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Sample records for activation inhibits rapamycin

  1. Rapamycin Exerts Antifungal Activity In Vitro and In Vivo against Mucor circinelloides via FKBP12-Dependent Inhibition of Tor

    PubMed Central

    Bastidas, Robert J.; Shertz, Cecelia A.; Lee, Soo Chan; Heitman, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    The zygomycete Mucor circinelloides is an opportunistic fungal pathogen that commonly infects patients with malignancies, diabetes mellitus, and solid organ transplants. Despite the widespread use of antifungal therapy in the management of zygomycosis, the incidence of infections continues to rise among immunocompromised individuals. In this study, we established that the target and mechanism of antifungal action of the immunosuppressant rapamycin in M. circinelloides are mediated via conserved complexes with FKBP12 and a Tor homolog. We found that spontaneous mutations that disrupted conserved residues in FKBP12 conferred rapamycin and FK506 resistance. Disruption of the FKBP12-encoding gene, fkbA, also conferred rapamycin and FK506 resistance. Expression of M. circinelloides FKBP12 (McFKBP12) complemented a Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutant strain lacking FKBP12 to restore rapamycin sensitivity. Expression of the McTor FKBP12-rapamycin binding (FRB) domain conferred rapamycin resistance in S. cerevisiae, and McFKBP12 interacted in a rapamycin-dependent fashion with the McTor FRB domain in a yeast two-hybrid assay, validating McFKBP12 and McTor as conserved targets of rapamycin. We showed that in vitro, rapamycin exhibited potent growth inhibitory activity against M. circinelloides. In a Galleria mellonella model of systemic mucormycosis, rapamycin improved survival by 50%, suggesting that rapamycin and nonimmunosuppressive analogs have the potential to be developed as novel antifungal therapies for treatment of patients with mucormycosis. PMID:22210828

  2. Rapamycin inhibits poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation in intact cells

    SciTech Connect

    Fahrer, Joerg; Wagner, Silvia; Buerkle, Alexander; Koenigsrainer, Alfred

    2009-08-14

    Rapamycin is an immunosuppressive drug, which inhibits the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) kinase activity inducing changes in cell proliferation. Synthesis of poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) is an immediate cellular response to genotoxic stress catalyzed mostly by poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP-1), which is also controlled by signaling pathways. Therefore, we investigated whether rapamycin affects PAR production. Strikingly, rapamycin inhibited PAR synthesis in living fibroblasts in a dose-dependent manner as monitored by immunofluorescence. PARP-1 activity was then assayed in vitro, revealing that down-regulation of cellular PAR production by rapamycin was apparently not due to competitive PARP-1 inhibition. Further studies showed that rapamycin did not influence the cellular NAD pool and the activation of PARP-1 in extracts of pretreated fibroblasts. Collectively, our data suggest that inhibition of cellular PAR synthesis by rapamycin is mediated by formation of a detergent-sensitive complex in living cells, and that rapamycin may have a potential as therapeutic PARP inhibitor.

  3. Inhibition of the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) - Rapamycin and beyond

    PubMed Central

    Lamming, Dudley W.

    2016-01-01

    Rapamycin is an FDA-approved immunosuppressant and anti-cancer agent discovered in the soil of Easter Island in the early 1970s. Rapamycin is a potent and selective inhibitor of the mTOR (mechanistic Target Of Rapamycin) protein kinase, which acts as a central integrator of nutrient signaling pathways. During the last decade, genetic and pharmaceutical inhibition of mTOR pathway signaling has been found to promote longevity in yeast, worms, flies and mice. In this chapter, we will discuss the molecular biology underlying the effects of rapamycin and its physiological effects; evidence for rapamycin as an anti-aging compound; mechanisms by which rapamycin may extend lifespan; and the potential limitations of rapamycin as an anti-aging molecule. Finally, we will discuss possible strategies that may allow us to inhibit mTOR signaling safely while minimizing side effects, and reap the health, social and economic benefits from slowing the aging process. PMID:27048303

  4. Inhibition of target of rapamycin signaling by rapamycin in the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Crespo, José L; Díaz-Troya, Sandra; Florencio, Francisco J

    2005-12-01

    The macrolide rapamycin specifically binds the 12-kD FK506-binding protein (FKBP12), and this complex potently inhibits the target of rapamycin (TOR) kinase. The identification of TOR in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) revealed that TOR is conserved in photosynthetic eukaryotes. However, research on TOR signaling in plants has been hampered by the natural resistance of plants to rapamycin. Here, we report TOR inactivation by rapamycin treatment in a photosynthetic organism. We identified and characterized TOR and FKBP12 homologs in the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Whereas growth of wild-type Chlamydomonas cells is sensitive to rapamycin, cells lacking FKBP12 are fully resistant to the drug, indicating that this protein mediates rapamycin action to inhibit cell growth. Unlike its plant homolog, Chlamydomonas FKBP12 exhibits high affinity to rapamycin in vivo, which was increased by mutation of conserved residues in the drug-binding pocket. Furthermore, pull-down assays demonstrated that TOR binds FKBP12 in the presence of rapamycin. Finally, rapamycin treatment resulted in a pronounced increase of vacuole size that resembled autophagic-like processes. Thus, our findings suggest that Chlamydomonas cell growth is positively controlled by a conserved TOR kinase and establish this unicellular alga as a useful model system for studying TOR signaling in photosynthetic eukaryotes.

  5. [Rapamycin: a new immunosuppressive agent capable of inhibiting chronic rejection?].

    PubMed

    Viklický, O; Matl, I

    2001-01-19

    Chronic rejection represents the most common cause of transplanted graft loss in the long term. Rapamycin (sirolimus), and it's derivate RAD, are new and potent, immunosuppressive drugs. They inhibit cell proliferation driven by various growth factors. These drugs were successfully tested in some experimental models of the chronic rejection. Results of the first clinical trials have defined rapamycin pharmacokinetics and proved immunosuppressive efficacy. Rapamycin acts synergistically with cyclosporin A. The side effects are a dose-dependent thrombocytopenia and leukopenia but the most frequent is hyperlipidemia. The question, if rapamycin and RAD inhibit development of chronic rejection in man, will be solved by the prospective clinical trials over years.

  6. Autophagy Induction by Endothelial-Monocyte Activating Polypeptide II Contributes to the Inhibition of Malignant Biological Behaviors by the Combination of EMAP II with Rapamycin in Human Glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jun; Meng, Fanjie; Li, Shuai; Liu, Libo; Zhao, Lini; Liu, Yunhui; Hu, Yi; Li, Zhen; Yao, Yilong; Xi, Zhuo; Teng, Hao; Xue, Yixue

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the effect of endothelial-monocyte activating polypeptide II (EMAP II) on human glioblastoma (GBM) cells and glioblastoma stem cells (GSCs) as well as its possible mechanisms. In this study, EMAP II inhibited the cell viability and decreased the mitochondrial membrane potential in human GBM cells and GSCs, and autophagy inhibitor 3-methyl adenine (3-MA) blocked these effects. Autophagic vacuoles were formed in these cells after EMAP II treatment and this phenomenon was blocked by 3-MA. In addition, the up-regulation of microtubule-associated protein-1 light chain-3 (LC3)-II and the down-regulation of autophagic degraded substrate p62/SQSTM1 caused by EMAP II were observed. Cells treated with EMAP-II inhibited the PI3K/Akt/mTOR signal pathway, and PI3K/Akt agonist insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) blocked the effect of EMAP II on the expression of LC3-II and p62/SQSTM1. Cells exposed to EMAP-II experienced mitophagy and ER stress. Furthermore, the inhibition of cell proliferation, migration and invasion of GBM cells and GSCs were more remarkable by the combination of EMAP II and rapamycin than either agent alone in vitro and in vivo. The current study demonstrated that the cytotoxicity of EMAP II in human GBM cells and GSCs was induced by autophagy, accompanied by the inhibition of PI3K/Akt/mTOR signal pathway, mitophagy and ER stress. The combination of EMAP II with rapamycin demonstrated the inhibitory effect on the malignant biological behaviors of human GBM cells and GSCs in vitro and in vivo. PMID:26648842

  7. Characterization of the cloned full-length and a truncated human target of rapamycin: Activity, specificity, and enzyme inhibition as studied by a high capacity assay

    SciTech Connect

    Toral-Barza, Lourdes; Zhang Weiguo; Lamison, Craig; LaRocque, James; Gibbons, James; Yu, Ker . E-mail: yuk@wyeth.com

    2005-06-24

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR/TOR) is implicated in cancer and other human disorders and thus an important target for therapeutic intervention. To study human TOR in vitro, we have produced in large scale both the full-length TOR (289 kDa) and a truncated TOR (132 kDa) from HEK293 cells. Both enzymes demonstrated a robust and specific catalytic activity towards the physiological substrate proteins, p70 S6 ribosomal protein kinase 1 (p70S6K1) and eIF4E binding protein 1 (4EBP1), as measured by phosphor-specific antibodies in Western blotting. We developed a high capacity dissociation-enhanced lanthanide fluorescence immunoassay (DELFIA) for analysis of kinetic parameters. The Michaelis constant (K {sub m}) values of TOR for ATP and the His6-S6K substrate were shown to be 50 and 0.8 {mu}M, respectively. Dose-response and inhibition mechanisms of several known inhibitors, the rapamycin-FKBP12 complex, wortmannin and LY294002, were also studied in DELFIA. Our data indicate that TOR exhibits kinetic features of those shared by traditional serine/threonine kinases and demonstrate the feasibility for TOR enzyme screen in searching for new inhibitors.

  8. Recovery from rapamycin: drug-insensitive activity of yeast target of rapamycin complex 1 (TORC1) supports residual proliferation that dilutes rapamycin among progeny cells.

    PubMed

    Evans, Stephanie K; Burgess, Karl E V; Gray, Joseph V

    2014-09-19

    The target of rapamycin complex 1 (TORC1) is a key conserved regulator of eukaryotic cell growth. The xenobiotic rapamycin is a potent inhibitor of the yeast complex. Surprisingly, the EGO complex, a nonessential in vivo activator of TORC1, is somehow required for yeast cells to recover efficiently from a period of treatment with rapamycin. Why? Here, we found that rapamycin is only a partial inhibitor of TORC1. We confirmed that saturating amounts of rapamycin do not fully inhibit proliferation of wild-type cells, and we found that the residual proliferation in the presence of the drug is dependent on the EGO complex and on the activity of TORC1. We found that this residual TORC1-dependent proliferation is key to recovery from rapamycin treatment. First, the residual proliferation rate correlates with the ability of cells to recover from treatment. Second, the residual proliferation rate persists long after washout of the drug and until cells recover. Third, the total observable pool of cell-associated rapamycin is extremely stable and decreases only with increasing cell number after washout of the drug. Finally, consideration of the residual proliferation rate alone accurately and quantitatively accounts for the kinetics of recovery of wild-type cells and for the nature and severity of the ego- mutant defect. Overall, our results revealed that rapamycin is a partial inhibitor of yeast TORC1, that persistence of the drug limits recovery, and that rapamycin is not detoxified by yeast but is passively diluted among progeny cells because of residual proliferation.

  9. Quercetin Inhibits Fibroblast Activation and Kidney Fibrosis Involving the Suppression of Mammalian Target of Rapamycin and β-catenin Signaling.

    PubMed

    Ren, Jiafa; Li, Jianzhong; Liu, Xin; Feng, Ye; Gui, Yuan; Yang, Junwei; He, Weichun; Dai, Chunsun

    2016-04-07

    Quercetin, a flavonoid found in a wide variety of plants and presented in human diet, displays promising potential in preventing kidney fibroblast activation. However, whether quercetin can ameliorate kidney fibrosis in mice with obstructive nephropathy and the underlying mechanisms remain to be further elucidated. In this study, we found that administration of quercetin could largely ameliorate kidney interstitial fibrosis and macrophage accumulation in the kidneys with obstructive nephropathy. MTORC1, mTORC2, β-catenin as well as Smad signaling were activated in the obstructive kidneys, whereas quercetin could markedly reduce their abundance except Smad3 phosphorylation. In cultured NRK-49F cells, quercetin could inhibit α-SMA and fibronectin (FN) expression induced by TGFβ1 treatment. MTORC1, mTORC2, β-catenin and Smad signaling pathways were stimulated by TGFβ1 at a time dependent manner. Similar to those findings in the obstructive kidneys, mTORC1, mTORC2 and β-catenin, but not Smad signaling pathways were remarkably blocked by quercetin treatment. Together, these results suggest that quercetin inhibits fibroblast activation and kidney fibrosis involving a combined inhibition of mTOR and β-catenin signaling transduction, which may act as a therapeutic candidate for patients with chronic kidney diseases.

  10. Quercetin Inhibits Fibroblast Activation and Kidney Fibrosis Involving the Suppression of Mammalian Target of Rapamycin and β-catenin Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Jiafa; Li, Jianzhong; Liu, Xin; Feng, Ye; Gui, Yuan; Yang, Junwei; He, Weichun; Dai, Chunsun

    2016-01-01

    Quercetin, a flavonoid found in a wide variety of plants and presented in human diet, displays promising potential in preventing kidney fibroblast activation. However, whether quercetin can ameliorate kidney fibrosis in mice with obstructive nephropathy and the underlying mechanisms remain to be further elucidated. In this study, we found that administration of quercetin could largely ameliorate kidney interstitial fibrosis and macrophage accumulation in the kidneys with obstructive nephropathy. MTORC1, mTORC2, β-catenin as well as Smad signaling were activated in the obstructive kidneys, whereas quercetin could markedly reduce their abundance except Smad3 phosphorylation. In cultured NRK-49F cells, quercetin could inhibit α-SMA and fibronectin (FN) expression induced by TGFβ1 treatment. MTORC1, mTORC2, β-catenin and Smad signaling pathways were stimulated by TGFβ1 at a time dependent manner. Similar to those findings in the obstructive kidneys, mTORC1, mTORC2 and β-catenin, but not Smad signaling pathways were remarkably blocked by quercetin treatment. Together, these results suggest that quercetin inhibits fibroblast activation and kidney fibrosis involving a combined inhibition of mTOR and β-catenin signaling transduction, which may act as a therapeutic candidate for patients with chronic kidney diseases. PMID:27052477

  11. Rapamycin antagonizes TNF induction of VCAM-1 on endothelial cells by inhibiting mTORC2

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chen; Qin, Lingfeng; Manes, Thomas D.; Kirkiles-Smith, Nancy C.; Tellides, George

    2014-01-01

    Recruitment of circulating leukocytes into inflamed tissues depends on adhesion molecules expressed by endothelial cells (ECs). Here we report that rapamycin pretreatment reduced the ability of TNF-treated ECs to capture T cells under conditions of venular flow. This functional change was caused by inhibition of TNF-induced expression of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) and could be mimicked by knockdown of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) or rictor, but not raptor, implicating mTORC2 as the target of rapamycin for this effect. Mechanistically, mTORC2 acts through Akt to repress Raf1-MEK1/2-ERK1/2 signaling, and inhibition of mTORC2 consequently results in hyperactivation of ERK1/2. Increased ERK1/2 activity antagonizes VCAM-1 expression by repressing TNF induction of the transcription factor IRF-1. Preventing activation of ERK1/2 reduced the ability of rapamycin to inhibit TNF-induced VCAM-1 expression. In vivo, rapamycin inhibited mTORC2 activity and potentiated activation of ERK1/2. These changes correlated with reduced endothelial expression of TNF-induced VCAM-1, which was restored via pharmacological inhibition of ERK1/2. Functionally, rapamycin reduced infiltration of leukocytes into renal glomeruli, an effect which was partially reversed by inhibition of ERK1/2. These data demonstrate a novel mechanism by which rapamycin modulates the ability of vascular endothelium to mediate inflammation and identifies endothelial mTORC2 as a potential therapeutic target. PMID:24516119

  12. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ agonist inhibits the mammalian target of rapamycin signaling pathway and has a protective effect in a rat model of status epilepticus

    PubMed Central

    SAN, YONG-ZHI; LIU, YU; ZHANG, YU; SHI, PING-PING; ZHU, YU-LAN

    2015-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPAR-γ) has a protective role in several neurological diseases. The present study investigated the effect of the PPAR-γ agonist, pioglitazone, on the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway in a rat model of pentylenetetrazol (PTZ)-induced status epilepticus (SE). The investigation proceeded in two stages. First, the course of activation of the mTOR signaling pathway in PTZ-induced SE was examined to determine the time-point of peak activity, as reflected by phopshorylated (p)-mTOR/mTOR and p-S6/S6 ratios. Subsequently, pioglitazone was administrated intragastrically to investigate its effect on the mTOR signaling pathway, through western blot and immunochemical analyses. The levels of the interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-6 inflammatory cytokines were detected using ELISA, and neuronal loss was observed via Nissl staining. In the first stage of experimentation, the mTOR signaling pathway was activated, and the p-mTOR/mTOR and p-S6/S6 ratios peaked on the third day. Compared with the vehicle treated-SE group, pretreatment with pioglitazone was associated with the loss of fewer neurons, lower levels of IL-1β and IL-6, and inhibition of the activation of the mTOR signaling pathway. Therefore, the mTOR signaling pathway was activated in the PTZ-induced SE rat model, and the PPAR-γ agonist, pioglitazone, had a neuroprotective effect, by inhibiting activation of the mTOR pathway and preventing the increase in the levels of IL-1β and IL-6. PMID:25891824

  13. Inhibition of Galectin-1 Sensitizes HRAS-driven Tumor Growth to Rapamycin Treatment.

    PubMed

    Michael, James V; Wurtzel, Jeremy G T; Goldfinger, Lawrence E

    2016-10-01

    The goal of this study was to develop combinatorial application of two drugs currently either in active use as anticancer agents (rapamycin) or in clinical trials (OTX008) as a novel strategy to inhibit Harvey RAS (HRAS)-driven tumor progression. HRAS anchored to the plasma membrane shuttles from the lipid ordered (Lo) domain to the lipid ordered/lipid disordered border upon activation, and retention of HRAS at these sites requires galectin-1. We recently showed that genetically enforced Lo sequestration of HRAS inhibited mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling, but not phoshatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) activation. Here we show that inhibition of galectin-1 with OTX008 sequestered HRAS in the Lo domain, blocked HRAS-mediated MAPK signaling, and attenuated HRAS-driven tumor progression in mice. HRAS-driven tumor growth was also attenuated by treatment with mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor rapamycin, and this effect was further enhanced in tumors driven by Lo-sequestered HRAS. These drugs also revealed bidirectional cross-talk in HRAS pathways. Moreover, dual pathway inhibition with OTX008 and rapamycin resulted in nearly complete ablation of HRAS-driven tumor growth. These findings indicate that membrane microdomain sequestration of HRAS with galectin-1 inhibition, coupled with mTOR inhibition, may support a novel therapeutic approach to treat HRAS-mutant cancer.

  14. Rapamycin inhibits the secretory phenotype of senescent cells by a Nrf2-independent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rong; Yu, Zhen; Sunchu, Bharath; Shoaf, James; Dang, Ivana; Zhao, Stephanie; Caples, Kelsey; Bradley, Lynda; Beaver, Laura M; Ho, Emily; Löhr, Christiane V; Perez, Viviana I

    2017-03-31

    Senescent cells contribute to age-related pathology and loss of function, and their selective removal improves physiological function and extends longevity. Rapamycin, an inhibitor of mTOR, inhibits cell senescence in vitro and increases longevity in several species. Nrf2 levels have been shown to decrease with aging and silencing Nrf2 gene induces premature senescence. Therefore, we explored whether Nrf2 is involved in the mechanism by which rapamycin delays cell senescence. In wild-type (WT) mouse fibroblasts, rapamycin increased the levels of Nrf2, and this correlates with the activation of autophagy and a reduction in the induction of cell senescence, as measured by SA-β-galactosidase (β-gal) staining, senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP), and p16 and p21 molecular markers. In Nrf2KO fibroblasts, however, rapamycin still decreased β-gal staining and the SASP, but rapamycin did not activate the autophagy pathway or decrease p16 and p21 levels. These observations were further confirmed in vivo using Nrf2KO mice, where rapamycin treatment led to a decrease in β-gal staining and pro-inflammatory cytokines in serum and fat tissue; however, p16 levels were not significantly decreased in fat tissue. Consistent with literature demonstrating that the Stat3 pathway is linked to the production of SASP, we found that rapamycin decreased activation of the Stat3 pathway in cells or tissue samples from both WT and Nrf2KO mice. Our data thus suggest that cell senescence is a complex process that involves at least two arms, and rapamycin uses Nrf2 to regulate cell cycle arrest, but not the production of SASP.

  15. FLZ protects dopaminergic neuron through activating protein kinase B/mammalian target of rapamycin pathway and inhibiting RTP801 expression in Parkinson's disease models.

    PubMed

    Bao, X-Q; Kong, X-C; Qian, C; Zhang, D

    2012-01-27

    The pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease is characterized by progressive degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in substantia nigra (SNpc). FLZ, a novel synthetic squamosamide derivative from a Chinese herb, has been shown to have neuroprotective effects in experimental Parkinson's disease (PD) models. However, it is still unclear whether FLZ protects against PD through regulating the function of dopaminergic system. In this study, we carried out a set of in vitro and in vivo experiments to address these questions. Oral administration of FLZ significantly improved motor dysfunction of mice challenged by MPTP. The beneficial effects of FLZ on motor behavior attributed to the elevation of dopamine level in striatum, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-positive cells, and TH activity in the middle brain of mouse. Mechanism study showed that treatment of FLZ increased the phosphorylation of activating protein kinase B (Akt) and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). Using LY294002 to block phosphoinositide 3-kinases (PI3K)/Akt signaling pathway prevented the phosphorylation of mTOR and attenuated the neuroprotection of FLZ in MN9D cells challenged by MPP(+). In addition, FLZ reduced the expression of RTP801, an important protein in PD, in mice and cells intoxicated by MPTP/MPP(+). Taken together, these results revealed a novel role that FLZ elevated TH expression and activity in dopaminergic neuron through activation of Akt/mTOR survival pathway and inhibition of RTP801 in MPTP/MPP(+)-induced PD models. The data also provided evidence that FLZ had potent neuroprotecive effects and might become a new promising anti-PD drug.

  16. Mammalian target of rapamycin inhibition in hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ashworth, René E; Wu, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the leading causes of cancer-related death worldwide. It is associated with a poor prognosis and has limited treatment options. Sorafenib, a multi-targeted kinase inhibitor, is the only available systemic agent for treatment of HCC that improves overall survival for patients with advanced stage disease; unfortunately, an effective second-line agent for the treatment of progressive or sorafenib-resistant HCC has yet to be identified. This review focuses on components of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway, its role in HCC pathogenesis, and dual mTOR inhibition as a therapeutic option with potential efficacy in advanced HCC. There are several important upstream and downstream signals in the mTOR pathway, and alternative tumor-promoting pathways are known to exist beyond mTORC1 inhibition in HCC. This review analyzes the relationships of the upstream and downstream regulators of mTORC1 and mTORC2 signaling; it also provides a comprehensive global picture of the interaction between mTORC1 and mTORC2 which demonstrates the pre-clinical relevance of the mTOR pathway in HCC pathogenesis and progression. Finally, it provides scientific rationale for dual mTORC1 and mTORC2 inhibition in the treatment of HCC. Clinical trials utilizing mTORC1 inhibitors and dual mTOR inhibitors in HCC are discussed as well. The mTOR pathway is comprised of two main components, mTORC1 and mTORC2; each has a unique role in the pathogenesis and progression of HCC. In phase III studies, mTORC1 inhibitors demonstrate anti-tumor activity in advanced HCC, but dual mTOR (mTORC1 and mTORC2) inhibition has greater therapeutic potential in HCC treatment which warrants further clinical investigation. PMID:25429315

  17. Growth of Steptomyces hygroscopicus in rotating-wall bioreactor under simulated microgravity inhibits rapamycin production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fang, A.; Pierson, D. L.; Mishra, S. K.; Demain, A. L.

    2000-01-01

    Growth of Streptomyces hygroscopicus under conditions of simulated microgravity in a rotating-wall bioreactor resulted in a pellet form of growth, lowered dry cell weight, and inhibition of rapamycin production. With the addition of Teflon beads to the bioreactor, growth became much less pelleted, dry cell weight increased but rapamycin production was still markedly inhibited. Growth under simulated microgravity favored extracellular production of rapamycin, in contrast to a greater percentage of cell-bound rapamycin observed under normal gravity conditions.

  18. Growth of Steptomyces hygroscopicus in rotating-wall bioreactor under simulated microgravity inhibits rapamycin production.

    PubMed

    Fang, A; Pierson, D L; Mishra, S K; Demain, A L

    2000-07-01

    Growth of Streptomyces hygroscopicus under conditions of simulated microgravity in a rotating-wall bioreactor resulted in a pellet form of growth, lowered dry cell weight, and inhibition of rapamycin production. With the addition of Teflon beads to the bioreactor, growth became much less pelleted, dry cell weight increased but rapamycin production was still markedly inhibited. Growth under simulated microgravity favored extracellular production of rapamycin, in contrast to a greater percentage of cell-bound rapamycin observed under normal gravity conditions.

  19. Growth of Streptomyces Hygroscopicus in Rotating-Wall Bioreactor Under Simulated Microgravity Inhibits Rapamycin Production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fang, A.; Pierson, D. L.; Mishra, S. K.; Demain, A. L.

    2000-01-01

    Growth of Streptomyces hygroscopicus under conditions of simulated microgravity in a rotating-wall bioreactor resulted in a pellet form of growth, lowered dry cell weight, and inhibition of rapamycin production. With the addition of Teflon beads to the bioreactor, growth became much less pelleted, dry cell weight increased but rapamycin production was still markedly inhibited. Growth under simulated microgravity favored extracellular production of rapamycin in contrast to a greater percentage of cell-bound rapamycin observed under normal gravity conditions.

  20. Reperfusion Therapy with Rapamycin Attenuates Myocardial Infarction through Activation of AKT and ERK

    PubMed Central

    Filippone, Scott M.; Samidurai, Arun; Roh, Sean K.; Cain, Chad K.; He, Jun; Salloum, Fadi N.; Kukreja, Rakesh C.

    2017-01-01

    Prompt coronary reperfusion is the gold standard for minimizing injury following acute myocardial infarction. Rapamycin, mammalian target of Rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor, exerts preconditioning-like cardioprotective effects against ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury. We hypothesized that Rapamycin, given at the onset of reperfusion, reduces myocardial infarct size through modulation of mTOR complexes. Adult C57 male mice were subjected to 30 min of myocardial ischemia followed by reperfusion for 1 hour/24 hours. Rapamycin (0.25 mg/kg) or DMSO (7.5%) was injected intracardially at the onset of reperfusion. Post-I/R survival (87%) and cardiac function (fractional shortening, FS: 28.63 ± 3.01%) were improved in Rapamycin-treated mice compared to DMSO (survival: 63%, FS: 17.4 ± 2.6%). Rapamycin caused significant reduction in myocardial infarct size (IS: 26.2 ± 2.2%) and apoptosis (2.87 ± 0.64%) as compared to DMSO-treated mice (IS: 47.0 ± 2.3%; apoptosis: 7.39 ± 0.81%). Rapamycin induced phosphorylation of AKT S473 (target of mTORC2) but abolished ribosomal protein S6 phosphorylation (target of mTORC1) after I/R. Rapamycin induced phosphorylation of ERK1/2 but inhibited p38 phosphorylation. Infarct-limiting effect of Rapamycin was abolished with ERK inhibitor, PD98059. Rapamycin also attenuated Bax and increased Bcl-2/Bax ratio. These results suggest that reperfusion therapy with Rapamycin protects the heart against I/R injury by selective activation of mTORC2 and ERK with concurrent inhibition of mTORC1 and p38. PMID:28373901

  1. CWF-145, a novel synthetic quinolone derivative exerts potent antimitotic activity against human prostate cancer: Rapamycin enhances antimitotic drug-induced apoptosis through the inhibition of Akt/mTOR pathway.

    PubMed

    Hung, Chao-Ming; Lin, Ying-Chao; Liu, Liang-Chih; Kuo, Sheng-Chu; Ho, Chi-Tang; Way, Tzong-Der

    2016-12-25

    CWF-145, a synthetic 2-phenyl-4-quinolone derivative exerted potent cytotoxicity against prostate cancer. CWF-145 inhibited prostate cancer cell lines PC-3, DU-145 and LNCap. It had a very low IC50 about 200 nM against castrate-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) PC-3. We found that CWF-145 had a similar effect to clinical trial antimitotic agents in cancer cells and normal cells. CWF-145 arrested cell cycle at G2/M phase by binding to the β-tubulin at the colchicine-binding site then disrupted microtubule polymerization. Furthermore, the damaged microtubule affected the Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway. Our data showed that CWF-145 activated Akt and mTOR expression to increase emi1 accumulation and inhibit APC. The increased cyclin B1 and securin arrested cell cycle at G2/M phase. Moreover, we showed that Akt activation markedly increased resistance to microtubule-directed agents, including CWF-145, colchicine, and paclitaxel. Interestingly, rapamycin inhibited Akt-mediated therapeutic resistance, indicating that these effects were dependent on mTOR. Taken together, these observations suggest that activation of the Akt/mTOR signaling pathway can promote resistance to chemotherapeutic agents that do not directly target metabolic regulation. These data may provide insight into potentially synergistic combinations of anticancer therapies.

  2. Rapamycin attenuates mitochondrial dysfunction via activation of mitophagy in experimental ischemic stroke

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Qiang; Zhang, Ting; Wang, Jixian; Zhang, Zhijun; Zhai, Yu; Yang, Guo-Yuan; Sun, Xiaojiang

    2014-02-07

    Highlights: • Rapamycin enhances mitophagy via increasing p62 translocation to the mitochondria. • Rapamycin attenuates brain ischemic damage and improves mitochondrial function. • The protection of rapamycin to mitochondrial is linked to enhanced mitophagy. - Abstract: Rapamycin has been demonstrated to exhibit neuroprotective functions via the activation of autophagy in a cerebral ischemia model. However, the involvement of mitophagy in this process and its contribution to the protection of mitochondrial function remains unknown. The present study explored the characteristics of mitophagy after cerebral ischemia and the effect of rapamycin on mitochondrial function. Male Sprague–Dawley rats underwent transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAO). Neurological deficits scores; infarct volumes; mitophagy morphology; and the levels of malondialdehyde (MDA), adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and mitochondrial membrane potentials (Δψm) were examined. The expression of LC3, Beclin-1 and p62 in the mitochondrial fraction combined with transmission electronic microscopy were used to explore mitophagic activity after ischemia. We also blocked autophagosome formation using 3-methyladenine (3-MA) to check the linkage between the mitochondrial protective effect of rapamycin and enhanced mitophagy. We observed that rapamycin significantly enhanced mitophagy, as evidenced by the increase in LC3-II and Beclin-1 expression in the mitochondria and p62 translocation to the mitochondria. Rapamycin reduced infarct volume, improved neurological outcomes and inhibited mitochondrial dysfunction compared with the control animals (p < 0.05). However, these protective effects were reversed by 3-methyladenine treatment after rapamycin. The present study indicates that rapamycin treatment attenuates mitochondrial dysfunction following cerebral ischemia, which is linked to enhanced mitophagy.

  3. Rapamycin, a mTOR inhibitor, induced growth inhibition in retinoblastoma Y79 cell via down-regulation of Bmi-1.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan-Dong; Su, Yong-Jing; Li, Jian-Ying; Yao, Xiang-Chao; Liang, Guang-Jiang

    2015-01-01

    Rapamycin is useful in the treatment of certain cancers by inhibiting mTOR(mammalian target of rapamycin) pathway. Here, anticancer activity and its acting mechanisms of rapamycin were investigated in human retinoblastoma Y79 cells. CCK-8 assay showed that the IC50 value of rapamycin against human retinoblastoma Y79 cells was 0.122±0.026 μmol/L. Flow cytometry analysis indicated that rapamycin induced G1 cell cycle arrest. Western blot assay demonstrated that the mTOR pathway in Y79 cells was blocked by rapamycin. Western blot and RT-PCR assay showed that Bmi-1 was downregulated in protein and mRNA level by rapamycin treatment. Further Western blot and RNA interference assays showed that rapamycin-mediated downregulation of Bmi-1 induced decreases of cyclin E1, which accounted for rapamycin-mediated G1 cell cycle arrest in human retinoblastoma cells. Together, all these results illustrated that rapamycin induced growth inhibition of human retinoblastoma cells, and inactive of mTOR pathway and downregulation of Bmi-1 was involved in its action mechanism.

  4. The ketogenic diet inhibits the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway.

    PubMed

    McDaniel, Sharon S; Rensing, Nicholas R; Thio, Liu Lin; Yamada, Kelvin A; Wong, Michael

    2011-03-01

    The ketogenic diet (KD) is an effective treatment for epilepsy, but its mechanisms of action are poorly understood. We investigated the hypothesis that the KD inhibits mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway signaling. The expression of pS6 and pAkt, markers of mTOR pathway activation, was reduced in hippocampus and liver of rats fed KD. In the kainate model of epilepsy, KD blocked the hippocampal pS6 elevation that occurs after status epilepticus. Because mTOR signaling has been implicated in epileptogenesis, these results suggest that the KD may have anticonvulsant or antiepileptogenic actions via mTOR pathway inhibition.

  5. Downregulation of cancer stem cell properties via mTOR signaling pathway inhibition by rapamycin in nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    YANG, CHUNGUANG; ZHANG, YUE; ZHANG, YU; ZHANG, ZIHENG; PENG, JIANHUA; LI, ZHI; HAN, LIANG; YOU, QUANJIE; CHEN, XIAOYU; RAO, XINGWANG; ZHU, YI; LIAO, ZHISU

    2015-01-01

    Rapamycin, a mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling inhibitor, inhibits cancer cell proliferation and tumor formation, including in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC), which we proved in a previous study. However, whether rapamycin affects cancer stem cells (CSCs) is unclear. In examining samples of NPCs, we found regions of CD44-positive cancer cells co-expressing the stem cell biomarker OCT4, suggesting the presence of CSCs. Following this, we used double-label immunohistochemistry to identify whether the mTOR signaling pathway was activated in CD44-positive CSCs in NPCs. We used a CCK-8 assay and western blotting to explore whether the stem cell biomarkers CD44 and SOX2 and the invasion protein MMP-2 could be suppressed by treatment with rapamycin in cultured primary NPC cells and secondary tumors in BALB/c nude mice. Interestingly, we found that rapamycin inhibited mTOR signaling in addition to simultaneously downregulating the expression of CD44, SOX2 and MMP-2 and that it affected cell growth and tumor size and weight both in vitro and in vivo. Collectively, we confirmed for the first time that CSC properties are reduced and invasion potential is restrained in response to mTOR signaling inhibition in NPC. This evidence indicates that the targeted inhibition of CSC properties may provide a novel strategy to treat cancer. PMID:26202311

  6. Rapamycin requires AMPK activity and p27 expression for promoting autophagy-dependent Tsc2-null cell survival.

    PubMed

    Campos, Tania; Ziehe, Javiera; Fuentes-Villalobos, Francisco; Riquelme, Orlando; Peña, Daniela; Troncoso, Rodrigo; Lavandero, Sergio; Morin, Violeta; Pincheira, Roxana; Castro, Ariel F

    2016-06-01

    Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) disease results from inactivation of the TSC1 or TSC2 gene, and is characterized by benign tumors in several organs. Because TSC tumorigenesis correlates with hyperactivation of mTORC1, current therapies focus on mTORC1 inhibition with rapamycin or its analogs. Rapamycin-induced tumor shrinkage has been reported, but tumor recurrence occurs on withdrawal from rapamycin. Autophagy has been associated with development of TSC tumors and with tumor cell survival during rapamycin treatment. mTORC1 and AMPK directly inhibit and activate autophagy, respectively. AMPK is hyperactivated in TSC cells and tumors, and drives cytoplasmic sequestration of the cell-cycle inhibitor p27KIP (p27). Whether AMPK and p27 are involved in rapamycin-induced autophagy and survival of TSC cells remain unexplored. Here, we show that inhibition of AMPK by compound C or by shRNA-mediated depletion of LKB1 reduces activation of autophagy by rapamycin in Tsc2-null cells. Similarly, shRNA-mediated depletion of p27 inhibited rapamycin-induced autophagy. In support of p27 lying downstream of AMPK on the activation of autophagy in Tsc2-null cells, a p27 mutant that preferentially localizes in the cytosol recovered the effect of rapamycin on autophagy in both p27- and LKB1-depleted cells, but a nuclear p27 mutant was inactive. Finally, we show that p27-dependent activation of autophagy is involved in Tsc2-null cell survival under rapamycin treatment. These results indicate that an AMPK/p27 axis is promoting a survival mechanism that could explain in part the relapse of TSC tumors treated with rapamycin, exposing new avenues for designing more efficient treatments for TSC patients.

  7. Targeted Inhibition of Rictor/mTORC2 in Cancer Treatment: A New Era after Rapamycin.

    PubMed

    Zou, Zhipeng; Chen, Juan; Yang, Jun; Bai, Xiaochun

    2016-01-01

    The evolutionarily conserved mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) forms two functionally distinct complexes, mTORC1 and mTORC2. mTORC1, consisting of mTOR, raptor, and mLST8 (GβL), is sensitive to rapamycin and thought to control autonomous cell growth in response to nutrient availability and growth factors. mTORC2, containing the core components mTOR, mLST8, Rictor, mSIN1, and Protor1/2 is largely insensitive to rapamycin. mTORC2 specifically senses growth factors and regulates cell proliferation, metabolism, actin rearrangement, and survival. Dysregulation of mTOR signaling often occurs in a variety of human malignant diseases, rendering it a crucial and validated target in cancer treatment. However, the effectiveness of rapamycin as single-agent therapy is suppressed, in part, by the numerous strong mTORC1-dependent negative feedback loops. Although preclinical and clinical studies of ATP-competitive mTOR inhibitors that target both mTORC1 and mTORC2 have shown greater effectiveness than rapalogs for cancer treatment, the mTORC1 inhibition-induced negative feedback activation of PI3- K/PDK1 and Akt (Thr308) may be sufficient to promote cell survival. Recent cancer biology studies indicated that mTORC2 is a promising target, since its activity is essential for the development of a number of cancers. These studies provide a rationale for developing inhibitors specifically targeting mTORC2, which do not perturb the mTORC1- dependent negative feedback loops and have a more acceptable therapeutic window. This review summarizes the present understanding of mTORC2 signaling and functions, especially tumorigenic functions, highlighting the current status and future perspectives for targeting mTORC2 in cancer treatment.

  8. High mobility group box 1 induces the activation of the Janus kinase 2 and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (JAK2/STAT3) signaling pathway in pancreatic acinar cells in rats, while AG490 and rapamycin inhibit their activation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guoliang; Zhang, Jingchao; Dui, Danhua; Ren, Haoyuan; Liu, Jin

    2016-01-01

    The pathogenesis of severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) remains unclear. The Janus kinase and signal transducer and activator of transcription (JAK/STAT) pathway is important for various cytokines and growth factors. This study investigated the effect of the late inflammatory factor high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) on the activation of JAK2/STAT3 in pancreatic acinar cells and the inhibitory effects of AG490 (a JAK2 inhibitor) and rapamycin (a STAT3 inhibitor) on this pathway. Rat pancreatic acinar cells were randomly divided into the control, HMGB1, AG490, and rapamycin groups. The mRNA levels of JAK2 and STAT3 at 10, 30, 60, and 120 minutes were detected using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The protein levels of JAK2 and STAT3 at 60 and 120 minutes were observed using Western blotting. Compared with the control group, the HMGB1 group exhibited significantly increased levels of JAK2 mRNA at each time point; STAT3 mRNA at 30, 60, and 120 minutes; and JAK2 and STAT3 proteins at 60 and 120 minutes (p < 0.01). Compared with the HMGB1 group, the AG490 and rapamycin groups both exhibited significantly decreased levels of JAK2 mRNA at each time point (p < 0.05); STAT3 mRNA at 30, 60, and 120 minutes (p < 0.01); and JAK2 and STAT3 proteins at 60 and 120 minutes (p < 0.01). HMGB1 induces the activation of the JAK2/STAT3 signaling pathway in rat pancreatic acinar cells, and this activation can be inhibited by AG490 and rapamycin. The results of this study may provide new insights for the treatment of SAP. PMID:27754827

  9. Enhanced antitumor activity of 3-bromopyruvate in combination with rapamycin in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qi; Pan, Jing; Lubet, Ronald A; Komas, Steven M; Kalyanaraman, Balaraman; Wang, Yian; You, Ming

    2015-04-01

    3-Bromopyruvate (3-BrPA) is an alkylating agent and a well-known inhibitor of energy metabolism. Rapamycin is an inhibitor of the serine/threonine protein kinase mTOR. Both 3-BrPA and rapamycin show chemopreventive efficacy in mouse models of lung cancer. Aerosol delivery of therapeutic drugs for lung cancer has been reported to be an effective route of delivery with little systemic distribution in humans. In this study, 3-BrPA and rapamycin were evaluated in combination for their preventive effects against lung cancer in mice by aerosol treatment, revealing a synergistic ability as measured by tumor multiplicity and tumor load compared treatment with either single-agent alone. No evidence of liver toxicity was detected by monitoring serum levels of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) enzymes. To understand the mechanism in vitro experiments were performed using human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines. 3-BrPA and rapamycin also synergistically inhibited cell proliferation. Rapamycin alone blocked the mTOR signaling pathway, whereas 3-BrPA did not potentiate this effect. Given the known role of 3-BrPA as an inhibitor of glycolysis, we investigated mitochondrial bioenergetics changes in vitro in 3-BrPA-treated NSCLC cells. 3-BrPA significantly decreased glycolytic activity, which may be due to adenosine triphosphate (ATP) depletion and decreased expression of GAPDH. Our results demonstrate that rapamycin enhanced the antitumor efficacy of 3-BrPA, and that dual inhibition of mTOR signaling and glycolysis may be an effective therapeutic strategy for lung cancer chemoprevention.

  10. Inhibition of akt enhances the chemopreventive effects of topical rapamycin in mouse skin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dickinson, Sally E; Janda, Jaroslav; Criswell, Jane; Blohm-Mangone, Karen; Olson, Erik R.; Liu, Zhonglin; Barber, Christie; Rusche, Jadrian J.; Petricoin, Emmanuel; Calvert, Valerie; Einspahr, Janine G.; Dickinson, Jesse; Stratton, Steven P.; Curiel-Lewandrowski, Clara; Saboda, Kathylynn; Hu, Chengcheng; Bode, Ann M.; Dong, Zigang; Alberts, David S.; Bowden, G. Timothy

    2016-01-01

    The PI3Kinase/Akt/mTOR pathway has important roles in cancer development for multiple tumor types, including UV-induced non-melanoma skin cancer. Immunosuppressed populations are at increased risk of aggressive cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Individuals who are treated with rapamycin, (sirolimus, a classical mTOR inhibitor) have significantly decreased rates of developing new cutaneous SCCs compared to those that receive traditional immunosuppression. However, systemic rapamycin use can lead to significant adverse events. Here we explored the use of topical rapamycin as a chemopreventive agent in the context of solar simulated light (SSL)-induced skin carcinogenesis. In SKH-1 mice, topical rapamycin treatment decreased tumor yields when applied after completion of 15 weeks of SSL exposure compared to controls. However, applying rapamycin during SSL exposure for 15 weeks, and continuing for 10 weeks after UV treatment, increased tumor yields. We also examined whether a combinatorial approach might result in more significant tumor suppression by rapamycin. We validated that rapamycin causes increased Akt (S473) phosphorylation in the epidermis after SSL, and show for the first time that this dysregulation can be inhibited in vivo by a selective PDK1/Akt inhibitor, PHT-427. Combining rapamycin with PHT-427 on tumor prone skin additively caused a significant reduction of tumor multiplicity compared to vehicle controls. Our findings indicate that patients taking rapamycin should avoid sun exposure, and that combining topical mTOR inhibitors and Akt inhibitors may be a viable chemoprevention option for individuals at high risk for cutaneous SCC.

  11. Inhibition of Akt Enhances the Chemopreventive Effects of Topical Rapamycin in Mouse Skin.

    PubMed

    Dickinson, Sally E; Janda, Jaroslav; Criswell, Jane; Blohm-Mangone, Karen; Olson, Erik R; Liu, Zhonglin; Barber, Christy; Petricoin, Emanuel F; Calvert, Valerie S; Einspahr, Janine; Dickinson, Jesse E; Stratton, Steven P; Curiel-Lewandrowski, Clara; Saboda, Kathylynn; Hu, Chengcheng; Bode, Ann M; Dong, Zigang; Alberts, David S; Timothy Bowden, G

    2016-03-01

    The PI3Kinase/Akt/mTOR pathway has important roles in cancer development for multiple tumor types, including UV-induced nonmelanoma skin cancer. Immunosuppressed populations are at increased risk of aggressive cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Individuals who are treated with rapamycin (sirolimus, a classical mTOR inhibitor) have significantly decreased rates of developing new cutaneous SCCs compared with those that receive traditional immunosuppression. However, systemic rapamycin use can lead to significant adverse events. Here, we explored the use of topical rapamycin as a chemopreventive agent in the context of solar-simulated light (SSL)-induced skin carcinogenesis. In SKH-1 mice, topical rapamycin treatment decreased tumor yields when applied after completion of 15 weeks of SSL exposure compared with controls. However, applying rapamycin during SSL exposure for 15 weeks, and continuing for 10 weeks after UV treatment, increased tumor yields. We also examined whether a combinatorial approach might result in more significant tumor suppression by rapamycin. We validated that rapamycin causes increased Akt (S473) phosphorylation in the epidermis after SSL, and show for the first time that this dysregulation can be inhibited in vivo by a selective PDK1/Akt inhibitor, PHT-427. Combining rapamycin with PHT-427 on tumor prone skin additively caused a significant reduction of tumor multiplicity compared with vehicle controls. Our findings indicate that patients taking rapamycin should avoid sun exposure, and that combining topical mTOR inhibitors and Akt inhibitors may be a viable chemoprevention option for individuals at high risk for cutaneous SCC.

  12. Covalent modification of pericardial patches for sustained rapamycin delivery inhibits venous neointimal hyperplasia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Hualong; Lee, Jung Seok; Chen, Elizabeth; Wang, Mo; Xing, Ying; Fahmy, Tarek M.; Dardik, Alan

    2017-01-01

    Prosthetic grafts and patches are commonly used in cardiovascular surgery, however neointimal hyperplasia remains a significant concern, especially under low flow conditions. We hypothesized that delivery of rapamycin from nanoparticles (NP) covalently attached to patches allows sustained site-specific delivery of therapeutic agents targeted to inhibit localized neointimal hyperplasia. NP were covalently linked to pericardial patches using EDC/NHS chemistry and could deliver at least 360 ng rapamycin per patch without detectable rapamycin in serum; nanoparticles were detectable in the liver, kidney and spleen but no other sites within 24 hours. In a rat venous patch angioplasty model, control patches developed robust neointimal hyperplasia on the patch luminal surface characterized by Eph-B4-positive endothelium and underlying SMC and infiltrating cells such as macrophages and leukocytes. Patches delivering rapamycin developed less neointimal hyperplasia, less smooth muscle cell proliferation, and had fewer infiltrating cells but retained endothelialization. NP covalently linked to pericardial patches are a novel composite delivery system that allows sustained site-specific delivery of therapeutics; NP delivering rapamycin inhibit patch neointimal hyperplasia. NP linked to patches may represent a next generation of tissue engineered cardiovascular implants.

  13. Covalent modification of pericardial patches for sustained rapamycin delivery inhibits venous neointimal hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Bai, Hualong; Lee, Jung Seok; Chen, Elizabeth; Wang, Mo; Xing, Ying; Fahmy, Tarek M; Dardik, Alan

    2017-01-10

    Prosthetic grafts and patches are commonly used in cardiovascular surgery, however neointimal hyperplasia remains a significant concern, especially under low flow conditions. We hypothesized that delivery of rapamycin from nanoparticles (NP) covalently attached to patches allows sustained site-specific delivery of therapeutic agents targeted to inhibit localized neointimal hyperplasia. NP were covalently linked to pericardial patches using EDC/NHS chemistry and could deliver at least 360 ng rapamycin per patch without detectable rapamycin in serum; nanoparticles were detectable in the liver, kidney and spleen but no other sites within 24 hours. In a rat venous patch angioplasty model, control patches developed robust neointimal hyperplasia on the patch luminal surface characterized by Eph-B4-positive endothelium and underlying SMC and infiltrating cells such as macrophages and leukocytes. Patches delivering rapamycin developed less neointimal hyperplasia, less smooth muscle cell proliferation, and had fewer infiltrating cells but retained endothelialization. NP covalently linked to pericardial patches are a novel composite delivery system that allows sustained site-specific delivery of therapeutics; NP delivering rapamycin inhibit patch neointimal hyperplasia. NP linked to patches may represent a next generation of tissue engineered cardiovascular implants.

  14. Covalent modification of pericardial patches for sustained rapamycin delivery inhibits venous neointimal hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Hualong; Lee, Jung Seok; Chen, Elizabeth; Wang, Mo; Xing, Ying; Fahmy, Tarek M.; Dardik, Alan

    2017-01-01

    Prosthetic grafts and patches are commonly used in cardiovascular surgery, however neointimal hyperplasia remains a significant concern, especially under low flow conditions. We hypothesized that delivery of rapamycin from nanoparticles (NP) covalently attached to patches allows sustained site-specific delivery of therapeutic agents targeted to inhibit localized neointimal hyperplasia. NP were covalently linked to pericardial patches using EDC/NHS chemistry and could deliver at least 360 ng rapamycin per patch without detectable rapamycin in serum; nanoparticles were detectable in the liver, kidney and spleen but no other sites within 24 hours. In a rat venous patch angioplasty model, control patches developed robust neointimal hyperplasia on the patch luminal surface characterized by Eph-B4-positive endothelium and underlying SMC and infiltrating cells such as macrophages and leukocytes. Patches delivering rapamycin developed less neointimal hyperplasia, less smooth muscle cell proliferation, and had fewer infiltrating cells but retained endothelialization. NP covalently linked to pericardial patches are a novel composite delivery system that allows sustained site-specific delivery of therapeutics; NP delivering rapamycin inhibit patch neointimal hyperplasia. NP linked to patches may represent a next generation of tissue engineered cardiovascular implants. PMID:28071663

  15. Inhibition of the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 signaling pathway reduces itch behaviour in mice.

    PubMed

    Obara, Ilona; Medrano, Maria C; Signoret-Genest, Jérémy; Jiménez-Díaz, Lydia; Géranton, Sandrine M; Hunt, Stephen P

    2015-08-01

    Activated mammalian target of rapamycin (P-mTOR) has been shown to maintain the sensitivity of subsets of small-diameter primary afferent A-nociceptors. Local or systemic inhibition of the mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) pathway reduced punctate mechanical and cold sensitivity in neuropathic pain and therefore offered a new approach to chronic pain control. In this study, we have investigated the effects of the rapamycin analog temsirolimus (CCI-779) on itch. Bouts of scratching induced by the histamine-dependent pruritogenic compound 48/80 and histamine-independent pruritogens, chloroquine and SLIGRL-NH2, injected intradermally were significantly reduced by local (intradermal) or systemic (intraperitoneal, i.p.) pretreatment with CCI-779. We also investigated the action of metformin, a drug taken to control type 2 diabetes and recently shown to inhibit mTORC1 in vivo. Although the response to nonhistaminergic stimuli was reduced at all of the time points tested, scratching to compound 48/80 was modified by metformin only when the drug was injected 24 hours before this pruritogen. We also examined the colocalization of P-mTOR with gastrin-releasing peptide, a putative marker for some itch-sensitive primary afferents, and found that P-mTOR was coexpressed in less than 5% of gastrin-releasing peptide-positive fibers in the mouse skin. Taken together, the data highlight the role that P-mTOR-positive A-fibers play in itch signaling and underline the importance of the mTORC1 pathway in the regulation of homeostatic primary afferent functions such as pain and itch. The actions of the antidiabetic drug metformin in ameliorating nonhistamine-mediated itch also suggest a new therapeutic route for the control of this category of pruritus.

  16. Rapid cytoplasmic turnover of yeast ribosomes in response to rapamycin inhibition of TOR.

    PubMed

    Pestov, Dimitri G; Shcherbik, Natalia

    2012-06-01

    The target of rapamycin (TOR) pathway is the central regulator of cell growth in eukaryotes. Inhibition of TOR by rapamycin elicits changes in translation attributed mainly to altered translation initiation and repression of the synthesis of new ribosomes. Using quantitative analysis of rRNA, we found that the number of existing ribosomes present in a Saccharomyces cerevisiae culture during growth in rich medium rapidly decreases by 40 to 60% when the cells are treated with rapamycin. This process is not appreciably affected by a suppression of autophagy, previously implicated in degradation of ribosomes in eukaryotes upon starvation. Yeast cells deficient in the exosome function or lacking its cytoplasmic Ski cofactors show an abnormal pattern of rRNA degradation, particularly in the large ribosomal subunit, and accumulate rRNA fragments after rapamycin treatment and during diauxic shift. The exosome and Ski proteins are thus important for processing of rRNA decay intermediates, although they are probably not responsible for initiating rRNA decay. The role of cytoplasmic nucleases in rapamycin-induced rRNA degradation suggests mechanistic parallels of this process to nutrient-controlled ribosome turnover in prokaryotes. We propose that ribosome content is regulated dynamically in eukaryotes by TOR through both ribosome synthesis and the cytoplasmic turnover of mature ribosomes.

  17. TORC1 signaling inhibition by rapamycin and caffeine affect lifespan, global gene expression, and cell proliferation of fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Rallis, Charalampos; Codlin, Sandra; Bähler, Jürg

    2013-08-01

    Target of rapamycin complex 1 (TORC1) is implicated in growth control and aging from yeast to humans. Fission yeast is emerging as a popular model organism to study TOR signaling, although rapamycin has been thought to not affect cell growth in this organism. Here, we analyzed the effects of rapamycin and caffeine, singly and combined, on multiple cellular processes in fission yeast. The two drugs led to diverse and specific phenotypes that depended on TORC1 inhibition, including prolonged chronological lifespan, inhibition of global translation, inhibition of cell growth and division, and reprograming of global gene expression mimicking nitrogen starvation. Rapamycin and caffeine differentially affected these various TORC1-dependent processes. Combined drug treatment augmented most phenotypes and effectively blocked cell growth. Rapamycin showed a much more subtle effect on global translation than did caffeine, while both drugs were effective in prolonging chronological lifespan. Rapamycin and caffeine did not affect the lifespan via the pH of the growth media. Rapamycin prolonged the lifespan of nongrowing cells only when applied during the growth phase but not when applied after cells had stopped proliferation. The doses of rapamycin and caffeine strongly correlated with growth inhibition and with lifespan extension. This comprehensive analysis will inform future studies into TORC1 function and cellular aging in fission yeast and beyond.

  18. Inhibition of mTOR kinase via rapamycin blocks persistent predator stress-induced hyperarousal.

    PubMed

    Fifield, Kathleen; Hebert, Mark; Angel, Rebecca; Adamec, Robert; Blundell, Jacqueline

    2013-11-01

    Traumatic, stressful life events are thought to trigger acquired anxiety disorders such as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Recent data suggests that the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) plays a key role in the formation of traumatic memories. The predator stress paradigm allows us to determine whether mTOR mediates the formation of both context-dependent (associative) and context-independent (non-associative) fear memories. Predator stress involves an acute, unprotected exposure of a rat to a cat which causes long-lasting non-associative fear memories manifested as generalized hyperarousal and increased anxiety-like behavior. Here, we show that rapamycin, an mTOR inhibitor, attenuates predator stress-induced hyperarousal, lasting at least three weeks. In addition, rapamycin blocks a subset of anxiety-like behaviors as measured in the elevated plus maze and hole board. Furthermore, when re-exposed to the predator stress context, rapamycin-treated stressed rats showed increased activity compared to vehicle controls suggesting that rapamycin blocks predator stress-induced associative fear memory. Taken together with past research, our results indicate that mTOR regulation of protein translation is required for the formation of both associative and non-associative fear memories. Overall, these data suggest that mTOR activation may contribute to the development of acquired anxiety disorders such as PTSD.

  19. A spectrophotometric assay for routine measurement of mammalian target of rapamycin activity in cell lysates.

    PubMed

    Dekter, Hinke E; Romijn, Fred P H T M; Temmink, Wouter P M; van Pelt, Johannes; de Fijter, Johan W; Smit, Nico P M

    2010-08-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is an important mediator in the PI3K/AKT signaling pathway. mTOR is the target of immunosuppressive drugs, such as rapamycin and everolimus, that are used in transplant patients but also for the treatment of various cancers. We have developed a method for mTOR activity measurement in cell lysates that measures the phosphorylation of p70 S6 kinase by an enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) protocol. Using an optimized lysis composition, activity could be measured in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) isolated from blood. For the PBMCs, intra- and interassay variations of 7 and 10%, respectively, were found using one lot number of the kit. With different lot numbers, the interassay variation increased up to 21%. Activity remained constant for PBMC pool samples on storage for a period of more than 7 months. Activity could also be measured in CD3+ T-cells isolated from blood. In vitro experiments revealed maximum mTOR inhibition of 30% in PBMCs and 44% in T-cells. The in vitro inhibition in PBMCs could also be demonstrated by Western blotting. The mTOR activity measurements may be used to show in vivo inhibition in renal allograft patients during everolimus treatment and to study mTOR activity in various (tumor) cell types.

  20. Inhibition of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) by rapamycin increases chemosensitivity of CaSki cells to paclitaxel.

    PubMed

    Faried, L S; Faried, A; Kanuma, T; Nakazato, T; Tamura, T; Kuwano, H; Minegishi, T

    2006-05-01

    Paclitaxel, a potent anti-neoplastic agent, has been found to be effective against several tumours, including cervical cancer. However, the exact mechanism underlying the cytotoxic effects of pacitaxel, especially in the survival-signalling pathway, is poorly understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the molecular pathway of the cytotoxic effect of paclitaxel in human cervical cancer cell lines. Four human cervical cancer cell lines were treated for 24 h with various concentration of paclitaxel, and the sensitivity was analysed by an MTT assay. The cell cycle progression and sub-G1 population were analysed by flow cytometry. Apoptosis was further measured by DNA fragmentation and microscope examination. The protein expression was determined by Western blot analysis. Our results showed that HeLa cells demonstrated the highest sensitivity to paclitaxel, whereas CaSki cells showed the lowest. In cervical cancer cells, paclitaxel induced apoptosis through an intrinsic pathway with prior G2/M arrest. In addition, we showed that paclitaxel downregulated the phosphorylation of Akt in both HeLa and CaSki cells. Interestingly, in CaSki cells, which were more suggestive of a resistant phenotype, paclitaxel induced the activation of mTOR as a downstream target of Akt. Pre-treatment with rapamycin inhibited activation of mTOR signalling and significantly enhanced the sensitivity of CaSki cells to paclitaxel by increasing apoptotic cell death. This effect was mediated, at least partly, through caspase activation. Overall, paclitaxel exerts its anti-tumour effects on cervical cancer cells by inducing apoptosis through intrinsic pathway, and rapamycin targeted to mTOR can sensitise paclitaxel-resistant cervical cancer cells.

  1. Activation of mTOR (mechanistic target of rapamycin) in rheumatic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Perl, Andras

    2017-01-01

    Mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR, also known as mammalian target of rapamycin) is a ubiquitous serine/threonine kinase that regulates cell growth, proliferation and survival. These effects are cell-type-specific, and are elicited in response to stimulation by growth factors, hormones and cytokines, as well as to internal and external metabolic cues. Rapamycin was initially developed as an inhibitor of T-cell proliferation and allograft rejection in the organ transplant setting. Subsequently, its molecular target (mTOR) was identified as a component of two interacting complexes, mTORC1 and mTORC2, that regulate T-cell lineage specification and macrophage differentiation. mTORC1 drives the proinflammatory expansion of T helper (TH) type 1, TH17, and CD4−CD8− (double-negative, DN) T cells. Both mTORC1 and mTORC2 inhibit the development of CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ T regulatory (TREG) cells and, indirectly, mTORC2 favours the expansion of Tfollicular helper (TFH) cells which, similarly to DN T cells, promote B-cell activation and autoantibody production. In contrast to this proinflammatory effect of mTORC2, mTORC1 favours, to some extent, an anti-inflammatory macrophage polarization that is protective against infections and tissue inflammation. Outside the immune system, mTORC1 controls fibroblast proliferation and chondrocyte survival, with implications for tissue fibrosis and osteoarthritis, respectively. Rapamycin (which primarily inhibits mTORC1), ATP-competitive, dual mTORC1/mTORC2 inhibitors and upstream regulators of the mTOR pathway are being developed to treat autoimmune, hyperproliferative and degenerative diseases. In this regard, mTOR blockade promises to increase life expectancy through treatment and prevention of rheumatic diseases. PMID:26698023

  2. Rapamycin inhibits BAFF-stimulated cell proliferation and survival by suppressing mTOR-mediated PP2A-Erk1/2 signaling pathway in normal and neoplastic B-lymphoid cells.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Qingyu; Zhang, Hai; Qin, Jiamin; Xu, Zhigang; Gui, Lin; Liu, Beibei; Liu, Chunxiao; Xu, Chong; Liu, Wen; Zhang, Shuangquan; Huang, Shile; Chen, Long

    2015-12-01

    B-cell activating factor (BAFF) is involved in not only physiology of normal B cells, but also pathophysiology of aggressive B cells related to malignant and autoimmune diseases. Rapamycin, a lipophilic macrolide antibiotic, has recently shown to be effective in the treatment of human lupus erythematosus. However, how rapamycin inhibits BAFF-stimulated B-cell proliferation and survival has not been fully elucidated. Here, we show that rapamycin inhibited human soluble BAFF (hsBAFF)-induced cell proliferation and survival in normal and B-lymphoid (Raji and Daudi) cells by activation of PP2A and inactivation of Erk1/2. Pretreatment with PD98059, down-regulation of Erk1/2, expression of dominant negative MKK1, or overexpression of wild-type PP2A potentiated rapamycin's suppression of hsBAFF-activated Erk1/2 and B-cell proliferation/viability, whereas expression of constitutively active MKK1, inhibition of PP2A by okadaic acid, or expression of dominant negative PP2A attenuated the inhibitory effects of rapamycin. Furthermore, expression of a rapamycin-resistant and kinase-active mTOR (mTOR-T), but not a rapamycin-resistant and kinase-dead mTOR-T (mTOR-TE), conferred resistance to rapamycin's effects on PP2A, Erk1/2 and B-cell proliferation/viability, implying mTOR-dependent mechanism involved. The findings indicate that rapamycin inhibits BAFF-stimulated cell proliferation/survival by targeting mTOR-mediated PP2A-Erk1/2 signaling pathway in normal and neoplastic B-lymphoid cells. Our data highlight that rapamycin may be exploited for preventing excessive BAFF-induced aggressive B-cell malignancies and autoimmune diseases.

  3. P-Rex1 links mammalian target of rapamycin signaling to Rac activation and cell migration.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Negrete, Ivette; Carretero-Ortega, Jorge; Rosenfeldt, Hans; Hernández-García, Ricardo; Calderón-Salinas, J Victor; Reyes-Cruz, Guadalupe; Gutkind, J Silvio; Vázquez-Prado, José

    2007-08-10

    Polarized cell migration results from the transduction of extra-cellular cues promoting the activation of Rho GTPases with the intervention of multidomain proteins, including guanine exchange factors. P-Rex1 and P-Rex2 are Rac GEFs connecting Gbetagamma and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase signaling to Rac activation. Their complex architecture suggests their regulation by protein-protein interactions. Novel mechanisms of activation of Rho GTPases are associated with mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), a serine/threonine kinase known as a central regulator of cell growth and proliferation. Recently, two independent multiprotein complexes containing mTOR have been described. mTORC1 links to the classical rapamycin-sensitive pathways relevant for protein synthesis; mTORC2 links to the activation of Rho GTPases and cytoskeletal events via undefined mechanisms. Here we demonstrate that P-Rex1 and P-Rex2 establish, through their tandem DEP domains, interactions with mTOR, suggesting their potential as effectors in the signaling of mTOR to Rac activation and cell migration. This possibility was consistent with the effect of dominant-negative constructs and short hairpin RNA-mediated knockdown of P-Rex1, which decreased mTOR-dependent leucine-induced activation of Rac and cell migration. Rapamycin, a widely used inhibitor of mTOR signaling, did not inhibit Rac activity and cell migration induced by leucine, indicating that P-Rex1, which we found associated to both mTOR complexes, is only active when in the mTORC2 complex. mTORC2 has been described as the catalytic complex that phosphorylates AKT/PKB at Ser-473 and elicits activation of Rho GTPases and cytoskeletal reorganization. Thus, P-Rex1 links mTOR signaling to Rac activation and cell migration.

  4. Intrathecal administration of rapamycin inhibits the phosphorylation of DRG Nav1.8 and attenuates STZ-induced painful diabetic neuropathy in rats.

    PubMed

    He, Wan-You; Zhang, Bin; Xiong, Qing-Ming; Yang, Cheng-Xiang; Zhao, Wei-Cheng; He, Jian; Zhou, Jun; Wang, Han-Bing

    2016-04-21

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a key regulator of mRNA translation and protein synthesis, and it is specifically inhibited by rapamycin. In chronic pain conditions, mTOR-mediated local protein synthesis is crucial for neuronal hyperexcitability and synaptic plasticity. The tetrodotoxin-resistant (TTX-R) sodium channel Nav1.8 plays a major role in action potential initiation and propagation and cellular excitability in DRG (dorsal root ganglion) neurons. In this study, we investigated if mTOR modulates the phosphorylation of Nav1.8 that is associated with neuronal hyperexcitability and behavioral hypersensitivity in STZ-induced diabetic rats. Painful diabetic neuropathy (PDN) was induced in Sprague-Dawley rats by intraperitoneal injection with streptozotocin (STZ) at 60mg/kg. After the onset of PDN, the rats received daily intrathecal administrations of rapamycin (1μg, 3μg, or 10μg/day) for 7 days; other diabetic rats received the same volumes of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). Herein, we demonstrate a marked increase in protein expression of total mTOR and phospho-mTOR (p-mTOR) together with the up-regulation of phosphor-Nav1.8 (p-Nav1.8) prior to the mechanical withdrawal threshold reaching a significant reduction in dorsal root ganglions (DRGs). Furthermore, the intrathecal administration of rapamycin, inhibiting the activity of mTOR, suppressed the phosphorylation of DRG Nav1.8, reduced the TTX-R current density, heightened the voltage threshold for activation and lowered the voltage threshold for inactivation and relieved mechanical hypersensitivity in diabetic rats. An intrathecal injection (i.t.) of rapamycin inhibited the phosphorylation and enhanced the functional availability of DRG Nav1.8 attenuated STZ-induced hyperalgesia. These results suggest that rapamycin is a potential therapeutic intervention for clinical PDN.

  5. A Rapamycin-Releasing Perivascular Polymeric Sheath Produces Highly Effective Inhibition of Intimal Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xaohua; Takayama, Toshio; Goel, Shakti A.; Shi, Xudong; Zhou, Yifan; Kent, K. Craig; Murphy, William L.; Guo, Lian-Wang

    2014-01-01

    Intimal hyperplasia produces restenosis (re-narrowing) of the vessel lumen following vascular intervention. Drugs that inhibit intimal hyperplasia have been developed, however there is currently no clinical method of perivascular drug-delivery to prevent restenosis following open surgical procedures. Here we report a poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) sheath that is highly effective in preventing intimal hyperplasia through perivascular delivery of rapamycin. We first screened a series of bioresorbable polymers, i.e., poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA), poly(lactic acid) (PLLA), PCL, and their blends, to identify desired release kinetics and sheath physical properties. Both PLGA and PLLA sheaths produced minimal (<30%) rapamycin release within 50 days in PBS buffer. In contrast, PCL sheaths exhibited more rapid and near-linear release kinetics, as well as durable integrity (>90 days) as evidenced in both scanning electron microscopy and subcutaneous embedding experiments. Moreover, a PCL sheath deployed around balloon-injured rat carotid arteries was associated with a minimum rate of thrombosis compared to PLGA and PLLA. Morphometric analysis and immunohistochemistry revealed that rapamycin-loaded perivascular PCL sheaths produced pronounced (85%) inhibition of intimal hyperplasia (0.15±0.05 vs 1.01±0.16), without impairment of the luminal endothelium, the vessel’s anti-thrombotic layer. Our data collectively show that a rapamycin-loaded PCL delivery system produces substantial mitigation of neointima, likely due to its favorable physical properties leading to a stable yet flexible perivascular sheath and steady and prolonged release kinetics. Thus, a PCL sheath may provide useful scaffolding for devising effective perivascular drug delivery particularly suited for preventing restenosis following open vascular surgery. PMID:24852098

  6. A rapamycin-releasing perivascular polymeric sheath produces highly effective inhibition of intimal hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiaohua; Takayama, Toshio; Goel, Shakti A; Shi, Xudong; Zhou, Yifan; Kent, K Craig; Murphy, William L; Guo, Lian-Wang

    2014-10-10

    Intimal hyperplasia produces restenosis (re-narrowing) of the vessel lumen following vascular intervention. Drugs that inhibit intimal hyperplasia have been developed, however there is currently no clinical method of perivascular drug-delivery to prevent restenosis following open surgical procedures. Here we report a poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) sheath that is highly effective in preventing intimal hyperplasia through perivascular delivery of rapamycin. We first screened a series of bioresorbable polymers, i.e., poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA), poly(lactic acid) (PLLA), PCL, and their blends, to identify desired release kinetics and sheath physical properties. Both PLGA and PLLA sheaths produced minimal (<30%) rapamycin release within 50days in PBS buffer. In contrast, PCL sheaths exhibited more rapid and near-linear release kinetics, as well as durable integrity (>90days) as evidenced in both scanning electron microscopy and subcutaneous embedding experiments. Moreover, a PCL sheath deployed around balloon-injured rat carotid arteries was associated with a minimum rate of thrombosis compared to PLGA and PLLA. Morphometric analysis and immunohistochemistry revealed that rapamycin-loaded perivascular PCL sheaths produced pronounced (85%) inhibition of intimal hyperplasia (0.15±0.05 vs 1.01±0.16), without impairment of the luminal endothelium, the vessel's anti-thrombotic layer. Our data collectively show that a rapamycin-loaded PCL delivery system produces substantial mitigation of neointima, likely due to its favorable physical properties leading to a stable yet flexible perivascular sheath and steady and prolonged release kinetics. Thus, a PCL sheath may provide useful scaffolding for devising effective perivascular drug delivery particularly suited for preventing restenosis following open vascular surgery.

  7. Ubiquilin-mediated Small Molecule Inhibition of Mammalian Target of Rapamycin Complex 1 (mTORC1) Signaling*

    PubMed Central

    Coffey, Rory T.; Shi, Yuntao; Long, Marcus J. C.; Marr, Michael T.; Hedstrom, Lizbeth

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) is a master regulator of cellular metabolism, growth, and proliferation. mTORC1 has been implicated in many diseases such as cancer, diabetes, and neurodegeneration, and is a target to prolong lifespan. Here we report a small molecule inhibitor (Cbz-B3A) of mTORC1 signaling. Cbz-B3A inhibits the phosphorylation of eIF4E-binding protein 1 (4EBP1) and blocks 68% of translation. In contrast, rapamycin preferentially inhibits the phosphorylation of p70S6k and blocks 35% of translation. Cbz-B3A does not appear to bind directly to mTORC1, but instead binds to ubiquilins 1, 2, and 4. Knockdown of ubiquilin 2, but not ubiquilins 1 and 4, decreases the phosphorylation of 4EBP1, suggesting that ubiquilin 2 activates mTORC1. The knockdown of ubiquilins 2 and 4 decreases the effect of Cbz-B3A on 4EBP1 phosphorylation. Cbz-B3A slows cellular growth of some human leukemia cell lines, but is not cytotoxic. Thus Cbz-B3A exemplifies a novel strategy to inhibit mTORC1 signaling that might be exploited for treating many human diseases. We propose that Cbz-B3A reveals a previously unappreciated regulatory pathway coordinating cytosolic protein quality control and mTORC1 signaling. PMID:26740621

  8. Rapamycin protects neurons from brain contusion-induced inflammatory reaction via modulation of microglial activation

    PubMed Central

    SONG, QI; XIE, DUJIANG; PAN, SHIYONG; XU, WEIJUN

    2015-01-01

    The inflammatory reaction is important in secondary injury following traumatic brain injury (TBI). Rapamycin has been demonstrated as a neuroprotective agent in a mouse model of TBI, however, there is a lack of data regarding the effects of rapamycin on the inflammatory reaction following TBI. Therefore, the present study was designed to assess the effects of treatment with rapamycin on inflammatory reactions and examine the possible involvement of microglial activation following TBI. Male imprinting control region mice were randomly divided into four groups: Sham group (n=23), TBI group (n=23), TBI + dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) group (n=31) and TBI + rapamycin group (n=31). Rapamycin was dissolved in DMSO (50 mg/ml) and injected 30 min after TBI (2 mg/Kg; intraperitoneally). A weight-drop model of TBI was induced, and the brain tissues were harvested 24 h after TBI. The findings indicated that the administration of rapamycin following TBI was associated with decreased levels of activated microglia and neuron degeneration at the peri-injury site, reduced levels of proinflammatory cytokines and increased neurobehavioral function, possibly mediated by inactivation of the mammalian target of rapamycin pathway. The results of the present study offer novel insight into the mechanisms responsible for the anti-neuroinflammatory effects of rapamycin, possibly involving the modulation of microglial activation. PMID:26458361

  9. Mechanical activation of mammalian target of rapamycin pathway is required for cartilage development

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Yingjie; Yang, Xu; Yang, Wentian; Charbonneau, Cherie; Chen, Qian

    2014-01-01

    Mechanical stress regulates development by modulating cell signaling and gene expression. However, the cytoplasmic components mediating mechanotransduction remain unclear. In this study, elimination of muscle contraction during chicken embryonic development resulted in a reduction in the activity of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) in the cartilaginous growth plate. Inhibition of mTOR activity led to significant inhibition of chondrocyte proliferation, cartilage tissue growth, and expression of chondrogenic genes, including Indian hedgehog (Ihh), a critical mediator of mechanotransduction. Conversely, cyclic loading (1 Hz, 5% matrix deformation) of embryonic chicken growth plate chondrocytes in 3-dimensional (3D) collagen scaffolding induced sustained activation of mTOR. Mechanical activation of mTOR occurred in serum-free medium, indicating that it is independent of growth factor or nutrients. Treatment of chondrocytes with Rapa abolished mechanical activation of cell proliferation and Ihh gene expression. Cyclic loading of chondroprogenitor cells deficient in SH2-containing protein tyrosine phosphatase 2 (Shp2) further enhanced mechanical activation of mTOR, cell proliferation, and chondrogenic gene expression. This result suggests that Shp2 is an antagonist of mechanotransduction through inhibition of mTOR activity. Our data demonstrate that mechanical activation of mTOR is necessary for cell proliferation, chondrogenesis, and cartilage growth during bone development, and that mTOR is an essential mechanotransduction component modulated by Shp2 in the cytoplasm.—Guan, Y., Yang, X., Yang, W., Charbonneau, C., Chen, Q. Mechanical activation of mammalian target of rapamycin pathway is required for cartilage development. PMID:25002119

  10. Chronic rapamycin restores brain vascular integrity and function through NO synthase activation and improves memory in symptomatic mice modeling Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ai-Ling; Zheng, Wei; Halloran, Jonathan J; Burbank, Raquel R; Hussong, Stacy A; Hart, Matthew J; Javors, Martin; Shih, Yen-Yu Ian; Muir, Eric; Solano Fonseca, Rene; Strong, Randy; Richardson, Arlan G; Lechleiter, James D; Fox, Peter T; Galvan, Veronica

    2013-01-01

    Vascular pathology is a major feature of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and other dementias. We recently showed that chronic administration of the target-of-rapamycin (TOR) inhibitor rapamycin, which extends lifespan and delays aging, halts the progression of AD-like disease in transgenic human (h)APP mice modeling AD when administered before disease onset. Here we demonstrate that chronic reduction of TOR activity by rapamycin treatment started after disease onset restored cerebral blood flow (CBF) and brain vascular density, reduced cerebral amyloid angiopathy and microhemorrhages, decreased amyloid burden, and improved cognitive function in symptomatic hAPP (AD) mice. Like acetylcholine (ACh), a potent vasodilator, acute rapamycin treatment induced the phosphorylation of endothelial nitric oxide (NO) synthase (eNOS) and NO release in brain endothelium. Administration of the NOS inhibitor L-NG-Nitroarginine methyl ester reversed vasodilation as well as the protective effects of rapamycin on CBF and vasculature integrity, indicating that rapamycin preserves vascular density and CBF in AD mouse brains through NOS activation. Taken together, our data suggest that chronic reduction of TOR activity by rapamycin blocked the progression of AD-like cognitive and histopathological deficits by preserving brain vascular integrity and function. Drugs that inhibit the TOR pathway may have promise as a therapy for AD and possibly for vascular dementias. PMID:23801246

  11. Low-dose rapamycin treatment increases the ability of human regulatory T cells to inhibit transplant arteriosclerosis in vivo.

    PubMed

    Hester, J; Schiopu, A; Nadig, S N; Wood, K J

    2012-08-01

    Regulatory T cells (T(reg)) are currently being tested in clinical trials as a potential therapy in cell and solid organ transplantation. The immunosuppressive drug rapamycin has been shown to preferentially promote T(reg) expansion. Here, we hypothesized that adjunctive rapamycin therapy might potentiate the ability of ex vivo expanded human T(reg) to inhibit vascular allograft rejection in a humanized mouse model of arterial transplantation. We studied the influence of combined treatment with low-dose rapamycin and subtherapeutic T(reg) numbers on the development of transplant arteriosclerosis (TA) in human arterial grafts transplanted into immunodeficient BALB/cRag2(-/-) Il2rg(-/-) mice reconstituted with allogeneic human peripheral blood mononuclear cell. In addition, we assessed the effects of the treatment on the proliferation and apoptosis of naïve/effector T cells. The combined therapy efficiently suppressed T-cell proliferation in vivo and in vitro. Neointima formation in the human arterial allografts was potently inhibited compared with each treatment alone. Interestingly, CD4(+) but not CD8(+) T lymphocytes were sensitive to T(reg) and rapamycin-induced apoptosis in vitro. Our data support the concept that rapamycin can be used as an adjunctive therapy to improve efficacy of T(reg)-based immunosuppressive protocols in clinical practice. By inhibiting TA, T(reg) and rapamycin may prevent chronic transplant dysfunction and improve long-term allograft survival.

