Science.gov

Sample records for activation motif itam

  1. Viral immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM)-mediated signaling in cell transformation and cancer.

    PubMed

    Lanier, Lewis L

    2006-08-01

    Viruses frequently co-opt host cell pathways to enhance their propagation or to enable latent infection. Certain receptors expressed by hematopoietic cells have immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motifs (ITAMs) in their cytoplasmic domains that initiate cellular activation, proliferation and differentiation. Some viruses have evolved, or acquired from their host, genes that encode ITAM-bearing proteins. These ITAM-bearing viral proteins have been implicated in cellular transformation in virus-infected hematopoietic cells, typically B cells, but also in non-hematopoietic tissues--including endothelial and epithelial cells.

  2. Distinct Pathways Regulate Syk Protein Activation Downstream of Immune Tyrosine Activation Motif (ITAM) and hemITAM Receptors in Platelets*

    PubMed Central

    Manne, Bhanu Kanth; Badolia, Rachit; Dangelmaier, Carol; Eble, Johannes A.; Ellmeier, Wilfried; Kahn, Mark; Kunapuli, Satya P.

    2015-01-01

    Tyrosine kinase pathways are known to play an important role in the activation of platelets. In particular, the GPVI and CLEC-2 receptors are known to activate Syk upon tyrosine phosphorylation of an immune tyrosine activation motif (ITAM) and hemITAM, respectively. However, unlike GPVI, the CLEC-2 receptor contains only one tyrosine motif in the intracellular domain. The mechanisms by which this receptor activates Syk are not completely understood. In this study, we identified a novel signaling mechanism in CLEC-2-mediated Syk activation. CLEC-2-mediated, but not GPVI-mediated, platelet activation and Syk phosphorylation were abolished by inhibition of PI3K, which demonstrates that PI3K regulates Syk downstream of CLEC-2. Ibrutinib, a Tec family kinase inhibitor, also completely abolished CLEC-2-mediated aggregation and Syk phosphorylation in human and murine platelets. Furthermore, embryos lacking both Btk and Tec exhibited cutaneous edema associated with blood-filled vessels in a typical lymphatic pattern similar to CLEC-2 or Syk-deficient embryos. Thus, our data show, for the first time, that PI3K and Tec family kinases play a crucial role in the regulation of platelet activation and Syk phosphorylation downstream of the CLEC-2 receptor. PMID:25767114

  3. Platelet immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM) and hemITAM signaling and vascular integrity in inflammation and development.

    PubMed

    Lee, R H; Bergmeier, W

    2016-04-01

    Platelets are essential for maintaining hemostasis following mechanical injury to the vasculature. Besides this established function, novel roles of platelets are becoming increasingly recognized, which are critical in non-injury settings to maintain vascular barrier integrity. For example, during embryogenesis platelets act to support the proper separation of blood and lymphatic vessels. This role continues beyond birth, where platelets prevent leakage of blood into the lymphatic vessel network. During the course of inflammation, platelets are necessary to prevent local hemorrhage due to neutrophil diapedesis and disruption of endothelial cell-cell junctions. Surprisingly, platelets also work to secure tumor-associated blood vessels, inhibiting excessive vessel permeability and intra-tumor hemorrhaging. Interestingly, many of these novel platelet functions depend on immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM) signaling but not on signaling via G protein-coupled receptors, which plays a crucial role in platelet plug formation at sites of mechanical injury. Murine platelets express two ITAM-containing receptors: the Fc receptor γ-chain (FcRγ), which functionally associates with the collagen receptor GPVI, and the C-type lectin-like 2 (CLEC-2) receptor, a hemITAM receptor for the mucin-type glycoprotein podoplanin. Human platelets express an additional ITAM receptor, FcγRIIA. These receptors share common downstream effectors, including Syk, SLP-76 and PLCγ2. Here we will review the recent literature that highlights a critical role for platelet GPVI/FcRγ and CLEC-2 in vascular integrity during development and inflammation in mice and discuss the relevance to human disease.

  4. Analysis of immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM) binding to ZAP-70 by surface plasmon resonance.

    PubMed

    Vély, F; Nunès, J A; Malissen, B; Hedgecock, C J

    1997-11-01

    The signaling function of the T cell antigen receptor (TCR) is mediated via CD3 polypeptides, the cytoplasmic sequences of which bear conserved immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motifs (ITAM). ITAM are defined by two YxxL/I sequences separated by a six-eight amino acid long spacer. Upon antigen recognition, ITAM become phosphorylated on both tyrosine residues, creating a high affinity binding site for the tandem SH2 domains found in the protein tyrosine kinase ZAP-70. Using surface plasmon resonance, we further dissected the sequences required for the binding of ZAP-70 to each TCR-associated ITAM. First, we generated protein tyrosine phosphatase-resistant ITAM peptide analogs, in which difluorophosphonomethyl phenylalanyl (F2p) replaced both phosphotyrosines, and showed that those protein tyrosine phosphatase-resistant analogs bind ZAP-70 with high affinity, establishing a rational strategy for the design of novel pharmacological tools capable of interfering with TCR signaling function. Second, we substituted the five amino acids separating the two YxxL/I sequences of the CD3 zeta 1 ITAM with a non-peptidic linker made up of gamma-amino butyric acid units and demonstrated that the length of this intervening sequence rather than its chemical composition is essential for high affinity binding of phosphorylated ITAM to the ZAP-70 SH2 domains.

  5. Immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM), a unique module linking antigen and Fc receptors to their signaling cascades.

    PubMed

    Isakov, N

    1997-01-01

    Signal transduction by the T cell and B cell antigen receptors and by receptors for a variety of immunoglobulins' Fc region is strictly dependent on a receptor subunit cytoplasmic module termed immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM). This module exists in one or more copies in each of the receptor-associated signal-transducing molecules and it possesses two repeats of the consensus sequence Tyr-X-X-Leu/Ile spaced by six to eight amino acids. Receptor engagement is followed by a rapid and transient phosphorylation of tyrosine residues within their ITAMs, thereby creating temporary binding sites for Src homology 2 (SH2)-containing signaling molecules operating downstream of the activated receptor. The purpose of this review is to discuss recent findings on the functional role of ITAMs in antigen and Fc receptor-mediated signal transduction, with a particular emphasis on kinases operating upstream and downstream of the ITAMs.

  6. Downstream signaling molecules bind to different phosphorylated immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM) peptides of the high affinity IgE receptor.

    PubMed

    Kimura, T; Kihara, H; Bhattacharyya, S; Sakamoto, H; Appella, E; Siraganian, R P

    1996-11-01

    The cytoplasmic tails of both the beta and gamma subunits of the high affinity IgE receptor (FcepsilonRI) contain a consensus sequence termed the immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM). This motif plays a critical role in receptor-mediated signal transduction. Synthetic peptides based on the ITAM sequences of the beta and gamma subunits of FcepsilonRI were used to investigate which proteins associate with these motifs. Tyrosine-phosphorylated beta and gamma ITAM peptides immobilized on beads precipitated Syk, Lyn, Shc, Grb2, and phospholipase C-gamma1 from lysates of rat basophilic leukemia RBL-2H3 cells. Syk was precipitated predominantly by the tyrosine-diphosphorylated gamma ITAM peptide, but much less by the diphosphorylated beta ITAM peptide or by the monophosphorylated peptides. Phospholipase C-gamma1, Shc, and Grb2 were precipitated only by the diphosphorylated beta ITAM peptide. Non-phosphorylated ITAM peptides did not precipitate these proteins. In membrane binding assays, fusion proteins containing the Src homology 2 domains of phospholipase C-gamma1, Shc, Syk, and Lyn directly bound the tyrosine-phosphorylated ITAM peptides. Although the ITAM sequences of the beta and gamma subunits of FcepsilonRI are similar, once they are tyrosine-phosphorylated they preferentially bind different downstream signaling molecules. Tyrosine phosphorylation of the ITAM of the gamma subunit recruits and activates Syk, whereas the beta subunit may be important for the Ras signaling pathway.

  7. Functional analysis of immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM)-mediated signal transduction: the two YxxL segments within a single CD3zeta-ITAM are functionally distinct.

    PubMed

    Sunder-Plassmann, R; Lialios, F; Madsen, M; Koyasu, S; Reinherz, E L

    1997-08-01

    Functional analysis of the immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM) derived from the membrane-proximal ITAM of CD3zeta demonstrates that mutations at either the tyrosine or leucine residues in the N-terminal YxxL segment of the ITAM abolish all signal transduction functions of this ITAM. In contrast, mutations at the tyrosine or leucine residues in the C-terminal YxxL segment abrogate signals for interleukin (IL)-2 production but do not prevent tyrosine phosphorylation of the N-terminal tyrosine of the ITAM, lck association with the ITAM, activation of phospholipase C-gamma1 or calcium mobilization. Cross-linking of chimeric receptors containing a C-terminal YxxL leucine mutation induces tyrosine phosphorylation of ZAP70 but without stable binding to the phosphorylated ITAM. These results indicate that the two YxxL segments in an ITAM are functionally distinct and that both are essential for ZAP70 binding and IL-2 production. Furthermore, tyrosine phosphorylation of ZAP70 per se is not sufficient to trigger the downstream events leading to IL-2 production. Substitution of an alanine for the bulky side chain at the Y+1 position of the N-terminal YxxL segment reduces the receptor cross-linking requirement necessary to achieve cellular activation and the absolute dependence on lck in this process. Our results reveal that both the number of ITAM as well as the specific amino acid residues within a single ITAM determine the extent of chimeric receptor cross-linking required to trigger tyrosine phosphorylation-dependent signaling events.

  8. Calcineurin/nuclear factors of activated T cells (NFAT)-activating and immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM)-containing protein (CNAIP), a novel ITAM-containing protein that activates the calcineurin/NFAT-signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jianhua; Hu, Guanghui; Wang, Shen-Wu; Li, Yucheng; Martin, Rachel; Li, Kang; Yao, Zhengbin

    2003-05-09

    We report in this study the identification and characterization of a novel protein that we designated as calcineurin/NFAT-activating and immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM)-containing protein (CNAIP). The predicted 270-amino acid sequence contains an N-terminal signal peptide, an immunoglobin domain in the extracellular region, a transmembrane domain and an ITAM in the cytoplasmic tail. Quantitative reverse transcription-PCR showed that CNAIP was preferentially expressed in neutrophils, monocytes, mast cells, and other immune-related cells. Co-transfection of CNAIP expression constructs with luciferase reporter plasmids in HMC-1 cells resulted in activation of interleukin-13 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha promoters, which was mediated through the calcineurin/NFAT-signaling pathway. Mutation of either or both tyrosines in the ITAM abolished transcriptional activation induced by CNAIP, indicating that the ITAM is indispensable for CNAIP function in activating cytokine gene promoters. Thus, it is concluded that CNAIP is a novel ITAM-containing protein that activates the calcineurin/NFAT-signaling pathway and the downstream cytokine gene promoters.

  9. A mechanism of immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM)-like sequences in the capsid protein VP2 in viral growth and pathogenesis of Coxsackievirus B3.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dae-Sun; Park, Jung-Hyun; Kim, Joo-Young; Kim, Dokeun; Nam, Jae-Hwan

    2012-04-01

    Coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3) is an RNA virus that mainly causes myocarditis. We have reported previously that immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM)-like sequences are contained in the capsid protein VP2 of CVB3. The substitution of two tyrosines for phenylalanines in the ITAM-like region causes attenuation of CVB3, possibly via defective viral assembly. In this study, we found that Syk, a downstream molecule of ITAM, interacts with the wild-type (WT) CVB3 VP0 protein, but not with the mutant CVB3 VP0 (called YYFF), and that an inhibitor of Syk reduced the growth of CVB3. The WT CVB3 activated nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), a protein activated by ITAM, and eventually induced the production of interleukin-6 (IL-6)-one of the proinflammatory cytokines induced by NF-κB-in macrophages. However, the YYFF form did not. In addition, viral VP2 protein may be dependent on the phosphorylation of an ITAM-like region that affected the activation of NF-κB. Taken together, these results suggest that the ITAM-like sequences in CVB3 VP2 can not only affect viral structure but also act as signals in pathogenesis.

  10. The Activating C-type Lectin-like Receptor NKp65 Signals through a Hemi-immunoreceptor Tyrosine-based Activation Motif (hemITAM) and Spleen Tyrosine Kinase (Syk).

    PubMed

    Bauer, Björn; Wotapek, Tanja; Zöller, Tobias; Rutkowski, Emilia; Steinle, Alexander

    2017-02-24

    NKp65 is an activating human C-type lectin-like receptor (CTLR) triggering cellular cytotoxicity and cytokine secretion upon high-affinity interaction with the cognate CTLR keratinocyte-associated C-type lectin (KACL) selectively expressed by human keratinocytes. Previously, we demonstrated that NKp65-mediated cellular cytotoxicity depends on tyrosine 7, located in a cytoplasmic sequence motif of NKp65 resembling a hemi-immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (hemITAM). HemITAMs have been reported for a few activating myeloid-specific CTLRs, including Dectin-1 and CLEC-2, and consist of a single tyrosine signaling unit preceded by a triacidic motif. Upon receptor engagement, the hemITAM undergoes phosphotyrosinylation and specifically recruits spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk), initiating cellular activation. In this study, we addressed the functionality of the putative hemITAM of NKp65. We show that NKp65 forms homodimers and is phosphorylated at the hemITAM-embedded tyrosine 7 upon engagement by antibodies or KACL homodimers. HemITAM phosphotyrosinylation initiates a signaling pathway involving and depending on Syk, leading to cellular activation and natural killer (NK) cell degranulation. However, although NKp65 utilizes Syk for NK cell activation, a physical association of Syk with the NKp65 hemITAM could not be detected, unlike shown previously for the hemITAM of myeloid CTLR. Failure of NKp65 to recruit Syk is not due to an alteration of the triacidic motif, which rather affects the efficiency of hemITAM phosphotyrosinylation. In summary, NKp65 utilizes a hemITAM-like motif for cellular activation that requires Syk, although Syk appears not to be recruited to NKp65.

  11. Platelet immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM) signaling and vascular integrity.

    PubMed

    Boulaftali, Yacine; Hess, Paul R; Kahn, Mark L; Bergmeier, Wolfgang

    2014-03-28

    Platelets are well-known for their critical role in hemostasis, that is, the prevention of blood loss at sites of mechanical vessel injury. Inappropriate platelet activation and adhesion, however, can lead to thrombotic complications, such as myocardial infarction and stroke. To fulfill its role in hemostasis, the platelet is equipped with various G protein-coupled receptors that mediate the response to soluble agonists such as thrombin, ADP, and thromboxane A2. In addition to G protein-coupled receptors, platelets express 3 glycoproteins that belong to the family of immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif receptors: Fc receptor γ chain, which is noncovalently associated with the glycoprotein VI collagen receptor, C-type lectin 2, the receptor for podoplanin, and Fc receptor γII A, a low-affinity receptor for immune complexes. Although both genetic and chemical approaches have documented a critical role for platelet G protein-coupled receptors in hemostasis, the contribution of immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif receptors to this process is less defined. Studies performed during the past decade, however, have identified new roles for platelet immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif signaling in vascular integrity in utero and at sites of inflammation. The purpose of this review is to summarize recent findings on how platelet immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif signaling controls vascular integrity, both in the presence and absence of mechanical injury.

  12. Interference with immunoglobulin (Ig)alpha immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM) phosphorylation modulates or blocks B cell development, depending on the availability of an Igbeta cytoplasmic tail.

    PubMed

    Kraus, M; Pao, L I; Reichlin, A; Hu, Y; Canono, B; Cambier, J C; Nussenzweig, M C; Rajewsky, K

    2001-08-20

    To determine the function of immunoglobulin (Ig)alpha immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM) phosphorylation, we generated mice in which Igalpha ITAM tyrosines were replaced by phenylalanines (Igalpha(FF/FF)). Igalpha(FF/FF) mice had a specific reduction of B1 and marginal zone B cells, whereas B2 cell development appeared to be normal, except that lambda1 light chain usage was increased. The mutants responded less efficiently to T cell-dependent antigens, whereas T cell-independent responses were unaffected. Upon B cell receptor ligation, the cells exhibited heightened calcium flux, weaker Lyn and Syk tyrosine phosphorylation, and phosphorylation of Igalpha non-ITAM tyrosines. Strikingly, when the Igalpha ITAM mutation was combined with a truncation of Igbeta, B cell development was completely blocked at the pro-B cell stage, indicating a crucial role of ITAM phosphorylation in B cell development.

  13. Attenuated natural killer (NK) cell activation through C-type lectin-like receptor NKp80 is due to an anomalous hemi-immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (HemITAM) with impaired Syk kinase recruitment capacity.

    PubMed

    Rückrich, Thomas; Steinle, Alexander

    2013-06-14

    Cellular cytotoxicity is the hallmark of NK cells mediating both elimination of virus-infected or malignant cells, and modulation of immune responses. NK cytotoxicity is triggered upon ligation of various activating NK cell receptors. Among these is the C-type lectin-like receptor NKp80 which is encoded in the human Natural Killer Gene Complex (NKC) adjacent to its ligand, activation-induced C-type lectin (AICL). NKp80-AICL interaction promotes cytolysis of malignant myeloid cells, but also stimulates the mutual crosstalk between NK cells and monocytes. While many activating NK cell receptors pair with ITAM-bearing adaptors, we recently reported that NKp80 signals via a hemITAM-like sequence in its cytoplasmic domain. Here we molecularly dissect the NKp80 hemITAM and demonstrate that two non-consensus amino acids, in particular arginine 6, critically impair both hemITAM phosphorylation and Syk recruitment. Impaired Syk recruitment results in a substantial attenuation of cytotoxic responses upon NKp80 ligation. Reconstituting the hemITAM consensus or Syk overexpression resulted in robust NKp80-mediated responsiveness. Collectively, our data provide a molecular rationale for the restrained activation potential of NKp80 and illustrate how subtle alterations in signaling motifs determine subsequent cellular responses. They also suggest that non-consensus alterations in the NKp80 hemITAM, as commonly present among mammalian NKp80 sequences, may have evolved to dampen NKp80-mediated cytotoxic responses toward AICL-expressing cells.

  14. Critical Role for an acidic amino acid region in platelet signaling by the HemITAM (hemi-immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif) containing receptor CLEC-2 (C-type lectin receptor-2).

    PubMed

    Hughes, Craig E; Sinha, Uma; Pandey, Anjali; Eble, Johannes A; O'Callaghan, Christopher A; Watson, Steve P

    2013-02-15

    CLEC-2 is a member of new family of C-type lectin receptors characterized by a cytosolic YXXL downstream of three acidic amino acids in a sequence known as a hemITAM (hemi-immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif). Dimerization of two phosphorylated CLEC-2 molecules leads to recruitment of the tyrosine kinase Syk via its tandem SH2 domains and initiation of a downstream signaling cascade. Using Syk-deficient and Zap-70-deficient cell lines we show that hemITAM signaling is restricted to Syk and that the upstream triacidic amino acid sequence is required for signaling. Using surface plasmon resonance and phosphorylation studies, we demonstrate that the triacidic amino acids are required for phosphorylation of the YXXL. These results further emphasize the distinct nature of the proximal events in signaling by hemITAM relative to ITAM receptors.

  15. An ITAM in a nonenveloped virus regulates activation of NF-κB, induction of beta interferon, and viral spread.

    PubMed

    Stebbing, Rachael E; Irvin, Susan C; Rivera-Serrano, Efraín E; Boehme, Karl W; Ikizler, Mine; Yoder, Jeffrey A; Dermody, Terence S; Sherry, Barbara

    2014-03-01

    Immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motifs (ITAMs) are signaling domains located within the cytoplasmic tails of many transmembrane receptors and associated adaptor proteins that mediate immune cell activation. ITAMs also have been identified in the cytoplasmic tails of some enveloped virus glycoproteins. Here, we identified ITAM sequences in three mammalian reovirus proteins: μ2, σ2, and λ2. We demonstrate for the first time that μ2 is phosphorylated, contains a functional ITAM, and activates NF-κB. Specifically, μ2 and μNS recruit the ITAM-signaling intermediate Syk to cytoplasmic viral factories and this recruitment requires the μ2 ITAM. Moreover, both the μ2 ITAM and Syk are required for maximal μ2 activation of NF-κB. A mutant virus lacking the μ2 ITAM activates NF-κB less efficiently and induces lower levels of the downstream antiviral cytokine beta interferon (IFN-β) than does wild-type virus despite similar replication. Notably, the consequences of these μ2 ITAM effects are cell type specific. In fibroblasts where NF-κB is required for reovirus-induced apoptosis, the μ2 ITAM is advantageous for viral spread and enhances viral fitness. Conversely, in cardiac myocytes where the IFN response is critical for antiviral protection and NF-κB is not required for apoptosis, the μ2 ITAM stimulates cellular defense mechanisms and diminishes viral fitness. Together, these results suggest that the cell type-specific effect of the μ2 ITAM on viral spread reflects the cell type-specific effects of NF-κB and IFN-β. This first demonstration of a functional ITAM in a nonenveloped virus presents a new mechanism for viral ITAM-mediated signaling with likely organ-specific consequences in the host.

  16. Dual requirement for the Ig alpha immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM) and a conserved non-Ig alpha ITAM tyrosine in supporting Ig alpha beta-mediated B cell development.

    PubMed

    Pike, Kelly A; Ratcliffe, Michael J H

    2005-02-15

    Surface Ig (sIg) expression is a critical checkpoint during avian B cell development. Only cells that express sIg colonize bursal follicles, clonally expand, and undergo Ig diversification by gene conversion. Expression of a heterodimer, in which the extracellular and transmembrane domains of murine CD8alpha or CD8beta are fused to the cytoplasmic domains of chicken Igalpha (chIgalpha) or Igbeta, respectively (murine CD8alpha (mCD8alpha):chIgalpha + mCD8beta:chIgbeta), or an mCD8alpha:chIgalpha homodimer supported bursal B cell development as efficiently as endogenous sIg. In this study we demonstrate that B cell development, in the absence of chIgbeta, requires both the Igalpha ITAM and a conserved non-ITAM Igalpha tyrosine (Y3) that has been associated with binding to B cell linker protein (BLNK). When associated with the cytoplasmic domain of Igbeta, the Igalpha ITAM is not required for the induction of strong calcium mobilization or BLNK phosphorylation, but is still necessary to support B cell development. In contrast, mutation of the Igalpha Y3 severely compromised calcium mobilization when expressed as either a homodimer or a heterodimer with the cytoplasmic domain of Igbeta. However, coexpression of the cytoplasmic domain of Igbeta partially complemented the Igalpha Y3 mutation, rescuing higher levels of BLNK phosphorylation and, more strikingly, supporting B cell development.

  17. Impact of the PI3-kinase/Akt pathway on ITAM and hemITAM receptors: haemostasis, platelet activation and antithrombotic therapy.

    PubMed

    Moroi, Alyssa J; Watson, Steve P

    2015-04-01

    Phosphoinositide 3-kinases (PI3Ks) are a family of lipid kinases that are activated in response to various stimulants, and they regulate many processes including inflammation; the stress response; gene transcription; and cell proliferation, differentiation, and death. Increasing reports have shown that the PI3Ks and their downstream effector Akt are activated by several platelet receptors that regulate platelet activation and haemostasis. Platelets express two immunoreceptor tyrosine based activation motif (ITAM) receptors, collagen receptor glycoprotein VI (GPVI) and Fcγ receptor IIA (FcγRIIA), which are characterized by two YxxL sequences separated by 6-12 amino acids. Activation of an ITAM receptor initiates a reaction cascade via its YxxL sequence in which signaling molecules such as spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk), linker for activation of T cells (LAT) and phospholipase C γ2 (PLCγ2) become activated, leading to platelet activation. Platelets also express another receptor, C-type lectin 2 (CLEC-2), which has a single YxxL sequence, so it is appropriately called a hemITAM receptor. ITAM receptors and the hemITAM receptor share many signaling features. Here we will summarize our current knowledge about how the PI3K/Akt pathway regulates (hem)ITAM receptor-mediated platelet activation and haemostasis and discuss the possible benefits of targeting PI3K/Akt as an antithrombotic therapy.

  18. The mouse B cell-specific mb-1 gene encodes an immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM) protein that may be evolutionarily conserved in diverse species by purifying selection.

    PubMed

    Sims, Richard; Vandergon, Virginia Oberholzer; Malone, Cindy S

    2012-03-01

    The B-lymphocyte accessory molecule Ig-alpha (Ig-α) is encoded by the mouse B cell-specific gene (mb-1), and along with the Ig-beta (Ig-β) molecule and a membrane bound immunoglobulin (mIg) makes up the B-cell receptor (BCR). Ig-α and Ig-β form a heterodimer structure that upon antigen binding and receptor clustering primarily initiates and controls BCR intracellular signaling via a phosphorylation cascade, ultimately triggering an effector response. The signaling capacity of Ig-α is contained within its immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM), which is also a key component for intracellular signaling initiation in other immune cell-specific receptors. Although numerous studies have been devoted to the mb-1 gene product, Ig-α, and its signaling mechanism, an evolutionary analysis of the mb-1 gene has been lacking until now. In this study, mb-1 coding sequences from 19 species were compared using Bayesian inference. Analysis revealed a gene phylogeny consistent with an expected species divergence pattern, clustering species from the primate order separate from lower mammals and other species. In addition, an overall comparison of non-synonymous and synonymous nucleotide mutational changes suggests that the mb-1 gene has undergone purifying selection throughout its evolution.

  19. Shifting FcγRIIA-ITAM from activation to inhibitory configuration ameliorates arthritis.

    PubMed

    Ben Mkaddem, Sanae; Hayem, Gilles; Jönsson, Friederike; Rossato, Elisabetta; Boedec, Erwan; Boussetta, Tarek; El Benna, Jamel; Launay, Pierre; Goujon, Jean-Michel; Benhamou, Marc; Bruhns, Pierre; Monteiro, Renato C

    2014-09-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis-associated (RA-associated) inflammation is mediated through the interaction between RA IgG immune complexes and IgG Fc receptors on immune cells. Polymorphisms within the gene encoding the human IgG Fc receptor IIA (hFcγRIIA) are associated with an increased risk of developing RA. Within the hFcγRIIA intracytoplasmic domain, there are 2 conserved tyrosine residues arranged in a noncanonical immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM). Here, we reveal that inhibitory engagement of the hFcγRIIA ITAM either with anti-hFcγRII F(ab')2 fragments or intravenous hIgG (IVIg) ameliorates RA-associated inflammation, and this effect was characteristic of previously described inhibitory ITAM (ITAMi) signaling for hFcαRI and hFcγRIIIA, but only involves a single tyrosine. In hFcγRIIA-expressing mice, arthritis induction was inhibited following hFcγRIIA engagement. Moreover, hFcγRIIA ITAMi-signaling reduced ROS and inflammatory cytokine production through inhibition of guanine nucleotide exchange factor VAV-1 and IL-1 receptor-associated kinase 1 (IRAK-1), respectively. ITAMi signaling was mediated by tyrosine 304 (Y304) within the hFcγRIIA ITAM, which was required for recruitment of tyrosine kinase SYK and tyrosine phosphatase SHP-1. Anti-hFcγRII F(ab')2 treatment of inflammatory synovial cells from RA patients inhibited ROS production through induction of ITAMi signaling. These data suggest that shifting constitutive hFcγRIIA-mediated activation to ITAMi signaling could ameliorate RA-associated inflammation.

  20. A redundant role of the CD3 gamma-immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif in mature T cell function.

    PubMed

    Haks, M C; Cordaro, T A; van den Brakel, J H; Haanen, J B; de Vries, E F; Borst, J; Krimpenfort, P; Kruisbeek, A M

    2001-02-15

    At least four different CD3 polypeptide chains are contained within the mature TCR complex, each encompassing one (CD3gamma, CD3delta, and CD3epsilon) or three (CD3zeta) immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motifs (ITAMs) within their cytoplasmic domains. Why so many ITAMs are required is unresolved: it has been speculated that the different ITAMs function in signal specification, but they may also serve in signal amplification. Because the CD3zeta chains do not contribute unique signaling functions to the TCR, and because the ITAMs of the CD3-gammadeltaepsilon module alone can endow the TCR with normal signaling capacity, it thus becomes important to examine how the CD3gamma-, delta-, and epsilon-ITAMs regulate TCR signaling. We here report on the role of the CD3gamma chain and the CD3gamma-ITAM in peripheral T cell activation and differentiation to effector function. All T cell responses were reduced or abrogated in T cells derived from CD3gamma null-mutant mice, probably because of decreased expression levels of the mature TCR complex lacking CD3gamma. Consistent with this explanation, T cell responses proceed undisturbed in the absence of a functional CD3gamma-ITAM. Loss of integrity of the CD3gamma-ITAM only slightly impaired the regulation of expression of activation markers, suggesting a quantitative contribution of the CD3gamma-ITAM in this process. Nevertheless, the induction of an in vivo T cell response in influenza A virus-infected CD3gamma-ITAM-deficient mice proceeds normally. Therefore, if ITAMs can function in signal specification, it is likely that either the CD3delta and/or the CD3epsilon chains endow the TCR with qualitatively unique signaling functions.

  1. The immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif of Epstein-Barr virus LMP2A is essential for blocking BCR-mediated signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Fruehling, S; Longnecker, R

    1997-09-01

    The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) latent membrane protein 2A (LMP2A) blocks B-cell receptor (BCR) signal transduction in EBV-immortalized B lymphocytes in vitro. The cytoplasmic amino-terminal domain of LMP2A contains an immunoreceptor tyrosine activation motif (ITAM). ITAMs consist of paired tyrosine and leucine residues and play a central role in signal transduction of the BCR and the T-cell receptor (TCR). To investigate the importance of the LMP2A ITAM, two EBV recombinants were constructed, each containing a tyrosine-to-phenylalanine point mutation at amino acid 74 or 85 within the ITAM of LMP2A. Tyrosine phosphorylation, calcium mobilization, and induction of BZLF1 expression were no longer blocked in the LMP2A ITAM mutant LCLs following BCR cross-linking. In addition, the Syk protein tyrosine kinase (PTK) was unable to bind LMP2A in unstimulated LCLs infected with either of the LMP2A ITAM mutants. Analysis of Syk phosphorylation before and after BCR cross-linking in the LMP2A mutant ITAM LCLs compared with wild-type EBV LCLs indicates a specific role of the LMP2A ITAM on the LMP2A-mediated negative effect on the Syk PTK. These data indicate the importance of the LMP2A ITAM motif in the LMP2A-mediated block on BCR signal transduction and position the role of the Syk PTK as being central to the function of LMP2A.

  2. Analysis of the linker for activation of T cells and the linker for activation of B cells in natural killer cells reveals a novel signaling cassette, dual usage in ITAM signaling, and influence on development of the Ly49 repertoire.

    PubMed

    Whittaker, Gillian C; Burshtyn, Deborah N; Orr, Selinda J; Quigley, Laura; Hodge, Deborah L; Pascal, Véronique; Zhang, Weiguo; McVicar, Daniel W

    2008-10-01

    The linker for activation of T cells (LAT) and the linker for activation of B cells (LAB/NTAL/LAT2) are integral proteins in receptor coupling to downstream events. Both proteins are expressed in natural killer (NK) cells and LAT is phosphorylated during target cell interactions or ligation of the immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM)-coupled CD16. Regardless, Lat(-/-) mice exhibit normal natural and antibody-mediated killing. Here we place both LAT and LAB in the DAP12 pathway of NK cells. Moreover, we unveil a LAT-independent pathway that requires expression of Syk. Mice lacking either LAT or LAB have a skewed Ly49 repertoire, and activated NK cells from Lat(-/-) mice have reduced responses to the ITAM-coupled receptor NK1.1. In contrast, resting Lat(-/-) NK cells show intact NK1.1 responses, whereas NK cells without LAB are hyperactive. Elimination of both adaptors severely reduces NK1.1 signaling under both conditions. Together these data show that NK ITAMs preferentially use a signaling cassette regulated by interplay between LAT and LAB. Activation by interleukin-2 causes a shift to greater dependency on LAT due to suppression of Syk signaling. The overlapping use of multiple adaptors permits fine-tuning of NK-cell ITAM responses over the course of an immune response.

  3. Platelet ITAM Signaling and Vascular Integrity

    PubMed Central

    Boulaftali, Yacine; Hess, Paul R.; Kahn, Mark L.; Bergmeier, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    Platelets are well-known for their critical role in hemostasis, i.e. the prevention of blood loss at sites of mechanical vessel injury. Inappropriate platelet activation and adhesion, however, can lead to thrombotic complications, such as myocardial infarction and stroke. To fulfill its role in hemostasis, the platelet is equipped with various G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) that mediate the response to soluble agonists such as thrombin, ADP, and thromboxane A2. In addition to GPCRs, platelets express three glycoproteins (GP) that belong to the family of immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM) receptors: Fc receptor (FcR) γ chain, which is non-covalently associated with the GPVI collagen receptor, C-type lectin 2 (CLEC2), the receptor for podoplanin, and FcγRIIA, a low-affinity receptor for immune complexes. While both genetic and chemical approaches have documented a critical role for platelet GPCRs in hemostasis, the contribution of ITAM receptors to this process is less defined. Studies performed over the last decade, however, have identified new roles for platelet ITAM signaling in vascular integrity in utero and at sites of inflammation. The purpose of this review is to summarize recent findings on how platelet ITAM signaling controls vascular integrity, both in the presence and absence of mechanical injury. PMID:24677237

  4. Mouse mammary tumor virus suppresses apoptosis of mammary epithelial cells through ITAM-mediated signaling.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyoung H; Grande, Shannon M; Monroe, John G; Ross, Susan R

    2012-12-01

    Many receptors in hematopoietic cells use a common signaling pathway that relies on a highly conserved immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM), which signals through Src family tyrosine kinases. ITAM-bearing proteins are also found in many oncogenic viruses, including the mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) envelope (Env). We previously showed that MMTV Env expression transformed normal mammary epithelial cells and that Src kinases were important mediators in this transformation. To study how ITAM signaling affects mammary cell transformation, we utilized mammary cell lines expressing two different ITAM-containing proteins, one encoding a MMTV provirus and the other a B cell receptor fusion protein. ITAM-expressing cells were resistant to both serum starvation- and chemotherapeutic drug-induced apoptosis, whereas cells transduced with these molecules bearing ITAM mutations were indistinguishable from untransduced cells in their sensitivity to these treatments. We also found that Src kinase was activated in the MMTV-expressing cells and that MMTV-induced apoptosis resistance was completely restored by the Src inhibitor PP2. In vivo, MMTV infection delayed involution-induced apoptosis in the mouse mammary gland. Our results show that MMTV suppresses apoptosis through ITAM-mediated Src tyrosine kinase signaling. These studies could lead to the development of effective treatment of nonhematopoietic cell cancers in which ITAM-mediated signaling plays a role.

  5. Of ITIMs, ITAMs, and ITAMis: revisiting immunoglobulin Fc receptor signaling.

    PubMed

    Getahun, Andrew; Cambier, John C

    2015-11-01

    Receptors for immunoglobulin Fc regions play multiple critical roles in the immune system, mediating functions as diverse as phagocytosis, triggering degranulation of basophils and mast cells, promoting immunoglobulin class switching, and preventing excessive activation. Transmembrane signaling associated with these functions is mediated primarily by two amino acid sequence motifs, ITAMs (immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motifs) and ITIMs (immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibition motifs) that act as the receptors' interface with activating and inhibitory signaling pathways, respectively. While ITAMs mobilize activating tyrosine kinases and their consorts, ITIMs mobilize opposing tyrosine and inositol-lipid phosphatases. In this review, we will discuss our current understanding of signaling by these receptors/motifs and their sometimes blurred lines of function.

  6. Asymmetrical phosphorylation and function of immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif tyrosines in B cell antigen receptor signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Pao, L I; Famiglietti, S J; Cambier, J C

    1998-04-01

    CD79a and CD79b function as transducers of B cell antigen receptor signals via a cytoplasmic sequence, termed the immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM). ITAMs contain two conserved tyrosines that may become phosphorylated upon receptor aggregation and bind distinct effectors by virtue of the distinct preference of phosphotyrosyl-containing sequences for SH2 domains. To explore the function of CD79a and CD79b ITAM tyrosines, we created membrane molecules composed of MHC class II I-Ak extracellular and transmembrane domains, and CD79a or CD79b cytoplasmic domains in which one or both of the ITAM tyrosines were mutated to phenylalanine. Functional analysis revealed that both ITAM tyrosines are required for ligand-induced Syk phosphorylation. However CD79a-ITAM and CD79b-ITAM tyrosine phosphorylations were asymmetrical, with >80% of phosphorylation occurring on the N-terminal tyrosine (Y-E-G-L). Thus, these findings suggest that following receptor ligation, only a minor proportion of phosphorylated ITAMs are doubly phosphorylated and thus can engage Syk. Only the N-terminal ITAM tyrosine of CD79a was required for ligand-mediated phosphorylation of the receptor and a subset of downstream substrates, including p62, p110, and Shc, and for Ca2+ mobilization. However, responses mediated through CD79b exhibited a greater dependence on the presence of both tyrosines. Neither tyrosine in CD79a or CD79b appeared absolutely essential for Src family kinase phosphorylation. These results indicate that phosphorylations of the tyrosines in CD79a and CD79b occur with very different stoichiometry, and the respective tyrosyl residues have distinct functions.

  7. The role of ITAM- and ITIM-coupled receptors in platelet activation by collagen.

    PubMed

    Watson, S P; Asazuma, N; Atkinson, B; Berlanga, O; Best, D; Bobe, R; Jarvis, G; Marshall, S; Snell, D; Stafford, M; Tulasne, D; Wilde, J; Wonerow, P; Frampton, J

    2001-07-01

    The major activation-inducing collagen receptor glycoprotein VI (GPVI) has been cloned within the last two years. It is a member of the Ig superfamily of proteins and is constitutively associated with the ITAM-bearing Fc receptor gamma-chain (FcR gamma-chain). GPVI signals through a pathway that involves several of the proteins used by Fc, B- and T-lymphocyte receptors and which takes place in glycolipid-enriched membrane domains in the plasma membrane known as GEMs. Responses to GPVI are regulated by PECAM-1 (CD31) and possibly other ITIM-bearing receptors. Despite a pivotal role for GPVI, there are important differences between signalling events to collagen and GPVI-specific ligands. This may reflect a role for co-receptors in the response to collagen.

  8. TCR ITAM multiplicity is required for the generation of follicular helper T-cells.

    PubMed

    Hwang, SuJin; Palin, Amy C; Li, LiQi; Song, Ki-Duk; Lee, Jan; Herz, Jasmin; Tubo, Noah; Chu, Hamlet; Pepper, Marion; Lesourne, Renaud; Zvezdova, Ekaterina; Pinkhasov, Julia; Jenkins, Marc K; McGavern, Dorian; Love, Paul E

    2015-05-11

    The T-cell antigen receptor (TCR) complex contains 10 copies of a di-tyrosine Immunoreceptor-Tyrosine-based-Activation-Motif (ITAM) that initiates TCR signalling by recruiting protein tyrosine kinases. ITAM multiplicity amplifies TCR signals, but the importance of this capability for T-cell responses remains undefined. Most TCR ITAMs (6 of 10) are contributed by the CD3ζ subunits. We generated 'knock-in' mice that express non-signalling CD3ζ chains in lieu of wild-type CD3ζ. Here we demonstrate that ITAM multiplicity is important for the development of innate-like T-cells and follicular helper T-cells, events that are known to require strong/sustained TCR-ligand interactions, but is not essential for 'general' T-cell responses including proliferation and cytokine production or for the generation of a diverse antigen-reactive TCR repertoire.

  9. PTEN controls immunoreceptor (immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif) signaling and the activation of Rac.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jong Suk; Peng, Xiaodong; De, Pradip K; Geahlen, Robert L; Durden, Donald L

    2002-01-15

    Fcgamma receptor-mediated phagocytosis is a model for the study of immunoreceptor (immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif [ITAM]) signaling and involves the activation of protein tyrosine kinases, protein tyrosine phosphatases, and downstream effectors including phosphatidylinositol-3 (PI-3) kinase. Relatively little is known of the role of lipid phosphatases in the control of ITAM signaling and inflammation. A heterologous COS7 cell system was used to examine the roles played by PI-3 kinase and the dual-specificity phosphatase, phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN), in the signal transduction pathway leading to Fcgamma receptor IIA-mediated phagocytosis and the activation of Rac. The expression of wildtype PTEN completely abrogated the phagocytosis of immunoglobulin-G-sensitized sheep red blood cells, as compared with the catalytically inactive mutant of PTEN, which had no effect. This is the first direct evidence that PTEN, an inositol 3' phosphatase, regulates Fcgamma receptor-mediated phagocytosis, an ITAM-based signaling event. The data suggest that PTEN exerts control over phagocytosis potentially by controlling the downstream conversion of guanosine diphosphate-Rac to guanosine triphosphate-Rac following ITAM stimulation.

  10. Viral immunoreceptor-associated tyrosine-based activation motifs: potential players in oncogenesis.

    PubMed

    Grande, Shannon M; Ross, Susan R; Monroe, John G

    2006-04-01

    Cancer is thought to arise as a consequence of multiple insults to a cell. Mutations that lead to increased expression or activity of proto-oncogenes or decreased expression of tumor suppressors are common insults that have been identified to date. However, when considering tumor viruses, viral proteins that modify cellular gene expression, alter host immune surveillance, or affect signaling pathways are also common players. Notably, several of these tumor viruses encode proteins containing an immunoreceptor-associated tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM), a signaling motif recently implicated in epithelial cell oncogenesis. As expression of proteins bearing this motif is normally restricted to hematopoietic cells, recent work highlighting the consequences of ITAM expression in epithelial cells suggests it may play a role in solid tumor formation.

  11. Substrate recognition by the Lyn protein-tyrosine kinase. NMR structure of the immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif signaling region of the B cell antigen receptor.

    PubMed

    Gaul, B S; Harrison, M L; Geahlen, R L; Burton, R A; Post, C B

    2000-05-26

    The immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM) plays a central role in transmembrane signal transduction in hematopoietic cells by mediating responses leading to proliferation and differentiation. An initial signaling event following activation of the B cell antigen receptor is phosphorylation of the CD79a (Ig-alpha) ITAM by Lyn, a Src family protein-tyrosine kinase. To elucidate the structural basis for recognition between the ITAM substrate and activated Lyn kinase, the structure of an ITAM-derived peptide bound to Lyn was determined using exchange-transferred nuclear Overhauser NMR spectroscopy. The bound substrate structure has an irregular helix-like character. Docking based on the NMR data into the active site of the closely related Lck kinase strongly favors ITAM binding in an orientation similar to binding of cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase rather than that of insulin receptor tyrosine kinase. The model of the complex provides a rationale for conserved ITAM residues, substrate specificity, and suggests that substrate binds only the active conformation of the Src family tyrosine kinase, unlike the ATP cofactor, which can bind the inactive form.

  12. Syk-coupled C-type lectin receptors that mediate cellular activation via single tyrosine based activation motifs.

    PubMed

    Kerrigan, Ann M; Brown, Gordon D

    2010-03-01

    Different dendritic cell (DC) subsets have distinct specialized functions contributed in part by their differential expression of pattern recognition receptors (PRRs). C-type lectin receptors (CLRs) are a group of PRRs expressed by DCs and other myeloid cells that can recognize endogenous ligands as well as a wide range of exogenous structures present on pathogens. Dual roles in homeostasis and immunity have been demonstrated for some members of this receptor family. Largely due to their endocytic ability and subset specific expression, DC-expressed CLRs have been the focus of significant antigen-targeting studies. A number of CLRs function on the basis of signaling via association with immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM)-containing adapter proteins. Others contain ITAM-related motifs or immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motifs (ITIMs) in their cytoplasmic tails. Here we review CLRs that induce intracellular signaling via a single tyrosine-based ITAM-like motif and highlight their relevance in terms of DC function.

  13. Microglial immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation and inhibition motif signaling in neuroinflammation.

    PubMed

    Linnartz, Bettina; Wang, Yiner; Neumann, Harald

    2010-06-22

    Elimination of extracellular aggregates and apoptotic neural membranes without inflammation is crucial for brain tissue homeostasis. In the mammalian central nervous system, essential molecules in this process are the Fc receptors and the DAP12-associated receptors which both trigger the microglial immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif- (ITAM-) Syk-signaling cascade. Microglial triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells-2 (TREM2), signal regulatory protein-beta1, and complement receptor-3 (CD11b/CD18) signal via the adaptor protein DAP12 and activate phagocytic activity of microglia. Microglial ITAM-signaling receptors are counter-regulated by immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibition motif- (ITIM-) signaling molecules such as sialic acid-binding immunoglobulin superfamily lectins (Siglecs). Siglecs can suppress the proinflammatory and phagocytic activity of microglia via ITIM signaling. Moreover, microglial neurotoxicity is alleviated via interaction of Siglec-11 with sialic acids on the neuronal glycocalyx. Thus, ITAM- and ITIM-signaling receptors modulate microglial phagocytosis and cytokine expression during neuroinflammatory processes. Their dysfunction could lead to impaired phagocytic clearance and neurodegeneration triggered by chronic inflammation.

  14. Microglial activatory (immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif)- and inhibitory (immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibition motif)-signaling receptors for recognition of the neuronal glycocalyx.

    PubMed

    Linnartz, Bettina; Neumann, Harald

    2013-01-01

    Microglia sense intact or lesioned cells of the central nervous system (CNS) and respond accordingly. To fulfill this task, microglia express a whole set of recognition receptors. Fc receptors and DAP12 (TYROBP)-associated receptors such as microglial triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells-2 (TREM2) and the complement receptor-3 (CR3, CD11b/CD18) trigger the immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM)-signaling cascade, resulting in microglial activation, migration, and phagocytosis. Those receptors are counter-regulated by immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibition motif (ITIM)-signaling receptors, such as sialic acid-binding immunoglobulin superfamily lectins (Siglecs). Siglecs recognize the sialic acid cap of healthy neurons thus leading to an ITIM signaling that turns down microglial immune responses and phagocytosis. In contrast, desialylated neuronal processes are phagocytosed by microglial CR3 signaling via an adaptor protein containing an ITAM. Thus, the aberrant terminal glycosylation of neuronal surface glycoproteins and glycolipids could serve as a flag for microglia, which display a multitude of diverse carbohydrate-binding receptors that monitor the neuronal physical condition and respond via their ITIM- or ITAM-signaling cascade accordingly.

  15. NFAM1, an immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif-bearing molecule that regulates B cell development and signaling.

    PubMed

    Ohtsuka, Makoto; Arase, Hisashi; Takeuchi, Arata; Yamasaki, Sho; Shiina, Ritsuko; Suenaga, Tadahiro; Sakurai, Daiju; Yokosuka, Tadashi; Arase, Noriko; Iwashima, Makio; Kitamura, Toshio; Moriya, Hideshige; Saito, Takashi

    2004-05-25

    A functional cDNA cloning system was developed by using a retrovirus library encoding CD8-chimeric proteins and a nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT)-GFP reporter cell line to identify molecules inducing NFAT activation. By using this strategy, NFAT activating molecule 1 (NFAM1) was cloned as an immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM)-bearing cell surface molecule belonging to the Ig superfamily and is predominantly expressed in spleen B and T cells. NFAM1 crosslinking induced ITAM phosphorylation, ZAP-70/Syk recruitment, NFAT activation, and cytokine production. In vivo overexpression of NFAM1 in bone marrow chimeras and transgenic mice induced severe impairment of early B cell development in an ITAM-dependent manner. In NFAM1-expressing B cells, B cell antigen receptor stimulation induced NFAM1 translocation to lipid raft, and NFAM1 co-crosslinking augmented B cell antigen receptor signaling. The results suggest that NFAM1 modulates B cell signaling through its ITAM, which regulates B cell development.

  16. Identification of an immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif of K1 transforming protein of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus.

    PubMed

    Lee, H; Guo, J; Li, M; Choi, J K; DeMaria, M; Rosenzweig, M; Jung, J U

    1998-09-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is consistently identified in Kaposi's sarcoma and body cavity-based lymphoma. KSHV encodes a transforming protein called K1 which is structurally similar to lymphocyte receptors. We have found that a highly conserved region of the cytoplasmic domain of K1 resembles the sequence of immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motifs (ITAMs). To demonstrate the signal-transducing activity of K1, we constructed a chimeric protein in which the cytoplasmic tail of the human CD8alpha polypeptide was replaced with that of KSHV K1. Expression of the CD8-K1 chimera in B cells induced cellular tyrosine phosphorylation and intracellular calcium mobilization upon stimulation with an anti-CD8 antibody. Mutational analyses showed that the putative ITAM of K1 was required for its signal-transducing activity. Furthermore, tyrosine residues of the putative ITAM of K1 were phosphorylated upon stimulation, and this allowed subsequent binding of SH2-containing proteins. These results demonstrate that the KSHV transforming protein K1 contains a functional ITAM in its cytoplasmic domain and that it can transduce signals to induce cellular activation.

  17. Contributions of the T Cell Receptor–associated CD3γ–ITAM to Thymocyte Selection

    PubMed Central

    Haks, Mariëlle C.; Pépin, Elsa; van den Brakel, Jeroen H.N.; Smeele, Sigrid A.A.; Belkowski, Stanley M.; Kessels, Helmut W.H.G.; Krimpenfort, Paul; Kruisbeek, Ada M.

    2002-01-01

    The immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motifs (ITAMs) in the CD3 chains associated with the T cell receptor (TCR) are crucial for TCR signaling. To probe the role of the CD3γ–ITAM in T cell development, we created knock-in mice in which the CD3γ chain of the TCR complex is replaced by a mutant signaling-deficient CD3γ chain, lacking the CD3γ–ITAM. This mutation results in considerable impairment in positive selection in the polyclonal TCR repertoire. When CD3γ–ΔITAM mice are crossed to mice expressing transgenic F5 TCRs, their thymocytes are completely unable to perform positive selection in vivo in response to intrathymic ligands. Also, the in vitro positive selection response of double-positive (DP) thymocytes with F5–CD3γ–ΔITAM mutant receptors to their agonist ligand and many of its variants is severely impaired or abrogated. Yet, the binding and dissociation constants of agonist ligands for the F5 receptor are not affected by the CD3γ–ΔITAM mutation. Furthermore, DP thymocytes with mutant receptors can respond to agonist ligand with normal antigen sensitivity and to normal levels, as shown by their ability to induce CD69 up-regulation, TCR down-regulation, negative selection, and ZAP70 and c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase activation. In sharp contrast, induction of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activation and linker for activation of T cells (LAT) phosphorylation are severely impaired in these cells. Together, these findings underscore that intrinsic properties of the TCR–CD3 complex regulate selection at the DP checkpoint. More importantly, this analysis provides the first direct genetic evidence for a role of the CD3γ–ITAM in TCR-driven thymocyte selection. PMID:12093866

  18. RBP-J imposes a requirement for ITAM-mediated costimulation of osteoclastogenesis.

    PubMed

    Li, Susan; Miller, Christine H; Giannopoulou, Eugenia; Hu, Xiaoyu; Ivashkiv, Lionel B; Zhao, Baohong

    2014-11-01

    Osteoclastogenesis requires activation of RANK signaling as well as costimulatory signals from immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif-containing (ITAM-containing) receptors/adaptors, predominantly tyrosine kinase-binding proteins DAP12 and FcRγ, in osteoclast precursors. It is not well understood how costimulatory signals are regulated and integrated with RANK signaling. Here, we found that osteopetrotic bone phenotypes in mice lacking DAP12 or DAP12 and FcRγ are mediated by the transcription factor RBP-J, as deletion of Rbpj in these mice substantially rescued the defects of bone remodeling. Using a TNF-α-induced model of inflammatory bone resorption, we determined that RBP-J deficiency enables TNF-α to induce osteoclast formation and bone resorption in DAP12-deficient animals. Thus, RBP-J imposes a requirement for ITAM-mediated costimulation of RANKL or TNF-α-induced osteoclastogenesis. Mechanistically, RBP-J suppressed induction of key osteoclastogenic factors NFATc1, BLIMP1, and c-FOS by inhibiting ITAM-mediated expression and function of PLCγ2 and activation of downstream calcium-CaMKK/PYK2 signaling. Moreover, RBP-J suppressed Plcg2 expression and downstream calcium oscillations indirectly by a TGF-β/PLCγ2/calcium axis. Together, our findings indicate that RBP-J suppresses ITAM-mediated costimulation, thereby limiting crosstalk between ITAM and RANK/TNFR signaling and allowing fine tuning of osteoclastogenesis during bone homeostasis and under inflammatory conditions. Furthermore, these data suggest that environmental cues that regulate RBP-J expression/function potentially modulate the requirement for costimulatory signaling for osteoclast differentiation and bone remodeling.

  19. Phosphorylation and recruitment of Syk by immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif-based phosphorylation of tamalin.

    PubMed

    Hirose, Masayuki; Kitano, Jun; Nakajima, Yoshiaki; Moriyoshi, Koki; Yanagi, Shigeru; Yamamura, Hirohei; Muto, Takanori; Jingami, Hisato; Nakanishi, Shigetada

    2004-07-30

    Tamalin is a scaffold protein that forms a multiple protein assembly including metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) and several postsynaptic and protein-trafficking scaffold proteins in distinct mode of protein-protein association. In the present investigation, we report that tamalin possesses a typical immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM), which enables Syk kinase to be recruited and phosphorylated by the Src family kinases. Coimmunoprecipitation analysis of rat brain membrane fractions showed that tamalin is present in a multimolecular protein assembly comprising not only mGluR1 but also c-Src, Fyn, and a protein phosphatase, SHP-2. The protein association of both tamalin and c-Src, as determined by truncation analysis of mGluR1 in COS-7 cells, occurred at the carboxyl-terminal tail of mGluR1. Mutation analysis of tyrosine with phenylalanine in COS-7 cells revealed that paired tyrosines at the ITAM sequence of tamalin are phosphorylated preferentially by c-Src and Fyn, and this phosphorylation can recruit Syk kinase and enables it to be phosphorylated by the Src family kinases. The phosphorylated tyrosines at the ITAM sequence of tamalin were highly susceptible to dephosphorylation by protein-tyrosine phosphatases in COS-7 cells. Importantly, tamalin was endogenously phosphorylated and associated with Syk in retinoic acid-treated P19 embryonal carcinoma cells that undergo neuron-like differentiation. The present investigation demonstrates that tamalin is a novel signaling molecule that possesses a PDZ domain and a PDZ binding motif and mediates Syk signaling in an ITAM-based fashion.

  20. Role of the immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif of latent membrane protein 2A (LMP2A) in Epstein-Barr virus LMP2A-induced cell transformation.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Makoto; Kawaguchi, Yasushi

    2014-05-01

    Latent membrane protein 2A (LMP2A) of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is widely expressed in EBV-associated malignancies. We demonstrate that LMP2A has a transformation ability. This study shows that LMP2A-induced transformation in several human nonhematopoietic cell lines was blocked in those cells expressing an immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM) LMP2A mutant. The Syk inhibitor or Syk-specific small interfering RNA (siRNA) inhibited LMP2A-induced transformation. These results indicate that the interaction of the LMP2A ITAM with Syk is a key step for LMP2A-mediated transformation.

  1. G6f-like is an ITAM-containing collagen receptor in thrombocytes.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Craig E; Radhakrishnan, Uvaraj P; Lordkipanidzé, Marie; Egginton, Stuart; Dijkstra, Johannes M; Jagadeeswaran, Pudur; Watson, Stephen P

    2012-01-01

    Collagen activates mammalian platelets through a complex of the immunoglobulin (Ig) receptor GPVI and the Fc receptor γ-chain, which has an immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM). Cross-linking of GPVI mediates activation through the sequential activation of Src and Syk family kinases and activation of PLCγ2. Nucleated thrombocytes in fish are activated by collagen but lack an ortholog of GPVI. In this study we show that collagen activates trout thrombocytes in whole blood and under flow conditions through a Src kinase driven pathway. We identify the Ig receptor G6f-like as a collagen receptor and demonstrate in a cell line assay that it signals through its cytoplasmic ITAM. Using a morpholino for in vivo knock-down of G6f-like levels in zebrafish, we observed a marked delay or absence of occlusion of the venous and arterial systems in response to laser injury. Thus, G6f-like is a physiologically relevant collagen receptor in fish thrombocytes which signals through the same ITAM-based signalling pathway as mammalian GPVI, providing a novel example of convergent evolution.

  2. Homooligomerization of the cytoplasmic domain of the T cell receptor zeta chain and of other proteins containing the immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif.

    PubMed

    Sigalov, Alexander; Aivazian, Dikran; Stern, Lawrence

    2004-02-24

    Antigen receptors on T cells, B cells, mast cells, and basophils all have cytoplasmic domains containing one or more copies of an immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM), tyrosine residues of which are phosphorylated upon receptor engagement in an early and obligatory event in the signaling cascade. How clustering of receptor extracellular domains leads to phosphorylation of cytoplasmic domain ITAMs is not known, and little structural or biochemical information is available for the ITAM-containing cytoplasmic domains. Here we investigate the conformation and oligomeric state of several immune receptor cytoplasmic domains, using purified recombinant proteins and a variety of biophysical and biochemical techniques. We show that all of the cytoplasmic domains of ITAM-containing signaling subunits studied are oligomeric in solution, namely, T cell antigen receptor zeta, CD3epsilon, CD3delta, and CD3gamma, B cell antigen receptor Igalpha and Igbeta, and Fc receptor FcepsilonRIgamma. For zeta(cyt), the oligomerization behavior is best described by a two-step monomer-dimer-tetramer fast dynamic equilibrium with dissociation constants in the order of approximately 10 microM (monomer-dimer) and approximately 1 mM (dimer-tetramer). In contrast to the other ITAM-containing proteins, Igalpha(cyt) forms stable dimers and tetramers even below 10 microM. Circular dichroic analysis reveals the lack of stable ordered structure of the cytoplasmic domains studied, and oligomerization does not change the random-coil-like conformation observed. The random-coil nature of zeta(cyt) was also confirmed by heteronuclear NMR. Phosphorylation of zeta(cyt) and FcepsilonRIgamma(cyt) does not significantly alter their oligomerization behavior. The implications of these results for transmembrane signaling and cellular activation by immune receptors are discussed.

  3. Cytoskeletal polarization of T cells is regulated by an immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Lowin-Kropf, B; Shapiro, V S; Weiss, A

    1998-02-23

    Binding of a T cell to an appropriate antigen-presenting cell (APC) induces the rapid reorientation of the T cell cytoskeleton and secretory apparatus towards the cell-cell contact site in a T cell antigen receptor (TCR) and peptide/major histocompatibility complex-dependent process. Such T cell polarization directs the delivery of cytokines and cytotoxic mediators towards the APC and contributes to the highly selective and specific action of effector T cells. To study the signaling pathways that regulate cytoskeletal rearrangements in T lymphocytes, we set up a conjugate formation assay using Jurkat T cells as effectors and cell-sized latex beads coated with various antibodies as artificial APCs. Here, we report that beads coated with antibodies specific for the TCR-CD3 complex were sufficient to induce T cell polarization towards the bead attachment site, as judged by reorientation of the microtubule-organizing center (MTOC) and localized actin polymerization. Thus, these cytoskeletal changes did not depend on activation of additional coreceptors. Moreover, single subunits of the TCR complex, namely TCR-zeta and CD3epsilon, were equally effective in inducing cytoskeletal polarization. However, mutagenesis of the immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motifs (ITAMs), present three times in TCR-zeta and once in CD3epsilon, revealed that the induction of cytoskeletal rearrangements required the presence of at least one intact ITAM. In agreement with this result, lack of functional Lck, the protein tyrosine kinase responsible for ITAM phosphorylation, abolished both MTOC reorientation and polarized actin polymerization. Both inhibitor and transient overexpression studies demonstrated that MTOC reorientation could occur in the absence of Ras activation. Our results suggest that APC-induced T cell polarization is a TCR-mediated event that is coupled to the TCR by the same signaling motif as TCR-induced gene activation, but diverges in its distal signaling

  4. Bone Microenvironment Specific Roles of ITAM Adapter Signaling during Bone Remodeling Induced by Acute Estrogen-Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yalei; Torchia, James; Yao, Wei; Lane, Nancy E.; Lanier, Lewis L.; Nakamura, Mary C.; Humphrey, Mary Beth

    2007-01-01

    Immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM) signaling mediated by DAP12 or Fcε receptor Iγ chain (FcRγ) have been shown to be critical for osteoclast differentiation and maturation under normal physiological conditions. Their function in pathological conditions is unknown. We studied the role of ITAM signaling during rapid bone remodeling induced by acute estrogen-deficiency in wild-type (WT), DAP12-deficient (DAP12-/-), FcRγ-deficient (FcRγ-/-) and double-deficient (DAP12-/-FcRγ-/-) mice. Six weeks after ovariectomy (OVX), DAP12-/-FcRγ-/- mice showed resistance to lumbar vertebral body (LVB) trabecular bone loss, while WT, DAP12-/- and FcRγ-/- mice had significant LVB bone loss. In contrast, all ITAM adapter-deficient mice responded to OVX with bone loss in both femur and tibia of approximately 40%, relative to basal bone volumes. Only WT mice developed significant cortical bone loss after OVX. In vitro studies showed microenvironmental changes induced by OVX are indispensable for enhanced osteoclast formation and function. Cytokine changes, including TGFβ and TNFα, were able to induce osteoclastogenesis independent of RANKL in BMMs from WT but not DAP12-/- and DAP12-/-FcRγ-/- mice. FSH stimulated RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation from BMMs in WT, but not DAP12-/- and DAP12-/-FcRγ-/- mice. Our study demonstrates that although ITAM adapter signaling is critical for normal bone remodeling, estrogen-deficiency induces an ITAM adapter-independent bypass mechanism allowing for enhanced osteoclastogenesis and activation in specific bony microenvironments. PMID:17611621

  5. Two YxxL segments of a single immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif in the CD3zeta molecule differentially activate calcium mobilization and mitogen-activated protein kinase family pathways.

    PubMed

    Tsuchihashi, N; Matsuda, S; Reinherz, E L; Koyasu, S

    2000-06-01

    Immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motifs (ITAM), consisting of two YxxL segments, transmit signals leading to IL-2 gene activation in T cells. We investigated here the functional difference in signal transduction between these two YxxL segments in the CD3zeta membrane-proximal ITAM. N-terminal YxxL mutants failed to induce ZAP-70 phosphorylation, elevation of intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) or extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activation even in the presence of CD28 co-stimulation, whereas a mutant of the leucine residue at the C-terminal YxxL segment retained the ability to induce these events although this mutation abrogated the ability to induce IL-2 gene activation. In marked contrast to ERK activation, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) activation was observed in all mutants when co-stimulated with CD28. The mutant of the leucine residue at the C-terminal YxxL segment had a defect in the transcriptional activation at the NF-AT cis-element, which was restored to wild-type level by addition of a Ca2+ ionophore, suggesting that the intensity and/or duration of [Ca2+]i elevation defines the threshold of T cell activation in this mutant. Our data collectively indicate that the activation pathways of ERK, JNK and Ca2+ mobilization are differentially regulated through YxxL segments of an ITAM.

  6. SLAP/SLAP2 prevent excessive platelet (hem)ITAM signaling in thrombosis and ischemic stroke in mice.

    PubMed

    Cherpokova, Deya; Bender, Markus; Morowski, Martina; Kraft, Peter; Schuhmann, Michael K; Akbar, Sarah M; Sultan, Cheryl S; Hughes, Craig E; Kleinschnitz, Christoph; Stoll, Guido; Dragone, Leonard L; Watson, Steve P; Tomlinson, Michael G; Nieswandt, Bernhard

    2015-01-01

    Glycoprotein VI and C-type lectin-like receptor 2 are essential platelet activating receptors in hemostasis and thrombo-inflammatory disease, which signal through a (hem)immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM)-dependent pathway. The adapter molecules Src-like adapter proteins (SLAP and SLAP2) are involved in the regulation of immune cell surface expression and signaling, but their function in platelets is unknown. In this study, we show that platelets expressed both SLAP isoforms and that overexpression of either protein in a heterologous cell line almost completely inhibited glycoprotein VI and C-type lectin-like receptor 2 signaling. In mice, single deficiency of SLAP or SLAP2 had only moderate effects on platelet function, whereas double deficiency of both adapters resulted in markedly increased signal transduction, integrin activation, granule release, aggregation, procoagulant activity, and thrombin generation in response to (hem)ITAM-coupled, but not G protein-coupled, receptor activation. In vivo, constitutive SLAP/SLAP2 knockout mice displayed accelerated occlusive arterial thrombus formation and a dramatically worsened outcome after focal cerebral ischemia. This was attributed to the absence of both adapter proteins in platelets, as demonstrated by adoptive transfer of Slap(-/-)/Slap2(-/-) platelets into wild-type mice. Our results establish SLAP and SLAP2 as critical inhibitors of platelet (hem)ITAM signaling in the setting of arterial thrombosis and ischemic stroke.

  7. The protein-tyrosine phosphatase SHP-1 associates with the phosphorylated immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif of Fc gamma RIIa to modulate signaling events in myeloid cells.

    PubMed

    Ganesan, Latha P; Fang, Huiqing; Marsh, Clay B; Tridandapani, Susheela

    2003-09-12

    Fc gamma RIIa is a low affinity IgG receptor uniquely expressed in human cells that promotes phagocytosis of immune complexes and induces inflammatory cytokine gene transcription. Recent studies have revealed that phagocytosis initiated by Fc gamma RIIa is tightly controlled by the inositol phosphatase SHIP-1, and the protein-tyrosine phosphatase SHP-1. Whereas the molecular nature of SHIP-1 involvement with Fc gamma RIIa has been well studied, it is not clear how SHP-1 is activated by Fc gamma RIIa to mediate its regulatory effect. Here we report that Fc gamma RIIa clustering induces SHP-1 phosphatase activity in THP-1 cells. Using synthetic phosphopeptides, and stable transfectants expressing immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM) tyrosine mutants of Fc gamma RIIa, we demonstrate that SHP-1 associates with the phosphorylated amino-terminal ITAM tyrosine of Fc gamma RIIa, whereas the tyrosine kinase Syk associates with the carboxyl-terminal ITAM tyrosine. Association of SHP-1 with Fc gamma RIIa ITAM appears to suppress total cellular tyrosine phosphorylation. Furthermore, Fc gamma RIIa clustering results in the association of SHP-1 with key signaling molecules such as Syk, p85 subunit of PtdIns 3-kinase, and p62dok, suggesting that these molecules may be substrates of SHP-1 in this system. Finally, overexpression of wild-type SHP-1 but not catalytically deficient SHP-1 led to a down-regulation of NF kappa B-dependent gene transcription in THP-1 cells activated by clustering Fc gamma RIIa.

  8. An immunoreceptor tyrosine activation motif in the mouse mammary tumor virus envelope protein plays a role in virus-induced mammary tumors.

    PubMed

    Ross, Susan R; Schmidt, John W; Katz, Elad; Cappelli, Laura; Hultine, Stacy; Gimotty, Phyllis; Monroe, John G

    2006-09-01

    Mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) induces breast cancer with almost 100% efficiency in susceptible strains through insertional activation of protooncogenes, such as members of the wnt and fibroblast growth factor (fgf) families. We previously showed that expression of the MMTV envelope protein (Env) in normal immortalized mammary epithelial cells grown in three-dimensional cultures caused their morphological transformation, and that this phenotype depended on an immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM) present in Env and signaling through the Syk tyrosine kinase (E. Katz, M. H. Lareef, J. C. Rassa, S. M. Grande, L. B. King, J. Russo, S. R. Ross, and J. G. Monroe, J. Exp. Med. 201:431-439, 2005). Here, we examined the role of the Env protein in virus-induced mammary tumorigenesis in vivo. Similar to the effect seen in vitro, Env expression in the mammary glands of transgenic mice bearing either full-length wild-type provirus or only Env transgenes showed increased lobuloalveolar budding. Introduction of the ITAM mutation into the env of an infectious, replication-competent MMTV or into MMTV/murine leukemia virus pseudotypes had no effect on incorporation of Env into virus particles or on in vitro infectivity. Moreover, replication-competent MMTV bearing the ITAM mutation in Env infected lymphoid and mammary tissue at the same level as wild-type MMTV and was transmitted through milk. However, mammary tumor induction was greatly attenuated, and the pattern of oncogene activation was altered. Taken together, these studies indicate that the MMTV Env protein participates in mammary epithelial cell transformation in vivo and that this requires a functional ITAM in the envelope protein.

  9. Immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif-dependent signaling by Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus K1 protein: effects on lytic viral replication.

    PubMed

    Lagunoff, M; Lukac, D M; Ganem, D

    2001-07-01

    The Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) K1 gene encodes a polypeptide bearing an immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM) that is constitutively active for ITAM-based signal transduction. Although ectopic overexpression of K1 in cultured fibroblasts can lead to growth transformation, in vivo this gene is primarily expressed in lymphoid cells undergoing lytic infection. Here we have examined function of K1 in the setting of lytic replication, through the study of K1 mutants lacking functional ITAMs. Expression of such mutants in BJAB cells cotransfected with wild-type K1 results in dramatic inhibition of K1 signal transduction, as judged by impaired activation of Syk kinase and phospholipase C-gamma2 as well as by diminished expression of a luciferase reporter gene dependent upon K1-induced calcium and Ras signaling. Thus, the mutants behave as dominantly acting inhibitors of K1 function. To assess the role of K1 in lytic replication, we introduced these K1 mutants into BCBL-1 cells, a B-cell lymphoma line latently infected with KSHV, and induced lytic replication by ectopic expression of the KSHV ORF50 transactivator. Expression of lytic cycle genes was diminished up to 80% in the presence of a K1 dominant negative mutant. These inhibitory effects could be overridden by tetradecanoyl phorbol acetate treatment, indicating that inhibition was not due to irreversible cell injury and suggesting that other signaling events could bypass the block. We conclude that ITAM-dependent signaling by K1 is not absolutely required for lytic reactivation but functions to modestly augment lytic replication in B cells, the natural reservoir of KSHV.

  10. Immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif phosphorylation during engulfment of Neisseria gonorrhoeae by the neutrophil-restricted CEACAM3 (CD66d) receptor.

    PubMed

    McCaw, Shannon E; Schneider, Jutta; Liao, Edward H; Zimmermann, Wolfgang; Gray-Owen, Scott D

    2003-08-01

    Gonorrhea is characterized by a purulent urethral or cervical discharge consisting primarily of neutrophils associated with Neisseria gonorrhoeae. These interactions are facilitated by gonococcal colony opacity-associated (Opa) protein binding to host cellular CEACAM receptors. Of these, CEACAM3 is restricted to neutrophils and contains an immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM) reminiscent of that found within certain phagocytic Fc receptors. CEACAM3 was tyrosine phosphorylated by a Src family kinase-dependent process upon infection by gonococci expressing CEACAM-specific Opa proteins. This phosphorylation was necessary for efficient bacterial uptake; however, a less efficient uptake process became evident when kinase inhibitors or mutagenesis of the ITAM were used to prevent phosphorylation. Ligated CEACAM3 was recruited to a cytoskeleton-containing fraction, intense foci of polymerized actin were evident where bacteria attached to HeLa-CEACAM3, and disruption of polymerized actin by cytochalasin D blocked all bacterial uptake by these cells. These data support a model whereby CEACAM3 can mediate the Opa-dependent uptake of N. gonorrhoeae via either an efficient, ITAM phosphorylation-dependent process that resembles phagocytosis or a less efficient, tyrosine phosphorylation-independent mechanism.

  11. Immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibition motif-bearing receptors regulate the immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif-induced activation of immune competent cells.

    PubMed

    Gergely, J; Pecht, I; Sármay, G

    1999-05-03

    ITIM-bearing receptors, a family which only recently has been recognized, play a key role in the regulation of the ITAM-induced activation of immune competent cells. The mechanism of ITM-mediated regulation in various cells was recently clarified. The present review focuses on ITIM bearing membrane proteins that negatively regulate the activation of cells when co-crosslinked with ITAM containing receptors, illustrates the inhibitory processes by the negative regulation of B-, NK-, T-cells and mast cells and summarizes current views on the mechanism of ITIM-mediated inhibition.

  12. Syk-dependent phosphorylation of CLEC-2: a novel mechanism of hem-immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif signaling.

    PubMed

    Séverin, Sonia; Pollitt, Alice Y; Navarro-Nuñez, Leyre; Nash, Craig A; Mourão-Sá, Diego; Eble, Johannes A; Senis, Yotis A; Watson, Steve P

    2011-02-11

    The C-type lectin-like receptor CLEC-2 signals via phosphorylation of a single cytoplasmic YXXL sequence known as a hem-immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (hemITAM). In this study, we show that phosphorylation of CLEC-2 by the snake toxin rhodocytin is abolished in the absence of the tyrosine kinase Syk but is not altered in the absence of the major platelet Src family kinases, Fyn, Lyn, and Src, or the tyrosine phosphatase CD148, which regulates the basal activity of Src family kinases. Further, phosphorylation of CLEC-2 by rhodocytin is not altered in the presence of the Src family kinase inhibitor PP2, even though PLCγ2 phosphorylation and platelet activation are abolished. A similar dependence of phosphorylation of CLEC-2 on Syk is also seen in response to stimulation by an IgG mAb to CLEC-2, although interestingly CLEC-2 phosphorylation is also reduced in the absence of Lyn. These results provide the first definitive evidence that Syk mediates phosphorylation of the CLEC-2 hemITAM receptor with Src family kinases playing a critical role further downstream through the regulation of Syk and other effector proteins, providing a new paradigm in signaling by YXXL-containing receptors.

  13. TCR engagement induces proline-rich tyrosine kinase-2 (Pyk2) translocation to the T cell-APC interface independently of Pyk2 activity and in an immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif-mediated fashion.

    PubMed

    Sancho, David; Montoya, María C; Monjas, Alicia; Gordón-Alonso, Mónica; Katagiri, Takuya; Gil, Diana; Tejedor, Reyes; Alarcón, Balbino; Sánchez-Madrid, Francisco

    2002-07-01

    The relocation of kinases in T lymphocytes during their cognate interaction with APCs is essential for lymphocyte activation. We found that the proline-rich tyrosine kinase-2 (Pyk2) is rapidly translocated to the T cell-APC contact area upon T cell-specific recognition of superantigen-pulsed APCs. Stimulation with anti-CD3-coated latex microspheres was sufficient for Pyk2 reorientation, and the coengagement of CD28 boosted Pyk2 redistribution. Nevertheless, Pyk2 translocation did not result in its recruitment to lipid rafts. Two results support that Pyk2 translocation was independent of its kinase activity. First, Lck activity was required for TCR-induced Pyk2 translocation, but not for TCR-induced Pyk2 activation. Second, a kinase-dead Pyk2 mutant was equally translocated upon TCR triggering. In addition, Lck activity alone was insufficient to induce Pyk2 reorientation and activation, requiring the presence of at least one intact immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM). Despite the dependence on functional Lck and on phosphorylated ITAM for Pyk2 translocation, the ITAM-binding tyrosine kinase zeta-associated protein 70 (ZAP-70) was not essential. All these data suggest that, by translocating to the vicinity of the immune synapse, Pyk2 could play an essential role in T cell activation and polarized secretion of cytokines.

  14. Cloning, expression and functional characterization of the putative regeneration and tolerance factor (RTF/TJ6) as a functional vacuolar ATPase proton pump regulatory subunit with a conserved sequence of immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif.

    PubMed

    Babichev, Yael; Tamir, Ami; Park, Meeyoug; Muallem, Shmuel; Isakov, Noah

    2005-10-01

    In an attempt to identify new immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM)-containing human molecules that may regulate hitherto unknown immune cell functions, we BLAST searched the National Center for Biotechnology Information database for ITAM-containing sequences. A human expressed sequence tag showing partial homology to the murine TJ6 (mTJ6) gene and encoding a putative ITAM sequence has been identified and used to clone the human TJ6 (hTJ6) gene from an HL-60-derived cDNA library. hTJ6 was found to encode a protein of 856 residues with a calculated mass of 98 155 Da. Immunolocalization and sequence analysis revealed that hTJ6 is a membrane protein with predicted six transmembrane-spanning regions, typical of ion channels, and a single putative ITAM (residues 452-466) in a juxtamembrane or hydrophobic intramembrane region. hTJ6 is highly homologous to Bos taurus 116-kDa subunit of the vacuolar proton-translocating ATPase. Over-expression of hTJ6 in HEK 293 cells increased H+ uptake into intracellular organelles, an effect that was sensitive to inhibition by bafilomycin, a selective inhibitor of vacuolar H+ pump. Northern blot analysis demonstrated three different hybridizing mRNA transcripts corresponding to 3.2, 5.0 and 7.3 kb, indicating the presence of several splice variants. Significant differences in hTJ6 mRNA levels in human tissues of different origins point to possible tissue-specific function. Although hTJ6 was found to be a poor substrate for tyrosine-phosphorylating enzymes, suggesting that its ITAM sequence is non-functional in protein tyrosine kinase-mediated signaling pathways, its role in organellar H+ pumping suggests that hTJ6 function may participate in protein trafficking/processing.

