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Sample records for activation markers cd38

  1. The relationship of HLA-DR, CD38 and CD71 markers to activation, proliferation and differentiation of some human leukemia and lymphoma cells.

    PubMed

    Glasová, M; Koníková, E; Stasáková, J; Babusíková, O

    1998-01-01

    We investigated the expression-percentage as well as MESF values ("molecules of equivalent soluble fluorochrom" that represent approximately the density of marker expression) of HLA-DR, CD71 and CD38 markers in some human leukemias (ALL, AML, CLL, CML) and lymphomas. They are non-lineage restricted and are supposed to be activation markers except for cases where they represent pathological phenotype like HLA-DR in pre B-ALL, CD38 in some M0 AML or in plasmocytoma or CD38 and CD71 in less mature T-ALL. We used flow cytometry, immunofluorescent staining, DNA staining by propidium iodide and quantification by calibration particles. We demonstrated increased MESF values of HLA-DR compared with controls in all investigated disorders, what could have a prognostic value. We demonstrated significantly higher MESF values of HLA-DR in cALL (37,300-46,000) in comparison with AML (9400-12,400), what could represent another important parameter when distinguishing between these two groups of leukemia. In cells of CML patients with lower CD38% and CD71% increased MESF values (5100 for CD38 and 7900 for CD71), were found while in some T-ALL, AML and cALL patients with high percentages of CD71 and CD38 there were lower MESF values what could indicate a possible connection of higher stage of cell maturation with increased density of CD38 and CD71 markers. We investigated possible relationship between percentage of expression of HLA-DR, CD38 and CD71 and proliferation rate by DNA analysis of the cell cycle. In a group of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma patients, there was no significant increase of proliferation index of malignant cells compared with control. The correlation between percentage of expression of mentioned parameters and proliferation index was not significant. In one patient with Burkitt's lymphoma we demonstrated significant increase of proliferation index of CD71+ subpopulation compared with CD71- one, what indicates that in aggressive form of NHL CD71 can be evaluated not

  2. CD38 expression labels an activated subset within chronic lymphocytic leukemia clones enriched in proliferating B cells

    PubMed Central

    Damle, Rajendra N.; Temburni, Sonal; Calissano, Carlo; Yancopoulos, Sophia; Banapour, Taraneh; Sison, Cristina; Allen, Steven L.; Rai, Kanti R.

    2007-01-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) cells are thought to have diminished cell-cycling capacity, a view challenged by their phenotypic resemblance to activated human B lymphocytes. The present study addresses the cell-cycling status of CLL cells, focusing on those leukemic cells expressing CD38, a molecule involved in signaling and activation that also serves as a prognostic marker in this disease. CD38+ and CD38− members of individual CLL clones were analyzed for coexpression of molecules associated with cellular activation (CD27, CD62L, and CD69), cell-cycle entry (Ki-67), signaling (ZAP-70), and protection from apoptosis (telomerase and Bcl-2). Regardless of the size of the CD38+ fraction within a CLL clone, CD38+ subclones are markedly enriched for expression of Ki-67, ZAP-70, human telomerase reverse transcriptase, and telomerase activity. Although the percentage of cells (approximately 2%) entering the cell cycle as defined by Ki-67 expression is small, the absolute number within a clone can be sizeable and is contained primarily within the CD38+ fraction. Despite these activation/proliferation differences, both CD38+ and CD38− fractions have similar telomere lengths, suggesting that CD38 expression is dynamic and transient. These findings may help explain why high percentages of CD38+ cells within clones are associated with poor clinical outcome. PMID:17684154

  3. Contribution of NADPH Oxidase to Membrane CD38 Internalization and Activation in Coronary Arterial Myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ming; Li, Xiao-Xue; Ritter, Joseph K.; Abais, Justine M.; Zhang, Yang; Li, Pin-Lan

    2013-01-01

    The CD38-ADP-ribosylcyclase-mediated Ca2+ signaling pathway importantly contributes to the vasomotor response in different arteries. Although there is evidence indicating that the activation of CD38-ADP-ribosylcyclase is associated with CD38 internalization, the molecular mechanism mediating CD38 internalization and consequent activation in response to a variety of physiological and pathological stimuli remains poorly understood. Recent studies have shown that CD38 may sense redox signals and is thereby activated to produce cellular response and that the NADPH oxidase isoform, NOX1, is a major resource to produce superoxide (O2·−) in coronary arterial myocytes (CAMs) in response to muscarinic receptor agonist, which uses CD38-ADP-ribosylcyclase signaling pathway to exert its action in these CAMs. These findings led us hypothesize that NOX1-derived O2·− serves in an autocrine fashion to enhance CD38 internalization, leading to redox activation of CD38-ADP-ribosylcyclase activity in mouse CAMs. To test this hypothesis, confocal microscopy, flow cytometry and a membrane protein biotinylation assay were used in the present study. We first demonstrated that CD38 internalization induced by endothelin-1 (ET-1) was inhibited by silencing of NOX1 gene, but not NOX4 gene. Correspondingly, NOX1 gene silencing abolished ET-1-induced O2·− production and increased CD38-ADP-ribosylcyclase activity in CAMs, while activation of NOX1 by overexpression of Rac1 or Vav2 or administration of exogenous O2·− significantly increased CD38 internalization in CAMs. Lastly, ET-1 was found to markedly increase membrane raft clustering as shown by increased colocalization of cholera toxin-B with CD38 and NOX1. Taken together, these results provide direct evidence that Rac1-NOX1-dependent O2·− production mediates CD38 internalization in CAMs, which may represent an important mechanism linking receptor activation with CD38 activity in these cells. PMID:23940720

  4. CD38 is a putative functional marker for side population cells in human nasopharyngeal carcinoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Danwei; Liao, Shan; Zhu, Guangchao; Luo, Gengqiu; Xiao, Songshu; He, Junyu; Pei, Zhen; Li, Guiyuan; Zhou, Yanhong

    2016-03-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are thought to be responsible for cancer progression and therapeutic resistance but identification of this subpopulation requires selective markers. Fortunately, side population (SP) cells analysis brings a novel method to CSCs study. In this study, we identified SP cells, which are demonstrated rich in CSCs, in four nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) cell lines. We investigated SP cells from HK-1 NPC cell line and showed CSCs characteristics in this subpopulation. SP cells displayed greater proliferation and invasion and expressed high levels of CSCs markers than NSP cells. Furthermore, our microRNA microarray analysis of SP versus NSP cells revealed that CD38-related miRNAs were down-regulated in SP cell, but the mRNA and protein level of CD38 were highly expressed in SP cells. We further searched for molecules interacting with CD38 and identified ZAP70, which was also well expressed in SP cells at both mRNA and protein levels. Our results uncover a CD38 pathway that may regulate the proliferation and migration of SP cells from HK-1 NPC cell line. PMID:25630761

  5. Inhibition of the intrinsic NAD+ glycohydrolase activity of CD38 by carbocyclic NAD analogues.

    PubMed

    Wall, K A; Klis, M; Kornet, J; Coyle, D; Amé, J C; Jacobson, M K; Slama, J T

    1998-11-01

    Carba-NAD and pseudocarba-NAD are carbocyclic analogues of NAD+ in which a 2,3-dihydroxycyclopentane methanol replaces the beta-d-ribonucleotide ring of the nicotinamide riboside moiety of NAD+ [Slama and Simmons (1988) Biochemistry 27, 183-193]. These carbocyclic NAD+ analogues, related to each other as diastereomers, have been tested as inhibitors of the intrinsic NAD+ glycohydrolase activity of human CD38, dog spleen NAD+ glycohydrolase, mouse CD38 and Aplysia californica cADP-ribose synthetase. Pseudocarba-NAD, the carbocyclic dinucleotide in which l-2,3-dihydroxycyclopentane methanol replaces the d-ribose of the nicotinamide riboside moiety of NAD+, was found to be the more potent inhibitor. Pseudocarba-NAD was shown to inhibit the intrinsic NAD+ glycohydrolase activity of human CD38 competitively, with Ki=148 microM determined for the recombinant extracellular protein domain and Ki=180 microM determined for the native protein expressed as a cell-surface enzyme on cultured Jurkat cells. Pseudocarba-NAD was shown to be a non-competitive inhibitor of the purified dog spleen NAD+ glycohydrolase, with Kis=47 miroM and Kii=198 microM. Neither pseudocarba-NAD nor carba-NAD inhibited mouse CD38 or Aplysia californica cADP-ribose synthetase significantly at concentrations up to 1 mM. The results underscore significant species differences in the sensitivity of these enzymes to inhibition, and indicate that pseudocarba-NAD will be useful as an inhibitor of the enzymic activity of human but not mouse CD38 in studies using cultured cells. PMID:9794804

  6. Inhibition of the intrinsic NAD+ glycohydrolase activity of CD38 by carbocyclic NAD analogues.

    PubMed Central

    Wall, K A; Klis, M; Kornet, J; Coyle, D; Amé, J C; Jacobson, M K; Slama, J T

    1998-01-01

    Carba-NAD and pseudocarba-NAD are carbocyclic analogues of NAD+ in which a 2,3-dihydroxycyclopentane methanol replaces the beta-d-ribonucleotide ring of the nicotinamide riboside moiety of NAD+ [Slama and Simmons (1988) Biochemistry 27, 183-193]. These carbocyclic NAD+ analogues, related to each other as diastereomers, have been tested as inhibitors of the intrinsic NAD+ glycohydrolase activity of human CD38, dog spleen NAD+ glycohydrolase, mouse CD38 and Aplysia californica cADP-ribose synthetase. Pseudocarba-NAD, the carbocyclic dinucleotide in which l-2,3-dihydroxycyclopentane methanol replaces the d-ribose of the nicotinamide riboside moiety of NAD+, was found to be the more potent inhibitor. Pseudocarba-NAD was shown to inhibit the intrinsic NAD+ glycohydrolase activity of human CD38 competitively, with Ki=148 microM determined for the recombinant extracellular protein domain and Ki=180 microM determined for the native protein expressed as a cell-surface enzyme on cultured Jurkat cells. Pseudocarba-NAD was shown to be a non-competitive inhibitor of the purified dog spleen NAD+ glycohydrolase, with Kis=47 miroM and Kii=198 microM. Neither pseudocarba-NAD nor carba-NAD inhibited mouse CD38 or Aplysia californica cADP-ribose synthetase significantly at concentrations up to 1 mM. The results underscore significant species differences in the sensitivity of these enzymes to inhibition, and indicate that pseudocarba-NAD will be useful as an inhibitor of the enzymic activity of human but not mouse CD38 in studies using cultured cells. PMID:9794804

  7. CD24+/CD38- as new prognostic marker for non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Lung cancer is the leading cause of death among cancers in the world. The annual death toll due to this disease exceeds the combined deaths caused by colon, breast, prostate, and pancreatic cancers. As a result, there has been a tremendous effort to identify new biomarkers for early detection and diagnosis of lung cancer. Methods In this study we report the results of screening a panel of eight non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines originating from different subtypes of lung cancer in an attempt to identify potential biomarkers unique to this disease. We used real-time polymerase chain reaction and flow cytometry techniques to analyze the expression of ALDHA1, EpCAM, CD133, CD24, and CD38 in this panel. Results We demonstrate for the first time that the majority of NSCLC cells do not express levels of CD38 that would qualify it as a new biomarker for the disease. In contrast, we found that CD24 is over-expressed in 6 out of 8 of the cell lines. The combined CD24+/CD38-/low phenotype was detected in 50% of the cell lines that are also positive for CD133 and EpCAM. Conclusions We report that CD24+/CD38-/low signature could potentially be used as a new biomarker for the early detection of NSCLC. PMID:24094028

  8. CD38, CD81 and BAFFR combined expression by transitional B cells distinguishes active from inactive systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Henriques, Ana; Silva, Isabel; Inês, Luís; Souto-Carneiro, M Margarida; Pais, M Luísa; Trindade, Hélder; da Silva, José António Pereira; Paiva, Artur

    2016-05-01

    In view of its heterogeneous presentation and unpredictable course, clinical management of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is difficult. There is a need for biomarkers and diagnostic aids to monitor SLE disease activity and severity prior to, during and after treatment. We undertook this study to search for unique phenotypic patterns in each peripheral blood (PB) B cell subset, capable of distinguishing SLE patients with inactive disease versus SLE patients with active disease versus controls by using an automated population separator (APS) visualization strategy. PB was collected from 41 SLE patients and 28 age- and gender-matched controls. We analyzed the cell surface markers (in a tube CD20/CD27/CD19/CD45/CD38/CD81/BAFFR combination) expression on PB B cell subsets using principal component analysis, implemented in the APS software tool. Overall, our analysis indicates that active SLE can be distinguished from inactive SLE on the basis of a single tube analysis, focused on the decreased expression of CD38, CD81 and BAFFR in transitional B cells. The cluster analysis of immunophenotypic profiles of B cell subsets highlighted disease-specific abnormalities on transitional B cells that emerge as promising surrogate markers for disease activity. Further validation is needed with larger samples and prospective follow-up of patients. PMID:25894569

  9. CD38 and chronic lymphocytic leukemia: a decade later.

    PubMed

    Malavasi, Fabio; Deaglio, Silvia; Damle, Rajendra; Cutrona, Giovanna; Ferrarini, Manlio; Chiorazzi, Nicholas

    2011-09-29

    This review highlights a decade of investigations into the role of CD38 in CLL. CD38 is accepted as a dependable marker of unfavorable prognosis and as an indicator of activation and proliferation of cells when tested. Leukemic clones with higher numbers of CD38(+) cells are more responsive to BCR signaling and are characterized by enhanced migration. In vitro activation through CD38 drives CLL proliferation and chemotaxis via a signaling pathway that includes ZAP-70 and ERK1/2. Finally, CD38 is under a polymorphic transcriptional control after external signals. Consequently, CD38 appears to be a global molecular bridge to the environment, promoting survival/proliferation over apoptosis. Together, this evidence contributes to the current view of CLL as a chronic disease in which the host's microenvironment promotes leukemic cell growth and also controls the sequential acquisition and accumulation of genetic alterations. This view relies on the existence of a set of surface molecules, including CD38, which support proliferation and survival of B cells on their way to and after neoplastic transformation. The second decade of studies on CD38 in CLL will tell if the molecule is an effective target for antibody-mediated therapy in this currently incurable leukemia. PMID:21765022

  10. Dominant enrichment of phenotypically activated CD38(+) HLA-DR(+) CD8(+) T cells, rather than CD38(+) HLA-DR(+) CD4(+) T cells, in HIV/HCV coinfected patients on antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    d'Ettorre, Gabriella; Ceccarelli, Giancarlo; Serafino, Sara; Giustini, Noemi; Cavallari, Eugenio Nelson; Bianchi, Luigi; Pavone, Paolo; Bellelli, Valeria; Turriziani, Ombretta; Antonelli, Guido; Stroffolini, Tommaso; Vullo, Vincenzo

    2016-08-01

    HIV infection may enhance immune-activation, while little is known regarding the role of HCV infection. This study investigates the impact of HCV in HIV coinfected patients with undetectable viraemia under HAART on the levels of peripheral T cell's immune-activation. We determined T lymphocytes subsets to characterize immune-activation defined as CD38 and/or HLA-DR expression in chronic monoinfected HCV, HIV, and HIV/HCV coinfected subjects. One hundred and fifty six patients were divided into three groups: (i) 77 HIV+ patients; (ii) 50 HCV+ patients; and (iii) 29 coinfected HIV/HCV patients. The level of CD4(+) was significantly higher in HCV+ than in HIV+ or in coinfected HIV/HCV subjects. The frequencies of CD4(+) CD38(+) /HLA-DR(-) , CD4(+) CD38(-) /HLA-DR(+) and CD4(+) CD38(+) /HLA-DR(+) in HIV+ patients were comparable to those measured in coinfected patients, but statistically higher than those observed in HCV+ subjects. The percentage of CD8(+) was comparable in HIV-1+ patients and coinfected HIV/HCV but the results obtained in both groups were significantly higher compared to the results obtained in HCV patients. The level of CD8(+) CD38(+) /HLA-DR(-) showed values lower in HIV+ patients than in that monoinfected HCV and coinfected HIV/HCV patients. The frequencies of CD8(+) CD38(-) /HLA-DR(+) were higher in HIV+ patients compared to HCV+ and coinfected HIV/HCV patients. HIV/HCV coinfected group showed highest levels of CD8(+) CD38(+) /HLA-DR(+) . HIV plays a pivotal role to determine the immune activation in the host. The role of HCV needs of further investigations but our data show that HCV mainly influences the immune-activation of the pool of CD8, but also probably plays a supporting additive effect on CD4 immune-activation. J. Med. Virol. 88:1347-1356, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26765625

  11. Depletion of NADP(H) due to CD38 activation triggers endothelial dysfunction in the postischemic heart

    PubMed Central

    Reyes, Levy A.; Boslett, James; Varadharaj, Saradhadevi; De Pascali, Francesco; Hemann, Craig; Druhan, Lawrence J.; Ambrosio, Giuseppe; El-Mahdy, Mohamed; Zweier, Jay L.

    2015-01-01

    In the postischemic heart, coronary vasodilation is impaired due to loss of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) function. Although the eNOS cofactor tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) is depleted, its repletion only partially restores eNOS-mediated coronary vasodilation, indicating that other critical factors trigger endothelial dysfunction. Therefore, studies were performed to characterize the unidentified factor(s) that trigger endothelial dysfunction in the postischemic heart. We observed that depletion of the eNOS substrate NADPH occurs in the postischemic heart with near total depletion from the endothelium, triggering impaired eNOS function and limiting BH4 rescue through NADPH-dependent salvage pathways. In isolated rat hearts subjected to 30 min of ischemia and reperfusion (I/R), depletion of the NADP(H) pool occurred and was most marked in the endothelium, with >85% depletion. Repletion of NADPH after I/R increased NOS-dependent coronary flow well above that with BH4 alone. With combined NADPH and BH4 repletion, full restoration of NOS-dependent coronary flow occurred. Profound endothelial NADPH depletion was identified to be due to marked activation of the NAD(P)ase-activity of CD38 and could be prevented by inhibition or specific knockdown of this protein. Depletion of the NADPH precursor, NADP+, coincided with formation of 2’-phospho-ADP ribose, a CD38-derived signaling molecule. Inhibition of CD38 prevented NADP(H) depletion and preserved endothelium-dependent relaxation and NO generation with increased recovery of contractile function and decreased infarction in the postischemic heart. Thus, CD38 activation is an important cause of postischemic endothelial dysfunction and presents a novel therapeutic target for prevention of this dysfunction in unstable coronary syndromes. PMID:26297248

  12. Quantitation of CD38 activation antigen expression on CD8+ T cells in HIV-1 infection using CD4 expression on CD4+ T lymphocytes as a biological calibrator.

    PubMed

    Hultin, L E; Matud, J L; Giorgi, J V

    1998-10-01

    For some membrane-associated antigens, the number of molecules expressed per cell carries information about the cell's differentiation and activation state. Quantitating antigen expression by flow cytometry has immediate application in monitoring CD38 expression on CD8+ T cells in human immunodeficiency virus 1-associated disease, where elevated CD38 antigen expression is a marker of CD8+ T-cell activation and a poor prognostic indicator. Reproducible methods are needed in order to quantify such antigens. Here we describe a reproducible method for quantitative fluorescence cytometry (QFCM) that depends on the tightly regulated expression of CD4 antigen on human CD4+ T lymphocytes, which we estimated in a study of 57 normal donors to have an interperson coefficient of variation of 4.9%. Using phycoerythrin (PE)-conjugated CD4 monoclonal antibody (mAb) with a nominal fluorochrome to protein ratio of 1:1 and a nominal published value of approximately 50,000 CD4 antibody molecules bound per CD4+ T lymphocyte, we estimated the number of PE molecules detected per relative fluorescence intensity (RFI) unit on our flow cytometer to be 41 (19, 20). This value is called the "RFI multiplier." To estimate the number of CD38 antibodies bound per CD8+ T cell (CD38-ABC) on patient samples, we multiply the measured CD38 RFI value of CD38 staining using a nominal 1:1 conjugate of CD38-PE by the "RFI multiplier." The measurements for CD4 and CD38 were stable for 2 years despite the use of different mAb lots and the potential for drift in instrumentation. We used this approach in a study of nine flow cytometers in which the interinstrument interlaboratory coefficients of variation for CD3-ABC ranged from 3.3% to 5.8% and those for CD38-ABC ranged from 9.8% to 13.8%. These data indicate that CD4 expression can serve as a biological calibrator to standardize fluorescence intensity measurements in longitudinal and multicenter studies. PMID:9773872

  13. Targeting Attenuated Interferon-α to Myeloma Cells with a CD38 Antibody Induces Potent Tumor Regression with Reduced Off-Target Activity.

    PubMed

    Pogue, Sarah L; Taura, Tetsuya; Bi, Mingying; Yun, Yong; Sho, Angela; Mikesell, Glen; Behrens, Collette; Sokolovsky, Maya; Hallak, Hussein; Rosenstock, Moti; Sanchez, Eric; Chen, Haiming; Berenson, James; Doyle, Anthony; Nock, Steffen; Wilson, David S

    2016-01-01

    Interferon-α (IFNα) has been prescribed to effectively treat multiple myeloma (MM) and other malignancies for decades. Its use has waned in recent years, however, due to significant toxicity and a narrow therapeutic index (TI). We sought to improve IFNα's TI by, first, attaching it to an anti-CD38 antibody, thereby directly targeting it to MM cells, and, second, by introducing an attenuating mutation into the IFNα portion of the fusion protein rendering it relatively inactive on normal, CD38 negative cells. This anti-CD38-IFNα(attenuated) immunocytokine, or CD38-Attenukine™, exhibits 10,000-fold increased specificity for CD38 positive cells in vitro compared to native IFNα and, significantly, is ~6,000-fold less toxic to normal bone marrow cells in vitro than native IFNα. Moreover, the attenuating mutation significantly decreases IFNα biomarker activity in cynomolgus macaques indicating that this approach may yield a better safety profile in humans than native IFNα or a non-attenuated IFNα immunocytokine. In human xenograft MM tumor models, anti-CD38-IFNα(attenuated) exerts potent anti-tumor activity in mice, inducing complete tumor regression in most cases. Furthermore, anti-CD38-IFNα(attenuated) is more efficacious than standard MM treatments (lenalidomide, bortezomib, dexamethasone) and exhibits strong synergy with lenalidomide and with bortezomib in xenograft models. Our findings suggest that tumor-targeted attenuated cytokines such as IFNα can promote robust tumor killing while minimizing systemic toxicity. PMID:27611189

  14. CD38 Deficiency Protects the Heart from Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury through Activating SIRT1/FOXOs-Mediated Antioxidative Stress Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Xiao-Hui; Liu, Xiao-Hong; Hong, Xuan; Zhao, Ning; Xiao, Yun-Fei; Wang, Ling-Fang; Qian, Yi-Song; Deng, Ke-Yu; Ji, Guangju; Fu, Mingui

    2016-01-01

    Ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury induces irreversible oxidative stress damage to the cardiac muscle. We previously observed that CD38 deficiency remarkably protects mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) from oxidative stress-induced injury. However, whether CD38 deficiency protects from I/R injury in the heart is not explored. Here, we showed that the hearts of CD38 deficient mice or wild type mice supplied with exogenous NAD were significantly protected from ischemia/reperfusion injury, seen as reduction of the myocardial infarct sizes when the mice were subjected to 30 min ischemia followed by 24 hours of reperfusion. Consistently, the protection of CD38 deficiency on hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R) injury was confirmed with a CD38 knockdown H9c2 stable cell line. Furthermore, we observed that knockdown of CD38 remarkably inhibited ROS generation and intracellular Ca2+ overloading induced by H/R in H9c2 cells. The FOXO1 and FOXO3 expressions were significantly elevated by H/R injury in CD38 knockdown cells compared with normal H9c2 cells. The cell immunofluorescence assay showed that FOXO1 nuclear translocation was significantly increased in CD38 knockdown H9c2 cells. In addition, we demonstrated that the increase of FOXO1 nuclear translocation was associated with the increased expressions of antioxidant catalase and SOD2 and the attenuated expression of the ROS generation enzyme NOX4. In conclusion, our results provide new evidence that CD38 deficiency protects the heart from I/R injury through activating SIRT1/FOXOs-mediated antioxidative stress pathway. PMID:27547294

  15. T. vaginalis Infection Is Associated with Increased IL-8 and TNFr1 Levels but with the Absence of CD38 and HLADR Activation in the Cervix of ESN

    PubMed Central

    Brady, Kirsten E.; Plants, Jill; Landay, Alan L.; Ghassemi, Mahmood; Golub, Elizabeth T.; Spear, Greg T.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Trichomonas vaginalis infection is associated with an increased risk of HIV infection in exposed-seronegative women (ESN) despite their unique immune quiescent profile. It is important to understand possible mechanisms, such as recruitment of activated T cells, by which T. vaginalis could facilitate HIV infection in this population. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional study exploring the relationships between T. vaginalis infection, inflammatory markers and T cell activation in the cervix of ESN. During scheduled study visits, participants completed a behavioral questionnaire and physical exam, including sexually transmitted infection (STI) screening and collection of endocervical sponge and cytobrush specimens. T cell and monocyte phenotypes were measured in cervical cytobrush specimens using multi-parameter flow cytometry. Cervical sponge specimens were used to measure cytokines (IL-6, IL-8,IL-10, IP-10, RANTES) using Luminex immunoassays and the immune activation marker soluble TNF receptor 1 using ELISA. Results Specimens of 65 women were tested. Twenty-one of these women were infected with T. vaginalis. T. vaginalis infection was associated with significantly increased concentrations of IL-8 (1275pg/ml vs. 566pg/ml, p=.02) and sTNFr1 (430 pg/ml vs. 264 pg/ml, p=.005). However, T. vaginalis infection was not associated with increased percent expression of CCR5+ T cells nor increased CD38 and HLADR activation compared to uninfected women. It was also not associated with increased expression of CCR5+ monocytes. Conclusions Among ESN T. vaginalis infection is associated with increased levels of genital pro-inflammatory/immune activation markers IL-8 and TNFr1, but was not associated with an increased percentage of activated endocervical T cells along the CD38 and HLADR pathways. Thus, while T.vaginalis infection may result in some reversal of the immune quiescent profile of ESN, enhanced recruitment of activated CD38 and HLADR expressing CD4+ cells

  16. Contribution of Nrf2 to Atherogenic Phenotype Switching of Coronary Arterial Smooth Muscle Cells Lacking CD38 Gene

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ming; Li, Xiao-Xue; Wang, Lei; Wang, Mi; Zhang, Yang; Li, Pin-Lan

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims Recent studies have indicated that CD38 gene deficiency results in dedifferentiation or transdifferentiation of arterial smooth muscle cells upon atherogenic stimulations. However, the molecular mechanisms mediating this vascular smooth muscle (SMC) phenotypic switching remain unknown. Methods & Results In the present study, we first characterized the phenotypic change in the primary cultures of coronary arterial myocytes (CAMs) from CD38−/− mice. It was shown that CD38 deficiency decreased the expression of contractile marker calponin, SM22α and α-SMA but increased the expression of SMC dedifferentiation marker, vimentin, which was accompanied by enhanced cell proliferation. This phenotypic change in CD38−/− CAMs was enhanced by 7-ketocholesterol (7-Ket), an atherogenic stimulus. We further found that the CD38 deficiency decreased the expression and activity of nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), a basic leucine zipper (bZIP) transcription factor sensitive to redox regulation. Similar to CD38 deletion, Nrf2 gene silencing increased CAM dedifferentiation upon 7-Ket stimulation. In contrast, the overexpression of Nrf2 gene abolished 7-Ket-induced dedifferentiation in CD38−/− CAMs. Given the sensitivity of Nrf2 to oxidative stress, we determined the role of redox signaling in the regulation of Nrf2 expression and activity associated with CD38 effect in CAM phenotype changes. It was demonstrated that in CD38−/− CAMs, 7-Ket failed to stimulate the production of O2−., while in CD38+/+ CAMs 7-Ket induced marked O2−. production and enhancement of Nrf2 activity, which was substantially attenuated by NOX4 gene silencing. Finally, we demonstrated that 7-Ket-induced and NOX4-dependent O2−. production was inhibited by 8-Br-cADPR, an antagonist of cADPR or NED-19, an antagonist of NAADP as product of CD38 ADP-ribosylcyclase, which significantly inhibited the level of cytosolic Ca2+ and the activation of Nrf2 under 7-Ket. Conclusion

  17. CD38 Expression in a Subset of Memory T Cells Is Independent of Cell Cycling as a Correlate of HIV Disease Progression

    PubMed Central

    Würsch, Daniela; Ormsby, Christopher E.; Romero-Rodríguez, Dámaris P.; Olvera-García, Gustavo; Zúñiga, Joaquín; Jiang, Wei; Pérez-Patrigeon, Santiago

    2016-01-01

    In order to determine if the expression of the activation marker CD38 can correlate with HIV disease progression independently of cycling, we performed a cluster-based multivariate correlation analysis of total circulating CD4+ T cell counts and viral loads with frequencies of CD38 and Ki67 expression on CD4+ lymphocytes from patients with untreated HIV infection, stratified in maturation subpopulations, and subpopulation subsets defined by the expression of CXCR5, CXCR3, and CCR4. The frequencies of the activated phenotypes %CD38+ Ki67− and %CD38+ Ki67+ of the CXCR5− CXCR3− CCR4+ (“pre-Th2”) central memory (TCM) cell subset clustered together, comprising a significant negative correlate of total circulating CD4+ T cell counts and a positive correlate of viral load in multivariate analysis. Frequency of cycling-uncoupled CD38 expression in “pre-Th2” TCM cells was a negative correlate of total circulating CD4+ T cell counts in univariate analysis, which was not the case of their %CD38+ Ki67+. CXCR5+ CXCR3− CCR4−  TCM cells were underrepresented in patients, and their absolute counts correlated negatively with their %CD38+ Ki67− but not with their % CD38+ Ki67+. Our results may imply that CD38 expression either reflects or participates in pathogenic mechanisms of HIV disease independently of cell cycling. PMID:27064238

  18. [CD38 and autism spectrum disorders].

    PubMed

    Higashida, Haruhiro; Munesue, Toshio

    2013-11-01

    We have demonstrated that CD38, a transmembrane protein with ADP-ribosyl cyclase activity, plays a critical role in mouse social behavior by regulating the release of oxytocin (OXT), which is essential for mutual recognition. When CD38 was disrupted, social amnesia was observed in Cd38 knockout mice. We investigated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the human CD38 gene in autism spectrum disorder (ASD) patients. The SNP rs3796863 (A>C) was associated with high-functioning autism (HFA) in American samples. Although this finding was partially confirmed in low-functioning autism subjects in Israel, it has not been replicated in Japanese HFA subjects. The second SNP of interest, rs1800561 (4693C>T), leads to the substitution of an arginine (R) at codon 140 by tryptophan (W;R140W) in CD38. This mutation was found in 4 probands of ASD and in family members of 3 pedigrees with variable levels of ASD or ASD traits. The plasma levels of OXT in ASD subjects with the R140W allele were lower than those in ASD subjects lacking this allele. One proband with the R140W allele receiving intranasal OXT for approximately 3 years showed improvement in areas of social approach, eye contact and communication behaviors, emotion, irritability, and aggression. Five other ASD subjects with mental deficits received nasal OXT for various periods;three subjects showed improved symptoms, while 2 showed little or no effect. These results suggest that SNPs in CD38 may be risk factors for ASD by abrogating the OXT function, and that some ASD subjects can be treated with OXT in preliminary clinical trials. PMID:24313001

  19. Human CD38hiCD138+ Plasma Cells Can Be Generated In Vitro from CD40-Activated Switched-Memory B Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Itoua Maïga, Rayelle; Tremblay Rochette, Josiane; Néron, Sonia

    2014-01-01

    B lymphocyte differentiation into long-lived plasma cells is the keystone event for the production of long-term protective antibodies. CD40-CD154 and CD27-CD70 interactions are involved in human B lymphocyte differentiation into CD38hiCD138+ cells in vivo as well as in vitro. In this study, we have compared these interactions in their capacity to drive switched-memory B lymphocytes differentiation into CD38hiCD138+ plasma cells. The targeted B lymphocytes were isolated from human peripheral blood, expanded for 19 days, and then submitted to CD70 or CD154 interactions for 14 days. The expanded B lymphocytes were constitutively expressing CD39, whereas CD31's expression was noticed only following the in vitro differentiation step (day 5) and was exclusively present on the CD38hi cell population. Furthermore, the generated CD38hiCD138+ cells showed a higher proportion of CD31+ cells than the CD38hiCD138− cells. Besides, analyses done with human blood and bone marrow plasma cells showed that in vivo and de novo generated CD38hiCD138+ cells have a similar CD31 expression profile but are distinct according to their reduced CD39 expression level. Overall, we have evidences that in vitro generated plasma cells are heterogeneous and appear as CD39+ precursors to the ones present in bone marrow niches. PMID:25759831

  20. Monoclonal antibodies targeting CD38 in hematological malignancies and beyond.

    PubMed

    van de Donk, Niels W C J; Janmaat, Maarten L; Mutis, Tuna; Lammerts van Bueren, Jeroen J; Ahmadi, Tahamtan; Sasser, A Kate; Lokhorst, Henk M; Parren, Paul W H I

    2016-03-01

    CD38 is a multifunctional cell surface protein that has receptor as well as enzyme functions. The protein is generally expressed at low levels on various hematological and solid tissues, while plasma cells express particularly high levels of CD38. The protein is also expressed in a subset of hematological tumors, and shows especially broad and high expression levels in plasma cell tumors such as multiple myeloma (MM). Together, this triggered the development of various therapeutic CD38 antibodies, including daratumumab, isatuximab, and MOR202. Daratumumab binds a unique CD38 epitope and showed strong anti-tumor activity in preclinical models. The antibody engages diverse mechanisms of action, including complement-dependent cytotoxicity, antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity, antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis, programmed cell death, modulation of enzymatic activity, and immunomodulatory activity. CD38-targeting antibodies have a favorable toxicity profile in patients, and early clinical data show a marked activity in MM, while studies in other hematological malignancies are ongoing. Daratumumab has single agent activity and a limited toxicity profile, allowing favorable combination therapies with existing as well as emerging therapies, which are currently evaluated in the clinic. Finally, CD38 antibodies may have a role in the treatment of diseases beyond hematological malignancies, including solid tumors and antibody-mediated autoimmune diseases. PMID:26864107

  1. Reduced CD5(+) CD24(hi) CD38(hi) and interleukin-10(+) regulatory B cells in active anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibody-associated vasculitis permit increased circulating autoantibodies.

    PubMed

    Aybar, L T; McGregor, J G; Hogan, S L; Hu, Y; Mendoza, C E; Brant, E J; Poulton, C J; Henderson, C D; Falk, R J; Bunch, D O

    2015-05-01

    Pathogenesis of anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis is B cell-dependent, although how particular B cell subsets modulate immunopathogenesis remains unknown. Although their phenotype remains controversial, regulatory B cells (Bregs ), play a role in immunological tolerance via interleukin (IL)-10. Putative CD19(+) CD24(hi) CD38(hi) and CD19(+) CD24(hi) CD27(+) Bregs were evaluated in addition to their CD5(+) subsets in 69 patients with ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV). B cell IL-10 was verified by flow cytometry following culture with CD40 ligand and cytosine-phosphate-guanosine (CpG) DNA. Patients with active disease had decreased levels of CD5(+) CD24(hi) CD38(hi) B cells and IL-10(+) B cells compared to patients in remission and healthy controls (HCs). As IL-10(+) and CD5(+) CD24(hi) CD38(hi) B cells normalized in remission within an individual, ANCA titres decreased. The CD5(+) subset of CD24(hi) CD38(hi) B cells decreases in active disease and rebounds during remission similarly to IL-10-producing B cells. Moreover, CD5(+) B cells are enriched in the ability to produce IL-10 compared to CD5(neg) B cells. Together these results suggest that CD5 may identify functional IL-10-producing Bregs . The malfunction of Bregs during active disease due to reduced IL-10 expression may thus permit ANCA production. PMID:25376552

  2. All-trans-retinoic acid and CD38 ligation differentially regulate CD1d expression and α-galactosylceramide-induced immune responses.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qiuyan; Ross, A Catharine

    2015-01-01

    The MHC class-I like molecule CD1d presents glycolipid antigens and thereby activates invariant natural killer-T (NKT) cells. However, little is understood regarding the regulation of its expression. All-trans-retinoic acid (RA) and CD38, which is itself a target of RA, both independently regulate the differentiation of antigen presenting cells. In the current study, we treated human THP-1 cells and murine splenic cells with RA, with and without antibody-mediated ligation of cell-surface CD38. Whereas a physiological concentration (20 nM) of RA alone rapidly and markedly increased CD1d protein in THP-1 cells, there was a marked synergy between RA and ligation of CD38 with antibody to CD38. Moreover, RA and CD38 ligation differentially regulated CD1d protein distribution between the cell surface and intracellular compartments, as, whereas RA mainly increased intracellular CD1d protein, ligation of CD38 increased CD1d protein both at the cell surface and intracellularly. By confocal microscopy, CD1d was located close to the plasma membrane but only partially overlapped with LAMP1, a late endosomes/lysosomal marker. Furthermore, RA and/or CD38 ligation increased splenocyte proliferation and differentiation after treatment with the CD1 ligand α-galactosylceramide (αGalCer), evidenced by an increase in the number of splenic dendritic cells, NKT cells, and germinal center plasmacytes. RA also differentially regulated αGalCer-induced cytokine expression, increasing IL-4 and decreasing IFNγ production by total spleen cells and the NKT cell population. Our results indicate a previously unknown mechanism in which RA and CD38 differentially yet cooperatively regulate CD1d expression and antigen-presenting function, which could be important for the enhancement of immunity. PMID:25248321

  3. CD38 low IgG-secreting cells are precursors of various CD38 high-expressing plasma cell populations.

    PubMed

    Arce, Sergio; Luger, Elke; Muehlinghaus, Gwendolin; Cassese, Giuliana; Hauser, Anja; Horst, Alexander; Lehnert, Katja; Odendahl, Marcus; Hönemann, Dirk; Heller, Karl-Dieter; Kleinschmidt, Harald; Berek, Claudia; Dörner, Thomas; Krenn, Veit; Hiepe, Falk; Bargou, Ralf; Radbruch, Andreas; Manz, Rudolf A

    2004-06-01

    Despite the important role immunoglobulin G (IgG)-secreting plasma cells play in memory immune responses, the differentiation and homeostasis of these cells are not completely understood. Here, we studied the differentiation of human IgG-secreting cells ex vivo and in vitro, identifying these cells by the cellular affinity matrix technology. Several subpopulations of IgG-secreting cells were identified among the cells isolated from tonsils and bone marrow, particularly differing in the expression levels of CD9, CD19, and CD38. CD38 low IgG-secreting cells were present exclusively in the tonsils. A major fraction of these cells appeared to be early plasma cell precursors, as upon activation of B cells in vitro, IgG secretion preceded up-regulation of CD38, and on tonsillar sections, IgG-containing, CD38 low cells with a plasmacytoid phenotype were found in follicles, where plasma cell differentiation starts. A unitary phenotype of migratory peripheral blood IgG-secreting cells suggests that all bone marrow plasma cell populations share a common precursor cell. These data are compatible with a multistep model for plasma cell differentiation and imply that a common CD38 low IgG-secreting precursor gives rise to a diverse plasma cell compartment. PMID:15020647

  4. The ΔC splice-variant of TRPM2 is the hypertonicity-induced cation channel in HeLa cells, and the ecto-enzyme CD38 mediates its activation

    PubMed Central

    Numata, Tomohiro; Sato, Kaori; Christmann, Jens; Marx, Romy; Mori, Yasuo; Okada, Yasunobu; Wehner, Frank

    2012-01-01

    Hypertonicity-induced cation channels (HICCs) are key-players in proliferation and apoptosis but their molecular correlate remains obscure. Furthermore, the activation profile of HICCs is not well defined yet. We report here that, in HeLa cells, intracellular adenosine diphosphate ribose (ADPr) and cyclic ADPr (cADPr), as supposed activators of TRPM2, elicited cation currents that were virtually identical to the osmotic activation of HICCs. Silencing of the expression of TRPM2 and of the ecto-enzyme CD38 (as a likely source of ADPr and cADPr) inhibited HICC as well as nucleotide-induced currents and, in parallel, the hypertonic volume response of cells (the regulatory volume increase, RVI) was attenuated. Quantification of intracellular cADPr levels and the systematic application of extra- vs. intracellular nucleotides indicate that the outwardly directed gradient rather than the cellular activity of ADPr and cADPr triggers TRPM2 activation, probably along with a simultaneous biotransformation of nucleotides. Cloning of TRPM2 identified the ΔC-splice variant as the molecular correlate of the HICC, which could be strongly supported by a direct comparison of the respective Ca2+ selectivity. Finally, immunoprecipitation and high-resolution FRET/FLIM imaging revealed the interaction of TRPM2 and CD38 in the native as well as in a heterologous (HEK293T) expression system. We propose transport-related nucleotide export via CD38 as a novel mechanism of TRPM2/HICC activation. With the biotransformation of nucleotides running in parallel, continuous zero trans-conditions are achieved which will render the system infinitely sensitive. PMID:22219339

  5. Circulating (CD3−CD19+CD20−IgD−CD27highCD38high) Plasmablasts: A Promising Cellular Biomarker for Immune Activity for Anti-PLA2R1 Related Membranous Nephropathy?

    PubMed Central

    Beukinga, Ingrid; Willard-Gallo, Karen; Nortier, Joëlle; Pradier, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Membranous nephropathy (MN) is a kidney specific autoimmune disease mainly mediated by anti-phospholipase A2 receptor 1 autoantibody (PLA2R1 Ab). The adequate assessment of chimeric anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody, rituximab (RTX), efficacy is still needed to improve clinical outcome of patient with MN. We evaluated the modification of plasmablasts (CD3−CD19+CD20−IgD−CD27highCD38high), a useful biomarker of RTX response in other autoimmune diseases, and memory (CD3−CD19+CD20+IgD−CD27+CD38−) and naive (CD3−CD19+CD20+IgD+CD27−CD38low) B cells by fluorescence-activated cell sorter analysis in PLA2R1 related MN in one patient during the 4 years of follow-up after RTX. RTX induced complete disappearance of CD19+ B cells, plasmablasts, and memory B cells as soon as day 15. Despite severe CD19+ lymphopenia, plasmablasts and memory B cells reemerged early before naive B cells (days 45, 90, and 120, resp.). During the follow-up, plasmablasts decreased more rapidly than memory B cells but still remained elevated as compared to day 0 of RTX. Concomitantly, anti-PLA2R1 Ab increased progressively. Our single case report suggests that, besides monitoring of serum anti-PLA2R1 Ab level, enumeration of circulating plasmablasts and memory B cells represents an attractive and complementary tool to assess immunological activity and efficacy of RTX induced B cells depletion in anti-PLA2R1 Ab related MN. PMID:27493452

  6. CD38 and Airway hyperresponsiveness: Studies on human airway smooth muscle cells and mouse models

    PubMed Central

    Guedes, Alonso GP; Deshpande, Deepak A; Dileepan, Mythili; Walseth, Timothy F; Panettieri, Reynold A; Subramanian, Subbaya; Kannan, Mathur S

    2015-01-01

    Asthma is an inflammatory disease in which altered calcium regulation, contractility and airway smooth muscle (ASM) proliferation contribute to airway hyperresponsiveness and airway wall remodeling. The enzymatic activity of CD38, a cell-surface protein expressed in human ASM cells, generates calcium mobilizing second messenger molecules such as cyclic ADP-ribose. CD38 expression in human ASM cells is augmented by cytokines (e.g. TNF-α) that requires activation of MAP kinases and the transcription factors, NF-ƙB and AP-1 and post-transcriptionally regulated by miR-140-3p and miR-708 by binding to 3’ Untranslated Region of CD38 as well as by modulating the activation of signaling mechanisms involved in its regulation. Mice deficient in CD38 exhibit reduced airway responsiveness to inhaled methacholine relative to response in wild-type mice. Intranasal challenge of CD38 deficient mice with TNF-α or IL-13, or the environmental fungus Alternaria alternata, causes significantly attenuated methacholine responsiveness compared to wild-type mice, with comparable airway inflammation. Reciprocal bone marrow transfer studies revealed partial restoration of airway hyperresponsiveness to inhaled methacholine in the Cd38 deficient mice. These studies provide evidence for CD38 involvement in the development of airway hyperresponsiveness, a hallmark feature of asthma. Future studies aimed at drug discovery and delivery targeting CD38 expression and/or activity are warranted. PMID:25594684

  7. Role of CD38, a cyclic ADP-ribosylcyclase, in morphine antinociception and tolerance.

    PubMed

    Hull, Lynn C; Rabender, Christopher; Gabra, Bichoy H; Zhang, Fan; Li, Pin-Lan; Dewey, William L

    2010-09-01

    Our previous studies have demonstrated that an increase in intracellular levels of Ca(2+) in neurons is an important component of both the antinociception produced by morphine and morphine's tolerance. The present study tested the hypothesis that the Ca(2+) signaling second messenger, cyclic ADP-ribose (cADPR), derived from CD38 activation participates in morphine antinociception and tolerance. We first showed that morphine's antinociceptive potency was increased by the intracerebroventricular injection of CD38 substrate beta-NAD(+) in mice. Furthermore, morphine tolerance was reversed by intracerebroventricular administration of each of three different inhibitors of the CD38-cADPR-ryanodine receptor Ca(2+) signaling pathway. These inhibitors were the ADP-ribosylcyclase inhibitor nicotinamide, cADPR analog 8-bromo-cADPR, and a large dose of ryanodine (>50 muM) that blocks the ryanodine receptor. In CD38 gene knockout [CD38(-/-)] mice, the antinociceptive action of morphine was found to be less potent compared with wild-type (WT) mice, as measured by tail-flick response, hypothermia assay, and observations of straub tail. However, there was no difference in locomotor activation between CD38(-/-) and WT animals. It was also found that less tolerance to morphine developed in CD38(-/-) mice compared with WT animals. These results indicate that cADRP-ryanodine receptor Ca(2+) signaling associated with CD38 plays an important role in morphine tolerance. PMID:20551293

  8. Role of CD38, a Cyclic ADP-Ribosylcyclase, in Morphine Antinociception and Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Hull, Lynn C.; Rabender, Christopher; Gabra, Bichoy H.; Zhang, Fan; Li, Pin-Lan

    2010-01-01

    Our previous studies have demonstrated that an increase in intracellular levels of Ca2+ in neurons is an important component of both the antinociception produced by morphine and morphine's tolerance. The present study tested the hypothesis that the Ca2+ signaling second messenger, cyclic ADP-ribose (cADPR), derived from CD38 activation participates in morphine antinociception and tolerance. We first showed that morphine's antinociceptive potency was increased by the intracerebroventricular injection of CD38 substrate β-NAD+ in mice. Furthermore, morphine tolerance was reversed by intracerebroventricular administration of each of three different inhibitors of the CD38–cADPR–ryanodine receptor Ca2+ signaling pathway. These inhibitors were the ADP–ribosylcyclase inhibitor nicotinamide, cADPR analog 8-bromo-cADPR, and a large dose of ryanodine (>50 μM) that blocks the ryanodine receptor. In CD38 gene knockout [CD38(−/−)] mice, the antinociceptive action of morphine was found to be less potent compared with wild-type (WT) mice, as measured by tail-flick response, hypothermia assay, and observations of straub tail. However, there was no difference in locomotor activation between CD38(−/−) and WT animals. It was also found that less tolerance to morphine developed in CD38(−/−) mice compared with WT animals. These results indicate that cADRP–ryanodine receptor Ca2+ signaling associated with CD38 plays an important role in morphine tolerance. PMID:20551293

  9. CD38 Is Expressed on Inflammatory Cells of the Intestine and Promotes Intestinal Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Michael; Schumacher, Valéa; Lischke, Timo; Lücke, Karsten; Meyer-Schwesinger, Catherine; Velden, Joachim; Koch-Nolte, Friedrich; Mittrücker, Hans-Willi

    2015-01-01

    The enzyme CD38 is expressed on a variety of hematopoietic and non-hematopoietic cells and is involved in diverse processes such as generation of calcium-mobilizing metabolites, cell activation, and chemotaxis. Here, we show that under homeostatic conditions CD38 is highly expressed on immune cells of the colon mucosa of C57BL/6 mice. Myeloid cells recruited to this tissue upon inflammation also express enhanced levels of CD38. To determine the role of CD38 in intestinal inflammation, we applied the dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) colitis model. Whereas wild-type mice developed severe colitis, CD38-/- mice had only mild disease following DSS-treatment. Histologic examination of the colon mucosa revealed pronounced inflammatory damage with dense infiltrates containing numerous granulocytes and macrophages in wild-type animals, while these findings were significantly attenuated in CD38-/- mice. Despite attenuated histological findings, the mRNA expression of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines was only marginally lower in the colons of CD38-/- mice as compared to wild-type mice. In conclusion, our results identify a function for CD38 in the control of inflammatory processes in the colon. PMID:25938500

  10. CD38 and its role in oxytocin secretion and social behavior.

    PubMed

    Higashida, Haruhiro; Yokoyama, Shigeru; Kikuchi, Mitsuru; Munesue, Toshio

    2012-03-01

    Here, we review the functional roles of cyclic ADP-ribose and CD38, a transmembrane protein with ADP-ribosyl cyclase activity, in mouse social behavior via the regulation of oxytocin (OXT) release, an essential component of social cognition. Herein we describe data detailing the molecular mechanism of CD38-dependent OXT secretion in CD38 knockout mice. We also review studies that used OXT, OXT receptor (OXTR), or CD38 knockout mice. Additionally, we compare the behavioral impairments that occur in these knockout mice in relation to the OXT system and CD38. This review also examines autism spectrum disorder (ASD), which is characterized by social and communication impairments, in relation to defects in the OXT system. Two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the human CD38 gene are possible risk factors for ASD via inhibition of OXT function. Further analysis of CD38 in relation to the OXT system may provide a better understanding of the neuroendocrinological roles of OXT and CD38 in the hypothalamus and of the pathophysiology of ASD. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Oxytocin, Vasopressin, and Social Behavior. PMID:22227279

  11. Design, synthesis and biological characterization of novel inhibitors of CD38

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Min; Si, Yuan-Qi; Sun, Shuang-Yong; Pu, Xiao-Ping; Yang, Zhen-Jun; Zhang, Liang-Ren; Zhang, Li-He; Leung, Fung Ping; Lam, Connie Mo Ching.; Kwong, Anna Ka Yee; Yue, Jianbo; Zhou, Yeyun; Kriksunov, Irina A.; Hao, Quan; Lee, Hon Cheung

    2012-01-01

    Human CD38 is a novel multi-functional protein that acts not only as an antigen for B-lymphocyte activation, but also an enzyme catalyzing the synthesis of a Ca2+ messenger molecule, cyclic ADP-ribose, from NAD+. It is well established that this novel Ca2+ signaling enzyme is responsible for regulating a wide range of physiological functions. Based on the crystal structure of the CD38/NAD+ complex, we synthesized a series of simplified N-substituted nicotinamide derivatives (Compound 1–14). A number of these compounds exhibited moderate inhibition of the NAD+ utilizing activity of CD38, with Compound 4 showing the higher potency. The crystal structure of CD38/ Compound 4 complex and computer simulation of Compound 7 docking to CD38 show a significant role of the nicotinamide moiety and the distal aromatic group of the compounds for substrate recognition by the active site of CD38. Biologically, we showed that both Compounds 4 and 7 effectively relaxed the agonist-induced contraction of muscle preparations form rats and guinea pigs. This study is a rational design of inhibitors for CD38 that exhibit important physiological effects, and can serve as a model for future drug development. PMID:21431168

  12. Lysosomal cholesterol accumulation in macrophages leading to coronary atherosclerosis in CD38(-/-) mice.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaoyang; Yuan, Xinxu; Li, Ningjun; Dewey, William L; Li, Pin-Lan; Zhang, Fan

    2016-06-01

    The disruption in transportation of oxLDL-derived cholesterol and the subsequent lipid accumulation in macrophages are the hallmark events in atherogenesis. Our recent studies demonstrated that lysosomal Ca(2+) messenger of nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAADP), an enzymatic product of CD38 ADP-ribosylcyclase (CD38), promoted lipid endocytic trafficking in human fibroblast cells. The current studies are designed to examine the functional role of CD38/NAADP pathway in the regulation of lysosomal cholesterol efflux in atherosclerosis. Oil red O staining showed that oxLDL concentration-dependently increased lipid buildup in bone marrow-derived macrophages from both wild type and CD38(-/-) , but to a significant higher extent with CD38 gene deletion. Bodipy 493/503 fluorescence staining found that the deposited lipid in macrophages was mainly enclosed in lysosomal organelles and largely enhanced with the blockade of CD38/NAADP pathway. Filipin staining and direct measurement of lysosome fraction further revealed that the free cholesterol constituted a major portion of the total cholesterol segregated in lysosomes. Moreover, in situ assay disclosed that both lysosomal lumen acidity and the acid lipase activity were reduced upon cholesterol buildup in lysosomes. In CD38(-/-) mice, treatment with Western diet (12 weeks) produced atherosclerotic damage in coronary artery with striking lysosomal cholesterol sequestration in macrophages. These data provide the first experimental evidence that the proper function of CD38/NAADP pathway plays an essential role in promoting free cholesterol efflux from lysosomes and that a defection of this signalling leads to lysosomal cholesterol accumulation in macrophages and results in coronary atherosclerosis in CD38(-/-) mice. PMID:26818887

  13. Regulation of SIRT 1 mediated NAD dependent deacetylation: A novel role for the multifunctional enzyme CD38

    SciTech Connect

    Aksoy, Pinar; Escande, Carlos; White, Thomas A.; Thompson, Michael; Soares, Sandra; Benech, Juan Claudio; Chini, Eduardo N. . E-mail: chini.eduardo@mayo.edu

    2006-10-13

    The SIRT 1 enzyme is a NAD dependent deacetylase implicated in ageing, cell protection, and energy metabolism in mammalian cells. How the endogenous activity of SIRT 1 is modulated is not known. The enzyme CD38 is a multifunctional enzyme capable of synthesis of the second messenger, cADPR, NAADP, and ADPR. However, the major enzymatic activity of CD38 is the hydrolysis of NAD. Of particular interest is the fact that CD38 is present on the inner nuclear membrane. Here, we investigate the modulation of the SIRT 1 activity by CD38. We propose that by modulating availability of NAD to the SIRT1 enzyme, CD38 may regulate SIRT1 enzymatic activity. We observed that in CD38 knockout mice, tissue levels of NAD are significantly increased. We also observed that incubation of purified recombinant SIRT1 enzyme with CD38 or nuclear extracts of wild-type mice led to a significant inhibition of its activity. In contrast, incubation of SIRT1 with cellular extract from CD38 knockout mice was without effect. Furthermore, the endogenous activity of SIRT1 was several time higher in nuclear extracts from CD38 knockout mice when compared to wild-type nuclear extracts. Finally, the in vivo deacetylation of the SIRT1 substrate P53 is increased in CD38 knockout mice tissue. Our data support the novel concept that nuclear CD38 is a major regulator of cellular/nuclear NAD level, and SIRT1 activity. These findings have strong implications for understanding the basic mechanisms that modulate intracellular NAD levels, energy homeostasis, as well as ageing and cellular protection modulated by the SIRT enzymes.

  14. Nuclear CD38 in retinoic acid-induced HL-60 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yalcintepe, Leman . E-mail: lemany@istanbul.edu.tr; Albeniz, Isil; Adin-Cinar, Suzan; Tiryaki, Demir; Bermek, Engin; Graeff, Richard M.; Lee, Hon Cheung

    2005-02-01

    The cell surface antigen, CD38, is a 45-kDa transmembrane protein which is predominantly expressed on hematopoietic cells during differentiation. As a bifunctional ectoenzyme, it catalyzes the synthesis of cyclic ADP-ribose (cADPR) from NAD{sup +} and hydrolysis of either NAD{sup +} or cADPR to ADP-ribose. All-trans-retinoic acid (RA) is a potent and specific inducer of CD38 in myeloid cells. In this report, we demonstrate that the nuclei of RA-treated human HL-60 myeloblastic cells reveal enzymatic activities inherent to CD38. Thus, GDP-ribosyl cyclase and NAD{sup +} glycohydrolase activities in the nuclear fraction increased very significantly in response to incubation with RA. With Western blotting, we detected in the nuclear protein fraction from RA-treated cells a {approx}43-kDa protein band which was reactive with the CD38-specific monoclonal antibody OKT10. The expression of CD38 in HL-60 nuclei was also shown with FACScan analysis. RA treatment gave rise to an increase in in vitro ADP ribosylation of the {approx}43-kDa nuclear protein. Moreover, nuclei isolated from RA-treated HL-60 cells revealed calcium release in response to cADPR, whereas a similar response was not observed in control nuclei. These results suggest that CD38 is expressed in HL-60 cell nuclei during RA-induced differentiation.

  15. Functional expression of soluble forms of human CD38 in Escherichia coli and Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Fryxell, K B; O'Donoghue, K; Graeff, R M; Lee, H C; Branton, W D

    1995-06-01

    Cyclic adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-ribose (cADPR), a metabolite of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+), mobilizes calcium from intracellular stores in many cells. The synthesis of cADPR from NAD+ and its subsequent hydrolysis to ADPR is catalyzed by an ADP-ribosyl cyclase and a cADPR hydrolase, respectively. The ADP-ribosyl cyclase cloned from the ovotestis of the marine invertebrate Aplysia californica has amino acid sequence homology to the human lymphocyte surface antigen CD38. CD38 has been shown to catalyze both the formation and the hydrolysis of cADPR. In this study, we produced soluble, enzymatically active CD38 using recombinant expression techniques in bacteria and yeast. We engineered a gene coding for a soluble form of CD38 by excision of the region of the gene coding for the N-terminal amino acids representing the putative membrane spanning sequence and short putative intracellular sequence. For expression in bacteria (Escherichia coli), this construct was cloned into the pFlag-1 plasmid which allows induced, periplasmic expression and relatively simple purification of the soluble CD38. For expression in yeast (Pichia pastoris) the CD38 sequence was further modified to eliminate four putative N-linked glycosylation sites and the resulting construct was expressed as a secreted protein. Both systems produce soluble enzymes of approximately 30 kDa and both recombinant enzymes display similar cyclase and hydrolase activities. PMID:7663169

  16. CD38-Expressing Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells Promote Tumor Growth in a Murine Model of Esophageal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Karakasheva, Tatiana A; Waldron, Todd J; Eruslanov, Evgeniy; Kim, Sang-Bae; Lee, Ju-Seog; O'Brien, Shaun; Hicks, Philip D; Basu, Devraj; Singhal, Sunil; Malavasi, Fabio; Rustgi, Anil K

    2015-10-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) are an immunosuppressive population of immature myeloid cells found in advanced-stage cancer patients and mouse tumor models. Production of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and arginase, as well as other suppressive mechanisms, allows MDSCs to suppress T-cell-mediated tumor clearance and foster tumor progression. Using an unbiased global gene expression approach in conditional p120-catenin knockout mice (L2-cre;p120ctn(f/f)), a model of oral-esophageal cancer, we have identified CD38 as playing a vital role in MDSC biology, previously unknown. CD38 belongs to the ADP-ribosyl cyclase family and possesses both ectoenzyme and receptor functions. It has been described to function in lymphoid and early myeloid cell differentiation, cell activation, and neutrophil chemotaxis. We find that CD38 expression in MDSCs is evident in other mouse tumor models of esophageal carcinogenesis, and CD38(high) MDSCs are more immature than MDSCs lacking CD38 expression, suggesting a potential role for CD38 in the maturation halt found in MDSC populations. CD38(high) MDSCs also possess a greater capacity to suppress activated T cells, and promote tumor growth to a greater degree than CD38(low) MDSCs, likely as a result of increased iNOS production. In addition, we have identified novel tumor-derived factors, specifically IL6, IGFBP3, and CXCL16, which induce CD38 expression by MDSCs ex vivo. Finally, we have detected an expansion of CD38(+) MDSCs in peripheral blood of advanced-stage cancer patients and validated targeting CD38 in vivo as a novel approach to cancer therapy. PMID:26294209

  17. CD38 expression and complement inhibitors affect response and resistance to daratumumab therapy in myeloma.

    PubMed

    Nijhof, Inger S; Casneuf, Tineke; van Velzen, Jeroen; van Kessel, Berris; Axel, Amy E; Syed, Khaja; Groen, Richard W J; van Duin, Mark; Sonneveld, Pieter; Minnema, Monique C; Zweegman, Sonja; Chiu, Christopher; Bloem, Andries C; Mutis, Tuna; Lokhorst, Henk M; Sasser, A Kate; van de Donk, Niels W C J

    2016-08-18

    The anti-CD38 monoclonal antibody daratumumab is well tolerated and has high single agent activity in heavily pretreated relapsed and refractory multiple myeloma (MM). However, not all patients respond, and many patients eventually develop progressive disease to daratumumab monotherapy. We therefore examined whether pretreatment expression levels of CD38 and complement-inhibitory proteins (CIPs) are associated with response and whether changes in expression of these proteins contribute to development of resistance. In a cohort of 102 patients treated with daratumumab monotherapy (16 mg/kg), we found that pretreatment levels of CD38 expression on MM cells were significantly higher in patients who achieved at least partial response (PR) compared with patients who achieved less than PR. However, cell surface expression of the CIPs, CD46, CD55, and CD59, was not associated with clinical response. In addition, CD38 expression was reduced in both bone marrow-localized and circulating MM cells, following the first daratumumab infusion. CD38 expression levels on MM cells increased again following daratumumab discontinuation. In contrast, CD55 and CD59 levels were significantly increased on MM cells only at the time of progression. All-trans retinoic acid increased CD38 levels and decreased CD55 and CD59 expression on MM cells from patients who developed daratumumab resistance, to approximately pretreatment values. This resulted in significant enhancement of daratumumab-mediated complement-dependent cytotoxicity. Together, these data demonstrate an important role for CD38 and CIP expression levels in daratumumab sensitivity and suggest that therapeutic combinations that alter CD38 and CIP expression levels should be investigated in the treatment of MM. These trials were registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00574288 (GEN501) and #NCT01985126 (SIRIUS). PMID:27307294

  18. Particular activation phenotype of T cells expressing HLA-DR but not CD38 in GALT from HIV-controllers is associated with immune regulation and delayed progression to AIDS.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Sandra M; Taborda, Natalia A; Correa, Luis A; Castro, Gustavo A; Hernandez, Juan C; Montoya, Carlos J; Rugeles, Maria T

    2016-06-01

    The spontaneous control of HIV replication in HIV-controllers underlines the importance of these subjects for exploring factors related to delayed progression. Several studies have revealed fewer immune alterations and effector mechanisms related to viral control, mainly in peripheral blood, in these individuals compared to normal progressors. However, immune characterization of gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT), the major target of infection, has not been thoroughly explored in these subjects. We evaluated the following parameters in GALT samples from 11 HIV-controllers and 15 HIV-progressors: (i) frequency and activation phenotype of T cells; (ii) expression of transcription factors associated with immune response profiles; and (iii) frequency of apoptotic cells. Interestingly, HIV-controllers exhibited a particular activation phenotype, with predominance of T cells expressing HLA-DR but not CD38 in GALT. This phenotype, previously associated with better control of infection, was correlated with low viral load and higher CD4(+) T cell count. Furthermore, a positive correlation of this activation phenotype with higher expression of Foxp3 and RORγT transcription factors suggested a key role for Treg and Th17 cells in the control of the immune activation and in the maintenance of gut mucosal integrity. Although we evaluated apoptosis by measuring expression of cleaved caspase-3 in GALT, we did not find differences between HIV-controllers and HIV-progressors. Taken together, our findings suggest that predominance of HLA-DR(+) T cells, along with lower immune activation and higher expression of transcription factors required for the development of Treg and Th17 cells, is associated with better viral control and delayed progression to AIDS. PMID:26724942

  19. Immuno-targeting the multifunctional CD38 using nanobody

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ting; Qi, Shali; Unger, Mandy; Hou, Yun Nan; Deng, Qi Wen; Liu, Jun; Lam, Connie M. C.; Wang, Xian Wang; Xin, Du; Zhang, Peng; Koch-Nolte, Friedrich; Hao, Quan; Zhang, Hongmin; Lee, Hon Cheung; Zhao, Yong Juan

    2016-01-01

    CD38, as a cell surface antigen is highly expressed in several hematologic malignancies including multiple myeloma (MM) and has been proven to be a good target for immunotherapy of the disease. CD38 is also a signaling enzyme responsible for the metabolism of two novel calcium messenger molecules. To be able to target this multifunctional protein, we generated a series of nanobodies against CD38 with high affinities. Crystal structures of the complexes of CD38 with the nanobodies were solved, identifying three separate epitopes on the carboxyl domain. Chromobodies, engineered by tagging the nanobody with fluorescence proteins, provide fast, simple and versatile tools for quantifying CD38 expression. Results confirmed that CD38 was highly expressed in malignant MM cells compared with normal white blood cells. The immunotoxin constructed by splicing the nanobody with a bacterial toxin, PE38 shows highly selective cytotoxicity against patient-derived MM cells as well as the cell lines, with half maximal effective concentration reaching as low as 10−11 molar. The effectiveness of the immunotoxin can be further increased by stimulating CD38 expression using retinoid acid. These results set the stage for the development of clinical therapeutics as well as diagnostic screening for myeloma. PMID:27251573

  20. The A-myb gene is preferentially expressed in tonsillar CD38+, CD39-, and sIgM- B lymphocytes and in Burkitt's lymphoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Golay, J; Erba, E; Bernasconi, S; Peri, G; Introna, M

    1994-07-15

    The A-myb gene is structurally related to the c-mby proto-oncogene, a transcription factor involved in the regulation of hemopoietic proliferation and differentiation. Recent evidence has shown that A-myb also functions as a transcriptional activator. We have previously demonstrated that A-myb RNA is not expressed in most mature human leukocytes at rest or after mitogenic or functional activation. We show here, by using cell sorting, PCR, and Western analyses that A-myb is most highly expressed in the subsets of human tonsillar B lymphocytes with the phenotypes CD38+, CD39-, and SIgM-. The preferential expression of A-myb in these populations was seen at both the RNA and protein levels. CD38 was consistently best at separating high from low A-myb-expressing cells, whereas other markers (CD10, 22, 23, 77, 11a, and 49d) did not correlate with A-myb expression. The CD38+ population expressing the highest levels of A-myb was shown to contain mostly cycling cells inasmuch as more than 95% were in the late G1, S, G2, and M phases of the cell cycle. In addition, A-myb expression always correlated with the percentage of cells in S/G2/M in the populations sorted with either CD38, CD39, or sIgM. Small resting tonsillar B lymphocytes induced to proliferate in vitro by several different polyclonal B cell activators did not, however, express detectable levels of A-myb, although these cells were demonstrated to express CD38 and enter the S/G2/M phases of the cell cycle. These data suggest that A-myb is a marker of in vivo-activated but not in vitro-activated B lymphocytes. Finally, A-myb was also found to be highly expressed in five of seven Burkitt's lymphoma lines and in none of three EBV lymphoblastoid cell lines. This finding is in agreement with the phenotype of the normal B cells that express high levels of A-myb in vivo and suggests that A-myb may be specifically induced within germinal center B cells. PMID:8021494

  1. NAD(P)H oxidase-dependent intracellular and extracellular O2·- production in coronary arterial myocytes from CD38 knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ming; Zhang, Yang; Xia, Min; Li, Xiao-Xue; Ritter, Joseph K; Zhang, Fan; Li, Pin-Lan

    2011-01-01

    Activation of NAD(P)H oxidase has been reported to produce superoxide (O2 ·-) extracellularly as an autocrine/paracrine regulator or intracellularly as a signaling messenger in a variety of mammalian cells. However, it remains unknown how the activity of NAD(P)H oxidase is regulated in arterial myocytes. Recently, CD38-associated ADP-ribosylcyclase has been reported to use NAD(P)H oxidase product, NAD+ or NADP+ to produce cyclic ADP-ribose (cADPR) or nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAADP), which mediates intracellular Ca2+ signaling. The present study was designed to test a hypothesis that CD38/cADPR pathway as a downstream event exerts feedback regulatory action on the NAD(P)H oxidase activity in production of extra- or intracellular O2 ·-in mouse coronary arterial myocytes (CAMs). By fluorescent microscopic imaging, we simultaneously monitored extra- and intracellular O2 ·-production in wild-type (CD38+/+) and CD38 knockout (CD38-/-) CAMs in response to oxotremorine (OXO), a muscarinic type 1 (M1) receptor agonist. It was found that CD38 deficiency prevented OXO-induced intracellular but not extracellular O2 ·-production in CAMs. Consistently, the OXO-induced intracellular O2 ·-production was markedly inhibited by CD38 shRNA or CD38 inhibitor nicotinamide in CD38+/+ CAMs. Further, Nox4 siRNA inhibited OXO-induced intracellular but not extracellular O2 ·- production, whereas Nox1 siRNA attenuated both intracellular and extracellular O2 ·-production in CD38+/+ CAMs. Direct delivery of exogenous cADPR into CAMs markedly elevated intracellular Ca2+ concentration and restored intracellular O2 ·-production in CD38-/- CAMs. Functionally, CD38 deficiency or Nox1 siRNA and Nox4 siRNA prevented OXO-induced contraction in isolated perfused coronary arteries in CD38 WT mice. These results provide direct evidence that CD38/cADPR pathway importantly controls Nox4-mediated intracellular O2 ·-production and that CD38-dependent intracellular O2

  2. α-Radioimmunotherapy with 213Bi-anti-CD38 immunoconjugates is effective in a mouse model of human multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Blechert, Birgit; Gaertner, Florian C.; Gilbertz, Klaus-Peter; Fernandez, Vanesa; Bassermann, Florian; Endell, Jan; Boxhammer, Rainer; Leclair, Stephane; Vallon, Mario; Aichler, Michaela; Feuchtinger, Annette; Bruchertseifer, Frank; Morgenstern, Alfred; Essler, Markus

    2015-01-01

    In spite of development of molecular therapeutics, multiple myeloma (MM) is fatal in most cases. CD38 is a promising target for selective treatment of MM. We tested radioimmunoconjugates consisting of the α-emitter 213Bi coupled to an anti-CD38 MAb in preclinical treatment of MM. Efficacy of 213Bi-anti-CD38-MAb was assayed towards different MM cell lines with regard to induction of DNA double-strand breaks, induction of apoptosis and initiation of cell cycle arrest. Moreover, mice bearing luciferase-expressing MM xenografts were treated with 213Bi-anti-CD38-MAb. Therapeutic efficacy was monitored by bioluminescence imaging, overall survival and histology. 213Bi-anti-CD38-MAb treatment induced DNA damage which did not result in activation of the G2 DNA-damage-response checkpoint, but instead in mitotic arrest and subsequent mitotic catastrophe. The anti-tumor effect of 213Bi-anti-CD38-MAb correlated with the expression level of CD38 in each MM cell line. In myeloma xenografts, treatment with 213Bi-anti-CD38-MAb suppressed tumor growth via induction of apoptosis in tumor tissue and significantly prolonged survival compared to controls. The major organ systems did not show any signs of 213Bi-induced toxicity. Preclinical treatment of MM with 213Bi-anti-CD38-MAb turned out as an effective therapeutic option. PMID:25576914

  3. CD38-Targeted Immunochemotherapy in Refractory Multiple Myeloma: A New Horizon.

    PubMed

    Laubach, Jacob P; Richardson, Paul G

    2015-06-15

    CD38 is a type II transmembrane glycoprotein that is highly expressed in multiple myeloma and is a promising target for immunotherapy. Daratumumab is a human monoclonal antibody that has potent anti-multiple myeloma activity both as monotherapy and in combination with other multiple myeloma treatments, and has breakthrough designation on this basis. PMID:25878332

  4. Genetic Ablation of CD38 Protects against Western Diet-Induced Exercise Intolerance and Metabolic Inflexibility

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Shian-Huey; Harrington, W. Wallace; Luo, Guizhen; Milliken, Naphtali O.; Ulrich, John C.; Chen, Jing; Rajpal, Deepak K.; Qian, Ying; Carpenter, Tiffany; Murray, Rusty; Geske, Robert S.; Stimpson, Stephen A.; Kramer, Henning F.; Haffner, Curt D.; Becherer, J. David; Preugschat, Frank; Billin, Andrew N.

    2015-01-01

    Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) is a key cofactor required for essential metabolic oxidation-reduction reactions. It also regulates various cellular activities, including gene expression, signaling, DNA repair and calcium homeostasis. Intracellular NAD+ levels are tightly regulated and often respond rapidly to nutritional and environmental changes. Numerous studies indicate that elevating NAD+ may be therapeutically beneficial in the context of numerous diseases. However, the role of NAD+ on skeletal muscle exercise performance is poorly understood. CD38, a multi-functional membrane receptor and enzyme, consumes NAD+ to generate products such as cyclic-ADP-ribose. CD38 knockout mice show elevated tissue and blood NAD+ level. Chronic feeding of high-fat, high-sucrose diet to wild type mice leads to exercise intolerance and reduced metabolic flexibility. Loss of CD38 by genetic mutation protects mice from diet-induced metabolic deficit. These animal model results suggest that elevation of tissue NAD+ through genetic ablation of CD38 can profoundly alter energy homeostasis in animals that are maintained on a calorically-excessive Western diet. PMID:26287487

  5. Flow cytometric detection of some activation and proliferation markers in human hematopoietic cell lines.

    PubMed

    Glasová, M; Koníková, E; Kusenda, J; Babusíková, O

    1996-01-01

    Simultaneous surface marker/DNA, cytoplasmic/DNA or nuclear/DNA staining was used to study proliferation of hematopoietic cell lines (MOLT4, BJAB, P3HR1). Different fixation/permeabilization methods (paraformaldehyde with metanol or Tween 20 or saponin, buffered formaldehyde-acetone) were used providing optimal results of the double stainings. There was a significant increase of S phase and proliferation index (PI) of CD71+ and Ki67+ MOLT4 cells in comparison with their negative counterparts. This indicates their close connection with proliferation. Unlike that, the correlation between the expression of CD38 and S phase or PI was not significant either in MOLT4 or in P3HRI cells. For cytoplasmic markers CD3 (in MOLT4 cells) and CD22 (in BJAB cells) statistically significant (cCD3) and not significant (cCD22) correlation was demonstrated between their expression and S phase or PI. Molecular equivalents of soluble fluorescein values for CD71 were always higher than for CD38. The density of these cell surface markers in addition to the percentage of their expression is of considerable significance for their evaluation as activation or proliferation markers. PMID:8996562

  6. Upregulation of CD38 expression on multiple myeloma cells by all-trans retinoic acid improves the efficacy of daratumumab.

    PubMed

    Nijhof, I S; Groen, R W J; Lokhorst, H M; van Kessel, B; Bloem, A C; van Velzen, J; de Jong-Korlaar, R; Yuan, H; Noort, W A; Klein, S K; Martens, A C M; Doshi, P; Sasser, K; Mutis, T; van de Donk, N W C J

    2015-10-01

    Daratumumab is an anti-CD38 monoclonal antibody with lytic activity against multiple myeloma (MM) cells, including ADCC (antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity) and CDC (complement-dependent cytotoxicity). Owing to a marked heterogeneity of response to daratumumab therapy in MM, we investigated determinants of the sensitivity of MM cells toward daratumumab-mediated ADCC and CDC. In bone marrow samples from 144 MM patients, we observed no difference in daratumumab-mediated lysis between newly diagnosed or relapsed/refractory patients. However, we discovered, next to an expected effect of effector (natural killer cells/monocytes) to target (MM cells) ratio on ADCC, a significant association between CD38 expression and daratumumab-mediated ADCC (127 patients), as well as CDC (56 patients). Similarly, experiments with isogenic MM cell lines expressing different levels of CD38 revealed that the level of CD38 expression is an important determinant of daratumumab-mediated ADCC and CDC. Importantly, all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) increased CD38 expression levels but also reduced expression of the complement-inhibitory proteins CD55 and CD59 in both cell lines and primary MM samples. This resulted in a significant enhancement of the activity of daratumumab in vitro and in a humanized MM mouse model as well. Our results provide the preclinical rationale for further evaluation of daratumumab combined with ATRA in MM patients. PMID:25975191

  7. Clinical efficacy and management of monoclonal antibodies targeting CD38 and SLAMF7 in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    van de Donk, Niels W C J; Moreau, Philippe; Plesner, Torben; Palumbo, Antonio; Gay, Francesca; Laubach, Jacob P; Malavasi, Fabio; Avet-Loiseau, Hervé; Mateos, Maria-Victoria; Sonneveld, Pieter; Lokhorst, Henk M; Richardson, Paul G

    2016-02-11

    Immunotherapeutic strategies are emerging as promising therapeutic approaches in multiple myeloma (MM), with several monoclonal antibodies in advanced stages of clinical development. Of these agents, CD38-targeting antibodies have marked single agent activity in extensively pretreated MM, and preliminary results from studies with relapsed/refractory patients have shown enhanced therapeutic efficacy when daratumumab and isatuximab are combined with other agents. Furthermore, although elotuzumab (anti-SLAMF7) has no single agent activity in advanced MM, randomized trials in relapsed/refractory MM have demonstrated significantly improved progression-free survival when elotuzumab is added to lenalidomide-dexamethasone or bortezomib-dexamethasone. Importantly, there has been no significant additive toxicity when these monoclonal antibodies are combined with other anti-MM agents, other than infusion-related reactions specific to the therapeutic antibody. Prevention and management of infusion reactions is important to avoid drug discontinuation, which may in turn lead to reduced efficacy of anti-MM therapy. Therapeutic antibodies interfere with several laboratory tests. First, interference of therapeutic antibodies with immunofixation and serum protein electrophoresis assays may lead to underestimation of complete response. Strategies to mitigate interference, based on shifting the therapeutic antibody band, are in development. Furthermore, daratumumab, and probably also other CD38-targeting antibodies, interfere with blood compatibility testing and thereby complicate the safe release of blood products. Neutralization of the therapeutic CD38 antibody or CD38 denaturation on reagent red blood cells mitigates daratumumab interference with transfusion laboratory serologic tests. Finally, therapeutic antibodies may complicate flow cytometric evaluation of normal and neoplastic plasma cells, since the therapeutic antibody can affect the availability of the epitope for binding

  8. Thromboxane-induced renal vasoconstriction is mediated by the ADP-ribosyl cyclase CD38 and superoxide anion

    PubMed Central

    Vogel, Paul A.; Kopple, Tayler E.; Arendshorst, William J.

    2013-01-01

    The present renal hemodynamic study tested the hypothesis that CD38 and superoxide anion (O2·−) participate in the vasoconstriction produced by activation of thromboxane prostanoid (TP) receptors in the mouse kidney. CD38 is the major mammalian ADP-ribosyl cyclase contributing to vasomotor tone through the generation of cADP-ribose, a second messenger that activates ryanodine receptors to release Ca2+ from the sarcoplasmic reticulum in vascular smooth muscle cells. We evaluated whether the stable thromboxane mimetic U-46619 causes less pronounced renal vasoconstriction in CD38-deficient mice and the involvement of O2·− in U-46619-induced renal vasoconstriction. Our results indicate that U-46619 activation of TP receptors causes renal vasoconstriction in part by activating cADP-ribose signaling in renal resistance arterioles. Based on maximal renal blood flow and renal vascular resistance responses to bolus injections of U-46619, CD38 contributes 30–40% of the TP receptor-induced vasoconstriction. We also found that the antioxidant SOD mimetic tempol attenuated the magnitude of vasoconstriction by U-46619 in both groups of mice, suggesting mediation by O2·−. The degree of tempol blockage of U-46619-induced renal vasoconstriction was greater in wild-type mice, attenuating renal vasoconstriction by 40% compared with 30% in CD38-null mice. In other experiments, U-46619 rapidly stimulated O2·− production (dihydroethidium fluorescence) in isolated mouse afferent arterioles, an effect abolished by tempol. These observations provide the first in vivo demonstration of CD38 and O2·− involvement in the vasoconstrictor effects of TP receptor activation in the kidney and in vitro evidence for TP receptor stimulation of O2·− production by the afferent arteriole. PMID:23884143

  9. Global transcriptional response of Clostridium difficile carrying the CD38 prophage.

    PubMed

    Sekulovic, Ognjen; Fortier, Louis-Charles

    2015-02-01

    Clostridium difficile is one of the most dangerous pathogens in hospital settings. Most strains of C. difficile carry one or more prophages, and some of them, like CD38-2 and CD119, can influence the expression of toxin genes. However, little is known about the global host response in the presence of a given prophage. In order to fill this knowledge gap, we used high-throughput RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) to conduct a genome-wide transcriptomic analysis of the epidemic C. difficile strain R20291 carrying the CD38-2 prophage. A total of 39 bacterial genes were differentially expressed in the R20291 lysogen, 26 of them being downregulated. Several of the regulated genes encode transcriptional regulators and phosphotransferase system (PTS) subunits involved in glucose, fructose, and glucitol/sorbitol uptake and metabolism. CD38-2 also upregulated the expression of a group of regulatory genes located in phi-027, a resident prophage common to most ribotype 027 isolates. The most differentially expressed gene was that encoding the conserved phase-variable cell wall protein CwpV, which was upregulated 20-fold in the lysogen. Quantitative PCR and immunofluorescence showed that the increased cwpV expression results from a greater proportion of cells actively transcribing the gene. Indeed, 95% of f lysogenic cells express cwpV, as opposed to only 5% of wild-type cells. Furthermore, the higher proportion of cells expressing cwpV results from a higher frequency of recombination of the genetic switch controlling phase variation, which we confirmed to be dependent on the host-encoded recombinase RecV. In summary, CD38-2 interferes with phase variation of the surface protein CwpV and the expression of metabolic genes. PMID:25501487

  10. Global Transcriptional Response of Clostridium difficile Carrying the ϕCD38-2 Prophage

    PubMed Central

    Sekulovic, Ognjen

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is one of the most dangerous pathogens in hospital settings. Most strains of C. difficile carry one or more prophages, and some of them, like ϕCD38-2 and ϕCD119, can influence the expression of toxin genes. However, little is known about the global host response in the presence of a given prophage. In order to fill this knowledge gap, we used high-throughput RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) to conduct a genome-wide transcriptomic analysis of the epidemic C. difficile strain R20291 carrying the ϕCD38-2 prophage. A total of 39 bacterial genes were differentially expressed in the R20291 lysogen, 26 of them being downregulated. Several of the regulated genes encode transcriptional regulators and phosphotransferase system (PTS) subunits involved in glucose, fructose, and glucitol/sorbitol uptake and metabolism. ϕCD38-2 also upregulated the expression of a group of regulatory genes located in phi-027, a resident prophage common to most ribotype 027 isolates. The most differentially expressed gene was that encoding the conserved phase-variable cell wall protein CwpV, which was upregulated ∼20-fold in the lysogen. Quantitative PCR and immunofluorescence showed that the increased cwpV expression results from a greater proportion of cells actively transcribing the gene. Indeed, ∼95% of lysogenic cells express cwpV, as opposed to only ∼5% of wild-type cells. Furthermore, the higher proportion of cells expressing cwpV results from a higher frequency of recombination of the genetic switch controlling phase variation, which we confirmed to be dependent on the host-encoded recombinase RecV. In summary, ϕCD38-2 interferes with phase variation of the surface protein CwpV and the expression of metabolic genes. PMID:25501487

  11. Expression and purification of the recombinant His-tagged GST-CD38 fusion protein using the baculovirus/insect cell expression system.

