally deformed Schwarzschild solutions. These data have been evolved using the Spectral Einstein Code (SpEC) and have been shown to result in reduced junk radiation and smaller mass drift than our previous initial data sets. The use of a generic post-Newtonian binary metric for the near-field region allows us to adjust the eccentricity of simulated binaries, allowing for quasicircular simulations with eccentricities similar to those produced by previous initial data sets.

  14. A simple global asymptotic convergent observer for uncertain mechanical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Yuxin

    2016-03-01

    A simple nonlinear observer is proposed for a class of uncertain nonlinear multiple-input-multiple-output mechanical systems whose dynamics are first-order differentiable. The proposed observer is constructed without any detailed model knowledge of the system and the observer gains are easily chosen. Another interesting features of the proposed observer include that it is more immune to noise and is high robust against parameters variations, and thus it is readily implemented. Lyapunov's direct method is employed to prove global asymptotic convergent observation. Extensive simulations are presented to illustrate the effectiveness and improved performance of the proposed observer.

  15. Helicopter rotor loads using matched asymptotic expansions: User's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierce, G. A.; Vaidyanathan, A. R.

    1983-01-01

    Computer programs were developed to implement the computational scheme arising from Van Holten's asymptotic method for calculating airloads on a helicopter rotor blade in forward flight, and a similar technique which is based on a discretized version of the method. The basic outlines of the two programs are presented, followed by separate descriptions of the input requirements and output format. Two examples illustrating job entry with appropriate input data and corresponding output are included. Appendices contain a sample table of lift coefficient data for the NACA 0012 air foil and listings of the two programs.

  16. Further evidence for asymptotic safety of quantum gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falls, K.; Litim, D.; Nikolakopoulos, K.; Rahmede, C.

    2016-05-01

    The asymptotic safety conjecture is examined for quantum gravity in four dimensions. Using the renormalization group, we find evidence for an interacting UV fixed point for polynomial actions up to the 34th power in the Ricci scalar. The extrapolation to infinite polynomial order is given, and the self-consistency of the fixed point is established using a bootstrap test. All details of our analysis are provided. We also clarify further aspects such as stability, convergence, the role of boundary conditions, and a partial degeneracy of eigenvalues. Within this setting we find strong support for the conjecture.

  17. Asymptotic-preserving Boltzmann model equations for binary gas mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Sha; Liang, Yihua

    2016-02-01

    An improved system of Boltzmann model equations is developed for binary gas mixture. This system of model equations has a complete asymptotic preserving property that can strictly recover the Navier-Stokes equations in the continuum limit with the correct constitutive relations and the correct viscosity, thermal conduction, diffusion, and thermal diffusion coefficients. In this equation system, the self- and cross-collision terms in Boltzmann equations are replaced by single relaxation terms. In monocomponent case, this system of equations can be reduced to the commonly used Shakhov equation. The conservation property and the H theorem which are important for model equations are also satisfied by this system of model equations.

  18. Asymptotic-preserving Boltzmann model equations for binary gas mixture.

    PubMed

    Liu, Sha; Liang, Yihua

    2016-02-01

    An improved system of Boltzmann model equations is developed for binary gas mixture. This system of model equations has a complete asymptotic preserving property that can strictly recover the Navier-Stokes equations in the continuum limit with the correct constitutive relations and the correct viscosity, thermal conduction, diffusion, and thermal diffusion coefficients. In this equation system, the self- and cross-collision terms in Boltzmann equations are replaced by single relaxation terms. In monocomponent case, this system of equations can be reduced to the commonly used Shakhov equation. The conservation property and the H theorem which are important for model equations are also satisfied by this system of model equations. PMID:26986408

  19. Dissipation of acoustic-gravity waves: an asymptotic approach.

    PubMed

    Godin, Oleg A

    2014-12-01

    Acoustic-gravity waves in the middle and upper atmosphere and long-range propagation of infrasound are strongly affected by air viscosity and thermal conductivity. To characterize the wave dissipation, it is typical to consider idealized environments, which admit plane-wave solutions. Here, an asymptotic approach is developed that relies instead on the assumption that spatial variations of environmental parameters are gradual. It is found that realistic assumptions about the atmosphere lead to rather different predictions for wave damping than do the plane-wave solutions. A modification to the Sutherland-Bass model of infrasound absorption is proposed. PMID:25480091

  20. The thermal stability of coronal loops by nonlinear diffusion asymptotics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pakkert, J. W.; Verhulst, F.; Martens, P. C. H.

    1987-01-01

    A nonlinear reaction-diffusion equation and some additional constraints are derived which describe the time-dependent behavior of the temperature structure of the plasma in coronal loops. The equation is analyzed using nonlinear diffusion asymptotics, in particular singular perturbation techniques, and the results are interpreted in the context of the physical problem of the thermal stability and temporal behavior of the plasma. The results are consistent with the possibility of cyclic thermal behavior of the plasma, as suggested by Kuin and Martens (1982).