  15. Regulation of ITAM adaptor molecules and their receptors by inhibition of calcineurin-NFAT signalling during late stage osteoclast differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Zawawi, M.S.F.; Dharmapatni, A.A.S.S.K.; Cantley, M.D.; McHugh, K.P.; Haynes, D.R.; Crotti, T.N.

    2012-10-19

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Calcineurin/NFAT inhibitors FK506 and VIVIT treated human PBMC derived osteoclasts in vitro. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Differential regulation of ITAM receptors and adaptor molecules by calcineurin/NFAT inhibitors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer FK506 and VIVIT suppress ITAM factors during late phase osteoclast differentiation. -- Abstract: Osteoclasts are specialised bone resorptive cells responsible for both physiological and pathological bone loss. Osteoclast differentiation and activity is dependent upon receptor activator NF-kappa-B ligand (RANKL) interacting with its receptor RANK to induce the transcription factor, nuclear factor of activated T-cells, cytoplasmic, calcineurin-dependent 1 (NFATc1). The immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM)-dependent pathway has been identified as a co-stimulatory pathway in osteoclasts. Osteoclast-associated receptor (OSCAR) and triggering receptor expressed in myeloid cells (TREM2) are essential receptors that pair with adaptor molecules Fc receptor common gamma chain (FcR{gamma}) and DNAX-activating protein 12 kDa (DAP12) respectively to induce calcium signalling. Treatment with calcineurin-NFAT inhibitors, Tacrolimus (FK506) and the 11R-VIVIT (VIVIT) peptide, reduces NFATc1 expression consistent with a reduction in osteoclast differentiation and activity. This study aimed to investigate the effects of inhibiting calcineurin-NFAT signalling on the expression of ITAM factors and late stage osteoclast genes including cathepsin K (CathK), Beta 3 integrin ({beta}3) and Annexin VIII (AnnVIII). Human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were differentiated with RANKL and macrophage-colony stimulating factor (M-CSF) over 10 days in the presence or absence of FK506 or VIVIT. Osteoclast formation (as assessed by tartrate resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP)) and activity (assessed by dentine pit resorption) were significantly reduced with treatment. Quantitative real

  16. The Src homology 2 domain-containing inositol 5-phosphatase negatively regulates Fcgamma receptor-mediated phagocytosis through immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif-bearing phagocytic receptors.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Koji; Malykhin, Alexander; Coggeshall, K Mark

    2002-11-01

    Molecular mechanisms by which the Src homology 2 domain-containing inositol 5-phosphatase (SHIP) negatively regulates phagocytosis in macrophages are unclear. We addressed the issue using bone marrow-derived macrophages from FcgammaR- or SHIP-deficient mice. Phagocytic activities of macrophages from FcgammaRII(b)(-/-) and SHIP(-/-) mice were enhanced to a similar extent, relative to those from wild type. However, calcium influx was only marginally affected in FcgammaRII(b)(-/-), but greatly enhanced in SHIP(-/-) macrophages. Furthermore, SHIP was phosphorylated on tyrosine residues upon FcgammaR aggregation even in macrophages from FcgammaRII(b)(-/-) mice or upon clustering of a chimeric receptor containing CD8 and the immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM)-bearing gamma-chain or human-restricted FcgammaRIIa. These findings indicate that, unlike B cells, SHIP is efficiently phosphorylated in the absence of an immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibition motif (ITIM)-bearing receptor. We further demonstrate that SHIP directly bound to phosphorylated peptides derived from FcgammaRIIa with a high affinity, comparable to that of FcgammaRII(b). Lastly, FcgammaRIIa-mediated phagocytosis was significantly enhanced in THP-1 cells overexpressing dominant-negative form of SHIP in the absence of FcgammaRII(b). These results indicate that SHIP negatively regulates FcgammaR-mediated phagocytosis through all ITAM-containing IgG receptors using a molecular mechanism distinct from that in B cells.

  17. SHIP-1 Couples to the Dectin-1 hemITAM and Selectively Modulates Reactive Oxygen Species Production in Dendritic Cells in Response to Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Blanco-Menéndez, Noelia; del Fresno, Carlos; Fernandes, Sandra; Calvo, Enrique; Conde-Garrosa, Ruth; Kerr, William G; Sancho, David

    2015-11-01

    Dectin-1 (Clec7a) is a paradigmatic C-type lectin receptor that binds Syk through a hemITAM motif and couples sensing of pathogens such as fungi to induction of innate responses. Dectin-1 engagement triggers a plethora of activating events, but little is known about the modulation of such pathways. Trying to define a more precise picture of early Dectin-1 signaling, we explored the interactome of the intracellular tail of the receptor in mouse dendritic cells. We found unexpected binding of SHIP-1 phosphatase to the phosphorylated hemITAM. SHIP-1 colocalized with Dectin-1 during phagocytosis of zymosan in a hemITAM-dependent fashion. Moreover, endogenous SHIP-1 relocated to live or heat-killed Candida albicans-containing phagosomes in a Dectin-1-dependent manner in GM-CSF-derived bone marrow cells (GM-BM). However, SHIP-1 absence in GM-BM did not affect activation of MAPK or production of cytokines and readouts dependent on NF-κB and NFAT. Notably, ROS production was enhanced in SHIP-1-deficient GM-BM treated with heat-killed C. albicans, live C. albicans, or the specific Dectin-1 agonists curdlan or whole glucan particles. This increased oxidative burst was dependent on Dectin-1, Syk, PI3K, phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase 1, and NADPH oxidase. GM-BM from CD11c∆SHIP-1 mice also showed increased killing activity against live C. albicans that was dependent on Dectin-1, Syk, and NADPH oxidase. These results illustrate the complexity of myeloid C-type lectin receptor signaling, and how an activating hemITAM can also couple to intracellular inositol phosphatases to modulate selected functional responses and tightly regulate processes such as ROS production that could be deleterious to the host.

  18. Differential interaction of Crkl with Cbl or C3G, Hef-1, and gamma subunit immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif in signaling of myeloid high affinity Fc receptor for IgG (Fc gamma RI).

    PubMed

    Kyono, W T; de Jong, R; Park, R K; Liu, Y; Heisterkamp, N; Groffen, J; Durden, D L

    1998-11-15

    Cbl-Crkl and Crkl-C3G interactions have been implicated in T cell and B cell receptor signaling and in the regulation of the small GTPase, Rap1. Recent evidence suggests that Rap1 plays a prominent role in the regulation of immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM) signaling. To gain insight into the role of Crkl in myeloid ITAM signaling, we investigated Cbl-Crkl and Crkl-C3G interactions following Fc gamma RI aggregation in U937IF cells. Fc gamma RI cross-linking of U937IF cells results in the tyrosine phosphorylation of Cbl, Crkl, and Hef-1, an increase in the association of Crkl with Cbl via direct SH2 domain interaction and increased Crkl-Hef-1 binding. Crkl constitutively binds to the guanine nucleotide-releasing protein, C3G, via direct SH3 domain binding. Our data show that distinct Cbl-Crkl and Crkl-C3G complexes exist in myeloid cells, suggesting that these complexes may modulate distinct signaling events. Anti-Crkl immunoprecipitations demonstrate that the ITAM-containing gamma subunit of Fc gamma RI is induced to form a complex with the Crkl protein, and Crkl binds to the cytoskeletal protein, Hef-1. The induced association of Crkl with Cbl, Hef-1, and Fc gamma RI gamma after Fc gamma RI activation and the constitutive association between C3G and Crkl provide the first evidence that a Fc gamma RI gamma-Crkl-C3G complex may link ITAM receptors to the activation of Rap1 in myeloid cells.

  19. The high-affinity immunoglobulin E receptor (FcepsilonRI) regulates mitochondrial calcium uptake and a dihydropyridine receptor-mediated calcium influx in mast cells: Role of the FcepsilonRIbeta chain immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Yoshihiro; Yoshimaru, Tetsuro; Inoue, Toshio; Nunomura, Satoshi; Ra, Chisei

    2008-04-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests that mitochondria take up calcium upon receptor (agonist) stimulation and that this contributes to the dynamics of spatiotemporal calcium signaling. We have previously shown that engagement of the high-affinity receptor for immunoglobulin E (FcepsilonRI) stimulates mitochondrial calcium ([Ca2+]m) uptake in mast cells. The present study was undertaken to investigate the mechanisms and biological significance of FcepsilonRI regulation of [Ca2+]m. Antigen stimulated [Ca2+]m uptake in a dose-dependent manner with a minimal effective dose of 0.03-3 ng/ml. This [Ca2+]m uptake took place immediately, reaching its peak within minutes and was inhibited by the src family kinase inhibitor PP1 and phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase inhibitor wortmannin. Analyses using mast cells expressing the wild-type or the mutated type of the FcepsilonRIbeta immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM) in which all tyrosine residues were replaced by phenylalanine revealed that the FcepsilonRIbeta ITAM is essential for a sustained [Ca2+]m uptake. The FcepsilonRIbeta ITAM was essential for overall calcium response upon weak FcepsilonRI stimulation (at low antigen concentration), while upon strong stimulation (at high antigen concentration) it appeared necessary selectively to an immediate calcium response that was sensitive to the dihydropyridine receptor (DHPR) antagonist nifedipine and wortmannin but not to the store-operated calcium entry (SOCE) antagonists such as 2-aminoethoxyphenyl borate and SK&F96365. These data demonstrate that the FcepsilonRIbeta regulates [Ca2+]m uptake in mast cells via the ITAM and suggest that this plays a key role in regulating calcium influx especially that induced via a DHPR-mediated calcium channel.

  20. Differential dephosphorylation of the FcRgamma immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif tyrosines with dissimilar potential for activating Syk.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Toshiyuki; Suzuki, Ryo; Backlund, Peter S; Yamashita, Yumi; Yergey, Alfred L; Rivera, Juan

    2008-10-17

    The cell surface-expressed gamma chain of the high affinity receptor for IgE (FcepsilonRI) can be phosphorylated on two tyrosine residues of the immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM), leading to recruitment and activation of spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk), a kinase that is essential for mast cell signaling and allergic responses. However, it is not known whether preferential phosphorylation or dephosphorylation of the two individual FcRgamma tyrosines (the N-terminal Tyr47 and C-terminal Tyr58) could regulate Syk activation. Herein we report that phosphorylation of only Tyr58 was able to elicit Syk phosphorylation and a weak rise in intracellular calcium, suggesting that Tyr58 phosphorylation may be distinctively important for Syk activation. In vitro and in vivo studies revealed that both Tyr47 and Tyr58 could be similarly phosphorylated. However, mass spectrometric analysis of the phosphorylated FcepsilonRgamma from bone marrow-derived mast cells showed that phosphorylation at Tyr47 was at least 2-fold greater than at Tyr58. This suggested that, once phosphorylated, Tyr58 is preferentially dephosphorylated. In vitro studies demonstrated more efficient dephosphorylation of Tyr58 (by the receptor-associated phosphatases SHP-1 and SHP-2) than of Tyr47. Analysis of Syk binding to wild type and mutant phosphorylated FcepsilonRI revealed that mutation at Tyr58 almost completely ablated Syk binding, whereas mutation at Tyr47 moderately reduced Syk binding. The findings argue for a novel regulatory mechanism, where dephosphorylation of phospho-Tyr58 is likely to promote the down-regulation of Syk activation and suppression of mast cell responses.

  1. Regulation of ITAM adaptor molecules and their receptors by inhibition of calcineurin-NFAT signalling during late stage osteoclast differentiation.

    PubMed

    Zawawi, M S F; Dharmapatni, A A S S K; Cantley, M D; McHugh, K P; Haynes, D R; Crotti, T N

    2012-10-19

    Osteoclasts are specialised bone resorptive cells responsible for both physiological and pathological bone loss. Osteoclast differentiation and activity is dependent upon receptor activator NF-kappa-B ligand (RANKL) interacting with its receptor RANK to induce the transcription factor, nuclear factor of activated T-cells, cytoplasmic, calcineurin-dependent 1 (NFATc1). The immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM)-dependent pathway has been identified as a co-stimulatory pathway in osteoclasts. Osteoclast-associated receptor (OSCAR) and triggering receptor expressed in myeloid cells (TREM2) are essential receptors that pair with adaptor molecules Fc receptor common gamma chain (FcRγ) and DNAX-activating protein 12kDa (DAP12) respectively to induce calcium signalling. Treatment with calcineurin-NFAT inhibitors, Tacrolimus (FK506) and the 11R-VIVIT (VIVIT) peptide, reduces NFATc1 expression consistent with a reduction in osteoclast differentiation and activity. This study aimed to investigate the effects of inhibiting calcineurin-NFAT signalling on the expression of ITAM factors and late stage osteoclast genes including cathepsin K (CathK), Beta 3 integrin (β3) and Annexin VIII (AnnVIII). Human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were differentiated with RANKL and macrophage-colony stimulating factor (M-CSF) over 10days in the presence or absence of FK506 or VIVIT. Osteoclast formation (as assessed by tartrate resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP)) and activity (assessed by dentine pit resorption) were significantly reduced with treatment. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) analysis demonstrated that FK506 treatment significantly (p<0.05) reduced the expression of NFATc1, CathK, OSCAR, FcRγ, TREM2 and DAP12 during the terminal stage of osteoclast formation. VIVIT treatment significantly (p<0.05) decreased CathK, OSCAR, FcRγ, and AnnVIII, gene expression. This data suggest FK506 and VIVIT act differently in targeting the

  2. Enhanced immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif signaling is related to pathological bone resorption during critical illness.

    PubMed

    Vanhees, I; Gunst, J; Janssens, T; Wauters, A; Van Herck, E; Van Cromphaut, S; Van den Berghe, G; Owen, H C

    2013-11-01

    Prolonged critically ill patients present with distinct alterations in calcium and bone metabolism. Circulating bone formation markers are reduced and bone resorption markers are substantially elevated, indicating an uncoupling between osteoclast and osteoblast activity, possibly resulting in pronounced bone loss, impaired traumatic or surgical fracture healing, and osteoporosis. In addition, we have previously shown that increased circulating osteoclast precursors in critically ill patients result in increased osteoclastogenesis in vitro, possibly through FcγRIII signaling. In the current study, we investigated the effects of sustained critical illness on bone metabolism at the tissue level in a standardized rabbit model of prolonged (7 days), burn injury-induced critical illness. This in vivo model showed a reduction in serum ionized calcium and osteocalcin levels, as is seen in humans. Trabecular area, bone mineral content, and -density were decreased in sick rabbits [by 43% (p<0.01), 31% (p<0.01), and 29% (p<0.05), respectively], as was the trabecular gene expression of osteoblast and angiogenesis markers, indicating decreased bone formation and impaired vascularization. There was no change in the expression of osteoclast differentiation markers from the canonical RANK/RANKL/OPG pathway, however, there was an increase in expression of markers from the non-canonical, immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM) signaling pathway, FcγRIII, and DAP12 (148% and 59%, respectively; p<0.01). The current study has shown a detrimental effect of prolonged critical illness on trabecular bone integrity, possibly explained by reduced osteoblast differentiation and angiogenesis, coupled with increased osteoclastogenesis signaling that may be mediated via the non-canonical immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif signaling pathway.

  3. Immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motif (ITIM)-mediated inhibitory signaling is regulated by sequential phosphorylation mediated by distinct nonreceptor tyrosine kinases: a case study involving PECAM-1.

    PubMed

    Tourdot, Benjamin E; Brenner, Michelle K; Keough, Kathleen C; Holyst, Trudy; Newman, Peter J; Newman, Debra K

    2013-04-16

    The activation state of many blood and vascular cells is tightly controlled by a delicate balance between receptors that contain immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motifs (ITAMs) and those that contain immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motifs (ITIMs). Precisely how the timing of cellular activation by ITAM-coupled receptors is regulated by ITIM-containing receptors is, however, poorly understood. Using platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule 1 (PECAM-1) as a prototypical ITIM-bearing receptor, we demonstrate that initiation of inhibitory signaling occurs via a novel, sequential process in which Src family kinases phosphorylate the C-terminal ITIM, thereby enabling phosphorylation of the N-terminal ITIM of PECAM-1 by other Src homology 2 domain-containing nonreceptor tyrosine kinases (NRTKs). NRTKs capable of mediating the second phosphorylation event include C-terminal Src kinase (Csk) and Bruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk). Btk and Csk function downstream of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) activation during ITAM-dependent platelet activation. In ITAM-activated platelets that were treated with a PI3K inhibitor, PECAM-1 was phosphorylated but did not bind the tandem SH2 domain-containing tyrosine phosphatase SHP-2, indicating that it was not phosphorylated on its N-terminal ITIM. Csk bound to and phosphorylated PECAM-1 more efficiently than did Btk and required its SH2 domain to perform these functions. Additionally, the phosphorylation of the N-terminal ITIM of Siglec-9 by Csk is enhanced by the prior phosphorylation of its C-terminal ITIM, providing evidence that the ITIMs of other dual ITIM-containing receptors are also sequentially phosphorylated. On the basis of these findings, we propose that sequential ITIM phosphorylation provides a general mechanism for precise temporal control over the recruitment and activation of tandem SH2 domain-containing tyrosine phosphatases that dampen ITAM-dependent signals.

  4. Identification of a novel immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif-containing molecule, STAM2, by mass spectrometry and its involvement in growth factor and cytokine receptor signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Pandey, A; Fernandez, M M; Steen, H; Blagoev, B; Nielsen, M M; Roche, S; Mann, M; Lodish, H F

    2000-12-08

    In an effort to clone novel tyrosine-phosphorylated substrates of the epidermal growth factor receptor, we have initiated an approach coupling affinity purification using anti-phosphotyrosine antibodies to mass spectrometry-based identification. Here, we report the identification of a signaling molecule containing a Src homology 3 domain as well as an immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM). This molecule is 55% identical to a previously isolated molecule designated signal transducing adaptor molecule (STAM) that was identified as an interleukin (IL)-2-induced phosphoprotein and is therefore designated STAM2. Tyrosine phosphorylation of STAM2 is induced by growth factors such as epidermal growth factor and platelet-derived growth factor as well as by cytokines like IL-3. Several of the deletion mutants tested except the one containing only the amino-terminal region underwent tyrosine phosphorylation upon growth factor stimulation, implying that STAM2 is phosphorylated on several tyrosine residues. STAM2 is downstream of the Jak family of kinases since coexpression of STAM2 with Jak1 or Jak2 but not an unrelated Tec family kinase, Etk, resulted in its tyrosine phosphorylation. In contrast to epidermal growth factor receptor-induced phosphorylation, this required the ITAM domain since mutants lacking this region did not undergo tyrosine phosphorylation. Finally, overexpression of wild type STAM2 led to an increase in IL-2-mediated induction of c-Myc promoter activation indicating that it potentiates cytokine receptor signaling.

  5. Myosin II-dependent exclusion of CD45 from the site of Fcγ receptor activation during phagocytosis.

    PubMed

    Yamauchi, Shota; Kawauchi, Keiko; Sawada, Yasuhiro

    2012-09-21

    Fcγ receptor (FcγR)-mediated phagocytosis requires myosin II activity. Here we show that myosin II contributes to FcγR activation and subsequent F-actin assembly at the nascent phagocytic cup. Inhibition of myosin II attenuates phosphorylation of the immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM) of FcγR and binding of Syk to the ITAM. Furthermore, FcγR clusters independently of myosin II activity at the phagocytic cup, from which the receptor-like protein tyrosine phosphatase CD45 is excluded depending on myosin II activity. These findings suggest that myosin II-dependent segregation of CD45 from FcγR facilitates phosphorylation of the ITAM and triggers phagocytosis.

  6. A molecule in teleost fish, related with human MHC-encoded G6F, has a cytoplasmic tail with ITAM and marks the surface of thrombocytes and in some fishes also of erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Ohashi, Ken; Takizawa, Fumio; Tokumaru, Norihiro; Nakayasu, Chihaya; Toda, Hideaki; Fischer, Uwe; Moritomo, Tadaaki; Hashimoto, Keiichiro; Nakanishi, Teruyuki; Dijkstra, Johannes Martinus

    2010-08-01

    In teleost fish, a novel gene G6F-like was identified, encoding a type I transmembrane molecule with four extracellular Ig-like domains and a cytoplasmic tail with putative tyrosine phosphorylation motifs including YxN and an immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM). G6F-like maps to a teleost genomic region where stretches corresponding to human chromosomes 6p (with the MHC), 12p (with CD4 and LAG-3), and 19q are tightly linked. This genomic organization resembles the ancestral "Ur-MHC" proposed for the jawed vertebrate ancestor. The deduced G6F-like molecule shows sequence similarity with members of the CD4/LAG-3 family and with the human major histocompatibility complex-encoded thrombocyte marker G6F. Despite some differences in molecular organization, teleost G6F-like and tetrapod G6F seem orthologous as they map to similar genomic location, share typical motifs in transmembrane and cytoplasmic regions, and are both expressed by thrombocytes/platelets. In the crucian carps goldfish (Carassius auratus auratus) and ginbuna (Carassius auratus langsdorfii), G6F-like was found expressed not only by thrombocytes but also by erythrocytes, supporting that erythroid and thromboid cells in teleost fish form a hematopoietic lineage like they do in mammals. The ITAM-bearing of G6F-like suggests that the molecule plays an important role in cell activation, and G6F-like expression by erythrocytes suggests that these cells have functional overlap potential with thrombocytes.

  7. Clustering of immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif-containing signalling subunits in CD4(+) T cells is an optimal signal for IFN-gamma production, but not for the production of IL-4.

    PubMed

    Annenkov, Alexander E; Daly, Gordon M; Brocker, Thomas; Chernajovsky, Yuti

    2003-05-01

    CD4(+) T cells with pre-defined MHC-unrestricted specificity to type II collagen (CII) were engineered for cell-based anti-inflammatory gene therapy of autoimmune arthritis. To this end, recombinant chimeric immunoreceptors, C2gamma or C2zeta, were expressed in primary mouse keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH)-specific T(h)1 and T(h)2 cells using retrovirus vector-based somatic cell gene transfer. The ectodomain of these tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM)-containing immunoreceptors is a single-chain IgG variable domain of an anti-CII mAb. The engineered cells might arrest migration when they encounter CII in articular cartilage. Up to 19 and 55% of transduced CD4(+) T cells expressed respectively C2gamma and C2zeta. The expression of C2gamma or C2zeta on the surface of CD4(+) T cells was down-regulated upon binding CII, and cells activated in such a way proliferated, up-regulated CD25 expression and produced cytokines. Comparison of cytokine levels normalized by the number of producer cells revealed that C2gamma and C2zeta were as potent as TCR in the induction of IFN-gamma, but induced lower levels of IL-4. It appears that the reason why CD4(+) T cells stimulated through C2gamma and C2zeta produce low levels of IL-4 is a lack of integration between co-stimulatory signals required for the optimal production of this cytokine and the ITAM-dependent signals generated by the immunoreceptors. The significance of these data for the development of anti-inflammatory gene therapy based on CD4(+) T cells targeted to a tissue-specific protein is discussed.

  8. Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli Tir recruits cellular SHP-2 through ITIM motifs to suppress host immune response.

    PubMed

    Yan, Dapeng; Quan, Heming; Wang, Lin; Liu, Feng; Liu, Haipeng; Chen, Jianxia; Cao, Xuetao; Ge, Baoxue

    2013-09-01

    Immune responses to pathogens are regulated by immune receptors containing either an immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM) or an immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motif (ITIM). The important diarrheal pathogen enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) require delivery and insertion of the bacterial translocated intimin receptor (Tir) into the host plasma membrane for pedestal formation. The C-terminal region of Tir, encompassing Y483 and Y511, shares sequence similarity with cellular ITIMs. Here, we show that EPEC Tir suppresses the production of inflammatory cytokines by recruitment of SHP-2 and subsequent deubiquitination of TRAF6 in an ITIM dependent manner. Our findings revealed a novel mechanism by which the EPEC utilize its ITIM motifs to suppress and evade the host innate immune response, which could lead to the development of novel therapeutics to prevent bacterial infection.

  9. US Army Europe: Sharing the ITAM Tenets with Multinational Partners in Africa

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-01

    Any Mission, Anywhere UNCLASSIFIED As of 5 May 2011 USAREUR; Sharing ITAM TenetsUNCLASSIFIED Jeff Andrews USAREUR ITAM Operations Coordinator...Jeffrey.a.andrews@us.army.mil Army Sustainable Range Program (SRP) US Army Europe: Sharing the ITAM Tenets with Multinational Partners in Africa Report...REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2011 to 00-00-2011 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE US Army Europe: Sharing the ITAM Tenets with Multinational

  10. Crammed signaling motifs in the T-cell receptor.

    PubMed

    Borroto, Aldo; Abia, David; Alarcón, Balbino

    2014-09-01

    Although the T cell antigen receptor (TCR) is long known to contain multiple signaling subunits (CD3γ, CD3δ, CD3ɛ and CD3ζ), their role in signal transduction is still not well understood. The presence of at least one immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM) in each CD3 subunit has led to the idea that the multiplication of such elements essentially serves to amplify signals. However, the evolutionary conservation of non-ITAM sequences suggests that each CD3 subunit is likely to have specific non-redundant roles at some stage of development or in mature T cell function. The CD3ɛ subunit is paradigmatic because in a relatively short cytoplasmic sequence (∼55 amino acids) it contains several docking sites for proteins involved in intracellular trafficking and signaling, proteins whose relevance in T cell activation is slowly starting to be revealed. In this review we will summarize our current knowledge on the signaling effectors that bind directly to the TCR and we will propose a hierarchy in their response to TCR triggering.

  11. The EDLL motif: a potent plant transcriptional activation domain from AP2/ERF transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Shiv B; Belachew, Alemu; Ma, Siu Fong; Young, Melinda; Ade, Jules; Shen, Yu; Marion, Colleen M; Holtan, Hans E; Bailey, Adina; Stone, Jeffrey K; Edwards, Leslie; Wallace, Andreah D; Canales, Roger D; Adam, Luc; Ratcliffe, Oliver J; Repetti, Peter P

    2012-06-01

    In plants, the ERF/EREBP family of transcriptional regulators plays a key role in adaptation to various biotic and abiotic stresses. These proteins contain a conserved AP2 DNA-binding domain and several uncharacterized motifs. Here, we describe a short motif, termed 'EDLL', that is present in AtERF98/TDR1 and other clade members from the same AP2 sub-family. We show that the EDLL motif, which has a unique arrangement of acidic amino acids and hydrophobic leucines, functions as a strong activation domain. The motif is transferable to other proteins, and is active at both proximal and distal positions of target promoters. As such, the EDLL motif is able to partly overcome the repression conferred by the AtHB2 transcription factor, which contains an ERF-associated amphiphilic repression (EAR) motif. We further examined the activation potential of EDLL by analysis of the regulation of flowering time by NF-Y (nuclear factor Y) proteins. Genetic evidence indicates that NF-Y protein complexes potentiate the action of CONSTANS in regulation of flowering in Arabidopsis; we show that the transcriptional activation function of CONSTANS can be substituted by direct fusion of the EDLL activation motif to NF-YB subunits. The EDLL motif represents a potent plant activation domain that can be used as a tool to confer transcriptional activation potential to heterologous DNA-binding proteins.

  12. Repression domains of class II ERF transcriptional repressors share an essential motif for active repression.

    PubMed

    Ohta, M; Matsui, K; Hiratsu, K; Shinshi, H; Ohme-Takagi, M

    2001-08-01

    We reported previously that three ERF transcription factors, tobacco ERF3 (NtERF3) and Arabidopsis AtERF3 and AtERF4, which are categorized as class II ERFs, are active repressors of transcription. To clarify the roles of these repressors in transcriptional regulation in plants, we attempted to identify the functional domains of the ERF repressor that mediates the repression of transcription. Analysis of the results of a series of deletions revealed that the C-terminal 35 amino acids of NtERF3 are sufficient to confer the capacity for repression of transcription on a heterologous DNA binding domain. This repression domain suppressed the intermolecular activities of other transcriptional activators. In addition, fusion of this repression domain to the VP16 activation domain completely inhibited the transactivation function of VP16. Comparison of amino acid sequences of class II ERF repressors revealed the conservation of the sequence motif (L)/(F)DLN(L)/(F)(x)P. This motif was essential for repression because mutations within the motif eliminated the capacity for repression. We designated this motif the ERF-associated amphiphilic repression (EAR) motif, and we identified this motif in a number of zinc-finger proteins from wheat, Arabidopsis, and petunia plants. These zinc finger proteins functioned as repressors, and their repression domains were identified as regions that contained an EAR motif.

  13. US Army Europe Integrated Training Area Management (ITAM) Program - Training Support and the Environment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-01

    1UNCLASSIFIED Supporting 7th ArmyReady Thru Training! Integrated Training Area Management Jeff Andrews USAREUR ITAM Operations Coordinator...Jeffrey.a.andrews@us.army.mil Army Sustainable Range Program (SRP) US Army Europe Integrated Training Area Management ( ITAM ) Program – Training Support and...Management ( ITAM ) Program - Training Support and the Environment 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d

  14. A conserved motif mediates both multimer formation and allosteric activation of phosphoglycerate mutase 5.

    PubMed

    Wilkins, Jordan M; McConnell, Cyrus; Tipton, Peter A; Hannink, Mark

    2014-09-05

    Phosphoglycerate mutase 5 (PGAM5) is an atypical mitochondrial Ser/Thr phosphatase that modulates mitochondrial dynamics and participates in both apoptotic and necrotic cell death. The mechanisms that regulate the phosphatase activity of PGAM5 are poorly understood. The C-terminal phosphoglycerate mutase domain of PGAM5 shares homology with the catalytic domains found in other members of the phosphoglycerate mutase family, including a conserved histidine that is absolutely required for catalytic activity. However, this conserved domain is not sufficient for maximal phosphatase activity. We have identified a highly conserved amino acid motif, WDXNWD, located within the unique N-terminal region, which is required for assembly of PGAM5 into large multimeric complexes. Alanine substitutions within the WDXNWD motif abolish the formation of multimeric complexes and markedly reduce phosphatase activity of PGAM5. A peptide containing the WDXNWD motif dissociates the multimeric complex and reduces but does not fully abolish phosphatase activity. Addition of the WDXNWD-containing peptide in trans to a mutant PGAM5 protein lacking the WDXNWD motif markedly increases phosphatase activity of the mutant protein. Our results are consistent with an intermolecular allosteric regulation mechanism for the phosphatase activity of PGAM5, in which the assembly of PGAM5 into multimeric complexes, mediated by the WDXNWD motif, results in maximal activation of phosphatase activity. Our results suggest the possibility of identifying small molecules that function as allosteric regulators of the phosphatase activity of PGAM5.

  15. Subtle Changes in Motif Positioning Cause Tissue-Specific Effects on Robustness of an Enhancer's Activity

    PubMed Central

    Erceg, Jelena; Saunders, Timothy E.; Girardot, Charles; Devos, Damien P.; Hufnagel, Lars; Furlong, Eileen E. M.

    2014-01-01

    Deciphering the specific contribution of individual motifs within cis-regulatory modules (CRMs) is crucial to understanding how gene expression is regulated and how this process is affected by sequence variation. But despite vast improvements in the ability to identify where transcription factors (TFs) bind throughout the genome, we are limited in our ability to relate information on motif occupancy to function from sequence alone. Here, we engineered 63 synthetic CRMs to systematically assess the relationship between variation in the content and spacing of motifs within CRMs to CRM activity during development using Drosophila transgenic embryos. In over half the cases, very simple elements containing only one or two types of TF binding motifs were capable of driving specific spatio-temporal patterns during development. Different motif organizations provide different degrees of robustness to enhancer activity, ranging from binary on-off responses to more subtle effects including embryo-to-embryo and within-embryo variation. By quantifying the effects of subtle changes in motif organization, we were able to model biophysical rules that explain CRM behavior and may contribute to the spatial positioning of CRM activity in vivo. For the same enhancer, the effects of small differences in motif positions varied in developmentally related tissues, suggesting that gene expression may be more susceptible to sequence variation in one tissue compared to another. This result has important implications for human eQTL studies in which many associated mutations are found in cis-regulatory regions, though the mechanism for how they affect tissue-specific gene expression is often not understood. PMID:24391522

  16. Retention of duplicated ITAM-containing transmembrane signaling subunits in the tetraploid amphibian species Xenopus laevis.

    PubMed

    Guselnikov, S V; Grayfer, L; De Jesús Andino, F; Rogozin, I B; Robert, J; Taranin, A V

    2015-11-01

    The ITAM-bearing transmembrane signaling subunits (TSS) are indispensable components of activating leukocyte receptor complexes. The TSS-encoding genes map to paralogous chromosomal regions, which are thought to arise from ancient genome tetraploidization(s). To assess a possible role of tetraploidization in the TSS evolution, we studied TSS and other functionally linked genes in the amphibian species Xenopus laevis whose genome was duplicated about 40 MYR ago. We found that X. laevis has retained a duplicated set of sixteen TSS genes, all except one being transcribed. Furthermore, duplicated TCRα loci and genes encoding TSS-coupling protein kinases have also been retained. No clear evidence for functional divergence of the TSS paralogs was obtained from gene expression and sequence analyses. We suggest that the main factor of maintenance of duplicated TSS genes in X. laevis was a protein dosage effect and that this effect might have facilitated the TSS set expansion in early vertebrates.

  17. The MRE11 GAR motif regulates DNA double-strand break processing and ATR activation

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Zhenbao; Vogel, Gillian; Coulombe, Yan; Dubeau, Danielle; Spehalski, Elizabeth; Hébert, Josée; Ferguson, David O; Masson, Jean Yves; Richard, Stéphane

    2012-01-01

    The MRE11/RAD50/NBS1 complex is the primary sensor rapidly recruited to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). MRE11 is known to be arginine methylated by PRMT1 within its glycine-arginine-rich (GAR) motif. In this study, we report a mouse knock-in allele of Mre11 that substitutes the arginines with lysines in the GAR motif and generates the MRE11RK protein devoid of methylated arginines. The Mre11RK/RK mice were hypersensitive to γ-irradiation (IR) and the cells from these mice displayed cell cycle checkpoint defects and chromosome instability. Moreover, the Mre11RK/RK MEFs exhibited ATR/CHK1 signaling defects and impairment in the recruitment of RPA and RAD51 to the damaged sites. The MRKRN complex formed and localized to the sites of DNA damage and normally activated the ATM pathway in response to IR. The MRKRN complex exhibited exonuclease and DNA-binding defects in vitro responsible for the impaired DNA end resection and ATR activation observed in vivo in response to IR. Our findings provide genetic evidence for the critical role of the MRE11 GAR motif in DSB repair, and demonstrate a mechanistic link between post-translational modifications at the MRE11 GAR motif and DSB processing, as well as the ATR/CHK1 checkpoint signaling. PMID:21826105

  18. Analysis of the DXD motifs in human xylosyltransferase I required for enzyme activity.

    PubMed

    Götting, Christian; Müller, Sandra; Schöttler, Manuela; Schön, Sylvia; Prante, Christian; Brinkmann, Thomas; Kuhn, Joachim; Kleesiek, Knut

    2004-10-08

    Human xylosyltransferase I (XT-I) is the initial enzyme involved in the biosynthesis of the glycosaminoglycan linker region in proteoglycans. Here, we tested the importance of the DXD motifs at positions 314-316 and 745-747 for enzyme activity and the nucleotide binding capacity of human XT-I. Mutations of the 314DED316 motif did not have any effect on enzyme activity, whereas alterations of the 745DWD747 motif resulted in reduced XT-I activity. Loss of function was observed after exchange of the highly conserved aspartic acid at position 745 with glycine. However, mutation of Asp745 to glutamic acid retained full enzyme activity, indicating the importance of an acidic amino acid at this position. Reduced substrate affinity was observed for mutants D747G (Km=6.9 microm) and D747E (Km=4.4 microm) in comparison with the wild-type enzyme (Km=0.9 microm). Changing the central tryptophan to a neutral, basic, or acidic amino acid resulted in a 6-fold lower Vmax, with Km values comparable with those of the wild-type enzyme. Despite the major effect of the DWD motif on XT-I activity, nucleotide binding was not abolished in the D745G and D747G mutants, as revealed by UDP-bead binding assays. Ki values for inhibition by UDP were determined to be 1.9-24.6 microm for the XT-I mutants. The properties of binding of XT-I to heparin-beads, the Ki constants for noncompetitive inhibition by heparin, and the activation by protamine were not altered by the generated mutations.

  19. Highly active subnano palladium clusters embedded in i-motif DNA.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jinli; Wang, Xian; Fu, Yan; Han, You; Cheng, Jingyao; Zhang, Yanqing; Li, Wei

    2013-11-26

    Highly active subnano Pd clusters were synthesized using i-motif DNA as the template through characterization via ESI MS, DLS, XPS, UV-vis, and FTIR. It is indicated that Pd1-Pd5 clusters are generated at a [Pd]/[base] ratio of 0.2, Pd8 to Pd9 clusters are generated at a [Pd]/[base] ratio of 0.5, and large nanoparticles with the size about 2.6 nm are formed at a [Pd]/[base] ratio of 2.0. The i-motif-stabilized Pd8-Pd9 clusters show high catalytic activity toward the reduction of 4-nitrophenol with a relative rate constant value of 2034 min(-1) (mM Pd)(-1). DFT calculations disclose that the unique structure of the i-motif with consecutive hemiprotonated CH(+)·C pairs can efficiently ligate Pd ions at the N3 sites of cytosines and that the synthesized Pd clusters consist of metallic Pd atoms as well as positively charged Pd that is ligated by nucleobases, which is capable of facilitating the activation of the nitryl group of 4-nitrophenol. This work suggests a promising pathway to preparing subnano metal catalysts with enhanced catalytic activity using programmable DNA scaffolds.

  20. Mitogen-activated protein kinase 4-like carrying an MEY motif instead of a TXY motif is involved in ozone tolerance and regulation of stomatal closure in tobacco

    PubMed Central

    Yanagawa, Yuki; Yoda, Hiroshi; Osaki, Kohei; Amano, Yuta; Aono, Mitsuko; Seo, Shigemi; Kuchitsu, Kazuyuki; Mitsuhara, Ichiro

    2016-01-01

    The mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs/MPKs) are important factors in the regulation of signal transduction in response to biotic and abiotic stresses. Previously, we characterized a MAPK from tobacco, Nicotiana tabacum MPK4 (NtMPK4). Here, we found a highly homologous gene, NtMPK4-like (NtMPK4L), in tobacco as well as other species in Solanaceae and Gramineae. Deduced amino acid sequences of their translation products carried MEY motifs instead of conserved TXY motifs of the MAPK family. We isolated the full length NtMPK4L gene and examined the physiological functions of NtMPK4L. We revealed that NtMPK4L was activated by wounding, like NtMPK4. However, a constitutively active salicylic acid-induced protein kinase kinase (SIPKKEE), which phosphorylates NtMPK4, did not phosphorylate NtMPK4L. Moreover, a tyrosine residue in the MEY motif was not involved in NtMPK4L activation. We also found that NtMPK4L-silenced plants showed rapid transpiration caused by remarkably open stomata. In addition, NtMPK4L-silenced plants completely lost the ability to close stomata upon ozone treatment and were highly sensitive to ozone, suggesting that this atypical MAPK plays a role in ozone tolerance through stomatal regulation. PMID:27126796

  1. The immunostimulatory activity of CpG oligonucleotides on microglial N9 cells is affected by a polyguanosine motif.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhiren; Guo, Ketai; Schluesener, Hermann J

    2005-04-01

    Oligonucleotides (ODN) with hexameric motifs containing central unmethylated CpG dinucleotides are immunostimulatory. Also ODN with continuous guanosines (polyG motif) show a wide range of immunological activity. Depending on the position, the chemical property of the ODN backbone and the cell type, polyG motifs have either an enhancing or a suppressing effect on the immunostimulatory activity of the CpG-ODN. Microglial cells are central components of the innate immune system of the brain and are activated by CpG-ODN in vitro and in vivo. Here we present the analysis of the immunomodulatory effects of CpG-ODN carrying a polyG motif on the microglial cell line N9. Our data show that N9 cells express Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) and are activated by CpG-ODN, which leads to expression of interleukin-12p40 (IL12p40), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). A 3'-end polyG motif inhibits phosphothioate (PS) CpG-ODN immunostimulatory activity but enhances the immunostimulatory activity of phosphodiester (PE) CpG-ODN. Correspondingly, a 3'-end polyG motif improves the cellular uptake of PE CpG-ODN but does not change their cellular distribution pattern. Furthermore, PE CpG-ODN with a 3'-end polyG motif interact with a much higher number of cellular proteins than PE CpG-ODN. These data indicate that the 3'-end polyG motif could enhance the immunostimulatory activity of PE CpG-ODN in microglial N9 cells through increasing interaction with cellular proteins. Therefore PE CpG-ODN containing a 3'-end polyG motif resulting in increased immunostimulatory activity might be promising alternate analogues for studies in the central nervous system.

  2. Species-Specific Minimal Sequence Motif for Oligodeoxyribonucleotides Activating Mouse TLR9.

    PubMed

    Pohar, Jelka; Lainšček, Duško; Fukui, Ryutaro; Yamamoto, Chikako; Miyake, Kensuke; Jerala, Roman; Benčina, Mojca

    2015-11-01

    Synthetic oligodeoxyribonucleotides (ODNs) containing unmethylated CpG recapitulate the activation of TLR9 by microbial DNA. ODNs are potent stimulators of the immune response in cells expressing TLR9. Despite extensive use of mice as experimental animals in basic and applied immunological research, the key sequence determinants that govern the activation of mouse TLR9 by ODNs have not been well defined. We performed a systematic investigation of the sequence motif of B class phosphodiester ODNs to identify the sequence properties that govern mouse TLR9 activation. In contrast to ODNs activating human TLR9, where the minimal sequence motif for the receptor activation comprises a pair of closely positioned CpGs we found that the mouse TLR9 requires a single CpG positioned 4-6 nt from the 5'-end. Activation is augmented by a 5'TCC sequence one to three nucleotides from the CG. The distance of the CG dinucleotide of four to six nucleotides from the 5'-end and the ODN's length fine-tunes activation of mouse macrophages. Length of the ODN <23 and >29 nt decreases activation of dendritic cells. The ODNs with minimal sequence induce Th1-type cytokine synthesis in dendritic cells and confirm the expression of cell surface markers in B cells. Identification of the minimal sequence provides an insight into the sequence selectivity of mouse TLR9 and points to the differences in the receptor selectivity between species probably as a result of differences in the receptor binding sites.

  3. Characterization of human TCR Vbeta gene promoter. Role of the dodecamer motif in promoter activity.

    PubMed

    Deng, X; Sun, G R; Zheng, Q; Li, Y

    1998-09-11

    During T-lymphocyte development, the T-cell antigen receptor (TCR) gene expression is controlled by its promoter and enhancer elements and regulated in tissue- and development stage-specific manner. To uncover the promoter function and to define positive and negative regulatory elements in TCR gene promoters, the promoter activities from 13 human TCR Vbeta genes were determined by the transient transfection system and luciferase reporter assay. Although most of the TCR Vbeta gene promoters that we tested are inactive by themselves, some promoters were found to be constitutively strong. Among them, Vbeta6.7 is the strongest. 5'-Deletion and fragmentation experiments have narrowed the full promoter activity of Vbeta6.7 to a fragment of 147 base pairs immediately 5' to the transcription initiation site. A decanucleotide motif with the consensus sequence AGTGAYRTCA has been found to be conserved in most TCR Vbeta gene promoters. There are three such decamer motifs in the promoter region of Vbeta6.7, and the contribution of each such motif to the promoter activity has been examined. Further site-directed mutagenesis analyses showed that: 1) when two Ts in the decamer were mutated, the promoter activity was totally abolished; 2) when two additional nucleotides 3' to the end of decamer were mutated, the promoter activity was decreased to two-thirds of the full level; and 3) when the element with the sequence AGTGATGTCACT was inserted into other promoters, the original weak promoters become very strong. Taken together, our data suggest that the positive regulatory element in Vbeta6.7 should be considered a dodecamer rather than a decamer and that it confers strong basal transcriptional activity on TCR Vbeta genes.

  4. Multiple Binding Modes between HNF4α and the LXXLL Motifs of PGC-1α Lead to Full Activation*

    PubMed Central

    Rha, Geun Bae; Wu, Guangteng; Shoelson, Steven E.; Chi, Young-In

    2009-01-01

    Hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α (HNF4α) is a novel nuclear receptor that participates in a hierarchical network of transcription factors regulating the development and physiology of such vital organs as the liver, pancreas, and kidney. Among the various transcriptional coregulators with which HNF4α interacts, peroxisome proliferation-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) coactivator 1α (PGC-1α) represents a novel coactivator whose activation is unusually robust and whose binding mode appears to be distinct from that of canonical coactivators such as NCoA/SRC/p160 family members. To elucidate the potentially unique molecular mechanism of PGC-1α recruitment, we have determined the crystal structure of HNF4α in complex with a fragment of PGC-1α containing all three of its LXXLL motifs. Despite the presence of all three LXXLL motifs available for interactions, only one is bound at the canonical binding site, with no additional contacts observed between the two proteins. However, a close inspection of the electron density map indicates that the bound LXXLL motif is not a selected one but an averaged structure of more than one LXXLL motif. Further biochemical and functional studies show that the individual LXXLL motifs can bind but drive only minimal transactivation. Only when more than one LXXLL motif is involved can significant transcriptional activity be measured, and full activation requires all three LXXLL motifs. These findings led us to propose a model wherein each LXXLL motif has an additive effect, and the multiple binding modes by HNF4α toward the LXXLL motifs of PGC-1α could account for the apparent robust activation by providing a flexible mechanism for combinatorial recruitment of additional coactivators and mediators. PMID:19846556

  5. Mesoscale infraslow spontaneous membrane potential fluctuations recapitulate high-frequency activity cortical motifs.

    PubMed

    Chan, Allen W; Mohajerani, Majid H; LeDue, Jeffrey M; Wang, Yu Tian; Murphy, Timothy H

    2015-07-20

    Neuroimaging of spontaneous, resting-state infraslow (<0.1 Hz) brain activity has been used to reveal the regional functional organization of the brain and may lead to the identification of novel biomarkers of neurological disease. However, these imaging studies generally rely on indirect measures of neuronal activity and the nature of the neuronal activity correlate remains unclear. Here we show, using wide-field, voltage-sensitive dye imaging, the mesoscale spatiotemporal structure and pharmacological dependence of spontaneous, infraslow cortical activity in anaesthetized and awake mice. Spontaneous infraslow activity is regionally distinct, correlates with electroencephalography and local field potential recordings, and shows bilateral symmetry between cortical hemispheres. Infraslow activity is attenuated and its functional structure abolished after treatment with voltage-gated sodium channel and glutamate receptor antagonists. Correlation analysis reveals patterns of infraslow regional connectivity that are analogous to cortical motifs observed from higher-frequency spontaneous activity and reflect the underlying framework of intracortical axonal projections.

  6. Mesoscale infraslow spontaneous membrane potential fluctuations recapitulate high-frequency activity cortical motifs

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Allen W.; Mohajerani, Majid H.; LeDue, Jeffrey M.; Wang, Yu Tian; Murphy, Timothy H.

    2016-01-01

    Neuroimaging of spontaneous, resting-state infraslow (<0.1 Hz) brain activity has been used to reveal the regional functional organization of the brain and may lead to the identification of novel biomarkers of neurological disease. However, these imaging studies generally rely on indirect measures of neuronal activity and the nature of the neuronal activity correlate remains unclear. Here we show, using wide-field, voltage-sensitive dye imaging, the mesoscale spatiotemporal structure and pharmacological dependence of spontaneous, infraslow cortical activity in anaesthetized and awake mice. Spontaneous infraslow activity is regionally distinct, correlates with electroencephalography and local field potential recordings, and shows bilateral symmetry between cortical hemispheres. Infraslow activity is attenuated and its functional structure abolished after treatment with voltage-gated sodium channel and glutamate receptor antagonists. Correlation analysis reveals patterns of infraslow regional connectivity that are analogous to cortical motifs observed from higher-frequency spontaneous activity and reflect the underlying framework of intracortical axonal projections. PMID:26190168

  7. GIV/Girdin activates Gαi and inhibits Gαs via the same motif

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Vijay; Bhandari, Deepali; Leyme, Anthony; Aznar, Nicolas; Midde, Krishna K.; Lo, I-Chung; Ear, Jason; Niesman, Ingrid; López-Sánchez, Inmaculada; Blanco-Canosa, Juan Bautista; von Zastrow, Mark; Garcia-Marcos, Mikel; Farquhar, Marilyn G.; Ghosh, Pradipta

    2016-01-01

    We previously showed that guanine nucleotide-binding (G) protein α subunit (Gα)-interacting vesicle-associated protein (GIV), a guanine-nucleotide exchange factor (GEF), transactivates Gα activity-inhibiting polypeptide 1 (Gαi) proteins in response to growth factors, such as EGF, using a short C-terminal motif. Subsequent work demonstrated that GIV also binds Gαs and that inactive Gαs promotes maturation of endosomes and shuts down mitogenic MAPK–ERK1/2 signals from endosomes. However, the mechanism and consequences of dual coupling of GIV to two G proteins, Gαi and Gαs, remained unknown. Here we report that GIV is a bifunctional modulator of G proteins; it serves as a guanine nucleotide dissociation inhibitor (GDI) for Gαs using the same motif that allows it to serve as a GEF for Gαi. Upon EGF stimulation, GIV modulates Gαi and Gαs sequentially: first, a key phosphomodification favors the assembly of GIV–Gαi complexes and activates GIV’s GEF function; then a second phosphomodification terminates GIV’s GEF function, triggers the assembly of GIV–Gαs complexes, and activates GIV’s GDI function. By comparing WT and GIV mutants, we demonstrate that GIV inhibits Gαs activity in cells responding to EGF. Consequently, the cAMP→PKA→cAMP response element-binding protein signaling axis is inhibited, the transit time of EGF receptor through early endosomes are accelerated, mitogenic MAPK–ERK1/2 signals are rapidly terminated, and proliferation is suppressed. These insights define a paradigm in G-protein signaling in which a pleiotropically acting modulator uses the same motif both to activate and to inhibit G proteins. Our findings also illuminate how such modulation of two opposing Gα proteins integrates downstream signals and cellular responses. PMID:27621449

  8. A Conserved GPG-Motif in the HIV-1 Nef Core Is Required for Principal Nef-Activities.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Bonet, Marta; Palladino, Claudia; Briz, Veronica; Rudolph, Jochen M; Fackler, Oliver T; Relloso, Miguel; Muñoz-Fernandez, Maria Angeles; Madrid, Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    To find out new determinants required for Nef activity we performed a functional alanine scanning analysis along a discrete but highly conserved region at the core of HIV-1 Nef. We identified the GPG-motif, located at the 121-137 region of HIV-1 NL4.3 Nef, as a novel protein signature strictly required for the p56Lck dependent Nef-induced CD4-downregulation in T-cells. Since the Nef-GPG motif was dispensable for CD4-downregulation in HeLa-CD4 cells, Nef/AP-1 interaction and Nef-dependent effects on Tf-R trafficking, the observed effects on CD4 downregulation cannot be attributed to structure constraints or to alterations on general protein trafficking. Besides, we found that the GPG-motif was also required for Nef-dependent inhibition of ring actin re-organization upon TCR triggering and MHCI downregulation, suggesting that the GPG-motif could actively cooperate with the Nef PxxP motif for these HIV-1 Nef-related effects. Finally, we observed that the Nef-GPG motif was required for optimal infectivity of those viruses produced in T-cells. According to these findings, we propose the conserved GPG-motif in HIV-1 Nef as functional region required for HIV-1 infectivity and therefore with a potential interest for the interference of Nef activity during HIV-1 infection.

  9. A Conserved GPG-Motif in the HIV-1 Nef Core Is Required for Principal Nef-Activities

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Bonet, Marta; Palladino, Claudia; Briz, Veronica; Rudolph, Jochen M.; Fackler, Oliver T.; Relloso, Miguel; Muñoz-Fernandez, Maria Angeles; Madrid, Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    To find out new determinants required for Nef activity we performed a functional alanine scanning analysis along a discrete but highly conserved region at the core of HIV-1 Nef. We identified the GPG-motif, located at the 121–137 region of HIV-1 NL4.3 Nef, as a novel protein signature strictly required for the p56Lck dependent Nef-induced CD4-downregulation in T-cells. Since the Nef-GPG motif was dispensable for CD4-downregulation in HeLa-CD4 cells, Nef/AP-1 interaction and Nef-dependent effects on Tf-R trafficking, the observed effects on CD4 downregulation cannot be attributed to structure constraints or to alterations on general protein trafficking. Besides, we found that the GPG-motif was also required for Nef-dependent inhibition of ring actin re-organization upon TCR triggering and MHCI downregulation, suggesting that the GPG-motif could actively cooperate with the Nef PxxP motif for these HIV-1 Nef-related effects. Finally, we observed that the Nef-GPG motif was required for optimal infectivity of those viruses produced in T-cells. According to these findings, we propose the conserved GPG-motif in HIV-1 Nef as functional region required for HIV-1 infectivity and therefore with a potential interest for the interference of Nef activity during HIV-1 infection. PMID:26700863

  10. Potentiation of TRAIL killing activity by multimerization through isoleucine zipper hexamerization motif.

    PubMed

    Han, Ji Hye; Moon, Ae Ran; Chang, Jeong Hwan; Bae, Jeehyeon; Choi, Jin Myung; Lee, Sung Haeng; Kim, Tae-Hyoung

    2016-05-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) is a homo-trimeric cytotoxic ligand. Several studies have demonstrated that incorporation of artificial trimerization motifs into the TRAIL protein leads to the enhancement of biological activity. Here, we show that linkage of the isoleucine zipper hexamerization motif to the N-terminus of TRAIL, referred as ILz(6):TRAIL, leads to multimerization of its trimeric form, which has higher cytotoxic activity compared to its native state. Size exclusion chromatography of ILz(6):TRAIL revealed possible existence of various forms such as trimeric, hexameric, and multimeric (possibly containing one-, two-, and multi-units of trimeric TRAIL, respectively). Increased number of multimerized ILz(6):TRAIL units corresponded with enhanced cytotoxic activity. Further, a high degree of ILz(6):TRAIL multimerization triggered rapid signaling events such as activation of caspases, tBid generation, and chromatin condensation. Taken together, these results indicate that multimerization of TRAIL significantly enhances its cytotoxic activity. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(5): 282-287].

  11. Novel DNA motif binding activity observed in vivo with an estrogen receptor α mutant mouse.

    PubMed

    Hewitt, Sylvia C; Li, Leping; Grimm, Sara A; Winuthayanon, Wipawee; Hamilton, Katherine J; Pockette, Brianna; Rubel, Cory A; Pedersen, Lars C; Fargo, David; Lanz, Rainer B; DeMayo, Francesco J; Schütz, Günther; Korach, Kenneth S

    2014-06-01

    Estrogen receptor α (ERα) interacts with DNA directly or indirectly via other transcription factors, referred to as "tethering." Evidence for tethering is based on in vitro studies and a widely used "KIKO" mouse model containing mutations that prevent direct estrogen response element DNA- binding. KIKO mice are infertile, due in part to the inability of estradiol (E2) to induce uterine epithelial proliferation. To elucidate the molecular events that prevent KIKO uterine growth, regulation of the pro-proliferative E2 target gene Klf4 and of Klf15, a progesterone (P4) target gene that opposes the pro-proliferative activity of KLF4, was evaluated. Klf4 induction was impaired in KIKO uteri; however, Klf15 was induced by E2 rather than by P4. Whole uterine chromatin immunoprecipitation-sequencing revealed enrichment of KIKO ERα binding to hormone response elements (HREs) motifs. KIKO binding to HRE motifs was verified using reporter gene and DNA-binding assays. Because the KIKO ERα has HRE DNA-binding activity, we evaluated the "EAAE" ERα, which has more severe DNA-binding domain mutations, and demonstrated a lack of estrogen response element or HRE reporter gene induction or DNA-binding. The EAAE mouse has an ERα null-like phenotype, with impaired uterine growth and transcriptional activity. Our findings demonstrate that the KIKO mouse model, which has been used by numerous investigators, cannot be used to establish biological functions for ERα tethering, because KIKO ERα effectively stimulates transcription using HRE motifs. The EAAE-ERα DNA-binding domain mutant mouse demonstrates that ERα DNA-binding is crucial for biological and transcriptional processes in reproductive tissues and that ERα tethering may not contribute to estrogen responsiveness in vivo.

  12. Novel DNA Motif Binding Activity Observed In Vivo With an Estrogen Receptor α Mutant Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Li, Leping; Grimm, Sara A.; Winuthayanon, Wipawee; Hamilton, Katherine J.; Pockette, Brianna; Rubel, Cory A.; Pedersen, Lars C.; Fargo, David; Lanz, Rainer B.; DeMayo, Francesco J.; Schütz, Günther; Korach, Kenneth S.

    2014-01-01

    Estrogen receptor α (ERα) interacts with DNA directly or indirectly via other transcription factors, referred to as “tethering.” Evidence for tethering is based on in vitro studies and a widely used “KIKO” mouse model containing mutations that prevent direct estrogen response element DNA- binding. KIKO mice are infertile, due in part to the inability of estradiol (E2) to induce uterine epithelial proliferation. To elucidate the molecular events that prevent KIKO uterine growth, regulation of the pro-proliferative E2 target gene Klf4 and of Klf15, a progesterone (P4) target gene that opposes the pro-proliferative activity of KLF4, was evaluated. Klf4 induction was impaired in KIKO uteri; however, Klf15 was induced by E2 rather than by P4. Whole uterine chromatin immunoprecipitation-sequencing revealed enrichment of KIKO ERα binding to hormone response elements (HREs) motifs. KIKO binding to HRE motifs was verified using reporter gene and DNA-binding assays. Because the KIKO ERα has HRE DNA-binding activity, we evaluated the “EAAE” ERα, which has more severe DNA-binding domain mutations, and demonstrated a lack of estrogen response element or HRE reporter gene induction or DNA-binding. The EAAE mouse has an ERα null–like phenotype, with impaired uterine growth and transcriptional activity. Our findings demonstrate that the KIKO mouse model, which has been used by numerous investigators, cannot be used to establish biological functions for ERα tethering, because KIKO ERα effectively stimulates transcription using HRE motifs. The EAAE-ERα DNA-binding domain mutant mouse demonstrates that ERα DNA-binding is crucial for biological and transcriptional processes in reproductive tissues and that ERα tethering may not contribute to estrogen responsiveness in vivo. PMID:24713037

  13. A Leucine Zipper Motif Essential for Gating of Hyperpolarization-activated Channels*

    PubMed Central

    Wemhöner, Konstantin; Silbernagel, Nicole; Marzian, Stefanie; Netter, Michael F.; Rinné, Susanne; Stansfeld, Phillip J.; Decher, Niels

    2012-01-01

    Hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels are pacemakers in cardiac myocytes and neurons. Although their membrane topology closely resembles that of voltage-gated K+ channels, the mechanism of their unique gating behavior in response to hyperpolarization is still poorly understood. We have identified a highly conserved leucine zipper motif in the S5 segment of HCN family members. In order to study the role of this motif for channel function, the leucine residues of the zipper were individually mutated to alanine, arginine, or glutamine residues. Leucine zipper mutants traffic to the plasma membrane, but the channels lose their sensitivity to open upon hyperpolarization. Thus, our data indicate that the leucine zipper is an important molecular determinant for hyperpolarization-activated channel gating. Residues of the leucine zipper interact with the adjacent S6 segment of the channel. This interaction is essential for voltage-dependent gating of the channel. The lower part of the leucine zipper, at the intracellular mouth of the channel, is important for stabilizing the closed state. Mutations at these sites increase current amplitudes or result in channels with deficient closing and increased min-Po. Our data are further supported by homology models of the open and closed state of the HCN2 channel pore. Thus, we conclude that the leucine zipper of HCN channels is a major determinant for hyperpolarization-activated channel gating. PMID:23048023

  14. Targeting a Proteinase-Activated Receptor 4 (PAR4) Carboxyl Terminal Motif to Regulate Platelet Function.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, Rithwik; Mihara, Koichiro; Thibeault, Pierre; Vanderboor, Christina M; Petri, Björn; Saifeddine, Mahmoud; Bouvier, Michel; Hollenberg, Morley D

    2017-04-01

    Thrombin initiates human platelet aggregation by coordinately activating proteinase-activated receptors (PARs) 1 and 4. However, targeting PAR1 with an orthosteric-tethered ligand binding-site antagonist results in bleeding, possibly owing to the important role of PAR1 activation on cells other than platelets. Because of its more restricted tissue expression profile, we have therefore turned to PAR4 as an antiplatelet target. We have identified an intracellular PAR4 C-terminal motif that regulates calcium signaling and β-arrestin interactions. By disrupting this PAR4 calcium/β-arrestin signaling process with a novel cell-penetrating peptide, we were able to inhibit both thrombin-triggered platelet aggregation in vitro and clot consolidation in vivo. We suggest that targeting PAR4 represents an attractive alternative to blocking PAR1 for antiplatelet therapy in humans.

  15. Insights into the allosteric regulation of Syk association with receptor ITAM, a multi-state equilibrium.

    PubMed

    Feng, Chao; Post, Carol Beth

    2016-02-17

    The phosphorylation of interdomain A (IA), a linker region between tandem SH2 domains of Syk tyrosine kinase, regulates the binding affinity for association of Syk with doubly-phosphorylated ITAM regions of the B cell receptor. The mechanism of this allosteric regulation has been suggested to be a switch from the high-affinity bifunctional binding, mediated through both SH2 domains binding two phosphotyrosine residues of ITAM, to a substantially lower-affinity binding of only one SH2 domain. IA phosphorylation triggers the switch by inducing disorder in IA and weakening the SH2-SH2 interaction. The postulated switch to a single-SH2-domain binding mode is examined using NMR to monitor site-specific binding to each SH2 domain of Syk variants engineered to have IA regions that differ in conformational flexibility. The combined analysis of titration curves and NMR line-shapes provides sufficient information to determine the energetics of inter-molecular binding at each SH2 site along with an intra-molecular binding or isomerization step. A less favorable isomerization equilibrium associated with the changes in the SH2-SH2 conformational ensemble and IA flexibility accounts for the inhibition of Syk association with membrane ITAM regions when IA is phosphorylated, and refutes the proposed switch to single-SH2-domain binding. Syk localizes in the cell through its SH2 interactions, and this basis for allosteric regulation of ITAM association proposes for the first time a phosphorylation-dependent model to regulate Syk binding to alternate receptors and other signaling proteins that differ either in the number of residues separating ITAM phosphotyrosines or by having only one phosphotyrosine, a half ITAM.

  16. The ABBA motif binds APC/C activators and is shared by APC/C substrates and regulators

    PubMed Central

    Hagting, Anja; Izawa, Daisuke; Mansfeld, Jörg; Gibson, Toby J.; Pines, Jonathon

    2016-01-01

    The APC/C is the ubiquitin ligase that regulates mitosis by targeting specific proteins for degradation at specific times under the control of the Spindle Assembly Checkpoint (SAC). How the APC/C recognises its different substrates is a key problem in the control of cell division. Here, we have identified the ABBA motif in Cyclin A, BUBR1, BUB1 and Acm1, and show that it binds to the APC/C co-activator CDC20. The ABBA motif in Cyclin A is required for its proper degradation in prometaphase through competing with BUBR1 for the same site on CDC20. Moreover, the ABBA motifs in BUBR1 and BUB1 are necessary for the SAC to work at full strength and to recruit CDC20 to kinetochores. Thus, we have identified a conserved motif integral to the proper control of mitosis that connects APC/C substrate recognition with the SAC. PMID:25669885

  17. Targeting glycoprotein VI and the immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Stegner, David; Haining, Elizabeth J; Nieswandt, Bernhard

    2014-08-01

    Coronary artery thrombosis and ischemic stroke are often initiated by the disruption of an atherosclerotic plaque and consequent intravascular platelet activation. Thus, antiplatelet drugs are central in the treatment and prevention of the initial, and subsequent, vascular events. However, novel pharmacological targets for platelet inhibition remain an important goal of cardiovascular research because of the negative effect of existing antiplatelet drugs on primary hemostasis. One promising target is the platelet collagen receptor glycoprotein VI. Blockade or antibody-mediated depletion of this receptor in circulating platelets is beneficial in experimental models of thrombosis and thrombo-inflammatory diseases, such as stroke, without impairing hemostasis. In this review, we summarize the importance of glycoprotein VI and (hem)immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif signaling in hemostasis, thrombosis, and thrombo-inflammatory processes and discuss the targeting strategies currently under development for inhibiting glycoprotein VI and its signaling.

  18. The PDZ-binding motif of Yes-associated protein is required for its co-activation of TEAD-mediated CTGF transcription and oncogenic cell transforming activity

    SciTech Connect

    Shimomura, Tadanori; Miyamura, Norio; Hata, Shoji; Miura, Ryota; Hirayama, Jun Nishina, Hiroshi

    2014-01-17

    Highlights: •Loss of the PDZ-binding motif inhibits constitutively active YAP (5SA)-induced oncogenic cell transformation. •The PDZ-binding motif of YAP promotes its nuclear localization in cultured cells and mouse liver. •Loss of the PDZ-binding motif inhibits YAP (5SA)-induced CTGF transcription in cultured cells and mouse liver. -- Abstract: YAP is a transcriptional co-activator that acts downstream of the Hippo signaling pathway and regulates multiple cellular processes, including proliferation. Hippo pathway-dependent phosphorylation of YAP negatively regulates its function. Conversely, attenuation of Hippo-mediated phosphorylation of YAP increases its ability to stimulate proliferation and eventually induces oncogenic transformation. The C-terminus of YAP contains a highly conserved PDZ-binding motif that regulates YAP’s functions in multiple ways. However, to date, the importance of the PDZ-binding motif to the oncogenic cell transforming activity of YAP has not been determined. In this study, we disrupted the PDZ-binding motif in the YAP (5SA) protein, in which the sites normally targeted by Hippo pathway-dependent phosphorylation are mutated. We found that loss of the PDZ-binding motif significantly inhibited the oncogenic transformation of cultured cells induced by YAP (5SA). In addition, the increased nuclear localization of YAP (5SA) and its enhanced activation of TEAD-dependent transcription of the cell proliferation gene CTGF were strongly reduced when the PDZ-binding motif was deleted. Similarly, in mouse liver, deletion of the PDZ-binding motif suppressed nuclear localization of YAP (5SA) and YAP (5SA)-induced CTGF expression. Taken together, our results indicate that the PDZ-binding motif of YAP is critical for YAP-mediated oncogenesis, and that this effect is mediated by YAP’s co-activation of TEAD-mediated CTGF transcription.

  19. Synthesis, anti-mycobacterial activity and DNA sequence-selectivity of a library of biaryl-motifs containing polyamides.

    PubMed

    Brucoli, Federico; Guzman, Juan D; Maitra, Arundhati; James, Colin H; Fox, Keith R; Bhakta, Sanjib

    2015-07-01

    The alarming rise of extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (XDR-TB) strains, compel the development of new molecules with novel modes of action to control this world health emergency. Distamycin analogues containing N-terminal biaryl-motifs 2(1-5)(1-7) were synthesised using a solution-phase approach and evaluated for their anti-mycobacterial activity and DNA-sequence selectivity. Thiophene dimer motif-containing polyamide 2(2,6) exhibited 10-fold higher inhibitory activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis compared to distamycin and library member 2(5,7) showed high binding affinity for the 5'-ACATAT-3' sequence.

  20. The PDZ-binding motif of Yes-associated protein is required for its co-activation of TEAD-mediated CTGF transcription and oncogenic cell transforming activity.

    PubMed

    Shimomura, Tadanori; Miyamura, Norio; Hata, Shoji; Miura, Ryota; Hirayama, Jun; Nishina, Hiroshi

    2014-01-17

    YAP is a transcriptional co-activator that acts downstream of the Hippo signaling pathway and regulates multiple cellular processes, including proliferation. Hippo pathway-dependent phosphorylation of YAP negatively regulates its function. Conversely, attenuation of Hippo-mediated phosphorylation of YAP increases its ability to stimulate proliferation and eventually induces oncogenic transformation. The C-terminus of YAP contains a highly conserved PDZ-binding motif that regulates YAP's functions in multiple ways. However, to date, the importance of the PDZ-binding motif to the oncogenic cell transforming activity of YAP has not been determined. In this study, we disrupted the PDZ-binding motif in the YAP (5SA) protein, in which the sites normally targeted by Hippo pathway-dependent phosphorylation are mutated. We found that loss of the PDZ-binding motif significantly inhibited the oncogenic transformation of cultured cells induced by YAP (5SA). In addition, the increased nuclear localization of YAP (5SA) and its enhanced activation of TEAD-dependent transcription of the cell proliferation gene CTGF were strongly reduced when the PDZ-binding motif was deleted. Similarly, in mouse liver, deletion of the PDZ-binding motif suppressed nuclear localization of YAP (5SA) and YAP (5SA)-induced CTGF expression. Taken together, our results indicate that the PDZ-binding motif of YAP is critical for YAP-mediated oncogenesis, and that this effect is mediated by YAP's co-activation of TEAD-mediated CTGF transcription.

  1. Structural and functional insights into the regulation of Helicobacter pylori arginase activity by an evolutionary nonconserved motif.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Abhishek; Meena, Shiv Kumar; Alam, Mashkoor; Nayeem, Shahid M; Deep, Shashank; Sau, Apurba Kumar

    2013-01-22

    Urea producing bimetallic arginases are essential for the synthesis of polyamine, DNA, and RNA. Despite conservation of the signature motifs in all arginases, a nonconserved ¹⁵³ESEEKAWQKLCSL¹⁶⁵ motif is found in the Helicobacter pylori enzyme, whose role is yet unknown. Using site-directed mutagenesis, kinetic assays, metal analyses, circular dichroism, heat-induced denaturation, molecular dynamics simulations and truncation studies, we report here the significance of this motif in catalytic function, metal retention, structural integrity, and stability of the protein. The enzyme did not exhibit detectable activity upon deletion of the motif as well as on individual mutation of Glu155 and Trp159 while Cys163Ala displayed significant decrease in the activity. Trp159Ala and Glu155Ala show severe loss of thermostability (14-17°) by a decrease in the α-helical structure. The role of Trp159 in stabilization of the structure with the surrounding aromatic residues is confirmed when Trp159Phe restored the structure and stability substantially compared to Trp159Ala. The simulation studies support the above results and show that the motif, which was previously solvent exposed, displays a loop-cum-small helix structure (Lys161-Cys163) and is located near the active-site through a novel Trp159-Asp126 interaction. This is consistent with the mutational analyses, where Trp159 and Asp126 are individually critical for retaining a bimetallic center and thereby for function. Furthermore, Cys163 of the helix is primarily important for dimerization, which is crucial for stimulation of the activity. Thus, these findings not only provide insights into the role of this motif but also offer a possibility to engineer it in human arginases for therapeutics against a number of carcinomas.

  2. Development of a salicylic acid inducible minimal sub-genomic transcript promoter from Figwort mosaic virus with enhanced root- and leaf-activity using TGACG motif rearrangement.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Deepak; Patro, Sunita; Ghosh, Jayasish; Das, Abhimanyu; Maiti, Indu B; Dey, Nrisingha

    2012-07-15

    In Figwort mosaic virus sub-genomic transcript promoter (F-Sgt), function of the TGACG-regulatory motif, was investigated in the background of artificially designed promoter sequences. The 131bp (FS, -100 to +31) long F-Sgt promoter sequence containing one TGACG motif [FS-(TGACG)] was engineered to generate a set of three modified promoter constructs: [FS-(TGACG)(2), containing one additional TGACG motif at 7 nucleotides upstream of the original one], [FS-(TGACG)(3), containing two additional TGACG motifs at 7 nucleotides upstream and two nucleotides downstream of the original one] and [FS-(TGCTG)(mu), having a mutated TGACG motif]. EMSA and foot-printing analysis confirmed binding of tobacco nuclear factors with modified TGACG motif/s. The transcription-activation of the GUS gene by the TGACG motif/s in above promoter constructs was examined in transgenic tobacco and Arabidopsis plants and observed that the transcription activation was affected by the spacing/s and number/s of the TGACG motif/s. The FS-(TGACG)(2) promoter showed strongest root-activity compared to other modified and CaMV35S promoters. Also under salicylic acid (SA) stress, the leaf-activity of the said promoter was further enhanced. All above findings were confirmed by real-time and semi-qRT PCR analysis. Taken together, these results clearly demonstrated that the TGACG motif plays an important role in inducing the root-specific expression of the F-Sgt promoter. This study advocates the importance of genetic manipulation of functional cis-motif for amending the tissue specificity of a plant promoter. SA inducible FS-(TGACG)(2) promoter with enhanced activity could be a useful candidate promoter for developing plants with enhanced crop productivity.

  3. Defining RNA motif-aminoglycoside interactions via two-dimensional combinatorial screening and structure-activity relationships through sequencing.

    PubMed

    Velagapudi, Sai Pradeep; Disney, Matthew D

    2013-10-15

    RNA is an extremely important target for the development of chemical probes of function or small molecule therapeutics. Aminoglycosides are the most well studied class of small molecules to target RNA. However, the RNA motifs outside of the bacterial rRNA A-site that are likely to be bound by these compounds in biological systems is largely unknown. If such information were known, it could allow for aminoglycosides to be exploited to target other RNAs and, in addition, could provide invaluable insights into potential bystander targets of these clinically used drugs. We utilized two-dimensional combinatorial screening (2DCS), a library-versus-library screening approach, to select the motifs displayed in a 3×3 nucleotide internal loop library and in a 6-nucleotide hairpin library that bind with high affinity and selectivity to six aminoglycoside derivatives. The selected RNA motifs were then analyzed using structure-activity relationships through sequencing (StARTS), a statistical approach that defines the privileged RNA motif space that binds a small molecule. StARTS allowed for the facile annotation of the selected RNA motif-aminoglycoside interactions in terms of affinity and selectivity. The interactions selected by 2DCS generally have nanomolar affinities, which is higher affinity than the binding of aminoglycosides to a mimic of their therapeutic target, the bacterial rRNA A-site.

  4. Inhibitory activities of short linear motifs underlie Hox interactome specificity in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Baëza, Manon; Viala, Séverine; Heim, Marjorie; Dard, Amélie; Hudry, Bruno; Duffraisse, Marilyne; Rogulja-Ortmann, Ana; Brun, Christine; Merabet, Samir

    2015-01-01

    Hox proteins are well-established developmental regulators that coordinate cell fate and morphogenesis throughout embryogenesis. In contrast, our knowledge of their specific molecular modes of action is limited to the interaction with few cofactors. Here, we show that Hox proteins are able to interact with a wide range of transcription factors in the live Drosophila embryo. In this context, specificity relies on a versatile usage of conserved short linear motifs (SLiMs), which, surprisingly, often restrains the interaction potential of Hox proteins. This novel buffering activity of SLiMs was observed in different tissues and found in Hox proteins from cnidarian to mouse species. Although these interactions remain to be analysed in the context of endogenous Hox regulatory activities, our observations challenge the traditional role assigned to SLiMs and provide an alternative concept to explain how Hox interactome specificity could be achieved during the embryonic development. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06034.001 PMID:25869471

  5. A Disintegrin and Metalloproteinase with Thrombospondin Motifs-5 (ADAMTS-5) Forms Catalytically Active Oligomers*

    PubMed Central

    Kosasih, Hansen J.; Last, Karena; Rogerson, Fraser M.; Golub, Suzanne B.; Gauci, Stephanie J.; Russo, Vincenzo C.; Stanton, Heather; Wilson, Richard; Lamande, Shireen R.; Holden, Paul; Fosang, Amanda J.