    PubMed

    Khoo, Keng Meng; Chang, Chan Fong; Schubert, Jeffrey; Wondrak, Ewald; Chng, Hiok Hee

    2005-04-01

    CD38 is a type II transmembrane glycoprotein found in myriad mammalian tissues and cell types. It is known for its involvement in the metabolism of cyclic ADP-ribose and nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate, two nucleotides with calcium mobilizing activity independent of inositol trisphosphate. CD38 itself has been shown to have clinical significance in certain diseases with possible utilization in diagnostic and prognostic applications. Previous studies on several autoimmune diseases have shown the usefulness of recombinant CD38 protein expressed from Escherichia coli and Pichia pastoris in the detection of autoantibodies to CD38 via Western blot and ELISA. In this study, we produced a 6 x His-tagged GST-CD38 fusion protein using a recombinant baculovirus/insect cell expression technique that was purified as a soluble protein. The fusion protein was purified to homogeneity by affinity and gel filtration chromatography steps. It has an apparent molecular mass of 56 kDa on SDS-PAGE gel stained with Coomassie blue and was recognized on Western blots by antibodies against human CD38 as well as the polyhistidine tag. Peptide mass fingerprinting analysis confirmed the identity of human CD38 in the fusion protein. PMID:15766882

  12. CD38 Ligation in Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells of Myeloma Patients Induces Release of Protumorigenic IL-6 and Impaired Secretion of IFNγ Cytokines and Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Fedele, Giorgio; Di Girolamo, Marco; Recine, Umberto; Palazzo, Raffaella; Urbani, Francesca; Horenstein, Alberto L.; Malavasi, Fabio; Ausiello, Clara Maria

    2013-01-01

    CD38, a surface receptor that controls signals in immunocompetent cells, is densely expressed by cells of multiple myeloma (MM). The immune system of MM patients appears as functionally impaired, with qualitative and quantitative defects in T cell immune responses. This work answers the issue whether CD38 plays a role in the impairment of T lymphocyte response. To this aim, we analyzed the signals implemented by monoclonal antibodies (mAb) ligation in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) obtained from MM patients and compared to benign monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS). PBMC from MM both failed to proliferate and secrete IFNγ induced by CD38 ligation while it retained the ability to respond to TCR/CD3. The impaired CD38-dependent proliferative response likely reflects an arrest in the progression of cell cycle, as indicated by the reduced expression of PCNA. CD38 signaling showed an enhanced ability to induce IL-6 secretion. PBMC from MM patients displays a deregulated response possibly due to defects of CD38 activation pathways and CD38 may be functionally involved in the progression of this pathology via the secretion of high levels of IL-6 that protects neoplastic cells from apoptosis. PMID:24489445

  13. Targeting of CD34+CD38- cells using Gemtuzumab ozogamicin (Mylotarg) in combination with tipifarnib (Zarnestra) in acute Myeloid Leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The CD34+CD38- subset of AML cells is enriched for resistance to current chemotherapeutic agents and considered to contribute to disease progression and relapse in Acute Myeloid Leukaemia (AML) patients following initial treatment. Methods Chemosensitivity in phenotypically defined subsets from 34 primary AML samples was measured by flow cytometry following 48 hr in vitro treatment with gemtuzumab ozogamicin (GO, Mylotarg) and the farnesyltransferase inhibitor tipifarnib/zarnestra. The DNA damage response was measured using flow cytometry, immunofluorescence and immunohistochemistry. Results Using a previously validated in vitro minimal residual disease model, we now show that the combination of GO (10 ng/ml) and tipifarnib (5 μM) targets the CD34+CD38- subset resulting in 65% median cell loss compared to 28% and 13% CD34+CD38- cell loss in GO-treated and tipifarnib-treated cells, respectively. Using phosphokinome profiling and immunofluorescence in the TF-1a cell line, we demonstrate that the drug combination is characterised by the activation of a DNA damage response (induction of γH2A.X and thr68 phosphorylation of chk2). Higher induction of γH2AX was found in CD34+CD38- than in CD34+CD38+ patient cells. In a model system, we show that dormancy impairs damage resolution, allowing accumulation of γH2AX foci. Conclusions The chemosensitivity of the CD34+CD38- subset, combined with enhanced damage indicators, suggest that this subset is primed to favour programmed cell death as opposed to repairing damage. This interaction between tipifarnib and GO suggests a potential role in the treatment of AML. PMID:23013471

  14. Flavonoid apigenin is an inhibitor of the NAD+ ase CD38: implications for cellular NAD+ metabolism, protein acetylation, and treatment of metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Escande, Carlos; Nin, Veronica; Price, Nathan L; Capellini, Verena; Gomes, Ana P; Barbosa, Maria Thereza; O'Neil, Luke; White, Thomas A; Sinclair, David A; Chini, Eduardo N

    2013-04-01

    Metabolic syndrome is a growing health problem worldwide. It is therefore imperative to develop new strategies to treat this pathology. In the past years, the manipulation of NAD(+) metabolism has emerged as a plausible strategy to ameliorate metabolic syndrome. In particular, an increase in cellular NAD(+) levels has beneficial effects, likely because of the activation of sirtuins. Previously, we reported that CD38 is the primary NAD(+)ase in mammals. Moreover, CD38 knockout mice have higher NAD(+) levels and are protected against obesity and metabolic syndrome. Here, we show that CD38 regulates global protein acetylation through changes in NAD(+) levels and sirtuin activity. In addition, we characterize two CD38 inhibitors: quercetin and apigenin. We show that pharmacological inhibition of CD38 results in higher intracellular NAD(+) levels and that treatment of cell cultures with apigenin decreases global acetylation as well as the acetylation of p53 and RelA-p65. Finally, apigenin administration to obese mice increases NAD(+) levels, decreases global protein acetylation, and improves several aspects of glucose and lipid homeostasis. Our results show that CD38 is a novel pharmacological target to treat metabolic diseases via NAD(+)-dependent pathways. PMID:23172919

  15. Cluster of Differentiation 38 (CD38) Mediates Bile Acid-induced Acinar Cell Injury and Pancreatitis through Cyclic ADP-ribose and Intracellular Calcium Release*

    PubMed Central

    Orabi, Abrahim I.; Muili, Kamaldeen A.; Javed, Tanveer A.; Jin, Shunqian; Jayaraman, Thottala; Lund, Frances E.; Husain, Sohail Z.

    2013-01-01

    Aberrant Ca2+ signals within pancreatic acinar cells are an early and critical feature in acute pancreatitis, yet it is unclear how these signals are generated. An important mediator of the aberrant Ca2+ signals due to bile acid exposure is the intracellular Ca2+ channel ryanodine receptor. One putative activator of the ryanodine receptor is the nucleotide second messenger cyclic ADP-ribose (cADPR), which is generated by an ectoenzyme ADP-ribosyl cyclase, CD38. In this study, we examined the role of CD38 and cADPR in acinar cell Ca2+ signals and acinar injury due to bile acids using pharmacologic inhibitors of CD38 and cADPR as well as mice deficient in Cd38 (Cd38−/−). Cytosolic Ca2+ signals were imaged using live time-lapse confocal microscopy in freshly isolated mouse acinar cells during perifusion with the bile acid taurolithocholic acid 3-sulfate (TLCS; 500 μm). To focus on intracellular Ca2+ release and to specifically exclude Ca2+ influx, cells were perifused in Ca2+-free medium. Cell injury was assessed by lactate dehydrogenase leakage and propidium iodide uptake. Pretreatment with either nicotinamide (20 mm) or the cADPR antagonist 8-Br-cADPR (30 μm) abrogated TLCS-induced Ca2+ signals and cell injury. TLCS-induced Ca2+ release and cell injury were reduced by 30 and 95%, respectively, in Cd38-deficient acinar cells compared with wild-type cells (p < 0.05). Cd38-deficient mice were protected against a model of bile acid infusion pancreatitis. In summary, these data indicate that CD38-cADPR mediates bile acid-induced pancreatitis and acinar cell injury through aberrant intracellular Ca2+ signaling. PMID:23940051

  16. The Roles of Oxytocin and CD38 in Social or Parental Behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Lopatina, Olga; Inzhutova, Alena; Salmina, Alla B.; Higashida, Haruhiro

    2013-01-01

    The nine amino acid peptide oxytocin (OXT) has been directly associated with different types of behavioral reactions. The formation and maintenance of social relationships in youth and middle age are important components of human mental health. A deficit in healthy behavioral formation leads to social isolation and limitation of well-being. Mice are social animals and are therefore useful for investigating the neurobiological mechanisms of cognitive process control, including the development of social relationships and social skills. Studies in mice may broaden our understanding of the human condition. The multifunctional protein CD38/ADP-ribosyl cyclase is highly expressed in the brain, plays an important role in central OXT release, and regulates social memory. In this review article, we discuss the mechanisms of social behavior affected by the dysregulation of brain OXT function as a consequence of a lack of CD38. OXT bound to OXT receptors initiates autoregulatory positive feedback of OXT release in the hypothalamus and posterior pituitary. OXT bio-behavioral positive feedback is usually implicated in female reproductive systems, but can also be observed in social behavior. Exogenous stimuli (OXT treatment in vitro, OXT intravenous or intraventricular administration, and nasal OXT delivery) initiate activation of OXT neurons via PKC-CD38/ADP-ribosyl cyclase cascades and result in the modulation of social behavior in humans and mice. Based on these findings, we reviewed the functions of OXT and its properties with respect to the development of therapies for human social behavior impairments in psychological diseases. In addition, preliminary studies of continuous nasal OXT administration on subjects with autism spectrum disorders are described. PMID:23335873

  17. Relative value of ZAP-70, CD38, and immunoglobulin mutation status in predicting aggressive disease in chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Rassenti, Laura Z.; Jain, Sonia; Keating, Michael J.; Wierda, William G.; Grever, Michael R.; Byrd, John C.; Kay, Neil E.; Brown, Jennifer R.; Gribben, John G.; Neuberg, Donna S.; He, Feng; Greaves, Andrew W.; Rai, Kanti R.

    2008-01-01

    Leukemia-cell expression of ZAP-70, CD38, or unmutated immunoglobulin heavy chain variable region genes (U-IGHV) each is associated with aggressive disease in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). To assess the relative strength of each marker, we defined thresholds for designating a case as positive for CD38 or ZAP-70 in a test cohort of 307 patients and used these data-defined criteria to stratify patients in an independent cohort of 705 patients. Multivariable analysis revealed that ZAP-70 was the strongest risk factor. Knowledge of the IGHV mutation status or CD38 did not improve our ability to predict the time to first treatment except for ZAP-70–negative cases, which could be segregated into 2 groups of intermediate-risk or low-risk disease based on whether they expressed unmutated or mutated IGHV. ZAP-70 maintained its high relative prognostic value for the subset of patients with early-stage, asymptomatic disease, including patients evaluated within 1 year of diagnosis. Although it is premature to recommend therapy based on these risk factors, patients with ZAP-70–positive CLL cells should be monitored closely for disease progression as they have a median time from diagnosis to requiring initial therapy by standard criteria of approximately 3 years. PMID:18577710

  18. c-Cbl Interacts with CD38 and Promotes Retinoic Acid–Induced Differentiation and G0 Arrest of Human Myeloblastic Leukemia Cells

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Miaoqing; Yen, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Retinoic acid (RA) is known to regulate cell growth and differentiation. In HL-60 human myeloblastic leukemia cells, it causes mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling leading to myeloid differentiation and G0 cell cycle arrest. This communication reports that expression of the Cbl adaptor caused enhanced extracellular signal-regulated kinase 2 activation and promoted RA-induced differentiation and G0-arrest. Stable transfectants ectopically expressing c-Cbl underwent myeloid differentiation faster than wild-type (wt) cells when treated with RA. In contrast, c-Cbl knockdown stable transfectants differentiated slower than wt cells when treated with RA. Cells ectopically expressing c-Cbl had enhanced CD38 expression when treated with RA, and cells ectopically expressing CD38 had enhanced c-Cbl expression, even without with RA, suggesting an interaction between c-Cbl and CD38. Fluorescence resource energy transfer and coimmunoprecipitation showed that c-Cbl and CD38 bind each other. RA causes the gradual down-regulation and eventual loss of c-Cbl expression, resulting in loss of the Cbl-CD38 interaction, suggesting that c-Cbl plays a relatively early role in promoting RA-induced differentiation. RA-induced differentiation can thus be propelled by c-Cbl and by CD38, both of which bind together, enhance the expression of each other, and cause MAPK signaling. There thus seems to be a cooperative role for c-Cbl and CD38, reflected in their direct binding, in propulsion of RA-induced differentiation. PMID:18974118

  19. Daratumumab depletes CD38+ immune regulatory cells, promotes T-cell expansion, and skews T-cell repertoire in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Krejcik, Jakub; Casneuf, Tineke; Nijhof, Inger S; Verbist, Bie; Bald, Jaime; Plesner, Torben; Syed, Khaja; Liu, Kevin; van de Donk, Niels W C J; Weiss, Brendan M; Ahmadi, Tahamtan; Lokhorst, Henk M; Mutis, Tuna; Sasser, A Kate

    2016-07-21

    Daratumumab targets CD38-expressing myeloma cells through a variety of immune-mediated mechanisms (complement-dependent cytotoxicity, antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity, and antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis) and direct apoptosis with crosslinking. These mechanisms may also target nonplasma cells that express CD38, which prompted evaluation of daratumumab's effects on CD38-positive immune subpopulations. Peripheral blood (PB) and bone marrow (BM) from patients with relapsed/refractory myeloma from 2 daratumumab monotherapy studies were analyzed before and during therapy and at relapse. Regulatory B cells and myeloid-derived suppressor cells, previously shown to express CD38, were evaluated for immunosuppressive activity and daratumumab sensitivity in the myeloma setting. A novel subpopulation of regulatory T cells (Tregs) expressing CD38 was identified. These Tregs were more immunosuppressive in vitro than CD38-negative Tregs and were reduced in daratumumab-treated patients. In parallel, daratumumab induced robust increases in helper and cytotoxic T-cell absolute counts. In PB and BM, daratumumab induced significant increases in CD8(+):CD4(+) and CD8(+):Treg ratios, and increased memory T cells while decreasing naïve T cells. The majority of patients demonstrated these broad T-cell changes, although patients with a partial response or better showed greater maximum effector and helper T-cell increases, elevated antiviral and alloreactive functional responses, and significantly greater increases in T-cell clonality as measured by T-cell receptor (TCR) sequencing. Increased TCR clonality positively correlated with increased CD8(+) PB T-cell counts. Depletion of CD38(+) immunosuppressive cells, which is associated with an increase in T-helper cells, cytotoxic T cells, T-cell functional response, and TCR clonality, represents possible additional mechanisms of action for daratumumab and deserves further exploration. PMID:27222480

  20. Daratumumab depletes CD38+ immune regulatory cells, promotes T-cell expansion, and skews T-cell repertoire in multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Krejcik, Jakub; Casneuf, Tineke; Nijhof, Inger S.; Verbist, Bie; Bald, Jaime; Plesner, Torben; Syed, Khaja; Liu, Kevin; van de Donk, Niels W. C. J.; Weiss, Brendan M.; Ahmadi, Tahamtan; Lokhorst, Henk M.; Mutis, Tuna

    2016-01-01

    Daratumumab targets CD38-expressing myeloma cells through a variety of immune-mediated mechanisms (complement-dependent cytotoxicity, antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity, and antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis) and direct apoptosis with crosslinking. These mechanisms may also target nonplasma cells that express CD38, which prompted evaluation of daratumumab’s effects on CD38-positive immune subpopulations. Peripheral blood (PB) and bone marrow (BM) from patients with relapsed/refractory myeloma from 2 daratumumab monotherapy studies were analyzed before and during therapy and at relapse. Regulatory B cells and myeloid-derived suppressor cells, previously shown to express CD38, were evaluated for immunosuppressive activity and daratumumab sensitivity in the myeloma setting. A novel subpopulation of regulatory T cells (Tregs) expressing CD38 was identified. These Tregs were more immunosuppressive in vitro than CD38-negative Tregs and were reduced in daratumumab-treated patients. In parallel, daratumumab induced robust increases in helper and cytotoxic T-cell absolute counts. In PB and BM, daratumumab induced significant increases in CD8+:CD4+ and CD8+:Treg ratios, and increased memory T cells while decreasing naïve T cells. The majority of patients demonstrated these broad T-cell changes, although patients with a partial response or better showed greater maximum effector and helper T-cell increases, elevated antiviral and alloreactive functional responses, and significantly greater increases in T-cell clonality as measured by T-cell receptor (TCR) sequencing. Increased TCR clonality positively correlated with increased CD8+ PB T-cell counts. Depletion of CD38+ immunosuppressive cells, which is associated with an increase in T-helper cells, cytotoxic T cells, T-cell functional response, and TCR clonality, represents possible additional mechanisms of action for daratumumab and deserves further exploration. PMID:27222480

  1. A non-canonical adenosinergic pathway led by CD38 in human melanoma cells induces suppression of T cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Chillemi, Antonella; Quarona, Valeria; Zaccarello, Gianluca; Carrega, Paolo; Ferlazzo, Guido; Mingari, Maria Cristina; Moretta, Lorenzo

    2015-01-01

    Nucleotide-metabolizing ectoenzymes are endowed with an extracellular catalytic domain, which is involved in regulating the extracellular nucleotide/nucleoside balance. The tumor microenvironment contains high levels of adenosine (ADO) generated by this enzymatic network, thus promoting tumor growth by inhibiting anti-tumor immune responses. ADO inhibition in melanoma murine models limits tumor metastases and restores anti-tumor immune responses. This work investigates the expression and function of ectoenzymes in primary human melanoma cell lines. All of latter cells expressed CD38, CD39, CD73, and CD203a/PC-1, and produced ADO from AMP and NAD+. Melanoma cells inhibited T cell proliferation through an ADO-dependent mechanism, since such inhibition was reverted using CD38/CD73 specific inhibitors. Melanoma cells abolished the function of effector memory, central memory and reduced naïve CD4+ T cell proliferation. Accordingly, phosphorylation of S6 ribosomal protein, p38 and Stat1 was lower in activated memory cells than in naïve CD4+ T lymphocytes. Melanoma cells also inhibited proliferation of naïve, memory and -to a lesser extent- of effector CD8+ T cells. These different inhibitory effects correlated with distinct patterns of expression of the ADO receptor A2a and A2b. These results show that primary human melanoma cell lines suppress in vitro T cell proliferation through an adenosinergic pathway in which CD38 and CD73 play a prominent role. PMID:26329660

  2. Seminal CD38 Enhances Human Sperm Capacitation through Its Interaction with CD31

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Byung-Ju; Park, Dae-Ryoung; Nam, Tae-Sik; Lee, Seo Ho; Kim, Uh-Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Human sperm have to undergo a maturational process called capacitation in the female reproductive tract. Capacitation confers upon the sperm an ability to gain hypermotility and undergo acrosome reaction. Previous studies have suggested that seminal plasma proteins induce the capacitation of sperm in the female reproductive tract for the successful fertilization of the oocyte. However, the function of seminal plasma proteins in capacitation remains largely unclear. To the end, we found that soluble CD38 (sCD38) in seminal plasma increases the capacitation of sperm via specific interactions between sCD38 and the CD31 on the sperm. Upon the association of sCD38 with CD31, tyrosine kinase Src phosphorylates CD31, a process blocked by Src inhibitors. Shc, SHP-2, Grb2, and SOS, as well as Src kinase were found to associate with the phosphorylated CD31. The sCD38-induced phosphorylation of CD31 initiates a cascade reaction through the phosphorylation of Erk1/2, which results in the acrosome reaction, and sperm hypermotility. These processes were prevented by Src, Ras and MEK inhibitors. Taken together, these data indicate that the sCD38 present in seminal plasma plays a critical role in the capacitation of sperm. PMID:26407101

  3. All-trans retinoic acid and a novel synthetic retinoid tamibarotene (Am80) differentially regulate CD38 expression in human leukemia HL-60 cells: possible involvement of protein kinase C-delta.

    PubMed

    Uruno, Akira; Noguchi, Naoya; Matsuda, Ken; Nata, Koji; Yoshikawa, Takeo; Chikamatsu, Youichiro; Kagechika, Hiroyuki; Harigae, Hideo; Ito, Sadayoshi; Okamoto, Hiroshi; Sugawara, Akira

    2011-08-01

    ATRA and a synthetic RAR agonist tamibarotene (Am80) induce granulocytic differentiation of human acute leukemia HL-60 cells and have been used in antineoplastic therapy. ATRA induces CD38 antigen during HL-60 cell differentiation, which interacts with CD31 antigen on the vascular EC surface and may induce disadvantages in the therapy. We here examined the mechanisms of the ATRA-mediated CD38 induction and compared the difference between ATRA- and tamibarotene-mediated induction. Tamibarotene-induced HL-60 cell adhesion to ECs was 38% lower than ATRA, and NB4 cell adhesion to ECs by tamibarotene was equivalent to ATRA, which induced CD38 gene transcription biphasically in HL-60 cells, the early-phase induction via DR-RARE containing intron 1, and the delayed-phase induction via RARE lacking the 5'-flanking region. In contrast to ATRA, tamibarotene induced only the early-phase induction, resulting in its lower CD38 induction than ATRA. A PKCδ inhibitor, rottlerin, and siRNA-mediated PKCδ knockdown suppressed the ATRA-induced CD38 promoter activity of the 5'-flanking region, whereas a RAR antagonist, LE540, or RAR knockdown did not affect it. Cycloheximide and rottlerin suppressed the delayed-phase induction of CD38 expression by ATRA but did not affect the early-phase induction. Moreover, ATRA, but not tamibarotene, induced PKCδ expression without affecting its mRNA stability. The diminished effect of tamibarotene on CD38-mediated HL-60 cell adhesion to ECs compared with ATRA is likely a result of the lack of its delayed-phase induction of CD38 expression, which may be advantageous in antineoplastic therapy. PMID:21393419

  4. Mobilization of CD34+CD38- hematopoietic stem cells after priming in acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Plesa, Adriana; Chelghoum, Youcef; Mattei, Eve; Labussière, Hélène; Elhamri, Mohamed; Cannas, Giovanna; Morisset, Stéphane; Tagoug, Inès; Michallet, Mauricette; Dumontet, Charles; Thomas, Xavier

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate quantitatively and qualitatively the different CD34+ cell subsets after priming by chemotherapy granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (± G-CSF) in patients with acute myeloid leukemia. METHODS: Peripheral blood and bone marrow samples were harvested in 8 acute myeloid leukemia patients during and after induction chemotherapy. The CD34/CD38 cell profile was analyzed by multi-parameter flow cytometry. Adhesion profile was made using CXC chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4) (CD184), VLA-4 (CD49d/CD29) and CD47. RESULTS: Chemotherapy ± G-CSF mobilized immature cells (CD34+CD38− population), while the more mature cells (CD34+CD38low and CD34+CD38+ populations) decreased progressively after treatment. Circulating CD34+ cells tended to be more sensitive to chemotherapy after priming with G-CSF. CD34+ cell mobilization was correlated with a gradual increase in CXCR4 and CD47 expression, suggesting a role in cell protection and the capacity of homing back to the marrow. CONCLUSION: Chemotherapy ± G-CSF mobilizes into the circulation CD34+ bone marrow cells, of which, the immature CD34+CD38– cell population. Further manipulations of these interactions may be a means with which to control the trafficking of leukemia stem cells to improve patients’ outcomes. PMID:24179607

  5. Effect of CD38 on the multidrug resistance of human chronic myelogenous leukemia K562 cells to doxorubicin

    PubMed Central

    YALÇINTEPE, LEMAN; HALIS, EMRE; ULKU, SIBEL

    2016-01-01

    Drug resistance is a serious challenge in cancer chemotherapy. Alterations in the intracellular concentration and homeostasis of calcium (Ca2+) may contribute to the development of drug resistance. To investigate the mechanism of drug resistance in leukemia, the present study rendered human chronic myelogenous leukemia K562 cells resistant to the cytotoxic effect of doxorubicin by progressively adapting the sensitive parental K562 cells to doxorubicin. The resulting cells were termed K562/DOX. Subsequently, the expression of two multidrug resistance proteins, P-glycoprotein (P-gp) and multidrug resistance protein 1 (MRP1), was analyzed in K562/DOX cells. In addition to P-gp and MRP1, these cells also expressed cluster of differentiation (CD)38 and its active enzyme adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-ribosyl cyclase. The present study also demonstrated that K562/DOX cells responded to cyclic ADP-ribose-mediated increases in intracellular Ca2+. These data indicate that CD38 may participate in the development of drug resistance to doxorubicin in K562 cells. PMID:26998164

  6. A non-canonical adenosinergic pathway led by CD38 in human melanoma cells induces suppression of T cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Morandi, Fabio; Morandi, Barbara; Horenstein, Alberto L; Chillemi, Antonella; Quarona, Valeria; Zaccarello, Gianluca; Carrega, Paolo; Ferlazzo, Guido; Mingari, Maria Cristina; Moretta, Lorenzo; Pistoia, Vito; Malavasi, Fabio

    2015-09-22

    Nucleotide-metabolizing ectoenzymes are endowed with an extracellular catalytic domain, which is involved in regulating the extracellular nucleotide/nucleoside balance. The tumor microenvironment contains high levels of adenosine (ADO) generated by this enzymatic network, thus promoting tumor growth by inhibiting anti-tumor immune responses. ADO inhibition in melanoma murine models limits tumor metastases and restores anti-tumor immune responses. This work investigates the expression and function of ectoenzymes in primary human melanoma cell lines. All of latter cells expressed CD38, CD39, CD73, and CD203a/PC-1, and produced ADO from AMP and NAD(+ )T cell proliferation. Accordingly, phosphorylation of S6 ribosomal protein, p38 and Stat1 was lower in activated memory cells than in naïve CD4(+) T lymphocytes. Melanoma cells also inhibited proliferation of naïve, memory and -to a lesser extent- of effector CD8(+) T cells. These different inhibitory effects correlated with distinct patterns of expression of the ADO receptor A2a and A2b. These results show that primary human melanoma cell lines suppress in vitro T cell proliferation through an adenosinergic pathway in which CD38 and CD73 play a prominent role. PMID:26329660

  7. Pre-clinical evaluation of CD38 chimeric antigen receptor engineered T cells for the treatment of multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Drent, Esther; Groen, Richard W J; Noort, Willy A; Themeli, Maria; Lammerts van Bueren, Jeroen J; Parren, Paul W H I; Kuball, Jürgen; Sebestyen, Zsolt; Yuan, Huipin; de Bruijn, Joost; van de Donk, Niels W C J; Martens, Anton C M; Lokhorst, Henk M; Mutis, Tuna

    2016-05-01

    Adoptive transfer of chimeric antigen receptor-transduced T cells is a promising strategy for cancer immunotherapy. The CD38 molecule, with its high expression on multiple myeloma cells, appears a suitable target for antibody therapy. Prompted by this, we used three different CD38 antibody sequences to generate second-generation retroviral CD38-chimeric antigen receptor constructs with which we transduced T cells from healthy donors and multiple myeloma patients. We then evaluated the preclinical efficacy and safety of the transduced T cells. Irrespective of the donor and antibody sequence, CD38-chimeric antigen receptor-transduced T cells proliferated, produced inflammatory cytokines and effectively lysed malignant cell lines and primary malignant cells from patients with acute myeloid leukemia and multi-drug resistant multiple myeloma in a cell-dose, and CD38-dependent manner, despite becoming CD38-negative during culture. CD38-chimeric antigen receptor-transduced T cells also displayed significant anti-tumor effects in a xenotransplant model, in which multiple myeloma tumors were grown in a human bone marrow-like microenvironment. CD38-chimeric antigen receptor-transduced T cells also appeared to lyse the CD38(+) fractions of CD34(+) hematopoietic progenitor cells, monocytes, natural killer cells, and to a lesser extent T and B cells but did not inhibit the outgrowth of progenitor cells into various myeloid lineages and, furthermore, were effectively controllable with a caspase-9-based suicide gene. These results signify the potential importance of CD38-chimeric antigen receptor-transduced T cells as therapeutic tools for CD38(+) malignancies and warrant further efforts to diminish the undesired effects of this immunotherapy using appropriate strategies. PMID:26858358

  8. Renal vasoconstriction by vasopressin V1a receptors is modulated by nitric oxide, prostanoids, and superoxide but not the ADP ribosyl cyclase CD38

    PubMed Central

    Kopple, Tayler E.; Arendshorst, William J.

    2014-01-01

    Renal blood flow (RBF) responses to arginine vasopressin (AVP) were tested in anesthetized wild-type (WT) and CD38−/− mice that lack the major calcium-mobilizing second messenger cyclic ADP ribose. AVP (3–25 ng) injected intravenously produced dose-dependent decreases in RBF, reaching a maximum of 25 ± 2% below basal RBF in WT and 27 ± 2% in CD38−/− mice with 25 ng of AVP. Renal vascular resistance (RVR) increased 75 ± 6% and 78 ± 6% in WT and CD38−/− mice. Inhibition of nitric oxide (NO) synthase with nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME) increased the maximum RVR response to AVP to 308 ± 76% in WT and 388 ± 81% in CD38−/− (P < 0.001 for both). Cyclooxygenase inhibition with indomethacin increased the maximum RVR response to 125 ± 15% in WT and 120 ± 14% in CD38−/− mice (P < 0.001, <0.05). Superoxide suppression with tempol inhibited the maximum RVR response to AVP by 38% in both strains (P < 0.005) but was ineffective when administered after l-NAME. The rate of RBF recovery (relaxation) after AVP was slowed by l-NAME and indomethacin (P < 0.001, <0.005) but was unchanged by tempol. All vascular responses to AVP were abolished by an AVP V1a receptor antagonist. A V2 receptor agonist or antagonist had no effect on AVP-induced renal vasoconstriction. Taken together, the results indicate that renal vasoconstriction by AVP in the mouse is strongly buffered by vasodilatory actions of NO and prostanoids. The vasoconstriction depends on V1a receptor activation without involvement of CD38 or concomitant vasodilatation by V2 receptors. The role of superoxide is to enhance the contractile response to AVP, most likely by reducing the availability of NO rather than directly stimulating intracellular contraction signaling pathways. PMID:24623148

  9. Novel Markers to Delineate Murine M1 and M2 Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Jablonski, Kyle A.; Amici, Stephanie A.; Webb, Lindsay M.; Ruiz-Rosado, Juan de Dios; Popovich, Phillip G.; Partida-Sanchez, Santiago; Guerau-de-Arellano, Mireia

    2015-01-01

    Classically (M1) and alternatively activated (M2) macrophages exhibit distinct phenotypes and functions. It has been difficult to dissect macrophage phenotypes in vivo, where a spectrum of macrophage phenotypes exists, and also in vitro, where low or non-selective M2 marker protein expression is observed. To provide a foundation for the complexity of in vivo macrophage phenotypes, we performed a comprehensive analysis of the transcriptional signature of murine M0, M1 and M2 macrophages and identified genes common or exclusive to either subset. We validated by real-time PCR an M1-exclusive pattern of expression for CD38, G-protein coupled receptor 18 (Gpr18) and Formyl peptide receptor 2 (Fpr2) whereas Early growth response protein 2 (Egr2) and c-Myc were M2-exclusive. We further confirmed these data by flow cytometry and show that M1 and M2 macrophages can be distinguished by their relative expression of CD38 and Egr2. Egr2 labeled more M2 macrophages (~70%) than the canonical M2 macrophage marker Arginase-1, which labels 24% of M2 macrophages. Conversely, CD38 labeled most (71%) in vitro M1 macrophages. In vivo, a similar CD38+ population greatly increased after LPS exposure. Overall, this work defines exclusive and common M1 and M2 signatures and provides novel and improved tools to distinguish M1 and M2 murine macrophages. PMID:26699615

  10. Vitamin A and immune function: retinoic acid modulates population dynamics in antigen receptor and CD38-stimulated splenic B cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qiuyan; Ross, A Catharine

    2005-10-01

    Vitamin A and its active metabolite, all-trans retinoic acid (RA), regulate the antibody response in vivo, although the underlying mechanisms are not well understood. We have investigated the regulation by RA of B cell population dynamics and Ig gene expression in purified splenic mouse B cells stimulated through the B cell antigen receptor (BCR) and/or CD38, a BCR coreceptor. After ligation of the BCR and/or CD38, B cells became more heterogeneous in size. RA substantially restrained this change, concomitant with inhibition of cell proliferation. To examine B cell heterogeneity more closely, we categorized stimulated B cells by size (forward angle light scatter) and determined cell division dynamics, germ-line Ig heavy chain gene transcription and surface IgG1 (sIgG1) expression. Flow cytometric analysis of carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester-labeled B cells costained for sIgG1 showed that the more proliferative groups of B cells were smaller, whereas cells expressing more sIgG1 were larger. RA enriched the latter population, whereas cell division frequency in general and the number of smaller B cells that had undergone division cycles were reduced. Although RA significantly inhibited Ig germ-line transcript levels in the total B cell population, CD19(-)IgG1(+) B cells, which represent a more differentiated phenotype, were enriched. Furthermore, pax-5 mRNA was decreased and activation-induced cytidine deaminase mRNA was increased in RA-treated stimulated B cells. Thus, RA regulated factors known to be required for Ig class switch recombination and modulated the population dynamics of ligation-stimulated B cells, while promoting the progression of a fraction of B cells into differentiated sIgG-expressing cells. PMID:16093312

  11. A preclinical model of CD38-pretargeted radioimmunotherapy for plasma cell malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Green, Damian J.; Orgun, Nural N.; Jones, Jon C.; Hylarides, Mark D.; Pagel, John M.; Hamlin, Donald K.; Wilbur, D.S.; Lin, Yukang; Fisher, Darrell R.; Kenoyer, Aimee L.; Frayo, Shani L.; Gopal, Ajay K.; Orozco, Johnnie J.; Gooley, Theodore A.; Wood, Brent L.; Bensinger, William I.; Press, Oliver W.

    2014-01-01

    The vast majority of patients with plasma cell neoplasms die of progressive disease despite high response rates to novel agents. Malignant plasma cells are very radiosensitive, but the potential role of radioimmunotherapy (RIT) in the management of plasmacytomas and multiple myeloma (MM) has undergone only limited evaluation. Furthermore, CD38 has not been explored as a RIT target despite its uniform high expression on plasma cell malignancies. In this report, both conventional RIT (directly radiolabeled antibody) and streptavidin-biotin pretargeted RIT (PRIT) directed against the CD38 antigen, were assessed as approaches to deliver radiation doses sufficient for MM cell eradication. PRIT demonstrated biodistributions that were markedly superior to conventional RIT. Tumor-to-blood ratios as high as 638:1 were seen 24hr after PRIT, while ratios never exceeded 1:1 with conventional RIT. 90Yttrium absorbed dose estimates demonstrated excellent target-to-normal organ ratios (6:1 for the kidney, lung, liver; 10:1 for the whole body). Objective remissions were observed within 7 days in 100% of the mice treated with doses ranging from 800 µCi to 1200 µCi of anti-CD38 pretargeted 90Y-DOTA-biotin, including 100% complete remissions (no detectable tumor in treated mice compared to tumors that were 2982±2834% of initial tumor volume in control animals) by day 23. Furthermore, 100% of animals bearing NCI-H929 multiple myeloma tumor xenografts treated with 800 µCi of anti-CD38 pretargeted 90Y-DOTA-biotin achieved long-term myeloma-free survival (>70 days) compared to none (0%) of the control animals. PMID:24371230

  12. A preclinical model of CD38-pretargeted radioimmunotherapy for plasma cell malignancies.

    PubMed

    Green, Damian J; Orgun, Nural N; Jones, Jon C; Hylarides, Mark D; Pagel, John M; Hamlin, Donald K; Wilbur, D S; Lin, Yukang; Fisher, Darrell R; Kenoyer, Aimee L; Frayo, Shani L; Gopal, Ajay K; Orozco, Johnnie J; Gooley, Theodore A; Wood, Brent L; Bensinger, William I; Press, Oliver W

    2014-02-15

    The vast majority of patients with plasma cell neoplasms die of progressive disease despite high response rates to novel agents. Malignant plasma cells are very radiosensitive, but the potential role of radioimmunotherapy (RIT) in the management of plasmacytomas and multiple myeloma has undergone only limited evaluation. Furthermore, CD38 has not been explored as a RIT target despite its uniform high expression on malignant plasma cells. In this report, both conventional RIT (directly radiolabeled antibody) and streptavidin-biotin pretargeted RIT (PRIT) directed against the CD38 antigen were assessed as approaches to deliver radiation doses sufficient for multiple myeloma cell eradication. PRIT demonstrated biodistributions that were markedly superior to conventional RIT. Tumor-to-blood ratios as high as 638:1 were seen 24 hours after PRIT, whereas ratios never exceeded 1:1 with conventional RIT. (90)Yttrium absorbed dose estimates demonstrated excellent target-to-normal organ ratios (6:1 for the kidney, lung, liver; 10:1 for the whole body). Objective remissions were observed within 7 days in 100% of the mice treated with doses ranging from 800 to 1,200 μCi of anti-CD38 pretargeted (90)Y-DOTA-biotin, including 100% complete remissions (no detectable tumor in treated mice compared with tumors that were 2,982% ± 2,834% of initial tumor volume in control animals) by day 23. Furthermore, 100% of animals bearing NCI-H929 multiple myeloma tumor xenografts treated with 800 μCi of anti-CD38 pretargeted (90)Y-DOTA-biotin achieved long-term myeloma-free survival (>70 days) compared with none (0%) of the control animals. PMID:24371230

  13. Synergistic and persistent effect of T-cell immunotherapy with anti-CD19 or anti-CD38 chimeric receptor in conjunction with rituximab on B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Mihara, Keichiro; Yanagihara, Kazuyoshi; Takigahira, Misato; Kitanaka, Akira; Imai, Chihaya; Bhattacharyya, Joyeeta; Kubo, Takanori; Takei, Yoshifumi; Yasunaga, Shin'ichiro; Takihara, Yoshihiro; Kimura, Akiro

    2010-10-01

    Using artificial receptors, it is possible to redirect the specificity of immune cells to tumour-associated antigens, which is expected to provide a useful strategy for cancer immunotherapy. Given that B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (B-NHL) cells invariably express CD19 and CD38, these antigens may be suitable molecular candidates for such immunotherapy. We transduced human peripheral T cells or a T-cell line with either anti-CD19-chimeric receptor (CAR) or anti-CD38-CAR, which contained an anti-CD19 or anti-CD38 antibody-derived single-chain variable domain respectively. Retroviral transduction led to anti-CD19-CAR or anti-CD38-CAR expression in T cells with high efficiency (>60%). The T cell line, Hut78, when transduced with anti-CD19-CAR or anti-CD38-CAR, exerted strong cytotoxicity against the B-NHL cell lines, HT and RL, and lymphoma cells isolated from patients. Interestingly, use of both CARs had an additive cytotoxic effect on HT cells in vitro. In conjunction with rituximab, human peripheral T cells expressing either anti-CD19-CAR or anti-CD38-CAR enhanced cytotoxicity against HT-luciferase cells in xenografted mice. Moreover, the synergistic tumour-suppressing activity was persistent in vivo for over 2 months. These results provide a powerful rationale for clinical testing of the combination of rituximab with autologous T cells carrying either CAR on aggressive or relapsed B-NHLs. PMID:20678160

  14. Cyclic ADP-Ribose and Heat Regulate Oxytocin Release via CD38 and TRPM2 in the Hypothalamus during Social or Psychological Stress in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Jing; Amina, Sarwat; Liang, Mingkun; Akther, Shirin; Yuhi, Teruko; Nishimura, Tomoko; Tsuji, Chiharu; Tsuji, Takahiro; Liu, Hong-Xiang; Hashii, Minako; Furuhara, Kazumi; Yokoyama, Shigeru; Yamamoto, Yasuhiko; Okamoto, Hiroshi; Zhao, Yong Juan; Lee, Hon Cheung; Tominaga, Makoto; Lopatina, Olga; Higashida, Haruhiro

    2016-01-01

    Hypothalamic oxytocin (OT) is released into the brain by cyclic ADP-ribose (cADPR) with or without depolarizing stimulation. Previously, we showed that the intracellular free calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) that seems to trigger OT release can be elevated by β-NAD+, cADPR, and ADP in mouse oxytocinergic neurons. As these β-NAD+ metabolites activate warm-sensitive TRPM2 cation channels, when the incubation temperature is increased, the [Ca2+]i in hypothalamic neurons is elevated. However, it has not been determined whether OT release is facilitated by heat in vitro or hyperthermia in vivo in combination with cADPR. Furthermore, it has not been examined whether CD38 and TRPM2 exert their functions on OT release during stress or stress-induced hyperthermia in relation to the anxiolytic roles and social behaviors of OT under stress conditions. Here, we report that OT release from the isolated hypothalami of male mice in culture was enhanced by extracellular application of cADPR or increasing the incubation temperature from 35°C to 38.5°C, and simultaneous stimulation showed a greater effect. This release was inhibited by a cADPR-dependent ryanodine receptor inhibitor and a nonspecific TRPM2 inhibitor. The facilitated release by heat and cADPR was suppressed in the hypothalamus isolated from CD38 knockout mice and CD38- or TRPM2-knockdown mice. In the course of these experiments, we noted that OT release differed markedly between individual mice under stress with group housing. That is, when male mice received cage-switch stress and eliminated due to their social subclass, significantly higher levels of OT release were found in subordinates compared with ordinates. In mice exposed to anxiety stress in an open field, the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) OT level increased transiently at 5 min after exposure, and the rectal temperature also increased from 36.6°C to 37.8°C. OT levels in the CSF of mice with lipopolysaccharide-induced fever (+0.8°C) were higher than those

  15. Cyclic ADP-Ribose and Heat Regulate Oxytocin Release via CD38 and TRPM2 in the Hypothalamus during Social or Psychological Stress in Mice.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Jing; Amina, Sarwat; Liang, Mingkun; Akther, Shirin; Yuhi, Teruko; Nishimura, Tomoko; Tsuji, Chiharu; Tsuji, Takahiro; Liu, Hong-Xiang; Hashii, Minako; Furuhara, Kazumi; Yokoyama, Shigeru; Yamamoto, Yasuhiko; Okamoto, Hiroshi; Zhao, Yong Juan; Lee, Hon Cheung; Tominaga, Makoto; Lopatina, Olga; Higashida, Haruhiro

    2016-01-01

    Hypothalamic oxytocin (OT) is released into the brain by cyclic ADP-ribose (cADPR) with or without depolarizing stimulation. Previously, we showed that the intracellular free calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) that seems to trigger OT release can be elevated by β-NAD(+), cADPR, and ADP in mouse oxytocinergic neurons. As these β-NAD(+) metabolites activate warm-sensitive TRPM2 cation channels, when the incubation temperature is increased, the [Ca(2+)]i in hypothalamic neurons is elevated. However, it has not been determined whether OT release is facilitated by heat in vitro or hyperthermia in vivo in combination with cADPR. Furthermore, it has not been examined whether CD38 and TRPM2 exert their functions on OT release during stress or stress-induced hyperthermia in relation to the anxiolytic roles and social behaviors of OT under stress conditions. Here, we report that OT release from the isolated hypothalami of male mice in culture was enhanced by extracellular application of cADPR or increasing the incubation temperature from 35°C to 38.5°C, and simultaneous stimulation showed a greater effect. This release was inhibited by a cADPR-dependent ryanodine receptor inhibitor and a nonspecific TRPM2 inhibitor. The facilitated release by heat and cADPR was suppressed in the hypothalamus isolated from CD38 knockout mice and CD38- or TRPM2-knockdown mice. In the course of these experiments, we noted that OT release differed markedly between individual mice under stress with group housing. That is, when male mice received cage-switch stress and eliminated due to their social subclass, significantly higher levels of OT release were found in subordinates compared with ordinates. In mice exposed to anxiety stress in an open field, the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) OT level increased transiently at 5 min after exposure, and the rectal temperature also increased from 36.6°C to 37.8°C. OT levels in the CSF of mice with lipopolysaccharide-induced fever (+0.8°C) were higher than

  16. Transient receptor potential melastatin-2 and temperature participate in the process of CD38-regulated oxytocin secretion.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hong-Xiang; Ma, Shuang; Nan, Yong; Yang, Wan-Hua

    2016-08-17

    In recent studies, oxytocin showed potential for the treatment of mental diseases. CD38 is essential for oxytocin release, and hence plays a critical role in social behavior. CD38 catalyzes β-NAD into cyclic ADP ribose (cADPR), which could elevate the intracellular Ca by Ca-permeable channels for oxytocin secretion. The temperature-sensitive cation channel, transient receptor potential melastatin-2 (TRPM2), is a cation-nonselective cation and has been shown to affect oxytocin indirectly. The aim of the present study was to verify the participation of temperature and TRPM2 in CD38-regulated oxytocin release. The crude membranes were prepared to isolate the nerve terminals from the posterior pituitary. At 34°C, 37°C, and 39°C, agonists (β-NAD, ADPR, cADPR) and antagonists (8-Br-cADPR, 2-APB) were used to stimulate the nerve terminals. Oxytocin releases were investigated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. In addition, the expression of TRPM2 and CD38 in the hypothalamus and pituitary was detected by western blotting and quantitative PCR. CD38 agonists (β-NAD, cADPR) and antagonist (8-Br-cADPR) could increase or reduce the oxytocin release, respectively. TRPM2 agonist (ADPR) and antagonist (2-APB) alone could also regulate oxytocin release. Furthermore, temperature could increase agonist stimulation and attenuate the antagonist inhibition on oxytocin release. In addition, CD38 and TRPM2 were expressed in the hypothalamus and pituitary at both the mRNA and the protein level. TRPM2 in pituitary nerve terminals plays a role in oxytocin release. Temperature- enhanced oxytocin release by CD38 and TRPM2. TRPM2 might be involved in the process of CD38-regulated oxytocin release. PMID:27348016

  17. Anti-CD38 Antibody Therapy: Windows of Opportunity Yielded by the Functional Characteristics of the Target Molecule

    PubMed Central

    Chillemi, Antonella; Zaccarello, Gianluca; Quarona, Valeria; Ferracin, Manuela; Ghimenti, Chiara; Massaia, Massimo; Horenstein, Alberto L; Malavasi, Fabio

    2013-01-01

    In vivo use of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) has become a mainstay of routine clinical practice in the treatment of various human diseases. A number of molecules can serve as targets, according to the condition being treated. Now entering human clinical trials, CD38 molecule is a particularly attractive target because of its peculiar pattern of expression and its twin role as receptor and ectoenzyme. This review provides a range of analytical perspectives on the current progress in and challenges to anti-CD38 mAb therapy. We present a synopsis of the evidence available on CD38, particularly in myeloma and chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). Our aim is to make the data from basic science helpful and accessible to a diverse clinical audience and, at the same time, to improve its potential for in vivo use. The topics covered include tissue distribution and signal implementation by mAb ligation and the possibility of increasing cell density on target cells by exploiting information about the molecule’s regulation in combination with drugs approved for in vivo use. Also analyzed is the behavior of CD38 as an enzyme: CD38 is a component of a pathway leading to the production of adenosine in the tumor microenvironment, thus inducing local anergy. Consequently, not only might CD38 be a prime target for mAb-mediated therapy, but its functional block may contribute to general improvement in cancer immunotherapy and outcomes. PMID:23615966

  18. Combinations of ZAP-70, CD38 and IGHV mutational status as predictors of time to first treatment in CLL.

    PubMed

    Morilla, Alison; Gonzalez de Castro, David; Del Giudice, Ilaria; Osuji, Nnenna; Else, Monica; Morilla, Ricardo; Brito Babapulle, Vasantha; Rudenko, Hannah; Matutes, Estella; Dearden, Claire; Catovsky, Daniel; Morgan, Gareth J

    2008-11-01

    ZAP-70, CD38 and IGHV mutations have all been reported to have prognostic impact in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), both individually and in paired combinations. We aimed to determine whether the combination of all three factors provided more refined prognostic information concerning the treatment-free interval (TFI) from diagnosis. ZAP-70, CD38 and IGHV mutations were evaluated in 142 patients. Combining all three factors, the ZAP-70-/CD38-/Mutated group showed the longest median TFI (62 months, n = 37), ZAP-70+/CD38+/Unmutated cases the shortest (11 months, n = 37) and cases discordant for > or = 1 factor, an intermediate TFI (27 months, n = 68) (p = 0.006). Analysis of discordant cases revealed values that were otherwise masked when measuring single prognostic factors. The presence or absence of cytogenetic abnormalities did not explain the variability among discordant cases. Simultaneous analysis of ZAP-70, CD38 and IGHV mutations in CLL provides more discriminatory prediction of TFI than any factor alone. PMID:19021053

  19. A Deletion Involving CD38 and BST1 Results in a Fusion Transcript in a Patient With Autism and Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Ceroni, Fabiola; Sagar, Angela; Simpson, Nuala H.; Gawthrope, Alex J.T.; Newbury, Dianne F.; Pinto, Dalila; Francis, Sunday M.; Tessman, Dorothy C.; Cook, Edwin H.; Monaco, Anthony P.; Maestrini, Elena; Pagnamenta, Alistair T.; Jacob, Suma

    2015-01-01

    CD38 encodes a ligand in the oxytocin signaling pathway. Some single nucleotide polymorphisms in this gene have been associated with low serum oxytocin levels in autism spectrum disorder (ASD) patients. Oxytocin disruption has been hypothesized to account for features of ASD, including impaired communication and social behavior, based on animal studies. Recent human studies have shown administration of oxytocin improving emotion recognition, promoting social behavior, and improving auditory processing of social stimuli in ASD patients. In addition to its role in oxytocin signaling, CD38 is involved in the regulation of calcium concentration in airway smooth muscle with impairment of CD38 being implicated in airway diseases like asthma. While a number of studies have implicated rare chromosomal deletions and duplications in helping determine genetic risk for autism, there are to our knowledge no reports describing rearrangements involving CD38 or deletions in patients with ASD. Here, we present two sisters diagnosed with autism and with features of regression—previously acquired speech lost in the second year of life. The younger sister, who also had asthma, inherited a maternal deletion of 4p15.32 that results in a BST1-CD38 fusion transcript. Their mother's deletion was mosaic and she was not affected. Although further work is required to assess functional consequences of the fusion transcript, we hypothesize that the proband's deletion may have served as a risk factor for autism that, when combined with other susceptibility variants, resulted in a more severe presentation than her sister. PMID:24634087

  20. CD56brightCD16- NK Cells Produce Adenosine through a CD38-Mediated Pathway and Act as Regulatory Cells Inhibiting Autologous CD4+ T Cell Proliferation.

    PubMed

    Morandi, Fabio; Horenstein, Alberto L; Chillemi, Antonella; Quarona, Valeria; Chiesa, Sabrina; Imperatori, Andrea; Zanellato, Silvia; Mortara, Lorenzo; Gattorno, Marco; Pistoia, Vito; Malavasi, Fabio

    2015-08-01

    Recent studies suggested that human CD56(bright)CD16(-) NK cells may play a role in the regulation of the immune response. Since the mechanism(s) involved have not yet been elucidated, in the present study we have investigated the role of nucleotide-metabolizing enzymes that regulate the extracellular balance of nucleotides/nucleosides and produce the immunosuppressive molecule adenosine (ADO). Peripheral blood CD56(dim)CD16(+) and CD56(bright)CD16(-) NK cells expressed similar levels of CD38. CD39, CD73, and CD157 expression was higher in CD56(bright)CD16(-) than in CD56(dim)CD16(+) NK cells. CD57 was mostly expressed by CD56(dim)CD16(+) NK cells. CD203a/PC-1 expression was restricted to CD56(bright)CD16(-) NK cells. CD56(bright)CD16(-) NK cells produce ADO and inhibit autologous CD4(+) T cell proliferation. Such inhibition was 1) reverted pretreating CD56(bright)CD16(-) NK cells with a CD38 inhibitor and 2) increased pretreating CD56(bright)CD16(-) NK cells with a nucleoside transporter inhibitor, which increase extracellular ADO concentration. CD56(bright)CD16(-) NK cells isolated from the synovial fluid of juvenile idiopathic arthritis patients failed to inhibit autologous CD4(+) T cell proliferation. Such functional impairment could be related to 1) the observed reduced CD38/CD73 expression, 2) a peculiar ADO production kinetics, and 3) a different expression of ADO receptors. In contrast, CD56(bright)CD16(-) NK cells isolated from inflammatory pleural effusions display a potent regulatory activity. In conclusion, CD56(bright)CD16(-) NK cells act as "regulatory cells" through ADO produced by an ectoenzymes network, with a pivotal role of CD38. This function may be relevant for the modulation of the immune response in physiological and pathological conditions, and it could be impaired during autoimmune/inflammatory diseases. PMID:26091716

  1. Insights into the Mechanism of Bovine CD38/NAD+Glycohydrolase from the X-Ray Structures of Its Michaelis Complex and Covalently-Trapped Intermediates

    PubMed Central

    Egea, Pascal F.; Muller-Steffner, Hélène; Kuhn, Isabelle; Cakir-Kiefer, Céline; Oppenheimer, Norman J.; Stroud, Robert M.; Kellenberger, Esther; Schuber, Francis

    2012-01-01

    Bovine CD38/NAD+glycohydrolase (bCD38) catalyses the hydrolysis of NAD+ into nicotinamide and ADP-ribose and the formation of cyclic ADP-ribose (cADPR). We solved the crystal structures of the mono N-glycosylated forms of the ecto-domain of bCD38 or the catalytic residue mutant Glu218Gln in their apo state or bound to aFNAD or rFNAD, two 2′-fluorinated analogs of NAD+. Both compounds behave as mechanism-based inhibitors, allowing the trapping of a reaction intermediate covalently linked to Glu218. Compared to the non-covalent (Michaelis) complex, the ligands adopt a more folded conformation in the covalent complexes. Altogether these crystallographic snapshots along the reaction pathway reveal the drastic conformational rearrangements undergone by the ligand during catalysis with the repositioning of its adenine ring from a solvent-exposed position stacked against Trp168 to a more buried position stacked against Trp181. This adenine flipping between conserved tryptophans is a prerequisite for the proper positioning of the N1 of the adenine ring to perform the nucleophilic attack on the C1′ of the ribofuranoside ring ultimately yielding cADPR. In all structures, however, the adenine ring adopts the most thermodynamically favorable anti conformation, explaining why cyclization, which requires a syn conformation, remains a rare alternate event in the reactions catalyzed by bCD38 (cADPR represents only 1% of the reaction products). In the Michaelis complex, the substrate is bound in a constrained conformation; the enzyme uses this ground-state destabilization, in addition to a hydrophobic environment and desolvation of the nicotinamide-ribosyl bond, to destabilize the scissile bond leading to the formation of a ribooxocarbenium ion intermediate. The Glu218 side chain stabilizes this reaction intermediate and plays another important role during catalysis by polarizing the 2′-OH of the substrate NAD+. Based on our structural analysis and data on active site mutants

  2. Genetic variation in CD38 and breastfeeding experience interact to impact infants’ attention to social eye cues

    PubMed Central

    Krol, Kathleen M.; Monakhov, Mikhail; Lai, Poh San; Ebstein, Richard P.; Grossmann, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    Attending to emotional information conveyed by the eyes is an important social skill in humans. The current study examined this skill in early development by measuring attention to eyes while viewing emotional faces in 7-mo-old infants. In particular, we investigated individual differences in infant attention to eyes in the context of genetic variation (CD38 rs3796863 polymorphism) and experiential variation (exclusive breastfeeding duration) related to the oxytocin system. Our results revealed that, whereas infants at this age show a robust fear bias (increased attention to fearful eyes), their attention to angry and happy eyes varies as a function of exclusive breastfeeding experience and genetic variation in CD38. Specifically, extended exclusive breastfeeding duration selectively enhanced looking preference to happy eyes and decreased looking to angry eyes. Importantly, however, this interaction was impacted by CD38 variation, such that only the looking preferences of infants homozygous for the C allele of rs3796863 were affected by breastfeeding experience. This genotype has been associated with reduced release of oxytocin and higher rates of autism. In contrast, infants with the CA/AA genotype showed similar looking preferences regardless of breastfeeding exposure. Thus, differences in the sensitivity to emotional eyes may be linked to an interaction between the endogenous (CD38) and exogenous (breastfeeding) availability of oxytocin. These findings underline the importance of maternal care and the oxytocin system in contributing to the early development of responding to social eye cues. PMID:26371313

  3. Genetic variation in CD38 and breastfeeding experience interact to impact infants' attention to social eye cues.

    PubMed

    Krol, Kathleen M; Monakhov, Mikhail; Lai, Poh San; Ebstein, Richard P; Grossmann, Tobias

    2015-09-29

    Attending to emotional information conveyed by the eyes is an important social skill in humans. The current study examined this skill in early development by measuring attention to eyes while viewing emotional faces in 7-mo-old infants. In particular, we investigated individual differences in infant attention to eyes in the context of genetic variation (CD38 rs3796863 polymorphism) and experiential variation (exclusive breastfeeding duration) related to the oxytocin system. Our results revealed that, whereas infants at this age show a robust fear bias (increased attention to fearful eyes), their attention to angry and happy eyes varies as a function of exclusive breastfeeding experience and genetic variation in CD38. Specifically, extended exclusive breastfeeding duration selectively enhanced looking preference to happy eyes and decreased looking to angry eyes. Importantly, however, this interaction was impacted by CD38 variation, such that only the looking preferences of infants homozygous for the C allele of rs3796863 were affected by breastfeeding experience. This genotype has been associated with reduced release of oxytocin and higher rates of autism. In contrast, infants with the CA/AA genotype showed similar looking preferences regardless of breastfeeding exposure. Thus, differences in the sensitivity to emotional eyes may be linked to an interaction between the endogenous (CD38) and exogenous (breastfeeding) availability of oxytocin. These findings underline the importance of maternal care and the oxytocin system in contributing to the early development of responding to social eye cues. PMID:26371313

  4. High levels of CD34+CD38low/−CD123+ blasts are predictive of an adverse outcome in acute myeloid leukemia: a Groupe Ouest-Est des Leucémies Aiguës et Maladies du Sang (GOELAMS) study

    PubMed Central

    Vergez, François; Green, Alexa S.; Tamburini, Jerome; Sarry, Jean-Emmanuel; Gaillard, Baptiste; Cornillet-Lefebvre, Pascale; Pannetier, Melanie; Neyret, Aymeric; Chapuis, Nicolas; Ifrah, Norbert; Dreyfus, François; Manenti, Stéphane; Demur, Cecile; Delabesse, Eric; Lacombe, Catherine; Mayeux, Patrick; Bouscary, Didier; Recher, Christian; Bardet, Valerie

    2011-01-01

    Background Acute myeloid leukemias arise from a rare population of leukemic cells, known as leukemic stem cells, which initiate the disease and contribute to frequent relapses. Although the phenotype of these cells remains unclear in most patients, these cells are enriched within the CD34+CD38low/− compartment expressing the interleukin-3 alpha chain receptor, CD123. The aim of this study was to determine the prognostic value of the percentage of blasts with the CD34+CD38low/−CD123+ phenotype. Design and Methods The percentage of CD34+CD38low/−CD123+ cells in the blast population was determined at diagnosis using flow cytometry. One hundred and eleven patients under 65 years of age with de novo acute myeloid leukemia and treated with intensive chemotherapy were retrospectively included in the study. Correlations with complete response, disease-free survival and overall survival were evaluated with univariate and multivariate analyses. Results A proportion of CD34+CD38low/−CD123+ cells greater than 15% at diagnosis and an unfavorable karyotype were significantly correlated with a lack of complete response. By logistic regression analysis, a percentage of CD34+CD38low/−CD123+ higher than 15% retained significance with an odds ratio of 0.33 (0.1–0.97; P=0.044). A greater than 1% population of CD34+CD38low/−CD123+ cells negatively affected disease-free survival (0.9 versus 4.7 years; P<0.0001) and overall survival (1.25 years versus median not reached; P<0.0001). A greater than 1% population of CD34+CD38low/−CD123+ cells retained prognostic significance for both parameters after multivariate analysis. Conclusions The percentage of CD34+CD38low/−CD123+ leukemic cells at diagnosis was significantly correlated with response to treatment and survival. This prognostic marker might be easily adopted in clinical practice to rapidly identify patients at risk of treatment failure. PMID:21933861

  5. Markers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Healthy Schools Network, Inc., 2011

    2011-01-01

    Dry erase whiteboards come with toxic dry erase markers and toxic cleaning products. Dry erase markers labeled "nontoxic" are not free of toxic chemicals and can cause health problems. Children are especially vulnerable to environmental health hazards; moreover, schools commonly have problems with indoor air pollution, as they are more densely…

  6. Multisite comparison of methods for the quantitation of the surface expression of CD38 on CD8(+) T lymphocytes. The ACTG Advanced Flow Cytometry Focus Group.

    PubMed

    Schmitz, J L; Czerniewski, M A; Edinger, M; Plaeger, S; Gelman, R; Wilkening, C L; Zawadzki, J A; Wormsley, S B

    2000-06-15

    We evaluated the effect of specimen processing variations and quantitation methods on quantitative determination of CD38 expression on CD8 T lymphocytes. Neither lysing reagent (ammonium chloride versus BD FACSlyse), fixation (paraformaldehyde versus no final fixation step), nor acquisition delay (acquisition within 6 h after fixation versus 24 h after fixation) had a significant effect on CD38 relative fluorescent intensity or CD38 quantitative estimates (RFI or antibodies bound per cell). The only significant difference in fluorescent intensity and CD38 antibodies bound per cell (ABC) was encountered when whole blood was held for 24 h prior to staining and fixation and then acquired after another 24-h hold. However, for all sample processing methods above, the CD4 biologic calibrator and QuantiBRITE bead methods gave significantly different estimates of CD38 intensity. In many cases, however, these differences are relatively small and were more pronounced in certain laboratories. We conclude that there is some flexibility in sample processing methods for quantitative CD38 determination; however, it is preferable for a laboratory to employ one method of fluorescence quantitation calculation consistently because small differences are detected between different methods. Cytometry (Comm. Clin. Cytometry) 42:174-179, 2000. PMID:10861690

  7. Computational study on the conformations of CD38 and inclusion complexes of some lower-size large-ring cyclodextrins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Petko; Atanassov, Emanouil; Jaime, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    The conformations of CD38 were examined by conformational search with molecular dynamics simulations using the Glycam04 force field. The results were compared with previous ones for CD26, the largest cyclodextrin for which crystal data are available. Principal component analysis (PCA) was applied for post-processing of the simulation trajectories. Limited number of modes determine the overall deformations of the macroring of CD38. The longer perimeter of the macroring allowed the formation of a form not observed so far - a three-turn helix shaped as a short tube. In analogy with CD26, significant participation was monitored for conformations of CD38 with one-turn spirals at the opposite sides of the macroring linked together from the 'bottom' and from the 'top' with extended bridge spacers. Computationally were examined for the first time inclusion complexes of some lower-size LR-CDs, namely complexes of CDn (n = 13, 14, 26) with adamantane and of CD14 with 1-hydroxyadamantane. The macroring conformation of CD13 was not altered by the inclusion of the substrate molecule which acquired preferred positioning not in the middle of the cavity but rather close to the glucose residues at one of the sides. The same positioning of the small molecule in the cavity of the more flexible CD14 macroring enhanced the appearance of bent onto two conformation of this cyclodextrin. The most interesting behaviour presented the complex of CD26 with adamantane in which case the small molecule acts as a 'nucleation center' for the formation of a second helical turn about the substrate molecule.

  8. [TLR9 expression is positively correlated with the levels of CD38, HLA-DR and CD95 on peripheral blood mononuclear cells in chronic HBV infected patients].

    PubMed

    Mao, Xuefeng; Peng, Lishan; Liu, Xian; Yang, Yang; Wang, Qihui; Wang, Dengrong; Xiao, Jian; Leng, Jing

    2016-05-01

    Objective To explore the relationship between the expression of TLR9 and the levels of CD38, HLA-DR and CD95 on peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infected patients. Methods70 chronic HBV infected patients and 12 healthy donors were enrolled in this study, and density gradient centrifugation was used to isolate PBMCs from peripheral blood with EDTA for anticoagulation. Flow cytometry was used to detect the levels of TLR9, CD38, HLA-DR and CD95 on PBMCs. Results Compared to the healthy donors, chronic HBV infected patients with low viral load or high viral load had significantly higher levels of TLR9, HLA-DR and CD95 on PMBCs. Furthermore, the co-expression rates of TLR9 and CD38, HLA-DR, CD95 on PBMCs were obviously higher than those of the healthy donors. Correlation analysis showed that the expression of TLR9 was positively correlated with CD38 (r=0.345), HLA-DR (r=0.334), CD95 (r=0.227) on PBMCs in the patients with chronic HBV infection. Conclusion The expression of TLR9 increased and was positively associated with CD38, HLA-DR and CD95 on PBMCs during chronic HBV infection. PMID:27126946

  9. Progesterone Levels Associate with a Novel Population of CCR5+CD38+ CD4 T Cells Resident in the Genital Mucosa with Lymphoid Trafficking Potential.

    PubMed

    Swaims-Kohlmeier, Alison; Haaland, Richard E; Haddad, Lisa B; Sheth, Anandi N; Evans-Strickfaden, Tammy; Lupo, L Davis; Cordes, Sarah; Aguirre, Alfredo J; Lupoli, Kathryn A; Chen, Cheng-Yen; Ofotukun, Igho; Hart, Clyde E; Kohlmeier, Jacob E

    2016-07-01

    The female genital tract (FGT) provides a means of entry to pathogens, including HIV, yet immune cell populations at this barrier between host and environment are not well defined. We initiated a study of healthy women to characterize resident T cell populations in the lower FGT from lavage and patient-matched peripheral blood to investigate potential mechanisms of HIV sexual transmission. Surprisingly, we observed FGT CD4 T cell populations were primarily CCR7(hi), consistent with a central memory or recirculating memory T cell phenotype. In addition, roughly half of these CCR7(hi) CD4 T cells expressed CD69, consistent with resident memory T cells, whereas the remaining CCR7(hi) CD4 T cells lacked CD69 expression, consistent with recirculating memory CD4 T cells that traffic between peripheral tissues and lymphoid sites. HIV susceptibility markers CCR5 and CD38 were increased on FGT CCR7(hi) CD4 T cells compared with blood, yet migration to the lymphoid homing chemokines CCL19 and CCL21 was maintained. Infection with GFP-HIV showed that FGT CCR7(hi) memory CD4 T cells are susceptible HIV targets, and productive infection of CCR7(hi) memory T cells did not alter chemotaxis to CCL19 and CCL21. Variations of resident CCR7(hi) FGT CD4 T cell populations were detected during the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle, and longitudinal analysis showed the frequency of this population positively correlated to progesterone levels. These data provide evidence women may acquire HIV through local infection of migratory CCR7(hi) CD4 T cells, and progesterone levels predict opportunities for HIV to access these novel target cells. PMID:27233960

  10. Biological markers of macrophage activation: applications for fish phagocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Enane, N A; Frenkel, K; O'Connor, J M; Squibb, K S; Zelikoff, J T

    1993-01-01

    The immune defence mechanisms of fish seem to be related and similarly competent to those of mammals. Because of this, there is an increased interest in the immune responses of fish as models for higher vertebrates in immunological/immunotoxicological studies. Macrophages (M phi), phagocytic cells of the mammalian and teleost immune system which reside in tissues, represent a quiescent population of cells. However, upon stimulation, alterations in the physiology of these resident M phi occur which can be defined in terms of activation. This study was undertaken to determine whether biological markers used to assess mammalian M phi activation are applicable for use with fish M phi. Cells were recovered from the peritoneal cavity of non-injected and Aeromonas salmonicida-injected fish, and differences between resident and elicited M phi were evaluated with respect to protein content, phagocytic competence, enzyme activities and hydrogen peroxide production. Results demonstrate that biological markers used to assess mammalian M phi activation, with the exception of acid phosphatase activity, can be used to characterize the activation state of trout M phi, and that the activation process in both fish and mammals may occur by similar mechanism(s). PMID:8244466

  11. Macrophage Activation Syndrome-Associated Markers in Severe Dengue.

    PubMed

    Ab-Rahman, Hasliana Azrah; Rahim, Hafiz; AbuBakar, Sazaly; Wong, Pooi-Fong

    2016-01-01

    Hemophagocytosis, a phenomenon of which activated macrophages phagocytosed hematopoietic elements was reportedly observed in severe dengue patients. In the present study, we investigated whether markers of macrophage activation syndrome (MAS) can be used as differential diagnostic markers of severe dengue. Two hundred and eight confirmed dengue patients were recruited for the study. Sandwich ELISA was used to determine serum ferritin, soluble CD163 (sCD163), and soluble CD25 (sCD25) levels. The population of circulating CD163 (mCD163) monocytes was determined using flow cytometry. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was plotted to determine the predictive validity of the biomarkers. Serum ferritin and sCD163 were found significantly increased in severe dengue patients compared to dengue fever patients (P = 0.003). A fair area under ROC curves (AUC) at 0.72 with a significant P value of 0.004 was observed for sCD163. sCD25 and mCD163 levels were not significantly different between severe dengue and dengue fever patients. Our findings suggest that in addition to serum ferritin, sCD163 can differentiate severe dengue from that of dengue fever patients. Hence, sCD163 level can be considered for use as a predictive marker for impending severe dengue. PMID:26941578

  12. Macrophage Activation Syndrome-Associated Markers in Severe Dengue

    PubMed Central

    Ab-Rahman, Hasliana Azrah; Rahim, Hafiz; AbuBakar, Sazaly; Wong, Pooi-Fong

    2016-01-01

    Hemophagocytosis, a phenomenon of which activated macrophages phagocytosed hematopoietic elements was reportedly observed in severe dengue patients. In the present study, we investigated whether markers of macrophage activation syndrome (MAS) can be used as differential diagnostic markers of severe dengue. Two hundred and eight confirmed dengue patients were recruited for the study. Sandwich ELISA was used to determine serum ferritin, soluble CD163 (sCD163), and soluble CD25 (sCD25) levels. The population of circulating CD163 (mCD163) monocytes was determined using flow cytometry. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was plotted to determine the predictive validity of the biomarkers. Serum ferritin and sCD163 were found significantly increased in severe dengue patients compared to dengue fever patients (P = 0.003). A fair area under ROC curves (AUC) at 0.72 with a significant P value of 0.004 was observed for sCD163. sCD25 and mCD163 levels were not significantly different between severe dengue and dengue fever patients. Our findings suggest that in addition to serum ferritin, sCD163 can differentiate severe dengue from that of dengue fever patients. Hence, sCD163 level can be considered for use as a predictive marker for impending severe dengue. PMID:26941578

  13. Monoclonal antibody 1.6.1 against human MPL receptor allows HSC enrichment of CB and BM CD34(+)CD38(-) populations.

    PubMed

    Petit Cocault, Laurence; Fleury, Maud; Clay, Denis; Larghero, Jérôme; Vanneaux, Valérie; Souyri, Michèle

    2016-04-01

    Thrombopoietin (TPO) and its receptor Mpl (CD110) play a crucial role in the regulation of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). Functional study of Mpl-expressing HSCs has, however, been hampered by the lack of efficient monoclonal antibodies, explaining the very few data available on Mpl(+) HSCs during human embryonic development and after birth. Investigating the main monoclonal antibodies used so far to sort CD110(+) cells from cord blood (CB) and adult bone marrow (BM), we found that only the recent monoclonal antibody 1.6.1 engineered by Immunex Corporation was specific. Using in vitro functional assays, we found that this antibody can be used to sort a CD34(+)CD38(-)CD110(+) population enriched in hematopoietic progenitor stem cells, both in CB and in adult BM. In vivo injection into NSG mice further indicated that the CB CD34(+)CD38(-)CD110(+) population is highly enriched in HSCs compared with both CD34(+)CD38(-)CD110(-) and CD34(+)CD38(-) populations. Together our results validate MAb1.6.1 as an important tool, which has so far been lacking, in the HSC field. PMID:26733047

  14. IgVH genes mutation and usage, ZAP-70 and CD38 expression provide new insights on B-cell prolymphocytic leukemia (B-PLL).

    PubMed

    Del Giudice, I; Davis, Z; Matutes, E; Osuji, N; Parry-Jones, N; Morilla, A; Brito-Babapulle, V; Oscier, D; Catovsky, D

    2006-07-01

    B-prolymphocytic leukemia (B-PLL) is a rare disease with poor prognosis. To further characterize the biological features of this disease, we analyzed immunoglobulin heavy chain (IgVH) mutations, ZAP-70 and CD38 in 19 cases with de novo B-PLL. Immunoglobulin heavy chain genes analysis showed an unmutated pattern (>98% homology to germ line) in 9/17 cases (53%), with 100% homology in eight. In the remaining, it ranged from 90 to 97.4%, with three cases slightly mutated (98-95%) and five heavily mutated (<95%). All B-PLL utilized members of VH3 (11/17) and VH4 (6/17) families, with V3-23, V4-59 and V4-34 gene accounting for more than half of them, regardless of mutational status. ZAP-70, assessed by flow cytometry, ranged from 1 to 91% cells, being > or =20% in 57% of cases. CD38 ranged from 1 to 99% (median 21%). There was no correlation between IgVH status and ZAP-70 or CD38 expression, but male gender and del(17p) were more common in the unmutated group. Neither IgVH mutations, CD38 expression nor del(17p) influenced patients' outcome. Unexpectedly, ZAP-70+ B-PLL patients survived longer (40 months) than ZAP-70- B-PLL (8 months). B-PLL appears biologically heterogeneous regarding IgVH mutations, ZAP-70 and CD38 expression, showing a pattern distinct from that of other lymphoproliferative disorders. PMID:16642047

  15. Percentage of Peripheral CD19+CD24hiCD38hi Regulatory B Cells in Neonatal Sepsis Patients and Its Functional Implication

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Xiao; Ji, Zuoquan; Xue, Jiang

    2016-01-01

    Background As a major cause of mortality in neonates, neonatal sepsis is often accompanied by immune dysfunctions, which are frequently caused by dysregulated T cell sub-populations. The role of regulatory B cells in neonatal sepsis, however, remains unknown. Therefore, this study investigated the percentage and functional variation of CD19+CD24hiCD38hi regulatory B cells in peripheral blood of neonatal sepsis patients in an attempt to elucidate the role of these regulatory B cells in pathogenesis of sepsis. Material/Methods Flow cytometry was used to quantify the percentage of CD19+CD24hiCD38hi regulatory B cells from peripheral blood samples. The correlation between B cell percentage and C reactive protein (CRP) level was analyzed. Secretion level of interleukin-10 (IL-10) and effects on the proliferation of naïve CD4+ T cells were further analyzed. Results The percentage of CD19+CD24hiCD38hi regulatory B cells in neonatal sepsis patients was significantly higher compared to healthy controls (p<0.05), and was positively correlated with serum CRP level. The percentage of IL-10+ CD19+CD24hiCD38hi regulatory B cells was also higher in sepsis patients, and also had more potent inhibition on naïve CD4+ T cells (p<0.01). Conclusions The elevation of CD19+CD24hiCD38hi regulatory B cells in neonatal sepsis can inhibit body immune function and thus may participate in the pathogenesis of sepsis. PMID:27389933

  16. A CD38/CD203a/CD73 ectoenzymatic pathway independent of CD39 drives a novel adenosinergic loop in human T lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Horenstein, Alberto L; Chillemi, Antonella; Zaccarello, Gianluca; Bruzzone, Santina; Quarona, Valeria; Zito, Andrea; Serra, Sara; Malavasi, Fabio

    2013-01-01

    The tumor microenvironment is characterized by of high levels of extracellular nucleotides that are metabolized through the dynamic and sequential action of cell surface enzymes (ectoenzymes). These ectoenzymes operate according to their spatial arrangement, as part of (1) continuous (molecules on the same cell) or (2) discontinuous (molecules on different cells) pathways, the latter being facilitated by restricted cellular microenvironment. The outcome of this catabolic activity is an increase in the local concentration of adenosine, a nucleoside involved in the control of inflammation and immune responses. The aim of the work presented here was to demonstrate that a previously unexplored enzymatic pathway may be an alternate route to produce extracellular adenosine. Our data show that this new axis is driven by the nucleotide-metabolizing ectoenzymes CD38 (an NAD+ nucleosidase), the ecto-nucleotide pyrophosphatase/phosphodiesterase 1 (NPP1, also known as CD203a or PC-1) and the 5′ ectonucleotidase (5′-NT) CD73, while bypassing the canonical catabolic pathway mediated by the nucleoside tri- and diphosphohydrolase (NTPDase) CD39. To determine the relative contributions of these cell surface enzymes to the production of adenosine, we exploited a human T-cell model allowing for the modular expression of the individual components of this alternative pathway upon activation and transfection. The biochemical analysis of the products of these ectoenzymes by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) fully substantiated our working hypothesis. This newly characterized pathway may facilitate the emergence of an adaptive immune response in selected cellular contexts. Considering the role for extracellular adenosine in the regulation of inflammation and immunogenicity, this pathway could constitute a novel strategy of tumor evasion, implying that these enzymes may represent ideal targets for antibody-mediated therapy. PMID:24319640

  17. Early systemic sclerosis: marker autoantibodies and videocapillaroscopy patterns are each associated with distinct clinical, functional and cellular activation markers

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Early systemic sclerosis (SSc) is characterized by Raynaud's phenomenon together with scleroderma marker autoantibodies and/or a scleroderma pattern at capillaroscopy and no other distinctive feature of SSc. Patients presenting with marker autoantibodies plus a capillaroscopic scleroderma pattern seem to evolve into definite SSc more frequently than patients with either feature. Whether early SSc patients with only marker autoantibodies or capillaroscopic positivity differ in any aspect at presentation is unclear. Methods Seventy-one consecutive early SSc patients were investigated for preclinical cardiopulmonary alterations. Out of these, 44 patients and 25 controls affected by osteoarthritis or primary fibromyalgia syndrome were also investigated for serum markers of fibroblast (carboxyterminal propeptide of collagen I), endothelial (soluble E-selectin) and T-cell (soluble IL-2 receptor alpha) activation. Results Thirty-two of the 71 patients (45.1%) had both a marker autoantibody and a capillaroscopic scleroderma pattern (subset 1), 16 patients (22.5%) had only a marker autoantibody (subset 2), and 23 patients (32.4%) had only a capillaroscopic scleroderma pattern (subset 3). Patients with marker autoantibodies (n = 48, 67.6%) had a higher prevalence of impaired diffusing lung capacity for carbon monoxide (P = 0.0217) and increased serum levels of carboxyterminal propeptide of collagen I (P = 0.0037), regardless of capillaroscopic alterations. Patients with a capillaroscopic scleroderma pattern (n = 55, 77.5%) had a higher prevalence of puffy fingers (P = 0.0001) and increased serum levels of soluble E-selectin (P = 0.0003) regardless of marker autoantibodies. Conclusion These results suggest that the autoantibody and microvascular patterns in early SSc may each be related to different clinical-preclinical features and circulating activation markers at presentation. Longitudinal studies are warranted to investigate whether these subsets undergo a

  18. Recent advances in the Okamoto model: the CD38-cyclic ADP-ribose signal system and the regenerating gene protein (Reg)-Reg receptor system in beta-cells.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Hiroshi; Takasawa, Shin

    2002-12-01

    Twenty years ago, we first proposed our hypothesis on beta-cell damage and its prevention (the Okamoto model), according to which poly(ADP-ribose) synthetase/polymerase (PARP) activation is critically involved in the consumption of NAD(+), leading to energy depletion and cell death by necrosis. Recently, the model was reconfirmed by results using PARP knockout mice and has been recognized as providing the basis for necrotic death of various cells and tissues. Based on the model, we proposed two signal systems in beta-cells: one is the CD38-cyclic ADP-ribose (cADPR) signal system for insulin secretion, and the other is the regenerating gene protein (Reg)-Reg receptor system for beta-cell regeneration. The physiological and pathological significance of the two signal systems in a variety of cells and tissues as well as in pancreatic beta-cells has recently been recognized. Here, we describe the Okamoto model and its descendents, the CD38-cADPR signal system and the Reg-Reg receptor system, focusing on recent advances and how their significance came to light. Because PARP is involved in Reg gene transcription to induce beta-cell regeneration, and the PARP activation reduces the cellular NAD(+) to decrease the formation of cADPR (a second messenger for insulin secretion) and further to cause necrotic beta-cell death, PARP and its inhibitors have key roles in the induction of beta-cell regeneration, the maintenance of insulin secretion, and the prevention of beta-cell death. PMID:12475791

  19. Evidence for a role of the oxytocin system, indexed by genetic variation in CD38, in the social bonding effects of expressed gratitude.