  12. Inhibition of mTOR Pathway by Rapamycin Reduces Brain Damage in Rats Subjected to Transient Forebrain Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiao; Hei, Changhun; Liu, Ping; Song, Yaozu; Thomas, Taylor; Tshimanga, Sylvie; Wang, Feng; Niu, Jianguo; Sun, Tao; Li, P. Andy

    2015-01-01

    The aims of this study are to clarify the role of mTOR in mediating cerebral ischemic brain damage and the effects of rapamycin on ischemic outcomes. Ten minutes of forebrain ischemia was induced in rats, and their brains were sampled after 3 h, 16 h, and 7 days reperfusion for histology, immunohistochemistry and biochemical analysis. Our data demonstrated that cerebral ischemia resulted in both apoptotic and necrotic neuronal death; cerebral ischemia and reperfusion led to significant increases of mRNA and protein levels of p-mTOR and its downstream p-P70S6K and p-S6; elevation of LC3-II, and release of cytochrome c into the cytoplasm in both the cortex and hippocampus. Inhibition of mTOR by rapamycin markedly reduced ischemia-induced damage; suppressed p-Akt, p-mTOR, p-P70S6K and p-S6 protein levels; decreased LC3-II and Beclin-1; and prevented cytochrome c release in the two structures. All together, these data provide evidence that cerebral ischemia activates mTOR and autophagy pathways. Inhibition of mTOR deactivates the mTOR pathway, suppresses autophagy, prevents cytochrome c release and reduces ischemic brain damage. PMID:26681922

  13. Rapamycin-Resistant mTOR Activity Is Required for Sensory Axon Regeneration Induced by a Conditioning Lesion

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Na; Ding, Yue; Chan, Leung Ting; Wang, Xu; Gao, Xin; Jiang, Songshan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Neuronal mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) activity is a critical determinant of the intrinsic regenerative ability of mature neurons in the adult central nervous system (CNS). However, whether its action also applies to peripheral nervous system (PNS) neurons after injury remains elusive. To address this issue unambiguously, we used genetic approaches to determine the role of mTOR signaling in sensory axon regeneration in mice. We showed that deleting mTOR in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons suppressed the axon regeneration induced by conditioning lesions. To establish whether the impact of mTOR on axon regeneration results from functions of mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) or 2 (mTORC2), two distinct kinase complexes, we ablated either Raptor or Rictor in DRG neurons. We found that suppressing mTORC1 signaling dramatically decreased the conditioning lesion effect. In addition, an injury to the peripheral branch boosts mTOR activity in DRG neurons that cannot be completely inhibited by rapamycin, a widely used mTOR-specific inhibitor. Unexpectedly, examining several conditioning lesion–induced pro-regenerative pathways revealed that Raptor deletion but not rapamycin suppressed Stat3 activity in neurons. Therefore, our results demonstrate that crosstalk between mTOR and Stat3 signaling mediates the conditioning lesion effect and provide genetic evidence that rapamycin-resistant mTOR activity contributes to the intrinsic axon growth capacity in adult sensory neurons after injury. PMID:28101526

  14. Grape polyphenols inhibit Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin signaling and potentiate the effects of gefitinib in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Castillo-Pichardo, Linette; Dharmawardhane, Suranganie F

    2012-01-01

    We recently reported that a combination of dietary grape polyphenols resveratrol, quercetin, and catechin (RQC), at low concentrations, was effective at inhibiting metastatic cancer progression. Herein, we investigate the molecular mechanisms of RQC in breast cancer and explore the potential of RQC as a potentiation agent for the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) therapeutic gefitinib. Our in vitro experiments showed RQC induced apoptosis in gefitinib-resistant breast cancer cells via regulation of a myriad of proapoptotic proteins. Because the Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway is often elevated during development of anti-EGFR therapy resistance, the effect of RQC on the mTOR upstream effector Akt and the negative regulator AMP kinase (AMPK) was investigated. RQC was found to reduce Akt activity, induce the activation of AMPK, and inhibit mTOR signaling in breast cancer cells. Combined RQC and gefitinib decreased gefitinib resistant breast cancer cell viability to a greater extent than RQC or gefitinib alone. Moreover, RQC inhibited Akt and mTOR and activated AMPK even in the presence of gefitinib. Our in vivo experiments showed combined RQC and gefitinib was more effective than the individual treatments at inhibiting mammary tumor growth and metastasis in nude mice. Therefore, RQC treatment inhibits breast cancer progression and may potentiate anti-EGFR therapy by inhibition of Akt/mTOR signaling.

  15. Differential effects of rapamycin treatment on tonic and phasic GABAergic inhibition in dentate granule cells after focal brain injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Butler, Corwin R; Boychuk, Jeffery A; Smith, Bret N

    2016-06-01

    The cascade of events leading to post-traumatic epilepsy (PTE) after traumatic brain injury (TBI) remains unclear. Altered inhibition in the hippocampal formation and dentate gyrus is a hallmark of several neurological disorders, including TBI and PTE. Inhibitory synaptic signaling in the hippocampus is predominately driven by γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) neurotransmission, and is prominently mediated by postsynaptic type A GABA receptors (GABAAR's). Subsets of these receptors involved in tonic inhibition of neuronal membranes serve a fundamental role in maintenance of inhibitory state, and GABAAR-mediated tonic inhibition is altered functionally in animal models of both TBI and epilepsy. In this study, we assessed the effect of mTOR inhibition on hippocampal hilar inhibitory interneuron loss and synaptic and tonic GABAergic inhibition of dentate gyrus granule cells (DGCs) after controlled cortical impact (CCI) to determine if mTOR activation after TBI modulates GABAAR function. Hilar inhibitory interneuron density was significantly reduced 72h after CCI injury in the dorsal two-thirds of the hemisphere ipsilateral to injury compared with the contralateral hemisphere and sham controls. Rapamycin treatment did not alter this reduction in cell density. Synaptic and tonic current measurements made in DGCs at both 1-2 and 8-13weeks post-injury indicated reduced synaptic inhibition and THIP-induced tonic current density in DGCs ipsilateral to CCI injury at both time points post-injury, with no change in resting tonic GABAAR-mediated currents. Rapamycin treatment did not alter the reduced synaptic inhibition observed in ipsilateral DGCs 1-2weeks post-CCI injury, but further reduced synaptic inhibition of ipsilateral DGCs at 8-13weeks post-injury. The reduction in THIP-induced tonic current after injury, however, was prevented by rapamycin treatment at both time points. Rapamycin treatment thus differentially modifies CCI-induced changes in synaptic and tonic GABAAR

  16. The inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase-3 by insulin or insulin-like growth factor 1 in the rat skeletal muscle cell line L6 is blocked by wortmannin, but not by rapamycin: evidence that wortmannin blocks activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway in L6 cells between Ras and Raf.

    PubMed Central

    Cross, D A; Alessi, D R; Vandenheede, J R; McDowell, H E; Hundal, H S; Cohen, P

    1994-01-01

    Glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK3) is inactivated in vitro by p70 S6 kinase or MAP kinase-activated protein kinase-1 beta (MAPKAP kinase-1 beta; also known as Rsk-2). Here we show that GSK3 isoforms are inhibited by 40% within minutes after stimulation of the rat skeletal-muscle cell line L6 with insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) or insulin. GSK3 was similarly inhibited in rabbit skeletal muscle after an intravenous injection of insulin. Inhibition resulted from increased phosphorylation of GSK3, probably at a serine/threonine residue(s), because it was reversed by incubation with protein phosphatase-2A. Rapamycin blocked the activation of p70 S6 kinase by IGF-1 in L6 cells, but had no effect on the inhibition of GSK3 or the activation of MAPKAP kinase-1 beta. In contrast, wortmannin, a potent inhibitor of PtdIns 3-kinase, prevented the inactivation of GSK3 and the activation of MAPKAP kinase-1 beta and p70 S6 kinase by IGF-1 or insulin. Wortmannin also blocked the activation of p74raf-1. MAP kinase kinase and p42 MAP kinase, but not the formation of GTP-Ras by IGF-1. The results suggest that the stimulation of glycogen synthase by insulin/IGF-1 in skeletal muscle involves the MAP-KAP kinase-1-catalysed inhibition of GSK3, as well as the previously described activation of the glycogen-associated form of protein phosphatase-1. Images Figure 1 PMID:7945242

  17. Target of rapamycin activation predicts lifespan in fruit flies

    PubMed Central

    Scialò, Filippo; Sriram, Ashwin; Naudí, Alba; Ayala, Victoria; Jové, Mariona; Pamplona, Reinald; Sanz, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Aging and age-related diseases are one of the most important health issues that the world will confront during the 21st century. Only by understanding the proximal causes will we be able to find treatments to reduce or delay the onset of degenerative diseases associated with aging. Currently, the prevalent paradigm in the field is the accumulation of damage. However, a new theory that proposes an alternative explanation is gaining momentum. The hyperfunction theory proposes that aging is not a consequence of a wear and tear process, but a result of the continuation of developmental programs during adulthood. Here we use Drosophila melanogaster, where evidence supporting both paradigms has been reported, to identify which parameters that have been previously related with lifespan best predict the rate of aging in wild type flies cultured at different temperatures. We find that mitochondrial function and mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mtROS) generation correlates with metabolic rate, but not with the rate of aging. Importantly, we find that activation of nutrient sensing pathways (i.e. insulin-PI3K/Target of rapamycin (Tor) pathway) correlates with lifespan, but not with metabolic rate. Our results, dissociate metabolic rate and lifespan in wild type flies and instead link nutrient sensing signaling with longevity as predicted by the hyperfunction theory. PMID:26259964

  18. Ketamine Exhibits Different Neuroanatomical Profile After Mammalian Target of Rapamycin Inhibition in the Prefrontal Cortex: the Role of Inflammation and Oxidative Stress.

    PubMed

    Abelaira, Helena M; Réus, Gislaine Z; Ignácio, Zuleide M; Dos Santos, Maria Augusta B; de Moura, Airam B; Matos, Danyela; Demo, Júlia P; da Silva, Júlia B I; Danielski, Lucineia G; Petronilho, Fabricia; Carvalho, André F; Quevedo, João

    2016-09-02

    Studies indicated that mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), oxidative stress, and inflammation are involved in the pathophysiology of major depressive disorder (MDD). Ketamine, an N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist, has been identified as a novel MDD therapy; however, the antidepressant mechanism is not fully understood. In addition, the effects of ketamine after mTOR inhibition have not been fully investigated. In the present study, we examined the behavioral and biochemical effects of ketamine in the prefrontal cortex (PFC), hippocampus, amygdala, and nucleus accumbens after inhibition of mTOR signaling in the PFC. Male adult Wistar rats received pharmacological mTOR inhibitor, rapamycin (0.2 nmol) or vehicle into the PFC and then a single dose of ketamine (15 mg/kg, i.p.). Immobility was assessed in forced swimming tests, and then oxidative stress parameters and inflammatory markers were evaluated in the brain and periphery. mTOR activation in the PFC was essential to ketamine's antidepressant-like effects. Ketamine increased lipid damage in the PFC, hippocampus, and amygdala. Protein carbonyl was elevated in the PFC, amygdala, and NAc after ketamine administration. Ketamine also increased nitrite/nitrate in the PFC, hippocampus, amygdala, and NAc. Myeloperoxidase activity increased in the hippocampus and NAc after ketamine administration. The activities of superoxide dismutase and catalase were reduced after ketamine administration in all brain areas studied. Inhibition of mTOR signaling pathways by rapamycin in the PFC was required to protect against oxidative stress by reducing damage and increasing antioxidant enzymes. Finally, the TNF-α level was increased in serum by ketamine; however, the rapamycin plus treatment group was not able to block this increase. Activation of mTOR in the PFC is involved in the antidepressant-like effects of ketamine; however, the inhibition of this pathway was able to protect certain brain areas against

  19. Rapamycin inhibition of mTORC1 reverses lithium-induced proliferation of renal collecting duct cells.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yang; Romero-Aleshire, Melissa J; Cai, Qi; Price, Theodore J; Brooks, Heddwen L

    2013-10-15

    Nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI) is the most common renal side effect in patients undergoing lithium therapy for bipolar affective disorders. Approximately 2 million US patients take lithium of whom ∼50% will have altered renal function and develop NDI (2, 37). Lithium-induced NDI is a defect in the urinary concentrating mechanism. Lithium therapy also leads to proliferation and abundant renal cysts (microcysts), commonly in the collecting ducts of the cortico-medullary region. The mTOR pathway integrates nutrient and mitogen signals to control cell proliferation and cell growth (size) via the mTOR Complex 1 (mTORC1). To address our hypothesis that mTOR activation may be responsible for lithium-induced proliferation of collecting ducts, we fed mice lithium chronically and assessed mTORC1 signaling in the renal medulla. We demonstrate that mTOR signaling is activated in the renal collecting ducts of lithium-treated mice; lithium increased the phosphorylation of rS6 (Ser240/Ser244), p-TSC2 (Thr1462), and p-mTOR (Ser2448). Consistent with our hypothesis, treatment with rapamycin, an allosteric inhibitor of mTOR, reversed lithium-induced proliferation of medullary collecting duct cells and reduced levels of p-rS6 and p-mTOR. Medullary levels of p-GSK3β were increased in the renal medullas of lithium-treated mice and remained elevated following rapamycin treatment. However, mTOR inhibition did not improve lithium-induced NDI and did not restore the expression of collecting duct proteins aquaporin-2 or UT-A1.

  20. The Akt/mTOR/p70S6K pathway is activated in IgA nephropathy and rapamycin may represent a viable treatment option.

    PubMed

    Tian, Jihua; Wang, Yanhong; Guo, Haixiu; Li, Rongshan

    2015-12-01

    IgA nephropathy (IgAN) is one of the most frequent forms of glomerulonephritis, and 20 to 40% of patients progress to end-stage renal disease (ESRD) within 20 years of disease onset. However, little is known about the molecular pathways involved in the altered physiology of mesangial cells during IgAN progression. This study was designed to explore the role of mTOR signaling and the potential of targeted rapamycin therapy in a rat model of IgAN. After establishing an IgA nephropathy model, the rats were randomly divided into four groups: control, control+rapamycin, IgAN and IgA+rapamycin. Western blotting and immunohistochemistry were performed to determine phospho-Akt, p70S6K and S6 protein levels. Coomassie Brilliant Blue was utilized to measure 24-h urinary protein levels. The biochemical parameters of the rats were analyzed with an autoanalyzer. To evaluate IgA deposition in the glomeruli, FITC-conjugated goat anti-rat IgA antibody was used for direct immunofluorescence. Cellular proliferation and the mesangial matrix in glomeruli were assayed via histological and morphometric procedures. Our results showed that p70S6K, S6 and Akt phosphorylation were significantly upregulated in IgAN rats, and rapamycin effectively inhibited p70S6K and S6 phosphorylation. A low dose of the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin reduced proteinuria, inhibited IgA deposition, and protected kidney function in an IgAN rat model. Low-dose rapamycin treatment corresponded to significantly lower cellular proliferation rates and a decreased mesangial matrix in the glomeruli. In conclusion, the Akt/mTOR/p70S6K pathway was activated in IgAN, and our findings suggested that rapamycin may represent a viable option for the treatment of IgAN.

  1. Rapamycin Protects from Type-I Peritoneal Membrane Failure Inhibiting the Angiogenesis, Lymphangiogenesis, and Endo-MT

    PubMed Central

    Aguirre, Anna Rita; Loureiro, Jesús; Abensur, Hugo; Sandoval, Pilar; Sánchez-Tomero, José Antonio; del Peso, Gloria; Jiménez-Heffernan, José Antonio; Ruiz-Carpio, Vicente; Selgas, Rafael; López-Cabrera, Manuel; Aguilera, Abelardo; Liappas, Georgios

    2015-01-01

    Preservation of peritoneal membrane (PM) is essential for long-term survival in peritoneal dialysis (PD). Continuous presence of PD fluids (PDF) in the peritoneal cavity generates chronic inflammation and promotes changes of the PM, such as fibrosis, angiogenesis, and lymphangiogenesis. Mesothelial-to-mesenchymal transition (MMT) and endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition (Endo-MT) seem to play a central role in this pathogenesis. We speculated that Rapamycin, a potent immunosuppressor, could be beneficial by regulating blood and lymphatic vessels proliferation. We demonstrate that mice undergoing a combined PD and Rapamycin treatment (PDF + Rapa group) presented a reduced PM thickness and lower number of submesothelial blood and lymphatic vessels, as well as decreased MMT and Endo-MT, comparing with their counterparts exposed to PD alone (PDF group). Peritoneal water transport in the PDF + Rapa group remained at control level, whereas PD effluent levels of VEGF, TGF-β, and TNF-α were lower than in the PDF group. Moreover, the treatment of mesothelial cells with Rapamycin in vitro significantly decreased VEGF synthesis and selectively inhibited the VEGF-C and VEGF-D release when compared with control cells. Thus, Rapamycin has a protective effect on PM in PD through an antifibrotic and antiproliferative effect on blood and lymphatic vessels. Moreover, it inhibits Endo-MT and, at least partially, MMT. PMID:26688823

  2. Rapamycin Protects from Type-I Peritoneal Membrane Failure Inhibiting the Angiogenesis, Lymphangiogenesis, and Endo-MT.

    PubMed

    González-Mateo, Guadalupe Tirma; Aguirre, Anna Rita; Loureiro, Jesús; Abensur, Hugo; Sandoval, Pilar; Sánchez-Tomero, José Antonio; del Peso, Gloria; Jiménez-Heffernan, José Antonio; Ruiz-Carpio, Vicente; Selgas, Rafael; López-Cabrera, Manuel; Aguilera, Abelardo; Liappas, Georgios

    2015-01-01

    Preservation of peritoneal membrane (PM) is essential for long-term survival in peritoneal dialysis (PD). Continuous presence of PD fluids (PDF) in the peritoneal cavity generates chronic inflammation and promotes changes of the PM, such as fibrosis, angiogenesis, and lymphangiogenesis. Mesothelial-to-mesenchymal transition (MMT) and endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition (Endo-MT) seem to play a central role in this pathogenesis. We speculated that Rapamycin, a potent immunosuppressor, could be beneficial by regulating blood and lymphatic vessels proliferation. We demonstrate that mice undergoing a combined PD and Rapamycin treatment (PDF + Rapa group) presented a reduced PM thickness and lower number of submesothelial blood and lymphatic vessels, as well as decreased MMT and Endo-MT, comparing with their counterparts exposed to PD alone (PDF group). Peritoneal water transport in the PDF + Rapa group remained at control level, whereas PD effluent levels of VEGF, TGF-β, and TNF-α were lower than in the PDF group. Moreover, the treatment of mesothelial cells with Rapamycin in vitro significantly decreased VEGF synthesis and selectively inhibited the VEGF-C and VEGF-D release when compared with control cells. Thus, Rapamycin has a protective effect on PM in PD through an antifibrotic and antiproliferative effect on blood and lymphatic vessels. Moreover, it inhibits Endo-MT and, at least partially, MMT.

  3. Rapamycin inhibits prostate cancer cell growth through cyclin D1 and enhances the cytotoxic efficacy of cisplatin

    PubMed Central

    Imrali, Ahmet; Mao, Xueying; Yeste-Velasco, Marc; Shamash, Jonathan; Lu, Yongjie

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common malignancy in Western men and hormone refractory cancer (HRPC) kills most of the patients. Chemo-resistance is a major obstacle for the treatment of prostate cancer. Platinum-complexes have been used to treat a number of malignancies including prostate cancer. However, it has limited effect to prostate cancer and with significant toxicity at higher doses. In recent years, increasing numbers of new agents targeting cancer specific pathways have become available and with low toxic side-effects. Rapamycin (Sirolimus) is an mTORC1 inhibitor, which inhibits the PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling pathway, which is commonly altered in prostate cancer. We determined the expression of cyclin D1 and phosphorylated-mTOR proteins in association with the response to rapamycin in two androgen sensitive (22RV1 and LNCaP) and two androgen independent (DU145 and PC3) prostate cancer cell lines and found that the base-line and changes of cyclin D1 level, but not the expression level of p-mTOR, correlated with rapamycin sensitivity. We evaluated the cell killing effect of combined rapamycin and cisplatin treatment and showed that the combination had a more than additive effect in both androgen dependent and independent prostate cancer cells, which may be partially explained by the reduction of cyclin D1 expression by rapamycin. We also evaluated a range of combined treatment schedules, simultaneously or sequentially and found that continuous rapamycin treatment after a short cisplatin exposure was effective. The clinical application of these findings for prostate cancer treatment should be further investigated. PMID:27648364

  4. Loss of long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase isoform 1 impairs cardiac autophagy and mitochondrial structure through mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 activation

    PubMed Central

    Grevengoed, Trisha J.; Cooper, Daniel E.; Young, Pamela A.; Ellis, Jessica M.; Coleman, Rosalind A.

    2015-01-01

    Because hearts with a temporally induced knockout of acyl-CoA synthetase 1 (Acsl1T−/−) are virtually unable to oxidize fatty acids, glucose use increases 8-fold to compensate. This metabolic switch activates mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1), which initiates growth by increasing protein and RNA synthesis and fatty acid metabolism, while decreasing autophagy. Compared with controls, Acsl1T−/− hearts contained 3 times more mitochondria with abnormal structure and displayed a 35–43% lower respiratory function. To study the effects of mTORC1 activation on mitochondrial structure and function, mTORC1 was inhibited by treating Acsl1T−/− and littermate control mice with rapamycin or vehicle alone for 2 wk. Rapamycin treatment normalized mitochondrial structure, number, and the maximal respiration rate in Acsl1T−/− hearts, but did not improve ADP-stimulated oxygen consumption, which was likely caused by the 33–51% lower ATP synthase activity present in both vehicle- and rapamycin-treated Acsl1T−/− hearts. The turnover of microtubule associated protein light chain 3b in Acsl1T−/− hearts was 88% lower than controls, indicating a diminished rate of autophagy. Rapamycin treatment increased autophagy to a rate that was 3.1-fold higher than in controls, allowing the formation of autophagolysosomes and the clearance of damaged mitochondria. Thus, long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase isoform 1 (ACSL1) deficiency in the heart activated mTORC1, thereby inhibiting autophagy and increasing the number of damaged mitochondria.—Grevengoed, T. J., Cooper, D. E., Young, P. A., Ellis, J. M., Coleman, R. A. Loss of long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase isoform 1 impairs cardiac autophagy and mitochondrial structure through mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 activation. PMID:26220174

  5. Novel withanolides target medullary thyroid cancer through inhibition of both RET phosphorylation and the mammalian target of rapamycin pathway

    PubMed Central

    Samadi, Abbas K.; Bazzill, Joseph; Zhang, Xuan; Gallagher, Rob; Zhang, Hauping; Gollapudi, Rao; Kindscher, Kelly; Timmermann, Barbara; Cohen, Mark S.

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite development of current targeted therapies for medullary thyroid cancer (MTC), long-term survival remains unchanged. Recently isolated novel withanolide compounds from Solanaceae physalis are highly potent against MTCs. We hypothesize that these withanolides uniquely inhibit RET phosphorylation and the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway in MTC cells as a mechanism of antiproliferation and apoptosis. Methods MTC cells were treated with novel withanolides and MTC-targeted drugs. In vitro studies assessed cell viability and proliferation (MTS; trypan blue assays), apoptosis (flow cytometry with Annexin V/PI staining; confirmed by Western blot analysis), long-term cytotoxic effects (clonogenic assay), and suppression of key regulatory proteins such as RET, Akt, and mTOR (by Western blot analysis). Results The novel withanolides potently reduced MTC cell viability (half maximal inhibitory concentration [IC50], 270–2,850 nmol/L; 250–1,380 nmol/L for vandetanib; 360–1,640 nmol/L for cabozantinib) with induction of apoptosis at <1,000 nmol/L of drug. Unique from other targeted therapies, withanolides suppressed RET and Akt phosphorylation and protein expression (in a concentration- and time-dependent manner) as well as mTOR activity and translational activity of 4E-BP1 and protein synthesis mediated by p70S6kinase activation at IC50 concentrations. Conclusion Novel withanolides from Physalis selectively and potently inhibit MTC cells in vitro. Unlike other MTC-targeted therapies, these compounds uniquely inhibit both RET kinase activity and the Akt/mTOR prosurvival pathway. Further translational studies are warranted to evaluate their clinical potential. PMID:23158190

  6. Systemic inhibition of mTOR kinase via rapamycin disrupts consolidation and reconsolidation of auditory fear memory.

    PubMed

    Mac Callum, Phillip E; Hebert, Mark; Adamec, Robert E; Blundell, Jacqueline

    2014-07-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) kinase is a critical regulator of mRNA translation and is known to be involved in various long lasting forms of synaptic and behavioural plasticity. However, information concerning the temporal pattern of mTOR activation and susceptibility to pharmacological intervention during both consolidation and reconsolidation of long-term memory (LTM) remains scant. Male C57BL/6 mice were injected systemically with rapamycin at various time points following conditioning or retrieval in an auditory fear conditioning paradigm, and compared to vehicle (and/or anisomycin) controls for subsequent memory recall. Systemic blockade of mTOR with rapamycin immediately or 12h after training or reactivation impairs both consolidation and reconsolidation of an auditory fear memory. Further behavioural analysis revealed that the enduring effects of rapamycin on reconsolidation are dependent upon reactivation of the memory trace. Rapamycin, however, has no effect on short-term memory or the ability to retrieve an established fear memory. Collectively, our data suggest that biphasic mTOR signalling is essential for both consolidation and reconsolidation-like activities that contribute to the formation, re-stabilization, and persistence of long term auditory-fear memories, while not influencing other aspects of the memory trace. These findings also provide evidence for a cogent treatment model for reducing the emotional strength of established, traumatic memories analogous to those observed in acquired anxiety disorders such as posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and specific phobias, through pharmacologic blockade of mTOR using systemic rapamycin following reactivation.

  7. Overexpression of TOR (target of rapamycin) inhibits cell proliferation in Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Swer, Pynskhem Bok; Mishra, Himanshu; Lohia, Rakhee; Saran, Shweta

    2016-05-01

    TOR (target of rapamycin) protein kinase acts as a central controller of cell growth and development of an organism. Present study was undertaken to find the expression pattern and role of TOR during growth and development of Dictyostelium discoideum. Failures to generate either knockout and/or knockdown mutants indicate that interference with its levels led to cellular defects. Thus, the effects of TOR (DDB_G0281569) overexpression specifically, cells expressing Dd(Δ211-TOR)-Eyfp mutant was analyzed. Elevated expression of (Δ211-TOR)-Eyfp reduced both cell size and cell proliferation. DdTOR was found to be closer to fungus. mRNA level of TOR was found maximally in the freshly starved/aggregate cells that gradually declined. This was also strengthened by the expression patterns observed by in situ and the analysis of β-galactosidase reporter driven by the putative TOR promoter. The TOR protein was found to be highest at the aggregate stage. The fusion protein, (Δ211-TOR)-Eyfp was localized to the cell membrane, cytosol, and the nucleus. We suggest, DdTOR to be an essential protein and high TOR expression inhibits cell proliferation.

  8. Hepatitis C virus inhibits AKT-tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC), the mechanistic target of rapamycin (MTOR) pathway, through endoplasmic reticulum stress to induce autophagy.

    PubMed

    Huang, He; Kang, Rongyan; Wang, Ji; Luo, Guangxiang; Yang, Wei; Zhao, Zhendong

    2013-02-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is able to induce autophagy via endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, but the exact molecular signaling pathway is not well understood. We found that the activity of the mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (MTORC1) was inhibited in Huh7 cells either harboring HCV-N (genotype 1b) full-genomic replicon or infected with JFH1 (genotype 2a) virus, which led to the activation of UNC-51-like kinase 1 (ULK1) and thus to autophagy. We then analyzed activity upstream of MTORC1, and found that both protein kinase, AMP-activated, α (PRKAA, including PRKAA1 and PRKAA2, also known as AMP-activated protein kinase, AMPKα) and AKT (refers to pan AKT, including three isoforms of AKT1-3, also known as protein kinase B, PKB) were inhibited by HCV infection. The inhibition of the AKT-TSC-MTORC1 pathway contributed to upregulating autophagy, but inhibition of PRKAA downregulated autophagy. The net effect on autophagy was from AKT, which overrode the inhibition effect from PRKAA. It was further found that HCV-induced ER stress was responsible for the inhibition of the AKT pathway. Metformin, a PRKAA agonist, inhibited HCV replication not only by activating PRKAA as previously reported, but also by activating AKT independently of the autophagy pathway. Taken together, our data suggested HCV inhibited the AKT-TSC-MTORC1 pathway via ER stress, resulting in autophagy, which may contribute to the establishment of the HCV-induced autophagy.

  9. Inhibiting PLK1 induces autophagy of acute myeloid leukemia cells via mammalian target of rapamycin pathway dephosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Tao, Yan-Fang; Li, Zhi-Heng; Du, Wei-Wei; Xu, Li-Xiao; Ren, Jun-Li; Li, Xiao-Lu; Fang, Fang; Xie, Yi; Li, Mei; Qian, Guang-Hui; Li, Yan-Hong; Li, Yi-Ping; Li, Gang; Wu, Yi; Feng, Xing; Wang, Jian; He, Wei-Qi; Hu, Shao-Yan; Lu, Jun; Pan, Jian

    2017-03-01

    Decreased autophagy is accompanied by the development of a myeloproliferative state or acute myeloid leukemia (AML). AML cells are often sensitive to autophagy‑inducing stimuli, prompting the idea that targeting autophagy can be useful in AML cytotoxic therapy. AML NB4 cells overexpressing microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3-green fluorescent protein were screened with 69 inhibitors to analyze autophagy activity. AML cells were treated with the polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1) inhibitors RO3280 and BI2536 before autophagy analysis. Cleaved LC3 (LC3-II) and the phosphorylation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase, and Unc-51-like kinase 1 during autophagy was detected with western blotting. Autophagosomes were detected using transmission electron microscopy. Several inhibitors had promising autophagy inducer effects: BI2536, MLN0905, SK1-I, SBE13 HCL and RO3280. Moreover, these inhibitors all targeted PLK1. Autophagy activity was increased in the NB4 cells treated with RO3280 and BI2536. Inhibition of PLK1 expression in NB4, K562 and HL-60 leukemia cells with RNA interference increased LC3-II and autophagy activity. The phosphorylation of mTOR was reduced significantly in NB4 cells treated with RO3280 and BI2536, and was also reduced significantly when PLK1 expression was downregulated in the NB4, K562 and HL-60 cells. We demonstrate that PLK1 inhibition induces AML cell autophagy and that it results in mTOR dephosphorylation. These results may provide new insights into the molecular mechanism of PLK1 in regulating autophagy.

  10. Inhibiting PLK1 induces autophagy of acute myeloid leukemia cells via mammalian target of rapamycin pathway dephosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Yan-Fang; Li, Zhi-Heng; Du, Wei-Wei; Xu, Li-Xiao; Ren, Jun-Li; Li, Xiao-Lu; Fang, Fang; Xie, Yi; Li, Mei; Qian, Guang-Hui; Li, Yan-Hong; Li, Yi-Ping; Li, Gang; Wu, Yi; Feng, Xing; Wang, Jian; He, Wei-Qi; Hu, Shao-Yan; Lu, Jun; Pan, Jian

    2017-01-01

    Decreased autophagy is accompanied by the development of a myeloproliferative state or acute myeloid leukemia (AML). AML cells are often sensitive to autophagy-inducing stimuli, prompting the idea that targeting autophagy can be useful in AML cytotoxic therapy. AML NB4 cells overexpressing microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3-green fluorescent protein were screened with 69 inhibitors to analyze autophagy activity. AML cells were treated with the polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1) inhibitors RO3280 and BI2536 before autophagy analysis. Cleaved LC3 (LC3-II) and the phosphorylation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase, and Unc-51-like kinase 1 during autophagy was detected with western blotting. Autophagosomes were detected using transmission electron microscopy. Several inhibitors had promising autophagy inducer effects: BI2536, MLN0905, SK1-I, SBE13 HCL and RO3280. Moreover, these inhibitors all targeted PLK1. Autophagy activity was increased in the NB4 cells treated with RO3280 and BI2536. Inhibition of PLK1 expression in NB4, K562 and HL-60 leukemia cells with RNA interference increased LC3-II and autophagy activity. The phosphorylation of mTOR was reduced significantly in NB4 cells treated with RO3280 and BI2536, and was also reduced significantly when PLK1 expression was downregulated in the NB4, K562 and HL-60 cells. We demonstrate that PLK1 inhibition induces AML cell autophagy and that it results in mTOR dephosphorylation. These results may provide new insights into the molecular mechanism of PLK1 in regulating autophagy. PMID:28184925

  11. Mechanistically distinct cancer-associated mTOR activation clusters predict sensitivity to rapamycin

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jianing; Pham, Can G.; Albanese, Steven K.; Dong, Yiyu; Lee, Chung-Han; Yao, Zhan; Han, Song; Chen, David; Parton, Daniel L.; Chodera, John D.; Rosen, Neal; Cheng, Emily H.; Hsieh, James J.

    2016-01-01

    Genomic studies have linked mTORC1 pathway–activating mutations with exceptional response to treatment with allosteric inhibitors of mTORC1 called rapalogs. Rapalogs are approved for selected cancer types, including kidney and breast cancers. Here, we used sequencing data from 22 human kidney cancer cases to identify the activating mechanisms conferred by mTOR mutations observed in human cancers and advance precision therapeutics. mTOR mutations that clustered in focal adhesion kinase targeting domain (FAT) and kinase domains enhanced mTORC1 kinase activity, decreased nutrient reliance, and increased cell size. We identified 3 distinct mechanisms of hyperactivation, including reduced binding to DEP domain–containing MTOR-interacting protein (DEPTOR), resistance to regulatory associated protein of mTOR–mediated (RAPTOR-mediated) suppression, and altered kinase kinetics. Of the 28 mTOR double mutants, activating mutations could be divided into 6 complementation groups, resulting in synergistic Rag- and Ras homolog enriched in brain–independent (RHEB-independent) mTORC1 activation. mTOR mutants were resistant to DNA damage–inducible transcript 1–mediated (REDD1-mediated) inhibition, confirming that activating mutations can bypass the negative feedback pathway formed between HIF1 and mTORC1 in the absence of von Hippel–Lindau (VHL) tumor suppressor expression. Moreover, VHL-deficient cells that expressed activating mTOR mutants grew tumors that were sensitive to rapamycin treatment. These data may explain the high incidence of mTOR mutations observed in clear cell kidney cancer, where VHL loss and HIF activation is pathognomonic. Our study provides mechanistic and therapeutic insights concerning mTOR mutations in human diseases. PMID:27482884

  12. Rapamycin and glucose-target of rapamycin (TOR) protein signaling in plants.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Yan; Sheen, Jen

    2012-01-20

    Target of rapamycin (TOR) kinase is an evolutionarily conserved master regulator that integrates energy, nutrients, growth factors, and stress signals to promote survival and growth in all eukaryotes. The reported land plant resistance to rapamycin and the embryo lethality of the Arabidopsis tor mutants have hindered functional dissection of TOR signaling in plants. We developed sensitive cellular and seedling assays to monitor endogenous Arabidopsis TOR activity based on its conserved S6 kinase (S6K) phosphorylation. Surprisingly, rapamycin effectively inhibits Arabidopsis TOR-S6K1 signaling and retards glucose-mediated root and leaf growth, mimicking estradiol-inducible tor mutants. Rapamycin inhibition is relieved in transgenic plants deficient in Arabidopsis FK506-binding protein 12 (FKP12), whereas FKP12 overexpression dramatically enhances rapamycin sensitivity. The role of Arabidopsis FKP12 is highly specific as overexpression of seven closely related FKP proteins fails to increase rapamycin sensitivity. Rapamycin exerts TOR inhibition by inducing direct interaction between the TOR-FRB (FKP-rapamycin binding) domain and FKP12 in plant cells. We suggest that variable endogenous FKP12 protein levels may underlie the molecular explanation for longstanding enigmatic observations on inconsistent rapamycin resistance in plants and in various mammalian cell lines or diverse animal cell types. Integrative analyses with rapamycin and conditional tor and fkp12 mutants also reveal a central role of glucose-TOR signaling in root hair formation. Our studies demonstrate the power of chemical genetic approaches in the discovery of previously unknown and pivotal functions of glucose-TOR signaling in governing the growth of cotyledons, true leaves, petioles, and primary and secondary roots and root hairs.

  13. Rapamycin induces Bad phosphorylation in association with its resistance to human lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan; Sun, Shi-Yong; Owonikoko, Taofeek K; Sica, Gabriel L; Curran, Walter J; Khuri, Fadlo R; Deng, Xingming

    2012-01-01

    Inhibition of mTOR signaling by rapamycin has been shown to activate extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 or 2 (ERK1/2) and Akt in various types of cancer cells, which contributes to rapamycin resistance. However, the downstream effect of rapamycin-activated ERKs and Akt on survival or death substrate(s) remains unclear. We discovered that treatment of human lung cancer cells with rapamycin results in enhanced phosphorylation of Bad at serine (S) 112 and S136 but not S155 in association with activation of ERK1/2 and Akt. A higher level of Bad phosphorylation was observed in rapamycin-resistant cells compared with parental rapamycin-sensitive cells. Thus, Bad phosphorylation may contribute to rapamycin resistance. Mechanistically, rapamycin promotes Bad accumulation in the cytosol, enhances Bad/14-3-3 interaction, and reduces Bad/Bcl-XL binding. Rapamycin-induced Bad phosphorylation promotes its ubiquitination and degradation, with a significant reduction of its half-life (i.e., from 53.3-37.5 hours). Inhibition of MEK/ERK by PD98059 or depletion of Akt by RNA interference blocks rapamycin-induced Bad phosphorylation at S112 or S136, respectively. Simultaneous blockage of S112 and S136 phosphorylation of Bad by PD98059 and silencing of Akt significantly enhances rapamycin-induced growth inhibition in vitro and synergistically increases the antitumor efficacy of rapamycin in lung cancer xenografts. Intriguingly, either suppression of Bad phosphorylation at S112 and S136 sites or expression of the nonphosphorylatable Bad mutant (S112A/S136A) can reverse rapamycin resistance. These findings uncover a novel mechanism of rapamycin resistance, which may promote the development of new strategies for overcoming rapamycin resistance by manipulating Bad phosphorylation at S112 and S136 in human lung cancer.

  14. Inhibition of mTOR Pathway by Rapamycin Decreases P-glycoprotein Expression and Spontaneous Seizures in Pharmacoresistant Epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Chi, Xiaosa; Huang, Cheng; Li, Rui; Wang, Wei; Wu, Mengqian; Li, Jinmei; Zhou, Dong

    2017-04-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) has been demonstrated to mediate multidrug resistance in various tumors by inducing P-glycoprotein (P-gp) overexpression. Here, we investigated the correlation between the mTOR pathway and P-gp expression in pharmacoresistant epilepsy. Temporal cortex specimens were obtained from patients with refractory mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (mTLE) and age-matched controls who underwent surgeries at West China Hospital of Sichuan University between June 2014 and May 2015. We established a rat model of epilepsy kindled by coriaria lactone (CL) and screened pharmacoresistant rats (non-responders) using phenytoin. Non-responders were treated for 4 weeks with vehicle only or with the mTOR pathway inhibitor rapamycin at doses of 1, 3, and 6 mg/kg. Western blotting and immunohistochemistry were used to detect the expression of phospho-S6 (P-S6) and P-gp at different time points (1 h, 8 h, 1 day, 3 days, 1 weeks, 2 weeks, and 4 weeks) after the onset of treatment. Overexpression of P-S6 and P-gp was detected in both refractory mTLE patients and non-responder rats. Rapamycin showed an inhibitory effect on P-S6 and P-gp expression 1 week after treatment in rats. In addition, the expression levels of P-S6 and P-gp in the 6 mg/kg group were significantly lower than those in the 1 mg/kg or the 3 mg/kg group at the same time points (all P < 0.05). Moreover, rapamycin decreased the duration and number of CL-induced seizures, as well as the stage of non-responders (all P < 0.05). The current study indicates that the mTOR signaling pathway plays a critical role in P-gp expression in drug-resistant epilepsy. Inhibition of the mTOR pathway by rapamycin may be a potential therapeutic approach for pharmacoresistant epilepsy.

  15. The Prolyl Peptidases PRCP/PREP Regulate IRS-1 Stability Critical for Rapamycin-induced Feedback Activation of PI3K and AKT*

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Lei; Ying, Guoguang; Danzer, Brian; Perez, Ricardo E.; Shariat-Madar, Zia; Levenson, Victor V.; Maki, Carl G.

    2014-01-01

    The phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/protein kinase B (PKB/AKT)/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway conveys signals from receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) to regulate cell metabolism, proliferation, survival, and motility. Previously we found that prolylcarboxypeptidase (PRCP) regulate proliferation and survival in breast cancer cells. In this study, we found that PRCP and the related family member prolylendopeptidase (PREP) are essential for proliferation and survival of pancreatic cancer cells. Depletion/inhibition of PRCP and PREP-induced serine phosphorylation and degradation of IRS-1, leading to inactivation of the cellular PI3K and AKT. Notably, depletion/inhibition of PRCP/PREP destabilized IRS-1 in the cells treated with rapamycin, blocking the feedback activation PI3K/AKT. Consequently, inhibition of PRCP/PREP enhanced rapamycin-induced cytotoxicity. Thus, we have identified PRCP and PREP as a stabilizer of IRS-1 which is critical for PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling in pancreatic cancer cells. PMID:24936056

  16. Inhibition of 4EBP phosphorylation mediates the cytotoxic effect of mechanistic target of rapamycin kinase inhibitors in aggressive B-cell lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Bi, Chengfeng; Zhang, Xuan; Lu, Ting; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Wang, Xianhuo; Meng, Bin; Zhang, Huilai; Wang, Ping; Vose, Julie M; Chan, Wing C; McKeithan, Timothy W; Fu, Kai

    2017-04-01

    Mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) complex 1 is a central integrator of nutrient and growth factor inputs that controls cell growth in eukaryotes. The second generation of mTOR kinase inhibitors (TORKi), directly targeting the mTOR catalytic site, are more effective than rapamycin and its analogs in cancer treatment, particularly in inducing apoptosis. However, the mechanism underlying the cytotoxic effect of TORKi remains elusive. Herein, we demonstrate that TORKi-induced apoptosis is predominantly dependent on the loss of mTOR complex 1-mediated 4EBP activation. Knocking out RICTOR, a key component of mTOR complex 2, or inhibiting p70S6K has little effect on TORKi-induced apoptosis. Conversely, increasing the eIF4E:4EBP ratio by either overexpressing eIF4E or knocking out 4EBP1/2 protects lymphoma cells from TORKi-induced cytotoxicity. Furthermore, downregulation of MCL1 expression plays an important role in TORKi-induced apoptosis, whereas BCL-2 overexpression confers resistance to TORKi treatment. We further show that the therapeutic effect of TORKi in aggressive B-cell lymphomas can be predicted by BH3 profiling, and improved by combining it with pro-apoptotic drugs, especially BCL-2 inhibitors, both in vitro and in vivo Taken together, the study herein provides mechanistic insight into TORKi cytotoxicity and identified a potential way to optimize its efficacy in the clinical treatment of aggressive B-cell lymphoma.

  17. Effects of chronic Akt/mTOR inhibition by rapamycin on mechanical overload-induced hypertrophy and myosin heavy chain transition in masseter muscle.

    PubMed

    Umeki, Daisuke; Ohnuki, Yoshiki; Mototani, Yasumasa; Shiozawa, Kouichi; Fujita, Takayuki; Nakamura, Yoshiki; Saeki, Yasutake; Okumura, Satoshi

    2013-01-01

    To examine the effects of the Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway on masseter muscle hypertrophy and myosin heavy chain (MHC) transition in response to mechanical overload, we analyzed the effects of bite-opening (BO) on the hypertrophy and MHC composition of masseter muscle of BO-rats treated or not treated with rapamycin (RAPA), a selective mTOR inhibitor. The masseter muscle weight in BO-rats was significantly greater than that in controls, and this increase was attenuated by RAPA treatment. Expression of slow-twitch MHC isoforms was significantly increased in BO-rats with/without RAPA treatment, compared with controls, but the magnitude of the increase was much smaller in RAPA-treated BO-rats. Phosphorylation of p44/42 MAPK (ERK1/2), which preserves fast-twitch MHC isoforms in skeletal muscle, was significantly decreased in BO-rats, but the decrease was abrogated by RAPA treatment. Calcineurin signaling is known to be important for masseter muscle hypertrophy and fast-to-slow MHC isoform transition, but expression of known calcineurin activity modulators was unaffected by RAPA treatment. Taken together, these results indicate that the Akt/mTOR pathway is involved in both development of masseter muscle hypertrophy and fast-to-slow MHC isoform transition in response to mechanical overload with inhibition of the ERK1/2 pathway and operates independently of the calcineurin pathway.

  18. Loss of ypk1 function causes rapamycin sensitivity, inhibition of translation initiation and synthetic lethality in 14-3-3-deficient yeast.

    PubMed Central

    Gelperin, Daniel; Horton, Lynn; DeChant, Anne; Hensold, Jack; Lemmon, Sandra K

    2002-01-01

    14-3-3 proteins bind to phosphorylated proteins and regulate a variety of cellular activities as effectors of serine/threonine phosphorylation. To define processes requiring 14-3-3 function in yeast, mutants with increased sensitivity to reduced 14-3-3 protein levels were identified by synthetic lethal screening. One mutation was found to be allelic to YPK1, which encodes a Ser/Thr protein kinase. Loss of Ypk function causes hypersensitivity to rapamycin, similar to 14-3-3 mutations and other mutations affecting the TOR signaling pathway in yeast. Similar to treatment with rapamycin, loss of Ypk function disrupted translation, at least in part by causing depletion of eIF4G, a central adaptor protein required for cap-dependent mRNA translation initiation. In addition, Ypk1 as well as eIF4G protein levels were rapidly depleted upon nitrogen starvation, but not during glucose starvation, even though both conditions inhibit translation initiation. These results suggest that Ypk regulates translation initiation in response to nutrient signals, either through the TOR pathway or in a functionally related pathway parallel to TOR. PMID:12196392

  19. Rapamycin extends life span of Rb1+/− mice by inhibiting neuroendocrine tumors

    PubMed Central

    Livi, Carolina B.; Hardman, Rulon L.; Christy, Barbara A.; Dodds, Sherry G.; Jones, Diane; Williams, Charnae; Strong, Randy; Bokov, Alex; Javors, Martin A.; Ikeno, Yuji; Hubbard, Gene; Hasty, Paul; Sharp, Zelton Dave

    2013-01-01

    Chronic treatment of mice with an enterically released formulation of rapamycin (eRapa) extends median and maximum life span, partly by attenuating cancer. The mechanistic basis of this response is not known. To gain a better understanding of these in vivo effects, we used a defined preclinical model of neuroendocrine cancer, Rb1+/− mice. Previous results showed that diet restriction (DR) had minimal or no effect on the lifespan of Rb1+/− mice, suggesting that the beneficial response to DR is dependent on pRb1. Since long-term eRapa treatment may at least partially mimic chronic DR in lifespan extension, we predicted that it would have a minimal effect in Rb1+/− mice. Beginning at 9 weeks of age until death, we fed Rb1+/− mice a diet without or with eRapa at 14 mg/kg food, which results in an approximate dose of 2.24 mg/kg body weight per day, and yielded rapamycin blood levels of about 4 ng/ml. Surprisingly, we found that eRapa dramatically extended life span of both female and male Rb1+/− mice, and slowed the appearance and growth of pituitary and decreased the incidence of thyroid tumors commonly observed in these mice. In this model, eRapa appears to act differently than DR, suggesting diverse mechanisms of action on survival and anti-tumor effects. In particular the beneficial effects of rapamycin did not depend on the dose of Rb1. PMID:23454836

  20. Functionally conserved effects of rapamycin exposure on zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Sucularli, Ceren; Shehwana, Huma; Kuscu, Cem; Dungul, Dilay Ciglidag; Ozdag, Hilal; Konu, Ozlen

    2016-05-01

    Mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a conserved serine/threonine kinase important in cell proliferation, growth and protein translation. Rapamycin, a well‑known anti‑cancer agent and immunosuppressant drug, inhibits mTOR activity in different taxa including zebrafish. In the present study, the effect of rapamycin exposure on the transcriptome of a zebrafish fibroblast cell line, ZF4, was investigated. Microarray analysis demonstrated that rapamycin treatment modulated a large set of genes with varying functions including protein synthesis, assembly of mitochondrial and proteasomal machinery, cell cycle, metabolism and oxidative phosphorylation in ZF4 cells. A mild however, coordinated reduction in the expression of proteasomal and mitochondrial ribosomal subunits was detected, while the expression of numerous ribosomal subunits increased. Meta‑analysis of heterogeneous mouse rapamycin microarray datasets enabled the comparison of zebrafish and mouse pathways modulated by rapamycin, using Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes and Gene Ontology pathway analysis. The analyses demonstrated a high degree of functional conservation between zebrafish and mice in response to rapamycin. In addition, rapamycin treatment resulted in a marked dose‑dependent reduction in body size and pigmentation in zebrafish embryos. The present study is the first, to the best of our knowledge, to evaluate the conservation of rapamycin‑modulated functional pathways between zebrafish and mice, in addition to the dose‑dependent growth curves of zebrafish embryos upon rapamycin exposure.

  1. Down-regulation of mitogen-activated protein kinases and nuclear factor-κB signaling is involved in rapamycin suppression of TLR2-induced inflammatory response in monocytic THP-1 cells.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ruili; Zhang, Yi; Ma, Shijiang; Qi, Hengtian; Wang, Mingyong; Duan, Juhong; Ma, Shujun; Zhu, Xiaofei; Li, Guancheng; Wang, Hui

    2015-10-01

    Tripalmitoyl-S-glycero-Cys-(Lys) 4 (Pam3CSK4) interacted with TLR2 induces inflammatory responses through the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) signal pathway. Rapamycin can suppress TLR-induced inflammatory responses; however, the detailed molecular mechanism is not fully understood. Here, the mechanism by which rapamycin suppresses TLR2-induced inflammatory responses was investigated. It was found that Pam3CSK4-induced pro-inflammatory cytokines were significantly down-regulated at both the mRNA and protein levels in THP-1 cells pre-treated with various concentrations of rapamycin. Inhibition of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/protein kinase-B (PI3K/AKT) signaling did not suppress the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, indicating that the immunosuppression mediated by rapamycin in THP1 cells is independent of the PI3K/AKT pathway. RT-PCR showed that Erk and NF-κB signal pathways are related to the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Inhibition of Erk or NF-κB signaling significantly down-regulated production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Additionally, western blot showed that pre-treatment of THP-1 cells with rapamycin down-regulates MAPKs and NF-κB signaling induced by Pam3CSK4 stimulation, suggesting that rapamycin suppresses Pam3CSK4-induced pro-inflammatory cytokines via inhibition of TLR2 signaling. It was concluded that rapamycin suppresses TLR2-induced inflammatory responses by down-regulation of Erk and NF-κB signaling.

  2. Traumatic Brain Injury Stimulates Neural Stem Cell Proliferation via Mammalian Target of Rapamycin Signaling Pathway Activation

    PubMed Central

    Seekaew, Pich

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Neural stem cells in the adult brain possess the ability to remain quiescent until needed in tissue homeostasis or repair. It was previously shown that traumatic brain injury (TBI) stimulated neural stem cell (NSC) proliferation in the adult hippocampus, indicating an innate repair mechanism, but it is unknown how TBI promotes NSC proliferation. In the present study, we observed dramatic activation of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) in the hippocampus of mice with TBI from controlled cortical impact (CCI). The peak of mTORC1 activation in the hippocampal subgranular zone, where NSCs reside, is 24–48 h after trauma, correlating with the peak of TBI-enhanced NSC proliferation. By use of a Nestin-GFP transgenic mouse, in which GFP is ectopically expressed in the NSCs, we found that TBI activated mTORC1 in NSCs. With 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine labeling, we observed that TBI increased mTORC1 activation in proliferating NSCs. Furthermore, administration of rapamycin abolished TBI-promoted NSC proliferation. Taken together, these data indicate that mTORC1 activation is required for NSC proliferation postinjury, and thus might serve as a therapeutic target for interventions to augment neurogenesis for brain repair after TBI. PMID:27822507

  3. The immunosuppressive agents rapamycin, cyclosporin A and tacrolimus increase lipolysis, inhibit lipid storage and alter expression of genes involved in lipid metabolism in human adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Maria J; Palming, Jenny; Rizell, Magnus; Aureliano, Manuel; Carvalho, Eugénia; Svensson, Maria K; Eriksson, Jan W

    2013-01-30

    Cyclosporin A (CsA), tacrolimus and rapamycin are immunosuppressive agents (IAs) associated with insulin resistance and dyslipidemia, although their molecular effects on lipid metabolism in adipose tissue are unknown. We explored IAs effects on lipolysis, lipid storage and expression of genes involved on lipid metabolism in isolated human adipocytes and/or adipose tissue obtained via subcutaneous and omental fat biopsies. CsA, tacrolimus and rapamycin increased isoproterenol-stimulated lipolysis and inhibited lipid storage by 20-35% and enhanced isoproterenol-stimulated hormone-sensitive lipase Ser552 phosphorylation. Rapamycin also increased basal lipolysis (~20%) and impaired insulin's antilipolytic effect. Rapamycin, down-regulated the gene expression of perilipin, sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1 (SREBP1) and lipin 1, while tacrolimus down-regulated CD36 and aP2 gene expression. All three IAs increased IL-6 gene expression and secretion, but not expression and secretion of TNF-α or adiponectin. These findings suggest that CsA, tacrolimus and rapamycin enhance lipolysis, inhibit lipid storage and expression of lipogenic genes in adipose tissue, which may contribute to the development of dyslipidemia and insulin resistance associated with immunosuppressive therapy.

  4. Imbalanced mechanistic target of rapamycin C1 and C2 activity in the cerebellum of Angelman syndrome mice impairs motor function.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jiandong; Liu, Yan; Moreno, Stephanie; Baudry, Michel; Bi, Xiaoning

    2015-03-18

    Angelman syndrome (AS) is a neurogenetic disorder caused by deficiency of maternally expressed ubiquitin-protein ligase E3A (UBE3A), an E3 ligase that targets specific proteins for proteasomal degradation. Although motor function impairment occurs in all patients with AS, very little research has been done to understand and treat it. The present study focuses on Ube3A deficiency-induced alterations in signaling through the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway in the cerebellum of the AS mouse model and on potential therapeutic applications of rapamycin. Levels of tuberous sclerosis complex 2 (TSC2), a negative regulator of mTOR, were increased in AS mice compared with wild-type mice; however, TSC2 inhibitory phosphorylation was also increased. Correspondingly, levels of phosphorylated/active mTOR were increased. Phosphorylation of the mTORC1 substrates S6 kinase 1 (S6K1) and S6 was elevated, whereas that of the mTORC2 substrates AKT and N-myc downstream regulated 1 was decreased, suggesting enhanced mTORC1 but inhibited mTORC2 signaling. Semi-chronic treatment of AS mice with rapamycin not only improved their motor performance but also normalized mTORC1 and mTORC2 signaling. Furthermore, inhibitory phosphorylation of rictor, a key regulatory/structural subunit of the mTORC2 complex, was increased in AS mice and decreased after rapamycin treatment. These results indicate that Ube3A deficiency leads to overactivation of the mTORC1-S6K1 pathway, which in turn inhibits rictor, resulting in decreased mTORC2 signaling in Purkinje neurons of AS mice. Finally, rapamycin treatment also improved dendritic spine morphology in AS mice, through inhibiting mTORC1 and possibly enhancing mTORC2-mediated regulation of synaptic cytoskeletal elements. Collectively, our results indicate that the imbalance between mTORC1 and mTORC2 activity may contribute to synaptic pathology and motor impairment in AS.

  5. Imbalanced Mechanistic Target of Rapamycin C1 and C2 Activity in the Cerebellum of Angelman Syndrome Mice Impairs Motor Function

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jiandong; Liu, Yan; Moreno, Stephanie; Baudry, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Angelman syndrome (AS) is a neurogenetic disorder caused by deficiency of maternally expressed ubiquitin-protein ligase E3A (UBE3A), an E3 ligase that targets specific proteins for proteasomal degradation. Although motor function impairment occurs in all patients with AS, very little research has been done to understand and treat it. The present study focuses on Ube3A deficiency-induced alterations in signaling through the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway in the cerebellum of the AS mouse model and on potential therapeutic applications of rapamycin. Levels of tuberous sclerosis complex 2 (TSC2), a negative regulator of mTOR, were increased in AS mice compared with wild-type mice; however, TSC2 inhibitory phosphorylation was also increased. Correspondingly, levels of phosphorylated/active mTOR were increased. Phosphorylation of the mTORC1 substrates S6 kinase 1 (S6K1) and S6 was elevated, whereas that of the mTORC2 substrates AKT and N-myc downstream regulated 1 was decreased, suggesting enhanced mTORC1 but inhibited mTORC2 signaling. Semi-chronic treatment of AS mice with rapamycin not only improved their motor performance but also normalized mTORC1 and mTORC2 signaling. Furthermore, inhibitory phosphorylation of rictor, a key regulatory/structural subunit of the mTORC2 complex, was increased in AS mice and decreased after rapamycin treatment. These results indicate that Ube3A deficiency leads to overactivation of the mTORC1–S6K1 pathway, which in turn inhibits rictor, resulting in decreased mTORC2 signaling in Purkinje neurons of AS mice. Finally, rapamycin treatment also improved dendritic spine morphology in AS mice, through inhibiting mTORC1 and possibly enhancing mTORC2-mediated regulation of synaptic cytoskeletal elements. Collectively, our results indicate that the imbalance between mTORC1 and mTORC2 activity may contribute to synaptic pathology and motor impairment in AS. PMID:25788687

  6. Long-term effects of rapamycin treatment on insulin mediated phosphorylation of Akt/PKB and glycogen synthase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Varma, Shailly; Shrivastav, Anuraag; Changela, Sheena; Khandelwal, Ramji L.

    2008-04-01

    Protein kinase B (Akt/PKB) is a Ser/Thr kinase that is involved in the regulation of cell proliferation/survival through mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and the regulation of glycogen metabolism through glycogen synthase kinase 3{beta} (GSK-3{beta}) and glycogen synthase (GS). Rapamycin is an inhibitor of mTOR. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of rapamycin pretreatment on the insulin mediated phosphorylation of Akt/PKB phosphorylation and GS activity in parental HepG2 and HepG2 cells with overexpression of constitutively active Akt1/PKB-{alpha} (HepG2-CA-Akt/PKB). Rapamycin pretreatment resulted in a decrease (20-30%) in the insulin mediated phosphorylation of Akt1 (Ser 473) in parental HepG2 cells but showed an upregulation of phosphorylation in HepG2-CA-Akt/PKB cells. Rictor levels were decreased (20-50%) in parental HepG2 cells but were not significantly altered in the HepG2-CA-Akt/PKB cells. Furthermore, rictor knockdown decreased the phosphorylation of Akt (Ser 473) by 40-60% upon rapamycin pretreatment. GS activity followed similar trends as that of phosphorylated Akt and so with rictor levels in these cells pretreated with rapamycin; parental HepG2 cells showed a decrease in GS activity, whereas as HepG2-CA-Akt/PKB cells showed an increase in GS activity. The changes in the levels of phosphorylated Akt/PKB (Ser 473) correlated with GS and protein phoshatase-1 activity.

  7. Methylglyoxal activates the target of rapamycin complex 2-protein kinase C signaling pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Wataru; Inoue, Yoshiharu

    2015-04-01

    Methylglyoxal is a typical 2-oxoaldehyde derived from glycolysis. We show here that methylglyoxal activates the Pkc1-Mpk1 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase cascade in a target of rapamycin complex 2 (TORC2)-dependent manner in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We demonstrate that TORC2 phosphorylates Pkc1 at Thr(1125) and Ser(1143). Methylglyoxal enhanced the phosphorylation of Pkc1 at Ser(1143), which transmitted the signal to the downstream Mpk1 MAP kinase cascade. We found that the phosphorylation status of Pkc1(T1125) affected the phosphorylation of Pkc1 at Ser(1143), in addition to its protein levels. Methylglyoxal activated mammalian TORC2 signaling, which, in turn, phosphorylated Akt at Ser(473). Our results suggest that methylglyoxal is a conserved initiator of TORC2 signaling among eukaryotes.

  8. Methylglyoxal Activates the Target of Rapamycin Complex 2-Protein Kinase C Signaling Pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Nomura, Wataru

    2015-01-01

    Methylglyoxal is a typical 2-oxoaldehyde derived from glycolysis. We show here that methylglyoxal activates the Pkc1-Mpk1 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase cascade in a target of rapamycin complex 2 (TORC2)-dependent manner in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We demonstrate that TORC2 phosphorylates Pkc1 at Thr1125 and Ser1143. Methylglyoxal enhanced the phosphorylation of Pkc1 at Ser1143, which transmitted the signal to the downstream Mpk1 MAP kinase cascade. We found that the phosphorylation status of Pkc1T1125 affected the phosphorylation of Pkc1 at Ser1143, in addition to its protein levels. Methylglyoxal activated mammalian TORC2 signaling, which, in turn, phosphorylated Akt at Ser473. Our results suggest that methylglyoxal is a conserved initiator of TORC2 signaling among eukaryotes. PMID:25624345

  9. Topical rapamycin (sirolimus) for facial angiofibromas.

    PubMed

    Madke, Bhushan

    2013-01-01

    Rapamycin (sirolimus) is a fungal fermentation product that inhibits the proper functioning of a serine/threonine protein kinase in mammalian cells eponymously named mammalian target of rapamycin, or mTOR. Rapamycin is a novel class of anticancer and immunosuppressant drugs targeting the proteins at molecular level. Rapamycin (sirolimus) is routinely incorporated in drug-eluting stents used for cardiac angioplasty. In recent years, rapamycin was found to be efficacious in managing the symptom complex of tuberous sclerosis, i.e. renal angiomyolipoma, giant cell astrocytoma and pulmonary lymphangiomyomatosis. Various investigators have also proved that topically applied rapamycin causes regression of facial angiofibromas, giving better cosmetic results.

  10. Temsirolimus in advanced leiomyosarcomas: patterns of response and correlation with the activation of the mammalian target of rapamycin pathway.

    PubMed

    Italiano, Antoine; Kind, Michèle; Stoeckle, Eberhard; Jones, Natalie; Coindre, Jean-Michel; Bui, Binh

    2011-06-01

    Preclinical data have indicated that alteration of PTEN and activation of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway play a crucial role in the oncogenesis of leiomyosarcoma. The objective of this exploratory study was to assess the clinical role of mTOR inhibition in patients with advanced leiomyosarcoma refractory to standard chemotherapy. Patients with advanced leiomyosarcoma were treated with temsirolimus and consented to retrospective collection of data from their medical records and analysis of archival tumor specimens. Tumor response was determined according to the response evaluation criteria in solid tumor (RECIST) and Choi criteria. Tumors were assessed for immunohistochemical evidence of PTEN loss of expression and mTOR activation. Six patients participated in the study. According to the RECIST, three patients had stable disease and three patients had progressive disease. The three patients with RECIST stable disease had partial response according to the Choi criteria. Partial response according to the Choi criteria was associated with clinical improvement and biological signs of temsirolimus antitumor activity. The immunohistochemical status of PTEN and phosphorylated S6 ribosomal protein was not predictive of the outcome. This exploratory study indicates antitumor activity of temsirolimus in leiomyosarcoma, possibly through a mechanism involving aberration of the PTEN gene. Further investigations of the phosphoinositide 3-kinases/PTEN/Akt/mTOR pathway are needed to explore the role of mTOR inhibitors, either alone or in combination, in patients with advanced sarcoma.

  11. Anticancer peptidylarginine deiminase (PAD) inhibitors regulate the autophagy flux and the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 activity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuji; Li, Pingxin; Wang, Shu; Hu, Jing; Chen, Xiangyun Amy; Wu, Jianhui; Fisher, Megan; Oshaben, Kira; Zhao, Na; Gu, Ying; Wang, Dong; Chen, Gong; Wang, Yanming

    2012-07-27

    Tumor suppressor genes are frequently silenced in cancer cells by enzymes catalyzing epigenetic histone modifications. The peptidylarginine deiminase family member PAD4 (also called PADI4) is markedly overexpressed in a majority of human cancers, suggesting that PAD4 is a putative target for cancer treatment. Here, we have generated novel PAD inhibitors with low micromolar IC(50) in PAD activity and cancer cell growth inhibition. The lead compound YW3-56 alters the expression of genes controlling the cell cycle and cell death, including SESN2 that encodes an upstream inhibitor of the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling pathway. Guided by the gene expression profile analyses with YW3-56, we found that PAD4 functions as a corepressor of p53 to regulate SESN2 expression by histone citrullination in cancer cells. Consistent with the mTORC1 inhibition by SESN2, the phosphorylation of its substrates including p70S6 kinase (p70S6K) and 4E-BP1 was decreased. Furthermore, macroautophagy is perturbed after YW3-56 treatment in cancer cells. In a mouse xenograft model, YW3-56 demonstrates cancer growth inhibition activity with little if any detectable adverse effect to vital organs, whereas a combination of PAD4 and histone deacetylase inhibitors further decreases tumor growth. Taken together, our work found that PAD4 regulates the mTORC1 signaling pathway and that PAD inhibitors are potential anticancer reagents that activate tumor suppressor gene expression alone or in combination with histone deacetylase inhibitors.

  12. The Enigma of Rapamycin Dosage.

    PubMed

    Mukhopadhyay, Suman; Frias, Maria A; Chatterjee, Amrita; Yellen, Paige; Foster, David A

    2016-03-01

    The mTOR pathway is a critical regulator of cell growth, proliferation, metabolism, and survival. Dysregulation of mTOR signaling has been observed in most cancers and, thus, the mTOR pathway has been extensively studied for therapeutic intervention. Rapamycin is a natural product that inhibits mTOR with high specificity. However, its efficacy varies by dose in several contexts. First, different doses of rapamycin are needed to suppress mTOR in different cell lines; second, different doses of rapamycin are needed to suppress the phosphorylation of different mTOR substrates; and third, there is a differential sensitivity of the two mTOR complexes mTORC1 and mTORC2 to rapamycin. Intriguingly, the enigmatic properties of rapamycin dosage can be explained in large part by the competition between rapamycin and phosphatidic acid (PA) for mTOR. Rapamycin and PA have opposite effects on mTOR whereby rapamycin destabilizes and PA stabilizes both mTOR complexes. In this review, we discuss the properties of rapamycin dosage in the context of anticancer therapeutics.

  13. CX-5461 induces autophagy and inhibits tumor growth via mammalian target of rapamycin-related signaling pathways in osteosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Leiming; Li, Yan; Zhao, Jiansong; Fan, Shuli; Wang, Liguo; Li, Xu

    2016-01-01

    Osteosarcoma (OS) is the most common primary bone tumor, but molecular mechanisms of the disease have not been well understood, and treatment of metastatic OS remains a challenge. Rapid ribosomal RNA synthesis in cancer is transcribed by RNA polymerase I, which results in unbridled cell growth. The recent discovery of CX-5461, a selective RNA polymerase I inhibitor, exerted its inhibitory effect of ribosomal RNA synthesis and antiproliferative potency. Here, we demonstrate that CX-5461 induces G2 arrest in the cell cycle and expression of microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 II isoform in OS cell lines. Autophagic vacuoles could be observed in electron microscopy and 3-methyladenine prevented cell death mediated by CX-5461. Moreover, it significantly augmented phosphorylated AMP-Activated Protein Kinases α (p-AMPK α). (Thr172) expression in U2-OS cells and decreased p-Akt (Ser473) expression in MNNG cells, respectively, which repressed their downstream effector, mammalian target of rapamycin. On the other hand, CX-5461 increased p53 accumulation and messenger RNA level of its target genes, p21, MDM2, and Sestrin1/2 in U2-OS cells. Knockdown of p53 expression markedly impaired cell death as well as the expression of light chain 3-II and p21 induced by CX-5461. It also significantly enhanced doxorubicin-mediated cytotoxic effect in vitro and in vivo together with additive expression of p53, p21, and light chain 3-II in U2-OS cells. Our data indicate that CX-5461 might induce autophagy via mammalian target of rapamycin-associated signaling pathways dependent on p53 status and exert p53-dependent synergistic antitumor effect combined with doxorubicin in OS. These results suggest that CX-5461 might be promising in clinical therapy for OS, especially cases harboring wild-type p53. PMID:27729807

  14. Target of rapamycin (TOR) controls vitellogenesis via activation of the S6 kinase in the fat body of the tick, Haemaphysalis longicornis.

    PubMed

    Umemiya-Shirafuji, Rika; Boldbaatar, Damdinsuren; Liao, Min; Battur, Banzragch; Rahman, Md Morshedur; Kuboki, Thasaneeya; Galay, Remil Linggatong; Tanaka, Tetsuya; Fujisaki, Kozo

    2012-10-01

    Vitellogenin (Vg) synthesis, vitellogenesis, is an essential process for the development and reproduction of ticks. Our previous finding led to the hypothesis that target of rapamycin (TOR) pathway is important for vitellogenesis in the hard tick, Haemaphysalis longicornis. The TOR pathway controls cellular activity according to nutrient availability in eukaryotes. TOR, a member of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase family, is a central player in this pathway. Here, we present preliminary evidence that H. longicornis TOR (HlTOR) controls vitellogenesis via activation of S6 kinase (S6K) in the fat body. RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated gene silencing of HlTOR was undertaken to elucidate the involvement of HlTOR in the vitellogenesis of the tick. HlTOR-RNAi caused inhibition of S6K phosphorylation in the fat body. HlTOR-RNAi also altered not only the expression levels of GATA mRNA and protein but also the intracellular localisation of GATA in the fat body. The expression levels of Vg mRNA and protein in the fat body of HlTOR-RNAi ticks were significantly lower than those in control ticks. In the pre-ovipositional stage, the ovaries of control ticks had brown oocytes developing, but those of HlTOR-RNAi ticks were white and immature. The haemolymph colour indicated that the amount of Vg was lower in HlTOR-RNAi ticks than in the controls. Furthermore, rapamycin inhibited S6K phosphorylation and reduced the expression levels of Vg mRNA and protein in the fat bodies. Vg proteins were not detected in rapamycin-treated fat bodies in the presence of 20-hydroxyecdysone. These results suggest that HlTOR activity is critical for vitellogenesis stimulated by 20-hydroxyecdysone.

  15. The novel orally bioavailable inhibitor of phosphoinositol-3-kinase and mammalian target of rapamycin, NVP-BEZ235, inhibits growth and proliferation in multiple myeloma

    SciTech Connect

    Baumann, Philipp Mandl-Weber, Sonja; Oduncu, Fuat; Schmidmaier, Ralf

    2009-02-01

    NVP-BEZ235 is a new inhibitor of phosphoinositol-3-kinase (PI3 kinase) and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) whose efficacy in advanced solid tumours is currently being evaluated in a phase I/II clinical trial. Here we show that NVP-BEZ235 inhibits growth in common myeloma cell lines as well as primary myeloma cells at nanomolar concentrations in a time and dose dependent fashion. Further experiments revealed induction of apoptosis in three of four cell lines. Inhibition of cell growth was mainly due to inhibition of myeloma cell proliferation, as shown by the BrdU assay. Cell cycle analysis revealed induction of cell cycle arrest in the G1 phase, which was due to downregulation of cyclin D1, pRb and cdc25a. NVP-BEZ235 inhibited phosphorylation of protein kinase B (Akt), P70S6k and 4E-BP-1. Furthermore we show that the stimulatory effect of CD40-ligand (CD40L), insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), interleukin-6 (IL-6) and conditioned medium of HS-5 stromal cells on myeloma cell growth is completely abrogated by NVP-BEZ235. In addition, synergism studies revealed synergistic and additive activity of NVP-BEZ235 together with melphalan, doxorubicin and bortezomib. Taken together, inhibition of PI3 kinase/mTOR by NVP-BEZ235 is highly effective and NVP-BEZ235 represents a potential new candidate for targeted therapy in multiple myeloma.

  16. GTPase ROP2 binds and promotes activation of target of rapamycin, TOR, in response to auxin.

    PubMed

    Schepetilnikov, Mikhail; Makarian, Joelle; Srour, Ola; Geldreich, Angèle; Yang, Zhenbiao; Chicher, Johana; Hammann, Philippe; Ryabova, Lyubov A

    2017-02-28

    Target of rapamycin (TOR) promotes reinitiation at upstream ORFs (uORFs) in genes that play important roles in stem cell regulation and organogenesis in plants. Here, we report that the small GTPase ROP2, if activated by the phytohormone auxin, promotes activation of TOR, and thus translation reinitiation of uORF-containing mRNAs. Plants with high levels of active ROP2, including those expressing constitutively active ROP2 (CA-ROP2), contain high levels of active TOR ROP2 physically interacts with and, when GTP-bound, activates TOR in vitro TOR activation in response to auxin is abolished in ROP-deficient rop2 rop6 ROP4 RNAi plants. GFP-TOR can associate with endosome-like structures in ROP2-overexpressing plants, indicating that endosomes mediate ROP2 effects on TOR activation. CA-ROP2 is efficient in loading uORF-containing mRNAs onto polysomes and stimulates translation in protoplasts, and both processes are sensitive to TOR inhibitor AZD-8055. TOR inactivation abolishes ROP2 regulation of translation reinitiation, but not its effects on cytoskeleton or intracellular trafficking. These findings imply a mode of translation control whereby, as an upstream effector of TOR, ROP2 coordinates TOR function in translation reinitiation pathways in response to auxin.

  17. Device-based local delivery of siRNA against mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) in a murine subcutaneous implant model to inhibit fibrous encapsulation

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Hironobu; Wang, Yuwei; Grainger, David W.

    2010-01-01

    Fibrous encapsulation of surgically implant devices is associated with elevated proliferation and activation of fibroblasts in tissues surrounding these implants, frequently causing foreign body complications. Here we test the hypothesis that inhibition of the expression of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) in fibroblasts can mitigate the soft tissue implant foreign body response by suppressing fibrotic responses around implants. In this study, mTOR was knocked down using small interfering RNA conjugated with branched cationic polyethylenimine (bPEI) in fibroblastic lineage cells in serum-based cell culture as shown by both gene and protein analysis. This mTOR knockdown led to an inhibition in fibroblast proliferation by 70% and simultaneous down-regulation in the expression of type I collagen in fibroblasts in vitro. These siRNA/bPEI complexes were released from poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-based hydrogel coatings surrounding model polymer implants in a subcutaneous rodent model in vivo. No significant reduction in fibrous capsule thickness and mTOR expression in the foreign body capsules was observed. Observed siRNA inefficacy in this in vivo implant model was attributed to siRNA dosing limitations in the gel delivery system, and lack of targeting ability of the siRNA complex specifically to fibroblasts. While in vitro data supported mTOR knock-down in fibroblast cultures, in vivo siRNA delivery must be further improved to produce clinically relevant effects on fibrotic encapsulation around implants. PMID:20727922

  18. Ex vivo rapamycin generates donor Th2 cells that potently inhibit graft-versus-host disease and graft-versus-tumor effects via an IL-4-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Foley, Jason E; Jung, Unsu; Miera, Angel; Borenstein, Todd; Mariotti, Jacopo; Eckhaus, Michael; Bierer, Barbara E; Fowler, Daniel H

    2005-11-01

    Rapamycin (sirolimus) inhibits graft-vs-host disease (GVHD) and polarizes T cells toward Th2 cytokine secretion after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT). Therefore, we reasoned that ex vivo rapamycin might enhance the generation of donor Th2 cells capable of preventing GVHD after fully MHC-disparate murine BMT. Using anti-CD3 and anti-CD28 costimulation, CD4+ Th2 cell expansion was preserved partially in high-dose rapamycin (10 microM; Th2.rapa cells). Th2.rapa cells secreted IL-4 yet had reduced IL-5, IL-10, and IL-13 secretion relative to control Th2 cells. BMT cohorts receiving wild-type (WT) Th2.rapa cells, but not Th2.rapa cells generated from IL-4-deficient (knockout) donors, had marked Th2 skewing post-BMT and greatly reduced donor anti-host T cell alloreactivity. Histologic studies demonstrated that Th2.rapa cell recipients had near complete abrogation of skin, liver, and gut GVHD. Overall survival in recipients of WT Th2.rapa cells, but not IL-4 knockout Th2.rapa cells, was constrained due to marked attenuation of an allogeneic graft-vs-tumor (GVT) effect against host-type breast cancer cells. Delay in Th2.rapa cell administration until day 4, 7, or 14 post-BMT enhanced GVT effects, moderated GVHD, and improved overall survival. Therefore, ex vivo rapamycin generates enhanced donor Th2 cells for attempts to balance GVHD and GVT effects.

  19. Inhibition of Mammalian Target of Rapamycin (mTOR) Signaling in the Insular Cortex Alleviates Neuropathic Pain after Peripheral Nerve Injury

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Minjee; Han, Jeongsoo; Kim, Un Jeng; Cha, Myeounghoon; Um, Sun Woo; Bai, Sun Joon; Hong, Seong-Karp; Lee, Bae Hwan

    2017-01-01

    Injury of peripheral nerves can trigger neuropathic pain, producing allodynia and hyperalgesia via peripheral and central sensitization. Recent studies have focused on the role of the insular cortex (IC) in neuropathic pain. Because the IC is thought to store pain-related memories, translational regulation in this structure may reveal novel targets for controlling chronic pain. Signaling via mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), which is known to control mRNA translation and influence synaptic plasticity, has been studied at the spinal level in neuropathic pain, but its role in the IC under these conditions remains elusive. Therefore, this study was conducted to determine the role of mTOR signaling in neuropathic pain and to assess the potential therapeutic effects of rapamycin, an inhibitor of mTORC1, in the IC of rats with neuropathic pain. Mechanical allodynia was assessed in adult male Sprague-Dawley rats after neuropathic surgery and following microinjections of rapamycin into the IC on postoperative days (PODs) 3 and 7. Optical recording was conducted to observe the neural responses of the IC to peripheral stimulation. Rapamycin reduced mechanical allodynia and downregulated the expression of postsynaptic density protein 95 (PSD95), decreased neural excitability in the IC, thereby inhibiting neuropathic pain-induced synaptic plasticity. These findings suggest that mTOR signaling in the IC may be a critical molecular mechanism modulating neuropathic pain. PMID:28377693

  20. Mammalian Target of Rapamycin (mTOR) Activation Increases Axonal Growth Capacity of Injured Peripheral Nerves*

    PubMed Central

    Abe, Namiko; Borson, Steven H.; Gambello, Michael J.; Wang, Fan; Cavalli, Valeria

    2010-01-01

    Unlike neurons in the central nervous system (CNS), injured neurons in the peripheral nervous system (PNS) can regenerate their axons and reinnervate their targets. However, functional recovery in the PNS often remains suboptimal, especially in cases of severe damage. The lack of regenerative ability of CNS neurons has been linked to down-regulation of the mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin) pathway. We report here that PNS dorsal root ganglial neurons (DRGs) activate mTOR following damage and that this activity enhances axonal growth capacity. Furthermore, genetic up-regulation of mTOR activity by deletion of tuberous sclerosis complex 2 (TSC2) in DRGs is sufficient to enhance axonal growth capacity in vitro and in vivo. We further show that mTOR activity is linked to the expression of GAP-43, a crucial component of axonal outgrowth. However, although TSC2 deletion in DRGs facilitates axonal regrowth, it leads to defects in target innervation. Thus, whereas manipulation of mTOR activity could provide new strategies to stimulate nerve regeneration in the PNS, fine control of mTOR activity is required for proper target innervation. PMID:20615870

  1. Combination of Rapamycin and Resveratrol for Treatment of Bladder Cancer.

    PubMed

    Alayev, Anya; Salamon, Rachel S; Schwartz, Naomi S; Berman, Adi Y; Wiener, Sara L; Holz, Marina K

    2017-02-01

    Loss of TSC1 function, a crucial negative regulator of mTOR signaling, is a common alteration in bladder cancer. Mutations in other members of the PI3K pathway, leading to mTOR activation, are also found in bladder cancer. This provides rationale for targeting mTOR for treatment of bladder cancer characterized by TSC1 mutations and/or mTOR activation. In this study, we asked whether combination treatment with rapamycin and resveratrol could be effective in concurrently inhibiting mTOR and PI3K signaling and inducing cell death in bladder cancer cells. In combination with rapamycin, resveratrol was able to block rapamycin-induced Akt activation, while maintaining mTOR pathway inhibition. In addition, combination treatment with rapamycin and resveratrol induced cell death specifically in TSC1(-/-) MEF cells, and not in wild-type MEFs. Similarly, resveratrol alone or in combination with rapamycin induced cell death in human bladder cancer cell lines. These data indicate that administration of resveratrol together with rapamycin may be a promising therapeutic option for treatment of bladder cancer. J. Cell. Physiol. 232: 436-446, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 activation is required for the stimulation of human skeletal muscle protein synthesis by essential amino acids.