    2016-01-01

    The metalloproteinase ADAMTS-5 (A disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin motifs) degrades aggrecan, a proteoglycan essential for cartilage structure and function. ADAMTS-5 is the major aggrecanase in mouse cartilage, and is also likely to be the major aggrecanase in humans. ADAMTS-5 is a multidomain enzyme, but the function of the C-terminal ancillary domains is poorly understood. We show that mutant ADAMTS-5 lacking the catalytic domain, but with a full suite of ancillary domains inhibits wild type ADAMTS activity, in vitro and in vivo, in a dominant-negative manner. The data suggest that mutant ADAMTS-5 binds to wild type ADAMTS-5; thus we tested the hypothesis that ADAMTS-5 associates to form oligomers. Co-elution, competition, and in situ PLA experiments using full-length and truncated recombinant ADAMTS-5 confirmed that ADAMTS-5 molecules interact, and showed that the catalytic and disintegrin-like domains support these intermolecular interactions. Cross-linking experiments revealed that recombinant ADAMTS-5 formed large, reduction-sensitive oligomers with a nominal molecular mass of ∼400 kDa. The oligomers were unimolecular and proteolytically active. ADAMTS-5 truncates comprising the disintegrin and/or catalytic domains were able to competitively block full-length ADAMTS-5-mediated aggrecan cleavage, measured by production of the G1-EGE373 neoepitope. These results show that ADAMTS-5 oligomerization is required for full aggrecanase activity, and they provide evidence that blocking oligomerization inhibits ADAMTS-5 activity. The data identify the surface provided by the catalytic and disintegrin-like domains of ADAMTS-5 as a legitimate target for the design of aggrecanase inhibitors. PMID:26668318

  6. Motif Discovery on Seismic Amplitude Time Series: The Case Study of Mt Etna 2011 Eruptive Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassisi, Carmelo; Aliotta, Marco; Cannata, Andrea; Montalto, Placido; Patanè, Domenico; Pulvirenti, Alfredo; Spampinato, Letizia

    2013-04-01

    Algorithms searching for similar patterns are widely used in seismology both when the waveforms of the events of interest are known and when there is no a priori-knowledge. Such methods usually make use of the cross-correlation coefficient as a measure of similarity; if there is no a-priori knowledge, they behave as brute-force searching algorithms. The disadvantage of these methods, preventing or limiting their application to very large datasets, is computational complexity. The Mueen-Keogh (MK) algorithm overcomes this limitation by means of two optimization techniques—the early abandoning concept and space indexing. Here, we apply the MK algorithm to amplitude time series retrieved from seismic signals recorded during episodic eruptive activity of Mt Etna in 2011. By adequately tuning the input to the MK algorithm we found eight motif groups characterized by distinct seismic amplitude trends, each related to a different phenomenon. In particular, we observed that earthquakes are accompanied by sharp increases and decreases in seismic amplitude whereas lava fountains are accompanied by slower changes. These results demonstrate that the MK algorithm, because of its particular features, may have wide applicability in seismology.

  7. Signature motifs identify an Acinetobacter Cif virulence factor with epoxide hydrolase activity.

    PubMed

    Bahl, Christopher D; Hvorecny, Kelli L; Bridges, Andrew A; Ballok, Alicia E; Bomberger, Jennifer M; Cady, Kyle C; O'Toole, George A; Madden, Dean R

    2014-03-14

    Endocytic recycling of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is blocked by the CFTR inhibitory factor (Cif). Originally discovered in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Cif is a secreted epoxide hydrolase that is transcriptionally regulated by CifR, an epoxide-sensitive repressor. In this report, we investigate a homologous protein found in strains of the emerging nosocomial pathogens Acinetobacter nosocomialis and Acinetobacter baumannii ("aCif"). Like Cif, aCif is an epoxide hydrolase that carries an N-terminal secretion signal and can be purified from culture supernatants. When applied directly to polarized airway epithelial cells, mature aCif triggers a reduction in CFTR abundance at the apical membrane. Biochemical and crystallographic studies reveal a dimeric assembly with a stereochemically conserved active site, confirming our motif-based identification of candidate Cif-like pathogenic EH sequences. Furthermore, cif expression is transcriptionally repressed by a CifR homolog ("aCifR") and is induced in the presence of epoxides. Overall, this Acinetobacter protein recapitulates the essential attributes of the Pseudomonas Cif system and thus may facilitate airway colonization in nosocomial lung infections.

  8. SUMO-Interacting Motifs of Human TRIM5α are Important for Antiviral Activity

    PubMed Central

    Goff, Stephen P.

    2011-01-01

    Human TRIM5α potently restricts particular strains of murine leukemia viruses (the so-called N-tropic strains) but not others (the B- or NB-tropic strains) during early stages of infection. We show that overexpression of SUMO-1 in human 293T cells, but not in mouse MDTF cells, profoundly blocks N-MLV infection. This block is dependent on the tropism of the incoming virus, as neither B-, NB-, nor the mutant R110E of N-MLV CA (a B-tropic switch) are affected by SUMO-1 overexpression. The block occurred prior to reverse transcription and could be abrogated by large amounts of restricted virus. Knockdown of TRIM5α in 293T SUMO-1-overexpressing cells resulted in ablation of the SUMO-1 antiviral effects, and this loss of restriction could be restored by expression of a human TRIM5α shRNA-resistant plasmid. Amino acid sequence analysis of human TRIM5α revealed a consensus SUMO conjugation site at the N-terminus and three putative SUMO interacting motifs (SIMs) in the B30.2 domain. Mutations of the TRIM5α consensus SUMO conjugation site did not affect the antiviral activity of TRIM5α in any of the cell types tested. Mutation of the SIM consensus sequences, however, abolished TRIM5α antiviral activity against N-MLV. Mutation of lysines at a potential site of SUMOylation in the CA region of the Gag gene reduced the SUMO-1 block and the TRIM5α restriction of N-MLV. Our data suggest a novel aspect of TRIM5α-mediated restriction, in which the presence of intact SIMs in TRIM5α, and also the SUMO conjugation of CA, are required for restriction. We propose that at least a portion of the antiviral activity of TRIM5α is mediated through the binding of its SIMs to SUMO-conjugated CA. PMID:21490953

  9. FcR-Like 2 Inhibition of B Cell Receptor-Mediated Activation of B Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Tanisha A.; Haga, Christopher L.; Ehrhardt, Götz R. A.; Davis, Randall S.; Cooper, Max D.

    2017-01-01

    FcR-like (FCRL) 2 is a transmembrane protein with immunomodulatory potential that is preferentially expressed by memory B cells in humans. It has two consensus ITIMs in addition to a putative ITAM sequence in its cytoplasmic domain. We have confirmed the cellular distribution of FCRL2 and analyzed its functional potential to show that coligation with the BCR leads to tyrosine phosphorylation of its ITIM motifs and subsequent Src homology region 2 domain-containing phosphatase-1 recruitment to facilitate inhibition of BCR signaling. Mutational analysis indicates that the tyrosine residues in both inhibitory motifs of FCRL2 are required for complete inhibition of BCR signaling, whereas tyrosines in the putative activation motif are dispensable for signal modulation. These findings suggest a negative immunomodulatory function for FCRL2 in the regulation of memory B cells. PMID:21068405

  10. Genome-Wide Identification of Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Gene Family across Fungal Lineage Shows Presence of Novel and Diverse Activation Loop Motifs

    PubMed Central

    Mohanta, Tapan Kumar; Mohanta, Nibedita; Parida, Pratap; Panda, Sujogya Kumar; Ponpandian, Lakshmi Narayanan; Bae, Hanhong

    2016-01-01

    The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) is characterized by the presence of the T-E-Y, T-D-Y, and T-G-Y motifs in its activation loop region and plays a significant role in regulating diverse cellular responses in eukaryotic organisms. Availability of large-scale genome data in the fungal kingdom encouraged us to identify and analyse the fungal MAPK gene family consisting of 173 fungal species. The analysis of the MAPK gene family resulted in the discovery of several novel activation loop motifs (T-T-Y, T-I-Y, T-N-Y, T-H-Y, T-S-Y, K-G-Y, T-Q-Y, S-E-Y and S-D-Y) in fungal MAPKs. The phylogenetic analysis suggests that fungal MAPKs are non-polymorphic, had evolved from their common ancestors around 1500 million years ago, and are distantly related to plant MAPKs. We are the first to report the presence of nine novel activation loop motifs in fungal MAPKs. The specificity of the activation loop motif plays a significant role in controlling different growth and stress related pathways in fungi. Hence, the presences of these nine novel activation loop motifs in fungi are of special interest. PMID:26918378

  11. A role for the ITAM signaling module in specifying cytokine-receptor functions.

    PubMed

    Bezbradica, Jelena S; Rosenstein, Rachel K; DeMarco, Richard A; Brodsky, Igor; Medzhitov, Ruslan

    2014-04-01

    Diverse cellular responses to external cues are controlled by a small number of signal-transduction pathways, but how the specificity of functional outcomes is achieved remains unclear. Here we describe a mechanism for signal integration based on the functional coupling of two distinct signaling pathways widely used in leukocytes: the ITAM pathway and the Jak-STAT pathway. Through the use of the receptor for interferon-γ (IFN-γR) and the ITAM adaptor Fcγ as an example, we found that IFN-γ modified responses of the phagocytic antibody receptor FcγRI (CD64) to specify cell-autonomous antimicrobial functions. Unexpectedly, we also found that in peritoneal macrophages, IFN-γR itself required tonic signaling from Fcγ through the kinase PI(3)K for the induction of a subset of IFN-γ-specific antimicrobial functions. Our findings may be generalizable to other ITAM and Jak-STAT signaling pathways and may help explain signal integration by those pathways.

  12. All six GC-motifs of the SV40 early upstream element contribute to promoter activity in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Barrera-Saldana, H; Takahashi, K; Vigneron, M; Wildeman, A; Davidson, I; Chambon, P

    1985-01-01

    Recombinants in which the six GC-motifs (I-VI) present in the upstream element of the SV40 early promoter region have been point mutated either individually or in pairs were used to determine the possible contribution of each GC-motif to the function of the overlapping early-early and late-early SV40 promoters. GC-motif I, and to a lesser extent, GC-motifs II and III, are critical for initiation at the early-early start sites. GC-motifs IV-VI play a subsidiary role. Mutations in GC-motifs I and II do not decrease the activity of the late-early promoter, whereas mutations in the GC-motifs III-VI have a moderate effect on it. The in vivo phenotype of the GC-motif mutants can be almost fully reproduced in vitro using a nuclear extract. DNase I protection footprinting experiments using wild-type or mutated templates and nuclear extracts indicate that each GC-motif behaves principally as an independent protein-binding site, presumably for transcription factor Sp1. The effect of changing the position of the 21-bp repeat region on initiation from the early-early and late-early start sites indicates that there is little flexibility in the position in which this upstream element can efficiently activate initiation of transcription from these start sites. Images Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 7. Fig. 8. Fig. 9. PMID:3004974

  13. Structure of PEP carboxykinase from the succinate-producing Actinobacillus succinogenes: a new conserved active-site motif.

    PubMed

    Leduc, Yvonne A; Prasad, Lata; Laivenieks, Maris; Zeikus, J Gregory; Delbaere, Louis T J

    2005-07-01

    Actinobacillus succinogenes can produce, via fermentation, high concentrations of succinate, an important industrial commodity. A key enzyme in this pathway is phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PCK), which catalyzes the production of oxaloacetate from phosphoenolpyruvate and carbon dioxide, with the concomitant conversion of adenosine 5'-diphosphate to adenosine 5'-triphosphate. 1.85 and 1.70 A resolution structures of the native and a pyruvate/Mn(2+)/phosphate complex have been solved, respectively. The structure of the complex contains sulfhydryl reducing agents covalently bound to three cysteine residues via disulfide bonds. One of these cysteine residues (Cys285) is located in the active-site cleft and may be analogous to the putative reactive cysteine of PCK from Trypanosoma cruzi. Cys285 is also part of a previously unreported conserved motif comprising residues 280-287 and containing the pattern NXEXGXY(/F)A(/G); this new motif appears to have a structural role in stabilizing and positioning side chains that bind substrates and metal ions. The first few residues of this motif connect the two domains of the enzyme and a fulcrum point appears to be located near Asn280. In addition, an active-site Asp residue forms two coordinate bonds with the Mn(2+) ion present in the structure of the complex in a symmetrical bidentate manner, unlike in other PCK structures that contain a manganese ion.

  14. An ITAM-Syk-CARD9 signalling axis triggers contact hypersensitivity by stimulating IL-1 production in dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Yasukawa, Shinsuke; Miyazaki, Yoshiyuki; Yoshii, Chika; Nakaya, Mako; Ozaki, Naoko; Toda, Shuji; Kuroda, Etsushi; Ishibashi, Ken-ichi; Yasuda, Tomoharu; Natsuaki, Yohei; Mi-ichi, Fumika; Iizasa, Ei'ichi; Nakahara, Takeshi; Yamazaki, Masanori; Kabashima, Kenji; Iwakura, Yoichiro; Takai, Toshiyuki; Saito, Takashi; Kurosaki, Tomohiro; Malissen, Bernard; Ohno, Naohito; Furue, Masutaka; Yoshida, Hiroki; Hara, Hiromitsu

    2014-05-07

    A variety of reactive organic compounds, called haptens, can cause allergic contact dermatitis. However, the innate immune mechanisms by which haptens stimulate dendritic cells (DCs) to sensitize T cells remain unclear. Here we show that the coupling of ITAM-Syk-CARD9 signalling to interleukin-1 (IL-1) secretion in DCs is crucial for allergic sensitization to haptens. Both MyD88 and Caspase recruitment domain-containing protein 9 (CARD9) signalling are required for contact hypersensitivity (CHS). Naïve T cells require signals received through IL-1R1-MyD88 for effector differentiation, whereas DCs require CARD9 and spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk) signalling for hapten-induced IL-1α/β secretion and their ability to prime T cells. DC-specific deletion of CARD9, DAP12, Syk or NLRP3, but not MyD88, is sufficient to abolish CHS. All tested haptens, but not irritants, can induce Syk activation, leading to both the CARD9/BCL10-dependent pro-IL-1 synthesis (signal1) and reactive oxygen species-mediated NLRP3 inflammasome activation (signal2), required for IL-1 secretion. These data unveil an innate immune mechanism crucial for allergic contact sensitization to chemical compounds.

  15. An octamer motif is required for activation of the inducible nitric oxide synthase promoter in pancreatic beta-cells.

    PubMed

    Darville, Martine I; Terryn, Sara; Eizirik, Décio L

    2004-03-01

    Nitric oxide, generated by the inducible form of nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), is a potential mediator of cytokine-induced beta-cell dysfunction in type 1 diabetes mellitus. We have previously shown that cytokine-induced iNOS expression is cycloheximide (CHX) sensitive and requires nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kappa B) activation. In the present study, we show that an octamer motif located 20 bp downstream of the proximal NF-kappa B binding site in the rat iNOS promoter is critical for IL-1 beta and interferon-gamma induction of promoter activity in rat primary beta-cells and insulin-producing RINm5F cells. In gel shift assays, the octamer motif bound constitutively the transcription factor Oct1. Neither Oct1 nor NF-kappa B binding activities were blocked by CHX, suggesting that other factor(s) synthesized in response to IL-1 beta contribute to iNOS promoter induction. The high mobility group (HMG)-I(Y) protein also bound the proximal iNOS promoter region. HMG-I(Y) binding was decreased in cells treated with CHX and HMG-I(Y) silencing by RNA interference reduced IL-1 beta-induced iNOS promoter activity. These results suggest that Oct1, NF-kappa B, and HMG-I(Y) cooperate for transactivation of the iNOS promoter in pancreatic beta-cells.

  16. The GPS motif is a molecular switch for bimodal activities of adhesion class G protein-coupled receptors.

    PubMed

    Prömel, Simone; Frickenhaus, Marie; Hughes, Samantha; Mestek, Lamia; Staunton, David; Woollard, Alison; Vakonakis, Ioannis; Schöneberg, Torsten; Schnabel, Ralf; Russ, Andreas P; Langenhan, Tobias

    2012-08-30

    Adhesion class G protein-coupled receptors (aGPCR) form the second largest group of seven-transmembrane-spanning (7TM) receptors whose molecular layout and function differ from canonical 7TM receptors. Despite their essential roles in immunity, tumorigenesis, and development, the mechanisms of aGPCR activation and signal transduction have remained obscure to date. Here, we use a transgenic assay to define the protein domains required in vivo for the activity of the prototypical aGPCR LAT-1/Latrophilin in Caenorhabditis elegans. We show that the GPCR proteolytic site (GPS) motif, the molecular hallmark feature of the entire aGPCR class, is essential for LAT-1 signaling serving in two different activity modes of the receptor. Surprisingly, neither mode requires cleavage but presence of the GPS, which relays interactions with at least two different partners. Our work thus uncovers the versatile nature of aGPCR activity in molecular detail and places the GPS motif in a central position for diverse protein-protein interactions.

  17. The catalytic activity of the kinase ZAP-70 mediates basal signaling and negative feedback of the T cell receptor pathway

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Debra A; Kadlecek, Theresa A.; Cantor, Aaron J.; Kuriyan, John

    2015-01-01

    T cell activation must be properly regulated to ensure normal T cell development and effective immune responses to pathogens and transformed cells while avoiding autoimmunity. The mechanisms controlling the fine-tuning of T cell receptor (TCR) signaling and T cell activation are unclear. The Syk family kinase ζ chain–associated protein kinase of 70 kD (ZAP-70) is a critical component of the TCR signaling machinery that leads to T cell activation. To elucidate potential feedback targets that are dependent on the kinase activity of ZAP-70, we performed a mass spectrometry–based, phosphoproteomic study to quantify temporal changes in phosphorylation patterns after inhibition of ZAP-70 catalytic activity. Our results provide insights into the fine-tuning of the T cell signaling network before and after TCR engagement. The data indicate that the kinase activity of ZAP-70 stimulates negative feedback pathways that target the Src family kinase Lck and modulate the phosphorylation patterns of the immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motifs (ITAMs) of the CD3 and ζ-chain components of the TCR, and of downstream signaling molecules, including ZAP-70. We developed a computational model that provides a unified mechanistic explanation for the experimental findings on ITAM phosphorylation in wild-type cells, ZAP-70–deficient cells, and cells with inhibited ZAP-70 catalytic activity. This model incorporates negative feedback regulation of Lck activity by the kinase activity of ZAP-70 and makes unanticipated specific predictions for the order in which tyrosines in the ITAMs of TCR ζ-chains must be phosphorylated to be consistent with the experimental data. PMID:25990959

  18. N-terminal tetrapeptide T/SPLH motifs contribute to multimodal activation of human TRPA1 channel

    PubMed Central

    Hynkova, Anna; Marsakova, Lenka; Vaskova, Jana; Vlachova, Viktorie

    2016-01-01

    Human transient receptor potential ankyrin channel 1 (TRPA1) is a polymodal sensor implicated in pain, inflammation and itching. An important locus for TRPA1 regulation is the cytoplasmic N-terminal domain, through which various exogenous electrophilic compounds such as allyl-isothiocyanate from mustard oil or cinnamaldehyde from cinnamon activate primary afferent nociceptors. This major region is comprised of a tandem set of 17 ankyrin repeats (AR1-AR17), five of them contain a strictly conserved T/SPLH tetrapeptide motif, a hallmark of an important and evolutionarily conserved contribution to conformational stability. Here, we characterize the functional consequences of putatively stabilizing and destabilizing mutations in these important structural units and identify AR2, AR6, and AR11-13 to be distinctly involved in the allosteric activation of TRPA1 by chemical irritants, cytoplasmic calcium, and membrane voltage. Considering the potential involvement of the T/SP motifs as putative phosphorylation sites, we also show that proline-directed Ser/Thr kinase CDK5 modulates the activity of TRPA1, and that T673 outside the AR-domain is its only possible target. Our data suggest that the most strictly conserved N-terminal ARs define the energetics of the TRPA1 channel gate and contribute to chemical-, calcium- and voltage-dependence. PMID:27345869

  19. N-terminal tetrapeptide T/SPLH motifs contribute to multimodal activation of human TRPA1 channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hynkova, Anna; Marsakova, Lenka; Vaskova, Jana; Vlachova, Viktorie

    2016-06-01

    Human transient receptor potential ankyrin channel 1 (TRPA1) is a polymodal sensor implicated in pain, inflammation and itching. An important locus for TRPA1 regulation is the cytoplasmic N-terminal domain, through which various exogenous electrophilic compounds such as allyl-isothiocyanate from mustard oil or cinnamaldehyde from cinnamon activate primary afferent nociceptors. This major region is comprised of a tandem set of 17 ankyrin repeats (AR1-AR17), five of them contain a strictly conserved T/SPLH tetrapeptide motif, a hallmark of an important and evolutionarily conserved contribution to conformational stability. Here, we characterize the functional consequences of putatively stabilizing and destabilizing mutations in these important structural units and identify AR2, AR6, and AR11-13 to be distinctly involved in the allosteric activation of TRPA1 by chemical irritants, cytoplasmic calcium, and membrane voltage. Considering the potential involvement of the T/SP motifs as putative phosphorylation sites, we also show that proline-directed Ser/Thr kinase CDK5 modulates the activity of TRPA1, and that T673 outside the AR-domain is its only possible target. Our data suggest that the most strictly conserved N-terminal ARs define the energetics of the TRPA1 channel gate and contribute to chemical-, calcium- and voltage-dependence.

  20. The NAP motif of activity-dependent neuroprotective protein (ADNP) regulates dendritic spines through microtubule end binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Oz, S; Kapitansky, O; Ivashco-Pachima, Y; Malishkevich, A; Giladi, E; Skalka, N; Rosin-Arbesfeld, R; Mittelman, L; Segev, O; Hirsch, J A; Gozes, I

    2014-10-01

    The NAP motif of activity-dependent neuroprotective protein (ADNP) enhanced memory scores in patients suffering from mild cognitive impairment and protected activities of daily living in schizophrenia patients, while fortifying microtubule (MT)-dependent axonal transport, in mice and flies. The question is how does NAP fortify MTs? Our sequence analysis identified the MT end-binding protein (EB1)-interacting motif SxIP (SIP, Ser-Ile-Pro) in ADNP/NAP and showed specific SxIP binding sites in all members of the EB protein family (EB1-3). Others found that EB1 enhancement of neurite outgrowth is attenuated by EB2, while EB3 interacts with postsynaptic density protein 95 (PSD-95) to modulate dendritic plasticity. Here, NAP increased PSD-95 expression in dendritic spines, which was inhibited by EB3 silencing. EB1 or EB3, but not EB2 silencing inhibited NAP-mediated cell protection, which reflected NAP binding specificity. NAPVSKIPQ (SxIP=SKIP), but not NAPVAAAAQ mimicked NAP activity. ADNP, essential for neuronal differentiation and brain formation in mouse, a member of the SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complex and a major protein mutated in autism and deregulated in schizophrenia in men, showed similar EB interactions, which were enhanced by NAP treatment. The newly identified shared MT target of NAP/ADNP is directly implicated in synaptic plasticity, explaining the breadth and efficiency of neuroprotective/neurotrophic capacities.

  1. SARM1-specific motifs in the TIR domain enable NAD+ loss and regulate injury-induced SARM1 activation.

    PubMed

    Summers, Daniel W; Gibson, Daniel A; DiAntonio, Aaron; Milbrandt, Jeffrey

    2016-10-11

    Axon injury in response to trauma or disease stimulates a self-destruction program that promotes the localized clearance of damaged axon segments. Sterile alpha and Toll/interleukin receptor (TIR) motif-containing protein 1 (SARM1) is an evolutionarily conserved executioner of this degeneration cascade, also known as Wallerian degeneration; however, the mechanism of SARM1-dependent neuronal destruction is still obscure. SARM1 possesses a TIR domain that is necessary for SARM1 activity. In other proteins, dimerized TIR domains serve as scaffolds for innate immune signaling. In contrast, dimerization of the SARM1 TIR domain promotes consumption of the essential metabolite NAD(+) and induces neuronal destruction. This activity is unique to the SARM1 TIR domain, yet the structural elements that enable this activity are unknown. In this study, we identify fundamental properties of the SARM1 TIR domain that promote NAD(+) loss and axon degeneration. Dimerization of the TIR domain from the Caenorhabditis elegans SARM1 ortholog TIR-1 leads to NAD(+) loss and neuronal death, indicating these activities are an evolutionarily conserved feature of SARM1 function. Detailed analysis of sequence homology identifies canonical TIR motifs as well as a SARM1-specific (SS) loop that are required for NAD(+) loss and axon degeneration. Furthermore, we identify a residue in the SARM1 BB loop that is dispensable for TIR activity yet required for injury-induced activation of full-length SARM1, suggesting that SARM1 function requires multidomain interactions. Indeed, we identify a physical interaction between the autoinhibitory N terminus and the TIR domain of SARM1, revealing a previously unrecognized direct connection between these domains that we propose mediates autoinhibition and activation upon injury.

  2. SARM1-specific motifs in the TIR domain enable NAD+ loss and regulate injury-induced SARM1 activation

    PubMed Central

    Summers, Daniel W.; Gibson, Daniel A.; DiAntonio, Aaron; Milbrandt, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    Axon injury in response to trauma or disease stimulates a self-destruction program that promotes the localized clearance of damaged axon segments. Sterile alpha and Toll/interleukin receptor (TIR) motif-containing protein 1 (SARM1) is an evolutionarily conserved executioner of this degeneration cascade, also known as Wallerian degeneration; however, the mechanism of SARM1-dependent neuronal destruction is still obscure. SARM1 possesses a TIR domain that is necessary for SARM1 activity. In other proteins, dimerized TIR domains serve as scaffolds for innate immune signaling. In contrast, dimerization of the SARM1 TIR domain promotes consumption of the essential metabolite NAD+ and induces neuronal destruction. This activity is unique to the SARM1 TIR domain, yet the structural elements that enable this activity are unknown. In this study, we identify fundamental properties of the SARM1 TIR domain that promote NAD+ loss and axon degeneration. Dimerization of the TIR domain from the Caenorhabditis elegans SARM1 ortholog TIR-1 leads to NAD+ loss and neuronal death, indicating these activities are an evolutionarily conserved feature of SARM1 function. Detailed analysis of sequence homology identifies canonical TIR motifs as well as a SARM1-specific (SS) loop that are required for NAD+ loss and axon degeneration. Furthermore, we identify a residue in the SARM1 BB loop that is dispensable for TIR activity yet required for injury-induced activation of full-length SARM1, suggesting that SARM1 function requires multidomain interactions. Indeed, we identify a physical interaction between the autoinhibitory N terminus and the TIR domain of SARM1, revealing a previously unrecognized direct connection between these domains that we propose mediates autoinhibition and activation upon injury. PMID:27671644

  3. Mapping of transcription factor motifs in active chromatin identifies IRF5 as key regulator in classical Hodgkin lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Kreher, Stephan; Bouhlel, M. Amine; Cauchy, Pierre; Lamprecht, Björn; Li, Shuang; Grau, Michael; Hummel, Franziska; Köchert, Karl; Anagnostopoulos, Ioannis; Jöhrens, Korinna; Hummel, Michael; Hiscott, John; Wenzel, Sören-Sebastian; Lenz, Peter; Schneider, Markus; Küppers, Ralf; Scheidereit, Claus; Giefing, Maciej; Siebert, Reiner; Rajewsky, Klaus; Lenz, Georg; Cockerill, Peter N.; Janz, Martin; Dörken, Bernd; Bonifer, Constanze; Mathas, Stephan

    2014-01-01

    Deregulated transcription factor (TF) activities are commonly observed in hematopoietic malignancies. Understanding tumorigenesis therefore requires determining the function and hierarchical role of individual TFs. To identify TFs central to lymphomagenesis, we identified lymphoma type-specific accessible chromatin by global mapping of DNaseI hypersensitive sites and analyzed enriched TF-binding motifs in these regions. Applying this unbiased approach to classical Hodgkin lymphoma (HL), a common B-cell–derived lymphoma with a complex pattern of deregulated TFs, we discovered interferon regulatory factor (IRF) sites among the top enriched motifs. High-level expression of the proinflammatory TF IRF5 was specific to HL cells and crucial for their survival. Furthermore, IRF5 initiated a regulatory cascade in human non-Hodgkin B-cell lines and primary murine B cells by inducing the TF AP-1 and cooperating with NF-κB to activate essential characteristic features of HL. Our strategy efficiently identified a lymphoma type-specific key regulator and uncovered a tumor promoting role of IRF5. PMID:25288773

  4. Mapping of transcription factor motifs in active chromatin identifies IRF5 as key regulator in classical Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Kreher, Stephan; Bouhlel, M Amine; Cauchy, Pierre; Lamprecht, Björn; Li, Shuang; Grau, Michael; Hummel, Franziska; Köchert, Karl; Anagnostopoulos, Ioannis; Jöhrens, Korinna; Hummel, Michael; Hiscott, John; Wenzel, Sören-Sebastian; Lenz, Peter; Schneider, Markus; Küppers, Ralf; Scheidereit, Claus; Giefing, Maciej; Siebert, Reiner; Rajewsky, Klaus; Lenz, Georg; Cockerill, Peter N; Janz, Martin; Dörken, Bernd; Bonifer, Constanze; Mathas, Stephan

    2014-10-21

    Deregulated transcription factor (TF) activities are commonly observed in hematopoietic malignancies. Understanding tumorigenesis therefore requires determining the function and hierarchical role of individual TFs. To identify TFs central to lymphomagenesis, we identified lymphoma type-specific accessible chromatin by global mapping of DNaseI hypersensitive sites and analyzed enriched TF-binding motifs in these regions. Applying this unbiased approach to classical Hodgkin lymphoma (HL), a common B-cell-derived lymphoma with a complex pattern of deregulated TFs, we discovered interferon regulatory factor (IRF) sites among the top enriched motifs. High-level expression of the proinflammatory TF IRF5 was specific to HL cells and crucial for their survival. Furthermore, IRF5 initiated a regulatory cascade in human non-Hodgkin B-cell lines and primary murine B cells by inducing the TF AP-1 and cooperating with NF-κB to activate essential characteristic features of HL. Our strategy efficiently identified a lymphoma type-specific key regulator and uncovered a tumor promoting role of IRF5.

  5. Identification of a novel motif that affects the conformation and activity of the MARCH1 E3 ubiquitin ligase.

    PubMed

    Bourgeois-Daigneault, Marie-Claude; Thibodeau, Jacques

    2013-02-15

    MARCH1, a member of the membrane-associated RING-CH family of E3 ubiquitin ligases, regulates antigen presentation by downregulating the cell surface expression of Major Histocompatibility Complex class II and CD86 molecules. MARCH1 is a transmembrane protein that exposes both its N- and C-terminus to the cytoplasm. We have conducted a structure-function analysis of its two cytoplasmic tails to gain insights into the trafficking of MARCH1 in the endocytic pathway. Fusion of the N-terminal portion of MARCH1 to a type II transmembrane reporter molecule revealed that this cytoplasmic tail contains endosomal sorting motifs. The C-terminal domain also appears to contain intracellular sorting signals because it reduced surface expression of a type I transmembrane reporter molecule. Mutation of the two putative C-terminal tyrosine-based sorting signals did not affect the activity of human MARCH1; however, it did reduce its incorporation into exosomes. Moreover, site-directed mutagenesis pointed to a functional C-terminal 221VQNC224 sequence that affects the spatial organization of the two cytoplasmic regions. This motif is also found in other RING-type E3 ubiquitin ligases, such as parkin. Altogether, these findings highlight the complex regulation of MARCH1 trafficking in the endocytic pathway as well as the intricate interactions between its cytoplasmic tails.

  6. Insights into the Activity and Substrate Binding of Xylella fastidiosa Polygalacturonase by Modification of a Unique QMK Amino Acid Motif Using Protein Chimeras

    PubMed Central

    Warren, Jeremy G.; Lincoln, James E.; Kirkpatrick, Bruce C.

    2015-01-01

    Polygalacturonases (EC 3.2.1.15) catalyze the random hydrolysis of 1, 4-alpha-D-galactosiduronic linkages in pectate and other galacturonans. Xylella fastidiosa possesses a single polygalacturonase gene, pglA (PD1485), and X. fastidiosa mutants deficient in the production of polygalacturonase are non-pathogenic and show a compromised ability to systemically infect grapevines. These results suggested that grapevines expressing sufficient amounts of an inhibitor of X. fastidiosa polygalacturonase might be protected from disease. Previous work in our laboratory and others have tried without success to produce soluble active X. fastidiosa polygalacturonase for use in inhibition assays. In this study, we created two enzymatically active X. fastidiosa / A. vitis polygalacturonase chimeras, AX1A and AX2A to explore the functionality of X. fastidiosa polygalacturonase in vitro. The AX1A chimera was constructed to specifically test if recombinant chimeric protein, produced in Escherichia coli, is soluble and if the X. fastidiosa polygalacturonase catalytic amino acids are able to hydrolyze polygalacturonic acid. The AX2A chimera was constructed to evaluate the ability of a unique QMK motif of X. fastidiosa polygalacturonase, most polygalacturonases have a R(I/L)K motif, to bind to and allow the hydrolysis of polygalacturonic acid. Furthermore, the AX2A chimera was also used to explore what effect modification of the QMK motif of X. fastidiosa polygalacturonase to a conserved RIK motif has on enzymatic activity. These experiments showed that both the AX1A and AX2A polygalacturonase chimeras were soluble and able to hydrolyze the polygalacturonic acid substrate. Additionally, the modification of the QMK motif to the conserved RIK motif eliminated hydrolytic activity, suggesting that the QMK motif is important for the activity of X. fastidiosa polygalacturonase. This result suggests X. fastidiosa polygalacturonase may preferentially hydrolyze a different pectic substrate or

  7. Insights into the Activity and Substrate Binding of Xylella fastidiosa Polygalacturonase by Modification of a Unique QMK Amino Acid Motif Using Protein Chimeras.

    PubMed

    Warren, Jeremy G; Lincoln, James E; Kirkpatrick, Bruce C

    2015-01-01

    Polygalacturonases (EC 3.2.1.15) catalyze the random hydrolysis of 1, 4-alpha-D-galactosiduronic linkages in pectate and other galacturonans. Xylella fastidiosa possesses a single polygalacturonase gene, pglA (PD1485), and X. fastidiosa mutants deficient in the production of polygalacturonase are non-pathogenic and show a compromised ability to systemically infect grapevines. These results suggested that grapevines expressing sufficient amounts of an inhibitor of X. fastidiosa polygalacturonase might be protected from disease. Previous work in our laboratory and others have tried without success to produce soluble active X. fastidiosa polygalacturonase for use in inhibition assays. In this study, we created two enzymatically active X. fastidiosa / A. vitis polygalacturonase chimeras, AX1A and AX2A to explore the functionality of X. fastidiosa polygalacturonase in vitro. The AX1A chimera was constructed to specifically test if recombinant chimeric protein, produced in Escherichia coli, is soluble and if the X. fastidiosa polygalacturonase catalytic amino acids are able to hydrolyze polygalacturonic acid. The AX2A chimera was constructed to evaluate the ability of a unique QMK motif of X. fastidiosa polygalacturonase, most polygalacturonases have a R(I/L)K motif, to bind to and allow the hydrolysis of polygalacturonic acid. Furthermore, the AX2A chimera was also used to explore what effect modification of the QMK motif of X. fastidiosa polygalacturonase to a conserved RIK motif has on enzymatic activity. These experiments showed that both the AX1A and AX2A polygalacturonase chimeras were soluble and able to hydrolyze the polygalacturonic acid substrate. Additionally, the modification of the QMK motif to the conserved RIK motif eliminated hydrolytic activity, suggesting that the QMK motif is important for the activity of X. fastidiosa polygalacturonase. This result suggests X. fastidiosa polygalacturonase may preferentially hydrolyze a different pectic substrate or

  8. Trans-cleaving hammerhead ribozymes with tertiary stabilizing motifs: in vitro and in vivo activity against a structured viroid RNA

    PubMed Central

    Carbonell, Alberto; Flores, Ricardo; Gago, Selma

    2011-01-01

    Trans-cleaving hammerheads with discontinuous or extended stem I and with tertiary stabilizing motifs (TSMs) have been tested previously against short RNA substrates in vitro at low Mg2+ concentration. However, the potential of these ribozymes for targeting longer and structured RNAs in vitro and in vivo has not been examined. Here, we report the in vitro cleavage of short RNAs and of a 464-nt highly structured RNA from potato spindle tuber viroid (PSTVd) by hammerheads with discontinuous and extended formats at submillimolar Mg2+. Under these conditions, hammerheads derived from eggplant latent viroid and peach latent mosaic viroid (PLMVd) with discontinuous and extended formats, respectively, where the most active. Furthermore, a PLMVd-derived hammerhead with natural TSMs showed activity in vivo against the same long substrate and interfered with systemic PSTVd infection, thus reinforcing the idea that this class of ribozymes has potential to control pathogenic RNA replicons. PMID:21097888

  9. Identification of active VQ motif-containing genes and the expression patterns under low nitrogen treatment in soybean.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaobo; Zhang, Haowei; Sun, Genlou; Jin, Yuan; Qiu, Lijuan

    2014-06-15

    Plant VQ motif-containing protein family plays crucial roles in plant growth, seed development, and defense responses in Arabidopsis. However, its function in soybean is still not well defined. We aim to identify the VQ gene family, and explore the genetic variation of active GmVQ genes in soybean and their expression patterns under low nitrogen stresses. A total of 74 VQ motif-containing genes were identified in soybean genome, and were clustered into five distinct subfamilies (GmVQI-V) with each gene having two or three copies except GmVQ55 (GmVQIV) with single copy. Fourteen genes with relatively high expression level, at least in one tissue, were defined as active GmVQ genes. Most of these active GmVQ genes specifically expressed in soybean pod shell (7/74), root (9/74) and/or nodule (10/74) respectively. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis in cultivated and wild soybeans revealed there were selected site(s) in GmVQ6, GmVQ7, GmVQ10, GmVQ26 and GmVQ61, which means that these genes have undergone artificial selection during soybean domestication. After low nitrogen treatment, enhanced expression of VQ genes was noticed in specific tissues, such as GmVQ53, GmVQ26, GmVQ58, GmVQ61, GmVQ70 and GmVQ6 in shoot, and GmVQ53, GmVQ58, GmVQ48 in root. On the contrary, suppressed expression of GmVQ57, GmVQ21 and GmVQ1 genes was noticed in root after the treatment. Duplicated copy of the active GmVQ genes showed similar expression pattern, suggesting that these genes might be complete copies. The results suggested that soybean VQ-motif containing genes may act as positive or negative regulators in soybean growth, development and nitrogen metabolism. Taken together, our results provided useful information for functional characterization of soybean GmVQ genes to unravel their biological roles.

  10. Gene switching rate determines response to extrinsic perturbations in the self-activation transcriptional network motif

    PubMed Central

    de Franciscis, Sebastiano; Caravagna, Giulio; Mauri, Giancarlo; d’Onofrio, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Gene switching dynamics is a major source of randomness in genetic networks, also in the case of large concentrations of the transcription factors. In this work, we consider a common network motif - the positive feedback of a transcription factor on its own synthesis - and assess its response to extrinsic noises perturbing gene deactivation in a variety of settings where the network might operate. These settings are representative of distinct cellular types, abundance of transcription factors and ratio between gene switching and protein synthesis rates. By investigating noise-induced transitions among the different network operative states, our results suggest that gene switching rates are key parameters to shape network response to external perturbations, and that such response depends on the particular biological setting, i.e. the characteristic time scales and protein abundance. These results might have implications on our understanding of irreversible transitions for noise-related phenomena such as cellular differentiation. In addition these evidences suggest to adopt the appropriate mathematical model of the network in order to analyze the system consistently to the reference biological setting. PMID:27256916

  11. Gene switching rate determines response to extrinsic perturbations in the self-activation transcriptional network motif.

    PubMed

    de Franciscis, Sebastiano; Caravagna, Giulio; Mauri, Giancarlo; d'Onofrio, Alberto

    2016-06-03

    Gene switching dynamics is a major source of randomness in genetic networks, also in the case of large concentrations of the transcription factors. In this work, we consider a common network motif - the positive feedback of a transcription factor on its own synthesis - and assess its response to extrinsic noises perturbing gene deactivation in a variety of settings where the network might operate. These settings are representative of distinct cellular types, abundance of transcription factors and ratio between gene switching and protein synthesis rates. By investigating noise-induced transitions among the different network operative states, our results suggest that gene switching rates are key parameters to shape network response to external perturbations, and that such response depends on the particular biological setting, i.e. the characteristic time scales and protein abundance. These results might have implications on our understanding of irreversible transitions for noise-related phenomena such as cellular differentiation. In addition these evidences suggest to adopt the appropriate mathematical model of the network in order to analyze the system consistently to the reference biological setting.

  12. Gene switching rate determines response to extrinsic perturbations in the self-activation transcriptional network motif

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Franciscis, Sebastiano; Caravagna, Giulio; Mauri, Giancarlo; D’Onofrio, Alberto

    2016-06-01

    Gene switching dynamics is a major source of randomness in genetic networks, also in the case of large concentrations of the transcription factors. In this work, we consider a common network motif - the positive feedback of a transcription factor on its own synthesis - and assess its response to extrinsic noises perturbing gene deactivation in a variety of settings where the network might operate. These settings are representative of distinct cellular types, abundance of transcription factors and ratio between gene switching and protein synthesis rates. By investigating noise-induced transitions among the different network operative states, our results suggest that gene switching rates are key parameters to shape network response to external perturbations, and that such response depends on the particular biological setting, i.e. the characteristic time scales and protein abundance. These results might have implications on our understanding of irreversible transitions for noise-related phenomena such as cellular differentiation. In addition these evidences suggest to adopt the appropriate mathematical model of the network in order to analyze the system consistently to the reference biological setting.

  13. Characterization of a unique motif in LIM mineralization protein-1 that interacts with jun activation-domain-binding protein 1

    PubMed Central

    Sangadala, Sreedhara; Yoshioka, Katsuhito; Enyo, Yoshio; Liu, Yunshan; Titus, Louisa; Boden, Scott D.

    2014-01-01

    Development and repair of the skeletal system and other organs are highly dependent on precise regulation of the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) pathway. The use of BMPs clinically to induce bone formation has been limited in part by the requirement of much higher doses of recombinant proteins in primates than were needed in cell culture or rodents. Therefore, increasing cellular responsiveness to BMPs has become our focus. We determined that an osteogenic LIM mineralization protein, LMP-1 interacts with Smurf1 (Smad ubiquitin regulatory factor 1) and prevents ubiquitination of Smads resulting in potentiation of BMP activity. In the region of LMP-1 responsible for bone formation, there is a motif that directly interacts with the Smurf1 WW2 domain and thus effectively competes for binding with Smad1 and Smad5, key signaling proteins in the BMP pathway. Here we show that the same region also contains a motif that interacts with Jun activation-domain-binding protein 1 (Jab1) which targets a common Smad, Smad4, shared by both the BMP and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) pathways, for proteasomal degradation. Jab1 was first identified as a coactivator of the transcription factor c-Jun. Jab1 binds to Smad4, Smad5, and Smad7, key intracellular signaling molecules of the TGF-β superfamily, and causes ubiquiti-nation and/or degradation of these Smads. We confirmed a direct interaction of Jab1 with LMP-1 using recombinantly expressed wild-type and mutant proteins in slot-blot-binding assays. We hypothesized that LMP-1 binding to Jab1 prevents the binding and subsequent degradation of these Smads causing increased accumulation of osteogenic Smads in cells. We identified a sequence motif in LMP-1 that was predicted to interact with Jab1 based on the MAME/MAST sequence analysis of several cellular signaling molecules that are known to interact with Jab-1. We further mutated the potential key interacting residues in LMP-1 and showed loss of binding to Jab1 in binding

  14. Characterization of a unique motif in LIM mineralization protein-1 that interacts with jun activation-domain-binding protein 1.

    PubMed

    Sangadala, Sreedhara; Yoshioka, Katsuhito; Enyo, Yoshio; Liu, Yunshan; Titus, Louisa; Boden, Scott D

    2014-01-01

    Development and repair of the skeletal system and other organs are highly dependent on precise regulation of the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) pathway. The use of BMPs clinically to induce bone formation has been limited in part by the requirement of much higher doses of recombinant proteins in primates than were needed in cell culture or rodents. Therefore, increasing cellular responsiveness to BMPs has become our focus. We determined that an osteogenic LIM mineralization protein, LMP-1 interacts with Smurf1 (Smad ubiquitin regulatory factor 1) and prevents ubiquitination of Smads resulting in potentiation of BMP activity. In the region of LMP-1 responsible for bone formation, there is a motif that directly interacts with the Smurf1 WW2 domain and thus effectively competes for binding with Smad1 and Smad5, key signaling proteins in the BMP pathway. Here we show that the same region also contains a motif that interacts with Jun activation-domain-binding protein 1 (Jab1) which targets a common Smad, Smad4, shared by both the BMP and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) pathways, for proteasomal degradation. Jab1 was first identified as a coactivator of the transcription factor c-Jun. Jab1 binds to Smad4, Smad5, and Smad7, key intracellular signaling molecules of the TGF-β superfamily, and causes ubiquitination and/or degradation of these Smads. We confirmed a direct interaction of Jab1 with LMP-1 using recombinantly expressed wild-type and mutant proteins in slot-blot-binding assays. We hypothesized that LMP-1 binding to Jab1 prevents the binding and subsequent degradation of these Smads causing increased accumulation of osteogenic Smads in cells. We identified a sequence motif in LMP-1 that was predicted to interact with Jab1 based on the MAME/MAST sequence analysis of several cellular signaling molecules that are known to interact with Jab-1. We further mutated the potential key interacting residues in LMP-1 and showed loss of binding to Jab1 in binding

  15. T cell activation.

    PubMed

    Smith-Garvin, Jennifer E; Koretzky, Gary A; Jordan, Martha S

    2009-01-01

    This year marks the 25th anniversary of the first Annual Review of Immunology article to describe features of the T cell antigen receptor (TCR). In celebration of this anniversary, we begin with a brief introduction outlining the chronology of the earliest studies that established the basic paradigm for how the engaged TCR transduces its signals. This review continues with a description of the current state of our understanding of TCR signaling, as well as a summary of recent findings examining other key aspects of T cell activation, including cross talk between the TCR and integrins, the role of costimulatory molecules, and how signals may negatively regulate T cell function.Acronyms and DefinitionsAdapter protein: cellular protein that functions to bridge molecular interactions via characteristic domains able to mediate protein/protein or protein/lipid interactions Costimulation: signals delivered to T cells by cell surface receptors other than the TCR itself that potentiate T cell activation cSMAC: central supramolecular activation cluster Immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM): a short peptide sequence in the cytoplasmic tails of key surface receptors on hematopoietic cells that is characterized by tyrosine residues that are phosphorylated by Src family PTKs, enabling the ITAM to recruit activated Syk family kinases Inside-out signaling: signals initiated by engagement of immunoreceptors that lead to conformational changes and clustering of integrins, thereby increasing the affinity and avidity of the integrins for their ligands NFAT: nuclear factor of activated T cells PI3K: phosphoinositide 3-kinase PKC: protein kinase C PLC: phospholipase C pMHC: peptide major histocompatibility complex (MHC) complex pSMAC: peripheral supramolecular activation cluster PTK: protein tyrosine kinase Signal transduction: biochemical events linking surface receptor engagement to cellular responses TCR: T cell antigen receptor

  16. Functional conservation of PISTILLATA activity in a pea homolog lacking the PI motif.

    PubMed

    Berbel, Ana; Navarro, Cristina; Ferrándiz, Cristina; Cañas, Luis Antonio; Beltrán, José-Pío; Madueño, Francisco

    2005-09-01

    Current understanding of floral development is mainly based on what we know from Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and Antirrhinum majus. However, we can learn more by comparing developmental mechanisms that may explain morphological differences between species. A good example comes from the analysis of genes controlling flower development in pea (Pisum sativum), a plant with more complex leaves and inflorescences than Arabidopsis and Antirrhinum, and a different floral ontogeny. The analysis of UNIFOLIATA (UNI) and STAMINA PISTILLOIDA (STP), the pea orthologs of LEAFY and UNUSUAL FLORAL ORGANS, has revealed a common link in the regulation of flower and leaf development not apparent in Arabidopsis. While the Arabidopsis genes mainly behave as key regulators of flower development, where they control the expression of B-function genes, UNI and STP also contribute to the development of the pea compound leaf. Here, we describe the characterization of P. sativum PISTILLATA (PsPI), a pea MADS-box gene homologous to B-function genes like PI and GLOBOSA (GLO), from Arabidopsis and Antirrhinum, respectively. PsPI encodes for an atypical PI-type polypeptide that lacks the highly conserved C-terminal PI motif. Nevertheless, constitutive expression of PsPI in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) and Arabidopsis shows that it can specifically replace the function of PI, being able to complement the strong pi-1 mutant. Accordingly, PsPI expression in pea flowers, which is dependent on STP, is identical to PI and GLO. Interestingly, PsPI is also transiently expressed in young leaves, suggesting a role of PsPI in pea leaf development, a possibility that fits with the established role of UNI and STP in the control of this process.

  17. Identifying the activation motif in the N-terminal of rainbow trout and zebrafish melanocortin-2 receptor accessory protein 1 (MRAP1) orthologs.

    PubMed

    Dores, Robert M; Liang, Liang; Hollmann, Rebecca E; Sandhu, Navdeep; Vijayan, Mathilakath M

    2016-08-01

    The activation of mammalian melanocortin-2 receptor (MC2R) orthologs is dependent on a four-amino acid activation motif (LDYL/I) located in the N-terminal of mammalian MRAP1 (melanocortin-2 receptor accessory protein). Previous alanine substitution analysis had shown that the Y residue in this motif appears to be the most important for mediating the activation of mammalian MC2R orthologs. Similar, but not identical amino acid motifs were detected in rainbow trout MRAP1 (YDYL) and zebrafish MRAP1 (YDYV). To determine the importance of these residues in the putative activation motifs, rainbow trout and zebrafish MRAP1 orthologs were individually co-expressed in CHO cells with rainbow trout MC2R, and the activation of this receptor with either the wild-type MRAP1 ortholog or alanine-substituted analogs of the two teleost MRAP1s was analyzed. Alanine substitutions at all four amino acid positions in rainbow trout MRAP1 blocked activation of the rainbow trout MC2R. Single alanine substitutions of the D and Y residues in rainbow trout and zebrafish MRAP1 indicate that these two residues play a significant role in the activation of rainbow trout MC2R. These observations indicate that there are subtle differences in the way that teleost and mammalian MRAPs are involved in the activation of their corresponding MC2R orthologs.

  18. Tripartite motif-containing protein 30 modulates TCR-activated proliferation and effector functions in CD4+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Choi, Un Yung; Hur, Ji Yeon; Lee, Myeong Sup; Zhang, Quanri; Choi, Won Young; Kim, Lark Kyun; Lee, Wook-Bin; Oh, Goo Taeg; Kim, Young-Joon

    2014-01-01

    To avoid excessive activation, immune signals are tightly controlled by diverse inhibitory proteins. TRIM30, a tripartite motif (TRIM)-containing protein is one of such inhibitors known to function in macrophages. To define the roles of TRIM30, we generated Trim30 knockout (Trim30-/-) mice. Trim30 deletion caused no major developmental defects in any organs, nor showed any discernable defect in the activation of macrophages. But, Trim30-/- mice showed increased CD4/CD8 ratio when aged and Trim30-/- CD4+ T cells exhibited an abnormal response upon TCR activation, in particular in the absence of a costimulatory signal. Adoptive transfer of wild-type and Trim30-/- CD4+ T cells together into lymphopenic hosts confirmed higher proliferation of the Trim30-/- CD4+ T cells in vivo. Despite the enhanced proliferation, Trim30-/- T cells showed decreased levels of NF-κB activation and IL-2 production compared to wild-type cells. These results indicate a distinct requirement for TRIM30 in modulation of NF-κB activation and cell proliferation induced by TCR stimulation.

  19. A conserved sequence extending motif III of the motor domain in the Snf2-family DNA translocase Rad54 is critical for ATPase activity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Ping; Janke, Ryan; Kingsley, James; Luo, Jerry; Fasching, Clare; Ehmsen, Kirk T; Heyer, Wolf-Dietrich

    2013-01-01

    Rad54 is a dsDNA-dependent ATPase that translocates on duplex DNA. Its ATPase function is essential for homologous recombination, a pathway critical for meiotic chromosome segregation, repair of complex DNA damage, and recovery of stalled or broken replication forks. In recombination, Rad54 cooperates with Rad51 protein and is required to dissociate Rad51 from heteroduplex DNA to allow access by DNA polymerases for recombination-associated DNA synthesis. Sequence analysis revealed that Rad54 contains a perfect match to the consensus PIP box sequence, a widely spread PCNA interaction motif. Indeed, Rad54 interacts directly with PCNA, but this interaction is not mediated by the Rad54 PIP box-like sequence. This sequence is located as an extension of motif III of the Rad54 motor domain and is essential for full Rad54 ATPase activity. Mutations in this motif render Rad54 non-functional in vivo and severely compromise its activities in vitro. Further analysis demonstrated that such mutations affect dsDNA binding, consistent with the location of this sequence motif on the surface of the cleft formed by two RecA-like domains, which likely forms the dsDNA binding site of Rad54. Our study identified a novel sequence motif critical for Rad54 function and showed that even perfect matches to the PIP box consensus may not necessarily identify PCNA interaction sites.

  20. Stably integrated mouse mammary tumor virus long terminal repeat DNA requires the octamer motifs for basal promoter activity.

    PubMed Central

    Buetti, E

    1994-01-01

    In the mouse mammary tumor virus promoter, a tandem of octamer motifs, recognized by ubiquitous and tissue-restricted Oct transcription factors, is located upstream of the TATA box and next to a binding site for the transcription factor nuclear factor I (NF-I). Their function was investigated with mutant long terminal repeats under different transfection conditions in mouse Ltk- cells and quantitative S1 nuclease mapping of the transcripts. In stable transfectants, which are most representative of the state of proviral DNA with respect to both number of integrated DNA templates and chromatin organization, a long terminal repeat mutant of both octamer sites showed an average 50-fold reduction of the basal transcription level, while the dexamethasone-stimulated level was unaffected. DNase I in vitro footprinting assays with L-cell nuclear protein extracts showed that the mutant DNA was unable to bind octamer factors but had a normal footprint in the NF-I site. I conclude that mouse mammary tumor virus employs the tandem octamer motifs of the viral promoter, recognized by the ubiquitous transcription factor Oct-1, for its basal transcriptional activity and the NF-I binding site, as previously shown, for glucocorticoid-stimulated transcription. A deletion mutant with only one octamer site showed a marked base-level reduction at high copy number but little reduction at low copies of integrated plasmids. The observed transcription levels may depend both on the relative ratio of transcription factors to DNA templates and on the relative affinity of binding sites, as determined by oligonucleotide competition footprinting. Images PMID:8289800

  1. A WXW Motif Is Required for the Anticancer Activity of the TAT-RasGAP317–326 Peptide*

    PubMed Central

    Barras, David; Chevalier, Nadja; Zoete, Vincent; Dempsey, Rosemary; Lapouge, Karine; Olayioye, Monilola A.; Michielin, Olivier; Widmann, Christian

    2014-01-01

    TAT-RasGAP317–326, a cell-permeable 10-amino acid-long peptide derived from the N2 fragment of p120 Ras GTPase-activating protein (RasGAP), sensitizes tumor cells to apoptosis induced by various anticancer therapies. This RasGAP-derived peptide, by targeting the deleted in liver cancer-1 (DLC1) tumor suppressor, also hampers cell migration and invasion by promoting cell adherence and by inhibiting cell movement. Here, we systematically investigated the role of each amino acid within the RasGAP317–326 sequence for the anticancer activities of TAT-RasGAP317–326. We report here that the first three amino acids of this sequence, tryptophan, methionine, and tryptophan (WMW), are necessary and sufficient to sensitize cancer cells to cisplatin-induced apoptosis and to reduce cell migration. The WMW motif was found to be critical for the binding of fragment N2 to DLC1. These results define the interaction mode between the active anticancer sequence of RasGAP and DLC1. This knowledge will facilitate the design of small molecules bearing the tumor-sensitizing and antimetastatic activities of TAT-RasGAP317–326. PMID:25008324

  2. A WXW motif is required for the anticancer activity of the TAT-RasGAP317-326 peptide.

    PubMed

    Barras, David; Chevalier, Nadja; Zoete, Vincent; Dempsey, Rosemary; Lapouge, Karine; Olayioye, Monilola A; Michielin, Olivier; Widmann, Christian

    2014-08-22

    TAT-RasGAP317-326, a cell-permeable 10-amino acid-long peptide derived from the N2 fragment of p120 Ras GTPase-activating protein (RasGAP), sensitizes tumor cells to apoptosis induced by various anticancer therapies. This RasGAP-derived peptide, by targeting the deleted in liver cancer-1 (DLC1) tumor suppressor, also hampers cell migration and invasion by promoting cell adherence and by inhibiting cell movement. Here, we systematically investigated the role of each amino acid within the RasGAP317-326 sequence for the anticancer activities of TAT-RasGAP317-326. We report here that the first three amino acids of this sequence, tryptophan, methionine, and tryptophan (WMW), are necessary and sufficient to sensitize cancer cells to cisplatin-induced apoptosis and to reduce cell migration. The WMW motif was found to be critical for the binding of fragment N2 to DLC1. These results define the interaction mode between the active anticancer sequence of RasGAP and DLC1. This knowledge will facilitate the design of small molecules bearing the tumor-sensitizing and antimetastatic activities of TAT-RasGAP317-326.

  3. Palmitoylation of protease-activated receptor-1 regulates adaptor protein complex-2 and -3 interaction with tyrosine-based motifs and endocytic sorting.

    PubMed

    Canto, Isabel; Trejo, JoAnn

    2013-05-31

    Protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR1) is a G protein-coupled receptor for the coagulant protease thrombin. Thrombin binds to and cleaves the N terminus of PAR1, generating a new N terminus that functions as a tethered ligand that cannot diffuse away. In addition to rapid desensitization, PAR1 trafficking is critical for the regulation of cellular responses. PAR1 displays constitutive and agonist-induced internalization. Constitutive internalization of unactivated PAR1 is mediated by the clathrin adaptor protein complex-2 (AP-2), which binds to a distal tyrosine-based motif localized within the C-terminal tail (C-tail) domain. Once internalized, PAR1 is sorted from endosomes to lysosomes via AP-3 interaction with a second C-tail tyrosine motif proximal to the transmembrane domain. However, the regulatory processes that control adaptor protein recognition of PAR1 C-tail tyrosine-based motifs are not known. Here, we report that palmitoylation of PAR1 is critical for regulating proper utilization of tyrosine-based motifs and endocytic sorting. We show that PAR1 is basally palmitoylated at highly conserved C-tail cysteines. A palmitoylation-deficient PAR1 mutant is competent to signal and exhibits a marked increase in constitutive internalization and lysosomal degradation compared with wild type receptor. Intriguingly, enhanced constitutive internalization of PAR1 is mediated by AP-2 and requires the proximal tyrosine-based motif rather than the distal tyrosine motif used by wild type receptor. Moreover, palmitoylation-deficient PAR1 displays increased degradation that is mediated by AP-3. These findings suggest that palmitoylation of PAR1 regulates appropriate utilization of tyrosine-based motifs by adaptor proteins and endocytic trafficking, processes that are critical for maintaining appropriate expression of PAR1 at the cell surface.

  4. [Personal motif in art].

    PubMed

    Gerevich, József

    2015-01-01

    One of the basic questions of the art psychology is whether a personal motif is to be found behind works of art and if so, how openly or indirectly it appears in the work itself. Analysis of examples and documents from the fine arts and literature allow us to conclude that the personal motif that can be identified by the viewer through symbols, at times easily at others with more difficulty, gives an emotional plus to the artistic product. The personal motif may be found in traumatic experiences, in communication to the model or with other emotionally important persons (mourning, disappointment, revenge, hatred, rivalry, revolt etc.), in self-searching, or self-analysis. The emotions are expressed in artistic activity either directly or indirectly. The intention nourished by the artist's identity (Kunstwollen) may stand in the way of spontaneous self-expression, channelling it into hidden paths. Under the influence of certain circumstances, the artist may arouse in the viewer, consciously or unconsciously, an illusionary, misleading image of himself. An examination of the personal motif is one of the important research areas of art therapy.

  5. Validation of chemical compound library screening for transcriptional co-activator with PDZ-binding motif inhibitors using GFP-fused transcriptional co-activator with PDZ-binding motif.

    PubMed

    Nagashima, Shunta; Maruyama, Junichi; Kawano, Shodai; Iwasa, Hiroaki; Nakagawa, Kentaro; Ishigami-Yuasa, Mari; Kagechika, Hiroyuki; Nishina, Hiroshi; Hata, Yutaka

    2016-06-01

    Transcriptional co-activator with PDZ-binding motif (TAZ) plays versatile roles in cell proliferation and differentiation. It is phosphorylated by large tumor suppressor kinases, the core kinases of the tumor-suppressive Hippo pathway. Phosphorylation induces the cytoplasmic accumulation of TAZ and its degradation. In human cancers, the deregulation of the Hippo pathway and gene amplification enhance TAZ activity. TAZ interacts with TEA domain family members (TEAD), and upregulates genes implicated in epithelial-mesenchymal transition. It also confers stemness to cancer cells. Thus, TAZ activation provides cancer cells with malignant properties and worsens the clinical prognosis. Therefore, TAZ attracts attention as a therapeutic target in cancer therapy. We applied 18 606 small chemical compounds to human osteosarcoma U2OS cells expressing GFP-fused TAZ (GFP-TAZ), monitored the subcellular localization of GFP-TAZ, and selected 33 compounds that shifted GFP-TAZ to the cytoplasm. Unexpectedly, only a limited number of compounds suppressed TAZ-mediated enhancement of TEAD-responsive reporter activity. Moreover, the compounds that weakened TEAD reporter activity did not necessarily decrease the unphosphorylated TAZ. In this study, we focused on three compounds that decreased both TEAD reporter activity and unphosphorylated TAZ, and treated several human cancer cells with these compounds. One compound did not show a remarkable effect, whereas the other two compounds compromised the cell viability in certain cancer cells. In conclusion, the GFP-TAZ-based assay can be used as the first screening for compounds that inhibit TAZ and show anticancer properties. To develop anticancer drugs, we need additional assays to select the compounds.

  6. Adaptation of short-term plasticity parameters via error-driven learning may explain the correlation between activity-dependent synaptic properties, connectivity motifs and target specificity

    PubMed Central

    Esposito, Umberto; Giugliano, Michele; Vasilaki, Eleni

    2015-01-01

    The anatomical connectivity among neurons has been experimentally found to be largely non-random across brain areas. This means that certain connectivity motifs occur at a higher frequency than would be expected by chance. Of particular interest, short-term synaptic plasticity properties were found to colocalize with specific motifs: an over-expression of bidirectional motifs has been found in neuronal pairs where short-term facilitation dominates synaptic transmission among the neurons, whereas an over-expression of unidirectional motifs has been observed in neuronal pairs where short-term depression dominates. In previous work we found that, given a network with fixed short-term properties, the interaction between short- and long-term plasticity of synaptic transmission is sufficient for the emergence of specific motifs. Here, we introduce an error-driven learning mechanism for short-term plasticity that may explain how such observed correspondences develop from randomly initialized dynamic synapses. By allowing synapses to change their properties, neurons are able to adapt their own activity depending on an error signal. This results in more rich dynamics and also, provided that the learning mechanism is target-specific, leads to specialized groups of synapses projecting onto functionally different targets, qualitatively replicating the experimental results of Wang and collaborators. PMID:25688203

  7. Epsilon glutathione transferases possess a unique class-conserved subunit interface motif that directly interacts with glutathione in the active site

    PubMed Central

    Wongsantichon, Jantana; Robinson, Robert C.; Ketterman, Albert J.

    2015-01-01

    Epsilon class glutathione transferases (GSTs) have been shown to contribute significantly to insecticide resistance. We report a new Epsilon class protein crystal structure from Drosophila melanogaster for the glutathione transferase DmGSTE6. The structure reveals a novel Epsilon clasp motif that is conserved across hundreds of millions of years of evolution of the insect Diptera order. This histidine-serine motif lies in the subunit interface and appears to contribute to quaternary stability as well as directly connecting the two glutathiones in the active sites of this dimeric enzyme. PMID:26487708

  8. Understanding the role of histidine in the GHSxG acyltransferase active site motif: Evidence for histidine stabilization of the malonyl-enzyme intermediate

    SciTech Connect

    Poust, Sean; Yoon, Isu; Adams, Paul D.; Katz, Leonard; Petzold, Christopher J.; Keasling, Jay D.

    2014-10-06

    Acyltransferases determine which extender units are incorporated into polyketide and fatty acid products. Thus, the ping-pong acyltransferase mechanism utilizes a serine in a conserved GHSxG motif. However, the role of the conserved histidine in this motif is poorly understood. We observed that a histidine to alanine mutation (H640A) in the GHSxG motif of the malonyl-CoA specific yersiniabactin acyltransferase results in an approximately seven-fold higher hydrolysis rate over the wildtype enzyme, while retaining transacylation activity. We propose two possibilities for the reduction in hydrolysis rate: either H640 structurally stabilizes the protein by hydrogen bonding with a conserved asparagine in the ferredoxin-like subdomain of the protein, or a water-mediated hydrogen bond between H640 and the malonyl moiety stabilizes the malonyl-O-AT ester intermediate.

  9. Understanding the role of histidine in the GHSxG acyltransferase active site motif: Evidence for histidine stabilization of the malonyl-enzyme intermediate

    DOE PAGES

    Poust, Sean; Yoon, Isu; Adams, Paul D.; ...

    2014-10-06

    Acyltransferases determine which extender units are incorporated into polyketide and fatty acid products. Thus, the ping-pong acyltransferase mechanism utilizes a serine in a conserved GHSxG motif. However, the role of the conserved histidine in this motif is poorly understood. We observed that a histidine to alanine mutation (H640A) in the GHSxG motif of the malonyl-CoA specific yersiniabactin acyltransferase results in an approximately seven-fold higher hydrolysis rate over the wildtype enzyme, while retaining transacylation activity. We propose two possibilities for the reduction in hydrolysis rate: either H640 structurally stabilizes the protein by hydrogen bonding with a conserved asparagine in the ferredoxin-likemore » subdomain of the protein, or a water-mediated hydrogen bond between H640 and the malonyl moiety stabilizes the malonyl-O-AT ester intermediate.« less

  10. ITAM Signaling by Vav Family Rho Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factors Regulates Interstitial Transit Rates of Neutrophils In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Mascarenhas, Francesca; Delgado, Ryan; Miller, Mark J.; Swat, Wojciech

    2009-01-01

    Background In response to infection, neutrophils are quickly recruited from the blood into inflamed tissues. The interstitial migration of neutrophils is crucial for the efficient capture and control of rapidly proliferating microbes before microbial growth can overwhelm the host's defenses. However, the molecular mechanisms that regulate interstitial migration are incompletely understood. Methodology/Principal Findings Here, we use two-photon microscopy (2PM) to study discrete steps of neutrophil responses during subcutaneous infection with bacteria. Our study demonstrates that signals emanating from ITAM-containing receptors mediated by Vav family Rho GEFs control the velocity, but not the directionality, of neutrophil migration towards sites of bacterial infection. Conclusions/Significance Here we show that during neutrophil migration towards sites of bacterial infection, signals emanating from ITAM-containing receptors specifically control interstitial neutrophil velocity. PMID:19247495

  11. LAB/NTAL facilitates fungal/PAMP-induced IL-12 and IFN-γ production by repressing β-catenin activation in dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Orr, Selinda J; Burg, Ashley R; Chan, Tim; Quigley, Laura; Jones, Gareth W; Ford, Jill W; Hodge, Deborah; Razzook, Catherine; Sarhan, Joseph; Jones, Yava L; Whittaker, Gillian C; Boelte, Kimberly C; Lyakh, Lyudmila; Cardone, Marco; O'Connor, Geraldine M; Tan, Cuiyan; Li, Hongchuan; Anderson, Stephen K; Jones, Simon A; Zhang, Weiguo; Taylor, Philip R; Trinchieri, Giorgio; McVicar, Daniel W

    2013-05-01

    Fungal pathogens elicit cytokine responses downstream of immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM)-coupled or hemiITAM-containing receptors and TLRs. The Linker for Activation of B cells/Non-T cell Activating Linker (LAB/NTAL) encoded by Lat2, is a known regulator of ITAM-coupled receptors and TLR-associated cytokine responses. Here we demonstrate that LAB is involved in anti-fungal immunity. We show that Lat2-/- mice are more susceptible to C. albicans infection than wild type (WT) mice. Dendritic cells (DCs) express LAB and we show that it is basally phosphorylated by the growth factor M-CSF or following engagement of Dectin-2, but not Dectin-1. Our data revealed a unique mechanism whereby LAB controls basal and fungal/pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMP)-induced nuclear β-catenin levels. This in turn is important for controlling fungal/PAMP-induced cytokine production in DCs. C. albicans- and LPS-induced IL-12 and IL-23 production was blunted in Lat2-/- DCs. Accordingly, Lat2-/- DCs directed reduced Th1 polarization in vitro and Lat2-/- mice displayed reduced Natural Killer (NK) and T cell-mediated IFN-γ production in vivo/ex vivo. Thus our data define a novel link between LAB and β-catenin nuclear accumulation in DCs that facilitates IFN-γ responses during anti-fungal immunity. In addition, these findings are likely to be relevant to other infectious diseases that require IL-12 family cytokines and an IFN-γ response for pathogen clearance.

  12. Human ADA3 regulates RARα transcriptional activity through direct contact between LxxLL motifs and the receptor coactivator pocket

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chia-Wei; Ai, Ni; Dinh, Gia Khanh; Welsh, William J.; Chen, J. Don

    2010-01-01

    The alternation/deficiency in activation-3 (ADA3) is an essential component of the human p300/CBP-associated factor (PCAF) and yeast Spt-Ada-Gcn5-acetyltransferase (SAGA) histone acetyltransferase complexes. These complexes facilitate transactivation of target genes by association with transcription factors and modification of local chromatin structure. It is known that the yeast ADA3 is required for nuclear receptor (NR)-mediated transactivation in yeast cells; however, the role of mammalian ADA3 in NR signaling remains elusive. In this study, we have investigated how the human (h) ADA3 regulates retinoic acid receptor (RAR) α-mediated transactivation. We show that hADA3 interacts directly with RARα in a hormone-dependent manner and this interaction contributes to RARα transactivation. Intriguingly, this interaction involves classical LxxLL motifs in hADA3, as demonstrated by both ‘loss’ and ‘gain’ of function mutations, as well as a functional coactivator pocket of the receptor. Additionally, we show that hADA3 associates with RARα target gene promoter in a hormone-dependent manner and ADA3 knockdown impairs RARβ2 expression. Furthermore, a structural model was established to illustrate an interaction network within the ADA3/RARα complex. These results suggest that hADA3 is a bona fide transcriptional coactivator for RARα, acting through a conserved mechanism involving direct contacts between NR boxes and the receptor’s co-activator pocket. PMID:20413580

  13. A basic motif in the N-terminal region of RAG1 enhances V(D)J recombination activity.

    PubMed Central

    McMahan, C J; Difilippantonio, M J; Rao, N; Spanopoulou, E; Schatz, D G

    1997-01-01

    The variable portions of antigen receptor genes are assembled from component gene segments by a site-specific recombination reaction known as V(D)J recombination. The RAG1 and RAG2 proteins are the critical lymphoid cell-specific components of the recombination enzymatic machinery and are responsible for site-specific DNA recognition and cleavage. Previous studies had defined a minimal, recombinationally active core region of murine RAG1 consisting of amino acids 384 to 1008 of the 1,040-residue RAG1 protein. No recombination function has heretofore been ascribed to any portion of the 383-amino-acid N-terminal region that is missing from the core, but it seems likely to be of functional significance, based on its evolutionary conservation. Using extrachromosomal recombination substrates, we demonstrate here that the N-terminal region enhances the recombination activity of RAG1 by up to an order of magnitude in a variety of cell lines. Deletion analysis localized a region of the N terminus critical for this effect to amino acids 216 to 238, and further mutagenesis demonstrated that a small basic amino acid motif (BIIa) in this region is essential for enhancing the activity of RAG1. Despite the fact that BIIa is important for the interaction of RAG1 with the nuclear localization factor Srp-1, it does not appear to enhance recombination by facilitating nuclear transport of RAG1. A variety of models for how this region stimulates the recombination activity of RAG1 are considered. PMID:9234712

  14. Molybdenum and tungsten oxygen transferases--and functional diversity within a common active site motif.

    PubMed

    Pushie, M Jake; Cotelesage, Julien J; George, Graham N

    2014-01-01

    Molybdenum and tungsten are the only second and third-row transition elements with a known function in living organisms. The molybdenum and tungsten enzymes show common structural features, with the metal being bound by a pyranopterin-dithiolene cofactor called molybdopterin. They catalyze a variety of oxygen transferase reactions coupled with two-electron redox chemistry in which the metal cycles between the +6 and +4 oxidation states usually with water, either product or substrate, providing the oxygen. The functional roles filled by the molybdenum and tungsten enzymes are diverse; for example, they play essential roles in microbial respiration, in the uptake of nitrogen in green plants, and in human health. Together, the enzymes form a superfamily which is among the most prevalent known, being found in all kingdoms of life. This review discusses what is known of the active site structures and the mechanisms, together with some recent insights into the evolution of these important enzyme systems.

  15. The Transmembrane Domain of HIV-1 gp41 Inhibits T-Cell Activation by Targeting Multiple T-Cell Receptor Complex Components through Its GxxxG Motif.

    PubMed

    Rotem, Etai; Reuven, Eliran Moshe; Klug, Yoel A; Shai, Yechiel

    2016-02-23

    To successfully infect and persist within its host, HIV-1 utilizes several immunosuppressive motifs within its gp41 envelope glycoprotein to manipulate and evade the immune system. The transmembrane domain (TMD) of gp41 downregulates T-cell receptor (TCR) signaling through a hitherto unknown mechanism. Interactions between TMDs within the membrane milieu have been shown to be typically mediated by particular amino acids, such as interactions between basic and acidic residues and dimerization motifs as GxxxG. The HIV-1 TMD exhibits both a polar arginine (Arg(696)) residue and a GxxxG motif, making them ideal candidates for mediators of TMD-TCR interaction. Using a primary T-cell activation assay and biochemical and biophysical methods, we demonstrate that the gp41 TMD directly interacts with TMDs of the TCR and the CD3 coreceptors (δ, γ, and ε) within the membrane, presumably leading to impairment of complex assembly. Additionally, we reveal that although Arg(696) does not affect TMD immunosuppression, the GxxxG motif is crucial in mediating gp41's TMD interaction with the CD3 coreceptors of the TCR. These findings suggest that compared with other gp41 immunosuppressive motifs, the gp41 TMD has multiple targets within the TCR complex, suggesting less susceptibility to evolutionary pressure and consequently being advantageous for the virus over the host immune response. Furthermore, as the GxxxG motif mediates interactions of the gp41 TMD with multiple receptors, it emerges as an attractive drug target. This multitarget inhibitory mechanism might be a strategy utilized by HIV to interfere with the function of additional host receptors.

  16. Ligand structural motifs can decouple glucocorticoid receptor transcriptional activation from target promoter occupancy.

    PubMed

    Blind, Raymond D; Pineda-Torra, Inés; Xu, Yong; Xu, H Eric; Garabedian, Michael J

    2012-04-20

    Glucocorticoid (GC) induction of the tyrosine aminotransferase (TAT) gene by the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) is a classic model used to investigate steroid-regulated gene expression. Classic studies analyzing GC-induction of the TAT gene demonstrated that despite having very high affinity for GR, some steroids cannot induce maximal TAT enzyme activity, but the molecular basis for this phenomenon is unknown. Here, we used RT-PCR and chromatin immunoprecipitation to determine TAT mRNA accumulation and GR recruitment to the TAT promoter (TAT-GRE) in rat hepatoma cells induced by seven GR ligands: dexamethasone (DEX), cortisol (CRT), corticosterone (CCS), 11-deoxycorticosterone (DOC), aldosterone (ALD), progesterone (PRG) and 17-hydroxyprogesterone (17P). As expected, DEX, CRT, CCS and ALD all induced both TAT mRNA and GR recruitment to the TAT-GRE, while PRG and 17P did not. However, while DOC could not induce significant TAT mRNA, it did induce robust GR occupancy of the TAT-GRE. DOC also induced recruitment of the histone acetyltransferase p300 to the TAT-GRE as efficiently as DEX. These DOC-induced effects recapitulated at another GR target gene (sulfonyltransferase 1A1), and DOC also failed to promote the multiple changes in gene expression required for glucocorticoid-dependent 3T3-L1 adipocyte differentiation. Structural simulations and protease sensitivity assays suggest that DOC and DEX induce different conformations in GR. Thus, although steroids that bind GR with high affinity can induce GR and p300 occupancy of target promoters, they may not induce a conformation of GR capable of activating transcription.

