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Sample records for activation oxidative stress

  1. Mitochondrial oxidant stress in locus coeruleus is regulated by activity and nitric oxide synthase.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Padilla, Javier; Guzman, Jaime N; Ilijic, Ema; Kondapalli, Jyothisri; Galtieri, Daniel J; Yang, Ben; Schieber, Simon; Oertel, Wolfgang; Wokosin, David; Schumacker, Paul T; Surmeier, D James

    2014-06-01

    Loss of noradrenergic locus coeruleus (LC) neurons is a prominent feature of aging-related neurodegenerative diseases, such as Parkinson's disease (PD). The basis of this vulnerability is not understood. To explore possible physiological determinants, we studied LC neurons using electrophysiological and optical approaches in ex vivo mouse brain slices. We found that autonomous activity in LC neurons was accompanied by oscillations in dendritic Ca(2+) concentration that were attributable to the opening of L-type Ca(2+) channels. This oscillation elevated mitochondrial oxidant stress and was attenuated by inhibition of nitric oxide synthase. The relationship between activity and stress was malleable, as arousal and carbon dioxide increased the spike rate but differentially affected mitochondrial oxidant stress. Oxidant stress was also increased in an animal model of PD. Thus, our results point to activity-dependent Ca(2+) entry and a resulting mitochondrial oxidant stress as factors contributing to the vulnerability of LC neurons. PMID:24816140

  2. Mitochondrial oxidant stress in locus coeruleus is regulated by activity and nitric oxide synthase

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez–Padilla, J.; Guzman, J.N.; Ilijic, E.; Kondapalli, J.; Galtieri, D.J.; Yang, B.; Schieber, S.; Oertel, W.; Wokosin, D.; Schumacker, P. T.; Surmeier, D. J.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Loss of noradrenergic locus coeruleus (LC) neurons is a prominent feature of aging–related neurodegenerative diseases, like Parkinson’s disease (PD). The basis of this vulnerability is not understood. To explore possible physiological determinants, LC neurons were studied using electrophysiological and optical approaches in ex vivo mouse brain slices. These studies revealed that autonomous activity in LC neurons was accompanied by oscillations in dendritic Ca2+ concentration attributable to opening of L–type Ca2+ channels. This oscillation elevated mitochondrial oxidant stress and was attenuated by inhibition of nitric oxide synthase. The relationship between activity and stress was malleable, as arousal and carbon dioxide, each increased the spike rate, but differentially affected mitochondrial oxidant stress. Oxidant stress also was increased in an animal model of PD. Thus, our results point to activity–dependent Ca2+ entry and a resulting mitochondrial oxidant stress as factors contributing to the vulnerability of LC neurons. PMID:24816140

  3. Activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal stress axis induces cellular oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Spiers, Jereme G.; Chen, Hsiao-Jou Cortina; Sernia, Conrad; Lavidis, Nickolas A.

    2015-01-01

    Glucocorticoids released from the adrenal gland in response to stress-induced activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis induce activity in the cellular reduction-oxidation (redox) system. The redox system is a ubiquitous chemical mechanism allowing the transfer of electrons between donor/acceptors and target molecules during oxidative phosphorylation while simultaneously maintaining the overall cellular environment in a reduced state. The objective of this review is to present an overview of the current literature discussing the link between HPA axis-derived glucocorticoids and increased oxidative stress, particularly focussing on the redox changes observed in the hippocampus following glucocorticoid exposure. PMID:25646076

  4. Oxidative Stress and Maxi Calcium-Activated Potassium (BK) Channels

    PubMed Central

    Hermann, Anton; Sitdikova, Guzel F.; Weiger, Thomas M.

    2015-01-01

    All cells contain ion channels in their outer (plasma) and inner (organelle) membranes. Ion channels, similar to other proteins, are targets of oxidative impact, which modulates ion fluxes across membranes. Subsequently, these ion currents affect electrical excitability, such as action potential discharge (in neurons, muscle, and receptor cells), alteration of the membrane resting potential, synaptic transmission, hormone secretion, muscle contraction or coordination of the cell cycle. In this chapter we summarize effects of oxidative stress and redox mechanisms on some ion channels, in particular on maxi calcium-activated potassium (BK) channels which play an outstanding role in a plethora of physiological and pathophysiological functions in almost all cells and tissues. We first elaborate on some general features of ion channel structure and function and then summarize effects of oxidative alterations of ion channels and their functional consequences. PMID:26287261

  5. Oxidative stress, activity behaviour and body mass in captive parrots.

    PubMed

    Larcombe, S D; Tregaskes, C A; Coffey, J; Stevenson, A E; Alexander, L G; Arnold, K E

    2015-01-01

    Many parrot species are kept in captivity for conservation, but often show poor reproduction, health and survival. These traits are known to be influenced by oxidative stress, the imbalance between the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and ability of antioxidant defences to ameliorate ROS damage. In humans, oxidative stress is linked with obesity, lack of exercise and poor nutrition, all of which are common in captive animals. Here, we tested whether small parrots (budgerigars, Melopsittacus undulatus) maintained in typical pet cages and on ad libitum food varied in oxidative profile, behaviour and body mass. Importantly, as with many birds held in captivity, they did not have enough space to engage in extensive free flight. Four types of oxidative damage, single-stranded DNA breaks (low-pH comet assay), alkali-labile sites in DNA (high-pH comet assay), sensitivity of DNA to ROS (H2O2-treated comet assay) and malondialdehyde (a byproduct of lipid peroxidation), were uncorrelated with each other and with plasma concentrations of dietary antioxidants. Without strenuous exercise over 28 days in a relatively small cage, more naturally 'active' individuals had more single-stranded DNA breaks than sedentary birds. High body mass at the start or end of the experiment, coupled with substantial mass gain, were all associated with raised sensitivity of DNA to ROS. Thus, high body mass in these captive birds was associated with oxidative damage. These birds were not lacking dietary antioxidants, because final body mass was positively related to plasma levels of retinol, zeaxanthin and α-tocopherol. Individuals varied widely in activity levels, feeding behaviour, mass gain and oxidative profile despite standardized living conditions. DNA damage is often associated with poor immunocompetence, low fertility and faster ageing. Thus, we have candidate mechanisms for the limited lifespan and fecundity common to many birds kept for conservation purposes. PMID:27293729

  6. Oxidative stress, activity behaviour and body mass in captive parrots

    PubMed Central

    Larcombe, S. D.; Tregaskes, C. A.; Coffey, J.; Stevenson, A. E.; Alexander, L. G.; Arnold, K. E.

    2015-01-01

    Many parrot species are kept in captivity for conservation, but often show poor reproduction, health and survival. These traits are known to be influenced by oxidative stress, the imbalance between the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and ability of antioxidant defences to ameliorate ROS damage. In humans, oxidative stress is linked with obesity, lack of exercise and poor nutrition, all of which are common in captive animals. Here, we tested whether small parrots (budgerigars, Melopsittacus undulatus) maintained in typical pet cages and on ad libitum food varied in oxidative profile, behaviour and body mass. Importantly, as with many birds held in captivity, they did not have enough space to engage in extensive free flight. Four types of oxidative damage, single-stranded DNA breaks (low-pH comet assay), alkali-labile sites in DNA (high-pH comet assay), sensitivity of DNA to ROS (H2O2-treated comet assay) and malondialdehyde (a byproduct of lipid peroxidation), were uncorrelated with each other and with plasma concentrations of dietary antioxidants. Without strenuous exercise over 28 days in a relatively small cage, more naturally ‘active’ individuals had more single-stranded DNA breaks than sedentary birds. High body mass at the start or end of the experiment, coupled with substantial mass gain, were all associated with raised sensitivity of DNA to ROS. Thus, high body mass in these captive birds was associated with oxidative damage. These birds were not lacking dietary antioxidants, because final body mass was positively related to plasma levels of retinol, zeaxanthin and α-tocopherol. Individuals varied widely in activity levels, feeding behaviour, mass gain and oxidative profile despite standardized living conditions. DNA damage is often associated with poor immunocompetence, low fertility and faster ageing. Thus, we have candidate mechanisms for the limited lifespan and fecundity common to many birds kept for conservation purposes. PMID

  7. Oxidative stress-mediated antibacterial activity of graphene oxide and reduced graphene oxide in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Gurunathan, Sangiliyandi; Han, Jae Woong; Dayem, Ahmed Abdal; Eppakayala, Vasuki; Kim, Jin-Hoi

    2012-01-01

    Background Graphene holds great promise for potential use in next-generation electronic and photonic devices due to its unique high carrier mobility, good optical transparency, large surface area, and biocompatibility. The aim of this study was to investigate the antibacterial effects of graphene oxide (GO) and reduced graphene oxide (rGO) in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In this work, we used a novel reducing agent, betamercaptoethanol (BME), for synthesis of graphene to avoid the use of toxic materials. To uncover the impacts of GO and rGO on human health, the antibacterial activity of two types of graphene-based material toward a bacterial model P. aeruginosa was studied and compared. Methods The synthesized GO and rGO was characterized by ultraviolet-visible absorption spectroscopy, particle-size analyzer, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. Further, to explain the antimicrobial activity of graphene oxide and reduced graphene oxide, we employed various assays, such as cell growth, cell viability, reactive oxygen species generation, and DNA fragmentation. Results Ultraviolet-visible spectra of the samples confirmed the transition of GO into graphene. Dynamic light-scattering analyses showed the average size among the two types of graphene materials. X-ray diffraction data validated the structure of graphene sheets, and high-resolution scanning electron microscopy was employed to investigate the morphologies of prepared graphene. Raman spectroscopy data indicated the removal of oxygen-containing functional groups from the surface of GO and the formation of graphene. The exposure of cells to GO and rGO induced the production of superoxide radical anion and loss of cell viability. Results suggest that the antibacterial activities are contributed to by loss of cell viability, induced oxidative stress, and DNA fragmentation. Conclusion The antibacterial activities of GO and rGO against P. aeruginosa were compared. The loss of P

  8. Redox Active Thiol Sensors of Oxidative and Nitrosative Stress

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Significance: The reactivity of the thiol in the side chain of cysteines is exploited by bacterial regulatory proteins that sense and respond to reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. Recent Advances: Charged residues and helix dipoles diminish the pKa of redox active cysteines, resulting in a thiolate that is stabilized by neighboring polar amino acids. The reaction of peroxides with thiolates generates a sulfenic acid (–SOH) intermediate that often gives rise to a reversible disulfide bond. Peroxide-induced intramolecular and intermolecular disulfides and intermolecular mixed disulfides modulate the signaling activity of members of the LysR/OxyR, MarR/OhrR, and RsrA family of transcriptional regulators. Thiol-dependent regulators also help bacteria resist the nitrosative and nitroxidative stress. −SOHs, mixed disulfides, and S-nitrosothiols are some of the post-translational modifications induced by nitrogen oxides in the thiol groups of OxyR and SsrB bacterial regulatory proteins. Sulfenylation, disulfide bond formation, S-thiolation, and S-nitrosylation are reversible modifications amenable to feedback regulation by antioxidant and antinitrosative repair systems. The structural and functional changes engaged in the thiol-dependent sensing of reactive species have been adopted by several regulators to foster bacterial virulence during exposure to products of NADPH phagocyte oxidase and inducible nitric oxide synthase. Critical Issues: Investigations with LysR/OxyR, MarR/OhrR, and RsrA family members have helped in an understanding of the mechanisms by which thiols in regulatory proteins react with reactive species, thereby activating antioxidant and antinitrosative gene expression. Future Directions: To define the determinants that provide selectivity of redox active thiolates for some reactive species but not others is an important challenge for future investigations. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 17, 1201–1214. PMID:22257022

  9. A potential biomarker for fatigue: Oxidative stress and anti-oxidative activity.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Sanae; Nojima, Junzo; Motoki, Yukari; Yamaguti, Kouzi; Nakatomi, Yasuhito; Okawa, Naoko; Fujiwara, Kazumi; Watanabe, Yasuyoshi; Kuratsune, Hirohiko

    2016-07-01

    We sought to determine whether oxidative stress and anti-oxidative activity could act as biomarkers that discriminate patients with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) from healthy volunteers at acute and sub-acute fatigue and resting conditions. We calculated the oxidative stress index (OSI) from reactive oxygen metabolites-derived compounds (d-ROMs) and the biological antioxidant potential (BAP). We determined changes in d-ROMs, BAP, and OSI in acute and sub-acute fatigue in two healthy groups, and compared their values at rest between patients with CFS (diagnosed by Fukuda 1994 criteria) and another group of healthy controls. Following acute fatigue in healthy controls, d-ROMs and OSI increased, and BAP decreased. Although d-ROMs and OSI were significantly higher after sub-acute fatigue, BAP did not decrease. Resting condition yielded higher d-ROMs, higher OSI, and lower BAP in patients with CFS than in healthy volunteers, but lower d-ROMs and OSI when compared with sub-acute controls. BAP values did not significantly differ between patients with CFS and controls in the sub-acute condition. However, values were significantly higher than in the resting condition for controls. Thus, measured of oxidative stress (d-ROMS) and anti-oxidative activity (BAP) might be useful for discriminating acute, sub-acute, and resting fatigue in healthy people from patients with CFS, or for evaluating fatigue levels in healthy people. PMID:27224647

  10. Cysteamine Modulates Oxidative Stress and Blocks Myofibroblast Activity in CKD

    PubMed Central

    Bahrami, Nadia M.; Ren, Shuyu; Pasichnyk, Katie; Williams, Juliana M.; Gangoiti, Jon A.; Lopez-Guisa, Jesus M.; Yamaguchi, Ikuyo; Barshop, Bruce A.; Duffield, Jeremy S.; Eddy, Allison A.

    2014-01-01

    Therapy to slow the relentless expansion of interstitial extracellular matrix that leads to renal functional decline in patients with CKD is currently lacking. Because chronic kidney injury increases tissue oxidative stress, we evaluated the antifibrotic efficacy of cysteamine bitartrate, an antioxidant therapy for patients with nephropathic cystinosis, in a mouse model of unilateral ureteral obstruction. Fresh cysteamine (600 mg/kg) was added to drinking water daily beginning on the day of surgery, and outcomes were assessed on days 7, 14, and 21 after surgery. Plasma cysteamine levels showed diurnal variation, with peak levels similar to those observed in patients with cystinosis. In cysteamine-treated mice, fibrosis severity decreased significantly at 14 and 21 days after unilateral ureteral obstruction, and renal oxidized protein levels decreased at each time point, suggesting reduced oxidative stress. Consistent with these results, treatment of cultured macrophages with cysteamine reduced cellular generation of reactive oxygen species. Furthermore, treatment with cysteamine reduced α-smooth muscle actin–positive interstitial myofibroblast proliferation and mRNA levels of extracellular matrix proteins in mice and attenuated myofibroblast differentiation and proliferation in vitro, but did not augment TGF-β signaling. In a study of renal ischemia reperfusion, cysteamine therapy initiated 10 days after injury and continued for 14 days decreased renal fibrosis by 40%. Taken together, these data suggest previously unrecognized antifibrotic actions of cysteamine via TGF-β–independent mechanisms that include oxidative stress reduction and attenuation of the myofibroblast response to kidney injury and support further investigation into the potential benefit of cysteamine therapy in the treatment of CKD. PMID:24009239

  11. Voluntary locomotor activity mitigates oxidative damage associated with isolation stress in the prairie vole (Microtus ochrogaster)

    PubMed Central

    Fletcher, Kelsey L.; Whitley, Brittany N.; Treidel, Lisa A.; Thompson, David; Williams, Annie; Noguera, Jose C.; Stevenson, Jennie R.; Haussmann, Mark F.

    2015-01-01

    Organismal performance directly depends on an individual's ability to cope with a wide array of physiological challenges. For social animals, social isolation is a stressor that has been shown to increase oxidative stress. Another physiological challenge, routine locomotor activity, has been found to decrease oxidative stress levels. Because we currently do not have a good understanding of how diverse physiological systems like stress and locomotion interact to affect oxidative balance, we studied this interaction in the prairie vole (Microtus ochrogaster). Voles were either pair housed or isolated and within the isolation group, voles either had access to a moving wheel or a stationary wheel. We found that chronic periodic isolation caused increased levels of oxidative stress. However, within the vole group that was able to run voluntarily, longer durations of locomotor activity were associated with less oxidative stress. Our work suggests that individuals who demonstrate increased locomotor activity may be better able to cope with the social stressor of isolation. PMID:26179798

  12. Voluntary locomotor activity mitigates oxidative damage associated with isolation stress in the prairie vole (Microtus ochrogaster).

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Kelsey L; Whitley, Brittany N; Treidel, Lisa A; Thompson, David; Williams, Annie; Noguera, Jose C; Stevenson, Jennie R; Haussmann, Mark F

    2015-07-01

    Organismal performance directly depends on an individual's ability to cope with a wide array of physiological challenges. For social animals, social isolation is a stressor that has been shown to increase oxidative stress. Another physiological challenge, routine locomotor activity, has been found to decrease oxidative stress levels. Because we currently do not have a good understanding of how diverse physiological systems like stress and locomotion interact to affect oxidative balance, we studied this interaction in the prairie vole (Microtus ochrogaster). Voles were either pair housed or isolated and within the isolation group, voles either had access to a moving wheel or a stationary wheel. We found that chronic periodic isolation caused increased levels of oxidative stress. However, within the vole group that was able to run voluntarily, longer durations of locomotor activity were associated with less oxidative stress. Our work suggests that individuals who demonstrate increased locomotor activity may be better able to cope with the social stressor of isolation. PMID:26179798

  13. Resveratrol-loaded Nanoparticles Induce Antioxidant Activity against Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae-Hwan; Park, Eun-Young; Ha, Ho-Kyung; Jo, Chan-Mi; Lee, Won-Jae; Lee, Sung Sill; Kim, Jin Wook

    2016-01-01

    Resveratrol acts as a free radical scavenger and a potent antioxidant in the inhibition of numerous reactive oxygen species (ROS). The function of resveratrol and resveratrol-loaded nanoparticles in protecting human lung cancer cells (A549) against hydrogen peroxide was investigated in this study. The 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonic acid (ABTS) assay was performed to evaluate the antioxidant properties. Resveratrol had substantially high antioxidant capacity (trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity value) compared to trolox and vitamin E since the concentration of resveratrol was more than 50 μM. Nanoparticles prepared from β-lactoglobulin (β-lg) were successfully developed. The β-lg nanoparticle showed 60 to 146 nm diameter in size with negatively charged surface. Non-cytotoxicity was observed in Caco-2 cells treated with β-lg nanoparticles. Fluorescein isothiocynate-conjugated β-lg nanoparticles were identified into the cell membrane of Caco-2 cells, indicating that nanoparticles can be used as a delivery system. Hydrogen peroxide caused accumulation of ROS in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Resveratrol-loaded nanoparticles restored H2O2-induced ROS levels by induction of cellular uptake of resveratrol in A549 cells. Furthermore, resveratrol activated nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2-Kelch ECH associating protein 1 (Nrf2-Keap1) signaling in A549 cells, thereby accumulation of Nrf2 abundance, as demonstrated by western blotting approach. Overall, these results may have implications for improvement of oxidative stress in treatment with nanoparticles as a biodegradable and non-toxic delivery carrier of bioactive compounds. PMID:26732454

  14. Salidroside Suppresses HUVECs Cell Injury Induced by Oxidative Stress through Activating the Nrf2 Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yao; Zhang, Ya-Jie; Liu, Wei-Wei; Shi, Ai-Wu; Gu, Ning

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress plays an important role in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases. Salidroside (SAL), one of the main effective constituents of Rhodiola rosea, has been reported to suppress oxidative stress-induced cardiomyocyte injury and necrosis by promoting transcription of nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)-regulated genes such as heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and NAD(P)H dehydrogenase (quinone1) (NQO1). However, it has not been indicated whether SAL might ameliorate endothelial injury induced by oxidative stress. Here, our study demonstrated that SAL might suppress HUVEC cell injury induced by oxidative stress through activating the Nrf2 signaling pathway. The results of our study indicated that SAL decreased the levels of intercellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and malondialdehyde (MDA), and improved the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT), resulting in protective effects against oxidative stress-induced cell damage in HUVECs. It suppressed oxidative stress damage by inducing Nrf2 nuclear translocation and activating the expression of Nrf2-regulated antioxidant enzyme genes such as HO-1 and NQO1 in HUVECs. Knockdown of Nrf2 with siRNA abolished the cytoprotective effects against oxidative stress, decreased the expression of Nrf2, HO-1, and NQO1, and inhibited the nucleus translocation of Nrf2 in HUVECs. This study is the first to demonstrate that SAL suppresses HUVECs cell injury induced by oxidative stress through activating the Nrf2 signaling pathway. PMID:27517893

  15. Effect of Nitric Oxide on the Antifungal Activity of Oxidative Stress and Azoles Against Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Li, De-Dong; Yang, Chang-Chun; Liu, Ping; Wang, Yan; Sun, Yan

    2016-06-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a small molecule with a wide range of biological activities in mammalian and bacteria. However, the role of NO in fungi, especially Candida albicans, is not clear. In this study, we confirmed the generation of endogenous NO in C. albicans, and found that the production of endogenous NO in C. albicans was associated with nitric oxide synthase pathway. Our results further indicated that the production of endogenous NO in C. albicans was reduced under oxidative stress such as menadione or H2O2 treatment. Meanwhile, exogenous NO donor, sodium nitroprusside (SNP), synergized with H2O2 against C. albicans. Interestingly, SNP could inhibit the antifungal effect of azoles against C. albicans in vitro, suggesting that NO might be involved in the resistance of C. albicans to antifungals. Collectively, this study demonstrated the production of endogenous NO in C. albicans, and indicated that NO may play an important role in the response of C. albicans to oxidative stress and azoles. PMID:27570314

  16. SIRT1 activating compounds reduce oxidative stress and prevent cell death in neuronal cells

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Reas S.; Fonseca-Kelly, Zoe; Callinan, Catherine; Zuo, Ling; Sachdeva, Mira M.; Shindler, Kenneth S.

    2012-01-01

    Activation of SIRT1, an NAD+-dependent deacetylase, prevents retinal ganglion cell (RGC) loss in optic neuritis, an inflammatory demyelinating optic nerve disease. While SIRT1 deacetylates numerous protein targets, downstream mechanisms of SIRT1 activation mediating this neuroprotective effect are unknown. SIRT1 increases mitochondrial function and reduces oxidative stress in muscle and other cells, and oxidative stress occurs in neuronal degeneration. We examined whether SIRT1 activators reduce oxidative stress and promote mitochondrial function in neuronal cells. Oxidative stress, marked by reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation, was induced in RGC-5 cells by serum deprivation, or addition of doxorubicin or hydrogen peroxide, and resulted in significant cell loss. SIRT1 activators resveratrol (RSV) and SRTAW04 reduced ROS levels and promoted cell survival in RGC-5 cells as well as primary RGC cultures. Effects were blocked by SIRT1 siRNA. SIRT1 activators also increased expression of succinate dehydrogenase (SDH), a mitochondrial enzyme, and promoted deacetylation of PGC-1α, a co-enzyme involved in mitochondrial function. Results show SIRT1 activators prevent cell loss by reducing oxidative stress and promoting mitochondrial function in a neuronal cell line. Results suggest SIRT1 activators can mediate neuroprotective effects during optic neuritis by these mechanisms, and they have the potential to preserve neurons in other neurodegenerative diseases that involve oxidative stress. PMID:23293585

  17. Increased oxidative stress in pemphigus vulgaris is related to disease activity and HLA-association.

    PubMed

    Shah, Amit Aakash; Dey-Rao, Rama; Seiffert-Sinha, Kristina; Sinha, Animesh A

    2016-06-01

    Pemphigus vulgaris (PV) is a rare blistering skin disorder characterized by the disadhesion of keratinocytes due to autoantibody attack against epidermal targets including desmoglein (Dsg) 3, Dsg 1 and possibly other adhesion and non-adhesion molecules. The mechanisms leading to immune-mediated pathology in PV are multifactorial and not fully understood. Recently, oxidative stress (antioxidant/oxidant disequilibrium) has been proposed as a contributory mechanism of autoimmune skin diseases, including PV. In this study, we directly assessed oxidative stress via measurement of total antioxidant capacity (TAC) using ELISA in 47 PV patients, 25 healthy controls and 18 bullous pemphigoid (BP) patients. We also performed microarray gene expression analysis on a separate set of 21 PV patients and 10 healthy controls to evaluate transcriptional dysregulation in oxidative stress-related pathways. Our data indicate that there is a significant reduction in TAC levels in PV patients compared with healthy controls, as well as BP patients. Furthermore, PV patients with active disease have significantly lower TAC levels than PV patients in remission. We also find that HLA allele status has a significant influence on oxidative stress. These findings are corroborated by microarray analysis showing differentially expressed genes involved in oxidative stress between the aforementioned groups. Collectively, our findings provide support for a role of oxidative stress in PV. Whether increased oxidative stress leads to disease manifestation and/or activity, or if disease activity leads to increased oxidative stress remains unknown. Future longitudinal studies may help to further elucidate the relationship between PV and oxidative stress. PMID:26911801

  18. Mitochondrial Oxidative Stress Corrupts Coronary Collateral Growth by Activating Adenosine Monophosphate Activated Kinase-α Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Pung, Yuh Fen; Sam, Wai Johnn; Stevanov, Kelly; Enrick, Molly; Chen, Chwen-Lih; Kolz, Christopher; Thakker, Prashanth; Hardwick, James P.; Chen, Yeong-Renn; Dyck, Jason R.B.; Yin, Liya; Chilian, William M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Our goal was to determine the mechanism by which mitochondrial oxidative stress impairs collateral growth in the heart. Approach and Results Rats were treated with rotenone (mitochondrial complex I inhibitor that increases reactive oxygen species production) or sham-treated with vehicle and subjected to repetitive ischemia protocol for 10 days to induce coronary collateral growth. In control rats, repetitive ischemia increased flow to the collateral-dependent zone; however, rotenone treatment prevented this increase suggesting that mitochondrial oxidative stress compromises coronary collateral growth. In addition, rotenone also attenuated mitochondrial complex I activity and led to excessive mitochondrial aggregation. To further understand the mechanistic pathway(s) involved, human coronary artery endothelial cells were treated with 50 ng/ mL vascular endothelial growth factor, 1 µmol/L rotenone, and rotenone/vascular endothelial growth factor for 48 hours. Vascular endothelial growth factor induced robust tube formation; however, rotenone completely inhibited this effect (P<0.05 rotenone versus vascular endothelial growth factor treatment). Inhibition of tube formation by rotenone was also associated with significant increase in mitochondrial superoxide generation. Immunoblot analyses of human coronary artery endothelial cells with rotenone treatment showed significant activation of adenosine monophosphate activated kinase (AMPK)-α and inhibition of mammalian target of rapamycin and p70 ribosomal S6 kinase. Activation of AMPK-α suggested impairments in energy production, which was reflected by decrease in O2 consumption and bioenergetic reserve capacity of cultured cells. Knockdown of AMPK-α (siRNA) also preserved tube formation during rotenone, suggesting the negative effects were mediated by the activation of AMPK-α. Conversely, expression of a constitutively active AMPK-α blocked tube formation. Conclusions We conclude that activation of AMPK

  19. Enhanced oxidative stress resistance through activation of a zinc deficiency transcription factor in Brachypodium distachyon.

    PubMed

    Glover-Cutter, Kira M; Alderman, Stephen; Dombrowski, James E; Martin, Ruth C

    2014-11-01

    Identification of viable strategies to increase stress resistance of crops will become increasingly important for the goal of global food security as our population increases and our climate changes. Considering that resistance to oxidative stress is oftentimes an indicator of health and longevity in animal systems, characterizing conserved pathways known to increase oxidative stress resistance could prove fruitful for crop improvement strategies. This report argues for the usefulness and practicality of the model organism Brachypodium distachyon for identifying and validating stress resistance factors. Specifically, we focus on a zinc deficiency B. distachyon basic leucine zipper transcription factor, BdbZIP10, and its role in oxidative stress in the model organism B. distachyon. When overexpressed, BdbZIP10 protects plants and callus tissue from oxidative stress insults, most likely through distinct and direct activation of protective oxidative stress genes. Increased oxidative stress resistance and cell viability through the overexpression of BdbZIP10 highlight the utility of investigating conserved stress responses between plant and animal systems. PMID:25228396

  20. Oxidative Stress Impairs the Stimulatory Effect of S100 Proteins on Protein Phosphatase 5 Activity.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Fuminori; Tsuchiya, Mitsumasa; Shimamoto, Seiko; Fujimoto, Tomohito; Tokumitsu, Hiroshi; Tokuda, Masaaki; Kobayashi, Ryoji

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress is the consequence of an imbalance between the production of harmful reactive oxygen species and the cellular antioxidant system for neutralization, and it activates multiple intracellular signaling pathways, including apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1). Protein phosphatase 5 (PP5) is a serine/threonine phosphatase involved in oxidative stress responses. Previously, we reported that S100 proteins activate PP5 in a calcium-dependent manner. S100 proteins belong to a family of small EF-hand calcium-binding proteins involved in many processes such as cell proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, and inflammation. Therefore, we investigated the effects of oxidative stress on S100 proteins, their interaction with PP5, and PP5 enzyme activity. Recombinant S100A2 was easily air-oxidized or Cu-oxidized, and oxidized S100A2 formed cross-linked dimers and higher molecular-mass complexes. The binding of oxidized S100A2 to PP5 was reduced, resulting in decreased PP5 activation in vitro. Oxidation also impaired S100A1, S100A6, S100B, and S100P to activate PP5, although the low dose of oxidized S100 proteins still activated PP5. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) induced S100A2 oxidation in human keratinocytes (HaCaT) and human hepatocellular carcinoma (Huh-7) cells. Furthermore, H2O2 reduced the binding of S100A2 to PP5 and decreased PP5 activation in HaCaT and Huh-7 cells. Importantly, even the low dose of S100A2 achieved by knocking down increased dephosphorylation of ASK1 and reduced caspase 3/7 activity in Huh-7 cells treated with H2O2. These results indicate that oxidative stress impairs the ability of S100 proteins to bind and activate PP5, which in turn modulates the ASK1-mediated signaling cascades involved in apoptosis. PMID:27600583

  1. Oxidative stress is required for mechanical ventilation-induced protease activation in the diaphragm

    PubMed Central

    Smuder, Ashley J.; Wu, Min; Hudson, Matthew B.; Nelson, W. Bradley; Powers, Scott K.