    PubMed

    Dickinson, Jared M; Fry, Christopher S; Drummond, Micah J; Gundermann, David M; Walker, Dillon K; Glynn, Erin L; Timmerman, Kyle L; Dhanani, Shaheen; Volpi, Elena; Rasmussen, Blake B

    2011-05-01

    The relationship between mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling and muscle protein synthesis during instances of amino acid surplus in humans is based solely on correlational data. Therefore, the goal of this study was to use a mechanistic approach specifically designed to determine whether increased mTORC1 activation is requisite for the stimulation of muscle protein synthesis following L-essential amino acid (EAA) ingestion in humans. Examination of muscle protein synthesis and signaling were performed on vastus lateralis muscle biopsies obtained from 8 young (25 ± 2 y) individuals who were studied prior to and following ingestion of 10 g of EAA during 2 separate trials in a randomized, counterbalanced design. The trials were identical except during 1 trial, participants were administered a single oral dose of a potent mTORC1 inhibitor (rapamycin) prior to EAA ingestion. In response to EAA ingestion, an ~60% increase in muscle protein synthesis was observed during the control trial, concomitant with increased phosphorylation of mTOR (Ser(2448)), ribosomal S6 kinase 1 (Thr(389)), and eukaryotic initiation factor 4E binding protein 1 (Thr(37/46)). In contrast, prior administration of rapamycin completely blocked the increase in muscle protein synthesis and blocked or attenuated activation of mTORC1-signaling proteins. The inhibition of muscle protein synthesis and signaling was not due to differences in either extracellular or intracellular amino acid availability, because these variables were similar between trials. These data support a fundamental role for mTORC1 activation as a key regulator of human muscle protein synthesis in response to increased EAA availability. This information will be useful in the development of evidence-based nutritional therapies targeting mTORC1 to counteract muscle wasting associated with numerous clinical conditions.

  3. Fucoidan inhibits the migration and proliferation of HT-29 human colon cancer cells via the phosphoinositide-3 kinase/Akt/mechanistic target of rapamycin pathways.

    PubMed

    Han, Yong-Seok; Lee, Jun Hee; Lee, Sang Hun

    2015-09-01

    Fucoidan, a sulfated polysaccharide, has a variety of biological activities, including anti-cancer, anti-angiogenic and anti-inflammatory effects. However, the underlying mechanisms of fucoidan as an anti‑cancer agent remain to be elucidated. The present study examined the anti‑cancer effect of fucoidan on HT‑29 human colon cancer cells. The cell growth of HT29 cells was significantly decreased following treatment with fucoidan (200 µg/ml). In addition, fucoidan inhibited the migration of HT‑29 cells by decreasing the expression levels of matrix metalloproteinase‑2 in a dose‑dependent manner (0‑200 µg/ml). The underlying mechanism of these inhibitory effects included the downregulation of phosphoinositide 3‑kinase (PI3K)/Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) by treatment with fucoidan. Furthermore, fucoidan increased the expression of cleaved caspase‑3 and decreased cancer sphere formation. The present study suggested that fucoidan exerts an anti‑cancer effect on HT‑29 human colon cancer cells by downregulating the PI3K‑Akt‑mTOR signaling pathway. Therefore, fucoidan may be a potential therapeutic reagent against the growth of human colon cancer cells.

  4. Rapamycin drives selection against a pathogenic heteroplasmic mitochondrial DNA mutation.

    PubMed

    Dai, Ying; Zheng, Kangni; Clark, Joanne; Swerdlow, Russell H; Pulst, Stefan M; Sutton, James P; Shinobu, Leslie A; Simon, David K

    2014-02-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations cause a variety of mitochondrial disorders for which effective treatments are lacking. Emerging data indicate that selective mitochondrial degradation through autophagy (mitophagy) plays a critical role in mitochondrial quality control. Inhibition of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) kinase activity can activate mitophagy. To test the hypothesis that enhancing mitophagy would drive selection against dysfunctional mitochondria harboring higher levels of mutations, thereby decreasing mutation levels over time, we examined the impact of rapamycin on mutation levels in a human cytoplasmic hybrid (cybrid) cell line expressing a heteroplasmic mtDNA G11778A mutation, the most common cause of Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy. Inhibition of mTORC1/S6 kinase signaling by rapamycin induced colocalization of mitochondria with autophagosomes, and resulted in a striking progressive decrease in levels of the G11778A mutation and partial restoration of ATP levels. Rapamycin-induced upregulation of mitophagy was confirmed by electron microscopic evidence of increased autophagic vacuoles containing mitochondria-like organelles. The decreased mutational burden was not due to rapamycin-induced cell death or mtDNA depletion, as there was no significant difference in cytotoxicity/apoptosis or mtDNA copy number between rapamycin and vehicle-treated cells. These data demonstrate the potential for pharmacological inhibition of mTOR kinase activity to activate mitophagy as a strategy to drive selection against a heteroplasmic mtDNA G11778A mutation and raise the exciting possibility that rapamycin may have therapeutic potential for the treatment of mitochondrial disorders associated with heteroplasmic mtDNA mutations, although further studies are needed to determine if a similar strategy will be effective for other mutations and other cell types.

  5. Tomato FK506 Binding Protein 12KD (FKBP12) Mediates the Interaction between Rapamycin and Target of Rapamycin (TOR).

    PubMed

    Xiong, Fangjie; Dong, Pan; Liu, Mei; Xie, Gengxin; Wang, Kai; Zhuo, Fengping; Feng, Li; Yang, Lu; Li, Zhengguo; Ren, Maozhi

    2016-01-01

    Target of Rapamycin (TOR) signaling is an important regulator in multiple organisms including yeast, plants, and animals. However, the TOR signaling in plants is much less understood as compared to that in yeast and animals. TOR kinase can be efficiently suppressed by rapamycin in the presence of functional FK506 Binding Protein 12 KD (FKBP12) in yeast and animals. In most examined higher plants rapamycin fails to inhibit TOR kinase due to the non-functional FKBP12. Here we find that tomato plants showed obvious growth inhibition when treated with rapamycin and the inhibitory phenotype is similar to suppression of TOR causing by active-site TOR inhibitors (asTORis) such as KU63794, AZD8055, and Torin1. The chemical genetic assays using TOR inhibitors and heterologous expressing SlFKBP12 in Arabidopsis indicated that the TOR signaling is functional in tomato. The protein gel shifting and TOR inhibitors combination assays showed that SlFKBP12 can mediate the interaction between rapamycin and TOR. Furthermore, comparative expression profile analysis between treatments with rapamycin and KU63794 identified highly overlapped Differentially Expressed Genes (DEGs) which are involved in many anabolic and catabolic processes, such as photosynthesis, cell wall restructuring, and senescence in tomato. These observations suggest that SlFFBP12 is functional in tomato. The results provided basic information of TOR signaling in tomato, and also some new insights into how TOR controls plant growth and development through reprogramming the transcription profiles.

  6. Tomato FK506 Binding Protein 12KD (FKBP12) Mediates the Interaction between Rapamycin and Target of Rapamycin (TOR)

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Fangjie; Dong, Pan; Liu, Mei; Xie, Gengxin; Wang, Kai; Zhuo, Fengping; Feng, Li; Yang, Lu; Li, Zhengguo; Ren, Maozhi

    2016-01-01

    Target of Rapamycin (TOR) signaling is an important regulator in multiple organisms including yeast, plants, and animals. However, the TOR signaling in plants is much less understood as compared to that in yeast and animals. TOR kinase can be efficiently suppressed by rapamycin in the presence of functional FK506 Binding Protein 12 KD (FKBP12) in yeast and animals. In most examined higher plants rapamycin fails to inhibit TOR kinase due to the non-functional FKBP12. Here we find that tomato plants showed obvious growth inhibition when treated with rapamycin and the inhibitory phenotype is similar to suppression of TOR causing by active-site TOR inhibitors (asTORis) such as KU63794, AZD8055, and Torin1. The chemical genetic assays using TOR inhibitors and heterologous expressing SlFKBP12 in Arabidopsis indicated that the TOR signaling is functional in tomato. The protein gel shifting and TOR inhibitors combination assays showed that SlFKBP12 can mediate the interaction between rapamycin and TOR. Furthermore, comparative expression profile analysis between treatments with rapamycin and KU63794 identified highly overlapped Differentially Expressed Genes (DEGs) which are involved in many anabolic and catabolic processes, such as photosynthesis, cell wall restructuring, and senescence in tomato. These observations suggest that SlFFBP12 is functional in tomato. The results provided basic information of TOR signaling in tomato, and also some new insights into how TOR controls plant growth and development through reprogramming the transcription profiles. PMID:27917191

  7. Divergent tissue and sex effects of rapamycin on the proteasome-chaperone network of old mice

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Karl A.; Dodds, Sherry G.; Strong, Randy; Galvan, Veronica; Sharp, Z. D.; Buffenstein, Rochelle

    2014-01-01

    Rapamycin, an allosteric inhibitor of the mTOR kinase, increases longevity in mice in a sex-specific manner. In contrast to the widely accepted theory that a loss of proteasome activity is detrimental to both life- and healthspan, biochemical studies in vitro reveal that rapamycin inhibits 20S proteasome peptidase activity. We tested if this unexpected finding is also evident after chronic rapamycin treatment in vivo by measuring peptidase activities for both the 26S and 20S proteasome in liver, fat, and brain tissues of old, male and female mice fed encapsulated chow containing 2.24 mg/kg (14 ppm) rapamycin for 6 months. Further we assessed if rapamycin altered expression of the chaperone proteins known to interact with the proteasome-mediated degradation system (PMDS), heat shock factor 1 (HSF1), and the levels of key mTOR pathway proteins. Rapamycin had little effect on liver proteasome activity in either gender, but increased proteasome activity in female brain lysates and lowered its activity in female fat tissue. Rapamycin-induced changes in molecular chaperone levels were also more substantial in tissues from female animals. Furthermore, mTOR pathway proteins showed more significant changes in female tissues compared to those from males. These data show collectively that there are divergent tissue and sex effects of rapamycin on the proteasome-chaperone network and that these may be linked to the disparate effects of rapamycin on males and females. Further our findings suggest that rapamycin induces indirect regulation of the PMDS/heat-shock response through its modulation of the mTOR pathway rather than via direct interactions between rapamycin and the proteasome. PMID:25414638

  8. Divergent tissue and sex effects of rapamycin on the proteasome-chaperone network of old mice.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Karl A; Dodds, Sherry G; Strong, Randy; Galvan, Veronica; Sharp, Z D; Buffenstein, Rochelle

    2014-01-01

    Rapamycin, an allosteric inhibitor of the mTOR kinase, increases longevity in mice in a sex-specific manner. In contrast to the widely accepted theory that a loss of proteasome activity is detrimental to both life- and healthspan, biochemical studies in vitro reveal that rapamycin inhibits 20S proteasome peptidase activity. We tested if this unexpected finding is also evident after chronic rapamycin treatment in vivo by measuring peptidase activities for both the 26S and 20S proteasome in liver, fat, and brain tissues of old, male and female mice fed encapsulated chow containing 2.24 mg/kg (14 ppm) rapamycin for 6 months. Further we assessed if rapamycin altered expression of the chaperone proteins known to interact with the proteasome-mediated degradation system (PMDS), heat shock factor 1 (HSF1), and the levels of key mTOR pathway proteins. Rapamycin had little effect on liver proteasome activity in either gender, but increased proteasome activity in female brain lysates and lowered its activity in female fat tissue. Rapamycin-induced changes in molecular chaperone levels were also more substantial in tissues from female animals. Furthermore, mTOR pathway proteins showed more significant changes in female tissues compared to those from males. These data show collectively that there are divergent tissue and sex effects of rapamycin on the proteasome-chaperone network and that these may be linked to the disparate effects of rapamycin on males and females. Further our findings suggest that rapamycin induces indirect regulation of the PMDS/heat-shock response through its modulation of the mTOR pathway rather than via direct interactions between rapamycin and the proteasome.

  9. The mammalian target of rapamycin modulates the immunoproteasome system in the heart.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hong-Mei; Fu, Jianliang; Hamilton, Ryan; Diaz, Vivian; Zhang, Yiqiang

    2015-09-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) plays an important role in cardiac development and function. Inhibition of mTOR by rapamycin has been shown to attenuate pathological cardiac hypertrophy and improve the function of aging heart, accompanied by an inhibition of the cardiac proteasome activity. The current study aimed to determine the potential mechanism(s) by which mTOR inhibition modulates cardiac proteasome. Inhibition of mTOR by rapamycin was found to reduce primarily the immunoproteasome in both H9c2 cells in vitro and mouse heart in vivo, without significant effect on the constitutive proteasome and protein ubiquitination. Concurrent with the reduction of the immunoproteasome, rapamycin reduced two important inflammatory response pathways, the NF-κB and Stat3 signaling. In addition, rapamycin attenuated the induction of the immunoproteasome in H9c2 cells by inflammatory cytokines, including INFγ and TNFα, by suppressing NF-κB signaling. These data indicate that rapamycin indirectly modulated immunoproteasome through the suppression of inflammatory response pathways. Lastly, the role of the immunoproteasome during the development of cardiac hypertrophy was investigated. Administration of a specific inhibitor of the immunoproteasome ONX 0914 attenuated isoproterenol-induced cardiac hypertrophy, suggesting that the immunoproteasome may be involved in the development of cardiac hypertrophy and therefore could be a therapeutic target. In conclusion, rapamycin inhibits the immunoproteasome through its effect on the inflammatory signaling pathways and the immunoproteasome could be a potential therapeutic target for pathological cardiac hypertrophy.

  10. Alternative rapamycin treatment regimens mitigate the impact of rapamycin on glucose homeostasis and the immune system.

    PubMed

    Arriola Apelo, Sebastian I; Neuman, Joshua C; Baar, Emma L; Syed, Faizan A; Cummings, Nicole E; Brar, Harpreet K; Pumper, Cassidy P; Kimple, Michelle E; Lamming, Dudley W

    2016-02-01

    Inhibition of the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway by the FDA-approved drug rapamycin has been shown to promote lifespan and delay age-related diseases in model organisms including mice. Unfortunately, rapamycin has potentially serious side effects in humans, including glucose intolerance and immunosuppression, which may preclude the long-term prophylactic use of rapamycin as a therapy for age-related diseases. While the beneficial effects of rapamycin are largely mediated by the inhibition of mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1), which is acutely sensitive to rapamycin, many of the negative side effects are mediated by the inhibition of a second mTOR-containing complex, mTORC2, which is much less sensitive to rapamycin. We hypothesized that different rapamycin dosing schedules or the use of FDA-approved rapamycin analogs with different pharmacokinetics might expand the therapeutic window of rapamycin by more specifically targeting mTORC1. Here, we identified an intermittent rapamycin dosing schedule with minimal effects on glucose tolerance, and we find that this schedule has a reduced impact on pyruvate tolerance, fasting glucose and insulin levels, beta cell function, and the immune system compared to daily rapamycin treatment. Further, we find that the FDA-approved rapamycin analogs everolimus and temsirolimus efficiently inhibit mTORC1 while having a reduced impact on glucose and pyruvate tolerance. Our results suggest that many of the negative side effects of rapamycin treatment can be mitigated through intermittent dosing or the use of rapamycin analogs.

  11. Activation of the Mechanistic Target of Rapamycin in SLE: Explosion of Evidence in the Last Five Years

    PubMed Central

    Oaks, Zachary; Winans, Thomas; Huang, Nick; Banki, Katalin; Perl, Andras

    2017-01-01

    The mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a central regulator in cell growth, activation, proliferation, and survival. Activation of the mTOR pathway underlies the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). While mTOR activation and its therapeutic reversal were originally discovered in T cells, recent investigations have also uncovered roles in other cell subsets including B cells, macrophages, and “non-immune” organs such as the liver and the kidney. Activation of mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) precedes the onset of SLE and associated co-morbidities, such as anti-phospholipid syndrome (APS), and may act as an early marker of disease pathogenesis. Six case reports have now been published that document the development of SLE in patients with genetic activation of mTORC1. Targeting mTORC1 over-activation with N-acetylcysteine, rapamycin, and rapalogs provides an opportunity to supplant current therapies with severe side effect profiles such as prednisone or cyclophosphamide. In the present review, we will discuss the recent explosion of findings in support for a central role for mTOR activation in SLE. PMID:27812954

  12. Ras pathway activation in hepatocellular carcinoma and anti-tumoral effect of combined sorafenib and rapamycin in vivo☆

    PubMed Central

    Newell, Pippa; Toffanin, Sara; Villanueva, Augusto; Chiang, Derek Y.; Minguez, Beatriz; Cabellos, Laia; Savic, Radoslav; Hoshida, Yujin; Lim, Kiat Hon; Melgar-Lesmes, Pedro; Yea, Steven; Peix, Judit; Deniz, Kemal; Fiel, M. Isabel; Thung, Swan; Alsinet, Clara; Tovar, Victoria; Mazzaferro, Vincenzo; Bruix, Jordi; Roayaie, Sasan; Schwartz, Myron; Friedman, Scott L.; Llovet, Josep M.

    2010-01-01

    Background/Aims The success of sorafenib in the treatment of advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) has focused interest on the role of Ras signaling in this malignancy. We investigated the molecular alterations of the Ras pathway in HCC and the antineoplastic effects of sorafenib in combination with rapamycin, an inhibitor of mTOR pathway, in experimental models. Methods Gene expression (qRT-PCR, oligonucleotide microarray), DNA copy number changes (SNP-array), methylation of tumor suppressor genes (methylation-specific PCR) and protein activation (immunohistochemistry) were analysed in 351 samples. Anti-tumoral effects of combined therapy targeting the Ras and mTOR pathways were evaluated in cell lines and HCC xenografts. Results Different mechanisms accounted for Ras pathway activation in HCC. H-ras was up-regulated during different steps of hepatocarcinogenesis. B-raf was overexpressed in advanced tumors and its expression was associated with genomic amplification. Partial methylation of RASSF1A and NORE1A was detected in 89% and 44% of tumors respectively, and complete methylation was found in 11 and 4% of HCCs. Activation of the pathway (pERK immunostaining) was identified in 10.3% of HCC. Blockade of Ras and mTOR pathways with sorafenib and rapamycin reduced cell proliferation and induced apoptosis in cell lines. In vivo, the combination of both compounds enhanced tumor necrosis and ulceration when compared with sorafenib alone. Conclusions Ras activation results from several molecular alterations, such as methylation of tumor suppressors and amplification of oncogenes (B-raf). Sorafenib blocks signaling and synergizes with rapamycin in vivo, preventing tumor progression. These data provide the rationale for testing this combination in clinical studies. PMID:19665249

  13. Curcumin Attenuates Rapamycin-induced Cell Injury of Vascular Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Guo, Ning; Chen, Fangyuan; Zhou, Juan; Fang, Yuan; Li, Hongbing; Luo, Yongbai; Zhang, Yong

    2015-10-01

    Although drug-eluting stents (DES) effectively improve the clinical efficacy of percutaneous coronary intervention, a high risk of late stent thrombosis and in-stent restenosis also exists after DES implantation. Anti-smooth muscle proliferation drugs, such as rapamycin, coating stents, not only inhibit the growth of vascular smooth muscle cells but also inhibit vascular endothelial cells and delay the reendothelialization. Therefore, the development of an ideal agent that protects vascular endothelial cells from rapamycin-eluting stents is of great importance for the next generation of DES. In this study, we demonstrated that rapamycin significantly inhibited the growth of rat aortic endothelial cells in both dose- and time-dependent manner in vitro. Cell apoptosis was increased and migration was decreased by rapamycin treatments in rat aortic endothelial cells in vitro. Surprisingly, treatment with curcumin, an active ingredient of turmeric, significantly reversed these detrimental effects of rapamycin. Moreover, curcumin increased the expression of vascular nitric oxide synthases (eNOS), which was decreased by rapamycin. Furthermore, caveolin-1, the inhibitor of eNOS, was decreased by curcumin. Knockdown of eNOS by small interfering RNA significantly abrogated the protective effects of curcumin. Taken together, our results suggest that curcumin antagonizes the detrimental effect of rapamycin on aortic endothelial cells in vitro through upregulating eNOS. Therefore, curcumin is a promising combined agent for the rescue of DES-induced reendothelialization delay.

  14. Rapamycin regulates biochemical metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Tucci, Paola; Porta, Giovanni; Agostini, Massimiliano; Antonov, Alexey; Garabadgiu, Alexander Vasilievich; Melino, Gerry; Willis, Anne E

    2013-01-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) kinase is a master regulator of protein synthesis that couples nutrient sensing to cell growth, and deregulation of this pathway is associated with tumorigenesis. p53, and its less investigated family member p73, have been shown to interact closely with mTOR pathways through the transcriptional regulation of different target genes. To investigate the metabolic changes that occur upon inhibition of the mTOR pathway and the role of p73 in this response primary mouse embryonic fibroblast from control and TAp73−/− were treated with the macrocyclic lactone rapamycin. Extensive gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) and liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) analysis were used to obtain a rapamycin-dependent global metabolome profile from control or TAp73−/− cells. In total 289 metabolites involved in selective pathways were identified; 39 biochemical metabolites were found to be significantly altered, many of which are known to be associated with the cellular stress response. PMID:23839040

  15. Calcium/calmodulin kinase inhibitors and immunosuppressant macrolides rapamycin and FK506 inhibit progestin- and glucocorticosteroid receptor-mediated transcription in human breast cancer T47D cells.

    PubMed

    Le Bihan, S; Marsaud, V; Mercier-Bodard, C; Baulieu, E E; Mader, S; White, J H; Renoir, J M

    1998-07-01

    The effects of immunosuppressants and inhibitors of specific calcium/calmodulin kinase (CaMK) of types II and IV on progestin/glucocorticosteroid-induced transcription were studied in two human stably transfected breast cancer T47D cell lines. The lines contain the chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) gene under control either of the mouse mammary tumor virus promoter (T47D-MMTV-CAT), or the minimal promoter containing five glucocorticosteroid/progestin hormone response elements [T47D-(GRE)5-CAT]. Progestin- and triamcinolone acetonide (TA)-induced CAT gene expression was inhibited in a dose-dependent manner in both lines by preincubation with rapamycin (Rap) and, to a lesser extent, with FK506, but not with cyclosporin A. CaMK II and/or IV inhibitors KN62 and KN93 also inhibited progestin- and TA-stimulated transcription in both lines. None of these drugs had any effect on basal transcription. The antagonist RU486 inhibited all the effects of both progestin and TA, suggesting that progesterone receptor (PR)-, as well as glucocorticosteroid receptor (GR)- mediated transactivation are targets of immunosuppressants and CaMKs in T47D cells. Indeed, Northern analysis showed that Rap, KN62, and, to a lesser degree, FK506 inhibited progestin stimulation of Cyclin D1 mRNA levels, but not those of the non-steroid-regulated glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) gene. Addition of Rap or KN62 after exposure of cells to progesterone agonist Org 2058 had no effect on induction of CAT activity. Taken together, these data indicate that Rap and FK506, as well as CaMK inhibitors, inhibit steroid-induced activities of exogenous, as well as of some endogenous, steroid receptor-regulated genes by a mechanism preceding hormone-induced receptor activation. Rap appeared to stabilize a 9S form of [3H]Org 2058-PR complexes isolated from T47D (GRE)5CAT cell nuclei. By contrast, the progesterone receptor (PR) was isolated from cells treated with KN62 as a 5S entity

  16. Structure-Activity Analysis of Niclosamide Reveals Potential Role for Cytoplasmic pH in Control of Mammalian Target of Rapamycin Complex 1 (mTORC1) Signaling*

    PubMed Central

    Fonseca, Bruno D.; Diering, Graham H.; Bidinosti, Michael A.; Dalal, Kush; Alain, Tommy; Balgi, Aruna D.; Forestieri, Roberto; Nodwell, Matt; Rajadurai, Charles V.; Gunaratnam, Cynthia; Tee, Andrew R.; Duong, Franck; Andersen, Raymond J.; Orlowski, John; Numata, Masayuki; Sonenberg, Nahum; Roberge, Michel

    2012-01-01

    Mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling is frequently dysregulated in cancer. Inhibition of mTORC1 is thus regarded as a promising strategy in the treatment of tumors with elevated mTORC1 activity. We have recently identified niclosamide (a Food and Drug Administration-approved antihelminthic drug) as an inhibitor of mTORC1 signaling. In the present study, we explored possible mechanisms by which niclosamide may inhibit mTORC1 signaling. We tested whether niclosamide interferes with signaling cascades upstream of mTORC1, the catalytic activity of mTOR, or mTORC1 assembly. We found that niclosamide does not impair PI3K/Akt signaling, nor does it inhibit mTORC1 kinase activity. We also found that niclosamide does not interfere with mTORC1 assembly. Previous studies in helminths suggest that niclosamide disrupts pH homeostasis of the parasite. This prompted us to investigate whether niclosamide affects the pH balance of cancer cells. Experiments in both breast cancer cells and cell-free systems demonstrated that niclosamide possesses protonophoric activity in cells and in vitro. In cells, niclosamide dissipated protons (down their concentration gradient) from lysosomes to the cytosol, effectively lowering cytoplasmic pH. Notably, analysis of five niclosamide analogs revealed that the structural features of niclosamide required for protonophoric activity are also essential for mTORC1 inhibition. Furthermore, lowering cytoplasmic pH by means other than niclosamide treatment (e.g. incubation with propionic acid or bicarbonate withdrawal) recapitulated the inhibitory effects of niclosamide on mTORC1 signaling, lending support to a possible role for cytoplasmic pH in the control of mTORC1. Our data illustrate a potential mechanism for chemical inhibition of mTORC1 signaling involving modulation of cytoplasmic pH. PMID:22474287

  17. Activation of Autophagic Flux against Xenoestrogen Bisphenol-A-induced Hippocampal Neurodegeneration via AMP kinase (AMPK)/Mammalian Target of Rapamycin (mTOR) Pathways*

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Swati; Tiwari, Shashi Kant; Seth, Brashket; Yadav, Anuradha; Singh, Anshuman; Mudawal, Anubha; Chauhan, Lalit Kumar Singh; Gupta, Shailendra Kumar; Choubey, Vinay; Tripathi, Anurag; Kumar, Amit; Ray, Ratan Singh; Shukla, Shubha; Parmar, Devendra; Chaturvedi, Rajnish Kumar

    2015-01-01

    The human health hazards related to persisting use of bisphenol-A (BPA) are well documented. BPA-induced neurotoxicity occurs with the generation of oxidative stress, neurodegeneration, and cognitive dysfunctions. However, the cellular and molecular mechanism(s) of the effects of BPA on autophagy and association with oxidative stress and apoptosis are still elusive. We observed that BPA exposure during the early postnatal period enhanced the expression and the levels of autophagy genes/proteins. BPA treatment in the presence of bafilomycin A1 increased the levels of LC3-II and SQSTM1 and also potentiated GFP-LC3 puncta index in GFP-LC3-transfected hippocampal neural stem cell-derived neurons. BPA-induced generation of reactive oxygen species and apoptosis were mitigated by a pharmacological activator of autophagy (rapamycin). Pharmacological (wortmannin and bafilomycin A1) and genetic (beclin siRNA) inhibition of autophagy aggravated BPA neurotoxicity. Activation of autophagy against BPA resulted in intracellular energy sensor AMP kinase (AMPK) activation, increased phosphorylation of raptor and acetyl-CoA carboxylase, and decreased phosphorylation of ULK1 (Ser-757), and silencing of AMPK exacerbated BPA neurotoxicity. Conversely, BPA exposure down-regulated the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway by phosphorylation of raptor as a transient cell's compensatory mechanism to preserve cellular energy pool. Moreover, silencing of mTOR enhanced autophagy, which further alleviated BPA-induced reactive oxygen species generation and apoptosis. BPA-mediated neurotoxicity also resulted in mitochondrial loss, bioenergetic deficits, and increased PARKIN mitochondrial translocation, suggesting enhanced mitophagy. These results suggest implication of autophagy against BPA-mediated neurodegeneration through involvement of AMPK and mTOR pathways. Hence, autophagy, which arbitrates cell survival and demise during stress conditions, requires further assessment to be

  18. Acute systemic rapamycin induces neurobehavioral alterations in rats.

    PubMed

    Hadamitzky, Martin; Herring, Arne; Keyvani, Kathy; Doenlen, Raphael; Krügel, Ute; Bösche, Katharina; Orlowski, Kathrin; Engler, Harald; Schedlowski, Manfred

    2014-10-15

    Rapamycin is a drug with antiproliferative and immunosuppressive properties, widely used for prevention of acute graft rejection and cancer therapy. It specifically inhibits the activity of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), a protein kinase known to play an important role in cell growth, proliferation and antibody production. Clinical observations show that patients undergoing therapy with immunosuppressive drugs frequently suffer from affective disorders such as anxiety or depression. However, whether these symptoms are attributed to the action of the distinct compounds remains rather elusive. The present study investigated in rats neurobehavioral consequences of acute rapamycin treatment. Systemic administration of a single low dose rapamycin (3mg/kg) led to enhanced neuronal activity in the amygdala analyzed by intracerebral electroencephalography and FOS protein expression 90min after drug injection. Moreover, behavioral investigations revealed a rapamycin-induced increase in anxiety-related behaviors in the elevated plus-maze and in the open-field. The behavioral alterations correlated to enhanced amygdaloid expression of KLK8 and FKBP51, proteins that have been implicated in the development of anxiety and depression. Together, these results demonstrate that acute blockade of mTOR signaling by acute rapamycin administration not only causes changes in neuronal activity, but also leads to elevated protein expression in protein kinase pathways others than mTOR, contributing to the development of anxiety-like behavior. Given the pivotal role of the amygdala in mood regulation, associative learning, and modulation of cognitive functions, our findings raise the question whether therapy with rapamycin may induce alterations in patients neuropsychological functioning.

  19. Local therapeutic efficacy with reduced systemic side effects by rapamycin-loaded subcapsular microspheres.

    PubMed

    Falke, Lucas L; van Vuuren, Stefan H; Kazazi-Hyseni, Filis; Ramazani, Farshad; Nguyen, Tri Q; Veldhuis, Gert J; Maarseveen, Erik M; Zandstra, Jurjen; Zuidema, Johan; Duque, Luisa F; Steendam, Rob; Popa, Eliane R; Kok, Robbert Jan; Goldschmeding, Roel

    2015-02-01

    Kidney injury triggers fibrosis, the final common pathway of chronic kidney disease (CKD). The increase of CKD prevalence worldwide urgently calls for new therapies. Available systemic treatment such as rapamycin are associated with serious side effects. To study the potential of local antifibrotic therapy, we administered rapamycin-loaded microspheres under the kidney capsule of ureter-obstructed rats and assessed the local antifibrotic effects and systemic side effects of rapamycin. After 7 days, microsphere depots were easily identifiable under the kidney capsule. Both systemic and local rapamycin treatment reduced intrarenal mTOR activity, myofibroblast accumulation, expression of fibrotic genes, and T-lymphocyte infiltration. Upon local treatment, inhibition of mTOR activity and reduction of myofibroblast accumulation were limited to the immediate vicinity of the subcapsular pocket, while reduction of T-cell infiltration was widespread. In contrast to systemically administered rapamycin, local treatment did not induce off target effects such as weight loss. Thus subcapsular delivery of rapamycin-loaded microspheres successfully inhibited local fibrotic response in UUO with less systemic effects. Therapeutic effect of released rapamycin was most prominent in close vicinity to the implanted microspheres.

  20. Diosmetin inhibits cell proliferation and induces apoptosis by regulating autophagy via the mammalian target of rapamycin pathway in hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jie; Ren, Hao; Liu, Bin; Zhang, Qingyu; Li, Mingyi; Zhu, Runzhi

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), which is a type of malignant tumor, is the fifth most common cancer in men and ninth in women worldwide. The aim of the present study was to investigate the antitumor effect of diosmetin (DIOS) in hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 cells. The proliferation, apoptosis and autophagy rates of HepG2 cells were measured following treatment with DIOS. The effects of DIOS treatment on HepG2 cell proliferation and apoptosis rates were analyzed using MTT assays and Annexin V staining, respectively. The effect of DIOS treatment on autophagy levels was assessed using transmission electron microscopy, green fluorescent protein (GFP)-microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain (LC3) transfection and LysoTracker Red staining. Furthermore, bafilomycin A1 (BA1), an autophagy inhibitor, was used to assess the association between DIOS and cell autophagy, proliferation and apoptosis. In addition, the expression of autophagy-related proteins [mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, P70S6K, phosphoinositide-dependent kinase-1, extracellular signal-regulated kinase, 5′-AMP-activated protein kinase and Akt] and apoptosis-related proteins [B-cell lymphoma (Bcl)-2-associated X protein, Bak, p53, Bcl-2 and caspase-3] were analyzed by western blotting. The results revealed that DIOS significantly inhibited proliferation (P<0.01) and induced apoptosis (P<0.001) in HepG2 cells. It was also demonstrated that DIOS triggered autophagy by regulating the mTOR pathway in HepG2 cells. Notably, following treatment of HepG2 cells with the autophagy inhibitor, BA1, the expression of apoptosis-related proteins, including Bax, Bak and p53, were significantly decreased (P<0.05), and cell viability was recovered to a certain extent. In conclusion, DIOS inhibits cell proliferation and induces apoptosis in HepG2 cells via regulation of the mTOR pathway. Thus, the results of the current study indicate that DIOS may present a potential therapeutic

  1. Rapamycin Effectively Impedes Melamine-Induced Impairments of Cognition and Synaptic Plasticity in Wistar Rats.

    PubMed

    Fu, Jingxuan; Wang, Hui; Gao, Jing; Yu, Mei; Wang, Rubin; Yang, Zhuo; Zhang, Tao

    2017-03-01

    Our previous investigation demonstrated that autophagy significantly reduced melamine-induced cell death in PC12 cells via inhibiting the excessive generation of ROS. In the present study, we further examine if rapamycin, used as an autophagy activator, can play a significant role in protecting neurons and alleviating the impairment of spatial cognition and hippocampal synaptic plasticity in melamine-treated rats. Male Wistar rats were divided into three groups: control, melamine-treated, and melamine-treated + rapamycin. The animal model was established by administering melamine at a dose of 300 mg/kg/day for 4 weeks. Rapamycin was intraperitoneally given at a dose of 1 mg/kg/day for 28 consecutive days. The Morris water maze test showed that spatial learning and reversal learning in melamine-treated rats were considerably damaged, whereas rapamycin significantly impeded the cognitive function impairment. Rapamycin efficiently alleviated the melamine-induced impairments of both long-term potentiation (LTP) and depotentiation, which were damaged in melamine rats. Rapamycin further increased the expression level of autophagy markers, which were significantly enhanced in melamine rats. Moreover, rapamycin noticeably decreased the reactive oxygen species level, while the superoxide dismutase activity was remarkably increased by rapamycin in melamine rats. Malondialdehyde assay exhibited that rapamycin prominently reduced the malondialdehyde (MDA) level of hippocampal neurons in melamine-treated rats. In addition, rapamycin significantly decreased the caspase-3 activity, which was elevated by melamine. Consequently, our results suggest that regulating autophagy may become a new targeted therapy to relieve the damage induced by melamine.

  2. Effects of combining rapamycin and resveratrol on apoptosis and growth of TSC2-deficient xenograft tumors.

    PubMed

    Alayev, Anya; Salamon, Rachel S; Sun, Yang; Schwartz, Naomi S; Li, Chenggang; Yu, Jane J; Holz, Marina K

    2015-11-01

    Lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM) is a rare neoplastic metastatic disease affecting women of childbearing age. LAM is caused by hyperactivation of the mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) as a consequence of tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) 1/2 inactivation. Clinically, LAM results in cystic lung destruction. mTORC1 inhibition using rapamycin analogs (rapalogs) is partially effective in reducing disease progression and improving lung function. However, cessation of treatment results in continued progression of the disease. In the present study, we investigated the effectiveness of the combination of rapamycin treatment with resveratrol, an autophagy inhibitor, in the TSC2-null xenograft tumor model. We determined that this combination inhibits phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate 3-kinase PI3K/Akt/mTORC1 signaling and activates apoptosis. Therefore, the combination of rapamycin and resveratrol may be an effective clinical strategy for treatment of LAM and other diseases with mTORC1 hyperactivation.

  3. Activation of mammalian target of rapamycin signaling in skeletal muscle of neonatal chicks: effects of dietary leucine and age.

    PubMed

    Deng, Huiling; Zheng, Aijuan; Liu, Guohua; Chang, Wenhuan; Zhang, Shu; Cai, Huiyi

    2014-01-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway is necessary for cellular protein synthesis regulation. Leucine was reported to stimulate muscle protein synthesis in mammalian embryos and neonates, but in higher animals (chickens) the effect of dietary leucine on mTOR signaling is unknown. Thus, we investigated the effects of dietary leucine and age on mRNA expression and phosphorylation of mTOR as well as its downstream targets, ribosomal protein S6 kinase (S6K1) and eukaryotic initiation factor 4E binding protein 1 (4E-BP1) in chick pectoral muscles. One hundred eighty newly hatched male chicks were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 dietary leucine treatment groups (1.43, 1.73, and 2.03% leucine) for 14 d, respectively. Each treatment group consisted of 6 cages with 10 chicks each. On d 3, 7, and 14, plasma insulin and leucine were measured and target gene expression and phosphorylation was assessed. Dietary leucine influenced plasma leucine but not insulin, and plasma leucine and insulin declined with chick age. The mTOR, S6K1, and 4E-BP1 mRNA expression and phosphorylation within chick pectoral muscles were upregulated with increased dietary leucine but downregulated with increased chick age. Thus, high dietary leucine activates target of rapamycin signaling pathways in skeletal muscle of neonatal chicks to stimulate muscle protein synthesis, and this pathway is attenuated with aging.

  4. Comparison of the effects of FK-506, cyclosporin A and rapamycin on IL-2 production.

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, D J; Naya, I; Bundick, R V; Smith, G M; Schmidt, J A

    1991-01-01

    The immunosuppressive compounds FK-506, cyclosporin A (CsA) and rapamycin inhibit both the human and mouse mixed lymphocyte reactions (MLR) with IC50s of 2-5 x 10(-10) M for FK-506 and rapamycin and 10(-8) M for CsA. FK-506 and CsA were also potent inhibitors of A23187/PMA-stimulated IL-2 production by Jurkat and HuT-78 cells but had no effect on the response of mouse CTLL cells to IL-2. IC50 values for inhibition of IL-2 production closely matched those for inhibition of the MLR and both drugs were active only during the first 4-6 hr following stimulation. In contrast, rapamycin was a poor inhibitor of IL-2 production, although it inhibited cellular responses to IL-2. The IC50 values for these two activities indicated that neither alone accounted for rapamycin inhibition of the MLR. FK-506 and CsA affected IL-2 gene transcription in Jurkat cells by the same mechanism. Both inhibited the appearance of the transcription factor, NFAT, whereas rapamycin did not. The appearance of another transcription factor, NFK beta, was unaffected by all three drugs. The effects of FK-506 and CsA on IL-2 gene expression, therefore, are similar even though the two drugs act through distinct cytosolic receptors. Images Figure 4 PMID:1715317

  5. Rapamycin disrupts cyclin/cyclin-dependent kinase/p21/proliferating cell nuclear antigen complexes and cyclin D1 reverses rapamycin action by stabilizing these complexes.

    PubMed

    Law, Mary; Forrester, Elizabeth; Chytil, Anna; Corsino, Patrick; Green, Gail; Davis, Bradley; Rowe, Thomas; Law, Brian

    2006-01-15

    Rapamycin and its derivatives are promising anticancer agents, but the exact mechanisms by which these drugs induce cell cycle arrest and inhibit tumor growth are unknown. A biochemical analysis of human mammary tumor cell lines indicated that rapamycin-induced antiproliferative effects correlated with down-regulation of cellular p21 levels and the levels of p21 in cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) 2 and 4 complexes. Cyclin D1 overexpression reversed rapamycin action and this reversal correlated with increased levels of cellular p21, higher levels of p21 associated with Cdk2, and stabilization of cyclin D1/Cdk2/p21/proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) complexes. Experiments using a novel cyclin D1-Cdk2 fusion protein or a kinase-dead mutant of the fusion protein indicated that reversal of rapamycin action required not only the formation of complexes with p21 and PCNA but also complex-associated kinase activity. Similar results were observed in vivo. The rapamycin derivative RAD001 (everolimus) inhibited the growth of mouse mammary tumors, which correlated with the disruption of cyclin D1/Cdk2 complexes. The potential implications of these results with respect to the use of rapamycin derivatives in breast cancer therapy are discussed.

  6. Rapamycin-induced insulin resistance is mediated by mTORC2 loss and uncoupled from longevity

    PubMed Central

    Lamming, Dudley W.; Ye, Lan; Katajisto, Pekka; Goncalves, Marcus D.; Saitoh, Maki; Stevens, Deanna M.; Davis, James G.; Salmon, Adam B.; Richardson, Arlan; Ahima, Rexford S.; Guertin, David A.; Sabatini, David M.; Baur, Joseph A.

    2012-01-01

    Rapamycin, an inhibitor of mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1), extends the lifespans of yeast, flies, and mice. Calorie restriction, which increases lifespan and insulin sensitivity, is proposed to function by inhibition of mTORC1, yet paradoxically, chronic administration of rapamycin substantially impairs glucose tolerance and insulin action. We demonstrate that rapamycin disrupted a second mTOR complex, mTORC2, in vivo and that mTORC2 was required for the insulin-mediated suppression of hepatic gluconeogenesis. Further, decreased mTORC1 signaling was sufficient to extend lifespan independently from changes in glucose homeostasis, as female mice heterozygous for both mTOR and mLST8 exhibited decreased mTORC1 activity and extended lifespan, but had normal glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity. Thus, mTORC2 disruption is an important mediator of the effects of rapamycin in vivo. PMID:22461615

  7. Ciliary transport regulates PDGF-AA/αα signaling via elevated mammalian target of rapamycin signaling and diminished PP2A activity.

    PubMed

    Umberger, Nicole L; Caspary, Tamara

    2015-01-15

    Primary cilia are built and maintained by intraflagellar transport (IFT), whereby the two IFT complexes, IFTA and IFTB, carry cargo via kinesin and dynein motors for anterograde and retrograde transport, respectively. Many signaling pathways, including platelet- derived growth factor (PDGF)-AA/αα, are linked to primary cilia. Active PDGF-AA/αα signaling results in phosphorylation of Akt at two residues: P-Akt(T308) and P-Akt(S473), and previous work showed decreased P-Akt(S473) in response to PDGF-AA upon anterograde transport disruption. In this study, we investigated PDGF-AA/αα signaling via P-Akt(T308) and P-Akt(S473) in distinct ciliary transport mutants. We found increased Akt phosphorylation in the absence of PDGF-AA stimulation, which we show is due to impaired dephosphorylation resulting from diminished PP2A activity toward P-Akt(T308). Anterograde transport mutants display low platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR)α levels, whereas retrograde mutants exhibit normal PDGFRα levels. Despite this, neither shows an increase in P-Akt(S473) or P-Akt(T308) upon PDGF-AA stimulation. Because mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling is increased in ciliary transport mutant cells and mTOR signaling inhibits PDGFRα levels, we demonstrate that inhibition of mTORC1 rescues PDGFRα levels as well as PDGF-AA-dependent phosphorylation of Akt(S473) and Akt(T308) in ciliary transport mutant MEFs. Taken together, our data indicate that the regulation of mTORC1 signaling and PP2A activity by ciliary transport plays key roles in PDGF-AA/αα signaling.

  8. Mechanism of metabolic control. Target of rapamycin signaling links nitrogen quality to the activity of the Rtg1 and Rtg3 transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Komeili, A; Wedaman, K P; O'Shea, E K; Powers, T

    2000-11-13

    De novo biosynthesis of amino acids uses intermediates provided by the TCA cycle that must be replenished by anaplerotic reactions to maintain the respiratory competency of the cell. Genome-wide expression analyses in Saccharomyces cerevisiae reveal that many of the genes involved in these reactions are repressed in the presence of the preferred nitrogen sources glutamine or glutamate. Expression of these genes in media containing urea or ammonia as a sole nitrogen source requires the heterodimeric bZip transcription factors Rtg1 and Rtg3 and correlates with a redistribution of the Rtg1p/Rtg3 complex from a predominantly cytoplasmic to a predominantly nuclear location. Nuclear import of the complex requires the cytoplasmic protein Rtg2, a previously identified upstream regulator of Rtg1 and Rtg3, whereas export requires the importin-beta-family member Msn5. Remarkably, nuclear accumulation of Rtg1/Rtg3, as well as expression of their target genes, is induced by addition of rapamycin, a specific inhibitor of the target of rapamycin (TOR) kinases. We demonstrate further that Rtg3 is a phosphoprotein and that its phosphorylation state changes after rapamycin treatment. Taken together, these results demonstrate that target of rapamycin signaling regulates specific anaplerotic reactions by coupling nitrogen quality to the activity and subcellular localization of distinct transcription factors.

  9. p53 and rapamycin are additive

    PubMed Central

    Campisi, Judith; Huang, Jing; Jones, Diane; Dodds, Sherry G.; Williams, Charnae; Hubbard, Gene; Livi, Carolina B.; Gao, Xiaoli; Weintraub, Susan; Curiel, Tyler; Sharp, Z. Dave; Hasty, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a kinase found in a complex (mTORC1) that enables macromolecular synthesis and cell growth and is implicated in cancer etiology. The rapamycin-FK506 binding protein 12 (FKBP12) complex allosterically inhibits mTORC1. In response to stress, p53 inhibits mTORC1 through a separate pathway involving cell signaling and amino acid sensing. Thus, these different mechanisms could be additive. Here we show that p53 improved the ability of rapamycin to: 1) extend mouse life span, 2) suppress ionizing radiation (IR)-induced senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP) and 3) increase the levels of amino acids and citric acid in mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells. This additive effect could have implications for cancer treatment since rapamycin and p53 are anti-oncogenic. PMID:26158292

  10. Erythroid induction of K562 cells treated with mithramycin is associated with inhibition of raptor gene transcription and mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) functions.

    PubMed

    Finotti, Alessia; Bianchi, Nicoletta; Fabbri, Enrica; Borgatti, Monica; Breveglieri, Giulia; Gasparello, Jessica; Gambari, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Rapamycin, an inhibitor of mTOR activity, is a potent inducer of erythroid differentiation and fetal hemoglobin production in β-thalassemic patients. Mithramycin (MTH) was studied to see if this inducer of K562 differentiation also operates through inhibition of mTOR. We can conclude from the study that the mTOR pathway is among the major transcript classes affected by mithramycin-treatment in K562 cells and a sharp decrease of raptor protein production and p70S6 kinase is detectable in mithramycin treated K562 cells. The promoter sequence of the raptor gene contains several Sp1 binding sites which may explain its mechanism of action. We hypothesize that the G+C-selective DNA-binding drug mithramycin is able to interact with these sequences and to inhibit the binding of Sp1 to the raptor promoter due to the following results: (a) MTH strongly inhibits the interactions between Sp1 and Sp1-binding sites of the raptor promoter (studied by electrophoretic mobility shift assays, EMSA); (b) MTH strongly reduces the recruitment of Sp1 transcription factor to the raptor promoter in intact K562 cells (studied by chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments, ChIP); (c) Sp1 decoy oligonucleotides are able to specifically inhibit raptor mRNA accumulation in K562 cells. In conclusion, raptor gene expression is involved in mithramycin-mediated induction of erythroid differentiation of K562 cells and one of its mechanism of action is the inhibition of Sp1 binding to the raptor promoter.

  11. Erythroid induction of K562 cells treated with mithramycin is associated with inhibition of raptor gene transcription and mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) functions

    PubMed Central

    Finotti, Alessia; Bianchi, Nicoletta; Fabbri, Enrica; Borgatti, Monica; Breveglieri, Giulia; Gasparello, Jessica; Gambari, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Rapamycin, an inhibitor of mTOR activity, is a potent inducer of erythroid differentiation and fetal hemoglobin production in β-thalassemic patients. Mithramycin (MTH) was studied to see if this inducer of K562 differentiation also operates through inhibition of mTOR. We can conclude from the study that the mTOR pathway is among the major transcript classes affected by mithramycin-treatment in K562 cells and a sharp decrease of raptor protein production and p70S6 kinase is detectable in mithramycin treated K562 cells. The promoter sequence of the raptor gene contains several Sp1 binding sites which may explain its mechanism of action. We hypothesize that the G + C-selective DNA-binding drug mithramycin is able to interact with these sequences and to inhibit the binding of Sp1 to the raptor promoter due to the following results: (a) MTH strongly inhibits the interactions between Sp1 and Sp1-binding sites of the raptor promoter (studied by electrophoretic mobility shift assays, EMSA); (b) MTH strongly reduces the recruitment of Sp1 transcription factor to the raptor promoter in intact K562 cells (studied by chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments, ChIP); (c) Sp1 decoy oligonucleotides are able to specifically inhibit raptor mRNA accumulation in K562 cells. In conclusion, raptor gene expression is involved in mithramycin-mediated induction of erythroid differentiation of K562 cells and one of its mechanism of action is the inhibition of Sp1 binding to the raptor promoter. PMID:25478892

  12. Suppression of the proliferation of hypoxia-Induced retinal pigment epithelial cell by rapamycin through the /mTOR/HIF-1α/VEGF/ signaling.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ning-Ning; Zhao, Ning; Cai, Na

    2015-06-01

    Rapamycin, a highly specific inhibitor of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), exhibits significant antitumor/antiangiogenic activity in human cancer cells. Its effect on the retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells was rarely investigated. This study assessed the proliferation of hypoxia-induced RPE and the inhibitory effects of rapamycin using 3-(4,5-dimethylthazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay and examined the expression of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in RPE cells with or without rapamycin under normoxic and hypoxic conditions using real-time PCR and Western blot. We found that hypoxia increased the levels of mTOR, HIF-1α, and VEGF. The suppression of HIF-1α and VEGF by rapamycin was associated with dephosphorylation of mTOR and the downstream effector ribosomal protein S6 kinase (P70S6K) and 4E-binding protein-1 (4E-BP1) of mTORC1. Rapamycin only inhibited the protein levels and did not change the mRNA expression of HIF-1α. No cytotoxicity to the RPE cells by rapamycin was caused under either normoxia or hypoxia. Our data suggest that rapamycin suppresses hypoxia-induced RPE cell proliferation through a mechanism related to the targeting of mTOR/HIF-1α/VEGF signaling. Rapamycin may potentially provide a safe and effective novel treatment for choroidal vascular disease.

  13. Rapamycin generates anti-apoptotic human Th1/Tc1 cells via autophagy for induction of xenogeneic GVHD.

    PubMed

    Amarnath, Shoba; Flomerfelt, Francis A; Costanzo, Carliann M; Foley, Jason E; Mariotti, Jacopo; Konecki, Daniel M; Gangopadhyay, Anu; Eckhaus, Michael; Wong, Susan; Levine, Bruce L; June, Carl H; Fowler, Daniel H

    2010-05-01

    Murine T cells exposed to rapamycin maintain flexibility towards Th1/Tc1 differentiation, thereby indicating that rapamycin promotion of regulatory T cells (Tregs) is conditional. The degree to which rapamycin might inhibit human Th1/Tc1 differentiation has not been evaluated. In the presence of rapamycin, T cell costimulation and polarization with IL-12 or IFN-α permitted human CD4+ and CD8+ T cell differentiation towards a Th1/Tc1 phenotype; activation of STAT1 and STAT4 pathways essential for Th1/Tc1 polarity was preserved during mTOR blockade but instead abrogated by PI3 kinase inhibition. Such rapamycin-resistant human Th1/Tc1 cells: (1) were generated through autophagy (increased LC3BII expression; phenotype reversion by autophagy inhibition via 3-MA or siRNA for Beclin1); (2) expressed anti-apoptotic bcl-2 family members (reduced Bax, Bak; increased phospho-Bad); (3) maintained mitochondrial membrane potentials; and (4) displayed reduced apoptosis. In vivo, type I polarized and rapamycin-resistant human T cells caused increased xenogeneic graft-versus-host disease (x-GVHD). Murine recipients of rapamycin-resistant human Th1/Tc1 cells had: (1) persistent T cell engraftment; (2) increased T cell cytokine and cytolytic effector function; and (3) T cell infiltration of skin, gut, and liver. Rapamycin therefore does not impair human T cell capacity for type I differentiation. Rather, rapamycin yields an anti-apoptotic Th1/Tc1 effector phenotype by promoting autophagy.

  14. Inhibition of mTORC1 leads to MAPK pathway activation through a PI3K-dependent feedback loop in human cancer

    PubMed Central

    Carracedo, Arkaitz; Ma, Li; Teruya-Feldstein, Julie; Rojo, Federico; Salmena, Leonardo; Alimonti, Andrea; Egia, Ainara; Sasaki, Atsuo T.; Thomas, George; Kozma, Sara C.; Papa, Antonella; Nardella, Caterina; Cantley, Lewis C.; Baselga, Jose; Pandolfi, Pier Paolo

    2008-01-01

    Numerous studies have established a causal link between aberrant mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) activation and tumorigenesis, indicating that mTOR inhibition may have therapeutic potential. In this study, we show that rapamycin and its analogs activate the MAPK pathway in human cancer, in what represents a novel mTORC1-MAPK feedback loop. We found that tumor samples from patients with biopsy-accessible solid tumors of advanced disease treated with RAD001, a rapamycin derivative, showed an administration schedule–dependent increase in activation of the MAPK pathway. RAD001 treatment also led to MAPK activation in a mouse model of prostate cancer. We further show that rapamycin-induced MAPK activation occurs in both normal cells and cancer cells lines and that this feedback loop depends on an S6K-PI3K-Ras pathway. Significantly, pharmacological inhibition of the MAPK pathway enhanced the antitumoral effect of mTORC1 inhibition by rapamycin in cancer cells in vitro and in a xenograft mouse model. Taken together, our findings identify MAPK activation as a consequence of mTORC1 inhibition and underscore the potential of a combined therapeutic approach with mTORC1 and MAPK inhibitors, currently employed as single agents in the clinic, for the treatment of human cancers. PMID:18725988

  15. Rapamycin negatively impacts insulin signaling, glucose uptake and uncoupling protein-1 in brown adipocytes.

    PubMed

    García-Casarrubios, Ester; de Moura, Carlos; Arroba, Ana I; Pescador, Nuria; Calderon-Dominguez, María; Garcia, Laura; Herrero, Laura; Serra, Dolors; Cadenas, Susana; Reis, Flavio; Carvalho, Eugenia; Obregon, Maria Jesus; Valverde, Ángela M

    2016-12-01

    New onset diabetes after transplantation (NODAT) is a metabolic disorder that affects 40% of patients on immunosuppressive agent (IA) treatment, such as rapamycin (also known as sirolimus). IAs negatively modulate insulin action in peripheral tissues including skeletal muscle, liver and white fat. However, the effects of IAs on insulin sensitivity and thermogenesis in brown adipose tissue (BAT) have not been investigated. We have analyzed the impact of rapamycin on insulin signaling, thermogenic gene-expression and mitochondrial respiration in BAT. Treatment of brown adipocytes with rapamycin for 16h significantly decreased insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS1) protein expression and insulin-mediated protein kinase B (Akt) phosphorylation. Consequently, both insulin-induced glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) translocation to the plasma membrane and glucose uptake were decreased. Early activation of the N-terminal Janus activated kinase (JNK) was also observed, thereby increasing IRS1 Ser 307 phosphorylation. These effects of rapamycin on insulin signaling in brown adipocytes were partly prevented by a JNK inhibitor. In vivo treatment of rats with rapamycin for three weeks abolished insulin-mediated Akt phosphorylation in BAT. Rapamycin also inhibited norepinephrine (NE)-induced lipolysis, the expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1α (PGC-1α) and uncoupling protein (UCP)-1 in brown adipocytes. Importantly, basal mitochondrial respiration, proton leak and maximal respiratory capacity were significantly decreased in brown adipocytes treated with rapamycin. In conclusion, we demonstrate, for the first time the important role of brown adipocytes as target cells of rapamycin, suggesting that insulin resistance in BAT might play a major role in NODAT development.

  16. Rapamycin increases neuronal survival, reduces inflammation and astrocyte proliferation after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Goldshmit, Yona; Kanner, Sivan; Zacs, Maria; Frisca, Frisca; Pinto, Alexander R; Currie, Peter D; Pinkas-Kramarski, Ronit

    2015-09-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) frequently leads to a permanent functional impairment as a result of the initial injury followed by secondary injury mechanism, which is characterised by increased inflammation, glial scarring and neuronal cell death. Finding drugs that may reduce inflammatory cell invasion and activation to reduce glial scarring and increase neuronal survival is of major importance for improving the outcome after SCI. In the present study, we examined the effect of rapamycin, an mTORC1 inhibitor and an inducer of autophagy, on recovery from spinal cord injury. Autophagy, a process that facilitates the degradation of cytoplasmic proteins, is also important for maintenance of neuronal homeostasis and plays a major role in neurodegeneration after neurotrauma. We examined rapamycin effects on the inflammatory response, glial scar formation, neuronal survival and regeneration in vivo using spinal cord hemisection model in mice, and in vitro using primary cortical neurons and human astrocytes. We show that a single injection of rapamycin, inhibited p62/SQSTM1, a marker of autophagy, inhibited mTORC1 downstream effector p70S6K, reduced macrophage/neutrophil infiltration into the lesion site, microglia activation and secretion of TNFα. Rapamycin inhibited astrocyte proliferation and reduced the number of GFAP expressing cells at the lesion site. Finally, it increased neuronal survival and axonogenesis towards the lesion site. Our study shows that rapamycin treatment increased significantly p-Akt levels at the lesion site following SCI. Similarly, rapamycin treatment of neurons and astrocytes induced p-Akt elevation under stress conditions. Together, these findings indicate that rapamycin is a promising candidate for treatment of acute SCI condition and may be a useful therapeutic agent.

  17. The anti-diabetic drug metformin inhibits vascular endothelial growth factor expression via the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1/hypoxia-inducible factor-1α signaling pathway in ELT-3 cells.

    PubMed

    Tadakawa, Mari; Takeda, Takashi; Li, Bin; Tsuiji, Kenji; Yaegashi, Nobuo

    2015-01-05

    The aim of this study was to elucidate whether metformin can regulate the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in rat-derived uterine leiomyoma cells (ELT-3 cells). In vitro studies were conducted using ELT-3 cells. Under normoxic conditions, metformin suppressed VEGF protein levels in the supernatant and cells in a dose-dependent manner. In hypoxia-mimicking conditions, VEGF and hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) proteins were both highly expressed and were suppressed by the metformin treatment. Metformin did not affect HIF-1α mRNA levels, which indicated that its effects occurred at the post-translational level. Metformin inhibited mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) activity by phosphorylating the mTORC1 component raptor. This study revealed the anti-angiogenic activity of metformin in ELT-3 cells by suppressing the expression of VEGF via the mTORC1/HIF-1α pathway. These results indicate that metformin may represent an effective alternative in the future treatment of uterine leiomyomas.

  18. Target of rapamycin (TOR)-based therapy for cardiomyopathy: evidence from zebrafish and human studies.

    PubMed

    Kushwaha, Sudhir; Xu, Xiaolei

    2012-02-01

    Rapamycin is a U.S. Food and Drug Administration-approved drug for the prevention of immunorejection following organ transplantation. Pharmacological studies suggest a potential new application of rapamycin in attenuating cardiomyopathy, but the potential for this application is not yet supported by genetic studies of genes in target of rapamycin (TOR) signaling in rodents. Recently, supporting genetic evidence was presented in zebrafish using two adult cardiomyopathy models. By characterizing a heterozygous zebrafish target of rapamycin (ztor) mutant, the therapeutic effect of long-term TOR signaling inhibition was demonstrated. Dose- and stage-dependent functions of TOR signaling provide an explanation for the seemingly contradictory results obtained in genetic studies of TOR components in rodents. The results from the zebrafish studies, together with the supporting preliminary clinical studies, suggested that TOR signaling inhibition should be further pursued as a novel therapeutic strategy for cardiomyopathy. Future directions for developing TOR-based therapy include assessing the long-term benefits of rapamycin as a candidate drug for heart failure patients, defining the dynamic activity of TOR, exploring the impacts of TOR signaling manipulation in different models of cardiomyopathies, and elucidating the downstream signaling branches that confer the therapeutic effects of TOR signaling inhibition.

  19. Rapamycin improves TIE2-mutated venous malformation in murine model and human subjects

    PubMed Central

    Boscolo, Elisa; Limaye, Nisha; Huang, Lan; Kang, Kyu-Tae; Soblet, Julie; Uebelhoer, Melanie; Mendola, Antonella; Natynki, Marjut; Seront, Emmanuel; Dupont, Sophie; Hammer, Jennifer; Legrand, Catherine; Brugnara, Carlo; Eklund, Lauri; Vikkula, Miikka; Bischoff, Joyce; Boon, Laurence M.

    2015-01-01

    Venous malformations (VMs) are composed of ectatic veins with scarce smooth muscle cell coverage. Activating mutations in the endothelial cell tyrosine kinase receptor TIE2 are a common cause of these lesions. VMs cause deformity, pain, and local intravascular coagulopathy, and they expand with time. Targeted pharmacological therapies are not available for this condition. Here, we generated a model of VMs by injecting HUVECs expressing the most frequent VM-causing TIE2 mutation, TIE2-L914F, into immune-deficient mice. TIE2-L914F–expressing HUVECs formed VMs with ectatic blood-filled channels that enlarged over time. We tested both rapamycin and a TIE2 tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TIE2-TKI) for their effects on murine VM expansion and for their ability to inhibit mutant TIE2 signaling. Rapamycin prevented VM growth, while TIE2-TKI had no effect. In cultured TIE2-L914F–expressing HUVECs, rapamycin effectively reduced mutant TIE2-induced AKT signaling and, though TIE2-TKI did target the WT receptor, it only weakly suppressed mutant-induced AKT signaling. In a prospective clinical pilot study, we analyzed the effects of rapamycin in 6 patients with difficult–to-treat venous anomalies. Rapamycin reduced pain, bleeding, lesion size, functional and esthetic impairment, and intravascular coagulopathy. This study provides a VM model that allows evaluation of potential therapeutic strategies and demonstrates that rapamycin provides clinical improvement in patients with venous malformation. PMID:26258417

  20. Rapamycin protects against neuronal death and improves neurological function with modulation of microglia after experimental intracerebral hemorrhage in rats.

    PubMed

    Li, D; Liu, F; Yang, T; Jin, T; Zhang, H; Luo, X; Wang, M

    2016-09-30

    Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) results in a devastating brain disorder with high mortality and poor prognosis and effective therapeutic intervention for the disease remains a challenge at present. The present study investigated the neuroprotective effects of rapamycin on ICH-induced brain damage and the possible involvement of activated microglia. ICH was induced in rats by injection of type IV collagenase into striatum. Different dose of rapamycin was systemically administrated by intraperitoneal injection beginning at 1 h after ICH induction. Western blot analysis showed that ICH led to a long-lasting increase of phosphorylated mTOR and this hyperactivation of mTOR was reduced by systemic administration of rapamycin. Rapamycin treatment significantly improved the sensorimotor deficits induced by ICH, and attenuated ICH-induced brain edema formation as well as lesion volume. Nissl and Fluoro-Jade C staining demonstrated that administration with rapamycin remarkably decreased neuronal death surrounding the hematoma at 7 d after ICH insult. ELISA and real-time quantitative PCR demonstrated that rapamycin inhibited ICH-induced excessive expression of TNF-α and IL-1β in ipsilateral hemisphere. Furthermore, activation of microglia induced by ICH was significantly suppressed by rapamycin administration. These data indicated that treatment of rapamycin following ICH decreased the brain injuries and neuronal death at the peri-hematoma striatum, and increased neurological function, which associated with reduced the levels of proinflammatory cytokines and activated microglia. The results provide novel insight into the neuroprotective therapeutic strategy of rapamycin for ICH insult, which possibly involving the regulation of microglial activation.

  1. TOR (target of rapamycin) is a key regulator of triacylglycerol accumulation in microalgae.

    PubMed

    Imamura, Sousuke; Kawase, Yasuko; Kobayashi, Ikki; Shimojima, Mie; Ohta, Hiroyuki; Tanaka, Kan

    2016-01-01

    Most microalgae abundantly accumulate lipid droplets (LDs) containing triacylglycerols (TAGs) under several stress conditions, but the underlying molecular mechanism of this accumulation remains unclear. In a recent study, we found that inhibition of TOR (target of rapamycin), a highly conserved protein kinase of eukaryotes, by rapamycin resulted in TAG accumulation in microalgae, indicating that TOR negatively regulates TAG accumulation. Here, we show that formation of intracellular LDs and TAG accumulation were also induced in the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii after exposure to Torin1 or AZD8055, which are novel TOR inhibitors that inhibit TOR activity in a manner different from rapamycin. These results supported quite well our previous conclusion that TOR is a central regulator of TAG accumulation in microalgae.

  2. TOR (target of rapamycin) is a key regulator of triacylglycerol accumulation in microalgae

    PubMed Central

    Imamura, Sousuke; Kawase, Yasuko; Kobayashi, Ikki; Shimojima, Mie; Ohta, Hiroyuki; Tanaka, Kan

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Most microalgae abundantly accumulate lipid droplets (LDs) containing triacylglycerols (TAGs) under several stress conditions, but the underlying molecular mechanism of this accumulation remains unclear. In a recent study, we found that inhibition of TOR (target of rapamycin), a highly conserved protein kinase of eukaryotes, by rapamycin resulted in TAG accumulation in microalgae, indicating that TOR negatively regulates TAG accumulation. Here, we show that formation of intracellular LDs and TAG accumulation were also induced in the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii after exposure to Torin1 or AZD8055, which are novel TOR inhibitors that inhibit TOR activity in a manner different from rapamycin. These results supported quite well our previous conclusion that TOR is a central regulator of TAG accumulation in microalgae. PMID:26855321

  3. Adventitial Nab-Rapamycin Injection Reduces Porcine Femoral Artery Luminal Stenosis Induced by Balloon Angioplasty via Inhibition of Medial Proliferation and Adventitial Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Gasper, Warren J.; Jimenez, Cynthia A.; Walker, Joy; Conte, Michael S.; Seward, Kirk; Owens, Christopher D.

    2014-01-01

    Background Endovascular interventions on peripheral arteries are limited by high rates of restenosis. Our hypothesis was that adventitial injection of rapamycin nanoparticles would be safe and reduce luminal stenosis in a porcine femoral artery balloon angioplasty model. Methods and Results Eighteen juvenile male crossbred swine were included. Single-injury (40%–60% femoral artery balloon overstretch injury; n=2) and double-injury models (endothelial denudation injury 2 weeks before a 20%–30% overstretch injury; n=2) were compared. The double-injury model produced significantly more luminal stenosis at 28 days, P=0.002, and no difference in medial fibrosis or inflammation. Four pigs were randomized to the double-injury model and adventitial injection of saline (n=2) or 500 μg of nanoparticle albumin-bound rapamycin (nab-rapamycin; n=2) with an endovascular microinfusion catheter. There was 100% procedural success and no difference in endothelial regeneration. At 28 days, nab-rapamycin led to significant reductions in luminal stenosis, 17% (interquartile range, 12%–35%) versus 10% (interquartile range, 8.3%–14%), P=0.001, medial cell proliferation, P<0.001, and fibrosis, P<0.001. There were significantly fewer adventitial leukocytes at 3 days, P<0.001, but no difference at 28 days. Pharmacokinetic analysis (single-injury model) found rapamycin concentrations 1500× higher in perivascular tissues than in blood at 1 hour. Perivascular rapamycin persisted ≥8 days and was not detectable at 28 days. Conclusions Adventitial nab-rapamycin injection was safe and significantly reduced luminal stenosis in a porcine femoral artery balloon angioplasty model. Observed reductions in early adventitial leukocyte infiltration and late medial cell proliferation and fibrosis suggest an immunosuppressive and antiproliferative mechanism. An intraluminal microinfusion catheter for adventitial injection represents an alternative to stent- or balloon-based local drug delivery

  4. Rapamycin restores p14, p15 and p57 expression and inhibits the mTOR/p70S6K pathway in acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Huibo; Kong, Xiaolin; Cui, Gang; Ren, Cuicui; Fan, Shengjin; Sun, Lili; Zhang, Yingjie; Cao, Rongyi; Li, Yinghua; Zhou, Jin

    2015-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of rapamycin and its underlying mechanisms on acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) cells. We found that the p14, p15, and p57 genes were not expressed in ALL cell lines (Molt-4 and Nalm-6) and adult ALL patients, whereas mTOR, 4E-BP1, and p70S6K were highly expressed. In Molt-4 and Nalm-6 cells exposed to rapamycin, cell viability decreased and the cell cycle was arrested at the G1/S phase. Rapamycin restored p14, p15, and p57 gene expression through demethylation of the promoters of these genes. As expected, rapamycin also increased p14 and p15 protein expression in both Molt-4 and Nalm-6 cells, as well as p57 protein expression in Nalm-6 cells. Rapamycin additionally decreased mTOR and p70S6K mRNA levels, as well as p70S6K and p-p70S6K protein levels. However, depletion of mTOR by siRNA did not alter the expression and promoter methylation states of p14, p15, and p57. These results indicate that the inhibitory effect of rapamycin may be due mainly to increased p14, p15, and p57 expression via promoter demethylation and decreased mTOR and p70S6K expression in ALL cell lines. These results suggest a potential role for rapamycin in the treatment of adult ALL.

  5. Are invertebrates relevant models in ageing research? Focus on the effects of rapamycin on TOR.

    PubMed

    Erdogan, Cihan Suleyman; Hansen, Benni Winding; Vang, Ole

    2016-01-01

    Ageing is the organisms increased susceptibility to death, which is linked to accumulated damage in the cells and tissues. Ageing is a complex process regulated by crosstalk of various pathways in the cells. Ageing is highly regulated by the Target of Rapamycin (TOR) pathway activity. TOR is an evolutionary conserved key protein kinase in the TOR pathway that regulates growth, proliferation and cell metabolism in response to nutrients, growth factors and stress. Comparing the ageing process in invertebrate model organisms with relatively short lifespan with mammals provides valuable information about the molecular mechanisms underlying the ageing process faster than mammal systems. Inhibition of the TOR pathway activity via either genetic manipulation or rapamycin increases lifespan profoundly in most invertebrate model organisms. This contribution will review the recent findings in invertebrates concerning the TOR pathway and effects of TOR inhibition by rapamycin on lifespan. Besides some contradictory results, the majority points out that rapamycin induces longevity. This suggests that administration of rapamycin in invertebrates is a promising tool for pursuing the scientific puzzle of lifespan prolongation.

  6. Destabilization of TNF-α mRNA by Rapamycin

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jong-Woo; Jeon, Ye Ji; Lee, Jae Cheol; Ahn, So Ra; Ha, Shin Won; Bang, So Young; Park, Eun Kyung; Yi, Sang Ah; Lee, Min Gyu; Han, Jeung-Whan

    2012-01-01

    Stimulation of mast cells through the high affinity IgE receptor (FcεRI) induces degranulation, lipid mediator release, and cytokine secretion leading to allergic reactions. Although various signaling pathways have been characterized to be involved in the FcεRI-mediated responses, little is known about the precious mechanism for the expression of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in mast cells. Here, we report that rapamycin, a specific inhibitor of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), reduces the expression of TNF-α in rat basophilic leukemia (RBL-2H3) cells. IgE or specific antigen stimulation of RBL-2H3 cells increases the expression of TNF-α and activates various signaling molecules including S6K1, Akt and p38 MAPK. Rapamycin specifically inhibits antigen-induced TNF-α mRNA level, while other kinase inhibitors have no effect on TNF-α mRNA level. These data indicate that mTOR signaling pathway is the main regulation mechanism for antigen-induced TNF-α expression. TNF-α mRNA stability analysis using reporter construct containing TNF-α adenylate/uridylate-rich elements (AREs) shows that rapamycin destabilizes TNF-α mRNA via regulating the AU-rich element of TNF-α mRNA. The antigen-induced activation of S6K1 is inhibited by specific kinase inhibitors including mTOR, PI3K, PKC and Ca2+chelator inhibitor, while TNF-α mRNA level is reduced only by rapamycin treatment. These data suggest that the effects of rapamycin on the expression of TNF-α mRNA are not mediated by S6K1 but regulated by mTOR. Taken together, our results reveal that mTOR signaling pathway is a novel regulation mechanism for antigen-induced TNF-α expression in RBL-2H3 cells. PMID:24116273

  7. SR4 Uncouples Mitochondrial Oxidative Phosphorylation, Modulates AMP-dependent Kinase (AMPK)-Mammalian Target of Rapamycin (mTOR) Signaling, and Inhibits Proliferation of HepG2 Hepatocarcinoma Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Figarola, James L.; Singhal, Jyotsana; Tompkins, Joshua D.; Rogers, George W.; Warden, Charles; Horne, David; Riggs, Arthur D.; Awasthi, Sanjay; Singhal, Sharad S.

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation produces most of the energy in aerobic cells by coupling respiration to the production of ATP. Mitochondrial uncouplers, which reduce the proton gradient across the mitochondrial inner membrane, create a futile cycle of nutrient oxidation without generating ATP. Regulation of mitochondrial dysfunction and associated cellular bioenergetics has been recently identified as a promising target for anticancer therapy. Here, we show that SR4 is a novel mitochondrial uncoupler that causes dose-dependent increase in mitochondrial respiration and dissipation of mitochondrial membrane potential in HepG2 hepatocarcinoma cells. These effects were reversed by the recoupling agent 6-ketocholestanol but not cyclosporin A and were nonexistent in mitochondrial DNA-depleted HepG2 cells. In isolated mouse liver mitochondria, SR4 similarly increased oxygen consumption independent of adenine nucleotide translocase and uncoupling proteins, decreased mitochondrial membrane potential, and promoted swelling of valinomycin-treated mitochondria in potassium acetate medium. Mitochondrial uncoupling in HepG2 cells by SR4 results in the reduction of cellular ATP production, increased ROS production, activation of the energy-sensing enzyme AMPK, and inhibition of acetyl-CoA carboxylase and mammalian target of rapamycin signaling pathways, leading to cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Global analysis of SR4-associated differential gene expression confirms these observations, including significant induction of apoptotic genes and down-regulation of cell cycle, mitochondrial, and oxidative phosphorylation pathway transcripts at 24 h post-treatment. Collectively, our studies demonstrate that the previously reported indirect activation of AMPK and in vitro anticancer properties of SR4 as well as its beneficial effects in both animal xenograft and obese mice models could be a direct consequence of its mitochondrial uncoupling activity. PMID:26534958

  8. Inhibition of Hageman factor activation

    PubMed Central

    Nossel, H. L.; Rubin, H.; Drillings, M.; Hsieh, R.

    1968-01-01

    A method for studying inhibitors of the contact stages of blood coagulation is described. A number of positively charged substances were shown to inhibit the contact stages. The inhibitory substances include spermine, cytochrome c, ribonuclease, and lysozyme. The inhibitory effect of these substances was neutralized by the addition of an activated plasma thromboplastin antecedent, factor XI, (PTA) fraction. Other positively charged substances including protamine, hexadimethrine, polylysine, polyornithine, methylene blue, and ortho-toluidine blue also inhibited the contact stages of coagulation, but the inhibitory effect on coagulation was not neutralized by the activated PTA fraction. Negatively charged substances such as heparin and insulin did not inhibit the contact stages of coagulation. Cytochrome c inhibited Celite adsorption of a partially purified Hageman factor fraction, and cytochrome, ribonuclease, spermine, and lysozome inhibited the adsorption of Hageman factor from PTA-deficient plasma. Very much smaller quantities of Celite completely adsorbed Hageman factor from the fraction rather than from whole plasma, which suggested the possibility that plasma contains an inhibitor or inhibitors of Hageman factor adsorption. Furthermore cytochrome c, spermine, ribonuclease, and lysozyme inhibited the coagulant activity of the following activators of the Hageman and PTA factors: Celite, kaolin, sodium stearate, ellagic acid, and skin. It is suggested that negatively charged sites on these activators are critical for adsorption and activation and that inhibition results from neutralization of the negatively charged sites by the adsorbed inhibtor. Tests with polylysine polymers indicate that inhibitory activity is directly related to molecular size over the molecular weight range of 4000 to 100,000. PMID:5645860

  9. [Rapamycin effect on senescence and autophagy processes in human cell lines].

    PubMed

    Fernández Larrosa, Pablo N; Ruiz Grecco, Marina; Alvarado, Cecilia V; Micenmacher, Sabrina; Aguirre, Cristina; Martínez Noel, Giselle; Costas, Mónica A; Rubio, María Fernanda

    2011-01-01

    Autophagy and senescence are both processes that firstly avoid tumor development through the inhibition of proliferation of damaged cells. However, autophagy does not imply cell death, because it is also a mechanism of cell survival under stress conditions. Concerning senescence, although these cells do not proliferate, they produce growth factors that contribute to the proliferative response of other cells. Rapamycin is an immunosupressor used in transplanted patients that inhibits the mTOR transduction signal pathway. This pathway is involved in the control of the energetic and nutritional state of the cell allowing protein synthesis and inhibiting autophagy when it is active. In this paper, the action of rapamycin over these processes was investigated and we found that a low concentration of this drug induces the senescence of a normal cell line, while a higher concentration induces autophagy of a transformed cell line. We have also determined that the oncogen RAC3 inhibits autophagy and that its expression is diminished by rapamycin. Therefore, our results contribute to a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms by which this drug is effective, given the relevance of rapamycin for potential tumor therapy.

  10. S6 kinase 1 is required for rapamycin-sensitive liver proliferation after mouse hepatectomy.

    PubMed

    Espeillac, Catherine; Mitchell, Claudia; Celton-Morizur, Séverine; Chauvin, Céline; Koka, Vonda; Gillet, Cynthia; Albrecht, Jeffrey H; Desdouets, Chantal; Pende, Mario

    2011-07-01

    Rapamycin is an antibiotic inhibiting eukaryotic cell growth and proliferation by acting on target of rapamycin (TOR) kinase. Mammalian TOR (mTOR) is thought to work through 2 independent complexes to regulate cell size and cell replication, and these 2 complexes show differential sensitivity to rapamycin. Here we combine functional genetics and pharmacological treatments to analyze rapamycin-sensitive mTOR substrates that are involved in cell proliferation and tissue regeneration after partial hepatectomy in mice. After hepatectomy, hepatocytes proliferated rapidly, correlating with increased S6 kinase phosphorylation, while treatment with rapamycin derivatives impaired regeneration and blocked S6 kinase activation. In addition, genetic deletion of S6 kinase 1 (S6K1) caused a delay in S phase entry in hepatocytes after hepatectomy. The proliferative defect of S6K1-deficient hepatocytes was cell autonomous, as it was also observed in primary cultures and hepatic overexpression of S6K1-rescued proliferation. We found that S6K1 controlled steady-state levels of cyclin D1 (Ccnd1) mRNA in liver, and cyclin D1 expression was required to promote hepatocyte cell cycle. Notably, in vivo overexpression of cyclin D1 was sufficient to restore the proliferative capacity of S6K-null livers. The identification of an S6K1-dependent mechanism participating in cell proliferation in vivo may be relevant for cancer cells displaying high mTOR complex 1 activity and cyclin D1 accumulation.

  11. EFFECTS OF RAPAMYCIN ON CEREBRAL OXYGEN SUPPLY AND CONSUMPTION DURING REPERFUSION AFTER CEREBRAL ISCHEMIA

    PubMed Central

    CHI, O. Z.; BARSOUM, S.; VEGA-COTTO, N. M.; JACINTO, E.; LIU, X.; MELLENDER, S. J.; WEISS, H. R.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract—Activation of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) leads to cell growth and survival. We tested the hypothesis that inhibition of mTOR would increase infarct size and decrease microregional O2 supply/consumption balance after cerebral ischemia–reperfusion. This was tested in isoflurane-anesthetized rats with middle cerebral artery blockade for 1 h and reperfusion for 2 h with and without rapamycin (20 mg/kg once daily for two days prior to ischemia). Regional cerebral blood flow was determined using a C14-iodoantipyrine autoradiographic technique. Regional small-vessel arterial and venous oxygen saturations were determined microspectrophotometrically. The control ischemic-reperfused cortex had a similar blood flow and O2 consumption to the contralateral cortex. However, microregional O2 supply/consumption balance was significantly reduced in the ischemic-reperfused cortex. Rapamycin significantly increased cerebral O2 consumption and further reduced O2 supply/consumption balance in the reperfused area. This was associated with an increased cortical infarct size (13.5 ± 0.8% control vs. 21.5 ± 0.9% rapamycin). We also found that ischemia–reperfusion increased AKT and S6K1 phosphorylation, while rapamycin decreased this phosphorylation in both the control and ischemic-reperfused cortex. This suggests that mTOR is important for not only cell survival, but also for the control of oxygen balance after cerebral ischemia–reperfusion. PMID:26742793

  12. Effects of rapamycin on cerebral oxygen supply and consumption during reperfusion after cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Chi, O Z; Barsoum, S; Vega-Cotto, N M; Jacinto, E; Liu, X; Mellender, S J; Weiss, H R

    2016-03-01

    Activation of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) leads to cell growth and survival. We tested the hypothesis that inhibition of mTOR would increase infarct size and decrease microregional O2 supply/consumption balance after cerebral ischemia-reperfusion. This was tested in isoflurane-anesthetized rats with middle cerebral artery blockade for 1h and reperfusion for 2h with and without rapamycin (20mg/kg once daily for two days prior to ischemia). Regional cerebral blood flow was determined using a C(14)-iodoantipyrine autoradiographic technique. Regional small-vessel arterial and venous oxygen saturations were determined microspectrophotometrically. The control ischemic-reperfused cortex had a similar blood flow and O2 consumption to the contralateral cortex. However, microregional O2 supply/consumption balance was significantly reduced in the ischemic-reperfused cortex. Rapamycin significantly increased cerebral O2 consumption and further reduced O2 supply/consumption balance in the reperfused area. This was associated with an increased cortical infarct size (13.5±0.8% control vs. 21.5±0.9% rapamycin). We also found that ischemia-reperfusion increased AKT and S6K1 phosphorylation, while rapamycin decreased this phosphorylation in both the control and ischemic-reperfused cortex. This suggests that mTOR is important for not only cell survival, but also for the control of oxygen balance after cerebral ischemia-reperfusion.