  17. The disulfide oxidoreductase SdbA is active in Streptococcus gordonii using a single C-terminal cysteine of the CXXC motif.

    PubMed

    Davey, Lauren; Cohen, Alejandro; LeBlanc, Jason; Halperin, Scott A; Lee, Song F

    2016-01-01

    Recently, we identified a novel disulfide oxidoreductase, SdbA, in the oral bacterium Streptococcus gordonii. Disulfide oxidoreductases form disulfide bonds in nascent proteins using a CXXC catalytic motif. Typically, the N-terminal cysteine interacts with substrates, whereas the C-terminal cysteine is buried and only reacts with the first cysteine of the motif. In this study, we investigated the SdbA C(86) P(87) D(88) C(89) catalytic motif. In vitro, SdbA single cysteine variants at the N or C-terminal position (SdbAC86P and SdbAC89A ) were active but displayed different susceptibility to oxidation, and N-terminal cysteine was prone to sulfenylation. In S. gordonii, mutants with a single N-terminal cysteine were inactive and formed unstable disulfide adducts with other proteins. Activity was partially restored by inactivation of pyruvate oxidase, a hydrogen peroxide generator. Presence of the C-terminal cysteine alone (in the SdbAC86P variant) could complement the ΔsdbA mutant and restore disulfide bond formation in recombinant and natural protein substrates. These results provide evidence that certain disulfide oxidoreductases can catalyze disulfide bond formation using a single cysteine of the CXXC motif, including the buried C-terminal cysteine.

  18. Detection of protein-protein interactions in plants using the transrepressive activity of the EAR motif repression domain.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Kyoko; Ohme-Takagi, Masaru

    2010-02-01

    The activities of many regulatory factors involve interactions with other proteins. We demonstrate here that the ERF-associated amphiphilic repression (EAR) motif repression domain (SRDX) can convert a transcriptional complex into a repressor via transrepression that is mediated by protein-protein interactions and show that transrepressive activity of SRDX can be used to detect such protein-protein interactions. When we fused a protein that interacts with a transcription factor with SRDX and co-expressed the product with the transcription factor in plant cells, the expression of genes that are targets of the transcription factor was suppressed by transrepression. We demonstrated the transrepressive activity of SRDX using FOS and JUN as a model system and used two MADS box plant proteins, PISTILLATA and APETALA3, which are known to form heterodimers. Furthermore, the transgenic plants that expressed TTG1, which is a WD40 protein and interacts with bHLH transcription factors, fused to SRDX exhibited a phenotype similar to ttg1 mutants by transrepression and the regions of TTG1 required for interaction to the bHLH protein were detected using our system. We also used this system to analyse a protein factor that might be incorporated into a transcriptional complex and identified an Arabidopsis WD40 protein PWP2 (AtPWP2) interacting with AtTBP1 through comparison of phenotypes induced by 35S:AtPWP2-SRDX with that induced by the chimeric repressor. Our results indicate that the transrepression mediated by SRDX can be used to detect and confirm protein-protein interactions in plants and should be useful in identifying factors that form transcriptional protein complexes.

  19. Identification of sex pheromone components of blueberry spanworm Itame argillacearia (Lepidoptera: Geometridae).

    PubMed

    De Silva, E C A; Silk, P J; Mayo, P; Hillier, N K; Magee, D; Cutler, G C

    2013-09-01

    Blueberry spanworm, Itame argillacearia (Packard), is an important defoliator of lowbush (syn. 'wild') blueberry, Vaccinium angustifolium Aiton, in north-eastern North America. The goal of the present study was to identify the female I. argillacearia sex pheromone, which could be used in traps for monitoring or mass-trapping this pest. Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) and electroantennogram (EAG) recordings of sex pheromone gland extracts, in combination with chemical synthesis, a Y-tube olfactometer study and field experiments confirmed (2R,3S)-2-ethyl-3-((Z,Z)-tridecadi-2,5-enyl) oxirane (hereafter (Z,Z)-(3R,4S)-3,4-epoxy-6,9-heptadecadiene) and (Z,Z,Z)-3,6,9-heptadecatriene as female-produced sex pheromone components. (Z,Z)-(3R,4S)-3,4-Epoxy-6,9-heptadecadiene elicited a response from male I. argillacearia antennae during EAG recording, and in the Y-tube olfactometer tests males did not discriminate between a live female and (Z,Z)-(3R,4S)-3,4-epoxy-6,9-heptadecadiene. Field-trapping experiments showed that a blend of (Z,Z)-(3R,4S)-3,4-epoxy-6,9-heptadecadiene and (Z,Z,Z)-3,6,9-heptadecatriene was more attractive to male moths than (Z,Z)-(3R,4S)-3,4-epoxy-6,9-heptadecadiene alone.

  20. Effects of mutations in the Exo III motif of the herpes simplex virus DNA polymerase gene on enzyme activities, viral replication, and replication fidelity.

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Y T; Liu, B Y; Coen, D M; Hwang, C B

    1997-01-01

    The herpes simplex virus DNA polymerase catalytic subunit, which has intrinsic polymerase and 3'-5' exonuclease activities, contains sequence motifs that are homologous to those important for 3'-5' exonuclease activity in other polymerases. The role of one such motif, Exo III, was examined in this study. Mutated polymerases containing either a single tyrosine-to-histidine change at residue 577 or this change plus an aspartic acid-to-alanine at residue 581 in the Exo III motif exhibited defective or undetectable exonuclease activity, respectively, yet retained substantial polymerase activity. Despite the defects in exonuclease activity, the mutant polymerases were able to support viral replication in transient complementation assays, albeit inefficiently. Viruses replicated via the action of these mutant polymerases exhibited substantially increased frequencies of mutants resistant to ganciclovir. Furthermore, when the Exo III mutations were incorporated into the viral genome, the resulting mutant viruses displayed only modestly defect in replication in Vero cells and exhibited substantially increased mutation frequencies. The results suggest that herpes simplex virus can replicate despite severely impaired exonuclease activity and that the 3'-5' exonuclease contributes substantially to the fidelity of viral DNA replication. PMID:9311864

  1. Activation of the bacterial thermosensor DesK involves a serine zipper dimerization motif that is modulated by bilayer thickness

    PubMed Central

    Cybulski, Larisa Estefanía; Ballering, Joost; Moussatova, Anastassiia; Inda, Maria Eugenia; Vazquez, Daniela B.; Wassenaar, Tsjerk A.; de Mendoza, Diego; Tieleman, D. Peter; Killian, J. Antoinette

    2015-01-01

    DesK is a bacterial thermosensor protein involved in maintaining membrane fluidity in response to changes in environmental temperature. Most likely, the protein is activated by changes in membrane thickness, but the molecular mechanism of sensing and signaling is still poorly understood. Here we aimed to elucidate the mode of action of DesK by studying the so-called “minimal sensor DesK” (MS-DesK), in which sensing and signaling are captured in a single transmembrane segment. This simplified version of the sensor allows investigation of membrane thickness-dependent protein–lipid interactions simply by using synthetic peptides, corresponding to the membrane-spanning parts of functional and nonfunctional mutants of MS-DesK incorporated in lipid bilayers with varying thicknesses. The lipid-dependent behavior of the peptides was investigated by circular dichroism, tryptophan fluorescence, and molecular modeling. These experiments were complemented with in vivo functional studies on MS-DesK mutants. Based on the results, we constructed a model that suggests a new mechanism for sensing in which the protein is present as a dimer and responds to an increase in bilayer thickness by membrane incorporation of a C-terminal hydrophilic motif. This results in exposure of three serines on the same side of the transmembrane helices of MS-DesK, triggering a switching of the dimerization interface to allow the formation of a serine zipper. The final result is activation of the kinase state of MS-DesK. PMID:25941408

  2. Decavanadate possesses alpha-adrenergic agonist activity and a structural motif common with trans-beta form of noradrenaline.

    PubMed

    Venkataraman, B V; Ravishankar, H N; Rao, A V; Kalyani, P; Sharada, G; Namboodiri, K; Gabor, B; Ramasarma, T

    1997-04-01

    Decavanadate, an inorganic polymer of vanadate, produced contraction of rat aortic rings at a relatively high concentration compared to phenylephrine, an agonist of alpha-adrenergic receptor. This effect was blocked by two known alpha-adrenergic receptor antagonists, prazosin and phenoxybenzamine. Decavanadate, formed by possible dimerization of V5 under acid conditions, possessed a structural feature of two pairs of unshared oxygen atoms at a distance of 3.12 A, not found in its constituents of V4 or V5. A structural motif of O..O..O using such oxygen atoms is recognized in decavanadate. This matches with a similar motif of N..O..O that uses the essential amino and hydroxyl groups of the side-chain and the m-hydroxyl group in trans-beta form of noradrenaline. The interaction of such a structural motif with the membrane receptor is likely to be the basis of the unusual noradrenaline-mimic action of decavanadate.

  3. Testing the role of the FcγRIIB immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motif in regulation of the B cell immune response.

    PubMed

    Vuyyuru, Raja; Shen, Shixue; Manser, Tim

    2015-09-01

    In vitro studies have demonstrated that the immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motif (ITIM) of the inhibitory Fc receptor FcγRIIB is critical for mediating attenuation of signaling via immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM) containing receptors, such as the B cell antigen receptor (BCR), when FcγRIIB is co-cross-linked to these activation receptors. To test the role of the FcγRIIB ITIM motif in regulation of the B cell immune response in vivo, we constructed lines of transgenic mice expressing a form of FcγRIIB with an inactivating tyrosine (Y) to phenylalanine (F) mutation in the ITIM motif. Detailed studies of one of these lines, in which the mutant FcγRIIB was expressed on B cells and other cell types that normally express this receptor, were performed. No quantitative differences in germinal center (GC) B cell responses were observed between the mutant FcγRIIB transgenic line and control mice. However, serum antibody and antibody forming cell responses were often observed to be elevated in the ITIM mutant FcγRIIB transgenic mice as compared to controls, though not to the same extent as mice deficient in expression of FcγRIIB. Moreover, primary B cells from the ITIM mutant FcγRIIB line did not display the same level of augmented BCR signaling as primary FcγRIIB deficient B cells under conditions inducing co-cross-linking of FcγRIIB and the BCR. In total, these data suggest that a functional ITIM motif is not required for all in vivo inhibitory activity of this receptor. However, we also found that the transgenic ITIM mutant FcγRIIB receptor was expressed at abnormal levels in several hematopoietic lineages. Thus, confirmation of our findings will require the generation and analysis of mice in which an ITIM mutant form of FcγRIIB is expressed in vivo as is the endogenous receptor.

  4. Conserved motifs II to VI of DNA helicase II from Escherichia coli are all required for biological activity.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, G; Deng, E; Baugh, L R; Hamilton, C M; Maples, V F; Kushner, S R

    1997-01-01

    There are seven conserved motifs (IA, IB, and II to VI) in DNA helicase II of Escherichia coli that have high homology among a large family of proteins involved in DNA metabolism. To address the functional importance of motifs II to VI, we employed site-directed mutagenesis to replace the charged amino acid residues in each motif with alanines. Cells carrying these mutant alleles exhibited higher UV and methyl methanesulfonate sensitivity, increased rates of spontaneous mutagenesis, and elevated levels of homologous recombination, indicating defects in both the excision repair and mismatch repair pathways. In addition, we also changed the highly conserved tyrosine(600) in motif VI to phenylalanine (uvrD309, Y600F). This mutant displayed a moderate increase in UV sensitivity but a decrease in spontaneous mutation rate, suggesting that DNA helicase II may have different functions in the two DNA repair pathways. Furthermore, a mutation in domain IV (uvrD307, R284A) significantly reduced the viability of some E. coli K-12 strains at 30 degrees C but not at 37 degrees C. The implications of these observations are discussed. PMID:9393722

  5. Exploring the role of putative active site amino acids and pro-region motif of recombinant falcipain-2: a principal hemoglobinase of Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Amit; Dasaradhi, P V N; Chauhan, Virander S; Malhotra, Pawan

    2004-04-23

    Falcipain-2 is one of the principal hemoglobinases of Plasmodium falciparum, a human malaria parasite. It has a typical papain family cysteine protease structural organization, a large pro-domain, a mature domain with conserved active site amino acids. Pro-domain of falcipain-2 also contains two important conserved motifs, "GNFD" and "ERFNIN." The "GNFD" motif has been shown to be responsible for correct folding and stability in case of many papain family proteases. In the present study, we carried out site-directed mutagenesis to assess the roles of active site residues and pro-domain residues for the activity of falcipain-2. Our results showed that substitutions of putative active site residues; Q36, C42, H174, and N204 resulted in complete loss of falcipain-2 activity, while W206 and D155 mutants retained partial/complete activity in comparison to the wild type falcipain-2. Homology modeling data also corroborate the results of mutagenesis; Q36, C42, H174, N204, and W206 residues form the active site loop of the enzyme and D155 lie outside the active pocket. Substitutions in the pro-region did not affect the activity of falcipain-2. This implies that falcipain-2 shares active site residues with other members of papain family, however pro-region of falcipain-2 does not play any role in the activity of enzyme.

  6. Stress-responsive mitogen-activated protein kinases interact with the EAR motif of a poplar zinc finger protein and mediate its degradation through the 26S proteasome.

    PubMed

    Hamel, Louis-Philippe; Benchabane, Meriem; Nicole, Marie-Claude; Major, Ian T; Morency, Marie-Josée; Pelletier, Gervais; Beaudoin, Nathalie; Sheen, Jen; Séguin, Armand

    2011-11-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) contribute to the establishment of plant disease resistance by regulating downstream signaling components, including transcription factors. In this study, we identified MAPK-interacting proteins, and among the newly discovered candidates was a Cys-2/His-2-type zinc finger protein named PtiZFP1. This putative transcription factor belongs to a family of transcriptional repressors that rely on an ERF-associated amphiphilic repression (EAR) motif for their repression activity. Amino acids located within this repression motif were also found to be essential for MAPK binding. Close examination of the primary protein sequence revealed a functional bipartite MAPK docking site that partially overlaps with the EAR motif. Transient expression assays in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) protoplasts suggest that MAPKs promote PtiZFP1 degradation through the 26S proteasome. Since features of the MAPK docking site are conserved among other EAR repressors, our study suggests a novel mode of defense mechanism regulation involving stress-responsive MAPKs and EAR repressors.

  7. Key Importance of Small RNA Binding for the Activity of a Glycine-Tryptophan (GW) Motif-containing Viral Suppressor of RNA Silencing*

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Cañamás, Miryam; Hernández, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    Viruses express viral suppressors of RNA silencing (VSRs) to counteract RNA silencing-based host defenses. Although virtually all stages of the antiviral silencing pathway can be inhibited by VSRs, small RNAs (sRNAs) and Argonaute (AGO) proteins seem to be the most frequent targets. Recently, GW/WG motifs of some VSRs have been proposed to dictate their suppressor function by mediating interaction with AGO(s). Here we have studied the VSR encoded by Pelargonium line pattern virus (family Tombusviridae). The results show that p37, the viral coat protein, blocks RNA silencing. Site-directed mutagenesis of some p37 sequence traits, including a conserved GW motif, allowed generation of suppressor-competent and -incompetent molecules and uncoupling of the VSR and particle assembly capacities. The engineered mutants were used to assess the importance of p37 functions for viral infection and the relative contribution of diverse molecular interactions to suppressor activity. Two main conclusions can be drawn: (i) the silencing suppression and encapsidation functions of p37 are both required for systemic Pelargonium line pattern virus infection, and (ii) the suppressor activity of p37 relies on the ability to bind sRNAs rather than on interaction with AGOs. The data also caution against potential misinterpretations of results due to overlap of sequence signals related to distinct protein properties. This is well illustrated by mutation of the GW motif in p37 that concurrently affects nucleolar localization, efficient interaction with AGO1, and sRNA binding capability. These concomitant effects could have been overlooked in other GW motif-containing suppressors, as we exemplify with the orthologous p38 of turnip crinkle virus. PMID:25505185

  8. The tetra-aspartate motif in the activation peptide of human cationic trypsinogen is essential for autoactivation control but not for enteropeptidase recognition.

    PubMed

    Nemoda, Zsófia; Sahin-Tóth, Miklós

    2005-08-19

    The activation peptide of vertebrate trypsinogens contains a highly conserved tetra-aspartate sequence (Asp(19-22) in humans) preceding the Lys-Ile scissile bond. A large body of research has defined the primary role of this acidic motif as a specific recognition site for enteropeptidase, the physiological activator of trypsinogen. In addition, the acidic stretch was shown to contribute to the suppression of autoactivation. In the present study, we determined the relative importance of these two activation peptide functions in human cationic trypsinogen. Individual Ala replacements of Asp(19-22) had minimal or no effect on trypsinogen activation catalyzed by human enteropeptidase. Strikingly, a tetra-Ala(19-22) trypsinogen mutant devoid of acidic residues in the activation peptide was still a highly specific substrate for human, but not for bovine, enteropeptidase. In contrast, an intact Asp(19-22) motif was critical for autoactivation control. Thus, single Ala mutations of Asp(19), Asp(20) and Asp(21) resulted in 2-3-fold increased autoactivation, whereas the Asp(22) --> Ala mutant autoactivated at a 66-fold increased rate. These effects were multiplicative in the tri-Ala(19-21) and tetra-Ala(19-22) mutants. Structural modeling revealed that the conserved hydrophobic S2 subsite of trypsin and the unique Asp(218), which forms part of the S3-S4 subsite, participate in distinct inhibitory interactions with the activation peptide. Finally, mutagenesis studies confirmed the significance of the negative charge of Asp(218) in autoactivation control. The results demonstrate that in human cationic trypsinogen the Asp(19-22) motif per se is not required for enteropeptidase recognition, whereas it is essential for maximal suppression of autoactivation. The evolutionary selection of Asp(218), which is absent in the large majority of vertebrate trypsins, provides an additional mechanism of autoactivation control in the human pancreas.

  9. A novel Wnt5a-Frizzled4 signaling pathway mediates activity-independent dendrite morphogenesis via the distal PDZ motif of Frizzled 4.

    PubMed

    Bian, Wen-Jie; Miao, Wan-Ying; He, Shun-Ji; Wan, Zong-Fang; Luo, Zhen-Ge; Yu, Xiang

    2015-08-01

    The morphology of the dendritic tree is critical to neuronal function and neural circuit wiring. Several Wnt family members have been demonstrated to play important roles in dendrite development. However, the Wnt receptors responsible for mediating this process remain largely elusive. Using primary hippocampal neuronal cultures as a model system, we report that Frizzled4 (Fzd4), a member of the Fzd family of Wnt receptors, specifically signals downstream of Wnt5a to promote dendrite branching and growth. Interestingly, the less conserved distal PDZ binding motif of Fzd4, and not its conserved proximal Dvl-interacting PDZ motif, is required for mediating this effect. We further showed that Dvl signaled parallel to and independent of Fzd4 in promoting dendrite growth. Unlike most previously described pathways, Wnt5a/Fzd4 signaling promoted dendrite development in an activity-independent and autocrine fashion. Together, these results provide the first identification of a Wnt receptor for regulating dendrite development in the mammalian system, and demonstrate a novel function of the distal PDZ motif of Fzd4 in dendrite morphogenesis, thereby expanding our knowledge of the complex roles of Wnt signaling in neural development.

  10. CD3ζ-based chimeric antigen receptors mediate T cell activation via cis- and trans-signalling mechanisms: implications for optimization of receptor structure for adoptive cell therapy.

    PubMed

    Bridgeman, J S; Ladell, K; Sheard, V E; Miners, K; Hawkins, R E; Price, D A; Gilham, D E

    2014-02-01

    Chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) can mediate redirected lysis of tumour cells in a major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-independent manner, thereby enabling autologous adoptive T cell therapy for a variety of malignant neoplasms. Currently, most CARs incorporate the T cell receptor (TCR) CD3ζ signalling chain; however, the precise mechanisms responsible for CAR-mediated T cell activation are unclear. In this study, we used a series of immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM)-mutant and transmembrane-modified receptors to demonstrate that CARs activate T cells both directly via the antigen-ligated signalling chain and indirectly via associated chains within the TCR complex. These observations allowed us to generate new receptors capable of eliciting polyfunctional responses in primary human T cells. This work increases our understanding of CAR function and identifies new avenues for the optimization of CAR-based therapeutic interventions.

  11. Putative Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase (PI3K) Binding Motifs in Ovine Betaretrovirus Env Proteins Are Not Essential for Rodent Fibroblast Transformation and PI3K/Akt Activation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shan-Lu; Lerman, Michael I.; Miller, A. Dusty

    2003-01-01

    Jaagsiekte sheep retrovirus (JSRV) and enzootic nasal tumor virus (ENTV) are simple betaretroviruses that cause epithelial cell tumors in the lower and upper airways of sheep and goats. The envelope (Env) glycoproteins of both viruses can transform rodent and chicken fibroblasts, indicating that they play an essential role in oncogenesis. Previous studies found that a YXXM motif in the Env cytoplasmic tail, a putative docking site for phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) after tyrosine phosphorylation, was necessary for rodent cell transformation but was not required for transformation of DF-1 chicken fibroblasts. Here we show that JSRV and ENTV Env proteins with tyrosine or methionine mutations in the YXXM motif can still transform rodent fibroblasts, albeit with reduced efficiency. Akt was activated in cells transformed by JSRV or ENTV Env proteins and in cells transformed by the proteins with tyrosine mutations. Furthermore, the PI3K-specific inhibitor LY294002 could inhibit Akt activation and cell transformation in all cases, indicating that Akt activation and transformation is PI3K dependent. However, we could not detect tyrosine phosphorylation of JSRV or ENTV Env proteins or an interaction between the Env proteins and PI3K in the transformed cells. We found no evidence for mitogen-activated protein kinase activation in cells that were transformed by the JSRV or ENTV Env proteins. We conclude that ovine betaretrovirus Env proteins transform the rodent fibroblasts by indirectly activating the PI3K/Akt pathway. PMID:12829832

  12. Activation of ERK and NF-κB during HARE-Mediated Heparin Uptake Require Only One of the Four Endocytic Motifs

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Madhu S.; Miller, Colton M.; Harris, Edward N.; Weigel, Paul H.

    2016-01-01

    Fifteen different ligands, including heparin (Hep), are cleared from lymph and blood by the Hyaluronan (HA) Receptor for Endocytosis (HARE; derived from Stabilin-2 by proteolysis), which contains four endocytic motifs (M1-M4). Endocytosis of HARE•Hep complexes is targeted to coated pits by M1, M2, and M3 (Pandey et al, Int. J. Cell Biol. 2015, article ID 524707), which activates ERK1/2 and NF-κB (Pandey et al J. Biol. Chem. 288, 14068–79, 2013). Here, we used a NF-κB promoter-driven luciferase gene assay and cell lines expressing different HARE cytoplasmic domain mutants to identify motifs needed for Hep-mediated signaling. Deletion of M1, M2 or M4 singly had no effect on Hep-mediated ERK1/2 activation, whereas signaling (but not uptake) was eliminated in HARE(ΔM3) cells lacking NPLY2519. ERK1/2 signaling in cells expressing WT HARE(Y2519A) or HARE(Y2519A) lacking M1, M2 and M4 (containing M3-only) was decreased by 75% or eliminated, respectively. Deletion of M3 (but not M1, M2 or M4) also inhibited the formation of HARE•Hep•ERK1/2 complexes by 67%. NF-κB activation by HARE-mediated uptake of Hep, HA, dermatan sulfate or acetylated LDL was unaffected in single-motif deletion mutants lacking M1, M2 or M4. In contrast, cells expressing HARE(ΔM3) showed loss of HARE-mediated NF-κB activation during uptake of each of these four ligands. NF-κB activation by the four signaling ligands was also eliminated in HARE(Y2519A) or HARE(M3-only;Y2519A) cells. We conclude that the HARE NPLY2519 motif is necessary for both ERK1/2 and NF-κB signaling and that Tyr2519 is critical for these functions. PMID:27100626

  13. Repeating Spatial-Temporal Motifs of CA3 Activity Dependent on Engineered Inputs from Dentate Gyrus Neurons in Live Hippocampal Networks

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Aparajita; Desai, Harsh; DeMarse, Thomas B.; Wheeler, Bruce C.; Brewer, Gregory J.

    2016-01-01

    Anatomical and behavioral studies, and in vivo and slice electrophysiology of the hippocampus suggest specific functions of the dentate gyrus (DG) and the CA3 subregions, but the underlying activity dynamics and repeatability of information processing remains poorly understood. To approach this problem, we engineered separate living networks of the DG and CA3 neurons that develop connections through 51 tunnels for axonal communication. Growing these networks on top of an electrode array enabled us to determine whether the subregion dynamics were separable and repeatable. We found spontaneous development of polarized propagation of 80% of the activity in the native direction from DG to CA3 and different spike and burst dynamics for these subregions. Spatial-temporal differences emerged when the relationships of target CA3 activity were categorized with to the number and timing of inputs from the apposing network. Compared to times of CA3 activity when there was no recorded tunnel input, DG input led to CA3 activity bursts that were 7× more frequent, increased in amplitude and extended in temporal envelope. Logistic regression indicated that a high number of tunnel inputs predict CA3 activity with 90% sensitivity and 70% specificity. Compared to no tunnel input, patterns of >80% tunnel inputs from DG specified different patterns of first-to-fire neurons in the CA3 target well. Clustering dendrograms revealed repeating motifs of three or more patterns at up to 17 sites in CA3 that were importantly associated with specific spatial-temporal patterns of tunnel activity. The number of these motifs recorded in 3 min was significantly higher than shuffled spike activity and not seen above chance in control networks in which CA3 was apposed to CA3 or DG to DG. Together, these results demonstrate spontaneous input-dependent repeatable coding of distributed activity in CA3 networks driven by engineered inputs from DG networks. These functional configurations at measured times

  14. Unique ζ-chain motifs mediate a direct TCR-actin linkage critical for immunological synapse formation and T-cell activation.

    PubMed

    Klieger, Yair; Almogi-Hazan, Osnat; Ish-Shalom, Eliran; Pato, Aviad; Pauker, Maor H; Barda-Saad, Mira; Wang, Lynn; Baniyash, Michal

    2014-01-01

    TCR-mediated activation induces receptor microclusters that evolve to a defined immune synapse (IS). Many studies showed that actin polymerization and remodeling, which create a scaffold critical to IS formation and stabilization, are TCR mediated. However, the mechanisms controlling simultaneous TCR and actin dynamic rearrangement in the IS are yet not fully understood. Herein, we identify two novel TCR ζ-chain motifs, mediating the TCR's direct interaction with actin and inducing actin bundling. While T cells expressing the ζ-chain mutated in these motifs lack cytoskeleton (actin) associated (cska)-TCRs, they express normal levels of non-cska and surface TCRs as cells expressing wild-type ζ-chain. However, such mutant cells are unable to display activation-dependent TCR clustering, IS formation, expression of CD25/CD69 activation markers, or produce/secrete cytokine, effects also seen in the corresponding APCs. We are the first to show a direct TCR-actin linkage, providing the missing gap linking between TCR-mediated Ag recognition, specific cytoskeleton orientation toward the T-cell-APC interacting pole and long-lived IS maintenance.

  15. Allosteric regulation of helicase core activities of the DEAD-box helicase YxiN by RNA binding to its RNA recognition motif.

    PubMed

    Samatanga, Brighton; Andreou, Alexandra Z; Klostermeier, Dagmar

    2017-01-23

    DEAD-box proteins share a structurally similar core of two RecA-like domains (RecA_N and RecA_C) that contain the conserved motifs for ATP-dependent RNA unwinding. In many DEAD-box proteins the helicase core is flanked by ancillary domains. To understand the regulation of the DEAD-box helicase YxiN by its C-terminal RNA recognition motif (RRM), we investigated the effect of RNA binding to the RRM on its position relative to the core, and on core activities. RRM/RNA complex formation substantially shifts the RRM from a position close to the RecA_C to the proximity of RecA_N, independent of RNA contacts with the core. RNA binding to the RRM is communicated to the core, and stimulates ATP hydrolysis and RNA unwinding. The conformational space of the core depends on the identity of the RRM-bound RNA. Allosteric regulation of core activities by RNA-induced movement of ancillary domains may constitute a general regulatory mechanism of DEAD-box protein activity.

  16. The FcepsilonRIbeta immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif exerts inhibitory control on MAPK and IkappaB kinase phosphorylation and mast cell cytokine production.

    PubMed

    Furumoto, Yasuko; Nunomura, Satoshi; Terada, Tomoyoshi; Rivera, Juan; Ra, Chisei

    2004-11-19

    The high affinity IgE Fc receptor (FcepsilonRI) beta chain functions as a signal amplifier and has been linked to atopy, asthma, and allergy. Herein, we report on a previously unrecognized negative regulatory role for the nonconventional beta chain immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif that contains three tyrosine residues (YX5YX3Y). Degranulation and leukotriene production was found to be impaired in cells expressing the mutated FcepsilonRIbeta immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motifs FYY, YYF, FYF, and FFF. In contrast, cytokine synthesis and secretion were enhanced in the YFY and FFF mutants. FcepsilonRI phosphorylation and Lyn kinase co-immunoprecipitation was intact in the YFY mutant but was lost in the FYF and FFF mutants. The phosphorylation of Syk, LAT, phospholipase gamma1/2, and Srchomology 2 domain-containing protein phosphatase 2 was intact, whereas the phosphorylation of SHIP-1 was significantly reduced in the YFY mutant cells. The FYF and FFF mutants were defective in phosphorylating all of these molecules. In contrast, the phosphorylation of ERK, p38 MAPK, IkappaB kinase beta (IKKbeta), and nuclear NFkappaB activity was enhanced in the YFY and FFF mutants. These findings show that the FcepsilonRIbeta functions to both selectively amplify (degranulation and leukotriene secretion) and dampen (lymphokine) mast cell effector responses.

  17. The pseudo-immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif of CD5 mediates its inhibitory action on B-cell receptor signaling.

    PubMed

    Gary-Gouy, H; Bruhns, P; Schmitt, C; Dalloul, A; Daëron, M; Bismuth, G

    2000-01-07

    Genetic studies revealed that CD5 could be a negative regulator of the B-cell antigen receptor (BCR). We explore here the effect of human CD5 on BCR-triggered responses. B cells were obtained expressing a chimera composed of extracellular and transmembrane domains of Fcgamma type IIB receptor fused to CD5 cytoplasmic domain (CD5cyt). Coligation of the chimera with the BCR induces CD5cyt tyrosine phosphorylation. A rapid inhibition of BCR-induced calcium response is observed, as well as a partial but delayed inhibition of phospholipase Cgamma-1 phosphorylation. Activation of extracellular regulated kinase-2 is also severely impaired. Moreover, at the functional level, interleukin-2 production is abolished. Src homology 2 domain-bearing tyrosine phosphatase SHP-1 and Src homology 2 domain-bearing inositol 5'-phosphatase SHIP usually participate in negative regulation of the BCR. We show that they do not associate with the phosphorylated CD5 chimera. We finally demonstrate that the pseudo-immunoreceptor tyrosine based activation motif present in CD5cyt is involved because its deletion eliminates the inhibitory effect of the chimera, both at biochemical and functional levels. These results demonstrate the inhibitory role of CD5 pseudo-immunoreceptor tyrosine based activation motif tyrosine phosphorylation on BCR signaling. They further support the idea that CD5 uses mechanisms different from those already described to negatively regulate the BCR pathway.

  18. A new functional motif in Hox domain-containing ceramide synthases: identification of a novel region flanking the Hox and TLC domains essential for activity.

    PubMed

    Mesika, Adi; Ben-Dor, Shifra; Laviad, Elad L; Futerman, Anthony H

    2007-09-14

    Ceramide is synthesized in mammals by a family of ceramide synthases (CerS) each of which uses a relatively restricted set of fatty acyl-CoAs for N-acylation of the sphingoid long chain base (Pewzner-Jung, Y., Ben-Dor, S., and Futerman, A. H. (2006) J. Biol. Chem. 281, 25001-25005). CerS are characterized by two functional domains, the Tram-Lag-CLN8 (TLC) domain and the homeobox (Hox) domain, which is found in all mammalian CerS except CerS1. We now demonstrate that the majority of the Hox domain is not required for CerS activity since its deletion in CerS5 does not affect activity. Subsequently, we define a highly conserved new motif of 12 amino acid residues that flanks the Hox and TLC domains but is not part of the TLC domain, which is essential for CerS5 and CerS6 activity. Two positively charged residues in this domain, one of which is conserved in all putative CerS in all organisms, are essential for activity since site-directed mutagenesis of either (Lys-134 and Lys-140 in CerS5) results in an approximately 50% loss of activity, whereas mutation of both leads to a complete loss of activity. Because this region is conserved across species, we propose that it plays a previously unidentified and essential role in CerS activity and can be used as a new motif to define Hox domain-containing CerS.

  19. The Canonical DHHC Motif Is Not Absolutely Required for the Activity of the Yeast S-acyltransferases Swf1 and Pfa4*

    PubMed Central

    González Montoro, Ayelén; Chumpen Ramirez, Sabrina; Valdez Taubas, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Protein S-acyltransferases, also known as palmitoyltransferases (PATs), are characterized by the presence of a 50-amino acid domain called the DHHC domain. Within this domain, these four amino acids constitute a highly conserved motif. It has been proposed that the palmitoylation reaction occurs through a palmitoyl-PAT covalent intermediate that involves the conserved cysteine in the DHHC motif. Mutation of this cysteine results in lack of function for several PATs, and DHHA or DHHS mutants are used regularly as catalytically inactive controls. In a genetic screen to isolate loss-of-function mutations in the yeast PAT Swf1, we isolated an allele encoding a Swf1 DHHR mutant. Overexpression of this mutant is able to partially complement a swf1Δ strain and to acylate the Swf1 substrates Tlg1, Syn8, and Snc1. Overexpression of the palmitoyltransferase Pfa4 DHHA or DHHR mutants also results in palmitoylation of its substrate Chs3. We also investigated the role of the first histidine of the DHHC motif. A Swf1 DQHC mutant is also partially active but a DQHR is not. Finally, we show that Swf1 substrates are differentially modified by both DHHR and DQHC Swf1 mutants. We propose that, in the absence of the canonical mechanism, alternative suboptimal mechanisms take place that are more dependent on the reactivity of the acceptor protein. These results also imply that caution must be exercised when proposing non-canonical roles for PATs on the basis of considering DHHC mutants as catalytically inactive and, more generally, contribute to an understanding of the mechanism of protein palmitoylation PMID:26224664

  20. Chronic active B-cell-receptor signalling in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Davis, R Eric; Ngo, Vu N; Lenz, Georg; Tolar, Pavel; Young, Ryan M; Romesser, Paul B; Kohlhammer, Holger; Lamy, Laurence; Zhao, Hong; Yang, Yandan; Xu, Weihong; Shaffer, Arthur L; Wright, George; Xiao, Wenming; Powell, John; Jiang, Jian-Kang; Thomas, Craig J; Rosenwald, Andreas; Ott, German; Muller-Hermelink, Hans Konrad; Gascoyne, Randy D; Connors, Joseph M; Johnson, Nathalie A; Rimsza, Lisa M; Campo, Elias; Jaffe, Elaine S; Wilson, Wyndham H; Delabie, Jan; Smeland, Erlend B; Fisher, Richard I; Braziel, Rita M; Tubbs, Raymond R; Cook, J R; Weisenburger, Dennis D; Chan, Wing C; Pierce, Susan K; Staudt, Louis M

    2010-01-07

    A role for B-cell-receptor (BCR) signalling in lymphomagenesis has been inferred by studying immunoglobulin genes in human lymphomas and by engineering mouse models, but genetic and functional evidence for its oncogenic role in human lymphomas is needed. Here we describe a form of 'chronic active' BCR signalling that is required for cell survival in the activated B-cell-like (ABC) subtype of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). The signalling adaptor CARD11 is required for constitutive NF-kappaB pathway activity and survival in ABC DLBCL. Roughly 10% of ABC DLBCLs have mutant CARD11 isoforms that activate NF-kappaB, but the mechanism that engages wild-type CARD11 in other ABC DLBCLs was unknown. An RNA interference genetic screen revealed that a BCR signalling component, Bruton's tyrosine kinase, is essential for the survival of ABC DLBCLs with wild-type CARD11. In addition, knockdown of proximal BCR subunits (IgM, Ig-kappa, CD79A and CD79B) killed ABC DLBCLs with wild-type CARD11 but not other lymphomas. The BCRs in these ABC DLBCLs formed prominent clusters in the plasma membrane with low diffusion, similarly to BCRs in antigen-stimulated normal B cells. Somatic mutations affecting the immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM) signalling modules of CD79B and CD79A were detected frequently in ABC DLBCL biopsy samples but rarely in other DLBCLs and never in Burkitt's lymphoma or mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma. In 18% of ABC DLBCLs, one functionally critical residue of CD79B, the first ITAM tyrosine, was mutated. These mutations increased surface BCR expression and attenuated Lyn kinase, a feedback inhibitor of BCR signalling. These findings establish chronic active BCR signalling as a new pathogenetic mechanism in ABC DLBCL, suggesting several therapeutic strategies.

  1. RSAT peak-motifs: motif analysis in full-size ChIP-seq datasets.

    PubMed

    Thomas-Chollier, Morgane; Herrmann, Carl; Defrance, Matthieu; Sand, Olivier; Thieffry, Denis; van Helden, Jacques

    2012-02-01

    ChIP-seq is increasingly used to characterize transcription factor binding and chromatin marks at a genomic scale. Various tools are now available to extract binding motifs from peak data sets. However, most approaches are only available as command-line programs, or via a website but with size restrictions. We present peak-motifs, a computational pipeline that discovers motifs in peak sequences, compares them with databases, exports putative binding sites for visualization in the UCSC genome browser and generates an extensive report suited for both naive and expert users. It relies on time- and memory-efficient algorithms enabling the treatment of several thousand peaks within minutes. Regarding time efficiency, peak-motifs outperforms all comparable tools by several orders of magnitude. We demonstrate its accuracy by analyzing data sets ranging from 4000 to 1,28,000 peaks for 12 embryonic stem cell-specific transcription factors. In all cases, the program finds the expected motifs and returns additional motifs potentially bound by cofactors. We further apply peak-motifs to discover tissue-specific motifs in peak collections for the p300 transcriptional co-activator. To our knowledge, peak-motifs is the only tool that performs a complete motif analysis and offers a user-friendly web interface without any restriction on sequence size or number of peaks.

  2. The signal peptide of the IgE receptor alpha-chain prevents surface expression of an immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif-free receptor pool.

    PubMed

    Platzer, Barbara; Fiebiger, Edda

    2010-05-14

    The high affinity receptor for IgE, Fc epsilon receptor I (FcepsilonRI), is an activating immune receptor and key regulator of allergy. Antigen-mediated cross-linking of IgE-loaded FcepsilonRI alpha-chains induces cell activation via immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motifs in associated signaling subunits, such as FcepsilonRI gamma-chains. Here we show that the human FcepsilonRI alpha-chain can efficiently reach the cell surface by itself as an IgE-binding receptor in the absence of associated signaling subunits when the endogenous signal peptide is swapped for that of murine major histocompatibility complex class-I H2-K(b). This single-chain isoform of FcepsilonRI exited the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), trafficked to the Golgi and, subsequently, trafficked to the cell surface. Mutational analysis showed that the signal peptide regulates surface expression in concert with other described ER retention signals of FcepsilonRI-alpha. Once the FcepsilonRI alpha-chain reached the cell surface by itself, it formed a ligand-binding receptor that stabilized upon IgE contact. Independently of the FcepsilonRI gamma-chain, this single-chain FcepsilonRI was internalized after receptor cross-linking and trafficked into a LAMP-1-positive lysosomal compartment like multimeric FcepsilonRI. These data suggest that the single-chain isoform is capable of shuttling IgE-antigen complexes into antigen loading compartments, which plays an important physiologic role in the initiation of immune responses toward allergens. We propose that, in addition to cytosolic and transmembrane ER retention signals, the FcepsilonRI alpha-chain signal peptide contains a negative regulatory signal that prevents expression of an immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif-free IgE receptor pool, which would fail to induce cell activation.

  3. Temporal motifs in time-dependent networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovanen, Lauri; Karsai, Márton; Kaski, Kimmo; Kertész, János; Saramäki, Jari

    2011-11-01

    Temporal networks are commonly used to represent systems where connections between elements are active only for restricted periods of time, such as telecommunication, neural signal processing, biochemical reaction and human social interaction networks. We introduce the framework of temporal motifs to study the mesoscale topological-temporal structure of temporal networks in which the events of nodes do not overlap in time. Temporal motifs are classes of similar event sequences, where the similarity refers not only to topology but also to the temporal order of the events. We provide a mapping from event sequences to coloured directed graphs that enables an efficient algorithm for identifying temporal motifs. We discuss some aspects of temporal motifs, including causality and null models, and present basic statistics of temporal motifs in a large mobile call network.

  4. Protospacer recognition motifs

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Shiraz A.; Erdmann, Susanne; Mojica, Francisco J.M.; Garrett, Roger A.

    2013-01-01

    Protospacer adjacent motifs (PAMs) were originally characterized for CRISPR-Cas systems that were classified on the basis of their CRISPR repeat sequences. A few short 2–5 bp sequences were identified adjacent to one end of the protospacers. Experimental and bioinformatical results linked the motif to the excision of protospacers and their insertion into CRISPR loci. Subsequently, evidence accumulated from different virus- and plasmid-targeting assays, suggesting that these motifs were also recognized during DNA interference, at least for the recently classified type I and type II CRISPR-based systems. The two processes, spacer acquisition and protospacer interference, employ different molecular mechanisms, and there is increasing evidence to suggest that the sequence motifs that are recognized, while overlapping, are unlikely to be identical. In this article, we consider the properties of PAM sequences and summarize the evidence for their dual functional roles. It is proposed to use the terms protospacer associated motif (PAM) for the conserved DNA sequence and to employ spacer acqusition motif (SAM) and target interference motif (TIM), respectively, for acquisition and interference recognition sites. PMID:23403393

  5. Interlocked positive and negative feedback network motifs regulate β-catenin activity in the adherens junction pathway

    PubMed Central

    Klinke, David J.; Horvath, Nicholas; Cuppett, Vanessa; Wu, Yueting; Deng, Wentao; Kanj, Rania

    2015-01-01

    The integrity of epithelial tissue architecture is maintained through adherens junctions that are created through extracellular homotypic protein–protein interactions between cadherin molecules. Cadherins also provide an intracellular scaffold for the formation of a multiprotein complex that contains signaling proteins, including β-catenin. Environmental factors and controlled tissue reorganization disrupt adherens junctions by cleaving the extracellular binding domain and initiating a series of transcriptional events that aim to restore tissue homeostasis. However, it remains unclear how alterations in cell adhesion coordinate transcriptional events, including those mediated by β-catenin in this pathway. Here were used quantitative single-cell and population-level in vitro assays to quantify the endogenous pathway dynamics after the proteolytic disruption of the adherens junctions. Using prior knowledge of isolated elements of the overall network, we interpreted these data using in silico model-based inference to identify the topology of the regulatory network. Collectively the data suggest that the regulatory network contains interlocked network motifs consisting of a positive feedback loop, which is used to restore the integrity of adherens junctions, and a negative feedback loop, which is used to limit β-catenin–induced gene expression. PMID:26224311

  6. Mutation of an EF-hand Ca(2+)-binding motif in phospholipase C of Dictyostelium discoideum: inhibition of activity but no effect on Ca(2+)-dependence.

    PubMed

    Drayer, A L; Meima, M E; Derks, M W; Tuik, R; van Haastert, P J

    1995-10-15

    Phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C (PLC) is dependent on Ca2+ ions for substrate hydrolysis. The role of an EF-hand Ca(2+)-binding motif in Ca(2+)-dependent PLC activity was investigated by site-directed mutagenesis of the Dictyostelium discoideum PLC enzyme. Amino acid residues with oxygen-containing side chains at co-ordinates x, y, z, -x and -z of the putative Ca(2+)-binding-loop sequence were replaced by isoleucine (x), valine (y) or alanine (z, -x and -z). The mutated proteins were expressed in a Dictyostelium cell line with a disrupted plc gene displaying no endogenous PLC activity, and PLC activity was measured in cell lysates at different Ca2+ concentrations. Replacement of aspartate at position x, which is considered to play an essential role in Ca2+ binding, had little effect on Ca2+ affinity and maximal enzyme activity. A mutant with substitutions at both aspartate residues in position x and y also showed no decrease in Ca2+ affinity, whereas the maximal PLC activity was reduced by 60%. Introduction of additional mutations in the EF-hand revealed that the Ca2+ concentration giving half-maximal activity was unaltered, but PLC activity levels at saturating Ca2+ concentrations were markedly decreased. The results demonstrate that, although the EF-hand domain is required for enzyme activity, it is not the site that regulates the Ca(2+)-dependence of the PLC reaction.

  7. The serine and threonine residues in the Ig-alpha cytoplasmic tail negatively regulate immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif-mediated signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Müller, R; Wienands, J; Reth, M

    2000-07-18

    The B cell antigen receptor (BCR) is a multiprotein complex consisting of the membrane-bound Ig molecule and the Ig-alpha/Ig-beta heterodimer. On BCR engagement, Ig-alpha and Ig-beta become phosphorylated not only on tyrosine residues of the immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif but also on serine and threonine residues. We have mutated all serine and threonine residues in the Ig-alpha tail to alanine and valine, respectively. The mutated Ig-alpha sequence was expressed either as a single-chain Fv/Ig-alpha molecule or in the context of the complete BCR. In both cases, the mutated Ig-alpha showed a stronger tyrosine phosphorylation than the wild-type Ig-alpha and initiated increased signaling on stimulation. These findings suggest that serine/threonine kinases can negatively regulate signal transduction from the BCR.

  8. A Review of Functional Motifs Utilized by Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Sobhy, Haitham

    2016-01-01

    Short linear motifs (SLiM) are short peptides that facilitate protein function and protein-protein interactions. Viruses utilize these motifs to enter into the host, interact with cellular proteins, or egress from host cells. Studying functional motifs may help to predict protein characteristics, interactions, or the putative cellular role of a protein. In virology, it may reveal aspects of the virus tropism and help find antiviral therapeutics. This review highlights the recent understanding of functional motifs utilized by viruses. Special attention was paid to the function of proteins harboring these motifs, and viruses encoding these proteins. The review highlights motifs involved in (i) immune response and post-translational modifications (e.g., ubiquitylation, SUMOylation or ISGylation); (ii) virus-host cell interactions, including virus attachment, entry, fusion, egress and nuclear trafficking; (iii) virulence and antiviral activities; (iv) virion structure; and (v) low-complexity regions (LCRs) or motifs enriched with residues (Xaa-rich motifs). PMID:28248213

  9. The serine protease motif of Pic mediates a dose-dependent mucolytic activity after binding to sugar constituents of the mucin substrate.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Jiménez, Javier; Arciniega, Ivonne; Navarro-García, Fernando

    2008-08-01

    The pic gene is harbored on the chromosomes of three important pathogens: enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC), uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC), and Shigella flexneri. Since Pic is secreted into the intestinal lumen during EAEC infection, we sought to identify intestinal-mucosal substrates for Pic. Pic did not damage epithelial cells, cleave fodrin, or degrade host defense proteins embedded in the mucus layer (sIgA, lactoferrin and lysozyme). However, by using a solid-phase assay to evaluate the mucinolytic activity of EAEC Pic, we documented a specific, dose-dependent mucinolytic activity. A serine protease inhibitor and an enzymatically inactive variant of Pic were used to show that the Pic serine protease motif is required for mucinolytic activity. Pic binds mucin, and this binding was blocked in competition assays using monosaccharide constituents of the oligosaccharide side chains of mucin. Moreover, Pic mucinolytic activity decreased when sialic acid was removed from mucin. Thus, Pic is a mucinase with lectin-like activity that can be related to its reported hemagglutinin activity. Our results suggest that EAEC may secrete Pic into the intestinal lumen as a strategy for penetrating the gel-like mucus layer during EAEC colonization.

  10. Tripartite Motif 8 Contributes to Pathological Cardiac Hypertrophy Through Enhancing Transforming Growth Factor β-Activated Kinase 1-Dependent Signaling Pathways.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lijuan; Huang, Jia; Ji, Yan-Xiao; Mei, Fanghua; Wang, Pi-Xiao; Deng, Ke-Qiong; Jiang, Xi; Ma, Genshan; Li, Hongliang

    2017-02-01

    Tripartite motif (TRIM) 8 functions as an E3 ubiquitin ligase, interacting with and ubiquitinating diverse substrates, and is implicated in various pathological processes. However, the function of TRIM8 in the heart remains largely uncharacterized. This study aims to explore the role of TRIM8 in the development of pathological cardiac hypertrophy. Mice and isolated neonatal rat cardiomyocytes overexpressing or lacking TRIM8 were examined in several experiments. The effect of aortic banding-induced cardiac hypertrophy was analyzed by echocardiographic, pathological and molecular analyses. Our results indicated that the TRIM8 overexpression in hearts exacerbated the cardiac hypertrophy triggered by aortic banding. In contrast, the development of pathological cardiac hypertrophy was profoundly blocked in TRIM8-deficient hearts. Mechanistically, our study suggests that TRIM8 may elicit cardiodetrimental effects by promoting the activation of transforming growth factor β-activated kinase 1 (TAK1)-p38/JNK signaling pathways. Similar results were observed in cultured neonatal rat cardiomyocytes treated with angiotensin II. The rescue experiments using the TAK1-specific inhibitor 5z-7-ox confirmed the requirement of TAK1 activation in TRIM8-mediated pathological cardiac hypertrophy. Furthermore, TRIM8 contributed to TAK1 activation by binding to and promoting TAK1 ubiquitination. In conclusion, our study demonstrates that TRIM8 plays a deleterious role in pressure overload-induced cardiac hypertrophy by accelerating the activation of TAK1-dependent signaling pathways.

  11. [Psychopathological study of lie motif in schizophrenia].

    PubMed

    Otsuka, Koichiro; Kato, Satoshi

    2006-01-01

    present directive lie motif is told. Lie motifs are considered to have the effect of restoring the patient's own subjectivity by the following ways: (a) by actualizing the structural constituents elementary for the establishment of subjectivity, (b) by conducting a kind of speech act for declaring themselves as an active lying subject to co-presenting others for the resettlement in our inter-subjective world.

  12. Phosphorylation of the Kinase Interaction Motif in Mitogen-activated Protein (MAP) Kinase Phosphatase-4 Mediates Cross-talk between Protein Kinase A and MAP Kinase Signaling Pathways*

    PubMed Central

    Dickinson, Robin J.; Delavaine, Laurent; Cejudo-Marín, Rocío; Stewart, Graeme; Staples, Christopher J.; Didmon, Mark P.; Trinidad, Antonio Garcia; Alonso, Andrés; Pulido, Rafael; Keyse, Stephen M.

    2011-01-01

    MAP kinase phosphatase 4 (DUSP9/MKP-4) plays an essential role during placental development and is one of a subfamily of three closely related cytoplasmic dual-specificity MAPK phosphatases, which includes the ERK-specific enzymes DUSP6/MKP-3 and DUSP7/MKP-X. However, unlike DUSP6/MKP-3, DUSP9/MKP-4 also inactivates the p38α MAP kinase both in vitro and in vivo. Here we demonstrate that inactivation of both ERK1/2 and p38α by DUSP9/MKP-4 is mediated by a conserved arginine-rich kinase interaction motif located within the amino-terminal non-catalytic domain of the protein. Furthermore, DUSP9/MKP-4 is unique among these cytoplasmic MKPs in containing a conserved PKA consensus phosphorylation site 55RRXSer-58 immediately adjacent to the kinase interaction motif. DUSP9/MKP-4 is phosphorylated on Ser-58 by PKA in vitro, and phosphorylation abrogates the binding of DUSP9/MKP-4 to both ERK2 and p38α MAP kinases. In addition, although mutation of Ser-58 to either alanine or glutamic acid does not affect the intrinsic catalytic activity of DUSP9/MKP-4, phospho-mimetic (Ser-58 to Glu) substitution inhibits both the interaction of DUSP9/MKP-4 with ERK2 and p38α in vivo and its ability to dephosphorylate and inactivate these MAP kinases. Finally, the use of a phospho-specific antibody demonstrates that endogenous DUSP9/MKP-4 is phosphorylated on Ser-58 in response to the PKA agonist forskolin and is also modified in placental tissue. We conclude that DUSP9/MKP-4 is a bona fide target of PKA signaling and that attenuation of DUSP9/MKP-4 function can mediate cross-talk between the PKA pathway and MAPK signaling through both ERK1/2 and p38α in vivo. PMID:21908610

  13. Carbohydrate-binding motif in Chitinase 3-like 1 (CHI3L1/YKL-40) specifically activates Akt signaling pathway in colonic epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chun-Chuan; Llado, Victoria; Eurich, Katrin; Tran, Hoa T.; Mizoguchi, Emiko

    2011-01-01

    Host-microbial interactions play a key role during the development of colitis. We have previously shown that chinase 3-like 1 (CHI3L1) is an inducible molecule overexpressed in colonic epithelial cells (CECs) under inflammatory conditions. In this study, we found that chitin-binding motif (CBM) of CHI3L1 is specifically associated with the CHI3L1-mediated activation of the Akt-signaling in CEC by transfecting the CBM-mutant CHI3L1 vectors in SW480 CECs. Downstream, CHI3L1 enhanced the secretion of IL-8 and TNFα in a dose-dependent manner. We previously show that 325 through 339 amino-acids in CBM are crucial for the biological function of CHI3L1. Here we demonstrated that 325th–339th residues of CBM in CHI3L1 is a critical region for the activation of Akt, IL-8 production, and for a specific cellular localization of CHI3L1. In conclusion, CBM region of CHI3L1 is critical in activating Akt signaling in CECs, and the activation may be associated with the development of chronic colitis. PMID:21546314

  14. N-Terminal Ile-Orn- and Trp-Orn-Motif Repeats Enhance Membrane Interaction and Increase the Antimicrobial Activity of Apidaecins against Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Bluhm, Martina E. C.; Schneider, Viktoria A. F.; Schäfer, Ingo; Piantavigna, Stefania; Goldbach, Tina; Knappe, Daniel; Seibel, Peter; Martin, Lisandra L.; Veldhuizen, Edwin J. A.; Hoffmann, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    The Gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a life-threatening nosocomial pathogen due to its generally low susceptibility toward antibiotics. Furthermore, many strains have acquired resistance mechanisms requiring new antimicrobials with novel mechanisms to enhance treatment options. Proline-rich antimicrobial peptides, such as the apidaecin analog Api137, are highly efficient against various Enterobacteriaceae infections in mice, but less active against P. aeruginosa in vitro. Here, we extended our recent work by optimizing lead peptides Api755 (gu-OIORPVYOPRPRPPHPRL-OH; gu = N,N,N′,N′-tetramethylguanidino, O = L-ornithine) and Api760 (gu-OWORPVYOPRPRPPHPRL-OH) by incorporation of Ile-Orn- and Trp-Orn-motifs, respectively. Api795 (gu-O(IO)2RPVYOPRPRPPHPRL-OH) and Api794 (gu-O(WO)3RPVYOPRPRPPHPRL-OH) were highly active against P. aeruginosa with minimal inhibitory concentrations of 8–16 and 8–32 μg/mL against Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae. Assessed using a quartz crystal microbalance, these peptides inserted into a membrane layer and the surface activity increased gradually from Api137, over Api795, to Api794. This mode of action was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy indicating some membrane damage only at the high peptide concentrations. Api794 and Api795 were highly stable against serum proteases (half-life times >5 h) and non-hemolytic to human erythrocytes at peptide concentrations of 0.6 g/L. At this concentration, Api795 reduced the cell viability of HeLa cells only slightly, whereas the IC50 of Api794 was 0.23 ± 0.09 g/L. Confocal fluorescence microscopy revealed no colocalization of 5(6)-carboxyfluorescein-labeled Api794 or Api795 with the mitochondria, excluding interactions with the mitochondrial membrane. Interestingly, Api795 was localized in endosomes, whereas Api794 was present in endosomes and the cytosol. This was verified using flow cytometry showing a 50% higher uptake of Api794 in HeLa cells compared

  15. Motif enrichment tool.

    PubMed

    Blatti, Charles; Sinha, Saurabh

    2014-07-01

    The Motif Enrichment Tool (MET) provides an online interface that enables users to find major transcriptional regulators of their gene sets of interest. MET searches the appropriate regulatory region around each gene and identifies which transcription factor DNA-binding specificities (motifs) are statistically overrepresented. Motif enrichment analysis is currently available for many metazoan species including human, mouse, fruit fly, planaria and flowering plants. MET also leverages high-throughput experimental data such as ChIP-seq and DNase-seq from ENCODE and ModENCODE to identify the regulatory targets of a transcription factor with greater precision. The results from MET are produced in real time and are linked to a genome browser for easy follow-up analysis. Use of the web tool is free and open to all, and there is no login requirement. ADDRESS: http://veda.cs.uiuc.edu/MET/.

  16. Structural characterization and cytolytic activity of a potent antimicrobial motif in longicin, a defensin-like peptide in the tick Haemaphysalis longicornis.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Morshedur; Tsuji, Naotoshi; Boldbaatar, Damdinsuren; Battur, Banzragch; Liao, Min; Umemiya-Shirafuji, Rika; You, Myungjo; Tanaka, Tetsuya; Fujisaki, Kozo

    2010-02-01

    Longicin, a defensin-like peptide, was recently identified in the hard tick Haemaphysalis longicornis. Longicin and one of its synthetic partial analogs (P4) displayed antimicrobial/fungicidal/parasiticidal activity. In the present study, we compared longicin-derived synthetic analogs in order to characterize the antimicrobial motif (P4) by analyzing some structural features using various bioinformatic tools and/or CD spectroscopy. According to the chemicophysical characteristics, P4 is suggested to be a cationic peptide with hydrophobic and amphipathic character. The predicted secondary structure indicated the existence of a beta-sheet, which was also observed in the modeled tertiary structure. CD spectroscopic results also showed the existence of a beta-sheet and transition to a helical conformation in the presence of membrane-mimicking conditions. These structural observations on P4 suggested that the antimicrobial activity could be due to the beta-sheet as well as the alpha-helix. In addition, a sequence homology search showed that molecules identified in other ticks and organisms also have the P4 analogous domain at their C-terminal, which indicates P4 as a conserved domain. The peptide P4 also showed low cytolytic activity. Based on the present result and previously reported studies, the peptide P4 could be suggested as a novel antimicrobial domain indicating future therapeutic agent against bacteria.

  17. Elevated Expression of Immunoreceptor Tyrosine-Based Inhibitory Motif (TIGIT) on T Lymphocytes is Correlated with Disease Activity in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Qing; Deng, Zhen; Xu, Chuxin; Zeng, Lulu; Ye, Jianqing; Li, Xue; Guo, Yang; Huang, Zikun; Li, Junming

    2017-01-01

    Background It is well known that lymphocytes play an important role in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). T cell immunoreceptors with immunoglobulin (Ig) and immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motif (TIGIT) have immunosuppressive co-stimulatory molecules that mediate inhibitory effects, but their roles in RA are poorly understood. Material/Methods Were recruited 76 patients with RA and 33 healthy controls (HC). Clinical manifestations, laboratory measurements, physical examination, and medical history of RA patients were recorded. The expression of TIGIT on CD3+ T lymphocytes, B lymphocytes, monocytes, neutrophils, CD3+CD4+ T lymphocytes, and CD3+CD8+ T lymphocytes was determined using flow cytometry. The expression of TIGIT on T lymphocytes in patients with RA was further analyzed to investigate its correlations with markers of autoimmune response, inflammation, and disease activity in RA. Results Compared with HC, the expression levels of TIGIT on CD3+CD4+ T lymphocytes and CD3+CD8+ T lymphocytes were significantly increased in patients with RA (P < 0.01). The frequency of TIGIT-expressing CD3+CD4+ T lymphocytes was positively correlated with RF, increased ACPA, ESR, and CRP levels. The frequency of TIGIT-expressing CD3+CD8+ T lymphocytes was positively correlated with RF and ESR levels. Furthermore, the expression level of TIGIT on CD3+CD4+ T lymphocytes was positively correlated with the DAS28 score in RA. Conclusions The expression levels of TIGIT on T lymphocytes were elevated and correlated with disease activity in RA. PMID:28282368

  18. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Solution Structures of Lacticin Q and Aureocin A53 Reveal a Structural Motif Conserved among Leaderless Bacteriocins with Broad-Spectrum Activity.

    PubMed

    Acedo, Jeella Z; van Belkum, Marco J; Lohans, Christopher T; Towle, Kaitlyn M; Miskolzie, Mark; Vederas, John C

    2016-02-02

    Lacticin Q (LnqQ) and aureocin A53 (AucA) are leaderless bacteriocins from Lactococcus lactis QU5 and Staphylococcus aureus A53, respectively. These bacteriocins are characterized by the absence of an N-terminal leader sequence and are active against a broad range of Gram-positive bacteria. LnqQ and AucA consist of 53 and 51 amino acids, respectively, and have 47% identical sequences. In this study, their three-dimensional structures were elucidated using solution nuclear magnetic resonance and were shown to consist of four α-helices that assume a very similar compact, globular overall fold (root-mean-square deviation of 1.7 Å) with a highly cationic surface and a hydrophobic core. The structures of LnqQ and AucA resemble the shorter two-component leaderless bacteriocins, enterocins 7A and 7B, despite having low levels of sequence identity. Homology modeling revealed that the observed structural motif may be shared among leaderless bacteriocins with broad-spectrum activity against Gram-positive organisms. The elucidated structures of LnqQ and AucA also exhibit some resemblance to circular bacteriocins. Despite their similar overall fold, inhibition studies showed that LnqQ and AucA have different antimicrobial potency against the Gram-positive strains tested, suggesting that sequence disparities play a crucial role in their mechanisms of action.

  19. Histidine Triad-Like Motif of the Rotavirus NSP2 Octamer Mediates Both RTPase and NTPase Activities

    PubMed Central

    Carpio, Rodrigo Vasquez-Del; Gonzalez-Nilo, Fernando D.; Riadi, Gonzalo; Taraporewala, Zenobia F.; Patton., John T.

    2006-01-01

    SUMMARY Rotavirus NSP2 is an abundant nonstructural RNA-binding protein essential for forming the viral factories that support replication of the double-stranded RNA genome. NSP2 exists as stable doughnut-shaped octamers within the infected cell, representing the tail-to-tail interaction of two tetramers. Extending diagonally across the surface of each octamer are four highly basic grooves that function as binding sites for single-stranded RNA. Between the N and C-terminal domains of each monomer is a deep electropositive cleft containing a catalytic site that hydrolyzes the γ-β phosphoanhydride bond of any NTP. The catalytic site has similarity to those of the histidine triad (HIT) family of nucleotide-binding proteins. Due to the close proximity of the grooves and clefts, we investigated the possibility that the RNA-binding activity of the groove promoted the insertion of the 5′-triphosphate moiety of the RNA into the cleft, and the subsequent hydrolysis of its γ-β phosphoanhydride bond. Our results show that NSP2 hydrolyzes the γP from RNAs and NTPs through Mg2+-dependent activities that proceed with similar reaction velocities, that require the catalytic His225 residue, and that produce a phosphorylated intermediate. Competition assays indicate that although both substrates enter the active site, RNA is the preferred substrate due to its higher affinity for the octamer. The RTPase activity of NSP2 may account for the absence of 5′-terminal γP on the (−) strands of the dsRNA genome segments. This is the first report of a HIT-like protein with a multifunctional catalytic site, capable of accommodating both NTPs and RNAs during γP hydrolysis. PMID:16934294

  20. C-reactive protein inhibits insulin activation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase via the immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibition motif of FcgammaRIIB and SHIP-1.

    PubMed

    Tanigaki, Keiji; Mineo, Chieko; Yuhanna, Ivan S; Chambliss, Ken L; Quon, Michael J; Bonvini, Ezio; Shaul, Philip W

    2009-06-05

    Insulin promotes the cardiovascular protective functions of the endothelium including NO production by endothelial NO synthase (eNOS), which it stimulates via Akt kinase which phosphorylates eNOS Ser1179. C-reactive protein (CRP) is an acute-phase reactant that is positively correlated with cardiovascular disease risk in patients with type 2 diabetes. We previously showed that CRP inhibits eNOS activation by insulin by blunting Ser1179 phosphorylation. We now elucidate the underlying molecular mechanisms. We first show in mice that CRP inhibits insulin-induced eNOS phosphorylation, indicating that these processes are operative in vivo. In endothelial cells we find that CRP attenuates insulin-induced Akt phosphorylation, and CRP antagonism of eNOS is negated by expression of constitutively active Akt; the inhibitory effect of CRP on Akt is also observed in vivo. A requirement for the IgG receptor FcgammaRIIB was demonstrated in vitro using blocking antibody, and reconstitution experiments with wild-type and mutant FcgammaRIIB in NIH3T3IR cells revealed that these processes require the ITIM (immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibition motif) of the receptor. Furthermore, we find that endothelium express SHIP-1 (Src homology 2 domain-containing inositol 5'-phosphatase 1), that CRP induces SHIP-1 stimulatory phosphorylation in endothelium in culture and in vivo, and that SHIP-1 knockdown by small interfering RNA prevents CRP antagonism of insulin-induced eNOS activation. Thus, CRP inhibits eNOS stimulation by insulin via FcgammaRIIB and its ITIM, SHIP-1 activation, and resulting blunted activation of Akt. These findings provide mechanistic linkage among CRP, impaired insulin signaling in endothelium, and greater cardiovascular disease risk in type 2 diabetes.

  1. An Active Insect Kinin Analog with 4-Aminopyroglutamate, A Novel cis-Peptide Bond, Type VI beta-Turn Motif

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-01-01

    modified FastMoc0.25 procedure as well as manually by the solid-phase method, using the Fmoc - strategy and starting from Rink Amide resin (Novabiochem...0.53 mM/g). The Fmoc protecting group was removed by 20% piperidine in DMF. A fourfold excess of the respective Fmoc -amino acids was activated in...equivalents). Amino acid side-chain protect- ing groups were Pbf for Arg and Boc for Trp. The coupling of Fmoc -(S,S)-4-aminopyroglutamic acid ( Fmoc -APy

  2. New amphiphilic neamine conjugates bearing a metal binding motif active against MDR E. aerogenes Gram-negative bacteria.

    PubMed

    Allam, Anas; Maigre, Laure; Alves de Sousa, Rodolphe; Dumont, Estelle; Vergalli, Julia; Pagès, Jean-Marie; Artaud, Isabelle

    2017-02-15

    Structure of bacterial envelope is one of the major factors contributing to Gram negative bacterial resistance. To develop new agents that target the bacterial membranes, we synthesized, by analogy with our previous peptide conjugates, new amphiphilic 3',4',6-trinaphthylmethylene neamines functionalized at position 5 through a short spacer by a chelating group, tris(2-pyridylmethyl)amine (TPA) and di-(picolyl)amine (DPA) and tetraazacyclotetradecane (Cyclam). ESI(+) mass spectrometry analyses showed that neither Zn(II)(NeaDPA) nor Cu(II)(NeaCyclam) were stable in the Mueller Hinton (MH) medium used for antibacterial assays. In contrast Zn(NeaTPA) was stable in the MH medium. Interestingly, in MH, the free ligand NeaTPA was found bound to zinc, the zinc salt being the most abundant salt in this medium. Thus, the antibacterial activities of all compounds were evaluated as free ligands against E. coli strains, wild type AG100 and E. aerogenes EA289 (a clinical MDR strain that overexpresses AcrAB-TolC efflux pump), as well as AG100A an AcrAB- E. coli strain and EA298 a TolC- derivative. NeaCyclam and Zn(NeaTPA) were by far the most efficient compounds active against resistant isolate EA289 with MICs in the range 16-4 and 4 μM, respectively, while usual antibiotics such as β-lactams and phenicols were inactive (MICs > 128) and ciprofloxacin was at 64 μM. Zn(NeaTPA) and NeaCyclam were shown to target and permeabilize the outer membrane of EA289 by promoting the cleavage of nitrocefin by periplasmic β-lactamase. Moreover, all the neamine conjugates were able to block the efflux of 1,2'-dinaphthylamine in EA289, by acting on the efflux transporter located in the inner membrane. These membranotropic properties contribute to explain the activities of these neamine conjugates toward the MDR EA289 strain.

  3. Structure-Activity Studies of Cysteine-Rich α-Conotoxins that Inhibit High-Voltage-Activated Calcium Channels via GABA(B) Receptor Activation Reveal a Minimal Functional Motif.

    PubMed

    Carstens, Bodil B; Berecki, Géza; Daniel, James T; Lee, Han Siean; Jackson, Kathryn A V; Tae, Han-Shen; Sadeghi, Mahsa; Castro, Joel; O'Donnell, Tracy; Deiteren, Annemie; Brierley, Stuart M; Craik, David J; Adams, David J; Clark, Richard J

    2016-04-04

    α-Conotoxins are disulfide-rich peptides that target nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. Recently we identified several α-conotoxins that also modulate voltage-gated calcium channels by acting as G protein-coupled GABA(B) receptor (GABA(B)R) agonists. These α-conotoxins are promising drug leads for the treatment of chronic pain. To elucidate the diversity of α-conotoxins that act through this mechanism, we synthesized and characterized a set of peptides with homology to α-conotoxins known to inhibit high voltage-activated calcium channels via GABA(B)R activation. Remarkably, all disulfide isomers of the active α-conotoxins Pu1.2 and Pn1.2, and the previously studied Vc1.1 showed similar levels of biological activity. Structure determination by NMR spectroscopy helped us identify a simplified biologically active eight residue peptide motif containing a single disulfide bond that is an excellent lead molecule for developing a new generation of analgesic peptide drugs.

  4. Negative regulation of glial engulfment activity by Draper terminates glial responses to axon injury

    PubMed Central

    Logan, Mary A.; Hackett, Rachel; Doherty, Johnna; Sheehan, Amy; Speese, Sean D.; Freeman, Marc R.

    2012-01-01

    Neuronal injury elicits potent cellular responses from glia, but molecular pathways modulating glial activation, phagocytic function, and termination of reactive responses remain poorly defined. Here we show that positive or negative regulation of glial reponses to axon injury are molecularly encoded by unique isoforms of the Drosophila engulfment receptor Draper. Draper-I promotes engulfment of axonal debris through an immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM). In contrast, Draper-II, an alternative splice variant, potently inhibits glial engulfment function. Draper-II suppresses Draper-I signaling through a novel immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motif (ITIM)-like domain and the tyrosine phosphatase Corkscrew (Csw). Intriguingly, loss of Draper-II/Csw signaling prolongs expression of glial engulfment genes after axotomy and reduces the ability of glia to respond to secondary axotomy. Our work highlights a novel role for Draper-II in inhibiting glial responses to neurodegeneration, and indicates a balance of opposing Draper-I/-II signaling events is essential to maintain glial sensitivity to brain injury. PMID:22426252

  5. Site-1 protease-activated formation of lysosomal targeting motifs is independent of the lipogenic transcription control[S

    PubMed Central

    Klünder, Sarah; Heeren, Jörg; Markmann, Sandra; Santer, René; Braulke, Thomas; Pohl, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    Site-1 protease (S1P) cleaves membrane-bound lipogenic sterol regulatory element-binding proteins (SREBPs) and the α/β-subunit precursor protein of the N-acetylglucosamine-1-phosphotransferase forming mannose 6-phosphate (M6P) targeting markers on lysosomal enzymes. The translocation of SREBPs from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to the Golgi-resident S1P depends on the intracellular sterol content, but it is unknown whether the ER exit of the α/β-subunit precursor is regulated. Here, we investigated the effect of cholesterol depletion (atorvastatin treatment) and elevation (LDL overload) on ER-Golgi transport, S1P-mediated cleavage of the α/β-subunit precursor, and the subsequent targeting of lysosomal enzymes along the biosynthetic and endocytic pathway to lysosomes. The data showed that the proteolytic cleavage of the α/β-subunit precursor into mature and enzymatically active subunits does not depend on the cholesterol content. In either treatment, lysosomal enzymes are normally decorated with M6P residues, allowing the proper sorting to lysosomes. In addition, we found that, in fibroblasts of mucolipidosis type II mice and Niemann-Pick type C patients characterized by aberrant cholesterol accumulation, the proteolytic cleavage of the α/β-subunit precursor was not impaired. We conclude that S1P substrate-dependent regulatory mechanisms for lipid synthesis and biogenesis of lysosomes are different. PMID:26108224

  6. Mutation of the aspartic acid residues of the GDD sequence motif of poliovirus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase results in enzymes with altered metal ion requirements for activity.

    PubMed Central

    Jablonski, S A; Morrow, C D

    1995-01-01

    The poliovirus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, 3Dpol, is known to share a region of sequence homology with all RNA polymerases centered at the GDD amino acid motif. The two aspartic acids have been postulated to be involved in the catalytic activity and metal ion coordination of the enzyme. To test this hypothesis, we have utilized oligonucleotide site-directed mutagenesis to generate defined mutations in the aspartic acids of the GDD motif of the 3Dpol gene. The codon for the first aspartate (3D-D-328 [D refers to the single amino acid change, and the number refers to its position in the polymerase]) was changed to that for glutamic acid, histidine, asparagine, or glutamine; the codons for both aspartic acids were simultaneously changed to those for glutamic acids; and the codon for the second aspartic acid (3D-D-329) was changed to that for glutamic acid or asparagine. The mutant enzymes were expressed in Escherichia coli, and the in vitro poly(U) polymerase activity was characterized. All of the mutant 3Dpol enzymes were enzymatically inactive in vitro when tested over a range of Mg2+ concentrations. However, when Mn2+ was substituted for Mg2+ in the in vitro assays, the mutant that substituted the second aspartic acid for asparagine (3D-N-329) was active. To further substantiate this finding, a series of different transition metal ions were substituted for Mg2+ in the poly(U) polymerase assay. The wild-type enzyme was active with all metals except Ca2+, while the 3D-N-329 mutant was active only when FeC6H7O5 was used in the reaction. To determine the effects of the mutations on poliovirus replication, the mutant 3Dpol genes were subcloned into an infectious cDNA of poliovirus. The cDNAs containing the mutant 3Dpol genes did not produce infectious virus when transfected into tissue culture cells under standard conditions. Because of the activity of the 3D-N-329 mutant in the presence of Fe2+ and Mn2+, transfections were also performed in the presence of the

  7. Conserved Motifs within Hepatitis C Virus Envelope (E2) RNA and Protein Independently Inhibit T Cell Activation

    PubMed Central

    Bhattarai, Nirjal; McLinden, James H.; Xiang, Jinhua; Kaufman, Thomas M.; Stapleton, Jack T.

