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Sample records for activation experimental approach

  1. Experimental acquisition system for impedance tomography with active electrode approach.

    PubMed

    Rigaud, B; Shi, Y; Chauveau, N; Morucci, J P

    1993-11-01

    An experimental system for impedance tomography has been constructed. The acquisition system uses 16 multifunctional active electrodes, each including a current source and a voltage buffer. Images of active and reactive parts of different target impedances in a phantom filled with liquid have been obtained. The system performance has been compared with those of other systems using either a mesh phantom or rods as point sources used for the determination of the modulation transfer function. PMID:8145585

  2. Proficient synthesis of biologically active pregnane derivatives and its glycoside - Experimental and theoretical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sethi, Arun; Bhatia, Akriti; Maurya, Atul; Panday, Anil; Bhatia, Gitika; Shrivastava, Atul; Singh, Ranvijay Pratap; Prakash, Rohit

    2013-11-01

    Synthesis of a number of pregnane derivatives including the glycoside has been described in detail. These compounds were synthesized by reaction of 3β-acetoxy-5, 16-pregnadiene-20-one, derived from diosgenin and then treating it with different nucleophilic reagents. The structures of these newly synthesized compounds were established on the basis of their physical, chemical and spectral data. The molecular geometry of compounds were calculated in ground state by density functional theory method (DFT/B3LYP) using 6-31G (d,p) basis set. 1H NMR chemical shifts were also studied using gauge-including atomic orbital (GIAO) approach, which were found in good agreement with the experimental values. The study of electronic properties such as UV-Vis spectral analysis, HOMO and LUMO energy calculations were performed with time dependent DFT (TD-DFT). Global and local reactivity descriptors were calculated to study the reactive sites within the molecules. These compounds were also evaluated for their anti-dyslipidemic (Triton model) and in vitro anti-oxidant activities. Out of these, compound 9 showed potent anti-dyslipidemic and anti-oxidant activity.

  3. A theoretical and experimental approach for correlating nanoparticle structure and electrocatalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Rachel M; Yancey, David F; Zhang, Liang; Chill, Samuel T; Henkelman, Graeme; Crooks, Richard M

    2015-05-19

    The objective of the research described in this Account is the development of high-throughput computational-based screening methods for discovery of catalyst candidates and subsequent experimental validation using appropriate catalytic nanoparticles. Dendrimer-encapsulated nanoparticles (DENs), which are well-defined 1-2 nm diameter metal nanoparticles, fulfill the role of model electrocatalysts. Effective comparison of theory and experiment requires that the theoretical and experimental models map onto one another perfectly. We use novel synthetic methods, advanced characterization techniques, and density functional theory (DFT) calculations to approach this ideal. For example, well-defined core@shell DENs can be synthesized by electrochemical underpotential deposition (UPD), and the observed deposition potentials can be compared to those calculated by DFT. Theory is also used to learn more about structure than can be determined by analytical characterization alone. For example, density functional theory molecular dynamics (DFT-MD) was used to show that the core@shell configuration of Au@Pt DENs undergoes a surface reconstruction that dramatically affects its electrocatalytic properties. A separate Pd@Pt DENs study also revealed reorganization, in this case a core-shell inversion to a Pt@Pd structure. Understanding these types of structural changes is critical to building correlations between structure and catalytic function. Indeed, the second principal focus of the work described here is correlating structure and catalytic function through the combined use of theory and experiment. For example, the Au@Pt DENs system described earlier is used for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) as well as for the electro-oxidation of formic acid. The surface reorganization predicted by theory enhances our understanding of the catalytic measurements. In the case of formic acid oxidation, the deformed nanoparticle structure leads to reduced CO binding energy and therefore

  4. Experimental and theoretical approach of nanocrystalline TiO2 with antifungal activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longo, Valeria M.; Picon, Francini C.; Zamperini, Camila; Albuquerque, Anderson R.; Sambrano, Julio R.; Vergani, Carlos E.; Machado, Ana L.; Andrés, Juan; Hernandes, Antônio C.; Varela, José A.; Longo, Elson

    2013-07-01

    Using a solvothermal method for this research we synthesized nanocrystalline titanium dioxide (nc-TiO2) anatase particles with a mean diameter of 5.4 nm and evaluated their potential antifungal effect against planktonic cells of Candida albicans without UV radiation. To complement experimental data, we analyzed structural and electronic properties of both the bulk and the (1 0 1) surface of anatase by first-principles calculations. Based on experimental and theoretical results, a reactive O2H and OH species formation mechanism was proposed to explain the key factor which facilitates the antifungal activity.

  5. Experimental Comparison of two Active Vibration Control Approaches: Velocity Feedback and Negative Capacitance Shunt Damping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beck, Benjamin; Schiller, Noah

    2013-01-01

    This paper outlines a direct, experimental comparison between two established active vibration control techniques. Active vibration control methods, many of which rely upon piezoelectric patches as actuators and/or sensors, have been widely studied, showing many advantages over passive techniques. However, few direct comparisons between different active vibration control methods have been made to determine the performance benefit of one method over another. For the comparison here, the first control method, velocity feedback, is implemented using four accelerometers that act as sensors along with an analog control circuit which drives a piezoelectric actuator. The second method, negative capacitance shunt damping, consists of a basic analog circuit which utilizes a single piezoelectric patch as both a sensor and actuator. Both of these control methods are implemented individually using the same piezoelectric actuator attached to a clamped Plexiglas window. To assess the performance of each control method, the spatially averaged velocity of the window is compared to an uncontrolled response.

  6. Experimental approaches to evaluate activities of cytochromes P450 3A

    PubMed Central

    Bořek-Dohalská, Lucie; Hodek, Petr; Hudeček, Jiří; Stiborová, Marie

    2008-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 (CYP) is a heme protein oxidizing various xenobiotics, as well as endogenous substrates. Understanding which CYP enzymes are involved in metabolic activation and/or detoxication of different compounds is important in the assessment of an individual's susceptibility to the toxic action of these substances. Therefore, investigation which of several in vitro experimental models are appropriate to mimic metabolism of xenobiotics in organisms is the major challenge for research of many laboratories. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficiency of different in vitro systems containing individual enzymes of the mixed-function monooxygenase system to oxidize two model substrates of CYP3A enzymes, exogenous and endogenous compounds, α-naphtoflavone (α-NF) and testosterone, respectively. Several different enzymatic systems containing CYP3A enzymes were utilized in the study: (i) human hepatic microsomes rich in CYP3A4, (ii) hepatic microsomes of rabbits treated with a CYP3A6 inducer, rifampicine, (iii) microsomes of Baculovirus transfected insect cells containing recombinant human CYP3A4 and NADPH:CYP reductase with or without cytochrome b5 (Supersomes™), (iv) membranes isolated from of Escherichia coli, containing recombinant human CYP3A4 and cytochrome b5, and (v) purified human CYP3A4 or rabbit CYP3A6 reconstituted with NADPH:CYP reductase with or without cytochrome b5 in liposomes. The most efficient systems oxidizing both compounds were Supersomes™ containing human CYP3A4 and cytochrome b5. The results presented in this study demonstrate the suitability of the supersomal CYP3A4 systems for studies investigating oxidation of testosterone and α-NF in vitro. PMID:21218106

  7. Angiogenic Activity of Breast Cancer Patients’ Monocytes Reverted by Combined Use of Systems Modeling and Experimental Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Guex, Nicolas; Crespo, Isaac; Bron, Sylvian; Ifticene-Treboux, Assia; Faes-van’t Hull, Eveline; Kharoubi, Solange; Liechti, Robin; Werffeli, Patricia; Ibberson, Mark; Majo, Francois; Nicolas, Michäel; Laurent, Julien; Garg, Abhishek; Zaman, Khalil; Lehr, Hans-Anton; Stevenson, Brian J.; Rüegg, Curzio; Coukos, George; Delaloye, Jean-François; Xenarios, Ioannis; Doucey, Marie-Agnès

    2015-01-01

    Angiogenesis plays a key role in tumor growth and cancer progression. TIE-2-expressing monocytes (TEM) have been reported to critically account for tumor vascularization and growth in mouse tumor experimental models, but the molecular basis of their pro-angiogenic activity are largely unknown. Moreover, differences in the pro-angiogenic activity between blood circulating and tumor infiltrated TEM in human patients has not been established to date, hindering the identification of specific targets for therapeutic intervention. In this work, we investigated these differences and the phenotypic reversal of breast tumor pro-angiogenic TEM to a weak pro-angiogenic phenotype by combining Boolean modelling and experimental approaches. Firstly, we show that in breast cancer patients the pro-angiogenic activity of TEM increased drastically from blood to tumor, suggesting that the tumor microenvironment shapes the highly pro-angiogenic phenotype of TEM. Secondly, we predicted in silico all minimal perturbations transitioning the highly pro-angiogenic phenotype of tumor TEM to the weak pro-angiogenic phenotype of blood TEM and vice versa. In silico predicted perturbations were validated experimentally using patient TEM. In addition, gene expression profiling of TEM transitioned to a weak pro-angiogenic phenotype confirmed that TEM are plastic cells and can be reverted to immunological potent monocytes. Finally, the relapse-free survival analysis showed a statistically significant difference between patients with tumors with high and low expression values for genes encoding transitioning proteins detected in silico and validated on patient TEM. In conclusion, the inferred TEM regulatory network accurately captured experimental TEM behavior and highlighted crosstalk between specific angiogenic and inflammatory signaling pathways of outstanding importance to control their pro-angiogenic activity. Results showed the successful in vitro reversion of such an activity by perturbation

  8. The role of ECL2 in CGRP receptor activation: a combined modelling and experimental approach

    PubMed Central

    Woolley, Michael. J.; Watkins, Harriet A.; Taddese, Bruck; Karakullukcu, Z. Gamze; Barwell, James; Smith, Kevin J.; Hay, Debbie L.; Poyner, David R.; Reynolds, Christopher A.; Conner, Alex C.

    2013-01-01

    The calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) receptor is a complex of a calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CLR), which is a family B G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) and receptor activity modifying protein 1. The role of the second extracellular loop (ECL2) of CLR in binding CGRP and coupling to Gs was investigated using a combination of mutagenesis and modelling. An alanine scan of residues 271–294 of CLR showed that the ability of CGRP to produce cAMP was impaired by point mutations at 13 residues; most of these also impaired the response to adrenomedullin (AM). These data were used to select probable ECL2-modelled conformations that are involved in agonist binding, allowing the identification of the likely contacts between the peptide and receptor. The implications of the most likely structures for receptor activation are discussed. PMID:24047872

  9. Experimental Solubility Approach to Determine PDMS-Water Partition Constants and PDMS Activity Coefficients.

    PubMed

    Grant, Sharon; Schacht, Veronika J; Escher, Beate I; Hawker, Darryl W; Gaus, Caroline

    2016-03-15

    Freely dissolved aqueous concentration and chemical activity are important determinants of contaminant transport, fate, and toxic potential. Both parameters are commonly quantified using Solid Phase Micro-Extraction (SPME) based on a sorptive polymer such as polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). This method requires the PDMS-water partition constants, KPDMSw, or activity coefficient to be known. For superhydrophobic contaminants (log KOW >6), application of existing methods to measure these parameters is challenging, and independent measures to validate KPDMSw values would be beneficial. We developed a simple, rapid method to directly measure PDMS solubilities of solid contaminants, SPDMS(S), which together with literature thermodynamic properties was then used to estimate KPDMSw and activity coefficients in PDMS. PDMS solubility for the test compounds (log KOW 7.2-8.3) ranged over 3 orders of magnitude (4.1-5700 μM), and was dependent on compound class. For polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs), solubility-derived KPDMSw increased linearly with hydrophobicity, consistent with trends previously reported for less chlorinated congeners. In contrast, subcooled liquid PDMS solubilities, SPDMS(L), were approximately constant within a compound class. SPDMS(S) and KPDMSw can therefore be predicted for a compound class with reasonable robustness based solely on the class-specific SPDMS(L) and a particular congener's entropy of fusion, melting point, and aqueous solubility. PMID:26881312

  10. A New Two-Step Approach for Hands-On Teaching of Gene Technology: Effects on Students' Activities During Experimentation in an Outreach Gene Technology Lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scharfenberg, Franz-Josef; Bogner, Franz X.

    2011-08-01

    Emphasis on improving higher level biology education continues. A new two-step approach to the experimental phases within an outreach gene technology lab, derived from cognitive load theory, is presented. We compared our approach using a quasi-experimental design with the conventional one-step mode. The difference consisted of additional focused discussions combined with students writing down their ideas (step one) prior to starting any experimental procedure (step two). We monitored students' activities during the experimental phases by continuously videotaping 20 work groups within each approach ( N = 131). Subsequent classification of students' activities yielded 10 categories (with well-fitting intra- and inter-observer scores with respect to reliability). Based on the students' individual time budgets, we evaluated students' roles during experimentation from their prevalent activities (by independently using two cluster analysis methods). Independently of the approach, two common clusters emerged, which we labeled as `all-rounders' and as `passive students', and two clusters specific to each approach: `observers' as well as `high-experimenters' were identified only within the one-step approach whereas under the two-step conditions `managers' and `scribes' were identified. Potential changes in group-leadership style during experimentation are discussed, and conclusions for optimizing science teaching are drawn.

  11. An Experimental Approach To… Everything!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orr, Taylor; Flowers, Jim

    2014-01-01

    The goal of formal education is student learning. By emphasizing experimentation in the classroom or lab, students learn about the results of a particular inquiry. But more importantly, they learn to refine their approach to learning by creating new knowledge rather than merely remembering what they have been told. An inquiry approach where…

  12. Innovative approach for increasing physical activity among breast cancer survivors: protocol for Project MOVE, a quasi-experimental study

    PubMed Central

    Caperchione, Cristina M; Sabiston, Catherine M; Clark, Marianne I; Bottorff, Joan L; Toxopeus, Renee; Campbell, Kristin L; Eves, Neil D; Ellard, Susan L; Gotay, Carolyn

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Physical activity is a cost-effective and non-pharmaceutical strategy that can help mitigate the physical and psychological health challenges associated with breast cancer survivorship. However, up to 70% of women breast cancer survivors are not meeting minimum recommended physical activity guidelines. Project MOVE is an innovative approach to increase physical activity among breast cancer survivors through the use of Action Grants, a combination of microgrants (small amounts of money awarded to groups of individuals to support a physical activity initiative) and financial incentives. The purpose of this paper is to describe the rationale and protocol of Project MOVE. Method and analysis A quasi-experimental pre–post design will be used. Twelve groups of 8–12 adult women who are breast cancer survivors (N=132) were recruited for the study via face-to-face meetings with breast cancer-related stakeholders, local print and radio media, social media, and pamphlets and posters at community organisations and medical clinics. Each group submitted a microgrant application outlining their proposed physical activity initiative. Successful applicants were determined by a grant review panel and informed of a financial incentive on meeting their physical activity goals. An evaluation of feasibility will be guided by the reach, effectiveness, adoption, implementation, maintenance (RE-AIM) framework and assessed through focus groups, interviews and project-related reports. Physical activity will be assessed through accelerometry and by self-report. Quality of life, motivation to exercise and social connection will also be assessed through self-report. Assessments will occur at baseline, 6 months and 1 year. Ethics and dissemination Ethical approval was obtained from the University of British Columbia's Behavioural Research Ethics Board (#H14-02502) and has been funded by the Canadian Cancer Society Research Institute (project number #702913). Study findings

  13. Antioxidant activity, NMR, X-ray, ECD and UV/vis spectra of (+)-terrein: Experimental and theoretical approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trabolsy, Zuhra Bashir Khalifa Al; Anouar, El Hassane; Zakaria, Nur Shahidatul Shida; Zulkeflee, Manar; Hasan, Mizaton Hazizul; Zin, Maisarah Mohd; Ahmad, Rohaya; Sultan, Sadia; Weber, Jean-Frédéric F.

    2014-02-01

    Fungal metabolite terrein isolated from Aspergillus terreus is endowed with diverse biological and antioxidant activities. To determine the stereochemistry of the isolated terrein, we combined spectroscopic methods (CD and NMR spectra) and theoretical calculations (DFT and TD-DFT methods). Stereochemistry effects on the antioxidant activity of isolated terrein were evaluated by calculating bond dissociation enthalpies (BDEs), ionization potentials (IPs) and spin density delocalization of terrein and isoterrein stereoisomers with B3P86/6-31+G (d, p) method in gas and polarizable continuum model. The results showed a good agreement between experimental data and theoretical calculations which confirmed the (+)-terrein stereochemistry of isolated metabolite. Theoretical calculations showed that the antioxidant activity is relatively influenced by isomeric geometry of the terrein (a variation of 2 kcal/mol between BDEs of terrein and isoterrein isomers), while chirality has no influence on the antioxidant activity [0.2 kcal/mol difference between BDEs of (+)- and (-)-terrein]. The low antioxidant activity of (+)-terrein with respect to trolox and ascorbic acid was explained by the positive free Gibbs energy of the hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) mechanism and high BDE values of the 2-OH active site.

  14. Experimental and Theoretical Approaches for the Surface Interaction between Copper and Activated Sludge Microorganisms at Molecular Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Hong-Wei; Chen, Jie-Jie; Sheng, Guo-Ping; Su, Ji-Hu; Wei, Shi-Qiang; Yu, Han-Qing

    2014-11-01

    Interactions between metals and activated sludge microorganisms substantially affect the speciation, immobilization, transport, and bioavailability of trace heavy metals in biological wastewater treatment plants. In this study, the interaction of Cu(II), a typical heavy metal, onto activated sludge microorganisms was studied in-depth using a multi-technique approach. The complexing structure of Cu(II) on microbial surface was revealed by X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) analysis. EPR spectra indicated that Cu(II) was held in inner-sphere surface complexes of octahedral coordination with tetragonal distortion of axial elongation. XAFS analysis further suggested that the surface complexation between Cu(II) and microbial cells was the distorted inner-sphere coordinated octahedra containing four short equatorial bonds and two elongated axial bonds. To further validate the results obtained from the XAFS and EPR analysis, density functional theory calculations were carried out to explore the structural geometry of the Cu complexes. These results are useful to better understand the speciation, immobilization, transport, and bioavailability of metals in biological wastewater treatment plants.

  15. Experimental and Theoretical Approaches for the Surface Interaction between Copper and Activated Sludge Microorganisms at Molecular Scale

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Hong-Wei; Chen, Jie-Jie; Sheng, Guo-Ping; Su, Ji-Hu; Wei, Shi-Qiang; Yu, Han-Qing

    2014-01-01

    Interactions between metals and activated sludge microorganisms substantially affect the speciation, immobilization, transport, and bioavailability of trace heavy metals in biological wastewater treatment plants. In this study, the interaction of Cu(II), a typical heavy metal, onto activated sludge microorganisms was studied in-depth using a multi-technique approach. The complexing structure of Cu(II) on microbial surface was revealed by X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) analysis. EPR spectra indicated that Cu(II) was held in inner-sphere surface complexes of octahedral coordination with tetragonal distortion of axial elongation. XAFS analysis further suggested that the surface complexation between Cu(II) and microbial cells was the distorted inner-sphere coordinated octahedra containing four short equatorial bonds and two elongated axial bonds. To further validate the results obtained from the XAFS and EPR analysis, density functional theory calculations were carried out to explore the structural geometry of the Cu complexes. These results are useful to better understand the speciation, immobilization, transport, and bioavailability of metals in biological wastewater treatment plants. PMID:25399801

  16. Identification of phototransformation products of thalidomide and mixture toxicity assessment: an experimental and quantitative structural activity relationships (QSAR) approach.

    PubMed

    Mahmoud, Waleed M M; Toolaram, Anju P; Menz, Jakob; Leder, Christoph; Schneider, Mandy; Kümmerer, Klaus

    2014-02-01

    The fate of thalidomide (TD) was investigated after irradiation with a medium-pressure Hg-lamp. The primary elimination of TD was monitored and structures of phototransformation products (PTPs) were assessed by LC-UV-FL-MS/MS. Environmentally relevant properties of TD and its PTPs as well as hydrolysis products (HTPs) were predicted using in silico QSAR models. Mutagenicity of TD and its PTPs was investigated in the Ames microplate format (MPF) aqua assay (Xenometrix, AG). Furthermore, a modified luminescent bacteria test (kinetic luminescent bacteria test (kinetic LBT)), using the luminescent bacteria species Vibrio fischeri, was applied for the initial screening of environmental toxicity. Additionally, toxicity of phthalimide, one of the identified PTPs, was investigated separately in the kinetic LBT. The UV irradiation eliminated TD itself without complete mineralization and led to the formation of several PTPs. TD and its PTPs did not exhibit mutagenic response in the Salmonella typhimurium strains TA 98, and TA 100 with and without metabolic activation. In contrast, QSAR analysis of PTPs and HTPs provided evidence for mutagenicity, genotoxicity and carcinogenicity using additional endpoints in silico software. QSAR analysis of different ecotoxicological endpoints, such as acute toxicity towards V. fischeri, provided positive alerts for several identified PTPs and HTPs. This was partially confirmed by the results of the kinetic LBT, in which a steady increase of acute and chronic toxicity during the UV-treatment procedure was observed for the photolytic mixtures at the highest tested concentration. Moreover, the number of PTPs within the reaction mixture that might be responsible for the toxification of TD during UV-treatment was successfully narrowed down by correlating the formation kinetics of PTPs with QSAR predictions and experimental toxicity data. Beyond that, further analysis of the commercially available PTP phthalimide indicated that transformation of

  17. Synthesis of N-(6-Arylbenzo[d]thiazole-2-acetamide Derivatives and Their Biological Activities: An Experimental and Computational Approach.

    PubMed

    Gull, Yasmeen; Rasool, Nasir; Noreen, Mnaza; Altaf, Ataf Ali; Musharraf, Syed Ghulam; Zubair, Muhammad; Nasim, Faiz-Ul-Hassan; Yaqoob, Asma; DeFeo, Vincenzo; Zia-Ul-Haq, Muhammad

    2016-01-01

    A new series of N-(6-arylbenzo[d]thiazol-2-yl)acetamides were synthesized by C-C coupling methodology in the presence of Pd(0) using various aryl boronic pinacol ester/acids. The newly synthesized compounds were evaluated for various biological activities like antioxidant, haemolytic, antibacterial and urease inhibition. In bioassays these compounds were found to have moderate to good activities. Among the tested biological activities screened these compounds displayed the most significant activity for urease inhibition. In urease inhibition, all compounds were found more active than the standard used. The compound N-(6-(p-tolyl)benzo[d]thiazol-2-yl)acetamide was found to be the most active. To understand this urease inhibition, molecular docking studies were performed. The in silico studies showed that these acetamide derivatives bind to the non-metallic active site of the urease enzyme. Structure-activity studies revealed that H-bonding of compounds with the enzyme is important for its inhibition. PMID:26927044

  18. Experimental Approach to Teaching Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stern, Catalina

    2015-11-01

    For the last 15 years we have promoted experimental work even in the theoretical courses. Fluids appear in the Physics curriculum of the National University of Mexico in two courses: Collective Phenomena in their sophomore year and Continuum Mechanics in their senior year. In both, students are asked for a final project. Surprisingly, at least 85% choose an experimental subject even though this means working extra hours every week. Some of the experiments were shown in this congress two years ago. This time we present some new results and the methodology we use in the classroom. I acknowledge support from the Physics Department, Facultad de Ciencias, UNAM.

  19. Involving students in experimental design: three approaches.

    PubMed

    McNeal, A P; Silverthorn, D U; Stratton, D B

    1998-12-01

    Many faculty want to involve students more actively in laboratories and in experimental design. However, just "turning them loose in the lab" is time-consuming and can be frustrating for both students and faculty. We describe three different ways of providing structures for labs that require students to design their own experiments but guide the choices. One approach emphasizes invertebrate preparations and classic techniques that students can learn fairly easily. Students must read relevant primary literature and learn each technique in one week, and then design and carry out their own experiments in the next week. Another approach provides a "design framework" for the experiments so that all students are using the same technique and the same statistical comparisons, whereas their experimental questions differ widely. The third approach involves assigning the questions or problems but challenging students to design good protocols to answer these questions. In each case, there is a mixture of structure and freedom that works for the level of the students, the resources available, and our particular aims. PMID:16161223

  20. Structures of benthic prokaryotic communities and their hydrolytic enzyme activities resuspended from samples of intertidal mudflats: An experimental approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallet, Clarisse; Agogué, Hélène; Bonnemoy, Frédérique; Guizien, Katell; Orvain, Francis; Dupuy, Christine

    2014-09-01

    Resuspended sediment can increase plankton biomass and the growth of bacteria, thus influencing the coastal planktonic microbial food web. But little is known about resuspension itself: is it a single massive change or a whole series of events and how does it affect the quantity and quality of resuspended prokaryotic cells? We simulated the sequential erosion of mud cores to better understand the fate and role of benthic prokaryotes resuspended in the water column. We analyzed the total, attached and free-living prokaryotic cells resuspended, their structure and the activities of their hydrolytic enzymes in terms of the biotic and abiotic factors that affect the composition of microphytobenthic biofilm. Free living prokaryotes were resuspended during the fluff layer erosion phase (for shear velocities below 5 cm · s- 1) regardless of the bed sediment composition. At the higher shear velocities, resuspended prokaryotes were attached to particulate matter. Free and attached cells are thus unevenly distributed, scattered throughout the organic matter (OM) in the uppermost mm of the sediment. Only 10-27% of the total cells initially resuspended were living and most of the Bacteria were Cyanobacteria and Gamma-proteobacteria; their numbers increased to over 30% in parallel with the hydrolytic enzyme activity at highest shear velocity. These conditions released prokaryotic cells having different functions that lie deep in the sediment; the most important of them are Archaea. Finally, composition of resuspended bacterial populations varied with resuspension intensity, and intense resuspension events boosted the microbial dynamics and enzyme activities in the bottom layers of sea water.

  1. Experimental approach to neutron stars

    SciTech Connect

    Leifels, Yvonne

    2014-05-09

    The equation of state (EOS) of nuclear matter is of fundamental importance in many areas of nuclear physics and astrophysics In the laboratory, there are different means to study the nuclearmatter equation of state and its density dependence in particular: nuclear masses, neutron skins, pygmy resonance, and nuclear structure at the drip line give access to nuclear matter properties at densities lower than and at saturation density ρ0. Heavy ion reactions at energies above 0.1 AGeV are the only means to study nuclear matter at densities larger than normal nuclear matter density ρ0. In the beamenergy range of 0.1 to 2A GeV nuclear matter is compressed upto three times ρ0. Access to nuclear matter properties is achieved by simulating nuclear collisions by means of microscopic transport codes, or statistical or hydrodynamicalmodels. Characteristics of heavy-ion collisions are discussed, and experimental observables which allow to constrain nuclear matter properties by comparing experimental results with those of transport codes are presented. Special emphasis will be given to the density dependence of the symmetry energy which is the most relevant connection between neutron stars and heavy ion collisions.

  2. Measuring bacterial activity and community composition at high hydrostatic pressure using a novel experimental approach: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Wannicke, Nicola; Frindte, Katharina; Gust, Giselher; Liskow, Iris; Wacker, Alexander; Meyer, Andreas; Grossart, Hans-Peter

    2015-05-01

    In this pilot study, we describe a high-pressure incubation system allowing multiple subsampling of a pressurized culture without decompression. The system was tested using one piezophilic (Photobacterium profundum), one piezotolerant (Colwellia maris) bacterial strain and a decompressed sample from the Mediterranean deep sea (3044 m) determining bacterial community composition, protein production (BPP) and cell multiplication rates (BCM) up to 27 MPa. The results showed elevation of BPP at high pressure was by a factor of 1.5 ± 1.4 and 3.9 ± 2.3 for P. profundum and C. maris, respectively, compared to ambient-pressure treatments and by a factor of 6.9 ± 3.8 fold in the field samples. In P. profundum and C. maris, BCM at high pressure was elevated (3.1 ± 1.5 and 2.9 ± 1.7 fold, respectively) compared to the ambient-pressure treatments. After 3 days of incubation at 27 MPa, the natural bacterial deep-sea community was dominated by one phylum of the genus Exiguobacterium, indicating the rapid selection of piezotolerant bacteria. In future studies, our novel incubation system could be part of an isopiestic pressure chain, allowing more accurate measurement of bacterial activity rates which is important both for modeling and for predicting the efficiency of the oceanic carbon pump. PMID:25873457

  3. The impact of area-based initiatives on physical activity trends in deprived areas; a quasi-experimental evaluation of the Dutch District Approach

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Numerous area-based initiatives (ABIs) have been implemented in deprived neighbourhoods across Europe. These large-scale initiatives aim to tackle the socio-economic and environmental problems in these areas that might influence physical activity (PA). There is little robust evidence of their impact on PA. This study aimed to assess the impact of a Dutch ABI called the District Approach on trends in leisure-time PA in deprived districts. Methods Repeated cross-sectional data on 48401 adults across the Netherlands were obtained from the Integrated Survey on Household Living Conditions (POLS) 2004–2011. 1517 of these adults resided in deprived target districts and 46884 adults resided elsewhere in the Netherlands. In a quasi-experimental interrupted time-series design, multilevel logistic regression analyses were performed to assess trends in leisure-time walking, cycling, and sports before and during the intervention. Trends in deprived target districts were compared with trends in various control groups. The role of the intensity of environmental interventions was also assessed. Results Deprived target districts showed a significantly positive change in walking trend between the pre-intervention and intervention period. The trend change in the deprived target districts was significantly larger compared to the rest of the Netherlands, but not compared to other deprived districts. For cycling and sports, neither deprived districts nor control districts showed a significant trend change. For all leisure-time PA outcomes, trend changes were not related to the intensity of environmental interventions in the deprived target districts. Conclusion Some evidence was found to suggest that ABIs like the District Approach have a positive impact on leisure-time PA in deprived districts, regardless of the intensity of environmental interventions. PMID:24612770

  4. Experimental Approaches to Studying Biological Electron Transfer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Robert A.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Provides an overview on biological electron-transfer reactions, summarizing what is known about how distance, spatial organization, medium, and other factors affect electron transfer. Experimental approaches, including studies of bimolecular electron transfer reactions (electrostatic effects and precursor complexes), are considered. (JN)

  5. A hybrid approach to experimental control.

    PubMed

    Dixon, Peter

    2009-08-01

    In the present article, I describe a new, hybrid approach to experimental control that combines the best features of general-purpose programs and specific-experiment programs. First, experimental control objects are developed in an object-oriented programming environment. Then, an XML file is used to select and arrange those control objects in order to carry out an experiment. A wide range of experiments can be implemented by specifying the arrangement of the control objects in the XML file, while, at the same time, the set of control objects can be easily extended for more demanding applications. An overview of a system using this approach is provided, along with some examples. PMID:19587170

  6. Modeling approaches for active systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herold, Sven; Atzrodt, Heiko; Mayer, Dirk; Thomaier, Martin

    2006-03-01

    To solve a wide range of vibration problems with the active structures technology, different simulation approaches for several models are needed. The selection of an appropriate modeling strategy is depending, amongst others, on the frequency range, the modal density and the control target. An active system consists of several components: the mechanical structure, at least one sensor and actuator, signal conditioning electronics and the controller. For each individual part of the active system the simulation approaches can be different. To integrate the several modeling approaches into an active system simulation and to ensure a highly efficient and accurate calculation, all sub models must harmonize. For this purpose, structural models considered in this article are modal state-space formulations for the lower frequency range and transfer function based models for the higher frequency range. The modal state-space formulations are derived from finite element models and/or experimental modal analyses. Consequently, the structure models which are based on transfer functions are directly derived from measurements. The transfer functions are identified with the Steiglitz-McBride iteration method. To convert them from the z-domain to the s-domain a least squares solution is implemented. An analytical approach is used to derive models of active interfaces. These models are transferred into impedance formulations. To couple mechanical and electrical sub-systems with the active materials, the concept of impedance modeling was successfully tested. The impedance models are enhanced by adapting them to adequate measurements. The controller design strongly depends on the frequency range and the number of modes to be controlled. To control systems with a small number of modes, techniques such as active damping or independent modal space control may be used, whereas in the case of systems with a large number of modes or with modes that are not well separated, other control

  7. In Vivo Approaches Reveal a Key Role for DCs in CD4+ T Cell Activation and Parasite Clearance during the Acute Phase of Experimental Blood-Stage Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Borges da Silva, Henrique; Fonseca, Raíssa; Cassado, Alexandra dos Anjos; Machado de Salles, Érika; de Menezes, Maria Nogueira; Langhorne, Jean; Perez, Katia Regina; Cuccovia, Iolanda Midea; Ryffel, Bernhard; Barreto, Vasco M.; Marinho, Cláudio Romero Farias; Boscardin, Silvia Beatriz; Álvarez, José Maria; D’Império-Lima, Maria Regina; Tadokoro, Carlos Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are phagocytes that are highly specialized for antigen presentation. Heterogeneous populations of macrophages and DCs form a phagocyte network inside the red pulp (RP) of the spleen, which is a major site for the control of blood-borne infections such as malaria. However, the dynamics of splenic DCs during Plasmodium infections are poorly understood, limiting our knowledge regarding their protective role in malaria. Here, we used in vivo experimental approaches that enabled us to deplete or visualize DCs in order to clarify these issues. To elucidate the roles of DCs and marginal zone macrophages in the protection against blood-stage malaria, we infected DTx (diphtheria toxin)-treated C57BL/6.CD11c-DTR mice, as well as C57BL/6 mice treated with low doses of clodronate liposomes (ClLip), with Plasmodium chabaudi AS (Pc) parasites. The first evidence suggesting that DCs could contribute directly to parasite clearance was an early effect of the DTx treatment, but not of the ClLip treatment, in parasitemia control. DCs were also required for CD4+ T cell responses during infection. The phagocytosis of infected red blood cells (iRBCs) by splenic DCs was analyzed by confocal intravital microscopy, as well as by flow cytometry and immunofluorescence, at three distinct phases of Pc malaria: at the first encounter, at pre-crisis concomitant with parasitemia growth and at crisis when the parasitemia decline coincides with spleen closure. In vivo and ex vivo imaging of the spleen revealed that DCs actively phagocytize iRBCs and interact with CD4+ T cells both in T cell-rich areas and in the RP. Subcapsular RP DCs were highly efficient in the recognition and capture of iRBCs during pre-crisis, while complete DC maturation was only achieved during crisis. These findings indicate that, beyond their classical role in antigen presentation, DCs also contribute to the direct elimination of iRBCs during acute Plasmodium infection. PMID:25658925

  8. Experimental approach toward holographic interferometric fringe interpretation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, H. K.

    1974-01-01

    Current literature concerning the measurement of small displacements by the laser holographic technique was reviewed. It was found that existing theories are extremely difficult, if not impossible, to apply to any realistic nondestructive testing conditions in which the geometries of the objects are complex and the three-dimensional displacements are irregular. An experimental approach was adopted for interpreting correlation between real time holographic fringe patterns and small displacements. Preliminary results show that the present method is feasible for the quantitative interpretation of the fringes as well as the calibration of the mobile HNDT system.

  9. An experimental approach to submarine canyon evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Steven Y. J.; Gerber, Thomas P.; Amblas, David

    2016-03-01

    We present results from a sandbox experiment designed to investigate how sediment gravity flows form and shape submarine canyons. In the experiment, unconfined saline gravity flows were released onto an inclined sand bed bounded on the downstream end by a movable floor that was used to increase relief during the experiment. In areas unaffected by the flows, we observed featureless, angle-of-repose submarine slopes formed by retrogressive breaching processes. In contrast, areas influenced by gravity flows cascading across the shelf break were deeply incised by submarine canyons with well-developed channel networks. Normalized canyon long profiles extracted from successive high-resolution digital elevation models collapse to a single profile when referenced to the migrating shelf-slope break, indicating self-similar growth in the relief defined by the canyon and intercanyon profiles. Although our experimental approach is simple, the resulting canyon morphology and behavior appear similar in several important respects to that observed in the field.

  10. BOP: biocompatible osteoconductive polymer: an experimental approach.

    PubMed

    Buron, F; Bourgois, R; Burny, F; Chaboteaux, C; d'Hemricourt, J; el Banna, S; Pasteels, J L; Sintzoff, S; Vienne, A

    1994-01-01

    BOP (biocompatible osteoconductive polymer) is a material proposed for osteosyntheses and for filling of bone defects in orthopaedics, neurosurgery and stomatology. It is a composite made of a copolymer of N-vinylpyrrolidone and methylmethacrylate, of polyamide-6 fibers and of calcium gluconate. The histological investigation includes the study of 30 intact rabbit femurs instrumented with a BOP rod, as well as the study of organs of the reticuloendothelial system. The currently available results show the absence of toxicity on hematopoietic tissue. Zones of osteoblastic activity surround the rods, coupled with an osteoclastic reaction which may result in the partial fragmentation of the polyamide fibers and its incorporation in the newly formed bone. We also observed the encapsulation of the material. The biomechanical approach investigated the mechanical properties of the material in bending and in shear. The radiological aspects of the investigation consisted of computerized axial tomography of the implanted femurs to measure density at the bone-implant interface. PMID:10150170

  11. Unlocking water markets: an experimental approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, J.; Rabotyagov, S.

    2011-12-01

    Water markets are frequently referred to as a promising approach to alleviate stress on water systems, especially as future hydrologic assessments suggest increasing demand and less reliable supply. Yet, despite decades of advocacy by water resource economists, water markets (leases and sales of water rights between willing buyers and sellers) have largely failed to develop in the western US. Although there are a number of explanations for this failure, we explore one potential reason that has received less attention : farmers as sellers may have preferences for different elements of a water market transaction that are not captured in the relative comparison of their profits from farming and their profits from agreeing to a deal. We test this explanation by recruiting irrigators with senior water rights in the upper Yakima River Basin in Washington state to participate in a series of experimental auctions. In concept, the Yakima Basin is well situated for water market transactions as it has significant water shortages for junior water users ~15% of years and projections show these are likely to increase in the future. Participants were asked a series of questions about the operation of a hypothetical 100-acre timothy hay farm including the type of buyer, how the water bank is managed, the lease type, and the offer price. Results from 7 sessions with irrigators (n=49) and a comparison group of undergraduates (n=38) show that irrigators are more likely to accept split-season than full-season leases (controlling for differences in farm profits) and are more likely to accept a lease from an irrigation district and less likely to accept an offer from a Developer. Most notably, we find farmers were far more likely than students to reject offers from buyers even though it would increase their winnings from the experiment. These results could be used in ongoing water supply policy debates in the Yakima Basin to simulate the amount of water that could be freed by water

  12. Combined fundamental and experimental approach to milling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starkey, Derek

    Air jet mills are important tools in the size reduction processing of pharmaceutical powders. The benefits of the air jet mill to the pharmaceutical industry are its sanitary design (no moving parts or media) and ability to produce narrow particle size distributions. Due to the high-value nature of active pharmaceutical ingredients, a trial-and-error approach to obtain optimal milling conditions for size reduction would lead to a needless expenditure of time and valuable resources. This work uses population balances for modeling the continuous milling of a spiral jet mill with inexpensive, readily available excipient powders, and predicts milling model parameters for high value powders with only small quantities being consumed. We have developed a multilevel model that describes the effect of material characteristics and mill operating variables on particle breakage in a specific air jet mill. This model allows us to predict product size distributions of brittle crystalline materials. The method used to develop this model can be utilized for many self-classifying mills. For a new mill, extensive initial milling with inexpensive excipient powders is required to determine mill-dependent model parameters. Subsequently, quick material characterization experiments can be made with limited powder consumption of expensive powders to determine powder-dependent milling parameters.

  13. Trust and cooperation: a new experimental approach.

    PubMed

    Acedo, Cristina; Gomila, Antoni

    2013-09-01

    Several theories within different disciplines emphasize the role of trust in fostering cooperation in human social life. Despite differences, the core of these notions of trust is affectively motivated loyalty, which makes the individuals feel mutually committed and willing to accept vulnerability because of positive expectations about each other's behavior. In evolutionary game theory and experimental economics, the notion of trust is much simpler: it is an expectation about another's behavior, a kind of wager, in which the sense of mutual commitment and vulnerability is completely absent. In order to extend the paradigm of trust games typical in those fields to explore the fuller sense of trust relationships, we have developed a new experimental design, in which an iterated prisoner dilemma is played by participants who do or do not hold a trusting personal relationship, while anonymity is preserved. We present here the results of our two pilot studies, which indicate the relevance of personal trust in fostering cooperation and suggest the influence of the structure of social networks on the degree of cooperation achieved. PMID:25708082

  14. Human brain mapping: Experimental and computational approaches

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, C.C.; George, J.S.; Schmidt, D.M.; Aine, C.J.; Sanders, J.; Belliveau, J.

    1998-11-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). This program developed project combined Los Alamos' and collaborators' strengths in noninvasive brain imaging and high performance computing to develop potential contributions to the multi-agency Human Brain Project led by the National Institute of Mental Health. The experimental component of the project emphasized the optimization of spatial and temporal resolution of functional brain imaging by combining: (a) structural MRI measurements of brain anatomy; (b) functional MRI measurements of blood flow and oxygenation; and (c) MEG measurements of time-resolved neuronal population currents. The computational component of the project emphasized development of a high-resolution 3-D volumetric model of the brain based on anatomical MRI, in which structural and functional information from multiple imaging modalities can be integrated into a single computational framework for modeling, visualization, and database representation.

  15. Understanding bimolecular machines: Theoretical and experimental approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goler, Adam Scott

    This dissertation concerns the study of two classes of molecular machines from a physical perspective: enzymes and membrane proteins. Though the functions of these classes of proteins are different, they each represent important test-beds from which new understanding can be developed by the application of different techniques. HIV1 Reverse Transcriptase is an enzyme that performs multiple functions, including reverse transcription of RNA into an RNA/DNA duplex, RNA degradation by the RNaseH domain, and synthesis of dsDNA. These functions allow for the incorporation of the retroviral genes into the host genome. Its catalytic cycle requires repeated large-scale conformational changes fundamental to its mechanism. Motivated by experimental work, these motions were studied theoretically by the application of normal mode analysis. It was observed that the lowest order modes correlate with largest amplitude (low-frequency) motion, which are most likely to be catalytically relevant. Comparisons between normal modes obtained via an elastic network model to those calculated from the essential dynamics of a series of all-atom molecular dynamics simulations show the self-consistency between these calculations. That similar conformational motions are seen between independent theoretical methods reinforces the importance of large-scale subdomain motion for the biochemical action of DNA polymerases in general. Moreover, it was observed that the major subunits of HIV1 Reverse Transcriptase interact quasi-harmonically. The 5HT3A Serotonin receptor and P2X1 receptor, by contrast, are trans-membrane proteins that function as ligand gated ion channels. Such proteins feature a central pore, which allows for the transit of ions necessary for cellular function across a membrane. The pore is opened by the ligation of binding sites on the extracellular portion of different protein subunits. In an attempt to resolve the individual subunits of these membrane proteins beyond the diffraction

  16. Thermoelectric conversion of heat fluxes: analytical and experimental approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amokrane, Mounir; Nogarede, Bertrand

    2012-08-01

    When considering electric energy harvesting from waste heat, two different solutions of direct conversion are possible: pyroelectric and thermoelectric conversions. This paper presents a study of the thermoelectric conversion by two different approaches: analytical and experimental. Furthermore, a brief historical description of the discovery and early years of development of thermoelectricity is presented. The essential objective of this work is to develop a numerical tool that can estimate the output quantities of a thermoelectric converter, without knowing all its features. For this, two analytical models were developed, based on electrical and thermal phenomena occurring within the active element. The results obtained by this model were compared successfully with experiments carried out on an industrial thermoelectric element. Considering the centimetric size of the device (16 cm2 area), the electrical power recovered by this conversion varies from 16 to 80 mW for a temperature difference between 2 and 18 °C and according to the load value. In addition, both models transcribe the behavior of the active element with an accuracy of about 10%. In agreement with this, the output voltages reached are of the same magnitude for the models and the experimental values and vary from 0.1 to 0.8 V depending on the load connected and the type of convection. Another issue which is discussed for the two cases is that an optimal recovered energy is obtained for a given electric load taking into account the physical characteristics of the considered thermoelectric element. Finally, a conversion efficiency calculation has shown that it is possible to reach 45% of the Carnot efficiency. This denotes the interest to perform load matching to optimize the output power.

  17. Acting like a physicist: Student approach study to experimental design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karelina, Anna; Etkina, Eugenia

    2007-12-01

    National studies of science education have unanimously concluded that preparing our students for the demands of the 21st century workplace is one of the major goals. This paper describes a study of student activities in introductory college physics labs, which were designed to help students acquire abilities that are valuable in the workplace. In these labs [called Investigative Science Learning Environment (ISLE) labs], students design their own experiments. Our previous studies have shown that students in these labs acquire scientific abilities such as the ability to design an experiment to solve a problem, the ability to collect and analyze data, the ability to evaluate assumptions and uncertainties, and the ability to communicate. These studies mostly concentrated on analyzing students’ writing, evaluated by specially designed scientific ability rubrics. Recently, we started to study whether the ISLE labs make students not only write like scientists but also engage in discussions and act like scientists while doing the labs. For example, do students plan an experiment, validate assumptions, evaluate results, and revise the experiment if necessary? A brief report of some of our findings that came from monitoring students’ activity during ISLE and nondesign labs was presented in the Physics Education Research Conference Proceedings. We found differences in student behavior and discussions that indicated that ISLE labs do in fact encourage a scientistlike approach to experimental design and promote high-quality discussions. This paper presents a full description of the study.

  18. Experimental approaches for studying non-equilibrium atmospheric plasma jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shashurin, A.; Keidar, M.

    2015-12-01

    This work reviews recent research efforts undertaken in the area non-equilibrium atmospheric plasma jets with special focus on experimental approaches. Physics of small non-equilibrium atmospheric plasma jets operating in kHz frequency range at powers around few Watts will be analyzed, including mechanism of breakdown, process of ionization front propagation, electrical coupling of the ionization front with the discharge electrodes, distributions of excited and ionized species, discharge current spreading, transient dynamics of various plasma parameters, etc. Experimental diagnostic approaches utilized in the field will be considered, including Rayleigh microwave scattering, Thomson laser scattering, electrostatic streamer scatterers, optical emission spectroscopy, fast photographing, etc.

  19. Experimental approaches for studying non-equilibrium atmospheric plasma jets

    SciTech Connect

    Shashurin, A.; Keidar, M.

    2015-12-15

    This work reviews recent research efforts undertaken in the area non-equilibrium atmospheric plasma jets with special focus on experimental approaches. Physics of small non-equilibrium atmospheric plasma jets operating in kHz frequency range at powers around few Watts will be analyzed, including mechanism of breakdown, process of ionization front propagation, electrical coupling of the ionization front with the discharge electrodes, distributions of excited and ionized species, discharge current spreading, transient dynamics of various plasma parameters, etc. Experimental diagnostic approaches utilized in the field will be considered, including Rayleigh microwave scattering, Thomson laser scattering, electrostatic streamer scatterers, optical emission spectroscopy, fast photographing, etc.

  20. Experimental Demonstration of Active Electromagnetic Cloaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selvanayagam, Michael; Eleftheriades, George V.

    2013-10-01

    Active electromagnetic cloaking uses an array of elementary sources to cancel the scattered fields created by an object. An active interior cloak does this by placing the sources along the boundary of the object. This process can be thought of as introducing a discontinuity in the field to cancel out the scattered field by the object. Here, an experimental version of a thin active cloak at microwave frequencies is demonstrated for an aluminum cylinder with a radius of 0.56λ. The cloak consists of a 12-element magnetic-dipole array. By controlling the weights of the current on each element of the array, the scattering off of the cylinder is reduced in the backward and forward directions. The ability to disguise the aluminum cylinder as another object by varying the weights of the dipole array is also demonstrated. Finally, potential ways of overcoming the constraint of requiring a priori knowledge of the incident field leading to camouflaging-type behavior are discussed.

  1. Active flutter suppression - Control system design and experimental validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waszak, Martin R.; Srinathkumar, S.

    1991-01-01

    The synthesis and experimental validation of an active flutter suppression controller for the Active Flexible Wing wind-tunnel model is presented. The design is accomplished with traditional root locus and Nyquist methods using interactive computer graphics tools and with extensive use of simulation-based analysis. The design approach uses a fundamental understanding of the flutter mechanism to formulate a simple controller structure to meet stringent design specifications. Experimentally, the flutter suppression controller succeeded in simultaneous suppression of two flutter modes, significantly increasing the flutter dynamic pressure despite errors in flutter dynamic pressure and flutter frequency in the mathematical model. The flutter suppression controller was also successfully operated in combination with a roll maneuver controller to perform flutter suppression during rapid rolling maneuvers.

  2. Parametric and experimental analysis using a power flow approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuschieri, J. M.

    1990-01-01

    A structural power flow approach for the analysis of structure-borne transmission of vibrations is used to analyze the influence of structural parameters on transmitted power. The parametric analysis is also performed using the Statistical Energy Analysis approach and the results are compared with those obtained using the power flow approach. The advantages of structural power flow analysis are demonstrated by comparing the type of results that are obtained by the two analytical methods. Also, to demonstrate that the power flow results represent a direct physical parameter that can be measured on a typical structure, an experimental study of structural power flow is presented. This experimental study presents results for an L shaped beam for which an available solution was already obtained. Various methods to measure vibrational power flow are compared to study their advantages and disadvantages.

  3. A Surrogate Approach to the Experimental Optimization of Multielement Airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Otto, John C.; Landman, Drew; Patera, Anthony T.

    1996-01-01

    The incorporation of experimental test data into the optimization process is accomplished through the use of Bayesian-validated surrogates. In the surrogate approach, a surrogate for the experiment (e.g., a response surface) serves in the optimization process. The validation step of the framework provides a qualitative assessment of the surrogate quality, and bounds the surrogate-for-experiment error on designs "near" surrogate-predicted optimal designs. The utility of the framework is demonstrated through its application to the experimental selection of the trailing edge ap position to achieve a design lift coefficient for a three-element airfoil.

  4. Experimental constraints on hydrothermal activities in Enceladus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekine, Y.; Shibuya, T.; Suzuki, K.; Kuwatani, T.

    2012-12-01

    One of the most remarkable findings by the Cassini-Huygens mission is perhaps water-rich plumes erupting from the south-pole region of Enceladus [1]. Given such geological activity and the detection of sodium salts in the plume, the interior of Enceladus is highly likely to contain an interior ocean interacting with the rock core [2]. A primary question regarding astrobiology and planetary science is whether Enceladus has (or had) hydrothermal activities in the interior ocean. Because N2 might be formed by thermal dissociation of primordial NH3 [3], the presence of N2 in the plume may be a possible indicator for the presence of hydrothermal activities in Enceladus. However, the Cassini UVIS revealed that the plumes do not contain large amounts of N2 [4]. Although these observations may not support the presence of hydrothermal activities, whether NH3 dissociation proceeds strongly depends on the kinetics of hydrothermal reactions and interactions with the rock components, which remain largely unknown. Furthermore, the Cassini CDA recently showed that small amounts of SiO2 might have been included in the plume dusts [5]. Formation of amorphous SiO2 usually occurs when high-temperature and/or high-pH solution with high concentrations of dissolved SiO2 cools and/or is neutralized. Thus, the presence of SiO2 in the plume dusts may suggest the presence of a temperature and/or pH gradient in the ocean. However, no laboratory experiments have investigated what processes control pH and SiO2 concentrations in hydrothermal fluids possibly existing in Enceladus. Here, we show the results of laboratory experiments simulating hydrothermal systems on Enceladus. As the initial conditions, we used both aqueous solution of high concentrations (0.01-2%) of NH3 and NaHCO3 and powdered olivine as an analog for the rock components. Our experimental results show that formation of N2 from NH3 is kinetically and thermodynamically inhibited even under high temperature conditions (< 400

  5. Cultures of Experimental Practice--An Approach in a Museum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heering, Peter; Muller, Falk

    2002-01-01

    Describes generations and experiences of an exhibition presented in Spring 1998 at the Oldenburg Museum of Natural History and Pre-History. Discusses the thematic leitmotiv of this exhibition which was to present experiments from the history of physics as a cultural activity. Describes how reconstructions of historical experimental set-ups were…

  6. A Constitutive Equation for Grain Boundary Sliding: An Experimental Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korla, Rajesh; Chokshi, Atul H.

    2014-02-01

    Although grain boundary sliding (GBS) has been recognized as an important process during high-temperature deformation in crystalline materials, there is paucity in experimental data for characterizing a constitutive equation for GBS. High-temperature tensile creep experiments were conducted, together with measurements of GBS at different strains, stresses, grain sizes, and temperatures. Experimental data obtained on a Mg AZ31 alloy demonstrate that, for the first time, dynamic recrystallization during creep does not alter the contribution of GBS to creep during high-temperature deformation. The experimentally observed invariance of the sliding contribution with strain was used together with the creep data for developing a constitutive equation for GBS in a manner similar to the standard creep equation. Using this new approach, it is demonstrated that the stress, grain size, and temperature dependence for creep and GBS are identical. This is rationalized by a model based on GBS controlled by dislocations, within grains or near-grain boundaries.

  7. An active learning approach with uncertainty, representativeness, and diversity.

    PubMed

    He, Tianxu; Zhang, Shukui; Xin, Jie; Zhao, Pengpeng; Wu, Jian; Xian, Xuefeng; Li, Chunhua; Cui, Zhiming

    2014-01-01

    Big data from the Internet of Things may create big challenge for data classification. Most active learning approaches select either uncertain or representative unlabeled instances to query their labels. Although several active learning algorithms have been proposed to combine the two criteria for query selection, they are usually ad hoc in finding unlabeled instances that are both informative and representative and fail to take the diversity of instances into account. We address this challenge by presenting a new active learning framework which considers uncertainty, representativeness, and diversity creation. The proposed approach provides a systematic way for measuring and combining the uncertainty, representativeness, and diversity of an instance. Firstly, use instances' uncertainty and representativeness to constitute the most informative set. Then, use the kernel k-means clustering algorithm to filter the redundant samples and the resulting samples are queried for labels. Extensive experimental results show that the proposed approach outperforms several state-of-the-art active learning approaches. PMID:25180208

  8. An Active Learning Approach with Uncertainty, Representativeness, and Diversity

    PubMed Central

    He, Tianxu; Zhang, Shukui; Xin, Jie; Xian, Xuefeng; Li, Chunhua; Cui, Zhiming

    2014-01-01

    Big data from the Internet of Things may create big challenge for data classification. Most active learning approaches select either uncertain or representative unlabeled instances to query their labels. Although several active learning algorithms have been proposed to combine the two criteria for query selection, they are usually ad hoc in finding unlabeled instances that are both informative and representative and fail to take the diversity of instances into account. We address this challenge by presenting a new active learning framework which considers uncertainty, representativeness, and diversity creation. The proposed approach provides a systematic way for measuring and combining the uncertainty, representativeness, and diversity of an instance. Firstly, use instances' uncertainty and representativeness to constitute the most informative set. Then, use the kernel k-means clustering algorithm to filter the redundant samples and the resulting samples are queried for labels. Extensive experimental results show that the proposed approach outperforms several state-of-the-art active learning approaches. PMID:25180208

  9. Cultures of Experimental Practice An Approach in a Museum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heering, Peter; Müller, Falk

    The aim of this paper is to describe the generation of as well as theexperiences made with an exhibition that was presented in spring 1998 in the Oldenburg Museumof Natural History and Pre-History. The thematic leitmotiv of thisexhibition was to present experiments from the history of physics as a cultural activity. In doing so, reconstructionsof historical experimental set-ups were not only shown but enabled the visitors to make their own experimentalexperiences with these apparatus.

  10. Experimental approaches for evaluating the invasion risk of biofuel crops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flory, S. Luke; Lorentz, Kimberly A.; Gordon, Doria R.; Sollenberger, Lynn E.

    2012-12-01

    There is growing concern that non-native plants cultivated for bioenergy production might escape and result in harmful invasions in natural areas. Literature-derived assessment tools used to evaluate invasion risk are beneficial for screening, but cannot be used to assess novel cultivars or genotypes. Experimental approaches are needed to help quantify invasion risk but protocols for such tools are lacking. We review current methods for evaluating invasion risk and make recommendations for incremental tests from small-scale experiments to widespread, controlled introductions. First, local experiments should be performed to identify conditions that are favorable for germination, survival, and growth of candidate biofuel crops. Subsequently, experimental introductions in semi-natural areas can be used to assess factors important for establishment and performance such as disturbance, founder population size, and timing of introduction across variable habitats. Finally, to fully characterize invasion risk, experimental introductions should be conducted across the expected geographic range of cultivation over multiple years. Any field-based testing should be accompanied by safeguards and monitoring for early detection of spread. Despite the costs of conducting experimental tests of invasion risk, empirical screening will greatly improve our ability to determine if the benefits of a proposed biofuel species outweigh the projected risks of invasions.

  11. A Bayesian experimental design approach to structural health monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Farrar, Charles; Flynn, Eric; Todd, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Optimal system design for SHM involves two primarily challenges. The first is the derivation of a proper performance function for a given system design. The second is the development of an efficient optimization algorithm for choosing a design that maximizes, or nearly maximizes the performance function. In this paper we will outline how an SHM practitioner can construct the proper performance function by casting the entire design problem into a framework of Bayesian experimental design. The approach demonstrates how the design problem necessarily ties together all steps of the SHM process.

  12. Experimental observations of active invariance striations in a tank environment.

    PubMed

    Quijano, Jorge E; Campbell, Richard L; Oesterlein, Tobias G; Zurk, Lisa M

    2010-08-01

    The waveguide invariant in shallow water environments has been widely studied in the context of passive sonar. The invariant provides a relationship between the frequency content of a moving broadband source and the distance to the receiver, and this relationship is not strongly affected by small perturbations in environment parameters such as sound speed or bottom features. Recent experiments in shallow water suggest that a similar range-frequency structure manifested as striations in the spectrogram exists for active sonar, and this property has the potential to enhance the performance of target tracking algorithms. Nevertheless, field experiments with active sonar have not been conclusive on how the invariant is affected by the scattering kernel of the target and the sonar configuration (monostatic vs bistatic). The experimental work presented in this paper addresses those issues by showing the active invariance for known scatterers under controlled conditions of bathymetry, sound speed profile and high SNR. Quantification of the results is achieved by introducing an automatic image processing approach inspired on the Hough transform for extraction of the invariant from spectrograms. Normal mode simulations are shown to be in agreement with the experimental results. PMID:20707430

  13. Experimental measurements of motion cue effects on STOL approach tasks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ringland, R. F.; Stapleford, R. L.

    1972-01-01

    An experimental program to investigate the effects of motion cues on STOL approach is presented. The simulator used was the Six-Degrees-of-Freedom Motion Simulator (S.01) at Ames Research Center of NASA which has ?2.7 m travel longitudinally and laterally and ?2.5 m travel vertically. Three major experiments, characterized as tracking tasks, were conducted under fixed and moving base conditions: (1) A simulated IFR approach of the Augmentor Wing Jet STOL Research Aircraft (AWJSRA), (2) a simulated VFR task with the same aircraft, and (3) a single-axis task having only linear acceleration as the motion cue. Tracking performance was measured in terms of the variances of several motion variables, pilot vehicle describing functions, and pilot commentary.

  14. Aging of vitrified wastes: An experimental and analogical approach

    SciTech Connect

    Sterpenich, J.; Forestier, L. Le; Libourel, G. |

    1995-12-31

    In order to tackle the problems of the longevity of vitrified wastes, the authors used two complementary approaches: an analogical approach to examine the leaching processes of vitreous matrices as a function of time and to evaluate the longevity of vitrified wastes, and an experimental approach based on leaching experiments which allowed the determination of the rate and the kinetics of release of each element under well known conditions. Despite the very different durations of alteration, around 1,000 years for the medieval stained glasses and several weeks for leaching experiments, the authors show that the results obtained in laboratory and under natural conditions are comparable. Thus, studies of medieval stained glasses allow prediction of the alteration of vitreous matrices and in particular, of vitrified wastes, and can be used to determine the rates and kinetics of release of pollutants. Medieval stained glasses furnish an excellent model for understanding the aging of vitrified wastes over time periods of up to a thousand years.

  15. Parametric and experimental analysis using a power flow approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuschieri, J. M.

    1988-01-01

    Having defined and developed a structural power flow approach for the analysis of structure-borne transmission of structural vibrations, the technique is used to perform an analysis of the influence of structural parameters on the transmitted energy. As a base for comparison, the parametric analysis is first performed using a Statistical Energy Analysis approach and the results compared with those obtained using the power flow approach. The advantages of using structural power flow are thus demonstrated by comparing the type of results obtained by the two methods. Additionally, to demonstrate the advantages of using the power flow method and to show that the power flow results represent a direct physical parameter that can be measured on a typical structure, an experimental investigation of structural power flow is also presented. Results are presented for an L-shaped beam for which an analytical solution has already been obtained. Furthermore, the various methods available to measure vibrational power flow are compared to investigate the advantages and disadvantages of each method.

  16. Analyzing patterns in experts' approaches to solving experimental problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Čančula, Maja Poklinek; Planinšič, Gorazd; Etkina, Eugenia

    2015-04-01

    We report detailed observations of three pairs of expert scientists and a pair of advanced undergraduate students solving an experimental optics problem. Using a new method ("transition graphs") of visualizing sequences of logical steps, we were able to compare the groups and identify patterns that could not be found using previously existing methods. While the problem solving of undergraduates significantly differed from that of experts at the beginning of the process, it gradually became more similar to the expert problem solving. We mapped problem solving steps and their sequence to the elements of an approach to teaching and learning physics called Investigative Science Learning Environment (ISLE), and we speculate that the ISLE educational framework closely represents the actual work of physicists.

  17. Sequential experimental design approaches to helicopter rotor tuning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shengda

    2005-07-01

    Two different approaches based on sequential experimental design concepts have been studied for helicopter rotor tuning, which is the process of adjusting the rotor blades so as to reduce the aircraft vibration and the spread of rotors. One uses an interval model adapted sequentially to improve the search for the blade adjustments. The other uses a probability model to search for the blade adjustments with the maximal probability of success. In the first approach, an interval model is used to represent the range of effect of blade adjustments on helicopter vibration, so as to cope with the nonlinear and stochastic nature of aircraft vibration. The coefficients of the model are initially defined according to sensitivity coefficients between the blade adjustments and helicopter vibration, to include the expert knowledge of the process. The model coefficients are subsequently transformed into intervals and updated after each tuning iteration to improve the model's estimation accuracy. The search for the blade adjustments is performed according to this model by considering the vibration estimates of all of the flight regimes so as to provide a comprehensive solution for rotor tuning. The second approach studied uses a probability model to maximize the likelihood of success of the selected blade adjustments. The underlying model in this approach consists of two segments: a deterministic segment to include a linear regression model representing the relationships between the blade adjustments and helicopter vibration, and a stochastic segment to comprise probability densities of the vibration components. The blade adjustments with the maximal probability of generating acceptable vibration are selected as recommended adjustments. The effectiveness of the proposed approaches is evaluated in simulation based on a series of neural networks trained with actual vibration data. To incorporate the stochastic behavior of the helicopter vibration and better simulate the tuning

  18. The contour method: a new approach in experimental mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Prime, Michael B

    2009-01-01

    The recently developed contour method can measure complex residual-stress maps in situations where other measurement methods cannot. This talk first describes the principle of the contour method. A part is cut in two using a precise and low-stress cutting technique such as electric discharge machining. The contour of the resulting new surface, which will not be flat if residual stresses are relaxed by the cutting, is then measured. Finally, a conceptually simple finite element analysis determines the original residual stresses from the measured contour. Next, this talk gives several examples of applications. The method is validated by comparing with neutron diffraction measurements in an indented steel disk and in a friction stir weld between dissimilar aluminum alloys. Several applications are shown that demonstrate the power of the contour method: large aluminum forgings, railroad rails, and welds. Finally, this talk discusses why the contour method is significant departure from conventional experimental mechanics. Other relaxation method, for example hole-drilling, can only measure a 1-D profile of residual stresses, and yet they require a complicated inverse calculation to determine the stresses from the strain data. The contour method gives a 2-D stress map over a full cross-section, yet a direct calculation is all that is needed to reduce the data. The reason for these advantages lies in a subtle but fundamental departure from conventional experimental mechanics. Applying new technology to old methods like will not give similar advances, but the new approach also introduces new errors.

  19. Experimentally Induced Stress Validated by EMG Activity

    PubMed Central

    Luijcks, Rosan; Hermens, Hermie J.; Bodar, Lonneke; Vossen, Catherine J.; Os, Jim van.; Lousberg, Richel

    2014-01-01

    Experience of stress may lead to increased electromyography (EMG) activity in specific muscles compared to a non-stressful situation. The main aim of this study was to develop and validate a stress-EMG paradigm in which a single uncontrollable and unpredictable nociceptive stimulus was presented. EMG activity of the trapezius muscles was the response of interest. In addition to linear time effects, non-linear EMG time courses were also examined. Taking into account the hierarchical structure of the dataset, a multilevel random regression model was applied. The stress paradigm, executed in N = 70 subjects, consisted of a 3-minute baseline measurement, a 3-minute pre-stimulus stress period and a 2-minute post-stimulus phase. Subjects were unaware of the precise moment of stimulus delivery and its intensity level. EMG activity during the entire experiment was conform a priori expectations: the pre-stimulus phase showed a significantly higher mean EMG activity level compared to the other two phases, and an immediate EMG response to the stimulus was demonstrated. In addition, the analyses revealed significant non-linear EMG time courses in all three phases. Linear and quadratic EMG time courses were significantly modified by subjective anticipatory stress level, measured just before the start of the stress task. Linking subjective anticipatory stress to EMG stress reactivity revealed that subjects with a high anticipatory stress level responded with more EMG activity during the pre-stimulus stress phase, whereas subjects with a low stress level showed an inverse effect. Results suggest that the stress paradigm presented here is a valid test to quantify individual differences in stress susceptibility. Further studies with this paradigm are required to demonstrate its potential use in mechanistic clinical studies. PMID:24736740

  20. Ketamine activation of experimental corticoreticular epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Black, J A; Golden, G T; Fariello, R G

    1980-03-01

    Generalized corticoreticular epilepsy was established in adult cats by parenteral penicillin, and electroencephalographic monitoring was carried out. Ketamine HCl was injected intravenously in doses of 2.5 to 20 mg per kilogram. If doses of penicillin were inadequate to establish typical spike-wave activity, ketamine induced the spike-wave pattern typical of much higher doses of penicillin. At doses of penicillin that established the spike-wave pattern, ketamine potentiated the spike-wave activity and sometimes induced spike-and-wave status. These findings suggest caution in the clinical use of ketamine in patients with corticoreticular epilepsy. Because analogous effects have been observed upon administration of GABA-mimetic agents, GABA systems may play a role in ketamine anesthesia and corticoreticular epilepsy. Precollicular brain transections failed to modify ketamine effects, excluding a possible influence of mesencephalic centers on the observed potentiation. PMID:7189033

  1. High temperature permeability in volcanic systems: An experimental approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chadderton, Amy; Sammonds, Peter; Meredith, Philip; Smith, Rosanna; Tuffen, Hugh

    2015-04-01

    The permeability of magma exerts a major influence on volcanic activity and we have long held the ability to experimentally determine the permeability of volcanic material via various techniques. These observations have provided the basis for numerous theories of magmatic degassing. Recent enhancements to the High Temperature Triaxial Deformation Cell (HTTDC) at UCL have enabled us to make permeability measurements on 25mm x 75mm core samples at elevated temperature and elevated hydrostatic pressure (Gaunt et al, 2013). Specifically, we present here the results of several suites of permeability data on samples of dome dacite from Mount St Helens volcano, measured under an effective pressure of 5 MPa (confining pressure of 10 MPa and pore fluid pressure of 5 MPa) and temperatures up to 900oC. Most recently, the capabilities of the HTTDC apparatus have been further extended to enable permeability measurements to be made during triaxial deformation of test samples under similar temperature and pressure conditions. Initial results from this entirely new methodology will also be presented. These new experimental results are being applied to enhance our understanding of the complex issue of silicic magma degassing. Two recent eruptions in Chile, at Chaitén Volcano in 2008-10 and at Cordón Caulle in 2011-12, allowed the first detailed observations of rhyolitic activity and provided previously hidden insights into the evolution of highly silicic eruptions. Both events exhibited simultaneous explosive and effusive activity, with both lava and ash plumes emitted from the same vent (Castro et al, 2014). The permeability of fracture networks that act as fluid flow pathways is key to such eruptive behaviour, and will be investigated systematically at magmatic temperatures and pressures in the presence of pore fluids, using our newly-developed experimental capability. Castro, J.M., Bindeman, I.N., Tuffen, H. and Schipper, I. (2014) EPSL 405, 52-61. Gaunt, H.E., Sammonds, P

  2. Science and society: different bioethical approaches towards animal experimentation.

    PubMed

    Brom, Frans W A

    2002-01-01

    The use of live animals for experiments plays an important role in many forms of research. This gives rise to an ethical dilemma. On the one hand, most of the animals used are sentient beings who may be harmed by the experiments. The research, on the other hand, may be vital for preventing, curing or alleviating human diseases. There is no consensus on how to tackle this dilemma. One extreme is the view taken by adherents of the so-called animal rights view. According to this view, we are never justified in harming animals for human purposes - however vital these purposes may be. The other extreme is the ruthless view, according to which animals are there to be used at our discretion. However, most people have a view situated somewhere between these two extremes. It is accepted that animals may be used for research - contrary to the animal rights view. However, contrary to the ruthless view, that is only accepted under certain conditions. The aim of this presentation is to present different ethical views which may serve as a foundation for specifying the circumstances under which it is acceptable to use animals for research. Three views serving this role are contractarianism, utilitarianism and a deontological approach. According to contractarianism, the key ethical issue is concern for the sentiments of other human beings in society, on whose co-operation those responsible for research depend. Thus it is acceptable to use animals as long as most people can see the point of the experiment and are not offended by the way it is done. According to utilitarianism, the key ethical issue is about the consequences for humans and animals. Thus it is justified to use animals for research if enough good comes out of it in terms of preventing suffering and creating happiness, and if there is no better alternative. In the deontological approach the prima facie duty of beneficence towards human beings has to be weighed against the prima facie duties not to harm animals and to

  3. Fungal communities as an experimental approach to Darwin's naturalization hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Morales, María Camila; Verdejo, Valentina; Orlando, Julieta; Carú, Margarita

    2016-01-01

    Darwin's naturalization hypothesis suggests that the success of an invasive species will be lower when colonizing communities are formed by phylogenetically related rather than unrelated species due to increased competition. Although microbial invasions are involved in both natural and anthropogenic processes, factors affecting the success of microbial invaders are unknown. A biological invasion assay was designed using Trichoderma cf. harzianum as the invader and two types of recipient communities assembled in microcosm assays: communities phylogenetically related to the invader, and communities phylogenetically unrelated to it. Both types of communities were invaded by T. cf. harzianum, and the success of colonization was monitored by qPCR; its effect on the genetic structure of recipient fungal communities was then assessed by DGGE profiles. T. cf. harzianum established itself in both communities, reaching 1000-10,000 times higher copy numbers in the non-related communities. However, invader establishment does not affect the structure of the invaded communities. These results suggest that the composition of recipient communities and their phylogenetic relationship to the invader affect the success of colonization by T. cf. harzianum. While this approach represents a very simplified assay, these microcosms enable an experimental test of Darwin's hypothesis in order to understand the biological invasion process in microbial communities. PMID:26506029

  4. Teachers' implicit personality theories about the gifted: an experimental approach.

    PubMed

    Baudson, Tanja Gabriele; Preckel, Franzis

    2013-03-01

    The implicit theories teachers hold about the gifted influence their perception of and behavior toward highly able students, thus impacting the latter's educational opportunities. Two persistent stereotypes about the gifted can be distinguished: the harmony hypothesis (gifted students are superior in almost all domains) and the disharmony hypothesis (giftedness implies maladaptive social behavior and emotional problems). The present study investigated whether teachers' implicit personality theories about the gifted are in line with the harmony or the disharmony hypothesis. Using an experimental vignette approach, we examined 321 prospective and practicing teachers' implicit personality theories (based on the big five personality framework) about students described along three dimensions (ability level, gender, and age, resulting in 8 different vignettes), controlling for teachers' age, gender, experience with gifted students, and knowledge about giftedness. Ability level had the strongest effect on teachers' ratings (partial η² = .60). Students described as gifted were perceived as more open to new experiences, more introverted, less emotionally stable, and less agreeable (all ps < .001). No differences were found for conscientiousness. Gender and its interaction with ability level had a small effect (partial η²s = .04 and .03). Thus, teachers' implicit personality theories about the gifted were in line with the disharmony hypothesis. Possible consequences for gifted identification and education are discussed. PMID:23356881

  5. Experimental demonstration of a classical approach for flexible structure control - The ACES testbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wie, Bong

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes the results of an active structural control experiment performed for the Advanced Control Evaluation for Structures (ACES) testbed at NASA-Marshall as part of the NASA Control-Structure Interaction Guest Investigator Program. The experimental results successfully demonstrate the effectiveness of a 'dipole' concept for line-of-sight control of a pointing system mounted on a flexible structure. The simplicity and effectiveness of a classical 'single-loop-at-a-time' approach for the active structural control design for a complex structure, such as the ACES testbed, are demonstrated.