    PubMed

    Algoe, Sara B; Way, Baldwin M

    2014-12-01

    Oxytocin is thought to play a central role in promoting close social bonds via influence on social interactions. The current investigation targeted interactions involving expressed gratitude between members of romantic relationships because recent evidence suggests gratitude and its expression provides behavioral and psychological 'glue' to bind individuals closer together. Specifically, we took a genetic approach to test the hypothesis that social interactions involving expressed gratitude would be associated with variation in a gene, CD38, which has been shown to affect oxytocin secretion. A polymorphism (rs6449182) that affects CD38 expression was significantly associated with global relationship satisfaction, perceived partner responsiveness and positive emotions (particularly love) after lab-based interactions, observed behavioral expression of gratitude toward a romantic partner in the lab, and frequency of expressed gratitude in daily life. A separate polymorphism in CD38 (rs3796863) previously associated with plasma oxytocin levels and social engagement was also associated with perceived responsiveness in the benefactor after an expression of gratitude. The combined influence of the two polymorphisms was associated with a broad range of gratitude-related behaviors and feelings. The consistent pattern of findings suggests that the oxytocin system is associated with solidifying the glue that binds adults into meaningful and important relationships. PMID:24396004

  20. Exhaustion of Activated CD8 T Cells Predicts Disease Progression in Primary HIV-1 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Hickling, Stephen; Hurst, Jacob; Meyerowitz, Jodi; Willberg, Christian B.; Robinson, Nicola; Brown, Helen; Kinloch, Sabine; Babiker, Abdel; Nwokolo, Nneka; Fox, Julie; Fidler, Sarah; Phillips, Rodney; Frater, John

    2016-01-01

    The rate at which HIV-1 infected individuals progress to AIDS is highly variable and impacted by T cell immunity. CD8 T cell inhibitory molecules are up-regulated in HIV-1 infection and associate with immune dysfunction. We evaluated participants (n = 122) recruited to the SPARTAC randomised clinical trial to determine whether CD8 T cell exhaustion markers PD-1, Lag-3 and Tim-3 were associated with immune activation and disease progression. Expression of PD-1, Tim-3, Lag-3 and CD38 on CD8 T cells from the closest pre-therapy time-point to seroconversion was measured by flow cytometry, and correlated with surrogate markers of HIV-1 disease (HIV-1 plasma viral load (pVL) and CD4 T cell count) and the trial endpoint (time to CD4 count <350 cells/μl or initiation of antiretroviral therapy). To explore the functional significance of these markers, co-expression of Eomes, T-bet and CD39 was assessed. Expression of PD-1 on CD8 and CD38 CD8 T cells correlated with pVL and CD4 count at baseline, and predicted time to the trial endpoint. Lag-3 expression was associated with pVL but not CD4 count. For all exhaustion markers, expression of CD38 on CD8 T cells increased the strength of associations. In Cox models, progression to the trial endpoint was most marked for PD-1/CD38 co-expressing cells, with evidence for a stronger effect within 12 weeks from confirmed diagnosis of PHI. The effect of PD-1 and Lag-3 expression on CD8 T cells retained statistical significance in Cox proportional hazards models including antiretroviral therapy and CD4 count, but not pVL as co-variants. Expression of ‘exhaustion’ or ‘immune checkpoint’ markers in early HIV-1 infection is associated with clinical progression and is impacted by immune activation and the duration of infection. New markers to identify exhausted T cells and novel interventions to reverse exhaustion may inform the development of novel immunotherapeutic approaches. PMID:27415828

  1. Exhaustion of Activated CD8 T Cells Predicts Disease Progression in Primary HIV-1 Infection.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Matthias; Pantazis, Nikos; Martin, Genevieve E; Hickling, Stephen; Hurst, Jacob; Meyerowitz, Jodi; Willberg, Christian B; Robinson, Nicola; Brown, Helen; Fisher, Martin; Kinloch, Sabine; Babiker, Abdel; Weber, Jonathan; Nwokolo, Nneka; Fox, Julie; Fidler, Sarah; Phillips, Rodney; Frater, John

    2016-07-01

    The rate at which HIV-1 infected individuals progress to AIDS is highly variable and impacted by T cell immunity. CD8 T cell inhibitory molecules are up-regulated in HIV-1 infection and associate with immune dysfunction. We evaluated participants (n = 122) recruited to the SPARTAC randomised clinical trial to determine whether CD8 T cell exhaustion markers PD-1, Lag-3 and Tim-3 were associated with immune activation and disease progression. Expression of PD-1, Tim-3, Lag-3 and CD38 on CD8 T cells from the closest pre-therapy time-point to seroconversion was measured by flow cytometry, and correlated with surrogate markers of HIV-1 disease (HIV-1 plasma viral load (pVL) and CD4 T cell count) and the trial endpoint (time to CD4 count <350 cells/μl or initiation of antiretroviral therapy). To explore the functional significance of these markers, co-expression of Eomes, T-bet and CD39 was assessed. Expression of PD-1 on CD8 and CD38 CD8 T cells correlated with pVL and CD4 count at baseline, and predicted time to the trial endpoint. Lag-3 expression was associated with pVL but not CD4 count. For all exhaustion markers, expression of CD38 on CD8 T cells increased the strength of associations. In Cox models, progression to the trial endpoint was most marked for PD-1/CD38 co-expressing cells, with evidence for a stronger effect within 12 weeks from confirmed diagnosis of PHI. The effect of PD-1 and Lag-3 expression on CD8 T cells retained statistical significance in Cox proportional hazards models including antiretroviral therapy and CD4 count, but not pVL as co-variants. Expression of 'exhaustion' or 'immune checkpoint' markers in early HIV-1 infection is associated with clinical progression and is impacted by immune activation and the duration of infection. New markers to identify exhausted T cells and novel interventions to reverse exhaustion may inform the development of novel immunotherapeutic approaches. PMID:27415828

  2. Identification of Neutrophil Activation Markers as Novel Surrogate Markers of CF Lung Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hage, Lisa; Kügler, Marion; Menendez, Katrin; Naehrlich, Lutz; Schulz, Richard; Roderfeld, Martin; Roeb, Elke

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims Cystic Fibrosis (CF) lung disease is characterized by progressively declining lung function and represents a major factor contributing to the high morbidity and mortality associated with CF. However, apart from spirometry, respiratory disease surrogate markers reliably indicating CF lung disease and the occurrence of pulmonary exacerbations (PEx) are still lacking. Within this study, we aimed to identify new experimental biomarkers for the detection of CF lung disease. Methods 54 adult and 26 pediatric CF patients were included in the study and serum concentrations of MMP-1, -2, -8, -9, -13, TIMP-1, TIMP-2, YKL-40, hyaluronic acid, procollagen III peptide were quantified by ELISA. CF lung disease was diagnosed by lung function test, PEx was defined based on a clinical scoring established by Rosenfeld in 2001. Results Adults and children with moderate to severe CF lung disease exhibited significantly increased serum expression of MMP-8, MMP-9, YKL-40 and TIMP-1. Further, MMP-8, MMP-9 and YKL-40 were significantly increased in adult CF patients suffering from PEx compared to those without clinical signs of respiratory exacerbation. MMP-8, MMP-9, YKL-40, and TIMP-1 serum levels were unaffected by the presence or absence of CF liver disease or pancreatic insufficiency. Conclusions MMP-8, MMP-9, and YKL-40 might serve as novel non-invasive biomarkers of CF lung disease and PEx. PMID:25545245

  3. In vitro expansion of CD34(+)CD38(-) cells under stimulation with hematopoietic growth factors on AGM-S3 cells in juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Sakashita, K; Kato, I; Daifu, T; Saida, S; Hiramatsu, H; Nishinaka, Y; Ebihara, Y; Ma, F; Matsuda, K; Saito, S; Hirabayashi, K; Kurata, T; Uyen, L T N; Nakazawa, Y; Tsuji, K; Heike, T; Nakahata, T; Koike, K

    2015-03-01

    Using serum-containing culture, we examined whether AGM-S3 stromal cells, alone or in combination with hematopoietic growth factor(s), stimulated the proliferation of CD34(+) cells from patients with juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia (JMML). AGM-S3 cells in concert with stem cell factor plus thrombopoietin increased the numbers of peripheral blood CD34(+) cells to approximately 20-fold of the input value after 2 weeks in nine JMML patients with either PTPN11 mutations or RAS mutations, who received allogeneic hematopoietic transplantation. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) also augmented the proliferation of JMML CD34(+) cells on AGM-S3 cells. The expansion potential of CD34(+) cells was markedly low in four patients who achieved spontaneous hematological improvement. A large proportion of day-14-cultured CD34(+) cells were negative for CD38 and cryopreservable. Cultured JMML CD34(+)CD38(-) cells expressed CD117, CD116, c-mpl, CD123, CD90, but not CXCR4, and formed GM and erythroid colonies. Day-7-cultured CD34(+) cells from two of three JMML patients injected intrafemorally into immunodeficient mice stimulated with human GM-CSF after transplantation displayed significant hematopoietic reconstitution. The abilities of OP9 cells and MS-5 cells were one-third and one-tenth, respectively, of the value obtained with AGM-S3 cells. Our culture system may provide a useful tool for elucidating leukemogenesis and for therapeutic approaches in JMML. PMID:25102944

  4. CD19+CD24hiCD38hiBregs involved in downregulate helper T cells and upregulate regulatory T cells in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Weiwei; Yuan, Xiangliang; Chen, Hui; Xie, Guohua; Ma, Yanhui; Zheng, Yingxia; Zhou, Yunlan; Shen, Lisong

    2015-01-01

    Regulatory B cells (Bregs) play a critical role in inflammation and autoimmune disease. We characterized the role of Bregs in the progression of gastric cancer. We detected an increase in Bregs producing IL-10 both in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and in gastric tumors. Multicolor flow cytometry analysis revealed that a subset of CD19+CD24hiCD38hi B cells produces IL-10. Functional studies indicated that increased Bregs do not inhibit the proliferation of CD3+T cells or CD4+ helper T cells (Th cells). However, Bregs do suppress the secretion of IFN-γ and TNF-α by CD4+Th cells. CD19+CD24hiCD38hiBregs were also found to correlate positively with CD4+FoxP3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs). Neutralization experiments showed that Bregs convert CD4+CD25− effector T cells to CD4+FoxP3+Tregs via TGF-β1. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that increased Bregs play a immunosuppressive role in gastric cancer by inhibiting T cells cytokines as well as conversion to Tregs. These results may provide new clues about the underlying mechanisms of immune escape in gastric cancer. PMID:26378021

  5. Low oxygen tension favored expansion and hematopoietic reconstitution of CD34(+) CD38(-) cells expanded from human cord blood-derived CD34(+) Cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ziyan; Du, Zheng; Cai, Haibo; Ye, Zhaoyang; Fan, Jinli; Tan, Wen-Song

    2016-07-01

    Oxygen tension is an important factor that regulates hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) in both in vivo hematopoietic microenvironment and ex vivo culture system. Although the effect of oxygen tension on ex vivo expansion of HSCs was extensively studied, there were no clear descriptions on physiological function and gene expression analysis of HSCs under different oxygen tensions. In this study, the effects of oxygen tension on ex vivo expansion characteristics of human umbilical cord blood (UCB)-derived CD34(+) cells are evaluated. Moreover, the physiological function of expanded CD34(+) cells was assessed by secondary expansion ability ex vivo and hematopoietic reconstitution ability in vivo. Also, genetic profiling was applied to analyze the expression of genes related to cell function. It was found that low oxygen tension favored expansion of CD34(+) CD38(-) cells. Additionally, CD34(+) cells expanded under low oxygen tension showed better secondary expansion ability and reconstitution ability than those under atmospheric oxygen concentration. Finally, the genetic profiling of CD34(+) CD38(-) cells cultured under low oxygen tension was more akin to freshly isolated cells. These results collectively demonstrate that low oxygen tension was able to better maintain both self-renewal and hematopoietic reconstitution potential and may lay an experimental basis for clinical transplantation of HSCs. PMID:26997358

  6. 78 FR 21008 - Proposed Information Collection (NCA Customer Satisfaction Surveys (Headstone/Marker) Activity...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-08

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (NCA Customer Satisfaction Surveys (Headstone/Marker) Activity... solicits comments on the burden estimates relating to customer satisfaction surveys involving the National... information technology. Title: Generic Clearance for NCA, and IG Customer Satisfaction Surveys. OMB...

  7. 78 FR 38809 - Agency Information Collection (NCA Customer Satisfaction Surveys (Headstone/Marker)) Activity...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-27

    ... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (NCA Customer Satisfaction Surveys (Headstone/Marker)) Activity....'' SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: Generic Clearance for NCA, and IG Customer Satisfaction Surveys. OMB Control... 12862, Setting Customer Service Standards, requires Federal agencies and Departments to identify...

  8. EEG markers for characterizing anomalous activities of cerebral neurons in NAT (neuronal activity topography) method.

    PubMed

    Musha, Toshimitsu; Matsuzaki, Haruyasu; Kobayashi, Yohei; Okamoto, Yoshiwo; Tanaka, Mieko; Asada, Takashi

    2013-08-01

    A pair of markers, sNAT and vNAT, is derived from the electroencephalogram (EEG) power spectra (PS) recorded for 5 min with 21 electrodes (4-20 Hz) arranged according to the 10-20 standard. These markers form a new diagnosis tool "NAT" aiming at characterizing various brain disorders. Each signal sequence is divided into segments of 0.64 s and its discrete PS consists of eleven frequency components from 4.68 (3 × 1.56) Hz through 20.34 (13 × 1.56) Hz. PS is normalized to its mean and the bias of PS components on each frequency component across the 21 signal channels is reset to zero. The marker sNAT consists of ten frequency components on 21 channels, characterizing neuronal hyperactivity or hypoactivity as compared with NLc (normal controls). The marker vNAT consists of ten ratios between adjacent PS components denoting the over- or undersynchrony of collective neuronal activities as compared with NLc. The likelihood of a test subject to a specified brain disease is defined in terms of the normalized distance to the template NAT state of the disease in the NAT space. Separation of MCI-AD patients (developing AD in 12-18 months) from NLc is made with a false alarm rate of 15%. Locations with neuronal hypoactivity and undersynchrony of AD patients agree with locations of rCBF reduction measured by SPECT. The 2-D diagram composed of the binary likelihoods between ADc and NLc in the two representations of sNAT and vNAT enables tracing the NAT state of a test subject approaching the AD area, and the follow-up of the treatment effects. PMID:23559020

  9. Response of salivary markers of autonomic activity to elite competition.

    PubMed

    Diaz, M M; Bocanegra, O L; Teixeira, R R; Soares, S S; Espindola, F S

    2012-09-01

    We investigated the response of salivary total protein (TP), alpha-amylase (sAA) and chromogranin A (CgA) to sporting competition and their relation with positive and negative affect. 11 professional swimmers were examined during the first day of a national contest and on a recreated event that matched time-of-the-day and day-of-the-week assessments 2 weeks later. Total protein was determined by the Bradford method and sAA and CgA by Western blotting upon awakening, 30 and 60 min post awakening, immediately before warming up for competition and 5, 20 and 60 min after competition. Psychometric instruments included the Positive Affect and Negative Affect Schedule-X. The concentrations of TP, sAA and CgA differed from controls only prior to and 5 min after the event. We observed positive correlations between higher negative affect scores with higher levels of TP, sAA and CgA prior to the event on the competition day. All 3 markers showed a similar reactivity to sporting competition, which may be attributed to the mechanisms responsible for protein secretion into saliva when collection is performed with no exogenous stimulation. TP is an attractive marker in sports psychology since its determination is faster and cheaper than traditional kinetic or immune assays. PMID:22581684

  10. Selectively active markers for solving of the partial occlusion problem in matchmoving and chromakeying workflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazurek, Przemysław

    2013-09-01

    Matchmoving (Match Moving) is the process used for the estimation of camera movements for further integration of acquired video image with computer graphics. The estimation of movements is possible using pattern recognition, 2D and 3D tracking algorithms. The main problem for the workflow is the partial occlusion of markers by the actor, because manual rotoscoping is necessary for fixing of the chroma-keyed footage. In the paper, the partial occlusion problem is solved using the invented, selectively active electronic markers. The sensor network with multiple infrared links detects occlusion state (no-occlusion, partial, full) and switch LED's based markers.

  11. Intervention Markers of Physical Activity Maintenance in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Floegel, Theresa A.; Giacobbi, Peter R.; Dzierzewski, Joseph M.; Aiken-Morgan, Adrienne T.; Roberts, Beverly; McCrae, Christina S.; Marsiske, Michael; Buman, Matthew P.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To identify intervention components that may promote long-term changes of physical activity among older adults in a behavioral theory-based physical activity trial. Methods Participants (N = 24; aged 65±8.79 years) shared perceptions of intervention components at the end of the intervention and physical activity was assessed at 18 months. Mixed-methods analyses using a pragmatic content analysis of interview data were conducted. Results Active study participants (25%) cited more specific goals/actions to achieve goals and more social support from family/friends, and had significantly higher self-determined motivation mean scores at 18 months than insufficiently active study participants (75%). Conclusions Specific goal-setting behaviors and social support from family/friends may be key elements of physical activity maintenance in older adults. PMID:26018097

  12. High expression of CD38, CD69, CD95 and CD154 biomarkers in cultured peripheral T lymphocytes correlates with an increased risk of acute rejection in liver allograft recipients.

    PubMed

    Boix, Francisco; Millan, Olga; Segundo, David San; Mancebo, Esther; Rimola, Antoni; Fabrega, Emilio; Fortuna, Virginia; Mrowiec, Anna; Castro-Panete, Maria J; Peña, Jesus de la; Llorente, Santiago; Minguela, Alfredo; Bolarin, Jose M; Paz-Artal, Estela; Lopez-Hoyos, Marcos; Brunet, Mercé; Muro, Manuel

    2016-05-01

    The mayor goal still outstanding into the solid organ transplantation field involves the search of surrogate biomarkers able to predict several clinical events, such as acute rejection (AR) or opportunistic infection. In the present multicenter study, a series of interesting surface antigens with important activator or inhibitory immune functions on cultured peripheral T cells were monitored in liver transplant recipients drawn at baseline and up to one year after transplantation. Sixty-four patients were included in the multicenter study during 3 years. Pre- and post-transplantation surface antigens levels displayed significant differences between AR and non acute rejection (NAR) groups, and also this differential expression was used to construct a risk predictive model based on a composite panel of outcome biomarkers (CD38, CD69, CD95 and CD154). The model was able to stratify these patients at high risk of AR. These preliminary results could provide basic information to improve the immunosuppressive treatment and it might better help to predict AR episodes. PMID:26850323

  13. Left insula activation: A marker for language attainment in bilinguals

    PubMed Central

    Chee, Michael W. L.; Soon, Chun Siong; Lee, Hwee Ling; Pallier, Christophe

    2004-01-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest the importance of phonological working memory (PWM) in language acquisition. We investigated the neural correlates of PWM in young adults who were under compelling social pressure to be bilingual. Equal bilinguals had high proficiency in English and Chinese as measured by a standardized examination, whereas unequal bilinguals were proficient in English but not Chinese. Both groups were matched on several measures of nonverbal intelligence and working memory. In-scanner behavioral results did not show between-group differences. Of the regions showing load-dependent increments in activation, the left insula showed greater activation in equal bilinguals. Unequal bilinguals showed greater task-related deactivation in the anterior medial frontal region and greater anterior cingulate activation. Although unequal bilinguals kept apace with equal bilinguals in the simple PWM task, the differential cortical activations suggest that more optimal engagement of PWM in the latter may correlate with better second-language attainment. PMID:15469927

  14. Physical Activity, Physical Performance, and Biological Markers of Health among Sedentary Older Latinos.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Gerardo; Mangione, Carol M; Wang, Pin-Chieh; Trejo, Laura; Butch, Anthony; Tseng, Chi-Hong; Sarkisian, Catherine A

    2014-01-01

    Background. Physical activity is associated with better physical health, possibly by changing biological markers of health such as waist circumference and inflammation, but these relationships are unclear and even less understood among older Latinos-a group with high rates of sedentary lifestyle. Methods. Participants were 120 sedentary older Latino adults from senior centers. Community-partnered research methods were used to recruit participants. Inflammatory (C-reactive protein) and metabolic markers of health (waist circumference, HDL-cholesterol, triglycerides, insulin, and glucose), physical activity (Yale physical activity survey), and physical performance (short physical performance NIA battery) were measured at baseline and 6-month followup. Results. Eighty percent of the sample was female. In final adjusted cross-sectional models, better physical activity indices were associated with faster gait speed (P < 0.05). In adjusted longitudinal analyses, change in self-reported physical activity level correlated inversely with change in CRP (β = -0.05; P = 0.03) and change in waist circumference (β = -0.16; P = 0.02). Biological markers of health did not mediate the relationship between physical activity and physical performance. Conclusion. In this community-partnered study, higher physical activity was associated with better physical performance in cross-sectional analyses. In longitudinal analysis, increased physical activity was associated with improvements in some metabolic and inflammatory markers of health. PMID:25136359

  15. Phytochelatin synthase activity as a marker of metal pollution.

    PubMed

    Zitka, Ondrej; Krystofova, Olga; Sobrova, Pavlina; Adam, Vojtech; Zehnalek, Josef; Beklova, Miroslava; Kizek, Rene

    2011-08-30

    The synthesis of phytochelatins is catalyzed by γ-Glu-Cys dipeptidyl transpeptidase called phytochelatin synthase (PCS). Aim of this study was to suggest a new tool for determination of phytochelatin synthase activity in the tobacco BY-2 cells treated with different concentrations of the Cd(II). After the optimization steps, an experiment on BY-2 cells exposed to different concentrations of Cd(NO(3))(2) for 3 days was performed. At the end of the experiment, cells were harvested and homogenized. Reduced glutathione and cadmium (II) ions were added to the cell suspension supernatant. These mixtures were incubated at 35°C for 30min and analysed using high performance liquid chromatography coupled with electrochemical detector (HPLC-ED). The results revealed that PCS activity rises markedly with increasing concentration of cadmium (II) ions. The lowest concentration of the toxic metal ions caused almost three fold increase in PCS activity as compared to control samples. The activity of PCS (270fkat) in treated cells was more than seven times higher in comparison to control ones. K(m) for PCS was estimated as 2.3mM. PMID:21715087

  16. Nonexercise Physical Activity and Inflammatory and Oxidative Stress Markers in Women

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Sheng Hui; Shu, Xiao Ou; Chow, Wong-Ho; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Zhang, Xianglan; Li, Hong-Lan; Cai, Qiuyin; Milne, Ginger; Ji, Bu-Tian; Cai, Hui; Rothman, Nathaniel; Gao, Yu-Tang; Zheng, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: Leisure time exercise has been linked to lower circulating levels of inflammatory markers. Few studies have examined the association of nonexercise physical activity with markers of inflammation and oxidative stress. Methods: This cross-sectional analysis included 1005 Chinese women aged 40–70 years. Usual physical activity was assessed through in-person interviews using a validated physical activity questionnaire. Plasma proinflammatory cytokines and urinary F2-isoprostanes were measured. Multivariable linear models were used to evaluate the association of inflammatory and oxidative stress markers with nonexercise physical activity and its major components. Results: Nonexercise physical activity accounted for 93.8% of overall physical activity energy expenditure. Levels of nonexercise physical activity were inversely associated with circulating concentrations of interleukin (IL)-6 (Ptrend=0.004), IL-1β (Ptrend=0.03) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) (Ptrend=0.01). Multivariable-adjusted concentrations of these cytokines were 28.2% for IL-6, 22.1% for IL-1β, and 15.9% for TNF-α lower in the highest quartile of nonexercise physical activity compared with the lowest quartile. Similar inverse associations were found for two major components of nonexercise physical activity, walking and biking for transportation, and household activity. No significant associations were observed between nonexercise physical activity and oxidative stress markers. Conclusion: Daily nonexercise physical activity is associated with lower levels of systemic inflammation. This finding may have important public health implications because this type of activity is the main contributor to overall physical activity among middle-aged and elderly women. PMID:24168102

  17. Sleep Loss Activates Cellular Markers of Inflammation: Sex Differences

    PubMed Central

    Irwin, Michael R.; Carrillo, Carmen; Olmstead, Richard

    2009-01-01

    Sleep disturbance is associated with inflammation and related disorders including cardiovascular disease, arthritis, and diabetes mellitus. Given sex differences in the prevalence of inflammatory disorders with stronger associations in females, this study was undertaken to test the effects of sleep loss on cellular mechanisms that contribute to proinflammatory cytokine activity. In 26 healthy adults (11 females; 15 males), monocyte intracellular proinflammatory cytokine production was repeatedly assessed at 08:00, 12:00, 16:00, 20:00, and 23:00 h during a baseline period and after partial sleep deprivation (awake from 11 PM to 3 AM). In the morning after a night of sleep loss, monocyte production of interleukin 6 and tumor necrosis factor- α differentially changed between the two sexes. Whereas both females and males showed a marked increase in the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) - stimulated production of IL-6 and TNF-α in the morning immediately after PSD, production of these cytokines during the early- and late evening was increased in the females as compared to decreases in the males. Sleep loss induces a functional alteration of monocyte proinflammatory cytokine responses with females showing greater cellular immune activation as compared to changes in males. These results have implications for understanding the role of sleep disturbance in the differential risk profile for inflammatory disorders between the sexes. PMID:19520155

  18. CENPA a Genomic Marker for Centromere Activity and Human Diseases

    PubMed Central

    M. Valdivia, Manuel; Hamdouch, Khaoula; Ortiz, Manuela; Astola, Antonio

    2009-01-01

    Inheritance of genetic material requires that chromosomes segregate faithfully during cell division. Failure in this process can drive to aneuploidy phenomenon. Kinetochores are unique centromere macromolecular protein structures that attach chromosomes to the spindle for a proper movement and segregation. A unique type of nucleosomes of centromeric chromatin provides the base for kinetochore formation. A specific histone H3 variant, CENPA, replaces conventional histone H3 and together with centromere-specific-DNA-binding factors directs the assembly of active kinetochores. Recent studies on CENPA nucleosomal structure, epigenetic inheritance of centromeric chromatin and transcription of pericentric heterochromatin provide new clues to our understanding of centromere structure and function. This review highlights the role and dynamics of CENPA assembly into centromeres and the potential contribution of this kinetochore protein to autoimmune and cancer diseases in humans. PMID:20119530

  19. Understanding the Mysterious M2 Macrophage through Activation Markers and Effector Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Rőszer, Tamás

    2015-01-01

    The alternatively activated or M2 macrophages are immune cells with high phenotypic heterogeneity and are governing functions at the interface of immunity, tissue homeostasis, metabolism, and endocrine signaling. Today the M2 macrophages are identified based on the expression pattern of a set of M2 markers. These markers are transmembrane glycoproteins, scavenger receptors, enzymes, growth factors, hormones, cytokines, and cytokine receptors with diverse and often yet unexplored functions. This review discusses whether these M2 markers can be reliably used to identify M2 macrophages and define their functional subdivisions. Also, it provides an update on the novel signals of the tissue environment and the neuroendocrine system which shape the M2 activation. The possible evolutionary roots of the M2 macrophage functions are also discussed. PMID:26089604

  20. Biomarkers on patient T cells diagnose active tuberculosis and monitor treatment response

    PubMed Central

    Adekambi, Toidi; Ibegbu, Chris C.; Cagle, Stephanie; Kalokhe, Ameeta S.; Wang, Yun F.; Hu, Yijuan; Day, Cheryl L.; Ray, Susan M.; Rengarajan, Jyothi

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND. The identification and treatment of individuals with tuberculosis (TB) is a global public health priority. Accurate diagnosis of pulmonary active TB (ATB) disease remains challenging and relies on extensive medical evaluation and detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) in the patient’s sputum. Further, the response to treatment is monitored by sputum culture conversion, which takes several weeks for results. Here, we sought to identify blood-based host biomarkers associated with ATB and hypothesized that immune activation markers on Mtb-specific CD4+ T cells would be associated with Mtb load in vivo and could thus provide a gauge of Mtb infection. METHODS. Using polychromatic flow cytometry, we evaluated the expression of immune activation markers on Mtb-specific CD4+ T cells from individuals with asymptomatic latent Mtb infection (LTBI) and ATB as well as from ATB patients undergoing anti-TB treatment. RESULTS. Frequencies of Mtb-specific IFN-γ+CD4+ T cells that expressed immune activation markers CD38 and HLA-DR as well as intracellular proliferation marker Ki-67 were substantially higher in subjects with ATB compared with those with LTBI. These markers accurately classified ATB and LTBI status, with cutoff values of 18%, 60%, and 5% for CD38+IFN-γ+, HLA-DR+IFN-γ+, and Ki-67+IFN-γ+, respectively, with 100% specificity and greater than 96% sensitivity. These markers also distinguished individuals with untreated ATB from those who had successfully completed anti-TB treatment and correlated with decreasing mycobacterial loads during treatment. CONCLUSION. We have identified host blood-based biomarkers on Mtb-specific CD4+ T cells that discriminate between ATB and LTBI and provide a set of tools for monitoring treatment response and cure. TRIAL REGISTRATION. Registration is not required for observational studies. FUNDING. This study was funded by Emory University, the NIH, and the Yerkes National Primate Center. PMID:25822019

  1. PDGFRβ Is a Novel Marker of Stromal Activation in Oral Squamous Cell Carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Han, Rong; Haines, Paul; Gallagher, George; Noonan, Vikki; Kukuruzinska, Maria; Monti, Stefano; Trojanowska, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Carcinoma associated fibroblasts (CAFs) form the main constituents of tumor stroma and play an important role in tumor growth and invasion. The presence of CAFs is a strong predictor of poor prognosis of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Despite significant progress in determining the role of CAFs in tumor progression, the mechanisms contributing to their activation remain poorly characterized, in part due to fibroblast heterogeneity and the scarcity of reliable fibroblast surface markers. To search for such markers in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), we applied a novel approach that uses RNA-sequencing data derived from the cancer genome atlas (TCGA). Specifically, our strategy allowed for an unbiased identification of genes whose expression was closely associated with a set of bona fide stroma-specific transcripts, namely the interstitial collagens COL1A1, COL1A2, and COL3A1. Among the top hits were genes involved in cellular matrix remodeling and tumor invasion and migration, including platelet-derived growth factor receptor beta (PDGFRβ), which was found to be the highest-ranking receptor protein genome-wide. Similar analyses performed on ten additional TCGA cancer datasets revealed that other tumor types shared CAF markers with OSCC, including PDGFRβ, which was found to significantly correlate with the reference collagen expression in ten of the 11 cancer types tested. Subsequent immunostaining of OSCC specimens demonstrated that PDGFRβ was abundantly expressed in stromal fibroblasts of all tested cases (12/12), while it was absent in tumor cells, with greater specificity than other known markers such as alpha smooth muscle actin or podoplanin (3/11). Overall, this study identified PDGFRβ as a novel marker of stromal activation in OSCC, and further characterized a list of promising candidate CAF markers that may be relevant to other carcinomas. Our novel approach provides for a fast and accurate method to identify CAF markers without the need for

  2. PDGFRβ Is a Novel Marker of Stromal Activation in Oral Squamous Cell Carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Kartha, Vinay K; Stawski, Lukasz; Han, Rong; Haines, Paul; Gallagher, George; Noonan, Vikki; Kukuruzinska, Maria; Monti, Stefano; Trojanowska, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Carcinoma associated fibroblasts (CAFs) form the main constituents of tumor stroma and play an important role in tumor growth and invasion. The presence of CAFs is a strong predictor of poor prognosis of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Despite significant progress in determining the role of CAFs in tumor progression, the mechanisms contributing to their activation remain poorly characterized, in part due to fibroblast heterogeneity and the scarcity of reliable fibroblast surface markers. To search for such markers in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), we applied a novel approach that uses RNA-sequencing data derived from the cancer genome atlas (TCGA). Specifically, our strategy allowed for an unbiased identification of genes whose expression was closely associated with a set of bona fide stroma-specific transcripts, namely the interstitial collagens COL1A1, COL1A2, and COL3A1. Among the top hits were genes involved in cellular matrix remodeling and tumor invasion and migration, including platelet-derived growth factor receptor beta (PDGFRβ), which was found to be the highest-ranking receptor protein genome-wide. Similar analyses performed on ten additional TCGA cancer datasets revealed that other tumor types shared CAF markers with OSCC, including PDGFRβ, which was found to significantly correlate with the reference collagen expression in ten of the 11 cancer types tested. Subsequent immunostaining of OSCC specimens demonstrated that PDGFRβ was abundantly expressed in stromal fibroblasts of all tested cases (12/12), while it was absent in tumor cells, with greater specificity than other known markers such as alpha smooth muscle actin or podoplanin (3/11). Overall, this study identified PDGFRβ as a novel marker of stromal activation in OSCC, and further characterized a list of promising candidate CAF markers that may be relevant to other carcinomas. Our novel approach provides for a fast and accurate method to identify CAF markers without the need for

  3. Early Surrogate Markers of Treatment Activity: Where Are We Now?

    PubMed

    Klintman, Marie; Dowsett, Mitchell

    2015-05-01

    The assessment of new therapies in the adjuvant setting in early breast cancer requires large numbers of patients and many years of follow-up for results to be presented. Therefore, the neoadjuvant study setting, which allows for early prediction of treatment response in smaller patient sets, has become increasingly popular. Ki67 is the most commonly used and extensively studied intermediate biomarker of treatment activity and residual risk in neoadjuvant trials on endocrine therapy, new biological therapies, and chemotherapy. It is increasingly being used as a primary endpoint for new therapies particularly those added to endocrine therapy. The PeriOperative Endocrine Therapy for Individualizing Care (POETIC) trial, including more than 4000 postmenopausal, estrogen receptor (ER)-positive patients randomly assigned to receive 2 weeks of presurgical treatment with an aromatase inhibitor or no further treatment, is the largest window-of-opportunity trial conducted and is assessing the clinical utility of on-treatment Ki67 as a predictor of long-term outcome. For generalizability, Ki67 measurements in the POETIC and other trials need to use standard methodology. The International Working Group on Ki67 in Breast Cancer is conducting a series of studies to bring this to reality. PMID:26063881

  4. 75 FR 3539 - Agency Information Collection (NCA Customer Satisfaction Surveys (Headstone/Marker)) Activity...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-21

    ... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (NCA Customer Satisfaction Surveys (Headstone/Marker)) Activity.... National Cemetery Administration Mail Surveys a. Next of Kin National Customer Satisfaction Survey (Mail to... National Customer Satisfaction Survey (Mail to 5,000 respondents/30 minutes per survey) = 2,500 hours. ]...

  5. Renal Transplant Recipients Treated with Calcineurin-Inhibitors Lack Circulating Immature Transitional CD19+CD24hiCD38hi Regulatory B-Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Tebbe, Bastian; Wilde, Benjamin; Ye, Zeng; Wang, Junyu; Wang, Xinning; Jian, Fu; Dolff, Sebastian; Schedlowski, Manfred; Hoyer, Peter F.; Kribben, Andreas; Witzke, Oliver; Hoerning, André

    2016-01-01

    Background CD19+CD24hiCD38hi transitional immature B-lymphocytes have been demonstrated to play an important role in regulating the alloimmune response in transplant recipients. Here, we analyzed the effect of calcineurin inhibition on these peripherally circulating regulatory B-cells (Breg) in renal transplant recipients receiving cyclosporine A (CsA) or tacrolimus. Methods PBMCs from healthy subjects (HS) (n = 16) and renal transplant recipients (n = 46) were isolated. Flow cytometry was performed for CD19, CD24, CD38 and IL-10 either after isolation or after 72 hours of co-culture in presence of PMA/Ionomycin and TLR9-ligand in presence or absence of increasing concentrations of tacrolimus or CsA. Results The amount of CD19+ B-cells among lymphocytes was ∼9.1% in HS, ∼3.6% in CsA (n = 11, p<0.05) and ∼6.4% in TAC (n = 35, p<0.05) treated patients. Among B-cells, a distinct subset of Breg was found to be 4.7% in HS, 1.4% in tacrolimus treated patients and almost blunted in patients receiving CsA. Similarily, ∼4% of B-cells in HS and even fewer in CsA or tacrolimus treated patients produced IL-10 (0.5% and 1.5%, p<0.05) and this was confirmed both in non-transplanted CsA-treated healthy subjects and in in vitro co-culture experiments. Among 29 patients with <1% of Breg, 9 cases (31%) displayed an allograft rejection in contrast to only one case of rejection (6%) among 17 patients with >1%. Conclusion Calcineurin inhibitors reduce number and IL-10 production of Bregs in the peripheral circulation of both renal transplant recipients and non-transplanted healthy subjects. CNI induced Breg reduction is not restricted to a solid organ transplant setting and is not mediated by co-medication with steroids or MPA. A low proportion of Breg cells is associated with an elevated frequency of allograft rejection events. PMID:27045291

  6. Markers of oxidative stress and erythrocyte antioxidant enzyme activity in older men and women with differing physical activity.

    PubMed

    Rowiński, Rafał; Kozakiewicz, Mariusz; Kędziora-Kornatowska, Kornelia; Hübner-Woźniak, Elżbieta; Kędziora, Józef

    2013-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the relationship between markers of oxidative stress and erythrocyte antioxidant enzyme activity and physical activity in older men and women. The present study included 481 participants (233 men and 248 women) in the age group 65-69 years (127 men and 125 women) and in the age group 90 years and over (106 men and 123 women). The classification of respondents by physical activity was based on answers to the question if, in the past 12 months, they engaged in any pastimes which require physical activity. The systemic oxidative stress status was assessed by measuring plasma iso-PGF2α and protein carbonyl concentration as well as erythrocyte antioxidant enzymes activity, i.e., superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and glutathione reductase (GR). The concentration of plasma iso-PGF2α and protein carbonyls (CP) was lower in groups of younger men and women compared to the respective older groups. In all examined groups, physical activity resulted in decrease of these oxidative stress markers and simultaneously caused adaptive increase in the erythrocyte SOD activity. Additionally, in active younger men CAT, GPx, and GR activities were higher than in sedentary ones. In conclusion, oxidative stress increase is age-related, but physical activity can reduce oxidative stress markers and induce adaptive increase in the erythrocyte antioxidant enzyme activity, especially SOD, even in old and very old men and women. PMID:23911531

  7. Distinct serum proteome profiles associated with collagen-induced arthritis and complete Freund's adjuvant-induced inflammation in CD38⁻/⁻ mice: The discriminative power of protein species or proteoforms.

    PubMed

    Rosal-Vela, Antonio; García-Rodríguez, Sonia; Postigo, Jorge; Iglesias, Marcos; Longobardo, Victoria; Lario, Antonio; Merino, Jesús; Merino, Ramón; Zubiaur, Mercedes; Sancho, Jaime

    2015-10-01

    Collagen-type-II-induced arthritis (CIA) is an autoimmune disease, which involves a complex host systemic response including inflammatory and autoimmune reactions. CIA is milder in CD38(-/-) than in wild-type (WT) mice. ProteoMiner-equalized serum samples were subjected to 2D-DiGE and MS-MALDI-TOF/TOF analyses to identify proteins that changed in their relative abundances in CD38(-/-) versus WT mice either with arthritis (CIA(+) ), with no arthritis (CIA(-) ), or with inflammation (complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA)-treated mice). Multivariate analyses revealed that a multiprotein signature (n = 28) was able to discriminate CIA(+) from CIA(-) mice, and WT from CD38(-/-) mice within each condition. Likewise, a distinct multiprotein signature (n = 16) was identified which differentiated CIA(+) CD38(-/-) mice from CIA(+) WT mice, and lastly, a third multiprotein signature (n = 18) indicated that CD38(-/-) and WT mice could be segregated in response to CFA treatment. Further analyses showed that the discriminative power to distinguish these groups was reached at protein species level and not at the protein level. Hence, the need to identify and quantify proteins at protein species level to better correlate proteome changes with disease processes. It is crucial for plasma proteomics at the low-abundance protein species level to apply the ProteoMiner enrichment. All MS data have been deposited in the ProteomeXchange with identifiers PXD001788, PXD001799 and PXD002071 (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD001788, http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD001799 and http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD002071). PMID:26175002

  8. Markers of coagulation activation and acute kidney injury in patients after hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Hingorani, S R; Seidel, K; Pao, E; Lawler, R; McDonald, G B

    2015-05-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is common after hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT). The etiology of AKI is unknown because biopsies are rarely performed. The pathophysiology of injury is inferred from clinical data. Thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) is often invoked as the cause of renal injury. Patients >2 years old undergoing their first HCT at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center participated in this study. We prospectively measured plasma markers of coagulation activation, (PAI-1 and tPA) and fibrinolyis (D-dimer) weekly in 149 patients during the first 100 days post transplant. Cox proportional hazards modeling was used to determine associations between these markers and AKI (doubling of baseline serum creatinine). Kruskal-Wallis test was used to determine the associations between day 100 urinary albumin to creatinine ratios and these markers. Thirty one percent of patients developed AKI. Though elevations in these markers occurred frequently, neither PAI-1 nor tPA were associated with the development of AKI. D-dimer was associated with a slightly increased risk of AKI (relative risk=1.76; P-value 0.04). None of these markers were associated with micro- or macroalbuminuria at day 100. The lack of an association with AKI suggests that endothelial injury in the form of TMA is not a common cause of AKI early after transplant. PMID:25665045

  9. Markers of coagulation activation and acute kidney injury in patients after hematopoietic cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Hingorani, Sangeeta R; Seidel, Kristy; Pao, Emily; Lawler, Rick; McDonald, George B.

    2015-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is common after hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT). The etiology of AKI is unknown because biopsies are rarely performed. The pathophysiology of injury is inferred from clinical data. Thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) is often invoked as the cause of renal injury. Patients > 2 years undergoing their first HCT at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center (FHCRC) participated in this study. We prospectively measured plasma markers of coagulation activation, (PAI-1 and tPA) and fibrinolyis (D-dimer) weekly in 149 patients during the first 100 days post-transplant. Cox proportional hazards modeling was used to determine associations between these markers and AKI (doubling of baseline serum creatinine). Kruskal-Wallis test was used to determine associations between day 100 urinary albumin to creatinine ratios (ACR) and these markers. Thirty one percent of patients developed AKI. Though elevations in these markers occurred frequently, neither PAI-1 nor tPA were associated with development of AKI. D-dimer was associated with a slightly increased risk of AKI (RR=1.76; p-value 0.04). None of these markers were associated with micro- or macroalbuminuria at day 100. The lack of an association with AKI suggests that endothelial injury in the form of TMA is not a common cause of AKI early after transplant. PMID:25665045

  10. Basophil Markers for Identification and Activation in the Indirect Basophil Activation Test by Flow Cytometry for Diagnosis of Autoimmune Urticaria

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Zehwan; Choi, Bong Seok; Kim, Jong Kun

    2016-01-01

    Background The indirect basophil activation test using flow cytometry is a promising tool for autoimmune urticaria diagnosis. We aimed to identify better donor basophils (from atopic vs. non-atopic donors and interleukin-3 primed vs. unprimed basophils) and improve basophil identification and activation markers (eotaxin CC chemokine receptor-3 [CCR3] vs. CD123 and CD63 vs. CD203c). Methods Donor basophils were obtained from non-atopic and atopic group O donors. Positive control sera were artificially prepared to simulate autoimmune urticaria patients' sera. Patient sera were obtained from nine children with chronic urticaria. Assay sensitivity was compared among each variation by using positive control sera (n=21), applying cutoff values defined from negative control sera (n=20). Results For basophil identification, a combination of CCR3 and CD123 markers revealed a higher correlation with automated complete blood count (r=0.530) compared with that observed using CD123 (r=0.498) or CCR3 alone (r=0.195). Three activation markers on the atopic donor basophils attained 100% assay sensitivity: CD203c on unprimed basophils, CD63+CD203+ or CD63 alone on primed basophils; however, these markers on the non-atopic donor basophils attained lower assay sensitivity. Conclusions For basophil identification markers, a combination of CD123 and CCR3 is recommended, while CD123 alone may be used as an alternative. Donor basophils should be obtained from an atopic donor. For basophil activation markers, either CD203c alone on unprimed basophils or CD203c and CD63 on primed basophils are recommended, while CD63 alone on primed basophils may be used as an alternative. PMID:26522756

  11. Eculizumab reduces complement activation, inflammation, endothelial damage, thrombosis, and renal injury markers in aHUS

    PubMed Central

    Cofiell, Roxanne; Kukreja, Anjli; Bedard, Krystin; Yan, Yan; Mickle, Angela P.; Ogawa, Masayo; Bedrosian, Camille L.

    2015-01-01

    Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS) is a genetic, life-threatening disease characterized by uncontrolled complement activation, systemic thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA), and vital organ damage. We evaluated the effect of terminal complement blockade with the anti-C5 monoclonal antibody eculizumab on biomarkers of cellular processes involved in TMA in patients with aHUS longitudinally, during up to 1 year of treatment, compared with in healthy volunteers. Biomarker levels were elevated at baseline in most patients, regardless of mutational status, plasma exchange/infusion use, platelet count, or lactate dehydrogenase or haptoglobin levels. Eculizumab reduced terminal complement activation (C5a and sC5b-9) and renal injury markers (clusterin, cystatin-C, β2-microglobulin, and liver fatty acid binding protein-1) to healthy volunteer levels and reduced inflammation (soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor-1), coagulation (prothrombin fragment F1+2 and d-dimer), and endothelial damage (thrombomodulin) markers to near-normal levels. Alternative pathway activation (Ba) and endothelial activation markers (soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule-1) decreased but remained elevated, reflecting ongoing complement activation in aHUS despite complete terminal complement blockade. These results highlight links between terminal complement activation and inflammation, endothelial damage, thrombosis, and renal injury and underscore ongoing risk for systemic TMA and progression to organ damage. Further research regarding underlying complement dysregulation is warranted. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT01194973. PMID:25833956

  12. Objectively Measured Physical Activity and Its Association With Adiponectin and Other Novel Metabolic Markers

    PubMed Central

    Metcalf, Brad S.; Jeffery, Alison N.; Hosking, Joanne; Voss, Linda D.; Sattar, Naveed; Wilkin, Terence J.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—Recent evidence suggests that, in children, traditional markers of metabolic disturbance are related only weakly to physical activity. We therefore sought to establish the corresponding relationships with newer metabolic markers. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS—This was a nonintervention longitudinal study of 213 healthy children recruited from 54 schools in Plymouth, U.K. MTI accelerometers were used to make objective 7-day recordings of physical activity at ages 5 ± 0.3 (mean ± SD), 6, 7, and 8 years. Overall physical activity was taken as the average of the four annual time points. The metabolic markers at 8 years were adiponectin, leptin, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP), and insulin resistance (homeostasis model assessment). Potential confounders included percent body fat measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and diet measured by food frequency questionnaire. RESULTS—Whereas physical activity did not correlate with insulin resistance (r = −0.01), leptin (r = +0.04), or hsCRP (r = +0.01) independently of percent body fat, it did correlate with adiponectin, but inversely (r = −0.18, P = 0.02). This unexpected inverse relationship was strongest among the less active children (physical activity < median: r = −0.30, P = 0.01) but negligible in the more active children (physical activity > median: r = +0.04, P = 0.76). Adiponectin was significantly higher (0.52 SD, P < 0.01) in the least active tertile compared with the other two tertiles. Insulin resistance, however, did not differ across the physical activity tertiles (P = 0.62). CONCLUSIONS—Adiponectin levels in children are highest among those who are least active, but their insulin resistance is no different. Adiponectin has a known insulin-sensitizing effect, and our findings are consistent with a selective effect at low levels of physical activity. PMID:19033408

  13. Physical Activity and Adiposity Markers at Older Ages: Accelerometer Vs Questionnaire Data

    PubMed Central

    Sabia, Séverine; Cogranne, Pol; van Hees, Vincent T.; Bell, Joshua A.; Elbaz, Alexis; Kivimaki, Mika; Singh-Manoux, Archana

    2015-01-01

    Objective Physical activity is critically important for successful aging, but its effect on adiposity markers at older ages is unclear as much of the evidence comes from self-reported data on physical activity. We assessed the associations of questionnaire-assessed and accelerometer-assessed physical activity with adiposity markers in older adults. Design/Setting/Participants This was a cross-sectional study on 3940 participants (age range 60-83 years) of the Whitehall II study who completed a 20-item physical activity questionnaire and wore a wrist-mounted accelerometer for 9 days in 2012 and 2013. Measurements Total physical activity was estimated using metabolic equivalent hours/week for the questionnaire and mean acceleration for the accelerometer. Time spent in moderate-and-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) was also assessed by questionnaire and accelerometer. Adiposity assessment included body mass index, waist circumference, and fat mass index. Fat mass index was calculated as fat mass/height² (kg/m²), with fat mass estimated using bioimpedance. Results Greater total physical activity was associated with lower adiposity for all adiposity markers in a dose-response manner. In men, the strength of this association was 2.4 to 2.8 times stronger with the accelerometer than with questionnaire data. In women, it was 1.9 to 2.3 times stronger. For MVPA, questionnaire data in men suggested no further benefit for adiposity markers past 1 hour/week of activity. This was not the case for accelerometer-assessed MVPA where, for example, compared with men undertaking <1 hour/week of accelerometer-assessed MVPA, waist circumference was 3.06 (95% confidence interval 2.06–4.06) cm lower in those performing MVPA 1–2.5 hours/week, 4.69 (3.47–5.91) cm lower in those undertaking 2.5–4 hours/week, and 7.11 (5.93–8.29) cm lower in those performing ≥4 hours/week. Conclusions The association of physical activity with adiposity markers in older adults was

  14. Imaging of moving fiducial markers during radiotherapy using a fast, efficient active pixel sensor based EPID

    SciTech Connect

    Osmond, John P. F.; Zin, Hafiz M.; Harris, Emma J.; Lupica, Giovanni; Allinson, Nigel M.; Evans, Philip M.

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this work was to investigate the use of an experimental complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) active pixel sensor (APS) for tracking of moving fiducial markers during radiotherapy. Methods: The APS has an active area of 5.4 x 5.4 cm and maximum full frame read-out rate of 20 frame s{sup -1}, with the option to read out a region-of-interest (ROI) at an increased rate. It was coupled to a 4 mm thick ZnWO4 scintillator which provided a quantum efficiency (QE) of 8% for a 6 MV x-ray treatment beam. The APS was compared with a standard iViewGT flat panel amorphous Silicon (a-Si) electronic portal imaging device (EPID), with a QE of 0.34% and a frame-rate of 2.5 frame s{sup -1}. To investigate the ability of the two systems to image markers, four gold cylinders of length 8 mm and diameter 0.8, 1.2, 1.6, and 2 mm were placed on a motion-platform. Images of the stationary markers were acquired using the APS at a frame-rate of 20 frame s{sup -1}, and a dose-rate of 143 MU min{sup -1} to avoid saturation. EPID images were acquired at the maximum frame-rate of 2.5 frame s{sup -1}, and a reduced dose-rate of 19 MU min{sup -1} to provide a similar dose per frame to the APS. Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the background signal and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of the marker signal relative to the background were evaluated for both imagers at doses of 0.125 to 2 MU. Results: Image quality and marker visibility was found to be greater in the APS with SNR {approx}5 times greater than in the EPID and CNR up to an order of magnitude greater for all four markers. To investigate the ability to image and track moving markers the motion-platform was moved to simulate a breathing cycle with period 6 s, amplitude 20 mm and maximum speed 13.2 mm s{sup -1}. At the minimum integration time of 50 ms a tracking algorithm applied to the APS data found all four markers with a success rate of {>=}92% and positional error {<=}90 {mu}m. At an integration time of 400

  15. S100A9 is a Biliary Protein Marker of Disease Activity in Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis

    PubMed Central

    Ruppert, Thomas; Giese, Thomas; Flechtenmacher, Christa; Weiss, Karl Heinz; Kloeters-Plachky, Petra; Stremmel, Wolfgang; Schirmacher, Peter; Sauer, Peter; Gotthardt, Daniel Nils

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aims Bile analysis has the potential to serve as a surrogate marker for inflammatory and neoplastic disorders of the biliary epithelium and may provide insight into biliary pathophysiology and possible diagnostic markers. We aimed to identify biliary protein markers of patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) by a proteomic approach. Methods Bile duct-derived bile samples were collected from PSC patients (n = 45) or patients with choledocholithiasis (n = 24, the control group). Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) was performed to analyse the proteins, 2-D-gel patterns were compared by densitometry, and brush cytology specimens were analysed by RT-PCR. Results A reference bile-duct bile proteome was established in the control group without signs of inflammation or maligancy comprising a total of 379 non-redundant biliary proteins; 21% were of unknown function and 24% had been previously described in serum. In PSC patients, the biliary S100A9 expression was elevated 95-fold (p<0.005), serum protein expression was decreased, and pancreatic enzyme expression was unchanged compared to controls. The S100A9 expression was 2-fold higher in PSC patients with high disease activity than in those with low activity (p<0.05). The brush cytology specimens from the PSC patients with high disease activity showed marked inflammatory activity and leukocyte infiltration compared to the patients with low activity, which correlated with S100A9 mRNA expression (p<0.05). Conclusions The bile-duct bile proteome is complex and its analysis might enhance the understanding of cholestatic liver disease. Biliary S100A9 levels may be a useful marker for PSC activity, and its implication in inflammation and carcinogenesis warrants further investigation. PMID:22253789

  16. Ghrelin and adipokines as circulating markers of disease activity in patients with Takayasu arteritis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The current markers of disease activity in Takayasu arteritis (TA) are insufficient for proper assessment. We investigated circulating levels of unacylated and acylated ghrelin, leptin and adiponectin and their relationships with disease activity in patients with TA. Methods This study included 31 patients with TA and 32 sex-, age- and body mass index-matched healthy controls. Disease activity was assessed in TA patients using various tools, including Kerr's criteria, disease extent index-Takayasu, physician's global assessment, radiological parameters, and laboratory markers. Plasma unacylated and acylated ghrelin, and serum leptin and adiponectin levels were measured using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results Unacylated and acylated ghrelin levels were found to be significantly lower in TA patients than that in healthy controls. Patients with active disease had lower unacylated ghrelin levels than those with inactive disease and had lower acylated ghrelin levels than healthy controls. Ghrelin levels were negatively correlated with various parameters of disease activity. The leptin/ghrelin ratio was significantly higher in TA patients than controls. It was positively correlated with disease activity. There was a positive correlation between unacylated and acylated ghrelin and a negative correlation between leptin and ghrelin. There was no statistical difference in adiponectin levels between TA patients and controls. The radiological activity markers were positively correlated with other parameters of disease activity. Conclusions This study suggests that plasma unacylated and acylated ghrelin levels may be useful in monitoring disease activity and planning treatment strategies for patients with TA. The serum leptin level and leptin/ghrelin ratio may also be used to help assess the disease activity. PMID:23259466

  17. CD8+ T Lymphocyte Expansion, Proliferation and Activation in Dengue Fever

    PubMed Central

    de Matos, Andréia Manso; Carvalho, Karina Inacio; Rosa, Daniela Santoro; Villas-Boas, Lucy Santos; da Silva, Wanessa Cardoso; Rodrigues, Célia Luiza de Lima; Oliveira, Olímpia Massae Nakasone Peel Furtado; Levi, José Eduardo; Araújo, Evaldo Stanislau Affonso; Pannuti, Claudio Sergio; Luna, Expedito José Albuquerque; Kallas, Esper George

    2015-01-01

    Dengue fever induces a robust immune response, including massive T cell activation. The level of T cell activation may, however, be associated with more severe disease. In this study, we explored the level of CD8+ T lymphocyte activation in the first six days after onset of symptoms during a DENV2 outbreak in early 2010 on the coast of São Paulo State, Brazil. Using flow cytometry we detected a progressive increase in the percentage of CD8+ T cells in 74 dengue fever cases. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 30 cases were thawed and evaluated using expanded phenotyping. The expansion of the CD8+ T cells was coupled with increased Ki67 expression. Cell activation was observed later in the course of disease, as determined by the expression of the activation markers CD38 and HLA-DR. This increased CD8+ T lymphocyte activation was observed in all memory subsets, but was more pronounced in the effector memory subset, as defined by higher CD38 expression. Our results show that most CD8+ T cell subsets are expanded during DENV2 infection and that the effector memory subset is the predominantly affected sub population. PMID:25675375

  18. CD8+ T lymphocyte expansion, proliferation and activation in dengue fever.

    PubMed

    de Matos, Andréia Manso; Carvalho, Karina Inacio; Rosa, Daniela Santoro; Villas-Boas, Lucy Santos; da Silva, Wanessa Cardoso; Rodrigues, Célia Luiza de Lima; Oliveira, Olímpia Massae Nakasone Peel Furtado; Levi, José Eduardo; Araújo, Evaldo Stanislau Affonso; Pannuti, Claudio Sergio; Luna, Expedito José Albuquerque; Kallas, Esper George

    2015-02-01

    Dengue fever induces a robust immune response, including massive T cell activation. The level of T cell activation may, however, be associated with more severe disease. In this study, we explored the level of CD8+ T lymphocyte activation in the first six days after onset of symptoms during a DENV2 outbreak in early 2010 on the coast of São Paulo State, Brazil. Using flow cytometry we detected a progressive increase in the percentage of CD8+ T cells in 74 dengue fever cases. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 30 cases were thawed and evaluated using expanded phenotyping. The expansion of the CD8+ T cells was coupled with increased Ki67 expression. Cell activation was observed later in the course of disease, as determined by the expression of the activation markers CD38 and HLA-DR. This increased CD8+ T lymphocyte activation was observed in all memory subsets, but was more pronounced in the effector memory subset, as defined by higher CD38 expression. Our results show that most CD8+ T cell subsets are expanded during DENV2 infection and that the effector memory subset is the predominantly affected sub population. PMID:25675375

  19. Markers of B-Cell Activation in Relation to Risk of Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    De Roos, Anneclaire J; Mirick, Dana K; Edlefsen, Kerstin L; LaCroix, Andrea Z; Kopecky, Kenneth J; Madeleine, Margaret; Magpantay, Larry; Martínez-Maza, Otoniel

    2012-01-01

    B-cell activation biomarkers have been associated with increased risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) in HIV-infected populations. However, whether a similar association may exist in general populations has not been established. We conducted a case-control study within the Women’s Health Initiative Observational Study cohort to measure the B-cell activation biomarkers sCD23, sCD27, sCD30, sCD44, and CXCL13 in serum samples collected an average of 6 years before NHL diagnosis, in 491 cases and 491 controls. Using logistic regression to estimate odds ratios, we observed strong associations between NHL and markers, for all B-cell NHL and for major subtypes. Women with marker levels in the highest-versus-lowest quartile categories of CD23, CD27, CD30, or CXCL13 were at 2.8 to 5.5-fold increased risk of B-NHL. Additionally, there were significant trends of risk with increasing levels of these markers present. Associations were strongest for cases with shortest lag times between blood draw and diagnosis (<3 years). However, there were also significant associations for cases with the longest prediagnostic lag (9–13 years). Taken together, our findings indicate a prominent role for B-cell activation among postmenopausal women in the etiology of B-cell NHL and/or in processes reflective of early disease development, as early as 9 years before diagnosis. PMID:22846913

  20. Platelet and monocyte activity markers and mediators of inflammation in Takotsubo cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Pirzer, Rainer; Elmas, Elif; Haghi, Dariusch; Lippert, Christiane; Kralev, Stefan; Lang, Siegfried; Borggrefe, Martin; Kälsch, Thorsten

    2012-03-01

    Patients with Takotsubo cardiomyopathy (TC) often present with symptoms similar to those of myocardial infarction (MI). We analyzed blood concentrations of mediators of inflammation and platelet- and monocyte-activity markers in patients with TC and MI for significant differences. Clinical data of patients with TC (n = 16) and acute MI (n = 16) were obtained. Serial blood samples were taken at the time of hospital admission (t(0)), after 2-4 days (t(1)) and after 4-7 weeks (t(2)), respectively. Plasma concentrations of interleukin (IL)-6, IL-7, soluble CD40 ligand (sCD40L), and monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP-1) were determined with an ELISA. Tissue factor binding on monocytes, platelet-activation marker CD62P, platelet CD40-ligand (CD40L), and platelet-monocyte aggregates were measured using flow cytometry. Expression of CD62P on platelets and IL-6 plasma levels were significantly lower in patients with TC compared to MI at the time of hospital admission. IL-7 plasma levels were significantly elevated in patients with TC compared to patients with MI at 2-4 days after hospital admission. No significant differences were observed concerning sCD40L and MCP-1 plasma levels, tissue factor binding on monocytes, CD40L expression on platelets, and platelet-monocyte aggregates at any point in time. Our results indicate that inflammatory mediators and platelet-activity markers contribute to the differences in the pathogenesis of MI and TC. PMID:21416113

  1. NP001 regulation of macrophage activation markers in ALS: a phase I clinical and biomarker study.

    PubMed

    Miller, Robert G; Zhang, Rongzhen; Block, Gilbert; Katz, Jonathan; Barohn, Richard; Kasarskis, Edward; Forshew, Dallas; Gopalakrishnan, Vidhya; McGrath, Michael S

    2014-12-01

    This is a phase I, placebo-controlled, single ascending dose safety and tolerability study of NP001 in patients with ALS. NP001 is a novel regulator of inflammatory macrophages and monocytes. As ALS progression is thought to be related to neuroinflammation, an additional objective of the study was to assess the effects of NP001 administration on monocyte activation markers. Thirty-two ALS patients were enrolled and received either placebo (eight) or one of four (six at each dose) ascending single i.v. doses (0.2, 0.8, 1.6 and 3.2 mg/kg NP001). Patients were monitored for safety, and blood monocyte immune activation markers CD16 and HLA-DR were assessed pre- and 24 h post-dosing. Changes from baseline were calculated. Results showed that NP001 was generally safe and well tolerated. Importantly, a single dose of NP001 caused a dose-dependent reduction in expression of monocyte CD16, a marker of monocyte activation/inflammation. Additionally, monocyte HLA-DR expression was also decreased in those patients with elevated values at baseline. In conclusion, these data indicate that NP001 has an acute effect on inflammatory monocytes in ALS patient blood. The potential for modulation of inflammation in the context of ALS disease progression will require further study with long-term follow-up. PMID:25192333

  2. Serological markers of hepatitis B and C in patients with HIV/AIDS and active tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Araújo-Mariz, Carolline; Lopes, Edmundo Pessoa; Ximenes, Ricardo A A; Lacerda, Heloísa R; Miranda-Filho, Demócrito B; Montarroyos, Ulisses R; Barreto, Silvana; Salustiano, Daniela Medeiros; Albuquerque, Maria Fátima Pessoa Militão

    2016-06-01

    Infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV) and C virus (HCV) are common in patients with HIV/AIDS and tuberculosis (TB). This is a cross-sectional study with patients infected with HIV/AIDS and active TB in Recife, Brazil, aiming to verify the prevalence of markers for HBV: antibody to hepatitis B core antigen (anti-HBc); and HCV: antibody to hepatitis C virus (anti-HCV) by chemiluminescence, and to identify the frequency of associated factors. Data were collected through questionnaires, and blood was drawn from patients for analysis. We used the chi-square test and the Fisher exact test when necessary. We conducted a bivariate logistic regression analysis and the magnitude of the associations was expressed as odds ratio (OR) with a confidence interval of 95%. Among 166 patients studied with HIV/AIDS and active TB, anti-HBc was positive in 61 patients [36.7%; 95%CI (29.4-44.6%)] and anti-HCV in 11[6.6%; 95%CI (3.4-11.5%)]. In the logistic regression analysis, male sex, and age ≥40 years were independent factors associated with the occurrence of anti-HBc. In conclusion, we verified a high frequency of HBV contact marker and a low frequency of HCV markers in patients with HIV/AIDS and TB in Recife. J. Med. Virol. 88:996-1002, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26580855

  3. Selection and validation of enzymatic activities as functional markers in wood biotechnology and fungal ecology.

    PubMed

    Mathieu, Yann; Gelhaye, Eric; Dumarçay, Stéphane; Gérardin, Philippe; Harvengt, Luc; Buée, Marc

    2013-02-15

    The dead wood and forest soils are sources of diversity and under-explored fungal strains with biotechnological potential, which require to be studied. Numerous enzymatic tests have been proposed to investigate the functional potential of the soil microbial communities or to test the functional abilities of fungal strains. Nevertheless, the diversity of these functional markers and their relevance in environmental studies or biotechnological screening does still have not been demonstrated. In this work, we assessed ten different extracellular enzymatic activities involved in the wood decaying process including β-etherase that specifically cleaves the β-aryl ether linkages in the lignin polymer. For this purpose, a collection of 26 fungal strains, distributed within three ecological groups (white, brown and soft rot fungi), has been used. Among the ten potential functional markers, the combinatorial use of only six of them allowed separation between the group of white and soft rot fungi from the brown rot fungi. Moreover, our results suggest that extracellular β-etherase is a rare and dispensable activity among the wood decay fungi. Finally, we propose that this set of markers could be useful for the analysis of fungal communities in functional and environmental studies, and for the selection of strains with biotechnological interests. PMID:23206919

  4. Activity Markers of the Anti-Breast Carcinoma Cell Growth Fractions of Vernonia amygdalina Extracts

    PubMed Central

    Oyugi, Daniel A.; Luo, Xuan; Lee, Ken S.; Hill, Brandon; Izevbigie, Ernest B.

    2010-01-01

    Vernonia amygdalina (VA) is an edible plant of the Asteraceae family used in many herbal formulations prescribed by herbalists for many diseases. We have previously reported that aqueous VA extracts inhibit the growth of estrogen receptor-positive human breast cancerous cells in vitro. Activity markers of the VA extracts have not been previously identified or characterized. Hence, the objective of this study was to identify activity markers of the VA extracts associated with cell growth inhibition. Extraction of VA with multiple solvents of various polarity indexes yielded three fractions (A1-2, B-3) that significantly inhibited cell growth (p <0.05) at 0.1 mg/ml concentration. At a higher concentration of 1 mg/ml, six fractions of hexane, chloroform, butanol, and ethyl acetate (A1-3, B2-4) inhibited DNA synthesis by 76, 98, 94, 98, 98, and 96% respectively. These fractions were UV-detected from 250–730 nm; and all showed three distinct peaks around 410, 431, and 664 nm. Furthermore, HPLC analysis of the fractions revealed similar retention times of 2.213, 2.167, and 2.151 min respectively. Bioactivity assays showed that HPLC retention of approximately 2 min is required for cell growth-inhibitory activity of VA fractions. Interestingly, all active fractions exhibited HPLC peaks at approximately 2 min. Therefore, the UV and HPLC peaks may be used as predictive tools to determine VA extracts activities. PMID:19176872

  5. Markers of endothelial cell activation and injury in childhood haemolytic uraemic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nevard, C H; Blann, A D; Jurd, K M; Haycock, G B; Hunt, B J

    1999-08-01

    Diarrhoea-associated haemolytic uraemic syndrome (D+ HUS) is usually caused by verotoxin-producing Escherichia coli. Histology shows endothelial swelling with localised thrombus. Activation of coagulation and fibrinolysis also occurs. These facts, combined with the knowledge that recovery usually follows within weeks, led us to hypothesise that verotoxin causes localised endothelial cell activation but not injury. Markers of endothelial cell activation and injury were measured serially in 30 children with acute D+ HUS, healthy children, and children receiving chronic dialysis. Interpretation of markers was complicated by the renal dysfunction characteristic of D+ HUS. Nevertheless there was no evidence for endothelial cell injury, as soluble tissue factor levels were not increased and soluble thrombomodulin levels were lower than dialysed controls (P<0.001). In the acute phase, soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule levels were raised above normal (P<0.001), but were lower than dialysed controls (P<0.001), and soluble E-selectin levels were not significantly increased compared with normal controls (P=0.2). Hence, there was no evidence for endothelial cell damage or endothelial cell activation by the time children reached hospital; but this study did not exclude the possibility that endothelial cell activation occurred prior to hospital admission. PMID:10452276

  6. Can red cell distribution width be a marker of disease activity in ulcerative colitis?

    PubMed Central

    Ipek, Serkan; Cekic, Cem; Alper, Emrah; Coban, Eyup; Eliacik, Eylem; Arabul, Mahmut; Aslan, Fatih; Vatansever, Sezgin; Yalcin, Hulya; Unsal, Belkis

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The current study aimed to investigate the association between disease activity and red cell distribution width (RDW) levels in ulcerative colitis and to determine whether RDW can be used as a marker of disease activity in non-anemic ulcerative colitis. Methods: The RDW levels of 310 ulcerative colitis patients who underwent colonoscopy were analyzed retrospectively. The patients were divided into two groups (active disease and remission) according to the endoscopic activity index. In addition, the accuracy of RDW in determining disease activity in non-anemic patients was assessed. The efficacy of RDW in determining disease activity was compared to that of white blood cell count, platelet count, C-reactive protein, and erythrocyte sedimentation rate. Results: Two hundred and six (66.5%) patients had active disease, and 104 (33.5%) were in remission. The mean RDW levels in patients with active ulcerative colitis and in those in remission were 16.8±2.9 and 15.5±1.4, respectively (P<0.001). Ninety-six (46.6%) patients in the active disease group and 89 (85.6%) in the remission group were non-anemic, and their respective RDW levels were 15.4±1.2 and 15.3±1.1 (P=0.267). The sensitivity and specificity of RDW in determining inflammation were 41% and 91%, respectively (AUC 0.65, P<0.001). Conclusions: This study demonstrated that RDW can be used as a marker for disease activity in ulcerative colitis, but it did not have the same efficacy in the non-anemic group. PMID:26550336

  7. Prospective Real-Time Correction for Arbitrary Head Motion Using Active Markers

    PubMed Central

    Ooi, Melvyn B.; Krueger, Sascha; Thomas, William J.; Swaminathan, Srirama V.; Brown, Truman R.

    2011-01-01

    Patient motion during an MRI exam can result in major degradation of image quality, and is of increasing concern due to the aging population and its associated diseases. This work presents a general strategy for real-time, intra-image compensation of rigid-body motion that is compatible with multiple imaging sequences. Image quality improvements are established for structural brain MRI acquired during volunteer motion. A headband integrated with three active markers is secured to the forehead. Prospective correction is achieved by interleaving a rapid track-and-update module into the imaging sequence. For every repetition of this module, a short tracking pulse-sequence re-measures the marker positions; during head motion, the rigid-body transformation that realigns the markers to their initial positions is fed back to adaptively update the image-plane – maintaining it at a fixed orientation relative to the head – before the next imaging segment of k-space is acquired. In cases of extreme motion, corrupted lines of k-space are rejected and re-acquired with the updated geometry. High precision tracking measurements (0.01 mm) and corrections are accomplished in a temporal resolution (37 ms) suitable for real-time application. The correction package requires minimal additional hardware and is fully integrated into the standard user interface, promoting transferability to clinical practice. PMID:19488989

  8. The mycotoxin deoxynivalenol inhibits the cell surface expression of activation markers in human macrophages.

    PubMed

    Waché, Yann J; Hbabi-Haddioui, Laila; Guzylack-Piriou, Laurence; Belkhelfa, Haouaria; Roques, Christine; Oswald, Isabelle P

    2009-08-21

    Deoxynivalenol (DON) is the most prevalent trichothecene mycotoxin in crops in Europe and North America. It exhibits several toxic effects including impaired growth and immune dysregulation. Macrophages play pivotal role in the host defense; upon activation, they express several specific cell surface receptors that are important in adhesion and cell signaling. Several studies have demonstrated that DON can affect macrophages, however, very few data are available concerning the effect of DON on human macrophages, and the effect on macrophage cell surface receptors is unknown. In the present study, human blood monocytes, differentiated in vitro into macrophages, were activated with IFN-gamma, in the presence or absence of low concentrations of DON. The expression of CD11c, CD13, CD14, CD18, CD33, CD35, CD54, CD119 and HLA-DP/DQ/DR was analyzed by flow cytometry. As expected, macrophage activation by IFN-gamma upregulated the expression of CD54, CD14, CD119 and HLA-DP/DQ/DR. Incubation with DON decrease the cell surface expression of these activation markers in a dose-dependent manner. When cells were treated with 5muM DON, the mean fluorescence intensity measured for the expression of these receptors was the same as that observed in non-activated macrophages. This inhibitory effect of DON was only observed when the mycotoxin was applied before the activation signal. Taken together, our results suggest that low concentration of DON alter macrophage activation as measured by the expression of cell surface markers. This may have implications for human health when consuming DON contaminated feed. PMID:19549553

  9. Markers of Inflammation, Endothelial Activation and Autoimmunity in Adolescent Female Gymnasts

    PubMed Central

    Alshammari, Eyad; Shafi, Shahida; Nurmi-Lawton, Jaana; Burut, Dayangku Fatiha Pengiran; Lanham-New, Susan; Ferns, Gordon

    2010-01-01

    High levels of physical activity have been linked to benefits in cardiovascular and bone health by affecting, in part, changes in proinflammatory profile. Therefore, we have aimed to assess the effects of intensive training on markers of inflammation, endothelial activation and auto-immunity in the absence of the potential confounding effects of incident atherosclerosis. The subjects comprised 25 competitive gymnasts and 19 healthy sedentary adolescent females, aged 8-17 years. Serum soluble intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (sICAM-1), high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP), heat shock protein 27 (Hsp27) and Hsp27 antibody titres were measured by ELISAs in a sample of adolescent girls who were either physically active (competitive gymnasts) or sedentary. The association between age, body mass index (BMI), dietary intake, serum hsCRP, sICAM-1 and Hsp27 antigen and antibody titres were determined. The mean serum sICAM-1 concentrations were significantly higher in the gymnasts compared to the sedentary females (0.29 ± 0.02 versus 0.23 ± 0.01 mg·L-1, p < 0.01). In contrast serum hsCRP concentrations were substantially lower in the gymnasts compared to the sedentary adolescent females (0.49 ± 0.03 versus 1.38 ± 0.19 mg·L-1, p < 0.001). Differences remained significant after adjustment for anthropometric factors. We also found that serum Hsp27 antigen concentrations were determined by dietary saturated fat intake (p < 0.001), and antibody titres to Hsp27 were determined by dietary PUFA (p < 0.001) after adjustment for BMI. Our findings show that young female gymnasts have an altered profile of inflammatory markers and endothelial activation compared to their less physically active peers. Key points Results showed that adolescent young female gymnasts have an altered serum inflammatory markers and endothelial activation, compared to their less physically active peers. Physical activities improved immune system. Differences in these biochemical data kept

  10. The influence of statin therapy on platelet activity markers in hyperlipidemic patients after ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Chmielewski, Henryk; Kaczorowska, Beata; Przybyła, Monika; Baj, Zbigniew

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) has been reported to increase platelet activation. Reducing the level of LDL-C with statins induces important pleiotropic effects such as platelet inhibition. This association between platelet activity and statin therapy may be clinically important in reducing the risk of ischemic stroke. We investigated the effect of simvastatin therapy on platelet activation markers (platelet CD62P, sP-selectin, and platelet-derived microparticles (PDMPs)) in hyperlipidemic patients after ischemic stroke. Material and methods The study group consisted of 21 hyperlipidemic patients after ischemic stroke confirmed by CT, and 20 healthy subjects served as controls. We assessed the CD62P expression on resting and thrombin-activated blood platelets. CD62P and PDMPs were analyzed by the use of monoclonal antibodies anti-CD61 and anti-CD62 on a flow cytometer. The level of sP-selectin in serum was measured by the ELISA (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay) method. All markers were re-analyzed after 6 months of treatment with simvastatin (20 mg/day). Results Hyperlipidemic patients presented a significantly higher percentage of CD62+ platelets and higher reactivity to thrombin compared to control subjects. After simvastatin therapy hyperlipidemic patients showed a reduction of the percentage of resting CD62P(+) platelets (p = 0.005) and a reduction of expression and percentage of CD62P(+) platelets after activation by thrombin (median p < 0.05; percentage: p = 0.001). A decrease of sP-selectin levels (p = 0.001) and percentage of PDMPs (p < 0.05) in this group was also observed. Conclusions HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor therapy in stroke patients with hyperlipidemia may be useful not only due to the lipid-lowering effect but also because of a significant role in reduction of platelet activation and reactivity. PMID:25861297

  11. The Immunosuppressive Activity of Amniotic Membrane Mesenchymal Stem Cells on T Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Alikarami, Fatemeh; Yari, Fatemeh; Amirizadeh, Naser; Nikougoftar, Mahin; Jalili, Mohammad Ali

    2015-01-01

    Background: Mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSCs) are isolated from different sources like placenta. The placenta and its membranes like Amniotic Membrane (AM) are readily available and easy to work with. There is only limited knowledge on the immunomodulatory properties of human Amniotic Membrane-derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells (hAM-MSCs). The aim of this study was to survey the suppressive activity of hAM-MSCs on T lymphocytes in vitro. Methods: Human AMs were obtained after caesarean section births from healthy women. After enzymatic digestion, cells were cultured and hAM-MSCs were obtained. In addition, human T lymphocytes were isolated and co-cultured with hAM-MSCs for 72 hr in the presence or absence of phytohemagglutinin (PHA). Subsequently, proliferation of T cells was analyzed using BrdU and subsequently flow cytometry technique. Besides, the production of IL-4 and IFN-γ was examined by ELISA method. Additionally, the expression of activation markers (CD38, HLA-DR) was studied on T lymphocytes by flow cytometry technique. Results: It was revealed that hAM-MSCs could significantly suppress the proliferation of T lymphocytes (p≤0.01) and significantly decrease the production of IFN-γ by T cells (p<0.05). hAM-MSCs also down regulated the expression of activation markers on the surface of T lymphocytes, CD38 and HLA-DR. The difference was significant between the case and control samples (p<0.05). All the comparisons were carried out between the case (Tcell+PHA+hAM-MSCs) and control (Tcell+PHA) groups. Conclusion: In conclusion, hAM-MSCs could inhibit the (mitogen-activated) T cells even in the absence of blood monocytes. Besides, hAM-MSCs-mediated inhibition of T lymphocytes was combined with down regulation of activation markers. PMID:26306147

  12. Prospective active marker motion correction improves statistical power in BOLD fMRI

    PubMed Central

    Ooi, Melvyn B.; Goldman, Robin I.; Krueger, Sascha; Thomas, William J.; Sajda, Paul; Brown, Truman R.

    2013-01-01

    Group level statistical maps of blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) signals acquired using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) have become a basic measurement for much of systems, cognitive and social neuroscience. A challenge in making inferences from these statistical maps is the noise and potential confounds that arise from the head motion that occurs within and between acquisition volumes. This motion results in the scan plane being misaligned during acquisition, ultimately leading to reduced statistical power when maps are constructed at the group level. In most cases, an attempt is made to correct for this motion through the use of retrospective analysis methods. In this paper, we use a prospective active marker motion correction (PRAMMO) system that uses radio frequency markers for real-time tracking of motion, enabling on-line slice plane correction. We show that the statistical power of the activation maps is substantially increased using PRAMMO compared to conventional retrospective correction. Analysis of our results indicates that the PRAMMO acquisition reduces the variance without decreasing the signal component of the BOLD (beta). Using PRAMMO could thus improve the overall statistical power of fMRI based BOLD measurements, leading to stronger inferences of the nature of processing in the human brain. PMID:23220430

  13. Changes in urinary amino acids excretion in relationship with muscle activity markers over a professional cycling stage race: in search of fatigue markers.

    PubMed

    Corsetti, Roberto; Barassi, Alessandra; Perego, Silvia; Sansoni, Veronica; Rossi, Alessandra; Damele, Clara Anna Linda; Melzi D'Eril, Gianlodovico; Banfi, Giuseppe; Lombardi, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the relationship between metabolic effort, muscular damage/activity indices, and urinary amino acids profile over the course of a strenuous prolonged endurance activity, as a cycling stage race is, in order to identify possible fatigue markers. Nine professional cyclists belonging to a single team, competing in the Giro d'Italia cycling stage race, were anthropometrically characterized and sampled for blood and urine the day before the race started, and on days 12 and 23 of the race. Diet was kept the same over the race, and power output and energy expenditure were recorded. Sera were assayed for muscle markers (lactate dehydrogenase, aspartate aminotransferase, and creatine kinase activities, and blood urea nitrogen), and creatinine, all corrected for plasma volume changes. Urines were profiled for amino acid concentrations, normalized on creatinine excretion. Renal function, in terms of glomerular filtration rate, was monitored by MDRD equation corrected on body surface area. Creatine kinase activity and blood urea were increased during the race as did serum creatinine while kidney function remained stable. Among the amino acids, taurine, glycine, cysteine, leucine, carnosine, 1-methyl histidine, and 3-methyl histidine showed a net decreased, while homocysteine was increased. Taurine and the dipeptide carnosine (β-alanyl-L-histidine) were significantly correlated with the muscle activity markers and the indices of effort. In conclusion, the metabolic profile is modified strikingly due to the effort. Urinary taurine and carnosine seem useful tools to evaluate the muscle damage and possibly the fatigue status on a long-term basis. PMID:26306846

  14. Central and peripheral markers of neurodegeneration and monocyte activation in HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders.