    2015-01-01

    T cell receptor (TCR) signaling is required for T-cell activation, proliferation, differentiation, and effector function. Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is associated with impaired T-cell function leading to persistent viremia, delayed and inconsistent antibody responses, and mild immune dysfunction. Although multiple factors appear to contribute to T-cell dysfunction, a role for HCV particles in this process has not been identified. Here, we show that incubation of primary human CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells with HCV RNA-containing serum, HCV-RNA containing extracellular vesicles (EVs), cell culture derived HCV particles (HCVcc) and HCV envelope pseudotyped retrovirus particles (HCVpp) inhibited TCR-mediated signaling. Since HCVpp’s contain only E1 and E2, we examined the effect of HCV E2 on TCR signaling pathways. HCV E2 expression recapitulated HCV particle-induced TCR inhibition. A highly conserved, 51 nucleotide (nt) RNA sequence was sufficient to inhibit TCR signaling. Cells expressing the HCV E2 coding RNA contained a short, virus-derived RNA predicted to be a Dicer substrate, which targeted a phosphatase involved in Src-kinase signaling (PTPRE). T-cells and hepatocytes containing HCV E2 RNA had reduced PTPRE protein levels. Mutation of 6 nts abolished the predicted Dicer interactions and restored PTPRE expression and proximal TCR signaling. HCV RNA did not inhibit distal TCR signaling induced by PMA and Ionomycin; however, HCV E2 protein inhibited distal TCR signaling. This inhibition required lymphocyte-specific tyrosine kinase (Lck). Lck phosphorylated HCV E2 at a conserved tyrosine (Y613), and phospho-E2 inhibited nuclear translocation of NFAT. Mutation of Y613 restored distal TCR signaling, even in the context of HCVpps. Thus, HCV particles delivered viral RNA and E2 protein to T-cells, and these inhibited proximal and distal TCR signaling respectively. These effects of HCV particles likely aid in establishing infection and contribute to viral persistence

  8. The nuclear splicing factor RNA binding motif 5 promotes caspase activation in human neuronal cells, and increases after traumatic brain injury in mice

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Travis C; Du, Lina; Janesko-Feldman, Keri; Vagni, Vincent A; Dezfulian, Cameron; Poloyac, Samuel M; Jackson, Edwin K; Clark, Robert SB; Kochanek, Patrick M

    2015-01-01

    Splicing factors (SFs) coordinate nuclear intron/exon splicing of RNA. Splicing factor disturbances can cause cell death. RNA binding motif 5 (RBM5) and 10 (RBM10) promote apoptosis in cancer cells by activating detrimental alternative splicing of key death/survival genes. The role(s) of RBM5/10 in neurons has not been established. Here, we report that RBM5 knockdown in human neuronal cells decreases caspase activation by staurosporine. In contrast, RBM10 knockdown augments caspase activation. To determine whether brain injury alters RBM signaling, we measured RBM5/10 protein in mouse cortical/hippocampus homogenates after controlled cortical impact (CCI) traumatic brain injury (TBI) plus hemorrhagic shock (CCI+HS). The RBM5/10 staining was higher 48  to 72 hours after injury and appeared to be increased in neuronal nuclei of the hippocampus. We also measured levels of other nuclear SFs known to be essential for cellular viability and report that splicing factor 1 (SF1) but not splicing factor 3A (SF3A) decreased 4  to 72 hours after injury. Finally, we confirm that RBM5/10 regulate protein expression of several target genes including caspase-2, cellular FLICE-like inhibitory protein (c-FLIP), LETM1 Domain-Containing Protein 1 (LETMD1), and amyloid precursor-like protein 2 (APLP2) in neuronal cells. Knockdown of RBM5 appeared to increase expression of c-FLIP(s), LETMD1, and APLP2 but decrease caspase-2. PMID:25586139

  9. Activation of ATP binding for the autophosphorylation of DosS, a Mycobacterium tuberculosis histidine kinase lacking an ATP lid motif.

    PubMed

    Cho, Ha Yeon; Lee, Young-Hoon; Bae, Young-Seuk; Kim, Eungbin; Kang, Beom Sik

    2013-05-03

    The sensor histidine kinases of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, DosS and DosT, are responsible for sensing hypoxic conditions and consist of sensor and kinase cores responsible for accepting signals and phosphorylation activity, respectively. The kinase core contains a dimerization and histidine phosphate-accepting (DHp) domain and an ATP binding domain (ABD). The 13 histidine kinase genes of M. tuberculosis can be grouped based on the presence or absence of the ATP lid motif and F box (elements known to play roles in ATP binding) in their ABDs; DosS and DosT have ABDs lacking both these elements, and the crystal structures of their ABDs indicated that they were unsuitable for ATP binding, as a short loop covers the putative ATP binding site. Although the ABD alone cannot bind ATP, the kinase core is functional in autophosphorylation. Appropriate spatial arrangement of the ABD and DHp domain within the kinase core is required for both autophosphorylation and ATP binding. An ionic interaction between Arg(440) in the DHp domain and Glu(537) in the short loop of the ABD is available and may open the ATP binding site, by repositioning the short loop away from the site. Mutations at Arg(440) and Glu(537) reduce autophosphorylation activity. Unlike other histidine kinases containing an ATP lid, which protects bound ATP, DosS is unable to accept ATP until the ABD is properly positioned relative to the histidine; this may prevent unexpected ATP reactions. ATP binding can, therefore, function as a control mechanism for histidine kinase activity.

  10. Role of repetitive nine-residue sequence motifs in secretion, enzymatic activity, and protein conformation of a family I.3 lipase.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Hyun-Ju; Haruki, Mitsuru; Morikawa, Masaaki; Omori, Kenji; Kanaya, Shigenori

    2002-01-01

    A family I.3 lipase from Pseudomonas sp. MIS38 (PML) contains 12 repeats of a nine-residue sequence motif in the C-terminal region. To elucidate the role of these repetitive sequences, mutant proteins PML5, PML4, PML1, and PML0, in which 7, 8, 11, and all 12 of the repetitive sequences are deleted, and PMLdelta19, in which 19 C-terminal residues are truncated, were constructed. Escherichia coli DH5 cells carrying the Serratia marcescens Lip system permitted the secretion of the wild-type and all of the mutant proteins except for PMLdelta19, although they were partially accumulated in the cells in an insoluble form as well. Both the secretion level and cellular content of the proteins decreased in the order PML > PML5 > PML4 > PML1 > PML0, indicating that repetitive sequences are not required for secretion of PML but are important for its stability in the cells. All the mutant proteins were purified in a refolded form and their biochemical properties were characterized. CD spectra, the Ca2+ contents, and susceptibility to chymotryptic digestion strongly suggested that the five repetitive sequences remaining in PML5 are sufficient to form a beta-roll structure, whereas the four in PML4 are not. PML5 and PMLdelta19 showed both lipase and esterase activities, whereas PML4, PML1, and PML0 were inactive. These results suggest that the enzymatic activity of PML is not seriously affected by a deletion or truncation at the C-terminal region as long as a succession of repetitive sequences can build a beta-roll structure.

  11. Modeling gene regulatory network motifs using statecharts

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Gene regulatory networks are widely used by biologists to describe the interactions among genes, proteins and other components at the intra-cellular level. Recently, a great effort has been devoted to give gene regulatory networks a formal semantics based on existing computational frameworks. For this purpose, we consider Statecharts, which are a modular, hierarchical and executable formal model widely used to represent software systems. We use Statecharts for modeling small and recurring patterns of interactions in gene regulatory networks, called motifs. Results We present an improved method for modeling gene regulatory network motifs using Statecharts and we describe the successful modeling of several motifs, including those which could not be modeled or whose models could not be distinguished using the method of a previous proposal. We model motifs in an easy and intuitive way by taking advantage of the visual features of Statecharts. Our modeling approach is able to simulate some interesting temporal properties of gene regulatory network motifs: the delay in the activation and the deactivation of the "output" gene in the coherent type-1 feedforward loop, the pulse in the incoherent type-1 feedforward loop, the bistability nature of double positive and double negative feedback loops, the oscillatory behavior of the negative feedback loop, and the "lock-in" effect of positive autoregulation. Conclusions We present a Statecharts-based approach for the modeling of gene regulatory network motifs in biological systems. The basic motifs used to build more complex networks (that is, simple regulation, reciprocal regulation, feedback loop, feedforward loop, and autoregulation) can be faithfully described and their temporal dynamics can be analyzed. PMID:22536967

  12. A Secreted Protein with Plant-Specific Cysteine-Rich Motif Functions as a Mannose-Binding Lectin That Exhibits Antifungal Activity1[W

    PubMed Central

    Miyakawa, Takuya; Hatano, Ken-ichi; Miyauchi, Yumiko; Suwa, You-ichi; Sawano, Yoriko; Tanokura, Masaru

    2014-01-01

    Plants have a variety of mechanisms for defending against plant pathogens and tolerating environmental stresses such as drought and high salinity. Ginkbilobin2 (Gnk2) is a seed storage protein in gymnosperm that possesses antifungal activity and a plant-specific cysteine-rich motif (domain of unknown function26 [DUF26]). The Gnk2-homologous sequence is also observed in an extracellular region of cysteine-rich repeat receptor-like kinases that function in response to biotic and abiotic stresses. Here, we report the lectin-like molecular function of Gnk2 and the structural basis of its monosaccharide recognition. Nuclear magnetic resonance experiments showed that mannan was the only yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) cell wall polysaccharide that interacted with Gnk2. Gnk2 also interacted with mannose, a building block of mannan, with a specificity that was similar to those of mannose-binding legume lectins, by strictly recognizing the configuration of the hydroxy group at the C4 position of the monosaccharide. The crystal structure of Gnk2 in complex with mannose revealed that three residues (asparagine-11, arginine-93, and glutamate-104) recognized mannose by hydrogen bonds, which defined the carbohydrate-binding specificity. These interactions were directly related to the ability of Gnk2 to inhibit the growth of fungi, including the plant pathogenic Fusarium spp., which were disrupted by mutation of arginine-93 or the presence of yeast mannan in the assay system. In addition, Gnk2 did not inhibit the growth of a yeast mutant strain lacking the α1,2-linked mannose moiety. These results provide insights into the molecular basis of the DUF26 protein family. PMID:25139159

  13. Cutting Edge: Ikaros null thymocytes mature into the CD4 lineage with reduced TCR signal: A study using CD3{zeta} immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Urban, Julie A; Brugmann, William; Winandy, Susan

    2009-04-01

    Positive selection is a critical T cell developmental checkpoint that is driven by TCR signals. Enhanced positive selection toward the CD4 lineage occurs in the absence of Ikaros. One explanation for this phenotype is that Ikaros establishes the TCR signaling threshold that must be overcome for positive selection to occur. In the current study, this possibility is explored through the use of CD3zeta ITAM transgenic mice that express a CD3 zeta-chain with zero, one, or three ITAMs and an MHC class II (DO11.10)- or MHC class I (H-Y)-restricted TCR transgene. Using this system, we demonstrate that in the absence of Ikaros, thymocytes are able to mature into the CD4 lineage with reduced TCR signaling potential compared with that required to drive the maturation of wild-type thymocytes. We also demonstrate that maturation into the CD8 lineage is enhanced under conditions of reduced TCR signaling potential in the absence of Ikaros.

  14. Mutation in the DC-SIGN cytoplasmic triacidic cluster motif markedly attenuates receptor activity for phagocytosis and endocytosis of mannose-containing ligands by human myeloid cells.

    PubMed

    Azad, Abul K; Torrelles, Jordi B; Schlesinger, Larry S

    2008-12-01

    The transmembrane C-type lectin, dendritic cell-specific ICAM-3-grabbing nonintegrin (DC-SIGN), has three conserved cytoplasmic tail motifs: the tyrosine (Y)-based, dileucine (LL), and triacidic cluster (EEE), which are believed to regulate ligand binding, uptake, and trafficking. We mutated each of these motifs by alanine substitution and tested their roles in phagocytosis and receptor-mediated endocytosis of the highly mannosylated ligands, Mycobacterium tuberculosis mannose-capped lipoarabinomannan (ManLAM) and HIV-1 surface glycoprotein gp120, respectively, in transfected human myeloid K-562 cells. Compared with wild-type and other mutants, the EEE mutant of DC-SIGN showed a reduced cell-surface expression, near abolishment in the phagocytosis of ManLAM-coated beads (90.5+/-0.4%), and a marked reduction in the endocytosis of soluble gp120 (79.3+/-0.7%). Although, the Y mutant of DC-SIGN did not exhibit any effect on phagocytosis and intracellular trafficking to the phagolysosome, the LL mutant caused the majority of the receptor and/or ligands to remain bound to the cell surface, indicating a role for the LL motif as an internalization signal. The majority of the EEE mutant protein was found to be retained by the intracellular trans-Golgi network and not by the late endosomal/lysosomal compartment of transfected K-562 cells. Collectively, our data indicate a dual role for the EEE motif as a sorting signal in the secretory pathway and a lysosomal targeting signal in the endocytic pathway.

  15. The polarization of the G-protein activated potassium channel GIRK5 to the vegetal pole of Xenopus laevis oocytes is driven by a di-leucine motif.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Bello, Beatriz; Rangel-García, Claudia I; Salvador, Carolina; Carrisoza-Gaytán, Rolando; Escobar, Laura I

    2013-01-01

    The G protein-coupled inwardly-rectifying potassium channels (known as GIRK or Kir3) form functional heterotetramers gated by G-βγ subunits. GIRK channels participate in heart rate modulation and neuronal postsynaptic inhibition in mammals. In Xenopus laevis oocytes, GIRK5 is a functional homomultimer. Previously, we found that phosphorylation of a tyrosine (Y16) at its N-terminus downregulates the surface expression of GIRK5. In this work, we elucidated the subcellular localization and trafficking of GIRK5 in oocytes. Several EGFP-GIRK5 chimeras were produced and an ECFP construct was used to identify the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Whereas GIRK5-WT was retained in the ER at the animal pole, the phospho-null GIRK5-Y16A was localized to the vegetal pole. Interestingly, a construct with an N-terminal Δ25 deletion produced an even distribution of the channel in the whole oocyte. Through an alanine-scan, we identified an acidic cluster/di-leucine sorting-signal recognition motif between E17 and I22. We quantified the effect of each amino acid residue within this di-leucine motif in determining the distribution of GIRK5 to the animal and vegetal poles. We found that Y16 and I22 contributed to functional expression and were dominant in the polarization of GIRK5. We thus conclude that the N-terminal acidic di-leucine motif of GIRK5 determines its retention and polarized trafficking within Xl oocytes.

  16. Moraxella catarrhalis induces CEACAM3-Syk-CARD9-dependent activation of human granulocytes.

    PubMed

    Heinrich, A; Heyl, K A; Klaile, E; Müller, M M; Klassert, T E; Wiessner, A; Fischer, K; Schumann, R R; Seifert, U; Riesbeck, K; Moter, A; Singer, B B; Bachmann, S; Slevogt, H

    2016-11-01

    The human restricted pathogen Moraxella catarrhalis is an important causal agent for exacerbations in chronic obstructive lung disease in adults. In such patients, increased numbers of granulocytes are present in the airways, which correlate with bacteria-induced exacerbations and severity of the disease. Our study investigated whether the interaction of M. catarrhalis with the human granulocyte-specific carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule (CEACAM)-3 is linked to NF-κB activation, resulting in chemokine production. Granulocytes from healthy donors and NB4 cells were infected with M. catarrhalis in the presence of different inhibitors, blocking antibodies and siRNA. The supernatants were analysed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for chemokines. NF-κB activation was determined using a luciferase reporter gene assay and chromatin-immunoprecipitation. We found evidence that the specific engagement of CEACAM3 by M. catarrhalis ubiquitous surface protein A1 (UspA1) results in the activation of pro-inflammatory events, such as degranulation of neutrophils, ROS production and chemokine secretion. The interaction of UspA1 with CEACAM3 induced the activation of the NF-κB pathway via Syk and the CARD9 pathway and was dependent on the phosphorylation of the CEACAM3 ITAM-like motif. These findings suggest that the CEACAM3 signalling in neutrophils is able to specifically modulate airway inflammation caused by infection with M. catarrhalis.

  17. Epstein-Barr virus latent membrane protein 2A contributes to anoikis resistance through ERK activation.

    PubMed

    Iwakiri, Dai; Minamitani, Takeharu; Samanta, Mrinal

    2013-07-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is associated with various malignancies, including epithelial cancers. In this study, we analyzed the effect of EBV infection on epithelial cells by using EBV-converted epithelial cells. In EBV-positive cells, the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway is constitutively activated. Inhibition of ERK activity leads to reduced anoikis resistance; therefore, EBV-positive cells are more resistant to anoikis, a type of apoptosis induced by cell detachment, than are EBV-negative cells. Among the viral genes expressed in EBV-positive cells, the latent membrane protein 2A (LMP2A) is responsible for induction of ERK-mediated anoikis resistance, although the expression level of LMP2A is much lower in EBV-positive cells than in EBV-transformed B cells. Further analysis demonstrated that LMP2A downregulation of the proanoikis mediator Bim through proteasomal degradation is dependent on the immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM). These findings suggest that LMP2A-mediated ERK activation is involved in the generation of EBV-associated epithelial malignancies.

  18. Ehrlichia chaffeensis TRP120 binds a G+C-rich motif in host cell DNA and exhibits eukaryotic transcriptional activator function.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Bing; Kuriakose, Jeeba A; Luo, Tian; Ballesteros, Efren; Gupta, Sharu; Fofanov, Yuriy; McBride, Jere W

    2011-11-01

    Ehrlichia chaffeensis is an obligately intracellular bacterium that modulates host cell gene transcription in the mononuclear phagocyte, but the host gene targets and mechanisms involved in transcriptional modulation are not well-defined. In this study, we identified a novel tandem repeat DNA-binding domain in the E. chaffeensis 120-kDa tandem repeat protein (TRP120) that directly binds host cell DNA. TRP120 was observed by immunofluorescent microscopy in the nucleus of E. chaffeensis-infected host cells and was detected in nuclear extracts by Western immunoblotting with TRP120-specific antibody. The TRP120 binding sites and associated host cell target genes were identified using high-throughput deep sequencing (Illumina) of immunoprecipitated DNA (chromatin immunoprecipitation and high-throughput DNA sequencing). Multiple em motif elicitation (MEME) analysis of the most highly enriched TRP120-bound sequences revealed a G+C-rich DNA motif, and recombinant TRP120 specifically bound synthetic oligonucleotides containing the motif. TRP120 target gene binding sites were mapped most frequently to intersecting regions (intron/exon; 49%) but were also identified in upstream regulatory regions (25%) and downstream locations (26%). Genes targeted by TRP120 were most frequently associated with transcriptional regulation, signal transduction, and apoptosis. TRP120 targeted inflammatory chemokine genes, CCL2, CCL20, and CXCL11, which were strongly upregulated during E. chaffeensis infection and were also upregulated by direct transfection with recombinant TRP120. This study reveals that TRP120 is a novel DNA-binding protein that is involved in a host gene transcriptional regulation strategy.

  19. Motivated Proteins: A web application for studying small three-dimensional protein motifs

    PubMed Central

    Leader, David P; Milner-White, E James

    2009-01-01

    Background Small loop-shaped motifs are common constituents of the three-dimensional structure of proteins. Typically they comprise between three and seven amino acid residues, and are defined by a combination of dihedral angles and hydrogen bonding partners. The most abundant of these are αβ-motifs, asx-motifs, asx-turns, β-bulges, β-bulge loops, β-turns, nests, niches, Schellmann loops, ST-motifs, ST-staples and ST-turns. We have constructed a database of such motifs from a range of high-quality protein structures and built a web application as a visual interface to this. Description The web application, Motivated Proteins, provides access to these 12 motifs (with 48 sub-categories) in a database of over 400 representative proteins. Queries can be made for specific categories or sub-categories of motif, motifs in the vicinity of ligands, motifs which include part of an enzyme active site, overlapping motifs, or motifs which include a particular amino acid sequence. Individual proteins can be specified, or, where appropriate, motifs for all proteins listed. The results of queries are presented in textual form as an (X)HTML table, and may be saved as parsable plain text or XML. Motifs can be viewed and manipulated either individually or in the context of the protein in the Jmol applet structural viewer. Cartoons of the motifs imposed on a linear representation of protein secondary structure are also provided. Summary information for the motifs is available, as are histograms of amino acid distribution, and graphs of dihedral angles at individual positions in the motifs. Conclusion Motivated Proteins is a publicly and freely accessible web application that enables protein scientists to study small three-dimensional motifs without requiring knowledge of either Structured Query Language or the underlying database schema. PMID:19210785

  20. Motif Yggdrasil: sampling sequence motifs from a tree mixture model.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Samuel A; Lagergren, Jens

    2007-06-01

    In phylogenetic foot-printing, putative regulatory elements are found in upstream regions of orthologous genes by searching for common motifs. Motifs in different upstream sequences are subject to mutations along the edges of the corresponding phylogenetic tree, consequently taking advantage of the tree in the motif search is an appealing idea. We describe the Motif Yggdrasil sampler; the first Gibbs sampler based on a general tree that uses unaligned sequences. Previous tree-based Gibbs samplers have assumed a star-shaped tree or partially aligned upstream regions. We give a probabilistic model (MY model) describing upstream sequences with regulatory elements and build a Gibbs sampler with respect to this model. The model allows toggling, i.e., the restriction of a position to a subset of nucleotides, but does not require aligned sequences nor edge lengths, which may be difficult to come by. We apply the collapsing technique to eliminate the need to sample nuisance parameters, and give a derivation of the predictive update formula. We show that the MY model improves the modeling of difficult motif instances and that the use of the tree achieves a substantial increase in nucleotide level correlation coefficient both for synthetic data and 37 bacterial lexA genes. We investigate the sensitivity to errors in the tree and show that using random trees MY sampler still has a performance similar to the original version.

  1. Two PEST-like motifs regulate Ca2+/calpain-mediated cleavage of the CaVβ3 subunit and provide important determinants for neuronal Ca2+ channel activity

    PubMed Central

    Sandoval, Alejandro; Oviedo, Norma; Tadmouri, Abir; Avila, Traudy; De Waard, Michel; Felix, Ricardo

    2006-01-01

    Increase in intracellular Ca2+ due to voltage-gated Ca2+ (CaV) channel opening represents an important trigger for a number of second-messenger mediated effects ranging from neurotransmitter release to gene activation. Ca2+ entry occurs through the principal pore-forming protein, but several ancillary subunits are known to more precisely tune ion influx. Among them, the CaVβ subunits are perhaps the most important given that they largely influence the biophysical and pharmacological properties of the channel. Notably, several functional features may be associated with specific structural regions of the CaVβ subunits emphasizing the relevance of intramolecular domains in the physiology of these proteins. In the current report, we show that CaVβ3 contains two PEST motifs and undergoes Ca2+-dependent degradation which can be prevented by the specific calpain inhibitor calpeptin. Using mutant constructs lacking the PEST motifs, we present evidence that they are necessary for the cleavage of CaVβ3 by calpain. Furthermore, the deletion of the PEST sequences did not affect the binding of CaVβ3 to the ionconducting CaV2.2 subunit, and when expressed in HEK-293 cells, the PEST motif-deleted CaVβ3 significantly increased whole-cell current density and retarded channel inactivation. Consistent with this observation, calpeptin treatment of HEK-293 cells expressing wild-type CaVβ3 resulted in an increase in current amplitude. Together, these findings suggest that calpainmediated CaVβ3 proteolysis may be an essential process for Ca2+ channel functional regulation. PMID:16706839

  2. [Prediction of Promoter Motifs in Virophages].

    PubMed

    Gong, Chaowen; Zhou, Xuewen; Pan, Yingjie; Wang, Yongjie

    2015-07-01

    Virophages have crucial roles in ecosystems and are the transport vectors of genetic materials. To shed light on regulation and control mechanisms in virophage--host systems as well as evolution between virophages and their hosts, the promoter motifs of virophages were predicted on the upstream regions of start codons using an analytical tool for prediction of promoter motifs: Multiple EM for Motif Elicitation. Seventeen potential promoter motifs were identified based on the E-value, location, number and length of promoters in genomes. Sputnik and zamilon motif 2 with AT-rich regions were distributed widely on genomes, suggesting that these motifs may be associated with regulation of the expression of various genes. Motifs containing the TCTA box were predicted to be late promoter motif in mavirus; motifs containing the ATCT box were the potential late promoter motif in the Ace Lake mavirus . AT-rich regions were identified on motif 2 in the Organic Lake virophage, motif 3 in Yellowstone Lake virophage (YSLV)1 and 2, motif 1 in YSLV3, and motif 1 and 2 in YSLV4, respectively. AT-rich regions were distributed widely on the genomes of virophages. All of these motifs may be promoter motifs of virophages. Our results provide insights into further exploration of temporal expression of genes in virophages as well as associations between virophages and giant viruses.

  3. Inhibition of NADPH oxidase activation by synthetic peptides mapping within the carboxyl-terminal domain of small GTP-binding proteins. Lack of amino acid sequence specificity and importance of polybasic motif.

    PubMed

    Joseph, G; Gorzalczany, Y; Koshkin, V; Pick, E

    1994-11-18

    The small GTP-binding protein (G protein) Rac1 is an obligatory participant in the assembly of the superoxide (O2-.)-generating NADPH oxidase complex of macrophages. We investigated the effect of synthetic peptides, mapping within the near carboxyl-terminal domains of Rac1 and of related G proteins, on the activity of NADPH oxidase in a cell-free system consisting of solubilized guinea pig macrophage membrane, a cytosolic fraction enriched in p47phox and p67phox (or total cytosol), highly purified Rac1-GDP dissociation inhibitor for Rho (Rho GDI) complex, and the activating amphiphile, lithium dodecyl sulfate. Peptides Rac1-(178-188) and Rac1-(178-191), but not Rac2-(178-188), inhibited NADPH oxidase activity in a Rac1-dependent system when added prior to or simultaneously with the initiation of activation. However, undecapeptides corresponding to the near carboxyl-terminal domains of RhoA and RhoC and, most notably, a peptide containing the same amino acids as Rac1-(178-188), but in reversed orientation, were also inhibitory. Surprisingly, O2-. production in a Rac2-dependent cell-free system was inhibited by Rac1-(178-188) but not by Rac2-(178-188). Finally, basic polyamino acids containing lysine, histidine, or arginine, also inhibited NADPH oxidase activation. We conclude that inhibition of NADPH oxidase activation by synthetic peptides mapping within the carboxyl-terminal domain of certain small G proteins is not amino acid sequence-specific but related to the presence of a polybasic motif. It has been proposed that such a motif serves as a plasma membrane targeting signal for a number of small G proteins (Hancock, J.F., Paterson, H., and Marshall, C.J. (1990) Cell 63, 133-139).

  4. The orphan G protein-coupled receptor GPR139 is activated by the peptides: Adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), α-, and β-melanocyte stimulating hormone (α-MSH, and β-MSH), and the conserved core motif HFRW.

    PubMed

    Nøhr, Anne Cathrine; Shehata, Mohamed A; Hauser, Alexander S; Isberg, Vignir; Mokrosinski, Jacek; Andersen, Kirsten B; Farooqi, I Sadaf; Pedersen, Daniel Sejer; Gloriam, David E; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans

    2017-01-01

    GPR139 is an orphan G protein-coupled receptor that is expressed primarily in the brain. Not much is known regarding the function of GPR139. Recently we have shown that GPR139 is activated by the amino acids l-tryptophan and l-phenylalanine (EC50 values of 220 μM and 320 μM, respectively), as well as di-peptides comprised of aromatic amino acids. This led us to hypothesize that GPR139 may be activated by peptides. Sequence alignment of the binding cavities of all class A GPCRs, revealed that the binding pocket of the melanocortin 4 receptor is similar to that of GPR139. Based on the chemogenomics principle "similar targets bind similar ligands", we tested three known endogenous melanocortin 4 receptor agonists; adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and α- and β-melanocyte stimulating hormone (α-MSH and β-MSH) on CHO-k1 cells stably expressing the human GPR139 in a Fluo-4 Ca(2+)-assay. All three peptides, as well as their conserved core motif HFRW, were found to activate GPR139 in the low micromolar range. Moreover, we found that peptides consisting of nine or ten N-terminal residues of α-MSH activate GPR139 in the submicromolar range. α-MSH1-9 was found to correspond to the product of a predicted cleavage site in the pre-pro-protein pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC). Our results demonstrate that GPR139 is a peptide receptor, activated by ACTH, α-MSH, β-MSH, the conserved core motif HFRW as well as a potential endogenous peptide α-MSH1-9. Further studies are needed to determine the functional relevance of GPR139 mediated signaling by these peptides.

  5. Knowledge discovery of multilevel protein motifs

    SciTech Connect

    Conklin, D.; Glasgow, J.; Fortier, S.

    1994-12-31

    A new category of protein motif is introduced. This type of motif captures, in addition to global structure, the nested structure of its component parts. A dataset of four proteins is represented using this scheme. A structured machine discovery procedure is used to discover recurrent amino acid motifs and this knowledge is utilized for the expression of subsequent protein motif discoveries. Examples of discovered multilevel motifs are presented.

  6. Sequential visibility-graph motifs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iacovacci, Jacopo; Lacasa, Lucas

    2016-04-01

    Visibility algorithms transform time series into graphs and encode dynamical information in their topology, paving the way for graph-theoretical time series analysis as well as building a bridge between nonlinear dynamics and network science. In this work we introduce and study the concept of sequential visibility-graph motifs, smaller substructures of n consecutive nodes that appear with characteristic frequencies. We develop a theory to compute in an exact way the motif profiles associated with general classes of deterministic and stochastic dynamics. We find that this simple property is indeed a highly informative and computationally efficient feature capable of distinguishing among different dynamics and robust against noise contamination. We finally confirm that it can be used in practice to perform unsupervised learning, by extracting motif profiles from experimental heart-rate series and being able, accordingly, to disentangle meditative from other relaxation states. Applications of this general theory include the automatic classification and description of physical, biological, and financial time series.

  7. Finding specific RNA motifs: Function in a zeptomole world?

    PubMed Central

    KNIGHT, ROB; YARUS, MICHAEL

    2003-01-01

    We have developed a new method for estimating the abundance of any modular (piecewise) RNA motif within a longer random region. We have used this method to estimate the size of the active motifs available to modern SELEX experiments (picomoles of unique sequences) and to a plausible RNA World (zeptomoles of unique sequences: 1 zmole = 602 sequences). Unexpectedly, activities such as specific isoleucine binding are almost certainly present in zeptomoles of molecules, and even ribozymes such as self-cleavage motifs may appear (depending on assumptions about the minimal structures). The number of specified nucleotides is not the only important determinant of a motif’s rarity: The number of modules into which it is divided, and the details of this division, are also crucial. We propose three maxims for easily isolated motifs: the Maxim of Minimization, the Maxim of Multiplicity, and the Maxim of the Median. These maxims together state that selected motifs should be small and composed of as many separate, equally sized modules as possible. For evenly divided motifs with four modules, the largest accessible activity in picomole scale (1–1000 pmole) pools of length 100 is about 34 nucleotides; while for zeptomole scale (1–1000 zmole) pools it is about 20 specific nucleotides (50% probability of occurrence). This latter figure includes some ribozymes and aptamers. Consequently, an RNA metabolism apparently could have begun with only zeptomoles of RNA molecules. PMID:12554865

  8. The distribution of RNA motifs in natural sequences.

    PubMed

    Bourdeau, V; Ferbeyre, G; Pageau, M; Paquin, B; Cedergren, R

    1999-11-15

    Functional analysis of genome sequences has largely ignored RNA genes and their structures. We introduce here the notion of 'ribonomics' to describe the search for the distribution of and eventually the determination of the physiological roles of these RNA structures found in the sequence databases. The utility of this approach is illustrated here by the identification in the GenBank database of RNA motifs having known binding or chemical activity. The frequency of these motifs indicates that most have originated from evolutionary drift and are selectively neutral. On the other hand, their distribution among species and their location within genes suggest that the destiny of these motifs may be more elaborate. For example, the hammerhead motif has a skewed organismal presence, is phylogenetically stable and recent work on a schistosome version confirms its in vivo biological activity. The under-representation of the valine-binding motif and the Rev-binding element in GenBank hints at a detrimental effect on cell growth or viability. Data on the presence and the location of these motifs may provide critical guidance in the design of experiments directed towards the understanding and the manipulation of RNA complexes and activities in vivo.

  9. Dynamic motifs in socio-economic networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xin; Shao, Shuai; Stanley, H. Eugene; Havlin, Shlomo

    2014-12-01

    Socio-economic networks are of central importance in economic life. We develop a method of identifying and studying motifs in socio-economic networks by focusing on “dynamic motifs,” i.e., evolutionary connection patterns that, because of “node acquaintances” in the network, occur much more frequently than random patterns. We examine two evolving bi-partite networks: i) the world-wide commercial ship chartering market and ii) the ship build-to-order market. We find similar dynamic motifs in both bipartite networks, even though they describe different economic activities. We also find that “influence” and “persistence” are strong factors in the interaction behavior of organizations. When two companies are doing business with the same customer, it is highly probable that another customer who currently only has business relationship with one of these two companies, will become customer of the second in the future. This is the effect of influence. Persistence means that companies with close business ties to customers tend to maintain their relationships over a long period of time.

  10. Increasing the Receptor Tyrosine Kinase EphB2 Prevents Amyloid-β-induced Depletion of Cell Surface Glutamate Receptors by a Mechanism That Requires the PDZ-binding Motif of EphB2 and Neuronal Activity*

    PubMed Central

    Miyamoto, Takashi; Kim, Daniel; Knox, Joseph A.; Johnson, Erik; Mucke, Lennart

    2016-01-01

    Diverse lines of evidence suggest that amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides causally contribute to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease (AD), the most frequent neurodegenerative disorder. However, the mechanisms by which Aβ impairs neuronal functions remain to be fully elucidated. Previous studies showed that soluble Aβ oligomers interfere with synaptic functions by depleting NMDA-type glutamate receptors (NMDARs) from the neuronal surface and that overexpression of the receptor tyrosine kinase EphB2 can counteract this process. Through pharmacological treatments and biochemical analyses of primary neuronal cultures expressing wild-type or mutant forms of EphB2, we demonstrate that this protective effect of EphB2 depends on its PDZ-binding motif and the presence of neuronal activity but not on its kinase activity. We further present evidence that the protective effect of EphB2 may be mediated by the AMPA-type glutamate receptor subunit GluA2, which can become associated with the PDZ-binding motif of EphB2 through PDZ domain-containing proteins and can promote the retention of NMDARs in the membrane. In addition, we show that the Aβ-induced depletion of surface NMDARs does not depend on several factors that have been implicated in the pathogenesis of Aβ-induced neuronal dysfunction, including aberrant neuronal activity, tau, prion protein (PrPC), and EphB2 itself. Thus, although EphB2 does not appear to be directly involved in the Aβ-induced depletion of NMDARs, increasing its expression may counteract this pathogenic process through a neuronal activity- and PDZ-dependent regulation of AMPA-type glutamate receptors. PMID:26589795

  11. Receptor signaling lymphocyte-activation molecule family 1 (Slamf1) regulates membrane fusion and NADPH oxidase 2 (NOX2) activity by recruiting a Beclin-1/Vps34/ultraviolet radiation resistance-associated gene (UVRAG) complex.

    PubMed

    Ma, Chunyan; Wang, Ninghai; Detre, Cynthia; Wang, Guoxing; O'Keeffe, Michael; Terhorst, Cox

    2012-05-25

    Phagocytosis is a pivotal process by which macrophages eliminate microorganisms upon recognition by pathogen sensors. Surprisingly, the self-ligand cell surface receptor Slamf1 functions not only as a co-stimulatory molecule but also as a microbial sensor of several Gram-negative bacteria. Upon entering the phagosome of macrophages Slamf1 induces production of phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate, which positively regulates the activity of the NOX2 enzyme and phagolysosomal maturation. Here, we report that in Escherichia coli-containing phagosomes of mouse macrophages, Slamf1 interacts with the class III PI3K Vps34 in a complex with Beclin-1 and UVRAG. Upon phagocytosis of bacteria the NOX2 activity was reduced in macrophages isolated from Beclin-1(+/-) mice compared with wild-type mice. This Slamf1/Beclin-1/Vps34/UVRAG protein complex is formed in intracellular membrane compartments as it is found without inducing phagocytosis in macrophages, human chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells, and transfectant HEK293 cells. Elimination of its cytoplasmic tail abolished the interaction of Slamf1 with the complex, but deletion or mutation of the two ITAM motifs did not. Both the BD and CCD domains of Beclin-1 were required for efficient binding to Slamf1. Because Slamf1 did not interact with Atg14L or Rubicon, which can also form a complex with Vps34 and Beclin-1, we conclude that Slamf1 recruits a subset of Vps34-associated proteins, which is involved in membrane fusion and NOX2 regulation.

  12. Discovering Multidimensional Motifs in Physiological Signals for Personalized Healthcare.

    PubMed

    Balasubramanian, Arvind; Wang, Jun; Prabhakaran, Balakrishnan

    2016-08-01

    Personalized diagnosis and therapy requires monitoring patient activity using various body sensors. Sensor data generated during personalized exercises or tasks may be too specific or inadequate to be evaluated using supervised methods such as classification. We propose multidimensional motif (MDM) discovery as a means for patient activity monitoring, since such motifs can capture repeating patterns across multiple dimensions of the data, and can serve as conformance indicators. Previous studies pertaining to mining MDMs have proposed approaches that lack the capability of concurrently processing multiple dimensions, thus limiting their utility in online scenarios. In this paper, we propose an efficient real-time approach to MDM discovery in body sensor generated time series data for monitoring performance of patients during therapy. We present two alternative models for MDMs based on motif co-occurrences and temporal ordering among motifs across multiple dimensions, with detailed formulation of the concepts proposed. The proposed method uses an efficient hashing based record to enable speedy update and retrieval of motif sets, and identification of MDMs. Performance evaluation using synthetic and real body sensor data in unsupervised motif discovery tasks shows that the approach is effective for (a) concurrent processing of multidimensional time series information suitable for real-time applications, (b) finding unknown naturally occurring patterns with minimal delay, and

  13. A highly conserved interaction involving the middle residue of the SXN active-site motif is crucial for function of class B penicillin-binding proteins: mutational and computational analysis of PBP 2 from N. gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed

    Tomberg, Joshua; Temple, Brenda; Fedarovich, Alena; Davies, Christopher; Nicholas, Robert A

    2012-04-03

    Insertion of an aspartate residue at position 345a in penicillin-binding protein 2 (PBP 2), which lowers the rate of penicillin acylation by ~6-fold, is commonly observed in penicillin-resistant strains of Neisseria gonorrhoeae. Here, we show that insertions of other amino acids also lower the penicillin acylation rate of PBP 2, but none supported growth of N. gonorrhoeae, indicating loss of essential transpeptidase activity. The Asp345a mutation likely acts by altering the interaction between its adjacent residue, Asp346, in the β2a-β2d hairpin loop and Ser363, the middle residue of the SXN active site motif. Because the adjacent aspartate creates ambiguity in the position of the insertion, we also examined if insertions at position 346a could confer decreased susceptibility to penicillin. However, only aspartate insertions were identified, indicating that only an Asp-Asp couple can confer resistance and retain transpeptidase function. The importance of the Asp346-Ser363 interaction was assessed by mutation of each residue to Ala. Although both mutants lowered the acylation rate of penicillin G by 5-fold, neither could support growth of N. gonorrhoeae, again indicating loss of transpeptidase function. Interaction between a residue in the equivalent of the β2a-β2d hairpin loop and the middle residue of the SXN motif is observed in crystal structures of other Class B PBPs, and its importance is also supported by multisequence alignments. Overall, these results suggest that this conserved interaction can be manipulated (e.g., by insertion) to lower the acylation rate by β-lactam antibiotics and increase resistance, but only if essential transpeptidase activity is preserved.

  14. The N-terminus region of the putative C2H2 transcription factor Ada1 harbors a species-specific activation motif that regulates asexual reproduction in Fusarium verticillioides.

    PubMed

    Malapi-Wight, Martha; Kim, Jung-Eun; Shim, Won-Bo

    2014-01-01

    Fusarium verticillioides is an important plant pathogenic fungus causing maize ear and stalk rots. In addition, the fungus is directly associated with fumonisin contamination of food and feeds. Here, we report the functional characterization of Ada1, a putative Cys2-His2 zinc finger transcription factor with a high level of similarity to Aspergillus nidulans FlbC, which is required for the activation of the key regulator of conidiation brlA. ADA1 is predicted to encode a protein with two DNA binding motifs at the C terminus and a putative activator domain at the N terminus region. Deletion of the flbC gene in A. nidulans results in "fluffy" cotton-like colonies, with a defect in transition from vegetative growth to asexual development. In this study we show that Ada1 plays a key role in asexual development in F. verticillioides. Conidia production was significantly reduced in the knockout mutant (Δada1), in which aberrant conidia and conidiophores were also observed. We identified genes that are predicted to be downstream of ADA1, based on A. nidulans conidiation signaling pathway. Among them, the deletion of stuA homologue, FvSTUA, resulted in near absence of conidia production. To further investigate the functional conservation of this transcription factor, we complemented the Δada1 strain with A. nidulans flbC, F. verticillioides ADA1, and chimeric constructs. A. nidulans flbC failed to restore conidia production similar to the wild-type level. However, the Ada1N-terminal domain, which contains a putative activator, fused to A. nidulans FlbC C-terminal motif successfully complemented the Δada1 mutant. Taken together, Ada1 is an important transcriptional regulator of asexual development in F. verticillioides and that the N-terminus domain is critical for proper function of this transcription factor.

  15. Neural Circuits: Male Mating Motifs.

    PubMed

    Benton, Richard

    2015-09-02

    Characterizing microcircuit motifs in intact nervous systems is essential to relate neural computations to behavior. In this issue of Neuron, Clowney et al. (2015) identify recurring, parallel feedforward excitatory and inhibitory pathways in male Drosophila's courtship circuitry, which might explain decisive mate choice.

  16. Decreased RNA-binding motif 5 expression is associated with tumor progression in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Takahiko; Ishida, Junich; Shimizu, Yuichi; Kawakami, Hiroshi; Suda, Goki; Muranaka, Tetsuhito; Komatsu, Yoshito; Asaka, Masahiro; Sakamoto, Naoya

    2017-03-01

    RNA-binding motif 5 is a putative tumor suppressor gene that modulates cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. We recently demonstrated that RNA-binding motif 5 inhibits cell growth through the p53 pathway. This study evaluated the clinical significance of RNA-binding motif 5 expression in gastric cancer and the effects of altered RNA-binding motif 5 expression on cancer biology in gastric cancer cells. RNA-binding motif 5 protein expression was evaluated by immunohistochemistry using the surgical specimens of 106 patients with gastric cancer. We analyzed the relationships of RNA-binding motif 5 expression with clinicopathological parameters and patient prognosis. We further explored the effects of RNA-binding motif 5 downregulation with short hairpin RNA on cell growth and p53 signaling in MKN45 gastric cancer cells. Immunohistochemistry revealed that RNA-binding motif 5 expression was decreased in 29 of 106 (27.4%) gastric cancer specimens. Decreased RNA-binding motif 5 expression was correlated with histological differentiation, depth of tumor infiltration, nodal metastasis, tumor-node-metastasis stage, and prognosis. RNA-binding motif 5 silencing enhanced gastric cancer cell proliferation and decreased p53 transcriptional activity in reporter gene assays. Conversely, restoration of RNA-binding motif 5 expression suppressed cell growth and recovered p53 transactivation in RNA-binding motif 5-silenced cells. Furthermore, RNA-binding motif 5 silencing reduced the messenger RNA and protein expression of the p53 target gene p21. Our results suggest that RNA-binding motif 5 downregulation is involved in gastric cancer progression and that RNA-binding motif 5 behaves as a tumor suppressor gene in gastric cancer.

  17. Activation of constitutive 5-hydroxytryptamine(1B) receptor by a series of mutations in the BBXXB motif: positioning of the third intracellular loop distal junction and its G(o)alpha protein interactions.

    PubMed Central

    Pauwels, P J; Gouble, A; Wurch, T

    1999-01-01

    Constitutive activity of the recombinant human 5-hydroxytryptamine(1B) (5-HT(1B)) receptor (RC code 2.1.5HT.01.B) was investigated by mutagenesis of the BBXXB motif (in which B represents a basic residue and X a non-basic residue) located in the C-terminal portion of the third intracellular loop. In contrast with wild-type 5-HT(1B) receptors, three receptor mutants (Thr(313)-->Lys, Thr(313)-->Arg and Thr(313)-->Gln) increased their agonist-independent guanosine 5'-[gamma-[(35)S]thio]triphosphate binding response by 26-41%. This activity represented approx. 30% of the maximal response induced by 5-HT and could be reversed by the inverse agonists methiothepin and 3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-4-hydroxy-N-(4-pyridin-4-yl phenyl)-benzenamide (GR 55562). Enhanced agonist-independent and agonist-dependent 5-HT(1B) receptor activation was provided by co-expression of a pertussis toxin-resistant rat G(o)alpha Cys(351)-->Ile protein. The wild-type 5-HT(1B) receptor displayed a doubling in basal activity, whereas a spectrum of enhanced basal activities (313-571%) was observed with a series of diverse amino acid substitutions (isoleucine, glycine, asparagine, alanine, lysine, phenylalanine, glutamine and arginine) at the 5-HT(1B) receptor position 313 in the presence of pertussis toxin (100 ng/ml). Consequently, the constitutive 5-HT(1B) receptor activity can be modulated by the mutation of Thr(313), and displays a graded range between 11% and 59% of maximal 5-HT(1B) receptor activation by 5-HT. No clear pattern is apparent in the framework of traditionally cited amino acid characteristics (i.e. residue size, charge or hydrophobicity) to explain the observed constitutive activities. The various amino acid substitutions that yielded enhanced activity are unlikely to make similar intramolecular interactions within the 5-HT(1B) receptor. It is hypothesized that the positioning of the junction between the third intracellular loop and transmembrane domain VI is altered by mutation of

  18. Localization of the labile disulfide bond between SU and TM of the murine leukemia virus envelope protein complex to a highly conserved CWLC motif in SU that resembles the active-site sequence of thiol-disulfide exchange enzymes.

    PubMed Central

    Pinter, A; Kopelman, R; Li, Z; Kayman, S C; Sanders, D A

    1997-01-01

    Previous studies have indicated that the surface (SU) and transmembrane (TM) subunits of the envelope protein (Env) of murine leukemia viruses (MuLVs) are joined by a labile disulfide bond that can be stabilized by treatment of virions with thiol-specific reagents. In the present study this observation was extended to the Envs of additional classes of MuLV, and the cysteines of SU involved in this linkage were mapped by proteolytic fragmentation analyses to the CWLC sequence present at the beginning of the C-terminal domain of SU. This sequence is highly conserved across a broad range of distantly related retroviruses and resembles the CXXC motif present at the active site of thiol-disulfide exchange enzymes. A model is proposed in which rearrangements of the SU-TM intersubunit disulfide linkage, mediated by the CWLC sequence, play roles in the assembly and function of the Env complex. PMID:9311907

  19. IQ-motif peptides as novel anti-microbial agents.

    PubMed

    McLean, Denise T F; Lundy, Fionnuala T; Timson, David J

    2013-04-01

    The IQ-motif is an amphipathic, often positively charged, α-helical, calmodulin binding sequence found in a number of eukaryote signalling, transport and cytoskeletal proteins. They share common biophysical characteristics with established, cationic α-helical antimicrobial peptides, such as the human cathelicidin LL-37. Therefore, we tested eight peptides encoding the sequences of IQ-motifs derived from the human cytoskeletal scaffolding proteins IQGAP2 and IQGAP3. Some of these peptides were able to inhibit the growth of Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus with minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC) comparable to LL-37. In addition some IQ-motifs had activity against the fungus Candida albicans. This antimicrobial activity is combined with low haemolytic activity (comparable to, or lower than, that of LL-37). Those IQ-motifs with anti-microbial activity tended to be able to bind to lipopolysaccharide. Some of these were also able to permeabilise the cell membranes of both Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria. These results demonstrate that IQ-motifs are viable lead sequences for the identification and optimisation of novel anti-microbial peptides. Thus, further investigation of the anti-microbial properties of this diverse group of sequences is merited.

  20. Interconnected Network Motifs Control Podocyte Morphology and Kidney Function

    PubMed Central

    Azeloglu, Evren U.; Hardy, Simon V.; Eungdamrong, Narat John; Chen, Yibang; Jayaraman, Gomathi; Chuang, Peter Y.; Fang, Wei; Xiong, Huabao; Neves, Susana R.; Jain, Mohit R.; Li, Hong; Ma’ayan, Avi; Gordon, Ronald E.; He, John Cijiang; Iyengar, Ravi

    2014-01-01

    Podocytes are kidney cells with specialized morphology that is required for glomerular filtration. Diseases, such as diabetes, or drug exposure that causes disruption of the podocyte foot process morphology results in kidney pathophysiology. Proteomic analysis of glomeruli isolated from rats with puromycin-induced kidney disease and control rats indicated that protein kinase A (PKA), which is activated by adenosine 3′,5′-monophosphate (cAMP), is a key regulator of podocyte morphology and function. In podocytes, cAMP signaling activates cAMP response element–binding protein (CREB) to enhance expression of the gene encoding a differentiation marker, synaptopodin, a protein that associates with actin and promotes its bundling. We constructed and experimentally verified a β-adrenergic receptor–driven network with multiple feedback and feedforward motifs that controls CREB activity. To determine how the motifs interacted to regulate gene expression, we mapped multicompartment dynamical models, including information about protein subcellular localization, onto the network topology using Petri net formalisms. These computational analyses indicated that the juxtaposition of multiple feedback and feedforward motifs enabled the prolonged CREB activation necessary for synaptopodin expression and actin bundling. Drug-induced modulation of these motifs in diseased rats led to recovery of normal morphology and physiological function in vivo. Thus, analysis of regulatory motifs using network dynamics can provide insights into pathophysiology that enable predictions for drug intervention strategies to treat kidney disease. PMID:24497609

  1. The Thiamin Pyrophosphate-Motif

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dominiak, Paulina M.; Ciszak, Ewa M.

    2003-01-01

    Using databases the authors have identified a common thiamin pyrophosphate (TPP)-motif in the family of functionally diverse TPP-dependent enzymes. This common motif consists of multimeric organization of subunits, two catalytic centers, common amino acid sequence, and specific contacts to provide a flip-flop, or alternate site, mechanism of action. Each catalytic center [PP:PYR] is formed at the interface of the PP-domain binding the magnesium ion, pyrophosphate and aminopyrimidine ring of TPP, and the PYR-domain binding the aminopyrimidine ring of that cofactor. A pair of these catalytic centers constitutes the catalytic core [PP:PYR]* within these enzymes. Analysis of the structural elements of this catalytic core reveals novel definition of the common amino acid sequences, which are GX@&(G)@XXGQ, and GDGX25-30 within the PP- domain, and the E&(G)@XXG@ within the PYR-domain, where Q, corresponds to a hydrophobic amino acid. This TPP-motif provides a novel tool for annotation of TPP-dependent enzymes useful in advancing functional proteomics.

  2. The Thiamin Pyrophosphate-Motif

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dominiak, P.; Ciszak, E.

    2003-01-01

    Using databases the authors have identified a common thiamin pyrophosphate (TPP)-motif in the family of functionally diverse TPP-dependent enzymes. This common motif consists of multimeric organization of subunits and two catalytic centers. Each catalytic center (PP:PYR) is formed at the interface of the PP-domain binding the magnesium ion, pyrophosphate and amhopyrimidine ring of TPP, and the PYR-domain binding the aminopyrimidine ring of that cofactor. A pair of these catalytic centers constitutes the catalytic core (PP:PYR)(sub 2) within these enzymes. Analysis of the structural elements of this catalytic core reveals novel definition of the common amino acid sequences, which are GXPhiX(sub 4)(G)PhiXXGQ and GDGX(sub 25-30)NN in the PP-domain, and the EX(sub 4)(G)PhiXXGPhi in the PYR-domain, where Phi corresponds to a hydrophobic amino acid. This TPP-motif provides a novel tool for annotation of TPP-dependent enzymes useful in advancing functional proteomics.

  3. Comprehensive discovery of DNA motifs in 349 human cells and tissues reveals new features of motifs.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yiyu; Li, Xiaoman; Hu, Haiyan

    2015-01-01

    Comprehensive motif discovery under experimental conditions is critical for the global understanding of gene regulation. To generate a nearly complete list of human DNA motifs under given conditions, we employed a novel approach to de novo discover significant co-occurring DNA motifs in 349 human DNase I hypersensitive site datasets. We predicted 845 to 1325 motifs in each dataset, for a total of 2684 non-redundant motifs. These 2684 motifs contained 54.02 to 75.95% of the known motifs in seven large collections including TRANSFAC. In each dataset, we also discovered 43 663 to 2 013 288 motif modules, groups of motifs with their binding sites co-occurring in a significant number of short DNA regions. Compared with known interacting transcription factors in eight resources, the predicted motif modules on average included 84.23% of known interacting motifs. We further showed new features of the predicted motifs, such as motifs enriched in proximal regions rarely overlapped with motifs enriched in distal regions, motifs enriched in 5' distal regions were often enriched in 3' distal regions, etc. Finally, we observed that the 2684 predicted motifs classified the cell or tissue types of the datasets with an accuracy of 81.29%. The resources generated in this study are available at http://server.cs.ucf.edu/predrem/.

  4. Synthetic Oligodeoxynucleotides Containing Multiple Telemeric TTAGGG Motifs Suppress Inflammasome Activity in Macrophages Subjected to Oxygen and Glucose Deprivation and Reduce Ischemic Brain Injury in Stroke-Prone Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jing; Mou, Yongshan; Bernstock, Joshua D; Klimanis, Dace; Wang, Sixian; Spatz, Maria; Maric, Dragan; Johnson, Kory; Klinman, Dennis M; Li, Xiaohong; Li, Xinhui; Hallenbeck, John M

    2015-01-01

    The immune system plays a fundamental role in both the development and pathobiology of stroke. Inflammasomes are multiprotein complexes that have come to be recognized as critical players in the inflammation that ultimately contributes to stroke severity. Inflammasomes recognize microbial and host-derived danger signals and activate caspase-1, which in turn controls the production of the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-1β. We have shown that A151, a synthetic oligodeoxynucleotide containing multiple telemeric TTAGGG motifs, reduces IL-1β production by activated bone marrow derived macrophages that have been subjected to oxygen-glucose deprivation and LPS stimulation. Further, we demonstrate that A151 reduces the maturation of caspase-1 and IL-1β, the levels of both the iNOS and NLRP3 proteins, and the depolarization of mitochondrial membrane potential within such cells. In addition, we have demonstrated that A151 reduces ischemic brain damage and NLRP3 mRNA levels in SHR-SP rats that have undergone permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion. These findings clearly suggest that the modulation of inflammasome activity via A151 may contribute to a reduction in pro-inflammatory cytokine production by macrophages subjected to conditions that model brain ischemia and modulate ischemic brain damage in an animal model of stroke. Therefore, modulation of ischemic pathobiology by A151 may have a role in the development of novel stroke prevention and therapeutic strategies.

  5. Systematic discovery and characterization of regulatory motifs in ENCODE TF binding experiments

    PubMed Central

    Kheradpour, Pouya; Kellis, Manolis

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in technology have led to a dramatic increase in the number of available transcription factor ChIP-seq and ChIP-chip data sets. Understanding the motif content of these data sets is an important step in understanding the underlying mechanisms of regulation. Here we provide a systematic motif analysis for 427 human ChIP-seq data sets using motifs curated from the literature and also discovered de novo using five established motif discovery tools. We use a systematic pipeline for calculating motif enrichment in each data set, providing a principled way for choosing between motif variants found in the literature and for flagging potentially problematic data sets. Our analysis confirms the known specificity of 41 of the 56 analyzed factor groups and reveals motifs of potential cofactors. We also use cell type-specific binding to find factors active in specific conditions. The resource we provide is accessible both for browsing a small number of factors and for performing large-scale systematic analyses. We provide motif matrices, instances and enrichments in each of the ENCODE data sets. The motifs discovered here have been used in parallel studies to validate the specificity of antibodies, understand cooperativity between data sets and measure the variation of motif binding across individuals and species. PMID:24335146

  6. A survey of DNA motif finding algorithms

    PubMed Central

    Das, Modan K; Dai, Ho-Kwok

    2007-01-01

    Background Unraveling the mechanisms that regulate gene expression is a major challenge in biology. An important task in this challenge is to identify regulatory elements, especially the binding sites in deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) for transcription factors. These binding sites are short DNA segments that are called motifs. Recent advances in genome sequence availability and in high-throughput gene expression analysis technologies have allowed for the development of computational methods for motif finding. As a result, a large number of motif finding algorithms have been implemented and applied to various motif models over the past decade. This survey reviews the latest developments in DNA motif finding algorithms. Results Earlier algorithms use promoter sequences of coregulated genes from single genome and search for statistically overrepresented motifs. Recent algorithms are designed to use phylogenetic footprinting or orthologous sequences and also an integrated approach where promoter sequences of coregulated genes and phylogenetic footprinting are used. All the algorithms studied have been reported to correctly detect the motifs that have been previously detected by laboratory experimental approaches, and some algorithms were able to find novel motifs. However, most of these motif finding algorithms have been shown to work successfully in yeast and other lower organisms, but perform significantly worse in higher organisms. Conclusion Despite considerable efforts to date, DNA motif finding remains a complex challenge for biologists and computer scientists. Researchers have taken many different approaches in developing motif discovery tools and the progress made in this area of research is very encouraging. Performance comparison of different motif finding tools and identification of the best tools have proven to be a difficult task because tools are designed based on algorithms and motif models that are diverse and complex and our incomplete understanding of

  7. Motif-directed redesign of enzyme specificity.

    PubMed

    Borgo, Benjamin; Havranek, James J

    2014-03-01

    Computational protein design relies on several approximations, including the use of fixed backbones and rotamers, to reduce protein design to a computationally tractable problem. However, allowing backbone and off-rotamer flexibility leads to more accurate designs and greater conformational diversity. Exhaustive sampling of this additional conformational space is challenging, and often impossible. Here, we report a computational method that utilizes a preselected library of native interactions to direct backbone flexibility to accommodate placement of these functional contacts. Using these native interaction modules, termed motifs, improves the likelihood that the interaction can be realized, provided that suitable backbone perturbations can be identified. Furthermore, it allows a directed search of the conformational space, reducing the sampling needed to find low energy conformations. We implemented the motif-based design algorithm in Rosetta, and tested the efficacy of this method by redesigning the substrate specificity of methionine aminopeptidase. In summary, native enzymes have evolved to catalyze a wide range of chemical reactions with extraordinary specificity. Computational enzyme design seeks to generate novel chemical activities by altering the target substrates of these existing enzymes. We have implemented a novel approach to redesign the specificity of an enzyme and demonstrated its effectiveness on a model system.

  8. Active site of the mRNA-capping enzyme guanylyltransferase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae: similarity to the nucleotidyl attachment motif of DNA and RNA ligases.

    PubMed Central

    Fresco, L D; Buratowski, S

    1994-01-01

    Nascent mRNA chains are capped at the 5' end by the addition of a guanylyl residue to form a G(5')ppp(5')N ... structure. During the capping reaction, the guanylyltransferase (GTP:mRNA guanylyltransferase, EC 2.7.7.50) is reversibly and covalently guanylylated. In this enzyme-GMP (E-GMP) intermediate, GMP is linked to the epsilon-amino group of a lysine residue via a phosphoamide bond. Lys-70 was identified as the GMP attachment site of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae guanylyltransferase (encoded by the CEG1 gene) by guanylylpeptide sequencing. CEG1 genes with substitutions at Lys-70 were unable to support viability in yeast and produced proteins that were not guanylylated in vitro. The CEG1 active site exhibits sequence similarity to the active sites of viral guanylyltransferases and polynucleotide ligases, suggesting similarity in the mechanisms of nucleotidyl transfer catalyzed by these enzymes. Images PMID:8022828

  9. A Minimal Cysteine Motif Required to Activate the SKOR K+ Channel of Arabidopsis by the Reactive Oxygen Species H2O2*

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Mata, Carlos; Wang, Jianwen; Gajdanowicz, Pawel; Gonzalez, Wendy; Hills, Adrian; Donald, Naomi; Riedelsberger, Janin; Amtmann, Anna; Dreyer, Ingo; Blatt, Michael R.

    2010-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are essential for development and stress signaling in plants. They contribute to plant defense against pathogens, regulate stomatal transpiration, and influence nutrient uptake and partitioning. Although both Ca2+ and K+ channels of plants are known to be affected, virtually nothing is known of the targets for ROS at a molecular level. Here we report that a single cysteine (Cys) residue within the Kv-like SKOR K+ channel of Arabidopsis thaliana is essential for channel sensitivity to the ROS H2O2. We show that H2O2 rapidly enhanced current amplitude and activation kinetics of heterologously expressed SKOR, and the effects were reversed by the reducing agent dithiothreitol (DTT). Both H2O2 and DTT were active at the outer face of the membrane and current enhancement was strongly dependent on membrane depolarization, consistent with a H2O2-sensitive site on the SKOR protein that is exposed to the outside when the channel is in the open conformation. Cys substitutions identified a single residue, Cys168 located within the S3 α-helix of the voltage sensor complex, to be essential for sensitivity to H2O2. The same Cys residue was a primary determinant for current block by covalent Cys S-methioylation with aqueous methanethiosulfonates. These, and additional data identify Cys168 as a critical target for H2O2, and implicate ROS-mediated control of the K+ channel in regulating mineral nutrient partitioning within the plant. PMID:20605786

  10. The Thiamine-Pyrophosphate-Motif

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ciszak, Ewa; Dominiak, Paulina

    2004-01-01

    Thiamin pyrophosphate (TPP), a derivative of vitamin B1, is a cofactor for enzymes performing catalysis in pathways of energy production including the well known decarboxylation of a-keto acid dehydrogenases followed by transketolation. TPP-dependent enzymes constitute a structurally and functionally diverse group exhibiting multimeric subunit organization, multiple domains and two chemically equivalent catalytic centers. Annotation of functional TPP-dependcnt enzymes, therefore, has not been trivial due to low sequence similarity related to this complex organization. Our approach to analysis of structures of known TPP-dependent enzymes reveals for the first time features common to this group, which we have termed the TPP-motif. The TPP-motif consists of specific spatial arrangements of structural elements and their specific contacts to provide for a flip-flop, or alternate site, enzymatic mechanism of action. Analysis of structural elements entrained in the flip-flop action displayed by TPP-dependent enzymes reveals a novel definition of the common amino acid sequences. These sequences allow for annotation of TPP-dependent enzymes, thus advancing functional proteomics. Further details of three-dimensional structures of TPP-dependent enzymes will be discussed.

  11. SREBP2 Activation Induces Hepatic Long-chain Acyl-CoA Synthetase 1 (ACSL1) Expression in Vivo and in Vitro through a Sterol Regulatory Element (SRE) Motif of the ACSL1 C-promoter.

    PubMed

    Singh, Amar Bahadur; Kan, Chin Fung Kelvin; Dong, Bin; Liu, Jingwen

    2016-03-04

    Long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase 1 (ACSL1) plays a key role in fatty acid metabolism. To identify novel transcriptional modulators of ACSL1, we examined ACSL1 expression in liver tissues of hamsters fed a normal diet, a high fat diet, or a high cholesterol and high fat diet (HCHFD). Feeding hamsters HCHFD markedly reduced hepatic Acsl1 mRNA and protein levels as well as acyl-CoA synthetase activity. Decreases in Acsl1 expression strongly correlated with reductions in hepatic Srebp2 mRNA level and mature Srebp2 protein abundance. Conversely, administration of rosuvastatin (RSV) to hamsters increased hepatic Acsl1 expression. These new findings were reproduced in mice treated with RSV or fed the HCHFD. Furthermore, the RSV induction of acyl-CoA activity in mouse liver resulted in increases in plasma and hepatic cholesterol ester concentrations and reductions in free cholesterol amounts. Investigations on different ACSL1 transcript variants in HepG2 cells revealed that the mRNA expression of C-ACSL1 was specifically regulated by the sterol regulatory element (SRE)-binding protein (SREBP) pathway, and RSV treatment increased the C-ACSL1 abundance from a minor mRNA species to an abundant transcript. We analyzed 5'-flanking sequence of exon 1C of the human ACSL1 gene and identified one putative SRE site. By performing a promoter activity assay and DNA binding assays, we firmly demonstrated the key role of this SRE motif in SREBP2-mediated activation of C-ACSL1 gene transcription. Finally, we demonstrated that knockdown of endogenous SREBP2 in HepG2 cells lowered ACSL1 mRNA and protein levels. Altogether, this work discovered an unprecedented link between ACSL1 and SREBP2 via the specific regulation of the C-ACSL1 transcript.

  12. SREBP2 Activation Induces Hepatic Long-chain Acyl-CoA Synthetase 1 (ACSL1) Expression in Vivo and in Vitro through a Sterol Regulatory Element (SRE) Motif of the ACSL1 C-promoter*

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Amar Bahadur; Kan, Chin Fung Kelvin; Dong, Bin; Liu, Jingwen

    2016-01-01

    Long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase 1 (ACSL1) plays a key role in fatty acid metabolism. To identify novel transcriptional modulators of ACSL1, we examined ACSL1 expression in liver tissues of hamsters fed a normal diet, a high fat diet, or a high cholesterol and high fat diet (HCHFD). Feeding hamsters HCHFD markedly reduced hepatic Acsl1 mRNA and protein levels as well as acyl-CoA synthetase activity. Decreases in Acsl1 expression strongly correlated with reductions in hepatic Srebp2 mRNA level and mature Srebp2 protein abundance. Conversely, administration of rosuvastatin (RSV) to hamsters increased hepatic Acsl1 expression. These new findings were reproduced in mice treated with RSV or fed the HCHFD. Furthermore, the RSV induction of acyl-CoA activity in mouse liver resulted in increases in plasma and hepatic cholesterol ester concentrations and reductions in free cholesterol amounts. Investigations on different ACSL1 transcript variants in HepG2 cells revealed that the mRNA expression of C-ACSL1 was specifically regulated by the sterol regulatory element (SRE)-binding protein (SREBP) pathway, and RSV treatment increased the C-ACSL1 abundance from a minor mRNA species to an abundant transcript. We analyzed 5′-flanking sequence of exon 1C of the human ACSL1 gene and identified one putative SRE site. By performing a promoter activity assay and DNA binding assays, we firmly demonstrated the key role of this SRE motif in SREBP2-mediated activation of C-ACSL1 gene transcription. Finally, we demonstrated that knockdown of endogenous SREBP2 in HepG2 cells lowered ACSL1 mRNA and protein levels. Altogether, this work discovered an unprecedented link between ACSL1 and SREBP2 via the specific regulation of the C-ACSL1 transcript. PMID:26728456

  13. Protein Chaperones Q8ZP25_SALTY from Salmonella Typhimurium and HYAE_ECOLI from Escherichia coli Exhibit Thioredoxin-like Structures Despite Lack of Canonical Thioredoxin Active Site Sequence Motif

    SciTech Connect

    Parish, D.; Benach, J; Liu, G; Singarapu, K; Xiao, R; Acton, T; Hunt, J; Montelione, G; Szyperski, T; et. al.

    2008-01-01

    The structure of the 142-residue protein Q8ZP25 SALTY encoded in the genome of Salmonella typhimurium LT2 was determined independently by NMR and X-ray crystallography, and the structure of the 140-residue protein HYAE ECOLI encoded in the genome of Escherichia coli was determined by NMR. The two proteins belong to Pfam (Finn et al. 34:D247-D251, 2006) PF07449, which currently comprises 50 members, and belongs itself to the 'thioredoxin-like clan'. However, protein HYAE ECOLI and the other proteins of Pfam PF07449 do not contain the canonical Cys-X-X-Cys active site sequence motif of thioredoxin. Protein HYAE ECOLI was previously classified as a (NiFe) hydrogenase-1 specific chaperone interacting with the twin-arginine translocation (Tat) signal peptide. The structures presented here exhibit the expected thioredoxin-like fold and support the view that members of Pfam family PF07449 specifically interact with Tat signal peptides.

  14. Human Cannabinoid Receptor 2 Ligand-Interaction Motif: Transmembrane Helix 2 Cysteine, C2.59(89), as Determinant of Classical Cannabinoid Agonist Activity and Binding Pose.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Han; Peng, Yan; Halikhedkar, Aneetha; Fan, Pusheng; Janero, David R; Thakur, Ganesh A; Mercier, Richard W; Sun, Xin; Ma, Xiaoyu; Makriyannis, Alexandros

    2017-03-01

    Cannabinoid receptor 2 (CB2R)-dependent signaling is implicated in neuronal physiology and immune surveillance by brain microglia. Selective CB2R agonists hold therapeutic promise for inflammatory and other neurological disorders. Information on human CB2R (hCB2R) ligand-binding and functional domains is needed to inform the rational design and optimization of candidate druglike hCB2R agonists. Prior demonstration that hCB2R transmembrane helix 2 (TMH2) cysteine C2.59(89) reacts with small-molecule methanethiosulfonates showed that this cysteine residue is accessible to sulfhydryl derivatization reagents. We now report the design and application of two novel, pharmacologically active, high-affinity molecular probes, AM4073 and AM4099, as chemical reporters to interrogate directly the interaction of classical cannabinoid agonists with hCB2R cysteine residues. AM4073 has one electrophilic isothiocyanate (NCS) functionality at the C9 position of its cyclohexenyl C-ring, whereas AM4099 has NCS groups at that position and at the terminus of its aromatic A-ring C3 side chain. Pretreatment of wild-type hCB2R with either probe reduced subsequent [(3)H]CP55,940 specific binding by ∼60%. Conservative serine substitution of any hCB2R TMH cysteine residue except C2.59(89) did not affect the reduction of [(3)H]CP55,940 specific binding by either probe, suggesting that AM4073 and AM4099 interact irreversibly with this TMH2 cysteine. In contrast, AM841, an exceptionally potent hCB2R megagonist and direct AM4073/4099 congener bearing a single electrophilic NCS group at the terminus of its C3 side chain, had been demonstrated to bind covalently to TMH6 cysteine C6.47(257) and not C2.59(89). Molecular modeling indicates that the AM4073-hCB2R* interaction at C2.59(89) orients this classical cannabinoid away from TMH6 and toward the TMH2-TMH3 interface in the receptor's hydrophobic binding pocket, whereas the AM841-hCB2R* interaction at C6.47(257) favors agonist orientation toward

  15. Redemptive Rhetoric: The Continuity Motif in the Rhetoric of Right to Life.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solomon, Martha

    1980-01-01

    Traces the use of the "continuity" motif in the Right to Life movement's rhetoric and its influence on the depiction of the abortion controversy. Analyzes how the motif functions rhetorically to aid the movement in defining its activities and involvement. (PD)

  16. Combinatorial motif analysis of regulatory gene expression in Mafb deficient macrophages

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Deficiency of the transcription factor MafB, which is normally expressed in macrophages, can underlie cellular dysfunction associated with a range of autoimmune diseases and arteriosclerosis. MafB has important roles in cell differentiation and regulation of target gene expression; however, the mechanisms of this regulation and the identities of other transcription factors with which MafB interacts remain uncertain. Bioinformatics methods provide a valuable approach for elucidating the nature of these interactions with transcriptional regulatory elements from a large number of DNA sequences. In particular, identification of patterns of co-occurrence of regulatory cis-elements (motifs) offers a robust approach. Results Here, the directional relationships among several functional motifs were evaluated using the Log-linear Graphical Model (LGM) after extraction and search for evolutionarily conserved motifs. This analysis highlighted GATA-1 motifs and 5’AT-rich half Maf recognition elements (MAREs) in promoter regions of 18 genes that were down-regulated in Mafb deficient macrophages. GATA-1 motifs and MafB motifs could regulate expression of these genes in both a negative and positive manner, respectively. The validity of this conclusion was tested with data from a luciferase assay that used a C1qa promoter construct carrying both the GATA-1 motifs and MAREs. GATA-1 was found to inhibit the activity of the C1qa promoter with the GATA-1 motifs and MafB motifs. Conclusions These observations suggest that both the GATA-1 motifs and MafB motifs are important for lineage specific expression of C1qa. In addition, these findings show that analysis of combinations of evolutionarily conserved motifs can be successfully used to identify patterns of gene regulation. PMID:22784578

  17. MSDmotif: exploring protein sites and motifs

    PubMed Central

    Golovin, Adel; Henrick, Kim

    2008-01-01

    Background Protein structures have conserved features – motifs, which have a sufficient influence on the protein function. These motifs can be found in sequence as well as in 3D space. Understanding of these fragments is essential for 3D structure prediction, modelling and drug-design. The Protein Data Bank (PDB) is the source of this information however present search tools have limited 3D options to integrate protein sequence with its 3D structure. Results We describe here a web application for querying the PDB for ligands, binding sites, small 3D structural and sequence motifs and the underlying database. Novel algorithms for chemical fragments, 3D motifs, ϕ/ψ sequences, super-secondary structure motifs and for small 3D structural motif associations searches are incorporated. The interface provides functionality for visualization, search criteria creation, sequence and 3D multiple alignment options. MSDmotif is an integrated system where a results page is also a search form. A set of motif statistics is available for analysis. This set includes molecule and motif binding statistics, distribution of motif sequences, occurrence of an amino-acid within a motif, correlation of amino-acids side-chain charges within a motif and Ramachandran plots for each residue. The binding statistics are presented in association with properties that include a ligand fragment library. Access is also provided through the distributed Annotation System (DAS) protocol. An additional entry point facilitates XML requests with XML responses. Conclusion MSDmotif is unique by combining chemical, sequence and 3D data in a single search engine with a range of search and visualisation options. It provides multiple views of data found in the PDB archive for exploring protein structures. PMID:18637174

  18. Single promoters as regulatory network motifs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zopf, Christopher; Maheshri, Narendra

    2012-02-01

    At eukaryotic promoters, chromatin can influence the relationship between a gene's expression and transcription factor (TF) activity. This additional complexity might allow single promoters to exhibit dynamical behavior commonly attributed to regulatory motifs involving multiple genes. We investigate the role of promoter chromatin architecture in the kinetics of gene activation using a previously described set of promoter variants based on the phosphate-regulated PHO5 promoter in S. cerevisiae. Accurate quantitative measurement of transcription activation kinetics is facilitated by a controllable and observable TF input to a promoter of interest leading to an observable expression output in single cells. We find the particular architecture of these promoters can result in a significant delay in activation, filtering of noisy TF signals, and a memory of previous activation -- dynamical behaviors reminiscent of a feed-forward loop but only requiring a single promoter. We suggest this is a consequence of chromatin transactions at the promoter, likely passing through a long-lived ``primed'' state between its inactive and competent states. Finally, we show our experimental setup can be generalized as a ``gene oscilloscope'' to probe the kinetics of heterologous promoter architectures.

  19. A survey of motif finding Web tools for detecting binding site motifs in ChIP-Seq data.

    PubMed

    Tran, Ngoc Tam L; Huang, Chun-Hsi

    2014-02-20

    ChIP-Seq (chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing) has provided the advantage for finding motifs as ChIP-Seq experiments narrow down the motif finding to binding site locations. Recent motif finding tools facilitate the motif detection by providing user-friendly Web interface. In this work, we reviewed nine motif finding Web tools that are capable for detecting binding site motifs in ChIP-Seq data. We showed each motif finding Web tool has its own advantages for detecting motifs that other tools may not discover. We recommended the users to use multiple motif finding Web tools that implement different algorithms for obtaining significant motifs, overlapping resemble motifs, and non-overlapping motifs. Finally, we provided our suggestions for future development of motif finding Web tool that better assists researchers for finding motifs in ChIP-Seq data.

  20. Sampling Motif-Constrained Ensembles of Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Rico; Leitão, Jorge C.; Peixoto, Tiago P.; Altmann, Eduardo G.

    2015-10-01

    The statistical significance of network properties is conditioned on null models which satisfy specified properties but that are otherwise random. Exponential random graph models are a principled theoretical framework to generate such constrained ensembles, but which often fail in practice, either due to model inconsistency or due to the impossibility to sample networks from them. These problems affect the important case of networks with prescribed clustering coefficient or number of small connected subgraphs (motifs). In this Letter we use the Wang-Landau method to obtain a multicanonical sampling that overcomes both these problems. We sample, in polynomial time, networks with arbitrary degree sequences from ensembles with imposed motifs counts. Applying this method to social networks, we investigate the relation between transitivity and homophily, and we quantify the correlation between different types of motifs, finding that single motifs can explain up to 60% of the variation of motif profiles.

  1. Computational generation and screening of RNA motifs in large nucleotide sequence pools

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Namhee; Izzo, Joseph A.; Elmetwaly, Shereef; Gan, Hin Hark; Schlick, Tamar

    2010-01-01

    Although identification of active motifs in large random sequence pools is central to RNA in vitro selection, no systematic computational equivalent of this process has yet been developed. We develop a computational approach that combines target pool generation, motif scanning and motif screening using secondary structure analysis for applications to 1012–1014-sequence pools; large pool sizes are made possible using program redesign and supercomputing resources. We use the new protocol to search for aptamer and ribozyme motifs in pools up to experimental pool size (1014 sequences). We show that motif scanning, structure matching and flanking sequence analysis, respectively, reduce the initial sequence pool by 6–8, 1–2 and 1 orders of magnitude, consistent with the rare occurrence of active motifs in random pools. The final yields match the theoretical yields from probability theory for simple motifs and overestimate experimental yields, which constitute lower bounds, for aptamers because screening analyses beyond secondary structure information are not considered systematically. We also show that designed pools using our nucleotide transition probability matrices can produce higher yields for RNA ligase motifs than random pools. Our methods for generating, analyzing and designing large pools can help improve RNA design via simulation of aspects of in vitro selection. PMID:20448026

  2. Efficient motif search in ranked lists and applications to variable gap motifs.

    PubMed

    Leibovich, Limor; Yakhini, Zohar

    2012-07-01

    Sequence elements, at all levels-DNA, RNA and protein, play a central role in mediating molecular recognition and thereby molecular regulation and signaling. Studies that focus on -measuring and investigating sequence-based recognition make use of statistical and computational tools, including approaches to searching sequence motifs. State-of-the-art motif searching tools are limited in their coverage and ability to address large motif spaces. We develop and present statistical and algorithmic approaches that take as input ranked lists of sequences and return significant motifs. The efficiency of our approach, based on suffix trees, allows searches over motif spaces that are not covered by existing tools. This includes searching variable gap motifs-two half sites with a flexible length gap in between-and searching long motifs over large alphabets. We used our approach to analyze several high-throughput measurement data sets and report some validation results as well as novel suggested motifs and motif refinements. We suggest a refinement of the known estrogen receptor 1 motif in humans, where we observe gaps other than three nucleotides that also serve as significant recognition sites, as well as a variable length motif related to potential tyrosine phosphorylation.