  6. Mutations that Cause Human Disease: A Computational/Experimental Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Beernink, P; Barsky, D; Pesavento, B

    2006-01-11

    International genome sequencing projects have produced billions of nucleotides (letters) of DNA sequence data, including the complete genome sequences of 74 organisms. These genome sequences have created many new scientific opportunities, including the ability to identify sequence variations among individuals within a species. These genetic differences, which are known as single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), are particularly important in understanding the genetic basis for disease susceptibility. Since the report of the complete human genome sequence, over two million human SNPs have been identified, including a large-scale comparison of an entire chromosome from twenty individuals. Of the protein coding SNPs (cSNPs), approximately half leads to a single amino acid change in the encoded protein (non-synonymous coding SNPs). Most of these changes are functionally silent, while the remainder negatively impact the protein and sometimes cause human disease. To date, over 550 SNPs have been found to cause single locus (monogenic) diseases and many others have been associated with polygenic diseases. SNPs have been linked to specific human diseases, including late-onset Parkinson disease, autism, rheumatoid arthritis and cancer. The ability to predict accurately the effects of these SNPs on protein function would represent a major advance toward understanding these diseases. To date several attempts have been made toward predicting the effects of such mutations. The most successful of these is a computational approach called ''Sorting Intolerant From Tolerant'' (SIFT). This method uses sequence conservation among many similar proteins to predict which residues in a protein are functionally important. However, this method suffers from several limitations. First, a query sequence must have a sufficient number of relatives to infer sequence conservation. Second, this method does not make use of or provide any information on protein structure, which can be used to

  7. Photochemical approaches to T-cell activation

    PubMed Central

    Huse, Morgan

    2010-01-01

    Despite decades of intensive research, T-cell activation has remained mysterious because of both the dizzying diversity of antigen recognition and the speed and comprehensiveness of the T-cell-receptor signalling network. Further progress will require new approaches and reagents that provide added levels of control. Photochemistry allows specific biochemical processes to be controlled with light and is well suited to mechanistic studies in complex cellular environments. In recent years, several laboratories have adopted approaches based on photoreactive peptide-major histocompatibility complex reagents in order to study T-cell activation and function with high precision. Here, I review these efforts and outline future directions for this exciting area of research. PMID:20406301

  8. [Statistical Process Control applied to viral genome screening: experimental approach].

    PubMed

    Reifenberg, J M; Navarro, P; Coste, J

    2001-10-01

    During the National Multicentric Study concerning the introduction of NAT for HCV and HIV-1 viruses in blood donation screening which was supervised by the Medical and Scientific departments of the French Blood Establishment (Etablissement français du sang--EFS), Transcription-Mediated transcription Amplification (TMA) technology (Chiron/Gen Probe) was experimented in the Molecular Biology Laboratory of Montpellier, EFS Pyrénées-Méditerranée. After a preliminary phase of qualification of the material and training of the technicians, routine screening of homologous blood and apheresis donations using this technology was applied for two months. In order to evaluate the different NAT systems, exhaustive daily operations and data were registered. Among these, the luminescence results expressed as RLU of the positive and negative calibrators and the associated internal controls were analysed using Control Charts, Statistical Process Control methods, which allow us to display rapidly process drift and to anticipate the appearance of incidents. This study demonstrated the interest of these quality control methods, mainly used for industrial purposes, to follow and to increase the quality of any transfusion process. it also showed the difficulties of the post-investigations of uncontrolled sources of variations of a process which was experimental. Such tools are in total accordance with the new version of the ISO 9000 norms which are particularly focused on the use of adapted indicators for processes control, and could be extended to other transfusion activities, such as blood collection and component preparation. PMID:11729395

  9. New experimental approaches to the biology of flight control systems.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Graham K; Bacic, Marko; Bomphrey, Richard J; Carruthers, Anna C; Gillies, James; Walker, Simon M; Thomas, Adrian L R

    2008-01-01

    Here we consider how new experimental approaches in biomechanics can be used to attain a systems-level understanding of the dynamics of animal flight control. Our aim in this paper is not to provide detailed results and analysis, but rather to tackle several conceptual and methodological issues that have stood in the way of experimentalists in achieving this goal, and to offer tools for overcoming these. We begin by discussing the interplay between analytical and empirical methods, emphasizing that the structure of the models we use to analyse flight control dictates the empirical measurements we must make in order to parameterize them. We then provide a conceptual overview of tethered-flight paradigms, comparing classical ;open-loop' and ;closed-loop' setups, and describe a flight simulator that we have recently developed for making flight dynamics measurements on tethered insects. Next, we provide a conceptual overview of free-flight paradigms, focusing on the need to use system identification techniques in order to analyse the data they provide, and describe two new techniques that we have developed for making flight dynamics measurements on freely flying birds. First, we describe a technique for obtaining inertial measurements of the orientation, angular velocity and acceleration of a steppe eagle Aquila nipalensis in wide-ranging free flight, together with synchronized measurements of wing and tail kinematics using onboard instrumentation and video cameras. Second, we describe a photogrammetric method to measure the 3D wing kinematics of the eagle during take-off and landing. In each case, we provide demonstration data to illustrate the kinds of information available from each method. We conclude by discussing the prospects for systems-level analyses of flight control using these techniques and others like them. PMID:18165253

  10. Activity-Centric Approach to Distributed Programming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, Renato; Satapathy, Goutam; Lang, Jun

    2004-01-01

    The first phase of an effort to develop a NASA version of the Cybele software system has been completed. To give meaning to even a highly abbreviated summary of the modifications to be embodied in the NASA version, it is necessary to present the following background information on Cybele: Cybele is a proprietary software infrastructure for use by programmers in developing agent-based application programs [complex application programs that contain autonomous, interacting components (agents)]. Cybele provides support for event handling from multiple sources, multithreading, concurrency control, migration, and load balancing. A Cybele agent follows a programming paradigm, called activity-centric programming, that enables an abstraction over system-level thread mechanisms. Activity centric programming relieves application programmers of the complex tasks of thread management, concurrency control, and event management. In order to provide such functionality, activity-centric programming demands support of other layers of software. This concludes the background information. In the first phase of the present development, a new architecture for Cybele was defined. In this architecture, Cybele follows a modular service-based approach to coupling of the programming and service layers of software architecture. In a service-based approach, the functionalities supported by activity-centric programming are apportioned, according to their characteristics, among several groups called services. A well-defined interface among all such services serves as a path that facilitates the maintenance and enhancement of such services without adverse effect on the whole software framework. The activity-centric application-program interface (API) is part of a kernel. The kernel API calls the services by use of their published interface. This approach makes it possible for any application code written exclusively under the API to be portable for any configuration of Cybele.

  11. Macrophage activation and polarization: nomenclature and experimental guidelines.

    PubMed

    Murray, Peter J; Allen, Judith E; Biswas, Subhra K; Fisher, Edward A; Gilroy, Derek W; Goerdt, Sergij; Gordon, Siamon; Hamilton, John A; Ivashkiv, Lionel B; Lawrence, Toby; Locati, Massimo; Mantovani, Alberto; Martinez, Fernando O; Mege, Jean-Louis; Mosser, David M; Natoli, Gioacchino; Saeij, Jeroen P; Schultze, Joachim L; Shirey, Kari Ann; Sica, Antonio; Suttles, Jill; Udalova, Irina; van Ginderachter, Jo A; Vogel, Stefanie N; Wynn, Thomas A

    2014-07-17

    Description of macrophage activation is currently contentious and confusing. Like the biblical Tower of Babel, macrophage activation encompasses a panoply of descriptors used in different ways. The lack of consensus on how to define macrophage activation in experiments in vitro and in vivo impedes progress in multiple ways, including the fact that many researchers still consider there to be only two types of activated macrophages, often termed M1 and M2. Here, we describe a set of standards encompassing three principles-the source of macrophages, definition of the activators, and a consensus collection of markers to describe macrophage activation-with the goal of unifying experimental standards for diverse experimental scenarios. Collectively, we propose a common framework for macrophage-activation nomenclature. PMID:25035950

  12. Synchronization-based approach for detecting functional activation of brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Lei; Cai, Shi-Min; Zhang, Jie; Zhuo, Zhao; Fu, Zhong-Qian; Zhou, Pei-Ling

    2012-09-01

    In this paper, we investigate a synchronization-based, data-driven clustering approach for the analysis of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data, and specifically for detecting functional activation from fMRI data. We first define a new measure of similarity between all pairs of data points (i.e., time series of voxels) integrating both complete phase synchronization and amplitude correlation. These pairwise similarities are taken as the coupling between a set of Kuramoto oscillators, which in turn evolve according to a nearest-neighbor rule. As the network evolves, similar data points naturally synchronize with each other, and distinct clusters will emerge. The clustering behavior of the interaction network of the coupled oscillators, therefore, mirrors the clustering property of the original multiple time series. The clustered regions whose cross-correlation coefficients are much greater than other regions are considered as the functionally activated brain regions. The analysis of fMRI data in auditory and visual areas shows that the recognized brain functional activations are in complete correspondence with those from the general linear model of statistical parametric mapping, but with a significantly lower time complexity. We further compare our results with those from traditional K-means approach, and find that our new clustering approach can distinguish between different response patterns more accurately and efficiently than the K-means approach, and therefore more suitable in detecting functional activation from event-related experimental fMRI data.

  13. Novel Approaches in Astrocyte Protection: from Experimental Methods to Computational Approaches.

    PubMed

    Garzón, Daniel; Cabezas, Ricardo; Vega, Nelson; Ávila-Rodriguez, Marcos; Gonzalez, Janneth; Gómez, Rosa Margarita; Echeverria, Valentina; Aliev, Gjumrakch; Barreto, George E

    2016-04-01

    Astrocytes are important for normal brain functioning. Astrocytes are metabolic regulators of the brain that exert many functions such as the preservation of blood-brain barrier (BBB) function, clearance of toxic substances, and generation of antioxidant molecules and growth factors. These functions are fundamental to sustain the function and survival of neurons and other brain cells. For these reasons, the protection of astrocytes has become relevant for the prevention of neuronal death during brain pathologies such as Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, stroke, and other neurodegenerative conditions. Currently, different strategies are being used to protect the main astrocytic functions during neurological diseases, including the use of growth factors, steroid derivatives, mesenchymal stem cell paracrine factors, nicotine derivatives, and computational biology tools. Moreover, the combined use of experimental approaches with bioinformatics tools such as the ones obtained through system biology has allowed a broader knowledge in astrocytic protection both in normal and pathological conditions. In the present review, we highlight some of these recent paradigms in assessing astrocyte protection using experimental and computational approaches and discuss how they could be used for the study of restorative therapies for the brain in pathological conditions. PMID:26803310

  14. Optimal active vibration absorber - Design and experimental results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee-Glauser, Gina; Juang, Jer-Nan; Sulla, Jeffrey L.

    1993-01-01

    An optimal active vibration absorber can provide guaranteed closed-loop stability and control for large flexible space structures with collocated sensors/actuators. The active vibration absorber is a second-order dynamic system which is designed to suppress any unwanted structural vibration. This can be designed with minimum knowledge of the controlled system. Two methods for optimizing the active vibration absorber parameters are illustrated: minimum resonant amplitude and frequency matched active controllers. The Controls-Structures Interaction Phase-1 Evolutionary Model at NASA LaRC is used to demonstrate the effectiveness of the active vibration absorber for vibration suppression. Performance is compared numerically and experimentally using acceleration feedback.

  15. Optimal active vibration absorber: Design and experimental results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee-Glauser, Gina; Juang, Jer-Nan; Sulla, Jeffrey L.

    1992-01-01

    An optimal active vibration absorber can provide guaranteed closed-loop stability and control for large flexible space structures with collocated sensors/actuators. The active vibration absorber is a second-order dynamic system which is designed to suppress any unwanted structural vibration. This can be designed with minimum knowledge of the controlled system. Two methods for optimizing the active vibration absorber parameters are illustrated: minimum resonant amplitude and frequency matched active controllers. The Controls-Structures Interaction Phase-1 Evolutionary Model at NASA LaRC is used to demonstrate the effectiveness of the active vibration absorber for vibration suppression. Performance is compared numerically and experimentally using acceleration feedback.

  16. Annual Summary. Training and Technology Experimentation, Demonstration, and Utilization Program Activities (January 1-December 31, 1971).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oak Ridge Associated Universities, TN.

    Directed primarily toward increasing utilization of industrial resources for training and development of disadvantaged persons, Training and Technology (TAT) activities for 1971 included: (1) development and implementation of experimental approaches to program development and operation, (2) technical support for university-conducted related…

  17. Experimental approaches to study plant cell walls during plant-microbe interactions

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Ye; Petti, Carloalberto; Williams, Mark A.; DeBolt, Seth

    2014-01-01

    Plant cell walls provide physical strength, regulate the passage of bio-molecules, and act as the first barrier of defense against biotic and abiotic stress. In addition to providing structural integrity, plant cell walls serve an important function in connecting cells to their extracellular environment by sensing and transducing signals to activate cellular responses, such as those that occur during pathogen infection. This mini review will summarize current experimental approaches used to study cell wall functions during plant-pathogen interactions. Focus will be paid to cell imaging, spectroscopic analyses, and metabolic profiling techniques. PMID:25352855

  18. Measuring segregation: an activity space approach

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Shih-Lung

    2010-01-01

    While the literature clearly acknowledges that individuals may experience different levels of segregation across their various socio-geographical spaces, most measures of segregation are intended to be used in the residential space. Using spatially aggregated data to evaluate segregation in the residential space has been the norm and thus individual’s segregation experiences in other socio-geographical spaces are often de-emphasized or ignored. This paper attempts to provide a more comprehensive approach in evaluating segregation beyond the residential space. The entire activity spaces of individuals are taken into account with individuals serving as the building blocks of the analysis. The measurement principle is based upon the exposure dimension of segregation. The proposed measure reflects the exposure of individuals of a referenced group in a neighborhood to the populations of other groups that are found within the activity spaces of individuals in the referenced group. Using the travel diary data collected from the tri-county area in southeast Florida and the imputed racial–ethnic data, this paper demonstrates how the proposed segregation measurement approach goes beyond just measuring population distribution patterns in the residential space and can provide a more comprehensive evaluation of segregation by considering various socio-geographical spaces. PMID:21643546

  19. Measuring segregation: an activity space approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, David W. S.; Shaw, Shih-Lung

    2011-06-01

    While the literature clearly acknowledges that individuals may experience different levels of segregation across their various socio-geographical spaces, most measures of segregation are intended to be used in the residential space. Using spatially aggregated data to evaluate segregation in the residential space has been the norm and thus individual's segregation experiences in other socio-geographical spaces are often de-emphasized or ignored. This paper attempts to provide a more comprehensive approach in evaluating segregation beyond the residential space. The entire activity spaces of individuals are taken into account with individuals serving as the building blocks of the analysis. The measurement principle is based upon the exposure dimension of segregation. The proposed measure reflects the exposure of individuals of a referenced group in a neighborhood to the populations of other groups that are found within the activity spaces of individuals in the referenced group. Using the travel diary data collected from the tri-county area in southeast Florida and the imputed racial-ethnic data, this paper demonstrates how the proposed segregation measurement approach goes beyond just measuring population distribution patterns in the residential space and can provide a more comprehensive evaluation of segregation by considering various socio-geographical spaces.

  20. Animal experimentation: a rational approach towards drug development.

    PubMed

    Kumar, V; Singh, P N; Mishra, B

    2000-06-01

    Man's observation of animals as objects of study undoubtedly began in prehistoric times. The first recorded attempt involving the use of live animals for research was by Ersistratis in Alexandria in 300 B.C. Animal investigation has clearly made possible the enormous advances in drug development in this century. A cursory review of any modern text book of pharmacology or medicine will attest the many drugs currently available to benefit mankind in the struggle to eradicate and control diseases. The main purpose of this article is to describe some of the experimental work on animals which contributed to the discovery and development of drugs benefiting human beings and other animal species. Since animal experimentation has occupied a focal position in all the research leading to useful drugs, one will appreciate that it will be necessary to limit the discussion to certain aspects of this broad and interesting topic. With this in mind, an attempt is made to relate briefly the nature of animal investigations which were instrumental in the development of major classes of drugs. Some attention has also been focused on legislation's on animal experimentation of some developed countries with emphasis on India and to views on animal experimentation. We hope this article will stimulate the minds of the scientists for a rational debate on the future of animal experimentation. PMID:11116523

  1. Experimental approaches for the development of gamma spectroscopy well logging system

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Jehyun; Hwang, Seho; Kim, Jongman; Won, Byeongho

    2015-03-10

    This article discusses experimental approaches for the development of gamma spectroscopy well logging system. Considering the size of borehole sonde, we customize 2 x 2 inches inorganic scintillators and the system including high voltage, preamplifier, amplifier and multichannel analyzer (MCA). The calibration chart is made by test using standard radioactive sources so that the measured count rates are expressed by energy spectrum. Optimum high-voltage supplies and the measurement parameters of each detector are set up by experimental investigation. Also, the responses of scintillation detectors have been examined by analysis according to the distance between source and detector. Because gamma spectroscopy well logging needs broad spectrum, high sensitivity and resolution, the energy resolution and sensitivity as a function of gamma ray energy are investigated by analyzing the gamma ray activities of the radioactive sources.

  2. In-Store Experimental Approach to Pricing and Consumer Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sigurdsson, Valdimar; Foxall, Gordon; Saevarsson, Hugi

    2010-01-01

    This study assessed how, and to what extent, it is possible to use behavioral experimentation and relative sales analysis to study the effects of price on consumers' brand choices in the store environment. An in-store experiment was performed in four stores to investigate the effects of different prices of a target brand on consumers' relative…

  3. Properties of Ferroelectric Nanostructures: A Combined Theoretical and Experimental Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Bellaiche, Laurent; Fu, Huaxiang

    2008-01-24

    Our main goal was to develop and/or use numerical schemes, from first-principles, to understand (at a microscopic level and via a comparison with experimental data, when available) ferroelectric nanostructures, as well as to reveal their unusual properties.

  4. Experimental Approach to the Study of Vowel Perception in German

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wangler, Hans-Heinrich; Weiss, Rudolf

    1975-01-01

    An experimental phonetic investigation is described whose goal it was to develop a test which could be used to establish norms in the perception of vowels by native speakers of German. Particular emphasis is placed upon the design of the experiment. The test procedure and the results are discussed. Available from Albert J. Phiebig, Inc., P.O. Box…

  5. Uncovering the Role of Metal Catalysis in Tetrazole Formation by an In Situ Cycloaddition Reaction: An Experimental Approach.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Di-Chang; Wen, Ya-Qiong; Deng, Ji-Hua; Luo, Xu-Zhong; Gong, Yun-Nan; Lu, Tong-Bu

    2015-09-28

    Using an experimental approach, the role of metal catalysis has been investigated in the in situ cycloaddition reaction of nitrile with azide to form tetrazoles. It has been shown that metal catalysis serves to activate the cyano group in the nitrile reagent by a coordinative interaction. PMID:26293313

  6. A cyber-physical approach to experimental fluid mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackowski, Andrew Williams

    This Thesis documents the design, implementation, and use of a novel type of experimental apparatus, termed Cyber-Physical Fluid Dynamics (CPFD). Unlike traditional fluid mechanics experiments, CPFD is a general-purpose technique that allows one to impose arbitrary forces on an object submerged in a fluid. By combining fluid mechanics with robotics, we can perform experiments that would otherwise be incredibly difficult or time-consuming. More generally, CPFD allows a high degree of automation and control of the experimental process, allowing for much more efficient use of experimental facilities. Examples of CPFD's capabilites include imposing a gravitational force in the horizontal direction (allowing a test object to "fall" sideways in a water channel), simulating nonlinear springs for a vibrating fluid-structure system, or allowing a self-propelled body to move forward under its own force. Because experimental parameters (including forces and even the mass of the test object) are defined in software, one can define entire ensembles of experiments to run autonomously. CPFD additionally integrates related systems such as water channel speed control, LDV flow speed measurements, and PIV flowfield measurements. The end result is a general-purpose experimental system that opens the door to a vast array of fluid-structure interaction problems. We begin by describing the design and implementation of CPFD, the heart of which is a high-performance force-feedback control system. Precise measurement of time-varying forces (including removing effects of the test object's inertia) is more critical here than in typical robotic force-feedback applications. CPFD is based on an integration of ideas from control theory, fluid dynamics, computer science, electrical engineering, and solid mechanics. We also describe experiments using the CPFD experimental apparatus to study vortex-induced vibration (VIV) and oscillating-airfoil propulsion. We show how CPFD can be used to simulate

  7. Morphodynamics of submarine channel inception revealed by new experimental approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Leeuw, Jan; Eggenhuisen, Joris T.; Cartigny, Matthieu J. B.

    2016-03-01

    Submarine channels are ubiquitous on the seafloor and their inception and evolution is a result of dynamic interaction between turbidity currents and the evolving seafloor. However, the morphodynamic links between channel inception and flow dynamics have not yet been monitored in experiments and only in one instance on the modern seafloor. Previous experimental flows did not show channel inception, because flow conditions were not appropriately scaled to sustain suspended sediment transport. Here we introduce and apply new scaling constraints for similarity between natural and experimental turbidity currents. The scaled currents initiate a leveed channel from an initially featureless slope. Channelization commences with deposition of levees in some slope segments and erosion of a conduit in other segments. Channel relief and flow confinement increase progressively during subsequent flows. This morphodynamic evolution determines the architecture of submarine channel deposits in the stratigraphic record and efficiency of sediment bypass to the basin floor.

  8. Morphodynamics of submarine channel inception revealed by new experimental approach

    PubMed Central

    de Leeuw, Jan; Eggenhuisen, Joris T.; Cartigny, Matthieu J. B.

    2016-01-01

    Submarine channels are ubiquitous on the seafloor and their inception and evolution is a result of dynamic interaction between turbidity currents and the evolving seafloor. However, the morphodynamic links between channel inception and flow dynamics have not yet been monitored in experiments and only in one instance on the modern seafloor. Previous experimental flows did not show channel inception, because flow conditions were not appropriately scaled to sustain suspended sediment transport. Here we introduce and apply new scaling constraints for similarity between natural and experimental turbidity currents. The scaled currents initiate a leveed channel from an initially featureless slope. Channelization commences with deposition of levees in some slope segments and erosion of a conduit in other segments. Channel relief and flow confinement increase progressively during subsequent flows. This morphodynamic evolution determines the architecture of submarine channel deposits in the stratigraphic record and efficiency of sediment bypass to the basin floor. PMID:26996440

  9. Morphodynamics of submarine channel inception revealed by new experimental approach.

    PubMed

    de Leeuw, Jan; Eggenhuisen, Joris T; Cartigny, Matthieu J B

    2016-01-01

    Submarine channels are ubiquitous on the seafloor and their inception and evolution is a result of dynamic interaction between turbidity currents and the evolving seafloor. However, the morphodynamic links between channel inception and flow dynamics have not yet been monitored in experiments and only in one instance on the modern seafloor. Previous experimental flows did not show channel inception, because flow conditions were not appropriately scaled to sustain suspended sediment transport. Here we introduce and apply new scaling constraints for similarity between natural and experimental turbidity currents. The scaled currents initiate a leveed channel from an initially featureless slope. Channelization commences with deposition of levees in some slope segments and erosion of a conduit in other segments. Channel relief and flow confinement increase progressively during subsequent flows. This morphodynamic evolution determines the architecture of submarine channel deposits in the stratigraphic record and efficiency of sediment bypass to the basin floor. PMID:26996440

  10. Single Component Sorption-Desorption Test Experimental Design Approach Discussions

    SciTech Connect

    Phil WInston

    2011-09-01

    A task was identified within the fission-product-transport work package to develop a path forward for doing testing to determine behavior of volatile fission products behavior and to engage members of the NGNP community to advise and dissent on the approach. The following document is a summary of the discussions and the specific approaches suggested for components of the testing. Included in the summary isare the minutes of the conference call that was held with INL and external interested parties to elicit comments on the approaches brought forward by the INL participants. The conclusion was that an initial non-radioactive, single component test will be useful to establish the limits of currently available chemical detection methods, and to evaluated source-dispersion uniformity. In parallel, development of a real-time low-concentration monitoring method is believed to be useful in detecting rapid dispersion as well as desorption phenomena. Ultimately, the test cycle is expected to progress to the use of radio-traced species, simply because this method will allow the lowest possible detection limits. The consensus of the conference call was that there is no need for an in-core test because the duct and heat exchanger surfaces that will be the sorption target will be outside the main neutron flux and will not be affected by irradiation. Participants in the discussion and contributors to the INL approach were Jeffrey Berg, Pattrick Calderoni, Gary Groenewold, Paul Humrickhouse, Brad Merrill, and Phil Winston. Participants from outside the INL included David Hanson of General Atomics, Todd Allen, Tyler Gerczak, and Izabela Szlufarska of the University of Wisconsin, Gary Was, of the University of Michigan, Sudarshan Loyalka and Tushar Ghosh of the University of Missouri, and Robert Morris of Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  11. Sequential activation of metabolic pathways: a dynamic optimization approach.

    PubMed

    Oyarzún, Diego A; Ingalls, Brian P; Middleton, Richard H; Kalamatianos, Dimitrios

    2009-11-01

    The regulation of cellular metabolism facilitates robust cellular operation in the face of changing external conditions. The cellular response to this varying environment may include the activation or inactivation of appropriate metabolic pathways. Experimental and numerical observations of sequential timing in pathway activation have been reported in the literature. It has been argued that such patterns can be rationalized by means of an underlying optimal metabolic design. In this paper we pose a dynamic optimization problem that accounts for time-resource minimization in pathway activation under constrained total enzyme abundance. The optimized variables are time-dependent enzyme concentrations that drive the pathway to a steady state characterized by a prescribed metabolic flux. The problem formulation addresses unbranched pathways with irreversible kinetics. Neither specific reaction kinetics nor fixed pathway length are assumed.In the optimal solution, each enzyme follows a switching profile between zero and maximum concentration, following a temporal sequence that matches the pathway topology. This result provides an analytic justification of the sequential activation previously described in the literature. In contrast with the existent numerical approaches, the activation sequence is proven to be optimal for a generic class of monomolecular kinetics. This class includes, but is not limited to, Mass Action, Michaelis-Menten, Hill, and some Power-law models. This suggests that sequential enzyme expression may be a common feature of metabolic regulation, as it is a robust property of optimal pathway activation. PMID:19412635

  12. Novel Approaches to Treat Experimental Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Umar, S.; Steendijk, P.; Ypey, D. L.; Atsma, D. E.; van der Wall, E. E.; Schalij, M. J.; van der Laarse, A.

    2010-01-01

    Background. Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a life-threatening disease characterized by an increase in pulmonary artery pressure leading to right ventricular (RV) hypertrophy, RV failure, and ultimately death. Current treatments can improve symptoms and reduce severity of the hemodynamic disorder but gradual deterioration in their condition often necessitates a lung transplant. Methods and Results. In experimental models of PAH, particularly the model of monocrotaline-induced pulmonary hypertension, efficacious treatment options tested so far include a spectrum of pharmacologic agents with actions such as anti-mitogenic, proendothelial function, proangiogenic, antiinflammatory and antioxidative. Emerging trends in PAH treatment are gene and cell therapy and their combination, like (progenitor) cells enriched with eNOS or VEGF gene. More animal data should be collected to investigate optimal cell type, in vitro cell transduction, route of administration, and number of cells to inject. Several recently discovered and experimentally tested interventions bear potential for therapeutic purposes in humans or have been shown already to be effective in PAH patients leading to improved life expectation and better quality of life. Conclusion. Since many patients remain symptomatic despite therapy, we should encourage research in animal models of PAH and implement promising treatments in homogeneous groups of PAH patients. PMID:20339474

  13. Theoretical and experimental approaches for the hypercube-embedding problem

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Woeikae.

    1991-01-01

    The hypercube-embedding problem, a restricted version of the general mapping problem, is the problem of mapping a set of communicating processes to a hypercube multiprocessor. The goal is to find a mapping that minimizes the length of the paths between communicating processes so that communication overhead is minimized. Unfortunately, the hypercube-embedding problem has been shown to be NP-hard, even for trees. This thesis studies both experimental and theoretical issues for the hypercube-embedding problem. Many heuristics have been proposed for hypercube embedding. For experimental studies, a versatile test bed is established for the evaluation of heuristics. Extensive experiments were performed for a wide range of hypercube-embedding heuristics chosen from the literature. Overall, ten different heuristics are evaluated. It is shown that two of the new heuristic proposed are particularly successful in comparison with other heuristics. For theoretical studies, a simple linear-time heuristic is presented which embeds arbitrary binary trees to hypercubes with expansion 1 and average dilation no more than 2.

  14. Antioxidant potential of orientin: A combined experimental and DFT approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Praveena, R.; Sadasivam, K.; Deepha, V.; Sivakumar, Raman

    2014-03-01

    The antioxidant activity of the bioactive fractions obtained from the leaves of Rhynchosia capitata is evaluated for its capacity to reduce ferric ions. In vitro antihemolytic analysis for the separated erythrocytes of Wistar rat blood cells exhibits maximum inhibition value for ethyl acetate (1202.55 ± 9.46) than ethanol fraction (424.57 ± 12.04). Gas and solvent phase studies of structural and molecular characteristics of C-glycosyl flavonoid, orientin present in the bioactive fraction of R. capitata is investigated through hydrogen atom transfer mechanism (HAT) using DFT/B3LYP/6-311G(d,p) level of theory. Interestingly, the intramolecular hydrogen bonding formed between 3‧-O and 4‧-H makes 3‧-OH as the active site which is supported by its bond dissociation energy values. The computed values of the adiabatic ionization potential, electron affinity, hardness, softness, electronegativity and electrophilic index indicate that orientin possess good radical scavenging activity. In this study, role of molecular electrostatic potential and electron density distribution map in predicting the importance of B-ring are analyzed and reported. Spin density distribution analysis for the radicals is formed by summing of spin on rings A, B and C. The most active system able to transfer a hydrogen atom is orientin compared to vitexin and the bond dissociation enthalpy follows the order benzene > ethyl acetate > water.

  15. A Hierarchical Adaptive Approach to Optimal Experimental Design

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Woojae; Pitt, Mark A.; Lu, Zhong-Lin; Steyvers, Mark; Myung, Jay I.

    2014-01-01

    Experimentation is at the core of research in the behavioral and neural sciences, yet observations can be expensive and time-consuming to acquire (e.g., MRI scans, responses from infant participants). A major interest of researchers is designing experiments that lead to maximal accumulation of information about the phenomenon under study with the fewest possible number of observations. In addressing this challenge, statisticians have developed adaptive design optimization methods. This letter introduces a hierarchical Bayes extension of adaptive design optimization that provides a judicious way to exploit two complementary schemes of inference (with past and future data) to achieve even greater accuracy and efficiency in information gain. We demonstrate the method in a simulation experiment in the field of visual perception. PMID:25149697

  16. A Novel Approach to Experimental Studies of Mineral Dissolution Kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Zhu; William E. Seyfried

    2005-01-01

    Currently, DOE is conducting pilot CO{sub 2} injection tests to evaluate the concept of geological sequestration. One strategy that potentially enhances CO{sub 2} solubility and reduces the risk of CO{sub 2} leak back to the surface is dissolution of indigenous minerals in the geological formation and precipitation of secondary carbonate phases, which increases the brine pH and immobilizes CO{sub 2}. Clearly, the rates at which these dissolution and precipitation reactions occur directly determine the efficiency of this strategy. However, one of the fundamental problems in modern geochemistry is the persistent two to five orders of magnitude discrepancy between laboratory-measured and field derived feldspar dissolution rates. To date, there is no real guidance as to how to predict silicate reaction rates for use in quantitative models. Current models for assessment of geological carbon sequestration have generally opted to use laboratory rates, in spite of the dearth of such data for compositionally complex systems, and the persistent disconnect between lab and field applications. Therefore, a firm scientific basis for predicting silicate reaction kinetics in CO{sub 2} injected geological formations is urgently needed to assure the reliability of the geochemical models used for the assessments of carbon sequestration strategies. The funded experimental and theoretical study attempts to resolve this outstanding scientific issue by novel experimental design and theoretical interpretation to measure silicate dissolution rates and iron carbonate precipitation rates at conditions pertinent to geological carbon sequestration. In the first year of the project, we have successfully developed a sample preparation method and completed three batch feldspar dissolution experiments at 200 C and 300 bars. The changes of solution chemistry as dissolution experiments progressed were monitored with on-line sampling of the aqueous phase at the constant temperature and pressure

  17. A Novel Approach to Experimental Studies of Mineral Dissolution Kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Zhu

    2006-08-31

    Currently, DOE is conducting pilot CO{sub 2} injection tests to evaluate the concept of geological sequestration. One strategy that potentially enhances CO{sub 2} solubility and reduces the risk of CO{sub 2} leak back to the surface is dissolution of indigenous minerals in the geological formation and precipitation of secondary carbonate phases, which increases the brine pH and immobilizes CO{sub 2}. Clearly, the rates at which these dissolution and precipitation reactions occur directly determine the efficiency of this strategy. However, one of the fundamental problems in modern geochemistry is the persistent two to five orders of magnitude discrepancy between laboratory measured and field derived feldspar dissolution rates. To date, there is no real guidance as to how to predict silicate reaction rates for use in quantitative models. Current models for assessment of geological carbon sequestration have generally opted to use laboratory rates, in spite of the dearth of such data for compositionally complex systems, and the persistent disconnect between laboratory and field applications. Therefore, a firm scientific basis for predicting silicate reaction kinetics in CO2 injected geological formations is urgently needed to assure the reliability of the geochemical models used for the assessments of carbon sequestration strategies. The funded experimental and theoretical study attempts to resolve this outstanding scientific issue by novel experimental design and theoretical interpretation to measure silicate dissolution rates and iron carbonate precipitation rates at conditions pertinent to geological carbon sequestration. In the second year of the project, we completed CO{sub 2}-Navajo sandstone interaction batch and flow-through experiments and a Navajo sandstone dissolution experiment without the presence of CO{sub 2} at 200 C and 250-300 bars, and initiated dawsonite dissolution and solubility experiments. We also performed additional 5-day experiments at the

  18. Inulin, oligofructose and bone health: experimental approaches and mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Weaver, Connie M

    2005-04-01

    Inulin-type fructans have been proposed to benefit mineral retention, thereby enhancing bone health. Many, but not all, experimental animal studies have shown increased mineral absorption by feeding non-digestible oligosaccharides. Possible reasons for inconsistencies are explored. A few studies have reported an enhanced bone mineral density or content. Bone health can be evaluated in chronic feeding studies with bone densitometry, bone breaking strength, bone mineral concentration and bone structure. Isotopic Ca tracers can be used to determine the point of metabolism affected by feeding a functional food ingredient. These methods and the effects of feeding inulin-type fructose are reviewed. Inulin-type fructans enhance Mg retention. Chicory long-chain inulin and oligofructose enhance femoral Ca content, bone mineral density and Ca retention through enhanced Ca absorption and suppressed bone turnover rates, but it is not bone-promoting under all conditions. PMID:15877902

  19. Droplet activation of wet particles: development of the Wet CCN approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakao, S.; Suda, S. R.; Camp, M.; Petters, M. D.; Kreidenweis, S. M.

    2014-07-01

    Relationships between critical supersaturation required for activation and particle dry diameter have been the primary means for experimentally characterizing cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activity; however, use of the dry diameter inherently limits the application to cases where the dry diameter can be used to accurately estimate solute volume. This study challenges the requirement and proposes a new experimental approach, Wet CCN, for studying CCN activity without the need for a drying step. The new approach directly measures the subsaturated portion of the Köhler curves. The experimental setup consists of a humidity-controlled differential mobility analyzer and a CCN counter; wet diameter equilibrated at known relative humidity is used to characterize CCN activity instead of the dry diameter. The experimental approach was validated against ammonium sulfate, glucose, and nonspherical ammonium oxalate monohydrate. Further, the approach was applied to a mixture of nonspherical iodine oxide particles. The Wet CCN approach successfully determined the hygroscopicity of nonspherical particles by collapsing them into spherical, deliquesced droplets. We further show that the Wet CCN approach offers unique insights into the physical and chemical impacts of the aqueous phase on CCN activity; a potential application is to investigate the impact of evaporation/co-condensation of water-soluble semivolatile species on CCN activity.

  20. Droplet activation of wet particles: development of the Wet CCN approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakao, S.; Suda, S. R.; Camp, M.; Petters, M. D.; Kreidenweis, S. M.

    2014-01-01

    Relationships between critical supersaturation required for activation and particle dry diameter have been the primary means for experimentally characterizing cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activity; however, use of the dry diameter inherently limits the application to cases where the dry diameter can be used to accurately estimate solute volume. This study challenges the requirement and proposes a new experimental approach, Wet CCN, for studying CCN activity without the need for a drying step. The new approach directly measures Köhler curves under sub-saturated conditions. The experimental setup consists of a humidity-controlled differential mobility analyzer and a CCN counter; wet diameter equilibrated at known relative humidity is used to characterize CCN activity instead of the dry diameter. The experimental approach was validated against ammonium sulfate, glucose and non-spherical ammonium oxalate monohydrate. Further, the approach was applied to a mixture of non-spherical iodine oxide particles. The Wet CCN approach successfully determined the hygroscopicity of non-spherical particles by collapsing them into spherical, deliquesced droplets. We further show that the Wet CCN approach offers unique insights to the physical and chemical impacts of the aqueous phase on CCN activity; a potential application is to investigate the impact of evaporation/co-condensation of water-soluble semi-volatile species on CCN activity.

  1. Experimental approaches to identify non-coding RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Hüttenhofer, Alexander; Vogel, Jörg

    2006-01-01

    Cellular RNAs that do not function as messenger RNAs (mRNAs), transfer RNAs (tRNAs) or ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs) comprise a diverse class of molecules that are commonly referred to as non-protein-coding RNAs (ncRNAs). These molecules have been known for quite a while, but their importance was not fully appreciated until recent genome-wide searches discovered thousands of these molecules and their genes in a variety of model organisms. Some of these screens were based on biocomputational prediction of ncRNA candidates within entire genomes of model organisms. Alternatively, direct biochemical isolation of expressed ncRNAs from cells, tissues or entire organisms has been shown to be a powerful approach to identify ncRNAs both at the level of individual molecules and at a global scale. In this review, we will survey several such wet-lab strategies, i.e. direct sequencing of ncRNAs, shotgun cloning of small-sized ncRNAs (cDNA libraries), microarray analysis and genomic SELEX to identify novel ncRNAs, and discuss the advantages and limits of these approaches. PMID:16436800

  2. Activated Corrosion Product Analysis. Analytical Approach.

    SciTech Connect

    Golubov, Stanislav I; Busby, Jeremy T; Stoller, Roger E

    2010-01-01

    The presence of activated corrosion products (ACPs) in a water cooling system is a key factor in the licensing of ITER and affects nuclear classification, which governs design and operation. The objective of this study is to develop a method to accurately estimate radionuclide concentrations during ITER operation in support of nuclear classification. A brief overview of the PACTITER numerical code, which is currently used for ACP estimation, is presented. An alternative analytical approach for calculation of ACPs, which can also be used for validation of existing numerical codes, including PACTITER, has been proposed. A continuity equation describing the kinetics of accumulation of radioactive isotopes in a water cooling system in the form of a closed ring has been formulated, taking into account the following processes: production of radioactive elements and their decay, filtration, and ACP accumulation in filter system. Additional work is needed to more accurately assess the ACP inventory in the cooling water system, including more accurate simulation of the Tokamak cooling water system (TCWS) operating cycle and consideration of material corrosion, release, and deposition rates.

  3. Operator assistant systems - An experimental approach using a telerobotics application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boy, Guy A.; Mathe, Nathalie

    1993-01-01

    This article presents a knowledge-based system methodology for developing operator assistant (OA) systems in dynamic and interactive environments. This is a problem both of training and design, which is the subject of this article. Design includes both design of the system to be controlled and design of procedures for operating this system. A specific knowledge representation is proposed for representing the corresponding system and operational knowledge. This representation is based on the situation recognition and analytical reasoning paradigm. It tries to make explicit common factors involved in both human and machine intelligence, including perception and reasoning. An OA system based on this representation has been developed for space telerobotics. Simulations have been carried out with astronauts and the resulting protocols have been analyzed. Results show the relevance of the approach and have been used for improving the knowledge representation and the OA architecture.

  4. Experimental and modeling approaches for food waste composting: a review.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhentong; Lu, Hongwei; Ren, Lixia; He, Li

    2013-10-01

    Composting has been used as a method to dispose food waste (FW) and recycle organic matter to improve soil structure and fertility. Considering the significance of composting in FW treatment, many researchers have paid their attention on how to improve FW composting efficiency, reduce operating cost, and mitigate the associated environmental damage. This review focuses on the overall studies of FW composting, not only various parameters significantly affecting the processes and final results, but also a number of simulation approaches that are greatly instrumental in well understanding the process mechanism and/or results prediction. Implications of many key ingredients on FW composting performance are also discussed. Perspects of effective laboratory experiments and computer-based simulation are finally investigated, demonstrating many demanding areas for enhanced research efforts, which include the screening of multi-functional additives, volatile organiccompound emission control, necessity of modeling and post-modeling analysis, and usefulness of developing more conjunctive AI-based process control techniques. PMID:23876506

  5. Sparsely sampling the sky: a Bayesian experimental design approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paykari, P.; Jaffe, A. H.

    2013-08-01

    The next generation of galaxy surveys will observe millions of galaxies over large volumes of the Universe. These surveys are expensive both in time and cost, raising questions regarding the optimal investment of this time and money. In this work, we investigate criteria for selecting amongst observing strategies for constraining the galaxy power spectrum and a set of cosmological parameters. Depending on the parameters of interest, it may be more efficient to observe a larger, but sparsely sampled, area of sky instead of a smaller contiguous area. In this work, by making use of the principles of Bayesian experimental design, we will investigate the advantages and disadvantages of the sparse sampling of the sky and discuss the circumstances in which a sparse survey is indeed the most efficient strategy. For the Dark Energy Survey (DES), we find that by sparsely observing the same area in a smaller amount of time, we only increase the errors on the parameters by a maximum of 0.45 per cent. Conversely, investing the same amount of time as the original DES to observe a sparser but larger area of sky, we can in fact constrain the parameters with errors reduced by 28 per cent.

  6. An experimental approach to a simplified model of human birth.

    PubMed

    Lehn, Andrea M; Baumer, Alexa; Leftwich, Megan C

    2016-07-26

    This study presents a simplified experimental model of labor for the study of fetal lie and amniotic fluid properties. It mimics a ventouse (vacuum extraction) delivery to study the effect of amniotic fluid properties on force transfer to a passive fetus. The simplified vacuum delivery consists of a solid ovate spheroid being pulled from a passive, flexible spherical elastic shell filled with fluid. We compare the force necessary to remove the ovate fetus in fluids of varying properties. Additionally, the fetal lie-angular deviation from maternal/fetal spinal alignment-is changed by 5° intervals and the pullout force is measured. In both the concentric ovate experiments, the force to remove the fetus changes with the properties of the fluid occupying the space between the fetus and the uterus. Increasing the fluid viscosity by 35% decreases the maximum fetal removal force by up to 52.5%. Furthermore, while the force is dominated by the elastic force of the latex uterus, the properties of the amniotic fluid can significantly decrease the total removal force. This study demonstrates that the fluid components of a birth model can significantly alter the forces associated with fetus removal. This suggests that complete studies of human parturition should be designed to include both the material and fluid systems. PMID:26684434

  7. The mechanism of the keyhole lesion reassessed: An experimental approach.

    PubMed

    Delannoy, Yann; Colard, Thomas; Le Garff, Erwan; Humez, Sarah; Gosset, Didier; Hedouin, Valéry

    2016-01-01

    The initial description of the keyhole defect was detailed as a peculiar gunshot entrance wound in the cranial vault due to firearm discharge in a tangential path. This injury may be described in two parts: a rounded section with inner table beveling and a triangular section with outer table beveling. We report a case of a gunshot skull wound "keyhole" shaped, appeared to have been made perpendicularly to the bone. Performing an experimental study on cranial bones with shots made perpendicularly to the skull approved this hypothesis, and bone injuries were then architecturally characterised using high-resolution micro computed tomography. The singular link between the tangential gunshot path and the keyhole pattern has been refuted several times, and some authors have hypothesised that there is an important role for concentric fractures that occur far away from the initial impact point of the bullet. Micro computed tomography analysis of the bone showed these keyhole defect features with a particular high description. Then, the whole pattern has a spider-web effect, and these concentric fractures could explain the keyhole pattern even in a perpendicular gunshot path. PMID:26497111

  8. Music Performance As an Experimental Approach to Hyperscanning Studies.

    PubMed

    Acquadro, Michaël A S; Congedo, Marco; De Riddeer, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    Humans are fundamentally social and tend to create emergent organizations when interacting with each other; from dyads to families, small groups, large groups, societies, and civilizations. The study of the neuronal substrate of human social behavior is currently gaining momentum in the young field of social neuroscience. Hyperscanning is a neuroimaging technique by which we can study two or more brains simultaneously while participants interact with each other. The aim of this article is to discuss several factors that we deem important in designing hyperscanning experiments. We first review hyperscanning studies performed by means of electroencephalography (EEG) that have been relying on a continuous interaction paradigm. Then, we provide arguments for favoring ecological paradigms, for studying the emotional component of social interactions and for performing longitudinal studies, the last two aspects being largely neglected so far in the hyperscanning literature despite their paramount importance in social sciences. Based on these premises, we argue that music performance is a suitable experimental setting for hyperscanning and that for such studies EEG is an appropriate choice as neuroimaging modality. PMID:27252641

  9. Music Performance As an Experimental Approach to Hyperscanning Studies

    PubMed Central

    Acquadro, Michaël A. S.; Congedo, Marco; De Riddeer, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    Humans are fundamentally social and tend to create emergent organizations when interacting with each other; from dyads to families, small groups, large groups, societies, and civilizations. The study of the neuronal substrate of human social behavior is currently gaining momentum in the young field of social neuroscience. Hyperscanning is a neuroimaging technique by which we can study two or more brains simultaneously while participants interact with each other. The aim of this article is to discuss several factors that we deem important in designing hyperscanning experiments. We first review hyperscanning studies performed by means of electroencephalography (EEG) that have been relying on a continuous interaction paradigm. Then, we provide arguments for favoring ecological paradigms, for studying the emotional component of social interactions and for performing longitudinal studies, the last two aspects being largely neglected so far in the hyperscanning literature despite their paramount importance in social sciences. Based on these premises, we argue that music performance is a suitable experimental setting for hyperscanning and that for such studies EEG is an appropriate choice as neuroimaging modality. PMID:27252641

  10. New experimental approaches to search for neutrino mass

    SciTech Connect

    Gironi, L.

    2013-12-30

    In order to obtain high sensitivity in the study of the neutrino mass it is necessary to design experiments able to optimize all the sensitivity parameters. One of the most promising techniques to achieve this goal is the bolometric technique because of its intrinsic characteristics: high detection efficiency, excellent energy resolution, low intrinsic background and the possibility to study many different compounds. The bolometric technique has already obtained excellent results on the neutrino mass study with Cuoricino. The Cuoricino experiment has also shown that surface contaminations of materials facing the detectors would be the limiting factor for the sensitivity of next generation experiments with bolometers. Mainly for this reason scintillating bolometers have been developed allowing a very efficient discrimination of alpha particles thanks to their double readout. Tests performed on these crystals showed moreover the possibility to discriminate the interacting particles through a pulse shape analysis. This feature is very promising because it allows to reach the same results on the background reduction obtained with the hybrid detectors but without complicating the experimental assembly.

  11. Numerical and Experimental Approaches Toward Understanding Lava Flow Heat Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rumpf, M.; Fagents, S. A.; Hamilton, C.; Crawford, I. A.

    2013-12-01

    We have performed numerical modeling and experimental studies to quantify the heat transfer from a lava flow into an underlying particulate substrate. This project was initially motivated by a desire to understand the transfer of heat from a lava flow into the lunar regolith. Ancient regolith deposits that have been protected by a lava flow may contain ancient solar wind, solar flare, and galactic cosmic ray products that can give insight into the history of our solar system, provided the records were not heated and destroyed by the overlying lava flow. In addition, lava-substrate interaction is an important aspect of lava fluid dynamics that requires consideration in lava emplacement models Our numerical model determines the depth to which the heat pulse will penetrate beneath a lava flow into the underlying substrate. Rigorous treatment of the temperature dependence of lava and substrate thermal conductivity and specific heat capacity, density, and latent heat release are imperative to an accurate model. Experiments were conducted to verify the numerical model. Experimental containers with interior dimensions of 20 x 20 x 25 cm were constructed from 1 inch thick calcium silicate sheeting. For initial experiments, boxes were packed with lunar regolith simulant (GSC-1) to a depth of 15 cm with thermocouples embedded at regular intervals. Basalt collected at Kilauea Volcano, HI, was melted in a gas forge and poured directly onto the simulant. Initial lava temperatures ranged from ~1200 to 1300 °C. The system was allowed to cool while internal temperatures were monitored by a thermocouple array and external temperatures were monitored by a Forward Looking Infrared (FLIR) video camera. Numerical simulations of the experiments elucidate the details of lava latent heat release and constrain the temperature-dependence of the thermal conductivity of the particulate substrate. The temperature-dependence of thermal conductivity of particulate material is not well known

  12. Photodynamic therapy: Theoretical and experimental approaches to dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ken Kang-Hsin

    Singlet oxygen (1O2) is the major cytotoxic species generated during photodynamic therapy (PDT), and 1O 2 reactions with biological targets define the photodynamic dose at the most fundamental level. We have developed a theoretical model for rigorously describing the spatial and temporal dynamics of oxygen (3O 2) consumption and transport and microscopic 1O 2 dose deposition during PDT in vivo. Using experimentally established physiological and photophysical parameters, the mathematical model allows computation of the dynamic variation of hemoglobin-3O 2 saturation within vessels, irreversible photosensitizer degradation due to photobleaching, therapy-induced blood flow decrease and the microscopic distributions of 3O2 and 1O 2 dose deposition under various irradiation conditions. mTHPC, a promising photosensitizer for PDT, is approved in Europe for the palliative treatment of head and neck cancer. Using the theoretical model and informed by intratumor sensitizer concentrations and distributions, we calculated photodynamic dose depositions for mTHPC-PDT. Our results demonstrate that the 1O 2 dose to the tumor volume does not track even qualitatively with long-term tumor responses. Thus, in this evaluation of mTHPC-PDT, any PDT dose metric that is proportional to singlet oxygen creation and/or deposition would fail to predict the tumor response. In situations like this one, other reporters of biological response to therapy would be necessary. In addition to the case study of mTHPC-PDT, we also use the mathematical model to simulate clinical photobleaching data, informed by a possible blood flow reduction during treatment. In a recently completed clinical trial at Roswell Park Cancer Institute, patients with superficial basal cell carcinoma received topical application of 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) and were irradiated with 633 nm light at 10-150 mW cm-2 . Protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) photobleaching in the lesion and the adjacent perilesion normal margin was monitored by

  13. Solidification effects on sill formation: An experimental approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chanceaux, L.; Menand, T.

    2014-10-01

    Sills represent a major mechanism for constructing continental Earth's crust because these intrusions can amalgamate and form magma reservoirs and plutons. As a result, numerous field, laboratory and numerical studies have investigated the conditions that lead to sill emplacement. However, all previous studies have neglected the potential effect magma solidification could have on sill formation. The effects of solidification on the formation of sills are studied and quantified with scaled analogue laboratory experiments. The experiments presented here involved the injection of hot vegetable oil (a magma analogue) which solidified during its propagation as a dyke in a colder and layered solid of gelatine (a host rock analogue). The gelatine solid had two layers of different stiffness, to create a priori favourable conditions to form sills. Several behaviours were observed depending on the injection temperature and the injection rate: no intrusions (extreme solidification effects), dykes stopping at the interface (high solidification effects), sills (moderate solidification effects), and dykes passing through the interface (low solidification effects). All these results can be explained quantitatively as a function of a dimensionless temperature θ, which describes the experimental thermal conditions, and a dimensionless flux ϕ, which describes their dynamical conditions. The experiments reveal that sills can only form within a restricted domain of the (θ,ϕ) parameter space. These experiments demonstrate that contrary to isothermal experiments where cooling could not affect sill formation, the presence of an interface that would be a priori mechanically favourable is not a sufficient condition for sill formation; solidification effects restrict sill formation. The results are consistent with field observations and provide a means to explain why some dykes form sills when others do not under seemingly similar geological conditions.

  14. Activity Group Guidance: A Developmental Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hillman, Bill W.; And Others

    1975-01-01

    Illustrates the content, process, and group dynamics of Activity Group Guidance. Describes and evaluates a comprehensive Activity Group Guidance program. Gives specific suggestions to counselors who wish to start Activity Groups. (Author)

  15. The influence of experimentally induced pain on shoulder muscle activity.

    PubMed

    Diederichsen, Louise Pyndt; Winther, Annika; Dyhre-Poulsen, Poul; Krogsgaard, Michael R; Nørregaard, Jesper

    2009-04-01

    Muscle function is altered in painful shoulder conditions. However, the influence of shoulder pain on muscle coordination of the shoulder has not been fully clarified. The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of experimentally induced shoulder pain on shoulder muscle function. Eleven healthy men (range 22-27 years), with no history of shoulder or cervical problems, were included in the study. Pain was induced by 5% hypertonic saline injections into the supraspinatus muscle or subacromially. Seated in a shoulder machine, subjects performed standardized concentric abduction (0 degrees -105 degrees) at a speed of approximately 120 degrees/s, controlled by a metronome. During abduction, electromyographic (EMG) activity was recorded by intramuscular wire electrodes inserted in two deeply located shoulder muscles and by surface-electrodes over six superficially located shoulder muscles. EMG was recorded before pain, during pain and after pain had subsided and pain intensity was continuously scored on a visual analog scale (VAS). During abduction, experimentally induced pain in the supraspinatus muscle caused a significant decrease in activity of the anterior deltoid, upper trapezius and the infraspinatus and an increase in activity of lower trapezius and latissimus dorsi muscles. Following subacromial injection a significantly increased muscle activity was seen in the lower trapezius, the serratus anterior and the latissimus dorsi muscles. In conclusion, this study shows that acute pain both subacromially and in the supraspinatus muscle modulates coordination of the shoulder muscles during voluntary movements. During painful conditions, an increased activity was detected in the antagonist (latissimus), which support the idea that localized pain affects muscle activation in a way that protects the painful structure. Further, the changes in muscle activity following subacromial pain induction tend to expand the subacromial space and thereby decrease the load

  16. Experimental Approaches to Study Genome Packaging of Influenza A Viruses.

    PubMed

    Isel, Catherine; Munier, Sandie; Naffakh, Nadia

    2016-01-01

    The genome of influenza A viruses (IAV) consists of eight single-stranded negative sense viral RNAs (vRNAs) encapsidated into viral ribonucleoproteins (vRNPs). It is now well established that genome packaging (i.e., the incorporation of a set of eight distinct vRNPs into budding viral particles), follows a specific pathway guided by segment-specific cis-acting packaging signals on each vRNA. However, the precise nature and function of the packaging signals, and the mechanisms underlying the assembly of vRNPs into sub-bundles in the cytoplasm and their selective packaging at the viral budding site, remain largely unknown. Here, we review the diverse and complementary methods currently being used to elucidate these aspects of the viral cycle. They range from conventional and competitive reverse genetics, single molecule imaging of vRNPs by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and high-resolution electron microscopy and tomography of budding viral particles, to solely in vitro approaches to investigate vRNA-vRNA interactions at the molecular level. PMID:27517951

  17. Experimental Approaches to Study Genome Packaging of Influenza A Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Isel, Catherine; Munier, Sandie; Naffakh, Nadia

    2016-01-01

    The genome of influenza A viruses (IAV) consists of eight single-stranded negative sense viral RNAs (vRNAs) encapsidated into viral ribonucleoproteins (vRNPs). It is now well established that genome packaging (i.e., the incorporation of a set of eight distinct vRNPs into budding viral particles), follows a specific pathway guided by segment-specific cis-acting packaging signals on each vRNA. However, the precise nature and function of the packaging signals, and the mechanisms underlying the assembly of vRNPs into sub-bundles in the cytoplasm and their selective packaging at the viral budding site, remain largely unknown. Here, we review the diverse and complementary methods currently being used to elucidate these aspects of the viral cycle. They range from conventional and competitive reverse genetics, single molecule imaging of vRNPs by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and high-resolution electron microscopy and tomography of budding viral particles, to solely in vitro approaches to investigate vRNA-vRNA interactions at the molecular level. PMID:27517951

  18. Conjugate field approaches for active array compensation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acosta, R. J.

    1989-01-01

    Two approaches for calculating the compensating feed array complex excitations are namely, the indirect conjugate field matching (ICFM) and the direct conjugate field matching (DCFM) approach. In the ICFM approach the compensating feed array excitations are determined by considering the transmitting mode and the reciprocity principle. The DCF, in contrast calculates the array excitations by integrating directly the induced surface currents on the reflector under a receiving mode. DCFM allows the reflector to be illuminated by an incident plane wave with a tapered amplitude. The level of taper can effectively control the sidelobe level of the compensated antenna pattern. Both approaches are examined briefly.

  19. Experimental approaches to kinetics of gas diffusion in hydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Leroux, Fanny; Dementin, Sébastien; Burlat, Bénédicte; Cournac, Laurent; Volbeda, Anne; Champ, Stéphanie; Martin, Lydie; Guigliarelli, Bruno; Bertrand, Patrick; Fontecilla-Camps, Juan; Rousset, Marc; Léger, Christophe

    2008-08-12

    Hydrogenases, which catalyze H(2) to H(+) conversion as part of the bioenergetic metabolism of many microorganisms, are among the metalloenzymes for which a gas-substrate tunnel has been described by using crystallography and molecular dynamics. However, the correlation between protein structure and gas-diffusion kinetics is unexplored. Here, we introduce two quantitative methods for probing the rates of diffusion within hydrogenases. One uses protein film voltammetry to resolve the kinetics of binding and release of the competitive inhibitor CO; the other is based on interpreting the yield in the isotope exchange assay. We study structurally characterized mutants of a NiFe hydrogenase, and we show that two mutations, which significantly narrow the tunnel near the entrance of the catalytic center, decrease the rates of diffusion of CO and H(2) toward and from the active site by up to 2 orders of magnitude. This proves the existence of a functional channel, which matches the hydrophobic cavity found in the crystal. However, the changes in diffusion rates do not fully correlate with the obstruction induced by the mutation and deduced from the x-ray structures. Our results demonstrate the necessity of measuring diffusion rates and emphasize the role of side-chain dynamics in determining these. PMID:18685111

  20. Experimental approaches to kinetics of gas diffusion in hydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Leroux, Fanny; Dementin, Sébastien; Burlat, Bénédicte; Cournac, Laurent; Volbeda, Anne; Champ, Stéphanie; Martin, Lydie; Guigliarelli, Bruno; Bertrand, Patrick; Fontecilla-Camps, Juan; Rousset, Marc; Léger, Christophe

    2008-01-01

    Hydrogenases, which catalyze H2 to H+ conversion as part of the bioenergetic metabolism of many microorganisms, are among the metalloenzymes for which a gas-substrate tunnel has been described by using crystallography and molecular dynamics. However, the correlation between protein structure and gas-diffusion kinetics is unexplored. Here, we introduce two quantitative methods for probing the rates of diffusion within hydrogenases. One uses protein film voltammetry to resolve the kinetics of binding and release of the competitive inhibitor CO; the other is based on interpreting the yield in the isotope exchange assay. We study structurally characterized mutants of a NiFe hydrogenase, and we show that two mutations, which significantly narrow the tunnel near the entrance of the catalytic center, decrease the rates of diffusion of CO and H2 toward and from the active site by up to 2 orders of magnitude. This proves the existence of a functional channel, which matches the hydrophobic cavity found in the crystal. However, the changes in diffusion rates do not fully correlate with the obstruction induced by the mutation and deduced from the x-ray structures. Our results demonstrate the necessity of measuring diffusion rates and emphasize the role of side-chain dynamics in determining these. PMID:18685111

  1. The movement towards a more experimental approach to problem solving in mathematics using coding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barichello, Leonardo

    2016-07-01

    Motivated by a problem proposed in a coding competition for secondary students, I will show on this paper how coding substantially changed the problem-solving process towards a more experimental approach.

  2. Manipulative Experimental Approaches to Addressing Geobiological Questions in Microbial Mat and Stromatolite Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bebout, I. Lee

    2005-01-01

    We will present a short synopsis of experimental approaches using greenhouse flume systems to address questions of biogeochemical cycling, mineral formation and 3-d structure for Guerrero Negro microbial mats and Highborne Cay Stromatolites.

  3. Biophysical Interactions in Porous Media: an Integrated Experimental and Modelling Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otten, W.; Baveye, P.; Falconer, R.

    2012-12-01

    experimental program with the development and analysis of a theoretical modelling framework. This comprises of a combination of lattice Boltzmann modelling to simulate the spatial distribution of water and velocities of flow, with a fungal growth model. This model is the first physiologically based model that enables to simulate the dynamics within a complicated 3-dimensional structure. We combine the modelling with the experimentally characterised pore architecture and present how connectivity is a key factor in fungal dynamics and interactions, and how this connectivity of preferential pathways is mediated by the spatial distribution of water within these porous media. We then use the modelling approach to demonstrate how the combination of physical and biological models can be used to offer insight into the conditions under which biological activity alters flow patterns of water within soil due to partial blocking of pores or larger volumes within a structure.

  4. Overview of International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) engineering design activities*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimomura, Y.

    1994-05-01

    The International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) [International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) (International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna, 1988), ITER Documentation Series, No. 1] project is a multiphased project, presently proceeding under the auspices of the International Atomic Energy Agency according to the terms of a four-party agreement among the European Atomic Energy Community (EC), the Government of Japan (JA), the Government of the Russian Federation (RF), and the Government of the United States (US), ``the Parties.'' The ITER project is based on the tokamak, a Russian invention, and has since been brought to a high level of development in all major fusion programs in the world. The objective of ITER is to demonstrate the scientific and technological feasibility of fusion energy for peaceful purposes. The ITER design is being developed, with support from the Parties' four Home Teams and is in progress by the Joint Central Team. An overview of ITER Design activities is presented.