    2010-01-01

    Prolonged mechanical ventilation (MV) results in diaphragmatic weakness due to fiber atrophy and contractile dysfunction. Recent work reveals that activation of the proteases calpain and caspase-3 is required for MV-induced diaphragmatic atrophy and contractile dysfunction. However, the mechanism(s) responsible for activation of these proteases remains unknown. To address this issue, we tested the hypothesis that oxidative stress is essential for the activation of calpain and caspase-3 in the diaphragm during MV. Cause-and-effect was established by prevention of MV-induced diaphragmatic oxidative stress using the antioxidant Trolox. Treatment of animals with Trolox prevented MV-induced protein oxidation and lipid peroxidation in the diaphragm. Importantly, the Trolox-mediated protection from MV-induced oxidative stress prevented the activation of calpain and caspase-3 in the diaphragm during MV. Furthermore, the avoidance of MV-induced oxidative stress not only averted the activation of these proteases but also rescued the diaphragm from MV-induced diaphragmatic myofiber atrophy and contractile dysfunction. Collectively, these findings support the prediction that oxidative stress is required for MV-induced activation of calpain and caspase-3 in the diaphragm and are consistent with the concept that antioxidant therapy can retard MV-induced diaphragmatic weakness. PMID:20203072

  2. Lung cancer: what are the links with oxidative stress, physical activity and nutrition.

    PubMed

    Filaire, Edith; Dupuis, Carmen; Galvaing, Géraud; Aubreton, Sylvie; Laurent, Hélène; Richard, Ruddy; Filaire, Marc

    2013-12-01

    Oxidative stress appears to play an essential role as a secondary messenger in the normal regulation of a variety of physiological processes, such as apoptosis, survival, and proliferative signaling pathways. Oxidative stress also plays important roles in the pathogenesis of many diseases, including aging, degenerative disease, and cancer. Among cancers, lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer in the Western world. Lung cancer is the commonest fatal cancer whose risk is dependent on the number of cigarettes smoked per day as well as the number of years smoking, some components of cigarette smoke inducing oxidative stress by transmitting or generating oxidative stress. It can be subdivided into two broad categories, small cell lung cancer and non-small-cell lung cancer, the latter is the most common type. Distinct measures of primary and secondary prevention have been investigated to reduce the risk of morbidity and mortality caused by lung cancer. Among them, it seems that physical activity and nutrition have some beneficial effects. However, physical activity can have different influences on carcinogenesis, depending on energy supply, strength and frequency of exercise loads as well as the degree of exercise-mediated oxidative stress. Micronutrient supplementation seems to have a positive impact in lung surgery, particularly as an antioxidant, even if the role of micronutrients in lung cancer remains controversial. The purpose of this review is to examine lung cancer in relation to oxidative stress, physical activity, and nutrition. PMID:24161719

  3. Markers of oxidative stress and erythrocyte antioxidant enzyme activity in older men and women with differing physical activity.

    PubMed

    Rowiński, Rafał; Kozakiewicz, Mariusz; Kędziora-Kornatowska, Kornelia; Hübner-Woźniak, Elżbieta; Kędziora, Józef

    2013-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the relationship between markers of oxidative stress and erythrocyte antioxidant enzyme activity and physical activity in older men and women. The present study included 481 participants (233 men and 248 women) in the age group 65-69 years (127 men and 125 women) and in the age group 90 years and over (106 men and 123 women). The classification of respondents by physical activity was based on answers to the question if, in the past 12 months, they engaged in any pastimes which require physical activity. The systemic oxidative stress status was assessed by measuring plasma iso-PGF2α and protein carbonyl concentration as well as erythrocyte antioxidant enzymes activity, i.e., superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and glutathione reductase (GR). The concentration of plasma iso-PGF2α and protein carbonyls (CP) was lower in groups of younger men and women compared to the respective older groups. In all examined groups, physical activity resulted in decrease of these oxidative stress markers and simultaneously caused adaptive increase in the erythrocyte SOD activity. Additionally, in active younger men CAT, GPx, and GR activities were higher than in sedentary ones. In conclusion, oxidative stress increase is age-related, but physical activity can reduce oxidative stress markers and induce adaptive increase in the erythrocyte antioxidant enzyme activity, especially SOD, even in old and very old men and women. PMID:23911531

  4. Smoke Exposure Causes Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Lipid Accumulation in Retinal Pigment Epithelium through Oxidative Stress and Complement Activation*

    PubMed Central

    Kunchithapautham, Kannan; Atkinson, Carl; Rohrer, Bärbel

    2014-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a complex disease caused by genetic and environmental factors, including genetic variants in complement components and smoking. Smoke exposure leads to oxidative stress, complement activation, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, and lipid dysregulation, which have all been proposed to be associated with AMD pathogenesis. Here we examine the effects of smoke exposure on the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). Mice were exposed to cigarette smoke or filtered air for 6 months. RPE cells grown as stable monolayers were exposed to 5% cigarette smoke extract (CSE). Effects of smoke were determined by biochemical, molecular, and histological measures. Effects of the alternative pathway (AP) of complement and complement C3a anaphylatoxin receptor signaling were analyzed using knock-out mice or specific inhibitors. ER stress markers were elevated after smoke exposure in RPE of intact mice, which was eliminated in AP-deficient mice. To examine this relationship further, RPE monolayers were exposed to CSE. Short term smoke exposure resulted in production and release of complement C3, the generation of C3a, oxidative stress, complement activation on the cell membrane, and ER stress. Long term exposure to CSE resulted in lipid accumulation, and secretion. All measures were reversed by blocking C3a complement receptor (C3aR), alternative complement pathway signaling, and antioxidant therapy. Taken together, our results provide clear evidence that smoke exposure results in oxidative stress and complement activation via the AP, resulting in ER stress-mediated lipid accumulation, and further suggesting that oxidative stress and complement act synergistically in the pathogenesis of AMD. PMID:24711457

  5. Determination of oxidative stress and activities of antioxidant enzymes in guinea pigs treated with haloperidol

    PubMed Central

    GUMULEC, JAROMIR; RAUDENSKA, MARTINA; HLAVNA, MARIAN; STRACINA, TIBOR; SZTALMACHOVA, MARKETA; TANHAUSEROVA, VERONIKA; PACAL, LUKAS; RUTTKAY-NEDECKY, BRANISLAV; SOCHOR, JIRI; ZITKA, ONDREJ; BABULA, PETR; ADAM, VOJTECH; KIZEK, RENE; NOVAKOVA, MARIE; MASARIK, MICHAL

    2013-01-01

    Guinea pigs (Cavia porcellus) were treated with haloperidol (HP), and free radical (FR) and ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) assays were used to determine oxidative stress levels. Furthermore, the superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione reductase (GR) and glutathione-S-transferase (GST) activity levels were detected and glucose levels and the reduced and oxidized glutathione (GSH/GSSG) ratio were measured in HP-treated and untreated guinea pigs. The present study demonstrated that the administration of HP causes significant oxidative stress in guinea pigs (P=0.022). In animals treated with HP, the activity of GST was significantly increased compared with a placebo (P= 0.007). The elevation of SOD and GR activity levels and increase in the levels of glutathione (GSH) in HP-treated animals were not statistically significant. In the HP-untreated animals, a significant positive correlation was observed between oxidative stress detected by the FR method and GST (r=0.88, P=0.008) and SOD (r=0.86, P= 0.01) activity levels, respectively. A significant negative correlation between the levels of plasma glucose and oxidative stress detected by the FRAP method was observed (r=−0.78, P=0.04). Notably, no significant correlations were observed in the treated animals. In the HP-treated group, two subgroups of animals were identified according to their responses to oxidative stress. The group with higher levels of plasma HP had higher enzyme activity and reactive oxygen species production compared with the group with lower plasma levels of HP. The greatest difference in activity (U/μl) between the two groups of animals was for GR. PMID:23403848

  6. Decreased histone deacetylase 2 impairs Nrf2 activation by oxidative stress

    SciTech Connect

    Mercado, Nicolas; Thimmulappa, Rajesh; Thomas, Catherine M.R.; Fenwick, Peter S.; Chana, Kirandeep K.; Donnelly, Louise E.; Biswal, Shyam; Ito, Kazuhiro; Barnes, Peter J.

    2011-03-11

    Research highlights: {yields} Nrf2 anti-oxidant function is impaired when HDAC activity is inhibited. {yields} HDAC inhibition decreases Nrf2 protein stability. {yields} HDAC2 is involved in reduced Nrf2 stability and both correlate in COPD samples. {yields} HDAC inhibition increases Nrf2 acetylation. -- Abstract: Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) plays a crucial role in cellular defence against oxidative stress by inducing the expression of multiple anti-oxidant genes. However, where high levels of oxidative stress are observed, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), Nrf2 activity is reduced, although the molecular mechanism for this defect is uncertain. Here, we show that down-regulation of histone deacetylase (HDAC) 2 causes Nrf2 instability, resulting in reduced anti-oxidant gene expression and increase sensitivity to oxidative stress. Although Nrf2 protein was clearly stabilized after hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) stimulation in a bronchial epithelial cell line (BEAS2B), Nrf2 stability was decreased and Nrf2 acetylation increased in the presence of an HDAC inhibitor, trichostatin A (TSA). TSA also reduced Nrf2-regulated heme-oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression in these cells, and this was confirmed in acute cigarette-smoke exposed mice in vivo. HDAC2 knock-down by RNA interference resulted in reduced H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced Nrf2 protein stability and activity in BEAS2B cells, whereas HDAC1 knockdown had no effect. Furthermore, monocyte-derived macrophages obtained from healthy volunteers (non-smokers and smokers) and COPD patients showed a significant correlation between HDAC2 expression and Nrf2 expression (r = 0.92, p < 0.0001). Thus, reduced HDAC2 activity in COPD may account for increased Nrf2 acetylation, reduced Nrf2 stability and impaired anti oxidant defences.

  7. Transglutaminase inhibition protects against oxidative stress-induced neuronal death downstream of pathological ERK activation

    PubMed Central

    Basso, Manuela; Berlin, Jill; Li, Xia; Sleiman, Sama F.; Ko, Brendan; Haskew-Layton, Renee; Kim, Eunhee; Antonyak, Marc A.; Cerione, Richard A.; Iismaa, Siiri E.; Willis, Dianna; Cho, Sunghee; Ratan, Rajiv R.

    2012-01-01

    Molecular deletion of transglutaminase 2 (TG2) has been shown to improve function and survival in a host of neurological conditions including stroke, Huntington’s disease, and Parkinson’s disease. However, unifying schemes by which these crosslinking or polyaminating enzymes participate broadly in neuronal death have yet to be presented. Unexpectedly, we found that in addition to TG2, TG1 gene expression level is significantly induced following stroke in vivo or due to oxidative stress in vitro. Forced expression of TG1 or TG2 proteins is sufficient to induce neuronal death in Rattus novergicus cortical neurons in vitro. Accordingly, molecular deletion of TG2 alone is insufficient to protect Mus musculus neurons from oxidative death. By contrast, structurally diverse inhibitors used at concentrations that inhibit TG1 and TG2 simultaneously are neuroprotective. These small molecules inhibit increases in neuronal transamidating activity induced by oxidative stress; they also protect neurons downstream of pathological ERK activation when added well after the onset of the death stimulus. Together, these studies suggest that multiple TG isoforms, not only TG2, participate in oxidative stress-induced cell death signaling; and that isoform non-selective inhibitors of TG will be most efficacious in combating oxidative death in neurological disorders. PMID:22573678

  8. Renin-Angiotensin Activation and Oxidative Stress in Early Heart Failure with Preserved Ejection Fraction

    PubMed Central

    Negi, Smita I.; Jeong, Euy-Myoung; Shukrullah, Irfan; Veleder, Emir; Jones, Dean P.; Fan, Tai-Hwang M.; Varadarajan, Sudhahar; Danilov, Sergei M.; Fukai, Tohru; Dudley, Samuel C.

    2015-01-01

    Animal models have suggested a role of renin-angiotensin system (RAS) activation and subsequent cardiac oxidation in heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF). Nevertheless, RAS blockade has failed to show efficacy in treatment of HFpEF. We evaluated the role of RAS activation and subsequent systemic oxidation in HFpEF. Oxidative stress markers were compared in 50 subjects with and without early HFpEF. Derivatives of reactive oxidative metabolites (DROMs), F2-isoprostanes (IsoPs), and ratios of oxidized to reduced glutathione (Eh GSH) and cysteine (Eh CyS) were measured. Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) levels and activity were measured. On univariate analysis, HFpEF was associated with male sex (p = 0.04), higher body mass index (BMI) (p = 0.003), less oxidized Eh CyS (p = 0.001), lower DROMs (p = 0.02), and lower IsoP (p = 0.03). Higher BMI (OR: 1.3; 95% CI: 1.1–1.6) and less oxidized Eh CyS (OR: 1.2; 95% CI: 1.1–1.4) maintained associations with HFpEF on multivariate analysis. Though ACE levels were higher in early HFpEF (OR: 1.09; 95% CI: 1.01–1.05), ACE activity was similar to that in controls. HFpEF is not associated with significant systemic RAS activation or oxidative stress. This may explain the failure of RAS inhibitors to alter outcomes in HFpEF. PMID:26504834

  9. Reactive Oxygene Species and Thioredoxin Activity in Plants at Development of Hypergravity and Oxidative Stresses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jadko, Sergiy

    Early increasing of reactive oxygen species (ROS) content, including H2O2, occurs in plant cells under various impacts and than these ROS can function as signaling molecules in starting of cell stress responses. At the same time thioredoxins (TR) are significant ROS and H2O2 sensors and transmitters to activation of various redox sensitive proteins, transcription factors and MAP kinases. This study was aimed to investigate early increasing of ROS and H2O2 contents and TR activity in the pea roots and in tissue culture under hypergravity and oxidative stresses. Pea roots of 3-5 days old seedlings and 12-14 days old tissue culture of Arabidopsis thaliana were studied. The pea seedlings were grown on wet filter paper and the tissue culture was grown on MS medium in dark conditions under 24oC. Hypergravity stress was induced by centrifugation at 10 and 15 g. Chemiluminescence (ChL) intensity for ROS concentration, H2O2 content and TR activity were determined. All experiments were repeated by 3-5 times. Early and reliable increasing of ChL intensity and H2O2 contents in the pea roots and in the tissue culture took place under hypergravity and oxidative stresses to 30, 60 and 90 min. At the same time TR activity increased on 11 and 19 percents only to 60 and 90 min. Thus under hypergravity and oxidative stresses in both investigated plants take place early increasing of ROS and H2O2 contents which as second messengers lead to increasing of TR activity with creating of ROS-TR stress signaling pathway.

  10. Oxidative-Nitrosative Stress and Poly(ADP-Ribose) Polymerase (PARP) Activation in Experimental Diabetic Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Obrosova, Irina G.; Drel, Viktor R.; Pacher, Pal; Ilnytska, Olga; Wang, Zhong Q.; Stevens, Martin J.; Yorek, Mark A.

    2008-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) activation, an important factor in the pathogenesis of diabetes complications, is considered a downstream effector of oxidative-nitrosative stress. However, some recent findings suggest that it is not necessarily the case and that PARP activation may precede and contribute to free radical and oxidant-induced injury. This study evaluated the effect of PARP inhibition on oxidative-nitrosative stress in diabetic peripheral nerve, vasa nervorum, aorta, and high glucose–exposed human Schwann cells. In vivo experiments were performed in control rats and streptozocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats treated with and without the PARP inhibitor 3-aminobenzamide (ABA) (30 mg · kg−1 · day−1 i.p. for 2 weeks after 2 weeks of untreated diabetes). Human Schwann cells (HSC) (passages 7–10; ScienCell Research Labs) were cultured in 5.5 or 30 mmol/l glucose with and without 5 mmol/l ABA. Diabetes-induced increase in peripheral nerve nitrotyrosine immunoreactivity, epineurial vessel superoxide and nitrotyrosine immunoreactivities, and aortic superoxide production was reduced by ABA. PARP-1 (Western blot analysis) was abundantly expressed in HSC, and its expression was not affected by high glucose or ABA treatment. High-glucose–induced superoxide production and overexpression of nitrosylated and poly(ADP-ribosyl)ated protein, chemically reduced amino acid-(4)-hydroxynonenal adducts, and inducible nitric oxide synthase were decreased by ABA. We concluded that PARP activation contributes to superoxide anion radical and peroxynitrite formation in peripheral nerve, vasa nervorum, and aorta of STZ-induced diabetic rats and high-glucose–exposed HSC. The relations between oxidative-nitrosative stress and PARP activation in diabetes are bi-rather than unidirectional, and PARP activation cannot only result from but also lead to free radical and oxidant generation. PMID:16306359

  11. Nonexercise Physical Activity and Inflammatory and Oxidative Stress Markers in Women

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Sheng Hui; Shu, Xiao Ou; Chow, Wong-Ho; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Zhang, Xianglan; Li, Hong-Lan; Cai, Qiuyin; Milne, Ginger; Ji, Bu-Tian; Cai, Hui; Rothman, Nathaniel; Gao, Yu-Tang; Zheng, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: Leisure time exercise has been linked to lower circulating levels of inflammatory markers. Few studies have examined the association of nonexercise physical activity with markers of inflammation and oxidative stress. Methods: This cross-sectional analysis included 1005 Chinese women aged 40–70 years. Usual physical activity was assessed through in-person interviews using a validated physical activity questionnaire. Plasma proinflammatory cytokines and urinary F2-isoprostanes were measured. Multivariable linear models were used to evaluate the association of inflammatory and oxidative stress markers with nonexercise physical activity and its major components. Results: Nonexercise physical activity accounted for 93.8% of overall physical activity energy expenditure. Levels of nonexercise physical activity were inversely associated with circulating concentrations of interleukin (IL)-6 (Ptrend=0.004), IL-1β (Ptrend=0.03) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) (Ptrend=0.01). Multivariable-adjusted concentrations of these cytokines were 28.2% for IL-6, 22.1% for IL-1β, and 15.9% for TNF-α lower in the highest quartile of nonexercise physical activity compared with the lowest quartile. Similar inverse associations were found for two major components of nonexercise physical activity, walking and biking for transportation, and household activity. No significant associations were observed between nonexercise physical activity and oxidative stress markers. Conclusion: Daily nonexercise physical activity is associated with lower levels of systemic inflammation. This finding may have important public health implications because this type of activity is the main contributor to overall physical activity among middle-aged and elderly women. PMID:24168102

  12. Ultra Fine Particles from Diesel Engines Induce Vascular Oxidative Stress via JNK Activation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Rongsong; Ning, Zhi; Cui, Jeffery; Khalsa, Bhavraj; Ai, Lisong; Takabe, Wakako; Beebe, Tyler; Majumdar, Rohit; Sioutas, Constantinos; Hsiai, Tzung

    2011-01-01

    Exposure of particulate air pollution is linked to increased incidences of cardiovascular diseases. Ambient ultra fine particles (UFP) from diesel vehicle engines have been shown to be pro-atherogenic in apoE knockout mice and may constitute a major cardiovascular risk in humans. We posited that circulating nano-sized particles from traffic pollution sources induced vascular oxidative stress via JNK activation in endothelial cells. Diesel UFP were collected from a 1998 Kenworth truck. Intra-cellular superoxide assay revealed that these UFP dose-dependently induced superoxide (O2·-) production in human aortic endothelial cells (HAEC). Flow cytometry (FACS) showed that UFP increased MitoSOX Red intensity specific for mitochondrial superoxide. Protein carbonyl content is increased by UFP as an indication of vascular oxidative stress. UFP also up-regulated hemeoxygenase-1 (HO-1) and tissue factor (TF) mRNA expression, and pre-treatment with antioxidant, N-acetyl cysteine (NAC), significantly decreased their expression. Furthermore, UFP transiently activated JNK in HAEC. Treatment with JNK inhibitor SP600125 and silencing of both JNK1 and JNK2 with siRNA inhibited UFP stimulated O2·- production and mRNA expression of HO-1 and TF. Our findings suggest that JNK activation play an important role in UFP-induced oxidative stress and stress response gene expression. PMID:19154785

  13. Oxidative stress by inorganic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Tee, Jie Kai; Ong, Choon Nam; Bay, Boon Huat; Ho, Han Kiat; Leong, David Tai

    2016-05-01

    Metallic and metallic oxide nanoparticles (NPs) have been increasingly used for various bio-applications owing to their unique physiochemical properties in terms of conductivity, optical sensitivity, and reactivity. With the extensive usage of NPs, increased human exposure may cause oxidative stress and lead to undesirable health consequences. To date, various endogenous and exogenous sources of oxidants contributing to oxidative stress have been widely reported. Oxidative stress is generally defined as an imbalance between the production of oxidants and the activity of antioxidants, but it is often misrepresented as a single type of cellular stress. At the biological level, NPs can initiate oxidative stress directly or indirectly through various mechanisms, leading to profound effects ranging from the molecular to the disease level. Such effects of oxidative stress have been implicated owing to their small size and high biopersistence. On the other hand, cellular antioxidants help to counteract oxidative stress and protect the cells from further damage. While oxidative stress is commonly known to exert negative biological effects, measured and intentional use of NPs to induce oxidative stress may provide desirable effects to either stimulate cell growth or promote cell death. Hence, NP-induced oxidative stress can be viewed from a wide paradigm. Because oxidative stress is comprised of a wide array of factors, it is also important to use appropriate assays and methods to detect different pro-oxidant and antioxidant species at molecular and disease levels. WIREs Nanomed Nanobiotechnol 2016, 8:414-438. doi: 10.1002/wnan.1374 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:26359790

  14. Oxidative stress in autism.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Abha; Chauhan, Ved

    2006-08-01

    Autism is a severe developmental disorder with poorly understood etiology. Oxidative stress in autism has been studied at the membrane level and also by measuring products of lipid peroxidation, detoxifying agents (such as glutathione), and antioxidants involved in the defense system against reactive oxygen species (ROS). Lipid peroxidation markers are elevated in autism, indicating that oxidative stress is increased in this disease. Levels of major antioxidant serum proteins, namely transferrin (iron-binding protein) and ceruloplasmin (copper-binding protein), are decreased in children with autism. There is a positive correlation between reduced levels of these proteins and loss of previously acquired language skills in children with autism. The alterations in ceruloplasmin and transferrin levels may lead to abnormal iron and copper metabolism in autism. The membrane phospholipids, the prime target of ROS, are also altered in autism. The levels of phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) are decreased, and phosphatidylserine (PS) levels are increased in the erythrocyte membrane of children with autism as compared to their unaffected siblings. Several studies have suggested alterations in the activities of antioxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, and catalase in autism. Additionally, altered glutathione levels and homocysteine/methionine metabolism, increased inflammation, excitotoxicity, as well as mitochondrial and immune dysfunction have been suggested in autism. Furthermore, environmental and genetic factors may increase vulnerability to oxidative stress in autism. Taken together, these studies suggest increased oxidative stress in autism that may contribute to the development of this disease. A mechanism linking oxidative stress with membrane lipid abnormalities, inflammation, aberrant immune response, impaired energy metabolism and excitotoxicity, leading to clinical symptoms and pathogenesis of autism is proposed. PMID:16766163

  15. Resveratrol protects rabbit ventricular myocytes against oxidative stress-induced arrhythmogenic activity and Ca2+ overload

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wei; Wang, Yue-peng; Gao, Ling; Zhang, Peng-pai; Zhou, Qing; Xu, Quan-fu; Zhou, Zhi-wen; Guo, Kai; Chen, Ren-hua; Yang, Huang-tian; Li, Yi-gang

    2013-01-01

    Aim: To investigate whether resveratrol suppressed oxidative stress-induced arrhythmogenic activity and Ca2+ overload in ventricular myocytes and to explore the underlying mechanisms. Methods: Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2, 200 μmol/L)) was used to induce oxidative stress in rabbit ventricular myocytes. Cell shortening and calcium transients were simultaneously recorded to detect arrhythmogenic activity and to measure intracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i). Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinases II (CaMKII) activity was measured using a CaMKII kit or Western blotting analysis. Voltage-activated Na+ and Ca2+ currents were examined using whole-cell recording in myocytes. Results: H2O2 markedly prolonged Ca2+ transient duration (CaTD), and induced early afterdepolarization (EAD)-like and delayed afterdepolarization (DAD)-like arrhythmogenic activity in myocytes paced at 0.16 Hz or 0.5 Hz. Application of resveratrol (30 or 50 μmol/L) dose-dependently suppressed H2O2-induced EAD-like arrhythmogenic activity and attenuated CaTD prolongation. Co-treatment with resveratrol (50 μmol/L) effectively prevented both EAD-like and DAD-like arrhythmogenic activity induced by H2O2. In addition, resveratrol markedly blunted H2O2-induced diastolic [Ca2+]i accumulation and prevented the myocytes from developing hypercontracture. In whole-cell recording studies, H2O2 significantly enhanced the late Na+ current (INa,L) and L-type Ca2+ current (ICa,L) in myocytes, which were dramatically suppressed or prevented by resveratrol. Furthermore, H2O2-induced ROS production and CaMKII activation were significantly prevented by resveratrol. Conclusion: Resveratrol protects ventricular myocytes against oxidative stress-induced arrhythmogenic activity and Ca2+ overload through inhibition of INa,L/ICa,L, reduction of ROS generation, and prevention of CaMKII activation. PMID:23912472

  16. S-Glutathionylation Enhances Human Cystathionine β-Synthase Activity Under Oxidative Stress Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Wei-Ning; Yadav, Pramod Kumar; Adamec, Jiri

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Cystathionine β-synthase (CBS) catalyzes the first and rate-limiting step in the two-step trans-sulfuration pathway that converts homocysteine to cysteine. It is also one of three major enzymes responsible for the biogenesis of H2S, a signaling molecule. We have previously demonstrated that CBS is activated in cells challenged by oxidative stress, but the underlying molecular mechanism of this regulation has remained unclear. Results: Here, we demonstrate that S-glutathionylation of CBS enhances its activity ∼2-fold in vitro. Loss of this post-translational modification in the presence of dithiothreitol results in reversal to basal activity. Cys346 was identified as the site for S-glutathionylation by a combination of mass spectrometric, mutagenesis, and activity analyses. To test the physiological relevance of S-glutathionylation-dependent regulation of CBS, HEK293 cells were oxidatively challenged with peroxide, which is known to enhance the trans-sulfuration flux. Under these conditions, CBS glutathionylation levels increased and were correlated with a ∼3-fold increase in CBS activity. Innovation: Collectively, our results reveal a novel post-translational modification of CBS, that is, glutathionylation, which functions as an allosteric activator under oxidative stress conditions permitting enhanced synthesis of both cysteine and H2S. Conclusions: Our study elucidates a molecular mechanism for increased cysteine and therefore glutathione, synthesis via glutathionylation of CBS. They also demonstrate the potential for increased H2S production under oxidative stress conditions, particularly in tissues where CBS is a major source of H2S. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 22, 350–361. PMID:24893130

  17. Classical and alternative macrophage activation in the lung following ozone-induced oxidative stress

    SciTech Connect

    Sunil, Vasanthi R.; Patel-Vayas, Kinal; Shen, Jianliang; Laskin, Jeffrey D.; Laskin, Debra L.

    2012-09-01

    Ozone is a pulmonary irritant known to cause oxidative stress, inflammation and tissue injury. Evidence suggests that macrophages play a role in the pathogenic response; however, their contribution depends on the mediators they encounter in the lung which dictate their function. In these studies we analyzed the effects of ozone-induced oxidative stress on the phenotype of alveolar macrophages (AM). Exposure of rats to ozone (2 ppm, 3 h) resulted in increased expression of 8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), as well as heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in AM. Whereas 8-OHdG was maximum at 24 h, expression of HO-1 was biphasic increasing after 3 h and 48–72 h. Cleaved caspase-9 and beclin-1, markers of apoptosis and autophagy, were also induced in AM 24 h post-ozone. This was associated with increased bronchoalveolar lavage protein and cells, as well as matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and MMP-9, demonstrating alveolar epithelial injury. Ozone intoxication resulted in biphasic activation of the transcription factor, NFκB. This correlated with expression of monocyte chemotactic protein‐1, inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase‐2, markers of proinflammatory macrophages. Increases in arginase-1, Ym1 and galectin-3 positive anti-inflammatory/wound repair macrophages were also observed in the lung after ozone inhalation, beginning at 24 h (arginase-1, Ym1), and persisting for 72 h (galectin-3). This was associated with increased expression of pro-surfactant protein-C, a marker of Type II cell proliferation and activation, important steps in wound repair. These data suggest that both proinflammatory/cytotoxic and anti-inflammatory/wound repair macrophages are activated early in the response to ozone-induced oxidative stress and tissue injury. -- Highlights: ► Lung macrophages are highly sensitive to ozone induced oxidative stress. ► Ozone induces autophagy and apoptosis in lung macrophages. ► Proinflammatory and wound repair macrophages are activated

  18. Cdc42-Dependent Activation of NADPH Oxidase Is Involved in Ethanol-Induced Neuronal Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xin; Ke, Zunji; Chen, Gang; Xu, Mei; Bower, Kimberly A.; Frank, Jacqueline A.; Zhang, Zhuo; Shi, Xianglin; Luo, Jia

    2012-01-01

    It has been suggested that excessive reactive oxygen species (ROS) and oxidative stress play an important role in ethanol-induced damage to both the developing and mature central nervous system (CNS). The mechanisms underlying ethanol-induced neuronal ROS, however, remain unclear. In this study, we investigated the role of NADPH oxidase (NOX) in ethanol-induced ROS generation. We demonstrated that ethanol activated NOX and inhibition of NOX reduced ethanol-promoted ROS generation. Ethanol significantly increased the expression of p47phox and p67phox, the essential subunits for NOX activation in cultured neuronal cells and the cerebral cortex of infant mice. Ethanol caused serine phosphorylation and membrane translocation of p47phox and p67phox, which were prerequisites for NOX assembly and activation. Knocking down p47phox with the small interfering RNA was sufficient to attenuate ethanol-induced ROS production and ameliorate ethanol-mediated oxidative damage, which is indicated by a decrease in protein oxidation and lipid peroxidation. Ethanol activated cell division cycle 42 (Cdc42) and overexpression of a dominant negative (DN) Cdc42 abrogate ethanol-induced NOX activation and ROS generation. These results suggest that Cdc42-dependent NOX activation mediates ethanol-induced oxidative damages to neurons. PMID:22662267

  19. Aldosterone Increases Oxidant Stress to Impair Guanylyl Cyclase Activity by Cysteinyl Thiol Oxidation in Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Maron, Bradley A.; Zhang, Ying-Yi; Handy, Diane E.; Beuve, Annie; Tang, Shiow-Shih; Loscalzo, Joseph; Leopold, Jane A.