  3. Improved K-means clustering algorithm for exploring local protein sequence motifs representing common structural property.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Wei; Altun, Gulsah; Harrison, Robert; Tai, Phang C; Pan, Yi

    2005-09-01

    Information about local protein sequence motifs is very important to the analysis of biologically significant conserved regions of protein sequences. These conserved regions can potentially determine the diverse conformation and activities of proteins. In this work, recurring sequence motifs of proteins are explored with an improved K-means clustering algorithm on a new dataset. The structural similarity of these recurring sequence clusters to produce sequence motifs is studied in order to evaluate the relationship between sequence motifs and their structures. To the best of our knowledge, the dataset used by our research is the most updated dataset among similar studies for sequence motifs. A new greedy initialization method for the K-means algorithm is proposed to improve traditional K-means clustering techniques. The new initialization method tries to choose suitable initial points, which are well separated and have the potential to form high-quality clusters. Our experiments indicate that the improved K-means algorithm satisfactorily increases the percentage of sequence segments belonging to clusters with high structural similarity. Careful comparison of sequence motifs obtained by the improved and traditional algorithms also suggests that the improved K-means clustering algorithm may discover some relatively weak and subtle sequence motifs, which are undetectable by the traditional K-means algorithms. Many biochemical tests reported in the literature show that these sequence motifs are biologically meaningful. Experimental results also indicate that the improved K-means algorithm generates more detailed sequence motifs representing common structures than previous research. Furthermore, these motifs are universally conserved sequence patterns across protein families, overcoming some weak points of other popular sequence motifs. The satisfactory result of the experiment suggests that this new K-means algorithm may be applied to other areas of bioinformatics

  4. DNA containing CpG motifs induces angiogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Mei; Klinman, Dennis M.; Gierynska, Malgorzata; Rouse, Barry T.

    2002-06-01

    New blood vessel formation in the cornea is an essential step in the pathogenesis of a blinding immunoinflammatory reaction caused by ocular infection with herpes simplex virus (HSV). By using a murine corneal micropocket assay, we found that HSV DNA (which contains a significant excess of potentially bioactive "CpG" motifs when compared with mammalian DNA) induces angiogenesis. Moreover, synthetic oligodeoxynucleotides containing CpG motifs attract inflammatory cells and stimulate the release of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), which in turn triggers new blood vessel formation. In vitro, CpG DNA induces the J774A.1 murine macrophage cell line to produce VEGF. In vivo CpG-induced angiogenesis was blocked by the administration of anti-mVEGF Ab or the inclusion of "neutralizing" oligodeoxynucleotides that specifically oppose the stimulatory activity of CpG DNA. These findings establish that DNA containing bioactive CpG motifs induces angiogenesis, and suggest that CpG motifs in HSV DNA may contribute to the blinding lesions of stromal keratitis.

  5. The dimerization motif of the glycophorin A transmembrane segment in membranes: importance of glycine residues.

    PubMed

    Brosig, B; Langosch, D

    1998-04-01

    The glycophorin A transmembrane segment homo-dimerizes to a right-handed pair of alpha-helices. Here, we identified the amino acid motif mediating this interaction within a natural membrane environment. Critical residues were grafted onto two different hydrophobic host sequences in a stepwise manner and self-assembly of the hybrid sequences was determined with the ToxR transcription activator system. Our results show that the motif LIxxGxxxGxxxT elicits a level of self-association equivalent to that of the original glycophorin A transmembrane segment. This motif is very similar to the one previously established in detergent solution. Interestingly, the central GxxxG motif by itself already induced strong self-assembly of host sequences and the three-residue spacing between both glycines proved to be optimal for the interaction. The GxxxG element thus appears to be the most crucial part of the interaction motif.

  6. The dimerization motif of the glycophorin A transmembrane segment in membranes: importance of glycine residues.

    PubMed Central

    Brosig, B.; Langosch, D.

    1998-01-01

    The glycophorin A transmembrane segment homo-dimerizes to a right-handed pair of alpha-helices. Here, we identified the amino acid motif mediating this interaction within a natural membrane environment. Critical residues were grafted onto two different hydrophobic host sequences in a stepwise manner and self-assembly of the hybrid sequences was determined with the ToxR transcription activator system. Our results show that the motif LIxxGxxxGxxxT elicits a level of self-association equivalent to that of the original glycophorin A transmembrane segment. This motif is very similar to the one previously established in detergent solution. Interestingly, the central GxxxG motif by itself already induced strong self-assembly of host sequences and the three-residue spacing between both glycines proved to be optimal for the interaction. The GxxxG element thus appears to be the most crucial part of the interaction motif. PMID:9568912

  7. VARUN: discovering extensible motifs under saturation constraints.

    PubMed

    Apostolico, Alberto; Comin, Matteo; Parida, Laxmi

    2010-01-01

    The discovery of motifs in biosequences is frequently torn between the rigidity of the model on one hand and the abundance of candidates on the other hand. In particular, motifs that include wild cards or "don't cares" escalate exponentially with their number, and this gets only worse if a don't care is allowed to stretch up to some prescribed maximum length. In this paper, a notion of extensible motif in a sequence is introduced and studied, which tightly combines the structure of the motif pattern, as described by its syntactic specification, with the statistical measure of its occurrence count. It is shown that a combination of appropriate saturation conditions and the monotonicity of probabilistic scores over regions of constant frequency afford us significant parsimony in the generation and testing of candidate overrepresented motifs. A suite of software programs called Varun is described, implementing the discovery of extensible motifs of the type considered. The merits of the method are then documented by results obtained in a variety of experiments primarily targeting protein sequence families. Of equal importance seems the fact that the sets of all surprising motifs returned in each experiment are extracted faster and come in much more manageable sizes than would be obtained in the absence of saturation constraints.

  8. Stochastic motif extraction using hidden Markov model

    SciTech Connect

    Fujiwara, Yukiko; Asogawa, Minoru; Konagaya, Akihiko

    1994-12-31

    In this paper, we study the application of an HMM (hidden Markov model) to the problem of representing protein sequences by a stochastic motif. A stochastic protein motif represents the small segments of protein sequences that have a certain function or structure. The stochastic motif, represented by an HMM, has conditional probabilities to deal with the stochastic nature of the motif. This HMM directive reflects the characteristics of the motif, such as a protein periodical structure or grouping. In order to obtain the optimal HMM, we developed the {open_quotes}iterative duplication method{close_quotes} for HMM topology learning. It starts from a small fully-connected network and iterates the network generation and parameter optimization until it achieves sufficient discrimination accuracy. Using this method, we obtained an HMM for a leucine zipper motif. Compared to the accuracy of a symbolic pattern representation with accuracy of 14.8 percent, an HMM achieved 79.3 percent in prediction. Additionally, the method can obtain an HMM for various types of zinc finger motifs, and it might separate the mixed data. We demonstrated that this approach is applicable to the validation of the protein databases; a constructed HMM b as indicated that one protein sequence annotated as {open_quotes}lencine-zipper like sequence{close_quotes} in the database is quite different from other leucine-zipper sequences in terms of likelihood, and we found this discrimination is plausible.

  9. Efficient motif search in ranked lists and applications to variable gap motifs

    PubMed Central

    Leibovich, Limor; Yakhini, Zohar

    2012-01-01

    Sequence elements, at all levels—DNA, RNA and protein, play a central role in mediating molecular recognition and thereby molecular regulation and signaling. Studies that focus on measuring and investigating sequence-based recognition make use of statistical and computational tools, including approaches to searching sequence motifs. State-of-the-art motif searching tools are limited in their coverage and ability to address large motif spaces. We develop and present statistical and algorithmic approaches that take as input ranked lists of sequences and return significant motifs. The efficiency of our approach, based on suffix trees, allows searches over motif spaces that are not covered by existing tools. This includes searching variable gap motifs—two half sites with a flexible length gap in between—and searching long motifs over large alphabets. We used our approach to analyze several high-throughput measurement data sets and report some validation results as well as novel suggested motifs and motif refinements. We suggest a refinement of the known estrogen receptor 1 motif in humans, where we observe gaps other than three nucleotides that also serve as significant recognition sites, as well as a variable length motif related to potential tyrosine phosphorylation. PMID:22416066

  10. Automated classification of RNA 3D motifs and the RNA 3D Motif Atlas.

    PubMed

    Petrov, Anton I; Zirbel, Craig L; Leontis, Neocles B

    2013-10-01

    The analysis of atomic-resolution RNA three-dimensional (3D) structures reveals that many internal and hairpin loops are modular, recurrent, and structured by conserved non-Watson-Crick base pairs. Structurally similar loops define RNA 3D motifs that are conserved in homologous RNA molecules, but can also occur at nonhomologous sites in diverse RNAs, and which often vary in sequence. To further our understanding of RNA motif structure and sequence variability and to provide a useful resource for structure modeling and prediction, we present a new method for automated classification of internal and hairpin loop RNA 3D motifs and a new online database called the RNA 3D Motif Atlas. To classify the motif instances, a representative set of internal and hairpin loops is automatically extracted from a nonredundant list of RNA-containing PDB files. Their structures are compared geometrically, all-against-all, using the FR3D program suite. The loops are clustered into motif groups, taking into account geometric similarity and structural annotations and making allowance for a variable number of bulged bases. The automated procedure that we have implemented identifies all hairpin and internal loop motifs previously described in the literature. All motif instances and motif groups are assigned unique and stable identifiers and are made available in the RNA 3D Motif Atlas (http://rna.bgsu.edu/motifs), which is automatically updated every four weeks. The RNA 3D Motif Atlas provides an interactive user interface for exploring motif diversity and tools for programmatic data access.

  11. Automated classification of RNA 3D motifs and the RNA 3D Motif Atlas

    PubMed Central

    Petrov, Anton I.; Zirbel, Craig L.; Leontis, Neocles B.

    2013-01-01

    The analysis of atomic-resolution RNA three-dimensional (3D) structures reveals that many internal and hairpin loops are modular, recurrent, and structured by conserved non-Watson–Crick base pairs. Structurally similar loops define RNA 3D motifs that are conserved in homologous RNA molecules, but can also occur at nonhomologous sites in diverse RNAs, and which often vary in sequence. To further our understanding of RNA motif structure and sequence variability and to provide a useful resource for structure modeling and prediction, we present a new method for automated classification of internal and hairpin loop RNA 3D motifs and a new online database called the RNA 3D Motif Atlas. To classify the motif instances, a representative set of internal and hairpin loops is automatically extracted from a nonredundant list of RNA-containing PDB files. Their structures are compared geometrically, all-against-all, using the FR3D program suite. The loops are clustered into motif groups, taking into account geometric similarity and structural annotations and making allowance for a variable number of bulged bases. The automated procedure that we have implemented identifies all hairpin and internal loop motifs previously described in the literature. All motif instances and motif groups are assigned unique and stable identifiers and are made available in the RNA 3D Motif Atlas (http://rna.bgsu.edu/motifs), which is automatically updated every four weeks. The RNA 3D Motif Atlas provides an interactive user interface for exploring motif diversity and tools for programmatic data access. PMID:23970545

  12. Network motif identification in stochastic networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Rui; Tu, Zhidong; Chen, Ting; Sun, Fengzhu

    2006-06-01

    Network motifs have been identified in a wide range of networks across many scientific disciplines and are suggested to be the basic building blocks of most complex networks. Nonetheless, many networks come with intrinsic and/or experimental uncertainties and should be treated as stochastic networks. The building blocks in these networks thus may also have stochastic properties. In this article, we study stochastic network motifs derived from families of mutually similar but not necessarily identical patterns of interconnections. We establish a finite mixture model for stochastic networks and develop an expectation-maximization algorithm for identifying stochastic network motifs. We apply this approach to the transcriptional regulatory networks of Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, as well as the protein-protein interaction networks of seven species, and identify several stochastic network motifs that are consistent with current biological knowledge. expectation-maximization algorithm | mixture model | transcriptional regulatory network | protein-protein interaction network

  13. iMotifs: an integrated sequence motif visualization and analysis environment

    PubMed Central

    Piipari, Matias; Down, Thomas A.; Saini, Harpreet; Enright, Anton; Hubbard, Tim J.P.

    2010-01-01

    Motivation: Short sequence motifs are an important class of models in molecular biology, used most commonly for describing transcription factor binding site specificity patterns. High-throughput methods have been recently developed for detecting regulatory factor binding sites in vivo and in vitro and consequently high-quality binding site motif data are becoming available for increasing number of organisms and regulatory factors. Development of intuitive tools for the study of sequence motifs is therefore important. iMotifs is a graphical motif analysis environment that allows visualization of annotated sequence motifs and scored motif hits in sequences. It also offers motif inference with the sensitive NestedMICA algorithm, as well as overrepresentation and pairwise motif matching capabilities. All of the analysis functionality is provided without the need to convert between file formats or learn different command line interfaces. The application includes a bundled and graphically integrated version of the NestedMICA motif inference suite that has no outside dependencies. Problems associated with local deployment of software are therefore avoided. Availability: iMotifs is licensed with the GNU Lesser General Public License v2.0 (LGPL 2.0). The software and its source is available at http://wiki.github.com/mz2/imotifs and can be run on Mac OS X Leopard (Intel/PowerPC). We also provide a cross-platform (Linux, OS X, Windows) LGPL 2.0 licensed library libxms for the Perl, Ruby, R and Objective-C programming languages for input and output of XMS formatted annotated sequence motif set files. Contact: matias.piipari@gmail.com; imotifs@googlegroups.com PMID:20106815

  14. The MASH pipeline for protein function prediction and an algorithm for the geometric refinement of 3D motifs.

    PubMed

    Chen, Brian Y; Fofanov, Viacheslav Y; Bryant, Drew H; Dodson, Bradley D; Kristensen, David M; Lisewski, Andreas M; Kimmel, Marek; Lichtarge, Olivier; Kavraki, Lydia E

    2007-01-01

    The development of new and effective drugs is strongly affected by the need to identify drug targets and to reduce side effects. Resolving these issues depends partially on a thorough understanding of the biological function of proteins. Unfortunately, the experimental determination of protein function is expensive and time consuming. To support and accelerate the determination of protein functions, algorithms for function prediction are designed to gather evidence indicating functional similarity with well studied proteins. One such approach is the MASH pipeline, described in the first half of this paper. MASH identifies matches of geometric and chemical similarity between motifs, representing known functional sites, and substructures of functionally uncharacterized proteins (targets). Observations from several research groups concur that statistically significant matches can indicate functionally related active sites. One major subproblem is the design of effective motifs, which have many matches to functionally related targets (sensitive motifs), and few matches to functionally unrelated targets (specific motifs). Current techniques select and combine structural, physical, and evolutionary properties to generate motifs that mirror functional characteristics in active sites. This approach ignores incidental similarities that may occur with functionally unrelated proteins. To address this problem, we have developed Geometric Sieving (GS), a parallel distributed algorithm that efficiently refines motifs, designed by existing methods, into optimized motifs with maximal geometric and chemical dissimilarity from all known protein structures. In exhaustive comparison of all possible motifs based on the active sites of 10 well-studied proteins, we observed that optimized motifs were among the most sensitive and specific.

  15. Structural assessment of glycyl mutations in invariantly conserved motifs.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Tulika; Sandhu, Kuljeet Singh; Singh, Nitin Kumar; Bhasin, Yasha; Ramakrishnan, C; Brahmachari, Samir K

    2007-11-15

    Motifs that are evolutionarily conserved in proteins are crucial to their structure and function. In one of our earlier studies, we demonstrated that the conserved motifs occurring invariantly across several organisms could act as structural determinants of the proteins. We observed the abundance of glycyl residues in these invariantly conserved motifs. The role of glycyl residues in highly conserved motifs has not been studied extensively. Thus, it would be interesting to examine the structural perturbations induced by mutation in these conserved glycyl sites. In this work, we selected a representative set of invariant signature (IS) peptides for which both the PDB structure and mutation information was available. We thoroughly analyzed the conformational features of the glycyl sites and their local interactions with the surrounding residues. Using Ramachandran angles, we showed that the glycyl residues occurring in these IS peptides, which have undergone mutation, occurred more often in the L-disallowed as compared with the L-allowed region of the Ramachandran plot. Short range contacts around the mutation site were analyzed to study the steric effects. With the results obtained from our analysis, we hypothesize that any change of activity arising because of such mutations must be attributed to the long-range interaction(s) of the new residue if the glycyl residue in the IS peptide occurred in the L-allowed region of the Ramachandran plot. However, the mutation of those conserved glycyl residues that occurred in the L-disallowed region of the Ramachandran plot might lead to an altered activity of the protein as a result of an altered conformation of the backbone in the immediate vicinity of the glycyl residue, in addition to long range effects arising from the long side chains of the new residue. Thus, the loss of activity because of mutation in the conserved glycyl site might either relate to long range interactions or to local perturbations around the site

  16. Local motifs involved in the canonical structure of the ligand-binding domain in the nuclear receptor superfamily.

    PubMed

    Tsuji, Motonori

    2014-03-01

    Structural and sequence alignment analyses have revealed the existence of class-dependent and -independent local motifs involved in the overall fold of the ligand-binding domain (LBD) in the nuclear receptor (NR) superfamily. Of these local motifs, three local motifs, i.e., AF-2 fixed motifs, were involved in the agonist conformation of the activation function-2 (AF-2) region of the LBD. Receptor-agonist interactions increased the stability of these AF-2 fixed motifs in the agonist conformation. In contrast, perturbation of the AF-2 fixed motifs by a ligand or another protein molecule led the AF-2 architecture to adopt an antagonist conformation. Knowledge of this process should provide us with novel insights into the 'agonism' and 'antagonism' of NRs.

  17. Characteristic motifs for families of allergenic proteins

    PubMed Central

    Ivanciuc, Ovidiu; Garcia, Tzintzuni; Torres, Miguel; Schein, Catherine H.; Braun, Werner

    2008-01-01

    The identification of potential allergenic proteins is usually done by scanning a database of allergenic proteins and locating known allergens with a high sequence similarity. However, there is no universally accepted cut-off value for sequence similarity to indicate potential IgE cross-reactivity. Further, overall sequence similarity may be less important than discrete areas of similarity in proteins with homologous structure. To identify such areas, we first classified all allergens and their subdomains in the Structural Database of Allergenic Proteins (SDAP, http://fermi.utmb.edu/SDAP/) to their closest protein families as defined in Pfam, and identified conserved physicochemical property motifs characteristic of each group of sequences. Allergens populate only a small subset of all known Pfam families, as all allergenic proteins in SDAP could be grouped to only 130 (of 9318 total) Pfams, and 31 families contain more than four allergens. Conserved physicochemical property motifs for the aligned sequences of the most populated Pfam families were identified with the PCPMer program suite and catalogued in the webserver Motif-Mate (http://born.utmb.edu/motifmate/summary.php). We also determined specific motifs for allergenic members of a family that could distinguish them from non-allergenic ones. These allergen specific motifs should be most useful in database searches for potential allergens. We found that sequence motifs unique to the allergens in three families (seed storage proteins, Bet v 1, and tropomyosin) overlap with known IgE epitopes, thus providing evidence that our motif based approach can be used to assess the potential allergenicity of novel proteins. PMID:18951633

  18. Caveats in modeling a common motif in genetic circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labavić, Darka; Nagel, Hannes; Janke, Wolfhard; Meyer-Ortmanns, Hildegard

    2013-06-01

    From a coarse-grained perspective, the motif of a self-activating species, activating a second species that acts as its own repressor, is widely found in biological systems, in particular in genetic systems with inherent oscillatory behavior. Here we consider a specific realization of this motif as a genetic circuit, termed the bistable frustrated unit, in which genes are described as directly producing proteins. Upon an improved resolution in time, we focus on the effect that inherent time scales on the underlying scale can have on the bifurcation patterns on a coarser scale. Time scales are set by the binding and unbinding rates of the transcription factors to the promoter regions of the genes. Depending on the ratio of these rates to the decay times of both proteins, the appropriate averaging procedure for obtaining a coarse-grained description changes and leads to sets of deterministic equations, which considerably differ in their bifurcation structure. In particular, the desired intermediate range of regular limit cycles fades away when the binding rates of genes are not fast as compared to the decay time of the proteins. Our analysis illustrates that the common topology of the widely found motif alone does not imply universal features in the dynamics.

  19. The role of the fibronectin IGD motif in stimulating fibroblast migration.

    PubMed

    Millard, Christopher J; Ellis, Ian R; Pickford, Andrew R; Schor, Ana M; Schor, Seth L; Campbell, Iain D

    2007-12-07

    The motogenic activity of migration-stimulating factor, a truncated isoform of fibronectin (FN), has been attributed to the IGD motifs present in its FN type 1 modules. The structure-function relationship of various recombinant IGD-containing FN fragments is now investigated. Their structure is assessed by solution state NMR and their motogenic ability tested on fibroblasts. Even conservative mutations in the IGD motif are inactive or have severely reduced potency, while the structure remains essentially the same. A fragment with two IGD motifs is 100 times more active than a fragment with one and up to 10(6) times more than synthetic tetrapeptides. The wide range of potency in different contexts is discussed in terms of cryptic FN sites and cooperativity. These results give new insight into the stimulation of fibroblast migration by IGD motifs in FN.

  20. A novel motif in telomerase reverse transcriptase regulates telomere repeat addition rate and processivity

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Mingyi; Podlevsky, Joshua D.; Qi, Xiaodong; Bley, Christopher J.; Chen, Julian J.-L.

    2010-01-01

    Telomerase is a specialized reverse transcriptase that adds telomeric DNA repeats onto chromosome termini. Here, we characterize a new telomerase-specific motif, called motif 3, in the catalytic domain of telomerase reverse transcriptase, that is crucial for telomerase function and evolutionally conserved between vertebrates and ciliates. Comprehensive mutagenesis of motif 3 identified mutations that remarkably increase the rate or alter the processivity of telomere repeat addition. Notably, the rate and processivity of repeat addition are affected independently by separate motif 3 mutations. The processive telomerase action relies upon a template translocation mechanism whereby the RNA template and the telomeric DNA strand separate and realign between each repeat synthesis. By analyzing the mutant telomerases reconstituted in vitro and in cells, we show that the hyperactive mutants exhibit higher repeat addition rates and faster enzyme turnovers, suggesting higher rates of strand-separation during template translocation. In addition, the strong correlation between the processivity of the motif 3 mutants and their ability to use an 8 nt DNA primer, suggests that motif 3 facilitates realignment between the telomeric DNA and the template RNA following strand-separation. These findings support motif 3 as a key determinant for telomerase activity and processivity. PMID:20044353

  1. MODA: an efficient algorithm for network motif discovery in biological networks.

    PubMed

    Omidi, Saeed; Schreiber, Falk; Masoudi-Nejad, Ali

    2009-10-01

    In recent years, interest has been growing in the study of complex networks. Since Erdös and Rényi (1960) proposed their random graph model about 50 years ago, many researchers have investigated and shaped this field. Many indicators have been proposed to assess the global features of networks. Recently, an active research area has developed in studying local features named motifs as the building blocks of networks. Unfortunately, network motif discovery is a computationally hard problem and finding rather large motifs (larger than 8 nodes) by means of current algorithms is impractical as it demands too much computational effort. In this paper, we present a new algorithm (MODA) that incorporates techniques such as a pattern growth approach for extracting larger motifs efficiently. We have tested our algorithm and found it able to identify larger motifs with more than 8 nodes more efficiently than most of the current state-of-the-art motif discovery algorithms. While most of the algorithms rely on induced subgraphs as motifs of the networks, MODA is able to extract both induced and non-induced subgraphs simultaneously. The MODA source code is freely available at: http://LBB.ut.ac.ir/Download/LBBsoft/MODA/

  2. Dispom: a discriminative de-novo motif discovery tool based on the jstacs library.

    PubMed

    Grau, Jan; Keilwagen, Jens; Gohr, André; Paponov, Ivan A; Posch, Stefan; Seifert, Michael; Strickert, Marc; Grosse, Ivo

    2013-02-01

    DNA-binding proteins are a main component of gene regulation as they activate or repress gene expression by binding to specific binding sites in target regions of genomic DNA. However, de-novo discovery of these binding sites in target regions obtained by wet-lab experiments is a challenging problem in computational biology, which has not yet been solved satisfactorily. Here, we present a detailed description and analysis of the de-novo motif discovery tool Dispom, which has been developed for finding binding sites of DNA-binding proteins that are differentially abundant in a set of target regions compared to a set of control regions. Two additional features of Dispom are its capability of modeling positional preferences of binding sites and adjusting the length of the motif in the learning process. Dispom yields an increased prediction accuracy compared to existing tools for de-novo motif discovery, suggesting that the combination of searching for differentially abundant motifs, inferring their positional distributions, and adjusting the motif lengths is beneficial for de-novo motif discovery. When applying Dispom to promoters of auxin-responsive genes and those of ABI3 target genes from Arabidopsis thaliana, we identify relevant binding motifs with pronounced positional distributions. These results suggest that learning motifs, their positional distributions, and their lengths by a discriminative learning principle may aid motif discovery from ChIP-chip and gene expression data. We make Dispom freely available as part of Jstacs, an open-source Java library that is tailored to statistical sequence analysis. To facilitate extensions of Dispom, we describe its implementation using Jstacs in this manuscript. In addition, we provide a stand-alone application of Dispom at http://www.jstacs.de/index.php/Dispom for instant use.

  3. Distinct TCR signaling pathways drive proliferation and cytokine production in T cells.

    PubMed

    Guy, Clifford S; Vignali, Kate M; Temirov, Jamshid; Bettini, Matthew L; Overacre, Abigail E; Smeltzer, Matthew; Zhang, Hui; Huppa, Johannes B; Tsai, Yu-Hwai; Lobry, Camille; Xie, Jianming; Dempsey, Peter J; Crawford, Howard C; Aifantis, Iannis; Davis, Mark M; Vignali, Dario A A

    2013-03-01

    The physiological basis and mechanistic requirements for a large number of functional immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motifs (ITAMs; high ITAM multiplicity) in the complex of the T cell antigen receptor (TCR) and the invariant signaling protein CD3 remain obscure. Here we found that whereas a low multiplicity of TCR-CD3 ITAMs was sufficient to engage canonical TCR-induced signaling events that led to cytokine secretion, a high multiplicity of TCR-CD3 ITAMs was required for TCR-driven proliferation. This was dependent on the formation of compact immunological synapses, interaction of the adaptor Vav1 with phosphorylated CD3 ITAMs to mediate the recruitment and activation of the oncogenic transcription factor Notch1 and, ultimately, proliferation induced by the cell-cycle regulator c-Myc. Analogous mechanistic events were also needed to drive proliferation in response to weak peptide agonists. Thus, the TCR-driven pathways that initiate cytokine secretion and proliferation are separable and are coordinated by the multiplicity of phosphorylated ITAMs in TCR-CD3.

  4. Motif-based embedding for graph clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Sungsu; Lee, Jae-Gil

    2016-12-01

    Community detection in complex networks is a fundamental problem that has been extensively studied owing to its wide range of applications. However, because community detection methods typically rely on the relations between vertices in networks, they may fail to discover higher-order graph substructures, called the network motifs. In this paper, we propose a novel embedding method for graph clustering that considers higher-order relationships involving multiple vertices. We show that our embedding method, which we call motif-based embedding, is more effective in detecting communities than existing graph embedding methods, spectral embedding and force-directed embedding, both theoretically and experimentally.

  5. Targeting functional motifs of a protein family

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhadola, Pradeep; Deo, Nivedita

    2016-10-01

    The structural organization of a protein family is investigated by devising a method based on the random matrix theory (RMT), which uses the physiochemical properties of the amino acid with multiple sequence alignment. A graphical method to represent protein sequences using physiochemical properties is devised that gives a fast, easy, and informative way of comparing the evolutionary distances between protein sequences. A correlation matrix associated with each property is calculated, where the noise reduction and information filtering is done using RMT involving an ensemble of Wishart matrices. The analysis of the eigenvalue statistics of the correlation matrix for the β -lactamase family shows the universal features as observed in the Gaussian orthogonal ensemble (GOE). The property-based approach captures the short- as well as the long-range correlation (approximately following GOE) between the eigenvalues, whereas the previous approach (treating amino acids as characters) gives the usual short-range correlations, while the long-range correlations are the same as that of an uncorrelated series. The distribution of the eigenvector components for the eigenvalues outside the bulk (RMT bound) deviates significantly from RMT observations and contains important information about the system. The information content of each eigenvector of the correlation matrix is quantified by introducing an entropic estimate, which shows that for the β -lactamase family the smallest eigenvectors (low eigenmodes) are highly localized as well as informative. These small eigenvectors when processed gives clusters involving positions that have well-defined biological and structural importance matching with experiments. The approach is crucial for the recognition of structural motifs as shown in β -lactamase (and other families) and selectively identifies the important positions for targets to deactivate (activate) the enzymatic actions.

  6. Targeting functional motifs of a protein family.

    PubMed

    Bhadola, Pradeep; Deo, Nivedita

    2016-10-01

    The structural organization of a protein family is investigated by devising a method based on the random matrix theory (RMT), which uses the physiochemical properties of the amino acid with multiple sequence alignment. A graphical method to represent protein sequences using physiochemical properties is devised that gives a fast, easy, and informative way of comparing the evolutionary distances between protein sequences. A correlation matrix associated with each property is calculated, where the noise reduction and information filtering is done using RMT involving an ensemble of Wishart matrices. The analysis of the eigenvalue statistics of the correlation matrix for the β-lactamase family shows the universal features as observed in the Gaussian orthogonal ensemble (GOE). The property-based approach captures the short- as well as the long-range correlation (approximately following GOE) between the eigenvalues, whereas the previous approach (treating amino acids as characters) gives the usual short-range correlations, while the long-range correlations are the same as that of an uncorrelated series. The distribution of the eigenvector components for the eigenvalues outside the bulk (RMT bound) deviates significantly from RMT observations and contains important information about the system. The information content of each eigenvector of the correlation matrix is quantified by introducing an entropic estimate, which shows that for the β-lactamase family the smallest eigenvectors (low eigenmodes) are highly localized as well as informative. These small eigenvectors when processed gives clusters involving positions that have well-defined biological and structural importance matching with experiments. The approach is crucial for the recognition of structural motifs as shown in β-lactamase (and other families) and selectively identifies the important positions for targets to deactivate (activate) the enzymatic actions.

  7. Platelets activated by collagen through the immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif in the Fc receptor gamma-chain play a pivotal role in the development of myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Takaya, Norihide; Katoh, Youichi; Iwabuchi, Kazuhisa; Hayashi, Ichiro; Konishi, Hakuoh; Itoh, Seigo; Okumura, Ko; Ra, Chisei; Nagaoka, Isao; Daida, Hiroyuki

    2005-12-01

    Platelet activation and the formation of platelet microaggregates in coronary vessels play pivotal roles in myocardial ischemia and reperfusion injury. The Fc receptor gamma-chain (FcR gamma) is coexpressed with glycoprotein (GP) VI, forming a platelet collagen receptor, and the activation of platelets by collagen is closely coupled with tyrosine phosphorylation of the FcRgamma. To examine the functional significance of platelet FcR gamma/GPVI complex in the early phase of myocardial ischemia and reperfusion injury in mice, we performed coronary occlusion and reperfusion experiments using wild type mice and FcRgamma-deficient (FcRgamma(-/-)) mice that lack GPVI. The infarct size was significantly smaller in FcRgamma(-/-) mice subjected to occlusion and reperfusion of the coronary artery than in control FcR gamma(+/+) mice. Twenty-four hours after the reperfusion, electron microscopy of the injured tissue showed substantially more platelet aggregation and occlusive platelet microthrombi in the capillaries of the damaged areas of the wild type mice than in those of the FcR gamma(-/-) mice. Platelet Syk was scarcely activated in the FcR gamma(-/-) mice after myocardial ischemia and reperfusion, but significantly activated in the FcR gamma(+/+) mice. CD11b expression on neutrophils was elevated after myocardial ischemia and reperfusion in both mouse groups, whereas myeloperoxidase activity in the injured areas was significantly lower in the FcRgamma(-/-) mice than in the FcRgamma(+/+) mice. These results suggest that the collagen-induced activation of platelets through the FcR gamma plays a pivotal role in the extension of myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury. FcRgamma and GPVI may be important therapeutic targets for myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury.

  8. Prevalence of the EH1 Groucho interaction motif in the metazoan Fox family of transcriptional regulators

    PubMed Central

    Yaklichkin, Sergey; Vekker, Alexander; Stayrook, Steven; Lewis, Mitchell; Kessler, Daniel S

    2007-01-01

    Background The Fox gene family comprises a large and functionally diverse group of forkhead-related transcriptional regulators, many of which are essential for metazoan embryogenesis and physiology. Defining conserved functional domains that mediate the transcriptional activity of Fox proteins will contribute to a comprehensive understanding of the biological function of Fox family genes. Results Systematic analysis of 458 protein sequences of the metazoan Fox family was performed to identify the presence of the engrailed homology-1 motif (eh1), a motif known to mediate physical interaction with transcriptional corepressors of the TLE/Groucho family. Greater than 50% of Fox proteins contain sequences with high similarity to the eh1 motif, including ten of the nineteen Fox subclasses (A, B, C, D, E, G, H, I, L, and Q) and Fox proteins of early divergent species such as marine sponge. The eh1 motif is not detected in Fox proteins of the F, J, K, M, N, O, P, R and S subclasses, or in yeast Fox proteins. The eh1-like motifs are positioned C-terminal to the winged helix DNA-binding domain in all subclasses except for FoxG proteins, which have an N-terminal motif. Two similar eh1-like motifs are found in the zebrafish FoxQ1 and in FoxG proteins of sea urchin and amphioxus. The identification of eh1-like motifs by manual sequence alignment was validated by statistical analyses of the Swiss protein database, confirming a high frequency of occurrence of eh1-like sequences in Fox family proteins. Structural predictions suggest that the majority of identified eh1-like motifs are short α-helices, and wheel modeling revealed an amphipathicity that supports this secondary structure prediction. Conclusion A search for eh1 Groucho interaction motifs in the Fox gene family has identified eh1-like sequences in greater than 50% of Fox proteins. The results predict a physical and functional interaction of TLE/Groucho corepressors with many members of the Fox family of transcriptional

  9. A systematic approach to identify functional motifs within vertebrate developmental enhancers

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qiang; Ritter, Deborah; Yang, Nan; Dong, Zhiqiang; Li, Hao; Chuang, Jeffrey H.; Guo, Su

    2012-01-01

    Uncovering the cis-regulatory logic of developmental enhancers is critical to understanding the role of non-coding DNA in development. However, it is cumbersome to identify functional motifs within enhancers, and thus few vertebrate enhancers have their core functional motifs revealed. Here we report a combined experimental and computational approach for discovering regulatory motifs in developmental enhancers. Making use of the zebrafish gene expression database, we computationally identified conserved non-coding elements (CNEs) likely to have a desired tissue-specificity based on the expression of nearby genes. Through a high throughput and robust enhancer assay, we tested the activity of ~100 such CNEs and efficiently uncovered developmental enhancers with desired spatial and temporal expression patterns in the zebrafish brain. Application of de novo motif prediction algorithms on a group of forebrain enhancers identified five top-ranked motifs, all of which were experimentally validated as critical for forebrain enhancer activity. These results demonstrate a systematic approach to discover important regulatory motifs in vertebrate developmental enhancers. Moreover, this dataset provides a useful resource for further dissection of vertebrate brain development and function. PMID:19850031

  10. Network motifs modulate druggability of cellular targets

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Fan; Ma, Cong; Tan, Cheemeng

    2016-01-01

    Druggability refers to the capacity of a cellular target to be modulated by a small-molecule drug. To date, druggability is mainly studied by focusing on direct binding interactions between a drug and its target. However, druggability is impacted by cellular networks connected to a drug target. Here, we use computational approaches to reveal basic principles of network motifs that modulate druggability. Through quantitative analysis, we find that inhibiting self-positive feedback loop is a more robust and effective treatment strategy than inhibiting other regulations, and adding direct regulations to a drug-target generally reduces its druggability. The findings are explained through analytical solution of the motifs. Furthermore, we find that a consensus topology of highly druggable motifs consists of a negative feedback loop without any positive feedback loops, and consensus motifs with low druggability have multiple positive direct regulations and positive feedback loops. Based on the discovered principles, we predict potential genetic targets in Escherichia coli that have either high or low druggability based on their network context. Our work establishes the foundation toward identifying and predicting druggable targets based on their network topology. PMID:27824147

  11. The Motif of Meeting in Digital Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheail, Philippa

    2015-01-01

    This article draws on theoretical work which considers the composition of meetings, in order to think about the form of the meeting in digital environments for higher education. To explore the motif of meeting, I undertake a "compositional interpretation" (Rose, 2012) of the default interface offered by "Collaborate", an…

  12. Motifs and structural blocks retrieval by GHT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantoni, Virginio; Ferone, Alessio; Petrosino, Alfredo; Polat, Ozlem

    2014-06-01

    The structure of a protein gives more insight on the protein function than its amino acid sequence. Protein structure analysis and comparison are important for understanding the evolutionary relationships among proteins, predicting protein functions, and predicting protein folding. Proteins are formed by two basic regular 3D structural patterns, called Secondary Structures (SSs): helices and sheets. A structural motif is a compact 3D protein block referring to a small specific combination of secondary structural elements, which appears in a variety of molecules. In this paper we compare a few approaches for motif retrieval based on the Generalized Hough Transform (GHT). A primary technique is to adopt the single SS as structural primitives; alternatives are to adopt a SSs pair as primitive structural element, or a SSs triplet, and so on up-to an entire motif. The richer the primitive, the higher the time for pre-analysis and search, and the simpler the inspection process on the parameter space for analyzing the peaks. Performance comparisons, in terms of precision and computation time, are here presented considering the retrieval of motifs composed by three to five SSs for more than 15 million searches. The approach can be easily applied to the retrieval of greater blocks, up to protein domains, or even entire proteins.

  13. Structure-Activity Relationships of the Competence Stimulating Peptides (CSPs) in Streptococcus pneumoniae Reveal Motifs Critical for Intra-group and Cross-group ComD Receptor Activation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yifang; Koirala, Bimal; Sanchez, Lucia A; Phillips, Naiya R; Hamry, Sally R; Tal-Gan, Yftah

    2017-03-10

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a highly recombinogenic human pathogen that utilizes the competence stimulating peptide (CSP)-based quorum sensing (QS) circuitry to acquire antibiotic resistance genes from the environment and initiate its attack on the human host. Modulation of QS in this bacterium, either inhibition or activation, can therefore be used to attenuate S. pneumoniae infectivity and slow down pneumococcal resistance development. In this study, we set to determine the molecular mechanism that drives CSP:receptor binding and identify CSP-based QS modulators with distinct activity profiles. To this end, we conducted systematic replacement of the amino acid residues in the two major CSP signals (CSP1 and CSP2) and assessed the ability of the mutated analogs to modulate QS against both cognate and noncognate ComD receptors. We then evaluated the overall 3D structures of these analogs using circular dichroism (CD) to correlate between the structure and function of these peptides. Our CD analysis revealed a strong correlation between α-helicity and bioactivity for both specificity groups (CSP1 and CSP2). Furthermore, we identified the first pan-group QS activator and the most potent group-II QS inhibitor to date. These chemical probes can be used to study the role of QS in S. pneumoniae and as scaffolds for the design of QS-based anti-infective therapeutics against S. pneumoniae infections.

  14. A survey of motif finding Web tools for detecting binding site motifs in ChIP-Seq data

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Abstract ChIP-Seq (chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing) has provided the advantage for finding motifs as ChIP-Seq experiments narrow down the motif finding to binding site locations. Recent motif finding tools facilitate the motif detection by providing user-friendly Web interface. In this work, we reviewed nine motif finding Web tools that are capable for detecting binding site motifs in ChIP-Seq data. We showed each motif finding Web tool has its own advantages for detecting motifs that other tools may not discover. We recommended the users to use multiple motif finding Web tools that implement different algorithms for obtaining significant motifs, overlapping resemble motifs, and non-overlapping motifs. Finally, we provided our suggestions for future development of motif finding Web tool that better assists researchers for finding motifs in ChIP-Seq data. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Prof. Sandor Pongor, Dr. Yuriy Gusev, and Dr. Shyam Prabhakar (nominated by Prof. Limsoon Wong). PMID:24555784

  15. The Assembly Motif of a Bacterial Small Multidrug Resistance Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Poulsen, Bradley E.; Rath, Arianna; Deber, Charles M.

    2009-01-01

    Multidrug transporters such as the small multidrug resistance (SMR) family of bacterial integral membrane proteins are capable of conferring clinically significant resistance to a variety of common therapeutics. As antiporter proteins of ∼100 amino acids, SMRs must self-assemble into homo-oligomeric structures for efflux of drug molecules. Oligomerization centered at transmembrane helix four (TM4) has been implicated in SMR assembly, but the full complement of residues required to mediate its self-interaction remains to be characterized. Here, we use Hsmr, the 110-residue SMR family member of the archaebacterium Halobacterium salinarum, to determine the TM4 residue motif required to mediate drug resistance and SMR self-association. Twelve single point mutants that scan the central portion of the TM4 helix (residues 85–104) were constructed and were tested for their ability to confer resistance to the cytotoxic compound ethidium bromide. Six residues were found to be individually essential for drug resistance activity (Gly90, Leu91, Leu93, Ile94, Gly97, and Val98), defining a minimum activity motif of 90GLXLIXXGV98 within TM4. When the propensity of these mutants to dimerize on SDS-PAGE was examined, replacements of all but Ile resulted in ∼2-fold reduction of dimerization versus the wild-type antiporter. Our work defines a minimum activity motif of 90GLXLIXXGV98 within TM4 and suggests that this sequence mediates TM4-based SMR dimerization along a single helix surface, stabilized by a small residue heptad repeat sequence. These TM4-TM4 interactions likely constitute the highest affinity locus for disruption of SMR function by directly targeting its self-assembly mechanism. PMID:19224913

  16. CombiMotif: A new algorithm for network motifs discovery in protein-protein interaction networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Jiawei; Li, Guanghui; Song, Dan; Liang, Cheng

    2014-12-01

    Discovering motifs in protein-protein interaction networks is becoming a current major challenge in computational biology, since the distribution of the number of network motifs can reveal significant systemic differences among species. However, this task can be computationally expensive because of the involvement of graph isomorphic detection. In this paper, we present a new algorithm (CombiMotif) that incorporates combinatorial techniques to count non-induced occurrences of subgraph topologies in the form of trees. The efficiency of our algorithm is demonstrated by comparing the obtained results with the current state-of-the art subgraph counting algorithms. We also show major differences between unicellular and multicellular organisms. The datasets and source code of CombiMotif are freely available upon request.

  17. Helix-hairpin-helix motifs confer salt resistance and processivity on chimeric DNA polymerases.

    PubMed

    Pavlov, Andrey R; Belova, Galina I; Kozyavkin, Sergei A; Slesarev, Alexei I

    2002-10-15

    Helix-hairpin-helix (HhH) is a widespread motif involved in sequence-nonspecific DNA binding. The majority of HhH motifs function as DNA-binding modules with typical occurrence of one HhH motif or one or two (HhH)(2) domains in proteins. We recently identified 24 HhH motifs in DNA topoisomerase V (Topo V). Although these motifs are dispensable for the topoisomerase activity of Topo V, their removal narrows the salt concentration range for topoisomerase activity tenfold. Here, we demonstrate the utility of Topo V's HhH motifs for modulating DNA-binding properties of the Stoffel fragment of TaqDNA polymerase and Pfu DNA polymerase. Different HhH cassettes fused with either NH(2) terminus or COOH terminus of DNA polymerases broaden the salt concentration range of the polymerase activity significantly (up to 0.5 M NaCl or 1.8 M potassium glutamate). We found that anions play a major role in the inhibition of DNA polymerase activity. The resistance of initial extension rates and the processivity of chimeric polymerases to salts depend on the structure of added HhH motifs. Regardless of the type of the construct, the thermal stability of chimeric Taq polymerases increases under the optimal ionic conditions, as compared with that of TaqDNA polymerase or its Stoffel fragment. Our approach to raise the salt tolerance, processivity, and thermostability of Taq and Pfu DNA polymerases may be applied to all pol1- and polB-type polymerases, as well as to other DNA processing enzymes.

  18. DRIMust: a web server for discovering rank imbalanced motifs using suffix trees

    PubMed Central

    Leibovich, Limor; Paz, Inbal; Yakhini, Zohar; Mandel-Gutfreund, Yael

    2013-01-01

    Cellular regulation mechanisms that involve proteins and other active molecules interacting with specific targets often involve the recognition of sequence patterns. Short sequence elements on DNA, RNA and proteins play a central role in mediating such molecular recognition events. Studies that focus on measuring and investigating sequence-based recognition processes make use of statistical and computational tools that support the identification and understanding of sequence motifs. We present a new web application, named DRIMust, freely accessible through the website http://drimust.technion.ac.il for de novo motif discovery services. The DRIMust algorithm is based on the minimum hypergeometric statistical framework and uses suffix trees for an efficient enumeration of motif candidates. DRIMust takes as input ranked lists of sequences in FASTA format and returns motifs that are over-represented at the top of the list, where the determination of the threshold that defines top is data driven. The resulting motifs are presented individually with an accurate P-value indication and as a Position Specific Scoring Matrix. Comparing DRIMust with other state-of-the-art tools demonstrated significant advantage to DRIMust, both in result accuracy and in short running times. Overall, DRIMust is unique in combining efficient search on large ranked lists with rigorous P-value assessment for the detected motifs. PMID:23685432

  19. DRIMust: a web server for discovering rank imbalanced motifs using suffix trees.

    PubMed

    Leibovich, Limor; Paz, Inbal; Yakhini, Zohar; Mandel-Gutfreund, Yael

    2013-07-01

    Cellular regulation mechanisms that involve proteins and other active molecules interacting with specific targets often involve the recognition of sequence patterns. Short sequence elements on DNA, RNA and proteins play a central role in mediating such molecular recognition events. Studies that focus on measuring and investigating sequence-based recognition processes make use of statistical and computational tools that support the identification and understanding of sequence motifs. We present a new web application, named DRIMust, freely accessible through the website http://drimust.technion.ac.il for de novo motif discovery services. The DRIMust algorithm is based on the minimum hypergeometric statistical framework and uses suffix trees for an efficient enumeration of motif candidates. DRIMust takes as input ranked lists of sequences in FASTA format and returns motifs that are over-represented at the top of the list, where the determination of the threshold that defines top is data driven. The resulting motifs are presented individually with an accurate P-value indication and as a Position Specific Scoring Matrix. Comparing DRIMust with other state-of-the-art tools demonstrated significant advantage to DRIMust, both in result accuracy and in short running times. Overall, DRIMust is unique in combining efficient search on large ranked lists with rigorous P-value assessment for the detected motifs.

  20. Leveraging cross-link modification events in CLIP-seq for motif discovery.

    PubMed

    Bahrami-Samani, Emad; Penalva, Luiz O F; Smith, Andrew D; Uren, Philip J

    2015-01-01

    High-throughput protein-RNA interaction data generated by CLIP-seq has provided an unprecedented depth of access to the activities of RNA-binding proteins (RBPs), the key players in co- and post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression. Motif discovery forms part of the necessary follow-up data analysis for CLIP-seq, both to refine the exact locations of RBP binding sites, and to characterize them. The specific properties of RBP binding sites, and the CLIP-seq methods, provide additional information not usually present in the classic motif discovery problem: the binding site structure, and cross-linking induced events in reads. We show that CLIP-seq data contains clear secondary structure signals, as well as technology- and RBP-specific cross-link signals. We introduce Zagros, a motif discovery algorithm specifically designed to leverage this information and explore its impact on the quality of recovered motifs. Our results indicate that using both secondary structure and cross-link modifications can greatly improve motif discovery on CLIP-seq data. Further, the motifs we recover provide insight into the balance between sequence- and structure-specificity struck by RBP binding.

  1. Phosphotyrosine Substrate Sequence Motifs for Dual Specificity Phosphatases

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Bryan M.; Keasey, Sarah L.; Tropea, Joseph E.; Lountos, George T.; Dyas, Beverly K.; Cherry, Scott; Raran-Kurussi, Sreejith; Waugh, David S.; Ulrich, Robert G.

    2015-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatases dephosphorylate tyrosine residues of proteins, whereas, dual specificity phosphatases (DUSPs) are a subgroup of protein tyrosine phosphatases that dephosphorylate not only Tyr(P) residue, but also the Ser(P) and Thr(P) residues of proteins. The DUSPs are linked to the regulation of many cellular functions and signaling pathways. Though many cellular targets of DUSPs are known, the relationship between catalytic activity and substrate specificity is poorly defined. We investigated the interactions of peptide substrates with select DUSPs of four types: MAP kinases (DUSP1 and DUSP7), atypical (DUSP3, DUSP14, DUSP22 and DUSP27), viral (variola VH1), and Cdc25 (A-C). Phosphatase recognition sites were experimentally determined by measuring dephosphorylation of 6,218 microarrayed Tyr(P) peptides representing confirmed and theoretical phosphorylation motifs from the cellular proteome. A broad continuum of dephosphorylation was observed across the microarrayed peptide substrates for all phosphatases, suggesting a complex relationship between substrate sequence recognition and optimal activity. Further analysis of peptide dephosphorylation by hierarchical clustering indicated that DUSPs could be organized by substrate sequence motifs, and peptide-specificities by phylogenetic relationships among the catalytic domains. The most highly dephosphorylated peptides represented proteins from 29 cell-signaling pathways, greatly expanding the list of potential targets of DUSPs. These newly identified DUSP substrates will be important for examining structure-activity relationships with physiologically relevant targets. PMID:26302245

  2. Functional Motifs in Biochemical Reaction Networks

    PubMed Central

    Tyson, John J.; Novák, Béla

    2013-01-01

    The signal-response characteristics of a living cell are determined by complex networks of interacting genes, proteins, and metabolites. Understanding how cells respond to specific challenges, how these responses are contravened in diseased cells, and how to intervene pharmacologically in the decision-making processes of cells requires an accurate theory of the information-processing capabilities of macromolecular regulatory networks. Adopting an engineer’s approach to control systems, we ask whether realistic cellular control networks can be decomposed into simple regulatory motifs that carry out specific functions in a cell. We show that such functional motifs exist and review the experimental evidence that they control cellular responses as expected. PMID:20055671

  3. On the Kernelization Complexity of Colorful Motifs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambalath, Abhimanyu M.; Balasundaram, Radheshyam; Rao H., Chintan; Koppula, Venkata; Misra, Neeldhara; Philip, Geevarghese; Ramanujan, M. S.

    The Colorful Motif problem asks if, given a vertex-colored graph G, there exists a subset S of vertices of G such that the graph induced by G on S is connected and contains every color in the graph exactly once. The problem is motivated by applications in computational biology and is also well-studied from the theoretical point of view. In particular, it is known to be NP-complete even on trees of maximum degree three [Fellows et al, ICALP 2007]. In their pioneering paper that introduced the color-coding technique, Alon et al. [STOC 1995] show, inter alia, that the problem is FPT on general graphs. More recently, Cygan et al. [WG 2010] showed that Colorful Motif is NP-complete on comb graphs, a special subclass of the set of trees of maximum degree three. They also showed that the problem is not likely to admit polynomial kernels on forests.

  4. Sequential motif profile of natural visibility graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iacovacci, Jacopo; Lacasa, Lucas

    2016-11-01

    The concept of sequential visibility graph motifs—subgraphs appearing with characteristic frequencies in the visibility graphs associated to time series—has been advanced recently along with a theoretical framework to compute analytically the motif profiles associated to horizontal visibility graphs (HVGs). Here we develop a theory to compute the profile of sequential visibility graph motifs in the context of natural visibility graphs (VGs). This theory gives exact results for deterministic aperiodic processes with a smooth invariant density or stochastic processes that fulfill the Markov property and have a continuous marginal distribution. The framework also allows for a linear time numerical estimation in the case of empirical time series. A comparison between the HVG and the VG case (including evaluation of their robustness for short series polluted with measurement noise) is also presented.

  5. Chiral Alkyl Halides: Underexplored Motifs in Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Gál, Bálint; Bucher, Cyril; Burns, Noah Z.

    2016-01-01

    While alkyl halides are valuable intermediates in synthetic organic chemistry, their use as bioactive motifs in drug discovery and medicinal chemistry is rare in comparison. This is likely attributable to the common misconception that these compounds are merely non-specific alkylators in biological systems. A number of chlorinated compounds in the pharmaceutical and food industries, as well as a growing number of halogenated marine natural products showing unique bioactivity, illustrate the role that chiral alkyl halides can play in drug discovery. Through a series of case studies, we demonstrate in this review that these motifs can indeed be stable under physiological conditions, and that halogenation can enhance bioactivity through both steric and electronic effects. Our hope is that, by placing such compounds in the minds of the chemical community, they may gain more traction in drug discovery and inspire more synthetic chemists to develop methods for selective halogenation. PMID:27827902

  6. Anticipated synchronization in neuronal network motifs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matias, F. S.; Gollo, L. L.; Carelli, P. V.; Copelli, M.; Mirasso, C. R.

    2013-01-01

    Two identical dynamical systems coupled unidirectionally (in a so called master-slave configuration) exhibit anticipated synchronization (AS) if the one which receives the coupling (the slave) also receives a negative delayed self-feedback. In oscillatory neuronal systems AS is characterized by a phase-locking with negative time delay τ between the spikes of the master and of the slave (slave fires before the master), while in the usual delayed synchronization (DS) regime τ is positive (slave fires after the master). A 3-neuron motif in which the slave self-feedback is replaced by a feedback loop mediated by an interneuron can exhibits both AS and DS regimes. Here we show that AS is robust in the presence of noise in a 3 Hodgkin-Huxley type neuronal motif. We also show that AS is stable for large values of τ in a chain of connected slaves-interneurons.

  7. CPI motif interaction is necessary for capping protein function in cells

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Marc; McConnell, Patrick; Schafer, Dorothy A.; Cooper, John A.

    2015-01-01

    Capping protein (CP) has critical roles in actin assembly in vivo and in vitro. CP binds with high affinity to the barbed end of actin filaments, blocking the addition and loss of actin subunits. Heretofore, models for actin assembly in cells generally assumed that CP is constitutively active, diffusing freely to find and cap barbed ends. However, CP can be regulated by binding of the ‘capping protein interaction' (CPI) motif, found in a diverse and otherwise unrelated set of proteins that decreases, but does not abolish, the actin-capping activity of CP and promotes uncapping in biochemical experiments. Here, we report that CP localization and the ability of CP to function in cells requires interaction with a CPI-motif-containing protein. Our discovery shows that cells target and/or modulate the capping activity of CP via CPI motif interactions in order for CP to localize and function in cells. PMID:26412145

  8. Analyzing network reliability using structural motifs.

    PubMed

    Khorramzadeh, Yasamin; Youssef, Mina; Eubank, Stephen; Mowlaei, Shahir

    2015-04-01

    This paper uses the reliability polynomial, introduced by Moore and Shannon in 1956, to analyze the effect of network structure on diffusive dynamics such as the spread of infectious disease. We exhibit a representation for the reliability polynomial in terms of what we call structural motifs that is well suited for reasoning about the effect of a network's structural properties on diffusion across the network. We illustrate by deriving several general results relating graph structure to dynamical phenomena.

  9. Designing synthetic RNAs to determine the relevance of structural motifs in picornavirus IRES elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez-Chamorro, Javier; Lozano, Gloria; Garcia-Martin, Juan Antonio; Ramajo, Jorge; Dotu, Ivan; Clote, Peter; Martinez-Salas, Encarnacion

    2016-04-01

    The function of Internal Ribosome Entry Site (IRES) elements is intimately linked to their RNA structure. Viral IRES elements are organized in modular domains consisting of one or more stem-loops that harbor conserved RNA motifs critical for internal initiation of translation. A conserved motif is the pyrimidine-tract located upstream of the functional initiation codon in type I and II picornavirus IRES. By computationally designing synthetic RNAs to fold into a structure that sequesters the polypyrimidine tract in a hairpin, we establish a correlation between predicted inaccessibility of the pyrimidine tract and IRES activity, as determined in both in vitro and in vivo systems. Our data supports the hypothesis that structural sequestration of the pyrimidine-tract within a stable hairpin inactivates IRES activity, since the stronger the stability of the hairpin the higher the inhibition of protein synthesis. Destabilization of the stem-loop immediately upstream of the pyrimidine-tract also decreases IRES activity. Our work introduces a hybrid computational/experimental method to determine the importance of structural motifs for biological function. Specifically, we show the feasibility of using the software RNAiFold to design synthetic RNAs with particular sequence and structural motifs that permit subsequent experimental determination of the importance of such motifs for biological function.

  10. Novel DNA binding motifs in the DNA repair enzyme endonuclease III crystal structure.

    PubMed Central

    Thayer, M M; Ahern, H; Xing, D; Cunningham, R P; Tainer, J A

    1995-01-01

    The 1.85 A crystal structure of endonuclease III, combined with mutational analysis, suggests the structural basis for the DNA binding and catalytic activity of the enzyme. Helix-hairpin-helix (HhH) and [4Fe-4S] cluster loop (FCL) motifs, which we have named for their secondary structure, bracket the cleft separating the two alpha-helical domains of the enzyme. These two novel DNA binding motifs and the solvent-filled pocket in the cleft between them all lie within a positively charged and sequence-conserved surface region. Lys120 and Asp138, both shown by mutagenesis to be catalytically important, lie at the mouth of this pocket, suggesting that this pocket is part of the active site. The positions of the HhH motif and protruding FCL motif, which contains the DNA binding residue Lys191, can accommodate B-form DNA, with a flipped-out base bound within the active site pocket. The identification of HhH and FCL sequence patterns in other DNA binding proteins suggests that these motifs may be a recurrent structural theme for DNA binding proteins. Images PMID:7664751

  11. Function of Cd3ε-Mediated Signals in T Cell Development

    PubMed Central

    Sommers, Connie L.; Dejarnette, Jan B.; Huang, Kun; Lee, Jan; El-Khoury, Dalal; Shores, Elizabeth W.; Love, Paul E.

    2000-01-01

    The T cell antigen receptor (TCR) and pre-TCR complexes are composed of multiple signal-transducing subunits (CD3γ, CD3δ, CD3ε, and ζ) that each contain one or more copies of a semiconserved functional motif, the immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM). Although biochemical studies indicate that individual TCR-ITAMs may bind selectively or with different affinity to various effector molecules, data from other experiments suggest that at least some ITAMs are functionally equivalent. In this study, we examined the role of CD3ε ITAM-mediated signals in T cell development by genetically reconstituting CD3ε-deficient mice with transgenes encoding either wild-type or ITAM-mutant (signaling defective) forms of the protein. The results demonstrate that signals transduced by CD3ε are not specifically required for T cell maturation but instead contribute quantitatively to TCR signaling in a manner similar to that previously observed for ζ chain. Unexpectedly, analysis of TCR-transgenic/CD3ε-mutant mice reveals a potential role for CD3ε signals in T cell survival. PMID:10993922

  12. Identification of imine reductase-specific sequence motifs.

    PubMed

    Fademrecht, Silvia; Scheller, Philipp N; Nestl, Bettina M; Hauer, Bernhard; Pleiss, Jürgen

    2016-05-01

    Chiral amines are valuable building blocks for the production of a variety of pharmaceuticals, agrochemicals and other specialty chemicals. Only recently, imine reductases (IREDs) were discovered which catalyze the stereoselective reduction of imines to chiral amines. Although several IREDs were biochemically characterized in the last few years, knowledge of the reaction mechanism and the molecular basis of substrate specificity and stereoselectivity is limited. To gain further insights into the sequence-function relationships, the Imine Reductase Engineering Database (www.IRED.BioCatNet.de) was established and a systematic analysis of 530 putative IREDs was performed. A standard numbering scheme based on R-IRED-Sk was introduced to facilitate the identification and communication of structurally equivalent positions in different proteins. A conservation analysis revealed a highly conserved cofactor binding region and a predominantly hydrophobic substrate binding cleft. Two IRED-specific motifs were identified, the cofactor binding motif GLGxMGx(5 )[ATS]x(4) Gx(4) [VIL]WNR[TS]x(2) [KR] and the active site motif Gx[DE]x[GDA]x[APS]x(3){K}x[ASL]x[LMVIAG]. Our results indicate a preference toward NADPH for all IREDs and explain why, despite their sequence similarity to β-hydroxyacid dehydrogenases (β-HADs), no conversion of β-hydroxyacids has been observed. Superfamily-specific conservations were investigated to explore the molecular basis of their stereopreference. Based on our analysis and previous experimental results on IRED mutants, an exclusive role of standard position 187 for stereoselectivity is excluded. Alternatively, two standard positions 139 and 194 were identified which are superfamily-specifically conserved and differ in R- and S-selective enzymes.

  13. Identification of an oligodeoxynucleotide sequence motif that specifically inhibits phosphorylation by protein tyrosine kinases.

    PubMed

    Krieg, A M; Matson, S; Cheng, K; Fisher, E; Koretzky, G A; Koland, J G

    1997-04-01

    Protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs) have central roles in cellular signal transduction. We have identified a sequence motif (CGT[C]GA) in phosphorothioate-modified oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) that specifically inhibits the enzymatic activity of recombinant or immunoprecipitated PTK in vitro. Hexamer ODNs containing this motif block both substrate and autophosphorylation of at least four different PTKs but have no apparent effect on the enzymatic activity of a serine/threonine protein kinase. These data suggest possible new applications for ODNs and have implications for the design and interpretation of experiments using antisense or triplex ODNs.

  14. Occurrence probability of structured motifs in random sequences.

    PubMed

    Robin, S; Daudin, J-J; Richard, H; Sagot, M-F; Schbath, S

    2002-01-01

    The problem of extracting from a set of nucleic acid sequences motifs which may have biological function is more and more important. In this paper, we are interested in particular motifs that may be implicated in the transcription process. These motifs, called structured motifs, are composed of two ordered parts separated by a variable distance and allowing for substitutions. In order to assess their statistical significance, we propose approximations of the probability of occurrences of such a structured motif in a given sequence. An application of our method to evaluate candidate promoters in E. coli and B. subtilis is presented. Simulations show the goodness of the approximations.

  15. Signature motifs of GDP polyribonucleotidyltransferase, a non-segmented negative strand RNA viral mRNA capping enzyme, domain in the L protein are required for covalent enzyme-pRNA intermediate formation.

    PubMed

    Neubauer, Julie; Ogino, Minako; Green, Todd J; Ogino, Tomoaki

    2016-01-08

    The unconventional mRNA capping enzyme (GDP polyribonucleotidyltransferase, PRNTase; block V) domain in RNA polymerase L proteins of non-segmented negative strand (NNS) RNA viruses (e.g. rabies, measles, Ebola) contains five collinear sequence elements, Rx(3)Wx(3-8)ΦxGxζx(P/A) (motif A; Φ, hydrophobic; ζ, hydrophilic), (Y/W)ΦGSxT (motif B), W (motif C), HR (motif D) and ζxxΦx(F/Y)QxxΦ (motif E). We performed site-directed mutagenesis of the L protein of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV, a prototypic NNS RNA virus) to examine participation of these motifs in mRNA capping. Similar to the catalytic residues in motif D, G1100 in motif A, T1157 in motif B, W1188 in motif C, and F1269 and Q1270 in motif E were found to be essential or important for the PRNTase activity in the step of the covalent L-pRNA intermediate formation, but not for the GTPase activity that generates GDP (pRNA acceptor). Cap defective mutations in these residues induced termination of mRNA synthesis at position +40 followed by aberrant stop-start transcription, and abolished virus gene expression in host cells. These results suggest that the conserved motifs constitute the active site of the PRNTase domain and the L-pRNA intermediate formation followed by the cap formation is essential for successful synthesis of full-length mRNAs.

  16. Signature motifs of GDP polyribonucleotidyltransferase, a non-segmented negative strand RNA viral mRNA capping enzyme, domain in the L protein are required for covalent enzyme–pRNA intermediate formation

    PubMed Central

    Neubauer, Julie; Ogino, Minako; Green, Todd J.; Ogino, Tomoaki

    2016-01-01

    The unconventional mRNA capping enzyme (GDP polyribonucleotidyltransferase, PRNTase; block V) domain in RNA polymerase L proteins of non-segmented negative strand (NNS) RNA viruses (e.g. rabies, measles, Ebola) contains five collinear sequence elements, Rx(3)Wx(3–8)ΦxGxζx(P/A) (motif A; Φ, hydrophobic; ζ, hydrophilic), (Y/W)ΦGSxT (motif B), W (motif C), HR (motif D) and ζxxΦx(F/Y)QxxΦ (motif E). We performed site-directed mutagenesis of the L protein of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV, a prototypic NNS RNA virus) to examine participation of these motifs in mRNA capping. Similar to the catalytic residues in motif D, G1100 in motif A, T1157 in motif B, W1188 in motif C, and F1269 and Q1270 in motif E were found to be essential or important for the PRNTase activity in the step of the covalent L-pRNA intermediate formation, but not for the GTPase activity that generates GDP (pRNA acceptor). Cap defective mutations in these residues induced termination of mRNA synthesis at position +40 followed by aberrant stop–start transcription, and abolished virus gene expression in host cells. These results suggest that the conserved motifs constitute the active site of the PRNTase domain and the L-pRNA intermediate formation followed by the cap formation is essential for successful synthesis of full-length mRNAs. PMID:26602696

  17. CLIMP: Clustering Motifs via Maximal Cliques with Parallel Computing Design

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yong

    2016-01-01

    A set of conserved binding sites recognized by a transcription factor is called a motif, which can be found by many applications of comparative genomics for identifying over-represented segments. Moreover, when numerous putative motifs are predicted from a collection of genome-wide data, their similarity data can be represented as a large graph, where these motifs are connected to one another. However, an efficient clustering algorithm is desired for clustering the motifs that belong to the same groups and separating the motifs that belong to different groups, or even deleting an amount of spurious ones. In this work, a new motif clustering algorithm, CLIMP, is proposed by using maximal cliques and sped up by parallelizing its program. When a synthetic motif dataset from the database JASPAR, a set of putative motifs from a phylogenetic foot-printing dataset, and a set of putative motifs from a ChIP dataset are used to compare the performances of CLIMP and two other high-performance algorithms, the results demonstrate that CLIMP mostly outperforms the two algorithms on the three datasets for motif clustering, so that it can be a useful complement of the clustering procedures in some genome-wide motif prediction pipelines. CLIMP is available at http://sqzhang.cn/climp.html. PMID:27487245

  18. No tradeoff between versatility and robustness in gene circuit motifs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payne, Joshua L.

    2016-05-01

    Circuit motifs are small directed subgraphs that appear in real-world networks significantly more often than in randomized networks. In the Boolean model of gene circuits, most motifs are realized by multiple circuit genotypes. Each of a motif's constituent circuit genotypes may have one or more functions, which are embodied in the expression patterns the circuit forms in response to specific initial conditions. Recent enumeration of a space of nearly 17 million three-gene circuit genotypes revealed that all circuit motifs have more than one function, with the number of functions per motif ranging from 12 to nearly 30,000. This indicates that some motifs are more functionally versatile than others. However, the individual circuit genotypes that constitute each motif are less robust to mutation if they have many functions, hinting that functionally versatile motifs may be less robust to mutation than motifs with few functions. Here, I explore the relationship between versatility and robustness in circuit motifs, demonstrating that functionally versatile motifs are robust to mutation despite the inherent tradeoff between versatility and robustness at the level of an individual circuit genotype.

  19. RNA structural motif recognition based on least-squares distance.

    PubMed

    Shen, Ying; Wong, Hau-San; Zhang, Shaohong; Zhang, Lin

    2013-09-01

    RNA structural motifs are recurrent structural elements occurring in RNA molecules. RNA structural motif recognition aims to find RNA substructures that are similar to a query motif, and it is important for RNA structure analysis and RNA function prediction. In view of this, we propose a new method known as RNA Structural Motif Recognition based on Least-Squares distance (LS-RSMR) to effectively recognize RNA structural motifs. A test set consisting of five types of RNA structural motifs occurring in Escherichia coli ribosomal RNA is compiled by us. Experiments are conducted for recognizing these five types of motifs. The experimental results fully reveal the superiority of the proposed LS-RSMR compared with four other state-of-the-art methods.

  20. Chaotic motif sampler: detecting motifs from biological sequences by using chaotic neurodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuura, Takafumi; Ikeguchi, Tohru

    Identification of a region in biological sequences, motif extraction problem (MEP) is solved in bioinformatics. However, the MEP is an NP-hard problem. Therefore, it is almost impossible to obtain an optimal solution within a reasonable time frame. To find near optimal solutions for NP-hard combinatorial optimization problems such as traveling salesman problems, quadratic assignment problems, and vehicle routing problems, chaotic search, which is one of the deterministic approaches, has been proposed and exhibits better performance than stochastic approaches. In this paper, we propose a new alignment method that employs chaotic dynamics to solve the MEPs. It is called the Chaotic Motif Sampler. We show that the performance of the Chaotic Motif Sampler is considerably better than that of the conventional methods such as the Gibbs Site Sampler and the Neighborhood Optimization for Multiple Alignment Discovery.

  1. Bases of motifs for generating repeated patterns with wild cards.

    PubMed

    Pisanti, Nadia; Crochemore, Maxime; Grossi, Roberto; Sagot, Marie-France

    2005-01-01

    Motif inference represents one of the most important areas of research in computational biology, and one of its oldest ones. Despite this, the problem remains very much open in the sense that no existing definition is fully satisfying, either in formal terms, or in relation to the biological questions that involve finding such motifs. Two main types of motifs have been considered in the literature: matrices (of letter frequency per position in the motif) and patterns. There is no conclusive evidence in favor of either, and recent work has attempted to integrate the two types into a single model. In this paper, we address the formal issue in relation to motifs as patterns. This is essential to get at a better understanding of motifs in general. In particular, we consider a promising idea that was recently proposed, which attempted to avoid the combinatorial explosion in the number of motifs by means of a generator set for the motifs. Instead of exhibiting a complete list of motifs satisfying some input constraints, what is produced is a basis of such motifs from which all the other ones can be generated. We study the computational cost of determining such a basis of repeated motifs with wild cards in a sequence. We give new upper and lower bounds on such a cost, introducing a notion of basis that is provably contained in (and, thus, smaller) than previously defined ones. Our basis can be computed in less time and space, and is still able to generate the same set of motifs. We also prove that the number of motifs in all bases defined so far grows exponentially with the quorum, that is, with the minimal number of times a motif must appear in a sequence, something unnoticed in previous work. We show that there is no hope to efficiently compute such bases unless the quorum is fixed.

  2. Binding of the Grb2 SH2 domain to phosphotyrosine motifs does not change the affinity of its SH3 domains for Sos proline-rich motifs.

    PubMed

    Cussac, D; Frech, M; Chardin, P

    1994-09-01

    Phosphotyrosine peptide binding to Grb2 induces tryptophan fluorescence changes in the Src homology 2 (SH2) domain. Affinities are in the nanomolar range, the Shc peptide having the highest affinity, followed by peptides mimicking Grb2 binding sites on EGF and HGF receptors, the putative sites on insulin and IGF-1 receptors having much lower affinities. Proline-rich peptide binding to the SH3 domains induces fluorescence changes mainly in the C-terminal SH3. Affinities are in the micromolar range, the highest affinity peptides mimicking the first proline-rich motif of the Sos C-terminus. Additional residues before this PVPPPVPP motif provide a minor contribution to the binding, but the two residues after this motif are important and may contribute to specificity. The affinity of each SH3 for each proline-rich motif is too low to account for the high stability of the Grb2-Sos complex, suggesting that Grb2 recognizes other structural features in the Sos C-terminus. Binding of a phosphotyrosine peptide to the SH2 has no effect on the SH3s. Thus the binding of Grb2 to a receptor or to an associated protein phosphorylated on tyrosines is unlikely to activate the exchange factor activity of Sos through a conformational change transmitted from the SH2 to the SH3 domains.

  3. Structural basis for the binding of tryptophan-based motifs by δ-COP

    PubMed Central

    Suckling, Richard J.; Poon, Pak Phi; Travis, Sophie M.; Majoul, Irina V.; Hughson, Frederick M.; Evans, Philip R.; Duden, Rainer; Owen, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Coatomer consists of two subcomplexes: the membrane-targeting, ADP ribosylation factor 1 (Arf1):GTP-binding βγδζ-COP F-subcomplex, which is related to the adaptor protein (AP) clathrin adaptors, and the cargo-binding αβ’ε-COP B-subcomplex. We present the structure of the C-terminal μ-homology domain of the yeast δ-COP subunit in complex with the WxW motif from its binding partner, the endoplasmic reticulum-localized Dsl1 tether. The motif binds at a site distinct from that used by the homologous AP μ subunits to bind YxxΦ cargo motifs with its two tryptophan residues sitting in compatible pockets. We also show that the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Arf GTPase-activating protein (GAP) homolog Gcs1p uses a related WxxF motif at its extreme C terminus to bind to δ-COP at the same site in the same way. Mutations designed on the basis of the structure in conjunction with isothermal titration calorimetry confirm the mode of binding and show that mammalian δ-COP binds related tryptophan-based motifs such as that from ArfGAP1 in a similar manner. We conclude that δ-COP subunits bind Wxn(1–6)[WF] motifs within unstructured regions of proteins that influence the lifecycle of COPI-coated vesicles; this conclusion is supported by the observation that, in the context of a sensitizing domain deletion in Dsl1p, mutating the tryptophan-based motif-binding site in yeast causes defects in both growth and carboxypeptidase Y trafficking/processing. PMID:26578768

  4. Structural basis for the binding of tryptophan-based motifs by δ-COP.

    PubMed

    Suckling, Richard J; Poon, Pak Phi; Travis, Sophie M; Majoul, Irina V; Hughson, Frederick M; Evans, Philip R; Duden, Rainer; Owen, David J

    2015-11-17

    Coatomer consists of two subcomplexes: the membrane-targeting, ADP ribosylation factor 1 (Arf1):GTP-binding βγδζ-COP F-subcomplex, which is related to the adaptor protein (AP) clathrin adaptors, and the cargo-binding αβ'ε-COP B-subcomplex. We present the structure of the C-terminal μ-homology domain of the yeast δ-COP subunit in complex with the WxW motif from its binding partner, the endoplasmic reticulum-localized Dsl1 tether. The motif binds at a site distinct from that used by the homologous AP μ subunits to bind YxxΦ cargo motifs with its two tryptophan residues sitting in compatible pockets. We also show that the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Arf GTPase-activating protein (GAP) homolog Gcs1p uses a related WxxF motif at its extreme C terminus to bind to δ-COP at the same site in the same way. Mutations designed on the basis of the structure in conjunction with isothermal titration calorimetry confirm the mode of binding and show that mammalian δ-COP binds related tryptophan-based motifs such as that from ArfGAP1 in a similar manner. We conclude that δ-COP subunits bind Wxn(1-6)[WF] motifs within unstructured regions of proteins that influence the lifecycle of COPI-coated vesicles; this conclusion is supported by the observation that, in the context of a sensitizing domain deletion in Dsl1p, mutating the tryptophan-based motif-binding site in yeast causes defects in both growth and carboxypeptidase Y trafficking/processing.

  5. MINER: software for phylogenetic motif identification.

    PubMed

    La, David; Livesay, Dennis R

    2005-07-01

    MINER is web-based software for phylogenetic motif (PM) identification. PMs are sequence regions (fragments) that conserve the overall familial phylogeny. PMs have been shown to correspond to a wide variety of catalytic regions, substrate-binding sites and protein interfaces, making them ideal functional site predictions. The MINER output provides an intuitive interface for interactive PM sequence analysis and structural visualization. The web implementation of MINER is freely available at http://www.pmap.csupomona.edu/MINER/. Source code is available to the academic community on request.