  5. Photosynthesis: a short history of some modern experimental approaches.

    PubMed

    Pennazio, Sergio

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents a personal interpretation of a chapter of plant physiology beginning from the early 1930s to the early 1940s, when plant physiologists tried to find the missing link between the two (dark and light) phases of photosynthesis. As initially inferred by Richard Willstätter and Arthur Stoll in the 1910s, and then stated by Robert Emerson and William Arnold in 1932, the most accredited theory proposed that carbon dioxide must combine with chlorophyll in the dark. Successive light flashes activated the complex chlorophyll-carbon dioxide with oxygen evolution, and carbon dioxide was reduced to formaldehyde and successively polymerised into hexose. Arthur Stool in 1932 and Cornelius v. Niel in 1935 gave the first stroke to this theory suggesting that carbon dioxide must be reduced and assimilated by means of a process of water oxidation. Robert Hill showed the existence of an indissoluble link between the light phase, water oxidation and possibly oxygen evolution. Two physicists, Sam Ruben and Martin Kamen proposed the assembly of photosynthesis into a unitary process occurring as a sequence of several steps in the first 1940s. By utilising for the first time radioactive carbon (11C), they elaborated a new theory according to which carbon dioxide reduction was a repeated "cyclic" mechanism. This "heretical" view abolished the old, but still considered, theory of formaldehyde. Hill, Ruben and Kamen were able to exploit at best the possibility offered by a very advanced technology, thus confirming once again that ideas stand upon the powerful legs of technology. PMID:12852175

  6. Sustained Reduction of Cerebellar Activity in Experimental Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Rijkers, Kim; Moers-Hornikx, Véronique M. P.; Hemmes, Roelof J.; Aalbers, Marlien W.; Temel, Yasin; Vles, Johan S. H.; Hoogland, Govert

    2015-01-01

    Clinical and experimental evidence suggests a role for the cerebellum in seizure control, while no data are available on cerebellar activity between seizures. We hypothesized that interictal regional activity of the deep cerebellar nuclei is reduced in epilepsy and tested this in an animal model by using ΔFosB and cytochrome oxidase (COX) (immuno)histochemistry. The expression of these two markers of neuronal activity was analysed in the dentate nucleus (DN), interpositus nucleus (IN), and fastigial nucleus (FN) of the cerebellum of fully amygdala kindled rats that were sacrificed 48 hours after their last seizure. The DN and FN of kindled rats exhibited 25 to 29% less ΔFosB immunopositive cells than their respective counterpart in sham controls (P < 0.05). COX expression in the DN and FN of kindled animals was reduced by 32 to 33% compared to respective control values (P < 0.05). These results indicate that an epileptogenic state is characterized by decreased activity of deep cerebellar nuclei, especially the DN and FN. Possible consequences may include a decreased activation of the thalamus, contributing to further seizure spread. Restoration of FN activity by low frequency electrical stimulation is suggested as a possible treatment option in chronic epilepsy. PMID:26417599

  7. Hepatoprotective activity of Amaranthus spinosus in experimental animals.

    PubMed

    Zeashan, Hussain; Amresh, G; Singh, Satyawan; Rao, Chandana Venkateswara

    2008-11-01

    The hepatoprotective and antioxidant activity of 50% ethanolic extract of whole plant of Amaranthus spinosus (ASE) was evaluated against carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) induced hepatic damage in rats. The ASE at dose of 100, 200 and 400 mg/kg were administered orally once daily for fourteen days. The substantially elevated serum enzymatic levels of serum glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase (AST), serum glutamate pyruvate transaminase (ALT), serum alkaline phosphatase (SALP) and total bilirubin were restored towards normalization significantly by the ASE in a dose dependent manner. Higher dose exhibited significant hepatoprotective activity against carbon tetrachloride induced hepatotoxicity in rats. The biochemical observations were supplemented with histopathological examination of rat liver sections. Meanwhile, in vivo antioxidant activities as malondialdehyde (MDA), hydroperoxides, reduced glutathione (GSH), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) were also screened which were also found significantly positive in a dose dependent manner. The results of this study strongly indicate that whole plants of A. spinosus have potent hepatoprotective activity against carbon tetrachloride induced hepatic damage in experimental animals. This study suggests that possible mechanism of this activity may be due to the presence of flavonoids and phenolics compound in the ASE which may be responsible to hepatoprotective activity. PMID:18783728

  8. Teaching Systems Biology: An Active-learning Approach

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    With genomics well established in modern molecular biology, recent studies have sought to further the discipline by integrating complementary methodologies into a holistic depiction of the molecular mechanisms underpinning cell function. This genomic subdiscipline, loosely termed “systems biology,” presents the biology educator with both opportunities and obstacles: The benefit of exposing students to this cutting-edge scientific methodology is manifest, yet how does one convey the breadth and advantage of systems biology while still engaging the student? Here, I describe an active-learning approach to the presentation of systems biology. In graduate classes at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, I divided students into small groups and asked each group to interpret a sample data set (e.g., microarray data, two-hybrid data, homology-search results) describing a hypothetical signaling pathway. Mimicking realistic experimental results, each data set revealed a portion of this pathway; however, students were only able to reconstruct the full pathway by integrating all data sets, thereby exemplifying the utility in a systems biology approach. Student response to this cooperative exercise was extremely positive. In total, this approach provides an effective introduction to systems biology appropriate for students at both the undergraduate and graduate levels. PMID:16341259

  9. Analytical methods and experimental approaches for electrophysiological studies of brain oscillations

    PubMed Central

    Gross, Joachim

    2014-01-01

    Brain oscillations are increasingly the subject of electrophysiological studies probing their role in the functioning and dysfunction of the human brain. In recent years this research area has seen rapid and significant changes in the experimental approaches and analysis methods. This article reviews these developments and provides a structured overview of experimental approaches, spectral analysis techniques and methods to establish relationships between brain oscillations and behaviour. PMID:24675051

  10. Hepatoprotective activity of Musa paradisiaca on experimental animal models

    PubMed Central

    Nirmala, M; Girija, K; Lakshman, K; Divya, T

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the hepatoprotective activity of stem of Musa paradisiaca (M. paradisiaca) in CCl4 and paracetamol induced hepatotoxicity models in rats. Methods Hepatoprotective activity of alcoholic and aqueous extracts of stem of M. paradisiaca was demonstrated by using two experimentally induced hepatotoxicity models. Results Administration of hepatotoxins (CCl4 and paracetamol) showed significant biochemical and histological deteriorations in the liver of experimental animals. Pretreatment with alcoholic extract (500 mg/kg), more significantly and to a lesser extent the alcoholic extract (250 mg/kg) and aqueous extract (500 mg/kg), reduced the elevated levels of the serum enzymes like serum glutamic-oxaloacetic transaminase (SGOT), serum glutamic pyruvic transaminase (SGPT), alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and bilirubin levels and alcoholic and aqueous extracts reversed the hepatic damage towards the normal, which further evidenced the hepatoprotective activity of stem of M. paradisiaca. Conclusions The alcoholic extract at doses of 250 and 500 mg/kg, p.o. and aqueous extract at a dose of 500 mg/kg, p.o. of stem of M. paradisiaca have significant effect on the liver of CCl4 and paracetamol induced hepatotoxicity animal models. PMID:23569826

  11. Experimental and numerical study of open-air active cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Fifi, Salman Amsari

    The topic of my thesis is Experimental and Numerical Study of Open Air Active Cooling. The present research is intended to investigate experimentally and Numerically the effectiveness of cooling large open areas like stadiums, shopping malls, national gardens, amusement parks, zoos, transportation facilities and government facilities or even in buildings outdoor gardens and patios. Our cooling systems are simple cooling fans with different diameters and a mist system. This type of cooling systems has been chosen among the others to guarantee less energy consumption, which will make it the most favorable and applicable for cooling such places mentioned above. In the experiments, the main focus is to study the temperature domain as a function of different fan diameters aerodynamically similar in different heights till we come up with an empirical relationship that can determine the temperature domain for different fan diameters and for different heights of these fans. The experimental part has two stages. The first stage is devoted to investigate the maximum range of airspeed and profile for three different fan diameters and for different heights without mist, while the second stage is devoted to investigate the maximum range of temperature and profile for the three different diameter fans and for different heights with mist. The computational study is devoted to built an experimentally verified mathematical model to be used in the design and optimization of water mist cooling systems, and to compare the mathematical results to the experimental results and to get an insight of how to apply such evaporative mist cooling for different places for different conditions. In this study, numerical solution is presented based on experimental conditions, such dry bulb temperature, wet bulb temperature, relative humidity, operating pressure and fan airspeed. In the computational study, all experimental conditions are kept the same for the three fans except the fan airspeed

  12. Promoting Active Lifestyles--A Multidisciplinary Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordan, Deb; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Presents a series of articles that address the theme of promoting active lifestyles through education. Some topics are facilities and equipment, how fear plays a part in limiting participation in physical activity, working with disabled as well as aging persons, the use of water activities, and instructor accountability. (GLR)

  13. A microscopic field theoretical approach for active systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alaimo, F.; Praetorius, S.; Voigt, A.

    2016-08-01

    We consider a microscopic modeling approach for active systems. The approach extends the phase field crystal (PFC) model and allows us to describe generic properties of active systems within a continuum model. The approach is validated by reproducing results obtained with corresponding agent-based and microscopic phase field models. We consider binary collisions, collective motion and vortex formation. For larger numbers of particles we analyze the coarsening process in active crystals and identify giant number fluctuation in a cluster formation process.

  14. Overview of the PPPL International Experimental Stellarator Collaboration Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Gates, David

    2012-03-28

    PPPL has initiated and strengthened collaborative experimental programs aimed at developing the required toolsets and scientific knowledge for advancing stellarators as a viable fusion energy source. In particular, activities at LHD and W7-X, the two large superconducting helical confinement systems in the world, have been expanded. The focus at LHD has been on diagnostic development and data analysis, since the device is a mature research facility with more than 20MW of heating power available. High beta stability experiments, ion and electron temperature measurements using a recently installed imaging x-ray crystal spectrometer, and 3D equilibrium reconstructions will be described. The focus on W7-X has been to develop hardware capabilities for divertor heat flux control, including plasma-facing components, error field correction coils, and power supplies. Progress on these and other activities will be presented.

  15. Personal Reflections on Observational and Experimental Research Approaches to Childhood Psychopathology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rapoport, Judith L.

    2009-01-01

    The past 50 years have seen dramatic changes in childhood psychopathology research. The goal of this overview is to contrast observational and experimental research approaches; both have grown more complex such that the boundary between these approaches may be blurred. Both are essential. Landmark observational studies with long-term follow-up…

  16. Direct Experimental Assessment of Microbial Activity in North Pond Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferdelman, T. G.; Picard, A.; Morando, M.; Ziebis, W.

    2009-12-01

    North Pond, an isolated sediment pond located at 22°45’N on the western flank of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, offered the opportunity to study microbial activities in deeply-buried low-activity sediments. About 8 x 15 km in size with sediment maximum thickness of about 300 m, North Pond is completely surrounded by exposed 7 Ma old basement. North Pond lies above the carbonate compensation depth at a water depth about 4500 m; hydrostatic pressure at the seafloor is about 45 MPa and the temperature is near 2°C. During the a R/V MS Merian cruise (MSM-11/1) in February -March 2009, 14 gravity cores of up to 9 m length were successfully obtained, from which samples were taken with 1-m resolution for experimental activity measurements. The goal of the experimental work was 1) to examine potential metabolic pathways in North Pond sediments and carbon assimilation pathways in this low-energy environment, and 2) explore the effects of pressure on microbial metabolic activities. As dissolved oxygen penetrated through all depths, sediments were aerobically sampled, processed and incubated at 4°C. Selected samples were immediately stored at in situ pressure until further use. The microbial uptake of both organic and inorganic carbon in selected North Pond sediment samples was investigated by following the fate of 14C in radio-labeled organic and organic compounds in North Pond sediment slurry incubations. Shipboard and on-shore experiments using 14C-leucine, 14C-glucose and 14C-bicarbonate were performed on selected cores. Day- to month- incubations were performed at 4°C. Parallel incubations were conducted at atmospheric pressure (0.1 MPa) and in situ pressure (~45 MPa). Either whole cell extraction (Kallmeyer et al., Limnol. Oceanogr.: Methods 6, 2008, 238-245) or protein-DNA extraction was carried on after various incubations to determine the fraction of 14C incorporated into cellular components. Formation of 14C-labeled CO2 was determined on samples incubated with 14C

  17. Experimental generation of single photons via active multiplexing

    SciTech Connect

    Ma Xiaosong; Zotter, Stefan; Kofler, Johannes; Jennewein, Thomas; Zeilinger, Anton

    2011-04-15

    An on-demand single-photon source is a fundamental building block in quantum science and technology. We experimentally demonstrate the proof of concept for a scheme to generate on-demand single photons via actively multiplexing several heralded photons probabilistically produced from pulsed spontaneous parametric down-conversions (SPDCs). By utilizing a four-photon-pair source, an active feed-forward technique, and an ultrafast single-photon router, we show a fourfold enhancement of the output photon rate. Simultaneously, we maintain the quality of the output single-photon states, confirmed by correlation measurements. We also experimentally verify, via Hong-Ou-Mandel interference, that the router does not affect the indistinguishability of the single photons. Furthermore, we give numerical simulations, which indicate that photons based on multiplexing of four SPDC sources can outperform the heralding based on highly advanced photon-number-resolving detectors. Our results show a route for on-demand single-photon generation and the practical realization of scalable linear optical quantum-information processing.

  18. Active Flow Control: Instrumentation Automation and Experimental Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gimbert, N. Wes

    1995-01-01

    In investigating the potential of a new actuator for use in an active flow control system, several objectives had to be accomplished, the largest of which was the experimental setup. The work was conducted at the NASA Langley 20x28 Shear Flow Control Tunnel. The actuator named Thunder, is a high deflection piezo device recently developed at Langley Research Center. This research involved setting up the instrumentation, the lighting, the smoke, and the recording devices. The instrumentation was automated by means of a Power Macintosh running LabVIEW, a graphical instrumentation package developed by National Instruments. Routines were written to allow the tunnel conditions to be determined at a given instant at the push of a button. This included determination of tunnel pressures, speed, density, temperature, and viscosity. Other aspects of the experimental equipment included the set up of a CCD video camera with a video frame grabber, monitor, and VCR to capture the motion. A strobe light was used to highlight the smoke that was used to visualize the flow. Additional effort was put into creating a scale drawing of another tunnel on site and a limited literature search in the area of active flow control.

  19. Effects of experimentally-induced maternal hypothyroidism on crucial offspring rat brain enzyme activities.

    PubMed

    Koromilas, Christos; Liapi, Charis; Zarros, Apostolos; Stolakis, Vasileios; Tsagianni, Anastasia; Skandali, Nikolina; Al-Humadi, Hussam; Tsakiris, Stylianos

    2014-06-01

    Hypothyroidism is known to exert significant structural and functional changes to the developing central nervous system, and can lead to the establishment of serious mental retardation and neurological problems. The aim of the present study was to shed more light on the effects of gestational and/or lactational maternal exposure to propylthiouracil-induced experimental hypothyroidism on crucial brain enzyme activities of Wistar rat offspring, at two time-points of their lives: at birth (day-1) and at 21 days of age (end of lactation). Under all studied experimental conditions, offspring brain acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity was found to be significantly decreased due to maternal hypothyroidism, in contrast to the two studied adenosinetriphosphatase (Na(+),K(+)-ATPase and Mg(2+)-ATPase) activities that were only found to be significantly altered right after birth (increased and decreased, respectively, following an exposure to gestational maternal hypothyroidism) and were restored to control levels by the end of lactation. As our findings regarding the pattern of effects that maternal hypothyroidism has on the above-mentioned crucial offspring brain enzyme activities are compared to those reported in the literature, several differences are revealed that could be attributed to both the mode of the experimental simulation approach followed as well as to the time-frames examined. These findings could provide the basis for a debate on the need of a more consistent experimental approach to hypothyroidism during neurodevelopment as well as for a further evaluation of the herein presented and discussed neurochemical (and, ultimately, neurodevelopmental) effects of experimentally-induced maternal hypothyroidism, in a brain region-specific manner. PMID:24632022

  20. Regulation of cellular function via electromagnetic field frequency and extracellular environment: A theoretical- experimental approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taghian, Toloo; Sheikh, Abdul; Narmoneva, Daria; Kogan, Andrei

    2015-03-01

    Application of external electric field (EF) as a non-pharmacological, non-invasive tool to control cell function is of great therapeutic interest. We developed a theoretical-experimental approach to investigate the biophysical mechanisms of EF interaction with cells in electrode-free physiologically-relevant configuration. Our numerical results demonstrated that EF frequency is the major parameter to control cell response to EF. Non-oscillating or low-frequency EF leads to charge accumulation on the cell surface membrane that may mediate membrane initiated cell responses. In contrast, high-frequency EF penetrates the cell membrane and reaches cell cytoplasm, where it may directly activate intracellular responses. The theoretical predictions were confirmed in our experimental studies of the effects of applied EF on vascular cell function. Results show that non-oscillating EF increases vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression while field polarity controls cell adhesion rate. High-frequency, but not low frequency, EF provides differential regulation of cytoplasmic focal adhesion kinase and VEGF expression depending on the substrate, with increased expression in cells cultured on RGD-rich synthetic hydrogels, and decreased expression for matrigel culture. The authors acknowledge the financial support from the NSF (DMR-1206784 & DMR-0804199 to AK); the NIH (1R21 DK078814-01A1 to DN) and the University of Cincinnati (Interdisciplinary Faculty Research Support Grant to DN and AK).

  1. Optical approach for the efficient data volume handling in experimentally encrypted data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trejos, Sorayda; Fredy Barrera, John; Velez, Alejandro; Tebaldi, Myrian; Torroba, Roberto

    2016-06-01

    Experimental optical procedures generate a tremendous amount of data, which must be then processed for any practical application. We present a new optical approach in terms of the data volume for the efficient handling of multiple data obtained from an experimental cryptosystem. In order to achieve this goal, we use the combination of optical filtering and optical scaling of the experimentally registered data. The intention is to reduce by optical means the amount of data to be managed. We define a so called ‘efficiency factor’ to describe the effectiveness of the approach. We find that volume reduction depends on this factor and the number of objects to be processed. We achieved substantial data volume reductions up to 94.24%. We introduce the basic concepts as well as experimental results that support both the feasibility and the applicability of our approach.

  2. Anxiety, not anger, induces inflammatory activity: An avoidance/approach model of immune system activation.

    PubMed

    Moons, Wesley G; Shields, Grant S

    2015-08-01

    Psychological stressors reliably trigger systemic inflammatory activity as indexed by levels of proinflammatory cytokines. This experiment demonstrates that one's specific emotional reaction to a stressor may be a significant determinant of whether an inflammatory reaction occurs in response to that stressor. Based on extant correlational evidence and theory, a causal approach was used to determine whether an avoidant emotion (anxiety) triggers more inflammatory activity than an approach emotion (anger). In an experimental design (N = 40), a 3-way Emotion Condition × Time × Analyte interaction revealed that a writing-based anxiety induction, but not a writing-based anger induction, increased mean levels of interferon-γ (IFN- γ) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β), but not interleukin-6 (IL-6) in oral mucous, F(2, 54) = 4.64, p = .01, ηp(²) = .15. Further, self-reported state anxiety predicted elevated levels of proinflammatory cytokines, all ΔR(²) >.06, ps <.04, but self-reported state anger did not. These results constitute the first evidence to our knowledge that specific negative emotions can differentially cause inflammatory activity and support a theoretical model explaining these effects based on the avoidance or approach motivations associated with emotions. PMID:26053247

  3. Differential activation of microglia after experimental spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, T; Yamamoto, T; Abe, Y; Saito, N; Kumagai, T; Kayama, H

    1999-03-01

    This study sought to experimentally clarify time-dependent, differential microglial activation at various spinal cord locations in response to injury. The spinal cords of Wistar rats were either sharply transected at the Th 11 or subjected to compression at the same site. Immediately to 4 weeks after injury, each spinal cord was fixed and cut into longitudinal frozen sections, and was immunostained with OX42 for resident and activated microglia, OX-6 for activated microglia, GFAP for activated astrocytes, and biotinylated BS-I, a lectin for both resident and activated microglia. From three to 24 hours after injury, we observed a narrow belt around the transection site in which OX42 positive microglia were dramatically reduced in number, or often absent. BS-I labeling of the zone disclosed the rapid transformation of those microglia possessing typical antler-like processes to macrophage-like cells. At day 1 and thereafter, the zone of reduced OX42 immunoreactivity was gradually replaced by macrophage-like OX42-positive round cells, and the lesion itself was ultimately capped by fibrogliotic scar tissue. By 2-4 weeks postinjury, another phase of microglial activation was observed in those white matter tracts undergoing Wallerian degeneration. These microglia characterized by the presence of newly-expressed MHC class II antigens. We posit that the decreased OX42 immunoreactivity suggests that CR3 is quickly saturated by activated iC3b and internalized, but not down-regulated. The trigger for this transformation most likely occurs through signaling by iC3b-saturated CR3. In contrast, microglia activation along those degenerating tracts undergoing Wallerian degeneration does not appear to be CR3-related, as the CR3 is upregulated. These observations indicate microglia have at least two different spatial and temporal patterns of activation. One is rapid and most likely involves the blood-borne complement activating system. The other accompanies Wallerian degeneration and

  4. Innovative Approaches to Plasminogen Activator Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haber, Edgar; Quertermous, Thomas; Matsueda, Gary R.; Runge, Marschall S.

    1989-01-01

    Plasminogen activator therapy for acute myocardial infarction has become standard medical practice. Bleeding complications, however, limit the utility of the currently available agents. This article reviews how the tools of molecular biology and protein engineering are being used to develop safer and more effective plasminogen activators.

  5. Experimental results using active control of traveling wave power flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, David W.; Hall, Steven R.

    1991-01-01

    Active structural control experiments conducted on a 24-ft pinned-free beam derived feedback compensators on the basis of a traveling-wave approach. A compensator is thus obtained which eliminates resonant behavior by absorbing all impinging power. A causal solution is derived for this noncausal compensator which mimics its behavior in a given frequency range, using the Wiener-Hopf. This optimal Wiener-Hopf compensator's structure-damping performance is found to exceed any obtainable by means of rate feedback. Performance limitations encompassed the discovery of frequencies above which the sensor and actuator were no longer dual and an inadvertent coupling of the control hardware to unmodeled structure torsion modes.

  6. Wnt-signalling pathways and microRNAs network in carcinogenesis: experimental and bioinformatics approaches.

    PubMed

    Onyido, Emenike K; Sweeney, Eloise; Nateri, Abdolrahman Shams

    2016-01-01

    Over the past few years, microRNAs (miRNAs) have not only emerged as integral regulators of gene expression at the post-transcriptional level but also respond to signalling molecules to affect cell function(s). miRNAs crosstalk with a variety of the key cellular signalling networks such as Wnt, transforming growth factor-β and Notch, control stem cell activity in maintaining tissue homeostasis, while if dysregulated contributes to the initiation and progression of cancer. Herein, we overview the molecular mechanism(s) underlying the crosstalk between Wnt-signalling components (canonical and non-canonical) and miRNAs, as well as changes in the miRNA/Wnt-signalling components observed in the different forms of cancer. Furthermore, the fundamental understanding of miRNA-mediated regulation of Wnt-signalling pathway and vice versa has been significantly improved by high-throughput genomics and bioinformatics technologies. Whilst, these approaches have identified a number of specific miRNA(s) that function as oncogenes or tumour suppressors, additional analyses will be necessary to fully unravel the links among conserved cellular signalling pathways and miRNAs and their potential associated components in cancer, thereby creating therapeutic avenues against tumours. Hence, we also discuss the current challenges associated with Wnt-signalling/miRNAs complex and the analysis using the biomedical experimental and bioinformatics approaches. PMID:27590724

  7. Experimental validation of the direct transmissibility approach to classical transfer path analysis on a mechanical setup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guasch, Oriol; García, Carlos; Jové, Jordi; Artís, Pere

    2013-05-01

    Transmissibility functions have received renewed interest given the important role they play in operational modal analysis and operational transfer path analysis. However, transmissibilities can also be used in the framework of classical transmission path analysis. This avoids some of the problems associated to the latter, such as the measurement of operational loads, or the need to remove the active parts of the system to measure frequency response functions. The key of the transmissibility approach to classical transfer path analysis relies on the notion of direct or blocked transmissibilities, which can be computed from standard measurable transmissibilities. The response at any degree of freedom to a system external load can then be decomposed in terms of the remaining degrees of freedom responses and the system direct transmissibilities. Although the theory supporting this approach has been known for long, no experimental validation test has been reported to date. It is the purpose of this paper to provide such a test by applying the method to a simple mechanical system for which an analytical solution can be derived. For different configurations, it will be shown that direct transmissibilities computed from measured transmissibilities compare fairly well with analytical results. This opens the door to apply the method to more complex situations of practical interest with confidence.

  8. Experimental active structural acoustic control of simply supported plates using a weighted sum of spatial gradients.

    PubMed

    Hendricks, Daniel R; Johnson, William R; Sommerfeldt, Scott D; Blotter, Jonathan D

    2014-11-01

    A limitation currently facing active structural acoustic control (ASAC) researchers is that an ideal minimization quantity for use in the control algorithms has not been developed. A novel parameter termed the "weighted sum of spatial gradients" (WSSG) was recently developed for use in ASAC and shown to effectively attenuate acoustic radiation from a vibrating flat simply supported plate in computer simulations. This paper extends this research from computer simulations and provides experimental test results. The results presented show that WSSG is a viable control quantity and provides better results than the volume velocity approach. The paper also investigates several of the challenges presented by the use of WSSG. These include determining a method to measure WSSG experimentally, an analysis of the influence of noise on WSSG control results and complications presented when degenerate modes exist. Results are shown and discussed for several experimental configurations. PMID:25373961

  9. Calcium and IP3 dynamics in cardiac myocytes: experimental and computational perspectives and approaches

    PubMed Central

    Hohendanner, Felix; McCulloch, Andrew D.; Blatter, Lothar A.; Michailova, Anushka P.

    2014-01-01

    Calcium plays a crucial role in excitation-contraction coupling (ECC), but it is also a pivotal second messenger activating Ca2+-dependent transcription factors in a process termed excitation-transcription coupling (ETC). Evidence accumulated over the past decade indicates a pivotal role of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (IP3R)-mediated Ca2+ release in the regulation of cytosolic and nuclear Ca2+ signals. IP3 is generated by stimulation of plasma membrane receptors that couple to phospholipase C (PLC), liberating IP3 from phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2). An intriguing aspect of IP3 signaling is the presence of the entire PIP2-PLC-IP3 signaling cascade as well as the presence of IP3Rs at the inner and outer membranes of the nuclear envelope (NE) which functions as a Ca2+ store. The observation that the nucleus is surrounded by its own putative Ca2+ store raises the possibility that nuclear IP3-dependent Ca2+ release plays a critical role in ETC. This provides a potential mechanism of regulation that acts locally and autonomously from the global cytosolic Ca2+ signal underlying ECC. Moreover, there is evidence that: (i) the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) and NE are a single contiguous Ca2+ store; (ii) the nuclear pore complex is the major gateway for Ca2+ and macromolecules to pass between the cytosol and the nucleoplasm; (iii) the inner membrane of the NE hosts key Ca2+ handling proteins including the Na+/Ca2+ exchanger (NCX)/GM1 complex, ryanodine receptors (RyRs), nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate receptors (NAADPRs), Na+/K+ ATPase, and Na+/H+ exchanger. Thus, it appears that the nucleus represents a Ca2+ signaling domain equipped with its own ion channels and transporters that allow for complex local Ca2+ signals. Many experimental and modeling approaches have been used for the study of intracellular Ca2+ signaling but the key to the understanding of the dual role of Ca2+ mediating ECC and ECT lays in quantitative differences of local

  10. SIRT1 Activation Confers Neuroprotection in Experimental Optic Neuritis

    PubMed Central

    Shindler, Kenneth S.; Ventura, Elvira; Rex, Tonia S.; Elliott, Peter; Rostami, Abdolmohamad

    2007-01-01

    Purpose Axonal damage and loss of neurons correlate with permanent vision loss and neurologic disability in patients with optic neuritis and multiple sclerosis (MS). Current therapies involve immunomodulation, with limited effects on neuronal damage. The authors examined potential neuroprotective effects in optic neuritis by SRT647 and SRT501, two structurally and mechanistically distinct activators of SIRT1, an enzyme involved in cellular stress resistance and survival. Methods Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an animal model of MS, was induced by immunization with proteolipid protein peptide in SJL/J mice. Optic neuritis developed in two thirds of eyes with significant retinal ganglion cell (RGC) loss detected 14 days after immunization. RGCs were labeled in a retrograde fashion with fluorogold by injection into superior colliculi. Optic neuritis was detected by inflammatory cell infiltration of the optic nerve. Results Intravitreal injection of SIRT1 activators 0, 3, 7, and 11 days after immunization significantly attenuated RGC loss in a dose-dependent manner. This neuroprotective effect was blocked by sirtinol, a SIRT1 inhibitor. Treatment with either SIRT1 activator did not prevent EAE or optic nerve inflammation. A single dose of SRT501 on day 11 was sufficient to limit RGC loss and to preserve axon function. Conclusions SIRT1 activators provide an important potential therapy to prevent the neuronal damage that leads to permanent neurologic disability in optic neuritis and MS patients. Intravitreal administration of SIRT1 activators does not suppress inflammation in this model, suggesting that their neuroprotective effects will be additive or synergistic with current immunomodulatory therapies. PMID:17652729

  11. Antinociceptive Activity of Melicope ptelefolia Ethanolic Extract in Experimental Animals

    PubMed Central

    Sulaiman, Mohd Roslan; Mohd Padzil, Azyyati; Shaari, Khozirah; Khalid, Syamimi; Shaik Mossadeq, Wan Mastura; Mohamad, Azam Shah; Ahmad, Syahida; Akira, Ahmad; Israf, Daud; Lajis, Nordin

    2010-01-01

    Melicope ptelefolia is a medicinal herb commonly used in Malaysia to treat fever, pain, wounds, and itches. The present study was conducted to evaluate the antinociceptive activity of the Melicope ptelefolia ethanolic extract (MPEE) using animal models of nociception. The antinociceptive activity of the extract was assessed using acetic acid-induced abdominal writhing, hot-plate, and formalin-induced paw licking tests. Oral administration of MPEE produced significant dose-dependent antinociceptive effects when tested in mice and rats using acetic acid-induced abdominal constriction test and on the second phase of the formalin-induced paw licking test, respectively. It was also demonstrated that MPEE had no effect on the response latency time to the heat stimulus in the thermal model of the hot-plate test. In addition, the antinociception produced by MPEE was not blocked by naloxone. Furthermore, oral administration of MPEE did not produce any effect in motor performance of the rota-rod test and in acute toxicity study no abnormal behaviors as well as mortality were observed up to a dose level of the extract of 5 g/kg. These results indicated that MPEE at all doses investigated which did not produce any sedative and toxic effects exerted pronounce antinociceptive activity that acts peripherally in experimental animals. PMID:21274262

  12. Antinociceptive activity of Melicope ptelefolia ethanolic extract in experimental animals.

    PubMed

    Sulaiman, Mohd Roslan; Mohd Padzil, Azyyati; Shaari, Khozirah; Khalid, Syamimi; Shaik Mossadeq, Wan Mastura; Mohamad, Azam Shah; Ahmad, Syahida; Akira, Ahmad; Israf, Daud; Lajis, Nordin

    2010-01-01

    Melicope ptelefolia is a medicinal herb commonly used in Malaysia to treat fever, pain, wounds, and itches. The present study was conducted to evaluate the antinociceptive activity of the Melicope ptelefolia ethanolic extract (MPEE) using animal models of nociception. The antinociceptive activity of the extract was assessed using acetic acid-induced abdominal writhing, hot-plate, and formalin-induced paw licking tests. Oral administration of MPEE produced significant dose-dependent antinociceptive effects when tested in mice and rats using acetic acid-induced abdominal constriction test and on the second phase of the formalin-induced paw licking test, respectively. It was also demonstrated that MPEE had no effect on the response latency time to the heat stimulus in the thermal model of the hot-plate test. In addition, the antinociception produced by MPEE was not blocked by naloxone. Furthermore, oral administration of MPEE did not produce any effect in motor performance of the rota-rod test and in acute toxicity study no abnormal behaviors as well as mortality were observed up to a dose level of the extract of 5 g/kg. These results indicated that MPEE at all doses investigated which did not produce any sedative and toxic effects exerted pronounce antinociceptive activity that acts peripherally in experimental animals. PMID:21274262

  13. 5-Lipoxygenase Activity Increases Susceptibility to Experimental Paracoccidioides brasiliensis Infection

    PubMed Central

    Tristão, Fabrine Sales Massafera; Rocha, Fernanda Agostini; Moreira, Ana Paula; Cunha, Fernando Queiroz; Rossi, Marcos Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM) is a systemic mycosis caused by the thermodimorphic fungus Paracoccidioides brasiliensis. Leukotrienes and lipoxins are lipid mediators produced after 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) activation that exhibit pro- and anti-inflammatory roles, respectively. Here, we have investigated the contribution of 5-LO enzymatic activity in PCM using an experimental model of P. brasiliensis infection. B6.129 wild-type (B6.129) and 5-LO-deficient (5-LO−/−) mice were intravenously inoculated with a virulent strain of P. brasiliensis (Pb18), and the survival rate of the infected mice was investigated on different days after yeast infection. 5-LO−/− mice exhibited an increased survival rate associated with a decreased number of CFU. The resistance of 5-LO−/− during PCM was associated with augmented nitric oxide (NO) production and the formation of compact granulomas. In addition, the absence of 5-LO was associated with a diminished number of CD4+ CD25+ regulatory T cells, higher levels of gamma interferon and interleukin-12, and increased T-bet (a T-box transcription factor that directs Th1 lineage commitment) mRNA levels in the lungs. Taken together, our results show for the first time that 5-LO enzymatic activity increases susceptibility to P. brasiliensis, suggesting that this pathway may be a potential target for therapeutic intervention during PCM. PMID:23381993

  14. Soft Approaches to CO2 Activation.

    PubMed

    Das, Shoubhik; Bobbink, Felix D; Gopakumar, Aswin; Dyson, Paul J

    2015-01-01

    The utilization of CO(2) as a C1 synthon is becoming increasingly important as a feedstock derived from carbon capture and storage technologies. Herein, we describe some of our recent research on carbon dioxide valorization, notably, using organocatalysts to convert CO(2) into carboxylic acid, ester, formyl and methyl groups on various organic molecules. We describe these studies within the broader context of CO(2) capture and valorization and suggest approaches for future research. PMID:26842327

  15. Design and experimental validation of a flutter suppression controller for the active flexible wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waszak, Martin R.; Srinathkumar, S.

    1992-01-01

    The synthesis and experimental validation of an active flutter suppression controller for the Active Flexible Wing wind tunnel model is presented. The design is accomplished with traditional root locus and Nyquist methods using interactive computer graphics tools and extensive simulation based analysis. The design approach uses a fundamental understanding of the flutter mechanism to formulate a simple controller structure to meet stringent design specifications. Experimentally, the flutter suppression controller succeeded in simultaneous suppression of two flutter modes, significantly increasing the flutter dynamic pressure despite modeling errors in predicted flutter dynamic pressure and flutter frequency. The flutter suppression controller was also successfully operated in combination with another controller to perform flutter suppression during rapid rolling maneuvers.

  16. Flutter suppression for the Active Flexible Wing - Control system design and experimental validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waszak, M. R.; Srinathkumar, S.

    1992-01-01

    The synthesis and experimental validation of a control law for an active flutter suppression system for the Active Flexible Wing wind-tunnel model is presented. The design was accomplished with traditional root locus and Nyquist methods using interactive computer graphics tools and with extensive use of simulation-based analysis. The design approach relied on a fundamental understanding of the flutter mechanism to formulate understanding of the flutter mechanism to formulate a simple control law structure. Experimentally, the flutter suppression controller succeeded in simultaneous suppression of two flutter modes, significantly increasing the flutter dynamic pressure despite errors in the design model. The flutter suppression controller was also successfully operated in combination with a rolling maneuver controller to perform flutter suppression during rapid rolling maneuvers.

  17. Intestinal motor activity in experimental hyperthyroidism in conscious dogs.

    PubMed

    Karaus, M; Wienbeck, M; Grussendorf, M; Erckenbrecht, J F; Strohmeyer, G

    1989-10-01

    The small intestinal motor effects of experimental hyperthyroidism were studied in 8 conscious dogs to reveal possible mechanisms of accelerated small bowel transit in hyperthyroidism. Six strain gauge transducers were implanted on the small intestine of each dog. Long-term hyperthyroidism was induced by subcutaneous administration of 100 and 200 micrograms/kg.day of thyroxin. Application of thyroxin did not interrupt the cyclic fasting motor activity. Thyroxin (100 micrograms/kg.day) caused a slight increase in the period of the migrating motor complex (p less than 0.05). The maximum contractile frequency rose dose-dependently up to 11% (p less than 0.05). During phase 2 and the digestive state the contraction frequency increased up to 29% and 27%, respectively (p less than 0.05). More contractions occurred in groups during the digestive state in hyperthyroidism. Half of the dogs showed giant migrating contractions during thyroxin administration, whereas those contractions were not observed during the control period. We conclude that fasted and postprandial intestinal motility is changed in experimental hyperthyroidism. Acceleration of small bowel transit may be caused by changes in contractile pattern of phase 2 and the digestive state or by the increased frequency of giant migrating contractions. PMID:2777044

  18. Active Load Control Using a Non-traditional MEMs Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yen Nakafuji, Dora; van Dam, Cornelis

    2001-11-01

    An active load control concept using micro-electro-mechanical (MEM) translational tabs has been undergoing testing and development at the University of California at Davis. The concept utilizes microfabricated sliding components to retract and extend small tabs located near the trailing edge of a lifting surface. The tab assembly, referred to as a microtab, extends approximately normal to the surface and has a maximum deployment height on the order of the boundary-layer thickness. Deployment of these retractable devices on either the suction or pressure side of a lifting surface effectively modifies the camber distribution and changes the lift and moments generated. On the pressure side, the effect of the microtabs on lift is shown to be as powerful as conventional flap-like control surfaces resulting in positive DCl changes of 30conventional control surfaces which typically occupy 20of the lifting surface, these large-scale load changes are achieved using microtabs with heights of 1located 5suction side, these microtabs work by decreasing the lift resulting in negative DCl changes in the linear range of the lift curve. Numerical and experimental wind tunnel results are in good agreement, and both confirm that these micro-scale devices are capable of generating macro-scale changes in the aerodynamic loading. Application of this rather simple but innovative load control system based on microfabrication techniques will allow for miniaturization of conventional systems. With further development and integration with an activation and feedback network, these microtabs may result in significant reductions in typical control system weight, complexity and cost. Due to their minute size, the activation and response times are expected to be much faster than that of conventional trailing edge devices. Using a multi-disciplinary approach incorporating aspects of experimental and computational aerodynamics, mechanical design and microfabrication, the potentials of this concept

  19. Activation analysis of concrete and graphite in the experimental reactor RUS.

    PubMed

    Cometto, M; Ridikas, D; Aubert, M C; Damoy, F; Ancius, D

    2005-01-01

    The decommissioning and dismantling of nuclear installations after their service life involves the necessary disassembling, handling and disposing of a large amount of radioactive equipment and structures. In particular, the concrete that has been used as a biological reactor shield and graphite that has been used as a moderator-reflector represent the majority of waste, requiring geological disposal. To reduce this undesirable volume to the minimum and to successfully plan the dismantling and disposal of radioactive materials to storage facilities, the activations of the structures should be accurately evaluated. In the framework of the decommissioning and the dismantling of the experimental reactor of the University of Strasbourg, detailed activation estimates have been conducted to characterise the graphite and the structural materials present in the reactor environment. For this purpose, the chemical compositions of fresh graphite samples and different types of concrete have been determined by activation analysis in the research reactors OSIRIS and ORPHEE of CEA Saclay (France). Then, the activations of graphite, concrete and other materials have been calculated in the whole reactor, as a function of the three main nuclear data libraries, i.e. ENDF, JEF and JENDL. In parallel, the activations of representative graphite and concrete samples have been measured experimentally. The comparison of theoretical predictions with experimental values validates the approach and the methodology used in the present study and tests the consistency and the reliability of the nuclear data used for activation analysis. We believe that a similar approach could also be used for the decommissioning of industrial nuclear reactors. PMID:16381692

  20. Antistress activity of Argyreia speciosa roots in experimental animals

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Nikunj B.; Galani, Varsha J.; Patel, Bharatkumar G.

    2011-01-01

    The antistress effect of a seven-day treatment (100 and 200 mg / kg, p.o.) of the hydroalcoholic extract of Argyreia speciosa root (ASE) was evaluated by using the swimming endurance test, acetic acid–induced writhing test, pentylenetetrazole-induced convulsion test, anoxic tolerance test, cold-restraint, stress-induced gastric ulcers, aspirin-induced ulcers, and biochemical, and histopathological changes in the cold-restraint stress test. The immunomodulatory activity was also evaluated for the same doses, and treatment of ASE was done using the hemagglutination test. Both the doses of ASE showed antistress activity in all the tested models. The ASE-treated animals showed a decrease in immobility time and an increase in anoxic tolerance time in swimming endurance and the anoxic tolerance tests, respectively. The effect of glacial acetic acid and pentylenetetrazole were also reduced by decreasing the number of writhing responses and increasing the onset of convulsions, respectively. In the cold restrained stress and aspirin-induced gastric ulcer models, ASE showed a significant reduction in the ulcer index. Pretreatment with ASE significantly ameliorated the cold stress-induced variations in biochemical levels such as increased plasma cholesterol, triglyceride, glucose, total protein, and cortisol. ASE was also effective in preventing the pathological changes in the adrenal gland, due to cold restrained stress, in rats. In mice immunized with sheep red blood cells, the treatment groups subjected to restraint stress prevented the humoral immune response to the antigen. The immunostimulating activity of the ASE was indicated by an increase in the antibody titer in mice pre-immunized with sheep red blood cells and subjected to restraint stress. The findings of the present investigations indicate that the ASE has significant antistress activity, which may be due to the immunostimulating property and increased resistance, nonspecifically, against all experimental

  1. Cathepsin B Activity Initiates Apoptosis via Digestive Protease Activation in Pancreatic Acinar Cells and Experimental Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Sendler, Matthias; Maertin, Sandrina; John, Daniel; Persike, Maria; Weiss, F Ulrich; Krüger, Burkhard; Wartmann, Thomas; Wagh, Preshit; Halangk, Walter; Schaschke, Norbert; Mayerle, Julia; Lerch, Markus M

    2016-07-01

    Pancreatitis is associated with premature activation of digestive proteases in the pancreas. The lysosomal hydrolase cathepsin B (CTSB) is a known activator of trypsinogen, and its deletion reduces disease severity in experimental pancreatitis. Here we studied the activation mechanism and subcellular compartment in which CTSB regulates protease activation and cellular injury. Cholecystokinin (CCK) increased the activity of CTSB, cathepsin L, trypsin, chymotrypsin, and caspase 3 in vivo and in vitro and induced redistribution of CTSB to a secretory vesicle-enriched fraction. Neither CTSB protein nor activity redistributed to the cytosol, where the CTSB inhibitors cystatin-B/C were abundantly present. Deletion of CTSB reduced and deletion of cathepsin L increased intracellular trypsin activation. CTSB deletion also abolished CCK-induced caspase 3 activation, apoptosis-inducing factor, as well as X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein degradation, but these depended on trypsinogen activation via CTSB. Raising the vesicular pH, but not trypsin inhibition, reduced CTSB activity. Trypsin inhibition did not affect apoptosis in hepatocytes. Deletion of CTSB affected apoptotic but not necrotic acinar cell death. In summary, CTSB in pancreatitis undergoes activation in a secretory, vesicular, and acidic compartment where it activates trypsinogen. Its deletion or inhibition regulates acinar cell apoptosis but not necrosis in two models of pancreatitis. Caspase 3-mediated apoptosis depends on intravesicular trypsinogen activation induced by CTSB, not CTSB activity directly, and this mechanism is pancreas-specific. PMID:27226576

  2. Child Development: An Active Learning Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine, Laura E.; Munsch, Joyce

    2010-01-01

    Within each chapter of this innovative topical text, the authors engage students by demonstrating the wide range of real-world applications of psychological research connected to child development. In particular, the distinctive Active Learning features incorporated throughout the book foster a dynamic and personal learning process for students.…

  3. An Active Learning Approach to Teaching Statistics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dolinsky, Beverly

    2001-01-01

    Provides suggestions for using active learning as the primary means to teaching statistics in order to create a collaborative environment. Addresses such strategies as using SPSS Base 7.5 for Windows and course periods centered on answering student-generated questions. Discusses various writing intensive assignments. (CMK)

  4. The Elastic Body Model: A Pedagogical Approach Integrating Real Time Measurements and Modelling Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fazio, C.; Guastella, I.; Tarantino, G.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we describe a pedagogical approach to elastic body movement based on measurements of the contact times between a metallic rod and small bodies colliding with it and on modelling of the experimental results by using a microcomputer-based laboratory and simulation tools. The experiments and modelling activities have been built in the…

  5. An Automated Approach to Transform Use Cases into Activity Diagrams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Tao; Briand, Lionel C.; Labiche, Yvan

    Use cases are commonly used to structure and document requirements while UML activity diagrams are often used to visualize and formalize use cases, for example to support automated test case generation. Therefore the automated support for the transition from use cases to activity diagrams would provide significant, practical help. Additionally, traceability could be established through automated transformation, which could then be used for instance to relate requirements to design decisions and test cases. In this paper, we propose an approach to automatically generate activity diagrams from use cases while establishing traceability links. Data flow information can also be generated and added to these activity diagrams. Our approach is implemented in a tool, which we used to perform five case studies. The results show that high quality activity diagrams can be generated. Our analysis also shows that our approach outperforms existing academic approaches and commercial tools.

  6. Mechanisms-based viscoplasticity: Theoretical approach and experimental validation for steel 304L

    PubMed Central

    Zubelewicz, Aleksander; Oliferuk, Wiera

    2016-01-01

    We propose a mechanisms-based viscoplasticity approach for metals and alloys. First, we derive a stochastic model for thermally-activated motion of dislocations and, then, introduce power-law flow rules. The overall plastic deformation includes local plastic slip events taken with an appropriate weight assigned to each angle of the plane misorientation from the direction of maximum shear stress. As deformation progresses, the material experiences successive reorganizations of the slip systems. The microstructural evolution causes that a portion of energy expended on plastic deformation is dissipated and the rest is stored in the defect structures. We show that the reorganizations are stable in a homogeneously deformed material. The concept is tested for steel 304L, where we reproduce experimentally obtained stress-strain responses, we construct the Frost-Ashby deformation map and predict the rate of the energy storage. The storage is assessed in terms of synchronized measurements of temperature and displacement distributions on the specimen surface during tensile loading. PMID:27026209

  7. Mechanisms-based viscoplasticity: Theoretical approach and experimental validation for steel 304L.

    PubMed

    Zubelewicz, Aleksander; Oliferuk, Wiera

    2016-01-01

    We propose a mechanisms-based viscoplasticity approach for metals and alloys. First, we derive a stochastic model for thermally-activated motion of dislocations and, then, introduce power-law flow rules. The overall plastic deformation includes local plastic slip events taken with an appropriate weight assigned to each angle of the plane misorientation from the direction of maximum shear stress. As deformation progresses, the material experiences successive reorganizations of the slip systems. The microstructural evolution causes that a portion of energy expended on plastic deformation is dissipated and the rest is stored in the defect structures. We show that the reorganizations are stable in a homogeneously deformed material. The concept is tested for steel 304L, where we reproduce experimentally obtained stress-strain responses, we construct the Frost-Ashby deformation map and predict the rate of the energy storage. The storage is assessed in terms of synchronized measurements of temperature and displacement distributions on the specimen surface during tensile loading. PMID:27026209

  8. Computational and experimental approaches to chart the Escherichia coli cell-envelope-associated proteome and interactome.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Mejía, Juan Javier; Babu, Mohan; Emili, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    The bacterial cell-envelope consists of a complex arrangement of lipids, proteins and carbohydrates that serves as the interface between a microorganism and its environment or, with pathogens, a human host. Escherichia coli has long been investigated as a leading model system to elucidate the fundamental mechanisms underlying microbial cell-envelope biology. This includes extensive descriptions of the molecular identities, biochemical activities and evolutionary trajectories of integral transmembrane proteins, many of which play critical roles in infectious disease and antibiotic resistance. Strikingly, however, only half of the c. 1200 putative cell-envelope-related proteins of E. coli currently have experimentally attributed functions, indicating an opportunity for discovery. In this review, we summarize the state of the art of computational and proteomic approaches for determining the components of the E. coli cell-envelope proteome, as well as exploring the physical and functional interactions that underlie its biogenesis and functionality. We also provide a comprehensive comparative benchmarking analysis on the performance of different bioinformatic and proteomic methods commonly used to determine the subcellular localization of bacterial proteins. PMID:19054114

  9. Mechanisms-based viscoplasticity: Theoretical approach and experimental validation for steel 304L

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zubelewicz, Aleksander; Oliferuk, Wiera

    2016-03-01

    We propose a mechanisms-based viscoplasticity approach for metals and alloys. First, we derive a stochastic model for thermally-activated motion of dislocations and, then, introduce power-law flow rules. The overall plastic deformation includes local plastic slip events taken with an appropriate weight assigned to each angle of the plane misorientation from the direction of maximum shear stress. As deformation progresses, the material experiences successive reorganizations of the slip systems. The microstructural evolution causes that a portion of energy expended on plastic deformation is dissipated and the rest is stored in the defect structures. We show that the reorganizations are stable in a homogeneously deformed material. The concept is tested for steel 304L, where we reproduce experimentally obtained stress-strain responses, we construct the Frost-Ashby deformation map and predict the rate of the energy storage. The storage is assessed in terms of synchronized measurements of temperature and displacement distributions on the specimen surface during tensile loading.

  10. Computational and experimental approaches to chart the Escherichia coli cell-envelope-associated proteome and interactome

    PubMed Central

    Díaz-Mejía, Juan Javier; Babu, Mohan; Emili, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    The bacterial cell-envelope consists of a complex arrangement of lipids, proteins and carbohydrates that serves as the interface between a microorganism and its environment or, with pathogens, a human host. Escherichia coli has long been investigated as a leading model system to elucidate the fundamental mechanisms underlying microbial cell-envelope biology. This includes extensive descriptions of the molecular identities, biochemical activities and evolutionary trajectories of integral transmembrane proteins, many of which play critical roles in infectious disease and antibiotic resistance. Strikingly, however, only half of the c. 1200 putative cell-envelope-related proteins of E. coli currently have experimentally attributed functions, indicating an opportunity for discovery. In this review, we summarize the state of the art of computational and proteomic approaches for determining the components of the E. coli cell-envelope proteome, as well as exploring the physical and functional interactions that underlie its biogenesis and functionality. We also provide a comprehensive comparative benchmarking analysis on the performance of different bioinformatic and proteomic methods commonly used to determine the subcellular localization of bacterial proteins. PMID:19054114

  11. An Experimental Project Approach to Biology: Mastering the Interdisciplinary Skills at the Core of Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petersen, Chris E.

    2000-01-01

    Examines the educational benefits of an experimental project approach to students taking the last course of an introductory biology sequence. Educational benefits were defined in terms of analytical skills, knowledge of basic statistics, and experience with scientific writing. The study was viewed as a preliminary investigation, but one that…

  12. Synthesis of Single-Case Experimental Data: A Comparison of Alternative Multilevel Approaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferron, John; Van den Noortgate, Wim; Beretvas, Tasha; Moeyaert, Mariola; Ugille, Maaike; Petit-Bois, Merlande; Baek, Eun Kyeng

    2013-01-01

    Single-case or single-subject experimental designs (SSED) are used to evaluate the effect of one or more treatments on a single case. Although SSED studies are growing in popularity, the results are in theory case-specific. One systematic and statistical approach for combining single-case data within and across studies is multilevel modeling. The…

  13. Renal Response to Volume Expansion: Learning the Experimental Approach in the Context of Integrative Physiology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kline, Robert L.; Dukacz, Stephen A. W.; Stavraky, Thomas

    2000-01-01

    Describes a laboratory experience for upper-level science students that provides a hands-on approach to understanding the basics of experimental physiology. Students design an experiment to determine the relative importance of dilution of plasma proteins in the overall renal excretory response following volume expansion with intravenous saline.…

  14. Combining Best-Practice and Experimental Approaches: Redundancy, Images, and Misperceptions in Multimedia Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fenesi, Barbara; Heisz, Jennifer J.; Savage, Philip I.; Shore, David I.; Kim, Joseph A.

    2014-01-01

    This experiment combined controlled experimental design with a best-practice approach (i.e., real course content, subjective evaluations) to clarify the role of verbal redundancy, confirm the multimodal impact of images and narration, and highlight discrepancies between actual and perceived understanding. The authors presented 1 of 3…

  15. Multilevel approach to the experimental study of plastic deformation of HCP-zirconium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Poletika, T. M. E-mail: girs@ispms.tsc.ru; Girsova, S. L. E-mail: girs@ispms.tsc.ru

    2014-11-14

    A multilevel approach was developed to the experimental study of plastic deformation in anisotropic polycrystalline materials, using by way of an example HCP-Zr alloys. This allowed establishing the relationship and hierarchy of processes occurring at macro-, meso- and microscale levels in conditions of significant heterogeneity of plastic flow and of texture formation.

  16. An Experimental Approach for the Personalization of a Teacher Education Program. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rockarts, Dorothea Grace

    This project attempted to design an experimental model for a teacher education program in the College of Education of the University of Alabama. The model attempted to identify students' concerns and problems and to test a novel approach for personalizing their programs through the inclusion of microteaching. Three distinct stages were included.…

  17. Tracking Learners' Progress: Adopting a Dual "Corpus cum Experimental Data" Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meunier, Fanny; Littre, Damien

    2013-01-01

    The article discusses the potential of combining learner corpus research with experimental studies in order to fine-tune the understanding of learner language development. It illustrates the complementarity of the two methodological approaches with data from an ongoing study of the acquisition of the English tense and aspect system by French…

  18. Experimental Semiotics: A New Approach For Studying Communication As A Form Of Joint Action

    PubMed Central

    Galantucci, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    In the last few years, researchers have begun to investigate the emergence of novel forms of human communication in the laboratory. I survey this growing line of research, which may be called experimental semiotics, from three distinct angles. First, I situate the new approach in its theoretical and historical context. Second, I review a sample of studies that exemplify experimental semiotics. Third, I present an empirical study that illustrates how the new approach can help us understand the sociocognitive underpinnings of human communication. The main conclusion of the paper will be that, by reproducing micro samples of historical processes in the laboratory, experimental semiotics offers new powerful tools for investigating human communication as a form of joint action. PMID:25164941

  19. Understanding Fatty Acid Metabolism through an Active Learning Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fardilha, M.; Schrader, M.; da Cruz e Silva, O. A. B.; da Cruz e Silva, E. F.

    2010-01-01

    A multi-method active learning approach (MALA) was implemented in the Medical Biochemistry teaching unit of the Biomedical Sciences degree at the University of Aveiro, using problem-based learning as the main learning approach. In this type of learning strategy, students are involved beyond the mere exercise of being taught by listening. Less…

  20. Steam-driven explosions at Solfatara volcano, Campi Flegrei: new insights from an experimental approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montanaro, Cristian; Bettina, Scheu; Klaus, Mayer; Giovanni, Orsi; Moretti, Roberto; Dingwell Donald, B.

    2014-05-01

    The Solfatara crater is a highly active hydrothermal site located in the central part of the Campi Flegrei Caldera (south-central Italy). Campi Flegrei is one of most active calderas in the world, characterized by intense unrest episodes involving massive ground deformation, high seismicity and continuous gas emissions from the Solfatara crater. These episodes are thought to be driven by the complex interaction between a deep magmatic source and a shallow hydrothermal system [Orsi et al., 1999]. The most recent unrest episode started in 2006, exhibiting an increase in the degassing activity, especially in the Pisciarelli field (SE of Solfatara crater). In such an active magmato-hydrothermal system steam-driven explosive eruptions (phreatic or hydrothermal) are a likely potential hazard - one that is difficult to predict in terms of timing and magnitude. Here we present an experimental approach based on a rapid decompression experiments to investigate the different scenarios likely for steam explosions in the Solfatara area. The experimental setup produces fragmentation precipitated by the release of Argon gas overpressure and assisted by water-to-steam flashing within the connected pore space of the tested samples. We have investigated varying P-T conditions and varying gas-to-liquid ratios. The experimental conditions used in this case study mimic those of a mixing zone present at the base of the hydrothermal system below Solfatara at a depth between 1000 and 1500 m (15-25 MPa) and temperatures from 270°C to 300°C [Caliro et al., 2007]. Neapolitan Yellow Tuff is used as sample material for the study as it is the stratigraphic unit expected at this depth in this region [Orsi et al. 1996]. Sensors monitor temperature and pressure evolution during the experiments, enabling the determination of the speed of fragmentation. A high-speed camera (10000 fps) is used to measure the ejection velocities of the gas-particle mixtures. The fragments generated are recovered and

  1. Air pollution exposure: An activity pattern approach for active transportation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Matthew D.; Yiannakoulias, Nikolaos; Kanaroglou, Pavlos S.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate the calculation of personal air pollution exposure during trips made by active transportation using activity patterns without personal monitors. We calculate exposure as the inhaled dose of particulate matter 2.5 μg or smaller. Two modes of active transportation are compared, and they include cycling and walking. Ambient conditions are calculated by combining mobile and stationary monitoring data in an artificial neural network space-time model. The model uses a land use regression framework and has a prediction accuracy of R2 = 0.78. Exposure is calculated at 10 m or shorter intervals during the trips using inhalation rates associated with both modes. The trips are children's routes between home and school. The average dose during morning cycling trips was 2.17 μg, during morning walking trips was 3.19 μg, during afternoon cycling trips was 2.19 μg and during afternoon walking trips was 3.23 μg. The cycling trip dose was significantly lower than the walking trip dose. The air pollution exposure during walking or cycling trips could not be strongly predicted by either the school or household ambient conditions, either individually or in combination. Multiple linear regression models regressing both the household and school ambient conditions against the dose were only able to account for, at most, six percent of the variance in the exposure. This paper demonstrates that incorporating activity patterns when calculating exposure can improve the estimate of exposure compared to its calculation from ambient conditions.

  2. Behavioural Differences between Single Scandinavian Brown Bears (Ursus arctos) and Females with Dependent Young When Experimentally Approached by Humans

    PubMed Central

    Sahlén, Veronica; Ordiz, Andrés; Swenson, Jon E.; Støen, Ole Gunnar

    2015-01-01

    Carnivore-human encounters that result in human injury present a conservation and management challenge and it is therefore important to understand under what conditions such incidents occur. Females with cubs are often involved when humans are injured by brown bears Ursus arctos. In Scandinavia, this is particularly true for unarmed recreational forest users. Our aim was to document behavioural differences between single bears and females with cubs in order to develop recommendations to minimize the risk of injuries to recreational forest users. We documented the reactions of GPS-collared females with cubs and single brown bears to experimental approaches by humans to 50 m from the bear on 42 and 108 occasions, respectively. The majority of females with cubs (95%) and single bears (89%) left when approached. Bears that left were passed at shorter distances and were in more open areas than those that stayed. Both groups had similar flight initiation distances, which were longer for bears that were active at the time of the disturbance. Females with cubs selected more open habitat than single bears, also for the new site they selected following disturbance. Females with cubs, particularly active females with cubs of the year, moved greater distances and spent more time active following the approach. Females with cubs and single bears were seen or heard in 26% and 14% of the approaches, respectively. None of the bears displayed any aggressive behaviour during the approaches. Females with cubs selected more open habitat, perhaps predisposing them to encountering people that are not involved in hunting activities, which might be the primary explanation why females with cubs are most frequently involved when unarmed people are injured by bears in Scandinavia. To mitigate injury risks, one must consider factors that bring bears closer to human activity in the first place. PMID:25830333

  3. Suggestions for Teaching Mathematics Using Laboratory Approaches Grades 1-6. 3. Geometry. Experimental Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Bureau of Elementary Curriculum Development.

    This guide describes activities and materials which can be used in a mathematics laboratory approach to a basic mathematics program for grades 1-6. Thirty-five activities pertaining to geometric concepts are described in terms of purpose, suggested grade levels, materials needed, and procedures. Some concepts included in the guide are: basic…

  4. A Resampling Based Approach to Optimal Experimental Design for Computer Analysis of a Complex System

    SciTech Connect

    Rutherford, Brian

    1999-08-04

    The investigation of a complex system is often performed using computer generated response data supplemented by system and component test results where possible. Analysts rely on an efficient use of limited experimental resources to test the physical system, evaluate the models and to assure (to the extent possible) that the models accurately simulate the system order investigation. The general problem considered here is one where only a restricted number of system simulations (or physical tests) can be performed to provide additional data necessary to accomplish the project objectives. The levels of variables used for defining input scenarios, for setting system parameters and for initializing other experimental options must be selected in an efficient way. The use of computer algorithms to support experimental design in complex problems has been a topic of recent research in the areas of statistics and engineering. This paper describes a resampling based approach to form dating this design. An example is provided illustrating in two dimensions how the algorithm works and indicating its potential on larger problems. The results show that the proposed approach has characteristics desirable of an algorithmic approach on the simple examples. Further experimentation is needed to evaluate its performance on larger problems.

  5. Numerical and Experimental Approach for the Optimal Design of a Dual Plate Under Ballistic Impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Jeonghoon; Chung, Dong-Teak; Park, Myung Soo

    To predict the behavior of a dual plate composed of 5052-aluminum and 1002-cold rolled steel under ballistic impact, numerical and experimental approaches are attempted. For the accurate numerical simulation of the impact phenomena, the appropriate selection of the key parameter values based on numerical or experimental tests are critical. This study is focused on not only the optimization technique using the numerical simulation but also numerical and experimental procedures to obtain the required parameter values in the simulation. The Johnson-Cook model is used to simulate the mechanical behaviors, and the simplified experimental and the numerical approaches are performed to obtain the material properties of the model. The element erosion scheme for the robust simulation of the ballistic impact problem is applied by adjusting the element erosion criteria of each material based on numerical and experimental results. The adequate mesh size and the aspect ratio are chosen based on parametric studies. Plastic energy is suggested as a response representing the strength of the plate for the optimization under dynamic loading. Optimized thickness of the dual plate is obtained to resist the ballistic impact without penetration as well as to minimize the total weight.

  6. Adaptive combinatorial design to explore large experimental spaces: approach and validation.

    PubMed

    Lejay, L V; Shasha, D E; Palenchar, P M; Kouranov, A Y; Cruikshank, A A; Chou, M F; Coruzzi, G M

    2004-12-01

    Systems biology requires mathematical tools not only to analyse large genomic datasets, but also to explore large experimental spaces in a systematic yet economical way. We demonstrate that two-factor combinatorial design (CD), shown to be useful in software testing, can be used to design a small set of experiments that would allow biologists to explore larger experimental spaces. Further, the results of an initial set of experiments can be used to seed further 'Adaptive' CD experimental designs. As a proof of principle, we demonstrate the usefulness of this Adaptive CD approach by analysing data from the effects of six binary inputs on the regulation of genes in the N-assimilation pathway of Arabidopsis. This CD approach identified the more important regulatory signals previously discovered by traditional experiments using far fewer experiments, and also identified examples of input interactions previously unknown. Tests using simulated data show that Adaptive CD suffers from fewer false positives than traditional experimental designs in determining decisive inputs, and succeeds far more often than traditional or random experimental designs in determining when genes are regulated by input interactions. We conclude that Adaptive CD offers an economical framework for discovering dominant inputs and interactions that affect different aspects of genomic outputs and organismal responses. PMID:17051692

  7. Activity Approach to Just Beyond the Classroom. Environmental Education Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skliar, Norman; La Mantia, Laura

    To provide teachers with some of the many activities that can be carried on "just beyond the classroom," the booklet presents plans for more than 40 outdoor education activities, all emphasizing multidisciplinary, inquiry approach to learning. The school grounds offer optimum conditions for initiating studies in the out-of-doors. While every…

  8. Re"modeling" College Algebra: An Active Learning Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinzon, D.; Pinzon, K.; Stackpole, M.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we discuss active learning in College Algebra at Georgia Gwinnett College. This approach has been used in more than 20 sections of College Algebra taught by the authors in the past four semesters. Students work in small, structured groups on guided inquiry activities after watching 15-20 minutes of videos before class. We discuss a…

  9. Experimental approaches for addressing fundamental biological questions in living, functioning cells with single molecule precision

    PubMed Central

    Lenn, Tchern; Leake, Mark C.

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, single molecule experimentation has allowed researchers to observe biological processes at the sensitivity level of single molecules in actual functioning, living cells, thereby allowing us to observe the molecular basis of the key mechanistic processes in question in a very direct way, rather than inferring these from ensemble average data gained from traditional molecular and biochemical techniques. In this short review, we demonstrate the impact that the application of single molecule bioscience experimentation has had on our understanding of various cellular systems and processes, and the potential that this approach has for the future to really address very challenging and fundamental questions in the life sciences. PMID:22773951

  10. Energy effective approach for activation of metallurgical slag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazov, I. N.; Khaydarov, B. B.; Mamulat, S. L.; Suvorov, D. S.; Saltikova, Y. S.; Yudin, A. G.; Kuznetsov, D. V.

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents results of investigation of the process of mechanical activation of metallurgical slag using different approaches - ball milling and electromagnetic vortex apparatus. Particle size distribution and structure of mechanically activated slag samples were investigated, as well as energetic parameters of the activation process. It was shown that electromagnetic vortex activation is more energy effective and allows to produce microscale milled slag-based concrete using very short treatment time. Activated slag materials can be used as clinker-free cement in civilian and road construction, providing ecology-friendly technology and recycling of high-tonnage industrial waste.

  11. Experimental and Numerical Analysis of Triaxially Braided Composites Utilizing a Modified Subcell Modeling Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cater, Christopher; Xiao, Xinran; Goldberg, Robert K.; Kohlman, Lee W.

    2015-01-01

    A combined experimental and analytical approach was performed for characterizing and modeling triaxially braided composites with a modified subcell modeling strategy. Tensile coupon tests were conducted on a [0deg/60deg/-60deg] braided composite at angles [0deg, 30deg, 45deg, 60deg and 90deg] relative to the axial tow of the braid. It was found that measured coupon strength varied significantly with the angle of the applied load and each coupon direction exhibited unique final failures. The subcell modeling approach implemented into the finite element software LS-DYNA was used to simulate the various tensile coupon test angles. The modeling approach was successful in predicting both the coupon strength and reported failure mode for the 0deg, 30deg and 60deg loading directions. The model over-predicted the strength in the 90deg direction; however, the experimental results show a strong influence of free edge effects on damage initiation and failure. In the absence of these local free edge effects, the subcell modeling approach showed promise as a viable and computationally efficient analysis tool for triaxially braided composite structures. Future work will focus on validation of the approach for predicting the impact response of the braided composite against flat panel impact tests.

  12. Experimental and Numerical Analysis of Triaxially Braided Composites Utilizing a Modified Subcell Modeling Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cater, Christopher; Xiao, Xinran; Goldberg, Robert K.; Kohlman, Lee W.

    2015-01-01

    A combined experimental and analytical approach was performed for characterizing and modeling triaxially braided composites with a modified subcell modeling strategy. Tensile coupon tests were conducted on a [0deg/60deg/-60deg] braided composite at angles of 0deg, 30deg, 45deg, 60deg and 90deg relative to the axial tow of the braid. It was found that measured coupon strength varied significantly with the angle of the applied load and each coupon direction exhibited unique final failures. The subcell modeling approach implemented into the finite element software LS-DYNA was used to simulate the various tensile coupon test angles. The modeling approach was successful in predicting both the coupon strength and reported failure mode for the 0deg, 30deg and 60deg loading directions. The model over-predicted the strength in the 90deg direction; however, the experimental results show a strong influence of free edge effects on damage initiation and failure. In the absence of these local free edge effects, the subcell modeling approach showed promise as a viable and computationally efficient analysis tool for triaxially braided composite structures. Future work will focus on validation of the approach for predicting the impact response of the braided composite against flat panel impact tests.

  13. Thermodynamic compatibility of actives encapsulated into PEG-PLA nanoparticles: In Silico predictions and experimental verification.

    PubMed

    Erlebach, Andreas; Ott, Timm; Otzen, Christoph; Schubert, Stephanie; Czaplewska, Justyna; Schubert, Ulrich S; Sierka, Marek

    2016-09-15

    Achieving optimal solubility of active substances in polymeric carriers is of fundamental importance for a number of industrial applications, including targeted drug delivery within the growing field of nanomedicine. However, its experimental optimization using a trial-and-error approach is cumbersome and time-consuming. Here, an approach based on molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and the Flory-Huggins theory is proposed for rapid prediction of thermodynamic compatibility between active species and copolymers comprising hydrophilic and hydrophobic segments. In contrast to similar methods, our approach offers high computational efficiency by employing MD simulations that avoid explicit consideration of the actual copolymer chains. The accuracy of the method is demonstrated for compatibility predictions between pyrene and nile red as model dyes as well as indomethacin as model drug and copolymers containing blocks of poly(ethylene glycol) and poly(lactic acid) in different ratios. The results of the simulations are directly verified by comparison with the observed encapsulation efficiency of nanoparticles prepared by nanoprecipitation. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27425625

  14. Using a hybrid approach to optimize experimental network design for aquifer parameter identification.

    PubMed

    Chang, Liang-Cheng; Chu, Hone-Jay; Lin, Yu-Pin; Chen, Yu-Wen

    2010-10-01

    This research develops an optimum design model of groundwater network using genetic algorithm (GA) and modified Newton approach, based on the experimental design conception. The goal of experiment design is to minimize parameter uncertainty, represented by the covariance matrix determinant of estimated parameters. The design problem is constrained by a specified cost and solved by GA and a parameter identification model. The latter estimates optimum parameter value and its associated sensitivity matrices. The general problem is simplified into two classes of network design problems: an observation network design problem and a pumping network design problem. Results explore the relationship between the experimental design and the physical processes. The proposed model provides an alternative to solve optimization problems for groundwater experimental design. PMID:19757116

  15. A statistical approach to the experimental evaluation of transonic turbine airfoils in a linear cascade

    SciTech Connect

    Shelton, M.L.; Gregory, B.A. ); Doughty, R.L.; Kiss, T.; Moses, H.L. . Mechanical Engineering Dept.)

    1993-07-01

    In aircraft engine design (and in other applications), small improvements in turbine efficiency may be significant. Since analytical tools for predicting transonic turbine losses are still being developed, experimental efforts are required to evaluate various designs, calibrate design methods, and validate CFD analysis tools. However, these experimental efforts must be very accurate to measure the performance differences to the levels required by the highly competitive aircraft engine market. Due to the sensitivity of transonic and supersonic flow fields, it is often difficult to obtain the desired level of accuracy. In this paper, a statistical approach is applied to the experimental evaluation of transonic turbine airfoils in the VPI and SU transonic cascade facility in order to quantify the differences between three different transonic turbine airfoils. This study determines whether the measured performance differences between the three different airfoils are statistically significant. This study also assesses the degree of confidence in the transonic cascade testing process at VPI and SU.

  16. Changes of soil pore system due to soil macrofauna: an experimental approach to study the contribution of different taxa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gargiulo, Laura; Buscemi, Gilda; Mele, Giacomo; Terribile, Fabio

    2015-04-01

    Soil fauna contributes to the ecosystem functioning, for example, by means of its direct influence on soil structure which modifies the physical environment of the microbial community. Changes in habitat structure due to soil fauna activities can influence resource availability, species' abundances, and community composition of soil microorganisms. X-ray tomography has been increasingly used to obtain precise and non-destructive analysis mostly of the macroporosity resulting from earthworm activity in repacked soil cores. However also other macrofauna species contribute in different manner and extent to the modification of soil pore system, and then to the soil functioning, by means of their burrows and bioturbation activity. In this work we have developed an experimental approach based on the use of repacked soil mesocosms specifically constructed for the purpose of distinguish separately the contribution to soil structure changes of different organisms naturally present in field or inoculated in laboratory. Six different orders of macrofauna were studied and after four weeks of fauna activity the cores were imaged using a medical X-ray tomograph. Three-dimensional image processing was used in order to obtain 3D reconstructions and preliminary analysis of the identified biopores. In addition to the earthworms (Haplotaxida, genus Lombricus), among the studied taxa, Embioptera showed the most intense burrowing activity, while Coleoptera larvae (sp. Elater sanguineus) and Julida (class Diplopoda) produced the thickest pore network in our mesocosms. The used experimental approach showed a promising potential to provide new useful information about the widely differentiated contribution of many types of macrofauna to the modification of soil pore system.