    2009-01-01

    Hyperaldosteronism is associated with impaired endothelium-dependent vascular reactivity owing to increased reactive oxygen species and decreased bioavailable nitric oxide (NO·); however, the effects of aldosterone on vasodilatory signaling pathways in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) remain unknown. Soluble guanylyl cyclase (GC) is a heterodimer that is activated by NO· to convert cytosolic GTP to cGMP, a second messenger required for normal VSMC relaxation. Here, we show that aldosterone (10-9-10-7 mol/liter) diminishes GC activity by activating NADPH oxidase in bovine aortic VSMC to increase reactive oxygen species levels and induce oxidative posttranslational modification(s) of Cys-122, a β1-subunit cysteinyl residue demonstrated previously to modulate NO· sensing by GC. In VSMC treated with aldosterone, Western immunoblotting detected evidence of GC β1-subunit disulfide bonding, whereas mass spectrometry analysis of a homologous peptide containing the Cys-122-bearing sequence exposed to conditions of increased oxidant stress confirmed cysteinyl sulfinic acid (m/z 435), sulfonic acid (m/z 443), and disulfide (m/z 836) bond formation. The functional effect of these modifications was examined by transfecting COS-7 cells with wild-type GC or mutant GC containing an alanine substitution at Cys-122 (C122A). Exposure to aldosterone or hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) significantly decreased cGMP levels in cells expressing wild-type GC. In contrast, aldosterone or H2O2 did not influence cGMP levels in cells expressing the mutant C122A GC, confirming that oxidative modification of Cys-122 specifically impairs GC activity. These findings demonstrate that pathophysiologically relevant concentrations of aldosterone increase oxidant stress to convert GC to an NO·-insensitive state, resulting in disruption of normal vasodilatory signaling pathways in VSMC. PMID:19141618

  20. Suppression of KATP channel activity protects murine pancreatic β cells against oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Gier, Belinda; Krippeit-Drews, Peter; Sheiko, Tatiana; Aguilar-Bryan, Lydia; Bryan, Joseph; Düfer, Martina; Drews, Gisela

    2009-01-01

    The enhanced oxidative stress associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus contributes to disease pathogenesis. We previously identified plasma membrane–associated ATP-sensitive K+ (KATP) channels of pancreatic β cells as targets for oxidants. Here, we examined the effects of genetic and pharmacologic ablation of KATP channels on loss of mouse β cell function and viability following oxidative stress. Using mice lacking the sulfonylurea receptor type 1 (Sur1) subunit of KATP channels, we found that, compared with insulin secretion by WT islets, insulin secretion by Sur1–/– islets was less susceptible to oxidative stress induced by the oxidant H2O2. This was likely, at least in part, a result of the reduced ability of H2O2 to hyperpolarize plasma membrane potential and reduce cytosolic free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]c) in the Sur1–/– β cells. Remarkably, Sur1–/– β cells were less prone to apoptosis induced by H2O2 or an NO donor than WT β cells, despite an enhanced basal rate of apoptosis. This protective effect was attributed to upregulation of the antioxidant enzymes SOD, glutathione peroxidase, and catalase. Upregulation of antioxidant enzymes and reduced sensitivity of Sur1–/– cells to H2O2-induced apoptosis were mimicked by treatment with the sulfonylureas tolbutamide and gliclazide. Enzyme upregulation and protection against oxidant-induced apoptosis were abrogated by agents lowering [Ca2+]c. Sur1–/– mice were less susceptible than WT mice to streptozotocin-induced β cell destruction and subsequent hyperglycemia and death, which suggests that loss of KATP channel activity may protect against streptozotocin-induced diabetes in vivo. PMID:19805912

  1. Comparative Study of Antidiabetic Activity and Oxidative Stress Induced by Zinc Oxide Nanoparticles and Zinc Sulfate in Diabetic Rats.

    PubMed

    Nazarizadeh, Ali; Asri-Rezaie, Siamak

    2016-08-01

    In the current study, antidiabetic activity and toxic effects of zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO) were investigated in diabetic rats compared to zinc sulfate (ZnSO4) with particular emphasis on oxidative stress parameters. One hundred and twenty male Wistar rats were divided into two healthy and diabetic groups, randomly. Each major group was further subdivided into five subgroups and then orally supplemented with various doses of ZnO (1, 3, and 10 mg/kg) and ZnSO4 (30 mg/kg) for 56 consecutive days. ZnO showed greater antidiabetic activity compared to ZnSO4 evidenced by improved glucose disposal, insulin levels, and zinc status. The altered activities of erythrocyte antioxidant enzymes as well as raised levels of lipid peroxidation and a marked reduction of total antioxidant capacity were observed in rats receiving ZnO. ZnO nanoparticles acted as a potent antidiabetic agent, however, severely elicited oxidative stress particularly at higher doses. PMID:26349687

  2. Escin activates AKT-Nrf2 signaling to protect retinal pigment epithelium cells from oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kaijun; Jiang, Yiqian; Wang, Wei; Ma, Jian; Chen, Min

    2015-12-25

    Here we explored the anti-oxidative and cytoprotective potentials of escin, a natural triterpene-saponin, against hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells. We showed that escin remarkably attenuated H2O2-induced death and apoptosis of established (ARPE-19) and primary murine RPE cells. Meanwhile, ROS production and lipid peroxidation by H2O2 were remarkably inhibited by escin. Escin treatment in RPE cells resulted in NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) signaling activation, evidenced by transcription of anti-oxidant-responsive element (ARE)-regulated genes, including HO-1, NQO-1 and SRXN-1. Knockdown of Nrf2 through targeted shRNAs/siRNAs alleviated escin-mediated ARE gene transcription, and almost abolished escin-mediated anti-oxidant activity and RPE cytoprotection against H2O2. Reversely, escin was more potent against H2O2 damages in Nrf2-over-expressed ARPE-19 cells. Further studies showed that escin-induced Nrf2 activation in RPE cells required AKT signaling. AKT inhibitors (LY294002 and perifosine) blocked escin-induced AKT activation, and dramatically inhibited Nrf2 phosphorylation, its cytosol accumulation and nuclear translocation in RPE cells. Escin-induced RPE cytoprotection against H2O2 was also alleviated by the AKT inhibitors. Together, these results demonstrate that escin protects RPE cells from oxidative stress possibly through activating AKT-Nrf2 signaling. PMID:26505797

  3. Upregulation of phase II enzymes through phytochemical activation of Nrf2 protects cardiomyocytes against oxidant stress.

    PubMed

    Reuland, Danielle J; Khademi, Shadi; Castle, Christopher J; Irwin, David C; McCord, Joe M; Miller, Benjamin F; Hamilton, Karyn L

    2013-03-01

    Increased production of reactive oxygen species has been implicated in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease (CVD), and enhanced endogenous antioxidants have been proposed as a mechanism for regulating redox balance. Nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2) is a transcriptional regulator of phase II antioxidant enzymes, and activation of Nrf2 has been suggested to be an important step in attenuating oxidative stress associated with CVD. A well-defined combination of five widely studied medicinal plants derived from botanical sources (Bacopa monniera, Silybum marianum (milk thistle), Withania somnifera (Ashwagandha), Camellia sinensis (green tea), and Curcuma longa (turmeric)) has been shown to activate Nrf2 and induce phase II enzymes through the antioxidant response element. The purpose of these experiments was to determine if treatment of cardiomyocytes with this phytochemical composition, marketed as Protandim, activates Nrf2, induces phase II detoxification enzymes, and protects cardiomyocytes from oxidant-induced apoptosis in a Nrf2-dependent manner. In cultured HL-1 cardiomyocytes, phytochemical treatment was associated with nuclear accumulation of Nrf2, significant induction of phase II enzymes, and concomitant protection against hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptosis. The protection against oxidant stress was abolished when Nrf2 was silenced by shRNA, suggesting that our phytochemical treatment worked through the Nrf2 pathway. Interestingly, phytochemical treatment was found to be a more robust activator of Nrf2 than oxidant treatment, supporting the use of the phytochemicals as a potential treatment to increase antioxidant defenses and protect heart cells against an oxidative challenge. PMID:23201694

  4. Cocaine promotes oxidative stress and microglial-macrophage activation in rat cerebellum.

    PubMed

    López-Pedrajas, Rosa; Ramírez-Lamelas, Dolores T; Muriach, Borja; Sánchez-Villarejo, María V; Almansa, Inmaculada; Vidal-Gil, Lorena; Romero, Francisco J; Barcia, Jorge M; Muriach, María

    2015-01-01

    Different mechanisms have been suggested for cocaine neurotoxicity, including oxidative stress alterations. Nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), considered a sensor of oxidative stress and inflammation, is involved in drug toxicity and addiction. NF-κB is a key mediator for immune responses that induces microglial/macrophage activation under inflammatory processes and neuronal injury/degeneration. Although cerebellum is commonly associated to motor control, muscular tone, and balance. Its relation with addiction is getting relevance, being associated to compulsive and perseverative behaviors. Some reports indicate that cerebellar microglial activation induced by cannabis or ethanol, promote cerebellar alterations and these alterations could be associated to addictive-related behaviors. After considering the effects of some drugs on cerebellum, the aim of the present work analyzes pro-inflammatory changes after cocaine exposure. Rats received daily 15 mg/kg cocaine i.p., for 18 days. Reduced and oxidized forms of glutathione (GSH) and oxidized glutathione (GSSG), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity and glutamate were determined in cerebellar homogenates. NF-κB activity, CD68, and GFAP expression were determined. Cerebellar GPx activity and GSH/GSSG ratio are significantly decreased after cocaine exposure. A significant increase of glutamate concentration is also observed. Interestingly, increased NF-κB activity is also accompanied by an increased expression of the lysosomal mononuclear phagocytic marker ED1 without GFAP alterations. Current trends in addiction biology are focusing on the role of cerebellum on addictive behaviors. Cocaine-induced cerebellar changes described herein fit with previosus data showing cerebellar alterations on addict subjects and support the proposed role of cerebelum in addiction. PMID:26283916

  5. Cocaine promotes oxidative stress and microglial-macrophage activation in rat cerebellum

    PubMed Central

    López-Pedrajas, Rosa; Ramírez-Lamelas, Dolores T.; Muriach, Borja; Sánchez-Villarejo, María V.; Almansa, Inmaculada; Vidal-Gil, Lorena; Romero, Francisco J.; Barcia, Jorge M.; Muriach, María

    2015-01-01

    Different mechanisms have been suggested for cocaine neurotoxicity, including oxidative stress alterations. Nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), considered a sensor of oxidative stress and inflammation, is involved in drug toxicity and addiction. NF-κB is a key mediator for immune responses that induces microglial/macrophage activation under inflammatory processes and neuronal injury/degeneration. Although cerebellum is commonly associated to motor control, muscular tone, and balance. Its relation with addiction is getting relevance, being associated to compulsive and perseverative behaviors. Some reports indicate that cerebellar microglial activation induced by cannabis or ethanol, promote cerebellar alterations and these alterations could be associated to addictive-related behaviors. After considering the effects of some drugs on cerebellum, the aim of the present work analyzes pro-inflammatory changes after cocaine exposure. Rats received daily 15 mg/kg cocaine i.p., for 18 days. Reduced and oxidized forms of glutathione (GSH) and oxidized glutathione (GSSG), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity and glutamate were determined in cerebellar homogenates. NF-κB activity, CD68, and GFAP expression were determined. Cerebellar GPx activity and GSH/GSSG ratio are significantly decreased after cocaine exposure. A significant increase of glutamate concentration is also observed. Interestingly, increased NF-κB activity is also accompanied by an increased expression of the lysosomal mononuclear phagocytic marker ED1 without GFAP alterations. Current trends in addiction biology are focusing on the role of cerebellum on addictive behaviors. Cocaine-induced cerebellar changes described herein fit with previosus data showing cerebellar alterations on addict subjects and support the proposed role of cerebelum in addiction. PMID:26283916

  6. The C-ETS2-TFEB Axis Promotes Neuron Survival under Oxidative Stress by Regulating Lysosome Activity

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Zijun; Luo, Wenwen; Yang, Yunzhi; Wang, Chenyao; Zhang, Qian; Wang, Huafei; Chen, Huaiyong; Chan, Chi bun; Liu, Zhixue

    2016-01-01

    Excessive reactive oxygen species/reactive nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) produced as a result of ageing causes damage to macromolecules and organelles or leads to interference of cell signalling pathways, which in turn results in oxidative stress. Oxidative stress occurs in many neurodegenerative diseases (e.g., Parkinson's disease) and contributes to progressive neuronal loss. In this study, we show that cell apoptosis is induced by oxidative stress and that lysosomes play an important role in cell survival under oxidative stress. As a compensatory response to this stress, lysosomal genes were upregulated via induction of transcription factor EB (TFEB). In addition, localization of TFEB to the nucleus was increased by oxidative stress. We also confirmed that TFEB protects cells from oxidative stress both in vitro and in vivo. Finally, we found that C-ETS2 senses oxidative stress, activates TFEB transcription, and mediates the upregulation of lysosomal genes. Our results demonstrate a mechanistic pathway for inducing lysosomal activity during ageing and neurodegeneration. PMID:27195074

  7. The C-ETS2-TFEB Axis Promotes Neuron Survival under Oxidative Stress by Regulating Lysosome Activity.

    PubMed

    Ma, Shumin; Fang, Zijun; Luo, Wenwen; Yang, Yunzhi; Wang, Chenyao; Zhang, Qian; Wang, Huafei; Chen, Huaiyong; Chan, Chi Bun; Liu, Zhixue

    2016-01-01

    Excessive reactive oxygen species/reactive nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) produced as a result of ageing causes damage to macromolecules and organelles or leads to interference of cell signalling pathways, which in turn results in oxidative stress. Oxidative stress occurs in many neurodegenerative diseases (e.g., Parkinson's disease) and contributes to progressive neuronal loss. In this study, we show that cell apoptosis is induced by oxidative stress and that lysosomes play an important role in cell survival under oxidative stress. As a compensatory response to this stress, lysosomal genes were upregulated via induction of transcription factor EB (TFEB). In addition, localization of TFEB to the nucleus was increased by oxidative stress. We also confirmed that TFEB protects cells from oxidative stress both in vitro and in vivo. Finally, we found that C-ETS2 senses oxidative stress, activates TFEB transcription, and mediates the upregulation of lysosomal genes. Our results demonstrate a mechanistic pathway for inducing lysosomal activity during ageing and neurodegeneration. PMID:27195074

  8. Oxidative stress plays a role in high glucose-induced activation of pancreatic stellate cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ryu, Gyeong Ryul; Lee, Esder; Chun, Hyun-Ji; Yoon, Kun-Ho; Ko, Seung-Hyun; Ahn, Yu-Bae; Song, Ki-Ho

    2013-09-20

    Highlights: •High glucose increased production of reactive oxygen species in cultured pancreatic stellate cells. •High glucose facilitated the activation of these cells. •Antioxidant treatment attenuated high glucose-induced activation of these cells. -- Abstract: The activation of pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) is thought to be a potential mechanism underlying islet fibrosis, which may contribute to progressive β-cell failure in type 2 diabetes. Recently, we demonstrated that antioxidants reduced islet fibrosis in an animal model of type 2 diabetes. However, there is no in vitro study demonstrating that high glucose itself can induce oxidative stress in PSCs. Thus, PSCs were isolated and cultured from Sprague Dawley rats, and treated with high glucose for 72 h. High glucose increased the production of reactive oxygen species. When treated with high glucose, freshly isolated PSCs exhibited myofibroblastic transformation. During early culture (passage 1), PSCs treated with high glucose contained an increased number of α-smooth muscle actin-positive cells. During late culture (passages 2–5), PSCs treated with high glucose exhibited increases in cell proliferation, the expression of fibronectin and connective tissue growth factor, release of interleukin-6, transforming growth factor-β and collagen, and cell migration. Finally, the treatment of PSCs with high glucose and antioxidants attenuated these changes. In conclusion, we demonstrated that high glucose increased oxidative stress in primary rat PSCs, thereby facilitating the activation of these cells, while antioxidant treatment attenuated high glucose-induced PSC activation.

  9. Selective downregulation of mitochondrial electron transport chain activity and increased oxidative stress in human atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Emelyanova, Larisa; Ashary, Zain; Cosic, Milanka; Negmadjanov, Ulugbek; Ross, Gracious; Rizvi, Farhan; Olet, Susan; Kress, David; Sra, Jasbir; Tajik, A Jamil; Holmuhamedov, Ekhson L; Shi, Yang; Jahangir, Arshad

    2016-07-01

    Mitochondria are critical for maintaining normal cardiac function, and a deficit in mitochondrial energetics can lead to the development of the substrate that promotes atrial fibrillation (AF) and its progression. However, the link between mitochondrial dysfunction and AF in humans is still not fully defined. The aim of this study was to elucidate differences in the functional activity of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) complexes and oxidative stress in right atrial tissue from patients without (non-AF) and with AF (AF) who were undergoing open-heart surgery and were not significantly different for age, sex, major comorbidities, and medications. The overall functional activity of the electron transport chain (ETC), NADH:O2 oxidoreductase activity, was reduced by 30% in atrial tissue from AF compared with non-AF patients. This was predominantly due to a selective reduction in complex I (0.06 ± 0.007 vs. 0.09 ± 0.006 nmol·min(-1)·citrate synthase activity(-1), P = 0.02) and II (0.11 ± 0.012 vs. 0.16 ± 0.012 nmol·min(-1)·citrate synthase activity(-1), P = 0.003) functional activity in AF patients. Conversely, complex V activity was significantly increased in AF patients (0.21 ± 0.027 vs. 0.12 ± 0.01 nmol·min(-1)·citrate synthase activity(-1), P = 0.005). In addition, AF patients exhibited a higher oxidative stress with increased production of mitochondrial superoxide (73 ± 17 vs. 11 ± 2 arbitrary units, P = 0.03) and 4-hydroxynonenal level (77.64 ± 30.2 vs. 9.83 ± 2.83 ng·mg(-1) protein, P = 0.048). Our findings suggest that AF is associated with selective downregulation of ETC activity and increased oxidative stress that can contribute to the progression of the substrate for AF. PMID:27199126

  10. Antistressor activity of Ocimum sanctum (Tulsi) against experimentally induced oxidative stress in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Jyoti, S; Satendra, S; Sushma, S; Anjana, T; Shashi, S

    2007-01-01

    Fresh leaves of Ocimum sanctum (O. sanctum) were evaluated for antistress activity against experimentally induced oxidative stress in albino rabbits. Animals of the test group received supplementation of 2 g fresh leaves of O. sanctum per rabbit for 30 days. Anemic hypoxia was induced chemically by injecting the rabbits with 15 mg sodium nitrite per 100 g body weight intraperitoneally. Results indicated that O. sanctum administration blunted the changes in cardiorespiratory (BP, HR, RR) parameters in response to stress. A significant (p < 0.01) decrease in blood sugar level was observed after 30 days of dietary supplementation of O. sanctum leaves. Significant increase (p < 0.05) in the levels of enzymatic (superoxide dismutase) and nonenzymatic (reduced glutathione) antioxidants was observed in the test group after the treatment with O. sanctum. Oxidative stress led to a lesser depletion of reduced glutathione (28.80%) and plasma superoxide dismutase (23.04%) in O. sanctum-treated rabbits. The results of this study suggest that the potential antistressor activity of O. sanctum is partly attributable to its antioxidant properties. PMID:17922070

  11. Rutin protects rat articular chondrocytes against oxidative stress induced by hydrogen peroxide through SIRT1 activation.

    PubMed

    Na, Ji-Young; Song, Kibbeum; Kim, Sokho; Kwon, Jungkee

    2016-05-13

    The progressive degeneration and ossification of articular chondrocytes are main symptoms in the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis (OA). Several flavonoids may provide an adjunctive alternative for the management of moderate OA in humans. Rutin, a natural flavone derivative (quercetin-3-rhamnosylglucoside), is well known for its potent anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant properties against oxidative stress. However, the protective function of rutin related to OA, which is characterized by deterioration of articular cartilage, remains unclear. The present study investigated the protective effects of rutin, an activator of silent information regulator 1 (SIRT1), involved in the inhibition of NF-κB/MAPK signaling pathway in hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced oxidative stress in rat chondrocytes. SIRT1 activation by rutin attenuated levels of inflammatory cytokines and NF-κB/MAPK signaling, whereas the inhibition of SIRT1 by sirtinol counteracted the beneficial effects of rutin in H2O2-treated chondrocytes. The findings of these studies suggested the potential involvement of SIRT1 in the pathogenesis of OA, and indicated that rutin is a possible therapeutic option for OA. PMID:27086847

  12. Oxidative and Nitrosative Stress and Histone Deacetylase-2 Activity in Exacerbations of COPD

    PubMed Central

    Footitt, Joseph; Mallia, Patrick; Durham, Andrew L.; Ho, W. Eugene; Trujillo-Torralbo, Maria-Belen; Telcian, Aurica G.; Del Rosario, Ajerico; Chang, Cheng; Peh, Hong-Yong; Kebadze, Tatiana; Aniscenko, Julia; Stanciu, Luminita; Essilfie-Quaye, Sarah; Ito, Kazuhiro; Barnes, Peter J.; Elkin, Sarah L.; Kon, Onn M.; Wong, W. S. Fred; Adcock, Ian M.; Johnston, Sebastian L.

    2016-01-01

    Background Respiratory virus infections are commonly associated with COPD exacerbations, but little is known about the mechanisms linking virus infection to exacerbations. Pathogenic mechanisms in stable COPD include oxidative and nitrosative stress and reduced activity of histone deacetylase-2 (HDAC2), but their roles in COPD exacerbations is unknown. We investigated oxidative and nitrosative stress (O&NS) and HDAC2 in COPD exacerbations using experimental rhinovirus infection. Methods Nine subjects with COPD (Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease stage II), 10 smokers, and 11 nonsmokers were successfully infected with rhinovirus. Markers of O&NS-associated cellular damage, and inflammatory mediators and proteases were measured in sputum, and HDAC2 activity was measured in sputum and bronchoalveolar macrophages. In an in vitro model, monocyte-derived THP-1 cells were infected with rhinovirus and nitrosylation and activity of HDAC2 was measured. Results Rhinovirus infection induced significant increases in airways inflammation and markers of O&NS in subjects with COPD. O&NS markers correlated with virus load and inflammatory markers. Macrophage HDAC2 activity was reduced during exacerbation and correlated inversely with virus load, inflammatory markers, and nitrosative stress. Sputum macrophage HDAC2 activity pre-infection was inversely associated with sputum virus load and inflammatory markers during exacerbation. Rhinovirus infection of monocytes induced nitrosylation of HDAC2 and reduced HDAC2 activity; inhibition of O&NS inhibited rhinovirus-induced inflammatory cytokines. Conclusions O&NS, airways inflammation, and impaired HDAC2 may be important mechanisms of virus-induced COPD exacerbations. Therapies targeting these mechanisms offer potential new treatments for COPD exacerbations. PMID:25790167

  13. Oxidative stress generation of silver nanoparticles in three bacterial genera and its relationship with the antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Quinteros, M A; Cano Aristizábal, V; Dalmasso, P R; Paraje, M G; Páez, P L

    2016-10-01

    Oxidative stress is a condition caused by the high intracellular concentrations of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that includes superoxide anion radicals, hydroxyl radicals and hydrogen peroxide. Nanoparticles could cause rapid generation of free radicals by redox reactions. ROS can react directly with membrane lipids, proteins and DNA and are normally scavenged by antioxidants that are capable of neutralizing; however, elevated concentrations of ROS in bacterial cells can result in oxidative stress. The aim of this work was contribute to the knowledge of action mechanism of silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs) and their relation to the generation of oxidative stress in bacteria. We demonstrated that Ag-NPs generated oxidative stress in Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa mediated by the increment of ROS and this increase correlated with a better antimicrobial activity. On the other hand, we showed that the oxidative stress caused by the Ag-NPs biosynthesized was associated to a variation in the level of reactive nitrogen intermediates (RNI). Oxidative stress in bacteria can result from disruption of the electronic transport chain due to the high affinity of Ag-NPs for the cell membrane. This imbalance in the oxidative stress was evidentiated by a macromolecular oxidation at level of DNA, lipids and proteins in E. coli exposed to Ag-NPs. The formation of ROS and RNI by Ag-NPs may also be considered to explain the bacterial death. PMID:27530963

  14. Enhanced Oxidative Stress Resistance through Activation of a Zinc Deficiency Transcription Factor in Brachypodium distachyon1[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Glover-Cutter, Kira M.; Alderman, Stephen; Dombrowski, James E.; Martin, Ruth C.

    2014-01-01

    Identification of viable strategies to increase stress resistance of crops will become increasingly important for the goal of global food security as our population increases and our climate changes. Considering that resistance to oxidative stress is oftentimes an indicator of health and longevity in animal systems, characterizing conserved pathways known to increase oxidative stress resistance could prove fruitful for crop improvement strategies. This report argues for the usefulness and practicality of the model organism Brachypodium distachyon for identifying and validating stress resistance factors. Specifically, we focus on a zinc deficiency B. distachyon basic leucine zipper transcription factor, BdbZIP10, and its role in oxidative stress in the model organism B. distachyon. When overexpressed, BdbZIP10 protects plants and callus tissue from oxidative stress insults, most likely through distinct and direct activation of protective oxidative stress genes. Increased oxidative stress resistance and cell viability through the overexpression of BdbZIP10 highlight the utility of investigating conserved stress responses between plant and animal systems. PMID:25228396

  15. Oxidative stress in health and disease: the therapeutic potential of Nrf2 activation.

    PubMed

    Hybertson, Brooks M; Gao, Bifeng; Bose, Swapan K; McCord, Joe M

    2011-08-01

    For the past 40 years or so, oxidative stress has been increasingly recognized as a contributing factor in aging and in various forms of pathophysiology generally associated with aging. Our view of oxidative stress has been largely "superoxide-centric", as we focused on the pathological sources of this oxygen-derived free radical and the types of molecular havoc it can wreak, as well as on the protection provided by the antioxidant enzymes, especially the superoxide dismutases, catalases, and glutathione peroxidases. In the last decade our view of oxidative stress has broadened considerably, and it is now often seen as an imbalance that has its origins in our genes, and the ways in which gene expression is regulated. At the center of this new focus is the transcription factor called nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2, or Nrf2. Nrf2 is referred to as the "master regulator" of the antioxidant response, modulating the expression of hundreds of genes, including not only the familiar antioxidant enzymes, but large numbers of genes that control seemingly disparate processes such as immune and inflammatory responses, tissue remodeling and fibrosis, carcinogenesis and metastasis, and even cognitive dysfunction and addictive behavior. Thus, the dysregulation of Nrf2-regulated genes provides a logical explanation for the connections, both direct and indirect, between observable oxidative stress and perhaps 200 human diseases involving these various physiological processes, each reflecting a network involving many gene products. The evolutionary self-association of these many genes under the common control of Nrf2 suggests that the immune and inflammatory systems may present the largest demand for increased antioxidant protection, apart from constitutive oxidative stress resulting from mitochondrial oxygen consumption for metabolic purposes. Gene expression microarray data on human primary vascular endothelial cells and on the SK-N-MC human neuroblastoma-derived cell

  16. Oxidant stress in the vasculature.

    PubMed

    Maytin, M; Leopold, J; Loscalzo, J

    1999-09-01

    Vascular disease and vasomotor responses are largely influenced by oxidant stress. Superoxide is generated via the cellular oxidase systems, xanthine oxidase, and NADH/NADPH oxidases. Once formed, superoxides participate in a number of reactions, yielding various free radicals such as hydrogen peroxide, peroxynitrite, oxidized low-density lipoprotein, or hypochlorous acid. Numerous cellular antioxidant systems exist to defend against oxidant stress; glutathione and the enzymes superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase are critical for maintaining the redox balance of the cell. However, the redox state is disrupted by certain vascular diseases. It appears that oxidant stress both promotes and is induced by diseases such as hypertension, atherosclerosis, and restenosis as well as by certain risk factors for coronary artery disease including hyperlipidemia, diabetes, and cigarette smoking. Once oxidant stress is invoked, characteristic pathophysiologic features ensue, namely adverse vessel reactivity, vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation, macrophage adhesion, platelet activation, and lipid peroxidation. PMID:11122705

  17. Impacts of oxidative stress on acetylcholinesterase transcription, and activity in embryos of zebrafish (Danio rerio) following Chlorpyrifos exposure.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Fuentes, Gabriela; Rubio-Escalante, Fernando J; Noreña-Barroso, Elsa; Escalante-Herrera, Karla S; Schlenk, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Organophosphate pesticides cause irreversible inhibition of AChE which leads to neuronal overstimulation and death. Thus, dogma indicates that the target of OP pesticides is AChE, but many authors postulate that these compounds also disturb cellular redox processes, and change the activities of antioxidant enzymes. Interestingly, it has also been reported that oxidative stress plays also a role in the regulation and activity of AChE. The aims of this study were to determine the effects of the antioxidant, vitamin C (VC), the oxidant, t-butyl hydroperoxide (tBOOH) and the organophosphate Chlorpyrifos (CPF), on AChE gene transcription and activity in zebrafish embryos after 72h exposure. In addition, oxidative stress was evaluated by measuring antioxidant enzymes activities and transcription, and quantification of total glutathione. Apical effects on the development of zebrafish embryos were also measured. With the exception of AChE inhibition and enhanced gene expression, limited effects of CPF on oxidative stress and apical endpoints were found at this developmental stage. Addition of VC had little effect on oxidative stress or AChE, but increased pericardial area and heartbeat rate through an unknown mechanism. TBOOH diminished AChE gene expression and activity, and caused oxidative stress when administered alone. However, in combination with CPF, only reductions in AChE activity were observed with no significant changes in oxidative stress suggesting the adverse apical endpoints in the embryos may have been due to AChE inhibition by CPF rather than oxidative stress. These results give additional evidence to support the role of prooxidants in AChE activity and expression. PMID:25937383

  18. Superoxide dismutase activity as a measure of hepatic oxidative stress in cattle following ethionine administration.

    PubMed

    Abd Ellah, Mahmoud R; Okada, Keiji; Goryo, Masanobu; Oishi, Akihiro; Yasuda, Jun

    2009-11-01

    The goal of this study was to assess if oxidative stress, as measured by alterations in the concentrations of antioxidant enzymes in the liver and erythrocytes of cattle, could be induced following dl-ethionine administration. Whole blood, serum and liver biopsy samples were collected 0, 4, 7 and 10 days after intra-peritoneal ethionine administration to five cows. The activities of the antioxidant enzymes copper zinc superoxide dismutase (Cu, Zn SOD) and catalase were assessed in the liver biopsies which were also examined histopathologically. Significant increases in hepatic Cu, Zn SOD concentrations (P<0.01) were noted on days 7 and 10 post-treatment. Hepatic catalase activity decreased significantly (P<0.01) on days 4, 7 and 10 post-treatment and erythrocyte Cu, Zn SOD activity was significantly increased on day 10. Serum biochemical analysis revealed a significant increase (P<0.01) in non-esterified fatty acid concentrations on day 4 and significant decreases in total cholesterol and phospholipid levels on days 4 (P<0.05), 7 (P<0.01) and 10 (P<0.01). In this model system, dl-ethionine administration was effective in inducing oxidative stress particularly reflected in the liver. PMID:18585936

  19. Streptozotocin induced activation of oxidative stress responsive splenic cell signaling pathways: Protective role of arjunolic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Manna, Prasenjit; Ghosh, Jyotirmoy; Das, Joydeep

    2010-04-15

    Present study investigates the beneficial role of arjunolic acid (AA) against the alteration in the cytokine levels and simultaneous activation of oxidative stress responsive signaling pathways in spleen under hyperglycemic condition. Diabetes was induced by injection of streptozotocin (STZ) (at a dose of 70 mg/kg body weight, injected in the tail vain). STZ administration elevated the levels of IL-2 as well as IFN-gamma and attenuated the level of TNF-alpha in the sera of diabetic animals. In addition, hyperglycemia is also associated with the increased production of intracellular reactive intermediates resulting with the elevation in lipid peroxidation, protein carbonylation and reduction in intracellular antioxidant defense. Investigating the oxidative stress responsive cell signaling pathways, increased expressions (immunoreactive concentrations) of phosphorylated p65 as well as its inhibitor protein phospho IkappaBalpha and phosphorylated mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPKs) have been observed in diabetic spleen tissue. Studies on isolated splenocytes revealed that hyperglycemia caused disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential, elevation in the concentration of cytosolic cytochrome c as well as activation of caspase 3 leading to apoptotic cell death. Histological examination revealed that diabetic induction depleted the white pulp scoring which is in agreement with the reduced immunological response. Treatment with AA prevented the hyperglycemia and its associated pathogenesis in spleen tissue. Results suggest that AA might act as an anti-diabetic and immunomodulatory agent against hyperglycemia.