  6. A systematic analysis of a mi-RNA inter-pathway regulatory motif

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The continuing discovery of new types and functions of small non-coding RNAs is suggesting the presence of regulatory mechanisms far more complex than the ones currently used to study and design Gene Regulatory Networks. Just focusing on the roles of micro RNAs (miRNAs), they have been found to be part of several intra-pathway regulatory motifs. However, inter-pathway regulatory mechanisms have been often neglected and require further investigation. Results In this paper we present the result of a systems biology study aimed at analyzing a high-level inter-pathway regulatory motif called Pathway Protection Loop, not previously described, in which miRNAs seem to play a crucial role in the successful behavior and activation of a pathway. Through the automatic analysis of a large set of public available databases, we found statistical evidence that this inter-pathway regulatory motif is very common in several classes of KEGG Homo Sapiens pathways and concurs in creating a complex regulatory network involving several pathways connected by this specific motif. The role of this motif seems also confirmed by a deeper review of other research activities on selected representative pathways. Conclusions Although previous studies suggested transcriptional regulation mechanism at the pathway level such as the Pathway Protection Loop, a high-level analysis like the one proposed in this paper is still missing. The understanding of higher-level regulatory motifs could, as instance, lead to new approaches in the identification of therapeutic targets because it could unveil new and “indirect” paths to activate or silence a target pathway. However, a lot of work still needs to be done to better uncover this high-level inter-pathway regulation including enlarging the analysis to other small non-coding RNA molecules. PMID:24152805

  7. Transcription factor motif quality assessment requires systematic comparative analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kibet, Caleb Kipkurui; Machanick, Philip

    2016-01-01

    Transcription factor (TF) binding site prediction remains a challenge in gene regulatory research due to degeneracy and potential variability in binding sites in the genome. Dozens of algorithms designed to learn binding models (motifs) have generated many motifs available in research papers with a subset making it to databases like JASPAR, UniPROBE and Transfac. The presence of many versions of motifs from the various databases for a single TF and the lack of a standardized assessment technique makes it difficult for biologists to make an appropriate choice of binding model and for algorithm developers to benchmark, test and improve on their models. In this study, we review and evaluate the approaches in use, highlight differences and demonstrate the difficulty of defining a standardized motif assessment approach. We review scoring functions, motif length, test data and the type of performance metrics used in prior studies as some of the factors that influence the outcome of a motif assessment. We show that the scoring functions and statistics used in motif assessment influence ranking of motifs in a TF-specific manner. We also show that TF binding specificity can vary by source of genomic binding data. We also demonstrate that information content of a motif is not in isolation a measure of motif quality but is influenced by TF binding behaviour. We conclude that there is a need for an easy-to-use tool that presents all available evidence for a comparative analysis. PMID:27092243

  8. Cross-disciplinary detection and analysis of network motifs.

    PubMed

    Tran, Ngoc Tam L; DeLuccia, Luke; McDonald, Aidan F; Huang, Chun-Hsi

    2015-01-01

    The detection of network motifs has recently become an important part of network analysis across all disciplines. In this work, we detected and analyzed network motifs from undirected and directed networks of several different disciplines, including biological network, social network, ecological network, as well as other networks such as airlines, power grid, and co-purchase of political books networks. Our analysis revealed that undirected networks are similar at the basic three and four nodes, while the analysis of directed networks revealed the distinction between networks of different disciplines. The study showed that larger motifs contained the three-node motif as a subgraph. Topological analysis revealed that similar networks have similar small motifs, but as the motif size increases, differences arise. Pearson correlation coefficient showed strong positive relationship between some undirected networks but inverse relationship between some directed networks. The study suggests that the three-node motif is a building block of larger motifs. It also suggests that undirected networks share similar low-level structures. Moreover, similar networks share similar small motifs, but larger motifs define the unique structure of individuals. Pearson correlation coefficient suggests that protein structure networks, dolphin social network, and co-authorships in network science belong to a superfamily. In addition, yeast protein-protein interaction network, primary school contact network, Zachary's karate club network, and co-purchase of political books network can be classified into a superfamily.

  9. Olf-1-binding site: characterization of an olfactory neuron-specific promoter motif.

    PubMed Central

    Kudrycki, K; Stein-Izsak, C; Behn, C; Grillo, M; Akeson, R; Margolis, F L

    1993-01-01

    We report characterization of several domains within the 5' flanking region of the olfactory marker protein (OMP) gene that may participate in regulating transcription of this and other olfactory neuron-specific genes. Analysis by electrophoretic mobility shift assay and DNase I footprinting identifies two regions that contain a novel sequence motif. Interactions between this motif and nuclear proteins were detected only with nuclear protein extracts derived from olfactory neuroepithelium, and this activity is more abundant in olfactory epithelium enriched in immature neurons. We have designated a factor(s) involved in this binding as Olf-1. The Olf-1-binding motif consensus sequence was defined as TCCCC(A/T)NGGAG. Studies with transgenic mice indicate that a 0.3-kb fragment of the OMP gene containing one Olf-1 motif is sufficient for olfactory tissue-specific expression of the reporter gene. Some of the other identified sequence motifs also interact specifically with olfactory nuclear protein extracts. We propose that Olf-1 is a novel, olfactory neuron-specific trans-acting factor involved in the cell-specific expression of OMP. Images PMID:8474458

  10. Promoter Motifs in NCLDVs: An Evolutionary Perspective.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Graziele Pereira; Andrade, Ana Cláudia Dos Santos Pereira; Rodrigues, Rodrigo Araújo Lima; Arantes, Thalita Souza; Boratto, Paulo Victor Miranda; Silva, Ludmila Karen Dos Santos; Dornas, Fábio Pio; Trindade, Giliane de Souza; Drumond, Betânia Paiva; La Scola, Bernard; Kroon, Erna Geessien; Abrahão, Jônatas Santos

    2017-01-20

    For many years, gene expression in the three cellular domains has been studied in an attempt to discover sequences associated with the regulation of the transcription process. Some specific transcriptional features were described in viruses, although few studies have been devoted to understanding the evolutionary aspects related to the spread of promoter motifs through related viral families. The discovery of giant viruses and the proposition of the new viral order Megavirales that comprise a monophyletic group, named nucleo-cytoplasmic large DNA viruses (NCLDV), raised new questions in the field. Some putative promoter sequences have already been described for some NCLDV members, bringing new insights into the evolutionary history of these complex microorganisms. In this review, we summarize the main aspects of the transcription regulation process in the three domains of life, followed by a systematic description of what is currently known about promoter regions in several NCLDVs. We also discuss how the analysis of the promoter sequences could bring new ideas about the giant viruses' evolution. Finally, considering a possible common ancestor for the NCLDV group, we discussed possible promoters' evolutionary scenarios and propose the term "MEGA-box" to designate an ancestor promoter motif ('TATATAAAATTGA') that could be evolved gradually by nucleotides' gain and loss and point mutations.

  11. Promoter Motifs in NCLDVs: An Evolutionary Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Graziele Pereira; Andrade, Ana Cláudia dos Santos Pereira; Rodrigues, Rodrigo Araújo Lima; Arantes, Thalita Souza; Boratto, Paulo Victor Miranda; Silva, Ludmila Karen dos Santos; Dornas, Fábio Pio; Trindade, Giliane de Souza; Drumond, Betânia Paiva; La Scola, Bernard; Kroon, Erna Geessien; Abrahão, Jônatas Santos

    2017-01-01

    For many years, gene expression in the three cellular domains has been studied in an attempt to discover sequences associated with the regulation of the transcription process. Some specific transcriptional features were described in viruses, although few studies have been devoted to understanding the evolutionary aspects related to the spread of promoter motifs through related viral families. The discovery of giant viruses and the proposition of the new viral order Megavirales that comprise a monophyletic group, named nucleo-cytoplasmic large DNA viruses (NCLDV), raised new questions in the field. Some putative promoter sequences have already been described for some NCLDV members, bringing new insights into the evolutionary history of these complex microorganisms. In this review, we summarize the main aspects of the transcription regulation process in the three domains of life, followed by a systematic description of what is currently known about promoter regions in several NCLDVs. We also discuss how the analysis of the promoter sequences could bring new ideas about the giant viruses’ evolution. Finally, considering a possible common ancestor for the NCLDV group, we discussed possible promoters’ evolutionary scenarios and propose the term “MEGA-box” to designate an ancestor promoter motif (‘TATATAAAATTGA’) that could be evolved gradually by nucleotides’ gain and loss and point mutations. PMID:28117683

  12. EAR motif-mediated transcriptional repression in plants: an underlying mechanism for epigenetic regulation of gene expression.

    PubMed

    Kagale, Sateesh; Rozwadowski, Kevin

    2011-02-01

    Ethylene-responsive element binding factor-associated Amphiphilic Repression (EAR) motif-mediated transcriptional repression is emerging as one of the principal mechanisms of plant gene regulation. The EAR motif, defined by the consensus sequence patterns of either LxLxL or DLNxxP, is the most predominant form of transcriptional repression motif so far identified in plants. Additionally, this active repression motif is highly conserved in transcriptional regulators known to function as negative regulators in a broad range of developmental and physiological processes across evolutionarily diverse plant species. Recent discoveries of co-repressors interacting with EAR motifs, such as TOPLESS (TPL) and AtSAP18, have begun to unravel the mechanisms of EAR motif-mediated repression. The demonstration of genetic interaction between mutants of TPL and AtHDA19, co-complex formation between TPL-related 1 (TPR1) and AtHDA19, as well as direct physical interaction between AtSAP18 and AtHDA19 support a model where EAR repressors, via recruitment of chromatin remodeling factors, facilitate epigenetic regulation of gene expression. Here, we discuss the biological significance of EAR-mediated gene regulation in the broader context of plant biology and present literature evidence in support of a model for EAR motif-mediated repression via the recruitment and action of chromatin modifiers. Additionally, we discuss the possible influences of phosphorylation and ubiquitination on the function and turnover of EAR repressors.

  13. Negative regulation of defence and stress genes by EAR-motif-containing repressors.

    PubMed

    Kazan, Kemal

    2006-03-01

    Although positive control or activation mechanism(s) involved in plant defence- and stress-related gene expression is relatively well studied, little is known about what keeps defensive armoury under control when not needed. Recent reports suggest that transcriptional repression of gene expression by EAR-motif-containing repressor proteins plays a key role in modulating plant defence and stress responses.

  14. Electromagnetic Field Seems to Not Influence Transcription via CTCT Motif in Three Plant Promoters

    PubMed Central

    Sztafrowski, Dariusz; Aksamit-Stachurska, Anna; Kostyn, Kamil; Mackiewicz, Paweł; Łukaszewicz, Marcin

    2017-01-01

    It was proposed that magnetic fields (MFs) can influence gene transcription via CTCT motif located in human HSP70 promoter. To check the universality of this mechanism, we estimated the potential role of this motif on plant gene transcription in response to MFs using both bioinformatics and experimental studies. We searched potential promoter sequences (1000 bp upstream) in the potato Solanum tuberosum and thale cress Arabidopsis thaliana genomes for the CTCT sequence. The motif was found, on average, 3.6 and 4.3 times per promoter (148,487 and 134,361 motifs in total) in these two species, respectively; however, the CTCT sequences were not randomly distributed in the promoter regions but were preferentially located near the transcription initiation site and were closely packed. The closer these CTCT sequences to the transcription initiation site, the smaller distance between them in both plants. One can assume that genes with many CTCT motifs in their promoter regions can be potentially regulated by MFs. To check this assumption, we tested the influence of MFs on gene expression in a transgenic potato with three promoters (16R, 20R, and 5UGT) containing from 3 to 12 CTCT sequences and starting expression of β-glucuronidase as a reported gene. The potatoes were exposed to a 50 Hz 60–70 A/m MF for 30 min and the reporter gene activity was measured for up to 24 h. Although other factors induced the reporter gene activity, the MF did not. It implies the CTCT motif does not mediate in response to MF in the tested plant promoters. PMID:28326086

  15. Probabilistic models for semisupervised discriminative motif discovery in DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jong Kyoung; Choi, Seungjin

    2011-01-01

    Methods for discriminative motif discovery in DNA sequences identify transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs), searching only for patterns that differentiate two sets (positive and negative sets) of sequences. On one hand, discriminative methods increase the sensitivity and specificity of motif discovery, compared to generative models. On the other hand, generative models can easily exploit unlabeled sequences to better detect functional motifs when labeled training samples are limited. In this paper, we develop a hybrid generative/discriminative model which enables us to make use of unlabeled sequences in the framework of discriminative motif discovery, leading to semisupervised discriminative motif discovery. Numerical experiments on yeast ChIP-chip data for discovering DNA motifs demonstrate that the best performance is obtained between the purely-generative and the purely-discriminative and the semisupervised learning improves the performance when labeled sequences are limited.

  16. An Affinity Propagation-Based DNA Motif Discovery Algorithm.

    PubMed

    Sun, Chunxiao; Huo, Hongwei; Yu, Qiang; Guo, Haitao; Sun, Zhigang

    2015-01-01

    The planted (l, d) motif search (PMS) is one of the fundamental problems in bioinformatics, which plays an important role in locating transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) in DNA sequences. Nowadays, identifying weak motifs and reducing the effect of local optimum are still important but challenging tasks for motif discovery. To solve the tasks, we propose a new algorithm, APMotif, which first applies the Affinity Propagation (AP) clustering in DNA sequences to produce informative and good candidate motifs and then employs Expectation Maximization (EM) refinement to obtain the optimal motifs from the candidate motifs. Experimental results both on simulated data sets and real biological data sets show that APMotif usually outperforms four other widely used algorithms in terms of high prediction accuracy.

  17. Network Motifs: Simple Building Blocks of Complex Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milo, R.; Shen-Orr, S.; Itzkovitz, S.; Kashtan, N.; Chklovskii, D.; Alon, U.

    2002-10-01

    Complex networks are studied across many fields of science. To uncover their structural design principles, we defined ``network motifs,'' patterns of interconnections occurring in complex networks at numbers that are significantly higher than those in randomized networks. We found such motifs in networks from biochemistry, neurobiology, ecology, and engineering. The motifs shared by ecological food webs were distinct from the motifs shared by the genetic networks of Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae or from those found in the World Wide Web. Similar motifs were found in networks that perform information processing, even though they describe elements as different as biomolecules within a cell and synaptic connections between neurons in Caenorhabditis elegans. Motifs may thus define universal classes of networks. This approach may uncover the basic building blocks of most networks.

  18. Detecting DNA regulatory motifs by incorporating positional trendsin information content

    SciTech Connect

    Kechris, Katherina J.; van Zwet, Erik; Bickel, Peter J.; Eisen,Michael B.

    2004-05-04

    On the basis of the observation that conserved positions in transcription factor binding sites are often clustered together, we propose a simple extension to the model-based motif discovery methods. We assign position-specific prior distributions to the frequency parameters of the model, penalizing deviations from a specified conservation profile. Examples with both simulated and real data show that this extension helps discover motifs as the data become noisier or when there is a competing false motif.

  19. The cysteine-cluster motif of c-Yes, Lyn and FAK as a suppressive module for the kinases.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Mohammad Aminur; Senga, Takeshi; Oo, Myat Lin; Hasegawa, Hitoki; Biswas, Md Helal Uddin; Mon, Naing Naing; Huang, Pengyu; Ito, Satoko; Yamamoto, Tadashi; Hamaguchi, Michinari

    2008-04-01

    The Src family of non-receptor protein tyrosine kinases plays a critical role in the progression of human cancers so that the development of its specific inhibitors is important as a therapeutic tool. We previously reported that cysteine residues in the cysteine-cluster (CC) motif of v-Src were critical for the kinase inactivation by the SH-alkylating agents such as N-(9-acridinyl) maleimide (NAM), whereas other cysteine residues were dispensable. We found similar CC-motifs in other Src-family kinases and a non-Src-family kinase, FAK. In this study, we explored the function of the CC-motif in Yes, Lyn and FAK. While Src has four cysteines in the CC-motif, c-Yes and Lyn have three and two of the four cysteines, respectively. Two conserved cysteines of the Src family kinases, corresponding to Cys487 and Cys498 of Src, were essential for the resistance to the inactivation of the kinase activity by NAM, whereas the first cysteine of c-Yes, which is absent in Lyn, was less important. FAK has similar CC-motifs with two cysteines and both cysteines were again essential for the resistance to the inactivation of the kinase activity by NAM. Taken together, modification of cysteine residues of the CC-motif causes a repressor effect on the catalytic activity of the Src family kinases and FAK.

  20. RNA Sociology: Group Behavioral Motifs of RNA Consortia

    PubMed Central

    Witzany, Guenther

    2014-01-01

    RNA sociology investigates the behavioral motifs of RNA consortia from the social science perspective. Besides the self-folding of RNAs into single stem loop structures, group building of such stem loops results in a variety of essential agents that are highly active in regulatory processes in cellular and non-cellular life. RNA stem loop self-folding and group building do not depend solely on sequence syntax; more important are their contextual (functional) needs. Also, evolutionary processes seem to occur through RNA stem loop consortia that may act as a complement. This means the whole entity functions only if all participating parts are coordinated, although the complementary building parts originally evolved for different functions. If complementary groups, such as rRNAs and tRNAs, are placed together in selective pressure contexts, new evolutionary features may emerge. Evolution initiated by competent agents in natural genome editing clearly contrasts with statistical error replication narratives. PMID:25426799

  1. Gibbs motif sampling: detection of bacterial outer membrane protein repeats.

    PubMed Central

    Neuwald, A. F.; Liu, J. S.; Lawrence, C. E.

    1995-01-01

    The detection and alignment of locally conserved regions (motifs) in multiple sequences can provide insight into protein structure, function, and evolution. A new Gibbs sampling algorithm is described that detects motif-encoding regions in sequences and optimally partitions them into distinct motif models; this is illustrated using a set of immunoglobulin fold proteins. When applied to sequences sharing a single motif, the sampler can be used to classify motif regions into related submodels, as is illustrated using helix-turn-helix DNA-binding proteins. Other statistically based procedures are described for searching a database for sequences matching motifs found by the sampler. When applied to a set of 32 very distantly related bacterial integral outer membrane proteins, the sampler revealed that they share a subtle, repetitive motif. Although BLAST (Altschul SF et al., 1990, J Mol Biol 215:403-410) fails to detect significant pairwise similarity between any of the sequences, the repeats present in these outer membrane proteins, taken as a whole, are highly significant (based on a generally applicable statistical test for motifs described here). Analysis of bacterial porins with known trimeric beta-barrel structure and related proteins reveals a similar repetitive motif corresponding to alternating membrane-spanning beta-strands. These beta-strands occur on the membrane interface (as opposed to the trimeric interface) of the beta-barrel. The broad conservation and structural location of these repeats suggests that they play important functional roles. PMID:8520488

  2. Discriminative motif analysis of high-throughput dataset

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Zizhen; MacQuarrie, Kyle L.; Fong, Abraham P.; Tapscott, Stephen J.; Ruzzo, Walter L.; Gentleman, Robert C.

    2014-01-01

    Motivation: High-throughput ChIP-seq studies typically identify thousands of peaks for a single transcription factor (TF). It is common for traditional motif discovery tools to predict motifs that are statistically significant against a naïve background distribution but are of questionable biological relevance. Results: We describe a simple yet effective algorithm for discovering differential motifs between two sequence datasets that is effective in eliminating systematic biases and scalable to large datasets. Tested on 207 ENCODE ChIP-seq datasets, our method identifies correct motifs in 78% of the datasets with known motifs, demonstrating improvement in both accuracy and efficiency compared with DREME, another state-of-art discriminative motif discovery tool. More interestingly, on the remaining more challenging datasets, we identify common technical or biological factors that compromise the motif search results and use advanced features of our tool to control for these factors. We also present case studies demonstrating the ability of our method to detect single base pair differences in DNA specificity of two similar TFs. Lastly, we demonstrate discovery of key TF motifs involved in tissue specification by examination of high-throughput DNase accessibility data. Availability: The motifRG package is publically available via the bioconductor repository. Contact: yzizhen@fhcrc.org Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:24162561

  3. An RNA motif that binds ATP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sassanfar, M.; Szostak, J. W.

    1993-01-01

    RNAs that contain specific high-affinity binding sites for small molecule ligands immobilized on a solid support are present at a frequency of roughly one in 10(10)-10(11) in pools of random sequence RNA molecules. Here we describe a new in vitro selection procedure designed to ensure the isolation of RNAs that bind the ligand of interest in solution as well as on a solid support. We have used this method to isolate a remarkably small RNA motif that binds ATP, a substrate in numerous biological reactions and the universal biological high-energy intermediate. The selected ATP-binding RNAs contain a consensus sequence, embedded in a common secondary structure. The binding properties of ATP analogues and modified RNAs show that the binding interaction is characterized by a large number of close contacts between the ATP and RNA, and by a change in the conformation of the RNA.

  4. Complex lasso: new entangled motifs in proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niemyska, Wanda; Dabrowski-Tumanski, Pawel; Kadlof, Michal; Haglund, Ellinor; Sułkowski, Piotr; Sulkowska, Joanna I.

    2016-11-01

    We identify new entangled motifs in proteins that we call complex lassos. Lassos arise in proteins with disulfide bridges (or in proteins with amide linkages), when termini of a protein backbone pierce through an auxiliary surface of minimal area, spanned on a covalent loop. We find that as much as 18% of all proteins with disulfide bridges in a non-redundant subset of PDB form complex lassos, and classify them into six distinct geometric classes, one of which resembles supercoiling known from DNA. Based on biological classification of proteins we find that lassos are much more common in viruses, plants and fungi than in other kingdoms of life. We also discuss how changes in the oxidation/reduction potential may affect the function of proteins with lassos. Lassos and associated surfaces of minimal area provide new, interesting and possessing many potential applications geometric characteristics not only of proteins, but also of other biomolecules.

  5. Complex lasso: new entangled motifs in proteins

    PubMed Central

    Niemyska, Wanda; Dabrowski-Tumanski, Pawel; Kadlof, Michal; Haglund, Ellinor; Sułkowski, Piotr; Sulkowska, Joanna I.

    2016-01-01

    We identify new entangled motifs in proteins that we call complex lassos. Lassos arise in proteins with disulfide bridges (or in proteins with amide linkages), when termini of a protein backbone pierce through an auxiliary surface of minimal area, spanned on a covalent loop. We find that as much as 18% of all proteins with disulfide bridges in a non-redundant subset of PDB form complex lassos, and classify them into six distinct geometric classes, one of which resembles supercoiling known from DNA. Based on biological classification of proteins we find that lassos are much more common in viruses, plants and fungi than in other kingdoms of life. We also discuss how changes in the oxidation/reduction potential may affect the function of proteins with lassos. Lassos and associated surfaces of minimal area provide new, interesting and possessing many potential applications geometric characteristics not only of proteins, but also of other biomolecules. PMID:27874096

  6. Motif-role-fingerprints: the building-blocks of motifs, clustering-coefficients and transitivities in directed networks.

    PubMed

    McDonnell, Mark D; Yaveroğlu, Ömer Nebil; Schmerl, Brett A; Iannella, Nicolangelo; Ward, Lawrence M

    2014-01-01

    Complex networks are frequently characterized by metrics for which particular subgraphs are counted. One statistic from this category, which we refer to as motif-role fingerprints, differs from global subgraph counts in that the number of subgraphs in which each node participates is counted. As with global subgraph counts, it can be important to distinguish between motif-role fingerprints that are 'structural' (induced subgraphs) and 'functional' (partial subgraphs). Here we show mathematically that a vector of all functional motif-role fingerprints can readily be obtained from an arbitrary directed adjacency matrix, and then converted to structural motif-role fingerprints by multiplying that vector by a specific invertible conversion matrix. This result demonstrates that a unique structural motif-role fingerprint exists for any given functional motif-role fingerprint. We demonstrate a similar result for the cases of functional and structural motif-fingerprints without node roles, and global subgraph counts that form the basis of standard motif analysis. We also explicitly highlight that motif-role fingerprints are elemental to several popular metrics for quantifying the subgraph structure of directed complex networks, including motif distributions, directed clustering coefficient, and transitivity. The relationships between each of these metrics and motif-role fingerprints also suggest new subtypes of directed clustering coefficients and transitivities. Our results have potential utility in analyzing directed synaptic networks constructed from neuronal connectome data, such as in terms of centrality. Other potential applications include anomaly detection in networks, identification of similar networks and identification of similar nodes within networks. Matlab code for calculating all stated metrics following calculation of functional motif-role fingerprints is provided as S1 Matlab File.

  7. Motif-Role-Fingerprints: The Building-Blocks of Motifs, Clustering-Coefficients and Transitivities in Directed Networks

    PubMed Central

    McDonnell, Mark D.; Yaveroğlu, Ömer Nebil; Schmerl, Brett A.; Iannella, Nicolangelo; Ward, Lawrence M.

    2014-01-01

    Complex networks are frequently characterized by metrics for which particular subgraphs are counted. One statistic from this category, which we refer to as motif-role fingerprints, differs from global subgraph counts in that the number of subgraphs in which each node participates is counted. As with global subgraph counts, it can be important to distinguish between motif-role fingerprints that are ‘structural’ (induced subgraphs) and ‘functional’ (partial subgraphs). Here we show mathematically that a vector of all functional motif-role fingerprints can readily be obtained from an arbitrary directed adjacency matrix, and then converted to structural motif-role fingerprints by multiplying that vector by a specific invertible conversion matrix. This result demonstrates that a unique structural motif-role fingerprint exists for any given functional motif-role fingerprint. We demonstrate a similar result for the cases of functional and structural motif-fingerprints without node roles, and global subgraph counts that form the basis of standard motif analysis. We also explicitly highlight that motif-role fingerprints are elemental to several popular metrics for quantifying the subgraph structure of directed complex networks, including motif distributions, directed clustering coefficient, and transitivity. The relationships between each of these metrics and motif-role fingerprints also suggest new subtypes of directed clustering coefficients and transitivities. Our results have potential utility in analyzing directed synaptic networks constructed from neuronal connectome data, such as in terms of centrality. Other potential applications include anomaly detection in networks, identification of similar networks and identification of similar nodes within networks. Matlab code for calculating all stated metrics following calculation of functional motif-role fingerprints is provided as S1 Matlab File. PMID:25486535

  8. Solution NMR characterization of Sgf73(1-104) indicates that Zn ion is required to stabilize zinc finger motif

    SciTech Connect

    Lai, Chaohua; Wu, Minhao; Li, Pan; Shi, Chaowei; Tian, Changlin; Zang, Jianye

    2010-07-02

    Zinc finger motif contains a zinc ion coordinated by several conserved amino acid residues. Yeast Sgf73 protein was identified as a component of SAGA (Spt/Ada/Gcn5 acetyltransferase) multi-subunit complex and Sgf73 protein was known to contain two zinc finger motifs. Sgf73(1-104), containing the first zinc finger motif, was necessary to modulate the deubiquitinase activity of SAGA complex. Here, Sgf73(1-104) was over-expressed using bacterial expression system and purified for solution NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) structural studies. Secondary structure and site-specific relaxation analysis of Sgf73(1-104) were achieved after solution NMR backbone assignment. Solution NMR and circular dichroism analysis of Sgf73(1-104) after zinc ion removal using chelation reagent EDTA (ethylene-diamine-tetraacetic acid) demonstrated that zinc ion was required to maintain stable conformation of the zinc finger motif.

  9. Structural Relationships in the Lysozyme Superfamily: Significant Evidence for Glycoside Hydrolase Signature Motifs

    PubMed Central

    Wohlkönig, Alexandre; Huet, Joëlle; Looze, Yvan; Wintjens, René

    2010-01-01

    Background Chitin is a polysaccharide that forms the hard, outer shell of arthropods and the cell walls of fungi and some algae. Peptidoglycan is a polymer of sugars and amino acids constituting the cell walls of most bacteria. Enzymes that are able to hydrolyze these cell membrane polymers generally play important roles for protecting plants and animals against infection with insects and pathogens. A particular group of such glycoside hydrolase enzymes share some common features in their three-dimensional structure and in their molecular mechanism, forming the lysozyme superfamily. Results Besides having a similar fold, all known catalytic domains of glycoside hydrolase proteins of lysozyme superfamily (families and subfamilies GH19, GH22, GH23, GH24 and GH46) share in common two structural elements: the central helix of the all-α domain, which invariably contains the catalytic glutamate residue acting as general-acid catalyst, and a β-hairpin pointed towards the substrate binding cleft. The invariant β-hairpin structure is interestingly found to display the highest amino acid conservation in aligned sequences of a given family, thereby allowing to define signature motifs for each GH family. Most of such signature motifs are found to have promising performances for searching sequence databases. Our structural analysis further indicates that the GH motifs participate in enzymatic catalysis essentially by containing the catalytic water positioning residue of inverting mechanism. Conclusions The seven families and subfamilies of the lysozyme superfamily all have in common a β-hairpin structure which displays a family-specific sequence motif. These GH β-hairpin motifs contain potentially important residues for the catalytic activity, thereby suggesting the participation of the GH motif to catalysis and also revealing a common catalytic scheme utilized by enzymes of the lysozyme superfamily. PMID:21085702

  10. An ion-responsive motif in the second transmembrane segment of rhodopsin-like receptors.

    PubMed

    Parker, M S; Wong, Y Y; Parker, S L

    2008-06-01

    A L(M)xxxD(N, E) motif (x=a non-ionic amino acid residue, most frequently A, S, L or F; small capitals indicating a minor representation) is found in the second transmembrane (tm2) segment of most G-protein coupling metazoan receptors of the rhodopsin family (Rh-GPCRs). Changes in signal transduction, agonist binding and receptor cycling are known for numerous receptors bearing evolved or experimentally introduced mutations in this tm2 motif, especially of its aspartate residue. The [Na(+)] sensitivity of the receptor-agonist interaction relates to this aspartate in a number of Rh-GPCRs. Native non-conservative mutations in the tm2 motif only rarely coincide with significant changes in two other ubiquitous features of the rhodopsin family, the seventh transmembrane N(D)PxxY(F) motif and the D(E)RY(W,F) or analogous sequence at the border of the third transmembrane helix and the second intracellular loop. Native tm2 mutations with Rh-GPCRs frequently result in constitutive signaling, and with visual opsins also in shifts to short-wavelength sensitivity. Substitution of a strongly basic residue for the tm2 aspartate in Taste-2 receptors could be connected to a lack of sodium sensing by these receptors. These properties could be consistent with ionic interactions, and even of ion transfer, that involve the tm2 motif. A decrease in cation sensing by this motif is usually connected to an enhanced constitutive interaction of the mutated receptors with cognate G- proteins, and also relates to both the constitutive and the overall activity of the short-wavelength opsins.

  11. The Q Motif Is Involved in DNA Binding but Not ATP Binding in ChlR1 Helicase

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Hao; Guo, Manhong; Vidhyasagar, Venkatasubramanian; Talwar, Tanu; Wu, Yuliang

    2015-01-01

    Helicases are molecular motors that couple the energy of ATP hydrolysis to the unwinding of structured DNA or RNA and chromatin remodeling. The conversion of energy derived from ATP hydrolysis into unwinding and remodeling is coordinated by seven sequence motifs (I, Ia, II, III, IV, V, and VI). The Q motif, consisting of nine amino acids (GFXXPXPIQ) with an invariant glutamine (Q) residue, has been identified in some, but not all helicases. Compared to the seven well-recognized conserved helicase motifs, the role of the Q motif is less acknowledged. Mutations in the human ChlR1 (DDX11) gene are associated with a unique genetic disorder known as Warsaw Breakage Syndrome, which is characterized by cellular defects in genome maintenance. To examine the roles of the Q motif in ChlR1 helicase, we performed site directed mutagenesis of glutamine to alanine at residue 23 in the Q motif of ChlR1. ChlR1 recombinant protein was overexpressed and purified from HEK293T cells. ChlR1-Q23A mutant abolished the helicase activity of ChlR1 and displayed reduced DNA binding ability. The mutant showed impaired ATPase activity but normal ATP binding. A thermal shift assay revealed that ChlR1-Q23A has a melting point value similar to ChlR1-WT. Partial proteolysis mapping demonstrated that ChlR1-WT and Q23A have a similar globular structure, although some subtle conformational differences in these two proteins are evident. Finally, we found ChlR1 exists and functions as a monomer in solution, which is different from FANCJ, in which the Q motif is involved in protein dimerization. Taken together, our results suggest that the Q motif is involved in DNA binding but not ATP binding in ChlR1 helicase. PMID:26474416

  12. Conserved sequence motifs among bacterial, eukaryotic, and archaeal phosphatases that define a new phosphohydrolase superfamily.

    PubMed Central

    Thaller, M. C.; Schippa, S.; Rossolini, G. M.

    1998-01-01

    Members of a new molecular family of bacterial nonspecific acid phosphatases (NSAPs), indicated as class C, were found to share significant sequence similarities to bacterial class B NSAPs and to some plant acid phosphatases, representing the first example of a family of bacterial NSAPs that has a relatively close eukaryotic counterpart. Despite the lack of an overall similarity, conserved sequence motifs were also identified among the above enzyme families (class B and class C bacterial NSAPs, and related plant phosphatases) and several other families of phosphohydrolases, including bacterial phosphoglycolate phosphatases, histidinol-phosphatase domains of the bacterial bifunctional enzymes imidazole-glycerolphosphate dehydratases, and bacterial, eukaryotic, and archaeal phosphoserine phosphatases and threalose-6-phosphatases. These conserved motifs are clustered within two domains, separated by a variable spacer region, according to the pattern [FILMAVT]-D-[ILFRMVY]-D-[GSNDE]-[TV]-[ILVAM]-[AT S VILMC]-X-¿YFWHKR)-X-¿YFWHNQ¿-X( 102,191)-¿KRHNQ¿-G-D-¿FYWHILVMC¿-¿QNH¿-¿FWYGP¿-D -¿PSNQYW¿. The dephosphorylating activity common to all these proteins supports the definition of this phosphatase motif and the inclusion of these enzymes into a superfamily of phosphohydrolases that we propose to indicate as "DDDD" after the presence of the four invariant aspartate residues. Database searches retrieved various hypothetical proteins of unknown function containing this or similar motifs, for which a phosphohydrolase activity could be hypothesized. PMID:9684901

  13. Some motifs were important for myostatin transcriptional regulation in sheep (Ovis aries).

    PubMed

    Du, Rong; An, Xiao-Rong; Chen, Yong-Fu; Qin, Jian

    2007-07-31

    Many motifs along the 1.2 kb myostatin promoter (MSTNpro) in sheep have been found by the MatInspecter program in our recent study. To further verify the role of the motifs and better understand the transcriptional regulation mechanism of the myostatin gene in sheep, the reporter gene EGFP (enhanced green fluorescent protein) was selected and the wild-type (W) vector MSTNPro(W)-EGFP or motif-mutational (M) vector MSTNPro(M)-EGFP were constructed. The transcriptional regulation activities were analyzed by detecting the fluorescence strength of EGFP in C2C12 myoblasts transfected with the vectors. The results showed that E-box (E) 3, E4, E5 and E7, particularly E3, E5 and E7, had important effects on the activity of the 1.2 kb sheep myostatin promoter. In addition, we also detected several other important motifs such as MTBF (muscle-specific Mt binding factor), MEF2 (myocyte enhancer factor 2), GRE (glucocorticoid response elements) and PRE (progesterone response elements) along the sheep myostatin promoter by the mutational analysis.

  14. MADMX: a strategy for maximal dense motif extraction.

    PubMed

    Grossi, Roberto; Pietracaprina, Andrea; Pisanti, Nadia; Pucci, Geppino; Upfal, Eli; Vandin, Fabio

    2011-04-01

    We develop, analyze, and experiment with a new tool, called MADMX, which extracts frequent motifs from biological sequences. We introduce the notion of density to single out the "significant" motifs. The density is a simple and flexible measure for bounding the number of don't cares in a motif, defined as the fraction of solid (i.e., different from don't care) characters in the motif. A maximal dense motif has density above a certain threshold, and any further specialization of a don't care symbol in it or any extension of its boundaries decreases its number of occurrences in the input sequence. By extracting only maximal dense motifs, MADMX reduces the output size and improves performance, while enhancing the quality of the discoveries. The efficiency of our approach relies on a newly defined combining operation, dubbed fusion, which allows for the construction of maximal dense motifs in a bottom-up fashion, while avoiding the generation of nonmaximal ones. We provide experimental evidence of the efficiency and the quality of the motifs returned by MADMX.

  15. DETAIL VIEW, MAIN ENTRANCE GATES, SHOWING A WINGED HOURGLASS MOTIF, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL VIEW, MAIN ENTRANCE GATES, SHOWING A WINGED HOURGLASS MOTIF, WHICH REFERS TO THE QUICK PASSAGE OF TIME AND THE SHORTNESS OF HUMAN LIFE. USE OF THIS MOTIF WAS A CARRYOVER FROM THE MCARTHUR GATES. - Woodlands Cemetery, 4000 Woodlands Avenue, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  16. Multivalent dendrimer vectors with DNA intercalation motifs for gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Wong, Pamela T; Tang, Kenny; Coulter, Alexa; Tang, Shengzhuang; Baker, James R; Choi, Seok Ki

    2014-11-10

    Poly(amido amine) (PAMAM) dendrimers constitute an important class of nonviral, cationic vectors in gene delivery. Here we report on a new concept for dendrimer vector design based on the incorporation of dual binding motifs: DNA intercalation, and receptor recognition for targeted delivery. We prepared a series of dendrimer conjugates derived from a fifth generation (G5) PAMAM dendrimer, each conjugated with multiple folate (FA) or riboflavin (RF) ligands for cell receptor targeting, and with 3,8-diamino-6-phenylphenanthridinium ("DAPP")-derived ligands for anchoring a DNA payload. Polyplexes of each dendrimer with calf thymus dsDNA were made and characterized by surface plasmon resonance (SPR) spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering (DLS) and zeta potential measurement. These studies provided evidence supporting polyplex formation based on the observation of tight DNA-dendrimer adhesion, and changes in particle size and surface charge upon coincubation. Further SPR studies to investigate the adhesion of the polyplex to a model surface immobilized with folate binding protein (FBP), demonstrated that the DNA payload has only a minimal effect on the receptor binding activity of the polyplex: KD = 0.22 nM for G5(FA)(DAPP) versus 0.98 nM for its polyplex. Finally, we performed in vitro transfection assays to determine the efficiency of conjugate mediated delivery of a luciferase-encoding plasmid into the KB cancer cell line and showed that RF-conjugated dendrimers were 1 to 2 orders of magnitude more effective in enhancing luciferase gene transfection than a plasmid only control. In summary, this study serves as a proof of concept for DNA-ligand intercalation as a motif in the design of multivalent dendrimer vectors for targeted gene delivery.

  17. Dynamic motifs of strategies in prisoner's dilemma games

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Young Jin; Roh, Myungkyoon; Jeong, Seon-Young; Son, Seung-Woo

    2014-12-01

    We investigate the win-lose relations between strategies of iterated prisoner's dilemma games by using a directed network concept to display the replicator dynamics results. In the giant strongly-connected component of the win/lose network, we find win-lose circulations similar to rock-paper-scissors and analyze the fixed point and its stability. Applying the network motif concept, we introduce dynamic motifs, which describe the population dynamics relations among the three strategies. Through exact enumeration, we find 22 dynamic motifs and display their phase portraits. Visualization using directed networks and motif analysis is a useful method to make complex dynamic behavior simple in order to understand it more intuitively. Dynamic motifs can be building blocks for dynamic behavior among strategies when they are applied to other types of games.

  18. Improved bioactivity of antimicrobial peptides by addition of amino-terminal copper and nickel (ATCUN) binding motifs.

    PubMed

    Libardo, M Daben; Cervantes, Jorge L; Salazar, Juan C; Angeles-Boza, Alfredo M

    2014-08-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are promising candidates to help circumvent antibiotic resistance, which is an increasing clinical problem. Amino-terminal copper and nickel (ATCUN) binding motifs are known to actively form reactive oxygen species (ROS) upon metal binding. The combination of these two peptidic constructs could lead to a novel class of dual-acting antimicrobial agents. To test this hypothesis, a set of ATCUN binding motifs were screened for their ability to induce ROS formation, and the most potent were then used to modify AMPs with different modes of action. ATCUN binding motif-containing derivatives of anoplin (GLLKRIKTLL-NH2), pro-apoptotic peptide (PAP; KLAKLAKKLAKLAK-NH2), and sh-buforin (RAGLQFPVGRVHRLLRK-NH2) were synthesized and found to be more active than the parent AMPs against a panel of clinically relevant bacteria. The lower minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values for the ATCUN-anoplin peptides are attributed to the higher pore-forming activity along with their ability to cause ROS-induced membrane damage. The addition of the ATCUN motifs to PAP also increases its ability to disrupt membranes. DNA damage is the major contributor to the activity of the ATCUN-sh-buforin peptides. Our findings indicate that the addition of ATCUN motifs to AMPs is a simple strategy that leads to AMPs with higher antibacterial activity and possibly to more potent, usable antibacterial agents.

  19. De Novo Regulatory Motif Discovery Identifies Significant Motifs in Promoters of Five Classes of Plant Dehydrin Genes

    PubMed Central

    Zolotarov, Yevgen; Strömvik, Martina

    2015-01-01

    Plants accumulate dehydrins in response to osmotic stresses. Dehydrins are divided into five different classes, which are thought to be regulated in different manners. To better understand differences in transcriptional regulation of the five dehydrin classes, de novo motif discovery was performed on 350 dehydrin promoter sequences from a total of 51 plant genomes. Overrepresented motifs were identified in the promoters of five dehydrin classes. The Kn dehydrin promoters contain motifs linked with meristem specific expression, as well as motifs linked with cold/dehydration and abscisic acid response. KS dehydrin promoters contain a motif with a GATA core. SKn and YnSKn dehydrin promoters contain motifs that match elements connected with cold/dehydration, abscisic acid and light response. YnKn dehydrin promoters contain motifs that match abscisic acid and light response elements, but not cold/dehydration response elements. Conserved promoter motifs are present in the dehydrin classes and across different plant lineages, indicating that dehydrin gene regulation is likely also conserved. PMID:26114291

  20. Definition of a GC-rich motif as regulatory sequence of the human IL-3 gene: coordinate regulation of the IL-3 gene by CLE2/GC box of the GM-CSF gene in T cell activation.

    PubMed

    Nishida, J; Yoshida, M; Arai, K; Yokota, T

    1991-03-01

    The human IL-3 gene, located on chromosome 5, contains several cis-acting DNA sequences, i.e. CLE (conserved lymphokine element) and a GC-rich region, similar to the GM-CSF gene. To investigate the role of these elements, the 5' flanking region of the IL-3 gene was attached to a bacterial chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) gene. The fusion plasmids were analyzed by an in vitro transcription system using Jurkat cell nuclear extract prepared from cells stimulated with phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate and calcium ionophore (PMA/A23187), introduced into Jurkat cells, expressed transiently, and stimulated by co-transfection of human T cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I) encoded transactivator, p40tax. The GC-rich region enhanced TATA-dependent transcription in the in vitro transcription system and also strongly responded to p40tax stimulation in the in vivo cotransfection assay. Using this GC-rich region as a probe, we identified a constitutive DNA-protein complex, alpha, whose binding specificity correlates with transcription activity. However, this element is not sufficient for the expression of the IL-3 gene in response to T cell activation signals (PMA/A23187) and no sequence was found within the IL-3 gene which mediates the response to PMA/A23187. The enhancer sequence which responds to T cell activation signals may be located outside the IL-3 gene and may be shared by other lymphokines, possibly by GM-CSF. We propose that the GM-CSF enhancer (CLE2/GC box) which mediates the response to T cell activation signals may stimulate the expression of the IL-3 gene.

  1. The DRF motif of CXCR6 as chemokine receptor adaptation to adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Koenen, Andrea; Babendreyer, Aaron; Schumacher, Julian; Pasqualon, Tobias; Schwarz, Nicole; Seifert, Anke; Deupi, Xavier

    2017-01-01

    The CXC-chemokine receptor 6 (CXCR6) is a class A GTP-binding protein-coupled receptor (GPCRs) that mediates adhesion of leukocytes by interacting with the transmembrane cell surface-expressed chemokine ligand 16 (CXCL16), and also regulates leukocyte migration by interacting with the soluble shed variant of CXCL16. In contrast to virtually all other chemokine receptors with chemotactic activity, CXCR6 carries a DRF motif instead of the typical DRY motif as a key element in receptor activation and G protein coupling. In this work, modeling analyses revealed that the phenylalanine F3.51 in CXCR6 might have impact on intramolecular interactions including hydrogen bonds by this possibly changing receptor function. Initial investigations with embryonic kidney HEK293 cells and further studies with monocytic THP-1 cells showed that mutation of DRF into DRY does not influence ligand binding, receptor internalization, receptor recycling, and protein kinase B (AKT) signaling. Adhesion was slightly decreased in a time-dependent manner. However, CXCL16-induced calcium signaling and migration were increased. Vice versa, when the DRY motif of the related receptor CX3CR1 was mutated into DRF the migratory response towards CX3CL1 was diminished, indicating that the presence of a DRF motif generally impairs chemotaxis in chemokine receptors. Transmembrane and soluble CXCL16 play divergent roles in homeostasis, inflammation, and cancer, which can be beneficial or detrimental. Therefore, the DRF motif of CXCR6 may display a receptor adaptation allowing adhesion and cell retention by transmembrane CXCL16 but reducing the chemotactic response to soluble CXCL16. This adaptation may avoid permanent or uncontrolled recruitment of inflammatory cells as well as cancer metastasis. PMID:28267793

  2. Cellular microRNAs up-regulate transcription via interaction with promoter TATA-box motifs.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yijun; Fan, Miaomiao; Zhang, Xue; Huang, Feng; Wu, Kang; Zhang, Junsong; Liu, Jun; Huang, Zhuoqiong; Luo, Haihua; Tao, Liang; Zhang, Hui

    2014-12-01

    The TATA box represents one of the most prevalent core promoters where the pre-initiation complexes (PICs) for gene transcription are assembled. This assembly is crucial for transcription initiation and well regulated. Here we show that some cellular microRNAs (miRNAs) are associated with RNA polymerase II (Pol II) and TATA box-binding protein (TBP) in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Among them, let-7i sequence specifically binds to the TATA-box motif of interleukin-2 (IL-2) gene and elevates IL-2 mRNA and protein production in CD4(+) T-lymphocytes in vitro and in vivo. Through direct interaction with the TATA-box motif, let-7i facilitates the PIC assembly and transcription initiation of IL-2 promoter. Several other cellular miRNAs, such as mir-138, mir-92a or mir-181d, also enhance the promoter activities via binding to the TATA-box motifs of insulin, calcitonin or c-myc, respectively. In agreement with the finding that an HIV-1-encoded miRNA could enhance viral replication through targeting the viral promoter TATA-box motif, our data demonstrate that the interaction with core transcription machinery is a novel mechanism for miRNAs to regulate gene expression.

  3. The extended AT-hook is a novel RNA binding motif.

    PubMed

    Filarsky, Michael; Zillner, Karina; Araya, Ingrid; Villar-Garea, Ana; Merkl, Rainer; Längst, Gernot; Németh, Attila

    2015-01-01

    The AT-hook has been defined as a DNA binding peptide motif that contains a glycine-arginine-proline (G-R-P) tripeptide core flanked by basic amino acids. Recent reports documented variations in the sequence of AT-hooks and revealed RNA binding activity of some canonical AT-hooks, suggesting a higher structural and functional variability of this protein domain than previously anticipated. Here we describe the discovery and characterization of the extended AT-hook peptide motif (eAT-hook), in which basic amino acids appear symmetrical mainly at a distance of 12-15 amino acids from the G-R-P core. We identified 80 human and 60 mouse eAT-hook proteins and biochemically characterized the eAT-hooks of Tip5/BAZ2A, PTOV1 and GPBP1. Microscale thermophoresis and electrophoretic mobility shift assays reveal the nucleic acid binding features of this peptide motif, and show that eAT-hooks bind RNA with one order of magnitude higher affinity than DNA. In addition, cellular localization studies suggest a role for the N-terminal eAT-hook of PTOV1 in nucleocytoplasmic shuttling. In summary, our findings classify the eAT-hook as a novel nucleic acid binding motif, which potentially mediates various RNA-dependent cellular processes.

  4. Temporal motifs reveal collaboration patterns in online task-oriented networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xuan, Qi; Fang, Huiting; Fu, Chenbo; Filkov, Vladimir

    2015-05-01

    Real networks feature layers of interactions and complexity. In them, different types of nodes can interact with each other via a variety of events. Examples of this complexity are task-oriented social networks (TOSNs), where teams of people share tasks towards creating a quality artifact, such as academic research papers or software development in commercial or open source environments. Accomplishing those tasks involves both work, e.g., writing the papers or code, and communication, to discuss and coordinate. Taking into account the different types of activities and how they alternate over time can result in much more precise understanding of the TOSNs behaviors and outcomes. That calls for modeling techniques that can accommodate both node and link heterogeneity as well as temporal change. In this paper, we report on methodology for finding temporal motifs in TOSNs, limited to a system of two people and an artifact. We apply the methods to publicly available data of TOSNs from 31 Open Source Software projects. We find that these temporal motifs are enriched in the observed data. When applied to software development outcome, temporal motifs reveal a distinct dependency between collaboration and communication in the code writing process. Moreover, we show that models based on temporal motifs can be used to more precisely relate both individual developer centrality and team cohesion to programmer productivity than models based on aggregated TOSNs.

  5. Triadic motifs in the dependence networks of virtual societies.

    PubMed

    Xie, Wen-Jie; Li, Ming-Xia; Jiang, Zhi-Qiang; Zhou, Wei-Xing

    2014-06-10

    In friendship networks, individuals have different numbers of friends, and the closeness or intimacy between an individual and her friends is heterogeneous. Using a statistical filtering method to identify relationships about who depends on whom, we construct dependence networks (which are directed) from weighted friendship networks of avatars in more than two hundred virtual societies of a massively multiplayer online role-playing game (MMORPG). We investigate the evolution of triadic motifs in dependence networks. Several metrics show that the virtual societies evolved through a transient stage in the first two to three weeks and reached a relatively stable stage. We find that the unidirectional loop motif (M9) is underrepresented and does not appear, open motifs are also underrepresented, while other close motifs are overrepresented. We also find that, for most motifs, the overall level difference of the three avatars in the same motif is significantly lower than average, whereas the sum of ranks is only slightly larger than average. Our findings show that avatars' social status plays an important role in the formation of triadic motifs.

  6. Triadic motifs in the dependence networks of virtual societies

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Wen-Jie; Li, Ming-Xia; Jiang, Zhi-Qiang; Zhou, Wei-Xing

    2014-01-01

    In friendship networks, individuals have different numbers of friends, and the closeness or intimacy between an individual and her friends is heterogeneous. Using a statistical filtering method to identify relationships about who depends on whom, we construct dependence networks (which are directed) from weighted friendship networks of avatars in more than two hundred virtual societies of a massively multiplayer online role-playing game (MMORPG). We investigate the evolution of triadic motifs in dependence networks. Several metrics show that the virtual societies evolved through a transient stage in the first two to three weeks and reached a relatively stable stage. We find that the unidirectional loop motif (M9) is underrepresented and does not appear, open motifs are also underrepresented, while other close motifs are overrepresented. We also find that, for most motifs, the overall level difference of the three avatars in the same motif is significantly lower than average, whereas the sum of ranks is only slightly larger than average. Our findings show that avatars' social status plays an important role in the formation of triadic motifs. PMID:24912755

  7. The TRTGn motif stabilizes the transcription initiation open complex.

    PubMed

    Voskuil, Martin I; Chambliss, Glenn H

    2002-09-20

    The effect on transcription initiation by the extended -10 motif (5'-TRTG(n)-3'), positioned upstream of the -10 region, was investigated using a series of base substitution mutations in the alpha-amylase promoter (amyP). The extended -10 motif, previously referred to as the -16 region, is found frequently in Gram-positive bacterial promoters and several extended -10 promoters from Escherichia coli. The inhibitory effects of the non-productive promoter site (amyP2), which overlaps the upstream region of amyP, were eliminated by mutagenesis of the -35 region and the TRTG motif of amyP2. Removal by mutagenesis of the competitive effects of amyP2 resulted in a reduced dependence of amyP on the TRTG motif. In the absence of the second promoter, mutations in the TRTG motif of amyP destabilized the open complex and prevented the maintenance of open complexes at low temperatures. The open complex half-life was up to 26-fold shorter in the mutant TRTG motif promoters than in the wild-type promoter. We demonstrate that the amyP TRTG motif dramatically stabilizes the open complex intermediate during transcription initiation. Even though the open complex is less stable in the mutant promoters, the region of melted DNA is the same in the wild-type and mutant promoters. However, upon addition of the first three nucleotides, which trap RNAP (RNA polymerase) in a stable initiating complex, the melted DNA region contracts at the 5'-end in a TRTG motif promoter mutant but not at the wild-type promoter, indicating that the motif contributes to maintaining DNA-strand separation.

  8. The RXL motif of the African cassava mosaic virus Rep protein is necessary for rereplication of yeast DNA and viral infection in plants

    SciTech Connect

    Hipp, Katharina; Rau, Peter; Schäfer, Benjamin; Gronenborn, Bruno; Jeske, Holger

    2014-08-15

    Geminiviruses, single-stranded DNA plant viruses, encode a replication-initiator protein (Rep) that is indispensable for virus replication. A potential cyclin interaction motif (RXL) in the sequence of African cassava mosaic virus Rep may be an alternative link to cell cycle controls to the known interaction with plant homologs of retinoblastoma protein (pRBR). Mutation of this motif abrogated rereplication in fission yeast induced by expression of wildtype Rep suggesting that Rep interacts via its RXL motif with one or several yeast proteins. The RXL motif is essential for viral infection of Nicotiana benthamiana plants, since mutation of this motif in infectious clones prevented any symptomatic infection. The cell-cycle link (Clink) protein of a nanovirus (faba bean necrotic yellows virus) was investigated that activates the cell cycle by binding via its LXCXE motif to pRBR. Expression of wildtype Clink and a Clink mutant deficient in pRBR-binding did not trigger rereplication in fission yeast. - Highlights: • A potential cyclin interaction motif is conserved in geminivirus Rep proteins. • In ACMV Rep, this motif (RXL) is essential for rereplication of fission yeast DNA. • Mutating RXL abrogated viral infection completely in Nicotiana benthamiana. • Expression of a nanovirus Clink protein in yeast did not induce rereplication. • Plant viruses may have evolved multiple routes to exploit host DNA synthesis.

  9. Automated motif extraction and classification in RNA tertiary structures

    PubMed Central

    Djelloul, Mahassine; Denise, Alain

    2008-01-01

    We used a novel graph-based approach to extract RNA tertiary motifs. We cataloged them all and clustered them using an innovative graph similarity measure. We applied our method to three widely studied structures: Haloarcula marismortui 50S (H.m 50S), Escherichia coli 50S (E. coli 50S), and Thermus thermophilus 16S (T.th 16S) RNAs. We identified 10 known motifs without any prior knowledge of their shapes or positions. We additionally identified four putative new motifs. PMID:18957493

  10. Coherent feedforward transcriptional regulatory motifs enhance drug resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charlebois, Daniel A.; Balázsi, Gábor; Kærn, Mads

    2014-05-01

    Fluctuations in gene expression give identical cells access to a spectrum of phenotypes that can serve as a transient, nongenetic basis for natural selection by temporarily increasing drug resistance. In this study, we demonstrate using mathematical modeling and simulation that certain gene regulatory network motifs, specifically coherent feedforward loop motifs, can facilitate the development of nongenetic resistance by increasing cell-to-cell variability and the time scale at which beneficial phenotypic states can be maintained. Our results highlight how regulatory network motifs enabling transient, nongenetic inheritance play an important role in defining reproductive fitness in adverse environments and provide a selective advantage subject to evolutionary pressure.

  11. Seeing the B-A-C-H motif

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catravas, Palmyra

    2005-09-01

    Musical compositions can be thought of as complex, multidimensional data sets. Compositions based on the B-A-C-H motif (a four-note motif of the pitches of the last name of Johann Sebastian Bach) span several centuries of evolving compositional styles and provide an intriguing set for analysis since they contain a common feature, the motif, buried in dissimilar contexts. We will present analyses which highlight the content of this unusual set of pieces, with emphasis on visual display of information.

  12. Insight into the role of histidine in RNR motif of protein component of RNase P of M. tuberculosis in catalysis.

    PubMed

    Singh, Alla; Ramteke, Anup K; Afroz, Tariq; Batra, Janendra K

    2016-03-01

    RNase P, a ribonucleoprotein endoribonuclease, is involved in the 5' end processing of pre-tRNAs, with its RNA component being the catalytic subunit. It is an essential enzyme. All bacterial RNase Ps have one RNA and one protein component. A conserved RNR motif in bacterial RNase P protein components is involved in their interaction with the RNA component. In this work, we have reconstituted the RNase P of M. tuberculosis in vitro and investigated the role of a histidine in the RNR motif in its catalysis. We expressed the protein and RNA components of mycobacterial RNase P in E. coli, purified them, and reconstituted the holoenzyme in vitro. The histidine in RNR motif was mutated to alanine and asparagine by site-directed mutagenesis. The RNA component alone showed activity on pre-tRNA(ala) substrate at high magnesium concentrations. The RNA and protein components associated together to manifest catalytic activity at low magnesium concentrations. The histidine 67 in the RNR motif of M. tuberculosis RNase P protein component was found to be important for the catalytic activity and stability of the enzyme. Generally, the RNase P of M. tuberculosis functions like other bacterial enzymes. The histidine in the RNR motif of M. tuberculosis appears to be able to substitute optimally for asparagine found in the majority of the protein components of other bacterial RNase P enzymes.

  13. A genetic screen for novel components of the Ras/Mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway that interact with the yan gene of Drosophila identifies split ends, a new RNA recognition motif-containing protein.

    PubMed Central

    Rebay, I; Chen, F; Hsiao, F; Kolodziej, P A; Kuang, B H; Laverty, T; Suh, C; Voas, M; Williams, A; Rubin, G M

    2000-01-01

    The receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) signaling pathway is used reiteratively during the development of all multicellular organisms. While the core RTK/Ras/MAPK signaling cassette has been studied extensively, little is known about the nature of the downstream targets of the pathway or how these effectors regulate the specificity of cellular responses. Drosophila yan is one of a few downstream components identified to date, functioning as an antagonist of the RTK/Ras/MAPK pathway. Previously, we have shown that ectopic expression of a constitutively active protein (yan(ACT)) inhibits the differentiation of multiple cell types. In an effort to identify new genes functioning downstream in the Ras/MAPK/yan pathway, we have performed a genetic screen to isolate dominant modifiers of the rough eye phenotype associated with eye-specific expression of yan(ACT). Approximately 190,000 mutagenized flies were screened, and 260 enhancers and 90 suppressors were obtained. Among the previously known genes we recovered are four RTK pathway components, rolled (MAPK), son-of-sevenless, Star, and pointed, and two genes, eyes absent and string, that have not been implicated previously in RTK signaling events. We also isolated mutations in five previously uncharacterized genes, one of which, split ends, we have characterized molecularly and have shown to encode a member of the RRM family of RNA-binding proteins. PMID:10655223

  14. Synthesis of aromatase inhibitors and dual aromatase steroid sulfatase inhibitors by linking an arylsulfamate motif to 4-(4H-1,2,4-triazol-4-ylamino)benzonitrile: SAR, crystal structures, in vitro and in vivo activities.

    PubMed

    Bubert, Christian; Woo, L W Lawrence; Sutcliffe, Oliver B; Mahon, Mary F; Chander, Surinder K; Purohit, Atul; Reed, Michael J; Potter, Barry V L

    2008-11-01

    4-(((4-Cyanophenyl)(4H-1,2,4-triazol-4-yl)amino)methyl)phenyl sulfamate (6 a) was the first dual aromatase-sulfatase inhibitor (DASI) reported. Several series of its derivatives with various linker systems between the steroid sulfatase (STS) and the aromatase inhibitory pharmacophores were synthesised and evaluated in JEG-3 cells. The X-ray crystal structures of the aromatase inhibitors, DASI precursors 42 d and 60, and DASI 43 h were determined. Nearly all derivatives show improved in vitro aromatase inhibition over 6 a but decreased STS inhibition. The best aromatase inhibitor is 42 e (IC(50)=0.26 nM) and the best DASI is 43 e (IC(50 aromatase)=0.45 nM, IC(50 STS)=1200 nM). SAR for aromatase inhibition shows that compounds containing an alkylene- and thioether-based linker system are more potent than those that are ether-, sulfone-, or sulfonamide-based, and that the length of the linker has a limited effect on aromatase inhibition beyond two methylene units. Compounds 43 d-f were studied in vivo (10 mg kg(-1), single, p.o.). The most potent DASI is 43 e, which inhibited PMSG-induced plasma estradiol levels by 92 % and liver STS activity by 98 % 3 h after dosing. These results further strengthen the concept of designing and developing DASIs for potential treatment of hormone-related cancers.

  15. Eukaryotic Penelope-Like Retroelements Encode Hammerhead Ribozyme Motifs

    PubMed Central

    Cervera, Amelia; De la Peña, Marcos

    2014-01-01

    Small self-cleaving RNAs, such as the paradigmatic Hammerhead ribozyme (HHR), have been recently found widespread in DNA genomes across all kingdoms of life. In this work, we found that new HHR variants are preserved in the ancient family of Penelope-like elements (PLEs), a group of eukaryotic retrotransposons regarded as exceptional for encoding telomerase-like retrotranscriptases and spliceosomal introns. Our bioinformatic analysis revealed not only the presence of minimalist HHRs in the two flanking repeats of PLEs but also their massive and widespread occurrence in metazoan genomes. The architecture of these ribozymes indicates that they may work as dimers, although their low self-cleavage activity in vitro suggests the requirement of other factors in vivo. In plants, however, PLEs show canonical HHRs, whereas fungi and protist PLEs encode ribozyme variants with a stable active conformation as monomers. Overall, our data confirm the connection of self-cleaving RNAs with eukaryotic retroelements and unveil these motifs as a significant fraction of the encoded information in eukaryotic genomes. PMID:25135949

  16. Sevoflurane Alters Spatiotemporal Functional Connectivity Motifs That Link Resting-State Networks during Wakefulness

    PubMed Central

    Kafashan, MohammadMehdi; Ching, ShiNung; Palanca, Ben J. A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The spatiotemporal patterns of correlated neural activity during the transition from wakefulness to general anesthesia have not been fully characterized. Correlation analysis of blood-oxygen-level dependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) allows segmentation of the brain into resting-state networks (RSNs), with functional connectivity referring to the covarying activity that suggests shared functional specialization. We quantified the persistence of these correlations following the induction of general anesthesia in healthy volunteers and assessed for a dynamic nature over time. Methods: We analyzed human fMRI data acquired at 0 and 1.2% vol sevoflurane. The covariance in the correlated activity among different brain regions was calculated over time using bounded Kalman filtering. These time series were then clustered into eight orthogonal motifs using a K-means algorithm, where the structure of correlated activity throughout the brain at any time is the weighted sum of all motifs. Results: Across time scales and under anesthesia, the reorganization of interactions between RSNs is related to the strength of dynamic connections between member pairs. The covariance of correlated activity between RSNs persists compared to that linking individual member pairs of different RSNs. Conclusions: Accounting for the spatiotemporal structure of correlated BOLD signals, anesthetic-induced loss of consciousness is mainly associated with the disruption of motifs with intermediate strength within and between members of different RSNs. In contrast, motifs with higher strength of connections, predominantly with regions-pairs from within-RSN interactions, are conserved among states of wakefulness and sevoflurane general anesthesia. PMID:28082871

  17. An SOS Regulon under Control of a Noncanonical LexA-Binding Motif in the Betaproteobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez-Alberola, Neus; Campoy, Susana; Emerson, David; Barbé, Jordi

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The SOS response is a transcriptional regulatory network governed by the LexA repressor that activates in response to DNA damage. In the Betaproteobacteria, LexA is known to target a palindromic sequence with the consensus sequence CTGT-N8-ACAG. We report the characterization of a LexA regulon in the iron-oxidizing betaproteobacterium Sideroxydans lithotrophicus. In silico and in vitro analyses show that LexA targets six genes by recognizing a binding motif with the consensus sequence GAACGaaCGTTC, which is strongly reminiscent of the Bacillus subtilis LexA-binding motif. We confirm that the closely related Gallionella capsiferriformans shares the same LexA-binding motif, and in silico analyses indicate that this motif is also conserved in the Nitrosomonadales and the Methylophilales. Phylogenetic analysis of LexA and the alpha subunit of DNA polymerase III (DnaE) reveal that the organisms harboring this noncanonical LexA form a compact taxonomic cluster within the Betaproteobacteria. However, their lexA gene is unrelated to the standard Betaproteobacteria lexA, and there is evidence of its spread through lateral gene transfer. In contrast to other reported cases of noncanonical LexA-binding motifs, the regulon of S. lithotrophicus is comparable in size and function to that of many other Betaproteobacteria, suggesting that a convergent SOS regulon has reevolved under the control of a new LexA protein. Analysis of the DNA-binding domain of S. lithotrophicus LexA reveals little sequence similarity with that of other LexA proteins targeting similar binding motifs, suggesting that network structure may limit site evolution or that structural constrains make the B. subtilis-type motif an optimal interface for multiple LexA sequences. IMPORTANCE Understanding the evolution of transcriptional systems enables us to address important questions in microbiology, such as the emergence and transfer potential of different regulatory systems to regulate virulence or

  18. Emergence of connectivity motifs in networks of model neurons with short- and long-term plastic synapses.

    PubMed

    Vasilaki, Eleni; Giugliano, Michele

    2014-01-01

    Recent experimental data from the rodent cerebral cortex and olfactory bulb indicate that specific connectivity motifs are correlated with short-term dynamics of excitatory synaptic transmission. It was observed that neurons with short-term facilitating synapses form predominantly reciprocal pairwise connections, while neurons with short-term depressing synapses form predominantly unidirectional pairwise connections. The cause of these structural differences in excitatory synaptic microcircuits is unknown. We show that these connectivity motifs emerge in networks of model neurons, from the interactions between short-term synaptic dynamics (SD) and long-term spike-timing dependent plasticity (STDP). While the impact of STDP on SD was shown in simultaneous neuronal pair recordings in vitro, the mutual interactions between STDP and SD in large networks are still the subject of intense research. Our approach combines an SD phenomenological model with an STDP model that faithfully captures long-term plasticity dependence on both spike times and frequency. As a proof of concept, we first simulate and analyze recurrent networks of spiking neurons with random initial connection efficacies and where synapses are either all short-term facilitating or all depressing. For identical external inputs to the network, and as a direct consequence of internally generated activity, we find that networks with depressing synapses evolve unidirectional connectivity motifs, while networks with facilitating synapses evolve reciprocal connectivity motifs. We then show that the same results hold for heterogeneous networks, including both facilitating and depressing synapses. This does not contradict a recent theory that proposes that motifs are shaped by external inputs, but rather complements it by examining the role of both the external inputs and the internally generated network activity. Our study highlights the conditions under which SD-STDP might explain the correlation between

  19. Target motifs affecting natural immunity by a constitutive CRISPR-Cas system in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Almendros, Cristóbal; Guzmán, Noemí M; Díez-Villaseñor, César; García-Martínez, Jesús; Mojica, Francisco J M

    2012-01-01

    Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR) and CRISPR associated (cas) genes conform the CRISPR-Cas systems of various bacteria and archaea and produce degradation of invading nucleic acids containing sequences (protospacers) that are complementary to repeat intervening spacers. It has been demonstrated that the base sequence identity of a protospacer with the cognate spacer and the presence of a protospacer adjacent motif (PAM) influence CRISPR-mediated interference efficiency. By using an original transformation assay with plasmids targeted by a resident spacer here we show that natural CRISPR-mediated immunity against invading DNA occurs in wild type Escherichia coli. Unexpectedly, the strongest activity is observed with protospacer adjoining nucleotides (interference motifs) that differ from the PAM both in sequence and location. Hence, our results document for the first time native CRISPR activity in E. coli and demonstrate that positions next to the PAM in invading DNA influence their recognition and degradation by these prokaryotic immune systems.

  20. A million peptide motifs for the molecular biologist.

    PubMed

    Tompa, Peter; Davey, Norman E; Gibson, Toby J; Babu, M Madan

    2014-07-17

    A molecular description of functional modules in the cell is the focus of many high-throughput studies in the postgenomic era. A large portion of biomolecular interactions in virtually all cellular processes is mediated by compact interaction modules, referred to as peptide motifs. Such motifs are typically less than ten residues in length, occur within intrinsically disordered regions, and are recognized and/or posttranslationally modified by structured domains of the interacting partner. In this review, we suggest that there might be over a million instances of peptide motifs in the human proteome. While this staggering number suggests that peptide motifs are numerous and the most understudied functional module in the cell, it also holds great opportunities for new discoveries.

  1. DETAIL OF CORNICE MOULDING WITH RAM'S HEAD MOTIF. EIGHT SHADES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL OF CORNICE MOULDING WITH RAM'S HEAD MOTIF. EIGHT SHADES OF GOLD LEAF AND BURNISHED GOLD LEAF WERE USED FOR THE INTERIOR FINISHES. - Anaconda Historic District, Washoe Theater, 305 Main Street, Anaconda, Deer Lodge County, MT

  2. 10. DETAIL OF CORNICE MOULDING WITH RAM'S HEAD MOTIF. EIGHT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. DETAIL OF CORNICE MOULDING WITH RAM'S HEAD MOTIF. EIGHT SHADES OF GOLD LEAF AND BURNISHED GOLD LEAF WERE USED FOR THE INTERIOR FINISHES - Anaconda Historic District, Washoe Theater, 305 Main Street, Anaconda, Deer Lodge County, MT

  3. Three-Dimensional DNA Nanostructures Assembled from DNA Star Motifs.

    PubMed

    Tian, Cheng; Zhang, Chuan

    2017-01-01

    Tile-based DNA self-assembly is a promising method in DNA nanotechnology and has produced a wide range of nanostructures by using a small set of unique DNA strands. DNA star motif, as one of DNA tiles, has been employed to assemble varieties of symmetric one-, two-, three-dimensional (1, 2, 3D) DNA nanostructures. Herein, we describe the design principles, assembly methods, and characterization methods of 3D DNA nanostructures assembled from the DNA star motifs.

  4. Identification and characterization of four novel peptide motifs that recognize distinct regions of the transcription factor CP2.

    PubMed

    Kang, Ho Chul; Chung, Bo Mee; Chae, Ji Hyung; Yang, Sung-Il; Kim, Chan Gil; Kim, Chul Geun

    2005-03-01

    Although ubiquitously expressed, the transcriptional factor CP2 also exhibits some tissue- or stage-specific activation toward certain genes such as globin in red blood cells and interleukin-4 in T helper cells. Because this specificity may be achieved by interaction with other proteins, we screened a peptide display library and identified four consensus motifs in numerous CP2-binding peptides: HXPR, PHL, ASR and PXHXH. Protein-database searching revealed that RE-1 silencing factor (REST), Yin-Yang1 (YY1) and five other proteins have one or two of these CP2-binding motifs. Glutathione S-transferase pull-down and coimmunoprecipitation assays showed that two HXPR motif-containing proteins REST and YY1 indeed were able to bind CP2. Importantly, this binding to CP2 was almost abolished when a double amino acid substitution was made on the HXPR sequence of REST and YY1 proteins. The suppressing effect of YY1 on CP2's transcriptional activity was lost by this point mutation on the HXPR sequence of YY1 and reduced by an HXPR-containing peptide, further supporting the interaction between CP2 and YY1 via the HXPR sequence. Mapping the sites on CP2 for interaction with the four distinct CP2-binding motifs revealed at least three different regions on CP2. This suggests that CP2 recognizes several distinct binding motifs by virtue of employing different regions, thus being able to interact with and regulate many cellular partners.

  5. Selection of peptide entry motifs by bacterial surface display.

    PubMed Central

    Taschner, Sabine; Meinke, Andreas; von Gabain, Alexander; Boyd, Aoife P

    2002-01-01

    Surface display technologies have been established previously to select peptides and polypeptides that interact with purified immobilized ligands. In the present study, we designed and implemented a surface display-based technique to identify novel peptide motifs that mediate entry into eukaryotic cells. An Escherichia coli library expressing surface-displayed peptides was combined with eukaryotic cells and the gentamicin protection assay was performed to select recombinant E. coli, which were internalized into eukaryotic cells by virtue of the displayed peptides. To establish the proof of principle of this approach, the fibronectin-binding motifs of the fibronectin-binding protein A of Staphylococcus aureus were inserted into the E. coli FhuA protein. Surface expression of the fusion proteins was demonstrated by functional assays and by FACS analysis. The fibronectin-binding motifs were shown to mediate entry of the bacteria into non-phagocytic eukaryotic cells and brought about the preferential selection of these bacteria over E. coli expressing parental FhuA, with an enrichment of 100000-fold. Four entry sequences were selected and identified using an S. aureus library of peptides displayed in the FhuA protein on the surface of E. coli. These sequences included novel entry motifs as well as integrin-binding Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) motifs and promoted a high degree of bacterial entry. Bacterial surface display is thus a powerful tool to effectively select and identify entry peptide motifs. PMID:12144529

  6. cWINNOWER Algorithm for Finding Fuzzy DNA Motifs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liang, Shoudan

    2003-01-01

    The cWINNOWER algorithm detects fuzzy motifs in DNA sequences rich in protein-binding signals. A signal is defined as any short nucleotide pattern having up to d mutations differing from a motif of length l. The algorithm finds such motifs if multiple mutated copies of the motif (i.e., the signals) are present in the DNA sequence in sufficient abundance. The cWINNOWER algorithm substantially improves the sensitivity of the winnower method of Pevzner and Sze by imposing a consensus constraint, enabling it to detect much weaker signals. We studied the minimum number of detectable motifs qc as a function of sequence length N for random sequences. We found that qc increases linearly with N for a fast version of the algorithm based on counting three-member sub-cliques. Imposing consensus constraints reduces qc, by a factor of three in this case, which makes the algorithm dramatically more sensitive. Our most sensitive algorithm, which counts four-member sub-cliques, needs a minimum of only 13 signals to detect motifs in a sequence of length N = 12000 for (l,d) = (15,4).

  7. Transcriptional Network Growing Models Using Motif-Based Preferential Attachment.

    PubMed

    Abdelzaher, Ahmed F; Al-Musawi, Ahmad F; Ghosh, Preetam; Mayo, Michael L; Perkins, Edward J

    2015-01-01

    Understanding relationships between architectural properties of gene-regulatory networks (GRNs) has been one of the major goals in systems biology and bioinformatics, as it can provide insights into, e.g., disease dynamics and drug development. Such GRNs are characterized by their scale-free degree distributions and existence of network motifs - i.e., small-node subgraphs that occur more abundantly in GRNs than expected from chance alone. Because these transcriptional modules represent "building blocks" of complex networks and exhibit a wide range of functional and dynamical properties, they may contribute to the remarkable robustness and dynamical stability associated with the whole of GRNs. Here, we developed network-construction models to better understand this relationship, which produce randomized GRNs by using transcriptional motifs as the fundamental growth unit in contrast to other methods that construct similar networks on a node-by-node basis. Because this model produces networks with a prescribed lower bound on the number of choice transcriptional motifs (e.g., downlinks, feed-forward loops), its fidelity to the motif distributions observed in model organisms represents an improvement over existing methods, which we validated by contrasting their resultant motif and degree distributions against existing network-growth models and data from the model organism of the bacterium Escherichia coli. These models may therefore serve as novel testbeds for further elucidating relationships between the topology of transcriptional motifs and network-wide dynamical properties.

