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Sample records for activation ferritic alloys

  1. Low activation ferritic alloys

    DOEpatents

    Gelles, David S.; Ghoniem, Nasr M.; Powell, Roger W.

    1986-01-01

    Low activation ferritic alloys, specifically bainitic and martensitic stainless steels, are described for use in the production of structural components for nuclear fusion reactors. They are designed specifically to achieve low activation characteristics suitable for efficient waste disposal. The alloys essentially exclude molybdenum, nickel, nitrogen and niobium. Strength is achieved by substituting vanadium, tungsten, and/or tantalum in place of the usual molybdenum content in such alloys.

  2. Low activation ferritic alloys

    DOEpatents

    Gelles, D.S.; Ghoniem, N.M.; Powell, R.W.

    1985-02-07

    Low activation ferritic alloys, specifically bainitic and martensitic stainless steels, are described for use in the production of structural components for nuclear fusion reactors. They are designed specifically to achieve low activation characteristics suitable for efficient waste disposal. The alloys essentially exclude molybdenum, nickel, nitrogen and niobium. Strength is achieved by substituting vanadium, tungsten, and/or tantalum in place of the usual molybdenum content in such alloys.

  3. Charpy impact test results for low-activation ferritic alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Cannon, N.S.; Hu, W.L.; Gelles, D.S.

    1987-05-01

    The objective of this work is to evaluate the shift of the ductile to brittle transition temperature (DBTT) and the reduction of the upper shelf energy (USE) due to neutron irradiation of low activation ferritic alloys. Six low activation ferritic alloys have been tested following irradiation at 365/sup 0/C to 10 dpa and compared with control specimens in order to assess the effect of irradiation on Charpy impact properties.

  4. Charpy impact test results for low activation ferritic alloys irradiated to 30 dpa

    SciTech Connect

    Schubert, L.E.; Hamilton, M.L.; Gelles, D.S.

    1996-04-01

    Miniature specimens of six low activation ferritic alloys have been impact field tested following irradiation at 370{degrees}C to 30 dpa. Comparison of the results with those of control specimens and specimens irradiated to 10 dpa indicates that degradation in the impact behavior appears to have saturated by {approx}10 dpa in at least four of these alloys. The 7.5Cr-2W alloy referred to as GA3X appears most promising for further consideration as a candidate structural material in fusion reactor applications, although the 9Cr-1V alloy may also warrant further investigation.

  5. Impurity content of reduced-activation ferritic steels and a vanadium alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Klueh, R.L.; Grossbeck, M.L.; Bloom, E.E.

    1997-04-01

    Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry was used to analyze a reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steel and a vanadium alloy for low-level impurities that would compromise the reduced-activation characteristics of these materials. The ferritic steel was from the 5-ton IEA heat of modified F82H, and the vanadium alloy was from a 500-kg heat of V-4Cr-4Ti. To compare techniques for analysis of low concentrations of impurities, the vanadium alloy was also examined by glow discharge mass spectrometry. Two other reduced-activation steels and two commercial ferritic steels were also analyzed to determine the difference in the level of the detrimental impurities in the IEA heat and steels for which no extra effort was made to restrict some of the tramp impurities. Silver, cobalt, molybdenum, and niobium proved to be the tramp impurities of most importance. The levels observed in these two materials produced with present technology exceeded the limits for low activation for either shallow land burial or recycling. The chemical analyses provide a benchmark for the improvement in production technology required to achieve reduced activation; they also provide a set of concentrations for calculating decay characteristics for reduced-activation materials. The results indicate the progress that has been made and give an indication of what must still be done before the reduced-activation criteria can be achieved.

  6. High strength ferritic alloy

    DOEpatents

    Hagel, William C.; Smidt, Frederick A.; Korenko, Michael K.

    1977-01-01

    A high-strength ferritic alloy useful for fast reactor duct and cladding applications where an iron base contains from about 9% to about 13% by weight chromium, from about 4% to about 8% by weight molybdenum, from about 0.2% to about 0.8% by weight niobium, from about 0.1% to about 0.3% by weight vanadium, from about 0.2% to about 0.8% by weight silicon, from about 0.2% to about 0.8% by weight manganese, a maximum of about 0.05% by weight nitrogen, a maximum of about 0.02% by weight sulfur, a maximum of about 0.02% by weight phosphorous, and from about 0.04% to about 0.12% by weight carbon.

  7. Charpy impact test results of four low activation ferritic alloys irradiated at 370{degrees}C to 15 DPA

    SciTech Connect

    Schubert, L.E.; Hamilton, M.L.; Gelles, D.S.

    1996-10-01

    Miniature CVN specimens of four low activation ferritic alloys have been impact tested following irradiation at 370{degrees}C to 15 dpa. Comparison of the results with those of control specimens indicates that degradation in the impact behavior occurs in each of these four alloys. The 9Cr-2W alloy referred to as GA3X and the similar alloy F82H with 7.8Cr-2W appear most promising for further consideration as candidate structural materials in fusion energy system applications. These two alloys exhibit a small DBTT shift to higher temperatures but show increased absorbed energy on the upper shelf.

  8. Further Charpy impact test results of low activation ferritic alloys, irradiated at 430{degrees}C to 67 dpa

    SciTech Connect

    Schubert, L.E.; Hamilton, M.L.; Gelles, D.S.

    1997-04-01

    Miniature CVN specimens of four ferritic alloys, GA3X, F82H, GA4X and HT9, have been impact tested following irradiation at 430{degrees}C to 67 dpa. Comparison of the results with those of the previously tested lower dose irradiation condition indicates that the GA3X and F82H alloys, two primary candidate low activation alloys, exhibit virtually identical behavior following irradiation at 430{degrees}C to {approximately}67 dpa and at 370{degrees}C to {approximately}15 dpa. Very little shift is observed in either DBTT or USE relative to the unirradiated condition. The shifts in DBTT and USE observed in both GA4X and HT9 were smaller after irradiation at 430{degrees}C to {approximately}67 dpa than after irradiation at 370{degrees}C to {approximately}15 dpa.

  9. Effects of alloying elements and heat treatments on mechanical properties of Korean reduced-activation ferritic-martensitic steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chun, Y. B.; Kang, S. H.; Noh, S.; Kim, T. K.; Lee, D. W.; Cho, S.; Jeong, Y. H.

    2014-12-01

    As part of an alloy development program for Korean reduced-activation ferritic-martensitic (RAFM) steel, a total of 37 program alloys were designed and their mechanical properties were evaluated with special attention being paid to the effects of alloying elements and heat treatments. A reduction of the normalizing temperature from 1050 °C to 980 °C was found to have a positive effect on the impact resistance, resulting in a decrease in ductile-brittle transition-temperature (DBTT) of the program alloys by an average of 30 °C. The yield strength and creep rupture time are affected strongly by the tempering time at 760 °C but at the expense of ductility. Regarding the effects of the alloying elements, the addition of trace amounts of Zr enhances both the creep and impact resistance: the lowest DBTT was observed for the alloys containing 0.005 wt.% Zr, whereas the addition of 0.01 wt.% Zr extends the creep rupture-time under an accelerated condition. The enhanced impact resistance owing to the normalizing at lower temperature is attributed to a more refined grain structure, which provides more barriers to the propagation of cleavage cracks. Solution softening by Zr addition is suggested as a possible mechanism for enhanced resistance to both impact and creep of the program alloys.

  10. Tantalum modified ferritic iron base alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oldrieve, R. E.; Blankenship, C. P. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    Strong ferritic alloys of the Fe-CR-Al type containing 0.4% to 2% tantalum were developed. These alloys have improved fabricability without sacrificing high temperature strength and oxidation resistance in the 800 C (1475 F) to 1040 C (1900 F) range.

  11. Cold worked ferritic alloys and components

    DOEpatents

    Korenko, Michael K.

    1984-01-01

    This invention relates to liquid metal fast breeder reactor and steam generator precipitation hardening fully ferritic alloy components which have a microstructure substantially free of the primary precipitation hardening phase while having cells or arrays of dislocations of varying population densities. It also relates to the process by which these components are produced, which entails solution treating the alloy followed by a final cold working step. In this condition, the first significant precipitation hardening of the component occurs during high temperature use.

  12. Joining Techniques for Ferritic ODS Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    V.G. Krishnardula; V.G. Krishnardula; D.E. Clark; T.C. Totemeier

    2005-06-01

    This report presents results of research on advanced joining techniques for ferritic oxide-dispersion strengthened alloys MA956 and PM2000. The joining techniques studied were resistance pressure welding (also known as pressure forge welding), transient liquid phase bonding, and diffusion bonding. All techniques were shown to produce sound joints in fine-grained, unrecrystallized alloys. Post-bond heat treatment to produce a coarse-grained, recrystallized microstructure resulted in grain growth across the bondline for transient liquid phase and diffusion bonds, giving microstructures essentially identical to that of the parent alloy in the recrystallized condition. The effects of bond orientation, boron interlayer thickness, and bonding parameters are discussed for transient liquid phase and diffusion bonding. The report concludes with a brief discussion of ODS joining techniques and their applicability to GEN IV reactor systems.

  13. Helium entrapment in a nanostructured ferritic alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Edmondson, Philip D; Parish, Chad M; Zhang, Yanwen; Hallen, Dr Anders; Miller, Michael K

    2011-01-01

    The nanostructured ferritic alloy 14YWT has been irradiated with He ions to simulate accumulation of He during the service life of a nuclear reactor to test the hypothesis that the large surface area for nanoclusters is a preferential nucleation site for bubbles. Transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography showed that high number densities of He bubbles were formed on the surface of nanoclusters and Ti(C,N) precipitates, and along grain boundaries and dislocations. At higher fluences, facetted bubbles are formed and it is postulated that the lowest energy state configuration is the truncated rhombic dodecahedron.

  14. High strength ferritic alloy-D53

    DOEpatents

    Hagel, William C.; Smidt, Frederick A.; Korenko, Michael K.

    1977-01-01

    A high strength ferritic alloy is described having from about 0.2% to about 0.8% by weight nickel, from about 2.5% to about 3.6% by weight chromium, from about 2.5% to about 3.5% by weight molybdenum, from about 0.1% to about 0.5% by weight vanadium, from about 0.1% to about 0.5% by weight silicon, from about 0.1% to about 0.6% by weight manganese, from about 0.12% to about 0.20% by weight carbon, from about 0.02% to about 0.1% by weight boron, a maximum of about 0.05% by weight nitrogen, a maximum of about 0.02% by weight phosphorous, a maximum of about 0.02% by weight sulfur, and the balance iron.

  15. Towards Radiation Tolerant Nanostructured Ferritic Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Michael K; Hoelzer, David T; Russell, Kaye F

    2010-01-01

    The high temperature and irradiation response of a new class of nanostructured ferritic alloys have been investigated by atom probe tomography. These materials are candidate materials for use in the extreme environments that will be present in the next generation of power generating systems. Atom probe tomography has revealed that the yttria powder is forced into solid solution during the mechanical alloying process andsubsequently 2-nm-diameter Ti-, Y- and O-enriched nanoclusters are formedduring the extrusion process. These nanoclusters have been shown to be remarkably stable during isothermal annealing treatments up to 0.92 of the melting temperature and during proton irradiation up to 3 displacements per atom. No significant difference in sizes, compositions and number densities of the nanoclusters was also observed between the unirradiated and proton irradiated conditions. The grain boundaries were found to have high number densities of nanoclusters as well as chromium and tungsten segregation which pin the grain boundary to minimize creep and grain growth.

  16. Ferritic Alloys with Extreme Creep Resistance via Coherent Hierarchical Precipitates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Gian; Sun, Zhiqian; Li, Lin; Xu, Xiandong; Rawlings, Michael; Liebscher, Christian H.; Clausen, Bjørn; Poplawsky, Jonathan; Leonard, Donovan N.; Huang, Shenyan; Teng, Zhenke; Liu, Chain T.; Asta, Mark D.; Gao, Yanfei; Dunand, David C.; Ghosh, Gautam; Chen, Mingwei; Fine, Morris E.; Liaw, Peter K.

    2015-11-01

    There have been numerous efforts to develop creep-resistant materials strengthened by incoherent particles at high temperatures and stresses in response to future energy needs for steam turbines in thermal-power plants. However, the microstructural instability of the incoherent-particle-strengthened ferritic steels limits their application to temperatures below 900 K. Here, we report a novel ferritic alloy with the excellent creep resistance enhanced by coherent hierarchical precipitates, using the integrated experimental (transmission-electron microscopy/scanning-transmission-electron microscopy, in-situ neutron diffraction, and atom-probe tomography) and theoretical (crystal-plasticity finite-element modeling) approaches. This alloy is strengthened by nano-scaled L21-Ni2TiAl (Heusler phase)-based precipitates, which themselves contain coherent nano-scaled B2 zones. These coherent hierarchical precipitates are uniformly distributed within the Fe matrix. Our hierarchical structure material exhibits the superior creep resistance at 973 K in terms of the minimal creep rate, which is four orders of magnitude lower than that of conventional ferritic steels. These results provide a new alloy-design strategy using the novel concept of hierarchical precipitates and the fundamental science for developing creep-resistant ferritic alloys. The present research will broaden the applications of ferritic alloys to higher temperatures.

  17. Ferritic Alloys with Extreme Creep Resistance via Coherent Hierarchical Precipitates

    PubMed Central

    Song, Gian; Sun, Zhiqian; Li, Lin; Xu, Xiandong; Rawlings, Michael; Liebscher, Christian H.; Clausen, Bjørn; Poplawsky, Jonathan; Leonard, Donovan N.; Huang, Shenyan; Teng, Zhenke; Liu, Chain T.; Asta, Mark D.; Gao, Yanfei; Dunand, David C.; Ghosh, Gautam; Chen, Mingwei; Fine, Morris E.; Liaw, Peter K.

    2015-01-01

    There have been numerous efforts to develop creep-resistant materials strengthened by incoherent particles at high temperatures and stresses in response to future energy needs for steam turbines in thermal-power plants. However, the microstructural instability of the incoherent-particle-strengthened ferritic steels limits their application to temperatures below 900 K. Here, we report a novel ferritic alloy with the excellent creep resistance enhanced by coherent hierarchical precipitates, using the integrated experimental (transmission-electron microscopy/scanning-transmission-electron microscopy, in-situ neutron diffraction, and atom-probe tomography) and theoretical (crystal-plasticity finite-element modeling) approaches. This alloy is strengthened by nano-scaled L21-Ni2TiAl (Heusler phase)-based precipitates, which themselves contain coherent nano-scaled B2 zones. These coherent hierarchical precipitates are uniformly distributed within the Fe matrix. Our hierarchical structure material exhibits the superior creep resistance at 973 K in terms of the minimal creep rate, which is four orders of magnitude lower than that of conventional ferritic steels. These results provide a new alloy-design strategy using the novel concept of hierarchical precipitates and the fundamental science for developing creep-resistant ferritic alloys. The present research will broaden the applications of ferritic alloys to higher temperatures. PMID:26548303

  18. Ferritic Alloys with Extreme Creep Resistance via Coherent Hierarchical Precipitates

    DOE PAGES

    Song, Gian; Sun, Zhiqian; Li, Lin; ...

    2015-11-09

    There have been numerous efforts to develop creep-resistant materials strengthened by incoherent particles at high temperatures and stresses in response to future energy needs for steam turbines in thermal-power plants. However, the microstructural instability of the incoherent-particle-strengthened ferritic steels limits their application to temperatures below 900 K. Here, we report a novel ferritic alloy with the excellent creep resistance enhanced by coherent hierarchical precipitates, using the integrated experimental (transmission-electron microscopy/scanning-transmission-electron microscopy, in-situ neutron diffraction, and atom-probe tomography) and theoretical (crystal-plasticity finite-element modeling) approaches. This alloy is strengthened by nano-scaled L21-Ni2TiAl (Heusler phase)-based precipitates, which themselves contain coherent nano-scaled B2 zones.more » These coherent hierarchical precipitates are uniformly distributed within the Fe matrix. Our hierarchical structure material exhibits the superior creep resistance at 973 K in terms of the minimal creep rate, which is four orders of magnitude lower than that of conventional ferritic steels. These results provide a new alloy-design strategy using the novel concept of hierarchical precipitates and the fundamental science for developing creep-resistant ferritic alloys. Finally, the present research will broaden the applications of ferritic alloys to higher temperatures.« less

  19. Ferritic Alloys with Extreme Creep Resistance via Coherent Hierarchical Precipitates

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Gian; Sun, Zhiqian; Li, Lin; Xu, Xiandong; Rawlings, Michael; Liebscher, Christian H.; Clausen, Bjørn; Poplawsky, Jonathan; Leonard, Donovan N.; Huang, Shenyan; Teng, Zhenke; Liu, Chain T.; Asta, Mark D.; Gao, Yanfei; Dunand, David C.; Ghosh, Gautam; Chen, Mingwei; Fine, Morris E.; Liaw, Peter K.

    2015-11-09

    There have been numerous efforts to develop creep-resistant materials strengthened by incoherent particles at high temperatures and stresses in response to future energy needs for steam turbines in thermal-power plants. However, the microstructural instability of the incoherent-particle-strengthened ferritic steels limits their application to temperatures below 900 K. Here, we report a novel ferritic alloy with the excellent creep resistance enhanced by coherent hierarchical precipitates, using the integrated experimental (transmission-electron microscopy/scanning-transmission-electron microscopy, in-situ neutron diffraction, and atom-probe tomography) and theoretical (crystal-plasticity finite-element modeling) approaches. This alloy is strengthened by nano-scaled L21-Ni2TiAl (Heusler phase)-based precipitates, which themselves contain coherent nano-scaled B2 zones. These coherent hierarchical precipitates are uniformly distributed within the Fe matrix. Our hierarchical structure material exhibits the superior creep resistance at 973 K in terms of the minimal creep rate, which is four orders of magnitude lower than that of conventional ferritic steels. These results provide a new alloy-design strategy using the novel concept of hierarchical precipitates and the fundamental science for developing creep-resistant ferritic alloys. Finally, the present research will broaden the applications of ferritic alloys to higher temperatures.

  20. Ferritic Fe-Mn alloy for cryogenic applications

    DOEpatents

    Hwang, Sun-Keun; Morris, Jr., John W.

    1979-01-01

    A ferritic, nickel-free alloy steel composition, suitable for cryogenic applications, which consists essentially of about 10-13% manganese, 0.002-0.01% boron, 0.1-0.5% titanium, 0-0.05% aluminum, and the remainder iron and incidental impurities normally associated therewith.

  1. Design and screening of nanoprecipitates-strengthened advanced ferritic alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Lizhen; Yang, Ying; Chen, Tianyi; Sridharan, K.; He, Li

    2016-12-30

    Advanced nuclear reactors as well as the life extension of light water reactors require advanced alloys capable of satisfactory operation up to neutron damage levels approaching 200 displacements per atom (dpa). Extensive studies, including fundamental theories, have demonstrated the superior resistance to radiation-induced swelling in ferritic steels, primarily inherited from their body-centered cubic (bcc) structure. This study aims at developing nanoprecipitates strengthened advanced ferritic alloys for advanced nuclear reactor applications. To be more specific, this study aims at enhancing the amorphization ability of some precipitates, such as Laves phase and other types of intermetallic phases, through smart alloying strategy, and thereby promote the crystalline®amorphous transformation of these precipitates under irradiation.

  2. Mechanical alloying of lanthana-bearing nanostructured ferritic steels

    SciTech Connect

    Somayeh Paseban; Indrajit Charit; Yaqiao Q. Wu; Jatuporn Burns; Kerry N. Allahar; Darryl P. Butt; James I. Cole

    2013-09-01

    A novel nanostructured ferritic steel powder with the nominal composition Fe–14Cr–1Ti–0.3Mo–0.5La2O3 (wt.%) was developed via high energy ball milling. La2O3 was added to this alloy instead of the traditionally used Y2O3. The effects of varying the ball milling parameters, such as milling time, steel ball size and ball to powder ratio, on the mechanical properties and micro structural characteristics of the as-milled powder were investigated. Nanocrystallites of a body-centered cubic ferritic solid solution matrix with a mean size of approximately 20 nm were observed by transmission electron microscopy. Nanoscale characterization of the as-milled powder by local electrode atom probe tomography revealed the formation of Cr–Ti–La–O-enriched nanoclusters during mechanical alloying. The Cr:Ti:La:O ratio is considered “non-stoichiometric”. The average size (radius) of the nanoclusters was about 1 nm, with number density of 3.7 1024 m3. The mechanism for formation of nanoclusters in the as-milled powder is discussed. La2O3 appears to be a promising alternative rare earth oxide for future nanostructured ferritic steels.

  3. The role of nickel in radiation damage of ferritic alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Osetskiy, Yury N.; Anento, Napoleon; Serra, Anna; Terentyev, Dmitry

    2014-11-26

    According to the modern theory damage evolution under neutron irradiation depends on the fraction of self interstitial atoms (SIAs) produced in the form of one-dimensionally (1-D) glissile clusters. These clusters, having a low interaction cross-section with other defects, sink mainly on grain boundaries and dislocations creating the so-called production bias. It is known empirically that addition of certain alloying elements affect many radiation effects, including swelling, however the mechanisms are unknown in many cases. In this paper we report the results of an extensive multi-technique atomistic level modeling of SIA clusters mobility in bcc Fe-Ni alloys with Ni content from 0.8 to 10 at.%. We have found that Ni interacts strongly with periphery of clusters affecting their mobility. The total effect is defined by all Ni atoms interacting with the cluster at the same time and can be significant even in low-Ni alloys. Thus 1nm (37SIAs) cluster is practically immobile at T < 500K in the Fe-0.8at.% Ni alloy. Increasing cluster size and Ni content enhance cluster immobilization. Furthermore, this effect should have quite broad consequences in swelling rate, matrix damage accumulation, radiation induced hardening, etc. and the results obtained help in better understanding and prediction of radiation effects in Fe-Ni ferritic alloys.

  4. The role of nickel in radiation damage of ferritic alloys

    DOE PAGES

    Osetskiy, Yury N.; Anento, Napoleon; Serra, Anna; ...

    2014-11-26

    According to the modern theory damage evolution under neutron irradiation depends on the fraction of self interstitial atoms (SIAs) produced in the form of one-dimensionally (1-D) glissile clusters. These clusters, having a low interaction cross-section with other defects, sink mainly on grain boundaries and dislocations creating the so-called production bias. It is known empirically that addition of certain alloying elements affect many radiation effects, including swelling, however the mechanisms are unknown in many cases. In this paper we report the results of an extensive multi-technique atomistic level modeling of SIA clusters mobility in bcc Fe-Ni alloys with Ni content frommore » 0.8 to 10 at.%. We have found that Ni interacts strongly with periphery of clusters affecting their mobility. The total effect is defined by all Ni atoms interacting with the cluster at the same time and can be significant even in low-Ni alloys. Thus 1nm (37SIAs) cluster is practically immobile at T < 500K in the Fe-0.8at.% Ni alloy. Increasing cluster size and Ni content enhance cluster immobilization. Furthermore, this effect should have quite broad consequences in swelling rate, matrix damage accumulation, radiation induced hardening, etc. and the results obtained help in better understanding and prediction of radiation effects in Fe-Ni ferritic alloys.« less

  5. Precipitation sequence in niobium-alloyed ferritic stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, Nobuhiro; Bhadeshia, H. K. D. H.; Kikuchi, Masao

    2004-03-01

    Niobium is an important alloying element in the design of heat-resistant ferritic stainless steels for automotive exhaust systems. When in solid solution, it improves both the high temperature strength and the resistance to thermal fatigue. However, it also forms several kinds of precipitates during service. These reactions have been modelled, taking into account the multicomponent nature of the diffusion process and allowing for capillarity effects. It has been possible to estimate not only the volume fractions but also the particle sizes for Fe2Nb (Laves phase) and Fe3Nb3C (M6C) carbide in a 19Cr-0.8Nb steel, with good agreement against experimental data.

  6. Stability of Y–Ti–O precipitates in friction stir welded nanostructured ferritic alloys

    DOE PAGES

    Yu, Xinghua; Mazumder, B.; Miller, M. K.; ...

    2015-01-19

    Nanostructured ferritic alloys, which have complex microstructures which consist of ultrafine ferritic grains with a dispersion of stable oxide particles and nanoclusters, are promising materials for fuel cladding and structural applications in the next generation nuclear reactor. This paper evaluates microstructure of friction stir welded nanostructured ferritic alloys using electron microscopy and atom probe tomography techniques. Atom probe tomography results revealed that nanoclusters are coarsened and inhomogeneously distributed in the stir zone and thermomechanically affected zone. Three hypotheses on coarsening of nanoclusters are presented. Finally, the hardness difference in different regions of friction stir weld has been explained.

  7. Stress relaxation behavior of nanocluster-strengthened ferritic alloy at high temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jeoung H; Byun, Thak Sang; Hoelzer, David T

    2012-01-01

    Stress relaxation behavior was investigated for the nanoclusters/dispersoids-strengthened steels including the nanostructured ferritic alloy 14YWT (SM10), oxide-dispersion strengthened (ODS) Eurofer97, and commercial ODS steel PM2000. The stress relaxation tests were carried out at high temperatures ranging from 600 to 1000 degrees C. Overall, the relaxation rates of 14YWT and ODS-Eurofer97 were lower than that of PM2000. To analyze the strain rate sensitivity of the alloys, the load drop-time curves were converted to the stress-strain rate curves. In the log-log plots of these curves, no significant change in slope was observed in the strain rate range of 2 x 10(-5)-1 x 10(-3)s(-1). At 600 degrees C, 14YWT and ODS-Eurofer97 have similar activation values of similar to 50b(3) while PM2000 has similar to 100b(3). Above 700 degrees C, the differences of the activation energy among alloys become more noticeable with increasing temperature. The activation energies of the three alloys were derived and compared. The rate-controlling mechanisms in the stress relaxation of the three nanoclusters/dispersoids-hardened alloys include dislocation glide and climb, and further study is necessary to clarify detailed contributing mechanisms.

  8. Vacancy-controlled ultrastable nanoclusters in nanostructured ferritic alloys

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Z. W.; Yao, L.; Wang, X. -L.; ...

    2015-05-29

    A new class of advanced structural materials, based on the Fe-O-vacancy system, has exceptional resistance to high-temperature creep and excellent tolerance to extremely high-dose radiation. Although these remarkable improvements in properties compared to steels are known to be associated with the Y-Ti-O-enriched nanoclusters, the roles of vacancies in facilitating the nucleation of nanoclusters are a long-standing puzzle, due to the experimental difficulties in characterizing vacancies, particularly in-situ while the nanoclusters are forming. We report an experiment study that provides the compelling evidence for the presence of significant concentrations of vacancies in Y-Ti-O-enriched nanoclusters in a nanostructured ferritic alloy using amore » combination of state-of-the-art atom-probe tomography and in situ small angle neutron scattering. The nucleation of nanoclusters starts from the O-enriched solute clustering with vacancy mediation. The nanoclusters grow with an extremely low growth rate through attraction of vacancies and O:vacancy pairs, leading to the unusual stability of the nanoclusters.« less

  9. Vacancy-controlled ultrastable nanoclusters in nanostructured ferritic alloys

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Z. W.; Yao, L.; Wang, X.-L.; Miller, M. K.

    2015-01-01

    A new class of advanced structural materials, based on the Fe-O-vacancy system, has exceptional resistance to high-temperature creep and excellent tolerance to extremely high-dose radiation. Although these remarkable improvements in properties compared to steels are known to be associated with the Y-Ti-O-enriched nanoclusters, the roles of vacancies in facilitating the nucleation of nanoclusters are a long-standing puzzle, due to the experimental difficulties in characterizing vacancies, particularly in-situ while the nanoclusters are forming. Here we report an experiment study that provides the compelling evidence for the presence of significant concentrations of vacancies in Y-Ti-O-enriched nanoclusters in a nanostructured ferritic alloy using a combination of state-of-the-art atom-probe tomography and in situ small angle neutron scattering. The nucleation of nanoclusters starts from the O-enriched solute clustering with vacancy mediation. The nanoclusters grow with an extremely low growth rate through attraction of vacancies and O:vacancy pairs, leading to the unusual stability of the nanoclusters. PMID:26023747

  10. Vacancy-controlled ultrastable nanoclusters in nanostructured ferritic alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Z. W.; Yao, L.; Wang, X. -L.; Miller, M. K.

    2015-05-29

    A new class of advanced structural materials, based on the Fe-O-vacancy system, has exceptional resistance to high-temperature creep and excellent tolerance to extremely high-dose radiation. Although these remarkable improvements in properties compared to steels are known to be associated with the Y-Ti-O-enriched nanoclusters, the roles of vacancies in facilitating the nucleation of nanoclusters are a long-standing puzzle, due to the experimental difficulties in characterizing vacancies, particularly in-situ while the nanoclusters are forming. We report an experiment study that provides the compelling evidence for the presence of significant concentrations of vacancies in Y-Ti-O-enriched nanoclusters in a nanostructured ferritic alloy using a combination of state-of-the-art atom-probe tomography and in situ small angle neutron scattering. The nucleation of nanoclusters starts from the O-enriched solute clustering with vacancy mediation. The nanoclusters grow with an extremely low growth rate through attraction of vacancies and O:vacancy pairs, leading to the unusual stability of the nanoclusters.

  11. Irradiation creep of various ferritic alloys irradiated {approximately}400 C in the PFR and FFTF reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Toloczko, M.B.; Garner, F.A.; Eiholzer, C.R.

    1998-03-01

    Three ferritic alloys were irradiated in two fast reactors to doses of 50 dpa or more at temperatures near 400 C. One martensitic alloy, HT9, was irradiated in both the FFTF and PFR reactors. PFR is the Prototype Fast Reactor in Dourneay, Scotland, and FFTF is the Fast Flux Test Facility in Richland, WA. D57 is a developmental alloy that was irradiated in PFR only, and MA957 is a Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} dispersion-hardened ferritic alloy that was irradiated only in FFTF. These alloys exhibited little or no void swelling at {approximately}400 C. Depending on the alloy starting condition, these steels develop a variety of non-creep strains early in the irradiation that are associated with phase changes. Each of these alloys creeps at a rate that is significantly lower than that of austenitic steels irradiated in the same experiments. The creep compliance for ferritic alloys in general appears to be {approximately}0.5 {times} 10{sup {minus}6} MPa{sup {minus}1} dpa{sup {minus}1}, independent of both composition and starting state. The addition of Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} as a dispersoid does not appear to change the creep behavior.

  12. Liquid metal embrittlement susceptibility of ferritic martensitic steel in liquid lead alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van den Bosch, J.; Bosch, R. W.; Sapundjiev, D.; Almazouzi, A.

    2008-06-01

    The susceptibility of the ferritic-martensitic steels T91 and EUROFER97 to liquid metal embrittlement (LME) in lead alloys has been examined under various conditions. T91, which is currently the most promising candidate material for the high temperature components of the future accelerator driven system (ADS) was tested in liquid lead bismuth eutectic (LBE), whereas the reduced activation steel, EUROFER97 which is under consideration to be the structural steel for fusion reactors was tested in liquid lead lithium eutectic. These steels, similar in microstructure and mechanical properties in the unirradiated condition were tested for their susceptibility to LME as function of temperature (150-450 °C) and strain rate (1 × 10 -3-1 × 10 -6 s -1). Also, the influence of pre-exposure and surface stress concentrators was evaluated for both steels in, respectively, liquid PbBi and PbLi environment. To assess the LME effect, results of the tests in liquid metal environment are compared with tests in air or inert gas environment. Although both unirradiated and irradiated smooth ferritic-martensitic steels do not show any or little deterioration of mechanical properties in liquid lead alloy environment compared to their mechanical properties in gas as function of temperature and strain rate, pre-exposure or the presence of surface stress concentrators does lead to a significant decrease in total elongation for certain test conditions depending on the type of liquid metal environment. The results are discussed in terms of wetting enhanced by liquid metal corrosion or crack initiation processes.

  13. A comparative assessment of the fracture toughness behavior of ferritic-martensitic steels and nanostructured ferritic alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byun, Thak Sang; Hoelzer, David T.; Kim, Jeoung Han; Maloy, Stuart A.

    2017-02-01

    The Fe-Cr alloys with ultrafine microstructures are primary candidate materials for advanced nuclear reactor components because of their excellent high temperature strength and high resistance to radiation-induced damage such as embrittlement and swelling. Mainly two types of Fe-Cr alloys have been developed for the high temperature reactor applications: the quenched and tempered ferritic-martensitic (FM) steels hardened primarily by ultrafine laths and carbonitrides and the powder metallurgy-based nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFAs) by nanograin structure and nanoclusters. This study aims at elucidating the differences and similarities in the temperature and strength dependences of fracture toughness in the Fe-Cr alloys to provide a comparative assessment of their high-temperature structural performance. The KJQ versus yield stress plots confirmed that the fracture toughness was inversely proportional to yield strength. It was found, however, that the toughness data for some NFAs were outside the band of the integrated dataset at given strength level, which indicates either a significant improvement or deterioration in mechanical properties due to fundamental changes in deformation and fracture mechanisms. When compared to the behavior of NFAs, the FM steels have shown much less strength dependence and formed narrow fracture toughness data bands at a significantly lower strength region. It appeared that at high temperatures ≥600 °C the NFAs cannot retain the nanostructure advantage of high strength and high toughness either by high-temperature embrittlement or by excessive loss of strength. Irradiation studies have revealed, however, that the NFAs have much stronger radiation resistance than tempered martensitic steels, such as lower radiation-induced swelling, finer helium bubble formation, lower irradiation creep rate and reduced low temperature embrittlement.

  14. A comparative assessment of the fracture toughness behavior of ferritic-martensitic steels and nanostructured ferritic alloys

    DOE PAGES

    Byun, Thak Sang; Hoelzer, David T.; Kim, Jeoung Han; ...

    2016-12-07

    The Fe-Cr alloys with ultrafine microstructures are primary candidate materials for advanced nuclear reactor components because of their excellent high temperature strength and high resistance to radiation-induced damage such as embrittlement and swelling. Mainly two types of Fe-Cr alloys have been developed for the high temperature reactor applications: the quenched and tempered ferritic-martensitic (FM) steels hardened primarily by ultrafine laths and carbonitrides and the powder metallurgy-based nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFAs) by nanograin structure and nanoclusters. This paper aims at elucidating the differences and similarities in the temperature and strength dependences of fracture toughness in the Fe-Cr alloys to provide amore » comparative assessment of their high-temperature structural performance. The KJQ versus yield stress plots confirmed that the fracture toughness was inversely proportional to yield strength. It was found, however, that the toughness data for some NFAs were outside the band of the integrated dataset at given strength level, which indicates either a significant improvement or deterioration in mechanical properties due to fundamental changes in deformation and fracture mechanisms. When compared to the behavior of NFAs, the FM steels have shown much less strength dependence and formed narrow fracture toughness data bands at a significantly lower strength region. It appeared that at high temperatures ≥600 °C the NFAs cannot retain the nanostructure advantage of high strength and high toughness either by high-temperature embrittlement or by excessive loss of strength. Finally, irradiation studies have revealed, however, that the NFAs have much stronger radiation resistance than tempered martensitic steels, such as lower radiation-induced swelling, finer helium bubble formation, lower irradiation creep rate and reduced low temperature embrittlement.« less

  15. A comparative assessment of the fracture toughness behavior of ferritic-martensitic steels and nanostructured ferritic alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Byun, Thak Sang; Hoelzer, David T.; Kim, Jeoung Han; Maloy, Stuart A.

    2016-12-07

    The Fe-Cr alloys with ultrafine microstructures are primary candidate materials for advanced nuclear reactor components because of their excellent high temperature strength and high resistance to radiation-induced damage such as embrittlement and swelling. Mainly two types of Fe-Cr alloys have been developed for the high temperature reactor applications: the quenched and tempered ferritic-martensitic (FM) steels hardened primarily by ultrafine laths and carbonitrides and the powder metallurgy-based nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFAs) by nanograin structure and nanoclusters. This paper aims at elucidating the differences and similarities in the temperature and strength dependences of fracture toughness in the Fe-Cr alloys to provide a comparative assessment of their high-temperature structural performance. The KJQ versus yield stress plots confirmed that the fracture toughness was inversely proportional to yield strength. It was found, however, that the toughness data for some NFAs were outside the band of the integrated dataset at given strength level, which indicates either a significant improvement or deterioration in mechanical properties due to fundamental changes in deformation and fracture mechanisms. When compared to the behavior of NFAs, the FM steels have shown much less strength dependence and formed narrow fracture toughness data bands at a significantly lower strength region. It appeared that at high temperatures ≥600 °C the NFAs cannot retain the nanostructure advantage of high strength and high toughness either by high-temperature embrittlement or by excessive loss of strength. Finally, irradiation studies have revealed, however, that the NFAs have much stronger radiation resistance than tempered martensitic steels, such as lower radiation-induced swelling, finer helium bubble formation, lower irradiation creep rate and reduced low temperature embrittlement.

  16. Detection and quantification of solute clusters in a nanostructured ferritic alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Michael K.; Larson, David J.; Reinhard, D. A.

    2014-12-26

    A series of simulated atom probe datasets were examined with a friends-of-friends method to establish the detection efficiency required to resolve solute clusters in the ferrite phase of a 14YWT nanostructured ferritic alloy. The size and number densities of solute clusters in the ferrite of the as-milled mechanically-alloyed condition and the stir zone of a friction stir weld were estimated with a prototype high-detection-efficiency (~80%) local electrode atom probe. High number densities, 1.8 × 1024 m–3 and 1.2 × 1024 m–3, respectively of solute clusters containing between 2 and 9 solute atoms of Ti, Y and O and were detected for these two conditions. Furthermore, these results support first principle calculations that predicted that vacancies stabilize these Ti–Y–O– clusters, which retard diffusion and contribute to the excellent high temperature stability of the microstructure and radiation tolerance of nanostructured ferritic alloys.

  17. Detection and quantification of solute clusters in a nanostructured ferritic alloy

    DOE PAGES

    Miller, Michael K.; Larson, David J.; Reinhard, D. A.

    2014-12-26

    A series of simulated atom probe datasets were examined with a friends-of-friends method to establish the detection efficiency required to resolve solute clusters in the ferrite phase of a 14YWT nanostructured ferritic alloy. The size and number densities of solute clusters in the ferrite of the as-milled mechanically-alloyed condition and the stir zone of a friction stir weld were estimated with a prototype high-detection-efficiency (~80%) local electrode atom probe. High number densities, 1.8 × 1024 m–3 and 1.2 × 1024 m–3, respectively of solute clusters containing between 2 and 9 solute atoms of Ti, Y and O and were detectedmore » for these two conditions. Furthermore, these results support first principle calculations that predicted that vacancies stabilize these Ti–Y–O– clusters, which retard diffusion and contribute to the excellent high temperature stability of the microstructure and radiation tolerance of nanostructured ferritic alloys.« less

  18. Development of porosity in an oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic alloy containing nanoscale oxide particles

    SciTech Connect

    Schneibel, Joachim H; Liu, Chain T; Hoelzer, David T; Mills, Michael J.; Sarosi, P. M.; Hayashi, Taisuke; Wendt, Ullrich; Heyse, Hartmut

    2007-01-01

    The development of porosity at 1000 C in an oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic alloy containing ultra-fine oxide particles with diameters on the order of a few nm is investigated. A comparison with an alloy fabricated by internal oxidation demonstrates that the porosity formation is associated with mechanical alloying with Y2O3 in argon. The pores grow in spite of a sub-micron grain size suggesting that the grain boundaries are not effective paths for removing entrapped gas from the pores.

  19. The Effect of H and He on Irradiation Performance of Fe and Ferritic Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    James F. Stubbins

    2010-01-22

    This research program was designed to look at basic radiation damage and effects and mechanical properties in Fe and ferritic alloys. The program scope included a number of materials ranging from pure single crystal Fe to more complex Fe-Cr-C alloys. The range of materials was designed to examine materials response and performance on ideal/model systems and gradually move to more complex systems. The experimental program was coordinated with a modeling effort. The use of pure and model alloys also facilitated the ability to develop and employ atomistic-scale modeling techniques to understand the inherent physics underlying materials performance

  20. Computational Design of Creep-Resistant Alloys and Experimental Validation in Ferritic Superalloys

    SciTech Connect

    Liaw, Peter

    2014-12-31

    A new class of ferritic superalloys containing B2-type zones inside parent L21-type precipitates in a disordered solid-solution matrix, also known as a hierarchical-precipitate strengthened ferritic alloy (HPSFA), has been developed for high-temperature structural applications in fossil-energy power plants. These alloys were designed by the addition of the Ti element into a previously-studied NiAl-strengthened ferritic alloy (denoted as FBB8 in this study). In the present research, systematic investigations, including advanced experimental techniques, first-principles calculations, and numerical simulations, have been integrated and conducted to characterize the complex microstructures and excellent creep resistance of HPSFAs. The experimental techniques include transmission-electron microscopy, scanningtransmission- electron microscopy, neutron diffraction, and atom-probe tomography, which provide detailed microstructural information of HPSFAs. Systematic tension/compression creep tests revealed that HPSFAs exhibit the superior creep resistance, compared with the FBB8 and conventional ferritic steels (i.e., the creep rates of HPSFAs are about 4 orders of magnitude slower than the FBB8 and conventional ferritic steels.) First-principles calculations include interfacial free energies, anti-phase boundary (APB) free energies, elastic constants, and impurity diffusivities in Fe. Combined with kinetic Monte- Carlo simulations of interdiffusion coefficients, and the integration of computational thermodynamics and kinetics, these calculations provide great understanding of thermodynamic and mechanical properties of HPSFAs. In addition to the systematic experimental approach and first-principles calculations, a series of numerical tools and algorithms, which assist in the optimization of creep properties of ferritic superalloys, are utilized and developed. These numerical simulation results are compared with the available experimental data and previous first

  1. Helium sequestration at nanoparticle-matrix interfaces in helium + heavy ion irradiated nanostructured ferritic alloys

    DOE PAGES

    Parish, Chad M.; Unocic, Kinga A.; Tan, Lizhen; ...

    2016-10-24

    Here we irradiated four ferritic alloys with energetic Fe and He ions: one castable nanostructured alloy (CNA) containing Ti-W-Ta-carbides, and three nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFAs). The NFAs were: 9Cr containing Y-Ti-O nanoclusters, and two Fe-12Cr-5Al NFAs containing Y-Zr-O or Y-Hf-O clusters. All four were subjected to simultaneous dual-beam Fe + He ion implantation (650 °C, ~50 dpa, ~15 appm He/dpa), simulating fusion-reactor conditions. Examination using scanning/transmission electron microscopy (STEM) revealed high-number-density helium bubbles of ~8 nm, ~1021 m-3 (CNA), and of ~3 nm, 1023 m-3 (NFAs). STEM combined with multivariate statistical analysis data mining suggests that the precipitate-matrix interfaces inmore » all alloys survived ~50 dpa at 650 °C and serve as effective helium trapping sites. All alloys appear viable structural material candidates for fusion or advanced fission energy systems. Finally, among these developmental alloys the NFAs appear to sequester the helium into smaller bubbles and away from the grain boundaries more effectively than the early-generation CNA.« less

  2. Helium sequestration at nanoparticle-matrix interfaces in helium + heavy ion irradiated nanostructured ferritic alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parish, C. M.; Unocic, K. A.; Tan, L.; Zinkle, S. J.; Kondo, S.; Snead, L. L.; Hoelzer, D. T.; Katoh, Y.

    2017-01-01

    We irradiated four ferritic alloys with energetic Fe and He ions: one castable nanostructured alloy (CNA) containing Ti-W-Ta-carbides, and three nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFAs). The NFAs were: 9Cr containing Y-Ti-O nanoclusters, and two Fe-12Cr-5Al NFAs containing Y-Zr-O or Y-Hf-O clusters. All four were subjected to simultaneous dual-beam Fe + He ion implantation (650 °C, ∼50 dpa, ∼15 appm He/dpa), simulating fusion-reactor conditions. Examination using scanning/transmission electron microscopy (STEM) revealed high-number-density helium bubbles of ∼8 nm, ∼1021 m-3 (CNA), and of ∼3 nm, 1023 m-3 (NFAs). STEM combined with multivariate statistical analysis data mining suggests that the precipitate-matrix interfaces in all alloys survived ∼50 dpa at 650 °C and serve as effective helium trapping sites. All alloys appear viable structural material candidates for fusion or advanced fission energy systems. Among these developmental alloys the NFAs appear to sequester the helium into smaller bubbles and away from the grain boundaries more effectively than the early-generation CNA.

  3. Helium sequestration at nanoparticle-matrix interfaces in helium + heavy ion irradiated nanostructured ferritic alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Parish, Chad M.; Unocic, Kinga A.; Tan, Lizhen; Zinkle, S. J.; Kondo, Sosuke; Snead, Lance Lewis; Hoelzer, David T.; Katoh, Yutai

    2016-10-24

    Here we irradiated four ferritic alloys with energetic Fe and He ions: one castable nanostructured alloy (CNA) containing Ti-W-Ta-carbides, and three nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFAs). The NFAs were: 9Cr containing Y-Ti-O nanoclusters, and two Fe-12Cr-5Al NFAs containing Y-Zr-O or Y-Hf-O clusters. All four were subjected to simultaneous dual-beam Fe + He ion implantation (650 °C, ~50 dpa, ~15 appm He/dpa), simulating fusion-reactor conditions. Examination using scanning/transmission electron microscopy (STEM) revealed high-number-density helium bubbles of ~8 nm, ~1021 m-3 (CNA), and of ~3 nm, 1023 m-3 (NFAs). STEM combined with multivariate statistical analysis data mining suggests that the precipitate-matrix interfaces in all alloys survived ~50 dpa at 650 °C and serve as effective helium trapping sites. All alloys appear viable structural material candidates for fusion or advanced fission energy systems. Finally, among these developmental alloys the NFAs appear to sequester the helium into smaller bubbles and away from the grain boundaries more effectively than the early-generation CNA.

  4. Creep behavior of a {beta}{prime}(NiAl) precipitation strengthened ferritic Fe-Cr-Ni-Al alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, S.M.; Tjong, S.C.; Lai, J.K.L.

    1998-05-22

    Creep in precipitation-strengthened alloys usually exhibits a pronounced transition in the stress vs creep rate relationship due to dislocations bypassing of particles by climb at low stresses. In the present study, a single-slope behavior is observed in creep of {beta}{prime}(NiAl) strengthened ferritic Fe-19Cr-4Ni-2Al alloy in the temperature range 873--923 K. The alloy exhibits anomalously high values of apparent stress exponent and activation energy (980 kJ/mol). Transmission electron microscopy examination of the deformation microstructure reveals the occurrence of attractive dislocation/particle interaction, a feature which is usually observed in dispersion-strengthened alloys. Such an attractive dislocation particle interaction makes the local climb of dislocations over particles a realistic configuration at low stresses. The creep data are analyzed by the back-stress approach and by the recent dislocation-climb theories based on attractive interaction between dislocations and particles. By considering a back stress, all data can be rationalized by a power-law with a stress exponent of 4 and a creep activation energy close to the self-diffusion energy of the matrix lattice. Local climb together with the attractive but not strong interactions between the dislocations and particles is suggested to be the operative deformation mechanism at low stresses and to account for the single-slope behavior in the stress/creep rate relationship of this alloy.

  5. Studies on the activation energy from the ac conductivity measurements of rubber ferrite composites containing manganese zinc ferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashim, Mohd.; Alimuddin; Kumar, Shalendra; Shirsath, Sagar E.; Mohammed, E. M.; Chung, Hanshik; Kumar, Ravi

    2012-11-01

    Manganese zinc ferrites (MZF) have resistivities between 0.01 and 10 Ω m. Making composite materials of ferrites with either natural rubber or plastics will modify the electrical properties of ferrites. The moldability and flexibility of these composites find wide use in industrial and other scientific applications. Mixed ferrites belonging to the series Mn(1-x)ZnxFe2O4 were synthesized for different ‘x’ values in steps of 0.2, and incorporated in natural rubber matrix (RFC). From the dielectric measurements of the ceramic manganese zinc ferrite and rubber ferrite composites, ac conductivity and activation energy were evaluated. A program was developed with the aid of the LabVIEW package to automate the measurements. The ac conductivity of RFC was then correlated with that of the magnetic filler and matrix by a mixture equation which helps to tailor properties of these composites.

  6. Evaluation of magnetic behaviour and in vitro biocompatibility of ferritic PM2000 alloy.

    PubMed

    Flores, M S; Ciapetti, G; González-Carrasco, J L; Montealegre, M A; Multigner, M; Pagani, S; Rivero, G

    2004-05-01

    PM2000 is a ferritic alloy obtained by powder metallurgy and is being investigated for potential applications as a biomaterial. This work aimed to assess the biological compatibility and to determine the influence of the processing route and further recrystallisation treatment on the magnetic behaviour. The magnetic behaviour has been analysed as a function of the hysteresis loop obtained by using an inductive method. The biocompatibility has been tested using human osteoblast-like cells seeded onto discs of PM2000. The ability of cells, on its surface, to attach, grow, and produce alkaline phosphatase (ALP) was determined. It is shown that PM2000 is a soft magnetic material irrespective of its material condition, its remanent magnetisation being very low (up to about 3% for the recrystallised swaged material). Fields close to 200 Oe are required to saturate the material. The saturation magnetisation is about 135 emu g(-1). In vitro tests indicate that cells are able to attach and grow onto its surface, and produce ALP, a specific marker of cells with bone-forming activity. In this respect, PM2000 holds promise as a suitable substrate for bone integration. These properties could make PM2000 a useful candidate for the preparation of medical devices where biocompatible and soft magnetic materials are sought. Applications for dental magnetic attachments could be envisaged.

  7. Development of new generation reduced activation ferritic-martensitic steels for advanced fusion reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, L.; Snead, L. L.; Katoh, Y.

    2016-09-01

    International development of reduced activation ferritic-martensitic (RAFM) steels has focused on 9 wt percentage Cr, which primarily contain M23C6 (M = Cr-rich) and small amounts of MX (M = Ta/V, X = C/N) precipitates, not adequate to maintain strength and creep resistance above ∼500 °C. To enable applications at higher temperatures for better thermal efficiency of fusion reactors, computational alloy thermodynamics coupled with strength modeling have been employed to explore a new generation RAFM steels. The new alloys are designed to significantly increase the amount of MX nanoprecipitates, which are manufacturable through standard and scalable industrial steelmaking methods. Preliminary experimental results of the developed new alloys demonstrated noticeably increased amount of MX, favoring significantly improved strength, creep resistance, and Charpy impact toughness as compared to current RAFM steels. The strength and creep resistance were comparable or approaching to the lower bound of, but impact toughness was noticeably superior to 9-20Cr oxide dispersion-strengthened ferritic alloys.

  8. Development of new generation reduced activation ferritic-martenstic steels for advanced fusion reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Lizhen; Snead, Lance Lewis; Katoh, Yutai

    2016-05-26

    International development of reduced activation ferritic-martensitic (RAFM) steels has focused on 9 wt percentage Cr, which primarily contain M23C6 (M = Cr-rich) and small amounts of MX (M = Ta/V, X = C/N) precipitates, not adequate to maintain strength and creep resistance above ~500 °C. To enable applications at higher temperatures for better thermal efficiency of fusion reactors, computational alloy thermodynamics coupled with strength modeling have been employed to explore a new generation RAFM steels. The new alloys are designed to significantly increase the amount of MX nanoprecipitates, which are manufacturable through standard and scalable industrial steelmaking methods. Preliminary experimental results of the developed new alloys demonstrated noticeably increased amount of MX, favoring significantly improved strength, creep resistance, and Charpy impact toughness as compared to current RAFM steels. Furthermore, the strength and creep resistance were comparable or approaching to the lower bound of, but impact toughness was noticeably superior to 9–20Cr oxide dispersion-strengthened ferritic alloys.

  9. Development of new generation reduced activation ferritic-martenstic steels for advanced fusion reactors

    DOE PAGES

    Tan, Lizhen; Snead, Lance Lewis; Katoh, Yutai

    2016-05-26

    International development of reduced activation ferritic-martensitic (RAFM) steels has focused on 9 wt percentage Cr, which primarily contain M23C6 (M = Cr-rich) and small amounts of MX (M = Ta/V, X = C/N) precipitates, not adequate to maintain strength and creep resistance above ~500 °C. To enable applications at higher temperatures for better thermal efficiency of fusion reactors, computational alloy thermodynamics coupled with strength modeling have been employed to explore a new generation RAFM steels. The new alloys are designed to significantly increase the amount of MX nanoprecipitates, which are manufacturable through standard and scalable industrial steelmaking methods. Preliminary experimentalmore » results of the developed new alloys demonstrated noticeably increased amount of MX, favoring significantly improved strength, creep resistance, and Charpy impact toughness as compared to current RAFM steels. Furthermore, the strength and creep resistance were comparable or approaching to the lower bound of, but impact toughness was noticeably superior to 9–20Cr oxide dispersion-strengthened ferritic alloys.« less

  10. The role of processing route on the microstructure of 14YWT nanostructured ferritic alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazumder, B.; Parish, C. M.; Bei, H.; Miller, M. K.

    2015-10-01

    Nanostructured ferritic alloys have outstanding high temperature creep properties and enhanced tolerance to radiation damage over conventional ferritic alloys. To achieve these properties, NFAs are fabricated by mechanical alloying of metallic and yttria powders. Atom probe tomography has demonstrated that milling times of at least 40 h are required to produce a uniform distribution of solutes in the flakes. After milling and hot extrusion, the microstructure consists of α-Fe, high number densities of Ti-Y-O-vacancy-enriched nanoclusters, and coarse Y2Ti2O7 and Ti(O,C,N) precipitates on the grain boundaries. In contrast, the as-cast condition consists of α-Fe with 50-100 μm irregularly-shaped Y2Ti2O7 pyrochlore precipitates with smaller embedded precipitates with the Y3Al5O12 (yttrium-aluminum garnet) crystal structure indicating that this traditional processing route is not a viable approach to achieve the desired microstructure. The nano-hardnesses were also substantially different, i.e., 4 and 8 GPa for the as-cast and as-extruded conditions, respectively. These variances can be explained by the microstructural differences and the effects of the high vacancy content introduced by mechanical alloying, and the strong binding energy of vacancies with O, Ti, and Y atoms that retard diffusion.

  11. Computational thermodynamics aided design of novel ferritic alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Ying; Chen, Tianyi; Tan, Lizhen

    2016-06-30

    With the aid of computational thermodynamics, Ni was identified to suppress the liquidus temperature of Fe2Zr and four Fe-Cr-Ni-Zr alloys were designed to study the Ni effect on the phase stability of Fe2Zr laves_phase. These alloys were fabricated through traditional arc-metling, followed by annealing at 1000 C for 336 hours and 700 C for 1275 hours. The microstructure were examined and characterized by SEM BSE image, EDS compositional mapping and point scan, XRD and TEM analysis. The major results were summarized below: 1)For investigated alloys with 12wt% Cr, 3~6wt% Zr and 3~9 wt%Ni, the phases in equilibrium with the BCC phase are C15_Laves phase, Fe23Zr6 phase. The volume fraction of intermetallic phases increases with Ni and Zr contents. 2)Instead of (Fe,Cr)2Zr C14_Laves phase, Ni stabilizes the C15_Laves structure in Fe-Cr-Ni-Zr alloys by substituting Fe and Cr atoms with Ni atoms in the first sublattice. 3)Fe23Zr6, that is metastable in the Fe-Cr-Zr ternary, is also stabilized by Ni addition. 4)Ni7Zr2 phase was observed in samples with high Ni/Zr ratio. Extensive solubility of Fe was identified in the phase. The microstructural and composition results obtained from this study will be incorportated into the the Fe-Cr-Ni-Zr database. The current samples will be subjected to ion irradiaition to be compared with those results for Fe-Cr-Zr alloys. Additional alloys will be designed to form (Fe,Cr,Ni)2Zr nanoprecipitates for further studies.

  12. Dynamical interaction of helium bubbles with cascade damage in Fe-9Cr ferritic alloy.

    SciTech Connect

    Ono, K.; Miyamoto, M.; Arakawa, K.; Birtcher, R. C.; Materials Science Division; Shimane Univ.; Osaka Univ.

    2008-12-01

    Dynamic interaction of helium bubble with cascade damage in Fe-9Cr ferritic alloy has been studied using in situ irradiation and electron microscopy. During the irradiation of the alloy by 400 keV Fe{sup +} ions at temperatures where no thermal motion takes place, induced displacement of small helium bubbles was observed: the bubbles underwent sporadic and instant displacement. The displacement was of the order of a few nanometers. The experimentally determined displacement probability of helium bubbles is consistent with the calculated probability of their dynamic interaction with sub-cascades introduced by the irradiation. Furthermore, during the irradiation of the alloy at higher temperatures, both retarded and accelerated Brownian type motions were observed. These results are discussed on the basis of dynamic interaction of helium bubbles with point defects that survive through high-energy self-ion irradiation.

  13. Investigation of Magnetic Signatures and Microstructures for Heat-Treated Ferritic/Martensitic HT-9 Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Henager, Charles H.; McCloy, John S.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Edwards, Danny J.; Hu, Shenyang Y.; Li, Yulan

    2013-05-01

    There is increased interest in improved methods for in-situ nondestructive interrogation of materials for nuclear reactors in order to ensure reactor safety and quantify material degradation (particularly embrittlement) prior to failure. Therefore, a prototypical ferritic/martensitic alloy, HT-9, of interest to the nuclear materials community was investigated to assess microstructure effects on micromagnetics measurements – Barkhausen noise emission, magnetic hysteresis measurements, and first-order reversal curve analysis – for samples with three different heat-treatments. Microstructural and physical measurements consisted of high-precision density, resonant ultrasound elastic constant determination, Vickers microhardness, grain size, and texture. These were varied in the HT-9 alloy samples and related to various magnetic signatures. In parallel, a meso-scale microstructure model was created for alpha iron and effects of polycrystallinity and demagnetization factor were explored. It was observed that Barkhausen noise emission decreased with increasing hardness and decreasing grain size (lath spacing) while coercivity increased. The results are discussed in terms of the use of magnetic signatures for nondestructive interrogation of radiation damage and other microstructural changes in ferritic/martensitic alloys.

  14. Irradiation creep of various ferritic alloys irradiated at {approximately}400{degrees}C in the PFR and FFTF reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Toloczko, M.B.; Garner, F.A.; Eiholzer, C.R.

    1997-04-01

    Three ferritic alloys were irradiated in two fast reactors to doses of 50 dpa or more at temperatures near 400{degrees}C. One martensitic alloy, HT9, was irradiated in both the FFTF and PFR reactors. PFR is the Prototype Fast Reactor in Dourneay, Scotland, and FFTF is the Fast Flux Test Facility in Richland, WA. D57 is a developmental alloy that was irradiated in PFR only, and MA957 is a Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} dispersion-hardened ferritic alloy that was irradiated only in FFTF. These alloys exhibited little or no void swelling at {approximately}400{degrees}C. Depending on the alloy starting condition, these steels develop a variety of non-creep strains early in the irradiation that are associated with phase changes. Each of these alloys creeps at a rate that is significantly lower than that of austenitic steels irradiated in the same experiments. The creep compliance for ferritic alloys in general appears to be {approximately}0.5 x 10{sup {minus}6} MPa{sup {minus}1} dpa{sup {minus}1}, independent of both composition and starting state. The addition of Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} as a dispersoid does not appear to change the creep behavior.

  15. System and method of forming nanostructured ferritic alloy

    DOEpatents

    Dial, Laura Cerully; DiDomizio, Richard; Alinger, Matthew Joseph; Huang, Shenyan

    2016-07-26

    A system for mechanical milling and a method of mechanical milling are disclosed. The system includes a container, a feedstock, and milling media. The container encloses a processing volume. The feedstock and the milling media are disposed in the processing volume of the container. The feedstock includes metal or alloy powder and a ceramic compound. The feedstock is mechanically milled in the processing volume using metallic milling media that includes a surface portion that has a carbon content less than about 0.4 weight percent.

  16. Duplex precipitates and their effects on the room-temperature fracture behaviour of a NiAl-strengthened ferritic alloy

    DOE PAGES

    Sun, Zhiqian; Song, Gian; Ilavsky, Jan; ...

    2015-03-23

    Duplex precipitates are presented in a NiAl-strengthened ferritic alloy. They were characterized by the ultra-small angle X-ray scattering and transmission electron microscope. Fine cooling precipitates with the size of several to tens of nanometres harden the matrix considerably at room temperature. Cracks are likely to initiate from precipitates, and coalesce and propagate quickly through the matrix due to the excessive hardening effect of cooling precipitates, which lead to the premature fracture of NiAl-strengthened ferritic alloys.

  17. Effect of alloying on microstructure and precipitate evolution in ferritic weld metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayanan, Badri Kannan

    The effect of alloying on the microstructure of ferritic weld metal produced with an self-shielded flux cored arc welding process (FCAW-S) has been studied. The welding electrode has a flux core that is intentionally alloyed with strong deoxidizers and denitriding elements such as aluminum, titanium and zirconium in addition to austenite formers such as manganese and nickel. This results in formation of microstructure consisting of carbide free bainite, retained austenite and twinned martensite. The work focuses on characterization of the microstructures and the precipitates formed during solidification and the allotropic phase transformation of the weld metal. Aluminum, manganese and nickel have significant solubility in iron while aluminum, titanium and zirconium have very strong affinity for nitrogen and oxygen. The effect of these alloying elements on the phase transformation and precipitation of oxides and nitrides have been studied with various characterization techniques. In-situ X-ray synchrotron diffraction has been used to characterize the solidification path and the effect of heating and cooling rates on microstructure evolution. Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (STEM) in conjunction with Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) and Electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) was used to study the effect of micro-alloying additions on inclusion evolution. The formation of core-shell structure of oxide/nitride is identified as being key to improvement in toughness of the weld metal. Electron Back Scattered Diffraction (EBSD) in combination with Orientation Imaging Microscopy (OIM) and Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has been employed to study the effect of alloying on austenite to ferrite transformation modes. The prevention of twinned martensite has been identified to be key to improving ductility for achieving high strength weld metal.

  18. Corrosion of ferritic-martensitic steels and nickel-based alloys in supercritical water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Xiaowei

    The corrosion behavior of ferritic/martensitic (F/M) steels and Ni-based alloys in supercritical water (SCW) has been studied due to their potential applications in future nuclear reactor systems, fossil fuel power plants and waste treatment processes. 9˜12% chromium ferritic/martensitic steels exhibit good radiation resistance and stress corrosion cracking resistance. Ni-based alloys with an austenitic face-centered cubic (FCC) structure are designed to retain good mechanical strength and corrosion/oxidation resistance at elevated temperatures. Corrosion tests were carried out at three temperatures, 360°C, 500°C and 600°C, with two dissolved oxygen contents, 25 ppb and 2 ppm for up to 3000 hours. Alloys modified by grain refinement and reactive element addition were also investigated to determine their ability to improve the corrosion resistance in SCW. A duplex oxide structure was observed in the F/M steels after exposure to 25 ppb oxygen SCW, including an outer oxide layer with columnar magnetite grains and an inner oxide layer constituted of a mixture of spinel and ferrite phases in an equiaxed grain structure. An additional outermost hematite layer formed in the SCW-exposed samples when the oxygen content was increased to 2 ppm. Weight gain in the F/M steels increased with exposure temperatures and times, and followed parabolic growth kinetics in most of the samples. In Ni-based alloys after exposure to SCW, general corrosion and pitting corrosion were observed, and intergranular corrosion was found when exposed at 600°C due to formation of a local healing layer. The general oxide structure on the Ni-based alloys was characterized as NiO/Spinel/(CrxFe 1-x)2O3/(Fe,Ni). No change in oxidation mechanism was observed in crossing the critical point despite the large change in water properties. Corrosion resistance of the F/M steels was significantly improved by plasma-based yttrium surface treatment because of restrained outward diffusion of iron by the

  19. The development of ferritic-martensitic steels with reduced long-term activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehrlich, K.; Kelzenberg, S.; Röhrig, H.-D.; Schäfer, L.; Schirra, M.

    1994-09-01

    Ferritic-martensitic 9-12% CrMoVNb steels of MANET type possess a number of advantageous properties for fusion reactor application. Their optimization has led to improved creep and fracture-toughness properties. New 9-10% CrWVTa alloys have been developed by KfK/IMF in collaboration with the SAARSTAHL GmbH which have a reduced long-term activation and show in addition superior fracture toughness properties. The calculation of dose rate and other radiological parameters with the presently available FISPACT/EAF codes, extended by KfK files for sequential reactions has shown that the long-term dose-rate in these alloys is governed by the remaining 'impurity level' of Nb and the alloying elements W and Ta. Sequential reactions — though relevant for single alloying elements like Cr, Mn, V and N — provide only a second order effect in Fe-based alloys. A challenge for the future materials development is the production of alloys with the desired narrow specification of elements and impurities, which necessitates new ways of steelmaking.

  20. The effect of fusion-relevant helium levels on the mechanical properties of isotopically tailored ferritic alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Hankin, G.L.; Hamilton, M.L.; Gelles, D.S.

    1997-04-01

    The yield and maximum strengths of an irradiated series of isotopically tailored ferritic alloys were evaluated using the shear punch test. The composition of three of the alloys was Fe-12Cr-1.5Ni. Different balances of nickel isotopes were used in each alloy in order to produce different helium levels. A fourth alloy, which contained no nickel, was also irradiated. The addition of nickel at any isotopic balance to the Fe-12Cr base alloy significantly increased the shear yield and maximum strengths of the alloys, and as expected, the strength of the alloys decreased with increasing irradiation temperature. Helium itself, up to 75 appm over 7 dpa appears to have little effect on the mechanical properties of the alloys.

  1. Temperature-dependent elastic anisotropy and mesoscale deformation in a nanostructured ferritic alloy

    DOE PAGES

    Stoica, G. M.; Stoica, A. D.; Miller, M. K.; ...

    2014-10-10

    Nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFA) are a new class of ultrafine-grained oxide dispersion-strengthened steels, promising for service in extreme environments of high temperature and high irradiation in the next-generation of nuclear reactors. This is owing to the remarkable stability of their complex microstructures containing a high density of Y-Ti-O nanoclusters within grains and along the grain boundaries. While nanoclusters have been recognized to be the primary contributor to the exceptional resistance to irradiation and high-temperature creep, very little is known about the mechanical roles of the polycrystalline grains that constitute the bulk ferritic matrix. Here we report the mesoscale characterization ofmore » anisotropic responses of the ultrafine NFA grains to tensile stresses at various temperatures using the state-of-the-art in situ neutron diffraction. We show the first experimental determination of temperature-dependent single-crystal elastic constants for the NFA, and reveal a strong temperature-dependent elastic anisotropy due to a sharp decrease in the shear stiffness constant [c'=(c_11-c_12)/2] when a critical temperature ( T_c ) is approached, indicative of elastic softening and instability of the ferritic matrix. We also show, from anisotropy-induced intergranular strain/stress accumulations, that a common dislocation slip mechanism operates at the onset of yielding for low temperatures, while there is a deformation crossover from low-temperature lattice hardening to high temperature lattice softening in response to extensive plastic deformation.« less

  2. Temperature-dependent elastic anisotropy and mesoscale deformation in a nanostructured ferritic alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Stoica, G. M.; Stoica, A. D.; Miller, M. K.; Ma, D.

    2014-10-10

    Nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFA) are a new class of ultrafine-grained oxide dispersion-strengthened steels, promising for service in extreme environments of high temperature and high irradiation in the next-generation of nuclear reactors. This is owing to the remarkable stability of their complex microstructures containing a high density of Y-Ti-O nanoclusters within grains and along the grain boundaries. While nanoclusters have been recognized to be the primary contributor to the exceptional resistance to irradiation and high-temperature creep, very little is known about the mechanical roles of the polycrystalline grains that constitute the bulk ferritic matrix. Here we report the mesoscale characterization of anisotropic responses of the ultrafine NFA grains to tensile stresses at various temperatures using the state-of-the-art in situ neutron diffraction. We show the first experimental determination of temperature-dependent single-crystal elastic constants for the NFA, and reveal a strong temperature-dependent elastic anisotropy due to a sharp decrease in the shear stiffness constant [c'=(c_11-c_12)/2] when a critical temperature ( T_c ) is approached, indicative of elastic softening and instability of the ferritic matrix. We also show, from anisotropy-induced intergranular strain/stress accumulations, that a common dislocation slip mechanism operates at the onset of yielding for low temperatures, while there is a deformation crossover from low-temperature lattice hardening to high temperature lattice softening in response to extensive plastic deformation.

  3. Grain boundary diffusion of {sup 181}W in Fe-Cr ferritic alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Cermak, J.; Ruzickova, J.; Pokorna, A.

    1995-07-15

    The grain boundary diffusivity s{delta}D{sub b} of {sup 181}W in binary Fe-Cr alloys with 8--12 wt.% Cr, in a ternary alloy Fe-8Cr-0.17C and in two commercial modifications of 8% Cr ferritic steels were measured by the serial sectioning method in the temperature range 773--1,123 K. A variation of the Cr concentration in the range 8--12 wt.% does not influence s{delta}D{sub b}. The addition of carbon and, probably also phosphorus, decreases s{delta}D{sub b} similarly as it was observed in a previous study on iron diffusion in austenitic alloys Fe-Ni-Cr-C and Fe-Ni-Cr-P. The binary alloys could be considered pure, i.e. free of carbon, above 883 K, whereas at lower temperatures, probably due to residual carbon segregation to grain boundaries, a considerable decrease in s{delta}D{sub b} was observed compared with the extrapolated values from the high temperature region. The tungsten grain boundary diffusivity was found to be insensitive to small changes in the concentration of other alloying or impurity elements.