  17. A Simulation Based Approach for Contingency Planning for Aircraft Turnaround Operation System Activities in Airline Hubs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adeleye, Sanya; Chung, Christopher

    2006-01-01

    Commercial aircraft undergo a significant number of maintenance and logistical activities during the turnaround operation at the departure gate. By analyzing the sequencing of these activities, more effective turnaround contingency plans may be developed for logistical and maintenance disruptions. Turnaround contingency plans are particularly important as any kind of delay in a hub based system may cascade into further delays with subsequent connections. The contingency sequencing of the maintenance and logistical turnaround activities were analyzed using a combined network and computer simulation modeling approach. Experimental analysis of both current and alternative policies provides a framework to aid in more effective tactical decision making.

  18. Consolidating guided wave simulations and experimental data: a dictionary learning approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alguri, K. Supreet; Harley, Joel B.

    2016-04-01

    Modeling and simulating guided wave propagation in complex, geometric structures is a topic of significant interest in structural health monitoring. These models have the potential to benefit damage detection, localization, and characterization in structures where traditional algorithms fail. Numerical modelling (for example, using finite element or semi-analytical finite element methods) is a popular approach for simulating complex wave behavior. Yet, using these models to improve experimental data analysis remains difficult. Numerical simulations and experimental data rarely match due to uncertainty in the properties of the structures and the guided waves traveling within them. As a result, there is a significant need to reduce this uncertainty by incorporating experimental data into the models. In this paper, we present a dictionary learning framework to address this challenge. Specifically, use dictionary learning to combine numerical wavefield simulations with 24 simulated guided wave measurements with different frequency-dependent velocity characteristics (emulating an experimental system) to make accurate, global predictions about experimental wave behavior. From just 24 measurements, we show that we can predict and extrapolate guided wave behavior with accuracies greater than 92%.

  19. A Computational-Experimental Approach Identifies Mutations That Enhance Surface Expression of an Oseltamivir-Resistant Influenza Neuraminidase

    PubMed Central

    Bloom, Jesse D.; Nayak, Jagannath S.; Baltimore, David

    2011-01-01

    The His274Tyr (H274Y) oseltamivir (Tamiflu) resistance mutation causes a substantial decrease in the total levels of surface-expressed neuraminidase protein and activity in early isolates of human seasonal H1N1 influenza, and in the swine-origin pandemic H1N1. In seasonal H1N1, H274Y only became widespread after the occurrence of secondary mutations that counteracted this decrease. H274Y is currently rare in pandemic H1N1, and it remains unclear whether secondary mutations exist that might similarly counteract the decreased neuraminidase surface expression associated with this resistance mutation in pandemic H1N1. Here we investigate the possibility of predicting such secondary mutations. We first test the ability of several computational approaches to retrospectively identify the secondary mutations that enhanced levels of surface-expressed neuraminidase protein and activity in seasonal H1N1 shortly before the emergence of oseltamivir resistance. We then use the most successful computational approach to predict a set of candidate secondary mutations to the pandemic H1N1 neuraminidase. We experimentally screen these mutations, and find that several of them do indeed partially counteract the decrease in neuraminidase surface expression caused by H274Y. Two of the secondary mutations together restore surface-expressed neuraminidase activity to wildtype levels, and also eliminate the very slight decrease in viral growth in tissue-culture caused by H274Y. Our work therefore demonstrates a combined computational-experimental approach for identifying mutations that enhance neuraminidase surface expression, and describes several specific mutations with the potential to be of relevance to the spread of oseltamivir resistance in pandemic H1N1. PMID:21799795

  20. Experimental investigation of active machine tool vibration control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rojas, J.; Liang, Chen; Geng, Zheng J.

    1996-05-01

    The successful vibration reduction of machine tools during machining process can improve productivity, increase quality, and reduce tool wear. This paper will present our initial investigation in the application of smart material technologies in machine tool vibration control using magnetostrictive actuators and electrorheological elastomer dampers on an industrial Sheldon horizontal lathe. The dynamics of the machining process are first studied, which reveals the complexity in the machine tool vibration response and the challenge to the active control techniques. The active control experiment shows encouraging results. The use of electrorheological elastomer damping device for active/passive vibration control provides significant vibration reduction in the high frequency range and great improvement in the workpiece surface finishing. The research presented in this paper demonstrates that the combination of active and active/passive vibration control techniques is very promising for successful machine tool vibration control.

  1. New approaches to enhance active steering system functionalities: preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serarslan, Benan

    2014-09-01

    An important development of the steering systems in general is active steering systems like active front steering and steer-by-wire systems. In this paper the current functional possibilities in application of active steering systems are explored. A new approach and additional functionalities are presented that can be implemented to the active steering systems without additional hardware such as new sensors and electronic control units. Commercial active steering systems are controlling the steering angle depending on the driving situation only. This paper introduce methods for enhancing active steering system functionalities depending not only on the driving situation but also vehicle parameters like vehicle mass, tyre and road condition. In this regard, adaptation of the steering ratio as a function of above mentioned vehicle parameters is presented with examples. With some selected vehicle parameter changes, the reduction of the undesired influences on vehicle dynamics of these parameter changes has been demonstrated theoretically with simulations and with real-time driving measurements.

  2. Family Therapy: A Phenomenological and Active Directive Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Albert

    1978-01-01

    A "third force" in family therapy is outlined in this paper, which combines a phenomenological-humanistic approach with a highly active-directive attempt to help family members surrender their misperceptions of themselves and others and to make profound philosophic changes in their intrapersonal and interpersonal attitudes and behaviors. (Author)

  3. A Hybrid Approach to University Subject Learning Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osorio Gomez, Luz Adriana; Duart, Josep M.

    2012-01-01

    In order to get a better understanding of subject design and delivery using a hybrid approach, we have studied a hybrid learning postgraduate programme offered by the University of the Andes, Bogota, Colombia. The study analyses students' perceptions of subject design and delivery, with particular reference to learning activities and the roles of…

  4. Anthropological Approach and Activity Theory: Culture, Communities and Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lagrange, Jean-Baptiste

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to evaluate the contribution of the anthropological approach (AA) concurrently to Activity Theory (AT) in view of overarching questions about classroom use of technology for teaching and learning mathematics. I will do it first from a philosophical point of view, presenting the main notions of AA that have been used to…

  5. Using an Active-Learning Approach to Teach Epigenetics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colon-Berlingeri, Migdalisel

    2010-01-01

    Epigenetics involves heritable changes in gene expression that do not involve alterations in the DNA sequence. I developed an active-learning approach to convey this topic to students in a college genetics course. I posted a brief summary of the topic before class to stimulate exchange in cooperative groups. During class, we discussed the…

  6. State Activism in School Funding: Goals and Approaches.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Theobald, Neil D.

    2000-01-01

    State activism in school funding extends far beyond increasing states' percentage of public-school revenues. However, local districts' share of funding has fallen dramatically over the last 7 decades. Equity-, efficiency-, and liberty-enhancing goals are explained, along with assistance-oriented, persuasive, and regulatory policy approaches.…

  7. A Behavior-Based Approach for Educational Robotics Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Cristoforis, P.; Pedre, S.; Nitsche, M.; Fischer, T.; Pessacg, F.; Di Pietro, C.

    2013-01-01

    Educational robotics proposes the use of robots as a teaching resource that enables inexperienced students to approach topics in fields unrelated to robotics. In recent years, these activities have grown substantially in elementary and secondary school classrooms and also in outreach experiences to interest students in science, technology,…

  8. A Variance Based Active Learning Approach for Named Entity Recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassanzadeh, Hamed; Keyvanpour, Mohammadreza

    The cost of manually annotating corpora is one of the significant issues in many text based tasks such as text mining, semantic annotation and generally information extraction. Active Learning is an approach that deals with reduction of labeling costs. In this paper we proposed an effective active learning approach based on minimal variance that reduces manual annotation cost by using a small number of manually labeled examples. In our approach we use a confidence measure based on the model's variance that reaches a considerable accuracy for annotating entities. Conditional Random Field (CRF) is chosen as the underlying learning model due to its promising performance in many sequence labeling tasks. The experiments show that the proposed method needs considerably fewer manual labeled samples to produce a desirable result.

  9. A comparative experimental study on structural and interface damping approaches for vibration suppression purposes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yi; Sanchez, Alberto; Zogg, Markus; Ermanni, Paolo

    2010-04-01

    Dynamic loadings in automotive structures may lead to reduction of driving comfort and even to failure of the components. Damping treatments are applied in order to attenuate the vibrations and improve the long term fatigue behavior of the structures. This experimental study is targeting applications in floor panels that are mounted to the loadcarrying primary structure of the vehicle. The objective is to reach outstanding damping performance considering the stringent weight and cost requirement in the automotive industry. An experimental setup has been developed and validated for the determination of the damping properties of structural specimens also considering interface damping effects. This contribution is structured in three main parts: test rig design, experimental results and discussion. Reliable and easy-to-use devices for the characterization of the damping properties of specimens between 200×40 mm2 and 400×400 mm2 are not available "on the shelf". In this context, we present a flexible experimental set-up which has been realized to (1) support the development of novel damping solutions for multi-functional composite structures; (2) characterize the loss-factor of the different damping concepts, including boundary effects. A variety of novel passive and active damping treatments have been investigated including viscoelastic, coulomb, magnetorheological (MR), particle, magnetic and eddy current damping. The particle, interface as well as active damping systems show promising performance in comparison to the classical viscoelastic treatments.

  10. [Artificial Inversion of the Left-Right Visceral Asymmetry in Vertebrates: Conceptual Approaches and Experimental Solutions].

    PubMed

    Truleva, A S; Malashichev, E B; Ermakov, A S

    2015-01-01

    Externally, vertebrates are bilaterally symmetrical; however, left-right asymmetry is observed in the structure of their internal organs and systems of organs (circulatory, digestive, and respiratory). In addition to the asymmetry of internal organs (visceral), there is also functional (i.e., asymmetrical functioning of organs on the left and right sides of the body) and behavioral asymmetry. The question of a possible association between different types of asymmetry is still open. The study of the mechanisms of such association, in addition to the fundamental interest, has important applications for biomedicine, primarily for the understanding of the brain functioning in health and disease and for the development of methods of treatment of certain mental diseases, such as schizophrenia and autism, for which the disturbance of left-right asymmetry of the brain was shown. To study the deep association between different types of asymmetry, it is necessary to obtain adequate animal models (primarily animals with inverted visceral organs, situs inversus totalis). There are two main possible approaches to obtaining such model organisms: mutagenesis followed by selection of mutant strains with mutations in the genes that affect the formation of the left-right visceral asymmetry and experimental obtaining of animals with inverted internal organs. This review focuses on the second approach. We describe the theoretical models for establishing left-right asymmetry and possible experimental approaches to obtaining animals with inverted internal organs. PMID:26859965

  11. Driver hand activity analysis in naturalistic driving studies: challenges, algorithms, and experimental studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohn-Bar, Eshed; Martin, Sujitha; Trivedi, Mohan Manubhai

    2013-10-01

    We focus on vision-based hand activity analysis in the vehicular domain. The study is motivated by the overarching goal of understanding driver behavior, in particular as it relates to attentiveness and risk. First, the unique advantages and challenges for a nonintrusive, vision-based solution are reviewed. Next, two approaches for hand activity analysis, one relying on static (appearance only) cues and another on dynamic (motion) cues, are compared. The motion-cue-based hand detection uses temporally accumulated edges in order to maintain the most reliable and relevant motion information. The accumulated image is fitted with ellipses in order to produce the location of the hands. The method is used to identify three hand activity classes: (1) two hands on the wheel, (2) hand on the instrument panel, (3) hand on the gear shift. The static-cue-based method extracts features in each frame in order to learn a hand presence model for each of the three regions. A second-stage classifier (linear support vector machine) produces the final activity classification. Experimental evaluation with different users and environmental variations under real-world driving shows the promise of applying the proposed systems for both postanalysis of captured driving data as well as for real-time driver assistance.

  12. Latest developments in experimental and computational approaches to characterize protein–lipid interactions

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Hyunju; Wu, Ming; Bilgin, Betul; Walton, S. Patrick; Chan, Christina

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the functional roles of all the molecules in cells is an ultimate goal of modern biology. An important facet is to understand the functional contributions from intermolecular interactions, both within a class of molecules (e.g. protein–protein) or between classes (e.g. protein-DNA). While the technologies for analyzing protein–protein and protein–DNA interactions are well established, the field of protein–lipid interactions is still relatively nascent. Here, we review the current status of the experimental and computational approaches for detecting and analyzing protein–lipid interactions. Experimental technologies fall into two principal categories, namely solution-based and array-based methods. Computational methods include large–scale data-driven analyses and predictions/dynamic simulations based on prior knowledge of experimentally identified interactions. Advances in the experimental technologies have led to improved computational analyses and vice versa, thereby furthering our understanding of protein–lipid interactions and their importance in biological systems. PMID:22997137

  13. Investigation of interaction of nuclear fast red with human serum albumin by experimental and computational approaches.

    PubMed

    Gholivand, Mohammad-Bagher; Jalalvand, Ali R; Goicoechea, Hector C; Omidi, Mehdi

    2013-11-01

    For the first time, interaction of nuclear fast red (NFR) with human serum albumin (HSA) was studied by experimental and computational approaches. Firstly, experimental measurements including fluorescence spectroscopy (F), UVvis spectrophotometry (UVvis), cyclic voltammetry (CV), differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) and linear sweep voltammetry (LSV) were separately used to investigate the interaction of NFR with HSA and interesting thermodynamics information was obtained from these studies. Secondly, new information including electrochemical behavior of NFR-HSA complex species, relative concentrations of the various reacting species and effects of NFR on the sub-structure of HSA was obtained by applying multivariate curve resolution-alternating least squares (MCR-ALS). In this case, a row- and column-wise augmented matrix was built with DPV, LSV, F and UVvis sub-matrices and resolved by MCR-ALS. Surprisingly, by this method two NFR-HSA complex species with different stoichiometries and different electrochemical behaviors were found. Furthermore, by the use of the recorded voltammetric and spectroscopic data the binding constants of complex species were computed by EQUISPEC (a hard-modeling algorithm). Finally, the binding of NFR to HSA was modeled by molecular modeling and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations methods. Excellent agreement was found between experimental and computational results. Both experimental and computational results suggested that the NFR binds mainly to the sub-domain IIA of HSA. PMID:23871980

  14. Problem-Centered and Experimental Mathematics Activities for Aboriginal Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seputro, Theresia Tirta

    1998-01-01

    Presents an activity carried out by aboriginal students that addresses solving a real-life problem that could be linked to number sequence, graph theory, and combinations. Contains 14 references. (ASK)

  15. Kappa opioid receptor activation alleviates experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis and promotes oligodendrocyte-mediated remyelination

    PubMed Central

    Du, Changsheng; Duan, Yanhui; Wei, Wei; Cai, Yingying; Chai, Hui; Lv, Jie; Du, Xiling; Zhu, Jian; Xie, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is characterized by autoimmune damage to the central nervous system. All the current drugs for MS target the immune system. Although effective in reducing new lesions, they have limited effects in preventing the progression of disability. Promoting oligodendrocyte-mediated remyelination and recovery of neurons are the new directions of MS therapy. The endogenous opioid system, consisting of MOR, DOR, KOR and their ligands, has been suggested to participate in the pathogenesis of MS. However, the exact receptor and mechanism remain elusive. Here we show that genetic deletion of KOR exacerbates experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, whereas activating KOR with agonists alleviates the symptoms. KOR does not affect immune cell differentiation and function. Instead, it promotes oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelination both in vitro and in vivo. Our study suggests that targeting KOR might be an intriguing way to develop new MS therapies that may complement the existing immunosuppressive approaches. PMID:27040771

  16. Kappa opioid receptor activation alleviates experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis and promotes oligodendrocyte-mediated remyelination.

    PubMed

    Du, Changsheng; Duan, Yanhui; Wei, Wei; Cai, Yingying; Chai, Hui; Lv, Jie; Du, Xiling; Zhu, Jian; Xie, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is characterized by autoimmune damage to the central nervous system. All the current drugs for MS target the immune system. Although effective in reducing new lesions, they have limited effects in preventing the progression of disability. Promoting oligodendrocyte-mediated remyelination and recovery of neurons are the new directions of MS therapy. The endogenous opioid system, consisting of MOR, DOR, KOR and their ligands, has been suggested to participate in the pathogenesis of MS. However, the exact receptor and mechanism remain elusive. Here we show that genetic deletion of KOR exacerbates experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, whereas activating KOR with agonists alleviates the symptoms. KOR does not affect immune cell differentiation and function. Instead, it promotes oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelination both in vitro and in vivo. Our study suggests that targeting KOR might be an intriguing way to develop new MS therapies that may complement the existing immunosuppressive approaches. PMID:27040771

  17. Forming Limits in Sheet Metal Forming for Non-Proportional Loading Conditions - Experimental and Theoretical Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Ofenheimer, Aldo; Buchmayr, Bruno; Kolleck, Ralf

    2005-08-05

    The influence of strain paths (loading history) on material formability is well known in sheet forming processes. Sophisticated experimental methods are used to determine the entire shape of strain paths of forming limits for aluminum AA6016-T4 alloy. Forming limits for sheet metal in as-received condition as well as for different pre-deformation are presented. A theoretical approach based on Arrieux's intrinsic Forming Limit Stress Curve (FLSC) concept is employed to numerically predict the influence of loading history on forming severity. The detailed experimental strain paths are used in the theoretical study instead of any linear or bilinear simplified loading histories to demonstrate the predictive quality of forming limits in the state of stress.

  18. Concept Learning for Achieving Personalized Ontologies: An Active Learning Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Şensoy, Murat; Yolum, Pinar

    In many multiagent approaches, it is usual to assume the existence of a common ontology among agents. However, in dynamic systems, the existence of such an ontology is unrealistic and its maintenance is cumbersome. Burden of maintaining a common ontology can be alleviated by enabling agents to evolve their ontologies personally. However, with different ontologies, agents are likely to run into communication problems since their vocabularies are different from each other. Therefore, to achieve personalized ontologies, agents must have a means to understand the concepts used by others. Consequently, this paper proposes an approach that enables agents to teach each other concepts from their ontologies using examples. Unlike other concept learning approaches, our approach enables the learner to elicit most informative examples interactively from the teacher. Hence, the learner participates to the learning process actively. We empirically compare the proposed approach with the previous concept learning approaches. Our experiments show that using the proposed approach, agents can learn new concepts successfully and with fewer examples.

  19. Computational and experimental analysis of TMS-induced electric field vectors critical to neuronal activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krieg, Todd D.; Salinas, Felipe S.; Narayana, Shalini; Fox, Peter T.; Mogul, David J.

    2015-08-01

    Objective. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) represents a powerful technique to noninvasively modulate cortical neurophysiology in the brain. However, the relationship between the magnetic fields created by TMS coils and neuronal activation in the cortex is still not well-understood, making predictable cortical activation by TMS difficult to achieve. Our goal in this study was to investigate the relationship between induced electric fields and cortical activation measured by blood flow response. Particularly, we sought to discover the E-field characteristics that lead to cortical activation. Approach. Subject-specific finite element models (FEMs) of the head and brain were constructed for each of six subjects using magnetic resonance image scans. Positron emission tomography (PET) measured each subject’s cortical response to image-guided robotically-positioned TMS to the primary motor cortex. FEM models that employed the given coil position, orientation, and stimulus intensity in experimental applications of TMS were used to calculate the electric field (E-field) vectors within a region of interest for each subject. TMS-induced E-fields were analyzed to better understand what vector components led to regional cerebral blood flow (CBF) responses recorded by PET. Main results. This study found that decomposing the E-field into orthogonal vector components based on the cortical surface geometry (and hence, cortical neuron directions) led to significant differences between the regions of cortex that were active and nonactive. Specifically, active regions had significantly higher E-field components in the normal inward direction (i.e., parallel to pyramidal neurons in the dendrite-to-axon orientation) and in the tangential direction (i.e., parallel to interneurons) at high gradient. In contrast, nonactive regions had higher E-field vectors in the outward normal direction suggesting inhibitory responses. Significance. These results provide critical new

  20. Experimental Activities in Primary School to Learn about Microbes in an Oral Health Education Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mafra, Paulo; Lima, Nelson; Carvalho, Graça S.

    2015-01-01

    Experimental science activities in primary school enable important cross-curricular learning. In this study, experimental activities on microbiology were carried out by 16 pupils in a Portuguese grade-4 classroom (9-10?years old) and were focused on two problem-questions related to microbiology and health: (1) do your teeth carry microbes? (2) why…

  1. Experimental approach and modelling of the mechanical behaviour of graphite fuel elements subjected to compression pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forquin, P.

    2010-06-01

    -graphite and the corresponding standard deviation. The behaviour being non linear before failure, a numerical simulation has been conducted to build the relation between the applied load and the maximum tensile stress. A statistical approach applied to experimental data allows deducing the mean tensile strength (about 2.5 MPa) and the scatter of failure stresses (Weibull modulus m = 12).

  2. An alternative experimental approach for subcritical configurations of the IPEN/MB-01 nuclear reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonnelli, E.; Lee, S. M.; Pinto, L. N.; Landim, H. R.; Diniz, R.; Jerez, R.; dos Santos, A.

    2015-07-01

    This work presents an alternative approach for the reactivity worth experiments analysis in the IPEN/MB-01 reactor considering highly subcritical arrays. In order to reach the subcritical levels, the removal of a specific number of fuel rods is proposed. Twenty three configurations were carried out for this purpose. The control bank insertion experiment was used only as reference for the fuel rod experiment and, in addition, the control banks were maintained completely withdrawn during all the fuel rods experiment. The theoretical simulation results using the MCNP5 code and the ENDF/B-VII.0 library neutron data are in a very good agreement to experimental results.

  3. An experimental approach to validating a theory of human error in complex systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, N. M.; Rouse, W. B.

    1985-01-01

    The problem of 'human error' is pervasive in engineering systems in which the human is involved. In contrast to the common engineering approach of dealing with error probabilistically, the present research seeks to alleviate problems associated with error by gaining a greater understanding of causes and contributing factors from a human information processing perspective. The general approach involves identifying conditions which are hypothesized to contribute to errors, and experimentally creating the conditions in order to verify the hypotheses. The conceptual framework which serves as the basis for this research is discussed briefly, followed by a description of upcoming research. Finally, the potential relevance of this research to design, training, and aiding issues is discussed.

  4. A systematic approach to modeling, capturing, and disseminating proteomics experimental data.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Chris F; Paton, Norman W; Garwood, Kevin L; Kirby, Paul D; Stead, David A; Yin, Zhikang; Deutsch, Eric W; Selway, Laura; Walker, Janet; Riba-Garcia, Isabel; Mohammed, Shabaz; Deery, Michael J; Howard, Julie A; Dunkley, Tom; Aebersold, Ruedi; Kell, Douglas B; Lilley, Kathryn S; Roepstorff, Peter; Yates, John R; Brass, Andy; Brown, Alistair J P; Cash, Phil; Gaskell, Simon J; Hubbard, Simon J; Oliver, Stephen G

    2003-03-01

    Both the generation and the analysis of proteome data are becoming increasingly widespread, and the field of proteomics is moving incrementally toward high-throughput approaches. Techniques are also increasing in complexity as the relevant technologies evolve. A standard representation of both the methods used and the data generated in proteomics experiments, analogous to that of the MIAME (minimum information about a microarray experiment) guidelines for transcriptomics, and the associated MAGE (microarray gene expression) object model and XML (extensible markup language) implementation, has yet to emerge. This hinders the handling, exchange, and dissemination of proteomics data. Here, we present a UML (unified modeling language) approach to proteomics experimental data, describe XML and SQL (structured query language) implementations of that model, and discuss capture, storage, and dissemination strategies. These make explicit what data might be most usefully captured about proteomics experiments and provide complementary routes toward the implementation of a proteome repository. PMID:12610571

  5. Parametric analysis of lithium oxyhalide spirally wound cells utilizing the Taguchi approach to experimental design

    SciTech Connect

    Takeuchi, E.S.; Size, P.J.

    1994-12-31

    The Taguchi Method of Experimental Design was utilized to parametrically assess the effects of four variables in cell configuration on performance of spirally wound lithium oxyhalide D cells. This approach utilizes fractional factorial designs requiring a fraction of the number of experiments required of full factorial experiments. The Taguchi approach utilizes ANOVA analysis for calculating the percent contribution of each factor to battery performance as well as main effects of each factor. The four factors investigated in this study were the electrolyte type, the electrolyte concentration, the depolarizer type, and the mechanical cell design. The effects of these four factors on 1A constant current discharge, low temperature discharge, start-up, and shelf-life were evaluated. The factor having the most significant effect on cell performance was the electrolyte type.

  6. Experimental evaluation of active-member control of precision structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fanson, James; Blackwood, Gary; Chu, Cheng-Chih

    1989-01-01

    The results of closed loop experiments that use piezoelectric active-members to control the flexible motion of a precision truss structure are described. These experiments are directed toward the development of high-performance structural systems as part of the Control/Structure Interaction (CSI) program at JPL. The focus of CSI activity at JPL is to develop the technology necessary to accurately control both the shape and vibration levels in the precision structures from which proposed large space-based observatories will be built. Structural error budgets for these types of structures will likely be in the sub-micron regime; optical tolerances will be even tighter. In order to achieve system level stability and local positioning at this level, it is generally expected that some form of active control will be required.

  7. Sequential Model-Based Parameter Optimization: an Experimental Investigation of Automated and Interactive Approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutter, Frank; Bartz-Beielstein, Thomas; Hoos, Holger H.; Leyton-Brown, Kevin; Murphy, Kevin P.

    This work experimentally investigates model-based approaches for optimizing the performance of parameterized randomized algorithms. Such approaches build a response surface model and use this model for finding good parameter settings of the given algorithm. We evaluated two methods from the literature that are based on Gaussian process models: sequential parameter optimization (SPO) (Bartz-Beielstein et al. 2005) and sequential Kriging optimization (SKO) (Huang et al. 2006). SPO performed better "out-of-the-box," whereas SKO was competitive when response values were log transformed. We then investigated key design decisions within the SPO paradigm, characterizing the performance consequences of each. Based on these findings, we propose a new version of SPO, dubbed SPO+, which extends SPO with a novel intensification procedure and a log-transformed objective function. In a domain for which performance results for other (modelfree) parameter optimization approaches are available, we demonstrate that SPO+ achieves state-of-the-art performance. Finally, we compare this automated parameter tuning approach to an interactive, manual process that makes use of classical

  8. Anorexia nervosa and bulimia: an activity-oriented approach.

    PubMed

    Giles, G M

    1985-08-01

    In recent years, there has been a growing trend away from a dogmatic adherence to any one approach in the treatment of eating disorders. This paper adds the new element of practice in relation to cognitive change. The activity-oriented approach outlined here stresses that patients with anorexia nervosa or bulimia must maintain responsibility for their own food intake throughout treatment. The key role of the occupational therapist in the treatment team is outlined, and suggestions for assessment and management of this type of patient are given. PMID:3862340

  9. Plant species richness increases phosphatase activities in an experimental grassland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hacker, Nina; Wilcke, Wolfgang; Oelmann, Yvonne

    2014-05-01

    Plant species richness has been shown to increase aboveground nutrient uptake requiring the mobilization of soil nutrient pools. For phosphorus (P) the underlying mechanisms for increased P release in soil under highly diverse grassland mixtures remain obscure because aboveground P storage and concentrations of inorganic and organic P in soil solution and differently reactive soil P pools are unrelated (Oelmann et al. 2011). The need of plants and soil microorganisms for P can increase the exudation of enzymes hydrolyzing organically bound P (phosphatases) which might represent an important release mechanism of inorganic P in a competitive environment such as highly diverse grassland mixtures. Our objectives were to test the effects of i) plant functional groups (legumes, grasses, non-leguminous tall and small herbs), and of (ii) plant species richness on microbial P (Pmic) and phosphatase activities in soil. In autumn 2013, we measured Pmic and alkaline phosphomonoesterase and phosphodiesterase activities in soil of 80 grassland mixtures comprising different community compositions and species richness (1, 2, 4, 8, 16, 60) in the Jena Experiment. In general, Pmic and enzyme activities were correlated (r = 0.59 and 0.46 for phosphomonoesterase and phosphodiesterase activities, respectively; p

  10. Food, 47 Activities: An Experimental Unit, First Draft.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denver Univ., CO. Center for Teaching International Relations.

    Supplementary teaching activities at the junior- and senior-high school level on issues and topics involving food are provided. Topics include food production and distribution, nutrition, food shortages, food habits, and meal planning. Students are encouraged to develop perspective on global food concerns as well as understand their own family…

  11. An Experimental Method for the Active Learning of Greedy Algorithms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Velazquez-Iturbide, J. Angel

    2013-01-01

    Greedy algorithms constitute an apparently simple algorithm design technique, but its learning goals are not simple to achieve.We present a didacticmethod aimed at promoting active learning of greedy algorithms. The method is focused on the concept of selection function, and is based on explicit learning goals. It mainly consists of an…

  12. Experimental studies of light propagation in active scattering media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perkins, Amy Elizabeth

    1998-10-01

    Over the past several years there has been a great deal of renewed interest in multiple scattering systems with gain. Laser action has been demonstrated in systems containing high gain laser dyes mixed with passive scattering particles. In these materials, known as photonic paint, the scatterers redirect the light and provide the feedback mechanism to initiate lasing. A method of decreasing the linewidth which has been used in conventional laser systems is injection locking, in which a seed at the desired wavelength is introduced into the cavity to initiate lasing. Experiments are presented which demonstrate injection locking of this new laser system. It is also of particular interest to study the phenomenon of weak localization of light in these photonic paint systems. The interference between scattered light paths increases the probability of light traveling opposite to the direction of the incident light, and produces a cone of enhanced reflected light in that direction. In the presence of amplification, the coherent backscattering cone narrows. In this high gain scattering system, an unstudied regime can be achieved in which significant amplification takes place over one scattering length. The results of the coherent backscattering experiment in a high gain scattering system is discussed. There are certain intrinsic problems with inversion gain systems, such as photonic paint, which makes the narrowing of the coherent backscattering cone less pronounced. In Raman materials, these effects are greatly reduced. Experimental studies of the amplification of a probe beam in a disordered Raman scattering medium, and the Monte Carlo simulations of this experiment, are presented. It is also of interest to study absorptive scattering systems which appear in a number of different situations, including the determination of the excitation volume in a scattering gain system and the modeling of biological tissue. The addition of an absorbing species into a scattering medium

  13. Breaking Through the Glass Ceiling: Recent Experimental Approaches to Probe the Properties of Supercooled Liquids near the Glass Transition.

    PubMed

    Smith, R Scott; Kay, Bruce D

    2012-03-15

    Experimental measurements of the properties of supercooled liquids at temperatures near their glass transition temperatures, Tg, are requisite for understanding the behavior of glasses and amorphous solids. Unfortunately, many supercooled molecular liquids rapidly crystallize at temperatures far above their Tg, making such measurements difficult to nearly impossible. In this Perspective, we discuss some recent alternative approaches to obtain experimental data in the temperature regime near Tg. These new approaches may yield the additional experimental data necessary to test current theoretical models of the dynamical slowdown that occurs in supercooled liquids approaching the glass transition. PMID:26286280

  14. Cerebroside D, a glycoceramide compound, improves experimental colitis in mice with multiple targets against activated T lymphocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Xue-Feng; Wu, Xing-Xin; Guo, Wen-Jie; Luo, Qiong; Gu, Yan-Hong; Shen, Yan; Tan, Ren-Xiang; Sun, Yang; Xu, Qiang

    2012-09-15

    In the present paper, we aimed to examine the novel effects of cerebroside D, a glycoceramide compound, on murine experimental colitis. Cerebroside D significantly reduced the weight loss, mortality rate and alleviated the macroscopic and microscopic appearances of colitis induced by dexran sulfate sodium. This compound also decreased the levels of TNF-α, IFN-γ and IL-1β in intestinal tissue of mice with experimental colitis in a concentration-dependent manner, accompanied with markedly increased serum level of IL-10. Cerebroside D inhibited proliferation and induced apoptosis of T cells activated by concanavalin A or anti-CD3 plus anti-CD28 antibodies. The compound did not show an effect on naive lymphocytes but prevented cells from entering S phase and G2/M phase during T cells activation. Moreover, the treatment of cerebroside D led to apoptosis of activated T cells with the cleavage of caspase 3, 9, 12 and PARP. These results showed multiple effects of cerebroside D against activated T cells for a novel approach to treatment of colonic inflammation. Highlights: ► Cerebroside D, a glycoceramide compound, alleviated DSS induced colitis. ► The mechanism of the compound involved multiple effects against activated T cells. ► It regulated cytokine profiles in mice with experimental colitis. ► It prevented T cells from entering S and G2/M phases during activation. ► It led to apoptosis of activated T cells with the cleavage of caspases and PARP.

  15. Experimental evaluation of anti-sound approach in damping self-sustained thermoacoustics oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xinyan; Zhao, Dan; Li, Junwei; Xu, Yousheng

    2013-11-01

    Self-sustained thermoacoustics oscillations most often arise due to the coupling between unsteady heat release and acoustic waves. The large-amplitude oscillations are wanted in thermoacoustic engine systems. However, they are undesirable in many other systems such as aero-engine afterburners, rocket motors, ramjets, and gas turbines, since the oscillations may become so intense that they cause structural damage and costly mission failure. In this work, we experimentally investigate the "anti-sound" approach in damping Rijke-type thermoacoustic oscillations by actuating a monopole-like sound source. For this, four different least-mean-square (LMS) algorithms are used to determine the "anti-sound" signal to drive the actuator. Comparison is then made. It is found that the LMS-based "anti-sound" approach is able to minimize the thermoacoustic oscillations, even when the operating conditions are slightly changed. Sound pressure level is reduced by 45 dB. Finally, a numerical model is developed to gain insights on the interaction between the monopole sound source and the system. Unsteady heat release from the flame is assumed to be caused by its surface variations resulting from the oncoming acoustic fluctuations. By linearizing the flame model and recasting it into the classical time-lag N -τ formulation, the thermoacoustic system transfer function is calculated. Compared with the experimental measurement by injecting a broad-band white noise, good agreement is obtained.

  16. Experimental Approach for Deep Proteome Measurements from Small-Scale Microbial Biomass Samples.

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, Melissa R; Chourey, Karuna; Froelich, Jennifer M.; Erickson, Brian K; Verberkmoes, Nathan C; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L

    2008-01-01

    Many methods of microbial proteome characterizations require large quantities of cellular biomass (> 1-2 g) for sample preparation and protein identification. Our experimental approach differs from traditional techniques by providing the ability to identify the proteomic state of a microbe from a few milligrams of starting cellular material. The small-scale, guanidine-lysis method minimizes sample loss by achieving cellular lysis and protein digestion in a single tube experiment. For this experimental approach, the freshwater microbe Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 and the purple non-sulfur bacterium Rhodopseudomonas palustris CGA0010 were used as model organisms for technology development and evaluation. A 2-D LC-MS/MS comparison between a standard sonication lysis method and the small-scale guanidine-lysis techniques demonstrates that the guanidine-lysis method is more efficient with smaller sample amounts of cell pellet (i.e. down to 1 mg). The described methodology would enable deep proteome measurements from a few milliliters of confluent bacterial cultures. We also report a new protocol for efficient lysis from small amounts of natural biofilm samples for deep proteome measurements, which should greatly enhance the emerging field of microbial community proteomics. This straightforward sample boiling protocol is complementary to the small-scale guanidine-lysis technique, is amenable for small sample quantities, and requires no special reagents that might complicate the MS measurements.

  17. Laser Assisted Cancer Immunotherapy: An Experimental Theraputic Approach in Balb/c Mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, John

    2005-03-01

    Among the different therapeutic approaches to treat superficial malignant tumors, Laser Assisted Cancer Immunotherapy (LACI) shows promise. Experiments are in progress in our laboratory based on the concept of LACI which utilizes a light absorbing dye (Indocyanine Green, ICG), an immunoadjuvant (Glycated Chitosan, GC), and an infrared diode laser (1-15w) operating at 804 nm. Superficial tumors (5 to 7 mm in diameter) of the T4 cell line are grown in an animal model (Balb/C mice). The tumors are injected with ICG and GC prior to interstitial/surface irradiation of the tumor. The tumors' internal temperatures are monitored during the irradiation by invasive (microthermocouples) as well as noninvasive (infrared detector) modes. Along with the various experimental parameters, only the laser delivery (interstitial/surface) and laser intensity are varied in this initial stage so that the tumor temperature is in the range of 55 degrees C to 65 degrees C to ensure hyperthermic cell killing. The goal of the project is to determine the precise temperature range through which primary tumor necrosis and a vigorous immune response will end in tumor elimination. Experimental results coupled with a theoretical framework of laser-tissue interactions will be presented in the context of this therapeutic approach.

  18. Elements of a flexible approach for conceptual hydrological modeling: 2. Application and experimental insights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavetski, Dmitri; Fenicia, Fabrizio

    2011-11-01

    In this article's companion paper, flexible approaches for conceptual hydrological modeling at the catchment scale were motivated, and the SUPERFLEX framework, based on generic model components, was introduced. In this article, the SUPERFLEX framework and the "fixed structure" GR4H model (an hourly version of the popular GR4J model) are applied to four hydrologically distinct experimental catchments in Europe and New Zealand. The estimated models are scrutinized using several diagnostic measures, ranging from statistical metrics, such as the statistical reliability and precision of the predictive distribution of streamflow, to more process-oriented diagnostics based on flow-duration curves and the correspondence between model states and groundwater piezometers. Model performance was clearly catchment specific, with a single fixed structure unable to accommodate intercatchment differences in hydrological behavior, including seasonality and thresholds. This highlights an important limitation of any "fixed" model structure. In the experimental catchments, the ability of competing model hypotheses to reproduce hydrological signatures of interest could be interpreted on the basis of independent fieldwork insights. The potential of flexible frameworks such as SUPERFLEX is then examined with respect to systematic and stringent hypothesis-testing in hydrological modeling, for characterizing catchment diversity, and, more generally, for aiding progress toward a more unified formulation of hydrological theory at the catchment scale. When interpreted in physical process-oriented terms, the flexible approach can also serve as a language for dialogue between modeler and experimentalist, facilitating the understanding, representation, and interpretation of catchment behavior.

  19. Simulating oligomerization at experimental concentrations and long timescales: A Markov state model approach

    PubMed Central

    Kelley, Nicholas W.; Vishal, V.; Krafft, Grant A.; Pande, Vijay S.

    2008-01-01

    Here, we present a novel computational approach for describing the formation of oligomeric assemblies at experimental concentrations and timescales. We propose an extension to the Markovian state model approach, where one includes low concentration oligomeric states analytically. This allows simulation on long timescales (seconds timescale) and at arbitrarily low concentrations (e.g., the micromolar concentrations found in experiments), while still using an all-atom model for protein and solvent. As a proof of concept, we apply this methodology to the oligomerization of an Aβ peptide fragment (Aβ21–43). Aβ oligomers are now widely recognized as the primary neurotoxic structures leading to Alzheimer’s disease. Our computational methods predict that Aβ trimers form at micromolar concentrations in 10 ms, while tetramers form 1000 times more slowly. Moreover, the simulation results predict specific intermonomer contacts present in the oligomer ensemble as well as putative structures for small molecular weight oligomers. Based on our simulations and statistical models, we propose a novel mutation to stabilize the trimeric form of Aβ in an experimentally verifiable manner. PMID:19063575

  20. Radon entry into basements: Approach, experimental structures, and instrumentation of the small structures research project

    SciTech Connect

    Fisk, W.J.; Modera, M.P.; Sextro, R.G.; Garbesi, K.; Wollenberg, H.A.; Narasimhan, T.N.; Nuzum, T.; Tsang, Y.W.

    1992-02-01

    We describe the experimental approach, structures, and instrumentation of a research project on radon generation and transport in soil and entry into basements. The overall approach is to construct small precisely-fabricated basements in areas of different geology and climate, to control the pressures and ventilation rates in the structures, and to monitor radon concentrations and other relevant parameters over a period of one year or more. Two nearly air-tight structures have been constructed at the first site. The floor of each structure contains adjustable-width slots that serve as the only significant pathway for advective entry of radon. A layer of gravel underlays the floor of one structure; otherwise they are identical. The structures are instrumented for continuous or periodic monitoring of soil, structural, and meteorological parameters that affect radon entry. The pressure difference that drives advective radon entry can be maintained constant or varied over time. Soil gas and radon entry rates and associated parameters, such as soil gas pressures and radon concentrations, have been monitored for a range of steady-state and time-varying pressure differences between the interior of the structure and the soil. Examples of the experimentally-measured pressure and permeability fields in the soil around a structure are presented and discussed.

  1. Experimental demonstration of a classical approach for flexible space structure control: NASA CSI testbeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bond, Wie

    1991-01-01

    The results of active control experiments performed for the Mini-Mast truss structure are presented. The primary research objectives were: (1) to develop active structural control concepts and/or techniques; (2) to verify the concept of robust non-minimum-phase compensation for a certain class of non-colocated structural control problems through ground experiments; (3) to verify a 'dipole' concept for persistent disturbance rejection control of flexible structures; and (4) to identify CSI (Control Structure Interaction) issues and areas of emphasis for the next generation of large flexible spacecraft. The classical SISO (Single Input and Single Output) control design approach was employed.

  2. Theoretical and experimental studies of a truss incorporating active members

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edberg, D. L.; Bicos, A. S.; Fuller, C. M.; Tracy, J. J.; Fechter, J. S.

    1992-04-01

    To model the behavior of the piezoelectric elements, a unique finite-element formulation of the piezoelectric struts has been developed which is based on the MSC/NASTRAN CQUAD4 element. The formulation uses the element's Poisson expansion under in-plane loading to make its behavior simulate a piezoelectric member. It is shown that the active members in the MDSSC CSI truss are useful in the investigation of a variety of vibration dissipitation and damage detection techniques.

  3. Simulation and experimental studies of the SMA-activated needle behavior inside the tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konh, Bardia; Honarvar, Mohammad; Hutapea, Parsaoran

    2015-04-01

    Recently, the concept of developing an active steerable needle has gathered a lot of attention as they could potentially result in an improved outcome in various medical percutaneous procedures. Compared to the conventional straight bevel tip needles, active needles can be bent by means of the attached actuation component in order to reach the target locations more accurately. In this study, the movement of the passive needle inside the tissue was investigated using numerical and experimental approaches. A finite element simulation of needle insertion was developed using LSDYNA software to study the maneuverability of the passive needle. The Arbitrary-Eulerian-Lagrangian (ALE) formulation was used to model the interactions between the solid elements of the needle and the fluid elements of the tissue. Also the passive needle insertion tests were performed inside a tissue mimicking phantom. This model was validated for the 150mm of insertion which is similar to the depth in our needle insertion experiments. The model is intended to be based as a framework for modeling the active needle insertion in future.

  4. A coupled observation - modeling approach for studying activation kinetics from measurements of CCN activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raatikainen, T.; Moore, R. H.; Lathem, T. L.; Nenes, A.

    2012-05-01

    This paper presents an approach to study droplet activation kinetics from measurements of CCN activity by the Continuous Flow Streamwise Thermal Gradient CCN Chamber (CFSTGC) and a comprehensive model of the instrument and droplet growth. The model, which can be downloaded from http://nenes.eas.gatech.edu/Experiments/CFSTGC.html , is evaluated against a series of experiments with ammonium sulfate calibration aerosol. Observed and modeled droplet sizes are in excellent agreement for a water vapor uptake coefficient ~0.2, which is consistent with theoretical expectations. The model calculations can be considerably accelerated without significant loss of accuracy by assuming simplified instrument geometry and constant parabolic flow velocity profiles. With these assumptions, the model can be applied to large experimental data sets to infer kinetic growth parameters while fully accounting for water vapor depletion effects and changes in instrument operation parameters such as the column temperature, flow rates, sheath and sample flow relative humidities, and pressure. When the effects of instrument operation parameters, water vapor depletion and equilibrium dry particle properties on droplet size are accounted for, the remaining variations in droplet size are most likely due to non-equilibrium processes such as those caused by organic surface films, slow solute dissociation and glassy or highly viscous particle states. As an example of model application, data collected during a research flight in the ARCTAS 2008 campaign are analyzed. The model shows that water vapor depletion effects can explain changes in the observed average droplet size.

  5. Linking soil chemistry, treeline shifts and climate change: scenario modeling using an experimental approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mavris, Christian; Furrer, Gerhard; Anderson, Susanne; Blum, Alex; Wells, Aaron; Dahms, Dennis; Egli, Markus

    2014-05-01

    Climate change and global warming have a strong influence on the landscape development. As cold areas become warmer, both flora and fauna must adapt to new conditions (a). It is widely accepted that climate changes deeply influence the treeline shifts. In addition to that, wildfires, plant diseases and insect infestation (i.e. mountain pine beetle) can promote a selective replacement of plants, inhibiting some and favoring others, thus modifying the ecosystem in diverse ways. There is little knowledge on the behavior of soil chemistry when such changes occur. Will elemental availability become a crucial factor as a function of climate changes? The Sinks Canyon and Stough Basin - SE flank of the Wind River Range, Wyoming, USA - offer an ideal case study. Conceptually, the areas were divided into three main subsets: tundra, forest and a subarid environment. All soils were developed on granitoid moraines (b, c). From each subset, a liquid topsoil extract was produced and mixed with the solid subsoil samples in batch reactors at 50 °C. The batch experiments were carried out over 1800 h, and the progress of the dissolution was regularly monitored by analyzing liquid aliquots using IC and ICP-OES. The nutrients were mostly released within the first hours of the experiment. Silicon and Al were continuously released into the solution, while some alkali elements - i.e. Na - showed a more complex trend. Organic acids (acetic, citric) and other ligands produced during biodegradation played an active role in mineral dissolution and nutrient release. The mineral colloids detected in the extract (X-ray diffraction) can significantly control surface reactions (adsorption/desorption) and contributed to specific cationic concentrations. The experimental set up was then compared to a computed dissolution model using SerialSTEADYQL software (d, e). Decoding the mechanisms driving mineral weathering is the key to understand the main geochemical aspects of adaptation during climate

  6. Passive and active adaptive management: Approaches and an example

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, B.K.

    2011-01-01

    Adaptive management is a framework for resource conservation that promotes iterative learning-based decision making. Yet there remains considerable confusion about what adaptive management entails, and how to actually make resource decisions adaptively. A key but somewhat ambiguous distinction in adaptive management is between active and passive forms of adaptive decision making. The objective of this paper is to illustrate some approaches to active and passive adaptive management with a simple example involving the drawdown of water impoundments on a wildlife refuge. The approaches are illustrated for the drawdown example, and contrasted in terms of objectives, costs, and potential learning rates. Some key challenges to the actual practice of AM are discussed, and tradeoffs between implementation costs and long-term benefits are highlighted. ?? 2010 Elsevier Ltd.

  7. An ultrasonic theoretical and experimental approach to determine thickness and wave speed in layered media.

    PubMed

    de Sousa, Ana Valéria Greco; Pereira, Wagner Coelho de Albuquerque; Machado, João Carlos

    2007-02-01

    This work presents an ultrasonic method to characterize the layers of a stratified medium, using independent measurements of wave speed and thickness of each layer. The model, based on geometrical acoustics, includes refraction. Two transducers are used: one active (3.4 MHz) and a hydrophone as a receptor, which is moved laterally through 15 positions. The distance between the transducers and the delay between the echoes, from the interfaces separating the layers, received by them are used to estimate the speed and thickness. Three types of layered phantoms were used: Ph1 made with alcohol/acrylic, Ph2 made with polyvinyl chloride/water/acrylic, and Ph3 made with acrylic/water/polyvinyl chloride. The experimental results for speed of sound and layer thickness presented an experimental mean relative error, for thickness and wave speed, lower than 7.0% and 6.6%, respectively. PMID:17328335

  8. Antioxidant Activity of Marine Algal Polyphenolic Compounds: A Mechanistic Approach.

    PubMed

    Fernando, I P Shanura; Kim, Misook; Son, Kwang-Tae; Jeong, Yoonhwa; Jeon, You-Jin

    2016-07-01

    Polyphenolic compounds isolated from marine algae exhibit a broad spectrum of beneficial biological properties, including antioxidant, anticancer, antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, and antidiabetic activities, along with several other bioactivities centered on their antioxidant properties. Consequently, polyphenolic compounds are increasingly being investigated for their potential use in food, cosmetic, and pharmaceutical applications. The antioxidant activities of these compounds have been explored widely through experimental studies. Nonetheless, a theoretical understanding of the structural and electronic properties could broaden research perspectives, leading to the identification and synthesis of efficient structural analogs with prophylactic uses. This review briefly summarizes the current state of knowledge regarding antioxidant polyphenolic compounds in marine algae with an attempt to describe the structure-activity relationship. PMID:27332715

  9. Donor Activation Focused Rehabilitation Approach: Maximizing Outcomes After Nerve Transfers.

    PubMed

    Kahn, Lorna Canavan; Moore, Amy M

    2016-05-01

    As nerve transfers become the mainstay in treatment of brachial plexus and isolated nerve injuries, the preoperative and postoperative therapy performed to restore motor function requires continued dedication and appreciation. Through the understanding of the general principles of muscle activation and patient education, the therapist has a unique impact on the return of function in patients with nerve injuries. As surgeons continue to develop novel nerve transfers, the perioperative training, education, and implementation of the donor activation focused rehabilitation approach model is critical to ensure successful outcomes. PMID:27094897

  10. Camera calibration approach based on adaptive active target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yalin; Zhou, Fuqiang; Deng, Peng

    2011-12-01

    Aiming at calibrating camera on site, where the lighting condition is hardly controlled and the quality of target images would be declined when the angle between camera and target changes, an adaptive active target is designed and the camera calibration approach based on the target is proposed. The active adaptive target in which LEDs are embedded is flat, providing active feature point. Therefore the brightness of the feature point can be modified via adjusting the electricity, judging from the threshold of image feature criteria. In order to extract features of the image accurately, the concept of subpixel-precise thresholding is also proposed. It converts the discrete representation of the digital image to continuous function by bilinear interpolation, and the sub-pixel contours are acquired by the intersection of the continuous function and the appropriate selection of threshold. According to analysis of the relationship between the features of the image and the brightness of the target, the area ratio of convex hulls and the grey value variance are adopted as the criteria. Result of experiments revealed that the adaptive active target accommodates well to the changing of the illumination in the environment, the camera calibration approach based on adaptive active target can obtain high level of accuracy and fit perfectly for image targeting in various industrial sites.

  11. Exceptional activity of sub-nm Pt clusters on CdS for photocatalytic hydrogen production: A combined of experimental and first-principles study

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Qiyuan; Su, Dong; Xiong, Shangmin; Shen, Peichuan; Zhao, Shen; Li, Yan; Orlov, Alexander

    2014-12-24

    In this work we have explored a new concept of substantially increasing photocatalytic activity for H₂ production of conventional semiconductors by modifying them with sub-nm Pt particles. By combining both experimental and theoretical approaches, we have also developed new mechanistic insights into the 17 times increase in photocatalytic activity of Pt modified CdS catalysts.

  12. Chemical activation of molecules by metals: Experimental studies of electron distributions and bonding

    SciTech Connect

    Lichtenberger, D.L.

    1992-01-01

    Purpose of this research program is to obtain experimental information on the different fundamental ways metals bond and activate organic molecules. Our approach has been to directly probe the electronic interactions between metals and molecules through a wide variety of ionization spectroscopies and other techniques, and to investigate the relationships with bonding modes, structures, and chemical behavior. During this period, we have (1) characterized the electronic features of diphosphines and monophosphines in their coordination to metals, (2) carried out theoretical and experimental investigations of the bonding capabilities of C[sub 60] to transition metals, (3) developed techniques for the imaging of single molecules on gold substrates that emphasizes the electronic backbonding from the metal to the molecule, (4) obtained the high resolution photoelectron spectrum of pure C[sub 70] in the gas phase, (5) compared the bonding of [eta][sup 3]- acetylide ligands to the bonding of other small organic molecules with metals, and (6) reported the photoelectron spectra and bonding of [eta][sup 3]-cyclopropenyl groups to metals.

  13. Characterization of the anisotropic mechanical behaviour of colonic tissues: experimental activity and constitutive formulation.

    PubMed

    Carniel, E L; Gramigna, V; Fontanella, C G; Frigo, A; Stefanini, C; Rubini, A; Natali, A N

    2014-05-01

    The aim was to investigate the biomechanical behaviour of colonic tissues by a coupled experimental and numerical approach. The wall of the colon is composed of different tissue layers. Within each layer, different fibre families are distributed according to specific spatial orientations, which lead to a strongly anisotropic configuration. Accounting for the complex histology of the tissues, mechanical tests must be planned and designed to evaluate the behaviour of the colonic wall in different directions. Uni-axial tensile tests were performed on tissue specimens from 15 fresh pig colons, accounting for six different loading directions (five specimens for each loading direction). The next step of the investigation was to define an appropriate constitutive framework and develop a procedure for identification of the constitutive parameters. A specific hyperelastic formulation was developed that accounted for the multilayered conformation of the colonic wall and the fibre-reinforced configuration of the tissues. The parameters were identified by inverse analyses of the mechanical tests. The comparison of model results with experimental data, together with the evaluation of satisfaction of material thermomechanics principles, confirmed the reliability of the analysis developed. This work forms the basis for more comprehensive activities that aim to provide computational tools for the interpretation of surgical procedures that involve the gastrointestinal tract, considering the specific biomedical devices adopted. PMID:24486449

  14. Experimental evidence from active placement efforts among unemployed in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Hägglund, Pathric

    2014-06-01

    This article uses data from a field experiment in Sweden to analyze the effects of active placement efforts. In particular, the relative efficiency between combining job-search monitoring and job-search assistance, and monitoring alone, is analyzed. Although the impact estimates are generally imprecisely estimated, a general conclusion is that placement programs are effective policies in increasing the job exit rate for various groups of unemployed. I find that monitoring of job search is an efficient method to increase off-unemployment exit rate both alone and combined with job-search assistance services. The results, however, indicate that the combined services generate more permanent job exits. PMID:25201049

  15. Finding degrees of separation: Experimental approaches for astroglial and oligodendroglial cell isolation and genetic targeting

    PubMed Central

    Chew, Li-Jin; DeBoy, Cynthia A.; Senatorov, Vladimir V

    2014-01-01

    The study of CNS glial cell function requires experimental methods to detect, purify, and manipulate each cell population with fidelity and specificity. With the identification and cloning of cell- and stage-specific markers, glial cell analysis techniques have grown beyond physical methods of tissue dissociation and cell culture, and become highly specific with immunoselection of cell cultures in vitro and genetic targeting in vivo. The unique plasticity of glial cells offers the potential for cell replacement therapies in neurological disease that utilize neural cells derived from transplanted neural stem and progenitor cells. In this mini-review, we outline general physical and genetic approaches for macroglial cell generation. We summarize cell culture methods to obtain astrocytes and oligodendrocytes and their precursors, from developing and adult tissue, as well as approaches to obtain human neural progenitor cells through the establishment of stem cells. We discuss popular targeting rodent strains designed for cell-specific detection, selection and manipulation of neuroglial cell progenitors and their committed progeny. Based on shared markers between astrocytes and stem cells, we discuss genetically modified mouse strains with overlapping expression, and highlight SOX-expressing strains available for targeting of stem and progenitor cell populations. We also include recently established mouse strains for detection, and tag-assisted RNA and miRNA analysis. This discussion aims to provide a brief overview of the rapidly expanding collection of experimental approaches and genetic resources for the isolation and targeting of macroglial cells, their sources, progeny and gene products to facilitate our understanding of their properties and potential application in pathology. PMID:25169049

  16. A new experimental approach to study helicopter blade-vortex interaction noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koushik, Sudarshan N.

    A unique and novel experimental approach has been developed to study the aerodynamics and acoustics of the helicopter Blade-Vortex Interaction in a controlled hover environment. This is achieved by having a non-lifting single-bladed rotor with a rigid hub interact with a carefully controlled gust disturbance that replicates the essential characteristics of the vortex velocity. This experimental approach termed the Blade-Controlled Disturbance-Interaction or the BCDI, decouples the rotor parameters from the charactersitics of the incident disturbance velocity, thus providing an ideal setup for studying the blade's aerodynamics and acoustic response in detail. Moreover, the angle of interaction between the disturbance field and the rotor blade can be controlled by orienting the gust, providing the ability to study both parallel and oblique interactions. The noise data was recorded at thirty different microphone locations. A series of experiments at various rotor tip Mach numbers and interaction angles, replicating many of the conditions of helicopter BVI, were performed. The results show that the the directionality of the BVI noise is strongly determined by the interaction angle. A small change in interaction angle results in the radiation of noise over a larger azimuthal area compared to the parallel interaction. Moreover, as the interaction becomes more oblique, the peak noise elevation angle approaches closer to the rotor plane. A linear unsteady lifting-line aerodynamic theory (corrected for chord-wise non-compactness) was used to estimate the blade aerodynamics during the interaction and hence the radiated noise. Although the theory under-predicted the noise levels for most of the cases, and did not replicate exactly the general pulse shape, the general directionality trends were predicted reasonably well. The theory was used to separate the contribution to the acoustics, from different spanwise blade sections, providing significant insights into the phasing

  17. Microglial Activation in Rat Experimental Spinal Cord Injury Model

    PubMed Central

    Abdanipour, Alireza; Tiraihi, Taki; Taheri, Taher; Kazemi, Hadi

    2013-01-01

    Background: The present study was designed to evaluate the secondary microglial activation processes after spinal cord injury (SCI). Methods: A quantitative histological study was performed to determine ED-1 positive cells, glial cell density, and cavitation size in untreated SCI rats at days 1, 2, and 4, and weeks 1, 2, 3, and 4. Results: The results of glial cell quantification along the 4900-µm long injured spinal cord showed a significant increase in glial cell density percentage at day 2 as compared to other days. Whereas the highest increase in ED-1 immunoreactive cells (monocyte/phagocyte marker in rats) was observed at day 2 (23.15%) post-injury. Evaluation of cavity percentage showed a significant difference between weeks 3 and 4 post-injury groups. Conclusions: This study provides a new insight into the multiphase immune response to SCI, including cellular inflammation, macrophages/microglia activation, glial cell density, and cavitation. Better understanding of the inflammatory processes associated with acute SCI would permit the development of better therapeutic strategies. PMID:23999718

  18. Experimental Approach to Controllably Vary Protein Oxidation While Minimizing Electrode Adsorption for Boron-Doped Diamond Electrochemical Surface Mapping Applications

    SciTech Connect

    McClintock, Carlee; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L

    2013-01-01

    Oxidative protein surface mapping has become a powerful approach for measuring the solvent accessibility of folded protein structures. A variety of techniques exist for generating the key reagent hydroxyl radicals for these measurements; however, many of these approaches require use of radioactive sources or caustic oxidizing chemicals. The purpose of this research was to evaluate and optimize the use of boron-doped diamond (BDD) electrochemistry as a highly accessible tool for producing hydroxyl radicals as a means to induce a controllable level of oxidation on a range of intact proteins. These experiments utilize a relatively high flow rates to reduce protein residence time inside the electrochemical flow chamber, along with a unique cell activation approach to improve control over the intact protein oxidation yield. Studies were conducted to evaluate the level of protein adsorption onto the electrode surface. This report demonstrates a robust protocol for the use of BDD electrochemistry and high performance LC-MS/MS as a high-throughput experimental pipeline for probing higher order protein structure, and illustrates how it is complementary to predictive computational modeling efforts.

  19. Wall conditioning for ITER: Current experimental and modeling activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douai, D.; Kogut, D.; Wauters, T.; Brezinsek, S.; Hagelaar, G. J. M.; Hong, S. H.; Lomas, P. J.; Lyssoivan, A.; Nunes, I.; Pitts, R. A.; Rohde, V.; de Vries, P. C.

    2015-08-01

    Wall conditioning will be required in ITER to control fuel and impurity recycling, as well as tritium (T) inventory. Analysis of conditioning cycle on the JET, with its ITER-Like Wall is presented, evidencing reduced need for wall cleaning in ITER compared to JET-CFC. Using a novel 2D multi-fluid model, current density during Glow Discharge Conditioning (GDC) on the in-vessel plasma-facing components (PFC) of ITER is predicted to approach the simple expectation of total anode current divided by wall surface area. Baking of the divertor to 350 °C should desorb the majority of the co-deposited T. ITER foresees the use of low temperature plasma based techniques compatible with the permanent toroidal magnetic field, such as Ion (ICWC) or Electron Cyclotron Wall Conditioning (ECWC), for tritium removal between ITER plasma pulses. Extrapolation of JET ICWC results to ITER indicates removal comparable to estimated T-retention in nominal ITER D:T shots, whereas GDC may be unattractive for that purpose.

  20. Experimental study on asphaltene adsorption onto formation rock: An approach to asphaltene formation damage prevention

    SciTech Connect

    Piro, G.; Barberis Canonica, L.; Galbariggi, G.; Bertero, L.; Carniani, C.

    1995-12-31

    In this paper, through a comparative study on Static vs Dynamic adsorption of asphaltene onto formation rock, it is reported how, for the particular asphaltene/formation rock system here considered, the Dynamic asphaltene adsorption onto formation rock is a continuous phenomenon by which the quantity of adsorbed asphaltene increases continuously. In the authors` opinion this rather remarkable adsorption behavior may contribute to asphaltene formation damage. In the hypothesis that prevention may represent a more economical approach than removal, in this work is also reported a possible prevention approach based on formation rock treatment by means of specific chemicals more apt than asphaltenes to be adsorbed onto rock. As preliminary demonstration, with the aim at assessing qualitatively the potential of their approach, the authors have pre-treated the rock by means of commercially available asphaltene dispersant and flocculation inhibitors. Albeit the chosen additives are not commercialized on the base of their specific adsorption feature, a prevention effect has been effectively found. Experimental set ups and procedures used as a base for a test able to rank chemicals with respect to their asphaltene adsorption inhibitive effects are also reported.

  1. Three experimental approaches to measure the social context dependence of prejudice communication and discriminatory behavior.

    PubMed

    Beyer, Heiko; Liebe, Ulf

    2015-01-01

    Empirical research on discrimination is faced with crucial problems stemming from the specific character of its object of study. In democratic societies the communication of prejudices and other forms of discriminatory behavior is considered socially undesirable and depends on situational factors such as whether a situation is considered private or whether a discriminatory consensus can be assumed. Regular surveys thus can only offer a blurred picture of the phenomenon. But also survey experiments intended to decrease the social desirability bias (SDB) so far failed in systematically implementing situational variables. This paper introduces three experimental approaches to improve the study of discrimination and other topics of social (un-)desirability. First, we argue in favor of cognitive context framing in surveys in order to operationalize the salience of situational norms. Second, factorial surveys offer a way to take situational contexts and substitute behavior into account. And third, choice experiments - a rather new method in sociology - offer a more valid method of measuring behavioral characteristics compared to simple items in surveys. All three approaches - which may be combined - are easy to implement in large-scale surveys. Results of empirical studies demonstrate the fruitfulness of each of these approaches. PMID:25432623

  2. Stereoselective sulfation of terbutaline by the rat liver cytosol: Evaluation of experimental approaches

    SciTech Connect

    Walle, U.K.; Walle, T. )

    1989-01-01

    Little is known about the stereochemistry of sulfation of chiral phenolic drugs. In this study we examined several in vitro approaches to this question, using (+)-, (-)-, or (+/-)-terbutaline as the substrate and the rat liver cytosol as the phenolsulfotransferase enzyme source. The cosubstrate PAPS was either generated by the cytosol from inorganic sulfate and ATP or added to the cytosol. The intact sulfate conjugates formed were determined by HPLC. Using the PAPS generating system, which is best suited for the production of relatively large quantities of sulfate conjugates, with the individual enantiomers as substrates, (T)-terbutaline was conjugated to a much greater extent than (-)-terbutaline; the (+)/(-)-enantiomer ratio was 7.3 +/- 0.3 (mean +/- SE). When (+/-)-terbutaline was the substrate and chiral derivatization was employed to separate the sulfate enantiomers formed, a similar (+)/(-)-enantiomer ratio of 7.9 +/- 0.2 was obtained. With PAP35S added to the cytosol, an approach best suited for kinetic studies, the substrate concentration dependence of sulfation could be determined. The Km app for this reaction was identical for (+)- and (-)-terbutaline. However, the Vmax app was 8.1 +/- 0.4 times greater for (+)-terbutaline. This study for the first time shows enantioselectivity in sulfation of a chiral phenolic drug. The experimental approaches used should be valuable for human studies of stereoselective sulfation of terbutaline and other chiral drugs.

  3. Bougainvillea spectabilis Exhibits Antihyperglycemic and Antioxidant Activities in Experimental Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Pratibha; Mahajan, Sunil; Kulshrestha, Archana; Shrivastava, Sadhana; Sharma, Bechan; Goswamy, H M; Prasad, G B K S

    2016-07-01

    The study investigates the effects of aqueous extract of Bougainvillea spectabilis leaves on blood glucose, glycosylated hemoglobin, lipid profile, oxidative stress, and on DNA damage, if any, as well as on liver and kidney functions in streptozotocin-induced diabetes in Wistar rats. Daily administration of the aqueous extract of B spectabilis leaves for 28 days resulted in significant reduction in hyperglycemia and hyperlipidemia as evident from restoration of relevant biochemical markers following extract administration. The extract also exhibited significant antioxidant activity as evidenced from the enzymatic and nonenzymatic responses and DNA damage markers. The extract restored kidney and liver functions to normal and proved to be nontoxic. A marked improvement in the histological changes of tissues was also observed. The present study documented antihyperglycemic, antihyperlipidemic, and antioxidative potentials of the aqueous extract of B spectabilis leaves without any toxicity in streptozotocin-treated Wistar rats. PMID:26187284

  4. A Virtual Screening Approach For Identifying Plants with Anti H5N1 Neuraminidase Activity

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Recent outbreaks of highly pathogenic and occasional drug-resistant influenza strains have highlighted the need to develop novel anti-influenza therapeutics. Here, we report computational and experimental efforts to identify influenza neuraminidase inhibitors from among the 3000 natural compounds in the Malaysian-Plants Natural-Product (NADI) database. These 3000 compounds were first docked into the neuraminidase active site. The five plants with the largest number of top predicted ligands were selected for experimental evaluation. Twelve specific compounds isolated from these five plants were shown to inhibit neuraminidase, including two compounds with IC50 values less than 92 μM. Furthermore, four of the 12 isolated compounds had also been identified in the top 100 compounds from the virtual screen. Together, these results suggest an effective new approach for identifying bioactive plant species that will further the identification of new pharmacologically active compounds from diverse natural-product resources. PMID:25555059

  5. A virtual screening approach for identifying plants with anti H5N1 neuraminidase activity.

    PubMed

    Ikram, Nur Kusaira Khairul; Durrant, Jacob D; Muchtaridi, Muchtaridi; Zalaludin, Ayunni Salihah; Purwitasari, Neny; Mohamed, Nornisah; Rahim, Aisyah Saad Abdul; Lam, Chan Kit; Normi, Yahaya M; Rahman, Noorsaadah Abd; Amaro, Rommie E; Wahab, Habibah A

    2015-02-23

    Recent outbreaks of highly pathogenic and occasional drug-resistant influenza strains have highlighted the need to develop novel anti-influenza therapeutics. Here, we report computational and experimental efforts to identify influenza neuraminidase inhibitors from among the 3000 natural compounds in the Malaysian-Plants Natural-Product (NADI) database. These 3000 compounds were first docked into the neuraminidase active site. The five plants with the largest number of top predicted ligands were selected for experimental evaluation. Twelve specific compounds isolated from these five plants were shown to inhibit neuraminidase, including two compounds with IC50 values less than 92 μM. Furthermore, four of the 12 isolated compounds had also been identified in the top 100 compounds from the virtual screen. Together, these results suggest an effective new approach for identifying bioactive plant species that will further the identification of new pharmacologically active compounds from diverse natural-product resources. PMID:25555059

  6. HIV Eradication: Combinatorial Approaches to Activate Latent Viruses

    PubMed Central

    De Crignis, Elisa; Mahmoudi, Tokameh

    2014-01-01

    The concept of eradication of the Human Immune Deficiency Virus (HIV) from infected patients has gained much attention in the last few years. While combination Anti-Retroviral Therapy (c-ART) has been extremely effective in suppressing viral replication, it is not curative. This is due to the presence of a reservoir of latent HIV infected cells, which persist in the presence of c-ART. Recently, pharmaceutical approaches have focused on the development of molecules able to induce HIV-1 replication from latently infected cells in order to render them susceptible to viral cytopathic effects and host immune responses. Alternative pathways and transcription complexes function to regulate the activity of the HIV promoter and might serve as molecular targets for compounds to activate latent HIV. A combined therapy coupling various depressors and activators will likely be the most effective in promoting HIV replication while avoiding pleiotropic effects at the cellular level. Moreover, in light of differences among HIV subtypes and variability in integration sites, the combination of multiple agents targeting multiple pathways will increase likelihood of therapeutic effectiveness and prevent mutational escape. This review provides an overview of the mechanisms that can be targeted to induce HIV activation focusing on potential combinatorial approaches. PMID:25421889

  7. HIV eradication: combinatorial approaches to activate latent viruses.

    PubMed

    De Crignis, Elisa; Mahmoudi, Tokameh

    2014-11-01

    The concept of eradication of the Human Immune Deficiency Virus (HIV) from infected patients has gained much attention in the last few years. While combination Anti-Retroviral Therapy (c-ART) has been extremely effective in suppressing viral replication, it is not curative. This is due to the presence of a reservoir of latent HIV infected cells, which persist in the presence of c-ART. Recently, pharmaceutical approaches have focused on the development of molecules able to induce HIV-1 replication from latently infected cells in order to render them susceptible to viral cytopathic effects and host immune responses. Alternative pathways and transcription complexes function to regulate the activity of the HIV promoter and might serve as molecular targets for compounds to activate latent HIV. A combined therapy coupling various depressors and activators will likely be the most effective in promoting HIV replication while avoiding pleiotropic effects at the cellular level. Moreover, in light of differences among HIV subtypes and variability in integration sites, the combination of multiple agents targeting multiple pathways will increase likelihood of therapeutic effectiveness and prevent mutational escape. This review provides an overview of the mechanisms that can be targeted to induce HIV activation focusing on potential combinatorial approaches. PMID:25421889

  8. Predicting activity approach based on new atoms similarity kernel function.

    PubMed

    Abu El-Atta, Ahmed H; Moussa, M I; Hassanien, Aboul Ella

    2015-07-01

    Drug design is a high cost and long term process. To reduce time and costs for drugs discoveries, new techniques are needed. Chemoinformatics field implements the informational techniques and computer science like machine learning and graph theory to discover the chemical compounds properties, such as toxicity or biological activity. This is done through analyzing their molecular structure (molecular graph). To overcome this problem there is an increasing need for algorithms to analyze and classify graph data to predict the activity of molecules. Kernels methods provide a powerful framework which combines machine learning with graph theory techniques. These kernels methods have led to impressive performance results in many several chemoinformatics problems like biological activity prediction. This paper presents a new approach based on kernel functions to solve activity prediction problem for chemical compounds. First we encode all atoms depending on their neighbors then we use these codes to find a relationship between those atoms each other. Then we use relation between different atoms to find similarity between chemical compounds. The proposed approach was compared with many other classification methods and the results show competitive accuracy with these methods. PMID:26117822

  9. Experimental and modeling study of unsaturated solute flow in soils: from classical to discrete approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerke, K.