    PubMed

    McGuire, Jennifer L; Gill, Alexander J; Douglas, Steven D; Kolson, Dennis L

    2015-08-01

    HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) affect up to 50 % of HIV-infected adults, independently predict HIV morbidity/mortality, and are associated with neuronal damage and monocyte activation. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) neurofilament subunits (NFL, pNFH) are sensitive surrogate markers of neuronal damage in several neurodegenerative diseases. In HIV, CSF NFL is elevated in individuals with and without cognitive impairment, suggesting early/persistent neuronal injury during HIV infection. Although individuals with severe cognitive impairment (HIV-associated dementia (HAD)) express higher CSF NFL levels than cognitively normal HIV-infected individuals, the relationships between severity of cognitive impairment, monocyte activation, neurofilament expression, and systemic infection are unclear. We performed a retrospective cross-sectional study of 48 HIV-infected adults with varying levels of cognitive impairment, not receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART), enrolled in the CNS Anti-Retroviral Therapy Effects Research (CHARTER) study. We quantified NFL, pNFH, and monocyte activation markers (sCD14/sCD163) in paired CSF/plasma samples. By examining subjects off ART, these correlations are not confounded by possible effects of ART on inflammation and neurodegeneration. We found that CSF NFL levels were elevated in individuals with HAD compared to cognitively normal or mildly impaired individuals with CD4+ T-lymphocyte nadirs ≤200. In addition, CSF NFL levels were significantly positively correlated to plasma HIV-1 RNA viral load and negatively correlated to plasma CD4+ T-lymphocyte count, suggesting a link between neuronal injury and systemic HIV infection. Finally, CSF NFL was significantly positively correlated with CSF pNFH, sCD163, and sCD14, demonstrating that monocyte activation within the CNS compartment is directly associated with neuronal injury at all stages of HAND. PMID:25776526

  15. Long-term Exposure to Air Pollution and Markers of Inflammation, Coagulation, and Endothelial Activation

    PubMed Central

    Hajat, Anjum; Allison, Matthew; Diez-Roux, Ana V.; Jenny, Nancy Swords; Jorgensen, Neal W.; Szpiro, Adam A.; Vedal, Sverre; Kaufman, Joel D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Air pollution is associated with cardiovascular disease, and systemic inflammation may mediate this effect. We assessed associations between long- and short-term concentrations of air pollution and markers of inflammation, coagulation, and endothelial activation. Methods We studied participants from the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis from 2000 to 2012 with repeat measures of serum C-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin-6 (IL-6), fibrinogen, D-dimer, soluble E-selectin, and soluble Intercellular Adhesion Molecule-1. Annual average concentrations of ambient fine particulate matter (PM2.5), individual-level ambient PM2.5 (integrating indoor concentrations and time–location data), oxides of nitrogen (NOx), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), and black carbon were evaluated. Short-term concentrations of PM2.5 reflected the day of blood draw, day prior, and averages of prior 2-, 3-, 4-, and 5-day periods. Random-effects models were used for long-term exposures and fixed effects for short-term exposures. The sample size was between 9,000 and 10,000 observations for CRP, IL-6, fibrinogen, and D-dimer; approximately 2,100 for E-selectin; and 3,300 for soluble Intercellular Adhesion Molecule-1. Results After controlling for confounders, 5 µg/m3 increase in long-term ambient PM2.5 was associated with 6% higher IL-6 (95% confidence interval = 2%, 9%), and 40 parts per billion increase in long-term NOx was associated with 7% (95% confidence interval = 2%, 13%) higher level of D-dimer. PM2.5 measured at day of blood draw was associated with CRP, fibrinogen, and E-selectin. There were no other positive associations between blood markers and short- or long-term air pollution. Conclusions These data are consistent with the hypothesis that long-term exposure to air pollution is related to some markers of inflammation and fibrinolysis. PMID:25710246

  16. CD4+ and CD8+ T Cell Activation Are Associated with HIV DNA in Resting CD4+ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cockerham, Leslie R.; Siliciano, Janet D.; Sinclair, Elizabeth; O'Doherty, Una; Palmer, Sarah; Yukl, Steven A.; Strain, Matt C.; Chomont, Nicolas; Hecht, Frederick M.; Siliciano, Robert F.; Richman, Douglas D.; Deeks, Steven G.

    2014-01-01

    The association between the host immune environment and the size of the HIV reservoir during effective antiretroviral therapy is not clear. Progress has also been limited by the lack of a well-accepted assay for quantifying HIV during therapy. We examined the association between multiple measurements of HIV and T cell activation (as defined by markers including CD38, HLA-DR, CCR5 and PD-1) in 30 antiretroviral-treated HIV-infected adults. We found a consistent association between the frequency of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells expressing HLA-DR and the frequency of resting CD4+ T cells containing HIV DNA. This study highlights the need to further examine this relationship and to better characterize the biology of markers commonly used in HIV studies. These results may also have implications for reactivation strategies. PMID:25340755

  17. High IL-23 level is a marker of disease activity in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Abu Al Fadl, Esam M; Fattouh, Mona; Allam, Ahmed A

    2013-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic autoimmune systemic disorder characterized by inflammatory responses mainly affecting the synovial joints. Interleukin-23 (IL-23) is a heterodimeric pro-inflammatory cytokine secreted by activated dendritic cells and activated macrophages. IL-23 is the key cytokine controlling inflammation in peripheral tissues leading to the development of autoimmune diseases. The objective of our study was to determine the relationship between the IL-23 level and disease activity in RA patients. Sixty RA patients were included in the study with mean age of 40 years; they included 44 (73.3 %) females and 16 males (26.7 %). The clinical parameters of disease activity were determined, including the 28-joint disease activity score (DAS28), serum levels of C-reactive protein (CRP), Anti-citrullinated peptide antibody (ACPA), rheumatoid factor (RF), and TNF-alpha and the degree of bony erosions based on X-rays. Patients were subdivided into active disease group (n = 30) with DAS28 score higher than 5.1 (Group I); and remission group (n = 30) with DAS28 score less than 2.6 (Group II). Thirty healthy individuals in the same age group of RA patients including 22 (73.3%) females and 8 males (26.7%) were randomly selected as the control group (Group III). The levels of IL-23 were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and the correlations between the serum levels of IL-23 and disease activity parameters of patients with RA were determined. Serum levels of IL-23 were significantly higher in RA patients during active stage of the disease in comparison to the patients in remission and the control group. There was a significant positive correlation between serum IL-23 levels in RA patients and individual disease activity parameters. It is concluded that elevated serum IL-23 level may be a useful marker to detect active RA and disease progression in patients with RA. PMID:24617049

  18. Elevated levels of invariant natural killer T-cell and natural killer cell activation correlate with disease progression in HIV-1 and HIV-2 infections

    PubMed Central

    Bächle, Susanna M.; Malone, David F.G.; Buggert, Marcus; Karlsson, Annika C.; Isberg, Per-Erik; Biague, Antonio J.; Norrgren, Hans; Medstrand, Patrik; Moll, Markus; Sandberg, Johan K.; Jansson, Marianne

    2016-01-01

    Objective: In this study, we aimed to investigate the frequency and activation of invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells and natural killer (NK) cells among HIV-1, HIV-2, or dually HIV-1/HIV-2 (HIV-D)-infected individuals, in relation to markers of disease progression. Design: Whole blood samples were collected from treatment-naive HIV-1 (n = 23), HIV-2 (n = 34), and HIV-D (n = 11) infected individuals, as well as HIV-seronegative controls (n = 25), belonging to an occupational cohort in Guinea-Bissau. Methods: Frequencies and activation levels of iNKT and NK cell subsets were analysed using multicolour flow cytometry, and results were related to HIV-status, CD4+ T-cell levels, viral load, and T-cell activation. Results: HIV-1, HIV-D, and viremic HIV-2 individuals had lower numbers of CD4+ iNKT cells in circulation compared with seronegative controls. Numbers of CD56bright NK cells were also reduced in HIV-infected individuals as compared with control study participants. Notably, iNKT cell and NK cell activation levels, assessed by CD38 expression, were increased in HIV-1 and HIV-2 single, as well as dual, infections. HIV-2 viremia was associated with elevated activation levels in CD4+ iNKT cells, CD56bright, and CD56dim NK cells, as compared with aviremic HIV-2 infection. Additionally, disease markers such as CD4+ T-cell percentages, viral load, and CD4+ T-cell activation were associated with CD38 expression levels of both iNKT and NK cells, which activation levels also correlated with each other. Conclusion: Our data indicate that elevated levels of iNKT-cell and NK-cell activation are associated with viremia and disease progression markers in both HIV-1 and HIV-2 infections. PMID:27163705

  19. Evaluation of Potential Clinical Surrogate Markers of a Trauma Induced Alteration of Clotting Factor Activities

    PubMed Central

    Payas, Arzu; Schoeneberg, Carsten; Wegner, Alexander; Kauther, Max Daniel; Lendemans, Sven

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this study was to identify routinely available clinical surrogate markers for potential clotting factor alterations following multiple trauma. Methods. In 68 patients admitted directly from the scene of the accident, all soluble clotting factors were analyzed and clinical data was collected prospectively. Ten healthy subjects served as control group. Results. Patients showed reduced activities of clotting factors II, V, VII, and X and calcium levels (all P < 0.0001 to 0.01). Levels of hemoglobin and base deficit correlated moderately to highly with the activities of a number of clotting factors. Nonsurvivors and patients who needed preclinical intubation or hemostatic therapy showed significantly reduced factor activities at admission. In contrast, factor VIII activity was markedly elevated after injury in general (P < 0.0001), but reduced in nonsurvivors (P < 0.05). Conclusions. Multiple trauma causes an early reduction of the activities of nearly all soluble clotting factors in general. Initial hemoglobin and, with certain qualifications, base deficit levels demonstrated a potential value in detecting those underlying clotting factor deficiencies. Nevertheless, their role as triggers of a hemostatic therapy as well as the observed response of factor VIII to multiple trauma and also its potential prognostic value needs further evaluation. PMID:27433474

  20. Characterizing proton-activated materials to develop PET-mediated proton range verification markers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Jongmin; Ibbott, Geoffrey S.; Kerr, Matthew D.; Amos, Richard A.; Stingo, Francesco C.; Marom, Edith M.; Truong, Mylene T.; Palacio, Diana M.; Betancourt, Sonia L.; Erasmus, Jeremy J.; DeGroot, Patricia M.; Carter, Brett W.; Gladish, Gregory W.; Sabloff, Bradley S.; Benveniste, Marcelo F.; Godoy, Myrna C.; Patil, Shekhar; Sorensen, James; Mawlawi, Osama R.

    2016-06-01

    Conventional proton beam range verification using positron emission tomography (PET) relies on tissue activation alone and therefore requires particle therapy PET whose installation can represent a large financial burden for many centers. Previously, we showed the feasibility of developing patient implantable markers using high proton cross-section materials (18O, Cu, and 68Zn) for in vivo proton range verification using conventional PET scanners. In this technical note, we characterize those materials to test their usability in more clinically relevant conditions. Two phantoms made of low-density balsa wood (~0.1 g cm‑3) and beef (~1.0 g cm‑3) were embedded with Cu or 68Zn foils of several volumes (10–50 mm3). The metal foils were positioned at several depths in the dose fall-off region, which had been determined from our previous study. The phantoms were then irradiated with different proton doses (1–5 Gy). After irradiation, the phantoms with the embedded foils were moved to a diagnostic PET scanner and imaged. The acquired data were reconstructed with 20–40 min of scan time using various delay times (30–150 min) to determine the maximum contrast-to-noise ratio. The resultant PET/computed tomography (CT) fusion images of the activated foils were then examined and the foils’ PET signal strength/visibility was scored on a 5 point scale by 13 radiologists experienced in nuclear medicine. For both phantoms, the visibility of activated foils increased in proportion to the foil volume, dose, and PET scan time. A linear model was constructed with visibility scores as the response variable and all other factors (marker material, phantom material, dose, and PET scan time) as covariates. Using the linear model, volumes of foils that provided adequate visibility (score 3) were determined for each dose and PET scan time. The foil volumes that were determined will be used as a guideline in developing practical implantable markers.

  1. Characterizing proton-activated materials to develop PET-mediated proton range verification markers.

    PubMed

    Cho, Jongmin; Ibbott, Geoffrey S; Kerr, Matthew D; Amos, Richard A; Stingo, Francesco C; Marom, Edith M; Truong, Mylene T; Palacio, Diana M; Betancourt, Sonia L; Erasmus, Jeremy J; DeGroot, Patricia M; Carter, Brett W; Gladish, Gregory W; Sabloff, Bradley S; Benveniste, Marcelo F; Godoy, Myrna C; Patil, Shekhar; Sorensen, James; Mawlawi, Osama R

    2016-06-01

    Conventional proton beam range verification using positron emission tomography (PET) relies on tissue activation alone and therefore requires particle therapy PET whose installation can represent a large financial burden for many centers. Previously, we showed the feasibility of developing patient implantable markers using high proton cross-section materials ((18)O, Cu, and (68)Zn) for in vivo proton range verification using conventional PET scanners. In this technical note, we characterize those materials to test their usability in more clinically relevant conditions. Two phantoms made of low-density balsa wood (~0.1 g cm(-3)) and beef (~1.0 g cm(-3)) were embedded with Cu or (68)Zn foils of several volumes (10-50 mm(3)). The metal foils were positioned at several depths in the dose fall-off region, which had been determined from our previous study. The phantoms were then irradiated with different proton doses (1-5 Gy). After irradiation, the phantoms with the embedded foils were moved to a diagnostic PET scanner and imaged. The acquired data were reconstructed with 20-40 min of scan time using various delay times (30-150 min) to determine the maximum contrast-to-noise ratio. The resultant PET/computed tomography (CT) fusion images of the activated foils were then examined and the foils' PET signal strength/visibility was scored on a 5 point scale by 13 radiologists experienced in nuclear medicine. For both phantoms, the visibility of activated foils increased in proportion to the foil volume, dose, and PET scan time. A linear model was constructed with visibility scores as the response variable and all other factors (marker material, phantom material, dose, and PET scan time) as covariates. Using the linear model, volumes of foils that provided adequate visibility (score 3) were determined for each dose and PET scan time. The foil volumes that were determined will be used as a guideline in developing practical implantable markers. PMID:27203621

  2. Evaluation of ornithine decarboxylase activity as a marker for tumor growth rate in malignant tumors.

    PubMed

    Westin, T; Edström, S; Lundholm, K; Gustafsson, B

    1991-10-01

    Ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) is a rate-limiting enzyme in the synthesis of polyamines. Polyamines regulate DNA synthesis by a mechanism that is not fully understood. High levels of polyamines and ODC activity are associated with rapid cell growth, particularly in tumor tissues. The aim of this study was to determine whether ODC activity as a marker for rapid alterations in tumor growth could be used to investigate whether nutritional support in cancer patients stimulates tumor cell proliferation. Weight-losing head and neck cancer patients and tumor-bearing mice (MCG 101, C57/BL) were studied during different feeding regimens. The ODC activity in tumor tissue was investigated in relation to the following variables: (1) histopathologic differentiation; (2) DNA content; and (3) bromodeoxyuridine (BrdUrd) incorporation into DNA. After the animals were starved for 24 hours, a significant reduction of tumor growth was demonstrated in the experimental tumor along with a reduction of ODC activity, an accumulation of cells in the G0G1 phase, and a reduction of cells incorporating BrdUrd into DNA. Refeeding after 24 hours generated a response by all variables. Tumor biopsy specimens from patients with head and neck cancer malignancies demonstrated aneuploidy in the cells of 70% of the patients. High ODC activity in tumor tissue was demonstrated mainly among poorly differentiated tumors, and ODC activity was correlated with the compartment size of aneuploidic cells in the tumor. High ODC activity indicated a poor short-term survival (1 year). It was concluded that experimental tumor growth is highly dependent on host feeding. However, there was no evidence supporting the claim that nutritional support to cancer patients stimulates tumor cell proliferation. Determination of ODC activity may be used to monitor rapid changes in DNA synthesis and may have prognostic significance for survival. PMID:1951878

  3. Effect of antiviral treatment of chronic hepatitis C on the frequency of regulatory T cells, T-cell activation, and serum levels of TGF-beta.

    PubMed

    Chalupa, Pavel; Davidová, Alžběta; Beran, Ondřej; Arientová, Simona; Boštík, Pavel; Kapla, Jaroslav; Kondělková, Kateřina; Plíšek, Stanislav; Holub, Michal

    2016-08-01

    The aim was to analyze T-regulatory cells (Tregs), activated CD8(+) T cells, and transforming growth factor-beta (TGF)-β in hepatitis C patients. We enrolled 31 patients with chronic genotype 1 hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, 30 seropositive persons with spontaneous HCV elimination, and 23 healthy volunteers. The patients were examined at the beginning of the interferon-alpha (IFN-α)-based therapy (baseline) and at weeks 4 (W4) and 12 (W12) of the therapy. The percentage of Tregs and the expression of activation markers CD38 and HLA-DR on CD8(+) T cells were analyzed in the peripheral blood by flow cytometry. Serum levels of TGF-β were measured in a multiplex assay using flow cytometry. The percentage of Tregs in patients was higher than in controls and seropositive persons. Similarly, the percentage of CD8(+) T cells expressing CD38 and HLA-DR was higher in patients compared with controls and seropositive persons. Chronic HCV infection is associated with elevated circulating Tregs and activated CD8(+) T cells. During IFN-α-based therapy these cells gradually increase, whereas TGF-β serum levels decrease. PMID:27307383

  4. Antimicrobial Activity of Euplotin C, the Sesquiterpene Taxonomic Marker from the Marine Ciliate Euplotes crassus

    PubMed Central

    Savoia, Dianella; Avanzini, Claudio; Allice, Tiziano; Callone, Emanuela; Guella, Graziano; Dini, Fernando

    2004-01-01

    Strains of the marine ciliate protist Euplotes crassus produce exclusive terpenoids called euplotins that play an ecological role. Among these derivatives, euplotin C is the main of four secondary metabolites isolated from cultures of this protozoon and represents the sesquiterpene taxonomic marker from E. crassus. Because different terpenoid metabolites of plant origin showed a certain antimicrobial activity, we assessed the compound euplotin C, purified by high-pressure liquid chromatography and solubilized in two solubility enhancers, against the protozoa Leishmania major and Leishmani infantum, the fungus Candida albicans, and nine strains of gram-positive and gram-negative microorganisms. An activity of euplotin C against Leishmania promastigotes was demonstrated (50% lethal doses were 4.6 or 8.1 μg/ml depending on the agent used to solubilize the compound), while the effect was less evident on Candida and nearly absent on bacteria. A nonsignificant cytotoxicity (50% lethal dose, >200 μg/ml) against the J774 cell line was observed. A leishmanicidal activity was also shown by the living, euplotin-producing cells of E. crassus cultured together with promastigotes; this activity increased with time from 10 min to 6 h of incubation. This study provides an initial rationale for the evaluation of euplotin C and other similar natural products as alternative or possibly synergistic compounds for current antiprotozoon chemotherapeutics. PMID:15388442

  5. Antimicrobial activity of euplotin C, the sesquiterpene taxonomic marker from the marine ciliate Euplotes crassus.

    PubMed

    Savoia, Dianella; Avanzini, Claudio; Allice, Tiziano; Callone, Emanuela; Guella, Graziano; Dini, Fernando

    2004-10-01

    Strains of the marine ciliate protist Euplotes crassus produce exclusive terpenoids called euplotins that play an ecological role. Among these derivatives, euplotin C is the main of four secondary metabolites isolated from cultures of this protozoon and represents the sesquiterpene taxonomic marker from E. crassus. Because different terpenoid metabolites of plant origin showed a certain antimicrobial activity, we assessed the compound euplotin C, purified by high-pressure liquid chromatography and solubilized in two solubility enhancers, against the protozoa Leishmania major and Leishmani infantum, the fungus Candida albicans, and nine strains of gram-positive and gram-negative microorganisms. An activity of euplotin C against Leishmania promastigotes was demonstrated (50% lethal doses were 4.6 or 8.1 microg/ml depending on the agent used to solubilize the compound), while the effect was less evident on Candida and nearly absent on bacteria. A nonsignificant cytotoxicity (50% lethal dose, >200 microg/ml) against the J774 cell line was observed. A leishmanicidal activity was also shown by the living, euplotin-producing cells of E. crassus cultured together with promastigotes; this activity increased with time from 10 min to 6 h of incubation. This study provides an initial rationale for the evaluation of euplotin C and other similar natural products as alternative or possibly synergistic compounds for current antiprotozoon chemotherapeutics. PMID:15388442

  6. Interferon regulatory factor-1 binds c-Cbl, enhances mitogen activated protein kinase signaling and promotes retinoic acid-induced differentiation of HL-60 human myelo-monoblastic leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Miaoqing; Bunaciu, Rodica P.; Congleton, Johanna; Jensen, Holly A.; Sayam, Lavanya G.; Varner, Jeffrey D.; Yen, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    All-trans retinoic acid (RA) and interferons (IFNs) have efficacy in treating certain leukemias and lymphomas, respectively, motivating interest in their mechanism of action to improve therapy. Both RA and IFNs induce interferon regulatory factor-1 (IRF-1). We find that in HL-60 myeloblastic leukemia cells which undergo mitogen activated protien kinase (MAPK)-dependent myeloid differentiation in response to RA, IRF-1 propels differentiation. RA induces MAPK-dependent expression of IRF-1. IRF-1 binds c-Cbl, a MAPK related adaptor. Ectopic IRF-1 expression causes CD38 expression and activation of the Raf/MEK/ERK axis, and enhances RA-induced differentiation by augmenting CD38, CD11b, respiratory burst and G0 arrest. Ectopic IRF-1 expression also decreases the activity of aldehyde dehydrogenase 1, a stem cell marker, and enhances RA-induced ALDH1 down-regulation. Interestingly, expression of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), which is RA-induced and known to down-regulate Oct4 and drive RA-induced differentiation, also enhances IRF-1 expression. The data are consistent with a model whereby IRF-1 acts downstream of RA and AhR to enhance Raf/MEK/ERK activation and propel differentiation. PMID:21740303

  7. The Role of Power Doppler Ultrasonography as Disease Activity Marker in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Bhasin, Shaloo; Cheung, Peter P.

    2015-01-01

    Structural damage in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) occurs early if inflammation is not treated promptly. Treatment targeted to reduce inflammation, in particular, that of synovial inflammation in the joints (synovitis), has been recommended as standard treat-to-target recommendations by rheumatologists. The goal is to achieve disease remission (i.e., no disease activity). Several accepted remission criteria have not always equated to the complete absence of true inflammation. Over the last decade, musculoskeletal ultrasonography has been demonstrated to detect subclinical synovitis not appreciated by routine clinical or laboratory assessments, with the Power Doppler modality allowing clinicians to more readily appreciate true inflammation. Thus, targeting therapy to Power Doppler activity may provide superior outcomes compared with treating to clinical targets alone, making it an attractive marker of disease activity in RA. However, more validation on its true benefits such as its benefits to patients in regard to patient related outcomes and issues with standardized training in acquisition and interpretation of power Doppler findings are required. PMID:26063952

  8. Olfactory marker protein (OMP) gene deletion causes altered physiological activity of olfactory sensory neurons.

    PubMed Central

    Buiakova, O I; Baker, H; Scott, J W; Farbman, A; Kream, R; Grillo, M; Franzen, L; Richman, M; Davis, L M; Abbondanzo, S; Stewart, C L; Margolis, F L

    1996-01-01

    Olfactory marker protein (OMP) is an abundant, phylogentically conserved, cytoplasmic protein of unknown function expressed almost exclusively in mature olfactory sensory neurons. To address its function, we generated OMP-deficient mice by gene targeting in embryonic stem cells. We report that these OMP-null mice are compromised in their ability to respond to odor stimull, providing insight to OMP function. The maximal electroolfactogram response of the olfactory neuroepithelium to several odorants was 20-40% smaller in the mutants compared with controls. In addition, the onset and recovery kinetics following isoamyl acetate stimulation are prolonged in the null mice. Furthermore, the ability of the mutants to respond to the second odor pulse of a pair is impaired, over a range of concentrations, compared with controls. These results imply that neural activity directed toward the olfactory bulb is also reduced. The bulbar phenotype observed in the OMP-null mouse is consistent with this hypothesis. Bulbar activity of tyrosine hydroxylase, the rate limiting enzyme of catecholamine biosynthesis, and content of the neuropeptide cholecystokinin are reduced by 65% and 50%, respectively. This similarity to postsynaptic changes in gene expression induced by peripheral olfactory deafferentation or naris blockade confirms that functional neural activity is reduced in both the olfactory neuroepithelium and the olfactory nerve projection to the bulb in the OMP-null mouse. These observations provide strong support for the conclusion that OMP is a novel modulatory component of the odor detection/signal transduction cascade. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:8790421

  9. Olfactory marker protein (OMP) gene deletion causes altered physiological activity of olfactory sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Buiakova, O I; Baker, H; Scott, J W; Farbman, A; Kream, R; Grillo, M; Franzen, L; Richman, M; Davis, L M; Abbondanzo, S; Stewart, C L; Margolis, F L

    1996-09-01

    Olfactory marker protein (OMP) is an abundant, phylogentically conserved, cytoplasmic protein of unknown function expressed almost exclusively in mature olfactory sensory neurons. To address its function, we generated OMP-deficient mice by gene targeting in embryonic stem cells. We report that these OMP-null mice are compromised in their ability to respond to odor stimull, providing insight to OMP function. The maximal electroolfactogram response of the olfactory neuroepithelium to several odorants was 20-40% smaller in the mutants compared with controls. In addition, the onset and recovery kinetics following isoamyl acetate stimulation are prolonged in the null mice. Furthermore, the ability of the mutants to respond to the second odor pulse of a pair is impaired, over a range of concentrations, compared with controls. These results imply that neural activity directed toward the olfactory bulb is also reduced. The bulbar phenotype observed in the OMP-null mouse is consistent with this hypothesis. Bulbar activity of tyrosine hydroxylase, the rate limiting enzyme of catecholamine biosynthesis, and content of the neuropeptide cholecystokinin are reduced by 65% and 50%, respectively. This similarity to postsynaptic changes in gene expression induced by peripheral olfactory deafferentation or naris blockade confirms that functional neural activity is reduced in both the olfactory neuroepithelium and the olfactory nerve projection to the bulb in the OMP-null mouse. These observations provide strong support for the conclusion that OMP is a novel modulatory component of the odor detection/signal transduction cascade. PMID:8790421

  10. Expression of markers of activity in cultured human osteoblasts: effects of interleukin-4 and interleukin-13.

    PubMed

    Silfverswärd, Carl-Johan; Penno, Hendrik; Frost, Anders; Nilsson, Olle; Ljunggren, Osten

    2010-09-01

    Cytokines regulate proliferation, differentiation and activation of osteoblasts. Interleukin-4 (IL-4) and interleukin-13 (IL-13) takes part in this regulation by inhibiting proliferation and by enhancement of interleukin-6 (IL-6) formation in cultured human osteoblasts (hOBs). In the present study we have investigated the effects of IL-4 and IL-13 on markers of osteoblastic activity in isolated hOBs. Treatment with either IL-4 or IL-13 (1-100 pM) stimulated the formation of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) dose-dependently, detected by enzyme reaction and histochemistry. IL-4 and IL-13 also induced an increase in the secretion of procollagen type I carboxypeptide (PICP) from cultured hOBs, measured by RIA. Osteocalcin secretion measured by ELISA-technique was unaffected. The rate of mineralization, assessed by von Kossa and Alizarin Red staining, was clearly enhanced in hOBs stimulated by IL-4 or IL-13. In conclusion IL-4 and IL-13 exert multiple effects on osteoblast activity in cultured hOBs. Stimulation of ALP secretion together with enhanced collagen secretion and mineralization suggests that IL-4 and IL-13 also have the capacity to maintain hOBs in a differentiated, productive phase. PMID:20509757

  11. Neuronal activity topography parameters as a marker for differentiating vascular cognitive impairment in carotid stenosis.

    PubMed

    Shibata, Takashi; Musha, Toshimitu; Kubo, Michiya; Horie, Yukio; Asahi, Takashi; Kuwayama, Naoya; Kuroda, Satoshi; Hayashi, Karin; Kobayashi, Yohei; Tanaka, Mieko; Matsuzaki, Haruyasu; Asada, Takashi

    2014-10-01

    Previously, we reported on the differentiation between patients with Alzheimer disease and normal controls using a quantitative electroencephalographic technique called neuronal activity topography (NAT). In this technique, cerebral neuronal activities are characterized by the signal intensity and coherence (sNAT and vNAT, respectively). In the present study, we examined 47 patients with vascular cognitive impairment in carotid stenosis and 52 normal controls. All subjects underwent electroencephalography in a resting state with closed eyes for 5 minutes. Electroencephalographic markers of the differential likelihood, that is, the sensitivity-versus-specificity characteristics, sL(x:VCI-NLc) and vL(x:VCI-NLc), were assessed with neuronal activity topography and were compared between the 2 groups. sL(x:VCI-NLc) and vL(x:VCI-NLc) crossed each other at a cutoff value of the differential likelihood. Separation of the patients and controls was made with a sensitivity of 92% and 88%, as well as a false-positive rate of 8% and 12% for sL(x:VCI-NLc) and vL(x:VCI-NLc), respectively. Using sNAT, we accurately differentiated 92% patients with vascular cognitive impairment. We recommend that sNAT, rather than vNAT, should be used in detecting vascular cognitive impaired patients. PMID:25174560

  12. LPL is the strongest prognostic factor in a comparative analysis of RNA-based markers in early chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Kaderi, Mohd Arifin; Kanduri, Meena; Buhl, Anne Mette; Sevov, Marie; Cahill, Nicola; Gunnarsson, Rebeqa; Jansson, Mattias; Smedby, Karin Ekström; Hjalgrim, Henrik; Jurlander, Jesper; Juliusson, Gunnar; Mansouri, Larry; Rosenquist, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Background The expression levels of LPL, ZAP70, TCL1A, CLLU1 and MCL1 have recently been proposed as prognostic factors in chronic lymphocytic leukemia. However, few studies have systematically compared these different RNA-based markers. Design and Methods Using real-time quantitative PCR, we measured the mRNA expression levels of these genes in unsorted samples from 252 newly diagnosed chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients and correlated our data with established prognostic markers (for example Binet stage, CD38, IGHV gene mutational status and genomic aberrations) and clinical outcome. Results High expression levels of all RNA-based markers, except MCL1, predicted shorter overall survival and time to treatment, with LPL being the most significant. In multivariate analysis including the RNA-based markers, LPL expression was the only independent prognostic marker for overall survival and time to treatment. When studying LPL expression and the established markers, LPL expression retained its independent prognostic strength for overall survival. All of the RNA-based markers, albeit with varying ability, added prognostic information to established markers, with LPL expression giving the most significant results. Notably, high LPL expression predicted a worse outcome in good-prognosis subgroups, such as patients with mutated IGHV genes, Binet stage A, CD38 negativity or favorable cytogenetics. In particular, the combination of LPL expression and CD38 could further stratify Binet stage A patients. Conclusions LPL expression is the strongest RNA-based prognostic marker in chronic lymphocytic leukemia that could potentially be applied to predict outcome in the clinical setting, particularly in the large group of patients with favorable prognosis. PMID:21508119

  13. Blood acylpeptide hydrolase activity is a sensitive marker for exposure to some organophosphate toxicants.

    PubMed

    Quistad, Gary B; Klintenberg, Rebecka; Casida, John E

    2005-08-01

    Acylpeptide hydrolase (APH) unblocks N-acetyl peptides. It is a major serine hydrolase in rat blood, brain, and liver detected by derivatization with (3)H-diisopropyl fluorophosphate (DFP) or a biotinylated fluorophosphonate. Although APH does not appear to be a primary target of acute poisoning by organophosphorus (OP) compounds, the inhibitor specificity of this secondary target is largely unknown. This study fills the gap and emphasizes blood APH as a potential marker of OP exposure. The most potent in vitro inhibitors for human erythrocyte and mouse brain APH are DFP (IC(50) 11-17 nM), chlorpyrifos oxon (IC(50) 21-71 nM), dichlorvos (IC(50) 230-560 nM), naled (IC(50) 370-870 nM), and their analogs with modified alkyl substituents. (3)H-diisopropyl fluorophosphate is a potent inhibitor of mouse blood and brain APH in vivo (ED(50) 0.09-0.2 mg/kg and 0.02-0.03 mg/l for ip and vapor exposure, respectively). Mouse blood and brain APH and blood butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) are of similar sensitivity to DFP in vitro and in vivo (ip and vapor exposure), but APH inhibition is much more persistent in vivo (still >80% inhibition after 4 days). The inhibitory potency of OP pesticides in vivo in mice varies from APH selective (dichlorvos, naled, and trichlorfon), to APH and BChE selective (profenofos and tribufos), to ChE selective or nonselective (many commercial insecticides). Sarin administered ip at a lethal dose to guinea pigs inhibits blood acetylcholinesterase and BChE completely but erythrocyte APH only partially. Blood APH activity is therefore a sensitive marker for exposure to some but not all OP pesticides and chemical warfare agents. PMID:15888665

  14. Specific marker of feigned memory impairment: The activation of left superior frontal gyrus.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zi-Xiang; Xue, Li; Liang, Chun-Yu; Wang, Li-Li; Mei, Wei; Zhang, Qiang; Zhao, Hu

    2015-11-01

    Faking memory impairment means normal people complain lots of memory problems without organic damage in forensic assessments. Using alternative forced-choice paradigm, containing digital or autobiographical information, previous neuroimaging studies have indicated that faking memory impairment could cause the activation in the prefrontal and parietal regions, and might involve a fronto-parietal-subcortical circuit. However, it is still unclear whether different memory types have influence on faking or not. Since different memory types, such as long-term memory (LTM) and short-term memory (STM), were found supported by different brain areas, we hypothesized that feigned STM or LTM impairment had distinct neural activation mapping. Besides that, some common neural correlates may act as the general characteristic of feigned memory impairment. To verify this hypothesis, the functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) combined with an alternative word forced-choice paradigm were used in this study. A total of 10 right-handed participants, in this study, had to perform both STW and LTM tasks respectively under answering correctly, answering randomly and feigned memory impairment conditions. Our results indicated that the activation of the left superior frontal gyrus and the left medial frontal gyrus was associated with feigned LTM impairment, whereas the left superior frontal gyrus, the left precuneus and the right anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) were highly activated while feigning STM impairment. Furthermore, an overlapping was found in the left superior frontal gyrus, and it suggested that the activity of the left superior frontal gyrus might be acting as a specific marker of feigned memory impairment. PMID:26479324

  15. APOE genotype alters glial activation and loss of synaptic markers in mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yuangui; Nwabuisi-Heath, Evelyn; Dumanis, Sonya B.; Tai, Leon; Yu, Chunjiang; Rebeck, G. William; Jo LaDu, Mary

    2011-01-01

    The E4 allele of the Apolipoprotein E (APOE) gene is the strongest genetic risk factor for late-onset Alzheimer's disease (AD), and affects clinical outcomes of chronic and acute brain damages. The mechanisms by which apoE affect diverse diseases and disorders may involve modulation of the glial response to various types of brain damages. We examined glial activation in a mouse model where each of the human APOE alleles are expressed under the endogenous mouse APOE promoter, as well as in APOE knock-out mice. APOE4 mice displayed increased glial activation in response to intracerebroventricular lipopolysaccharide (LPS) compared to APOE2 and APOE3 mice by several measures. There were higher levels of microglia/macrophage, astrocytes, and invading T-cells after LPS injection in APOE4 mice. APOE4 mice also displayed greater and more prolonged increases of cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α) than APOE2 and APOE3 mice. We found that APOE4 mice had greater synaptic protein loss after LPS injection, as measured by three different markers: PSD-95, Drebin, and synaptophysin. In all assays, APOE knock-out mice responded similar to APOE4 mice, suggesting that the apoE4 protein may lack anti-inflammatory characteristics of apoE2 and apoE3. Together, these findings demonstrate that APOE4 predisposes to inflammation, which could contribute to its association with Alzheimer's disease and other disorders. PMID:22228589

  16. BACE1 activity in cerebrospinal fluid and its relation to markers of AD pathology.

    PubMed

    Mulder, Sandra D; van der Flier, Wiesje M; Verheijen, Jan H; Mulder, Cees; Scheltens, Philip; Blankenstein, Marinus A; Hack, C Erik; Veerhuis, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Several studies have shown that reduced amyloid-beta 1-42 (Abeta(42)) and increased tau levels in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) reflect increased Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology in the brain. beta-site APP cleaving enzyme (BACE1) is thought to be the major beta-secretase involved in Abeta production in the brain, and therefore we investigated the relation between BACE1 activity and CSF markers Abeta(40), Abeta(42), total tau (t-tau), and tau phosphorylated at threonine 181 (p-tau) in CSF of control (n=12), mild cognitive impairment (n=18), and AD (n=17) subjects. Patients were classified according to their Abeta(42), t-tau, and p-tau CSF biomarker levels, with either an AD-like biomarker profile (two or three biomarkers abnormal: Abeta(42) < 495 pg/ml in combination with t-tau > 356 pg/ml, and/or p-tau > 54 pg/ml) or a normal biomarker profile (activity levels, compared to patients with a normal biomarker profile (20 pg/ml and 16 pg/ml respectively; p=0.01), when controlled for age and gender. In the whole sample, BACE1 activity correlated with CSF levels of Abeta(40), t-tau, and p-tau (r=0.38, r=0.63, and r=0.65; all p< 0.05), but not with Abeta(42). These data suggest that increased BACE1 activity in CSF relates to AD pathology in the brain. PMID:20164582

  17. Tissue factor activity. A marker of alveolar macrophage maturation in rabbits. Effects of granulomatous pneumonitis.

    PubMed Central

    Rothberger, H; McGee, M P; Lee, T K

    1984-01-01

    amounts of tissue factor activity due to the presence of large numbers of mature alveolar macrophage forms that had high levels of the procoagulant. Thus, tissue factor activity in alveolar macrophages is a marker of cellular maturation in vivo and in vitro. Increased amounts of this initiator of the extrinsic clotting pathway, as found in alveolar macrophage populations from animals with granulomatous pneumonitis induced by BCG hypersensitivity, suggest that alveolar macrophage tissue factor may contribute to the pathology of immune lung diseases. PMID:6373826

  18. Feasibility of proton-activated implantable markers for proton range verification using PET

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Jongmin; Ibbott, Geoffrey; Gillin, Michael; Gonzalez-Lepera, Carlos; Titt, Uwe; Paganetti, Harald; Kerr, Matthew; Mawlawi, Osama

    2014-01-01

    Proton beam range verification using positron emission tomography (PET) currently relies on proton activation of tissue, the products of which decay with a short half-life and necessitate an on-site PET scanner. Tissue activation is, however, negligible near the distal dose fall-off region of the proton beam range due to their high interaction energy thresholds. Therefore Monte Carlo simulation is often supplemented for comparison with measurement; however, this also may be associated with systematic and statistical uncertainties. Therefore, we sought to test the feasibility of using long-lived proton-activated external materials that are inserted or infused into the target volume for more accurate proton beam range verification that could be performed at an off-site PET scanner. We irradiated samples of ≥98% 18O-enriched water, natural Cu foils, and ≥97% 68Zn-enriched foils as candidate materials, along with samples of tissue-equivalent materials including 16O water, heptane (C7H16), and polycarbonate (C16H14O3)n, at 4 depths (ranging from 100% to 3% of center of modulation (COM) dose) along the distal fall-off of a modulated 160-MeV proton beam. Samples were irradiated either directly or after being embedded in Plastic Water® or balsa wood. We then measured the activity of the samples using PET imaging for 20 or 30 min after various delay times. Measured activities of candidate materials were up to 100 times greater than those of the tissue-equivalent materials at the 4 distal dose fall-off depths. The differences between candidate materials and tissue-equivalent materials became more apparent after longer delays between irradiation and PET imaging, due to the longer half-lives of the candidate materials. Furthermore, the activation of the candidate materials closely mimicked the distal dose fall-off with offsets of 1 to 2 mm. Also, signals from the foils were clearly visible compared to the background from the activated Plastic Water® and balsa wood

  19. Feasibility of proton-activated implantable markers for proton range verification using PET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Jongmin; Ibbott, Geoffrey; Gillin, Michael; Gonzalez-Lepera, Carlos; Titt, Uwe; Paganetti, Harald; Kerr, Matthew; Mawlawi, Osama

    2013-11-01

    Proton beam range verification using positron emission tomography (PET) currently relies on proton activation of tissue, the products of which decay with a short half-life and necessitate an on-site PET scanner. Tissue activation is, however, negligible near the distal dose fall-off region of the proton beam range due to their high interaction energy thresholds. Therefore Monte Carlo simulation is often supplemented for comparison with measurement; however, this also may be associated with systematic and statistical uncertainties. Therefore, we sought to test the feasibility of using long-lived proton-activated external materials that are inserted or infused into the target volume for more accurate proton beam range verification that could be performed at an off-site PET scanner. We irradiated samples of ≥98% 18O-enriched water, natural Cu foils, and >97% 68Zn-enriched foils as candidate materials, along with samples of tissue-equivalent materials including 16O water, heptane (C7H16), and polycarbonate (C16H14O3)n, at four depths (ranging from 100% to 3% of center of modulation (COM) dose) along the distal fall-off of a modulated 160 MeV proton beam. Samples were irradiated either directly or after being embedded in Plastic Water® or balsa wood. We then measured the activity of the samples using PET imaging for 20 or 30 min after various delay times. Measured activities of candidate materials were up to 100 times greater than those of the tissue-equivalent materials at the four distal dose fall-off depths. The differences between candidate materials and tissue-equivalent materials became more apparent after longer delays between irradiation and PET imaging, due to the longer half-lives of the candidate materials. Furthermore, the activation of the candidate materials closely mimicked the distal dose fall-off with offsets of 1 to 2 mm. Also, signals from the foils were clearly visible compared to the background from the activated Plastic Water® and balsa wood

  20. Ropinirole regulates emotionality and neuronal activity markers in the limbic forebrain.

    PubMed

    Mavrikaki, Maria; Schintu, Nicoletta; Nomikos, George G; Panagis, George; Svenningsson, Per

    2014-12-01

    Restless legs syndrome (RLS) and Parkinson's disease (PD) are movement disorders usually accompanied by emotional and cognitive deficits. Although D3/D2 receptor agonists are effective against motor and non-motor deficits in RLS and PD, the exact behavioral and neurochemical effects of these drugs are not clearly defined. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of acute ropinirole (0, 0.1, 1 or 10 mg/kg, i.p.), a preferential D3/D2 receptor agonist, on intracranial self-stimulation (ICSS), spontaneous motor activity, anxiety- and depression-like behaviors, spatial reference and working memory in rats as well as on certain markers of neuronal activity, i.e. induction of immediate early genes, such as c-fos and arc, and crucial phosphorylations on GluA1 subunit of α-Amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptors and NA1, NA2A and NA2B subunits of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors. Ropinirole decreased ICSS thresholds and induced anxiolytic- and antidepressive-like effects without affecting motor activity or spatial memory. The effects on emotionality were associated with a decrease in p-Ser897-NA1 and an increase in p-Tyr1472-NA2B in the ventral striatum as well as an increased induction of c-fos messenger RNA (mRNA) in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and decreased expression of arc mRNA in the striatum and the shell of the nucleus accumbens. Our data indicate that ropinirole significantly affects emotionality at doses (1-10 mg/kg, i.p.) that exert no robust effects on locomotion or cognition. The data reinforce the use of D3/D2 receptor agonists in the treatment of RLS and PD patients characterized by emotional deficits and suggest that altered NMDA-mediated neurotransmission in the limbic forebrain may underlie some of ropinirole's therapeutic actions. PMID:24852388

  1. Prostate-specific antigen as a marker of disease activity in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Partin, Alan W; Hanks, Gerald E; Klein, Eric A; Moul, Judd W; Nelson, William G; Scher, Howard I

    2002-09-01

    Despite the impact of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing on the detection and management of prostate cancer, controversy about its usefulness as a marker of disease activity continues. This review, based on a recent roundtable discussion, examines whether PSA measurements can be used rationally in several clinical settings. Following radical prostatectomy and radiation therapy, prediction of survival by PSA level is most reliable in high-risk patients. PSA doubling time after radiation therapy is the strongest predictor of biochemical failure. PSA measurements have been associated with inconsistent results following hormonal treatment; reduced PSA levels may result from antiandrogen treatment, which decreases expression of the PSA gene, and therefore, the level of PSA production. In the setting of primary and secondary cancer prevention, PSA is important in risk stratification when selecting patients for studies. Part 2 of this two-part article, which began in the August issue, discusses the role of PSA in hormonal and drug therapies and in primary and secondary chemoprevention. PMID:12380948

  2. ADENOSINE DEAMINASE ACTIVITY AND SERUM C-REACTIVE PROTEIN AS PROGNOSTIC MARKERS OF CHAGAS DISEASE SEVERITY

    PubMed Central

    BRAVO-TOBAR, Iván Darío; NELLO-PÉREZ, Carlota; FERNÁNDEZ, Alí; MOGOLLÓN, Nora; PÉREZ, Mary Carmen; VERDE, Juan; CONCEPCIÓN, Juan Luis; RODRIGUEZ-BONFANTE, Claudina; BONFANTE-CABARCAS, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Chagas disease is a public health problem worldwide. The availability of diagnostic tools to predict the development of chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy is crucial to reduce morbidity and mortality. Here we analyze the prognostic value of adenosine deaminase serum activity (ADA) and C-reactive protein serum levels (CRP) in chagasic individuals. One hundred and ten individuals, 28 healthy and 82 chagasic patients were divided according to disease severity in phase I (n = 35), II (n = 29), and III (n = 18). A complete medical history, 12-lead electrocardiogram, chest X-ray, and M-mode echocardiogram were performed on each individual. Diagnosis of Chagas disease was confirmed by ELISA and MABA using recombinant antigens; ADA was determined spectrophotometrically and CRP by ELISA. The results have shown that CRP and ADA increased linearly in relation to disease phase, CRP being significantly higher in phase III and ADA at all phases. Also, CRP and ADA were positively correlated with echocardiographic parameters of cardiac remodeling and with electrocardiographic abnormalities, and negatively with ejection fraction. CRP and ADA were higher in patients with cardiothoracic index ≥ 50%, while ADA was higher in patients with ventricular repolarization disturbances. Finally, CRP was positively correlated with ADA. In conclusion, ADA and CRP are prognostic markers of cardiac dysfunction and remodeling in Chagas disease. PMID:26603224

  3. ADENOSINE DEAMINASE ACTIVITY AND SERUM C-REACTIVE PROTEIN AS PROGNOSTIC MARKERS OF CHAGAS DISEASE SEVERITY.

    PubMed

    Bravo-Tobar, Iván Darío; Nello-Pérez, Carlota; Fernández, Alí; Mogollón, Nora; Pérez, Mary Carmen; Verde, Juan; Concepción, Juan Luis; Rodriguez-Bonfante, Claudina; Bonfante-Cabarcas, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    Chagas disease is a public health problem worldwide. The availability of diagnostic tools to predict the development of chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy is crucial to reduce morbidity and mortality. Here we analyze the prognostic value of adenosine deaminase serum activity (ADA) and C-reactive protein serum levels (CRP) in chagasic individuals. One hundred and ten individuals, 28 healthy and 82 chagasic patients were divided according to disease severity in phase I (n = 35), II (n = 29), and III (n = 18). A complete medical history, 12-lead electrocardiogram, chest X-ray, and M-mode echocardiogram were performed on each individual. Diagnosis of Chagas disease was confirmed by ELISA and MABA using recombinant antigens; ADA was determined spectrophotometrically and CRP by ELISA. The results have shown that CRP and ADA increased linearly in relation to disease phase, CRP being significantly higher in phase III and ADA at all phases. Also, CRP and ADA were positively correlated with echocardiographic parameters of cardiac remodeling and with electrocardiographic abnormalities, and negatively with ejection fraction. CRP and ADA were higher in patients with cardiothoracic index ≥ 50%, while ADA was higher in patients with ventricular repolarization disturbances. Finally, CRP was positively correlated with ADA. In conclusion, ADA and CRP are prognostic markers of cardiac dysfunction and remodeling in Chagas disease. PMID:26603224

  4. Activating Transcription Factor 3 Expression as a Marker of Response to the Histone Deacetylase Inhibitor Pracinostat.

    PubMed

    Sooraj, Dhanya; Xu, Dakang; Cain, Jason E; Gold, Daniel P; Williams, Bryan R G

    2016-07-01

    Improved treatment strategies are required for bladder cancer due to frequent recurrence of low-grade tumors and poor survival rate from high-grade tumors with current therapies. Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi), approved as single agents for specific lymphomas, have shown promising preclinical results in solid tumors but could benefit from identification of biomarkers for response. Loss of activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3) expression is a feature of bladder tumor progression and correlates with poor survival. We investigated the utility of measuring ATF3 expression as a marker of response to the HDACi pracinostat in bladder cancer models. Pracinostat treatment of bladder cancer cell lines reactivated the expression of ATF3, correlating with significant alteration in proliferative, migratory, and anchorage-dependent growth capacities. Pracinostat also induced growth arrest at the G0-G1 cell-cycle phase, coincident with the activation of tumor suppressor genes. In mouse xenograft bladder cancer models, pracinostat treatment significantly reduced tumor volumes compared with controls, accompanied by reexpression of ATF3 in nonproliferating cells from early to late stage of therapy and in parallel induced antiangiogenesis and apoptosis. Importantly, cells in which ATF3 expression was depleted were less sensitive to pracinostat treatment in vitro, exhibiting significantly higher proliferative and migratory properties. In vivo, control xenograft tumors were significantly more responsive to treatment than ATF3 knockdown xenografts. Thus, reactivation of ATF3 is an important factor in determining sensitivity to pracinostat treatment, both in vitro and in vivo, and could serve as a potential biomarker of response and provide a rationale for therapeutic utility in HDACi-mediated treatments for bladder cancer. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(7); 1726-39. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27196751

  5. Association of platelet activation markers with cancer-associated venous thromboembolism.

    PubMed

    Riedl, Julia; Hell, Lena; Kaider, Alexandra; Koder, Silvia; Marosi, Christine; Zielinski, Christoph; Panzer, Simon; Pabinger, Ingrid; Ay, Cihan

    2016-01-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a frequent complication in cancer patients. Platelet activation is thought to be involved in cancer-associated VTE. Here, we determined the association between evolving markers of platelet activation (soluble P-selectin [sP-selectin], soluble CD40 ligand [sCD40L], thrombospondin-1 [TSP-1] and platelet factor-4 [PF-4]) and the development of cancer-associated VTE. A nested matched case-control study was applied within a cohort of 1779 patients with different types of cancer that had been included in the Vienna Cancer and Thrombosis Study (CATS), a prospective, observational study on patients with newly diagnosed or progressive cancer after remission. Primary endpoint is symptomatic VTE during a maximum follow-up of 2 years. Cases (patients who developed VTE during follow-up) were matched in a 1:2 ratio to controls without VTE during follow-up with respect to tumor type, stage and time of observation in the study. In total, 131 VTE cases were compared to 262 controls. In logistic regression analysis, only sP-selectin was associated with risk of VTE. The odds ratios (OR) per double increase of sP-selectin, sCD40L, TSP-1 and PF-4 were 1.66 (95% confidence interval: 1.17-2.35, p = 0.005), 1.04 (0.89-1.21, p = 0.635), 1.09 (0.90-1.32, p = 0.360) and 1.03 (0.87-1.21, p = 0.737), respectively. In conclusion, sP-selectin, but not sCD40L, TSP-1 or PF-4 were associated with risk of VTE in cancer patients in this nested case-control study. PMID:25970326

  6. Short communication: T cell activation in HIV-1/herpes simplex virus-2-coinfected Kenyan women receiving valacyclovir.

    PubMed

    Roxby, Alison C; Liu, Amy Y; Drake, Alison L; Kiarie, James N; Richardson, Barbra; Lohman-Payne, Barbara L; John-Stewart, Grace C; Wald, Anna; De Rosa, Stephen; Farquhar, Carey

    2013-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus-2 (HSV-2) suppression with acyclovir or valacyclovir reduces HIV-1 viral RNA levels; one hypothesis is that HSV-2 suppression reduces immune activation. We measured T cell immune activation markers among women participating in a randomized placebo-controlled trial of valacyclovir to reduce HIV-1 RNA levels among pregnant women. Although valacyclovir was associated with lower HIV-1 RNA levels, the distribution of both CD4(+) and CD8(+) CD38(+)HLA-DR(+) T cells was not different among women taking valacyclovir when compared to women taking placebo. Further study is needed to understand the mechanism of HIV-1 RNA reduction following herpes suppression among those coinfected with HIV-1 and HSV-2. PMID:22852760

  7. Exposure to inhaled particulate matter activates early markers of oxidative stress, inflammation and unfolded protein response in rat striatum.

    PubMed

    Guerra, R; Vera-Aguilar, E; Uribe-Ramirez, M; Gookin, G; Camacho, J; Osornio-Vargas, A R; Mugica-Alvarez, V; Angulo-Olais, R; Campbell, A; Froines, J; Kleinman, T M; De Vizcaya-Ruiz, A

    2013-10-24

    To study central nervous system airborne PM related subchronic toxicity, SD male rats were exposed for eight weeks to either coarse (32 μg/m³), fine (178 μg/m³) or ultrafine (107 μg/m³) concentrated PM or filtered air. Different brain regions (olfactory bulb, frontal cortex, striatum and hippocampus), were harvested from the rats following exposure to airborne PM. Subsequently, prooxidant (HO-1 and SOD-2), and inflammatory markers (IL-1β and TNFα), apoptotic (caspase 3), and unfolded protein response (UPR) markers (XBP-1S and BiP), were also measured using real-time PCR. Activation of nuclear transcription factors Nrf-2 and NF-κB, associated with antioxidant and inflammation processes, respectively, were also analyzed by GSMA. Ultrafine PM increased HO-1 and SOD-2 mRNA levels in the striatum and hippocampus, in the presence of Nrf-2 activation. Also, ultrafine PM activated NF-κB and increased IL-1β and TNFα in the striatum. Activation of UPR was observed after exposure to coarse PM through the increment of XBP-1S and BiP in the striatum, accompanied by an increase in antioxidant response markers HO-1 and SOD-2. Our results indicate that exposure to different size fractions of PM may induce physiological changes (in a neuroanatomical manner) in the central nervous system (CNS), specifically within the striatum, where inflammation, oxidative stress and UPR signals were effectively activated. PMID:23892126

  8. Exposure to inhaled particulate matter activates early markers of oxidative stress, inflammation and unfolded protein response in rat striatum

    PubMed Central

    Guerra, R.; Vera-Aguilar, E.; Uribe-Ramirez, M.; Gookin, G.; Camacho, J.; Osornio-Vargas, A.R.; Mugica-Alvarez, V.; Angulo-Olais, R.; Campbell, A.; Froines, J.; Kleinman, T.M.; De Vizcaya-Ruiz, A.

    2014-01-01

    To study central nervous system airborne PM related subchronic toxicity, SD male rats were exposed for eight weeks to either coarse (32 µg/m3), fine (178 µg/m3) or ultrafine (107 µg/m3) concentrated PM or filtered air. Different brain regions (olfactory bulb, frontal cortex, striatum and hippocampus), were harvested from the rats following exposure to airborne PM. Subsequently, prooxidant (HO-1 and SOD-2), and inflammatory markers (IL-1β and TNFα), apoptotic (caspase 3), and unfolded protein response (UPR) markers (XBP-1S and BiP), were also measured using real-time PCR. Activation of nuclear transcription factors Nrf-2 and NF-κB, associated with antioxidant and inflammation processes, respectively, were also analyzed by GSMA. Ultrafine PM increased HO-1 and SOD-2 mRNA levels in the striatum and hippocampus, in the presence of Nrf-2 activation. Also, ultrafine PM activated NF-κB and increased IL-1β and TNFα in the striatum. Activation of UPR was observed after exposure to coarse PM through the increment of XBP-1S and BiP in the striatum, accompanied by an increase in antioxidant response markers HO-1 and SOD-2. Our results indicate that exposure to different size fractions of PM may induce physiological changes (in a neuroanatomical manner) in the central nervous system (CNS), specifically within the striatum, where inflammation, oxidative stress and UPR signals were effectively activated. PMID:23892126

  9. Stability of cytokines, chemokines and soluble activation markers in unprocessed blood stored under different conditions

    PubMed Central

    Aziz, Najib; Detels, Roger; Quint, Joshua J.; Li, Qian; Gjertson, David; Butch, Anthony W.

    2016-01-01

    Background Biomarkers such as cytokines, chemokines, and soluble activation markers can be unstable when processing of blood is delayed. The stability of various biomarkers in serum and plasma was investigated when unprocessed blood samples were stored for up to 24 h at room and refrigerator temperature. Methods Blood was collected from 16 healthy volunteers. Unprocessed serum, EDTA and heparinized blood was stored at room (20–25 °C) and refrigerator temperature (4–8 °C) for 0.5, 2, 4, 6, 8, and 24 h after collection before centrifugation and separation of serum and plasma. Samples were batch tested for various biomarkers using commercially available immunoassays. Statistically significant changes were determined using the generalized estimating equation. Results IFN-γ, sIL-2Rα, sTNF-RII and β2-microglobulin were stable in unprocessed serum, EDTA and heparinized blood samples stored at either room or refrigerator temperature for up to 24 h. IL-6, TNF-α, MIP-1β and RANTES were unstable in heparinized blood at room temperature; TNF-α, and MIP-1β were unstable in unprocessed serum at room temperature; IL-12 was unstable in unprocessed serum at refrigerator temperature; and neopterin was unstable in unprocessed EDTA blood at room temperature. IL-1ra was stable only in unprocessed serum at room temperature. Conclusion All the biomarkers studied, with the exception of IL-1ra, were stable in unprocessed EDTA blood stored at refrigerator temperature for 24 h. This indicates that blood for these biomarkers should be collected in EDTA and if delays in processing are anticipated the unseparated blood should be stored at refrigerator temperature until processing. PMID:27208752

  10. Hypersensitivity to fluoroquinolones: The expression of basophil activation markers depends on the clinical entity and the culprit fluoroquinolone.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Tahia D; Ariza, Adriana; Palomares, Francisca; Montañez, María I; Salas, María; Martín-Serrano, Angela; Fernández, Rubén; Ruiz, Arturo; Blanca, Miguel; Mayorga, Cristobalina; Torres, María J

    2016-06-01

    Although fluoroquinolones (FQs) are generally well-tolerated antibiotics, increasing numbers of hypersensitivity reactions have been reported. These can be evaluated in vitro by basophil activation tests (BATs); however, sensitivity is not optimal. Many factors could influence sensitivity such as basophil activation markers. The objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of 2 different activations markers, CD63 and CD203c, on the sensitivity of BAT to FQ. We studied 17 patients with immediate allergic reactions to FQ. BAT was performed with moxifloxacin and ciprofloxacin using CD193 (CCR3) for basophil selection and CD203c or CD63 as activation markers. Stimulation with ciprofloxacin induced a significantly higher expression of CD63 in ciprofloxacin-allergic patients compared to moxifloxacin-allergic patients (P = 0.002). In patients allergic to moxifloxacin with anaphylactic shock, we have observed an increase in the percentage of cells that upregulate CD203c, whereas patients with anaphylaxis preferentially upregulate CD63. The best sensitivity-specificity was obtained using a cutoff of 3 and the culprit FQ, using CD203c for moxifloxacin-allergic patients (sensitivity = 36.4%; specificity = 94.4%), and CD63 for ciprofloxacin-allergic patients (sensitivity = 83.3%; specificity = 88.9%). A negative correlation was found between the upregulation of CD63 and CD203c and the time interval between the reaction occurrence and the performance of the test (Spearman r = -0.446; P < 0.001 for CD63 and Spearman r = -0.386; P < 0.001 for CD203c). The performance of BAT for FQ allergy must be optimized for each drug, taking into account possible differences in the stimulation mechanism that leads to the upregulation of different activation markers. PMID:27281069

  11. Immunohistochemical evaluation of stem cell markers and signal transducer and activator of transcription 6 (STAT6) in solitary fibrous tumors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chengyan; Qi, Yan; Liu, Ruixue; Lan, Jiaojiao; Zhou, Yang; Ju, Xinxin; Chen, Dongdong; Zou, Hong; Li, Shugang; Hu, Jianming; Zhao, Jin; Shen, Yaoyuan; Sun, Zhenzhu; Pang, Lijuan; Li, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Solitary fibrous tumors (SFT) are fibroblastic, ubiquitous mesenchymal tumors. Although several SFT studies have been conducted, the cell of origin of SFT remains controversial and reliable diagnostic markers are needed for SFT identification for proper prognosis and therapeutics. To analyze the immunophenotype of SFT for the identification of specific diagnostic markers and the cell of origin of this tumor, we performed an immunohistochemical study of stem cell markers [aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (ALDH1), CD29, CD44, CD133, and nestin] and signal transducer and activator of transcription 6 (STAT6) in 18 cases of SFT. The results demonstrated that ALDH1 was present in 16 cases (16/18), STAT6 in 13 cases (13/18), CD44 in 8 cases (8/18), and CD29 in 1 case (1/18), whereas CD133 and nestin were absent in all cases (0/18). Our results indicate that combination with ALDH1 and STAT6 can improve the diagnostic value of CD34 for SFT. The immunohistochemical findings for stem cell surface markers indicate that SFT may originate from stem cells and that ALDH1 plays an important role in the development of SFT. PMID:26617768

  12. Palmitic Acid Reduces Circulating Bone Formation Markers in Obese Animals and Impairs Osteoblast Activity via C16-Ceramide Accumulation.

    PubMed

    Alsahli, Ahmad; Kiefhaber, Kathryn; Gold, Tziporah; Muluke, Munira; Jiang, Hongfeng; Cremers, Serge; Schulze-Späte, Ulrike

    2016-05-01

    Obesity and impaired lipid metabolism increase circulating and local fatty acid (FA) levels. Our previous studies showed that a high high-saturated -fat diet induced greater bone loss in mice than a high high-unsaturated-fat diet due to increased osteoclast numbers and activity. The impact of elevated FA levels on osteoblasts is not yet clear. We induced obesity in 4 week old male mice using a palmitic acid (PA)- or oleic acid (OA)-enriched high fat high-fat diet (HFD) (20 % of calories from FA), and compared them to mice on a normal (R) caloric diet (10 % of calories from FA). We collected serum to determine FA and bone metabolism marker levels. Primary osteoblasts were isolated; cultured in PA, OA, or control (C) medium; and assessed for mineralization activity, gene expression, and ceramide levels. Obese animals in the PA and OA groups had significantly lower serum levels of bone formation markers P1NP and OC compared to normal weight animals (*p < 0.001), with the lowest marker levels in animals on an PA-enriched HFD (*p < 0.001). Accordingly, elevated levels of PA significantly reduced osteoblast mineralization activity in vitro (*p < 0.05). Elevated PA intake significantly increased C16 ceramide accumulation. This accumulation was preventable through inhibition of SPT2 (serine palmitoyl transferase 2) using myriocin. Elevated levels of PA reduce osteoblast function in vitro and bone formation markers in vivo. Our findings suggest that saturated PA can compromise bone health by affecting osteoblasts, and identify a potential mechanism through which obesity promotes bone loss. PMID:26758875

  13. Markers of Thrombogenesis and Fibrinolysis and Their Relation to Inflammation and Endothelial Activation in Patients with Idiopathic Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Kopeć, Grzegorz; Moertl, Deddo; Steiner, Sabine; Stępień, Ewa; Mikołajczyk, Tomasz; Podolec, Jakub; Waligóra, Marcin; Stępniewski, Jakub; Tomkiewicz-Pająk, Lidia; Guzik, Tomasz; Podolec, Piotr

    2013-01-01

    Background Chronic anticoagulation is a standard of care in idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH). However, hemostatic abnormalities in this disease remain poorly understood. Therefore, we aimed to study markers of thrombogenesis and fibrinolysis in patients with IPAH. Methods We studied 27 consecutive patients (67% female) with IPAH aged 50.0 years (IQR: 41.0 - 65.0) and 16 controls without pulmonary hypertension. Prothrombin fragment 1+2 (F1+2) and thrombin-antithrombin (TAT) complexes were measured to assess thrombogenesis; tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) antigen and plasmin-anti-plasmin complex to characterize activation of fibrinolysis; plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1) to measure inhibition of fibrinolysis; and endothelin-1 (ET-1) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) to assess endothelial activation and systemic inflammation, respectively. In addition, in treatment-naive IPAH patients these markers were assessed after 3 months of PAH-specific therapies. Results TPA (10.1[6.8-15.8] vs 5.2[3.3-7.3] ng/ml, p<0.001), plasmin-anti-plasmin (91.5[60.3-94.2] vs 55.8[51.1-64.9] ng/ml, p<0.001), IL-6 (4.9[2.5-7.9] vs 2.1[1.3-3.8] pg/ml, p=0.001) and ET-1 (3.7 [3.3-4.5] vs 3.4[3.1-3.5], p= 0.03) were higher in patients with IPAH than in controls. In IPAH patients plasmin-anti-plasmin and tPA correlated positively with IL-6 (r=0.39, p=0.04 and r=0.63, p<0.001, respectively) and ET-1 (r=0.55, p=0.003 and r=0.59, p=0.001, respectively). No correlation was found between tPA or plasmin-anti-plasmin and markers of thrombogenesis. Plasmin-anti-plasmin decreased after 3 months of PAH specific therapy while the other markers remained unchanged. Conclusions In the present study we showed that markers of fibrynolysis were elevated in patients with IPAH however we did not find a clear evidence for increased thrombogenesis in this group of patients. Fibrinolysis, inflammation, and endothelial activation were closely interrelated in IPAH. PMID:24312667

  14. Mitochondrial activity and oxidative stress markers in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of patients with bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, and healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Gubert, Carolina; Stertz, Laura; Pfaffenseller, Bianca; Panizzutti, Bruna Schilling; Rezin, Gislaine Tezza; Massuda, Raffael; Streck, Emilio Luiz; Gama, Clarissa Severino; Kapczinski, Flávio; Kunz, Maurício

    2013-10-01

    Evidence suggests that mitochondrial dysfunction is involved in the pathophysiology of psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia (SZ) and bipolar disorder (BD). However, the exact mechanisms underlying this dysfunction are not well understood. Impaired activity of electron transport chain (ETC) complexes has been described in these disorders and may reflect changes in mitochondrial metabolism and oxidative stress markers. The objective of this study was to compare ETC complex activity and protein and lipid oxidation markers in 12 euthymic patients with BD type I, in 18 patients with stable chronic SZ, and in 30 matched healthy volunteers. Activity of complexes I, II, and III was determined by enzyme kinetics of mitochondria isolated from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Protein oxidation was evaluated using the protein carbonyl content (PCC) method, and lipid peroxidation, the thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) assay kit. A significant decrease in complex I activity was observed (p = 0.02), as well as an increase in plasma levels of TBARS (p = 0.00617) in patients with SZ when compared to matched controls. Conversely, no significant differences were found in complex I activity (p = 0.17) or in plasma TBARS levels (p = 0.26) in patients with BD vs. matched controls. Our results suggest that mitochondrial complex I dysfunction and oxidative stress play important roles in the pathophysiology of SZ and may be used in potential novel adjunctive therapy for SZ, focusing primarily on cognitive impairment and disorder progression. PMID:23870796

  15. Effects of the contraceptive skin patch and subdermal contraceptive implant on markers of endothelial cell activation and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Hernandez-Juarez, Jesus; Sanchez-Serrano, Juan Carlos; Moreno-Hernandez, Manuel; Alvarado-Moreno, Jose Antonio; Hernandez-Lopez, Jose Rubicel; Isordia-Salas, Irma; Majluf-Cruz, Abraham

    2015-07-01

    Changes in blood coagulation factors may partially explain the association between hormonal contraceptives and thrombosis. Therefore, the likely effects of the contraceptive skin patch and subdermal contraceptive implant on levels of inflammatory markers and endothelial activation were analyzed. This was an observational, prospective, longitudinal, nonrandomized study composed of 80 women between 18 and 35 years of age who made the decision to use the contraceptive skin patch or subdermal contraceptive implant. vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), endothelial cell leukocyte adhesion molecule-1 (ELAM-1), von Willebrand factor (VWF), and plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1(PAI-1) as well as high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) were assayed before and after 4 months of use of the contraceptive method. VCAM-1, VWF, and PAI-1 remained unchanged in the contraceptive skin patch group; however, a significant increase in hsCRP (0.29-0.50 mg/dL; P =.012) and a significant decrease in ELAM-1 (44-25 ng/mL; P =.022) were observed. A significant diminution in VCAM-1 (463-362 ng/mL; P =.022) was also found in the subdermal contraceptive implant group. Our results strongly suggest that these contraceptive methods do not induce endothelial activation after 4 months of use. Increase in hsCRP levels was unrelated to changes in markers of endothelial activation. PMID:25655356

  16. Nondestructive testing of electron beam sterilization by means of an optically active marker material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Härtling, Thomas; Reitzig, Manuela; Mayer, Anton; Wetzel, Christiane; Röder, Olaf; Schreiber, Jürgen; Opitz, Jörg

    2012-02-01

    Secure proof of sterilization processes on packaging materials is an important issue in many economic sectors. In this context, electron beam sterilization is a highly effective low temperature technique. However, verifying the application of a sufficient electron dose is still difficult - especially on products with complex geometry. Here we report on an optical, hence fast and contactless approach which gives reliable evidence of a successful e-beam treatment. The technique is based on placing a suitable marker material (rare-earth based particles) inside or as a coating on the packaging material. By electron irradiation these particles change their optical properties and thus indicate the successful application of the electron beam.

  17. Marker development

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, M.R.

    1987-05-01

    This report is to discuss the marker development for radioactive waste disposal sites. The markers must be designed to last 10,000 years, and place no undue burdens on the future generations. Barriers cannot be constructed that preclude human intrusion. Design specifications for surface markers will be discussed, also marker pictograms will also be covered.

  18. ESAM is a novel human hematopoietic stem cell marker associated with a subset of human leukemias.

    PubMed

    Ishibashi, Tomohiko; Yokota, Takafumi; Tanaka, Hirokazu; Ichii, Michiko; Sudo, Takao; Satoh, Yusuke; Doi, Yukiko; Ueda, Tomoaki; Tanimura, Akira; Hamanaka, Yuri; Ezoe, Sachiko; Shibayama, Hirohiko; Oritani, Kenji; Kanakura, Yuzuru

    2016-04-01

    Reliable markers are essential to increase our understanding of the biological features of human hematopoietic stem cells and to facilitate the application of hematopoietic stem cells in the field of transplantation and regenerative medicine. We previously identified endothelial cell-selective adhesion molecule (ESAM) as a novel functional marker of hematopoietic stem cells in mice. Here, we found that ESAM can also be used to purify human hematopoietic stem cells from all the currently available sources (adult bone marrow, mobilized peripheral blood, and cord blood). Multipotent colony-forming units and long-term hematopoietic-reconstituting cells in immunodeficient mice were found exclusively in the ESAM(High) fraction of CD34(+)CD38(-) cells. The CD34(+)CD38(-) fraction of cord blood and collagenase-treated bone marrow contained cells exhibiting extremely high expression of ESAM; these cells are likely to be related to the endothelial lineage. Leukemia cell lines of erythroid and megakaryocyte origin, but not those of myeloid or lymphoid descent, were ESAM positive. However, high ESAM expression was observed in some primary acute myeloid leukemia cells. Furthermore, KG-1a myeloid leukemia cells switched from ESAM negative to ESAM positive with repeated leukemia reconstitution in vivo. Thus, ESAM is a useful marker for studying both human hematopoietic stem cells and leukemia cells. PMID:26774386

  19. The active metabolite of prasugrel inhibits ADP-stimulated thrombo-inflammatory markers of platelet activation: Influence of other blood cells, calcium, and aspirin.

    PubMed

    Frelinger, Andrew L; Jakubowski, Joseph A; Li, Youfu; Barnard, Marc R; Fox, Marsha L; Linden, Matthew D; Sugidachi, Atsuhiro; Winters, Kenneth J; Furman, Mark I; Michelson, Alan D

    2007-07-01

    The novel thienopyridine prodrug prasugrel, a platelet P2Y(12) ADP receptor antagonist, requires in vivo metabolism for activity. Although pharmacological data have been collected on the effects of prasugrel on platelet aggregation, there are few data on the direct effects of the prasugrel's active metabolite, R-138727, on other aspects of platelet function. Here we examined the effects of R-138727 on thrombo-inflammatory markers of platelet activation, and the possible modulatory effects of other blood cells, calcium, and aspirin. Blood (PPACK or citrate anticoagulated) from healthy donors pre- and post-aspirin was incubated with R-138727 and the response to ADP assessed in whole blood or platelet-rich plasma (PRP) by aggregometry and flow cytometric analysis of leukocyte-platelet aggregates, platelet surface P-selectin, and GPIIb-IIIa activation. Low-micromolar concentrations of R-138727 resulted in a rapid and consistent inhibition of these ADP-stimulated thrombo-inflammatory markers. These rapid kinetics required physiological calcium levels, but were largely unaffected by aspirin. Lower IC(50) values in whole blood relative to PRP suggested that other blood cells affect ADP-induced platelet activation and hence the net inhibition by R-138727. R-138727 did not inhibit P2Y(12)-mediated ADP-induced shape change, even at concentrations that completely inhibited platelet aggregation, confirming the specificity of R-138727 for P2Y(12). In conclusion, R-138727, the active metabolite of prasugrel, results in rapid, potent, consistent, and selective inhibition of P2Y(12)-mediated up-regulation of thrombo-inflammatory markers of platelet activation. This inhibition is enhanced in the presence other blood cells and calcium, but not aspirin. PMID:17598013

  20. Minocycline attenuates HIV-1 infection and suppresses chronic immune activation in humanized NOD/LtsZ-scidIL-2Rγnull mice

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Maneesh; Singh, Pratibha; Vaira, Dolores; Amand, Mathieu; Rahmouni, Souad; Moutschen, Michel

    2014-01-01

    More than a quarter of a century of research has established chronic immune activation and dysfunctional T cells as central features of chronic HIV infection and subsequent immunodeficiency. Consequently, the search for a new immunomodulatory therapy that could reduce immune activation and improve T-cell function has been increased. However, the lack of small animal models for in vivo HIV study has hampered progress. In the current study, we have investigated a model of cord blood haematopoietic progenitor cells (CB-HPCs) -transplanted humanized NOD/LtsZ-scidIL-2Rγnull mice in which progression of HIV infection is associated with widespread chronic immune activation and inflammation. Indeed, HIV infection in humanized NSG mice caused up-regulation of several T-cell immune activation markers such as CD38, HLA-DR, CD69 and co-receptor CCR5. T-cell exhaustion markers PD-1 and CTLA-4 were found to be significantly up-regulated on T cells. Moreover, increased plasmatic levels of lipopolysaccharide, sCD14 and interleukin-10 were also observed in infected mice. Treatment with minocycline resulted in a significant decrease of expression of cellular and plasma immune activation markers, inhibition of HIV replication and improved T-cell counts in HIV-infected humanized NSG mice. The study demonstrates that minocycline could be an effective, low-cost adjunctive treatment to regulate chronic immune activation and replication of HIV. PMID:24409837

  1. Mammographic parenchymal texture as an imaging marker of hormonal activity: a comparative study between pre- and post-menopausal women

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daye, Dania; Bobo, Ezra; Baumann, Bethany; Ioannou, Antonios; Conant, Emily F.; Maidment, Andrew D. A.; Kontos, Despina

    2011-03-01

    Mammographic parenchymal texture patterns have been shown to be related to breast cancer risk. Yet, little is known about the biological basis underlying this association. Here, we investigate the potential of mammographic parenchymal texture patterns as an inherent phenotypic imaging marker of endogenous hormonal exposure of the breast tissue. Digital mammographic (DM) images in the cranio-caudal (CC) view of the unaffected breast from 138 women diagnosed with unilateral breast cancer were retrospectively analyzed. Menopause status was used as a surrogate marker of endogenous hormonal activity. Retroareolar 2.5cm2 ROIs were segmented from the post-processed DM images using an automated algorithm. Parenchymal texture features of skewness, coarseness, contrast, energy, homogeneity, grey-level spatial correlation, and fractal dimension were computed. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was performed to evaluate feature classification performance in distinguishing between 72 pre- and 66 post-menopausal women. Logistic regression was performed to assess the independent effect of each texture feature in predicting menopause status. ROC analysis showed that texture features have inherent capacity to distinguish between pre- and post-menopausal statuses (AUC>0.5, p<0.05). Logistic regression including all texture features yielded an ROC curve with an AUC of 0.76. Addition of age at menarche, ethnicity, contraception use and hormonal replacement therapy (HRT) use lead to a modest model improvement (AUC=0.78) while texture features maintained significant contribution (p<0.05). The observed differences in parenchymal texture features between pre- and post- menopausal women suggest that mammographic texture can potentially serve as a surrogate imaging marker of endogenous hormonal activity.

  2. Rifaximin for preventing acute graft-versus-host disease: impact on plasma markers of inflammation and T-cell activation.

    PubMed

    Qayed, Muna; Langston, Amelia; Chiang, Kuang-Yueh; August, Keith; Hilinski, Joseph A; Cole, Conrad R; Rogatko, Andre; Bostick, Roberd M; Horan, John T

    2013-05-01

    In murine allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation models, inhibiting bacterial translocation stemming from conditioning-induced damage to the gut mucosa abrogates inflammatory stimulation of donor T cells, preventing acute graft-versus-host disease (AGVHD). We conducted a phase I trial to begin testing the hypothesis that rifaximin, a broadly acting oral antibiotic, would reduce systemic inflammation and T-cell activation. We administered rifaximin to 20 adolescents and younger adults (day -10 through day +30) receiving intensive conditioning. We measured the plasma level of interleukin-6, as a marker of conditioning-induced inflammation, and the levels of soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor-1 and soluble interleukin-2 receptor, as surrogate markers of AGVHD. We formed a historical control group (n=24), from a previous study of biomarkers in AGVHD. The increase in the treatment group's mean interleukin-6 level from baseline to day 0 was 73% less than that in the control group (P=0.006). The increase from baseline to day 15 in the treatment group's mean soluble tumor necrosis factor-1 and soluble interleukin-2 receptor levels was similar to the control group. Incidences of grade 2 to 4 AGVHD also did not differ. This suggests that rifaximin may abrogate bacterial translocation and resultant inflammation, but in alternative donor transplants this does not prevent downstream activation of donor T cells. PMID:23274384

  3. Herpes simplex virus type 2 serostatus is not associated with inflammatory or metabolic markers in antiretroviral therapy-treated HIV.

    PubMed

    Tan, Darrell H S; Raboud, Janet M; Szadkowski, Leah; Yi, Tae Joon; Shannon, Brett; Kaul, Rupert; Liles, W Conrad; Walmsley, Sharon L

    2015-03-01

    Systemic inflammation and immune activation may persist in HIV-infected persons on suppressive combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) and contribute to adverse health outcomes. We compared markers of immune activation, inflammation, and abnormal glucose and lipid metabolism in HIV-infected adults according to herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) serostatus in a 6-month observational cohort study in Toronto, Canada. HIV-infected adults on suppressive (viral load <50 copies/ml) cART were categorized as HSV-2 seropositive or seronegative using the HerpeSelect ELISA, and underwent study visits at baseline, 3 months, and 6 months. The primary outcome was the median percentage of activated (CD38(+)HLADR(+)) CD8 T cells. Secondary outcome measures included additional immune (activated CD4, regulatory T cells) and inflammatory (hsCRP, D-dimer, IL-1b, IL-6, MCP-1, TNF, sICAM-1, sVCAM-1, Ang1/Ang2 ratio) markers. Metabolic outcomes included the proportion with impaired fasting glucose/impaired glucose tolerance/diabetes, insulin sensitivity (calculated using the Matsuda index), insulin resistance (homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance), and fasting lipids. The impact of HSV-2 on each outcome was estimated using generalized estimating equation regression models. Of 84 participants, 38 (45%) were HSV-2 seropositive. HSV signs and symptoms were uncommon. Aside from D-dimer, which was more often detectable in HSV-2 seropositives (adjusted odds ratio=3.58, 95% CI=1.27, 10.07), HSV-2 serostatus was not associated with differences in any other immune, inflammatory cytokine, acute phase reactant, endothelial activation, or metabolic markers examined in univariable or multivariable models. During the study, CD8 and CD4 T cell activation declined by 0.16% and 0.08% per month, respectively, while regulatory T cells increased by 0.05% per month. HSV-2 serostatus was not consistently associated with immune activation, inflammatory, or lipid and glucose metabolic markers in

  4. Identification of Gene Markers for Activation of the Nuclear Receptor Pregnane X Receptor

    EPA Science Inventory

    Many environmentally-relevant chemicals and drugs activate the nuclear receptor pregnane X receptor (PXR). Activation of PXR in the mouse liver can lead to increases in liver weight in part through increased hepatocyte replication similar to chemicals that activate other nuclear ...