  4. Optical driving of a miniature machine composed of temperature-sensitive ferrite and shape memory alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshizawa, Toru; Hayashi, Daisuke; Otani, Yukitoshi

    2001-02-01

    12 Optically driven small machines have such features as easily miniaturized in fabrication and as controlled by optical energy supplied remotely in wireless. We report on an optically controlled machine which moves like a caterpillar on the basis of optomechatronic principle. This miniaturized machine consists of two parts; a body made of shape memory alloys and springs and feet made of a magnet, a temperature- sensitive ferrite. The feet can hold the steel-made floor using magnetic force balance caused by projected beam, and the body repeats expansion and contraction using deformation of shape memory alloys caused by switching of projected beam. A prototype is fabricated in trial with a size of 35 mm X 12 mm. As an experimental result, it proved that they could move at the speed of 8.7 mm per cycle on a ceiling as well as a horizontal steel floor and it could ascend a slope as steep as 50 degree.

  5. Structural and chemical evolution in neutron irradiated and helium-injected ferritic ODS PM2000 alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Hee Joon; Edwards, Dan J.; Kurtz, Richard J.; Yamamoto, Takuya; Wu, Yuan; Odette, G. Robert

    2017-02-01

    An investigation of the influence of helium on damage evolution under neutron irradiation of an 11 at% Al, 19 at% Cr ODS ferritic PM2000 alloy was carried out in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) using a novel in situ helium injection (ISHI) technique. Helium was injected into adjacent TEM discs from thermal neutron 58Ni(nth,γ) 59Ni(nth,α) reactions in a thin NiAl layer. The PM2000 undergoes concurrent displacement damage from the high-energy neutrons. The ISHI technique allows direct comparisons of regions with and without high concentrations of helium since only the side coated with the NiAl experiences helium injection. The corresponding microstructural and microchemical evolutions were characterized using both conventional and scanning transmission electron microscopy techniques. The evolutions observed include formation of dislocation loops and associated helium bubbles, precipitation of a variety of phases, amorphization of the Al2YO3 oxides (which also variously contained internal voids), and several manifestations of solute segregation. Notably, high concentrations of helium had a significant effect on many of these diverse phenomena. These results on PM2000 are compared and contrasted to the evolution of so-called nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFA).

  6. Influence of alloy content and a cerium surface treatment on the oxidation behavior of Fe-Cr ferritic stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Alman, D.E.; Jablonski, P.D.

    2006-01-01

    The cost of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) can be significantly reduced by using interconnects made from ferritic stainless steels. In fact, several alloys have been developed specifically for this application (Crofer 22APU and Hitachi ZMG323). However, these steels lack environmental stability in SOFC environments, and as a result, degrade the performance of the SOFC. A steel interconnect can contribute to performance degradation through: (i) Cr poisoning of electrochemically active sites within the cathode; (ii) formation of non-conductive oxides, such as SiO2 or Al2O3 from residual or minor alloying elements, at the base metal-oxide scale interface; and/or (iii) excessive oxide scale growth, which may also retard electrical conductivity. Consequently, there has been considerable attention on developing coatings to protect steel interconnects in SOFC environments and controlling trace elements during alloy production. Recently, we have reported on the development of a Cerium surface treatment that improves the oxidation behavior of a variety alloys, including Crofer 22APU [1-5]. Initial results indicated that the treatment may improve the performance of Crofer 22APU for SOFC application by: (i) retarding scale growth resulting in a thinner oxide scale; and (ii) suppressing the formation of a deleterious continuous SiO2 layer that can form at the metal-oxide scale interface in materials with high residual Si content [5]. Crofer 22 APU contains Fe-22Cr-0.5Mn-0.1Ti (weight percent). Depending on current market prices and the purity of raw materials utilized for ingot production, Cr can contribute upwards of 90 percent of the raw materials cost. The present research was undertaken to determine the influence of Cr content and minor element additions, especially Ti, on the effectiveness of the Ce surface treatment. Particular emphasis is placed on the behavior of low Cr alloys.

  7. The consequences of helium production on microstructural development in isotopically tailored ferritic alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Gelles, D.S.

    1996-10-01

    A series of alloys have been made adding various isotopes of nickel in order to vary the production of helium during irradiation by a two step nuclear reaction in a mixed spectrum reactor. The alloys use a base composition of Fe-12Cr with an addition of 1.5% nickel, either in the form of {sup 60}Ni which produces no helium, {sup 59}Ni which produces helium at a rate of about 10 appm He/dpa, or natural nickel ({sup Nat}Ni) which provides an intermediate level of helium due to delayed development of {sup 59}Ni. Specimens were irradiated in the HFIR at Oak Ridge, TN to {approx}7 dpa at 300 and 400{degrees}C. Microstructural examinations indicated that nickel additions promote precipitation in all alloys, but the effect appears to be much stronger at 400{degrees}C than at 300{degrees}C. There is sufficient dose by 7 dpa (and with 2 appm He) to initiate void swelling in ferritic/martensitic alloys. Little difference was found between response from {sup 59}Ni and {sup Nat}Ni. Also, helium bubble development for high helium generation conditions appeared to be very different at 300 and 400{degrees}C. At 300{degrees}C, it appeared that high densities of bubbles formed whereas at 400{degrees}C, bubbles could not be identified, possibly because of the complexity of the microstructure, but more likely because helium accumulated at precipitate interfaces.

  8. Controlling diffusion for a self-healing radiation tolerant nanostructured ferritic alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Michael K.; Parish, Chad M.; Bei, Hongbin

    2014-12-18

    Diffusion plays a major role in the stability of microstructures to extreme conditions of high temperature and high doses of irradiation. In nanostructured ferritic alloys, first principle calculations indicate that the binding energy of vacancies is reduced by the presence of oxygen, titanium and yttrium atoms. Therefore, the number of free vacancies available for diffusion can be greatly reduced. The mechanical properties of these alloys, compared to traditional wrought alloys of similar composition and grain structure, is distinctly different, and the ultrafine grained alloy is distinguished by a high number density of Ti–Y–O-enriched nanoclusters and solute clusters, which drives the mechanical response. When a displacement cascade interacts with a nanocluster, the solute atoms are locally dispersed into the matrix by ballistic collisions, but immediately a new nanocluster reforms due to the local supersaturation of solutes and vacancies until the excess vacancies are consumed. Furthermore, the result of these processes is a structural material for advanced energy systems with a microstructure that is self-healing and tolerant to high doses of radiation and high temperatures.

  9. Mechanical behavior of aluminum-bearing ferritic alloys for accident-tolerant fuel cladding applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guria, Ankan

    Nuclear power currently provides about 13% of electrical power worldwide. Nuclear reactors generating this power traditionally use Zirconium (Zr) based alloys as the fuel cladding material. Exothermic reaction of Zr with steam under accident conditions may lead to production of hydrogen with the possibility of catastrophic consequences. Following the Fukushima-Daiichi incident, the exploration of accident-tolerant fuel cladding materials accelerated. Aluminum-rich (around 5 wt. %) ferritic steels such as Fecralloy, APMT(TM) and APM(TM) are considered as potential materials for accident-tolerant fuel cladding applications. These materials create an aluminum-based oxide scale protecting the alloy at elevated temperatures. Tensile deformation behavior of the above alloys was studied at different temperatures (25-500 °C) at a strain rate of 10-3 s-1 and correlated with microstructural characteristics. Higher strength and decent ductility of APMT(TM) led to further investigation of the alloy at various combination of strain rates and temperatures followed by fractography and detailed microscopic analyses. Serrations appeared in the stress-strain curves of APMT(TM) and Fecralloy steel tested in a limited temperature range (250-400 °C). The appearance of serrations is explained on the basis of dynamic strain aging (DSA) effect due to solute-dislocation interactions. The research in this study is being performed using the funds received from the US DOE Office of Nuclear Energy's Nuclear Energy University Programs (NEUP).

  10. Controlling diffusion for a self-healing radiation tolerant nanostructured ferritic alloy

    DOE PAGES

    Miller, Michael K.; Parish, Chad M.; Bei, Hongbin

    2014-12-18

    Diffusion plays a major role in the stability of microstructures to extreme conditions of high temperature and high doses of irradiation. In nanostructured ferritic alloys, first principle calculations indicate that the binding energy of vacancies is reduced by the presence of oxygen, titanium and yttrium atoms. Therefore, the number of free vacancies available for diffusion can be greatly reduced. The mechanical properties of these alloys, compared to traditional wrought alloys of similar composition and grain structure, is distinctly different, and the ultrafine grained alloy is distinguished by a high number density of Ti–Y–O-enriched nanoclusters and solute clusters, which drives themore » mechanical response. When a displacement cascade interacts with a nanocluster, the solute atoms are locally dispersed into the matrix by ballistic collisions, but immediately a new nanocluster reforms due to the local supersaturation of solutes and vacancies until the excess vacancies are consumed. Furthermore, the result of these processes is a structural material for advanced energy systems with a microstructure that is self-healing and tolerant to high doses of radiation and high temperatures.« less

  11. Ferritic Alloys as Accident Tolerant Fuel Cladding Material for Light Water Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Rebak, Raul B.

    2014-09-30

    provide hermetic seal. The replacement of a zirconium alloy using a ferritic material containing chromium and aluminum appears to be the most near term implementation for accident tolerant nuclear fuels.

  12. High Temperature Deformation Mechanism in Hierarchical and Single Precipitate Strengthened Ferritic Alloys by In Situ Neutron Diffraction Studies

    PubMed Central

    Song, Gian; Sun, Zhiqian; Li, Lin; Clausen, Bjørn; Zhang, Shu Yan; Gao, Yanfei; Liaw, Peter K.

    2017-01-01

    The ferritic Fe-Cr-Ni-Al-Ti alloys strengthened by hierarchical-Ni2TiAl/NiAl or single-Ni2TiAl precipitates have been developed and received great attentions due to their superior creep resistance, as compared to conventional ferritic steels. Although the significant improvement of the creep resistance is achieved in the hierarchical-precipitate-strengthened ferritic alloy, the in-depth understanding of its high-temperature deformation mechanisms is essential to further optimize the microstructure and mechanical properties, and advance the development of the creep resistant materials. In the present study, in-situ neutron diffraction has been used to investigate the evolution of elastic strain of constitutive phases and their interactions, such as load-transfer/load-relaxation behavior between the precipitate and matrix, during tensile deformation and stress relaxation at 973 K, which provide the key features in understanding the governing deformation mechanisms. Crystal-plasticity finite-element simulations were employed to qualitatively compare the experimental evolution of the elastic strain during tensile deformation at 973 K. It was found that the coherent elastic strain field in the matrix, created by the lattice misfit between the matrix and precipitate phases for the hierarchical-precipitate-strengthened ferritic alloy, is effective in reducing the diffusional relaxation along the interface between the precipitate and matrix phases, which leads to the strong load-transfer capability from the matrix to precipitate. PMID:28387230

  13. Effect of alloy composition on high-temperature bending fatigue strength of ferritic stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Yong-Sik; Song, Jeon-Young

    2011-12-01

    Exhaust manifolds are subjected to an environment in which heating and cooling cycles occur due to the running pattern of automotive engines. This temperature profile results in the repeated bending stress of exhaust pipes. Therefore, among high-temperature characteristics, the bending fatigue strength is an important factor that affects the lifespan of exhaust manifolds. Here, we report on the effect of the alloy composition, namely the weight fraction of the elements Cr, Mo, Nb, and Ti, on the high-temperature bending fatigue strength of the ferritic stainless steel used in exhaust manifolds. Little difference in the tensile strength and bending fatigue strength of the different composition steels was observed below 600 °C, with the exception of the low-Cr steel. However, steels with high Cr, Mo, or Nb fractions showed considerably larger bending fatigue strength at temperatures of 800 °C. After heating, the precipitates from the specimens were extracted electrolytically and analyzed using scanning electron microscopy energy dispersive spectrometry and transmission electron microscopy. Alloying with Cr and Mo was found to increase the bending fatigue strength due to the substitutional solid solution effect, while alloying with Nb enhanced the strength by forming fine intermetallic compounds, including NbC and Fe2Nb.

  14. The role of processing route on the microstructure of 14YWT nanostructured ferritic alloy

    DOE PAGES

    Mazumder, B.; Parish, C. M.; Bei, H.; ...

    2015-06-03

    Nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFAs) have outstanding high temperature creep properties and extreme tolerance to radiation damage. To achieve these properties, NFAs are fabricated by mechanical alloying of metallic and yttria powders. Atom probe tomography has demonstrated that milling times of at least 40 h are required to produce a uniform distribution of solutes in the flakes. After milling and hot extrusion, the microstructure consists of -Fe, high number densities of Ti-Y-O-vacancy-enriched nanoclusters, and coarse Y2Ti2O7 and Ti(O,C,N) precipitates on the grain boundaries. In contrast, the as-cast condition consists of -Fe with 50-100 m irregularly-shaped Y2Ti2O7 pyrochlore precipitates with smaller embeddedmore » precipitates with the Al5Y3O12 (yttrium-aluminum garnet) crystal structure indicating that this traditional processing route is not a viable approach to achieve the desired microstructure. The nano-hardnesses were also substantially different, i.e., 4 and 8 GPa for the as-cast and as-extruded conditions, respectively. These differences can be explained by the differences in the microstructure and the effects of the high vacancy content introduced by mechanical alloying, and the strong binding energy of vacancies with O, Ti, and Y atoms retarding diffusion.« less

  15. The role of processing route on the microstructure of 14YWT nanostructured ferritic alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Mazumder, B.; Parish, C. M.; Bei, H.; Miller, M. K.

    2015-06-03

    Nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFAs) have outstanding high temperature creep properties and extreme tolerance to radiation damage. To achieve these properties, NFAs are fabricated by mechanical alloying of metallic and yttria powders. Atom probe tomography has demonstrated that milling times of at least 40 h are required to produce a uniform distribution of solutes in the flakes. After milling and hot extrusion, the microstructure consists of -Fe, high number densities of Ti-Y-O-vacancy-enriched nanoclusters, and coarse Y2Ti2O7 and Ti(O,C,N) precipitates on the grain boundaries. In contrast, the as-cast condition consists of -Fe with 50-100 m irregularly-shaped Y2Ti2O7 pyrochlore precipitates with smaller embedded precipitates with the Al5Y3O12 (yttrium-aluminum garnet) crystal structure indicating that this traditional processing route is not a viable approach to achieve the desired microstructure. The nano-hardnesses were also substantially different, i.e., 4 and 8 GPa for the as-cast and as-extruded conditions, respectively. These differences can be explained by the differences in the microstructure and the effects of the high vacancy content introduced by mechanical alloying, and the strong binding energy of vacancies with O, Ti, and Y atoms retarding diffusion.

  16. Creep behavior of pack cementation aluminide coatings on Grade 91 ferritic martensitic alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Bates, Brian; Zhang, Ying; Dryepondt, Sebastien N; Pint, Bruce A

    2014-01-01

    The creep behavior of various pack cementation aluminide coatings on Grade 91 ferritic-martensitic steel was investigated at 650 C in laboratory air. The coatings were fabricated in two temperature regimes, i.e., 650 or 700 C (low temperature) and 1050 C(high temperature), and consisted of a range of Al levels and thicknesses. For comparison, uncoated specimens heat-treated at 1050 C to simulate the high temperature coating cycle also were included in the creep test. All coated specimens showed a reduction in creep resistance, with 16 51% decrease in rupture life compared to the as-received bare substrate alloy. However, the specimens heat-treated at 1050 C exhibited the lowest creep resistance among all tested samples, with a surprisingly short rupture time of < 25 h, much shorter than the specimen coated at 1050 C. Factors responsible for the reduction in creep resistance of both coated and heat-treated specimens were discussed.

  17. Morphology, Structure, and Chemistry of Nanoclusters in a Mechanically-Alloyed Nanostructured Ferritic Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Brandes, Matthew C; Kovarik, L.; Miller, Michael K; Mills, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    Nanostructured ferritic steels have excellent elevated temperature strengths, creep resistances, and radiation tolerances due to the presence of a high density of Ti-Y-O-enriched nanoclusters. The compositions, morphologies, and structures of the smallest of these nanoclusters with maximum dimensions of {approx}2-4 nm were investigated in alloy 14YWT by high-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography. Nanoclusters are found to be coherent with truncated rhombic dodecahedron morphologies defined by the {l_brace}100{r_brace} and {l_brace}110{r_brace} planes in the Fe matrix. Particles have compositions rich in Ti, O, Y, and Cr that are inconsistent with known oxide structures. The smallest nanoclusters appear to lack an identifiable crystal structure. Both nano-diffraction and focal series imaging through the sample thickness suggest that they are amorphous.

  18. Effect of tube processing methods on the texture and grain boundary characteristics of 14YWT nanostructured ferritic alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Aydogan, E.; Pal, S.; Anderoglu, O.; Maloy, S. A.; Vogel, S. C.; Odette, G. R.; Lewandowski, J. J.; Hoelzer, D. T.; Anderson, I. E.; Rieken, J. R.

    2016-03-08

    In this paper, texture and microstructure of tubes and plates fabricated from a nanostructured ferritic alloy (14YWT), produced either by spray forming followed by hydrostatic extrusion (Process I) or hot extrusion and cross-rolling a plate followed by hydrostatic tube extrusion (Process II) have been characterized in terms of their effects on texture and grain boundary character. Hydrostatic extrusion results in a combination of plane strain and shear deformations which generate low intensity α- and γ-fiber components of {001}<110> and {111}<110> together with a weak ζ-fiber component of {011}<211> and {011}<011>. In contrast, multi-step plane strain deformation by hot extrusion and cross-rolling of the plate leads to a strong texture component of {001}<110> together with a weaker {111}<112> component. Although the total strains are similar, shear dominated deformation leads to much lower texture indexes compared to plane strain deformations. Further, the texture intensity decreases after hydrostatic extrusion of the alloy plate formed by plane strain deformation, due to a lower number of activated slip systems during shear dominated deformation. Finally and notably, hot extruded and cross-rolled plate subjected to plane strain deformation to ~50% engineering strain creates only a modest population of low angle grain boundaries, compared to the much larger population observed following the combination of plane strain and shear deformation of ~44% engineering strain resulting from subsequent hydrostatic extrusion.

  19. Effect of tube processing methods on the texture and grain boundary characteristics of 14YWT nanostructured ferritic alloys

    DOE PAGES

    Aydogan, E.; Pal, S.; Anderoglu, O.; ...

    2016-03-08

    In this paper, texture and microstructure of tubes and plates fabricated from a nanostructured ferritic alloy (14YWT), produced either by spray forming followed by hydrostatic extrusion (Process I) or hot extrusion and cross-rolling a plate followed by hydrostatic tube extrusion (Process II) have been characterized in terms of their effects on texture and grain boundary character. Hydrostatic extrusion results in a combination of plane strain and shear deformations which generate low intensity α- and γ-fiber components of {001}<110> and {111}<110> together with a weak ζ-fiber component of {011}<211> and {011}<011>. In contrast, multi-step plane strain deformation by hot extrusion andmore » cross-rolling of the plate leads to a strong texture component of {001}<110> together with a weaker {111}<112> component. Although the total strains are similar, shear dominated deformation leads to much lower texture indexes compared to plane strain deformations. Further, the texture intensity decreases after hydrostatic extrusion of the alloy plate formed by plane strain deformation, due to a lower number of activated slip systems during shear dominated deformation. Finally and notably, hot extruded and cross-rolled plate subjected to plane strain deformation to ~50% engineering strain creates only a modest population of low angle grain boundaries, compared to the much larger population observed following the combination of plane strain and shear deformation of ~44% engineering strain resulting from subsequent hydrostatic extrusion.« less

  20. ODS Ferritic/martensitic alloys for Sodium Fast Reactor fuel pin cladding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubuisson, Philippe; Carlan, Yann de; Garat, Véronique; Blat, Martine

    2012-09-01

    The development of ODS materials for the cladding for Sodium Fast Reactors is a key issue to achieve the objectives required for the GEN IV reactors. CEA, AREVA and EDF have launched in 2007 an important program to determine the optimal fabrication parameters, and to measure and understand the microstructure and properties before, under and after irradiation of such cladding materials. The aim of this paper is to present the French program and the major results obtained recently at CEA on Fe-9/14/18Cr1WTiY2O3 ferritic/martensitic ODS materials. The first step of the program was to consolidate Fe-9/14/18Cr ODS materials as plates and bars to study the microstructure and the mechanical properties of the new alloys. The second step consists in producing tubes at a geometry representative of the cladding of new Sodium Fast Reactors. The optimization of the fabrication route at the laboratory scale is conducted and different tubes were produced. Their microstructure depends on the martensitic (Fe-9Cr) or ferritic (Fe-14Cr) structure. To join the plug to the tube, the reference process is the welding resistance. A specific approach is developed to model the process and support the development of the welds performed within the "SOPRANO" facility. The development at CEA of Fe-9/14/18Cr new ODS materials for the cladding for GENIV Sodium Fast Reactors is in progress. The first microstructural and mechanical characterizations are very encouraging and the full assessment and qualification of this new alloys and products will pass through the irradiation of specimens, tubes, fuel pins and subassemblies up to high doses.

  1. Control of activation levels to simplify waste management of fusion reactor ferritic steel components

    SciTech Connect

    Wiffen, F.W.; Santoro, R. T.

    1983-01-01

    Activation characteristics of a material for service in the neutron flux of a fusion reactor first wall fall into three areas: waste management, reactor maintenance and repair, and safety. Of these, the waste management area is the most likely to impact the public acceptance of fusion reactors for power generation. The decay of the activity in steels within tens of years could lead to simplified waste disposal or possibly even to materials recycle. Whether or not these can be achieved will be controlled by (1) selection of alloying elements, (2) control of critical impurity elements, and (3) control of cross contamination from other reactor components. Several criteria can be used to judge the acceptability of potential alloying elements in iron, and to define the limits on content of critical impurity elements. One approach is to select and limit alloying additions on the basis of the activity. If material recycle is a goal, N, Al, Ni, Cu, Nb, and Mo must be excluded. If simplified waste storage by shallow land burial is the goal, regulations limit the concentration of only a few isotopes. For first-wall material that will be exposed to 9 MW-y/m/sup 2/ service, allowable initial concentration limits include (in at. ppM) Ni < 20,000; Mo < 3650; N < 3650, Cu < 2400; and Nb < 1.0. The other constituent elements of ferritic steels will not be limited. Possible substitutes for the molybdenum normally used to strengthen the steels include W, Ta, Ti, and V.

  2. Low temperature embrittlement behaviour of different ferritic-martensitic alloys for fusion applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieth, M.; Dafferner, B.

    1996-10-01

    In the last few years a lot of different low activation CrWVTa steels have been developed world-wide. Without irradiation some of these alloys show clearly a better low temperature embrittlement behaviour than commercial CrNiMoV(Nb) alloys. Within the MANITU project a study was carried out to compare, prior to the irradiation program, the embrittlement behaviour of different alloys in the unirradiated condition performing instrumented Charpy impact bending tests with sub-size specimens. The low activation materials (LAM) considered were different OPTIFER alloys (Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe), F82H (JAERI), 9Cr2WVTa (ORNL), and GA3X (PNL). The modified commercial 10-11% CrNiMoVNb steels were MANET and OPTIMAR. A meaningful comparison between these alloys could be drawn, since the specimens of all materials were manufactured and tested under the same conditions.

  3. Influence of displacement damage on deuterium and helium retention in austenitic and ferritic-martensitic alloys considered for ADS service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voyevodin, V. N.; Karpov, S. A.; Kopanets, I. E.; Ruzhytskyi, V. V.; Tolstolutskaya, G. D.; Garner, F. A.

    2016-01-01

    The behavior of ion-implanted hydrogen (deuterium) and helium in austenitic 18Cr10NiTi stainless steel, EI-852 ferritic steel and ferritic/martensitic steel EP-450 and their interaction with displacement damage were investigated. Energetic argon irradiation was used to produce displacement damage and bubble formation to simulate nuclear power environments. The influence of damage morphology and the features of radiation-induced defects on deuterium and helium trapping in structural alloys was studied using ion implantation, the nuclear reaction D(3He,p)4He, thermal desorption spectrometry and transmission electron microscopy. It was found in the case of helium irradiation that various kinds of helium-radiation defect complexes are formed in the implanted layer that lead to a more complicated spectra of thermal desorption. Additional small changes in the helium spectra after irradiation with argon ions to a dose of ≤25 dpa show that the binding energy of helium with these traps is weakly dependent on the displacement damage. It was established that retention of deuterium in ferritic and ferritic-martensitic alloys is three times less than in austenitic steel at damage of ˜1 dpa. The retention of deuterium in steels is strongly enhanced by presence of radiation damages created by argon ion irradiation, with a shift in the hydrogen release temperature interval of 200 K to higher temperature. At elevated temperatures of irradiation the efficiency of deuterium trapping is reduced by two orders of magnitude.

  4. Low-chromium reduced-activation ferritic steels for fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Klueh, R.L.; Alexander, D.J.; Kenik, E.A.

    1996-04-01

    Development of reduced-activation ferritic steels has concentrated on high-chromium (8-10 wt% Cr) steels. However, there are advantages for a low-chromium steel, and initial ORNL studies on reduced-activation steels were on compositions with 2.25 to 12% Cr. Those studies showed an Fe-2.25Cr-2W-0.25V-0.1C (2 1/4Cr-2WV) steel to have the highest strenglth of the steels studied. Although this steel had the best strength, Charpy impact properties were inferior to those of an Fe-9Cr-2W-0.25V-0.07Ta-0.1C (9Cr-2WVTa) and an Fe-2.25Cr-2W-0.1C (2 1/4Cr-2W) steel. Therefore, further development of the low-chromium Cr-W steels was required. These results indicate that it is possible to develop low-chromium reduced-activation ferritic steels that have tensile and impact properties as good or better than those of high-chromium (7-9% Cr) steels. Further improvement of properties should be possible by optimizing the composition.

  5. Effects of Partial Phase Transformation on Characteristics of 9Cr Nanostructured Ferritic Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Ji Hyun, Yoon; Byun, Thak Sang; Hoelzer, David T

    2014-01-01

    The core structures of future nuclear systems require tolerance to extreme irradiation, and some critical components, for example, the fuel cladding in Sodium-cooled Fast Reactors (SFRs), have to maintain mechanical integrity to very high doses of 200 -400 dpa at high temperatures up to 700 degrees C. The high Cr nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFAs) are under intense research worldwide as a candidate core material. Although the NFAs have some admirable characteristics for high-temperature applications, their crack sensitivity is very high at high temperatures. The fracture toughness of high strength NFAs is unacceptably low above 300 degrees C. The objective of this study is to develop processes and microstructures with improved high temperature fracture toughness and ductility. To optimize the afterextrusion heat treatment condition, both the computational simulation technique on phase equilibrium and the basic microstructural and mechanical characterization have been carried out. 9 Cr-NFA was produced by the mechanical alloying of pre-alloyed Fe-9Cr base metallic powder and yttria particles, and subsequent extrusion. The post-extrusion heat-treatments of various conditions were applied to the asextruded NFA. The tensile and fracture toughness tests were conducted for as-extruded and heat-treated samples at up to 700 degrees C. Fracture toughness of the NFA has increased by more than 40% at every testing temperature after heat-treatment in the inter-critical temperature range. The increment of fracture toughness of the NFA after post-extrusion heat-treatment is attributed to the increased strength at below 500 degrees C, and an increased ductility at 700 degrees C.

  6. Evaluation of Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Nano-Y2O3-Dispersed Ferritic Alloy Synthesized by Mechanical Alloying and Consolidated by High-Pressure Sintering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karak, Swapan Kumar; Dutta Majumdar, J.; Witczak, Zbigniew; Lojkowski, Witold; Ciupiński, Łukasz; Kurzydłowski, K. J.; Manna, Indranil

    2013-06-01

    In this study, an attempt has been made to synthesize 1.0 wt pct nano-Y2O3-dispersed ferritic alloys with nominal compositions: 83.0 Fe-13.5 Cr-2.0 Al-0.5 Ti (alloy A), 79.0 Fe-17.5 Cr-2.0 Al-0.5 Ti (alloy B), 75.0 Fe-21.5 Cr-2.0 Al-0.5 Ti (alloy C), and 71.0 Fe-25.5 Cr-2.0 Al-0.5 Ti (alloy D) steels (all in wt pct) by solid-state mechanical alloying route and consolidation the milled powder by high-pressure sintering at 873 K, 1073 K, and 1273 K (600°C, 800°C, and 1000°C) using 8 GPa uniaxial pressure for 3 minutes. Subsequently, an extensive effort has been undertaken to characterize the microstructural and phase evolution by X-ray diffraction, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, and energy dispersive spectroscopy. Mechanical properties including hardness, compressive strength, Young's modulus, and fracture toughness were determined using micro/nano-indentation unit and universal testing machine. The present ferritic alloys record extraordinary levels of compressive strength (from 1150 to 2550 MPa), Young's modulus (from 200 to 240 GPa), indentation fracture toughness (from 3.6 to 15.4 MPa√m), and hardness (from13.5 to 18.5 GPa) and measure up to 1.5 through 2 times greater strength but with a lower density (~7.4 Mg/m3) than other oxide dispersion-strengthened ferritic steels (<1200 MPa) or tungsten-based alloys (<2200 MPa). Besides superior mechanical strength, the novelty of these alloys lies in the unique microstructure comprising uniform distribution of either nanometric (~10 nm) oxide (Y2Ti2O7/Y2TiO5 or un-reacted Y2O3) or intermetallic (Fe11TiY and Al9.22Cr2.78Y) particles' ferritic matrix useful for grain boundary pinning and creep resistance.

  7. Improvement of High Temperature Mechanical Property by Precipitation Hardening of Reduced Activation Ferritic/Martensitic Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Sakasegawa, H.; Kohyama, A.; Katoh, Y.; Tamura, M.; Khono, Y.; Kimura, A.

    2003-07-15

    Reduced Activation Ferritic/Martensitic steels (RAFs) are leading candidates for blanket and first wall structures of the D-T fusion reactors. Recently, in order to achieve better efficiency of energy conversion by using RAFs in advanced blanket systems, improvement of high temperature mechanical property of RAFs is desired. In this work, experimental alloys, FETA-series (Fe-Ta-C or N) steels, were prepared to observe precipitation hardening mechanism by MX-type particles at elevated temperatures in detail. According to the results, innovative improvement of creep property can be achieved by applying of precipitation hardening by very fine TaX (X=C, N) particles. With increasing tantalum content, finer dispersion of MX-type particles, dislocation structures and sub-grain structures were observed by TEM (Transmission Electron Microscopy). These fine structures contributed to the improvement of creep property.

  8. Tensile and fracture toughness properties of the nanostructured oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic alloy 13Cr-1W-0.3Ti-0.3Y 2O 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eiselt, Ch. Ch.; Klimenkov, M.; Lindau, R.; Möslang, A.; Odette, G. R.; Yamamoto, T.; Gragg, D.

    2011-10-01

    The realization of fusion power as an attractive energy source requires advanced structural materials that can cope with ultra-severe thermo-mechanical loads and high neutron fluxes experienced by fusion power plant components, such as the first wall, divertor and blanket structures. Towards this end, two variants of a 13Cr-1W-0.3Ti-0.3Y 2O 3 reduced activation ferritic (RAF-) ODS steel were produced by ball milling phase blended Fe-13Cr-1W, 0.3Y 20 3 and 0.3Ti powders in both argon and hydrogen atmospheres. The milled powders were consolidated by hot isostatic pressing (HIP). The as-HIPed alloys were then hot rolled into 6 mm plates. Microstructural, tensile and fracture toughness characterization of the hot rolled alloys are summarized here and compared to results previously reported for the as-HIPed condition.

  9. R&D of low activation ferritic steels for fusion in japanese universities*1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohyama, Akira; Kohno, Yutaka; Asakura, Kentaro; Kayano, Hideo

    1994-09-01

    Following the brief review of the R&D of low activation ferritic steels in Japanese universities, the status of 9Cr-2W type ferritic steels development is presented. The main emphasis is on mechanical property changes by fast neutron irradiation in FFTF. Bend test, tensile test, CVN test and in-reactor creep results are provided including some data about low activation ferritic steels with Cr variation from 2.25 to 12%. The 9Cr-2W ferritic steel, denoted as JLF-1, showed excellent mechanical properties under fast neutron irradiation as high as 60 dpa. As potential materials for DEMO and beyond, innovative oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) quasi-amorphous low activation ferritic steels are introduced. The baseline properties, microstructural evolution under ion irradiation and the recent progress of new processes are provided.

  10. Mechanical alloyed Ho3+ doping in CoFe2O4 spinel ferrite and understanding of magnetic nanodomains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panneer Muthuselvam, I.; Bhowmik, R. N.

    2010-04-01

    We doped Ho3+ in CoFe1.95Ho0.05O4 spinel ferrite by mechanical alloying and subsequent annealing at different temperatures (600-1200 °C). We understood the structural and magnetic properties of the samples using X-ray diffraction, SEM, Thermal analysis (TGA and DTA), and VSM measurement. The samples have shown structural stabilization within cubic spinel phase for the annealing temperature (TAN)≥800 °C. Thermal activated grain growth kinetics has been accompanied with the substantial decrease in lattice strain. The gain size dependent magnetism is evident from the variation of magnetic moment, remanent magnetization and coercivity of the material. The paramagnetic to ferrimagnetic transition temperature TC (˜805 K) seems to be grain size independent in the present material. The magnetic nanograins, either single domain/pseudo-single domain (50-64 nm) or multi-domain (above 64 nm) regime, showed superparamagnetic blocking below Tm, which is below TC (805 K) and also well above the room temperature.

  11. Development of rapidly quenched brazing foils to join tungsten alloys with ferritic steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalin, B. A.; Fedotov, V. T.; Sevrjukov, O. N.; Moeslang, A.; Rohde, M.

    2004-08-01

    Results on rapidly solidified filler metals for tungsten brazing are presented. A rapidly quenched foil-type filler metal based on Ni bal-15Cr-4Mo-4Fe-(0.5-1.0)V-7.5Si-1.5B was developed to braze tungsten to ferritic/martensitic Crl3Mo2NbVB steel (FS) for helium gas cooled divertors and plasma facing components. Polycrystalline W-2CeO 2 and monocrystalline pure tungsten were brazed to the steel under vacuum at 1150 °C, using a 0.5 mm thick foil spacer made of a 50Fe-50Ni alloy. As a result of thermocycling tests (100 cycles between 700 °C/20 min and air-water cooling/3-5 min) on brazed joints, tungsten powder metallurgically processed W-2CeO 2 failed due to residual stresses, whereas the brazed joint with zone-melted monocrystalline tungsten withstood the thermocycling tests.

  12. Response of nanostructured ferritic alloys to high-dose heavy ion irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Parish, Chad M.; White, Ryan M.; LeBeau, James M.; Miller, Michael K.

    2014-02-01

    A latest-generation aberration-corrected scanning/transmission electron microscope (STEM) is used to study heavy-ion-irradiated nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFAs). Results are presented for STEM X-ray mapping of NFA 14YWT irradiated with 10 MeV Pt to 16 or 160 dpa at -100°C and 750°C, as well as pre-irradiation reference material. Irradiation at -100°C results in ballistic destruction of the beneficial microstructural features present in the pre-irradiated reference material, such as Ti-Y-O nanoclusters (NCs) and grain boundary (GB) segregation. Irradiation at 750°C retains these beneficial features, but indicates some coarsening of the NCs, diffusion of Al to the NCs, and a reduction of the Cr-W GB segregation (or solute excess) content. Ion irradiation combined with the latest-generation STEM hardware allows for rapid screening of fusion candidate materials and improved understanding of irradiation-induced microstructural changes in NFAs.

  13. Effect of friction stir welding and post-weld heat treatment on a nanostructured ferritic alloy

    DOE PAGES

    Mazumder, Baishakhi; Yu, Xinghua; Edmondson, Philip D.; ...

    2015-12-08

    Nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFAs) are new generation materials for use in high temperature energy systems, such as nuclear fission or fusion reactors. However, joining these materials is a concern, as their unique microstructure is destroyed by traditional liquid-state welding methods. The microstructural evolution of a friction stir welded 14YWT NFA was investigated by atom probe tomography, before and after a post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) at 1123K. The particle size, number density, elemental composition, and morphology of the titanium-yttrium-oxygenenriched nanoclusters (NCs) in the stir and thermally-affected zones were studied and compared with the base metal. No statistical difference in the sizemore » of the NCs was observed in any of these conditions. After the PWHT, increases in the number density and the oxygen enrichment in the NCs were observed. Therefore, these new results provide additional supporting evidence that friction stir welding appears to be a viable joining technique for NFAs, as the microstructural parameters of the NCs are not strongly affected, in contrast to traditional welding techniques.« less

  14. Effect of friction stir welding and post-weld heat treatment on a nanostructured ferritic alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Mazumder, Baishakhi; Yu, Xinghua; Edmondson, Philip D.; Parish, Chad M.; Miller, Michael K; Meyer, H. M.; Feng, Zhili

    2015-12-08

    Nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFAs) are new generation materials for use in high temperature energy systems, such as nuclear fission or fusion reactors. However, joining these materials is a concern, as their unique microstructure is destroyed by traditional liquid-state welding methods. The microstructural evolution of a friction stir welded 14YWT NFA was investigated by atom probe tomography, before and after a post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) at 1123K. The particle size, number density, elemental composition, and morphology of the titanium-yttrium-oxygenenriched nanoclusters (NCs) in the stir and thermally-affected zones were studied and compared with the base metal. No statistical difference in the size of the NCs was observed in any of these conditions. After the PWHT, increases in the number density and the oxygen enrichment in the NCs were observed. Therefore, these new results provide additional supporting evidence that friction stir welding appears to be a viable joining technique for NFAs, as the microstructural parameters of the NCs are not strongly affected, in contrast to traditional welding techniques.

  15. Effect of friction stir welding and post-weld heat treatment on a nanostructured ferritic alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazumder, B.; Yu, X.; Edmondson, P. D.; Parish, C. M.; Miller, M. K.; Meyer, H. M.; Feng, Z.

    2016-02-01

    Nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFAs) are new generation materials for use in high temperature energy systems, such as nuclear fission or fusion reactors. However, joining these materials is a concern, as their unique microstructure is destroyed by traditional liquid-state welding methods. The microstructural evolution of a friction stir welded 14YWT NFA was investigated by atom probe tomography, before and after a post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) at 1123K. The particle size, number density, elemental composition, and morphology of the titanium-yttrium-oxygen-enriched nanoclusters (NCs) in the stir and thermally-affected zones were studied and compared with the base metal. No statistical difference in the size of the NCs was observed in any of these conditions. After the PWHT, increases in the number density and the oxygen enrichment in the NCs were observed. Therefore, these new results provide additional supporting evidence that friction stir welding appears to be a viable joining technique for NFAs, as the microstructural parameters of the NCs are not strongly affected, in contrast to traditional welding techniques.

  16. Tensile deformation and fracture properties of a 14YWT nanostructured ferritic alloy

    DOE PAGES

    Alam, M. Ershadul; Pal, Soupitak; Fields, Kirk; ...

    2016-08-13

    Here, a new larger heat of a 14YWT nanostructured ferritic alloy (NFA), FCRD NFA-1, was synthesized by ball milling FeO and argon atomized Fe-14Cr-3W-0.4Ti-0.2Y (wt%) powders, followed by hot extrusion, annealing and cross rolling to produce an ≈10 mm-thick plate. NFA-1 contains a bimodal size distribution of pancake-shaped, mostly very fine scale, grains. The as-processed plate also contains a large population of microcracks running parallel to its broad surfaces. The small grains and large concentration of Y–Ti–O nano-oxides (NOs) result in high strength up to 800 °C. The uniform and total elongations range from ≈1–8%, and ≈10–24%, respectively. The strengthmore » decreases more rapidly above ≈400 °C and deformation transitions to largely viscoplastic creep by ≈600 °C. While the local fracture mechanism is generally ductile-dimple microvoid nucleation, growth and coalescence, perhaps the most notable feature of tensile deformation behavior of NFA-1 is the occurrence of periodic delamination, manifested as fissures on the fracture surfaces.« less

  17. Tensile deformation and fracture properties of a 14YWT nanostructured ferritic alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Alam, M. Ershadul; Pal, Soupitak; Fields, Kirk; Maloy, S. A.; Hoelzer, David T.; Odette, George R.

    2016-08-13

    Here, a new larger heat of a 14YWT nanostructured ferritic alloy (NFA), FCRD NFA-1, was synthesized by ball milling FeO and argon atomized Fe-14Cr-3W-0.4Ti-0.2Y (wt%) powders, followed by hot extrusion, annealing and cross rolling to produce an ≈10 mm-thick plate. NFA-1 contains a bimodal size distribution of pancake-shaped, mostly very fine scale, grains. The as-processed plate also contains a large population of microcracks running parallel to its broad surfaces. The small grains and large concentration of Y–Ti–O nano-oxides (NOs) result in high strength up to 800 °C. The uniform and total elongations range from ≈1–8%, and ≈10–24%, respectively. The strength decreases more rapidly above ≈400 °C and deformation transitions to largely viscoplastic creep by ≈600 °C. While the local fracture mechanism is generally ductile-dimple microvoid nucleation, growth and coalescence, perhaps the most notable feature of tensile deformation behavior of NFA-1 is the occurrence of periodic delamination, manifested as fissures on the fracture surfaces.

  18. Antibacterial activity and characteristics of modified ferrite powder coated with a gemini pyridinium salt molecule.

    PubMed

    Shirai, Akihiro; Maeda, Takuya; Ohkita, Motoaki; Nagamune, Hideaki; Kourai, Hiroki

    2007-09-01

    This report describes the synthesis of an antibacterial material consisting of a gemini quaternary ammonium salt (gemini-QUAT) immobilized on ferrite powder, and its antibacterial activity. A gemini-QUAT containing two pyridinium residues per molecule, 4,4'-[1,3-(2,2-dihydroxylmethyl-1,3-dithiapropane)]bis (1-octylpyridinium bromide), was immobilized on ferrite powder by a reaction between the hydroxyl group of the QUAT and trimethoxysilane. Immobilization of the gemini-QUAT on ferrite (F-gemini-QUAT) was confirmed when the dye, bromophenol blue, was released from F-gemini-QUAT-dye after contact between ferrite and the dye. Elemental analysis of the QUAT-ferrite determined the molar amount of QUAT on the ferrite. The antibacterial effect of the ferrite was investigated using a batch treatment system, and this effect was compared with that of another QUAT-ferrite (F-mono-QUAT) binding a mono-QUAT, which possesses one pyridinium residue, prepared by the same immobilization method as F-gemini-QUAT. Results indicated the F-gemini QUAT possessed a higher bactericidal potency and broader antibacterial spectrum compared to F-mono-QUAT. In addition, this study suggested that gemini-QUATs possessed high bactericidal potency without being influenced by immobilization to materials, and the antibacterial activity and characteristics of F-gemini-QUAT could be attributed to the unique structure of the immobilized gemini-QUAT.

  19. A review of advantages of high-efficiency X-ray spectrum imaging for analysis of nanostructured ferritic alloys

    DOE PAGES

    Parish, Chad M.; Miller, Michael K.

    2014-12-09

    Nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFAs) exhibit complex microstructures consisting of 100-500 nm ferrite grains, grain boundary solute enrichment, and multiple populations of precipitates and nanoclusters (NCs). Understanding these materials' excellent creep and radiation-tolerance properties requires a combination of multiple atomic-scale experimental techniques. Recent advances in scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) hardware and data analysis methods have the potential to revolutionize nanometer to micrometer scale materials analysis. The application of these methods is applied to NFAs as a test case and is compared to both conventional STEM methods as well as complementary methods such as scanning electron microscopy and atom probe tomography.more » In this paper, we review past results and present new results illustrating the effectiveness of latest-generation STEM instrumentation and data analysis.« less

  20. A review of advantages of high-efficiency X-ray spectrum imaging for analysis of nanostructured ferritic alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Parish, Chad M.; Miller, Michael K.

    2014-12-09

    Nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFAs) exhibit complex microstructures consisting of 100-500 nm ferrite grains, grain boundary solute enrichment, and multiple populations of precipitates and nanoclusters (NCs). Understanding these materials' excellent creep and radiation-tolerance properties requires a combination of multiple atomic-scale experimental techniques. Recent advances in scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) hardware and data analysis methods have the potential to revolutionize nanometer to micrometer scale materials analysis. The application of these methods is applied to NFAs as a test case and is compared to both conventional STEM methods as well as complementary methods such as scanning electron microscopy and atom probe tomography. In this paper, we review past results and present new results illustrating the effectiveness of latest-generation STEM instrumentation and data analysis.

  1. Formation Mechanisms of Alloying Element Nitrides in Recrystallized and Deformed Ferritic Fe-Cr-Al Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhlaghi, Maryam; Meka, Sai Ramudu; Jägle, Eric A.; Kurz, Silke J. B.; Bischoff, Ewald; Mittemeijer, Eric J.

    2016-09-01

    The effect of the initial microstructure (recrystallized or cold-rolled) on the nitride precipitation process upon gaseous nitriding of ternary Fe-4.3 at. pct Cr-8.1 at. pct Al alloy was investigated at 723 K (450 °C) employing X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), atom probe tomography (APT), and electron probe microanalysis (EPMA). In recrystallized Fe-Cr-Al specimens, one type of nitride develops: ternary, cubic, NaCl-type mixed Cr1- x Al x N. In cold-rolled Fe-Cr-Al specimens, precipitation of two types of nitrides occurs: ternary, cubic, NaCl-type mixed Cr1- x Al x N and binary, cubic, NaCl-type AlN. By theoretical analysis, it was shown that for the recrystallized specimens an energy barrier for the nucleation of mixed Cr1- x Al x N exists, whereas in the cold-rolled specimens no such energy barriers for the development of mixed Cr1- x Al x N and of binary, cubic AlN occur. The additional development of the cubic AlN in the cold-rolled microstructure could be ascribed to the preferred heterogeneous nucleation of cubic AlN on dislocations. The nitrogen concentration-depth profile of the cold-rolled specimen shows a stepped nature upon prolonged nitriding as a consequence of instantaneous nucleation of nitride upon arrival of nitrogen and nitride growth rate-limited by nitrogen transport through the thickening nitrided zone.

  2. Effect of constituent phase on mechanical properties of 9Cr-1WVTa reduced activation ferritic-martensitic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chang-Hoon; Moon, Joonoh; Park, Min-Gu; Lee, Tae-Ho; Jang, Min-Ho; Kim, Hyoung Chan; Suh, Dong-Woo

    2014-12-01

    Influence of the formation of ferrite and accompanying carbides in martensite matrix on the tensile and Charpy impact properties was investigated for reduced activation ferritic-martensitic (RAFM) 9Cr-1WVTa steel. As the fractions of ferrite and carbide adjacent to the ferrite grain boundary increase, both tensile and Charpy impact properties deteriorated in as-normalized condition. In particular, the tensile strength and elongation decreased simultaneously, which is believed to be led by the localized deformation in ferrite which is softer than martensite, promoting the formation and growth of voids. In addition, the formation of ferrite was also detrimental to the Charpy impact properties regarding to the absorbed energy because the precipitation of carbides around ferrite were vulnerable to the nucleation and propagation of cleavage cracks. The degradation of tensile properties can be recovered by tempering, but the DBTT temperature still increases with presence of ferrite.

  3. PERFORMANCE IMPROVEMENT OF CREEP-RESISTANT FERRITIC STEEL WELDMENTS THROUGH THERMO-MECHANICAL TREATMENT AND ALLOY DESIGN

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Yukinori; Babu, Prof. Sudarsanam Suresh; Shassere, Benjamin; Yu, Xinghua

    2016-01-01

    Two different approaches have been proposed for improvement of cross-weld creep properties of the high temperature ferrous structural materials for fossil-fired energy applications. The traditional creep strength-enhanced ferritic (CSEF) steel weldments suffer from Type IV failures which occur at the fine-grained heat affected zone (FGHAZ). In order to minimize the premature failure at FGHAZ in the existing CSEF steels, such as modified 9Cr-1Mo ferritic-martensitic steels (Grade 91), a thermo-mechanical treatment consisting of aus-forging/rolling and subsequent aus-aging is proposed which promotes the formation of stable MX carbonitrides prior to martensitic transformation. Such MX remains undissolved during welding process, even in FGHAZ, which successfully improves the cross-weld creep properties. Another approach is to develop a new fully ferrtic, creep-resistant FeCrAl alloy which is essentially free from Type IV failure issues. Fe-30Cr-3Al base alloys with minor alloying additions were developed which achieved a combination of good oxidation/corrosion resistance and improved tensile and creep performance comparable or superior to Grade 92 steel.

  4. Gas atomized precursor alloy powder for oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Rieken, Joel

    2011-12-13

    Gas atomization reaction synthesis (GARS) was employed as a simplified method for producing precursor powders for oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic stainless steels (e.g., Fe-Cr-Y-(Ti,Hf)-O), departing from the conventional mechanical alloying (MA) process. During GARS processing a reactive atomization gas (i.e., Ar-O2) was used to oxidize the powder surfaces during primary break-up and rapid solidification of the molten alloy. This resulted in envelopment of the powders by an ultra-thin (t < 150 nm) metastable Cr-enriched oxide layer that was used as a vehicle for solid-state transport of O into the consolidated microstructure. In an attempt to better understand the kinetics of this GARS reaction, theoretical cooling curves for the atomized droplets were calculated and used to establish an oxidation model for this process. Subsequent elevated temperature heat treatments, which were derived from Rhines pack measurements using an internal oxidation model, were used to promote thermodynamically driven O exchange reactions between trapped films of the initial Cr-enriched surface oxide and internal Y-enriched intermetallic precipitates. This novel microstructural evolution process resulted in the successful formation of nano-metric Y-enriched dispersoids, as confirmed using high energy X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), equivalent to conventional ODS alloys from MA powders. The thermal stability of these Y-enriched dispersoids was evaluated using high temperature (1200°C) annealing treatments ranging from 2.5 to 1,000 hrs of exposure. In a further departure from current ODS practice, replacing Ti with additions of Hf appeared to improve the Y-enriched dispersoid thermal stability by means of crystal structure modification. Additionally, the spatial distribution of the dispersoids was found to depend strongly on the original rapidly solidified microstructure. To exploit this, ODS microstructures were engineered from

  5. Gas atomized precursor alloy powder for oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieken, Joel Rodney

    Gas atomization reaction synthesis (GARS) was employed as a simplified method for producing precursor powders for oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic stainless steels (e.g., Fe-Cr-Y-(Ti,Hf)-O), departing from the conventional mechanical alloying (MA) process. During GARS processing a reactive atomization gas (i.e., Ar-O2) was used to oxidize the powder surfaces during primary break-up and rapid solidification of the molten alloy. This resulted in envelopment of the powders by an ultra-thin (t < 150 nm) metastable Cr-enriched oxide layer that was used as a vehicle for solid-state transport of O into the consolidated microstructure. In an attempt to better understand the kinetics of this GARS reaction, theoretical cooling curves for the atomized droplets were calculated and used to establish an oxidation model for this process. Subsequent elevated temperature heat treatments, which were derived from Rhines pack measurements using an internal oxidation model, were used to promote thermodynamically driven O exchange reactions between trapped films of the initial Cr-enriched surface oxide and internal Y-enriched intermetallic precipitates. This novel microstructural evolution process resulted in the successful formation of nano-metric Y-enriched dispersoids, as confirmed using high energy X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), equivalent to conventional ODS alloys from MA powders. The thermal stability of these Y-enriched dispersoids was evaluated using high temperature (1200°C) annealing treatments ranging from 2.5 to 1,000 hrs of exposure. In a further departure from current ODS practice, replacing Ti with additions of Hf appeared to improve the Y-enriched dispersoid thermal stability by means of crystal structure modification. Additionally, the spatial distribution of the dispersoids was found to depend strongly on the original rapidly solidified microstructure. To exploit this, ODS microstructures were engineered from different

  6. The Kinetics of Dislocation Loop Formation in Ferritic Alloys Through the Aggregation of Irradiation Induced Defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohnert, Aaron Anthony

    The mechanical properties of materials are often degraded over time by exposure to irradiation environments, a phenomenon that has hindered the development of multiple nuclear reactor design concepts. Such property changes are the result of microstructural changes induced by the collision of high energy particles with the atoms in a material. The lattice defects generated in these recoil events migrate and interact to form extended damage structures. This study has used theoretical models based on the mean field chemical reaction rate theory to analyze the aggregation of isolated lattice defects into larger microstructural features that are responsible for long term property changes, focusing on the development of black dot damage in ferritic iron based alloys. The purpose of such endeavors is two-fold. Primarily, such models explain and quantify the processes through which these microstructures form. Additionally, models provide insight into the behavior and properties of the point defects and defect clusters which drive general microstructural evolution processes. The modeling effort presented in this work has focused on physical fidelity, drawing from a variety of sources of information to characterize the unobservable defect generation and agglomeration processes that give rise to the observable features reported in experimental data. As such, the models are based not solely on isolated point defect creation, as is the case with many older rate theory approaches, but instead on realistic estimates of the defect cluster population produced in high energy cascade damage events. Experimental assessments of the microstructural changes evident in transmission electron microscopy studies provide a means to measure the efficacy of the kinetic models. Using common assumptions of the mobility of defect clusters generated in cascade damage conditions, an unphysically high density of damage features develops at the temperatures of interest with a temperature dependence

  7. Fabrication of silver-coated cobalt ferrite nanocomposite and the study of its antibacterial activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kooti, M.; Saiahi, S.; Motamedi, H.

    2013-05-01

    A new silver coated cobalt ferrite nanocomposite, Ag@CoFe2O4, was prepared by a two-step procedure. In the first step, cobalt ferrite nanoparticles were synthesized by a combustion method using glycine as a fuel. This ferrite was then coated with nanosilver via chemical reduction of Ag+ solution. The as-synthesized Ag@CoFe2O4 was characterized by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and vibrating sample magnetometer. The antibacterial activity of this composite was investigated against some Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria and compared with those of silver nanoparticles and some standard antibacterial drugs.

  8. Load partitioning between the bcc-iron matrix and NiAl-type precipitates in a ferritic alloy on multiple length scales

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Zhiqian; Song, Gian; Sisneros, Thomas A.; Clausen, Bjorn; Pu, Chao; Li, Lin; Gao, Yanfei; Liaw, Peter K.

    2016-03-16

    An understanding of load sharing among constituent phases aids in designing mechanical properties of multiphase materials. Here we investigate load partitioning between the body-centered-cubic iron matrix and NiAl-type precipitates in a ferritic alloy during uniaxial tensile tests at 364 and 506 C on multiple length scales by in situ neutron diffraction and crystal plasticity finite element modeling. Our findings show that the macroscopic load-transfer efficiency is not as high as that predicted by the Eshelby model; moreover, it depends on the matrix strain-hardening behavior. We explain the grain-level anisotropic load-partitioning behavior by considering the plastic anisotropy of the matrix and elastic anisotropy of precipitates. We further demonstrate that the partitioned load on NiAl-type precipitates relaxes at 506 C, most likely through thermally-activated dislocation rearrangement on the microscopic scale. Furthermore, the study contributes to further understanding of load-partitioning characteristics in multiphase materials.

  9. Investigation of frequency response of microwave active ring resonator based on ferrite film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martynov, M. I.; Nikitin, A. A.; Ustinov, A. B.; Kalinikos, B. A.

    2016-11-01

    The complex transmission coefficient of active ring resonators based on ferrite-film delay lines was investigated both theoretically and experimentally. Influence of the parameters of the delay line on the transmission coefficients was investigated. It was shown that the resonant frequencies of the ring depend on the ferrite film thickness and the distance between spin-wave antennae. These dependences give possibility to control the shape of the transmission coefficient that in combination with magnetic tuning provide flexibility for microwave applications.

  10. Tritium retention in reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steels

    SciTech Connect

    Hatano, Y.; Abe, S.; Matsuyama, M.; Alimov, V.K.; Spitsyn, A.V.; Bobyr, N.P.; Cherkez, D.I.; Khripunov, B.I.; Golubeva, A.V.; Ogorodnikova, O.V.; Klimov, N.S.; Chernov, V.M.; Oyaidzu, M.; Yamanishi, T.

    2015-03-15

    Reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steels are structural material candidates for breeding blankets of future fusion reactors. Therefore, tritium (T) retention in RAFM steels is an important problem in assessing the T inventory of blankets. In this study, specimens of RAFM steels were subjected to irradiation of 20 MeV W ions to 0.54 displacements per atom (dpa), exposure to high flux D plasmas at 400 and 600 K and that to pulsed heat loads. The specimens thus prepared were exposed to DT gas at 473 K. Despite severe modification in the surface morphology, heat loads had negligible effects on T retention. Significant increase in T retention at the surface and/or subsurface was observed after D plasma exposure. However, T trapped at the surface/subsurface layer was easily removed by maintaining the specimens in the air at about 300 K. Displacement damage led to increase in T retention in the bulk due to the trapping effects of defects, and T trapped was stable at 300 K. It was therefore concluded that displacement damages had the largest influence on T retention under the present conditions.

  11. Nano-sized precipitate stability and its controlling factors in a NiAl-strengthened ferritic alloy

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Zhiqian; Song, Gian; Ilavsky, Jan; Ghosh, Gautam; Liaw, Peter K.

    2015-01-01

    Coherent B2-ordered NiAl-type precipitates have been used to reinforce solid-solution body-centered-cubic iron for high-temperature application in fossil-energy power plants. In this study, we investigate the stability of nano-sized precipitates in a NiAl-strengthened ferritic alloy at 700–950 °C using ultra-small angle X-ray scattering and electron microscopies. Here we show that the coarsening kinetics of NiAl-type precipitates is in excellent agreement with the ripening model in multicomponent alloys. We further demonstrate that the interfacial energy between the matrix and NiAl-type precipitates is strongly dependent on differences in the matrix/precipitate compositions. Our results profile the ripening process in multicomponent alloys by illustrating controlling factors of interfacial energy, diffusivities, and element partitioning. The study provides guidelines to design and develop high-temperature alloys with stable microstructures for long-term service. PMID:26537060

  12. Nano-sized precipitate stability and its controlling factors in a NiAl-strengthened ferritic alloy.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhiqian; Song, Gian; Ilavsky, Jan; Ghosh, Gautam; Liaw, Peter K

    2015-11-05

    Coherent B2-ordered NiAl-type precipitates have been used to reinforce solid-solution body-centered-cubic iron for high-temperature application in fossil-energy power plants. In this study, we investigate the stability of nano-sized precipitates in a NiAl-strengthened ferritic alloy at 700-950 °C using ultra-small angle X-ray scattering and electron microscopies. Here we show that the coarsening kinetics of NiAl-type precipitates is in excellent agreement with the ripening model in multicomponent alloys. We further demonstrate that the interfacial energy between the matrix and NiAl-type precipitates is strongly dependent on differences in the matrix/precipitate compositions. Our results profile the ripening process in multicomponent alloys by illustrating controlling factors of interfacial energy, diffusivities, and element partitioning. The study provides guidelines to design and develop high-temperature alloys with stable microstructures for long-term service.

  13. Dispersoid Distribution and Microstructure in Fe-Cr-Al Ferritic Oxide Dispersion-Strengthened Alloy Prepared by Friction Consolidation

    SciTech Connect

    Catalini, David; Kaoumi, Djamel; Reynolds, Anthony; Grant, Glenn J.

    2015-07-09

    INCOLOY® MA956 is a ferritic Oxide Dispersion Strengthened (ODS) alloy. Three different oxides, Y4Al2O9, YAlO3 and Y3Al5O12, have been observed in this alloy. The oxide particle sizes range from just a few up to hundreds of nm and these particles are responsible of the high temperature mechanical strength of this alloy. Mechanically alloyed MA956 powder was consolidated via Friction Consolidation using three different processing conditions. As a result, three small compacts of low porosity were produced. The compacts exhibited a refined equiaxed grain structure with grain sizes smaller than 10 µm and the desired oxide dispersion.YAlO3 and Y3Al5O12 were identified in the compacts by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Electron Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The size distribution of precipitates above 50 nm showed a direct proportionality between average precipitate size and grain size. The total energy input during processing was correlated with the relative amount of each of the oxides in the disks: the higher the total processing energy input, the higher the relative amount of Y3Al5O12 precipitates. The elemental composition of the oxide precipitates was also probed individually by EDS showing an aluminum enrichment trend as precipitates grow in size.

  14. Nano-sized precipitate stability and its controlling factors in a NiAl-strengthened ferritic alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Zhiqian; Song, Gian; Ilavsky, Jan; Ghosh, Gautam; Liaw, Peter K.

    2015-11-05

    Coherent B2-ordered NiAl-type precipitates have been used to reinforce solid-solution bodycentered- cubic iron for high-temperature application in fossil-energy power plants. In this study, the stability of nano-sized precipitates in a NiAl-strengthened ferritic alloy was investigated at 700 - 950°C using ultra-small angle X-ray scattering and electron microscopies. Here we show that the coarsening kinetics of NiAl-type precipitates is in excellent agreement with the ripening model in multicomponent alloys. We further demonstrate that the interfacial energy between the matrix and NiAl-type precipitates is strongly dependent to differences in the matrix/precipitate compositions. The results profile the ripening process in multicomponent alloys by illustrating controlling factors (i.e., interfacial energy, diffusivities, and element partitioning). As a result, the study provides guidelines to design and develop high-temperature alloys with stable microstructures for long-term service.

  15. Nano-sized precipitate stability and its controlling factors in a NiAl-strengthened ferritic alloy

    DOE PAGES

    Sun, Zhiqian; Song, Gian; Ilavsky, Jan; ...

    2015-11-05

    Coherent B2-ordered NiAl-type precipitates have been used to reinforce solid-solution bodycentered- cubic iron for high-temperature application in fossil-energy power plants. In this study, the stability of nano-sized precipitates in a NiAl-strengthened ferritic alloy was investigated at 700 - 950°C using ultra-small angle X-ray scattering and electron microscopies. Here we show that the coarsening kinetics of NiAl-type precipitates is in excellent agreement with the ripening model in multicomponent alloys. We further demonstrate that the interfacial energy between the matrix and NiAl-type precipitates is strongly dependent to differences in the matrix/precipitate compositions. The results profile the ripening process in multicomponent alloys bymore » illustrating controlling factors (i.e., interfacial energy, diffusivities, and element partitioning). As a result, the study provides guidelines to design and develop high-temperature alloys with stable microstructures for long-term service.« less

  16. HIGH POWER MICROWAVE FERRITES AND DEVICES

    DTIC Science & Technology

    FERROMAGNETIC MATERIALS, * MICROWAVE EQUIPMENT, ALUMINUM, DELAY LINES, ELECTRODES, FERRITES , GADOLINIUM , GARNET, IONS, IRON, MAGNESIUM ALLOYS...MAGNETIC FIELDS, MAGNETIC MATERIALS, MAGNETIC MOMENTS, MANGANESE ALLOYS, MICROWAVE SPECTROSCOPY, NICKEL ALLOYS, RADIOFREQUENCY POWER, RARE EARTH COMPOUNDS, SINGLE CRYSTALS, WAVEFORM GENERATORS, YTTRIUM.

  17. HIGH POWER MICROWAVE FERRITES AND DEVICES

    DTIC Science & Technology

    FERRITES , *FERROMAGNETIC MATERIALS, *GARNET, *MICROWAVE EQUIPMENT, ABSORPTION, ALUMINUM, ALUMINUM ALLOYS, ANISOTROPY, CRYSTALS, DIELECTRICS, DIRECT...CURRENT, ELECTRODES, GADOLINIUM , IRON, IRON ALLOYS, MAGNETIC FIELDS, MAGNETIC PROPERTIES, NICKEL ALLOYS, PHASE SHIFT CIRCUITS, RADIOFREQUENCY, RESONANCE, WAVEGUIDES, X RAY DIFFRACTION, YTTRIUM.

  18. Modified ferritic iron alloys with improved high-temperature mechanical properties and oxidation resistance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oldrieve, R. E.

    1975-01-01

    An alloy modification program was conducted in which the compositions of two existing Fe-Cr-Al alloys (Armco 18SR and GE-1541) were changed to achieve either improved high-temperature strength or improved fabricability. Only modifications of Armco 18SR were successful in achieving increased strength without loss of fabricability or oxidation resistance. The best modified alloy, designated NASA-18T, had twice the rupture strength of Armco 18SR at 800 and 1000 C. The NASA-18T alloy also had better oxidation resistance than Armco 18SR and comparable fabricability. The nominal composition of NASA-18T is Fe-18Cr-2Al-1Si-1.25Ta. All attempted modifications of the GE-1541 alloy were unsuccessful in terms of achieving better fabricability without sacrificing high-temperature strength and oxidation resistance.

  19. Epitaxial Fe/Y2O3 interfaces as a model system for oxide-dispersion-strengthened ferritic alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaspar, T. C.; Bowden, M. E.; Wang, C. M.; Shutthanandan, V.; Overman, N. R.; van Ginhoven, R. M.; Wirth, B. D.; Kurtz, R. J.

    2015-02-01

    The fundamental mechanisms underlying the superior radiation tolerance properties of oxide-dispersion-strengthened ferritic steels and nanostructured ferritic alloys are poorly understood. Thin film heterostructures of Fe/Y2O3 can serve as a model system for fundamental studies of radiation damage. Epitaxial thin films of Y2O3 were deposited by pulsed laser deposition on 8% Y:ZrO2 (YSZ) substrates with (1 0 0), (1 1 0), and (1 1 1) orientation. Metallic Fe was subsequently deposited by molecular beam epitaxy. Characterization by X-ray diffraction and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry in the channeling geometry revealed a degree of epitaxial or axiotaxial orientation for Fe(2 1 1) deposited on Y2O3(1 1 0)/YSZ(1 1 0). In contrast, Fe on Y2O3(1 1 1)/YSZ(1 1 1) was fully polycrystalline, and Fe on Y2O3(1 0 0)/YSZ(1 0 0) exhibited out-of-plane texture in the [1 1 0] direction with little or no preferential in-plane orientation. Scanning transmission electron microscopy imaging of Fe(2 1 1)/Y2O3(1 1 0)/YSZ(1 10) revealed a strongly islanded morphology for the Fe film, with no epitaxial grains visible in the cross-sectional sample. Well-ordered Fe grains with no orientation to the underlying Y2O3 were observed. Well-ordered crystallites of Fe with both epitaxial and non-epitaxial orientations on Y2O3 are a promising model system for fundamental studies of radiation damage phenomena. This is illustrated with preliminary results of He bubble formation following implantation with a helium ion microscope. He bubble formation is shown to preferentially occur at the Fe/Y2O3 interface.

  20. Past research and fabrication conducted at SCK•CEN on ferritic ODS alloys used as cladding for FBR's fuel pins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Bremaecker, Anne

    2012-09-01

    In the 1960s in the frame of the sodium-cooled fast breeders, SCK•CEN decided to develop claddings made with ferritic stainless materials because of their specific properties, namely a higher thermal conductivity, a lower thermal expansion, a lower tendency to He-embrittlement, and a lower swelling than the austenitic stainless steels. To enhance their lower creep resistance at 650-700 °C arose the idea to strengthen the microstructure by oxide dispersions. This was the starting point of an ambitious programme where both the matrix and the dispersions were optimized. A purely ferritic 13 wt% Cr matrix was selected and its mechanical strength was improved through addition of ferritizing elements. Results of tensile and stress-rupture tests showed that Ti and Mo were the most beneficial elements, partly because of the chi-phase precipitation. In 1973 the optimized matrix composition was Fe-13Cr-3.5Ti-2Mo. To reach creep properties similar to those of AISI 316, different dispersions and methods were tested: internal oxidation (that was not conclusive), and the direct mixing of metallic and oxide powders (Al2O3, MgO, ZrO2, TiO2, ZrSiO4) followed by pressing, sintering, and extrusion. The compression and extrusion parameters were determined: extrusion as hollow at 1050 °C, solution annealing at 1050 °C/15 min, cleaning, cold drawing to the final dimensions with intermediate annealings at 1050 °C, final annealing at 1050 °C, straightening and final aging at 800 °C. The choice of titania and yttria powders and their concentrations were finalized on the basis of their out-of-pile and in-pile creep and tensile strength. As soon as a resistance butt welding machine was developed and installed in a glove-box, fuel segments with PuO2 were loaded in the Belgian MTR BR2. The fabrication parameters were continuously optimized: milling and beating, lubrication, cold drawing (partial and final reduction rates, temperature, duration, atmosphere and furnace). Specific non

  1. Recent status and improvement of reduced-activation ferritic-martensitic steels for high-temperature service

    DOE PAGES

    Tan, L.; Katoh, Y.; Tavassoli, A. -A. F.; ...

    2016-07-26

    Reduced-activation ferritic-martensitic (RAFM) steels, candidate structural materials for fusion reactors, have achieved technological maturity after about three decades of research and development. The recent status of a few developmental aspects of current RAFM steels, such as aging resistance, plate thickness effects, fracture toughness, and fatigue, is updated in this paper, together with ongoing efforts to develop next-generation RAFM steels for superior high-temperature performance. Additionally, to thermomechanical treatments, including nonstandard heat treatment, alloy chemistry refinements and modifications have demonstrated some improvements in high-temperature performance. Castable nanostructured alloys (CNAs) were developed by significantly increasing the amount of nanoscale MX (M = V/Ta/Ti,more » X = C/N) precipitates and reducing coarse M23C6 (M = Cr). Preliminary results showed promising improvement in creep resistance and Charpy impact toughness. We present and compare limited low-dose neutron irradiation results for one of the CNAs and China low activation martensitic with data for F82H and Eurofer97 irradiated up to ~70 displacements per atom at ~300–325 °C.« less

  2. Recent status and improvement of reduced-activation ferritic-martensitic steels for high-temperature service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, L.; Katoh, Y.; Tavassoli, A.-A. F.; Henry, J.; Rieth, M.; Sakasegawa, H.; Tanigawa, H.; Huang, Q.

    2016-10-01

    Reduced-activation ferritic-martensitic (RAFM) steels, candidate structural materials for fusion reactors, have achieved technological maturity after about three decades of research and development. The recent status of a few developmental aspects of current RAFM steels, such as aging resistance, plate thickness effects, fracture toughness, and fatigue, is updated in this paper, together with ongoing efforts to develop next-generation RAFM steels for superior high-temperature performance. In addition to thermomechanical treatments, including nonstandard heat treatment, alloy chemistry refinements and modifications have demonstrated some improvements in high-temperature performance. Castable nanostructured alloys (CNAs) were developed by significantly increasing the amount of nanoscale MX (M = V/Ta/Ti, X = C/N) precipitates and reducing coarse M23C6 (M = Cr). Preliminary results showed promising improvement in creep resistance and Charpy impact toughness. Limited low-dose neutron irradiation results for one of the CNAs and China low activation martensitic are presented and compared with data for F82H and Eurofer97 irradiated up to ∼70 displacements per atom at ∼300-325 °C.