  20. Alpha7 nicotinic receptor activation protects against oxidative stress via heme-oxygenase I induction.

    PubMed

    Navarro, Elisa; Buendia, Izaskun; Parada, Esther; León, Rafael; Jansen-Duerr, Pidder; Pircher, Haymo; Egea, Javier; Lopez, Manuela G

    2015-10-15

    Subchronic oxidative stress and inflammation are being increasingly implicated in the pathogenesis of numerous diseases, such as Alzheimer's or Parkinson's disease. This study was designed to evaluate the potential protective role of α7 nicotinic receptor activation in an in vitro model of neurodegeneration based on subchronic oxidative stress. Rat organotypic hippocampal cultures (OHCs) were exposed for 4 days to low concentration of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and the complex III mitochondrial blocker, antimycin-A. Antimycin-A (0.1μM) and lipopolysaccharide (1ng/ml) caused low neurotoxicity on their own, measured as propidium iodide fluorescence in CA1 and CA3 regions. However, their combination (LPS/AA) caused a greater detrimental effect, in addition to mitochondrial depolarization, overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and Nox4 overexpression. Antimycin-A per se increased ROS and mitochondrial depolarization, although these effects were significantly higher when combined with LPS. More interesting was the finding that exposure of OHCs to the combination of LPS/AA triggered aberrant protein aggregation, measured as thioflavin S immunofluorescence. The α7 nicotinic receptor agonist, PNU282987, prevented the neurotoxicity and the pathological hallmarks observed in the LPS/AA subchronic toxicity model (oxidative stress and protein aggregates); these effects were blocked by α-bungarotoxin and tin protoporphyrin, indicating the participation of α7 nAChRs and heme-oxygenase I induction. In conclusion, subchronic exposure of OHCs to low concentration of antimycin-A plus LPS reproduced pathological features of neurodegenerative disorders. α7 nAChR activation ameliorated these alterations by a mechanism involving heme-oxygenase I induction. PMID:26212551

  1. In Vivo Imaging of Retinal Oxidative Stress Using a Reactive Oxygen Species–Activated Fluorescent Probe

    PubMed Central

    Prunty, Megan C.; Aung, Moe H.; Hanif, Adam M.; Allen, Rachael S.; Chrenek, Micah A.; Boatright, Jeffrey H.; Thule, Peter M.; Kundu, Kousik; Murthy, Niren; Pardue, Machelle T.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose In vivo methods for detecting oxidative stress in the eye would improve screening and monitoring of the leading causes of blindness: diabetic retinopathy, glaucoma, and age-related macular degeneration. Methods To develop an in vivo biomarker for oxidative stress in the eye, we tested the efficacy of a reactive oxygen species (ROS)–activated, near-infrared hydrocyanine-800CW (H-800CW) fluorescent probe in light-induced retinal degeneration (LIRD) mouse models. After intravitreal delivery in LIRD rats, fluorescent microscopy was used to confirm that the oxidized H-800CW appeared in the same retinal layers as an established ROS marker (dichlorofluorescein). Results Dose–response curves of increasing concentrations of intravenously injected H-800CW demonstrated linear increases in both intensity and total area of fundus hyperfluorescence in LIRD mice, as detected by scanning laser ophthalmoscopy. Fundus hyperfluorescence also correlated with the duration of light damage and functional deficits in vision after LIRD. In LIRD rats with intravitreal injections of H-800CW, fluorescent labeling was localized to photoreceptor inner segments, similar to dichlorofluorescein. Conclusions Hydrocyanine-800CW detects retinal ROS in vivo and shows potential as a novel biomarker for ROS levels in ophthalmic diseases. PMID:26348635

  2. Stem cell factor (SCF) protects osteoblasts from oxidative stress through activating c-Kit-Akt signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Lei; Wu, Zhong; Yin, Gang; Liu, Haifeng; Guan, Xiaojun; Zhao, Xiaoqiang; Wang, Jianguang; Zhu, Jianguo

    2014-12-12

    Highlights: • SCF receptor c-Kit is functionally expressed in primary and transformed osteoblasts. • SCF protects primary and transformed osteoblasts from H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. • SCF activation of c-Kit in osteoblasts, required for its cyto-protective effects. • c-Kit mediates SCF-induced Akt activation in cultured osteoblasts. • Akt activation is required for SCF-regulated cyto-protective effects in osteoblasts. - Abstract: Osteoblasts regulate bone formation and remodeling, and are main target cells of oxidative stress in the progression of osteonecrosis. The stem cell factor (SCF)-c-Kit pathway plays important roles in the proliferation, differentiation and survival in a range of cell types, but little is known about its functions in osteoblasts. In this study, we found that c-Kit is functionally expressed in both osteoblastic-like MC3T3-E1 cells and primary murine osteoblasts. Its ligand SCF exerted significant cyto-protective effects against hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}). SCF activated its receptor c-Kit in osteoblasts, which was required for its cyto-protective effects against H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. Pharmacological inhibition (by Imatinib and Dasatinib) or shRNA-mediated knockdown of c-Kit thus inhibited SCF-mediated osteoblast protection. Further investigations showed that protection by SCF against H{sub 2}O{sub 2} was mediated via activation of c-Kit-dependent Akt pathway. Inhibition of Akt activation, through pharmacological or genetic means, suppressed SCF-mediated anti-H{sub 2}O{sub 2} activity in osteoblasts. In summary, we have identified a new SCF-c-Kit-Akt physiologic pathway that protects osteoblasts from H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced damages, and might minimize the risk of osteonecrosis caused by oxidative stress.

  3. Oxidized LDL induces an oxidative stress and activates the tumor suppressor p53 in MRC5 human fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Mazière, C; Meignotte, A; Dantin, F; Conte, M A; Mazière, J C

    2000-09-24

    It is now well established that oxidized LDL (OxLDL) is involved in the progression of the atheromatous plaque via several mechanisms, including its cytotoxicity toward the arterial wall. Our study demonstrates that a 4-h incubation of cultured human fibroblasts with 25-75 microg/ml OxLDL induced a dose-dependent increase in the intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and lipid peroxidation end products (TBARS). This effect was markedly prevented by the antioxidant vitamin E. The lipid extract of OxLDL partially reproduced the action of the LDL particle itself. Concomitantly, OxLDL enhanced the DNA binding activity of p53 measured by electrophoretic mobility shift assay, and the intracellular protein level of p53 determined by immunoblot analysis. Cycloheximide prevented the OxLDL-induced augmentation in both p53 binding activity and intracellular level. Again, the lipid extract of OxLDL reproduced the effect of OxLDL on p53 binding activity, whereas vitamin E prevented it. These results indicate that OxLDL initiates an intracellular oxidative stress by means of its lipid peroxidation products, leading to the activation of the tumour suppressor p53 by enhancement of p53 protein synthesis. This effect might be related to the cytotoxic effect of OxLDL since the activation of p53 is known to lead to cell cycle arrest, necrosis or apoptosis. PMID:11027537

  4. Cytochrome bd oxidase from Escherichia coli displays high catalase activity: an additional defense against oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Borisov, Vitaliy B; Forte, Elena; Davletshin, Albert; Mastronicola, Daniela; Sarti, Paolo; Giuffrè, Alessandro

    2013-07-11

    Cytochrome bd oxygen reductase from Escherichia coli has three hemes, b558, b595 and d. We found that the enzyme, as-prepared or in turnover with O2, rapidly decomposes H2O2 with formation of approximately half a mole of O2 per mole of H2O2. Such catalase activity vanishes upon cytochrome bd reduction, does not compete with the oxygen-reductase activity, is insensitive to NO, CO, antimycin-A and N-ethylmaleimide (NEM), but is inhibited by cyanide (Ki ~2.5μM) and azide. The activity, possibly associated with heme-b595, was also observed in catalase-deficient E. coli cells following cytochrome bd over-expression suggesting a protective role against oxidative stress in vivo. PMID:23727202

  5. Oxidative stress in the mollusk Echinolittorina peruviana (Gasteropoda: Littorinidae, Lamarck, 1822) and trace metals in coastal sectors with mining activity.

    PubMed

    Jara, C; Gaete, H; Lobos, G; Hidalgo, M E

    2014-08-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of coastal waters of sites with mining activity in Echinolittorina peruviana, through oxidative stress biomarkers and heavy metals determination both in water and in tissue. Organisms were collected in the intertidal zone in areas with and without mining activity. Metal concentrations in the water and tissues, and also, the following biomarkers of oxidative stress: antioxidant enzyme activity, superoxide dismutase and catalase, non-enzymatic oxidative capacity (TRAP), oxidative damage to proteins (carbonyls) and TBARS, were measured The concentrations of accumulated metals had the following order Fe > Cu > Cd > Zn > Cr > Mo > As; the highest concentrations of metals in water and tissues were found in Caleta Palito and Chañaral. Results suggest that the coastal waters with mining activity and greatest concentrations of copper and iron induced the greater antioxidant response and oxidative damage to lipids in E. peruviana. PMID:24829115

  6. Activation of PPARγ is required for hydroxysafflor yellow A of Carthamus tinctorius to attenuate hepatic fibrosis induced by oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Wang, C Y; Liu, Q; Huang, Q X; Liu, J T; He, Y H; Lu, J J; Bai, X Y

    2013-05-15

    Oxidative stress caused hepatic fibrosis by activating hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), which were implemented by depressing PPARγ activation. Hydroxysafflor yellow A (HSYA) as a nature active ingredient with antioxidant capacity was able to effectively attenuate oxidative stress mediated injury. So it will be very interesting to study effect of HSYA on HSCs activation and liver fibrosis, and reveal the role of PPARγ·CCl4 and H2O2 were used to mimic oxidative stress mediated hepatic injury in vitro and in vivo respectively. The anti-fibrosis effects of HSYA were evaluated and its mechanisms were disclosed by applying western blot, histopathological analysis, flow cytometry, RT-PCR and ELISA. Our results showed that HSCs activation and proliferation could be induced by oxidative stress, and the expressive levels of TGF-β1 and TIMP-1, the serum levels of ALT, AST, HA, LN, III-C and IV-C were also enhanced by oxidative stress, which is correlated with liver fibrosis (p<0.05 or p<0.01). HSYA was able to effectively inhibit oxidative stress mediated hepatic injury by increasing the activities of antioxidant enzymes, up regulating the expression of PPARγ and MMP-2, and down regulating the expression of TGF-β1 and TIMP-1, and reducing α-SMA level. The protective effect of HSYA can be significantly attenuated by GW9662 via blocking PPARγ (p<0.05 or p<0.01). Taken together, these results demonstrate that HSYA is able to significantly protect the liver from oxidative stress, which requires for HSYA to stimulate PPARγ activity, reduce cell proliferation and suppress ECM synthesis. PMID:23523101

  7. Value of monitoring Nrf2 activity for the detection of chemical and oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Mutter, Fiona E.; Park, B. Kevin; Copple, Ian M.

    2015-01-01

    Beyond specific limits of exposure, chemical entities can provoke deleterious effects in mammalian cells via direct interaction with critical macromolecules or by stimulating the accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). In particular, these chemical and oxidative stresses can underpin adverse reactions to therapeutic drugs, which pose an unnecessary burden in the clinic and pharmaceutical industry. Novel pre-clinical testing strategies are required to identify, at an earlier stage in the development pathway, chemicals and drugs that are likely to provoke toxicity in humans. Mammalian cells can adapt to chemical and oxidative stress via the action of the transcription factor nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), which up-regulates the expression of numerous cell defence genes and has been shown to protect against a variety of chemical toxicities. Here, we provide a brief overview of the Nrf2 pathway and summarize novel experimental models that can be used to monitor changes in Nrf2 pathway activity and thus understand the functional consequences of such perturbations in the context of chemical and drug toxicity. We also provide an outlook on the potential value of monitoring Nrf2 activity for improving the pre-clinical identification of chemicals and drugs with toxic liability in humans. PMID:26551708

  8. Oxyresveratrol abrogates oxidative stress by activating ERK-Nrf2 pathway in the liver.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hee Yoon; Lee, Ju-Hee; Jegal, Kyung Hwan; Cho, Il Je; Kim, Young Woo; Kim, Sang Chan

    2016-02-01

    Oxyresveratrol is a polyphenolic phytoalexin produced by plants as an antioxidant. This study investigated the hepatoprotective effects of oxyresveratrol as well as its underlying mechanism of action. Here, we evaluated the protective effects of oxyresveratrol against tert-butyl hydroperoxide (tBHP)-induced severe oxidative stress in HepG2 cells as well as acute liver injury caused by carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) in mice. tBHP-induced reactive oxygen species production and cell death in hepatocytes were blocked by oxyresveratrol, as indicated by MTT, TUNEL, and FACS analyses. Moreover, pretreatment with oxyresveratrol increased nuclear translocation and transactivation of NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), as assessed by antioxidant response element reporter gene expression and immunofluorescence staining, and transactivated expression of both hemeoxygenase-1 and glutamate-cysteine ligase catalytic subunit. More importantly, oxyresveratrol induced phosphorylation of Nrf2 mediated through activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2). Further, ERK inhibitors such as PD98059 and U0126 blocked phosphorylation of Nrf2 as well as the protective effect of oxyresveratrol in mitochondria. In mice, oral administration of oxyresveratrol significantly prevented hepatocyte degeneration, inflammatory cell infiltration, as well as elevation of plasma markers such as ALT and AST induced by CCl4 injection. In conclusion, this study confirmed that oxyresveratrol protected hepatocytes against oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction, which might be associated with activation of Nrf2. PMID:26102008

  9. Thioredoxin 1 protects astrocytes from oxidative stress by maintaining peroxiredoxin activity

    PubMed Central

    WANG, MENGFEI; ZHU, KUNTING; ZHANG, LUYU; LI, LINGYU; ZHAO, JING

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that thioredoxin 1 (Trx1) exerts neuroprotective effects against cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury caused by oxidative stress. While Trx1 is known to maintain the anti-oxidant activity of 2-Cys peroxiredoxins (Prdxs), the underlying mechanisms of its protective effects have remained to be elucidated, which was the aim of the present study. For this, an in vitro ischemic model of hypoxemia lasting for 4 h, followed by 24 h of reperfusion was used. Primary astrocytes from neonatal rats were pre-treated with small interfering RNA targeting Trx1 prior to oxygen glucose deprivation/reperfusion (OGD/R). MTS and lactate dehydrogenase assays were performed to evaluate cell viability. Reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) and western blot analysis were employed to assess the mRNA and protein expression levels of Prdx1-4 and Prdx-SO3. Furthermore, a dual luciferase reporter assay was used to assess the interaction between activator protein-1 (AP-1) and Trx1. The present study demonstrated that OGD/R decreased the cell viability and increased cellular damage, which was more marked following Trx1 knockdown. The expression of Prdx1-4 and Prdx-SO3 protein was higher in the cells subjected to OGD/R. Knockdown of Trx1 markedly decreased the levels of Prdx1-4 but increased Prdx-SO3 mRNA and protein levels. The results of the present study also suggested that AP-1 directly activated the expression of Trx1. The present study demonstrated that Trx1 exerts its neuroprotective effects by preventing oxidative stress in astrocytes via maintaining Prdx expression. PMID:26846911

  10. Mitochondria are required for ATM activation by extranuclear oxidative stress in cultured human hepatoblastoma cell line Hep G2 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Morita, Akinori; Tanimoto, Keiji; Murakami, Tomoki; Morinaga, Takeshi; Hosoi, Yoshio

    2014-01-24

    Highlights: • Oxidative ATM activation can occur in the absence of nuclear DNA damage response. • The oxidized Hep G2 cells were subjected to subcellular fractionation. • The obtained results suggest that the ATM activation occurs in mitochondria. • ATM failed to respond to oxidative stress in mitochondria-depleted Hep G2 cells. • Mitochondria are required for the oxidative activation of ATM. - Abstract: Ataxia–telangiectasia mutated (ATM) is a serine/threonine protein kinase that plays a central role in DNA damage response (DDR). A recent study reported that oxidized ATM can be active in the absence of DDR. However, the issue of where ATM is activated by oxidative stress remains unclear. Regarding the localization of ATM, two possible locations, namely, mitochondria and peroxisomes are possible. We report herein that ATM can be activated when exposed to hydrogen peroxide without inducing nuclear DDR in Hep G2 cells, and the oxidized cells could be subjected to subcellular fractionation. The first detergent-based fractionation experiment revealed that active, phosphorylated ATM was located in the second fraction, which also contained both mitochondria and peroxisomes. An alternative fractionation method involving homogenization and differential centrifugation, which permits the light membrane fraction containing peroxisomes to be produced, but not mitochondria, revealed that the light membrane fraction contained only traces of ATM. In contrast, the heavy membrane fraction, which mainly contained mitochondrial components, was enriched in ATM and active ATM, suggesting that the oxidative activation of ATM occurs in mitochondria and not in peroxisomes. In Rho 0-Hep G2 cells, which lack mitochondrial DNA and functional mitochondria, ATM failed to respond to hydrogen peroxide, indicating that mitochondria are required for the oxidative activation of ATM. These findings strongly suggest that ATM can be activated in response to oxidative stress in mitochondria

  11. Temperature stress, anti-oxidative enzyme activity and virus acquisition in Bemisia tabaci (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In most eukaryotic systems, antioxidants provide protection when cells are exposed to stressful environmental conditions. Antioxidants, such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPX) and catalase, function in a stepwise series with SOD initially preventing oxidative damage by conve...

  12. PPAR-pan activation induces hepatic oxidative stress and lipidomic remodelling.

    PubMed

    Ament, Zsuzsanna; West, James A; Stanley, Elizabeth; Ashmore, Tom; Roberts, Lee D; Wright, Jayne; Nicholls, Andrew W; Griffin, Julian L

    2016-06-01

    The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are ligand activated nuclear receptors that regulate cellular homoeostasis and metabolism. PPARs control the expression of genes involved in fatty-acid and lipid metabolism. Despite evidence showing beneficial effects of their activation in the treatment of metabolic diseases, particularly dyslipidaemias and type 2 diabetes, PPAR agonists have also been associated with a variety of side effects and adverse pathological changes. Agonists have been developed that simultaneously activate the three PPAR receptors (PPARα, γ and δ) in the hope that the beneficial effects can be harnessed while avoiding some of the negative side effects. In this study, the hepatic effects of a discontinued PPAR-pan agonist (a triple agonist of PPAR-α, -γ, and -δ), was investigated after dietary treatment of male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. The agonist induced liver enlargement in conjunction with metabolomic and lipidomic remodelling. Increased concentrations of several metabolites related to processes of oxidation, such as oxo-methionine, methyl-cytosine and adenosyl-methionine indicated increased stress and immune status. These changes are reflected in lipidomic changes, and increased energy demands as determined by free fatty acid (decreased 18:3 n-3, 20:5 n-3 and increased ratios of n-6/n-3 fatty acids) triacylglycerol, phospholipid (decreased and increased bulk changes respectively) and eicosanoid content (increases in PGB2 and 15-deoxy PGJ2). We conclude that the investigated PPAR agonist, GW625019, induces liver enlargement, accompanied by lipidomic remodelling, oxidative stress and increases in several pro-inflammatory eicosanoids. This suggests that such pathways should be monitored in the drug development process and also outline how PPAR agonists induce liver proliferation. PMID:26654758

  13. Exposure of Jurkat cells to bis (tri-n-butyltin) oxide (TBTO) induces transcriptomics changes indicative for ER- and oxidative stress, T cell activation and apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Katika, Madhumohan R.; Hendriksen, Peter J.M.; Loveren, Henk van; Peijnenburg, Ad

    2011-08-01

    Tributyltin oxide (TBTO) is an organotin compound that is widely used as a biocide in agriculture and as an antifouling agent in paints. TBTO is toxic for many cell types, particularly immune cells. The present study aimed to identify the effects of TBTO on the human T lymphocyte cell line Jurkat. Cells were treated with 0.2 and 0.5 {mu}M TBTO for 3, 6, 12 and 24 h and then subjected to whole genome gene expression microarray analysis. The biological interpretation of the gene expression profiles revealed that endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is among the earliest effects of TBTO. Simultaneously or shortly thereafter, oxidative stress, activation of NFKB and NFAT, T cell activation, and apoptosis are induced. The effects of TBTO on genes involved in ER stress, NFAT pathway, T cell activation and apoptosis were confirmed by qRT-PCR. Activation and nuclear translocation of NFATC1 and the oxidative stress response proteins NRF2 and KEAP1 were confirmed by immunocytology. Taking advantage of previously published microarray data, we demonstrated that the induction of ER stress, oxidative stress, T cell activation and apoptosis by TBTO is not unique for Jurkat cells but does also occur in mouse thymocytes both ex vivo and in vivo and rat thymocytes ex vivo. We propose that the induction of ER stress leading to a T cell activation response is a major factor in the higher sensitivity of immune cells above other types of cells for TBTO. - Research Highlights: > The human T lymphocyte cell line Jurkat was exposed to TBTO. > Whole-genome microarray experiments were performed. > Data analysis revealed the induction of ER stress and activation of NFAT and NFKB. > Exposure to TBTO also led to T cell activation, oxidative stress and apoptosis.

  14. DJ-1 upregulates anti-oxidant enzymes and attenuates hypoxia/re-oxygenation-induced oxidative stress by activation of the nuclear factor erythroid 2-like 2 signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Yan, Yu-Feng; Yang, Wen-Jie; Xu, Qiang; Chen, He-Ping; Huang, Xiao-Shan; Qiu, Ling-Yu; Liao, Zhang-Ping; Huang, Qi-Ren

    2015-09-01

    DJ-1 protein, as a multifunctional intracellular protein, has an important role in transcriptional regulation and anti-oxidant stress. A recent study by our group showed that DJ-1 can regulate the expression of certain anti‑oxidant enzymes and attenuate hypoxia/re‑oxygenation (H/R)‑induced oxidative stress in the cardiomyocyte cell line H9c2; however, the detailed molecular mechanisms have remained to be elucidated. Nuclear factor erythroid 2‑like 2 (Nrf2) is an essential transcription factor that regulates the expression of several anti‑oxidant genes via binding to the anti‑oxidant response element (ARE). The present study investigated whether activation of the Nrf2 pathway is responsible for the induction of anti‑oxidative enzymes by DJ‑1 and contributes to the protective functions of DJ‑1 against H/R‑induced oxidative stress in H9c2 cells. The results demonstrated that DJ‑1‑overexpressing H9c2 cells exhibited anti‑oxidant enzymes, including manganese superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxidase, to a greater extent and were more resistant to H/R‑induced oxidative stress compared with native cells, whereas DJ‑1 knockdown suppressed the induction of these enzymes and further augmented the oxidative stress injury. Determination of the importance of Nrf2 in DJ‑1‑mediated anti‑oxidant enzymes induction and cytoprotection against oxidative stress induced by H/R showed that overexpression of DJ‑1 promoted the dissociation of Nrf2 from its cytoplasmic inhibitor Keap1, resulting in enhanced levels of nuclear translocation, ARE‑binding and transcriptional activity of Nrf2. Of note, Nrf2 knockdown abolished the DJ‑1‑mediated induction of anti‑oxidant enzymes and cytoprotection against oxidative stress induced by H/R. In conclusion, these findings indicated that activation of the Nrf2 pathway is a critical mechanism by which DJ-1 upregulates anti-oxidative enzymes and attenuates H/R-induced oxidative stress in H9c2

  15. Enhanced oxidative stress resistance through activation of a zinc deficiency transcription factor in Brachypodium distachyon

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Identification of viable strategies to increase stress resistance of crops will become increasingly important for the goal of global food security as our population increases and our climate changes. Considering that resistance to oxidative stress is oftentimes an indicator of health and longevity i...

  16. Plasma membrane oxidoreductase activity in cultured cells in relation to mitochondrial function and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Deleonardi, Giulia; Biondi, Annalisa; D'Aurelio, Marilena; Pich, Milena Merlo; Stankov, Karmen; Falasca, Anna; Formiggini, Gabriella; Bovina, Carla; Romeo, Giovanni; Lenaz, Giorgio

    2004-01-01

    Dichlorophenol indophenol (DCIP) reduction by intracellualr pyridine nucleotides was investigated in two different lines of cultured cells characterized by enhanced production of reacive oxygen species (ROS) with respect to suitable controls. The first line denominated XTC-UC1 was derived from a metastasis of an oxyphilic thyroid tumor characterized by mitochondrial hyperplasia and compared with a line (B-CPAP) derived from a papillary thyroid carcinoma with normal mitochondrial mass. The second line (170 MN) was a cybrid line derived from rho0 cells from an osteosarcoma line (143B) fused with platelets from a patient with a nucleotide 9957 mutation in mitochondrial DNA (encoding for cytochrome c oxidase subunit III) in comparison with the parent 143B line. The experimental lines had no major decreases of electron transfer activities with respect to the controls; both of them, however, exhibited an increased peroxide production. The XTC-UC1 cell line exhibited enhanced activity with respect to control of dicoumarol-sensitive DCIP reduction, identified with membrane bound DT-diaphorase, whereas dicoumarol insensitive DCIP reduction was not significantly changed. On the other hand the mtDNA mutated cybrids exhibited a strong increase of both dicoumarol sensitive and insensitive DCIP reduction. The results suggest that enhanced oxidative stress and not deficient respiratory activity per se is the stimulus triggering over-expression of plasma membrane oxidative enzymes. PMID:15706061

  17. A study of oxidative stress induced by non-thermal plasma-activated water for bacterial damage

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Qian; Ma, Ruonan; Tian, Ying; Liang, Yongdong; Feng, Hongqing; Zhang, Jue; Fang, Jing

    2013-05-20

    Ar/O{sub 2} (2%) cold plasma microjet was used to create plasma-activated water (PAW). The disinfection efficacy of PAW against Staphylococcus aureus showed that PAW can effectively disinfect bacteria. Optical emission spectra and oxidation reduction potential results demonstrated the inactivation is attributed to oxidative stress induced by reactive oxygen species in PAW. Moreover, the results of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, atomic absorption spectrometry, and transmission electron microscopy suggested that the chemical state of cell surface, the integrity of cell membrane, as well as the cell internal components and structure were damaged by the oxidative stress.

  18. A study of oxidative stress induced by non-thermal plasma-activated water for bacterial damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qian; Liang, Yongdong; Feng, Hongqing; Ma, Ruonan; Tian, Ying; Zhang, Jue; Fang, Jing

    2013-05-01

    Ar/O2 (2%) cold plasma microjet was used to create plasma-activated water (PAW). The disinfection efficacy of PAW against Staphylococcus aureus showed that PAW can effectively disinfect bacteria. Optical emission spectra and oxidation reduction potential results demonstrated the inactivation is attributed to oxidative stress induced by reactive oxygen species in PAW. Moreover, the results of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, atomic absorption spectrometry, and transmission electron microscopy suggested that the chemical state of cell surface, the integrity of cell membrane, as well as the cell internal components and structure were damaged by the oxidative stress.

  19. Elevated NADPH oxidase activity contributes to oxidative stress and cell death in Huntington's disease

    PubMed Central

    Valencia, Antonio; Sapp, Ellen; Kimm, Jeffrey S.; McClory, Hollis; Reeves, Patrick B.; Alexander, Jonathan; Ansong, Kwadwo A.; Masso, Nicholas; Frosch, Matthew P.; Kegel, Kimberly B.; Li, Xueyi; DiFiglia, Marian

    2013-01-01

    A mutation in the huntingtin (Htt) gene produces mutant Htt and Huntington's disease (HD), a neurodegenerative disorder. HD patients have oxidative damage in the brain, but the causes are unclear. Compared with controls, we found brain levels of NADPH oxidase (NOX) activity, which produces reactive oxygen species (ROS), elevated in human HD postmortem cortex and striatum and highest in striatum of presymptomatic individuals. Synaptosome fractions from cortex and striatum of HD140Q/140Q mice had elevated NOX activity at 3 months of age and a further rise at 6 and 12 months compared with synaptosomes of age-matched wild-type (WT) mice. High NOX activity in primary cortical and striatal neurons of HD140Q/140Q mice correlated with more ROS and neurite swellings. These features and neuronal cell death were markedly reduced by treatment with NOX inhibitors such as diphenyleneiodonium (DPI), apocynin (APO) and VAS2870. The rise in ROS levels in mitochondria of HD140Q/140Q neurons followed the rise in NOX activity and inhibiting only mitochondrial ROS was not neuroprotective. Mutant Htt colocalized at plasma membrane lipid rafts with gp91-phox, a catalytic subunit for the NOX2 isoform. Assembly of NOX2 components at lipid rafts requires activation of Rac1 which was also elevated in HD140Q/140Q neurons. HD140Q/140Q mice bred to gp91-phox knock-out mice had lower NOX activity in the brain and in primary neurons, and neurons had normal ROS levels and significantly improved survival. These findings suggest that increased NOX2 activity at lipid rafts is an early and major source of oxidative stress and cell death in HD140Q/140Q neurons. PMID:23223017

  20. Antibacterial activity of Syzygium aromaticum seed: Studies on oxidative stress biomarkers and membrane permeability.

    PubMed

    Ajiboye, T O; Mohammed, A O; Bello, S A; Yusuf, I I; Ibitoye, O B; Muritala, H F; Onajobi, I B

    2016-06-01

    Oxidative stress and membrane permeability as mode of antibacterial activity of aqueous extract of Syzygium aromaticum seeds against Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus was investigated. The concentration of phytochemical constituents of Syzygium aromaticum was determined using gas chromatography. Syzygium aromaticum seeds contain eugenol acetate > β-carophyllene > eugenin > eugenol > methyl salicylate > β-humulene > rhamnatin > fernesol > α-copeane > β-ylangene > kaempferol > cinnamic acid > oleanolic acid > benzaldehyde > α-humulene > vanillin > α-cubebene > carvicol > benzoic acid. Syzygium aromaticum showed antimicrobial activity with minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) values as 0.06 and 0.10 mg/mL respectively. Time kill susceptibility by Syzygium aromaticum at MBC values showed significant decrease in the optical density and colony-forming unit (CFU) of Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus. Superoxide anion radical content of the bacterial cells increased significantly following exposure to the extract. In a similar vein, superoxide dismutase and catalase activities increased significantly, while the level of reduced glutathione reduced, malondialdehyde increased significantly in bacterial cells exposed to the extract. The extract at MBC also enhanced the leakage of 260 nm absorbing materials and outer membrane permeability. It is evident from the data generated from this study that aqueous extract of Syzygium aromaticum seeds enhanced membrane permeability and oxidative stress in Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus. PMID:27038843

  1. Activation of the cnidarian oxidative stress response by ultraviolet radiation, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and crude oil

    PubMed Central

    Tarrant, A. M.; Reitzel, A. M.; Kwok, C. K.; Jenny, M. J.