    2012-04-01

    Most dye staining experiments in natural soils result in highly heterogeneous flow patterns which are usually explained with presence of preferential flow paths or different kinds of flow instabilities. It is quite logic that soil structure is one of the main factors affecting infiltrations regimes, however the degree of flow stochasticity is not studied enough. In this contribution a substantial amount of large scale (2-4 m lateral excavations) field experiment data is considered (including forested hillslopes and agricultural fields) with special attention to sprinkling of two different staining substances with different dyeing mechanisms (common dye is visible both in adsorbed and in solution states; fluorescent dye - only in solution). The latter method allows an estimation of the flow stability (stochasticity). Most staining field experiments are supported by undisturbed sample collections (laboratory measurements for hydraulic conductivity, water retention curves, X-ray microtomography scans, grain size distributions, etc.). Preliminary results strongly support the evidence of stability of flow under similar precipitation and moisture conditions. Infiltration also correlated with soil structure and microproperties. Numerical modeling using classical approach (single-porosity coupled Richard's and advection-dispersion equations, random hydraulic properties based on log-normal experimentally obtained distribution) fails to describe experimentally obtained staining patterns. Multi-porosity models may provide better tools to account for different soil heterogeneities, but their parameters can not be obtained experimentally. Small scale solutions using pore-network or lattice-Botzmann methods based on microtomography scans are accurate, but computationally expensive (volumes around tens of cm3). Based on field observations a simple cellular automata approach to model staining patterns is developed and tested on experimental data. Our results are much better then

  10. Temperature rise during experimental light-activated bleaching.

    PubMed

    Klaric, Eva; Rakic, Mario; Sever, Ivan; Tarle, Zrinka

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the surface and intrapulpal temperatures after treatments with different bleaching gels subjected to different types of light activation. A K-type thermocouple and infrared thermometer were used to measure the temperature increase during the 15- or 30-min treatment period. Light-emitting diode with a center wavelength of 405 nm (LED405), organic light-emitting diode (OLED), and femtosecond laser were tested and compared to ZOOM2. The tooth surface was treated with five bleaching agents and Vaseline which served as a control.The generalized estimating equation (GEE) model was applied for testing the differences in temperature increase. The ZOOM2 light source led to the largest increase in mean pulpal and tooth surface temperatures of 21.1 and 22.8 °C, followed by focused femtosecond laser which increased the pulpal and surface temperatures by up to 15.7 and 16.8 °C. Treatments with unfocused femtosecond laser, LED405, and OLED induced significantly lower mean temperature increases (p < 0.001 for each comparison with ZOOM2 and focused femtosecond laser), both in the pulp chamber (up to 2.7, 2.5, and 1.4 °C) and at the tooth surface (up to 3.2, 3.4, and 1.8 °C). Significant differences between pulp chamber and tooth surface measurements were obtained for all types of bleaching gel, during treatments with ZOOM2 (p < 0.001), LED405 (p < 0.001), and unfocused (p < 0.001) and focused femtosecond laser (p ≤ 0.002). Different bleaching agents or Vaseline can serve as an isolating layer. Focused femtosecond laser and ZOOM2 produced large temperature increases in the pulp chamber and at the tooth surface. Caution is advised when using these types of light activation, while LED405, OLED, and unfocused femtosecond laser could be safely used. PMID:23780710

  11. Lipoicmethylenedioxyphenol Reduces Experimental Atherosclerosis through Activation of Nrf2 Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Ying, Zhekang; Chen, Minjie; Xie, Xiaoyun; Wang, Xiaoke; Kherada, Nisharahmed; Desikan, Rajagopal; Mihai, Georgeta; Burns, Patrick; Sun, Qinghua; Rajagopalan, Sanjay

    2016-01-01

    Objective Oxidative stress is implicated in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, and Nrf2 is the transcriptional factor central in cellular antioxidant responses. In the present study, we investigate the effect of a dihydrolipoic acid derivative lipoicmethylenedioxyphenol (LMDP) on the progression of atherosclerosis and test whether its effect on atherosclerosis is mediated by Nrf2. Methods and Results Both magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanning and en face analysis reveal that 14 weeks of treatment with LMDP markedly reduced atherosclerotic burden in a rabbit balloon vascular injury model. Myograph analyses show decreased aortic contractile response to phenylephrine and increased aortic response to acetylcholine and insulin in LMDP-treated animals, suggesting that LMDP inhibits atherosclerosis through improving vascular function. A role of Nrf2 signaling in mediating the amelioration of vascular function by LMDP was supported by increased Nrf2 translocation into nuclear and increased expression of Nrf2 target genes. Furthermore, chemotaxis analysis with Boydem chamber shows that leukocytes isolated from LMDP-treated rabbits had reduced chemotaxis, and knock-down of Nrf2 significantly reduced the effect of LMDP on the chemotaxis of mouse macrophages. Conclusion Our results support that LMDP has an anti-atherosclerotic effect likely through activation of Nrf2 signaling and subsequent inhibition of macrophage chemotaxis. PMID:26859892

  12. An experimental search for gamma radiation associated with thunderstorm activity

    SciTech Connect

    Fryberger, D.

    1992-11-01

    This experiment is a repeat of an earlier experiment, but with more sensitive apparatus and in a location with a higher incidence of thunderstorm activity. The earlier experiment was undertaken by Ashby and Whitehead to investigate the theory that ball lightning might be associated with the annihilation of small amounts of antimatter, and it yielded some very interesting but inconclusive results. In the course of about 12 months of data taking, four high rate bursts of gamma radiation were detected. These events lasted a few seconds and had many thousands of counts (16500, 5000, 3700, and [gt] 7700. Unfortunately, the association of these gamma ray bursts with thunderstorms or ball lightning was not clearly established, although one of the bursts did occur during a local thunderstorm in rough coincidence with a lightning bolt striking a flagpole about 100 yards from the gamma ray detection crystals. A pulse height spectrum taken for this burst (no spectrum was taken for the other three) exhibited a significant peak, well above background, the energy of which appeared to be compatible with the 511 keV positron annihilation line. While the peak could not be unambiguously attributed to positron annihilation, this certainly appeared to be the most likely source.

  13. An experimental search for gamma radiation associated with thunderstorm activity

    SciTech Connect

    Fryberger, D.

    1992-11-01

    This experiment is a repeat of an earlier experiment, but with more sensitive apparatus and in a location with a higher incidence of thunderstorm activity. The earlier experiment was undertaken by Ashby and Whitehead to investigate the theory that ball lightning might be associated with the annihilation of small amounts of antimatter, and it yielded some very interesting but inconclusive results. In the course of about 12 months of data taking, four high rate bursts of gamma radiation were detected. These events lasted a few seconds and had many thousands of counts (16500, 5000, 3700, and {gt} 7700. Unfortunately, the association of these gamma ray bursts with thunderstorms or ball lightning was not clearly established, although one of the bursts did occur during a local thunderstorm in rough coincidence with a lightning bolt striking a flagpole about 100 yards from the gamma ray detection crystals. A pulse height spectrum taken for this burst (no spectrum was taken for the other three) exhibited a significant peak, well above background, the energy of which appeared to be compatible with the 511 keV positron annihilation line. While the peak could not be unambiguously attributed to positron annihilation, this certainly appeared to be the most likely source.

  14. Analysis of the biomechanical behaviour of gastrointestinal regions adopting an experimental and computational approach.

    PubMed

    Carniel, E L; Rubini, A; Frigo, A; Natali, A N

    2014-01-01

    An integrated experimental and computational procedure is provided for the evaluation of the biomechanical behaviour that characterizes the pressure-volume response of gastrointestinal regions. The experimental activity pertains to inflation tests performed on specific gastrointestinal conduct segments. Different inflation processes are performed according to progressively increasing volumes. Each inflation test is performed by a rapid liquid in-flaw, up to a prescribed volume, which is held constant for about 300s to allow the development of relaxation processes. The different tests are interspersed by 600s of rest to allow the recovery of the specimen mechanical condition. A physio-mechanical model is developed to interpret both the elastic behaviour of the sample, as the pressure-volume trend during the rapid liquid in-flaw, and the time-dependent response, as the pressure drop during the relaxation processes. The minimization of discrepancy between experimental data and model results entails the identification of the parameters that characterize the viscoelastic model adopted for the definition of the behaviour of the gastrointestinal regions. The reliability of the procedure is assessed by the characterization of the response of samples from rat small intestine. PMID:24252470

  15. Experimental tests of mate choice in nonhuman mammals: the need for an integrative approach.

    PubMed

    Charlton, Benjamin D

    2013-04-01

    Experimental studies of mate choice have normally focused on non-mammal animal species, in which female mating preferences are based on clearly defined male traits. Because mammals are invariably larger and behaviourally more complex, they are less suited to this type of experimentation. Nevertheless, numerous studies on nonhuman mammals have shown that females appear to actively choose their mates. In this Commentary, I review the current literature to reveal that most experimental tests of mate choice in mammals are unable to reveal the actual male phenotypic trait(s) of female preference, which is crucial for identifying male characteristics under sexual selection. In addition, very few studies take into account female oestrous stage, or quantify the fitness benefits to discriminating females. Future work should concentrate on demonstrating female preferences for specific male traits that are shown by genetic paternity analysis to be correlated with male reproductive success, using setups that control for the effects of male and female mating strategies and in which the actual experiments are performed during the female's peak oestrous period. PMID:23487265

  16. Anti-invasive activities of experimental chemotherapeutic agents.

    PubMed

    Mareel, M M; De Mets, M

    1989-01-01

    We have discussed a number of agents that affect invasion and we have grouped them according to their most probable targets. This strategy is based on the following hypothesis. Invasion is the result of cellular responses to extracellular signals. Candidate signals are components of the extracellular matrix, which are rendered inactive by the flavonoid (+)-catechin (see Section III). Signals are recognized by receptors on the plasma membrane, possibly glycoproteins, that may lose their recognition function through alteration of the oligosaccharide side chains by inhibitors of protein glycosylation (see Section IV) and possibly also by alkyllysophospholipids (see Section V). Synthetic oligopeptides reflecting sequences from cell-binding domains of extracellular matrix molecules are also effective tools for blocking specific receptors (see Section VI). GTP-binding proteins (G proteins) act as signal transducers and can be inactivated by pertussis toxin (see Section VII). An intriguing aspect of both alkyllysophospholipids and pertussis toxin is that they can either inhibit the invasion of constitutively invasive cells or induce invasion of constitutively noninvasive cells. Without doubt, cellular responses implicated in invasion are many-fold. Discussed here are cell motility and directional migration with inhibition through dipyridamole and its analogs and through microtubule inhibitors, respectively (see Section VIII). Alternative hypotheses and alternative strategies for the dissection of the invasion process do exist, and alternative cellular and molecular mechanisms of action may explain the anti-invasive activity of the agents discussed earlier. The latter are mentioned in each section. It is the authors' opinion that the possibilities for exploiting the battery of anti-invasive agents have by no means been exhausted. Introducing researchers to experiments that may lead to an understanding of the mechanisms of invasion and metastasis and to new rationales for

  17. Neuroprotective approaches in experimental models of beta-amyloid neurotoxicity: relevance to Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Harkany, T; Hortobágyi, T; Sasvári, M; Kónya, C; Penke, B; Luiten, P G; Nyakas, C

    1999-08-01

    1. beta-Amyloid peptides (A beta s) accumulate abundantly in the Alzheimer's disease (AD) brain in areas subserving information acquisition and processing, and memory formation. A beta fragments are produced in a process of abnormal proteolytic cleavage of their precursor, the amyloid precursor protein (APP). While conflicting data exist in the literature on the roles of A beta s in the brain, and particularly in AD, recent studies have provided firm experimental evidence for the direct neurotoxic properties of A beta. 2. Sequence analysis of A beta s revealed a high degree of evolutionary conservation and inter-species homology of the A beta amino acid sequence. In contrast, synthetic A beta fragments, even if modified fluorescent or isotope-labeled derivatives, are pharmacological candidates for in vitro and in vivo modeling of their cellular actions. During the past decade, acute injection, prolonged mini-osmotic brain perfusion approaches or A beta infusions into the blood circulation were developed in order to investigate the effects of synthetic A beta s, whereas transgenic models provided insight into the distinct molecular steps of pathological APP cleavage. 3. The hippocampus, caudate putamen, amygdala and neocortex all formed primary targets of acute neurotoxicity screening, but functional consequences of A beta infusions were primarily demonstrated following either intracerebroventricular or basal forebrain (medial septum or magnocellular basal nucleus (MBN)) infusions of A beta fragments. 4. In vivo investigations confirmed that, while the active core of A beta is located within the beta(25-35) sequence, the flanking peptide regions influence not only the folding properties of the A beta fragments, but also their in vivo neurotoxic potentials. 5. It has recently been established that A beta administration deranges neuron-glia signaling, affects the glial glutamate uptake and thereby induces noxious glutamatergic stimulation of nerve cells. In fact, a

  18. Reinforced concrete structures loaded by snow avalanches : numerical and experimental approaches.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ousset, I.; Bertrand, D.; Brun, M.; Limam, A.; Naaim, M.

    2012-04-01

    Today, due to the extension of occupied areas in mountainous regions, new strategies for risk mitigation have to be developed. In the framework of risk analysis, these latter have to take into account not only the natural hazard description but also the physical vulnerability of the exposed structures. From a civil engineering point of view, the dynamic behavior of column or portico was widely investigated especially in the case of reinforced concrete and steel. However, it is not the case of reinforced concrete walls for which only the in-plan dynamic behavior (shear behavior) has been studied in detail in the field of earthquake engineering. Therefore, the aim of this project is to study the behavior of reinforced concrete civil engineering structures submitted to out-of-plan dynamic loadings coming from snow avalanche interaction. Numerical simulations in 2D or 3D by the finite element method (FEM) are presented. The approach allows solving mechanical problems in dynamic condition involving none linearities (especially none linear materials). Thus, the structure mechanical response can be explored in controlled conditions. First, a reinforced concrete wall with a L-like shape is considered. The structure is supposed to represent a French defense structure dedicated to protect people against snow avalanches. Experimental pushover tests have been performed on a physical model. The experimental tests consisted to apply a uniform distribution of pressure until the total collapse of the wall. A 2D numerical model has been developed to simulate the mechanical response of the structure under quasi-static loading. Numerical simulations have been compared to experimental datas and results gave a better understanding of the failure mode of the wall. Moreover, the influence of several parameters (geometry and the mechanical properties) is also presented. Secondly, punching shear experimental tests have also been carried out. Reinforced concrete slabs simply supported have

  19. Triboelectrification: A review of experimental and mechanistic modeling approaches with a special focus on pharmaceutical powders.

    PubMed

    Naik, Shivangi; Mukherjee, Raj; Chaudhuri, Bodhisattwa

    2016-08-20

    The continuous relative motion of particles against solid surfaces in pharmaceutical manufacturing triggers multiple physio-chemical alterations generating contact charging or triboelectrification. Charged particles in manufacturing processes can actuate multiple impediments including agglomeration, segregation during flow or adhesion to process equipment. Generation of excess charge might lead to electrostatic discharges inducing severe imperilments of fire and explosions. Despite its prevalence, the electrostatic charging process is not fully understood, owing to the diverse physical, chemical and environmental factors that can affect the phenomenon. In the course of this review, some of the basic concepts involved in charge transfer have been briefly discussed highlighting the different experimental approaches employed in measuring electrostatic charges and summarizing the constituent factors responsible. Pertinent numerical models have been further conferred to analyze the different hypotheses of particle charging. PMID:27353731

  20. The Local Integrity Approach for Urban Contexts: Definition and Vehicular Experimental Assessment.

    PubMed

    Margaria, Davide; Falletti, Emanuela

    2016-01-01

    A novel cooperative integrity monitoring concept, called "local integrity", suitable to automotive applications in urban scenarios, is discussed in this paper. The idea is to take advantage of a collaborative Vehicular Ad hoc NETwork (VANET) architecture in order to perform a spatial/temporal characterization of possible degradations of Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) signals. Such characterization enables the computation of the so-called "Local Protection Levels", taking into account local impairments to the received signals. Starting from theoretical concepts, this paper describes the experimental validation by means of a measurement campaign and the real-time implementation of the algorithm on a vehicular prototype. A live demonstration in a real scenario has been successfully carried out, highlighting effectiveness and performance of the proposed approach. PMID:26821028

  1. The Local Integrity Approach for Urban Contexts: Definition and Vehicular Experimental Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Margaria, Davide; Falletti, Emanuela

    2016-01-01

    A novel cooperative integrity monitoring concept, called “local integrity”, suitable to automotive applications in urban scenarios, is discussed in this paper. The idea is to take advantage of a collaborative Vehicular Ad hoc NETwork (VANET) architecture in order to perform a spatial/temporal characterization of possible degradations of Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) signals. Such characterization enables the computation of the so-called “Local Protection Levels”, taking into account local impairments to the received signals. Starting from theoretical concepts, this paper describes the experimental validation by means of a measurement campaign and the real-time implementation of the algorithm on a vehicular prototype. A live demonstration in a real scenario has been successfully carried out, highlighting effectiveness and performance of the proposed approach. PMID:26821028

  2. A Bayesian approach to quantifying uncertainty from experimental noise in DEER spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Thomas H; Stoll, Stefan

    2016-09-01

    Double Electron-Electron Resonance (DEER) spectroscopy is a solid-state pulse Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) experiment that measures distances between unpaired electrons, most commonly between protein-bound spin labels separated by 1.5-8nm. From the experimental data, a distance distribution P(r) is extracted using Tikhonov regularization. The disadvantage of this method is that it does not directly provide error bars for the resulting P(r), rendering correct interpretation difficult. Here we introduce a Bayesian statistical approach that quantifies uncertainty in P(r) arising from noise and numerical regularization. This method provides credible intervals (error bars) of P(r) at each r. This allows practitioners to answer whether or not small features are significant, whether or not apparent shoulders are significant, and whether or not two distance distributions are significantly different from each other. In addition, the method quantifies uncertainty in the regularization parameter. PMID:27414762

  3. Electromagnetic scattering problems -Numerical issues and new experimental approaches of validation

    SciTech Connect

    Geise, Robert; Neubauer, Bjoern; Zimmer, Georg

    2015-03-10

    Electromagnetic scattering problems, thus the question how radiated energy spreads when impinging on an object, are an essential part of wave propagation. Though the Maxwell’s differential equations as starting point, are actually quite simple,the integral formulation of an object’s boundary conditions, respectively the solution for unknown induced currents can only be solved numerically in most cases.As a timely topic of practical importance the scattering of rotating wind turbines is discussed, the numerical description of which is still based on rigorous approximations with yet unspecified accuracy. In this context the issue of validating numerical solutions is addressed, both with reference simulations but in particular with the experimental approach of scaled measurements. For the latter the idea of an incremental validation is proposed allowing a step by step validation of required new mathematical models in scattering theory.

  4. An experimental design approach to the chemical characterisation of pectin polysaccharides extracted from Cucumis melo Inodorus.

    PubMed

    Denman, Laura J; Morris, Gordon A

    2015-03-01

    Extracted pectins have been utilised in a number of applications in both the food and pharmaceutical industries where they are generally used as gelling agents, thickeners and stabilisers, although a number of pectins have been shown to be bioactive. These functional properties will depend upon extraction conditions. A statistical experimental design approach was used to study the effects of extraction conditions pH, time and temperature on pectins extracted from Cucumis melo Inodorus. The results show that the chemical composition is very sensitive to these conditions and that this has a great influence on for example the degree of branching. Higher temperatures, lower pHs and longer extraction times lead to a loss of the more acid labile arabinofuranose residues present on the pectin side chain. The fitting of regression equations relating yield and composition to extraction conditions can therefore lead to tailor-made pectins for specific properties and/or applications. PMID:25498647

  5. Improving Wind Turbine Drivetrain Reliability Using a Combined Experimental, Computational, and Analytical Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Y.; van Dam, J.; Bergua, R.; Jove, J.; Campbell, J.

    2015-03-01

    Nontorque loads induced by the wind turbine rotor overhang weight and aerodynamic forces can greatly affect drivetrain loads and responses. If not addressed properly, these loads can result in a decrease in gearbox component life. This work uses analytical modeling, computational modeling, and experimental data to evaluate a unique drivetrain design that minimizes the effects of nontorque loads on gearbox reliability: the Pure Torque(R) drivetrain developed by Alstom. The drivetrain has a hub-support configuration that transmits nontorque loads directly into the tower rather than through the gearbox as in other design approaches. An analytical model of Alstom's Pure Torque drivetrain provides insight into the relationships among turbine component weights, aerodynamic forces, and the resulting drivetrain loads. Main shaft bending loads are orders of magnitude lower than the rated torque and are hardly affected by wind conditions and turbine operations.

  6. An Experimental Approach for the Identification of Conserved Secreted Proteins in Trypanosomatids

    PubMed Central

    Corrales, Rosa M.; Mathieu-Daudé, Françoise; Garcia, Déborah; Brenière, Simone F.; Sereno, Denis

    2010-01-01

    Extracellular factors produced by Leishmania spp., Trypanosoma cruzi, and Trypanosoma brucei are important in the host-parasite relationship. Here, we describe a genome-based approach to identify putative extracellular proteins conserved among trypanosomatids that are likely involved in the classical secretory pathway. Potentially secreted proteins were identified by bioinformatic analysis of the T. cruzi genome. A subset of thirteen genes encoding unknown proteins with orthologs containing a signal peptide sequence in L. infantum, L. major, and T. brucei were transfected into L. infantum. Tagged proteins detected in the extracellular medium confirmed computer predictions in about 25% of the hits. Secretion was confirmed for two L. infantum orthologs proteins using the same experimental system. Infectivity studies of transgenic Leishmania parasites suggest that one of the secreted proteins increases parasite replication inside macrophages. This methodology can identify conserved secreted proteins involved in the classical secretory pathway, and they may represent potential virulence factors in trypanosomatids. PMID:20145711

  7. Improved Wind Turbine Drivetrain Reliability using a Combined Experimental, Computational, and Analytical Approach (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Yi; Bergua, R.; van Dam, J.; Jove, J.; Campbell, J.

    2014-08-01

    Nontorque loads induced by the wind turbine rotor overhang weight and aerodynamic forces can greatly affect drivetrain loads and responses. If not addressed properly, these loads can result in a decrease in gearbox component life. This work uses analytical modeling, computational modeling, and experimental data to evaluate a unique drivetrain design that minimize the effects of nontorque loads on gearbox reliability: the Pure Torque drivetrain developed by Alstom. The drivetrain has a hub-support configuration that transmits nontorque loads directly into the tower rather than through the gearbox as in other design approaches. An analytical model of Alstom's Pure Torque drivetrain provides insight into the relationships among turbine component weights, aerodynamic forces, and the resulting drivetrain loads. Main shaft bending loads are orders of magnitude lower than the rated torque and are hardly affected by wind speed and turbine operations.

  8. An experimental approach to study the function of mitochondria in cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Youn Wook; Kang, Seok-Min

    2015-01-01

    Cardiomyopathy is an inherited or acquired disease of the myocardium, which can result in severe ventricular dysfunction. Mitochondrial dysfunction is involved in the pathological process of cardiomyopathy. Many dysfunctions in cardiac mitochondria are consequences of mutations in nuclear or mitochondrial DNA followed by alterations in transcriptional regulation, mitochondrial protein function, and mitochondrial dynamics and energetics, presenting with associated multisystem mitochondrial disorders. To ensure correct diagnosis and optimal management of mitochondrial dysfunction in cardiomyopathy caused by multiple pathogenesis, multidisciplinary approaches are required, and to integrate between clinical and basic sciences, ideal translational models are needed. In this review, we will focus on experimental models to provide insights into basic mitochondrial physiology and detailed underlying mechanisms of cardiomyopathy and current mitochondria-targeted therapies for cardiomyopathy. [BMB Reports 2015; 48(10): 541-548] PMID:26198095

  9. Experimental approaches to studying the nature and impact of splicing variation in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Keightley, M C; Markmiller, S; Love, C G; Rasko, J E J; Lieschke, G J; Heath, J K

    2016-01-01

    From a fixed number of genes carried in all cells, organisms create considerable diversity in cellular phenotype through differential regulation of gene expression. One prevalent source of transcriptome diversity is alternative pre-mRNA splicing, which is manifested in many different forms. Zebrafish models of splicing dysfunction due to mutated spliceosome components provide opportunity to link biochemical analyses of spliceosome structure and function with whole organism phenotypic outcomes. Drawing from experience with two zebrafish mutants: cephalophŏnus (a prpf8 mutant, isolated for defects in granulopoiesis) and caliban (a rnpc3 mutant, isolated for defects in digestive organ development), we describe the use of glycerol gradient sedimentation and native gel electrophoresis to resolve components of aberrant splicing complexes. We also describe how RNAseq can be employed to examine relatively rare alternative splicing events including intron retention. Such experimental approaches in zebrafish can promote understanding of how splicing variation and dysfunction contribute to phenotypic diversity and disease pathogenesis. PMID:27443930

  10. Quantitative Assessment of Protein Interaction with Methyl-Lysine Analogues by Hybrid Computational and Experimental Approaches

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    In cases where binding ligands of proteins are not easily available, structural analogues are often used. For example, in the analysis of proteins recognizing different methyl-lysine residues in histones, methyl-lysine analogues based on methyl-amino-alkylated cysteine residues have been introduced. Whether these are close enough to justify quantitative interpretation of binding experiments is however questionable. To systematically address this issue, we developed, applied, and assessed a hybrid computational/experimental approach that extracts the binding free energy difference between the native ligand (methyl-lysine) and the analogue (methyl-amino-alkylated cysteine) from a thermodynamic cycle. Our results indicate that measured and calculated binding differences are in very good agreement and therefore allow the correction of measured affinities of the analogues. We suggest that quantitative binding parameters for defined ligands in general can be derived by this method with remarkable accuracy. PMID:21991995

  11. A Bayesian approach to quantifying uncertainty from experimental noise in DEER spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, Thomas H.; Stoll, Stefan

    2016-09-01

    Double Electron-Electron Resonance (DEER) spectroscopy is a solid-state pulse Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) experiment that measures distances between unpaired electrons, most commonly between protein-bound spin labels separated by 1.5-8 nm. From the experimental data, a distance distribution P (r) is extracted using Tikhonov regularization. The disadvantage of this method is that it does not directly provide error bars for the resulting P (r) , rendering correct interpretation difficult. Here we introduce a Bayesian statistical approach that quantifies uncertainty in P (r) arising from noise and numerical regularization. This method provides credible intervals (error bars) of P (r) at each r . This allows practitioners to answer whether or not small features are significant, whether or not apparent shoulders are significant, and whether or not two distance distributions are significantly different from each other. In addition, the method quantifies uncertainty in the regularization parameter.

  12. How close can one approach the Dirac point in graphene experimentally?

    PubMed

    Mayorov, Alexander S; Elias, Daniel C; Mukhin, Ivan S; Morozov, Sergey V; Ponomarenko, Leonid A; Novoselov, Kostya S; Geim, A K; Gorbachev, Roman V

    2012-09-12

    The above question is frequently asked by theorists who are interested in graphene as a model system, especially in context of relativistic quantum physics. We offer an experimental answer by describing electron transport in suspended devices with carrier mobilities of several 10(6) cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) and with the onset of Landau quantization occurring in fields below 5 mT. The observed charge inhomogeneity is as low as ≈10(8) cm(-2), allowing a neutral state with a few charge carriers per entire micrometer-scale device. Above liquid helium temperatures, the electronic properties of such devices are intrinsic, being governed by thermal excitations only. This yields that the Dirac point can be approached within 1 meV, a limit currently set by the remaining charge inhomogeneity. No sign of an insulating state is observed down to 1 K, which establishes the upper limit on a possible bandgap. PMID:22935053

  13. Experimental and theoretical approaches for identification of p-benzophenoneoxycarbonylphenyl acrylate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karaboga, F.; Soykan, U.; Dogruer, M.; Ozturk, B.; Yildirim, G.; Cetin, S.; Terzioglu, C.

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this multidisciplinary study is to characterize a title compound, p-benzophenoneoxycarbonylphenyl acrylate (BPOCPA) synthesized by condensation reaction of p-acryloyloxybenzoyl chloride (ABC) with 4-hydroxybenzophenone (HBP) by means of experimental and theoretical evidences. The spectroscopic properties of the compound are experimentally examined by Fourier transformation-infrared (FTIR) spectra (in the region 400-4000 cm-1) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shifts (with a frequency of 400 MHz). For the theoretical studies, the optimized molecular structures, vibrational frequencies including infrared intensities and Raman activities, corresponding vibrational spectra interpreted with the aid of normal coordinate analysis based on scaled density functional force field, atomic charges, thermodynamic properties, 1H and 13C NMR chemical shifts, JCH and JCC coupling constants belonging to the BPOCPA compound are analyzed in the ground state by the way of the density functional theory (B3LYP) with the standard 6-311++G(d,p) level of theory for the first time. All the results obtained show that the calculated vibrational frequencies and chemical shifts are observed to be in good agreement with the available experimental findings. According to the comparison between experimental results and theoretical data, the calculation level chosen plays an important role in understanding of dynamics of the title compound studied in this work. The self-consistent field (SCF) energy of the molecule in six different solvent media is also analyzed at the same basis set by applying both the Onsager and Polarizable Continuum Model (PCM). It is found that the SCF energies deduced from the methods reduce with the enhancement of the solvent polarity as a consequence of the increment in the stability of the compound studied. Besides, the changes of the PCM calculations are found to be higher than those of the Onsager ones, confirming that the former method displays a

  14. PARTICLE TRANSPORTATION AND DEPOSITION IN HOT GAS FILTER VESSELS - A COMPUTATIONAL AND EXPERIMENTAL MODELING APPROACH

    SciTech Connect

    Goodarz Ahmadi

    2002-07-01

    In this project, a computational modeling approach for analyzing flow and ash transport and deposition in filter vessels was developed. An Eulerian-Lagrangian formulation for studying hot-gas filtration process was established. The approach uses an Eulerian analysis of gas flows in the filter vessel, and makes use of the Lagrangian trajectory analysis for the particle transport and deposition. Particular attention was given to the Siemens-Westinghouse filter vessel at Power System Development Facility in Wilsonville in Alabama. Details of hot-gas flow in this tangential flow filter vessel are evaluated. The simulation results show that the rapidly rotation flow in the spacing between the shroud and the vessel refractory acts as cyclone that leads to the removal of a large fraction of the larger particles from the gas stream. Several alternate designs for the filter vessel are considered. These include a vessel with a short shroud, a filter vessel with no shroud and a vessel with a deflector plate. The hot-gas flow and particle transport and deposition in various vessels are evaluated. The deposition patterns in various vessels are compared. It is shown that certain filter vessel designs allow for the large particles to remain suspended in the gas stream and to deposit on the filters. The presence of the larger particles in the filter cake leads to lower mechanical strength thus allowing for the back-pulse process to more easily remove the filter cake. A laboratory-scale filter vessel for testing the cold flow condition was designed and fabricated. A laser-based flow visualization technique is used and the gas flow condition in the laboratory-scale vessel was experimental studied. A computer model for the experimental vessel was also developed and the gas flow and particle transport patterns are evaluated.

  15. A study of Ti-doped WO3 thin films using comparative theoretical and experimental approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paez, Aurelio

    Metal oxides like Tungsten Oxide (WO3) are well documented and characterized in the literature, with uses in darkening windows and mirrors, flat computer displays, solar panel cooling, and sensors (of interest in this study). Ti doping of WO3 is less documented and the focus of this study. Sample thin films of pure WO3 and varyingly Ti doped WO3 were prepared using Radio Frequency magnetron sputtering (RF) (13.56 MHz) to grow thin films on a silicon substrate. This study aims to compare multiple Ti doping percentages in WO3 theoretically and then compare with experimental data taken from thin films of various Ti doping levels grown at temperatures ranging from room temperature to 400 0°C. Characterization of the materials was to be conducted using Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy, Raman Spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and other theoretical and simulated approaches. Theoretical calculations optimized Ti doping at somewhere between 6.25% and 12%. Experimental data indicates that under the given growing conditions optimal Ti doping is 5%. The percentage of Ti may be able to be increased and the material retain desired characteristics with an increased growth temperature above 400 0°C as annealing samples post-growth has no positive impact on the thin film structure.

  16. Quantification of nanoparticle pesticide adsorption: computational approaches based on experimental data.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ran; Zhang, Yuntao; Monteiro-Riviere, Nancy A; Riviere, Jim E

    2016-10-01

    Quantitative analysis of the interactions between nanomaterials and environmental contamINANts, such as pesticides, in natural water systems and food residuals is crucial for the application of nanomaterials-based tools for the detection of the presence of toxic substances, monitoring pollution levels and environmental remediation. Previously, the Biological Surface Adsorption Index (BSAI) has demonstrated promising capabilities of interaction characterization and prediction based on experimental data from small organic molecules. In this article, the first attempt of the application of such quantitative measures toward environmental endpoints by analyzing the interactions of a selected group of nanomaterials with a variety of pesticides was made. Statistical modeling was conducted on the experimental obtained adsorption data based on polynomial BSAI models, as well as models with the incorporation of artificial neural network methodologies. Finally, clustering analyzes were performed for the categorization of nanomaterials based on surface physicochemical properties using both polynomial indices and physical adsorption modeling parameters. These quantitative computational approaches support the application of BSAI modeling in the area of environmental contamINANt detection and remediation. PMID:27074998

  17. Investigation of sonar transponders for offshore wind farms: modeling approach, experimental setup, and results.

    PubMed

    Fricke, Moritz B; Rolfes, Raimund

    2013-11-01

    The installation of offshore wind farms in the German Exclusive Economic Zone requires the deployment of sonar transponders to prevent collisions with submarines. The general requirements for these systems have been previously worked out by the Research Department for Underwater Acoustics and Marine Geophysics of the Bundeswehr. In this article, the major results of the research project "Investigation of Sonar Transponders for Offshore Wind Farms" are presented. For theoretical investigations a hybrid approach was implemented using the boundary element method to calculate the source directivity and a three-dimensional ray-tracing algorithm to estimate the transmission loss. The angle-dependence of the sound field as well as the weather-dependence of the transmission loss are compared to experimental results gathered at the offshore wind farm alpha ventus, located 45 km north of the island Borkum. While theoretical and experimental results are in general agreement, the implemented model slightly underestimates scattering at the rough sea surface. It is found that the source level of 200 dB re 1 μPa at 1 m is adequate to satisfy the detectability of the warning sequence at distances up to 2 NM (≈3.7 km) within a horizontal sector of ±60° if realistic assumptions about signal-processing and noise are made. An arrangement to enlarge the angular coverage is discussed. PMID:24180764

  18. A Unified Experimental Approach for Estimation of Irrigationwater and Nitrate Leaching in Tree Crops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopmans, J. W.; Kandelous, M. M.; Moradi, A. B.

    2014-12-01

    Groundwater quality is specifically vulnerable in irrigated agricultural lands in California and many other(semi-)arid regions of the world. The routine application of nitrogen fertilizers with irrigation water in California is likely responsible for the high nitrate concentrations in groundwater, underlying much of its main agricultural areas. To optimize irrigation/fertigation practices, it is essential that irrigation and fertilizers are applied at the optimal concentration, place, and time to ensure maximum root uptake and minimize leaching losses to the groundwater. The applied irrigation water and dissolved fertilizer, as well as root growth and associated nitrate and water uptake, interact with soil properties and fertilizer source(s) in a complex manner that cannot easily be resolved. It is therefore that coupled experimental-modeling studies are required to allow for unraveling of the relevant complexities that result from typical field-wide spatial variations of soil texture and layering across farmer-managed fields. We present experimental approaches across a network of tree crop orchards in the San Joaquin Valley, that provide the necessary soil data of soil moisture, water potential and nitrate concentration to evaluate and optimize irrigation water management practices. Specifically, deep tensiometers were used to monitor in-situ continuous soil water potential gradients, for the purpose to compute leaching fluxes of water and nitrate at both the individual tree and field scale.

  19. A hybrid computational-experimental approach for automated crystal structure solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meredig, Bryce; Wolverton, C.

    2013-02-01

    Crystal structure solution from diffraction experiments is one of the most fundamental tasks in materials science, chemistry, physics and geology. Unfortunately, numerous factors render this process labour intensive and error prone. Experimental conditions, such as high pressure or structural metastability, often complicate characterization. Furthermore, many materials of great modern interest, such as batteries and hydrogen storage media, contain light elements such as Li and H that only weakly scatter X-rays. Finally, structural refinements generally require significant human input and intuition, as they rely on good initial guesses for the target structure. To address these many challenges, we demonstrate a new hybrid approach, first-principles-assisted structure solution (FPASS), which combines experimental diffraction data, statistical symmetry information and first-principles-based algorithmic optimization to automatically solve crystal structures. We demonstrate the broad utility of FPASS to clarify four important crystal structure debates: the hydrogen storage candidates MgNH and NH3BH3; Li2O2, relevant to Li-air batteries; and high-pressure silane, SiH4.

  20. Interplay of seismic and aseismic deformations during earthquake swarms: An experimental approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lengliné, O.; Elkhoury, J. E.; Daniel, G.; Schmittbuhl, J.; Toussaint, R.; Ampuero, J.-P.; Bouchon, M.

    2012-05-01

    Observations of earthquake swarms and slow propagating ruptures on related faults suggest a close relation between the two phenomena. Earthquakes are the signature of fast unstable ruptures initiated on localized asperities while slow aseismic deformations are experienced on large stable segments of the fault plane. The spatial proximity and the temporal coincidence of both fault mechanical responses highlight the variability of fault rheology. However, the mechanism relating earthquakes and aseismic processes is still elusive due to the difficulty of imaging these phenomena of large spatiotemporal variability at depth. Here we present laboratory experiments that explore, in great detail, the deformation processes of heterogeneous interfaces in the brittle-creep regime. We track the evolution of an interfacial crack over 7 orders of magnitude in time and 5 orders of magnitude in space using optical and acoustic sensors. We explore the response of the system to slow transient loads and show that slow deformation episodes are systematically accompanied by acoustic emissions due to local fracture energy disorder. Features of acoustic emission activities and deformation rate distributions of our experimental system are similar to those in natural faults. On the basis of an activation energy model, we link our results to the Rate and State friction model and suggest an active role of local creep deformation in driving the seismic activity of earthquake swarms.

  1. Can we predict indirect interactions from quantitative food webs?--an experimental approach.

    PubMed

    Tack, Ayco J M; Gripenberg, Sofia; Roslin, Tomas

    2011-01-01

    1. Shared enemies may link the dynamics of their prey. Recently, quantitative food webs have been used to infer that herbivorous insect species attacked by the same major parasitoid species will affect each other negatively through apparent competition. Nonetheless, theoretical work predicts several alternative outcomes, including positive effects. 2. In this paper, we use an experimental approach to link food web patterns to realized population dynamics. First, we construct a quantitative food web for three dominant leaf miner species on the oak Quercus robur. We then measure short- and long-term indirect effects by increasing leaf miner densities on individual trees. Finally, we test whether experimental results are consistent with natural leaf miner dynamics on unmanipulated trees. 3. The quantitative food web shows that all leaf miner species share a minimum of four parasitoid species. While only a small fraction of the parasitoid pool is shared among Tischeria ekebladella and each of two Phyllonorycter species, the parasitoid communities of the congeneric Phyllonorycter species overlap substantially. 4. Based on the structure of the food web, we predict strong short- and long-term indirect interactions between the Phyllonorycter species, and limited interactions between them and T. ekebladella. As T. ekebladella is the main source of its own parasitoids, we expect to find intraspecific density-dependent parasitism in this species. 5. Consistent with these predictions, parasitism in T. ekebladella was high on trees with high densities of conspecifics in the previous generation. Among leaf miner species sharing more parasitoids, we found positive rather than negative interactions among years. No short-term indirect interactions (i.e. indirect interactions within a single generation) were detected. 6. Overall, this study is the first to experimentally demonstrate that herbivores with overlapping parasitoid communities may exhibit independent population dynamics

  2. Practical Approaches to Prescribing Physical Activity and Monitoring Exercise Intensity.

    PubMed

    Reed, Jennifer L; Pipe, Andrew L

    2016-04-01

    Regular physical activity helps to prevent heart disease, and reduces the risk of first or subsequent cardiovascular events. It is recommended that Canadian adults accumulate at least 150 minutes of moderate- to vigorous-intensity aerobic exercise per week, in bouts of 10 minutes or more, and perform muscle- and bone-strengthening activities at least 2 days per week. Individual exercise prescriptions can be developed using the frequency, intensity, time, and type principles. Increasing evidence suggests that high-intensity interval training is efficacious for a broad spectrum of heart health outcomes. Several practical approaches to prescribing and monitoring exercise intensity exist including: heart rate monitoring, the Borg rating of perceived exertion scale, the Talk Test, and, motion sensors. The Borg rating of perceived exertion scale matches a numerical value to an individual's perception of effort, and can also be used to estimate heart rate. The Talk Test, the level at which simple conversation is possible, can be used to monitor desired levels of moderate- to vigorous-intensity exercise. Motion sensors can provide users with practical and useful exercise training information to aid in meeting current exercise recommendations. These approaches can be used by the public, exercise scientists, and clinicians to easily and effectively guide physical activity in a variety of settings. PMID:26897182

  3. Numerical Simulation and Experimental Validation of Calibrant-Loaded Extraction Phase Standardization Approach.

    PubMed

    Alam, Md Nazmul; Pawliszyn, Janusz

    2016-09-01

    We present the kinetics of calibrant release and analyte uptake between the sample and calibrant-loaded extraction phase, CL-EP, with a finite-element analysis (FEA) using COMSOL Multiphysics software package. Effect of finite and infinite sample volume conditions, as well as various sample environment parameters such as fluid flow velocity, temperature, and presence of a binding matrix component were investigated in detail with the model in relation to the performance of the calibration. The simulation results supported by experimental data demonstrate the suitability of the CL-EP method for analysis of samples with variation of the sample environment parameters. The calibrant-loaded approach can provide both total and free concentrations from a single experiment based on whether the partition coefficient (Kes) value being used is measured in a matrix-matched sample or in a matrix-free sample, respectively. Total concentrations can also be obtained by utilizing CL-EP in combination with external matrix-matched calibrations, which can be employed to automate the sampling process and provide corrections for variations in sample preparation, matrix effects, and detection processes. This approach is also suitable for very small volumes of sample, where addition of an internal standard in the sample is either troublesome or can change the sample characteristics. PMID:27508421

  4. Comparison of Modeling and Experimental Approaches for Improved Modeling of Filtration in Granular and Consolidated Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirabolghasemi, M.; Prodanovic, M.; DiCarlo, D. A.

    2014-12-01

    Filtration is relevant to many disciplines from colloid transport in environmental engineering to formation damage in petroleum engineering. In this study we compare the results of the novel numerical modeling of filtration phenomenon on pore scale with the complementary experimental observations on laboratory scale and discuss how the results of comparison can be used to improve macroscale filtration models for different porous media. The water suspension contained glass beads of 200 micron diameter and flows through a packing of 1mm diameter glass beads, and thus the main filtration mechanism is straining and jamming of particles. The numerical model simulates the flow of suspension through a realistic 3D structure of an imaged, disordered sphere pack, which acts as the filter medium. Particle capture through size exclusion and jamming is modeled via a coupled Discrete Element Method (DEM) and Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) approach. The coupled CFD-DEM approach is capable of modeling the majority of particle-particle, particle-wall, and particle-fluid interactions. Note that most of traditional approaches require spherical particles both in suspension and the filtration medium. We adapted the interface between the pore space and the spherical grains to be represented as a triangulated surface and this allows extensions to any imaged media. The numerical and experimental results show that the filtration coefficient of the sphere pack is a function of the flow rate and concentration of the suspension, even for constant total particle flow rate. An increase in the suspension flow rate results in a decrease in the filtration coefficient, which suggests that the hydrodynamic drag force plays the key role in hindering the particle capture in random sphere packs. Further, similar simulations of suspension flow through a sandstone sample, which has a tighter pore space, show that filtration coefficient remains almost constant at different suspension flow rates. This

  5. Experimental Study of Collision Detection Schema Used by Pilots During Closely Spaced Parallel Approaches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pritchett, Amy R.; Hansman, R. John

    1996-01-01

    An experimental flight simulator study was conducted to examine the mental alerting logic and thresholds used by subjects to issue an alert and execute an avoidance maneuver. Subjects flew a series of autopilot landing approaches with traffic on a closely-spaced parallel approach; during some runs, the traffic would deviate towards the subject and the subject was to indicate the point when they recognized the potential traffic conflict, and then indicate a direction of flight for an avoidance maneuver. A variety of subjects, including graduate students, general aviation pilots and airline pilots, were tested. Five traffic displays were evaluated, with a moving map TCAS-type traffic display as a baseline. A side-task created both high and low workload situations. Subjects appeared to use the lateral deviation of the intruder aircraft from its approach path as the criteria for an alert regardless of the display available. However, with displays showing heading and/or trend information, their alerting thresholds were significantly lowered. This type of range-only schema still resulted in many near misses, as a high convergence rate was often established by the time of the subject's alert. Therefore, the properties of the intruder's trajectory had the greatest effect on the resultant near miss rate; no display system reliably caused alerts timely enough for certain collision avoidance. Subjects' performance dropped significantly on a side-task while they analyzed the need for an alert, showing alert generation can be a high workload situation at critical times. No variation was found between subjects with and with out piloting experience. These results suggest the design of automatic alerting systems should take into account the range-type alerting schema used by the human, such that the rationale for the automatic alert should be obvious to, and trusted by, the operator. Although careful display design may help generate pilot/automation trust, issues such as user non

  6. Prevention or Modification of Epileptogenesis after Brain Insults: Experimental Approaches and Translational Research

    PubMed Central

    Brandt, Claudia

    2010-01-01

    Diverse brain insults, including traumatic brain injury, stroke, infections, tumors, neurodegenerative diseases, and prolonged acute symptomatic seizures, such as complex febrile seizures or status epilepticus (SE), can induce “epileptogenesis,” a process by which normal brain tissue is transformed into tissue capable of generating spontaneous recurrent seizures. Furthermore, epileptogenesis operates in cryptogenic causes of epilepsy. In view of the accumulating information about cellular and molecular mechanisms of epileptogenesis, it should be possible to intervene in this process before the onset of seizures and thereby either prevent the development of epilepsy in patients at risk or increase the potential for better long-term outcome, which constitutes a major clinical need. For identifying pharmacological interventions that prevent, interrupt or reverse the epileptogenic process in people at risk, two groups of animal models, kindling and SE-induced recurrent seizures, have been recommended as potentially useful tools. Furthermore, genetic rodent models of epileptogenesis are increasingly used in assessing antiepileptogenic treatments. Two approaches have been used in these different model categories: screening of clinically established antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) for antiepileptogenic or disease-modifying potential, and targeting the key causal mechanisms that underlie epileptogenesis. The first approach indicated that among various AEDs, topiramate, levetiracetam, carisbamate, and valproate may be the most promising. On the basis of these experimental findings, two ongoing clinical trials will address the antiepileptogenic potential of topiramate and levetiracetam in patients with traumatic brain injury, hopefully translating laboratory discoveries into successful therapies. The second approach has highlighted neurodegeneration, inflammation and up-regulation of immune responses, and neuronal hyperexcitability as potential targets for antiepileptogenesis

  7. Optimal active power dispatch by network flow approach

    SciTech Connect

    Carvalho, M.F. ); Soares, S.; Ohishi, T. )

    1988-11-01

    In this paper the optimal active power dispatch problem is formulated as a nonlinear capacitated network flow problem with additional linear constraints. Transmission flow limits and both Kirchhoff's laws are taken into account. The problem is solved by a Generalized Upper Bounding technique that takes advantage of the network flow structure of the problem. The new approach has potential applications on power systems problems such as economic dispatch, load supplying capability, minimum load shedding, and generation-transmission reliability. The paper also reviews the use of transportation models for power system analysis. A detailed illustrative example is presented.

  8. Experimental/analytical approaches to modeling, calibrating and optimizing shaking table dynamics for structural dynamic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trombetti, Tomaso

    This thesis presents an Experimental/Analytical approach to modeling and calibrating shaking tables for structural dynamic applications. This approach was successfully applied to the shaking table recently built in the structural laboratory of the Civil Engineering Department at Rice University. This shaking table is capable of reproducing model earthquake ground motions with a peak acceleration of 6 g's, a peak velocity of 40 inches per second, and a peak displacement of 3 inches, for a maximum payload of 1500 pounds. It has a frequency bandwidth of approximately 70 Hz and is designed to test structural specimens up to 1/5 scale. The rail/table system is mounted on a reaction mass of about 70,000 pounds consisting of three 12 ft x 12 ft x 1 ft reinforced concrete slabs, post-tensioned together and connected to the strong laboratory floor. The slip table is driven by a hydraulic actuator governed by a 407 MTS controller which employs a proportional-integral-derivative-feedforward-differential pressure algorithm to control the actuator displacement. Feedback signals are provided by two LVDT's (monitoring the slip table relative displacement and the servovalve main stage spool position) and by one differential pressure transducer (monitoring the actuator force). The dynamic actuator-foundation-specimen system is modeled and analyzed by combining linear control theory and linear structural dynamics. The analytical model developed accounts for the effects of actuator oil compressibility, oil leakage in the actuator, time delay in the response of the servovalve spool to a given electrical signal, foundation flexibility, and dynamic characteristics of multi-degree-of-freedom specimens. In order to study the actual dynamic behavior of the shaking table, the transfer function between target and actual table accelerations were identified using experimental results and spectral estimation techniques. The power spectral density of the system input and the cross power spectral

  9. Detectability of active triangulation range finder: a solar irradiance approach.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huizhe; Gao, Jason; Bui, Viet Phuong; Liu, Zhengtong; Lee, Kenneth Eng Kian; Peh, Li-Shiuan; Png, Ching Eng

    2016-06-27

    Active triangulation range finders are widely used in a variety of applications such as robotics and assistive technologies. The power of the laser source should be carefully selected in order to satisfy detectability and still remain eye-safe. In this paper, we present a systematic approach to assess the detectability of an active triangulation range finder in an outdoor environment. For the first time, we accurately quantify the background noise of a laser system due to solar irradiance by coupling the Perez all-weather sky model and ray tracing techniques. The model is validated with measurements with a modeling error of less than 14.0%. Being highly generic and sufficiently flexible, the proposed model serves as a guide to define a laser system for any geographical location and microclimate. PMID:27410637

  10. High-temperature and melting behaviour of nanocrystalline refractory compounds: an experimental approach applied to thorium dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cappia, F.; Hudry, D.; Courtois, E.; Janßen, A.; Luzzi, L.; Konings, R. J. M.; Manara, D.

    2014-04-01

    The behaviour from 1500 K up to melting of nanocrystalline (nc) thorium dioxide, the refractory binary oxide with the highest melting point (3651 K), was explored here for the first time using fast laser heating, multi-wavelength pyrometry and Raman spectroscopy for the analysis of samples quenched to room temperature. Nc-ThO2 was melted at temperatures hundreds of K below the melting temperature assessed for bulk thorium dioxide. A particular behaviour has been observed in the formed liquid and its co-existence with a partially restructured solid, possibly due to the metastable nature of the liquid itself. Raman spectroscopy was used to characterize the thermal-induced structural evolution of nc-ThO2. Assessment of a semi-empirical relation between the Raman active T2g mode peak characteristics (peak width and frequency) and crystallites size provided a powerful, fast and non-destructive tool to determine local crystallites growth within the nc-ThO2 samples before and after melting. This semi-quantitative analysis, partly based on a phonon-confinement model, constitutes an advantageous, more flexible, complementary approach to electron microscopy and powder x-ray diffraction (PXRD) for the crystallite size determination. The adopted experimental approach (laser heating coupled with Raman spectroscopy) is therefore proven to be a promising methodology for the high temperature investigation of nanostructured refractory oxides.

  11. Functional characterization of α1-adrenoceptor subtypes in vascular tissues using different experimental approaches:a comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Gisbert, Regina; Madrero, Yolanda; Sabino, Valentina; Noguera, M Antonia; Ivorra, M Dolores; D'Ocon, Pilar

    2003-01-01

    The α1-adrenergic responses of rat aorta and tail artery have been analysed measuring the contractility and the inositol phosphate (IP) formation induced by noradrenaline. Three antagonists, prazosin, 5-methylurapidil (α1A selective) and BMY 7378 (α1D selective) have been used in different experimental procedures. Noradrenaline possesses a greater potency inducing contraction and IP accumulation in aorta (pEC50-contraction=7.32±0.04; pEC50-IPs=6.03±0.08) than in the tail artery (pEC50-contraction=5.71±0.07; pEC50-IPs=5.51±0.10). Although the maximum contraction was similar in both tissues (Emax-tail=619.1±55.6 mg; Emax-aorta-698.2±40.8 mg), there were marked differences in the ability of these tissues to generate intracellular second messengers the tail artery being more efficient (Emax-tail=1060±147%; Emax-aorta=108.1±16.9%). Concentration response curves of noradrenaline in presence of antagonist together with concentration inhibition curves for antagonists added before (CICb) or after (CICa) noradrenaline-induced maximal response in Ca2+-containing or Ca2+-free medium have been performed. A comparative analysis of the different procedures as well as the mathematical approaches used in each case to calculate the antagonist potencies, were completed. The CICa was the simplest method to characterize the predominant α1-adrenoceptor subtype involved in the functional response of a tissue. In aorta, where constitutively active α1D-adrenoeptors are present, the use of different experimental procedures evidenced a complex equilibrium between α1D- and α1A-adrenoceptor subtypes. The appropriate management of LiCl in IP accumulation studies allowed us to reproduce the different experimental procedures performed in contractile experiments giving more technical possibilities to this methodology. PMID:12540527

  12. Experimental evaluation of leaky least-mean-square algorithms for active noise reduction in communication headsets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cartes, David A.; Ray, Laura R.; Collier, Robert D.

    2002-04-01

    An adaptive leaky normalized least-mean-square (NLMS) algorithm has been developed to optimize stability and performance of active noise cancellation systems. The research addresses LMS filter performance issues related to insufficient excitation, nonstationary noise fields, and time-varying signal-to-noise ratio. The adaptive leaky NLMS algorithm is based on a Lyapunov tuning approach in which three candidate algorithms, each of which is a function of the instantaneous measured reference input, measurement noise variance, and filter length, are shown to provide varying degrees of tradeoff between stability and noise reduction performance. Each algorithm is evaluated experimentally for reduction of low frequency noise in communication headsets, and stability and noise reduction performance are compared with that of traditional NLMS and fixed-leakage NLMS algorithms. Acoustic measurements are made in a specially designed acoustic test cell which is based on the original work of Ryan et al. [``Enclosure for low frequency assessment of active noise reducing circumaural headsets and hearing protection,'' Can. Acoust. 21, 19-20 (1993)] and which provides a highly controlled and uniform acoustic environment. The stability and performance of the active noise reduction system, including a prototype communication headset, are investigated for a variety of noise sources ranging from stationary tonal noise to highly nonstationary measured F-16 aircraft noise over a 20 dB dynamic range. Results demonstrate significant improvements in stability of Lyapunov-tuned LMS algorithms over traditional leaky or nonleaky normalized algorithms, while providing noise reduction performance equivalent to that of the NLMS algorithm for idealized noise fields.

  13. Experimental evaluation of leaky least-mean-square algorithms for active noise reduction in communication headsets.

    PubMed

    Cartes, David A; Ray, Laura R; Collier, Robert D

    2002-04-01

    An adaptive leaky normalized least-mean-square (NLMS) algorithm has been developed to optimize stability and performance of active noise cancellation systems. The research addresses LMS filter performance issues related to insufficient excitation, nonstationary noise fields, and time-varying signal-to-noise ratio. The adaptive leaky NLMS algorithm is based on a Lyapunov tuning approach in which three candidate algorithms, each of which is a function of the instantaneous measured reference input, measurement noise variance, and filter length, are shown to provide varying degrees of tradeoff between stability and noise reduction performance. Each algorithm is evaluated experimentally for reduction of low frequency noise in communication headsets, and stability and noise reduction performance are compared with that of traditional NLMS and fixed-leakage NLMS algorithms. Acoustic measurements are made in a specially designed acoustic test cell which is based on the original work of Ryan et al. ["Enclosure for low frequency assessment of active noise reducing circumaural headsets and hearing protection," Can. Acoust. 21, 19-20 (1993)] and which provides a highly controlled and uniform acoustic environment. The stability and performance of the active noise reduction system, including a prototype communication headset, are investigated for a variety of noise sources ranging from stationary tonal noise to highly nonstationary measured F-16 aircraft noise over a 20 dB dynamic range. Results demonstrate significant improvements in stability of Lyapunov-tuned LMS algorithms over traditional leaky or nonleaky normalized algorithms, while providing noise reduction performance equivalent to that of the NLMS algorithm for idealized noise fields. PMID:12002860

  14. Experimental approach on the pyrotechnical shock reduction of Ariane-5 upper stage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uribarri, I.; Tejero, P.; Rivaillon, B.; Laviron, B.

    1991-10-01

    The separation of the upper stage of the Ariane 5 launcher is to be achieved by means of a Pyrotechnical Expansive Tube (PET) installed in the Vehicle Equipment Bay (VEB) structure. When the pyrotechnical device is activated, severe shock levels are transmitted to the structural components and electronic equipment located near the separation section. These shock inputs could affect the operational performances of the above mentioned components during and after separation. An experimental research project to verify that VEB equipment will not be damaged, to achieve a deeper knowledge of the nature and consequences of the event, and to improve existing theoretical models, was undertaken. A specification was identified for the equipment platform, and a campaign of technological tests were started in order to select a damping material and its layout to obtain the highest shock reduction without compromising the VEB structural integrity and stiffness.

  15. Cometary activity and nucleus modelling: a new approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Möhlmann, D.

    1996-06-01

    The phenomena of comet splittings with an average frequency of about one splitting per 100 years and comet (Chen and Jewitt, Icarus108, 265-271, 1994), and the restriction of cometary activity to well-defined small areas at the almost passive and mantle covered surface (Keller et al., ESA SP-250, Vol. II, pp. 363-364, 1986) are at present driving challenges to models of structure and evolution of comet nuclei. Extending the presently discussed models by incorporating lateral subsurface transport of sublimed volatiles, there appears the possibility that the places of sublimation are different from those of activity (the so-called active areas). Then, there is no necessity to distinguish between different surface properties at active and passive areas, assuming, e.g. an uncovered icy surface at active areas. Active areas are simply the very local "source sites" where the accumulated subsurface flows from distant regions reach the surface. The pressure driven subsurface flows of volatiles may not only leave the comet at its surface, they may penetrate via cracks, etc. also deeply into the nucleus. There they can cause a further growth of cracks and also new cracks. This can be a cause for the observed regular splittings. Furthermore, actual models (Kührt and Keller, Icarus109, 121-132, 1994; Skorov and Rickman, Planet. Space Sci.43, 1587-1594, 1995) of the gas transport through porous comet surface crusts can be interpreted as to give first indications for thermodynamical parameters in heat conducting and porous cometary crusts which are appropriate for 1 AU conditions to permit the temporary existence of a layer with fluid subsurface water within these crusts. This exciting result of the possible temporary existence of subsurface warm water in comets which approach the Sun within about 1 AU makes a cometary subsurface chemistry much more efficient than expected hitherto.

  16. Recent approaches for reducing hemolytic activity of chemotherapeutic agents.

    PubMed

    Jeswani, Gunjan; Alexander, Amit; Saraf, Shailendra; Saraf, Swarnlata; Qureshi, Azra; Ajazuddin

    2015-08-10

    Drug induced hemolysis is a frequent complication associated with chemotherapy. It results from interaction of drug with erythrocyte membrane and leads to cell lysis. In recent past, various approaches were made to reduce drug-induced hemolysis, which includes drug polymer conjugation, drug delivery via colloidal carriers and hydrogels, co-administration of botanical agents and modification in molecular chemistry of drug molecules. The basic concept behind these strategies is to protect the red blood cells from membrane damaging effects of drugs. There are several examples of drug polymer conjugate that either are approved by Food and Drug Administration or are under clinical trial for delivering drugs with reduced toxicities. Likewise, colloidal carriers are also used successfully nowadays for the delivery of various chemotherapeutic agents like gemcitabine and amphotericin B with remarkable decrease in their hemolytic activity. Similarly, co-administration of botanical agents with drugs works as secondary system proving protection and strength to erythrocyte membranes. In addition to the above statement, interaction hindrance between RBC and drug molecule by molecular modification plays an important role in reducing hemolysis. This review predominantly describes the above recent approaches explored to achieve the reduced hemolytic activity of drugs especially chemotherapeutic agents. PMID:26047758

  17. Tissue plasminogen activator-based clot busting: Controlled delivery approaches

    PubMed Central

    El-Sherbiny, Ibrahim M.; Elkholi, Islam E.; Yacoub, Magdi H.

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are the leading cause of death worldwide. Thrombosis, the formation of blood clot (thrombus) in the circulatory system obstructing the blood flow, is one of the main causes behind various ischemic arterial syndromes such as ischemic stroke and myocardial infarction, as well as vein syndromes such as deep vein thrombosis, and consequently, pulmonary emboli. Several thrombolytic agents have been developed for treating thrombosis, the most common being tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), administrated systemically or locally via IV infusion directly proximal to the thrombus, with the aim of restoring and improving the blood flow. TPA triggers the dissolution of thrombi by inducing the conversion of plasminogen to protease plasmin followed by fibrin digestion that eventually leads to clot lysis. Although tPA provides powerful thrombolytic activity, it has many shortcomings, including poor pharmacokinetic profiles, impairment of the reestablishment of normal coronary flow, and impairment of hemostasis, leading to life-threatening bleeding consequences. The bleeding consequence is ascribed to the ability of tPA to circulate throughout the body and therefore can lysis all blood clots in the circulation system, even the good ones that prevent the bleeding and promote injury repair. This review provides an overview of the different delivery approaches for tPA including: liposomes, ultrasound-triggered thrombolysis, anti-fibrin antibody-targeted tPA, camouflaged-tPA, tpA-loaded microcarriers, and nano-modulated delivery approaches. PMID:25780787

  18. Nail projectiles propelled by a mason's lacing cord: an experimental approach.

    PubMed

    Frank, Matthias; Grossjohann, Rico; Schikorr, Wolfgang; Tesch, Ralf; Lange, Jörn; Ekkernkamp, Axel; Langner, Sönke; Bockholdt, Britta; Tost, Frank

    2013-01-01

    The recent clinical observation of two unintentional penetrating ocular and cerebral injuries due to 90-mm construction nails gave occasion to an experimental study to check the alleged trauma mechanism for plausibility. Both casualties reported that they had attached a mason's lacing cord to the masonry using a nail as anchoring when suddenly the nail was yanked from its moorings and propelled like a missile by the overstretched lacing cord. As to the best of the authors' knowledge, this mechanism of injury has not yet been reported in any of the literature; it was the aim to find an experimental approach to review the plausibility of the alleged sequence of events leading to the accidents. The tensile strength at break and strain at break of different mason's lacing cords (diameter of 1 and 2 mm) were measured according to DIN EN ISO 2062 by using a tensile testing machine. Based on the maximum spring energy of the lacing cords, which was determined 174.9 J for the 1-mm cord (length 10 m) and 747.4 J for the 2-mm cord (length 10 m), the maximum possible velocity of the nails as projectiles was calculated to be 243.5 m/s for the 1-mm cord and 503.4 m/s for the 2-mm cord. The critical elongation a cord of a certain length has to be stretched to deliver enough kinetic energy to a 90-mm nail to surpass the threshold velocity for skin penetration, which was investigated by Sellier (1977) to be approximately 18 m/s, was also calculated. To conclude, the energy delivered by the cords is high enough to surpass the rather low threshold velocity of nails. The details of how these accidents occurred, which seemed questionable at first, can be reasonably explained by trauma biomechanics. PMID:22562442

  19. A structural and spectroscopic study on para-aminohippuric acid with experimental and theoretical approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karabacak, Mehmet; Cinar, Zeliha; Cinar, Mehmet

    2012-01-01

    In this work, the molecular conformation, vibrational and electronic analysis of para-aminohippuric acid (pAHA, C 9H 10N 2O 3) were presented for the ground state using experimental techniques (FT-IR, FT-Raman and UV) and density functional theory (DFT) employing B3LYP exchange correlation with the 6-311++G(d,p) basis set. FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra were recorded in the regions of 400-4000 cm -1 and 50-4000 cm -1, respectively. The UV absorption spectra of the compound that dissolved in ethanol and water solution were recorded in the range of 190-400 nm. Potential energy curve was computed by means of scanning NCC dbnd O torsion angle. The geometry optimization and the energies associated possible four conformers (C1-C4) were computed. The computational results diagnose the most stable conformer of pAHA as the C1 form. Optimized structure of compound was interpreted and compared with the earlier reported experimental values. The complete assignments of fundamental vibrations were performed on the basis of the total energy distribution (TED) of the vibrational modes, calculated with scaled quantum mechanics (SQM) method. A study on the electronic properties, such as frontier molecular energies, absorption wavelengths and oscillator strengths, were predicted by time-dependent DFT (TD-DFT) approach, while taking solvent effects into account. To investigate non-linear optical properties: polarizability, anisotropy of polarizability and molecular first hyperpolarizability of molecule were computed. Thermodynamic properties (heat capacity, entropy and enthalpy) of the title compound at different temperatures were calculated.

  20. Evaluation of fiber-based tools for glass polishing using experimental and computational approaches.

    PubMed

    Shahinian, Hossein; Cherukuri, Harish; Mullany, Brigid

    2016-06-01

    Polymeric pad or pitch-based tools combined with loose abrasive slurries are typically used in the polishing of optical materials. In this paper, the potential of fiber-based tools to both remove material and provide high quality surface finishes on BK7 glass is explored. The potential advantage of fiber-based tools over traditional tools is their inherent compliance, which could accommodate varying workpiece surface curvatures as found in aspheres and freeforms. To evaluate the new tools, both experimental and finite element (FE) modeling approaches were taken. A FE model consisting of a single fiber engaged with the workpiece surface was used to estimate the shape and magnitude of the pressure distribution exerted by the fiber on the workpiece surface. Two different tool configurations, yielding two different Fes, predicted pressure distributions, were used to polish BK7 samples, and the material removal profiles were interferometrically measured. The resulting profiles and the predicted pressure distributions share the same v-shape. While differences in scale exist between the experimental and FE-predicted profiles, the tool generating higher material removal had the greater predicted pressure distribution, thus demonstrating the ability of the FE model to provide insights into tool design. Additional testing was conducted to determine if the tool's removal rate can be predicted by Preston's equation. Initial results indicate the equation is valid within the range of parameters tested. The surface roughness of BK7 samples processed by this tool was measured and some deterioration on the Sq value was noted; the surface roughness increased from 1.89 to 3.66 nm Sq. Over several hours of continuous use, the load applied by the fibers decays in a repeatable manner, and little wear was observed on the fibers after 5.33 h of polishing. PMID:27411180

  1. Health Monitoring of a Rotating Disk Using a Combined Analytical-Experimental Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdul-Aziz, Ali; Woike, Mark R.; Lekki, John D.; Baaklini, George Y.