  3. Recent status and improvement of reduced-activation ferritic-martensitic steels for high-temperature service

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, L.; Katoh, Y.; Tavassoli, A. -A. F.; Henry, J.; Rieth, M.; Sakasegawa, H.; Tanigawa, H.; Huang, Q.

    2016-07-26

    Reduced-activation ferritic-martensitic (RAFM) steels, candidate structural materials for fusion reactors, have achieved technological maturity after about three decades of research and development. The recent status of a few developmental aspects of current RAFM steels, such as aging resistance, plate thickness effects, fracture toughness, and fatigue, is updated in this paper, together with ongoing efforts to develop next-generation RAFM steels for superior high-temperature performance. Additionally, to thermomechanical treatments, including nonstandard heat treatment, alloy chemistry refinements and modifications have demonstrated some improvements in high-temperature performance. Castable nanostructured alloys (CNAs) were developed by significantly increasing the amount of nanoscale MX (M = V/Ta/Ti, X = C/N) precipitates and reducing coarse M23C6 (M = Cr). Preliminary results showed promising improvement in creep resistance and Charpy impact toughness. We present and compare limited low-dose neutron irradiation results for one of the CNAs and China low activation martensitic with data for F82H and Eurofer97 irradiated up to ~70 displacements per atom at ~300–325 °C.

  4. Morphology, structure, and chemistry of nanoclusters in a mechanically alloyed nanostructured ferritic steel

    SciTech Connect

    Brandes, M. C.; Kovarik, Libor; Miller, Michael K.; Mills, M. J.

    2012-01-14

    Nanostructured ferritic steels have excellent high temperature creep properties and radiation tolerance due to the presence of a high density of Ti-Y-O-enriched nanoclusters. The morphology of the nanoclusters is found to be consistent with a truncated rhombic dodecahedron defined by the {l_brace}100{r_brace} and {l_brace}110{r_brace} planes in the Fe matrix. The derived symmetry and the compositional information indicate that the nanoclusters are inconsistent with the cubic Y2Ti2O7 or the polymorphs of Y2TiO5 phase. Possible structural models are discussed.

  5. Comparison of catalytic activity of bismuth substituted cobalt ferrite nanoparticles synthesized by combustion and co-precipitation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiran, Venkat Savunthari; Sumathi, Shanmugam

    2017-01-01

    In this study, cobalt ferrite and bismuth substituted cobalt ferrite (CoFe2-xBixO4x=0, 0.1) nanoparticles were synthesized by two different methods viz combustion and co-precipitation. The nanoparticles were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS), scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray analyzer (SEM-EDX) and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). The results of powder XRD pattern showed an increase in lattice parameter and decrease in particle size of cobalt ferrite by the substitution of bismuth. Catalytic activity of cobalt ferrite and bismuth substituted cobalt ferrite nanoparticles synthesized by two different methods were compared for the reduction of 4-nitrophenol to 4-aminophenol using NaBH4 as a reducing agent.

  6. Load partitioning between the bcc-iron matrix and NiAl-type precipitates in a ferritic alloy on multiple length scales

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Zhiqian; Song, Gian; Sisneros, Thomas A.; Clausen, Bjørn; Pu, Chao; Li, Lin; Gao, Yanfei; Liaw, Peter K.

    2016-01-01

    An understanding of load sharing among constituent phases aids in designing mechanical properties of multiphase materials. Here we investigate load partitioning between the body-centered-cubic iron matrix and NiAl-type precipitates in a ferritic alloy during uniaxial tensile tests at 364 and 506 °C on multiple length scales by in situ neutron diffraction and crystal plasticity finite element modeling. Our findings show that the macroscopic load-transfer efficiency is not as high as that predicted by the Eshelby model; moreover, it depends on the matrix strain-hardening behavior. We explain the grain-level anisotropic load-partitioning behavior by considering the plastic anisotropy of the matrix and elastic anisotropy of precipitates. We further demonstrate that the partitioned load on NiAl-type precipitates relaxes at 506 °C, most likely through thermally-activated dislocation rearrangement on the microscopic scale. The study contributes to further understanding of load-partitioning characteristics in multiphase materials. PMID:26979660

  7. Load partitioning between the bcc-iron matrix and NiAl-type precipitates in a ferritic alloy on multiple length scales.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhiqian; Song, Gian; Sisneros, Thomas A; Clausen, Bjørn; Pu, Chao; Li, Lin; Gao, Yanfei; Liaw, Peter K

    2016-03-16

    An understanding of load sharing among constituent phases aids in designing mechanical properties of multiphase materials. Here we investigate load partitioning between the body-centered-cubic iron matrix and NiAl-type precipitates in a ferritic alloy during uniaxial tensile tests at 364 and 506 °C on multiple length scales by in situ neutron diffraction and crystal plasticity finite element modeling. Our findings show that the macroscopic load-transfer efficiency is not as high as that predicted by the Eshelby model; moreover, it depends on the matrix strain-hardening behavior. We explain the grain-level anisotropic load-partitioning behavior by considering the plastic anisotropy of the matrix and elastic anisotropy of precipitates. We further demonstrate that the partitioned load on NiAl-type precipitates relaxes at 506 °C, most likely through thermally-activated dislocation rearrangement on the microscopic scale. The study contributes to further understanding of load-partitioning characteristics in multiphase materials.

  8. Load partitioning between the bcc-iron matrix and NiAl-type precipitates in a ferritic alloy on multiple length scales

    DOE PAGES

    Sun, Zhiqian; Song, Gian; Sisneros, Thomas A.; ...

    2016-03-16

    An understanding of load sharing among constituent phases aids in designing mechanical properties of multiphase materials. Here we investigate load partitioning between the body-centered-cubic iron matrix and NiAl-type precipitates in a ferritic alloy during uniaxial tensile tests at 364 and 506 C on multiple length scales by in situ neutron diffraction and crystal plasticity finite element modeling. Our findings show that the macroscopic load-transfer efficiency is not as high as that predicted by the Eshelby model; moreover, it depends on the matrix strain-hardening behavior. We explain the grain-level anisotropic load-partitioning behavior by considering the plastic anisotropy of the matrix andmore » elastic anisotropy of precipitates. We further demonstrate that the partitioned load on NiAl-type precipitates relaxes at 506 C, most likely through thermally-activated dislocation rearrangement on the microscopic scale. Furthermore, the study contributes to further understanding of load-partitioning characteristics in multiphase materials.« less

  9. Development of High-Temperature Ferritic Alloys and Performance Prediction Methods for Advanced Fission Energy Systems

    SciTech Connect

    G. RObert Odette; Takuya Yamamoto

    2009-08-14

    Reports the results of a comprehensive development and analysis of a database on irradiation hardening and embrittlement of tempered martensitic steels (TMS). Alloy specific quantitative semi-empirical models were derived for the dpa dose, irradiation temperature (ti) and test (Tt) temperature of yield stress hardening (or softening) .

  10. Fatigue strength of low-activation ferritic-martensitic high-chromium EK-181 steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolmakov, A. G.; Terent'ev, V. F.; Prosvirnin, D. V.; Chernov, V. M.; Leont'eva-Smirnova, M. V.

    2016-04-01

    The static and cyclic mechanical properties of low-activation ferritic-martensitic EK-181 (Fe‒12Cr-2W-V-Ta-B-C) steel are studied in the temperature range 20-920°C (static tests) and at 20°C (cyclic tests). The fracture mechanisms of the steel under static tension and fatigue fracture conditions are analyzed by scanning electron microscopy.

  11. Effects of proton irradiation on nanocluster precipitation in ferritic steel containing fcc alloying additions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Zhongwu; Liu, C T; Wang, Xun-Li; Miller, Michael K; Ma, Dong; Chen, Guang; Williams, J R; Chin, Bryan

    2012-01-01

    Newly-developed precipitate-strengthened ferritic steels with and without pre-existing nanoscale precipitates were irradiated with 4 MeV protons to a dose of ~5 mdpa at 50 C and subsequently examined by nanoindentation and atom probe tomography (APT). Irradiation-enhanced precipitation and coarsening of pre-existing nanoscale precipitates were observed. Copper partitions to the precipitate core along with a segregation of Ni, Al and Mn to the precipitate/matrix interface after both thermal aging and proton irradiation. Proton irradiation induces the precipitation reaction and coarsening of pre-existing nanoscale precipitates, and these results are similar to a thermal aging process. The precipitation and coarsening of nanoscale precipitates are responsible for the changes in hardness. The observation of the radiation-induced softening is essentially due to the coarsening of the pre-existing Cu-rich nanoscale precipitates. The implication of the precipitation on the embrittlement of reactor-pressure-vessel steels after irradiation is discussed.

  12. ATR-A1 irradiation experiment on vanadium alloys and low activation steels

    SciTech Connect

    Tasi, H.; Strain, R.V.; Gomes, I.; Hins, A.G.; Smith, D.L.

    1996-04-01

    To study the mechanical properties of vanadium alloys under neutron irradiation at low temperatures, an experiment was designed and constructed for irradiation in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). The experiment contained Charpy, tensile, compact tension, TEM, and creep specimens of vanadium alloys. It also contained limited low-activation ferritic steel specimens as part of the collaborative agreement with Monbusho of Japan. The design irradiation temperatures for the vanadium alloy specimens in the experiment are {approx}200 and 300{degrees}C, achieved with passive gap-gap sizing and fill gas blending. To mitigate vanadium-to-chromium transmutation from the thermal neutron flux, the test specimens are contained inside gadolinium flux filters. All specimens are lithium-bonded. The irradiation started in Cycle 108A (December 3, 1995) and is expected to have a duration of three ATR cycles and a peak influence of 4.4 dpa.

  13. Facile method to synthesize dopamine-capped mixed ferrite nanoparticles and their peroxidase-like activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mumtaz, Shazia; Wang, Li-Sheng; Abdullah, Muhammad; Zajif Hussain, Syed; Iqbal, Zafar; Rotello, Vincent M.; Hussain, Irshad

    2017-03-01

    A facile single-step strategy to prepare stable and water-dispersible dopamine-functionalized ultra-small mixed ferrite nanoparticles MFe2O4-DOPA (where M is a bivalent metal atom i.e. Fe, Co Cu, Mn and Ni) at room temperature is described. The nanoparticles formed have narrow size distribution as indicated by their characterization using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and dynamic light scattering. The surface chemistry of these nanoparticles was probed by FTIR spectroscopy indicating their successful capping with dopamine ligands, which was further confirmed using zetapotential measurements and thermogravimetric analysis. The comparative horseradish peroxidase (HRP)—like activity of these cationic mixed ferrites nanoparticles was studied at pH 4.6 using a negatively-charged 2, 2‧-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) diammonium salt (ABTS) as a chromogenic substrate in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. A time-dependent relative peroxidase-like activity follows the following order CoFe2O4-DOPA  >  MnFe2O4-DOPA  >  CuFe2O4-DOPA  >  NiFe2O4-DOPA  >  Fe3O4-DOPA. This diversity in HRP-like activity may be attributed to the different redox properties of ferrite nanoparticles when doped with M (Fe, Co Cu, Mn and Ni).

  14. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of a Nitride-Strengthened Reduced Activation Ferritic/Martensitic Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Qiangguo; Zhang, Wenfeng; Yan, Wei; Wang, Wei; Sha, Wei; Shan, Yiyin; Yang, Ke

    2012-12-01

    Nitride-strengthened reduced activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steels are developed taking advantage of the high thermal stability of nitrides. In the current study, the microstructure and mechanical properties of a nitride-strengthened RAFM steel with improved composition were investigated. Fully martensitic microstructure with fine nitrides dispersion was achieved in the steel. In all, 1.4 pct Mn is sufficient to suppress delta ferrite and assure the steel of the full martensitic microstructure. Compared to Eurofer97, the steel showed similar strength at room temperature but higher strength at 873 K (600 °C). The steel exhibited very high impact toughness and a low ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) of 243 K (-30 °C), which could be further reduced by purification.

  15. Comparison of fracture behavior for low-swelling ferritic and austenitic alloys irradiated in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) to 180 DPA. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, F.H.

    1992-02-01

    Fracture toughness testing was conducted to investigate the radiation embrittlement of high-nickel superalloys, modified austenitic steels and ferritic steels. These materials have been experimentally proven to possess excellent resistance to void swelling after high neutron exposures. In addition to swelling resistance, post-irradiation fracture resistance is another important criterion for reactor material selection. By means of fracture mechanics techniques the fracture behavior of those highly irradiated alloys was characterized in terms of irradiation and test conditions. Precipitation-strengthened alloys failed by channel fracture with very low postirradiation ductility. The fracture toughness of titanium-modified austenitic stainless steel D9 deteriorates with increasing fluence to about 100 displacement per atom (dpa), the fluence level at which brittle fracture appears to occur. Ferritic steels such as HT9 are the most promising candidate materials for fast and fusion reactor applications. The upper-shelf fracture toughness of alloy HT9 remained adequate after irradiation to 180 dpa although its ductile- brittle transition temperature (DBTT) shift by low temperature irradiation rendered the material susceptible to brittle fracture at room temperature. Understanding the fracture characteristics under various irradiation and test conditions helps reduce the potential for brittle fracture by permitting appropriate measure to be taken.

  16. Comparison of fracture behavior for low-swelling ferritic and austenitic alloys irradiated in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) to 180 DPA

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, F.H.

    1992-02-01

    Fracture toughness testing was conducted to investigate the radiation embrittlement of high-nickel superalloys, modified austenitic steels and ferritic steels. These materials have been experimentally proven to possess excellent resistance to void swelling after high neutron exposures. In addition to swelling resistance, post-irradiation fracture resistance is another important criterion for reactor material selection. By means of fracture mechanics techniques the fracture behavior of those highly irradiated alloys was characterized in terms of irradiation and test conditions. Precipitation-strengthened alloys failed by channel fracture with very low postirradiation ductility. The fracture toughness of titanium-modified austenitic stainless steel D9 deteriorates with increasing fluence to about 100 displacement per atom (dpa), the fluence level at which brittle fracture appears to occur. Ferritic steels such as HT9 are the most promising candidate materials for fast and fusion reactor applications. The upper-shelf fracture toughness of alloy HT9 remained adequate after irradiation to 180 dpa although its ductile- brittle transition temperature (DBTT) shift by low temperature irradiation rendered the material susceptible to brittle fracture at room temperature. Understanding the fracture characteristics under various irradiation and test conditions helps reduce the potential for brittle fracture by permitting appropriate measure to be taken.

  17. High-Temperature Tensile Properties of Nano-Oxide Dispersion Strengthened Ferritic Steels Produced by Mechanical Alloying and Spark Plasma Sintering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boulnat, Xavier; Fabregue, Damien; Perez, Michel; Mathon, Marie-Hélène; de Carlan, Yann

    2013-06-01

    Oxide-dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steels were produced by mechanical alloying and subsequent spark plasma sintering. Very fast heating rates were used to minimize porosity when controlling grain size and precipitation of dispersoids within a compacted material. Sintering cycles performed at 1373 K (1100 °C) induced heterogeneous, but fine grain size distribution and high density of nano-oxides. Yield strengths at room temperature and at 923 K (650 °C) are 975 MPa and 298 MPa, respectively. Furthermore, high-temperature ductility is much increased: total strain of 28 pct at 923 K (650 °C).

  18. Effect of neutron irradiation at low temperature on the embrittlement of the reduced-activation ferritic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rybin, V. V.; Kursevich, I. P.; Lapin, A. N.

    1998-10-01

    Effects of neutron irradiation to fluence of 2.0 × 10 24 n/m 2 ( E > 0.5 MeV) in temperature range 70-300°C on mechanical properties and structure of the experimental reduced-activation ferritic 0.1%C-(2.5-12)%Cr-(1-2)%W-(0.2-0.7)%V alloys were investigated. The steels were studied in different initial structural conditions obtained by changing the modes of heat treatments. Effect of neutron irradiation estimated by a shift in ductile-brittle transition temperature (ΔDBTT) and reduction of upper shelf energy (ΔUSE) highly depends on both irradiation condition and steel chemical composition and structure. For the steel with optimum chemical composition (9Cr-1.5WV) after irradiation to 2 × 10 24 n/m 2 ( E ⩾ 0.5 MeV) at 280°C the ΔDBTT does not exceed 25°C. The shift in DBTT increased from 35°C to 110°C for the 8Cr-1.5WV steel at a decrease in irradiation temperature from 300°C to 70°C. The CCT diagrams are presented for several reduced-activated steels.

  19. Synthesis of Water Dispersible and Catalytically Active Gold-Decorated Cobalt Ferrite Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Silvestri, Alessandro; Mondini, Sara; Marelli, Marcello; Pifferi, Valentina; Falciola, Luigi; Ponti, Alessandro; Ferretti, Anna Maria; Polito, Laura

    2016-07-19

    Hetero-nanoparticles represent an important family of composite nanomaterials that in the past years are attracting ever-growing interest. Here, we report a new strategy for the synthesis of water dispersible cobalt ferrite nanoparticles (CoxFe3-xO4 NPs) decorated with ultrasmall (2-3 nm) gold nanoparticles (Au NPs). The synthetic procedure is based on the use of 2,3-meso-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA), which plays a double role. First, it transfers cobalt ferrite NPs from the organic phase to aqueous media. Second, the DMSA reductive power promotes the in situ nucleation of gold NPs in proximity of the magnetic NP surface. Following this procedure, we achieved a water dispersible nanosystem (CoxFe3-xO4-DMSA-Au NPs) which combines the cobalt ferrite magnetic properties with the catalytic features of ultrasmall Au NPs. We showed that CoxFe3-xO4-DMSA-Au NPs act as an efficient nanocatalyst to reduce 4-nitrophenol to 4-aminophenol and that they can be magnetically recovered and recycled. It is noteworthy that such nanosystem is more catalytically active than Au NPs with equal size. Finally, a complete structural and chemical characterization of the hetero-NPs is provided.

  20. Development of oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic steels for fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Mukhopadhyay, D.K.; Froes, F.H.; Gelles, D.S.

    1998-03-01

    An oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steel with high temperature strength has been developed in line with low activation criteria for application in fusion power systems. The composition Fe-13.5Cr-2W-0.5Ti-0.25Y{sub 2}O{sup 3} was chosen to provide a minimum chromium content to insure fully delta-ferrite stability. High temperature strength has been demonstrated by measuring creep response of the ODS alloy in uniaxial tension at 650 and 900 C in an inert atmosphere chamber. Results of tests at 900 C demonstrate that this alloy has creep properties similar to other alloys of similar design and can be considered for use in high temperature fusion power system designs. The alloy selection process, materials production, microstructural evaluation and creep testing are described.

  1. Role of Y-Al oxides during extended recovery process of a ferritic ODS alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Capdevila, C.; Pimentel, G.; Aranda, M. M.; Rementeria, R.; Dawson, K.; Urones-Garrote, E.; Tatlock, G. J.; Miller, Michael K.

    2015-08-04

    The microstructural stability of Y-Al oxides during the recrystallization of Fe-Cr-Al oxide dispersion strengthened alloy is studied in this work. The goal is to determine the specific distribution pattern of oxides depending where they are located: in the matrix or at the grain boundaries. It was concluded that those located at the grain boundaries yielded a faster coarsening than the ones in the matrix, although no significant differences in composition and/or crystal structure were observed. However, the recrystallization heat treatment leads to the dissolution of the Y2O3 and its combination with Al to form the YAlO3 perovskite oxide particles process, mainly located at the grain boundaries. Lastly, atom probe tomography analysis revealed a significant Ti build-up at the grain boundaries that might affect subsequent migration during recrystallization.

  2. Role of Y-Al oxides during extended recovery process of a ferritic ODS alloy

    DOE PAGES

    Capdevila, C.; Pimentel, G.; Aranda, M. M.; ...

    2015-08-04

    The microstructural stability of Y-Al oxides during the recrystallization of Fe-Cr-Al oxide dispersion strengthened alloy is studied in this work. The goal is to determine the specific distribution pattern of oxides depending where they are located: in the matrix or at the grain boundaries. It was concluded that those located at the grain boundaries yielded a faster coarsening than the ones in the matrix, although no significant differences in composition and/or crystal structure were observed. However, the recrystallization heat treatment leads to the dissolution of the Y2O3 and its combination with Al to form the YAlO3 perovskite oxide particles process,more » mainly located at the grain boundaries. Lastly, atom probe tomography analysis revealed a significant Ti build-up at the grain boundaries that might affect subsequent migration during recrystallization.« less

  3. Status of ATR-A1 irradiation experiment on vanadium alloys and low-activation steels

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, H.; Strain, R.V.; Gomes, I.; Chung, H.; Smith, D.L.

    1997-04-01

    The ATR-A1 irradiation experiment in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) was a collaborative U.S./Japan effort to study at low temperatures the effects of neutron damage on vanadium alloys. The experiment also contained a limited quantity of low-activation ferritic steel specimens from Japan as part of the collaboration agreement. The irradiation was completed on May 5, 1996, as planned, after achieving an estimated neutron damage of 4.7 dpa in vanadium. The capsule has since been kept in the ATR water canal for the required radioactivity cool-down. Planning is underway for disassembly of the capsule and test specimen retrieval.

  4. Fabrication of 13Cr-2Mo Ferritic/Martensitic Oxide-Dispersion-Strengthened Steel Components by Mechanical Alloying and Spark-Plasma Sintering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogachev, I.; Grigoryev, E.; Khasanov, O. L.; Olevsky, E.

    2014-06-01

    The outcomes of the mechanical alloying of 13Cr-2Mo ferritic/martensitic steel and yttria (oxide-dispersion-strengthened steel) powders in a ball mill are reported in terms of the powder particle size and morphology evolution. The optimal ball mill rotation speed and the milling time are discussed. The densification kinetics of the mechanically alloyed powder during the process of spark-plasma sintering is analyzed. An optimal set of the compaction processing parameters, including the maximum temperature, the dwell time, and the heating rate, is determined. The specifics of the densification are discussed in terms of the impact of major spark-plasma sintering parameters as well as the possible phase transformations occurring during compaction processing.

  5. Interdiffusion Behavior of Al-Rich Oxidation Resistant Coatings on Ferritic-Martensitic Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Velraj, S.; Zhang, Ying; Hawkins, W. E.; Pint, Bruce A.

    2012-06-21

    We investigated interdiffusion of thin Al-rich coatings synthesized by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and pack cementation on 9Cr ferritic–martensitic alloys in the temperature range of 650–700°C. The compositional changes after long-term exposures in laboratory air and air + 10 vol% H2O were examined experimentally. Interdiffusion was modeled by a modified coating oxidation and substrate interdiffusion model (COSIM) program. The modification enabled the program to directly input the concentration profiles of the as-deposited coating determined by electron probe microanalysis (EPMA). Reasonable agreement was achieved between the simulated and experimental Al profiles after exposures. Moreover, the model was also applied to predict coating lifetime at 650–700°C based on a minimum Al content (Cb) required at the coating surface to re-form protective oxide scale. In addition to a Cb value established from the failure of a thin CVD coating at 700°C, values reported for slurry aluminide coatings were also included in lifetime predictions.

  6. TEM and HRTEM study of oxide particles in an Al-alloyed high-Cr oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic steel with Hf addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dou, Peng; Kimura, Akihiko; Kasada, Ryuta; Okuda, Takanari; Inoue, Masaki; Ukai, Shigeharu; Ohnuki, Somei; Fujisawa, Toshiharu; Abe, Fujio; Jiang, Shan; Yang, Zhigang

    2017-03-01

    The nanoparticles in an Al-alloyed high-Cr oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steel with Hf addition, i.e., SOC-16 (Fe-15Cr-2W-0.1Ti-4Al-0.62Hf-0.35Y2O3), have been examined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). Relative to an Al-alloyed high-Cr ODS ferritic steel without Hf addition, i.e., SOC-9 (Fe-15.5Cr-2W-0.1Ti-4Al-0.35Y2O3), the dispersion morphology and coherency of the oxide nanoparticles in SOC-16 were significantly improved. Almost all the small nanoparticles (diameter <10 nm) in SOC-16 were found to be consistent with cubic Y2Hf2O7 oxides with the anion-deficient fluorite structure and coherent with the bcc steel matrix. The larger particles (diameter >10 nm) were also mainly identified as cubic Y2Hf2O7 oxides with the anion-deficient fluorite structure. The results presented here are compared with those of SOC-9 with a brief discussion of the underlying mechanisms of the unusual thermal and irradiation stabilities of the oxides as well as the superior strength, excellent irradiation tolerance and extraordinary corrosion resistance of SOC-16.

  7. Low-temperature irradiation effects on tensile and Charpy properties of low-activation ferritic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiba, Kiyoyuki; Hishinuma, Akimichi

    2000-12-01

    Tensile and Charpy properties of low-activation ferritic steel, F82H irradiated up to 0.8 dpa at low temperature below 300°C were investigated. The helium effect on these properties was also investigated using the boron isotope doping method. Neutron irradiation increased yield stress accompanied with ductility loss, and it also shifted the ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) from -50°C to 0°C. Boron-doped F82H showed larger degradation in DBTT and ductility than boron-free F82H, while they had the same yield stress before and after irradiation.

  8. Irradiation-induced grain growth in nanocrystalline reduced activation ferrite/martensite steel

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, W. B.; Chen, L. Q.; Zhang, C. Yang, Z. G.; Ji, Y. Z.; Zang, H.; Shen, T. L.

    2014-09-22

    In this work, we investigate the microstructure evolution of surface-nanocrystallized reduced activation ferrite/martensite steels upon high-dose helium ion irradiation (24.3 dpa). We report a significant irradiation-induced grain growth in the irradiated buried layer at a depth of 300–500 nm, rather than at the peak damage region (at a depth of ∼840 nm). This phenomenon can be explained by the thermal spike model: minimization of the grain boundary (GB) curvature resulting from atomic diffusion in the cascade center near GBs.

  9. Effect of microstructural evolution by isothermal aging on the mechanical properties of 9Cr-1WVTa reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Min-Gu; Lee, Chang-Hoon; Moon, Joonoh; Park, Jun Young; Lee, Tae-Ho; Kang, Namhyun; Chan Kim, Hyoung

    2017-03-01

    The influence of microstructural changes caused by aging condition on tensile and Charpy impact properties was investigated for reduced activation ferritic-martensitic (RAFM) 9Cr-1WVTa steels having single martensite and a mixed microstructure of martensite and ferrite. For the mixed microstructure of martensite and ferrite, the Charpy impact properties deteriorated in both as-normalized and tempered conditions due to the ferrite and the accompanying M23C6 carbides at the ferrite grain boundaries which act as path and initiation sites for cleavage cracks, respectively. However, aging at 550 °C for 20-100 h recovered gradually the Charpy impact toughness without any distinct drop in strength, as a result of the spheroidization of the coarse M23C6 carbides at the ferrite grain boundaries, which makes crack initiation more difficult.

  10. Manufacturing development of low activation vanadium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.P.; Johnson, W.R.; Baxi, C.B.

    1996-10-01

    General Atomics is developing manufacturing methods for vanadium alloys as part of a program to encourage the development of low activation alloys for fusion use. The culmination of the program is the fabrication and installation of a vanadium alloy structure in the DIII-D tokamak as part of the Radiative Divertor modification. Water-cooled vanadium alloy components will comprise a portion of the new upper divertor structure. The first step, procuring the material for this program has been completed. The largest heat of vanadium alloy made to date, 1200 kg of V-4Cr-4Ti, has been produced and is being converted into various product forms. Results of many tests on the material during the manufacturing process are reported. Research into potential fabrication methods has been and continues to be performed along with the assessment of manufacturing processes particularly in the area of joining. Joining of vanadium alloys has been identified as the most critical fabrication issue for their use in the Radiative Divertor Program. Joining processes under evaluation include resistance seam, electrodischarge (stud), friction and electron beam welding. Results of welding tests are reported. Metallography and mechanical tests are used to evaluate the weld samples. The need for a protective atmosphere during different welding processes is also being determined. General Atomics has also designed, manufactured, and will be testing a helium-cooled, high heat flux component to assess the use of helium cooled vanadium alloy components for advanced tokamak systems. The component is made from vanadium alloy tubing, machined to enhance the heat transfer characteristics, and joined to end flanges to allow connection to the helium supply. Results are reported.

  11. Charpy impact properties of low activation alloys for fusion applications after neutron irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieth, M.; Dafferner, B.; Röhrig, H. D.

    1996-10-01

    The MANITU irradiation and fracture-toughness testing program although initially foreseen to clarify the early dose-saturation of ΔDBTT for commercial ferritic steels has been extended to include the medium temperature (≥ 250°C) irradiation hardening behaviour of promising low-activation alloys. The results after a first 0.8 dpa irradiation clearly show a much better behaviour of the new alloys in any respect (e.g. DBTT after irradiation always below +50°C for subsize specimens, for the ORNL steel even below -20°C). The complexity of temperature dependency is probably caused by the transition range in dose accumulation, and should therefore not be 'over-interpreted'.

  12. A strong magneto-optical activity in rare-earth La{sup 3+} substituted M-type strontium ferrites

    SciTech Connect

    Hu Feng; Liu Xiansong; Zhu Deru; Fernandez-Garcia, Lucia; Suarez, Marta; Luis Menendez, Jose

    2011-06-01

    M-type strontium ferrites with substitution of Sr{sup 2+} by rare-earth La{sup 3+} were prepared by conventional ceramic technology. The structure, magnetic properties, and magneto-optical Kerr activity of Sr{sub 1-x}La{sub x}Fe{sub 12}O{sub 19} (x = 0, 0.05, 0.10, 0.15, 0.20) were investigated by x-ray diffraction (XRD), vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM), and magneto-optical ellipsometry, respectively. X-ray diffraction showed that the samples sintered at 1290 deg. C for 3 h were single M-type hexagonal ferrites. The magnetic properties were remarkably changed due to the valence change of Fe ions induced by the substitution of La ions. Most significantly, an important magneto-optical activity was induced in the La{sup 3+} substituted M-type strontium ferrites around 3 eV.

  13. Large zinc cation occupancy of octahedral sites in mechanically activated zinc ferrite powders

    SciTech Connect

    Oliver, S. A.; Harris, V. G.; Hamdeh, H. H.; Ho, J. C.

    2000-05-08

    The cation site occupancy of a mechanically activated nanocrystalline zinc ferrite powder was determined as (Zn{sub 0.55}{sup 2+}Fe{sub 0.18}{sup 3+}){sub tet}[Zr{sub 0.45}{sup 2+}Fe{sub 1.82}{sup 3+}]{sub oct}O{sub 4} through analysis of extended x-ray absorption fine structure measurements, showing a large redistribution of cations between sites compared to normal zinc ferrite samples. The overpopulation of cations in the octahedral sites was attributed to the ascendance in importance of the ionic radii over the crystal energy and bonding coordination in determining which interstitial sites are occupied in this structurally disordered powder. Slight changes are observed in the local atomic environment about the zinc cations, but not the iron cations, with respect to the spinel structure. The presence of Fe{sup 3+} on both sites is consistent with the measured room temperature magnetic properties. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  14. HIGH TEMPERATURE BRAZING ALLOY FOR JOINT Fe-Cr-Al MATERIALS AND AUSTENITIC AND FERRITIC STAINLESS STEELS

    DOEpatents

    Cost, R.C.

    1958-07-15

    A new high temperature brazing alloy is described that is particularly suitable for brazing iron-chromiumaluminum alloys. It consists of approximately 20% Cr, 6% Al, 10% Si, and from 1.5 to 5% phosphorus, the balance being iron.

  15. Diffusive transport parameters of deuterium through China reduced activation ferritic-martensitic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bo; Liu, Lingbo; Xiang, Xin; Rao, Yongchu; Ye, Xiaoqiu; Chen, Chang An

    2016-03-01

    Reduced Activation Ferritic/Martensitic (RAFM) steels have been considered as the most promising candidate structure materials for a fusion reactor. In the recent decades, two new types of RAFM steels, called China Low Activation Martensitic (CLAM) steel and China Low-activation Ferritic (CLF-1) steel, have been developed. The gas evolution permeation technique has been used to investigate diffusive transport parameters of deuterium through CLAM and CLF-1 over the temperature range 623 ∼ 873 K at deuterium pressure of 105 Pa. The resultant transport parameters are: Φ (mol. m-1 s-1 Pa-1/2) = 5.40 × 10-8 exp (-46.8 (kJ. mol-1)/RT), D(m2 s-1) = 3.81 × 10-7 exp(-24.0(kJ. mol-1)/RT) and S (mol. m-3 Pa-1/2) = 1.42 × 10-1 exp(-22.8(kJ. mol-1)/RT) for CLAM; while Φ(mol m-1 s-1 Pa-1/2) = 1.76 × 10-8 exp(-43.9(kJ. mol-1)/RT), D(m2. s-1) = 1.02 × 10-7 exp(-16.9(kJ. mol-1)/RT) and S(mol. m-1 Pa-1/2) = 1.73 × 10-1 exp(-27.0(kJ. mol-1) /RT) for CLF-1. The results show that CLAM is more permeable than CLF-1, thus it is easier for hydrogen isotopes to transport and be removed.

  16. Reduction method of DBTT shift due to irradiation for reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakai, E.; Okubo, N.; Ando, M.; Yamamoto, T.; Takada, F.

    2010-03-01

    The method for reducing irradiation-induced DBTT shift of reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steels was examined. F82H-LN (low nitrogen, 20 ppm), F82H+60 ppm 11B+200 ppmN and F82H+60 ppm 10B+200 ppmN steels tempered at 780 °C for 0.5 h were irradiated at 250 °C to 2 dpa, and the results for Charpy impact tests were analyzed. The upper shelf energy of F82H+ 11B+N steel was hardly changed by the irradiation, and DBTT shift was very small. From our research, DBTT shift due to irradiation can be reduced by the control of tempered conditions before irradiation, and it is found to be furthermore reduced by impurity doping with 60 ppm 11B and 200 ppmN to F82H steel.

  17. Low cycle fatigue properties of a low activation ferritic steel (JLF-1) at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimura, A.; Nagasaka, T.; Inoue, N.; Muroga, T.; Namba, C.

    2000-12-01

    To investigate fatigue properties of a low activation ferritic steel (9Cr-2W steel, JLF-1), low cycle fatigue tests were performed in air at room temperature under axial strain control for a complete push-pull condition. The strain rate was 0.4% s-1. Cyclic strain-hardening was observed within the initial 20 cycles, and then cyclic strain-softening occurred gradually until the final failure, though the plastic strain range did not change significantly. Tensile peak stresses in hysteresis curves measured at around half the number of cycles to failure depended on the total strain range. The drop in the peak stress by the cyclic strain-softening increased with decreasing total strain range. The regression curve of the total strain range against the fatigue life was formulated using the Manson-Coffin equation and the fatigue life of JLF-1 steel was compared with that of 8Cr-2W steel.

  18. Fracture toughness of low activation ferritic steel (JLF-1) weld joint at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimura, A.; Inoue, N.; Muroga, T.

    1998-10-01

    A low activation ferritic steel has been developed for a candidate of a structural material of nuclear fusion reactors. Since welding must be performed when the support structures are constructed, fracture toughness of the weld joint has to be characterized as well as the base metal in an engineering sense. In this report, 25 mm thick plates of JLF-1, which contains 9% Cr and 2% W, are butt-welded by a tungsten inert gas (TIG) procedure, and the fracture toughness of the base plate and the weld metal is investigated at room temperature using 1T and 0.5T CT specimens. The base metal reveals high fracture toughness of about 430 kJ/m 2. However, the weld metal showed unstable big pop-ins. One sample fractured in a nearly elastic condition and another sample showed a toughness of over 400 kJ/m 2.

  19. Mechanical property changes of low activation ferritic/martensitic steels after neutron irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohno, Y.; Kohyama, A.; Hirose, T.; Hamilton, M. L.; Narui, M.

    Mechanical property changes of Fe- XCr-2W-0.2V,Ta ( X: 2.25-12) low activation ferritic/martensitic steels including Japanese Low Activation Ferritic/martensitic (JLF) steels and F82H after neutron irradiation were investigated with emphasis on Charpy impact property, tensile property and irradiation creep properties. Dose dependence of ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) in JLF-1 (9Cr steel) irradiated at 646-700 K increased with irradiation up to 20 dpa and then decreased with further irradiation showing highest DBTT of 260 K at 20 dpa. F82H showed similar dose dependence in DBTT to JLF-1 with higher transition temperature than that of JLF-1 at the same displacement damage. Yield strength in JLF steels and F82H showed similar dose dependence to that of DBTT. Yield strength increased with irradiation up to 15-20 dpa and then decreased to saturate above about 40 dpa. Irradiation hardening in 7-9%Cr steels (JLF-1, JLF-3, F82H) were observed to be smaller than those in steels with 2.25%Cr (JLF-4) or 12%Cr (JLF-5). Dependences of creep strain on applied hoop stress and neutron fluence were measured to be 1.5 and 1, respectively. Temperature dependence of creep coefficient showed a maximum at about 700 K which was caused by irradiation induced void formation or irradiation enhanced creep deformation. Creep coefficient of F82H was larger than those of JLF steels above 750 K. This was considered to be caused by the differences in N and Ta concentration between F82H and JLF steels.

  20. Morphology of Proeutectoid Ferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Jiaqing; Hillert, Mats; Borgenstam, Annika

    2017-01-01

    The morphology of grain boundary nucleated ferrite particles in iron alloys with 0.3 mass pct carbon has been classified according to the presence of facets. Several kinds of particles extend into both grains of austenite and have facets to both. It is proposed that they all belong to a continuous series of shapes. Ferrite plates can nucleate directly on the grain boundary but can also develop from edges on many kinds of particles. Feathery structures of parallel plates on both sides of a grain boundary can thus form. In sections, parallel to their main growth direction, plates have been seen to extend the whole way from the nucleation site at the grain boundary and to the growth front. This happens in the whole temperature range studied from 973 K to 673 K (700 °C to 400 °C). The plates thus grow continuously and not by subunits stopping at limited length and continuing the growth by new ones nucleating. Sometimes, the plates have ridges and in oblique sections they could be mistaken for the start of new plates. No morphological signs were observed indicating a transition between Widmanstätten ferrite and bainitic ferrite. It is proposed that there is only one kind of acicular ferrite.

  1. Morphology of Proeutectoid Ferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Jiaqing; Hillert, Mats; Borgenstam, Annika

    2017-03-01

    The morphology of grain boundary nucleated ferrite particles in iron alloys with 0.3 mass pct carbon has been classified according to the presence of facets. Several kinds of particles extend into both grains of austenite and have facets to both. It is proposed that they all belong to a continuous series of shapes. Ferrite plates can nucleate directly on the grain boundary but can also develop from edges on many kinds of particles. Feathery structures of parallel plates on both sides of a grain boundary can thus form. In sections, parallel to their main growth direction, plates have been seen to extend the whole way from the nucleation site at the grain boundary and to the growth front. This happens in the whole temperature range studied from 973 K to 673 K (700 °C to 400 °C). The plates thus grow continuously and not by subunits stopping at limited length and continuing the growth by new ones nucleating. Sometimes, the plates have ridges and in oblique sections they could be mistaken for the start of new plates. No morphological signs were observed indicating a transition between Widmanstätten ferrite and bainitic ferrite. It is proposed that there is only one kind of acicular ferrite.

  2. Establishing a Scientific Basis for Optimizing Compositions, Process Paths and Fabrication Methods for Nanostructured Ferritic Alloys for Use in Advanced Fission Energy Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Odette, G Robert; Cunningham, Nicholas J., Wu, Yuan; Etienne, Auriane; Stergar, Erich; Yamamoto, Takuya

    2012-02-21

    The broad objective of this NEUP was to further develop a class of 12-15Cr ferritic alloys that are dispersion strengthened and made radiation tolerant by an ultrahigh density of Y-Ti-O nanofeatures (NFs) in the size range of less than 5 nm. We call these potentially transformable materials nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFAs). NFAs are typically processed by ball milling pre-alloyed rapidly solidified powders and yttria (Y2O3) powders. Proper milling effectively dissolves the Ti, Y and O solutes that precipitate as NFs during hot consolidation. The tasks in the present study included examining alternative processing paths, characterizing and optimizing the NFs and investigating solid state joining. Alternative processing paths involved rapid solidification by gas atomization of Fe, 14% Cr, 3% W, and 0.4% Ti powders that are also pre-alloyed with 0.2% Y (14YWT), where the compositions are in wt.%. The focus is on exploring the possibility of minimizing, or even eliminating, the milling time, as well as producing alloys with more homogeneous distributions of NFs and a more uniform, fine grain size. Three atomization environments were explored: Ar, Ar plus O (Ar/O) and He. The characterization of powders and alloys occurred through each processing step: powder production by gas atomization; powder milling; and powder annealing or hot consolidation by hot isostatic pressing (HIPing) or hot extrusion. The characterization studies of the materials described here include various combinations of: a) bulk chemistry; b) electron probe microanalysis (EPMA); c) atom probe tomography (APT); d) small angle neutron scattering (SANS); e) various types of scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM and TEM); and f) microhardness testing. The bulk chemistry measurements show that preliminary batches of gas-atomized powders could be produced within specified composition ranges. However, EPMA and TEM showed that the Y is heterogeneously distributed and phase separated, but

  3. Characterization of low alloy ferritic steel–Ni base alloy dissimilar metal weld interface by SPM techniques, SEM/EDS, TEM/EDS and SVET

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Siyan; Ding, Jie; Ming, Hongliang; Zhang, Zhiming; Wang, Jianqiu

    2015-02-15

    The interface region of welded A508–Alloy 52 M is characterized by scanning probe microscope (SPM) techniques, scanning electron microscopy (SEM)/energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM)/Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) and scanning vibrate electrode technique (SVET). The regions along the welded A508–Alloy 52 M interface can be categorized into two types according to their different microstructures. In the type-I interface region, A508 and Alloy 52 M are separated by the fusion boundary, while in the type-II interface region, A508 and Alloy 52 M are separated by a martensite zone. A508, martensite zone and grain boundaries in Alloy 52 M are ferromagnetic while the Alloy 52 M matrix is paramagnetic. The Volta potentials measured by scanning Kelvin probe force microscopy (SKPFM) of A508, martensite zone and Alloy 52 M follow the order: V{sub 52} {sub M} > V{sub A508} > V{sub martensite}. The corrosion behavior of A508–Alloy 52 M interface region is galvanic corrosion, in which Alloy 52 M is cathode while A508 is anode. The martensite dissolves faster than Alloy 52 M, but slower than A508 in the test solution. - Highlights: • The A508–Alloy 52 M interface regions can be categorized into two types. • The chromium depleted region is observed along the Alloy 52 M grain boundary. • The Alloy 52 M grain boundaries which are close to the interface are ferromagnetic. • Martensite zone has lower Volta potential but higher corrosion resistance than A508.

  4. Diffusion Bonding Beryllium to Reduced Activation Ferritic Martensitic Steel: Development of Processes and Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, Ryan Matthew

    Only a few materials are suitable to act as armor layers against the thermal and particle loads produced by magnetically confined fusion. These candidates include beryllium, tungsten, and carbon fiber composites. The armor layers must be joined to the plasma facing components with high strength bonds that can withstand the thermal stresses resulting from differential thermal expansion. While specific joints have been developed for use in ITER (an experimental reactor in France), including beryllium to CuCrZr as well as tungsten to stainless steel interfaces, joints specific to commercially relevant fusion reactors are not as well established. Commercial first wall components will likely be constructed front Reduced Activation Ferritic Martensitic (RAFM) steel, which will need to be coating with one of the three candidate materials. Of the candidates, beryllium is particularly difficult to bond, because it reacts during bonding with most elements to form brittle intermetallic compounds. This brittleness is unacceptable, as it can lead to interface crack propagation and delamination of the armor layer. I have attempted to overcome the brittle behavior of beryllium bonds by developing a diffusion bonding process of beryllium to RAFM steel that achieves a higher degree of ductility. This process utilized two bonding aids to achieve a robust bond: a. copper interlayer to add ductility to the joint, and a titanium interlayer to prevent beryllium from forming unwanted Be-Cu intermetallics. In addition, I conducted a series of numerical simulations to predict the effect of these bonding aids on the residual stress in the interface. Lastly, I fabricated and characterized beryllium to ferritic steel diffusion bonds using various bonding parameters and bonding aids. Through the above research, I developed a process to diffusion bond beryllium to ferritic steel with a 150 M Pa tensile strength and 168 M Pa shear strength. This strength was achieved using a Hot Isostatic

  5. Elevated temperature creep properties for selected active metal braze alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Stephens, J.J.

    1997-02-01

    Active metal braze alloys reduce the number of processes required for the joining of metal to ceramic components by eliminating the need for metallization and/or Ni plating of the ceramic surfaces. Titanium (Ti), V, and Zr are examples of active element additions which have been used successfully in such braze alloys. Since the braze alloy is expected to accommodate thermal expansion mismatch strains between the metal and ceramic materials, a knowledge of its elevated temperature mechanical properties is important. In particular, the issue of whether or not the creep strength of an active metal braze alloy is increased or decreased relative to its non-activated counterpart is important when designing new brazing processes and alloy systems. This paper presents a survey of high temperature mechanical properties for two pairs of conventional braze alloys and their active metal counterparts: (a) the conventional 72Ag-28Cu (Cusil) alloy, and the active braze alloy 62.2Ag- 36.2Cu-1.6Ti (Cusil ABA), and (b) the 82Au-18Ni (Nioro) alloy and the active braze alloy Mu-15.5M-0.75Mo-1.75V (Nioro ABA). For the case of the Cusil/Cusil ABA pair, the active metal addition contributes to solid solution strengthening of the braze alloy, resulting in a higher creep strength as compared to the non-active alloy. In the case of the Nioro/Nioro ABA pair, the Mo and V additions cause the active braze alloy to have a two-phase microstructure, which results in a reduced creep strength than the conventional braze alloy. The Garofalo sinh equation has been used to quantitatively describe the stress and temperature dependence of the deformation behavior. It will be observed that the effective stress exponent in the Garofalo sinh equation is a function of the instantaneous value of the stress argument.

  6. Manifestation of weak ferromagnetism and photocatalytic activity in bismuth ferrite nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Sakar, M.; Balakumar, S.; Saravanan, P.; Jaisankar, S. N.

    2013-02-05

    Bismuth ferrite (BFO) nanoparticles were synthesized by auto-ignition technique with and without adding ignition fuel such as citric acid. The presence of citric acid in the reaction mixture yielded highly-magnetic BFO/{gamma}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanocomposite. When this composite was annealed to 650 Degree-Sign C, a single phase BFO was formed with average crystallite size of 50 nm and showed weak ferromagnetic behavior. Conversely, the phase pure BFO prepared without adding citric acid exhibited antiferromagnetism because of its larger crystallite size of around 70 nm. The visible-light driven photocatalytic activity of both the pure BFO and BFO/{gamma}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanocomposite were examined by degrading methyl orange dye. The pure BFO showed a moderate photocatalytic activity; while BFO/{gamma}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanocomposite showed enhanced activity. This could be probably due to the optimal band gap ratio between BFO and {gamma}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} phases reduced the recombination of electron-hole pairs which aided in the enhancement of photocatalytic activity.

  7. Characterization of TiN, TiC and Ti(C,N) in titanium-alloyed ferritic chromium steels focusing on the significance of different particle morphologies

    SciTech Connect

    Michelic, S.K.; Loder, D.; Reip, T.; Ardehali Barani, A.; Bernhard, C.

    2015-02-15

    Titanium-alloyed ferritic chromium steels are a competitive option to classical austenitic stainless steels owing to their similar corrosion resistance. The addition of titanium significantly influences their final steel cleanliness. The present contribution focuses on the detailed metallographic characterization of titanium nitrides, titanium carbides and titanium carbonitrides with regard to their size, morphology and composition. The methods used are manual and automated Scanning Electron Microscopy with Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy as well as optical microscopy. Additional thermodynamic calculations are performed to explain the precipitation procedure of the analyzed titanium nitrides. The analyses showed that homogeneous nucleation is decisive at an early process stage after the addition of titanium. Heterogeneous nucleation gets crucial with ongoing process time and essentially influences the final inclusion size of titanium nitrides. A detailed investigation of the nuclei for heterogeneous nucleation with automated Scanning Electron Microscopy proved to be difficult due to their small size. Manual Scanning Electron Microscopy and optical microscopy have to be applied. Furthermore, it was found that during solidification an additional layer around an existing titanium nitride can be formed which changes the final inclusion morphology significantly. These layers are also characterized in detail. Based on these different inclusion morphologies, in combination with thermodynamic results, tendencies regarding the formation and modification time of titanium containing inclusions in ferritic chromium steels are derived. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • The formation and modification of TiN in the steel 1.4520 was examined. • Heterogeneous nucleation essentially influences the final steel cleanliness. • In most cases heterogeneous nuclei in TiN inclusions are magnesium based. • Particle morphology provides important information

  8. Studies on A-TIG welding of Low Activation Ferritic/Martensitic (LAFM) steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasantharaja, P.; Vasudevan, M.

    2012-02-01

    Low Activation Ferritic-Martensitic steels (LAFM) are chosen as the candidate material for structural components in fusion reactors. The structural components are generally fabricated by welding processes. Activated Tungsten Inert Gas (A-TIG) welding is an emerging process for welding of thicker components. In the present work, attempt was made to develop A-TIG welding technology for LAFM steel plates of 10 mm thick. Activated flux was developed for LAFM steel by carrying out various bead-on-plate TIG welds without flux and with flux. The optimum flux was identified as one which gave maximum depth of penetration at minimum heat input values. With the optimized flux composition, LAFM steel plate of 10 mm thickness was welded in square butt weld joint configuration using double side welding technique. Optical and Scanning Electron Microscopy was used for characterizing the microstructures. Microhardness measurements were made across the weld cross section for as welded and post weld heat treated samples. Tensile and impact toughness properties were determined. The mechanical properties values obtained in A-TIG weld joint were comparable to that obtained in weld joints of LAFM steel made by Electron beam welding process.

  9. Long term high temperature oxidation characteristics of La and Cu alloyed ferritic stainless steels for solid oxide fuel cell interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swaminathan, Srinivasan; Lee, Young-Su; Kim, Dong-Ik

    2016-09-01

    To ensure the best performance of solid oxide fuel cell metallic interconnects, the Fe-22 wt.% Cr ferritic stainless steels with various La contents (0.006-0.6 wt.%) and Cu addition (1.57 wt.%), are developed. Long-term isothermal oxidation behavior of these steels is investigated in air at 800 °C, for 2700 h. Chemistry, morphology, and microstructure of the thermally grown oxide scale are examined using XPS, SEM-EDX, and XRD techniques. Broadly, all the steels show a double layer consisting of an inner Cr2O3 and outer (Mn, Cr)3O4. Distinctly, in the La-added steels, binary oxides of Cr, Mn and Ti are found at the oxide scale surface together with (Mn, Cr)3O4. Furthermore, all La-varied steels possess the metallic Fe protrusions along with discontinuous (Mn, Cr)3O4 spinel zones at the oxide scale/metal interface and isolated precipitates of Ti-oxides in the underlying matrix. Increase of La content to 0.6 wt.% is detrimental to the oxidation resistance. For the Cu-added steel, Cu is found to segregate strongly at the oxide scale/metal interface which inhibits the ingress of oxygen thereby suppressing the subscale formation of (Mn, Cr)3O4. Thus, Cu addition to the Fe-22Cr ferritic stainless steels benefits the oxidation resistance.

  10. Deformation mechanisms in a precipitation-strengthened ferritic super alloy revealed by in situ neutron dffraction studies at elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Shenyan; Gao, Yanfei; An, Ke; Zheng, Lili; Teng, Zhenke; Wu, Wei; Liaw, Peter K.

    2015-01-01

    The ferritic superalloy Fe–10Ni–6.5Al–10Cr–3.4Mo strengthened by ordered (Ni,Fe)AlB2-type precipitates is a candidate material for ultra-supercritical steam turbine applications above 923 K. Despite earlier success in improving its room-temperature ductility, the creep resistance of this material at high temperatures needs to be further improved, which requires a fundamental understanding of the high-temperature deformation mechanisms at the scales of individual phases and grains. In situ neutron diffraction has been utilized to investigate the lattice strain evolution and the microscopic load-sharing mechanisms during tensile deformation of this ferritic superalloy at elevated temperatures. Finite-element simulations based on the crystal plasticity theory are employed and compared with the experimental results, both qualitatively and quantitatively. Based on these interphase and intergranular load-partitioning studies, it is found that the deformation mechanisms change from dislocation slip to those related to dislocation climb, diffusional flow and possibly grain boundary sliding, below and above 873 K, respectively. Insights into microstructural design for enhancing creep resistance are also discussed.

  11. Analysis of the broadband chaotic spin-wave excitations in an active ring oscillator based on a metalized ferrite film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondrashov, A. V.; Ustinov, A. B.; Kalinikos, B. A.; Demokritov, S. O.

    2016-11-01

    This paper reports the first experimental study of broadband chaotic nonlinear spin- wave excitations which is formed through development of four-wave parametric processes in active ring oscillator based on metallized ferrite film. We find that an increase in the oscillation power leads to Hopf bifurcations sequence. Monochromatic, periodic quasi-periodic and chaotic excitations are observed. Spectra of the chaotic excitations consist of series of chaotic bands separated well in frequency. Parameters of the chaotic attractors are discussed.

  12. Magnetic properties and adsorptive performance of manganese–zinc ferrites/activated carbon nanocomposites

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, B.B.; Xu, J.C.; Xin, P.H.; Han, Y.B.; Hong, B.; Jin, H.X.; Jin, D.F.; Peng, X.L.; Li, J.; Gong, J.; Ge, H.L.; Zhu, Z.W.; Wang, X.Q.

    2015-01-15

    Owing to the unique microstructure and high specific surface area, activated carbon (AC) could act as an excellent adsorbent for wastewater treatment and good carrier for functional materials. In this paper, manganese–zinc ferrites (Mn{sub 0.5}Zn{sub 0.5}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4}: MZF) were anchored into AC by hydrothermal method, resulting in the excellent magnetic response for AC nanocomposites in wastewater treatment. All results demonstrated the magnetic nanoparticles presented a spinel phase structure and existed in the pores of AC. The saturation magnetization (Ms) of MZF/AC nanocomposites increased with the ferrites content, while the pore volume and specific surface area declined. The Sample-5 possessed the specific surface area of 1129 m{sup 2} g{sup −1} (close to 1243 m{sup 2} g{sup −1} of AC) and Ms of 3.96 emu g{sup −1}. Furthermore, the adsorptive performance for organic dyes was studied and 99% methylene blue was adsorbed in 30 min. The magnetic AC nanocomposites could be separated easily from solution by magnetic separation technique. - Graphical abstract: The Sample-5 presented both good magnetic response and high BET surface area up to 1129 m{sup 2} g{sup −1} (close to AC of 1243 m{sup 2} g{sup −1}), which could be separated completely for about 60 s. MZF/AC nanocomposites (Sample-3, 4, 5) in our work could be used as the magnetic absorbents, which could be separated easily by an outer magnet after the MB adsorption. - Highlights: • Mn{sub 0.5}Zn{sub 0.5}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} (MZF) as few as possible was implanted into activated carbon (AC) for the higher surface area. • Sample-5 possessed the high specific surface area (1129 m{sup 2} g{sup −1}) and the suitable Ms (3.96 emu g{sup −1}). • Methylene blue was adsorbed almost completely by MZF/AC nanocomposites in 30 min. • MZF/AC nanocomposites were separated easily from solution by magnetic separation technique.

  13. Status of ATR-A1 irradiation experiment on vanadium alloys and low-activation steels

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, H.; Strain, R.V.; Gomes, I.; Smith, D.L.; Matsui, H.

    1996-10-01

    The ATR-A1 irradiation experiment was a collaborative U.S./Japan effort to study at low temperature the effects of neutron damage on vanadium alloys. The experiment also contained a limited quantity of low-activation ferritic steel specimens from Japan as part of the collaboration agreement. The irradiation started in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) on November 30, 1995, and ended as planned on May 5, 1996. Total exposure was 132.9 effective full power days (EFPDs) and estimated neutron damage in the vanadium was 4.7 dpa. The vehicle has been discharged from the ATR core and is scheduled to be disassembled in the next reporting period.

  14. Effect of silicon on the microstructure and mechanical properties of reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shenghu; Rong, Lijian

    2015-04-01

    The effect of Si in the range of 0.05-0.77 wt.% on the microstructure, tensile properties and impact toughness of reduced activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steels has been investigated. An increase in Si content affected the prior austenite grain size resulting in an increase in the tensile strength at room temperature. The tensile strength of steels tested above 773 K did not change significantly with the addition of Si, which was due to the diminished carbide hardening effect and boundary strengthening effect. Detailed fractographic analysis revealed that tear fractures occurred in the samples tensile tested at room temperature, while cup and cone fractures were found in samples tensile tested at temperatures above 773 K, which were induced by the easing of dislocation pile-ups. The ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) decreased when the Si content increased to 0.22 wt.%. However, the DBTT increased when the Si content reached 0.77 wt.% and this was due to the precipitation of Laves phase. The RAFM steel with approximately 0.22 wt.% Si content was found to possess an optimized combination of microstructure, tensile properties and impact toughness.

  15. Microstructure property analysis of HFIR-irradiated reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanigawa, H.; Hashimoto, N.; Sakasegawa, H.; Klueh, R. L.; Sokolov, M. A.; Shiba, K.; Jitsukawa, S.; Kohyama, A.

    2004-08-01

    The effects of irradiation on the Charpy impact properties of reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steels were investigated on a microstructural basis. It was previously reported that the ductile-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) of F82H-IEA and its heat treatment variant increased by about 130 K after irradiation at 573 K up to 5 dpa. Moreover, the shifts in ORNL9Cr-2WVTa and JLF-1 steels were much smaller, and the differences could not be interpreted as an effect of irradiation hardening. The precipitation behavior of the irradiated steels was examined by weight analysis and X-ray diffraction analysis on extraction residues, and SEM/EDS analysis was performed on extraction replica samples and fracture surfaces. These analyses suggested that the difference in the extent of DBTT shift could be explained by (1) smaller irradiation hardening at low test temperatures caused by irradiation-induced lath structure recovery (in JLF-1), and (2) the fracture stress increase caused by the irradiation-induced over-solution of Ta (in ORNL9Cr-2WVTa).

  16. Effects of neutron irradiation on microstructural evolution in candidate low activation ferritic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohno, Yutaka; Kohyama, Akira; Yoshino, Masahiko; Asakura, Kentaro

    1994-09-01

    Fe-(2.25-12)Cr-2W-V, Ta low activation ferritic steels (JLF series steels) were developed in the fusion materials development program of Japanese universities. Microstructural observations, including precipitation response, were performed after neutron irradiation in the FFTF/MOTA. The preirradiation microstructure was stable after irradiation at low temperature (< 683 K). Recovery of martensitic lath structure and coarsening of precipitates took place above 733 K. Precipitates observed after irradiation were the same as those in unirradiated materials in 7-9Cr steels, and no irradiation induced phase was identified. The irradiation induced shift in DBTT in the 9Cr-2W steel proved to be very small which is a reflection of stable precipitation response in these steels. A high density of fine α' precipitates was observed in the 12Cr steel which might be responsible for the large irradiation hardening found in the 12Cr steel. Void formation was observed in 7-9Cr steels irradiated at 683 K, but the amount of void swelling was very small.

  17. Void swelling in high dose ion-irradiated reduced activation ferritic-martensitic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xu; Monterrosa, Anthony M.; Zhang, Feifei; Huang, Hao; Yan, Qingzhi; Jiao, Zhijie; Was, Gary S.; Wang, Lumin

    2015-07-01

    To determine the void swelling resistance of reduced-activation ferritic-martensitic steels CNS I and CNS II at high doses, ion irradiation was performed up to 188 dpa (4.6 × 1017 ion/cm2) at 460 °C using 5 MeV Fe++ ions. Helium was pre-implanted at levels of 10 and 100 appm at room temperature to investigate the role of helium on void swelling. Commercial FM steel T91 was also irradiated in this condition and the swelling results are of included in this paper as a reference. Voids were observed in all conditions. The 9Cr CNS I samples implanted with 10 appm helium exhibited lower swelling than 9Cr T91 irradiated at the same condition. The 12Cr CNS II with 10 and 100 appm helium showed significantly lower swelling than CNS I and T91. The swelling rate for CNS I and CNS II were determined to be 0.02%/dpa and 0.003%/dpa respectively. Increasing the helium content from 10 to 100 appm shortened the incubation region and increased the void density but had no effect on the swelling rates.

  18. Calcium alloy as active material in secondary electrochemical cell

    DOEpatents

    Roche, Michael F.; Preto, Sandra K.; Martin, Allan E.

    1976-01-01

    Calcium alloys such as calcium-aluminum and calcium-silicon, are employed as active material within a rechargeable negative electrode of an electrochemical cell. Such cells can use a molten salt electrolyte including calcium ions and a positive electrode having sulfur, sulfides, or oxides as active material. The calcium alloy is selected to prevent formation of molten calcium alloys resulting from reaction with the selected molten electrolytic salt at the cell operating temperatures.

  19. First principles assessment of helium trapping in Y{sub 2}TiO{sub 5} in nano-featured ferritic alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Yanan; Jiang, Yong E-mail: odette@engineering.ucsb.edu; Yang, Litong; Lan, Guoqiang; Robert Odette, G. E-mail: odette@engineering.ucsb.edu; Yamamoto, Takuya; Shang, Jiacheng; Dang, Ying

    2014-10-14

    Nano-scale Y{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7} and Y{sub 2}TiO{sub 5} oxides are the major features that provide high strength and irradiation tolerance in nano-structured ferritic alloys. Here, we employ density functional theory to study helium trapping in Y{sub 2}TiO{sub 5}. The results suggest that helium is more deeply trapped in Y{sub 2}TiO{sub 5} compared to Y{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7}. Helium occupies open channels in Y{sub 2}TiO{sub 5}, where it weakly chemically interacts with neighboring oxygen anions, and results in less volume expansion compared to Y{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7}, reducing strains in the iron matrix. The corresponding helium mobility in these channels is very high. While its ultimate fate is to form oxide/matrix interface bubbles, transient deep trapping of helium in oxides plays a major role in the ability of NFA to manage helium distribution.

  20. Effect of aluminizing of Cr-containing ferritic alloys on the seal strength of a novel high-temperature solid oxide fuel cell sealing glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Yeong-Shyung; Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Singh, Prabhakar

    A novel high-temperature alkaline earth silicate sealing glass was developed for solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) applications. The glass was used to join two metallic coupons of Cr-containing ferritic stainless steel for seal strength evaluation. In previous work, SrCrO 4 was found to form along the glass/steel interface, which led to severe strength degradation. In the present study, aluminization of the steel surface was investigated as a remedy to minimize or prevent the strontium chromate formation. Three different processes for aluminization were evaluated with Crofer22APU stainless steel: pack cementation, vapor-phase deposition, and aerosol spraying. It was found that pack cementation resulted in a rough surface with occasional cracks in the Al-diffused region. Vapor-phase deposition yielded a smoother surface, but the resulting high Al content increased the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE), resulting in the failure of joined coupons. Aerosol spraying of an Al-containing salt resulted in the formation of a thin aluminum oxide layer without any surface damage. The room temperature seal strength was evaluated in the as-fired state and in environmentally aged conditions. In contrast to earlier results with uncoated Crofer22APU, the aluminized samples showed no strength degradation even for samples aged in air. Interfacial and chemical compatibility was also investigated. The results showed aluminization to be a viable candidate approach to minimize undesirable chromate formation between alkaline earth silicate sealing glass and Cr-containing interconnect alloys for SOFC applications.

  1. TEM characterization of 14YWT and 12YWT ODS ferritic alloys neutron irradiated at 500C using in-situ helium injection

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, Hee Joon; Edwards, Danny J.; Kurtz, Richard J.; Odette, G Robert; Wu, Yuan; Yamamoto, Takuya

    2015-03-31

    This report summaries TEM characterization of 14YWT and 12YWT, ODS ferritic alloys with 14 and 12 wt % of Cr respectively, to compare the effect of neutron irradiation with and without concurrent He injection using ISHI. The density and average size of <100>/{100} type dislocation loops are always larger than those of 1/2<111>/{111} type, but this difference is significantly affected by He implantation. The density of dislocation loops of both types ranges from ~1 to 4x1021 m-3 with average size ranging from 5~20 nm. 14YWT has lower density but larger size dislocation loops than 12YWT, while the line dislocation density of 14YWT is 3 times lower than that of 12YWT. Helium bubble densities of both 14YWT and 12YWT are 1.9x1023 m-3, the average He bubbles size of 14YWT and 12YWT are 1.4 and 1.2 nm, respectively. 14YWT exhibits α-α’ phase separation, Y-rich particles and uniformly distributed W. In addition to those features, 12YWT exhibits Y-Ti-O particles (not Y-O rich) and elongated Cr-rich phases.

  2. Effect of aluminizing of Cr-containing ferritic alloys on the seal strength of a novel high-temperature solid oxide fuel cell sealing glass

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, Y. S.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Singh, Prabhakar

    2008-12-01

    A novel high-temperature alkaline-earth silicate sealing glass was developed for solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) applications. The glass was used to join two metallic coupons of Cr-containing ferritic stainless steel for seal strength evaluation. In previous work, SrCrO4 was found to form along the glass/steel interface, which led to severe strength degradation. In the present study, aluminization of the steel surface was investigated as a remedy to minimize or prevent the strontium chromate formation. Three different processes for aluminization were evaluated with Crofer22APU stainless steel: pack cementation, vapor phase deposition, and aerosol spraying. It was found that pack cementation resulted in a rough surface with occasional cracks in the Al-diffused region. Vapor phase deposition yielded a smoother surface, but the resulting high Al content increased the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE), resulting in failure of joined coupons. Aerosol spraying of an Al-containing salt resulted in formation of a thin aluminum oxide layer without any surface damage. The room temperature seal strength was evaluated in the as-fired state and in environmentally aged conditions. In contrast to earlier results with uncoated Crofer22APU, the aluminized samples showed no strength degradation even for samples aged in air. Interfacial and chemical compatibility was also investigated. The results showed aluminization to be a viable candidate approach to minimize undesirable chromate formation between alkaline earth silicate sealing glass and Cr-containing interconnect alloys for SOFC applications.

  3. Effect of heat treatment and irradiation temperature on impact behavior of irradiated reduced-activation ferritic steels

    SciTech Connect

    Klueh, R.L.; Alexander, D.J.

    1998-03-01

    Charpy tests were conducted on eight normalized-and-tempered reduced-activation ferritic steels irradiated in two different normalized conditions. Irradiation was conducted in the Fast Flux Test Facility at 393 C to {approx}14 dpa on steels with 2.25, 5, 9, and 12% Cr (0.1% C) with varying amounts of W, V, and Ta. The different normalization treatments involved changing the cooling rate after austenitization. The faster cooling rate produced 100% bainite in the 2.25 Cr steels, compared to duplex structures of bainite and polygonal ferrite for the slower cooling rate. For both cooling rates, martensite formed in the 5 and 9% Cr steels, and martensite with {approx}25% {delta}-ferrite formed in the 12% Cr steel. Irradiation caused an increase in the ductile-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) and a decrease in the upper-shelf energy. The difference in microstructure in the low-chromium steels due to the different heat treatments had little effect on properties. For the high-chromium martensitic steels, only the 5 Cr steel was affected by heat treatment. When the results at 393 C were compared with previous results at 365 C, all but a 5 Cr and a 9 Cr steel showed the expected decrease in the shift in DBTT with increasing temperature.

  4. MICROSTRUCTURAL EXAMINATION OF LOW ACTIVATION FERRITIC STEELS FOLLOWING IRRADIATION IN ORR

    SciTech Connect

    Gelles, David S.

    2002-09-01

    Microstructural examinations are reported for a series of low activation steels containing Mn following irradiation in the Oak Ridge Reactor at 330 and 400 degrees C to approximately 10 dpa. Alloy compositions included 2Cr, 9Cr and 12Cr steels with V to 1.5 percent and W to 1.0 percent. Results include compositional changes in precipitates and microstructural changes as a function of composition and irradiation temperature. It is concluded that temperatures in ORR are on the order of 50 degrees C higher than anticipated.

  5. Harnessing microbial subsurface metal reduction activities to synthesise nanoscale cobalt ferrite with enhanced magnetic properties

    SciTech Connect

    Coker, Victoria S.; Telling, Neil D.; van der Laan, Gerrit; Pattrick, Richard A.D.; Pearce, Carolyn I.; Arenholz, Elke; Tuna, Floriana; Winpenny, Richard E.P.; Lloyd, Jonathan R.

    2009-03-24

    Nanoscale ferrimagnetic particles have a diverse range of uses from directed cancer therapy and drug delivery systems to magnetic recording media and transducers. Such applications require the production of monodisperse nanoparticles with well-controlled size, composition, and magnetic properties. To fabricate these materials purely using synthetic methods is costly in both environmental and economical terms. However, metal-reducing microorganisms offer an untapped resource to produce these materials. Here, the Fe(III)-reducing bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens is used to synthesize magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles. A combination of electron microscopy, soft X-ray spectroscopy, and magnetometry techniques was employed to show that this method of biosynthesis results in high yields of crystalline nanoparticles with a narrow size distribution and magnetic properties equal to the best chemically synthesized materials. In particular, it is demonstrated here that cobalt ferrite (CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) nanoparticles with low temperature coercivity approaching 8 kOe and an effective anisotropy constant of {approx} 10{sup 6} erg cm{sup -3} can be manufactured through this biotechnological route. The dramatic enhancement in the magnetic properties of the nanoparticles by the introduction of high quantities of Co into the spinel structure represents a significant advance over previous biomineralization studies in this area using magnetotactic bacteria. The successful production of nanoparticulate ferrites achieved in this study at high yields could open up the way for the scaled-up industrial manufacture of nanoparticles using environmentally benign methodologies. Production of ferromagnetic nanoparticles for pioneering cancer therapy, drug delivery, chemical sensors, catalytic activity, photoconductive materials, as well as more traditional uses in data storage embodies a large area of inorganic synthesis research. In particular, the addition of transition metals other than

  6. Fractographic examination of reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel charpy specimens irradiated to 30 dpa at 370{degrees}C

    SciTech Connect

    Gelles, D.S.; Hamilton, M.L.; Schubert, L.E.