  5. A Fragment of the LG3 Peptide of Endorepellin Is Present in the Urine of Physically Active Mining Workers: A Potential Marker of Physical Activity

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Tony J.; Sampson, Dayle L.; Broszczak, Daniel; Chng, Yee L.; Carter, Shea L.; Leavesley, David I.; Parker, Anthony W.; Upton, Zee

    2012-01-01

    Biomarker analysis has been implemented in sports research in an attempt to monitor the effects of exertion and fatigue in athletes. This study proposed that while such biomarkers may be useful for monitoring injury risk in workers, proteomic approaches might also be utilised to identify novel exertion or injury markers. We found that urinary urea and cortisol levels were significantly elevated in mining workers following a 12 hour overnight shift. These levels failed to return to baseline over 24 h in the more active maintenance crew compared to truck drivers (operators) suggesting a lack of recovery between shifts. Use of a SELDI-TOF MS approach to detect novel exertion or injury markers revealed a spectral feature which was associated with workers in both work categories who were engaged in higher levels of physical activity. This feature was identified as the LG3 peptide, a C-terminal fragment of the anti-angiogenic/anti-tumourigenic protein endorepellin. This finding suggests that urinary LG3 peptide may be a biomarker of physical activity. It is also possible that the activity mediated release of LG3/endorepellin into the circulation may represent a biological mechanism for the known inverse association between physical activity and cancer risk/survival. PMID:22457785

  6. Sulforhodamine 101, a widely used astrocyte marker, can induce cortical seizure-like activity at concentrations commonly used.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Rune; Nedergaard, Maiken; Petersen, Nicolas Caesar

    2016-01-01

    Sulforhodamine 101 (SR101) is a preferential astrocyte marker widely used in 2-photon microscopy experiments. Here we show, that topical loading of two commonly used SR101 concentrations, 100 μM and 250 μM when incubated for 10 min, can induce seizure-like local field potential (LFP) activity in both anaesthetized and awake mouse sensori-motor cortex. This cortical seizure-like activity develops in less than ten minutes following topical loading, and when applied longer, these neuronal discharges reliably evoke contra-lateral hindlimb muscle contractions. Short duration (<1 min) incubation of 100 μM and 250 μM SR101 or application of lower concentrations 25 μM and 50 μM of SR101, incubated for 30 and 20 min, respectively, did not induce abnormal LFP activity in sensori-motor cortex, but did label astrocytes, and may thus be considered more appropriate concentrations for in vivo astrocyte labeling. In addition to label astrocytes SR101 may, at 100 μM and 250 μM, induce abnormal neuronal activity and interfere with cortical circuit activity. SR101 concentration of 50 μM or lower did not induce abnormal neuronal activity. We advocate that, to label astrocytes with SR101, concentrations no higher than 50 μM should be used for in vivo experiments. PMID:27457281

  7. Sulforhodamine 101, a widely used astrocyte marker, can induce cortical seizure-like activity at concentrations commonly used

    PubMed Central

    Rasmussen, Rune; Nedergaard, Maiken; Petersen, Nicolas Caesar

    2016-01-01

    Sulforhodamine 101 (SR101) is a preferential astrocyte marker widely used in 2-photon microscopy experiments. Here we show, that topical loading of two commonly used SR101 concentrations, 100 μM and 250 μM when incubated for 10 min, can induce seizure-like local field potential (LFP) activity in both anaesthetized and awake mouse sensori-motor cortex. This cortical seizure-like activity develops in less than ten minutes following topical loading, and when applied longer, these neuronal discharges reliably evoke contra-lateral hindlimb muscle contractions. Short duration (<1 min) incubation of 100 μM and 250 μM SR101 or application of lower concentrations 25 μM and 50 μM of SR101, incubated for 30 and 20 min, respectively, did not induce abnormal LFP activity in sensori-motor cortex, but did label astrocytes, and may thus be considered more appropriate concentrations for in vivo astrocyte labeling. In addition to label astrocytes SR101 may, at 100 μM and 250 μM, induce abnormal neuronal activity and interfere with cortical circuit activity. SR101 concentration of 50 μM or lower did not induce abnormal neuronal activity. We advocate that, to label astrocytes with SR101, concentrations no higher than 50 μM should be used for in vivo experiments. PMID:27457281

  8. Physical Activity is Related to Fatty Liver Marker in Obese Youth, Independently of Central Obesity or Cardiorespiratory Fitness

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Clarice; Aires, Luisa; Júnior, Ismael Freitas; Silva, Gustavo; Silva, Alexandre; Lemos, Luís; Mota, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is one of the most frequent complications associated with excess adiposity and has been identified as the leading cause of liver disease in pediatric populations worldwide. Because cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) is related to physical activity (PA) levels, and increased PA plays a protective role against NAFLD risk factors, the aim of this study was to analyze the association between PA and a fatty liver marker (alanine aminotransferase - ALT) in obese children and adolescents, independently of central adiposity or CRF. 131 obese children (83 girls, 7-15 year-olds) involved in a PA promotion program comprised the sample. Measurements included anthropometric and body composition evaluations (DEXA), biological measurements (venipuncture), CRF (progressive treadmill test), PA (accelerometry), and maturational stage (Tanner criteria). The associations between ALT with PA intensities, central obesity, and CRF were calculated by three different models of linear regression, adjusted for potential confounders. Level of significance was set at 95%. RESULTS: ALT was negatively associated with MVPA (β = -0.305), and CRF (β = -0.426), and positively associated with central obesity (β=.468). After adjustment for central obesity the negative and statistically significant association between ALT with MVPA (β = -0.364) and CRF (β = -0.550) still persists while a positive and significantly correlation was shown between ALT and SB (β = 0.382). Additional adjustment for CRF (Model 3) showed significant associations for all the PA intensities analyzed including light activity. PA at different intensities is associated to a fatty liver marker in obese children and adolescents, independently of central adiposity or CRF. Key points In a previous study our group observed that there might be a potential protective effect of cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) against abnormal ALT values; Considering that CRF is related to physical activity (PA

  9. Bone Markers

    MedlinePlus

    ... Alkaline Phosphatase; Osteocalcin; P1NP; Procollagen Type 1 N-Terminal Propeptide Formal name: Biochemical Markers of Bone Remodeling ... tests for evaluating bone turnover: C-telopeptide (C-terminal telopeptide of type 1 collagen (CTx)) – a marker ...

  10. Deoxyribonuclease activity of polyclonal IgGs: a putative serological marker in patients with spondyloarthritides.

    PubMed

    Kundzer, Alena V; Volkova, Margarita V; Bogdanos, Dimitrios P; Rödiger, Stefan; Schierack, Peter; Generalov, I; Nevinsky, Georgy A; Roggenbuck, Dirk

    2013-07-01

    Antibodies executing catalytic activity are referred to as antibody enzymes or short "abzymes" and may have diagnostic relevance. Abzymes with deoxyribonuclease (DNase) activity have been demonstrated in patients with autoimmune and infectious diseases. Despite several reports on the occurrence of DNase abzymes in systemic autoimmune rheumatic diseases, conclusive data about DNase activity of antibodies in patients with spondyloarthritides (SpAs) are lacking. In recent cross-sectional studies evaluating levels of IgG DNase activity in patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA), reactive arthritis (ReA), and ankylosing spondylitis (AS), DNase activity of IgG has been assessed by the rivanol clot method and confirmed by agarose gel electrophoresis. Remarkably, levels of IgG DNase activity were significantly higher in sera of SpA patients than those in control subjects. In patients with PsA, ReA, and AS, a positive correlation of DNase IgG activity with synovitis, disease activity, and stage of spondylitis was observed, respectively. Given the involvement of autoimmune reactions in cytolysis and connective tissue degradation in PsA, ReA, and to a lesser extent in AS, abzymes might have an impact on the pathophysiology of SpAs. Detection of IgG DNase activity in patients suffering from SpA represents an exciting new research field and may assist in the differential diagnosis of SpA. PMID:23592052

  11. Expression of stemness markers in mouse parthenogenetic-diploid blastocysts is influenced by slight variation of activation protocol adopted.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, Enrica; Geremia, Raffaele; Sette, Claudio

    2010-07-01

    The importance of obtaining stem cells through alternative methods has increased progressively in the recent years due to the potential role that embryonic stem (ES) cells play in the field of regenerative medicine. In this regard, generation of parthenogenetic blastocysts allows the production of ethic-free ES cells without the need to manipulate normal embryos. Our work was aimed at clarifying whether variations in the method adopted to generate diploid parthenogenetic blastocysts could determine differences in the quality of blastocysts produced. In vitro development of mouse oocytes activated with three protocols, using Sr2+ and cytochalasin for different time, was compared with that of in vivo fertilized embryos. We have evaluated the efficiency of blastocyst formation and analysed the expression pattern of the stemness markers OCT4, CDX2, and NANOG. Our results indicate that the yield of diploid parthenogenotes and the segregation of the stemness marker OCT4 in the developing blastocyst are influenced by the parthenogenetic protocol adopted. Particularly, even if all methods tested allowed the production of blastocysts in vitro, the correct segregation of OCT4 occurred only in blastocysts developed from oocytes concomitantly treated for 4 h with Sr2+ and cytochalasin D. Our results indicate that the protocol employed to develop parthenogenetic blastocysts in vitro affects the quality of cells in the inner cell mass. PMID:20376706

  12. Heat shock inhibits. alpha. -amylase synthesis in barley aleurone without inhibiting the activity of endoplasmic reticulum marker enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    Sticher, L.; Biswas, A.K.; Bush, D.S.; Jones, R.L. )

    1990-02-01

    The effects of heat shock on the synthesis of {alpha}-amylase and on the membranes of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of barley (Hordeum vulgare) aleurone were studied. Heat shock, imposed by raising the temperature of incubation from 25{degree}C to 40{degree}C for 3 hours, inhibits the accumulation of {alpha}-amylase and other proteins in the incubation medium of barley aleurone layers treated with gibberellic acid and Ca{sup 2+}. When ER is isolated from heat-shocked aleurone layers, less newly synthesized {alpha}-amylase is found associated with this membrane system. ER membranes, as indicated by the activities of NADH cytochrome c reductase and ATP-dependent Ca{sup 2+} transport, are not destroyed by heat stress, however. Although heat shock did not reduce the activity of ER membrane marker enzymes, it altered the buoyant density of these membranes. Whereas ER from control tissue showed a peak of marker enzyme activity at 27% to 28% sucrose (1.113-1.120 grams per cubic centimeter), ER from heat-shocked tissue peaked at 30% to 32% sucrose (1.127-1.137 grams per cubic centimeter). The synthesis of a group of proteins designated as heat-shock proteins (HSPs) was stimulated by heat shock. These HSPs were localized to different compartments of the aleurone cell. Several proteins ranging from 15 to 30 kilodaltons were found in the ER and the mitochondrial/plasma membrane fractions of heat-shocked cells, but none of the HSPs accumulated in the incubation medium of heat-shocked aleurone layers.

  13. Immunoassay for tumor markers in human serum based on Si nanoparticles and SiC@Ag SERS-active substrate.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Lu; Zhou, Jun; Feng, Zhao; Wang, Fuyan; Xie, Shushen; Bu, Shizhong

    2016-04-21

    Based on a sandwich structure consisting of nano-Si immune probes and a SiC@Ag SERS-active immune substrate, a kind of ultra-sensitive immunoassay protocol is presented to detect tumor markers in human serum. The nano-Si immune probes were prepared by immobilizing the detecting antibodies onto the surfaces of SiO2-coated Si nanoparticles (NPs) which were modified with 3-(aminopropyl)trimethoxysilane, and the SiC@Ag SERS-active immune substrates were prepared by immobilizing the captured antibodies on Ag film sputtered on SiC sandpaper. To the best of our knowledge, it is the first time that Si NPs are directly used as Raman tags in an immunoassay strategy. And, the SiC@Ag SERS-active substrates exhibit excellent surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) performances with an enhancement factor of ∼10(5), owing to the plasmonic effect of the Ag film on the rough surface of the SiC sandpaper. In our experiments, the sandwich immunoassay structure has been successfully applied to detect prostate specific antigen (PSA), α-fetoprotein (AFP) and carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA19-9) in a human serum sample and the limit of detections are as low as 1.79 fg mL(-1), 0.46 fg mL(-1) and 1.3 × 10(-3) U mL(-1), respectively. It reveals that the proposed immunoassay protocol has demonstrated a high sensitivity for tumor markers in human serum and a potential practicability in biosensing and clinical diagnostics. PMID:27003871

  14. A comparative phenotypical analysis of rheumatoid nodules and rheumatoid synovium with special reference to adhesion molecules and activation markers

    PubMed Central

    Elewaut, D.; De Keyser, F.; De Wever, N.; Baeten, D.; Van Damme, N.; Verbruggen, G.; Cuvelier, C.; Veys, E.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—(1)To analyse the in situ expression of adhesion molecules in rheumatoid nodules. (2) To compare the endothelial expression of adhesion molecules in synovial tissue and subcutaneous nodules obtained from the same patients. (3) To compare the expression of adhesion molecules and activation markers on T cell lines from nodules and synovium.
METHODS—(1) Immunohistochemical analysis by APAAP technique of E selectin, CD44, ICAM-1, PECAM-1, and VCAM-1 was performed on 10 rheumatoid nodules from seven patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA); nodules and synovium were simultaneously analysed from three patients. (2) T cell lines were generated from RA nodules (n=7) and synovium (n=7) by interleukin 2 expansion, and subsequently characterised by flow cytometry for surface expression of αEβ7, α4β7, CD44, L selectin, LFA-1a, PECAM-1, and CD30.
RESULTS—(1) In rheumatoid nodules, the palisading layer strongly stains for ICAM-1 and PECAM-1, but less pronounced for CD44. VCAM-1 staining was usually negative. ICAM-1 is upregulated in the vessels surrounding the central zone of fibrinoid necrosis. The immunohistological picture in different nodules derived from the same patient was similar. (2) The endothelial expression of adhesion molecules is comparable in RA nodules and synovium on an individual level, except for E selectin, which is overexpressed in nodule endothelium. (3) T cell lines from nodules and synovium display similar adhesion molecule profiles. However, the expression of CD30, a T cell activation marker linked with Th2 subsets, is higher in nodules compared with synovium.
CONCLUSION—These data support a recirculation hypothesis of T cells between articular and extra-articular manifestations in RA, although the activation state of the T cells in each of these localisations may differ.

 Keywords: T cells; adhesion molecules; rheumatoid nodules; rheumatoid synovium PMID:9797554

  15. Salivary Acetylcholinesterase Activity Is Increased in Parkinson's Disease: A Potential Marker of Parasympathetic Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Fedorova, Tatyana; Knudsen, Cindy Soendersoe; Mouridsen, Kim; Nexo, Ebba; Borghammer, Per

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Decreased salivary flow and xerostomia are frequent findings in Parkinson's disease (PD), possibly caused by alterations in the parasympathetic tonus. Here we explore salivary acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity as a potential biomarker in PD. Methods. We measured salivary flow, AChE activity, and total protein concentration in 30 PD patients and 49 healthy controls. We also performed exploratory correlation analyses with disease duration, motor symptom severity, autonomic complaints, and other nonmotor symptoms. Results. PD patients displayed significantly decreased salivary flow rate, significantly increased salivary AChE activity, and total protein concentration. Importantly, the AChE activity/total protein ratio was significantly increased in PD patients, suggesting that increased AChE activity cannot be explained solely by upconcentration of saliva. The Unified PD Rating Scale (UPDRS) score displayed significant correlation with total salivary protein (P = 0.002) and near-significant correlation with salivary flow (P = 0.07). Color vision test scores were also significantly correlated with AChE activity (P = 0.04) and total protein levels (P = 0.002). Conclusion. Salivary AChE activity is increased in PD patients compared to healthy controls. Future studies are needed to elucidate whether this parameter reflects the extent of neuronal damage and parasympathetic denervation in the salivary glands of PD patients. PMID:25767737

  16. The association of intensity and overall level of physical activity energy expenditure with a marker of insulin resistance

    PubMed Central

    Assah, F. K.; Brage, S.; Wareham, N. J.

    2008-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis Physical activity is important in preventing insulin resistance, but it is unclear which dimension of activity confers this benefit. We examined the association of overall level and intensity of physical activity with fasting insulin level, a marker of insulin resistance. Methods This was a cross-sectional analysis of the Medical Research Council Ely population-based cohort study (2000–2002). Physical activity energy expenditure (PAEE) in kJ kg−1 min−1 was measured by heart rate monitoring with individual calibration over a period of 4 days. The percentage of time spent above 1.5, 1.75 and 2 times resting heart rate (RHR) represented all light-to-vigorous, moderate-to-vigorous and vigorous activity, respectively. Results Data from a total of 643 non-diabetic individuals (319 men, 324 women) aged 50 to 75 years were analysed. In multivariate linear regression analyses, adjusting for age, sex and body fat percentage, PAEE was significantly associated with fasting insulin (pmol/l) (β = −0.875, p = 0.006). Time (% of total) spent above 1.75 × RHR and also time spent above 2 × RHR were both significantly associated with fasting insulin (β = −0.0109, p = 0.007 and β = −0.0365, p = 0.001 respectively), after adjusting for PAEE, age, sex and body fat percentage. Time spent above 1.5 × RHR was not significantly associated with fasting insulin in a similar model (β = −0.0026, p = 0.137). Conclusions/interpretation The association between PAEE and fasting insulin level, a marker of insulin resistance, may be attributable to the time spent in moderate-to-vigorous and vigorous activity, but not to time spent in light-intensity physical activity. PMID:18488189

  17. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) induces expression of B-cell activation markers on in vitro infection of EBV-negative B-lymphoma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Calender, A; Billaud, M; Aubry, J P; Banchereau, J; Vuillaume, M; Lenoir, G M

    1987-01-01

    A set of B-cell activation markers, including the EBV/C3d receptor [complement receptor type 2 (CR2) (CD21)], the 45-kDa lymphoblastoid cell-associated (Blast-2) antigen (CD23), and the B-cell restricted activation (Bac-1) antigen (which was recently identified as a potential B-cell growth factor receptor) can be turned on by infecting lymphoma cells that are genome negative for Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) with the B95-8 immortalizing strain of the virus. The nonimmortalizing EBV variant, strain P3HR-1, which possesses a deletion within the BamHI WYH region of the genome containing the coding sequence for the EBV-determined nuclear antigen 2, does not induce expression of these markers. Other lymphoblastoid cell-associated antigen markers can be activated by infection with either immortalizing or nonimmortalizing viruses. These results suggest that the immortalizing potential of EBV is correlated with its ability to induce expression of B-cell activation markers, which are suspected to play a major role in the physiological pathway leading to lymphoid cell proliferation. The viral genomic region deleted in the nonimmortalizing strain of EBV seems to be required for activation of some of these markers. Human lymphoma cell lines, such as those used in this study, can thus help identify the specific EBV genes involved in lymphoid B-cell proliferation and the mechanism of action of these genes. PMID:2825176

  18. Patterns of frontoparietal activation as a marker for unsuccessful visuospatial processing in healthy aging.

    PubMed

    Drag, Lauren L; Light, Sharee N; Langenecker, Scott A; Hazlett, Kathleen E; Wilde, Elisabeth A; Welsh, Robert; Steinberg, Brett A; Bieliauskas, Linas A

    2016-09-01

    Visuospatial abilities are sensitive to age-related decline, although the neural basis for this decline (and its everyday behavioral correlates) is as yet poorly understood. fMRI was employed to examine age-related differences in patterns of functional activation that underlie changes in visuospatial processing. All participants completed a brief neuropsychological battery and also a figure ground task (FGT) assessing visuospatial processing while fMRI was recorded. Participants included 16 healthy older adults (OA; aged 69-82 years) and 16 healthy younger adults (YA; aged 20-35 years). We examined age-related differences in behavioral performance on the FGT in relation to patterns of fMRI activation. OA demonstrated reduced performance on the FGT task and showed increased activation of supramarginal parietal cortex as well as increased activation of frontal and temporal regions compared to their younger counterparts. Performance on the FGT related to increased supramarginal gyrus activity and increased medial prefrontal activity in OAs, but not YAs. Our results are consistent with an anterior-posterior compensation model. Successful FGT performance requires the perception and integration of multiple stimuli and thus it is plausible that healthy aging may be accompanied by changes in visuospatial processing that mimic a subtle form of dorsal simultanagnosia. Overall, decreased visuospatial processing in OA relates to an altered frontoparietal neurobiological signature that may contribute to the general phenomenon of increasingly fragmented execution of behavior associated with normal aging. PMID:26195153

  19. Expression of Early Activation Marker CD69 on Peripheral Blood Lymphocytes from Pregnant Women after First Trimester Alloimmunization.

    PubMed

    Krechetova, L V; Vtorushina, V V; Nikolaeva, M A; Golubeva, E L; Van'ko, L V; Saribegova, V A; Tetruashvili, N K

    2016-08-01

    We studied the expression of an early activation marker CD69 in peripheral blood lymphocytes of pregnant women with a history of recurrent pregnancy loss after immunization with paternal lymphocytes. Spontaneous and phytohemagglutinin-stimulated expression of CD69 on the surface of T cells and NK cells isolated from the peripheral blood was analyzed. On gestation week 5-6, the number of T cells expressing CD69 spontaneously and after stimulation was significantly higher in women with miscarriage than in woman with prolonged pregnancy. However, the number of cells with CD56(+) phenotype expressing CD69 did not differ in these groups. No differences were found in the number of cells of all subpopulations expressing CD69 after stimulation on gestation week 12 in woman with full-term current pregnancy and in woman with physiological pregnancy. PMID:27591871

  20. Imaging Caspase-3 Activation as a Marker of Apoptosis-Targeted Treatment Response in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Delphine L.; Engle, Jacquelyn T.; Griffin, Elizabeth A.; Miller, J. Philip; Chu, Wenhua; Zhou, Dong; Mach, Robert H.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We tested whether positron emission tomography (PET) with the caspase-3 targeted isatin analog [18F]WC-4-116 could image caspase-3 activation in response to an apoptosis-inducing anticancer therapy. Procedures [18F]WC-4-116 uptake was determined in etoposide-treated EL4 cells. Biodistribution studies with [18F]WC-4-116 and [18F]ICMT-18, a non-caspase-3-targeted tracer, as well as [18F]WC-4-116 microPET imaging assessed responses in Colo205 tumor bearing mice treated with death receptor 5 (DR5) targeted agonist antibodies. Immunohistochemical staining and enzyme assays confirmed caspase-3 activation. Two-way analysis of variance or Student’s t-test assessed for treatment-related changes in tracer uptake. Results [18F]WC-4-116 increased 8 ± 2-fold in etoposide-treated cells. The [18F]WC-4-116 %ID/g also increased significantly in tumors with high caspase-3 enzyme activity (p < 0.05). [18F]ICMT-18 tumor uptake did not differ in tumors with high or low caspase-3 enzyme activity. Conclusions [18F]WC-4-116 uptake in vivo reflects increased caspase-3 activation and may be useful for detecting caspase-3 mediated apoptosis treatment responses in cancer. PMID:25344147

  1. Measurement of Fractional Exhaled Nitric Oxide as a Marker of Disease Activity in Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ikonomi, Erkanda; Rothstein, Robin D.; Ehrlich, Adam C.; Friedenberg, Frank K.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims Definitive diagnosis of IBD requires endoscopic and pathologic confirmation. These tools are also used to classify disease activity. Our aim was to determine if the fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) could be utilized to screen for IBD and assess for disease activity. Methods We matched weighted IBD cases and controls from the 2009–2010 NHANES dataset. All subjects underwent measurement of FeNO using standardized techniques. We assessed for potential confounders for FeNO measurement including age, height, and asthma. For IBD subjects, we used the presence of diarrhea, fatigue, and weight loss as a proxy for IBD activity. Laboratory parameters examined to estimate disease activity included anemia (≤ 10 g/dl), iron deficiency (ferritin ≤ 20 ng/ml), hypoalbuminemia (≤ 3.2 g/dl), and CRP (≥ 1.1 mg/dl). Results The weighted sample represented 199,414,901 subjects. The weighted prevalence of IBD was 2,084,895 (1.0%). IBD subjects had nearly the same FeNO level as those without IBD (17.0 ± 16.2 vs. 16.7 ± 14.5 ppb). The odds of a FeNO > 25 ppb was half (OR=0.501; 95% CI 0.497–0.504) for subjects with IBD compared to those without IBD after controlling for confounders. The AUROC curve for FeNO was 0.47 (0.35–0.59). FeNO levels were not higher in patients with laboratory values suggestive of active disease. FeNO levels were higher in IBD patients with diarrhea, rectal urgency, and fatigue but were lower in those with unintentional weight loss. Conclusion Measurement of FeNO does not appear to be useful to screen for IBD or assess disease activity. PMID:27398403

  2. Platelet-rich plasma stimulated by pulse electric fields: Platelet activation, procoagulant markers, growth factor release and cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Frelinger Iii, A L; Torres, A S; Caiafa, A; Morton, C A; Berny-Lang, M A; Gerrits, A J; Carmichael, S L; Neculaes, V B; Michelson, A D

    2016-03-01

    Therapeutic use of activated platelet-rich plasma (PRP) has been explored for wound healing, hemostasis and antimicrobial wound applications. Pulse electric field (PEF) stimulation may provide more consistent platelet activation and avoid complications associated with the addition of bovine thrombin, the current state of the art ex vivo activator of therapeutic PRP. The aim of this study was to compare the ability of PEF, bovine thrombin and thrombin receptor activating peptide (TRAP) to activate human PRP, release growth factors and induce cell proliferation in vitro. Human PRP was prepared in the Harvest SmartPreP2 System and treated with vehicle, PEF, bovine thrombin, TRAP or Triton X-100. Platelet activation and procoagulant markers and microparticle generation were measured by flow cytometry. Released growth factors were measured by ELISA. The releasates were tested for their ability to stimulate proliferation of human epithelial cells in culture. PEF produced more platelet-derived microparticles, P-selectin-positive particles and procoagulant annexin V-positive particles than bovine thrombin or TRAP. These differences were associated with higher levels of released epidermal growth factor after PEF than after bovine thrombin or TRAP but similar levels of platelet-derived, vascular-endothelial, and basic fibroblast growth factors, and platelet factor 4. Supernatant from PEF-treated platelets significantly increased cell proliferation compared to plasma. In conclusion, PEF treatment of fresh PRP results in generation of microparticles, exposure of prothrombotic platelet surfaces, differential release of growth factors compared to bovine thrombin and TRAP and significant cell proliferation. These results, together with PEF's inherent advantages, suggest that PEF may be a superior alternative to bovine thrombin activation of PRP for therapeutic applications. PMID:26030682

  3. Motion compensation for brain PET imaging using wireless MR active markers in simultaneous PET-MR: phantom and non-human primate studies

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chuan; Ackerman, Jerome L.; Petibon, Yoann; Normandin, Marc D.; Brady, Thomas J.; El Fakhri, Georges; Ouyang, Jinsong

    2014-01-01

    Brain PET scanning plays an important role in the diagnosis, prognostication and monitoring of many brain diseases. Motion artifacts from head motion are one of the major hurdles in brain PET. In this work, we propose to use wireless MR active markers to track head motion in real time during a simultaneous PET-MR brain scan and incorporate the motion measured by the markers in the listmode PET reconstruction. Several wireless MR active markers and a dedicated fast MR tracking pulse sequence module were built. Data were acquired on an ACR Flangeless PET phantom with multiple spheres and a non-human primate with and without motion. Motions of the phantom and monkey’s head were measured with the wireless markers using a dedicated MR tracking sequence module. The motion PET data were reconstructed using list-mode reconstruction with and without motion correction. Static reference was used as gold standard for quantitative analysis. The motion artifacts, which were prominent on the images without motion correction, were eliminated by the wireless marker based motion correction in both the phantom and monkey experiments. Quantitative analysis was performed on the phantom motion data from 24 independent noise realizations. The reduction of bias of sphere-to-background PET contrast by active marker based motion correction ranges from 26% to 64% and 17% to 25% for hot (i.e., radioactive) and cold (i.e., non-radioactive) spheres, respectively. The motion correction improved the channelized Hotelling observer signal-to-noise ratio of the spheres by 1.2 to 6.9 depending on their locations and sizes. The proposed wireless MR active marker based motion correction technique removes the motion artifacts in the reconstructed PET images and yields accurate quantitative values. PMID:24418501

  4. Motion compensation for brain PET imaging using wireless MR active markers in simultaneous PET-MR: phantom and non-human primate studies.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chuan; Ackerman, Jerome L; Petibon, Yoann; Normandin, Marc D; Brady, Thomas J; El Fakhri, Georges; Ouyang, Jinsong

    2014-05-01

    Brain PET scanning plays an important role in the diagnosis, prognostication and monitoring of many brain diseases. Motion artifacts from head motion are one of the major hurdles in brain PET. In this work, we propose to use wireless MR active markers to track head motion in real time during a simultaneous PET-MR brain scan and incorporate the motion measured by the markers in the listmode PET reconstruction. Several wireless MR active markers and a dedicated fast MR tracking pulse sequence module were built. Data were acquired on an ACR Flangeless PET phantom with multiple spheres and a non-human primate with and without motion. Motions of the phantom and monkey's head were measured with the wireless markers using a dedicated MR tracking sequence module. The motion PET data were reconstructed using list-mode reconstruction with and without motion correction. Static reference was used as gold standard for quantitative analysis. The motion artifacts, which were prominent on the images without motion correction, were eliminated by the wireless marker based motion correction in both the phantom and monkey experiments. Quantitative analysis was performed on the phantom motion data from 24 independent noise realizations. The reduction of bias of sphere-to-background PET contrast by active marker based motion correction ranges from 26% to 64% and 17% to 25% for hot (i.e., radioactive) and cold (i.e., non-radioactive) spheres, respectively. The motion correction improved the channelized Hotelling observer signal-to-noise ratio of the spheres by 1.2 to 6.9 depending on their locations and sizes. The proposed wireless MR active marker based motion correction technique removes the motion artifacts in the reconstructed PET images and yields accurate quantitative values. PMID:24418501

  5. Hematological and Biochemical Markers of Iron Status in a Male, Young, Physically Active Population

    PubMed Central

    Nunes, Lázaro Alessandro Soares; Grotto, Helena Zerlotti W.; Brenzikofer, René; Macedo, Denise Vaz

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to establish reference intervals (RIs) for the hemogram and iron status biomarkers in a physically active population. The study population included male volunteers (n = 150) with an average age of 19 ± 1 years who had participated in a regular and controlled exercise program for four months. Blood samples were collected to determine hematological parameters using a Sysmex XE-5000 analyzer (Sysmex, Kobe, Japan). Iron, total iron-binding capacity (TIBC), transferrin saturation and ferritin, and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (CRP) concentrations in serum samples were measured using commercial kits (Roche Diagnostics, GmbH, Mannheim, Germany) and a Roche/Hitachi 902 analyzer. The RIs were established using the RefVal program 4.1b. The leucocyte count, TIBC, and CRP and ferritin concentrations exhibited higher RIs compared with those in a nonphysically active population. Thirty volunteers (outliers) were removed from the reference population due to blood abnormalities. Among the outliers, 46% exhibited higher CRP concentrations and lower concentrations of iron and reticulocyte hemoglobin compared with the nonphysically active population (P < 0.001). Our results showed that it is important to establish RIs for certain laboratory parameters in a physically active population, especially for tests related to the inflammatory response and iron metabolism. PMID:25045665

  6. Xeno‐oestrogenic activity in serum as marker of occupational pesticide exposure

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Helle Raun; Nielsen, Flemming; Nielsen, Jesper Bo; Kjaerstad, Mia Birkhoej; Baelum, Jesper; Grandjean, Philippe

    2007-01-01

    Background An increasing number of currently used pesticides are reported to possess oestrogen‐like properties or to disturb the endocrine system in other ways. Objectives To investigate if xeno‐oestrogenic activity in serum can be used as a biomarker of the combined exposure to pesticides with oestrogen‐like properties in an occupational setting. Methods Serum samples were obtained from two separate cohorts representing non‐pregnant and pregnant female greenhouse workers in Denmark. Serum samples from 270 non‐pregnant women and 173 pregnant women were analysed for xeno‐oestrogenic activity. A fraction containing major xeno‐oestrogens but without pharmaceutical and endogenously produced oestrogens was isolated from each serum sample by solid‐phase extraction and tested for oestrogenic response in a MCF‐7 cell proliferation assay. The pesticide exposure for each woman was categorised as low, medium or high based on information collected by detailed interviews of the women and the employers. Results In both cohorts, an exposure‐associated increase in the xeno‐oestrogenic activity in serum was demonstrated. Among the pregnant women, the association between pesticide exposure and xeno‐oestrogenic activity in serum was statistically significant for women who had been at work within the last week, while no association was observed for women who had not been at work during the most recent week. Conclusions The study illustrates the usefulness of this biomarker for qualitative assessment of the combined exposure to mixtures of oestrogen‐like pesticides. Although the individual pesticides responsible for the xeno‐oestrogenic response were not identified, the study demonstrates that, even within highly‐controlled greenhouse operations, occupational exposure to oestrogen‐like pesticides can result in detectable impacts on hormonal activity in the blood. PMID:17478572

  7. Thrombin-Mediated Platelet Activation of Lysed Whole Blood and Platelet-Rich Plasma: A Comparison Between Platelet Activation Markers and Ultrastructural Alterations.

    PubMed

    Augustine, Tanya N; van der Spuy, Wendy J; Kaberry, Lindsay L; Shayi, Millicent

    2016-06-01

    Platelet ultrastructural alterations representing spurious activation have been identified in pathological conditions. A limitation of platelet studies is that sample preparation may lead to artifactual activation processes which may confound results, impacting the use of scanning electron microscopy as a supplemental diagnostic tool. We used scanning electron microscopy and flow cytometry to analyze platelet activation in platelet-rich plasma (PRP) and whole blood (WB) samples. PRP generated using a single high g force centrifugation, and WB samples treated with a red blood cell lysis buffer, were exposed to increasing concentrations of the agonist thrombin. Platelets in lysed WB samples responded to thrombin by elevating the activation marker CD62p definitively, with corresponding ultrastructural changes indicating activation. Conversely, CD62p expression in PRP preparations remained static. Ultrastructural analysis revealed fully activated platelets even under low concentration thrombin stimulation, with considerable fibrin deposition. It is proposed that the method for PRP production induced premature platelet activation, preventable by using an inhibitor of platelet aggregation and fibrin polymerization. Nevertheless, our results show a definitive correspondence between flow cytometry and scanning electron microscopy in platelet activation studies, highlighting the potential of the latter technique as a supplemental diagnostic tool. PMID:27329313

  8. Soluble ST2: A new and promising activity marker in ulcerative colitis

    PubMed Central

    Díaz-Jiménez, David; Núñez, Lucía E; Beltrán, Caroll J; Candia, Enzo; Suazo, Cristóbal; Álvarez-Lobos, Manuel; González, María-Julieta; Hermoso, Marcela A; Quera, Rodrigo

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To correlate circulating soluble ST2 (sST2) levels with the severity of ulcerative colitis (UC) and serum levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, and to demonstrate the predictive power of sST2 levels for differentiation between active and inactive UC. METHODS: We recruited 153 patients: 82 with UC, 26 with Crohn’s disease (CD) and 43 disease controls [non-inflammatory bowel disease (IBD)]. Subjects were excluded if they had diagnosis of asthma, autoimmune diseases or hypertension. The serum levels of sST2 and pro-inflammatory cytokines [pg/mL; median (25th-75th)] as well as clinical features, endoscopic and histological features, were subjected to analyses. The sST2 performance for discrimination between active and inactive UC, non-IBD and healthy controls (HC) was determined with regard to sensitivity and specificity, and Spearman’s rank correlation coefficient (r). To validate the method, the area under the curve (AUC) of receiver-operator characteristic (ROC) was determined (AUC, 95% CI) and the total ST2 content of the colonic mucosa in UC patients was correlated with circulating levels of sST2. RESULTS: The serum sST2 value was significantly higher in patients with active [235.80 (90.65-367.90) pg/mL] rather than inactive UC [33.19 (20.04-65.32) pg/mL], based on clinical, endoscopic and histopathological characteristics, as well as compared with non-IBD and HC (P < 0.001). The median level of sST2 in CD patients was 54.17 (35.02-122.0) pg/mL, significantly higher than that of the HC group only (P < 0.01). The cutoff was set at 74.87 pg/mL to compare active with inactive UC in a multicenter cohort of patients. Values of sensitivity, specificity, and ability to correctly classify UC, according to activity, were 83.33%, 83.33% and 83.33%, respectively. The AUC of the ROC curve to assess the ability of this molecule to discriminate between active vs inactive UC was 0.92 (0.86-0.97, P < 0.0001). The serum levels of sST2 in patients with UC significantly

  9. Arginase activity - a marker of disease status in patients with visceral leishmaniasis in ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Abebe, Tamrat; Takele, Yegnasew; Weldegebreal, Teklu; Cloke, Tom; Closs, Ellen; Corset, Camille; Hailu, Asrat; Hailu, Workagegnehu; Sisay, Yifru; Corware, Karina; Corset, Margaux; Modolell, Manuel; Munder, Markus; Tacchini-Cottier, Fabienne; Müller, Ingrid; Kropf, Pascale

    2013-01-01

    The underlying mechanisms resulting in the profound immune suppression characteristic of human visceral leishmaniasis (VL) are not fully understood. Here, we tested the hypothesis that arginase, an enzyme associated with immunosuppression, is higher in patients with VL and contributes to impaired T cell responses. We recruited patients with VL before and after treatment and healthy controls and measured the arginase metabolism in the blood of these individuals. Our results show that arginase activity is significantly higher in the blood of patients with active VL as compared to controls. These high levels of arginase decline considerably once the patients are successfully treated. We identified the phenotype of arginase-expressing cells among PBMCs as neutrophils and show that their frequency was increased in PBMCs of patients before treatment; this coincides with reduced levels of L-arginine in the plasma and decreased expression levels of CD3ζ in T cells. PMID:23556019

  10. Telomerase Activity as a Potential Diagnostic Marker for Triage of Abnormal Pap Smears

    PubMed Central

    Ault, Kevin A.; Allen, Heather K.; Phillips, Stacia L.; Bridget Zimmerman, M.; Klingelhutz, Aloysius J.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives To determine whether there is an association between high levels of telomerase and premalignant cervical disease and to provide a preliminary analysis of telomerase activity as a potential triage strategy. Materials and Methods Premenopausal women were invited to participate in the study during routine gynecologic visits as well as visits where colposcopy was performed. Samples were taken from the cervix using a broom device and placed in cold phosphate-buffered saline. A total of 92 samples were evaluated. Cells were counted and lysed, and a semi-quantitative measure of telomerase activity was determined using a commercially available telomerase enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay kit. The presence of human papillomavirus (HPV) types 16 and 18 was assessed by polymerase chain reaction analysis. One-way analysis of variance was used to test for the association of telomerase activity with cytology, HPV type 16 or 18 status, and colposcopy and/or biopsy findings. Results When telomerase levels were analyzed according to Pap smear results, there were no differences among four groups of cytology findings (normal, atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance, low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion, and high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion). When colposcopy and/or biopsy results were considered, significantly higher levels of telomerase were detected in cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) 2,3 samples than in normal Pap smear samples and CIN 1 samples (p = .035). There was no significant difference in telomerase levels between samples that tested positive for HPV type 16 or 18 and those that did not (p = .111). Conclusions Telomerase levels were significantly higher in cytologic samples from women with biopsy-proven CIN 2,3 than in samples from women with normal cytology results or CIN 1. These results warrant larger studies to determine whether telomerase activity may be a useful triage tool for abnormal cytologic findings. PMID:15870530

  11. Vitamin D status and effect of interferon-β1a treatment on MRI activity and serum inflammation markers in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Røsjø, Egil; Myhr, Kjell-Morten; Løken-Amsrud, Kristin I; Bakke, Søren J; Beiske, Antonie G; Bjerve, Kristian S; Hovdal, Harald; Lilleås, Finn; Midgard, Rune; Pedersen, Tom; Šaltytė Benth, Jūratė; Torkildsen, Øivind; Wergeland, Stig; Michelsen, Annika E; Aukrust, Pål; Ueland, Thor; Holmøy, Trygve

    2015-03-15

    To explore if vitamin D modulates interferon-β1a treatment effects in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis, we examined relationships between serum vitamin D and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) activity and ten systemic inflammation markers in 88 patients, before and during treatment. Odds ratios for all MRI parameters were negatively associated with vitamin D levels before therapy, but converged to equally low values irrespective of vitamin D status during treatment. During therapy, similar alterations of MRI activity and inflammation markers were found across patients categorized by mean vitamin D values. This suggests that vitamin D status has no major influence on interferon-β1a treatment effects. PMID:25773151

  12. Elastic Scattering Spectroscopy as an Optical Marker of Inflammatory Bowel Disease Activity and Subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Diaz, Eladio; Atkinson, Christopher; Jepeal, Lisa I.; Berg, Adam; Huang, Christopher S.; Cerda, Sandra R.; O’Brien, Michael J.; Bigio, Irving J.; Farraye, Francis A.; Singh, Satish K.

    2016-01-01

    Background In 10% to 15% of individuals, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is difficult to classify as ulcerative colitis (UC) or Crohn’s disease (CD). Previous work has demonstrated that probe-based elastic scattering spectroscopy (ESS) can produce spectra, informed by parameters like tissue ultrastructure and hemoglobin content, capable of differentiating pathologies. This study investigates whether ESS is an in vivo optical biomarker for the presence, activity, and type of IBD in the colon. Methods Pilot study, a retrospective data analysis. ESS spectra of endoscopically normal and inflamed colon were obtained from 48 patients with IBD and 46 non-IBD controls. Measurements from patients with IBD were categorized as CD or UC based on clinical diagnosis. Spectra were analyzed using high-dimensional methods. Leave-one-patient-out cross-validation was used to obtain diagnostic performance estimates. Results Patients with IBD were distinguishable from non-IBD controls with a sensitivity of 0.93 and specificity of 0.91 based on readings from endoscopically normal mucosa, and 0.94 and 0.93 from inflamed mucosa. In patients with IBD, histologically normal and inflamed colon were distinguishable with per-class accuracies of 0.83 and 0.89, respectively; histologically normal from inactive inflammation with accuracies of 0.73 and 0.89, respectively; and inactive from active colitis with accuracies of 0.87 and 0.84, respectively. The diagnosis of CD versus UC was made with per-class accuracies of 0.92 and 0.87 in normal and 0.87 and 0.85 in inflamed mucosa, respectively. Conclusions ESS, a simple, low-cost clinically friendly optical biopsy modality, has the potential to enhance the endoscopic assessment of IBD and its activity in real time and may help to distinguish CD from UC. PMID:24798637

  13. Myofibroblasts are distinguished from activated skin fibroblasts by the expression of AOC3 and other associated markers.

    PubMed

    Hsia, Lin-Ting; Ashley, Neil; Ouaret, Djamila; Wang, Lai Mun; Wilding, Jennifer; Bodmer, Walter F

    2016-04-12

    Pericryptal myofibroblasts in the colon and rectum play an important role in regulating the normal colorectal stem cell niche and facilitating tumor progression. Myofibroblasts previously have been distinguished from normal fibroblasts mostly by the expression of α smooth muscle actin (αSMA). We now have identified AOC3 (amine oxidase, copper containing 3), a surface monoamine oxidase, as a new marker of myofibroblasts by showing that it is the target protein of the myofibroblast-reacting mAb PR2D3. The normal and tumor tissue distribution and the cell line reactivity of AOC3 match that expected for myofibroblasts. We have shown that the surface expression of AOC3 is sensitive to digestion by trypsin and collagenase and that anti-AOC3 antibodies can be used for FACS sorting of myofibroblasts obtained by nonenzymatic procedures. Whole-genome microarray mRNA-expression profiles of myofibroblasts and skin fibroblasts revealed four additional genes that are significantly differentially expressed in these two cell types: NKX2-3 and LRRC17 in myofibroblasts and SHOX2 and TBX5 in skin fibroblasts. TGFβ substantially down-regulated AOC3 expression in myofibroblasts but in skin fibroblasts it dramatically increased the expression of αSMA. A knockdown of NKX2-3 in myofibroblasts caused a decrease of myofibroblast-related gene expression and increased expression of the fibroblast-associated gene SHOX2, suggesting that NKX2-3 is a key mediator for maintaining myofibroblast characteristics. Our results show that colorectal myofibroblasts, as defined by the expression of AOC3, NKX2-3, and other markers, are a distinctly different cell type from TGFβ-activated fibroblasts. PMID:27036009

  14. Markers of endothelial cell activation and immune activation are increased in patients with severe leptospirosis and associated with disease severity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objectives: Previous studies concluded that haemorrhage is one of the most accurate prognostic factors of mortality in leptospirosis. Therefore, endothelial cell activation was investigated in relation to disease severity in severe leptospirosis. Methods: Prospective cohort study of severe leptospi...

  15. Geomorphological markers of faulting and neotectonic activity along the western Andean margin, northern Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Audin, Laurence; Herail, Gérard; Riquelme, Rodrigo; Darrozes, José; Martinod, Joseph; Font, Eric

    2003-12-01

    In the Atacama Desert, northern Chile, some ephemeral channels are developed in the Plio-Quaternary alluvial sequence that caps the Neogene Atacama Gravels Formation. Geomorphological studies and high-resolution digital elevation data (GPS) along a structural transect in the Central Depression are used to document modern growth history of subtle folding and faulting in the fore-arc region. Outcrop data of the most recent deposits are combined with observations of warped and faulted late Quaternary pediments, alluvial fans and terrace surfaces to propose unsuspected neotectonic processes on the western flank of the Domeyko Cordillera. Neotectonic process recognition is here based largely upon the interpretation of alluvial landforms, drainage organisation and evolution as the intermittent river network shows systematic patterns of course deflections, successive incisions or deposition processes as it encounters the fault scarps or folds in the superficial deposits. This area presents both N-S-trending active vertical faults in the topographically higher pampas, and N-S-trending active folding in the lower pampas. These faults seem to accommodate E-W extension and compression that could be related to uplift of the western Andean margin within a compressive context. Uplift may have taken place unevenly over the past few million years after the deposition of the superficial alluvial surfaces that cap the Neogene Atacama Gravels. Copyright

  16. Transcriptional activity of interferon gamma and two subunits of its receptor as molecular markers of myocarditis.

    PubMed

    Smolik, Sławomir; Domal-Kwiatkowska, Dorota; Nowalany-Kozielska, Ewa; Wojnicz, Romuald; Swiatowska, Longina; Ludmiła, Weglarz

    2008-01-01

    Inflammatory cytokines have an important role in the pathogenesis of myocarditis, but still little is known about the importance of interferon gamma (IFNg) in this disease. The aim of the study was to evaluate the prognostic value of the initial transcriptional activity of IFNg and two subunits of its receptor as measured with the use of QRT-PCR and SYBRGreen chemistry in the group of 63 patients with clinically confirmed myocarditis who were treated with statin or immunosupressive therapy. The initial values of IFNg and the ratio of IFNgRb/IFNgRa were statistically different in the analyzed group of patients. The prognostic value of IFNg and IFNgRb/IFNgRa was determined by logistic regression analysis. PMID:19172849

  17. Urinary neopterin, a non-invasive marker of mammalian cellular immune activation, is highly stable under field conditions

    PubMed Central

    Heistermann, Michael; Higham, James P.

    2015-01-01

    Studying immunity and immune function in ecology and evolution requires field studies, but there has been a dearth of non-invasive markers of immune activation available for studying large wild mammals. Recently, we analytically and biologically validated the measurement of urinary neopterin (NEO), a biomarker of cellular immune activation, in captive macaques. However, applying this to free-ranging settings is complicated by issues involving sample collection, processing, storage, and transport. Here, we collected urine samples from captive macaques and undertook experiments simulating common field issues. We tested the effects on urinary NEO sample measurements following: dirt and faecal contamination; storage at room temperature; differences in processing and long-term storage methods (freezing, lyophilising, blotting onto filter paper); and freeze-thaw cycles. Our results show that concentrations of urinary NEO are highly stable – they are not affected by soil or faecal contamination, can be collected on filter paper and stored for many months frozen or lyophilised with minimal effect, and are resistant to multiple 24 hr freeze-thaws. With the addition of a biocidal preservative, concentrations are even stable at room temperature for long periods. Urinary NEO is remarkably resilient, and is highly suitable for non-invasive field studies of cellular immune responses in wild large mammals. PMID:26549509

  18. Comparison of hematological alterations and markers of B-cell activation in workers exposed to benzene, formaldehyde and trichloroethylene.

    PubMed

    Bassig, Bryan A; Zhang, Luoping; Vermeulen, Roel; Tang, Xiaojiang; Li, Guilan; Hu, Wei; Guo, Weihong; Purdue, Mark P; Yin, Songnian; Rappaport, Stephen M; Shen, Min; Ji, Zhiying; Qiu, Chuangyi; Ge, Yichen; Hosgood, H Dean; Reiss, Boris; Wu, Banghua; Xie, Yuxuan; Li, Laiyu; Yue, Fei; Freeman, Laura E Beane; Blair, Aaron; Hayes, Richard B; Huang, Hanlin; Smith, Martyn T; Rothman, Nathaniel; Lan, Qing

    2016-07-01

    Benzene, formaldehyde (FA) and trichloroethylene (TCE) are ubiquitous chemicals in workplaces and the general environment. Benzene is an established myeloid leukemogen and probable lymphomagen. FA is classified as a myeloid leukemogen but has not been associated with non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), whereas TCE has been associated with NHL but not myeloid leukemia. Epidemiologic associations between FA and myeloid leukemia, and between benzene, TCE and NHL are, however, still debated. Previously, we showed that these chemicals are associated with hematotoxicity in cross-sectional studies of factory workers in China, which included extensive personal monitoring and biological sample collection. Here, we compare and contrast patterns of hematotoxicity, monosomy 7 in myeloid progenitor cells (MPCs), and B-cell activation biomarkers across these studies to further evaluate possible mechanisms of action and consistency of effects with observed hematologic cancer risks. Workers exposed to benzene or FA, but not TCE, showed declines in cell types derived from MPCs, including granulocytes and platelets. Alterations in lymphoid cell types, including B cells and CD4+ T cells, and B-cell activation markers were apparent in workers exposed to benzene or TCE. Given that alterations in myeloid and lymphoid cell types are associated with hematological malignancies, our data provide biologic insight into the epidemiological evidence linking benzene and FA exposure with myeloid leukemia risk, and TCE and benzene exposure with NHL risk. PMID:27207665

  19. Effect of major burns on early and late activating markers of peripheral blood T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Sayed, S; Bakry, R; El-Shazly, M; El-Oteify, M; Terzaki, S; Fekry, M

    2012-03-31

    It is known that lymphocytes immunophenotype is a reflection of the functional level of the immune system. The immunosuppressive effect of major burns is also known for many years. T lymphocytes of 50 major burn patients were analyzed in base line (BL) samples at 24 hours and at 1 week and 2 weeks after burn, using monoclonal antibodies of CD3, CD4, CD8, CD25 (IL2R) and HLA-DR by flow cytometry and β2-microglobulin (β2-m) by ELISA. Recorded values were compared with those of 50 healthy donors. There was statistically significant reduction in absolute number of CD3 positive cells (CD3+) (p<0.000) and CD4/CD8 ratio (p=0.01) in the first 24 hours in comparison with controls. CD25 (IL-2R) shows insignificant upregulation on T lymphocytes after burn with significant upregulation of HLA-DR. The absolute number of CD3+ cells began to increase after 2 weeks (p=0.03) but remained less than controls (p=0.08). CD4/CD8 ratio was more or less same as healthy controls after 2 weeks. Upregulation of CD25 was insignificantly increased and that of HLA-DR was markedly increased after 2 weeks (p=0.001). Significant negative correlations were detected between mean values of β2-m and both absolute numbers of CD3 and CD4 positive cells in BL and one week samples. In addition there was significant correlation between mean values of β2-m and values of CD25 expression in the BL samples. The obtained data is suggestive of persistent activation of T lymphocytes two weeks after major burns whereas early shedding of β2-m is related to activation of lymphocytes increasing their susceptibility to apoptosis, both indicative of altered immune response. Burn intensivists and surgeons should be keen to support the patients' immune system in the first hours following major burns. This support will ensure free-bacteremic blood with a consequent better prognosis. PMID:23012611

  20. An integrated study of heart pain and behavior in freely moving rats (using fos as a marker for neuronal activation).

    PubMed

    Albutaihi, Ibrahim A M; DeJongste, Mike J L; Ter Horst, Gert J

    2004-01-01

    The awareness in specific brain centers of angina pectoris most often results from ischemic episodes in the heart. These ischemic episodes induce the release of a collage of chemicals that activate chemosensitive and mechanoreceptive receptors in the heart, which in turn excite receptors of the sympathetic afferent pathways. Ascending pain signals from these fibers result in the activation of the brain centers which are involved in the perception and integration of cardiac pain. Cytochemical studies of the nervous system provide the opportunity to identify these areas at the cellular level. In the present investigation, cardiac nociception was studied in the brains and the spinal cords of rats, using Fos protein as a marker of neuronal activation, following the application of pain-inducing chemicals to the heart. Induction of myocardial pain in conscious rats was achieved by infusion of bradykinin (0.5 microg) or capsaicin (5 microg) into the pericardial sac. During pain stimulation, the rats demonstrated pain behavior, in conjunction with alterations in heart rate and blood pressure. The cerebral Fos expression pattern was studied 2 h after pain stimulation. In contrast to the control group, increased Fos expression was found following the use of both capsaicin and bradykinin in a variety of areas of the brain. Bradykinin, but not capsaicin, induced Fos expression in the upper thoracic and upper cervical spinal cord; these segments are the sites where cardiac sympathetic fibers terminate. This finding suggests that these two chemicals use two different pathways, and provides extra evidence for the role of the vagus nerve in the transmission of cardiac nociception. Different cerebral areas showed an increase in the c-fos activity following pericardial application of pain-inducing chemicals. The role of these cerebral areas in the integration of cardiac pain is discussed in relation to the identified pathways which transmit cardiac pain. PMID:15305089

  1. Half-Sarcomere Dynamics in Myofibrils during Activation and Relaxation Studied by Tracking Fluorescent Markers

    PubMed Central

    Telley, Ivo A.; Denoth, Jachen; Stüssi, Edgar; Pfitzer, Gabriele; Stehle, Robert

    2006-01-01

    To study the dynamics of individual half-sarcomeres in striated muscle contraction, myofibrils prepared from rabbit psoas muscle and left ventricles of guinea pig were immunostained with two conjugated antibody complexes consisting of a primary antibody against either α-actinin or myomesin and a secondary fluorescently labeled Fab-fragment. We simultaneously measured force kinetics and determined the positions of the Z-line and M-band signals by fluorescence video microscopy and sophisticated computer vision (tracking) algorithms. Upon calcium activation, sarcomeres and half-sarcomeres shortened nonuniformly. Shortening occurred first rapidly and exponentially during the force rise and then slowly during the force plateau. In psoas myofibrils, time-resolved displacements of the A-band in sarcomeres were observed, i.e., the two halves of individual sarcomeres behaved nonuniformly. Nonuniformity in length changes between the two halves of sarcomeres was comparable to that between two adjacent half-sarcomeres of neighboring sarcomeres. Sequential lengthening of half-sarcomeres was observed in cardiac myofibrils during the rapid phase of force relaxation. The independent dynamics of the halves in a sarcomere reveals the half-sarcomere as the functional unit rather than the structural unit, the sarcomere. The technique will facilitate the study of filament sliding within individual half-sarcomeres and the mechanics of intersegmental chemomechanical coupling in multisegmental striated muscles. PMID:16239326

  2. Potential novel markers to discriminate between active and latent tuberculosis infection in Chinese individuals.

    PubMed

    Bai, Xue-juan; Liang, Yan; Yang, You-rong; Feng, Jin-dong; Luo, Zhan-peng; Zhang, Jun-Xian; Wu, Xue-qiong

    2016-02-01

    Latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) constitutes the main reservoir for reactivation tuberculosis. The finding of potential biomarkers for differentiating between TB and LTBI is very necessary. In this study, the immunological characteristics and potential diagnostic utility of Rv2029c, Rv2628 and Rv1813c proteins were assessed. These three proteins stimulated PBMCs from ELISPOT-positive LTBI subjects produced higher levels of IFN-γ in comparison with TB patients and ELISPOT-negative healthy subjects (p<0.05). BCG vaccination and non-TB respiratory disease had little influence on the immunological responses of Rv2029c and Rv2628 proteins (p>0.05). The LTBI diagnostic performance of Rv2029c was higher than Rv2628 and Rv1813c by ROC evaluation. But Rv2628 had much higher specificity than Rv2029c in active TB patients and uninfected healthy subjects. The IgG level against Rv1813c was higher in the TB group than in LTBI and uninfected healthy subjects (p<0.05). These results suggest that T cell response to Rv2628 and antibody against Rv1813c might be applicable as biomarkers to distinguish TB from LTBI and uninfected individuals. PMID:26851588

  3. Markers of inflammation, activation of blood platelets and coagulation disorders in inflammatory bowel diseases.

    PubMed

    Matowicka-Karna, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) includes ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease. It is a group of chronic disorders characterized by inflammation of the gastrointestinal track with unknown etiology. Currently applied biomarkers include CRP, ESR, pANCA, ASCA, and fecal calprotectin. The etiopathogenesis of IBD is multifactorial. In patients with IBD in inflamed alimentary tract mucosa the number of recruited monocytes and activated macrophages which are source of cytokines. In IBD, the exacerbation is accompanied by thrombocytosis. Platelets play a crucial role in the hemostasis and inflammatory response. Selectins, which regulates the hemostasis and inflammatory response, stimulates the secretion of many inflammatory mediators such as β-thromboglobuline, CD40L, fibrinogen, IL-1β, platelet factor-4. In the course of IBD the following changes are observed: an increase in the number of platelets (reactive thrombocytosis), PDW and PCT, reduction in MPV, increased production and excretion of granular content products (P-selectin, GP53, β-TG, PF-4, vWF, fibrinolytic inhibitors). PMID:27117106

  4. Comparative analysis of lymphocyte activation marker expression and cytokine secretion profile in stimulated human peripheral blood mononuclear cell cultures: an in vitro model to monitor cellular immune function.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Manjula; Eirikis, Edward; Davis, Cuc; Davis, Hugh M; Prabhakar, Uma

    2004-10-01

    Activation of lymphocytes is a complex, yet finely regulated cascade of events that results in the expression of cytokine receptors, production and secretion of cytokines and expression of several cell surface molecules that eventually lead to divergent immune responses. Assessing the qualitative and quantitative nature of lymphocyte function following immunotherapy provides valuable information about the immune responses mediated by a therapeutic agent. To facilitate evaluation of the immunomodulatory activity of therapeutic agents, we have established a platform of in vitro immunoassays with normal human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) treated with several polyclonal activators that are known to exhibit different modes of action. We evaluated the kinetics of cell surface marker expression and cytokine release from PBMCs stimulated in parallel with various activating agents over a time course. These stimulating agents induced early (CD69 and CD71) and late (CD25 and HLA-DR) activation markers to varying antigen densities, indicated different cytokine profiles, and showed differential inhibition with dexamethasone (DEX), an inhibitor of early signaling events. Based on the association or correlation of the kinetics of activation marker expression and secreted cytokines, the results of our study indicate the appropriate time points for the simultaneous measurement of both these activation products. This study defines the kinetics for both measures of T cell activation and provides a comprehensive review with various polyclonal activators that can serve as a reference for monitoring lymphocyte function in clinical study samples. PMID:15541283

  5. [MUSCULOSKELETAL MARKERS, ARTHROPATY, TRAUMAS].

    PubMed

    Caldarini, Carla; Zavaroni, Federica; Benassi, Valentina

    2015-01-01

    The bone tissue remodeling due to strong physical/working activity is defined as ergonomic markers or MSM (Muscoloskeletal Stress Markers) (Capasso et al. 1999) and MOS (Markers of Occupational Stress). Among them we can find: enthesopaties, arthropaties, non metrical stress and traumas markers. In the present study, the analysis of these traits has been used to clarify habitual activity patterns of four imperial populations from Suburbium: Castel Malnome, Casal Bertone area Q, Via Padre Semeria e Quarto Cappello del Prete. The very high prevalence of activity-induced stress lesions occurred among the individuals of Castel Malnome and Casal Bertone area Q suggests that these groups were involved in strenuous occupations such as, respectively: the processing and storage of salt and the dyeing of textiles and hides discernible from the archaeological context. For the individuals of Via Padre Semeria and Quarto Cappello del Prete the alterations, instead, could be compatibles with agricultural work. PMID:27348990

  6. Altered Markers of Cortical γ-Aminobutyric Acid Neuronal Activity in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Kimoto, Sohei; Zaki, Mark M.; Bazmi, H. Holly; Lewis, David A.

    2016-01-01

    controls: 40.1% lower [P = .003]) and microarray analyses (NARP; individuals with schizophrenia vs controls: 12.2%lower in layer 3 [P = .11] and 14.6%lower in layer 5 pyramidal cells [P = .001]). In schizophrenia specimens, NARP mRNA levels were positively correlated with GAD67 mRNA (r = 0.55; P < .001); the expression of GAD67 mRNA in parvalbumin interneurons is activity dependent. The NARP mRNA levels were also lower than healthy controls in bipolar disorder (−18.2%; F1,60 = 11.39; P = .001) and major depressive disorder (−21.7%; F1,30 = 5.36; P = .03) specimens, especially those from individuals with psychosis. In all 3 diagnostic groups, NARP mRNA levels were positively correlated (all r ≥ 0.53; all P ≤ .02) with somatostatin mRNA, the expression of which is activity dependent. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Given the role of NARP in the formation of excitatory inputs to parvalbumin (and perhaps somatostatin) interneurons, our findings suggest that lower NARP mRNA expression contributes to lower excitatory drive onto parvalbumin interneurons in schizophrenia. This reduced excitatory drive may lead to lower synthesis of γ-aminobutyric acid in these interneurons, contributing to a reduced capacity to generate the gamma oscillations required for working memory. PMID:26038830

  7. Effects of a Physical Activity Program on Markers of Endothelial Dysfunction, Oxidative Stress, and Metabolic Status in Adolescents with Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Camarillo-Romero, Eneida; Dominguez-Garcia, Ma Victoria; Amaya-Chavez, Araceli; Camarillo-Romero, Maria del Socorro; Talavera-Piña, Juan; Huitron-Bravo, Gerardo; Majluf-Cruz, Abraham

    2012-01-01

    The metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a precursor of diabetes. Physical activity (PA) improves endothelial dysfunction and may benefit patients with MetS. Aims. To evaluate the effect of a physical activity (PA) program on markers of endothelial dysfunction and oxidative stress in adolescents with (MetS). Methods. We carried out a cohort study of 38 adolescents with and without MetS (18 females and 20 males). All participants completed a 3-month PA program. All variables of the MetS as well as markers of endothelial dysfunction and oxidative stress tests were evaluated. Results. Females with and without MetS showed significant differences for almost all components of the MetS, whereas males were significantly different in half of the components. After the PA program, components of the MetS were not different from baseline values except for HDL-C levels. Some baseline endothelial dysfunction markers were significantly different among adolescents with and without MetS; however, after the PA program, most of these markers significantly improved in subjects with and without MetS. Conclusion. PA improves the markers of endothelial dysfunction in adolescents with MetS although other changes in the components of the MetS were not observed. Perhaps the benefits of PA on all components of MetS would appear after a PA program with a longer duration. PMID:22888450

  8. Erythropoietin exerts direct immunomodulatory effects on the cytokine production by activated human T-lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Todosenko, N M; Shmarov, V A; Malashchenko, V V; Meniailo, M E; Melashchenko, O B; Gazatova, N D; Goncharov, A G; Seledtsov, V I

    2016-07-01

    The effect of erythropoietin-β (Epo-β) on the functional profile of activated human T-lymphocytes remains largely unknown, which hinders clinical application of Epo as an immunomodulatory agent. We studied the direct impact of Epo on the activation status of human T lymphocytes following activation by particles loaded with antibodies (Abs) against human CD2, CD3, and CD28. T cell activation was assessed by the surface expression of CD38 activation marker. Epo did not significantly affect activation status of both CD4(+) and CD4(-) T cells, as well as of naive (CD45RA(+)CD197(+)), central memory (CD45RA(-)CD197(+)), effector memory (CD45RA(-)CD197(-)), and terminally-differentiated (CD45RA(+)CD197(-)) T cells. However, Epo markedly augmented production of IL-2, IL-4 and IL10 by activated T cells with concomitant reduction in IFN-γ secretion. Taken together, our data showed that Epo could directly down-regulate pro-inflammatory T cell responses without affecting T cell activation status. PMID:27208431

  9. Studies on the Utility of B-Amylase1 IntronIII Sequences as Markers for B-Amylase Activity and Thermostability, Diastatic Power and Malt Quality

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The third intron of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) ß-amylase 1 (Bmy1) is extremely polymorphic. The use of specific insertion/deletions (indels) in the third intron as markers for cultivar development has been recommended based on associations with ß-amylase activity and thermostability. The third in...

  10. Studies on the Utility of ß-amylase1 IntronIII Sequences as Markers for ß-amylase Activity and Thermostability, Diastatic Power and Malt Quality

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The third intron of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) ß-amylase 1 (Bmy1) is extremely polymorphic. The use of specific insertion/deletions (indels) in the third intron as markers for cultivar development has been recommended based on associations with ß-amylase activity and thermostability. The third intr...

  11. The Effects of Pragmatic Consciousness-Raising Activities on the Development of Pragmatic Awareness and Use of Hearsay Evidential Markers for Learners of Japanese as a Foreign Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Narita, Ritsuko

    2009-01-01

    The present study investigates the effectiveness of pragmatic consciousness-raising (PCR) activities in the L2 pragmatic acquisition of hearsay evidential markers by learners of Japanese as a foreign language (JFL). PCR is essentially an inductive approach to facilitating awareness of how language forms are used appropriately in a given context.…

  12. Elevated Levels of Monocyte Activation Markers Are Associated With Subclinical Atherosclerosis in Men With and Those Without HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    McKibben, Rebeccah A.; Margolick, Joseph B.; Grinspoon, Steven; Li, Xiuhong; Palella, Frank J.; Kingsley, Lawrence A.; Witt, Mallory D.; George, Richard T.; Jacobson, Lisa P.; Budoff, Matthew; Tracy, Russell P.; Brown, Todd T.; Post, Wendy S.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Heightened immune activation among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)–infected persons may contribute to atherosclerosis. We assessed associations of serologic markers of monocyte activation, soluble CD163 (sCD163) and soluble CD14 (sCD14), and monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (CCL2) with subclinical atherosclerosis among men with and those without HIV infection in the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study. Methods. We performed noncontrast computed tomography on 906 men (566 HIV-infected men and 340 HIV-uninfected men), 709 of whom also underwent coronary computed tomographic angiography. Associations between each biomarker and the prevalence of coronary plaque, the prevalence of stenosis of ≥50%, and the extent of plaque were assessed by logistic and linear regression, adjusting for age, race, HIV serostatus, and cardiovascular risk factors. Results. Levels of all biomarkers were higher among HIV-infected men, of whom 81% had undetectable HIV RNA, and were associated with lower CD4+ T-cell counts. In the entire population and among HIV-infected men, higher biomarker levels were associated with a greater prevalence of coronary artery stenosis of ≥50%. Higher sCD163 levels were also associated with greater prevalences of coronary artery calcium, mixed plaque, and calcified plaque; higher CCL2 levels were associated with a greater extent of noncalcified plaque. Conclusions. sCD163, sCD14, and CCL2 levels were elevated in treated HIV-infected men and associated with atherosclerosis. Monocyte activation may increase the risk for cardiovascular disease in individuals with HIV infection. PMID:25362192

  13. FOXP3+Helios+ Regulatory T Cells, Immune Activation, and Advancing Disease in HIV-Infected Children.

    PubMed

    Khaitan, Alka; Kravietz, Adam; Mwamzuka, Mussa; Marshed, Fatma; Ilmet, Tiina; Said, Swalehe; Ahmed, Aabid; Borkowsky, William; Unutmaz, Derya

    2016-08-15

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) are functionally suppressive CD4 T cells, critical for establishing peripheral tolerance and controlling inflammatory responses. Previous reports of Tregs during chronic HIV disease have conflicting results with higher or lower levels compared with controls. Identifying true Tregs with suppressive activity proves challenging during HIV infection, as traditional Treg markers, CD25 and FOXP3, may transiently upregulate expression as a result of immune activation (IA). Helios is an Ikaros family transcription factor that marks natural Tregs with suppressive activity and does not upregulate expression after activation. Coexpression of FOXP3 and Helios has been suggested as a highly specific marker of "bona fide" Tregs. We evaluated Treg subsets by FOXP3 coexpressed with either CD25 or Helios and their association with HIV disease progression in perinatally infected HIV-positive children. Identifying Tregs by FOXP3 coexpression with Helios rather than CD25 revealed markedly higher Treg frequencies, particularly in HIV+ children. Regardless of antiretroviral therapy, HIV-infected children had a selective expansion of memory FOXP3+Helios+ Tregs. The rise in memory Tregs correlated with declining HIV clinical status, indicated by falling CD4 percentages and CD4:CD8 ratios and increasing HIV plasma viremia and IA. In addition, untreated HIV+ children exhibited an imbalance between the levels of Tregs and activated T cells. Finally, memory Tregs expressed IA markers CD38 and Ki67 and exhaustion marker, PD-1, that tightly correlated with a similar phenotype in memory CD4 T cells. Overall, HIV-infected children had significant disruptions of memory Tregs that associated with advancing HIV disease. PMID:27003495

  14. Down-regulation of tumor endothelial marker 8 suppresses cell proliferation mediated by ERK1/2 activity

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Chuangjie; Wang, Zhuo; Huang, Leilei; Bai, Lihong; Wang, Yuefeng; Liang, Yingjie; Dou, Chengyun; Wang, Liantang

    2016-01-01

    Tumor endothelial marker 8 (TEM8) was recently suggested as a putative anti-tumor target in several types of human cancer based on its selective overexpression in tumor versus normal endothelial cells. The objective of this study was to detect the potential functions of TEM8 in osteosarcoma. Overall, TEM8 was mainly located in cytoplasm and was up-regulated in osteosarcoma compared to benign bone lesions and adjacent non tumor tissue (ANT). High TEM8 expression group had a significant lower overall survival rate than that in the low TEM8 expression group. TEM8 knock-down by siRNA or shRNA results in significant reduction of osteosarcoma cell growth and proliferation both in vitro and in vivo. Ablation of TEM8 led to increasing of p21 and p27 and suppression of cyclin D1 mediated by Erk1/2 activity. These findings suggest that down-regulation of TEM8 play an important role in the inhibition of tumorigenesis and development of osteosarcoma. PMID:26996335

  15. Floral markers of cornflower (Centaurea cyanus) honey and its peroxide antibacterial activity for an alternative treatment of digital dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Oelschlaegel, Stefanie; Pieper, Laura; Staufenbiel, Rudolf; Gruner, Margit; Zeippert, Linda; Pieper, Bernd; Koelling-Speer, Isabelle; Speer, Karl

    2012-11-28

    Cornflower (Centaurea cyanus) honey can be characterized by a greenish yellow color and an intense flavor with a bitter aftertaste. Because cornflower honey contains only a limited amount of pollen for the verification of its floral origin, one objective was the characterization of its polyphenol and norisoprenoid contents to assign floral markers. Here, lumichrome (18.8-43.5 mg/kg), 7-carboxylumichrome, (Z/E)-3-oxo-retro-α-ionol, and 3-oxo-α-ionol appeared to be quite suitable for distinguishing cornflower honey from other unifloral honeys. Additionally, due to its comparably high hydrogen peroxide content (0.5-0.9 mM/h) and the associated antibacterial activity, cornflower honey was used as an alternative treatment of digital dermatitis on an organic dairy farm. Cows affected by this hoof disease often show severe lameness and a subsequent decline in milk yield and loss of body condition. The cows' hooves treated with cornflower honey showed significantly faster healing than the control group without any treatment. PMID:23140532

  16. Xanthurenic Acid Activates mGlu2/3 Metabotropic Glutamate Receptors and is a Potential Trait Marker for Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Fazio, Francesco; Lionetto, Luana; Curto, Martina; Iacovelli, Luisa; Cavallari, Michele; Zappulla, Cristina; Ulivieri, Martina; Napoletano, Flavia; Capi, Matilde; Corigliano, Valentina; Scaccianoce, Sergio; Caruso, Alessandra; Miele, Jessica; De Fusco, Antonio; Di Menna, Luisa; Comparelli, Anna; De Carolis, Antonella; Gradini, Roberto; Nisticò, Robert; De Blasi, Antonio; Girardi, Paolo; Bruno, Valeria; Battaglia, Giuseppe; Nicoletti, Ferdinando; Simmaco, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    The kynurenine pathway of tryptophan metabolism has been implicated in the pathophysiology of psychiatric disorders, including schizophrenia. We report here that the kynurenine metabolite, xanturenic acid (XA), interacts with, and activates mGlu2 and mGlu3 metabotropic glutamate receptors in heterologous expression systems. However, the molecular nature of this interaction is unknown, and our data cannot exclude that XA acts primarily on other targets, such as the vesicular glutamate transporter, in the CNS. Systemic administration of XA in mice produced antipsychotic-like effects in the MK-801-induced model of hyperactivity. This effect required the presence of mGlu2 receptors and was abrogated by the preferential mGlu2/3 receptor antagonist, LY341495. Because the mGlu2 receptor is a potential drug target in the treatment of schizophrenia, we decided to measure serum levels of XA and other kynurenine metabolites in patients affected by schizophrenia. Serum XA levels were largely reduced in a large cohort of patients affected by schizophrenia, and, in patients with first-episode schizophrenia, levels remained low after 12 months of antipsychotic medication. As opposed to other kynurenine metabolites, XA levels were also significantly reduced in first-degree relatives of patients affected by schizophrenia. We suggest that lowered serum XA levels might represent a novel trait marker for schizophrenia. PMID:26643205

  17. Gli2 protein expression level is a feasible marker of ligand-dependent hedgehog activation in pancreatic neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Y; Sasajima, J; Mizukami, Y; Koizumi, K; Kawamoto, T; Ono, Y; Karasaki, H; Tanabe, H; Fujiya, M; Kohgo, Y

    2016-06-01

    The hedgehog pathway is known to promote proliferation of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) and has been shown to restrain tumor progression. To understand how hedgehog causes these effects, we sought to carefully examine protein expression of hedgehog signaling components during different tumor stages. Genetically engineered mice, Pdx1-Cre;LSL-KrasG12D and Pdx1-Cre;LSL-KrasG12D;p53lox/+, were utilized to model distinct phases of tumorigenesis, pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasm (PanIN) and PDA. Human pancreatic specimens of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN) and PDA were also employed. PanIN and IPMN lesions highly express Sonic Hedgehog, at a level that is slightly higher than that observed in PDA. GLI2 protein is also expressed in both PanIN/IPMN and PDA. Although there was no difference in the nuclear staining, the cytoplasmic GLI2 level in PDA was modest in comparison to that in PanIN/IPMN. Hedgehog interacting protein was strongly expressed in the precursors, whereas the level in PDA was significantly attenuated. There were no differences in expression of Patched1 at early and late stages. Finally, a strong correlation between Sonic Hedgehog and GLI2 staining was found in both human and murine pancreatic tumors. The results indicate that the GLI2 protein level could serve as a feasible marker of ligand-dependent hedgehog activation in pancreatic neoplasms. PMID:27543868

  18. Radiation-induced inflammatory markers of brain injury are modulated by PPARdelta activation in vitro and in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnegg, Caroline Isabel

    responses in microglia in vitro. To extend our in vitro findings in vivo, we investigated whether administration of the peroxisomal proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)ä agonist, GW0742, prevented radiation-induced brain injury in C57Bl/6 WT mice. Our data demonstrate that GW0742 prevented the radiation-induced increase in the number of activated microglia (CD68+ cells) in wild-type (WT) mice 1 week following 10 Gy WBI. Furthermore, GW0742 inhibited the WBI-induced increase in IL-1β message levels and ERK phosphorylation observed 3 h post-irradiation. In contrast, GW0742 administration failed to modulate the radiation-induced decrease in hippocampal neurogenesis (NeuN+/BrdU+ cells) determined 2 months after irradiation, or mitigate hippocampal-dependent spatial memory impairment observed 3 months post-irradiation using the Barnes Maze task. We used PPARō knockout (KO) mice to examine if the effects of GW0742 are PPARō-dependent. Unexpectedly, PPARō KO mice exhibited a differential response following WBI compared to WT mice; therefore, we were unable to make mechanistic conclusions about GW0742. KO mice do not exhibit a WBI-induced increase in activated microglia; however, they appeared to display a pronounced astrocytic response. In particular, PPARō KO but not WT mice displayed increased GFAP message levels 2 months after WBI. Additionally, the number of GFAP+ cells was reduced significantly in the WT mice 2 months after WBI, but it was not in the PPARō KO mice. These results demonstrate that: i) GW0742 prevents the radiation-induced increase in microglial activation and inflammatory markers, and ii) WT and PPARō KO mice have a differential response to WBI.

  19. A functional marker centromere with no detectable alpha-satellite, satellite III, or CENP-B protein: activation of a latent centromere?

    PubMed Central

    Voullaire, L E; Slater, H R; Petrovic, V; Choo, K H

    1993-01-01

    We report the investigation of an unusual human supernumerary marker chromosome 10 designated "mar del(10)." This marker is present together with two other marker chromosomes in the karyotype of a boy with mild developmental delay. It has a functional centromere at a primary constriction and is mitotically stable. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using alpha-satellite and satellite III DNA as probes failed to detect any signal at the primary constriction site. CENP-B protein could not be demonstrated, although the presence of at least some centromeric proteins was confirmed using a CREST antiserum. Consideration of these and other cytogenetic and FISH results supports a mechanism of formation of the mar del(10) chromosome involving the activation of a latent intercalary centromere at 10q25. Images Figure 5 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 6 PMID:7684888

  20. A functional marker centromere with no detectable alpha-satellite, satellite III, or CENP-B protein: Activation of a latent centromere

    SciTech Connect

    Voullaire, L.E.; Slater, H.R.; Petrovic, V.; Choo, K.H.A. )

    1993-06-01

    The authors report the investigation of an unusual human supernumerary marker chromosome 10 designated [open quotes]mar del(10)[close quotes]. This marker is present together with two other marker chromosomes in the karyotype of a boy with mild developmental delay. It has a functional centromere at a primary constriction and is mitotically stable. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using alpha-satellite and satellite III DNA as probes failed to detect any signal at the primary constriction site. CENP-B protein could not be demonstrated, although the presence of at least some centromeric proteins was confirmed using a CREST antiserum. Consideration of these and other cytogenetic and Fish results supports a mechanism of formation of the mar del(10) chromosome involving the activation of a latent intercalary centromere at 10q25. 33 refs., 6 figs.

  1. Expression Pattern of Pluripotent Markers in Different Embryonic Developmental Stages of Buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) Embryos and Putative Embryonic Stem Cells Generated by Parthenogenetic Activation

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Karn P.; Kaushik, Ramakant; Garg, Veena; Sharma, Ruchi; George, Aman; Singh, Manoj K.; Manik, Radhey S.; Palta, Prabhat; Singla, Suresh K.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract In this study, we describe the production of buffalo parthenogenetic blastocysts and subsequent isolation of parthenogenetic embryonic stem cell (PGESC)-like cells. PGESC colonies exhibited dome-shaped morphology and were clearly distinguishable from the feeder layer cells. Different stages of development of parthenogenetic embryos and derived embryonic stem cell (ESC)-like cells expressed key ESC-specific markers, including OCT-4, NANOG, SOX-2, FOXD3, REX-1, STAT-3, TELOMERASE, NUCLEOSTEMIN, and cMYC. Immunofluorescence-based studies revealed that the PGESCs were positive for surface-based pluripotent markers, viz., SSEA-3, SSEA-4, TRA 1-80, TRA 1-60, CD-9, and CD-90 and exhibited high alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity. PGEC cell-like cells formed embryoid body (EB)-like structures in hanging drop cultures and when cultured for extended period of time spontaneously differentiated into derivatives of three embryonic germ layers as confirmed by RT-PCR for ectodermal (CYTOKERATIN8, NF-68), mesodermal (MSX1, BMP-4, ASA), and endodermal markers (AFP, HNF-4, GATA-4). Differentiation of PGESCs toward the neuronal lineage was successfully directed by supplementation of serum-containing media with retinoic acid. Our results indicate that the isolated ESC-like cells from parthenogenetic blastocyst hold properties of ESCs and express markers of pluripotency. The pluripotency markers were also expressed by early cleavage-stage of buffalo embryos. PMID:23194456

  2. The Early Activation Marker CD69 Regulates the Expression of Chemokines and CD4 T Cell Accumulation in Intestine

    PubMed Central

    Radulovic, Katarina; Rossini, Valerio; Manta, Calin; Holzmann, Karlheinz; Kestler, Hans A.; Niess, Jan Hendrik

    2013-01-01

    Migration of naïve and activated lymphocytes is regulated by the expression of various molecules such as chemokine receptors and ligands. CD69, the early activation marker of C-type lectin domain family, is also shown to regulate the lymphocyte migration by affecting their egress from the thymus and secondary lymphoid organs. Here, we aimed to investigate the role of CD69 in accumulation of CD4 T cells in intestine using murine models of inflammatory bowel disease. We found that genetic deletion of CD69 in mice increases the expression of the chemokines CCL-1, CXCL-10 and CCL-19 in CD4+ T cells and/or CD4− cells. Efficient in vitro migration of CD69-deficient CD4 T cells toward the chemokine stimuli was the result of increased expression and/or affinity of chemokine receptors. In vivo CD69−/− CD4 T cells accumulate in the intestine in higher numbers than B6 CD4 T cells as observed in competitive homing assay, dextran sodium sulphate (DSS)-induced colitis and antigen-specific transfer colitis. In DSS colitis CD69−/− CD4 T cell accumulation in colonic lamina propria (cLP) was associated with increased expression of CCL-1, CXCL-10 and CCL-19 genes. Furthermore, treatment of DSS-administrated CD69−/− mice with the mixture of CCL-1, CXCL-10 and CCL-19 neutralizing Abs significantly decreased the histopathological signs of colitis. Transfer of OT-II×CD69−/− CD45RBhigh CD4 T cells into RAG−/− hosts induced CD4 T cell accumulation in cLP. This study showed CD69 as negative regulator of inflammatory responses in intestine as it decreases the expression of chemotactic receptors and ligands and reduces the accumulation of CD4 T cells in cLP during colitis. PMID:23776480

  3. [Serum determination of N-terminal peptide of type III procollagen as a marker of fibrotic activity].

    PubMed

    García Montes, J M; De Bonilla Blánez, F; Herrerías Gutiérrez, J M

    1989-03-01

    Among the noninvasive methods proposed for the study of collagen metabolism as an of fibrosis and inflammation, the most widely accepted method is quantitation in serum of the N-terminal peptide of type III procollagen (P-III-Ps). We measured this variable in 87 subjects classified into five study groups: 19 controls (C), 18 alcoholics (E), 15 patients diagnosed as liver cirrhosis (CH), 11 chronic liver disease (HC) and 24 pregnant women (EMB). In our environment, the serum level of P-III-P in the healthy population was 9.12-12.8 ng/ml. In 27.77% of the alcoholics studied (5 cases) the mean value exceeded this level, 19.35 +/- 3.05 ng/ml. Forty percent of the cirrhotics (6 cases) presented the highest values, 26.54 +/- 11.45 ng/ml, while 83.33% of the patients with chronic active hepatitis presented a mean value of 18.53 +/- 3.8 ng/ml. Of the 24 pregnant women, 95.83% (23 cases) had higher than normal values, and concentrations roses in the last trimester of gestation with respect to the previous trimesters. Analysis of the correlations of all the biochemical parameters of liver function with P-III-Ps disclosed a relationship between P-III-Ps and alkaline phosphatase in the groups of cirrhotics and chronic persistent hepatitis (p less than 0.05). We conclude that the N-terminal peptide of type III procollagen is a useful marker of active fibrosis. PMID:2734469

  4. B lymphocytes and B-cell activating factor promote collagen and profibrotic markers expression by dermal fibroblasts in systemic sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction B lymphocytes might play a pathogenic role in dermal fibrosis in systemic sclerosis (SSc). B-cell activating factor (BAFF), a key cytokine for B-cell activation, is increased in the serum and the skin of patients with SSc. However, the ability of B cells directly to stimulate dermal fibroblasts and the role of BAFF are not fully understood. We therefore investigated the involvement of B cells and BAFF in the expression of collagen and profibrotic markers by dermal fibroblasts. Methods Cocultures of blood B cells from healthy blood donors and normal or SSc dermal fibroblasts stimulated with anti-IgM and BAFF were performed. Alpha-SMA, TIMP1, MMP9, COL1A1, COL1A2, and COL3A1 mRNA expression were determined by quantitative RT-PCR. Soluble collagen, BAFF, IL-6, IL-1β, TGF-β1, and CCL2 protein secretion were assessed. Results Coculture of blood B cells and dermal fibroblasts isolated from SSc patients induced IL-6, TGF-β1, CCL2, and collagen secretion, as well as Alpha-SMA, TIMP1, and MMP9 expression in dermal fibroblasts. Transwell assays demonstrated that this induction was dependent on cell-cell contact. Addition of anti-IgM and BAFF to the coculture increased IL-6, CCL2, TGF-β1, and collagen secretion. B cell- and BAFF-induced collagen secretion was highly reduced by anti-TGF-β1 antibodies. Conclusions Our results showed for the first time a direct role of B cells on the production of collagen by dermal fibroblasts, which is further enhanced by BAFF. Thus, these results demonstrate a new pathogenic role of B cells and BAFF in fibrosis and systemic sclerosis. PMID:24289101

  5. Evaluation of area contaminated by wood treatment activities: Genetic markers in the environment and in the child population.