  13. Rapamycin induces the fusion-type independent downregulation of the EWS/FLI-1 proteins and inhibits Ewing's sarcoma cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Mateo-Lozano, Silvia; Tirado, Oscar M; Notario, Vicente

    2003-12-18

    Ewing's sarcoma (ES) is the prototype of a family of tumors (ESFT) of neuroectodermal origin formed by small, round cells with limited neural differentiation, which arise most frequently within bones in children or adolescents. The proliferation of ESFT cells is highly dependent on the establishment of, and signaling through several growth factor-mediated autocrine loops. The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a central regulator of translation and cell proliferation, involved in the cellular response to various nutritional, stress and mitogenic effectors. As mTOR has recently been associated with certain human cancers, we investigated the possibility that mTOR played a role in the regulation of ES cell proliferation. Results showed that ES cell lines carrying EWS/FLI-1 alleles of different types expressed different levels of total and phosphorylated mTOR protein. We demonstrate that rapamycin, an mTOR inhibitor, efficiently blocked the proliferation of all cell lines by promoting cell cycle arrest at the G1 phase. This was paralleled by the downregulation of the levels of the EWS/FLI-1 proteins, regardless of their fusion type, and the concomitant restoration of the expression of the TGF-beta type 2 receptor (TGFbeta RII), which is known to be repressed by several EWS-ETS fusion proteins. The expression of a rapamycin-resistant mTOR construct prevented both the proliferation blockade and the EWS/FLI-1 downregulation. These data demonstrate that mTOR signaling plays a central role in ES cell pathobiology and strongly suggest that the use of rapamycin as a cytostatic agent may be an efficient tool for the treatment of ES patients.

  14. Rapamycin: An InhibiTOR of Aging Emerges From the Soil of Easter Island.

    PubMed

    Arriola Apelo, Sebastian I; Lamming, Dudley W

    2016-07-01

    Rapamycin (sirolimus) is a macrolide immunosuppressant that inhibits the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) protein kinase and extends lifespan in model organisms including mice. Although rapamycin is an FDA-approved drug for select indications, a diverse set of negative side effects may preclude its wide-scale deployment as an antiaging therapy. mTOR forms two different protein complexes, mTORC1 and mTORC2; the former is acutely sensitive to rapamycin whereas the latter is only chronically sensitive to rapamycin in vivo. Over the past decade, it has become clear that although genetic and pharmacological inhibition of mTORC1 extends lifespan and delays aging, inhibition of mTORC2 has negative effects on mammalian health and longevity and is responsible for many of the negative side effects of rapamycin. In this review, we discuss recent advances in understanding the molecular and physiological effects of rapamycin treatment, and we discuss how the use of alternative rapamycin treatment regimens or rapamycin analogs has the potential to mitigate the deleterious side effects of rapamycin treatment by more specifically targeting mTORC1. Although the side effects of rapamycin are still of significant concern, rapid progress is being made in realizing the revolutionary potential of rapamycin-based therapies for the treatment of diseases of aging.

  15. Convergence of the target of rapamycin and the Snf1 protein kinase pathways in the regulation of the subcellular localization of Msn2, a transcriptional activator of STRE (Stress Response Element)-regulated genes.

    PubMed

    Mayordomo, Isabel; Estruch, Francisco; Sanz, Pascual

    2002-09-20

    The subcellular localization of Msn2, a transcriptional activator of STRE (stress response element)-regulated genes, is modulated by carbon source availability. In cells growing in glucose, Msn2 is located mainly in the cytosol, whereas in carbon source-starved cells, Msn2 is located largely inside the nucleus. However, in cells lacking Reg1 (the regulatory subunit of the Reg1/Glc7 protein phosphatase complex), the regulation of subcellular distribution is absent, Msn2 being constitutively present in the cytosol. The localization defect in these mutants is specific for carbon starvation stress, and it is because of the presence of an abnormally active Snf1 protein kinase that inhibits the nuclear localization of Msn2 upon carbon starvation. Active Snf1 kinase is also able to avoid the effects of rapamycin, a drug that by inhibiting the TOR kinase pathway leads to a nuclear localization of Msn2 in wild type cells. Therefore, active Snf1 and the TOR kinase pathway may affect similar cytosolic steps in the regulation of the subcellular localization of Msn2.

  16. Activation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt-mammalian target of Rapamycin signaling pathway in the hippocampus is essential for the acquisition of morphine-induced place preference in rats.

    PubMed

    Cui, Yue; Zhang, X Q; Cui, Y; Xin, W J; Jing, J; Liu, X G

    2010-11-24

    Hippocampus is a critical structure for the acquisition of morphine-induced conditioned place preference (CPP), which is a usual learning paradigm for assessing drug reward. However, the precise mechanisms remain largely unknown. Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and its downstream targets, including Akt, mammalian target of Rapamycin (mTOR) and 70-kDa ribosomal S6 kinase (p70S6K), are critical molecules implicated in learning and memory. Here, we tested the role of PI3K/Akt-mTOR-p70S6K signaling pathway in morphine-induced CPP in the hippocampus. Our results showed that the acquisition of morphine CPP increased phosphorylation of Akt in the hippocampal CA3, but not in the nucleus accumbens (NAc), the ventral tegmental area (VTA) or the CA1. Moreover, the phosphorylated Akt exclusively expressed in the CA3 neurons. Likewise, levels of phosphorylated mTOR and p70S6K were significantly enhanced in the CA3 following morphine CPP. The alterations of these phosphorylated proteins are positively correlated with the acquisition of morphine CPP. More importantly, microinjection of PI3K inhibitor (LY294002) or mTOR inhibitor (Rapamycin) into the CA3 prevented the acquisition of CPP and inhibited the activation of PI3K-Akt signaling pathway. In addition, pre-infusion of β-FNA (β-funaltrexamine hydrochloride), a selective irreversible μ opioid receptor antagonist, into CA3 significantly prevented the acquisition of CPP and impaired Akt phosphorylation. All these results strongly implied that the PI3K-Akt signaling pathway activated by μ opioid receptor in hippocampal CA3 plays an important role in acquisition of morphine-induced CPP.

  17. Loss of the repressor REST in uterine fibroids promotes aberrant G protein-coupled receptor 10 expression and activates mammalian target of rapamycin pathway

    PubMed Central

    Varghese, Binny V.; Koohestani, Faezeh; McWilliams, Michelle; Colvin, Arlene; Gunewardena, Sumedha; Kinsey, William H.; Nowak, Romana A.; Nothnick, Warren B.; Chennathukuzhi, Vargheese M.

    2013-01-01

    Uterine fibroids (leiomyomas) are the most common tumors of the female reproductive tract, occurring in up to 77% of reproductive-aged women, yet molecular pathogenesis remains poorly understood. A role for atypically activated mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway in the pathogenesis of uterine fibroids has been suggested in several studies. We identified that G protein-coupled receptor 10 [GPR10, a putative signaling protein upstream of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase–protein kinase B/AKT–mammalian target of rapamycin (PI3K/AKT–mTOR) pathway] is aberrantly expressed in uterine fibroids. The activation of GPR10 by its cognate ligand, prolactin releasing peptide, promotes PI3K–AKT–mTOR pathways and cell proliferation specifically in cultured primary leiomyoma cells. Additionally, we report that RE1 suppressing transcription factor/neuron-restrictive silencing factor (REST/NRSF), a known tumor suppressor, transcriptionally represses GPR10 in the normal myometrium, and that the loss of REST in fibroids permits GPR10 expression. Importantly, mice overexpressing human GPR10 in the myometrium develop myometrial hyperplasia with excessive extracellular matrix deposition, a hallmark of uterine fibroids. We demonstrate previously unrecognized roles for GPR10 and its upstream regulator REST in the pathogenesis of uterine fibroids. Importantly, we report a unique genetically modified mouse model for a gene that is misexpressed in uterine fibroids. PMID:23284171

  18. Calcineurin phosphatase activity in T lymphocytes is inhibited by FK 506 and cyclosporin A.

    PubMed Central

    Fruman, D A; Klee, C B; Bierer, B E; Burakoff, S J

    1992-01-01

    The immunosuppressive agents cyclosporin A (CsA) and FK 506 bind to distinct families of intracellular proteins (immunophilins) termed cyclophilins and FK 506-binding proteins (FKBPs). Recently, it has been shown that, in vitro, the complexes of CsA-cyclophilin and FK 506-FKBP-12 bind to and inhibit the activity of calcineurin, a calcium-dependent serine/threonine phosphatase. We have investigated the effects of drug treatment on phosphatase activity in T lymphocytes. Calcineurin is expressed in T cells, and its activity can be measured in cell lysates. Both CsA and FK 506 specifically inhibit cellular calcineurin at drug concentrations that inhibit interleukin 2 production in activated T cells. Rapamycin, which binds to FKBPs but exhibits different biological activities than FK 506, has no effect on calcineurin activity. Furthermore, excess concentrations of rapamycin prevent the effects of FK 506, apparently by displacing FK 506 from FKBPs. These results show that calcineurin is a target of drug-immunophilin complexes in vivo and establish a physiological role for calcineurin in T-cell activation. Images PMID:1373887

  19. The effect of rapamycin on biodiesel-producing protist Euglena gracilis.

    PubMed

    Mukaida, Shiho; Ogawa, Takumi; Ohishi, Kazuko; Tanizawa, Yasuhiro; Ohta, Daisaku; Arita, Masanori

    2016-06-01

    Rapamycin induces autophagy with lipid remodeling in yeast and mammalian cells. To investigate the lipid biosynthesis of Euglena gracilis, rapamycin was supplemented in comparison with two model algae, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Cyanidioschyzon merolae. In Euglena, rapamycin induced the reduction of chlorophylls and the accumulation of neutral lipids without deterring its cell proliferation. Its lipidomic profile revealed that the fatty acid composition did not alter by supplementing rapamycin. In Chlamydomonas, however, rapamycin induced serious growth inhibition as reported elsewhere. With a lower concentration of rapamycin, the alga accumulated neutral lipids without reducing chlorophylls. In Cyanidioschyzon, rapamycin did not increase neutral lipids but reduced its chlorophyll content. We also tested fatty acid elongase inhibitors such as pyroxasulfone or flufenacet in Euglena with no significant change in its neutral lipid contents. In summary, controlled supplementation of rapamycin can increase the yield of neutral lipids while the scheme is not always applicable for other algal species.

  20. Nitrogen Source Activates TOR (Target of Rapamycin) Complex 1 via Glutamine and Independently of Gtr/Rag Proteins*

    PubMed Central

    Stracka, Daniele; Jozefczuk, Szymon; Rudroff, Florian; Sauer, Uwe; Hall, Michael N.

    2014-01-01

    The evolutionary conserved TOR complex 1 (TORC1) activates cell growth in response to nutrients. In yeast, TORC1 responds to the nitrogen source via a poorly understood mechanism. Leucine, and perhaps other amino acids, activates TORC1 via the small GTPases Gtr1 and Gtr2, orthologs of the mammalian Rag GTPases. Here we investigate the activation of TORC1 by the nitrogen source and how this might be related to TORC1 activation by Gtr/Rag. The quality of the nitrogen source, as defined by its ability to promote growth and glutamine accumulation, directly correlates with its ability to activate TORC1 as measured by Sch9 phosphorylation. Preferred nitrogen sources stimulate rapid, sustained Sch9 phosphorylation and glutamine accumulation. Inhibition of glutamine synthesis reduces TORC1 activity and growth. Poor nitrogen sources stimulate rapid but transient Sch9 phosphorylation. A Gtr1 deficiency prevents the transient stimulation of TORC1 but does not affect the sustained TORC1 activity in response to good nitrogen sources. These findings suggest that the nitrogen source must be converted to glutamine, the preferred nitrogen source in yeast, to sustain TORC1 activity. Furthermore, sustained TORC1 activity is independent of Gtr/Rag. Thus, the nitrogen source and Gtr/Rag activate TORC1 via different mechanisms. PMID:25063813

  1. The combination of rapamycin and resveratrol blocks autophagy and induces apoptosis in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Alayev, Anya; Berger, Sara Malka; Kramer, Melissa Y; Schwartz, Naomi S; Holz, Marina K

    2015-03-01

    Hyperactivation of the mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) is a frequent event in breast cancer and current efforts are aimed at targeting the mTORC1 signaling pathway in combination with other targeted therapies. However, patients often develop drug resistance in part due to activation of the oncogenic Akt signaling and upregulation of autophagy, which protects cancer cells from apoptosis. In the present study we investigated the effects of combination therapy of rapamycin (an allosteric mTORC1 inhibitor) together with resveratrol (a phytoestrogen that inhibits autophagy). Our results show that combination of these drugs maintains inhibition of mTORC1 signaling, while preventing upregulation of Akt activation and autophagy, causing apoptosis. Additionally, this combination was effective in estrogen receptor positive and negative breast cancer cells, underscoring its versatility.

  2. The Neuroprotective Effect of Rapamycin as a Modulator of the mTOR-NF-κB Axis during Retinal Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Okamoto, Tomohiro; Ozawa, Yoko; Kamoshita, Mamoru; Osada, Hideto; Toda, Eriko; Kurihara, Toshihide; Nagai, Norihiro; Umezawa, Kazuo; Tsubota, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The determination of the molecular mechanism underlying retinal pathogenesis and visual dysfunction during innate inflammation, and the treatment effect of rapamycin thereon. Methods The endotoxin-induced uveitis and retinitis mouse model was established by injecting lipopolysaccharide. The mice were subsequently treated with rapamycin, a mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor. The rhodopsin mRNA and protein expression level in the retina and the photoreceptor outer segment (OS) length in immunohistochemical stainings were measured, and visual function was recorded by electroretinography. Inflammatory cytokines, their related molecules, mTOR, and LC3 levels were measured by real-time PCR and/or immunoblotting. Leukocyte adhesion during inflammation was analyzed using concanavalin A lectin. Results The post-transcriptional reduction in the visual pigment of rod photoreceptor cells, rhodopsin, OS shortening, and rod photoreceptor cell dysfunction during inflammation were suppressed by rapamycin. Activation of nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) and induction of inflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin-6 (IL-6) and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), and the activation of the downstream signaling protein, signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), which reduces rhodopsin in the retina during inflammation, were attenuated by rapamycin. Increased leukocyte adhesion was also attenuated by rapamycin. Interestingly, although mTOR activation was observed after NF-κB activation, mTOR inhibition suppressed NF-κB activation at the early phase, indicating that the basal level of activated mTOR was sufficient to activate NF-κB in the retina. In addition, the inhibition of NF-κB suppressed mTOR activation, suggesting a positive feedback loop of mTOR and NF-κB during inflammation. The ratio of LC3II to LC3I, which reflects autophagy induction, was not changed by inflammation but was increased by

  3. Rapamycin increases the yield and effector function of human γδ T cells stimulated in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Li, Haishan

    2011-01-01

    Clinical strategies to exploit Vγ2Vδ2 T cell responses for immunotherapy are confronted with short-term increases in cell levels or activity and the development of anergy that reduces the response to therapy with succeeding treatments. We are exploring strategies to increase the yield and durability of elicited Vγ2Vδ2 T cell responses. One approach focuses on the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), which is important for regulating T cell metabolism and function. In Vγ2Vδ2 T cells, mTOR phosphorylates the S6K1 and eIF4EBP1 signaling intermediates after antigen stimulation. Rapamycin inhibited these phosphorylation events without impacting Akt or Erk activation, even though specific inhibition of Akt or Erk in turn reduced the activation of mTOR. The effects of rapamycin on the T cell receptor signaling pathway lead to increased proliferation of treated and antigen-exposed Vγ2Vδ2 cells. Rapamycin altered the phenotype of antigen-specific Vγ2Vδ2 cells by inducing a population shift from CD62L + CD69−to CD62L-CD69+, higher expression of CD25 or Bcl-2, lower levels of CCR5 and increased resistance to Fas-mediated cellular apoptosis. These changes were consistent with rapamycin promoting cell activation while decreasing the susceptibility to cell death that might occur by CCR5 or Fas signaling. Rapamycin treatment during antigen-stimulation of Vγ2Vδ2 T cells may be a strategy for overcoming current obstacles in tumor immunotherapy. PMID:21107834

  4. FOXO3a reactivation mediates the synergistic cytotoxic effects of rapamycin and cisplatin in oral squamous cell carcinoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Fang Liang; Wang Huiming; Zhou Lin; Yu Da

    2011-02-15

    FOXO3a, a well-known transcriptional regulator, controls a wide spectrum of biological processes. The Phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling pathway inactivates FOXO3a via phosphorylation-induced nuclear exclusion and degradation. A loss or gain of FOXO3a activity has been correlated with efficiency of chemotherapies in various cancers including oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). Therefore, in the current study, we have investigated the FOXO3a activity modulating and antitumor effects of rapamycin and cisplatin in OSCC cells. Cisplatin inhibited proliferation and induced apoptosis in a dose-dependent way in OSCC Tca8113 cells. Rapamycin alone had no effect on cell proliferation and apoptosis. Rapamycin downregulated the expression of S-phase kinase associated protein-2 (Skp2) and increased the FOXO3a protein stability but induced the upregulation of feedback Akt activation-mediated FOXO3a phosphorylation. Cisplatin decreased the phosphorylation of FOXO3a via Akt inhibition. Rapamycin combined with cisplatin as its feedback Akt activation inhibitor revealed the most dramatic FOXO3a nuclear localization and reactivation with the prevention of its feedback loop and exposed significant synergistic effects of decreased cell proliferation and increased apoptosis in vitro and decreased tumor size in vivo. Furthermore, the downstream effects of FOXO3a reactivation were found to be accumulation of p27 and Bim. In conclusion, rapamycin/cisplatin combination therapy boosts synergistic antitumor effects through the significant FOXO3a reactivation in OSCC cells. These results may represent a novel mechanism by which rapamycin/cisplatin combination therapy proves to be a potent molecular-targeted strategy for OSCC.

  5. Potential use of rapamycin in HIV infection

    PubMed Central

    Donia, Marco; McCubrey, James A; Bendtzen, Klaus; Nicoletti, Ferdinando

    2010-01-01

    The strong need for the development of alternative anti-HIV agents is primarily due to the emergence of strain-resistant viruses, the need for sustained adherence to complex treatment regimens and the toxicity of currently used antiviral drugs. This review analyzes proof of concept studies indicating that the immunomodulatory drug rapamycin (RAPA) possesses anti-HIV properties both in vitro and in vivo that qualifies it as a potential new anti-HIV drug. It represents a literature review of published studies that evaluated the in vitro and in vivo activity of RAPA in HIV. RAPA represses HIV-1 replication in vitro through different mechanisms including, but not limited, to down regulation of CCR5. In addition RAPA synergistically enhances the anti-HIV activity of entry inhibitors such as vicriviroc, aplaviroc and enfuvirtide in vitro. RAPA also inhibits HIV-1 infection in human peripheral blood leucocytes-SCID reconstituted mice. In addition, a prospective nonrandomized trial of HIV patient series receiving RAPA monotherapy after liver transplantation indicated significantly better control of HIV and hepatitis C virus (HCV) replication among patients taking RAPA monotherapy. Taken together, the evidence presented in this review suggests that RAPA may be a useful drug that should be evaluated for the prevention and treatment of HIV-1 infection. PMID:21175433

  6. Mammalian-target of rapamycin inhibition with temsirolimus in myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) patients is associated with considerable toxicity: results of the temsirolimus pilot trial by the German MDS Study Group (D-MDS).

    PubMed

    Wermke, Martin; Schuster, Claudia; Nolte, Florian; Al-Ali, Haifa-Kathrin; Kiewe, Philipp; Schönefeldt, Claudia; Jakob, Christiane; von Bonin, Malte; Hentschel, Leopold; Klut, Ina-Maria; Ehninger, Gerhard; Bornhäuser, Martin; Baretton, Gustavo; Germing, Ulrich; Herbst, Regina; Haase, Detelef; Hofmann, Wolf K; Platzbecker, Uwe

    2016-12-01

    The mammalian-target of rapamycin (also termed mechanistic target of rapamycin, mTOR) pathway integrates various pro-proliferative and anti-apoptotic stimuli and is involved in regulatory T-cell (TREG) development. As these processes contribute to the pathogenesis of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), we hypothesized that mTOR modulation with temsirolimus (TEM) might show activity in MDS. This prospective multicentre trial enrolled lower and higher risk MDS patients, provided that they were transfusion-dependent/neutropenic or relapsed/refractory to 5-azacitidine, respectively. All patients received TEM at a weekly dose of 25 mg. Of the 9 lower- and 11 higher-risk patients included, only 4 (20%) reached the response assessment after 4 months of treatment and showed stable disease without haematological improvement. The remaining patients discontinued TEM prematurely due to adverse events. Median overall survival (OS) was not reached in the lower-risk group and 296 days in the higher-risk group. We observed a significant decline of bone marrow (BM) vascularisation (P = 0·006) but were unable to demonstrate a significant impact of TEM on the balance between TREG and pro-inflammatory T-helper-cell subsets within the peripheral blood or BM. We conclude that mTOR-modulation with TEM at a dose of 25 mg per week is accompanied by considerable toxicity and has no beneficial effects in elderly MDS patients.

  7. FK506 treatment inhibits caspase-3 activation and promotes oligodendroglial survival following traumatic spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Nottingham, Stephanie; Knapp, Pamela; Springer, Joe

    2002-09-01

    The focus of this study is to examine the ability of FK506, an immunosuppressant that inhibits calcineurin activation, to limit caspase-3 activation in oligodendroglia following spinal cord injury (SCI). To better establish a role for calcineurin and caspase-3 activation in oligodendroglia following SCI, rats received a contusion injury to the spinal cord followed by treatment with FK506 or rapamycin (another immunosuppressant with no detectable inhibitory action on calcineurin activation). Animals were then sacrificed at 8 days postinjury and spinal cord tissue was processed using immunofluorescence histochemistry to examine cellular caspase-3 activation in ventral and dorsal white matter. In all treatment groups, numerous oligodendroglia were found to express the activated form of caspase-3 in regions proximal and distal to the injury epicenter. However, our findings suggest that treatment with FK506, but not rapamycin reduces the number of oligodendroglia expressing activated caspase-3 and increases the number of surviving oligodendroglia in dorsal white matter. These results provide initial evidence that agents that reduce the actions of calcineurin and subsequent caspase-3 activation may prove beneficial in the treatment of traumatic SCI.

  8. Myxoma virus virotherapy for glioma in immunocompetent animal models: optimizing administration routes and synergy with rapamycin.

    PubMed

    Lun, XueQing; Alain, Tommy; Zemp, Franz J; Zhou, Hongyuan; Rahman, Masmudur M; Hamilton, Mark G; McFadden, Grant; Bell, John; Senger, Donna L; Forsyth, Peter A

    2010-01-15

    Oncolytic myxoma virus (MYXV) is being developed as a novel virotherapeutic against human brain cancer and has promising activity against human brain tumor models in immunocompromised hosts. Because an intact immune system could reduce its efficacy, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the oncolytic potential of MYXV in immunocompetent racine glioma models. Here, we report that MYXV infects and kills all racine cell glioma lines and that its effects are enhanced by rapamycin. Intratumoral administration of MYXV with rapamycin improved viral replication in the tumor and significantly prolonged host survival. Similarly, coadministration via a method of convection-enhanced delivery (CED) enhanced viral replication and efficacy in vivo. Mechanisms by which rapamycin improved MYXV oncolysis included an inhibition of type I IFN production in vitro and a reduction of intratumoral infiltration of CD68(+) microglia/macrophages and CD163(+) macrophages in vivo. Our findings define a method to improve MYXV efficacy against gliomas by rapamycin coadministration, which acts to promote immune responses engaged by viral delivery.

  9. Downregulation of p70S6K Enhances Cell Sensitivity to Rapamycin in Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Zhaoming; Peng, Kezheng; Wang, Ning; Liu, Hong-Min

    2016-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that mTOR/p70S6K pathway was abnormally activated in many cancers and rapamycin and its analogs can restrain tumor growth through inhibiting this pathway, but some tumors including esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) appear to be insensitive to rapamycin in recent studies. In the present study, we explored the measures to improve the sensitivity of ESCC cells to rapamycin and identified the clinical significance of the expression of phosphorylated p70S6K (p-p70S6K). The results showed that, after downregulating the expression of p70S6K and p-p70S6K by p70S6K siRNA, the inhibitory effects of rapamycin on cell proliferation, cell cycle, and tumor growth were significantly enhanced in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, p-p70S6K had strong positive expression in ESCC tissues and its expression was closely related to lymph node metastasis and the TNM staging. These results indicated that p-p70S6K may participate in the invasion and metastasis in the development of ESCC and downregulation of the expression of p-p70S6K could improve the sensitivity of cells to rapamycin in ESCC. PMID:27595116

  10. Two crystal structures of the FK506-binding domain of Plasmodium falciparum FKBP35 in complex with rapamycin at high resolution.

    PubMed

    Bianchin, Alessandra; Allemand, Frederic; Bell, Angus; Chubb, Anthony J; Guichou, Jean François

    2015-06-01

    Antimalarial chemotherapy continues to be challenging in view of the emergence of drug resistance, especially artemisinin resistance in Southeast Asia. It is critical that novel antimalarial drugs are identified that inhibit new targets with unexplored mechanisms of action. It has been demonstrated that the immunosuppressive drug rapamycin, which is currently in clinical use to prevent organ-transplant rejection, has antimalarial effects. The Plasmodium falciparum target protein is PfFKBP35, a unique immunophilin FK506-binding protein (FKBP). This protein family binds rapamycin, FK506 and other immunosuppressive and non-immunosuppressive macrolactones. Here, two crystallographic structures of rapamycin in complex with the FK506-binding domain of PfFKBP35 at high resolution, in both its oxidized and reduced forms, are reported. In comparison with the human FKBP12-rapamycin complex reported previously, the structures reveal differences in the β4-β6 segment that lines the rapamycin binding site. Structural differences between the Plasmodium protein and human hFKBP12 include the replacement of Cys106 and Ser109 by His87 and Ile90, respectively. The proximity of Cys106 to the bound rapamycin molecule (4-5 Å) suggests possible routes for the rational design of analogues of rapamycin with specific antiparasitic activity. Comparison of the structures with the PfFKBD-FK506 complex shows that both drugs interact with the same binding-site residues. These two new structures highlight the structural differences and the specific interactions that must be kept in consideration for the rational design of rapamycin analogues with antimalarial activity that specifically bind to PfFKBP35 without immunosuppressive effects.

  11. Delayed reendothelialization with rapamycin is rescued by the addition of nicorandil in balloon-injured rat carotid arteries

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ying Qian; Tian, Feng; Chen, Jin Song; Chen, Yun Dai; Zhou, Ying; Li, Bo; Ma, Qiang; Zhang, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Rapamycin is an immunosuppressive agent that is added to drug eluting stents. It prevents restenosis, but it also impairs reendothelialization. Nicorandil is a hybrid agent with adenosine triphosphated (ATP)-sensitive K+ (KATP) channel opener and nitrate properties. It prevents oxidative stress and cell apoptosis induced by rapamycin in endothelial cells in vitro. However, whether nicorandil promotes reendothelialization after angioplasty delayed by rapamycin remains to be determined. Balloon injury model was established in SD rats. Nicorandil increased reendothelialization impaired by rapamycin, and it decreased xanthine oxidase (XO)-generated reactive oxygen species (ROS) induced by rapamycin. In addition, eNOS expression inhibited by rapamycin was increased by nicorandil in vivo. In vitro, rapamycin-impeded cardiac microvascular endothelial cells (CMECs) migration, proliferation and rapamycin-induced ROS production were reversed by nicorandil. Knockdown of XO partially inhibited rapamycin-induced ROS production and cell apoptosis in CMECs, and it promoted CMECs migration and proliferation suppressed by rapamycin. Knockdown of Akt partially prevents eNOS upregulation promoted by nicorandil. The beneficial effect of nicorandil is exhibited by inhibiting XO and up-regulating Akt pathway. Nicorandil combined with rapamycin in effect rescue the deficiencies of rapamycin alone in arterial healing after angioplasty. PMID:27713157

  12. Differential Regulation of Cardiac Function and Intracardiac Cytokines by Rapamycin in Healthy and Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Luck, Christian; DeMarco, Vincent G.; Mahmood, Abuzar; Gavini, Madhavi P.

    2017-01-01

    Diabetes is comorbid with cardiovascular disease and impaired immunity. Rapamycin improves cardiac functions and extends lifespan by inhibiting the mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1). However, in diabetic murine models, Rapamycin elevates hyperglycemia and reduces longevity. Since Rapamycin is an immunosuppressant, we examined whether Rapamycin (750 μg/kg/day) modulates intracardiac cytokines, which affect the cardiac immune response, and cardiac function in male lean (ZL) and diabetic obese Zucker (ZO) rats. Rapamycin suppressed levels of fasting triglycerides, insulin, and uric acid in ZO but increased glucose. Although Rapamycin improved multiple diastolic parameters (E/E′, E′/A′, E/Vp) initially, these improvements were reversed or absent in ZO at the end of treatment, despite suppression of cardiac fibrosis and phosphoSer473Akt. Intracardiac cytokine protein profiling and Ingenuity® Pathway Analysis indicated suppression of intracardiac immune defense in ZO, in response to Rapamycin treatment in both ZO and ZL. Rapamycin increased fibrosis in ZL without increasing phosphoSer473Akt and differentially modulated anti-fibrotic IL-10, IFNγ, and GM-CSF in ZL and ZO. Therefore, fundamental difference in intracardiac host defense between diabetic ZO and healthy ZL, combined with differential regulation of intracardiac cytokines by Rapamycin in ZO and ZL hearts, underlies differential cardiac outcomes of Rapamycin treatment in health and diabetes.

  13. mTOR inhibition decreases SOX2-SOX9 mediated glioma stem cell activity and temozolomide resistance

    PubMed Central

    Garros-Regulez, Laura; Aldaz, Paula; Arrizabalaga, Olatz; Moncho-Amor, Veronica; Carrasco-Garcia, Estefania; Manterola, Lorea; Moreno-Cugnon, Leire; Barrena, Cristina; Villanua, Jorge; Ruiz, Irune; Pollard, Steven; Lovell-Badge, Robin; Sampron, Nicolas; Garcia, Idoia; Matheu, Ander

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: SOX2 and SOX9 are commonly overexpressed in glioblastoma, and regulate the activity of glioma stem cells (GSCs). Their specific and overlapping roles in GSCs and glioma treatment remain unclear. Methods: SOX2 and SOX9 levels were examined in human biopsies. Gain and loss of function determined the impact of altering SOX2 and SOX9 on cell proliferation, senescence, stem cell activity, tumorigenesis and chemoresistance. Results: SOX2 and SOX9 expression correlates positively in glioma cells and glioblastoma biopsies. High levels of SOX2 bypass cellular senescence and promote resistance to temozolomide. Mechanistic investigations revealed that SOX2 acts upstream of SOX9. mTOR genetic and pharmacologic (rapamycin) inhibition decreased SOX2 and SOX9 expression, and reversed chemoresistance. Conclusions: Our findings reveal SOX2-SOX9 as an oncogenic axis that regulates stem cell properties and chemoresistance. We identify that rapamycin abrogate SOX protein expression and provide evidence that a combination of rapamycin and temozolomide inhibits tumor growth in cells with high SOX2/SOX9. PMID:26878385

  14. Rapamycin suppresses brain aging in senescence-accelerated OXYS rats.

    PubMed

    Kolosova, Nataliya G; Vitovtov, Anton O; Muraleva, Natalia A; Akulov, Andrey E; Stefanova, Natalia A; Blagosklonny, Mikhail V

    2013-06-01

    Cellular and organismal aging are driven in part by the MTOR (mechanistic target of rapamycin) pathway and rapamycin extends life span inC elegans, Drosophila and mice. Herein, we investigated effects of rapamycin on brain aging in OXYS rats. Previously we found, in OXYS rats, an early development of age-associated pathological phenotypes similar to several geriatric disorders in humans, including cerebral dysfunctions. Behavioral alterations as well as learning and memory deficits develop by 3 months. Here we show that rapamycin treatment (0.1 or 0.5 mg/kg as a food mixture daily from the age of 1.5 to 3.5 months) decreased anxiety and improved locomotor and exploratory behavior in OXYS rats. In untreated OXYS rats, MRI revealed an increase of the area of hippocampus, substantial hydrocephalus and 2-fold increased area of the lateral ventricles. Rapamycin treatment prevented these abnormalities, erasing the difference between OXYS and Wister rats (used as control). All untreated OXYS rats showed signs of neurodegeneration, manifested by loci of demyelination. Rapamycin decreased the percentage of animals with demyelination and the number of loci. Levels of Tau and phospho-Tau (T181) were increased in OXYS rats (compared with Wistar). Rapamycin significantly decreased Tau and inhibited its phosphorylation in the hippocampus of OXYS and Wistar rats. Importantly, rapamycin treatment caused a compensatory increase in levels of S6 and correspondingly levels of phospo-S6 in the frontal cortex, indicating that some downstream events were compensatory preserved, explaining the lack of toxicity. We conclude that rapamycin in low chronic doses can suppress brain aging.

  15. Targeting glutamine metabolism and the focal adhesion kinase additively inhibits the mammalian target of the rapamycin pathway in spheroid cancer stem-like properties of ovarian clear cell carcinoma in vitro.

    PubMed

    Sato, Masakazu; Kawana, Kei; Adachi, Katsuyuki; Fujimoto, Asaha; Yoshida, Mitsuyo; Nakamura, Hiroe; Nishida, Haruka; Inoue, Tomoko; Taguchi, Ayumi; Ogishima, Juri; Eguchi, Satoko; Yamashita, Aki; Tomio, Kensuke; Wada-Hiraike, Osamu; Oda, Katsutoshi; Nagamatsu, Takeshi; Osuga, Yutaka; Fujii, Tomoyuki

    2017-04-01

    Ovarian cancer is one of the leading causes of death in the world, which is linked to its resistance to chemotherapy. Strategies to overcome chemoresistance have been keenly investigated. Culturing cancer cells in suspension, which results in formation of spheroids, is a more accurate reflection of clinical cancer behavior in vitro than conventional adherent cultures. By performing RNA-seq analysis, we found that the focal adhesion pathway was essential in spheroids. The phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) was increased in spheroids compared to adherent cells, and inhibition of FAK in spheroids resulted in inhibition of the downstream mammalian target of the rapamycin (mTOR) pathway in ovarian clear cell carcinomas. This result also suggested that only using a FAK inhibitor might have limitations because the phosphorylation level of FAK could not be reduced to the level in adherent cells, and it appeared that some combination therapies might be necessary. We previously reported that glutamine and glutamate concentrations were higher in spheroids than adherent cells, and we investigated a synergistic effect targeting glutamine metabolism with FAK inhibition on the mTOR pathway. The combination of AOA, a pan-transaminase inhibitor, and PF 573228, a FAK inhibitor, additively inhibited the mTOR pathway in spheroids from ovarian clear cell carcinomas. Our in vitro study proposed a rationale for the positive and negative effects of using FAK inhibitors in ovarian clear cell carcinomas and suggested that targeting glutamine metabolism could overcome the limitation of FAK inhibitors by additively inhibiting the mTOR pathway.

  16. Design, Synthesis and Biological Evaluation of Novel Rapamycin Benzothiazole Hybrids as mTOR Targeted Anti-cancer Agents.

    PubMed

    Xie, Lijun; Huang, Jie; Chen, Xiaoming; Yu, Hui; Li, Kualiang; Yang, Dan; Chen, Xiaqin; Ying, Jiayin; Pan, Fusheng; Lv, Youbing; Cheng, Yuanrong

    2016-01-01

    The immunosuppressant drug rapamycin, was firstly identified as a mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) allosteric inhibitor, and its derivatives have been successfully developed as anti-cancer drugs. Therefore, finding rapamycin derivatives with better anti-cancer activity has been proved to be an effective way to discover new targeted anti-cancer drugs. In this paper, structure modification was performed at the C-43 position of rapamycin using bioisosterism and a hybrid approach: a series of novel rapamycin-benzothiazole hybrids 4a-e, 5a-c, and 9a, b have been designed, synthesized and evaluated for their anti-cancer activity against Caski, CNE-2, SGC-7901, PC-3, SK-NEP-1 and A-375 human cancer cell lines. Some of these compounds (4a-e, 9a, b) displayed good to excellent potency against the Caski and SK-NEP-1 cell line as compared with rapamycin. Compound 9b as the most active compound showed IC50 values of 8.3 (Caski) and 9.6 μM (SK-NEP-1), respectively. In addition, research on the mechanism showed that 9b was able to cause G1 phase arrest and induce apoptosis in the Caski cell line. Most importantly, it significantly decreased the phosphorylation of S6 ribosomal protein, p70S6K1 and 4EBP1, which indicated that 9b inhibited the cancer cell growth by blocking the mTOR pathway and may have the potential to become a new mTOR inhibitor.

  17. Activation of mammalian target of rapamycin contributes to pain nociception induced in rats by BmK I, a sodium channel-specific modulator.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Feng; Hua, Li-Ming; Jiao, Yun-Lu; Ye, Pin; Fu, Jin; Cheng, Zhi-Jun; Ding, Gang; Ji, Yong-Hua

    2014-02-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway is essential for maintenance of the sensitivity of certain adult sensory neurons. Here, we investigated whether the mTOR cascade is involved in scorpion envenomation-induced pain hypersensitivity in rats. The results showed that intraplantar injection of a neurotoxin from Buthus martensii Karsch, BmK I (10 μg), induced the activation of mTOR, as well as its downstream molecules p70 ribosomal S6 protein kinase (p70 S6K) and eukaryotic initiation factor 4E-binding protein 1 (4E-BP1), in lumbar 5-6 dorsal root ganglia neurons on both sides in rats. The activation peaked at 2 h and recovered 1 day after injection. Compared with the control group, the ratios of p-mTOR/p-p70 S6K/p-4EBP1 in three types of neurons changed significantly. The cell typology of p-mTOR/p-p70 S6K/p-4E-BP1 immuno-reactive neurons also changed. Intrathecal administration of deforolimus, a specific inhibitor of mTOR, attenuated BmK I-induced pain responses (spontaneous flinching, paroxysmal pain-like behavior, and mechanical hypersensitivity). Together, these results imply that the mTOR signaling pathway is mobilized by and contributes to experimental scorpion sting-induced pain.

  18. Autophagy activation: a novel mechanism of atorvastatin to protect mesenchymal stem cells from hypoxia and serum deprivation via AMP-activated protein kinase/mammalian target of rapamycin pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qian; Yang, Yue-Jin; Wang, Hong; Dong, Qiu-Ting; Wang, Tian-Jie; Qian, Hai-Yan; Xu, Hui

    2012-05-20

    Autophagy is a complex "self-eating" process and could be utilized for cell survival under stresses. Statins, which could reduce apoptosis in mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) during both ischemia and hypoxia/serum deprivation (H/SD), have been proved to induce autophagy in some cell lines. We have previously shown that atorvastatin (ATV) could regulate AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a positive modulator of autophagy, in MSCs. Thus, we hypothesized that autophagy activation through AMPK and its downstream molecule mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) may be a novel mechanism of ATV to protect MSCs from apoptosis during H/SD. Here, we demonstrated that H/SD induced autophagy in MSCs significantly as identified by increasing acidic vesicular organelle-positive cells, type II of light chain 3 (LC3-II) expression, and autophagosome formation. The levels of H/SD-induced apoptosis were increased by autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine (3-MA) while decreased by rapamycin, an autophagic inducer. ATV further enhanced the autophagic activity observed in MSCs exposed to H/SD. Treatment with 3-MA attenuated ATV-induced autophagy and abrogated the protective effects of ATV on MSC apoptosis, while rapamycin failed to cause additional effects on either autophagy or apoptosis compared with ATV alone. The phosphorylation of AMPK was upregulated whereas the phosphorylation of mTOR was downregulated in ATV-treated MSCs, which were both attenuated by AMPK inhibitor compound C. Further, treatment with compound C reduced the ATV-induced autophagy in MSCs under H/SD. These data suggest that autophagy plays a protective role in H/SD-induced apoptosis of MSCs, and ATV could effectively activate autophagy via AMPK/mTOR pathway to enhance MSC survival during H/SD.

  19. Resveratrol potentiates rapamycin to prevent hyperinsulinemia and obesity in male mice on high fat diet

    PubMed Central

    Leontieva, O V; Paszkiewicz, G; Demidenko, Z N; Blagosklonny, M V

    2013-01-01

    High doses of rapamycin, an antiaging agent, can prevent obesity in mice on high fat diet (HFD). Obesity is usually associated with hyperinsulinemia. Here, we showed that rapamycin given orally, at doses that did not affect weight gain in male mice on HFD, tended to decrease fasting insulin levels. Addition of resveratrol, which alone did not affect insulin levels, potentiated the effect of rapamycin, so that the combination decreased obesity and prevented hyperinsulinemia. Neither rapamycin nor resveratrol, and their combination affected fasting levels of glucose (despite lowering insulin levels), implying that the combination might prevent insulin resistance. We and others previously reported that resveratrol at high doses inhibited the mTOR (Target of Rapamycin) pathway in cell culture. Yet, as we confirmed here, this effect was observed only at super-pharmacological concentrations. At pharmacological concentrations, resveratrol did not exert ‘rapamycin-like effects' on cellular senescence and did not inhibit the mTOR pathway in vitro, indicating nonoverlapping therapeutic mechanisms of actions of rapamycin and resveratrol in vivo. Although, like rapamycin, resveratrol decreased insulin-induced HIF-1-dependent transcription in cell culture, resveratrol did not inhibit mTOR at the same concentrations. Given distinct mechanisms of action of rapamycin and resveratrol at clinically relevant doses, their combination warrants further investigation as a potential antiaging, antiobesity and antidiabetic modality. PMID:23348586

  20. Rapamycin extends life- and health span because it slows aging

    PubMed Central

    Blagosklonny, Mikhail V.

    2013-01-01

    Making headlines, a thought-provocative paper by Neff, Ehninger and coworkers claims that rapamycin extends life span but has limited effects on aging. How is that possibly possible? And what is aging if not an increase of the probability of death with age. I discuss that the JCI paper actually shows that rapamycin slows aging and also extends lifespan regardless of its direct anti-cancer activities. Aging is, in part, MTOR-driven: a purposeless continuation of developmental growth. Rapamycin affects the same processes in young and old animals: young animals' traits and phenotypes, which continuations become hyperfunctional, harmful and lethal later in life. PMID:23934728

  1. Rapamycin extends life- and health span because it slows aging.

    PubMed

    Blagosklonny, Mikhail V

    2013-08-01

    Making headlines, a thought-provocative paper by Neff, Ehninger and coworkers claims that rapamycin extends life span but has limited effects on aging. How is that possibly possible? And what is aging if not an increase of the probability of death with age. I discuss that the JCI paper actually shows that rapamycin slows aging and also extends lifespan regardless of its direct anti-cancer activities. Aging is, in part, MTOR-driven: a purposeless continuation of developmental growth. Rapamycin affects the same processes in young and old animals: young animals' traits and phenotypes, which continuations become hyperfunctional, harmful and lethal later in life.

  2. The role of diacylglycerol kinase ζ and phosphatidic acid in the mechanical activation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling and skeletal muscle hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    You, Jae-Sung; Lincoln, Hannah C; Kim, Chan-Ran; Frey, John W; Goodman, Craig A; Zhong, Xiao-Ping; Hornberger, Troy A

    2014-01-17

    The activation of mTOR signaling is essential for mechanically induced changes in skeletal muscle mass, and previous studies have suggested that mechanical stimuli activate mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin) signaling through a phospholipase D (PLD)-dependent increase in the concentration of phosphatidic acid (PA). Consistent with this conclusion, we obtained evidence which further suggests that mechanical stimuli utilize PA as a direct upstream activator of mTOR signaling. Unexpectedly though, we found that the activation of PLD is not necessary for the mechanically induced increases in PA or mTOR signaling. Motivated by this observation, we performed experiments that were aimed at identifying the enzyme(s) that promotes the increase in PA. These experiments revealed that mechanical stimulation increases the concentration of diacylglycerol (DAG) and the activity of DAG kinases (DGKs) in membranous structures. Furthermore, using knock-out mice, we determined that the ζ isoform of DGK (DGKζ) is necessary for the mechanically induced increase in PA. We also determined that DGKζ significantly contributes to the mechanical activation of mTOR signaling, and this is likely driven by an enhanced binding of PA to mTOR. Last, we found that the overexpression of DGKζ is sufficient to induce muscle fiber hypertrophy through an mTOR-dependent mechanism, and this event requires DGKζ kinase activity (i.e. the synthesis of PA). Combined, these results indicate that DGKζ, but not PLD, plays an important role in mechanically induced increases in PA and mTOR signaling. Furthermore, this study suggests that DGKζ could be a fundamental component of the mechanism(s) through which mechanical stimuli regulate skeletal muscle mass.

  3. Tetra-O-Methyl Nordihydroguaiaretic Acid Broadly Suppresses Cancer Metabolism and Synergistically Induces Strong Anticancer Activity in Combination with Etoposide, Rapamycin and UCN-01.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Kotohiko; Huang, Ru Chih C

    2016-01-01

    The ability of Tetra-O-methyl nordihydroguaiaretic acid (M4N) to induce rapid cell death in combination with Etoposide, Rapamycin, or UCN-01 was examined in LNCaP cells, both in cell culture and animal experiments. Mice treated with M4N drug combinations with either Etoposide or Rapamycin showed no evidence of tumor and had a 100% survival rate 100 days after tumor implantation. By comparison all other vehicles or single drug treated mice failed to survive longer than 30 days after implantation. This synergistic improvement of anticancer effect was also confirmed in more than 20 cancer cell lines. In LNCaP cells, M4N was found to reduce cellular ATP content, and suppress NDUFS1 expression while inducing hyperpolarization of mitochondrial membrane potential. M4N-treated cells lacked autophagy with reduced expression of BNIP3 and ATG5. To understand the mechanisms of this anticancer activity of M4N, the effect of this drug on three cancer cell lines (LNCaP, AsPC-1, and L428 cells) was further examined via transcriptome and metabolomics analyses. Metabolomic results showed that there were reductions of 26 metabolites essential for energy generation and/or production of cellular components in common with these three cell lines following 8 hours of M4N treatment. Deep RNA sequencing analysis demonstrated that there were sixteen genes whose expressions were found to be modulated following 6 hours of M4N treatment similarly in these three cell lines. Six out of these 16 genes were functionally related to the 26 metabolites described above. One of these up-regulated genes encodes for CHAC1, a key enzyme affecting the stress pathways through its degradation of glutathione. In fact M4N was found to suppress glutathione content and induce reactive oxygen species production. The data overall indicate that M4N has profound specific negative impacts on a wide range of cancer metabolisms supporting the use of M4N combination for cancer treatments.

  4. Tetra-O-Methyl Nordihydroguaiaretic Acid Broadly Suppresses Cancer Metabolism and Synergistically Induces Strong Anticancer Activity in Combination with Etoposide, Rapamycin and UCN-01

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Kotohiko; Huang, Ru Chih C.

    2016-01-01

    The ability of Tetra-O-methyl nordihydroguaiaretic acid (M4N) to induce rapid cell death in combination with Etoposide, Rapamycin, or UCN-01 was examined in LNCaP cells, both in cell culture and animal experiments. Mice treated with M4N drug combinations with either Etoposide or Rapamycin showed no evidence of tumor and had a 100% survival rate 100 days after tumor implantation. By comparison all other vehicles or single drug treated mice failed to survive longer than 30 days after implantation. This synergistic improvement of anticancer effect was also confirmed in more than 20 cancer cell lines. In LNCaP cells, M4N was found to reduce cellular ATP content, and suppress NDUFS1 expression while inducing hyperpolarization of mitochondrial membrane potential. M4N-treated cells lacked autophagy with reduced expression of BNIP3 and ATG5. To understand the mechanisms of this anticancer activity of M4N, the effect of this drug on three cancer cell lines (LNCaP, AsPC-1, and L428 cells) was further examined via transcriptome and metabolomics analyses. Metabolomic results showed that there were reductions of 26 metabolites essential for energy generation and/or production of cellular components in common with these three cell lines following 8 hours of M4N treatment. Deep RNA sequencing analysis demonstrated that there were sixteen genes whose expressions were found to be modulated following 6 hours of M4N treatment similarly in these three cell lines. Six out of these 16 genes were functionally related to the 26 metabolites described above. One of these up-regulated genes encodes for CHAC1, a key enzyme affecting the stress pathways through its degradation of glutathione. In fact M4N was found to suppress glutathione content and induce reactive oxygen species production. The data overall indicate that M4N has profound specific negative impacts on a wide range of cancer metabolisms supporting the use of M4N combination for cancer treatments. PMID:26886430

  5. A combination therapy for KRAS-driven lung adenocarcinomas using lipophilic bisphosphonates and rapamycin

    SciTech Connect

    Xia, Yifeng; Liu, Yi -Liang; Xie, Yonghua; Zhu, Wei; Guerra, Francisco; Shen, Shen; Yeddula, Narayana; Fischer, Wolfgang; Low, William; Zhou, Xiaoying; Zhang, Yonghui; Oldfield, Eric; Verma, Inder M.

    2014-11-19

    Lung cancer is the most common human malignancy and leads to about one-third of all cancer-related deaths. Lung adenocarcinomas harboring KRAS mutations, in contrast to those with EGFR and EML4-ALK mutations, have not yet been successfully targeted. Here in this paper, we describe a combination therapy for treating these malignancies using two agents: a lipophilic bisphosphonate and rapamycin. This drug combination is much more effective than either agent acting alone in the KRAS G12D induced mouse lung model. Lipophilic bisphosphonates inhibit both farnesyl and geranylgeranyldiphosphate synthases, effectively blocking prenylation of the KRAS and other small G-proteins critical for tumor growth and cell survival. Bisphosphonate treatment of cells initiated autophagy but was ultimately unsuccessful and led to p62 accumulation and concomitant NF-κB activation, resulting in dampened efficacy in vivo. However, we found that rapamycin, in addition to inhibiting the mTOR pathway, facilitated autophagy and prevented p62 accumulation-induced NF-κB activation and tumor cell proliferation. Lastly, these results suggest that using lipophilic bisphosphonates in combination with rapamycin may provide an effective strategy for targeting lung adenocarcinomas harboring KRAS mutations.

  6. A combination therapy for KRAS-driven lung adenocarcinomas using lipophilic bisphosphonates and rapamycin

    DOE PAGES

    Xia, Yifeng; Liu, Yi -Liang; Xie, Yonghua; ...

    2014-11-19

    Lung cancer is the most common human malignancy and leads to about one-third of all cancer-related deaths. Lung adenocarcinomas harboring KRAS mutations, in contrast to those with EGFR and EML4-ALK mutations, have not yet been successfully targeted. Here in this paper, we describe a combination therapy for treating these malignancies using two agents: a lipophilic bisphosphonate and rapamycin. This drug combination is much more effective than either agent acting alone in the KRAS G12D induced mouse lung model. Lipophilic bisphosphonates inhibit both farnesyl and geranylgeranyldiphosphate synthases, effectively blocking prenylation of the KRAS and other small G-proteins critical for tumor growthmore » and cell survival. Bisphosphonate treatment of cells initiated autophagy but was ultimately unsuccessful and led to p62 accumulation and concomitant NF-κB activation, resulting in dampened efficacy in vivo. However, we found that rapamycin, in addition to inhibiting the mTOR pathway, facilitated autophagy and prevented p62 accumulation-induced NF-κB activation and tumor cell proliferation. Lastly, these results suggest that using lipophilic bisphosphonates in combination with rapamycin may provide an effective strategy for targeting lung adenocarcinomas harboring KRAS mutations.« less

  7. A hexane fraction of guava Leaves (Psidium guajava L.) induces anticancer activity by suppressing AKT/mammalian target of rapamycin/ribosomal p70 S6 kinase in human prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Nae Hyung; Park, Kyung-Ran; Kim, Sung-Moo; Yun, Hyung-Mun; Nam, Dongwoo; Lee, Seok-Geun; Jang, Hyeung-Jin; Ahn, Kyoo Seok; Kim, Sung-Hoon; Shim, Bum Sang; Choi, Seung-Hoon; Mosaddik, Ashik; Cho, Somi K; Ahn, Kwang Seok

    2012-03-01

    This study was carried out to evaluate the anticancer effects of guava leaf extracts and its fractions. The chemical compositions of the active extracts were also determined. In the present study, we set out to determine whether the anticancer effects of guava leaves are linked with their ability to suppress constitutive AKT/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR)/ribosomal p70 S6 kinase (S6K1) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activation pathways in human prostate cancer cells. We found that guava leaf hexane fraction (GHF) was the most potent inducer of cytotoxic and apoptotic effects in PC-3 cells. The molecular mechanism or mechanisms of GHF apoptotic potential were correlated with the suppression of AKT/mTOR/S6K1 and MAPK signaling pathways. This effect of GHF correlated with down-regulation of various proteins that mediate cell proliferation, cell survival, metastasis, and angiogenesis. Analysis of GHF by gas chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry tentatively identified 60 compounds, including β-eudesmol (11.98%), α-copaene (7.97%), phytol (7.95%), α-patchoulene (3.76%), β-caryophyllene oxide (CPO) (3.63%), caryophylla-3(15),7(14)-dien-6-ol (2.68%), (E)-methyl isoeugenol (1.90%), α-terpineol (1.76%), and octadecane (1.23%). Besides GHF, CPO, but not phytol, also inhibited the AKT/mTOR/S6K1 signaling pathway and induced apoptosis in prostate cancer cells. Overall, these findings suggest that guava leaves can interfere with multiple signaling cascades linked with tumorigenesis and provide a source of potential therapeutic compounds for both the prevention and treatment of cancer.

  8. Rapamycin induces the anti-apoptotic protein survivin in neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Samkari, Ayman; Cooper, Zachary A; Holloway, Michael P; Liu, Jiebin; Altura, Rachel A

    2012-01-01

    Neuroblastoma is the most common solid tumor of infancy, accounting for 15% of all cancer cell deaths in children. Expression of the anti-apoptotic protein survivin in these tumors correlates with poor prognostic features and resistance to therapy. The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) protein is being explored as a potential therapeutic target in patients with this disease. The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that rapamycin regulates survivin expression and function in neuroblastoma cells. To explore this hypothesis, we treated two different neuroblastoma lines (NB7, NB8) and a well-characterized control lung cancer cell line, A549, with varying doses of rapamycin (0.1-10μM) for serial time points (2-48 hours). RNA and protein expression levels were then evaluated by quantitative RT-PCR and western blotting, respectively. Cell proliferation and apoptosis were assayed by WST-1 and Annexin V. The results showed a rapamycin-dependent increase in survivin mRNA and protein levels in the neuroblastoma cell lines in a dose- and time-dependent fashion, while a decrease in these levels was observed in control cells. Rapamycin inhibited cell proliferation in both A549 and neuroblastoma cells however neuroblastoma cells had less apoptosis than A549 cells (9% vs. 20%). In summary, our results indicate that rapamycin induces expression of the anti-apoptotic protein survivin in neuroblastoma cells which may protect these cells from programmed cell death. Induction of survivin by rapamycin could therefore be a potential mechanism of neuroblastoma tumor cell resistance and rapamycin may not be an effective therapeutic agent for these tumors.

  9. Leucine does not affect mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 assembly but is required for maximal ribosomal protein s6 kinase 1 activity in human skeletal muscle following resistance exercise.

    PubMed

    Apró, William; Moberg, Marcus; Hamilton, D Lee; Ekblom, Björn; Rooyackers, Olav; Holmberg, Hans-Christer; Blomstrand, Eva

    2015-10-01

    We examined how the stimulatory effect of leucine on the mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) pathway is affected by the presence of the remaining essential amino acids (EAAs). Nine male subjects performed resistance exercise on 4 occasions and were randomly supplied EAAs with leucine, EAAs without leucine (EAA-Leu), leucine alone, or flavored water (placebo; control). Muscle biopsies were taken from the vastus lateralis before and 60 and 90 min after exercise. Biopsies were analyzed for protein phosphorylation, kinase activity, protein-protein interactions, amino acid concentrations, and tracer incorporation. Leucine alone stimulated ribosomal protein s6 kinase 1 (S6K1) phosphorylation ∼280% more than placebo and EAA-Leu after exercise. Moreover, this response was enhanced by 60-75% after intake of EAAs compared with that of leucine alone (P < 0.05). Kinase activity of S6K1 reflected that of S6K1 phosphorylation; 60 min after exercise, the activity was elevated 3.3- and 4.2-fold with intake of leucine alone and with EAAs, respectively (P < 0.05). The interaction between mammalian target of rapamycin and regulatory-associated protein of mammalian target of rapamycin was unaltered in response to both resistance exercise and amino acid provision. Leucine alone stimulates mTORC1 signaling, although this response is enhanced by other EAAs and does not appear to be caused by alterations in mTORC1 assembly.

  10. Chemotherapy of Skull Base Chordoma Tailored on Responsiveness of Patient-Derived Tumor Cells to Rapamycin12

    PubMed Central

    Ricci-Vitiani, Lucia; Runci, Daniele; D'Alessandris, Quintino Giorgio; Cenci, Tonia; Martini, Maurizio; Bianchi, Federico; Maira, Giulio; Stancato, Louis; De Maria, Ruggero; Larocca, Luigi Maria; Pallini, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Skull base chordomas are challenging tumors due to their deep surgical location and resistance to conventional radiotherapy. Chemotherapy plays a marginal role in the treatment of chordoma resulting from lack of preclinical models due to the difficulty in establishing tumor cell lines and valuable in vivo models. Here, we established a cell line from a recurrent clival chordoma. Cells were cultured for more than 30 passages and the expression of the chordoma cell marker brachyury was monitored using both immunohistochemistry and Western blot. Sensitivity of chordoma cells to the inhibition of specific signaling pathways was assessed through testing of a commercially available small molecule kinase inhibitor library. In vivo tumorigenicity was evaluated by grafting chordoma cells onto immunocompromised mice and established tumor xenografts were treated with rapamycin. Rapamycin was administered to the donor patient and its efficacy was assessed on follow-up neuroimaging. Chordoma cells maintained brachyury expression at late passages and generated xenografts closely mimicking the histology and phenotype of the parental tumor. Rapamycin was identified as an inhibitor of chordoma cell proliferation. Molecular analyses on tumor cells showed activation of the mammalian target of rapamycin signaling pathway and mutation of KRAS gene. Rapamycin was also effective in reducing the growth of chordoma xenografts. On the basis of these results, our patient received rapamycin therapy with about six-fold reduction of the tumor growth rate upon 10-month follow-up neuroimaging. This is the first case of chordoma in whom chemotherapy was tailored on the basis of the sensitivity of patient-derived tumor cells. PMID:23814489

  11. Rapamycin reverses the senescent phenotype and improves immuno-regulation of mesenchymal stem cells from MRL/lpr mice and systemic lupus erythematosus patients through inhibition of the mTOR signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Guijian; Meng, Yan; Da, Zhanyun; Guo, Genkai; Xia, Yunfei; Zhu, Xinhang; Shi, Guixiu; Cheng, Chun

    2016-01-01

    We have shown that bone marrow (BM)-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) from SLE patients exhibit senescent behavior and are involved in the pathogenesis of SLE. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of rapamycin (RAPA) on the senescences and immunoregulatory ability of MSCs of MRL/lpr mice and SLE patients and the underlying mechanisms. Cell morphology, senescence associated β-galactosidase (SA-β-gal) staining, F-actin staining were used to detect the senescence of cells. BM-MSCs and purified CD4+ T cells were co-cultured indirectly. Flow cytometry was used to inspect the proportion of regulatory T (Treg) /T helper type 17 (Th17). We used small interfering RNA (siRNA) to interfere the expression of mTOR, and detect the effects by RT-PCR, WB and immunofluorescence. Finally, 1×106 of SLE BM-MSCs treated with RAPA were transplanted to cure the 8 MRL/lpr mice aged 16 weeks for 12 weeks. We demonstrated that RAPA alleviated the clinical symptoms of lupus nephritis and prolonged survival in MRL/lpr mice. RAPA reversed the senescent phenotype and improved immunoregulation of MSCs from MRL/lpr mice and SLE patients through inhibition of the mTOR signaling pathway. Marked therapeutic effects were observed in MRL/lpr mice following transplantation of BM-MSCs from SLE patients pretreated with RAPA. PMID:27048648

  12. Berberine regulates AMP-activated protein kinase signaling pathways and inhibits colon tumorigenesis in mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Weidong; Hua, Baojin; Saud, Shakir M; Lin, Hongsheng; Hou, Wei; Matter, Matthias S; Jia, Libin; Colburn, Nancy H; Young, Matthew R

    2015-10-01

    Colorectal cancer, a leading cause of cancer death, has been linked to inflammation and obesity. Berberine, an isoquinoline alkaloid, possesses anti-inflammatory, anti-diabetes and anti-tumor properties. In the azoxymethane initiated and dextran sulfate sodium (AOM/DSS) promoted colorectal carcinogenesis mouse model, berberine treated mice showed a 60% reduction in tumor number (P = 0.009), a 48% reduction in tumors <2 mm, (P = 0.05); 94% reduction in tumors 2-4 mm, (P = 0.001), and 100% reduction in tumors >4 mm (P = 0.02) compared to vehicle treated mice. Berberine also decreased AOM/DSS induced Ki-67 and COX-2 expression. In vitro analysis showed that in addition to its anti-proliferation activity, berberine also induced apoptosis in colorectal cancer cell lines. Berberine activated AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a major regulator of metabolic pathways, and inhibited mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), a downstream target of AMPK. Furthermore, 4E-binding protein-1 and p70 ribosomal S6 kinases, downstream targets of mTOR, were down regulated by berberine treatment. Berberine did not affect Liver kinase B1 (LKB1) activity or the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway. Berberine inhibited Nuclear Factor kappa-B (NF-κB) activity, reduced the expression of cyclin D1 and survivin, induced phosphorylation of p53 and increased caspase-3 cleavage in vitro. Berberine inhibition of mTOR activity and p53 phosphorylation was found to be AMPK dependent, while inhibition NF-κB was AMPK independent. In vivo, berberine also activated AMPK, inhibited mTOR and p65 phosphorylation and activated caspase-3 cleavage. Our data suggests that berberine suppresses colon epithelial proliferation and tumorigenesis via AMPK dependent inhibition of mTOR activity and AMPK independent inhibition of NF-κB.

  13. Sann-Joong-Kuey-Jian-Tang decreases the protein expression of mammalian target of rapamycin but increases microtubule associated protein II light chain 3 expression to inhibit human BxPC‑3 pancreatic carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Su, Chin-Cheng

    2015-04-01

    Sann‑Joong‑Kuey‑Jian‑Tang (SJKJT), a Traditional Chinese Medicinal prescription, has been used for the treatment of lymphadenopathy and solid tumors, and has shown therapeutic potential in a number of human malignant tumor cell lines, such as Hep‑G2 hepatocellular carcinoma cells. Previous mechanistic studies demonstrated that SJKJT inhibited the proliferation of BxPC‑3 pancreatic carcinoma cells through the extrinsic and intrinsic apoptotic pathways in vitro. SJKJT was also shown to be cytotoxic to colo 205 colon cancer cells by inducing autophagy in vitro. The present study therefore investigated molecular mechanisms of autophagy in human BxPC‑3 pancreatic cancer cells treated with SJKJT. The cytotoxic effects of SJKJT on BxPC‑3 human pancreatic carcinoma cells were evaluated using an MTT assay. Furthermore, the expression of autophagy‑associated proteins, including mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), beclin‑1, autophagocytosis‑associated protein (Atg)3, Atg7, Atg5‑Atg12 and microtubule‑associated protein II light chain 3 (LC3‑II), was assessed using western blot analysis. The results demonstrated that BxPC‑3 cells treated with SJKJT exhibited decreased expression levels of mTOR and increased expression of LC3‑II protein. In addition, the expression of the beclin‑1, Atg3, Atg7 and Atg5‑Atg12 proteins was increased during the first 24 h, but decreased from 48 to 72 h. The results showed that SJKJT inhibited the proliferation of human BxPC‑3 pancreatic cancer cells in vitro. A possible underlying molecular mechanism may be the induction of autophagy. Further investigation into the therapeutic potential of SJKJT in human pancreatic cancer is required.

  14. Rapamycin protects against dominant negative-HNF1A-induced apoptosis in INS-1 cells.

    PubMed

    Farrelly, Angela M; Kilbride, Seán M; Bonner, Caroline; Prehn, Jochen H M; Byrne, Maria M

    2011-11-01

    HNF1A-maturity onset diabetes of the young (HNF1A-MODY) is caused by mutations in Hnf1a gene encoding the transcription factor hepatocyte nuclear factor 1alpha (HNF1A). An increased rate of apoptosis has been associated with the decrease in beta-cell mass that is a hallmark of HNF1A-MODY and other forms of diabetes. In a cellular model of HNF1A-MODY, we have recently shown that signalling through mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is decreased by the overexpression of a dominant-negative mutant of HNF1A (DN-HNF1A). mTOR is a protein kinase which has important roles in cell metabolism and growth, but also in cell survival, where it has been shown to be both protective and detrimental. Here, we show that pharmacological inhibition of mTOR activity with rapamycin protected INS-1 cells against DN-HNF1A-induced apoptosis. Rapamycin also prevented DN-HNF1A-induced activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), an intracellular energy sensor which we have previously shown to mediate DN-HNF1A-induced apoptosis. Conversely, activation of mTOR with leucine potentiated DN-HNF1A-induced apoptosis. Gene silencing of raptor (regulatory associated protein of mTOR), a subunit of mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1), also conferred protection on INS-1 cells against DN-HNF1A-induced apoptosis, confirming that mTORC1 mediates the protective effect. The potential relevance of this effect with regards to the clinical use of rapamycin as an immunosuppressant in diabetics post-transplantation is discussed.

  15. Rapamycin and Interleukin-1β Impair Brain-derived Neurotrophic Factor-dependent Neuron Survival by Modulating Autophagy*

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Erica D.; Prieto, G. Aleph; Tong, Liqi; Sears-Kraxberger, Ilse; Rice, Jeffrey D.; Steward, Oswald; Cotman, Carl W.

    2014-01-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway has multiple important physiological functions, including regulation of protein synthesis, cell growth, autophagy, and synaptic plasticity. Activation of mTOR is necessary for the many beneficial effects of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), including dendritic translation and memory formation in the hippocampus. At present, however, the role of mTOR in BDNF's support of survival is not clear. We report that mTOR activation is necessary for BDNF-dependent survival of primary rat hippocampal neurons, as either mTOR inhibition by rapamycin or genetic manipulation of the downstream molecule p70S6K specifically blocked BDNF rescue. Surprisingly, however, BDNF did not promote neuron survival by up-regulating mTOR-dependent protein synthesis or through mTOR-dependent suppression of caspase-3 activation. Instead, activated mTOR was responsible for BDNF's suppression of autophagic flux. shRNA against the autophagic machinery Atg7 or Atg5 prolonged the survival of neurons co-treated with BDNF and rapamycin, suggesting that suppression of mTOR in BDNF-treated cells resulted in excessive autophagy. Finally, acting as a physiological analog of rapamycin, IL-1β impaired BDNF signaling by way of inhibiting mTOR activation as follows: the cytokine induced caspase-independent neuronal death and accelerated autophagic flux in BDNF-treated cells. These findings reveal a novel mechanism of BDNF neuroprotection; BDNF not only prevents apoptosis through inhibiting caspase activation but also promotes neuron survival through modulation of autophagy. This protection mechanism is vulnerable under chronic inflammation, which deregulates autophagy through impairing mTOR signaling. These results may be relevant to age-related changes observed in neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:24917666

  16. Sann-Joong-Kuey-Jian-Tang induces autophagy in HepG2 cells via regulation of the phosphoinositide-3 kinase/Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Wan-Ling; Su, Chin-Cheng; Lin, Ping-Yi; Lin, Chi-Chen; Chen, Yao-Li

    2015-08-01

    Sann-Joong-Kuey-Jian-Tang (SJKJT), a traditional Chinese medicine, was previously reported to induce autophagy and inhibit the proliferation of the human HepG2 hepatocellular carcinoma cell line via an extrinsic pathway. In the present study, the effects of SJKJT-induced autophagy and the cytotoxic mechanisms mediating these effects were investigated in HepG2 cells. The cytotoxicity of SJKJT in the HepG2 cells was evaluated using a 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. The results demonstrated that the half-maximal inhibitory concentration of SJKJT was 2.91 mg/ml at 24 h, 1.64 mg/ml at 48 h and 1.26 mg/ml at 72 h. The results of confocal fluorescence microscopy indicated that SJKJT resulted in the accumulation of green fluorescent protein-LC3 and vacuolation of the cytoplasm. Flow cytometric analysis revealed the accumulation of acidic vesicular organelles. Furthermore, western blot analysis, used to determine the expression levels of autophagy-associated proteins, demonstrated that the HepG2 cells treated with SJKJT exhibited LC3B-I/LC3B-II conversion, increased expression levels of Beclin, Atg-3 and Atg-5 and reduced expression levels of p62 and decreased signaling of the phosphoinositide-3 kinase/Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin and the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways. Taken together, these findings may assist in the development of novel chemotherapeutic agents for the treatment of malignant types of liver cancer.

  17. Sann-Joong-Kuey-Jian-Tang induces autophagy in HepG2 cells via regulation of the phosphoinositide-3 kinase/Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways

    PubMed Central

    CHUANG, WAN-LING; SU, CHIN-CHENG; LIN, PING-YI; LIN, CHI-CHEN; CHEN, YAO-LI

    2015-01-01

    Sann-Joong-Kuey-Jian-Tang (SJKJT), a traditional Chinese medicine, was previously reported to induce autophagy and inhibit the proliferation of the human HepG2 hepatocellular carcinoma cell line via an extrinsic pathway. In the present study, the effects of SJKJT-induced autophagy and the cytotoxic mechanisms mediating these effects were investigated in HepG2 cells. The cytotoxicity of SJKJT in the HepG2 cells was evaluated using a 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. The results demonstrated that the half-maximal inhibitory concentration of SJKJT was 2.91 mg/ml at 24 h, 1.64 mg/ml at 48 h and 1.26 mg/ml at 72 h. The results of confocal fluorescence microscopy indicated that SJKJT resulted in the accumulation of green fluorescent protein-LC3 and vacuolation of the cytoplasm. Flow cytometric analysis revealed the accumulation of acidic vesicular organelles. Furthermore, western blot analysis, used to determine the expression levels of autophagy-associated proteins, demonstrated that the HepG2 cells treated with SJKJT exhibited LC3B-I/LC3B-II conversion, increased expression levels of Beclin, Atg-3 and Atg-5 and reduced expression levels of p62 and decreased signaling of the phosphoinositide-3 kinase/Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin and the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways. Taken together, these findings may assist in the development of novel chemotherapeutic agents for the treatment of malignant types of liver cancer. PMID:25847489

  18. Rapamycin (Sirolimus) alters mechanistic target of rapamycin pathway regulation and microRNA expression in mouse meiotic spermatocytes.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, A; Koli, S; Reddy, K V R

    2015-09-01

    Mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a signal transduction pathway that modulates translation initiation in several animals including mammals. Rapamaycin, an allosteric inhibitor of mTOR pathway, is often used as an immunosuppressive drug following kidney transplantation and causes gonadal dysfunction and defects in spermatogenesis. The molecular mechanism behind rapamycin-mediated testicular dysfunction is not known. We have therefore explored the contribution of rapamycin in mTOR regulation and microRNA (miRNA) expression in mouse spermatocytes, the intermediate stage of spermatogenesis, where meiosis takes place. In the present study, we optimized the isolation of highly pure and viable spermatocytes by flow sorting, treated them with rapamycin, and investigated the expression of mTOR and downstream effector molecules. Western blot and immunocytochemical analysis confirm that rapamycin treatment suppresses mTOR and phopsphorylated P70S6 kinase activities in spermatocytes, but not that of phosphorylated 4E-binding protein 1. Also, rapamycin treatment modulates the expression of several spermatocyte-specific miRNAs. To complement these finding an in vivo study was also performed. In silico prediction of target genes of these miRNAs and their functional pathway analysis revealed that, several of them are involved in crucial biological process, cellular process and catalytic activities. miRNA-transcription factor (TF) network analysis enlisted different TFs propelling the transcription machineries of these miRNAs. In silico prediction followed by quatitative real-time PCR revealed two of these TFs namely, PU.1 and CCCTC binding factor (CTCF) are down and upregulated, respectively, which may be the reason of the altered expression of miRNAs following rapamycin treatment. In conclusion, for the first time, the present study provides insight into how rapamycin regulates mTOR pathway and spermatocyte-specific miRNA expression which in turn, regulate expression of

  19. L-leucine availability regulates phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, p70 S6 kinase and glycogen synthase kinase-3 activity in L6 muscle cells: evidence for the involvement of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway in the L-leucine-induced up-regulation of system A amino acid transport.

    PubMed Central

    Peyrollier, K; Hajduch, E; Blair, A S; Hyde, R; Hundal, H S

    2000-01-01

    Amino acid availability is known to regulate diverse cell processes including the activation of p70 S6 kinase, initiation factors involved in mRNA translation, gene expression and cellular amino acid uptake. Essential amino acids, in particular the branched-chain amino acids (e.g. leucine), have been shown to be the dominant players in mediating these effects, although the precise nature by which they regulate these processes remain poorly understood. In this study we have investigated the mechanisms involved in the leucine-induced modulation of p70 S6 kinase and addressed whether this kinase participates in the up-regulation of the System A amino acid transporter in L6 muscle cells. Incubation of muscle cells that had been amino acid-deprived for 1 h with L-leucine (2 mM) led to a rapid (>2-fold) activation of p70 S6 kinase, which was suppressed by both wortmannin and rapamycin. Consistent with this finding, addition of leucine caused a rapid ( approximately 5-fold) but transient stimulation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K). PI3K activation was inhibited by wortmannin and was not dependent upon insulin receptor substrate-1 activation. Unlike stimulation by insulin, activation of neither protein kinase B nor p42/p44 mitogen-activated protein kinase accompanied the leucine-induced stimulation of PI3K. However, the leucine-induced activation of PI3K and p70 S6 kinase did result in the concomitant inactivation of glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3). Leucine enhanced System A transport by approximately 50%. We have shown previously that this stimulation is protein-synthesis-dependent and in the current study we show that it was blocked by both wortmannin and rapamycin. Our findings indicate that PI3K and the mammalian target of rapamycin are components of a nutrient signalling pathway that regulates the activation of p70 S6 kinase and induction of System A in L6 cells. The activation of this pathway by leucine is also responsible for the inactivation of GSK-3

  20. mTORC1 inhibitors rapamycin and metformin affect cardiovascular markers differentially in ZDF rats.

    PubMed

    Nistala, Ravi; Raja, Ahmad; Pulakat, Lakshmi

    2017-03-01

    Mammalian target for rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) is a common target for the action of immunosuppressant macrolide rapamycin and glucose-lowering metformin. Inhibition of mTORC1 can exert both beneficial and detrimental effects in different pathologies. Here, we investigated the differential effects of rapamycin (1.2 mg/kg per day delivered subcutaneously for 6 weeks) and metformin (300 mg/kg per day delivered orally for 11 weeks) treatments on male Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) rats that mimic the cardiorenal pathology of type 2 diabetic patients and progress to insulin insufficiency. Rapamycin and metformin improved proteinuria, and rapamycin also reduced urinary gamma glutamyl transferase (GGT) indicating improvement of tubular health. Metformin reduced food and water intake, and urinary sodium and potassium, whereas rapamycin increased urinary sodium. Metformin reduced plasma alkaline phosphatase, but induced transaminitis as evidenced by significant increases in plasma AST and ALT. Metformin also induced hyperinsulinemia, but did not suppress fasting plasma glucose after ZDF rats reached 17 weeks of age, and worsened lipid profile. Rapamycin also induced mild transaminitis. Additionally, both rapamycin and metformin increased plasma uric acid and creatinine, biomarkers for cardiovascular and renal disease. These observations define how rapamycin and metformin differentially modulate metabolic profiles that regulate cardiorenal pathology in conditions of severe type 2 diabetes.

  1. mTORC1-Activated Monocytes Increase Tregs and Inhibit the Immune Response to Bacterial Infections

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Huaijun; Guo, Wei; Wang, Shixuan; Xue, Ting; Yang, Fei; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Yang, Yazhi; Wan, Qian; Shi, Zhexin; Zhan, Xulong

    2016-01-01

    The TSC1/2 heterodimer, a key upstream regulator of the mTOR, can inhibit the activation of mTOR, which plays a critical role in immune responses after bacterial infections. Monocytes are an innate immune cell type that have been shown to be involved in bacteremia. However, how the mTOR pathway is involved in the regulation of monocytes is largely unknown. In our study, TSC1 KO mice and WT mice were infected with E. coli. When compared to WT mice, we found higher mortality, greater numbers of bacteria, decreased expression of coactivators in monocytes, increased numbers of Tregs, and decreased numbers of effector T cells in TSC1 KO mice. Monocytes obtained from TSC1 KO mice produced more ROS, IL-6, IL-10, and TGF-β and less IL-1, IFN-γ, and TNF-α. Taken together, our results suggest that the inhibited immune functioning in TSC1 KO mice is influenced by mTORC1 activation in monocytes. The reduced expression of coactivators resulted in inhibited effector T cell proliferation. mTORC1-activated monocytes are harmful during bacterial infections. Therefore, inhibiting mTORC1 signaling through rapamycin administration could rescue the harmful aspects of an overactive immune response, and this knowledge provides a new direction for clinical therapy. PMID:27746591

  2. Rapamycin alleviates brain edema after focal cerebral ischemia reperfusion in rats.

    PubMed

    Guo, Wei; Feng, Guoying; Miao, Yanying; Liu, Guixiang; Xu, Chunsheng

    2014-06-01

    Brain edema is a major consequence of cerebral ischemia reperfusion. However, few effective therapeutic options are available for retarding the brain edema progression after cerebral ischemia. Recently, rapamycin has been shown to produce neuroprotective effects in rats after cerebral ischemia reperfusion. Whether rapamycin could alleviate this brain edema injury is still unclear. In this study, the rat stroke model was induced by a 1-h left transient middle cerebral artery occlusion using an intraluminal filament, followed by 48 h of reperfusion. The effects of rapamycin (250 μg/kg body weight, intraperitoneal; i.p.) on brain edema progression were evaluated. The results showed that rapamycin treatment significantly reduced the infarct volume, the water content of the brain tissue and the Evans blue extravasation through the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Rapamycin treatment could improve histological appearance of the brain tissue, increased the capillary lumen space and maintain the integrity of BBB. Rapamycin also inhibited matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9) and aquaporin 4 (AQP4) expression. These data imply that rapamycin could improve brain edema progression after reperfusion injury through maintaining BBB integrity and inhibiting MMP9 and AQP4 expression. The data of this study provide a new possible approach for improving brain edema after cerebral ischemia reperfusion by administration of rapamycin.