    2014-01-01

    Organisms are continuously exposed to reactive chemicals capable of causing oxidative stress and cellular damage. Antioxidant enzymes, such as superoxide dismutases (SODs) and catalases, are present in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes and provide an important means of neutralizing such oxidants. Studies in cnidarians have previously documented the occurrence of antioxidant enzymes (transcript expression, protein expression and/or enzymatic activity), but most of these studies have not been conducted in species with sequenced genomes or included phylogenetic analyses, making it difficult to compare results across species due to uncertainties in the relationships between genes. Through searches of the genome of the sea anemone Nematostella vectensis Stephenson, one catalase gene and six SOD family members were identified, including three copper/zinc-containing SODs (CuZnSODs), two manganese-containing SODs (MnSODs) and one copper chaperone of SOD (CCS). In 24 h acute toxicity tests, juvenile N. vectensis showed enhanced sensitivity to combinations of ultraviolet radiation (UV) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs, specifically pyrene, benzo[a]pyrene and fluoranthene) relative to either stressor alone. Adult N. vectensis exhibited little or no mortality following UV, benzo[a]pyrene or crude oil exposure but exhibited changes in gene expression. Antioxidant enzyme transcripts were both upregulated and downregulated following UV and/or chemical exposure. Expression patterns were most strongly affected by UV exposure but varied between experiments, suggesting that responses vary according to the intensity and duration of exposure. These experiments provide a basis for comparison with other cnidarian taxa and for further studies of the oxidative stress response in N. vectensis. PMID:24436378

  2. Skin resistance to oxidative stress induced by resveratrol: from Nrf2 activation to GSH biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Soeur, J; Eilstein, J; Léreaux, G; Jones, C; Marrot, L

    2015-01-01

    Skin is particularly exposed to oxidative stress, either from environmental insults such as sunlight or pollution or as a consequence of specific impairments in antioxidant status resulting from pathologies or aging. Traditionally, antioxidant products are exogenously provided to neutralize pro-oxidant species. However, another approach based on stimulation of endogenous antioxidant defense pathways is more original. Resveratrol (RSV) was reported to display such a behavior in various tissues, but data about the mechanisms of action in skin are scarce. We show here that, in primary culture of normal human keratinocytes (NHKs) or in full-thickness reconstructed human skin, RSV activated the Nrf2 pathway at nontoxic doses, from 20 µM up to 100µM. Among the Nrf2 downstream genes, glutamylcysteinyl ligase and glutathione peroxidase-2 were induced at the mRNA and protein levels. In parallel, a significant increase in glutathione content, assessed by LC/MS analysis, was observed in both models. Nrf2 gene silencing experiments performed in NHKs confirmed that Nrf2 was involved in RSV-induced modulation of cellular antioxidant status, in part by increasing cellular glutathione content. Finally, improvement of endogenous defenses induced in RSV-pretreated reconstructed skin ensured protection against the toxic oxidative effects of cumene hydroperoxide (CHP). In fact after RSV pretreatment, in response to CHP stress, glutathione content did not decrease as in unprotected samples. Cellular alterations at the dermal-epidermal junction were clearly prevented. Together, these complementary experiments demonstrated the beneficial effects of RSV on skin, beyond its direct antioxidant properties, by upregulation of a cutaneous endogenous antioxidant pathway. PMID:25451641

  3. Modulated expression and enzymatic activities of Darkbarbel catfish, Pelteobagrus vachelli for oxidative stress induced by acute hypoxia and reoxygenation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guosong; Mao, Jianqiang; Liang, Fenfei; Chen, Jiawei; Zhao, Cheng; Yin, Shaowu; Wang, Li; Tang, Zhonglin; Chen, Shuqiao

    2016-05-01

    Large changes in oxygen availability in aquatic environments, ranging from anoxia through to hyperoxia, can lead to corresponding wide variation in the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by fish with aquatic respiration. In order to evaluate the effects of hypoxia and reoxygenation on oxidative stress in fish, the mRNA and protein expression of SODs (Cu/Zn-SOD and Mn-SOD) as well as indices (CP, LPO and MDA) and enzymatic activities (SOD, CAT, GPx, GR and GST) were analyzed in liver and brain tissues of Pelteobagrus vachelli. Predominant expression of PvSOD2 was detected in heart, brain, and liver. In contrast, PvSOD1 was highly expressed in liver. Based on the expression patterns of above parameters, we inferred that brain tissue of P. vachelli under 0.7 mg/L degree of acute hypoxia condition could experience hypometabolic states or no suffering stress, but brain tissue has effective mechanisms to minimize or prevent oxidative stress during the transition from hypoxia to reoxygenation. Our results also demonstrated an increased expression of SODs and enzymatic activities for oxidative stress in liver under hypoxic conditions, which supports the hypothesis that anticipatory preparation takes place in order to deal with the encountered oxidative stress during the recovery from hypoxia as proposed by M. Hermes-Lima. Therefore, this study will provide a clue to better understand the action mode of antioxidant genes and enzymes under oxidative stress in fish. PMID:26945243

  4. Prehypertension-Associated Elevation in Circulating Lysophosphatidlycholines, Lp-PLA2 Activity, and Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Minjoo; Jung, Saem; Kim, Su Yeon; Lee, Sang-Hyun; Lee, Jong Ho

    2014-01-01

    Prehypertension is a risk factor for atherosclerosis. We investigated alterations in plasma metabolites that are associated with prehypertension. A group of 53 individuals was identified who remained within the range of prehypertension during repeated measurements in a 3-year period. This group was compared with the control group of 53 normotensive subjects who were matched for age and gender. Metabolomic profiles were analyzed with UPLC-LTQ-Orbitrap mass spectrometry. The prehypertensive group showed higher levels of lysophosphatidylcholines (lysoPCs) containing C14:0, C16:1, C16:0, C18:2, C18:1, C18:0, C20:5, C20:4, C20:3, and C22:6, higher circulating Lp-PLA2 activity, oxidized LDL (ox-LDL), interleukin 6 (IL-6), urinary 8-epi-PGF2α, and higher brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (ba-PWV), before and after adjusting for BMI, WHR, smoking, alcohol consumption, serum lipid profiles, glucose, and insulin. LysoPC (16:0) was the most important plasma metabolite for evaluating the difference between control and prehypertensive groups, with a variable important in the projection (VIP) value of 17.173, and it showed a positive and independent association with DBP and SBP. In the prehypertensive group, the levels of lysoPC (16:0) positively and significantly correlated with ox-LDL, Lp-PLA2 activity, 8-epi-PGF2α, ba-PWV, and IL-6 before and after adjusting for confounding variables. Prehypertension-associated elevations in lysoPCs, Lp-PLA2 activity, ox-LDL, urinary 8-epi-PGF2α, IL-6, and ba-PWV could indicate increased oxidative stress from Lp-PLA2-catalyzed PC hydrolysis during increased LDL oxidation, thereby enhancing proinflammation and arterial stiffness. PMID:24800806

  5. Staphylococcal response to oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Gaupp, Rosmarie; Ledala, Nagender; Somerville, Greg A.

    2012-01-01

    Staphylococci are a versatile genus of bacteria that are capable of causing acute and chronic infections in diverse host species. The success of staphylococci as pathogens is due in part to their ability to mitigate endogenous and exogenous oxidative and nitrosative stress. Endogenous oxidative stress is a consequence of life in an aerobic environment; whereas, exogenous oxidative and nitrosative stress are often due to the bacteria's interaction with host immune systems. To overcome the deleterious effects of oxidative and nitrosative stress, staphylococci have evolved protection, detoxification, and repair mechanisms that are controlled by a network of regulators. In this review, we summarize the cellular targets of oxidative stress, the mechanisms by which staphylococci sense oxidative stress and damage, oxidative stress protection and repair mechanisms, and regulation of the oxidative stress response. When possible, special attention is given to how the oxidative stress defense mechanisms help staphylococci control oxidative stress in the host. PMID:22919625

  6. Deficiency of glutathione transferase zeta causes oxidative stress and activation of antioxidant response pathways.

    PubMed

    Blackburn, Anneke C; Matthaei, Klaus I; Lim, Cindy; Taylor, Matthew C; Cappello, Jean Y; Hayes, John D; Anders, M W; Board, Philip G

    2006-02-01

    Glutathione S-transferase (GST) zeta (GSTZ1-1) plays a significant role in the catabolism of phenylalanine and tyrosine, and a deficiency of GSTZ1-1 results in the accumulation of maleylacetoacetate and its derivatives maleylacetone (MA) and succinylacetone. Induction of GST subunits was detected in the liver of Gstz1(-/-) mice by Western blotting with specific antisera and high-performance liquid chromatography analysis of glutathione affinity column-purified proteins. The greatest induction was observed in members of the mu class. Induction of NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 and the catalytic and modifier subunits of glutamate-cysteine ligase was also observed. Many of the enzymes that are induced in Gstz1(-/-) mice are regulated by antioxidant response elements that respond to oxidative stress via the Keap1/Nrf2 pathway. It is significant that diminished glutathione concentrations were also observed in the liver of Gstz1(-/-) mice, which supports the conclusion that under normal dietary conditions, the accumulation of electrophilic intermediates such as maleylacetoacetate and MA results in a high level of oxidative stress. Elevated GST activities in the livers of Gstz1(-/-) mice suggest that GSTZ1-1 deficiency may alter the metabolism of some drugs and xenobiotics. Gstz1(-/-) mice given acetaminophen demonstrated increased hepatotoxicity compared with wild-type mice. This toxicity may be attributed to the increased GST activity or the decreased hepatic concentrations of glutathione, or both. Patients with acquired deficiency of GSTZ1-1 caused by therapeutic exposure to dichloroacetic acid for the clinical treatment of lactic acidosis may be at increased risk of drug- and chemical-induced toxicity. PMID:16278372

  7. Activation of oxidative stress-responsive signaling pathways in early splenotoxic response of aniline

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Jianling; Wang Gangduo; Ansari, G.A.S.; Khan, M. Firoze

    2008-07-15

    Aniline exposure causes toxicity to the spleen, which leads to a variety of sarcomas, and fibrosis appears to be an important preneoplastic lesion. However, early molecular mechanisms in aniline-induced toxicity to the spleen are not known. Previously, we have shown that aniline exposure results in iron overload and induction of oxidative stress in the spleen, which can cause transcriptional upregulation of fibrogenic/inflammatory cytokines via activation of oxidative stress (OS)-responsive signaling pathways. To test this mechanism, male SD rats were treated with aniline (1mmol/kg/day via gavage) for 7days, an experimental condition that precedes the appearance of fibrosis. Significant increases in both NF-{kappa}B and AP-1 binding activity was observed in the nuclear extracts of splenocytes from aniline-treated rats as determined by ELISAs, and supported by Western blot data showing increases in p-I{kappa}B{alpha}, p-p65 and p-c-Jun. To understand the upstream signaling events which could account for the activation of NF-{kappa}B and AP-1, phosphorylation patterns of I{kappa}B kinases (IKK{alpha} and IKK{beta}) and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) were pursued. Our data showed remarkable increases in both p-IKK{alpha} and p-IKK{beta} in the splenocytes from aniline-treated rats, suggesting their role in the phosphorylation of both I{kappa}B{alpha} and p65 subunits. Furthermore, aniline exposure led to activation of all three classes of MAPKs, as evident from increased phosphorylation of extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK1/2) and p38 MAPKs, which could potentially contribute to the observed activation of both AP-1 and NF-{kappa}B. Activation of upstream signaling molecules was also associated with simultaneous increases in gene transcription of cytokines IL-1, IL-6 and TNF-{alpha}. The observed sequence of events following aniline exposure could initiate a fibrogenic and/or tumorigenic response in the spleen.

  8. Catalase and superoxide dismutase activities as biomarkers of oxidative stress in workers exposed to mercury vapors

    SciTech Connect

    Perrin-Nadif, R.; Dusch, M.; Mur, J.M.; Koch, C.; Schmitt, P.

    1996-06-07

    We investigated the role of three blood antioxidant enzyme activities and total antioxidant status (TAS) as biological markers of oxidative stress in workers exposed to mercury (Hg{degrees}) vapors. Twenty-two female workers took part in the study. Blood and urine sampling for biological analyses was performed. The workers were classified into three subgroups according to their creatinine-corrected Hg concentration in urine. Blood antioxidant enzyme activities and TAS were compared between groups with nonparametric distribution-free methods. A significant difference existed in catalase activity and a slight, but not significant, difference existed in Cu{sup 2+}/Zn{sup 2+} superoxide dismutase (Cu{sup 2+}/Zn{sup 2+} SOD) activity between the three groups. No differences were observed in either the glutathione peroxidase activity or the TAS between these groups. Catalase and Cu{sup 2+}/Zn{sup 2+} SOD activities were increased in the groups of workers with higher creatinine-corrected urinary Hg concentrations when compared with the group of lower creatinine-corrected urinary Hg concentrations. Catalase activity was positively correlated with the creatinine-corrected concentration of Hg in urine, and Cu{sup 2+}/Zn{sup 2+} SOD activity was slightly correlated with the creatinine-corrected concentration of Hg in urine. The role of erythrocyte catalase and Cu{sup 2}/Zn{sup 2+} SOD activities we have measured is in agreement with the hypothesis of the involvement of reactive oxygen species production as an important event in chronic exposure to Hg{degrees} vapors in humans. In spite of the small sample size, results indicate that erythrocyte catalase and Cu{sup 2+}/Zn{sup 2+} SOD activities could be considered as markers of biological effect in workers exposed to Hg{degrees} vapors. 24 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Receptor for AGEs (RAGE) as mediator of NF-kB pathway activation in neuroinflammation and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Tóbon-Velasco, Julio C; Cuevas, Elvis; Torres-Ramos, Mónica A

    2014-01-01

    Recently, it has been proposed that the receptor for advanced glycation end-products (RAGE) plays a crucial role in damaging cellular processes, such as neuroinflammation, neurodegeneration, excitotoxicity and oxidative stress. RAGE is a multiligand receptor belonging to the immunoglobulin superfamily of cell surface molecules acting as a counter-receptor for diverse molecules. Engagement of RAGE converts a brief pulse of cellular activation into sustained cellular dysfunction and tissue damage. Indeed, the involvement of RAGE in physiopathological processes has been demonstrated for several neurodegenerative diseases. It is the full-length form of RAGE the one constituting the cellular receptor which is able to activate intracellular signals. After the binding of ligands to RAGE, oxidative stress is increased; then, over-expression of RAGE produces vicious cycles that perpetuate oxidative stress and contribute to neuroinflammation by nuclear factor-kB (NF-kB) up-regulation. The NF-kB activation promotes the expression of proinflammatory cytokines, including RAGE expression, to induce a prolonged activation and promotion of signaling mechanisms for cell damage. Because inflammatory and oxidative events have been demonstrated to concertedly interact during neurodegenerative events, this review is aimed to discuss the role of RAGE as mediator of an interaction between inflammation and oxidative stress through NF-kB signaling pathway. PMID:25106630

  10. Crocetin prevents retinal degeneration induced by oxidative and endoplasmic reticulum stresses via inhibition of caspase activity.

    PubMed

    Yamauchi, Mika; Tsuruma, Kazuhiro; Imai, Shunsuke; Nakanishi, Tomohiro; Umigai, Naofumi; Shimazawa, Masamitsu; Hara, Hideaki

    2011-01-10

    Crocetin is a carotenoid that is the aglicone of crocin, which are found in saffron stigmas (Crocus sativus L.) and gardenia fruit (Gardenia jasminoides Ellis). In this study, we investigated the effects of crocetin on retinal damage. To examine whether crocetin affects stress pathways, we investigated intracellular oxidation induced by reactive oxygen species, expression of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-related proteins, disruption of the mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨ(m)), and caspases activation. In vitro, we employed cultured retinal ganglion cells (RGC-5, a mouse ganglion cell-line transformed using E1A virus). Cell damage was induced by tunicamycin or hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) exposure. Crocetin at a concentration of 3μM showed the inhibitory effect of 50-60% against tunicamycin- and H(2)O(2)-induced cell death and inhibited increase in caspase-3 and -9 activity. Moreover, crocetin inhibited the enzymatic activity of caspase-9 in a cell-free system. In vivo, retinal damage in mice was induced by exposure to white light at 8000lx for 3h after dark adaptation. Photoreceptor damage was evaluated by measuring the outer nuclear layer thickness at 5days after light exposure and recording the electroretinogram (ERG). Retinal cell damage was also detected with Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) staining at 48h after light exposure. Crocetin at 100mg/kg, p.o. significantly inhibited photoreceptor degeneration and retinal dysfunction and halved the expression of TUNEL-positive cells. These results indicate that crocetin has protective effects against retinal damage in vitro and in vivo, suggesting that the mechanism may inhibit increase in caspase-3 and -9 activities after retinal damage. PMID:20951131

  11. The Relationship between Coenzyme Q10, Oxidative Stress, and Antioxidant Enzymes Activities and Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Bor-Jen; Lin, Yi-Chin; Huang, Yi-Chia; Ko, Ya-Wen; Hsia, Simon; Lin, Ping-Ting

    2012-01-01

    A higher oxidative stress may contribute to the pathogenesis of coronary artery disease (CAD). The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between coenzyme Q10 concentration and lipid peroxidation, antioxidant enzymes activities and the risk of CAD. Patients who were identified by cardiac catheterization as having at least 50% stenosis of one major coronary artery were assigned to the case group (n = 51). The control group (n = 102) comprised healthy individuals with normal blood biochemical values. The plasma coenzyme Q10, malondialdehyde (MDA) and antioxidant enzymes activities (catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx)) were measured. Subjects with CAD had significant lower plasma coenzyme Q10, CAT and GPx activities and higher MDA and SOD levels compared to those of the control group. The plasma coenzyme Q10 was positively correlated with CAT and GPx activities and negatively correlated with MDA and SOD. However, the correlations were not significant after adjusting for the potential confounders of CAD with the exception of SOD. A higher level of plasma coenzyme Q10 (≥0.52 μmol/L) was significantly associated with reducing the risk of CAD. Our results support the potential cardioprotective impact of coenzyme Q10. PMID:22645453

  12. Expression of PUMA in Follicular Granulosa Cells Regulated by FoxO1 Activation During Oxidative Stress.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ze-Qun; Shen, Ming; Wu, Wang-Jun; Li, Bo-Jiang; Weng, Qian-Nan; Li, Mei; Liu, Hong-Lin

    2015-06-01

    Many studies have demonstrated that oxidative stress-induced apoptosis is a main cause of follicular atresia. Reactive oxygen species (ROS)-induced granulosa cell (GC) apoptosis is regulated by a variety of signaling pathways involving numerous genes and transcription factors. In this study, we found expression of the p53-upregulated modulator of apoptosis (PUMA), a BH3-only Bcl-2 subfamily protein, in ovarian GCs during oxidative stress. By overexpression and knockdown of Forkhead box O1 (FoxO1), we found that FoxO1 regulates PUMA at the protein level. Moreover, as c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) has been shown to activate FoxO1 by promoting its nuclear import, we used a JNK inhibitor to reduce FoxO1 activation and detected decreased PUMA messenger RNA expression and protein levels during oxidative stress. In addition, in vivo oxidative stress-induced upregulation of PUMA was found following injection of 3 nitropropionic acid in mice. In conclusion, oxidative stress increases PUMA expression regulated by FoxO1 in follicular GCs. PMID:25425107

  13. Particulate air pollution induces arrhythmia via oxidative stress and calcium calmodulin kinase II activation

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jin-Bae; Kim, Changsoo; Choi, Eunmi; Park, Sanghoon; Park, Hyelim; Pak, Hui-Nam; Lee, Moon-Hyoung; Shin, Dong Chun; Hwang, Ki-Chul; Joung, Boyoung

    2012-02-15

    Ambient particulate matter (PM) can increase the incidence of arrhythmia. However, the arrhythmogenic mechanism of PM is poorly understood. This study investigated the arrhythmogenic mechanism of PM. In Sprague–Dawley rats, QT interval was increased from 115.0 ± 14.0 to 142.1 ± 18.4 ms (p = 0.02) after endotracheal exposure of DEP (200 μg/ml for 30 min, n = 5). Ventricular premature contractions were more frequently observed after DEP exposure (100%) than baseline (20%, p = 0.04). These effects were prevented by pretreatment of N-acetylcysteine (NAC, 5 mmol/L, n = 3). In 12 Langendorff-perfused rat hearts, DEP infusion of 12.5 μg/ml for 20 min prolonged action potential duration (APD) at only left ventricular base increasing apicobasal repolarization gradients. Spontaneous early afterdepolarization (EAD) and ventricular tachycardia (VT) were observed in 8 (67%) and 6 (50%) hearts, respectively, versus no spontaneous triggered activity or VT in any hearts before DEP infusion. DEP-induced APD prolongation, EAD and VT were successfully prevented with NAC (5 mmol/L, n = 5), nifedipine (10 μmol/L, n = 5), and active Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) blockade, KN 93 (1 μmol/L, n = 5), but not by thapsigargin (200 nmol/L) plus ryanodine (10 μmol/L, n = 5) and inactive CaMKII blockade, KN 92 (1 μmol/L, n = 5). In neonatal rat cardiomyocytes, DEP provoked ROS generation in dose dependant manner. DEP (12.5 μg/ml) induced apoptosis, and this effect was prevented by NAC and KN 93. Thus, this study shows that in vivo and vitro exposure of PM induced APD prolongation, EAD and ventricular arrhythmia. These effects might be caused by oxidative stress and CaMKII activation. -- Highlights: ► The ambient PM consistently prolonged repolarization. ► The ambient PM induced triggered activity and ventricular arrhythmia. ► These effects were prevented by antioxidants, I{sub CaL} blockade and CaMKII blockade. ► The ambient PM can induce

  14. Time profile of oxidative stress and neutrophil activation in ovine acute lung injury and sepsis.

    PubMed

    Lange, Matthias; Szabo, Csaba; Traber, Daniel L; Horvath, Eszter; Hamahata, Atsumori; Nakano, Yoshimitsu; Traber, Lillian D; Cox, Robert A; Schmalstieg, Frank C; Herndon, David N; Enkhbaatar, Perenlei

    2012-05-01

    The formation of oxidative stress in the lung and activation of neutrophils are major determinants in the development of respiratory failure after acute lung injury and sepsis. However, the time changes of these pathogenic factors have not been sufficiently described. Twenty-four chronically instrumented sheep were subjected to cotton smoke inhalation injury and instillation of live Pseudomonas aeruginosa into both lungs. The sheep were euthanized at 4, 8, 12, 18, and 24 h after injury. Additional sheep received sham injury and were euthanized after 24 h. Pulmonary function was assessed by determination of oxygenation index and pulmonary shunt fraction. In addition, lung tissue was harvested at the respective time points for the measurement of malondialdehyde, interleukin 6, poly(ADP ribose), myeloperoxidase, and alveolar polymorphonuclear neutrophil score. The injury induced severe respiratory failure that was associated with an early increase in lipid peroxidation and interleukin 6 expression. The injury further led to an increase in poly(ADP ribose) activity that reached its peak at 12 h after injury and declined afterward. In addition, progressive increases in markers of neutrophil accumulation in the lung were observed. The peak of neutrophil accumulation in the lung was associated with a severe depletion of circulating neutrophils. The results from our model may enhance the understanding of the pathophysiological alterations after acute lung injury and sepsis and thus be useful in exploring therapeutic interventions directed at modifying the expression or activation of inflammatory mediators. PMID:22266977

  15. Regulation of delta-aminolevulinate synthase activity during the development of oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Kaliman, P A; Barannik, T V

    1999-06-01

    Activities of rat liver delta-aminolevulinate synthetase (delta-ALAS), glutathione reductase (GR), and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH), GSH content in the liver, and the absorption spectrum of blood serum were investigated after CoCl2, HgCl2, or beta-adrenoblocker (propranolol) injection and after CoCl2 and propranolol co-administration. Inhibition of the activity of the key heme biosynthesis enzyme delta-ALAS was most pronounced and prolonged during the first hours after CoCl2 and CoCl2 plus propranolol injections; this was associated with accumulation of Co2+--protoporphyrin-containing products of hemolysis. Inhibition of delta-ALAS after propranolol injection is not mediated by hemolysis. A decrease in GSH content precedes the induction of heme biosynthesis only in the case of HgCl2 administration, and this was associated with inhibition of GR and G6PDH. The decreased GSH content during the first hours after injection of propranolol and co-administration of CoCl2 and propranolol was not followed by increase in delta-ALAS activity 24 h after the injection. The mechanisms of the increase in the free heme content in the liver during the early stages of oxidative stress and the regulation of the key heme biosynthesis enzyme are discussed. PMID:10395986

  16. Acute Activation of Oxidative Pentose Phosphate Pathway as First-Line Response to Oxidative Stress in Human Skin Cells.

    PubMed

    Kuehne, Andreas; Emmert, Hila; Soehle, Joern; Winnefeld, Marc; Fischer, Frank; Wenck, Horst; Gallinat, Stefan; Terstegen, Lara; Lucius, Ralph; Hildebrand, Janosch; Zamboni, Nicola

    2015-08-01

    Integrity of human skin is endangered by exposure to UV irradiation and chemical stressors, which can provoke a toxic production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and oxidative damage. Since oxidation of proteins and metabolites occurs virtually instantaneously, immediate cellular countermeasures are pivotal to mitigate the negative implications of acute oxidative stress. We investigated the short-term metabolic response in human skin fibroblasts and keratinocytes to H2O2 and UV exposure. In time-resolved metabolomics experiments, we observed that within seconds after stress induction, glucose catabolism is routed to the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) and nucleotide synthesis independent of previously postulated blocks in glycolysis (i.e., of GAPDH or PKM2). Through ultra-short (13)C labeling experiments, we provide evidence for multiple cycling of carbon backbones in the oxidative PPP, potentially maximizing NADPH reduction. The identified metabolic rerouting in oxidative and non-oxidative PPP has important physiological roles in stabilization of the redox balance and ROS clearance. PMID:26190262

  17. The Timing of Raf/ERK and AKT Activation in Protecting PC12 Cells against Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Ong, Qunxiang; Guo, Shunling; Duan, Liting; Zhang, Kai; Collier, Eleanor Ann; Cui, Bianxiao

    2016-01-01

    Acute brain injuries such as ischemic stroke or traumatic brain injury often cause massive neural death and irreversible brain damage with grave consequences. Previous studies have established that a key participant in the events leading to neural death is the excessive production of reactive oxygen species. Protecting neuronal cells by activating their endogenous defense mechanisms is an attractive treatment strategy for acute brain injuries. In this work, we investigate how the precise timing of the Raf/ERK and the AKT pathway activation affects their protective effects against oxidative stress. For this purpose, we employed optogenetic systems that use light to precisely and reversibly activate either the Raf/ERK or the AKT pathway. We find that preconditioning activation of the Raf/ERK or the AKT pathway immediately before oxidant exposure provides significant protection to cells. Notably, a 15-minute transient activation of the Raf/ERK pathway is able to protect PC12 cells against oxidant strike that is applied 12 hours later, while the transient activation of the AKT pathway fails to protect PC12 cells in such a scenario. On the other hand, if the pathways are activated after the oxidative insult, i.e. postconditioning, the AKT pathway conveys greater protective effect than the Raf/ERK pathway. We find that postconditioning AKT activation has an optimal delay period of 2 hours. When the AKT pathway is activated 30min after the oxidative insult, it exhibits very little protective effect. Therefore, the precise timing of the pathway activation is crucial in determining its protective effect against oxidative injury. The optogenetic platform, with its precise temporal control and its ability to activate specific pathways, is ideal for the mechanistic dissection of intracellular pathways in protection against oxidative stress. PMID:27082641

  18. Fish oil supplementation decreases oxidative stress but does not affect platelet-activating factor bioactivity in lungs of asthmatic rats.

    PubMed

    Zanatta, A L; Miranda, D T S Z; Dias, B C L; Campos, R M; Massaro, M C; Michelotto, P V; West, A L; Miles, E A; Calder, P C; Nishiyama, A

    2014-07-01

    Dietary fish oil supplementation increases the content of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) in cellular membranes. The highly unsaturated nature of n-3 PUFA could result in an enhanced lipid peroxidation in the oxidative environment characteristic of asthma. The oxidative reaction cascade culminates in an increased production of components associated to oxidative stress and of an important proinflammatory mediator platelet-activating factor (PAF)-like lipid. We evaluated the effect of fish oil supplementation in asthmatic rats upon the PAF bioactivity and parameters related to oxidative stress in the lung. Fish oil supplementation of asthmatic rats resulted in lower concentrations of nitrite (1.719 ± 0.137 vs. 2.454 ± 0.163 nmol/mL) and lipid hydroperoxide (72.190 ± 7.327 vs. 120.200 ± 11.270 nmol/mg protein). In asthmatic animals, fish oil increased the activities of superoxide dismutase (EC 1.15.1.1) (33.910 ± 2.325 vs. 24.110 ± 0.618 U/mg protein) and glutathione peroxidase (EC 1.11.1.9) (164.100 ± 31.250 vs. 12.590 ± 5.234 U/mg protein). However, fish oil did not affect PAF bioactivity in lung tissue of asthmatic rats (0.545 ± 0.098 340/380 vs. 0.669 ± 0.101 340/380 nm ratio). Considering the two-step process--oxidative stress and PAF bioactivity--fish oil exhibited a divergent action on these aspects of asthmatic inflammation, since the supplement lowered oxidative stress in the lungs of asthmatic rats, presenting an antioxidant effect, but did not affect PAF bioactivity. This suggests a dual effect of fish oil on oxidative stress and inflammation in asthma. PMID:24858941

  19. Thioredoxin-1/peroxiredoxin-1 as sensors of oxidative stress mediated by NADPH oxidase activity in atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Madrigal-Matute, Julio; Fernandez-Garcia, Carlos-Ernesto; Blanco-Colio, Luis Miguel; Burillo, Elena; Fortuño, Ana; Martinez-Pinna, Roxana; Llamas-Granda, Patricia; Beloqui, Oscar; Egido, Jesus; Zalba, Guillermo; Martin-Ventura, José Luis

    2015-09-01

    To assess the potential association between TRX-1/PRX-1 and NADPH oxidase (Nox) activity in vivo and in vitro, TRX-1/PRX-1 levels were assessed by ELISA in 84 asymptomatic subjects with known phagocytic NADPH oxidase activity and carotid intima-media thickness (IMT). We found a positive correlation between TRX-1/PRX-1 and NADPH oxidase-dependent superoxide production (r=0.48 and 0.47; p<0.001 for both) and IMT (r=0.31 and 0.36; p<0.01 for both) adjusted by age and sex. Moreover, asymptomatic subjects with plaques have higher PRX-1 and TRX plasma levels (p<0.01 for both). These data were confirmed in a second study in which patients with carotid atherosclerosis showed higher PRX-1 and TRX plasma levels than healthy subjects (p<0.001 for both). In human atherosclerotic plaques, the NADPH oxidase subunit p22phox colocalized with TRX-1/PRX-1 in macrophages (immunohistochemistry). In monocytes and macrophages, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) induced NADPH activation and TRX-1/PRX-1 release to the extracellular medium, with a concomitant decrease in their intracellular levels, which was reversed by the NADPH inhibitor apocynin (Western blot). In loss-of-function experiments, genetic silencing of the NADPH oxidase subunit Nox2 blocked PMA-induced intracellular TRX-1/PRX-1 downregulation in macrophages. Furthermore, the PMA-induced release of TRX-1/PRX-1 involves the modulation of their redox status and exosome-like vesicles. TRX-1/PRX-1 levels are associated with NADPH oxidase-activity in vivo and in vitro. These data could suggest a coordinated antioxidant response to oxidative stress in atherothrombosis. PMID:26117319

  20. Effects of nonionic and ionic surfactants on survival, oxidative stress, and cholinesterase activity of planarian.

    PubMed

    Li, Mei-Hui

    2008-02-01

    Eight widely used surfactants (cetyltrimethylammonium bromide; CTAB, benzethonium chloride; Hyamine 1622, 4-nonylphenol; NP, octylphenol ethoxylate; Triton X-100, dodecylbenzene sulfonate; LAS, lauryl sulfate; SDS, pentadecafluorooctanoic acid; PFOA, and perfluorooctane sulfonate; PFOS) were selected to examine their acute toxicities and effects on oxidative stress and cholinesterase (ChE) activities in Dugesia japonica. The differences in acute toxicity among eight surfactants to planarians were at least in the range of three orders of magnitudes. The toxicity rank of surfactants according to estimated 48-h LC(50) was SDS>NP>LAS>Hyamine 1622>CTAB>Triton X-100>PFOS>PFOA. The toxicity rank of surfactants according to 96-h LC(50) was as follows: SDS>CTAB>NP>LAS>Hyamine 1622>Triton X-100>PFOS>PFOA. There were significant increases in catalase activities in planarians exposed to LAS at nominal concentrations of 0.5 or 1 mgl(-1) and to PFOS at nominal concentrations of 5 or 10 mgl(-1) after 48-h exposure. Inhibitions of ChE activities were found in planarians exposed to Hyamine 1622 at all concentrations tested, to PFOS at nominal concentration of 10 mgl(-1), to PFOA at nominal concentrations of 50 or 100 mgl(-1) and to NP at nominal concentration of 0.5 mgl(-1). A significant increase in ChE activities was also observed in planarian exposed to Triton X-100 at nominal concentration of 5 mgl(-1). The implication of ChE inhibition by NP, PFOS and PFOA on neurological and behavioral effects in aquatic animals requires further investigation. PMID:17905407

  1. Sustained Oxidative Stress Inhibits NF-kB Activation Partially via Inactivating the Proteasome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    NF-kB is a family of important transcription factors involved in many cellular functions, such as cell survival, proliferation and stress responses. Many studies indicate that NF-kB is a stress sensitive transcription factor and its activation is regulated by reactive oxygen species. In previous s...