    1996-10-01

    Fractographic examinations are reported for a series of reduced activation ferritic/Martensitic steel Charpy impact specimens tested following irradiation to 30 dpa at 370{degrees}C in FFTF. One-third size specimens of six low activation steels developed for potential application as structural materials in fusion reactors were examined. A shift in brittle fracture appearance from cleavage to grain boundary failure was noted with increasing manganese content. The results are interpreted in light of transmutation induced composition changes in a fusion environment.

  7. Residual ferrite formation in 12CrODS steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ukai, S.; Kudo, Y.; Wu, X.; Oono, N.; Hayashi, S.; Ohtsuka, S.; Kaito, T.

    2014-12-01

    Increasing Cr content from 9 to 12 mass% leads to superior corrosion and high-temperature oxidation resistances, and usually changes microstructure from martensite to a ferrite. To make transformable martensitic type of 12CrODS steels that have superior processing capability by using α/γ phase transformation, alloy design was conducted through varying nickel content. The structure of 12CrODS steels was successfully modified from full ferrite to a transformable martensite-base matrix containing ferrite. This ferrite consists of both equilibrium ferrite and a metastable residual ferrite. It was shown that the fraction of the equilibrium ferrite is predictable by computed phase diagram and formation of the residual ferrite was successfully evaluated through pinning of α/γ interfacial boundaries by oxide particles.

  8. Assessment of Tungsten Content on Tertiary Creep Deformation Behavior of Reduced Activation Ferritic-Martensitic Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanaja, J.; Laha, Kinkar

    2015-10-01

    Tertiary creep deformation behavior of reduced activation ferritic-martensitic (RAFM) steels having different tungsten contents has been assessed. Creep tests were carried out at 823 K (550 °C) over a stress range of 180 to 260 MPa on three heats of the RAFM steel (9Cr-W-0.06Ta-0.22V) with tungsten content of 1, 1.4, and 2.0 wt pct. With creep exposure, the steels exhibited minimum in creep rate followed by progressive increase in creep rate until fracture. The minimum creep rate decreased, rupture life increased, and the onset of tertiary stage of creep deformation delayed with the increase in tungsten content. The tertiary creep behavior has been assessed based on the relationship, , considering minimum creep rate () instead of steady-state creep rate. The increase in tungsten content was found to decrease the rate of acceleration of tertiary parameter ` p.' The relationships between (1) tertiary parameter `p' with minimum creep rate and time spent in tertiary creep deformation and (2) the final creep rate with minimum creep rate revealed that the same first-order reaction rate theory prevailed in the minimum creep rate as well as throughout the tertiary creep deformation behavior of the steel. A master tertiary creep curve of the steels has been developed. Scanning electron microscopic investigation revealed enhanced coarsening resistance of carbides in the steel on creep exposure with increase in tungsten content. The decrease in tertiary parameter ` p' with tungsten content with the consequent decrease in minimum creep rate and increase in rupture life has been attributed to the enhanced microstructural stability of the steel.

  9. Microstructural origin of the skeletal ferrite morphology of austenitic stainless steel welds

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, J A; Williams, J C; Thompson, A W

    1982-04-01

    Scanning transmission electron microscopy was conducted on welds exhibiting a variety of skeletal, or vermicular ferrite morphologies in addition to one lathy ferrite morphology. These ferrite morphologies result from primary ferrite solidification followed by a solid state transformation upon cooling. During cooling, a large fraction of the ferrite transforms to austenite leaving a variety of ferrite morphologies. Comparison of composition profiles and alloy partitioning showed both the skeletal and lathy ferrite structures result from a diffusion controlled solid state transformation. However, the overall measured composition profiles of the weld structure are a result of partitioning during both solidification and the subsequent solid state transformation.

  10. Study of the Structure, Composition, and Stability of Yttrium-Ti-Oxygen nm-Scale Features in Nano-Structured Ferritic Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunningham, Nicholas John

    This work advances the understanding of the Y-Ti-O nanofeatures (NFs) in nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFAs); a class of high temperature, oxide dispersion strengthened iron alloys with applications in both advanced fission and fusion reactors. NFAs exhibit high creep strength up to 800ºC and a remarkable radiation damage tolerance and He management. However, the NFs, which are responsible for these properties, are not fully understood. This work addresses key questions including: a) what is the NF structure and composition and how are they affected by alloy composition and processing; b) what is the NFA long-term thermal stability; c) and what alternative processing paths are available to reduce costs and produce more uniform NF distributions? A detailed study using small angle neutron scattering (SANS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM-group member Y. Wu), and atom probe tomography (APT) evaluated the NF average size (), number density (N), volume fraction (f), composition, and structure in two heats of the commercial NFA MA957. The and N were ≈2.6 nm and ≈5x1023 m-3 , respectively, for both heats, with TEM indicating the NF are Y 2Ti2O7. However, SANS indicates a mixture of NF compositions or atomic densities with a difference between the heats, while APT shows compositions with ≈ 10% Cr and a Y/Ti ratio < 1. However, microscope artifacts such as preferential undercounting of Y and O or trajectory aberrations that prevent resolving Ti segregation to the NF-matrix interface could account for the discrepancy. The microstructure and NFs in MA957 were stable for long times at temperatures up to 900ºC. Notably, Ti in the matrix and some from the NFs migrates to large, Ti-rich phases. Aging at higher temperatures up to 1000ºC for 19.5 kh produced modest coarsening for ≈ 3.8 nm and ≈30% increase in grain size for a corresponding 13% reduction in microhardness. A coarsening model shows no significant NF coarsening will occur at temperatures less than

  11. Ferrite logic reliability study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baer, J. A.; Clark, C. B.

    1973-01-01

    Development and use of digital circuits called all-magnetic logic are reported. In these circuits the magnetic elements and their windings comprise the active circuit devices in the logic portion of a system. The ferrite logic device belongs to the all-magnetic class of logic circuits. The FLO device is novel in that it makes use of a dual or bimaterial ferrite composition in one physical ceramic body. This bimaterial feature, coupled with its potential for relatively high speed operation, makes it attractive for high reliability applications. (Maximum speed of operation approximately 50 kHz.)

  12. Microstructural characterization of weld joints of 9Cr reduced activation ferritic martensitic steel fabricated by different joining methods

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas Paul, V.; Saroja, S.; Albert, S.K.; Jayakumar, T.; Rajendra Kumar, E.

    2014-10-15

    This paper presents a detailed electron microscopy study on the microstructure of various regions of weldment fabricated by three welding methods namely tungsten inert gas welding, electron beam welding and laser beam welding in an indigenously developed 9Cr reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel. Electron back scatter diffraction studies showed a random micro-texture in all the three welds. Microstructural changes during thermal exposures were studied and corroborated with hardness and optimized conditions for the post weld heat treatment have been identified for this steel. Hollomon–Jaffe parameter has been used to estimate the extent of tempering. The activation energy for the tempering process has been evaluated and found to be corresponding to interstitial diffusion of carbon in ferrite matrix. The type and microchemistry of secondary phases in different regions of the weldment have been identified by analytical transmission electron microscopy. - Highlights: • Comparison of microstructural parameters in TIG, electron beam and laser welds of RAFM steel • EBSD studies to illustrate the absence of preferred orientation and identification of prior austenite grain size using phase identification map • Optimization of PWHT conditions for indigenous RAFM steel • Study of kinetics of tempering and estimation of apparent activation energy of the process.

  13. Articles comprising ferritic stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Rakowski, James M.

    2016-06-28

    An article of manufacture comprises a ferritic stainless steel that includes a near-surface region depleted of silicon relative to a remainder of the ferritic stainless steel. The article has a reduced tendency to form an electrically resistive silica layer including silicon derived from the steel when the article is subjected to high temperature oxidizing conditions. The ferritic stainless steel is selected from the group comprising AISI Type 430 stainless steel, AISI Type 439 stainless steel, AISI Type 441 stainless steel, AISI Type 444 stainless steel, and E-BRITE.RTM. alloy, also known as UNS 44627 stainless steel. In certain embodiments, the article of manufacture is a fuel cell interconnect for a solid oxide fuel cell.

  14. Hafnium-silicon precipitate structure determination in a new heat-resistant ferritic alloy by precession electron diffraction techniques.

    PubMed

    Viladot, Désirée; Portillo, Joaquim; Gemí, Mauro; Nicolopoulos, Stavros; Llorca-Isern, Núria

    2014-02-01

    The structure determination of an HfSi4 precipitate has been carried out by a combination of two precession electron diffraction techniques: high precession angle, 2.2°, single pattern collection at eight different zone axes and low precession angle, 0.5°, serial collection of patterns obtained by increasing tilts of 1°. A three-dimensional reconstruction of the associated reciprocal space shows an orthorhombic unit cell with parameters a = 11.4 Å, b = 11.8 Å, c = 14.6 Å, and an extinction condition of (hkl) h + k odd. The merged intensities from the high angle precession patterns have been symmetry tested for possible space groups (SG) fulfilling this condition and a best symmetrization residual found at 18% for SG 65 Cmmm. Use of the SIR2011 direct methods program allowed solving the structure with a structure residual of 18%. The precipitate objects of this study were reproducibly found in a newly implemented alloy, designed according to molecular orbital theory.

  15. HEAT INPUT AND POST WELD HEAT TREATMENT EFFECTS ON REDUCED-ACTIVATION FERRITIC/MARTENSITIC STEEL FRICTION STIR WELDS

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Wei; Chen, Gaoqiang; Chen, Jian; Yu, Xinghua; Frederick, David Alan; Feng, Zhili

    2015-01-01

    Reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steels are an important class of structural materials for fusion reactor internals developed in recent years because of their improved irradiation resistance. However, they can suffer from welding induced property degradations. In this paper, a solid phase joining technology friction stir welding (FSW) was adopted to join a RAFM steel Eurofer 97 and different FSW parameters/heat input were chosen to produce welds. FSW response parameters, joint microstructures and microhardness were investigated to reveal relationships among welding heat input, weld structure characterization and mechanical properties. In general, FSW heat input results in high hardness inside the stir zone mostly due to a martensitic transformation. It is possible to produce friction stir welds similar to but not with exactly the same base metal hardness when using low power input because of other hardening mechanisms. Further, post weld heat treatment (PWHT) is a very effective way to reduce FSW stir zone hardness values.

  16. Irradiation effects on precipitation and its impact on the mechanical properties of reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanigawa, H.; Sakasegawa, H.; Hashimoto, N.; Klueh, R. L.; Ando, M.; Sokolov, M. A.

    2007-08-01

    It was previously reported that reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steels (RAFs) showed a variety of changes in ductile-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) and yield stress after irradiation at 573 K up to 5 dpa. The precipitation behavior of the irradiated steels was examined and the presence of irradiation induced precipitation which works as if it was forced to reach the thermal equilibrium state at irradiation temperature 573 K. In this study, transmission electron microscopy was performed on extraction replica specimens to analyze the size distribution of precipitates. It turned out that the hardening level multiplied by the square root of the average block size showed a linear dependence on the extracted precipitate weight. This dependence suggests that the difference in irradiation hardening between RAFs was caused by different precipitation behavior on block, packet and prior austenitic grain boundaries during irradiation. The simple Hall-Petch law could be applicable for interpreting this dependence.

  17. Charpy Impact Properties of Reduced-Activation Ferritic/Martensitic Steels Irradiated in HFIR up to 20 dpa

    SciTech Connect

    Tanigawa, H.; Shiba, K.; Sokolov, M.A.; Klueh, R.L.

    2003-07-15

    The effects of irradiation up to 20 dpa on the Charpy impact properties of reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steels (RAFs) were investigated. The ductile-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) of F82H-IEA shifted up to around 323K. TIG weldments of F82H showed a fairly small variation on their impact properties. A finer prior austenite grain size in F82H-IEA after a different heat treatment resulted in a 20K lower DBTT compared to F82H-IEA after the standard heat treatment, and that effect was maintained even after irradiation. Helium effects were investigated utilizing Ni-doped F82H, but no obvious evidence of helium effects was obtained. ORNL9Cr-2WVTa and JLF-1 steels showed smaller DBTT shifts compared to F82H-IEA.

  18. Determining the shear fracture properties of HIP joints of reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steel by a torsion test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nozawa, Takashi; Noh, Sanghoon; Tanigawa, Hiroyasu

    2012-08-01

    Hot isostatic pressing (HIP) is a key technology used to fabricate a first wall with cooling channels for the fusion blanket system utilizing a reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steel. To qualify the HIPped components, small specimen test techniques are beneficial not only to evaluate the thin-wall cooling channels containing the HIP joint but also to use in neutron irradiation studies. This study aims to develop the torsion test method with special emphasis on providing a reasonable and comprehensive method to determine interfacial shear properties of HIP joints during the torsional fracture process. Torsion test results identified that the torsion process shows yield of the base metal followed by non-elastic deformation due to work hardening of the base metal. By considering this work hardening issue, we propose a reasonable and realistic solution to determine the torsional yield shear stress and the ultimate torsional shear strength of the HIPped interface. Finally, a representative torsion fracture process was identified.

  19. Dependence of the nitriding rate of ferritic and austenitic substrates on the crystallographic orientation of surface grains; gaseous nitriding of Fe-Cr and Ni-Ti alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhlaghi, M.; Jung, M.; Meka, S. R.; Fonović, M.; Leineweber, A.; Mittemeijer, E. J.

    2015-12-01

    Gaseous nitriding of ferritic Fe-Cr and austenitic Ni-Ti solid solutions reveals that the extent of the uptake of dissolved nitrogen depends on the crystallographic orientation of the surface grains of the substrate. In both ferritic and austenitic substrates, the surface nitrogen concentration and the nitriding depth decrease upon increasing the smallest angle between the surface normal and the normal of a {1 0 0} plane of the surface grain considered. This phenomenon could be ascribed to the residual compressive macrostress developed during nitriding which varies as a function of crystallographic orientation of the (surface) grains due to the elastically anisotropic nature of ferrite and austenite solid solutions investigated in this study.

  20. Delta ferrite-containing austenitic stainless steel resistant to the formation of undesirable phases upon aging

    DOEpatents

    Leitnaker, J.M.

    Austenitic stainless steel alloys containing delta ferrite, such as are used as weld deposits, are protected against the transformation of delta ferrite to sigma phase during aging by the presence of carbon plus nitrogen in a weight percent 0.015 to 0.030 times the volume percent ferrite present in the alloy. The formation of chi phase upon aging is controlled by controlling the Mo content.

  1. Delta ferrite-containing austenitic stainless steel resistant to the formation of undesirable phases upon aging

    DOEpatents

    Leitnaker, James M.

    1981-01-01

    Austenitic stainless steel alloys containing delta ferrite, such as are used as weld deposits, are protected against the transformation of delta ferrite to sigma phase during aging by the presence of carbon plus nitrogen in a weight percent 0.015-0.030 times the volume percent ferrite present in the alloy. The formation of chi phase upon aging is controlled by controlling the Mo content.

  2. Correlating size and composition-dependent effects with magnetic, Mössbauer, and pair distribution function measurements in a family of catalytically active ferrite nanoparticles

    DOE PAGES

    Wong, Stanislaus; Papaefthymiou, Georgia C.; Lewis, Crystal S.; ...

    2015-05-06

    The magnetic spinel ferrites, MFe₂O₄ (wherein 'M' = a divalent metal ion such as but not limited to Mn, Co, Zn, and Ni), represent a unique class of magnetic materials in which the rational introduction of different 'M's can yield correspondingly unique and interesting magnetic behaviors. Herein we present a generalized hydrothermal method for the synthesis of single-crystalline ferrite nanoparticles with 'M' = Mg, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, and Zn, respectively, which can be systematically and efficaciously produced simply by changing the metal precursor. Our protocol can moreover lead to reproducible size control by judicious selection of various surfactants. Asmore » such, we have probed the effects of both (i) size and (ii) chemical composition upon the magnetic properties of these nanomaterials using complementary magnetometry and Mössbauer spectroscopy techniques. The structure of the samples was confirmed by atomic PDF analysis of X-ray and electron powder diffraction data as a function of particle size. These materials retain the bulk spinel structure to the smallest size (i.e., 3 nm). In addition, we have explored the catalytic potential of our ferrites as both (a) magnetically recoverable photocatalysts and (b) biological catalysts, and noted that many of our as-prepared ferrite systems evinced intrinsically higher activities as compared with their iron oxide analogues.« less

  3. Correlating size and composition-dependent effects with magnetic, Mössbauer, and pair distribution function measurements in a family of catalytically active ferrite nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Stanislaus; Papaefthymiou, Georgia C.; Lewis, Crystal S.; Han, Jinkyu; Zhang, Cheng; Li, Qiang; Shi, Chenyang; Abeykoon, A. M.Milinda; Billinge, Simon J.L.; Stach, Eric; Thomas, Justin; Guerrero, Kevin; Munayco, Pablo; Munayco, Jimmy; Scorzelli, Rosa B.; Burnham, Philip; Viescas, Arthur J; Tiano, Amanda L.

    2015-05-06

    The magnetic spinel ferrites, MFe₂O₄ (wherein 'M' = a divalent metal ion such as but not limited to Mn, Co, Zn, and Ni), represent a unique class of magnetic materials in which the rational introduction of different 'M's can yield correspondingly unique and interesting magnetic behaviors. Herein we present a generalized hydrothermal method for the synthesis of single-crystalline ferrite nanoparticles with 'M' = Mg, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, and Zn, respectively, which can be systematically and efficaciously produced simply by changing the metal precursor. Our protocol can moreover lead to reproducible size control by judicious selection of various surfactants. As such, we have probed the effects of both (i) size and (ii) chemical composition upon the magnetic properties of these nanomaterials using complementary magnetometry and Mössbauer spectroscopy techniques. The structure of the samples was confirmed by atomic PDF analysis of X-ray and electron powder diffraction data as a function of particle size. These materials retain the bulk spinel structure to the smallest size (i.e., 3 nm). In addition, we have explored the catalytic potential of our ferrites as both (a) magnetically recoverable photocatalysts and (b) biological catalysts, and noted that many of our as-prepared ferrite systems evinced intrinsically higher activities as compared with their iron oxide analogues.

  4. Development and characterization of advanced 9Cr ferritic/martensitic steels for fission and fusion reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saroja, S.; Dasgupta, A.; Divakar, R.; Raju, S.; Mohandas, E.; Vijayalakshmi, M.; Bhanu Sankara Rao, K.; Raj, Baldev

    2011-02-01

    This paper presents the results on the physical metallurgy studies in 9Cr Oxide Dispersion Strengthened (ODS) and Reduced Activation Ferritic/Martensitic (RAFM) steels. Yttria strengthened ODS alloy was synthesized through several stages, like mechanical milling of alloy powders and yttria, canning and consolidation by hot extrusion. During characterization of the ODS alloy, it was observed that yttria particles possessed an affinity for Ti, a small amount of which was also helpful in refining the dispersoid particles containing mixed Y and Ti oxides. The particle size and their distribution in the ferrite matrix, were studied using Analytical and High Resolution Electron Microscopy at various stages. The results showed a distribution of Y 2O 3 particles predominantly in the size range of 5-20 nm. A Reduced Activation Ferritic/Martensitic steel has also been developed with the replacement of Mo and Nb by W and Ta with strict control on the tramp and trace elements (Mo, Nb, B, Cu, Ni, Al, Co, Ti). The transformation temperatures ( Ac1, Ac3 and Ms) for this steel have been determined and the transformation behavior of the high temperature austenite phase has been studied. The complete phase domain diagram has been generated which is required for optimization of the processing and fabrication schedules for the steel.

  5. Effects of activating fluxes on the weld penetration and corrosion resistant property of laser welded joint of ferritic stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yonghui; Hu, Shengsun; Shen, Junqi

    2015-10-01

    This study was based on the ferritic stainless steel SUS430. Under the parallel welding conditions, the critical penetration power values (CPPV) of 3mm steel plates with different surface-coating activating fluxes were tested. Results showed that, after coating with activating fluxes, such as ZrO2, CaCO3, CaF2 and CaO, the CPPV could reduce 100~250 W, which indicating the increases of the weld penetrations (WP). Nevertheless, the variation range of WP with or without activating fluxes was less than 16.7%. Compared with single-component ones, a multi-component activating flux composed of 50% ZrO2, 12.09% CaCO3, 10.43% CaO, and 27.49% MgO was testified to be much more efficient, the WP of which was about 2.3-fold of that without any activating fluxes. Furthermore, a FeCl3 spot corrosion experiment was carried out with samples cut from weld zone to test the effects of different activating fluxes on the corrosion resistant (CR) property of the laser welded joints. It was found that all kinds of activating fluxes could improve the CR of the welded joints. And, it was interesting to find that the effect of the mixed activating fluxes was inferior to those single-component ones. Among all the activating fluxes, the single-component of CaCO3 seemed to be the best in resisting corrosion. By means of Energy Dispersive Spectrometer (EDS) testing, it was found that the use of activating fluxes could effectively restrain the loss of Cr element of weld zone in the process of laser welding, thus greatly improving the CR of welded joints.

  6. Connectivity between electrical conduction and thermally activated grain size evolution in Ho-doped CoFe2O4 ferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panneer Muthuselvam, I.; Bhowmik, R. N.

    2010-11-01

    Ho-doped CoFe2O4 spinel ferrite has been synthesized by a combination of mechanical alloying and subsequent annealing of the alloyed powder in the temperature range 950 °C <= TAN <= 1200 °C. The grains of the nanocrystalline samples have been found in the single domain/pseudo-single domain state for TAN <= 1050 °C and multi-domain state for TAN >= 1100 °C. The room temperature Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy spectrum of the samples indicated substantial changes in the tetrahedral sites of the cubic spinel structure while the alloyed powder was annealed at different temperatures. Ac conductivity of the nano-grained samples has been studied in the frequency range 1 Hz-3 MHz and temperature range 303-523 K. This work has been specifically designed to highlight the properties of electrical conductivity in the annealed samples. Experimental results revealed a strong connectivity between electrical conduction and the single domain and multi-domain states of the grains.

  7. Activity and diffusion of metals in binary aluminum alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Jao, C. S.

    1980-12-01

    To determine the activity of zinc in Zn-Al alloys, the electromotive force (emf) of the cell: Zn/ZnCl/sub 2/-KC1 (eut)/Zn,Al was measured at temperatures between 569.5 K (296.5C) and 649.5 K (376.5C). The applicability of a two-suffix Margules equation was demonstrated, in good agreement with theoretical expectations. The diffusion coefficient of Zn in Al determined from a planar diffusion model for the experimental data was about 3 x 10/sup -10/ cm/sup 2//sec to 2 x 10/sup -9/ cm/sup 2//sec in the range of temperature studied. This is higher than that found in the literature. The most plausible reason appears to be the high alumina concentration in the working electrode because of partial oxidation. Oxidation of the alloying metals was the primary cause of poor alloying between calcium/or zinc and aluminum, thereby frustrating similar measurements at a Ca-Al/or Zn-Al alloy. The literature on the activity of calcium and zinc is aluminum is reviewed.

  8. Determination of concentrations of Fe, Mg, and Zn in some ferrite samples using neutron activation analysis and X-ray fluorescence techniques.

    PubMed

    Ali, I A; Mohamed, Gehan Y; Azzam, A; Sattar, A A

    2017-01-14

    Mg-Zn ferrite is considered as one of the important materials with potential uses in many applications. In this work, samples of ferrite Mg(1-x)ZnxFe2O4 (where x=0.0, 0.2, 0.4, 0.6, 0.8 and 1) were synthesized by the sol-gel method for use in some hyperthermia applications. The composition and purity of the prepared samples hardly affected their properties. Therefore, the elemental concentration of these samples was measured by the X-ray fluorescence technique and thermal neutron activation analysis to check the quality of the prepared samples. The results of both methods were compared with each other and with the molecular ratios of the as-prepared samples. In addition, no existing elemental impurity, with considerable concentration, was measured.

  9. Method for making conductors for ferrite memory arrays. [from pre-formed metal conductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heckler, C. H.; Baba, P. D.; Bhiwandker, N. C. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    The ferrite memory arrays are made from pre-formed metal conductors for the ferrite arrays. The conductors are made by forming a thin sheet of a metallizing paste of metal alloy powder, drying the paste layer, bisque firing the dried sheet at a first temperature, and then punching the conductors from the fired sheet. During the bisque firing, the conductor sheet shrinks to 58 percent of its pre-fired volume and the alloy particles sinter together. The conductors are embedded in ferrite sheet material and finally fired at a second higher temperature during which firing the conductors shrink approximately the same degree as the ferrite material.

  10. Visible-light photochemical activity of heterostructured core-shell materials composed of selected ternary titanates and ferrites coated by tiO2.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Liu, Xuan; Zhang, Yiling; Nuhfer, Noel T; Barmak, Katayun; Salvador, Paul A; Rohrer, Gregory S

    2013-06-12

    Heterostructured photocatalysts comprised of microcrystalline (mc-) cores and nanostructured (ns-) shells were prepared by the sol-gel method. The ability of titania-coated ATiO3 (A = Fe, Pb) and AFeO3 (A = Bi, La, Y) catalysts to degrade methylene blue in visible light (λ > 420 nm) was compared. The catalysts with the titanate cores had enhanced photocatalytic activities for methylene blue degradation compared to their components alone, whereas the catalysts with ferrite cores did not. The temperature at which the ns-titania shell is crystallized influences the photocatalytic dye degradation. mc-FeTiO3/ns-TiO2 annealed at 500 °C shows the highest reaction rate. Fe-doped TiO2, which absorbs visible light, did not show enhanced photocatalytic activity for methylene blue degradation. This result indicates that iron contamination is not a decisive factor in the reduced reactivity of the titania coated ferrite catalysts. The higher reactivity of materials with the titanate cores suggests that photogenerated charge carriers are more easily transported across the titanate-titanate interface than the ferrite-titanate interface and this provides guidance for materials selection in composite catalyst design.

  11. Experimental observations of field-dependent activation of core and surface spins in Ni-ferrite nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceylan, A.; Hasanain, S. K.; Shah, S. Ismat

    2008-05-01

    The magnetic behavior of Ni-ferrite (NiFe2O4) nanoparticles synthesized in a solid state reaction process has been investigated. The cooling field, HCF, dependence of magnetization in a wide range of temperatures, from 5 to 300 K, has been examined for low and high field regimes. It has been observed that there is a transition region, ~3-4 T, between different mechanisms that controls the magnetization. At low fields, <3 T, classical blocking-unblocking of small particles governs the magnetization whereas spin-glass like behavior prevails at high fields, >4 T, starting below a well defined freezing temperature of 50 K. The HCF dependence of magnetic viscosity has shown that there is a significant jump in the relaxation rate of the particles around 4 T which appears as the boundary region for the temperature-dependent magnetization as well. These observations are interpreted as indicating that below the spin freezing temperature there is a boundary field (~4 T) where the strongly pinned surface spins are enabled to be thermally activated while below this field only core spins participate in the magnetic relaxation.

  12. Status of ferrite technology for high volume microwave applications

    SciTech Connect

    Webb, D.C.

    1995-08-01

    With the emergence of high volume commercial and military applications, there is a growing need to reduce the size and cost of microwave ferrite components, especially ferrite circulators, to be more compatible with monolithic integrated circuits. The Ferrite Development Consortium, consisting of leading US ferrite government, university and industrial institutions, was formed under Advanced Research Project Agency (ARPA) sponsorship to address these needs. Areas of Consortium technical activity include bulk and thick-film techniques for batch processing of ferrite devices, improved computer-aided-design tools and protype demonstrations. This paper will review the Consortium`s materials development needs and progress.

  13. Improvement of catalytic activity in selective oxidation of styrene with H{sub 2}O{sub 2} over spinel Mg–Cu ferrite hollow spheres in water

    SciTech Connect

    Tong, Jinhui; Cai, Xiaodong; Wang, Haiyan; Zhang, Qianping

    2014-07-01

    Graphical abstract: Uniform spinel Mg–Cu ferrite hollow spheres were prepared using carbon spheres as templates. Solid spinel Mg{sub 0.5}Cu{sub 0.5}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} ferrite nanocrystals were also prepared by sol–gel auto-combustion, hydrothermal and coprecipitation methods for comparison. The samples were found to be efficient catalysts for oxidation of styrene using hydrogen peroxide as oxidant. Especially, in the case of Mg{sub 0.5}Cu{sub 0.5}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} hollow spheres, obvious improvement on catalytic activity was observed and 21.2% of styrene conversion and 75.2% of selectivity for benzaldehyde were obtained at 80 °C for 6 h reaction in water. The catalyst can be magnetically separated easily for reuse and no obvious loss of activity was observed when reused in six consecutive runs. - Highlights: • Uniform spinel ferrite hollow spheres were prepared by a simple method. • The catalyst has been proved much more efficient for styrene oxidation than the reported analogues. • The catalyst can be easily separated by external magnetic field and has exhibited excellent reusability. • The catalytic system is environmentally friendly. - Abstract: Uniform spinel Mg–Cu ferrite hollow spheres were prepared using carbon spheres as templates. For comparison, solid Mg–Cu ferrite nanocrystals were also prepared by sol–gel auto-combustion, hydrothermal and coprecipitation methods. All the samples were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectrophotometry (FT-IR), X-ray diffractometry (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and N{sub 2} physisorption. The samples were found to be efficient catalysts for oxidation of styrene using hydrogen peroxide as oxidant. Especially, in the case of Mg{sub 0.5}Cu{sub 0.5}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} hollow spheres, obvious improvement on catalytic activity was observed, and 21.2% of styrene conversion and 75.2% of selectivity for benzaldehyde were obtained at 80 °C for 6 h reaction in water. The catalyst can be

  14. A comparative study of different concentrations of pure Zn powder effects on synthesis, structure, magnetic and microwave-absorbing properties in mechanically-alloyed Ni-Zn ferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hajalilou, Abdollah; Mazlan, Saiful Amri; Shameli, Kamyar

    2016-09-01

    In this study, a powder mixture of Zn, Fe2O3 and NiO was used to produce different compositions of Ni1-xZnxFe2O4 (x=0.36, 0.5 and 0.64) nanopowders. High-energy ball milling with a subsequent heat treatment method was carried out. The XRD results indicated that for the content of Zn, x=0.64 a single phase of Ni-Zn ferrite was produced after 30 h milling while for the contents of Zn, x=0.36 and 0.5, the desired ferrite was formed after sintering the 30 h-milled powders at 500 °C. The average crystallite size decreased with increase in the Zn content. A DC electrical resistivity of the Ni-Zn ferrite, however, decreased with increase in the Zn content, its value was much higher than those samples prepared by the conventional ceramic route by using ZnO instead of Zn. This is attributed to smaller grains size which were obtained by using Zn. The FT-IR results suggested two absorption bands for octahedral and tetrahedral sites in the range of 350-700 cm-1. The VSM results revealed that by increasing the Zn content from 0.36 to 0.5, a saturation magnetization reached its maximum value; afterwards, a decrease was observed for Zn with x=0.64. Finally, magnetic permeability and dielectric permittivity were studied by using vector network analyzer to explore microwave-absorbing properties in X-band frequency. The minimum reflection loss value obtained for Ni0.5Zn0.5Fe2O4 samples, about -34 dB at 9.7 GHz, making them the best candidates for high frequency applications.

  15. Enabling Inexpensive Metallic Alloys as SOFC Interconnects: An Investigation into Hybrid Coating Technologies to Deposit Nanocomposite Functional Coatings on Ferritic Stainless Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Gannon, Paul; Gorokhovsky, Vladimir I.; Deibert, Max; Smith, Richard J.; Kayani, Asghar N.; White, P T.; Sofie, Stephen W.; Yang, Z Gary; Mccready, David E.; Visco, S.; Jacobson, C.; Kurokawa, H.

    2007-11-01

    Reduced operating temperatures (600-800°C) of Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFCs) may enable the use of inexpensive ferritic steels as interconnects. Due to the demanding SOFC interconnect operating environment, protective coatings are required to increase long-term stability. In this study, large area filtered arc deposition (LAFAD) and hybrid filtered arc-assisted electron beam physical vapor deposition (FA-EBPVD) technologies were used to deposit two-segment coatings with Cr-Al-Y-O nanocomposite bottom segments and Mn-Co-O spinel-based top segments. Coatings were deposited on ferritic steels and subsequently annealed in air for various times. Surface oxidation was investigated using SEM/EDS, XRD and RBS analyses. Cr-volatilization was evaluated by transpiration and ICP-MS analysis of the resultant condensate. Time dependent Area Specific Resistance (ASR) was studied using the four-point technique. The oxidation behavior, Cr volatilization rate, and ASR of coated and uncoated samples are reported. Significant long-term (>1,000 hours) surface stability, low ASR, and dramatically reduced Cr-volatility were observed with the coated specimens. Improvement mechanisms, including the coating diffusion barrier properties and electrical conductivity are discussed.

  16. Neutron Absorbing Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Mizia, Ronald E.; Shaber, Eric L.; DuPont, John N.; Robino, Charles V.; Williams, David B.

    2004-05-04

    The present invention is drawn to new classes of advanced neutron absorbing structural materials for use in spent nuclear fuel applications requiring structural strength, weldability, and long term corrosion resistance. Particularly, an austenitic stainless steel alloy containing gadolinium and less than 5% of a ferrite content is disclosed. Additionally, a nickel-based alloy containing gadolinium and greater than 50% nickel is also disclosed.

  17. Ferrite Formation Dynamics and Microstructure Due to Inclusion Engineering in Low-Alloy Steels by Ti2O3 and TiN Addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, Wangzhong; Shibata, Hiroyuki; Hedström, Peter; Jönsson, Pär Göran; Nakajima, Keiji

    2016-08-01

    The dynamics of intragranular ferrite (IGF) formation in inclusion engineered steels with either Ti2O3 or TiN addition were investigated using in situ high temperature confocal laser scanning microscopy. Furthermore, the chemical composition of the inclusions and the final microstructure after continuous cooling transformation was investigated using electron probe microanalysis and electron backscatter diffraction, respectively. It was found that there is a significant effect of the chemical composition of the inclusions, the cooling rate, and the prior austenite grain size on the phase fractions and the starting temperatures of IGF and grain boundary ferrite (GBF). The fraction of IGF is larger in the steel with Ti2O3 addition compared to the steel with TiN addition after the same thermal cycle has been imposed. The reason for this difference is the higher potency of the TiO x phase as nucleation sites for IGF formation compared to the TiN phase, which was supported by calculations using classical nucleation theory. The IGF fraction increases with increasing prior austenite grain size, while the fraction of IGF in both steels was the highest for the intermediate cooling rate of 70 °C/min, since competing phase transformations were avoided, the structure of the IGF was though refined with increasing cooling rate. Finally, regarding the starting temperatures of IGF and GBF, they decrease with increasing cooling rate and the starting temperature of GBF decreases with increasing grain size, while the starting temperature of IGF remains constant irrespective of grain size.

  18. Ferrite Nanoparticles in Pharmacological Modulation of Angiogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deshmukh, Aparna; Radha, S.; Khan, Y.; Tilak, Priya

    2011-07-01

    Nanoparticles are being explored in the targeted drug delivery of pharmacological agents : angiogenesis being one such novel application which involves formation of new blood vessels or branching of existing ones. The present study involves the use of ferrite nanoparticles for precise therapeutic modulation of angiogenesis. The ferrite nanoparticles synthesized by co-precipitation of ferrous and ferric salts by a suitable base, were found to be 10-20 nm from X-ray diffraction and TEM measurements. The magnetization measurements showed superparamagnetic behavior of the uncoated nanoparticles. These ferrite nanoparticles were found to be bio-compatible with lymphocytes and neural cell lines from the biochemical assays. The chick chorioallantoic membrane(CAM) from the shell of fertile white Leghorn eggs was chosen as a model to study angiogenic activity. An enhancement in the angiogenic activity in the CAM due to addition of uncoated ferrite nanoparticles was observed.

  19. Surface modification of Cobalt ferrite nano-hollowspheres for inherent multiple photoluminescence and enhanced photocatalytic activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talukdar, Souvanik; Mandal, Dipika; Mandal, Kalyan

    2017-03-01

    Nano-hollow spheres (NHSs) are the new drift in magnetic nanostructures as they provide more surface area at nano length scale with enhanced magnetic properties compared to their nanoparticle counterpart. Here we reported the synthesis of biocompatible CoFe2O4 NHSs of diameter around 250 nm and emergence of intrinsic multiple photoluminescence from blue, green to red on modifying their surface with small organic ligands like tartrate. The surface modified NHSs also showed notable photocatalytic activity towards the degradation of environmentally malefic dyes like Methylene Blue and Rhodamine B. The surface modified NHSs are found to exhibit superior magnetic properties.

  20. Visible-light Photocatalytic Activity of Titanium Dioxide/Bismuth Ferrite Heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yiling

    Ferroelectric polarization is believed to enhance the efficiency of a semiconductor photocatalyst, including ferroelectric/semiconductor heterojunction photocatalysts. BiFeO3, which has a narrow band gap of ≈2.2 - 2.7 eV and can absorb visible light, is investigated as a ferroelectric substrate that supports a TiO2 film in a photocatalytic heterostructure. The photocatalytic activity of the TiO2/BiFeO3 heterostructure is studied in detail, using visible light irradiation. The photochemical reduction of Ag+ to Ag0 in an aqueous silver nitrate solution under illumination from a blue light emitting diode is used to characterize the activity of the heterostructures and related samples. The photocatalytic activity is quantified by measuring the heights of the reduction products using atomic force microscopy. The observation of spatially selective silver patterns on the surface of the heterostructure after reaction suggests that electrons photogenerated in the BiFeO3 substrate migrate, under the influence of ferroelectric polarization, to the TiO2 surface, where they participate in the photochemical reduction reaction. This is supported by the correlation of the reduced silver pattern and the ferroelectric domain structure as revealed by piezoresponse force microscopy (PFM). To establish correlation between out-of-plane polarity of domains and photochemical activity for both bare BiFeO3 and TiO2/BiFeO3, analysis of domain structures using PFM responses and crystallographic orientation information and comparison to reactivity patterns are made. To study the dependence of photocatalytic activity of the heterostructures on the TiO2 phase and orientation, the orientation relationships (ORs) of TiO2 and BiFeO3 are determined via the Combinatorial Substrate Epitaxy technique using electron backscatter diffraction data of each grain in a heterostructure having a thick TiO2 film on a polycrystalline BiFeO3 substrate. It is found that the three dimensional alignment of closest

  1. The intrinsic antimicrobial activity of citric acid-coated manganese ferrite nanoparticles is enhanced after conjugation with the antifungal peptide Cm-p5

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Abarrategui, Carlos; Figueroa-Espi, Viviana; Lugo-Alvarez, Maria B; Pereira, Caroline D; Garay, Hilda; Barbosa, João ARG; Falcão, Rosana; Jiménez-Hernández, Linnavel; Estévez-Hernández, Osvaldo; Reguera, Edilso; Franco, Octavio L; Dias, Simoni C; Otero-Gonzalez, Anselmo J

    2016-01-01

    Diseases caused by bacterial and fungal pathogens are among the major health problems in the world. Newer antimicrobial therapies based on novel molecules urgently need to be developed, and this includes the antimicrobial peptides. In spite of the potential of antimicrobial peptides, very few of them were able to be successfully developed into therapeutics. The major problems they present are molecule stability, toxicity in host cells, and production costs. A novel strategy to overcome these obstacles is conjugation to nanomaterial preparations. The antimicrobial activity of different types of nanoparticles has been previously demonstrated. Specifically, magnetic nanoparticles have been widely studied in biomedicine due to their physicochemical properties. The citric acid-modified manganese ferrite nanoparticles used in this study were characterized by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, which confirmed the formation of nanocrystals of approximately 5 nm diameter. These nanoparticles were able to inhibit Candida albicans growth in vitro. The minimal inhibitory concentration was 250 µg/mL. However, the nanoparticles were not capable of inhibiting Gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli) or Gram-positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus). Finally, an antifungal peptide (Cm-p5) from the sea animal Cenchritis muricatus (Gastropoda: Littorinidae) was conjugated to the modified manganese ferrite nanoparticles. The antifungal activity of the conjugated nanoparticles was higher than their bulk counterparts, showing a minimal inhibitory concentration of 100 µg/mL. This conjugate proved to be nontoxic to a macrophage cell line at concentrations that showed antimicrobial activity. PMID:27563243

  2. The intrinsic antimicrobial activity of citric acid-coated manganese ferrite nanoparticles is enhanced after conjugation with the antifungal peptide Cm-p5.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Abarrategui, Carlos; Figueroa-Espi, Viviana; Lugo-Alvarez, Maria B; Pereira, Caroline D; Garay, Hilda; Barbosa, João Arg; Falcão, Rosana; Jiménez-Hernández, Linnavel; Estévez-Hernández, Osvaldo; Reguera, Edilso; Franco, Octavio L; Dias, Simoni C; Otero-Gonzalez, Anselmo J

    2016-01-01

    Diseases caused by bacterial and fungal pathogens are among the major health problems in the world. Newer antimicrobial therapies based on novel molecules urgently need to be developed, and this includes the antimicrobial peptides. In spite of the potential of antimicrobial peptides, very few of them were able to be successfully developed into therapeutics. The major problems they present are molecule stability, toxicity in host cells, and production costs. A novel strategy to overcome these obstacles is conjugation to nanomaterial preparations. The antimicrobial activity of different types of nanoparticles has been previously demonstrated. Specifically, magnetic nanoparticles have been widely studied in biomedicine due to their physicochemical properties. The citric acid-modified manganese ferrite nanoparticles used in this study were characterized by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, which confirmed the formation of nanocrystals of approximately 5 nm diameter. These nanoparticles were able to inhibit Candida albicans growth in vitro. The minimal inhibitory concentration was 250 µg/mL. However, the nanoparticles were not capable of inhibiting Gram-negative bacteria (Escherichia coli) or Gram-positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus). Finally, an antifungal peptide (Cm-p5) from the sea animal Cenchritis muricatus (Gastropoda: Littorinidae) was conjugated to the modified manganese ferrite nanoparticles. The antifungal activity of the conjugated nanoparticles was higher than their bulk counterparts, showing a minimal inhibitory concentration of 100 µg/mL. This conjugate proved to be nontoxic to a macrophage cell line at concentrations that showed antimicrobial activity.

  3. Microstructural Variations Across a Dissimilar 316L Austenitic: 9Cr Reduced Activation Ferritic Martensitic Steel Weld Joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas Paul, V.; Karthikeyan, T.; Dasgupta, Arup; Sudha, C.; Hajra, R. N.; Albert, S. K.; Saroja, S.; Jayakumar, T.

    2016-03-01

    This paper discuss the microstructural variations across a dissimilar weld joint between SS316 and 9Cr-RAFM steel and its modifications on post weld heat treatments (PWHT). Detailed characterization showed a mixed microstructure of austenite and martensite in the weld which is in agreement with the phases predicted using Schaeffler diagram based on composition measurements. The presence of very low volume fraction of δ-ferrite in SS316L has been identified employing state of the art electron back-scattered diffraction technique. PWHT of the ferritic steel did not reduce the hardness in the weld metal. Thermal exposure at 973 K (700 °C) showed a progressive reduction in hardness of weld joint with duration of treatment except in austenitic base metal. However, diffusion annealing at 1073 K (800 °C) for 100 hours resulted in an unexpected increase in hardness of weld metal, which is a manifestation of the dilution effects and enrichment of Ni on the transformation characteristics of the weld zone. Migration of carbon from ferritic steel aided the precipitation of fine carbides in the austenitic base metal on annealing at 973 K (700 °C); but enhanced diffusion at 1073 K (880 °C) resulted in coarsening of carbides and thereby reduction of hardness.

  4. Tensile and Charpy impact properties of irradiated reduced-activation ferritic steels

    SciTech Connect

    Klueh, R.L.; Alexander, D.J.

    1996-10-01

    Tensile tests were conducted on 8 reduced-activation Cr-W steels after irradiation to 15-17 and 26-29 dpa, and Charpy impact tests were conducted on steels irradiated to 26-29 dpa. Irradiation was in Fast Flux Test Facility at 365 C on steels containing 2.25-12% Cr, varying amounts of W, V, and Ta, and 0.1%C. Previously, tensile specimens were irradiated to 6-8 dpa and Charpy specimens to 6-8, 15- 17, and 20-24 dpa. Tensile and Charpy specimens were also thermally aged to 20,000 h at 365 C. Thermal aging had little effect on tensile properties or ductile-brittle transition temperature (DBTT), but several steels showed a slight increase in upper-shelf energy (USE). After 7 dpa, strength increased (hardened) and then remained relatively unchanged through 26-29 dpa (ie, strength saturated with fluence). Post-irradiation Charpy impact tests after 26-29 dpa showed that the loss of impact toughness (increased DBTT, decreased USE) remained relatively unchanged from the values after 20-24 dpa, which had been relatively unchanged from the earlier irradiations. As before, the two 9Cr steels had the most irradiation resistance.

  5. Tensile and charpy impact properties of irradiated reduced-activation ferritic steels

    SciTech Connect

    Klueh, R.L.; Alexander, D.J.

    1996-10-01

    Tensile tests were conducted on eight reduced-activation Cr-W steels after irradiation to 15-17 and 26-29 dpa, and Charpy impact tests were conducted on the steels irradiated to 26-29 dpa. Irradiation was in the Fast Flux Test Facility at 365{degrees}C on steels containing 2.25-12% Cr, varying amounts of W, V, and Ta, and 0.1%C. Previously, tensile specimens were irradiated to 6-8 dpa and Charpy specimens to 6-8, 15-17, and 20-24 dpa. Tensile and Charpy specimens were also thermally aged to 20000 h at 365{degrees}C. Thermal aging had little effect on the tensile behavior or the ductile-brittle transition temperature (DBTT), but several steels showed a slight increase in the upper-shelf energy (USE). After {approx}7 dpa, the strength of the steels increased and then remained relatively unchanged through 26-29 dpa (i.e., the strength saturated with fluence). Post-irradiation Charpy impact tests after 26-29 dpa showed that the loss of impact toughness, as measured by an increase in DBTT and a decrease in the USE, remained relatively unchanged from the values after 20-24 dpa, which had been relatively unchanged from the earlier irradiations. As before, the two 9Cr steels were the most irradiation resistant.

  6. Mesoporous zinc ferrite: synthesis, characterization, and photocatalytic activity with H2O2/visible light.

    PubMed

    Su, Minhua; He, Chun; Sharma, Virender K; Abou Asi, Mudar; Xia, Dehua; Li, Xiang-zhong; Deng, Huiqi; Xiong, Ya

    2012-04-15

    Mesoporous ZnFe(2)O(4) (meso-ZnFe(2)O(4)) was synthesized by a hydrothermal process in which cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) participates in the reaction to produce nanocrystals. Synthesized ZnFe(2)O(4) was characterized by energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area, scanning electronic microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and diffuse reflectance spectra (DRS). The meso-ZnFe(2)O(4) was resulted from the agglomeration of nanoparticles with size of 5-10nm. The photocatalytic activity of ZnFe(2)O(4) under visible light (λ>400 nm) was evaluated by the degradation of Acid Orange II (AOII) at different sintering temperatures, the amount of ZnFe(2)O(4), and the concentration of H(2)O(2). The photocatalytic degradation of AOII was almost complete within 2h in H(2)O(2)/visible light system. The high efficiency for AOII degradation was attributed to the strong absorption of ZnFe(2)O(4) in visible-light region and the generation of reactive OH by H(2)O(2) in the system. The involvement of OH in oxidizing AOII was examined by determining the photocurrent of ZnFe(2)O(4), [OH], and degradation rates using different scavengers. Organic compounds as intermediates of the degradation process were identified by LC/MS. Moreover, ZnFe(2)O(4) retained their degradation efficiencies for a series of repetitive batch runs, indicating the true photocatalytic process.

  7. Differential cytotoxicity of copper ferrite nanoparticles in different human cells.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Javed; Alhadlaq, Hisham A; Alshamsan, Aws; Siddiqui, Maqsood A; Saquib, Quaiser; Khan, Shams T; Wahab, Rizwan; Al-Khedhairy, Abdulaziz A; Musarrat, Javed; Akhtar, Mohd Javed; Ahamed, Maqusood

    2016-10-01

    Copper ferrite nanoparticles (NPs) have the potential to be applied in biomedical fields such as cell labeling and hyperthermia. However, there is a lack of information concerning the toxicity of copper ferrite NPs. We explored the cytotoxic potential of copper ferrite NPs in human lung (A549) and liver (HepG2) cells. Copper ferrite NPs were crystalline and almost spherically shaped with an average diameter of 35 nm. Copper ferrite NPs induced dose-dependent cytotoxicity in both types of cells, evident by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazoliumbromide and neutral red uptake assays. However, we observed a quite different susceptibility in the two kinds of cells regarding toxicity of copper ferrite NPs. Particularly, A549 cells showed higher susceptibility against copper ferrite NP exposure than those of HepG2 cells. Loss of mitochondrial membrane potential due to copper ferrite NP exposure was observed. The mRNA level as well as activity of caspase-3 enzyme was higher in cells exposed to copper ferrite NPs. Cellular redox status was disturbed as indicated by induction of reactive oxygen species (oxidant) generation and depletion of the glutathione (antioxidant) level. Moreover, cytotoxicity induced by copper ferrite NPs was efficiently prevented by N-acetylcysteine treatment, which suggests that reactive oxygen species generation might be one of the possible mechanisms of cytotoxicity caused by copper ferrite NPs. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report showing the cytotoxic potential of copper ferrite NPs in human cells. This study warrants further investigation to explore the mechanisms of differential toxicity of copper ferrite NPs in different types of cells. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Method of treating intermetallic alloy hydrogenation/oxidation catalysts for improved impurity poisoning resistance, regeneration and increased activity

    DOEpatents

    Wright, Randy B.

    1992-01-01

    Alternate, successive high temperature oxidation and reduction treatments, in either order, of intermetallic alloy hydrogenation and intermetallic alloy oxidation catalysts unexpectedly improves the impurity poisoning resistance, regeneration capacity and/or activity of the catalysts. The particular alloy, and the final high temperature treatment given alloy (oxidation or reduction) will be chosen to correspond to the function of the catalyst (oxidation or hydrogenation).

  9. Comminuting irradiated ferritic steel

    DOEpatents

    Bauer, Roger E.; Straalsund, Jerry L.; Chin, Bryan A.

    1985-01-01

    Disclosed is a method of comminuting irradiated ferritic steel by placing the steel in a solution of a compound selected from the group consisting of sulfamic acid, bisulfate, and mixtures thereof. The ferritic steel is used as cladding on nuclear fuel rods or other irradiated components.

  10. XXIst Century Ferrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazaleyrat, F.; Zehani, K.; Pasko, A.; Loyau, V.; LoBue, M.

    2012-05-01

    Ferrites have always been a subject of great interest from point of view of magnetic application, since the fist compass to present date. In contrast, the scientific interest for iron based magnetic oxides decreased after Ørsted discovery as they where replaced by coil as magnetizing sources. Neel discovery of ferrimagnetism boosted again interest and leads to strong developments during two decades before being of less interest. Recently, the evolution of power electronics toward higher frequency, the downsizing of ceramics microstucture to nanometer scale, the increasing price of rare-earth elements and the development of magnetocaloric materials put light again on ferrites. A review on three ferrite families is given herein: harder nanostructured Ba2+Fe12O19 magnet processed by spark plasma sintering, magnetocaloric effect associated to the spin transition reorientation of W-ferrite and low temperature spark plasma sintered Ni-Zn-Cu ferrites for high frequency power applications.

  11. Dielectric investigations of polycrystalline samarium bismuth ferrite ceramic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palaimiene, E.; Macutkevic, J.; Karpinsky, D. V.; Kholkin, A. L.; Banys, J.

    2015-01-01

    Results of broadband dielectric investigations of samarium doped bismuth ferrite ceramics are presented in wide temperature range (20-800 K). At temperatures higher than 400 K, the dielectric properties of samarium bismuth ferrite ceramics are governed by Maxwell-Wagner relaxation and electrical conductivity. The DC conductivity increases and activation energy decreases with samarium concentration. In samarium doped bismuth ferrite, the ferroelectric phase transition temperature decreases with samarium concentration and finally no ferroelectric order is observed at x = 0.2. At lower temperatures, the dielectric properties of ferroelectric samarium doped bismuth ferrite are governed by ferroelectric domains dynamics. Ceramics with x = 0.2 exhibit the relaxor-like behaviour.

  12. Prediction of yield stress in highly irradiated ferritic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Windsor, Colin G.; Cottrell, Geoff; Kemp, Richard

    2008-03-01

    The design of any fusion power plant requires information on the irradiation hardening of low-activation ferritic/martensitic steels beyond the range of most present measurements. Neural networks have been used by Kemp et al (J. Nucl. Mater. 348 311-28) to model the yield stress of some 1811 irradiated alloys. The same dataset has been used in this study, but has been divided into a training set containing the majority of the dataset with low irradiation levels, and a test set which contains just those alloys which have been irradiated above a given level. For example some 4.5% of the alloys were irradiated above 30 displacements per atom. For this 'prediction' problem it is found that simpler networks with fewer inputs are advantageous. By using target-driven dimensionality reduction, linear combinations of the atomic inputs reduce the test residual below that achievable by adding inputs from single atoms. It is postulated that these combinations represent 'mechanisms' for the prediction of irradiated yield stress.

  13. Influence of high temperature pre-deformation on the dissolution rate of delta ferrites in martensitic heat-resistant steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Junru; Liu, Jianjun; Jiang, Bo; Zhang, Chaolei; Liu, Yazheng

    2017-03-01

    The dissolution process of delta ferrites and the influence of high temperature pre-deformation on the dissolution rate of delta ferrites in martensitic heat-resistant steel 10Cr12Ni3Mo2VN were studied by isothermal heating and thermal simulation experiments. The precipitation temperature of delta ferrites in experimental steel is about 1195 °C. M23C6-type carbides incline to precipitate and coarsen at the boundaries of delta ferrites below 930 °C, and can be rapidly dissolved by heating at 1180 °C. The percentage of delta ferrites gradually decreases with heating time. And a Kolmogorov-Johnson-Mehl-Avrami equation was established to describe the dissolution process of delta ferrites at 1180 °C. High temperature pre-deformation can markedly increase the dissolution rate of delta ferrites. Pre-deformation can largely increase the interface area between delta ferrite and matrix and thus increase the unit-time diffusing quantities of alloying elements between delta ferrites and matrix. In addition, high temperature pre-deformation leads to dynamic recrystallization and increases the number of internal grain boundaries in the delta ferrites. This can also greatly increase the diffusing rate of alloying elements. In these cases, the dissolution of delta ferrites can be promoted.

  14. Influence of high temperature pre-deformation on the dissolution rate of delta ferrites in martensitic heat-resistant steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Junru; Liu, Jianjun; Jiang, Bo; Zhang, Chaolei; Liu, Yazheng

    2017-02-01

    The dissolution process of delta ferrites and the influence of high temperature pre-deformation on the dissolution rate of delta ferrites in martensitic heat-resistant steel 10Cr12Ni3Mo2VN were studied by isothermal heating and thermal simulation experiments. The precipitation temperature of delta ferrites in experimental steel is about 1195 °C. M23C6-type carbides incline to precipitate and coarsen at the boundaries of delta ferrites below 930 °C, and can be rapidly dissolved by heating at 1180 °C. The percentage of delta ferrites gradually decreases with heating time. And a Kolmogorov-Johnson-Mehl-Avrami equation was established to describe the dissolution process of delta ferrites at 1180 °C. High temperature pre-deformation can markedly increase the dissolution rate of delta ferrites. Pre-deformation can largely increase the interface area between delta ferrite and matrix and thus increase the unit-time diffusing quantities of alloying elements between delta ferrites and matrix. In addition, high temperature pre-deformation leads to dynamic recrystallization and increases the number of internal grain boundaries in the delta ferrites. This can also greatly increase the diffusing rate of alloying elements. In these cases, the dissolution of delta ferrites can be promoted.

  15. Monte Carlo simulation of spinodal decomposition in a ternary alloy within a three-phases field: comparison to phase transformation of ferrite in duplex stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emo, Jonathan; Pareige, Cristelle; Saillet, Sébastien; Domain, Christophe; Pareige, Philippe

    2014-06-01

    This work proposes to model phase transformations occurring in duplex stainless steels using atomistic kinetic Monte Carlo in a ternary model alloy. Kinetics are simulated in the three-phase field of a ternary system. Influence of the precipitation of the third phase on the kinetic of spinodal decomposition between the two other phases is studied in order to understand the synergy between spinodal decomposition and G-phase precipitation which exists in duplex stainless steels. Simulation results are compared to experimental data obtained with atom probe tomography.

  16. Hexagonal ferrites for millimeter wave applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polk, Donald E.; Hathaway, Kristl B.

    1993-01-01

    A review of the work accomplished on this contract is presented. A review of the physics of hexagonal ferrite materials and the effective linewidth concept and the detailed overall research plan are contained in the original proposal document. The focus of the program was on the effective linewidth in millimeter wave materials, including planar hexagonal ferrite Y-type materials, uniaxial M-type materials, and thin ferromagnetic transition metal and alloy films. The key idea in the original proposal was that the ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) linewidth in hexagonal ferrites is dominated by inhomogeneous and two-magnon scattering losses and that off-resonance measurements of the effective linewidth would (1) show that the FMR losses do not represent the intrinsic losses, and (2) that the intrinsic losses are significantly lower. This basic idea was verified. Results were obtained on the off-resonance far-field effective linewidth in planar Zn-Y hexagonal ferrite single crystal platelets, single crystal spheres of Ba- and Sr-hexaferrite materials, and permalloy thin films. Three papers on these results were published.

  17. Alloy development for irradiation performance. Quarterly progress report for period ending December 31, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-04-01

    Progress is reported in eight sections: analysis and evaluation studies, test matrices and test methods development, Path A Alloy Development (austenitic stainless steels), Path C Alloy Development (Ti and V alloys), Path D Alloy Development (Fe alloys), Path E Alloy Development (ferritic steels), irradiation experiments and materials inventory, and materials compatibility and hydrogen permeation studies. (DLC)

  18. Epitaxial Garnets and Hexagonal Ferrites.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-12-01

    Ferrites Lithium Ferrite Magnetostatic Wave Garnets Epitaxy Yttrium Iron Garnet Liquid Phase Epitaxy Hexagonal Ferrite Microwave Signal Processing...epitaxial ferrit ( materials for use in microwave and millirreter-wave signal processing devices. The major emphasis has been on multiple layer...overall objective of this research is to develop epitaxial single crystal ferrite films suitable for microwave and millimeter-wave signal processing at

  19. Thermally activated retainer means utilizing shape memory alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grimaldi, Margaret E. (Inventor); Hartz, Leslie S. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A retainer member suitable for retaining a gap filler placed in gaps between adjacent tile members is presented. One edge of the retainer member may be attached to the gap filler and another edge may be provided with a plurality of tab members which in an intermediate position do not interfere with placement or removal of the gap filler between tile members. The retainer member may be fabricated from a shape memory alloy which when heated to a specified memory temperature will thermally activate the tab members to predetermined memory positions engaging the tile members to retain the gap filler in the gap. This invention has particular application to the thermal tiles on space vehicles such as the Space Shuttle Orbiter.

  20. Research activities of biomedical magnesium alloys in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yufeng; Gu, Xuenan

    2011-04-01

    The potential application of Mg alloys as bioabsorable/biodegradable implants have attracted much recent attention in China. Advances in the design and biocompatibility evaluation of bio-Mg alloys in China are reviewed in this paper. Bio-Mg alloys have been developed by alloying with the trace elements existing in human body, such as Mg-Ca, Mg-Zn and Mg-Si based systems. Additionally, novel structured Mg alloys such as porous, composited, nanocrystalline and bulk metallic glass alloys were tried. To control the biocorrosion rate of bio-Mg implant to match the self-healing/regeneration rate of the surrounding tissue in vivo, surface modification layers were coated with physical and chemical methods.

  1. Properties of ferrites important to their friction and wear behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1983-01-01

    Environmental, chemical and crystallographical effects on the fundamental nature on friction and wear of the ferrites in contact with metals, magnetic tapes and themselves are reviewed. The removal of adsorbed films from the surfaces of ferrites results in very strong interfacial adhesion and high friction in ferrite to metal and ferrite to magnetic tape contacts. The metal ferrite bond at the interface is primarily a chemical bond between the metal atoms and the large oxygen anions in the ferrite surface, and the strength of these bonds is related to the oxygen to metal bond strength in the metal oxide. The more active the metal, the higher is the coefficient of friction. Not only under adhesive conditions, but also under abrasive conditions the friction and wear properties of ferrites are related to the crystallographic orientation. With ferrite to ferrite contact the mating of highest atomic density (most closely packed) direction on matched crystallographic planes, that is, 110 directions on /110/planes, results in the lowest coefficient of friction.

  2. Facile Synthesis of Nanoporous Pt-Y alloy with Enhanced Electrocatalytic Activity and Durability.

    PubMed

    Cui, Rongjing; Mei, Ling; Han, Guangjie; Chen, Jiyun; Zhang, Genhua; Quan, Ying; Gu, Ning; Zhang, Lei; Fang, Yong; Qian, Bin; Jiang, Xuefan; Han, Zhida

    2017-02-02

    Recently, Pt-Y alloy has displayed an excellent electrocatalytic activity for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), and is regarded as a promising cathode catalyst for fuel cells. However, the bulk production of nanoscaled Pt-Y alloy with outstanding catalytic performance remains a great challenge. Here, we address the challenge through a simple dealloying method to synthesize nanoporous Pt-Y alloy (NP-PtY) with a typical ligament size of ~5 nm. By combining the intrinsic superior electrocatalytic activity of Pt-Y alloy with the special nanoporous structure, the NP-PtY bimetallic catalyst presents higher activity for ORR and ethanol oxidation reaction, and better electrocatalytic stability than the commercial Pt/C catalyst and nanoporous Pt alloy. The as-made NP-PtY holds great application potential as a promising electrocatalyst in proton exchange membrane fuel cells due to the advantages of facile preparation and excellent catalytic performance.

  3. Facile Synthesis of Nanoporous Pt-Y alloy with Enhanced Electrocatalytic Activity and Durability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Rongjing; Mei, Ling; Han, Guangjie; Chen, Jiyun; Zhang, Genhua; Quan, Ying; Gu, Ning; Zhang, Lei; Fang, Yong; Qian, Bin; Jiang, Xuefan; Han, Zhida

    2017-02-01

    Recently, Pt-Y alloy has displayed an excellent electrocatalytic activity for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), and is regarded as a promising cathode catalyst for fuel cells. However, the bulk production of nanoscaled Pt-Y alloy with outstanding catalytic performance remains a great challenge. Here, we address the challenge through a simple dealloying method to synthesize nanoporous Pt-Y alloy (NP-PtY) with a typical ligament size of ~5 nm. By combining the intrinsic superior electrocatalytic activity of Pt-Y alloy with the special nanoporous structure, the NP-PtY bimetallic catalyst presents higher activity for ORR and ethanol oxidation reaction, and better electrocatalytic stability than the commercial Pt/C catalyst and nanoporous Pt alloy. The as-made NP-PtY holds great application potential as a promising electrocatalyst in proton exchange membrane fuel cells due to the advantages of facile preparation and excellent catalytic performance.

  4. Facile Synthesis of Nanoporous Pt-Y alloy with Enhanced Electrocatalytic Activity and Durability

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Rongjing; Mei, Ling; Han, Guangjie; Chen, Jiyun; Zhang, Genhua; Quan, Ying; Gu, Ning; Zhang, Lei; Fang, Yong; Qian, Bin; Jiang, Xuefan; Han, Zhida

    2017-01-01

    Recently, Pt-Y alloy has displayed an excellent electrocatalytic activity for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), and is regarded as a promising cathode catalyst for fuel cells. However, the bulk production of nanoscaled Pt-Y alloy with outstanding catalytic performance remains a great challenge. Here, we address the challenge through a simple dealloying method to synthesize nanoporous Pt-Y alloy (NP-PtY) with a typical ligament size of ~5 nm. By combining the intrinsic superior electrocatalytic activity of Pt-Y alloy with the special nanoporous structure, the NP-PtY bimetallic catalyst presents higher activity for ORR and ethanol oxidation reaction, and better electrocatalytic stability than the commercial Pt/C catalyst and nanoporous Pt alloy. The as-made NP-PtY holds great application potential as a promising electrocatalyst in proton exchange membrane fuel cells due to the advantages of facile preparation and excellent catalytic performance. PMID:28150732

  5. Influence of helium on deuterium retention in reduced activation ferritic martensitic steel (F82H) under simultaneous deuterium and helium irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yakushiji, K.; Lee, H. T.; Oya, M.; Hamaji, Y.; Ibano, K.; Ueda, Y.

    2016-02-01

    Deuterium and helium retention in Japanese reduced activation ferritic martensitic (RAFM) steel (F82H) under simultaneous D-He irradiation at 500, 625, 750, and 818 K was studied. This study aims to clarify tritium retention behavior in RAFM steels to assess their use as plasma facing materials. The irradiation fluence was kept constant at 1 × 1024 D m-2. Four He desorption peaks were observed with He retention greatest at 625 K. At T > 625 K a monotonic decrease in He retention was observed. At all temperatures a systematic reduction in D retention was observed for the simultaneous D-He case in comparison to D-only case. This suggests that He implanted at the near surface in RAFM steels may reduce the inward penetration of tritium in RAFM steels that would result in lower tritium inventory for a given fluence.

  6. Activity Trends of Binary Silver Alloy Nanocatalysts for Oxygen Reduction Reaction in Alkaline Media.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaoqiang; Chen, Fuyi; Zhang, Nan; Lei, Yimin; Jin, Yachao; Qaseem, Adnan; Johnston, Roy L

    2017-02-02

    The electrocatalytic activity of Pt-based alloys exhibits a strong dependence on their electronic structures, but a relationship between electronic structure and oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity in Ag-based alloys is still not clear. Here, a vapor deposition based approach is reported for the preparation of Ag75 M25 (M = Cu, Co, Fe, and In) and Agx Cu100-x (x = 0, 25, 45, 50, 55, 75, 90, and 100) nanocatalysts and their electronic structures are determined by valence band spectra. The relationship of the d-band center and ORR activity exhibits volcano-shape behaviors, where the maximum catalytic activity is obtained for Ag75 Cu25 alloys. The ORR enhancement of Ag75 Cu25 alloys originates from the 0.12 eV upshift in d-band center relative to pure Ag, which is different from the downshift in the d-band center in Pt-based alloys. The activity trend for these Ag75 M25 alloys is in the order of Ag75 Cu25 > Ag75 Fe25 > Ag75 Co25 . These results provide an insight to understand the activity and stability enhancement of Ag75 Cu25 and Ag50 Cu50 catalysts by alloying.

  7. A framework for predicting the yield stress, Charpy toughness and one hundred-year activation level for irradiated fusion power plant alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Windsor, Colin; Cottrell, Geoff; Kemp, Richard

    2011-04-01

    Recent papers have demonstrated that the yield stress and the Charpy ductile to brittle transition temperature shift at the high irradiation levels of a fusion power plant may be predicted from measurements at lower irradiation levels using neural networks. It was demonstrated that the extrapolation inherent in such predictions could be validated provided that network complexity was appropriately low. Simultaneous predictions of these metallurgical properties at the 100 dpa irradiation level and 400 °C irradiation temperature of a possible fusion power plant have been made for a series of ferritic/martensitic steels, albeit based on mainly fission data. Together with the readily available one hundred-year activation level, benefit functions are defined which can be used to predict the most suitable alloys for a fusion power plant from within existing databases. Our model is sufficiently flexible to allow a variety of possible benefit functions to be defined. The F82H, Eurofer and LA12 alloy series all receive a favourable rating, although all results presented here must be tempered with caution until more data at relevant irradiation levels and with relevant energy spectra become available.

  8. 46 CFR 54.25-20 - Low temperature operation-ferritic steels with properties enhanced by heat treatment (modifies...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Low temperature operation-ferritic steels with... VESSELS Construction With Carbon, Alloy, and Heat Treated Steels § 54.25-20 Low temperature operation—ferritic steels with properties enhanced by heat treatment (modifies UHT-5(c), UHT-6, UHT-23, and...

  9. 46 CFR 54.25-20 - Low temperature operation-ferritic steels with properties enhanced by heat treatment (modifies...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Low temperature operation-ferritic steels with... VESSELS Construction With Carbon, Alloy, and Heat Treated Steels § 54.25-20 Low temperature operation—ferritic steels with properties enhanced by heat treatment (modifies UHT-5(c), UHT-6, UHT-23, and...

  10. 46 CFR 54.25-10 - Low temperature operation-ferritic steels (replaces UCS-65 through UCS-67).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Low temperature operation-ferritic steels (replaces UCS... (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING PRESSURE VESSELS Construction With Carbon, Alloy, and Heat Treated Steels § 54.25-10 Low temperature operation—ferritic steels (replaces UCS-65 through UCS-67). (a) Scope. (1)...

  11. 46 CFR 54.25-20 - Low temperature operation-ferritic steels with properties enhanced by heat treatment (modifies...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Low temperature operation-ferritic steels with... VESSELS Construction With Carbon, Alloy, and Heat Treated Steels § 54.25-20 Low temperature operation—ferritic steels with properties enhanced by heat treatment (modifies UHT-5(c), UHT-6, UHT-23, and...