  8. Evidence for a gamma-turn motif in antifreeze glycopeptides.

    PubMed Central

    Drewes, J A; Rowlen, K L

    1993-01-01

    Knowledge of the secondary structure of antifreeze peptides (AFPs) and glycopeptides (AFGPs) is crucial to understanding the mechanism by which these molecules inhibit ice crystal growth. A polyproline type II helix is perhaps the most widely accepted conformation for active AFGPs; however, random coil and alpha-helix conformations have also been proposed. In this report we present vibrational spectroscopic evidence that the conformation of AFGPs in solution is not random, not alpha-helical, and not polyproline type II. Comparison of AFGP amide vibrational frequencies with those observed and calculated for beta and gamma-turns in other peptides strongly suggests that AFGPs contain substantial turn structure. Computer-generated molecular models were utilized to compare gamma-turn, beta-turn, and polyproline II structures. The gamma-turn motif is consistent with observed amide frequencies and results in a molecule with planar symmetry with respect to the disaccharides. This intriguing conformation may provide new insight into the unusual properties of AFGPs. Images FIGURE 6 PMID:8241413

  9. Motif mimetic of epsin perturbs tumor growth and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Yunzhou; Wu, Hao; Rahman, H.N. Ashiqur; Liu, Yanjun; Pasula, Satish; Tessneer, Kandice L.; Cai, Xiaofeng; Liu, Xiaolei; Chang, Baojun; McManus, John; Hahn, Scott; Dong, Jiali; Brophy, Megan L.; Yu, Lili; Song, Kai; Silasi-Mansat, Robert; Saunders, Debra; Njoku, Charity; Song, Hoogeun; Mehta-D’Souza, Padmaja; Towner, Rheal; Lupu, Florea; McEver, Rodger P.; Xia, Lijun; Boerboom, Derek; Srinivasan, R. Sathish; Chen, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Tumor angiogenesis is critical for cancer progression. In multiple murine models, endothelium-specific epsin deficiency abrogates tumor progression by shifting the balance of VEGFR2 signaling toward uncontrolled tumor angiogenesis, resulting in dysfunctional tumor vasculature. Here, we designed a tumor endothelium–targeting chimeric peptide (UPI) for the purpose of inhibiting endogenous tumor endothelial epsins by competitively binding activated VEGFR2. We determined that the UPI peptide specifically targets tumor endothelial VEGFR2 through an unconventional binding mechanism that is driven by unique residues present only in the epsin ubiquitin–interacting motif (UIM) and the VEGFR2 kinase domain. In murine models of neoangiogenesis, UPI peptide increased VEGF-driven angiogenesis and neovascularization but spared quiescent vascular beds. Further, in tumor-bearing mice, UPI peptide markedly impaired functional tumor angiogenesis, tumor growth, and metastasis, resulting in a notable increase in survival. Coadministration of UPI peptide with cytotoxic chemotherapeutics further sustained tumor inhibition. Equipped with localized tumor endothelium–specific targeting, our UPI peptide provides potential for an effective and alternative cancer therapy. PMID:26571402

  10. Motif types, motif locations and base composition patterns around the RNA polyadenylation site in microorganisms, plants and animals

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The polyadenylation of RNA is critical for gene functioning, but the conserved sequence motifs (often called signal or signature motifs), motif locations and abundances, and base composition patterns around mRNA polyadenylation [poly(A)] sites are still uncharacterized in most species. The evolutionary tendency for poly(A) site selection is still largely unknown. Results We analyzed the poly(A) site regions of 31 species or phyla. Different groups of species showed different poly(A) signal motifs: UUACUU at the poly(A) site in the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi; UGUAAC (approximately 13 bases upstream of the site) in the alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii; UGUUUG (or UGUUUGUU) at mainly the fourth base downstream of the poly(A) site in the parasite Blastocystis hominis; and AAUAAA at approximately 16 bases and approximately 19 bases upstream of the poly(A) site in animals and plants, respectively. Polyadenylation signal motifs are usually several hundred times more abundant around poly(A) sites than in whole genomes. These predominant motifs usually had very specific locations, whether upstream of, at, or downstream of poly(A) sites, depending on the species or phylum. The poly(A) site was usually an adenosine (A) in all analyzed species except for B. hominis, and there was weak A predominance in C. reinhardtii. Fungi, animals, plants, and the protist Phytophthora infestans shared a general base abundance pattern (or base composition pattern) of “U-rich—A-rich—U-rich—Poly(A) site—U-rich regions”, or U-A-U-A-U for short, with some variation for each kingdom or subkingdom. Conclusion This study identified the poly(A) signal motifs, motif locations, and base composition patterns around mRNA poly(A) sites in protists, fungi, plants, and animals and provided insight into poly(A) site evolution. PMID:25052519

  11. Crystallization and Preliminary X-ray Diffraction Analysis of motif N from Saccharomyces cerevisiae Dbf4

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, L.; Duong, A; Prasad, A; Duncker, B; Guarne, A

    2009-01-01

    The Cdc7-Dbf4 complex plays an instrumental role in the initiation of DNA replication and is a target of replication-checkpoint responses in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Cdc7 is a conserved serine/threonine kinase whose activity depends on association with its regulatory subunit, Dbf4. A conserved sequence near the N-terminus of Dbf4 (motif N) is necessary for the interaction of Cdc7-Dbf4 with the checkpoint kinase Rad53. To understand the role of the Cdc7-Dbf4 complex in checkpoint responses, a fragment of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Dbf4 encompassing motif N was isolated, overproduced and crystallized. A complete native data set was collected at 100 K from crystals that diffracted X-rays to 2.75 {angstrom} resolution and structure determination is currently under way.

  12. Drive against hotspot motifs in primates implicates the PRDM9 gene in meiotic recombination.

    PubMed

    Myers, Simon; Bowden, Rory; Tumian, Afidalina; Bontrop, Ronald E; Freeman, Colin; MacFie, Tammie S; McVean, Gil; Donnelly, Peter

    2010-02-12

    Although present in both humans and chimpanzees, recombination hotspots, at which meiotic crossover events cluster, differ markedly in their genomic location between the species. We report that a 13-base pair sequence motif previously associated with the activity of 40% of human hotspots does not function in chimpanzees and is being removed by self-destructive drive in the human lineage. Multiple lines of evidence suggest that the rapidly evolving zinc-finger protein PRDM9 binds to this motif and that sequence changes in the protein may be responsible for hotspot differences between species. The involvement of PRDM9, which causes histone H3 lysine 4 trimethylation, implies that there is a common mechanism for recombination hotspots in eukaryotes but raises questions about what forces have driven such rapid change.

  13. Mechanisms of Zero-Lag Synchronization in Cortical Motifs

    PubMed Central

    Gollo, Leonardo L.; Mirasso, Claudio; Sporns, Olaf; Breakspear, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Zero-lag synchronization between distant cortical areas has been observed in a diversity of experimental data sets and between many different regions of the brain. Several computational mechanisms have been proposed to account for such isochronous synchronization in the presence of long conduction delays: Of these, the phenomenon of “dynamical relaying” – a mechanism that relies on a specific network motif – has proven to be the most robust with respect to parameter mismatch and system noise. Surprisingly, despite a contrary belief in the community, the common driving motif is an unreliable means of establishing zero-lag synchrony. Although dynamical relaying has been validated in empirical and computational studies, the deeper dynamical mechanisms and comparison to dynamics on other motifs is lacking. By systematically comparing synchronization on a variety of small motifs, we establish that the presence of a single reciprocally connected pair – a “resonance pair” – plays a crucial role in disambiguating those motifs that foster zero-lag synchrony in the presence of conduction delays (such as dynamical relaying) from those that do not (such as the common driving triad). Remarkably, minor structural changes to the common driving motif that incorporate a reciprocal pair recover robust zero-lag synchrony. The findings are observed in computational models of spiking neurons, populations of spiking neurons and neural mass models, and arise whether the oscillatory systems are periodic, chaotic, noise-free or driven by stochastic inputs. The influence of the resonance pair is also robust to parameter mismatch and asymmetrical time delays amongst the elements of the motif. We call this manner of facilitating zero-lag synchrony resonance-induced synchronization, outline the conditions for its occurrence, and propose that it may be a general mechanism to promote zero-lag synchrony in the brain. PMID:24763382

  14. NetMODE: Network Motif Detection without Nauty

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Haidong; Deng, Hualiang; Liu, Xiaoguang; Wang, Gang

    2012-01-01

    A motif in a network is a connected graph that occurs significantly more frequently as an induced subgraph than would be expected in a similar randomized network. By virtue of being atypical, it is thought that motifs might play a more important role than arbitrary subgraphs. Recently, a flurry of advances in the study of network motifs has created demand for faster computational means for identifying motifs in increasingly larger networks. Motif detection is typically performed by enumerating subgraphs in an input network and in an ensemble of comparison networks; this poses a significant computational problem. Classifying the subgraphs encountered, for instance, is typically performed using a graph canonical labeling package, such as Nauty, and will typically be called billions of times. In this article, we describe an implementation of a network motif detection package, which we call NetMODE. NetMODE can only perform motif detection for -node subgraphs when , but does so without the use of Nauty. To avoid using Nauty, NetMODE has an initial pretreatment phase, where -node graph data is stored in memory (). For we take a novel approach, which relates to the Reconstruction Conjecture for directed graphs. We find that NetMODE can perform up to around times faster than its predecessors when and up to around times faster when (the exact improvement varies considerably). NetMODE also (a) includes a method for generating comparison graphs uniformly at random, (b) can interface with external packages (e.g. R), and (c) can utilize multi-core architectures. NetMODE is available from netmode.sf.net. PMID:23272055

  15. Combinations of various CpG motifs cloned into plasmid backbone modulate and enhance protective immunity of viral replicon DNA anthrax vaccines.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yun-Zhou; Ma, Yao; Xu, Wen-Hui; Wang, Shuang; Sun, Zhi-Wei

    2015-08-01

    DNA vaccines are generally weak stimulators of the immune system. Fortunately, their efficacy can be improved using a viral replicon vector or by the addition of immunostimulatory CpG motifs, although the design of these engineered DNA vectors requires optimization. Our results clearly suggest that multiple copies of three types of CpG motifs or combinations of various types of CpG motifs cloned into a viral replicon vector backbone with strong immunostimulatory activities on human PBMC are efficient adjuvants for these DNA vaccines to modulate and enhance protective immunity against anthrax, although modifications with these different CpG forms in vivo elicited inconsistent immune response profiles. Modification with more copies of CpG motifs elicited more potent adjuvant effects leading to the generation of enhanced immunity, which indicated a CpG motif dose-dependent enhancement of antigen-specific immune responses. Notably, the enhanced and/or synchronous adjuvant effects were observed in modification with combinations of two different types of CpG motifs, which provides not only a contribution to the knowledge base on the adjuvant activities of CpG motifs combinations but also implications for the rational design of optimal DNA vaccines with combinations of CpG motifs as "built-in" adjuvants. We describe an efficient strategy to design and optimize DNA vaccines by the addition of combined immunostimulatory CpG motifs in a viral replicon DNA plasmid to produce strong immune responses, which indicates that the CpG-modified viral replicon DNA plasmid may be desirable for use as vector of DNA vaccines.

  16. Meta-Analysis of Arabidopsis thaliana Phospho-Proteomics Data Reveals Compartmentalization of Phosphorylation Motifs[C][W

    PubMed Central

    van Wijk, Klaas J.; Friso, Giulia; Walther, Dirk; Schulze, Waltraud X.

    2014-01-01

    Protein (de)phosphorylation plays an important role in plants. To provide a robust foundation for subcellular phosphorylation signaling network analysis and kinase-substrate relationships, we performed a meta-analysis of 27 published and unpublished in-house mass spectrometry–based phospho-proteome data sets for Arabidopsis thaliana covering a range of processes, (non)photosynthetic tissue types, and cell cultures. This resulted in an assembly of 60,366 phospho-peptides matching to 8141 nonredundant proteins. Filtering the data for quality and consistency generated a set of medium and a set of high confidence phospho-proteins and their assigned phospho-sites. The relation between single and multiphosphorylated peptides is discussed. The distribution of p-proteins across cellular functions and subcellular compartments was determined and showed overrepresentation of protein kinases. Extensive differences in frequency of pY were found between individual studies due to proteomics and mass spectrometry workflows. Interestingly, pY was underrepresented in peroxisomes but overrepresented in mitochondria. Using motif-finding algorithms motif-x and MMFPh at high stringency, we identified compartmentalization of phosphorylation motifs likely reflecting localized kinase activity. The filtering of the data assembly improved signal/noise ratio for such motifs. Identified motifs were linked to kinases through (bioinformatic) enrichment analysis. This study also provides insight into the challenges/pitfalls of using large-scale phospho-proteomic data sets to nonexperts. PMID:24894044

  17. A Novel Fibronectin Binding Motif in MSCRAMMs Targets F3 Modules

    PubMed Central

    Prabhakaran, Sabitha; Liang, Xiaowen; Skare, Jonathan T.; Potts, Jennifer R.; Höök, Magnus

    2009-01-01

    Background BBK32 is a surface expressed lipoprotein and fibronectin (Fn)-binding microbial surface component recognizing adhesive matrix molecule (MSCRAMM) of Borrelia burgdorferi, the causative agent of Lyme disease. Previous studies from our group showed that BBK32 is a virulence factor in experimental Lyme disease and located the Fn-binding region to residues 21–205 of the lipoprotein. Methodology/Principal Findings Studies aimed at identifying interacting sites between BBK32 and Fn revealed an interaction between the MSCRAMM and the Fn F3 modules. Further analysis of this interaction showed that BBK32 can cause the aggregation of human plasma Fn in a similar concentration-dependent manner to that of anastellin, the superfibronectin (sFn) inducing agent. The resulting Fn aggregates are conformationally distinct from plasma Fn as indicated by a change in available thermolysin cleavage sites. Recombinant BBK32 and anastellin affect the structure of Fn matrices formed by cultured fibroblasts and inhibit endothelial cell proliferation similarly. Within BBK32, we have located the sFn-forming activity to a region between residues 160 and 175 which contains two sequence motifs that are also found in anastellin. Synthetic peptides mimicking these motifs induce Fn aggregation, whereas a peptide with a scrambled sequence motif was inactive, suggesting that these motifs represent the sFn-inducing sequence. Conclusions/Significance We conclude that BBK32 induces the formation of Fn aggregates that are indistinguishable from those formed by anastellin. The results of this study provide evidence for how bacteria can target host proteins to manipulate host cell activities. PMID:19404402

  18. Differences in Helicobacter pylori CagA tyrosine phosphorylation motif patterns between western and East Asian strains, and influences on interleukin-8 secretion.

    PubMed

    Argent, Richard H; Hale, James L; El-Omar, Emad M; Atherton, John C

    2008-09-01

    Helicobacter pylori strains from East Asia have an 'East Asian' type of CagA that is more active and predominantly comprises a single type. Strains from other countries have a 'western' type of CagA, which is less active and comprises many different types generated by intragenomic recombination. Co-culture of AGS gastric epithelial cells with isolates of western strains that displayed microevolution in CagA showed that isolates with additional copies of the C motif induced significantly more interleukin (IL)-8 secretion. Co-culture of AGS cells with western and East Asian strains, each expressing CagA with a single copy of the C or D motif, showed that East Asian strains induced significantly more IL-8 secretion. Analysis of the different CagA types from data deposited in GenBank and from the literature showed that western CagA is significantly more likely to undergo duplication of tyrosine phosphorylation motif C than East Asian CagA is of the corresponding D motif. Taken together, the data suggest that the already highly active East Asian CagA with one D motif has no requirement to increase its virulence, whereas the less active western CagA displays flexibility in its capacity to increase its number of tyrosine phosphorylation motifs to become more virulent.

  19. The 3'-5' exonuclease site of DNA polymerase III from gram-positive bacteria: definition of a novel motif structure.

    PubMed

    Barnes, M H; Spacciapoli, P; Li, D H; Brown, N C

    1995-11-07

    The primary structure of the 3'-5' exonuclease (Exo) site of the Gram+ bacterial DNA polymerase III (Pol III) was examined by site-directed mutagenesis of Bacillus subtilis Pol III (BsPol III). It was found to differ significantly from the conventional three-motif substructure established for the Exo site of DNA polymerase I of Escherichia coli (EcPol I) and the majority of other DNA polymerase-exonucleases. Motifs I and II were conventionally organized and anchored functionally by the predicted carboxylate residues. However, the conventional downstream motif, motif III, was replaced by motif III epsilon, a novel 55-amino-acid (aa) segment incorporating three essential aa (His565, Asp533 and Asp570) which are strictly conserved in three Gram+ Pol III and in the Ec Exo epsilon (epsilon). Despite its unique substructure, the Gram+ Pol III-specific Exo site was conventionally independent of Pol, the site of 2'-deoxyribonucleoside 5-triphosphate (dNTP) binding and polymerization. The entire Exo site, including motif III epsilon, could be deleted without profoundly affecting the enzyme's capacity to polymerize dNTPs. Conversely, Pol and all other sequences downstream of the Exo site could be deleted with little apparent effect on Exo activity. Whether the three essential aa within the unique motif III epsilon substructure participate in the conventional two-metal-ion mechanism elucidated for the model Exo site of EcPol I, remains to be established.

  20. A novel RNA-binding motif in omnipotent suppressors of translation termination, ribosomal proteins and a ribosome modification enzyme?

    PubMed

    Koonin, E V; Bork, P; Sander, C

    1994-06-11

    Using computer methods for database search, multiple alignment, protein sequence motif analysis and secondary structure prediction, a putative new RNA-binding motif was identified. The novel motif is conserved in yeast omnipotent translation termination suppressor SUP1, the related DOM34 protein and its pseudogene homologue; three groups of eukaryotic and archaeal ribosomal proteins, namely L30e, L7Ae/S6e and S12e; an uncharacterized Bacillus subtilis protein related to the L7A/S6e group; and Escherichia coli ribosomal protein modification enzyme RimK. We hypothesize that a new type of RNA-binding domain may be utilized to deliver additional activities to the ribosome.

  1. cWINNOWER algorithm for finding fuzzy dna motifs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liang, S.; Samanta, M. P.; Biegel, B. A.

    2004-01-01

    The cWINNOWER algorithm detects fuzzy motifs in DNA sequences rich in protein-binding signals. A signal is defined as any short nucleotide pattern having up to d mutations differing from a motif of length l. The algorithm finds such motifs if a clique consisting of a sufficiently large number of mutated copies of the motif (i.e., the signals) is present in the DNA sequence. The cWINNOWER algorithm substantially improves the sensitivity of the winnower method of Pevzner and Sze by imposing a consensus constraint, enabling it to detect much weaker signals. We studied the minimum detectable clique size qc as a function of sequence length N for random sequences. We found that qc increases linearly with N for a fast version of the algorithm based on counting three-member sub-cliques. Imposing consensus constraints reduces qc by a factor of three in this case, which makes the algorithm dramatically more sensitive. Our most sensitive algorithm, which counts four-member sub-cliques, needs a minimum of only 13 signals to detect motifs in a sequence of length N = 12,000 for (l, d) = (15, 4). Copyright Imperial College Press.

  2. Fitting a mixture model by expectation maximization to discover motifs in biopolymers

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, T.L.; Elkan, C.

    1994-12-31

    The algorithm described in this paper discovers one or more motifs in a collection of DNA or protein sequences by using the technique of expectation maximization to fit a two-component finite mixture model to the set of sequences. Multiple motifs are found by fitting a mixture model to the data, probabilistically erasing the occurrences of the motif thus found, and repeating the process to find successive motifs. The algorithm requires only a set of unaligned sequences and a number specifying the width of the motifs as input. It returns a model of each motif and a threshold which together can be used as a Bayes-optimal classifier for searching for occurrences of the motif in other databases. The algorithm estimates how many times each motif occurs in each sequence in the dataset and outputs an alignment of the occurrences of the motif. The algorithm is capable of discovering several different motifs with differing numbers of occurrences in a single dataset.

  3. The C-terminal dimerization motif of cyclase-associated protein is essential for actin monomer regulation.

    PubMed

    Iwase, Shohei; Ono, Shoichiro

    2016-12-01

    Cyclase-associated protein (CAP) is a conserved actin-regulatory protein that functions together with actin depolymerizing factor (ADF)/cofilin to enhance actin filament dynamics. CAP has multiple functional domains, and the function to regulate actin monomers is carried out by its C-terminal half containing a Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome protein homology 2 (WH2) domain, a CAP and X-linked retinitis pigmentosa 2 (CARP) domain, and a dimerization motif. WH2 and CARP are implicated in binding to actin monomers and important for enhancing filament turnover. However, the role of the dimerization motif is unknown. Here, we investigated the function of the dimerization motif of CAS-2, a CAP isoform in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, in actin monomer regulation. CAS-2 promotes ATP-dependent recycling of ADF/cofilin-bound actin monomers for polymerization by enhancing exchange of actin-bound nucleotides. The C-terminal half of CAS-2 (CAS-2C) has nearly as strong activity as full-length CAS-2. Maltose-binding protein (MBP)-tagged CAS-2C is a dimer. However, MBP-CAS-2C with a truncation of either one or two C-terminal β-strands is monomeric. Truncations of the dimerization motif in MBP-CAS-2C nearly completely abolish its activity to sequester actin monomers from polymerization and enhance nucleotide exchange on actin monomers. As a result, these CAS-2C variants, also in the context of full-length CAS-2, fail to compete with ADF/cofilin to release actin monomers for polymerization. CAS-2C variants lacking the dimerization motif exhibit enhanced binding to actin filaments, which is mediated by WH2. Taken together, these results suggest that the evolutionarily conserved dimerization motif of CAP is essential for its C-terminal region to exert the actin monomer-specific regulatory function.

  4. Identification of a common hyaluronan binding motif in the hyaluronan binding proteins RHAMM, CD44 and link protein.

    PubMed Central

    Yang, B; Yang, B L; Savani, R C; Turley, E A

    1994-01-01

    We have previously identified two hyaluronan (HA) binding domains in the HA receptor, RHAMM, that occur near the carboxyl-terminus of this protein. We show here that these two HA binding domains are the only HA binding regions in RHAMM, and that they contribute approximately equally to the HA binding ability of this receptor. Mutation of domain II using recombinant polypeptides of RHAMM demonstrates that K423 and R431, spaced seven amino acids apart, are critical for HA binding activity. Domain I contains two sets of two basic amino acids, each spaced seven residues apart, and mutation of these basic amino acids reduced their binding to HA--Sepharose. These results predict that two basic amino acids flanking a seven amino acid stretch [hereafter called B(X7)B] are minimally required for HA binding activity. To assess whether this motif predicts HA binding in the intact RHAMM protein, we mutated all basic amino acids in domains I and II that form part of these motifs using site-directed mutagenesis and prepared fusion protein from the mutated cDNA. The altered RHAMM protein did not bind HA, confirming that the basic amino acids and their spacing are critical for binding. A specific requirement for arginine or lysine residues was identified since mutation of K430, R431 and K432 to histidine residues abolished binding. Clustering of basic amino acids either within or at either end of the motif enhanced HA binding activity while the occurrence of acidic residues between the basic amino acids reduced binding. The B(X7)B motif, in which B is either R or K and X7 contains no acidic residues and at least one basic amino acid, was found in all HA binding proteins molecularly characterized to date. Recombinant techniques were used to generate chimeric proteins containing either the B(X7)B motifs present in CD44 or link protein, with the amino-terminus of RHAMM (amino acids 1-238) that does not bind HA. All chimeric proteins containing the motif bound HA in transblot analyses

  5. Expression of RNA-binding motif 10 is associated with advanced tumor stage and malignant behaviors of lung adenocarcinoma cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Guan, Guofang; Li, Ranwei; Tang, Wenfang; Liu, Tiecheng; Su, Zhenzhong; Wang, Yan; Tan, Jingjin; Jiang, Shan; Wang, Ke

    2017-03-01

    This study assessed RNA-binding motif 10 expression in lung adenocarcinoma tissues and examined the role and mechanism of RNA-binding motif 10 in the regulation of lung adenocarcinoma malignancy. Lung adenocarcinoma and corresponding adjacent non-tumor lung tissues from 41 patients were subjected to reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and Western blot assessment to detect RNA-binding motif 10 expression. Recombinant lentivirus carrying RNA-binding motif 10 complementary DNA was used to infect lung adenocarcinoma cell lines, A549 and H1299 cells. Complementary DNA microarray was used to profile RNA-binding motif 10-regulated genes. Levels of RNA-binding motif 10 messenger RNA and protein were significantly lower in lung adenocarcinoma tissues than those in paired non-tumor tissues (p < 0.001). Reduced RNA-binding motif 10 expression was found to be associated with an advanced tumor stage. RNA-binding motif 10 overexpression inhibited viability and colony formation capacity of lung adenocarcinoma cell lines and induced cell-cycle arrest at G0/G1 phase in A549 cells and at S phase in H1299 cells. Complementary DNA microarray analysis identified 304 upregulated and 386 downregulated genes induced by RNA-binding motif 10 overexpression, which may be involved in cancer, focal adhesion, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-regulated gene pathway, cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction, mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling, complement and coagulation cascades, platelet amyloid precursor protein pathway, extracellular matrix-receptor interaction, and small cell lung cancer-related genes. Expression of FGF2, EGFR, WNT5A, NF-κB, and RAP1A was downregulated, whereas expression of AKT2, BIRC3, and JUN was upregulated. RNA-binding motif 10 messenger RNA and protein were reduced in lung adenocarcinoma tissues, and RNA-binding motif 10 overexpression inhibited lung adenocarcinoma cancer cell malignant behavior in vitro. Molecularly, RNA-binding motif

  6. Identification of a pKa-regulating motif stabilizing imidazole-modified double-stranded DNA

    PubMed Central

    Buyst, Dieter; Gheerardijn, Vicky; Fehér, Krisztina; Van Gasse, Bjorn; Van Den Begin, Jos; Martins, José C.; Madder, Annemieke

    2015-01-01

    The predictable 3D structure of double-stranded DNA renders it ideally suited as a template for the bottom-up design of functionalized nucleic acid-based active sites. We here explore the use of a 14mer DNA duplex as a scaffold for the precise and predictable positioning of catalytic functionalities. Given the ubiquitous participation of the histidine-based imidazole group in protein recognition and catalysis events, single histidine-like modified duplexes were investigated. Tethering histamine to the C5 of the thymine base via an amide bond, allows the flexible positioning of the imidazole function in the major groove. The mutual interactions between the imidazole and the duplex and its influence on the imidazolium pKaH are investigated by placing a single modified thymine at four different positions in the center of the 14mer double helix. Using NMR and unrestrained molecular dynamics, a structural motif involving the formation of a hydrogen bond between the imidazole and the Hoogsteen side of the guanine bases of two neighboring GC base pairs is established. The motif contributes to a stabilization against thermal melting of 6°C and is key in modulating the pKaH of the imidazolium group. The general features, prerequisites and generic character of the new pKaH-regulating motif are described. PMID:25520197

  7. Regulation of Airway Inflammation by G-protein Regulatory Motif Peptides of AGS3 protein

    PubMed Central

    Choi, IL-Whan; Ahn, Do Whan; Choi, Jang-Kyu; Cha, Hee-Jae; Ock, Mee Sun; You, EunAe; Rhee, SangMyung; Kim, Kwang Chul; Choi, Yung Hyun; Song, Kyoung Seob

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory diseases such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and lung infections have critical consequences on mortality and morbidity in humans. The aims of the present study were to examine the mechanisms by which CXCL12 affects MUC1 transcription and airway inflammation, which depend on activator of G-protein signaling (AGS) 3 and to identify specific molecules that suppress CXCL12-induced airway inflammation by acting on G-protein-coupled receptors. Herein, AGS3 suppresses CXCL12-mediated upregulation of MUC1 and TNFα by regulating Gαi. We found that the G-protein regulatory (GPR) motif peptide in AGS3 binds to Gαi and downregulates MUC1 expression; in contrast, this motif upregulates TNFα expression. Mutated GPR Q34A peptide increased the expression of MUC1 and TGFβ but decreased the expression of TNFα and IL-6. Moreover, CXCR4-induced dendritic extensions in 2D and 3D matrix cultures were inhibited by the GPR Q34A peptide compared with a wild-type GPR peptide. The GPR Q34A peptide also inhibited CXCL12-induced morphological changes and inflammatory cell infiltration in the mouse lung, and production of inflammatory cytokines in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid and the lungs. Our data indicate that the GPR motif of AGS3 is critical for regulating MUC1/Muc1 expression and cytokine production in the inflammatory microenvironment. PMID:27270970

  8. The tungsten formylmethanofuran dehydrogenase from Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum contains sequence motifs characteristic for enzymes containing molybdopterin dinucleotide.

    PubMed

    Hochheimer, A; Schmitz, R A; Thauer, R K; Hedderich, R

    1995-12-15

    Formylmethanofuran dehydrogenases are molybdenum or tungsten iron-sulfur proteins containing a pterin dinucleotide cofactor. We report here on the primary structures of the four subunits FwdABCD of the tungsten enzyme from Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum which were determined by cloning and sequencing the encoding genes fwdABCD. FwdB was found to contain sequence motifs characteristic for molybdopterin-dinucleotide-containing enzymes indicating that this subunit harbors the active site. FwdA, FwdC and FwdD showed no significant sequence similarity to proteins in the data bases. Northern blot analysis revealed that the four fwd genes form a transcription unit together with three additional genes designated fwdE, fwdF and fwdG. A 17.8-kDa protein and an 8.6-kDa protein, both containing two [4Fe-4S] cluster binding motifs, were deduced from fwdE and fwdG. The open reading frame fwdF encodes a 38.6-kDa protein containing eight binding motifs for [4Fe-4S] clusters suggesting the gene product to be a novel polyferredoxin. All seven fwd genes were expressed in Escherichia coli yielding proteins of the expected size. The fwd operon was found to be located in a region of the M. thermoautotrophicum genome encoding molybdenum enzymes and proteins involved in molybdopterin biosynthesis.

  9. Identification of sequence motifs involved in Dengue virus-host interactions.

    PubMed

    Asnet Mary, J; Paramasivan, R; Shenbagarathai, R

    2016-01-01

    Dengue fever is a rapidly spreading mosquito-borne virus infection, which remains a serious global public health problem. As there is no specific treatment or commercial vaccine available for effective control of the disease, the attempts on developing novel control strategies are underway. Viruses utilize the surface receptor proteins of host to enter into the cells. Though various proteins were said to be receptors of Dengue virus (DENV) using Virus Overlay Protein Binding Assay, the precise interaction between DENV and host is not explored. Understanding the structural features of domain III envelope glycoprotein would help in developing efficient antiviral inhibitors. Therefore, an attempt was made to identify the sequence motifs present in domain III envelope glycoprotein of Dengue virus. Computational analysis revealed that the NGR motif is present in the domain III envelope glycoprotein of DENV-1 and DENV-3. Similarly, DENV-1, DENV-2 and DENV-4 were found to contain Yxxphi motif which is a tyrosine-based sorting signal responsible for the interaction with a mu subunit of adaptor protein complex. High-throughput virtual screening resulted in five compounds as lead molecules based on glide score, which ranges from -4.664 to -6.52 kcal/Mol. This computational prediction provides an additional tool for understanding the virus-host interactions and helps to identify potential targets in the host. Further, experimental evidence is warranted to confirm the virus-host interactions and also inhibitory activity of reported lead compounds.

  10. Identification of three immunodominant motifs with atypical isotype profile scattered over the Onchocerca volvulus proteome

    PubMed Central

    Van Dorst, Bieke; Stuyver, Lieven J.

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the immune response upon infection with the filarial nematode Onchocerca volvulus and the mechanisms that evolved in this parasite to evade immune mediated elimination is essential to expand the toolbox available for diagnostics, therapeutics and vaccines development. Using high-density peptide microarrays we scanned the proteome-wide linear epitope repertoire in Cameroonian onchocerciasis patients and healthy controls from Southern Africa which led to the identification of 249 immunodominant antigenic peptides. Motif analysis learned that 3 immunodominant motifs, encompassing 3 linear epitopes, are present in 70, 43, and 31 of these peptides, respectively and appear to be scattered over the entire proteome in seemingly non-related proteins. These linear epitopes are shown to have an atypical isotype profile dominated by IgG1, IgG3, IgE and IgM, in contrast to the commonly observed IgG4 response in chronic active helminth infections. The identification of these linear epitope motifs may lead to novel diagnostic development but further evaluation of cross-reactivity against common co-infecting human nematode infections will be needed. PMID:28125577

  11. Engineering Synthetic Antibody Inhibitors Specific for LD2 or LD4 Motifs of Paxillin.

    PubMed

    Nocula-Lugowska, Malgorzata; Lugowski, Mateusz; Salgia, Ravi; Kossiakoff, Anthony A

    2015-07-31

    Focal adhesion protein paxillin links integrin and growth factor signaling to actin cytoskeleton. Most of paxillin signaling activity is regulated via leucine-rich LD motifs (LD1-LD5) located at the N-terminus. Here, we demonstrate a method to engineer highly selective synthetic antibodies (sABs) against LD2 and LD4 that are binding sites for focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and other proteins. Phage display selections against peptides were used to generate sABs recognizing each LD motif. In the obtained X-ray crystal structures of the LD-sAB complexes, the LD motifs are helical and bind sABs through a hydrophobic side, similarly as in the structures with natural paxillin partners. The sABs are capable of pulling down endogenous paxillin in complex with FAK and can visualize paxillin in focal adhesions in cells. They were also used as selective inhibitors to effectively compete with focal adhesion targeting domain of FAK for the binding to LD2 and LD4. The sABs are tools for investigation of paxillin LD binding "platforms" and are capable of inhibiting paxillin interactions, thereby useful as potential therapeutics in the future.

  12. Identification of three immunodominant motifs with atypical isotype profile scattered over the Onchocerca volvulus proteome.

    PubMed

    Lagatie, Ole; Van Dorst, Bieke; Stuyver, Lieven J

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the immune response upon infection with the filarial nematode Onchocerca volvulus and the mechanisms that evolved in this parasite to evade immune mediated elimination is essential to expand the toolbox available for diagnostics, therapeutics and vaccines development. Using high-density peptide microarrays we scanned the proteome-wide linear epitope repertoire in Cameroonian onchocerciasis patients and healthy controls from Southern Africa which led to the identification of 249 immunodominant antigenic peptides. Motif analysis learned that 3 immunodominant motifs, encompassing 3 linear epitopes, are present in 70, 43, and 31 of these peptides, respectively and appear to be scattered over the entire proteome in seemingly non-related proteins. These linear epitopes are shown to have an atypical isotype profile dominated by IgG1, IgG3, IgE and IgM, in contrast to the commonly observed IgG4 response in chronic active helminth infections. The identification of these linear epitope motifs may lead to novel diagnostic development but further evaluation of cross-reactivity against common co-infecting human nematode infections will be needed.

  13. Selection against spurious promoter motifs correlates withtranslational efficiency across bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Froula, Jeffrey L.; Francino, M. Pilar

    2007-05-01

    Because binding of RNAP to misplaced sites could compromise the efficiency of transcription, natural selection for the optimization of gene expression should regulate the distribution of DNA motifs capable of RNAP-binding across the genome. Here we analyze the distribution of the -10 promoter motifs that bind the {sigma}{sup 70} subunit of RNAP in 42 bacterial genomes. We show that selection on these motifs operates across the genome, maintaining an over-representation of -10 motifs in regulatory sequences while eliminating them from the nonfunctional and, in most cases, from the protein coding regions. In some genomes, however, -10 sites are over-represented in the coding sequences; these sites could induce pauses effecting regulatory roles throughout the length of a transcriptional unit. For nonfunctional sequences, the extent of motif under-representation varies across genomes in a manner that broadly correlates with the number of tRNA genes, a good indicator of translational speed and growth rate. This suggests that minimizing the time invested in gene transcription is an important selective pressure against spurious binding. However, selection against spurious binding is detectable in the reduced genomes of host-restricted bacteria that grow at slow rates, indicating that components of efficiency other than speed may also be important. Minimizing the number of RNAP molecules per cell required for transcription, and the corresponding energetic expense, may be most relevant in slow growers. These results indicate that genome-level properties affecting the efficiency of transcription and translation can respond in an integrated manner to optimize gene expression. The detection of selection against promoter motifs in nonfunctional regions also implies that no sequence may evolve free of selective constraints, at least in the relatively small and unstructured genomes of bacteria.

  14. [Specific motifs in the genomes of the family Chlamydiaceae].

    PubMed

    Demkin, V V; Kirillova, N V

    2012-01-01

    Specific motifs in the genomes of the family Chlamydiaceae were discussed. The search for genetic markers ofbacteria identification and typing is an urgent problem. The progress in sequencing technology resulted in compilation of the database of genomic nucleotide sequences of bacteria. This raised the problem of the search and selection of genetic targets for identification and typing in bacterial genes based on comparative analysis of complete genomic sequences. The goal of this work was to implement comparative genetic analysis of different species of the family Chlamydiaceae. This analysis was focused to detection of specific motifs capable of serving as genetic marker of this family. The consensus domains were detected using the Visual Basic for Application software for MS Excel. Complete coincidence of segments 25 nucleotide long was used as the test for consensus domain selection. One complete genomic sequence for each of 8 bacterial species was taken for the experiment. The experimental sample did not contain complete sequence of C. suis, because at the moment of this research this species was absence in the database GenBank. Comparative assay of the sequences of the C. trachomatis and other representatives of the family Chlamydiaceae revealed 41 common motifs for 8 Chlamydiaceae species tested in this work. The maximal number of consensus motifs was observed in genes of ribosomal RNA and t-RNA. In addition to genes of r-RNA and t-RNA consensus motifs were observed in 5 genes and 6 intergene segments. The gene CTL0299, CTLO800, dagA, and hctA consensus motifs detected in this work can be regarded as identification domains of the family Chlamydiaceae.

  15. Specific RNA self-assembly with minimal paranemic motifs.

    PubMed

    Afonin, Kirill A; Cieply, Dennis J; Leontis, Neocles B

    2008-01-09

    The paranemic crossover (PX) is a motif for assembling two nucleic acid molecules using Watson-Crick (WC) basepairing without unfolding preformed secondary structure in the individual molecules. Once formed, the paranemic assembly motif comprises adjacent parallel double helices that crossover at every possible point over the length of the motif. The interaction is reversible as it does not require denaturation of basepairs internal to each interacting molecular unit. Paranemic assembly has been demonstrated for DNA but not for RNA and only for motifs with four or more crossover points and lengths of five or more helical half-turns. Here we report the design of RNA molecules that paranemically assemble with the minimum number of two crossovers spanning the major groove to form paranemic motifs with a length of three half turns (3HT). Dissociation constants (Kd's) were measured for a series of molecules in which the number of basepairs between the crossover points was varied from five to eight basepairs. The paranemic 3HT complex with six basepairs (3HT_6M) was found to be the most stable with Kd = 1 x 10-8 M. The half-time for kinetic exchange of the 3HT_6M complex was determined to be approximately 100 min, from which we calculated association and dissociation rate constants ka = 5.11 x 103 M-1s-1 and kd = 5.11 x 10-5 s-1. RNA paranemic assembly of 3HT and 5HT complexes is blocked by single-base substitutions that disrupt individual intermolecular Watson-Crick basepairs and is restored by compensatory substitutions that restore those basepairs. The 3HT motif appears suitable for specific, programmable, and reversible tecto-RNA self-assembly for constructing artificial RNA molecular machines.

  16. Conserved Hydration Sites in Pin1 Reveal a Distinctive Water Recognition Motif in Proteins.

    PubMed

    Barman, Arghya; Smitherman, Crystal; Souffrant, Michael; Gadda, Giovanni; Hamelberg, Donald

    2016-01-25

    Structurally conserved water molecules are important for biomolecular stability, flexibility, and function. X-ray crystallographic studies of Pin1 have resolved a number of water molecules around the enzyme, including two highly conserved water molecules within the protein. The functional role of these localized water molecules remains unknown and unexplored. Pin1 catalyzes cis/trans isomerizations of peptidyl prolyl bonds that are preceded by a phosphorylated serine or threonine residue. Pin1 is involved in many subcellular signaling processes and is a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of several life threatening diseases. Here, we investigate the significance of these structurally conserved water molecules in the catalytic domain of Pin1 using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, free energy calculations, analysis of X-ray crystal structures, and circular dichroism (CD) experiments. MD simulations and free energy calculations suggest the tighter binding water molecule plays a crucial role in maintaining the integrity and stability of a critical hydrogen-bonding network in the active site. The second water molecule is exchangeable with bulk solvent and is found in a distinctive helix-turn-coil motif. Structural bioinformatics analysis of nonredundant X-ray crystallographic protein structures in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) suggest this motif is present in several other proteins and can act as a water site, akin to the calcium EF hand. CD experiments suggest the isolated motif is in a distorted PII conformation and requires the protein environment to fully form the α-helix-turn-coil motif. This study provides valuable insights into the role of hydration in the structural integrity of Pin1 that can be exploited in protein engineering and drug design.

  17. Characterizing regulatory path motifs in integrated networks using perturbational data

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    We introduce Pathicular http://bioinformatics.psb.ugent.be/software/details/Pathicular, a Cytoscape plugin for studying the cellular response to perturbations of transcription factors by integrating perturbational expression data with transcriptional, protein-protein and phosphorylation networks. Pathicular searches for 'regulatory path motifs', short paths in the integrated physical networks which occur significantly more often than expected between transcription factors and their targets in the perturbational data. A case study in Saccharomyces cerevisiae identifies eight regulatory path motifs and demonstrates their biological significance. PMID:20230615

  18. A Command Editor Tool for X and Motif

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-07-01

    1of 16 h.. . . .. .. . . . . . .I .... . . . .. . . . . . . .- I m arble X/Motlf Design Document for Contract # DAAH01-93-C-R013 minimal implementation...Motif 2 of 18 m arble X/Motif Design Document for Contract # DAAH01-93-C-R013 ing of modified system widgets, proides to the developer the full source...oa’rutmz ol"croidctv fteseilmd h A iandEio olfrX n oi f1 i~lol’lot m arble Xfflotlf De*ign Documnent for Contract # DAAHOI-93-C-R013 user has just

  19. Specific regulatory motifs predict glucocorticoid responsiveness of hippocampal gene expression.

    PubMed

    Datson, N A; Polman, J A E; de Jonge, R T; van Boheemen, P T M; van Maanen, E M T; Welten, J; McEwen, B S; Meiland, H C; Meijer, O C

    2011-10-01

    The glucocorticoid receptor (GR) is an ubiquitously expressed ligand-activated transcription factor that mediates effects of cortisol in relation to adaptation to stress. In the brain, GR affects the hippocampus to modulate memory processes through direct binding to glucocorticoid response elements (GREs) in the DNA. However, its effects are to a high degree cell specific, and its target genes in different cell types as well as the mechanisms conferring this specificity are largely unknown. To gain insight in hippocampal GR signaling, we characterized to which GRE GR binds in the rat hippocampus. Using a position-specific scoring matrix, we identified evolutionary-conserved putative GREs from a microarray based set of hippocampal target genes. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation, we were able to confirm GR binding to 15 out of a selection of 32 predicted sites (47%). The majority of these 15 GREs are previously undescribed and thus represent novel GREs that bind GR and therefore may be functional in the rat hippocampus. GRE nucleotide composition was not predictive for binding of GR to a GRE. A search for conserved flanking sequences that may predict GR-GRE interaction resulted in the identification of GC-box associated motifs, such as Myc-associated zinc finger protein 1, within 2 kb of GREs with GR binding in the hippocampus. This enrichment was not present around nonbinding GRE sequences nor around proven GR-binding sites from a mesenchymal stem-like cell dataset that we analyzed. GC-binding transcription factors therefore may be unique partners for DNA-bound GR and may in part explain cell-specific transcriptional regulation by glucocorticoids in the context of the hippocampus.

  20. A novel role for the fibrinogen Asn-Gly-Arg (NGR) motif in platelet function.

    PubMed

    Moriarty, Róisín; McManus, Ciara A; Lambert, Matthew; Tilley, Thea; Devocelle, Marc; Brennan, Marian; Kerrigan, Steven W; Cox, Dermot

    2015-02-01

    The integrin αIIbβ3 on resting platelets can bind to immobilised fibrinogen resulting in platelet spreading and activation but requires activation to bind to soluble fibrinogen. αIIbβ3 is known to interact with the general integrin-recognition motif RGD (arginine-glycine-aspartate) as well as the fibrinogen-specific γ-chain dodecapeptide; however, it is not known how fibrinogen binding triggers platelet activation. NGR (asparagine-glycine-arginine) is another integrin-recognition sequence present in fibrinogen and this study aims to determine if it plays a role in the interaction between fibrinogen and αIIbβ3. NGR-containing peptides inhibited resting platelet adhesion to fibrinogen with an IC50 of 175 µM but failed to inhibit the adhesion of activated platelets to fibrinogen (IC50> 500 µM). Resting platelet adhesion to mutant fibrinogens lacking the NGR sequences was reduced compared to normal fibrinogen under both static and shear conditions (200 s⁻¹). However, pre-activated platelets were able to fully spread on all types of fibrinogen. Thus, the NGR motif in fibrinogen is the site that is primarily responsible for the interaction with resting αIIbβ3 and is responsible for triggering platelet activation.

  1. The RNA recognition motif domains of RBM5 are required for RNA binding and cancer cell proliferation inhibition

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Qing; Yang, Yu; Wu, Chuanfang

    2014-02-14

    Highlights: • RNA recognition motif domains of RBM5 are essential for cell proliferation inhibition. • RNA recognition motif domains of RBM5 are essential for apoptosis induction. • RNA recognition motif domains of RBM5 are essential for RNA binding. • RNA recognition motif domains of RBM5 are essential for caspase-2 alternative splicing. - Abstract: RBM5 is a known putative tumor suppressor gene that has been shown to function in cell growth inhibition by modulating apoptosis. RBM5 also plays a critical role in alternative splicing as an RNA binding protein. However, it is still unclear which domains of RBM5 are required for RNA binding and related functional activities. We hypothesized the two putative RNA recognition motif (RRM) domains of RBM5 spanning from amino acids 98–178 and 231–315 are essential for RBM5-mediated cell growth inhibition, apoptosis regulation, and RNA binding. To investigate this hypothesis, we evaluated the activities of the wide-type and mutant RBM5 gene transfer in low-RBM5 expressing A549 cells. We found that, unlike wild-type RBM5 (RBM5-wt), a RBM5 mutant lacking the two RRM domains (RBM5-ΔRRM), is unable to bind RNA, has compromised caspase-2 alternative splicing activity, lacks cell proliferation inhibition and apoptosis induction function in A549 cells. These data provide direct evidence that the two RRM domains of RBM5 are required for RNA binding and the RNA binding activity of RBM5 contributes to its function on apoptosis induction and cell growth inhibition.

  2. Oligonucleotide motifs that disappear during the evolution of influenza virus in humans increase alpha interferon secretion by plasmacytoid dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Jimenez-Baranda, Sonia; Greenbaum, Benjamin; Manches, Olivier; Handler, Jesse; Rabadán, Raúl; Levine, Arnold; Bhardwaj, Nina

    2011-04-01

    CpG motifs in an A/U context have been preferentially eliminated from classical H1N1 influenza virus genomes during virus evolution in humans. The hypothesis of the current work is that CpG motifs in a uracil context represent sequence patterns with the capacity to induce an immune response, and the avoidance of this immunostimulatory signal is the reason for the observed preferential decline. To analyze the immunogenicity of these domains, we used plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs). pDCs express pattern recognition receptors, including Toll-like receptor 7 (TLR7), which recognizes guanosine- and uridine-rich viral single-stranded RNA (ssRNA), including influenza virus ssRNA. The signaling through TLR7 results in the induction of inflammatory cytokines and type I interferon (IFN-I), an essential process for the induction of specific adaptive immune responses and for mounting a robust antiviral response mediated by IFN-α. Secretion of IFN-α is also linked to the activation of other immune cells, potentially amplifying the effect of an initial IFN-α secretion. We therefore also examined the role of IFN-α-driven activation of NK cells as another source of selective pressure on the viral genome. We found direct evidence that CpG RNA motifs in a U-rich context control pDC activation and IFN-α-driven activation of NK cells, likely through TLR7. These data provide a potential explanation for the loss of CpG motifs from avian influenza viruses as they adapt to mammalian hosts. The selective decrease of CpG motifs surrounded by U/A may be a viral strategy to avoid immune recognition, a strategy likely shared by highly expressed human immune genes.

  3. Three types of human CpG motifs differentially modulate and augment immunogenicity of nonviral and viral replicon DNA vaccines as built-in adjuvants.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yun-Zhou; Li, Na; Ma, Yao; Wang, Shuang; Yu, Wei-Yuan; Sun, Zhi-Wei

    2013-01-01

    NakedDNA vaccines given by intramuscular injection are efficient in mouse models, but they require improvement for human use. As the immunogenicity of DNA vaccines depends, to a large extent, on the presence of CpG motifs as built-in adjuvants, we addressed this issue by inserting three types of human CpG motifs (A-type, B-type, and C-type) into the backbone of nonviral DNA and viral DNA replicon vectors with distinct immunostimulatory activities on human PBMCs. The adjuvant effects of CpG modifications in DNA vaccines expressing three types of antigens (β-Gal, AHc, or PA4) were then characterized in mice and found to significantly enhance antigen-specific humoral and cell-mediated immune responses. The three types of CpG motifs also differentially affected and modulated immune responses and protective potency against botulinum neurotoxin serotype A and Bacillus anthracis A16R challenge. Taken together, these results demonstrate that insertion of human CpG motifs can differentially modulate the immunogenicity of nonviral DNA vaccines as well as viral DNA replicon vaccines. Our study provides not only a better understanding of the in vivo activities of CpG motif adjuvants but implications for the rational design of such motifs as built-in adjuvants for DNA vectors targeting specific antigens.

  4. Functional characterization of the guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) motif of GIV protein reveals a threshold effect in signaling.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Marcos, Mikel; Kietrsunthorn, Patrick S; Pavlova, Yelena; Adia, Michelle A; Ghosh, Pradipta; Farquhar, Marilyn G

    2012-02-07

    Heterotrimeric G proteins are critical signal-transducing molecules controlled by a complex network of regulators. GIV (a.k.a. Girdin) is a unique component of this network and a nonreceptor guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) that functions via a signature motif. GIV's GEF motif is involved in the regulation of critical biological processes such as phosphoinositide 3 kinase (PI3K)-Akt signaling, actin cytoskeleton remodeling, cell migration, and cancer metastasis. Here we investigated how the GEF function of GIV affects the wiring of its signaling pathway to shape different biological responses. Using a structure-guided approach, we designed a battery of GIV mutants with different Gαi-binding and -activating properties and used it to dissect the specific impact of changes in GIV's GEF activity on several cellular responses. In vivo signaling assays revealed a threshold effect of GEF activity for the activation of Akt by GIV in different cell lines and by different stimuli. Akt signaling is minimal at low GEF activity and is sharply increased to reach a maximum above a threshold of GEF activity, suggesting that GIV is a critical signal amplifier and that activation of Akt is ultrasensitive to changes in GIV's GEF activity. A similar threshold dependence was observed for other biological functions promoted by GIV such as remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton and cell migration. This functional characterization of GIV's GEF motif provides insights into the molecular interactions between nonreceptor GEFs and G proteins and the mechanisms that govern this signal transduction pathway.

  5. Nephila clavipes Flagelliform Silk-like GGX Motifs Contribute to Extensibility and Spacer Motifs Contribute to Strength in Synthetic Spider Silk Fibers

    PubMed Central

    Adrianos, Sherry L.; Teulé, Florence; Hinman, Michael B.; Jones, Justin A.; Weber, Warner S.; Yarger, Jeffery L.; Lewis, Randolph V.

    2013-01-01

    Flagelliform spider silk is the most extensible silk fiber produced by orb weaver spiders, though not as strong as the dragline silk of the spider. The motifs found in the core of the Nephila clavipes flagelliform Flag protein are: GGX, spacer, and GPGGX. Flag does not contain the polyalanine motif known to provide the strength of dragline silk. To investigate the source of flagelliform fiber strength, four recombinant proteins were produced containing variations of the three core motifs of the Nephila clavipes flagelliform Flag protein that produces this type of fiber. The as-spun fibers were processed in 80% aqueous isopropanol using a standardized process for all four fiber types, which produced improved mechanical properties. Mechanical testing of the recombinant proteins determined that the GGX motif contributes extensibility and the spacer motif contributes strength to the recombinant fibers. Recombinant protein fibers containing the spacer motif were stronger than the proteins constructed without the spacer that contained only the GGX motif or the combination of the GGX and GPGGX motifs. The mechanical and structural X-ray diffraction analysis of the recombinant fibers provide data that suggests a functional role of the spacer motif that produces tensile strength though the spacer motif is not clearly defined structurally. These results indicate that the spacer is likely a primary contributor of strength with the GGX motif supplying mobility to the protein network of native N. clavipes flagelliform silk fibers. PMID:23646825

  6. Nephila clavipes Flagelliform silk-like GGX motifs contribute to extensibility and spacer motifs contribute to strength in synthetic spider silk fibers.

    PubMed

    Adrianos, Sherry L; Teulé, Florence; Hinman, Michael B; Jones, Justin A; Weber, Warner S; Yarger, Jeffery L; Lewis, Randolph V

    2013-06-10

    Flagelliform spider silk is the most extensible silk fiber produced by orb weaver spiders, though not as strong as the dragline silk of the spider. The motifs found in the core of the Nephila clavipes flagelliform Flag protein are GGX, spacer, and GPGGX. Flag does not contain the polyalanine motif known to provide the strength of dragline silk. To investigate the source of flagelliform fiber strength, four recombinant proteins were produced containing variations of the three core motifs of the Nephila clavipes flagelliform Flag protein that produces this type of fiber. The as-spun fibers were processed in 80% aqueous isopropanol using a standardized process for all four fiber types, which produced improved mechanical properties. Mechanical testing of the recombinant proteins determined that the GGX motif contributes extensibility and the spacer motif contributes strength to the recombinant fibers. Recombinant protein fibers containing the spacer motif were stronger than the proteins constructed without the spacer that contained only the GGX motif or the combination of the GGX and GPGGX motifs. The mechanical and structural X-ray diffraction analysis of the recombinant fibers provide data that suggests a functional role of the spacer motif that produces tensile strength, though the spacer motif is not clearly defined structurally. These results indicate that the spacer is likely a primary contributor of strength, with the GGX motif supplying mobility to the protein network of native N. clavipes flagelliform silk fibers.

  7. Mutations in Two Putative Phosphorylation Motifs in the Tomato Pollen Receptor Kinase LePRK2 Show Antagonistic Effects on Pollen Tube Length*

    PubMed Central

    Salem, Tamara; Mazzella, Agustina; Barberini, María Laura; Wengier, Diego; Motillo, Viviana; Parisi, Gustavo; Muschietti, Jorge

    2011-01-01

    The tip-growing pollen tube is a useful model for studying polarized cell growth in plants. We previously characterized LePRK2, a pollen-specific receptor-like kinase from tomato (1). Here, we showed that LePRK2 is present as multiple phosphorylated isoforms in mature pollen membranes. Using comparative sequence analysis and phosphorylation site prediction programs, we identified two putative phosphorylation motifs in the cytoplasmic juxtamembrane (JM) domain. Site-directed mutagenesis in these motifs, followed by transient overexpression in tobacco pollen, showed that both motifs have opposite effects in regulating pollen tube length. Relative to LePRK2-eGFP pollen tubes, alanine substitutions in residues of motif I, Ser277/Ser279/Ser282, resulted in longer pollen tubes, but alanine substitutions in motif II, Ser304/Ser307/Thr308, resulted in shorter tubes. In contrast, phosphomimicking aspartic substitutions at these residues gave reciprocal results, that is, shorter tubes with mutations in motif I and longer tubes with mutations in motif II. We conclude that the length of pollen tubes can be negatively and positively regulated by phosphorylation of residues in motif I and II respectively. We also showed that LePRK2-eGFP significantly decreased pollen tube length and increased pollen tube tip width, relative to eGFP tubes. The kinase activity of LePRK2 was relevant for this phenotype because tubes that expressed a mutation in a lysine essential for kinase activity showed the same length and width as the eGFP control. Taken together, these results suggest that LePRK2 may have a central role in pollen tube growth through regulation of its own phosphorylation status. PMID:21131355

  8. Core signalling motif displaying multistability through multi-state enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Song; Sáez, Meritxell; Wiuf, Carsten; Feliu, Elisenda

    2016-01-01

    Bistability, and more generally multistability, is a key system dynamics feature enabling decision-making and memory in cells. Deciphering the molecular determinants of multistability is thus crucial for a better understanding of cellular pathways and their (re)engineering in synthetic biology. Here, we show that a key motif found predominantly in eukaryotic signalling systems, namely a futile signalling cycle, can display bistability when featuring a two-state kinase. We provide necessary and sufficient mathematical conditions on the kinetic parameters of this motif that guarantee the existence of multiple steady states. These conditions foster the intuition that bistability arises as a consequence of competition between the two states of the kinase. Extending from this result, we find that increasing the number of kinase states linearly translates into an increase in the number of steady states in the system. These findings reveal, to our knowledge, a new mechanism for the generation of bistability and multistability in cellular signalling systems. Further the futile cycle featuring a two-state kinase is among the smallest bistable signalling motifs. We show that multi-state kinases and the described competition-based motif are part of several natural signalling systems and thereby could enable them to implement complex information processing through multistability. These results indicate that multi-state kinases in signalling systems are readily exploited by natural evolution and could equally be used by synthetic approaches for the generation of multistable information processing systems at the cellular level. PMID:27733693

  9. Conditional graphical models for protein structural motif recognition.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan; Carbonell, Jaime; Gopalakrishnan, Vanathi; Weigele, Peter

    2009-05-01

    Determining protein structures is crucial to understanding the mechanisms of infection and designing drugs. However, the elucidation of protein folds by crystallographic experiments can be a bottleneck in the development process. In this article, we present a probabilistic graphical model framework, conditional graphical models, for predicting protein structural motifs. It represents the structure characteristics of a structural motif using a graph, where the nodes denote the secondary structure elements, and the edges indicate the side-chain interactions between the components either within one protein chain or between chains. Then the model defines the optimal segmentation of a protein sequence against the graph by maximizing its "conditional" probability so that it can take advantages of the discriminative training approach. Efficient approximate inference algorithms using reversible jump Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) algorithm are developed to handle the resulting complex graphical models. We test our algorithm on four important structural motifs, and our method outperforms other state-of-art algorithms for motif recognition. We also hypothesize potential membership proteins of target folds from Swiss-Prot, which further supports the evolutionary hypothesis about viral folds.

  10. Motifs in triadic random graphs based on Steiner triple systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkler, Marco; Reichardt, Jörg

    2013-08-01

    Conventionally, pairwise relationships between nodes are considered to be the fundamental building blocks of complex networks. However, over the last decade, the overabundance of certain subnetwork patterns, i.e., the so-called motifs, has attracted much attention. It has been hypothesized that these motifs, instead of links, serve as the building blocks of network structures. Although the relation between a network's topology and the general properties of the system, such as its function, its robustness against perturbations, or its efficiency in spreading information, is the central theme of network science, there is still a lack of sound generative models needed for testing the functional role of subgraph motifs. Our work aims to overcome this limitation. We employ the framework of exponential random graph models (ERGMs) to define models based on triadic substructures. The fact that only a small portion of triads can actually be set independently poses a challenge for the formulation of such models. To overcome this obstacle, we use Steiner triple systems (STSs). These are partitions of sets of nodes into pair-disjoint triads, which thus can be specified independently. Combining the concepts of ERGMs and STSs, we suggest generative models capable of generating ensembles of networks with nontrivial triadic Z-score profiles. Further, we discover inevitable correlations between the abundance of triad patterns, which occur solely for statistical reasons and need to be taken into account when discussing the functional implications of motif statistics. Moreover, we calculate the degree distributions of our triadic random graphs analytically.

  11. Forward and Back: Motifs of Inhibition in Olfactory Processing

    PubMed Central

    Bazhenov, Maxim; Stopfer, Mark

    2016-01-01

    The remarkable performance of the olfactory system in classifying and categorizing the complex olfactory environment is built upon several basic neural circuit motifs. These include forms of inhibition that may play comparable roles in widely divergent species. In this issue of Neuron, a new study by Stokes and Isaacson sheds light on how elementary types of inhibition dynamically interact. PMID:20696373

  12. Insights into the motif preference of APOBEC3 enzymes.

    PubMed

    Ebrahimi, Diako; Alinejad-Rokny, Hamid; Davenport, Miles P

    2014-01-01

    We used a multivariate data analysis approach to identify motifs associated with HIV hypermutation by different APOBEC3 enzymes. The analysis showed that APOBEC3G targets G mainly within GG, TG, TGG, GGG, TGGG and also GGGT. The G nucleotides flanked by a C at the 3' end (in +1 and +2 positions) were indicated as disfavoured targets by APOBEC3G. The G nucleotides within GGGG were found to be targeted at a frequency much less than what is expected. We found that the infrequent G-to-A mutation within GGGG is not limited to the inaccessibility, to APOBEC3, of poly Gs in the central and 3'polypurine tracts (PPTs) which remain double stranded during the HIV reverse transcription. GGGG motifs outside the PPTs were also disfavoured. The motifs GGAG and GAGG were also found to be disfavoured targets for APOBEC3. The motif-dependent mutation of G within the HIV genome by members of the APOBEC3 family other than APOBEC3G was limited to GA→AA changes. The results did not show evidence of other types of context dependent G-to-A changes in the HIV genome.

  13. Insights into the Motif Preference of APOBEC3 Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Ebrahimi, Diako; Alinejad-Rokny, Hamid; Davenport, Miles P.

    2014-01-01

    We used a multivariate data analysis approach to identify motifs associated with HIV hypermutation by different APOBEC3 enzymes. The analysis showed that APOBEC3G targets G mainly within GG, TG, TGG, GGG, TGGG and also GGGT. The G nucleotides flanked by a C at the 3′ end (in +1 and +2 positions) were indicated as disfavoured targets by APOBEC3G. The G nucleotides within GGGG were found to be targeted at a frequency much less than what is expected. We found that the infrequent G-to-A mutation within GGGG is not limited to the inaccessibility, to APOBEC3, of poly Gs in the central and 3′polypurine tracts (PPTs) which remain double stranded during the HIV reverse transcription. GGGG motifs outside the PPTs were also disfavoured. The motifs GGAG and GAGG were also found to be disfavoured targets for APOBEC3. The motif-dependent mutation of G within the HIV genome by members of the APOBEC3 family other than APOBEC3G was limited to GA→AA changes. The results did not show evidence of other types of context dependent G-to-A changes in the HIV genome. PMID:24498164

  14. 5. DETAIL VIEW OF THE EGYPTIAN MOTIF DECORATIVE ELEMENTS OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. DETAIL VIEW OF THE EGYPTIAN MOTIF DECORATIVE ELEMENTS OF BUILDING 1'S MAIN ENTRY TOWER (INCLUDING THE ENGAGED COLUMN CAPITALS, PILASTERS & CAPITALS, CORNICES, AND TERRA COTTA EAGLES); LOOKING SW FROM THE E WING ROOF. (Ryan) - Veterans Administration Medical Center, Building No. 1, Old State Route 13 West, Marion, Williamson County, IL

  15. A Calcineurin Docking Motif (LXVP) in Dynamin-related Protein 1 Contributes to Mitochondrial Fragmentation and Ischemic Neuronal Injury*

    PubMed Central

    Slupe, Andrew M.; Merrill, Ronald A.; Flippo, Kyle H.; Lobas, Mark A.; Houtman, Jon C. D.; Strack, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Fission and fusion events dynamically control the shape and function of mitochondria. The activity of the mitochondrial fission enzyme dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1) is finely tuned by several post-translational modifications. Phosphorylation of Ser-656 by cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) inhibits Drp1, whereas dephosphorylation by a mitochondrial protein phosphatase 2A isoform and the calcium-calmodulin-dependent phosphatase calcineurin (CaN) activates Drp1. Here, we identify a conserved CaN docking site on Drp1, an LXVP motif, which mediates the interaction between the phosphatase and mechanoenzyme. We mutated the LXVP motif in Drp1 to either increase or decrease similarity to the prototypical LXVP motif in the transcription factor NFAT, and assessed stability of the mutant Drp1-CaN complexes by affinity precipitation and isothermal titration calorimetry. Furthermore, we quantified effects of LXVP mutations on Drp1 dephosphorylation kinetics in vitro and in intact cells. With tools for bidirectional control of the CaN-Drp1 signaling axis in hand, we demonstrate that the Drp1 LXVP motif shapes mitochondria in neuronal and non-neuronal cells, and that CaN-mediated Drp1 dephosphorylation promotes neuronal death following oxygen-glucose deprivation. These results point to the CaN-Drp1 complex as a potential target for neuroprotective therapy of ischemic stroke. PMID:23486469

  16. Automatic generation of 3D motifs for classification of protein binding sites

    PubMed Central

    Nebel, Jean-Christophe; Herzyk, Pawel; Gilbert, David R

    2007-01-01

    Background Since many of the new protein structures delivered by high-throughput processes do not have any known function, there is a need for structure-based prediction of protein function. Protein 3D structures can be clustered according to their fold or secondary structures to produce classes of some functional significance. A recent alternative has been to detect specific 3D motifs which are often associated to active sites. Unfortunately, there are very few known 3D motifs, which are usually the result of a manual process, compared to the number of sequential motifs already known. In this paper, we report a method to automatically generate 3D motifs of protein structure binding sites based on consensus atom positions and evaluate it on a set of adenine based ligands. Results Our new approach was validated by generating automatically 3D patterns for the main adenine based ligands, i.e. AMP, ADP and ATP. Out of the 18 detected patterns, only one, the ADP4 pattern, is not associated with well defined structural patterns. Moreover, most of the patterns could be classified as binding site 3D motifs. Literature research revealed that the ADP4 pattern actually corresponds to structural features which show complex evolutionary links between ligases and transferases. Therefore, all of the generated patterns prove to be meaningful. Each pattern was used to query all PDB proteins which bind either purine based or guanine based ligands, in order to evaluate the classification and annotation properties of the pattern. Overall, our 3D patterns matched 31% of proteins with adenine based ligands and 95.5% of them were classified correctly. Conclusion A new metric has been introduced allowing the classification of proteins according to the similarity of atomic environment of binding sites, and a methodology has been developed to automatically produce 3D patterns from that classification. A study of proteins binding adenine based ligands showed that these 3D patterns are not

  17. Application of Synthetic Peptide Arrays To Uncover Cyclic Di-GMP Binding Motifs

    PubMed Central

    Düvel, Juliane; Bense, Sarina; Möller, Stefan; Bertinetti, Daniela; Schwede, Frank; Morr, Michael; Eckweiler, Denitsa; Genieser, Hans-Gottfried; Jänsch, Lothar; Herberg, Friedrich W.; Frank, Ronald

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT High levels of the universal bacterial second messenger cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) promote the establishment of surface-attached growth in many bacteria. Not only can c-di-GMP bind to nucleic acids and directly control gene expression, but it also binds to a diverse array of proteins of specialized functions and orchestrates their activity. Since its development in the early 1990s, the synthetic peptide array technique has become a powerful tool for high-throughput approaches and was successfully applied to investigate the binding specificity of protein-ligand interactions. In this study, we used peptide arrays to uncover the c-di-GMP binding site of a Pseudomonas aeruginosa protein (PA3740) that was isolated in a chemical proteomics approach. PA3740 was shown to bind c-di-GMP with a high affinity, and peptide arrays uncovered LKKALKKQTNLR to be a putative c-di-GMP binding motif. Most interestingly, different from the previously identified c-di-GMP binding motif of the PilZ domain (RXXXR) or the I site of diguanylate cyclases (RXXD), two leucine residues and a glutamine residue and not the charged amino acids provided the key residues of the binding sequence. Those three amino acids are highly conserved across PA3740 homologs, and their singular exchange to alanine reduced c-di-GMP binding within the full-length protein. IMPORTANCE In many bacterial pathogens the universal bacterial second messenger c-di-GMP governs the switch from the planktonic, motile mode of growth to the sessile, biofilm mode of growth. Bacteria adapt their intracellular c-di-GMP levels to a variety of environmental challenges. Several classes of c-di-GMP binding proteins have been structurally characterized, and diverse c-di-GMP binding domains have been identified. Nevertheless, for several c-di-GMP receptors, the binding motif remains to be determined. Here we show that the use of a synthetic peptide array allowed the identification of a c-di-GMP binding motif of a putative c

  18. Targeting a DNA binding motif of the EVI1 protein by a pyrrole-imidazole polyamide.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Sicot, Géraldine; Cui, Xiaohui; Vogel, Marion; Wuertzer, Charles A; Lezon-Geyda, Kimberly; Wheeler, John; Harki, Daniel A; Muzikar, Katy A; Stolper, Daniel A; Dervan, Peter B; Perkins, Archibald S

    2011-12-06

    The zinc finger protein EVI1 is causally associated with acute myeloid leukemogenesis, and inhibition of its function with a small molecule therapeutic may provide effective therapy for EVI1-expressing leukemias. In this paper we describe the development of a pyrrole-imidazole polyamide to specifically block EVI1 binding to DNA. We first identify essential domains for leukemogenesis through structure-function studies on both EVI1 and the t(3;21)(q26;q22)-derived RUNX1-MDS1-EVI1 (RME) protein, which revealed that DNA binding to the cognate motif GACAAGATA via the first of two zinc finger domains (ZF1, encompassing fingers 1-7) is essential transforming activity. To inhibit DNA binding via ZF1, we synthesized a pyrrole-imidazole polyamide 1, designed to bind to a subsite within the GACAAGATA motif and thereby block EVI1 binding. DNase I footprinting and electromobility shift assays revealed a specific and high affinity interaction between polyamide 1 and the GACAAGATA motif. In an in vivo CAT reporter assay using NIH-3T3-derived cell line with a chromosome-embedded tet-inducible EVI1-VP16 as well as an EVI1-responsive reporter, polyamide 1 completely blocked EVI1-responsive reporter activity. Growth of a leukemic cell line bearing overexpressed EVI1 was also inhibited by treatment with polyamide 1, while a control cell line lacking EVI1 was not. Finally, colony formation by RME was attenuated by polyamide 1 in a serial replating assay. These studies provide evidence that a cell permeable small molecule may effectively block the activity of a leukemogenic transcription factor and provide a valuable tool to dissect critical functions of EVI1 in leukemogenesis.

  19. Mutations affecting a putative MutLα endonuclease motif impact multiple mismatch repair functions

    PubMed Central

    Erdeniz, Naz; Nguyen, Megan; Deschênes, Suzanne M.; Liskay, R. Michael

    2008-01-01

    Mutations in DNA mismatch repair (MMR) lead to increased mutation rates and higher recombination between similar, but not identical sequences, as well as resistance to certain DNA methylating agents. Recently, a component of human MMR machinery, MutLα, has been shown to display a latent endonuclease activity. The endonuclease active site appears to include a conserved motif, DQHA(X)2E(X)4E, within the COOH-terminus of human PMS2. Substitution of the glutamic acid residue (E705) abolished the endonuclease activity and mismatch-dependent excision in vitro. Previously, we showed that the PMS2-E705K mutation and the corresponding mutation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae were both recessive loss of function alleles for mutation avoidance in vivo. Here, we show that mutations impacting this endonuclease motif also significantly affect MMR-dependent suppression of homeologous recombination in yeast and responses to Sn1-type methylating agents in both yeast and mammalian cells. Thus, our in vivo results suggest that the endonuclease activity of MutLα is important not only in MMR-dependent mutation avoidance but also for recombination and damage response functions. PMID:17567544

  20. New structural motif for carboxylic acid perhydrolases.

    PubMed

    Yin, DeLu Tyler; Purpero, Vince M; Fujii, Ryota; Jing, Qing; Kazlauskas, Romas J

    2013-02-25

    Some serine hydrolases also catalyze a promiscuous reaction--reversible perhydrolysis of carboxylic acids to make peroxycarboxylic acids. Five X-ray crystal structures of these carboxylic acid perhydrolases show a proline in the oxyanion loop. Here, we test whether this proline is essential for high perhydrolysis activity using Pseudomonas fluorescens esterase (PFE). The L29P variant of this esterase catalyzes perhydrolysis 43-fold faster (k(cat) comparison) than the wild type. Surprisingly, saturation mutagenesis at the 29 position of PFE identified six other amino acid substitutions that increase perhydrolysis of acetic acid at least fourfold over the wild type. The best variant, L29I PFE, catalyzed perhydrolysis 83-times faster (k(cat) comparison) than wild-type PFE and twice as fast as L29P PFE. Despite the different amino acid in the oxyanion loop, L29I PFE shows a similar selectivity for hydrogen peroxide over water as L29P PFE (β(0)=170 vs. 160 M(-1)), and a similar fast formation of acetyl-enzyme (140 vs. 62 U mg(-1)). X-ray crystal structures of L29I PFE with and without bound acetate show an unusual mixture of two different oxyanion loop conformations. The type II β-turn conformation resembles the wild-type structure and is unlikely to increase perhydrolysis, but the type I β-turn conformation creates a binding site for a second acetate. Modeling suggests that a previously proposed mechanism for L29P PFE can be extended to include L29I PFE, so that an acetate accepts a hydrogen bond to promote faster formation of the acetyl-enzyme.

  1. Pathogen recognition of a novel C-type lectin from Marsupenaeus japonicus reveals the divergent sugar-binding specificity of QAP motif

    PubMed Central

    Alenton, Rod Russel R.; Koiwai, Keiichiro; Miyaguchi, Kohei; Kondo, Hidehiro; Hirono, Ikuo

    2017-01-01

    C-type lectins (CTLs) are calcium-dependent carbohydrate-binding proteins known to assist the innate immune system as pattern recognition receptors (PRRs). The binding specificity of CTLs lies in the motif of their carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD), the tripeptide motifs EPN and QPD bind to mannose and galactose, respectively. However, variants of these motifs were discovered including a QAP sequence reported in shrimp believed to have the same carbohydrate specificity as QPD. Here, we characterized a novel C-type lectin (MjGCTL) possessing a CRD with a QAP motif. The recombinant MjGCTL has a calcium-dependent agglutinating capability against both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, and its sugar specificity did not involve either mannose or galactose. In an encapsulation assay, agarose beads coated with rMjGCTL were immediately encapsulated from 0 h followed by melanization at 4 h post-incubation with hemocytes. These results confirm that MjGCTL functions as a classical CTL. The structure of QAP motif and carbohydrate-specificity of rMjGCTL was found to be different to both EPN and QPD, suggesting that QAP is a new motif. Furthermore, MjGCTL acts as a PRR binding to hemocytes to activate their adherent state and initiate encapsulation. PMID:28374848

  2. The NPIY motif in the integrin beta1 tail dictates the requirement for talin-1 in outside-in signaling.

    PubMed

    Nieves, Bethsaida; Jones, Christopher W; Ward, Rachel; Ohta, Yasutaka; Reverte, Carlos G; LaFlamme, Susan E

    2010-04-15

    Protein interactions with the integrin beta-subunit cytoplasmic domain (beta-tail) are essential for adhesion-dependent processes, including cell spreading and the connection of integrins with actin filaments at adhesion sites. Talin-1 binds to the conserved membrane-proximal NPxY motif of beta-tails (NPIY in beta1 integrin) promoting the inside-out activation of integrins and providing a linkage between integrins and the actin cytoskeleton. Here, we characterize the role of interactions between talin-1 and beta-tail downstream of integrin activation, in the context of recombinant integrins containing either the wild type (WT) or the (YA) mutant beta1A tail, with a tyrosine to alanine substitution in the NPIY motif. In addition to inhibiting integrin activation, the YA mutation suppresses cell spreading, integrin signaling, focal adhesion and stress-fiber formation, as well as microtubule assembly. Constitutive activation of the mutant integrin restores these integrin-dependent processes, bringing into question the importance of the NPIY motif downstream of integrin activation. Depletion of talin-1 using TLN1 siRNA demonstrated that talin-1 is required for cell spreading, focal adhesion and stress-fiber formation, as well as microtubule assembly, even when cells are adhered by constitutively activated WT integrins. Depletion of talin-1 does not inhibit these processes when cells are adhered by constitutively activated mutant integrins, suggesting that the binding of an inhibitory protein to the NPIY motif negatively regulates integrin function when talin-1 is depleted. We identified filamin A (FLNa) as this inhibitory protein; it binds to the beta1A tail in an NPIY-dependent manner and inhibition of FLNa expression in talin-1-depleted cells restores integrin function when cells are adhered by constitutively activated WT integrins. FLNa binds FilGAP, which is a negative regulator of Rac activation. Expression of the dominant inhibitory mutant, Fil

  3. Tomato Pto encodes a functional N-myristoylation motif that is required for signal transduction in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    de Vries, Jeroen S; Andriotis, Vasilios M E; Wu, Ai-Jiuan; Rathjen, John P

    2006-01-01

    Pto kinase of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) confers resistance to bacterial speck disease caused by Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato expressing avrPto or avrPtoB. Pto interacts directly with these type-III secreted effectors, leading to induction of defence responses including the hypersensitive response (HR). Signalling by Pto requires the nucleotide-binding site-leucine-rich repeat (NBS-LRR) protein Prf. Little is known of how Pto is controlled prior to or during stimulation, although kinase activity is required for Avr-dependent activation. Here we demonstrate a role for the N-terminus in signalling by Pto. N-terminal residues outside the kinase domain were required for induction of the HR in Nicotiana benthamiana. The N-terminus also contributed to both AvrPto-binding and phosphorylation abilities. Pto residues 1-10 comprise a consensus