  3. Impact on Autophagy and Ultraviolet B Induced Responses of Treatment with the MTOR Inhibitors Rapamycin, Everolimus, Torin 1, and pp242 in Human Keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Song; Li, Li; Li, Min; Zhang, Mengli

    2017-01-01

    The mechanistic target of Rapamycin (MTOR) protein is a crucial signaling regulator in mammalian cells that is extensively involved in cellular biology. The function of MTOR signaling in keratinocytes remains unclear. In this study, we detected the MTOR signaling and autophagy response in the human keratinocyte cell line HaCaT and human epidermal keratinocytes treated with MTOR inhibitors. Moreover, we detected the impact of MTOR inhibitors on keratinocytes exposed to the common carcinogenic stressors ultraviolet B (UVB) and UVA radiation. As a result, keratinocytes were sensitive to the MTOR inhibitors Rapamycin, everolimus, Torin 1, and pp242, but the regulation of MTOR downstream signaling was distinct. Next, autophagy induction only was observed in HaCaT cells treated with Rapamycin. Furthermore, we found that MTOR signaling was insensitive to UVB but sensitive to UVA radiation. UVB treatment also had no impact on the inhibition of MTOR signaling by MTOR inhibitors. Finally, MTOR inhibition by Rapamycin, everolimus, or pp242 did not affect the series of biological events in keratinocytes exposed to UVB, including the downregulation of BiP and PERK, activation of Histone H2A and JNK, and cleavage of caspase-3 and PARP. Our study demonstrated that MTOR inhibition in keratinocytes cannot always induce autophagy, and the MTOR pathway does not play a central role in the UVB triggered cellular response.

  4. The bromodomain and extra-terminal inhibitor CPI203 enhances the antiproliferative effects of rapamycin on human neuroendocrine tumors

    PubMed Central

    Wong, C; Laddha, S V; Tang, L; Vosburgh, E; Levine, A J; Normant, E; Sandy, P; Harris, C R; Chan, C S; Xu, E Y

    2014-01-01

    Endogenous c-MYC (MYC) has been reported to be a potential pharmacological target to trigger ubiquitous tumor regression of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PanNETs) and lung tumors. Recently inhibitors of bromodomain and extra-terminal (BET) family proteins have shown antitumor effects through the suppression of MYC in leukemia and lymphoma. In this paper, we investigated the antitumor activity of a BET protein bromodomain inhibitor (BETi) CPI203 as a single agent and in combination with rapamycin in human PanNETs. We found that exposure of human PanNET cell lines to CPI203 led to downregulation of MYC expression, G1 cell cycle arrest and nearly complete inhibition of cell proliferation. In addition, overexpression of MYC suppressed the growth inhibition caused by CPI203 and knockdown of MYC phenocopied the effects of CPI203 treatment. These findings indicate that suppression of MYC contributed to the antiproliferative effects of BETi inhibition in human PanNET cells. Importantly, CPI203 treatment enhanced the antitumor effects of rapamycin in PanNET cells grown in monolayer and in three-dimensional cell cultures, as well as in a human PanNET xenograft model in vivo. Furthermore, the combination treatment attenuated rapamycin-induced AKT activation, a major limitation of rapamycin therapy. Collectively, our data suggest that targeting MYC with a BETi may increase the therapeutic benefits of rapalogs in human PanNET patients. This provides a novel clinical strategy for PanNETs, and possibly for other tumors as well. PMID:25299775

  5. Preservation of Anticancer and Immunosuppressive Properties of Rapamycin Achieved Through Controlled Releasing Particles.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yan Liang; Hou, Han Wei; Tay, Hui Min; Guo, Wei Mei; Berggren, Per-Olof; Loo, Say Chye Joachim

    2017-03-01

    Rapamycin is commonly used in chemotherapy and posttransplantation rejection suppression, where sustained release is preferred. Conventionally, rapamycin has to be administered in excess due to its poor solubility, and this often leads to cytotoxicity and undesirable side effects. In addition, rapamycin has been shown to be hydrolytically unstable, losing its bioactivity within a few hours. The use of drug delivery systems is hypothesized to preserve the bioactivity of rapamycin, while providing controlled release of this otherwise potent drug. This paper reports on the use of microparticles (MP) as a means to tune and sustain the delivery of bioactive rapamycin for up to 30 days. Rapamycin was encapsulated (100% efficiency) in poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA), polycaprolactone (PCL), or a mixture of both via an emulsion method. The use of different polymer types and mixture was shown to achieve a variety of release kinetics and profile. Released rapamycin was subsequently evaluated against breast cancer cell (MCF-7) and human lymphocyte cell (Jurkat). Inhibition of cell proliferation was in good agreement with in vitro release profiles, which confirmed the intact bioactivity of rapamycin. For Jurkat cells, the suppression of cell growth was proven to be effective up to 20 days, a duration significantly longer than free rapamycin. Taken together, these results demonstrate the ability to tune, sustain, and preserve the bioactivity of rapamycin using MP formulations. The sustained delivery of rapamycin could lead to better therapeutic effects than bolus dosage, at the same time improving patient compliance due to its long-acting duration.

  6. Adaptations to chronic rapamycin in mice

    PubMed Central

    Dodds, Sherry G.; Livi, Carolina B.; Parihar, Manish; Hsu, Hang-Kai; Benavides, Adriana D.; Morris, Jay; Javors, Martin; Strong, Randy; Christy, Barbara; Hasty, Paul; Sharp, Zelton Dave

    2016-01-01

    Rapamycin inhibits mechanistic (or mammalian) target of rapamycin (mTOR) that promotes protein production in cells by facilitating ribosome biogenesis (RiBi) and eIF4E-mediated 5'cap mRNA translation. Chronic treatment with encapsulated rapamycin (eRapa) extended health and life span for wild-type and cancer-prone mice. Yet, the long-term consequences of chronic eRapa treatment are not known at the organ level. Here, we report our observations of chronic eRapa treatment on mTORC1 signaling and RiBi in mouse colon and visceral adipose. As expected, chronic eRapa treatment decreased detection of phosphorylated mTORC1/S6K substrate, ribosomal protein (rpS6) in colon and fat. However, in colon, contrary to expectations, there was an upregulation of 18S rRNA and some ribosomal protein genes (RPGs) suggesting increased RiBi. Among RPGs, eRapa increases rpl22l1 mRNA but not its paralog rpl22. Furthermore, there was an increase in the cap-binding protein, eIF4E relative to its repressor 4E-BP1 suggesting increased translation. By comparison, in fat, there was a decrease in the level of 18S rRNA (opposite to colon), while overall mRNAs encoding ribosomal protein genes appeared to increase, including rpl22, but not rpl22l1 (opposite to colon). In fat, there was a decrease in eIF4E relative to actin (opposite to colon) but also an increase in the eIF4E/4E-BP1 ratio likely due to reductions in 4E-BP1 at our lower eRapa dose (similar to colon). Thus, in contrast to predictions of decreased protein production seen in cell-based studies, we provide evidence that colon from chronically treated mice exhibited an adaptive ‘pseudo-anabolic’ state, which is only partially present in fat, which might relate to differing tissue levels of rapamycin, cell-type-specific responses, and/or strain differences. PMID:27237224

  7. Serendipity in splendid isolation: rapamycin.

    PubMed

    Rao, V Koneti

    2016-01-07

    In this issue of Blood, Bride et al report results of the first prospective multi-institutional trial of a long-term single-agent therapy for refractory cytopenias using rapamycin in 30 patients and show remarkable efficacy in children with autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS).

  8. mTOR and MEK1/2 inhibition differentially modulate tumor growth and the immune microenvironment in syngeneic models of oral cavity cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cash, Harrison; Shah, Sujay; Moore, Ellen; Caruso, Andria; Uppaluri, Ravindra; Van Waes, Carter; Allen, Clint

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the effects of mTOR and MEK1/2 inhibition on tumor growth and the tumor microenvironment in immunogenic and poorly immunogenic models of murine oral cancer. In vitro, rapamycin and PD901 inhibited signaling through expected downstream targets, but only PD901 reduced viability and altered function of MOC cells. Following transplantation of MOC cells into immune-competent mice, effects on both cancer and infiltrating immune cells were characterized following rapamycin and/or PD901 treatment for 21 days. In vivo, both rapamycin and PD901 inhibition reduced primary growth of established MOC tumors on treatment. Following withdrawal of PD901, rapid rebound of tumor growth limited survival, whereas durable tumor control was observed following rapamycin treatment in immunogenic MOC1 tumors despite more robust inhibition of oncogenic signaling by PD901. Characterization of the immune microenvironment revealed diminished infiltration and activation of antigen-specific CD8+ T-cells and other immune cells following PD901 but not rapamycin in immunogenic tumors. Subsequent in vitro T-cell assays validated robust inhibition of T-cell expansion and activation following MEK inhibition compared to mTOR inhibition. CD8 cell depletion abrogated rapamycin-induced primary tumor growth inhibition in MOC1 mice. These data have critical implications in the design of combination targeted and immune therapies in oral cancer. PMID:26506415

  9. Blocking mammalian target of rapamycin alleviates bladder hyperactivity and pain in rats with cystitis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jie; Gou, Xin; Chen, Daihui

    2016-01-01

    Background Bladder disorders associated with interstitial cystitis are frequently characterized by increased contractility and pain. The purposes of this study were to examine (1) the effects of blocking mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) on the exaggerated bladder activity and pain evoked by cystitis and (2) the underlying mechanisms responsible for the role of mTOR in regulating cystic sensory activity. Results The expression of p-mTOR, mTOR-mediated phosphorylation of p70 ribosomal S6 protein kinase 1 (p-S6K1), 4 E–binding protein 4 (p-4 E-BP1), as well as phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase (p-PI3K) pathway were amplified in cyclophosphamide rats as compared with control rats. Blocking mTOR by intrathecal infusion of rapamycin attenuated bladder hyperactivity and pain. In addition, blocking PI3K signal pathway attenuated activities of mTOR, which was accompanied with decreasing bladder hyperactivity and pain. Inhibition of either mTOR or PI3K blunted the enhanced spinal substance P and calcitonin gene-related peptide in cyclophosphamide rats. Conclusions The data for the first time revealed specific signaling pathways leading to cyclophosphamide-induced bladder hyperactivity and pain, including the activation of mTOR and PI3K. Inhibition of these pathways alleviates cystic pain. Targeting one or more of these signaling molecules may present new opportunities for treatment and management of overactive bladder and pain often observed in cystitis. PMID:27780878

  10. Rapamycin attenuates the development of posttraumatic epilepsy in a mouse model of traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Guo, Dongjun; Zeng, Linghui; Brody, David L; Wong, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Posttraumatic epilepsy is a major source of disability following traumatic brain injury (TBI) and a common cause of medically-intractable epilepsy. Previous attempts to prevent the development of posttraumatic epilepsy with treatments administered immediately following TBI have failed. Recently, the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) pathway has been implicated in mechanisms of epileptogenesis and the mTORC1 inhibitor, rapamycin, has been proposed to have antiepileptogenic effects in preventing some types of epilepsy. In this study, we have tested the hypothesis that rapamycin has antiepileptogenic actions in preventing the development of posttraumatic epilepsy in an animal model of TBI. A detailed characterization of posttraumatic epilepsy in the mouse controlled cortical impact model was first performed using continuous video-EEG monitoring for 16 weeks following TBI. Controlled cortical impact injury caused immediate hyperactivation of the mTORC1 pathway lasting at least one week, which was reversed by rapamycin treatment. Rapamycin decreased neuronal degeneration and mossy fiber sprouting, although the effect on mossy fiber sprouting was reversible after stopping rapamycin and did not directly correlate with inhibition of epileptogenesis. Most posttraumatic seizures occurred greater than 10 weeks after TBI, and rapamycin treatment for one month after TBI decreased the seizure frequency and rate of developing posttraumatic epilepsy during the entire 16 week monitoring session. These results suggest that rapamycin may represent a rational treatment for preventing posttraumatic epilepsy in patients with TBI.

  11. Targeted therapy of colorectal neoplasia with rapamycin in peptide-labeled pegylated octadecyl lithocholate micelles.

    PubMed

    Khondee, Supang; Rabinsky, Emily F; Owens, Scott R; Joshi, Bishnu P; Qiu, Zhen; Duan, Xiyu; Zhao, Lili; Wang, Thomas D

    2015-02-10

    Many powerful drugs have limited clinical utility because of poor water solubility and high systemic toxicity. Here, we formulated a targeted nanomedicine, rapamycin encapsulated in pegylated octadecyl lithocholate micelles labeled with a new ligand for colorectal neoplasia, LTTHYKL peptide. CPC;Apc mice that spontaneously develop colonic adenomas were treated with free rapamycin, plain rapamycin micelles, and peptide-labeled rapamycin micelles via intraperitoneal injection for 35days. Endoscopy was performed to monitor adenoma regression in vivo. We observed complete adenoma regression at the end of therapy. The mean regression rate for peptide-labeled rapamycin micelles was significantly greater than that for plain rapamycin micelles, P<0.01. On immunohistochemistry, we observed a significant reduction in phospho-S6 but not β-catenin expression and reduced tumor cell proliferation, suggesting greater inhibition of downstream mTOR signaling. We observed significantly reduced renal toxicity for peptide-labeled rapamycin micelles compared to that of free drug, and no other toxicities were found on chemistries. Together, this unique targeted micelle represents a potential therapeutic for colorectal neoplasia with comparable therapeutic efficacy to rapamycin free drug and significantly less systemic toxicity.

  12. Rapamycin Rescues the Poor Developmental Capacity of Aged Porcine Oocytes

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung Eun; Kim, Eun Young; Choi, Hyun Yong; Moon, Jeremiah Jiman; Park, Min Jee; Lee, Jun Beom; Jeong, Chang Jin; Park, Se Pill

    2014-01-01

    Unfertilized oocytes age inevitably after ovulation, which limits their fertilizable life span and embryonic development. Rapamycin affects mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) expression and cytoskeleton reorganization during oocyte meiotic maturation. The goal of this study was to examine the effects of rapamycin treatment on aged porcine oocytes and their in vitro development. Rapamycin treatment of aged oocytes for 24 h (68 h in vitro maturation [IVM]; 44 h+10 μM rapamycin/24 h, 47.52±5.68) or control oocytes (44 h IVM; 42.14±4.40) significantly increased the development rate and total cell number compared with untreated aged oocytes (68 h IVM, 22.04±5.68) (p<0.05). Rapamycin treatment of aged IVM oocytes for 24 h also rescued aberrant spindle organization and chromosomal misalignment, blocked the decrease in the level of phosphorylated-p44/42 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), and increased the mRNA expression of cytoplasmic maturation factor genes (MOS, BMP15, GDF9, and CCNB1) compared with untreated, 24 h-aged IVM oocytes (p<0.05). Furthermore, rapamycin treatment of aged oocytes decreased reactive oxygen species (ROS) activity and DNA fragmentation (p<0.05), and downregulated the mRNA expression of mTOR compared with control or untreated aged oocytes. By contrast, rapamycin treatment of aged oocytes increased mitochondrial localization (p<0.05) and upregulated the mRNA expression of autophagy (BECN1, ATG7, MAP1LC3B, ATG12, GABARAP, and GABARAPL1), anti-apoptosis (BCL2L1 and BIRC5; p<0.05), and development (NANOG and SOX2; p<0.05) genes, but it did not affect the mRNA expression of pro-apoptosis genes (FAS and CASP3) compared with the control. This study demonstrates that rapamycin treatment can rescue the poor developmental capacity of aged porcine oocytes. PMID:25049998

  13. Hydrogen Sulfide Inhibits Plasma Renin Activity

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Ming; Liu, Yi-Hong; Goh, Hong Swen; Wang, Josh Jia Xing; Yong, Qian-Chen; Wang, Rui

    2010-01-01

    The development of renovascular hypertension depends on the release of renin from the juxtaglomerular (JG) cells, a process regulated by intracellular cAMP. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) downregulates cAMP production in some cell types by inhibiting adenylyl cyclase, suggesting the possibility that it may modulate renin release. Here, we investigated the effect of H2S on plasma renin activity and BP in rat models of renovascular hypertension. In the two-kidney-one-clip (2K1C) model of renovascular hypertension, the H2S donor NaHS prevented and treated hypertension. Compared with vehicle, NaHS significantly attenuated the elevation in plasma renin activity and angiotensin II levels but did not affect plasma angiotensin-converting enzyme activity. Furthermore, NaHS inhibited the upregulation of renin mRNA and protein levels in the clipped kidneys of 2K1C rats. In primary cultures of renin-rich kidney cells, NaHS markedly suppressed forskolin-stimulated renin activity in the medium and the intracellular increase in cAMP. In contrast, NaHS did not affect BP or plasma renin activity in normal or one-kidney-one-clip (1K1C) rats, both of which had normal plasma renin activity. In conclusion, these results demonstrate that H2S may inhibit renin activity by decreasing the synthesis and release of renin, suggesting its potential therapeutic value for renovascular hypertension. PMID:20360313

  14. Chemical inhibition of nitrification in activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Kelly, R T; Henriques, I D S; Love, N G

    2004-03-20

    Conventional aerobic nitrification was adversely affected by single pulse inputs of six different classes of industrially relevant chemical toxins: an electrophilic solvent (1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene, CDNB), a heavy metal (cadmium), a hydrophobic chemical (1-octanol), an uncoupling agent (2,4-dinitrophenol, DNP), alkaline pH, and cyanide in its weak metal complexed form. The concentrations of each chemical source that caused 1 5, 25, and 50% respiratory inhibition of a nitrifying mixed liquor during a short-term assay were used to shock sequencing batch reactors containing nitrifying conventional activated sludge. The reactors were monitored for recovery over a period of 30 days or less. All shock conditions inhibited nitrification, but to different degrees. The nitrate generation rate (NGR) of the shocked reactors recovered overtime to control reactor levels and showed that it was a more sensitive indicator of nitrification inhibition than both initial respirometric tests conducted on unexposed biomass and effluent nitrogen species analyses. CDNB had the most severe impact on nitrification, followed by alkaline pH 11, cadmium, cyanide, octanol, and DNP. Based on effluent data, cadmium and octanol primarily inhibited ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) while CDNB, pH 11,and cyanide inhibited both AOB and nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB). DNP initially inhibited nitrification but quickly increased the NGR relative to the control and stimulated nitrification after several days in a manner reflective of oxidative uncoupling. The shocked mixed liquor showed trends toward recovery from inhibition for all chemicals tested, but in some cases this reversion was slow. These results contribute to our broader effort to identify relationships between chemical sources and the process effects they induce in activated sludge treatment systems.

  15. Inhibition of aromatase activity by flavonoids.

    PubMed

    Jeong, H J; Shin, Y G; Kim, I H; Pezzuto, J M

    1999-06-01

    In searching for potent cancer chemopreventive agents from synthetic or natural products, 28 randomly selected flavonoids were screened for inhibitory effects against partially purified aromatase prepared from human placenta. Over 50% of the flavonoids significantly inhibited aromatase activity, with greatest activity being demonstrated with apigenin (IC50: 0.9 microg/mL), chrysin (IC50: 1.1 microg/mL), and hesperetin (IC50: 1.0 microg/mL).

  16. Resveratrol inhibits polyphosphoinositide metabolism in activated platelets.

    PubMed

    Olas, Beata; Wachowicz, Barbara; Holmsen, Holm; Fukami, Miriam H

    2005-08-15

    The effects of resveratrol (trans-3,4',5-trihydroxystilbene) on activation responses and the polyphosphoinositide metabolism in human blood platelets have been studied. Resveratrol partially inhibited secretory responses (liberation of dense granule nucleotides and lysosomal acid hydrolases), microparticle formation and protein phosphorylations induced by thrombin. The effects of resveratrol on phosphoinositide metabolites, phosphatidate (PtdOH), phosphatidylinositol (PtdIns), phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate (PtdIns-4(5)-P), phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PtdIns-4,5-P2), phosphatidylinositol-3,4-bisphosphate (PtdIns-3,4-P2) and phosphatidylinositol-3,4,5-trisphosphate (PtdIns-3,4,5-P3) were monitored in blood platelets prelabelled with [32P]Pi. Resveratrol not only inhibited the marked increase in levels of PtdOH in platelets activated by thrombin (0.1 U/ml) but it decreased the steady state levels of the other polyphosphoinositide metabolites. The distribution of 32P in phosphoinositides in activated platelets was consistent with inhibition of CDP-DAG inositol transferase and a weak inhibition of PtdIns-4(5)-P kinase. These observations show that resveratrol has a profound effect on phospholipids, particularly on polyphosphoinositide metabolism, and may decrease the amount of PtdIns-4,5-P2 available for signalling in these cells.

  17. Anti-remodeling effects of rapamycin in experimental heart failure: dose response and interaction with angiotensin receptor blockade.

    PubMed

    Bishu, Kalkidan; Ogut, Ozgur; Kushwaha, Sudhir; Mohammed, Selma F; Ohtani, Tomohito; Xu, Xiaolei; Brozovich, Frank V; Redfield, Margaret M

    2013-01-01

    While neurohumoral antagonists improve outcomes in heart failure (HF), cardiac remodeling and dysfunction progress and outcomes remain poor. Therapies superior or additive to standard HF therapy are needed. Pharmacologic mTOR inhibition by rapamycin attenuated adverse cardiac remodeling and dysfunction in experimental heart failure (HF). However, these studies used rapamycin doses that produced blood drug levels targeted for primary immunosuppression in human transplantation and therefore the immunosuppressive effects may limit clinical translation. Further, the relative or incremental effect of rapamycin combined with standard HF therapies targeting upstream regulators of cardiac remodeling (neurohumoral antagonists) has not been defined. Our objectives were to determine if anti-remodeling effects of rapamycin were preserved at lower doses and whether rapamycin effects were similar or additive to a standard HF therapy (angiotensin receptor blocker (losartan)). Experimental murine HF was produced by transverse aortic constriction (TAC). At three weeks post-TAC, male mice with established HF were treated with placebo, rapamycin at a dose producing immunosuppressive drug levels (target dose), low dose (50% target dose) rapamycin, losartan or rapamycin + losartan for six weeks. Cardiac structure and function (echocardiography, catheterization, pathology, hypertrophic and fibrotic gene expression profiles) were assessed. Downstream mTOR signaling pathways regulating protein synthesis (S6K1 and S6) and autophagy (LC3B-II) were characterized. TAC-HF mice displayed eccentric hypertrophy, systolic dysfunction and pulmonary congestion. These perturbations were attenuated to a similar degree by oral rapamycin doses achieving target (13.3±2.1 ng/dL) or low (6.7±2.5 ng/dL) blood levels. Rapamycin treatment decreased mTOR mediated regulators of protein synthesis and increased mTOR mediated regulators of autophagy. Losartan monotherapy did not attenuate remodeling, whereas

  18. Effects of ketamine administration on mTOR and reticulum stress signaling pathways in the brain after the infusion of rapamycin into prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Abelaira, Helena M; Réus, Gislaine Z; Ignácio, Zuleide M; Dos Santos, Maria Augusta B; de Moura, Airam B; Matos, Danyela; Demo, Júlia P; da Silva, Júlia B I; Michels, Monique; Abatti, Mariane; Sonai, Beatriz; Dal Pizzol, Felipe; Carvalho, André F; Quevedo, João

    2017-04-01

    Recent studies show that activation of the mTOR signaling pathway is required for the rapid antidepressant actions of glutamate N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonists. A relationship between mTOR kinase and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress pathway, also known as the unfolded protein response (UPR) has been shown. We evaluate the effects of ketamine administration on the mTOR signaling pathway and proteins of UPR in the prefrontal cortex (PFC), hippocampus, amygdala and nucleus accumbens, after the inhibiton of mTOR signaling in the PFC. Male adult Wistar rats received pharmacological mTOR inhibitor, rapamycin (0.2 nmol), or vehicle into the PFC and then a single dose of ketamine (15 mg/kg, i.p.). The immunocontent of mTOR, eukaryotic initiation factor 4E-binding protein 1 (4E-BP1), eukaryotic elongation factor 2 kinase (eEF2K) homologous protein (CHOP), PKR-like ER kinase (PERK) and inositol-requiring enzyme 1 (IRE1) - alpha were determined in the brain. The mTOR levels were reduced in the rapamycin group treated with saline and ketamine in the PFC; p4EBP1 levels were reduced in the rapamycin group treated with ketamine in the PFC and nucleus accumbens; the levels of peEF2K were increased in the PFC in the vehicle group treated with ketamine and reduced in the rapamycin group treated with ketamine. The PERK and IRE1-alpha levels were decreased in the PFC in the rapamycin group treated with ketamine. Our results suggest that mTOR signaling inhibition by rapamycin could be involved, at least in part, with the mechanism of action of ketamine; and the ketamine antidepressant on ER stress pathway could be also mediated by mTOR signaling pathway in certain brain structures.

  19. Thiomers: Inhibition of cytochrome P450 activity.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Javed; Sakloetsakun, Duangkamon; Bernkop-Schnürch, Andreas

    2011-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the potential of different thiolated polymers (thiomers) on the catalytic activity of CYP450s on one hand and to explore new inhibitors for CYP activity on the other hand. Several thiolated polymers including poly(acrylic acid)-cysteine (PAA-cysteine), chitosan-thioglycolic acid (chitosan-TGA), and thiolated PEG-g-PEI copolymer along with brij 35, myrj 52 and the well-established CYPP450 inhibitor verapamil were screened for their CYP3A4 and CYP2A6 inhibitory activity, and their IC(50) values were determined. Both enzyme inhibition assays were performed in 96-well microtiter plates. 7-Benzyloxy-4-(trifluoromethyl)-coumarin (BFC) and 7-hydroxycoumarin (7-HC) were used as fluorescent substrates in order to determine CYP3A4 and CYP2A6 catalytic activity, respectively. All investigated compounds inhibited CYP3A4 as well as CYP2A6 activity. All tested (thiolated) polymers were found to be more potent inhibitors of CYP3A4 than of CYP2A6 catalytic activity. Apart from verapamil that is a known CYP3A4 inhibitor, brij 35 and myrj 52 were explored as potent inhibitors of CYP3A4 and CYP2A6 catalytic activity. Among the tested polymers, the rank order for CYP3A4 inhibition was PAA-cysteine (100 kDa)>brij 35>thiolated PEG-g-PEI copolymer (16 kDa)>myrj 52>PAA (100 kDa)>PAA-cysteine (450 kDa)>verapamil>PAA (450 kDa)>chitosan-TGA (150 kDa)>chitosan (150 kDa). On the other hand, the rank order of CYP2A6 inhibition was brij 35>PAA-cysteine (100kDa)>chitosan-TGA (150 kDa)>PAA (100 kDa)>thiolated PEG-g-PEI copolymer (16 kDa)>PAA-cysteine (450 kDa)>chitosan (150 kDa)>verapamil>PAA (450 kDa)>myrj 52. Thus, this study suggests that (thiolated) polymers display a promising potential to inhibit cytochrome P450s activity and might turn out to be potentially valuable tools for improving the oral bioavailability of actively secreted compounds by avoiding intestinal metabolism.

  20. Platelet-derived growth factor regulates vascular smooth muscle phenotype via mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1

    SciTech Connect

    Ha, Jung Min; Yun, Sung Ji; Kim, Young Whan; Jin, Seo Yeon; Lee, Hye Sun; Song, Sang Heon; Shin, Hwa Kyoung; Bae, Sun Sik

    2015-08-14

    Mammalian target of rapamycin complex (mTORC) regulates various cellular processes including proliferation, growth, migration and differentiation. In this study, we showed that mTORC1 regulates platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-induced phenotypic conversion of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Stimulation of contractile VSMCs with PDGF significantly reduced the expression of contractile marker proteins in a time- and dose-dependent manner. In addition, angiotensin II (AngII)-induced contraction of VSMCs was completely blocked by the stimulation of VSMCs with PDGF. PDGF-dependent suppression of VSMC marker gene expression was significantly blocked by inhibition of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), and mTOR whereas inhibition of p38 MAPK had no effect. In particular, inhibition of mTORC1 by rapamycin or by silencing of Raptor significantly blocked the PDGF-dependent phenotypic change of VSMCs whereas silencing of Rictor had no effect. In addition, loss of AngII-dependent contraction by PDGF was significantly retained by silencing of Raptor. Inhibition of mTORC1 by rapamycin or by silencing of Raptor significantly blocked PDGF-induced proliferation of VSMCs. Taken together, we suggest that mTORC1 plays an essential role in PDGF-dependent phenotypic changes of VSMCs. - Graphical abstract: Regulation of VSMC phenotype by PDGF-dependent activation of mTORC1. - Highlights: • The expression of contractile marker proteins was reduced by PDGF stimulation. • PDGF-dependent phenotypic conversion of VSMCs was blocked by inhibition of mTOR. • PDGF-induced proliferation of VSMCs was attenuated by inhibition of mTORC1. • mTORC1 plays a critical role in PDGF-dependent phenotypic conversion of VSMCs.

  1. Aminopeptidase from Brevibacterium linens: activation and inhibition.

    PubMed

    Foissy, H

    1978-04-18

    Activation and inhibition of a purified aminopeptidase from Brevibacterium linens was investigated using L-alpha-leucyl-4-nitroanilide and L-leucyl-L-leucine as substrates. The enzyme was activated by cobalt, provided that the enzyme was preincubated with the metal. Strong inhibitory effects were derived from heavy metals, metal-complexing compounds, reducing agents, the modification of aromatic amino acids, and the presence of hydrophobic substances or certain amino acids in the test mixtures. Supposing that this B. linens aminopeptidase plays a part during surface-ripening of cheeses, possible consequences of specific technological conditions for its activity are discussed.

  2. Time-dependent effects of rapamycin on consolidation of predator stress-induced hyperarousal.

    PubMed

    Fifield, Kathleen; Hebert, Mark; Williams, Kimberly; Linehan, Victoria; Whiteman, Jesse D; Mac Callum, Phillip; Blundell, Jacqueline

    2015-06-01

    Previous studies have indicated that rapamycin, a potent inhibitor of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway, blocks consolidation of shock-induced associative fear memories. Moreover, rapamycin's block of associative fear memories is time-dependent. It is unknown, however, if rapamycin blocks consolidation of predator stress-induced non-associative fear memories. Furthermore, the temporal pattern of mTOR activation following predator stress is unknown. Thus, the goal of the current studies was to determine if rapamycin blocks consolidation of predator stress-induced fear memories and if so, whether rapamycin's effect is time-dependent. Male rats were injected systemically with rapamycin at various time points following predator stress. Predator stress involves an acute, unprotected exposure of a rat to a cat, which causes long-lasting non-associative fear memories manifested as generalized hyperarousal and increased anxiety-like behaviour. We show that rapamycin injected immediately after predator stress blocked consolidation of stress-induced startle. However, rapamycin injected 9, 24 or 48h post predator stress potentiated stress-induced startle. Consistent with shock-induced associative fear memories, we show that mTOR signalling is essential for consolidation of predator stress-induced hyperarousal. However, unlike shock-induced fear memories, a second, persistent, late phase mTOR-dependent process following predator stress actually dampens startle. Consistent with previous findings, our data support the potential role for rapamycin in treatment of stress related disorders such as posttraumatic stress disorder. However, our data suggest timing of rapamycin administration is critical.

  3. Rapamycin-enhanced mitomycin C-induced apoptotic death is mediated through the S6K1-Bad-Bak pathway in peritoneal carcinomatosis.

    PubMed

    Song, X; Dilly, A-K; Kim, S-Y; Choudry, H A; Lee, Y J

    2014-06-05

    Peritoneal carcinomatosis (PC) is the most common secondary cancerous disease, and more effective novel regimens are needed. In this study, we identified a novel combination treatment for PC, chemotherapeutic agent mitomycin C in combination with mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin) inhibitor rapamycin. We observed that the combination of mitomycin C and rapamycin induced synergistic cytotoxicity and apoptosis, which was mediated through an increase in caspase activation. The combination of mitomycin C and rapamycin inactivated p70 S6 ribosomal kinase (S6K1) and dephosphorylated Bad, leading to dissociation of Bcl-xL from Bak, which resulted in Bak oligomerization, mitochondria dysfunction and cytochrome c release. PF-4708671, a S6K1-specific inhibitor, enhanced the combination treatment-induced apoptosis, whereas S6K1 E389 DeltaCT-HA (S6K1 active form) dramatically decreased the induction of apoptosis. In addition, the combination treatment significantly inhibited LS174T intraperitoneal tumor growth in vivo. This study provides a preclinical rationale for apoptosis induction linked with the mTOR pathway through a combination of chemotherapeutic agents and mTOR inhibitor, and will support this combinatorial strategy to PC patients.

  4. Brassinosteriod Insensitive 2 (BIN2) acts as a downstream effector of the Target of Rapamycin (TOR) signaling pathway to regulate photoautotrophic growth in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Fangjie; Zhang, Rui; Meng, Zhigang; Deng, Kexuan; Que, Yumei; Zhuo, Fengping; Feng, Li; Guo, Sundui; Datla, Raju; Ren, Maozhi

    2017-01-01

    The components of the target of rapamycin (TOR) signaling pathway have been well characterized in heterotrophic organisms from yeast to humans. However, because of rapamycin insensitivity, embryonic lethality in tor null mutants and a lack of reliable ways of detecting TOR protein kinase in higher plants, the key players upstream and downstream of TOR remain largely unknown in plants. Using engineered rapamycin-sensitive Binding Protein 12-2 (BP12-2) plants, the present study showed that combined treatment with rapamycin and active-site TOR inhibitors (asTORis) results in synergistic inhibition of TOR activity and plant growth in Arabidopsis. Based on this system, we revealed that TOR signaling plays a crucial role in modulating the transition from heterotrophic to photoautotrophic growth in Arabidopsis. Ribosomal protein S6 kinase 2 (S6K2) was identified as a direct downstream target of TOR, and the growth of TOR-suppressed plants could be rescued by up-regulating S6K2. Systems, genetic, and biochemical analyses revealed that Brassinosteriod Insensitive 2 (BIN2) acts as a novel downstream effector of S6K2, and the phosphorylation of BIN2 depends on TOR-S6K2 signaling in Arabidopsis. By combining pharmacological with genetic and biochemical approaches, we determined that the TOR-S6K2-BIN2 signaling pathway plays important roles in regulating the photoautotrophic growth of Arabidopsis.

  5. Rapamycin-enhanced mitomycin C-induced apoptotic death is mediated through the S6K1–Bad–Bak pathway in peritoneal carcinomatosis

    PubMed Central

    Song, X; Dilly, A-K; Kim, S-Y; Choudry, H A; Lee, Y J

    2014-01-01

    Peritoneal carcinomatosis (PC) is the most common secondary cancerous disease, and more effective novel regimens are needed. In this study, we identified a novel combination treatment for PC, chemotherapeutic agent mitomycin C in combination with mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin) inhibitor rapamycin. We observed that the combination of mitomycin C and rapamycin induced synergistic cytotoxicity and apoptosis, which was mediated through an increase in caspase activation. The combination of mitomycin C and rapamycin inactivated p70 S6 ribosomal kinase (S6K1) and dephosphorylated Bad, leading to dissociation of Bcl-xL from Bak, which resulted in Bak oligomerization, mitochondria dysfunction and cytochrome c release. PF-4708671, a S6K1-specific inhibitor, enhanced the combination treatment-induced apoptosis, whereas S6K1 E389 DeltaCT-HA (S6K1 active form) dramatically decreased the induction of apoptosis. In addition, the combination treatment significantly inhibited LS174T intraperitoneal tumor growth in vivo. This study provides a preclinical rationale for apoptosis induction linked with the mTOR pathway through a combination of chemotherapeutic agents and mTOR inhibitor, and will support this combinatorial strategy to PC patients. PMID:24901052

  6. Synthesis of Rapamycin Derivatives Containing the Triazole Moiety Used as Potential mTOR-Targeted Anticancer Agents.

    PubMed

    Xie, Lijun; Huang, Jie; Chen, Xiaoming; Yu, Hui; Li, Kualiang; Yang, Dan; Chen, Xiaqin; Ying, Jiayin; Pan, Fusheng; Lv, Youbing; Cheng, Yuanrong

    2016-06-01

    Rapamycin, a potent antifungal antibiotic, was approved as immunosuppressant, and lately its derivatives have been developed into mTOR targeting anticancer drugs. Structure modification was performed at the C-42 position of rapamycin, and a novel series of rapamycin triazole hybrids (4a-d, 5a-e, 8a-e, and 9a-e) was facilely synthesized via Huisgen's reaction. The anticancer activity of these compounds was evaluated against the Caski, H1299, MGC-803, and H460 human cancer cell lines. Some of the derivatives (8a-e, 9a-e) appeared to have stronger activity than that of rapamycin; however, 4a-d and 5a-e failed to show potential anticancer activity. Compound 9e with a (2,4-dichlorophenylamino)methyl moiety on the triazole ring was the most active anticancer compound, which showed IC50 values of 6.05 (Caski), 7.89 (H1299), 25.88 (MGC-803), and 8.60 μM (H460). In addition, research on the mechanism showed that 9e was able to cause cell morphological changes and to induce apoptosis in the Caski cell line. Most importantly, 9e can decrease the phosphorylation of mTOR and of its downstream key proteins, S6 and P70S6K1, indicating that 9e can effectively inhibit the mTOR signaling pathway. Thus, it may have the potential to become a new mTOR inhibitor against various cancers.

  7. Dimethyl sulfoxide inhibits NLRP3 inflammasome activation.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Huijeong; Kim, Jeeyoung; Jeung, Eui-Bae; Lee, Geun-Shik

    2014-04-01

    Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) is an amphipathic molecule that is commonly/widely used as a solvent for biological compounds. In addition, DMSO has been studied as a medication for the treatment of inflammation, cystitis, and arthritis. Based on the anti-inflammatory characteristics of DMSO, we elucidated the effects of DMSO on activation of inflammasomes, which are cytoplasmic multi-protein complexes that mediate the maturation of interleukin (IL)-1β by activating caspase-1 (Casp1). In the present study, we prove that DMSO attenuated IL-1β maturation, Casp1 activity, and ASC pyroptosome formation via NLRP3 inflammasome activators. Further, NLRC4 and AIM2 inflammasome activity were not affected, suggesting that DMSO is a selective inhibitor of the NLRP3 inflammasomes. The anti-inflammatory effect of DMSO was further confirmed in animal, LPS-endotoxin sepsis and inflammatory bowel disease models. In addition, DMSO inhibited LPS-mediating IL-1s transcription. Taken together, DMSO shows anti-inflammatory characteristics, attenuates NLRP3 inflammasome activation, and mediates inhibition of IL-1s transcription.

  8. Chronic rapamycin treatment on the nutrient utilization and metabolism of juvenile turbot (Psetta maxima)

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qingchao; He, Gen; Mai, Kangsen; Xu, Wei; Zhou, Huihui; Wang, Xuan; Mei, Lin

    2016-01-01

    High dietary protein inclusion is necessary in fish feeds and also represents a major cost in the aquaculture industry, which demands improved dietary conversion into body proteins in fish. In mammals, the target of rapamycin (TOR) is a key nutritionally responsive molecule governing postprandial anabolism. However, its physiological significance in teleosts has not been fully examined. In the present study, we examined the nutritional physiology of turbot after chronic rapamycin inhibition. Our results showed that a 6-week inhibition of TOR using dietary rapamycin inclusion (30 mg/kg diet) reduced growth performance and feed utilization. The rapamycin treatment inhibited TOR signaling and reduced expression of key enzymes in glycolysis, lipogenesis, cholesterol biosynthesis, while increasing the expression of enzymes involved in gluconeogenesis. Furthermore, rapamycin treatment increased intestinal goblet cell number in turbot, while the expressions of Notch and Hes1 were down regulated. It was possible that stimulated goblet cell differentiation by rapamycin was mediated through Notch-Hes1 pathway. Therefore, our results demonstrate the important role of TOR signaling in fish nutritional physiology. PMID:27305975

  9. Rapamycin reverses impaired social interaction in mouse models of tuberous sclerosis complex.

    PubMed

    Sato, Atsushi; Kasai, Shinya; Kobayashi, Toshiyuki; Takamatsu, Yukio; Hino, Okio; Ikeda, Kazutaka; Mizuguchi, Masashi

    2012-01-01

    Impairment of reciprocal social interaction is a core symptom of autism spectrum disorder. Genetic disorders frequently accompany autism spectrum disorder, such as tuberous sclerosis complex caused by haploinsufficiency of the TSC1 and TSC2 genes. Accumulating evidence implicates a relationship between autism spectrum disorder and signal transduction that involves tuberous sclerosis complex 1, tuberous sclerosis complex 2 and mammalian target of rapamycin. Here we show behavioural abnormalities relevant to autism spectrum disorder and their recovery by the mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor rapamycin in mouse models of tuberous sclerosis complex. In Tsc2(+/-) mice, we find enhanced transcription of multiple genes involved in mammalian target of rapamycin signalling, which is dependent on activated mammalian target of rapamycin signalling with a minimal influence of Akt. The findings indicate a crucial role of mammalian target of rapamycin signalling in deficient social behaviour in mouse models of tuberous sclerosis complex, supporting the notion that mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors may be useful for the pharmacological treatment of autism spectrum disorder associated with tuberous sclerosis complex and other conditions that result from dysregulated mammalian target of rapamycin signalling.

  10. An Activation Threshold Model for Response Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    MacDonald, Hayley J.; McMorland, Angus J. C.; Stinear, Cathy M.; Coxon, James P.; Byblow, Winston D.

    2017-01-01

    Reactive response inhibition (RI) is the cancellation of a prepared response when it is no longer appropriate. Selectivity of RI can be examined by cueing the cancellation of one component of a prepared multi-component response. This substantially delays execution of other components. There is debate regarding whether this response delay is due to a selective neural mechanism. Here we propose a computational activation threshold model (ATM) and test it against a classical “horse-race” model using behavioural and neurophysiological data from partial RI experiments. The models comprise both facilitatory and inhibitory processes that compete upstream of motor output regions. Summary statistics (means and standard deviations) of predicted muscular and neurophysiological data were fit in both models to equivalent experimental measures by minimizing a Pearson Chi-square statistic. The ATM best captured behavioural and neurophysiological dynamics of partial RI. The ATM demonstrated that the observed modulation of corticomotor excitability during partial RI can be explained by nonselective inhibition of the prepared response. The inhibition raised the activation threshold to a level that could not be reached by the original response. This was necessarily followed by an additional phase of facilitation representing a secondary activation process in order to reach the new inhibition threshold and initiate the executed component of the response. The ATM offers a mechanistic description of the neural events underlying RI, in which partial movement cancellation results from a nonselective inhibitory event followed by subsequent initiation of a new response. The ATM provides a framework for considering and exploring the neuroanatomical constraints that underlie RI. PMID:28085907

  11. Progeria, rapamycin and normal aging: recent breakthrough.

    PubMed

    Blagosklonny, Mikhail V

    2011-07-01

    A recent discovery that rapamycin suppresses a pro-senescent phenotype in progeric cells not only suggests a non-toxic therapy for progeria but also implies its similarity with normal aging. For one, rapamycin is also known to suppress aging of regular human cells. Here I discuss four potential scenarios, comparing progeria with both normal and accelerated aging. This reveals further indications of rapamycin both for accelerated aging in obese and for progeria.

  12. Antitumor effects of rapamycin in pancreatic cancer cells by inducing apoptosis and autophagy.

    PubMed

    Dai, Zhi-Jun; Gao, Jie; Ma, Xiao-Bin; Kang, Hua-Feng; Wang, Bao-Feng; Lu, Wang-Feng; Lin, Shuai; Wang, Xi-Jing; Wu, Wen-Ying

    2012-12-21

    Rapamycin (Rapa), an inhibitor of mammalian target of Rapamycin (mTOR), is an immunosuppressive agent that has anti-proliferative effects on some tumors. This study aims to investigate the effects of Rapa suppressing proliferation of pancreatic carcinoma PC-2 cells in vitro and its molecular mechanism involved in antitumor activities. MTT assays showed that the inhibition of proliferation of PC-2 cells in vitro was in a time- and dose-dependent manner. By using transmission electron microscopy, apoptosis bodies and formation of abundant autophagic vacuoles were observed in PC-2 cells after Rapa treatment. Flow cytometry assays also showed Rapa had a positive effect on apoptosis. MDC staining showed that the fluorescent density was higher and the number of MDC-labeled particles in PC-2 cells was greater in the Rapa treatment group than in the control group. RT-PCR revealed that the expression levels of p53, Bax and Beclin 1 were up-regulated in a dose-dependent manner, indicating that Beclin 1 was involved in Rapa induced autophagy and Rapa induced apoptosis as well as p53 up-regulation in PC-2 cells. The results demonstrated that Rapa could effectively inhibit proliferation and induce apoptosis and autophagy in PC-2 cells.

  13. Kaempferol inhibits thrombosis and platelet activation.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jun-Hui; Park, Se-Eun; Kim, Sung-Jun; Kim, Seung

    2015-08-01

    The objectives of the present study were to investigate whether kaempferol affects pro-coagulant proteinase activity, fibrin clot formation, blood clot and thrombin (or collagen/epinephrine)-stimulated platelet activation, thrombosis, and coagulation in ICR (Imprinting Control Region) mice and SD (Sprague-Dawley) rats. Kaempferol significantly inhibited the enzymatic activities of thrombin and FXa by 68 ± 1.6% and 52 ± 2.4%, respectively. Kaempferol also inhibited fibrin polymer formation in turbidity. Microscopic analysis was performed using a fluorescent conjugate. Kaempferol completely attenuated phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2, p38, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) 1/2, and phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/PKB (AKT) in thrombin-stimulated platelets and delayed aggregation time (clotting) by 34.6% in an assay of collagen/epinephrine-stimulated platelet activation. Moreover, kaempferol protected against thrombosis development in 3 animal models, including collagen/epinephrine- and thrombin-induced acute thromboembolism models and an FeCl3-induced carotid arterial thrombus model. The ex vivo anticoagulant effect of kaempferol was further confirmed in ICR mice. This study demonstrated that kaempferol may be clinically useful due to its ability to reduce or prevent thrombotic challenge.

  14. CC-223 blocks mTORC1/C2 activation and inhibits human hepatocellular carcinoma cells in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Zichen; Wang, Jiqin; Liu, Mei; Chen, Deshan; Qiu, Chao

    2017-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a leading cause of cancer-related human mortalities. Over-activation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is important for HCC tumorigenesis and progression. The current study assessed the potential anti-HCC activity by a novel mTOR kinase inhibitor, CC-223. We demonstrate that CC-223, at nM concentrations, induced profound cytotoxic and anti-proliferative activities against established HCC cell lines (HepG2, KYN-2 and Huh-7) and primary human HCC cells. Meanwhile, CC-223 activated caspase-3/-9 and apoptosis in the above HCC cells. CC-223 concurrently blocked mTORC1 and mTORC2 activation, and its cytotoxicity against HCC cells was much more potent than the traditional mTORC1 inhibitors (RAD001 and rapamycin). Further studies demonstrated that CC-223 disrupted mitochondrial function, and induced mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) opening and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. On the other hand, ROS scavengers and mPTP blockers (cyclosporin A or sanglifehrin A) largely attenuated CC-223-induced HepG2 cell apoptosis. In vivo studies showed that oral administration of CC-223 dramatically inhibited growth of HepG2 xenografts in severe combined immuno-deficient (SCID) mice. mTORC1/2 activation was also blocked in xenografts with CC-223 administration. Together, CC-223 simultaneously blocks mTORC1/2 and efficiently inhibits human HCC cells. PMID:28334043

  15. CC-223 blocks mTORC1/C2 activation and inhibits human hepatocellular carcinoma cells in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Xie, Zichen; Wang, Jiqin; Liu, Mei; Chen, Deshan; Qiu, Chao; Sun, Keyu

    2017-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a leading cause of cancer-related human mortalities. Over-activation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is important for HCC tumorigenesis and progression. The current study assessed the potential anti-HCC activity by a novel mTOR kinase inhibitor, CC-223. We demonstrate that CC-223, at nM concentrations, induced profound cytotoxic and anti-proliferative activities against established HCC cell lines (HepG2, KYN-2 and Huh-7) and primary human HCC cells. Meanwhile, CC-223 activated caspase-3/-9 and apoptosis in the above HCC cells. CC-223 concurrently blocked mTORC1 and mTORC2 activation, and its cytotoxicity against HCC cells was much more potent than the traditional mTORC1 inhibitors (RAD001 and rapamycin). Further studies demonstrated that CC-223 disrupted mitochondrial function, and induced mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) opening and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. On the other hand, ROS scavengers and mPTP blockers (cyclosporin A or sanglifehrin A) largely attenuated CC-223-induced HepG2 cell apoptosis. In vivo studies showed that oral administration of CC-223 dramatically inhibited growth of HepG2 xenografts in severe combined immuno-deficient (SCID) mice. mTORC1/2 activation was also blocked in xenografts with CC-223 administration. Together, CC-223 simultaneously blocks mTORC1/2 and efficiently inhibits human HCC cells.

  16. Allosteric inhibition of HIV-1 integrase activity

    PubMed Central

    Engelman, Alan; Kessl, Jacques J.; Kvaratskhelia, Mamuka

    2013-01-01

    HIV-1 integrase is an important therapeutic target in the fight against HIV/AIDS. Integrase strand transfer inhibitors (INSTIs), which target the enzyme active site, have witnessed clinical success over the past 5 years, but the generation of drug resistance poses challenges to INSTI-based therapies moving forward. Integrase is a dynamic protein, and its ordered multimerization is critical to enzyme activity. The integrase tetramer, bound to viral DNA, interacts with host LEDGF/p75 protein to tether integration to active genes. Allosteric integrase inhibitors (ALLINIs) that compete with LEDGF/p75 for binding to integrase disrupt integrase assembly with viral DNA and allosterically inhibit enzyme function. ALLINIs display steep dose response curves and synergize with INSTIs ex vivo, highlighting this novel inhibitor class for clinical development. PMID:23647983

  17. Trace element inhibition of phytase activity.

    PubMed

    Santos, T; Connolly, C; Murphy, R

    2015-02-01

    Nowadays, 70 % of global monogastric feeds contains an exogenous phytase. Phytase supplementation has enabled a more efficient utilisation of phytate phosphorous (P) and reduction of P pollution. Trace minerals, such as iron (Fe), zinc (Zn), copper (Cu) and manganese (Mn) are essential for maintaining health and immunity as well as being involved in animal growth, production and reproduction. Exogenous sources of phytase and trace elements are regularly supplemented to monogastric diets and usually combined in a premix. However, the possibility for negative interaction between individual components within the premix is high and is often overlooked. Therefore, this initial study focused on assessing the potential in vitro interaction between inorganic and organic chelated sources of Fe, Zn, Cu and Mn with three commercially available phytase preparations. Additionally, this study has investigated if the degree of enzyme inhibition was dependent of the type of chelated sources. A highly significant relationship between phytase inhibition, trace mineral type as well as mineral source and concentration, p < 0.001 was verified. The proteinate sources of OTMs were consistently and significantly less inhibitory than the majority of the other sources, p < 0.05. This was verified for Escherichia coli and Peniophora lycii phytases for Fe and Zn, as well as for Cu with E. coli and Aspergillus niger phytases. Different chelate trace mineral sources demonstrated diversifying abilities to inhibit exogenous phytase activity.

  18. Milk inhibits the biological activity of ricin.

    PubMed

    Rasooly, Reuven; He, Xiaohua; Friedman, Mendel

    2012-08-10

    Ricin is a highly toxic protein produced by the castor plant Ricinus communis. The toxin is relatively easy to isolate and can be used as a biological weapon. There is great interest in identifying effective inhibitors for ricin. In this study, we demonstrated by three independent assays that a component of reconstituted powdered milk has a high binding affinity to ricin. We discovered that milk can competitively bind to and reduce the amount of toxin available to asialofetuin type II, which is used as a model to study the binding of ricin to galactose cell-surface receptors. Milk also removes ricin bound to the microtiter plate. In parallel experiments, we demonstrated by activity assay and by immuno-PCR that milk can bind competitively to 1 ng/ml ricin, reducing the amount of toxin uptake by the cells, and thus inhibit the biological activity of ricin. The inhibitory effect of milk on ricin activity in Vero cells was at the same level as by anti-ricin antibodies. We also found that (a) milk did not inhibit ricin at concentrations of 10 or 100 ng/ml; (b) autoclaving 10 and 100 ng/ml ricin in DMEM at 121 °C for 30 min completely abolished activity; and (c) milk did not affect the activity of another ribosome inactivating protein, Shiga toxin type 2 (Stx2), produced by pathogenic Escherichia coli O157:H7. Unlike ricin, which is internalized into the cells via a galactose-binding site, Stx2 is internalized through the cell surface receptor glycolipid globotriasylceramides Gb3 and Gb4. These observations suggest that ricin toxicity may possibly be reduced at room temperature by a widely consumed natural liquid food.

  19. N-acetyl-L-cysteine protects against cadmium-induced neuronal apoptosis by inhibiting ROS-dependent activation of Akt/mTOR pathway in mouse brain

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Sujuan; Ren, Qian; Zhang, Jinfei; Ye, Yangjing; Zhang, Zhen; Xu, Yijiao; Guo, Min; Ji, Haiyan; Xu, Chong; Gu, Chenjian; Gao, Wei; Huang, Shile; Chen, Long

    2014-01-01

    Aims This study explores the neuroprotective effects and mechanisms of N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) in mice exposed to cadmium (Cd). Methods NAC (150 mg/kg) was intraperitoneally administered to mice exposed to Cd (10-50 mg/L) in drinking water for 6 weeks. The changes of cell damage and death, reactive oxygen species (ROS), antioxidant enzymes, as well as Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway in brain neurons were assessed. To verify the role of mTOR activation in Cd-induced neurotoxicity, mice also received a subacute regimen of intraperitoneally administered Cd (1 mg/kg) with/without rapamycin (7.5 mg/kg) for 11 days. Results Chronic exposure of mice to Cd induced brain damage or neuronal cell death, due to ROS induction. Co-administration of NAC significantly reduced Cd levels in the plasma and brain of the animals. NAC prevented Cd-induced ROS and significantly attenuated Cd-induced brain damage or neuronal cell death. The protective effect of NAC was mediated, at least partially, by elevating the activities of Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxidase, as well as the level of glutathione in the brain. Furthermore, Cd-induced activation of Akt/mTOR pathway in the brain was also inhibited by NAC. Rapamycin in vitro and in vivo protected against Cd-induced neurotoxicity. Conclusions NAC protects against Cd-induced neuronal apoptosis in mouse brain partially by inhibiting ROS-dependent activation of Akt/mTOR pathway. The findings highlight that NAC may be exploited for prevention and treatment of Cd-induced neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:24299490

  20. Reciprocal Regulation of Target of Rapamycin Complex 1 and Potassium Accumulation.

    PubMed

    Primo, Cecilia; Ferri-Blázquez, Alba; Loewith, Robbie; Yenush, Lynne

    2017-01-13

    The proper maintenance of potassium homeostasis is crucial for cell viability. Among the major determinants of potassium uptake in the model organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae are the Trk1 high affinity potassium transporter and the functionally redundant Hal4 (Sat4) and Hal5 protein kinases. These kinases are required for the plasma membrane accumulation of not only Trk1 but also several nutrient permeases. Here, we show that overexpression of the target of rapamycin complex 1 (TORC1) effector NPR1 improves hal4 hal5 growth defects by stabilizing nutrient permeases at the plasma membrane. We subsequently found that internal potassium levels and TORC1 activity are linked. Specifically, growth under limiting potassium alters the activities of Npr1 and another TORC1 effector kinase, Sch9; hal4 hal5 and trk1 trk2 mutants display hypersensitivity to rapamycin, and reciprocally, TORC1 inhibition reduces potassium accumulation. Our results demonstrate that in addition to carbon and nitrogen, TORC1 also responds to and regulates potassium fluxes.

  1. SOX9-regulated cell plasticity in colorectal metastasis is attenuated by rapamycin

    PubMed Central

    Carrasco-Garcia, Estefania; Lopez, Lidia; Aldaz, Paula; Arevalo, Sara; Aldaregia, Juncal; Egaña, Larraitz; Bujanda, Luis; Cheung, Martin; Sampron, Nicolas; Garcia, Idoia; Matheu, Ander

    2016-01-01

    The cancer stem cell (CSC) hypothesis proposes a hierarchical organization of tumors, in which stem-like cells sustain tumors and drive metastasis. The molecular mechanisms underlying the acquisition of CSCs and metastatic traits are not well understood. SOX9 is a transcription factor linked to stem cell maintenance and commonly overexpressed in solid cancers including colorectal cancer. In this study, we show that SOX9 levels are higher in metastatic (SW620) than in primary colorectal cancer cells (SW480) derived from the same patient. This elevated expression correlated with enhanced self-renewal activity. By gain and loss-of-function studies in SW480 and SW620 cells respectively, we reveal that SOX9 levels modulate tumorsphere formation and self-renewal ability in vitro and tumor initiation in vivo. Moreover, SOX9 regulates migration and invasion and triggers the transition between epithelial and mesenchymal states. These activities are partially dependent on SOX9 post-transcriptional modifications. Importantly, treatment with rapamycin inhibits self-renewal and tumor growth in a SOX9-dependent manner. These results identify a functional role for SOX9 in regulating colorectal cancer cell plasticity and metastasis, and provide a strong rationale for a rapamycin-based therapeutic strategy. PMID:27571710

  2. Rapamycin-sensitive induction of eukaryotic initiation factor 4F in regenerating mouse liver.

    PubMed

    Goggin, Melissa M; Nelsen, Christopher J; Kimball, Scot R; Jefferson, Leonard S; Morley, Simon J; Albrecht, Jeffrey H

    2004-09-01

    Following acute injuries that diminish functional liver mass, the remaining hepatocytes substantially increase overall protein synthesis to meet increased metabolic demands and to allow for compensatory liver growth. Previous studies have not clearly defined the mechanisms that promote protein synthesis in the regenerating liver. In the current study, we examined the regulation of key proteins involved in translation initiation following 70% partial hepatectomy (PH) in mice. PH promoted the assembly of eukaryotic initiation factor (eIF) 4F complexes consisting of eIF4E, eIF4G, eIF4A1, and poly-A binding protein. eIF4F complex formation after PH occurred without detectable changes in eIF4E-binding protein 1 (4E-BP1) phosphorylation or its binding eIF4E. The amount of serine 1108-phosphorylated eIF4G (but not Ser209-phosphorylated eIF4E) was induced following PH. These effects were antagonized by treatment with rapamycin, indicating that target of rapamycin (TOR) activity is required for eIF4F assembly in the regenerating liver. Rapamycin inhibited the induction of cyclin D1, a known eIF4F-sensitive gene, at the level of protein expression but not messenger RNA (mRNA) expression. In conclusion, increased translation initiation mediated by the mRNA cap-binding complex eIF4F contributes to the induction of protein synthesis during compensatory liver growth. Further study of factors that regulate translation initiation may provide insight into mechanisms that govern metabolic homeostasis and regeneration in response to liver injury.

  3. FK866-induced NAMPT inhibition activates AMPK and downregulates mTOR signaling in hepatocarcinoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Schuster, Susanne; Penke, Melanie; Gorski, Theresa; Gebhardt, Rolf; Weiss, Thomas S.; Kiess, Wieland; Garten, Antje

    2015-03-06

    Background: Nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) is the key enzyme of the NAD salvage pathway starting from nicotinamide. Cancer cells have an increased demand for NAD due to their high proliferation and DNA repair rate. Consequently, NAMPT is considered as a putative target for anti-cancer therapies. There is evidence that AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) become dysregulated during the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Here, we investigated the effects of NAMPT inhibition by its specific inhibitor FK866 on the viability of hepatocarcinoma cells and analyzed the effects of FK866 on the nutrient sensor AMPK and mTOR complex1 (mTORC1) signaling. Results: FK866 markedly decreased NAMPT activity and NAD content in hepatocarcinoma cells (Huh7 cells, Hep3B cells) and led to delayed ATP reduction which was associated with increased cell death. These effects could be abrogated by administration of nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN), the enzyme product of NAMPT. Our results demonstrated a dysregulation of the AMPK/mTOR pathway in hepatocarcinoma cells compared to non-cancerous hepatocytes with a higher expression of mTOR and a lower AMPKα activation in hepatocarcinoma cells. We found that NAMPT inhibition by FK866 significantly activated AMPKα and inhibited the activation of mTOR and its downstream targets p70S6 kinase and 4E-BP1 in hepatocarcinoma cells. Non-cancerous hepatocytes were less sensitive to FK866 and did not show changes in AMPK/mTOR signaling after FK866 treatment. Conclusion: Taken together, these findings reveal an important role of the NAMPT-mediated NAD salvage pathway in the energy homeostasis of hepatocarcinoma cells and suggest NAMPT inhibition as a potential treatment option for HCC. - Highlights: • FK866 increases cell death in p53-deficient hepatocarcinoma cells. • AMPK/mTOR signaling is dysregulated in hepatocarcinoma cells. • FK866-induced NAMPT inhibition activates AMPK

  4. Isoflurane Promotes Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Malignancy by Activating the Akt-Mammalian Target of Rapamycin (mTOR) Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wenhua; Shao, Xueqian

    2016-01-01

    Background Lung cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer mortalities worldwide, and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) accounts for the majority of all lung cancer cases. Surgery remains one of the front-line treatment options for NSCLC, but events within the perioperative period were found to affect cancer prognosis, such as anesthesia procedures. Isoflurane, a commonly used volatile anesthetic, enhances the malignant potential of renal, prostate, and ovarian cancer cells, but its effects on NSCLC development have not been previously reported. Material/Methods CCK-8 and MTT cell proliferation assays were used to analyze NSCLC cell proliferation. Metastatic ability was examined by wound healing and transwell assays. We used Western blot analysis to study the mechanism of effect of Isoflurane in NSCLC development. Results We demonstrated that isoflurane promotes proliferation, migration and invasiveness of NSCLC cells, as well as upregulation of the Akt-mTOR signaling pathway in NSCLC cells. Pharmacological inhibition of Akt-mTOR signaling abolished the ability of isoflurane to promote proliferation, migration, and invasion of NSCLC cells, indicating that isoflurane promotes NSCLC cell malignancy by activating the Akt-mTOR signaling pathway. Conclusions Isoflurane promotes NSCLC proliferation, migration and invasion by activating the Akt-mTOR signaling pathway. PMID:27897153

  5. Demethoxycurcumin inhibits energy metabolic and oncogenic signaling pathways through AMPK activation in triple-negative breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Shieh, Jiunn-Min; Chen, Yung-Chan; Lin, Ying-Chao; Lin, Jia-Ni; Chen, Wei-Chih; Chen, Yang-Yuan; Ho, Chi-Tang; Way, Tzong-Der

    2013-07-03

    Demethoxycurcumin (DMC), curcumin (Cur), and bisdemethoxycurcumin (BDMC) are major forms of curcuminoids found in the rhizomes of turmeric. This study examined the effects of three curcuminoid analogues on breast cancer cells. The results revealed that DMC demonstrated the most potent cytotoxic effects on breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells. Compared with estrogen receptor (ER)-positive or HER2-overexpressing breast cancer cells, DMC demonstrated the most efficient cytotoxic effects on triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) cells. However, nonmalignant MCF-10A cells were unaffected by DMC treatment. The study showed that DMC activated AMPK in TNBC cells. Once activated, AMPK inhibited eukaryotic initiation factor 4E-binding protein-1 (4E-BP1) signaling and mRNA translation via mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and decreased the activity and/or expression of lipogenic enzymes, such as fatty acid synthase (FASN) and acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC). DMC also targeted multiple AMPK downstream pathways. Among these, the dephosphorylation of Akt is noteworthy because it circumvents the feedback activation of Akt that results from mTOR inhibition. Moreover, DMC suppressed LPS-induced IL-6 production, thereby blocking subsequent Stat3 activation. In addition, DMC also sustained epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) activation by suppressing the phosphatases, PP2a and SHP-2. These results suggest that DMC is a potent AMPK activator that acts through a broad spectrum of anti-TNBC activities.

  6. Caveolin-1 and accelerated host aging in the breast tumor microenvironment: chemoprevention with rapamycin, an mTOR inhibitor and anti-aging drug.

    PubMed

    Mercier, Isabelle; Camacho, Jeanette; Titchen, Kanani; Gonzales, Donna M; Quann, Kevin; Bryant, Kelly G; Molchansky, Alexander; Milliman, Janet N; Whitaker-Menezes, Diana; Sotgia, Federica; Jasmin, Jean-François; Schwarting, Roland; Pestell, Richard G; Blagosklonny, Mikhail V; Lisanti, Michael P

    2012-07-01

    Increasing chronological age is the most significant risk factor for human cancer development. To examine the effects of host aging on mammary tumor growth, we used caveolin (Cav)-1 knockout mice as a bona fide model of accelerated host aging. Mammary tumor cells were orthotopically implanted into these distinct microenvironments (Cav-1(+/+) versus Cav-1(-/-) age-matched young female mice). Mammary tumors grown in a Cav-1-deficient tumor microenvironment have an increased stromal content, with vimentin-positive myofibroblasts (a marker associated with oxidative stress) that are also positive for S6-kinase activation (a marker associated with aging). Mammary tumors grown in a Cav-1-deficient tumor microenvironment were more than fivefold larger than tumors grown in a wild-type microenvironment. Thus, a Cav-1-deficient tumor microenvironment provides a fertile soil for breast cancer tumor growth. Interestingly, the mammary tumor-promoting effects of a Cav-1-deficient microenvironment were estrogen and progesterone independent. In this context, chemoprevention was achieved by using the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor and anti-aging drug, rapamycin. Systemic rapamycin treatment of mammary tumors grown in a Cav-1-deficient microenvironment significantly inhibited their tumor growth, decreased their stromal content, and reduced the levels of both vimentin and phospho-S6 in Cav-1-deficient cancer-associated fibroblasts. Since stromal loss of Cav-1 is a marker of a lethal tumor microenvironment in breast tumors, these high-risk patients might benefit from treatment with mTOR inhibitors, such as rapamycin or other rapamycin-related compounds (rapalogues).

  7. Inhibition of mTOR down-regulates scavenger receptor, class B, type I (SR-BI) expression, reduces endothelial cell migration and impairs nitric oxide production.

    PubMed

    Fruhwürth, Stefanie; Krieger, Sigurd; Winter, Katharina; Rosner, Margit; Mikula, Mario; Weichhart, Thomas; Bittman, Robert; Hengstschläger, Markus; Stangl, Herbert

    2014-07-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibiting drug rapamycin (Sirolimus) has severe side effects in patients including hyperlipidemia, an established risk factor for atherosclerosis. Recently, it was shown that rapamycin decreases hepatic LDL receptor (LDL-R) expression, which likely contributes to hypercholesterolemia. Scavenger receptor, class B, type I (SR-BI) is the major HDL receptor and consequently regulating HDL-cholesterol levels and the athero-protective effects of HDL. By using the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin, we show that SR-BI is down-regulated in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). This reduction of SR-BI protein as well as mRNA levels by about 50% did not alter HDL particle uptake or HDL-derived lipid transfer. However, rapamycin reduced HDL-induced activation of eNOS and stimulation of endothelial cell migration. The effects on cell migration could be counteracted by SR-BI overexpression, indicating that decreased SR-BI expression is in part responsible for the rapamycin-induced effects. We demonstrate that inhibition of mTOR leads to endothelial cell dysfunction and decreased SR-BI expression, which may contribute to atherogenesis during rapamycin treatment.

  8. Stathmin Potentiates Vinflunine and Inhibits Paclitaxel Activity

    PubMed Central

    Malesinski, Soazig; Tsvetkov, Philipp O.; Kruczynski, Anna; Peyrot, Vincent; Devred, François

    2015-01-01

    Cell biology and crystallographic studies have suggested a functional link between stathmin and microtubule targeting agents (MTAs). In a previous study we showed that stathmin increases vinblastine (VLB) binding to tubulin, and that conversely VLB increases stathmin binding to tubulin. This constituted the first biochemical evidence of the direct relationship between stathmin and an antimitotic drug, and revealed a new mechanism of action for VLB. The question remained if the observed interaction was specific for this drug or represented a general phenomenon for all MTAs. In the present study we investigated the binding of recombinant stathmin to purified tubulin in the presence of paclitaxel or another Vinca alkaloid, vinflunine, using Isothermal Titration Calorimetry (ITC). These experiments revealed that stathmin binding to tubulin is increased in the presence of vinflunine, whereas no signal is observed in the presence of paclitaxel. Further investigation using turbidity and co-sedimentation showed that stathmin inhibited paclitaxel microtubule-stabilizing activity. Taken together with the previous study using vinblastine, our results suggest that stathmin can be seen as a modulator of MTA activity and binding to tubulin, providing molecular explanation for multiple previous cellular and in vivo studies showing that stathmin expression level affects MTAs efficiency. PMID:26030092

  9. Caspase activation inhibits proteasome function during apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiao-Ming; Butterworth, Michael; MacFarlane, Marion; Dubiel, Wolfgang; Ciechanover, Aaron; Cohen, Gerald M

    2004-04-09

    The ubiquitin/proteasome system regulates protein turnover by degrading polyubiquitinated proteins. To date, all studies on the relationship of apoptosis and the proteasome have emphasized the key role of the proteasome in the regulation of apoptosis, by virtue of its ability to degrade regulatory molecules involved in apoptosis. We now demonstrate how induction of apoptosis may regulate the activity of the proteasome. During apoptosis, caspase activation results in the cleavage of three specific subunits of the 19S regulatory complex of the proteasome: S6' (Rpt5) and S5a (Rpn10), whose role is to recognize polyubiquitinated substrates of the proteasome, and S1 (Rpn2), which with S5a and S2 (Rpn1) holds together the lid and base of the 19S regulatory complex. This caspase-mediated cleavage inhibits the proteasomal degradation of ubiquitin-dependent and -independent cellular substrates, including proapoptotic molecules such as Smac, so facilitating the execution of the apoptotic program by providing a feed-forward amplification loop.

  10. The mTOR Inhibitor Rapamycin Mitigates Perforant Pathway Neurodegeneration and Synapse Loss in a Mouse Model of Early-Stage Alzheimer-Type Tauopathy

    PubMed Central

    Siman, Robert; Cocca, Ryan; Dong, Yina

    2015-01-01

    The perforant pathway projection from layer II of the entorhinal cortex to the hippocampal dentate gyrus is especially important for long-term memory formation, and is preferentially vulnerable to developing a degenerative tauopathy early in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) that may spread over time trans-synaptically. Despite the importance of the perforant pathway to the clinical onset and progression of AD, a therapeutic has not been identified yet that protects it from tau-mediated toxicity. Here, we used an adeno-associated viral vector-based mouse model of early-stage AD-type tauopathy to investigate effects of the mTOR inhibitor and autophagy stimulator rapamycin on the tau-driven loss of perforant pathway neurons and synapses. Focal expression of human tau carrying a P301L mutation but not eGFP as a control in layer II of the lateral entorhinal cortex triggered rapid degeneration of these neurons, loss of lateral perforant pathway synapses in the dentate gyrus outer molecular layer, and activation of neuroinflammatory microglia and astroglia in the two locations. Chronic systemic rapamycin treatment partially inhibited phosphorylation of a mechanistic target of rapamycin substrate in brain and stimulated LC3 cleavage, a marker of autophagic flux. Compared with vehicle-treated controls, rapamycin protected against the tau-induced neuronal loss, synaptotoxicity, reactive microgliosis and astrogliosis, and activation of innate neuroimmunity. It did not alter human tau mRNA or total protein levels. Finally, rapamycin inhibited trans-synaptic transfer of human tau expression to the dentate granule neuron targets for the perforant pathway, likely by preventing the synaptic spread of the AAV vector in response to pathway degeneration. These results identify systemic rapamycin as a treatment that protects the entorhinal cortex and perforant pathway projection from tau-mediated neurodegeneration, axonal and synapse loss, and neuroinflammatory reactive gliosis. The

  11. Nuclear PIM1 confers resistance to rapamycin-impaired endothelial proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Walpen, Thomas; Kalus, Ina; Schwaller, Juerg; Peier, Martin A.; Battegay, Edouard J.; Humar, Rok

    2012-12-07

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pim1{sup -/-} endothelial cell proliferation displays increased sensitivity to rapamycin. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer mTOR inhibition by rapamycin enhances PIM1 cytosolic and nuclear protein levels. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Truncation of Pim1 beyond serine 276 results in nuclear localization of the kinase. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nuclear PIM1 increases endothelial proliferation independent of rapamycin. -- Abstract: The PIM serine/threonine kinases and the mTOR/AKT pathway integrate growth factor signaling and promote cell proliferation and survival. They both share phosphorylation targets and have overlapping functions, which can partially substitute for each other. In cancer cells PIM kinases have been reported to produce resistance to mTOR inhibition by rapamycin. Tumor growth depends highly on blood vessel infiltration into the malignant tissue and therefore on endothelial cell proliferation. We therefore investigated how the PIM1 kinase modulates growth inhibitory effects of rapamycin in mouse aortic endothelial cells (MAEC). We found that proliferation of MAEC lacking Pim1 was significantly more sensitive to rapamycin inhibition, compared to wildtype cells. Inhibition of mTOR and AKT in normal MAEC resulted in significantly elevated PIM1 protein levels in the cytosol and in the nucleus. We observed that truncation of the C-terminal part of Pim1 beyond Ser 276 resulted in almost exclusive nuclear localization of the protein. Re-expression of this Pim1 deletion mutant significantly increased the proliferation of Pim1{sup -/-} cells when compared to expression of the wildtype Pim1 cDNA. Finally, overexpression of the nuclear localization mutant and the wildtype Pim1 resulted in complete resistance to growth inhibition by rapamycin. Thus, mTOR inhibition-induced nuclear accumulation of PIM1 or expression of a nuclear C-terminal PIM1 truncation mutant is sufficient to increase endothelial cell proliferation

  12. Small‑molecule COH-SR4 inhibits adipocyte differentiation via AMPK activation.

    PubMed

    Figarola, James L; Rahbar, Samuel

    2013-05-01

    Obesity is a chronic metabolic disorder caused by an imbalance between energy intake and expenditure. It is one of the principal causative factors involved in the development of metabolic syndrome and cancer. Inhibition of adipocyte differentiation has often been a target of anti-obesity strategies since obesity is caused not only by hypertrophy but also by adipocyte hyperplasia. In this study, we investigated the effects of COH-SR4, a novel compound with anticancer properties, on the adipogenesis in 3T3-L1 cells. Treatment with COH-SR4 significantly inhibited adipocyte differentiation in a dose-dependent manner. This inhibitory effect mainly occurred at the early phase of differentiation through inhibition of mitotic clonal expansion and cell cycle arrest at the G1/S phase transition. In differentiating adipocytes, COH-SR4 significantly reduced intracellular lipid accumulation and downregulated the expression of key adipogenesis-related transcription factors and lipogenic proteins. COH-SR4 exhibited no cytotoxic effects in 3T3-L1 cells, but indirectly activated AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). AMPK activation by COH-SR4 also resulted in the phosphorylation of raptor and tuberous sclerosis protein 2 (TSC2), two proteins involved in the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathways. Additionally, COH-SR4 decreased the phosphorylation of p70 kDa ribosomal protein S6 kinase (S6K) and initiation factor 4E (eIF4E) binding protein 1 (4EB‑P1), two downstream effectors of mTOR that regulate protein synthesis. Interestingly, knockdown of AMPKα1/α2 prevented the ability of COH-SR4 to inhibit cell cycle arrest and overall adipogenesis and lipid accumulation in the differentiating 3T3-L1 cells. Taken together, these results suggest that COH-SR4 inhibits 3T3-L1 adipogenesis via AMPK activation. COH-SR4 may be a promising compound for the treatment of obesity and related metabolic disorders.

  13. Mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) plays a role in Pasteurella multocida toxin (PMT)-induced protein synthesis and proliferation in Swiss 3T3 cells.

    PubMed

    Oubrahim, Hammou; Wong, Allison; Wilson, Brenda A; Chock, P Boon

    2013-01-25

    Pasteurella multocida toxin (PMT) is a potent mitogen known to activate several signaling pathways via deamidation of a conserved glutamine residue in the α subunit of heterotrimeric G-proteins. However, the detailed mechanism behind mitogenic properties of PMT is unknown. Herein, we show that PMT induces protein synthesis, cell migration, and proliferation in serum-starved Swiss 3T3 cells. Concomitantly PMT induces phosphorylation of ribosomal S6 kinase (S6K1) and its substrate, ribosomal S6 protein (rpS6), in quiescent 3T3 cells. The extent of the phosphorylation is time and PMT concentration dependent, and is inhibited by rapamycin and Torin1, the two specific inhibitors of the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1). Interestingly, PMT-mediated mTOR signaling activation was observed in MEF WT but not in Gα(q/11) knock-out cells. These observations are consistent with the data indicating that PMT-induced mTORC1 activation proceeds via the deamidation of Gα(q/11), which leads to the activation of PLCβ to generate diacylglycerol and inositol trisphosphate, two known activators of the PKC pathway. Exogenously added diacylglycerol or phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, known activators of PKC, leads to rpS6 phosphorylation in a rapamycin-dependent manner. Furthermore, PMT-induced rpS6 phosphorylation is inhibited by PKC inhibitor, Gö6976. Although PMT induces epidermal growth factor receptor activation, it exerts no effect on PMT-induced rpS6 phosphorylation. Together, our findings reveal for the first time that PMT activates mTORC1 through the Gα(q/11)/PLCβ/PKC pathway. The fact that PMT-induced protein synthesis and cell migration is partially inhibited by rapamycin indicates that these processes are in part mediated by the mTORC1 pathway.

  14. Rapamycin ameliorates IgA nephropathy via cell cycle-dependent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Tian, Jihua; Wang, Yanhong; Liu, Xinyan; Zhou, Xiaoshuang; Li, Rongshan

    2015-07-01

    IgA nephropathy is the most frequent type of glomerulonephritis worldwide. The role of cell cycle regulation in the pathogenesis of IgA nephropathy has been studied. The present study was designed to explore whether rapamycin ameliorates IgA nephropathy via cell cycle-dependent mechanisms. After establishing an IgA nephropathy model, rats were randomly divided into four groups. Coomassie Brilliant Blue was used to measure the 24-h urinary protein levels. Renal function was determined using an autoanalyzer. Proliferation was assayed via Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen (PCNA) immunohistochemistry. Rat mesangial cells were cultured and divided into the six groups. Methylthiazolyldiphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) and flow cytometry were used to detect cell proliferation and the cell cycle phase. Western blotting was performed to determine cyclin E, cyclin-dependent kinase 2, p27(Kip1), p70S6K/p-p70S6K, and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2/p- extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 protein expression. A low dose of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor rapamycin prevented an additional increase in proteinuria, protected kidney function, and reduced IgA deposition in a model of IgA nephropathy. Rapamycin inhibited mesangial cell proliferation and arrested the cell cycle in the G1 phase. Rapamycin did not affect the expression of cyclin E and cyclin-dependent kinase 2. However, rapamycin upregulated p27(Kip1) at least in part via AKT (also known as protein kinase B)/mTOR. In conclusion, rapamycin can affect cell cycle regulation to inhibit mesangial cell proliferation, thereby reduce IgA deposition, and slow the progression of IgAN.

  15. Metabolic consequences of long-term rapamycin exposure on common marmoset monkeys (Callithrix jacchus).

    PubMed

    Ross, Corinna; Salmon, Adam; Strong, Randy; Fernandez, Elizabeth; Javors, Marty; Richardson, Arlan; Tardif, Suzette

    2015-11-01

    Rapamycin has been shown to extend lifespan in rodent models, but the effects on metabolic health and function have been widely debated in both clinical and translational trials. Prior to rapamycin being used as a treatment to extend both lifespan and healthspan in the human population, it is vital to assess the side effects of the treatment on metabolic pathways in animal model systems, including a closely related non-human primate model. In this study, we found that long-term treatment of marmoset monkeys with orally-administered encapsulated rapamycin resulted in no overall effects on body weight and only a small decrease in fat mass over the first few months of treatment. Rapamycin treated subjects showed no overall changes in daily activity counts, blood lipids, or significant changes in glucose metabolism including oral glucose tolerance. Adipose tissue displayed no differences in gene expression of metabolic markers following treatment, while liver tissue exhibited suppressed G6Pase activity with increased PCK and GPI activity. Overall, the marmosets revealed only minor metabolic consequences of chronic treatment with rapamycin and this adds to the growing body of literature that suggests that chronic and/or intermittent rapamycin treatment results in improved health span and metabolic functioning. The marmosets offer an interesting alternative animal model for future intervention testing and translational modeling.