    2009-01-01

    Rotating disks undergo rigorous mechanical loading conditions that make them subject to a variety of failure mechanisms leading to structural deformities and cracking. During operation, periodic loading fluctuations and other related factors cause fractures and hidden internal cracks that can only be detected via noninvasive types of health monitoring and/or nondestructive evaluation. These evaluations go further to inspect material discontinuities and other irregularities that have grown to become critical defects that can lead to failure. Hence, the objectives of this work is to conduct a collective analytical and experimental study to present a well-rounded structural assessment of a rotating disk by means of a health monitoring approach and to appraise the capabilities of an in-house rotor spin system. The analyses utilized the finite element method to analyze the disk with and without an induced crack at different loading levels, such as rotational speeds starting at 3000 up to 10 000 rpm. A parallel experiment was conducted to spin the disk at the desired speeds in an attempt to correlate the experimental findings with the analytical results. The testing involved conducting spin experiments which, covered the rotor in both damaged and undamaged (i.e., notched and unnotched) states. Damaged disks had artificially induced through-thickness flaws represented in the web region ranging from 2.54 to 5.08 cm (1 to 2 in.) in length. This study aims to identify defects that are greater than 1.27 cm (0.5 in.), applying available means of structural health monitoring and nondestructive evaluation, and documenting failure mechanisms experienced by the rotor system under typical turbine engine operating conditions.

  2. An active, collaborative approach to learning skills in flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Fuller, Kathryn; Linden, Matthew D; Lee-Pullen, Tracey; Fragall, Clayton; Erber, Wendy N; Röhrig, Kimberley J

    2016-06-01

    Advances in science education research have the potential to improve the way students learn to perform scientific interpretations and understand science concepts. We developed active, collaborative activities to teach skills in manipulating flow cytometry data using FlowJo software. Undergraduate students were given compensated clinical flow cytometry listmode output (FCS) files and asked to design a gating strategy to diagnose patients with different hematological malignancies on the basis of their immunophenotype. A separate cohort of research trainees was given uncompensated data files on which they performed their own compensation, calculated the antibody staining index, designed a sequential gating strategy, and quantified rare immune cell subsets. Student engagement, confidence, and perceptions of flow cytometry were assessed using a survey. Competency against the learning outcomes was assessed by asking students to undertake tasks that required understanding of flow cytometry dot plot data and gating sequences. The active, collaborative approach allowed students to achieve learning outcomes not previously possible with traditional teaching formats, for example, having students design their own gating strategy, without forgoing essential outcomes such as the interpretation of dot plots. In undergraduate students, favorable perceptions of flow cytometry as a field and as a potential career choice were correlated with student confidence but not the ability to perform flow cytometry data analysis. We demonstrate that this new pedagogical approach to teaching flow cytometry is beneficial for student understanding and interpretation of complex concepts. It should be considered as a useful new method for incorporating complex data analysis tasks such as flow cytometry into curricula. PMID:27068992

  3. Geomechanics of penetration : experimental and computational approaches : final report for LDRD project 38718.

    SciTech Connect

    Hardy, Robert Douglas; Holcomb, David Joseph; Gettemy, Glen L.; Fossum, Arlo Frederick; Rivas, Raul R.; Bronowski, David R.; Preece, Dale S.

    2004-10-01

    The purpose of the present work is to increase our understanding of which properties of geomaterials most influence the penetration process with a goal of improving our predictive ability. Two primary approaches were followed: development of a realistic, constitutive model for geomaterials and designing an experimental approach to study penetration from the target's point of view. A realistic constitutive model, with parameters based on measurable properties, can be used for sensitivity analysis to determine the properties that are most important in influencing the penetration process. An immense literature exists that is devoted to the problem of predicting penetration into geomaterials or similar man-made materials such as concrete. Various formulations have been developed that use an analytic or more commonly, numerical, solution for the spherical or cylindrical cavity expansion as a sort of Green's function to establish the forces acting on a penetrator. This approach has had considerable success in modeling the behavior of penetrators, both as to path and depth of penetration. However the approach is not well adapted to the problem of understanding what is happening to the material being penetrated. Without a picture of the stress and strain state imposed on the highly deformed target material, it is not easy to determine what properties of the target are important in influencing the penetration process. We developed an experimental arrangement that allows greater control of the deformation than is possible in actual penetrator tests, yet approximates the deformation processes imposed by a penetrator. Using explosive line charges placed in a central borehole, we loaded cylindrical specimens in a manner equivalent to an increment of penetration, allowing the measurement of the associated strains and accelerations and the retrieval of specimens from the more-or-less intact cylinder. Results show clearly that the deformation zone is highly concentrated near the

  4. Synthesis of designed materials by laser-based direct metal deposition technique: Experimental and theoretical approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Huan

    Direct metal deposition (DMD), a laser-cladding based solid freeform fabrication technique, is capable of depositing multiple materials at desired composition which makes this technique a flexible method to fabricate heterogeneous components or functionally-graded structures. The inherently rapid cooling rate associated with the laser cladding process enables extended solid solubility in nonequilibrium phases, offering the possibility of tailoring new materials with advanced properties. This technical advantage opens the area of synthesizing a new class of materials designed by topology optimization method which have performance-based material properties. For better understanding of the fundamental phenomena occurring in multi-material laser cladding with coaxial powder injection, a self-consistent 3-D transient model was developed. Physical phenomena including laser-powder interaction, heat transfer, melting, solidification, mass addition, liquid metal flow, and species transportation were modeled and solved with a controlled-volume finite difference method. Level-set method was used to track the evolution of liquid free surface. The distribution of species concentration in cladding layer was obtained using a nonequilibrium partition coefficient model. Simulation results were compared with experimental observations and found to be reasonably matched. Multi-phase material microstructures which have negative coefficients of thermal expansion were studied for their DMD manufacturability. The pixel-based topology-optimal designs are boundary-smoothed by Bezier functions to facilitate toolpath design. It is found that the inevitable diffusion interface between different material-phases degrades the negative thermal expansion property of the whole microstructure. A new design method is proposed for DMD manufacturing. Experimental approaches include identification of laser beam characteristics during different laser-powder-substrate interaction conditions, an

  5. Comprehensive multiphase NMR spectroscopy: basic experimental approaches to differentiate phases in heterogeneous samples.

    PubMed

    Courtier-Murias, Denis; Farooq, Hashim; Masoom, Hussain; Botana, Adolfo; Soong, Ronald; Longstaffe, James G; Simpson, Myrna J; Maas, Werner E; Fey, Michael; Andrew, Brian; Struppe, Jochem; Hutchins, Howard; Krishnamurthy, Sridevi; Kumar, Rajeev; Monette, Martine; Stronks, Henry J; Hume, Alan; Simpson, André J

    2012-04-01

    Heterogeneous samples, such as soils, sediments, plants, tissues, foods and organisms, often contain liquid-, gel- and solid-like phases and it is the synergism between these phases that determine their environmental and biological properties. Studying each phase separately can perturb the sample, removing important structural information such as chemical interactions at the gel-solid interface, kinetics across boundaries and conformation in the natural state. In order to overcome these limitations a Comprehensive Multiphase-Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (CMP-NMR) probe has been developed, and is introduced here, that permits all bonds in all phases to be studied and differentiated in whole unaltered natural samples. The CMP-NMR probe is built with high power circuitry, Magic Angle Spinning (MAS), is fitted with a lock channel, pulse field gradients, and is fully susceptibility matched. Consequently, this novel NMR probe has to cover all HR-MAS aspects without compromising power handling to permit the full range of solution-, gel- and solid-state experiments available today. Using this technology, both structures and interactions can be studied independently in each phase as well as transfer/interactions between phases within a heterogeneous sample. This paper outlines some basic experimental approaches using a model heterogeneous multiphase sample containing liquid-, gel- and solid-like components in water, yielding separate (1)H and (13)C spectra for the different phases. In addition, (19)F performance is also addressed. To illustrate the capability of (19)F NMR soil samples, containing two different contaminants, are used, demonstrating a preliminary, but real-world application of this technology. This novel NMR approach possesses a great potential for the in situ study of natural samples in their native state. PMID:22425441

  6. Comprehensive multiphase NMR spectroscopy: Basic experimental approaches to differentiate phases in heterogeneous samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courtier-Murias, Denis; Farooq, Hashim; Masoom, Hussain; Botana, Adolfo; Soong, Ronald; Longstaffe, James G.; Simpson, Myrna J.; Maas, Werner E.; Fey, Michael; Andrew, Brian; Struppe, Jochem; Hutchins, Howard; Krishnamurthy, Sridevi; Kumar, Rajeev; Monette, Martine; Stronks, Henry J.; Hume, Alan; Simpson, André J.

    2012-04-01

    Heterogeneous samples, such as soils, sediments, plants, tissues, foods and organisms, often contain liquid-, gel- and solid-like phases and it is the synergism between these phases that determine their environmental and biological properties. Studying each phase separately can perturb the sample, removing important structural information such as chemical interactions at the gel-solid interface, kinetics across boundaries and conformation in the natural state. In order to overcome these limitations a Comprehensive Multiphase-Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (CMP-NMR) probe has been developed, and is introduced here, that permits all bonds in all phases to be studied and differentiated in whole unaltered natural samples. The CMP-NMR probe is built with high power circuitry, Magic Angle Spinning (MAS), is fitted with a lock channel, pulse field gradients, and is fully susceptibility matched. Consequently, this novel NMR probe has to cover all HR-MAS aspects without compromising power handling to permit the full range of solution-, gel- and solid-state experiments available today. Using this technology, both structures and interactions can be studied independently in each phase as well as transfer/interactions between phases within a heterogeneous sample. This paper outlines some basic experimental approaches using a model heterogeneous multiphase sample containing liquid-, gel- and solid-like components in water, yielding separate 1H and 13C spectra for the different phases. In addition, 19F performance is also addressed. To illustrate the capability of 19F NMR soil samples, containing two different contaminants, are used, demonstrating a preliminary, but real-world application of this technology. This novel NMR approach possesses a great potential for the in situ study of natural samples in their native state.

  7. Thick Plate Rolling—a Numerical Approach in Comparison with Analytics and Experimental Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prommer, Hannes; Bojahr, Manuel; Tschullik, Ralf; Kaeding, Patrick

    2011-05-01

    Today, wind turbines are mostly made of glass or carbon fibre. The manufacturing process leads to high precision and quality of the final product. Nevertheless, this fabrication method of rotor blades is very cost intensive and its production technology is not the best in terms of recyclability. In addition to its good recyclability, the handling of steel is well known and its fabrication is inexpensive. Due to these facts an idea of foils to be produced from steel arose. In cooperation with a metal forming company the 3-Dimensional rolling concept came up. Initially, rolling experiments with cold lead plates in a scale of 1:4 are made to simulate the later on used hot steel plates. Such an approach has to be accompanied by fundamental research. This paper sketches the lead rolling experiment and gives an assessment if it is applicable for a hot rolling process with steel. For this purpose, the lead test data are interpreted, the numerical model is explained and results are presented. Furthermore, an analytical flat rolling approach is used to calculate process parameters like stamping force of the upper roll and necessary friction. The applicability and precision of the analytical results are discussed in comparison with the results of the FEM model and the experimental data. Concluding the paper, validity and pitfalls of this concept are outlined and a short outlook for further research is given. The purpose of these considerations is to get closer to process parameters for an experiment in full scale for hot rolling of a rotor blade.

  8. CHEMICAL ACTIVATION OF MOLECULES BY METALS: EXPERIMENTAL STUDIES OF ELECTRON DISTRIBUTIONS AND BONDING

    SciTech Connect

    LICHTENBERGER, DENNIS L.

    2002-03-26

    This research program is directed at obtaining detailed experimental information on the electronic interactions between metals and organic molecules. These interactions provide low energy pathways for many important chemical and catalytic processes. A major feature of the program is the continued development and application of our special high-resolution valence photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS), and high-precision X-ray core photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) instrumentation for study of organometallic molecules in the gas phase. The study involves a systematic approach towards understanding the interactions and activation of bound carbonyls, C-H bonds, methylenes, vinylidenes, acetylides, alkenes, alkynes, carbenes, carbynes, alkylidenes, alkylidynes, and others with various monometal, dimetal, and cluster metal species. Supporting ligands include -aryls, alkoxides, oxides, and phosphines. We are expanding our studies of both early and late transition metal species and electron-rich and electron-poor environments in order to more completely understand the electronic factors that serve to stabilize particular organic fragments and intermediates on metals. Additional new directions for this program are being taken in ultra-high vacuum surface UPS, XPS, scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) experiments on both physisorbed and chemisorbed organometallic thin films. The combination of these methods provides additional electronic structure information on surface-molecule and molecule-molecule interactions. A very important general result emerging from this program is the identification of a close relationship between the ionization energies of the species and the thermodynamics of the chemical and catalytic reactions of these systems.

  9. Endoscopic fluorescence mapping of the left atrium: A novel experimental approach for high resolution endocardial mapping in the intact heart

    PubMed Central

    Kalifa, Jérôme; Klos, Matthew; Zlochiver, Sharon; Mironov, Sergey; Tanaka, Kazuhiko; Ulahannan, Netha; Yamazaki, Masatoshi; Jalife, José; Berenfeld, Omer

    2007-01-01

    Background Despite availability of several mapping technologies to investigate the electrophysiological mechanisms of atrial fibrillation (AF), an experimental tool enabling high resolution mapping of electrical impulse on the endocardial surface of the left atrium is still lacking. Objective To present a new optical mapping approach implementing a steerable cardio-endoscope in isolated hearts. Methods The system consists of a direct or side-view endoscope coupled to a 532 nm excitation Laser for illumination, and to a CCD camera for imaging of potentiometric dye fluorescence (DI-4-ANEPPS, 80×80 pixels, 200–800 frames/sec). The cardio-endoscope was aimed successively at diverse posterior left atrial (PLA) locations to obtain high resolution movies of electrical wave propagation, as well as detailed endocardial anatomical features, in the presence and the absence of atrial stretch. Results We present several examples of high resolution endoscopic PLA recordings of wave propagation patterns during both sinus rhythm and AF with signal-to-noise ratio similar to conventional optical mapping systems. We demonstrate the endoscope’s ability to visualize highly organized AF sources (rotors) at specific locations on the PLA and PLA-pulmonary vein junctions, and present video images of waves emanating from such sources as they propagate into pectinate muscles in the LA appendage. In particular, we demonstrate this approach to be ideally suited for studying the effects of atrial stretch on AF dynamics. Conclusions In isolated hearts, cardio-endoscopic optical mapping of electrical activity should enable comprehensive evaluation of atrial fibrillatory activity in the PLA, of the role of the local anatomy on AF dynamics and of the efficacy of pharmacological and ablative interventions. PMID:17599678

  10. Nonlinear active wave modulation approach for microdamage detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Hwai-Chung; Warnemuende, Kraig

    2001-07-01

    Several nondestructive testing methods can be used to estimate the extents of damage in a concrete structure. Pulse-velocity and amplitude attenuation, are very common in nondestructive ultrasonic evaluation. Velocity of propagation is not very sensitive to the degrees of damage unless a great deal of micro-damage having evolving into localized macro-damage. Amplitude attenuation is potentially more sensitive than pulse-velocity. However, this method depends strongly on the coupling conditions between transducers and concrete, hence unreliable. A new active modulation approach, Nonlinear Active Wave Modulation Spectroscopy, is adopted in our study. In this procedure, a probe wave will be passed through the system in a similar fashion to regular acoustics. Simultaneously, a second, low frequency modulating wave will be applied to the system to effectively change the size and stiffness of flaws microscopically and cyclically, thereby causing the frequency modulation to change cyclically as well. The resulting amplified modulations will be correlated to the extents of damage with the effect that even slight damage should become quantifiable. This study unveils the potential of nonlinear frequency analysis methods for micro-damage detection and evaluation using actively modulated acoustic signals. This method can interrogate materials exaggerating the nonlinearly that exists due to microcracking and deterioration.

  11. Integrated Experimental Platforms to Study Blast Injuries: a Bottom-Up Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bo, Chiara

    2013-06-01

    Developing a cellular and molecular understanding of the nature of traumatic and post-traumatic effects of blast events on live biological samples is critical for improving clinical outcomes.1 To investigate the consequences of pressure waves upon cellular structures and the underlying physiological and biochemical changes, we are using an integrated approach to study the material and biological properties of cells, tissues and organs when subjected to extreme conditions. In particular we have developed a confined Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar (SHPB) system, which allows us to subject cells in suspension or in a monolayer to compression waves of the order of few MPa and duration of hundreds of microseconds.2 The chamber design also enables recovery of the biological samples for cellular and molecular analysis. Specifically, cell survivability, viability, proliferation and morphological changes are investigated post compression for different cell populations. The SHPB platform, coupled with Quasi-Static experiments, is also used to determine stress-strain curves of soft biological tissues under compression at low, medium and high strain rates. Samples are also examined using histological techniques to study macro- and microscopical changes induced by compression waves. Finally, a shock tube has been developed to replicate primary blast damage on organs (i.e. mice lungs) and cell monolayers by generating single or multiple air blast of the order of kPa and few milliseconds duration. This platform allows us to visualize post-traumatic morphological changes at the cellular level as a function of the stimulus pressure and duration as well as biomarker signatures of blast injuries. Adapting and integrating a variety of approaches with different experimental platforms allows us to sample a vast pressure-time space in terms of biological and structural damage that mimic blast injuries and also to determine which physical parameters (peak pressure, stimulus duration, impulse

  12. Experimental testicular tissue banking to generate spermatogenesis in the future: A multidisciplinary team approach.

    PubMed

    Sadri-Ardekani, Hooman; McLean, Thomas W; Kogan, Stanley; Sirintrapun, Joseph; Crowell, Kathryn; Yousif, Mustafa Q; Hodges, Steve J; Petty, John; Pranikoff, Thomas; Sieren, Leah; Zeller, Kristen; Atala, Anthony

    2016-04-15

    Spermatogonial stem cell (SSC) loss due to cancer treatment, developmental disorder or genetic abnormality may cause permanent infertility. Cryopreservation of ejaculated sperm is an effective method of fertility preservation in adult males at risk of infertility. However this is not an option in pre-pubertal boys because spermatogenesis has not yet started, and it is difficult in adolescents who are not sexually mature. Therefore testicular tissue cryopreservation to preserve SSCs for future generation of spermatogenesis, either in vivo or in vitro, could be an option for these groups of patients. Although SSC transplantation has been successful in several species including non-human primates, it is still experimental in humans. There are several remaining concerns which need to be addressed before initiating trials of human SSC autotransplantation. Establishment of a testicular tissue banking system is a fundamental step towards using SSC technology as a fertility preservation method. It is important to understand the consultation, harvesting the testicular tissue, histological evaluation, cryopreservation, and long term storage aspects. We describe here a multidisciplinary approach to establish testicular tissue banking for males at risk of infertility. PMID:26917042

  13. Experimental aspects of the adiabatic approach in estimating the effect of electron screening on alpha decay

    SciTech Connect

    Karpeshin, F. F.; Trzhaskovskaya, M. B.

    2015-12-15

    Special features of the effect of the electron shell on alpha decay that have important experimental implications are studied within the adiabatic approach. The magnitude of the effect is about several tenths of a percent or smaller, depending on the transition energy and on the atomic number. A dominant role of inner shells is shown: more than 80% of the effect is saturated by 1s electrons. This circumstance plays a crucial role for experiments, making it possible to measure this small effect by a difference method in the same storage rings via a comparison of, for example, decay probabilities in bare nuclei and heliumlike ions. The reasons behind the relative success and the applicability limits of the frozen-shell model, which has been used to calculate the effect in question for more than half a century, are analyzed. An interesting experiment aimed at studying charged alpha-particle states is proposed. This experiment will furnish unique information for testing our ideas of the interplay of nonadiabatic and adiabatic processes.

  14. Assessing Neurocognition via Gamified Experimental Logic: A Novel Approach to Simultaneous Acquisition of Multiple ERPs.

    PubMed

    Nair, Ajay K; Sasidharan, Arun; John, John P; Mehrotra, Seema; Kutty, Bindu M

    2016-01-01

    The present study describes the development of a neurocognitive paradigm: "Assessing Neurocognition via Gamified Experimental Logic" (ANGEL), for performing the parametric evaluation of multiple neurocognitive functions simultaneously. ANGEL employs an audiovisual sensory motor design for the acquisition of multiple event related potentials (ERPs)-the C1, P50, MMN, N1, N170, P2, N2pc, LRP, P300, and ERN. The ANGEL paradigm allows assessment of 10 neurocognitive variables over the course of three "game" levels of increasing complexity ranging from simple passive observation to complex discrimination and response in the presence of multiple distractors. The paradigm allows assessment of several levels of rapid decision making: speeded up response vs. response-inhibition; responses to easy vs. difficult tasks; responses based on gestalt perception of clear vs. ambiguous stimuli; and finally, responses with set shifting during challenging tasks. The paradigm has been tested using 18 healthy participants from both sexes and the possibilities of varied data analyses have been presented in this paper. The ANGEL approach provides an ecologically valid assessment (as compared to existing tools) that quickly yields a very rich dataset and helps to assess multiple ERPs that can be studied extensively to assess cognitive functions in health and disease conditions. PMID:26858586

  15. Tensile-shear correlations obtained from shear punch test technique using a modified experimental approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karthik, V.; Visweswaran, P.; Vijayraghavan, A.; Kasiviswanathan, K. V.; Raj, Baldev

    2009-09-01

    Shear punch testing has been a very useful technique for evaluating mechanical properties of irradiated alloys using a very small volume of material. The load-displacement data is influenced by the compliance of the fixture components. This paper describes a modified experimental approach where the compliances of the punch and die components are eliminated. The analysis of the load-displacement data using the modified setup for various alloys like low carbon steel, SS316, modified 9Cr-1Mo, 2.25Cr-1Mo indicate that the shear yield strength evaluated at 0.2% offset of normalized displacement relates to the tensile YS as per the Von Mises yield relation ( σys = 1.73 τys). A universal correlation of type UTS = mτmax where m is a function of strain hardening exponent, is seen to be obeyed for all the materials in this study. The use of analytical models developed for blanking process are explored for evaluating strain hardening exponent from the load-displacement data. This study is directed towards rationalizing the tensile-shear empirical correlations for a more reliable prediction of tensile properties from shear punch tests.

  16. Assessing Neurocognition via Gamified Experimental Logic: A Novel Approach to Simultaneous Acquisition of Multiple ERPs

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Ajay K.; Sasidharan, Arun; John, John P.; Mehrotra, Seema; Kutty, Bindu M.

    2016-01-01

    The present study describes the development of a neurocognitive paradigm: “Assessing Neurocognition via Gamified Experimental Logic” (ANGEL), for performing the parametric evaluation of multiple neurocognitive functions simultaneously. ANGEL employs an audiovisual sensory motor design for the acquisition of multiple event related potentials (ERPs)—the C1, P50, MMN, N1, N170, P2, N2pc, LRP, P300, and ERN. The ANGEL paradigm allows assessment of 10 neurocognitive variables over the course of three “game” levels of increasing complexity ranging from simple passive observation to complex discrimination and response in the presence of multiple distractors. The paradigm allows assessment of several levels of rapid decision making: speeded up response vs. response-inhibition; responses to easy vs. difficult tasks; responses based on gestalt perception of clear vs. ambiguous stimuli; and finally, responses with set shifting during challenging tasks. The paradigm has been tested using 18 healthy participants from both sexes and the possibilities of varied data analyses have been presented in this paper. The ANGEL approach provides an ecologically valid assessment (as compared to existing tools) that quickly yields a very rich dataset and helps to assess multiple ERPs that can be studied extensively to assess cognitive functions in health and disease conditions. PMID:26858586

  17. Heterogeneous deformation and texture development in halite polycrystals: comparison of different modeling approaches and experimental data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebensohn, Ricardo A.; Dawson, Paul R.; Kern, Hartmut M.; Wenk, Hans-Rudolf

    2003-07-01

    Modeling the plastic deformation and texture evolution in halite is challenging due to its high plastic anisotropy at the single crystal level and to the influence this exerts on the heterogeneity of deformation over halite polycrystals. Three different assumptions for averaging the single crystal responses over the polycrystal were used: a Taylor hypothesis, a self-consistent viscoplastic model, and a finite element methodology. The three modeling approaches employ the same single crystal relations, but construct the polycrystal response differently. The results are compared with experimental data for extension at two temperatures: 20 and 100 °C. These comparisons provide new insights of how the interplay of compatibility and local equilibrium affects the overall plastic behavior and the texture development in highly anisotropic polycrystalline materials. Neither formulation is able to completely simulate the texture development of halite polycrystals while, at the same time, giving sound predictions of microstructural evolution. Results obtained using the finite element methodology are promising, although they point to the need for greater resolution of the individual crystals to capture the full impact of deformation heterogeneities.

  18. Comparison of chemical and thermal protein denaturation by combination of computational and experimental approaches. II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qian; Christiansen, Alexander; Samiotakis, Antonios; Wittung-Stafshede, Pernilla; Cheung, Margaret S.

    2011-11-01

    Chemical and thermal denaturation methods have been widely used to investigate folding processes of proteins in vitro. However, a molecular understanding of the relationship between these two perturbation methods is lacking. Here, we combined computational and experimental approaches to investigate denaturing effects on three structurally different proteins. We derived a linear relationship between thermal denaturation at temperature Tb and chemical denaturation at another temperature Tu using the stability change of a protein (ΔG). For this, we related the dependence of ΔG on temperature, in the Gibbs-Helmholtz equation, to that of ΔG on urea concentration in the linear extrapolation method, assuming that there is a temperature pair from the urea (Tu) and the aqueous (Tb) ensembles that produces the same protein structures. We tested this relationship on apoazurin, cytochrome c, and apoflavodoxin using coarse-grained molecular simulations. We found a linear correlation between the temperature for a particular structural ensemble in the absence of urea, Tb, and the temperature of the same structural ensemble at a specific urea concentration, Tu. The in silico results agreed with in vitro far-UV circular dichroism data on apoazurin and cytochrome c. We conclude that chemical and thermal unfolding processes correlate in terms of thermodynamics and structural ensembles at most conditions; however, deviations were found at high concentrations of denaturant.

  19. Surface enhanced Raman spectroscopic studies on aspirin : An experimental and theoretical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Premkumar, R.; Premkumar, S.; Rekha, T. N.; Parameswari, A.; Mathavan, T.; Benial, A. Milton Franklin

    2016-05-01

    Surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) studies on aspirin molecule adsorbed on silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) were investigated by experimental and density functional theory approach. The AgNPs were synthesized by the solution-combustion method and characterized by the X-ray diffraction and high resolution-transmission electron microscopy techniques. The averaged particle size of synthesized AgNPs was calculated as ˜55 nm. The normal Raman spectrum (nRs) and SERS spectrum of the aspirin were recorded. The molecular structure of the aspirin and aspirin adsorbed on silver cluster were optimized by the DFT/ B3PW91 method with LanL2DZ basis set. The vibrational frequencies were calculated and assigned on the basis of potential energy distribution calculation. The calculated nRs and SERS frequencies were correlated well with the observed frequencies. The flat-on orientation was predicted from the nRs and SERS spectra, when the aspirin adsorbed on the AgNPs. Hence, the present studies lead to the understanding of adsorption process of aspirin on the AgNPs, which paves the way for biomedical applications.

  20. Spectroscopic Properties of Anisole at the Air-Ice Interface: A Combined Experimental-Computational Approach.

    PubMed

    Malongwe, Joseph K'Ekuboni; Nachtigallová, Dana; Corrochano, Pablo; Klán, Petr

    2016-06-14

    A combined experimental and computational approach was used to investigate the spectroscopic properties of anisole in aqueous solutions and at the ice-air interface in the temperature range of 77-298 K. The absorption, diffuse reflectance, and emission spectra of ice samples containing anisole prepared by different techniques, such as slow freezing (frozen aqueous solutions), shock freezing (ice grains), or anisole vapor deposition on ice grains, were measured to evaluate changes in the contaminated ice matrix that occur at different temperatures. It was found that the position of the lowest absorption band of anisole and its tail shift bathochromically by ∼4 nm in frozen samples compared to liquid aqueous solutions. On the other hand, the emission spectra of aqueous anisole solutions were found to fundamentally change upon freezing. While one emission band (∼290 nm) was observed under all circumstances, the second band at ∼350 nm, assigned to an anisole excimer, appeared only at certain temperatures (150-250 K). Its disappearance at lower temperatures is attributed to the formation of crystalline anisole on the ice surface. DFT and ADC(2) calculations were used to interpret the absorption and emission spectra of anisole monomer and dimer associates. Various stable arrangements of the anisole associates were found at the disordered water-air interface in the ground and excited states, but only those with a substantial overlap of the aromatic rings are manifested by the emission band at ∼350 nm. PMID:27243785

  1. Complete mouth rehabilitation after transposition osteotomy based on intraoral scanning: an experimental approach.

    PubMed

    Güth, Jan-Frederik; Edelhoff, Daniel; Ihloff, Hela; Mast, Gerson

    2014-08-01

    This article describes the surgical and prosthodontic treatment of a patient with severe dysgnathia combined with amelogenesis imperfecta. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first treatment report to describe the application of intraoral scanning for a complete mouth reconstruction. After transposition osteotomy, the treatment included the simultaneous fabrication of antagonistic computer-aided design/computer-aided manufactured (CAD/CAM) long-term interim restorations for the maxilla and mandible and the establishment of a new centric relation position and adequate vertical dimension of occlusion. Particularly in complex situations, the major advantages of intraoral scanning can be identified as an extended magnification of the 3-dimensional digital data to control the preparation and impression at the dental office. However, the presented treatment revealed some deficiencies in the digital work flow that must be rectified. In combination with high-performance polymers, the CAD/CAM technology offers a wide range of new treatment options and simplifies the fabrication of long-term interim restorations. Although in the present treatment the esthetic and functional requirements of the patient were met, no published studies of this procedure have been based on intraoral scanning, and the approach has to be considered experimental. PMID:24529842

  2. An integrated computational and experimental approach to gaining selectivity for MMP-2 within the gelatinase subfamily.

    PubMed

    Fabre, Benjamin; Filipiak, Kamila; Díaz, Natalia; Zapico, José María; Suárez, Dimas; Ramos, Ana; de Pascual-Teresa, Beatriz

    2014-02-10

    Looking for water-soluble inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2 or gelatinase A), we have previously reported compound 1, a potent MMP-2 inhibitor with a promising selectivity over the structurally homologous MMP-9 (gelatinase B). Here we report the results of Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations for both gelatinases (MMP-2 and MMP-9), and for the corresponding MMP/1 complexes, in an attempt to shed light on the observed selectivity between the two enzymes. These studies indicated a higher plasticity of MMP-2 at the S1' pocket and suggested an induced-fit effect at the "back door" of this pocket. On the basis of these observations, we designed 11 a-d to aid further discrimination between MMP-2 and MMP-9. Those compounds displayed notably lower inhibitory activities against MMP-9; in particular, 11 b proved to be over 100 times more active against MMP-2 than against MMP-9. MD simulations of the MMP/11 b complexes and thermodynamic integration calculations provided structural insight and relative binding energies consistent with the experimentally observed activity data. These findings demonstrate that structural differences in the S1' pocket bottom permit an improvement in selectivity in the inhibition of MMP-2 over that of MMP-9; this is of great relevance for future structure-based drug design because MMP-2 is a validated target for cancer therapy, whereas MMP-9 plays both detrimental and protective roles in cancer. This study also supports the need to consider the dynamics of the S1' pocket in order to achieve selectivity in the inhibition of MMPs. PMID:24449516

  3. A comprehensive theoretical, numerical and experimental approach for crack detection in power plant rotating machinery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoisser, C. M.; Audebert, S.

    2008-05-01

    In order to describe the state-of-the-art on cracked rotor related problems, the current work presents the comprehensive theoretical, numerical and experimental approach adopted by EDF for crack detection in power plant rotating machinery. The work mainly focuses on the theoretical cracked beam model developed in the past years by S. Andrieux and C. Varé and associates both numerical and experimental aspects related to the crack detection problem in either turboset or turbo pump units. The theoretical part consists of the derivation of a lumped cracked beam model from the three-dimensional formulation of the general problem of elasticity with unilateral contact conditions on the crack lips, valid for any shape and number of cracks in the beam section and extended to cracks not located in a cross-section. This leads to the assessment of the cracked beam rigidity as a function of the rotation angle, in case of pure bending load or bending plus shear load. In this way the function can be implemented in a 1D rotordynamics code. An extension of the cracked beam model taking into account the torsion behaviour is also proposed. It is based on the assumption of full adherence between crack lips, when the crack closes, and on an incremental formulation of deformation energy. An experimental validation has been carried out using different cracked samples, both in static and dynamic configurations, considering one or three elliptic cracks in the same cross-section and helix-shaped cracks. Concerning the static configuration, a good agreement between numerical and experimental results is found. It is shown to be equal to 1% maximal gap of the beam deflection. Concerning the dynamical analysis, the main well-known indicator 2× rev. bending vibration component at half critical speed is approximated at maximum by 18% near the crack position. Our experiments also allowed for the observation of the bending and torsion resonance frequency shifts determined by the extra

  4. BVI induced vibration and noise alleviation by active and passive approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Li

    This dissertation describes the development of a comprehensive aeroelastic/aeroacoustic simulation capability for the modeling of vibration and noise in rotorcraft induced by blade-vortex interaction (BVI). Subsequently this capability is applied to study vibration and noise reduction, using active and passive control approaches. The active approach employed is the actively controlled partial span trailing edge flaps (ACF), implemented in single and dual, servo and plain flap configurations. The passive approach is based on varying the sweep and anhedral on the tip of the rotor. Two different modern helicopters are chosen as the baseline for the implementation of ACF approach, one resembling a four-bladed MBB BO-105 hingeless rotor and the other similar to a five-bladed MD-900 bearingless rotor. The structural model is based on a finite element approach capable of simulating composite helicopter blades with swept tips, and representing multiple load paths at the blade root which is a characteristic of bearingless rotors. An unsteady compressible aerodynamic model based on a rational function approximation (RFA) approach is combined with a free wake analysis which has been enhanced by improving the wake analysis resolution and modeling a dual vortex structure. These enhancements are important for capturing BVI effects. A method for predicting compressible unsteady blade surface pressure distribution on rotor blades has been developed, which is required by the acoustic analysis. A modified version of helicopter noise code WOPWOP with provisions for blade flexibility has been combined with the aeroelastic analysis to predict the BVI noise. Several variants of the higher harmonic control (HHC) algorithm have been applied for the active noise control, as well as the simultaneous vibration and noise control. Active control of BVI noise is accomplished using feedback from an onboard microphone. The simulation has been extensively validated against experimental data and

  5. Poisson Parameters of Antimicrobial Activity: A Quantitative Structure-Activity Approach

    PubMed Central

    Sestraş, Radu E.; Jäntschi, Lorentz; Bolboacă, Sorana D.

    2012-01-01

    A contingency of observed antimicrobial activities measured for several compounds vs. a series of bacteria was analyzed. A factor analysis revealed the existence of a certain probability distribution function of the antimicrobial activity. A quantitative structure-activity relationship analysis for the overall antimicrobial ability was conducted using the population statistics associated with identified probability distribution function. The antimicrobial activity proved to follow the Poisson distribution if just one factor varies (such as chemical compound or bacteria). The Poisson parameter estimating antimicrobial effect, giving both mean and variance of the antimicrobial activity, was used to develop structure-activity models describing the effect of compounds on bacteria and fungi species. Two approaches were employed to obtain the models, and for every approach, a model was selected, further investigated and found to be statistically significant. The best predictive model for antimicrobial effect on bacteria and fungi species was identified using graphical representation of observed vs. calculated values as well as several predictive power parameters. PMID:22606039

  6. Surface activity of Janus particles adsorbed at fluid-fluid interfaces: Theoretical and experimental aspects.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Rodriguez, Miguel Angel; Rodriguez-Valverde, Miguel Angel; Cabrerizo-Vilchez, Miguel Angel; Hidalgo-Alvarez, Roque

    2016-07-01

    Since de Gennes coined in 1992 the term Janus particle (JP), there has been a continued effort to develop this field. The purpose of this review is to present the most relevant theoretical and experimental results obtained so far on the surface activity of amphiphilic JPs at fluid interfaces. The surface activity of JPs at fluid-fluid interfaces can be experimentally determined using two different methods: the classical Langmuir balance or the pendant drop tensiometry. The second method requires much less amount of sample than the first one, but it has also some experimental limitations. In all cases collected here the JPs exhibited a higher surface or interfacial activity than the corresponding homogeneous particles. This reveals the significant advantage of JPs for the stabilization of emulsions and foams. PMID:26094083

  7. A microstructure sensitive study of rolling contact fatigue in bearing steels: A numerical and experimental approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandkar, Anup Surendra

    Bearings are an integral part of machine components that transmit rotary power such as cars, motors, engines etc. Safe bearing operation is essential to avoid serious failures and accidents, which necessitates their timely replacement. This calls for an accurate bearing life prediction methods. Based on the Lundberg-Palmgen (LP) model, current life models consistently under predict bearings lives. Improvement in life prediction requires understanding of the bearing failure mechanism i.e. Rolling Contact Fatigue (RCF). The goal of this research is to develop a mechanistic framework required for an improved bearing life prediction model. Such model should account for metal plasticity, influence of microstructural features and cyclically evolving stressstrain fields induced during RCF. To achieve this, elastic-plastic finite element (FE) study is undertaken to investigate the response of M50-NiL bearing steel during RCF. Specifically, a microstructure sensitive study of the influence of non-metallic inclusions on RCF response of bearings is presented. M50-NiL microstructure consists of carbides which are orders of magnitude smaller than bearing dimensions. To account for this size difference, a multi-scale FE modeling approach is employed. The FE results reveal that hard carbide particles act as local stress risers, alter surrounding stressstrain fields and cause micro-scale yielding of steel matrix. Moreover, they introduce a shear stress cycle with non-zero mean stress, which promotes micro-plastic strain accumulation via ratcheting mechanism. Localized ratcheting is primarily responsible for cyclic hardening within the RCF affected region. Such evolution of subsurface hardness can be used to quantify RCF induced damage. To investigate this further, cyclic hardening response of the RCF affected region is simulated. The results show good agreement with the experimental observations. The cyclic stress-strain fields obtained from these simulations and the knowledge of

  8. Novel electro-fenton approach for regeneration of activated carbon.

    PubMed

    Bañuelos, Jennifer A; Rodríguez, Francisco J; Manríquez Rocha, Juan; Bustos, Erika; Rodríguez, Adrián; Cruz, Julio C; Arriaga, L G; Godínez, Luis A

    2013-07-16

    An electro-Fenton-based method was used to promote the regeneration of granular activated carbon (GAC) previously adsorbed with toluene. Electrochemical regeneration experiments were carried out using a standard laboratory electrochemical cell with carbon paste electrodes and a batch electrochemical reactor. For each system, a comparison was made using FeSO4 as a precursor salt in solution (homogeneous system) and an Fe-loaded ion-exchange resin (Purolite C-100, heterogeneous system), both in combination with electrogenerated H2O2 at the GAC cathode. In the two cases, high regeneration efficiencies were obtained in the presence of iron using appropriate conditions of applied potential and adsorption-polarization time. Consecutive loading and regeneration cycles of GAC were performed in the reactor without great loss of the adsorption properties, only reducing the regeneration efficiency by 1% per cycle during 10 cycles of treatment. Considering that, in the proposed resin-containing process, the use of Fe salts is avoided and that GAC cathodic polarization results in efficient cleaning and regeneration of the adsorbent material, this novel electro-Fenton approach could constitute an excellent alternative for regenerating activated carbon when compared to conventional methods. PMID:23782426

  9. Experimental and CFD simulation studies of wall shear stress for different impeller configurations and MBR activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Ratkovich, N; Chan, C C V; Bentzen, T R; Rasmussen, M R

    2012-01-01

    Membrane bioreactors (MBRs) have been used successfully in biological wastewater treatment for effective solids-liquid separation. However, a common problem encountered with MBR systems is fouling of the membrane resulting in frequent membrane cleaning and replacement which makes the system less appealing for full-scale applications. It has been widely demonstrated that the filtration performances in MBRs can be improved by understanding the shear stress over the membrane surface. Modern tools such as computational fluid dynamics (CFD) can be used to diagnose and understand the shear stress in an MBR. Nevertheless, proper experimental validation is required to validate CFD simulation. In this work experimental measurements of shear stress induced by impellers at a membrane surface were made with an electrochemical approach and the results were used to validate CFD simulations. As good results were obtained with the CFD model (<9% error), it was extrapolated to include the non-Newtonian behaviour of activated sludge. PMID:22592479

  10. Mechanism of amorphous silica particles precipitation: simulation approach compared to experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noguera, Claudine; Fritz, Bertrand; Clement, Alain

    2015-04-01

    Despite its importance in numerous industrial and natural processes, many unsolved questions remain regarding the mechanism of silica precipitation in aqueous solutions: order of the reaction, role of silica oligomers, existence of an induction time and characteristics of the particle population. Beyond empirical approaches used in the past, we demonstrate that the classical nucleation theory associated to a size dependent growth law, as embedded in the NANOKIN code (1-3), allows a quantitative description of precipitation occurring under largely different experimental conditions : preexisting initial supersaturation in a large domain of temperature (5-150°C) and chemical composition (4), supersaturation reached by neutralization of a high pH silica solution (5) or by fast cooling (6). In that way, the mechanism of silica precipitation can be unraveled. We are able to discard the hypothesis of an induction time as an explanation for the plateaus observed in the saturation curves in these experiments. We challenge the role of oligomer incorporation at the growth stage to account for the observed rate laws and we stress the difference between the order of the growth law and the order of the total reaction rate. We also demonstrate that the characteristics of the particle population are strongly dependent on the way supersaturation is reached (7). Such a microscopic approach thus proves to be well suited to elucidate the mechanism of nanoparticle formation in natural and industrial contexts, involving silica, but also other mineral phases produced as nanoparticles (8). (1) Noguera C., Fritz B., Clément A. and Barronet A., J. Cryst. Growth, 2006, 297, 180. (2) Noguera C., Fritz B., Clément A. and Barronet A., J. Cryst. Growth, 2006, 297, 187. (3) Fritz B., Clément A., Amal Y. and Noguera C., Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta, 2009, 73, 1340. (4) Rothbaum, H.P. and Rohde A.G., J. Colloid Interf. Sci., 1979,71, 533. (5) Tobler D.J., Shaw S. and Benning L.G., Geochim

  11. Chlorination and dechlorination rates in a forest soil - A combined modelling and experimental approach.

    PubMed

    Montelius, Malin; Svensson, Teresia; Lourino-Cabana, Beatriz; Thiry, Yves; Bastviken, David

    2016-06-01

    Much of the total pool of chlorine (Cl) in soil consists of naturally produced organic chlorine (Clorg). The chlorination of bulk organic matter at substantial rates has been experimentally confirmed in various soil types. The subsequent fates of Clorg are important for ecosystem Cl cycling and residence times. As most previous research into dechlorination in soils has examined either single substances or specific groups of compounds, we lack information about overall bulk dechlorination rates. Here we assessed bulk organic matter chlorination and dechlorination rates in coniferous forest soil based on a radiotracer experiment conducted under various environmental conditions (additional water, labile organic matter, and ammonium nitrate). Experiment results were used to develop a model to estimate specific chlorination (i.e., fraction of Cl(-) transformed to Clorg per time unit) and specific dechlorination (i.e., fraction of Clorg transformed to Cl(-) per time unit) rates. The results indicate that chlorination and dechlorination occurred simultaneously under all tested environmental conditions. Specific chlorination rates ranged from 0.0005 to 0.01 d(-1) and were hampered by nitrogen fertilization but were otherwise similar among the treatments. Specific dechlorination rates were 0.01-0.03d(-1) and were similar among all treatments. This study finds that soil Clorg levels result from a dynamic equilibrium between the chlorination and rapid dechlorination of some Clorg compounds, while another Clorg pool is dechlorinated more slowly. Altogether, this study demonstrates a highly active Cl cycling in soils. PMID:26950634

  12. Experimentally-induced maternal hypothyroidism alters crucial enzyme activities in the frontal cortex and hippocampus of the offspring rat.

    PubMed

    Koromilas, Christos; Tsakiris, Stylianos; Kalafatakis, Konstantinos; Zarros, Apostolos; Stolakis, Vasileios; Kimpizi, Despoina; Bimpis, Alexios; Tsagianni, Anastasia; Liapi, Charis

    2015-02-01

    Thyroid hormone insufficiency during neurodevelopment can result into significant structural and functional changes within the developing central nervous system (CNS), and is associated with the establishment of serious cognitive impairment and neuropsychiatric symptomatology. The aim of the present study was to shed more light on the effects of gestational and/or lactational maternal exposure to propylthiouracil (PTU)-induced hypothyroidism as a multilevel experimental approach to the study of hypothyroidism-induced changes on crucial brain enzyme activities of 21-day-old Wistar rat offspring in a brain region-specific manner. This experimental approach has been recently developed and characterized by the authors based on neurochemical analyses performed on newborn and 21-day-old rat offspring whole brain homogenates; as a continuum to this effort, the current study focused on two CNS regions of major significance for cognitive development: the frontal cortex and the hippocampus. Maternal exposure to PTU in the drinking water during gestation and/or lactation resulted into changes in the activities of acetylcholinesterase and two important adenosinetriphosphatases (Na(+),K(+)- and Mg(2+)-ATPase), that seemed to take place in a CNS-region-specific manner and that were dependent upon the PTU-exposure timeframe followed. As these findings are analyzed and compared to the available literature, they: (i) highlight the variability involved in the changes of the aforementioned enzymatic parameters in the studied CNS regions (attributed to both the different neuroanatomical composition and the thyroid-hormone-dependent neurodevelopmental growth/differentiation patterns of the latter), (ii) reveal important information with regards to the neurochemical mechanisms that could be involved in the way clinical hypothyroidism could affect optimal neurodevelopment and, ultimately, cognitive function, as well as (iii) underline the need for the adoption of more consistent

  13. Bedform genesis and evolution in bedrock substrates: a new experimental approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons, D. R.; Yin, N.; Peakall, J.

    2014-12-01

    Most previous studies on the genesis and evolution of bedforms have focused on aggradational bedforms within cohesionless sediments, with very few investigations that concern either erosive bedform genesis and evolution or bedrock channel abrasion processes. The study presented here details experiments that involve the genesis and formation of erosional bedform features within natural (soft clay) cohesive sediment beds and analogue bedrock substrates by modelling clay under the effect of both open-channel plain water flows, and sediment-laden flows. A new approach without using plaster-of-Paris or real bedrock developed provides a feasible method to simulate the genesis and evolution of the erosional bedforms in cohesive sediment beds and sculpted forms in bedrock channels on relatively short time-scales in the laboratory by using a realistic substrate substitute.A series of flume experiments are presented herein where the undrained shear strength of two different kinds of substrate material is systematically varied under constant flow conditions. Experiments using plain water flow indicated that erosive bedforms in cohesive sediment substrate cannot be produced only under the effect of sediment-free flow. Particulate-laden flows do form erosional bedforms in both kinds of clay beds and the shear strength of the bed material plays a key role in determining the diversity of erosional features forming on such substrates. Optimisation of modelling clay beds has enabled us to successfully replicate a suite of bedrock bedforms, including potholes, flutes, longitudinal furrows, etc., that have clear equivalents to those observed in bedrock rivers and contributed to investigate the genesis and evolution process of them and explore the flow structures within and above them in experimental analogue bedrock substrate for the first time.

  14. MYRRHA, a Pb-Bi experimental ADS: specific approach to radiation protection aspects.

    PubMed

    Abderrahim, H Aït; Aoust, Th; Malambu, E; Sobolev, V; Van Tichelen, K; De Bruyn, D; Maes, D; Haeck, W; Van den Eynde, G

    2005-01-01

    Since 1998, SCK*CEN, in partnership with IBA s.a. and many European research laboratories, is designing a multipurpose accelerator driven system (ADS) for Research and Development (R&D) applications-MYRRHA-and is conducting an associated R&D support programme. MYRRHA is an ADS under development at Mol in Belgium and is aiming to serve as a basis for the European experimental ADS to provide protons and neutrons for various R&D applications. It consists of a proton accelerator delivering a 350 MeV x 5 mA proton beam to a liquid Pb-Bi spallation target that in turn couples to a Pb-Bi cooled, subcritical fast core. In the first stage, the project focuses mainly on demonstration of the ADS concept, safety research on sub-critical systems and nuclear waste transmutation studies. In a later stage, the device will also be dedicated to research on structural materials, nuclear fuel, liquid metal technology and associated aspects, and on sub-critical reactor physics. Subsequently, it will be used for research on applications such as radioisotope production. A first preliminary conceptual design file of MYRRHA was completed by the end of 2001 and has been reviewed by an International Technical Guidance Committee, which concluded that there are no show stoppers in the project and even though some topics such as the safety studies and the fuel qualification need to be addressed more deeply before concluding it. In this paper, we are reporting on the state-of-the art of the MYRRHA project at the beginning of 2004 and in particular on the radiation shielding assessment and the radiation protection particular aspects through a remote handling operation approach in order to minimise the personnel exposure to radiation. PMID:16604674

  15. Persistent activation of microglia and NADPH drive hippocampal dysfunction in experimental multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Di Filippo, Massimiliano; de Iure, Antonio; Giampà, Carmela; Chiasserini, Davide; Tozzi, Alessandro; Orvietani, Pier Luigi; Ghiglieri, Veronica; Tantucci, Michela; Durante, Valentina; Quiroga-Varela, Ana; Mancini, Andrea; Costa, Cinzia; Sarchielli, Paola; Fusco, Francesca Romana; Calabresi, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive impairment is common in multiple sclerosis (MS). Unfortunately, the synaptic and molecular mechanisms underlying MS-associated cognitive dysfunction are largely unknown. We explored the presence and the underlying mechanism of cognitive and synaptic hippocampal dysfunction during the remission phase of experimental MS. Experiments were performed in a chronic-relapsing experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) model of MS, after the resolution of motor deficits. Immunohistochemistry and patch-clamp recordings were performed in the CA1 hippocampal area. The hole-board was utilized as cognitive/behavioural test. In the remission phase of experimental MS, hippocampal microglial cells showed signs of activation, CA1 hippocampal synapses presented an impaired long-term potentiation (LTP) and an alteration of spatial tests became evident. The activation of hippocampal microglia mediated synaptic and cognitive/behavioural alterations during EAE. Specifically, LTP blockade was found to be caused by the reactive oxygen species (ROS)-producing enzyme nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase. We suggest that in the remission phase of experimental MS microglia remains activated, causing synaptic dysfunctions mediated by NADPH oxidase. Inhibition of microglial activation and NADPH oxidase may represent a promising strategy to prevent neuroplasticity impairment associated with active neuro-inflammation, with the aim to improve cognition and counteract MS disease progression. PMID:26887636

  16. Novel approaches to the use of cytochrome P450 activities in wildlife toxicity studies

    SciTech Connect

    VandenBerg, M.; Bosveld, A.T.C.

    1995-12-31

    Many wildlife toxicity studies, e.g. with avian species, use cytochrome P450 activities as markers for biological activities of environmental contaminants. It has been established that induction of CYP1A1 correlates with Ah-receptor mediated toxicity of dioxin-like compounds in many species. In addition, CYP1A1 plays a significant role in bioactivation of polycyclic aromatics. So far very few studies focused on the natural function of P450 isoenzymes in wildlife species. Besides classical hepatic CYP1A(1) associated activities, like EROD and AHH, several new techniques are available to study the activities of various CYP isoenzymes. Caffeine N-demethylation, testosterone and 17ss-estradiol hydroxylation patterns can provide new insights in the physiological function of P450 isoenzymes and the induction of the basal activities by chemicals. So far little interest was given to processes which occur after the DNA-receptor binding, e.g. changes in steroid hormone metabolism and pathways in environmental toxicology. This in spite of the fact that very subtle changes in steroid hormone levels may have significant physiological implications. This presentation will focus on some P450 activities, besides CYP1A(1), which might be important for development and reproduction. Some experimental approaches, limitations and techniques will be discussed which could lead to elucidation of the possible endocrine function of P450s.

  17. A convergent diffusion and social marketing approach for disseminating proven approaches to physical activity promotion.

    PubMed

    Dearing, James W; Maibach, Edward W; Buller, David B

    2006-10-01

    Approaches from diffusion of innovations and social marketing are used here to propose efficient means to promote and enhance the dissemination of evidence-based physical activity programs. While both approaches have traditionally been conceptualized as top-down, center-to-periphery, centralized efforts at social change, their operational methods have usually differed. The operational methods of diffusion theory have a strong relational emphasis, while the operational methods of social marketing have a strong transactional emphasis. Here, we argue for a convergence of diffusion of innovation and social marketing principles to stimulate the efficient dissemination of proven-effective programs. In general terms, we are encouraging a focus on societal sectors as a logical and efficient means for enhancing the impact of dissemination efforts. This requires an understanding of complex organizations and the functional roles played by different individuals in such organizations. In specific terms, ten principles are provided for working effectively within societal sectors and enhancing user involvement in the processes of adoption and implementation. PMID:16979466

  18. Uncertainty-accounted calculational-experimental approach for improved conservative evaluations of VVER RPV radiation loading parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Borodkin, P.G.; Borodkin, G.I.; Khrennikov, N.N.

    2011-07-01

    The approach of improved uncertainty-accounted conservative evaluation of vodo-vodyanoi energetichesky reactor (VVER) (reactor-) pressure-vessel (RPV) radiation loading parameters has been proposed. This approach is based on the calculational-experimental procedure, which takes into account C/E ratio, depending on over- or underestimation, and uncertainties of measured and calculated results. An application of elaborated approach to the full-scale ex-vessel neutron dosimetry experiments on Russian VVERs combined with neutron-transport calculations has been demonstrated in the paper. (authors)

  19. Curriculum, Classroom Practices, and Tool Design in the Learning of Functions through Technology-Aided Experimental Approaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lagrange, J. B.

    2005-01-01

    The paper starts from classroom situations about the study of a functional relationship with help of technological tools as a "transposition" of experimental approaches from research mathematical practices. It considers the limitation of this transposition in existing curricula and practices based on the use of non-symbolic software like dynamic…

  20. Open Experimentation on Phenomena of Chemical Reactions via the Learning Company Approach in Early Secondary Chemistry Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beck, Katharina; Witteck, Torsten; Eilks, Ingo

    2010-01-01

    Presented is a case study on the implementation of open and inquiry-type experimentation in early German secondary chemistry education. The teaching strategy discussed follows the learning company approach. Originally adopted from vocational education, the learning company method is used to redirect lab-oriented classroom practice towards a more…

  1. Experimental manipulations of microglia in mouse models of Alzheimer’s pathology. Activation reduces amyloid but hastens tau pathology

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Daniel C.; Rizer, Justin; Hunt, Jerry B.; Selenica, Maj-Linda B.; Gordon, Marcia N.; Morgan, Dave

    2015-01-01

    The inflammation hypothesis of Alzheimer’s pathogenesis has directed much scientific effort towards ameliorating this disease. The development of mouse models of amyloid deposition permitted direct tests of the proposal that amyloid-activated microglia could cause neurodegeneration in vivo. Many approaches to manipulating microglial activation have been applied to these mouse models, and are the subject of this review. In general, these results do not support a direct neuricidal action of microglia in mouse amyloid models under any activation state. Some of the manipulations cause both a reduction in pathology, and a reduction in microglial activation. However, at least for agents like ibuprofen, this outcome may result from a direct action on amyloid production, and a reduction in the microglial provoking amyloid deposits, rather than from reduced microglial activation leading to a decline in amyloid deposition. Instead, a surprising number of the experimental manipulations which increase microglial activation lead to enhanced clearance of the amyloid deposits. Both the literature and new data presented here suggest that either classical or alternative activation of microglia can lead to enhanced amyloid clearance. However, a limited number of studies comparing the same treatments in amyloid-depositing vs tau-depositing mice find the opposite effects. Treatments that benefit amyloid pathology accelerate tau pathology. This observation argues strongly that potential treatments be tested for impact on both amyloid and tau pathology before consideration of testing in humans. PMID:23171029

  2. A self-sensing active magnetic bearing based on a direct current measurement approach.

    PubMed

    Niemann, Andries C; van Schoor, George; du Rand, Carel P

    2013-01-01

    Active magnetic bearings (AMBs) have become a key technology in various industrial applications. Self-sensing AMBs provide an integrated sensorless solution for position estimation, consolidating the sensing and actuating functions into a single electromagnetic transducer. The approach aims to reduce possible hardware failure points, production costs, and system complexity. Despite these advantages, self-sensing methods must address various technical challenges to maximize the performance thereof. This paper presents the direct current measurement (DCM) approach for self-sensing AMBs, denoting the direct measurement of the current ripple component. In AMB systems, switching power amplifiers (PAs) modulate the rotor position information onto the current waveform. Demodulation self-sensing techniques then use bandpass and lowpass filters to estimate the rotor position from the voltage and current signals. However, the additional phase-shift introduced by these filters results in lower stability margins. The DCM approach utilizes a novel PA switching method that directly measures the current ripple to obtain duty-cycle invariant position estimates. Demodulation filters are largely excluded to minimize additional phase-shift in the position estimates. Basic functionality and performance of the proposed self-sensing approach are demonstrated via a transient simulation model as well as a high current (10 A) experimental system. A digital implementation of amplitude modulation self-sensing serves as a comparative estimator. PMID:24030681

  3. A Self-Sensing Active Magnetic Bearing Based on a Direct Current Measurement Approach

    PubMed Central

    Niemann, Andries C.; van Schoor, George; du Rand, Carel P.

    2013-01-01

    Active magnetic bearings (AMBs) have become a key technology in various industrial applications. Self-sensing AMBs provide an integrated sensorless solution for position estimation, consolidating the sensing and actuating functions into a single electromagnetic transducer. The approach aims to reduce possible hardware failure points, production costs, and system complexity. Despite these advantages, self-sensing methods must address various technical challenges to maximize the performance thereof. This paper presents the direct current measurement (DCM) approach for self-sensing AMBs, denoting the direct measurement of the current ripple component. In AMB systems, switching power amplifiers (PAs) modulate the rotor position information onto the current waveform. Demodulation self-sensing techniques then use bandpass and lowpass filters to estimate the rotor position from the voltage and current signals. However, the additional phase-shift introduced by these filters results in lower stability margins. The DCM approach utilizes a novel PA switching method that directly measures the current ripple to obtain duty-cycle invariant position estimates. Demodulation filters are largely excluded to minimize additional phase-shift in the position estimates. Basic functionality and performance of the proposed self-sensing approach are demonstrated via a transient simulation model as well as a high current (10 A) experimental system. A digital implementation of amplitude modulation self-sensing serves as a comparative estimator. PMID:24030681

  4. On the Integration of Remote Experimentation into Undergraduate Laboratories--Pedagogical Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Esche, Sven K.

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents an Internet-based open approach to laboratory instruction. In this article, the author talks about an open laboratory approach using a multi-user multi-device remote facility. This approach involves both the direct contact with the computer-controlled laboratory setup of interest with the students present in the laboratory…

  5. Experimental approaches to marine and meteoric dissolution-to-repreciptiation cycles of fine-grained marine carbonate sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Immenhauser, Adrian; Buhl, Dieter; Riechelmann, Sylvia; Kwiecien, Ola; Lokier, Stephen; Neuser, Rolf

    2016-04-01

    Fine-grained carbonate (carbonate ooze), or microcrystalline carbonate (micrite), its lithified counterpart, forms a main constituent of limestones throughout much of Earth's history. Fine-grained carbonates are deposited below the permanent fair-weather wave base in neritic lagoonal environments or below the storm-wave base in basinal settings. The origin of components forming these fine-grained carbonates often remains poorly understood and represents a major challenge in carbonate sedimentology, particularly when these materials are used as carbonate archives (bulk micrite geochemistry). Here we present a novel experimental approach exposing natural, fine-grained carbonate sediments to dissolution-reprecipitation cycles under non-sterile conditions that mimick earth-surface conditions. In a first stage, the experiment simulated subaerial exposure of an ooid (aragonite) shoal and leaching and carbonate dissolution under meteoric phreatic conditions. In a second stage, CO2 was added to the experimental fluid (natural rainwater) representing soil-zone activity. In a third stage, partly dissolved (micro-karstified) sediments were exposed to marine phreatic conditions simulating renewed flooding of the shoal carbonates. During the third stage, precipitation was induced by degassing the CO2 in the fluid with N2. Degassing induced nucleation and growth of a diagenetic inorganic aragonite (and subordinate calcite) phase upon the surface of carbonate particles. The outcome of these first experiments is promising. The CO2 concentration of the fluid and the air are low under atmospheric conditions and increase as expected due to adding CO2 to the experiment resulting in a lower pH. Carbonate dissolution increases conductivity, alkalinity, and calcium concentration reaching a plateau at the end of the first experimental phase. Small surficial damages to ooids represent zones of weakness and form the preferred sites of dissolution leading to a deepening and widening of these

  6. In-situ measurement of dust devil activity at La Jornada Experimental Range, New Mexico, USA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We document observations of dust devil vortices using a linear array of 10 miniature pressure- and sunlight-logging stations in summer 2013 at La Jornada Experimental Range in the southwestern USA. These data provide a census of vortex and dust-devil activity at this site. The simultaneous spatial...

  7. The influence of motor activity on the development of cardiac arrhythmias during experimental emotional stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulyaninskiy, L. S.; Urmancheyeva, T. G.; Stepanyan, Y. P.; Fufacheva, A. A.; Gritsak, A. V.; Kuznetsova, B. A.; Kvitka, A. A.

    1982-01-01

    Experimental emotional stress which can produce various disorders of cardiac rhythm: sinus tachycardia, atrial fibrillation, ventricular, extrasystoles and paroxysmal ventricular tachysystoles was studied. In these conditions the adrenalin content in the blood and myocardium is increased 3 to 4 times. It is found that moderate motor activity leads to a relative decrease of adrenalin in the myocardium and arrest of cardiac arrhythmias.

  8. Validation of the Soil Moisture Active Passive mission using USDA-ARS experimental watersheds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The calibration and validation program of the Soil Moisture Active Passive mission (SMAP) relies upon an international cooperative of in situ networks to provide ground truth references across a variety of landscapes. The USDA Agricultural Research Service operates several experimental watersheds wh...

  9. Experimental and analytical study of secondary path variations in active engine mounts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hausberg, Fabian; Scheiblegger, Christian; Pfeffer, Peter; Plöchl, Manfred; Hecker, Simon; Rupp, Markus

    2015-03-01

    Active engine mounts (AEMs) provide an effective solution to further improve the acoustic and vibrational comfort of passenger cars. Typically, adaptive feedforward control algorithms, e.g., the filtered-x-least-mean-squares (FxLMS) algorithm, are applied to cancel disturbing engine vibrations. These algorithms require an accurate estimate of the AEM active dynamic characteristics, also known as the secondary path, in order to guarantee control performance and stability. This paper focuses on the experimental and theoretical study of secondary path variations in AEMs. The impact of three major influences, namely nonlinearity, change of preload and component temperature, on the AEM active dynamic characteristics is experimentally analyzed. The obtained test results are theoretically investigated with a linear AEM model which incorporates an appropriate description for elastomeric components. A special experimental set-up extends the model validation of the active dynamic characteristics to higher frequencies up to 400 Hz. The theoretical and experimental results show that significant secondary path variations are merely observed in the frequency range of the AEM actuator's resonance frequency. These variations mainly result from the change of the component temperature. As the stability of the algorithm is primarily affected by the actuator's resonance frequency, the findings of this paper facilitate the design of AEMs with simpler adaptive feedforward algorithms. From a practical point of view it may further be concluded that algorithmic countermeasures against instability are only necessary in the frequency range of the AEM actuator's resonance frequency.

  10. Benznidazole/Itraconazole Combination Treatment Enhances Anti-Trypanosoma cruzi Activity in Experimental Chagas Disease.

    PubMed

    Assíria Fontes Martins, Tassiane; de Figueiredo Diniz, Lívia; Mazzeti, Ana Lia; da Silva do Nascimento, Álvaro Fernando; Caldas, Sérgio; Caldas, Ivo Santana; de Andrade, Isabel Mayer; Ribeiro, Isabela; Bahia, Maria Terezinha

    2015-01-01

    The nitroheterocyclic drugs nifurtimox and benznidazole are first-line drugs available to treat Chagas disease; however, they have limitations, including long treatment courses and toxicity. Strategies to overcome these limitations include the identification of new drugs with specific target profiles, re-dosing regimens for the current drugs, drug repositioning and combination therapy. In this work, we evaluated combination therapy as an approach for optimization of the current therapeutic regimen for Chagas disease. The curative action of benznidazole/itraconazole combinations was explored in an established infection of the mice model with the T. cruzi Y strain. The activities of the benznidazole/itraconazole combinations were compared with the results from those receiving the same dosage of each individual drug. The administration of benznidazole/itraconazole in combination eliminated parasites from the blood more efficiently than each drug alone. Here, there was a significant reduction of the number of treatment days (number of doses) necessary to induce parasitemia suppression with the benznidazole/itraconazole combination, as compared to each compound administered alone. These results clearly indicate the enhanced effects of these drugs in combination, particularly at the dose of 75 mg/kg, as the effects observed with the drug combinations were four times more effective than those of each drug used alone. Moreover, benznidazole/itraconazole treatment was shown to prevent or decrease the typical lesions associated with chronic experimental Chagas disease, as illustrated by similar levels of inflammatory cells and fibrosis in the cardiac muscle tissue of healthy and treated mice. These results emphasize the importance of exploring the potential of combination treatments with currently available compounds to specifically treat Chagas disease. PMID:26076455

  11. Engine rotor health monitoring: an experimental approach to fault detection and durability assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdul-Aziz, Ali; Woike, Mark R.; Clem, Michelle; Baaklini, George

    2015-03-01

    Efforts to update and improve turbine engine components in meeting flights safety and durability requirements are commitments that engine manufacturers try to continuously fulfill. Most of their concerns and developments energies focus on the rotating components as rotor disks. These components typically undergo rigorous operating conditions and are subject to high centrifugal loadings which subject them to various failure mechanisms. Thus, developing highly advanced health monitoring technology to screen their efficacy and performance is very essential to their prolonged service life and operational success. Nondestructive evaluation techniques are among the many screening methods that presently are being used to pre-detect hidden flaws and mini cracks prior to any appalling events occurrence. Most of these methods or procedures are confined to evaluating material's discontinuities and other defects that have mature to a point where failure is eminent. Hence, development of more robust techniques to pre-predict faults prior to any catastrophic events in these components is highly vital. This paper is focused on presenting research activities covering the ongoing research efforts at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) rotor dynamics laboratory in support of developing a fault detection system for key critical turbine engine components. Data obtained from spin test experiments of a rotor disk that relates to investigating behavior of blade tip clearance, tip timing and shaft displacement based on measured data acquired from sensor devices such as eddy current, capacitive and microwave are presented. Additional results linking test data with finite element modeling to characterize the structural durability of a cracked rotor as it relays to the experimental tests and findings is also presented. An obvious difference in the vibration response is shown between the notched and the baseline no notch rotor disk indicating the presence of some type of irregularity.

  12. Constraints on the Dynamics of Seabed Pockmarks: an Integrated Sedimentological, Biostratigraphic, Geophysical, Oceanographic and Experimental Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pau, M.; Hammer, Ø.; Chand, S.; Gisler, G. R.

    2015-12-01

    Pockmarks are crater-like seabed depressions commonly resulting from focused fluid escape from soft, fine-grained sediments. Typically measuring 20-50 m across with depths of 2-10 m, these features often occur in extensive fields containing hundreds of them per square kilometre. They are prominent hazards for offshore installations such as oil rigs and pipelines, affecting vast areas worldwide. Besides, they represent a major geological source of methane, and their importance has been pointed out as contributors to the global climate variability.Sedimentological and biostratigraphic analyses of sediment cores were coupled with shallow seismic images to investigate the origin and evolution of a pockmark field in the southwestern Barents Sea, an epicontinental sea part of the Arctic Ocean. The pockmarks formed as a result of reduced sedimentation above active gas seeps near the retreating edge of the Barents Sea ice sheet about 15,000 years ago. The seepage is ascribed to climate change-induced dissociation of methane hydrates. These findings strengthen the case that pockmarks, worldwide, recorded the release of massive quantities of methane from the seafloor into the ocean during the last deglaciation. No evidence was found for current upward methane flux, so the pockmarks in the study area appear as inactive seabed features. Field measurements of currents and sediment fluxes in pockmarks in the Oslofjord, Norway, along with an experimental hydrodynamics study, provide insight into the mechanisms responsible for the long-term maintenance of inactive pockmarks. Near-bed currents may control the net sedimentation rate in these depressions by inhibiting the sedimentation from suspended transport. Enhanced turbulence and more intense biological activity suggest that the suspended fines are supported in the water column more easily in the pockmarks than on the surrounding bed, and can be transported away before settling. Moreover, upwelling generated by flow deflection

  13. Water adsorption on charcoal: New approach in experimental studies and data representation

    SciTech Connect

    Geynisman, M.; Walker, R.