  2. Increased activity of osteocyte autophagy in ovariectomized rats and its correlation with oxidative stress status and bone loss

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Yuehua Zheng, Xinfeng Li, Bo Jiang, Shengdan Jiang, Leisheng

    2014-08-15

    Highlights: • Examine autophagy level in the proximal tibia of ovariectomized rats. • Investigate whether autophagy level is associated with bone loss. • Investigate whether autophagy level is associated with oxidative stress status. - Abstract: Objectives: The objectives of the present study were to investigate ovariectomy on autophagy level in the bone and to examine whether autophagy level is associated with bone loss and oxidative stress status. Methods: 36 female Sprague–Dawley rats were randomly divided into sham-operated (Sham), and ovariectomized (OVX) rats treated either with vehicle or 17-β-estradiol. At the end of the six-week treatment, bone mineral density (BMD) and bone micro-architecture in proximal tibias were assessed by micro-CT. Serum 17β-estradiol (E2) level were measured. Total antioxidant capacity (T-AOC), superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, catalase (CAT) activity in proximal tibia was also determined. The osteocyte autophagy in proximal tibias was detected respectively by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), immunofluorescent histochemistry (IH), realtime-PCR and Western blot. In addition, the spearman correlation between bone mass, oxidative stress status, serum E2 and autophagy were analyzed. Results: Ovariectomy increased Atg5, LC3, and Beclin1 mRNA and proteins expressions while decreased p62 expression. Ovariectomy also declined the activities of T-AOC, CAT, and SOD. Treatment with E2 prevented the reduction in bone mass as well as restored the autophagy level. Furthermore, LC3-II expression was inversely correlated with T-AOC, CAT, and SOD activities. A significant inverse correlation between LC3-II expression and BV/TV, Tb.N, BMD in proximal tibias was found. Conclusions: Ovariectomy induced oxidative stress, autophagy and bone loss. Autophagy of osteocyte was inversely correlated with oxidative stress status and bone loss.

  3. Oxidative Stress and Psychological Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Salim, Samina

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress is an imbalance between cellular production of reactive oxygen species and the counteracting antioxidant mechanisms. The brain with its high oxygen consumption and a lipid-rich environment is considered highly susceptible to oxidative stress or redox imbalances. Therefore, the fact that oxidative stress is implicated in several mental disorders including depression, anxiety disorders, schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, is not surprising. Although several elegant studies have established a link between oxidative stress and psychiatric disorders, the causal relationship between oxidative stress and psychiatric diseases is not fully determined. Another critical aspect that needs much attention and effort is our understanding of the association between cellular oxidative stress and emotional stress. This review examines some of the recent discoveries that link oxidative status with anxiety, depression, schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. A discussion of published results and questions that currently exist in the field regarding a causal relationship between oxidative and emotional stress is also provided. PMID:24669208

  4. Circulating Biomarkers of Immune Activation, Oxidative Stress and Inflammation Characterize Severe Canine Visceral Leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Solcà, Manuela S; Andrade, Bruno B; Abbehusen, Melissa Moura Costa; Teixeira, Clarissa R; Khouri, Ricardo; Valenzuela, Jesus G; Kamhawi, Shaden; Bozza, Patrícia Torres; Fraga, Deborah Bittencourt Mothé; Borges, Valeria Matos; Veras, Patrícia Sampaio Tavares; Brodskyn, Claudia Ida

    2016-01-01

    Clinical manifestations in canine visceral leishmaniasis (CVL) have not been clearly associated with immunological status or disease progression. We simultaneously assessed biomarkers of inflammation, immune activation, oxidative stress, and anti-sand fly saliva IgG concentrations in dog sera with different clinical manifestations to characterize a biosignature associated with CVL severity. In a cross-sectional exploratory study, a random population of 70 dogs from an endemic area in Brazil was classified according to CVL clinical severity and parasitological evaluation. A panel of biomarkers and anti-sand fly saliva IgG were measured in canine sera. Assessment of protein expression of profile biomarkers identified a distinct biosignature that could cluster separately animal groups with different clinical scores. Increasing severity scores were associated with a gradual decrease of LTB4 and PGE2, and a gradual increase in CXCL1 and CCL2. Discriminant analyses revealed that combined assessment of LTB4, PGE2 and CXCL1 was able to distinguish dogs with different clinical scores. Dogs with the highest clinical score values also exhibited high parasite loads and higher concentrations of anti-saliva antibodies. Our findings suggest CVL clinical severity is tightly associated with a distinct inflammatory profile hallmarked by a differential expression of circulating eicosanoids and chemokines. PMID:27595802

  5. Circulating Biomarkers of Immune Activation, Oxidative Stress and Inflammation Characterize Severe Canine Visceral Leishmaniasis

    PubMed Central

    Solcà, Manuela S.; Andrade, Bruno B.; Abbehusen, Melissa Moura Costa; Teixeira, Clarissa R.; Khouri, Ricardo; Valenzuela, Jesus G.; Kamhawi, Shaden; Bozza, Patrícia Torres; Fraga, Deborah Bittencourt Mothé; Borges, Valeria Matos; Veras, Patrícia Sampaio Tavares; Brodskyn, Claudia Ida

    2016-01-01

    Clinical manifestations in canine visceral leishmaniasis (CVL) have not been clearly associated with immunological status or disease progression. We simultaneously assessed biomarkers of inflammation, immune activation, oxidative stress, and anti-sand fly saliva IgG concentrations in dog sera with different clinical manifestations to characterize a biosignature associated with CVL severity. In a cross-sectional exploratory study, a random population of 70 dogs from an endemic area in Brazil was classified according to CVL clinical severity and parasitological evaluation. A panel of biomarkers and anti–sand fly saliva IgG were measured in canine sera. Assessment of protein expression of profile biomarkers identified a distinct biosignature that could cluster separately animal groups with different clinical scores. Increasing severity scores were associated with a gradual decrease of LTB4 and PGE2, and a gradual increase in CXCL1 and CCL2. Discriminant analyses revealed that combined assessment of LTB4, PGE2 and CXCL1 was able to distinguish dogs with different clinical scores. Dogs with the highest clinical score values also exhibited high parasite loads and higher concentrations of anti-saliva antibodies. Our findings suggest CVL clinical severity is tightly associated with a distinct inflammatory profile hallmarked by a differential expression of circulating eicosanoids and chemokines. PMID:27595802

  6. Oxidative stress-mediated hemolytic activity of solvent exchange-prepared fullerene (C60) nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trpkovic, Andreja; Todorovic-Markovic, Biljana; Kleut, Duska; Misirkic, Maja; Janjetovic, Kristina; Vucicevic, Ljubica; Pantovic, Aleksandar; Jovanovic, Svetlana; Dramicanin, Miroslav; Markovic, Zoran; Trajkovic, Vladimir

    2010-09-01

    The present study investigated the hemolytic properties of fullerene (C60) nanoparticles prepared by solvent exchange using tetrahydrofuran (nC60THF), or by mechanochemically assisted complexation with macrocyclic oligosaccharide gamma-cyclodextrin (nC60CDX) or the copolymer ethylene vinyl acetate-ethylene vinyl versatate (nC60EVA-EVV). The spectrophotometrical analysis of hemoglobin release revealed that only nC60THF, but not nC60CDX or nC60EVA-EVV, was able to cause lysis of human erythrocytes in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Atomic force microscopy revealed that nC60THF-mediated hemolysis was preceded by erythrocyte shrinkage and increase in cell surface roughness. A flow cytometric analysis confirmed a decrease in erythrocyte size and demonstrated a significant increase in reactive oxygen species production in red blood cells exposed to nC60THF. The nC60THF-triggered hemolytic activity was efficiently reduced by the antioxidants N-acetylcysteine and butylated hydroxyanisole, as well as by serum albumin, the most abundant protein in human blood plasma. These data indicate that nC60THF can cause serum albumin-preventable hemolysis through oxidative stress-mediated damage of the erythrocyte membrane.

  7. Demethyleneberberine attenuates non-alcoholic fatty liver disease with activation of AMPK and inhibition of oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Qiang, Xiaoyan; Xu, Lulu; Zhang, Miao; Zhang, Pengcheng; Wang, Yinhang; Wang, Yongchen; Zhao, Zheng; Chen, Huan; Liu, Xie; Zhang, Yubin

    2016-04-15

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has reached an epidemic level globally, which is recognized to form non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) by the "two-hit" model, including oxidative stress and inflammation. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) has long been regarded as a key regulator of energy metabolism, which is recognized as a critical target for NAFLD treatment. Here we introduce a natural product, demethyleneberberine (DMB), which potentially ameliorated NAFLD by activating AMPK pathways. Our study showed that the intraperitoneal injection of DMB (20 or 40 mg/kg body weight) decreased hepatic lipid accumulation in methionine and choline deficient (MCD) high-fat diet feeding mice and db/db mice. The further investigation demonstrated that DMB activated AMPK by increasing its phosphorylation in vitro and in vivo. Accompanied with AMPK activation, the expression of lipogenic genes were significantly reduced while genes responsible for the fatty acid β-oxidation were restored in DMB-treated NAFLD mice. In addition, the remarkable oxidative damage and inflammation induced by NAFLD were both attenuated by DMB treatment, which is reflected by decreased lipid oxidative product, malonaldehyde (MDA) and inflammatory factors, tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) and interleukin 1β (IL-1β). Based on all above, DMB could serve as a novel AMPK activator for treating NAFLD and preventing the pathologic progression from NAFLD to NASH by inhibiting the oxidative stress and inflammation. PMID:26970305

  8. Oxidative stress-induced p53 activity is enhanced by a redox-sensitive TP53INP1 SUMOylation

    PubMed Central

    Peuget, S; Bonacci, T; Soubeyran, P; Iovanna, J; Dusetti, N J

    2014-01-01

    Tumor Protein p53-Induced Nuclear Protein 1 (TP53INP1) is a tumor suppressor that modulates the p53 response to stress. TP53INP1 is one of the key mediators of p53 antioxidant function by promoting the p53 transcriptional activity on its target genes. TP53INP1 expression is deregulated in many types of cancers including pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma in which its decrease occurs early during the preneoplastic development. In this work, we report that redox-dependent induction of p53 transcriptional activity is enhanced by the oxidative stress-induced SUMOylation of TP53INP1 at lysine 113. This SUMOylation is mediated by PIAS3 and CBX4, two SUMO ligases especially related to the p53 activation upon DNA damage. Importantly, this modification is reversed by three SUMO1-specific proteases SENP1, 2 and 6. Moreover, TP53INP1 SUMOylation induces its binding to p53 in the nucleus under oxidative stress conditions. TP53INP1 mutation at lysine 113 prevents the pro-apoptotic, antiproliferative and antioxidant effects of TP53INP1 by impairing the p53 response on its target genes p21, Bax and PUMA. We conclude that TP53INP1 SUMOylation is essential for the regulation of p53 activity induced by oxidative stress. PMID:24608790

  9. The Adaptogens Rhodiola and Schizandra Modify the Response to Immobilization Stress in Rabbits by Suppressing the Increase of Phosphorylated Stress-activated Protein Kinase, Nitric Oxide and Cortisol

    PubMed Central

    Panossian, Alexander; Hambardzumyan, Marina; Hovhanissyan, Areg; Wikman, Georg

    2007-01-01

    Adaptogens possess anti-fatigue and anti-stress activities that can increase mental and physical working performance against a background of fatigue or stress. The aim of the present study was to ascertain which mediators of stress response are significantly involved in the mechanisms of action of adaptogens, and to determine their relevance as biochemical markers for evaluating anti-stress effects in rabbits subjected to restraint stress. Blood levels of stress-activated protein kinase (SAPK/JNK), the phosphorylated kinase p-SAPK/p-JNK, nitric oxide (NO), cortisol, testosterone, prostaglandin E2, leukotriene B4 and thromboxane B2 were determined in groups of animals prior to daily oral administration of placebo, rhodioloside or extracts of Eleutherococcus senticosus, Schizandra chinensis, Rhodiola rosea, Bryonia alba and Panax ginseng over a 7 day period. Ten minutes after the final treatment, animals were immobilized for 2 hours and blood levels of the markers re-determined. In the placebo group, only p-SAPK/p-JNK, NO and cortisol were increased significantly (by 200–300% cf basal levels) following restraint stress, whilst in animals that had received multiple doses of adaptogens/stress-protectors, the levels of NO and cortisol remained practically unchanged after acute stress. Rhodioloside and extracts of S. chinensis and R. rosea were the most active inhibitors of stress-induced p-SAPK/p-JNK. E. senticosus, B. alba and P. ginseng exerted little effect on p-SAPK/p-JNK levels. It is suggested that the inhibitory effects of R. rosea and S. chinensis on p-SAPK/p-JNK activation may be associated with their antidepressant activity as well as their positive effects on mental performance under stress. PMID:21901061

  10. Effect of Induced Oxidative Stress and Herbal Extracts on Acid Phosphatase Activity in Lysosomal and Microsomal Fractions of Midgut Tissue of the Silkworm, Bombyx mori

    PubMed Central

    Gaikwad, Y. B.; Gaikwad, S. M.; Bhawane, G. P.

    2010-01-01

    Lysosomal and microsomal acid phosphatase activity was estimated in midgut tissue of silkworm larvae, Bombyx mori L. (Lepidoptera: Bombycidae), after induced oxidative stress by D-galactose. The larvae were simultaneously were treated with ethanolic extracts of Bacopa monniera and Lactuca sativa to study their antioxidant properties. Lipid peroxidation and fluorescence was measured to analyze extent of oxidative stress. The ethanolic extract of Lactuca sativa was found to be more effective in protecting membranes against oxidative stress than Bacopa monniera. PMID:20874583

  11. Inhibitory effects of Tyrphostin AG-related compounds on oxidative stress-sensitive transient receptor potential channel activation.

    PubMed

    Toda, Takahiro; Yamamoto, Shinichiro; Yonezawa, Ryo; Mori, Yasuo; Shimizu, Shunichi

    2016-09-01

    Some transient receptor potential (TRP) proteins including TRPA1, TPRM2 and TRPV1 are oxidative stress-sensitive Ca(2+)-permeable channels. Ca(2+) signaling via these TRP channels activated by oxidative stress has been implicated in the aggravation of various inflammatory diseases and pain sensation. We recently reported that Tyrphostin AG490 exerted inhibitory effects on H2O2-induced TRPM2 activation by scavenging the hydroxyl radical. In order to identify stronger inhibitors of oxidative stress-sensitive TRP channels than AG490, we examined the inhibitory effects of Tyrphostin AG-related compounds on H2O2-induced TRP channel activation in human embryonic kidney 293 cells expressing TRP channels. AG555 and AG556 blocked the activation of TRPM2 by H2O2 more strongly than AG490. Regarding TRPV1 and TRPA1, none of the three compounds tested affected H2O2-induced TRPV1 activation; however, AG555 and AG556 reduced H2O2-induced TRPA1 activation more than AG490. Thus, we herein identified AG555 and AG556 as new compounds that exert stronger inhibitory effects on H2O2-induced TRPM2 and TRPA1 activation than AG490. Edaravone, a hydroxyl radical scavenger used in the treatment of cerebral hemorrhage and cerebral infarction, did not affect H2O2-induced TRPM2 or TRPA1 activation. AG555 and AG556 may be useful seed compounds as therapeutic agents for several TRP-related diseases associated with oxidative stress. PMID:27238971

  12. Syzyguim guineense Extracts Show Antioxidant Activities and Beneficial Activities on Oxidative Stress Induced by Ferric Chloride in the Liver Homogenate.

    PubMed

    Pieme, Constant Anatole; Ngoupayo, Joseph; Nkoulou, Claude Herve Khou-Kouz; Moukette, Bruno Moukette; Nono, Borgia Legrand Njinkio; Moor, Vicky Jocelyne Ama; Minkande, Jacqueline Ze; Ngogang, Jeanne Yonkeu

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the in vitro antioxidant activity, free radical scavenging property and the beneficial effects of extracts of various parts of Syzygium guineense in reducing oxidative stress damage in the liver. The effects of extracts on free radicals were determined on radicals DPPH, ABTS, NO and OH followed by the antioxidant properties using Ferric Reducing Antioxidant Power assay (FRAP) and hosphomolybdenum (PPMB). The phytochemical screening of these extracts was performed by determination of the phenolic content. The oxidative damage inhibition in the liver was determined by measuring malondialdehyde (MDA) as well as the activity of the antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and peroxidase. Overall, the bark extract of the ethanol/water or methanol showed the highest radical scavenging activities against DPPH, ABTS and OH radicals compared to the other extracts. This extract also contained the highest phenolic content implying the potential contribution of phenolic compounds towards the antioxidant activities. However, the methanol extract of the root demonstrated the highest protective effects of SOD and CAT against ferric chloride while the hydro-ethanol extract of the leaves exhibited the highest inhibitory effects on lipid peroxidation. These findings suggest that antioxidant properties of S. guineense extracts could be attributed to phenolic compounds revealed by phytochemical studies. Thus, the present results indicate clearly that the extracts of S. guineense possess antioxidant properties and could serve as free radical inhibitors or scavengers, acting possibly as primary antioxidants. The antioxidant properties of the bark extract may thus sustain its various biological activities. PMID:26785075

  13. Syzyguim guineense Extracts Show Antioxidant Activities and Beneficial Activities on Oxidative Stress Induced by Ferric Chloride in the Liver Homogenate

    PubMed Central

    Pieme, Constant Anatole; Ngoupayo, Joseph; Khou-Kouz Nkoulou, Claude Herve; Moukette Moukette, Bruno; Njinkio Nono, Borgia Legrand; Ama Moor, Vicky Jocelyne; Ze Minkande, Jacqueline; Yonkeu Ngogang, Jeanne

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the in vitro antioxidant activity, free radical scavenging property and the beneficial effects of extracts of various parts of Syzygium guineense in reducing oxidative stress damage in the liver. The effects of extracts on free radicals were determined on radicals DPPH, ABTS, NO and OH followed by the antioxidant properties using Ferric Reducing Antioxidant Power assay (FRAP) and hosphomolybdenum (PPMB). The phytochemical screening of these extracts was performed by determination of the phenolic content. The oxidative damage inhibition in the liver was determined by measuring malondialdehyde (MDA) as well as the activity of the antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and peroxidase. Overall, the bark extract of the ethanol/water or methanol showed the highest radical scavenging activities against DPPH, ABTS and OH radicals compared to the other extracts. This extract also contained the highest phenolic content implying the potential contribution of phenolic compounds towards the antioxidant activities. However, the methanol extract of the root demonstrated the highest protective effects of SOD and CAT against ferric chloride while the hydro-ethanol extract of the leaves exhibited the highest inhibitory effects on lipid peroxidation. These findings suggest that antioxidant properties of S. guineense extracts could be attributed to phenolic compounds revealed by phytochemical studies. Thus, the present results indicate clearly that the extracts of S. guineense possess antioxidant properties and could serve as free radical inhibitors or scavengers, acting possibly as primary antioxidants. The antioxidant properties of the bark extract may thus sustain its various biological activities. PMID:26785075

  14. NEFAs activate the oxidative stress-mediated NF-κB signaling pathway to induce inflammatory response in calf hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiaoxia; Li, Dangdang; Deng, Qinghua; Li, Yu; Sun, Guoquan; Yuan, Xue; Song, Yuxiang; Wang, Zhe; Li, Xiaobing; Li, Xinwei; Liu, Guowen

    2015-01-01

    Non-esterified fatty acids (NEFAs) are important induction factors of inflammatory responses in some metabolic diseases. High plasma levels of NEFAs and oxidative stress exist in the dairy cows with ketosis. The aim of this study was to investigate whether high levels of NEFAs can induce inflammatory response and the specific molecular mechanism in the hepatocytes of dairy cow. In vitro, primary cultured bovine hepatocytes were treated with different concentrations of NEFAs, PDTC (an NF-κB inhibitor) and NAC (an antioxidant). NEFAs significantly activated NF-κB pathway. Activated NF-κB upregulated the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines, thereby inducing inflammatory response in bovine hepatocytes. When PDTC was added, activation of NF-κB-mediated inflammatory response induced by NEFAs was inhibited. NEFAs treatment results in the overproduction of the markers of oxidative stress, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and malondialdehyde (MDA), which were ameliorated by NAC treatment. These increased ROS and MDA were caused by decreasing activity of antioxidant system, including glutathione peroxidase, superoxide dismutase and catalase, in bovine hepatocytes treated with NEFAs. NAC also ameliorated NEFAs-mediated NF-κB activation and the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines. These results indicate that high concentrations of NEFAs can induce cattle hepatocytes inflammatory response through activating the oxidative stress-mediated NF-κB signaling pathway. PMID:25465477

  15. The synergic effect of regular exercise and resveratrol on kainate-induced oxidative stress and seizure activity in mice.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hee-jae; Kim, Il-Kon; Song, Wook; Lee, Jin; Park, Sok

    2013-01-01

    The synergic effect of regular exercise and resveratrol, a polyphenolic compound with potent antioxidant activity, was investigated against kainate-induced seizures and oxidative stress in mice. After 6 weeks of swimming training, the total body weight decreased and the blood concentration of lactate stabilized statistically in comparison with the sedentary mice, indicate that the training program increased the aerobic resistance of mice. Kainate (30 mg/kg) evoked seizure activity 5 min after injection, and seizure activity was measured seizure rating scores every 5 min up to 2 h. As previously well known experiments, regular exercise and resveratrol (40 mg/kg, daily supplementation for 6 weeks) have an inhibitory effect on kainate-induced seizure activity and oxidative stress. In particularly, a synergistic cooperation of regular exercise and resveratrol was observed in seizure activity, mortality and oxidative stress especially in SOD activity. These results suggest that regular exercise along with an anti-convulsant agent such as resveratrol could be a more efficient method for the prevention of seizure development than exercise alone. PMID:23054073

  16. Cutaneous oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Polefka, Thomas G; Meyer, Thomas A; Agin, Patricia P; Bianchini, Robert J

    2012-03-01

    The earliest known microfossil records suggest that microorganisms existed on the earth approximately 3.8 billion years ago. Not only did sunlight drive this evolutionary process, but it also allowed photosynthetic organisms to elaborate oxygen and fundamentally change the earth's atmosphere and subsequent evolution. Paradoxically, however, an atmosphere of 20% oxygen offers aerobic organisms both benefits and some key challenges, particularly, to the external integument. This mini-review summarizes almost 40 years of research and provides a "60 000-foot" perspective on cutaneous oxidative stress. Topics reviewed include the following: What are free radicals and reactive oxygen species? Where do they come from? What is their chemistry? What are their roles and/or impact on the skin? What antioxidant defenses are available to mitigate oxidative stress. PMID:22360336

  17. Interaction of vitamin E and exercise training on oxidative stress and antioxidant enzyme activities in rat skeletal muscles.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chen-Kang; Huang, Hui-Yu; Tseng, Hung-Fu; Hsuuw, Yan-Der; Tso, Tim K

    2007-01-01

    It has been shown that free radicals are increased during intensive exercise. We hypothesized that vitamin E (vit E) deficiency, which will increase oxidative stress, would augment the training-induced adaptation of antioxidant enzymes. This study investigated the interaction effect of vit E and exercise training on oxidative stress markers and activities of antioxidant enzymes in red quadriceps and white gastrocnemius of rats in a 2x2 design. Thirty-two male rats were divided into trained vit E-adequate, trained vit E-deficient, untrained vit E-adequate, and untrained vit E-deficient groups. The two trained groups swam 6 h/day, 6 days/week for 8 weeks. The two vit E-deficient groups consumed vit E-free diet for 8 weeks. Vitamin E-training interaction effect was significant on thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARSs), glutathione peroxidase (GPX), and superoxide dismutase (SOD) in both muscles. The trained vit E-deficient group showed the highest TBARS and GPX activity and the lowest SOD activity in both muscles. A significant vit E effect on glutathione reductase and catalase was present in both muscles. Glutathione reductase and catalase activities were significantly lower in the two vit E-adequate groups combined than in the two vit E-deficient groups combined in both muscles. This study shows that vit E status and exercise training have interactive effect on oxidative stress and GPX and SOD activities in rat skeletal muscles. Vitamin E deprivation augmented the exercise-induced elevation in GPX activity while inhibiting exercise-induced SOD activity, possibly through elevated oxidative stress. PMID:16644199

  18. Oxidative Stress in Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Percário, Sandro; Moreira, Danilo R.; Gomes, Bruno A. Q.; Ferreira, Michelli E. S.; Gonçalves, Ana Carolina M.; Laurindo, Paula S. O. C.; Vilhena, Thyago C.; Dolabela, Maria F.; Green, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    Malaria is a significant public health problem in more than 100 countries and causes an estimated 200 million new infections every year. Despite the significant effort to eradicate this dangerous disease, lack of complete knowledge of its physiopathology compromises the success in this enterprise. In this paper we review oxidative stress mechanisms involved in the disease and discuss the potential benefits of antioxidant supplementation as an adjuvant antimalarial strategy. PMID:23208374

  19. Inhibition of phagocytic activity of ARPE-19 cells by free radical mediated oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Olchawa, Magdalena M; Pilat, Anna K; Szewczyk, Grzegorz M; Sarna, Tadeusz Jan

    2016-08-01

    Oxidative stress is a main factor responsible for key changes leading to the onset of age-related macular degeneration (ARMD) that occur in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), which is involved in phagocytosis of photoreceptor outer segments (POS). In this study, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), H2O2 and iron ions (Fe) or rose Bengal (RB) in the presence of NADH and Fe were used to model free radical mediated oxidative stress to test if free radicals and singlet oxygen have different efficiency to inhibit phagocytosis of ARPE-19 cells. Free radical mediated oxidative stress was confirmed by HPLC-EC(Hg) measurements of cholesterol hydroperoxides in treated cells. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spin trapping was employed to detect superoxide anion. Cell survival was analyzed by the MTT assay. Specific phagocytosis of fluorescein-5-isothiocyanate-labeled POS and non-specific phagocytosis of fluorescent beads were measured by flow cytometry. HPLC analysis of cells photosensitized with RB in the presence of NADH and Fe indicated substantial increase in formation of free radical-dependent 7α/7β-hydroperoxides. EPR spin trapping confirmed the photogeneration of superoxide anion in samples enriched with RB, NADH and Fe. For all three protocols sub-lethal oxidative stress induced significant inhibition of the specific phagocytosis of POS. In contrast, non-specific phagocytosis was inhibited only by H2O2 or H2O2 and Fe treatment. Inhibition of phagocytosis was transient and recoverable by 24 h. These results suggest that free radicals may exert similar to singlet oxygen efficiency in inhibiting phagocytosis of RPE cells, and that the effect depends on the location where initial reactive species are formed. PMID:27225587

  20. Compositional analysis and in vitro protective activity against oxidative stress of essential oils from egyptian plants used in traditional medicine.