  12. 46 CFR 54.25-10 - Low temperature operation-ferritic steels (replaces UCS-65 through UCS-67).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Low temperature operation-ferritic steels (replaces UCS... (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING PRESSURE VESSELS Construction With Carbon, Alloy, and Heat Treated Steels § 54.25-10 Low temperature operation—ferritic steels (replaces UCS-65 through UCS-67). (a) Scope. (1)...

  13. 46 CFR 54.25-20 - Low temperature operation-ferritic steels with properties enhanced by heat treatment (modifies...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Low temperature operation-ferritic steels with... VESSELS Construction With Carbon, Alloy, and Heat Treated Steels § 54.25-20 Low temperature operation—ferritic steels with properties enhanced by heat treatment (modifies UHT-5(c), UHT-6, UHT-23, and...

  14. 46 CFR 54.25-10 - Low temperature operation-ferritic steels (replaces UCS-65 through UCS-67).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Low temperature operation-ferritic steels (replaces UCS... (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING PRESSURE VESSELS Construction With Carbon, Alloy, and Heat Treated Steels § 54.25-10 Low temperature operation—ferritic steels (replaces UCS-65 through UCS-67). (a) Scope. (1)...

  15. 46 CFR 54.25-10 - Low temperature operation-ferritic steels (replaces UCS-65 through UCS-67).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Low temperature operation-ferritic steels (replaces UCS... (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING PRESSURE VESSELS Construction With Carbon, Alloy, and Heat Treated Steels § 54.25-10 Low temperature operation—ferritic steels (replaces UCS-65 through UCS-67). (a) Scope. (1)...

  16. 46 CFR 54.25-10 - Low temperature operation-ferritic steels (replaces UCS-65 through UCS-67).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Low temperature operation-ferritic steels (replaces UCS... (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING PRESSURE VESSELS Construction With Carbon, Alloy, and Heat Treated Steels § 54.25-10 Low temperature operation—ferritic steels (replaces UCS-65 through UCS-67). (a) Scope. (1)...

  17. 46 CFR 54.25-20 - Low temperature operation-ferritic steels with properties enhanced by heat treatment (modifies...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Low temperature operation-ferritic steels with... VESSELS Construction With Carbon, Alloy, and Heat Treated Steels § 54.25-20 Low temperature operation—ferritic steels with properties enhanced by heat treatment (modifies UHT-5(c), UHT-6, UHT-23, and...

  18. Corrosion behavior of nickel-containing alloys in artificial sweat.

    PubMed

    Randin, J P

    1988-07-01

    The corrosion resistance of various nickel-containing alloys was measured in artificial sweat (perspiration) using the Tafel extrapolation method. It was found that Ni, CuNi 25 (coin alloy), NiAl (colored intermetallic compounds), WC + Ni (hard metal), white gold (jewelry alloy), FN42 and Nilo Alby K (controlled expansion alloys), and NiP (electroless nickel coating) are in an active state and dissolve readily in oxygenated artificial sweat. By contrast, austenitic stainless steels, TiC + Mo2C + Ni (hard metal), NiTi (shape-memory alloy), Hastelloy X (superalloy), Phydur (precipitation hardening alloy), PdNi and SnNi (nickel-containing coatings) are in a passive state but may pit under certain conditions. Cobalt, Cr, Ti, and some of their alloys were also investigated for the purpose of comparison. Cobalt and its alloys have poor corrosion resistance except for Stellite 20. Chromium and high-chromium ferritic stainless steels have a high pitting potential but the latter are susceptible to crevice corrosion. Ti has a pitting potential greater than 3 V. Comparison between the in vitro measurements of the corrosion rate of nickel-based alloys and the clinical observation of the occurrence of contact dermatitis is discussed.

  19. Preparation and electrocatalytic activity of nanocrystalline Ni-Mo-Co alloy electrode for hydrogen evolution.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lijian; Du, Jingjing; Chen, Baizhen

    2013-03-01

    Ni-Mo-Co alloy electrodes were prepared by electrodeposition technique with citric acid as a complexing agent. The influence of the main technical parameters such as the concentration of CoSO4 7H2O, the current density and the bath temperature on the component content in the Ni-Mo-Co alloy electrode were investigated by electron dispersive spectrometer (EDS), the microstructure and surface morphology of Ni-Mo-Co alloy electrodes were characterized by employing X-ray diffractometer (XRD) and scanning electron microscope (SEM), and the electrocatalytic activity of Ni-Mo-Co alloy electrode for hydrogen evolution was investigated by the method of the cathode polarization curves. The results showed that the excellent Ni-Mo-Co alloy electrode with 41.39 wt% Ni, 53.82 wt% Mo and 4.79 wt% Co was obtained when the concentration of CoSO4 x 7H2O was 8 g/L, the current density was 12 A/dm2 and the bath temperature was 25 degrees C. The mircostructure of the Ni-Mo-Co alloy was nanocrystalline and the average grain size was about 25 nm by calculating using Scherrer Equation. The electrocatalytic activity of Ni-Mo-Co alloy electrode for hydrogen evolution was better than that of Ni-Mo alloy electrode.

  20. Morphological Stability of δ-Ferrite/γ Interphase Boundary in Carbon Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Guowei; Chen, Shuying; Yue, Xudong; Li, Qingchun

    2017-01-01

    The morphological changes of the δ-ferrite/γ interphase boundary have been observed in situ with a high-temperature confocal scanning laser microscope (HTCSLM) during δ/γ transformations (δ → γ and γ → δ) of Fe-0.06 wt pct C-0.6 wt pct Mn alloy, and a kinetic equation of morphological stability of δ-ferrite/γ interphase boundary has been established. Thereafter, the criterion expression for morphological stability of δ-ferrite/γ interphase boundary was established and discussed, and the critical migration speeds of δ-ferrite/γ interphase boundaries are calculated in Fe-C, Fe-Ni, and Fe-Cr alloys. The results indicate that the δ-ferrite/γ interphase boundary is very stable and nearly remains absolute planar all the time during γ → δ transformation in Fe-C alloy. The δ-ferrite/γ interphase boundary remains basically planar during δ → γ transformation when the migration speed is lower than 0.88 μm/s, and the interphase boundary will be unstable and exhibit a finger-like morphology when the migration speed is higher than 0.88 μm/s. The morphological stability of δ-ferrite/γ interphase boundary is primarily controlled by the interface energy and the solute concentration gradient at the front of the boundary. During the constant temperature phase transformation, an opposite temperature gradient on both sides of δ-ferrite/γ interphase boundary weakens the steady effect of the temperature gradient on the boundary. The theoretical analysis of the morphological stability of the δ-ferrite/γ interphase boundary is coincident with the observed experimental results utilizing the HTCSLM. There is a good agreement between the theoretical calculation of the critical moving velocities of δ-ferrite/γ interphase boundaries and the experimental results.

  1. Morphological Stability of δ-Ferrite/ γ Interphase Boundary in Carbon Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Guowei; Chen, Shuying; Yue, Xudong; Li, Qingchun

    2017-04-01

    The morphological changes of the δ-ferrite/ γ interphase boundary have been observed in situ with a high-temperature confocal scanning laser microscope (HTCSLM) during δ/ γ transformations ( δ → γ and γ → δ) of Fe-0.06 wt pct C-0.6 wt pct Mn alloy, and a kinetic equation of morphological stability of δ-ferrite/ γ interphase boundary has been established. Thereafter, the criterion expression for morphological stability of δ-ferrite/ γ interphase boundary was established and discussed, and the critical migration speeds of δ-ferrite/ γ interphase boundaries are calculated in Fe-C, Fe-Ni, and Fe-Cr alloys. The results indicate that the δ-ferrite/ γ interphase boundary is very stable and nearly remains absolute planar all the time during γ → δ transformation in Fe-C alloy. The δ-ferrite/ γ interphase boundary remains basically planar during δ → γ transformation when the migration speed is lower than 0.88 μm/s, and the interphase boundary will be unstable and exhibit a finger-like morphology when the migration speed is higher than 0.88 μm/s. The morphological stability of δ-ferrite/ γ interphase boundary is primarily controlled by the interface energy and the solute concentration gradient at the front of the boundary. During the constant temperature phase transformation, an opposite temperature gradient on both sides of δ-ferrite/ γ interphase boundary weakens the steady effect of the temperature gradient on the boundary. The theoretical analysis of the morphological stability of the δ-ferrite/ γ interphase boundary is coincident with the observed experimental results utilizing the HTCSLM. There is a good agreement between the theoretical calculation of the critical moving velocities of δ-ferrite/ γ interphase boundaries and the experimental results.

  2. Activities of oxygen in liquid Cu-Sb and Cu-Ge alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otsuka, Shinya; Matsumura, Yoshihiro; Kozuka, Zensaku

    1982-03-01

    In order to determine the activity coefficients of oxygen, γΩ in liquid Cu-Sb and Cu-Ge alloys at 1373 K as a function of alloy composition, the modified coulometric titrations, described previously, have been performed by using the galvanic cell: O in liquid Cu-Sb or Cu-Ge alloys/ZrO2 (+CaO)/Air, Pt. A pronounced point of inflection in the In γΩ vs alloy composition curve has been observed both for Cu-Sb and Cu-Ge alloys, as predicted by Jacob and Alcock’s quasichemical equation. The measured data itself, however, are significantly different from those predicted by their equation. The validity of Wagner’s solution model with one or two energy parameters has been also tested.

  3. Electrical transport behavior of nonstoichiometric magnesium-zinc ferrite

    SciTech Connect

    Ghatak, S.; Sinha, M.; Meikap, A.K.; Pradhan, S.K.

    2010-08-15

    This paper presents the direct current conductivity, alternate current conductivity and dielectric properties of nonstoichiometric magnesium-zinc ferrite below room temperature. The frequency exponent (s) of conductivity shows an anomalous temperature dependency. The magnitude of the temperature exponent (n) of dielectric permittivity strongly depends on frequency and its value decreases with increasing frequency. The grain boundary contribution is dominating over the grain contribution in conduction process and the temperature dependence of resistance due to grain and grain boundary contribution exhibits two activation regions. The ferrite shows positive alternating current magnetoconductivity. The solid state processing technique was used for the preparation of nanocrystalline ferrite powder from oxides of magnesium, zinc and iron. The X-ray diffraction methods were used in determining the structure and composition of obtained ferrite, while multimeter, impedance analyzer, liquid nitrogen cryostat and electromagnet were used in the study of conducting and dielectric properties of ferrite.

  4. Impedance calculation for ferrite inserts

    SciTech Connect

    Breitzmann, S.C.; Lee, S.Y.; Ng, K.Y.; /Fermilab

    2005-01-01

    Passive ferrite inserts were used to compensate the space charge impedance in high intensity space charge dominated accelerators. They study the narrowband longitudinal impedance of these ferrite inserts. they find that the shunt impedance and the quality factor for ferrite inserts are inversely proportional to the imaginary part of the permeability of ferrite materials. They also provide a recipe for attaining a truly passive space charge impedance compensation and avoiding narrowband microwave instabilities.

  5. CASS Ferrite and Grain Structure Relationship

    SciTech Connect

    Ruud, Clayton O.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Meyer, Ryan M.; Diaz, Aaron A.; Anderson, Michael T.

    2016-07-13

    This document summarizes the results of research conducted at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to determine whether, based on experimental measurements, a correlation existed between grain structure in cast austenitic stainless steel (CASS) piping and ferrite content of the casting alloy. The motivation for this research lies in the fact that ultrasonic testing (UT) is strongly influenced by CASS grain structure; knowledge of this grain structure may help improve the ability to interpret UT responses, thereby improving the overall reliability of UT inspections of CASS components.

  6. Finemet versus ferrite -- Pros and cons

    SciTech Connect

    K.Y. Ng and Z.B. Qian

    1999-05-19

    There is a new magnetic alloy called Finemet which has very constant {mu}'{sub p}Qf up to {approximately} 2 kG and is very stable at high magnet flux density and temperature. It may be a good can-didate for high-gradient rf cavities. However, it has a rather low quality factor and is therefore very lossy. We compare the pros and cons of Finemet versus the common ferrite, when used in low-energy accelerating cavities, insertion for space-charge compensation, and barrier cavities.

  7. Hierarchical Pd-Sn alloy nanosheet dendrites: an economical and highly active catalyst for ethanol electrooxidation.

    PubMed

    Ding, Liang-Xin; Wang, An-Liang; Ou, Yan-Nan; Li, Qi; Guo, Rui; Zhao, Wen-Xia; Tong, Ye-Xiang; Li, Gao-Ren

    2013-01-01

    Hierarchical alloy nanosheet dendrites (ANSDs) are highly favorable for superior catalytic performance and efficient utilization of catalyst because of the special characteristics of alloys, nanosheets, and dendritic nanostructures. In this paper, we demonstrate for the first time a facile and efficient electrodeposition approach for the controllable synthesis of Pd-Sn ANSDs with high surface area. These synthesized Pd-Sn ANSDs exhibit high electrocatalytic activity and superior long-term cycle stability toward ethanol oxidation in alkaline media. The enhanced electrocataytic activity of Pd-Sn ANSDs may be attributed to Pd-Sn alloys, nanosheet dendrite induced promotional effect, large number of active sites on dendrite surface, large surface area, and good electrical contact with the base electrode. Because of the simple implement and high flexibility, the proposed approach can be considered as a general and powerful strategy to synthesize the alloy electrocatalysts with high surface areas and open dendritic nanostructures.

  8. Development of Lanthanum Ferrite SOFC Cathodes

    SciTech Connect

    Simner, Steve P.; Bonnett, Jeff F.; Canfield, Nathan L.; Meinhardt, Kerry D.; Shelton, Jayne P.; Sprenkle, Vince L.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.

    2003-01-01

    A number of studies have been conducted concerning compositional/microstructural modifications of a Sr-doped lanthanum ferrite (LSF) cathode and protective Sm-doped ceria (SDC) layer in an anode supported solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC). Emphasis was placed on achieving enhanced low temperature (700-800 degrees C) performance, and long-term cell stability. Investigations involved manipulation of the lanthanum ferrite chemistry, addition of noble metal oxygen reduction catalysts, incorporation of active cathode layer compositions containing Co, Fe and higher Sr contents, and attempts to optimize the ceria barrier layer between the LSF cathode and YSZ electrolyte.

  9. Method of treating intermetallic alloy hydrogenation/oxidation catalysts for improved impurity poisoning resistance, regeneration and increased activity

    DOEpatents

    Wright, R.B.

    1992-01-14

    Alternate, successive high temperature oxidation and reduction treatments, in either order, of intermetallic alloy hydrogenation and intermetallic alloy oxidation catalysts unexpectedly improves the impurity poisoning resistance, regeneration capacity and/or activity of the catalysts. The particular alloy, and the final high temperature treatment given alloy (oxidation or reduction) will be chosen to correspond to the function of the catalyst (oxidation or hydrogenation). 23 figs.

  10. Fabrication of biodegradable Zn-Al-Mg alloy: Mechanical properties, corrosion behavior, cytotoxicity and antibacterial activities.

    PubMed

    Bakhsheshi-Rad, H R; Hamzah, E; Low, H T; Kasiri-Asgarani, M; Farahany, S; Akbari, E; Cho, M H

    2017-04-01

    In this work, binary Zn-0.5Al and ternary Zn-0.5Al-xMg alloys with various Mg contents were investigated as biodegradable materials for implant applications. Compared with Zn-0.5Al (single phase), Zn-0.5Al-xMg alloys consisted of the α-Zn and Mg2(Zn, Al)11 with a fine lamellar structure. The results also revealed that ternary Zn-Al-Mg alloys presented higher micro-hardness value, tensile strength and corrosion resistance compared to the binary Zn-Al alloy. In addition, the tensile strength and corrosion resistance increased with increasing the Mg content in ternary alloys. The immersion tests also indicated that the corrosion rates in the following order Zn-0.5Al-0.5Mgalloy presents higher viability of MC3T3-E1 cell compared to the Zn-0.5Al alloy, which suggested good biocompatibility. The antibacterial activity result of both Zn-0.5Al and Zn-0.5Al-Mg alloys against Escherichia coli presented some antibacterial activity, while the Zn-0.5Al-0.5Mg significantly prohibited the growth of Escherichia coli. Thus, Zn-0.5Al-0.5Mg alloy with appropriate mechanical properties, low corrosion rate, good biocompatibility and antibacterial activities was believed to be a good candidate as a biodegradable implant material.

  11. Active brazing alloy paste as a totally metal thick film conductor material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Mingguang; Chung, D. D. L.

    1994-06-01

    A silver-based active (titanium-containing) brazing alloy, namely 63Ag-34.25Cu-1.75Ti-1.OSn, was found to serve as a totally metal (no glass) thick film conductor which exhibited lower electrical resistivity, much greater film/substrate adhesion, much lower porosity, similar solderability, and lower scratch resistance compared to the conventional silver-glass thick film. The brazing alloy film was formed by screen printing a paste containing the alloy particles and then firing at 880°C in vacuum.

  12. Nickel hydroxide/cobalt-ferrite magnetic nanocatalyst for alcohol oxidation.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Pooja B; Inam, Fawad; Bhat, Badekai Ramachandra

    2014-08-11

    A magnetically separable, active nickel hydroxide (Brønsted base) coated nanocobalt ferrite catalyst has been developed for oxidation of alcohols. High surface area was achieved by tuning the particle size with surfactant. The surface area of 120.94 m2 g(-1) has been achieved for the coated nanocobalt ferrite. Improved catalytic activity and selectivity were obtained by synergistic effect of transition metal hydroxide (basic hydroxide) on nanocobalt ferrite. The nanocatalyst oxidizes primary and secondary alcohols efficiently (87%) to corresponding carbonyls in good yields.

  13. Toughness of 12%Cr ferritic/martensitic steel welds produced by non-arc welding processes

    SciTech Connect

    Ginn, B.J.; Gooch, T.G.

    1998-08-01

    Low carbon 12%Cr steels can offer reduced life cycle costs in many applications. The present work examined the behavior of commercial steels of varying composition when subject to low heat input welding by the electron beam (EB) process and to a forge cycle by linear friction welding (LFW). Charpy impact testing was carried out on the high temperature heat-affected zone (HAZ)/fusion boundary or weld interface, with metallographic examination. With EB welding, the ductile-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) was below 0 C (32 F) only for steel of low ferrite factor giving a fully martensitic weld area. Higher ferrite factor alloys showed predominantly ferritic transformed microstructures and a transition well above room temperature. Grain coarsening was found even with low EB process power, the peak grain size increasing with both heat input and steel ferrite factor. Use of LFW gave a fine weld area structure and DBTTs around 0 C even in high ferrite factor (FF) material.

  14. Alloys developed for high temperature applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basuki, Eddy Agus; Prajitno, Djoko Hadi; Muhammad, Fadhli

    2017-01-01

    Alloys used for high temperatures applications require combinations of mechanical strength, microstructural stability and corrosion/oxidation resistance. Nickel base superalloys have been traditionally the prime materials utilized for hot section components of aircraft turbine engines. Nevertheless, due to their limited melting temperatures, alloys based on intermetallic compounds, such as TiAl base alloys, have emerged as high temperature materials and intensively developed with the main aim to replace nickel based superalloys. For applications in steam power plants operated at lower temperatures, ferritic high temperature alloys still attract high attention, and therefore, development of these alloys is in progress. This paper highlights the important metallurgical parameters of high temperature alloys and describes few efforts in the development of Fe-Ni-Al based alloys containing B2-(Fe,Ni)Al precipitates, oxide dispersion strengthening (ODS) ferritic steels and titanium aluminide based alloys include important protection system of aluminide coatings.

  15. Effect of loading mode on the fracture toughness of a reduced activation ferritic/martensitic stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Li, H.; Hirth, J.P.; Jones, R.H.; Gelles, D.S.

    1993-09-01

    The critical J integrals of mode I (J{sub IC}), mixed-mode I/III (J{sub MC}), and mode III (J{sub IIIC}) were examined for a ferritic stainless steel (F-82H) at ambient temperature. A determination of J{sub MC} was made using modified compact-tension specimens. Different ratios of tension/shear stress were achieved by varying the principal axis of the crack plane between 0 and 55 degrees from the load line. The results showed that J{sub MC}s and tearing moduli (T{sub M}) varied with the crack angles and were lower than their mode I and mode III counterparts. Both the minimum J{sub MC} and T{sub M} occurred at a crack angle between 40 and 50 degrees, where {sigma}{sub i}/{sigma}{sub iii} was 1.2 to 0.84. The J{sub min} was 240 kJ/m{sup 2}, and ratios of J{sub IC}/J{sub min} and J{sub IIIC}/J{sub min} were about 2.1 and 1.9, respectively. Morphology of fracture surfaces was consistent with the change of J{sub MC} and T{sub M} values. While the upper shelf-fracture toughness of F-82H depends on loading mode, the J{sub min} remains very high. Other important considerations include the effect of mixed-mode loading on the DBT temperature, and effects of hydrogen and irradiation on J{sub min}.

  16. Enhancing oxygen reduction reaction activity of Pt-shelled catalysts via subsurface alloying.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Daojian; Qiu, Xiangguo; Yu, Haiyan

    2014-10-14

    Despite remarkable efforts have been put into the field of Pt-shelled catalysts containing an atomically thin Pt surface layer for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in the last decade, further development of new Pt-shelled catalysts is still necessary. Here, a new set of Pt-shelled catalysts by subsurface alloying with early transition metals such as Mn and Fe is predicted to be a good candidate for the ORR by using density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Trends in oxygen reduction activity of Pt-alloy catalysts are determined with calculations of oxygen binding by using the slab and cluster models. It is found that the subsurface alloys by the incorporation of submonolayer M (M = Mn and Fe) into Pt(111) in the slab model result in the enhancement of ORR activity, compared with the well-known Pt(111)-skin-M, pure Pt, and Pt3M alloy catalysts. For the cluster model, the Pt12Mn and Pt12Fe clusters are also found to be the optimal catalysts for the ORR. It is expected that this work can open up new opportunities for enhancing the ORR activity of Pt-alloy catalysts by subsurface alloying.

  17. Microstructural evolution of delta ferrite in SAVE12 steel under heat treatment and short-term creep

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Shengzhi; Eliniyaz, Zumrat; Zhang, Lanting; Sun, Feng; Shen, Yinzhong; Shan, Aidang

    2012-11-15

    This research focused on the formation and microstructural evolution of delta ferrite phase in SAVE12 steel. The formation of delta ferrite was due to the high content of ferrite forming alloy elements such as Cr, W, and Ta. This was interpreted through either JMatPro-4.1 computer program or Cr{sub eq} calculations. Delta ferrite was found in bamboo-like shape and contained large amount of MX phase. It was surrounded by Laves phases before creep or aging treatment. Annealing treatments were performed under temperatures from 1050 Degree-Sign C to 1100 Degree-Sign C and various time periods to study its dissolution kinetics. The result showed that most of the delta ferrite can be dissolved by annealing in single phase austenitic region. Dissolution process of delta ferrite may largely depend on dissolution kinetic factors, rather than on thermodynamic factors. Precipitation behavior during short-term (1100 h) creep was investigated at temperature of 600 Degree-Sign C under a stress of 180 MPa. The results demonstrated that delta ferrite became preferential nucleation sites for Laves phase at the early stage of creep. Laves phase on the boundary around delta ferrite showed relatively slower growth and coarsening rate than that inside delta ferrite. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Delta ferrite is systematically studied under heat treatment and short-term creep. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Delta ferrite contains large number of MX phase and is surrounded by Laves phases before creep or aging treatment. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Formation of delta ferrite is interpreted by theoretical and empirical methods. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Most of the delta ferrite is dissolved by annealing in single phase austenitic region. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Delta ferrite becomes preferential nucleation sites for Laves phase at the early stage of creep.

  18. Dielectric properties of magnetic grains in CoFe1.95Ho0.05O4 spinel ferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhowmik, R. N.; Panneer Muthuselvam, I.

    2013-06-01

    CoFe1.95Ho0.05O4 spinel ferrite has been prepared by mechanical alloying and subsequent annealing at temperatures (TAN) in the range 800-1200° C. As an effect of annealing temperature, the average grain size of the material has increased from 40 to 90 nm and magnetically transformed from single domain/pseudo-single domain (40-64 nm) to multi-domain state (67-90 nm) for TAN>1050 °C. Dielectric properties of the nano-grained CoFe1.95Ho0.05O4 ferrite have suggested a correlation with magnetic domain transformation. The dielectric constant of the material is the lowest for the grains in pseudo-single domain state (59 nm). The material showed non-Debye type dielectric relaxation with activation energy 0.47-0.58 eV, along with lowest value of activation energy due to electrical conduction inside grains. The dielectric contributions of grains and grain boundaries have been precisely separated using complex modulus formalism and various scaling plots. Results of the dielectric parameters of the samples (dielectric constant: 20-100 and dielectric loss: 0.11-0.4) seems to be interesting for microelectronic applications of ferrite materials.

  19. Pu-ZR Alloy high-temperature activation-measurement foil

    DOEpatents

    McCuaig, Franklin D.

    1977-08-02

    A nuclear reactor fuel alloy consists essentially of from slightly greater than 7 to about 4 w/o zirconium, balance plutonium, and is characterized in that the alloy is castable and is rollable to thin foils. A preferred embodiment of about 7 w/o zirconium, balance plutonium, has a melting point substantially above the melting point of plutonium, is rollable to foils as thin as 0.0005 inch thick, and is compatible with cladding material when repeatedly cycled to temperatures above 650.degree. C. Neutron flux densities across a reactor core can be determined with a high-temperature activation-measurement foil which consists of a fuel alloy foil core sandwiched and sealed between two cladding material jackets, the fuel alloy foil core being a 7 w/o zirconium, plutonium foil which is from 0.005 to 0.0005 inch thick.

  20. Influence of DIT Parameters on the Cementite Spheroidization in a Low-Alloy Medium Carbon Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arruabarrena, Jon; López, Beatriz; Rodriguez-Ibabe, Jose M.

    2016-01-01

    The influence of strain, strain rate, and temperature on deformation-induced transformation (DIT) in a low-alloy medium carbon steel is studied. The strain promotes the nucleation of ferrite (deformation-induced ferrite) and also pearlite (deformation-induced pearlite), this last being characterized by a fine interlamellar spacing and morphological instability. At strains ɛ > 0.5, intragranular nucleation activates and further ferrite nucleation over the newly created α/ γ interface takes place, which gives rise to the precipitation of cementite (deformation-induced cementite) at the ferrite boundaries. Soft annealing treatments have been performed on the microstructures obtained by DIT, and the degree of spheroidization has been quantified by image analysis techniques. In comparison to non-deformed conditions, the application of DIT results in a higher degree of spheroidization after soft annealing. Moreover, the EBSD analysis denotes that ferrite grain size refinement is achieved with respect to non-deformed conditions. The degree of spheroidization is highly influenced by the applied strain level and subsequent holding temperature.

  1. Effect of Tungsten on Long-Term Microstructural Evolution and Impression Creep Behavior of 9Cr Reduced Activation Ferritic/Martensitic Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas Paul, V.; Vijayanand, V. D.; Sudha, C.; Saroja, S.

    2017-01-01

    The present study describes the changes in the creep properties associated with microstructural evolution during thermal exposures to near service temperatures in indigenously developed reduced activation ferritic-martensitic steels with varying tungsten (1 and 1.4 wt pct W) contents. The creep behavior has been studied employing impression creep (IC) test, and the changes in impression creep behavior with tungsten content have been correlated with the observed microstructures. The results of IC test showed that an increase in 0.4 pct W decreases the creep rate to nearly half the value. Creep strength of 1.4 pct W steel showed an increase in steels aged for short durations which decreased as aging time increased. The microstructural changes include coarsening of precipitates, reduction in dislocation density, changes in microchemistry, and formation of new phases. The formation of various phases and their volume fractions have been predicted using the JMatPro software for the two steels and validated by experimental methods. Detailed transmission electron microscopy analysis shows coarsening of precipitates and formation of a discontinuous network of Laves phase in 1.4 W steel aged for 10,000 hours at 823 K (550 °C) which is in agreement with the JMatPro simulation results.

  2. Effects of helium on ductile-brittle transition behavior of reduced-activation ferritic steels after high-concentration helium implantation at high temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, A.; Ejiri, M.; Nogami, S.; Ishiga, M.; Kasada, R.; Kimura, A.; Abe, K.; Jitsukawa, S.

    2009-04-01

    The effects of He on the fracture behavior of reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steels, including oxide dispersion-strengthened (ODS) steels and F82H, was determined by characterizing the microstructural evolution in and fracture behavior of these steels after He implantation up to 1000 appm at around 550 °C. He implantation was carried out by a cyclotron with a beam of 50 MeV α-particles. In the case of F82H, the ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) increase induced by He implantation was about 70 °C and the grain boundary fracture surface was only observed in the He-implanted area of all the ruptured specimens in brittle manner. By contrast, no DBTT shift or fracture mode change was observed in He-implanted 9Cr-ODS and 14Cr-ODS steels. Microstructural characterization suggested that the difference in the bubble formation behavior of F82H and ODS steels might be attributed to the grain boundary rupture of He-implanted F82H.

  3. Effect of alloying on the self-diffusion activation energy in γ-iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasilyev, A. A.; Sokolov, S. F.; Kolbasnikov, N. G.; Sokolov, D. F.

    2011-11-01

    The experimental data on the self-diffusion coefficient of austenite with different chemical compositions obtained by the radioactive isotope method have been analyzed quantitatively. The self-diffusion activation energy in pure γ-iron is shown to be ˜312 kJ/mol. Alloying of austenite with such elements as Mn, Mo, Nb, Ti, and Si (to a lower degree) increases the self-diffusion activation energy, and alloying with C, V, or Cr (for the element content ≥3 at %) decreases it. The empirical formula is derived for calculation of the self-diffusion activation energy in austenite solid solutions with complex composition.

  4. Magnetic Characterization of Ferrite Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryan, Matthew; Sokol, Paul; Gumina, Greg; Bronstein, Lyudmila; Dragnea, Bogdan

    2011-03-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (NPs) of different compositions (FeO/ Fe 3 O4 , g- Fe 2 O3 , FePt, and CoFe 2 O4) have been synthesized using high temperature organometallic routes described elsewhere. NPs (16.6 nm in diameter) of a mixed FeO/ Fe 3 O4 (wuestite/magnetite) composition were prepared by thermal decomposition or iron oleate in the presence of oleic acid as a surfactant in dodocane at 370C in argon atmosphere. After the thermal treatment of the reaction solution at 200 C under air for 2 hours these NPs are transformed into maghemite (g- Fe 2 O3) , the magnetization of which is significantly enhanced. NPs of CoFe 2 O4 (8 nm) have been prepared by simultaneous decomposition of Co(II) and Fe(III) acetylacetonates in the presence of oleic acid and oleylamine. The X-ray diffraction profile of these NPs is characteristic of cobalt ferrite. Alternatively, alloyed 1.8 nm FePt NPs prepared by simultaneous decomposition of Fe and Pt acetylacetonates in the reductive environment demonstrate a completely disordered structure, which is reflected in their magnetic properties. SQUID magnetometry was used to measure the magnetization of NPs at high and low temperatures. Zero-field cooling and field-cooling measurements were taken to demonstrate superparamagnetic behavior and an associated blocking temperature.

  5. Active and passive kink mode studies in a tokamak with a movable ferromagnetic wall

    SciTech Connect

    Levesque, J. P.; Hughes, P. E.; Bialek, J.; Byrne, P. J.; Mauel, M. E.; Navratil, G. A.; Peng, Q.; Rhodes, D. J.; Stoafer, C. C.

    2015-05-15

    High-resolution active and passive kink mode studies are conducted in a tokamak with an adjustable ferromagnetic wall near the plasma surface. Ferritic tiles made from 5.6 mm thick Hiperco{sup ®} 50 alloy have been mounted on the plasma-facing side of half of the in-vessel movable wall segments in the High Beta Tokamak-Extended Pulse device [D. A. Maurer et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 53, 074016 (2011)] in order to explore ferritic resistive wall mode stability. Low-activation ferritic steels are a candidate for structural components of a fusion reactor, and these experiments examine MHD stability of plasmas with nearby ferromagnetic material. Plasma-wall separation for alternating ferritic and non-ferritic wall segments is adjusted between discharges without opening the vacuum vessel. Amplification of applied resonant magnetic perturbations and plasma disruptivity are observed to increase when the ferromagnetic wall is close to plasma surface instead of the standard stainless steel wall. Rapidly rotating m/n=3/1 external kink modes have higher growth rates with the nearby ferritic wall. Feedback suppression of kinks is still as effective as before the installation of ferritic material in vessel, in spite of increased mode growth rates.

  6. Facile synthesis of PtAu alloy nanoparticles with high activity for formic acid oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Sheng; Shao, Yuyan; Yin, Geping; Lin, Yuehe

    2010-02-15

    We report the facile synthesis of carbon supported PtAu alloy nanoparticles with high electrocatalytic activity as the anode catalyst for direct formic acid fuel cells (DFAFCs). PtAu alloy nanopaticles are synthesized by co-reducing HAuCl4 and H2PtCl6 with NaBH4 in the presence of sodium citrate and then the nanoparticles are deposited on Vulcan XC-72R carbon support (PtAu/C). The obtained catalysts are characterized with X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscope (TEM), which reveal PtAu alloy formation with an average diameter of 4.6 nm. PtAu/C exhibits 8 times higher catalytic activity toward formic acid oxidation than Pt/C. The enhanced activity of PtAu/C catalyst is attributed to noncontinuous Pt sites formed in the presence of the neighbored Au sites, which promotes direct oxidation of formic acid by avoiding poison CO.

  7. Unique activity of Pd monomers: hydrogen evolution at AuPd(111) surface alloys.

    PubMed

    Pluntke, Y; Kibler, L A; Kolb, D M

    2008-07-07

    Well-defined Au/Pd(111) alloy films have been prepared on a Ru(0001) substrate by electrochemical metal deposition and subsequent heating up to 700 degrees C. The electrochemical behaviour of the 20 monolayers thick epitaxially-grown films is in excellent agreement with both equilibrium surface composition and distribution for Au/Pd alloys on Mo(110) as previously reported (D. W. Goodman et al., J. Phys. Chem., 2005, B109, 18535). The electrocatalytic activity of the AuPd(111) surface alloys was studied for the hydrogen evolution in 0.1 M H(2)SO(4) as a function of surface composition. Maximum activities were found for Pd fractions of 0.2 +/- 0.1, where the population of Pd atoms surrounded by Au has its maximum. These Pd monomers are found to be about 20 times more active than Pd atoms in the Pd overlayer.

  8. Investigation of Iron-Chromium-Niobium-Titanium Ferritic Stainless Steel for Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Interconnect Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Zhenguo; Xia, Guanguang; Wang, Chong M.; Nie, Zimin; Templeton, Joshua D.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Singh, Prabhakar

    2008-09-01

    As part of an effort to develop cost-effective ferritic stainless steel-based interconnects for solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) stacks, AL 441 HPTM was studied in terms of its metallurgical characteristics, oxidation behavior, and electrical performance. Minor alloying elements (Nb and Ti) captured interstitials such as C by forming carbides, stabilizing the ferritic structure and mitigating the risks of sensitization and inter-granular corrosion. Laves phases rich in Nb and Si precipitated along grain boundaries during high temperature exposure, improving the steel’s high temperature mechanical strength. The capture of Si in the Laves phase minimized the Si activity in the steel substrate and prevented formation of an insulating silica layer at the scale/metal interface. However, the relatively high oxidation rate, and thus increasing ASR over time, necessitates the application of a conductive protection layer on the steel. In particular, Mn1.5Co1.5O4 spinel protection layers drastically improved the electrical performance of the ferritic stainless steel 441, acting as barriers to chromium outward and oxygen inward diffusion.

  9. Microstructure and mechanical properties of ultrafine-grained Fe-14Cr and ODS Fe-14Cr model alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auger, M. A.; Leguey, T.; Muñoz, A.; Monge, M. A.; de Castro, V.; Fernández, P.; Garcés, G.; Pareja, R.

    2011-10-01

    Reduced activation ferritic Fe-14 wt%Cr and Fe-14 wt%Cr-0.3 wt%Y 2O 3 alloys were produced by mechanical alloying and hot isostatic pressing followed by forging and heat treating. The alloy containing Y 2O 3 developed a submicron-grained structure with homogeneous dispersion of oxide nanoparticles that enhanced the tensile properties in comparison to the Y 2O 3 free alloy. Strengthening induced by the Y 2O 3 dispersion appears to be effective up to 873 K, at least. A uniform distribution of Cr-rich precipitates, stable upon a heat treatment at 1123 K for 2 h, was also found in both alloys.

  10. Role of electronic perturbation in stability and activity of Pt-based alloy nanocatalysts for oxygen reduction.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Seung Jun; Kim, Soo-Kil; Lee, June-Gunn; Lee, Seung-Cheol; Jang, Jong Hyun; Kim, Pil; Lim, Tae-Hoon; Sung, Yung-Eun; Yoo, Sung Jong

    2012-12-05

    The design of electrocatalysts for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells must satsify two equally important fundamental principles: optimization of electrocatalytic activity and long-term stability in acid media (pH <1) at high potential (0.8 V). We report here a solution-based approach to the preparation of Pt-based alloy with early transition metals and realistic parameters for the stability and activity of Pt(3)M (M = Y, Zr, Ti, Ni, and Co) nanocatalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). The enhanced stability and activity of Pt-based alloy nanocatalysts in ORR and the relationship between electronic structure modification and stability were studied by experiment and DFT calculations. Stability correlates with the d-band fillings and the heat of alloy formation of Pt(3)M alloys, which in turn depends on the degree of the electronic perturbation due to alloying. This concept provides realistic parameters for rational catalyst design in Pt-based alloy systems.

  11. Biologically activated noble metal alloys at the nanoscale: for lithium ion battery anodes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yun Jung; Lee, Youjin; Oh, Dahyun; Chen, Tiffany; Ceder, Gerbrand; Belcher, Angela M

    2010-07-14

    We report the synthesis and electrochemical activity of gold and silver noble metals and their alloy nanowires using multiple virus clones as anode materials for lithium ion batteries. Using two clones, one for specificity (p8#9 virus) and one versatility (E4 virus), noble metal nanowires of high-aspect ratio with diameters below 50 nm were successfully synthesized with control over particle sizes, morphologies, and compositions. The biologically derived noble metal alloy nanowires showed electrochemical activities toward lithium even when the electrodes were prepared from bulk powder forms. The improvement in capacity retention was accomplished by alloy formation and surface stabilization. Although the cost of noble metals renders them a less ideal choice for lithium ion batteries, these noble metal/alloy nanowires serve as great model systems to study electrochemically induced transformation at the nanoscale. Given the demonstration of the electrochemical activity of noble metal alloy nanowires with various compositions, the M13 biological toolkit extended its utility for the study on the basic electrochemical property of materials.

  12. Epitaxial Garnets and Hexagonal Ferrites.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-04-20

    Iron Garnet Liquid Phase Epitaxy Hexagonal Ferrite microwave Signal Processing Millimeter-Wave 20. ABSTRACT (Continue ani revee arde if necoeermy and...le.’uIfy by block rns.) e objective of this research is to develop new and improved epitauial ferrite materials for use in microwave and millimeter... ferrite films suitable for microwave and millimeter-wave signal processing at frequencies above 1 GHz. The specific tasks are: a. Analyze and develop

  13. Synthesis and structural characterization of magnetic cadmium sulfide-cobalt ferrite nanocomposite, and study of its activity for dyes degradation under ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farhadi, Saeed; Siadatnasab, Firouzeh

    2016-11-01

    Cadmium sulfide-cobalt ferrite (CdS/CFO) nanocomposite was easily synthesized by one-step hydrothermal decomposition of cadmium diethyldithiocarbamate complex on the CoFe2O4 nanoparticles at 200 °C. Spectroscopic techniques of powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), UV-visible spectroscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET), and magnetic measurements were applied for characterizing the structure and morphology of the product. The results of FT-IR, XRD and EDX indicated that the CdS/CFO was highly pure. SEM and TEM results revealed that the CdS/CFO nanocomposite was formed from nearly uniform and sphere-like nanoparticles with the size of approximately 20 nm. The UV-vis absorption spectrum of the CdS/CFO nanocomposite showed the band gap of 2.21 eV, which made it suitable for sono-/photo catalytic purposes. By using the obtained CdS/CFO nanocomposite, an ultrasound-assisted advanced oxidation process (AOP) has been developed for catalytic degradation of methylene blue (MB), Rhodamine B (RhB), and methyl orange (MO)) in the presence of H2O2 as a green oxidant. CdS/CFO nanocomposite exhibited excellent sonocatalytic activity, so that, dyes were completely degraded in less than 10 min. The influences of crucial factors such as the H2O2 amount and catalyst dosage on the degradation efficiency were evaluated. The as-prepared CdS/CFO nanocomposite exhibited higher catalytic activity than pure CdS nanoparticles. Moreover, the magnetic property of CoFe2O4 made the nanocomposite recyclable.

  14. Dielectric investigations of polycrystalline samarium bismuth ferrite ceramic

    SciTech Connect

    Palaimiene, E.; Macutkevic, J.; Banys, J.; Karpinsky, D. V.; Kholkin, A. L.

    2015-01-05

    Results of broadband dielectric investigations of samarium doped bismuth ferrite ceramics are presented in wide temperature range (20–800 K). At temperatures higher than 400 K, the dielectric properties of samarium bismuth ferrite ceramics are governed by Maxwell-Wagner relaxation and electrical conductivity. The DC conductivity increases and activation energy decreases with samarium concentration. In samarium doped bismuth ferrite, the ferroelectric phase transition temperature decreases with samarium concentration and finally no ferroelectric order is observed at x = 0.2. At lower temperatures, the dielectric properties of ferroelectric samarium doped bismuth ferrite are governed by ferroelectric domains dynamics. Ceramics with x = 0.2 exhibit the relaxor-like behaviour.

  15. Probing the interaction induced conformation transitions in acid phosphatase with cobalt ferrite nanoparticles: Relation to inhibition and bio-activity of Chlorella vulgaris acid phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Farooq; Zhou, Xing; Yao, Hongzhou; Zhou, Ying; Xu, Chao

    2016-09-01

    The present study explored the interaction and kinetics of cobalt ferrite nanoparticles (NPs) with acid phosphatase (ACP) by utilizing diverse range of spectroscopic techniques. The results corroborate, the CoFe2O4 NPs cause fluorescence quenching in ACP by static quenching mechanism. The negative values of van't Hoff thermodynamic expressions (ΔH=-0.3293Jmol(-1)K(-1) and ΔG=-3.960kJmol(-1)K(-1)) corroborate the spontaneity and exothermic nature of static quenching. The positive value of ΔS (13.2893Jmol(-1)K(-1)) corroborate that major contributors of higher and stronger binding affinity among CoFe2O4 NPs with ACP were electrostatic. In addition, FTIR, UV-CD, UV-vis spectroscopy and three dimensional fluorescence (3D) techniques confirmed that CoFe2O4 NPs binding induces microenvironment perturbations leading to secondary and tertiary conformation changes in ACP to a great extent. Furthermore, synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy (SFS) affirmed the comparatively significant changes in microenvironment around tryptophan (Trp) residue by CoFe2O4 NPs. The effect of CoFe2O4 NPs on the activation kinetics of ACP was further examined in Chlorella vulgaris. Apparent Michaelis constant (Km) values of 0.57 and 26.5mM with activation energy values of 0.538 and 3.428kJmol(-1) were determined without and with 200μM CoFe2O4 NPs. Apparent Vmax value of -7Umml(-1) corroborate that enzyme active sites were completely captured by the NPs leaving no space for the substrate. The results confirmed that CoFe2O4 NPs ceased the activity by unfolding of ACP enzyme. This suggests CoFe2O4 NPs perturbed the enzyme activity by transitions in conformation and hence the metabolic activity of ACP. This study provides the pavement for novel and simple approach of using sensitive biomarkers for sensing NPs in environment.

  16. Pack cementation coatings for alloys

    SciTech Connect

    He, Yi-Rong; Zheng, Minhui; Rapp, R.A.

    1996-08-01

    The halide-activated pack cementation process was modified to produce a Ge-doped silicide diffusion coating on a Cr-Cr{sub 2}Nb alloy in a single processing step. The morphology and composition of the coating depended both on the composition of the pack and on the composition and microstructure of the substrate. Higher Ge content in the pack suppressed the formation of CrSi{sub 2} and reduced the growth kinetics of the coating. Ge was not homogeneously distributed in the coatings. In cyclic and isothermal oxidation in air at 700 and 1050{degrees}C, the Ge-doped silicide coating protected the Cr-Nb alloys from significant oxidation by the formation of a Ge-doped silica film. The codeposition and diffusion of aluminum and chromium into low alloy steel have been achieved using elemental Al and Cr powders and a two-step pack cementation process. Sequential process treatments at 925{degrees}C and 1150{degrees}C yield dense and uniform ferrite coatings, whose compositions are close to either Fe{sub 3}Al or else FeAl plus a lower Cr content, when processed under different conditions. The higher content of Al in the coatings was predicted by thermodynamic calculations of equilibrium in the gas phase. The effect of the particle size of the metal powders on the surface composition of the coating has been studied for various combinations of Al and Cr powders.

  17. Pack cementation diffusion coatings for iron-base alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Rapp, R.A.

    1995-02-01

    With the aid of computer-assisted calculations of the equilibrium vapor pressures in halide-activated cementation packs, processing conditions have been identified and experimentally verified for the codeposition of two or more alloying elements in a diffusion coating on a variety of steels. The Cr-Si ferrite layers have proven to be very resistant to high temperature cyclic oxidation and to pitting in aqueous solutions. The process has been patented, and is being transferred for industrial application, e.g. for water walls of utility boilers, etc. In the proposed extension of this project, the use of mixed pure metal powders in the pack will be extended to achieve similar ferrite Fe-Cr-Al coatings with excellent oxidation resistance, with the eventual transfer of the technology to industry. In other recent studies, Ni-base alloy rods were aluminized by the halide-activated pack cementation process to bring their average composition to that for the ORNL-developed Ni{sub 3}Al, for use as a welding rod. A similar effort to develop a welding rod for the ORNL Fe{sub 3}Al alloy did not yield reproducible coating compositions or growth kinetics. The continued effort to produce Duriron-type (Fe-18Si-5Cr) coatings on steels was not successful. Literature for the intrinsic diffusion coefficients suggests that this task cannot be achieved.

  18. Minimum activation martensitic alloys for surface disposal after exposure to neutron flux

    DOEpatents

    Lechtenberg, Thomas

    1985-01-01

    Steel alloys for long-term exposure to neutron flux have a martensitic microstructure and contain chromium, carbon, tungsten, vanadium and preferably titanium. Activation of the steel is held to within acceptable limits for eventual surface disposal by stringently controlling the impurity levels of Ni, Mo, Cu, N, Co, Nb, Al and Mn.

  19. Solid-Solution Alloying of Immiscible Ru and Cu with Enhanced CO Oxidation Activity.

    PubMed

    Huang, Bo; Kobayashi, Hirokazu; Yamamoto, Tomokazu; Matsumura, Syo; Nishida, Yoshihide; Sato, Katsutoshi; Nagaoka, Katsutoshi; Kawaguchi, Shogo; Kubota, Yoshiki; Kitagawa, Hiroshi

    2017-03-24

    We report on novel solid-solution alloy nanoparticles (NPs) of Ru and Cu that are completely immiscible even above melting point in bulk phase. Powder X-ray diffraction, scanning transmission electron microscopy, and energy-dispersive X-ray measurements demonstrated that Ru and Cu atoms were homogeneously distributed in the alloy NPs. Ru0.5Cu0.5 NPs demonstrated higher CO oxidation activity than fcc-Ru NPs, which are known as one of the best monometallic CO oxidation catalysts.

  20. Application of advanced austenitic alloys to fossil power system components

    SciTech Connect

    Swindeman, R.W.

    1996-06-01

    Most power and recovery boilers operating in the US produce steam at temperatures below 565{degrees}C (1050{degrees}F) and pressures below 24 MPa (3500 psi). For these operating conditions, carbon steels and low alloy steels may be used for the construction of most of the boiler components. Austenitic stainless steels often are used for superheater/reheater tubing when these components are expected to experience temperatures above 565{degrees}C (1050{degrees}F) or when the environment is too corrosive for low alloys steels. The austenitic stainless steels typically used are the 304H, 321H, and 347H grades. New ferritic steels such as T91 and T92 are now being introduced to replace austenitic: stainless steels in aging fossil power plants. Generally, these high-strength ferritic steels are more expensive to fabricate than austenitic stainless steels because the ferritic steels have more stringent heat treating requirements. Now, annealing requirements are being considered for the stabilized grades of austenitic stainless steels when they receive more than 5% cold work, and these requirements would increase significantly the cost of fabrication of boiler components where bending strains often exceed 15%. It has been shown, however, that advanced stainless steels developed at ORNL greatly benefit from cold work, and these steels could provide an alternative to either conventional stainless steels or high-strength ferritic steels. The purpose of the activities reported here is to examine the potential of advanced stainless steels for construction of tubular components in power boilers. The work is being carried out with collaboration of a commercial boiler manufacturer.

  1. Polyhedral Palladium–Silver Alloy Nanocrystals as Highly Active and Stable Electrocatalysts for the Formic Acid Oxidation Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Geng-Tao; Liu, Chang; Zhang, Qi; Chen, Yu; Tang, Ya-Wen

    2015-01-01

    Polyhedral noble–metal nanocrystals have received much attention and wide applications as electrical and optical devices as well as catalysts. In this work, a straightforward and effective hydrothermal route for the controllable synthesis of the high-quality Pd–Ag alloy polyhedrons with uniform size is presented. The morphology, composition and structure of the Pd–Ag alloy polyhedrons are fully characterized by the various physical techniques, demonstrating the Pd–Ag alloy polyhedrons are highly alloying. The formation/growth mechanisms of the Pd–Ag alloy polyhedrons are explored and discussed based on the experimental observations and discussions. As a preliminary electrochemical application, the Pd–Ag alloy polyhedrons are applied in the formic acid oxidation reaction, which shows higher electrocatalytic activity and stability than commercially available Pd black due to the “synergistic effects” between Pd and Ag atoms. PMID:26329555

  2. Surface chemistry, friction and wear of Ni-Zn and Mn-Zn ferrites in contact with metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1982-01-01

    X-ray photoelectron and Auger electron spectroscopy analysis were used in sliding friction experiments. These experiments were conducted with hot-pressed polycrystalline Ni-Zn and Mn-Zn ferrites, and single-crystal Mn-Zn ferrite in contact with various transition metals at room temperature in both vacuum and argon. The results indicate that Ni2O3 and Fe3O4 were present on the Ni-Zn ferrite surface in addition to the nominal bulk constituents, while MnO2 and Fe3O4 were present on the Mn-Zn ferrite surface in addition to the nominal bulk constituents. The coefficients of friction for the ferrites in contact with metals were related to the relative chemical activity of these metals. The more active the metal, the higher is the coefficient of friction. The coefficients of friction for the ferrites were correlated with the free energy of formation of the lowest metal oxide. The interfacial bond can be regarded as a chemical bond between the metal atoms and the oxygen anions in the ferrite surfaces. The adsorption of oxygen on clean metal and ferrite does strengthen the metal-ferrite contact and increase the friction. The ferrites exhibit local cracking and fracture with sliding under adhesive conditions. All the metals transferred to he surfaces of the ferrites in sliding.

  3. Surface chemistry, friction, and wear of Ni-Zn and Mn-Zn ferrites in contact with metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1983-01-01

    X-ray photoelectron and Auger electron spectroscopy analysis were used in sliding friction experiments. These experiments were conducted with hot-pressed polycrystalline Ni-Zn and Mn-Zn ferrites, and single-crystal Mn-Zn ferrite in contact with various transition metals at room temperature in both vacuum and argon. The results indicate that Ni2O3 and Fe3O4 were present on the Ni-Zn ferrite surface in addition to the nominal bulk constituents, while MnO2 and Fe3O4 were present on the Mn-Zn ferrite surface in addition to the nominal bulk constituents. The coefficients of friction for the ferrites in contact with metals were related to the relative chemical activity of these metals. The more active the metal, the higher is the coefficient of friction. The coefficients of friction for the ferrites were correlated with the free energy of formation of the lowest metal oxide. The interfacial bond can be regarded as a chemical bond between the metal atoms and the oxygen anions in the ferrite surfaces. The adsorption of oxygen on clean metal and ferrite does strengthen the metal-ferrite contact and increase the friction. The ferrites exhibit local cracking and fracture with sliding under adhesive conditions. All the metals transferred to the surfaces of the ferrites in sliding. Previously announced in STAR as N83-19901

  4. MHD Effects of a Ferritic Wall on Tokamak Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Paul E.

    It has been recognized for some time that the very high fluence of fast (14.1MeV) neutrons produced by deuterium-tritium fusion will represent a major materials challenge for the development of next-generation fusion energy projects such as a fusion component test facility and demonstration fusion power reactor. The best-understood and most promising solutions presently available are a family of low-activation steels originally developed for use in fission reactors, but the ferromagnetic properties of these steels represent a danger to plasma confinement through enhancement of magnetohydrodynamic instabilities and increased susceptibility to error fields. At present, experimental research into the effects of ferromagnetic materials on MHD stability in toroidal geometry has been confined to demonstrating that it is still possible to operate an advanced tokamak in the presence of ferromagnetic components. In order to better quantify the effects of ferromagnetic materials on tokamak plasma stability, a new ferritic wall has been installated in the High Beta Tokamak---Extended Pulse (HBT-EP) device. The development, assembly, installation, and testing of this wall as a modular upgrade is described, and the effect of the wall on machine performance is characterized. Comparative studies of plasma dynamics with the ferritic wall close-fitting against similar plasmas with the ferritic wall retracted demonstrate substantial effects on plasma stability. Resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) are applied, demonstrating a 50% increase in n = 1 plasma response amplitude when the ferritic wall is near the plasma. Susceptibility of plasmas to disruption events increases by a factor of 2 or more with the ferritic wall inserted, as disruptions are observed earlier with greater frequency. Growth rates of external kink instabilities are observed to be twice as large in the presence of a close-fitting ferritic wall. Initial studies are made of the influence of mode rotation frequency

  5. Cast Stainless Steel Ferrite and Grain Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Ruud, Clayton O.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Meyer, Ryan M.; Mathews, Royce; Diaz, Aaron A.; Anderson, Michael T.

    2012-09-01

    In-service inspection requirements dictate that piping welds in the primary pressure boundary of light-water reactors be subject to a volumetric examination based on the rules contained within the American Society of Mechanical Engineers Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, Section XI. The purpose of the inspection is the reliable detection and accurate sizing of service-induced degradation and/or material flaws introduced during fabrication. The volumetric inspection is usually carried out using ultrasonic testing (UT) methods. However, the varied metallurgical macrostructures and microstructures of cast austenitic stainless steel piping and fittings, including statically cast stainless steel and centrifugally cast stainless steel (CCSS), introduce significant variations in the propagation and attenuation of ultrasonic energy. These variations complicate interpretation of the UT responses and may compromise the reliability of UT inspection. A review of the literature indicated that a correlation may exist between the microstructure and the delta ferrite content of the casting alloy. This paper discusses the results of a recent study where the goal was to determine if a correlation existed between measured and/or calculated ferrite content and grain structure in CCSS pipe.

  6. Multi-modal Mn-Zn ferrite nanocrystals for magnetically-induced cancer targeted hyperthermia: a comparison of passive and active targeting effects.

    PubMed

    Xie, Jun; Yan, Caiyun; Yan, Yu; Chen, Ling; Song, Lina; Zang, Fengchao; An, Yanli; Teng, Gaojun; Gu, Ning; Zhang, Yu

    2016-10-14

    The high performance and increased tumor-targeting accumulation of magnetic nanocrystals (MNCs) are the most important considerations in cancer targeted magnetic hyperthermia (TMH). To achieve these goals, our study was firstly done using well-established fluorescence/magnetic Mn-Zn ferrite MNCs (core size: 14 nm) as multi-modal imaging contrast agents and highly-efficient "heat generators", which were coated with a biocompatible PEG-phospholipid (DSPE-PEG2000) and further modified by a cyclic tripeptide of arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD). By using a mouse model bearing breast carcinoma (4T1), we then systematically compared PEGylated MNCs (MNCs@PEG)- and RGD-PEGylated MNCs (MNCs@RGD)-mediated tumor targeting abilities by intravenous administration. The MNCs@PEG-based passive targeting could successfully accumulate at the tumor due to the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effects, but the non-targeted localization might make the MNCs@PEG "leaking" from larger pores of tumor fenestrated vascular networks. Our designed MNCs@RGD, simultaneously functionalized with PEG and RGD ligands, might promote a synergistic effect including efficient tumor vasculature active targeting and EPR-mediated passive targeting, improving total MNC concentration and retention time in tumor tissues. By combining fluorescence/magnetic resonance (MR)/thermal multi-modal imaging-guided diagnostics and continuous TMH treatment under an alternating current magnetic field (ACMF, 2.58 kA m(-1), 390 kHz), the tumor surface could be heated to approximately 43-44 °C based on the MNC-mediated repeated injections. Sufficient temperature elevation induced the apoptosis of tumor cells, and inhibited the tumor angiogenesis. Compared with MNCs@PEG, the active MNCs@RGD-based tumor targeting MR image was significantly more efficient due to both the higher and long-lasting tumor accumulation, but its antitumor efficacy was not obviously improved in the TMH treatments. To achieve a singularly

  7. Evaluation of Dynamic Stress-Strain Relations of Ti-Alloys and Al-Alloys Based on the Thermally Activated Process Concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, Kinya

    Since titanium and aluminum alloys are the most promising structural materials for the high velocity vehicles, the impact tensile strength of the materials is presently investigated. Three kinds of aging treatments on the beta-titanium alloy and two on the 6061 aluminum alloy were performed, and the tensile deformation behaviors were identified in the wide range of the temperature and the strain rate. The stress-strain relations of the titanium alloy significantly depend on the temperature and the strain rate investigated. Thermally activated process concept was applied to explain the experimental results, and the stress-strain relations at high strain rates were well understood with taking account of adiabatic heating effect. In the case of the aluminum alloy, the temperature and the strain rate effects are significant only in the low temperature range. Both for the alloys investigated, the stress-strain curves depend on the microstructures, while the temperature and the strain rate effects are almost independent of the different aging treatments.

  8. Characterization of Irradiated Nanostructured Ferritic Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Bentley, James; Hoelzer, David T; Tanigawa, H.; Yamamoto, T.; Odette, George R.

    2007-01-01

    The past decade has seen the development of a new class of mechanically alloyed (MA) ferritic steels with outstanding mechanical properties that come, at least in part, from the presence of high concentrations (>10{sup 23} m{sup -3}) of Ti-, Y-, and O-enriched nanoclusters (NC). From the outset, there has been much interest in their potential use for applications to fission and proposed fusion reactors, not only because of their attractive high-temperature strength, but also because the presence of NC may result in a highly radiation-resistant material by efficiently trapping point defects to enhance recombination. Of special interest for fusion applications is the potential of NC to trap transmutation-produced He in high concentrations of small cavities, rather than in fewer but larger cavities that lead to greater radiation-induced swelling and other degraded properties.

  9. Friction Stir Welding of HT9 Ferritic-Martensitic Steel: An Assessment of Microstructure and Properties

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    development. While high speed steel or WC-Co tools can be used for aluminum and copper alloys, FSW of steel generally requires even more refractory... steel and the microstructure produced by FSW is much more critical than in aluminum alloys. The αγδ phase transformations can cause complex, multi...thesis explores the processing-microstructure-property relationships in friction stir welded ( FSW ) HT9A ferritic-martensitic steel . HT9 has previously

  10. In vitro osteoblast response to ferritic stainless steel fiber networks for magneto-active layers on implants.

    PubMed

    Malheiro, V N; Skepper, J N; Brooks, R A; Markaki, A E

    2013-06-01

    The use of a porous coating on prosthetic components to encourage bone ingrowth is an important way of improving uncemented implant fixation. Enhanced fixation may be achieved by the use of porous magneto-active layers on the surface of prosthetic implants, which would deform elastically on application of a magnetic field, generating internal stresses within the in-growing bone. This approach requires a ferromagnetic material able to support osteoblast attachment, proliferation, differentiation, and mineralization. In this study, the human osteoblast responses to ferromagnetic 444 stainless steel networks were considered alongside those to nonmagnetic 316L (medical grade) stainless steel networks. While both networks had similar porosities, 444 networks were made from coarser fibers, resulting in larger inter-fiber spaces. The networks were analyzed for cell morphology, distribution, proliferation, and differentiation, extracellular matrix production and the formation of mineralized nodules. Cell culture was performed in both the presence of osteogenic supplements, to encourage cell differentiation, and in their absence. It was found that fiber size affected osteoblast morphology, cytoskeleton organization and proliferation at the early stages of culture. The larger inter-fiber spaces in the 444 networks resulted in better spatial distribution of the extracellular matrix. The addition of osteogenic supplements enhanced cell differentiation and reduced cell proliferation thereby preventing the differences in proliferation observed in the absence of osteogenic supplements. The results demonstrated that 444 networks elicited favorable responses from human osteoblasts, and thus show potential for use as magnetically active porous coatings for advanced bone implant applications.

  11. Overview of the multifaceted activities towards development and deployment of nuclear-grade FeCrAl Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Field, Kevin G; Yamamoto, Yukinori; Pint, Bruce A; Terrani, Kurt A

    2016-01-01

    A large effort is underway under the leadership of US DOE Fuel Cycle R&D program to develop advanced FeCrAl alloys as accident tolerant fuel (ATF) cladding to replace Zr-based alloys in light water reactors. The primary motivation is the excellent oxidation resistance of these alloys in high-temperature steam environments right up to their melting point (roughly three orders of magnitude slower oxidation kinetics than zirconium). A multifaceted effort is ongoing to rapidly advance FeCrAl alloys as a mature ATF concept. The activities span the broad spectrum of alloy development, environmental testing (high-temperature high-pressure water and elevated temperature steam), detailed mechanical characterization, material property database development, neutron irradiation, thin tube production, and multiple integral fuel test campaigns. Instead of off-the-shelf commercial alloys that might not prove optimal for the LWR fuel cladding application, a large amount of effort has been placed on the alloy development to identify the most optimum composition and microstructure for this application. The development program is targeting a cladding that offers performance comparable to or better than modern Zr-based alloys under normal operating and off-normal conditions. This paper provides a comprehensive overview of the systematic effort to advance nuclear-grade FeCrAl alloys as an ATF cladding in commercial LWRs.

  12. The activation energy for Mg acceptor in the Ga-rich InGaN alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Chuan-Zhen; Wei, Tong; Chen, Li-Ying; Wang, Sha-Sha; Wang, Jun

    2017-02-01

    The activation energy for Mg acceptor in InxGa1-xN alloys is investigated. It is found that there are three factors to influence the activation energy for Mg acceptor. One is the stronger dependence of the VBM of InxGa1-xN depending on In content than that of the Mg acceptor energy level. The other is the concentration of Mg acceptors. Another is the extending of the valence band-tail states into the band gap. In addition, a model based on modifying the effective mass model is developed. It is found that the model can describe the activation energy for Mg acceptor in the Ga-rich InxGa1-xN alloys well after considering the influence of the valence band-tail states.

  13. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy study of high-palladium dental alloys. Part II: behavior at active and passive potentials.

    PubMed

    Sun, D; Monaghan, P; Brantley, W A; Johnston, W M

    2002-05-01

    Electrochemical impedance spectroscopic (EIS) analyses were performed on three high-palladium alloys and a gold-palladium alloy at active and passive potentials in five electrolytes that simulated body fluid and oral environmental conditions. All four alloys were previously found to have excellent corrosion resistance in these in vitro environments. Before performing the EIS analyses, alloy specimens were subjected to a clinically relevant heat treatment that simulated the firing cycles for a dental porcelain. It was found that the EIS spectra varied with test potential and electrolyte. Diffusional effects, related to the dealloying and subsequent surface enrichment in palladium of the high-palladium alloys, along with species adsorption and passivation, were revealed at both active and passive potentials, although these effects were more evident at the passive potentials.

  14. Neutronics and activation analysis of lithium-based ternary alloys in IFE blankets

    SciTech Connect

    Jolodosky, Alejandra; Kramer, Kevin; Meier, Wayne; DeMuth, James; Reyes, Susana; Fratoni, Massimiliano

    2016-04-09

    Here we report that an attractive feature of using liquid lithium as the breeder and coolant in fusion blankets is that it has very high tritium solubility and results in very low levels of tritium permeation throughout the facility infrastructure. However, lithium metal vigorously reacts with air and water and presents plant safety concerns. The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is carrying an effort to develop a lithium-based alloy that maintains the beneficial properties of lithium (e.g. high tritium breeding and solubility) and at the same time reduces overall flammability concerns. This study evaluates the neutronics performance of lithium-based alloys in the blanket of an inertial fusion energy chamber in order to inform such development. 3-D Monte Carlo calculations were performed to evaluate two main neutronics performance parameters for the blanket: tritium breeding ratio (TBR), and the fusion energy multiplication factor (EMF). It was found that elements that exhibit low absorption cross sections and higher q-values such as lead, tin, and strontium, perform well with those that have high neutron multiplication such as lead and bismuth. These elements meet TBR constrains ranging from 1.02 to 1.1. However, most alloys do not reach EMFs greater than 1.15. Additionally, it was found that enriching lithium significantly increases the TBR and decreases the minimum lithium concentration by more than 60%. The amount of enrichment depends on how much total lithium is in the alloy to begin with. Alloys that performed well in the TBR and EMF calculations were considered for activation analysis. Activation simulations were executed with 50 years of irradiation and 300 years of cooling. It was discovered that bismuth is a poor choice due to achieving the highest decay heat, contact dose rates, and accident doses. In addition, it does not meet the waste disposal ratings (WDR). Some of the activation results for alloys with tin, zinc, and gallium were in the higher

  15. Neutronics and activation analysis of lithium-based ternary alloys in IFE blankets

    DOE PAGES

    Jolodosky, Alejandra; Kramer, Kevin; Meier, Wayne; ...

    2016-04-09

    Here we report that an attractive feature of using liquid lithium as the breeder and coolant in fusion blankets is that it has very high tritium solubility and results in very low levels of tritium permeation throughout the facility infrastructure. However, lithium metal vigorously reacts with air and water and presents plant safety concerns. The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is carrying an effort to develop a lithium-based alloy that maintains the beneficial properties of lithium (e.g. high tritium breeding and solubility) and at the same time reduces overall flammability concerns. This study evaluates the neutronics performance of lithium-based alloys inmore » the blanket of an inertial fusion energy chamber in order to inform such development. 3-D Monte Carlo calculations were performed to evaluate two main neutronics performance parameters for the blanket: tritium breeding ratio (TBR), and the fusion energy multiplication factor (EMF). It was found that elements that exhibit low absorption cross sections and higher q-values such as lead, tin, and strontium, perform well with those that have high neutron multiplication such as lead and bismuth. These elements meet TBR constrains ranging from 1.02 to 1.1. However, most alloys do not reach EMFs greater than 1.15. Additionally, it was found that enriching lithium significantly increases the TBR and decreases the minimum lithium concentration by more than 60%. The amount of enrichment depends on how much total lithium is in the alloy to begin with. Alloys that performed well in the TBR and EMF calculations were considered for activation analysis. Activation simulations were executed with 50 years of irradiation and 300 years of cooling. It was discovered that bismuth is a poor choice due to achieving the highest decay heat, contact dose rates, and accident doses. In addition, it does not meet the waste disposal ratings (WDR). Some of the activation results for alloys with tin, zinc, and gallium were in

  16. Zinc ferrite nanoparticles activate IL-1b, NFKB1, CCL21 and NOS2 signaling to induce mitochondrial dependent intrinsic apoptotic pathway in WISH cells.

    PubMed

    Saquib, Quaiser; Al-Khedhairy, Abdulaziz A; Ahmad, Javed; Siddiqui, Maqsood A; Dwivedi, Sourabh; Khan, Shams T; Musarrat, Javed

    2013-12-01

    The present study has demonstrated the translocation of zinc ferrite nanoparticles (ZnFe2O4-NPs) into the cytoplasm of human amnion epithelial (WISH) cells, and the ensuing cytotoxicity and genetic damage. The results suggested that in situ NPs induced oxidative stress, alterations in cellular membrane and DNA strand breaks. The [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide] (MTT) and neutral red uptake (NRU) cytotoxicity assays indicated 64.48 ± 1.6% and 50.73 ± 2.1% reduction in cell viability with 100 μg/ml of ZnFe2O4-NPs exposure. The treated WISH cells exhibited 1.2-fold higher ROS level with 0.9-fold decline in membrane potential (ΔΨm) and 7.4-fold higher DNA damage after 48h of ZnFe2O4-NPs treatment. Real-time PCR (qPCR) analysis of p53, CASP 3 (caspase-3), and bax genes revealed 5.3, 1.6, and 14.9-fold upregulation, and 0.18-fold down regulation of bcl 2 gene vis-à-vis untreated control. RT(2) Profiler™ PCR array data elucidated differential up-regulation of mRNA transcripts of IL-1b, NFKB1, NOS2 and CCL21 genes in the range of 1.5 to 3.7-folds. The flow cytometry based cell cycle analysis suggested the transfer of 15.2 ± 2.1% (p<0.01) population of ZnFe2O4-NPs (100 μg/ml) treated cells into apoptotic phase through intrinsic pathway. Over all, the data revealed the potential of ZnFe2O4-NPs to induce cellular and genetic toxicity in cells of placental origin. Thus, the significant ROS production, reduction in ΔΨm, DNA damage, and activation of genes linked to inflammation, oxidative stress, proliferation, DNA damage and repair could serve as the predictive toxicity and stress markers for ecotoxicological assessment of ZnFe2O4-NPs induced cellular and genetic damage.