  16. Improved blood compatibility of rapamycin-eluting stent by incorporating curcumin.

    PubMed

    Pan, C J; Tang, J J; Shao, Z Y; Wang, J; Huang, N

    2007-09-01

    This paper dealt with improving the blood compatibility of the rapamycin-eluting stent by incorporating curcumin. The rapamycin- and rapamycin/curcumin-loaded PLGA (poly(d,l-lactic acid-co-glycolic acid)) coatings were fabricated onto the surface of the stainless steel stents using an ultrasonic atomization spray method. The structure of the coating films was characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images of the drug-eluting stents indicated that the surface of all drug-eluting stents was very smooth and uniform, and there were not webbings and "bridges" between struts. There were not any cracks and delaminations on stent surface after expanded by the angioplasty balloon. The in vitro platelet adhesion and activation were investigated by static platelet adhesion test and GMP140 (P-selection), respectively. The clotting time was examined by activated partially prothromplastin time (APTT) test. The fibrinogen adsorption on the drug-loaded PLGA films was evaluated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). All obtained data showed that incorporating curcumin in rapamycin-loaded PLGA coating can significantly decrease platelet adhesion and activation, prolong APTT clotting time as well as decrease the fibrinogen adsorption. All results indicated that incorporating curcumin in rapamycin-eluting coating obviously improve the blood compatibility of rapamycin-eluting stents. It was suggested that it may be possible to develop a drug-eluting stent which had the characteristics of not only good anti-proliferation but also improved anticoagulation.

  17. Target of rapamycin (TOR) plays a critical role in triacylglycerol accumulation in microalgae.

    PubMed

    Imamura, Sousuke; Kawase, Yasuko; Kobayashi, Ikki; Sone, Toshiyuki; Era, Atsuko; Miyagishima, Shin-Ya; Shimojima, Mie; Ohta, Hiroyuki; Tanaka, Kan

    2015-10-01

    Most microalgae produce triacylglycerol (TAG) under stress conditions such as nitrogen depletion, but the underlying molecular mechanism remains unclear. In this study, we focused on the role of target of rapamycin (TOR) in TAG accumulation. TOR is a serine/threonine protein kinase that is highly conserved and plays pivotal roles in nitrogen and other signaling pathways in eukaryotes. We previously constructed a rapamycin-susceptible Cyanidioschyzon merolae, a unicellular red alga, by expressing yeast FKBP12 protein to evaluate the results of TOR inhibition (Imamura et al. in Biochem Biophys Res Commun 439:264-269, 2013). By using this strain, we here report that rapamycin-induced TOR inhibition results in accumulation of cytoplasmic lipid droplets containing TAG. Transcripts for TAG synthesis-related genes, such as glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase and acyl-CoA:diacylglycerol acyltransferase (DGAT), were increased by rapamycin treatment. We also found that fatty acid synthase-dependent de novo fatty acid synthesis was required for the accumulation of lipid droplets. Induction of TAG and up-regulation of DGAT gene expression by rapamycin were similarly observed in the unicellular green alga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. These results suggest the general involvement of TOR signaling in TAG accumulation in divergent microalgae.

  18. NFκB up-regulation of glucose transporter 3 is essential for hyperactive mammalian target of rapamycin-induced aerobic glycolysis and tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Zha, Xiaojun; Hu, Zhongdong; Ji, Shuang; Jin, Fuquan; Jiang, Keguo; Li, Chunjia; Zhao, Pan; Tu, Zhenzhen; Chen, Xianguo; Di, Lijun; Zhou, Haisheng; Zhang, Hongbing

    2015-04-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) exerts a crucial role in aerobic glycolysis and tumorigenesis, but the underlying mechanisms remain largely obscure. Results from Tsc1- or Tsc2-null mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) and human cancer cell lines consistently indicate that the expression of glucose transporter 3 (Glut3) is dramatically up-regulated by mTOR. The rapamycin-sensitive mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1), but not the rapamycin-insensitive mTOR complex 2 (mTORC2), was involved in the regulation of Glut3 expression. Moreover, mTORC1 enhances Glut3 expression through the activation of the IKK/NFκB pathway. Depletion of Glut3 led to the suppression of aerobic glycolysis, the inhibition of cell proliferation and colony formation, and the attenuation of the tumorigenic potential of the cells with aberrantly hyper-activated mTORC1 signaling in nude mice. We conclude that Glut3 is a downstream target of mTORC1, and it is critical for oncogenic mTORC1-mediated aerobic glycolysis and tumorigenesis. Hence Glut3 may be a potential target for therapy against cancers caused by the aberrantly activated mTORC1 signaling.

  19. AXL mediates resistance to PI3Kα inhibition by activating the EGFR/PKC/mTOR axis in head and neck and esophageal squamous cell carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Elkabets, Moshe; Pazarentzos, Evangelos; Juric, Dejan; Sheng, Qing; Pelossof, Raphael A.; Brook, Samuel; Benzaken, Ana Oaknin; Rodon, Jordi; Morse, Natasha; Yan, Jenny Jiacheng; Liu, Manway; Das, Rita; Chen, Yan; Tam, Angela; Wang, Huiqin; Liang, Jinsheng; Gurski, Joseph M.; Kerr, Darcy A.; Rosell, Rafael; Teixidó, Cristina; Huang, Alan; Ghossein, Ronald A.; Rosen, Neal; Bivona, Trever G.; Scaltriti, Maurizio; Baselga, José

    2015-01-01

    Summary Phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K)-α inhibitors have shown clinical activity in squamous carcinoma (SCC) of head and neck (H&N) bearing PIK3CA mutations or amplification. Studying models of therapeutic resistance we have observed that SCCs cells that become refractory to PI3Kα inhibition maintain PI3K-independent activation of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). This persistent mTOR activation is mediated by the tyrosine kinase receptor AXL. AXL is overexpressed in resistant tumors from both laboratory models and patients treated with the PI3Kα inhibitor BYL719. AXL dimerizes with and phosphorylates epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), resulting in activation of phospholipase Cγ (PLCγ)- protein kinase C (PKC), which in turn activates mTOR. Combined treatment with PI3Kα and either EGFR, AXL, or PKC inhibitors reverts this resistance. PMID:25873175

  20. Rapamycin regulates connective tissue growth factor expression of lung epithelial cells via phosphoinositide 3-kinase.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xuefeng; Wan, Xuan; Geng, Jing; Li, Fei; Yang, Ting; Dai, Huaping

    2013-09-01

    The pathogenesis of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) remains largely unknown. It is believed that IPF is mainly driven by activated alveolar epithelial cells that have a compromised migration capacity, and that also produce substances (such as connective tissue growth factor, CTGF) that contribute to fibroblast activation and matrix protein accumulation. Because the mechanisms regulating these processes are unclear, the aim of this study was to determine the role of rapamycin in regulating epithelial cell migration and CTGF expression. Transformed epithelial cell line A549 and normal human pulmonary alveolar or bronchial epithelial cells were cultured in regular medium or medium containing rapamycin. Real time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction was employed to determine CTGF mRNA expression. Western blotting and an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay were used for detecting CTGF protein. Wound healing and migration assays were used to determine the cell migration potential. Transforming growth factor (TGF)-β type I receptor (TβRI) inhibitor, SB431542 and phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor, LY294002 were used to determine rapamycin's mechanism of action. It was found that treatment of A549 and normal human alveolar or bronchial epithelial cells with rapamycin significantly promoted basal or TGF-β1 induced CTGF expression. LY294002, not SB431542 attenuated the promotional effect of rapamycin on CTGF expression. Cell mobility was not affected by rapamycin in wound healing and migration assays. These data suggest rapamycin has a profibrotic effect in vitro and underscore the potential of combined therapeutic approach with PI3K and mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors for the treatment of animal or human lung fibrosis.

  1. ATP-Competitive Inhibitors of the Mammalian Target of Rapamycin: Design and Synthesis of Highly Potent and Selective Pyrazolopyrimidines

    SciTech Connect

    Zask, Arie; Verheijen, Jeroen C.; Curran, Kevin; Kaplan, Joshua; Richard, David J.; Nowak, Pawel; Malwitz, David J.; Brooijmans, Natasja; Bard, Joel; Svenson, Kristine; Lucas, Judy; Toral-Barza, Lourdes; Zhang, Wei-Guo; Hollander, Irwin; Gibbons, James J.; Abraham, Robert T.; Ayral-Kaloustian, Semiramis; Mansour, Tarek S.; Yu, Ker

    2009-09-18

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), a central regulator of growth, survival, and metabolism, is a validated target for cancer therapy. Rapamycin and its analogues, allosteric inhibitors of mTOR, only partially inhibit one mTOR protein complex. ATP-competitive, global inhibitors of mTOR that have the potential for enhanced anticancer efficacy are described. Structural features leading to potency and selectivity were identified and refined leading to compounds with in vivo efficacy in tumor xenograft models.

  2. Behavioural and EEG effects of chronic rapamycin treatment in a mouse model of tuberous sclerosis complex.

    PubMed

    Cambiaghi, Marco; Cursi, Marco; Magri, Laura; Castoldi, Valerio; Comi, Giancarlo; Minicucci, Fabio; Galli, Rossella; Leocani, Letizia

    2013-04-01

    Tuberous Sclerosis Complex (TSC) is a multisystem genetic disorder caused by mutation in either Tsc1 or Tsc2 genes that leads to the hyper activation of the mTOR pathway, a key signalling pathway for synaptic plasticity. TSC is characterized by benign tumors arising in different organs and severe neuropsychiatric symptoms, such as epilepsy, intellectual disability, autism, anxiety and depressive behaviour. Rapamycin is a potent inhibitor of mTOR and its efficacy in treating epilepsy and neurological symptoms remains elusive. In a mouse model in which Tsc1 has been deleted in embryonic telencephalic neural stem cells, we analyzed anxiety- and depression-like behaviour by elevated-plus maze (EPM), open-field test (OFT), forced-swim test (FST) and tail-suspension test (TST), after chronic administration of rapamycin. In addition, spectral analysis of background EEG was performed. Rapamycin-treated mutant mice displayed a reduction in anxiety- and depression-like phenotype, as shown by the EPM/OFT and FST, respectively. These results were inline with EEG power spectra outcomes. The same effects of rapamycin were observed in wild-type mice. Notably, in heterozygous animals we did not observe any EEG and/or behavioural variation after rapamycin treatment. Together these results suggest that both TSC1 deletion and chronic rapamycin treatment might have a role in modulating behaviour and brain activity, and point out to the potential usefulness of background EEG analysis in tracking brain dysfunction in parallel with behavioural testing.

  3. Rapamycin down-regulates LDL-receptor expression independently of SREBP-2

    SciTech Connect

    Sharpe, Laura J.; Brown, Andrew J.

    2008-09-05

    As a key regulator of cholesterol homeostasis, sterol-regulatory element binding protein-2 (SREBP-2) up-regulates expression of genes involved in cholesterol synthesis (e.g., 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) Reductase) and uptake (the low density lipoprotein (LDL)-receptor). Previously, we showed that Akt, a critical kinase in cell growth and proliferation, contributes to SREBP-2 activation. However, the specific Akt target involved is unknown. A potential candidate is the mammalian target of rapamycin, mTOR. Rapamycin can cause hyperlipidaemia clinically, and we hypothesised that this may be mediated via an effect of mTOR on SREBP-2. Herein, we found that SREBP-2 activation and HMG-CoA Reductase gene expression were unaffected by rapamycin treatment. However, LDL-receptor gene expression was decreased by rapamycin, suggesting that this may contribute to the hyperlipidaemia observed in rapamycin-treated patients. Rapamycin did not affect mRNA stability, so the decrease in LDL-receptor gene expression is likely to be occurring at the transcriptional level, although independently of SREBP-2.

  4. Preclinical characterization of OSI-027, a potent and selective inhibitor of mTORC1 and mTORC2: distinct from rapamycin.

    PubMed

    Bhagwat, Shripad V; Gokhale, Prafulla C; Crew, Andrew P; Cooke, Andy; Yao, Yan; Mantis, Christine; Kahler, Jennifer; Workman, Jennifer; Bittner, Mark; Dudkin, Lorina; Epstein, David M; Gibson, Neil W; Wild, Robert; Arnold, Lee D; Houghton, Peter J; Pachter, Jonathan A

    2011-08-01

    The phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT/mTOR pathway is frequently activated in human cancers, and mTOR is a clinically validated target. mTOR forms two distinct multiprotein complexes, mTORC1 and mTORC2, which regulate cell growth, metabolism, proliferation, and survival. Rapamycin and its analogues partially inhibit mTOR through allosteric binding to mTORC1, but not mTORC2, and have shown clinical utility in certain cancers. Here, we report the preclinical characterization of OSI-027, a selective and potent dual inhibitor of mTORC1 and mTORC2 with biochemical IC(50) values of 22 nmol/L and 65 nmol/L, respectively. OSI-027 shows more than 100-fold selectivity for mTOR relative to PI3Kα, PI3Kβ, PI3Kγ, and DNA-PK. OSI-027 inhibits phosphorylation of the mTORC1 substrates 4E-BP1 and S6K1 as well as the mTORC2 substrate AKT in diverse cancer models in vitro and in vivo. OSI-027 and OXA-01 (close analogue of OSI-027) potently inhibit proliferation of several rapamycin-sensitive and -insensitive nonengineered and engineered cancer cell lines and also, induce cell death in tumor cell lines with activated PI3K-AKT signaling. OSI-027 shows concentration-dependent pharmacodynamic effects on phosphorylation of 4E-BP1 and AKT in tumor tissue with resulting tumor growth inhibition. OSI-027 shows robust antitumor activity in several different human xenograft models representing various histologies. Furthermore, in COLO 205 and GEO colon cancer xenograft models, OSI-027 shows superior efficacy compared with rapamycin. Our results further support the important role of mTOR as a driver of tumor growth and establish OSI-027 as a potent anticancer agent. OSI-027 is currently in phase I clinical trials in cancer patients.

  5. Hyperoxia Inhibits T Cell Activation in Mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes-Fulford, M.; Meissler, J.; Aguayo, E. T.; Globus, R.; Aguado, J.; Candelario, T.

    2013-02-01

    , spleens were removed and the splenocytes were isolated and kept as individual biological samples. We have also examined transcription factors (JASPAR) and pathways of the immune system to help us understand the mechanism of regulation. Results: Our recent mouse immunology experiment aboard STS-131 suggests that the early T cell immune response was inhibited in animals that have been exposed to spaceflight, even 24 hours after return to earth. Moreover, recent experiments in hyperoxic mice show that many of the same genes involved in early T cell activation were altered. Specifically, expression of IL-2Rα, Cxcl2, TNFα, FGF2, LTA and BCL2 genes are dysregulated in mice exposed to hyperoxia. Conclusions: If these hyperoxia-induced changes of gene expression in early T cell activation are additive to the changes seen in the microgravity of spaceflight, there could be an increased infection risk to EVA astronauts, which should be addressed prior to conducting a Mars or other long-term mission.

  6. Activating Cell Death Ligand Signaling Through Proteasome Inhibition

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-05-01

    Activating Cell Death Ligand Signaling Through Proteasome Inhibition PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Steven R Schwarze...SUBTITLE Activating Cell Death Ligand Signaling Through 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Proteasome Inhibition 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-08-1-0392 5c...proteasome inhibition can act as an anti-neoplastic agent in vivo by sensitizing cancer cells to cell death ligands in the tumor microenvironment

  7. Rapamycin reduces fibroblast proliferation without causing quiescence and induces STAT5A/B-mediated cytokine production

    PubMed Central

    Gillespie, Zoe E; MacKay, Kimberly; Sander, Michelle; Trost, Brett; Dawicki, Wojciech; Wickramarathna, Aruna; Gordon, John; Eramian, Mark; Kill, Ian R; Bridger, Joanna M; Kusalik, Anthony; Mitchell, Jennifer A; Eskiw, Christopher H

    2015-01-01

    Rapamycin is a well-known inhibitor of the Target of Rapamycin (TOR) signaling cascade; however, the impact of this drug on global genome function and organization in normal primary cells is poorly understood. To explore this impact, we treated primary human foreskin fibroblasts with rapamycin and observed a decrease in cell proliferation without causing cell death. Upon rapamycin treatment chromosomes 18 and 10 were repositioned to a location similar to that of fibroblasts induced into quiescence by serum reduction. Although similar changes in positioning occurred, comparative transcriptome analyses demonstrated significant divergence in gene expression patterns between rapamycin-treated and quiescence-induced fibroblasts. Rapamycin treatment induced the upregulation of cytokine genes, including those from the Interleukin (IL)-6 signaling network, such as IL-8 and the Leukemia Inhibitory Factor (LIF), while quiescent fibroblasts demonstrated up-regulation of genes involved in the complement and coagulation cascade. In addition, genes significantly up-regulated by rapamycin treatment demonstrated increased promoter occupancy of the transcription factor Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 5A/B (STAT5A/B). In summary, we demonstrated that the treatment of fibroblasts with rapamycin decreased proliferation, caused chromosome territory repositioning and induced STAT5A/B-mediated changes in gene expression enriched for cytokines. PMID:26652669

  8. Obesity and lipid stress inhibit carnitine acetyltransferase activity[S

    PubMed Central

    Seiler, Sarah E.; Martin, Ola J.; Noland, Robert C.; Slentz, Dorothy H.; DeBalsi, Karen L.; Ilkayeva, Olga R.; An, Jie; Newgard, Christopher B.; Koves, Timothy R.; Muoio, Deborah M.

    2014-01-01

    Carnitine acetyltransferase (CrAT) is a mitochondrial matrix enzyme that catalyzes the interconversion of acetyl-CoA and acetylcarnitine. Emerging evidence suggests that this enzyme functions as a positive regulator of total body glucose tolerance and muscle activity of pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH), a mitochondrial enzyme complex that promotes glucose oxidation and is feedback inhibited by acetyl-CoA. Here, we used tandem mass spectrometry-based metabolic profiling to identify a negative relationship between CrAT activity and muscle content of lipid intermediates. CrAT specific activity was diminished in muscles from obese and diabetic rodents despite increased protein abundance. This reduction in enzyme activity was accompanied by muscle accumulation of long-chain acylcarnitines (LCACs) and acyl-CoAs and a decline in the acetylcarnitine/acetyl-CoA ratio. In vitro assays demonstrated that palmitoyl-CoA acts as a direct mixed-model inhibitor of CrAT. Similarly, in primary human myocytes grown in culture, nutritional and genetic manipulations that promoted mitochondrial influx of fatty acids resulted in accumulation of LCACs but a pronounced decrease of CrAT-derived short-chain acylcarnitines. These results suggest that lipid-induced antagonism of CrAT might contribute to decreased PDH activity and glucose disposal in the context of obesity and diabetes. PMID:24395925

  9. Rapamycin prevents seizures after depletion of STRADA in a rare neurodevelopmental disorder.

    PubMed

    Parker, Whitney E; Orlova, Ksenia A; Parker, William H; Birnbaum, Jacqueline F; Krymskaya, Vera P; Goncharov, Dmitry A; Baybis, Marianna; Helfferich, Jelte; Okochi, Kei; Strauss, Kevin A; Crino, Peter B

    2013-04-24

    A rare neurodevelopmental disorder in the Old Order Mennonite population called PMSE (polyhydramnios, megalencephaly, and symptomatic epilepsy syndrome; also called Pretzel syndrome) is characterized by infantile-onset epilepsy, neurocognitive delay, craniofacial dysmorphism, and histopathological evidence of heterotopic neurons in subcortical white matter and subependymal regions. PMSE is caused by a homozygous deletion of exons 9 to 13 of the LYK5/STRADA gene, which encodes the pseudokinase STRADA, an upstream inhibitor of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1). We show that disrupted pathfinding in migrating mouse neural progenitor cells in vitro caused by STRADA depletion is prevented by mTORC1 inhibition with rapamycin or inhibition of its downstream effector p70 S6 kinase (p70S6K) with the drug PF-4708671 (p70S6Ki). We demonstrate that rapamycin can rescue aberrant cortical lamination and heterotopia associated with STRADA depletion in the mouse cerebral cortex. Constitutive mTORC1 signaling and a migration defect observed in fibroblasts from patients with PMSE were also prevented by mTORC1 inhibition. On the basis of these preclinical findings, we treated five PMSE patients with sirolimus (rapamycin) without complication and observed a reduction in seizure frequency and an improvement in receptive language. Our findings demonstrate a mechanistic link between STRADA loss and mTORC1 hyperactivity in PMSE, and suggest that mTORC1 inhibition may be a potential treatment for PMSE as well as other mTOR-associated neurodevelopmental disorders.

  10. Nuclear PIM1 confers resistance to rapamycin-impaired endothelial proliferation.

    PubMed

    Walpen, Thomas; Kalus, Ina; Schwaller, Jürg; Peier, Martin A; Battegay, Edouard J; Humar, Rok

    2012-12-07

    The PIM serine/threonine kinases and the mTOR/AKT pathway integrate growth factor signaling and promote cell proliferation and survival. They both share phosphorylation targets and have overlapping functions, which can partially substitute for each other. In cancer cells PIM kinases have been reported to produce resistance to mTOR inhibition by rapamycin. Tumor growth depends highly on blood vessel infiltration into the malignant tissue and therefore on endothelial cell proliferation. We therefore investigated how the PIM1 kinase modulates growth inhibitory effects of rapamycin in mouse aortic endothelial cells (MAEC). We found that proliferation of MAEC lacking Pim1 was significantly more sensitive to rapamycin inhibition, compared to wildtype cells. Inhibition of mTOR and AKT in normal MAEC resulted in significantly elevated PIM1 protein levels in the cytosol and in the nucleus. We observed that truncation of the C-terminal part of Pim1 beyond Ser 276 resulted in almost exclusive nuclear localization of the protein. Re-expression of this Pim1 deletion mutant significantly increased the proliferation of Pim1(-/-) cells when compared to expression of the wildtype Pim1 cDNA. Finally, overexpression of the nuclear localization mutant and the wildtype Pim1 resulted in complete resistance to growth inhibition by rapamycin. Thus, mTOR inhibition-induced nuclear accumulation of PIM1 or expression of a nuclear C-terminal PIM1 truncation mutant is sufficient to increase endothelial cell proliferation, suggesting that nuclear localization of PIM1 is important for resistance of MAEC to rapamycin-mediated inhibition of proliferation.

  11. Rapamycin with Antiretroviral Therapy in AIDS-Associated Kaposi Sarcoma: An AIDS Malignancy Consortium Study

    PubMed Central

    Krown, Susan E.; Roy, Debasmita; Lee, Jeannette Y.; Dezube, Bruce J.; Reid, Erin G.; Venkataramanan, Raman; Han, Kelong; Cesarman, Ethel; Dittmer, Dirk P.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is activated in Kaposi sarcoma (KS) and its inhibitor, rapamycin, has induced KS regression in transplant-associated KS. This study aimed to evaluate rapamycin's safety and toxicity in HIV-infected individuals with KS receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART), investigate rapamycin interactions with both protease inhibitor (PI)-containing and non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI)-containing ART regimens, and assess clinical and biological endpoints including KS response and mTOR-dependent signaling. Methods Seven participants, 4 on PI-based and 3 on NNRTI-based ART, had rapamycin titrated to achieve trough concentrations of 5-10 ng/mL. Patients were monitored for safety and KS response. KS biopsies were evaluated for changes in phospho-Ribosomal S6 protein (pRPS6), and phospho-Akt expression. Interleukin-6 and vascular endothelial growth factor levels, HIV and KS-associated herpesvirus viral loads, and CD4 counts were monitored. Results Despite pharmacokinetic interactions resulting in >200-fold differences in cumulative weekly rapamycin doses between participants on PI-containing and NNRTI-containing regimens, treatment was well tolerated. There were no significant changes in viral loads or cytokine levels; modest initial decreases in CD4 counts occurred in some patients. Three participants, all on PI-containing regimens and with higher rapamycin exposure, showed partial KS responses. Three of four subjects whose biopsies were studied at ≥day 50 showed decreased pRPS6 staining. Conclusions Rapamycin appears safe in HIV-infected individuals with KS and can, in some cases, induce tumor regression and affect its molecular targets. Significant pharmacokinetic interactions require careful titration to achieve target drug trough concentrations, but may be exploited to achieve therapeutic benefit. PMID:22067664

  12. Resveratrol prevents rapamycin-induced upregulation of autophagy and selectively induces apoptosis in TSC2-deficient cells.

    PubMed

    Alayev, Anya; Sun, Yang; Snyder, Rose B; Berger, Sara Malka; Yu, Jane J; Holz, Marina K

    2014-01-01

    The mammalian/mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling pathway is hyperactivated in a variety of cancers and disorders, including lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM) and tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC), which are characterized by mutations in tumor suppressors TSC1 or TSC2. The concern with the use of mTORC1 inhibitors, such as rapamycin or its analogs (rapalogs), is that they cause upregulation of autophagy and suppress the negative feedback loop to Akt, which promotes cell survival, causing the therapy to be only partially effective, and relapse occurs upon cessation of treatment. In this study, we investigate the use of rapamycin in combination with resveratrol, a naturally occurring polyphenol, in TSC2-deficient cells. We tested whether such combination would prevent rapamycin-induced upregulation of autophagy and shift the cell fate toward apoptosis. We found that this combination treatment blocked rapamycin-induced upregulation of autophagy and restored inhibition of Akt. Interestingly, the combination of rapamycin and resveratrol selectively promoted apoptosis of TSC2-deficient cells. Thus, the addition of resveratrol to rapamycin treatment may be a promising option for selective and targeted therapy for diseases with TSC loss and mTORC1 hyperactivation.

  13. Rapamycin Prolongs Cardiac Allograft Survival in a Mouse Model by Inducing Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, T; Nakao, T; Yoshimura, N; Ashihara, E

    2015-09-01

    Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitors are the main immunosuppressive drugs for organ transplant recipients. Nevertheless, the mechanisms by which mTOR inhibitors induce immunosuppression is not fully understood. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) maintain host immunity; however, the relationship between mTOR inhibitors and MDSCs is unclear. Here, the results from a murine cardiac transplantation model revealed that rapamycin treatment (3 mg/kg, intraperitoneally on postoperative days 0, 2, 4, and 6) led to the recruitment of MDSCs and increased their expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that rapamycin induced the migration of iNOS-expressing MDSCs into the subintimal space within the allograft vessels, resulting in a significant prolongation of graft survival compared with that in the untreated group (67 days vs. 7 days, respectively). These effects were counterbalanced by the administration of an anti-Gr-1, which reduced allograft survival to 21 days. Moreover, adoptive transcoronary arterial transfer of MDSCs from rapamycin-treated recipients prolonged allograft survival; this increase was reversed by the anti-Gr-1 antibody. Finally, co-administration of rapamycin and a mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK) inhibitor trametinib reversed rapamycin-mediated MDSC recruitment. Thus, the mTOR and Raf/MEK/extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK) signaling pathways appear to play an important role in MDSC expansion.

  14. Impact of rapamycin on phenotype and tolerogenic function of dendritic cells via intravital optical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Meijie; Zhang, Zhihong

    2014-03-01

    Rapamycin (RAPA) as a unique tolerance-promoting therapeutic drug is crucial to successful clinical organ transplantation. DC (Dendritic cells) play a critical role in antigen presentation to T cells to initiate immune responses involved in tissue rejection. Although the influence of RAPA on DC differentiation and maturation had been reported by some research groups, it is still controversial and unclear right now. In addition, it is also lack of study on investigating the role of DC in DTH reaction via intravital optical imaging. Herein, we investigated the effect of rapamycin on phenotype and function of bone marrow monocyte-derived DC both in vitro and in vivo. In vitro experiments by flow cytometry (FACS) showed that DC displayed decreased cell size and lower expression levels of surface molecule CD80 induced by RAPA; Furthermore, the phagocytic ability to OVA of DC was inhibited by RAPA started from 1 h to 2 h post co-incubation, but recovered after 4 h; In addition, the capacity of DC to activate naïve OT-II T cell proliferation was also inhibited at 3 day post co-incubation, but had no effect at 5 day, the data indicated this effect was reversible when removing the drug. More importantly, the DC-T interaction was monitored both in vitro and in intravital lymph node explant, and showed that RAPA-DC had a significant lower proportion of long-lived (>15min) contacts. Thus, RAPA displayed immunosuppressive to phenotypic and functional maturation of DC, and this phenomenon induced by RAPA may favorable in the clinical organ transplantation in future.

  15. TORC1 inhibition induces lipid droplet replenishment in yeast.

    PubMed

    Madeira, Juliana B; Masuda, Claudio A; Maya-Monteiro, Clarissa M; Matos, Gabriel Soares; Montero-Lomelí, Mónica; Bozaquel-Morais, Bruno L

    2015-02-01

    Lipid droplets (LDs) are intracellular structures that regulate neutral lipid homeostasis. In mammals, LD synthesis is inhibited by rapamycin, a known inhibitor of the mTORC1 pathway. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, LD dynamics are modulated by the growth phase; however, the regulatory pathways involved are unknown. Therefore, we decided to study the role of the TORC1 pathway on LD metabolism in S. cerevisiae. Interestingly, rapamycin treatment resulted in a fast LD replenishment and growth inhibition. The discovery that osmotic stress (1 M sorbitol) also induced LD synthesis but not growth inhibition suggested that the induction of LDs in yeast is not a secondary response to reduced growth. The induction of LDs by rapamycin was due to increased triacylglycerol but not sterol ester synthesis. Induction was dependent on the TOR downstream effectors, the PP2A-related phosphatase Sit4p and the regulatory protein Tap42p. The TORC1-controlled transcriptional activators Gln3p, Gat1p, Rtg1p, and Rtg3p, but not Msn2p and Msn4p, were required for full induction of LDs by rapamycin. Furthermore, we show that the deletion of Gln3p and Gat1p transcription factors, which are activated in response to nitrogen availability, led to abnormal LD dynamics. These results reveal that the TORC1 pathway is involved in neutral lipid homeostasis in yeast.

  16. Effects of Rapamycin on Reduction of Peridural Fibrosis: An Experimental Study

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Like; Zhang, Chifei; Zhao, Jinmin; Wei, Qingjun; Li, Xiaofeng

    2015-01-01

    Background Peridural fibrosis (PF) is a normal complication after lumbar surgery. It is a challenge for both surgeons and patients. Rapamycin (RPM), a novel antibiotic with anti-proliferative and immunosuppressive properties, has been shown to be effective in preventing uncontrolled scar proliferation diseases. The object of the present research was to investigate the effects of RPM on inhibiting PF in vitro and in vivo. Material/Methods In vitro, the fibroblasts collected and isolated from the rat tail skin were cultured with/without RPM and cell counting was performed. In vivo, the double-blinded study was conducted in 60 healthy Wistar rats divided randomly into 3 groups: 1) RPM treatment group; 2) Vehicle treatment group; 3) Control group. Rats underwent a L1-L2 level laminectomy with a satisfactory anesthetization. Four weeks post-operatively, the Rydell score, histological analysis, hydroxyproline content, vimentin expressional level, and inflammatory cytokines expressional levels were assessed. Results In vitro, RPM showed ability to prevent fibroblast proliferation. In vivo, the laminectomy was well tolerated by all rats, which were killed 4 weeks post-operatively. The Rydell score, histological evaluation, hydroxyproline content, vimentin expression level, and inflammatory activity showed the positive effect of RPM in preventing peridural adhesion, inhibiting fibrotic formation and collagen synthesis, and down-regulating inflammation. Conclusions In the present primary study, RPM showed good efficacy in preventing the proliferation of fibroblasts. RPM can prevent rat peridural adhesion through inhibiting collagen synthesis, fibroblasts proliferation, and inflammatory activity. PMID:25677111

  17. Topical application of rapamycin ointment ameliorates Dermatophagoides farina body extract-induced atopic dermatitis in NC/Nga mice.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fei; Tanaka, Mari; Wataya-Kaneda, Mari; Yang, Lingli; Nakamura, Ayumi; Matsumoto, Shoji; Attia, Mostafa; Murota, Hiroyuki; Katayama, Ichiro

    2014-08-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD), a chronic inflammatory skin disease characterized by relapsing eczema and intense prurigo, requires effective and safe pharmacological therapy. Recently, rapamycin, an mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin) inhibitor, has been reported to play a critical role in immune responses and has emerged as an effective immunosuppressive drug. In this study, we assessed whether inhibition of mTOR signalling could suppress dermatitis in mice. Rapamycin was topically applied to inflamed skin in a murine AD model that was developed by repeated topical application of Dermatophagoides farina body (Dfb) extract antigen twice weekly for 7 weeks in NC/Nga mice. The efficacy of topical rapamycin treatment was evaluated immunologically and serologically. Topical application of rapamycin reduced inflammatory cell infiltration in the dermis, alleviated the increase of serum IgE levels and resulted in a significant reduction in clinical skin condition score and marked improvement of histological findings. In addition, increased mTOR phosphorylation in the lesional skin was observed in our murine AD model. Topical application of rapamycin ointment inhibited Dfb antigen-induced dermatitis in NC/Nga mice, promising a new therapy for atopic dermatitis.

  18. Antipneumococcal activity of neuraminidase inhibiting artocarpin.

    PubMed

    Walther, E; Richter, M; Xu, Z; Kramer, C; von Grafenstein, S; Kirchmair, J; Grienke, U; Rollinger, J M; Liedl, K R; Slevogt, H; Sauerbrei, A; Saluz, H P; Pfister, W; Schmidtke, M

    2015-05-01

    Streptococcus (S.) pneumoniae is a major cause of secondary bacterial pneumonia during influenza epidemics. Neuraminidase (NA) is a virulence factor of both pneumococci and influenza viruses. Bacterial neuraminidases (NAs) are structurally related to viral NA and susceptible to oseltamivir, an inhibitor designed to target viral NA. This prompted us to evaluate the antipneumococcal potential of two NA inhibiting natural compounds, the diarylheptanoid katsumadain A and the isoprenylated flavone artocarpin. Chemiluminescence, fluorescence-, and hemagglutination-based enzyme assays were applied to determine the inhibitory efficiency (IC(50) value) of the tested compounds towards pneumococcal NAs. The mechanism of inhibition was studied via enzyme kinetics with recombinant NanA NA. Unlike oseltamivir, which competes with the natural substrate of NA, artocarpin exhibits a mixed-type inhibition with a Ki value of 9.70 μM. Remarkably, artocarpin was the only NA inhibitor (NAI) for which an inhibitory effect on pneumococcal growth (MIC: 0.99-5.75 μM) and biofilm formation (MBIC: 1.15-2.97 μM) was observable. In addition, we discovered that the bactericidal effect of artocarpin can reduce the viability of pneumococci by a factor of >1000, without obvious harm to lung epithelial cells. This renders artocarpin a promising natural product for further investigations.

  19. Rapidly Progressive Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy in an Infant with Noonan syndrome with multiple Lentigines. Palliative Treatment with a Rapamycin Analog

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Andreas; Lauriol, Jessica; Thul, Josef; Behnke-Hall, Kachina; Logeswaran, Tushiha; Schänzer, Anne; Böğürcü, Nuray; Garvalov, Boyan K.; Zenker, Martin; Gelb, Bruce D.; von Gerlach, Susanne; Kandolf, Reinhard; Kontaridis, Maria I.; Schranz, Dietmar

    2015-01-01

    Noonan syndrome with multiple lentigines (NSML) frequently manifests with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). Recently, it was demonstrated that mTOR inhibition reverses HCM in NSML mice. We report for the first time on the effects of treatment with a rapamycin analog in an infant with LS and a malignant form of HCM. In the boy, progressive HCM was diagnosed during the first week of life and diagnosis of NSML was established at age 20 weeks by showing a heterozygous Q510E mutation in the PTPN11 gene. Immunoblotting with antibodies against pERK, pAkt, and pS6RP in fibroblasts demonstrated reduced RAS/MAPK and enhanced Akt/mTOR pathway activities. Because of the patient’s critical condition, everolimus therapy was started at age 24 weeks and continued until heart transplantation at age 36 weeks. Prior to surgery, heart failure improved from NYHA stage IV to II and brain natriuretic peptide values decreased from 9600 to <1000 pg/ml, but no reversal of cardiac hypertrophy was observed. Examination of the explanted heart revealed severe hypertrophy and myofiber disarray with extensive perivascular fibrosis. These findings provide evidence that Akt/mTOR activity is enhanced in NSML with HCM and suggest that rapamycin treatment could be principally feasible for infantile NSML. But the preliminary experiences made in this single patient indicate that therapy should start early to prevent irreversible cardiac remodelling. PMID:25708222

  20. Hydrogen sulfide inhibits high glucose-induced matrix protein synthesis by activating AMP-activated protein kinase in renal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hak Joo; Mariappan, Meenalakshmi M; Feliers, Denis; Cavaglieri, Rita C; Sataranatarajan, Kavithalakshmi; Abboud, Hanna E; Choudhury, Goutam Ghosh; Kasinath, Balakuntalam S

    2012-02-10

    Hydrogen sulfide, a signaling gas, affects several cell functions. We hypothesized that hydrogen sulfide modulates high glucose (30 mm) stimulation of matrix protein synthesis in glomerular epithelial cells. High glucose stimulation of global protein synthesis, cellular hypertrophy, and matrix laminin and type IV collagen content was inhibited by sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS), an H(2)S donor. High glucose activation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) complex 1 (mTORC1), shown by phosphorylation of p70S6 kinase and 4E-BP1, was inhibited by NaHS. High glucose stimulated mTORC1 to promote key events in the initiation and elongation phases of mRNA translation: binding of eIF4A to eIF4G, reduction in PDCD4 expression and inhibition of its binding to eIF4A, eEF2 kinase phosphorylation, and dephosphorylation of eEF2; these events were inhibited by NaHS. The role of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), an inhibitor of protein synthesis, was examined. NaHS dose-dependently stimulated AMPK phosphorylation and restored AMPK phosphorylation reduced by high glucose. Compound C, an AMPK inhibitor, abolished NaHS modulation of high glucose effect on events in mRNA translation as well as global and matrix protein synthesis. NaHS induction of AMPK phosphorylation was inhibited by siRNA for calmodulin kinase kinase β, but not LKB1, upstream kinases for AMPK; STO-609, a calmodulin kinase kinase β inhibitor, had the same effect. Renal cortical content of cystathionine β-synthase and cystathionine γ-lyase, hydrogen sulfide-generating enzymes, was significantly reduced in mice with type 1 diabetes or type 2 diabetes, coinciding with renal hypertrophy and matrix accumulation. Hydrogen sulfide is a newly identified modulator of protein synthesis in the kidney, and reduction in its generation may contribute to kidney injury in diabetes.

  1. Dual mTORC1/2 inhibition by INK-128 results in antitumor activity in preclinical models of osteosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Haibin; Zeng, Zhiyuan

    Existing evidence has shown that mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) overactivation is an important contributor of osteosarcoma (OS) progression. Here, we studied the potential anti-OS activity of a potent mTOR kinase inhibitor: INK-128 (MLN0128). We demonstrated that INK-128 induced potent cytotoxic effects against several human OS cell lines (U2OS, MG-63 and SaOs-2), yet same INK-128 treatment was safe (non-cytotoxic) to OB-6 human osteoblastic cells and MLO-Y4 human osteocytic cells. INK-128 induced caspase-dependent apoptosis in OS cells, but not in MLO-Y4/OB-6 cells. The caspase-3 specific inhibitor (z-DVED-fmk) or the pan caspase inhibitor (z-VAD-fmk) dramatically attenuated INK-128-exerted cytotoxicity against OS cells. Molecularly, INK-128 inhibited activation of mTORC1 (S6K1 and S6 phosphorylations) and mTORC2 (AKT Ser-473 phosphorylation), without affecting AKT Thr-308 phosphorylation in U2OS cells. Significantly, AKT inhibition by MK-2206 (an AKT inhibitor), or AKT1/2 stable knockdown by targeted-shRNA, remarkably sensitized INK-128-induced activity in OS cells. In vivo, oral administration of INK-128 potently inhibited U2OS xenograft growth in severe combined immuno-deficient (SCID) mice. mTORC1/2 activation in xenograft tumors was also suppressed with INK-128 administration. In summary, we show that INK-128 exerts potent anti-OS activity in vitro and in vivo. INK-128 might be further investigated as a novel anti-OS agent.

  2. Mammalian target of rapamycin activator RHEB is frequently overexpressed in human carcinomas and is critical and sufficient for skin epithelial carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zhi Hong; Shvartsman, Mark B; Lee, Andrew Y; Shao, Jenny M; Murray, Mollianne M; Kladney, Raleigh D; Fan, Dong; Krajewski, Stan; Chiang, Gary G; Mills, Gordon B; Arbeit, Jeffrey M

    2010-04-15

    Small GTPase Ras homologue enriched in brain (RHEB) binds and activates the key metabolic regulator mTORC1, which has an important role in cancer cells, but the role of RHEB in cancer pathogenesis has not been shown. By performing a meta-analysis of published cancer cytogenetic and transcriptome databases, we defined a gain of chromosome 7q36.1-q36.3 containing the RHEB locus, an overexpression of RHEB mRNA in several different carcinoma histotypes, and an association between RHEB upregulation and poor prognosis in breast and head and neck cancers. To model gain of function in epithelial malignancy, we targeted Rheb expression to murine basal keratinocytes of transgenic mice at levels similar to those that occur in human squamous cancer cell lines. Juvenile transgenic epidermis displayed constitutive mTORC1 pathway activation, elevated cyclin D1 protein, and diffuse skin hyperplasia. Skin tumors subsequently developed with concomitant stromal angio-inflammatory foci, evidencing induction of an epidermal hypoxia-inducible factor-1 transcriptional program, and paracrine feed-forward activation of the interleukin-6-signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 pathway. Rheb-induced tumor persistence and neoplastic molecular alterations were mTORC1 dependent. Rheb markedly sensitized transgenic epidermis to squamous carcinoma induction following a single dose of Ras-activating carcinogen 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene. Our findings offer direct evidence that RHEB facilitates multistage carcinogenesis through induction of multiple oncogenic mechanisms, perhaps contributing to the poor prognosis of patients with cancers overexpressing RHEB.

  3. Chronic rapamycin treatment causes diabetes in male mice.

    PubMed

    Schindler, Christine E; Partap, Uttara; Patchen, Bonnie K; Swoap, Steven J

    2014-08-15

    Current evidence indicates that the mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor rapamycin both increases longevity and, seemingly contradictorily, impairs glucose homeostasis. Most studies exploring the dimensions of this paradox have been based on rapamycin treatment in mice for up to 20 wk. We sought to better understand the metabolic effects of oral rapamycin over a substantially longer period of time in HET3 mice. We observed that treatment with rapamycin for 52 wk induced diabetes in male mice, characterized by hyperglycemia, significant urine glucose levels, and severe glucose and pyruvate intolerance. Glucose intolerance occurred in male mice by 4 wk on rapamycin and could be only partially reversed with cessation of rapamycin treatment. Female mice developed moderate glucose intolerance over 1 yr of rapamycin treatment, but not diabetes. The role of sex hormones in the differential development of diabetic symptoms in male and female mice was further explored. HET3 mice treated with rapamycin for 52 wk were gonadectomized and monitored over 10 wk. Castrated male mice remained glucose intolerant, while ovariectomized females developed significant glucose intolerance over the same time period. Subsequent replacement of 17β-estradiol (E2) in ovariectomized females promoted a recovery of glucose tolerance over a 4-wk period, suggesting the protective role of E2 against rapamycin-induced diabetes. These results indicate that 1) oral rapamycin treatment causes diabetes in male mice, 2) the diabetes is partially reversible with cessation of treatment, and 3) E2 plays a protective role against the development of rapamycin-induced diabetes.

  4. Rapamycin enhances docetaxel-induced cytotoxicity in a androgen-independent prostate cancer xenograft model by survivin downregulation

    SciTech Connect

    Morikawa, Yasuyuki; Koike, Hidekazu; Sekine, Yoshitaka; Matsui, Hiroshi; Shibata, Yasuhiro; Ito, Kazuto; Suzuki, Kazuhiro

    2012-03-16

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Rapamycin (RPM) enhances the susceptibility of PC3 cells to docetaxel. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Low-dosage of docetaxel (DTX) did not reduce survivin expression levels in PC3 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Combination treatment of RPM with DTX suppressed the expression of surviving. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SiRNA against survivin enhanced the susceptibility of PC3 cells to DTX. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RPM and DTX cotreatment inhibited PC3 cell growth and decreased surviving in vivo. -- Abstract: Background: Docetaxel is a first-line treatment choice in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). However, the management of CRPC remains an important challenge in oncology. There have been many reports on the effects of rapamycin, which is an inhibitor of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), in the treatment of carcinogenesis. We assessed the cytotoxic effects of the combination treatment of docetaxel and rapamycin in prostate cancer cells. Furthermore, we examined the relationship between these treatments and survivin, which is a member of the inhibitory apoptosis family. Methods: Prostate cancer cells were cultured and treated with docetaxel and rapamycin. The effects on proliferation were evaluated with the MTS assay. In addition, we evaluated the effect on proliferation of the combination treatment induced knockdown of survivin expression by small interfering RNA transfection and docetaxel. Protein expression levels were assayed using western blotting. PC3 cells and xenograft growth in nude mice were used to evaluate the in vivo efficacy of docetaxel and its combination with rapamycin. Results: In vitro and in vivo, the combination of rapamycin with docetaxel resulted in a greater inhibition of proliferation than treatment with rapamycin or docetaxel alone. In addition, in vitro and in vivo, rapamycin decreased basal surviving levels, and cotreatment with docetaxel further decreased these levels

  5. Caloric Restriction and Rapamycin Differentially Alter Energy Metabolism in Yeast.

    PubMed

    Choi, Kyung-Mi; Hong, Seok-Jin; van Deursen, Jan M; Kim, Sooah; Kim, Kyoung Heon; Lee, Cheol-Koo

    2017-03-08

    Rapamycin (RM), a drug that inhibits the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway and responds to nutrient availability, seemingly mimics the effects of caloric restriction (CR) on healthy life span. However, the extent of the mechanistic overlap between RM and CR remains incompletely understood. Here, we compared the impact of CR and RM on cellular metabolic status. Both regimens maintained intracellular ATP through the chronological aging process and showed enhanced mitochondrial capacity. Comparative transcriptome analysis showed that CR had a stronger impact on global gene expression than RM. We observed a like impact on the metabolome and identified distinct metabolites affected by CR and RM. CR severely reduced the level of energy storage molecules including glycogen and lipid droplets, whereas RM did not. RM boosted the production of enzymes responsible for the breakdown of glycogen and lipid droplets. Collectively, these results provide insights into the distinct energy metabolism mechanisms induced by CR and RM, suggesting that these two anti-aging regimens might extend life span through distinctive pathways.

  6. Rapamycin transiently induces mitochondrial remodeling to reprogram energy metabolism in old hearts

    PubMed Central

    Chiao, Ying Ann; Kolwicz, Stephen C.; Basisty, Nathan; Gagnidze, Arni; Zhang, Julia; Gu, Haiwei; Djukovic, Danijel; Beyer, Richard P.; Raftery, Daniel; MacCoss, Michael; Tian, Rong; Rabinovitch, Peter S.

    2016-01-01

    Rapamycin, an inhibitor of mTOR signaling, has been shown to reverse diastolic dysfunction in old mice in 10 weeks, highlighting its therapeutic potential for a poorly treatable condition. However, the mechanisms and temporal regulation of its cardiac benefits remain unclear. We show that improved diastolic function in old mice begins at 2-4 weeks, progressing over the course of 10-week treatment. While TORC1-mediated S6 phosphorylation and TORC2 mediated AKT and PKCα phosphorylation are inhibited throughout the course of treatment, rapamycin inhibits ULK phosphorylation and induces autophagy during just the first week of treatment, returning to baseline at two weeks and after. Concordantly, markers of mitochondrial biogenesis increase over the first two weeks of treatment and return to control levels thereafter. This transient induction of autophagy and mitochondrial biogenesis suggests that damaged mitochondria are replaced by newly synthesized ones to rejuvenate mitochondrial homeostasis. This remodeling is shown to rapidly reverse the age-related reduction in fatty acid oxidation to restore a more youthful substrate utilization and energetic profile in old isolated perfused hearts, and modulates the myocardial metabolome in vivo. This study demonstrates the differential and dynamic mechanisms following rapamycin treatment and highlights the importance of understanding the temporal regulation of rapamycin effects. PMID:26872208

  7. A Signal-On Fluorosensor Based on Quench-Release Principle for Sensitive Detection of Antibiotic Rapamycin

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Hee-Jin; Itayama, Shuya; Ueda, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    An antibiotic rapamycin is one of the most commonly used immunosuppressive drugs, and also implicated for its anti-cancer activity. Hence, the determination of its blood level after organ transplantation or tumor treatment is of great concern in medicine. Although there are several rapamycin detection methods, many of them have limited sensitivity, and/or need complicated procedures and long assay time. As a novel fluorescent biosensor for rapamycin, here we propose “Q’-body”, which works on the fluorescence quench-release principle inspired by the antibody-based quenchbody (Q-body) technology. We constructed rapamycin Q’-bodies by linking the two interacting domains FKBP12 and FRB, whose association is triggered by rapamycin. The fusion proteins were each incorporated position-specifically with one of fluorescence dyes ATTO520, tetramethylrhodamine, or ATTO590 using a cell-free translation system. As a result, rapid rapamycin dose-dependent fluorescence increase derived of Q’-bodies was observed, especially for those with ATTO520 with a lowest detection limit of 0.65 nM, which indicates its utility as a novel fluorescent biosensor for rapamycin. PMID:25822756

  8. Rapamycin treatment during in vitro maturation of oocytes improves embryonic development after parthenogenesis and somatic cell nuclear transfer in pigs

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Joohyeong; Park, Jong-Im; Yun, Jung Im; Lee, Yongjin; Yong, Hwanyul; Lee, Seung Tae; Park, Choon-Keun; Hyun, Sang-Hwan; Lee, Geun-Shik

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effects of rapamycin treatment during in vitro maturation (IVM) on oocyte maturation and embryonic development after parthenogenetic activation (PA) and somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) in pigs. Morphologically good (MGCOCs) and poor oocytes (MPCOCs) were untreated or treated with 1 nM rapamycin during 0-22 h, 22-42 h, or 0-42 h of IVM. Rapamycin had no significant effects on nuclear maturation and blastocyst formation after PA of MGCOCs. Blastocyst formation after PA was significantly increased by rapamycin treatment during 22-42 h and 0-42 h (46.6% and 46.5%, respectively) relative to the control (33.3%) and 0-22 h groups (38.6%) in MPCOCs. In SCNT, blastocyst formation tended to increase in MPCOCs treated with rapamycin during 0-42 h of IVM relative to untreated oocytes (20.3% vs. 14.3%, 0.05 < p < 0.1), while no improvement was observed in MGCOCs. Gene expression analysis revealed that transcript abundance of Beclin 1 and microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 mRNAs was significantly increased in MPCOCs by rapamycin relative to the control. Our results demonstrated that autophagy induction by rapamycin during IVM improved developmental competence of oocytes derived from MPCOCs. PMID:25797293

  9. Rapamycin treatment during in vitro maturation of oocytes improves embryonic development after parthenogenesis and somatic cell nuclear transfer in pigs.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joohyeong; Park, Jong-Im; Yun, Jung Im; Lee, Yongjin; Yong, Hwanyul; Lee, Seung Tae; Park, Choon-Keun; Hyun, Sang-Hwan; Lee, Geun-Shik; Lee, Eunsong

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effects of rapamycin treatment during in vitro maturation (IVM) on oocyte maturation and embryonic development after parthenogenetic activation (PA) and somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) in pigs. Morphologically good (MGCOCs) and poor oocytes (MPCOCs) were untreated or treated with 1 nM rapamycin during 0-22 h, 22-42 h, or 0-42 h of IVM. Rapamycin had no significant effects on nuclear maturation and blastocyst formation after PA of MGCOCs. Blastocyst formation after PA was significantly increased by rapamycin treatment during 22-42 h and 0-42 h (46.6% and 46.5%, respectively) relative to the control (33.3%) and 0-22 h groups (38.6%) in MPCOCs. In SCNT, blastocyst formation tended to increase in MPCOCs treated with rapamycin during 0-42 h of IVM relative to untreated oocytes (20.3% vs. 14.3%, 0.05 < p < 0.1), while no improvement was observed in MGCOCs. Gene expression analysis revealed that transcript abundance of Beclin 1 and microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 mRNAs was significantly increased in MPCOCs by rapamycin relative to the control. Our results demonstrated that autophagy induction by rapamycin during IVM improved developmental competence of oocytes derived from MPCOCs.

  10. Weekly administration of rapamycin improves survival and biomarkers in obese male mice on high-fat diet.

    PubMed

    Leontieva, Olga V; Paszkiewicz, Geraldine M; Blagosklonny, Mikhail V

    2014-08-01

    Recent discoveries have revealed the key role of mTOR (target of rapamycin) in aging. Furthermore, rapamycin extends lifespan in mice, especially in female mice. Here, we treated obese male mice on high-fat diet with rapamycin given intermittently: either weekly (once a week) or alternating bi-weekly (three injections every other week). While only marginally reducing obesity, intermittent administration of rapamycin significantly extended lifespan. Significance was achieved for weekly treated group and for the three rapamycin-received groups combined. In weekly treatment group, 100% mice were alive by the age of 2 years, whereas 60% of mice died in untreated group by this age. The effect of weekly treatment on survival was highly significant and cannot be fully explained by partial reduction in obesity. Alternating bi-weekly treatments seem to be less effective than weekly treatment, although effects of additional factors (see ) may not be excluded. After one year of treatment, all survived mice were sacrificed 8 days after the last administration of rapamycin to avoid its direct interference with parameters examined. Fasting levels of cardiac and hepatic p-S6, a marker of mTORC1 activity, were lower in weekly treatment group compared with control mice. In contrast, levels of p-Akt (S473), glucose, triglycerides and insulin were unchanged, whereas leptin and IGF-1 tended to be lower. Thus, weekly treatment with rapamycin may slow down aging in obese male mice on high-fat diet.

  11. Rapamycin Ameliorates Nephropathy despite Elevating Hyperglycemia in a Polygenic Mouse Model of Type 2 Diabetes, NONcNZO10/LtJ

    PubMed Central

    Reifsnyder, Peter C.; Doty, Rosalinda; Harrison, David E.

    2014-01-01

    While rapamycin treatment has been reported to have a putatively negative effect on glucose homeostasis in mammals, it has not been tested in polygenic models of type 2 diabetes. One such mouse model, NONcNZO10/LtJ, was treated chronically with rapamycin (14 ppm encapsulated in diet) and monitored for the development of diabetes. As expected, rapamycin treatment accelerated the onset and severity of hyperglycemia. However, development of nephropathy was ameliorated, as both glomerulonephritis and IgG deposition in the subendothelial tuft were markedly reduced. Insulin production and secretion appeared to be inhibited, suppressing the developing hyperinsulinemia present in untreated controls. Rapamycin treatment also reduced body weight gain. Thus, rapamycin reduced some of the complications of diabetes despite elevating hyperglycemia. These results suggest that multiple factors must be evaluated when assessing the benefit vs. hazard of rapamycin treatment in patients that have overt, or are at risk for, type 2 diabetes. Testing of rapamycin in combination with insulin sensitizers is warranted, as such compounds may ameliorate the putative negative effects of rapamycin in the type 2 diabetes environment. PMID:25473963

  12. Rapamycin, a specific inhibitor of the target of rapamycin complex 1, disrupts intestinal barrier integrity in broiler chicks.

    PubMed

    Liu, S Q; Zhao, J P; Fan, X X; Liu, G H; Jiao, H C; Wang, X J; Sun, S H; Lin, H

    2016-04-01

    To uncover the molecular mechanisms underlying the intestinal barrier integrity, this study determined whether the rapamycin (RAPA)-sensitive target of rapamycin complex 1 (TORC1) pathway was involved in this process. Three groups of 4-day-old male chicks were randomly subjected to one of the following treatments for 6 days: high-dose RAPA [a specific inhibitor of TORC1; an intraperitoneal injection of 1.0 mg/kg body weight (BW), once daily at 09:00 hours], low-dose RAPA (0.4 mg/kg BW) and RAPA vehicle (control). Results showed that the RAPA treatment increased mortality, while decreasing villus height (p < 0.01), claudin 1 expression, content of immunoglobulin A (IgA), extent of TORC1 phosphorylation (p < 0.05), ratio of villus height to crypt depth (p < 0.01), and population of IgA-positive B cells in intestinal mucosa, particularly for the jejunum. Some aspects of these responses were dose dependent and appeared to result from weight loss. Together, RAPA exerts the expected inhibition of small intestinal development and IgA production in birds, suggesting the important role of TORC1 in gut barrier integrity.

  13. Complement Activation and Inhibition in Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Cazander, Gwendolyn; Jukema, Gerrolt N.; Nibbering, Peter H.

    2012-01-01

    Complement activation is needed to restore tissue injury; however, inappropriate activation of complement, as seen in chronic wounds can cause cell death and enhance inflammation, thus contributing to further injury and impaired wound healing. Therefore, attenuation of complement activation by specific inhibitors is considered as an innovative wound care strategy. Currently, the effects of several complement inhibitors, for example, the C3 inhibitor compstatin and several C1 and C5 inhibitors, are under investigation in patients with complement-mediated diseases. Although (pre)clinical research into the effects of these complement inhibitors on wound healing is limited, available data indicate that reduction of complement activation can improve wound healing. Moreover, medicine may take advantage of safe and effective agents that are produced by various microorganisms, symbionts, for example, medicinal maggots, and plants to attenuate complement activation. To conclude, for the development of new wound care strategies, (pre)clinical studies into the roles of complement and the effects of application of complement inhibitors in wound healing are required. PMID:23346185

  14. Rapamycin promotes Schwann cell migration and nerve growth factor secretion

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fang; Zhang, Haiwei; Zhang, Kaiming; Wang, Xinyu; Li, Shipu; Yin, Yixia

    2014-01-01

    Rapamycin, similar to FK506, can promote neural regeneration in vitro. We assumed that the mechanisms of action of rapamycin and FK506 in promoting peripheral nerve regeneration were similar. This study compared the effects of different concentrations of rapamycin and FK506 on Schwann cells and investigated effects and mechanisms of rapamycin on improving peripheral nerve regeneration. Results demonstrated that the lowest rapamycin concentration (1.53 nmol/L) more significantly promoted Schwann cell migration than the highest FK506 concentration (100μmol/L). Rapamycin promoted the secretion of nerve growth factors and upregulated growth-associated protein 43 expression in Schwann cells, but did not significantly affect Schwann cell proliferation. Therefore, rapamycin has potential application in peripheral nerve regeneration therapy. PMID:25206862

  15. Rapamycin reverses cellular phenotypes and enhances mutant protein clearance in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome cells.

    PubMed

    Cao, Kan; Graziotto, John J; Blair, Cecilia D; Mazzulli, Joseph R; Erdos, Michael R; Krainc, Dimitri; Collins, Francis S

    2011-06-29

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a lethal genetic disorder characterized by premature aging. HGPS is most commonly caused by a de novo single-nucleotide substitution in the lamin A/C gene (LMNA) that partially activates a cryptic splice donor site in exon 11, producing an abnormal lamin A protein termed progerin. Accumulation of progerin in dividing cells adversely affects the integrity of the nuclear scaffold and leads to nuclear blebbing in cultured cells. Progerin is also produced in normal cells, increasing in abundance as senescence approaches. Here, we report the effect of rapamycin, a macrolide antibiotic that has been implicated in slowing cellular and organismal aging, on the cellular phenotypes of HGPS fibroblasts. Treatment with rapamycin abolished nuclear blebbing, delayed the onset of cellular senescence, and enhanced the degradation of progerin in HGPS cells. Rapamycin also decreased the formation of insoluble progerin aggregates and induced clearance through autophagic mechanisms in normal fibroblasts. Our findings suggest an additional mechanism for the beneficial effects of rapamycin on longevity and encourage the hypothesis that rapamycin treatment could provide clinical benefit for children with HGPS.

  16. mTOR-dependent activation of the transcription factor TIF-IA links rRNA synthesis to nutrient availability.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Christine; Zhao, Jian; Yuan, Xuejun; Grummt, Ingrid

    2004-02-15

    In cycling cells, transcription of ribosomal RNA genes by RNA polymerase I (Pol I) is tightly coordinated with cell growth. Here, we show that the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) regulates Pol I transcription by modulating the activity of TIF-IA, a regulatory factor that senses nutrient and growth-factor availability. Inhibition of mTOR signaling by rapamycin inactivates TIF-IA and impairs transcription-initiation complex formation. Moreover, rapamycin treatment leads to translocation of TIF-IA into the cytoplasm. Rapamycin-mediated inactivation of TIF-IA is caused by hypophosphorylation of Se 44 (S44) and hyperphosphorylation of Se 199 (S199). Phosphorylation at these sites affects TIF-IA activity in opposite ways, for example, phosphorylation of S44 activates and S199 inactivates TIF-IA. The results identify a new target formTOR-signaling pathways and elucidate the molecular mechanism underlying mTOR-dependent regulation of RNA synthesis.

  17. Interneuron-mediated inhibition synchronizes neuronal activity during slow oscillation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jen-Yung; Chauvette, Sylvain; Skorheim, Steven; Timofeev, Igor; Bazhenov, Maxim

    2012-01-01

    The signature of slow-wave sleep in the electroencephalogram (EEG) is large-amplitude fluctuation of the field potential, which reflects synchronous alternation of activity and silence across cortical neurons. While initiation of the active cortical states during sleep slow oscillation has been intensively studied, the biological mechanisms which drive the network transition from an active state to silence remain poorly understood. In the current study, using a combination of in vivo electrophysiology and thalamocortical network simulation, we explored the impact of intrinsic and synaptic inhibition on state transition during sleep slow oscillation. We found that in normal physiological conditions, synaptic inhibition controls the duration and the synchrony of active state termination. The decline of interneuron-mediated inhibition led to asynchronous downward transition across the cortical network and broke the regular slow oscillation pattern. Furthermore, in both in vivo experiment and computational modelling, we revealed that when the level of synaptic inhibition was reduced significantly, it led to a recovery of synchronized oscillations in the form of seizure-like bursting activity. In this condition, the fast active state termination was mediated by intrinsic hyperpolarizing conductances. Our study highlights the significance of both intrinsic and synaptic inhibition in manipulating sleep slow rhythms. PMID:22641778

  18. Reward anticipation enhances brain activation during response inhibition.

    PubMed

    Rosell-Negre, Patricia; Bustamante, Juan Carlos; Fuentes-Claramonte, Paola; Costumero, Víctor; Benabarre, Sergio; Barros-Loscertales, Alfonso

    2014-06-01

    The chance to achieve a reward starts up the required neurobehavioral mechanisms to adapt our thoughts and actions in order to accomplish our objective. However, reward does not equally reinforce everybody but depends on interindividual motivational dispositions. Thus, immediate reward contingencies can modulate the cognitive process required for goal achievement, while individual differences in personality can affect this modulation. We aimed to test the interaction between inhibition-related brain response and motivational processing in a stop signal task by reward anticipation and whether individual differences in sensitivity to reward (SR) modulate such interaction. We analyzed the cognitive-motivational interaction between the brain pattern activation of the regions involved in correct and incorrect response inhibition and the association between such brain activations and SR scores. We also analyzed the behavioral effects of reward on both reaction times for the "go" trials before and after correct and incorrect inhibition in order to test error prediction performance and postinhibition adjustment. Our results show enhanced activation during response inhibition under reward contingencies in frontal, parietal, and subcortical areas. Moreover, activation of the right insula and the left putamen positively correlates with the SR scores. Finally, the possibility of reward outcome affects not only response inhibition performance (e.g., reducing stop signal reaction time), but also error prediction performance and postinhibition adjustment. Therefore, reward contingencies improve behavioral performance and enhance brain activation during response inhibition, and SR is related to brain activation. Our results suggest the conditions and factors that subserve cognitive control strategies in cognitive motivational interactions during response inhibition.

  19. Isorhamnetin inhibits cell proliferation and induces apoptosis in breast cancer via Akt and mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    HU, SHAN; HUANG, LIMING; MENG, LIWEI; SUN, HE; ZHANG, WEI; XU, YINGCHUN

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cause of female cancer-associated mortality. Although treatment options, including chemotherapy, radiotherapy and surgery have led to a decline in the mortality rates associated with breast cancer, drug resistance remains one of the predominant causes for poor prognosis and high recurrence rates. The present study investigated the potential effects of the natural product, isorhamnetin on breast cancer, and examined the effects of isorhamnetin on the Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)/MAPK kinase (MEK) signaling cascades, which are two important signaling pathways for endocrine therapy resistance in breast cancer. The results of the present study indicate that isorhamnetin inhibits cell proliferation and induces cell apoptosis. In addition, isorhamnetin was observed to inhibit the Akt/mTOR and the MEK/extracellular signal-regulated kinase phosphorylation cascades. The inhibition of these two signaling pathways was attenuated by the two Akt and MEK1 inhibitors, but not by the nuclear factor-κB inhibitor. Furthermore, epidermal growth factor inhibited the effects of isorhamnetin via activation of the Akt and MEK signaling pathways. These results indicate that isorhamnetin exhibits antitumor effects in breast cancer, which are mediated by the Akt and MEK signaling pathways. PMID:26502751

  20. Isorhamnetin inhibits cell proliferation and induces apoptosis in breast cancer via Akt and mitogen‑activated protein kinase kinase signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Hu, Shan; Huang, Liming; Meng, Liwei; Sun, He; Zhang, Wei; Xu, Yingchun

    2015-11-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cause of female cancer-associated mortality. Although treatment options, including chemotherapy, radiotherapy and surgery have led to a decline in the mortality rates associated with breast cancer, drug resistance remains one of the predominant causes for poor prognosis and high recurrence rates. The present study investigated the potential effects of the natural product, isorhamnetin on breast cancer, and examined the effects of isorhamnetin on the Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)/MAPK kinase (MEK) signaling cascades, which are two important signaling pathways for endocrine therapy resistance in breast cancer. The results of the present study indicate that isorhamnetin inhibits cell proliferation and induces cell apoptosis. In addition, isorhamnetin was observed to inhibit the Akt/mTOR and the MEK/extracellular signal-regulated kinase phosphorylation cascades. The inhibition of these two signaling pathways was attenuated by the two Akt and MEK1 inhibitors, but not by the nuclear factor-κB inhibitor. Furthermore, epidermal growth factor inhibited the effects of isorhamnetin via activation of the Akt and MEK signaling pathways. These results indicate that isorhamnetin exhibits antitumor effects in breast cancer, which are mediated by the Akt and MEK signaling pathways.

  1. Thyroid peroxidase activity is inhibited by amino acids.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, D P; Ferreira, A C; Coelho, S M; Moraes, J M; Camacho, M A; Rosenthal, D

    2000-03-01

    Normal in vitro thyroid peroxidase (TPO) iodide oxidation activity was completely inhibited by a hydrolyzed TPO preparation (0.15 mg/ml) or hydrolyzed bovine serum albumin (BSA, 0.2 mg/ml). A pancreatic hydrolysate of casein (trypticase peptone, 0.1 mg/ml) and some amino acids (cysteine, tryptophan and methionine, 50 microM each) also inhibited the TPO iodide oxidation reaction completely, whereas casamino acids (0.1 mg/ml), and tyrosine, phenylalanine and histidine (50 microM each) inhibited the TPO reaction by 54% or less. A pancreatic digest of gelatin (0.1 mg/ml) or any other amino acid (50 microM) tested did not significantly decrease TPO activity. The amino acids that impair iodide oxidation also inhibit the TPO albumin iodination activity. The inhibitory amino acids contain side chains with either sulfur atoms (cysteine and methionine) or aromatic rings (tyrosine, tryptophan, histidine and phenylalanine). Among the amino acids tested, only cysteine affected the TPO guaiacol oxidation reaction, producing a transient inhibition at 25 or 50 microM. The iodide oxidation inhibitory activity of cysteine, methionine and tryptophan was reversed by increasing iodide concentrations from 12 to 18 mM, while no such effect was observed when the cofactor (H2O2) concentration was increased. The inhibitory substances might interfere with the enzyme activity by competing with its normal substrates for their binding sites, binding to the free substrates or reducing their oxidized form.

  2. Docosahexaenoic acid inhibits proteolytic processing of sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c) via activation of AMP-activated kinase.

    PubMed

    Deng, Xiong; Dong, Qingming; Bridges, Dave; Raghow, Rajendra; Park, Edwards A; Elam, Marshall B

    2015-12-01

    In hyperinsulinemic states including obesity and T2DM, overproduction of fatty acid and triglyceride contributes to steatosis of the liver, hyperlipidemia and hepatic insulin resistance. This effect is mediated in part by the transcriptional regulator sterol responsive element binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c), which stimulates the expression of genes involved in hepatic fatty acid and triglyceride synthesis. SREBP-1c is up regulated by insulin both via increased transcription of nascent full-length SREBP-1c and by enhanced proteolytic processing of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-bound precursor to yield the transcriptionally active n-terminal form, nSREBP-1c. Polyunsaturated fatty acids of marine origin (n-3 PUFA) prevent induction of SREBP-1c by insulin thereby reducing plasma and hepatic triglycerides. Despite widespread use of n-3 PUFA supplements to reduce triglycerides in clinical practice, the exact mechanisms underlying their hypotriglyceridemic effect remain elusive. Here we demonstrate that the n-3 PUFA docosahexaenoic acid (DHA; 22:5 n-3) reduces nSREBP-1c by inhibiting regulated intramembrane proteolysis (RIP) of the nascent SREBP-1c. We further show that this effect of DHA is mediated both via activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and by inhibition of mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1). The inhibitory effect of AMPK on SREBP-1c processing is linked to phosphorylation of serine 365 of SREBP-1c in the rat. We have defined a novel regulatory mechanism by which n-3 PUFA inhibit induction of SREBP-1c by insulin. These findings identify AMPK as an important negative regulator of hepatic lipid synthesis and as a potential therapeutic target for hyperlipidemia in obesity and T2DM.

  3. Metformin inhibits growth of human non-small cell lung cancer cells via liver kinase B-1-independent activation of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase

    PubMed Central

    GUO, QIANQIAN; LIU, ZHIYAN; JIANG, LILI; LIU, MENGJIE; MA, JIEQUN; YANG, CHENGCHENG; HAN, LILI; NAN, KEJUN; LIANG, XUAN

    2016-01-01

    Metformin, the most widely administered oral anti-diabetic therapeutic agent, exerts its glucose-lowering effect predominantly via liver kinase B1 (LKB1)-dependent activation of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK). Accumulating evidence has demonstrated that metformin possesses potential antitumor effects. However, whether the antitumor effect of metformin is via the LKB1/AMPK signaling pathway remains to be determined. In the current study, the effects of metformin on proliferation, cell cycle progression, and apoptosis of human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) H460 (LKB1-null) and H1299 (LKB1-positive) cells were assessed, and the role of LKB1/AMPK signaling in the anti-growth effects of metformin were investigated. Cell viability was determined using a 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay, cell cycle distribution and apoptosis were assessed by flow cytometry, and protein expression levels were measured by western blotting. Metformin inhibited proliferation, induced significant cell cycle arrest at the G0–G1 phase and increased apoptosis in NSCLC cells in a time- and concentration-dependent manner, regardless of the level of LKB1 protein expression. Furthermore, knockdown of LKB1 with short hairpin RNA (shRNA) did not affect the antiproliferative effect of metformin in the H1299 cells. Metformin stimulated AMPK phosphorylation and subsequently suppressed the phosphorylation of mammalian target of rapamycin and its downstream effector, 70-kDa ribosomal protein S6 kinase in the two cell lines. These effects were abrogated by silencing AMPK with small interfering RNA (siRNA). In addition, knockdown of AMPK with siRNA inhibited the effect of metformin on cell proliferation in the two cell lines. These results provide evidence that the growth inhibition of metformin in NSCLC cells is mediated by LKB1-independent activation of AMPK, indicating that metformin may be a potential therapeutic agent for the treatment of

  4. Localized Ultrasound Enhances Delivery of Rapamycin from Microbubbles to Prevent Smooth Muscle Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Linsey C.; Klibanov, Alexander L.; Wamhoff, Brian R.; Hossack, John A.

    2011-01-01

    Microbubble contrast agents have been shown to enhance reagent delivery when activated by ultrasound. We hypothesized that ultrasound would enhance delivery of rapamycin, an antiproliferative agent, from the shell of microbubbles, thus reducing proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells. Our objective was to determine optimal ultrasound parameters that maximized therapeutic efficacy, maintained cell adherence, and minimized the drug exposure time. In vitro assays determined that ultrasound (1 MHz, 0.5% duty cycle) is required to successfully deliver rapamycin from microbubbles and reduce proliferation. Co-injection of rapamycin with control microbubbles did not result in a reduction in proliferation. Successful reduction in proliferation (>50%) required pulses at least 10 cycles in length and at least 300 kPa peak negative pressure at which point 90% of cells remained adherent. The anti-proliferative effect was also localized within a 6mm wide zone by focusing the ultrasound beam. PMID:21549778

  5. Activation of mTOR/p70S6 kinase by ANG II inhibits insulin-stimulated endothelial nitric oxide synthase and vasodilation

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Hyun-Ju; Martinez-Lemus, Luis A.; Sowers, James R.

    2012-01-01

    Elevated tissue levels of angiotensin II (ANG II) are associated with impairment of insulin actions in metabolic and cardiovascular tissues. ANG II-stimulated activation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR)/p70 S6 kinase (p70S6K) in cardiovascular tissues is implicated in cardiac hypertrophy and vascular remodeling. However, the role of ANG II-stimulated mTOR/p70S6K in vascular endothelium is poorly understood. In the present study, we observed that ANG II stimulated p70S6K in bovine aortic endothelial cells. ANG II increased phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1) at Ser636/639 and inhibited the insulin-stimulated phosphorylation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS). An inhibitor of mTOR, rapamycin, attenuated the ANG II-stimulated phosphorylation of p70S6K and phosphorylation of IRS-1 (Ser636/639) and blocked the ability of ANG II to impair insulin-stimulated phosphorylation of eNOS, nitric oxide production, and mesenteric-arteriole vasodilation. Moreover, point mutations of IRS-1 at Ser636/639 to Ala prevented the ANG II-mediated inhibition of insulin signaling. From these results, we conclude that activation of mTOR/p70S6K by ANG II in vascular endothelium may contribute to impairment of insulin-stimulated vasodilation through phosphorylation of IRS-1 at Ser636/639. This ANG II-mediated impairment of vascular actions of insulin may help explain the role of ANG II as a link between insulin resistance and hypertension. PMID:22028412

  6. mTORC1-independent TFEB activation via Akt inhibition promotes cellular clearance in neurodegenerative storage diseases

    PubMed Central

    Palmieri, Michela; Pal, Rituraj; Nelvagal, Hemanth R.; Lotfi, Parisa; Stinnett, Gary R.; Seymour, Michelle L.; Chaudhury, Arindam; Bajaj, Lakshya; Bondar, Vitaliy V.; Bremner, Laura; Saleem, Usama; Tse, Dennis Y.; Sanagasetti, Deepthi; Wu, Samuel M.; Neilson, Joel R.; Pereira, Fred A.; Pautler, Robia G.; Rodney, George G.; Cooper, Jonathan D.; Sardiello, Marco

    2017-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases characterized by aberrant accumulation of undigested cellular components represent unmet medical conditions for which the identification of actionable targets is urgently needed. Here we identify a pharmacologically actionable pathway that controls cellular clearance via Akt modulation of transcription factor EB (TFEB), a master regulator of lysosomal pathways. We show that Akt phosphorylates TFEB at Ser467 and represses TFEB nuclear translocation independently of mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1), a known TFEB inhibitor. The autophagy enhancer trehalose activates TFEB by diminishing Akt activity. Administration of trehalose to a mouse model of Batten disease, a prototypical neurodegenerative disease presenting with intralysosomal storage, enhances clearance of proteolipid aggregates, reduces neuropathology and prolongs survival of diseased mice. Pharmacological inhibition of Akt promotes cellular clearance in cells from patients with a variety of lysosomal diseases, thus suggesting broad applicability of this approach. These findings open new perspectives for the clinical translation of TFEB-mediated enhancement of cellular clearance in neurodegenerative storage diseases. PMID:28165011

  7. Prevention of carcinogen and inflammation-induced dermal cancer by oral rapamycin includes reducing genetic damage.

    PubMed

    Dao, Vinh; Pandeswara, Srilakshmi; Liu, Yang; Hurez, Vincent; Dodds, Sherry; Callaway, Danielle; Liu, Aijie; Hasty, Paul; Sharp, Zelton D; Curiel, Tyler J

    2015-05-01

    Cancer prevention is a cost-effective alternative to treatment. In mice, the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin prevents distinct spontaneous, noninflammatory cancers, making it a candidate broad-spectrum cancer prevention agent. We now show that oral microencapsulated rapamycin (eRapa) prevents skin cancer in dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA)/12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) carcinogen-induced, inflammation-driven carcinogenesis. eRapa given before DMBA/TPA exposure significantly increased tumor latency, reduced papilloma prevalence and numbers, and completely inhibited malignant degeneration into squamous cell carcinoma. Rapamycin is primarily an mTORC1-specific inhibitor, but eRapa did not reduce mTORC1 signaling in skin or papillomas, and did not reduce important proinflammatory factors in this model, including p-Stat3, IL17A, IL23, IL12, IL1β, IL6, or TNFα. In support of lack of mTORC1 inhibition, eRapa did not reduce numbers or proliferation of CD45(-)CD34(+)CD49f(mid) skin cancer initiating stem cells in vivo and marginally reduced epidermal hyperplasia. Interestingly, eRapa reduced DMBA/TPA-induced skin DNA damage and the hras codon 61 mutation that specifically drives carcinogenesis in this model, suggesting reduction of DNA damage as a cancer prevention mechanism. In support, cancer prevention and DNA damage reduction effects were lost when eRapa was given after DMBA-induced DNA damage in vivo. eRapa afforded picomolar concentrations of rapamycin in skin of DMBA/TPA-exposed mice, concentrations that also reduced DMBA-induced DNA damage in mouse and human fibroblasts in vitro. Thus, we have identified DNA damage reduction as a novel mechanism by which rapamycin can prevent cancer, which could lay the foundation for its use as a cancer prevention agent in selected human populations.

  8. Inhibition of existing denitrification enzyme activity by chloramphenicol

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brooks, M.H.; Smith, R.L.; Macalady, D.L.

    1992-01-01

    Chloramphenicol completely inhibited the activity of existing denitrification enzymes in acetylene-block incubations with (i) sediments from a nitrate-contaminated aquifer and (ii) a continuous culture of denitrifying groundwater bacteria. Control flasks with no antibiotic produced significant amounts of nitrous oxide in the same time period. Amendment with chloramphenicol after nitrous oxide production had begun resulted in a significant decrease in the rate of nitrous oxide production. Chloramphenicol also decreased (>50%) the activity of existing denitrification enzymes in pure cultures of Pseudomonas denitrificans that were harvested during log- phase growth and maintained for 2 weeks in a starvation medium lacking electron donor. Short-term time courses of nitrate consumption and nitrous oxide production in the presence of acetylene with P. denitrificans undergoing carbon starvation were performed under optimal conditions designed to mimic denitrification enzyme activity assays used with soils. Time courses were linear for both chloramphenicol and control flasks, and rate estimates for the two treatments were significantly different at the 95% confidence level. Complete or partial inhibition of existing enzyme activity is not consistent with the current understanding of the mode of action of chloramphenicol or current practice, in which the compound is frequently employed to inhibit de novo protein synthesis during the course of microbial activity assays. The results of this study demonstrate that chloramphenicol amendment can inhibit the activity of existing denitrification enzymes and suggest that caution is needed in the design and interpretation of denitrification activity assays in which chloramphenicol is used to prevent new protein synthesis.