    PubMed

    Coronas, Mariana Vieira; Rocha, Jocelita Aparecida Vaz; Salvadori, Daisy Maria Favero; Vargas, Vera Maria Ferrão

    2016-02-01

    Wood preservation activities and related compounds are a problem since these areas have major environmental contamination liabilities which compromise the health of the surrounding population and the integrity of ecological processes. The present study evaluated an area influenced by soil contamination arising from the activities of a deactivated wood treatment plant. The presence and effect of mutagenic compounds in environmental samples were used as markers of exposure together with the evaluation biomarkers of genetic damage in children. Organic extracts from samples of public source water and from fine atmospheric particulate matter (PM2.5) were evaluated for mutagenic potential using the Salmonella/microsome assay. Children living in the area surrounding the plant were analyzed for genetic damage assessed by the comet assay in lymphocytes and micronucleus test (MN) in lymphocytes and oral mucosa and compared to a group living in an area outside the preferential quadrant of atmospheric dispersion and in opposition to the drainage at the site. The mutagenic effect and PAHs concentrations found were similar to studies that evaluated intensely occupied urban areas and those under industrial influence. The MN frequencies in lymphocytes and binucleated cells in the oral mucosa were significantly higher in the risk group. No significant differences were observed in the other genetic damage biomarkers evaluated. The presence of pollutants with a mutagenic and carcinogenic effect on the PM2.5 and the increased in some biomarkers indicate that the population is potentially exposed to substances capable of causing adverse health effects and atmospheric airborne is a possible exposure route. PMID:26465966

  6. Changes in Astroglial Markers in a Maternal Immune Activation Model of Schizophrenia in Wistar Rats are Dependent on Sex

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Daniela F.; Wartchow, Krista M.; Lunardi, Paula S.; Brolese, Giovana; Tortorelli, Lucas S.; Batassini, Cristiane; Biasibetti, Regina; Gonçalves, Carlos-Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Data from epidemiological studies suggest that prenatal exposure to bacterial and viral infection is an important environmental risk factor for schizophrenia. The maternal immune activation (MIA) animal model is used to study how an insult directed at the maternal host can have adverse effects on the fetus, leading to behavioral and neurochemical changes later in life. We evaluated whether the administration of LPS to rat dams during late pregnancy affects astroglial markers (S100B and GFAP) of the offspring in later life. The frontal cortex and hippocampus were compared in male and female offspring on postnatal days (PND) 30 and 60. The S100B protein exhibited an age-dependent pattern of expression, being increased in the frontal cortex and hippocampus of the MIA group at PND 60, while at PND 30, male rats presented increased S100B levels only in the frontal cortex. Considering that S100B secretion is reduced by elevation of glutamate levels, we may hypothesize that this early increment in frontal cortex tissue of males is associated with elevated extracellular levels of glutamate and glutamatergic hypofunction, an alteration commonly associated with SCZ pathology. Moreover, we also found augmented GFAP in the frontal cortex of the LPS group at PND 30, but not in the hippocampus. Taken together data indicate that astroglial changes induced by MIA are dependent on sex and brain region and that these changes could reflect astroglial dysfunction. Such alterations may contribute to our understanding of the abnormal neuronal connectivity and developmental aspects of SCZ and other psychiatric disorders. PMID:26733814

  7. Changes in Astroglial Markers in a Maternal Immune Activation Model of Schizophrenia in Wistar Rats are Dependent on Sex.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Daniela F; Wartchow, Krista M; Lunardi, Paula S; Brolese, Giovana; Tortorelli, Lucas S; Batassini, Cristiane; Biasibetti, Regina; Gonçalves, Carlos-Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Data from epidemiological studies suggest that prenatal exposure to bacterial and viral infection is an important environmental risk factor for schizophrenia. The maternal immune activation (MIA) animal model is used to study how an insult directed at the maternal host can have adverse effects on the fetus, leading to behavioral and neurochemical changes later in life. We evaluated whether the administration of LPS to rat dams during late pregnancy affects astroglial markers (S100B and GFAP) of the offspring in later life. The frontal cortex and hippocampus were compared in male and female offspring on postnatal days (PND) 30 and 60. The S100B protein exhibited an age-dependent pattern of expression, being increased in the frontal cortex and hippocampus of the MIA group at PND 60, while at PND 30, male rats presented increased S100B levels only in the frontal cortex. Considering that S100B secretion is reduced by elevation of glutamate levels, we may hypothesize that this early increment in frontal cortex tissue of males is associated with elevated extracellular levels of glutamate and glutamatergic hypofunction, an alteration commonly associated with SCZ pathology. Moreover, we also found augmented GFAP in the frontal cortex of the LPS group at PND 30, but not in the hippocampus. Taken together data indicate that astroglial changes induced by MIA are dependent on sex and brain region and that these changes could reflect astroglial dysfunction. Such alterations may contribute to our understanding of the abnormal neuronal connectivity and developmental aspects of SCZ and other psychiatric disorders. PMID:26733814

  8. Reviewing and Updating the Major Molecular Markers for Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Calloni, Raquel; Cordero, Elvira Alicia Aparicio; Henriques, João Antonio Pêgas

    2013-01-01

    Stem cells (SC) are able to self-renew and to differentiate into many types of committed cells, making SCs interesting for cellular therapy. However, the pool of SCs in vivo and in vitro consists of a mix of cells at several stages of differentiation, making it difficult to obtain a homogeneous population of SCs for research. Therefore, it is important to isolate and characterize unambiguous molecular markers that can be applied to SCs. Here, we review classical and new candidate molecular markers that have been established to show a molecular profile for human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), and hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). The commonly cited markers for embryonic ESCs are Nanog, Oct-4, Sox-2, Rex-1, Dnmt3b, Lin-28, Tdgf1, FoxD3, Tert, Utf-1, Gal, Cx43, Gdf3, Gtcm1, Terf1, Terf2, Lefty A, and Lefty B. MSCs are primarily identified by the expression of CD13, CD29, CD44, CD49e, CD54, CD71, CD73, CD90, CD105, CD106, CD166, and HLA-ABC and lack CD14, CD31, CD34, CD45, CD62E, CD62L, CD62P, and HLA-DR expression. HSCs are mainly isolated based on the expression of CD34, but the combination of this marker with CD133 and CD90, together with a lack of CD38 and other lineage markers, provides the most homogeneous pool of SCs. Here, we present new and alternative markers for SCs, along with microRNA profiles, for these cells. PMID:23336433

  9. Radiosynthesis of [131I]IAZGP via nucleophilic substitution and its biological evaluation as a hypoxia marker — is specific activity a factor influencing hypoxia-mapping ability of a hypoxia marker?

    PubMed Central

    Suehiro, Makiko; Burgman, Paul; Carlin, Sean; Burke, Sean; Yang, Guangbin; Ouerfelli, Ouathek; Oehler-Janne, Christoph; O’Donoghue, Joseph; Ling, Clifton; Humm, John

    2010-01-01

    Introduction The hypoxia marker IAZGP, 1-(6-deoxy-6-iodo-β-D-galactopyranosyl)-2-nitroimidazole, has been labeled with 123I/124I/125I/131I via iodine–radioiodine exchange, which gives the radiotracer in a specific activity of 10–90 MBq/μmol. We synthesized the same radiotracer possessing several hundred to thousand times higher specific activity (high-SA IAZGP) via nucleophilic substitution and compared its biological behavior with that of conventionally produced IAZGP (low-SA IAZGP) to determine if specific activity is a factor influencing cell uptake kinetics, biodistribution and intratumor microregional localization of the radiotracer. Methods High-SA [131I]IAZGP was prepared by substitution of the tosyl functionality with [131I]iodide. In vitro uptake of high- and low-SA [131I]IAZGP by HCT8 and HT29 cells was assessed in normoxic and hypoxic conditions. Biodistribution and intratumor localization of high- and low-SA [131I]IAZGP were determined by injection into HT29 tumor-bearing mice. Results The nucleophilic substitution reaction proceeded efficiently in acetonitrile at 150°C, giving the final product in an average yield of 42% and an average specific activity of 30 GBq/μmol. In vitro, high-SA [131I]IAZGP was incorporated into the tumor cells with similar kinetics and oxygen dependence to low-SA [131I]IAZGP. In HT29 tumor-bearing mice, biodistributions of high- and low-SA [131I]IAZGP were equivalent. Ex vivo autoradiography revealed heterogeneous intratumor localization of high-SA [131I]IAZGP corresponding closely to distributions of other exogenous and endogenous hypoxia markers. Comparable microregional distribution patterns were observed with low-SA [131I]IAZGP. Conclusions Radiolabeled IAZGP produced via nucleophilic substitution is validated as an exogenous hypoxia marker. Specific activity does not appear to influence the in vivo hypoxia-mapping ability of the radiotracer. PMID:19520288

  10. Elevated Serum ADA Activity as a Marker for Diagnosis and Prognosis of Visceral Leishmaniasis and Post Kala-Azar Dermal Leishmaniasis in Indian Patients

    PubMed Central

    Vijayamahantesh; Amit, Ajay; Dikhit, Manas R.; Pandey, Raj K.; Singh, Kuljit; Mishra, Ritesh; Das, V. N. R; Das, Pradeep; Bimal, Sanjiva

    2016-01-01

    Serum adenosine deaminase (ADA) activity increases in diseases where cellular immunity is involved. Since cell-mediated immune responses play a paramount role in the pathogenesis and healing of the visceral leishmaniasis, therefore, the present study was undertaken to evaluate the serum ADA activity in different pathological conditions. Adenosine deaminase was determined in sera of active visceral leishmaniasis (VL) patients (n = 39), active postkala-azar dermal leishmaniasis (PKDL) cases (n = 34) at the point of diagnosis and after treatment stages along with healthy controls (n = 30), endemic healthy subjects (n = 34) and endemic asymptomatic subjects (n = 34).Our in-vitro result revealed that monocytes secrete significant ADA level in response to Leishmania donovani (L.donovani) stimulation. The serum ADA activity in active VL and PKDL subjects were found to be significantly higher than that of respective treated cases and healthy controls. We also observed a marginal number (17.6%) of endemic asymptomatic subjects showed elevated serum ADA activity. Further, the ADA activity in PKDL was found to be decreased gradually during the different phases of treatment. Interestingly, 2 out of 32 treated VL cases found to have high serum ADA activity during follow up period were relapsed within few days. These results suggest the possibility of ADA as a marker of clinical pathogenesis and can be used as a surrogate marker in the diagnosis and prognosis of VL and PKDL. PMID:27186641

  11. Elevated Serum ADA Activity as a Marker for Diagnosis and Prognosis of Visceral Leishmaniasis and Post Kala-Azar Dermal Leishmaniasis in Indian Patients.

    PubMed

    Vijayamahantesh; Amit, Ajay; Dikhit, Manas R; Pandey, Raj K; Singh, Kuljit; Mishra, Ritesh; Das, V N R; Das, Pradeep; Bimal, Sanjiva

    2016-01-01

    Serum adenosine deaminase (ADA) activity increases in diseases where cellular immunity is involved. Since cell-mediated immune responses play a paramount role in the pathogenesis and healing of the visceral leishmaniasis, therefore, the present study was undertaken to evaluate the serum ADA activity in different pathological conditions. Adenosine deaminase was determined in sera of active visceral leishmaniasis (VL) patients (n = 39), active postkala-azar dermal leishmaniasis (PKDL) cases (n = 34) at the point of diagnosis and after treatment stages along with healthy controls (n = 30), endemic healthy subjects (n = 34) and endemic asymptomatic subjects (n = 34).Our in-vitro result revealed that monocytes secrete significant ADA level in response to Leishmania donovani (L.donovani) stimulation. The serum ADA activity in active VL and PKDL subjects were found to be significantly higher than that of respective treated cases and healthy controls. We also observed a marginal number (17.6%) of endemic asymptomatic subjects showed elevated serum ADA activity. Further, the ADA activity in PKDL was found to be decreased gradually during the different phases of treatment. Interestingly, 2 out of 32 treated VL cases found to have high serum ADA activity during follow up period were relapsed within few days. These results suggest the possibility of ADA as a marker of clinical pathogenesis and can be used as a surrogate marker in the diagnosis and prognosis of VL and PKDL. PMID:27186641

  12. Effect of the French Oak Wood Extract Robuvit on Markers of Oxidative Stress and Activity of Antioxidant Enzymes in Healthy Volunteers: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Orszaghova, Zuzana; Laubertova, Lucia; Sabaka, Peter; Rohdewald, Peter; Durackova, Zdenka; Muchova, Jana

    2014-01-01

    We examined in vitro antioxidant capacity of polyphenolic extract obtained from the wood of oak Quercus robur (QR), Robuvit, using TEAC (Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity) method and the effect of its intake on markers of oxidative stress, activity of antioxidant enzymes, and total antioxidant capacity in plasma of 20 healthy volunteers. Markers of oxidative damage to proteins, DNA, and lipids and activities of Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) were determined in the erythrocytes. We have found an in vitro antioxidant capacity of Robuvit of 6.37 micromole Trolox equivalent/mg of Robuvit. One month intake of Robuvit in daily dose of 300 mg has significantly decreased the serum level of advanced oxidation protein products (AOPP) and lipid peroxides (LP). Significantly increased activities of SOD and CAT as well as total antioxidant capacity of plasma after one month intake of Robuvit have been shown. In conclusion, we have demonstrated for the first time that the intake of Robuvit is associated with decrease of markers of oxidative stress and increase of activity of antioxidant enzymes and total antioxidant capacity of plasma in vivo. PMID:25254080

  13. Connexin-43 hemichannels mediate cyclic ADP-ribose generation and its Ca2+-mobilizing activity by NAD+/cyclic ADP-ribose transport.

    PubMed

    Song, Eun-Kyung; Rah, So-Young; Lee, Young-Rae; Yoo, Chae-Hwa; Kim, Yu-Ri; Yeom, Ji-Hyun; Park, Kwang-Hyun; Kim, Jong-Suk; Kim, Uh-Hyun; Han, Myung-Kwan

    2011-12-30

    The ADP-ribosyl cyclase CD38 whose catalytic domain resides in outside of the cell surface produces the second messenger cyclic ADP-ribose (cADPR) from NAD(+). cADPR increases intracellular Ca(2+) through the intracellular ryanodine receptor/Ca(2+) release channel (RyR). It has been known that intracellular NAD(+) approaches ecto-CD38 via its export by connexin (Cx43) hemichannels, a component of gap junctions. However, it is unclear how cADPR extracellularly generated by ecto-CD38 approaches intracellular RyR although CD38 itself or nucleoside transporter has been proposed to import cADPR. Moreover, it has been unknown what physiological stimulation can trigger Cx43-mediated export of NAD(+). Here we demonstrate that Cx43 hemichannels, but not CD38, import cADPR to increase intracellular calcium through RyR. We also demonstrate that physiological stimulation such as Fcγ receptor (FcγR) ligation induces calcium mobilization through three sequential steps, Cx43-mediated NAD(+) export, CD38-mediated generation of cADPR and Cx43-mediated cADPR import in J774 cells. Protein kinase A (PKA) activation also induced calcium mobilization in the same way as FcγR stimulation. FcγR stimulation-induced calcium mobilization was blocked by PKA inhibition, indicating that PKA is a linker between FcγR stimulation and NAD(+)/cADPR transport. Cx43 knockdown blocked extracellular cADPR import and extracellular cADPR-induced calcium mobilization in J774 cells. Cx43 overexpression in Cx43-negative cells conferred extracellular cADPR-induced calcium mobilization by the mediation of cADPR import. Our data suggest that Cx43 has a dual function exporting NAD(+) and importing cADPR into the cell to activate intracellular calcium mobilization. PMID:22033928

  14. Use of serum C-reactive protein as an early marker of inflammatory activity in canine type II immune-mediated polyarthritis: case report

    PubMed Central

    Kjelgaard-Hansen, Mads; Jensen, Asger Lundorff; Houser, Geoffrey A; Jessen, Lisbeth Rem; Kristensen, Annemarie T

    2006-01-01

    Background Monitoring systemic inflammatory activity during steroid therapy of canine immune-mediated polyarthritis (IMPA) is difficult and mainly relies on clinical signs. Case presentation Canine serum C-reactive protein (CRP) was measured serially and blinded during a 27-week follow-up period of a case of Anaplasma phagocytophilia induced type II immune-mediated polyarthritis. Conclusion WBC was, as expected, observed not to reflect the inflammatory activity during steroid treatment in a clinical useful manner, whereas, CRP is suggested a valuable unbiased marker of inflammatory activity during steroid treatment in this case. PMID:16987405

  15. Concentration of thymidine kinase 1 in serum (S-TK1) is a more sensitive proliferation marker in human solid tumors than its activity.

    PubMed

    He, Qimin; Zhang, Pinggn; Zou, Li; Li, Hongxun; Wang, Xiuqin; Zhou, Shan; Fornander, Tommy; Skog, Sven

    2005-10-01

    Activity of thymidine kinase 1 in serum (STK) is a useful marker for leukaemia and lymphoma, but not for solid tumors. We investigate thymidine kinase 1 concentration in serum (S-TK1) as a potential tumor marker. S-TK1 concentration and STK activity levels were determined in 9 human malignant diseases (breast, gastric, rectal, colorectal, lung, brain cancer, hepatoma, lymphoma, leukaemia) and in benign and non-cancerous diseases, representing 850 preoperative cases. Healthy volunteers (n=43) were used as positive controls. S-TK1 concentration was determined by ECL dot blot assay and STK activity levels by an RIA assay. S-TK1 concentrations and STK activity levels in preoperative malignant patients were significantly higher than in healthy individuals, in patients with benign tumors and in those with non-cancerous diseases. Significant correlations between concentration and activity level were only found in healthy individuals, in patients with benign tumors, and in some patients with malignancies, i.e. leukaemia, and breast and gastric cancers. About 90-95 percent of the malignant patients showed S-TK1 concentrations above those of the healthy controls. The corresponding value for STK activity was about 75 percent. When sera from malignant patients were diluted with sera from healthy individuals, S-TK1 concentrations and STK activity levels decreased more than expected. This indicates the presence of a compound (or compounds) in the serum of healthy individuals that destabilises S-TK1. We conclude that S-TK1 concentration is a more sensitive tumor marker in solid malignancies than is STK activity. PMID:16142366

  16. Silibinin Inhibits HIV-1 Infection by Reducing Cellular Activation and Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    McClure, Janela; Lovelace, Erica S.; Elahi, Shokrollah; Maurice, Nicholas J.; Wagoner, Jessica; Dragavon, Joan; Mittler, John E.; Kraft, Zane; Stamatatos, Leonidis; Horton, Helen; De Rosa, Stephen C.; Coombs, Robert W.; Polyak, Stephen J.

    2012-01-01

    Purified silymarin-derived natural products from the milk thistle plant (Silybum marianum) block hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and inhibit T cell proliferation in vitro. An intravenous formulation of silibinin (SIL), a major component of silymarin, displays anti-HCV effects in humans and also inhibits T-cell proliferation in vitro. We show that SIL inhibited replication of HIV-1 in TZM-bl cells, PBMCs, and CEM cells in vitro. SIL suppression of HIV-1 coincided with dose-dependent reductions in actively proliferating CD19+, CD4+, and CD8+ cells, resulting in fewer CD4+ T cells expressing the HIV-1 co-receptors CXCR4 and CCR5. SIL inhibition of T-cell growth was not due to cytotoxicity measured by cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, or necrosis. SIL also blocked induction of the activation markers CD38, HLA-DR, Ki67, and CCR5 on CD4+ T cells. The data suggest that SIL attenuated cellular functions involved in T-cell activation, proliferation, and HIV-1 infection. Silymarin-derived compounds provide cytoprotection by suppressing virus infection, immune activation, and inflammation, and as such may be relevant for both HIV mono-infected and HIV/HCV co-infected subjects. PMID:22848626

  17. CD45RO enriches for activated, highly mutated human germinal center B cells

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Stephen M.; Harp, Natessa; Patel, Darshna; Zhang, Jeffrey; Willson, Savannah; Kim, Yoon J.; Clanton, Christian

    2007-01-01

    To date, there is no consensus regarding the influence of different CD45 isoforms during peripheral B-cell development. Examining correlations between surface CD45RO expression and various physiologic processes ongoing during the germinal center (GC) reaction, we hypothesized that GC B cells, like T cells, that up-regulate surface RO should progressively acquire phenotypes commonly associated with activated, differentiating lymphocytes. GC B cells (IgD−CD38+) were subdivided into 3 surface CD45RO fractions: RO−, RO+/−, and RO+. We show here that the average number of mutations per IgVH transcript increased in direct correlation with surface RO levels. Conjunctional use of RO and CD69 further delineated low/moderately and highly mutated fractions. Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) mRNA was slightly reduced among RO+ GC B cells, suggesting that higher mutation averages are unlikely due to elevated somatic mutation activity. Instead, RO+ GC B cells were negative for Annexin V, comprised mostly (93%) of CD77− centrocytes, and were enriched for CD69+ cells. Collectively, RO+ GC B cells occupy what seems to be a specialized niche comprised mostly of centrocytes that may be in transition between activation states. These findings are among the first to sort GC B cells into populations enriched for live mutated cells solely using a single extracellular marker. PMID:17644737

  18. Exercise restores decreased physical activity levels and increases markers of autophagy and oxidative capacity in myostatin/activin-blocked mdx mice.

    PubMed

    Hulmi, Juha J; Oliveira, Bernardo M; Silvennoinen, Mika; Hoogaars, Willem M H; Pasternack, Arja; Kainulainen, Heikki; Ritvos, Olli

    2013-07-15

    The importance of adequate levels of muscle size and function and physical activity is widely recognized. Myostatin/activin blocking increases skeletal muscle mass but may decrease muscle oxidative capacity and can thus be hypothesized to affect voluntary physical activity. Soluble activin receptor IIB (sActRIIB-Fc) was produced to block myostatin/activins. Modestly dystrophic mdx mice were injected with sActRIIB-Fc or PBS with or without voluntary wheel running exercise for 7 wk. Healthy mice served as controls. Running for 7 wk attenuated the sActRIIB-Fc-induced increase in body mass by decreasing fat mass. Running also enhanced/restored the markers of muscle oxidative capacity and autophagy in mdx mice to or above the levels of healthy mice. Voluntary running activity was decreased by sActRIIB-Fc during the first 3-4 wk correlating with increased body mass. Home cage physical activity of mice, quantified from the force plate signal, was decreased by sActRIIB-Fc the whole 7-wk treatment in sedentary mice. To understand what happens during the first weeks after sActRIIB-Fc administration, when mice are less active, healthy mice were injected with sActRIIB-Fc or PBS for 2 wk. During the sActRIIB-Fc-induced rapid 2-wk muscle growth period, oxidative capacity and autophagy were reduced, which may possibly explain the decreased running activity. These results show that increased muscle size and decreased markers of oxidative capacity and autophagy during the first weeks of myostatin/activin blocking are associated with decreased voluntary activity levels. Voluntary exercise in dystrophic mice enhances the markers of oxidative capacity and autophagy to or above the levels of healthy mice. PMID:23695214

  19. Relationship between innate immunity, soluble markers and metabolic-clinical parameters in HIV+ patients ART treated with HIV-RNA<50 cp/mL

    PubMed Central

    Dentone, Chiara; Fenoglio, Daniela; Signori, Alessio; Cenderello, Giovanni; Parodi, Alessia; Bozzano, Federica; Guerra, Michele; De Leo, Pasqualina; Bartolacci, Valentina; Mantia, Eugenio; Orofino, Giancarlo; Kalli, Francesca; Marras, Francesco; Fraccaro, Paolo; Giacomini, Mauro; Cassola, Giovanni; Bruzzone, Bianca; Ferrea, Giuseppe; Viscoli, Claudio; Filaci, Gilberto; De Maria, Andrea; Di Biagio, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The persistence of immune activation and inflammation in HIV patients with HIV-RNA (VL) undetectable causes many co-morbidities [1–3]. The aim of this study is to correlate monocytes (m) and NK cell activation levels, soluble markers and oxidative stress with clinical, biochemical and metabolic data in HIV-1 infected patients with VL≤50 copies (cp)/mL on antiretroviral therapy. Materials and Methods Multicentre, cross-sectional study in patients with VL≤50 cp/mL and on antiretroviral therapy by at least six months. We studied: activation/homing markers (CD38, HLA-DR, CCR-2, PDL-1) on inflammatory, intermediate, proinflammatory m; activatory receptors NKp30, NKp46 and HLA-DR on NK cells; soluble inflammatory (sCD14, adiponectina, MCP-1) and stress oxidative markers (dRoms, antiRoms). Univariate analyses are performed with non-parametric and Pearson tests. The significant correlations were adjusted for possible known confounding factors (smoking, Cytomegalovirus IgG serology, Raltegravir, Protease Inhibitor [PI] therapy and HCV-RNA) with multivariate analysis. Results In the 68 patients the positive correlation between age and antiRoms was significant also after adjustment for PI use (p=0.05). The% CD8+T was associated with% proinflammatory m (p=0.043) and with their expression of CCR2 mean fluorescence intensity (MFI) (p=0.012). The% NKp46+ was positively correlated with CD4+T count (p=0.001). The fibrinogen was positively associated with dRoms (p=0.052) and the positive correlation between triglycerides and antiRoms has been confirmed (p<0.001); the impact of antiRoms on HDL/triglycerides ratio (p=0.006) was observed after adjustment for PI use. The BMI was associated with smoking (p=0.011). Only the maraviroc-treated patients showed minimal arterial pressure, fibrinogen and antiRoms lower (p=0.001, 0.004 e 0.006) and sCD14 values higher (p=0.029). Conclusions Patients with long history of HIV infection and stable immunological and virological

  20. Studies on the alterations in haematological indices, micronuclei induction and pathological marker enzyme activities in Channa punctatus (spotted snakehead) perciformes, channidae exposed to thermal power plant effluent.

    PubMed

    Javed, Mehjbeen; Ahmad, Irshad; Ahmad, Ajaz; Usmani, Nazura; Ahmad, Masood

    2016-01-01

    The present study was conducted to assess the toxicity of thermal power plant effluent containing heavy metals (Fe > Cu > Zn > Mn > Ni > Co > Cr) on haematological indices, micronuclei, lobed nuclei and activity of pathological marker enzymes [alkaline phosphatase (ALP), aspartate transferase (AST), alanine transferase (ALT) and creatine kinase (CK)] in Channa punctatus. Total erythrocyte count (-54.52 %), hemoglobin (-36.98 %), packed cell volume (-36.25 %), mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (-1.41 %) and oxygen (O2) carrying capacity (-37.04 %) declined significantly over reference fish, however total leukocyte count (+25.43 %), mean corpuscular hemoglobin (+33.52 %) and mean corpuscular volume (+35.49 %) showed elevation. High frequency of micronuclei (1133.3 %) and lobed nuclei (150 %) were observed in exposed fish which may indicate mutagenesis. Activities of pathological marker enzymes ALP, AST, ALT and CK increased significantly in serum of exposed fish. The ratio of ALT: AST in exposed fish was beyond 1 which indicates manifestation of pathological processes. These biomarkers show that fish have macrocytic hypochromic anemia. Leukocytosis showed general defence response against heavy metal toxicity and marker enzymes showed tissue degeneration. In conclusion, thermal power plant effluent has strong potential to induce micronuclei, tissue pathology, making the fish anemic, weak, stressed and vulnerable to diseases. PMID:27386247

  1. Behavioral Activity and Some Markers of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder among Serotoninergic System Indicators and Glucocorticoid Metabolizing Enzymes in Rats with Different Duration of Hexenal Sleep.

    PubMed

    Tseylikman, O B; Lapshin, M S; Kozochkin, D A; Komel'kova, M V; Kuzina, O V; Golodniy, S V; Lazuko, S S; Tseylikman, V E

    2016-08-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder was imitated in rats with long and short hexenal sleep by exposure to cat odor. Rats with long hexenal sleep demonstrated the highest sensitivity to posttraumatic stress disorders and developed anxiety and depressive disorders. The duration of hexenal sleep correlated with changes in markers of post-traumatic stress disorder, e.g. activity of 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase-2 in the liver of non-stressed animals and serotonin and monoamine oxidase A activity in the brain of stressed animals. PMID:27597057

  2. Relationships between Inflammation, Immune Activation and Bone Health among HIV-Infected Adults on Stable Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Erlandson, Kristine M.; O’Riordan, MaryAnn; Labbato, Danielle; McComsey, Grace A.

    2014-01-01

    Background To determine the association between bone health and inflammation, T-cell activation and monocyte activation among HIV-infected persons on stable antiretroviral therapy. Methods We performed a cross-sectional analysis of all subjects enrolling in the Stopping Atherosclerosis and Treating Unhealthy bone with RosuvastatiN in HIV (SATURN-HIV) trial with available skeletal assessments by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, inflammation, and immune activation markers. Analyses used Wilcoxon rank sum tests, Spearman correlation coefficients and linear regression. Results 142 subjects were included: 78% male, 69% African-American, median age 46.3 years, CD4+ count 604 cells/μL, and 77% with undetectable HIV-1 RNA. 23% had osteopenia/osteoporosis at the hip; 21% at the lumbar spine. sVCAM-1 was correlated with hip (r=−0.22) and spine (r=−0.23 ) BMD, and bone turnover markers (r=0.20–0.33; all p <0.05). No significant correlations were observed between BMD and T-cell activation (%CD38HLA-DR on CD4+ or CD8+ T-cells), monocyte activation (CD14CD16, sCD14, sCD163), or inflammatory markers (IL-6, TNF-α, hs-CRP, d-dimer, RANKL, OPG, sTNF-RI and II). In regression models including traditional bone risk factors, hip BMD was associated with age, race, and body mass index; spine BMD was associated with race, family history of hip fracture, trunk fat, tenofovir, and HIV RNA; bone resorption (CTX) was associated with sICAM-1 and trunk fat; bone formation (P1NP) was associated with sVCAM-1, trunk and limb fat (p≤0.05). Conclusions Future studies should evaluate the longitudinal association of the adhesion molecules to further elucidate potential contributory mechanisms of bone loss among HIV-infected persons on stable ART. PMID:24525466

  3. Effects of 6-month soccer and traditional physical activity programmes on body composition, cardiometabolic risk factors, inflammatory, oxidative stress markers and cardiorespiratory fitness in obese boys.

    PubMed

    Seabra, André; Katzmarzyk, Peter; Carvalho, Maria José; Seabra, Ana; Coelho-E-Silva, Manuel; Abreu, Sandra; Vale, Susana; Póvoas, Susana; Nascimento, Henrique; Belo, Luís; Torres, Sandra; Oliveira, José; Mota, Jorge; Santos-Silva, Alice; Rêgo, Carla; Malina, Robert M

    2016-10-01

    Physical activity is important in obesity prevention, but the effectiveness of different physical activity modalities remains to be determined among children. The main purpose of this study was to compare the effects of a 6-month soccer programme and a traditional physical activity programme on changes in body composition, cardiometabolic risk factors, inflammatory and oxidative markers, cardiorespiratory fitness and perceived psychological status in obese boys. Eighty-eight boys (8-12 years; BMI > +2 standard deviations of WHO reference values) participated in one of three groups: soccer, traditional activity and control. Soccer and traditional activity programmes involved 3 sessions per week for 60-90 min at an average intensity of 70-80% of maximal heart rate. Control group participated in activities of normal daily living. All boys participated in school physical education, two sessions per week of 45-90-min. Measurements were taken at baseline and after 6 months, and included body size and composition, cardiometabolic risk factors, inflammatory and oxidative markers, cardiorespiratory fitness and perceived psychological status. Physical activity and dietary intake were assessed before and immediately following the intervention. The three groups had similar characteristics at baseline. After 6 months, both intervention groups had significantly lower relative fatness (% fat), waist circumference and total cholesterol, and higher cardiorespiratory fitness, self-esteem, perceived physical competence and attraction to physical activity compared with control group. In conclusion, physical activity interventions over 6 months positively influenced several indicators of health status among obese boys. The results also suggested that soccer has the potential as an effective tool for the prevention and reduction of childhood obesity and associated consequences. PMID:26890580

  4. The Retinoic Acid Receptor-α mediates human T-cell activation and Th2 cytokine and chemokine production

    PubMed Central

    Dawson, Harry D; Collins, Gary; Pyle, Robert; Key, Michael; Taub, Dennis D

    2008-01-01

    Background We have recently demonstrated that all-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA) and 9-cis-retinoic acid (9-cis RA) promote IL-4, IL-5 and IL-13 synthesis, while decreasing IFN-γ and TNF-α expression by activated human T cells and reduces the synthesis of IL-12p70 from accessory cells. Here, we have demonstrated that the observed effects using ATRA and 9-cis RA are shared with the clinically useful RAR ligand, 13-cis retinoic acid (13-cis RA), and the retinoic acid receptor-α (RAR-α)-selective agonist, AM580 but not with the RAR-β/γ ligand, 4-hydroxyphenylretinamide (4-HPR). Results The increase in type 2 cytokine production by these retinoids correlated with the expression of the T cell activation markers, CD69 and CD38. The RAR-α-selective agonist, AM580 recapitulated all of the T cell activation and type 2 cytokine-inducing effects of ATRA and 9-cis-RA, while the RAR-α-selective antagonist, RO 41–5253, inhibited these effects. Conclusion These results strongly support a role for RAR-α engagement in the regulation of genes and proteins involved with human T cell activation and type 2 cytokine production. PMID:18416830

  5. Exposure to Diesel Exhaust Particle Extracts (DEPe) Impairs Some Polarization Markers and Functions of Human Macrophages through Activation of AhR and Nrf2

    PubMed Central

    Jaguin, Marie; Fardel, Olivier; Lecureur, Valérie

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages (MΦ), well-known to play an important role in immune response, also respond to environmental toxic chemicals such as diesel exhaust particles (DEP). Potential effects of DEPs towards MΦ polarization, a key hall-mark of MΦ physiology, remain however poorly documented. This study was therefore designed to evaluate the effects of a reference DEP extract (DEPe) on human MΦ polarization. Human blood monocytes-derived MΦ were incubated with IFNγ+LPS or IL-4 to obtain M1 and M2 subtypes, respectively; a 24 h exposure of polarizing MΦ to 10 μg/ml DEPe was found to impair expression of some macrophagic M1 and M2 markers, without however overall inhibition of M1 and M2 polarization processes. Notably, DEPe treatment increased the secretion of the M1 marker IL-8 and the M2 marker IL-10 in both MΦ subtypes, whereas it reduced lipopolysaccharide-induced IL-6 and IL-12p40 secretion in M1 MΦ. In M2 MΦ, DEPe exposure led to a reduction of CD200R expression and of CCL17, CCL18 and CCL22 secretion, associated with a lower chemotaxis of CCR4-positive cells. DEPe activated the Nrf2 and AhR pathways and induced expression of their reference target genes such as Hmox-1 and cytochrome P-4501B1 in M1 and M2 MΦ. Nrf2 or AhR silencing through RNA interference prevented DEPe-related down-regulation of IL-6. AhR silencing also inhibited the down-secretion of IL-12p40 and CCL18 in M1- and M2-DEPe-exposed MΦ, respectively. DEPs are therefore likely to alter expression of some M1 and M2 markers in an AhR- and Nrf2-dependent manner; such regulations may contribute to deleterious immune effects of atmospheric DEP. PMID:25710172

  6. CSF markers of Alzheimer’s pathology and microglial activation are associated with altered white matter microstructure in asymptomatic adults at risk for Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Melah, Kelsey E; Lu, Sharon Yuan-Fu; Hoscheidt, Siobhan M; Alexander, Andrew L; Adluru, Nagesh; Destiche, Daniel J; Carlsson, Cynthia M; Zetterberg, Henrik; Blennow, Kaj; Okonkwo, Ozioma C; Gleason, Carey E; Dowling, N Maritza; Bratzke, Lisa C; Rowley, Howard A; Sager, Mark A; Asthana, Sanjay; Johnson, Sterling C; Bendlin, Barbara B

    2015-01-01

    Background The immune response in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) involves activation of microglia which may remove β-amyloid. However, overproduction of inflammatory compounds may exacerbate neural damage in Alzheimer’s disease. AD pathology accumulates years before diagnosis, yet the extent to which neuroinflammation is involved in the earliest disease stages is unknown. Objective To determine whether neuroinflammation exacerbates neural damage in preclinical AD. Methods We utilized cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and magnetic resonance imaging collected in 192 asymptomatic late-middle-aged adults (mean age=60.98 years). Neuroinflammatory markers chitinase-3-like protein 1 (YKL-40) and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) in CSF were utilized as markers of neuroinflammation. Neural cell damage was assessed using CSF neurofilament light chain protein (NFL), CSF total tau (T-Tau), and neural microstructure assessed with diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). With regard to AD pathology, CSF Aβ42 and tau phosphorylated at threonine 181 (P-Tau181) were used as markers of amyloid and tau pathology, respectively. We hypothesized that higher YKL-40 and MCP-1 in the presence of AD pathology would be associated with higher NFL, T-Tau, and altered microstructure on DTI. Results Neuroinflammation was associated with markers of neural damage. Higher CSF YKL-40 was associated with both higher CSF NFL and T-Tau. Inflammation interacted with AD pathology, such that greater MCP-1 and lower Aβ42 was associated with altered microstructure in bilateral frontal and right temporal lobe and that greater MCP-1 and greater P-Tau181 was associated with altered microstructure in precuneus. Conclusion Inflammation may play a role in neural damage in preclinical AD. PMID:26836182

  7. Combined Effects of Time Spent in Physical Activity, Sedentary Behaviors and Sleep on Obesity and Cardio-Metabolic Health Markers: A Novel Compositional Data Analysis Approach

    PubMed Central

    Chastin, Sebastien F. M.; Palarea-Albaladejo, Javier; Dontje, Manon L.; Skelton, Dawn A.

    2015-01-01

    The associations between time spent in sleep, sedentary behaviors (SB) and physical activity with health are usually studied without taking into account that time is finite during the day, so time spent in each of these behaviors are codependent. Therefore, little is known about the combined effect of time spent in sleep, SB and physical activity, that together constitute a composite whole, on obesity and cardio-metabolic health markers. Cross-sectional analysis of NHANES 2005–6 cycle on N = 1937 adults, was undertaken using a compositional analysis paradigm, which accounts for this intrinsic codependence. Time spent in SB, light intensity (LIPA) and moderate to vigorous activity (MVPA) was determined from accelerometry and combined with self-reported sleep time to obtain the 24 hour time budget composition. The distribution of time spent in sleep, SB, LIPA and MVPA is significantly associated with BMI, waist circumference, triglycerides, plasma glucose, plasma insulin (all p<0.001), and systolic (p<0.001) and diastolic blood pressure (p<0.003), but not HDL or LDL. Within the composition, the strongest positive effect is found for the proportion of time spent in MVPA. Strikingly, the effects of MVPA replacing another behavior and of MVPA being displaced by another behavior are asymmetric. For example, re-allocating 10 minutes of SB to MVPA was associated with a lower waist circumference by 0.001% but if 10 minutes of MVPA is displaced by SB this was associated with a 0.84% higher waist circumference. The proportion of time spent in LIPA and SB were detrimentally associated with obesity and cardiovascular disease markers, but the association with SB was stronger. For diabetes risk markers, replacing SB with LIPA was associated with more favorable outcomes. Time spent in MVPA is an important target for intervention and preventing transfer of time from LIPA to SB might lessen the negative effects of physical inactivity. PMID:26461112

  8. Soluble CD163, a Novel Marker of Activated Macrophages, Is Elevated and Associated With Noncalcified Coronary Plaque in HIV-Infected Patients

    PubMed Central

    Burdo, Tricia H.; Lo, Janet; Abbara, Suhny; Wei, Jeffrey; DeLelys, Michelle E.; Preffer, Fred; Rosenberg, Eric S.; Williams, Kenneth C.

    2011-01-01

    Background. Pro-inflammatory monocytes/macrophages may contribute to increased atherosclerosis in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)–infected patients. We investigate—to our knowledge, for the first time—sCD163 and other markers of monocyte activation in relationship to atherosclerotic plaque in HIV-infected patients. Methods. One hundred two HIV-infected and 41 HIV-seronegative men with equivalent cardiovascular risk factors and without history of coronary artery disease were prospectively recruited and underwent computed tomography coronary angiography. Results. sCD163 levels and presence of plaque were significantly higher among antiretroviral-treated subjects with undetectable HIV RNA levels, compared with seronegative controls (1172 ± 646 vs. 883 ± 561 ng/mL [P = .02] for sCD163 and 61% vs. 39% [P = .03] for presence of plaque). After adjusting for age, race, lipids, blood pressure, glucose, smoking, sCD14, and HIV infection, sCD163 remained independently associated with noncalcified plaque (P = .008). Among HIV-infected patients, sCD163 was associated with coronary segments with noncalcified plaque (r = 0.21; P = .04), but not with calcium score. In contrast, markers of generalized inflammation, including C-reactive protein level, and D-dimer were not associated with sCD163 or plaque among HIV-infected patients. Conclusions. sCD163, a monocyte/macrophage activation marker, is increased in association with noncalcified coronary plaque in men with chronic HIV infection and low or undetectable viremia. These data suggest a potentially important role of chronic monocyte/macrophage activation in the development of noncalcified vulnerable plaque. Clinical Trial Registration. NCT00455793. PMID:21917896

  9. Biological and Chemical Removal of Primary Cilia Affects Mechanical Activation of Chondrogenesis Markers in Chondroprogenitors and Hypertrophic Chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Deren, Matthew E.; Yang, Xu; Guan, Yingjie; Chen, Qian

    2016-01-01

    Chondroprogenitors and hypertrophic chondrocytes, which are the first and last stages of the chondrocyte differentiation process, respectively, are sensitive to mechanical signals. We hypothesize that the mechanical sensitivity of these cells depends on the cell surface primary cilia. To test this hypothesis, we removed the primary cilia by biological means with transfection with intraflagellar transport protein 88 (IFT88) siRNA or by chemical means with chloral hydrate treatment. Transfection of IFT88 siRNA significantly reduced the percentage of ciliated cells in both chondroprogenitor ATDC5 cells as well as primary hypertrophic chondrocytes. Cyclic loading (1 Hz, 10% matrix deformation) of ATDC5 cells in three-dimensional (3D) culture stimulates the mRNA levels of chondrogenesis marker Type II collagen (Col II), hypertrophic chondrocyte marker Type X collagen (Col X), and a molecular regulator of chondrogenesis and chondrocyte hypertrophy bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2). The reduction of ciliated chondroprogenitors abolishes mechanical stimulation of Col II, Col X, and BMP-2. In contrast, cyclic loading stimulates Col X mRNA levels in hypertrophic chondrocytes, but not those of Col II and BMP-2. Both biological and chemical reduction of ciliated hypertrophic chondrocytes reduced but failed to abolish mechanical stimulation of Col X mRNA levels. Thus, primary cilia play a major role in mechanical stimulation of chondrogenesis and chondrocyte hypertrophy in chondroprogenitor cells and at least a partial role in hypertrophic chondrocytes. PMID:26861287

  10. Blu-ray Technology-Based Quantitative Assays for Cardiac Markers: From Disc Activation to Multiplex Detection.

    PubMed

    Weng, Samuel; Li, Xiaochun; Niu, Michelle; Ge, Bixia; Yu, Hua-Zhong

    2016-07-01

    Acute myocardial infarction (AMI) is the leading cause of mortality and morbidity globally. To reduce the number of mortalities, reliable and rapid point-of-care (POC) diagnosis of AMI is extremely critical. We herein present a Blu-ray technology-based assay platform for multiplex cardiac biomarker detection; not only off-the-shelf Blu-ray discs (BDs) were adapted as substrates to prepare standard immunoassays and DNA aptamer/antibody hybrid assays for the three key cardiac marker proteins (myoglobin, troponin I, and C-creative protein) but also an unmodified optical drive was directly employed to read the assay results digitally. In particular, we have shown that all three cardiac markers can be quantitated in their respective physiological ranges of interest, and the detection limits achieved are comparable with conventional enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kits. The Blu-ray assay platform was further validated by measuring real-world samples and establishing a linear correlation with the simultaneously obtained ELISA data. Without the need to modify either the hardware (Blu-ray discs and optical drives) or the software driver, this assay-on-a-BD technique promises to be a low-cost user-friendly quantitative tool for on-site chemical analysis and POC medical diagnosis. PMID:27268387

  11. Global histone deacetylase enzymatic activity is an independent prognostic marker associated with a shorter overall survival in chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients

    PubMed Central

    Van Damme, Michaël; Crompot, Emerence; Meuleman, Nathalie; Mineur, Philippe; Dessars, Barbara; El Housni, Hakim; Bron, Dominique; Lagneaux, Laurence; Stamatopoulos, Basile

    2014-01-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDAC) play a crucial role in transcriptional regulation and are often deregulated in many cancers. However, global HDAC enzymatic activity has never been investigated in Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL). We measured HDAC activity in protein extracts from CD19+ B-cells purified from 114 CLL patients with a median follow-up of 91 months (range: 11–376). HDAC activity was equivalent in CLL and normal B-cells but higher in patients who died during the study than in living patients (152.1 vs. 65.04 pmol; P = 0.0060). Furthermore, HDAC activity correlated with treatment-free survival (TFS; P = 0.0156) and overall survival (OS; P < 0.0001): patients with low HDAC activity (n = 75) had a median TFS and OS of 101 and >376 months, respectively, whereas patients with high HDAC activity (n = 39) had a median TFS and OS of 47 and 137 months, respectively. Multivariate analyses indicated that HDAC activity is an independent predictor of OS (hazard ratio = 7.68; P = 0.0017). Finally, HDAC activity increased after B-cell receptor stimulation using IgM, suggesting a role for microenvironment stimuli (n = 10; P = 0.0371). In conclusion, high HDAC activity in CLL B-cells is associated with shorter TFS and OS and is an independent marker of OS, refining the use of other prognostic factors. This work provides a biological base for the use of HDAC inhibitors in CLL treatment. PMID:25437053

  12. Endogenous plasma activated protein C levels and the effect of enoxaparin and drotrecogin alfa (activated) on markers of coagulation activation and fibrinolysis in pulmonary embolism

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction There are no published data on the status of endogenous activated protein C (APC) in pulmonary embolism (PE), and no data on the effect of drotrecogin alfa (activated) (DAA) given in addition to therapeutic dose enoxaparin. Methods In this double-blind clinical trial, 47 patients with computed tomography (CT)-confirmed acute submassive PE treated with 1 mg/kg body weight of enoxaparin twice daily were randomized to groups receiving a 12-hour intravenous infusion of 6, 12, 18, or 24 μg/kg/hour of DAA or a placebo. Blood samples were drawn before starting DAA infusion, after 4, 8 and 12 hours (at the end of the infusion period), and on treatment days 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6. Results Initial endogenous plasma activated protein C (APC) levels were 0.36 ± 0.48 ng/ml (<0.10 to 1.72 ng/ml) and remained in the same range in the placebo group. APC levels in patients treated with DAA were 13.67 ± 3.57 ng/ml, 32.71 ± 8.76 ng/ml, 36.13 ± 7.60 ng/ml, and 51.79 ± 15.84 ng/ml in patients treated with 6, 12, 18, and 24 μg/kg/hour DAA, respectively. In patients with a D-dimer level >4 mg/L indicating a high level of acute fibrin formation and dissolution, DAA infusion resulted in a more rapid drop in soluble fibrin, D-dimer, and fibrinogen/fibrin degradation products (FDP) levels, compared to enoxaparin alone. There was a parallel decline of soluble fibrin, D-dimer, FDP, and plasmin-plasmin inhibitor complex (PPIC) in response to treatment with enoxaparin ± DAA, with no evidence of a systemic profibrinolytic effect of the treatment. Conclusions In patients with acute submassive PE endogenous APC levels are low. DAA infusion enhances the inhibition of fibrin formation. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00191724 PMID:21241489

  13. Environmental Stress Affects the Activity of Metabolic and Growth Factor Signaling Networks and Induces Autophagy Markers in MCF7 Breast Cancer Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Casado, Pedro; Bilanges, Benoit; Rajeeve, Vinothini; Vanhaesebroeck, Bart; Cutillas, Pedro R.

    2014-01-01

    Phosphoproteomic techniques are contributing to our understanding of how signaling pathways interact and regulate biological processes. This technology is also being used to characterize how signaling networks are remodeled during disease progression and to identify biomarkers of signaling pathway activity and of responses to cancer therapy. A potential caveat in these studies is that phosphorylation is a very dynamic modification that can substantially change during the course of an experiment or the retrieval and processing of cellular samples. Here, we investigated how exposure of cells to ambient conditions modulates phosphorylation and signaling pathway activity in the MCF7 breast cancer cell line. About 1.5% of 3,500 sites measured showed a significant change in phosphorylation extent upon exposure of cells to ambient conditions for 15 min. The effects of this perturbation in modifying phosphorylation patterns did not involve random changes due to stochastic activation of kinases and phosphatases. Instead, exposure of cells to ambient conditions elicited an environmental stress reaction that involved a coordinated response to a metabolic stress situation, which included: (1) the activation of AMPK; (2) the inhibition of PI3K, AKT, and ERK; (3) an increase in markers of protein synthesis inhibition at the level of translation elongation; and (4) an increase in autophagy markers. We also observed that maintaining cells in ice modified but did not completely abolish this metabolic stress response. In summary, exposure of cells to ambient conditions affects the activity of signaling networks previously implicated in metabolic and growth factor signaling. Mass spectrometry data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD000472. PMID:24425749

  14. Local and systemic activation of the whole complement cascade in human leukocytoclastic cutaneous vasculitis; C3d,g and terminal complement complex as sensitive markers.

    PubMed Central

    Dauchel, H; Joly, P; Delpech, A; Thomine, E; Sauger, F; Le Loet, X; Lauret, P; Tron, F; Fontaine, M; Ripoche, J

    1993-01-01

    We have studied complement activation both in plasma samples and in lesional skin from patients with leukocytoclastic cutaneous vasculitis (LCV). Enzyme immunoassay (EIA) quantification of the complement activation markers, C3d,g and the terminal complement complex (TCC) in plasma, showed that their levels were significantly increased in 66% and 55% of the patients, respectively (n = 29) compared with healthy controls, whereas the standard measurements of C3, factor B, C1q, C4 and C2 were generally within normal range. Elevations of C3d,g and TCC levels in plasma were significantly correlated. Importantly, a significant correlation was found between the severity of the vasculitis and both C3d,g and TCC plasma levels. Immunofluorescence studies of skin biopsy specimens demonstrated simultaneous presence of perivascular dermal deposits of C3d,g and TCC in lesional skin from 96% and 80% respectively of the patients (n = 25). There was a significant correlation between the intensity of the deposits of both markers. Clusterin, a TCC inhibitory protein, was always found at the same sites of perivascular TCC deposits. Immunofluorescence studies at the epidermal basement membrane zone (BMZ) revealed in each case deposits of C3d,g which were accompanied by TCC deposits in 52% of the biopsy specimens. These data demonstrate that there is a local and systemic activation of the whole complement cascade in human LCV. The presence of both C3d,g and clusterin-associated TCC perivascular deposits suggests an intervention of a regulatory mechanism of local complement activation in LCV. Finally, measurement of plasma C3d,g and TCC appears to be a sensitive indicator of systemic complement activation and disease severity in LCV. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:8485913

  15. Evaluation of serum markers in the LRF CLL4 trial: β2-microglobulin but not serum free light chains, is an independent marker of overall survival.

    PubMed

    Pratt, Guy; Thomas, Peter; Marden, Nicola; Alexander, Denis; Davis, Zadie; Hussey, David; Parry, Helen; Harding, Stephen; Catovsky, Daniel; Begley, Joe; Oscier, David

    2016-10-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is characterized by heterogeneous clinical behavior and there is a need for improved biomarkers. The current study evaluated the prognostic significance of serum free light chains (sFLC, kappa, and lambda) and other serum markers (bar, serum thymidine kinase (sTK), soluble CD23, and LDH) together with established biomarkers in 289 patients enrolled into the LRF CLL4 trial. In a multivariable analysis of serum markers alone, higher big and kappa light chains were statistically significant in predicting disease progression and higher blg, and sTK in predicting mortality. In multivariable analysis for overall survival the following were independently significant: β2M levels, immunoglobulin gene (IGHV) mutational status (>98% homology), age, 17p13 deletions (>10%), and CD38 expression. β2M is the only serum marker that retained clear independent value as a biomarker in the LRF CLL4 trial and remains powerfully prognostic requiring evaluation in any future method of risk stratifying patients. PMID:26732125

  16. Augmented telomerase activity, reduced telomere length and the presence of alternative lengthening of telomere in renal cell carcinoma: plausible predictive and diagnostic markers.

    PubMed

    Pal, Deeksha; Sharma, Ujjawal; Khajuria, Ragini; Singh, Shrawan Kumar; Kakkar, Nandita; Prasad, Rajendra

    2015-05-15

    In this study, we analyzed 100 cases of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) for telomerase activity, telomere length and alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT) using the TRAP assay, TeloTTAGGG assay kit and immunohistochemical analysis of ALT associated promyelocytic leukemia (PML) bodies respectively. A significantly higher (P=0.000) telomerase activity was observed in 81 cases of RCC which was correlated with clinicopathological features of tumor for instance, stage (P=0.008) and grades (P=0.000) but not with the subtypes of RCC (P = 0.355). Notwithstanding, no correlation was found between telomerase activity and subtypes of RCC. Strikingly, the telomere length was found to be significantly shorter in RCC (P=0.000) to that of corresponding normal renal tissues and it is well correlated with grades (P=0.016) but not with stages (P=0.202) and subtypes (P=0.669) of RCC. In this study, telomere length was also negatively correlated with the age of patients (r(2)=0.528; P=0.000) which supports the notion that it could be used as a marker for biological aging. ALT associated PML bodies containing PML protein was found in telomerase negative cases of RCC. It suggests the presence of an ALT pathway mechanism to maintain the telomere length in telomerase negative RCC tissues which was associated with high stages of RCC, suggesting a prevalent mechanism for telomere maintenance in high stages. In conclusion, the telomerase activity and telomere length can be used as a diagnostic as well as a predictive marker in RCC. The prevalence of ALT mechanism in high stages of RCC is warranted for the development of anti-ALT inhibitors along with telomerase inhibitor against RCC as a therapeutic approach. PMID:25769384

  17. Inhibitory Effects of Standardized Extracts of Phyllanthus amarus and Phyllanthus urinaria and Their Marker Compounds on Phagocytic Activity of Human Neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Yuandani; Ilangkovan, Menaga; Mohamad, Hazni Falina; Husain, Khairana; Abdul Razak, Amirul Faiz

    2013-01-01

    The standardized methanol extracts of Phyllanthus amarus and P. urinaria, collected from Malaysia and Indonesia, and their isolated chemical markers, phyllanthin and hypophyllanthin, were evaluated for their effects on the chemotaxis, phagocytosis and chemiluminescence of human phagocytes. All the plant extracts strongly inhibited the migration of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) with the Malaysian P. amarus showing the strongest inhibitory activity (IC50 value, 1.1 µg/mL). There was moderate inhibition by the extracts of the bacteria engulfment by the phagocytes with the Malaysian P. amarus exhibiting the highest inhibition (50.8% of phagocytizing cells). The Malaysian P. amarus and P. urinaria showed strong reactive oxygen species (ROS) inhibitory activity, with both extracts exhibiting IC50 value of 0.7 µg/mL. Phyllanthin and hypophyllanthin exhibited relatively strong activity against PMNs chemotaxis, with IC50 values slightly lower than that of ibuprofen (1.4 µg/mL). Phyllanthin exhibited strong inhibitory activity on the oxidative burst with an IC50 value comparable to that of aspirin (1.9 µg/mL). Phyllanthin exhibited strong engulfment inhibitory activity with percentage of phagocytizing cells of 14.2 and 27.1% for neutrophils and monocytes, respectively. The strong inhibitory activity of the extracts was due to the presence of high amounts of phyllanthin and hypophyllanthin although other constituents may also contribute. PMID:23737840

  18. The use of a spaceflight-compatible device to perform WBC surface marker staining and whole-blood mitogenic activation for cytokine detection by flow cytometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crucian, B. E.; Sams, C. F.

    1999-01-01

    Significant changes have recently been described regarding circulating peripheral immune cells immediately following spaceflight. Existing methods for immunophenotype staining of peripheral blood in terrestrial labs do not meet the constraints for flight on the Space Shuttle. We have recently described the development and use of the Whole Blood Staining Device (WBSD), a simple device for staining flow cytometry specimens during spaceflight. When preparing samples with the WBSD, all liquids are safely contained as the cells are moved through staining, lysis and fixation steps. Here we briefly review the use of the WBSD, and then describe another versatile adaptation, a modification to perform intracellular staining of cytokines for detection by flow cytometry. Alterations in cytokine production have been reported both in ground-based simulated microgravity culture and in astronaut samples returning from spaceflight. Data regarding microgravity effects on cytokine production for specific subpopulations of cells is lacking. Flow cytometric cytokine analysis offers the unique ability to perform simultaneous surface marker analysis and positively identity cytokine producing subsets of cells. The utilization of the WBSD provides the ability to perform rapid and routine mitogenic activation during spaceflight coupled with the ability to perform simultaneous surface marker analysis. The only external requirements for this procedure are an in-flight 37-degree incubator and the capacity for 4-degree storage.

  19. The mRNA level of Charcot-Leyden crystal protein/galectin-10 is a marker for CRTH2 activation in human whole blood in vitro.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tai-An; Kourteva, Galina; Hilton, Holly; Li, Hongli; Tare, Nadine S; Carvajal, Valerie; Hang, Julie S; Wei, Xin; Renzetti, Louis M

    2010-11-01

    CRTH2 is one of the prostaglandin D₂ receptors and plays a proinflammatory role in allergic diseases. Gene expression markers in whole blood induced by CRTH2 activation have not previously been reported. Using microarray analyses of 54 675 genes, we revealed modest gene expression changes in human whole blood stimulated in vitro by a selective CRTH2 agonist, DK-PGD₂. Five genes were found to exhibit 1.5- to 2.6-fold changes in expression. The expression of Charcot-Leyden crystal protein/galectin-10 (CLC/Gal-10) in particular was consistently enhanced in human whole blood stimulated by DK-PGD₂, as confirmed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction analyses. DK-PGD(2)-induced increases in blood CLC/Gal-10 mRNA levels were largely attenuated by the CRTH2 antagonist CAY10471.Thus, the DK-PGD₂-induced CLC/Gal-10 mRNA level can serve as a potential marker for monitoring pharmacodynamic effects of blood exposure to CRTH2 modulating agents. PMID:20858065

  20. Age-related protective effect of deprenyl on changes in the levels of diagnostic marker enzymes and antioxidant defense enzymes activities in cerebellar tissue in Wistar rats

    PubMed Central

    James, T. J.

    2010-01-01

    Antioxidants are free radical scavengers and protect living organisms against oxidative damage to tissues. Experimental evidence implicates oxygen-derived free radicals as important causative agents of aging and the present study was designed to evaluate the age-related effects of deprenyl on the antioxidant defense in the cerebellum of male Wistar rats. Experimental rats of three age groups (6, 12, and 18 months old) were administered with liquid deprenyl (2 mg/kg body weight/day for a period of 15 days i.p) and levels of diagnostic marker enzymes (alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, lactate dehydrogenase and creatine phosphokinase) in plasma, lipid peroxides, reduced glutathione and activities of glutathione-dependent antioxidant enzymes (glutathione peroxidase and glutathione-S-transferase) and antiperoxidative enzymes (catalase and superoxide dismutase) in the cerebellar tissue were determined. Intraperitonial administration of deprenyl (2 mg/kg body weight/day for a period of 15 days) significantly (p < 0.05) attenuated the age-related alterations noted in the levels of diagnostic marker enzymes plasma of experimental animals. Deprenyl also exerted an antioxidant effect against aging process by hindering lipid peroxidation to an extent. Moderate rise in the levels of reduced glutathione and activities of glutathione-dependent antioxidant enzymes and antiperoxidative enzymes was also observed. The results of the present investigation indicated that the protective potential of deprenyl was probably due to the increase of the activity of the free radical scavenging enzymes or to a counteraction of free radicals by its antioxidant nature or to a strengthening of neuronal membrane by its membrane-stabilizing action. Histopathological observations also confirmed the protective effect of deprenyl against the age-related aberrations in rat cerebellum. These data on the effect of deprenyl on parameters of normal aging provides new additional

  1. Activity of MMP-2, MMP-8 and MMP-9 in serum as a marker of progression of alcoholic liver disease in people from Lublin Region, eastern Poland.

    PubMed

    Prystupa, Andrzej; Boguszewska-Czubara, Anna; Bojarska-Junak, Agnieszka; Toruń-Jurkowska, Anna; Roliński, Jacek; Załuska, Wociech

    2015-01-01

    In alcoholic liver cirrhosis, normal liver cells are replaced by scar tissue (fibrosis). Liver fibrosis is a dynamic process in which activated hepatic stellate cells are involved in the synthesis of matrix proteins and the regulation of matrix degeneration. The aim of the presented study was to assess the usefulness of MMP-2, MMP-8 and MMP-9 as diagnostic markers of alcoholic liver disease. Sixty patients with alcoholic liver cirrhosis were randomly enrolled during hospitalization in departments of hospitals from the Lublin Region in eastern Poland. The stage of cirrhosis was estimated according to Child-Turcotte-Pugh criteria (Child-Pugh score) as P- Ch A, P-Ch B, P-Ch C. The control group consisted of 10 healthy persons without liver disease, who did not drink alcohol. Additionally, a group of alcoholics without liver cirrhosis was included in the study. Blood sample were obtained, and after centrifuge, serum was collected for further analysis. The activity of MMP-2, MMP-8 and MMP-9 in the blood plasma of the patients and the control group were measured by using the sandwich enzyme immunoassay technique with commercially available quantitative ELISA test kits. Activity of MMP-2, MMP-8 and MMP-9 in patients with liver cirrhosis were increased gradually according to Child-Pugh stages. The activity of MMP-2, MMP-8, MMP-9 were the highest in patients with liver cirrhosis stage C. MMP-2, MMP-8, MMP-9 concentrations in the people with liver cirrhosis (stage C) were significantly increased compared to controls. A significant difference were observed between activity MMP-2 in control group, alcoholics without liver cirrhosis, and those with liver cirrhosis (stages A, B, C according Child-Pugh score). MMP-2, MMP-8 and MMP-9 may be markers of alcoholic liver cirrhosis in the alcoholics. Elevated levels of MMP-2, MMP-8 and MMP-9 in the alcoholic patients indicated that cirrhosis has developed. The most sensitive is MMP-2, because the activity of this parameter is increased

  2. Enzyme markers

    MedlinePlus

    ... or defects passed down through families (inherited) can affect how enzymes work. Some enzymes are affected by several genes. Test results are usually reported as a percentage of normal enzyme activity.

  3. Epigenetic regulation of embryonic stem cell marker miR302C in human chondrosarcoma as determinant of antiproliferative activity of proline-rich polypeptide 1.

    PubMed

    Galoian, Karina; Qureshi, Amir; D'Ippolito, Gianluca; Schiller, Paul C; Molinari, Marco; Johnstone, Andrea L; Brothers, Shaun P; Paz, Ana C; Temple, H T

    2015-08-01

    Metastatic chondrosarcoma of mesenchymal origin is the second most common bone malignancy and does not respond either to chemotherapy or radiation; therefore, the search for new therapies is relevant and urgent. We described recently that tumor growth inhibiting cytostatic proline-rich polypeptide 1, (PRP-1) significantly upregulated tumor suppressor miRNAs, downregulated onco-miRNAs in human chondrosarcoma JJ012 cell line, compared to chondrocytes culture. In this study we hypothesized the existence and regulation of a functional marker in cancer stem cells, correlated to peptides antiproliferative activity. Experimental results indicated that among significantly downregulated miRNA after PRP-1treatment was miRNAs 302c*. This miRNA is a part of the cluster miR302‑367, which is stemness regulator in human embryonic stem cells and in certain tumors, but is not expressed in adult hMSCs and normal tissues. PRP-1 had strong inhibitory effect on viability of chondrosarcoma and multilineage induced multipotent adult cells (embryonic primitive cell type). Unlike chondrosarcoma, in glioblastoma, PRP-1 does not have any inhibitory activity on cell proliferation, because in glioblastoma miR-302-367 cluster plays an opposite role, its expression is sufficient to suppress the stemness inducing properties. The observed correlation between the antiproliferative activity of PRP-1 and its action on downregulation of miR302c explains the peptides opposite effects on the upregulation of proliferation of adult mesenchymal stem cells, and the inhibition of the proliferation of human bone giant-cell tumor stromal cells, reported earlier. PRP-1 substantially downregulated the miR302c targets, the stemness markers Nanog, c-Myc and polycomb protein Bmi-1. miR302c expression is induced by JMJD2-mediated H3K9me2 demethylase activity in its promoter region. JMJD2 was reported to be a positive regulator for Nanog. Our experimental results proved that PRP-1 strongly inhibited H3K9 activity

  4. Epigenetic regulation of embryonic stem cell marker miR302C in human chondrosarcoma as determinant of antiproliferative activity of proline-rich polypeptide 1

    PubMed Central

    GALOIAN, KARINA; QURESHI, AMIR; D’IPPOLITO, GIANLUCA; SCHILLER, PAUL C.; MOLINARI, MARCO; JOHNSTONE, ANDREA L.; BROTHERS, SHAUN P.; PAZ, ANA C.; TEMPLE, H.T.

    2015-01-01

    Metastatic chondrosarcoma of mesenchymal origin is the second most common bone malignancy and does not respond either to chemotherapy or radiation; therefore, the search for new therapies is relevant and urgent. We described recently that tumor growth inhibiting cytostatic proline-rich polypeptide 1, (PRP-1) significantly upregulated tumor suppressor miRNAs, downregulated onco-miRNAs in human chondrosarcoma JJ012 cell line, compared to chondrocytes culture. In this study we hypothesized the existence and regulation of a functional marker in cancer stem cells, correlated to peptides antiproliferative activity. Experimental results indicated that among significantly downregulated miRNA after PRP-1treatment was miRNAs 302c*. This miRNA is a part of the cluster miR302-367, which is stemness regulator in human embryonic stem cells and in certain tumors, but is not expressed in adult hMSCs and normal tissues. PRP-1 had strong inhibitory effect on viability of chondrosarcoma and multilineage induced multipotent adult cells (embryonic primitive cell type). Unlike chondrosarcoma, in glioblastoma, PRP-1 does not have any inhibitory activity on cell proliferation, because in glioblastoma miR-302-367 cluster plays an opposite role, its expression is sufficient to suppress the stemness inducing properties. The observed correlation between the antiproliferative activity of PRP-1 and its action on downregulation of miR302c explains the peptides opposite effects on the upregulation of proliferation of adult mesenchymal stem cells, and the inhibition of the proliferation of human bone giant-cell tumor stromal cells, reported earlier. PRP-1 substantially downregulated the miR302c targets, the stemness markers Nanog, c-Myc and polycomb protein Bmi-1. miR302c expression is induced by JMJD2-mediated H3K9me2 demethylase activity in its promoter region. JMJD2 was reported to be a positive regulator for Nanog. Our experimental results proved that PRP-1 strongly inhibited H3K9 activity

  5. Effects of polyphenol-rich extract from berries of Aronia melanocarpa on the markers of oxidative stress and blood platelet activation.

    PubMed

    Olas, Beata; Kedzierska, Magdalena; Wachowicz, Barbara; Stochmal, Anna; Oleszek, Wieslaw

    2010-01-01

    Bioactive substances found in numerous foods can be successfully and safely used to modify various cellular functions and affect the oxidative stress. Aronia melanocarpa fruits (Rosaceae) are one of the richest plant sources of phenolic substances shown to have anti-inflammatory, antitumor, antioxidative and antiplatelet activities. We investigated antioxidant properties of the extract from berries of A. melanocarpa by the estimation of the selected and other biomarkers of oxidative stress, i.e. the level of 8-epi-prostaglandin F(2) (8-EPI) (by immunoassay kit) and the amount of glutathione (by HPLC method) in control platelets and platelets treated with H(2)O(2). The expression of alpha(IIb)beta(3) (a marker of platelet activation) was measured by flow cytometer. The antioxidative and antiplatelet properties of the tested extract were also compared with the action of a well characterized antioxidative and antiplatelet commercial monomeric polyphenol-resveratrol. The extract from berries of A. melanocarpa (at the highest tested concentration -100 microg/ml) decreased the production of 8-EPI (a marker of lipid peroxidation) in control blood platelets and platelets treated with H(2)O(2) (2 mM). A combined action of the tested plant extract and H(2)O(2) evoked a significant increase of reduced form of glutathione in platelets compared with cells treated with H(2)O(2) only. Moreover, the tested plant extract (at the highest used concentration -100 microg/ml) reduced the expression of alpha(IIb)beta(3) on blood platelets. Comparative studies indicate that the tested plant extract was found to be more reactive in blood platelets than the solution of pure resveratrol. PMID:20218910

  6. Circulating miRNAs as Predictor Markers for Activation of Hepatic Stellate Cells and Progression of HCV-Induced Liver Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    El-Ahwany, Eman; Nagy, Faten; Zoheiry, Mona; Shemis, Mohamed; Nosseir, Mona; Taleb, Hoda Abu; El Ghannam, Maged; Atta, Rafaat; Zada, Suher

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Liver fibrosis is the excessive accumulation of extracellular matrix that occurs by activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), which has been identified as the major driver of liver fibrosis. Several studies confirmed that miRNAs have regulatory effects on the activation of HSCs by affecting the signaling pathways. The aim of this study was to develop non-invasive diagnostic markers by measuring different circulating miRNAs in serum as predictor markers for early diagnosis of liver fibrosis and its progression. Methods In this case-control study, we enrolled 66 subjects with chronic hepatitis C (CHC) with early stage of fibrosis and 65 subjects with CHC with late-stage fibrosis. Also, 40 subjects were included as normal controls. The six main miRNAs, i.e., miR-138, miR-140, miR-143, miR-325, miR-328, and miR-349, were measured using the reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Results In the cases of CHC both with early and late stage of fibrosis, the circulating levels of the six main miRNAs were significantly higher than the levels in the control group. ROC analysis indicated that the sensitivity and specificity of miR-138 were 89.3% and 71.43%, respectively, in the early stage of fibrosis. In the late stage, the sensitivity and specificity of miR-138 were 89.3 and 93.02%, respectively, whereas, for miR-143, they were 75.0 and 88.4%, respectively. Conclusions Circulating miR-138 could serve as a non-invasive biomarker for the detection of early fibrosis. Also, miR-138 and miR-143 could be specific biomarkers for indicating the late stage of liver fibrosis. PMID:26955452

  7. Intra-specific biodiversity of Italian myrtle (Myrtus communis) through chemical markers profile and biological activities of leaf methanolic extracts.

    PubMed

    Sacchetti, G; Muzzoli, M; Statti, G A; Conforti, F; Bianchi, A; Agrimonti, C; Ballero, M; Poli, F

    2007-02-01

    Methanolic extracts of Myrtus communis leaves from two Italian regions (Calabria and Sardinia) were processed to determine the content of myrtenol, linalool and eucalyptol. Among the Calabrian and Sardinian myrtle samples, linalool and eucalyptol chemotypes were prevalent. The extracts were also tested for antioxidant, antibacterial and antifungal activities. Myrtle leaves samples were dried and extracted through maceration. Partition chromatography was adopted to separate myrtenol, linalool and eucalyptol fractions. Analyses were performed through GC and GC-MS. Some of the samples showed a good scavenger activity evidenced by DPPH radical scavenging assay and beta-carotene bleaching test. Antibacterial and antifungal activities were generally weak. The phytochemical and biological characterization of all the extracts were determined with an aim to characterize the intra-specific biodiversity of myrtle populations. PMID:17365705

  8. Physical activity, sleep, and C-reactive protein as markers of positive health in resilient older men.

    PubMed

    Fields, Alison J; Hoyt, Robert E; Linnville, Steven E; Moore, Jeffery L

    2016-09-01

    This study explored whether physical activity and sleep, combined with the biomarker C-reactive protein, indexed positive health in older men. Many were former prisoners of war, with most remaining psychologically resilient and free of any psychiatric diagnoses. Activity and sleep were recorded through actigraphy in 120 veterans (86 resilient and 34 nonresilient) for 7 days. Resilient men had higher physical activity, significantly lower C-reactive protein levels, and 53 percent had lower cardiac-disease risk compared to nonresilient men. Sleep was adequate and not associated with C-reactive protein. Results suggest continued study is needed in actigraphy and C-reactive protein as means to index positive health. PMID:25673372

  9. Identification of Glial Activation Markers by Comparison of Transcriptome Changes between Astrocytes and Microglia following Innate Immune Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Madeddu, Silvia; Woods, Tyson A; Mukherjee, Piyali; Sturdevant, Dan; Butchi, Niranjan B; Peterson, Karin E

    2015-01-01

    The activation of astrocytes and microglia is often associated with diseases of the central nervous system (CNS). Understanding how activation alters the transcriptome of these cells may offer valuable insight regarding how activation of these cells mediate neurological damage. Furthermore, identifying common and unique pathways of gene expression during activation may provide new insight into the distinct roles these cells have in the CNS during infection and inflammation. Since recent studies indicate that TLR7 recognizes not only viral RNA but also microRNAs that are released by damaged neurons and elevated during neurological diseases, we first examined the response of glial cells to TLR7 stimulation using microarray analysis. Microglia were found to generate a much stronger response to TLR7 activation than astrocytes, both in the number of genes induced as well as fold induction. Although the primary pathways induced by both cell types were directly linked to immune responses, microglia also induced pathways associated with cellular proliferation, while astrocytes did not. Targeted analysis of a subset of the upregulated genes identified unique mRNA, including Ifi202b which was only upregulated by microglia and was found to be induced during both retroviral and bunyavirus infections in the CNS. In addition, other genes including Birc3 and Gpr84 as well as two expressed sequences AW112010 and BC023105 were found to be induced in both microglia and astrocytes and were upregulated in the CNS following virus infection. Thus, expression of these genes may a useful measurement of glial activation during insult or injury to the CNS. PMID:26214311

  10. Vitamin D status is associated with cardiometabolic markers in 8-11-year-old children, independently of body fat and physical activity.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Rikke A; Dalskov, Stine-Mathilde; Sørensen, Louise B; Hjorth, Mads F; Andersen, Rikke; Tetens, Inge; Krarup, Henrik; Ritz, Christian; Astrup, Arne; Michaelsen, Kim F; Mølgaard, Christian; Damsgaard, Camilla T

    2015-11-28

    Vitamin D status has been associated with cardiometabolic markers even in children, but the associations may be confounded by fat mass and physical activity behaviour. This study investigated associations between vitamin D status and cardiometabolic risk profile, as well as the impact of fat mass and physical activity in Danish 8-11-year-old children, using baseline data from 782 children participating in the Optimal well-being, development and health for Danish children through a healthy New Nordic Diet (OPUS) School Meal Study. We assessed vitamin D status as serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) and measured blood pressure, fasting plasma glucose, homoeostasis model of assessment-insulin resistance, plasma lipids, inflammatory markers, anthropometry and fat mass by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, and physical activity by 7 d accelerometry during August-November. Mean serum 25(OH)D was 60·8 (sd 18·7) nmol/l. Each 10 mmol/l 25(OH)D increase was associated with lower diastolic blood pressure (-0·3 mmHg, 95 % CI -0·6, -0·0) (P=0·02), total cholesterol (-0·07 mmol/l, 95 % CI -0·10, -0·05), LDL-cholesterol (-0·05 mmol/l, 95 % CI -0·08, -0·03), TAG (-0·02 mmol/l, 95 % CI -0·03, -0·01) (P≤0·001 for all lipids) and lower metabolic syndrome (MetS) score (P=0·01). Adjustment for fat mass index did not change the associations, but the association with blood pressure became borderline significant after adjustment for physical activity (P=0·06). In conclusion, vitamin D status was negatively associated with blood pressure, plasma lipids and a MetS score in Danish school children with low prevalence of vitamin D deficiency, and apart from blood pressure the associations were independent of body fat and physical activity. The potential underlying cause-effect relationship and possible long-term implications should be investigated in randomised controlled trials. PMID:26382732

  11. Activation of inflammatory responses in human U937 macrophages by particulate matter collected from dairy farms: an in vitro expression analysis of pro-inflammatory markers

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The purpose of the present study was to investigate activation of inflammatory markers in human macrophages derived from the U937 cell line after exposure to particulate matter (PM) collected on dairy farms in California and to identify the most potent components of the PM. Methods PM from different dairies were collected and tested to induce an inflammatory response determined by the expression of various pro-inflammatory genes, such as Interleukin (IL)-8, in U937 derived macrophages. Gel shift and luciferase reporter assays were performed to examine the activation of nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) and Toll-like-receptor 4 (TLR4). Results Macrophage exposure to PM derived from dairy farms significantly activated expression of pro-inflammatory genes, including IL-8, cyclooxygenase 2 and Tumor necrosis factor-alpha, which are hallmarks of inflammation. Acute phase proteins, such as serum amyloid A and IL-6, were also significantly upregulated in macrophages treated with PM from dairies. Coarse PM fractions demonstrated more pro-inflammatory activity on an equal-dose basis than fine PM. Urban PM collected from the same region as the dairy farms was associated with a lower concentration of endotoxin and produced significantly less IL-8 expression compared to PM collected on the dairy farms. Conclusion The present study provides evidence that the endotoxin components of the particles collected on dairies play a major role in mediating an inflammatory response through activation of TLR4 and NF-κB signaling. PMID:22452745

  12. Profiles of activation, differentiation-markers, or β-integrins on T cells contribute to predict T cells' antileukemic responses after stimulation with leukemia-derived dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Vogt, Valentin; Schick, Julia; Ansprenger, Christian; Braeu, Marion; Kroell, Tanja; Kraemer, Doris; Köhne, Claus-Henning; Hausmann, Andreas; Buhmann, Raymund; Tischer, Johanna; Schmetzer, Helga

    2014-01-01

    Stem cell transplantations and donor lymphocyte infusions are promising immunotherapies to cure acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Leukemia-derived dendritic cells are known to improve antileukemic functionality of T cells. We evaluated the composition and development of distinct T-cell subtypes in AML patients (n=12) compared with healthy probands (n=5) before and during stimulation with leukemia-derived dendritic cells-containing DC (DC) or blast-containing mononuclear cells (MNC) in 0-7 days mixed lymphocyte cultures (MLC) by flow cytometry. AML patients' T-cell subgroups were correlated with antileukemic functionality before and after DC/MNC stimulation by functional fluorolysis assays. (1) Unstimulated T cells from AML patients presented with significantly lower proportions of activated, Tcm, CD137, and β-integrin T cells, and significantly higher proportions of Tnaive and Teff compared with healthy probands. (2) After 7 days of DC or MNC stimulation, T-cell profiles were characterized by (significantly) increased proportions of activated T cells with effector function and significantly decreased proportions of β-integrin T cells. (3) Antileukemic cytotoxicity was achieved in 40% of T cells after MNC stimulation compared with 64% after DC stimulation. Antileukemic activity after DC stimulation but not after MNC stimulation correlated with higher proportions of Tcm and Tnaive before stimulation, as well as with significantly higher proportions of activated and β-integrin T cells. Furthermore, cutoff values for defined T-cell activation/differentiation markers and β-integrin T cells could be defined, allowing a prediction of antileukemic reactivity. We could demonstrate the potential of the composition of unstimulated/DC-stimulated T cells for the lysis of AML blasts. Especially, AML patients with high numbers of Tnaive and Tcm could benefit from DC stimulation; proportions of activated and β-integrin T cells correlated with increased antileukemic functionality

  13. Transcarboxylase mRNA: a marker which evidences P. freudenreichii survival and metabolic activity during its transit in the human gut.