    PubMed

    Eissa, Tarek F; González-Burgos, Elena; Carretero, M Emilia; Gómez-Serranillos, M Pilar

    2014-09-01

    The Sinai desert in Egypt contains great variability in plants extensively used for traditional medicines such as Achillea fragrantissima, Chiliadenus montanus, Mentha longifolia and Haplophyllum tuberculatum. The essential oils extracted by hydrodistillation from the aerial parts have been analyzed. Subsequently, their potential protective activity against oxidative stress has been evaluated, employing H2O2 as oxidant inductor and astrocytes as the cell model. The chemical composition of the essential oils was analyzed by GC/MS. Most of the compounds identified in A. fragrantissima and M. longifolia samples were oxygenated monoterpene derivatives, whereas for H. tuberculatum they were monoterpenes hydrocarbons and oxygenated compounds, and for C. montanus oxygenated monoterpenes and oxygenated sesquiterpenes predominated. The in vitro evaluation of antioxidant properties, using ORAC assay, revealed that M. longifolia essential oil possessed the highest scavenging activity against peroxyl radicals, following by H. tuberculatum, A. fragrantissima and C. montanus. Under oxidative stress conditions, M. longifolia and H. tuberculatum essential oils were the only ones that protected human astrocytoma U373-MG cells against H2O2 damage. Both essential oils prevented cell death and inhibited ROS production caused by H2O2. M. longifolia essential oil was the most active, suggesting an interesting prevention role in those CNS disorders associated with oxidative stress. PMID:25918816

  1. Marine carotenoids and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Riccioni, Graziano

    2012-01-01

    Oxidative stress induced by reactive oxygen species plays an important role in the etiology of many diseases. Dietary phytochemical products, such as bioactive food components and marine carotenoids (asthaxantin, lutein, β-carotene, fucoxanthin), have shown an antioxidant effect in reducing oxidative markers stress. Scientific evidence supports the beneficial role of phytochemicals in the prevention of some chronic diseases. Many carotenoids with high antioxidant properties have shown a reduction in disease risk both in epidemiological studies and supplementation human trials. However, controlled clinical trials and dietary intervention studies using well-defined subjects population have not provided clear evidence of these substances in the prevention of diseases. The most important aspects of this special issue will cover the synthesis, biological activities, and clinical applications of marine carotenoids, with particular attention to recent evidence regarding anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory properties in the prevention of cardiovascular disease. PMID:22363224

  2. Marine Carotenoids and Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Riccioni, Graziano

    2012-01-01

    Oxidative stress induced by reactive oxygen species plays an important role in the etiology of many diseases. Dietary phytochemical products, such as bioactive food components and marine carotenoids (asthaxantin, lutein, β-carotene, fucoxanthin), have shown an antioxidant effect in reducing oxidative markers stress. Scientific evidence supports the beneficial role of phytochemicals in the prevention of some chronic diseases. Many carotenoids with high antioxidant properties have shown a reduction in disease risk both in epidemiological studies and supplementation human trials. However, controlled clinical trials and dietary intervention studies using well-defined subjects population have not provided clear evidence of these substances in the prevention of diseases. The most important aspects of this special issue will cover the synthesis, biological activities, and clinical applications of marine carotenoids, with particular attention to recent evidence regarding anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory properties in the prevention of cardiovascular disease. PMID:22363224

  3. Free radical activity of industrial fibers: role of iron in oxidative stress and activation of transcription factors.

    PubMed Central

    Gilmour, P S; Brown, D M; Beswick, P H; MacNee, W; Rahman, I; Donaldson, K

    1997-01-01

    We studied asbestos, vitreous fiber (MMVF10), and refractory ceramic fiber (RCF1) from the Thermal Insulation Manufacturers' Association fiber repository regarding the following: free radical damage to plasmid DNA, iron release, ability to deplete glutathione (GSH), and activate redox-sensitive transcription factors in macrophages. Asbestos had much more free radical activity than any of the man-made vitreous fibers. More Fe3+ was released than Fe2+ and more of both was released at pH 4.5 than at pH 7.2. Release of iron from the different fibers was generally not a good correlate of ability to cause free radical injury to the plasmid DNA. All fiber types caused some degree of oxidative stress, as revealed by depletion of intracellular GSH. Amosite asbestos upregulated nuclear binding of activator protein 1 transcription factor to a greater level than MMVF10 and RCF1; long-fiber amosite was the only fiber to enhance activation of the transcription factor nuclear factor kappa B (NF kappa B). The use of cysteine methyl ester and buthionine sulfoximine to modulate GSH suggested that GSH homeostasis was important in leading to activation of transcription factors. We conclude that the intrinsic free radical activity is the major determinant of transcription factor activation and therefore gene expression in alveolar macrophages. Although this was not related to iron release or ability to deplete macrophage GSH at 4 hr, GSH does play a role in activation of NF kappa B. Images Figure 1. Figure 5. A Figure 5. B Figure 6. A Figure 6. B PMID:9400744

  4. Oxidative Stress in Myopia

    PubMed Central

    Francisco, Bosch-Morell; Salvador, Mérida; Amparo, Navea

    2015-01-01

    Myopia affected approximately 1.6 billion people worldwide in 2000, and it is expected to increase to 2.5 billion by 2020. Although optical problems can be corrected by optics or surgical procedures, normal myopia and high myopia are still an unsolved medical problem. They frequently predispose people who have them to suffer from other eye pathologies: retinal detachment, glaucoma, macular hemorrhage, cataracts, and so on being one of the main causes of visual deterioration and blindness. Genetic and environmental factors have been associated with myopia. Nevertheless, lack of knowledge in the underlying physiopathological molecular mechanisms has not permitted an adequate diagnosis, prevention, or treatment to be found. Nowadays several pieces of evidence indicate that oxidative stress may help explain the altered regulatory pathways in myopia and the appearance of associated eye diseases. On the one hand, oxidative damage associated with hypoxia myopic can alter the neuromodulation that nitric oxide and dopamine have in eye growth. On the other hand, radical superoxide or peroxynitrite production damage retina, vitreous, lens, and so on contributing to the appearance of retinopathies, retinal detachment, cataracts and so on. The objective of this review is to suggest that oxidative stress is one of the key pieces that can help solve this complex eye problem. PMID:25922643

  5. OXIDATIVE STRESS PARTICIPATES IN ACUTE LUNG INJURY AND ACTIVATION OF MITOGEN ACTIVATED PROTEIN KINASES (MAPK) FOLLOWING AIR POLLUTION PARTICLE EXPOSURE (PM)

    EPA Science Inventory

    OXIDATIVE STRESS PARTICIPATES IN ACUTE LUNG INJURY AND ACTIVATION OF MITOGEN ACTIVATED PROTEIN KINASES (MAPK) FOLLOWING AIR POLLUTION PARTICLE EXPOSURE (PM). E S Roberts1, R Jaskot2, J Richards2, and K L Dreher2. 1College of Veterinary Medicine, NC State University, Raleigh, NC a...

  6. AMP Kinase Activation Alters Oxidant-Induced Stress Granule Assembly by Modulating Cell Signaling and Microtubule Organization.

    PubMed

    Mahboubi, Hicham; Koromilas, Antonis E; Stochaj, Ursula

    2016-10-01

    Eukaryotic cells assemble stress granules (SGs) when translation initiation is inhibited. Different cell signaling pathways regulate SG production. Particularly relevant to this process is 5'-AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), which functions as a stress sensor and is transiently activated by adverse physiologic conditions. Here, we dissected the role of AMPK for oxidant-induced SG formation. Our studies identified multiple steps of de novo SG assembly that are controlled by the kinase. Single-cell analyses demonstrated that pharmacological AMPK activation prior to stress exposure changed SG properties, because the granules became more abundant and smaller in size. These altered SG characteristics correlated with specific changes in cell survival, cell signaling, cytoskeletal organization, and the abundance of translation initiation factors. Specifically, AMPK activation increased stress-induced eukaryotic initiation factor (eIF) 2α phosphorylation and reduced the concentration of eIF4F complex subunits eIF4G and eIF4E. At the same time, the abundance of histone deacetylase 6 (HDAC6) was diminished. This loss of HDAC6 was accompanied by increased acetylation of α-tubulin on Lys40. Pharmacological studies further confirmed this novel AMPK-HDAC6 interplay and its importance for SG biology. Taken together, we provide mechanistic insights into the regulation of SG formation. We propose that AMPK activation stimulates oxidant-induced SG formation but limits their fusion into larger granules. PMID:27430620

  7. Mitochondrial activity and oxidative stress markers in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of patients with bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, and healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Gubert, Carolina; Stertz, Laura; Pfaffenseller, Bianca; Panizzutti, Bruna Schilling; Rezin, Gislaine Tezza; Massuda, Raffael; Streck, Emilio Luiz; Gama, Clarissa Severino; Kapczinski, Flávio; Kunz, Maurício

    2013-10-01

    Evidence suggests that mitochondrial dysfunction is involved in the pathophysiology of psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia (SZ) and bipolar disorder (BD). However, the exact mechanisms underlying this dysfunction are not well understood. Impaired activity of electron transport chain (ETC) complexes has been described in these disorders and may reflect changes in mitochondrial metabolism and oxidative stress markers. The objective of this study was to compare ETC complex activity and protein and lipid oxidation markers in 12 euthymic patients with BD type I, in 18 patients with stable chronic SZ, and in 30 matched healthy volunteers. Activity of complexes I, II, and III was determined by enzyme kinetics of mitochondria isolated from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Protein oxidation was evaluated using the protein carbonyl content (PCC) method, and lipid peroxidation, the thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) assay kit. A significant decrease in complex I activity was observed (p = 0.02), as well as an increase in plasma levels of TBARS (p = 0.00617) in patients with SZ when compared to matched controls. Conversely, no significant differences were found in complex I activity (p = 0.17) or in plasma TBARS levels (p = 0.26) in patients with BD vs. matched controls. Our results suggest that mitochondrial complex I dysfunction and oxidative stress play important roles in the pathophysiology of SZ and may be used in potential novel adjunctive therapy for SZ, focusing primarily on cognitive impairment and disorder progression. PMID:23870796

  8. Impaired Transcriptional Activity of Nrf2 in Age-Related Myocardial Oxidative Stress Is Reversible by Moderate Exercise Training

    PubMed Central

    Gounder, Sellamuthu S.; Kannan, Sankaranarayanan; Devadoss, Dinesh; Miller, Corey J.; Whitehead, Kevin S.; Odelberg, Shannon J.; Firpo, Matthew A.; Paine, Robert; Hoidal, John R.; Abel, E. Dale; Rajasekaran, Namakkal S.

    2012-01-01

    Aging promotes accumulation of reactive oxygen/nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) in cardiomyocytes, which leads to contractile dysfunction and cardiac abnormalities. These changes may contribute to increased cardiovascular disease in the elderly. Inducible antioxidant pathways are regulated by nuclear erythroid 2 p45-related factor 2 (Nrf2) through antioxidant response cis-elements (AREs) and are impaired in the aging heart. Whereas acute exercise stress (AES) activates Nrf2 signaling and promotes myocardial antioxidant function in young mice (∼2 months), aging mouse (>23 months) hearts exhibit significant oxidative stress as compared to those of the young. The purpose of this study was to investigate age-dependent regulation of Nrf2-antioxidant mechanisms and redox homeostasis in mouse hearts and the impact of exercise. Old mice were highly susceptible to oxidative stress following high endurance exercise stress (EES), but demonstrated increased adaptive redox homeostasis after moderate exercise training (MET; 10m/min, for 45 min/day) for ∼6 weeks. Following EES, transcription and protein levels for most of the ARE-antioxidants were increased in young mice but their induction was blunted in aging mice. In contrast, 6-weeks of chronic MET promoted nuclear levels of Nrf2 along with its target antioxidants in the aging heart to near normal levels as seen in young mice. These observations suggest that enhancing Nrf2 function and endogenous cytoprotective mechanisms by MET, may combat age-induced ROS/RNS and protect the myocardium from oxidative stress diseases. PMID:23029187

  9. Space flight and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Stein, T P

    2002-10-01

    Space flight is associated with an increase in oxidative stress after return to 1g. The effect is more pronounced after long-duration space flight. The effects lasts for several weeks after landing. In humans there is increased lipid peroxidation in erythrocyte membranes, reduction in some blood antioxidants, and increased urinary excretion of 8-iso-prostaglandin F(2alpha) and 8-oxo-7,8 dihydro-2 deoxyguanosine. Isoprostane 8-iso-prostaglandin F(2alpha) and 8-oxo-7,8 dihydro-2 deoxyguanosine are markers for oxidative damage to lipids and DNA, respectively. The changes have been attributed to a combination of the energy deficiency that occurs during flight and substrate competition for amino acids occurring between repleting muscle and other tissues during the recovery phase. The observations in humans have been complemented by rodent studies. Most rodent studies showed increased production of lipid peroxidation products postflight and decreased antioxidant enzyme activity postflight. The rodent observations were attributed to the stress associated with reentry into Earth's gravity. Decreasing the imbalance between the production of endogenous oxidant defenses and oxidant production by increasing the supply of dietary antioxidants may lessen the severity of the postflight increase in oxidative stress. PMID:12361781

  10. Space flight and oxidative stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stein, T. P.

    2002-01-01

    Space flight is associated with an increase in oxidative stress after return to 1g. The effect is more pronounced after long-duration space flight. The effects lasts for several weeks after landing. In humans there is increased lipid peroxidation in erythrocyte membranes, reduction in some blood antioxidants, and increased urinary excretion of 8-iso-prostaglandin F(2alpha) and 8-oxo-7,8 dihydro-2 deoxyguanosine. Isoprostane 8-iso-prostaglandin F(2alpha) and 8-oxo-7,8 dihydro-2 deoxyguanosine are markers for oxidative damage to lipids and DNA, respectively. The changes have been attributed to a combination of the energy deficiency that occurs during flight and substrate competition for amino acids occurring between repleting muscle and other tissues during the recovery phase. The observations in humans have been complemented by rodent studies. Most rodent studies showed increased production of lipid peroxidation products postflight and decreased antioxidant enzyme activity postflight. The rodent observations were attributed to the stress associated with reentry into Earth's gravity. Decreasing the imbalance between the production of endogenous oxidant defenses and oxidant production by increasing the supply of dietary antioxidants may lessen the severity of the postflight increase in oxidative stress.

  11. Ethanol metabolism and oxidative stress are required for unfolded protein response activation and steatosis in zebrafish with alcoholic liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Tsedensodnom, Orkhontuya; Vacaru, Ana M.; Howarth, Deanna L.; Yin, Chunyue; Sadler, Kirsten C.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Secretory pathway dysfunction and lipid accumulation (steatosis) are the two most common responses of hepatocytes to ethanol exposure and are major factors in the pathophysiology of alcoholic liver disease (ALD). However, the mechanisms by which ethanol elicits these cellular responses are not fully understood. Recent data indicates that activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR) in response to secretory pathway dysfunction can cause steatosis. Here, we examined the relationship between alcohol metabolism, oxidative stress, secretory pathway stress and steatosis using zebrafish larvae. We found that ethanol was immediately internalized and metabolized by larvae, such that the internal ethanol concentration in 4-day-old larvae equilibrated to 160 mM after 1 hour of exposure to 350 mM ethanol, with an average ethanol metabolism rate of 56 μmol/larva/hour over 32 hours. Blocking alcohol dehydrogenase 1 (Adh1) and cytochrome P450 2E1 (Cyp2e1), the major enzymes that metabolize ethanol, prevented alcohol-induced steatosis and reduced induction of the UPR in the liver. Thus, we conclude that ethanol metabolism causes ALD in zebrafish. Oxidative stress generated by Cyp2e1-mediated ethanol metabolism is proposed to be a major culprit in ALD pathology. We found that production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) increased in larvae exposed to ethanol, whereas inhibition of the zebrafish CYP2E1 homolog or administration of antioxidants reduced ROS levels. Importantly, these treatments also blocked ethanol-induced steatosis and reduced UPR activation, whereas hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) acted as a pro-oxidant that synergized with low doses of ethanol to induce the UPR. Collectively, these data demonstrate that ethanol metabolism and oxidative stress are conserved mechanisms required for the development of steatosis and hepatic dysfunction in ALD, and that these processes contribute to ethanol-induced UPR activation and secretory pathway stress in hepatocytes. PMID

  12. Novel recombinant human lactoferrin: differential activation of oxidative stress related gene expression.

    PubMed

    Kruzel, Marian L; Actor, Jeffrey K; Zimecki, Michał; Wise, Jasen; Płoszaj, Paulina; Mirza, Shaper; Kruzel, Mark; Hwang, Shen-An; Ba, Xueqing; Boldogh, Istvan

    2013-12-01

    Lactoferrin, an iron-binding protein found in high concentrations in mammalian exocrine secretions, is an important component of the host defense system. It is also a major protein of the secondary granules of neutrophils from which is released upon activation. Due to its potential clinical utility, recombinant human lactoferrin (rhLF) has been produced in various eukaryotic expression systems; however, none of these are fully compatible with humans. Most of the biopharmaceuticals approved by the FDA for use in humans are produced in mammalian expression systems. The Chinese hamster ovary cells (CHO) have become the system of choice for proteins that require post-translational modifications, such as glycoproteins. The aim of this study was to scale-up expression and purification of rhLF in a CHO expression system, verify its glycan primary structure, and assess its biological properties in cell culture models. A stable CHO cell line producing >200mg/L of rhLF was developed and established. rhLF was purified by a single-step cation-exchange chromatography procedure. The highly homogenous rhLF has a molecular weight of approximately 80 kDa. MALDI-TOF mass spectrometric analysis revealed N-linked, partially sialylated glycans at two glycosylation sites, typical for human milk LF. This novel rhLF showed a protective effect against oxidative stress in a similar manner to its natural counterpart. In addition, rhLF revealed a modulatory effect on cellular redox via upregulation of key antioxidant enzymes. These data imply that the CHO-derived rhLF is fully compatible with the native molecule, thus it has promise for human therapeutic applications. PMID:24070904

  13. Overexpression of Amyloid- β Protein Precursor Induces Mitochondrial Oxidative Stress and Activates the Intrinsic Apoptotic Cascade

    PubMed Central

    Bartley, Matthew G.; Marquardt, Kristin; Kirchhof, Danielle; Wilkins, Heather M.; Patterson, David; Linseman, Daniel A.

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a debilitating cognitive disorder which is characterized pathologically by amyloid-β plaques and neurofibrillary tangles. Aberrant processing of amyloid beta protein precursor (AβPP) into amyloid-β fragments underlies the formation of senile plaques. Moreover, amyloid-β fragments, particularly Aβ42, exert direct toxic effects within neurons including the induction of mitochondrial oxidative stress (MOS). Interestingly, individuals with Down Syndrome (DS) frequently develop early onset AD as a major co-morbid phenotype. One hypothesis for AD associated with DS involves the overexpression of wild type (WT) AβPP protein, due to its location on chromosome 21. However, the mechanism by which the overexpression of WT AβPP might trigger MOS and induce cell death is presently unclear. Here we show that transient overexpression of DsRed2-tagged AβPP (WT) in CHO cells induces the activation of caspase-3 and nuclear fragmentation indicative of apoptosis. AβPP localizes to the mitochondrial fraction of transfected CHO cells and its overexpression causes glutathione (GSH)-sensitive opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) and cytochrome c release. MOS and intrinsic apoptosis induced by AβPP were significantly inhibited by the co-expression of Bcl-2 or treatment with either GSH or Boc, a pan-caspase inhibitor. Furthermore, the mPTP inhibitor, cyclosporin A, also significantly protected CHO cells from apoptosis induced by AβPP overexpression. Finally, co-treatment with a β-secretase inhibitor did not significantly protect CHO cells from AβPP overexpression and Aβ42 levels were undetectable in transfected CHO cells. Therefore, the mechanism of AβPP induced MOS and apoptosis is independent of the production of Aβ42. However, a γ-secretase inhibitor showed significant protection of the CHO cells against AβPP overexpression. Thus, suggesting a possible role of the AβPP intracellular domain in this apoptotic

  14. Perindopril Attenuates Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Amyloidogenesis and Memory Impairment by Suppression of Oxidative Stress and RAGE Activation.

    PubMed

    Goel, Ruby; Bhat, Shahnawaz Ali; Hanif, Kashif; Nath, Chandishwar; Shukla, Rakesh

    2016-02-17

    Clinical and preclinical studies account hypertension as a risk factor for dementia. We reported earlier that angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibition attenuated the increased vulnerability to neurodegeneration in hypertension and prevented lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced memory impairment in normotensive wistar rats (NWRs) and spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs). Recently, a receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) has been reported to induce amyloid beta (Aβ1-42) deposition and memory impairment in hypertensive animals. However, the involvement of ACE in RAGE activation and amyloidogenesis in the hypertensive state is still unexplored. Therefore, in this study, we investigated the role of ACE on RAGE activation and amyloidogenesis in memory-impaired NWRs and SHRs. Memory impairment was induced by repeated (on days 1, 4, 7, and 10) intracerebroventricular (ICV) injections of LPS in SHRs (25 μg) and NWRs (50 μg). Our data showed that SHRs exhibited increased oxidative stress (increased gp91-phox/NOX-2 expression and ROS generation), RAGE, and β-secretase (BACE) expression without Aβ1-42 deposition. LPS (25 μg, ICV) further amplified oxidative stress, RAGE, and BACE activation, culminating in Aβ1-42 deposition and memory impairment in SHRs. Similar changes were observed at the higher dose of LPS (50 μg, ICV) in NWRs. Further, LPS-induced oxidative stress was associated with endothelial dysfunction and reduction in cerebral blood flow (CBF), more prominently in SHRs than in NWRs. Finally, we showed that perindopril (0.1 mg/kg, 15 days) prevented memory impairment by reducing oxidative stress, RAGE activation, amyloidogenesis, and improved CBF in both SHRs and NWRs. These findings suggest that perindopril might be used as a therapeutic strategy for the early stage of dementia. PMID:26689453

  15. Deteriorated Stress Response in Stationary-Phase Yeast: Sir2 and Yap1 Are Essential for Hsf1 Activation by Heat Shock and Oxidative Stress, Respectively

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Aviv; Bar-Nun, Shoshana

    2014-01-01

    Stationary-phase cultures have been used as an important model of aging, a complex process involving multiple pathways and signaling networks. However, the molecular processes underlying stress response of non-dividing cells are poorly understood, although deteriorated stress response is one of the hallmarks of aging. The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a valuable model organism to study the genetics of aging, because yeast ages within days and are amenable to genetic manipulations. As a unicellular organism, yeast has evolved robust systems to respond to environmental challenges. This response is orchestrated largely by the conserved transcription factor Hsf1, which in S. cerevisiae regulates expression of multiple genes in response to diverse stresses. Here we demonstrate that Hsf1 response to heat shock and oxidative stress deteriorates during yeast transition from exponential growth to stationary-phase, whereas Hsf1 activation by glucose starvation is maintained. Overexpressing Hsf1 does not significantly improve heat shock response, indicating that Hsf1 dwindling is not the major cause for Hsf1 attenuated response in stationary-phase yeast. Rather, factors that participate in Hsf1 activation appear to be compromised. We uncover two factors, Yap1 and Sir2, which discretely function in Hsf1 activation by oxidative stress and heat shock. In Δyap1 mutant, Hsf1 does not respond to oxidative stress, while in Δsir2 mutant, Hsf1 does not respond to heat shock. Moreover, excess Sir2 mimics the heat shock response. This role of the NAD+-dependent Sir2 is supported by our finding that supplementing NAD+ precursors improves Hsf1 heat shock response in stationary-phase yeast, especially when combined with expression of excess Sir2. Finally, the combination of excess Hsf1, excess Sir2 and NAD+ precursors rejuvenates the heat shock response. PMID:25356557

  16. Rosiglitazone causes cardiotoxicity via peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ-independent mitochondrial oxidative stress in mouse hearts.

    PubMed

    He, Huamei; Tao, Hai; Xiong, Hui; Duan, Sheng Zhong; McGowan, Francis X; Mortensen, Richard M; Balschi, James A

    2014-04-01

    This study aims to test the hypothesis that thiazolidinedione rosiglitazone (RSG), a selective peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) agonist, causes cardiotoxicity independently of PPARγ. Energy metabolism and mitochondrial function were measured in perfused hearts isolated from C57BL/6, cardiomyocyte-specific PPARγ-deficient mice, and their littermates. Cardiac function and mitochondrial oxidative stress were measured in both in vitro and in vivo settings. Treatment of isolated hearts with RSG at the supratherapeutic concentrations of 10 and 30 μM caused myocardial energy deficiency as evidenced by the decreases in [PCr], [ATP], ATP/ADP ratio, energy charge with a concomitant cardiac dysfunction as indicated by the decreases in left ventricular systolic pressure, rates of tension development and relaxation, and by an increase in end-diastolic pressure. When incubated with tissue homogenate or isolated mitochondria at these same concentrations, RSG caused mitochondrial dysfunction as evidenced by the decreases in respiration rate, substrate oxidation rates, and activities of complexes I and IV. RSG also increased complexes I- and III-dependent O₂⁻ production, decreased glutathione content, inhibited superoxide dismutase, and increased the levels of malondialdehyde, protein carbonyl, and 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine in mitochondria, consistent with oxidative stress. N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) 20 mM prevented RSG-induced above toxicity at those in vitro settings. Cardiomyocyte-specific PPARγ deletion and PPARγ antagonist GW9662 did not prevent the observed cardiotoxicity. Intravenous injection of 10 mg/kg RSG also caused cardiac dysfunction and oxidative stress, 600 mg/kg NAC antagonized these adverse effects. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that RSG at supratherapeutic concentrations causes cardiotoxicity via a PPARγ-independent mechanism involving oxidative stress-induced mitochondrial dysfunction in mouse hearts. PMID:24449420

  17. Cadmium induced cardiac oxidative stress in rats and its attenuation by GSP through the activation of Nrf2 signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Nazimabashir; Manoharan, Vaihundam; Miltonprabu, Selvaraj

    2015-12-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is one of the toxic heavy metals in the environment, which induces oxidative stress, dyslipidemia and membrane disturbances in heart. The present study was designed to evaluate the role of grape seed proanthocyanidins (GSP) against Cd induced oxidative stress mediated cardio-toxicity in rats. In this study, male Wistar rats were treated with Cd as cadmium chloride (CdCl2, 5 mg/ kg bw, PO) and pre-administered with GSP (100 mg/kg bw, PO) 90 min before the Cd intoxication for 4 weeks. Our results demonstrate a significant increase in the levels of cardiac troponins T and I (cTnT & I), cardiac serum markers, lipid peroxidative markers and plasma total cholesterol (TC), triglycerides (TG), phospholipids (PL) and free fatty acids (FFA). Cd induced oxidative stress decreased the levels of mitochondrial Krebs cycle enzymes as well as the respiratory chain enzyme activities and altered the levels of cardiac enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidants. The inflammatory (NF-kB, NO, TNF-α, IL-6), apoptotic markers (caspase 3, cytochrome C, Bax, Bcl-2), membrane bound ATPases and antioxidant Nrf2 (HO-1, keap1) markers were also measured in the control and experimental rats. All these alterations caused by Cd could be lessened by the pre-supplementation of GSP. The pre-administration of GSP significantly increased the activities of mitochondrial and respiratory chain enzymes, reduced the levels of cardio-oxidative stress markers in Cd-treated rats, which examines the stress stabilizing action of GSP. GSP also prevented the cytochrome C release, inhibited the caspase activation and maintained the ratio of Bcl-2/Bax by its free radical scavenging ability. Nrf2 expression was transiently increased while the impaired cardiac markers were restored near to their basal levels by the pre-treatment with GSP in Cd intoxicated rats. The cardioprotective nature of the GSP was further fortified by our light microscopic and ultra structural findings. Overall, our results suggest

  18. Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator Controls Lung Proteasomal Degradation and Nuclear Factor-κB Activity in Conditions of Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Boncoeur, Emilie; Roque, Telma; Bonvin, Elise; Saint-Criq, Vinciane; Bonora, Monique; Clement, Annick; Tabary, Olivier; Henrion-Caude, Alexandra; Jacquot, Jacky

    2008-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis is a lethal inherited disorder caused by mutations in a single gene encoding the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein, resulting in progressive oxidative lung damage. In this study, we evaluated the role of CFTR in the control of ubiquitin-proteasome activity and nuclear factor (NF)-κB/IκB-α signaling after lung oxidative stress. After a 64-hour exposure to hyperoxia-mediated oxidative stress, CFTR-deficient (cftr−/−) mice exhibited significantly elevated lung proteasomal activity compared with wild-type (cftr+/+) animals. This was accompanied by reduced lung caspase-3 activity and defective degradation of NF-κB inhibitor IκB-α. In vitro, human CFTR-deficient lung cells exposed to oxidative stress exhibited increased proteasomal activity and decreased NF-κB-dependent transcriptional activity compared with CFTR-sufficient lung cells. Inhibition of the CFTR Cl− channel by CFTRinh-172 in the normal bronchial immortalized cell line 16HBE14o− increased proteasomal degradation after exposure to oxidative stress. Caspase-3 inhibition by Z-DQMD in CFTR-sufficient lung cells mimicked the response profile of increased proteasomal degradation and reduced NF-κB activity observed in CFTR-deficient lung cells exposed to oxidative stress. Taken together, these results suggest that functional CFTR Cl− channel activity is crucial for regulation of lung proteasomal degradation and NF-κB activity in conditions of oxidative stress. PMID:18372427

  19. Carbon monoxide alleviates ethanol-induced oxidative damage and inflammatory stress through activating p38 MAPK pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yanyan; Gao, Chao; Shi, Yanru; Tang, Yuhan; Liu, Liang; Xiong, Ting; Du, Min; Xing, Mingyou; Liu, Liegang; Yao, Ping

    2013-11-15

    Stress-inducible protein heme oxygenase-1(HO-1) is well-appreciative to counteract oxidative damage and inflammatory stress involving the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver diseases (ALD). The potential role and signaling pathways of HO-1 metabolite carbon monoxide (CO), however, still remained unclear. To explore the precise mechanisms, ethanol-dosed adult male Balb/c mice (5.0 g/kg.bw.) or ethanol-incubated primary rat hepatocytes (100 mmol/L) were pretreated by tricarbonyldichlororuthenium (II) dimmer (CORM-2, 8 mg/kg for mice or 20 μmol/L for hepatocytes), as well as other pharmacological reagents. Our data showed that CO released from HO-1 induction by quercetin prevented ethanol-derived oxidative injury, which was abolished by CO scavenger hemoglobin. The protection was mimicked by CORM-2 with the attenuation of GSH depletion, SOD inactivation, MDA overproduction, and the leakage of AST, ALT or LDH in serum and culture medium induced by ethanol. Moreover, CORM-2 injection or incubation stimulated p38 phosphorylation and suppressed abnormal Tnfa and IL-6, accompanying the alleviation of redox imbalance induced by ethanol and aggravated by inflammatory factors. The protective role of CORM-2 was abolished by SB203580 (p38 inhibitor) but not by PD98059 (ERK inhibitor) or SP600125 (JNK inhibitor). Thus, HO-1 released CO prevented ethanol-elicited hepatic oxidative damage and inflammatory stress through activating p38 MAPK pathway, suggesting a potential therapeutic role of gaseous signal molecule on ALD induced by naturally occurring phytochemicals. - Highlights: • CO alleviated ethanol-derived liver oxidative and inflammatory stress in mice. • CO eased ethanol and inflammatory factor-induced oxidative damage in hepatocytes. • The p38 MAPK is a key signaling mechanism for the protective function of CO in ALD.

  20. Acute laminar shear stress reversibly increases human glomerular endothelial cell permeability via activation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase.