  9. Hili inhibits HIV replication in activated T cells.

    PubMed

    Peterlin, B Matija; Liu, Pingyang; Wang, Xiaoyun; Cary, Daniele; Shao, Wei; Leoz, Marie; Hong, Tian; Pan, Tao; Fujinaga, Koh

    2017-03-22

    Piwil proteins restrict the replication of mobile genetic elements in the germline. They are also expressed in many transformed cell lines. In this report, we discovered that the human piwil 2 (hili) can also inhibit HIV replication, especially in activated CD4+ T cells that are the preferred target cells for this virus in the infected host. Although resting cells did not express hili, it was rapidly induced following T cell activation. In these cells and transformed cell lines, depletion of hili increased levels of viral proteins and new viral particles. Further studies revealed that hili binds to tRNA. Some of them represent rare tRNA species, whose codons are over-represented in the viral genome. Targeting tRNA(Arg)(UCU) with an antisense oligonucleotide replicated effects of hili and also inhibited HIV replication. Finally, hili also inhibited the retrotransposition of the endogenous intracysternal A particle (IAP) by a similar mechanism. Thus, hili joins a list of host proteins that inhibit the replication of HIV and other mobile genetic elements.IMPORTANCE Piwil proteins inhibit the movement of mobile genetic elements in the germline. In their absence, sperm does not form and male mice are sterile. This inhibition is thought to occur via small piRNAs. However, in some species and in human somatic cells, piwil proteins bind primarily to tRNA. In this report, we demonstrate that human piwil proteins, especially hili, not only bind to select tRNA species that include rare tRNAs, but also inhibit HIV replication. Importantly, T cell activation induces the expression of hili in CD4+ T cells. Since hili also inhibited the movement of an endogenous retrovirus (IAP), our finding shed new light on this intracellular resistance to exogenous and endogenous retroviruses as well as other mobile genetic elements.

  10. Rapamycin Promotes Mouse 4T1 Tumor Metastasis that Can Be Reversed by a Dendritic Cell-Based Vaccine.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tien-Jen; Liang, Wen-Miin; Hsiao, Pei-Wen; M S, Pradeep; Wei, Wen-Chi; Lin, Hsin-Ting; Yin, Shu-Yi; Yang, Ning-Sun

    2015-01-01

    Suppression of tumor metastasis is a key strategy for successful cancer interventions. Previous studies indicated that rapamycin (sirolimus) may promote tumor regression activity or enhance immune response against tumor targets. However, rapamycin also exhibits immunosuppressant effects and is hence used clinically as an organ transplantation drug. We hypothesized that the immunosuppressive activities of rapamycin might also negatively mediate host immunity, resulting in promotion of tumor metastasis. In this study, the effects of rapamycin and phytochemical shikonin were investigated in vitro and in vivo in a 4T1 mouse mammary tumor model through quantitative assessment of immunogenic cell death (ICD), autophagy, tumor growth and metastasis. Tumor-bearing mice were immunized with test vaccines to monitor their effect on tumor metastasis. We found that intraperitoneal (ip) administration of rapamycin after a tumor-resection surgery drastically increased the metastatic activity of 4T1 tumors. Possible correlation of this finding to human cancers was suggested by epidemiological analysis of data from Taiwan's National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD). Since our previous studies showed that modified tumor cell lysate (TCL)-pulsed, dendritic cell (DC)-based cancer vaccines can effectively suppress metastasis in mouse tumor models, we assessed whether such vaccines may help offset this rapamycin-promoted metastasis. We observed that shikonin efficiently induced ICD of 4T1 cells in culture, and DC vaccines pulsed with shikonin-treated TCL (SK-TCL-DC) significantly suppressed rapamycin-enhanced metastasis and Treg cell expansion in test mice. In conclusion, rapamycin treatment in mice (and perhaps in humans) promotes metastasis and the effect may be offset by treatment with a DC-based cancer vaccine.

  11. Fluoxetine Inhibits NLRP3 Inflammasome Activation: Implication in Depression

    PubMed Central

    Du, Ren-Hong; Tan, Jun; Sun, Xi-Yang; Lu, Ming; Ding, Jian-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Background: Emerging evidence indicates that NLRP3 inflammasome-induced inflammation plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of depression. Thus, inhibition of NLRP3 inflammasome activation may offer a therapeutic benefit in the treatment of depression. Fluoxetine, a widely used antidepressant, has been shown to have potential antiinflammatory activity, but the underlying mechanisms remain obscure. Methods: We used a chronic mild stress model and cultured primary macrophage/microglia to investigate the effects of fluoxetine on NLRP3 inflammasome and its underlying mechanisms. Results: We demonstrated that fluoxetine significantly suppressed NLRP3 inflammasome activation, subsequent caspase-1 cleavage, and interleukin-1β secretion in both peripheral macrophages and central microglia. We further found that fluoxetine reduced reactive oxygen species production, attenuated the phosphorylation of double-stranded RNA-dependent protein kinase, and inhibited the association of protein kinase with NLRP3. These data indicate that fluoxetine inhibits the activation of NLRP3 inflammasome via downregulating reactive oxygen species-protein kinase-NLRP3 signaling pathway. Correspondingly, in vivo data showed that fluoxetine also suppressed NLRP3 inflammasome activation in hippocampus and macrophages of chronic mild stress mice and alleviated chronic mild stress-induced depression-like behavior. Conclusions: Our findings reveal that fluoxetine confers an antidepressant effect partly through inhibition of peripheral and central NLRP3 inflammasome activation and suggest the potential clinical use of fluoxetine in NLRP3 inflammasome-driven inflammatory diseases such as depression. PMID:27207922

  12. Lactate dehydrogenase activity is inhibited by methylmalonate in vitro.

    PubMed

    Saad, Laura O; Mirandola, Sandra R; Maciel, Evelise N; Castilho, Roger F

    2006-04-01

    Methylmalonic acidemia (MMAemia) is an inherited metabolic disorder of branched amino acid and odd-chain fatty acid metabolism, involving a defect in the conversion of methylmalonyl-coenzyme A to succinyl-coenzyme A. Systemic and neurological manifestations in this disease are thought to be associated with the accumulation of methylmalonate (MMA) in tissues and biological fluids with consequent impairment of energy metabolism and oxidative stress. In the present work we studied the effect of MMA and two other inhibitors of mitochondrial respiratory chain complex II (malonate and 3-nitropropionate) on the activity of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) in tissue homogenates from adult rats. MMA potently inhibited LDH-catalyzed conversion of lactate to pyruvate in liver and brain homogenates as well as in a purified bovine heart LDH preparation. LDH was about one order of magnitude less sensitive to inhibition by MMA when catalyzing the conversion of pyruvate to lactate. Kinetic studies on the inhibition of brain LDH indicated that MMA inhibits this enzyme competitively with lactate as a substrate (K (i)=3.02+/-0.59 mM). Malonate and 3-nitropropionate also strongly inhibited LDH-catalyzed conversion of lactate to pyruvate in brain homogenates, while no inhibition was observed by succinate or propionate, when present in concentrations of up to 25 mM. We propose that inhibition of the lactate/pyruvate conversion by MMA contributes to lactate accumulation in blood, metabolic acidemia and inhibition of gluconeogenesis observed in patients with MMAemia. Moreover, the inhibition of LDH in the central nervous system may also impair the lactate shuttle between astrocytes and neurons, compromising neuronal energy metabolism.

  13. Rapamycin targeting mTOR and hedgehog signaling pathways blocks human rhabdomyosarcoma growth in xenograft murine model

    SciTech Connect

    Kaylani, Samer Z.; Xu, Jianmin; Srivastava, Ritesh K.; Kopelovich, Levy; Pressey, Joseph G.; Athar, Mohammad

    2013-06-14

    Graphical abstract: Intervention of poorly differentiated RMS by rapamycin: In poorly differentiated RMS, rapamycin blocks mTOR and Hh signaling pathways concomitantly. This leads to dampening in cell cycle regulation and induction of apoptosis. This study provides a rationale for the therapeutic intervention of poorly differentiated RMS by treating patients with rapamycin alone or in combination with other chemotherapeutic agents. -- Highlights: •Rapamycin abrogates RMS tumor growth by modulating proliferation and apoptosis. •Co-targeting mTOR/Hh pathways underlie the molecular basis of effectiveness. •Reduction in mTOR/Hh pathways diminish EMT leading to reduced invasiveness. -- Abstract: Rhabdomyosarcomas (RMS) represent the most common childhood soft-tissue sarcoma. Over the past few decades outcomes for low and intermediate risk RMS patients have slowly improved while patients with metastatic or relapsed RMS still face a grim prognosis. New chemotherapeutic agents or combinations of chemotherapies have largely failed to improve the outcome. Based on the identification of novel molecular targets, potential therapeutic approaches in RMS may offer a decreased reliance on conventional chemotherapy. Thus, identification of effective therapeutic agents that specifically target relevant pathways may be particularly beneficial for patients with metastatic and refractory RMS. The PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway has been found to be a potentially attractive target in RMS therapy. In this study, we provide evidence that rapamycin (sirolimus) abrogates growth of RMS development in a RMS xenograft mouse model. As compared to a vehicle-treated control group, more than 95% inhibition in tumor growth was observed in mice receiving parenteral administration of rapamycin. The residual tumors in rapamycin-treated group showed significant reduction in the expression of biomarkers indicative of proliferation and tumor invasiveness. These tumors also showed enhanced apoptosis

  14. MTOR inhibition attenuates DNA damage and apoptosis through autophagy-mediated suppression of CREB1.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Hu, Zhongdong; Liu, Zhibo; Chen, Rongrong; Peng, Haiyong; Guo, Jing; Chen, Xinxin; Zhang, Hongbing

    2013-12-01

    Hyperactivation of mechanistic target of rapamycin (MTOR) is a common feature of human cancers, and MTOR inhibitors, such as rapamycin, are thus becoming therapeutics in targeting certain cancers. However, rapamycin has also been found to compromise the efficacy of chemotherapeutics to cells with hyperactive MTOR. Here, we show that loss of TSC2 or PTEN enhanced etoposide-induced DNA damage and apoptosis, which was blunted by suppression of MTOR with either rapamycin or RNA interference. cAMP response element-binding protein 1 (CREB1), a nuclear transcription factor that regulates genes involved in survival and death, was positively regulated by MTOR in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) and cancer cell lines. Silencing Creb1 expression with siRNA protected MTOR-hyperactive cells from DNA damage-induced apoptosis. Furthermore, loss of TSC2 or PTEN impaired either etoposide or nutrient starvation-induced autophagy, which in turn, leads to CREB1 hyperactivation. We further elucidated an inverse correlation between autophagy activity and CREB1 activity in the kidney tumor tissue obtained from a TSC patient and the mouse livers with hepatocyte-specific knockout of PTEN. CREB1 induced DNA damage and subsequent apoptosis in response to etoposide in autophagy-defective cells. Reactivation of CREB1 or inhibition of autophagy not only improved the efficacy of rapamycin but also alleviated MTOR inhibition-mediated chemoresistance. Therefore, autophagy suppression of CREB1 may underlie the MTOR inhibition-mediated chemoresistance. We suggest that inhibition of MTOR in combination with CREB1 activation may be used in the treatment of cancer caused by an abnormal PI3K-PTEN-AKT-TSC1/2-MTOR signaling pathway. CREB1 activators should potentiate the efficacy of chemotherapeutics in treatment of these cancers.

  15. Protein kinase C activators inhibit capillary endothelial cell growth

    SciTech Connect

    Doctrow, S.R.

    1986-05-01

    Phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate (PDBu) binds specifically to bovine capillary endothelial (BCE) cells (K/sub d/ = 8nM) and inhibits the proliferation (K/sub 50/ = 6 +/- 4 nM). Under similar conditions, PDBu does not inhibit the growth of bovine aortic endothelial or smooth muscle cells. PDBu markedly attenuates the response of BCE cells to purified human hepatoma-derived growth factor which, in the absence of PDBu, stimulates BCE cell growth by about 3-fold. Several observations suggest that the inhibition of BCE cell growth by PDBu is mediated by protein kinase C: (1) different phorbol compounds inhibit BCE cell growth according to the relative potencies as protein kinase C activators (12-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate > PDBu >> phorbol 12,13-diacetate >>>..beta..-phorbol; ..cap alpha..-phorbol 12,13-didecanoate). (2) Specific binding of PDBu to BCE cells is displaced by sn-1,2-dioctanoylglycerol (diC/sub 8/), a protein kinase C activator and an analog of the putative second messenger activating this kinase in vivo. The weak protein kinase C activator, sn-1,2-dibutyrylglycerol, does not affect PDBu binding. (3) A cytosolic extract from BCE cells contains a Ca/sup 2 +//phosphatidylserine-dependent kinase that is activated by diC/sub 8/ and PDBu, but not by ..beta..-phorbol. These results support a role for protein kinase C in suppressing capillary endothelial cell growth and may therefore have implications in the intracellular regulation of angiogenesis.

  16. Thrombomodulin inhibits the activation of eosinophils and mast cells.

    PubMed

    Roeen, Ziaurahman; Toda, Masaaki; D'Alessandro-Gabazza, Corina N; Onishi, Masahiro; Kobayashi, Tetsu; Yasuma, Taro; Urawa, Masahito; Taguchi, Osamu; Gabazza, Esteban C

    2015-01-01

    Eosinophils and mast cells play critical roles in the pathogenesis of bronchial asthma. Activation of both cells leads to the release of pro-inflammatory mediators in the airway of asthmatic patients. Recently, we have shown that inhaled thrombomodulin inhibits allergic bronchial asthma in a mouse model. In the present study, we hypothesize that thrombomodulin can inhibit the activation of eosinophils and mast cells. The effect of thrombomodulin on the activation and release of inflammatory mediators from eosinophils and mast cells was evaluated. Thrombomodulin inhibited the eotaxin-induced chemotaxis, upregulation of CD11b and degranulation of eosinophils. Treatment with thrombomodulin also significantly suppressed the degranulation and synthesis of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines in eosinophils and mast cells. Mice treated with a low-dose of inhaled thrombomodulin have decreased number of eosinophils and activated mast cells and Th2 cytokines in the lungs compared to untreated mice. The results of this study suggest that thrombomodulin may modulate allergic responses by inhibiting the activation of both eosinophils and mast cells.

  17. Thyrsiferol Inhibits Mitochondrial Respiration and HIF-1 Activation

    PubMed Central

    Mahdi, Fakhri; Falkenberg, Miriam; Ioannou, Efstathia; Roussis, Vassilios; Zhou, Yu-Dong; Nagle, Dale G.

    2010-01-01

    The cytotoxic marine red algal metabolite thyrsiferol (1) was found to inhibit hypoxia-induced hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) activation in T47D human breast tumor cells (66% inhibition at 3 μM). Compound 1 also suppressed hypoxic induction of HIF-1 target genes (VEGF, GLUT-1) at the mRNA level, and displayed tumor cell line-selective time-dependent inhibition of cell viability/proliferation. Mechanistic studies revealed that 1 selectively suppressed mitochondrial respiration at Complex I (IC50 3 μM). Thyrsiferol represents a prototypical, structurally unique electron transport chain inhibitor. The apparent rotenone-like activity may contribute to the observed cytotoxicity of 1 and play an important role in Laurencia chemical defense. PMID:21785662

  18. Monoacylglycerol Lipase Inhibition Blocks Chronic Stress-Induced Depressive-Like Behaviors via Activation of mTOR Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Peng; Wang, Wei; Pan, Bin; Liu, Xiaojie; Zhang, Zhen; Long, Jonathan Z; Zhang, Han-ting; Cravatt, Benjamin F; Liu, Qing-song

    2014-01-01

    The endocannabinoid (eCB) system regulates mood, emotion, and stress coping, and dysregulation of the eCB system is critically involved in pathophysiology of depression. The eCB ligand 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) is inactivated by monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL). Using chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUS) as a mouse model of depression, we examined how 2-AG signaling in the hippocampus was altered in depressive-like states and how this alteration contributed to depressive-like behavior. We report that CUS led to impairment of depolarization-induced suppression of inhibition (DSI) in mouse hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons, and this deficiency in 2-AG-mediated retrograde synaptic depression was rescued by MAGL inhibitor JZL184. CUS induced depressive-like behaviors and decreased mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) activation in the hippocampus, and these biochemical and behavioral abnormalities were ameliorated by chronic JZL184 treatments. The effects of JZL184 were mediated by cannabinoid CB1 receptors. Genetic deletion of mTOR with adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector carrying the Cre recombinase in the hippocampus of mTORf/f mice recapitulated depressive-like behaviors induced by CUS and abrogated the antidepressant-like effects of chronic JZL184 treatments. Our results suggest that CUS decreases eCB-mTOR signaling in the hippocampus, leading to depressive-like behaviors, whereas MAGL inhibitor JZL184 produces antidepressant-like effects through enhancement of eCB-mTOR signaling. PMID:24476943

  19. Scutellarein Reduces Inflammatory Responses by Inhibiting Src Kinase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Nak Yoon

    2015-01-01

    Flavonoids are plant pigments that have been demonstrated to exert various pharmacological effects including anti-cancer, anti-diabetic, anti-atherosclerotic, anti-bacterial, and anti-inflammatory activities. However, the molecular mechanisms in terms of exact target proteins of flavonoids are not fully elucidated yet. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the anti-inflammatory mechanism of scutellarein (SCT), a flavonoid isolated from Erigeron breviscapus, Clerodendrum phlomidis and Oroxylum indicum Vent that have been traditionally used to treat various inflammatory diseases in China and Brazil. For this purpose, a nitric oxide (NO) assay, polymerase chain reaction (PCR), nuclear fractionation, immunoblot analysis, a kinase assay, and an overexpression strategy were employed. Scutellarein significantly inhibited NO production in a dose-dependent manner and reduced the mRNA expression levels of inducible NO synthase (iNOS) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-activated RAW264.7 cells. In addition, SCT also dampened nuclear factor (NF)-κB-driven expression of a luciferase reporter gene upon transfection of a TIR-domain-containing adapter-inducing interferon-β (TRIF) construct into Human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK 293) cells; similarly, NF-κ B nuclear translocation was inhibited by SCT. Moreover, the phosphorylation levels of various upstream signaling enzymes involved in NF-κB activation were decreased by SCT treatment in LPS-treated RAW264.7 cells. Finally, SCT strongly inhibited Src kinase activity and also inhibited the autophosphorylation of overexpressed Src. Therefore, our data suggest that SCT can block the inflammatory response by directly inhibiting Src kinase activity linked to NF-κB activation. PMID:26330757

  20. Dual effect of metformin on growth inhibition and oestradiol production in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Rice, S; Pellat, L; Ahmetaga, A; Bano, G; Mason, H D; Whitehead, S A

    2015-04-01

    Evidence has been accumulating for a role for metformin in reducing breast cancer risk in post-menopausal women. It inhibits growth of breast cancer cells via several mechanisms, primarily the AMPK/mTOR signalling pathway. Another possible protective mechanism may be the ability of metformin to inhibit aromatase activity. In the present study, we investigated the effects of metformin on the basal growth of MCF-7 cells, after oestradiol (E2) stimulation and after the inhibition of mTOR by rapamycin. Secondly, we investigated the effects of metformin on the activity of a number of steroidogenic enzymes and the mRNA expression of aromatase and steroid sulphatase (STS). High doses of metformin significantly inhibited both basal and oestrogen-stimulated cell division. Low-dose rapamycin (10-10 M) did not inhibit growth, but the addition of metformin induced a significant reduction in growth. High-dose rapamycin (10-8 M) inhibited growth, and this was further attenuated by the addition of metformin. Exposure to low (10-7 M) and high (10-4 M) doses of metformin for 7-10 days significantly reduced the conversion of androstenedione (ANDRO) and testosterone (TESTO) (both requiring aromatase), but not the conversion of oestrone or oestrone sulphate (ES) via 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase/sulphatase to E2. This attenuation was via a downregulation in the expression of total aromatase mRNA and promoter II, whilst the expression of sulphatase was unaffected by metformin. In conclusion, plasma levels of metformin have a dual therapeutic action, first by directly inhibiting cell proliferation which can be augmented by rapamycin analogues, and secondly, by inhibiting aromatase activity and reducing the local conversion of androgens to E2.

  1. Inhibition of catalase activity in vitro by diesel exhaust particles

    SciTech Connect

    Mori, Yoki; Murakami, Sumika; Sagae, Toshiyuki

    1996-02-09

    The effect of diesel exhaust particles (DEP) on the activity of catalase, an intracellular anti-oxidant, was investigated because H{sub 2}O{sub 2} is a cytotoxic oxidant, and catalase released from alveolar cells is an important antioxidant in the epithelial lining fluid in the lung. DEP inhibited the activity of bovine liver catalase dose-dependently, to 25-30% of its original value. The inhibition of catalase by DEP was observed only in the presence of anions such as Cl{sup {minus}}, Br{sup {minus}}, or thiocyanate. Other anions, such as CH{sub 3}COO{sup {minus}} or SO{sub 4}{sup {minus}}, and cations such as K{sup +}, Na{sup +}, Mg{sup 2+}, or Fe{sup 2+}, did not affect the activity of catalase, even in the presence of DEP extract. Catalase from guinea pig alveolar cells and catalase from red blood cells were also inhibited by DEP extracts, as was catalase from bovine liver. These results suggest that DEP taken up in the lung and located on alveolar spaces might cause cell injury by inhibiting the activity of catalase in epithelial lining fluid, enhancing the toxicity of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} generated from cells in addition to that of O{sub 2}{sup {minus}} generated by the chemical reaction of DEP with oxygen. 10 refs., 6 figs.

  2. Cyanate-mediated inhibition of neutrophil myeloperoxidase activity.

    PubMed Central

    Qian, M; Eaton, J W; Wolff, S P

    1997-01-01

    Cyanate (CNO-) forms spontaneously in solutions containing urea, and is present in urine and the body fluids of uraemic patients. We have explored the possibility that CNO- might be one of the unknown substances responsible for the reported impairment, by urine and uraemic plasma, of neutrophil oxidative metabolism (especially as measured by luminol-enhanced chemiluminescence). Luminol-enhanced chemiluminescence generated by human neutrophils derives predominantly from the activity of myeloperoxidase (MPO) which produces hypochlorous acid from H2O2 and Cl-. We hypothesized that CNO- (which resembles the 'pseudohalide' thiocyanate, an alternative substrate for MPO) might somehow interfere with the activity of MPO. In support of this, we find: (i) CNO- inhibits both peroxidative and halogenating activities of MPO and also inhibits the enzyme within intact human neutrophils; (ii) the inhibition is H2O2-dependent, irreversible, accompanied by covalent addition of [14C]CNO- (or a carbon-containing fragment thereof) to the enzyme; (iii) CNO- also inhibits Cl-/H2O2/MPO-mediated bacterial killing. Impairment of this arm of neutrophil bactericidal activity by CNO- formed from urea may be one factor in the risk of urinary-tract infection associated with urinary stasis and perhaps in the generalized increase in susceptibility to infection in uraemic patients. PMID:9337863

  3. Inhibition of catalase activity in vitro by diesel exhaust particles.

    PubMed

    Mori, Y; Murakami, S; Sagae, T; Hayashi, H; Sakata, M; Sagai, M; Kumagai, Y

    1996-02-09

    The effect of diesel exhaust particles (DEP) on the activity of catalase, an intracellular antioxidant, was investigated because H2O2 is a cytotoxic oxidant, and catalase released from alveolar cells is an important antioxidant in the epithelial lining fluid in the lung. DEP inhibited the activity of bovine liver catalase dose-dependently, to 25-30% of its original value. The inhibition of catalase by DEP was observed only in the presence of anions such as Cl-,Br-, or thiocyanate. Other anions, such as CH3COO- or SO4-, and cations such as K+, Na+, Mg2+, or Fe2+, did not affect the activity of catalase, even in the presence of DEP extract. Catalase from guinea pig alveolar cells and catalase from red blood cells were also inhibited by DEP extracts, as was catalase from bovine liver. These results suggest that DEP taken up in the lung and located on alveolar spaces might cause cell injury by inhibiting the activity of catalase in epithelial lining fluid, enhancing the toxicity of H2O2 generated from cells in addition to that of O2- generated by the chemical reaction of DEP with oxygen.

  4. Curcumin directly inhibits the transport activity of GLUT1.

    PubMed

    Gunnink, Leesha K; Alabi, Ola D; Kuiper, Benjamin D; Gunnink, Stephen M; Schuiteman, Sam J; Strohbehn, Lauren E; Hamilton, Kathryn E; Wrobel, Kathryn E; Louters, Larry L

    2016-06-01

    Curcumin, a major ingredient in turmeric, has a long history of medicinal applications in a wide array of maladies including treatment for diabetes and cancer. Seemingly counterintuitive to the documented hypoglycemic effects of curcumin, however, a recent report indicates that curcumin directly inhibits glucose uptake in adipocytes. The major glucose transporter in adipocytes is GLUT4. Therefore, this study investigates the effects of curcumin in cell lines where the major transporter is GLUT1. We report that curcumin has an immediate inhibitory effect on basal glucose uptake in L929 fibroblast cells with a maximum inhibition of 80% achieved at 75 μM curcumin. Curcumin also blocks activation of glucose uptake by azide, glucose deprivation, hydroxylamine, or phenylarsine oxide. Inhibition does not increase with exposure time and the inhibitory effects reverse within an hour. Inhibition does not appear to involve a reaction between curcumin and the thiol side chain of a cysteine residue since neither prior treatment of cells with iodoacetamide nor curcumin with cysteine alters curcumin's inhibitory effects. Curcumin is a mixed inhibitor reducing the Vmax of 2DG transport by about half with little effect on the Km. The inhibitory effects of curcumin are not additive to the effects of cytochalasin B and 75 μM curcumin actually reduces specific cytochalasin B binding by 80%. Taken together, the data suggest that curcumin binds directly to GLUT1 at a site that overlaps with the cytochalasin B binding site and thereby inhibits glucose transport. A direct inhibition of GLUT proteins in intestinal epithelial cells would likely reduce absorption of dietary glucose and contribute to a hypoglycemic effect of curcumin. Also, inhibition of GLUT1 activity might compromise cancer cells that overexpress GLUT1 and be another possible mechanism for the documented anticancer effects of curcumin.

  5. Curcumin directly inhibits the transport activity of GLUT1

    PubMed Central

    Gunnink, Leesha K.; Alabi, Ola D.; Kuiper, Benjamin D.; Gunnink, Stephen M.; Schuiteman, Sam J.; Strohbehn, Lauren E.; Hamilton, Kathryn E.; Wrobel, Kathryn E.; Louters, Larry L.

    2016-01-01

    Curcumin, a major ingredient in turmeric, has a long history of medicinal applications in a wide array of maladies including treatment for diabetes and cancer. Seemingly counterintuitive to the documented hypoglycemic effects of curcumin, however, a recent report indicates that curcumin directly inhibits glucose uptake in adipocytes. The major glucose transporter in adipocytes is GLUT4. Therefore, this study investigates the effects of curcumin in cell lines where the major transporter is GLUT1. We report that curcumin has an immediate inhibitory effect on basal glucose uptake in L929 fibroblast cells with a maximum inhibition of 80% achieved at 75 μM curcumin. Curcumin also blocks activation of glucose uptake by azide, glucose deprivation, hydroxylamine, or phenylarsine oxide. Inhibition does not increase with exposure time and the inhibitory effects reverse within an hour. Inhibition does not appear to involve a reaction between curcumin and the thiol side chain of a cysteine residue since neither prior treatment of cells with iodoacetamide nor curcumin with cysteine alters curcumin’s inhibitory effects. Curcumin is a mixed inhibitor reducing the Vmax of 2DG transport by about half with little effect on the Km. The inhibitory effects of curcumin are not additive to the effects of cytochalasin B and 75 μM curcumin actually reduces specific cytochalasin B binding by 80%. Taken together, the data suggest that curcumin binds directly to GLUT1 at a site that overlaps with the cytochalasin B binding site and thereby inhibits glucose transport. A direct inhibition of GLUT proteins in intestinal epithelial cells would likely reduce absorption of dietary glucose and contribute to a hypoglycemic effect of curcumin. Also, inhibition of GLUT1 activity might compromise cancer cells that overexpress GLUT1 and be another possible mechanism for the documented anticancer effects of curcumin. PMID:27039889

  6. Tac-beta1 inhibits FAK activation and Src signaling.

    PubMed

    Berrier, Allison L; Jones, Christopher W; LaFlamme, Susan E

    2008-03-28

    The binding of integrins to extracellular matrix triggers signals that promote cell spreading. We previously demonstrated that expression of the integrin beta1 cytoplasmic domain in the context of a chimeric transmembrane receptor with the Tac subunit of the interleukin-2 receptor (Tac-beta1) inhibits cell spreading. To study the mechanism whereby Tac-beta1 inhibits cell spreading, we examined the effect of Tac-beta1 on early signaling events following integrin engagement namely FAK and Src signaling. We infected primary fibroblasts with adenoviruses expressing Tac or Tac-beta1 and found that Tac-beta1 prevented FAK activation by inhibiting the phosphorylation of FAK at Tyr-397. In contrast, Src activation was maintained, as phosphorylation of Src at Tyr-419 and Tyr-530 were not responsive to expression of Tac-beta1. Importantly, adhesion-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of the Src substrates p130Cas and paxillin was inhibited, indicating that Src signaling was blocked by Tac-beta1. These Src-dependent signaling events were found to require FAK signaling. Our results suggest that Tac-beta1 inhibits cell spreading, at least in part, by preventing the phosphorylation of FAK at Tyr-397 and the assembly of signaling complexes necessary for phosphorylation of p130Cas and other downstream effectors.

  7. Irregular activity arises as a natural consequence of synaptic inhibition

    SciTech Connect

    Terman, D.; Rubin, J. E.; Diekman, C. O.

    2013-12-15

    Irregular neuronal activity is observed in a variety of brain regions and states. This work illustrates a novel mechanism by which irregular activity naturally emerges in two-cell neuronal networks featuring coupling by synaptic inhibition. We introduce a one-dimensional map that captures the irregular activity occurring in our simulations of conductance-based differential equations and mathematically analyze the instability of fixed points corresponding to synchronous and antiphase spiking for this map. We find that the irregular solutions that arise exhibit expansion, contraction, and folding in phase space, as expected in chaotic dynamics. Our analysis shows that these features are produced from the interplay of synaptic inhibition with sodium, potassium, and leak currents in a conductance-based framework and provides precise conditions on parameters that ensure that irregular activity will occur. In particular, the temporal details of spiking dynamics must be present for a model to exhibit this irregularity mechanism and must be considered analytically to capture these effects.

  8. Cutting edge: inhibition of T cell activation by TIM-2.

    PubMed

    Knickelbein, Jared E; de Souza, Anjali J; Tosti, Richard; Narayan, Preeti; Kane, Lawrence P

    2006-10-15

    T cell Ig and mucin domain protein 2 (TIM-2) has been shown to regulate T cell activation in vitro and T cell-mediated disease in vivo. However, it is still not clear whether TIM-2 acts mainly to augment T cell function or to inhibit it. We have directly examined the function of TIM-2 in murine and human T cell lines. Our results indicate that expression of TIM-2 significantly impairs the induction of NFAT and AP-1 transcriptional reporters by not only TCR ligation but also by the pharmacological stimuli PMA and ionomycin. This does not appear to be due to a general effect on cell viability, and the block in NFAT activation can be bypassed by expression of activated alleles of Ras or calcineurin, or MEK kinase, in the case of AP-1. Thus, our data are consistent with a model whereby TIM-2 inhibits T cell activation.

  9. Rapamycin Eye Drops Suppress Lacrimal Gland Inflammation In a Murine Model of Sjögren's Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Mihir; Edman, Maria C.; Reddy Janga, Srikanth; Yarber, Frances; Meng, Zhen; Klinngam, Wannita; Bushman, Jonathan; Ma, Tao; Liu, Siyu; Louie, Stan; Mehta, Arjun; Ding, Chuanqing; MacKay, J. Andrew; Hamm-Alvarez, Sarah F.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the efficacy of topical rapamycin in treating autoimmune dacryoadenitis in a mouse model of Sjögren's syndrome. Methods We developed rapamycin in a poly(ethylene glycol)-distearoyl phosphatidylethanolamine (PEG-DSPE) micelle formulation to maintain solubility. Rapamycin or PEG-DSPE eye drops (vehicle) were administered in a well-established Sjögren's syndrome disease model, the male nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice, twice daily for 12 weeks starting at 8 weeks of age. Mouse tear fluid was collected and tear Cathepsin S, a putative tear biomarker for Sjögren's syndrome, was measured. Lacrimal glands were retrieved for histological evaluation, and quantitative real-time PCR of genes associated with Sjögren's syndrome pathogenesis. Tear secretion was measured using phenol red threads, and corneal fluorescein staining was used to assess corneal integrity. Results Lymphocytic infiltration of lacrimal glands from rapamycin-treated mice was significantly (P = 0.0001) reduced by 3.8-fold relative to vehicle-treated mice after 12 weeks of treatment. Rapamycin, but not vehicle, treatment increased tear secretion and decreased corneal fluorescein staining after 12 weeks. In rapamycin-treated mice, Cathepsin S activity was significantly reduced by 3.75-fold in tears (P < 0.0001) and 1.68-fold in lacrimal gland lysates (P = 0.003) relative to vehicle-treated mice. Rapamycin significantly altered the expression of several genes linked to Sjögren's syndrome pathogenesis, including major histocompatibility complex II, TNF-α, IFN-γ, and IL-12a, as well as Akt3, an effector of autophagy. Conclusions Our findings suggest that topical rapamycin reduces autoimmune-mediated lacrimal gland inflammation while improving ocular surface integrity and tear secretion, and thus has potential for treating Sjögren's syndrome–associated dry eye. PMID:28122086

  10. Sex-specific Tradeoffs With Growth and Fitness Following Life-span Extension by Rapamycin in an Outcrossing Nematode, Caenorhabditis remanei.

    PubMed

    Lind, Martin I; Zwoinska, Martyna K; Meurling, Sara; Carlsson, Hanne; Maklakov, Alexei A

    2016-07-01

    Rapamycin inhibits the nutrient-sensing TOR pathway and extends life span in a wide range of organisms. Although life-span extension usually differs between the sexes, the reason for this is poorly understood. Because TOR influences growth, rapamycin likely affects life-history traits such as growth and reproduction. Sexes have different life-history strategies, and theory predicts that they will resolve the tradeoffs between growth, reproduction, and life span differently. Specifically, in taxa with female-biased sexual size dimorphism, reduced growth may have smaller effects on male fitness. We investigated the effects of juvenile, adult, or life-long rapamycin treatment on growth, reproduction, life span, and individual fitness in the outcrossing nematode Caenorhabditis remanei Life-long exposure to rapamycin always resulted in the strongest response, whereas postreproductive exposure did not affect life span. Although rapamycin resulted in longer life span and smaller size in males, male individual fitness was not affected. In contrast, size and fitness were negatively affected in females, whereas life span was only extended under high rapamycin concentrations. Our results support the hypothesis that rapamycin affects key life-history traits in a sex-specific manner. We argue that the fitness cost of life-span extension will be sex specific and propose that the smaller sex generally pay less while enjoying stronger life-span increase.

  11. Rapamycin Prolongs the Survival of Corneal Epithelial Cells in Culture

    PubMed Central

    Gidfar, Sanaz; Milani, Farnoud Y.; Milani, Behrad Y.; Shen, Xiang; Eslani, Medi; Putra, Ilham; Huvard, Michael J.; Sagha, Hossein; Djalilian, Ali R.

    2017-01-01

    Rapamycin has previously been shown to have anti-aging effects in cells and organisms. These studies were undertaken to investigate the effects of rapamycin on primary human corneal epithelial cells in vitro. Cell growth and viability were evaluated by bright field microscopy. Cell proliferation and cycle were evaluated by flow cytometry. The expression of differentiation markers was evaluated by quantitative PCR and Western blot. Senescence was evaluated by senescence-associated β-Galactosidase staining and by Western blot analysis of p16. Apoptosis was evaluated by a TUNEL assay. The results demonstrated that primary HCEC treated with rapamycin had lower proliferation but considerably longer survival in vitro. Rapamycin-treated cells maintained a higher capacity to proliferate after removal of rapamycin and expressed more keratin 14, N-Cadherin, DeltaNp63 and ABCG2, and less keratin 12, consistent with their less differentiated state. Rapamycin treated cells demonstrated less senescence by X-β-Gal SA staining and by lower expression of p16. Apoptosis was also lower in the rapamycin treated cells. These results indicate that rapamycin treatment of HCEC prevents the loss of corneal epithelial stem/progenitor cells to replicative senescence and apoptosis. Rapamycin may be a useful additive for ex vivo expansion of corneal epithelial cells. PMID:28054657

  12. N-Formyl-3,4-methylenedioxy-benzylidene-gamma-butyrolaetam, KNK437 induces caspase-3 activation through inhibition of mTORC1 activity in Cos-1 cells.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Hirofumi; Uyama, Takumi; Hayashi, Junko; Watanabe, Akito; Kobayashi, Ken-ichi; Tadokoro, Tadahiro; Yamamoto, Yuji

    2010-04-23

    The mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1: mTOR-raptor interaction) and heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) regulate various cellular processes and are crucial for the progression of many cancers and metabolic diseases. In the recent study, we reported that interaction of Hsp70 with tuberous sclerosis complex 1 (TSC1) regulated apoptosis. This study was designed to elucidate the underlying mechanism in Cos-1 cells. Here, we show that N-formyl-3,4-methylenedioxy-benzylidene-gamma-butyrolaetam (KNK437), which inhibits the expression level of Hsp70, abrogated phosphorylation of mTOR and S6K in response to insulin, and inhibited mTORC1 activity via disruption of an interaction between mTOR and raptor. In addition, KNK437 did not alter TSC1/2 complex formation. Furthermore, KNK437 inhibited the mTOR-raptor interaction on the outer membrane of the mitochondria and triggered caspase-3 activation. A reduction in the level of Hsp70 could result in the inhibition of the mTORC1 signaling pathway, thereby inducing apoptosis.

  13. Growth hormone improves growth retardation induced by rapamycin without blocking its antiproliferative and antiangiogenic effects on rat growth plate.

    PubMed

    Álvarez-García, Óscar; García-López, Enrique; Loredo, Vanessa; Gil-Peña, Helena; Mejía-Gaviria, Natalia; Rodríguez-Suárez, Julián; Ordóñez, Flor Á; Santos, Fernando

    2012-01-01

    Rapamycin, an immunosuppressant agent used in renal transplantation with antitumoral properties, has been reported to impair longitudinal growth in young individuals. As growth hormone (GH) can be used to treat growth retardation in transplanted children, we aimed this study to find out the effect of GH therapy in a model of young rat with growth retardation induced by rapamycin administration. Three groups of 4-week-old rats treated with vehicle (C), daily injections of rapamycin alone (RAPA) or in combination with GH (RGH) at pharmacological doses for 1 week were compared. GH treatment caused a 20% increase in both growth velocity and body length in RGH animals when compared with RAPA group. GH treatment did not increase circulating levels of insulin-like growth factor I, a systemic mediator of GH actions. Instead, GH promoted the maturation and hypertrophy of growth plate chondrocytes, an effect likely related to AKT and ERK1/2 mediated inactivation of GSK3β, increase of glycogen deposits and stabilization of β-catenin. Interestingly, GH did not interfere with the antiproliferative and antiangiogenic activities of rapamycin in the growth plate and did not cause changes in chondrocyte autophagy markers. In summary, these findings indicate that GH administration improves longitudinal growth in rapamycin-treated rats by specifically acting on the process of growth plate chondrocyte hypertrophy but not by counteracting the effects of rapamycin on proliferation and angiogenesis.

  14. Growth Hormone Improves Growth Retardation Induced by Rapamycin without Blocking Its Antiproliferative and Antiangiogenic Effects on Rat Growth Plate

    PubMed Central

    Álvarez-García, Óscar; García-López, Enrique; Loredo, Vanessa; Gil-Peña, Helena; Mejía-Gaviria, Natalia; Rodríguez-Suárez, Julián; Ordóñez, Flor Á.; Santos, Fernando

    2012-01-01

    Rapamycin, an immunosuppressant agent used in renal transplantation with antitumoral properties, has been reported to impair longitudinal growth in young individuals. As growth hormone (GH) can be used to treat growth retardation in transplanted children, we aimed this study to find out the effect of GH therapy in a model of young rat with growth retardation induced by rapamycin administration. Three groups of 4-week-old rats treated with vehicle (C), daily injections of rapamycin alone (RAPA) or in combination with GH (RGH) at pharmacological doses for 1 week were compared. GH treatment caused a 20% increase in both growth velocity and body length in RGH animals when compared with RAPA group. GH treatment did not increase circulating levels of insulin-like growth factor I, a systemic mediator of GH actions. Instead, GH promoted the maturation and hypertrophy of growth plate chondrocytes, an effect likely related to AKT and ERK1/2 mediated inactivation of GSK3β, increase of glycogen deposits and stabilization of β-catenin. Interestingly, GH did not interfere with the antiproliferative and antiangiogenic activities of rapamycin in the growth plate and did not cause changes in chondrocyte autophagy markers. In summary, these findings indicate that GH administration improves longitudinal growth in rapamycin-treated rats by specifically acting on the process of growth plate chondrocyte hypertrophy but not by counteracting the effects of rapamycin on proliferation and angiogenesis. PMID:22493717

  15. Nucleosomes Inhibit Cas9 Endonuclease Activity in Vitro.

    PubMed

    Hinz, John M; Laughery, Marian F; Wyrick, John J

    2015-12-08

    During Cas9 genome editing in eukaryotic cells, the bacterial Cas9 enzyme cleaves DNA targets within chromatin. To understand how chromatin affects Cas9 targeting, we characterized Cas9 activity on nucleosome substrates in vitro. We find that Cas9 endonuclease activity is strongly inhibited when its target site is located within the nucleosome core. In contrast, the nucleosome structure does not affect Cas9 activity at a target site within the adjacent linker DNA. Analysis of target sites that partially overlap with the nucleosome edge indicates that the accessibility of the protospacer-adjacent motif (PAM) is the critical determinant of Cas9 activity on a nucleosome.

  16. Inhibition of thyroid type 1 deiodinase activity by flavonoids.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, A C F; Lisboa, P C; Oliveira, K J; Lima, L P; Barros, I A; Carvalho, D P

    2002-07-01

    Some dietary flavonoids inhibit thyroperoxidase and hepatic deiodinase activity, indicating that these compounds could be classified as anti-thyroid agents. In this study, we evaluated the in vitro effect of various flavonoids on thyroid type 1 iodothyronine deiodinase activity (D1). D1 activity was measured in murine thyroid microsome fractions by the release of 125I from 125I-reverse T3. D1 activity was significantly inhibited by all the flavonoids tested; however, the inhibitory potencies on thyroid D1 activity differed greatly among them. A 50% inhibition of D1 activity (IC(50)) was obtained at 11 microM baicalein, 13 microM quercetin, 17 microM catechin, 55 microM morin, 68 microM rutin, 70 microM fisetin, 72 microM kaempferol and 77 microM biochanin A. Our data reinforce the concept that dietary flavonoids might behave as antithyroid agents, and possibly their chronic consumption could alter thyroid function.

  17. Pyrithione, a zinc ionophore, inhibits NF-kappaB activation.

    PubMed

    Kim, C H; Kim, J H; Moon, S J; Chung, K C; Hsu, C Y; Seo, J T; Ahn, Y S

    1999-06-16

    Pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC) suppresses NF-kappaB activity and exhibits cytotoxic effects in bovine cerebral endothelial cells (BCECs), and we have previously reported that these PDTC effects were accompanied by an increase in intracellular zinc levels. To further explore the role of zinc in the modulation of NF-kappaB activation, we studied the effect of pyrithione, a zinc ionophore, on NF-kappaB activation in BCECs. Pyrithione inhibited NF-kappaB activity in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Ca-EDTA, but not Zn-EDTA, prevented pyrithione inhibition of NF-kappaB activity. Pyrithione increased the intracellular zinc level within 15 min. This effect was also abolished by Ca-EDTA, but not by Zn-EDTA. The potency of pyrithione on NF-kappaB inhibition and zinc influx was approximately one order of magnitude more potent than PDTC. These findings establish the regulatory role of intracellular zinc levels on NF-kappaB activity in BCECs.

  18. Strenuous physical exercise inhibits granulocyte activation induced by high altitude.

    PubMed

    Choukèr, Alexander; Demetz, Florian; Martignoni, André; Smith, Leslie; Setzer, Florian; Bauer, Andreas; Hölzl, Joseph; Peter, Klaus; Christ, Frank; Thiel, Manfred

    2005-02-01

    To test the hypothesis of whether strenuous physical exercise inhibits neutrophils that can get activated by hypobaric hypoxia, we analyzed the effects of both high altitude and strenuous exercise alone and in combination on potentially cytotoxic functions of granulocytes in healthy volunteers (n = 12 men; average age 27.6 yr; range 24-38 yr). To this end, a field study was prospectively performed with an open-labeled within-subject design comprising three protocols. Protocol I (high altitude) involved a helicopter ascent, overnight stay at 3,196 m, and descent on the following day. Protocol II (physical exercise) involved hiking below an altitude of 2,100 m with repetitive ascents amounting to a total ascent to that of protocol III. Protocol III (combination of physical exercise and high altitude) involved climbing from 1,416 to 3,196 m, stay overnight, and descent on the following day. In protocol I, number of granulocytes did not change, but potentially cytotoxic functions of cells (CD18 expression and superoxide production) were early and significantly upregulated. In protocol II, subjects developed granulocytosis, but functions of cells were inhibited. In protocol III, granulocytosis occurred at higher values than those observed under protocol II. Potentially cytotoxic functions of cells, however, were strongly inhibited again. In conclusion, high altitude alone, even moderate in extent, can activate potentially cytotoxic functions of circulating granulocytes. Strenuous physical exercise strongly inhibits this activation, which may give protection from an otherwise inflammatory injury.

  19. Metformin-induced inhibition of the mitochondrial respiratory chain increases FGF21 expression via ATF4 activation

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Kook Hwan; Jeong, Yeon Taek; Kim, Seong Hun; Jung, Hye Seung; Park, Kyong Soo; Lee, Hae-Youn; Lee, Myung-Shik

    2013-10-11

    Highlights: •Metformin induces FGF21 expression in an AMPK independent manner. •Metformin enhances FGF21 expression by inhibiting mitochondrial complex I activity. •The PERK-eIF2α-ATF4 axis is required for metformin-induced FGF21 expression. •Metformin activates the ATF4-FGF21 axis in the liver of mouse. •Metformin increases serum FGF21 level in diabetic human subjects. -- Abstract: Fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) is an endocrine hormone that exhibits anti-obesity and anti-diabetes effects. Because metformin is widely used as a glucose-lowering agent in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D), we investigated whether metformin modulates FGF21 expression in cell lines, and in mice or human subjects. We found that metformin increased the expression and release of FGF21 in a diverse set of cell types, including rat hepatoma FaO, primary mouse hepatocytes, and mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs). Intriguingly, AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) was dispensable for the induction of FGF21 by metformin. Mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα), which are additional targets of metformin, were not involved in metformin-induced FGF21 expression. Importantly, inhibition of mitochondrial complex I activity by metformin resulted in FGF21 induction through PKR-like ER kinase (PERK)-eukaryotic translation factor 2α (eIF2α)-activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4). We showed that metformin activated ATF4 and increased FGF21 expression in the livers of mice, which led to increased serum levels of FGF21. We also found that serum FGF21 level was increased in human subjects with T2D after metformin therapy for 6 months. In conclusion, our results indicate that metformin induced expression of FGF21 through an ATF4-dependent mechanism by inhibiting mitochondrial respiration independently of AMPK. Therefore, FGF21 induction by metformin might explain a portion of the beneficial metabolic effects of metformin.

  20. Linalool inhibits cigarette smoke-induced lung inflammation by inhibiting NF-κB activation.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jianqun; Xu, Hai; Wu, Jun; Qu, Changfa; Sun, Fenglin; Xu, Shidong

    2015-12-01

    Linalool, a natural compound that exists in the essential oils of several aromatic plants species, has been reported to have anti-inflammatory effects. However, the effects of linalool on cigarette smoke (CS)-induced acute lung inflammation have not been reported. In the present study, we investigated the protective effects of linalool on CS-induced acute lung inflammation in mice. Linalool was given i.p. to mice 2h before CS exposure daily for five consecutive days. The numbers of macrophages and neutrophils in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were measured. The production of TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1β, IL-8 and MCP-1 were detected by ELISA. The expression of NF-κB was detected by Western blotting. Our results showed that treatment of linalool significantly attenuated CS-induced lung inflammation, coupled with inhibited the infiltration of inflammatory cells and TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1β, IL-8 and MCP-1 production. Meanwhile, treatment of linalool inhibited CS-induced lung MPO activity and pathological changes. Furthermore, linalool suppressed CS-induced NF-κB activation in a dose-dependent manner. In conclusion, our results demonstrated that linalool protected against CS-induced lung inflammation through inhibiting CS-induced NF-κB activation.

  1. Microglia-inhibiting activity of Parkinson's disease drug amantadine.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jong-Heon; Lee, Ho-Won; Hwang, Jaegyu; Kim, Jaehong; Lee, Min-Jeong; Han, Hyung-Soo; Lee, Won-Ha; Suk, Kyoungho

    2012-09-01

    Amantadine is currently used as an antiviral and an antiparkinsonian drug. Although the drug is known to bind a viral proton channel protein, the mechanism of action in Parkinson's disease (PD) remains to be determined. This study investigated whether the drug has an inhibitory effect on microglial activation and neuroinflammation, which have been implicated in the progression of neurodegenerative processes. Using cultured microglial cells, it was demonstrated that the drug inhibited inflammatory activation of microglia and a signaling pathway that governs the microglial activation. The drug reduced the expression and production of proinflammatory mediators in bacterial lipopolysaccharide-stimulated microglia cells. The microglia-inhibiting activity of amantadine was also demonstrated in a microglia/neuron coculture and animal models of neuroinflammation and Parkinson's disease. Collectively, our results suggest that amantadine may act on microglia in the central nervous system to inhibit their inflammatory activation, thereby attenuating neuroinflammation. These results provide a molecular basis of the glia-targeted mechanism of action for amantadine.

  2. The antileishmanial activity of xanthohumol is mediated by mitochondrial inhibition.

    PubMed

    Monzote, Lianet; Lackova, Alexandra; Staniek, Katrin; Steinbauer, Silvia; Pichler, Gerald; Jäger, Walter; Gille, Lars

    2016-12-12

    Xanthohumol (Xan) is a natural constituent of human nutrition. Little is known about its actions on leishmanial parasites and their mitochondria as putative target. Therefore, we determined the antileishmanial activity of Xan and resveratrol (Res, as alternative compound with antileishmanial activity) with respect to mitochondria in Leishmania amazonensis promastigotes/amastigotes (LaP/LaA) in comparison with their activity in peritoneal macrophages from mouse (PMM) and macrophage cell line J774A.1 (J774). Mechanistic studies were conducted in Leishmania tarentolae promastigotes (LtP) and mitochondrial fractions isolated from LtP. Xan and Res demonstrated antileishmanial activity in LaA [half inhibitory concentration (IC50): Xan 7 µ m, Res 14 µ m]; while they had less influence on the viability of PMM (IC50: Xan 70 µ m, Res >438 µ m). In contrast to Res, Xan strongly inhibited oxygen consumption in Leishmania (LtP) but not in J774 cells. This was based on the inhibition of the mitochondrial electron transfer complex II/III by Xan, which was less pronounced with Res. Neither Xan nor Res increased mitochondrial superoxide release in LtP, while both decreased the mitochondrial membrane potential in LtP. Bioenergetic studies showed that LtP mitochondria have no spare respiratory capacity in contrast to mitochondria in J774 cells and can therefore much less adapt to stress by mitochondrial inhibitors, such as Xan. These data show that Xan may have antileishmanial activity, which is mediated by mitochondrial inhibition.

  3. Chlorhexidine inhibits the activity of dental cysteine cathepsins.

    PubMed

    Scaffa, P M C; Vidal, C M P; Barros, N; Gesteira, T F; Carmona, A K; Breschi, L; Pashley, D H; Tjäderhane, L; Tersariol, I L S; Nascimento, F D; Carrilho, M R

    2012-04-01

    The co-expression of MMPs and cysteine cathepsins in the human dentin-pulp complex indicates that both classes of enzymes can contribute to the endogenous proteolytic activity of dentin. Chlorhexidine (CHX) is an efficient inhibitor of MMP activity. This study investigated whether CHX could also inhibit cysteine cathepsins present in dentin. The inhibitory profile of CHX on the activity of dentin-extracted and recombinant cysteine cathepsins (B, K, and L) was monitored in fluorogenic substrates. The rate of substrate hydrolysis was spectrofluorimetrically measured, and inhibitory constants were calculated. Molecular docking was performed to predict the binding affinity between CHX and cysteine cathepsins. The results showed that CHX inhibited the proteolytic activity of dentin-extracted cysteine cathepsins in a dose-dependent manner. The proteolytic activity of human recombinant cathepsins was also inhibited by CHX. Molecular docking analysis suggested that CHX strongly interacts with the subsites S2 to S2' of cysteine cathepsins B, K, and L in a very similar manner. Taken together, these results clearly showed that CHX is a potent inhibitor of the cysteine cathepsins-proteolytic enzymes present in the dentin-pulp complex.

  4. Sesquiterpenes inhibiting the microglial activation from Laurus nobilis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hongqiang; Xie, Chunfeng; Wang, Hao; Jin, Da-Qing; Li, Shen; Wang, Meicheng; Ren, Quanhui; Xu, Jing; Ohizumi, Yasushi; Guo, Yuanqiang

    2014-05-21

    The inhibitory reagents to inhibit the activation of microglial cells may be potentially useful for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. The leaves of the plant Laurus nobilis belonging to the family Lauraceae, namely, bay leaves, have been used as a popular spice, and their extract showed moderate inhibition on microglial activation. A further phytochemical investigation of the leaves led to the isolation of two new (1, 2) and eight known (3-10) sesquiterpenes. Their structures were elucidated on the basis of extensive 1D and 2D NMR (HMQC, HMBC, (1)H-(1)H COSY, and NOESY) spectroscopic data analyses and Chem3D modeling. The following biological studies disclosed that these isolated compounds showed inhibitory activities on LPS-induced microglial activation. The results of our phytochemical investigation, including two new sesquiterpenes (1 and 2) and the first report of two compounds (3 and 4) from this species, further revealed the chemical composition of bay leaves as a popular spice, and the biological studies implied that bay leaves, containing bioactive substances with the inhibition of microglial activation, were potentially beneficial to human health.

  5. Rapamycin suppresses mossy fiber sprouting but not seizure frequency in a mouse model of temporal lobe epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Buckmaster, Paul S.; Lew, Felicia H.

    2011-01-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy is prevalent and can be difficult to treat effectively. Granule cell axon (mossy fiber) sprouting is a common neuropathological finding in patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy, but its role in epileptogenesis is unclear and controversial. Focally infused or systemic rapamycin inhibits the mTOR signaling pathway and suppresses mossy fiber sprouting in rats. We tested whether long-term systemic treatment with rapamycin, beginning one day after pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus in mice, would suppress mossy fiber sprouting and affect the development of spontaneous seizures. Mice that had experienced status epilepticus and then were treated for 2 months with rapamycin displayed significantly less mossy fiber sprouting (42% of vehicle-treated animals), and the effect was dose dependent. However, behavioral and video/EEG monitoring revealed that rapamycin- and vehicle-treated mice displayed spontaneous seizures at similar frequencies. These findings suggest mossy fiber sprouting is neither pro- nor anti-convulsant; however, there are caveats. Rapamycin treatment also reduced epilepsy-related hypertrophy of the dentate gyrus but did not significantly affect granule cell proliferation, hilar neuron loss, or generation of ectopic granule cells. These findings are consistent with the hypotheses that hilar neuron loss and ectopic granule cells might contribute to temporal lobe epileptogenesis. PMID:21307269

  6. On the role of phosphatidylethanolamine in the inhibition of activated protein C activity by antiphospholipid antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Smirnov, M D; Triplett, D T; Comp, P C; Esmon, N L; Esmon, C T

    1995-01-01

    Phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) is an important membrane component for supporting activated protein C anticoagulant activity but has little influence on prothrombin activation. This difference constitutes a potential mechanism for selective inhibition of the protein C anticoagulant pathway by lupus anticoagulants and/or antiphospholipid antibodies. In this study, we demonstrate that the presence of PE augments lupus anticoagulant activity. In the plasma of some patients with lupus anticoagulants, activated protein C anticoagulant activity is more potently inhibited than prothrombin activation. As a result, in the presence of activated protein C and PE, these patient plasmas clot faster than normal plasma. Patients with minimal lupus anticoagulant activity are identified whose plasma potently inhibits activated protein C anticoagulant activity. This process is also PE dependent. In three patient plasmas, these phenomena are shown to be due to immunoglobulins. The PE requirement in the expression of activated protein C anticoagulant activity and the PE dependence of some antiphospholipid antibodies provide a mechanistic basis for the selective inhibition of the protein C pathway. Inhibition of activated protein C function may be a common mechanism contributing to increased thrombotic risk in certain patients with antiphospholipid antibodies. PMID:7814631

  7. Tiagabine Protects Dopaminergic Neurons against Neurotoxins by Inhibiting Microglial Activation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jie; Huang, Dongping; Xu, Jing; Tong, Jiabin; Wang, Zishan; Huang, Li; Yang, Yufang; Bai, Xiaochen; Wang, Pan; Suo, Haiyun; Ma, Yuanyuan; Yu, Mei; Fei, Jian; Huang, Fang

    2015-01-01

    Microglial activation and inflammation are associated with progressive neuronal apoptosis in neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson’s disease (PD). γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA), the major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system, has recently been shown to play an inhibitory role in the immune system. Tiagabine, a piperidine derivative, enhances GABAergic transmission by inhibiting GABA transporter 1 (GAT 1). In the present study, we found that tiagabine pretreatment attenuated microglial activation, provided partial protection to the nigrostriatal axis and improved motor deficits in a methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) mouse model of PD. The protective function of tiagabine was abolished in GAT 1 knockout mice that were challenged with MPTP. In an alternative PD model, induced by intranigral infusion of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), microglial suppression and subsequent neuroprotective effects of tiagabine were demonstrated. Furthermore, the LPS-induced inflammatory activation of BV-2 microglial cells and the toxicity of conditioned medium toward SH-SY5Y cells were inhibited by pretreatment with GABAergic drugs. The attenuation of the nuclear translocation of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) and the inhibition of the generation of inflammatory mediators were the underlying mechanisms. Our results suggest that tiagabine acts as a brake for nigrostriatal microglial activation and that it might be a novel therapeutic approach for PD. PMID:26499517

  8. Luteolin, a flavonoid, inhibits AP-1 activation by basophils

    SciTech Connect

    Hirano, Toru; Higa, Shinji; Arimitsu, Junsuke; Naka, Tetsuji; Ogata, Atsushi; Shima, Yoshihito; Fujimoto, Minoru; Yamadori, Tomoki; Ohkawara, Tomoharu; Kuwabara, Yusuke; Kawai, Mari; Matsuda, Hisashi; Yoshikawa, Masayuki; Maezaki, Naoyoshi; Tanaka, Tetsuaki; Kawase, Ichiro; Tanaka, Toshio . E-mail: ttanak@imed3.med.osaka-u.ac.jp

    2006-02-03

    Flavonoids including luteolin, apigenin, and fisetin are inhibitors of IL-4 synthesis and CD40 ligand expression by basophils. This study was done to search for compounds with greater inhibitory activity of IL-4 expression and to clarify the molecular mechanisms through which flavonoids inhibit their expression. Of the 37 flavonoids and related compounds examined, ayanin, luteolin, and apigenin were the strongest inhibitors of IL-4 production by purified basophils in response to anti-IgE antibody plus IL-3. Luteolin did not suppress Syk or Lyn phosphorylation in basophils, nor did suppress p54/46 SAPK/JNK, p38 MAPK, and p44/42 MAPK activation by a basophilic cell line, KU812 cells, stimulated with A23187 and PMA. However, luteolin did inhibit phosphorylation of c-Jun and DNA binding activity of AP-1 in nuclear lysates from stimulated KU812 cells. These results provide a fundamental structure of flavonoids for IL-4 inhibition and demonstrate a novel action of flavonoids that suppresses the activation of AP-1.

  9. Immune complexes inhibit interleukin-1 secretion and inflammasome activation

    PubMed Central

    Janczy, John R.; Ciraci, Ceren; Haasken, Stefanie; Iwakura, Yoichiro; Olivier, Alicia K.; Cassel, Suzanne L.; Sutterwala, Fayyaz S.

    2014-01-01

    Immunoglobulin G (IgG) immune complexes have been shown to modify immune responses driven by antigen presenting cells in either a pro- or anti-inflammatory direction depending upon the context of stimulation. However, the ability of immune complexes to modulate the inflammasome-dependent innate immune response is unknown. Here we show that IgG immune complexes suppress IL-1α and IL-1β secretion through inhibition of inflammasome activation. The mechanism by which this inhibition occurs is via immune complex ligation of activating Fcγ receptors (FcγR), resulting in prevention of both activation and assembly of the inflammasome complex in response to NLRP3, NLRC4, or AIM2 agonists. In vivo, administration of antigen in the form of an immune complex during priming of the immune response inhibited resultant adaptive immune responses in a NLRP3 dependent model of allergic airway disease. Our data reveal an unexpected mechanism regulating CD4+ T cell differentiation, whereby immune complexes suppress inflammasome activation and the generation of IL-1α and IL-1β from antigen presenting cells, which are critical for the antigen-driven differentiation of CD4+ T cells. PMID:25320279

  10. Tiagabine Protects Dopaminergic Neurons against Neurotoxins by Inhibiting Microglial Activation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jie; Huang, Dongping; Xu, Jing; Tong, Jiabin; Wang, Zishan; Huang, Li; Yang, Yufang; Bai, Xiaochen; Wang, Pan; Suo, Haiyun; Ma, Yuanyuan; Yu, Mei; Fei, Jian; Huang, Fang

    2015-10-26

    Microglial activation and inflammation are associated with progressive neuronal apoptosis in neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson's disease (PD). γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA), the major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system, has recently been shown to play an inhibitory role in the immune system. Tiagabine, a piperidine derivative, enhances GABAergic transmission by inhibiting GABA transporter 1 (GAT 1). In the present study, we found that tiagabine pretreatment attenuated microglial activation, provided partial protection to the nigrostriatal axis and improved motor deficits in a methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) mouse model of PD. The protective function of tiagabine was abolished in GAT 1 knockout mice that were challenged with MPTP. In an alternative PD model, induced by intranigral infusion of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), microglial suppression and subsequent neuroprotective effects of tiagabine were demonstrated. Furthermore, the LPS-induced inflammatory activation of BV-2 microglial cells and the toxicity of conditioned medium toward SH-SY5Y cells were inhibited by pretreatment with GABAergic drugs. The attenuation of the nuclear translocation of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) and the inhibition of the generation of inflammatory mediators were the underlying mechanisms. Our results suggest that tiagabine acts as a brake for nigrostriatal microglial activation and that it might be a novel therapeutic approach for PD.

  11. Immune complexes inhibit IL-1 secretion and inflammasome activation.

    PubMed

    Janczy, John R; Ciraci, Ceren; Haasken, Stefanie; Iwakura, Yoichiro; Olivier, Alicia K; Cassel, Suzanne L; Sutterwala, Fayyaz S

    2014-11-15

    IgG immune complexes have been shown to modify immune responses driven by APCs in either a pro- or anti-inflammatory direction depending upon the context of stimulation. However, the ability of immune complexes to modulate the inflammasome-dependent innate immune response is unknown. In this study, we show that IgG immune complexes suppress IL-1α and IL-1β secretion through inhibition of inflammasome activation. The mechanism by which this inhibition occurs is via immune complex ligation of activating FcγRs, resulting in prevention of both activation and assembly of the inflammasome complex in response to nucleotide-binding domain leucine-rich repeat (NLR) P3, NLRC4, or AIM2 agonists. In vivo, administration of Ag in the form of an immune complex during priming of the immune response inhibited resultant adaptive immune responses in an NLRP3-dependent model of allergic airway disease. Our data reveal an unexpected mechanism regulating CD4(+) T cell differentiation, by which immune complexes suppress inflammasome activation and the generation of IL-1α and IL-1β from APCs, which are critical for the Ag-driven differentiation of CD4(+) T cells.

  12. Complement activity and pharmacological inhibition in cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Théroux, Pierre; Martel, Catherine

    2006-01-01

    While complement is the most important component of humoral autoimmunity, and inflammation plays a key role in atherosclerosis, relatively few studies have looked at complement implications in atherosclerosis and its complications. C-reactive protein is a marker of inflammation and is also involved in atherosclerosis; it activates complement and colocalizes with activated complement proteins within the infarcting myocardium and the active atherosclerotic plaques. As new agents capable of modulating complement activity are being developed, new targets for the management of atherosclerosis are emerging that are related to autoimmunity and inflammation. The present paper reviews the putative roles of the various complement activation pathways in the development of atherosclerosis, in ST segment elevation and non-ST segment elevation acute coronary syndromes, and in coronary artery bypass graft surgery. It also provides a perspective on new therapeutic interventions being developed to modulate complement activity. These interventions include the C1 esterase inhibitor, which may be consumed in some inflammatory states resulting in the loss of one of the mechanisms inhibiting activation of the classical and lectin pathways; TP10, a recombinant protein of the soluble complement receptor type 1 (sCR1) which inhibits the C3 and C5 convertases of the common pathway by binding C3b and C4b; a truncated version of the soluble complement receptor type 1 CRI lacking the C4b binding site which selectively inhibits the alternative pathway; and pexelizumab, a monoclonal antibody selectively blocking C5 to prevent the activation of the terminal pathway that is involved in excessive inflammation and autoimmune responses. PMID:16498508

  13. BK Polyomavirus Replication in Renal Tubular Epithelial Cells Is Inhibited by Sirolimus, but Activated by Tacrolimus Through a Pathway Involving FKBP-12.

    PubMed

    Hirsch, H H; Yakhontova, K; Lu, M; Manzetti, J

    2016-03-01

    BK polyomavirus (BKPyV) replication causes nephropathy and premature kidney transplant failure. Insufficient BKPyV-specific T cell control is regarded as a key mechanism, but direct effects of immunosuppressive drugs on BKPyV replication might play an additional role. We compared the effects of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR)- and calcineurin-inhibitors on BKPyV replication in primary human renal tubular epithelial cells. Sirolimus impaired BKPyV replication with a 90% inhibitory concentration of 4 ng/mL by interfering with mTOR-SP6-kinase activation. Sirolimus inhibition was rapid and effective up to 24 h postinfection during viral early gene expression, but not thereafter, during viral late gene expression. The mTORC-1 kinase inhibitor torin-1 showed a similar inhibition profile, supporting the notion that early steps of BKPyV replication depend on mTOR activity. Cyclosporine A also inhibited BKPyV replication, while tacrolimus activated BKPyV replication and reversed sirolimus inhibition. FK binding protein 12kda (FKBP-12) siRNA knockdown abrogated sirolimus inhibition and increased BKPyV replication similar to adding tacrolimus. Thus, sirolimus and tacrolimus exert opposite effects on BKPyV replication in renal tubular epithelial cells by a mechanism involving FKBP-12 as common target. Immunosuppressive drugs may therefore contribute directly to the risk of BKPyV replication and nephropathy besides suppressing T cell functions. The data provide rationales for clinical trials aiming at reducing the risk of BKPyV replication and disease in kidney transplantation.

  14. BK Polyomavirus Replication in Renal Tubular Epithelial Cells Is Inhibited by Sirolimus, but Activated by Tacrolimus Through a Pathway Involving FKBP‐12

    PubMed Central

    Yakhontova, K.; Lu, M.; Manzetti, J.

    2015-01-01

    BK polyomavirus (BKPyV) replication causes nephropathy and premature kidney transplant failure. Insufficient BKPyV‐specific T cell control is regarded as a key mechanism, but direct effects of immunosuppressive drugs on BKPyV replication might play an additional role. We compared the effects of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR)‐ and calcineurin‐inhibitors on BKPyV replication in primary human renal tubular epithelial cells. Sirolimus impaired BKPyV replication with a 90% inhibitory concentration of 4 ng/mL by interfering with mTOR–SP6‐kinase activation. Sirolimus inhibition was rapid and effective up to 24 h postinfection during viral early gene expression, but not thereafter, during viral late gene expression. The mTORC‐1 kinase inhibitor torin‐1 showed a similar inhibition profile, supporting the notion that early steps of BKPyV replication depend on mTOR activity. Cyclosporine A also inhibited BKPyV replication, while tacrolimus activated BKPyV replication and reversed sirolimus inhibition. FK binding protein 12kda (FKBP‐12) siRNA knockdown abrogated sirolimus inhibition and increased BKPyV replication similar to adding tacrolimus. Thus, sirolimus and tacrolimus exert opposite effects on BKPyV replication in renal tubular epithelial cells by a mechanism involving FKBP‐12 as common target. Immunosuppressive drugs may therefore contribute directly to the risk of BKPyV replication and nephropathy besides suppressing T cell functions. The data provide rationales for clinical trials aiming at reducing the risk of BKPyV replication and disease in kidney transplantation. PMID:26639422

  15. Disruption of Parallel and Converging Signaling Pathways Contributes to the Synergistic Antitumor Effects of Simultaneous mTOR and EGFR Inhibition in GBM Cells1

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Ravi D; Mladek, Ann C; Lamont, Jeffrey D; Goble, Jennie M; Erlichman, Charles; James, C David; Sarkaria, Jann N

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Elevated epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling are known to contribute to the malignant properties of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), which include uncontrolled cell proliferation and evasion of apoptosis. Small molecule inhibitors that target these protein kinases have been evaluated in multiple clinical trials for cancer patients, including those with GBM. Here we have examined the cellular and molecular effects of a combined kinase inhibition of mTOR (rapamycin) and EGFR (EKI-785) in U87 and U251 GBM cells. Simultaneous treatment with rapamycin and EKI-785 results in synergistic antiproliferative as well as proapoptotic effects. At a molecular level, rapamycin alone significantly decreases S6 phosphorylation, whereas EKI-785 alone promotes substantially reduced signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT3) phosphorylation. Treatment with rapamycin alone also increases Akt phosphorylation on Ser-473, but this effect is blocked by a simultaneous administration of EKI-785. Individually, EKI-785 diminishes while rapamycin promotes the binding of the translation inhibitor eukaryotic initiation factor 4E binding protein (4EBP1) to the eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E (eIF4E). In spite of these opposing effects, the highest level of 4EBP1-eIF4E binding occurs with the combination of the two inhibitors. These results indicate that the inhibition of EGFR and mTOR has distinct as well as common signaling consequences and provides a molecular rationale for the synergistic antitumor effects of EKI-785 and rapamycin administration. PMID:16242075

  16. Some heterocyclic thione derivatives exhibit anticoccidial activity by inhibiting glycosidases.

    PubMed

    Balbaa, Mahmoud; Abd El-Hady, Neama; Taha, Nabil; El Ashry, El Sayed H

    2012-01-01

    Coccidiosis is one of the most common parasitic diseases affecting many species of domestic animals. This disease has a major economic significance and the search for new compounds having anticoccidial activity is of great importance. In this article, different levels of protection from coccidian infection by Eimeria stiedae were developed in rabbits by treatment with compounds incorporating the skeleton of thiourea. These compounds include 4,5-diphenylimidazole-2-thione (1), 4,5-Diphenyl-1,2,4-triazole-3-thiol (2) and 5-(2-Hydroxyphenyl)-4-phenyl-1,2,4-triazole-3-thiol (3) compared to the anticoccidial drug toltrazuril as a reference compound. Compounds 1-3 inhibit coccidiosis-induced activity of α-glucosidase. The protection from coccidial infection by compound 1 was higher than that shown for compounds 2 and 3. These data suggest that diazole and triazole thione derivatives have a mimetic effect for anticoccidial drugs through their inhibition of glycosidases.

  17. Spillover-mediated feedforward-inhibition functionally segregates interneuron activity

    PubMed Central

    Coddington, Luke T.; Rudolph, Stephanie; Lune, Patrick Vande; Overstreet-Wadiche, Linda; Wadiche, Jacques I.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Neurotransmitter spillover represents a form of neural transmission not restricted to morphologically defined synaptic connections. Communication between climbing fibers (CFs) and molecular layer interneurons (MLIs) in the cerebellum is mediated exclusively by glutamate spillover. Here, we show how CF stimulation functionally segregates MLIs based on their location relative to glutamate release. Excitation of MLIs that reside within the domain of spillover diffusion coordinates inhibition of MLIs outside the diffusion limit. CF excitation of MLIs is dependent on extrasynaptic NMDA receptors that enhance the spatial and temporal spread of CF signaling. Activity mediated by functionally segregated MLIs converges onto neighboring Purkinje cells (PCs) to generate a long-lasting biphasic change in inhibition. These data demonstrate how glutamate release from single CFs modulates excitability of neighboring PCs, thus expanding the influence of CFs on cerebellar cortical activity in a manner not predicted by anatomical connectivity. PMID:23707614

  18. Emergent patterns from probabilistic generalizations of lateral activation and inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Kabla, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    The combination of laterally activating and inhibiting feedbacks is well known to spontaneously generate spatial organization. It was introduced by Gierer and Meinhardt as an extension of Turing's great insight that two reacting and diffusing chemicals can spontaneously drive spatial morphogenesis per se. In this study, we develop an accessible nonlinear and discrete probabilistic model to study simple generalizations of lateral activation and inhibition. By doing so, we identify a range of modes of morphogenesis beyond the familiar Turing-type modes; notably, beyond stripes, hexagonal nets, pores and labyrinths, we identify labyrinthine highways, Kagome lattices, gyrating labyrinths and multi-colour travelling waves and spirals. The results are discussed within the context of Turing's original motivating interest: the mechanisms which underpin the morphogenesis of living organisms. PMID:27170648

  19. Rapamycin improves lymphoproliferative disease in murine autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS).

    PubMed

    Teachey, David T; Obzut, Dana A; Axsom, Kelly; Choi, John K; Goldsmith, Kelly C; Hall, Junior; Hulitt, Jessica; Manno, Catherine S; Maris, John M; Rhodin, Nicholas; Sullivan, Kathleen E; Brown, Valerie I; Grupp, Stephan A

    2006-09-15

    Autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS) is a disorder of abnormal lymphocyte survival caused by defective Fas-mediated apoptosis, leading to lymphadenopathy, hepatosplenomegaly, and an increased number of double-negative T cells (DNTs). Treatment options for patients with ALPS are limited. Rapamycin has been shown to induce apoptosis in normal and malignant lymphocytes. Since ALPS is caused by defective lymphocyte apoptosis, we hypothesized that rapamycin would be effective in treating ALPS. We tested this hypothesis using rapamycin in murine models of ALPS. We followed treatment response with serial assessment of DNTs by flow cytometry in blood and lymphoid tissue, by serial monitoring of lymph node and spleen size with ultrasonography, and by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for anti-double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) antibodies. Three-dimensional ultrasound measurements in the mice correlated to actual tissue measurements at death (r = .9648). We found a dramatic and statistically significant decrease in DNTs, lymphadenopathy, splenomegaly, and autoantibodies after only 4 weeks when comparing rapamycin-treated mice with controls. Rapamycin induced apoptosis through the intrinsic mitochondrial pathway. We compared rapamycin to mycophenolate mofetil, a second-line agent used to treat ALPS, and found rapamycin's control of lymphoproliferation was superior. We conclude that rapamycin is an effective treatment for murine ALPS and should be explored as treatment for affected humans.

  20. Metabolic control by target of rapamycin and autophagy during ageing - a mini-review.

    PubMed

    Markaki, Maria; Tavernarakis, Nektarios

    2013-01-01

    The conserved target of rapamycin (TOR) pathway integrates signals from nutrient and energy availability, growth factors and stress to regulate cell growth and proliferation, development and metabolism. Growing evidence suggests that TOR signalling controls the rate at which cells and tissues age, thereby contributing to whole-organism ageing. Although significant progress has been made in the last decades towards understanding fundamental aspects of the ageing process, the precise mechanisms underlying the age-related effects of TOR are still not fully understood. TOR interfaces with several cellular processes, such as DNA transcription, mRNA translation, protein turnover and autophagy, among others. Interestingly, TOR regulates various aspects of metabolism including mitochondrial function and lipid metabolism. Inhibition of TOR activity stimulates autophagy, a conserved lysosomal catabolic pathway that controls the degradation and turnover of macromolecules and organelles. Autophagy also has an important role in maintaining metabolic homeostasis at both the cellular and whole-organism level. Ageing in diverse organisms ranging from yeast to mammals appears to be associated with insufficient autophagy. Here, we summarize recent developments that outline how TOR and autophagy modulate the ageing process, with special emphasis on their role in the regulation of metabolism. A better understanding of the complex interplay between TOR, autophagy and ageing will pave the way for the development of novel therapeutic strategies to treat age-related pathologies.

  1. Licochalcones extracted from Glycyrrhiza inflata inhibit platelet aggregation accompanied by inhibition of COX-1 activity

    PubMed Central

    Okuda-Tanino, Asa; Sugawara, Daiki; Tashiro, Takumi; Iwashita, Masaya; Obara, Yutaro; Moriya, Takahiro; Tsushima, Chisato; Saigusa, Daisuke; Tomioka, Yoshihisa; Ishii, Kuniaki; Nakahata, Norimichi

    2017-01-01

    Licochalcones extracted from Glycyrrhiza inflata are known to have a variety of biological properties such as anti-inflammatory, anti-bacterial, and anti-tumor activities, but their action on platelet aggregation has not yet been reported. Therefore, in this study we investigated the effects of licochalcones on platelet aggregation. Collagen and U46619, a thromboxane A2 receptor agonist, caused rabbit platelet aggregation, which was reversed by pretreatment with licochalcones A, C and D in concentration-dependent manners. Among these compounds, licochalcone A caused the most potent inhibitory effect on collagen-induced platelet aggregation. However, the licochalcones showed marginal inhibitory effects on thrombin or ADP-induced platelet aggregation. In addition to rabbit platelets, licochalcone A attenuated collagen-induced aggregation in human platelets. Because licochalcone A also inhibited arachidonic acid-induced platelet aggregation and production of thromboxane A2 induced by collagen in intact platelets, we further examined the direct interaction of licochalcone A with cyclooxygenase (COX)-1. As expected, licochalcone A caused an inhibitory effect on both COX-1 and COX-2 in vitro. Regarding the effect of licochalcone A on COX-1 enzyme reaction kinetics, although licochalcone A showed a stronger inhibition of prostaglandin E2 synthesis induced by lower concentrations of arachidonic acid, Vmax values in the presence or absence of licochalcone A were comparable, suggesting that it competes with arachidonic acid at the same binding site on COX-1. These results suggest that licochalcones inhibit collagen-induced platelet aggregation accompanied by inhibition of COX-1 activity. PMID:28282426

  2. Licochalcones extracted from Glycyrrhiza inflata inhibit platelet aggregation accompanied by inhibition of COX-1 activity.

    PubMed

    Okuda-Tanino, Asa; Sugawara, Daiki; Tashiro, Takumi; Iwashita, Masaya; Obara, Yutaro; Moriya, Takahiro; Tsushima, Chisato; Saigusa, Daisuke; Tomioka, Yoshihisa; Ishii, Kuniaki; Nakahata, Norimichi

    2017-01-01

    Licochalcones extracted from Glycyrrhiza inflata are known to have a variety of biological properties such as anti-inflammatory, anti-bacterial, and anti-tumor activities, but their action on platelet aggregation has not yet been reported. Therefore, in this study we investigated the effects of licochalcones on platelet aggregation. Collagen and U46619, a thromboxane A2 receptor agonist, caused rabbit platelet aggregation, which was reversed by pretreatment with licochalcones A, C and D in concentration-dependent manners. Among these compounds, licochalcone A caused the most potent inhibitory effect on collagen-induced platelet aggregation. However, the licochalcones showed marginal inhibitory effects on thrombin or ADP-induced platelet aggregation. In addition to rabbit platelets, licochalcone A attenuated collagen-induced aggregation in human platelets. Because licochalcone A also inhibited arachidonic acid-induced platelet aggregation and production of thromboxane A2 induced by collagen in intact platelets, we further examined the direct interaction of licochalcone A with cyclooxygenase (COX)-1. As expected, licochalcone A caused an inhibitory effect on both COX-1 and COX-2 in vitro. Regarding the effect of licochalcone A on COX-1 enzyme reaction kinetics, although licochalcone A showed a stronger inhibition of prostaglandin E2 synthesis induced by lower concentrations of arachidonic acid, Vmax values in the presence or absence of licochalcone A were comparable, suggesting that it competes with arachidonic acid at the same binding site on COX-1. These results suggest that licochalcones inhibit collagen-induced platelet aggregation accompanied by inhibition of COX-1 activity.