    1991-08-01

    The experimental apparatus was built to study the H{sub 2}O adsorption on charcoal at very low concentrations and collect the data in the form of isosteres. Experimental method is discussed and the global three-dimensional fit is constructed to predict the post-regeneration conditions of charcoal absorbers. 11 refs.

  14. A Case-Based Approach Improves Science Students' Experimental Variable Identification Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grunwald, Sandra; Hartman, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    Incorporation of experimental case studies into the laboratory curriculum increases students' abilities to identify experimental variables that affect the outcome of an experiment. Here the authors describe how such case studies were incorporated using an online course management system into a biochemistry laboratory curriculum and the assessment…

  15. Experimental Systems-Biology Approaches for Clostridia-Based Bioenergy Production

    SciTech Connect

    Papoutsakis, Elefterios

    2015-04-30

    This is the final project report for project "Experimental Systems-Biology Approaches for Clostridia-Based Bioenergy Production" for the funding period of 9/1/12 to 2/28/2015 (three years with a 6-month no-cost extension) OVERVIEW AND PROJECT GOALS The bottleneck of achieving higher rates and titers of toxic metabolites (such as solvents and carboxylic acids that can used as biofuels or biofuel precursors) can be overcome by engineering the stress response system. Thus, understanding and modeling the response of cells to toxic metabolites is a problem of great fundamental and practical significance. In this project, our goal is to dissect at the molecular systems level and build models (conceptual and quantitative) for the stress response of C. acetobutylicum (Cac) to its two toxic metabolites: butanol (BuOH) and butyrate (BA). Transcriptional (RNAseq and microarray based), proteomic and fluxomic data and their analysis are key requirements for this goal. Transcriptional data from mid-exponential cultures of Cac under 4 different levels of BuOH and BA stress was obtained using both microarrays (Papoutsakis group) and deep sequencing (RNAseq; Meyers and Papoutsakis groups). These two sets of data do not only serve to validate each other, but are also used for identification of stress-induced changes in transcript levels, small regulatory RNAs, & in transcriptional start sites. Quantitative proteomic data (Lee group), collected using the iTRAQ technology, are essential for understanding of protein levels and turnover under stress and the various protein-protein interactions that orchestrate the stress response. Metabolic flux changes (Antoniewicz group) of core pathways, which provide important information on the re-allocation of energy and carbon resources under metabolite stress, were examined using 13C-labelled chemicals. Omics data are integrated at different levels and scales. At the metabolic-pathway level, omics data are integrated into a 2nd generation genome

  16. Identifying and characterising the different structural length scales in liquids and glasses: an experimental approach.

    PubMed

    Salmon, Philip S; Zeidler, Anita

    2013-10-01

    The structure of several network-forming liquids and glasses is considered, where a focus is placed on the detailed information that is made available by using the method of neutron diffraction with isotope substitution (NDIS). In the case of binary network glass-forming materials with the MX2 stoichiometry (e.g. GeO2, GeSe2, ZnCl2), two different length scales at distances greater than the nearest-neighbour distance manifest themselves by peaks in the measured diffraction patterns. The network properties are influenced by a competition between the ordering on these "intermediate" and "extended" length scales, which can be manipulated by changing the chemical identity of the atomic constituents or by varying state parameters such as the temperature and pressure. The extended-range ordering, which describes the decay of the pair-correlation functions at large-r, can be represented by making a pole analysis of the Ornstein-Zernike equations, an approach that can also be used to describe the large-r behaviour of the pair-correlation functions for liquid and amorphous metals where packing constraints are important. The first applications are then described of the NDIS method to measure the detailed structure of aerodynamically-levitated laser-heated droplets of "fragile" glass-forming liquid oxides (CaAl2O4 and CaSiO3) at high-temperatures (~2000 K) and the structure of a "strong" network-forming glass (GeO2) under pressures ranging from ambient to ~8 GPa. The high-temperature experiments show structural changes on multiple length scales when the oxides are vitrified. The high-pressure experiment offers insight into the density-driven mechanisms of network collapse in GeO2 glass, and parallels are drawn with the high-pressure behaviour of silica glass. Finally, the hydrogen-bonded network of water is considered, where the first application of the method of oxygen NDIS is used to measure the structures of light versus heavy water and a difference of approximately equal

  17. Spherical mechanism analysis of a surgical robot for minimally invasive surgery -- analytical and experimental approaches.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Jacob; Lum, Mitch; Trimble, Denny; Hannaford, Blake; Sinanan, Mika

    2005-01-01

    Recent advances in technology have led to the fusion of MIS techniques and robot devices. However, current systems are large and cumbersome. Optimizing the surgical robot mechanism will eventually lead to its integration into the operating room (OR) of the future becoming the extended presence of the surgeon and nurses in a room occupied by the patient alone. By optimizing a spherical mechanism using data collected in-vivo during MIS procedures, this study is focused on a bottom-up approach to developing a new class of surgical robotic arms while maximizing their performance and minimizing their size. The spherical mechanism is a rotational manipulator with all axes intersecting at the center of the sphere. Locating the rotation center of the mechanism at the MIS port makes this class of mechanism a suitable candidate for the first two links of a surgical robot for MIS. The required dexterous workspace (DWS) is defined as the region in which 95% of the tool motions are contained based on in-vivo measurements. The extended dexterous workspace (EDWS) is defined as the entire abdominal cavity reachable by a MIS instruments. The DWS is defined by a right circular cone with a vertex angle of 60 degrees and the EDWS is defined by a cone with an elliptical cross section created by two orthogonal vertex angles of 60 degrees and 90 degrees. A compound function based on the mechanism's isotropy and the mechanism stiffness was considered as the performance metric cost function. Optimization across both the DWS and the EDWS lead to a serial mechanism configuration with link length angles of 74 degrees and 60 degrees for a serial configuration. This mechanism configuration maximized the kinematic performance in the DWS while keeping the EDWS as its reachable workspace. Surgeons, using a mockup of two mechanisms in a MIS setup, validated these results experimentally. From these experiments the serial configuration was deemed most applicable for MIS robotic applications compared

  18. Impact of discharge and sediment flux on basin margin architecture: an experimental approach.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Berg van Saparoea, A. P. H.; Postma, G.

    2003-04-01

    for shelf valleys to connect with the trunk river occurs earlier in the latter case, which means that even though the system is fluvial dominated (i.e. strongly progradational), the influence of sea-level fluctuation on the fluvial domain is strong. [1] Van Heijst, M.W.I.M. and Postma, G. (2001) Fluvial response to sea-level changes: a quantitative analogue, experimental approach. Basin Research, 13, 269-292.

  19. Ligand and structure-based approaches for the identification of SIRT1 activators.

    PubMed

    Vyas, Vivek K; Goel, Ashutosh; Ghate, Manjunath; Patel, Palak

    2015-02-25

    SIRT1 is a NAD(+)-dependent deacetylase that involved in various important metabolic pathways. Combined ligand and structure-based approach was utilized for identification of SIRT1 activators. Pharmacophore models were developed using DISCOtech and refined with GASP module of Sybyl X software. Pharmacophore models were composed of two hydrogen bond acceptor (HBA) atoms, two hydrogen bond donor (HBD) sites and one hydrophobic (HY) feature. The pharmacophore models were validated through receiver operating characteristic (ROC) and Güner-Henry (GH) scoring methods. Model-2 was selected as best model among the model 1-3, based on ROC and GH score value, and found reliable in identification of SIRT1 activators. Model-2 (3D search query) was searched against Zinc database. Several compounds with different chemical scaffold were retrieved as hits. Currently, there is no experimental SIRT1 3D structure available, therefore, we modeled SIRT1 protein structure using homology modeling. Compounds with Qfit value of more than 86 were selected for docking study into the SIRT1 homology model to explore the binding mode of retrieved hits in the active allosteric site. Finally, in silico ADMET prediction study was performed with two best docked compounds. Combination of ligand and structure-based modeling methods identified active hits, which may be good lead compounds to develop novel SIRT1 activators. PMID:25595223

  20. Shaking table experimentation on adjacent structures controlled by passive and semi-active MR dampers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basili, M.; De Angelis, M.; Fraraccio, G.

    2013-06-01

    This paper presents the results of shaking table tests on adjacent structures controlled by passive and semi-active MR dampers. The aim was to demonstrate experimentally the effectiveness of passive and semi-active strategies in reducing structural vibrations due to seismic excitation. The physical model at issue was represented by two adjacent steel structures, respectively of 4 and 2 levels, connected at the second level by a MR damper. When the device operated in semi-active mode, an ON-OFF control algorithm, derived by the Lyapunov stability theory, was implemented and experimentally validated. Since the experimentation concerned adjacent structures, two control objectives have been reached: global and selective protection. In case of global protection, the attention was focused on protecting both structures, whereas, in case of selective protection, the attention was focused on protecting only one structure. For each objective the effectiveness of passive control has been compared with the situation of no control and then the effectiveness of semi-active control has been compared with the passive one. The quantities directly compared have been: measured displacements, accelerations and force-displacement of the MR damper, moreover some global response quantities have been estimated from experimental measures, which are the base share force and the base bending moment, the input energy and the energy dissipated by the device. In order to evaluate the effectiveness of the control action in both passive and semi-active case, an energy index EDI, previously defined and already often applied numerically, has been utilized. The aspects investigated in the experimentation have been: the implementation and validation of the control algorithm for selective and global protection, the MR damper input voltage influence, the kind of seismic input and its intensity.

  1. A combined experimental and theoretical study of the thermal cycloaddition of aryl azides with activated alkenes.

    PubMed

    Zeghada, Sarah; Bentabed-Ababsa, Ghenia; Derdour, Aïcha; Abdelmounim, Safer; Domingo, Luis R; Sáez, José A; Roisnel, Thierry; Nassar, Ekhlass; Mongin, Florence

    2011-06-01

    Reactions were performed from aryl azides on the one hand, and activated alkenes coming from β-dicarbonyl compounds or malonodinitrile on the other hand, either with recourse to conventional heating or to microwave activation, to afford 1-aryl-1H-1,2,3-triazoles. The mechanism and the regioselectivity of the reactions involving β-dicarbonyl compounds have been theoretically studied using DFT methods at the B3LYP/6-31G* level: they are domino processes comprising a tautomeric equilibrium of the β-dicarbonyl compounds with their enol forms, a 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition of the enol forms with the aryl azides (high activation energy), and a dehydration process (lower activation energy). The effect of non-conventional activation methods on the degradation of 1,2,3-triazolines was next studied experimentally. Finally, some of the 1,2,3-triazoles such synthesized were evaluated for their bactericidal and cytotoxic activities. PMID:21494704

  2. Structure-activity in the carrageenans: iota-carrageenan and experimental oedemagenic activity.

    PubMed

    Anderson, W; Harthill, J E; Zeitlin, I J

    1984-12-01

    The oedemagenic activities of several iota-carrageenans from Eucheuma spinosum have been compared using the rat hindpaw model. From the parent iota-carrageenan of weight average molecular weight 541 100 an acid-degraded iota-carrageenan (Mw = 20 300) was obtained which on fractionation yielded five iota-carrageenans Mw ranging from 73 700 to 4 600. The oedemagenic activity of iota-carrageenan resided in the fraction of Mw = 73 700, the parent undegraded high molecular weight iota-carrageenan being no more active and fractions of lower molecular weight being inactive. Fractionation was based on differential solubilities of the barium salts of the fractions in water and aqueous ethanol and was probably determined by aspects of primary structure in addition to molecular weight. PMID:6151972

  3. Behavioral study of ultradian activity periods of mice enclosed in experimental cages of different dimensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guillot, A.

    1982-01-01

    Male mice are enclosed in cages of different dimensions (cage A - 23x8x8 cm., cage B - 36x27x17 cm.), in an alternating light/dark regimen, at an ambient temperature of 22 to 23 C. The successions of the behavioral sequences of ultradian activity periods are noticed by direct observation during 11 consecutive hours in light. The experimental situation modifies the mean duration time and the behavioral organization of each activity period. However, the comparison of the overall activity time lengths and the comparison of the overall behavioral frequencies suggest that the energy spent per mouse is constant.

  4. [Immunosuppressive treatment of rheumatic diseases. Experimental bases of a rational concept of therapeutic approach (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Lemmel, E M; Botzenhardt, U

    1976-01-01

    For treatment of diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis or systemic lupus erythematodes, which are initiated or sustained by immune-pathological mechanisms, various "immunosuppressive" drugs are used. There are conflicting data as to the benefit of this type of therapy. In this paper it is attempted to define a base for a more differentiated application of available drugs, since the present therapeutic approach seems rather empiric or is deducted from analogy to selected animal experiments. The investigations presented focus primarily on the behaviour of the small and medium lymphocytes of the organism, the adopted carriers of immunological (as well as autoimmune) reactivity, under conventional conditions (and under the influence of suitable drugs) as a biological supposition for the activity of "immunosuppressives". In rabbits, and mice, number and rate of proliferation of lymphoid cells is determined in untreated controls and animals treated with 6-mercaptopurine (6-MP) and cyclophosphamide (Cy), two immunosuppressive agents representing different types of pharmacological action. The elucidation why in rabbits both substances are equally immunosuppressive, whereas in mice only Cy has significant immunosuppressive activity, yields the base for a therapeutic concept of clinical immunosuppression. This species dependent activity of 6-MP can be explained by different proliferation kinetics of lymphoid cells in mouse and rabbit. Lymphocytes of the rabbit, compared to those of mice, are short-lived and have a distinctly higher proliferation rate. Thus, 6-MP, as an antiproliferative agent, leads, in the rabbit (under long-term as well as single-dose therapy) to a significant reduction of the number of small lymphocytes, whereas it reduces the long-lived lymphocytes of the mouse only marginally, thus explaining the good immunosuppressive potency in the rabbit and failure in the mouse. Cy leads, in both species, to a marked reduction of small lymphocytes and affects the

  5. Structural Dynamics Experimental Activities in Ultra-Lightweight and Inflatable Space Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pappa, Richard S.; Lassiter, John O.; Ross, Brian P.

    2001-01-01

    This paper reports recently completed structural dynamics experimental activities with new ultralightweight and inflatable space structures (a.k.a., "Gossamer" spacecraft) at NASA Langley Research Center, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, and NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. Nine aspects of this work are covered, as follows: 1) inflated, rigidized tubes, 2) active control experiments, 3) photogrammetry, 4) laser vibrometry, 5) modal tests of inflatable structures, 6) in-vacuum modal tests, 7) tensioned membranes, 8) deployment tests, and 9) flight experiment support. Structural dynamics will play a major role in the design and eventual in-space deployment and performance of Gossamer spacecraft, and experimental R&D work such as this is required now to validate new analytical prediction methods. The activities discussed in the paper are pathfinder accomplishments, conducted on unique components and prototypes of future spacecraft systems.

  6. Active vibration suppression through positive acceleration feedback on a building-like structure: An experimental study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enríquez-Zárate, J.; Silva-Navarro, G.; Abundis-Fong, H. F.

    2016-05-01

    This work deals with the structural and dynamic analysis of a building-like structure consisting of a three-story building with one active vibration absorber. The base of the structure is perturbed using an electromagnetic shaker, which provides forces with a wide range of excitation frequencies, including some resonance frequencies of the structure. One beam-column of the structure is coupled with a PZT stack actuator to reduce the vibrations. The overall mechanical structure is modeled using Euler-Lagrange methodology and validated using experimental modal analysis and Fine Element Method (FEM) techniques. The active control laws are synthesized to actively attenuate the vibration system response via the PZT stack actuator, caused by excitation forces acting on the base of the structure. The control scheme is obtained using Positive Acceleration Feedback (PAF) and Multiple Positive Acceleration Feedback (MPAF) to improve the closed-loop system response. Some experimental results are included to illustrate the overall system performance.

  7. Structural Dynamics Experimental Activities in Ultra-Lightweight and Inflatable Space Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pappa, Richard S.; Lassiter, John O.; Ross, Brian P.

    2001-01-01

    This paper reports recently completed structural dynamics experimental activities with new ultra-lightweight and inflatable space structures (a.k.a., "Gossamer" spacecraft) at NASA Langley Research Center, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, and NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. Nine aspects of this work are covered: 1) inflated, rigidized tubes, 2) active control experiments, 3) photogrammetry, 4) laser vibrometry, 5) modal tests of inflatable structures, 6) in-vacuum modal tests, 7) tensioned membranes, 8) deployment tests, and 9) flight experiment support. Structural dynamics will play a major role in the design and eventually in-space deployment and performance of Gossamer spacecraft. Experimental research and development such as this is required to validate new analysis methods. The activities discussed in the paper are pathfinder accomplishments. conducted on unique components and prototypes of future spacecraft systems.

  8. Activity of "nonspecific pancreatic carboxylesterase" in rat serum in experimentally induced acute pancreatitis (preliminary results).

    PubMed

    Kálmán, A; Kálmán, Z; Velösy, G; Vargha, G; Vargha, G; Papp, M

    1989-01-01

    The aim of this study was to obtain more information on the serum level of "nonspecific pancreatic carboxylesterase" (PCE) in experimentally induced acute pancreatitis in rats. The effects of caerulein stimulation, hepatic duct ligation, bile-pancreatic duct ligation or the effect of retrograde injection of saline, 5% taurocholate and sunflower oil were investigated. The activity of PCE and amylase was measured in the serum, pancreatic tissue, pancreatic juice and ascitic fluid. The changes in PCE activity were greater (both in directions to increase or decrease) than that of amylase, produced by different experimental procedures. The results confirm the thesis that the serum activity of PCE is a more sensitive diagnostic method than that of amylase to detect the inflammatory process in the pancreas or the effect of obstruction of the pancreatic duct. PMID:2480696

  9. Highly visible light active Ag@TiO2 nanocomposites synthesized using an electrochemically active biofilm: a novel biogenic approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, M. Mansoob; Ansari, Sajid A.; Amal, M. Ikhlasul; Lee, Jintae; Cho, Moo Hwan

    2013-05-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles were decorated with different amounts of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) using an electrochemically active biofilm (EAB), which is a biogenic approach that leads to the formation of Ag@TiO2 nanocomposites. UV-vis spectroscopy, photoluminescence, X-ray diffraction and electron microscopy showed AgNPs, 2-5 nm in size, well-dispersed and anchored to the TiO2 surface and overall synthesis of Ag@TiO2 nanocomposites. The photocatalytic performance of the as-synthesized Ag@TiO2 nanocomposites was evaluated in terms of their efficiency for the photodecomposition of methylene blue (MB) in an aqueous solution under visible light irradiation. The nanocomposites showed exceptionally high photodecomposition efficiency (>7 times) compared to commercial TiO2 (Sigma). The enhanced photocatalytic activity was attributed to the synergistic contribution of both a delayed charge recombination rate caused by the high electronic mobility of the AgNPs and the increased surface area originating from the nanometer sized AgNPs on TiO2. The nanocomposites also showed exceptionally high stability and reusability under similar experimental conditions.Titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles were decorated with different amounts of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) using an electrochemically active biofilm (EAB), which is a biogenic approach that leads to the formation of Ag@TiO2 nanocomposites. UV-vis spectroscopy, photoluminescence, X-ray diffraction and electron microscopy showed AgNPs, 2-5 nm in size, well-dispersed and anchored to the TiO2 surface and overall synthesis of Ag@TiO2 nanocomposites. The photocatalytic performance of the as-synthesized Ag@TiO2 nanocomposites was evaluated in terms of their efficiency for the photodecomposition of methylene blue (MB) in an aqueous solution under visible light irradiation. The nanocomposites showed exceptionally high photodecomposition efficiency (>7 times) compared to commercial TiO2 (Sigma). The enhanced

  10. Combined Experimental and Computational Approach to Predict the Glass-Water Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, Eric M.; Bacon, Diana H.

    2011-10-01

    The use of mineral and glass dissolution rates measured in laboratory experiments to predict the weathering of primary minerals and volcanic and nuclear waste glasses in field studies requires the construction of rate models that accurately describe the weathering process over geologic timescales. Additionally, the need to model the long-term behavior of nuclear waste glass for the purpose of estimating radionuclide release rates requires that rate models be validated with long-term experiments. Several long-term test methods have been developed to accelerate the glass-water reaction [drip test, vapor hydration test, product consistency test B, and pressurized unsaturated flow (PUF)], thereby reducing the duration required to evaluate long-term performance. Currently, the PUF test is the only method that mimics the unsaturated hydraulic properties expected in a subsurface disposal facility and simultaneously monitors the glass-water reaction. PUF tests are being conducted to accelerate the weathering of glass and validate the model parameters being used to predict long-term glass behavior. A one-dimensional reactive chemical transport simulation of glass dissolution and secondary phase formation during a 1.5-year-long PUF experiment was conducted with the Subsurface Transport Over Reactive Multiphases (STORM) code. Results show that parameterization of the computer model by combining direct bench scale laboratory measurements and thermodynamic data provides an integrated approach to predicting glass behavior over the length of the experiment. Over the 1.5-year-long test duration, the rate decreased from 0.2 to 0.01 g/(m2 day) based on B release for low-activity waste glass LAWA44. The observed decrease is approximately two orders of magnitude higher than the decrease observed under static conditions with the SON68 glass (estimated to be a decrease by four orders of magnitude) and suggests that the gel-layer properties are less protective under these dynamic

  11. The adaptive function of tiger moth clicks against echolocating bats: an experimental and synthetic approach.

    PubMed

    Ratcliffe, John M; Fullard, James H

    2005-12-01

    We studied the efficiency and effects of the multiple sensory cues of tiger moths on echolocating bats. We used the northern long-eared bat, Myotis septentrionalis, a purported moth specialist that takes surface-bound prey (gleaning) and airborne prey (aerial hawking), and the dogbane tiger moth, Cycnia tenera, an eared species unpalatable to bats that possesses conspicuous colouration and sound-producing organs (tymbals). This is the first study to investigate the interaction of tiger moths and wild-caught bats under conditions mimicking those found in nature and to demand the use of both aerial hawking and gleaning strategies by bats. Further, it is the first to report spectrograms of the sounds produced by tiger moths while under aerial attack by echolocating bats. During both aerial hawking and gleaning trials, all muted C. tenera and perched intact C. tenera were attacked by M. septentrionalis, indicating that M. septentrionalis did not discriminate C. tenera from palatable moths based on potential echoic and/or non-auditory cues. Intact C. tenera were attacked significantly less often than muted C. tenera during aerial hawking attacks: tymbal clicks were therefore an effective deterrent in an aerial hawking context. During gleaning attacks, intact and muted C. tenera were always attacked and suffered similar mortality rates, suggesting that while handling prey this bat uses primarily chemical signals. Our results also show that C. tenera temporally matches the onset of click production to the ;approach phase' echolocation calls produced by aerial hawking attacking bats and that clicks themselves influence the echolocation behaviour of attacking bats. In the context of past research, these findings support the hypotheses that the clicks of arctiid moths are both an active defence (through echolocation disruption) and a reliable indicator of chemical defence against aerial-hawking bats. We suggest these signals are specialized for an aerial context. PMID

  12. Does Improved Water Access Increase Child School Attendance? A Quasi-Experimental Approach From Rural Ethiopia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuda, Y.; Cook, J.

    2012-12-01

    not measure the portion of children that engage in both activities. Indeed, children may very well be "attending" school according to an enrollment measure, but they may be doing so at low rates that prevent them from advancing to higher grade levels. Although enrollment rates may remain constant pre- and post-water access, school attendance may increase with the provision of water. This paper overcomes previous limitations by utilizing panel data from a quasi-experimental study and a continuous measure for school attendance collected over one year via random school attendance checks. In total, we collected data on 642 children from randomly selected households. Using a difference-in-difference estimator, our preliminary analysis finds that water access increases school attendance by 6% and is statistically significant at the 5% significance level. When using school enrollment as the outcome variable preliminary analysis finds that water access increases enrollment by 3%, although it is only marginally significant at the 10% significance level. Data on schooling via random school attendance checks provide a more reliable measure for the true impact of water access on schooling, and our preliminary findings suggest that the impact may be higher than previously estimated.

  13. A hybrid approach for simulating fluid loading effects on structures using experimental modal analysis and the boundary element method.

    PubMed

    Shepherd, Micah R; Fahnline, John B; Dare, Tyler P; Hambric, Stephen A; Campbell, Robert L

    2015-11-01

    Many structural acoustics problems involve a vibrating structure in a heavy fluid. However, obtaining fluid-loaded natural frequencies and damping experimentally can be difficult and expensive. This paper presents a hybrid experimental-numerical approach to determine the heavy-fluid-loaded resonance frequencies and damping of a structure from in-air measurements. The approach combines in-air experimentally obtained mode shapes with simulated in-water acoustic resistance and reactance matrices computed using boundary element (BE) analysis. The procedure relies on accurate estimates of the mass-normalized, in vacuo mode shapes using singular value decomposition and rational fraction polynomial fitting, which are then used as basis modes for the in-water BE analysis. The method is validated on a 4.445 cm (1.75 in.) thick nickel-aluminum-bronze rectangular plate by comparing natural frequencies and damping obtained using the hybrid approach to equivalent data obtained from actual in-water measurements. Good agreement is shown for the fluid-loaded natural frequencies and one-third octave loss factors. Finally, the limitations of the hybrid approach are examined. PMID:26627781

  14. An experimental evidence-based computational paradigm for new logic-gates in neuronal activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vardi, R.; Guberman, S.; Goldental, A.; Kanter, I.

    2013-09-01

    We propose a new experimentally corroborated paradigm in which the functionality of the brain's logic-gates depends on the history of their activity, e.g. an OR-gate that turns into a XOR-gate over time. Our results are based on an experimental procedure where conditioned stimulations were enforced on circuits of neurons embedded within a large-scale network of cortical cells in vitro. The underlying biological mechanism is the unavoidable increase of neuronal response latency to ongoing stimulations, which imposes a non-uniform gradual stretching of network delays.

  15. Deutsche Bundespost/FTZ activities in the Olympus experimentation program: Ojectives and experiment set-ups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lugert, M.

    1989-05-01

    The activities of the Telecommunications Engineering Center (FTZ) of the Deutsche Bundespost in the Olympus Experimentation Program are presented. The various communication experiments which are to be carried out in the framework of the GECO (Group of Experimenters of CEPT Administrations for Olympus) are described. These include: TV news gathering/TV distribution, teleseminar experiments, data distribution to microterminal experiments, SMS-TDMA (time division multiple access) experiments, and TDMA frequency diversity experiments. The applied experiment configurations and the layout and design of the transportable 20/30 GHz earth stations to be used in the experiments are described.

  16. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACHES TO EVALUATING THE ROLE OF ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Epidemiologic studies have suggested factors in drinking water influence on the human cardiovascular system. A clear identification of the factors involved requires more invasive techniques and more strict experimental controls than can usually be applied in epidemiologic studies...

  17. Genesis of Dune Fields Under Unidirectional Wind with Sand Input Flux Control: An Experimental Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, A.; Courrech du Pont, S.; Rodriguez, S.; Valance, A.; Narteau, C.; Gao, X.; Lucas, A.

    2015-05-01

    Our experimental studies with control of wind and sediment source will characterize more precisely the different modes of dune formation and long-term evolution, and constrain the physics behind the morphogenesis and dynamics of dunes fields.

  18. Theoretical and experimental approaches to possible thresholds of response in carcinogenicity

    EPA Science Inventory

    The determination and utilization of the actual low dose-response relationship for chemical carcinogens has long interested toxicologists, experimental pathologists, modelers and risk assessors. To date, no unequivocal examples of carcinogenic thresholds in humans are known. Ho...

  19. Experimental and calculated approach to the study of deformation and strength characteristics of elastoviscoplastic materials by direct impact method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazhenov, V. G.; Baranova, M. S.; Nagornykh, E. V.; Osetrov, D. L.

    2015-09-01

    It is proposed to develop experimental and calculated approach to the study of the strength characteristics of elastoviscoplastic materials in a non-uniform strain-stress state. Integral characteristics (forces, displacements and displacement speed) of the deformation process of hat-shaped specimens in tension are determined by a direct impact method, and their strain - stress states are determined by numerical solution of the axisymmetric problem. The results of experimental and theoretical study of the deformation and failure of hat-shaped specimens in the presence of stress concentrators are obtained.

  20. A consumption approach to wastes from economic activities.

    PubMed

    Beylot, Antoine; Boitier, Baptiste; Lancesseur, Nicolas; Villeneuve, Jacques

    2016-03-01

    In a context of waste management policies aimed at promoting waste prevention and recycling and, conversely, reducing waste landfilling, this study investigates how waste is generated and treated in a consumption perspective. A Waste Input-Output Analysis is implemented that considers 14 waste fractions and four waste management techniques. Input-Output Tables extended to wastes are initially compiled for the year 2008 considering France and five of its main import suppliers, and further completed with data on waste treatment. Wastes from economic activities are accordingly reallocated to the product categories of household consumption that induce their production. In particular, considering five waste categories (dry recyclable wastes, mixed wastes, mineral wastes, organic wastes, and total wastes) as an aggregation of the 14 waste fractions studied, the ten product categories with the highest contribution account for 64-86% of the total generation of wastes. Waste intensity and volume of expenses are analyzed as the drivers for the amounts of wastes induced by each product category. Similarly, the products responsible for the largest amounts of waste landfilling and incineration without energy recovery, i.e. the management techniques at the bottom of the "waste management hierarchy", are identified. Moreover, this study highlights the relative importance of waste produced abroad as compared to that produced in France, regarding the total amount of waste induced by French household consumption. The sensitivity of results to the modeling of import production is subsequently discussed. Finally, the potential perspectives for this type of consumption approach are considered with respect to its utility and current limitations in a context of waste policy planning, and more particularly regarding the way waste policy targets are set. PMID:26851169

  1. Target-classification approach applied to active UXO sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shubitidze, F.; Fernández, J. P.; Shamatava, Irma; Barrowes, B. E.; O'Neill, K.

    2013-06-01

    This study is designed to illustrate the discrimination performance at two UXO active sites (Oklahoma's Fort Sill and the Massachusetts Military Reservation) of a set of advanced electromagnetic induction (EMI) inversion/discrimination models which include the orthonormalized volume magnetic source (ONVMS), joint diagonalization (JD), and differential evolution (DE) approaches and whose power and flexibility greatly exceed those of the simple dipole model. The Fort Sill site is highly contaminated by a mix of the following types of munitions: 37-mm target practice tracers, 60-mm illumination mortars, 75-mm and 4.5'' projectiles, 3.5'', 2.36'', and LAAW rockets, antitank mine fuzes with and without hex nuts, practice MK2 and M67 grenades, 2.5'' ballistic windshields, M2A1-mines with/without bases, M19-14 time fuzes, and 40-mm practice grenades with/without cartridges. The site at the MMR site contains targets of yet different sizes. In this work we apply our models to EMI data collected using the MetalMapper (MM) and 2 × 2 TEMTADS sensors. The data for each anomaly are inverted to extract estimates of the extrinsic and intrinsic parameters associated with each buried target. (The latter include the total volume magnetic source or NVMS, which relates to size, shape, and material properties; the former includes location, depth, and orientation). The estimated intrinsic parameters are then used for classification performed via library matching and the use of statistical classification algorithms; this process yielded prioritized dig-lists that were submitted to the Institute for Defense Analyses (IDA) for independent scoring. The models' classification performance is illustrated and assessed based on these independent evaluations.

  2. An improvement of Barter's method for assaying plasma cholesterol ester transfer activity: experimental and clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Harvengt, C; Desager, J P; Mailleux, P; Heller, F R

    1989-01-01

    The use of a discontinuous density gradient and of a vertical rotor to separate plasma lipoproteins are modifications of Barter's described method for assaying cholesteryl ester transfer activity (CETA) in plasma. The original feature of our approach is the fast preparation of the labeled substrate by a physiologic-like process, which renders the assay easy and suitable for measurement of this activity in both man and animals. PMID:2730951

  3. Life in the Clouds of Venus? An Experimental Synthetic Biology Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothschild, L. J.; Paulino-Lima, I. G.; Amatya, D.; Bajar, B.; Geilich, B.; Hu, J.; Jackson, C. J.

    2015-01-01

    The surface of Venus constitutes the most hellish and biologically inhospitable planetary surface in our solar system, boasting a pH of 0, blistering winds that can melt lead, and pressures of 60 atm. However, during the earlier years of the solar system, without the runaway greenhouse effect that has plagued the planet, Venus potentially housed oceans and perhaps even life. There is a possibility that microbes could have retreated into hospitable niches in the atmosphere, as suggested by Carl Sagan as early as 1967 [1]. For example, 50 km above the raging hell of the Venusian surface, exists a relatively temperate environment that might serve as reservoir for life. This astrobiology project seeks to explore life at the extremes and to theorize whether microbial communities could not only survive but also reproduce in the Venusian atmosphere. Specifically, we ask: are aerosols viable microbial environments? But before we can test for life in the clouds, we have to develop a proper reporter to visualize cell growth in situ. For this purpose, we aimed to develop cell-growth dependent reporters to serve as remote biosensors for cell growth. We developed two using the polA promoter, a DNA-replication dependent promoter, and nrd operon promoter, a cell-cycle dependent promoter. Using these cell-growth reporters, the next step is to aerosolize microbes expressing these reporters in a suspension chamber adapted from a Millikan Drop Apparatus to assay reproduction in an aerosolized environment. Better yet is to test the reproduction of microbes in a microgravity regime such as on ISS.Approach: We engineered two cell-cycle dependent genetic reporters. One was the polA promoter which codes for DNA Polymerase I, a gene active in DNA replication [2]. The other was the nrdP. The activation of ribonucleotide reductase reduces ribonucleotides into deoxyribonucleotides and is involved in the bacterial cell cycle [3]. This promoter began activation during the initiation of DNA

  4. Comparing Different Approaches to Visualizing Light Waves: An Experimental Study on Teaching Wave Optics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mešic, Vanes; Hajder, Erna; Neumann, Knut; Erceg, Nataša

    2016-01-01

    Research has shown that students have tremendous difficulties developing a qualitative understanding of wave optics, at all educational levels. In this study, we investigate how three different approaches to visualizing light waves affect students' understanding of wave optics. In the first, the conventional, approach light waves are represented…

  5. Experimental autoimmune neuritis induces differential microglia activation in the rat spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Beiter, Thomas; Artelt, Matthias R; Trautmann, Katrin; Schluesener, Hermann J

    2005-03-01

    The reactive spatial and temporal activation pattern of parenchymal spinal cord microglia was analyzed in rat experimental autoimmune neuritis (EAN). We observed a differential activation of spinal cord microglial cells. A significant increase in ED1(+) microglia predominantly located in the dorsal horn grey matter of lumbar and thoracic spinal cord levels was observed on Day 12. As revealed by morphological criteria and by staining with further activation markers [allograft inflammatory factor 1 (AIF-1), EMAPII, OX6, P2X(4)R], reactive microglia did not reach a macrophage-like state of full activation. On Day 12, a significant proliferative response could be observed, affecting all spinal cord areas and including ED1(+) microglial cells and a wide range of putative progenitor cells. Thus, in rat EAN, a reactive localized and distinct microglial activation correlating with a generalized proliferative response could be observed. PMID:15710454

  6. Effect of experimental muscle pain on maximal voluntary activation of human biceps brachii muscle.

    PubMed

    Khan, Serajul I; McNeil, Chris J; Gandevia, Simon C; Taylor, Janet L

    2011-09-01

    Muscle pain has widespread effects on motor performance, but the effect of pain on voluntary activation, which is the level of neural drive to contracting muscle, is not known. To determine whether induced muscle pain reduces voluntary activation during maximal voluntary contractions, voluntary activation of elbow flexors was assessed with both motor-point stimulation and transcranial magnetic stimulation over the motor cortex. In addition, we performed a psychophysical experiment to investigate the effect of induced muscle pain across a wide range of submaximal efforts (5-75% maximum). In all studies, elbow flexion torque was recorded before, during, and after experimental muscle pain by injection of 1 ml of 5% hypertonic saline into biceps. Injection of hypertonic saline evoked deep pain in the muscle (pain rating ∼5 on a scale from 0 to 10). Experimental muscle pain caused a small (∼5%) but significant reduction of maximal voluntary torque in the motor-point and motor cortical studies (P < 0.001 and P = 0.045, respectively; n = 7). By contrast, experimental muscle pain had no significant effect on voluntary activation when assessed with motor-point and motor cortical stimulation although voluntary activation tested with motor-point stimulation was reduced by ∼2% in contractions after pain had resolved (P = 0.003). Furthermore, induced muscle pain had no significant effect on torque output during submaximal efforts (P > 0.05; n = 6), which suggests that muscle pain did not alter the relationship between the sense of effort and production of voluntary torque. Hence, the present study suggests that transient experimental muscle pain in biceps brachii has a limited effect on central motor pathways. PMID:21737829

  7. Activity plan for activity E-20-81: development and experimental validation of crevice corrosion models

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, J C

    1999-12-28

    Alloy 22 [UNS N06022] is now being considered for construction of high level waste containers to be emplaced at the potential repository at Yucca Mountain or elsewhere. In essence, this alloy is 21% Cr, 13% Mo, 4% Fe, 3% W, 2% Co, with the balance being Ni. Variants without tungsten are also being considered. Detailed mechanistic models are being developed to account for the corrosion of Alloy 22 surfaces in crevices that will inevitably form. Such occluded areas experience substantial decreases in pH, with corresponding elevations in chloride concentration. Other relevant materials will also be investigated: nickel-based alloys such as Alloys 825, 625, C-4, C-276 and 59; titanium-based alloys such as Grades 12, 7 and 16, carbon steels such as A516 Grade 55; stainless steels such as 304, 304L, 316, 316L and 316NG; various copper-based alloys; and any materials that would serve as crevice formers (rock, thermally-sprayed ceramics, etc.). Experimental work has been undertaken to validate the crevice corrosion model, including parallel studies with 304 stainless steel. The crevice corrosion model is described in detail in scientific notebooks of the Principal Investigator, as well as other publications. Codes will be prepared in accordance with the YMP QP entitled ''Software Quality Assurance'' (033-YMP-QP 12.0).

  8. Reduction of electronic delay in active noise control systems--a multirate signal processing approach.

    PubMed

    Bai, Mingsian R; Lin, Yuanpei; Lai, Jienwen

    2002-02-01

    Electronic delay has been a critical problem in active noise control (ANC) systems. This is true whether a feedforward structure or a feedback structure is adopted. In particular, excessive delays would create a causality problem in a feedforward ANC system of a finite-length duct. This paper suggests a multirate signal-processing approach for minimizing the electronic delay in the control loop. In this approach, digital controllers are required in decimation and interpolation of discrete-time signals. The computation efficiency is further enhanced by a polyphase method, where the phases of low-pass finite impulse response (FIR) filters must be carefully designed to avoid unnecessary delays. Frequency domain optimization procedures based on H1, H2, and Hinfinity norms, respectively, are utilized in the FIR filter design. The proposed method was implemented by using a floating-point digital signal processor. Experimental results showed that the multirate approach remains effective for suppressing a broadband (200-600 Hz) noise in a duct with a minimum upstream measurement microphone placement of 20 cm. PMID:11863193

  9. Ab Initio Approach for Prediction of Oxide Surface Structure, Stoichiometry, and Electrocatalytic Activity in Aqueous Solution.

    PubMed

    Rong, Xi; Kolpak, Alexie M

    2015-05-01

    The design of efficient, stable, and inexpensive catalysts for oxygen evolution and reduction is crucial for the development of electrochemical energy conversion devices such as fuel cells and metal-air batteries. Currently, such design is limited by challenges in atomic-scale experimental characterization and computational modeling of solid-liquid interfaces. Here, we begin to address these issues by developing a general-, first-principles-, and electrochemical-principles-based framework for prediction of catalyst surface structure, stoichiometry, and stability as a function of pH, electrode potential, and aqueous cation concentration. We demonstrate the approach by determining the surface phase diagram of LaMnO3, which has been studied for oxygen evolution and reduction and computing the reaction overpotentials on the relevant surface phases. Our results illustrate the critical role of solvated cation species in governing the catalyst surface structure and stoichiometry, and thereby catalytic activity, in aqueous solution. PMID:26263350

  10. Experimental evaluation of analgesic and anti-inflammatory activity of simvastatin and atorvastatin

    PubMed Central

    Jaiswal, Swapnil R.; Sontakke, Smita D.

    2012-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study is to evaluate the analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities of atorvastatin and simvastatin in different experimental models in mice and rats. Materials and Methods: Analgesic activity of simvastatin and atorvastatin was assessed in tail flick model in rats (n = 6), where it was compared with aspirin and tramadol and in acetic acid induced writhing in mice (n = 6), where it was compared with aspirin. Anti-inflammatory activity of statins was evaluated using carrageenin induced paw edema and formalin induced arthritis in rats. Results: In the tail flick method, analgesic effect of tramadol was significantly more than the other drugs except at two observation times, when it was comparable to simvastatin and atorvastatin. Effect of simvastatin was found to be comparable to aspirin. In acetic acid induced writhing method, analgesic activity of simvastatin was comparable to that of aspirin while that of atorvastatin was significantly less. In carrageenin induced paw edema in rats, both simvastatin and atorvastatin showed anti-inflammatory activity which was comparable to aspirin. Both the statins exhibited significant anti-inflammatory activity (P < 0.01) in formalin induced arthritis model though less than aspirin (P < 0.05). Conclusion: The results of this study if substantiated by further experimental and clinical research suggest that simvastatin and atorvastatin may play an adjuvant role, which may be particularly beneficial in the treatment of inflammatory disorders, especially when there is coexisting dyslipidemia. PMID:23087508

  11. Organizing a Campus Activity: An Alternative Learning Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bee, Mary Tracy; Montante, James; Lanigan, Kate; Andrzejak, Michelle; Grabowski, Greg

    2011-01-01

    Alternative teaching styles provide a unique and rewarding approach to reinforcing student knowledge and developing social skills. An approach that we implemented required students from the ecology class to organize and present information at the university-wide Earth Day celebration and exposition. In addition to the informational and research…

  12. Comparing different approaches to visualizing light waves: An experimental study on teaching wave optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mešić, Vanes; Hajder, Erna; Neumann, Knut; Erceg, Nataša

    2016-06-01

    Research has shown that students have tremendous difficulties developing a qualitative understanding of wave optics, at all educational levels. In this study, we investigate how three different approaches to visualizing light waves affect students' understanding of wave optics. In the first, the conventional, approach light waves are represented by sinusoidal curves. The second teaching approach includes representing light waves by a series of static images, showing the oscillating electric field vectors at characteristic, subsequent instants of time. Within the third approach phasors are used for visualizing light waves. A total of N =85 secondary school students were randomly assigned to one of the three teaching approaches, each of which lasted a period of four class hours. Students who learned with phasors and students who learned from the series of static images outperformed the students learning according to the conventional approach, i.e., they showed a much better understanding of basic wave optics, as measured by a conceptual survey administered to the students one week after the treatment. Our results suggest that visualizing light waves with phasors or oscillating electric field vectors is a promising approach to developing a deeper understanding of wave optics for students enrolled in conceptual level physics courses.

  13. Bond slip detection of concrete-encased composite structure using shear wave based active sensing approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Lei; Parvasi, Seyed Mohammad; Kong, Qingzhao; Huo, Linsheng; Lim, Ing; Li, Mo; Song, Gangbing

    2015-12-01

    Concrete-encased composite structure exhibits improved strength, ductility and fire resistance compared to traditional reinforced concrete, by incorporating the advantages of both steel and concrete materials. A major drawback of this type of structure is the bond slip introduced between steel and concrete, which directly reduces the load capacity of the structure. In this paper, an active sensing approach using shear waves to provide monitoring and early warning of the development of bond slip in the concrete-encased composite structure is proposed. A specimen of concrete-encased composite structure was investigated. In this active sensing approach, shear mode smart aggregates (SAs) embedded in the concrete act as actuators and generate desired shear stress waves. Distributed piezoceramic transducers installed in the cavities of steel plates act as sensors and detect the wave response from shear mode SAs. Bond slip acts as a form of stress relief and attenuates the wave propagation energy. Experimental results from the time domain analysis clearly indicate that the amplitudes of received signal by lead zirconate titanate sensors decreased when bond slip occurred. In addition, a wavelet packet-based analysis was developed to compute the received signal energy values, which can be used to determine the initiation and development of bond slip in concrete-encased composite structure. In order to establish the validity of the proposed method, a 3D finite element analysis of the concrete-steel bond model is further performed with the aid of the commercial finite element package, Abaqus, and the numerical results are compared with the results obtained in experimental study.

  14. Using the Montessori Approach for a Clientele with Cognitive Impairments: A Quasi-Experimental Study Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giroux, Dominique; Robichaud, Line; Paradis, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Background: The choice of activities responding to the needs of people with moderate to severe dementia is a growing concern for care providers trying to target the need for a feeling of self-accomplishment by adapting activities to the abilities of elderly patients. The activities created by Maria Montessori seem to be adaptable to this…

  15. An Improved Experimental Model of Hemorrhoids in Rats: Evaluation of Antihemorrhoidal Activity of an Herbal Formulation

    PubMed Central

    Azeemuddin, Mohammed; Viswanatha, Gollapalle Lakshminarayanashastry; Thippeswamy, Agadi HireMath; Baig, Mirza Rizwan; Kavya, Kethaganahalli Jayaramaiah; Patki, Pralhad Sadashiv; Shyam, Ramakrishnan

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To improve the existing experimental model of croton oil-induced hemorrhoids in rats by using Evans Blue (EB) dye extravasation technique. Further, an herbal formulation (Pilex) was evaluated for its antihemorrhoidal activity in this model. Methods. Two sets of experiments were carried out: first to improve the experimental model and to validate the same using Pilex and second to evaluate the effect of Pilex on cytoarchitecture of rectoanal tissue in croton oil-induced hemorrhoids. In both sets, hemorrhoids were induced to all the animals, except normal controls, by applying croton oil via rectoanal region and the effect of Pilex ointment (PO), Pilex granules (PG), and combination of PG and PO was evaluated. In the first set, extravasation of EB dye, TNF-α, IL-6, and rectoanal coefficient (RAC) was determined. In the second set, severity of score, RAC, and histopathology were evaluated. Results. The elevated levels of TNF-α, IL-6, and extravasations of EB dye were decreased with the Pilex treatment. The cytoarchitecture of rectoanal portion of the animals treated with Pilex was near to normal. Conclusion. The improved experimental model of hemorrhoid is useful in quantifying the inflammatory exudates and extent of inflammation. In this improved experimental model Pilex showed antihemorrhoidal activity, which further validates its clinical usage. PMID:25006493

  16. Acupuncture Attenuated Inflammation and Inhibited Th17 and Treg Activity in Experimental Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Ying; Dong, Ming; Zhang, Hongying; Lv, Yubao; Liu, Jiaqi; Wei, Kai; Luo, Qingli; Sun, Jing; Liu, Feng; Xu, Fei; Dong, Jingcheng

    2015-01-01

    Acupuncture is an effective therapeutic method in asthma treatment in traditional Chinese medicine. Here, we evaluated the effect of acupuncture on airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) and the associated inflammatory changes as well as Th17 and Treg activity in ovalbumin- (OVA-) induced experimental asthma. Our results revealed that acupuncture treatment significantly inhibited AHR, lung inflammation, and mucus secretion of experimental asthma mice. Furthermore, a decrease in lymphocytes and eosinophils as well as neutrophils was observed in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) of mice treated with acupuncture. Acupuncture reduced the OVA specific IgE level as well as the Th17 cytokine levels including IL-17A, IL-17F, and IL-22 in the serum of the experimental asthma mice. Acupuncture treatment group also had reduced CD4+IL-17A+ cell numbers and increased CD4+Foxp3+ cell numbers in BALF. In addition, acupuncture could inhibit IL-17R, RORγt, p65, and the inhibitor of NF-κB kinase-α (IKKα) protein expression. Our results indicated that acupuncture was effective in inhibiting AHR and inflammation in OVA-induced experimental asthma, which may be associated with the regulation of Th17 and Treg activity and NF-κB pathway. PMID:26612993

  17. Acupuncture Attenuated Inflammation and Inhibited Th17 and Treg Activity in Experimental Asthma.

    PubMed

    Wei, Ying; Dong, Ming; Zhang, Hongying; Lv, Yubao; Liu, Jiaqi; Wei, Kai; Luo, Qingli; Sun, Jing; Liu, Feng; Xu, Fei; Dong, Jingcheng

    2015-01-01

    Acupuncture is an effective therapeutic method in asthma treatment in traditional Chinese medicine. Here, we evaluated the effect of acupuncture on airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) and the associated inflammatory changes as well as Th17 and Treg activity in ovalbumin- (OVA-) induced experimental asthma. Our results revealed that acupuncture treatment significantly inhibited AHR, lung inflammation, and mucus secretion of experimental asthma mice. Furthermore, a decrease in lymphocytes and eosinophils as well as neutrophils was observed in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) of mice treated with acupuncture. Acupuncture reduced the OVA specific IgE level as well as the Th17 cytokine levels including IL-17A, IL-17F, and IL-22 in the serum of the experimental asthma mice. Acupuncture treatment group also had reduced CD4+IL-17A+ cell numbers and increased CD4+Foxp3+ cell numbers in BALF. In addition, acupuncture could inhibit IL-17R, RORγt, p65, and the inhibitor of NF-κB kinase-α (IKKα) protein expression. Our results indicated that acupuncture was effective in inhibiting AHR and inflammation in OVA-induced experimental asthma, which may be associated with the regulation of Th17 and Treg activity and NF-κB pathway. PMID:26612993

  18. Chondroprotective activity of N-acetylglucosamine in rabbits with experimental osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Shikhman, A; Amiel, D; D'Lima, D; Hwang, S; Hu, C; Xu, A; Hashimoto, S; Kobayashi, K; Sasho, T; Lotz, M

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To examine the therapeutic efficacy of N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) in rabbits with experimental osteoarthritis (OA). Methods: Experimental OA was induced in rabbits by anterior cruciate ligament transection (ACLT). In the first study, rabbits (six in each group) received intramuscular injections of GlcNAc or normal saline three times a week starting 1 week postoperatively. In the second study, rabbits (eight in each group) were injected intra-articularly with GlcNAc (either once or twice a week) or normal saline. In the third study, rabbits (seven in each group) were injected intra-articularly twice a week with either GlcNAc, hyaluronan, or normal saline. Animals were killed 8 weeks after ACLT for macroscopic and histological assessment of the knee joints. Results: Intramuscular administration of GlcNAc in rabbits with experimental knee OA did not show chondroprotective effects but showed mild anti-inflammatory activity. In contrast, intra-articular administration of GlcNAc twice a week reduced cartilage degradation. Additionally, intra-articular GlcNAc also suppressed synovitis. Once a week intra-articular injections of GlcNAc did not demonstrate therapeutic efficacy. The chondroprotective efficacy of GlcNAc was better than that of viscosupplementation treatment with hyaluronan. Conclusion: Intra-articular GlcNAc has chondroprotective and anti-inflammatory activity in experimental OA. PMID:15608304

  19. An integrated experimental approach to treating young people who sexually abuse.

    PubMed

    Longo, Robert E

    2004-01-01

    This article promotes the use of an integrated (holistic) approach to treating juvenile sexual offenders. An integrated model takes into account the fact that: (a) youth are resilient, (b) youth progress through various stages of development, (c) these stages are often arrested as a result of trauma, child abuse and neglect, and attachment disorders, (d) humanistic approaches and the therapeutic relationship are essential to the healing and recovery process, (e) youth learn and work with a variety of learning styles and multiple intelligences, (f) many traditional assessment and treatment approaches can be modified and blended with an integrated approach, and (g) the use of experiential treatments can have a positive and profound impact in treating youth with sexual behavior problems. PMID:15914396

  20. Identification and induction of human, social, and cultural capitals through an experimental approach to stormwater management

    EPA Science Inventory

    Decentralized stormwater management is based on the dispersal of stormwater management practices (SWMP) throughout a watershed to manage stormwater runoff volume and potentially restore natural hydrologic processes. This approach to stormwater management is increasingly popular b...

  1. An experimental approach to determine the heat transfer coefficient in directional solidification furnaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banan, Mohsen; Gray, Ross T.; Wilcox, William R.

    1992-01-01

    The heat transfer coefficient between a molten charge and its surroundings in a Bridgman furnace was experimentally determined using in-situ temperature measurement. The ampoule containing an isothermal melt was suddenly moved from a higher temperature zone to a lower temperature zone. The temperature-time history was used in a lumped-capacity cooling model to evaluate the heat transfer coefficient between the charge and the furnace. The experimentally determined heat transfer coefficient was of the same order of magnitude as the theoretical value estimated by standard heat transfer calculations.

  2. A Deterministic Approach to Active Debris Removal Target Selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lidtke, A.; Lewis, H.; Armellin, R.

    2014-09-01

    Many decisions, with widespread economic, political and legal consequences, are being considered based on space debris simulations that show that Active Debris Removal (ADR) may be necessary as the concerns about the sustainability of spaceflight are increasing. The debris environment predictions are based on low-accuracy ephemerides and propagators. This raises doubts about the accuracy of those prognoses themselves but also the potential ADR target-lists that are produced. Target selection is considered highly important as removal of many objects will increase the overall mission cost. Selecting the most-likely candidates as soon as possible would be desirable as it would enable accurate mission design and allow thorough evaluation of in-orbit validations, which are likely to occur in the near-future, before any large investments are made and implementations realized. One of the primary factors that should be used in ADR target selection is the accumulated collision probability of every object. A conjunction detection algorithm, based on the smart sieve method, has been developed. Another algorithm is then applied to the found conjunctions to compute the maximum and true probabilities of collisions taking place. The entire framework has been verified against the Conjunction Analysis Tools in AGIs Systems Toolkit and relative probability error smaller than 1.5% has been achieved in the final maximum collision probability. Two target-lists are produced based on the ranking of the objects according to the probability they will take part in any collision over the simulated time window. These probabilities are computed using the maximum probability approach, that is time-invariant, and estimates of the true collision probability that were computed with covariance information. The top-priority targets are compared, and the impacts of the data accuracy and its decay are highlighted. General conclusions regarding the importance of Space Surveillance and Tracking for the

  3. An integrated approach for non-periodic dynamic response prediction of complex structures: Numerical and experimental analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahneshin, Vahid; Chierichetti, Maria

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, a combined numerical and experimental method, called Extended Load Confluence Algorithm, is presented to accurately predict the dynamic response of non-periodic structures when little or no information about the applied loads is available. This approach, which falls into the category of Shape Sensing methods, inputs limited experimental information acquired from sensors to a mapping algorithm that predicts the response at unmeasured locations. The proposed algorithm consists of three major cores: an experimental core for data acquisition, a numerical core based on Finite Element Method for modeling the structure, and a mapping algorithm that improves the numerical model based on a modal approach in the frequency domain. The robustness and precision of the proposed algorithm are verified through numerical and experimental examples. The results of this paper demonstrate that without a precise knowledge of the loads acting on the structure, the dynamic behavior of the system can be predicted in an effective and precise manner after just a few iterations.

  4. Experimental Evaluation of Behavioral Activation Treatment of Anxiety (BATA) in Three Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Jarrod S.; Leach, David J.

    2010-01-01

    This report describes three single-case experimental evaluations of Behavioral Activation Treatment of Anxiety (BATA) applied with a 51-year-old male, a 62-year-old female, and a 53-year-old female, each of whom met DSM-IV criteria for anxiety. Each case was a clinical replication of an initial trial of BATA reported in Turner and Leach (2009).…

  5. In-situ measurement of dust devil activity at La Jornada Experimental Range, New Mexico, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, Ralph D.; Neakrase, Lynn D.; Anderson, John D.

    2015-12-01

    We document observations of dust devil vortices using a linear array of 10 miniature pressure- and sunlight-logging stations in summer 2013 at La Jornada Experimental Range in the southwestern USA. These data provide a census of vortex and dust-devil activity at this site. The simultaneous spatially-distributed measurements resolve the horizontal pressure structure of several dust devil encounters, and the data can be fit well with an analytic model, giving independent measures of vortex size and intensity.

  6. International Approaches to Whole-of-School Physical Activity Promotion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMullen, Jaimie; Ní Chróinín, Déirdre; Tammelin, Tuija; Pogorzelska, Malgorzata; van der Mars, Hans

    2015-01-01

    Increasing physical activity opportunities in schools has emerged as a global priority among school-aged youth. As a result, many countries have designed and implemented whole-of-school physical activity initiatives that seek to increase physical activity opportunities that are available to school-aged children before, during, and after school.…

  7. A Portfolio Approach to Impacting Physically Active Lifestyles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Ray; Pulling, Andrew R.; Alpert, Amanda; Jackman, Emma

    2014-01-01

    This article presents a physical activity portfolio designed to help students manage their own fitness and health-related physical activity outside of the physical education classroom. A main goal of physical education programs is to prepare students to lead a physically active lifestyle and maintain a lifetime of health-related fitness. The…

  8. Evaluating uncertainty in 7Be-based soil erosion estimates: an experimental plot approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blake, Will; Taylor, Alex; Abdelli, Wahid; Gaspar, Leticia; Barri, Bashar Al; Ryken, Nick; Mabit, Lionel

    2014-05-01

    Soil erosion remains a major concern for the international community and there is a growing need to improve the sustainability of agriculture to support future food security. High resolution soil erosion data are a fundamental requirement for underpinning soil conservation and management strategies but representative data on soil erosion rates are difficult to achieve by conventional means without interfering with farming practice and hence compromising the representativeness of results. Fallout radionuclide (FRN) tracer technology offers a solution since FRN tracers are delivered to the soil surface by natural processes and, where irreversible binding can be demonstrated, redistributed in association with soil particles. While much work has demonstrated the potential of short-lived 7Be (half-life 53 days), particularly in quantification of short-term inter-rill erosion, less attention has focussed on sources of uncertainty in derived erosion measurements and sampling strategies to minimise these. This poster outlines and discusses potential sources of uncertainty in 7Be-based soil erosion estimates and the experimental design considerations taken to quantify these in the context of a plot-scale validation experiment. Traditionally, gamma counting statistics have been the main element of uncertainty propagated and reported but recent work has shown that other factors may be more important such as: (i) spatial variability in the relaxation mass depth that describes the shape of the 7Be depth distribution for an uneroded point; (ii) spatial variability in fallout (linked to rainfall patterns and shadowing) over both reference site and plot; (iii) particle size sorting effects; (iv) preferential mobility of fallout over active runoff contributing areas. To explore these aspects in more detail, a plot of 4 x 35 m was ploughed and tilled to create a bare, sloped soil surface at the beginning of winter 2013/2014 in southwest UK. The lower edge of the plot was bounded by

  9. Experimental evidence that livestock grazing intensity affects the activity of a generalist predator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villar, Nacho; Lambin, Xavier; Evans, Darren; Pakeman, Robin; Redpath, Steve

    2013-05-01

    Grazing by domestic ungulates has substantial impacts on ecosystem structure and composition. In grasslands of the northern hemisphere, livestock grazing limits populations of small mammals, which are a main food source for a variety of vertebrate predators. However, no experimental studies have described the impact of livestock grazing on vertebrate predators. We experimentally manipulated sheep and cattle grazing intensity in the Scottish uplands to test its impact on a relatively abundant small mammal, the field vole (Microtus agrestis), and its archetypal generalist predator, the red fox (Vulpes vulpes). We demonstrate that ungulate grazing had a strong consistent negative impact on both vole densities and indices of fox activity. Ungulate grazing did not substantially affect the relationship between fox activity and vole densities. However, the data suggested that, as grazing intensity increased i) fox activity indices tended to be higher when vole densities were low, and ii) the relationship between fox activity and vole density was weaker. All these patterns are surprising given the relative small scale of our experiment compared to large red fox territories in upland habitats of Britain, and suggest that domestic grazing intensity causes a strong response in the activity of generalist predators important for their conservation in grassland ecosystems.

  10. Experimental approach to validation of an analytical and numerical thermal analysis of a travelling wave tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiejak, W.; Wymysłowski, A.

    2016-01-01

    Travelling Wave Tube (TWT) is an electronic vacuum microwave device, which is used as a high power microwave amplifier, mainly in telecommunication purposes, e.g. radar systems. TWT's is an alternative solution in comparison to semiconductor devices in case of high power and high frequency applications. Thermal behaviour of TWT is one of the key aspects influencing its reliability and working parameters. The main goal of the research was to perform analytical, experimental and numerical analysis of a temperature distribution of a low band TWT in case of a typical working condition. Because the theoretical analysis seems to be very complex thus it was decided to compare the experimental results with the numerical simulations as well as with the simplified analytical formulas. As a first step of the presented research, the analytical analysis and numerical modelling of the helix TWT was carried out. The objective of the thermal analysis was to assess the temperature distribution in different parts of the helix TWT assembly during the extreme standard and working conditions. As a second stage of the research the numerical results were validated by the experimental measurements, which were carried out using a specially designed TWT test samples and corresponding experimental measurement tools.

  11. Replicating Experimental Impact Estimates Using a Regression Discontinuity Approach. NCEE 2012-4025

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gleason, Philip M.; Resch, Alexandra M.; Berk, Jillian A.

    2012-01-01

    This NCEE Technical Methods Paper compares the estimated impacts of an educational intervention using experimental and regression discontinuity (RD) study designs. The analysis used data from two large-scale randomized controlled trials--the Education Technology Evaluation and the Teach for America Study--to provide evidence on the performance of…

  12. A combined experimental-numerical approach for two-phase flow boiling in a minichannel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hożejowska, Sylwia; Grabowski, Mirosław

    2016-03-01

    The paper addresses experimental and numerical modeling of the two-phase flows in an asymmetrically heated horizontal minichannel. Experimental measurements concerned flows of evaporating ethanol in a minichannel with rectangular cross section 1.8mm × 2 mm. In order to observe the flows, measuring system was designed and built. The system measured and recorded basic heat and flow parameters of flowing fluid, and the temperature of external surface of the heater by using infrared camera and recorded images of flow with high-speed camera. The second aim of the paper was to formulate appropriate flow boiling heat transfer model, which would minimises the use of experimentally determined constants. The procedure of calculating the temperature of the ethanol is coupled with concurrent process of determining the temperature distributions in the isolating foil and the heating surface. The two-dimensional temperature distributions in three subsequent domains were calculated with Trefftz method. Due to the Robin condition, heat transfer coefficient at the heating surface-ethanol interface was calculated based on the known temperature distributions of the foil and liquid. Additionally, the paper describes the relation between two sets of functions used in the calculation. Numerical calculations made by Trefftz method were performed with using experimental data.

  13. A Musical Approach to Reading Fluency: An Experimental Study in First-Grade Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leguizamon, Daniel F.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this quantitative, quasi-experimental study was to investigate the relationship between Kodaly-based music instruction and reading fluency in first-grade classrooms. Reading fluency and overall reading achievement were measured for 109 participants at mid-point in the academic year pre- and post treatment. Tests were carried out to…

  14. Dimensional Comparisons: An Experimental Approach to the Internal/External Frame of Reference Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moller, Jens; Koller, Olaf

    2001-01-01

    Three experimental studies investigated psychological processes underlying the effects of achievement in one domain and on self-perceived competence in another. In Study 1, high achievement in one domain led to lower self-perceived competence in the other. Study 2 showed inverse effects on self-perceived competence based on achievement feedback.…

  15. A Combined Experimental and Computational Approach to Subject-Specific Analysis of Knee Joint Laxity.

    PubMed

    Harris, Michael D; Cyr, Adam J; Ali, Azhar A; Fitzpatrick, Clare K; Rullkoetter, Paul J; Maletsky, Lorin P; Shelburne, Kevin B

    2016-08-01

    Modeling complex knee biomechanics is a continual challenge, which has resulted in many models of varying levels of quality, complexity, and validation. Beyond modeling healthy knees, accurately mimicking pathologic knee mechanics, such as after cruciate rupture or meniscectomy, is difficult. Experimental tests of knee laxity can provide important information about ligament engagement and overall contributions to knee stability for development of subject-specific models to accurately simulate knee motion and loading. Our objective was to provide combined experimental tests and finite-element (FE) models of natural knee laxity that are subject-specific, have one-to-one experiment to model calibration, simulate ligament engagement in agreement with literature, and are adaptable for a variety of biomechanical investigations (e.g., cartilage contact, ligament strain, in vivo kinematics). Calibration involved perturbing ligament stiffness, initial ligament strain, and attachment location until model-predicted kinematics and ligament engagement matched experimental reports. Errors between model-predicted and experimental kinematics averaged <2 deg during varus-valgus (VV) rotations, <6 deg during internal-external (IE) rotations, and <3 mm of translation during anterior-posterior (AP) displacements. Engagement of the individual ligaments agreed with literature descriptions. These results demonstrate the ability of our constraint models to be customized for multiple individuals and simultaneously call attention to the need to verify that ligament engagement is in good general agreement with literature. To facilitate further investigations of subject-specific or population based knee joint biomechanics, data collected during the experimental and modeling phases of this study are available for download by the research community. PMID:27306137

  16. The pharmacological approach to reverse portal hypertention and hepatic schistosomal fibrosis in Egypt, control experimental study.

    PubMed

    Helmy, Ahmed Hazem I; Abdel-Hady, Afaf Ahmed; el-Shanawany, Faten; Hammam, Olfat; Abdel-Hady, Ahmed

    2005-12-01

    infected hamsters (150-250 gm) were obtained from the BRPU-TBRI (5 groups, 20 hamsters each). Treatment was started 10 weeks post infection. First G (20 hamsters) was neither infected nor treated, second G. was infected but untreated, third group infected and PZQ treated, forth G. infected and PZQ and MP treated and fifth group infected and PZQ and PgE1 treated. Samples (liver and blood) were obtained 20 weeks post infection. The serum level of: liver functions, procollagen type III, collagen type IV & Th1 cytokine (IL-2) and Th2 cytokine (IL-10) were performed. Histopathology was performed to study liver fibrosis, measuring the proliferate activity of the hepatocytes using cell image analyzer system and granuloma cells using the indirect immuno-histochemistry by monoclonal antibody proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA). In this study, G.V showed high significant reduction in granuloma size, type and percentage of fibrosis and significant elevation in percentage of degenerated ova compared to Gs.III & IV. The proliferation index measured using PCNA showed high proliferative activity of hepatocytes in non treated group which declined in the treated Gs.III, IV & V. The proliferation activity of hepatocytes and granuloma forming cells decreased significantly in G.V compared to G.IV. There was a significant reduction in liver function tests even tendency for normalization in G.V compared to group III and IV. Procollagen type III and collagen type IV were significantly low in the serum in G.V compared to Gs.III & IV. Th1 (IL-2) level was significantly high in G.V compared to Gs.III, IV and Th2 (IL-10) was significantly low in G.V compared to Gs III & IV indicating the low amount of fibrosis was in the group treated with PZQ PgE1.PgE1 with PZQ to treat S. mansoni infected hamsters can modulate liver fibrosis and improves the liver function tests up to normalization. The balance between Th1 and Th2 cytokines level could be modulated to help reverse or decrease fibrosis in S

  17. Optimization of microporous palm shell activated carbon production for flue gas desulphurization: experimental and statistical studies.

    PubMed

    Sumathi, S; Bhatia, S; Lee, K T; Mohamed, A R

    2009-02-01

    Optimizing the production of microporous activated carbon from waste palm shell was done by applying experimental design methodology. The product, palm shell activated carbon was tested for removal of SO2 gas from flue gas. The activated carbon production was mathematically described as a function of parameters such as flow rate, activation time and activation temperature of carbonization. These parameters were modeled using response surface methodology. The experiments were carried out as a central composite design consisting of 32 experiments. Quadratic models were developed for surface area, total pore volume, and microporosity in term of micropore fraction. The models were used to obtain the optimum process condition for the production of microporous palm shell activated carbon useful for SO2 removal. The optimized palm shell activated carbon with surface area of 973 m(2)/g, total pore volume of 0.78 cc/g and micropore fraction of 70.5% showed an excellent agreement with the amount predicted by the statistical analysis. Palm shell activated carbon with higher surface area and microporosity fraction showed good adsorption affinity for SO2 removal. PMID:18952414

  18. Tissue-specific inhibition and recovery of esterase activities in Lumbricus terrestris experimentally exposed to chlorpyrifos.