    PubMed

    Hervé, Christophe; Fondrevez, Marc; Chéron, Angélique; Barloy-Hubler, Frédérique; Jan, Gwénaël

    2007-02-15

    Dairy propionibacteria have recently been considered as probiotics which may beneficially modulate the intestinal ecosystem. However, appropriate vectors (food matrices containing the probiotic) which preserve their viability and offer good tolerance towards digestive stresses need to be developed. In addition, the development of efficient non-invasive methods which specifically monitor Propionibacterium freudenreichii concentration and activity within the human gut is required. To address this latter need, an enzyme involved in propionic fermentation, transcarboxylase, was evaluated in this study as molecular marker in P. freudenreichii. In vitro, the three transcarboxylase subunits were shown to be encoded by an operon and their expression regulated. It occurred during propionic fermentation, ceased in starved cells and was not affected by digestive stresses. The 5S subunit gene of transcarboxylase allowed specific detection of P. freudenreichii by real time PCR in the complex human faecal microbiota. A dairy vector harbouring P. freudenreichii was developed and afforded elevated probiotic faecal concentrations in humans. In vivo, this PCR method allowed rapid quantification of faecal P. freudenreichii in agreement with the cultural method (cfu counting). Moreover, real time Reverse Transcription (RT) -PCR evidenced transcription of the 5S subunit gene during transit through the human digestive tract. This work constitutes a methodological advance for survival and activity evaluation in human trials of the probiotics belonging to the P. freudenreichii species. It strongly suggests that this bacterium not only survives but remains metabolically active in the human gut. PMID:17156879

  14. Preclinical pharmacology, antitumor activity and development of pharmacodynamic markers for the novel, potent AKT inhibitor CCT128930

    PubMed Central

    Yap, Timothy A.; Walton, Mike I.; Hunter, Lisa-Jane K.; Valenti, Melanie; de Haven Brandon, Alexis; Eve, Paul D.; Ruddle, Ruth; Heaton, Simon P.; Henley, Alan; Pickard, Lisa; Vijayaraghavan, Gowri; Caldwell, John J.; Thompson, Neil T.; Aherne, Wynne; Raynaud, Florence I.; Eccles, Suzanne A.; Workman, Paul; Collins, Ian; Garrett, Michelle D.

    2016-01-01

    AKT is frequently deregulated in cancer, making it an attractive anticancer drug target. CCT128930 is a novel ATP-competitive AKT inhibitor discovered using fragment and structure-based approaches. It is a potent, advanced lead pyrrolopyrimidine compound exhibiting selectivity for AKT over PKA, achieved by targeting a single amino acid difference. CCT128930 exhibited marked antiproliferative activity and inhibited the phosphorylation of a range of AKT substrates in multiple tumor cell lines in vitro, consistent with AKT inhibition. CCT128930 caused a G1 arrest in PTEN-null U87MG human glioblastoma cells, consistent with AKT pathway blockade. Pharmacokinetic studies established that potentially active concentrations of CCT128930 could be achieved in human tumor xenografts. Furthermore, CCT128930 also blocked the phosphorylation of several downstream AKT biomarkers in U87MG tumor xenografts, indicating AKT inhibition in vivo. Antitumor activity was observed with CCT128930 in U87MG and HER2-positive, PIK3CA-mutant BT474 human breast cancer xenografts, consistent with its pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties. A quantitative immunofluorescence assay to measure the phosphorylation and total protein expression of the AKT substrate PRAS40 in hair follicles is presented. Significant decreases in pThr246 PRAS40 occurred in CCT128930-treated mouse whisker follicles in vivo and human hair follicles treated ex vivo, with minimal changes in total PRAS40. In conclusion, CCT128930 is a novel, selective and potent AKT inhibitor, which blocks AKT activity in vitro and in vivo and induces marked antitumor responses. We have also developed a novel biomarker assay for the inhibition of AKT in human hair follicles, which is currently being employed in clinical trials. PMID:21191045

  15. Preclinical pharmacology, antitumor activity, and development of pharmacodynamic markers for the novel, potent AKT inhibitor CCT128930.

    PubMed

    Yap, Timothy A; Walton, Mike I; Hunter, Lisa-Jane K; Valenti, Melanie; de Haven Brandon, Alexis; Eve, Paul D; Ruddle, Ruth; Heaton, Simon P; Henley, Alan; Pickard, Lisa; Vijayaraghavan, Gowri; Caldwell, John J; Thompson, Neil T; Aherne, Wynne; Raynaud, Florence I; Eccles, Suzanne A; Workman, Paul; Collins, Ian; Garrett, Michelle D

    2011-02-01

    AKT is frequently deregulated in cancer, making it an attractive anticancer drug target. CCT128930 is a novel ATP-competitive AKT inhibitor discovered using fragment- and structure-based approaches. It is a potent, advanced lead pyrrolopyrimidine compound exhibiting selectivity for AKT over PKA, achieved by targeting a single amino acid difference. CCT128930 exhibited marked antiproliferative activity and inhibited the phosphorylation of a range of AKT substrates in multiple tumor cell lines in vitro, consistent with AKT inhibition. CCT128930 caused a G(1) arrest in PTEN-null U87MG human glioblastoma cells, consistent with AKT pathway blockade. Pharmacokinetic studies established that potentially active concentrations of CCT128930 could be achieved in human tumor xenografts. Furthermore, CCT128930 also blocked the phosphorylation of several downstream AKT biomarkers in U87MG tumor xenografts, indicating AKT inhibition in vivo. Antitumor activity was observed with CCT128930 in U87MG and HER2-positive, PIK3CA-mutant BT474 human breast cancer xenografts, consistent with its pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties. A quantitative immunofluorescence assay to measure the phosphorylation and total protein expression of the AKT substrate PRAS40 in hair follicles is presented. Significant decreases in pThr246 PRAS40 occurred in CCT128930-treated mouse whisker follicles in vivo and human hair follicles treated ex vivo, with minimal changes in total PRAS40. In conclusion, CCT128930 is a novel, selective, and potent AKT inhibitor that blocks AKT activity in vitro and in vivo and induces marked antitumor responses. We have also developed a novel biomarker assay for the inhibition of AKT in human hair follicles, which is currently being used in clinical trials. PMID:21191045

  16. Effects of methoxypoly (Ethylene glycol) mediated immunocamouflage on leukocyte surface marker detection, cell conjugation, activation and alloproliferation.

    PubMed

    Kyluik-Price, Dana L; Scott, Mark D

    2016-01-01

    Tissue rejection occurs subsequent to the recognition of foreign antigens via receptor-ligand contacts between APC (antigen presenting cells) and T cells, resulting in initialization of signaling cascades and T cell proliferation. Bioengineering of donor cells by the covalent attachment of methoxypolyethylene glycol (mPEG) to membrane proteins (PEGylation) provides a novel means to attenuate these interactions consequent to mPEG-induced charge and steric camouflage. While previous studies demonstrated that polymer-mediated immunocamouflage decreased immune recognition both in vitro and in vivo, these studies monitored late events in immune recognition and activation such as T cell proliferation. Consequently little information has been provided concerning the early cellular events governing this response. Therefore, the effect of PEGylation was assessed by examining initial cell-cell interactions, changes to activation pathways, and apoptosis to understand the role that each may play in the decreased proliferative response observed in modified cells during the course of a mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR). The mPEG-modified T cells resulted in significant immunocamouflage of lymphocyte surface proteins and decreased interactions with APC. Furthermore, mPEG-MLR exhibited decreased NFκB pathway activation, while exhibiting no significant differences in degree of cell death compared to the control MLR. These results suggest that PEGylation may prevent the direct recognition of foreign alloantigens by decreasing the stability and duration of initial cell-cell interactions. PMID:26457834

  17. [18F]FluorThanatrace uptake as a marker of PARP1 expression and activity in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Edmonds, Christine E; Makvandi, Mehran; Lieberman, Brian P; Xu, Kuiying; Zeng, Chenbo; Li, Shihong; Hou, Catherine; Lee, Hsiaoju; Greenberg, Roger A; Mankoff, David A; Mach, Robert H

    2016-01-01

    The nuclear enzyme PARP1 plays a central role in sensing DNA damage and facilitating repair. Tumors with BRCA1/2 mutations are highly dependent on PARP1 as an alternative mechanism for DNA repair, and PARP inhibitors generate synthetic lethality in tumors with BRCA mutations, resulting in cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Zhou et al. recently synthesized an 18F-labeled PARP1 inhibitor ([18F]FluorThanatrace) for PET, and demonstrated high specific tracer uptake in a xenograft model of breast cancer [1]. In the current study, we characterize the level of baseline PARP expression and activity across multiple human breast cancer cell lines, including a BRCA1 mutant line. PARP expression and activity, as measured by levels of PAR and PARP1, is correlated with in vitro [18F]FluorThanatrace binding as well as tracer uptake on PET in a xenograft model of breast cancer. Radiotracer uptake in genetically-engineered mouse fibroblasts indicates [18F]FluorThanatrace is selective for PARP1 versus other PARP enzymes. This motivates further studies of [18F]FluorThanatrace as an in vivo measure of PARP1 expression and activity in patients who would benefit from PARP inhibitor therapy. PMID:27069769

  18. The Brain Activity in Brodmann Area 17: A Potential Bio-Marker to Predict Patient Responses to Antiepileptic Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xin; Fang, Weidong; Zeng, Kebin; Yang, Mingming; Li, Chenyu; Wang, Shasha; Li, Minghui; Wang, Xuefeng

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we aimed to predict newly diagnosed patient responses to antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging tools to explore changes in spontaneous brain activity. We recruited 21 newly diagnosed epileptic patients, 8 drug-resistant (DR) patients, 11 well-healed (WH) patients, and 13 healthy controls. After a 12-month follow-up, 11 newly diagnosed epileptic patients who showed a poor response to AEDs were placed into the seizures uncontrolled (SUC) group, while 10 patients were enrolled in the seizure-controlled (SC) group. By calculating the amplitude of fractional low-frequency fluctuations (fALFF) of blood oxygen level-dependent signals to measure brain activity during rest, we found that the SUC patients showed increased activity in the bilateral occipital lobe, particularly in the cuneus and lingual gyrus compared with the SC group and healthy controls. Interestingly, DR patients also showed increased activity in the identical cuneus and lingual gyrus regions, which comprise Brodmann’s area 17 (BA17), compared with the SUC patients; however, these abnormalities were not observed in SC and WH patients. The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves indicated that the fALFF value of BA17 could differentiate SUC patients from SC patients and healthy controls with sufficient sensitivity and specificity prior to the administration of medication. Functional connectivity analysis was subsequently performed to evaluate the difference in connectivity between BA17 and other brain regions in the SUC, SC and control groups. Regions nearby the cuneus and lingual gyrus were found positive connectivity increased changes or positive connectivity changes with BA17 in the SUC patients, while remarkably negative connectivity increased changes or positive connectivity decreased changes were found in the SC patients. Additionally, default mode network (DMN) regions showed negative connectivity increased changes or negative

  19. Evaluation of molecular chaperons Hsp72 and neuropeptide Y as characteristic markers of adaptogenic activity of plant extracts.

    PubMed

    Asea, Alexzander; Kaur, Punit; Panossian, Alexander; Wikman, Karl Georg

    2013-11-15

    We have previously demonstrated that ADAPT-232, a fixed combination of adaptogenic substances derived from Eleutherococcus senticosus root extract, Schisandra chinensis berry extract, Rhodiola rosea root extract stimulated the expression and release of neuropeptide Y (NPY) and molecular chaperone Hsp72 from isolated human neurolgia cells. Both of these mediators of stress response are known to play an important role in regulation of neuroendocrine system and immune response. We further demonstrated that ADAPT-232 induced release of Hsp70 is mediated by NPY, suggesting an existence of NPY-mediated pathway of activation of Hsp72 release into the blood circulation system. The objective of this study was to determine whether this pathway is common for adaptogens and whether NPY and/or Hsp72 can be considered as necessary specific biomarkers for adaptogenic activity. The release of NPY and Hsp72 from neuroglia cells in response to treatment with various plant extracts (n=23) including selected validated adaptogens, partly validated adaptogens, claimed but negligibly validated adaptogens and some other plant extracts affecting neuroendocrine and immune systems but never considered as adaptogens was measured using high throughput ELISA techniques. We demonstrated that adaptogens, e.g. R. rosea, S. chinensis and E. senticosus stimulate both NPY and Hsp70 release from neuroblastoma cells, while tonics and stimulants have no significant effect on NPY in this in vitro test. In the groups of partly validated adaptogens the effect of Panax ginseng and Withania somnifera was not statistically significant both on NPY and Hsp70 release, while the activating effect of Bryonia alba and Rhaponticum cartamoides was significant only on Hsp70. In contrast, all tested non-adaptogens, such as antiinflammatoty plant extracts Matricaria recutita, Pelargonium sidoides, Hedera helix and Vitis vinifera significantly inhibit Hsp70 release and have no influence on NPY release from neuroblastoma

  20. Cytokine-Independent Detection of Antigen-Specific Germinal Center T Follicular Helper Cells in Immunized Nonhuman Primates Using a Live Cell Activation-Induced Marker Technique.

    PubMed

    Havenar-Daughton, Colin; Reiss, Samantha M; Carnathan, Diane G; Wu, Jennifer E; Kendric, Kayla; Torrents de la Peña, Alba; Kasturi, Sudhir Pai; Dan, Jennifer M; Bothwell, Marcella; Sanders, Rogier W; Pulendran, Bali; Silvestri, Guido; Crotty, Shane

    2016-08-01

    A range of current candidate AIDS vaccine regimens are focused on generating protective HIV-neutralizing Ab responses. Many of these efforts rely on the rhesus macaque animal model. Understanding how protective Ab responses develop and how to increase their efficacy are both major knowledge gaps. Germinal centers (GCs) are the engines of Ab affinity maturation. GC T follicular helper (Tfh) CD4 T cells are required for GCs. Studying vaccine-specific GC Tfh cells after protein immunizations has been challenging, as Ag-specific GC Tfh cells are difficult to identify by conventional intracellular cytokine staining. Cytokine production by GC Tfh cells may be intrinsically limited in comparison with other Th effector cells, as the biological role of a GC Tfh cell is to provide help to individual B cells within the GC, rather than secreting large amounts of cytokines bathing a tissue. To test this idea, we developed a cytokine-independent method to identify Ag-specific GC Tfh cells. RNA sequencing was performed using TCR-stimulated GC Tfh cells to identify candidate markers. Validation experiments determined CD25 (IL-2Rα) and OX40 to be highly upregulated activation-induced markers (AIM) on the surface of GC Tfh cells after stimulation. In comparison with intracellular cytokine staining, the AIM assay identified >10-fold more Ag-specific GC Tfh cells in HIV Env protein-immunized macaques (BG505 SOSIP). CD4 T cells in blood were also studied. In summary, AIM demonstrates that Ag-specific GC Tfh cells are intrinsically stingy producers of cytokines, which is likely an essential part of their biological function. PMID:27335502

  1. Gut Epithelial Barrier Dysfunction and Innate Immune Activation Predict Mortality in Treated HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, Peter W.; Sinclair, Elizabeth; Rodriguez, Benigno; Shive, Carey; Clagett, Brian; Funderburg, Nicholas; Robinson, Janet; Huang, Yong; Epling, Lorrie; Martin, Jeffrey N.; Deeks, Steven G.; Meinert, Curtis L.; Van Natta, Mark L.; Jabs, Douglas A.; Lederman, Michael M.

    2014-01-01

    Background. While inflammation predicts mortality in treated human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, the prognostic significance of gut barrier dysfunction and phenotypic T-cell markers remains unclear. Methods. We assessed immunologic predictors of mortality in a case-control study within the Longitudinal Study of the Ocular Complications of AIDS (LSOCA), using conditional logistic regression. Sixty-four case patients who died within 12 months of treatment-mediated viral suppression were each matched to 2 control individuals (total number of controls, 128) by duration of antiretroviral therapy–mediated viral suppression, nadir CD4+ T-cell count, age, sex, and prior cytomegalovirus (CMV) retinitis. A similar secondary analysis was conducted in the SCOPE cohort, which had participants with less advanced immunodeficiency. Results. Plasma gut epithelial barrier integrity markers (intestinal fatty acid binding protein and zonulin-1 levels), soluble CD14 level, kynurenine/tryptophan ratio, soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 level, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein level, and D-dimer level all strongly predicted mortality, even after adjustment for proximal CD4+ T-cell count (all P ≤ .001). A higher percentage of CD38+HLA-DR+ cells in the CD8+ T-cell population was a predictor of mortality before (P = .031) but not after (P = .10) adjustment for proximal CD4+ T-cell count. Frequencies of senescent (defined as CD28−CD57+ cells), exhausted (defined as PD1+ cells), naive, and CMV-specific T cells did not predict mortality. Conclusions. Gut epithelial barrier dysfunction, innate immune activation, inflammation, and coagulation—but not T-cell activation, senescence, and exhaustion—independently predict mortality in individuals with treated HIV infection with a history of AIDS and are viable targets for interventions. PMID:24755434

  2. Increased Cortical Synaptic Activation of TrkB and Downstream Signaling Markers in a Mouse Model of Down Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Nosheny, RL; Belichenko, PV; Busse, BL; Weissmiller, AM; Dang, V; Das, D; Fahimi, A; Salehi, A; Smith, SJ; Mobley, WC

    2015-01-01

    Down Syndrome (DS), trisomy 21, is characterized by synaptic abnormalities and cognitive deficits throughout the lifespan and with development of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) neuropathology and progressive cognitive decline in adults. Synaptic abnormalities are also present in the Ts65Dn mouse model of DS, but which synapses are affected and the mechanisms underlying synaptic dysfunction are unknown. Here we show marked increases in the levels and activation status of TrkB and associated signaling proteins in cortical synapses in Ts65Dn mice. Proteomic analysis at the single synapse level of resolution using array tomography (AT) uncovered increased colocalization of activated TrkB with signaling endosome related proteins, and demonstrated increased TrkB signaling. The extent of increases in TrkB signaling differed in each of the cortical layers examined and with respect to the type of synapse, with the most marked increases seen in inhibitory synapses. These findings are evidence of markedly abnormal TrkB-mediated signaling in synapses. They raise the possibility that dysregulated TrkB signaling contributes to synaptic dysfunction and cognitive deficits in DS. PMID:25753471

  3. The adipose renin-angiotensin system modulates sysemic markers of insulin sensitivity activates the intrarenal renin-angiotensin system

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Suyeon; Soltani-Bejnood, Morvarid; Quignard-Boulange, Annie; Massiera, Florence; Teboul, Michele; Ailhaud, Gerard; Kim, Jung; Moustaid-Moussa, Naima; Voy, Brynn H

    2006-07-01

    BACKGROUND: A growing body of data provides increasing evidence that the adipose tissue renin-angiotensin system (RAS) contributes to regulation of fat mass. Beyond its paracrine actions within adipose tissue, adipocyte-derived angiotensin II (Ang II) may also impact systemic functions such as blood pressure and metabolism. METHODS AND RESULTS: We used a genetic approach to manipulate adipose RAS activity in mice and then study the consequences on metabolic parameters and on feedback regulation of the RAS. The models included deletion of the angiotensinogen (Agt) gene (Agt-KO), its expression solely in adipose tissue under the control of an adipocyte-specific promoter (aP2-Agt/ Agt-KO), and overexpression in adipose tissue of wild type mice (aP2-Agt). Total body weight, epididymal fat pad weight, and circulating levels of leptin, insulin and resistin were significantly decreased in Agt-KO mice, while plasma adiponectin levels were increased. Overexpression of Agt in adipose tissue resulted in increased adiposity and plasma leptin and insulin levels compared to wild type (WT) controls. Angiotensinogen and type I Ang II receptor protein levels were also markedly elevated in kidney of aP2-Agt mice, suggesting that hypertension in these animals may be in part due to stimulation of the intrarenal RAS. CONCLUSIONS: Taken together, the results from this study demonstrate that alterations in adipose RAS activity significantly alter both local and systemic physiology in a way that may contribute to the detrimental health effects of obesity.

  4. Increased ventral-striatal activity during monetary decision making is a marker of problem poker gambling severity.

    PubMed

    Brevers, Damien; Noël, Xavier; He, Qinghua; Melrose, James A; Bechara, Antoine

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the impact of different neural systems on monetary decision making in frequent poker gamblers, who vary in their degree of problem gambling. Fifteen frequent poker players, ranging from non-problem to high-problem gambling, and 15 non-gambler controls were scanned using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) while performing the Iowa Gambling Task (IGT). During IGT deck selection, between-group fMRI analyses showed that frequent poker gamblers exhibited higher ventral-striatal but lower dorsolateral prefrontal and orbitofrontal activations as compared with controls. Moreover, using functional connectivity analyses, we observed higher ventral-striatal connectivity in poker players, and in regions involved in attentional/motor control (posterior cingulate), visual (occipital gyrus) and auditory (temporal gyrus) processing. In poker gamblers, scores of problem gambling severity were positively associated with ventral-striatal activations and with the connectivity between the ventral-striatum seed and the occipital fusiform gyrus and the middle temporal gyrus. Present results are consistent with findings from recent brain imaging studies showing that gambling disorder is associated with heightened motivational-reward processes during monetary decision making, which may hamper one's ability to moderate his level of monetary risk taking. PMID:25781641

  5. Discourse Markers across Language.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fraser, Bruce

    This paper discusses discourse markers (e.g., "and, so, anyway") and offers an overview of their characteristics and occurrence, using English for illustration. The role of discourse markers is to signal speaker comment on the current utterance. The discourse marker is not part of the sentence's propositional content. While absence of markers does…

  6. [THE IMMUNOMODULATORY ACTIVITY OF PLASMA OF PATIENTS INFECTED WITH HUMAN HIV VIRUS].

    PubMed

    Selimova, L M; Kalnina, L B; Serebrovskaya, L V; Ivanova, L A; Gulyaeva, A N; Nosik, D M

    2015-10-01

    The study was carried out to investigate impact of plasma of patients infected with human HIV virus receiving and not receiving highly active antiviral therapy on: expression of phenotypic markers of lymphocytes (CD3+, CD3+/CD4+, CD3+/CD8+, CD19+, CD3-/CD (16+56)+, CD3+/CD(16+56)+, CD3+/HLA-DR+, CD4+/CD62L+, CD8+/CD38+) in mononuclear cells of blood of donors and secretion of pro-inflammatory (interleukin-1β, interferon-γ, tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-4 and interleukin-10) cytokines. After 24 hours of activation of mononuclear cells with plasmas it was demonstrated that as compared with control groups, in of plasmas of patients with highly active antiviral therapy increasing of number of CD4+ T-cells and decreasing of CD8+ T-cells is observed. The plasmas of patients with highly active antiviral therapy activate in most instances CD4+ T-cells whereas plasmas of patients without treatment--CD8+ T-cells. The results of detection of cytokines in blood indicate that in patients without treatment inflammatory potential is increased as compared with group of highly active antiviral therapy. The data concerning accumulation of interleukin-1β under cultivation of mononuclear cells with plasmas indicates at its role in preservation of vitality of natural killers. The analysis of immunomodulatory activity of plasma of patients infected with human HIV virus can be recommended as an additional technique of evaluation of functioning of immune system. PMID:26841673

  7. 9-O-Acetylation of sialomucins: a novel marker of murine CD4 T cells that is regulated during maturation and activation.

    PubMed

    Krishna, M; Varki, A

    1997-06-01

    or without secondary cross-linking did not cause activation of CD4 T cells. However, activation by other stimuli including TCR ligation is associated with a substantial decrease in surface 9-O-acetylation, primarily in the mucin glycoprotein component. Thus, 9-O-acetylation of sialic acids on cell surface mucins is a novel marker on CD4 T cells that appears on maturation and is modulated downwards upon activation. PMID:9166429

  8. The influence of hypoxic physical activity on cfDNA as a new marker of vascular inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Zembron-Lacny, Agnieszka; Baldy-Chudzik, Katarzyna; Orysiak, Joanna; Sitkowski, Dariusz; Banach, Maciej

    2015-01-01

    The phenomenon of circulating cell-free DNA (cfDNA) is important for many biomedical disciplines including the field of exercise biochemistry and physiology. It is likely that cfDNA is released into the plasma by apoptosis of endothelial cells and circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs), and/or by NETosis of immune cells induced by strenuous exercise. Increases of cfDNA are described to be a potential hallmark for the overtraining syndrome, and might be related to aseptic vascular inflammation in athletes. Yet, the relevance of systemic inflammation and cfDNA with endothelial dysfunction in athletes still remains unclear. In this review article, we provide a current overview of exercise-induced cfDNA release to the circulation with special emphasis on its relationship with apoptosis and NETosis and the effect of hypoxic physical activity on vascular inflammation in athletes. PMID:26788076

  9. Quality Evaluation of Polar and Active Components in Crude and Processed Fructus Corni by Quantitative Analysis of Multicomponents with Single Marker

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yuhong; Chen, Hui; Wang, Liling; Zou, Jing; Zheng, Xiao

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To develop a quantitative analysis of multicomponents by single-marker (QAMS) method for the simultaneous determination of polar active components in Fructus Corni. Methods. Loganin was selected as the internal reference, and the relative correction factors (RCFs) of gallic acid, 5-hydroxymethyl-2-furfural, morroniside, sweroside, cornin, 7α-O-methylmorroniside, 7β-O-methylmorroniside, 7α-O-ethylmorroniside, 7β-O-ethylmorroniside, and cornuside were established. The contents of multicomponents were then calculated based on their RCFs, respectively. Contents of the 11 components were also calculated by external standard method and compared with those of the QAMS method. Results. The contents of the 11 components in 21 crude and 10 processed Fructus Corni products were measured. No significant difference was found in the quantitative results of the QAMS and external standard methods. Conclusion. QAMS could serve as an accurate and convenient method in determining the polar and active components in Fructus Corni and its processed products. PMID:27446632

  10. Effect of Excess Iodine on Oxidative Stress Markers, Steroidogenic-Enzyme Activities, Testicular Morphology, and Functions in Adult Male Rats.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Arijit; Mandal, Jagadis; Mondal, Chiranjit; Sinha, Sabyasachi; Chandra, Amar K

    2016-08-01

    Improper iodine intake is a major concern in public health. Chronic intake of low iodine affects gonadal functions of man and animals; however, such effects of excess iodine in male reproduction, specially on testicular morphology, testicular steroidogenic enzyme activities, sperm morphology, sperm viability, and sperm count including male hormonal profiles in reference to iodine status and thyroid hormone profiles are yet to be explored. With this background, adult male rats of 120 ± 10 gm Bw of 90 ± 5 days were divided broadly in two groups depending on the duration of the treatment for 30 and 60 days, respectively. Both the groups consisted of control animals. Excess iodine (100EI), i.e., 100 times more than its recommended level but within its tolerable ranges, was administered through gavage regularly to the first group of experimental animals for 30 and 60 days, respectively, and excessive iodine (500EI), i.e., 500 times more than its recommended level and above tolerable range in the same way and for the same durations, was administered to the other group of experimental animals. Overall results revealed that regular consumption of iodine in excess impairs reproductive functions in adult male rats depending on the dose and duration of its exposure through different mechanisms. Excess iodine accumulates in the testis which results in generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) as evidenced by higher lipid peroxidation level as well as an imbalance in the pro-/antioxidant status inhibiting the activity of ∆(5) 3β- hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (HSD) and 17β-HSD resulting to reduced synthesis of testosterone that causes structural and functional changes of the testis. Secondly, persistent generation of ROS in testis as a result of prolonged excess iodine exposure affects hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis that stimulates synthesis and secretion of corticosterone which inhibits LH release that downregulates testosterone synthesis causing further

  11. The Adipose Renin-Angiotensin System Modulates Systemic Markers of Insulin Sensitivity and Activates the Intrarenal Renin-Angiotensin System

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kim, Suyeon; Soltani-Bejnood, Morvarid; Quignard-Boulange, Annie; Massiera, Florence; Teboul, Michele; Ailhaud, Gerard; Kim, Jung Han; Moustaid-Moussa, Naima; Voy, Brynn H.

    2006-01-01

    Background . The adipose tissue renin-angiotensin system (RAS) contributes to regulation of fat mass and may also impact systemic functions such as blood pressure and metabolism. Methods and results . A panel of mouse models including mice lacking angiotensinogen, Agt ( Agt -KO), mice expressing Agt solely in adipose tissue (aP2- Agt/Agt -KO), and mice overexpressing Agt in adipose tissue (aP2- Agt ) was studied. Total body weight, epididymal fat pad weight, and circulating levels of leptin, insulin, and resistin were significantly decreased in Agt -KO mice, while plasma adiponectin levels were increased. aP2- Agt mice exhibited increased adipositymore » and plasma leptin and insulin levels compared to wild type (WT) controls. Angiotensinogen and type I Ang II receptor protein levels were also elevated in kidney of aP2- Agt mice. Conclusion . These findings demonstrate that alterations in adipose RAS activity significantly impact both local and systemic physiology in a way that may contribute to the detrimental health effects of obesity.« less

  12. Association of Markers of Inflammation with Sleep and Physical Activity Among People Living with HIV or AIDS.

    PubMed

    Wirth, Michael D; Jaggers, Jason R; Dudgeon, Wesley D; Hébert, James R; Youngstedt, Shawn D; Blair, Steven N; Hand, Gregory A

    2015-06-01

    This study examined associations of sleep and minutes spent in moderate-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) with C-reactive protein (CRP) and interleukin (IL)-6 among persons living with HIV. Cross-sectional analyses (n = 45) focused on associations of inflammatory outcomes (i.e., CRP and IL-6) with actigraph-derived sleep duration, latency, and efficiency; sleep onset; wake time; and wake-after-sleep-onset; as well as MVPA. Least square means for CRP and IL-6 by levels of sleep and MVPA were computed from general linear models. Individuals below the median of sleep duration, above the median for sleep onset, and below the median of MVPA minutes had higher CRP or IL-6 levels. Generally, individuals with both low MVPA and poor sleep characteristics had higher inflammation levels than those with more MVPA and worse sleep. Understanding the combined impact of multiple lifestyle/behavioral factors on inflammation could inform intervention strategies to reduce inflammation and therefore, chronic disease risk. PMID:25399034

  13. Computational modeling of resting-state activity demonstrates markers of normalcy in children with prenatal or perinatal stroke.

    PubMed

    Adhikari, Mohit H; Raja Beharelle, Anjali; Griffa, Alessandra; Hagmann, Patric; Solodkin, Ana; McIntosh, Anthony R; Small, Steven L; Deco, Gustavo

    2015-06-10

    Children who sustain a prenatal or perinatal brain injury in the form of a stroke develop remarkably normal cognitive functions in certain areas, with a particular strength in language skills. A dominant explanation for this is that brain regions from the contralesional hemisphere "take over" their functions, whereas the damaged areas and other ipsilesional regions play much less of a role. However, it is difficult to tease apart whether changes in neural activity after early brain injury are due to damage caused by the lesion or by processes related to postinjury reorganization. We sought to differentiate between these two causes by investigating the functional connectivity (FC) of brain areas during the resting state in human children with early brain injury using a computational model. We simulated a large-scale network consisting of realistic models of local brain areas coupled through anatomical connectivity information of healthy and injured participants. We then compared the resulting simulated FC values of healthy and injured participants with the empirical ones. We found that the empirical connectivity values, especially of the damaged areas, correlated better with simulated values of a healthy brain than those of an injured brain. This result indicates that the structural damage caused by an early brain injury is unlikely to have an adverse and sustained impact on the functional connections, albeit during the resting state, of damaged areas. Therefore, these areas could continue to play a role in the development of near-normal function in certain domains such as language in these children. PMID:26063923

  14. Association of Markers of Inflammation with Sleep and Physical Activity among People Living with HIV or AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Wirth, Michael D.; Jaggers, Jason R.; Dudgeon, Wesley D.; Hébert, James R.; Youngstedt, Shawn D.; Blair, Steven N.; Hand, Gregory A.

    2015-01-01

    This study examined associations of sleep and minutes spent in moderate-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) with C-reactive protein (CRP) and interleukin (IL)-6 among persons living with HIV (PLWH). Cross-sectional analyses (n=45) focused on associations of inflammatory outcomes (i.e., CRP and IL-6) with actigraph-derived sleep duration, latency, and efficiency; bedtime; wake time; and wake-after-sleep-onset; as well as MVPA. Least square means for CRP and IL-6 by levels of sleep and MVPA were computed from general linear models. Individuals below the median of sleep duration, above the median for bedtime, and below the median of MVPA minutes had higher CRP or IL-6 levels. Generally, individuals with both low MVPA and poor sleep characteristics had higher inflammation levels than those with more MVPA and better sleep. Understanding the combined impact of multiple lifestyle/behavioral factors on inflammation could inform intervention strategies to reduce inflammation and therefore, chronic disease risk. PMID:25399034

  15. Physical activity and cardiorespiratory fitness as major markers of cardiovascular risk: their independent and interwoven importance to health status.

    PubMed

    Myers, Jonathan; McAuley, Paul; Lavie, Carl J; Despres, Jean-Pierre; Arena, Ross; Kokkinos, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The evolution from hunting and gathering to agriculture, followed by industrialization, has had a profound effect on human physical activity (PA) patterns. Current PA patterns are undoubtedly the lowest they have been in human history, with particularly marked declines in recent generations, and future projections indicate further declines around the globe. Non-communicable health problems that afflict current societies are fundamentally attributable to the fact that PA patterns are markedly different than those for which humans were genetically adapted. The advent of modern statistics and epidemiological methods has made it possible to quantify the independent effects of cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) and PA on health outcomes. Based on more than five decades of epidemiological studies, it is now widely accepted that higher PA patterns and levels of CRF are associated with better health outcomes. This review will discuss the evidence supporting the premise that PA and CRF are independent risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD) as well as the interplay between both PA and CRF and other CVD risk factors. A particular focus will be given to the interplay between CRF, metabolic risk and obesity. PMID:25269064

  16. Phenotypic profile of expanded NK cells in chronic lymphoproliferative disorders: a surrogate marker for NK-cell clonality

    PubMed Central

    Bárcena, Paloma; Jara-Acevedo, María; Tabernero, María Dolores; López, Antonio; Sánchez, María Luz; García-Montero, Andrés C.; Muñoz-García, Noemí; Vidriales, María Belén; Paiva, Artur; Lecrevisse, Quentin; Lima, Margarida; Langerak, Anton W.; Böttcher, Sebastian; van Dongen, Jacques J.M.

    2015-01-01

    Currently, the lack of a universal and specific marker of clonality hampers the diagnosis and classification of chronic expansions of natural killer (NK) cells. Here we investigated the utility of flow cytometric detection of aberrant/altered NK-cell phenotypes as a surrogate marker for clonality, in the diagnostic work-up of chronic lymphoproliferative disorders of NK cells (CLPD-NK). For this purpose, a large panel of markers was evaluated by multiparametric flow cytometry on peripheral blood (PB) CD56low NK cells from 60 patients, including 23 subjects with predefined clonal (n = 9) and polyclonal (n = 14) CD56low NK-cell expansions, and 37 with CLPD-NK of undetermined clonality; also, PB samples from 10 healthy adults were included. Clonality was established using the human androgen receptor (HUMARA) assay. Clonal NK cells were found to show decreased expression of CD7, CD11b and CD38, and higher CD2, CD94 and HLADR levels vs. normal NK cells, together with a restricted repertoire of expression of the CD158a, CD158b and CD161 killer-associated receptors. In turn, NK cells from both clonal and polyclonal CLPD-NK showed similar/overlapping phenotypic profiles, except for high and more homogeneous expression of CD94 and HLADR, which was restricted to clonal CLPD-NK. We conclude that the CD94hi/HLADR+ phenotypic profile proved to be a useful surrogate marker for NK-cell clonality. PMID:26556869

  17. High Endogenous Avidin Binding Activity: An Inexpensive and Readily Available Marker for the Differential Diagnosis of Kidney Neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Kanehira, Kazunori; Hu, Johnny; Pier, Thomas; Sebree, Linda; Huang, Wei

    2008-01-01

    It has been documented that some tissues, such as salivary gland, liver, cardiac and skeletal muscles and kidney, have high level endogenous biotin or endogenous avidin binding activity (EABA). Limited data is available on EABA in renal cell neoplasms. A tissue microarray (TMA) was constructed that included oncocytoma (n=30), chromophobe renal cell carcinoma (RCC) (n=18), clear cell RCC (n=45), clear cell RCC with granular/eosinophilic (G/E) features (n=19), papillary RCC (n=21), papillary RCC with G/E features (n=29) and benign renal tissues (n=31). The TMA slides were stained with or without biotin blocker and analyzed using the automated cellular imaging system (ACIS®). Without biotin blocker, a high positive rate of EABA was found in oncocytoma (56/60, 93%) and normal renal tubules (46/60, 77%). A moderate positive rate of EABA was found in clear cell and papillary RCCs with G/E features (13/39, 33% and 19/55, 35%, respectively). Chromophobe RCC and RCC without G/E features had essentially no EABA. With biotin blocker, benign renal tissue and clear cell RCC were negative for EABA; but a significant number of renal oncocytoma (29/60, 48%) and a few papillary RCC with G/E features (5/52, 10%) remained positive for EABA. In conclusion, high EABA may be used to differentiate oncocytoma from chromophobe RCC, and the staining results must be interpreted with caution when avidin-biotin detection system is used in diagnosing renal neoplasms. PMID:18787626

  18. Long Terminal Repeat Circular DNA as Markers of Active Viral Replication of Human T Lymphotropic Virus-1 in Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Fox, James M; Hilburn, Silva; Demontis, Maria-Antonietta; Brighty, David W; Rios Grassi, Maria Fernanda; Galvão-Castro, Bernardo; Taylor, Graham P; Martin, Fabiola

    2016-01-01

    Clonal expansion of human T-lymphotropic virus type-1 (HTLV-1) infected cells in vivo is well documented. Unlike human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), HTLV-1 plasma RNA is sparse. The contribution of the “mitotic” spread of HTLV-1 compared with infectious spread of the virus to HTLV-1 viral burden in established infection is uncertain. Since extrachromosomal long terminal repeat (LTR) DNA circles are indicators of viral replication in HIV-1 carriers with undetectable plasma HIV RNA, we hypothesised that HTLV-1 LTR circles could indicate reverse transcriptase (RT) usage and infectious activity. 1LTR and 2LTR DNA circles were measured in HTLV-1 cell lines and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of asymptomatic carriers (ACs) and patients with HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP) or adult T cell leukaemia/lymphoma (ATLL). 1LTR DNA circles were detected in 14/20 patients at a mean of 1.38/100 PBMC but did not differentiate disease status nor correlate with HTLV-1 DNA copies. 2LTR DNA circles were detected in 30/31 patients and at higher concentrations in patients with HTLV-1-associated diseases, independent of HTLV-1 DNA load. In an incident case the 2LTR DNA circle concentration increased 2.1 fold at the onset of HAM/TSP compared to baseline. Detectable and fluctuating levels of HTLV-1 DNA circles in patients indicate viral RT usage and virus replication. Our results indicate HTLV-1 viral replication capacity is maintained in chronic infection and may be associated with disease onset. PMID:26985903

  19. Long Terminal Repeat Circular DNA as Markers of Active Viral Replication of Human T Lymphotropic Virus-1 in Vivo.

    PubMed

    Fox, James M; Hilburn, Silva; Demontis, Maria-Antonietta; Brighty, David W; Rios Grassi, Maria Fernanda; Galvão-Castro, Bernardo; Taylor, Graham P; Martin, Fabiola

    2016-03-01

    Clonal expansion of human T-lymphotropic virus type-1 (HTLV-1) infected cells in vivo is well documented. Unlike human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), HTLV-1 plasma RNA is sparse. The contribution of the "mitotic" spread of HTLV-1 compared with infectious spread of the virus to HTLV-1 viral burden in established infection is uncertain. Since extrachromosomal long terminal repeat (LTR) DNA circles are indicators of viral replication in HIV-1 carriers with undetectable plasma HIV RNA, we hypothesised that HTLV-1 LTR circles could indicate reverse transcriptase (RT) usage and infectious activity. 1LTR and 2LTR DNA circles were measured in HTLV-1 cell lines and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of asymptomatic carriers (ACs) and patients with HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP) or adult T cell leukaemia/lymphoma (ATLL). 1LTR DNA circles were detected in 14/20 patients at a mean of 1.38/100 PBMC but did not differentiate disease status nor correlate with HTLV-1 DNA copies. 2LTR DNA circles were detected in 30/31 patients and at higher concentrations in patients with HTLV-1-associated diseases, independent of HTLV-1 DNA load. In an incident case the 2LTR DNA circle concentration increased 2.1 fold at the onset of HAM/TSP compared to baseline. Detectable and fluctuating levels of HTLV-1 DNA circles in patients indicate viral RT usage and virus replication. Our results indicate HTLV-1 viral replication capacity is maintained in chronic infection and may be associated with disease onset. PMID:26985903

  20. Monocyte Activation in HIV/HCV Coinfection Correlates with Cognitive Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Rempel, Hans; Sun, Bing; Calosing, Cyrus; Abadjian, Linda; Monto, Alexander; Pulliam, Lynn

    2013-01-01

    Coinfection with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) challenges the immune system with two viruses that elicit distinct immune responses. Chronic immune activation is a hallmark of HIV infection and an accurate indicator of disease progression. Suppressing HIV viremia by antiretroviral therapy (ART) effectively prolongs life and significantly improves immune function. HIV/HCV coinfected individuals have peripheral immune activation despite effective ART control of HIV viral load. Here we examined freshly isolated CD14 monocytes for gene expression using high-density cDNA microarrays and analyzed T cell subsets, CD4 and CD8, by flow cytometry to characterize immune activation in monoinfected HCV and HIV, and HIV-suppressed coinfected subjects. To determine the impact of coinfection on cognition, subjects were evaluated in 7 domains for neuropsychological performance, which were summarized as a global deficit score (GDS). Monocyte gene expression analysis in HIV-suppressed coinfected subjects identified 43 genes that were elevated greater than 2.5 fold. Correlative analysis of subjects’ GDS and gene expression found eight genes with significance after adjusting for multiple comparisons. Correlative expression of six genes was confirmed by qPCR, five of which were categorized as type 1 IFN response genes. Global deficit scores were not related to plasma lipopolysaccharide levels. In the T cell compartment, coinfection significantly increased expression of activation markers CD38 and HLADR on both CD4 and CD8 T cells but did not correlate with GDS. These findings indicate that coinfection is associated with a type 1 IFN monocyte activation profile which was further found to correlate with cognitive impairment, even in subjects with controlled HIV infection. HIV-suppressed coinfected subjects with controlled HIV viral load experiencing immune activation could benefit significantly from successful anti-HCV therapy and may be considered as

  1. Breast cancer cells expressing stem cell markers CD44+ CD24lo are eliminated by Numb-1 peptide-activated T cells

    PubMed Central

    Mine, Takashi; Matsueda, Satoko; Li, Yufeng; Tokumitsu, Hiroshi; Gao, Hui; Danes, Cristopher; Wong, Kwong-Kwok; Wang, Xinhui; Ferrone, Soldano; Ioannides, Constantin G.

    2009-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSC) are resistant to chemoand radiotherapy. To eliminate cells with phenotypic markers of CSC-like we characterized: (1) expression of CD44, CD24, CD133 and MIC-A/B (NKG2 receptors) in breast (MCF7) and ovarian (SK-OV-3) cells resistant to gemcitabine (GEM), paclitaxel (PTX) and 5-Xuorouracil (5-FU) and (2) their elimination by Numb- and Notch-peptide activated CTL. The number of cells in all populations with the luminal CSC phenotype [epithelial specific antigen+ (ESA) CD44hi CD24lo, CD44hi CD133+, and CD133+ CD24lo] increased in drug-resistant MCF7 and SK-OV-3 cells. Similarly, the number of cells with expressed MIC-A/B increased 4 times in drug-resistant tumor cells compared with drug-sensitive cells. GEMRes MCF7 cells had lower levels of the Notch-1-extracellular domain (NECD) and Notch trans-membrane intracellular domain (TMIC) than GEMSens MCF7. The levels of Numb, and Numb-L-[P]-Ser265 were similar in GEMRes and GEMSens MCF7 cells. Only the levels of Numb-L (long)-Ser295 decreased slightly. This finding suggests that Notch-1 cleavage to TMIC is inhibited in GEMRes MCF7 cells. PBMC activated by natural immunogenic peptides Notch-1 (2112−2120) and Numb-1 (87−95) eliminated NICDpositive, CD24hi CD24lo MCF7 cells. It is likely that the immunogenic Numb-1 peptide in MCF7 cells originated from Numb, [P]-lated by an unknown kinase, because staurosporine but not wortmannin and MAPK-inhibitors decreased peptide presentation. Numb and Notch are antagonistic proteins which degrade each other to stop and activate cell proliferation, respectively. Their peptides are presented alternatively. Targeting both antagonistic proteins should be useful to prevent metastases in patients whose tumors are resistant to conventional treatments. PMID:19048252

  2. [Laboratory markers of melanoma progression].

    PubMed

    Bánfalvi, Teodóra; Edesné, Mariann B; Gergye, Mária; Udvarhelyi, Nóra; Orosz, Zsolt; Gilde, Katalin; Kremmer, Tibor; Ottó, Szabolcs; Tímár, József

    2003-01-01

    Extracellular tumour markers may have potential role in the follow-up of patients with malignant melanoma, in therapy monitoring and in prediction of prognosis. In our article circulating tumour markers in melanoma (melanoma inhibitory activity, lipid bound sialic acid, neuron specific enolase, TA90 immune complex, S-100B protein, 5-S-cysteinyldopa, tyrosinase, cytokines, metalloproteinases, LDH) were reviewed. Among laboratory melanoma markers the S-100B protein is the most investigated. S-100B protein has high specificity, appropriate sensitivity and proved to be significant prognostic factor independent from stages. High serum values are associated with shorter survival. However, before S-100B monitoring immunohistochemistry for the detection of S-100B is required. In the case of malignant melanomas with low expression serum S-100B monitoring may not be sensitive enough to follow disease progression. Although the serum concentration of 5-S-cysteinyldopa did not prove to be independent prognostic factor in our previous studies comprising the highest patient number in the literature, the marker was suggested for therapy monitoring. The survival analysis indicated that the elevated 5-S-cysteinyldopa level predicts shorter survival. In spite of the calculated low correlation between the two markers, parallel elevation of S-100B protein and 5-S-cysteinyldopa indicated shorter survival. On the basis of the literature LDH is the most appropriate tumour marker in stage IV to predict prognosis, but its sensitivity and specificity could not achieve that of S-100B protein. S-100B and LDH proved to be similarly reliable in respect to the clinical outcome. Determination of serum concentration of MIA and tyrosinase are also reliable markers in malignant melanoma. The other investigated markers are not well known yet or do not provide useful information to the clinicians. PMID:12704461

  3. The Diagnostic Value of Surface Markers in Acute Appendicitis; A Diagnostic Accuracy Study

    PubMed Central

    Gholi Mezerji, Naser Mohammad; Rafeie, Mohammad; Shayan, Zahra; Mosayebi, Ghasem

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine the diagnostic value of blood cells surface markers in patients with acute appendicitis. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 71 patients who underwent appendectomy following a diagnosis of appendicitis were recruited during a one-year period. The patients were divided into two groups: patients with histopathologically confirmed acute appendicitis and subjects with normal appendix. Blood cell surface markers of all patients were measured. Univariate and multivariate analytical methods were applied to identify the most useful markers. Receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curves were also used to find the best cut-off point, sensitivity, and specificity. Results: Overall we included 71 patients with mean age of 22.6±10.7 years. Of the 71 cases, 45 (63.4%) had acute appendicitis while 26 (36.6%) were normal. There was no significant difference between two study groups regarding the age (p=0.151) and sex (p=0.142). The initial WBC count was significantly higher in those with acute appendicitis (p=0.033). Maximum and minimum area under the ROC curve in univariate analysis was reported for CD3/RA (0.71) and CD38 (0.533), respectively. Multivariate regression models revealed the percentage of accurate diagnoses based on the combination of γ/δ TCR, CD3/RO, and CD3/RA markers to be 74.65%. Maximum area under the ROC curve (0.79) was also obtained for the same combination. Conclusion: the best blood cell surface markers in the prediction of acute appendicitis were HLA-DR+CD19, a/β TCR, and CD3/RA. The simultaneous use of γ/δ TCR, CD3/RA, and CD3/RO showed the highest diagnostic value in acute appendicitis. PMID:27162905

  4. sTREM2 cerebrospinal fluid levels are a potential biomarker for microglia activity in early-stage Alzheimer's disease and associate with neuronal injury markers.

    PubMed

    Suárez-Calvet, Marc; Kleinberger, Gernot; Araque Caballero, Miguel Ángel; Brendel, Matthias; Rominger, Axel; Alcolea, Daniel; Fortea, Juan; Lleó, Alberto; Blesa, Rafael; Gispert, Juan Domingo; Sánchez-Valle, Raquel; Antonell, Anna; Rami, Lorena; Molinuevo, José L; Brosseron, Frederic; Traschütz, Andreas; Heneka, Michael T; Struyfs, Hanne; Engelborghs, Sebastiaan; Sleegers, Kristel; Van Broeckhoven, Christine; Zetterberg, Henrik; Nellgård, Bengt; Blennow, Kaj; Crispin, Alexander; Ewers, Michael; Haass, Christian

    2016-01-01

    TREM2 is an innate immune receptor expressed on the surface of microglia. Loss-of-function mutations of TREM2 are associated with increased risk of Alzheimer's disease (AD). TREM2 is a type-1 protein with an ectodomain that is proteolytically cleaved and released into the extracellular space as a soluble variant (sTREM2), which can be measured in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). In this cross-sectional multicenter study, we investigated whether CSF levels of sTREM2 are changed during the clinical course of AD, and in cognitively normal individuals with suspected non-AD pathology (SNAP). CSF sTREM2 levels were higher in mild cognitive impairment due to AD than in all other AD groups and controls. SNAP individuals also had significantly increased CSF sTREM2 compared to controls. Moreover, increased CSF sTREM2 levels were associated with higher CSF total tau and phospho-tau181P, which are markers of neuronal degeneration and tau pathology. Our data demonstrate that CSF sTREM2 levels are increased in the early symptomatic phase of AD, probably reflecting a corresponding change of the microglia activation status in response to neuronal degeneration. PMID:26941262

  5. Voltage-Activated Calcium Channels as Functional Markers of Mature Neurons in Human Olfactory Neuroepithelial Cells: Implications for the Study of Neurodevelopment in Neuropsychiatric Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Solís-Chagoyán, Héctor; Flores-Soto, Edgar; Reyes-García, Jorge; Valdés-Tovar, Marcela; Calixto, Eduardo; Montaño, Luis M.; Benítez-King, Gloria

    2016-01-01

    In adulthood, differentiation of precursor cells into neurons continues in several brain structures as well as in the olfactory neuroepithelium. Isolated precursors allow the study of the neurodevelopmental process in vitro. The aim of this work was to determine whether the expression of functional Voltage-Activated Ca2+ Channels (VACC) is dependent on the neurodevelopmental stage in neuronal cells obtained from the human olfactory epithelium of a single healthy donor. The presence of channel-forming proteins in Olfactory Sensory Neurons (OSN) was demonstrated by immunofluorescent labeling, and VACC functioning was assessed by microfluorometry and the patch-clamp technique. VACC were immunodetected only in OSN. Mature neurons responded to forskolin with a five-fold increase in Ca2+. By contrast, in precursor cells, a subtle response was observed. The involvement of VACC in the precursors’ response was discarded for the absence of transmembrane inward Ca2+ movement evoked by step depolarizations. Data suggest differential expression of VACC in neuronal cells depending on their developmental stage and also that the expression of these channels is acquired by OSN during maturation, to enable specialized functions such as ion movement triggered by membrane depolarization. The results support that VACC in OSN could be considered as a functional marker to study neurodevelopment. PMID:27314332

  6. 230Th/232Th activity ratios as a chronological marker complementing 210Pb dating in an estuarine system affected by industrial releases.

    PubMed

    San Miguel, E G; Bolívar, J P; García-Tenorio, R; Martín, J E

    2001-01-01

    The main purpose of this research is to show the usefulness of the 230Th/232Th activity ratios as a chronological marker that can be helpful in the dating of sediment cores collected from an estuarine system located in the south west of Spain highly polluted by wastes from fertilizer plants. These wastes, being released for 30 years, and enriched in radionuclides from the uranium series including 210Pb, invalidate the application of the 210Pb dating technique in full extent to the sediment cores collected in this estuary. However, the evaluation and the interpretation of both 210Pb and 230Th/232Th profiles allows the determination of average sedimentation rates in different parts of the cores, contaminated and noncontaminated zone, that agree in the case analysed in this research. Through this approach, a confident chronology covering the last century, which is essential to analyse and reconstruct the historical evolution of other pollutants in this heavily contaminated system can be established. PMID:11291442

  7. Immune Activation and HIV-Specific CD8(+) T Cells in Cerebrospinal Fluid of HIV Controllers and Noncontrollers.

    PubMed

    Ganesh, Anupama; Lemongello, Donna; Lee, Evelyn; Peterson, Julia; McLaughlin, Bridget E; Ferre, April L; Gillespie, Geraldine M; Fuchs, Dietmar; Deeks, Steven G; Hunt, Peter W; Price, Richard W; Spudich, Serena S; Shacklett, Barbara L

    2016-08-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) is an important target of HIV, and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) can provide a window into host-virus interactions within the CNS. The goal of this study was to determine whether HIV-specific CD8(+) T cells are present in CSF of HIV controllers (HC), who maintain low to undetectable plasma viremia without antiretroviral therapy (ART). CSF and blood were sampled from 11 HC, defined based on plasma viral load (VL) consistently below 2,000 copies/ml without ART. These included nine elite controllers (EC, plasma VL <40 copies/ml) and two viremic controllers (VC, VL 40-2,000 copies/ml). All controllers had CSF VL <40 copies/ml. Three comparison groups were also sampled: six HIV noncontrollers (NC, VL >10,000 copies/ml, no ART); seven individuals with viremia suppressed due to ART (Tx, VL <40 copies/ml); and nine HIV-negative controls. CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells in CSF and blood were analyzed by flow cytometry to assess expression of CCR5, activation markers CD38 and HLA-DR, and memory/effector markers CD45RA and CCR7. HIV-specific CD8(+) T cells were quantified by major histocompatibility complex class I multimer staining. HIV-specific CD8(+) T cells were detected ex vivo at similar frequencies in CSF of HC and noncontrollers; the highest frequencies were in individuals with CD4 counts below 500 cells/μl. The majority of HIV-specific CD8(+) T cells in CSF were effector memory cells expressing CCR5. Detection of these cells in CSF suggests active surveillance of the CNS compartment by HIV-specific T cells, including in individuals with long-term control of HIV infection in the absence of therapy. PMID:27019338

  8. Dietary patterns are associated with biochemical markers of inflammation and endothelial activation in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA)2

    PubMed Central

    Nettleton, Jennifer A; Steffen, Lyn M; Mayer-Davis, Elizabeth J; Jenny, Nancy S; Jiang, Rui; Herrington, David M; Jacobs, David R

    2010-01-01

    Background Dietary patterns may influence cardiovascular disease risk through effects on inflammation and endothelial activation. Objective We examined relations between dietary patterns and markers of inflammation and endothelial activation. Design At baseline, diet (food-frequency questionnaire) and concentrations of C-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin 6 (IL-6), homocysteine, soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1), and soluble E selectin were assessed in 5089 nondiabetic participants in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis. Results Four dietary patterns were derived by using factor analysis. The fats and processed meats pattern (fats, oils, processed meats, fried potatoes, salty snacks, and desserts) was positively associated with CRP (P for trend < 0.001), IL-6 (P for trend < 0.001), and homocysteine (P for trend = 0.002). The beans, tomatoes, and refined grains pattern (beans, tomatoes, refined grains, and high-fat dairy products) was positively related to sICAM-1 (P for trend = 0.007). In contrast, the whole grains and fruit pattern (whole grains, fruit, nuts, and green leafy vegetables) was inversely associated with CRP, IL-6, homocysteine (P for trend ≤ 0.001), and sICAM-1 (P for trend = 0.034), and the vegetables and fish pattern (fish and dark-yellow, cruciferous, and other vegetables) was inversely related to IL-6 (P for trend = 0.009). CRP, IL-6, and homocysteine relations across the fats and processed meats and whole grains and fruit patterns were independent of demographics and lifestyle factors and were not modified by race-ethnicity. CRP and homocysteine relations were independent of waist circumference. Conclusions These results corroborate previous findings that empirically derived dietary patterns are associated with inflammation and show that these relations in an ethnically diverse population with unique dietary habits are similar to findings in more homogeneous populations. PMID:16762949

  9. Ceramic subsurface marker prototypes

    SciTech Connect

    Lukens, C.E.

    1985-05-02

    The client submitted 5 sets of porcelain and stoneware subsurface (radioactive site) marker prototypes (31 markers each set). The following were determined: compressive strength, thermal shock resistance, thermal crazing resistance, alkali resistance, color retention, and chemical resistance.

  10. Immune reconstitution but persistent activation after 48 weeks of antiretroviral therapy in youth with pre-therapy CD4 >350 in ATN 061

    PubMed Central

    Rudy, Bret J.; Kapogiannis, Bill G.; Worrell, Carol; Squires, Kathleen; Bethel, James; Li, Su; Wilson, Craig M.; Agwu, Allison; Emmanuel, Patricia; Price, Georgine; Hudey, Stephanie; Goodenow, Maureen M.; Sleasman, John W.

    2015-01-01

    Measures of immune outcomes in youth who initiate combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) early in HIV infection are limited. Design Adolescent Trials Network 061 examined changes over 48 weeks of cART in T cell subsets and markers of T cell and macrophage activation in subjects with pre-therapy CD4>350. All subjects had optimal viral suppression from weeks 24 through 48. Methods Subjects (n=48) initiated cART with tenofovir/emtricitabine plus ritonavir-boosted atazanavir. Data were collected at baseline and weeks 12, 24, and 48. Trends were compared to uninfected controls. Results Significant increases over 48 weeks were noted in all CD4 populations including total, naïve, central memory (CM), and effector memory RO (EM RO) and effector memory RA (EM RA) while numbers of CM and EMRO CD8 cells declined significantly. By week 48, CD4 naïve cells were similar to controls while CM CD4 cells remained significantly lower and EM RO and EM RA subsets were significantly higher. CD38 and HLA DR expression, both individually and when co-expressed, decreased over 48 weeks of cART on CD8 cells but remained significantly higher than controls at week 48. In contrast, markers of macrophage activation measured by sCD14 and sCD163 in plasma did not change with cART and were significantly higher than controls. Conclusion In youth initiating early cART, CD4 cell reconstitution is robust with decreases in CD8 cells. However CD8 T cell and macrophage activation persists at higher levels than uninfected controls. PMID:25942459

  11. Genetic polymorphisms in the CD14 gene are associated with monocyte activation and carotid intima-media thickness in HIV-infected patients on antiretroviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Yong, Yean K.; Shankar, Esaki M.; Westhorpe, Clare L.V.; Maisa, Anna; Spelman, Tim; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; Crowe, Suzanne M.; Lewin, Sharon R.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract HIV-infected individuals on antiretroviral therapy (ART) are at increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Given the relationship between innate immune activation and CVD, we investigated the association of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in TLR4 and CD14 and carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT), a surrogate measurement for CVD, in HIV-infected individuals on ART and HIV-uninfected controls as a cross-sectional, case-control study. We quantified the frequency of monocyte subsets (CD14, CD16), markers of monocyte activation (CD38, HLA-DR), and endothelial adhesion (CCR2, CX3CR1, CD11b) by flow cytometry. Plasma levels of lipopolysaccharide, sCD163, sCD14, sCX3CL1, and sCCL2, were measured by ELISA. Genotyping of TLR4 and CD14 SNPs was also performed. The TT genotype for CD14/−260SNP but not the CC/CT genotype was associated with elevated plasma sCD14, and increased frequency of CD11b+CD14+ monocytes in HIV-infected individuals. The TT genotype was associated with lower cIMT in HIV-infected patients (n = 47) but not in HIV-uninfected controls (n = 37). The AG genotype for TLR4/+896 was associated with increased CX3CR1 expression on total monocytes among HIV-infected individuals and increased sCCL2 and fibrinogen levels in HIV-uninfected controls. SNPs in CD14/−260 and TLR4/+896 were significantly associated with different markers of systemic and monocyte activation and cIMT that differed between HIV-infected participants on ART and HIV-uninfected controls. Further investigation on the relationship of these SNPs with a clinical endpoint of CVD is warranted in HIV-infected patients on ART. PMID:27495090

  12. Genetic polymorphisms in the CD14 gene are associated with monocyte activation and carotid intima-media thickness in HIV-infected patients on antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Yong, Yean K; Shankar, Esaki M; Westhorpe, Clare L V; Maisa, Anna; Spelman, Tim; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; Crowe, Suzanne M; Lewin, Sharon R

    2016-08-01

    HIV-infected individuals on antiretroviral therapy (ART) are at increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Given the relationship between innate immune activation and CVD, we investigated the association of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in TLR4 and CD14 and carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT), a surrogate measurement for CVD, in HIV-infected individuals on ART and HIV-uninfected controls as a cross-sectional, case-control study. We quantified the frequency of monocyte subsets (CD14, CD16), markers of monocyte activation (CD38, HLA-DR), and endothelial adhesion (CCR2, CX3CR1, CD11b) by flow cytometry. Plasma levels of lipopolysaccharide, sCD163, sCD14, sCX3CL1, and sCCL2, were measured by ELISA. Genotyping of TLR4 and CD14 SNPs was also performed. The TT genotype for CD14/-260SNP but not the CC/CT genotype was associated with elevated plasma sCD14, and increased frequency of CD11b+CD14+ monocytes in HIV-infected individuals. The TT genotype was associated with lower cIMT in HIV-infected patients (n = 47) but not in HIV-uninfected controls (n = 37). The AG genotype for TLR4/+896 was associated with increased CX3CR1 expression on total monocytes among HIV-infected individuals and increased sCCL2 and fibrinogen levels in HIV-uninfected controls. SNPs in CD14/-260 and TLR4/+896 were significantly associated with different markers of systemic and monocyte activation and cIMT that differed between HIV-infected participants on ART and HIV-uninfected controls. Further investigation on the relationship of these SNPs with a clinical endpoint of CVD is warranted in HIV-infected patients on ART. PMID:27495090

  13. High Pre-β1 HDL Concentrations and Low Lecithin: Cholesterol Acyltransferase Activities Are Strong Positive Risk Markers for Ischemic Heart Disease and Independent of HDL-Cholesterol

    PubMed Central

    Sethi, Amar A.; Sampson, Maureen; Warnick, Russell; Muniz, Nehemias; Vaisman, Boris; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Tybjærg-Hansen, Anne; Remaley, Alan T.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND We hypothesized that patients with high HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C) and ischemic heart disease (IHD) may have dysfunctional HDL or unrecognized nonconventional risk factors. METHODS Individuals with IHD (Copenhagen University Hospital) and either high HDL-C (n = 53; women ≥735 mg/L; men ≥619 mg/L) or low HDL-C (n = 42; women ≤387 mg/L; men ≤341 mg/L) were compared with individuals without IHD (Copenhagen City Heart Study) matched by age, sex, and HDL-C concentrations (n = 110). All participants had concentrations within reference intervals for LDL-C (<1600 mg/L) and triglyceride (<1500 mg/L), and none were treated with lipid-lowering medications. Pre-β1 HDL and phospholipid transfer protein concentrations were measured by using commercial kits and lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) activity by using a proteoliposome cholesterol esterification assay. RESULTS Pre-β1 HDL concentrations were 2-fold higher in individuals with IHD vs no IHD in both the high [63 (5.7) vs 35 (2.3) mg/L; P < 0.0001] and low HDL-C [49 (5.0) vs 27 (1.5) mg/L; P = 0.001] groups. Low LCAT activity was also associated with IHD in the high [95.2 (6.7) vs 123.0 (5.3) μmol · L−1 · h−1; P = 0.002] and low [93.4 (8.3) vs 113.5 (4.9) μmol · L−1 · h−1; P = 0.03] HDL-C groups. ROC curves for pre-β1 HDL in the high–HDL-C groups yielded an area under the curve of 0.71 (95% CI: 0.61–0.81) for predicting IHD, which increased to 0.92 (0.87–0.97) when LCAT was included. Similar results were obtained for low HDL-C groups. An inverse correlation between LCAT activity and pre-β1 HDL was observed (r2 = 0.30; P < 0.0001) in IHD participants, which was stronger in the low HDL-C group (r2 = 0.56; P < 0.0001). CONCLUSIONS IHD was associated with high pre-β1 HDL concentrations and low LCAT levels, yielding correct classification in more than 90% of the IHD cases for which both were measured, thus making pre-β1 HDL concentration and LCAT activity level potentially

  14. Monocyte activation is a feature of common variable immunodeficiency irrespective of plasma lipopolysaccharide levels

    PubMed Central

    Barbosa, R R; Silva, S P; Silva, S L; Tendeiro, R; Melo, A C; Pedro, E; Barbosa, M P; Santos, M C P; Victorino, R M M; Sousa, A E

    2012-01-01

    Common variable immunodeficiency disorders (CVID), the most frequent cause of symptomatic primary immunodeficiency, are defined by impaired antibody production. Notwithstanding, T cell activation and granulomatous manifestations represent the main causes of CVID morbidity even in patients receiving immunoglobulin (Ig) G replacement therapy. Additionally, gut pathology is a frequent feature of CVID. In this study, we investigated monocyte imbalances and their possible relationship with increased microbial translocation in CVID patients. Monocyte subsets were defined according to CD14 and CD16 expression levels and evaluated in terms of human leucocyte antigen D-related (HLA-DR), CD86 and programmed death-1 molecule ligand 1 (PD-L1) expression by flow cytometry, in parallel with the quantification of plasma lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and serum levels of soluble CD14 (sCD14), LPS-binding protein (LBP) and anti-LPS antibodies. CVID patients (n = 31) featured significantly increased levels of serum sCD14 and an expansion of CD14brightCD16+ monocytes in direct correlation with T cell and B cell activation, the latter illustrated by the frequency of the CD21lowCD38low subset. Such alterations were not observed in patients lacking B cells due to congenital agammaglobulinaemia (n = 4). Moreover, we found no significant increase in circulating LPS or LBP levels in CVID patients, together with a relative preservation of serum anti-LPS antibodies, in agreement with their presence in commercial IgG preparations. In conclusion, CVID was associated with monocyte imbalances that correlated directly with T cell activation markers and with B cell imbalances, without an association with plasma LPS levels. The heightened monocyte activated state observed in CVID may represent an important target for complementary therapeutic strategies. PMID:22861366

  15. Nr4a1-eGFP Is a Marker of Striosome-Matrix Architecture, Development and Activity in the Extended Striatum

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Margaret I.; Puhl, Henry L.

    2011-01-01

    Transgenic mice expressing eGFP under population specific promoters are widely used in neuroscience to identify specific subsets of neurons in situ and as sensors of neuronal activity in vivo. Mice expressing eGFP from a bacterial artificial chromosome under the Nr4a1 promoter have high expression within the basal ganglia, particularly within the striosome compartments and striatal-like regions of the extended amygdala (bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, striatal fundus, central amygdaloid nucleus and intercalated cells). Grossly, eGFP expression is inverse to the matrix marker calbindin 28K and overlaps with mu-opioid receptor immunoreactivity in the striatum. This pattern of expression is similar to Drd1, but not Drd2, dopamine receptor driven eGFP expression in structures targeted by medium spiny neuron afferents. Striosomal expression is strong developmentally where Nr4a1-eGFP expression overlaps with Drd1, TrkB, tyrosine hydroxylase and phospho-ERK, but not phospho-CREB, immunoreactivity in “dopamine islands”. Exposure of adolescent mice to methylphenidate resulted in an increase in eGFP in both compartments in the dorsolateral striatum but eGFP expression remained brighter in the striosomes. To address the role of activity in Nr4a1-eGFP expression, primary striatal cultures were prepared from neonatal mice and treated with forskolin, BDNF, SKF-83822 or high extracellular potassium and eGFP was measured fluorometrically in lysates. eGFP was induced in both neurons and contaminating glia in response to forskolin but SKF-83822, brain derived neurotrophic factor and depolarization increased eGFP in neuronal-like cells selectively. High levels of eGFP were primarily associated with Drd1+ neurons in vitro detected by immunofluorescence; however ∼15% of the brightly expressing cells contained punctate met-enkephalin immunoreactivity. The Nr4a1-GFP mouse strain will be a useful model for examining the connectivity, physiology, activity and development of the

  16. Common γ-chain blocking peptide reduces in vitro immune activation markers in HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis.

    PubMed

    Massoud, Raya; Enose-Akahata, Yoshimi; Tagaya, Yutaka; Azimi, Nazli; Basheer, Asjad; Jacobson, Steven

    2015-09-01

    Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1)-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP) is a progressive inflammatory myelopathy occurring in a subset of HTLV-1-infected individuals. Despite advances in understanding its immunopathogenesis, an effective treatment remains to be found. IL-2 and IL-15, members of the gamma chain (γc) family of cytokines, are prominently deregulated in HAM/TSP and underlie many of the characteristic immune abnormalities, such as spontaneous lymphocyte proliferation (SP), increased STAT5 phosphorylation in the lymphocytes, and increased frequency and cytotoxicity of virus-specific cytotoxic CD8(+) T lymphocytes (CTLs). In this study, we describe a novel immunomodulatory strategy consisting of selective blockade of certain γc family cytokines, including IL-2 and IL-15, with a γc antagonistic peptide. In vitro, a PEGylated form of the peptide, named BNZ132-1-40, reduced multiple immune activation markers such as SP, STAT5 phosphorylation, spontaneous degranulation of CD8(+) T cells, and the frequency of transactivator protein (Tax)-specific CD8(+) CTLs, thought to be major players in the immunopathogenesis of the disease. This strategy is thus a promising therapeutic approach to HAM/TSP with the potential of being more effective than single monoclonal antibodies targeting either IL-2 or IL-15 receptors and safer than inhibitors of downstream signaling molecules such as JAK1 inhibitors. Finally, selective cytokine blockade with antagonistic peptides might be applicable to multiple other conditions in which cytokines are pathogenic. PMID:26283355

  17. A comparative evaluation of assays for markers of activated coagulation and/or fibrinolysis: thrombin-antithrombin complex, D-dimer and fibrinogen/fibrin fragment E antigen.

    PubMed

    Boisclair, M D; Lane, D A; Wilde, J T; Ireland, H; Preston, F E; Ofosu, F A

    1990-04-01

    Measurements were made of levels of D-dimer in plasma and serum, thrombin-antithrombin complex (TAT) in plasma and fibrinogen/fibrin fragment E antigen (FgE) in serum in a normal healthy control group and in patients with a range of disorders associated with hypercoagulability. Levels were determined in 31 normal healthy controls, 30 patients with disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC), 21 patients with deep venous thrombosis (DVT), 27 patients with myocardial infarction (MI), 26 patients with acute leukaemia and 56 patients with liver disease. Considering all subjects, significant correlations were established between the results of all assays. Notably high correlations (r greater than 0.9) were established between plasma and serum levels of D-dimer, between plasma levels of D-dimer and serum levels of FgE, and between serum levels of D-dimer and FgE. All assays showed very high discrimination (sensitivity) between the normal control group and patients with DIC (97-100%), but there were marked differences between the assays in sensitivity for DVT and MI. In general, the FgE assay was more sensitive than the D-dimer assay, whilst both the FgE and D-dimer assays were more sensitive than the TAT assay. The same trends were apparent in the capability of the assays to discriminate between the normal control group and patients with acute leukaemia and liver disease: disorders with an unknown prevalence of activation of coagulation/fibrinolysis. Our results indicated that measurements of fibrinogen/fibrin degradation products (FDPs) in serum were almost unaffected by artefacts. The data further suggested that the broad-spectrum FgE assay was better than the more specific D-dimer assay in detecting clinical hypercoagulability. Our study showed that, in the clinical conditions examined, FDPs were more effective markers of hypercoagulability than TAT. PMID:2189490

  18. Combined Heart Rate– and Accelerometer-Assessed Physical Activity Energy Expenditure and Associations With Glucose Homeostasis Markers in a Population at High Risk of Developing Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Anne-Louise S.; Carstensen, Bendix; Helge, Jørn W.; Johansen, Nanna B.; Gram, Bibi; Christiansen, Jens S.; Brage, Søren; Lauritzen, Torsten; Jørgensen, Marit E.; Aadahl, Mette; Witte, Daniel R.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Regular physical activity (PA) reduces the risk of developing type 2 diabetes, and different subtypes of dysglycemia have shown different associations with PA. To better understand the associations of PA and glucose homeostasis, we examined the association of objectively measured PA energy expenditure (PAEE) with detailed measures of glucose homeostasis. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS In 1,531 men and women, with low to high risk of developing type 2 diabetes, we measured 7 days of PAEE using a combined accelerometry and heart rate monitor (ActiHeart). Measures and indices of glucose homeostasis were derived from a 3-point oral glucose tolerance test in addition to measures of long-term glycemia (glycated hemoglobin A1c and advanced glycation end products). Associations of PAEE with glucose homeostasis markers were examined using linear regression models. RESULTS Median age (IQR) was 66.6 years (62.1–71.6) (54% men) with a median ActiHeart wear time of 6.9 days (6.0–7.1) and PAEE level of 33.0 kJ/kg/day (23.5–46.1). In fully adjusted models, we found higher levels of PAEE to be positively associated with insulin sensitivity and negatively with insulin 2 h after glucose load (P < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS Even in an elderly population with low levels of PA, we found higher objectively measured PAEE levels to be associated with a more beneficial glucose metabolic profile. Although our findings are cross-sectional, they indicate that even without high-intensity exercise, increasing the overall level of PAEE slightly in an entire population at risk for developing type 2 diabetes may be a realistic and worthwhile goal to reach in order to achieve beneficial effect in terms of glucose metabolism. PMID:23757430

  19. Stress-induced NF-κB activation differentiates promyelocytic leukemia cells to macrophages in response to all-trans-retinoic acid.

    PubMed

    Imran, Muhammad; Park, Joon Seong; Lim, In Kyoung

    2015-03-01

    All-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA) has been known as a choice of treatment for inducing differentiation of promyelocytic leukemia cells to granulocytes. NF-κB plays a crucial role in inflammation and immunity and its activation is an important event for macrophage differentiation both in vivo and in vitro. We report here that NF-κB activation is critical for determining ATRA-induced lineage specific differentiation of myeloid leukemia cells. Our data revealed that ATRA treatment to HL-60 cells enhanced IκBα degradation and NF-κB nuclear translocation and the activated NF-κB potentiated the ability of ATRA for differentiation and switched differentiation to macrophages instead of granulocytes. Serum withdrawal and LPS treatment dampened IκBα expression via MAPK activation and reactive oxygen species generation leading to NF-κB nuclear translocation and ATRA treatment further corroborated these effects in myeloid leukemia cells. Activated NF-κB enhanced the degree of ATRA-induced differentiation of HL-60 cells to macrophages, rather than granulocytes, as assessed by morphologic examination and expressions of differentiation markers such as CD11b, CD38, CD68, MMP9 and Btg2. Employing LLnL or dominant negative IκBα attenuated NF-κB associated enhanced cell maturation and differentiation switch thus suggesting NF-κB as one of the factors that determines ATRA induced lineage specificity of myeloid leukemia cells. Furthermore, MAPK activation was observed to be central both for the differentiation of promyelocytic cells to macrophages or granulocytes regulating NF-κB or C/EBPα expressions, respectively; however, MAPK-mediated signals are modulated under various conditions affecting lineage specificity. In summary, our present data demonstrate that activation of NF-κB directly affects differentiation program of promyelocytes to macrophages, rather than granulocyte, in response to ATRA treatment. PMID:25435432

  20. Glaucomatous MYOC mutations activate the IL-1/NF-κB inflammatory stress response and the glaucoma marker SELE in trabecular meshwork cells

    PubMed Central

    Itakura, Tatsuo; Peters, Donna M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Activation of the IL-1/NF-κB inflammatory stress pathway and induction of SELE expression in the trabecular meshwork (TBM) is a marker for high-tension glaucomas of diverse etiology. Pathway activation stimulates aqueous outflow and protects against oxidative stress, but may be damaging in the long-term. MYOC mutations have been causally linked to high-tension forms of primary open angle glaucoma (POAG). This study investigated a possible link between MYOC mutations and activation of the IL-1/NF-κB pathway and expression of SELE. Methods We constructed MYOC expression vectors with mutations at sites that cause POAG. Mutations (Q368X, Y437H, A427T) were selected to represent proteins with differing POAG-causing potency (Q368X > Y437H > A427T) and intracellular retention behavior (Q368X and Y437H retained, A427T released). The constructs were made in two different kinds of vectors; one a plasmid designed for transient transfection (pCMV6), and one a doxycycline-inducible lentiviral vector (pSLIK) for stable cell transduction. The immortalized human trabecular meshwork line TM-1 was used for all expression studies. Expression of IL1A mRNA was determined by reverse transcription (RT)–PCR, as well as a set of five other genes associated with signaling pathways linked to glaucoma: IL1B and IL6 (NF-κB pathway), TGFB2 and ACTA2 (TGF-β pathway) and FOXO1 (E2F1 apoptotic pathway). An ELISA was used to quantify IL1A protein released into culture media. To quantify intracellular NF-κB activity, we transiently transfected stably transduced cell lines with a luciferase expression vector under control of the IL8 promoter (containing an NF-κB response element). Results Transiently expressed wild-type MYOC was released into cell culture media, whereas mutant MYOCs Q368X and Y437H remained within cells. Both mutant MYOCs activated the IL-1/ NF-κB pathway, significantly stimulating expression of IL1A and IL1B. However Y437H, which causes a severe glaucoma phenotype

  1. Stimulated proliferative responses in vertically HIV-infected children on HAART correlate with clinical and immunological markers

    PubMed Central

    RESINO, S; ABAD, M L; NAVARRO, J; BELLÓN, J M; SÁNCHEZ-RAMÓN, S; ÁNGELES MUÑOZ-FERNÁNDEZ, M

    2003-01-01

    The objective of the study was to investigate the relationship between various CD4+ T cell subsets and the ability of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) to proliferate to several stimuli in vertically human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-infected children. We studied 29 HIV-1-infected children on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) (median duration: 12·3 months). T cell subsets were determined by flow cytometry. Plasma viral load (VL) was quantified using a standardized molecular method. Proliferative responses were evaluated by [3H]-thymidine incorporation. Decreased proliferative responses of PBMC to pokeweed mitogen (PWM) were found for HIV-1-infected children in Centers for Disease Control (CDC) clinical categories B and C when compared to the control group (P < 0·05). Similarly, children with ≤ 15% CD4+ T cells showed a decrease in proliferative responses to PWM (P < 0·01), anti-CD3 + anti-CD28 (P < 0·01) and phytohaemagglutinin (PHA) (P < 0·05) with respect to the control group and to children with CD4+ T cells ≥ 25%. Proliferative responses to PWM, anti-CD3+, anti-CD28 and PHA had a statistically significant positive correlation with CD3+/mm3, CD4+/mm3, % CD4 T cells, CD4/CD8 ratio and the percentage of naive T cell subsets (CD4+CD45RO−HLA-DR−, CD4+ CD45RA+ CD62L+, CD4+ CD45RA+), CD4+ CD62L+ and CD4+ T cells co-expressing CD38+ (CD4+ HLA-DR−CD38+, CD4+ CD38+). Moreover, we found a negative correlation between PBMC proliferative responses and % CD8 T cells, memory, memory-activated and activated CD4+ T cell subsets. Lower proliferative responses to PWM (P < 0·01) and PHA (P < 0·01) were associated with higher VL. Our data show that higher proliferative responses to PWM, anti-CD3 + anti-CD28 and PHA are associated with both non-activated and naive CD4+ T cell subsets in HIV-1-infected children on HAART. PMID:12519396

  2. Histone H2AX phosphorylation as a measure of DNA double-strand breaks and a marker of environmental stress and disease activity in lupus

    PubMed Central

    Namas, Rajaie; Renauer, Paul; Ognenovski, Mikhail; Tsou, Pei-Suen; Sawalha, Amr H

    2016-01-01

    Objective Defective or inefficient DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair results in failure to preserve genomic integrity leading to apoptotic cell death, a hallmark of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Compelling evidence linked environmental factors that increase oxidative stress with SLE risk and the formation of DSBs. In this study, we sought to further explore genotoxic stress sensitivity in SLE by investigating DSB accumulation as a marker linking the effect of environmental stressors and the chromatin microenvironment. Methods DSBs were quantified in peripheral blood mononuclear cell subsets from patients with SLE, healthy controls, and patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) by measuring phosphorylated H2AX (phospho-H2AX) levels with flow cytometry. Phospho-H2AX levels were assessed in G0/G1, S and G2 cell-cycle phases using propidium iodide staining, and after oxidative stress using 0.5 µM hydrogen peroxide exposure for 0, 2, 5, 10, 30 and 60 min. Results DSB levels were significantly increased in CD4+ T cells, CD8+ T cells and monocytes in SLE compared with healthy controls (p=2.16×10−4, 1.68×10−3 and 4.74×10−3, respectively) and RA (p=1.05×10−3, 1.78×10−3 and 2.43×10−2, respectively). This increase in DSBs in SLE was independent of the cell-cycle phase, and correlated with disease activity. In CD4+ T cells, CD8+ T cells and monocytes, oxidative stress exposure induced significantly higher DSB accumulation in SLE compared with healthy controls (60 min; p=1.64×10−6, 8.11×10−7 and 2.04×10−3, respectively). Conclusions Our data indicate that SLE T cells and monocytes have increased baseline DSB levels and an increased sensitivity to acquiring DSBs in response to oxidative stress. Although the mechanism underlying DSB sensitivity in SLE requires further investigation, accumulation of DSB may serve a biomarker for disease activity in SLE and help explain increased apoptotic cell accumulation in this disease. PMID:27158526

  3. Phosphorylation of CDK9 at Ser175 Enhances HIV Transcription and Is a Marker of Activated P-TEFb in CD4+ T Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Mbonye, Uri R.; Gokulrangan, Giridharan; Datt, Manish; Dobrowolski, Curtis; Cooper, Maxwell; Chance, Mark R.; Karn, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    The HIV transactivator protein, Tat, enhances HIV transcription by recruiting P-TEFb from the inactive 7SK snRNP complex and directing it to proviral elongation complexes. To test the hypothesis that T-cell receptor (TCR) signaling induces critical post-translational modifications leading to enhanced interactions between P-TEFb and Tat, we employed affinity purification–tandem mass spectrometry to analyze P-TEFb. TCR or phorbal ester (PMA) signaling strongly induced phosphorylation of the CDK9 kinase at Ser175. Molecular modeling studies based on the Tat/P-TEFb X-ray structure suggested that pSer175 strengthens the intermolecular interactions between CDK9 and Tat. Mutations in Ser175 confirm that this residue could mediate critical interactions with Tat and with the bromodomain protein BRD4. The S175A mutation reduced CDK9 interactions with Tat by an average of 1.7-fold, but also completely blocked CDK9 association with BRD4. The phosphomimetic S175D mutation modestly enhanced Tat association with CDK9 while causing a 2-fold disruption in BRD4 association with CDK9. Since BRD4 is unable to compete for binding to CDK9 carrying S175A, expression of CDK9 carrying the S175A mutation in latently infected cells resulted in a robust Tat-dependent reactivation of the provirus. Similarly, the stable knockdown of BRD4 led to a strong enhancement of proviral expression. Immunoprecipitation experiments show that CDK9 phosphorylated at Ser175 is excluded from the 7SK RNP complex. Immunofluorescence and flow cytometry studies carried out using a phospho-Ser175-specific antibody demonstrated that Ser175 phosphorylation occurs during TCR activation of primary resting memory CD4+ T cells together with upregulation of the Cyclin T1 regulatory subunit of P-TEFb, and Thr186 phosphorylation of CDK9. We conclude that the phosphorylation of CDK9 at Ser175 plays a critical role in altering the competitive binding of Tat and BRD4 to P-TEFb and provides an informative molecular marker for

  4. B-mode ultrasound-detected carotid artery lesions with and without acoustic shadowing and their association with markers of inflammation and endothelial activation: the atherosclerosis risk in communities study.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Kelly J; Pankow, James S; Offenbacher, Steven; Kritchevsky, Stephen B; Duncan, Bruce B; Shahar, Eyal; Sharrett, A Richey; Heiss, Gerardo

    2002-05-01

    In a cross-sectional study of 8695 men and women free of clinical CVD, aged 45-64 years at the 1987-1989 baseline Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study exam, we examined the relationship between carotid artery lesions (CALs), with and without acoustic shadowing (AS) as an index of plaque mineralization, to systemic markers of inflammation and markers of endothelial function, including endothelial adhesion molecules. A three-level variable, based on the presence of extracranial CALs and AS, identified by B-mode ultrasound of six 1 cm arterial segments, defined the outcome. Among subjects without evidence of AS, after controlling for age, gender, ethnicity, study site, body mass index, hypertension, diabetes, and smoking status, CALs were associated with systemic markers of inflammation, including higher levels of fibrinogen [OR=1.24 (95% CI: 1.09, 1.40)] and white blood cell count [OR=1.37 (95% CI: 1.21, 1.56)]. Among subjects with a CAL, after controlling for the above risk factors as well as mean far wall intima-media thickness, AS was associated with higher levels of von Willebrand factor [OR=1.38 (95% CI: 1.10, 1.74)], a marker of endothelial activation. Associations with endothelial adhesion molecules were inconsistent. Further studies aimed at elucidating the mechanisms of arterial mineralization are warranted. PMID:11947908

  5. Total Lymphocyte Count and Haemoglobin Concentration Combined as a Surrogate Marker for Initiating Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy in a Resource-limited Setting as against CD4 Cell Count

    PubMed Central

    Dhamangaonkar, AC; Mathew, A; Pazare, AR

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Aim: To find a sensitive and low-cost surrogate marker for CD4 count for initiating highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) [CD4 < 200 /mm3], in the form of total lymphocyte count (TLC) < 1200 /mm3 combined with haemoglobin (Hb) with multiple Hb cut-offs. Method: Two hundred and three consecutive treatment-naïve adult HIV positive outpatients attending the virology clinic in World Health Organization (WHO) clinical stage 1, 2 or 3 were enrolled in the study. Their complete blood counts and CD4 counts were done. Descriptive statistics was done by two methods correlating TLC alone with CD4 and the other using combined marker of TLC and Hb with CD4 count. Result: Total lymphocyte count alone did not correlate well with CD4 counts (r = 0.13; p = 0.065). Sensitivity of TLC < 1200 /mm3 to predict CD4 < 200 /mm3 was low (23.27%) and the sensitivity of the combined marker (TLC + Hb) increased with higher Hb cut-offs. Conclusion: Adding Hb to TLC markedly improved the sensitivity of the marker to predict CD4 count < 200/mm3. We also recommend a trade-off Hb cut-off of 10.5 g/dL for optimum sensitivity and specificity in this population subset. PMID:25781283

  6. Transient expansion of activated CD8+ T cells characterizes tuberculosis-associated immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome in patients with HIV: a case control study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background CD4+ T cell activation indicators have been reported to be a common phenomenon underlying diverse manifestations of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS). However, we have found that a high frequency of circulating CD8+ T cells is a specific risk factor for mycobacterial IRIS. Therefore, we investigated whether CD8+ T cells from patients who develop TB IRIS were specifically activated. Methods We obtained PBMCs from HIV+ patients prior to and 4, 8, 12, 24, 52 and 104 weeks after initiating antiretroviral therapy. CD38 and HLADR expression on naive, central memory and effector memory CD8+ and CD4+ T cells were determined by flow cytometry. Absolute counts and frequencies of CD8+ T cell subsets were compared between patients who developed TB IRIS, who developed other IRIS forms and who remained IRIS-free. Results TB IRIS patients showed significantly higher counts of naive CD8+ T cells than the other groups at most time points, with a contraction of the effector memory subpopulation occurring later in the follow-up period. Activated (CD38+ HLADR+) CD8+ T cells from all groups decreased with treatment but transiently peaked in TB IRIS patients. This increase was due to an increase in activated naive CD8+ T cell counts during IRIS. Additionally, the CD8+ T cell subpopulations of TB IRIS patients expressed HLADR without CD38 more frequently and expressed CD38 without HLADR less frequently than cells from other groups. Conclusions CD8+ T cell activation is specifically relevant to TB IRIS. Different IRIS forms may involve different alterations in T cell subsets, suggesting different underlying inflammatory processes. PMID:23688318

  7. Genetic relationships in Cucurbita pepo (pumpkin, squash, gourd) as viewed with high frequency oligonucleotide–targeting active gene (HFO–TAG) markers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cucurbita pepo is a highly diverse, economically important member of the Cucurbitaceae. C. pepo encompasses hundreds of cultivars of pumpkins, squash, and gourds. Although C. pepo has been scrutinized with various types of DNA markers, the relationships among the cultivar-groups of C. pepo subsp. p...