  3. Flavonoid inhibition of aromatase enzyme activity in human preadipocytes.

    PubMed

    Campbell, D R; Kurzer, M S

    1993-09-01

    Eleven flavonoid compounds were compared with aminoglutethimide (AG), a pharmaceutical aromatase inhibitor, for their abilities to inhibit aromatase enzyme activity in a human preadipocyte cell culture system. Flavonoids exerting no effect on aromatase activity were catechin, daidzein, equol, genistein, beta-naphthoflavone (BNF), quercetin and rutin. The synthetic flavonoid, alpha-naphthoflavone (ANF), was the most potent aromatase inhibitor, with an I50 value of 0.5 microM. Three naturally-occurring flavonoids, chrysin, flavone, and genistein 4'-methyl ether (Biochanin A) showed I50 values of 4.6, 68, and 113 microM, respectively, while AG showed an I50 value of 7.4 microM. Kinetic analyses showed that both AG and the flavonoids acted as competitive inhibitors of aromatase. The Ki values, indicating the effectiveness of inhibition, were 0.2, 2.4, 2.4, 22, and 49 microM, for ANF, AG, chrysin, flavone, and Biochanin A, respectively. Chrysin, the most potent of the naturally-occurring flavonoids, was similar in potency and effectiveness to AG, a pharmaceutical aromatase inhibitor used clinically in cases of estrogen-dependent carcinoma. These data suggest that flavonoid inhibition of peripheral aromatase activity may contribute to the observed cancer-preventive hormonal effects of plant-based diets.

  4. Signaling Mechanisms that Suppress the Cytostatic Actions of Rapamycin

    PubMed Central

    Jahn, Stephan C.; Law, Mary E.; Corsino, Patrick E.; Davis, Bradley J.; Harrison, Jeffrey K.; Law, Brian K.

    2014-01-01

    While rapamycin and the “rapalogs” Everolimus and Temsirolimus have been approved for clinical use in the treatment of a number of forms of cancer, they have not met overarching success. Some tumors are largely refractory to rapamycin treatment, with some even undergoing an increase in growth rates. However the mechanisms by which this occurs are largely unknown. The results presented here reveal novel cell-signaling mechanisms that may lead to this resistance. The absence of TGFβ signaling results in resistance to rapamycin. Additionally, we observed that treatment of some cancer cell lines with rapamycin and its analogs not only potentiates mitogenic signaling and proliferation induced by HGF, but also stimulates the pro-survival kinase Akt. Together, the data show that the effectiveness of rapamycin treatment can be influenced by a number of factors and bring to light potential biomarkers for the prediction of responsiveness to treatment, and suggest combination therapies to optimize rapalog anticancer efficacy. PMID:24927123

  5. Joint inhibition of TOR and JNK pathways interacts to extend the lifespan of Brachionus manjavacas (Rotifera)

    PubMed Central

    Snell, Terry W.; Johnston, Rachel K.; Rabeneck, Brett; Zipperer, Cody; Teat, Stephanie

    2014-01-01

    lysosome activity using Lysotracker. Treatment of rotifers with JNK inhibitor enhanced mitochondria activity nearly 3-fold, whereas rapamycin treatment had no significant effect. Treatment of rotifers with rapamycin or JNK inhibitor reduced lysosome activity in 1, 3 and 8 day old animals, but treatment with both inhibitors did not produce any additive effect. We conclude that inhibition of TOR and JNK pathways significantly extends the lifespan of B. manjavacas. These pathways interact so that inhibition of both simultaneously acts additively to extend rotifer lifespan more than inhibition of either alone. PMID:24486130

  6. Joint inhibition of TOR and JNK pathways interacts to extend the lifespan of Brachionus manjavacas (Rotifera).

    PubMed

    Snell, Terry W; Johnston, Rachel K; Rabeneck, Brett; Zipperer, Cody; Teat, Stephanie

    2014-04-01

    marker MitoTracker and lysosome activity using LysoTracker. Treatment of rotifers with JNK inhibitor enhanced mitochondria activity nearly 3-fold, whereas rapamycin treatment had no significant effect. Treatment of rotifers with rapamycin or JNK inhibitor reduced lysosome activity in 1, 3 and 8 day old animals, but treatment with both inhibitors did not produce any additive effect. We conclude that inhibition of TOR and JNK pathways significantly extends the lifespan of B. manjavacas. These pathways interact so that inhibition of both simultaneously acts additively to extend rotifer lifespan more than the inhibition of either alone.

  7. Emotion potentiates response activation and inhibition in masked priming

    PubMed Central

    Bocanegra, Bruno R.; Zeelenberg, René

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that emotion can have 2-fold effects on perception. At the object-level, emotional stimuli benefit from a stimulus-specific boost in visual attention at the relative expense of competing stimuli. At the visual feature-level, recent findings indicate that emotion may inhibit the processing of small visual details and facilitate the processing of coarse visual features. In the present study, we investigated whether emotion can boost the activation and inhibition of automatic motor responses that are generated prior to overt perception. To investigate this, we tested whether an emotional cue affects covert motor responses in a masked priming task. We used a masked priming paradigm in which participants responded to target arrows that were preceded by invisible congruent or incongruent prime arrows. In the standard paradigm, participants react faster, and commit fewer errors responding to the directionality of target arrows, when they are preceded by congruent vs. incongruent masked prime arrows (positive congruency effect, PCE). However, as prime-target SOAs increase, this effect reverses (negative congruency effect, NCE). These findings have been explained as evidence for an initial activation and a subsequent inhibition of a partial response elicited by the masked prime arrow. Our results show that the presentation of fearful face cues, compared to neutral face cues, increased the size of both the PCE and NCE, despite the fact that the primes were invisible. This is the first demonstration that emotion prepares an individual's visuomotor system for automatic activation and inhibition of motor responses in the absence of visual awareness. PMID:23162447

  8. Inhibition of Neuroinflammation in LPS-Activated Microglia by Cryptolepine

    PubMed Central

    Olajide, Olumayokun A.; Bhatia, Harsharan S.; de Oliveira, Antonio C. P.; Wright, Colin W.; Fiebich, Bernd L.

    2013-01-01

    Cryptolepine, an indoloquinoline alkaloid in Cryptolepis sanguinolenta, has anti-inflammatory property. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the effects of cryptolepine on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)- induced neuroinflammation in rat microglia and its potential mechanisms. Microglial activation was induced by stimulation with LPS, and the effects of cryptolepine pretreatment on microglial activation and production of proinflammatory mediators, PGE2/COX-2, microsomal prostaglandin E2 synthase and nitric oxide/iNOS were investigated. We further elucidated the role of Nuclear Factor-kappa B (NF-κB) and the mitogen-activated protein kinases in the antiinflammatory actions of cryptolepine in LPS-stimulated microglia. Our results showed that cryptolepine significantly inhibited LPS-induced production of tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα), interleukin-6 (IL-6), interleukin-1beta (IL-1β), nitric oxide, and PGE2. Protein and mRNA levels of COX-2 and iNOS were also attenuated by cryptolepine. Further experiments on intracellular signalling mechanisms show that IκB-independent inhibition of NF-κB nuclear translocation contributes to the anti-neuroinflammatory actions of cryptolepine. Results also show that cryptolepine inhibited LPS-induced p38 and MAPKAPK2 phosphorylation in the microglia. Cell viability experiments revealed that cryptolepine (2.5 and 5 μM) did not produce cytotoxicity in microglia. Taken together, our results suggest that cryptolepine inhibits LPS-induced microglial inflammation by partial targeting of NF-κB signalling and attenuation of p38/MAPKAPK2. PMID:23737832

  9. Inhibition of polyphenol oxidases activity by various dipeptides.

    PubMed

    Girelli, Anna M; Mattei, Enrico; Messina, Antonella; Tarola, Anna M

    2004-05-19

    In an effort to develop natural and nontoxic inhibitors on the activity of mushroom polyphenol oxidase (PPO) the effect of various glycyl-dipeptides (GlyAsp, GlyGly, GlyHis, GlyLeu, GlyLys, GlyPhe, GlyPro, GlyTyr) was investigated. The inhibition study with dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA) as substrate is based on separation of the enzymatic reaction components by reversed phase HPLC and the UV detection of the dopachrome formed. The results have evidenced that several of tested dipeptides inhibited PPO activity in the range of 20-40% while GlyPro and GlyLeu had no effect. The study has also permitted the characterization of the following kinetic pattern: a linear-mixed-type mechanism for GlyAsp, GlyGly, GlyLys, and GlyPhe and a hyperbolic-mixed-type for GlyTyr. It was not possible to identify the inhibition mechanism for GlyHis, although it affects PPO activity. In addition the effects of GlyAsp, GlyLys and GlyHis were evaluated for lessening the browning of fresh Golden Delicious apple and Irish White Skinned potato. The effectiveness of such inhibitors was determined by the difference between the colors observed in the dipeptide-treated sample and the controls using the color space CIE-Lab system. The % browning inhibition on potato (20-50%) was greater than of apple (20-30%) by the all tested dipeptides. Only GlyLys presented the significant value of 50%.

  10. Menthol Inhibits Detrusor Contractility Independently of TRPM8 Activation

    PubMed Central

    Ramos-Filho, Antonio Celso Saragossa; Shah, Ajay; Augusto, Taize Machado; Barbosa, Guilherme Oliveira; Leiria, Luiz Osorio; de Carvalho, Hernandes Faustino; Antunes, Edson; Grant, Andrew Douglas

    2014-01-01

    Agonists such as icilin and menthol can activate the cool temperature-sensitive ion channel TRPM8. However, biological responses to menthol may occur independently of TRPM8 activation. In the rodent urinary bladder, menthol facilitates the micturition reflex but inhibits muscarinic contractions of the detrusor smooth muscle. The site(s) of TRPM8 expression in the bladder are controversial. In this study we investigated the regulation of bladder contractility in vitro by menthol. Bladder strips from wild type and TRPM8 knockout male mice (25–30 g) were dissected free and mounted in organ baths. Isometric contractions to carbachol (1 nM–30 µM), CaCl2 (1 µM to 100 mM) and electrical field stimulation (EFS; 8, 16, 32 Hz) were measured. Strips from both groups contracted similarly in response to both carbachol and EFS. Menthol (300 µM) or nifedipine (1 µM) inhibited carbachol and EFS-induced contractions in both wild type and TRPM8 knockout bladder strips. Incubation with the sodium channel blocker tetrodotoxin (1 µM), replacement of extracellular sodium with the impermeant cation N-Methyl-D-Glucamine, incubation with a cocktail of potassium channel inhibitors (100 nM charybdotoxin, 1 µM apamin, 10 µM glibenclamide and 1 µM tetraethylammonium) or removal of the urothelium did not affect the inhibitory actions of menthol. Contraction to CaCl2 was markedly inhibited by either menthol or nifedipine. In cultured bladder smooth muscle cells, menthol or nifedipine abrogated the carbachol or KCl-induced increases in [Ca2+]i. Intravesical administration of menthol increased voiding frequency while decreasing peak voiding pressure. We conclude that menthol inhibits muscarinic bladder contractions through blockade of L-type calcium channels, independently of TRPM8 activation. PMID:25375115

  11. Protein inhibitor of activated STAT3 inhibits adipogenic gene expression

    SciTech Connect

    Deng Jianbei; Hua Kunjie; Caveney, Erica J.; Takahashi, Nobuyuki; Harp, Joyce B. . E-mail: jharp@unc.edu

    2006-01-20

    Protein inhibitor of activated STAT3 (PIAS3), a cytokine-induced repressor of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) and a modulator of a broad array of nuclear proteins, is expressed in white adipose tissue, but its role in adipogenesis is not known. Here, we determined that PIAS3 was constitutively expressed in 3T3-L1 cells at all stages of adipogenesis. However, it translocated from the nucleus to the cytoplasm 4 days after induction of differentiation by isobutylmethylxanthine, dexamethasone, and insulin (MDI). In ob/ob mice, PIAS3 expression was increased in white adipose tissue depots compared to lean mice and was found in the cytoplasm of adipocytes. Overexpression of PIAS3 in differentiating preadipocytes, which localized primarily to the nucleus, inhibited mRNA level gene expression of adipogenic transcription factors C/EBP{alpha} and PPAR{gamma}, as well as their downstream target genes aP2 and adiponectin. PIAS3 also inhibited C/EBP{alpha} promoter activation mediated specifically by insulin, but not dexamethasone or isobutylmethylxanthine. Taken together, these data suggest that PIAS3 may play an inhibitory role in adipogenesis by modulating insulin-activated transcriptional activation events. Increased PIAS3 expression in adipose tissue may play a role in the metabolic disturbances of obesity.

  12. Reduced brain activation in violent adolescents during response inhibition.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Yi; Mei, Yi; Du, XiaoXia; Xie, Bin; Shao, Yang

    2016-02-18

    Deficits in inhibitory control have been linked to aggression and violent behaviour. This study aimed to observe whether violent adolescents show different brain activation patterns during response inhibition and to ascertain the roles these brain regions play. A self-report method and modified overt aggression scale (MOAS) were used to evaluate violent behaviour. Functional magnetic resonance imaging was performed in 22 violent adolescents and 17 matched healthy subjects aged 12 to 18 years. While scanning, a go/no-go task was performed. Between-group comparisons revealed that activation in the bilateral middle and superior temporal gyrus, hippocampus, and right orbitofrontal area (BA11) regions were significantly reduced in the violent group compared with the control group. Meanwhile, the violent group had more widespread activation in the prefrontal cortex than that observed in the control group. Activation of the prefrontal cortex in the violent group was widespread but lacking in focus, failing to produce intensive activation in some functionally related regions during response inhibition.

  13. Chemical-Genetics of Rapamycin-Insensitive TORC2 in S. cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Kliegman, Joseph I.; Fiedler, Dorothea; Ryan, Colm J.; Xu, Yi-Fan; Su, Xiao-yang; Thomas, David; Caccese, Max C.; Cheng, Ada; Shales, Michael; Rabinowitz, Joshua D.; Krogan, Nevan J.; Shokat, Kevan M.

    2014-01-01

    Current approaches for identifying synergistic targets use cell culture models with combinations of clinically available drugs to see if the combined effect of the combination is better than predicted by their individual efficacy. New techniques are needed to systematically and rationally identify targets and pathways that have a high potential as synergistic targets. In this study, we create a tool to screen and identify molecular targets that may synergize with new inhibitors of TOR (Target of Rapamycin), a conserved protein that is a major integrator of cell proliferation signals in the nutrient-signaling pathway. While clinical results from TORC1 inhibition using rapamycin analogs (that only inhibit TORC1) have been disappointing, trials using inhibitors that also target TORC2 have been promising. To understand the molecular basis for this increased therapeutic efficacy and to discover secondary targets that may have potential in targeted combination therapy, we engineered TOR2 in S. cerevisiae to accept an orthogonal inhibitor in order to create the first chemical tool to selectively inhibit TORC2. We used this tool to create a Chemical Epistasis Mini-Array Profile, or ChE-MAP, by measuring interactions between the chemically inhibited TOR2 kinase and a diverse library of deletion mutants. The ChE-MAP identified known TOR components and distinguished between TORC1 (assessed using rapamycin) and TORC2 dependent functions. Results showed a novel TORC2-specific interaction with the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP). We used global metabolic profiling to show that that TORC2 inhibition led to decreases in metabolites specific to the PPP and confirmed that TOR2 was regulating this process using metabolic flux analysis. Regulation of the PPP is a previously unappreciated role for TORC2 that may suggest a role for the complex in balancing the high energy demand required for ribosome biogenesis. PMID:24360963

  14. BX-795 inhibits HSV-1 and HSV-2 replication in a JNK/p38-dependent manner without interfering with PDK1 activity.

    PubMed

    Su, Ai-Rong; Qiu, Min; Li, Yan-Lei; Xu, Wen-Tao; Song, Si-Wei; Wang, Xiao-Hui; Song, Hong-Yong; Zheng, Nan; Wu, Zhi-Wei

    2017-01-23

    BX-795, an aminopyrimidine compound, was developed as an inhibitor of 3-phosphoinositide-dependent kinase 1 (PDK1) and was later shown to be a potent inhibitor of the IKK-related kinase, TANK-binding kinase 1 (TBK1) and IKKɛ. The currect study aimed to investigate the inhibition mechanism(s) of BX-795 on Herpes simplex virus (HSV) replication. HEC-1-A or Vero cells were treated in the absence or presence of serial concentrations of BX-795 and infected with HSV-1 or HSV-2 for different periods. BX-795 did not suppress HSV IE gene transcription at 6 h postinfection. In contrast, at 12 h postinfection, BX-795 exhibited an inhibitory effect on the expression of not only the two IE genes (ICP0 and ICP27) but also on the late gene (gD) in a dose-dependent manner with low cytotoxicity. HSV-2 infection resulted in the activation of PI3K and Akt. BX-795 inhibited HSV-2-induced Akt phosphorylation and activation. The blockage of PI3K/Akt/mTOR by LY294002 and rapamycin did not affect HSV-2 replication. HSV-2 infection increased the phosphorylation of JNK and p38 but reduced ERK phosphorylation at 8 h postinfection in HEC-1A cells. SB203580 (p38 inhibitor) and SP600125 (JNK inhibitor), but not PD98059 (ERK inhibitor), inhibited viral replication in both HEC-1-A and Vero cells in a dose-dependent manner. BX-795 inhibited HSV-2-induced activation of JNK and p38 MAP kinase. Furthermore, BX-795 inhibited activation of c-Jun and ATF-2 caused by HSV-2 infection. BX-795 blocked PMA-stimulated c-Jun activation as well as HSV-2-mediated c-Jun nuclear translocation. BX-795 also inhibited AP-1 activation induced by HSV-2, PMA, TNF-α in a dose-dependent manner. The inhibitory effect of BX-795 on HSV replication was attenuated by overexpression of p38/JNK. BX-795 completely blocked HSV-2-induced MKK4 phosphorylation suggesting that BX-795 acted upstream of JNK and p38 MAP kinase. BX-795 had no effects on HSV-induced NF-κB activation. The results indicated that BX-795 inhibited HSV

  15. Activity inhibition on municipal activated sludge by single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parise, Alex; Thakor, Harshrajsinh; Zhang, Xiaoqi

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the respiratory activity inhibition of activated sludge used in a typical wastewater treatment plant by single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with different length and functionality. Four types of SWCNTs were evaluated: short, functionalized short, long, and functionalized long. Based on the effective concentration (EC50) values obtained, we determined that functionalized SWCNTs resulted in a higher microbial respiratory inhibition than non-functionalized nanotubes, and long SWCNTs gave a higher microbial respiratory inhibition than their short counterparts. Among the four types of SWCNTs studied, functionalized long exhibited the highest respiration inhibition. Scanning electron microscopy imaging indicates that the long SWCNTs dispersed more favorably after sonication than the short variety. The findings demonstrated that the toxicity of CNTs (exhibited by respiratory inhibition) is related to their physical properties; the length and functionality of SWCNTs affected the toxicity of SWCNTs in a mixed-cultured biologic system.

  16. Surface Engineering of Porous Silicon Microparticles for Intravitreal Sustained Delivery of Rapamycin

    PubMed Central

    Nieto, Alejandra; Hou, Huiyuan; Moon, Sang Woong; Sailor, Michael J.; Freeman, William R.; Cheng, Lingyun

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To understand the relationship between rapamycin loading/release and surface chemistries of porous silicon (pSi) to optimize pSi-based intravitreal delivery system. Methods. Three types of surface chemical modifications were studied: (1) pSi-COOH, containing 10-carbon aliphatic chains with terminal carboxyl groups grafted via hydrosilylation of undecylenic acid; (2) pSi-C12, containing 12-carbon aliphatic chains grafted via hydrosilylation of 1-dodecene; and (3) pSiO2-C8, prepared by mild oxidation of the pSi particles followed by grafting of 8-hydrocarbon chains to the resulting porous silica surface via a silanization. Results. The efficiency of rapamycin loading follows the order (micrograms of drug/milligrams of carrier): pSiO2-C8 (105 ± 18) > pSi-COOH (68 ± 8) > pSi-C12 (36 ± 6). Powder X-ray diffraction data showed that loaded rapamycin was amorphous and dynamic drug-release study showed that the availability of the free drug was increased by 6-fold (compared with crystalline rapamycin) by using pSiO2-C8 formulation (P = 0.0039). Of the three formulations in this study, pSiO2-C8-RAP showed optimal performance in terms of simultaneous release of the active drug and carrier degradation, and drug-loading capacity. Released rapamycin was confirmed with the fingerprints of the mass spectrometry and biologically functional as the control of commercial crystalline rapamycin. Single intravitreal injections of 2.9 ± 0.37 mg pSiO2-C8-RAP into rabbit eyes resulted in more than 8 weeks of residence in the vitreous while maintaining clear optical media and normal histology of the retina in comparison to the controls. Conclusions. Porous silicon–based rapamycin delivery system using the pSiO2-C8 formulation demonstrated good ocular compatibility and may provide sustained drug release for retina. PMID:25613937

  17. [Metabolism inhibition stimulates, metabolism activation inhibits cancerogenic activity of ortho-aminoazotoluene in mouse liver].

    PubMed

    Kaledin, V I; Il'nitskaia, S I

    2011-01-01

    Pentachlorophenol, an inhibitor of metabolic activation of aminoazo dyes was administered to suckling mice prior to o-aminoazotoluene (OAT). It was followed by formation of numerous preneoplastic nodules and tumors in the lungs and liver. At the same time, 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxine treatment decreased their number in the liver while slightly increasing them in the lung. A possible mechanism of aminoazo dye carcinogenicity is suggested.

  18. Solubilized placental membrane protein inhibits insulin receptor tyrosine kinase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Strout, H.V. Jr.; Slater, E.E.

    1987-05-01

    Regulation of insulin receptor (IR) tyrosine kinase (TK) activity may be important in modulating insulin action. Utilizing an assay which measures IR phosphorylation of angiotensin II (AII), the authors investigated whether fractions of TX-100 solubilized human placental membranes inhibited IR dependent AII phosphorylation. Autophosphorylated IR was incubated with membrane fractions before the addition of AII, and kinase inhibition measured by the loss of TSP incorporated in AII. An inhibitory activity was detected which was dose, time, and temperature dependent. The inhibitor was purified 200-fold by sequential chromatography on wheat germ agglutinin, DEAE, and hydroxyapatite. This inhibitory activity was found to correlate with an 80 KD protein which was electroeluted from preparative slab gels and rabbit antiserum raised. Incubation of membrane fractions with antiserum before the IRTK assay immunoprecipitated the inhibitor. Protein immunoblots of crude or purified fractions revealed only the 80 KD protein. Since IR autophosphorylation is crucial to IRTK activity, the authors investigated the state of IR autophosphorylation after treatment with inhibitor; no change was detected by phosphoamino acid analysis.

  19. Grafting MAP peptide to dental polymer inhibits MMP-8 activity.

    PubMed

    Dixit, Namrata; Settle, Jenifer K; Ye, Qiang; Berrie, Cindy L; Spencer, Paulette; Laurence, Jennifer S

    2015-02-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are a class of zinc and calcium-dependent endopeptidases responsible for degrading extracellular matrix (ECM) components. Their activity is critical for both normal biological function and pathological processes (Dejonckheere et al., Cytokine Growth Factor Rev 2011;22:73-81). In dental restorations, the release and subsequent acid activation of MMPs contributes to premature failure. In particular, MMP-8 accelerates degradation by cleaving the collagen matrix within the dentin substrate in incompletely infiltrated aged bonded dentin (Buzalaf et al., Adv Dent Res 2012;24:72-76), hastening the need for replacement of restorations. Therefore, development of a dental adhesive that better resists MMP-8 activity is of significant interest. We hypothesize that modification of the polymer surface with an inhibitor would disable MMP-8 activity. Here, we identify the metal abstraction peptide (MAP) as an inhibitor of MMP-8 and demonstrate that tethering MAP to methacrylate polymers effectively inhibits catalysis. Our findings indicate complete inhibition of MMP-8 is achievable using a grafting approach. This strategy has potential to improve longevity of dental adhesives and other polymers and enable rational design of a new generation of biocompatible materials.

  20. Small molecule activation of NOTCH signaling inhibits acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Qi; Jiang, Jue; Zhan, Guanqun; Yan, Wanyao; Huang, Liang; Hu, Yufeng; Su, Hexiu; Tong, Qingyi; Yue, Ming; Li, Hua; Yao, Guangmin; Zhang, Yonghui; Liu, Hudan

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant activation of the NOTCH signaling pathway is crucial for the onset and progression of T cell leukemia. Yet recent studies also suggest a tumor suppressive role of NOTCH signaling in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and reactivation of this pathway offers an attractive opportunity for anti-AML therapies. N-methylhemeanthidine chloride (NMHC) is a novel Amaryllidaceae alkaloid that we previously isolated from Zephyranthes candida, exhibiting inhibitory activities in a variety of cancer cells, particularly those from AML. Here, we report NMHC not only selectively inhibits AML cell proliferation in vitro but also hampers tumor development in a human AML xenograft model. Genome-wide gene expression profiling reveals that NMHC activates the NOTCH signaling. Combination of NMHC and recombinant human NOTCH ligand DLL4 achieves a remarkable synergistic effect on NOTCH activation. Moreover, pre-inhibition of NOTCH by overexpression of dominant negative MAML alleviates NMHC-mediated cytotoxicity in AML. Further mechanistic analysis using structure-based molecular modeling as well as biochemical assays demonstrates that NMHC docks in the hydrophobic cavity within the NOTCH1 negative regulatory region (NRR), thus promoting NOTCH1 proteolytic cleavage. Our findings thus establish NMHC as a potential NOTCH agonist that holds great promises for future development as a novel agent beneficial to patients with AML. PMID:27211848

  1. The rodent malaria liver stage survives in the rapamycin-induced autophagosome of infected Hepa1–6 cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Chenghao; Liu, Taiping; Zhou, Taoli; Fu, Yong; Zheng, Hong; Ding, Yan; Zhang, Kun; Xu, Wenyue

    2016-01-01

    It has been reported that non-selective autophagy of infected hepatocytes could facilitate the development of malaria in the liver stage, but the fate of parasites following selective autophagy of infected hepatocytes is still not very clear. Here, we confirmed that sporozoite infection can induce a selective autophagy-like process targeting EEFs (exo-erythrocytic forms) in Hepa1–6. Rapamycin treatment greatly enhanced this process in EEFs and non-selective autophagy of infected Hepa1-6 cells and enhanced the development of the malaria liver stage in vivo. Although rapamycin promoted the fusion of autophagosomes containing the malaria parasite with lysosomes, some parasites inside the autophagosome survived and replicated normally. Further study showed that the maturation of affected autolysosomes was greatly inhibited. Therefore, in addition to the previously described positive role of rapamycin-induced nonselective autophagy of hepatocytes, we provide evidence that the survival of EEFs in the autophagosome of the infected hepatocytes also contributes to rapamycin-enhanced development of the malaria liver stage, possibly due to the suppression of autolysosome maturation by EEFs. These data suggest that the inhibition of autolysosome maturation might be a novel escape strategy used by the malaria liver stage. PMID:27901110

  2. Low-dose rapamycin reduces kidney volume angiomyolipomas and prevents the loss of renal function in a patient with tuberous sclerosis complex.

    PubMed

    Peces, Ramón; Peces, Carlos; Cuesta-López, Emilio; Pérez-Dueñas, Virginia; Vega-Cabrera, Cristina; Azorín, Sebastián; Selgas, Rafael

    2010-11-01

    Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is caused by constitutively activated mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) resulting in non-malignant tumours of several organs including renal angiomyolipomas (AMLs). AMLs may originate renal failure, hypertension and spontaneous life-threatening bleeding. Recent reports suggest a possible beneficial role of the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin for TSC. However, safety and efficiency of rapamycin in TSC patients as an anti-proliferative agent are still undefined. A 40-year-old man with sporadic TSC and a history of spontaneous bleeding from his left kidney AMLs received low-dose rapamycin for 12 months, and this was associated with a reduction in bilateral kidney AML volume, stabilization and even improvement of renal function. There was also a reduction of facial angiofibromas, improvement of blood pressure control and absence of AML bleeding over this time period. Brain lesion images remained stable, and no significant rapamycin-associated side effects were noted. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a case of reduction in renal AML volume together with preservation of renal function in a patient with TSC receiving low-dose rapamycin. These data suggest that it could be the result of the anti-angiogenic, anti-fibrotic and anti-proliferative effects of rapamycin.

  3. DMSO inhibits human platelet activation through cyclooxygenase-1 inhibition. A novel agent for drug eluting stents?

    SciTech Connect

    Asmis, Lars; Tanner, Felix C.; Sudano, Isabella; Luescher, Thomas F.; Camici, Giovanni G.

    2010-01-22

    Background: DMSO is routinely infused together with hematopoietic cells in patients undergoing myeloablative therapy and was recently found to inhibit smooth muscle cells proliferation and arterial thrombus formation in the mouse by preventing tissue factor (TF), a key activator of the coagulation cascade. This study was designed to investigate whether DMSO prevents platelet activation and thus, whether it may represent an interesting agent to be used on drug eluting stents. Methods and results: Human venous blood from healthy volunteers was collected in citrated tubes and platelet activation was studied by cone and platelet analyzer (CPA) and rapid-platelet-function-assay (RPFA). CPA analysis showed that DMSO-treated platelets exhibit a lower adherence in response to shear stress (-15.54 {+-} 0.9427%, n = 5, P < 0.0001 versus control). Additionally, aggregometry studies revealed that DMSO-treated, arachidonate-stimulated platelets had an increased lag phase (18.0% {+-} 4.031, n = 9, P = 0.0004 versus control) as well as a decreased maximal aggregation (-6.388 {+-} 2.212%, n = 6, P = 0.0162 versus control). Inhibitory action of DMSO could be rescued by exogenous thromboxane A2 and was mediated, at least in part, by COX-1 inhibition. Conclusions: Clinically relevant concentrations of DMSO impair platelet activation by a thromboxane A2-dependent, COX-1-mediated effect. This finding may be crucial for the previously reported anti-thrombotic property displayed by DMSO. Our findings support a role for DMSO as a novel drug to prevent not only proliferation, but also thrombotic complications of drug eluting stents.

  4. Antioedematogenic activity, acetylcholinesterase inhibition and antimicrobial properties of Jacaranda oxyphylla.

    PubMed

    Pereira, V V; Silva, R R; Dos Santos, M H; Dias, D F; Moreira, M E C; Takahashi, J A

    2016-09-01

    Jacaranda oxyphylla Cham. (Bignoniaceae) is a shrub found in the Brazilian cerrado and used in folk medicine to treat microbial infections. The aim of this study was to carry out a phytochemical screening and evaluate antioedematogenic, antimicrobial and antiacetylcholinesterase properties of J. oxyphylla crude extracts. All extracts analysed showed presence of terpenoids, which are potentially active chemical substances. A high AChE inhibitory activity for hexane extract from leaves and for the extracts from twigs was found. Ethanol extract from leaves of J. oxyphylla showed activity against Gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus cereus) and Gram-negative (Escherichia coli) bacteria. This extract was also effective in inhibiting the stages of inflammation evaluated. Biological investigation and phytochemical screening of J. oxyphylla extracts provided additional evidence of its traditional medicinal value.

  5. Betulin inhibits lung carcinoma proliferation through activation of AMPK signaling.

    PubMed

    Li, Xian-Dong; Zhang, Yi-Jie; Han, Ji-Chang

    2014-11-01

    Betulin (lup-20(29)-ene-3β, 28-diol) is an abundant, naturally occurring triterpene. It is commonly isolated from the bark of birch trees and forms up to 30% of the dry weight of the extractive. In the present study, we revealed its antiproliferative effects and mechanisms using two lung carcinoma cells (A549 and NCI-292). By 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) and bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation assays, we found that betulin could efficiently inhibit cell growth and proliferation. Besides, several key genes of cell-cycle regulators were also affected by betulin treatment. At the molecular level, our results demonstrated that treatment with betulin was also associated with activation of AMP kinase and inhibition of mTOR/p70S6K/pS6 signaling in these cells. In agreement, inhibition of AMPK signaling largely reversed the antiproliferative roles of betulin. Taken together, these data provide evidence for a mechanism that may contribute to the antineoplastic effects of betulin and justify further work to explore its potential roles in lung cancer prevention and treatment.

  6. TES inhibits colorectal cancer progression through activation of p38

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Lu; Wang, Lixia; Niu, Yanfeng; Liu, Hongli; Wang, Zheng; Wang, Lin; Wang, Guobin; Wang, Jiliang

    2016-01-01

    The human TESTIN (TES) gene has been identified as a candidate tumor suppressor based on its location at a common fragile site – a region where loss of heterozygosity has been detected in numerous types of tumors. To investigate its role in colorectal cancer (CRC), we examined TES protein levels in CRC tissue samples and cell lines. We observed that TES was markedly reduced in both CRC tissue and cell lines. Additionally, overexpression of TES significantly inhibited cell proliferation, migration, and invasion, while increasing cell apoptosis in colon cancer cells. By contrast, shRNA-mediated TES knockdown elicited the opposite effects. TES inhibited the progression of CRC by up-regulating pro-apoptotic proteins, down-regulating anti-apoptotic proteins, and simultaneously activating p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways. Collectively, these data indicate that TES functions as a necessary suppressor of CRC progression by activating p38-MAPK signaling pathways. This suggests that TES may have a potential application in CRC diagnosis and targeted gene therapy. PMID:27323777

  7. Target of rapamycin signaling regulates metabolism, growth, and life span in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Ren, Maozhi; Venglat, Prakash; Qiu, Shuqing; Feng, Li; Cao, Yongguo; Wang, Edwin; Xiang, Daoquan; Wang, Jinghe; Alexander, Danny; Chalivendra, Subbaiah; Logan, David; Mattoo, Autar; Selvaraj, Gopalan; Datla, Raju

    2012-12-01

    Target of Rapamycin (TOR) is a major nutrition and energy sensor that regulates growth and life span in yeast and animals. In plants, growth and life span are intertwined not only with nutrient acquisition from the soil and nutrition generation via photosynthesis but also with their unique modes of development and differentiation. How TOR functions in these processes has not yet been determined. To gain further insights, rapamycin-sensitive transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana lines (BP12) expressing yeast FK506 Binding Protein12 were developed. Inhibition of TOR in BP12 plants by rapamycin resulted in slower overall root, leaf, and shoot growth and development leading to poor nutrient uptake and light energy utilization. Experimental limitation of nutrient availability and light energy supply in wild-type Arabidopsis produced phenotypes observed with TOR knockdown plants, indicating a link between TOR signaling and nutrition/light energy status. Genetic and physiological studies together with RNA sequencing and metabolite analysis of TOR-suppressed lines revealed that TOR regulates development and life span in Arabidopsis by restructuring cell growth, carbon and nitrogen metabolism, gene expression, and rRNA and protein synthesis. Gain- and loss-of-function Ribosomal Protein S6 (RPS6) mutants additionally show that TOR function involves RPS6-mediated nutrition and light-dependent growth and life span in Arabidopsis.

  8. Regulation of the glutamate transporter EAAT3 by mammalian target of rapamycin mTOR.

    PubMed

    Almilaji, Ahmad; Pakladok, Tatsiana; Guo, Anne; Munoz, Carlos; Föller, Michael; Lang, Florian

    2012-05-04

    The serine/threonine kinase mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is stimulated by insulin, growth factors and nutrients and confers survival of several cell types. The kinase has previously been shown to stimulate amino acid uptake. In neurons, the cellular uptake of glutamate by the excitatory amino-acid transporters (EAATs) decreases excitation and thus confers protection against excitotoxicity. In epithelia, EAAT3 accomplishes transepithelial glutamate and aspartate transport. The present study explored, whether mTOR regulates EAAT3 (SLC1A1). To this end, cRNA encoding EAAT3 was injected into Xenopus oocytes with or without cRNA encoding mTOR and the glutamate induced current (I(glu)), a measure of glutamate transport, determined by dual electrode voltage clamp. Moreover, EAAT3 protein abundance was determined utilizing chemiluminescence. As a result, I(glu) was observed in Xenopus oocytes expressing EAAT3 but not in water injected oocytes. Coexpression of mTOR significantly increased I(glu), an effect reversed by rapamycin (100 nM). mTOR coexpression increased EAAT3 protein abundance in the cell membrane. The decay of I(glu) following inhibition of carrier insertion with brefeldin A in oocytes coexpressing EAAT3 with mTOR was similar in the presence and absence of rapamycin (100 nM). In conclusion, mTOR is a novel powerful regulator of EAAT3 and may thus contribute to protection against neuroexcitotoxicity.

  9. Behavioral inspiratory inhibition: inactivated and activated respiratory cells.

    PubMed

    Orem, J

    1989-11-01

    = 0.27 +/- 0.03, mean +/- SE). 4) The latency of their activation in response to the task averaged 58 +/- 2.7 (SE) ms and was significantly shorter than the latency of inactivation of the high eta 2-valued inspiratory cells. 5) This activation was intense and prolonged. 6. It is hypothesized that the activated cells integrate nonrespiratory and respiratory inputs and act to inhibit other respiratory cells during the behavioral inhibition of inspiration.

  10. Toward the definition of immunosuppressive regimens with antitumor activity.

    PubMed

    Casadio, F; Croci, S; D'Errico Grigioni, A; Corti, B; Grigioni, W F; Landuzzi, L; Lollini, P-L

    2005-06-01

    Immunosuppressive therapies associated with organ transplantation produce an increased risk of cancer development. Malignancies are increased in transplant recipients because of the impaired immune system. Moreover, experimental data point to a tumor-promoting activity of various immunosuppressive agents. In this study, we compared the effects of 4 immunosuppressive agents with different mechanisms of action (cyclosporine, rapamycin, mycophenolic acid, and leflunomide) on the in vitro growth of various tumor cell lines and umbilical vein endothelial cells. To varying degrees rapamycin (10 ng/mL), mycophenolic acid (300 nmol/L), and leflunomide (30 micromol/L) highly inhibited the growth of human rhabdomyosarcoma, hepatocellular carcinoma, colorectal carcinoma, and endothelial cells. In contrast, cyclosporine (100 ng/mL) did not affect their growth. Our data suggest that regimens containing rapamycin, mycophenolic acid, or leflunomide, which have both immunosuppressive and antitumor activities, should be preferred in transplant recipients to minimize the risk of tumors.

  11. Wnt signaling inhibits CTL memory programming.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Zhengguo; Sun, Zhifeng; Smyth, Kendra; Li, Lei

    2013-12-01

    Induction of functional CTLs is one of the major goals for vaccine development and cancer therapy. Inflammatory cytokines are critical for memory CTL generation. Wnt signaling is important for CTL priming and memory formation, but its role in cytokine-driven memory CTL programming is unclear. We found that wnt signaling inhibited IL-12-driven CTL activation and memory programming. This impaired memory CTL programming was attributed to up-regulation of eomes and down-regulation of T-bet. Wnt signaling suppressed the mTOR pathway during CTL activation, which was different to its effects on other cell types. Interestingly, the impaired memory CTL programming by wnt was partially rescued by mTOR inhibitor rapamycin. In conclusion, we found that crosstalk between wnt and the IL-12 signaling inhibits T-bet and mTOR pathways and impairs memory programming which can be recovered in part by rapamycin. In addition, direct inhibition of wnt signaling during CTL activation does not affect CTL memory programming. Therefore, wnt signaling may serve as a new tool for CTL manipulation in autoimmune diseases and immune therapy for certain cancers.

  12. The role of phosphoinositide 3-kinase and phosphatidic acid in the regulation of mammalian target of rapamycin following eccentric contractions.

    PubMed

    O'Neil, T K; Duffy, L R; Frey, J W; Hornberger, T A

    2009-07-15

    Resistance exercise induces a hypertrophic response in skeletal muscle and recent studies have begun to shed light on the molecular mechanisms involved in this process. For example, several studies indicate that signalling by the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is necessary for a hypertrophic response. Furthermore, resistance exercise has been proposed to activate mTOR signalling through an upstream pathway involving the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) and protein kinase B (PKB); however, this hypothesis has not been thoroughly tested. To test this hypothesis, we first evaluated the temporal pattern of signalling through PI3K-PKB and mTOR following a bout of resistance exercise with eccentric contractions (EC). Our results indicated that the activation of signalling through PI3K-PKB is a transient event (<15 min), while the activation of mTOR is sustained for a long duration (>12 h). Furthermore, inhibition of PI3K-PKB activity did not prevent the activation of mTOR signalling by ECs, indicating that PI3K-PKB is not part of the upstream regulatory pathway. These observations led us to investigate an alternative pathway for the activation of mTOR signalling involving the synthesis of phosphatidic acid (PA) by phospholipase D (PLD). Our results demonstrate that ECs induce a sustained elevation in [PA] and inhibiting the synthesis of PA by PLD prevented the activation of mTOR. Furthermore, we determined that similar to ECs, PA activates mTOR signalling through a PI3K-PKB-independent mechanism. Combined, the results of this study indicate that the activation of mTOR following eccentric contractions occurs through a PI3K-PKB-independent mechanism that requires PLD and PA.

  13. Caerulomycin A Suppresses Immunity by Inhibiting T Cell Activity

    PubMed Central

    Chauhan, Arun; Khatri, Neeraj; Vohra, Rakesh M.; Jolly, Ravinder S.; Agrewala, Javed N.

    2014-01-01

    Background Caerulomycin A (CaeA) is a known antifungal and antibiotic agent. Further, CaeA is reported to induce the expansion of regulatory T cell and prolongs the survival of skin allografts in mouse model of transplantation. In the current study, CaeA was purified and characterized from a novel species of actinomycetes, Actinoalloteichus spitiensis. The CaeA was identified for its novel immunosuppressive property by inhibiting in vitro and in vivo function of T cells. Methods Isolation, purification and characterization of CaeA were performed using High Performance Flash Chromatography (HPFC), NMR and mass spectrometry techniques. In vitro and in vivo T cell studies were conducted in mice using flowcytometry, ELISA and thymidine-[methyl-3H] incorporation. Results CaeA significantly suppressed T cell activation and IFN-γ secretion. Further, it inhibited the T cells function at G1 phase of cell cycle. No apoptosis was noticed by CaeA at a concentration responsible for inducing T cell retardation. Furthermore, the change in the function of B cells but not macrophages was observed. The CaeA as well exhibited substantial inhibitory activity in vivo. Conclusion This study describes for the first time novel in vitro and in vivo immunosuppressive function of CaeA on T cells and B cells. CaeA has enough potential to act as a future immunosuppressive drug. PMID:25286329

  14. Ramiprilate inhibits functional matrix metalloproteinase activity in Crohn's disease fistulas.

    PubMed

    Efsen, Eva; Saermark, Torben; Hansen, Alastair; Bruun, Eywin; Brynskov, Jørn

    2011-09-01

    effect on MMP activity. Increased functional MMP activity, notably MMP-3 and -9, is present in Crohn's fistulas and may be inhibited by ramiprilate, a widely available ACE inhibitor.

  15. Goniothalamin enhances the ATPase activity of the molecular chaperone Hsp90 but inhibits its chaperone activity.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Yuhei; Ohtaki, Aguru; Jantan, Ibrahim; Yohda, Masafumi; Nakamoto, Hitoshi

    2015-03-01

    Hsp90 is an ATP-dependent molecular chaperone that is involved in important cellular pathways such as signal transduction pathways. It is a potential cancer drug target because it plays a critical role for stabilization and activation of oncoproteins. Thus, small molecule compounds that control the Hsp90 function are useful to elucidate potential lead compounds against cancer. We studied effect of a naturally occurring styryl-lactone goniothalamin on the activity of Hsp90. Although many drugs targeting Hsp90 inhibit the ATPase activity of Hsp90, goniothalamin enhanced rather than inhibited the ATPase activity of a cyanobacterial Hsp90 (HtpG) and a yeast Hsp90. It increased both K(m) and k(cat) of the Hsp90s. Domain competition assays and tryptophan fluorescence measurements with various truncated derivatives of HtpG indicated that goniothalamin binds to the N-terminal domain of HtpG. Goniothalamin did not influence on the interaction of HtpG with a non-native protein or the anti-aggregation activity of HtpG significantly. However, it inhibited the activity of HtpG that assists refolding of a non-native protein in cooperation with the Hsp70 chaperone system. This is the first report to show that a small molecule that binds to the N-terminal domain of Hsp90 activates its ATPase activity, while inhibiting the chaperone function of Hsp90.

  16. Phosphorylation of eIF2α triggered by mTORC1 inhibition and PP6C activation is required for autophagy and is aberrant in PP6C-mutated melanoma.

    PubMed

    Wengrod, Jordan; Wang, Ding; Weiss, Sarah; Zhong, Hua; Osman, Iman; Gardner, Lawrence B

    2015-03-10

    Amino acid deprivation promotes the inhibition of the kinase complex mTORC1 (mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1) and activation of the kinase GCN2 (general control nonrepressed 2). Signaling pathways downstream of both kinases have been thought to independently induce autophagy. We showed that these two amino acid-sensing systems are linked. We showed that pharmacological inhibition of mTORC1 led to activation of GCN2 and phosphorylation of the eukaryotic initiation factor 2α (eIF2α) in a mechanism dependent on the catalytic subunit of protein phosphatase 6 (PP6C). Autophagy induced by pharmacological inhibition of mTORC1 required PP6C, GCN2, and eIF2α phosphorylation. Although some of the PP6C mutants found in melanoma did not form a strong complex with PP6 regulatory subunits and were rapidly degraded, these mutants paradoxically stabilized PP6C encoded by the wild-type allele and increased eIF2α phosphorylation. Furthermore, these PP6C mutations were associated with increased autophagy in vitro and in human melanoma samples. Thus, these data showed that GCN2 activation and phosphorylation of eIF2α in response to mTORC1 inhibition are necessary for autophagy. Additionally, we described a role for PP6C in this process and provided a mechanism for PP6C mutations associated with melanoma.

  17. Quorum Sensing Inhibiting Activity of Streptomyces coelicoflavus Isolated from Soil

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Ramadan; Shaaban, Mona I.; Abdel Bar, Fatma M.; El-Mahdy, Areej M.; Shokralla, Shadi

    2016-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) systems communicate bacterial population and stimulate microbial pathogenesis through signaling molecules. Inhibition of QS signals potentially suppresses microbial infections. Antimicrobial properties of Streptomyces have been extensively studied, however, less is known about quorum sensing inhibitory (QSI) activities of Streptomyces. This study explored the QSI potential of Streptomyces isolated from soil. Sixty-five bacterial isolates were purified from soil samples with morphological characteristics of Streptomyces. The three isolates: S6, S12, and S17, exhibited QSI effect by screening with the reporter, Chromobacterium violaceum. Isolate S17 was identified as Streptomyces coelicoflavus by sequencing of the hypervariable regions (V1–V6) of 16S rRNA and was assigned gene bank number KJ855087. The QSI effect of the cell-free supernatant of isolate S17 was not abolished by proteinase K indicating the non-enzymatic activity of QSI components of S17. Three major compounds were isolated and identified, using spectroscopic techniques (1D, 2D NMR, and Mass spectrometry), as behenic acid (docosanoic acid), borrelidin, and 1H-pyrrole-2-carboxylic acid. 1H-pyrrole-2-carboxylic acid inhibited QS and related virulence factors of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 including; elastase, protease, and pyocyanin without affecting Pseudomonas viability. At the molecular level, 1H-pyrrole-2-carboxylic acid suppressed the expression of QS genes (lasI, lasR, lasA, lasB, rhlI, rhlR, pqsA, and pqsR). Moreover, QSI activity of S17 was assessed under different growth conditions and ISP2 medium supplemented with glucose 0.4% w/v and adjusted at pH 7, showed the highest QSI action. In conclusion, 1H-pyrrole-2-carboxylic acid, one of the major metabolites of Streptomyces isolate S17, inhibited QS and virulence determinants of P. aeruginosa PAO1. The findings of the study open the scope to exploit the in vivo efficacy of this active molecule as anti-pathogenic and anti

  18. Activation of TRPV1 channels inhibits mechanosensitive Piezo channel activity by depleting membrane phosphoinositides.

    PubMed

    Borbiro, Istvan; Badheka, Doreen; Rohacs, Tibor

    2015-02-10

    Capsaicin is an activator of the heat-sensitive TRPV1 (transient receptor potential vanilloid 1) ion channels and has been used as a local analgesic. We found that activation of TRPV1 channels with capsaicin either in dorsal root ganglion neurons or in a heterologous expression system inhibited the mechanosensitive Piezo1 and Piezo2 channels by depleting phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2] and its precursor phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate [PI(4)P] from the plasma membrane through Ca(2+)-induced phospholipase Cδ (PLCδ) activation. Experiments with chemically inducible phosphoinositide phosphatases and receptor-induced activation of PLCβ indicated that inhibition of Piezo channels required depletion of both PI(4)P and PI(4,5)P2. The mechanically activated current amplitudes decreased substantially in the excised inside-out configuration, where the membrane patch containing Piezo1 channels is removed from the cell. PI(4,5)P2 and PI(4)P applied to these excised patches inhibited this decrease. Thus, we concluded that Piezo channel activity requires the presence of phosphoinositides, and the combined depletion of PI(4,5)P2 and PI(4)P reduces channel activity. In addition to revealing a role for distinct membrane lipids in mechanosensitive ion channel regulation, these data suggest that inhibition of Piezo2 channels may contribute to the analgesic effect of capsaicin.

  19. Arctigenin, a phenylpropanoid dibenzylbutyrolactone lignan, inhibits MAP kinases and AP-1 activation via potent MKK inhibition: the role in TNF-alpha inhibition.

    PubMed

    Cho, Min Kyung; Jang, Young Pyo; Kim, Young Choong; Kim, Sang Geon

    2004-10-01

    Arctigenin, naturally occurring in Bardanae fructus, Saussurea medusa, Arctium lappa L., Torreya nucifera and Ipomea cairica, is a phenylpropanoid dibenzylbutyrolactone lignan with antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. Previously, we showed that arctigenin potently inhibited the induction of nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) by lipopolysaccharide (LPS), which involved suppression of NF-kappaB activation. In the present study, we examined the effects of arctigenin on mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase activation in Raw264.7 cells and MAP kinase kinase (MKK) activity. The effect of arctigenin on activator protein-1 (AP-1) activation was also studied in association with tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) expression. Immunoblot analysis showed that arctigenin inhibited phosphorylation of MAP kinases ERK1/2, p38 kinase and JNK and their activities in Raw264.7 cells treated with LPS. Arctigenin potently inhibited the activity of MKK1 in vitro with the IC(50) value of 1 nM. Gel shift and reporter gene analyses revealed that arctigenin inhibited LPS-inducible AP-1 binding to the AP-1 consensus oligonucleotide and AP-1-mediated reporter gene expression. In view of the potential role of AP-1 in the induction of TNF-alpha, we next examined the inhibitory effects of arctigenin on the expression of TNF-alpha. Arctigenin blocked TNF-alpha production and decreased the level of TNF-alpha mRNA in the cells exposed to LPS. These results showed that arctigenin inhibited activation of MAP kinases including ERK1/2, p38 kinase and JNK through the inhibition of MKK activities, leading to AP-1 inactivation, which might, at least in part, contribute to the inhibition of TNF-alpha production.

  20. The Inhibition of microRNA-128 on IGF-1-Activating mTOR Signaling Involves in Temozolomide-Induced Glioma Cell Apoptotic Death

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Peng-Hsu; Cheng, Chia-Hsiung; Shih, Chwen-Ming; Ho, Kuo-Hao; Lin, Cheng-Wei; Lee, Chin-Cheng; Liu, Ann-Jeng; Chang, Cheng-Kuei

    2016-01-01

    Temozolomide (TMZ), an alkylating agent of the imidazotetrazine series, is a first-line chemotherapeutic drug used in the clinical therapy of glioblastoma multiforme, the most common and high-grade primary glioma in adults. Micro (mi)RNAs, which are small noncoding RNAs, post-transcriptionally regulate gene expressions and are involved in gliomagenesis. However, no studies have reported relationships between TMZ and miRNA gene regulation. We investigated TMZ-mediated miRNA profiles and its molecular mechanisms underlying the induction of glioma cell death. By performing miRNA microarray and bioinformatics analyses, we observed that expression of 248 miRNAs was altered, including five significantly upregulated and 17 significantly downregulated miRNAs, in TMZ-treated U87MG cells. miR-128 expression levels were lower in different glioma cells and strongly associated with poor survival. TMZ treatment significantly upregulated miR-128 expression. TMZ significantly enhanced miR-128-1 promoter activity and transcriptionally regulated miR-128 levels through c-Jun N-terminal kinase 2/c-Jun pathways. The overexpression and knockdown of miR-128 expression significantly affected TMZ-mediated cell viability and apoptosis-related protein expression. Furthermore, the overexpression of miR-128 alone enhanced apoptotic death of glioma cells through caspase-3/9 activation, poly(ADP ribose) polymerase degradation, reactive oxygen species generation, mitochondrial membrane potential loss, and non-protective autophagy formation. Finally, we identified that key members in mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling including mTOR, rapamycin-insensitive companion of mTOR, insulin-like growth factor 1, and PIK3R1, but not PDK1, were direct target genes of miR-128. TMZ inhibited mTOR signaling through miR-128 regulation. These results indicate that miR-128-inhibited mTOR signaling is involved in TMZ-mediated cytotoxicity. Our findings may provide a better understanding of cytotoxic

  1. Activation and inhibition of adenylyl cyclase isoforms by forskolin analogs.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Cibele; Papa, Dan; Hübner, Melanie; Mou, Tung-Chung; Lushington, Gerald H; Seifert, Roland

    2008-04-01

    Adenylyl cyclase (AC) isoforms 1 to 9 are differentially expressed in tissues and constitute an interesting drug target. ACs 1 to 8 are activated by the diterpene, forskolin (FS). It is unfortunate that there is a paucity of AC isoform-selective activators. To develop such compounds, an understanding of the structure/activity relationships of diterpenes is necessary. Therefore, we examined the effects of FS and nine FS analogs on ACs 1, 2, and 5 expressed in Spodoptera frugiperda insect cells. Diterpenes showed the highest potencies at AC1 and the lowest potencies at AC2. We identified full agonists, partial agonists, antagonists, and inverse agonists, i.e., diterpenes that reduced basal AC activity. Each AC isoform exhibited a distinct pharmacological profile. AC2 showed the highest basal activity of all AC isoforms and highest sensitivity to inverse agonistic effects of 1-deoxy-forskolin, 7-deacetyl-1,9-dideoxy-forskolin, and, particularly, BODIPY-forskolin. In contrast, BODIPY-forskolin acted as partial agonist at the other ACs. 1-Deoxy-forskolin analogs were devoid of agonistic activity at ACs but antagonized the effects of FS in a mixed competitive/noncompetitive manner. At purified catalytic AC subunits, BODIPY-forskolin acted as weak partial agonist/strong partial antagonist. Molecular modeling revealed that the BODIPY group rotates promiscuously outside of the FS-binding site. Collectively, ACs are not uniformly activated and inhibited by FS and FS analogs, demonstrating the feasibility to design isoform-selective FS analogs. The two- and multiple-state models, originally developed to conceptualize ligand effects at G-protein-coupled receptors, can be applied to ACs to explain certain experimental data.

  2. Rapamycin extends murine lifespan but has limited effects on aging

    PubMed Central

    Neff, Frauke; Flores-Dominguez, Diana; Ryan, Devon P.; Horsch, Marion; Schröder, Susanne; Adler, Thure; Afonso, Luciana Caminha; Aguilar-Pimentel, Juan Antonio; Becker, Lore; Garrett, Lillian; Hans, Wolfgang; Hettich, Moritz M.; Holtmeier, Richard; Hölter, Sabine M.; Moreth, Kristin; Prehn, Cornelia; Puk, Oliver; Rácz, Ildikó; Rathkolb, Birgit; Rozman, Jan; Naton, Beatrix; Ordemann, Rainer; Adamski, Jerzy; Beckers, Johannes; Bekeredjian, Raffi; Busch, Dirk H.; Ehninger, Gerhard; Graw, Jochen; Höfler, Heinz; Klingenspor, Martin; Klopstock, Thomas; Ollert, Markus; Stypmann, Jörg; Wolf, Eckhard; Wurst, Wolfgang; Zimmer, Andreas; Fuchs, Helmut; Gailus-Durner, Valérie; Hrabe de Angelis, Martin; Ehninger, Dan

    2013-01-01

    Aging is a major risk factor for a large number of disorders and functional impairments. Therapeutic targeting of the aging process may therefore represent an innovative strategy in the quest for novel and broadly effective treatments against age-related diseases. The recent report of lifespan extension in mice treated with the FDA-approved mTOR inhibitor rapamycin represented the first demonstration of pharmacological extension of maximal lifespan in mammals. Longevity effects of rapamycin may, however, be due to rapamycin’s effects on specific life-limiting pathologies, such as cancers, and it remains unclear if this compound actually slows the rate of aging in mammals. Here, we present results from a comprehensive, large-scale assessment of a wide range of structural and functional aging phenotypes, which we performed to determine whether rapamycin slows the rate of aging in male C57BL/6J mice. While rapamycin did extend lifespan, it ameliorated few studied aging phenotypes. A subset of aging traits appeared to be rescued by rapamycin. Rapamycin, however, had similar effects on many of these traits in young animals, indicating that these effects were not due to a modulation of aging, but rather related to aging-independent drug effects. Therefore, our data largely dissociate rapamycin’s longevity effects from effects on aging itself. PMID:23863708

  3. Homocysteine injures vascular endothelial cells by inhibiting mitochondrial activity

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Fengyong; Qi, Xiujing; Gao, Zheng; Yang, Xingju; Zheng, Xingfeng; Duan, Chonghao; Zheng, Jian

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of homocysteine (Hcy) in the pathogenesis of pulmonary embolism (PE) and the associated molecular mechanisms in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Hcy contents were detected with high-performance liquid chromatography. Apoptosis was detected by flow cytometry using Annexin-V staining. Cytochrome c oxidase (COX) activity was assessed with an enzyme activity assay, and the expression levels of COX 17 were determined by western blot analysis. Intracellular reactive oxygen species levels were measured using a microplate reader with a fluorescence probe. The results demonstrated that, compared with the control group, the serum Hcy levels were significantly elevated in the PE group, suggesting that Hcy may be an indicator for PE. Following treatment with Hcy, the apoptosis rate was markedly elevated in HUVECs. Moreover, Hcy decreased COX activity and downregulated the expression of COX 17 in HUVECs. Furthermore, Hcy increased the ROS levels in these endothelial cells. However, all the above-mentioned physiopathological changes induced by Hcy in HUVECs could be restored by folic acid. In conclusion, the results of the present study demonstrated that Hcy inhibited COX activity, downregulated COX 17 expression, increased intracellular ROS levels and enhanced apoptosis in endothelial cells. PMID:27698720

  4. Berberine inhibits PTP1B activity and mimics insulin action.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chunhua; Zhang, Yuebo; Huang, Cheng

    2010-07-02

    Type 2 diabetes patients show defects in insulin signal transduction that include lack of insulin receptor, decrease in insulin stimulated receptor tyrosine kinase activity and receptor-mediated phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrates (IRSs). A small molecule that could target insulin signaling would be of significant advantage in the treatment of diabetes. Berberine (BBR) has recently been shown to lower blood glucose levels and to improve insulin resistance in db/db mice partly through the activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling and induction of phosphorylation of insulin receptor (IR). However, the underlying mechanism remains largely unknown. Here we report that BBR mimics insulin action by increasing glucose uptake ability by 3T3-L1 adipocytes and L6 myocytes in an insulin-independent manner, inhibiting phosphatase activity of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B), and increasing phosphorylation of IR, IRS1 and Akt in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. In diabetic mice, BBR lowers hyperglycemia and improves impaired glucose tolerance, but does not increase insulin release and synthesis. The results suggest that BBR represents a different class of anti-hyperglycemic agents.

  5. Target of rapamycin signaling mediates vacuolar fragmentation.

    PubMed

    Stauffer, Bobbiejane; Powers, Ted

    2017-02-01

    In eukaryotic cells, cellular homeostasis requires that different organelles respond to intracellular as well as environmental signals and modulate their behavior as conditions demand. Understanding the molecular mechanisms required for these changes remains an outstanding goal. One such organelle is the lysosome/vacuole, which undergoes alterations in size and number in response to environmental and physiological stimuli. Changes in the morphology of this organelle are mediated in part by the equilibrium between fusion and fission processes. While the fusion of the yeast vacuole has been studied intensively, the regulation of vacuolar fission remains poorly characterized by comparison. In recent years, a number of studies have incorporated genome-wide visual screens and high-throughput microscopy to identify factors required for vacuolar fission in response to diverse cellular insults, including hyperosmotic and endoplasmic reticulum stress. Available evidence now demonstrates that the rapamycin-sensitive TOR network, a master regulator of cell growth, is required for vacuolar fragmentation in response to stress. Importantly, many of the genes identified in these studies provide new insights into potential links between the vacuolar fission machinery and TOR signaling. Together these advances both extend our understanding of the regulation of vacuolar fragmentation in yeast as well as underscore the role of analogous events in mammalian cells.

  6. Susceptibility of PTEN-positive metastatic tumors to small interfering RNA targeting the mammalian target of rapamycin.

    PubMed

    Koide, Hiroyuki; Asai, Tomohiro; Kato, Hiroki; Yonenaga, Norihito; Yokota, Masafumi; Ando, Hidenori; Dewa, Takehisa; Nango, Mamoru; Maeda, Noriyuki; Oku, Naoto

    2015-01-01

    PTEN-positive tumors are not susceptible to the treatment with rapamycin, an inhibitor of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). Here, we determined the susceptibility of PTEN-positive cells to small interfering RNA for mTOR (si-mTOR) by using a novel liposomal delivery system. We prepared dicetyl phosphate-tetraethylenepentamine-based polycation liposomes (TEPA-PCL) decorated with polyethylene glycol (PEG) grafting Ala-Pro-Arg-Pro-Gly (APRPG), a VRGFR-1-targeting peptide. APRPG-PEG-decorated TEPA-PCL carrying si-mTOR (APRPG-TEPA-PCL/si-mTOR) had an antiproliferative effect against B16F10 murine melanoma cells (PTEN-positive) and significantly inhibited both the proliferation and tube formation of mouse 2H-11 endothelial-like cells (PTEN-positive). APRPG-TEPA-PCL/si-mTOR treatment did not induce Akt phosphorylation (Ser473) in either B16F10 or 2H-11 cells although there was strong phosphorylation of Akt in response to rapamycin treatment. Intravenous injection of APRPG-TEPA-PCL/si-mTOR significantly suppressed the tumor growth compared with rapamycin treatment in mice bearing B16F10 melanoma. These findings suggest that APRPG-TEPA-PCL/si-mTOR is useful for the treatment of PTEN-positive tumors.

  7. BX-795 inhibits HSV-1 and HSV-2 replication by blocking the JNK/p38 pathways without interfering with PDK1 activity in host cells

    PubMed Central

    Su, Ai-rong; Qiu, Min; Li, Yan-lei; Xu, Wen-tao; Song, Si-wei; Wang, Xiao-hui; Song, Hong-yong; Zheng, Nan; Wu, Zhi-wei

    2017-01-01

    BX-795 is an inhibitor of 3-phosphoinositide-dependent kinase 1 (PDK1), but also a potent inhibitor of the IKK-related kinase, TANKbinding kinase 1 (TBK1) and IKKɛ. In this study we attempted to elucidate the molecular mechanism(s) underlying the inhibition of BX-795 on Herpes simplex virus (HSV) replication. HEC-1-A or Vero cells were treated with BX-795 and infected with HSV-1 or HSV-2 for different periods. BX-795 (3.125-25 μmol/L) dose-dependently suppressed HSV-2 replication, and displayed a low cytotoxicity to the host cells. BX-795 treatment dose-dependently suppressed the expression of two HSV immediate-early (IE) genes (ICP0 and ICP27) and the late gene (gD) at 12 h postinfection. HSV-2 infection resulted in the activation of PI3K and Akt in the host cells, and BX-795 treatment inhibited HSV-2-induced Akt phosphorylation and activation. However, the blockage of PI3K/Akt/mTOR with LY294002 and rapamycin did not affect HSV-2 replication. HSV-2 infection increased the phosphorylation of JNK and p38, and reduced ERK phosphorylation at 8 h postinfection in the host cells; BX-795 treatment inhibited HSV-2-induced activation of JNK and p38 MAP kinase as well as the phosphorylation of c-Jun and ATF-2, the downstream targets of JNK and p38 MAP kinase. Furthermore, SB203580 (a p38 inhibitor) or SP600125 (a JNK inhibitor) dose-dependently inhibited the viral replication in the host cells, whereas PD98059 (an ERK inhibitor) was not effective. Moreover, BX-795 blocked PMA-stimulated c-Jun activation as well as HSV-2-mediated c-Jun nuclear translocation. BX-795 dose-dependently inhibited HSV-2, PMA, TNF-α-stimulated AP-1 activation, but not HSV-induced NF-κB activation. Overexpression of p38/JNK attenuated the inhibitory effect of BX-795 on HSV replication. BX-795 completely blocked HSV-2-induced MKK4 phosphorylation, suggesting that BX-795 acting upstream of JNK and p38 MAP kinase. In conclusion, this study identifies the anti-HSV activity of BX-795 and its

  8. Sirolimus (rapamycin): from the soil of Easter Island to a bright future.

    PubMed

    Paghdal, Kapila V; Schwartz, Robert A

    2007-12-01

    Discovered in fungi in the remote Easter Island, sirolimus (rapamycin) shows potential beyond its obvious antiproliferative and immunosuppressant activity. Studies have demonstrated that sirolimus acts as a vascular endothelial growth factor inhibitor, providing prospective therapeutic benefits and possible prevention of tuberous sclerosis and Kaposi's sarcoma. Its ability to decrease keratinocyte proliferation may help patients with psoriasis. In those with tuberous sclerosis complex, it may prevent the development of hamartomas and reduce or eliminate them once grown by blocking the mammalian target of rapamycin, a critical regulatory kinase. A great advantage for this drug is in the decreased risk of malignancies, including Kaposi's sarcoma, associated with its use compared with other immunosuppressants, namely calcineurin inhibitors. This review will focus on the pharmacology and potential uses of sirolimus.

  9. MIF family members cooperatively inhibit p53 expression and activity.

    PubMed

    Brock, Stephanie E; Rendon, Beatriz E; Xin, Dan; Yaddanapudi, Kavitha; Mitchell, Robert A

    2014-01-01

    The tumor suppressor p53 is induced by genotoxic stress in both normal and transformed cells and serves to transcriptionally coordinate cell cycle checkpoint control and programmed cell death responses. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is an autocrine and paracrine acting cytokine/growth factor that promotes lung adenocarcinoma cell motility, anchorage-independence and neo-angiogenic potential. Several recent studies indicate that the only known homolog of MIF, D-dopachrome tautomerase (D-DT - also referred to as MIF-2), has functionally redundant activities with MIF and cooperatively promotes MIF-dependent pro-tumorigenic phenotypes. We now report that MIF and D-DT synergistically inhibit steady state p53 phosphorylation, stabilization and transcriptional activity in human lung adenocarcinoma cell lines. The combined loss of MIF and D-DT by siRNA leads to dramatically reduced cell cycle progression, anchorage independence, focus formation and increased programmed cell death when compared to individual loss of MIF or D-DT. Importantly, p53 mutant and p53 null lung adenocarcinoma cell lines were only nominally rescued from the cell growth effects of MIF/D-DT combined deficiency suggesting only a minor role for p53 in these transformed cell growth phenotypes. Finally, increased p53 activation was found to be independent of aberrantly activated AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) that occurs in response to MIF/D-DT-deficiency but is dependent on reactive oxygen species (ROS) that mediate aberrant AMPK activation in these cells. Combined, these findings suggest that both p53 wildtype and mutant human lung adenocarcinoma tumors rely on MIF family members for maximal cell growth and survival.

  10. Tetramethylpyrazine inhibits neutrophil activation following permanent cerebral ischemia in rats.

    PubMed

    Chang, Cheng-Yi; Kao, Tsung-Kuei; Chen, Wen-Ying; Ou, Yen-Chuan; Li, Jian-Ri; Liao, Su-Lan; Raung, Shue-Ling; Chen, Chun-Jung

    2015-07-31

    Experimental studies have demonstrated the beneficial effects of tetramethylpyrazine (TMP) against ischemic stroke and highlighted its crucial role in anti-inflammatory activity. This study provides evidence of an alternative target for TMP and sheds light on the mechanism of its anti-inflammatory action against ischemic brain injury. We report a global inhibitory effect of TMP on inflammatory cell intracerebral activation and infiltration in a rat model of permanent cerebral ischemia. The results of immunohistochemistry, enzymatic assay, flow cytometric analysis, and cytological analysis revealed that intraperitoneal TMP administration reduced neuronal loss, macrophage/microglia activation, brain parenchyma infiltrative neutrophils, and circulating neutrophils after cerebral ischemia. Biochemical studies of cultured neutrophils further demonstrated that TMP attenuated neutrophil migration, endothelium adhesion, spontaneous nitric oxide (NO) production, and stimuli-activated NO production after cerebral ischemia. In parallel with these anti-neutrophil phenomena, TMP also attenuated the activities of ischemia-induced inflammation-associated signaling molecules, including plasma high-mobility group box-1 protein (HMGB1) and neutrophil toll-like receptor-4 (TLR4), Akt, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), and inducible nitric oxide synthase. Another finding in this study was that the anti-neutrophil effect of TMP was accompanied by a further elevated expression of NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in neutrophils after cerebral ischemia. Taken together, our results suggest that both the promotion of endogenous anti-inflammatory defense capacity and the attenuation of pro-inflammatory responses via targeting of circulating neutrophils by elevating Nrf2/HO-1 expression and inhibiting HMGB1/TLR4, Akt, and ERK signaling might actively contribute to TMP-mediated neuroprotection against cerebral ischemia.

  11. Ratite oils promote keratinocyte cell growth and inhibit leukocyte activation.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Darin C; Leung, Gigi; Wang, Eddy; Ma, Sam; Lo, Blanche K K; McElwee, Kevin J; Cheng, Kimberly M

    2015-09-01

    Traditionally, native Australian aborigines have used emu oil for the treatment of inflammation and to accelerate wound healing. Studies on mice suggest that topically applied emu oil may have anti-inflammatory properties and may promote wound healing. We investigated the effects of ratite oils (6 emu, 3 ostrich, 1 rhea) on immortalized human keratinocytes (HaCaT cells) in vitro by culturing the cells in media with oil concentrations of 0%, 0.5%, and 1.0%. Peking duck, tea tree, and olive oils were used as comparative controls. The same oils at 0.5% concentration were evaluated for their influence on peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) survival over 48 hr and their ability to inhibit IFNγ production in PBMCs activated by phytohemagglutinin (PHA) in ELISpot assays. Compared to no oil control, significantly shorter population doubling time durations were observed for HaCaT cells cultured in emu oil (1.51×faster), ostrich oil (1.46×faster), and rhea oil (1.64×faster). Tea tree oil demonstrated significant antiproliferative activity and olive oil significantly prolonged (1.35×slower) cell population doubling time. In contrast, almost all oils, particularly tea tree oil, significantly reduced PBMC viability. Different oils had different levels of inhibitory effect on IFNγ production with individual emu, ostrich, rhea, and duck oil samples conferring full inhibition. This preliminary investigation suggests that emu oil might promote wound healing by accelerating the growth rate of keratinocytes. Combined with anti-inflammatory properties, ratite oil may serve as a useful component in bandages and ointments for the treatment of wounds and inflammatory skin conditions.

  12. Ratite oils promote keratinocyte cell growth and inhibit leukocyte activation

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Darin C.; Leung, Gigi; Wang, Eddy; Ma, Sam; Lo, Blanche K. K.; McElwee, Kevin J.; Cheng, Kimberly M.

    2015-01-01

    Traditionally, native Australian aborigines have used emu oil for the treatment of inflammation and to accelerate wound healing. Studies on mice suggest that topically applied emu oil may have anti-inflammatory properties and may promote wound healing. We investigated the effects of ratite oils (6 emu, 3 ostrich, 1 rhea) on immortalized human keratinocytes (HaCaT cells) in vitro by culturing the cells in media with oil concentrations of 0%, 0.5%, and 1.0%. Peking duck, tea tree, and olive oils were used as comparative controls. The same oils at 0.5% concentration were evaluated for their influence on peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) survival over 48 hr and their ability to inhibit IFNγ production in PBMCs activated by phytohemagglutinin (PHA) in ELISpot assays. Compared to no oil control, significantly shorter population doubling time durations were observed for HaCaT cells cultured in emu oil (1.51 × faster), ostrich oil (1.46 × faster), and rhea oil (1.64 × faster). Tea tree oil demonstrated significant antiproliferative activity and olive oil significantly prolonged (1.35 × slower) cell population doubling time. In contrast, almost all oils, particularly tea tree oil, significantly reduced PBMC viability. Different oils had different levels of inhibitory effect on IFNγ production with individual emu, ostrich, rhea, and duck oil samples conferring full inhibition. This preliminary investigation suggests that emu oil might promote wound healing by accelerating the growth rate of keratinocytes. Combined with anti-inflammatory properties, ratite oil may serve as a useful component in bandages and ointments for the treatment of wounds and inflammatory skin conditions. PMID:26217022

  13. Torin1-mediated TOR kinase inhibition reduces Wee1 levels and advances mitotic commitment in fission yeast and HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Atkin, Jane; Halova, Lenka; Ferguson, Jennifer; Hitchin, James R; Lichawska-Cieslar, Agata; Jordan, Allan M; Pines, Jonathon; Wellbrock, Claudia; Petersen, Janni

    2014-03-15

    The target of rapamycin (TOR) kinase regulates cell growth and division. Rapamycin only inhibits a subset of TOR activities. Here we show that in contrast to the mild impact of rapamycin on cell division, blocking the catalytic site of TOR with the Torin1 inhibitor completely arrests growth without cell death in Schizosaccharomyces pombe. A mutation of the Tor2 glycine residue (G2040D) that lies adjacent to the key Torin-interacting tryptophan provides Torin1 resistance, confirming the specificity of Torin1 for TOR. Using this mutation, we show that Torin1 advanced mitotic onset before inducing growth arrest. In contrast to TOR inhibition with rapamycin, regulation by either Wee1 or Cdc25 was sufficient for this Torin1-induced advanced mitosis. Torin1 promoted a Polo and Cdr2 kinase-controlled drop in Wee1 levels. Experiments in human cell lines recapitulated these yeast observations: mammalian TOR (mTOR) was inhibited by Torin1, Wee1 levels declined and mitotic commitment was advanced in HeLa cells. Thus, the regulation of the mitotic inhibitor Wee1 by TOR signalling is a conserved mechanism that helps to couple cell cycle and growth controls.

  14. Cinnamon effectively inhibits the activity of leukemia stem cells.

    PubMed

    Guan, X; Su, M C; Zhao, R B; Ouyang, H M; Dong, X D; Hu, P; Pei, Q; Lu, J; Li, Z F; Zhang, C R; Yang, T-H

    2016-08-19

    Cinnamon is the main component of Sanyangxuedai, which is one of the effective traditional Chinese medicines for treating malignancies. Leukemia is a prevalent malignant disease that Sanyangxuedai has been used to treat. Although successful in several studies, there is a lack of solid evidence as to why Sanyangxuedai has an effect on leukemia, and little is known about the underlying mechanisms. In this study, the active ingredients of cinnamon were isolated, purified, and identified. The transwell transport pool formed with the Caco-2 cell model was used to filter the active ingredients of cinnamon by simulating the gastrointestinal barrier in vitro. Moreover, the cell morphology, cell cycle status, apoptosis status, and antigenic variation of the cell surface antigens were observed and measured in K562 cells after treatment with the active ingredients of cinnamon. Our results showed that 50-75 μM was a safe concentration of cinnamon extract for treatment of K562 cells for 72 h. The cinnamon extract caused growth inhibition of K562 cells. Cinnamon extract seemed to arrest the cells at the G1 stage and increased the apoptosis rate significantly. Interestingly, cinnamon extract treatment upregulated the expression of erythroid and myeloid differentiation antigens and downregulated that of the megakaryocytic differentiation antigens in a dose-dependent manner. Our findings indicate that cinnamon extract from Sanyangxuedai may be effective for treating leukemia.

  15. Inhibition of LRRK2 kinase activity stimulates macroautophagy☆

    PubMed Central

    Manzoni, Claudia; Mamais, Adamantios; Dihanich, Sybille; Abeti, Rosella; Soutar, Marc P.M.; Plun-Favreau, Helene; Giunti, Paola; Tooze, Sharon A.; Bandopadhyay, Rina; Lewis, Patrick A.

    2013-01-01

    Leucine Rich Repeat Kinase 2 (LRRK2) is one of the most important genetic contributors to Parkinson's disease. LRRK2 has been implicated in a number of cellular processes, including macroautophagy. To test whether LRRK2 has a role in regulating autophagy, a specific inhibitor of the kinase activity of LRRK2 was applied to human neuroglioma cells and downstream readouts of autophagy examined. The resulting data demonstrate that inhibition of LRRK2 kinase activity stimulates macroautophagy in the absence of any alteration in the translational targets of mTORC1, suggesting that LRRK2 regulates autophagic vesicle formation independent of canonical mTORC1 signaling. This study represents the first pharmacological dissection of the role LRRK2 plays in the autophagy/lysosomal pathway, emphasizing the importance of this pathway as a marker for LRRK2 physiological function. Moreover it highlights the need to dissect autophagy and lysosomal activities in the context of LRRK2 related pathologies with the final aim of understanding their aetiology and identifying specific targets for disease modifying therapies in patients. PMID:23916833

  16. Chlorogenic Acid Inhibits Human Platelet Activation and Thrombus Formation

    PubMed Central

    Fuentes, Eduardo; Caballero, Julio; Alarcón, Marcelo; Rojas, Armando; Palomo, Iván

    2014-01-01

    Background Chlorogenic acid is a potent phenolic antioxidant. However, its effect on platelet aggregation, a critical factor in arterial thrombosis, remains unclear. Consequently, chlorogenic acid-action mechanisms in preventing platelet activation and thrombus formation were examined. Methods and Results Chlorogenic acid in a dose-dependent manner (0.1 to 1 mmol/L) inhibited platelet secretion and aggregation induced by ADP, collagen, arachidonic acid and TRAP-6, and diminished platelet firm adhesion/aggregation and platelet-leukocyte interactions under flow conditions. At these concentrations chlorogenic acid significantly decreased platelet inflammatory mediators (sP-selectin, sCD40L, CCL5 and IL-1β) and increased intraplatelet cAMP levels/PKA activation. Interestingly, SQ22536 (an adenylate cyclase inhibitor) and ZM241385 (a potent A2A receptor antagonist) attenuated the antiplatelet effect of chlorogenic acid. Chlorogenic acid is compatible to the active site of the adenosine A2A receptor as revealed through molecular modeling. In addition, chlorogenic acid had a significantly lower effect on mouse bleeding time when compared to the same dose of aspirin. Conclusions Antiplatelet and antithrombotic effects of chlorogenic acid are associated with the A2A receptor/adenylate cyclase/cAMP/PKA signaling pathway. PMID:24598787

  17. Notch Inhibits Yorkie Activity in Drosophila Wing Discs

    PubMed Central

    Djiane, Alexandre; Zaessinger, Sophie; Babaoğlan, A. Burcu; Bray, Sarah J.

    2014-01-01

    During development, tissues and organs must coordinate growth and patterning so they reach the right size and shape. During larval stages, a dramatic increase in size and cell number of Drosophila wing imaginal discs is controlled by the action of several signaling pathways. Complex cross-talk between these pathways also pattern these discs to specify different regions with different fates and grow