  17. AuPt Alloy Nanostructures with Tunable Composition and Enzyme-like Activities for Colorimetric Detection of Bisulfide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Weiwei; Han, Xiangna; Jia, Huimin; Cai, Junhui; Zhou, Yunlong; Zheng, Zhi

    2017-01-01

    Tuning the enzyme-like activity and studying the interaction between biologically relevant species and nano-enzymes may facilitate the applications of nanostructures in mimicking natural enzymes. In this work, AuPt alloy nanoparticles (NPs) with varying compositions were prepared through a facile method by co-reduction of Au3+ and Pt2+ in aqueous solutions. The composition could be tuned easily by adjusting the molar ratios of added Pt2+ to Au3+. It was found that both peroxidase-like and oxidase-like activity of AuPt alloy NPs were highly dependent on the alloy compositions, which thus suggesting an effective way to tailor their catalytic properties. By investigating the inhibitory effects of HS‑ on the enzyme-like activity of AuPt alloy NPs and natural enzyme, we have developed a method for colorimetric detection of HS‑ and evaluation of the inhibiting effects of inhibitors on natural and artificial enzymes. In addition, the responsive ability of this method was influenced largely by the composition: AuPt alloy NPs show much lower limit of detection for HS‑ than Pt NPs while Pt NPs show wider linear range than AuPt alloy NPs. This study suggests the facile way not only for synthesis of alloy nanostructures, but also for tuning their catalytic activities and for use in bioanalysis.

  18. AuPt Alloy Nanostructures with Tunable Composition and Enzyme-like Activities for Colorimetric Detection of Bisulfide

    PubMed Central

    He, Weiwei; Han, Xiangna; Jia, Huimin; Cai, Junhui; Zhou, Yunlong; Zheng, Zhi

    2017-01-01

    Tuning the enzyme-like activity and studying the interaction between biologically relevant species and nano-enzymes may facilitate the applications of nanostructures in mimicking natural enzymes. In this work, AuPt alloy nanoparticles (NPs) with varying compositions were prepared through a facile method by co-reduction of Au3+ and Pt2+ in aqueous solutions. The composition could be tuned easily by adjusting the molar ratios of added Pt2+ to Au3+. It was found that both peroxidase-like and oxidase-like activity of AuPt alloy NPs were highly dependent on the alloy compositions, which thus suggesting an effective way to tailor their catalytic properties. By investigating the inhibitory effects of HS− on the enzyme-like activity of AuPt alloy NPs and natural enzyme, we have developed a method for colorimetric detection of HS− and evaluation of the inhibiting effects of inhibitors on natural and artificial enzymes. In addition, the responsive ability of this method was influenced largely by the composition: AuPt alloy NPs show much lower limit of detection for HS− than Pt NPs while Pt NPs show wider linear range than AuPt alloy NPs. This study suggests the facile way not only for synthesis of alloy nanostructures, but also for tuning their catalytic activities and for use in bioanalysis. PMID:28051159

  19. Characterization of the corrosion resistance of several alloys to dilute biologically active solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsh, Daniel W.

    1990-01-01

    Sulfate reducing bacteria and acid producing bacteria/fungi detected in hygiene waters increased the corrosion rate in aluminum alloy. Biologically active media enhanced the formation of pits on metal coupons. Direct observation of gas evolved at the corrosion sample, coupled with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive x-ray analysis of the corrosion products indicates that the corrosion rate is increased because the presence of bacteria favor the reduction of hydrogen as the cathodic reaction through the reaction of oxygen and water. SEM verifies the presence of microbes in a biofilm on the surface of corroding samples. The bacterial consortia are associated with anodic sites on the metal surface, aggressive pitting occurs adjacent to biofilms. Many pits are associated with triple points and inclusions in the aluminum alloy microstructure. Similar bacterial colonization was found on the stainless steel samples. Fourier transform Infrared Spectroscopy confirmed the presence of carbonyl groups in pitted areas of samples exposed to biologically active waters.

  20. Method of making active magnetic refrigerant, colossal magnetostriction and giant magnetoresistive materials based on Gd-Si-Ge alloys

    DOEpatents

    Gschneidner, Jr., Karl A.; Pecharsky, Alexandra O.; Pecharsky, Vitalij K.

    2003-07-08

    Method of making an active magnetic refrigerant represented by Gd.sub.5 (Si.sub.x Ge.sub.1-x).sub.4 alloy for 0.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.1.0 comprising placing amounts of the commercially pure Gd, Si, and Ge charge components in a crucible, heating the charge contents under subambient pressure to a melting temperature of the alloy for a time sufficient to homogenize the alloy and oxidize carbon with oxygen present in the Gd charge component to reduce carbon, rapidly solidifying the alloy in the crucible, and heat treating the solidified alloy at a temperature below the melting temperature for a time effective to homogenize a microstructure of the solidified material, and then cooling sufficiently fast to prevent the eutectoid decomposition and improve magnetocaloric and/or the magnetostrictive and/or the magnetoresistive properties thereof.

  1. Dual ions implantation of zirconium and nitrogen into magnesium alloys for enhanced corrosion resistance, antimicrobial activity and biocompatibility.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Mengqi; Qiao, Yuqin; Wang, Qi; Qin, Hui; Zhang, Xianlong; Liu, Xuanyong

    2016-12-01

    Biodegradable magnesium-based alloys have shown great potential for medical applications due to their superior biological performances and mechanical properties. However, on one hand, some side effects including inferior biocompatibility, a local high-alkaline environment and gas cavities caused by a rapid corrosion rate, hinder their clinical application. On the other hand, it is also necessary to endow Mg alloys with antibacterial properties, which are crucial for clinic orthopedic applications. In this study, Zr and N ions are simultaneously implanted into AZ91 Mg alloys by plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII). A modified layer with a thickness of approximately 80nm is formed on the surface of AZ91 Mg alloys, and the hydrophobicity and roughness of these AZ91 Mg alloys obviously increase after Zr and N implantation. The in vitro evaluations including corrosion resistance tests, antimicrobial tests and cytocompatibility and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity tests, revealed that the dual ions implantation of Zr and N not only enhanced the corrosion resistance of the AZ91 Mg alloy but also provided better antimicrobial properties in vitro. Furthermore, the formation of biocompatible metal nitrides and metal oxides layer in the near surface of the Zr-N-implanted AZ91 Mg alloy provided a favorable implantation surface for cell adhesion and growth, which in return further promoted the bone formation in vivo. These promising results suggest that the Zr-N-implanted AZ91 Mg alloy shows potential for future application in the orthopedic field.

  2. Characterization and comparative analysis of the tensile properties of five tempered martensitic steels and an oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic alloy irradiated at ≈295 °C to ≈6.5 dpa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maloy, S. A.; Saleh, T. A.; Anderoglu, O.; Romero, T. J.; Odette, G. R.; Yamamoto, T.; Li, S.; Cole, J. I.; Fielding, R.

    2016-01-01

    Tensile test results at 25 and 300 °C on five 9-12Cr tempered martensitic steels and one 14Cr oxide dispersion strengthened alloy, that were side-by side irradiated to 6.5 dpa at 295 °C in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), are reported. The engineering stress-strain curves are analyzed to provide true stress-strain constitutive σ(ɛ) laws for all of these alloys. In the irradiated condition, the σ(ɛ) fall into categories of: strain softening, nearly perfectly plastic and strain hardening. Increases in yield stress (Δσy) and reductions in uniform strain ductility (eu) are observed, where the latter can be understood in terms of the alloy's σ(ɛ) behavior. Increases in the average σ(ɛ) in the range of 0-10% strain are smaller than the corresponding Δσy, and vary more from alloy to alloy. The data are also analyzed to establish relations between Δσy and coupled changes in the ultimate stresses as well as the effects of both test temperature and the unirradiated yield stress (σyu). The latter shows that higher σyu correlates with lower Δσy. In five out of six cases the effects of irradiation are generally consistent with previous observations on these alloys. However, the particular heat of the 12Cr HT-9 tempered martensitic steel in this study has a much higher eu than observed for earlier heats. The reasons for this improved behavior are not understood and may be microstructural in origin. However, it is noted that the new heat of HT-9, which was procured under modern quality assurance standards, has lower interstitial nitrogen than previous heats. Notably lower interstitial solute contents correlate with improved ductility and homogenous deformation in broadly similar steels.

  3. Characterization and comparative analysis of the tensile properties of five tempered martensitic steels and an oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic alloy irradiated at ≈295 °C to ≈6.5 dpa

    DOE PAGES

    Maloy, Stuart A.; Saleh, Tarik A.; Anderoglu, Osman; ...

    2015-08-06

    Tensile test results at 25 and 300 °C on five 9-12Cr tempered martensitic steels and one 14Cr oxide dispersion strengthened alloy, that were side-by side irradiated to 6.5 dpa at 295 °C in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), are reported. The engineering stress–strain curves are analyzed to provide true stress–strain constitutive σ(ε) laws for all of these alloys. In the irradiated condition, the σ(ε) fall into categories of: strain softening, nearly perfectly plastic and strain hardening. Increases in yield stress (Δσy) and reductions in uniform strain ductility (eu) are observed, where as the latter can be understood in terms ofmore » the alloy's σ(ε) behavior. Increases in the average σ(ε) in the range of 0–10% strain are smaller than the corresponding Δσy, and vary more from alloy to alloy. The data are analyzed to establish relations between Δσy and coupled changes in the ultimate stresses as well as the effects of both test temperature and the unirradiated yield stress (σyu). The latter shows that higher σyu correlates with lower Δσy. In five out of six cases the effects of irradiation are generally consistent with previous observations on these alloys. However, the particular heat of the 12Cr HT-9 tempered martensitic steel in this study has a much higher eu than observed for earlier heats. The reasons for this improved behavior are not understood and may be microstructural in origin. However, it is noted that the new heat of HT-9, which was procured under modern quality assurance standards, has lower interstitial nitrogen than previous heats. As a result, notably lower interstitial solute contents correlate with improved ductility and homogenous deformation in broadly similar steels.« less

  4. Zinc ferrite nanoparticles activate IL-1b, NFKB1, CCL21 and NOS2 signaling to induce mitochondrial dependent intrinsic apoptotic pathway in WISH cells

    SciTech Connect

    Saquib, Quaiser; Al-Khedhairy, Abdulaziz A.; Ahmad, Javed; Siddiqui, Maqsood A.; Dwivedi, Sourabh; Khan, Shams T.; Musarrat, Javed

    2013-12-01

    The present study has demonstrated the translocation of zinc ferrite nanoparticles (ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}-NPs) into the cytoplasm of human amnion epithelial (WISH) cells, and the ensuing cytotoxicity and genetic damage. The results suggested that in situ NPs induced oxidative stress, alterations in cellular membrane and DNA strand breaks. The [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide] (MTT) and neutral red uptake (NRU) cytotoxicity assays indicated 64.48 ± 1.6% and 50.73 ± 2.1% reduction in cell viability with 100 μg/ml of ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}-NPs exposure. The treated WISH cells exhibited 1.2-fold higher ROS level with 0.9-fold decline in membrane potential (ΔΨm) and 7.4-fold higher DNA damage after 48 h of ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}-NPs treatment. Real-time PCR (qPCR) analysis of p53, CASP 3 (caspase-3), and bax genes revealed 5.3, 1.6, and 14.9-fold upregulation, and 0.18-fold down regulation of bcl 2 gene vis-à-vis untreated control. RT{sup 2} Profiler™ PCR array data elucidated differential up-regulation of mRNA transcripts of IL-1b, NFKB1, NOS2 and CCL21 genes in the range of 1.5 to 3.7-folds. The flow cytometry based cell cycle analysis suggested the transfer of 15.2 ± 2.1% (p < 0.01) population of ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}-NPs (100 μg/ml) treated cells into apoptotic phase through intrinsic pathway. Over all, the data revealed the potential of ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}-NPs to induce cellular and genetic toxicity in cells of placental origin. Thus, the significant ROS production, reduction in ΔΨm, DNA damage, and activation of genes linked to inflammation, oxidative stress, proliferation, DNA damage and repair could serve as the predictive toxicity and stress markers for ecotoxicological assessment of ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}-NPs induced cellular and genetic damage. - Highlights: • First report on the molecular toxicity of ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}-NPs in cells of placental origin • WISH cells treated with ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}-NPs exhibited cytoplasmic

  5. Catalysts prepared from copper-nickel ferrites for the steam reforming of methanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yung-Han; Wang, Sea-Fue; Tsai, An-Pang; Kameoka, Satoshi

    2015-05-01

    In this study, Fe3O4-supported Cu and Ni catalysts are prepared through reduction of Cu-Ni (Ni1-xCuxFe2O4) ferrites. The Cu-Ni ferrites, synthesized using a solid-state reaction method, are reduced at temperatures from 240 °C to 500 °C in a H2 atmosphere. All ferrites are characterized with granular morphology and a smooth particle surface before reduction. For the CuFe2O4, Ni0.5Cu0.5Fe2O4 and NiFe2O4 ferrites reduced at 240, 300, and 400 °C, respectively, nanosized Cu and/or Ni particles (5-32 nm) and mesopores (5-30 nm) are distributed and adhered on the surfaces of Fe3O4 supports. After increasing the reduction temperature of NiFe2O4 ferrite to 500 °C, the Ni particles and mesopores disappear from the Fe3O4 surfaces, which is due to the formation of a Fe-Ni alloy covering on the Fe3O4 surfaces. The CuFe2O4 ferrite after H2 reduction at 240 °C exhibits the highest H2 production rate of 149 ml STP/min g-cat at 360 °C. The existence of Ni content in the Cu-Ni ferrites enhances the reverse water gas shift reaction, and raises the CO selectivity while reducing the CO2 selectivity. Formation of a Fe-Ni alloy exaggerates the trend and poisons the H2 production rate.

  6. Investigation of the Deformation Activation Volume of an Ultrafinegrained Ti50Ni50 Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunderov, D. V.; Churakova, A. A.; Lukianov, A. V.; Prokofiev, E. A.; Prokoshkin, S. D.; Kreizberg, A. Yu.; Raab, G. I.; Sabirov, I. N.

    2015-10-01

    The mechanical properties, strain rate sensitivity (m) and deformation activation volume (ΔV) are investigated at the experimental temperatures from 20 to 400°C in a Ti50Ni50 alloy in a coarse-grained (CG) state with the austenite grain size D = 200 μm and in an ultrafine-grained (UFG) state with D = 700 μm following an ECAP treatment. It is observed that this treatment improves the yield strength of the alloy compared to its CG-state. The strain rate sensitivity, m, is found to be by a factor of 1.5-2 higher than that of CG-specimens; it increases with the temperature in both states of the material. As the temperature of the material in tension increases up to Т = 150-250°C, parameter ΔV increases to its maximum and with a further growth of the experimental temperature to 400°C, parameter ΔV decreases. The deformation activation volume of the alloy in the UFG-state is by a factor of 2-4 larger than that in the CG-state for the same experimental temperatures.

  7. Hermetic diamond capsules for biomedical implants enabled by gold active braze alloys.

    PubMed

    Lichter, Samantha G; Escudié, Mathilde C; Stacey, Alastair D; Ganesan, Kumaravelu; Fox, Kate; Ahnood, Arman; Apollo, Nicholas V; Kua, Dunstan C; Lee, Aaron Z; McGowan, Ceara; Saunders, Alexia L; Burns, Owen; Nayagam, David A X; Williams, Richard A; Garrett, David J; Meffin, Hamish; Prawer, Steven

    2015-01-01

    As the field of biomedical implants matures the functionality of implants is rapidly increasing. In the field of neural prostheses this is particularly apparent as researchers strive to build devices that interact with highly complex neural systems such as vision, hearing, touch and movement. A retinal implant, for example, is a highly complex device and the surgery, training and rehabilitation requirements involved in deploying such devices are extensive. Ideally, such devices will be implanted only once and will continue to function effectively for the lifetime of the patient. The first and most pivotal factor that determines device longevity is the encapsulation that separates the sensitive electronics of the device from the biological environment. This paper describes the realisation of a free standing device encapsulation made from diamond, the most impervious, long lasting and biochemically inert material known. A process of laser micro-machining and brazing is described detailing the fabrication of hermetic electrical feedthroughs and laser weldable seams using a 96.4% gold active braze alloy, another material renowned for biochemical longevity. Accelerated ageing of the braze alloy, feedthroughs and hermetic capsules yielded no evidence of corrosion and no loss of hermeticity. Samples of the gold braze implanted for 15 weeks, in vivo, caused minimal histopathological reaction and results were comparable to those obtained from medical grade silicone controls. The work described represents a first account of a free standing, fully functional hermetic diamond encapsulation for biomedical implants, enabled by gold active alloy brazing and laser micro-machining.

  8. The influence of Cr content on the mechanical properties of ODS ferritic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shaofu; Zhou, Zhangjian; Jang, Jinsung; Wang, Man; Hu, Helong; Sun, Hongying; Zou, Lei; Zhang, Guangming; Zhang, Liwei

    2014-12-01

    The present investigation aimed at researching the mechanical properties of the oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steels with different Cr content, which were fabricated through a consolidation of mechanical alloyed (MA) powders of 0.35 wt.% nano Y2O3 dispersed Fe-12.0Cr-0.5Ti-1.0W (alloy A), Fe-16.0Cr-0.5Ti-1.0W (alloy B), and Fe-18.0Cr-0.5Ti-1.0W (alloy C) alloys (all in wt.%) by hot isostatic pressing (HIP) with 100 MPa pressure at 1150 °C for 3 h. The mechanical properties, including the tensile strength, hardness, and impact fracture toughness were tested by universal testers, while Young's modulus was determined by ultrasonic wave non-destructive tester. It was found that the relationship between Cr content and the strength of ODS ferritic steels was not a proportional relationship. However, too high a Cr content will cause the precipitation of Cr-enriched segregation phase, which is detrimental to the ductility of ODS ferritic steels.

  9. Calcium-assisted reduction of cobalt ferrite nanoparticles for nanostructured iron cobalt with enhanced magnetic performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, B.; Andrew, J. S.; Arnold, D. P.

    2017-03-01

    This paper demonstrates the potential of a calcium-assisted reduction process for synthesizing fine-grain ( 100 nm) metal alloys from metal oxide nanoparticles. To demonstrate the process, an iron cobalt alloy (Fe66Co34) is obtained by hydrogen annealing 7-nm cobalt ferrite (CoFe2O4) nanoparticles in the presence of calcium granules. The calcium serves as a strong reducing agent, promoting the phase transition from cobalt ferrite to a metallic iron cobalt alloy, while maintaining high crystallinity. Magnetic measurements demonstrate the annealing temperature is the dominant factor of tuning the grain size and magnetic properties. Annealing at 700 °C for 1 h maximizes the magnetic saturation, up to 2.4 T (235 emu/g), which matches that of bulk iron cobalt.

  10. Optimization and testing results of Zr-bearing ferritic steels

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Lizhen; Yang, Ying; Tyburska-Puschel, Beata; Sridharan, K.

    2014-09-01

    The mission of the Nuclear Energy Enabling Technologies (NEET) program is to develop crosscutting technologies for nuclear energy applications. Advanced structural materials with superior performance at elevated temperatures are always desired for nuclear reactors, which can improve reactor economics, safety margins, and design flexibility. They benefit not only new reactors, including advanced light water reactors (LWRs) and fast reactors such as sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR) that is primarily designed for management of high-level wastes, but also life extension of the existing fleet when component exchange is needed. Developing and utilizing the modern materials science tools (experimental, theoretical, and computational tools) is an important path to more efficient alloy development and process optimization. Ferritic-martensitic (FM) steels are important structural materials for nuclear reactors due to their advantages over other applicable materials like austenitic stainless steels, notably their resistance to void swelling, low thermal expansion coefficients, and higher thermal conductivity. However, traditional FM steels exhibit a noticeable yield strength reduction at elevated temperatures above ~500°C, which limits their applications in advanced nuclear reactors which target operating temperatures at 650°C or higher. Although oxide-dispersion-strengthened (ODS) ferritic steels have shown excellent high-temperature performance, their extremely high cost, limited size and fabricability of products, as well as the great difficulty with welding and joining, have limited or precluded their commercial applications. Zirconium has shown many benefits to Fe-base alloys such as grain refinement, improved phase stability, and reduced radiation-induced segregation. The ultimate goal of this project is, with the aid of computational modeling tools, to accelerate the development of a new generation of Zr-bearing ferritic alloys to be fabricated using conventional

  11. Ferrite attenuator modulation improves antenna performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hooks, J. C.; Larson, S. G.; Shorkley, F. H.; Williams, B. T.

    1970-01-01

    Ferrite attenuator inserted into appropriate waveguide reduces the gain of the antenna element which is causing interference. Modulating the ferrite attenuator to change the antenna gain at the receive frequency permits ground tracking until the antenna is no longer needed.

  12. Inhibited Aluminization of an ODS FeCr Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Vande Put Ep Rouaix, Aurelie; Pint, Bruce A

    2012-01-01

    Aluminide coatings are of interest for fusion energy applications both for compatibility with liquid Pb-Li and to form an alumina layer that acts as a tritium permeation barrier. Oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steels are a structural material candidate for commercial reactor concepts expected to operate above 600 C. Aluminizing was conducted in a laboratory scale chemical vapor deposition reactor using accepted conditions for coating Fe- and Ni-base alloys. However, the measured mass gains on the current batch of ODS Fe-14Cr were extremely low compared to other conventional and ODS alloys. After aluminizing at two different Al activities at 900 C and at 1100 C, characterization showed that the ODS Fe-14Cr specimens formed a dense, primarily AlN layer that prevented Al uptake. This alloy batch contained a higher (> 5000 ppma) N content than the other alloys coated and this is the most likely reason for the inhibited aluminization. Other factors such as the high O content, small ({approx} 140 nm) grain size and Y-Ti oxide nano-clusters in ODS Fe-14Cr also could have contributed to the observed behavior. Examples of typical aluminide coatings formed on conventional and ODS Fe- and Ni-base alloys are shown for comparison.

  13. Hollow raspberry-like PdAg alloy nanospheres: High electrocatalytic activity for ethanol oxidation in alkaline media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Cheng; Hu, Yongli; Liu, Mingrui; Zheng, Yixiong

    2015-03-01

    Palladium-silver (PdAg) alloy nanospheres with unique structure were prepared using a one-pot procedure based on the galvanic replacement reaction. Their electrocatalytic activity for ethanol oxidation in alkaline media was evaluated. The morphology and crystal structure of the samples were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Electrochemical characterization techniques, including cyclic voltammetry (CV) and chronoamperometry (CA) measurements were used to analyze the electrochemical performance of the PdAg alloy nanospheres. The SEM and TEM images showed that the PdAg alloy nanospheres exhibit a hierarchical nanostructure with hollow interiors and porous walls. Compared to the commercial Pd/C catalyst, the as-prepared PdAg alloy nanospheres exhibit superior electrocatalytic activity and stability towards ethanol electro-oxidation in alkaline media, showing its potential as a new non-Pt electro-catalyst for direct alcohol fuel cells (DAFCs).

  14. Effect of ferrite on cast stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Nadezhdin, A.; Cooper, K. ); Timbers, G. . Kraft Pulp Division)

    1994-09-01

    Premature failure of stainless steel castings in bleach washing service is attributed to poor casting quality high porosity and to a high ferrite content, which makes the castings susceptible to corrosion by hot acid chloride solutions. A survey of the chemical compositions and ferrite contents of corrosion-resistant castings in bleach plants at three pulp mills found high [delta]-ferrite levels in the austenitic matrix due to the improper balance between austenite and ferrite stabilizers.

  15. A highly active and coke-resistant steam reforming catalyst comprising uniform nickel-iron alloy nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Koike, Mitsuru; Li, Dalin; Nakagawa, Yoshinao; Tomishige, Keiichi

    2012-12-01

    Doing fine with Ni-Fe: The calcination and reduction of a hydrotalcite precursor containing Ni and Fe ions gives uniform Ni-Fe alloy nanoparticles mixed with Mg(Ni, Fe, Al)O particles. The uniformity of the Ni-Fe alloy nanoparticles is connected to the catalyst's high activity and resistance to coke formation in toluene and phenol steam reforming reactions.

  16. The nature of temper brittleness of high-chromium ferrite

    SciTech Connect

    Sarrak, V.I.; Suvorova, S.O.; Golovin, I.S.; Mishin, V.M.; Kislyuk, I.V.

    1995-03-01

    The reasons for development of {open_quotes}475{degrees}C brittleness{close_quotes} of high-chromium ferritic steels are considered from the standpoint of fracture mechanics. It is shown that the general rise in the curve of temperature-dependent local flow stress has the decisive influence on the position of the ductile-to-brittle transformation temperature and the increase in it as the result of a hold at temperatures of development of brittleness. The established effect is related to the change in the parameters determining dislocation mobility, that is, the activation energy of dislocation movement in high-chromium ferrite and the resistance to microplastic deformation, both caused by processes of separation into layers of high-chromium ferrite and decomposition of the interstitial solid solution.

  17. Antimicrobial Lemongrass Essential Oil-Copper Ferrite Cellulose Acetate Nanocapsules.

    PubMed

    Liakos, Ioannis L; Abdellatif, Mohamed H; Innocenti, Claudia; Scarpellini, Alice; Carzino, Riccardo; Brunetti, Virgilio; Marras, Sergio; Brescia, Rosaria; Drago, Filippo; Pompa, Pier Paolo

    2016-04-20

    Cellulose acetate (CA) nanoparticles were combined with two antimicrobial agents, namely lemongrass (LG) essential oil and Cu-ferrite nanoparticles. The preparation method of CA nanocapsules (NCs), with the two antimicrobial agents, was based on the nanoprecipitation method using the solvent/anti-solvent technique. Several physical and chemical analyses were performed to characterize the resulting NCs and to study their formation mechanism. The size of the combined antimicrobial NCs was found to be ca. 220 nm. The presence of Cu-ferrites enhanced the attachment of LG essential oil into the CA matrix. The magnetic properties of the combined construct were weak, due to the shielding of Cu-ferrites from the polymeric matrix, making them available for drug delivery applications where spontaneous magnetization effects should be avoided. The antimicrobial properties of the NCs were significantly enhanced with respect to CA/LG only. This work opens novel routes for the development of organic/inorganic nanoparticles with exceptional antimicrobial activities.

  18. Electrical and optical properties of gadolinium doped bismuth ferrite nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Mukherjee, A. Banerjee, M. Basu, S.; Pal, M.

    2014-04-24

    Multiferroic bismuth ferrite (BFO) and gadolinium (Gd) doped bismuth ferrite had been synthesized by a sol-gel method. Particle size had been estimated by Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and found to decrease with Gd doping. We studied the temperature and frequency dependence of impedance and electric modulus and calculated the grain and grain boundary resistance and capacitance of the investigated samples. We observed that electrical activation energy increases for all the doped samples. Optical band gap also increases for the doped samples which can be used in photocatalytic application of BFO.

  19. Electrical and optical properties of gadolinium doped bismuth ferrite nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, A.; Banerjee, M.; Basu, S.; Pal, M.

    2014-04-01

    Multiferroic bismuth ferrite (BFO) and gadolinium (Gd) doped bismuth ferrite had been synthesized by a sol-gel method. Particle size had been estimated by Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and found to decrease with Gd doping. We studied the temperature and frequency dependence of impedance and electric modulus and calculated the grain and grain boundary resistance and capacitance of the investigated samples. We observed that electrical activation energy increases for all the doped samples. Optical band gap also increases for the doped samples which can be used in photocatalytic application of BFO.

  20. Characterization and comparative analysis of the tensile properties of five tempered martensitic steels and an oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic alloy irradiated at ≈295 °C to ≈6.5 dpa

    SciTech Connect

    Maloy, Stuart A.; Saleh, Tarik A.; Anderoglu, Osman; Romero, Tobias J.; Odette, G. Robert; Yamamoto, Takuya; Li, S.; Cole, James I.; Fielding, Randall

    2015-08-06

    Tensile test results at 25 and 300 °C on five 9-12Cr tempered martensitic steels and one 14Cr oxide dispersion strengthened alloy, that were side-by side irradiated to 6.5 dpa at 295 °C in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), are reported. The engineering stress–strain curves are analyzed to provide true stress–strain constitutive σ(ε) laws for all of these alloys. In the irradiated condition, the σ(ε) fall into categories of: strain softening, nearly perfectly plastic and strain hardening. Increases in yield stress (Δσy) and reductions in uniform strain ductility (eu) are observed, where as the latter can be understood in terms of the alloy's σ(ε) behavior. Increases in the average σ(ε) in the range of 0–10% strain are smaller than the corresponding Δσy, and vary more from alloy to alloy. The data are analyzed to establish relations between Δσy and coupled changes in the ultimate stresses as well as the effects of both test temperature and the unirradiated yield stress (σyu). The latter shows that higher σyu correlates with lower Δσy. In five out of six cases the effects of irradiation are generally consistent with previous observations on these alloys. However, the particular heat of the 12Cr HT-9 tempered martensitic steel in this study has a much higher eu than observed for earlier heats. The reasons for this improved behavior are not understood and may be microstructural in origin. However, it is noted that the new heat of HT-9, which was procured under modern quality assurance standards, has lower interstitial nitrogen than previous heats. As a result, notably lower interstitial solute contents correlate with improved ductility and homogenous deformation in broadly similar steels.

  1. Nano-sized Superlattice Clusters Created by Oxygen Ordering in Mechanically Alloyed Fe Alloys

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yong-Jie; Li, Jing; Darling, Kristopher A.; Wang, William Y.; VanLeeuwen, Brian K.; Liu, Xuan L.; Kecskes, Laszlo J.; Dickey, Elizabeth C.; Liu, Zi-Kui

    2015-01-01

    Creating and maintaining precipitates coherent with the host matrix, under service conditions is one of the most effective approaches for successful development of alloys for high temperature applications; prominent examples include Ni- and Co-based superalloys and Al alloys. While ferritic alloys are among the most important structural engineering alloys in our society, no reliable coherent precipitates stable at high temperatures have been found for these alloys. Here we report discovery of a new, nano-sized superlattice (NSS) phase in ball-milled Fe alloys, which maintains coherency with the BCC matrix up to at least 913 °C. Different from other precipitates in ferritic alloys, this NSS phase is created by oxygen-ordering in the BCC Fe matrix. It is proposed that this phase has a chemistry of Fe3O and a D03 crystal structure and becomes more stable with the addition of Zr. These nano-sized coherent precipitates effectively double the strength of the BCC matrix above that provided by grain size reduction alone. This discovery provides a new opportunity for developing high-strength ferritic alloys for high temperature applications. PMID:26134420

  2. Development of Oxide Dispersion Strengthened (ODS) Ferritic Steel Through Powder Forging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Deepak; Prakash, Ujjwal; Dabhade, Vikram V.; Laha, K.; Sakthivel, T.

    2017-02-01

    Oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steels are candidates for cladding tubes in fast breeder nuclear reactors. In this study, an 18%Cr ODS ferritic steel was prepared through powder forging route. Elemental powders with a nominal composition of Fe-18Cr-2 W-0.2Ti (composition in wt.%) with 0 and 0.35% yttria were prepared by mechanical alloying in a Simoloyer attritor under argon atmosphere. The alloyed powders were heated in a mild steel can to 1473 K under flowing hydrogen atmosphere. The can was then hot forged. Steps of sealing, degassing and evacuation are eliminated by using powder forging. Heating ODS powder in hydrogen atmosphere ensures good bonding between alloy powders. A dense ODS alloy with an attractive combination of strength and ductility was obtained after re-forging. On testing at 973 K, a loss in ductility was observed in yttria-containing alloy. The strength and ductility increased with increase in strain rate at 973 K. Reasons for this are discussed. The ODS alloy exhibited a recrystallized microstructure which is difficult to achieve by extrusion. No prior particle boundaries were observed after forging. The forged compacts exhibited isotropic mechanical properties. It is suggested that powder forging may offer several advantages over the traditional extrusion/HIP routes for fabrication of ODS alloys.

  3. Small high directivity ferrite antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, T. M. B.

    A centimeter-wavelength antenna of millimetric dimensions, which uses the intrinsic angular sensitivity of ferrites, is described, with an emphasis on the modification of the material's permeability. The construction of both the ferrite film lens antenna and the ferrite film cassegrain antenna are detailed; both can be devised in a number of configurations for appropriate beam positioning and rf filtering. The antenna design, discussed primarily in the context of smart missiles, electronic warfare, and satellite systems, presents the possibility of magnetically switching between the transmit and receive modes within the antenna structure itself. Finally, it is noted that for a simple 2-dipole array the angular resolution can be two orders of magnitude higher than with the conventional techniques.

  4. High power ferrite microwave switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bardash, I.; Roschak, N. K.

    1975-01-01

    A high power ferrite microwave switch was developed along with associated electronic driver circuits for operation in a spaceborne high power microwave transmitter in geostationary orbit. Three units were built and tested in a space environment to demonstrate conformance to the required performance characteristics. Each unit consisted of an input magic-tee hybrid, two non-reciprocal latching ferrite phase shifters, an out short-slot 3 db quadrature coupler, a dual driver electronic circuit, and input logic interface circuitry. The basic mode of operation of the high power ferrite microwave switch is identical to that of a four-port, differential phase shift, switchable circulator. By appropriately designing the phase shifters and electronic driver circuits to operate in the flux-transfer magnetization mode, power and temperature insensitive operation was achieved. A list of the realized characteristics of the developed units is given.

  5. Oxidative stress mediated apoptosis induced by nickel ferrite nanoparticles in cultured A549 cells.

    PubMed

    Ahamed, Maqusood; Akhtar, Mohd Javed; Siddiqui, Maqsood A; Ahmad, Javed; Musarrat, Javed; Al-Khedhairy, Abdulaziz A; AlSalhi, Mohamad S; Alrokayan, Salman A

    2011-05-10

    Due to the interesting magnetic and electrical properties with good chemical and thermal stabilities, nickel ferrite nanoparticles are being utilized in many applications including magnetic resonance imaging, drug delivery and hyperthermia. Recent studies have shown that nickel ferrite nanoparticles produce cytotoxicity in mammalian cells. However, there is very limited information concerning the toxicity of nickel ferrite nanoparticles at the cellular and molecular level. The aim of this study was to investigate the cytotoxicity, oxidative stress and apoptosis induction by well-characterized nickel ferrite nanoparticles (size 26 nm) in human lung epithelial (A549) cells. Nickel ferrite nanoparticles induced dose-dependent cytotoxicity in A549 cells demonstrated by MTT, NRU and LDH assays. Nickel ferrite nanoparticles were also found to induce oxidative stress evidenced by generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and depletion of antioxidant glutathione (GSH). Further, co-treatment with the antioxidant L-ascorbic acid mitigated the ROS generation and GSH depletion due to nickel ferrite nanoparticles suggesting the potential mechanism of oxidative stress. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis demonstrated that following the exposure of A549 cells to nickel ferrite nanoparticles, the level of mRNA expressions of cell cycle checkpoint protein p53 and apoptotic proteins (bax, caspase-3 and caspase-9) were significantly up-regulated, whereas the expression of anti-apoptotic proteins (survivin and bcl-2) were down-regulated. Moreover, activities of caspase-3 and caspase-9 enzymes were also significantly higher in nickel ferrite nanoparticles exposed cells. To the best of our knowledge this is the first report showing that nickel ferrite nanoparticles induced apoptosis in A549 cells through ROS generation and oxidative stress via p53, survivin, bax/bcl-2 and caspase pathways.

  6. RF cavities with transversely biased ferrite tuning

    SciTech Connect

    Smythe, W.R.; Brophy, T.G.; Carlini, R.D.; Friedrichs, C.C.; Grisham, D.L.; Spalek, G.; Wilkerson, L.C.

    1985-10-01

    Earley et al. suggested that ferrite tuned rf cavities have lower ferrite power dissipation if the ferrite bias field is perpendicular rather than parallel to the rf magnetic field. A 50-84 MHz cavity has been constructed in which ferrite can be biased either way. Low power measurements of six microwave ferrites show that the magnetic Q's of these ferrites under perpendicular bias are much higher than under parallel bias, and that the high Q region extends over a much wider range of rf permeability. TDK Y-5 ferrite was found to have a magnetic Q of 10,800, 4,800, 1,200 and 129 at rf permeabilities of 1.2, 2.4, 3.7 and 4.5, respectively. Measurements of perpendicularly biased ferrite at various power levels were made in a coaxial line cavity. The Q of Y-5 ferrite was found to decrease by less than a factor of 2 as the power density in the ferrite was increased to 1.3 W/cmT. A cavity design for a 6 GeV, high current, rapid cycling synchrotron using transversely biased ferrite tuning is described.

  7. Swelling of several commercial alloys following high fluence neutron irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, R. W.; Peterson, D. T.; Zimmerschied, M. K.; Bates, J. F.

    Swelling values have been determined for a set of commercial alloys irradiated to a peak fluence of 1.8 × 10 23 n/cm 2 (E >0.1 MeV) over the temperature range of 400 to 650°C. The alloys studied fall into three classes: the ferritic alloys AISI 430F, AISI 416, EM-12, H-11 and 2 {1}/{4}Cr-1Mo; the superalloys Inconel 718 and Inconel X-750; and the refractory alloys TZM and Nb-1Zr. All of these alloys display swelling resistance far superior to cold worked AISI 316. Of the three alloy classes examined the swelling resistance of the ferritics is the least sensitive to composition.

  8. Cobalt ferrite nanoparticles under high pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Saccone, F. D.; Ferrari, S.; Grinblat, F.; Bilovol, V.; Errandonea, D.

    2015-08-21

    We report by the first time a high pressure X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy study of cobalt ferrite (CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) nanoparticles carried out at room temperature up to 17 GPa. In contrast with previous studies of nanoparticles, which proposed the transition pressure to be reduced from 20–27 GPa to 7.5–12.5 GPa (depending on particle size), we found that cobalt ferrite nanoparticles remain in the spinel structure up to the highest pressure covered by our experiments. In addition, we report the pressure dependence of the unit-cell parameter and Raman modes of the studied sample. We found that under quasi-hydrostatic conditions, the bulk modulus of the nanoparticles (B{sub 0} = 204 GPa) is considerably larger than the value previously reported for bulk CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} (B{sub 0} = 172 GPa). In addition, when the pressure medium becomes non-hydrostatic and deviatoric stresses affect the experiments, there is a noticeable decrease of the compressibility of the studied sample (B{sub 0} = 284 GPa). After decompression, the cobalt ferrite lattice parameter does not revert to its initial value, evidencing a unit cell contraction after pressure was removed. Finally, Raman spectroscopy provides information on the pressure dependence of all Raman-active modes and evidences that cation inversion is enhanced by pressure under non-hydrostatic conditions, being this effect not fully reversible.

  9. The effect of solution pH on the electrochemical performance of nanocrystalline metal ferrites MFe2O4 (M=Cu, Zn, and Ni) thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elsayed, E. M.; Rashad, M. M.; Khalil, H. F. Y.; Ibrahim, I. A.; Hussein, M. R.; El-Sabbah, M. M. B.

    2016-04-01

    Nanocrystalline metal ferrite MFe2O4 (M=Cu, Zn, and Ni) thin films have been synthesized via electrodeposition-anodization process. Electrodeposited (M)Fe2 alloys were obtained from aqueous sulfate bath. The formed alloys were electrochemically oxidized (anodized) in aqueous (1 M KOH) solution, at room temperature, to the corresponding hydroxides. The parameters controlling the current efficiency of the electrodeposition of (M)Fe2 alloys such as the bath composition and the current density were studied and optimized. The anodized (M)Fe2 alloy films were annealed in air at 400 °C for 2 h. The results revealed the formation of three ferrite thin films were formed. The crystallite sizes of the produced films were in the range between 45 and 60 nm. The microstructure of the formed film was ferrite type dependent. The corrosion behavior of ferrite thin films in different pH solutions was investigated using open circuit potential (OCP) and potentiodynamic polarization measurements. The open circuit potential indicates that the initial potential E im of ZnFe2O4 thin films remained constant for a short time, then sharply increased in the less negative direction in acidic and alkaline medium compared with Ni and Cu ferrite films. The values of the corrosion current density I corr were higher for the ZnFe2O4 films at pH values of 1 and 12 compared with that of NiFe2O4 and CuFe2O4 which were higher only at pH value 1. The corrosion rate was very low for the three ferrite films when immersion in the neutral medium. The surface morphology recommended that Ni and Cu ferrite films were safely used in neutral and alkaline medium, whereas Zn ferrite film was only used in neutral atmospheres.

  10. Comparative cytotoxic response of nickel ferrite nanoparticles in human liver HepG2 and breast MFC-7 cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Ahamed, Maqusood; Akhtar, Mohd Javed; Alhadlaq, Hisham A; Khan, M A Majeed; Alrokayan, Salman A

    2015-09-01

    Nickel ferrite nanoparticles (NPs) have received much attention for their potential applications in biomedical fields such as magnetic resonance imaging, drug delivery and cancer hyperthermia. However, little is known about the toxicity of nickel ferrite NPs at the cellular and molecular levels. In this study, we investigated the cytotoxic responses of nickel ferrite NPs in two different types of human cells (i.e., liver HepG2 and breast MCF-7). Nickel ferrite NPs induced dose-dependent cytotoxicity in both types of cells, which was demonstrated by 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyltetrazoliumbromide (MTT), neutral red uptake (NRU) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assays. Nickel ferrite NPs were also found to induce oxidative stress, which was evident by the depletion of glutathione and the induction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and lipid peroxidation. The mitochondrial membrane potential due to nickel ferrite NP exposure was also observed. The mRNA levels for the tumor suppressor gene p53 and the apoptotic genes bax, CASP3 and CASP9 were up-regulated, while the anti-apoptotic gene bcl-2 was down-regulated following nickel ferrite NP exposure. Furthermore, the activities of apoptotic enzymes (caspase-3 and caspase-9) were also higher in both types of cells treated with nickel ferrite NPs. Cytotoxicity induced by nickel ferrite was efficiently prevented by N-acetyl cysteine (ROS scavenger) treatment, which suggested that oxidative stress might be one of the possible mechanisms of nickel ferrite NP toxicity. We also observed that MCF-7 cells were slightly more susceptible to nickel ferrite NP exposure than HepG2 cells. This study warrants further investigation to explore the potential mechanisms of different cytotoxic responses of nickel ferrite NPs in different cell lines.

  11. The partitioning of alloying elements in vacuum arc remelted, Pd-modified PH 13-8 Mo alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cieslak, M. J.; Vandenavyle, J. A.; Carr, M. J.; Hills, C. R.; Semarge, R. E.

    1988-12-01

    The partitioning of alloying elements in as-solidified PH 13-8 Mo stainless steel containing up to 1.02 wt pct Pd has been investigated. The as-solidified structure is composed of two major phases, martensite and ferrite. Electron probe microanalysis reveals that Mo, Cr, and Al partition to the ferrite phase while Fe, Ni, Mn, and Pd partition to the martensite (prior austenite) during solidification and cooling from the solidus. In addition to bulk segregation between phases, precipitation of the intermetallic, PdAI, in the retained ferrite is observed. Precipitation of the normal hardening phase, β-NiAl, is also observed in the retained ferrite. Partition ratios of the various alloying elements are determined and are compared with those observed previously in duplex Fe-Cr-Ni stainless steel solidification structures. The martensite start temperature (Ms) was observed to decrease with increasing Pd concentration.

  12. A STUDY OF FERRITE CAVITY.

    SciTech Connect

    ZHAO, Y.

    2002-04-19

    This note addresses the general concerns for the design of a ferrite cavity. The parameters are specified for the RCMS, for which the frequency ramp is in the range of 1.27 MHz to 6.44 MHz, or a ratio of 1:5.

  13. A novel active fire protection approach for structural steel members using NiTi shape memory alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadiq, H.; Wong, M. B.; Al-Mahaidi, R.; Zhao, X. L.

    2013-02-01

    A novel active fire protection approach, based on integrating a shape memory alloy, NiTi, with a steel structure, was proposed to satisfy the fire resistance requirements in structural design. To demonstrate the principles of this approach, a simple structure in the form of a simply supported steel beam was used. The internal action of the beam due to a transverse applied load was reduced by utilizing the shape memory effect in the NiTi alloy at rising temperatures. As a result, the net internal action from the load design was kept below the deteriorated load capacity of the beam during the fire scenario for period of time that was longer than that of the original beam without the NiTi alloy. By integrating the NiTi alloy into the beam system, the structure remained stable even though the steel temperature exceeded the critical temperature which may have caused the original beam structure to collapse. Prior to testing the composite NiTi-steel beam under simulated fire conditions, the NiTi alloy specimens were characterized at high temperatures. At 300 °C, the stiffness of the specimens increased by three times and its strength by four times over that at room temperature. The results obtained from the high-temperature characterization highlighted the great potential of the alloy being used in fire engineering applications.

  14. The zinc ferrite obtained by oxidative precipitation method as a catalyst in n-butanol conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Klimkiewicz, Roman Wolska, Jolanta; Przepiera, Aleksander; Przepiera, Krystyna; Jablonski, Maciej; Lenart, Stanislaw

    2009-01-08

    This paper presents the results of catalytic properties of n-butanol conversion of the zinc ferrite obtained by oxidative precipitation method. The zinc ferrite showed good dehydrogenating activity but also catalyzed consecutive bimolecular condensation of emerged aldehyde particles into symmetrical ketone. The zinc-iron oxide of spinel structure was prepared from ferrous sulfate, which forms as a waste during the titanium dioxide production. The X-ray diffraction methods (XRD, XRF) were used in determining the structure and composition of obtained zinc ferrite, while thermogravimetry (TG-DTG), and differential thermal analysis (DTA) were used in the study of thermal transformations of zinc spinel in air.

  15. Characterization of ferritic G. M. A. weld deposits in 9% Ni steel for cryogenic applications

    SciTech Connect

    Mahin, K.W.

    1980-04-01

    Low temperature containment vessels of 9% Ni are normally fabricated using the shielded metal arc (S.M.A.W.) or the gas metal arc (G.M.A.W.) welding processes. Available filler metals compatible with these processes are highly alloyed austenitics, whose strength levels undermatch those of the base plate. A more efficient weld joint would be a low alloy ferritic deposit. Although acceptable matching ferritic gas tungsten arc weld (G.T.A.W.) wires have been developed, similar progress has not been made in the area of ferritic G.M.A. weld wires. Most of the prior work in this area has focused on correlating composition with mechanical properties, without a corresponding evaluation of resultant microstructure. The study presented focused on establishing correlations between chemistry, microstructure and mechanical properties for four different ferritic G.M.A. weld deposits in 9% Ni steel, with the purpose of developing a better understanding of the factors controlling the 77K (-196/sup 0/C) toughness behavior of these weld metals. Microstructural characterization was carried out using standard optical and scanning electron microscopes, as well as a variety of advanced analytical techniques, including transmission electron microscopy (T.E.M.), scanning T.E.M., Moessbauer spectroscopy and Auger electron spectroscopy.

  16. Nickel Alloy Primary Water Bulk Surface and SCC Corrosion Film Analytical Characterization and SCC Mechanistic Implications

    SciTech Connect

    Morton, D.; Lewis, N.; Hanson, M.; Rice, S.; Sanders, P.

    2007-04-18

    Alloy 600 corrosion coupon tests were performed: (1) to quantify the temperature dependency of general corrosion and (2) to characterize the composition and structure of bulk surface corrosion films for comparison with ongoing primary water SCC (PWSCC) crack tip corrosion film analyses. Results suggest that the thermal activation energy of Alloy 600 corrosion is consistent with the thermal activation energy of nickel alloy PWSCC. Analytical investigations of the structure and composition of Alloy 600 bulk surface corrosion oxides revealed a duplex (inner and outer) oxide layer structure. The outer layer is discontinuous and comprised of relatively large (1 to 3 {micro}m) nickel ferrite crystals and smaller ({approx}0.1 {micro}m) chromium containing nickel ferrite crystals. The inner layer consists of a relatively continuous chromite spinel (major phase) and chromia (Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} minor phase) which formed through non-selective oxidation. Chromia and dealloyed Alloy 600 (highly Ni enriched metal) were only observed at 337 C (640 F) and only along the boundaries of deformation induced fine grains and subcells. Specimens having deformation free surfaces exhibited continuous uniform inner chromite spinel oxide layers. Specimens with machining induced surface deformation produced non-uniform inner layer oxides (chromite spinel, Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} and unoxidized material). PWSCC crack tip oxides, in contrast, were fine grain (no duplex structure) and consisted of both chromium rich spinels and ''NiO'' structure oxides. Generally, nickel rich oxides were more abundant under more oxidized conditions (reduced coolant hydrogen) and spinel rich crack tip oxides were favored under more reducing conditions (increased coolant hydrogen). Bulk surface corrosion film thickness did not correlate with observed SCC growth rates. These results suggest that corrosion is not the rate controlling step of PWSCC but rather that PWSCC and corrosion have a common rate controlling sub

  17. Studies on separation and purification of fission (99)Mo from neutron activated uranium aluminum alloy.

    PubMed

    Rao, Ankita; Kumar Sharma, Abhishek; Kumar, Pradeep; Charyulu, M M; Tomar, B S; Ramakumar, K L

    2014-07-01

    A new method has been developed for separation and purification of fission (99)Mo from neutron activated uranium-aluminum alloy. Alkali dissolution of the irradiated target (100mg) results in aluminum along with (99)Mo and a few fission products passing into solution, while most of the fission products, activation products and uranium remain undissolved. Subsequent purification steps involve precipitation of aluminum as Al(OH)3, iodine as AgI/AgIO3 and molybdenum as Mo-α-benzoin oxime. Ruthenium is separated by volatilization as RuO4 and final purification of (99)Mo was carried out using anion exchange method. The radiochemical yield of fission (99)Mo was found to be >80% and the purity of the product was in conformity with the international pharmacopoeia standards.

  18. Monosemousness of Thermal Plastic Strain on Thermal Fatigue Life in Ferrite Ductile Cast Iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Morihito; Mouri, Hayato

    In this study, the monosemous effect of thermal plastic strain on the thermal fatigue life is newly found on ferrite ductile cast iron around the alpha phase field. At first, the monosemousness is defined and its meaning described. Next, the monosemousness of thermal fatigue is demonstrated by its conditional equation and its existence is verified by the thermal fatigue test on ferrite ductile cast iron. By doing so, the feature on the thermal fatigue of ferrite ductile cast iron is clarified. Generally, it is considered that fatigue life in ferrite-matrix temperature range can be expressed at least by two or more different Arrhenius equations, namely there are two or more different activation mechanisms to govern the thermal fatigue life corresponding to various ferrite temperature ranges. In this case, for determining the life in any various ferrite temperature ranges, it must have at least four or more unknown quantities. If there is the presence of a general equation which is able to replace above described plural equations, then the life can be determined by simple one variable. Here, by introducing conditional equations, it is verified that the general equation is a Coffin and Manson's equation of low cycle fatigue and whole thermal fatigue life can be determined by a variable of thermal plastic strain occurred in thermal cycle. As a result, the law can apply to describe thermal fatigue phenomenon and predict thermal fatigue life monosemously from cyclic thermal plastic strain on ductile cast iron with ferrite matrix.

  19. Development of high catalytic activity disordered hydrogen-storage alloys for electrochemical application in nickel-metal hydride batterie

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ovshinsky, S. R.; Fetcenko, M. A.

    2001-04-01

    Multi-element, multiphase disordered metal hydride alloys have enabled the widespread commercialization of nickel-metal hydride (NiMH) batteries by allowing high capacity and good kinetics while overcoming the crucial barrier of unstable oxidation/corrosion behavior to obtain long cycle life. Alloy-formula optimization and advanced materials processing have been used to promote a high concentration of active hydrogen-storage sites vital for raising NiMH specific energy. New commercial applications demand fundamentally higher specific power and discharge-rate kinetics. Disorder at the metal/electrolyte interface has enabled a surface oxide with less than 70 Å metallic nickel alloy inclusions suspended within the oxide, which provide exceptional catalytic activity to the metal hydride electrode surface.

  20. Shape memory alloy-based biopsy device for active locomotive intestinal capsule endoscope.

    PubMed

    Le, Viet Ha; Hernando, Leon-Rodriguez; Lee, Cheong; Choi, Hyunchul; Jin, Zhen; Nguyen, Kim Tien; Go, Gwangjun; Ko, Seong-Young; Park, Jong-Oh; Park, Sukho

    2015-03-01

    Recently, capsule endoscopes have been used for diagnosis in digestive organs. However, because a capsule endoscope does not have a locomotive function, its use has been limited to small tubular digestive organs, such as small intestine and esophagus. To address this problem, researchers have begun studying an active locomotive intestine capsule endoscope as a medical instrument for the whole gastrointestinal tract. We have developed a capsule endoscope with a small permanent magnet that is actuated by an electromagnetic actuation system, allowing active and flexible movement in the patient's gut environment. In addition, researchers have noted the need for a biopsy function in capsule endoscope for the definitive diagnosis of digestive diseases. Therefore, this paper proposes a novel robotic biopsy device for active locomotive intestine capsule endoscope. The proposed biopsy device has a sharp blade connected with a shape memory alloy actuator. The biopsy device measuring 12 mm in diameter and 3 mm in length was integrated into our capsule endoscope prototype, where the device's sharp blade was activated and exposed by the shape memory alloy actuator. Then the electromagnetic actuation system generated a specific motion of the capsule endoscope to extract the tissue sample from the intestines. The final biopsy sample tissue had a volume of about 6 mm(3), which is a sufficient amount for a histological analysis. Consequently, we proposed the working principle of the biopsy device and conducted an in-vitro biopsy test to verify the feasibility of the biopsy device integrated into the capsule endoscope prototype using the electro-magnetic actuation system.

  1. High-throughput design of low-activation, high-strength creep-resistant steels for nuclear-reactor applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Qi; van der Zwaag, Sybrand; Xu, Wei

    2016-02-01

    Reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steels are prime candidate materials for structural applications in nuclear power reactors. However, their creep strength is much lower than that of creep-resistant steel developed for conventional fossil-fired power plants as alloying elements with a high neutron activation cannot be used. To improve the creep strength and to maintain a low activation, a high-throughput computational alloy design model coupling thermodynamics, precipitate-coarsening kinetics and an optimization genetic algorithm, is developed. Twelve relevant alloying elements with either low or high activation are considered simultaneously. The activity levels at 0-10 year after the end of irradiation are taken as optimization parameter. The creep-strength values (after exposure for 10 years at 650 °C) are estimated on the basis of the solid-solution strengthening and the precipitation hardening (taking into account precipitate coarsening). Potential alloy compositions leading to a high austenite fraction or a high percentage of undesirable second phase particles are rejected automatically in the optimization cycle. The newly identified alloys have a much higher precipitation hardening and solid-solution strengthening at the same activity level as existing reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steels.

  2. Synthesis and anti-bacterial activity of Cu, Ag and Cu-Ag alloy nanoparticles: A green approach

    SciTech Connect

    Valodkar, Mayur; Modi, Shefaly; Pal, Angshuman; Thakore, Sonal

    2011-03-15

    Research highlights: {yields} Synthesis of novel nanosized copper-silver alloys of different compositions. {yields} Completely green approach for synthesis of water soluble bimetallic nanoparticle. {yields} Interesting anti-bacterial activity of as synthesized metal and alloy nanoparticle. -- Abstract: Metallic and bimetallic nanoparticles of copper and silver in various proportions were prepared by microwave assisted chemical reduction in aqueous medium using the biopolymer, starch as a stabilizing agent. Ascorbic acid was used as the reducing agent. The silver and copper nanoparticles exhibited surface plasmon absorption resonance maxima (SPR) at 416 and 584 nm, respectively; while SPR for the Cu-Ag alloys appeared in between depending on the alloy composition. The SPR maxima for bimetallic nanoparticles changes linearly with increasing copper content in the alloy. Transmission electron micrograph (TEM) showed monodispersed particles in the range of 20 {+-} 5 nm size. Both silver and copper nanoparticles exhibited emission band at 485 and 645 nm, respectively. The starch-stabilized nanoparticles exhibited interesting antibacterial activity with both gram positive and gram negative bacteria at micromolar concentrations.

  3. Vanadium-base alloys for fusion reactor applications

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.L.; Loomis, B.A.; Diercks, D.R.

    1984-10-01

    Vanadium-base alloys offer potentially significant advantages over other candidate alloys as a structural material for fusion reactor first wall/blanket applications. Although the data base is more limited than that for the other leading candidate structural materials, viz., austenitic and ferritic steels, vanadium-base alloys exhibit several properties that make them particularly attractive for the fusion reactor environment. This paper presents a review of the structural material requirements, a summary of the materials data base for selected vanadium-base alloys, and a comparison of projected performance characteristics compared to other candidate alloys. Also, critical research and development (R and D) needs are defined.

  4. Magnetoabsorption and magnetic hysteresis in Ni ferrite nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández-Gómez, P.; Muñoz, J. M.; Valente, M. A.; Torres, C.; de Francisco, C.

    2013-01-01

    Nickel ferrite nanoparticles were prepared by a modified sol-gel technique employing coconut oil, and then annealed at different temperatures in 400-1200 °C range. This route of preparation has revealed to be one efficient and cheap technique to obtain high quality nickel ferrite nanosized powder. Sample particles sizes obtained with XRD data and Scherrer's formula lie in 13 nm to 138 nm, with increased size with annealing temperature. Hysteresis loops have been obtained at room temperature with an inductive method. Magnetic field induced microwave absorption in nanoscale ferrites is a recent an active area of research, in order to characterize and explore potential novel applications. In the present work microwave magnetoabsorption data of the annealed nickel ferrite nanoparticles are presented. These data have been obtained with a system based on a network analyzer that operates in the frequency range 0 - 8.5 GHz. At fields up to 400 mT we can observe a peak according to ferromagnetic resonance theory. Sample annealed at higher temperature exhibits different absorption, coercivity and saturation magnetization figures, revealing its multidomain character.

  5. Friction and wear of single-crystal manganese-zinc ferrite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1979-01-01

    Sliding friction experiments were conducted with single-crystal manganese-zinc ferrite in contact with itself and with transition metals. Results indicate mating highest atomic density directions (110 line type) on matched crystallographic planes exhibit the lowest coefficient of friction indicating that direction is important in the friction behavior of ferrite. Matched parallel high atomic density planes and crystallographic directions at the interface exhibit low coefficients of friction. The coefficients of friction for ferrite in contact with various metals are related to the relative chemical activity of these metals. The more active the metal, the higher the coefficient of friction. Cracking and the formation of hexagon- and rectangular-shaped platelet wear debris due to cleavages are observed on the ferrite surfaces as a result of sliding.

  6. Friction and wear of single-crystal manganese-zinc ferrite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1979-01-01

    Sliding friction experiments were conducted with single crystal manganese-zinc ferrite in contact with itself and with transition metals. Results indicate mating highest atomic density directions (110) on matched crystallographic planes exhibit the lowest coefficient of friction, indicating that direction is important in the friction behavior of ferrite. Matched parallel high atomic density planes and crystallographic directions at the interface exhibit low coefficients of friction. The coefficients of friction for ferrite in contact with various metals are related to the relative chemical activity of these metals. The more active the metal, the higher the coefficient of friction. Cracking and the formation of hexagon- and rectangular-shaped platelet wear debris due to cleavages of (110) planes are observed on the ferrite surfaces as a result of sliding.

  7. Development of a monolithic ferrite memory array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heckler, C. H., Jr.; Bhiwandker, N. C.

    1972-01-01

    The results of the development and testing of ferrite monolithic memory arrays are presented. This development required the synthesis of ferrite materials having special magnetic and physical characteristics and the development of special processes; (1) for making flexible sheets (laminae) of the ferrite composition, (2) for embedding conductors in ferrite, and (3) bonding ferrite laminae together to form a monolithic structure. Major problems encountered in each of these areas and their solutions are discussed. Twenty-two full-size arrays were fabricated and fired during the development of these processes. The majority of these arrays were tested for their memory characteristics as well as for their physical characteristics and the results are presented. The arrays produced during this program meet the essential goals and demonstrate the feasibility of fabricating monolithic ferrite memory arrays by the processes developed.

  8. Surface alloying of Mg alloys after surface nanocrystallization.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ming-Xing; Shi, Yi-Nong; Sun, Haiqing; Kelly, Patrick M

    2008-05-01

    Surface nanocrystallization using a surface mechanical attrition treatment effectively activates the surface of magnesium alloys due to the increase in grain boundary diffusion channels. As a result, the temperature of subsequent surface alloying treatment of pure Mg and AZ91 alloy can be reduced from 430 degrees C to 380 degrees C. Thus, it is possible to combine the surface alloying process with the solution treatment for this type of alloy. After surface alloying, the hardness of the alloyed layer is 3 to 4 times higher than that of the substrate and this may significantly improve the wear resistance of magnesium alloys.

  9. Ferrite Phase Shifters Using Stress Insensitive Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-10-01

    loop property as far as microvave applications of ferrite toroids is concerned. Ideally, the remanent magnetization should equal the saturation ...a second phase that is presumably Mn ferrite or mannetite which both have large values of saturation magnetization (- 5000 gauss) and low field...temperature. In a ferrite device this may result in a loss of saturation and remanent magnetizations vhich may degrade phaser performance. In a unit excited

  10. Surface modification to improve fireside corrosion resistance of Fe-Cr ferritic steels

    DOEpatents

    Park, Jong-Hee; Natesan, Krishnamurti; Rink, David L.

    2010-03-16

    An article of manufacture and a method for providing an Fe--Cr ferritic steel article of manufacture having a surface layer modification for corrosion resistance. Fe--Cr ferritic steels can be modified to enhance their corrosion resistance to liquid coal ash and other chemical environments, which have chlorides or sulfates containing active species. The steel is modified to form an aluminide/silicide passivating layer to reduce such corrosion.

  11. Chromium and copper substituted lanthanum nano-ferrites: Their synthesis, characterization and application studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jauhar, Sheenu; Singhal, Sonal

    2014-10-01

    Nano-crystalline lanthanum ferrites substituted by chromium and copper having formula LaMxFe1-xO3 (M = Cr, Cu; 0.0 ⩽ x ⩽ 0.5) were synthesized using sol-gel auto-combustion method. The formation of ferrite particles was confirmed using Fourier Transform Infra-Red (FT-IR) spectra and powder X-ray Diffraction (XRD) techniques. The entire ferrite compositions were found to be pure phased with same symmetry as LaFeO3. The average crystallite size was calculated to be ∼60 nm. The ferrite compositions were observed to behave as semi-conductors, as their resistivity decreased with increasing temperature. These ferrite compositions were employed as catalysts in the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide solution (0.17 M). Pure LaFeO3 was found to have a very low catalytic activity towards the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide solution, while presence of copper in the lanthanum ferrite lattice was found to significantly enhance its catalytic activity. The rate constant in case of reactions catalysed by LaCu0.5Fe0.5O3 was nearly 25 times larger than that obtained from reactions catalysed by pure LaFeO3. However, chromium substitution was not found to influence the catalytic activity of lanthanum ferrites as chromium substituted lanthanum ferrites exhibited very low catalytic activity. This was explained on the basis of relative stability of oxidation states of the substituent ions and the presence of defects in the crystal lattice.

  12. Ultrahigh Charpy impact toughness (~450J) achieved in high strength ferrite/martensite laminated steels.

    PubMed

    Cao, Wenquan; Zhang, Mingda; Huang, Chongxiang; Xiao, Shuyang; Dong, Han; Weng, Yuqing

    2017-02-02

    Strength and toughness are a couple of paradox as similar as strength-ductility trade-off in homogenous materials, body-centered-cubic steels in particular. Here we report a simple way to get ultrahigh toughness without sacrificing strength. By simple alloying design and hot rolling the 5Mn3Al steels in ferrite/austenite dual phase temperature region, we obtain a series of ferrite/martensite laminated steels that show up-to 400-450J Charpy V-notch impact energy combined with a tensile strength as high as 1.0-1.2 GPa at room temperature, which is nearly 3-5 times higher than that of conventional low alloy steels at similar strength level. This remarkably enhanced toughness is mainly attributed to the delamination between ferrite and martensite lamellae. The current finding gives us a promising way to produce high strength steel with ultrahigh impact toughness by simple alloying design and hot rolling in industry.

  13. Ultrahigh Charpy impact toughness (~450J) achieved in high strength ferrite/martensite laminated steels

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Wenquan; Zhang, Mingda; Huang, Chongxiang; Xiao, Shuyang; Dong, Han; Weng, Yuqing

    2017-01-01

    Strength and toughness are a couple of paradox as similar as strength-ductility trade-off in homogenous materials, body-centered-cubic steels in particular. Here we report a simple way to get ultrahigh toughness without sacrificing strength. By simple alloying design and hot rolling the 5Mn3Al steels in ferrite/austenite dual phase temperature region, we obtain a series of ferrite/martensite laminated steels that show up-to 400–450J Charpy V-notch impact energy combined with a tensile strength as high as 1.0–1.2 GPa at room temperature, which is nearly 3–5 times higher than that of conventional low alloy steels at similar strength level. This remarkably enhanced toughness is mainly attributed to the delamination between ferrite and martensite lamellae. The current finding gives us a promising way to produce high strength steel with ultrahigh impact toughness by simple alloying design and hot rolling in industry. PMID:28150692

  14. Ultrahigh Charpy impact toughness (~450J) achieved in high strength ferrite/martensite laminated steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Wenquan; Zhang, Mingda; Huang, Chongxiang; Xiao, Shuyang; Dong, Han; Weng, Yuqing

    2017-02-01

    Strength and toughness are a couple of paradox as similar as strength-ductility trade-off in homogenous materials, body-centered-cubic steels in particular. Here we report a simple way to get ultrahigh toughness without sacrificing strength. By simple alloying design and hot rolling the 5Mn3Al steels in ferrite/austenite dual phase temperature region, we obtain a series of ferrite/martensite laminated steels that show up-to 400–450J Charpy V-notch impact energy combined with a tensile strength as high as 1.0–1.2 GPa at room temperature, which is nearly 3–5 times higher than that of conventional low alloy steels at similar strength level. This remarkably enhanced toughness is mainly attributed to the delamination between ferrite and martensite lamellae. The current finding gives us a promising way to produce high strength steel with ultrahigh impact toughness by simple alloying design and hot rolling in industry.

  15. A general method for multimetallic platinum alloy nanowires as highly active and stable oxygen reduction catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Bu, Lingzheng; Ding, Jiabao; Yao, Jianlin; Huang, Xiaoqing; Guo, Shaojun; Zhang, Xu; Lu, Gang; Su, Dong; Zhu, Xing; Guo, Jun

    2015-10-13

    The production of inorganic nanoparticles (NPs) with precise control over structures has always been a central target in various fields of chemistry and physics because the properties of NPs can be desirably manipulated by their structure.[1-4] There has been an intense search for high-performance noble metal NP catalysts particular for Pt.[5-9] Precious platinum (Pt) NPs are active catalysts for various heterogeneous reactions and show particularly superior performance in both the anodic oxidation reaction and the cathodic ORR in the fuel cells, but their rare content and high cost largely impede the practical application.[10-12] A potential strategy to address this tremendous challenge is alloying Pt NPs with the transition metals (TM).[13-16]

  16. A general method for multimetallic platinum alloy nanowires as highly active and stable oxygen reduction catalysts

    DOE PAGES

    Bu, Lingzheng; Ding, Jiabao; Yao, Jianlin; ...

    2015-10-13

    The production of inorganic nanoparticles (NPs) with precise control over structures has always been a central target in various fields of chemistry and physics because the properties of NPs can be desirably manipulated by their structure.[1-4] There has been an intense search for high-performance noble metal NP catalysts particular for Pt.[5-9] Precious platinum (Pt) NPs are active catalysts for various heterogeneous reactions and show particularly superior performance in both the anodic oxidation reaction and the cathodic ORR in the fuel cells, but their rare content and high cost largely impede the practical application.[10-12] A potential strategy to address this tremendousmore » challenge is alloying Pt NPs with the transition metals (TM).[13-16]« less

  17. Tensile properties and deformation mechanisms of a 14Cr ODS ferritic steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steckmeyer, A.; Praud, M.; Fournier, B.; Malaplate, J.; Garnier, J.; Béchade, J. L.; Tournié, I.; Tancray, A.; Bougault, A.; Bonnaillie, P.

    2010-10-01

    The search for a new cladding material is part of the research studies carried out at CEA to develop a sodium-cooled fast reactor meeting the expectations of the Generation IV International Forum. In this study, the tensile properties of a ferritic oxide dispersion strengthened steel produced by hot extrusion at CEA have been evaluated. They prove the studied alloy to be as resistant as and more ductile than the other nano-reinforced alloys of literature. The effects of the strain rate and temperature on the total plastic strain of the material remind of diffusion phenomena. Intergranular damage and intergranular decohesion are clearly highlighted.

  18. Progress in ferrite phase shifters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, C. R., Jr.

    1983-10-01

    Advances in the technology of reciprocal ferrite phase shifters are outlined. Nonlatching rotary-field phase shifters have been produced with enhanced phase accuracy and modest control power. A significant quantity of dual-mode latching units has been built at 35 GHz, with good results. Both types of phase shifter can be adapted to perform other functions in addition to phase shifting. Examples of phase shifters that perform duplexing and polarization switching functions are given.

  19. Anodic oxidation of a Co–Ni–Cr–Mo alloy and its inhibitory effect on platelet activation.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Akiko; Suzuki, Yuta; Tsutsumi, Yusuke; Nozaki, Kosuke; Wada, Norio; Katayama, Keiichi; Hanawa, Takao; Yamashit, Kimihiro

    2014-05-01

    In this study, surface treatment of a Co–Ni–Cr–Mo alloy (MP35N) was attempted to attain biocompatibility using an anodic oxidation technique. To determine the optimal condition of the anodic oxidation treatment for stent applications, anodic polarization of the alloy was first conducted. After anodic oxidation, the surface topology and wettability were examined, and the composition and chemical states of the surface oxide were characterized. For biocompatibility, stent surfaces must have both cell adhesion and antithrombogenic properties. Therefore, the anodically oxidized surface was assessed with an endothelial cell attachment test and an in vitro platelet adhesion test. The results indicated that the topography, wettability, and composition of the surface oxide film on the alloy were changed by anodic oxidation at a voltage near the passive and transpassive region. The surface roughness and wettability increased after anodic oxidation. The major content of the oxide layer after anodic oxidation was Cr containing a small amount of Mo, and Ni and Co were almost eliminated from the layer. Platelet activation of the alloy decreased significantly after anodic oxidation at an optimal potential, whereas the cytocompatibility remained constant. Therefore, the anodic oxidation is an effective process for treating this alloy for stent applications.