    PubMed

    Vejares, Sandra González; Sabat, Pablo; Sanchez-Hernandez, Juan C

    2010-04-01

    Exposure and effect assessment of organophosphate (OP) pesticides generally involves the use of cholinesterase (ChE) inhibition. In earthworm, this enzyme activity is often measured in homogenates from the whole organism. Here we examine the tissue-specific response of ChE and carboxylesterase (CE) activities in Lumbricus terrestris experimentally exposed to chlorpyrifos-spiked field soils. Esterases were measured in different gut segments and in the seminal vesicles of earthworms following acute exposure (2 d) to the OP and during 35d of a recovery period. We found that inhibition of both esterase activities was dependent on the tissue. Cholinesterase activity decreased in the pharynx, crop, foregut and seminal vesicles in a concentration-dependent way, whereas CE activity (4-nitrophenyl valerate) was strongly inhibited in these tissues. Gizzard CE activity was not inhibited by the OP, even an increase of enzyme activity was evident during the recovery period. These results suggest that both esterases should be determined jointly in selected tissues of earthworms. Moreover, the high levels of gut CE activity and its inhibition and recovery dynamic following OP exposure suggest that this esterase could play an important role as an enzymatic barrier against OP uptake from the ingested contaminated soil. PMID:20045489

  19. Experimental evaluation of decrease in the activities of polyphosphate/glycogen-accumulating organisms due to cell death and activity decay in activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Hao, Xiaodi; Wang, Qilin; Cao, Yali; van Loosdrecht, Mark C M

    2010-06-15

    Decrease in bacterial activity (biomass decay) in activated sludge can result from cell death (reduction in the amount of active bacteria) and activity decay (reduction in the specific activity of active bacteria). The goal of this study was to experimentally differentiate between cell death and activity decay as the cause of decrease in bacterial activity. By means of measuring maximal anaerobic phosphate release rates, verifying membrane integrity by live/dead staining and verifying presence of 16S rRNA with fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), the decay rates and death rates of polyphosphate-accumulating organisms (PAOs) in a biological nutrient removal (BNR) system and a laboratory phosphate removing sequencing batch reactor (SBR) system were determined, respectively, under famine conditions. In addition, the decay rate and death rate of glycogen-accumulating organisms (GAOs) in a SBR system with an enrichment culture of GAOs were also measured under famine conditions. Hereto the maximal anaerobic volatile fatty acid uptake rates, live/dead staining, and FISH were used. The experiments revealed that in the BNR and enriched PAO-SBR systems, activity decay contributed 58% and 80% to the decreased activities of PAOs, and that cell death was responsible for 42% and 20% of decreases in their respective activities. In the enriched GAOs system, activity decay constituted a proportion of 74% of the decreased activity of GAOs, and cell death only accounted for 26% of the decrease of their activity. PMID:20178124

  20. Intranasally administered oxytocin affects how dogs (Canis familiaris) react to the threatening approach of their owner and an unfamiliar experimenter.

    PubMed

    Hernádi, Anna; Kis, Anna; Kanizsár, Orsolya; Tóth, Katinka; Miklósi, Bernadett; Topál, József

    2015-10-01

    Fear and aggression are among the most prominent behavioural problems in dogs. Oxytocin has been shown to play a role in regulating social behaviours in humans including fear and aggression. As intranasal oxytocin has been found to have some analogous effects in dogs and humans, here we investigated the effect of oxytocin on dogs' behaviour in the Threatening Approach Test. Dogs, after having received intranasal administration of oxytocin (OT) or placebo (PL), showed the same reaction to an unfamiliar experimenter, but OT pretreated dogs showed a less friendly first reaction compared to the PL group when the owner was approaching. Individual differences in aggression (measured via questionnaire) also modulated dogs' first reaction. Moreover, subjects that received OT looked back more at the human (owner/experimenter) standing behind them during the threatening approach. These results suggest that oxytocin has an effect on dogs' response to the threatening cues of a human, but this effect is in interaction with other factors such as the identity of the approaching human and the 'baseline' aggression of the dogs. PMID:26165175

  1. [Behavioral activation and depression: a contextual treatment approach].

    PubMed

    Soucy Chartier, Isabelle; Blanchet, Valérie; Provencher, Martin D

    2013-01-01

    Depression is a widespread psychological disorder that affects approximately one in five North American. Typical reactions to depression include inactivity, isolation, and rumination. Several treatments and psychological interventions have emerged to address this problematic. Cognitive behavioural therapies have received increasingly large amounts of empirical support. A sub-component of cognitive behavioural therapy, behavioural activation, has been shown to in itself effectively treat symptoms of depression. This intervention involves efforts to re-activate the depressed client by having them engage in pleasant, gratifying, leisure, social, or physical activities, thereby counteracting the tendency to be inactive and to isolate oneself. Clients are guided through the process of establishing a list of potentially rewarding social, leisure, mastery-oriented or physical activities, to then establish a gradual hierarchy of objectives to be accomplished over the span of several weeks. Concrete action plans are devised, and solutions to potential obstacles are elaborated. The client is the asked to execute the targeted objective and to record their mood prior to and following the activity. Behavioural activation effectively reverses the downward spiral to depression. Interestingly, studies show that behavioural activation has a positive effect on cognitive activities. It has been shown to reduce rumination and favour cognitive restructuring, without requiring cognitively-based interventions. The advantage of this treatment is therefore that it is simpler to administer in comparison to full-packaged cognitive behavioural therapies, it requires a lesser number of sessions and can be disseminated in a low-intensity format. This article begins by summarizing the origins of the behavioural model of depression, which serves as a basis to the understanding of behavioural activation. This is followed by a detailed explanation of the different phases involved in a behavioural

  2. Assessment of the tautomeric population of benzimidazole derivatives in solution: a simple and versatile theoretical-experimental approach.

    PubMed

    Diaz, Carlos; Llovera, Ligia; Echevarria, Lorenzo; Hernández, Florencio E

    2015-02-01

    Herein, we present a simple and versatile theoretical-experimental approach to assess the tautomeric distribution on 5(6)-aminobenzimidazole (5(6)-ABZ) derivatives in solution via one-photon absorption. The method is based on the optimized weighted sum of the theoretical spectra of the corresponding tautomers. In this article we show how the choice of exchange-correlation functional (XCF) employed in the calculations becomes crucial for the success of the approach. After the systematic analysis of XCFs with different amounts of exact-exchange we found a better performance for B3LYP and PBE0. The direct test of the proposed method on omeprazole, a well-known 5(6)-benzimidazole based pharmacotherapeutic, demonstrate its broader applicability. The proposed approach is expected to find direct applications on the tautomeric analysis of other molecular systems exhibiting similar tautomeric equilibria. PMID:25510544

  3. Combining bioinformatics, chemoinformatics and experimental approaches to design chemical probes: Applications in the field of blood coagulation.

    PubMed

    Villoutreix, B O

    2016-07-01

    Bioinformatics and chemoinformatics approaches contribute to the discovery of novel targets, chemical probes, hits, leads and medicinal drugs. A vast repertoire of computational methods has indeed been reported over the years and in this review, I will briefly introduce some concepts and approaches, namely the analysis of potential therapeutic target binding pockets, the preparation of compound collections and virtual screening. An example of application is provided for two proteins acting in the blood coagulation system. Overall, in silico methods have been shown to improve R and D productivity in both, academic settings and in the private sector, if they are integrated in a rational manner with experimental approaches. However, integration of tools and pluridisciplinarity are seldom achieved. Efforts should be done in this direction as pluridisciplinarity and a true acknowledgment of all the contributing actors along the value chain could enhance innovation and reduce skyrocketing costs. PMID:27133312

  4. Active SAmpling Protocol (ASAP) to Optimize Individual Neurocognitive Hypothesis Testing: A BCI-Inspired Dynamic Experimental Design

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, Gaëtan; Lecaignard, Françoise; Otman, Anatole; Maby, Emmanuel; Mattout, Jérémie

    2016-01-01

    The relatively young field of Brain-Computer Interfaces has promoted the use of electrophysiology and neuroimaging in real-time. In the meantime, cognitive neuroscience studies, which make extensive use of functional exploration techniques, have evolved toward model-based experiments and fine hypothesis testing protocols. Although these two developments are mostly unrelated, we argue that, brought together, they may trigger an important shift in the way experimental paradigms are being designed, which should prove fruitful to both endeavors. This change simply consists in using real-time neuroimaging in order to optimize advanced neurocognitive hypothesis testing. We refer to this new approach as the instantiation of an Active SAmpling Protocol (ASAP). As opposed to classical (static) experimental protocols, ASAP implements online model comparison, enabling the optimization of design parameters (e.g., stimuli) during the course of data acquisition. This follows the well-known principle of sequential hypothesis testing. What is radically new, however, is our ability to perform online processing of the huge amount of complex data that brain imaging techniques provide. This is all the more relevant at a time when physiological and psychological processes are beginning to be approached using more realistic, generative models which may be difficult to tease apart empirically. Based upon Bayesian inference, ASAP proposes a generic and principled way to optimize experimental design adaptively. In this perspective paper, we summarize the main steps in ASAP. Using synthetic data we illustrate its superiority in selecting the right perceptual model compared to a classical design. Finally, we briefly discuss its future potential for basic and clinical neuroscience as well as some remaining challenges. PMID:27458364

  5. Compound-nuclear reactions with unstable nuclei: Constraining theory through innovative experimental approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escher, J. E.; Tonchev, A. P.; Burke, J. T.; Bedrossian, P.; Casperson, R. J.; Cooper, N.; Hughes, R. O.; Humby, P.; Ilieva, R. S.; Ota, S.; Pietralla, N.; Scielzo, N. D.; Werner, V.

    2016-06-01

    Cross sections for compound-nuclear reactions involving unstable targets are important for many applications, but can often not be measured directly. Several indirect methods have recently been proposed to determine neutron capture cross sections for unstable isotopes. We consider three approaches that aim at constraining statistical calculations of capture cross sections with data obtained from the decay of the compound nucleus relevant to the desired reaction. Each method produces this compound nucleus in a different manner (via a light-ion reaction, a photon-induced reaction, or β-decay) and requires additional ingredients to yield the sought-after cross section. We give a brief outline of the approaches and employ preliminary results from recent measurements to illustrate the methods. We discuss the main advantages and challenges of each approach.

  6. Experimental Studies Of Pilot Performance At Collision Avoidance During Closely Spaced Parallel Approaches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pritchett, Amy R.; Hansman, R. John

    1997-01-01

    Efforts to increase airport capacity include studies of aircraft systems that would enable simultaneous approaches to closely spaced parallel runway in Instrument Meteorological Conditions (IMC). The time-critical nature of a parallel approach results in key design issues for current and future collision avoidance systems. Two part-task flight simulator studies have examined the procedural and display issues inherent in such a time-critical task, the interaction of the pilot with a collision avoidance system, and the alerting criteria and avoidance maneuvers preferred by subjects.

  7. Identification of the anti-tumor activity and mechanisms of nuciferine through a network pharmacology approach

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Quan; Li, Rui; Li, Hui-ying; Cao, Yu-bing; Bai, Ming; Fan, Xiao-jing; Wang, Shu-yan; Zhang, Bo; Li, Shao

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Nuciferine is an aporphine alkaloid extracted from lotus leaves, which is a raw material in Chinese medicinal herb for weight loss. In this study we used a network pharmacology approach to identify the anti-tumor activity of nuciferine and the underlying mechanisms. Methods: The pharmacological activities and mechanisms of nuciferine were identified through target profile prediction, clustering analysis and functional enrichment analysis using our traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) network pharmacology platform. The anti-tumor activity of nuciferine was validated by in vitro and in vivo experiments. The anti-tumor mechanisms of nuciferine were predicted through network target analysis and verified by in vitro experiments. Results: The nuciferine target profile was enriched with signaling pathways and biological functions, including “regulation of lipase activity”, “response to nicotine” and “regulation of cell proliferation”. Target profile clustering results suggested that nuciferine to exert anti-tumor effect. In experimental validation, nuciferine (0.8 mg/mL) markedly inhibited the viability of human neuroblastoma SY5Y cells and mouse colorectal cancer CT26 cells in vitro, and nuciferine (0.05 mg/mL) significantly suppressed the invasion of 6 cancer cell lines in vitro. Intraperitoneal injection of nuciferine (9.5 mg/mL, ip, 3 times a week for 3 weeks) significantly decreased the weight of SY5Y and CT26 tumor xenografts in nude mice. Network target analysis and experimental validation in SY5Y and CT26 cells showed that the anti-tumor effect of nuciferine was mediated through inhibiting the PI3K-AKT signaling pathway and IL-1 levels in SY5Y and CT26 cells. Conclusion: By using a TCM network pharmacology method, nuciferine is identified as an anti-tumor agent against human neuroblastoma and mouse colorectal cancer in vitro and in vivo, through inhibiting the PI3K-AKT signaling pathways and IL-1 levels. PMID:27180984

  8. Development of a universal approach to increase physical activity among adolescents: the GoActive intervention

    PubMed Central

    Corder, Kirsten; Schiff, Annie; Kesten, Joanna M; van Sluijs, Esther M F

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To develop a physical activity (PA) promotion intervention for adolescents using a process addressing gaps in the literature while considering participant engagement. We describe the initial development stages; (1) existing evidence, (2) large scale opinion gathering and (3) developmental qualitative work, aiming (A) to gain insight into how to increase PA among the whole of year 9 (13–14 years-old) by identifying elements for intervention inclusion (B) to improve participant engagement and (C) to develop and refine programme design. Methods Relevant systematic reviews and longitudinal analyses of change were examined. An intervention was developed iteratively with older adolescents (17.3±0.5 years) and teachers, using the following process: (1) focus groups with (A) adolescents (n=26) and (B) teachers (n=4); (2) individual interviews (n=5) with inactive and shy adolescents focusing on engagement and programme acceptability. Qualitative data were analysed thematically. Results Limitations of the existing literature include lack of evidence on whole population approaches, limited adolescent involvement in intervention development, and poor participant engagement. Qualitative work suggested six themes which may encourage adolescents to do more PA; choice, novelty, mentorship, competition, rewards and flexibility. Teachers discussed time pressures as a barrier to encouraging adolescent PA and suggested between-class competition as a strategy. GoActive aims to increase PA through increased peer support, self-efficacy, group cohesion, self-esteem and friendship quality, and is implemented in tutor groups using a student-led tiered-leadership system. Conclusions We have followed an evidence-based iterative approach to translate existing evidence into an adolescent PA promotion intervention. Qualitative work with adolescents and teachers supported intervention design and addressed lack of engagement with health promotion programmes within this age group

  9. Experimental investigation and CFD simulation of active damping mechanism for propellant slosh in spacecraft launch systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leuva, Dhawal

    2011-07-01

    Motion of propellant in the liquid propellant tanks due to inertial forces transferred from actions like stage separation and trajectory correction of the launch vehicle is known as propellant slosh. If unchecked, propellant slosh can reach resonance and lead to complete loss of the spacecraft stability, it can change the trajectory of the vehicle or increase consumption of propellant from the calculated requirements, thereby causing starvation of the latter stages of the vehicle. Predicting the magnitude of such slosh events is not trivial. Several passive mechanisms with limited operating range are currently used to mitigate the effects of slosh. An active damping mechanism concept developed here can operate over a large range of slosh frequencies and is much more effective than passive damping devices. Spherical and cylindrical tanks modeled using the ANSYS CFX software package considers the free surface of liquid propellant exposed to atmospheric pressure. Hydrazine is a common liquid propellant and since it is toxic, it cannot be used in experiment. But properties of hydrazine are similar to the properties of water; therefore water is substituted as propellant for experimental study. For close comparison of the data, water is substituted as propellant in CFD simulation. The research is done in three phases. The first phase includes modeling free surface slosh using CFD and validation of the model by comparison to previous experimental results. The second phase includes developing an active damping mechanism and simulating the behavior using a CFD model. The third phase includes experimental development of damping mechanism and comparing the CFD simulation to the experimental results. This research provides an excellent tool for low cost analysis of damping mechanisms for propellant slosh as well as proves that the concept of an active damping mechanism developed here, functions as expected.

  10. Data Mining Approaches for Modeling Complex Electronic Circuit Design Activities

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, Yongjin; Omitaomu, Olufemi A; Wang, Gi-Nam

    2008-01-01

    A printed circuit board (PCB) is an essential part of modern electronic circuits. It is made of a flat panel of insulating materials with patterned copper foils that act as electric pathways for various components such as ICs, diodes, capacitors, resistors, and coils. The size of PCBs has been shrinking over the years, while the number of components mounted on these boards has increased considerably. This trend makes the design and fabrication of PCBs ever more difficult. At the beginning of design cycles, it is important to estimate the time to complete the steps required accurately, based on many factors such as the required parts, approximate board size and shape, and a rough sketch of schematics. Current approach uses multiple linear regression (MLR) technique for time and cost estimations. However, the need for accurate predictive models continues to grow as the technology becomes more advanced. In this paper, we analyze a large volume of historical PCB design data, extract some important variables, and develop predictive models based on the extracted variables using a data mining approach. The data mining approach uses an adaptive support vector regression (ASVR) technique; the benchmark model used is the MLR technique currently being used in the industry. The strengths of SVR for this data include its ability to represent data in high-dimensional space through kernel functions. The computational results show that a data mining approach is a better prediction technique for this data. Our approach reduces computation time and enhances the practical applications of the SVR technique.

  11. An Experimental Approach using Plasma Jets to Realize the Radicals' Effects for Improving Ignition and Combustion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Yohji; Iwamoto, Takashi; Shuzenji, Kiyotaka; Kakami, Akira; Tachibana, Takeshi

    To introduce an alternative fuel to a combustion system or develop a more sophisticated system used in aeronautical and other engineering fields, the combustion characteristics of the fuel must be fully understood. Therefore, some effects of radical species, which are involved and play a significant role in the combustion process, must be understood to arrive at a new technology, such as for super-lean combustion or low-quality fuel utilization, which in turn would lead to solutions for recent energy issues. We have developed an original experimental apparatus which can selectively supply radicals appearing in the combustion process by making use of a plasma torch and can be used to understand their effectiveness. A series of trial experiments conducted with di-methyl ether as the test fuel demonstrate that the experimental method proposed is valid and practical, and can be used to evaluate the role of radical species for the ignition/combustion of various gaseous fuels.

  12. Cohesive Laws and Progressive Damage Analysis of Composite Bonded Joints, a Combined Numerical/Experimental Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Girolamo, Donato; Davila, Carlos G.; Leone, Frank A.; Lin, Shih-Yung

    2015-01-01

    The results of an experimental/numerical campaign aimed to develop progressive damage analysis (PDA) tools for predicting the strength of a composite bonded joint under tensile loads are presented. The PDA is based on continuum damage mechanics (CDM) to account for intralaminar damage, and cohesive laws to account for interlaminar and adhesive damage. The adhesive response is characterized using standard fracture specimens and digital image correlation (DIC). The displacement fields measured by DIC are used to calculate the J-integrals, from which the associated cohesive laws of the structural adhesive can be derived. A finite element model of a sandwich conventional splice joint (CSJ) under tensile loads was developed. The simulations, in agreement with experimental tests, indicate that the model is capable of predicting the interactions of damage modes that lead to the failure of the joint.

  13. Purification of Germanium Crystals by Zone Refinement: Theoretical and Experimental Approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Gang; Guan, Yutong; Wang, Guojian; Mei, Hao; Jian, Fanyi; Mei, Dongming; Crystal Growth Team

    2015-03-01

    The results of single germanium crystals grown from zone-refined germanium ingots, identified by photon thermal ionization spectroscopy (PTIS), show that there are four main impurities, aluminum (Al), phosphor (P), boron (B) and gallium (Ga) in the crystals. Based the PTIS results, we investigated the influences of zone speed, zone width and the number of passes on effective segregation coefficient of Al, P and Ga in the process of zone refinement, then the further calculation of distribution of Al, P and Ga along the zone refined ingots has been conducted. In terms of trend of impurity distribution, the calculated results have a very good agreement with the experimental results. We report both the theoretical calculations and the experimental results. This work is supported by DOE grant DE-FG02-10ER46709 and the state of South Dakota.

  14. Experimental confirmation of a PDE-based approach to design of feedback controls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, H. T.; Smith, Ralph C.; Brown, D. E.; Silcox, R. J.; Metcalf, Vern L.

    1995-01-01

    Issues regarding the experimental implementation of partial differential equation based controllers are discussed in this work. While the motivating application involves the reduction of vibration levels for a circular plate through excitation of surface-mounted piezoceramic patches, the general techniques described here will extend to a variety of applications. The initial step is the development of a PDE model which accurately captures the physics of the underlying process. This model is then discretized to yield a vector-valued initial value problem. Optimal control theory is used to determine continuous-time voltages to the patches, and the approximations needed to facilitate discrete time implementation are addressed. Finally, experimental results demonstrating the control of both transient and steady state vibrations through these techniques are presented.

  15. A non-sperm transferring genital trait under sexual selection: an experimental approach.

    PubMed

    Nessler, Stefan H; Uhl, Gabriele; Schneider, Jutta M

    2007-09-22

    Male genitalia are among the fastest evolving morphological characters, and at a general level sexual selection seems to be involved. But experimental determination of the functions of many remarkable genitalic elaborations is very rare. Here we present the first study to address experimentally the adaptive function of a male genital structure that is not involved in sperm transfer. Females of the orb-weaving spider Argiope bruennichi are sexually cannibalistic and polyandrous. The male increases his paternity by obstructing the female's insemination duct with a fragment of his complex genitalia (embolus tip). We manipulated males by detaching another species-specific structure, the median apophysis spur, and found that the spur promotes breakage of the embolus tip inside the female duct, but does not affect the probability and duration of copulation. These data are novel in that they suggest that a genitalic structure which does not transfer sperm nevertheless evolved in the context of sperm competition. PMID:17644504

  16. On the nonlinear dynamics of a rotor in autorotation: a combined experimental and numerical approach.

    PubMed

    Rezgui, D; Lowenberg, M H

    2015-09-28

    This article presents a systematic assessment of the use of numerical continuation and bifurcation techniques in investigating the nonlinear periodic behaviour of a teetering rotor operating in forward autorotation. The aim is to illustrate the potential of these tools in revealing complex blade dynamics, when used in combination (not necessarily at the same time) with physical testing. We show a simple procedure to promote understanding of an existing but not fully understood engineering instability problem, when uncertainties in the numerical modelling and constraints in the experimental testing are present. It is proposed that continuation and bifurcation methods can play a significant role in developing numerical and experimental techniques for studying the nonlinear dynamics not only for rotating blades but also for other engineering systems with uncertainties and constraints. PMID:26303919

  17. IFNAR signaling directly modulates T lymphocyte activity, resulting in milder experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis development.

    PubMed

    Kavrochorianou, Nadia; Evangelidou, Maria; Markogiannaki, Melina; Tovey, Michael; Thyphronitis, George; Haralambous, Sylva

    2016-01-01

    Although interferon-β is used as first-line therapy for multiple sclerosis, the cell type-specific activity of type I interferons in multiple sclerosis and its animal model, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, remains obscure. In this study, we have elucidated the in vivo immunomodulatory role of type I interferon signaling in T cells during experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis by use of a novel transgenic mouse, carrying a cd2-ifnar1 transgene on a interferon-α/β receptor 1 null genetic background, thus allowing expression of the interferon-α/β receptor 1 and hence, a functional type I interferon receptor exclusively on T cells. These transgenic mice exhibited milder experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis with reduced T cell infiltration, demyelination, and axonal damage in the central nervous system. It is noteworthy that interferon-β administration in transgenic mice generated a more pronounced, protective effect against experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis compared with untreated littermates. In vivo studies demonstrated that before experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis onset, endogenous type I interferon receptor signaling in T cells led to impaired T-helper 17 responses, with a reduced fraction of CCR6(+) CD4(+) T cells in the periphery. At the acute phase, an increased proportion of interleukin-10- and interferon-γ-producing CD4(+) T cells was detected in the periphery of the transgenic mice, accompanied by up-regulation of the interferon-γ-induced gene Irgm1 in peripheral T cells. Together, these results reveal a hitherto unknown T cell-associated protective role of type I interferon in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis that may provide valuable clues for designing novel therapeutic strategies for multiple sclerosis. PMID:26232452

  18. Electrocatalysis of borohydride oxidation: a review of density functional theory approach combined with experimental validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sison Escaño, Mary Clare; Lacdao Arevalo, Ryan; Gyenge, Elod; Kasai, Hideaki

    2014-09-01

    The electrocatalysis of borohydride oxidation is a complex, up-to-eight-electron transfer process, which is essential for development of efficient direct borohydride fuel cells. Here we review the progress achieved by density functional theory (DFT) calculations in explaining the adsorption of BH4- on various catalyst surfaces, with implications for electrocatalyst screening and selection. Wherever possible, we correlate the theoretical predictions with experimental findings, in order to validate the proposed models and to identify potential directions for further advancements.

  19. Experimental Estimation of Mutation Rates in a Wheat Population With a Gene Genealogy Approach

    PubMed Central

    Raquin, Anne-Laure; Depaulis, Frantz; Lambert, Amaury; Galic, Nathalie; Brabant, Philippe; Goldringer, Isabelle

    2008-01-01

    Microsatellite markers are extensively used to evaluate genetic diversity in natural or experimental evolving populations. Their high degree of polymorphism reflects their high mutation rates. Estimates of the mutation rates are therefore necessary when characterizing diversity in populations. As a complement to the classical experimental designs, we propose to use experimental populations, where the initial state is entirely known and some intermediate states have been thoroughly surveyed, thus providing a short timescale estimation together with a large number of cumulated meioses. In this article, we derived four original gene genealogy-based methods to assess mutation rates with limited bias due to relevant model assumptions incorporating the initial state, the number of new alleles, and the genetic effective population size. We studied the evolution of genetic diversity at 21 microsatellite markers, after 15 generations in an experimental wheat population. Compared to the parents, 23 new alleles were found in generation 15 at 9 of the 21 loci studied. We provide evidence that they arose by mutation. Corresponding estimates of the mutation rates ranged from 0 to 4.97 × 10−3 per generation (i.e., year). Sequences of several alleles revealed that length polymorphism was only due to variation in the core of the microsatellite. Among different microsatellite characteristics, both the motif repeat number and an independent estimation of the Nei diversity were correlated with the novel diversity. Despite a reduced genetic effective size, global diversity at microsatellite markers increased in this population, suggesting that microsatellite diversity should be used with caution as an indicator in biodiversity conservation issues. PMID:18689900

  20. Geosynergetic Approach for Analyze of Rock State, Theoretical and Experimental Redlts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hachay, O. A.; Khachay, A. Y.; Khachay, O. Y.

    2012-04-01

    releasing the system returns to the same phase trajectory attracting area. That is confirmed by detailed analyze of phase trajectories of seismic massive response before and after high energetic rock burst. In the book [5] is developed a new mathematical method for modeling of processes in local active continuum, which are energetically influenced from an outer energy source. The common cause of chaotization and stochastization of dynamical system movements are its losses of stability and exponential recession of near located phase trajectories together with its common boundedness and its common compression. The mathematical result coincides as a whole with the practical result: in the phase area the smaller attracting phase trajectories area exists where can occur an exponential recession of them, then the movement character changes and the further movement of phase points lead to return to the same attracting area. These movements can occur in resonance or spontaneous mood. The work was supported by the grant RFBR 10-05-00013. 1. Hachay, O.A., and Khachay, O.Yu. 2009. "Results of electromagnetic and seismic monitoring of the state of rock massive by use the approach of the open dynamical systems,"presented at the EGU2009 - EGU General Assembly 2009, session: Thermo- hydro- mechanical coupling in stressed rock, 19 April 19 - 24 April 2009. 2. Hachay, O.A. "Synergetic events in geological medium and nonlinear features of wave propagation," presented at the EGU2009 - EGU General Assembly 2009, session: Solid Earth geocomplexity: surface processes, morphology and natural resources over wide ranges of scale, 19 April 19 - 24 April 2009. 3. Chulichkov, A.I. 2003. Mathematical models of nonlinear dynamics. Moscow: Phismatlit, p.420. 4. Malineckiy, G.G. 2007. Mathematical base of synergetics. Moscow: LKI, p.375. 5. Naimark, Yu.I.and Landa, P.S. 2009. Stochastic and Chaotic oscillations. Moscow: Knigniy dom "LIBROKOM", p.424.

  1. High frequency pressure propagation in viscoelastic tubes: a new experimental approach.

    PubMed

    Ursino, M; Artioli, E

    1992-01-01

    A new method for estimating the high-frequency characteristics of wave propagation (phase velocity and attenuation per wavelength) in hydraulic lines is presented in this work. It consists of measuring the ratio of pressure amplitudes at two distinct sections of an occluded tube at different frequencies, and minimizing the difference between the experimental pattern and the theoretical one predicted on the basis of the transmission line theory. In this work the method is used for estimating the high frequency propagation characteristics of two different latex tubes. The values obtained are then compared with those provided by the more traditional three-point pressure method. The results of our trials demonstrate that the new method furnishes reliable estimations of the asymptotic values of phase velocity and attenuation per wavelength, provided the frequencies used during the experiment are sufficiently high. Moreover, the method turns out quite robust as to the influence of noise and possible measurement errors. For this reason it seems particularly suitable for studying wave propagation under difficult experimental conditions, such as those met with when measurements are performed on blood vessels in vivo. Finally, some discrepancies between our experimental results and the predictions of the transmission line theory are pointed out, and their possible origin examined. PMID:1458201

  2. Microbial experimental evolution as a novel research approach in the Vibrionaceae and squid-Vibrio symbiosis

    PubMed Central

    Soto, William; Nishiguchi, Michele K.

    2014-01-01

    The Vibrionaceae are a genetically and metabolically diverse family living in aquatic habitats with a great propensity toward developing interactions with eukaryotic microbial and multicellular hosts (as either commensals, pathogens, and mutualists). The Vibrionaceae frequently possess a life history cycle where bacteria are attached to a host in one phase and then another where they are free from their host as either part of the bacterioplankton or adhered to solid substrates such as marine sediment, riverbeds, lakebeds, or floating particulate debris. These two stages in their life history exert quite distinct and separate selection pressures. When bound to solid substrates or to host cells, the Vibrionaceae can also exist as complex biofilms. The association between bioluminescent Vibrio spp. and sepiolid squids (Cephalopoda: Sepiolidae) is an experimentally tractable model to study bacteria and animal host interactions, since the symbionts and squid hosts can be maintained in the laboratory independently of one another. The bacteria can be grown in pure culture and the squid hosts raised gnotobiotically with sterile light organs. The partnership between free-living Vibrio symbionts and axenic squid hatchlings emerging from eggs must be renewed every generation of the cephalopod host. Thus, symbiotic bacteria and animal host can each be studied alone and together in union. Despite virtues provided by the Vibrionaceae and sepiolid squid-Vibrio symbiosis, these assets to evolutionary biology have yet to be fully utilized for microbial experimental evolution. Experimental evolution studies already completed are reviewed, along with exploratory topics for future study. PMID:25538686

  3. Impact of SOL plasma profiles on lower hybrid current drive: Experimental evidence, mitigation and modeling approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiraiwa, S.; Baek, S. G.; Faust, I.; Wallace, G.; Bonoli, P.; Meneghini, O.; Mumgaard, R.; Parker, R.; Scott, S.; Harvey, R. W.; Ding, B. J.; Li, M. H.; Lin, S. Y.; Yang, C.

    2015-12-01

    Recent progress in understanding and mitigating parasitic wave absorption in edge plasmas is presented. Experimental observations collected on Alcator C-Mod suggest multiple physics mechanisms are involved in such losses. Localized measurement of parametric decay instabilities (PDIs) has been performed using RF Langmuir probes. The divertor heat flux due to LH and ionization power loss have been evaluated quantitatively. We observe that the LHCD efficiency can be recovered when the SOL density profile is controlled by operating the tokamak at high current. The experimental progresses motivated a re-examination of the LHCD simulation model based on the ray-tracing/Fokker-Planck code (GENRAY/CQL3D). The effect of introducing a relatively small wave number broadening in the launched power spectrum and using 2D SOL density and temperature profiles was investigated. Comparison with C-Mod experiment indicates that the new model can explain the experimental trend over a wider density range including the density regime where disagreement was seen previously, suggesting that including realistic SOL geometry is a key to improve the simulation accuracy.

  4. Structural and Mechanical Properties of Amyloid Beta Fibrils: A Combined Experimental and Theoretical Approach.

    PubMed

    Paul, Thomas J; Hoffmann, Zachary; Wang, Congzhou; Shanmugasundaram, Maruda; DeJoannis, Jason; Shekhtman, Alexander; Lednev, Igor K; Yadavalli, Vamsi K; Prabhakar, Rajeev

    2016-07-21

    In this combined experimental (deep ultraviolet resonance Raman (DUVRR) spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM)) and theoretical (molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and stress-strain (SS)) study, the structural and mechanical properties of amyloid beta (Aβ40) fibrils have been investigated. The DUVRR spectroscopy and AFM experiments confirmed the formation of linear, unbranched and β-sheet rich fibrils. The fibrils (Aβ40)n, formed using n monomers, were equilibrated using all-atom MD simulations. The structural properties such as β-sheet character, twist, interstrand distance, and periodicity of these fibrils were found to be in agreement with experimental measurements. Furthermore, Young's modulus (Y) = 4.2 GPa computed using SS calculations was supported by measured values of 1.79 ± 0.41 and 3.2 ± 0.8 GPa provided by two separate AFM experiments. These results revealed size dependence of structural and material properties of amyloid fibrils and show the utility of such combined experimental and theoretical studies in the design of precisely engineered biomaterials. PMID:27387853

  5. Investigating the Effects of an Experimental Approach to Comprehension Instruction within a Literacy Clinic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ortlieb, Evan; McDowell, F. D.

    2015-01-01

    Reading comprehension levels of elementary students have not significantly improved in the 21st century and as a result, the need for systematic and intensive reading interventions is as high as ever. Literacy clinics are an ideal setting for struggling readers to experience success through the implementation of a cyclical approach to individual…

  6. Network topology and parameter estimation: from experimental design methods to gene regulatory network kinetics using a community based approach

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Accurate estimation of parameters of biochemical models is required to characterize the dynamics of molecular processes. This problem is intimately linked to identifying the most informative experiments for accomplishing such tasks. While significant progress has been made, effective experimental strategies for parameter identification and for distinguishing among alternative network topologies remain unclear. We approached these questions in an unbiased manner using a unique community-based approach in the context of the DREAM initiative (Dialogue for Reverse Engineering Assessment of Methods). We created an in silico test framework under which participants could probe a network with hidden parameters by requesting a range of experimental assays; results of these experiments were simulated according to a model of network dynamics only partially revealed to participants. Results We proposed two challenges; in the first, participants were given the topology and underlying biochemical structure of a 9-gene regulatory network and were asked to determine its parameter values. In the second challenge, participants were given an incomplete topology with 11 genes and asked to find three missing links in the model. In both challenges, a budget was provided to buy experimental data generated in silico with the model and mimicking the features of different common experimental techniques, such as microarrays and fluorescence microscopy. Data could be bought at any stage, allowing participants to implement an iterative loop of experiments and computation. Conclusions A total of 19 teams participated in this competition. The results suggest that the combination of state-of-the-art parameter estimation and a varied set of experimental methods using a few datasets, mostly fluorescence imaging data, can accurately determine parameters of biochemical models of gene regulation. However, the task is considerably more difficult if the gene network topology is not completely

  7. Adult Basic Learning in an Activity Center: A Demonstration Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Metropolitan Adult Education Program, San Jose, CA.

    Escuela Amistad, an activity center in San Jose, California, is now operating at capacity, five months after its origin. Average daily attendance has been 125 adult students, 18-65, most of whom are females of Mexican-American background. Activities and services provided by the center are: instruction in English as a second language, home…

  8. Active Generations: An Intergenerational Approach to Preventing Childhood Obesity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Werner, Danilea; Teufel, James; Holtgrave, Peter L.; Brown, Stephen L.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Over the last 3 decades, US obesity rates have increased dramatically as more children and more adults become obese. This study explores an innovative program, Active Generations, an intergenerational nutrition education and activity program implemented in out-of-school environments (after school and summer camps). It utilizes older…

  9. An Active, Collaborative Approach to Learning Skills in Flow Cytometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuller, Kathryn; Linden, Matthew D.; Lee-Pullen, Tracey; Fragall, Clayton; Erber, Wendy N.; Röhrig, Kimberley J.

    2016-01-01

    Advances in science education research have the potential to improve the way students learn to perform scientific interpretations and understand science concepts. We developed active, collaborative activities to teach skills in manipulating flow cytometry data using FlowJo software. Undergraduate students were given compensated clinical flow…

  10. Study of the effect of formulation variables on the characteristics of combination tablets containing enalapril maleate and indapamide as active substances using experimental design.

    PubMed

    Szabó, Zoltán-István; Székely-Szentmiklósi, Blanka; Deák, Boglárka; Székely-Szentmiklósi, István; Kovács, Béla; Zöldi, Katalin; Sipos, Emese

    2016-06-01

    To evaluate the influence of different variables on tablet formulations containing enalapril maleate and indapamide as active substances, two separate experimental designs were employed: one for evaluating powder properties and the other for tablet characteristics. Because of the low active pharmaceutical ingredient content, it was hypothesized that both powder and tablet properties could be determined only by the characteristics of excipients. In order to test this assumption, both experimental designs were done with placebo mixtures. The optimized formulation was then evaluated both with and without APIs. Results indicated that filler and lubricant percentage, along with compression force, were the most important variables during the formulation study. The optimized formulation showed similar characteristics in both cases for all responses, except for angle of repose and friability where only minor differences were observed. The combination of the applied approaches (using placebo composition and fractional experimental design) proved to be efficient, cost effective and time saving. PMID:27279063

  11. Amphibole reaction rims as a record of pre-eruptive magmatic heating: An experimental approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Angelis, S. H.; Larsen, J.; Coombs, M.; Dunn, A.; Hayden, L.

    2015-09-01

    Magmatic minerals record the pre-eruptive timescales of magma ascent and mixing in crustal reservoirs and conduits. Investigations of the mineral records of magmatic processes are fundamental to our understanding of what controls eruption style, as ascent rates and magma mixing processes are well known to control and/or trigger potentially hazardous explosive eruptions. Thus, amphibole reaction rims are often used to infer pre-eruptive magma dynamics, and in particular to estimate magma ascent rates. However, while several experimental studies have investigated amphibole destabilization during decompression, only two investigated thermal destabilization relevant to magma mixing processes. This study examines amphibole decomposition experimentally through isobaric heating of magnesio-hornblende phenocrysts within a natural high-silica andesite glass. The experiments first equilibrated for 24 h at 870 °C and 140 MPa at H2O-saturated conditions and ƒO2 ∼ Re-ReO prior to rapid heating to 880, 900, or 920 °C and hold times of 3-48 h. At 920 °C, rim thicknesses increased from 17 μm after 3 h, to 55 μm after 12 h, and became pseudomorphs after longer durations. At 900 °C, rim thicknesses increased from 7 μm after 3 h, to 80 μm after 24 h, to pseudomorphs after longer durations. At 880 °C, rim thicknesses increased from 7 μm after 3 h, to 18 μm after 36 h, to pseudomorphs after 48 h. Reaction rim microlites vary from 5-16 μm in size, with no systematic relationship between crystal size and the duration or magnitude of heating. Time-averaged rim microlite growth rates decrease steadily with increasing experimental duration (from 3.97 ×10-7 mms-1 to 3.1 to 3.5 ×10-8 mms-1). Time-averaged microlite nucleation rates also decrease with increasing experimental duration (from 1.2 ×103mm-3s-1 to 5.3 mm-3 s-1). There is no systematic relationship between time-averaged growth or nucleation rates and the magnitude of the heating step. Ortho- and clinopyroxene

  12. Approaches to Information-Theoretic Analysis of Neural Activity

    PubMed Central

    Victor, Jonathan D.

    2009-01-01

    Understanding how neurons represent, process, and manipulate information is one of the main goals of neuroscience. These issues are fundamentally abstract, and information theory plays a key role in formalizing and addressing them. However, application of information theory to experimental data is fraught with many challenges. Meeting these challenges has led to a variety of innovative analytical techniques, with complementary domains of applicability, assumptions, and goals. PMID:19606267

  13. Experimental studies on active control of a dynamic system via a time-delayed absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jian; Sun, Yixia

    2015-04-01

    The traditional passive absorber is fully effective within a narrow and certain frequency band. To solve this problem, a time-delayed acceleration feedback is introduced to convert a passive absorber into an active one. Both the inherent and the intentional time delays are included. The former mainly comes from signal acquiring and processing, computing, and applying the actuation force, and its value is fixed. The latter is introduced in the controller, and its value is actively adjustable. Firstly, the mechanical model is established and the frequency response equations are obtained. The regions of stability are delineated in the plane of control parameters. Secondly, the design scheme of control para- meters is performed to help select the values of the feedback gain and time delay. Thirdly, the experimental studies are conducted. Effects of both negative and positive feedback control are investigated. Experimental results show that the proper choices of control parameters may broaden the effective frequency band of vibration absorption. Moreover, the time-delayed absorber greatly suppresses the resonant response of the primary system when the passive absorber totally fails. The experimental results are in good agreement with the theoretical predictions and numerical simulations.

  14. Anti-inflammatory activity of methyl palmitate and ethyl palmitate in different experimental rat models

    SciTech Connect

    Saeed, Noha M.; El-Demerdash, Ebtehal; Abdel-Rahman, Hanaa M.; Algandaby, Mardi M.; Al-Abbasi, Fahad A.; Abdel-Naim, Ashraf B.

    2012-10-01

    Methyl palmitate (MP) and ethyl palmitate (EP) are naturally occurring fatty acid esters reported as inflammatory cell inhibitors. In the current study, the potential anti-inflammatory activity of MP and EP was evaluated in different experimental rat models. Results showed that MP and EP caused reduction of carrageenan-induced rat paw edema in addition to diminishing prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) level in the inflammatory exudates. In lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced endotoxemia in rats, MP and EP reduced plasma levels of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6). MP and EP decreased NF-κB expression in liver and lung tissues and ameliorated histopathological changes caused by LPS. Topical application of MP and EP reduced ear edema induced by croton oil in rats. In the same animal model, MP and EP reduced neutrophil infiltration, as indicated by decreased myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity. In conclusion, this study demonstrates the effectiveness of MP and EP in combating inflammation in several experimental models. -- Highlights: ► Efficacy of MP and EP in combating inflammation was displayed in several models. ► MP and EP reduced carrageenan-induced rat paw edema and prostaglandin E2 level. ► MP and EP decreased TNF-α and IL-6 levels in experimental endotoxemia. ► MP and EP reduced NF-κB expression and histological changes in rat liver and lung. ► MP and EP reduced croton oil-induced ear edema and neutrophil infiltration.

  15. Experimental evaluation of a neural-oscillator-driven active mass damper system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iba, Daisuke; Hongu, Junichi

    2014-03-01

    This paper proposes a new active dynamic absorber control system for high-rise buildings using a neural oscillator and a map, which estimates the amplitude level of the oscillator, and shows some experimental results by using an apparatus, which realizes the proposed control algorithm. The proposed system decides the travel distance and direction of the auxiliary mass of the dynamic absorber using the output of oscillator, which is the filtering result of structure acceleration responses by the property of the oscillator, and Amplitude-Phase map (AP-map) for estimation of the structural response in specific frequency between synchronization region, and then, transfer the auxiliary mass to the predetermined location by using a position controller. In addition, the developed active dynamic absorber system is mounted on the top of the experimental single degree of freedom structure, which represents high-rise buildings, and consists of the auxiliary mass, a DC motor, a ball screw, a microcomputer, a laser displacement sensor, and an acceleration sensor. The proposed AP-map and the algorithm to determine the travel direction of the mass using the oscillator output are embedded in the microcomputer. This paper starts by illuminating the relation among subsystems of the proposed system with reference to a block diagram, and then, shows experimental responses of the whole system excited by earthquakes to confirm the validity of the proposed system.

  16. Activity-Centred Approaches to Second Language Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevens, Florence

    Recent research in psycholinguistics shows that experience with language in its communicative function is essential for learning to speak a second language. A suitable linguistic environment provides for the development of strategies for aural comprehension and for the acquisition of means of expression. A different approach to curriculum is…

  17. Raphanus sativus, Germination, and Inquiry: A Learning Cycle Approach for Novice Experimenters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rillero, Peter

    1999-01-01

    Describes open-ended experiments with seeds from the common garden radish (Raphanus sativus). The phases of the 5-E learning cycle--Engagement, Exploration, Explanation, Extension, and Evaluation--guide this activity series. (Author/MM)

  18. Active Ageing: An Empirical Approach to the WHO Model

    PubMed Central

    Paúl, Constança; Ribeiro, Oscar; Teixeira, Laetitia

    2012-01-01

    Background. In the beginning of the 21st century, the world summit on population taking place in Madrid approved active ageing, WHO (2002) as the main objective of health and social policies for old people. Few studies have been done on the scientific validity of the construct. This study aims to validate the construct of active ageing and test empirically the WHO (2002) model of Active Ageing in a sample of community-dwelling seniors. Methods. 1322 old people living in the community were interviewed using an extensive assessment protocol to measure WHO's determinants of active ageing and performed an exploratory factor analysis followed by a confirmatory factor analyses. Results. We did not confirm the active ageing model, as most of the groups of determinants are either not independent or not significant. We got to a six-factor model (health, psychological component, cognitive performance, social relationships, biobehavioural component, and personality) explaining 54.6% of total variance. Conclusion. The present paper shows that there are objective as well as subjective variables contributing to active ageing and that psychological variables seem to give a very important contribute to the construct. The profile of active ageing is expected to vary between contexts and cultures and can be used to guide specific community and individually based interventions. PMID:23193396

  19. Experimental determination of the temperature dependence of water activities for a selection of aqueous organic solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganbavale, G.; Marcolli, C.; Krieger, U. K.; Zuend, A.; Stratmann, G.; Peter, T.

    2014-09-01

    This work presents experimental data of the temperature dependence of water activity in aqueous organic solutions relevant for tropospheric conditions (200-273 K). Water activity (aw) at low temperatures (T) is a crucial parameter for predicting homogeneous ice nucleation. We investigated temperature-dependent water activities, ice freezing and melting temperatures of solutions, and vapour pressures of a selection of atmospherically relevant aqueous organic systems. To measure aw over a wide composition range and with a focus on low temperatures, we use various aw measurement techniques and instruments: a dew point water activity meter, an electrodynamic balance (EDB), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and a setup to measure the total gas phase pressure at equilibrium over aqueous solutions. Water activity measurements were performed for aqueous multicomponent and multifunctional organic mixtures containing the functional groups typically found in atmospheric organic aerosols, such as hydroxyl, carboxyl, ketone, ether, ester, and aromatic groups. The aqueous organic systems studied at several fixed compositions over a considerable temperature range differ significantly in their temperature dependence. Aqueous organic systems of 1,4-butanediol and methoxyacetic acid show a moderate decrease in aw with decreasing temperature. The aqueous M5 system (a multicomponent system containing five different dicarboxylic acids) and aqueous 2-(2-ethoxyethoxy)ethanol solutions both show a strong increase of water activity with decreasing temperature at high solute concentrations for T < 270 K and T < 260 K, respectively. These measurements show that the temperature trend of aw can be reversed at low temperatures and that linear extrapolations of high-temperature data may lead to erroneous predictions. To avoid this, experimentally determined aw at low temperature are needed to improve thermodynamic models towards lower temperatures and for improved predictions of the ice

  20. Experimental determination of the temperature dependence of water activities for a selection of aqueous organic solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganbavale, G.; Marcolli, C.; Krieger, U. K.; Zuend, A.; Stratmann, G.; Peter, T.

    2014-05-01

    This work presents experimental data of the temperature dependence of water activity in aqueous organic solutions relevant for tropospheric conditions (200-273 K). Water activity (aw) at low temperatures (T) is a crucial parameter for predicting homogeneous ice nucleation. We investigated temperature dependent water activities, ice freezing and melting temperatures of solutions, and vapour pressures of a selection of atmospherically relevant aqueous organic systems. To measure aw over a wide composition range and with a focus on low temperatures, we use various aw measurement techniques and instruments: a dew point water activity meter, an electrodynamic balance (EDB), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and a setup to measure the total gas phase pressure at equilibrium over aqueous solutions. Water activity measurements were performed for aqueous multicomponent and multifunctional organic mixtures containing the functional groups typically found in atmospheric organic aerosols, such as hydroxyl, carboxyl, ketone, ether, ester, and aromatic groups. The aqueous organic systems studied at several fixed compositions over a considerable temperature range differ significantly in their temperature dependence. Aqueous organic systems of 1,4-butanediol and methoxyacetic acid show a moderate decrease in aw with decreasing temperature. The aqueous M5 system (a multicomponent system containing five different dicarboxylic acids) and aqueous 2-(2-ethoxyethoxy)ethanol solutions both show a strong increase of water activity with decreasing temperature at high solute concentrations for T<270 K and T<260 K, respectively. These measurements show that the temperature trend of aw can be reversed at low temperatures and that linear extrapolations of high temperature data may lead to erroneous predictions. To avoid this, experimentally determined aw at low temperature are needed to improve thermodynamic models towards lower temperatures and for improved predictions of the ice

  1. The effect of oxygen tension on human articular chondrocyte matrix synthesis: Integration of experimental and computational approaches

    PubMed Central

    Li, S; Oreffo, ROC; Sengers, BG; Tare, RS

    2014-01-01

    Significant oxygen gradients occur within tissue engineered cartilaginous constructs. Although oxygen tension is an important limiting parameter in the development of new cartilage matrix, its precise role in matrix formation by chondrocytes remains controversial, primarily due to discrepancies in the experimental setup applied in different studies. In this study, the specific effects of oxygen tension on the synthesis of cartilaginous matrix by human articular chondrocytes were studied using a combined experimental-computational approach in a “scaffold-free” 3D pellet culture model. Key parameters including cellular oxygen uptake rate were determined experimentally and used in conjunction with a mathematical model to estimate oxygen tension profiles in 21-day cartilaginous pellets. A threshold oxygen tension (pO2 ≈ 8% atmospheric pressure) for human articular chondrocytes was estimated from these inferred oxygen profiles and histological analysis of pellet sections. Human articular chondrocytes that experienced oxygen tension below this threshold demonstrated enhanced proteoglycan deposition. Conversely, oxygen tension higher than the threshold favored collagen synthesis. This study has demonstrated a close relationship between oxygen tension and matrix synthesis by human articular chondrocytes in a “scaffold-free” 3D pellet culture model, providing valuable insight into the understanding and optimization of cartilage bioengineering approaches. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2014;111: 1876–1885. PMID:24668194

  2. A standardized approach to study human variability in isometric thermogenesis during low-intensity physical activity

    PubMed Central

    Sarafian, Delphine; Miles-Chan, Jennifer L.; Yepuri, Gayathri; Montani, Jean-Pierre; Schutz, Yves; Dulloo, Abdul G.

    2013-01-01

    Limitations of current methods: The assessment of human variability in various compartments of daily energy expenditure (EE) under standardized conditions is well defined at rest [as basal metabolic rate (BMR) and thermic effect of feeding (TEF)], and currently under validation for assessing the energy cost of low-intensity dynamic work. However, because physical activities of daily life consist of a combination of both dynamic and isometric work, there is also a need to develop standardized tests for assessing human variability in the energy cost of low-intensity isometric work. Experimental objectives: Development of an approach to study human variability in isometric thermogenesis by incorporating a protocol of intermittent leg press exercise of varying low-intensity isometric loads with measurements of EE by indirect calorimetry. Results: EE was measured in the seated position with the subject at rest or while intermittently pressing both legs against a press-platform at 5 low-intensity isometric loads (+5, +10, +15, +20, and +25 kg force), each consisting of a succession of 8 cycles of press (30 s) and rest (30 s). EE, integrated over each 8-min period of the intermittent leg press exercise, was found to increase linearly across the 5 isometric loads with a correlation coefficient (r) > 0.9 for each individual. The slope of this EE-Load relationship, which provides the energy cost of this standardized isometric exercise expressed per kg force applied intermittently (30 s in every min), was found to show good repeatability when assessed in subjects who repeated the same experimental protocol on 3 separate days: its low intra-individual coefficient of variation (CV) of ~ 10% contrasted with its much higher inter-individual CV of 35%; the latter being mass-independent but partly explained by height. Conclusion: This standardized approach to study isometric thermogenesis opens up a new avenue for research in EE phenotyping and metabolic predisposition to obesity

  3. Challenges for Complex Microbial Ecosystems: Combination of Experimental Approaches with Mathematical Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Haruta, Shin; Yoshida, Takehito; Aoi, Yoshiteru; Kaneko, Kunihiko; Futamata, Hiroyuki

    2013-01-01

    In the past couple of decades, molecular ecological techniques have been developed to elucidate microbial diversity and distribution in microbial ecosystems. Currently, modern techniques, represented by meta-omics and single cell observations, are revealing the incredible complexity of microbial ecosystems and the large degree of phenotypic variation. These studies propound that microbiological techniques are insufficient to untangle the complex microbial network. This minireview introduces the application of advanced mathematical approaches in combination with microbiological experiments to microbial ecological studies. These combinational approaches have successfully elucidated novel microbial behaviors that had not been recognized previously. Furthermore, the theoretical perspective also provides an understanding of the plasticity, robustness and stability of complex microbial ecosystems in nature. PMID:23995424

  4. Direct Experimental Evidence of Growing Dynamical Facilitation on Approaching the Colloidal Glass Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gokhale, Shreyas; Nagamanasa, K. Hima; Ganapathy, Rajesh; Sood, A. K.

    2014-03-01

    The dramatic slowing down of dynamics with no apparent change in structure is perhaps the best-known and least understood feature of the glass transition in molecular, polymeric and colloidal liquids. Despite extensive research, the microscopic origin of this slowdown remains mysterious. In particular, it is unclear whether structural relaxation is governed by a growing length scale, as advocated by thermodynamic theories, or by the concerted motion of mobile defects termed excitations, a phenomenon known as dynamical facilitation. Here, by performing video microscopy on a binary colloidal glass-former, we show that dynamical facilitation unambiguously grows on approaching the glass transition. Interestingly, the spatial frequency of occurrence of excitations is anti-correlated with the distribution of local hexatic order, suggesting intriguing connections between structural evolution and relaxation dynamics on approaching the glass transition. SG thanks the Council for Scientifc and Industrial Research (CSIR), India, for a Shyama Prasad Mukherjee Fellowship.

  5. Characterization of Sound Transmission Loss of Laminated Glass with Analytical and Experimental Approaches

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Xin; Simmons, Kevin L.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2005-11-30

    In this project, we have developed the general formation for calculating transmission loss of sound waves through multi-layered structures. Full factorial design method has also been used to investigate the relative effect of various geometric and material parameters on the transmission loss. It was found that within the range of practical interest, the most effect way of increasing transmission loss is by increasing either the glass thickness or increasing the inner layer mass density. Experimental measurements of sound transmission loss (in decibels) for four laminated glass samples have been made in accordance to SAE J1400, in third-octave bands between 125 Hz and 8 kHz.

  6. Fluidelastic instability in a confined annular flow: An experimental and analytical approach

    SciTech Connect

    Porcher, G.; Langre, E. de

    1996-12-01

    Self excitation of slender structures under axial flow have been reported in a large variety of local flow configurations. This paper reports the result of a research program, both experimental and analytical, aimed at the result of the basic phenomena leading to such instabilities. A cylindrical body with a diffuser is put in a confined annular flow of water. A case of flutter is observed and analyzed with a classical potential flow method and with a friction based model. Closed-form solutions are proposed and the origin of the flutter instability is discussed. This is relevant for nuclear fuel studies.

  7. How hyperstereopsis can improve the accuracy of spatial perception: an experimental approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sipes, D. E.; CuQlock-Knopp, V. Grayson; Torgerson, Warren; Merritt, John O.

    1997-05-01

    It has been shown that people consistently underestimate distances between objects in the depth direction as compared to the lateral direction. This study examined the use of artificially enhanced stereopsis (hyperstereopsis) in judging relative distances. The data showed that doubling interocular distance by means of a telestereoscope reduced the illusory compression of depth: subjects who viewed the scene without the telestereoscope averaged a depth compression of 0.28. Subjects who used the telestereoscope yielded an average compression of 0.40. Individual verbal self-reports of depth compression effects were unreliable, pointing out the value of quantitative experimental methods.

  8. A Combined Experimental and Analytical Modeling Approach to Understanding Friction Stir Welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.; Stewart, Michael B.; Adams, Glynn P.; Romine, Peter

    1998-01-01

    In the Friction Stir Welding (FSW) process a rotating pin tool joins the sides of a seam by stirring them together. This solid state welding process avoids problems with melting and hot-shortness presented by some difficult-to weld high-performance light alloys. The details of the plastic flow during the process are not well understood and are currently a subject of research. Two candidate models of the FSW process, the Mixed Zone (MZ) and the Single Slip Surface (S3) model are presented and their predictions compared to experimental data.

  9. Influence of diosgenin structure on the polymerization kinetics of acrylamide: An experimental and theoretical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odio, Oscar F.; Martínez, Ariel; Martínez, Ricardo; Crespo-Otero, Rachel; Montero-Cabrera, Luis A.

    2011-01-01

    The acrylamide polymerization in presence of diosgenin has been investigated by experimental and theoretical methods. NMR spectroscopy shows the absence of copolymerization. Viscosimetric and dilatometric experiments support the occurrence of transfer reactions that retard the polymerization. The mechanism was studied at the MPWB1K/6-31G(d,p)//B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) level of theory. Transfer, homopropagation, copolymerization and reinitiation reactions were considered either in gas or solution phase. According to results, the retardation seems to be originated by the formation of an allylic radical in the ring B of diosgenin that reinitiates acrylamide polymerization at slow rate.

  10. A combined experimental-numerical approach for determining mechanical properties of aluminum subjects to nanoindentation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Mao; Lu, Cheng; Tieu, Kiet Anh; Peng, Ching-Tun; Kong, Charlie

    2015-01-01

    A crystal plasticity finite element method (CPFEM) model has been developed to investigate the mechanical properties and micro-texture evolution of single-crystal aluminum induced by a sharp Berkovich indenter. The load-displacement curves, pile-up patterns and lattice rotation angles from simulation are consistent with the experimental results. The pile-up phenomenon and lattice rotation have been discussed based on the theory of crystal plasticity. In addition, a polycrystal tensile CPFEM model has been established to explore the relationship between indentation hardness and yield stress. The elastic constraint factor C is slightly larger than conventional value 3 due to the strain hardening. PMID:26464128

  11. Dissipative structures in a two-cell system: Numerical and experimental approaches

    PubMed Central

    Breton, J.; Thomas, D.; Hervagault, J. F.

    1986-01-01

    It has been shown that the coupling between the photoreduction of the oxidized form of dichloroindophenol (an artificial electron acceptor) by thylakoids and the incident light intensity can lead to the appearance of multiple steady states when the system is operated under open conditions. In the present work, a numerical study and experimental evidence are presented on the occurrence of dissipative structures in an arrangement of two continuously stirred tank reactors with mutual mass exchange of dichloroindophenol through an inert membrane. The stable spatial structures are generated by the creation of transient internal and external asymmetries. A nontrivial hysteresis effect between symmetric and asymmetric stable steady states has been observed. PMID:16593652

  12. A systematic multiscale modeling and experimental approach to protect grain boundaries in magnesium alloys from corrosion

    SciTech Connect

    Horstemeyer, Mark R.; Chaudhuri, Santanu

    2015-09-30

    A multiscale modeling Internal State Variable (ISV) constitutive model was developed that captures the fundamental structure-property relationships. The macroscale ISV model used lower length scale simulations (Butler-Volmer and Electronics Structures results) in order to inform the ISVs at the macroscale. The chemomechanical ISV model was calibrated and validated from experiments with magnesium (Mg) alloys that were investigated under corrosive environments coupled with experimental electrochemical studies. Because the ISV chemomechanical model is physically based, it can be used for other material systems to predict corrosion behavior. As such, others can use the chemomechanical model for analyzing corrosion effects on their designs.

  13. Experimental Percutaneous Extrahepatic Portacaval Shunt Creation by Transjugular Approach in Swine

    SciTech Connect

    Seong, Chang Kyu; Pavcnik, Dusan Uchida, Barry T.; Anai, Hiroshi; Timmermans, Hans; Niyyati, Mahtab; Corless, Christopher L.; Correa, Luiz O.; Keller, Frederick S.; Roesch, Josef

    2005-06-15

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the feasibility of the creation of a percutaneous extrahepatic portacaval shunt (PEPS) in swine by a transjugular approach and to find a suitable stent-graft to use in PEPS. In 12 swine, the extrahepatic portal vein (PV) was entered from the inferior vena cava (IVC) by a needle system introduced from the transjugular approach. A catheter introduced through the transhepatic approach served as a target. Five types of stent-graft consisting of homemade Z stents and a polytetrafluoethylene cover were explored for PEPS creation. Eight animals had follow-up venograms up to 6 weeks or until the shunt became severely stenotic. Gross and histologic examinations were performed after the final follow-up venography. The PV punctures and stent-graft placement were difficult, but the PEPS was established in all animals. In four animals, the stent-graft failed to adequately cover the tract, causing severe hemorrhage. Only two shunts remained patent up to 6 weeks. The other shunts exhibited severe stenosis or occlusion. At gross examination, all shunts traversed the liver parenchyma of the caudate lobe surrounding the IVC. The extravascular PEPS portion was 4 mm to 2 cm long. All shunts entered the PV close to the splenomesenteric junction and exhibited neointimal formation. Shunt stenoses were caused by neointimal hyperplasia and occlusions by a superimposed thrombus. PEPS can be created by the transjugular approach in swine, but only the PV shunt entrance is extrahepatic. None of the tested rigid stent-grafts were suitable for PEPS creation. A short flexible stent-graft with flanged ends is suggested for further exploration.

  14. Gas turbine rotor/case structural response to rotating stall: Experimental documentation and analytical approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haley, P. J.

    1982-01-01

    The forcing functions and structural responses characterizing gas turbine rotor/case system vibration due to rotating stall in an axial flow compressor are described. Two data sets with fundamentally different response characteristics are presented; one is supersynchronous and the other subsynchronous. Conventional beam element rotor dynamics analysis is shown to be severely limited in its ability to predict these responses. A new analytical approach, which significantly increases structural response predictive capability for these phenomena, is briefly discussed.

  15. Poromechanics Parameters of Fluid-Saturated Chemically Active Fibrous Media Derived from a Micromechanical Approach.

    PubMed

    Misra, Anil; Parthasarathy, Ranganathan; Singh, Viraj; Spencer, Paulette

    2013-01-01

    The authors have derived macroscale poromechanics parameters for chemically active saturated fibrous media by combining microstructure-based homogenization with Hill's volume averaging. The stress-strain relationship of the dry fibrous media is first obtained by considering the fiber behavior. The constitutive relationships applicable to saturated media are then derived in the poromechanics framework using Hill's Lemmas. The advantage of this approach is that the resultant continuum model assumes a form suited to study porous materials, while retaining the effect of discrete fiber deformation. As a result, the model is able to predict the influence of microscale phenomena such as fiber buckling on the overall behavior, and in particular, on the poromechanics constants. The significance of the approach is demonstrated using the effect of drainage and fiber nonlinearity on monotonic compressive stress-strain behavior. The model predictions conform to the experimental observations for articular cartilage. The method can potentially be extended to other porous materials such as bone, clays, foams, and concrete. PMID:25419475

  16. An active structural acoustic control approach for the reduction of the structure-borne road noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douville, Hugo; Berry, Alain; Masson, Patrice

    2002-11-01

    The reduction of the structure-borne road noise generated inside the cabin of an automobile is investigated using an Active Structural Acoustic Control (ASAC) approach. First, a laboratory test bench consisting of a wheel/suspension/lower suspension A-arm assembly has been developed in order to identify the vibroacoustic transfer paths (up to 250 Hz) for realistic road noise excitation of the wheel. Frequency Response Function (FRF) measurements between the excitation/control actuators and each suspension/chassis linkage are used to characterize the different transfer paths that transmit energy through the chassis of the car. Second, a FE/BE model (Finite/Boundary Elements) was developed to simulate the acoustic field of an automobile cab interior. This model is used to predict the acoustic field inside the cabin as a response to the measured forces applied on the suspension/chassis linkages. Finally, an experimental implementation of ASAC is presented. The control approach relies on the use of inertial actuators to modify the vibration behavior of the suspension and the automotive chassis such that its noise radiation efficiency is decreased. The implemented algorithm consists of a MIMO (Multiple-Input-Multiple-Output) feedforward configuration with a filtered-X LMS algorithm using an advanced reference signal (width FIR filters) using the Simulink/Dspace environment for control prototyping.

  17. Poromechanics Parameters of Fluid-Saturated Chemically Active Fibrous Media Derived from a Micromechanical Approach

    PubMed Central

    Parthasarathy, Ranganathan; Singh, Viraj; Spencer, Paulette

    2014-01-01

    The authors have derived macroscale poromechanics parameters for chemically active saturated fibrous media by combining microstructure-based homogenization with Hill's volume averaging. The stress-strain relationship of the dry fibrous media is first obtained by considering the fiber behavior. The constitutive relationships applicable to saturated media are then derived in the poromechanics framework using Hill's Lemmas. The advantage of this approach is that the resultant continuum model assumes a form suited to study porous materials, while retaining the effect of discrete fiber deformation. As a result, the model is able to predict the influence of microscale phenomena such as fiber buckling on the overall behavior, and in particular, on the poromechanics constants. The significance of the approach is demonstrated using the effect of drainage and fiber nonlinearity on monotonic compressive stress-strain behavior. The model predictions conform to the experimental observations for articular cartilage. The method can potentially be extended to other porous materials such as bone, clays, foams, and concrete. PMID:25419475

  18. The influence of parent's body mass index on peer selection: an experimental approach using virtual reality.

    PubMed

    Martarelli, Corinna S; Borter, Natalie; Bryjova, Jana; Mast, Fred W; Munsch, Simone

    2015-11-30

    Relatively little is known about the influence of psychosocial factors, such as familial role modeling and social network on the development and maintenance of childhood obesity. We investigated peer selection using an immersive virtual reality environment. In a virtual schoolyard, children were confronted with normal weight and overweight avatars either eating or playing. Fifty-seven children aged 7-13 participated. Interpersonal distance to the avatars, child's BMI, self-perception, eating behavior and parental BMI were assessed. Parental BMI was the strongest predictor for the children's minimal distance to the avatars. Specifically, a higher mothers' BMI was associated with greater interpersonal distance and children approached closer to overweight eating avatars. A higher father's BMI was associated with a lower interpersonal distance to the avatars. These children approached normal weight playing and overweight eating avatar peers closest. The importance of parental BMI for the child's social approach/avoidance behavior can be explained through social modeling mechanisms. Differential effects of paternal and maternal BMI might be due to gender specific beauty ideals. Interventions to promote social interaction with peer groups could foster weight stabilization or weight loss in children. PMID:26330307

  19. Synthetic Molecular Machines for Active Self-Assembly: Prototype Algorithms, Designs, and Experimental Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabby, Nadine L.

    behaviors. This class of behaviors includes any behavior where a passive physical system simply does not have enough physical energy to perform the specified tasks in the requisite amount of time. As we will demonstrate and prove, a sufficiently expressive implementation of an "active" molecular self-assembly approach can achieve these behaviors. Using an external source of fuel solves part of the problem, so the system is not "energetically incomplete." But the programmable system also needs to have sufficient expressive power to achieve the specified behaviors. Perhaps surprisingly, some of these systems do not even require Turing completeness to be sufficiently expressive. Building on a large variety of work by other scientists in the fields of DNA nanotechnology, chemistry and reconfigurable robotics, this thesis introduces several research contributions in the context of active self-assembly. We show that simple primitives such as insertion and deletion are able to generate complex and interesting results such as the growth of a linear polymer in logarithmic time and the ability of a linear polymer to treadmill. To this end we developed a formal model for active-self assembly that is directly implementable with DNA molecules. We show that this model is computationally equivalent to a machine capable of producing strings that are stronger than regular languages and, at most, as strong as context-free grammars. This is a great advance in the theory of active self-assembly as prior models were either entirely theoretical or only implementable in the context of macro-scale robotics. We developed a chain reaction method for the autonomous exponential growth of a linear DNA polymer. Our method is based on the insertion of molecules into the assembly, which generates two new insertion sites for every initial one employed. The building of a line in logarithmic time is a first step toward building a shape in logarithmic time. We demonstrate the first construction of a synthetic

  20. Chaperone Activity of Small Heat Shock Proteins Underlies Therapeutic Efficacy in Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis*

    PubMed Central

    Kurnellas, Michael P.; Brownell, Sara E.; Su, Leon; Malkovskiy, Andrey V.; Rajadas, Jayakumar; Dolganov, Gregory; Chopra, Sidharth; Schoolnik, Gary K.; Sobel, Raymond A.; Webster, Jonathan; Ousman, Shalina S.; Becker, Rachel A.; Steinman, Lawrence; Rothbard, Jonathan B.

    2012-01-01

    To determine whether the therapeutic activity of αB crystallin, small heat shock protein B5 (HspB5), was shared with other human sHsps, a set of seven human family members, a mutant of HspB5 G120 known to exhibit reduced chaperone activity, and a mycobacterial sHsp were expressed and purified from bacteria. Each of the recombinant proteins was shown to be a functional chaperone, capable of inhibiting aggregation of denatured insulin with varying efficiency. When injected into mice at the peak of disease, they were all effective in reducing the paralysis in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Additional structure activity correlations between chaperone activity and therapeutic function were established when linear regions within HspB5 were examined. A single region, corresponding to residues 73–92 of HspB5, forms amyloid fibrils, exhibited chaperone activity, and was an effective therapeutic for encephalomyelitis. The linkage of the three activities was further established by demonstrating individual substitutions of critical hydrophobic amino acids in the peptide resulted in the loss of all of the functions. PMID:22955287