  8. Dietary Zinc Reduces Osteoclast Resorption Activities and Increases Markers of Osteoblast Differentiation, Matrix Maturation, and Mineralization in the Long Bones of Growing Rats

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The nutritional influence of zinc (Zn) on markers of bone extracellular matrix (ECM) resorption and mineralization was investigated in growing rats. Thirty male weanling rats were randomly assigned to consume AIN-93G based diets containing 2.5, 5, 7.5, 15, or 30 µg Zn/g diet for 24 d. Femur Zn incre...

  9. Increase in frequencies of circulating Th-17 cells correlates with microbial translocation, immune activation and exhaustion in HIV-1 infected patients with poor CD4 T-cell reconstitution.

    PubMed

    Valiathan, Ranjini; Asthana, Deshratn

    2016-05-01

    We analyzed the association of circulating Th-17 cells (cTh-17) with immune activation (IA), immune exhaustion (IE) and regulatory T-cells (T-regs) in 20 human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) infected patients with impaired restoration of CD4 T-cell counts despite prolonged suppression of plasma viremia (discordant) and compared it with 20 HIV-1 infected patients showing good immunologic and virologic responses (concordant) following highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Discordant HIV-1 infected patients showed significantly higher frequencies of cTh-17 cells compared to concordant patients and healthy controls after PMA+Ionomicin stimulation. Discordant patients also showed higher CD4 T-cell immune activation (HLA-DR+CD38+) than concordant patients which directly correlated with microbial translocation. Additionally, CD4 T-cells of discordant patients showed higher frequencies of CD4 T-cells expressing multiple immune exhaustion markers (Tim3+PD-1+) which correlated with immune activation indicating that combined analysis of inhibitory molecules along with PD-1 might be a better predictor for immune exhaustion of CD4 T-cells. Increased cTh-17 cell frequency correlated inversely with CD4 T-cell percentages and absolute counts and directly with CD4 T-cell immune activation and T-reg frequencies. Persistent CD4 T-cell immune activation might favor differentiation of activated CD4 T-cells toward cTh-17 phenotype in discordant patients. Discordant patients had significantly lower baseline CD4 T-cell counts and higher viral load at the initiation of HAART and higher immune activation and immune exhaustion after being on HAART for long time indicating that these factors might be associated with an increase in cTh-17 cell frequency, thus, increasing the risk of disease progression despite virologic control. PMID:26817581

  10. Increased CCT-eta expression is a marker of latent and active disease and a modulator of fibroblast contractility in Dupuytren's contracture.

    PubMed

    Satish, Latha; O'Gorman, David B; Johnson, Sandra; Raykha, Christina; Gan, Bing Siang; Wang, James H-C; Kathju, Sandeep

    2013-07-01

    Dupuytren's contracture (DC) is a fibroproliferative disorder of unknown etiology characterized by a scar-like contracture that develops in the palm and/or digits. We have previously reported that the eta subunit of the chaperonin containing T-complex polypeptide (CCT-eta) is increased in fibrotic wound healing, and is essential for the accumulation of α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) in fibroblasts. The purpose of this study was to determine if CCT-eta is similarly implicated in the aberrant fibrosis seen in DC and to investigate the role of CCT-eta in the behavior of myo/fibroblasts in DC. Fibroblasts were obtained from DC-affected palmar fascia, from adjacent phenotypically normal palmar fascia in the same DC patients (PF), and from non-DC palmar fascial tissues in patients undergoing carpal tunnel (CT) release. Inherent contractility in these three populations was examined using fibroblast-populated collagen lattices (FPCLs) and by cell traction force microscopy. Expression of CCT-eta and α-SMA protein was determined by Western blot. The effect of CCT-eta inhibition on the contractility of DC cells was determined by deploying an siRNA versus CCT-eta. DC cells were significantly more contractile than both matching palmar fascial (PF) cells and CT cells in both assays, with PF cells demonstrating an intermediate contractility in the FPCL assay. Whereas α-SMA protein was significantly increased only in DC cells compared to PF and CT cells, CCT-eta protein was significantly increased in both PF and DC cells compared to CT cells. siRNA-mediated depletion of CCT-eta inhibited the accumulation of both CCT-eta and α-SMA protein in DC cells, and also significantly decreased the contractility of treated DC cells. These observations suggest that increased expression of CCT-eta appears to be a marker for latent and active disease in these patients and to be essential for the increased contractility exhibited by these fibroblasts. PMID:23292503

  11. Translational neurophysiological markers for activity of the metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR2) modulator JNJ-40411813: Sleep EEG correlates in rodents and healthy men.

    PubMed

    Ahnaou, A; de Boer, P; Lavreysen, H; Huysmans, H; Sinha, V; Raeymaekers, L; Van De Casteele, T; Cid, J M; Van Nueten, L; Macdonald, G J; Kemp, J A; Drinkenburg, W H I M

    2016-04-01

    Alterations in rapid eye movement sleep (REM) have been suggested as valid translational efficacy markers: activation of the metabotropic glutamate receptor 2 (mGluR2) was shown to increase REM latency and to decrease REM duration. The present paper addresses the effects on vigilance states of the mGluR2 positive allosteric modulator (PAM) JNJ-40411813 at different circadian times in rats and after afternoon dosing in humans. Due to its dual mGluR2 PAM/serotonin 2A (5-HT2A) receptor antagonism in rodents, mGlu2R specificity of effects was studied in wild-type (WT) and mGluR2 (-/-) mice. 5-HT2A receptor occupancy was determined in humans using positron emission tomography (PET). Tolerance development was examined in rats after chronic dosing. EEG oscillations and network connectivity were assessed using multi-channel EEG. In rats, JNJ-40411813 increased deep sleep time and latency of REM onset but reduced REM time when administered 2 h after 'lights on' (CT2): this was sustained after chronic dosing. At CT5 similar effects were elicited, at CT10 only deep sleep was enhanced. Withdrawal resulted in baseline values, while re-administration reinstated drug effects. Parieto-occipital cortical slow theta and gamma oscillations were correlated with low locomotion. The specificity of functional response was confirmed in WT but not mGluR2 (-/-) mice. A double-blind, placebo-controlled polysomnographic study in healthy, elderly subjects showed that 500 mg of JNJ-40411813 consistently increased deep sleep time, but had no effect on REM parameters. This deep sleep effect was not explained by 5-HT2A receptor binding, as in the PET study even 700 mg only marginally displaced the tracer. JNJ-40411813 elicited comparable functional responses in rodents and men if circadian time of dosing was taken into account. These findings underscore the translational potential of sleep mechanisms in evaluating mGluR2 therapeutics when administered at the appropriate circadian time. PMID

  12. Analysis of Immune Response Markers in Jorge Lobo's Disease Lesions Suggests the Occurrence of Mixed T Helper Responses with the Dominance of Regulatory T Cell Activity.

    PubMed

    Azevedo, Michelle de C S; Rosa, Patricia S; Soares, Cleverson T; Fachin, Luciana R V; Baptista, Ida Maria F D; Woods, William J; Garlet, Gustavo P; Trombone, Ana Paula F; Belone, Andrea de F F

    2015-01-01

    Jorge Lobo's disease (JLD) is a chronic infection that affects the skin and subcutaneous tissues. Its etiologic agent is the fungus Lacazia loboi. Lesions are classified as localized, multifocal, or disseminated, depending on their location. Early diagnosis and the surgical removal of lesions are the best therapeutic options currently available for JLD. The few studies that evaluate the immunological response of JLD patients show a predominance of Th2 response, as well as a high frequency of TGF-β and IL-10 positive cells in the lesions; however, the overall immunological status of the lesions in terms of their T cell phenotype has yet to be determined. Therefore, the objective of this study was to evaluate the pattern of Th1, Th2, Th17 and regulatory T cell (Treg) markers mRNA in JLD patients by means of real-time PCR. Biopsies of JLD lesions (N = 102) were classified according to their clinical and histopathological features and then analyzed using real-time PCR in order to determine the expression levels of TGF-β1, FoxP3, CTLA4, IKZF2, IL-10, T-bet, IFN-γ, GATA3, IL-4, IL-5, IL-13, IL-33, RORC, IL-17A, IL-17F, and IL-22 and to compare these levels to those of healthy control skin (N = 12). The results showed an increased expression of FoxP3, CTLA4, TGF-β1, IL-10, T-bet, IL-17F, and IL-17A in lesions, while GATA3 and IL-4 levels were found to be lower in diseased skin than in the control group. When the clinical forms were compared, TGF-β1 was found to be highly expressed in patients with a single localized lesion while IL-5 and IL-17A levels were higher in patients with multiple/disseminated lesions. These results demonstrate the occurrence of mixed T helper responses and suggest the dominance of regulatory T cell activity, which could inhibit Th-dependent protective responses to intracellular fungi such as L. loboi. Therefore, Tregs may play a key role in JLD pathogenesis. PMID:26700881

  13. Analysis of Immune Response Markers in Jorge Lobo's Disease Lesions Suggests the Occurrence of Mixed T Helper Responses with the Dominance of Regulatory T Cell Activity

    PubMed Central

    Azevedo, Michelle de C. S.; Rosa, Patricia S.; Soares, Cleverson T.; Fachin, Luciana R. V.; Baptista, Ida Maria F. D.; Woods, William J.; Garlet, Gustavo P.

    2015-01-01

    Jorge Lobo’s disease (JLD) is a chronic infection that affects the skin and subcutaneous tissues. Its etiologic agent is the fungus Lacazia loboi. Lesions are classified as localized, multifocal, or disseminated, depending on their location. Early diagnosis and the surgical removal of lesions are the best therapeutic options currently available for JLD. The few studies that evaluate the immunological response of JLD patients show a predominance of Th2 response, as well as a high frequency of TGF-β and IL-10 positive cells in the lesions; however, the overall immunological status of the lesions in terms of their T cell phenotype has yet to be determined. Therefore, the objective of this study was to evaluate the pattern of Th1, Th2, Th17 and regulatory T cell (Treg) markers mRNA in JLD patients by means of real-time PCR. Biopsies of JLD lesions (N = 102) were classified according to their clinical and histopathological features and then analyzed using real-time PCR in order to determine the expression levels of TGF-β1, FoxP3, CTLA4, IKZF2, IL-10, T-bet, IFN-γ, GATA3, IL-4, IL-5, IL-13, IL-33, RORC, IL-17A, IL-17F, and IL-22 and to compare these levels to those of healthy control skin (N = 12). The results showed an increased expression of FoxP3, CTLA4, TGF-β1, IL-10, T-bet, IL-17F, and IL-17A in lesions, while GATA3 and IL-4 levels were found to be lower in diseased skin than in the control group. When the clinical forms were compared, TGF-β1 was found to be highly expressed in patients with a single localized lesion while IL-5 and IL-17A levels were higher in patients with multiple/disseminated lesions. These results demonstrate the occurrence of mixed T helper responses and suggest the dominance of regulatory T cell activity, which could inhibit Th-dependent protective responses to intracellular fungi such as L. loboi. Therefore, Tregs may play a key role in JLD pathogenesis. PMID:26700881

  14. 30 CFR 817.11 - Signs and markers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Signs and markers. 817.11 Section 817.11... ACTIVITIES § 817.11 Signs and markers. (a) Specifications. Signs and markers required under this part shall... durable material; and (4) Conform to local laws and regulations. (b) Duration of maintenance. Signs...

  15. 30 CFR 817.11 - Signs and markers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Signs and markers. 817.11 Section 817.11... ACTIVITIES § 817.11 Signs and markers. (a) Specifications. Signs and markers required under this part shall... durable material; and (4) Conform to local laws and regulations. (b) Duration of maintenance. Signs...

  16. 30 CFR 817.11 - Signs and markers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Signs and markers. 817.11 Section 817.11... ACTIVITIES § 817.11 Signs and markers. (a) Specifications. Signs and markers required under this part shall... durable material; and (4) Conform to local laws and regulations. (b) Duration of maintenance. Signs...

  17. 30 CFR 817.11 - Signs and markers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Signs and markers. 817.11 Section 817.11... ACTIVITIES § 817.11 Signs and markers. (a) Specifications. Signs and markers required under this part shall... durable material; and (4) Conform to local laws and regulations. (b) Duration of maintenance. Signs...

  18. 30 CFR 817.11 - Signs and markers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Signs and markers. 817.11 Section 817.11... ACTIVITIES § 817.11 Signs and markers. (a) Specifications. Signs and markers required under this part shall... durable material; and (4) Conform to local laws and regulations. (b) Duration of maintenance. Signs...

  19. Smart magnetic markers use in hydraulic fracturing.

    PubMed

    Zawadzki, Jarosław; Bogacki, Jan

    2016-11-01

    One of the main challenges and unknowns during shale gas exploration is to assess the range and efficiency of hydraulic fracturing. It is also essential to assess the distribution of proppant, which keeps the fracture pathways open. Solving these problems may considerably increase the efficiency of the shale gas extraction. Because of that, the idea of smart magnetic marker, which can be detected when added to fracturing fluid, has been considered for a long time. This study provides overview of the possibilities of magnetic marker application for shale gas extraction. The imaging methods using electromagnetic markers, are considered or developed in two directions. The first possibility is the markers' electromagnetic activity throughout the whole volume of the fracturing fluid. Thus, it can be assumed that the whole fracturing fluid is the marker. Among these type of hydraulic fracturing solutions, ferrofluid could be considered. The second possibility is marker, which is just one of many components of the fracturing fluid. In this case feedstock magnetic materials, ferrites and nanomaterials could be considered. Magnetic properties of magnetite could be too low and ferrofluids' or nanomaterials' price is unacceptably high. Because of that, ferrites, especially ZnMn ferrites seems to be the best material for magnetic marker. Because of the numerous applications in electronics, it is cheap and easily available, although the price is higher, then that of magnetite. The disadvantage of using ferrite, could be too small mechanical strength. It creates an essential need for combining magnetic marker with proppant into magnetic-ceramic composite. PMID:27475294

  20. High-risk oncogenic HPV genotype infection associates with increased immune activation and T cell exhaustion in ART-suppressed HIV-1-infected women.

    PubMed

    Papasavvas, Emmanouil; Surrey, Lea F; Glencross, Deborah K; Azzoni, Livio; Joseph, Jocelin; Omar, Tanvier; Feldman, Michael D; Williamson, Anna-Lise; Siminya, Maureen; Swarts, Avril; Yin, Xiangfan; Liu, Qin; Firnhaber, Cynthia; Montaner, Luis J

    2016-05-01

    Persistence of human papillomavirus (HPV) and cervical disease in the context of HIV co-infection can be influenced by introduction of antiretroviral therapy (ART) and sustained immune activation despite ART. We conducted a cross-sectional study in order to evaluate immune activation/exhaustion in ART-suppressed HIV(+) women with or without high-risk (HR) HPV-related cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN). 55 South African women were recruited in three groups: HR (-) (n = 16) and HR (+) (n = 15) HPV with negative cervical histopathology, and HR (+) HPV with CIN grade 1/2/3 (n = 24). Sampling included endocervical brushing (HPV DNA genotyping), Pap smear (cytology), colposcopic punch biopsy (histopathology, histochemical evaluation of immune cells), and peripheral blood (clinical assessment, flow cytometry-based immune subset characterization). Statistics were done using R2.5.1. Irrespective of the presence of CIN, HR (+) HPV women had higher circulating levels of T cells expressing markers of activation/exhaustion (CD38, PD1, CTLA-4, BTLA, CD160), Tregs, and myeloid subsets expressing corresponding ligands (PDL1, PDL2, CD86, CD40, HVEM) than HR (-) HPV women. A decrease in circulating NK cells was associated with CIN grade. CD4(+) T cell count associated negatively with T cell exhaustion and expression of negative regulators on myeloid cells. Women with CIN when compared to HR (-) HPV women, had higher cervical cell density in stroma and epithelium for CD4(+), CD68(+), and CD11c(+) cells, and only in stroma for CD8(+) cells. We conclude that in ART-suppressed HIV-infected women with HPV co-infection the levels of T and myeloid cell activation/exhaustion are associated with the presence of HR HPV genotypes. PMID:27467943

  1. Apoptotic markers in protozoan parasites

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The execution of the apoptotic death program in metazoans is characterized by a sequence of morphological and biochemical changes that include cell shrinkage, presentation of phosphatidylserine at the cell surface, mitochondrial alterations, chromatin condensation, nuclear fragmentation, membrane blebbing and the formation of apoptotic bodies. Methodologies for measuring apoptosis are based on these markers. Except for membrane blebbing and formation of apoptotic bodies, all other events have been observed in most protozoan parasites undergoing cell death. However, while techniques exist to detect these markers, they are often optimised for metazoan cells and therefore may not pick up subtle differences between the events occurring in unicellular organisms and multi-cellular organisms. In this review we discuss the markers most frequently used to analyze cell death in protozoan parasites, paying special attention to changes in cell morphology, mitochondrial activity, chromatin structure and plasma membrane structure/permeability. Regarding classical regulators/executors of apoptosis, we have reviewed the present knowledge of caspase-like and nuclease activities. PMID:21062457

  2. [Biology and markers of preeclampsia].

    PubMed

    Guibourdenche, Jean; Leguy, Marie-Clémence; Tsatsaris, Vassilis

    2013-11-01

    Preeclampsia is a syndrome specific of pregnancy and placenta diagnosed after 20 WG on the association of an hypertension and a proteinuria. It is responsible for significant maternal-fetal morbidity and mortality which justify the development of markers for screening, diagnosis and prognosis. These markers are actors or witnesses to the various stages and mechanisms of the disease : the initial defect of trophoblast invasion and remodeling of uterine arteries (proteases [PAPP-A, ADAM-12, uPA, MMPs], their inhibitors, and angiogenic factors [PlGF, sflt-1, s-eng]) which induces hydrostatic abnormalities (uterine doppler) and placental hypoperfusion with dysoxia (HIF-1α) and oxidative stress (free radicals, peroxynitrites, oxidized LDL). This results in impaired placental functions including endocrine and metabolic functions (hCG, leptin) with increase in placental apoptosis and necrosis with the release of exosomes and toxic placental fragments (STBM) and their content (RNA, DNA and proteins). This fragments amplify the gestational inflammation (IL6, TNFα ; activation of leukocytes and macrophages [elastase, neopterin] and complement) and lead to a deterioration of the maternal endothelium (vasoconstriction [ET2, TxA2]; platelet adhesion [sVCAM -1α), aggregation and activation; impaired vascular permeability) generating edema, hypertension, atherosclerosis and glomerular nephropathy (proteinuria, hyperuricemia). Other markers such as PP13 and PTX3 seem of interest even if their functions are poorly understood. Preeclampsia develops on a predisposed maternal environment (genetic, epigenetic infectious, and endocrine factors) characterized by a maternal inadequacy to pregnancy. PMID:24235331

  3. Salivary Markers for Periodontal and General Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Podzimek, Stepan; Vondrackova, Lucie; Duskova, Jana; Janatova, Tatjana; Broukal, Zdenek

    2016-01-01

    The determination of biomarkers in saliva is becoming an important part of laboratory diagnostics and the prediction of not only periodontal, but also other tissue and organ diseases. Biomarkers in saliva (e.g., enzymes, protein markers, or oxidative stress markers) can be used for activity determination and for periodontal disease prognosis. Saliva also contains many markers which can predict the risk of certain diseases (e.g., diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular, oncology, endocrinology, and psychiatric diseases). The study of salivary components proteomics clearly shows the relationship of periodontal diseases and diseases of distant systems, organs, or tissues. PMID:27143814

  4. The endothelial cell markers von Willebrand Factor (vWF), CD31 and CD34 are lost in glomerulonephritis and no longer correlate with the morphological indices of glomerular sclerosis, interstitial fibrosis, activity and chronicity.

    PubMed

    Gluhovschi, Cristina; Gluhovschi, Gheorghe; Potencz, Elena; Herman, Diana; Trandafirescu, Virginia; Petrica, Ligia; Velciov, Silvia; Bozdog, Gheorghe; Bob, Flaviu; Vernic, Corina; Cioca, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    Endothelial cells (ECs) are active participants of an inflammatory process in glomeruli. EC damage has been shown to play an important role in the progression of glomerulonephritis (GN). The degree of glomerular and peritubular capillary loss in models of progressive renal disease correlates with the severity of glomerulosclerosis and interstitial fibrosis. The aim of our study was to analyze the association of vWF, CD31 and CD34 immunoreactivity with the morphological indices of glomerular sclerosis, interstitial fibrosis, activity and chronicity in GN. A cross-sectional study of 22 patients with GN was conducted. Conventional stains (hematoxylin-eosin, periodic acid Schiff and Trichrome Gömöri stains) and immunohistochemistry (vWF, CD31 and CD34) were employed on kidney biopsies. Activity and chronicity of GN, as well as glomerular segmental sclerosis and interstitial fibrosis, were evaluated according to a scoring system initially used for lupus nephritis and antineutrophil-cytoplasmic-antibody-associated vasculitis. Immunohistochemistry was assessed using a semi-quantitative score. Statistical analysis was performed using EpiInfo 6.04. The mean patient age was 46.68+/-14.09; 14 patients were male, and eight were female. Performing Spearman's rank correlation test, no correlation was found between each marker and glomerular segmental sclerosis, interstitial fibrosis, activity and chronicity, which suggests a loss of these markers and microvasculature involvement. PMID:20675279

  5. Allelic diversity of a beer haze active protein gene in cultivated and Tibetan wild barley and development of allelic specific markers.

    PubMed

    Ye, Lingzhen; Dai, Fei; Qiu, Long; Sun, Dongfa; Zhang, Guoping

    2011-07-13

    The formation of haze is a serious quality problem in beer production. It has been shown that the use of silica elute (SE)-ve malt (absence of molecular weight (MW) ∼14000 Da) for brewing can improve haze stability in the resultant beer, and the protein was identified as a barley trypsin inhibitor of the chloroform/methanol type (BTI-CMe). The objectives of this study were to determine (1) the allelic diversity of the gene controlling BTI-CMe in cultivated and Tibetan wild barley and (2) allele-specific (AS) markers for screening SE protein type. A survey of 172 Tibetan annual wild barley accessions and 71 cultivated barley genotypes was conducted, and 104 wild accessions and 35 cultivated genotypes were identified as SE+ve and 68 wild accessions and 36 cultivated genotypes as SE-ve. The allelic diversity of the gene controlling BTI-CMe was investigated by cloning, alignment, and association analysis. It was found that there were significant differences between the SE+ve and SE-ve types in single-nucleotide polymorphisms at 234 (SNP(234)), SNP(313), and SNP(385.) Furthermore, two sets of AS markers were developed to screen SE protein type based on SNP(313). AS-PCR had results very similar to those obtained by immunoblot method. Mapping analysis showed that the gene controlling the MW∼14 kDa band was located on the short arm of chromosome 3H, at the position of marker BPB-0527 (33.302 cM) in the Franklin/Yerong DH population. PMID:21608526

  6. [Biological markers of alcoholism].

    PubMed

    Marcos Martín, M; Pastor Encinas, I; Laso Guzmán, F J

    2005-09-01

    Diagnosis of alcoholism is very important, given its high prevalence and possibility of influencing the disease course. For this reason, the so-called biological markers of alcoholism are useful. These are analytic parameters that alter in the presence of excessive alcohol consumption. The two most relevant markers are the gamma-glutamyltranspeptidase and carbohydrate deficient transferrin. With this clinical comment, we aim to contribute to the knowledge of these tests and promote its use in the clinical practice. PMID:16194480

  7. NETosis markers: Quest for specific, objective, and quantitative markers.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Sakiko; Nakazawa, Daigo; Shida, Haruki; Miyoshi, Arina; Kusunoki, Yoshihiro; Tomaru, Utano; Ishizu, Akihiro

    2016-08-01

    More than 10years have passed since the discovery of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) in 2004. NETs are extracellular web-like DNA decorated with antimicrobial proteins, which are released from activated neutrophils. The state of neutrophils with NET formation is called NETosis. It has been realized that NETosis includes suicidal NETosis and vital NETosis. The former state means cell death of neutrophils, whereas the latter state preserves living neutrophilic functions. Although both suicidal and vital NETosis play essential roles in elimination of microorganisms, excessive formation of NETs, especially the ones derived from suicidal NETosis, can harm the hosts. Therefore, the discovery of NETosis markers and development of evaluation methods are important. In this review, we compare the methods for evaluating NETosis, including immunocytological and immunohistological detection of co-localized neutrophil-derived proteins and extracellular DNA, and citrullinated histones, detection of NET remnants in fluid samples, and flow cytometric detection of cell-appendant NET components, with focus on the specificity, objectivity, and quantitativity. Since the gold standard marker of NETosis or method of NET detection has not been established yet, researchers should choose the most appropriate marker or method in each situation based on the knowledge of the respective virtues and faults. PMID:27259468

  8. Regulatory T cells and chronic immune activation in human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1)-infected children

    PubMed Central

    Freguja, R; Gianesin, K; Mosconi, I; Zanchetta, M; Carmona, F; Rampon, O; Giaquinto, C; De Rossi, A

    2011-01-01

    The function of CD4+ T cells with regulatory activity (Tregs) is the down-regulation of immune responses. This suppressive activity may limit the magnitude of effector responses, resulting in failure to control human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) infection, but may also suppress chronic immune activation, a characteristic feature of HIV-1 disease. We evaluated the correlation between viral load, immune activation and Tregs in HIV-1-infected children. Eighty-nine HIV-1-infected children (aged 6–14 years) were included in the study and analysed for HIV-1 plasmaviraemia, HIV-1 DNA load, CD4 and CD8 cell subsets. Treg cells [CD4+ CD25highCD127lowforkhead box P3 (FoxP3high)] and CD8-activated T cells (CD8+CD38+) were determined by flow cytometry. Results showed that the number of activated CD8+CD38+ T cells increased in relation to HIV-1 RNA plasmaviraemia (r = 0·403, P < 0·0001). The proportion of Tregs also correlated positively with HIV-1 plasmaviraemia (r = 0·323, P = 0·002), but correlated inversely with CD4+ cells (r = −0·312, P = 0·004), thus suggesting a selective expansion along with increased viraemia and CD4+ depletion. Interestingly, a positive correlation was found between the levels of Tregs and CD8+CD38+ T cells (r = 0·305, P = 0·005), and the percentage of Tregs tended to correlate with HIV-1 DNA load (r = 0·224, P = 0·062). Overall, these findings suggest that immune activation contributes to the expansion of Treg cells. In turn, the suppressive activity of Tregs may impair effector responses against HIV-1, but appears to be ineffective in limiting immune activation. PMID:21438872

  9. Key developmental transitions in human germinal center B cells are revealed by differential CD45RB expression.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Stephen M; Harp, Natessa; Patel, Darshna; Wulf, Jordan; Spaeth, Erich D; Dike, Uzoamaka K; James, Judith A; Capra, J Donald

    2009-04-23

    We previously reported that RO(+) expression correlated with increased mutation, activation, and selection among human germinal center (GC) B cells. Here, we subdivided human tonsillar B cells, including IgD(-)CD38(+) GC B cells, into different fractions based on RB expression. Although each subset contained RB(+) cells, when used as an intrasubset marker, differential RB expression effectively discriminated between phenotypically distinct cells. For example, RB(+) GC B cells were enriched for activated cells with lower AID expression. RB inversely correlated with mutation frequency, demonstrating a key difference between RB- and RO-expressing GC B cells. Reduced RB expression during the transition from pre-GC (IgM(+)IgD(+)CD38(+)CD27(-)) to GCB cells was followed by a dramatic increase during the GC-to-plasmablast (IgD(-)CD38(++)CD27(+)) and memory (IgD(-)CD38(-)CD27(+)) transition. Interestingly, RB(+) GC B cells showed increased signs of terminal differentiation toward CD27(+) post-GC early plasmablast (increased CD38 and RO) or early memory (decreased CD38 and RO) B cells. We propose that as in T cells, differential RB expression directly correlates with development- and function-based transitions in tonsillar B cells. Application of this RB:RO system should advance our understanding of normal B-cell development and facilitate the isolation of more discrete B-cell populations with potentially different propensities in disease pathogenesis. PMID:19059880

  10. Calpains: markers of tumor aggressiveness?

    PubMed

    Roumes, Hélène; Leloup, Ludovic; Dargelos, Elise; Brustis, Jean-Jacques; Daury, Laetitia; Cottin, Patrick

    2010-05-15

    Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) are soft-tissue sarcoma commonly encountered in childhood. RMS cells can acquire invasive behavior and form metastases. The metastatic dissemination implicates many proteases among which are mu-calpain and m-calpain. Study of calpain expression and activity underline the deregulation of calpain activity in RMS. Analysis of kinetic characteristics of RMS cells, compared to human myoblasts LHCN-M2 cells, shows an important migration velocity in RMS cells. One of the major results of this study is the positive linear correlation between calpain activity and migration velocity presenting calpains as a marker of tumor aggressiveness. The RMS cytoskeleton is disorganized. Specifying the role of mu- and m-calpain using antisense oligonucleotides led to show that both calpains up-regulate alpha- and beta-actin in ARMS cells. Moreover, the invasive behavior of these cells is higher than that of LHCN-M2 cells. However, it is similar to that of non-treated LHCN-M2 cells, when calpains are inhibited. In summary, calpains may be involved in the anarchic adhesion, migration and invasion of RMS. The direct relationship between calpain activity and migration velocities or invasive behavior indicates that calpains could be considered as markers of tumor aggressiveness and as potential targets for limiting development of RMS tumor as well as their metastatic behavior. PMID:20193680

  11. Surface markers. [Quarterly report, January 1--June 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, W.B.

    1995-08-01

    This research examined information on natural phenomena and human activities to ultimately recommend specific sites for surface markers to warn future generations of the potential hazards of disposed waste. Literature pertaining to previous marker designs was reviewed and summarized. This literature primarily addressed the recommendations of a consultant team for developing a marker system to warn future generations about radioactive waste (WIPP, New Mexico). Literature on archeological markers (e.g., Nazca lines in Peru, pyramids) and their durability was also covered. Application to Yucca Mountain is discussed; sites for possible placement of surface markers are considered.

  12. Inflammatory and immune markers associated with physical frailty syndrome: findings from Singapore longitudinal aging studies.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yanxia; Tan, Crystal Tze Ying; Nyunt, Ma Shwe Zin; Mok, Esther Wing Hei; Camous, Xavier; Kared, Hassen; Fulop, Tamas; Feng, Liang; Ng, Tze Pin; Larbi, Anis

    2016-05-17

    Chronic systematic inflammation and reduced immune system fitness are considered potential contributing factors to the development of age-related frailty, but the underlying mechanisms are poorly defined. This exploratory study aimed to identify frailty-related inflammatory markers and immunological phenotypes in a cohort of community-dwelling adults aged ≥ 55 years. Frailty was assessed using two models, a Frailty Index and a categorical phenotype, and correlated with levels of circulating immune biomarkers and markers of senescence in immune cell subsets. We identified eight serological biomarkers that were associated with frailty, including sgp130, IL-2Rα, I-309, MCP-1, BCA-1, RANTES, leptin, and IL-6R. Frailty Index was inversely predicted by the frequency of CD3+, CD45RA+, and central memory CD4 cells, and positively predicted by the loss of CD28 expression, especially in CD8+ T cells, while frailty status was predicted by the frequency of terminal effector CD8+ T cells. In γ/δ T cells, frailty was negatively associated with CD27, and positively associated with IFNγ+TNFα- secretion by γ/δ2+ cells and IFNγ-TNFα+ secretion by γ/δ2- cells. Increased numbers of exhausted and CD38+ B cells, as well as CD14+CD16+ inflammatory monocytes, were also identified as frailty-associated phenotypes. This pilot study supports an association between inflammation, cellular immunity, and the process of frailty. These findings have significance for the early identification of frailty using circulating biomarkers prior to clinical manifestations of severe functional decline in the elderly. PMID:27119508

  13. The Role of Apoptosis Associated Markers in Pathogenesis of Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2012-08-28

    To Compare the Serum Apoptosis-associated Markers Between Patients With Active TB and Patients With LTBI; To Evaluate the Efficiency of Apoptosis-associated Markers to Differentiate Potential of Active TB From LTBI

  14. Plasma levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 and in vivo markers of cytochrome P450 3A activity in Swedes and Koreans: effects of a genetic polymorphism and oral contraceptives.

    PubMed

    Nylén, Hanna; Björkhem-Bergman, Linda; Ekström, Lena; Roh, Hyung-Keun; Bertilsson, Leif; Eliasson, Erik; Lindh, Jonatan D; Diczfalusy, Ulf

    2014-10-01

    In vitro studies have shown that vitamin D may induce several cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes in general and CYP3A4 in particular. The primary aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between plasma levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 and suggested in vivo markers of CYP3A activity in healthy volunteers from Sweden and Korea. Plasma concentrations of 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 were analysed in samples from three previously performed studies, and the correlation between these levels and suggested in vivo markers of CYP3A activity was investigated by means of nonparametric correlation. In addition, we studied the modulating effects of three vitamin D receptor promoter polymorphisms on the association between 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 and CYP3A enzyme activity in Swedish subjects. The plasma levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 were not significantly associated with CYP3A phenotypes in any of the three studies, but after accounting for the vitamin D receptor polymorphism rs4516035, there was a significant positive association between 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 and CYP3A activity (p = 0.004). Swedes (n = 65) had significantly higher 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 levels than Koreans (n = 67), 75 nM compared with 31 nM (p < 0.001). Swedish women taking oral contraceptives (OC) (n = 19) had somewhat higher plasma levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 compared with Swedish women not taking oral contraceptives (n = 21), 89 and 72 nM, respectively (p = 0.02). In conclusion, our results suggest that the overall influence on the CYP3A activity by 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 is of marginal importance. PMID:24655660

  15. Informativeness of microsatellite markers.

    PubMed

    Reyes-Valdés, M Humberto

    2013-01-01

    Simple sequence repeats (SSR) are extensively used as genetic markers for studies of diversity, genetic mapping, and cultivar discrimination. The informativeness of a given SSR locus or a loci group depends on the number of alleles, their frequency distribution, as well as the kind of application. Here I describe several methods for calculating marker informativeness, all of them suitable for SSR polymorphisms, proposed by several authors and synthesized in an Information Theory framework. Additionally, free access software resources are described as well as their application through worked examples. PMID:23546797

  16. Co-infection by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and human T cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1): does immune activation lead to a faster progression to AIDS?

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Recent data have shown that HTLV-1 is prevalent among HIV positive patients in Mozambique, although the impact of HTLV-1 infection on HIV disease progression remains controversial. Our aim was to determine the phenotypic profile of T lymphocytes subsets among Mozambican patients co-infected by HIV and HTLV-1. Methods We enrolled 29 patients co-infected by HTLV-1 and HIV (co-infected), 59 patients mono-infected by HIV (HIV) and 16 healthy controls (HC), respectively. For phenotypic analysis, cells were stained with the following fluorochrome-labeled anti-human monoclonal antibodies CD4-APC, CD8-PerCP, CD25-PE, CD62L-FITC, CD45RA-FITC. CD45RO-PE, CD38-PE; being analysed by four-colour flow cytometry. Results We initially found that CD4+ T cell counts were significantly higher in co-infected, as compared to HIV groups. Moreover, CD4+ T Lymphocytes from co-infected patients presented significantly higher levels of CD45RO and CD25, but lower levels of CD45RA and CD62L, strongly indicating that CD4+ T cells are more activated under HTLV-1 plus HIV co-infection. Conclusion Our data indicate that HTLV-1/HIV co-infected patients progress with higher CD4+ T cell counts and higher levels of activation markers. In this context, it is conceivable that in co-infected individuals, these higher levels of activation may account for a faster progression to AIDS. PMID:20028500

  17. Update of fecal markers of inflammation in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Judd, Thomas A; Day, Andrew S; Lemberg, Daniel A; Turner, Dan; Leach, Steven T

    2011-10-01

    The diagnosis, prognosis, and assessment of disease activity of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) require investigating clinical, radiological, and histological criteria, as well as serum inflammatory markers. However, a range of fecal inflammatory markers now appears to have the potential to greatly assist in these processes. Calprotectin, a prominent neutrophil protein, was identified two decades ago as a potentially revolutionary marker for IBD. Following this discovery, numerous additional markers, including S100A12, lactoferrin, and M2-pyruvate kinase, have also been suggested as novel markers of IBD. In the present study, we provide an up-to-date review of fecal markers of IBD, and further, provide a novel analysis of each of these fecal markers in severe ulcerative colitis and compare their expression pattern in contrast to calprotectin. PMID:21777275

  18. Strategy Markers in Writing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sindermann, Gerda; Horsella, Maria

    1989-01-01

    Part of a research project is presented that aims at identifying the difficulties tertiary level students encounter in reading scientific texts in a foreign language and the strategies they apply to overcome them. Strategy markers are identified and listed, and are then analyzed to interpret the linguistic difficulty and the strategy used.…

  19. The Swift Turbidity Marker

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Omar, Ahmad Fairuz; MatJafri, Mohd Zubir

    2011-01-01

    The Swift Turbidity Marker is an optical instrument developed to measure the level of water turbidity. The components and configuration selected for the system are based on common turbidity meter design concepts but use a simplified methodology to produce rapid turbidity measurements. This work is aimed at high school physics students and is the…

  20. Beneficial effects of cocoa on lipid peroxidation and inflammatory markers in type 2 diabetic patients and investigation of probable interactions of cocoa active ingredients with prostaglandin synthase-2 (PTGS-2/COX-2) using virtual analysis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    of Cocoa on the lipid peroxidation prevention and inflammatory markers in type 2 diabetic patients. Cocoa ingredients block the Cox-2 activation and reduce inflammatory prostanoids synthesis according to virtual analysis. PMID:24495354

  1. Akt activation is a common event in pediatric malignant gliomas and a potential adverse prognostic marker: a report from the children’s oncology group

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, Ronald L.; Murdoch, Geoffrey H.; Burger, Peter C.; Brat, Daniel J.; Rosenblum, Marc K.; Nikiforova, Marina N.; Holmes, Emiko J.; Zhou, Tianni; Cohen, Kenneth J.; Jakacki, Regina I.

    2010-01-01

    Aberrant activation of Akt is a common finding in adult malignant gliomas, resulting in most cases from mutations or deletions involving PTEN, which allows constitutive Akt phosphorylation. In contrast, we have previously reported that pediatric malignant gliomas, which are morphologically similar to lesions arising in adults, have a substantially lower incidence of genomic alterations of PTEN. The objective of this study was to determine whether Akt activation was also an uncommon finding in childhood malignant gliomas and whether this feature was associated with survival. To address this issue, we examined the frequency of Akt activation, determined by overexpression of the activated phosphorylated form of Akt (Se473) on immunohistochemical analysis, in a series of 53 childhood malignant gliomas obtained from newly diagnosed patients treated on the Children’s Oncology Group ACNS0126 and 0423 studies. The relationship between Akt activation and p53 over-expression, MIB1 labeling, and tumor histology was evaluated. The association between Akt activation and survival was also assessed. Overexpression of activated Akt was observed in 42 of 53 tumors, far in excess of the frequency of PTEN mutations we have previously observed. There was no association between Akt activation and either histology, p53 overexpression, or MIB1 proliferation indices. Although tumors that lacked Akt overexpression had a trend toward more favorable event-free survival and overall survival (p = 0.06), this association reflected that non-overexpressing tumors were significantly more likely to have undergone extensive tumor removal, which was independently associated with outcome. Activation of Akt is a common finding in pediatric malignant gliomas, although it remains uncertain whether this is an independent adverse prognostic factor. In view of the frequency of Akt activation, the evaluation of molecularly targeted therapies that inhibit this pathway warrants consideration for these tumors

  2. Macrophages at the fetal-maternal interface express markers of alternative activation and are induced by M-CSF and IL-10.

    PubMed

    Svensson, Judit; Jenmalm, Maria C; Matussek, Andreas; Geffers, Robert; Berg, Göran; Ernerudh, Jan

    2011-10-01

    During pregnancy, the maternal immune system is challenged by the presence of the fetus, which must be tolerated despite being semiallogeneic. Uterine mucosal (or decidual) macrophages (M), one of the major leukocyte populations at the fetal-maternal interface, have been implicated in fetal tolerance, but information regarding their regulation is scarce. In this study, we investigated the role of several factors potentially involved in the differentiation and polarization of decidual M with an in vitro M differentiation model. By using flow cytometry, we showed that M-CSF and IL-10 were potent inducers of M2 (immunoregulatory) M markers expressed on human decidual M (CD14, CD163, CD206, CD209). In contrast, proinflammatory stimuli, and unexpectedly also the Th2-associated IL-4 and IL-13, induced different patterns of expression, indicating that a Th2-dominated environment is not required for decidual M polarization. M-CSF/IL-10-stimulated and decidual M also showed similar cytokine secretion patterns, with production of IL-10 as well as IL-6, TNF, and CCL4. Conversely, the proinflammatory, LPS/IFN-γ-stimulated M produced significantly higher levels of TNF and no IL-10. We also used a gene array with 420 M-related genes, of which 100 were previously reported to be regulated in a global gene expression profiling of decidual M, confirming that M-CSF/IL-10-induced M are closely related to decidual M. Taken together, our results consistently point to a central role for M-CSF and in particular IL-10 in the shaping of decidual M with regulatory properties. These cytokines may therefore play an important role in supporting the homeostatic and tolerant immune milieu required for a successful pregnancy. PMID:21890660

  3. Hes1 triggers epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT)-like cellular marker alterations and promotes invasion and metastasis of nasopharyngeal carcinoma by activating the PTEN/AKT pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sheng-Chun; Lin, Xiao-Lin; Wang, Hui-Yan; Qin, Yu-Juan; Chen, Lin; Li, Jing; Jia, Jun-Shuang; Shen, Hong-Fen; Yang, Sheng; Xie, Rao-Ying; Wei, Fang; Gao, Fei; Rong, Xiao-Xiang; Yang, Jie; Zhao, Wen-Tao; Zhang, Ting-Ting; Shi, Jun-Wen; Yao, Kai-Tai; Luo, Wei-Ren; Sun, Yan; Xiao, Dong

    2015-11-01

    Overexpression of the transcriptional factor Hes1 (hairy and enhancer of split-1) has been observed in numerous cancers, but the precise roles of Hes1 in epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), cancer invasion and metastasis remain unknown. Our current study firstly revealed that Hes1 upregulation in a cohort of human nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) biopsies is significantly associated with the EMT, invasive and metastatic phenotypes of cancer. In the present study, we found that Hes1 overexpression triggered EMT-like cellular marker alterations of NPC cells, whereas knockdown of Hes1 through shRNA reversed the EMT-like phenotypes, as strongly supported by Hes1-mediated EMT in NPC clinical specimens described above. Gain-of-function and loss-of-function experiments demonstrated that Hes1 promoted the migration and invasion of NPC cells in vitro. In addition, exogenous expression of Hes1 significantly enhanced the metastatic ability of NPC cells in vivo. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays showed that Hes1 inhibited PTEN expression in NPC cells through binding to PTEN promoter region. Increased Hes1 expression and decreased PTEN expression were also observed in a cohort of NPC biopsies. Additional studies demonstrated that Hes1-induced EMT-like molecular changes and increased motility and invasion of NPC cells were mediated by PTEN. Taken together, our results suggest, for what we believe is the first time, that Hes1 plays an important role in the invasion and metastasis of NPC through inhibiting PTEN expression to trigger EMT-like phenotypes. PMID:26452025

  4. Hes1 triggers epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT)-like cellular marker alterations and promotes invasion and metastasis of nasopharyngeal carcinoma by activating the PTEN/AKT pathway

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Yu-Juan; Chen, Lin; Li, Jing; Jia, Jun-Shuang; Shen, Hong-Fen; Yang, Sheng; Xie, Rao-Ying; Wei, Fang; Gao, Fei; Rong, Xiao-Xiang; Yang, Jie; Zhao, Wen-Tao; Zhang, Ting-Ting; Shi, Jun-Wen; Yao, Kai-Tai; Luo, Wei-Ren; Sun, Yan; Xiao, Dong

    2015-01-01

    Overexpression of the transcriptional factor Hes1 (hairy and enhancer of split-1) has been observed in numerous cancers, but the precise roles of Hes1 in epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), cancer invasion and metastasis remain unknown. Our current study firstly revealed that Hes1 upregulation in a cohort of human nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) biopsies is significantly associated with the EMT, invasive and metastatic phenotypes of cancer. In the present study, we found that Hes1 overexpression triggered EMT-like cellular marker alterations of NPC cells, whereas knockdown of Hes1 through shRNA reversed the EMT-like phenotypes, as strongly supported by Hes1-mediated EMT in NPC clinical specimens described above. Gain-of-function and loss-of-function experiments demonstrated that Hes1 promoted the migration and invasion of NPC cells in vitro. In addition, exogenous expression of Hes1 significantly enhanced the metastatic ability of NPC cells in vivo. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays showed that Hes1 inhibited PTEN expression in NPC cells through binding to PTEN promoter region. Increased Hes1 expression and decreased PTEN expression were also observed in a cohort of NPC biopsies. Additional studies demonstrated that Hes1-induced EMT-like molecular changes and increased motility and invasion of NPC cells were mediated by PTEN. Taken together, our results suggest, for what we believe is the first time, that Hes1 plays an important role in the invasion and metastasis of NPC through inhibiting PTEN expression to trigger EMT-like phenotypes. PMID:26452025

  5. Markers predicting progression of human immunodeficiency virus-related disease.

    PubMed Central

    Tsoukas, C M; Bernard, N F

    1994-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) interacts with the immune system throughout the course of infection. For most of the disease process, HIV activates the immune system, and the degree of activation can be assessed by measuring serum levels of molecules such as beta 2-microglobulin and neopterin, as well as other serum and cell surface phenotype markers. The levels of some of these markers correlate with clinical progression of HIV disease, and these markers may be useful as surrogate markers for development of clinical AIDS. Because the likelihood and timing of development of clinical AIDS following seroconversion, for any particular individual, are not readily predictable, the use of nonclinical disease markers has become critically important to patient management. Surrogate markers of HIV infection are, by definition, measurable traits that correlate with disease progression. An ideal marker should identify patients at highest risk of disease progression, provide information on how long an individual has been infected, help in staging HIV disease, predict development of opportunistic infections associated with AIDS, monitor the therapeutic efficacy of immunomodulating or antiviral treatments, and the easily quantifiable, reliable, clinically available, and affordable. This review examines the current state of knowledge and the role of surrogate markers in the natural history and treatment of HIV infection. The clinical usefulness of each marker is assessed with respect to the criteria outlined for the ideal surrogate marker for HIV disease progression. PMID:8118788

  6. Exploring Behavioral Markers of Long-term Physical Activity Maintenance: A Case Study of System Identification Modeling within a Behavioral Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Hekler, Eric B.; Buman, Matthew P.; Poothakandiyil, Nikhil; Rivera, Daniel E.; Dzierzewski, Joseph M.; Morgan, Adrienne Aiken; McCrae, Christina S.; Roberts, Beverly L.; Marsiske, Michael; Giacobbi, Peter R.

    2013-01-01

    Efficacious interventions to promote long-term maintenance of physical activity are not well understood. Engineers have developed methods to create dynamical system models for modeling idiographic (i.e., within-person) relationships within systems. In behavioral research, dynamical systems modeling may assist in decomposing intervention effects and identifying key behavioral patterns that may foster behavioral maintenance. The Active Adult Mentoring Program (AAMP) was a 16-week randomized controlled trial of a group-based, peer-delivered physical activity intervention targeting older adults. Time intensive (i.e., daily) physical activity reports were collected throughout the intervention. We explored differential patterns of behavior among participants who received the active intervention (N=34; 88% women, 64.1±8.3 years of age) and either maintained 150 minutes/week of moderate to vigorous intensity physical activity (MVPA; n=10) or did not (n=24) at 18 months following the intervention period. We used dynamical systems modeling to explore whether key intervention components (i.e., self-monitoring, access to an exercise facility, behavioral initiation training, behavioral maintenance training) and theoretically plausible behavioral covariates (i.e., indoor vs. outdoor activity) predicted differential patterns of behavior among maintainers and non-maintainers. We found that maintainers took longer to reach a steady-state of MVPA. At week 10 of the intervention, non-maintainers began to drop whereas maintainers increased MVPA. Self-monitoring, behavioral initiation training, % outdoor activity, and behavioral maintenance training, but not access to an exercise facility, were key variables that explained patterns of change among maintainers. Future studies should be conducted to systematically explore these concepts within a priori idiographic (i.e., N-of-1) experimental designs. PMID:24084400

  7. Exploring behavioral markers of long-term physical activity maintenance: a case study of system identification modeling within a behavioral intervention.

    PubMed

    Hekler, Eric B; Buman, Matthew P; Poothakandiyil, Nikhil; Rivera, Daniel E; Dzierzewski, Joseph M; Morgan, Adrienne Aiken; McCrae, Christina S; Roberts, Beverly L; Marsiske, Michael; Giacobbi, Peter R

    2013-10-01

    Efficacious interventions to promote long-term maintenance of physical activity are not well understood. Engineers have developed methods to create dynamical system models for modeling idiographic (i.e., within-person) relationships within systems. In behavioral research, dynamical systems modeling may assist in decomposing intervention effects and identifying key behavioral patterns that may foster behavioral maintenance. The Active Adult Mentoring Program was a 16-week randomized controlled trial of a group-based, peer-delivered physical activity intervention targeting older adults. Time-intensive (i.e., daily) physical activity reports were collected throughout the intervention. We explored differential patterns of behavior among participants who received the active intervention (N = 34; 88% women, 64.1 ± 8.3 years of age) and either maintained 150 minutes/week of moderate to vigorous intensity physical activity (MVPA; n = 10) or did not (n = 24) at 18 months following the intervention period. We used dynamical systems modeling to explore whether key intervention components (i.e., self-monitoring, access to an exercise facility, behavioral initiation training, behavioral maintenance training) and theoretically plausible behavioral covariates (i.e., indoor vs. outdoor activity) predicted differential patterns of behavior among maintainers and nonmaintainers. We found that maintainers took longer to reach a steady-state of MVPA. At week 10 of the intervention, nonmaintainers began to drop whereas maintainers increased MVPA. Self-monitoring, behavioral initiation training, percentage of outdoor activity, and behavioral maintenance training, but not access to an exercise facility, were key variables that explained patterns of change among maintainers. Future studies should be conducted to systematically explore these concepts within a priori idiographic (i.e., N-of-1) experimental designs. PMID:24084400

  8. Lack of correlation between phenotype activation markers of CD8 lymphocytes and cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) function in HIV-1 infection: evidence for rescue with rIL-2.

    PubMed

    Chia, W K; Nisbet-Brown, E; Li, X; Salit, I; Joshi, S; Read, S E

    1994-01-01

    CTL activity against HIV-1 antigens expressed on HLA-A-matched EBV-transformed B target cells was detected in 33% (6/18) of freshly isolated PBMC (FPBMC) from patients in the early stages of HIV-1 infection (CDCII). No CTL activity was detected in FPMBC in patients with AIDS (CDCIV). However, the presence of CTL activity did not correlate with the expression of CTL activation markers. A dual-color flow cytometric examination revealed that the CD8+ lymphocytes bearing the memory (CD29) and activation (S6F1) surface molecules increased in number as the HIV-1 infection progressed. This functional and phenotypic discrepancy in memory CD8+ lymphocytes suggests that the memory CD8+ lymphocytes have lost cytotoxic function and become "paralyzed" as the HIV disease progresses. Incubation of PBMC of HIV(+) patients with rIL-2 reactivated predominantly HIV-specific CTL. However, rIL-2 stimulation also activated a "polyclonal or polyreactive" cytotoxic function. The reactivation of CTL function is rIL-2 dosage dependent and the amount of rIL-2 required for reactivation is associated with the severity of the disease. HIV antigen specific CTL in HIV(+) patients can be selectively expanded by HIV antigen stimulation in the presence of rIL-2. These results suggest that the in vivo IL-2 deficiency occurring in HIV-1 infection may be responsible in part for the "paralysis" of HIV specific CTL activity. Such activity can be rescued nonspecifically by exogenous rIL-2 stimulation and expanded specifically by HIV-1 antigen stimulation. PMID:7848511

  9. Xanthine Oxidase Activity Is Associated with Risk Factors for Cardiovascular Disease and Inflammatory and Oxidative Status Markers in Metabolic Syndrome: Effects of a Single Exercise Session

    PubMed Central

    Feoli, Ana Maria Pandolfo; Macagnan, Fabrício Edler; Piovesan, Carla Haas; Bodanese, Luiz Carlos; Siqueira, Ionara Rodrigues

    2014-01-01

    Objective. The main goal of the present study was to investigate the xanthine oxidase (XO) activity in metabolic syndrome in subjects submitted to a single exercise session. We also investigated parameters of oxidative and inflammatory status. Materials/Methods. A case-control study (9 healthy and 8 MS volunteers) was performed to measure XO, superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase activities, lipid peroxidation, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) content, glucose levels, and lipid profile. Body mass indices, abdominal circumference, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, and TG levels were also determined. The exercise session consisted of 3 minutes of stretching, 3 minutes of warm-up, 30 minutes at a constant dynamic workload at a moderate intensity, and 3 minutes at a low speed. The blood samples were collected before and 15 minutes after the exercise session. Results. Serum XO activity was higher in MS group compared to control group. SOD activity was lower in MS subjects. XO activity was correlated with SOD, abdominal circumference, body mass indices, and hsCRP. The single exercise session reduced the SOD activity in the control group. Conclusions. Our data support the association between oxidative stress and risk factors for cardiovascular diseases and suggest XO is present in the pathogenesis of metabolic syndrome. PMID:24967004

  10. Lipoprotein marker for hypertriglyceridemia

    DOEpatents

    Cubicciotti, Roger S.; Karu, Alexander E.; Krauss, Ronald M.

    1986-01-01

    Methods and compositions are provided for the detection of a particular low density lipoprotein which has been found to be a marker for patients suffering from type IV hypertriglyceridemia. A monoclonal antibody capable of specifically binding to a characteristic epitopic site on this LDL subspecies can be utilized in a wide variety of immunoassays. Hybridoma cell line SPL.IVA5A1 was deposited at the American Type Culture Collection on Mar. 29, 1984, and granted accession no. HB 8535.

  11. Navigated marker placement for motion compensation in radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winterstein, A.; März, K.; Franz, A. M.; Hafezi, M.; Fard, N.; Sterzing, F.; Mehrabi, A.; Maier-Hein, L.

    2015-03-01

    Radiotherapy is frequently used to treat unoperated or partially resected tumors. Tumor movement, e.g. caused by respiration, is a major challenge in this context. Markers can be implanted around the tumor prior to radiation therapy for accurate tracking of tumor movement. However, accurate placement of these markers while keeping a secure margin around the target and while taking into account critical structures is a difficult task. Computer-assisted needle insertion has been an active field of research in the past decades. However, the challenge of navigated marker placement for motion compensated radiotherapy has not yet been addressed. This work presents a system to support marker implantation for radiotherapy under consideration of safety margins and optimal marker configuration. It is designed to allow placement of markers both percutaneously and during an open liver surgery. To this end, we adapted the previously proposed EchoTrack system which integrates ultrasound (US) imaging and electromagnetic (EM) tracking in a single mobile modality. The potential of our new marker insertion concept was evaluated in a phantom study by inserting sets of three markers around dedicated targets (n=22) simultaneously spacing the markers evenly around the target as well as placing the markers in a defined distance to the target. In all cases the markers were successfully placed in a configuration fulfilling the predefined criteria. This includes a minimum distance of 18.9 ± 2.4 mm between marker and tumor as well as a divergence of 2.1 ± 1.5 mm from the planned marker positions. We conclude that our system has high potential to facilitate the placement of markers in suitable configurations for surgeons without extensive experience in needle punctions as high quality configurations were obtained even by medical non-experts.

  12. Exploring Behavioral Markers of Long-Term Physical Activity Maintenance: A Case Study of System Identification Modeling within a Behavioral Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hekler, Eric B.; Buman, Matthew P.; Poothakandiyil, Nikhil; Rivera, Daniel E.; Dzierzewski, Joseph M.; Aiken Morgan, Adrienne; McCrae, Christina S.; Roberts, Beverly L.; Marsiske, Michael; Giacobbi, Peter R., Jr.

    2013-01-01

    Efficacious interventions to promote long-term maintenance of physical activity are not well understood. Engineers have developed methods to create dynamical system models for modeling idiographic (i.e., within-person) relationships within systems. In behavioral research, dynamical systems modeling may assist in decomposing intervention effects…

  13. 7-Hydroxycoumarin prevents UVB-induced activation of NF-κB and subsequent overexpression of matrix metalloproteinases and inflammatory markers in human dermal fibroblast cells.

    PubMed

    Karthikeyan, Ramasamy; Kanimozhi, Govindasamy; Prasad, Nagarajan Rajendra; Agilan, Balupillai; Ganesan, Muthusamy; Mohana, Shanmugham; Srithar, Gunaseelan

    2016-08-01

    Ultraviolet B (UVB) irradiation alters multiple molecular pathways in the skin, thereby inducing skin damage. Human dermal fibroblasts (HDFa) were subjected to single UVB-irradiation (18mJ/cm(2)) resulting in reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, oxidative DNA damage and upregulation of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) expression. Further, it has been observed that there was a significant cytokine production (TNF-α and IL-6) in UVB irradiated HDFa cells. Our results show that 7-hydroxycoumarin (7-OHC) prevents UVB-induced activation of NF-κB thereby subsequently preventing the overexpression of TNF-α and IL-6 in HDFa cells. Further, 7-OHC prevents UVB-induced activation of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression, an inflammatory mediator in skin cells. Moreover, 7-OHC inhibited mRNA expression pattern of matrix metalloproteinases (MMP-1 and MMP-9) in UVB irradiated skin cells. Furthermore, 7-OHC restored antioxidant status, thereby scavenging the excessively generated ROS; consequently preventing the oxidative DNA damage. It has also been noticed that 7-OHC prevents UVB mediated DNA damage through activation of DNA repair enzymes such as XRCC1 and HOGG1. In this study, we treated HDFa cells with 7-OHC before and after UVB irradiation and we found that pretreatment showed better results when compared to posttreatment. Further, 7-OHC showed 9.8416 sun protection factor (SPF) value and it absorbs photons in the UVB wavelength rage. Thus, it has been concluded that sunscreen property, free radical scavenging potential and prevention of NF-κB activation play a role for photoprotective property of 7-OHC. PMID:27240190

  14. Extracellular Superoxide Dismutase Activity and Plasma Malondialdehyde in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Subjects of Kano State as Surrogate Markers of CD4 Status

    PubMed Central

    Gwarzo, Muhammad Yalwa; Muhammad, Surajo Al-Kassim

    2010-01-01

    This study looked at the profile of plasma extracellular superoxide dismutase (SOD3) activity, malondialdehyde (MDA) vis-à-vis that of CD4 counts in human immunodeficiency virus subjects in Kano State, Nigeria. The subjects for this study comprised twenty (20) non-HIV infected volunteers as control and one hundred (100) HIV infected subjects. Forty nine (49) infected patients have not been on treatment, while fifty one (51) were at various stages of treatment. There was a negative correlation between the serum malondialdehyde concentration and CD4 count (Pearson r=−0.68, p<0.01). There was also a negative correlation between serum malondialdehyde concentration and extracellular superoxide dismutase activity ((Pearson r=−0.71, p<0.01) and Vitamin A concentration (Pearson r=−0.75; p<0.01). Conversely a positive correlation was observed between the CD4 counts in HIV infected patients and activity of extracellular superoxide dismutase (Pearson r=0.86, p<0.01). Similarly there was a positive correlation between CD4 count and serum vitamin A concentration (Pearson r=0.89 p<0.01). The possibility remains for using these indicators to monitor HIV patients not eligible for therapy in resource constrained facilities of our rural areas. PMID:23675205

  15. Restriction on an Energy-Dense Diet Improves Markers of Metabolic Health and Cellular Aging in Mice Through Decreasing Hepatic mTOR Activity

    PubMed Central

    Schloesser, Anke; Campbell, Graeme; Glüer, Claus-Christian; Rimbach, Gerald

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Dietary restriction (DR) on a normal low-fat diet improves metabolic health and may prolong life span. However, it is still uncertain whether restriction of an energy-dense, high-fat diet would also be beneficial and mitigate age-related processes. In the present study, we determined biomarkers of metabolic health, energy metabolism, and cellular aging in obesity-prone mice subjected to 30% DR on a high-fat diet for 6 months. Dietary-restricted mice had significantly lower body weights, less adipose tissue, lower energy expenditure, and altered substrate oxidation compared to their ad libitum–fed counterparts. Hepatic major urinary proteins (Mup) expression, which is linked to glucose and energy metabolism, and biomarkers of metabolic health, including insulin, glucose, cholesterol, and leptin/adiponectin ratio, were likewise reduced in high-fat, dietary-restricted mice. Hallmarks of cellular senescence such as Lamp2a and Hsc70 that mediate chaperone-mediated autophagy were induced and mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling mitigated upon high-fat DR. In contrast to DR applied in low-fat diets, anti-oxidant gene expression, proteasome activity, as well as 5′-adenosine monophosphate–activated protein kinase (AMPK) activation were not changed, suggesting that high-fat DR may attenuate some processes associated with cellular aging without the induction of cellular stress response or energy deprivation. PMID:25405871

  16. NQO1-induced activation of AMPK contributes to cancer cell death by oxygen-glucose deprivation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyemi; Oh, Eun-Taex; Choi, Bo-Hwa; Park, Moon-Taek; Lee, Ja-Kyeong; Lee, Jae-Seon; Park, Heon Joo

    2015-01-01

    Oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD) due to insufficient blood circulation can decrease cancer cell survival and proliferation in solid tumors. OGD increases the intracellular [AMP]/[ATP] ratio, thereby activating the AMPK. In this study, we have investigated the involvement of NQO1 in OGD-mediated AMPK activation and cancer cell death. We found that OGD activates AMPK in an NQO1-dependent manner, suppressing the mTOR/S6K/4E-BP1 pathway, which is known to control cell survival. Thus, the depletion of NQO1 prevents AMPK-induced cancer cell death in OGD. When we blocked OGD-induced Ca2+/CaMKII signaling, the NQO1-induced activation of AMPK was attenuated. In addition, when we blocked the RyR signaling, the accumulation of intracellular Ca2+ and subsequent activation of CaMKII/AMPK signaling was decreased in NQO1-expressing cells under OGD. Finally, siRNA-mediated knockdown of CD38 abrogated the OGD-induced activation of Ca2+/CaMKII/AMPK signaling. Taken together, we conclude that NQO1 plays a key role in the AMPK-induced cancer cell death in OGD through the CD38/cADPR/RyR/Ca2+/CaMKII signaling pathway. PMID:25586669

  17. Metabolic markers in sports medicine.

    PubMed

    Banfi, Giuseppe; Colombini, Alessandra; Lombardi, Giovanni; Lubkowska, Anna

    2012-01-01

    be interpreted considering the athlete's body-mass index (BMI) and phase of the competitive season; use of cystatin C could be a reliable alternative to creatinine. Exercise and training induce adaptations in glucose metabolism which improve glucose utilization in athletes and are beneficial for reducing insulin insensitivity in nonathletes. Glucose metabolism differs slightly for different sports disciplines, as revealed in laboratory levels. Sport activities induce a blood lipid profile superior to that of sedentary subjects. There are few reports for a definitive conclusion, however. The differences between athletes and sedentary subjects are mainly due to high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDLC) concentrations in physically active individuals, although some differences among sport disciplines exist. The effect of sports on serum and urinary markers for bone metabolism is not univocal; further studies are needed to establish the real and effective influence of sport on bone turnover and especially to establish its beneficial effect. PMID:22397027

  18. The non-invasive 13C-methionine breath test detects hepatic mitochondrial dysfunction as a marker of disease activity in non-alcoholic steatohepatitis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Mitochondrial dysfunction plays a central role in the general pathogenesis of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), increasing the risk of developing steatosis and subsequent hepatocellular inflammation. We aimed to assess hepatic mitochondrial function by a non-invasive 13C-methionine breath test (MeBT) in patients with histologically proven NAFLD. Methods 118 NAFLD-patients and 18 healthy controls were examined by MeBT. Liver biopsy specimens were evaluated according to the NASH scoring system. Results Higher grades of NASH activity and fibrosis were independently associated with a significant decrease in cumulative 13C-exhalation (expressed as cPDR(%)). cPDR1.5h was markedly declined in patients with NASH and NASH cirrhosis compared to patients with simple steatosis or borderline diagnosis (cPDR1.5h: 3.24 ± 1.12% and 1.32 ± 0.94% vs. 6.36 ± 0.56% and 4.80 ± 0.88% respectively; p < 0.001). 13C-exhalation further declined in the presence of advanced fibrosis which was correlated with NASH activity (r = 0.36). The area under the ROC curve (AUROC) for NASH diagnosis was estimated to be 0.87 in the total cohort and 0.83 in patients with no or mild fibrosis (F0-1). Conclusion The 13C-methionine breath test indicates mitochondrial dysfunction in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and predicts higher stages of disease activity. It may, therefore, be a valuable diagnostic addition for longitudinal monitoring of hepatic (mitochondrial) function in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. PMID:21810560

  19. In Vitro Antioxidant, Antibacterial, and Cytotoxic Activity and In Vivo Effect of Syngonium podophyllum and Eichhornia crassipes Leaf Extracts on Isoniazid Induced Oxidative Stress and Hepatic Markers

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Shashank; Pandey, Abhay K.

    2014-01-01

    The present study reports the in vitro antioxidant, antibacterial, and cytotoxic potential of Syngonium podophyllum (SP) and Eichhornia crassipes (EC) leaf aqueous extracts as well as their in vivo effect on oxidative stress and hepatic biomarkers in isoniazid induced rats. Phytochemical screening of extracts revealed the presence of flavonoids, terpenoids, reducing sugars, alkaloids, and saponins. Phenolic content in SP and EC extracts was 5.36 ± 0.32 and 10.63 ± 0.13 mg PGE/g, respectively, while flavonoid content was 1.26 ± 0.03 and 0.51 ± 0.03 μg QE/mg, respectively. EC extract exhibited comparatively better antioxidant activity as indicated by reducing power (0.197–0.775), DPPH radical scavenging potential (11%–96%), and metal ion chelating ability (42%–93%). Both the extracts provided 13%–65% protection against lipid peroxidation in rat tissue (liver, kidney, and brain) homogenate. SP and EC extracts exhibited 51% and 43% cytotoxicity against lung cancer (NCI-H322) cell line, respectively. Both extracts demonstrated considerable antibacterial activity against Proteus vulgaris, Salmonella typhi, and Bordetella bronchiseptica. Coadministration of E. crassipes extract with isoniazid in rats accounted for 46% decrease in malondialdehyde content and 21% increase in FRAP value of plasma. It also mitigated the isoniazid induced alterations in serum enzymes (SGOT, SGPT, and ALP), total bilirubin, creatinine, and hemoglobin contents. S. podophyllum extract was found to be hepatotoxic. PMID:25162013

  20. Absence of effects of different types of detergents on the cholinesterasic activity and histological markers of mosquitofish (Gambusia holbrooki) after a sub-lethal chronic exposure.

    PubMed

    Nunes, B; Miranda, M T; Correia, A T

    2016-08-01

    The release of anthropogenic compounds into the aquatic environment has been a particular concern, since some of these substances exhibit biologic activity of different types in non-target species. Among anthropogenic compounds present in the aquatic compartment, detergents are commonly found and may be responsible for physiological modifications in exposed organisms. The impairment of key physiological functions, such as neurotransmission, and tissue damage in some important organs, has been used to assess the effects of several classes of xenobiotics, including detergents, in aquatic organisms. The present study intended to assess the effect of three types of detersive compounds (sodium dodecylsulfate (SDS), benzalkonium chloride (BZC), and Triton X-100 (TX100)) in the acetylcholinesterase activity (AChE) and tissue damage (gills and liver) of Gambusia holbrooki after a chronic exposure to realistic levels of these compounds. SDS, BZC, and TX100 did not cause any significant alteration in AChE. Furthermore, no specific gross morphological changes were also observed in the gills and liver of the exposed individuals. It is possible to conclude that, under ecologically relevant conditions of exposure, both tissue damage and cholinesterasic impairment are not toxicological pathways affected by detergents in G. holbrooki. PMID:27074930

  1. Expression of Molecular Markers of Angiogenesis, Lymphangiogenesis, and Proliferation Depending on the Stage of Skin Melanoma.

    PubMed

    Bgatova, N P; Lomakin, A I; Fursov, S A; Kachesov, I V; Chepko, S A; Isakova, N B; Borodin, Yu I; Voytsitsky, V E; Konenkov, V I

    2016-08-01

    The expression of molecular markers characterizing activity of the tumor process and metastases (proliferation marker Ki-67, angiogenesis marker CD34, and lymphangiogenesis markers podoplanin and LYVE-1) was assessed by immunohictochemical method in the primary tumor specimens collected during surgery for cutaneous melanoma (40 patients). Proliferative activity of the tumor tissue and volume density of peritumoral blood and lymph vessels increased with increasing tumor malignancy, which could indicate the risk of metastases. PMID:27590758

  2. Higher Levels of Osteoprotegerin and Immune Activation/Immunosenescence Markers Are Correlated with Concomitant Bone and Endovascular Damage in HIV-Suppressed Patients

    PubMed Central

    D’Abramo, Alessandra; Zingaropoli, Maria Antonella; Oliva, Alessandra; D’Agostino, Claudia; Al Moghazi, Samir; De Luca, Giulia; Iannetta, Marco; d’Ettorre, Gabriella; Ciardi, Maria Rosa; Mastroianni, Claudio Maria; Vullo, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    HIV-infected patients appear to have a significantly greater risk of non-AIDS comorbidities such as osteoporosis and atherosclerosis. Subjects with osteoporosis are at a higher risk of developing cardiovascular disease than those with normal bone mass, therefore a possible relation between these two conditions can be hypothesized. In the setting of HIV infection, several factors might contribute to bone disease and endothelial dysfunction. The aim of our study was to evaluate the relationship between bone and cardiovascular disease and to investigate the role of traditional factors, T-cell phenotype and osteoprotegerin in HIV positive subjects on effective antiretroviral therapy. We included 94 HIV positive subjects on antiretroviral therapy with virological suppression and 41 healthy subjects matched for age and gender as a control group. Carotid-Intima Media Thickness (c-IMT) and bone mineral density (BMD) were performed by ultrasound and DEXA, respectively. CD4+/CD8+ T-cell activation, senescence and osteoprotegerin plasma levels were measured by flow-cytometry and ELISA, respectively. Among HIV positive patients, 56.4% had osteopenia/osteoporosis and 45.7% had pathological c-IMT (>0.9mm). Subjects with pathological c-IMT and BMD exhibited higher CD4+ and CD8+ activated, CD8+ senescent and osteoprotegerin than subjects with normal c-IMT and BMD. HIV positive subjects with osteopenia/osteoporosis had higher c-IMT than subjects with normal BMD, and linear regression analysis showed a negative correlation between BMD and c-IMT. Several factors are implicated in the pathogenesis of non-AIDS comorbidities in HIV positive patients. Osteoprotegerin together with inflammation and immunosenescence in HIV positive patients could affect bone and vascular system and could be considered as a possible common link between these two diseases. PMID:26913505

  3. Higher Levels of Osteoprotegerin and Immune Activation/Immunosenescence Markers Are Correlated with Concomitant Bone and Endovascular Damage in HIV-Suppressed Patients.

    PubMed

    D'Abramo, Alessandra; Zingaropoli, Maria Antonella; Oliva, Alessandra; D'Agostino, Claudia; Al Moghazi, Samir; De Luca, Giulia; Iannetta, Marco; d'Ettorre, Gabriella; Ciardi, Maria Rosa; Mastroianni, Claudio Maria; Vullo, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    HIV-infected patients appear to have a significantly greater risk of non-AIDS comorbidities such as osteoporosis and atherosclerosis. Subjects with osteoporosis are at a higher risk of developing cardiovascular disease than those with normal bone mass, therefore a possible relation between these two conditions can be hypothesized. In the setting of HIV infection, several factors might contribute to bone disease and endothelial dysfunction. The aim of our study was to evaluate the relationship between bone and cardiovascular disease and to investigate the role of traditional factors, T-cell phenotype and osteoprotegerin in HIV positive subjects on effective antiretroviral therapy. We included 94 HIV positive subjects on antiretroviral therapy with virological suppression and 41 healthy subjects matched for age and gender as a control group. Carotid-Intima Media Thickness (c-IMT) and bone mineral density (BMD) were performed by ultrasound and DEXA, respectively. CD4+/CD8+ T-cell activation, senescence and osteoprotegerin plasma levels were measured by flow-cytometry and ELISA, respectively. Among HIV positive patients, 56.4% had osteopenia/osteoporosis and 45.7% had pathological c-IMT (>0.9 mm). Subjects with pathological c-IMT and BMD exhibited higher CD4+ and CD8+ activated, CD8+ senescent and osteoprotegerin than subjects with normal c-IMT and BMD. HIV positive subjects with osteopenia/osteoporosis had higher c-IMT than subjects with normal BMD, and linear regression analysis showed a negative correlation between BMD and c-IMT. Several factors are implicated in the pathogenesis of non-AIDS comorbidities in HIV positive patients. Osteoprotegerin together with inflammation and immunosenescence in HIV positive patients could affect bone and vascular system and could be considered as a possible common link between these two diseases. PMID:26913505

  4. Application of ADA1 as a new marker enzyme in sandwich ELISA to study the effect of adenosine on activated monocytes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chengqian; Skaldin, Maksym; Wu, Chengxiang; Lu, Yuanan; Zavialov, Andrey V

    2016-01-01

    Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) is a valuable technique to detect antigens in biological fluids. Horse radish peroxidase (HRP) is one of the most common enzymes used for signal amplification in ELISA. Despite new advances in technology, such as a large-scale production of recombinant enzymes and availability of new detection systems, limited research is devoted to finding alternative enzymes and their substrates to amplify the ELISA signals. Here, HRP-avidin was substituted with the human adenosine deaminase (hADA1)-streptavidin complex and adenosine as a detection system in commercial ELISA kits. The hADA1 ELISA was successfully used to demonstrate that adenosine, bound to A1 and A3 adenosine receptors, increases cytokine secretion by LPS activated monocytes. We show that hADA1-based ELISA has the same sensitivity, and also provides identical results, as HRP ELISA. In addition, the sensitivity of hADA1-based ELISA could be easily adjusted by changing the adenosine concentration and the incubation time. Therefore, hADA1 could be used as a detection enzyme with any commercial ELISA kit with a wide range of concentration of antigens. PMID:27510152

  5. Photobiomodulation with 660-nm and 780-nm laser on activated J774 macrophage-like cells: Effect on M1 inflammatory markers.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Kristianne Porta Santos; Souza, Nadhia Helena Costa; Mesquita-Ferrari, Raquel Agnelli; Silva, Daniela de Fatima Teixeira da; Rocha, Lilia Alves; Alves, Agnelo Neves; Sousa, Kaline de Brito; Bussadori, Sandra Kalil; Hamblin, Michael R; Nunes, Fábio Daumas

    2015-12-01

    M1 profile macrophages exert a major influence on initial tissue repair process. Few days after the occurrence of injury, macrophages in the injured region exhibit a M2 profile, attenuate the effects of the M1 population, and stimulate the reconstruction of the damaged tissue. The different effects of macrophages in the healing process suggest that these cells could be the target of therapeutic interventions. Photobiomodulation has been used to accelerate tissue repair, but little is known regarding its effect on macrophages. In the present study, J774 macrophages were activated to simulate the M1 profile and irradiated with two different sets of laser parameters (780 nm, 70 mW, 2.6J/cm(2), 1.5s and 660 nm, 15 mW, 7.5 J/cm(2), 20s). IL-6, TNF-α, iNOS and COX-2 gene and protein expression were analyzed by RT-qPCR and ELISA. Both lasers were able to reduce TNF-α and iNOS expression, and TNF-α and COX-2 production, although the parameters used for 780 nm laser provided an additional decrease. 660 nm laser parameters resulted in an up-regulation of IL-6 expression and production. These findings imply a distinct, time-dependent modulation by the two different sets of laser parameters, suggesting that the best modulation may involve more than one combination of parameters. PMID:26519828

  6. Application of ADA1 as a new marker enzyme in sandwich ELISA to study the effect of adenosine on activated