  20. Magnesium alloys and graphite wastes encapsulated in cementitious materials: Reduction of galvanic corrosion using alkali hydroxide activated blast furnace slag.

    PubMed

    Chartier, D; Muzeau, B; Stefan, L; Sanchez-Canet, J; Monguillon, C

    2017-03-15

    Magnesium alloys and graphite from spent nuclear fuel have been stored together in La Hague plant. The packaging of these wastes is under consideration. These wastes could be mixed in a grout composed of industrially available cement (Portland, calcium aluminate…). Within the alkaline pore solution of these matrixes, magnesium alloys are imperfectly protected by a layer of Brucite resulting in a slow corrosion releasing hydrogen. As the production of this gas must be considered for the storage safety, and the quality of wasteform, it is important to select a cement matrix capable of lowering the corrosion kinetics. Many types of calcium based cements have been tested and most of them have caused strong hydrogen production when magnesium alloys and graphite are conditioned together because of galvanic corrosion. Exceptions are binders based on alkali hydroxide activated ground granulated blast furnace slag (BFS) which are presented in this article.

  1. Spin canting in ferrite nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marx, J.; Huang, H.; Salih, K. S. M.; Thiel, W. R.; Schünemann, V.

    2016-12-01

    Recently, an easily scalable process for the production of small (3 -7 nm) monodisperse superparamagnetic ferrite nanoparticles MeFe2O4 (Me = Zn, Mn, Co) from iron metal and octanoic acid has been reported (Salih et al., Chem. Mater. 25 1430-1435 2013). Here we present a Mössbauer spectroscopic study of these ferrite nanoparticles in external magnetic fields of up to B = 5 T at liquid helium temperatures. Our analysis shows that all three systems show a comparable inversion degree and the cationic distribution for the tetrahedral A and the octahedral B sites has been determined to (Zn0.19Fe0.81) A [Zn0.81Fe1.19] B O4, (Mn0.15Fe0.85) A [Mn0.85Fe1.15] B O4 and (Co0.27Fe0.73) A [Co0.73Fe1.27] B O4. Spin canting occurs presumably in the B-sites and spin canting angles of 33°, 51° and 59° have been determined for the zinc, the manganese, and the cobalt ferrite nanoparticles.

  2. Multifunctionality of nanocrystalline lanthanum ferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rai, Atma; Thakur, Awalendra K.

    2016-05-01

    Nanocrystalline lanthanum ferrite has been synthesized by adopting modified Pechini route. No evidence of impurity or secondary phase has been detected up to the detection of error limit of X-ray diffractometer (XRD). Rietveld refinement of X-ray diffraction pattern reveals orthorhombic crystal system with space group Pnma (62).Crystallite size and lattice strain was found to be ˜42.8nm and 0.306% respectively. Optical band gap was found to be 2.109 eV, by UV-Visible diffused reflectance spectrum (DRS). Brunauer-Emmet-Teller (BET) surface area was found to be ˜3.45 m2/g. Magnetization-hysteresis (M-H) loop was recorded at room temperature (300K) reveals weak ferromagnetism in Nanocrystalline lanthanum ferrite. The weak ferromagnetism in lanthanum ferrite is due to the uncompensated antiferromagnetic spin ordering. Ferroelectric loop hysteresis observed at room temperature at 100Hz depicts the presence of ferroelectric ordering in LaFeO3.Simultanious presence of magnetic and ferroelectric ordering at room temperature makes it suitable candidate of Multiferroic family.

  3. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and friction studies of nickel-zinc and manganese-zinc ferrites in contact with metals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, K.; Buckley, D. H.

    1983-01-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis and sliding friction experiments were conducted with hot-pressed, polycrystalline Ni-Zn and Mn-Zn ferrites in sliding contact with various transition metals at room temperature in a vacuum of 30 nPa. The results indicate that the coefficients of friction for Ni-Zn and Mn-Zn ferrites in contact with metals are related to the relative chemical activity in these metals: the more active the metal, the higher is the coefficient of friction. The coefficients of friction for the ferrites correlate with the free energy of formation of the lowest metal oxide. The interfacial bond can be regarded as a chemical bond between the metal atoms and the oxygen anions in the ferrite surfaces. The adsorption of oxygen on clean metal and ferrite surfaces increases the coefficients of friction for the Ni-Zn and Mn-Zn ferrite-metal interfaces.

  4. Effect of three adhesive primers on the bond strengths of four light-activated opaque resins to noble alloy.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, K; Kamada, K; Taira, Y; Atsuta, M

    2001-02-01

    The effect of commercial adhesive primers for noble metals on the bond strength of light-activated opaque resin has not been determined. This study evaluated the effect of three adhesive primers on the shear bond strengths of each of the four light-activated opaque resins to silver--palladium--copper--gold (Ag--Pd--Cu--Au) alloy. The adhesive primers Alloy Primer (AP), Metal Primer II (MPII) and Metaltite(MT) were used. Four commercial light-activated opaque resins (Axis (AX), Cesead II (CEII), Dentacolor(DE) and Solidex (SO) were used to bond a light-activated resin-veneered composite to Ag--Pd--Cu--Au alloy. The specimens were stored in water at 37 degrees C for 24 h and then immersed alternatively in water baths at 4 and 60 degrees C for 1 min each for up to 20,000 thermal cycles before shear mode testing at a cross-head speed of 0.5 mm min(-1). All the primers examined improved the shear bond strength between opaque resin and Ag--Pd--Cu--Au alloy compared with non-primed specimens prior to thermal cycling. After 20,000 thermal cycles, the bond strengths of combined use of AP and DE and that of MT and each of AX, CE or DE were significantly greater than any other groups. Significant difference was observed between the bond strengths at thermal cycles 0 and 20,000, with the combined use of MT and DE. With the combination of appropriate adhesive metal primers and light-activated opaque resins, complicated surface preparations of metal frameworks of resin-veneered prostheses that are composed of casting Ag-Pd-Cu-Au alloy may be negligible.

  5. Composition-dependent electrocatalytic activity of AuPd alloy nanoparticles prepared via simultaneous sputter deposition into an ionic liquid.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Masanori; Enokida, Kazuki; Okazaki, Ken-ichi; Kuwabata, Susumu; Yoshida, Hisao; Torimoto, Tsukasa

    2013-05-21

    Homogeneously alloyed bimetallic particles of AuPd with an average size of ca. 2 nm were successfully prepared by simultaneous sputter deposition of Au and Pd in an ionic liquid in the absence of any additional stabilizing agents. The chemical composition of the AuPd alloy was tunable depending on the area fraction of Au plates in the Au-Pd binary targets for sputtering. The particles were immobilized on an HOPG surface by heat treatment along with the increase in the average size of particles from ca. 2 nm to ca. 7 nm. Ionic liquid species adsorbed on the as-prepared AuPd nanoparticle films on HOPG caused the prevention of electrocatalytic reactions, but repetition of potential sweep cycling in a basic aqueous solution removed the adsorbed ionic species, resulting in electrocatalytic oxidation of ethanol at the AuPd alloy nanoparticle-immobilized HOPG electrode. The electrocatalytic activity of AuPd nanoalloy particles varied upon changing the fraction of Au and Pd in the particles, and alloy particles having an Au fraction of ca. 0.61 exhibited the maximum activity against ethanol oxidation, being higher than the activity of the pure Pt surface.

  6. Infrared Brazing of Ti50Ni50 Shape Memory Alloy and Inconel 600 Alloy with Two Ag-Cu-Ti Active Braze Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiue, Ren-Kae; Wu, Shyi-Kaan; Yang, Sheng-Hao

    2017-02-01

    Infrared brazing of Ti50Ni50 SMA and Inconel 600 alloy using Cusil-ABA and Ticusil filler metals has been investigated. The joints were dominated by Ag-Cu eutectic with proeutectic Cu in the Cusil-ABA brazed joint and with proeutectic Ag in the Ticusil one. A continuous curved belt composed of a Ni3Ti layer and a (Cu x Ni1- x )2Ti layer formed in the brazed Ti50Ni50/Ticusil/Inconel 600 joint. On the Ti50Ni50 SMA side, an intermetallic layer of (Cu x Ni1- x )2Ti formed in all joints, with x values around 0.81 and 0.47. Layers of (Cu x Ni1- x )2Ti, Ni3Ti, and mixed Ni3Ti and Ni2Cr intermetallics were observed next to the Inconel 600 substrate in the brazed Ti50Ni50/Cusil-ABA/Inconel 600 joint. The maximum shear strengths of the joints using the Cusil-ABA filler metal and the Ticusil filler metal were 324 and 300 MPa, respectively. In the Cusil-ABA brazed joint, cracks with cleavage-dominated fracture propagated along the (Cu x Ni1- x )2Ti interfacial layer next to the Ti50Ni50 SMA substrate. In the Ticusil brazed joint, ductile dimple fracture occurred in the Ag-rich matrix near the Inconel 600 alloy substrate. The absence of a detrimental Ti-Fe-(Cu) layer on the Inconel 600 substrate side can effectively improve the shear strength of the joint.

  7. Laser-Machined Shape Memory Alloy Sensors for Position Feedback in Active Catheters

    PubMed Central

    Tung, Alexander T.; Park, Byong-Ho; Liang, David H.; Niemeyer, Günter

    2008-01-01

    Catheter-based interventions are a form of minimally invasive surgery that can decrease hospitalization time and greatly lower patient morbidity compared to traditional methods. However, percutaneous catheter procedures are hindered by a lack of precise tip manipulation when actuation forces are transmitted over the length of the catheter. Active catheters with local shape-memory-alloy (SMA) actuation can potentially provide the desired manipulation of a catheter tip, but hysteresis makes it difficult to control the actuators. A method to integrate small-volume, compliant sensors on an active catheter to provide position feedback for control would greatly improve the viability of SMA-based active catheters. In this work, we describe the design, fabrication, and performance of resistance-based position sensors that are laser-machined from superelastic SMA tubing. Combining simple material models and rapid prototyping, we can develop sensors of appropriate stiffness and sensitivity with simple modifications in sensor geometry. The sensors exhibit excellent linearity over the operating range and are designed to be easily integrated onto an active catheter substrate. PMID:19759806

  8. Nanoporous PdZr surface alloy as highly active non-platinum electrocatalyst toward oxygen reduction reaction with unique structure stability and methanol-tolerance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Huimei; Xu, Caixia

    2016-06-01

    Nanoporous (NP) PdZr alloy with controllable bimetallic ratio is successfully fabricated by a simple dealloying method. By leaching out the more reactive Al from PdZrAl precursor alloy, NP-PdZr alloy with smaller ligament size was generated, characterized by the nanoscaled interconnected network skeleton and hollow channels extending in all three dimensions. Upon voltammetric scan in acid solution, the dissolution of surface Zr atoms generates the highly active Pd-Zr surface alloy with a nearly pure Pd surface and Pd-Zr alloy core. The NP-Pd80Zr20 surface alloy exhibits markedly enhanced specific and mass activities as well as higher catalytic stability toward oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) compared with NP-Pd and the state-of-the-art Pt/C catalysts. In addition, the NP-Pd80Zr20 surface alloy shows a better selectivity for ORR than methanol in the 0.1 M HClO4 and 0.1 M methanol mixed solution. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and density functional theory calculations both demonstrate that the weakened Pd-O bond and improved ORR performances in turn depend on the downshifted d-band center of Pd due to the alloying Pd with Zr (20 at.%). The as-made NP-PdZr alloy holds prospective applications as a cathode electrocatalyst in fuel-cell-related technologies with the advantages of superior overall ORR performances, unique structure stability, and easy preparation.

  9. Control of Particle Size and Morphology of Cobalt-Ferrite Nanoparticles by Salt-Matrix during Annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azizi, A.; Sadrnezhaad, S. K.; Mostafavi, M.

    Salt-matrix annealing of mechanically alloyed Co-ferrite nanopowder was used to modify its particle size and morphology. Efficiency improvement due to suppression of sintering and growth resulted in reduction of average particle size from 100nm for salt-less to 40nm for salt-full annealing procedure. Nanosized single-phase cobalt-ferrite particles were observed after 2h annealing at 750°C in the samples milled for 20 hours both with and without NaCl. NaCl:CoFe2O4 ratio of 10:1 resulted in cabbage-like clusters containing particles smaller than 50 nm.

  10. Flash fixation of heavy metals from two industrial wastes into ferrite by microwave hydrothermal co-treatment.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dan; Mei, Chun-Yan; Yao, Li-Hua; Jin, Hong-Ming; Qian, Guang-Ren; Xu, Zhi-Ping

    2011-09-15

    Flash fixation of heavy metals from electroplating wastewater (EPW) and pickling waste liquor (PWL) into ferrite lattice can be investigated by microwave hydrothermal process. The toxicity of wastewater may be reduced by the redox reaction between Cr(VI) in electroplating wastewater and Fe(II) in pickling waste liquor. Box-Behnken design (BBD) experiment gives optimal process condition of ferrite formation as follows: wastewater volume ratio (V(PWL):V(EPW) = 0.20), pH value 11 and retention time 15 min, on which formed ferrite has a soft magnetic property with high saturation magnetization (M(s)) 47.4 emu/g. The rapid ferrite process has lower activation energy 7.01 kJ/mol according to grain growth kinetics. Concerning the environmental and economy, we introduced a new and interesting method for water remediation simultaneously synthesizing ferrite by using microwave mediated hydrothermal processes.

  11. Effect of initial microstructure on the activation energy of second stage during austempering of ductile iron

    SciTech Connect

    Campos-Cambranis, R.E.; Narvaez Hernandez, L.; Cisneros-Guerrero, M.M.; Perez-Lopez, M.J.

    1998-03-13

    The good balance among mechanical properties of austempered ductile irons (ADI) mainly depends on the matrix microstructure, which basically consists of acicular ferrite and carbon-enriched austenite. This structure is produced by isothermal transformation of the austenite over the temperature range of 523 to 673 K. It is well accepted that during the isothermal holding, the transformation takes place in two stages. In the first stage, the austenite decomposes into acicular ferrite and carbon-enriched austenite. When the austenite is transformed at temperatures higher than 623 K, the acicular ferrite is free of carbides; at temperatures below 623 K, besides the formation of the acicular ferrite and austenite, precipitation of carbides takes place over the plates of the acicular ferrite. The mixture of ferrite and austenite is known as ausferrite being the responsible for the good mechanical properties of ADI. In this work, the ausferrite obtained above and below 623 K will be termed high and low temperature ausferrite respectively. Although ausferrite does not transform at room temperature, it is not a thermodynamically stable structure. Consequently, if the isothermal holding is extended, or if ADI is heated at high temperatures (523 to 800 K), the second stage of the austempering reaction will occur. During this stage, the carbon rich austenite will decompose into ferrite and carbides. In order to establish the maximum working temperature of ADI, it is necessary to characterize the thermal stability of ausferrite microstructure, since once stage II takes place, the mechanical properties, in particular ductility and toughness, are adversely affected. In the present work the influence of previous ausferrite microstructure (that obtained during first stage) of an alloyed ductile iron (0.6%Ni, 0.15%Mo) on the empirical activation energy of stage II is studied.

  12. Design optimization study of a shape memory alloy active needle for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Konh, Bardia; Honarvar, Mohammad; Hutapea, Parsaoran

    2015-05-01

    Majority of cancer interventions today are performed percutaneously using needle-based procedures, i.e. through the skin and soft tissue. The difficulty in most of these procedures is to attain a precise navigation through tissue reaching target locations. To overcome this challenge, active needles have been proposed recently where actuation forces from shape memory alloys (SMAs) are utilized to assist the maneuverability and accuracy of surgical needles. In the first part of this study, actuation capability of SMA wires was studied. The complex response of SMAs was investigated via a MATLAB implementation of the Brinson model and verified via experimental tests. The isothermal stress-strain curves of SMAs were simulated and defined as a material model in finite element analysis (FEA). The FEA was validated experimentally with developed prototypes. In the second part of this study, the active needle design was optimized using genetic algorithm aiming its maximum flexibility. Design parameters influencing the steerability include the needle's diameter, wire diameter, pre-strain and its offset from the needle. A simplified model was presented to decrease the computation time in iterative analyses. Integration of the SMA characteristics with the automated optimization schemes described in this study led to an improved design of the active needle.

  13. Facile synthesis of Rh-Pd alloy nanodendrites as highly active and durable electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Yue; Wu, Jianbo; Zhang, Hui; Jiang, Yingying; Jin, Chuanhong; Fu, Maoshen; Yang, Hong; Yang, Deren

    2014-05-01

    In addition to activity, durability of Pd-based catalysts in a highly corrosive medium has become one of the most important barriers to limit their industrial applications such as low-temperature fuel cell technologies. Here, Rh with a unique capability to resist against oxidation etching was incorporated into Pd-based catalysts to enhance both their activity and durability for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). This idea was achieved through the synthesis of the Rh-Pd alloy nanodendrites by co-reducing Rh and Pd salt precursors in oleylamine (OAm) containing cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB). In this synthesis, Rh-Pd alloy nanostructures with Rh-Pd atomic ratios from 19 : 1 to 1 : 4 were generated by varying the molar ratios of Rh and Pd salt precursors. Interestingly, this variation of the molar ratios of the precursors from Rh rich to Pd rich would lead to the shape evolution of Rh-Pd alloy from dendritic nanostructures to spherical aggregations. We found that Br- ions derived from CTAB were also indispensible to the production of Rh-Pd alloy nanodendrites. Owing to the addition of highly stable Rh as well as the radical structure with a large number of low-coordinated sites on the arms, Rh-Pd alloy nanodendrites with a Rh-Pd atomic ratio of 4 : 1 (Rh80Pd20) exhibited a substantially enhanced electrocatalytic performance towards ORR with a 5% loss of mass activity during the accelerated stability test for 10 000 cycles compared to ~50% loss of the commercial Pt/C (E-TEK).In addition to activity, durability of Pd-based catalysts in a highly corrosive medium has become one of the most important barriers to limit their industrial applications such as low-temperature fuel cell technologies. Here, Rh with a unique capability to resist against oxidation etching was incorporated into Pd-based catalysts to enhance both their activity and durability for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). This idea was achieved through the synthesis of the Rh-Pd alloy nanodendrites by co

  14. Ferrite Solutions for Electromagnetic Shock Lines

    SciTech Connect

    Coleman, Phillip D.; Dudley, Mark; Primm, Paul

    2014-09-01

    The goal of this work is to develop tools and test procedures for identifying ferrites suitable for use in shock line applications. Electromagnetic shocklines have been used to provide fast rising voltage pulses for many applications. In these applications a slow rising pulse is injected into the line where currents drive the ferrites into saturation leading to a fast rising output pulse. A shockline’s unique capabilities could be applied to new detonator configurations. A properly conditioned voltage pulse is critical for fire set applications. A carefully designed shockline could provide a passive solution to generating a fast rising voltage pulse for the fire set. Traditional circuits use ferrites operating in a linear regime. Shock lines push the ferrites well into the nonlinear regime where very few tools and data currently exist. Ferrite material is key to the operation of these shock lines, and tools for identifying suitable ferrites are critical. This report describes an experimental setup to that allows testing of ferrite samples and comparison to models with the goal of identifying optimal ferrites for shockline use.

  15. Subdomain zinc ferrite particles: Synthesis and characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pannaparayil, T.; Komarneni, S.; Marande, R.; Zadarko, M.

    1990-05-01

    Ultrafine and nearly spherical particles of zinc ferrite were synthesized under mild hydrothermal conditions by precipitating from metal nitrates. These particles exhibited antiferromagnetic ordering below 13 K. Mössbauer spectroscopic measurements revealed the subdomain superparamagnetic nature of the particles having a narrow particle size distribution. The hydrothermal ferrite powders were found to sinter to almost theoretical density with little or no intragranular porosity.

  16. In vivo degradation behavior and biological activity of some new Mg-Ca alloys with concentration's gradient of Si for bone grafts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trincă, Lucia Carmen; Fântânariu, Mircea; Solcan, Carmen; Trofin, Alina Elena; Burtan, Liviu; Acatrinei, Dumitru Mihai; Stanciu, Sergiu; Istrate, Bogdan; Munteanu, Corneliu

    2015-10-01

    Magnesium based alloys, especially Mg-Ca alloys, are biocompatible substrates with mechanical properties similar to those of bones. The biodegradable alloys of Mg-Ca provide sufficient mechanical strength in load carrying applications as opposed to biopolymers and also they avoid stress shielding and secondary surgery inherent with permanent metallic implant materials. The main issue facing a biodegradable Mg-Ca alloy is the fast degradation in the aggressive physiological environment of the body. The alloy's corrosion is proportional with the dissolution of the Mg in the body: the reaction with the water generates magnesium hydroxide and hydrogen. The accelerated corrosion will lead to early loss of the alloy's mechanical integrity. The degradation rate of an alloy can be improved mainly through tailoring the composition and by carrying out surface treatments. This research focuses on the ability to adjust degradation rate of Mg-Ca alloys by an original method and studies the biological activity of the resulted specimens. A new Mg-Ca alloy, with a Si gradient concentration from the surface to the interior of the material, was obtained. The surface morphology was investigated using scanning electron microscopy (VegaTescan LMH II, SE detector, 30 kV), X-ray diffraction (X'Pert equipment) and energy dispersive X-ray (Bruker EDS equipment). In vivo degradation behavior, biological compatibility and activity of Mg-Ca alloys with/without Si gradient concentration were studied with an implant model (subcutaneous and bony) in rats. The organism response to implants was characterized by using radiological (plain X-rays and computed tomography), biochemical and histological methods of investigation. The results sustained that Si gradient concentration can be used to control the rate of degradation of the Mg-Ca alloys for enhancing their biologic activity in order to facilitate bone tissue repair.

  17. Correlation between viscous-flow activation energy and phase diagram in four systems of Cu-based alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, Shuang; Bian, Xiufang; Ren, Zhenfeng

    2010-09-01

    Activation energy is obtained from temperature dependence of viscosities by means of a fitting to the Arrhenius equation for liquid alloys of Cu-Sb, Cu-Te, Cu-Sn and Cu-Ag systems. We found that the changing trend of activation energy curves with concentration is similar to that of liquidus in the phase diagrams. Moreover, a maximum value of activation energy is in the composition range of the intermetallic phases and a minimum value of activation energy is located at the eutectic point. The correlation between the activation energy and the phase diagrams has been further discussed.

  18. Catalytic Activity of Platinum Monolayer on Iridium and Rhenium Alloy Nanoparticles for the Oxygen Reduction Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Karan, Hiroko I.; Sasaki, Kotaro; Kuttiyiel, Kurian; Farberow, Carrie A.; Mavrikakis, Manos; Adzic, Radoslav R.

    2012-05-04

    A new type of electrocatalyst with a core–shell structure that consists of a platinum monolayer shell placed on an iridium–rhenium nanoparticle core or platinum and palladium bilayer shell deposited on that core has been prepared and tested for electrocatalytic activity for the oxygen reduction reaction. Carbon-supported iridium–rhenium alloy nanoparticles with several different molar ratios of Ir to Re were prepared by reducing metal chlorides dispersed on Vulcan carbon with hydrogen gas at 400 °C for 1 h. These catalysts showed specific electrocatalytic activity for oxygen reduction reaction comparable to that of platinum. The activities of PtML/PdML/Ir2Re1, PtML/Pd2layers/Ir2Re1, and PtML/Pd2layers/Ir7Re3 catalysts were, in fact, better than that of conventional platinum electrocatalysts, and their mass activities exceeded the 2015 DOE target. Our density functional theory calculations revealed that the molar ratio of Ir to Re affects the binding strength of adsorbed OH and, thereby, the O2 reduction activity of the catalysts. The maximum specific activity was found for an intermediate OH binding energy with the corresponding catalyst on the top of the volcano plot. The monolayer concept facilitates the use of much less platinum than in other approaches. Finally, the results with the PtML/PdML/Ir2Re electrocatalyst indicate that it is a promising alternative to conventional Pt electrocatalysts in low-temperature fuel cells.

  19. Investigation of iron-chromium-niobium-titanium ferritic stainless steel for solid oxide fuel cell interconnect applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhenguo; Xia, Guan-Guang; Wang, Chong-Min; Nie, Zimin; Templeton, Joshua; Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Singh, Prabhakar

    As part of an effort to develop cost-effective ferritic stainless steel-based interconnects for solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) stacks, both bare AISI441 and AISI441 coated with (Mn,Co) 3O 4 protection layers were studied in terms of its metallurgical characteristics, oxidation behavior, and electrical performance. The addition of minor alloying elements, in particular Nb, led to formation of Laves phases both inside grains and along grain boundaries. In particular, the Laves phase which precipitated out along grain boundaries during exposure at intermediate SOFC operating temperatures was found to be rich in both Nb and Si. The capture of Si in the Laves phase minimized the Si activity in the alloy matrix and prevented formation of an insulating silica layer at the scale/metal interface, resulting in a reduction in area-specific electrical resistance (ASR). However, the relatively high oxidation rate of the steel, which leads to increasing ASR over time, and the need to prevent volatilization of chromium from the steel necessitates the application of a conductive protection layer on the steel. In particular, the application of a Mn 1.5Co 1.5O 4 spinel protection layer substantially improved the electrical performance of the 441 by reducing the oxidation rate.

  20. Facile synthesis of Rh-Pd alloy nanodendrites as highly active and durable electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reaction.

    PubMed

    Qi, Yue; Wu, Jianbo; Zhang, Hui; Jiang, Yingying; Jin, Chuanhong; Fu, Maoshen; Yang, Hong; Yang, Deren

    2014-06-21

    In addition to activity, durability of Pd-based catalysts in a highly corrosive medium has become one of the most important barriers to limit their industrial applications such as low-temperature fuel cell technologies. Here, Rh with a unique capability to resist against oxidation etching was incorporated into Pd-based catalysts to enhance both their activity and durability for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). This idea was achieved through the synthesis of the Rh-Pd alloy nanodendrites by co-reducing Rh and Pd salt precursors in oleylamine (OAm) containing cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB). In this synthesis, Rh-Pd alloy nanostructures with Rh-Pd atomic ratios from 19 : 1 to 1 : 4 were generated by varying the molar ratios of Rh and Pd salt precursors. Interestingly, this variation of the molar ratios of the precursors from Rh rich to Pd rich would lead to the shape evolution of Rh-Pd alloy from dendritic nanostructures to spherical aggregations. We found that Br(-) ions derived from CTAB were also indispensible to the production of Rh-Pd alloy nanodendrites. Owing to the addition of highly stable Rh as well as the radical structure with a large number of low-coordinated sites on the arms, Rh-Pd alloy nanodendrites with a Rh-Pd atomic ratio of 4 : 1 (Rh80Pd20) exhibited a substantially enhanced electrocatalytic performance towards ORR with a 5% loss of mass activity during the accelerated stability test for 10 000 cycles compared to ∼ 50% loss of the commercial Pt/C (E-TEK).

  1. Ferrite thin films for microwave applications

    SciTech Connect

    Zaquine, I.; Benazizi, H.; Mage, J.C.

    1988-11-15

    Production of ferrite thin films is the key to integration of microwave ferrite devices (circulators for phased array antennas, for instance). The interesting materials are the usual microwave ferrites: garnets, lithium ferrites, barium hexaferrites. The required thicknesses are a few tens of micrometers, and it will be important to achieve high deposition rates. Different substrates can be used: silicon and alumina both with and without metallization. The films were deposited by rf sputtering from a single target. The as-deposited films are amorphous and therefore require careful annealing in oxygen atmosphere. The sputtered films are a few micrometers thick on 4 in. substrates. The optimum annealing temperature was found by trying to obtain the highest possible magnetization for each ferrite. The precision on the value of magnetization is limited by the precision on the thickness of the film. We obtain magnetization values slightly lower than the target's. The ferromagnetic resonance linewidth was measured on toroids from 5 to 18 GHz.

  2. Synthesis and Characterization of Nickel Zinc Ferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurian, Manju; Nair, Divya S.

    2011-10-01

    Nano crystalline mixed ferrites can be prepared through different methods. In the present work a comparison was made on sol-gel auto combustion method and co-precipitation method by preparing Nickel Zinc Ferrite. The prepared samples were calcined at different temperatures and were characterized by powder XRD, FTIR. X-ray diffraction analysis indicated the formation of ferrite in nanophase. The lattice parameter was found to be in the range 8.31-8.41Ao. This confirms that nano crystalline ferrite samples are in the cubic spinel structure. An average nano crystalline size was estimated from XRD by the Scherrer's equation. FTIR study also confirms the formation of ferrites. Sol-gel auto combustion technique was superior to co-precipitation method for producing single phase nano particles with smaller crystallite size.

  3. Bonding of Cf/SiC composite to Invar alloy using an active cement, Ag-Cu eutectic and Cu interlayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Zhao; Xiaohong, Li; Jinbao, Hou; Qiang, Sun; Fuli, Zhang

    2012-10-01

    The interfacial microstructures and mechanical properties of the joints formed by active cement added brazing in vacuum of Cf/SiC composite to Invar alloy, using Ag-Cu eutectic alloy and pure copper foil as braze alloy and interlayer respectively, were investigated. CuTi, Cu4Ti3, Fe2Ti and the reaction layer of TiC and Si were the predominant components at the joint interface. The maximum shear strength of the joint was 77 MPa for brazing at 850 °C for 15 min. The results show that active cement added brazing in vacuum using Ag-Cu eutectic alloy and Cu interlayer can be used successfully for joining Cf/SiC composites to Invar alloy.

  4. Alloy development for irradiation performance. Quarterly progress report for period ending December 31, 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Ashdown, B.G.

    1980-04-01

    Progress is reported concerning preparation of a materials handbook for fusion, creep-fatigue of first-wall structural materials, test results on miniature compact tension fracture toughness specimens, austenitic stainless steels, Fe-Ni-Cr alloys, iron-base alloys with long-range crystal structure, ferritic steels, irradiation experiments, corrosion testing, and hydrogen permeation studies. (FS)

  5. Potentiodynamic study of Al-Mg alloy with superhydrophobic coating in photobiologically active/not active natural seawater.

    PubMed

    Benedetti, Alessandro; Cirisano, Francesca; Delucchi, Marina; Faimali, Marco; Ferrari, Michele

    2016-01-01

    Superhydrophobic coating technology is regarded as an attractive possibility for the protection of materials in a sea environment. DC techniques are a useful tool to characterize metals' behavior in seawater in the presence/absence of coatings and/or corrosion inhibitors. In this work, investigations concerning Al-5%Mg alloy with and without a sprayed superhydrophobic coating were carried out with potentiodynamic scans in photobiologically active and not active seawater (3 weeks of immersion). In not photobiologically active seawater, the presence of the superhydrophobic coating did not prevent pitting corrosion. With time, the coating underwent local exfoliations, but intact areas still preserved superhydrophobicity. In photobiologically active seawater, on samples without the superhydrophobic coating (controls) pitting was inhibited, probably due to the adsorption of organic compounds produced by the photobiological activity. After 3 weeks of immersion, the surface of the coating became hydrophilic due to diatom coverage. As suggested by intermediate observations, the surface below the diatom layer is suspected of having lost its superhydrophobicity due to early stages of biofouling processes (organic molecule adsorption and diatom attachment/gliding). Polarization curves also revealed that the metal below the coating underwent corrosion inhibiting phenomena as observed in controls, likely due to the permeation of organic molecules through the coating. Hence, the initial biofouling stages (days) occurring in photobiologically active seawater can both accelerate the loss of superhydrophobicity of coatings and promote corrosion inhibition on the underlying metal. Finally, time durability of superhydrophobic surfaces in real seawater still remains the main challenge for applications, where the early stages of immersion are demonstrated to be of crucial importance.

  6. Cold dynamic compaction of pre-alloyed titanium and activated sintering

    SciTech Connect

    Raybould, D.

    1983-01-01

    The use of dynamic compaction has been found to allow the cold consolidation of Ti-6Al-4V to densities of 99% T.D. Although full interparticle welding was not attained, bonding was found to occur during a low temperature sintering operation; below the ..beta.. transition. The high strengths and toughness values thus obtained are due to an activation of the sintering operation caused by the removal of surface oxide and good metal to metal bonds formed during dynamic compaction, when extensive local shearing of the particles surface occurs. This activation of sintering allows a control of microstructure and in particular, avoidance of embrittling phases. During compaction the passage of the shock wave results in the formation of a shocked structure. Spherical powders usually compact dynamically to characteristic shapes. The shock hardening allows the particle through which the shock has passed to deform the subsequent particle it impacts. This is rarely observed with the titanium alloy, indicating the low shock hardening or high initial hardness of the powders. Areas of interparticle melting were observed, but appeared to be the melting of a third particle rather than melting and bonding between particles.

  7. Progress on Shape Memory Alloy Actuator Development for Active Clearance Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeCastro, Jonathan; Melcher, Kevin; Noebe, Ronald

    2006-01-01

    Results of a numerical analysis evaluating the feasibility of high-temperature shape memory alloys (HTSMA) for active clearance control actuation in the high-pressure turbine section of a modern turbofan engine has been conducted. The prototype actuator concept considered here consists of parallel HTSMA wires attached to the shroud that is located on the exterior of the turbine case. A transient model of an HTSMA actuator was used to evaluate active clearance control at various operating points in a test bed aircraft engine simulation. For the engine under consideration, each actuator must be designed to counteract loads from 380 to 2000 lbf and displace at least 0.033 in. Design results show that an actuator comprised of 10 wires 2 in. in length is adequate for control at critical engine operating points and still exhibit acceptable failsafe operability and cycle life. A proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controller with integrator windup protection was implemented to control clearance amidst engine transients during a normal mission. Simulation results show that the control system exhibits minimal variability in clearance control performance across the operating envelope. The final actuator design is sufficiently small to fit within the limited space outside the high-pressure turbine case and is shown to consume only small amounts of bleed air to adequately regulate temperature.

  8. Design of Radiation-Tolerant Structural Alloys for Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, T.R.; Was, G.S.; Bruemmer, S.M.; Gan, J.; Ukai, S.

    2005-12-28

    The objective of this program is to improve the radiation tolerance of both austenitic and ferritic-martensitic (F-M) alloys projected for use in Generation IV systems. The expected materials limitations of Generation IV components include: creep strength, dimensional stability, and corrosion/stress corrosion compatibility. The material design strategies to be tested fall into three main categories: (1) engineering grain boundaries; (2) alloying, by adding oversized elements to the matrix; and (3) microstructural/nanostructural design, such as adding matrix precipitates. These three design strategies were tested across both austenitic and ferritic-martensitic alloy classes

  9. Nano-ferrites for water splitting: unprecedented high photocatalytic hydrogen production under visible light.

    PubMed

    Mangrulkar, Priti A; Polshettiwar, Vivek; Labhsetwar, Nitin K; Varma, Rajender S; Rayalu, Sadhana S

    2012-08-21

    In the present investigation, hydrogen production via water splitting by nano-ferrites was studied using ethanol as the sacrificial donor and Pt as co-catalyst. Nano-ferrite is emerging as a promising photocatalyst with a hydrogen evolution rate of 8.275 μmol h(-1) and a hydrogen yield of 8275 μmol h(-1) g(-1) under visible light compared to 0.0046 μmol h(-1) for commercial iron oxide (tested under similar experimental conditions). Nano-ferrites were tested in three different photoreactor configurations. The rate of hydrogen evolution by nano-ferrite was significantly influenced by the photoreactor configuration. Altering the reactor configuration led to sevenfold (59.55 μmol h(-1)) increase in the hydrogen evolution rate. Nano-ferrites have shown remarkable stability in hydrogen production up to 30 h and the cumulative hydrogen evolution rate was observed to be 98.79 μmol h(-1). The hydrogen yield was seen to be influenced by several factors like photocatalyst dose, illumination intensity, irradiation time, sacrificial donor and presence of co-catalyst. These were then investigated in detail. It was evident from the experimental data that nano-ferrites under optimized reaction conditions and photoreactor configuration could lead to remarkable hydrogen evolution activity under visible light. Temperature had a significant role in enhancing the hydrogen yield.

  10. Cytotoxicity of nickel zinc ferrite nanoparticles on cancer cells of epithelial origin.

    PubMed

    Al-Qubaisi, Mothanna Sadiq; Rasedee, Abdullah; Flaifel, Moayad Husein; Ahmad, Sahrim H J; Hussein-Al-Ali, Samer; Hussein, Mohd Zobir; Eid, Eltayeb E M; Zainal, Zulkarnain; Saeed, Mohd; Ilowefah, Muna; Fakurazi, Sharida; Mohd Isa, Norhaszalina; El Zowalaty, Mohamed Ezzat

    2013-01-01

    In this study, in vitro cytotoxicity of nickel zinc (NiZn) ferrite nanoparticles against human colon cancer HT29, breast cancer MCF7, and liver cancer HepG2 cells was examined. The morphology, homogeneity, and elemental composition of NiZn ferrite nanoparticles were investigated by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, respectively. The exposure of cancer cells to NiZn ferrite nanoparticles (15.6-1,000 μg/mL; 72 hours) has resulted in a dose-dependent inhibition of cell growth determined by MTT (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) assay. The quantification of caspase-3 and -9 activities and DNA fragmentation to assess the cell death pathway of the treated cells showed that both were stimulated when exposed to NiZn ferrite nanoparticles. Light microscopy examination of the cells exposed to NiZn ferrite nanoparticles demonstrated significant changes in cellular morphology. The HepG2 cells were most prone to apoptosis among the three cells lines examined, as the result of treatment with NiZn nanoparticles. In conclusion, NiZn ferrite nanoparticles are suggested to have potential cytotoxicity against cancer cells.

  11. Kinetically-controlled growth of cubic and octahedral Rh-Pd alloy oxygen reduction electrocatalysts with high activity and durability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Yucong; Zhan, Fangwei; Du, Jingshan; Jiang, Yingying; Jin, Chuanhong; Fu, Maoshen; Zhang, Hui; Yang, Deren

    2014-11-01

    Rh is a promising candidate as an indispensible component in bimetallic catalysts due to its unique capability to resist against the aggressive corrosion from the reaction medium. However, Rh has a very strong oxygen binding ability and is generally not suitable for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). Here, we have demonstrated shape-controlled synthesis of Rh-Pd alloy nanocrystals with high activity and durability for ORR by retarding the reaction kinetics at an ultra-slow injection rate of metal salts using a syringe pump. Under precise control of sluggish reaction kinetics, Pd followed a preferential overgrowth along the <100> direction, whereas the growth behavior of Rh was dominant along the <111> direction. These different kinetically-controlled growth behaviors associated with Rh and Pd were essential for achieving the shape transition between the cube and the octahedron of their alloys. The Rh8Pd92 alloy octahedra exhibited the highest mass activity with a value of 0.18 mA μg-1 in terms of the equivalent Pt cost, and were two-fold higher than that of commercial Pt/C. Significantly, all Rh-Pd alloy nanocrystals were highly stable with only less than 25% loss in mass activity after 30 000 CV cycles in O2 saturated acid solution compared to ~56% loss of the commercial Pt/C (E-TEK). Indeed, the mass activity of Rh8Pd92 was 3.3 times higher than that of commercial Pt/C after the accelerated stability test (ADT). This improvement in activity and durability may arise possibly from synergistic effects between the facet and the surface composition.Rh is a promising candidate as an indispensible component in bimetallic catalysts due to its unique capability to resist against the aggressive corrosion from the reaction medium. However, Rh has a very strong oxygen binding ability and is generally not suitable for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). Here, we have demonstrated shape-controlled synthesis of Rh-Pd alloy nanocrystals with high activity and durability for

  12. Prediction of yield stress and Charpy transition temperature in highly neutron irradiated ferritic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Windsor, Colin; Cottrell, Geoff; Kemp, Richard

    2010-07-01

    Recent predictions have been made of metallurgical properties of low-activation ferritic/martensitic steels alloys at the high irradiation levels (displacements per atom or dpa) needed for a fusion power plant as based on measurements at low irradiation levels where more data are available. These predictions have been published for the yield stress and for the Charpy ductile to brittle transition temperature shift. The neural network model predictions use training data up to a certain dpa level to predict metallurgical properties above this level. This 'extrapolation' mode of neural networks is explored in some detail. Our studies revealed an increasing accuracy of predictions as the test dpa level is increased for both yield stress and Charpy shift predictions. This result suggests that a model exists for these metallurgical properties as a function of dpa level which becomes more accurate as the available irradiation range in the training data is increased. The explanation suggested is that the metallurgical annealing, which occurs as the irradiation level is increased, simplifies the microstructure and makes prediction more reliable.

  13. Current status and recent research achievements in ferritic/martensitic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavassoli, A.-A. F.; Diegele, E.; Lindau, R.; Luzginova, N.; Tanigawa, H.

    2014-12-01

    When the austenitic stainless steel 316L(N) was selected for ITER, it was well known that it would not be suitable for DEMO and fusion reactors due to its irradiation swelling at high doses. A parallel programme to ITER collaboration already had been put in place, under an IEA fusion materials implementing agreement for the development of a low activation ferritic/martensitic steel, known for their excellent high dose irradiation swelling resistance. After extensive screening tests on different compositions of Fe-Cr alloys, the chromium range was narrowed to 7-9% and the first RAFM was industrially produced in Japan (F82H: Fe-8%Cr-2%W-TaV). All IEA partners tested this steel and contributed to its maturity. In parallel several other RAFM steels were produced in other countries. From those experiences and also for improving neutron efficiency and corrosion resistance, European Union opted for a higher chromium lower tungsten grade, Fe-9%Cr-1%W-TaV steel (Eurofer), and in 1997 ordered the first industrial heats. Other industrial heats have been produced since and characterised in different states, including irradiated up to 80 dpa. China, India, Russia, Korea and US have also produced their grades of RAFM steels, contributing to overall maturity of these steels. This paper reviews the work done on RAFM steels by the fusion materials community over the past 30 years, in particular on the Eurofer steel and its design code qualification for RCC-MRx.

  14. Formation and Oxidation Performance of Low-Temperature Pack Aluminide Coatings on Ferritic-Martensitic Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Bates, Brian; Wang, Y. Q.; Zhang, Ying; Pint, Bruce A

    2009-01-01

    A pack cementation process was developed to coat commercial 9% Cr ferritic-martensitic steel T91 at temperatures below its normal tempering temperature to avoid any potential detrimental effect on the mechanical properties of the coated alloy. In order to prevent the formation of Fe{sub 2}Al{sub 5} coatings, the Al activity in the pack cementation process was reduced by substituting the pure Al masteralloy with binary Cr-Al masteralloys containing either 15 or 25 wt.% Al. When the Cr-25Al masteralloy was used, a duplex coating was formed at 700 C, consisting of a thin Fe{sub 2}Al{sub 5} outer layer and an inner layer of FeAl. With the Cr-15Al masteralloy, an FeAl coating of {approx} 12 {micro}m thick was achieved at 700 C. The pack aluminide coatings fabricated at 700 C are being evaluated in air + 10 vol.% H{sub 2}O at 650 C and 700 C to determine their long-term oxidation performance.

  15. Microstructural stability of a self-ion irradiated lanthana-bearing nanostructured ferritic steel

    SciTech Connect

    Pasebani, Somayeh; Charit, Indrajit; Burns, Jatuporn; Alsagabi, Sultan; Butt, Darryl P.; Cole, James I.; Price, Lloyd M.; Shao, Lin

    2015-07-01

    Thermally stable nanofeatures with high number density are expected to impart excellent high temperature strength and irradiation stability in nanostructured ferritic steels (NFSs) which have potential applications in advanced nuclear reactors. A lanthana-bearing NFS (14LMT) developed via mechanical alloying and spark plasma sintering was used in this study. The sintered samples were irradiated by Fe2+ ions to 10, 50 and 100 dpa at 30 °C and 500 °C. Microstructural and mechanical characteristics of the irradiated samples were studied using different microscopy techniques and nanoindentation, respectively. Overall morphology and number density of the nanofeatures remained unchanged after irradiation. Average radius of nanofeatures in the irradiated sample (100 dpa at 500 °C) was slightly reduced. A notable level of irradiation hardening and enhanced dislocation activity occurred after ion irradiation except at 30 °C and ≥50 dpa. Other microstructural features like grain boundaries and high density of dislocations also provided defect sinks to assist in defect removal.

  16. Thermally activated dislocation creep model for primary water stress corrosion cracking of NiCrFe alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, M.M., Jr

    1995-12-31

    There is a growing awareness that awareness that environmentally assisted creep plays an important role in integranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) of NiCrFe alloys in the primary coolant water environment of a pressurized water reactor (PWR). The expected creep mechanism is the thermally activated glide of dislocations. This mode of deformation is favored by the relatively low temperature of PWR operation combined with the large residual stresses that are most often identified as responsible for the SCC failure of plant components. Stress corrosion crack growth rate (CGR) equations that properly reflect the influence of this mechanism of crack tip deformation are required for accurate component life predictions. A phenomenological IGSCC-CGR model, which is based on an apriori assumption that the IGSCC-CGR is controlled by a low temperature dislocation creep mechanism, is developed in this report. Obstacles to dislocation creep include solute atoms such as carbon, which increase the lattice friction force, and forest dislocations, which can be introduced by cold prestrain. Dislocation creep also may be environmentally assisted due to hydrogen absorption at the crack tip. The IGSCC-CGR model developed here is based on an assumption that crack growth occurs by repeated fracture events occurring within an advancing crack-tip creep-fracture zone. Thermal activation parameters for stress corrosion cracking are obtained by fitting the CGR model to IGSCC-CGR data obtained on NiCrFe alloys, Alloy X-750 and Alloy 600. These IGSCC-CGR activation parameters are compared to activation parameters obtained from creep and stress relaxation tests. Recently reported CGR data, which exhibit an activation energy that depends on yield stress and the applied stress intensity factor, are used to benchmark the model. Finally, the effects of matrix carbon concentration, grain boundary carbides and absorbed hydrogen concentration are discussed within context of the model.

  17. TEM microscopical examination of the magnetic domain boundaries in a super duplex austenitic-ferritic stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Fourlaris, G.; Gladman, T.; Maylin, M.

    1996-12-31

    It has been demonstrated in an earlier publication that significant improvements in the coercivity, maximum induction and remanence values can be achieved, by using a 2205 type Duplex austenitic-ferritic stainless steel (DSS) instead of the low alloy medium carbon steels currently being used. These improvements are achieved in the as received 2205 material, and after small amounts of cold rolling have been applied, to increase the strength. In addition, the modification of the duplex austenitic-ferritic microstructure, via a heat treatment route, results in a finer austenite `island` dispersion in a ferritic matrix and provides an attractive option for further modification of the magnetic characteristics of the material. However, the 2205 type DSS exhibits {open_quotes}marginal{close_quotes} corrosion protection in a marine environment, so that a study has been undertaken to examine whether the beneficial effects exhibited by the 2205 DSS, are also present in a 2507 type super-DSS.

  18. Ferrite Phase Shifters Using Stress Insensitive Materials. Phase 1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-06-11

    PROGRAM OBJECTIVES 1.3 PROGRAM TECHNICAL TASKS (PHASE I) 2.0 BACKGROUND DISCUSSION 2.1 REMANENT STATE FERRITE PHASERS 2.2 REMANENT MAGNETIZATION 2.3... MAGNETIZATION AND MAGNETOSTRICTION 2.1 REMANENT STATE FERRITE PHASERS Microwave ferrite digital phase shifters utilize ferrite toroidal structures and the...The insertion phase length of the structure is dependent on the remanent magnetization of the ferrite (see the hysteresis loop shown in Figure 2-4

  19. Irradiation performance of 9--12 Cr ferritic/martensitic stainless steels and their potential for in-core application in LWRs

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, R.H.; Gelles, D.S.

    1993-08-01

    Ferritic-martensitic stainless steels exhibit radiation stability and stress corrosion resistance that make them attractive replacement materials for austenitic stainless steels for in-core applications. Recent radiation studies have demonstrated that 9% Cr ferritic/martensitic stainless steel had less than a 30C shift in ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) following irradiation at 365C to a dose of 14 dpa. These steels also exhibit very low swelling rates, a result of the microstructural stability of these alloys during radiation. The 9 to 12% Cr alloys to also exhibit excellent corrosion and stress corrosion resistance in out-of-core applications. Demonstration of the applicability of ferritic/martensitic stainless steels for in-core LWR application will require verification of the irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking behavior, measurement of DBTT following irradiation at 288C, and corrosion rates measurements for in-core water chemistry.

  20. Titanium oxynitride interlayer to influence oxygen reduction reaction activity and corrosion stability of Pt and Pt-Ni alloy.

    PubMed

    Tan, XueHai; Wang, Liya; Zahiri, Beniamin; Kohandehghan, Alireza; Karpuzov, Dimitre; Lotfabad, Elmira Memarzadeh; Li, Zhi; Eikerling, Michael H; Mitlin, David

    2015-01-01

    A key advancement target for oxygen reduction reaction catalysts is to simultaneously improve both the electrochemical activity and durability. To this end, the efficacy of a new highly conductive support that comprises of a 0.5 nm titanium oxynitride film coated by atomic layer deposition onto an array of carbon nanotubes has been investigated. Support effects for pure platinum and for a platinum (50 at %)/nickel alloy have been considered. Oxynitride induces a downshift in the d-band center for pure platinum and fundamentally changes the platinum particle size and spatial distribution. This results in major enhancements in activity and corrosion stability relative to an identically synthesized catalyst without the interlayer. Conversely, oxynitride has a minimal effect on the electronic structure and microstructure, and therefore, on the catalytic performance of platinum-nickel. Calculations based on density functional theory add insight with regard to compositional segregation that occurs at the alloy catalyst-support interface.

  1. Comparison of nanostructured nickel zinc ferrite and magnesium copper zinc ferrite prepared by water-in-oil microemulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hee, Ay Ching; Mehrali, Mehdi; Metselaar, Hendrik Simon Cornelis; Mehrali, Mohammad; Osman, Noor Azuan Abu

    2012-12-01

    Ferrite is an important ceramic material with magnetic properties that are useful in many types of electronic devices. In this study, structure and magnetic properties of nanostructured nickel zinc ferrite and magnesium copper zinc ferrite prepared by water-in-oil microemulsion were compared. Both ferrites samples demonstrated similar weight loss characteristics in TGA. The magnesium copper zinc ferrite showed a crystalline structure with an average crystallite size of 13.5 nm. However, nickel zinc ferrite showed an amorphous phase. Transmission electron micrographs showed agglomerated nanoparticles with an average crystallite size of 26.6 nm for magnesium copper zinc ferrite and 22.7 nm for nickel zinc ferrite. Magnesium copper zinc ferrite exhibited soft ferromagnetic bahaviour whereas nickel zinc ferrite showed superparamagnetic nature.

  2. Report on thermal aging effects on tensile properties of ferritic-martensitic steels.

    SciTech Connect

    Li, M.; Soppet, W.K.; Rink, D.L.; Listwan, J.T.; Natesan, K.

    2012-05-10

    This report provides an update on the evaluation of thermal-aging induced degradation of tensile properties of advanced ferritic-martensitic steels. The report is the first deliverable (level 3) in FY11 (M3A11AN04030103), under the Work Package A-11AN040301, 'Advanced Alloy Testing' performed by Argonne National Laboratory, as part of Advanced Structural Materials Program for the Advanced Reactor Concepts. This work package supports the advanced structural materials development by providing tensile data on aged alloys and a mechanistic model, validated by experiments, with a predictive capability on long-term performance. The scope of work is to evaluate the effect of thermal aging on the tensile properties of advanced alloys such as ferritic-martensitic steels, mod.9Cr-1Mo, NF616, and advanced austenitic stainless steel, HT-UPS. The aging experiments have been conducted over a temperature of 550-750 C for various time periods to simulate the microstructural changes in the alloys as a function of time at temperature. In addition, a mechanistic model based on thermodynamics and kinetics has been used to address the changes in microstructure of the alloys as a function of time and temperature, which is developed in the companion work package at ANL. The focus of this project is advanced alloy testing and understanding the effects of long-term thermal aging on the tensile properties. Advanced materials examined in this project include ferritic-martensitic steels mod.9Cr-1Mo and NF616, and austenitic steel, HT-UPS. The report summarizes the tensile testing results of thermally-aged mod.9Cr-1Mo, NF616 H1 and NF616 H2 ferritic-martensitic steels. NF616 H1 and NF616 H2 experienced different thermal-mechanical treatments before thermal aging experiments. NF616 H1 was normalized and tempered, and NF616 H2 was normalized and tempered and cold-rolled. By examining these two heats, we evaluated the effects of thermal-mechanical treatments on material microstructures and

  3. Development of nano-structured duplex and ferritic stainless steels by pulverisette planetary milling followed by pressureless sintering

    SciTech Connect

    R, Shashanka Chaira, D.

    2015-01-15

    Nano-structured duplex and ferritic stainless steel powders are prepared by planetary milling of elemental Fe, Cr and Ni powder for 40 h and then consolidated by conventional pressureless sintering. The progress of milling and the continuous refinement of stainless steel powders have been confirmed by means of X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. Activation energy for the formation of duplex and ferritic stainless steels is calculated by Kissinger method using differential scanning calorimetry and is found to be 159.24 and 90.17 KJ/mol respectively. Both duplex and ferritic stainless steel powders are consolidated at 1000, 1200 and 1400 °C in argon atmosphere to study microstructure, density and hardness. Maximum sintered density of 90% and Vickers microhardness of 550 HV are achieved for duplex stainless steel sintered at 1400 °C for 1 h. Similarly, 92% sintered density and 263 HV microhardness are achieved for ferritic stainless steel sintered at 1400 °C. - Highlights: • Synthesized duplex and ferritic stainless steels by pulverisette planetary milling • Calculated activation energy for the formation of duplex and ferritic stainless steels • Studied the effect of sintering temperature on density, hardness and microstructure • Duplex stainless steel exhibits 90% sintered density and microhardness of 550 HV. • Ferritic stainless steel shows 92% sintered density and 263 HV microhardness.

  4. Technical Letter Report on the Cracking of Irradiated Cast Stainless Steels with Low Ferrite Content

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y.; Alexandreanu, B.; Natesan, K.

    2014-11-01

    Crack growth rate and fracture toughness J-R curve tests were performed on CF-3 and CF-8 cast austenite stainless steels (CASS) with 13-14% of ferrite. The tests were conducted at ~320°C in either high-purity water with low dissolved oxygen or in simulated PWR water. The cyclic crack growth rates of CF-8 were higher than that of CF-3, and the differences between the aged and unaged specimens were small. No elevated SCC susceptibility was observed among these samples, and the SCC CGRs of these materials were comparable to those of CASS alloys with >23% ferrite. The fracture toughness values of unirradiated CF-3 were similar between unaged and aged specimens, and neutron irradiation decreased the fracture toughness significantly. The fracture toughness of CF-8 was reduced after thermal aging, and declined further after irradiation. It appears that while lowering ferrite content may help reduce the tendency of thermal aging embrittlement, it is not very effective to mitigate irradiation-induced embrittlement. Under a combined condition of thermal aging and irradiation, neutron irradiation plays a dominant role in causing embrittlement in CASS alloys.

  5. Modeling the austenite decomposition into ferrite and bainite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fazeli, Fateh

    2005-12-01

    during the industrial treatments. The thermodynamic boundary conditions for the kinetic model were assessed with respect to paraequilibrium. The potential interaction between the alloying atoms and the moving ferrite-austenite interface, referred to as solute drag effect, was accounted for rigorously in the model. To quantify the solute drag pressure the Purdy-Brechet approach was modified prior to its implementation into the model. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

  6. Three-dimensional hierarchical porous platinum-copper alloy networks with enhanced catalytic activity towards methanol and ethanol electro-oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Yang; Liu, Pei-Fang; Zhang, Zong-Wen; Cui, Ying; Zhang, Yan

    2015-11-01

    Porous Pt-Cu alloy networks are synthesized through a one-pot hydrothermal process, with ethylene glycol as the reducing agent and the block copolymer Pluronic F127 as structure-directing agent. The structure, porosity and surface chemical state of as-prepared Pt-Cu alloy with different composition are characterized. The formation mechanism of the porous structure is investigated by time sequential experiments. The obtained Pt53Cu47 alloy possesses a unique 3D hierarchical porous network structure assembled by interconnected nanodendrites as building blocks. Because of the high surface area, concave surface topology and open porous structure, the Pt53Cu47 alloy catalyst exhibits enhanced catalytic activity towards methanol and ethanol electro-oxidation in comparison with commercial Pt black and the Pt73Cu27 alloy synthesized following the same process as Pt53Cu47.

  7. Thermally activated low temperature creep and primary water stress corrosion cracking of NiCrFe alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, M.M. Jr.

    1993-10-01

    A phenomenological SCC-CGR model is developed based on an apriori assumption that the SCC-CGR is controlled by low temperature creep (LTC). This mode of low temperature time dependent deformation occurs at stress levels above the athermal flow stress by a dislocation glide mechanism that is thermally activated and may be environmentally assisted. The SCC-CGR model equations developed contain thermal activation parameters descriptive of the dislocation creep mechanism. Thermal activation parameters are obtained by fitting the CGR model to SCC-CGR data obtained on Alloy 600 and Alloy X-750. These SCC-CGR activation parameters are compared to LTC activation parameters obtained from stress relaxation tests. When the high concentration of hydrogen at the tip of an SCC crack is considered, the SCC-CGR activation energies and rate sensitivities are shown to be quantitatively consistent with hydrogen reducing the activation energy and increasing the strain rate sensitivity in LTC stress relaxation tests. Stress dependence of SCC-CGR activation energy consistent with that found for the LTC activation energy. Comparisons between temperature dependence of the SCC-CGR stress sensitivity and LTC stress sensitivity provide a basis for speculation on effects of hydrogen and solute carbon on SCC crack growth rates.

  8. Superior long-term activity for a Pt-Re alloy compared to Pt in methanol oxidation reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duke, Audrey S.; Xie, Kangmin; Monnier, John R.; Chen, Donna A.

    2017-03-01

    Pt-Re bimetallic catalysts have shown enhanced activity compared to pure Pt for reactions involving oxidation, but the origins of this improved activity are not fully understood. Methanol oxidation on a Pt-Re alloy surface and pure Pt foil was studied in a microreactor coupled to an ultrahigh vacuum chamber. For reaction at 60 °C, the Pt-Re alloy surface exhibits superior long-term activity over a 24 h reaction period compared to pure Pt. The initial activity of Pt is 10-15% higher than on Pt-Re; however, the Pt surface gradually loses activity after 10 h online, whereas the activity of Pt-Re does not diminish. Post-reaction XPS shows that more carbon accumulates on the Pt than on Pt-Re, and the improved long-term activity is attributed to a greater ability of Pt-Re to oxidize the carbonaceous intermediates that eventually poison active sites. Both Pt and Pt-Re surfaces have almost no activity for methanol oxidation until a minimum coverage of oxygen is achieved from O2 dissociation. A comparison with methanol oxidation studies on Pt and Pt-Re in a pressure regime that is 150 times lower than in this work demonstrates that more carbon and less oxygen accumulate on the surfaces during reaction at the lower pressures.

  9. Ferrite thin films for microwave applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaquine, I.; Benazizi, H.; Mage, J. C.

    1988-11-01

    This paper describes the preparation and the properties of thin (a few micron-thick) ferrite films for microwave applications. The films were deposited by RF sputtering from a single ferrite target on two different 4-in-thick substrates, silicon and alumina, both bare and metallized. The as-deposited films were amorphous, requiring careful annealing in oxygen atmosphere. The optimum annealing temperature was determined by obtaining the highest possible magnetization for each ferrite. The conditions of microwave measurements are described together with the results.

  10. Thermal activation mechanisms and Labusch-type strengthening analysis for a family of high-entropy and equiatomic solid-solution alloys

    DOE PAGES

    Wu, Zhenggang; Gao, Yanfei; Bei, Hongbin

    2016-11-01

    To understand the underlying strengthening mechanisms, thermal activation processes are investigated from stress-strain measurements with varying temperatures and strain rates for a family of equiatomic quinary, quaternary, ternary, and binary, face-center-cubic-structured, single phase solid-solution alloys, which are all subsystems of the FeNiCoCrMn high-entropy alloy. Our analysis suggests that the Labusch-type solution strengthening mechanism, rather than the lattice friction (or lattice resistance), governs the deformation behavior in equiatomic alloys. First, upon excluding the Hall-Petch effects, the activation volumes for these alloys are found to range from 10 to 1000 times the cubic power of Burgers vector, which are much larger thanmore » that required for kink pairs (i.e., the thermal activation process for the lattice resistance mechanism in body-center-cubic-structured metals). Second, the Labusch-type analysis for an N-element alloy is conducted by treating M-elements (M < N) as an effective medium and summing the strengthening contributions from the rest of N-M elements as individual solute species. For all equiatomic alloys investigated, a qualitative agreement exists between the measured strengthening effect and the Labusch strengthening factor from arbitrary M to N elements based on the lattice and modulus mismatches. Furthermore, the Labusch strengthening factor provides a practical critique to understand and design such compositionally complex but structurally simple alloys.« less

  11. Thermal activation mechanisms and Labusch-type strengthening analysis for a family of high-entropy and equiatomic solid-solution alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Zhenggang; Gao, Yanfei; Bei, Hongbin

    2016-11-01

    To understand the underlying strengthening mechanisms, thermal activation processes are investigated from stress-strain measurements with varying temperatures and strain rates for a family of equiatomic quinary, quaternary, ternary, and binary, face-center-cubic-structured, single phase solid-solution alloys, which are all subsystems of the FeNiCoCrMn high-entropy alloy. Our analysis suggests that the Labusch-type solution strengthening mechanism, rather than the lattice friction (or lattice resistance), governs the deformation behavior in equiatomic alloys. First, upon excluding the Hall-Petch effects, the activation volumes for these alloys are found to range from 10 to 1000 times the cubic power of Burgers vector, which are much larger than that required for kink pairs (i.e., the thermal activation process for the lattice resistance mechanism in body-center-cubic-structured metals). Second, the Labusch-type analysis for an N-element alloy is conducted by treating M-elements (M < N) as an effective medium and summing the strengthening contributions from the rest of N-M elements as individual solute species. For all equiatomic alloys investigated, a qualitative agreement exists between the measured strengthening effect and the Labusch strengthening factor from arbitrary M to N elements based on the lattice and modulus mismatches. Furthermore, the Labusch strengthening factor provides a practical critique to understand and design such compositionally complex but structurally simple alloys.

  12. Structural analysis of emerging ferrite: Doped nickel zinc ferrite

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Rajinder; Kumar, Hitanshu; Singh, Ragini Raj; Barman, P. B.

    2015-08-28

    Ni{sub 0.6-x}Zn{sub 0.4}Co{sub x}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} (x = 0, 0.033, 0.264) nanoparticles were synthesized by sol-gel method and annealed at 900°C. Structural properties of all prepared samples were examined with X-ray diffraction (XRD). The partial formation of hematite (α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) secondary phase with spinel phase cubic structure of undoped and cobalt doped nickel zinc ferrite was found by XRD peaks. The variation in crystallite size and other structural parameters with cobalt doping has been calculated for most prominent peak (113) of XRD and has been explained on the basis of cations ionic radii difference.

  13. Formation of nano-size oxide particles and δ-ferrite at elevated temperature in 9Cr-ODS steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sawoong; Ohtsuka, Satoshi; Kaito, Takeji; Yamashita, Shinichiro; Inoue, Masaki; Asayama, Tai; Shobu, Takahisa

    2011-10-01

    Excellent high-temperature strength and resistance to radiation damage of 9Cr Oxide Dispersion Strengthened (9Cr-ODS) martensitic steel have been realized by nano-size Y-Ti-O complex oxide particles dispersed in the matrix and a dual phase structure consisting of α'-martensite and δ-ferrite. These are produced by mechanically alloying Fe-Cr-Ti powders with Y 2O 3 followed by a hot-consolidation process. Therefore, the hot-consolidation process is the issue to be clarified for the formation of nano-size oxide particle and δ-ferrite. The temperature dependence of the formation and development of nano-size oxide particles and δ-ferrite using mechanically alloyed 9Cr-ODS raw powder were investigated applying X-ray Diffraction and Small Angle X-ray Scattering measurement at SPring-8 and by Electron Probe Micro Analysis. In situ heating measurement techniques with XRD and SAXS enabled real-time observation of phase transformations and allowed correlation between formation of nano-size oxide particle and δ-ferrite.

  14. Fe(3+)-Doped TiO₂ Nanotube Arrays on Ti-Fe Alloys for Enhanced Photoelectrocatalytic Activity.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jiangdong; Wu, Zhi; Gong, Cheng; Xiao, Wang; Sun, Lan; Lin, Changjian

    2016-06-06

    Highly ordered, vertically oriented Fe(3+)-doped TiO₂ nanotube arrays (Fe-TNTs) were prepared on Ti-Fe alloy substrates with different Fe contents by the electrochemical anodization method. The as-prepared Fe-TNTs were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and related electrochemical techniques. XPS results demonstrated that Fe(3+) ions were successfully doped into TiO₂ nanotubes. The photoelectrochemical activity of Fe-TNTs was compared with that of pure TiO₂ nanotube arrays (TNTs). The results showed that Fe-TNTs grown on low concentration (0.5 wt %-1 wt % Fe) Ti-Fe alloys possessed higher photocurrent density than TNTs. The Fe-TNTs grown on Ti-Fe alloy containing 0.8 wt % Fe exhibited the highest photoelectrochemical activity and the photoelectrocatalytic degradation rate of methylene blue (MB) aqueous solution was significantly higher than that of TNTs.

  15. Fe3+-Doped TiO2 Nanotube Arrays on Ti-Fe Alloys for Enhanced Photoelectrocatalytic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jiangdong; Wu, Zhi; Gong, Cheng; Xiao, Wang; Sun, Lan; Lin, Changjian

    2016-01-01

    Highly ordered, vertically oriented Fe3+-doped TiO2 nanotube arrays (Fe-TNTs) were prepared on Ti-Fe alloy substrates with different Fe contents by the electrochemical anodization method. The as-prepared Fe-TNTs were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and related electrochemical techniques. XPS results demonstrated that Fe3+ ions were successfully doped into TiO2 nanotubes. The photoelectrochemical activity of Fe-TNTs was compared with that of pure TiO2 nanotube arrays (TNTs). The results showed that Fe-TNTs grown on low concentration (0.5 wt %–1 wt % Fe) Ti-Fe alloys possessed higher photocurrent density than TNTs. The Fe-TNTs grown on Ti-Fe alloy containing 0.8 wt % Fe exhibited the highest photoelectrochemical activity and the photoelectrocatalytic degradation rate of methylene blue (MB) aqueous solution was significantly higher than that of TNTs. PMID:28335234

  16. Facile Fabrication of Platinum-Cobalt Alloy Nanoparticles with Enhanced Electrocatalytic Activity for a Methanol Oxidation Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Huihong; Hu, Xiulan; Zhang, Jianbo; Su, Nan; Cheng, JieXu

    2017-01-01

    Decreasing the cost associated with platinum-based catalysts along with improving their catalytic properties is a major challenge for commercial direct methanol fuel cells. In this work, a simple and facile strategy was developed for the more efficient preparation of multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) -supported Pt/CoPt composite nanoparticles (NPs) via solution plasma sputtering with subsequent thermal annealing. Quite different from general wet synthesis methods, Pt/CoPt composite NPs were directly derived from metal wire electrodes without any additions. The obtained Pt/CoPt/MWCNTs composite catalysts exhibited tremendous improvement in the electro-oxidation of methanol in acidic media with mass activities of 1719 mA mg−1Pt. This value is much higher than that of previous reports of Pt-Co alloy and commercial Pt/C (3.16 times) because of the many active sites and clean surface of the catalysts. The catalysts showed good stability due to the special synergistic effects of the CoPt alloy. Pt/CoPt/MWCNTs can be used as a promising catalyst for direct methanol fuel cells. In addition, this solution plasma sputtering-assisted synthesis method introduces a general and feasible route for the synthesis of binary alloys. PMID:28358143

  17. Method for reducing formation of electrically resistive layer on ferritic stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Rakowski, James M.

    2013-09-10

    A method of reducing the formation of electrically resistive scale on a an article comprising a silicon-containing ferritic stainless subjected to oxidizing conditions in service includes, prior to placing the article in service, subjecting the article to conditions under which silica, which includes silicon derived from the steel, forms on a surface of the steel. Optionally, at least a portion of the silica is removed from the surface to placing the article in service. A ferritic stainless steel alloy having a reduced tendency to form silica on at least a surface thereof also is provided. The steel includes a near-surface region that has been depleted of silicon relative to a remainder of the steel.

  18. Method for reducing formation of electrically resistive layer on ferritic stainless steels

    DOEpatents

    Rakowski, James M.

    2017-02-28

    A method of reducing the formation of electrically resistive scale on a an article comprising a silicon-containing ferritic stainless subjected to oxidizing conditions in service includes, prior to placing the article in service, subjecting the article to conditions under which silica, which includes silicon derived from the steel, forms on a surface of the steel. Optionally, at least a portion of the silica is removed from the surface to placing the article in service. A ferritic stainless steel alloy having a reduced tendency to form silica on at least a surface thereof also is provided. The steel includes a near-surface region that has been depleted of silicon relative to a remainder of the steel.

  19. Strength of "Light" Ferritic and Austenitic Steels Based on the Fe - Mn - Al - C System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaputkina, L. M.; Svyazhin, A. G.; Smarygina, I. V.; Kindop, V. E.

    2017-01-01

    The phase composition, the hardness, the mechanical properties at room temperature, and the resistance to hot (950 - 1000°C) and warm (550°C) deformation are studied for cast deformable "light" ferritic and austenitic steels of the Fe - (12 - 25)% Mn - (0 - 15)% Al - (0 - 2)% C system alloyed additionally with about 5% Ni. The high-aluminum high-manganese low-carbon and carbonless ferritic steels at a temperature of about 0.5 T melt have a specific strength close to that of the austenitic steels and may be used as weldable scale-resistant and wear-resistant materials. The high-carbon Fe - (20 - 24)% Mn - (5 - 9)% Al - 5% Ni - 1.5% C austenitic steels may be applied as light high-strength materials operating at cryogenic temperatures after a solution treatment and as scale- and heat-resistant materials in an aged condition.

  20. Ferrite HOM Absorber for the RHIC ERL

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn,H.; Choi, E.M.; Hammons, L.

    2008-10-01

    A superconducting Energy Recovery Linac is under construction at Brookhaven National Laboratory to serve as test bed for RHIC upgrades. The damping of higher-order modes in the superconducting five-cell cavity for the Energy-Recovery linac at RHIC is performed exclusively by two ferrite absorbers. The ferrite properties have been measured in ferrite-loaded pill box cavities resulting in the permeability values given by a first-order Debye model for the tiled absorber structure and an equivalent permeability value for computer simulations with solid ring dampers. Measured and simulated results for the higher-order modes in the prototype copper cavity are discussed. First room-temperature measurements of the finished niobium cavity are presented which confirm the effective damping of higher-order modes in the ERL. by the ferrite absorbers.

  1. Surface oxide net charge of a titanium alloy: modulation of fibronectin-activated attachment and spreading of osteogenic cells.

    PubMed

    Rapuano, Bruce E; MacDonald, Daniel E

    2011-01-01

    In the current study, we have altered the surface oxide properties of a Ti6Al4V alloy using heat treatment or radiofrequency glow discharge (RFGD) in order to evaluate the relationship between the physico-chemical and biological properties of the alloy's surface oxide. The effects of surface pretreatments on the attachment of cells from two osteogenic cell lines (MG63 and MC3T3) and a mesenchymal stem cell line (C3H10T1/2) to fibronectin adsorbed to the alloy were measured. Both heat and RFGD pretreatments produced a several-fold increase in the number of cells that attached to fibronectin adsorbed to the alloy at a range of coating concentrations (0.001-10nM FN) for each cell line tested. An antibody (HFN7.1) directed against the central integrin binding domain of fibronectin produced a 65-70% inhibition of cell attachment to fibronectin-coated disks, indicating that cell attachment to the metal discs was dependent on fibronectin binding to cell integrin receptors. Both treatments also accelerated the cell spreading response manifested by extensive flattening and an increase in mean cellular area. The treatment-induced increases in the cell attachment activity of adsorbed fibronectin were correlated with previously demonstrated increases in Ti6Al4V oxide negative net surface charge at physiological pH produced by both heat and RFGD pretreatments. Since neither treatment increased the adsorption mass of fibronectin, these findings suggest that negatively charged surface oxide functional groups in Ti6Al4V can modulate fibronectin's integrin receptor activity by altering the adsorbed protein's conformation. Our results further suggest that negatively charged functional groups in the surface oxide can play a prominent role in the osseointegration of metallic implant materials.

  2. Ferrite insertion at Recycler Flying Wire System

    SciTech Connect

    K.Y. Ng

    2004-02-27

    Ferrite rods are installed inside the flying-wire cavity of the Recycler Ring and at entrance and exit beam pipes in order to absorb high-frequency electromagnetic waves excited by the beam. However, these rods may also deteriorate the vacuum pressure of the ring. An investigation is made to analyze the necessity of the ferrite rods at the entrance and exit beam pipes.

  3. Facile One-Step Synthesis of Three-Dimensional Pd-Ag Bimetallic Alloy Networks and Their Electrocatalytic Activity toward Ethanol Oxidation.

    PubMed

    Fu, Shaofang; Zhu, Chengzhou; Du, Dan; Lin, Yuehe

    2015-07-01

    The three-dimensional palladium networks and palladium-silver bimetallic alloy networks were synthesized at room temperature on a large scale using a rapid and simple strategy. The results revealed that the morphology of the networks is not affected by the composition. We demonstrated that the as-prepared unsupported networks exhibited excellent electrochemical activity and stability toward ethanol oxidation reaction in alkaline media due to the formation of palladium-silver alloys as well as the porous nanostructures. The results indicate that the well-defined three-dimensional palladium-silver bimetallic alloy networks are promising catalysts for fuel cells.

  4. Evaluation of low activation vanadium alloys for structural material in a fusion reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Loomis, B.A.; Hull, A.B.; Smith, D.L.

    1989-10-23

    The V-7.2Cr-14.5Ti, V-9.2Cr-4.9Ti, V-9.9Cr-9.2Ti, V-13.5Cr-5.2Ti, V-4.1Cr-4.3Ti, Vanstar-7, V-4.6Ti, V-17.7Ti, and V-3.1Ti-(0.5-1.0)Si alloys were evaluated for use as structural material in a fusion reactor. The alloys were evaluated on the basis of their yield strength, swelling resistance, resistance to hydrogen and irradiation embrittlement, and compatibility with a lithium reactor coolant. On the basis of these evaluations, the V-7.2Cr-14.5Ti, V-9.2Cr-4.9Ti, V-9.9Cr-9.2Ti, V-13.5Cr-5.2Ti, Vanstar-7, and V-3.1Ti-(0.5-1.0)Si alloys are considered unacceptable for structural material in a fusion reactor, whereas the V-4.1Cr-4.3Ti, V-4.6Ti, and V-17.7Ti alloys are recommended for more intensive evaluation. The V-7Cr-5Ti alloy may have the optimum combination of strength, DBTT, swelling rate, and lithium dissolution rate for a structural material in a fusion reactor. 4 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  5. Bactericidal activity of copper and niobium-alloyed austenitic stainless steel.

    PubMed

    Baena, M I; Márquez, M C; Matres, V; Botella, J; Ventosa, A

    2006-12-01

    Biofouling and microbiologically influenced corrosion are processes of material deterioration that originate from the attachment of microorganisms as quickly as the material is immersed in a nonsterile environment. Stainless steels, despite their wide use in different industries and as appliances and implant materials, do not possess inherent antimicrobial properties. Changes in hygiene legislation and increased public awareness of product quality makes it necessary to devise control methods that inhibit biofilm formation or to act at an early stage of the biofouling process and provide the release of antimicrobial compounds on a sustainable basis and at effective level. These antibacterial stainless steels may find a wide range of applications in fields, such as kitchen appliances, medical equipment, home electronics, and tools and hardware. The purpose of this study was to obtain antibacterial stainless steel and thus mitigate the microbial colonization and bacterial infection. Copper is known as an antibacterial agent; in contrast, niobium has been demonstrated to improve the antimicrobial effect of copper by stimulating the formation of precipitated copper particles and its distribution in the matrix of the stainless steel. Thus, we obtained slides of 3.8% copper and 0.1% niobium alloyed stainless steel; subjected them to three different heat treatment protocols (550 degrees C, 700 degrees C, and 800 degrees C for 100, 200, 300, and 400 hours); and determined their antimicrobial activities by using different initial bacterial cell densities and suspending solutions to apply the bacteria to the stainless steels. The bacterial strain used in these experiments was Escherichia coli CCM 4517. The best antimicrobial effects were observed in the slides of stainless steel treated at 700 degrees C and 800 degrees C using an initial cell density of approximately 10(5) cells ml(-1) and phosphate-buffered saline as the solution in which the bacteria came into contact with

  6. Synthesis, electrical and dielectric characterization of cerium doped nano copper ferrites

    SciTech Connect

    Malana, Muhammad Aslam Qureshi, Raheela Beenish; Ashiq, Muhammad Naeem; Zafar, Zafar Iqbal

    2013-11-15

    Graphical abstract: Lattice constant (a) and activation energy (Ea) as a function of Ce (cerium) content. - Highlights: • The simple and economic method has been adopted for the synthesis of nanoferrites. • The electrical resistivity increases with cerium concentration. • DC electrical resistivity of these materials favours their use in microwave devices. • Dielectric measurements show semiconductor nature of the synthesized ferrites. - Abstract: The nanosized CuFe{sub 2−x}Ce{sub x}O{sub 4} (x = 0.0, 0.2, 0.4, 0.6, 0.8) ferrites doped with cerium are synthesized by chemical co-precipitation method. The synthesized materials are characterized by XRD, FTIR, TGA and SEM. XRD analysis of cerium substituted copper ferrites confirms the cubic spinel structure. The average crystallite size calculated by using Scherrer's formula ranges from 37 to 53 nm. The values of cell constant and cell volume vary with the dopant concentration. These variations can be explained in terms of their ionic radii. The DC electrical resistivity, measured by two point probe method, increases with increase in dopant concentration while it decreases with rise in temperature exhibiting semiconductor behaviour. Energy of activation of these ferrites is calculated by using Arrhenius type resistivity plots. Dielectric measurements of the synthesized compounds show exponential decrease in dielectric constant and dielectric loss factor with increase in frequency. This indicates the normal dielectric behaviour of ferrites.

  7. Microstructural characterization of oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) Fe-12Cr-0.5Y2O3 alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamsudin, Farha Mizana; Radiman, Shahidan; Abdullah, Yusof; Hamid, Nasri A.

    2016-11-01

    Oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic alloy containing 12wt% Cr and 0.5wt% Y2O3 was prepared by mechanical alloying (MA) method and then compacted into bulk shape. Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) was performed to characterize the microstructure of milled alloy powder. The fragments and nanoclusters of Y2O3 were observed in this alloy powder. FESEM-EDS mapping on the milled alloy powder reveal the uniformity of the element distribution achieved by the alloy. The Y element is finely dispersed into the alloy matrix and the O element is observed indicating the presence of oxides throughout the alloy sample. The compacted alloy was then heat treated at 1050°C and analyzed by field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM). The formations of nano-scale Y2O3 were observed after the heat treatment process of alloy indicating the dispersion and incorporation of Y2O3 nanoparticles into the alloy matrix.

  8. Weldability of High Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Maroef, I

    2003-01-22

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of silicon and iron on the weldability of HAYNES HR-160{reg_sign} alloy. HR-I60 alloy is a solid solution strengthened Ni-Co-Cr-Si alloy. The alloy is designed to resist corrosion in sulfidizing and other aggressive high temperature environments. Silicon is added ({approx}2.75%) to promote the formation of a protective oxide scale in environments with low oxygen activity. HR-160 alloy has found applications in waste incinerators, calciners, pulp and paper recovery boilers, coal gasification systems, and fluidized bed combustion systems. HR-160 alloy has been successfully used in a wide range of welded applications. However, the alloy can be susceptible to solidification cracking under conditions of severe restraint. A previous study by DuPont, et al. [1] showed that silicon promoted solidification cracking in the commercial alloy. In earlier work conducted at Haynes, and also from published work by DuPont et al., it was recognized that silicon segregates to the terminal liquid, creating low melting point liquid films on solidification grain boundaries. Solidification cracking has been encountered when using the alloy as a weld overlay on steel, and when joining HR-160 plate in a thickness greater than19 millimeters (0.75 inches) with matching filler metal. The effect of silicon on the weldability of HR-160 alloy has been well documented, but the effect of iron is not well understood. Prior experience at Haynes has indicated that iron may be detrimental to the solidification cracking resistance of the alloy. Iron does not segregate to the terminal solidification product in nickel-base alloys, as does silicon [2], but iron may have an indirect or interactive influence on weldability. A set of alloys covering a range of silicon and iron contents was prepared and characterized to better understand the welding metallurgy of HR-160 alloy.

  9. Feedback controlled hybrid fast ferrite tuners

    SciTech Connect

    Remsen, D.B.; Phelps, D.A.; deGrassie, J.S.; Cary, W.P.; Pinsker, R.I.; Moeller, C.P.; Arnold, W.; Martin, S.; Pivit, E.

    1993-09-01

    A low power ANT-Bosch fast ferrite tuner (FFT) was successfully tested into (1) the lumped circuit equivalent of an antenna strap with dynamic plasma loading, and (2) a plasma loaded antenna strap in DIII-D. When the FFT accessible mismatch range was phase-shifted to encompass the plasma-induced variation in reflection coefficient, the 50 {Omega} source was matched (to within the desired 1.4 : 1 voltage standing wave ratio). The time required to achieve this match (i.e., the response time) was typically a few hundred milliseconds, mostly due to a relatively slow network analyzer-computer system. The response time for the active components of the FFT was 10 to 20 msec, or much faster than the present state-of-the-art for dynamic stub tuners. Future FFT tests are planned, that will utilize the DIII-D computer (capable of submillisecond feedback control), as well as several upgrades to the active control circuit, to produce a FFT feedback control system with a response time approaching 1 msec.

  10. Study of Magnetic Alloys: Critical Phenomena.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    MAGNETIC ALLOYS, TRANSPORT PROPERTIES), ELECTRICAL RESISTANCE, SEEBECK EFFECT , MAGNETIC PROPERTIES, ALUMINUM ALLOYS, COBALT ALLOYS, GADOLINIUM ALLOYS, GOLD ALLOYS, IRON ALLOYS, NICKEL ALLOYS, PALLADIUM ALLOYS, PLATINUM ALLOYS, RHODIUM ALLOYS

  11. Magnetic tuning of electrically resonant metamaterial with inclusion of ferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Lei; Zhao, Qian; Zhao, Hongjie; Zhou, Ji

    2008-10-01

    We experimentally demonstrate a magnetic tuning of electrically resonant metamaterial (EMM) at microwave frequencies by introducing microwave ferrite rods into the periodic array of electrically resonant element. Different from those based on controlling the capacitance of equivalent LC circuit, this tunability arises from a mechanism of magnetically tuning the inductance of resonant element via the active ambient effective permeability. For magnetic fields from 0 to 5000 Oe, resonance frequency of the EMM can be continuously and reversibly tuned in a range of about 800 MHz. The active effective permittivity has also been investigated through the simulated scattering parameters.

  12. Swelling behavior of a simple ferritic alloy. [Fe-10% Cr

    SciTech Connect

    Horton, L.L.; Bentley, J.

    1983-01-01

    The swelling behavior which results from simulated fusion environment irradiation of Fe-10% Cr has been characterized with transmission electron microscopy. Specimens were bombarded at 850 K with: a triple-beam of He/sup +/, D/sup +//sub 2/, and 4 MeV Fe/sup + +/ ions to 0.3, 1, 3, 10, 30, and 100 dpa, a dual-beam of He/sup +/ and 4 MeV Fe/sup + +/ ions to 30 and 100 dpa; and a single-beam of 4 MeV Fe/sup + +/ ions to 30 dpa. The helium and hydrogen injection rates were approx. 10 appm He/dpa and approx. 40 appm D/dpa. Cavities were observed for damage levels of 3 dpa and greater. The swelling was <0.1% for damage levels <30 dpa, but at 100 dpa, there was an increase in the swelling to 2.5% for the triple-beam irradiation and 1.2% for the dual-beam irradiation. The swelling rates between 30 and 100 dpa correlate well with calculated values assuming a steady-state swelling-rate regime has been reached. Calculations show the rapid cavity growth associated with this swelling increase cannot be attributed to equilibrium bubble growth. For all of the bombardments, the cavities with a diameter greater than 10 nm had a truncated octahedral morphology with (111) facets and (100) truncations. Measurements indicate that the surface energy relationship was ..gamma../sub 111/approx. =0.8 ..gamma../sub 100/ for these cavities. At 30 dpa, the cavities in the specimen irradiated with the single-beam technique were larger and had a lower concentration than the specimens irradiated with specimens irradiated with the dual- and triple-ion beams suggests that deuterium has an effect on the damage microstructures in Fe-10% Cr.

  13. Cr-W-V bainitic/ferritic steel with improved strength and toughness and method of making

    DOEpatents

    Klueh, R.L.; Maziasz, P.J.

    1994-03-08

    This work describes a high strength, high toughness bainitic/ferritic steel alloy comprising about 2.75% to 4.0% chromium, about 2.0% to 3.5% tungsten, about 0.10% to 0.30% vanadium, and about 0.1% to 0.15% carbon with the balance iron, wherein the percentages are by total weight of the composition, wherein the alloy having been heated to an austenitizing temperature and then cooled at a rate sufficient to produce carbide-free acicular bainite. 15 figures.

  14. Effect of Structural Heterogeneity on In Situ Deformation of Dissimilar Weld Between Ferritic and Austenitic Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, M.; Santosh, R.; Das, S. K.; Das, G.; Mahato, B.; Korody, J.; Kumar, S.; Singh, P. K.

    2015-08-01

    Low-alloy steel and 304LN austenitic stainless steel were welded using two types of buttering material, namely 309L stainless steel and IN 182. Weld metals were 308L stainless steel and IN 182, respectively, for two different joints. Cross-sectional microstructure of welded assemblies was investigated. Microhardness profile was determined perpendicular to fusion boundary. In situ tensile test was performed in scanning electron microscope keeping low-alloy steel-buttering material interface at the center of gage length. Adjacent to fusion boundary, low-alloy steel exhibited carbon-depleted region and coarsening of matrix grains. Between coarse grain and base material structure, low-alloy steel contained fine grain ferrite-pearlite aggregate. Adjacent to fusion boundary, buttering material consisted of Type-I and Type-II boundaries. Within buttering material close to fusion boundary, thin cluster of martensite was formed. Fusion boundary between buttering material-weld metal and weld metal-304LN stainless steel revealed unmixed zone. All joints failed within buttering material during in situ tensile testing. The fracture location was different for various joints with respect to fusion boundary, depending on variation in local microstructure. Highest bond strength with adequate ductility was obtained for the joint produced with 309L stainless steel-buttering material. High strength of this weld might be attributed to better extent of solid solution strengthening by alloying elements, diffused from low-alloy steel to buttering material.

  15. EBSD analysis of (10–12) twinning activity in Mg–3Al–1Zn alloy during compression

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Bingshu; Deng, Liping; Guo, Ning; Xu, Zeren; Li, Qiang

    2014-12-15

    The (10–12) twinning activity of Mg–3Al–1Zn magnesium alloy during uniaxial compression at room temperature has been investigated by electron backscatter diffraction. The results indicated that the twinning activity was closely related with two angles: one was the angle between the c-axis and the compression direction and the other was the angle between the a-axis and the titling direction in the basal plane for a given relation between the c-axis and the compression direction. These two parameters can be used to explain which twinning variant will operate under the given strain path. For the grains containing a single (10–12) twinning variant, the (10–12) twinning variant occurred in a wide range of Schmid factor values (0 < Schmid factor < 0.5) and the Schmid factor rank of 1 or 2 was the most commonly observed. By contrast, for the grains containing two (10–12) twinning variants, the (10–12) twinning activity exhibited a stronger orientation dependence and the combinations of Schmid factor ranks 1–3 and 1–2 were the most commonly observed. - Highlights: • Twinning activity of AZ31 magnesium alloy was investigated by EBSD. • (10–12) twinning shows a strong orientation dependence. • Two angles can be used to explain which twin variant will operate.

  16. Sodium citrate assisted facile synthesis of AuPd alloy networks for ethanol electrooxidation with high activity and durability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Yanling; Zhu, Zhijun; Lu, Xiaolin; Zhou, H. Susan

    2016-10-01

    The direct ethanol fuel cell is an emerging energy conversion device for which palladium is considered as the one of the most effective components for anode catalyst, however, its widespread application has been still limited by the activity and durability of the anode catalyst. In this work, AuPd alloy networks (NWs) are synthesized using H2PdCl4 and HAuCl4 as precursors reduced by NaBH4 in the presence of sodium citrate (SC). The results reveal that SC plays significant role in network structure, resulting in the enhanced electrocatalytic activity of the catalyst. This self-supported AuPd NWs catalyst exhibits much higher electrochemical catalytic activity than commercial Pd/C catalyst toward ethanol electrooxidation in alkaline solution. Significantly, AuPd NWs catalyst shows extremely high durability at the beginning of the chronoamperometry test, and as high as 49% of the mass current density (1.41 A/mgPd) remains after 4000 s current-time test at -0.3 V (vs. Ag/AgCl) in N2-saturated KOH-ethanol solution. This strategy provides a facile method for the preparation of alloy networks with high electrochemical activity, and can be potentially expanded to a variety of electrochemical applications.

  17. Electroplating on titanium alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowery, J. R.

    1971-01-01

    Activation process forms adherent electrodeposits of copper, nickel, and chromium on titanium alloy. Good adhesion of electroplated deposits is obtained by using acetic-hydrofluoric acid anodic activation process.

  18. Must we use ferritic steel in TBM?

    SciTech Connect

    Salavy, Jean-Francois; Boccaccini, Lorenzo V.; Chaudhuri, Paritosh; Cho, Seungyon; Enoeda, Mikio; Giancarli, Luciano; Kurtz, Richard J.; Luo, Tian Y.; Rao, K. Bhanu Sankara; Wong, Clement

    2010-12-13

    Mock-ups of DEMO breeding blankets, called Test Blanket Modules (TBMs), inserted and tested in ITER in dedicated equatorial ports directly facing the plasma, are expected to provide the first experimental answers on the necessary performance of the corresponding DEMO breeding blankets. Several DEMO breeding blanket designs have been studied and assessed in the last 20 years. At present, after considering various coolant and breeder combinations, all the TBM concepts proposed by the seven ITER Parties use Reduced-Activation Ferritic/Martensitic (RAFM) steel as the structural material. In order to perform valuable tests in ITER, the TBMs are expected to use the same structural material as corresponding DEMO blankets. However, due to the fact that this family of steels is ferromagnetic, their presence in the ITER vacuum vessel will create perturbations of the ITER magnetic fields that could reduce the quality of the plasma confinement during H-mode. As a consequence, a legitimate question has been raised on the necessity of using RAFM steel for TBMs structural material in ITER. By giving a short description of the main TBM testing objectives in ITER and assessing the consequences of not using such a material, this paper gives a comprehensive answer to this question. According to the working group author of the study, the use of RAFM steel as structural material for TBM is judged mandatory.

  19. The effect of cooling speed on the structure and properties of the heat affected zone in welded compounds of ferrite-austenitic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonik, I. L.; Gurulev, D. N.; Bondareva, O. P.

    2017-02-01

    Such parameters as the maximum heating temperature, duration of stay at high temperatures, the rate of cooling influence greatly the structure and properties of the heat-affected zone of welded joints of steels and alloys. In the present work, the effect of different cooling speed upon the impact of the thermal cycle of welding on the structure, the fine structure and toughness of ferrite-austenitic steels is investigated. It is established that the cooling speed after welding has a great influence on the shock impact toughness, the phase composition and the structure of the zone of ferrite-austenitic steels.

  20. Effects of TiB2 particles and Ag on the activation energy of Ω phase in Al alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melotti, F.; Hirst, T.; Dustan, A.; Griffiths, W. D.

    2016-03-01

    This work analyses the effects of TiB2 reinforcement particles and silver additions on the activation energy of the GP zones and the Ω phase in an aluminium matrix composite (AMC). Several additions of TiB2 and Ag were made to a 2xxx series alloy. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) was used to identify the temperature peaks and the Kissinger approach used to calculate activation energies. Results showed that the activation energy for the Ω phase was greatly reduced by the addition of both elements; however, the TiB2 particles were more effective. In addition, experimental results show that the lowest value of the activation energy, 68 kJmol-1, was not affected by the silver content. This value is lower than any value found in literature and suggests that the formation of the Ω phase is related to the pipe diffusion of Cu in Al.

  1. Ferrite Materials for Advanced Multifunction Microwave Systems Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-07-05

    TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5. FUNDING NUMBERS Ferrite Materials for Advanced Multifunction Microwave Systems Applications Award No. (Grant) N00014-03-1-0070 PR...were also used in this work. (200 words) 14. SUBJECT TERMS 15. NUMBER OF PAGES Microwave ferrites , yttrium iron garnet, lithium ferrites , hexagonal...Unlimited COVER PAGE FINAL REPORT to the UNITED STATES OFFICE OF NAVAL RESEARCH Ferrite Materials for Advanced Multifunction Microwave Systems

  2. Radiation hardening and deformation behavior of irradiated ferritic-martensitic steels

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, J.P.; Klueh, R.L.; Rowcliffe, A.F.; Shiba, K.

    1998-03-01

    Tensile data from several 8--12% Cr alloys irradiated in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) to doses up to 34 dpa at temperatures ranging from 90 to 600 C are discussed in this paper. One of the critical questions surrounding the use of ferritic-martensitic steels in a fusion environment concerns the loss of uniform elongation after irradiation at low temperatures. Irradiation and testing at temperatures below 200--300 C results in uniform elongations less than 1% and stress-strain curves in which plastic instability immediately follows yielding, implying dislocation channeling and flow localization. Reductions in area and total elongations, however, remain high.

  3. Atomic scale design and control of cation distribution in hexagonal ferrite.

    PubMed

    Geiler, Anton L; Yang, Aria; Zuo, Xu; Yoon, Soack Dae; Chen, Yajie; Harris, Vincent G; Vittoria, Carmine

    2008-08-08

    Using a novel alternating target laser ablation deposition technique, Mn cations were placed in specific interstitial sites of BaFe12O19 thin films as opposed to being distributed throughout the unit cell as in conventional bulk materials. The distribution of Mn cations has been confirmed experimentally and predicted theoretically. As a result of site selection, the saturation magnetization increased 12%-22%, and the Néel temperature increased by 40-60 K compared to bulk materials. This technique implies a new methodology to design and process a new generation of ferrite, oxide, and alloy materials.

  4. Toughness testing and high-temperature oxidation evaluations of advanced alloys for core internals

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Lizhen; Pint, Bruce A.; Chen, Xiang

    2016-09-16

    Alloy X-750 was procured from Carpenter Technology and Bodycote in this year. An appropriate TMT was developed on Alloy 439 to obtain materials with refined grain size for property screening tests. Charpy V-notch impact tests were completed for the three ferritic steels Grade 92, Alloy 439, and 14YWT. Fracture toughness tests at elevated temperatures were completed for 14YWT. The tests will be completed for the other alloys in next fiscal year. Steam oxidation tests of the three ferritic steels, 316L, and Zr–2.5Nb have been completed. The steam tests of the Ni-based superalloys and the other austenitic stainless steels will be continued and finished in next fiscal year. Performance ranking in terms of steam oxidation resistance and impact/fracture toughness of the alloys will be deduced.

  5. Practical handbook of stainless steels and nickel alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Lamb, S.

    1999-07-01

    This new handbook is an up-to-date technical guide to the grades, properties, fabrication characteristics, and applications of stainless steels and nickel alloys. The individual chapters were written by industry experts and focus on the key properties and alloy characteristics important in material selection and specification as well as the practical factors that influence the development and application of these materials. The contents include: alloy grades and their welding and fabrication characteristics and their application; monel metal; iron-based and nickel-based alloys; ferritic, austenitic, superaustenitic, and martensitic stainless steels; hastelloys; alloys 20, G, and 825; AOD and new refining technology; duplex stainless steels; 6-Mo alloys; corrosion-resistant castings; specification cross-reference tables; trade names; hardness conversions; list of common abbreviations.

  6. Mixed-phase Pd-Pt bimetallic alloy on graphene oxide with high activity for electrocatalytic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Majid; Yousaf, Ammar Bin; Chen, Mingming; Wei, Chengsha; Wu, Xibo; Huang, Ningdong; Qi, Zeming; Li, Liangbin

    2015-05-01

    Bimetallic PdPt alloy nanoparticles on graphene oxide (GO) have been prepared by a simple and facile chemical route, in which the reduction of metal precursors is carried out using CO as a reductant. Structural and morphological characterizations of GO/PdPt composites are performed using X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis and transmission electron microscopy. It is found that PdPt bimetallic nanoparticles are successfully synthesized and uniformly attached on the graphene sheets. The electrocatalytic and electrochemical properties of GO/PdPt composites including methanol oxidation reaction (MOR), oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and methanol tolerant oxygen reduction reaction (MTORR) are studied in HClO4 aqueous solution. A significant improvement in the electrocatalytic activities is observed by increasing the atomic ratio of Pt in PdPt bimetallic alloys compared to the freestanding Pd nanoparticles on GO. The prepared GO/PdPt composites with an (Pd:Pt) atomic ratio of 40:60 exhibits higher methanol oxidation activity, higher specific ORR activity and better tolerance to CO poisoning. The results can be attributed to the collective effects of the PdPt nanoparticles and the enhanced electron transfer of graphene.

  7. The variation of cationic microstructure in Mn-doped spinel ferrite during calcination and its effect on formaldehyde catalytic oxidation.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xiaoliang; Liu, Peng; He, Hongping; Wei, Gaoling; Chen, Tianhu; Tan, Wei; Tan, Fuding; Zhu, Jianxi; Zhu, Runliang

    2016-04-05

    In this study, a series of Mn substituted spinel ferrites calcinated at different temperatures were used as catalysts for the oxidation of formaldehyde (HCHO). X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and H2 temperature-programmed reduction were conducted to characterize the structure and physico-chemical properties of catalysts, which were affected by calcination in the range of 200-600°C. Results show that all the ferrites were with spinel structure, and those calcinated in the range of 300-600°C were in the phase of maghemite. The calcination changed the valence and distribution of Mn and Fe on the ferrite surface, and accordingly the reducibility of ferrites. The HCHO catalytic oxidation test showed that with the increase of calcination temperature, the activity was initially improved until 400°C, but then decreased. The variation of HCHO conversion performance was well positively correlated to the variation of reduction temperature of surface Mn(4+) species. The remarkable effect of calcination on the catalytic activity of Mn-doped spinel ferrites for HCHO oxidation was discussed in view of reaction mechanism and variations in cationic microstructure of Mn-doped ferrites.

  8. Proceedings of the IEA Working Group meeting on ferritic/martensitic steels

    SciTech Connect

    Klueh, R.L.

    1996-12-31

    An IEA working group on ferritic/martensitic steels for fusion applications, consisting of researchers from Japan, European Union, USA, and Switzerland, met at the headquarters of the Joint European Torus, Culham, UK. At the meeting, preliminary data generated on the large heats of steels purchased for the IEA program and on other heats of steels were presented and discussed. Second purpose of the meeting was to continue planning and coordinating the collaborative test program in progress on reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steels. The majority of this report consists of viewographs for the presentations.

  9. Synthesis of ferrite and nickel ferrite nanoparticles using radio-frequency thermal plasma torch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, S.; Taheri, M.; Carpenter, E.; Harris, V. G.; McHenry, M. E.

    2002-05-01

    Nanocrystalline (NC) ferrite powders have been synthesized using a 50 kW-3 MHz rf thermal plasma torch for high-frequency soft magnet applications. A mixed powder of Ni and Fe (Ni:Fe=1:2), a NiFe permalloy powder with additional Fe powder (Ni:Fe=1:2), and a NiFe permalloy powder (Ni:Fe=1:1) were used as precursors for synthesis. Airflow into the reactor chamber was the source of oxygen for oxide formation. XRD patterns clearly show that the precursor powders were transformed into NC ferrite particles with an average particle size of 20-30 nm. SEM and TEM studies indicated that NC ferrite particles had well-defined polygonal growth forms with some exhibiting (111) faceting and many with truncated octahedral and truncated cubic shapes. The Ni content in the ferrite particles was observed to increase in going from mixed Ni and Fe to mixed permalloy and iron and finally to only permalloy starting precursor. The plasma-torch synthesized ferrite materials using exclusively the NiFe permalloy precursor had 40%-48% Ni content in the Ni-ferrite particle, differing from the NiFe2O4 ideal stoichiometry. EXAFS was used to probe the cation coordination in low Ni magnetite species. The coercivity and Neel temperature of the high Ni content ferrite sample were 58 Oe and ˜590 °C, respectively.

  10. Integrity assessment of the ferritic / austenitic dissimilar weld joint between intermediate heat exchanger and steam generator in fast reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Jayakumar, T.; Laha, K.; Chandravathi, K. S.; Parameswaran, P.; Goyal, S.; Kumar, J. G.; Mathew, M. D.

    2012-07-01

    Integrity of the modified 9Cr-1Mo / alloy 800 dissimilar joint welded with Inconel 182 electrodes has been assessed under creep condition based on the detailed analysis of microstructure and stress distribution across the joint by finite element analysis. A hardness peak at the ferritic / austenitic weld interface and a hardness trough at the inter-critical heat affected zone (HAZ) in ferritic base metal developed. Un-tempered martensite was found at the ferritic / austenitic weld interface to impart high hardness in it; whereas annealing of martensitic structure of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel by inter-critical heating during welding thermal cycle resulted in hardness tough in the inter-critical HAZ. Creep tests were carried out on the joint and ferritic steel base metal at 823 K over a stress range of 160-320 MPa. The joint possessed lower creep rupture strength than its ferritic steel base metal. Failure of the joint at relatively lower stresses occurred at the ferritic / austenitic weld interface; whereas it occurred at inter-critical region of HAZ at moderate stresses. Cavity nucleation associated with the weld interface particles led to premature failure of the joint. Finite element analysis of stress distribution across the weld joint considering the micro-mechanical strength inhomogeneity across it revealed higher von-Mises and principal stresses at the weld interface. These stresses induced preferential creep cavitation at the weld interface. Role of precipitate in enhancing creep cavitation at the weld interface has been elucidated based on the FE analysis of stress distribution across it. (authors)

  11. Catalytic activity of Pd-doped Cu nanoparticles for hydrogenation as a single-atom-alloy catalyst.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xinrui; Fu, Qiang; Luo, Yi

    2014-05-14

    The single atom alloy of extended surfaces is known to provide remarkably enhanced catalytic performance toward heterogeneous hydrogenation. Here we demonstrate from first principles calculations that this approach can be extended to nanostructures, such as bimetallic nanoparticles. The catalytic properties of the single-Pd-doped Cu55 nanoparticles have been systemically examined for H2 dissociation as well as H atom adsorption and diffusion, following the concept of single atom alloy. It is found that doping a single Pd atom at the edge site of the Cu55 shell can considerably reduce the activation energy of H2 dissociation, while the single Pd atom doped at the top site or in the inner layers is much less effective. The H atom adsorption on Cu55 is slightly stronger than that on the Cu(111) surface; however, a larger nanoparticle that contains 147 atoms could effectively recover the weak binding of the H atoms. We have also investigated the H atom diffusion on the 55-atom nanoparticle and found that spillover of the produced H atoms could be a feasible process due to the low diffusion barriers. Our results have demonstrated that facile H2 dissociation and weak H atom adsorption could be combined at the nanoscale. Moreover, the effects of doping one more Pd atom on the H2 dissociation and H atom adsorption have also been investigated. We have found that both the doping Pd atoms in the most stable configuration could independently exhibit their catalytic activity, behaving as two single-atom-alloy catalysts.

  12. Atomic scale investigation of redistribution of alloying elements in pearlitic steel wires upon cold-drawing and annealing.

    PubMed

    Li, Y J; Choi, P; Goto, S; Borchers, C; Raabe, D; Kirchheim, R

    2013-09-01

    A local electrode atom probe has been employed to analyze the redistribution of alloying elements including Si, Mn, and Cr in pearlitic steel wires upon cold-drawing and subsequent annealing. It has been found that the three elements undergo mechanical mixing upon cold-drawing at large strains, where Mn and Cr exhibit a nearly homogeneous distribution throughout both ferrite and cementite, whereas Si only dissolves slightly in cementite. Annealing at elevated temperatures leads to a reversion of the mechanical alloying. Si atoms mainly segregate at well-defined ferrite (sub)grain boundaries formed during annealing. Cr and Mn are strongly concentrated in cementite adjacent to the ferrite/cementite interface due to their lower diffusivities in cementite than in ferrite.

  13. Rapid phase synthesis of nanocrystalline cobalt ferrite

    SciTech Connect

    Shanmugavel, T.; Raj, S. Gokul; Rajarajan, G.; Kumar, G. Ramesh

    2014-04-24

    Synthesis of single phase nanocrystalline Cobalt Ferrite (CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) was achieved by single step autocombustion technique with the use of citric acid as a chelating agent in mono proportion with metal. Specimens prepared with this method showed significantly higher initial permeability's than with the conventional process. Single phase nanocrystalline cobalt ferrites were formed at very low temperature. Surface morphology identification were carried out by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis. The average grain size and density at low temperature increased gradually with increasing the temperature. The single phase formation is confirmed through powder X-ray diffraction analysis. Magnetization measurements were obtained at room temperature by using a vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM), which showed that the calcined samples exhibited typical magnetic behaviors. Temperature dependent magnetization results showed improved behavior for the nanocrystalline form of cobalt ferrite when compared to the bulk nature of materials synthesized by other methods.

  14. Dual-mode latching ferrite devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Y.; Jiang, Z.

    1986-05-01

    A primary consideration with microwave ferrite control devices is related to the switching speed. In order to achieve fast switching with the considered devices, an operation in the latching mode is required. A description is given of a new class of ferrite latching devices, taking into account latching quadrupole devices and their modifications. It is pointed out that the advantages of the new devices include fast switching, high electrical performance, and simple construction. According to the utilization of external or internal magnetic return paths, there are two modes of operation in latching ferrite devices. Attention is given to constructions and calculations, the design of a model for each of the two modes of operation, polarization insensitive phase shifters (PIPS) with external magnetic return paths, and PIPS with internal magnetic return paths.

  15. Irradiation response of delta ferrite in as-cast and thermally aged cast stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Zhangbo; Lo, Wei-Yang; Chen, Yiren; Pakarinen, Janne; Wu, Yaqiao; Allen, Todd; Yang, Yong

    2015-08-08

    To enable the life extension of Light Water Reactors (LWRs) beyond 60 years, it is critical to gain adequate knowledge for making conclusive predictions to assure the integrity of duplex stainless steel reactor components, e.g. primary pressure boundary and reactor vessel internal. Microstructural changes in the ferrite of thermally aged, neutron irradiated only, and neutron irradiated after being thermally aged cast austenitic stainless steels (CASS) were investigated using atom probe tomography. The thermal aging was performed at 400 °C for 10,000 h and the irradiation was conducted in the Halden reactor at ~315 °C to 0.08 dpa (5.6 × 1019 n/cm2 E > 1 MeV). Low dose neutron irradiation at a dose rate of 5 × 10-9 dpa/s was found to induce spinod,al decomposition in the ferrite of as-cast microstructure, and further to enhance the spinodal decomposition in the thermally aged cast alloys. Regarding the G-phase precipitates, the neutron irradiation dramatically increases the precipitate size, and alters the composition of the precipitates with increased, Mn, Ni, Si and Mo and reduced Fe and Cr contents. Lastly, The results have shown that low dose neutron irradiation can further accelerate the degradation of ferrite in a duplex stainless steel at the LWR relevant condition.

  16. Influence of Co content on the biocompatibility and bio-corrosion of super ferritic stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Y. R.; Jang, S. G.; Nam, H. S.; Shim, G. T.; Cho, H. H.; Kim, J. G.; Kim, Y. S.

    2008-12-01

    Bio-metals require high corrosion resistance, because their biocompatibility is closely related to this parameter. Bio-metals release metal ions into the human body, leading to deleterious effects. Allergies, dermatitis, and asthma are the predominant systemic effects resulting in the human body. In particular, Ni is one of the most common causes of allergic contact dermatitis. In the present work, we designed new ferritic stainless steels wherein Ni is replaced with Co under consideration of allergic respondes and microstructural stability. This work focuses on the effect of Co content on the biocompatibility and corrosion resistance of high PRE super ferritic stainless steels in bio-solution and acidic chloride solution. In the case of the acidic chloride solution, with increasing Co content in the ferritic stainless steels, passive current density increased and critical pitting temperature (CPT) decreased. Also, in the passive state, AC impedance and repassivation rate were reduced. These results are attributed to the thermodynamic stability of cobalt ions, as indicated in the EpH diagram for a Co-H2O system. However, in the case of bio-solutions, with increasing Co content of the alloys, the passive current density decreased. AC impedance and repassivation rate meanwhile increased in the passive state. This is due to the increased ratios of Cr2O3/Cr(OH)3 and [Metal Oxide]/Metal + Metal Oxide] of the passive film formed in bio-solution.

  17. Solute Segregation During Ferrite Growth: Solute/Interphase and Substitutional/Interstitial Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Landeghem, H. P.; Langelier, B.; Panahi, D.; Purdy, G. R.; Hutchinson, C. R.; Botton, G. A.; Zurob, H. S.

    2016-05-01

    The segregation of solutes to austenite/ferrite transformation interfaces during decarburization/denitriding of Fe-Mn-C, Fe-Mn-N, and Fe-Si-C ternary alloys was studied by using atom probe tomography. Manganese was found to segregate noticeably to the transformation interface in the presence of carbon, while no segregation could be detected in the presence of nitrogen. This result might indicate that manganese interacts little with the interface itself and that its interaction with the interstitial controls its segregation behavior. In the case of Fe-Si-C, the experiments were complicated by interface motion during quenching. Preliminary results suggest that silicon was depleted at the interface in contrast to the commonly observed segregation behavior of silicon at grain boundaries of ferrite and austenite. This observation could be explained by taking into account the repulsive interaction between silicon and carbon along with the intense segregation of carbon to the interface. This would lead to a net repulsive interaction of silicon with the interface even when considering the intrinsic tendency of silicon to segregate to the boundary in the absence of carbon. The results presented here emphasize the need to account for the interaction of all solutes present at the interface in ferrite growth models.

  18. Irradiation response of delta ferrite in as-cast and thermally aged cast stainless steel

    DOE PAGES

    Li, Zhangbo; Lo, Wei-Yang; Chen, Yiren; ...

    2015-08-08

    To enable the life extension of Light Water Reactors (LWRs) beyond 60 years, it is critical to gain adequate knowledge for making conclusive predictions to assure the integrity of duplex stainless steel reactor components, e.g. primary pressure boundary and reactor vessel internal. Microstructural changes in the ferrite of thermally aged, neutron irradiated only, and neutron irradiated after being thermally aged cast austenitic stainless steels (CASS) were investigated using atom probe tomography. The thermal aging was performed at 400 °C for 10,000 h and the irradiation was conducted in the Halden reactor at ~315 °C to 0.08 dpa (5.6 × 1019more » n/cm2 E > 1 MeV). Low dose neutron irradiation at a dose rate of 5 × 10-9 dpa/s was found to induce spinod,al decomposition in the ferrite of as-cast microstructure, and further to enhance the spinodal decomposition in the thermally aged cast alloys. Regarding the G-phase precipitates, the neutron irradiation dramatically increases the precipitate size, and alters the composition of the precipitates with increased, Mn, Ni, Si and Mo and reduced Fe and Cr contents. Lastly, The results have shown that low dose neutron irradiation can further accelerate the degradation of ferrite in a duplex stainless steel at the LWR relevant condition.« less

  19. Elevated-Temperature Ferritic and Martensitic Steels and Their Application to Future Nuclear Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Klueh, RL

    2005-01-31

    In the 1970s, high-chromium (9-12% Cr) ferritic/martensitic steels became candidates for elevated-temperature applications in the core of fast reactors. Steels developed for conventional power plants, such as Sandvik HT9, a nominally Fe-12Cr-1Mo-0.5W-0.5Ni-0.25V-0.2C steel (composition in wt %), were considered in the United States, Europe, and Japan. Now, a new generation of fission reactors is in the planning stage, and ferritic, bainitic, and martensitic steels are again candidates for in-core and out-of-core applications. Since the 1970s, advances have been made in developing steels with 2-12% Cr for conventional power plants that are significant improvements over steels originally considered. This paper will review the development of the new steels to illustrate the advantages they offer for the new reactor concepts. Elevated-temperature mechanical properties will be emphasized. Effects of alloying additions on long-time thermal exposure with and without stress (creep) will be examined. Information on neutron radiation effects will be discussed as it applies to ferritic and martensitic steels.

  20. The Apparent Contact Angle and Wetted Area of Active Alloys on Silicon Carbide as a Function of the Temperature and the Surface Roughness: A Multivariate Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tillmann, Wolfgang; Pfeiffer, Jan; Wojarski, Lukas

    2015-08-01

    Despite the broad field of applications for active filler alloys for brazing ceramics, as well as intense research work on the wetting and spreading behavior of these alloys on ceramic surfaces within the last decades, the manufactured joints still exhibit significant variations in their properties due to the high sensitivity of the alloys to changing brazing conditions. This increases the need for investigations of the wetting and spreading behavior of filler alloys with regard to the dominating influences combined with their interdependencies, instead of solely focusing on single parameter investigations. In this regard, measurements of the wetting angle and area were conducted at solidified AgCuTi and CuSnTi alloys on SiC substrates. Based on these measurements, a regression model was generated, illustrating the influence of the brazing temperature, the roughness of the faying surfaces, the furnace atmosphere, and their interdependencies on the wetting and spreading behavior of the filler alloys. It was revealed that the behavior of the melts was significantly influenced by the varied brazing parameters, as well as by their interdependencies. This result was also predicted by the developed model and showed a high accuracy.

  1. Nanoporous bimetallic Pt-Au alloy nanocomposites with superior catalytic activity towards electro-oxidation of methanol and formic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhonghua; Wang, Yan; Wang, Xiaoguang

    2011-04-01

    We present a facile route to fabricate novel nanoporous bimetallic Pt-Au alloy nanocomposites by dealloying a rapidly solidified Al75Pt15Au10 precursor under free corrosion conditions. The microstructure of the precursor and the as-dealloyed sample was characterized using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis. The Al75Pt15Au10 precursor is composed of a single-phase Al2(Au,Pt) intermetallic compound, and can be fully dealloyed in a 20 wt.% NaOH or 5 wt.% HCl aqueous solution. The dealloying leads to the formation of the nanoporous Pt60Au40 nanocomposites (np-Pt60Au40 NCs) with an fcc structure. The morphology, size and crystal orientation of grains in the precursor can be conserved in the resultant nanoporous alloy. The np-Pt60Au40 NCs consist of two zones with distinct ligament/channel sizes and compositions. The formation mechanism of these np-Pt60Au40 NCs can be rationalized based upon surface diffusion of more noble elements and spinodal decomposition during dealloying. Electrochemical measurements demonstrate that the np-Pt60Au40 NCs show superior catalytic activity towards the electro-oxidation of methanol and formic acid in the acid media compared to the commercial JM-Pt/C catalyst. This material can find potential applications in catalysis related areas, such as direct methanol or formic acidfuelcells. Our findings demonstrate that dealloying is an effective and simple strategy to realize the alloying of immiscible systems under mild conditions, and to fabricate novel nanostructures with superior performance.We present a facile route to fabricate novel nanoporous bimetallic Pt-Au alloy nanocomposites by dealloying a rapidly solidified Al75Pt15Au10 precursor under free corrosion conditions. The microstructure of the precursor and the as-dealloyed sample was characterized using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron

  2. Characterization of (Mg, La) Substituted Ni-Zn Spinel Ferrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; Wei, S. C.; Wang, Y. J.; Tian, H. L.; Tong, H.; Xu, B. S.

    Spinel structure of (Mg, La) substituted spinel Ni-Zn ferrite has been synthesized by sol-gel auto combustion method. The ferrite exhibits a single-spinel structure. The ferrite is studied as a microwave absorbing material. The microwave measurements are carried out by a vector network analyzer. The reflection loss of the ferrite is calculated as a single-layer absorber. The results indicate that the ferrite annealed at 850°C has great potential for application in electromagnetic wave attenuation.

  3. Cation distributions on rapidly solidified cobalt ferrite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De Guire, Mark R.; Kalonji, Gretchen; O'Handley, Robert C.

    1990-01-01

    The cation distributions in two rapidly solidified cobalt ferrites have been determined using Moessbauer spectroscopy at 4.2 K in an 8-T magnetic field. The samples were obtained by gas atomization of a Co0-Fe2O3-P2O5 melt. The degree of cation disorder in both cases was greater than is obtainable by cooling unmelted cobalt ferrite. The more rapidly cooled sample exhibited a smaller departure from the equilibrium cation distribution than did the more slowly cooled sample. This result is explained on the basis of two competing effects of rapid solidification: high cooling rate of the solid, and large undercooling.

  4. Implantable ferrite antenna for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fazeli, Maxwell L.

    We have developed an implantable microstrip patch antenna with dimensions of 10x10x1.28 mm, operating around the Industrial, Scientific and Medical (ISM) band (2.4-2.5 GHz). The antenna is characterized in skin-mimicking gels and compared with simulation results. The experimental measurements are in good agreement with simulations, having a -16 dB reflection coefficient and -18 dBi realized gain at resonance, with a 185 MHz -10 dB bandwidth. The simulated effects of ferrite film loading on antenna performance are investigated, with comparisons made for 5 and 10 microm thick films, as well as for 10 microm thick films with varying magnetic loss (tan delta micro = 0.05, 0.1 and 0.3). Our simulations reveal that the addition of 10 microm thick magnetic layers has effectively lowered the resonant frequency by 70 MHz, while improving return loss and -10 dB bandwidth by 3 dB and 40 MHz, respectively, over the uncoated antenna. Ferrite film coating also improved realized gain within the ISM band, with largest gain increases at resonance found for films having lower magnetic loss. Additionally, the gain (G) variance at ISM band limits, Delta Gf(2.5GHz)-f (2.4GHz), decreased from 1.97 to 0.44 dBi for the antenna with 10 microm films over the non-ferrite antenna. The measured dip-coated NiCo ferrite films effectively reduces the antenna resonance by 110 MHz, with a 4.2 dB reflection coefficient improvement as compared to an antenna without ferrite. The measured ferrite antenna also reveals a 6 dBi and 35 MHz improvement in realized gain and -10 dB bandwidth, respectively, at resonance. Additionally, the ferrite-coated antenna shows improved directivity, with wave propagation attenuated at the direction facing the body internal. These results indicate that implantable antenna miniaturization and reliable wireless communication in the operating frequency band can be realized with ferrite loading.

  5. Transmission through Ferrite Samples at Submillimeter Frequencies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-05-01

    K w+ i YAH YH P+ i , with "a - - B _ iB y = + iH) and / Bx = Hx + iKHy By = y iKHx where 4nM = the saturation magnetization , Y = the gyromagnetic...nac..ry ma Idertify by block number) A theoretical analysis is presented of 1he transmission spectra of thin magnetized ferrite slabs The energy range...chosen was 1 < V < 120 cm 1 (30 GHz < f < 3600 GHz) The magnetic field was assumed to lie in the plane of the ferrite slab, and the incident

  6. Alloy materials

    DOEpatents

    Hans Thieme, Cornelis Leo; Thompson, Elliott D.; Fritzemeier, Leslie G.; Cameron, Robert D.; Siegal, Edward J.

    2002-01-01

    An alloy that contains at least two metals and can be used as a substrate for a superconductor is disclosed. The alloy can contain an oxide former. The alloy can have a biaxial or cube texture. The substrate can be used in a multilayer superconductor, which can further include one or more buffer layers disposed between the substrate and the superconductor material. The alloys can be made a by process that involves first rolling the alloy then annealing the alloy. A relatively large volume percentage of the alloy can be formed of grains having a biaxial or cube texture.

  7. Accelerated development of Zr-containing new generation ferritic steels for advanced nuclear reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Lizhen; Yang, Ying; Sridharan, K.

    2015-12-01

    The mission of the Nuclear Energy Enabling Technologies (NEET) program is to develop crosscutting technologies for nuclear energy applications. Advanced structural materials with superior performance at elevated temperatures are always desired for nuclear reactors, which can improve reactor economics, safety margins, and design flexibility. They benefit not only new reactors, including advanced light water reactors (LWRs) and fast reactors such as the sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR) that is primarily designed for management of high-level wastes, but also life extension of the existing fleet when component exchange is needed. Developing and utilizing the modern materials science tools (experimental, theoretical, and computational tools) is an important path to more efficient alloy development and process optimization. The ultimate goal of this project is, with the aid of computational modeling tools, to accelerate the development of Zr-bearing ferritic alloys that can be fabricated using conventional steelmaking methods. The new alloys are expected to have superior high-temperature creep performance and excellent radiation resistance as compared to Grade 91. The designed alloys were fabricated using arc-melting and drop-casting, followed by hot rolling and conventional heat treatments. Comprehensive experimental studies have been conducted on the developed alloys to evaluate their hardness, tensile properties, creep resistance, Charpy impact toughness, and aging resistance, as well as resistance to proton and heavy ion (Fe2+) irradiation.

  8. CORROSION OF HIGH-TEMPERATURE ALLOYS

    SciTech Connect

    John P. Hurley; John P. Kay

    1999-10-01

    Five alloys were tested in the presence of water vapor and water vapor with HCl for 1000 hours using simulated combustion gas. Samples were removed at intervals during each test and measured for determination of corrosion rates. One sample of each alloy was examined with a SEM after the completion of each test. Cumulative corrosion depths were similar for the superstainless alloys. Corrosion for Alloy TP310 roughly doubled. Corrosion for the enhanced stainless alloys changed dramatically with the addition of chlorine. Corrosion for Alloy RA85H increased threefold, whereas Alloy TP347HFG showed an eightfold increase. SEM examination of the alloys revealed that water vapor alone allowed the formation of chromium oxide protective layers on the superstainless alloys. The enhanced stainless alloys underwent more corrosion due to greater attack of sulfur. Iron-rich oxide layers were more likely to form, which do not provide protection from further corrosion. The addition of chlorine further increased the corrosion because of its ability to diffuse through the oxide layers and react with iron. This resulted in a broken, discontinuous, and loose oxide layer that offered less protection. Niobium, although added to aid in creep strength, was found to be detrimental to corrosion resistance. The niobium tended to be concentrated in nodules and was easily attacked through sulfidation, providing conduits for further corrosion deep into the alloy. The alloys that displayed the best corrosion resistance were those which could produce chromium oxide protective layers. The predicted microstructure of all alloys except Alloy HR3C is the same and provided no further information relating to corrosion resistance. No correlation can be found relating corrosion resistance to the quantity of minor austenite-or ferrite-stabilizing elements. Also, there does not appear to be a correlation between corrosion resistance and the Cr:Ni ratio of the alloy. These alloys were tested for their

  9. Nanoporous bimetallic Pt-Au alloy nanocomposites with superior catalytic activity towards electro-oxidation of methanol and formic acid.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhonghua; Wang, Yan; Wang, Xiaoguang

    2011-04-01

    We present a facile route to fabricate novel nanoporous bimetallic Pt-Au alloy nanocomposites by dealloying a rapidly solidified Al(75)Pt(15)Au(10) precursor under free corrosion conditions. The microstructure of the precursor and the as-dealloyed sample was characterized using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis. The Al(75)Pt(15)Au(10) precursor is composed of a single-phase Al(2)(Au,Pt) intermetallic compound, and can be fully dealloyed in a 20 wt.% NaOH or 5 wt.% HCl aqueous solution. The dealloying leads to the formation of the nanoporous Pt(60)Au(40) nanocomposites (np-Pt(60)Au(40) NCs) with an fcc structure. The morphology, size and crystal orientation of grains in the precursor can be conserved in the resultant nanoporous alloy. The np-Pt(60)Au(40) NCs consist of two zones with distinct ligament/channel sizes and compositions. The formation mechanism of these np-Pt(60)Au(40) NCs can be rationalized based upon surface diffusion of more noble elements and spinodal decomposition during dealloying. Electrochemical measurements demonstrate that the np-Pt(60)Au(40) NCs show superior catalytic activity towards the electro-oxidation of methanol and formic acid in the acid media compared to the commercial JM-Pt/C catalyst. This material can find potential applications in catalysis related areas, such as direct methanol or formic acid fuel cells. Our findings demonstrate that dealloying is an effective and simple strategy to realize the alloying of immiscible systems under mild conditions, and to fabricate novel nanostructures with superior performance.

  10. Effect of oxide layer modification of CoCr stent alloys on blood activation and endothelial behavior.

    PubMed

    Milleret, Vincent; Ziogas, Algirdas; Buzzi, Stefano; Heuberger, Roman; Zucker, Arik; Ehrbar, Martin

    2015-04-01

    CoCr alloys, in particular MP35N and L605, are extensively used in biomedical implants, for example for coronary stents. In practice, these alloys present a moderately hydrophobic surface which leads to significant platelet adhesion and consequently to risk of early thrombosis or in-stent restenosis. Surface modification of biomedical implants is known to alter their biological performances. In this study we focused on the alteration of in vitro biological responses of human cells contacting CoCr surfaces with engineered oxide layers. XPS analysis was performed to determine the composition of the oxide layer of differently treated CoCr while the bulk properties were not modified. An extensive characterization of the surfaces was performed looking at surface roughness, wettability and charge. After static exposure to blood, strongly reduced platelet and increased polymorphonuclear neutrophil adhesion were observed on treated versus untreated surfaces. Comparisons of treated and untreated samples provide evidence for wettability being an important player for platelet adhesion, although multiple factors including surface oxide chemistry and charge might control polymorphonuclear neutrophil adhesion. The differently treated surfaces were shown to be equally suitable for endothelial cell proliferation. We herein present a novel approach to steer biological properties of CoCr alloys. By adjusting their oxide layer composition, substrates were generated which are suitable for endothelial cell growth and at the same time show an altered (reduced) blood contact activation. Such treatments are expected to lead to stents of highly reproducible quality with minimal thrombogenicity and in-stent restenosis, while maintaining rapid re-endothelialization after coronary angioplasty.

  11. Electrodeposition and electrocatalytic activity of Pt and Pt-alloy nanoparticles and thin films on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Guojin

    Pt and Pt-based alloy catalysts were synthesized by electrodeposition on HOPG. The nucleation and growth, morphology, composition and crystal structure, and electrocatalytic activity (towards relevant reactions in the frame of PEMFCs and DMFCs) of these model electrodes were systematically investigated. The presence of chlorides inhibits the Pt reduction processes. There is a transition from progressive to instantaneous nucleation with increasing overpotential for the deposition from 1 mM H2PtCl6 electrolytes. The possibility of instantaneous nucleation at large overpotential by using electrolytes with large chloride concentration is advantageous for the growth of small, well dispersed nanoparticles. The electrochemical data were confirmed by AFM and SEM imaging studies. Relatively narrow size distributed nanoparticles can be obtained from the current system. While MOR activity decreases with decreasing particle size, the HER and HOR activity of deposited Pt particles increases with decreasing deposition period. The ORR activity first increases then decreases with increasing deposition time. Interactions between Pt and Ru, or Ni or Co are observed and they form solid solution as verified by XRD. Underpotential deposition occurs for Pt-Ni or Pt-Co co-electrodeposition. Pt-Ru deposition can be described as progressive nucleation at low overpotential and instantaneous nucleation at high overpotentials. Through direct morphological observations, the Pt-Ni or Pt-Co nucleation can be approximately described as progressive. Pt-Ru deposits are superior to Pt towards MOR. The optimum Ru content is about 50 at.%. Pt-Ni and Pt-Co deposits are more active than Pt for ORR. The optimum content is about 30 at.% Ni or 50 at.% Co. Dealloying of Pt-Ru and Pt-Ni or Pt-Co electrodeposit is observed after electrochemical characterization. The extent of dealloying increases with the content of the alloying element.

  12. Microstructural characterization and mechanical property of active soldering anodized 6061 Al alloy using Sn-3.5Ag-xTi active solders

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Wei-Lin Tsai, Yi-Chia

    2012-06-15

    Active solders Sn-3.5Ag-xTi varied from x = 0 to 6 wt.% Ti addition were prepared by vacuum arc re-melting and the resultant phase formation and variation of microstructure with titanium concentration were analyzed using X-ray diffraction, optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The Sn-3.5Ag-xTi active solders are used as metallic filler to join with anodized 6061 Al alloy for potential applications of providing a higher heat conduction path. Their joints and mechanical properties were characterized and evaluated in terms of titanium content. The mechanical property of joints was measured by shear testing. The joint strength was very dependent on the titanium content. Solder with a 0.5 wt.% Ti addition can successfully wet and bond to the anodized aluminum oxide layers of Al alloy and posses a shear strength of 16.28 {+-} 0.64 MPa. The maximum bonding strength reached 22.24 {+-} 0.70 MPa at a 3 wt.% Ti addition. Interfacial reaction phase and chemical composition were identified by a transmission electron microscope with energy dispersive spectrometer. Results showed that the Ti element reacts with anodized aluminum oxide to form Al{sub 3}Ti-rich and Al{sub 3}Ti phases at the joint interfaces. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Active solder joining of anodized Al alloy needs 0.5 wt.% Ti addition for Sn-3.5Ag. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The maximum bonding strength occurs at 3 wt.% Ti addition. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The Ti reacts with anodized Al oxide to form Al{sub 3}Ti-rich and Al{sub 3}Ti at joint interface.

  13. Characterization and Modeling of Grain Boundary Chemistry Evolution in Ferritic Steels under Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Marquis, Emmanuelle; Wirth, Brian; Was, Gary

    2016-03-28

    Ferritic/martensitic (FM) steels such as HT-9, T-91 and NF12 with chromium concentrations in the range of 9-12 at.% Cr and high Cr ferritic steels (oxide dispersion strengthened steels with 12-18% Cr) are receiving increasing attention for advanced nuclear applications, e.g. cladding and duct materials for sodium fast reactors, pressure vessels in Generation IV reactors and first wall structures in fusion reactors, thanks to their advantages over austenitic alloys. Predicting the behavior of these alloys under radiation is an essential step towards the use of these alloys. Several radiation-induced phenomena need to be taken into account, including phase separation, solute clustering, and radiation-induced segregation or depletion (RIS) to point defect sinks. RIS at grain boundaries has raised significant interest because of its role in irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) and corrosion of structural materials. Numerous observations of RIS have been reported on austenitic stainless steels where it is generally found that Cr depletes at grain boundaries, consistently with Cr atoms being oversized in the fcc Fe matrix. While FM and ferritic steels are also subject to RIS at grain boundaries, unlike austenitic steels, the behavior of Cr is less clear with significant scatter and no clear dependency on irradiation condition or alloy type. In addition to the lack of conclusive experimental evidence regarding RIS in F-M alloys, there have been relatively few efforts at modeling RIS behavior in these alloys. The need for predictability of materials behavior and mitigation routes for IASCC requires elucidating the origin of the variable Cr behavior. A systematic detailed high-resolution structural and chemical characterization approach was applied to ion-implanted and neutron-irradiated model Fe-Cr alloys containing from 3 to 18 at.% Cr. Atom probe tomography analyses of the microstructures revealed slight Cr clustering and segregation to dislocations and

  14. Use of double and triple-ion irradiation to study the influence of high levels of helium and hydrogen on void swelling of 8-12% Cr ferritic-martensitic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kupriiyanova, Y. E.; Bryk, V. V.; Borodin, O. V.; Kalchenko, A. S.; Voyevodin, V. N.; Tolstolutskaya, G. D.; Garner, F. A.

    2016-01-01

    In accelerator-driven spallation (ADS) devices, some of the structural materials will be exposed to intense fluxes of very high energy protons and neutrons, producing not only displacement damage, but very high levels of helium and hydrogen. Unlike fission flux-spectra where most helium and hydrogen are generated by transmutation in nickel and only secondarily in iron or chromium, gas production in ADS flux-spectra are rather insensitive to alloy composition, such that Fe-Cr base ferritic alloys also generate very large gas levels. While ferritic alloys are known to swell less than austenitic alloys in fission spectra, there is a concern that high gas levels in fusion and especially ADS facilities may strongly accelerate void swelling in ferritic alloys. In this study of void swelling in response to helium and hydrogen generation, irradiation was conducted on three ferritic-martensitic steels using the Electrostatic Accelerator with External Injector (ESUVI) facility that can easily produce any combination of helium to dpa and/or hydrogen to dpa ratios. Irradiation was conducted under single, dual and triple beam modes using 1.8 MeV Cr+3, 40 keV He+, and 20 keV H+. In the first part of this study we investigated the response of dual-phase EP-450 to variations in He/dpa and H/dpa ratio, focusing first on dual ion studies and then triple ion studies, showing that there is a diminishing influence on swelling with increasing total gas content. In the second part we investigated the relative response of three alloys spanning a range of starting microstructure and composition. In addition to observing various synergisms between He and H, the most important conclusion was that the tempered martensite phase, known to lag behind the ferrite phase in swelling in the absence of gases, loses much of its resistance to void nucleation when irradiated at large gas/dpa levels.

  15. Innovative Powder Processing of Oxide Dispersion Strengthened ODS Ferritic Stainless Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Rieken, Joel; Anderson, Iver; Kramer, Matthew

    2011-04-01

    An innovative gas atomization reaction synthesis technique was employed as a viable method to dramatically lower the processing cost for precursor oxide dispersion forming ferritic stainless steel powders (i.e., Fe-Cr-(Hf,Ti)-Y). During this rapid solidification process the atomized powders were enveloped by a nano-metric Cr-enriched metastable oxide film. Elevated temperature heat treatment was used to dissociate this metastable oxide phase through oxygen exchange reactions with Y-(Hf,Ti) enriched intermetallic compound precipitates. These solid state reactions resulted in the formation of highly stable nano-metric mixed oxide dispersoids (i.e., Y-Ti-O or Y-Hf-O) throughout the alloy microstructure. Subsequent high temperature (1200 C) heat treatments were used to elucidate the thermal stability of each nano-metric oxide dispersoid phase. Transmission electron microscopy coupled with X-ray diffraction was used to evaluate phase evolution within the alloy microstructure.

  16. A study of the magnetic properties of cobalt ferrite-coated zinc ferrite particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Huan; Du, You-wei; Qiu, Zi-qiang; Walker, J. C.

    1987-04-01

    Nearly spherical Zn0.2Fe2.8O4 particles coated with an epitaxial layer of CoFe2O4 ferrites of various thicknesses were studied with Mössbauer spectroscopy. Measurements reveal that the magnetic structures of these particles are different at room temperature and liquid nitrogen or liquid helium temperatures, indicating the existence of a Verwey transition, which occurs between 77 and 119 K. Coating of Co-ferrite has no sizable effect on the transition.

  17. Microwave sintering versus conventional sintering of NiCuZn ferrites. Part I: Densification evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jianhua; Ouyang, Chenxin; Xiao, Shumin; Gao, Yongyi

    2016-06-01

    This work reports the recent study on the microwave sintering (MS) versus conventional sintering (CS) of NiCuZn ferrites, with particular interests in the densification evolution. NiCuZn ferrite powders were synthesized through the solid state reaction route. Densification behaviors of ferrite samples under the two types of thermal sources were monitored in real-time. Meanwhile, the influences of additives (1 wt% BSZ glass or 1 wt% Bi2O3) on the densifications were also investigated. Both constant heating rate (CHR) and master sintering curve (MSC) models were used to evaluate the sintering activation energy (Q). Results demonstrated that the microwave-enhanced diffusion mainly occurs at the intermediate sintering stage. The Q-value estimated by MSC method agreed well with that from CHR method. With the influence of microwave electromagnetic field, the activation energy of NiCuZn ferrites was decreased by roughly 100-150 kJ/mol. In addition, doping a small amount of additives could improve densification degree and reduce the minimal energy to activate diffusion mechanisms.

  18. Hollow alloy nanostructures templated by Au nanorods: synthesis, mechanistic insights, and electrocatalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Xue, Mengmeng; Tan, Yiwei

    2014-11-07

    A unique methodology having access to Au nanorods (AuNRs)-based hollow alloy nanostructures has been developed. The syntheses and characterization of the hollow Pt-Au nanoalloys with ellipsoidal and cylindrical shapes together with a rattle-type hollow Cu-Au nanoheterostructure are described. Unlike the conventional nanoscale Kirkendall process, the formation of these AuNRs-based hollow nanostructures occurs under extremely mild conditions, indicating a distinctive underlying mechanism. The key step for this present synthesis method is the incubation of AuNRs with CuCl2 at 60 °C in the presence of hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) or hexadecyltrimethylammonium chloride (CTAC). The selective etching of the tips of AuNRs caused by Cu(2+) ions combined with the dissolved molecular oxygen promotes the generation of defects and vacancies, leading to a facile alloying reaction by the crystal fusion of AuNRs. Particularly, the results of the formation of the hollow nanoalloys in conjunction with various control experiments demonstrate that the halide ions that are specifically adsorbed on the AuNR surface afford sinks for vacancy accumulation and condensation during the unbalanced interdiffusion of alloying atoms, presumably because of the disproportion in the equilibrium concentration of vacancies. Thus, the void formation becomes kinetically favorable. The Pt-Au nanocages can provide modified surface electronic structures, resulting from their non-uniform crystalline structures and the surface segregation of Pt in the nanocages. These characteristics enable them to exhibit excellent electrocatalytic performance for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR).

  19. Influence of copper content on the electrocatalytic activity toward methanol oxidation of CoχCuy alloy nanoparticles-decorated CNFs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghouri, Zafar Khan; Barakat, Nasser A. M.; Kim, Hak Yong

    2015-11-01

    In this study, CoCu alloy nanoparticles-incorporated carbon nanofibers are introduced as effective non precious electrocatalyst for methanol oxidation in alkaline medium. The introduced electrocatalyst has been synthesized by simple and effective process; electrospinning. Typically, calcination, in nitrogen atmosphere, of electrospun nanofibers composed of cobalt acetate, copper acetate and poly (vinyl alcohol) leads to form carbon nanofibers decorated by CoCu nanoparticles. The nanofibrous morphology and alloy structure have been confirmed by SEM, TEM and XRD analyses. Investigation of the electrocatalytic activity indicates that copper content has strong influence, the alloy nanoparticles having the composition Cu5%Co95% showed distinct high performance; 100 times higher than other formulations. Overall, the introduced study revealed the veil about the distinct role of copper in enhancing the electrocatalytic activity of cobalt-based materials.

  20. Influence of copper content on the electrocatalytic activity toward methanol oxidation of CoχCuy alloy nanoparticles-decorated CNFs

    PubMed Central

    Ghouri, Zafar Khan; Barakat, Nasser A. M.; Kim, Hak Yong

    2015-01-01

    In this study, CoCu alloy nanoparticles-incorporated carbon nanofibers are introduced as effective non precious electrocatalyst for methanol oxidation in alkaline medium. The introduced electrocatalyst has been synthesized by simple and effective process; electrospinning. Typically, calcination, in nitrogen atmosphere, of electrospun nanofibers composed of cobalt acetate, copper acetate and poly (vinyl alcohol) leads to form carbon nanofibers decorated by CoCu nanoparticles. The nanofibrous morphology and alloy structure have been confirmed by SEM, TEM and XRD analyses. Investigation of the electrocatalytic activity indicates that copper content has strong influence, the alloy nanoparticles having the composition Cu5%Co95% showed distinct high performance; 100 times higher than other formulations. Overall, the introduced study revealed the veil about the distinct role of copper in enhancing the electrocatalytic activity of cobalt-based materials. PMID:26568442