    PubMed

    Bevan, Heather S; Slater, Sadie C; Clarke, Hayley; Cahill, Paul A; Mathieson, Peter W; Welsh, Gavin I; Satchell, Simon C

    2011-10-01

    Laminar shear stress is a key determinant of systemic vascular behavior, including through activation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), but little is known of its role in the glomerulus. We confirmed eNOS expression by glomerular endothelial cells (GEnC) in tissue sections and examined effects of acute exposure (up to 24 h) to physiologically relevant levels of laminar shear stress (10-20 dyn/cm(2)) in conditionally immortalized human GEnC. Laminar shear stress caused an orientation of GEnC and stress fibers parallel to the direction of flow and induced Akt and eNOS phosphorylation along with NO production. Inhibition of the phophatidylinositol (PI)3-kinase/Akt pathway attenuated laminar shear stress-induced eNOS phosphorylation and NO production. Laminar shear stress of 10 dyn/cm(2) had a dramatic effect on GEnC permeability, reversibly decreasing the electrical resistance across GEnC monolayers. Finally, the laminar shear stress-induced reduction in electrical resistance was attenuated by the NOS inhibitors l-N(G)-monomethyl arginine (l-NMMA) and l-N(G)-nitroarginine methyl ester (l-NAME) and also by inhibition of the PI3-kinase/Akt pathway. Hence we have shown for GEnC in vitro that acute permeability responses to laminar shear stress are dependent on NO, produced via activation of the PI3-kinase/Akt pathway and increased eNOS phosphorylation. These results suggest the importance of laminar shear stress and NO in regulating the contribution of GEnC to the permeability properties of the glomerular capillary wall. PMID:21775480

  1. Induction of oxidative stress, lysosome activation and autophagy by nanoparticles in human brain-derived endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Halamoda Kenzaoui, Blanka; Chapuis Bernasconi, Catherine; Guney-Ayra, Seher; Juillerat-Jeanneret, Lucienne

    2012-02-01

    Different types of NPs (nanoparticles) are currently under development for diagnostic and therapeutic applications in the biomedical field, yet our knowledge about their possible effects and fate in living cells is still limited. In the present study, we examined the cellular response of human brain-derived endothelial cells to NPs of different size and structure: uncoated and oleic acid-coated iron oxide NPs (8-9 nm core), fluorescent 25 and 50 nm silica NPs, TiO2 NPs (21 nm mean core diameter) and PLGA [poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid)]-PEO [poly(ethylene oxide)] polymeric NPs (150 nm). We evaluated their uptake by the cells, and their localization, generation of oxidative stress and DNA-damaging effects in exposed cells. We show that NPs are internalized by human brain-derived endothelial cells; however, the extent of their intracellular uptake is dependent on the characteristics of the NPs. After their uptake by human brain-derived endothelial cells NPs are transported into the lysosomes of these cells, where they enhance the activation of lysosomal proteases. In brain-derived endothelial cells, NPs induce the production of an oxidative stress after exposure to iron oxide and TiO2 NPs, which is correlated with an increase in DNA strand breaks and defensive mechanisms that ultimately induce an autophagy process in the cells. PMID:22026563

  2. Nitric oxide-induced cellular stress and p53 activation in chronic inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Hofseth, Lorne J.; Saito, Shin'ichi; Hussain, S. Perwez; Espey, Michael G.; Miranda, Katrina M.; Araki, Yuzuru; Jhappan, Chamelli; Higashimoto, Yuichiro; He, Peijun; Linke, Steven P.; Quezado, Martha M.; Zurer, Irit; Rotter, Varda; Wink, David A.; Appella, Ettore; Harris, Curtis C.

    2003-01-01

    Free radical-induced cellular stress contributes to cancer during chronic inflammation. Here, we investigated mechanisms of p53 activation by the free radical, NO. NO from donor drugs induced both ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM)- and ataxia-telangiectasia mutated and Rad3-related-dependent p53 posttranslational modifications, leading to an increase in p53 transcriptional targets and a G2/M cell cycle checkpoint. Such modifications were also identified in cells cocultured with NO-releasing macrophages. In noncancerous colon tissues from patients with ulcerative colitis (a cancer-prone chronic inflammatory disease), inducible NO synthase protein levels were positively correlated with p53 serine 15 phosphorylation levels. Immunostaining of HDM-2 and p21WAF1 was consistent with transcriptionally active p53. Our study highlights a pivotal role of NO in the induction of cellular stress and the activation of a p53 response pathway during chronic inflammation. PMID:12518062

  3. Phorate-induced oxidative stress, DNA damage and transcriptional activation of p53 and caspase genes in male Wistar rats

    SciTech Connect

    Saquib, Quaiser; Attia, Sabry M.; Siddiqui, Maqsood A.; Aboul-Soud, Mourad A.M.; Al-Khedhairy, Abdulaziz A.; Giesy, John P.; Musarrat, Javed

    2012-02-15

    Male Wistar rats exposed to a systemic organophosphorus insecticide, phorate [O,O-diethyl S-[(ethylthio) methyl] phosphorothioate] at varying oral doses of 0.046, 0.092 or 0.184 mg phorate/kg bw for 14 days, exhibited substantial oxidative stress, cellular DNA damage and activation of apoptosis-related p53, caspase 3 and 9 genes. The histopathological changes including the pyknotic nuclei, inflammatory leukocyte infiltrations, renal necrosis, and cardiac myofiber degeneration were observed in the liver, kidney and heart tissues. Biochemical analysis of catalase and glutathione revealed significantly lesser activities of antioxidative enzymes and lipid peroxidation in tissues of phorate exposed rats. Furthermore, generation of intracellular reactive oxygen species and reduced mitochondrial membrane potential in bone marrow cells confirmed phorate-induced oxidative stress. Significant DNA damage was measured through comet assay in terms of the Olive tail moment in bone marrow cells of treated animals as compared to control. Cell cycle analysis also demonstrated the G{sub 2}/M arrest and appearance of a distinctive SubG{sub 1} peak, which signified induction of apoptosis. Up-regulation of tumor suppressor p53 and caspase 3 and 9 genes, determined by quantitative real-time PCR and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, elucidated the activation of intrinsic apoptotic pathways in response to cellular stress. Overall, the results suggest that phorate induces genetic alterations and cellular toxicity, which can adversely affect the normal cellular functioning in rats. -- Highlights: ► This is the first report on molecular toxicity of phorate in an in vivo test system. ► Phorate induces biochemical and histological changes in liver, kidney and heart. ► Rats treated with phorate exhibited DNA damage in bone marrow cells. ► Phorate induces apoptosis, oxidative stress and alters mitochondrial fluorescence. ► Phorate induces transcriptional changes and enhanced

  4. Assessment oxidative stress biomarkers and metal bioaccumulation in macroalgae from coastal areas with mining activities in Chile.

    PubMed

    Gaete Olivares, Hernán; Moyano Lagos, Natalia; Jara Gutierrez, Carlos; Carrasco Kittelsen, Romina; Lobos Valenzuela, Gabriela; Hidalgo Lillo, María Eliana

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect on seaweeds Scytosiphon lomentaria and Ulva rigida of coastal waters of sites with mining activity, using oxidative stress biomarkers and heavy metal determination both in water and in tissue. The greatest bioaccumulation factors in S. lomentaria and U. rigida were founded for iron and arsenic in Quintay. Bioaccumulation factor in S. lomentaria in descending order was Fe> Cu> Zn> Cd> Cr> As> Mo and in U. rigida, in descending order, was Fe> Cu> Cd> Zn> Cr> Mo> As. Both species had higher antioxidant activity levels in areas with high mining activities. The concentration of metals in waters such as copper and arsenic in S. lomentaria, and iron, arsenic, and cadmium in U. rigida were related with oxidative stress biomarkers measured in both species. The use of both species is proposed to monitor the bioavailability and oxidative damage in coastal areas with mining activity. This work will generate a significant knowledge about the impact of mining wastes on macroalgal community in the area of north-central Chile. PMID:26661961

  5. Effects of pristane alone or combined with chloroquine on macrophage activation, oxidative stress, and TH1/TH2 skewness.

    PubMed

    Ouyang, Qiufang; Huang, Ziyang; Wang, Zhenhua; Chen, Xiaoqing; Ni, Jingqin; Lin, Ling

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the protective role of chloroquine against pristane-induced macrophage activation, oxidative stress, and Th1/Th2 skewness in C57BL/6J mice. Those mice were treated with pristane alone or combined with chloroquine. Hematological and biochemical parameters, macrophage phagocytic function, the oxidant/antioxidant index, cytokine for IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-4, and IL-6, and the isotypes of IgG2a and IgG1 were determined. And the expression of T-bet/GATA-3 and IL-12/IL-10 mRNA in spleen were analyzed by real-time PCR. We found that pristane treatment for a period of 12 or 24 weeks triggered macrophage activation syndrome, characterized by hemophagocytosis in spleen and peripheral blood, enhanced lipid phagocytosis by peritoneal macrophages in vitro, erythropenia and leucopenia, increased anti-Smith, lactic dehydrogenase, triglyceride, and ferritin, as well as hypercytokinemia of IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-4, and IL-6. In parallel, a significant increase in lipid peroxidation and a decrease in superoxide dismutase, glutathione, and catalase activity, as well as a skewed Th1/Th2 balance in spleen, were observed. However, chloroquine supplementation showed a remarkable amelioration of these abnormalities. Our data indicate that pristane administration induces macrophage activation, oxidative stress, and Th1/Th2 skewness, which can be attenuated by chloroquine. PMID:25136646

  6. AMPK activation protects cells from oxidative stress-induced senescence via autophagic flux restoration and intracellular NAD(+) elevation.

    PubMed

    Han, Xiaojuan; Tai, Haoran; Wang, Xiaobo; Wang, Zhe; Zhou, Jiao; Wei, Xiawei; Ding, Yi; Gong, Hui; Mo, Chunfen; Zhang, Jie; Qin, Jianqiong; Ma, Yuanji; Huang, Ning; Xiang, Rong; Xiao, Hengyi

    2016-06-01

    AMPK activation is beneficial for cellular homeostasis and senescence prevention. However, the molecular events involved in AMPK activation are not well defined. In this study, we addressed the mechanism underlying the protective effect of AMPK on oxidative stress-induced senescence. The results showed that AMPK was inactivated in senescent cells. However, pharmacological activation of AMPK by metformin and berberine significantly prevented the development of senescence and, accordingly, inhibition of AMPK by Compound C was accelerated. Importantly, AMPK activation prevented hydrogen peroxide-induced impairment of the autophagic flux in senescent cells, evidenced by the decreased p62 degradation, GFP-RFP-LC3 cancellation, and activity of lysosomal hydrolases. We also found that AMPK activation restored the NAD(+) levels in the senescent cells via a mechanism involving mostly the salvage pathway for NAD(+) synthesis. In addition, the mechanistic relationship of autophagic flux and NAD(+) synthesis and the involvement of mTOR and Sirt1 activities were assessed. In summary, our results suggest that AMPK prevents oxidative stress-induced senescence by improving autophagic flux and NAD(+) homeostasis. This study provides a new insight for exploring the mechanisms of aging, autophagy and NAD(+) homeostasis, and it is also valuable in the development of innovative strategies to combat aging. PMID:26890602

  7. Morin modulates the oxidative stress-induced NF-kappaB pathway through its anti-oxidant activity.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji Min; Lee, Eun Kyeong; Park, Gwangli; Kim, Mi Kyung; Yokozawa, Takako; Yu, Byung Pal; Chung, Hae Young

    2010-04-01

    Morin is a flavone that has anti-inflammatory effects through a mechanism that is not well understood. Based on the extreme sensitive nature of the transcription factor, NF-kB to redox change, it is postulated that morin's anti-NF-kappaB activation likely depends on its ability to scavenge excessive reactive species [RS]. The present study assessed the extent of morin's ability to modulate RS-induced NF-kappaB activation through its scavenging activity. Results indicate that morin neutralized RS in vitro and inhibited t-BHP-induced RS generation. It also examined morin for suppressed redox-sensitive transcription factor NF-kappaB activation via reduced DNA binding activity, I kappaB alpha phosphorylation and p65/p50 nuclear translocation. The more important finding was that suppression of the NF-kappaB cascade by morin was modulated through the ERK and p38 MAPKs signal transduction pathways in endothelial cells. As a consequence, morin's anti-oxidant effect extended expression level of NF-kappaB dependent pro-inflammatory genes, thereby reducing COX-2, iNOS and 5-LOX. The data indicate that morin has strong anti-oxidative power against RS-induced NF-kappaB modulation through the ERK and p38 MAPKs signalling pathways by its RS scavenging activity. The significance of the current study is the new revelation that morin may have potential as an effective anti-inflammatory therapeutic agent. PMID:20187708

  8. Activation of Nrf2-mediated oxidative stress response in macrophages by hypochlorous acid

    SciTech Connect

    Pi Jingbo Zhang Qiang; Woods, Courtney G.; Wong, Victoria; Collins, Sheila; Andersen, Melvin E.

    2008-02-01

    Hypochlorous acid (HOCl), a potent oxidant generated when chlorine gas reacts with water, is important in the pathogenesis of many disorders. Transcription factor Nrf2-mediated antioxidant response represents a critical cellular defense mechanism that serves to maintain intracellular redox homeostasis and limit oxidative damage. In the present study, the effect of HOCl on Nrf2 activation was investigated in macrophages, one of the target cells of chlorine gas exposure. Exposure of RAW 264.7 macrophages to HOCl resulted in increased protein levels of Nrf2 in nuclear extractions, as well as a time- and dose-dependent increase in the expression of Nrf2 target genes, including heme oxygenase-1, NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO-1), glutamate cysteine ligase catalytic subunit (GCLC), and glutathione synthetase (GS). Additionally, intracellular glutathione (GSH), which is the prime scavenger for HOCl in cells, decreased within the first hour of HOCl exposure. The decline was followed by a GSH rebound that surpassed the initial basal levels by up to 4-fold. This reversal in GSH levels closely correlated with the gene expression profile of GCLC and GS. To study the mechanisms of Nrf2 activation in response to HOCl exposure, we examined the effects of several antioxidants on Nrf2-mediated response. Pretreatment with cell-permeable catalase, N-acetyl-L-cysteine or GSH-monoethyl ester markedly reduced expression of NQO-1 and GCLC under HOCl challenge conditions, suggesting intracellular ROS-scavenging capacity affects HOCl-induced Nrf2 activation. Importantly, pre-activation of Nrf2 with low concentrations of pro-oxidants protected the cells against HOCl-induced cell damage. Taken together, we provide direct evidence that HOCl activates Nrf2-mediated antioxidant response, which protects cells from oxidative damage.

  9. CNTF-ACM promotes mitochondrial respiration and oxidative stress in cortical neurons through upregulating L-type calcium channel activity.

    PubMed

    Sun, Meiqun; Liu, Hongli; Xu, Huanbai; Wang, Hongtao; Wang, Xiaojing

    2016-09-01

    A specialized culture medium termed ciliary neurotrophic factor-treated astrocyte-conditioned medium (CNTF-ACM) allows investigators to assess the peripheral effects of CNTF-induced activated astrocytes upon cultured neurons. CNTF-ACM has been shown to upregulate neuronal L-type calcium channel current activity, which has been previously linked to changes in mitochondrial respiration and oxidative stress. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate CNTF-ACM's effects upon mitochondrial respiration and oxidative stress in rat cortical neurons. Cortical neurons, CNTF-ACM, and untreated control astrocyte-conditioned medium (UC-ACM) were prepared from neonatal Sprague-Dawley rat cortical tissue. Neurons were cultured in either CNTF-ACM or UC-ACM for a 48-h period. Changes in the following parameters before and after treatment with the L-type calcium channel blocker isradipine were assessed: (i) intracellular calcium levels, (ii) mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm), (iii) oxygen consumption rate (OCR) and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) formation, (iv) intracellular nitric oxide (NO) levels, (v) mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, and (vi) susceptibility to the mitochondrial complex I toxin rotenone. CNTF-ACM neurons displayed the following significant changes relative to UC-ACM neurons: (i) increased intracellular calcium levels (p < 0.05), (ii) elevation in ΔΨm (p < 0.05), (iii) increased OCR and ATP formation (p < 0.05), (iv) increased intracellular NO levels (p < 0.05), (v) increased mitochondrial ROS production (p < 0.05), and (vi) increased susceptibility to rotenone (p < 0.05). Treatment with isradipine was able to partially rescue these negative effects of CNTF-ACM (p < 0.05). CNTF-ACM promotes mitochondrial respiration and oxidative stress in cortical neurons through elevating L-type calcium channel activity. PMID:27514537

  10. Lipotoxic brain microvascular injury is mediated by activating transcription factor 3-dependent inflammatory and oxidative stress pathways.

    PubMed

    Aung, Hnin Hnin; Altman, Robin; Nyunt, Tun; Kim, Jeffrey; Nuthikattu, Saivageethi; Budamagunta, Madhu; Voss, John C; Wilson, Dennis; Rutledge, John C; Villablanca, Amparo C

    2016-06-01

    Dysfunction of the cerebrovasculature plays an important role in vascular cognitive impairment (VCI). Lipotoxic injury of the systemic endothelium in response to hydrolyzed triglyceride-rich lipoproteins (TGRLs; TGRL lipolysis products) or a high-fat Western diet (WD) suggests similar mechanisms may be present in brain microvascular endothelium. We investigated the hypothesis that TGRL lipolysis products cause lipotoxic injury to brain microvascular endothelium by generating increased mitochondrial superoxide radical generation, upregulation of activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3)-dependent inflammatory pathways, and activation of cellular oxidative stress and apoptotic pathways. Human brain microvascular endothelial cells were treated with human TGRL lipolysis products that induced intracellular lipid droplet formation, mitochondrial superoxide generation, ATF3-dependent transcription of proinflammatory, stress response, and oxidative stress genes, as well as activation of proapoptotic cascades. Male apoE knockout mice were fed a high-fat/high-cholesterol WD for 2 months, and brain microvessels were isolated by laser capture microdissection. ATF3 gene transcription was elevated 8-fold in the hippocampus and cerebellar brain region of the WD-fed animals compared with chow-fed control animals. The microvascular injury phenotypes observed in vitro and in vivo were similar. ATF3 plays an important role in mediating brain microvascular responses to acute and chronic lipotoxic injury and may be an important preventative and therapeutic target for endothelial dysfunction in VCI. PMID:27087439

  11. Pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate inhibits UVB-induced skin inflammation and oxidative stress in hairless mice and exhibits antioxidant activity in vitro.

    PubMed

    Ivan, Ana L M; Campanini, Marcela Z; Martinez, Renata M; Ferreira, Vitor S; Steffen, Vinicius S; Vicentini, Fabiana T M C; Vilela, Fernanda M P; Martins, Frederico S; Zarpelon, Ana C; Cunha, Thiago M; Fonseca, Maria J V; Baracat, Marcela M; Georgetti, Sandra R; Verri, Waldiceu A; Casagrande, Rúbia

    2014-09-01

    Ultraviolet B (UVB) irradiation may cause oxidative stress- and inflammation-dependent skin cancer and premature aging. Pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC) is an antioxidant and inhibits nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activation. In the present study, the mechanisms of PDTC were investigated in cell free oxidant/antioxidant assays, in vivo UVB irradiation in hairless mice and UVB-induced NFκB activation in keratinocytes. PDTC presented the ability to scavenge 2,2'-azinobis-(3-ethyl benzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) radical (ABTS), 2,2-diphenyl-1-picryl-hydrazyl radical (DPPH) and hydroxyl radical (OH); and also efficiently inhibited iron-dependent and -independent lipid peroxidation as well as chelated iron. In vivo, PDTC treatment significantly decreased UVB-induced skin edema, myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, production of the proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-1β (IL-1β), matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), increase of reduced glutathione (GSH) levels and antioxidant capacity of the skin tested by the ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) and ABTS assays. PDTC also reduced UVB-induced IκB degradation in keratinocytes. These results demonstrate that PDTC presents antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects in vitro, which line up well with the PDTC inhibition of UVB irradiation-induced skin inflammation and oxidative stress in mice. These data suggest that treatment with PDTC may be a promising approach to reduce UVB irradiation-induced skin damages and merits further pre-clinical and clinical studies. PMID:24927233

  12. Fumigant Activity of the Psidium guajava Var. Pomifera (Myrtaceae) Essential Oil in Drosophila melanogaster by Means of Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Pinho, Antonio Ivanildo; Wallau, Gabriel Luz; Nunes, Mauro Eugenio Medina; Leite, Nadghia Figueiredo; Tintino, Saulo Relison; da Cruz, Litiele Cezar; da Cunha, Francisco Assis Bezerra; da Costa, José Galberto Martins; Douglas Melo Coutinho, Henrique; Posser, Thais

    2014-01-01

    The guava fruit, Psidium guajava var. pomifera (Myrtaceae family), is a native plant from South America. Its leaves and fruits are widely used in popular medicine in tropical and subtropical countries. Drosophila melanogaster has been used as one of the main model organisms in genetic studies since the 1900s. The extensive knowledge about this species makes it one of the most suitable organisms to study many aspects of toxic compound effects. Due to the lack of studies on the effects of the bioactive compounds present in the P. guajava var. pomifera essential oil, we performed a phytochemical characterization by CG-MS and evaluated the toxicity induced by the essential oil in the D. melanogaster insect model. In order to understand the biochemical mechanisms of toxicity, changes on the Nrf2 signaling as well as hallmarks of oxidative stress response were followed in the exposed flies. Our results showed that exposure of insects to the P. guajava oil increased mortality and locomotor deficits in parallel with an oxidative stress response signaling. Therefore, it suggested a bioinsecticidal activity for P. guajava volatile compounds by means of oxidative stress. Further studies are ongoing to identify which oil compounds are responsible for such effect. PMID:25478063

  13. Mechanisms underlying the exquisite sensitivity of Candida albicans to combinatorial cationic and oxidative stress that enhances the potent fungicidal activity of phagocytes.

    PubMed

    Kaloriti, Despoina; Jacobsen, Mette; Yin, Zhikang; Patterson, Miranda; Tillmann, Anna; Smith, Deborah A; Cook, Emily; You, Tao; Grimm, Melissa J; Bohovych, Iryna; Grebogi, Celso; Segal, Brahm H; Gow, Neil A R; Haynes, Ken; Quinn, Janet; Brown, Alistair J P

    2014-01-01

    Immune cells exploit reactive oxygen species (ROS) and cationic fluxes to kill microbial pathogens, such as the fungus Candida albicans. Yet, C. albicans is resistant to these stresses in vitro. Therefore, what accounts for the potent antifungal activity of neutrophils? We show that simultaneous exposure to oxidative and cationic stresses is much more potent than the individual stresses themselves and that this combinatorial stress kills C. albicans synergistically in vitro. We also show that the high fungicidal activity of human neutrophils is dependent on the combinatorial effects of the oxidative burst and cationic fluxes, as their pharmacological attenuation with apocynin or glibenclamide reduced phagocytic potency to a similar extent. The mechanistic basis for the extreme potency of combinatorial cationic plus oxidative stress--a phenomenon we term stress pathway interference--lies with the inhibition of hydrogen peroxide detoxification by the cations. In C. albicans this causes the intracellular accumulation of ROS, the inhibition of Cap1 (a transcriptional activator that normally drives the transcriptional response to oxidative stress), and altered readouts of the stress-activated protein kinase Hog1. This leads to a loss of oxidative and cationic stress transcriptional outputs, a precipitous collapse in stress adaptation, and cell death. This stress pathway interference can be suppressed by ectopic catalase (Cat1) expression, which inhibits the intracellular accumulation of ROS and the synergistic killing of C. albicans cells by combinatorial cationic plus oxidative stress. Stress pathway interference represents a powerful fungicidal mechanism employed by the host that suggests novel approaches to potentiate antifungal therapy. Importance: The immune system combats infection via phagocytic cells that recognize and kill pathogenic microbes. Human neutrophils combat Candida infections by killing this fungus with a potent mix of chemicals that includes

  14. Inversed relationship between CD44 variant and c-Myc due to oxidative stress-induced canonical Wnt activation

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshida, Go J. Saya, Hideyuki

    2014-01-10

    Highlights: •CD44 variant8–10 and c-Myc are inversely expressed in gastric cancer cells. •Redox-stress enhances c-Myc expression via canonical Wnt signal. •CD44v, but not CD44 standard, suppresses redox stress-induced Wnt activation. •CD44v expression promotes both transcription and proteasome degradation of c-Myc. •Inversed expression pattern between CD44v and c-Myc is often recognized in vivo. -- Abstract: Cancer stem-like cells express high amount of CD44 variant8-10 which protects cancer cells from redox stress. We have demonstrated by immunohistochemical analysis and Western blotting, and reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction, that CD44 variant8-10 and c-Myc tend to show the inversed expression manner in gastric cancer cells. That is attributable to the oxidative stress-induced canonical Wnt activation, and furthermore, the up-regulation of the downstream molecules, one of which is oncogenic c-Myc, is not easily to occur in CD44 variant-positive cancer cells. We have also found out that CD44v8-10 expression is associated with the turn-over of the c-Myc with the experiments using gastric cancer cell lines. This cannot be simply explained by the model of oxidative stress-induced Wnt activation. CD44v8-10-positive cancer cells are enriched at the invasive front. Tumor tissue at the invasive area is considered to be composed of heterogeneous cellular population; dormant cancer stem-like cells with CD44v8-10 {sup high}/ Fbw7 {sup high}/ c-Myc {sup low} and proliferative cancer stem-like cells with CD44v8-10 {sup high}/ Fbw7 {sup low}/ c-Myc {sup high}.

  15. D-Methionine attenuated cisplatin-induced vestibulotoxicity through altering ATPase activities and oxidative stress in guinea pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, P.-W.; Liu, S.-H.; Young, Y.-H.; Lin-Shiau, Shoei-Yn . E-mail: syl@ha.mc.ntu.edu.tw

    2006-09-01

    Cisplatin has been used as a chemotherapeutic agent to treat many kinds of malignancies. Its damage to the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) system has been reported. However, the underlying biochemical change in the inner ear or central vestibular nervous system is not fully understood. In this study, we attempted to examine whether cisplatin-induced vestibulotoxicity and D-methionine protection were correlated with the changes of ATPase activities and oxidative stress of ampullary tissue of vestibules as well as cerebellar cortex (the inhibitory center of VOR system) of guinea pigs. By means of a caloric test coupled with electronystagmographic recordings, we found that cisplatin exposure caused a dose-dependent (1, 3, or 5 mg/kg) vestibular dysfunction as revealed by a decrease of slow phase velocity (SPV). In addition, cisplatin significantly inhibited the Na{sup +}, K{sup +}-ATPase and Ca{sup 2+}-ATPase activities in the ampullary tissue with a good dose-response relationship but not those of cerebellar cortex. Regression analysis indicated that a decrease of SPV was well correlated with the reduction of Na{sup +}, K{sup +}-ATPase and Ca{sup 2+}-ATPase activities of the ampullary tissue. D-Methionine (300 mg/kg) reduced both abnormalities of SPV and ATPase activities in a correlated manner. Moreover, cisplatin exposure led to a significant dose-dependent increase of lipid peroxidation and nitric oxide concentrations of the vestibules, which could be significantly suppressed by D-methionine. However, cisplatin did not alter the levels of lipid peroxidation and nitric oxide of the cerebellum. In conclusion, cisplatin inhibited ATPase activities and increased oxidative stress in guinea pig vestibular labyrinths. D-Methionine attenuated cisplatin-induced vestibulotoxicity associated with ionic disturbance through its antioxidative property.

  16. Caspase-like enzymatic activity and the ascorbate-glutathione cycle participate in salt stress tolerance of maize conferred by exogenously applied nitric oxide

    PubMed Central

    Keyster, Marshall; Klein, Ashwil; Ludidi, Ndiko

    2012-01-01

    Salinity stress causes ionic stress (mainly from high Na+ and Cl- levels) and osmotic stress (as a result of inhibition of water uptake by roots and amplified water loss from plant tissue), resulting in cell death and inhibition of growth and ultimately adversely reducing crop productivity. In this report, changes in root nitric oxide content, shoot and root biomass, root H2O2 content, root lipid peroxidation, root cell death, root caspase-like enzymatic activity, root antioxidant enzymatic activity and root ascorbate and glutathione contents/redox states were investigated in maize (Zea mays L. cv Silverking) after long-term (21 d) salt stress (150 mM NaCl) with or without exogenously applied nitric oxide generated from the nitric oxide donor 2,2′-(Hydroxynitrosohydrazano)bis-ethane. In addition to reduced shoot and root biomass, salt stress increased the nitric oxide and H2O2 contents in the maize roots and resulted in elevated lipid peroxidation, caspase-like activity and cell death in the roots. Altered antioxidant enzymatic activities, along with changes in ascorbate and glutathione contents/redox status were observed in the roots in response to salt stress. The detrimental effects of salt stress in the roots were reversed by exogenously applied nitric oxide. These results demonstrate that exogenously applied nitric oxide confers salt stress tolerance in maize by reducing salt stress-induced oxidative stress and caspase-like activity through a process that limits accumulation of reactive oxygen species via enhanced antioxidant enzymatic activity. PMID:22476534

  17. Aerobic exercise training improves oxidative stress and ubiquitin proteasome system activity in heart of spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    de Andrade, Luiz Henrique Soares; de Moraes, Wilson Max Almeida Monteiro; Matsuo Junior, Eduardo Hiroshi; de Orleans Carvalho de Moura, Elizabeth; Antunes, Hanna Karen Moreira; Montemor, Jairo; Antonio, Ednei Luiz; Bocalini, Danilo Sales; Serra, Andrey Jorge; Tucci, Paulo José Ferreira; Brum, Patricia Chakur; Medeiros, Alessandra

    2015-04-01

    The activity of the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) and the level of oxidative stress contribute to the transition from compensated cardiac hypertrophy to heart failure in hypertension. Moreover, aerobic exercise training (AET) is an important therapy for the treatment of hypertension, but its effects on the UPS are not completely known. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of AET on UPS's activity and oxidative stress level in heart of spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). A total of 53 Wistar and SHR rats were randomly divided into sedentary and trained groups. The AET protocol was 5×/week in treadmill for 13 weeks. Exercise tolerance test, non-invasive blood pressure measurement, echocardiographic analyses, and left ventricle hemodynamics were performed during experimental period. The expression of ubiquitinated proteins, 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE), Akt, phospho-Akt(ser473), GSK3β, and phospho-GSK3β(ser9) were analyzed by western blotting. The evaluation of lipid hydroperoxide concentration was performed using the xylenol orange method, and the proteasomal chymotrypsin-like activity was measured by fluorimetric assay. Sedentary hypertensive group presented cardiac hypertrophy, unaltered expression of total Akt, phospho-Akt, total GSK3β and phospho-GSK3β, UPS hyperactivity, increased lipid hydroperoxidation as well as elevated expression of 4-HNE but normal cardiac function. In contrast, AET significantly increased exercise tolerance, decreased resting systolic blood pressure and heart rate in hypertensive animals. In addition, the AET increased phospho-Akt expression, decreased phospho-GSK3β, and did not alter the expression of total Akt, total GSK3β, and ubiquitinated proteins, however, significantly attenuated 4-HNE levels, lipid hydroperoxidation, and UPS's activity toward normotensive group levels. Our results provide evidence for the main effect of AET on attenuating cardiac ubiquitin proteasome hyperactivity and oxidative stress in SHR

  18. Quercus infectoria galls possess antioxidant activity and abrogates oxidative stress-induced functional alterations in murine macrophages.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Gurpreet; Athar, Mohammad; Alam, M Sarwar

    2008-02-15

    The present study reports the antioxidant activity of ethanolic extract of Quercus infectoria galls. The antioxidant potency of galls was investigated employing several established in vitro model systems. Their protective efficacy on oxidative modulation of murine macrophages was also explored. Gall extract was found to contain a large amount of polyphenols and possess a potent reducing power. HPTLC analysis of the extract suggested it to contain 19.925% tannic acid (TA) and 8.75% gallic acid (GA). The extract potently scavenged free radicals including DPPH (IC(50)~0.5 microg/ml), ABTS (IC(50)~1 microg/ml), hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) (IC(50)~2.6 microg/ml) and hydroxyl (*OH) radicals (IC(50)~6 microg/ml). Gall extract also chelated metal ions and inhibited Fe(3+) -ascorbate-induced oxidation of protein and peroxidation of lipids. Exposure of rat peritoneal macrophages to tertiary butyl hydroperoxide (tBOOH) induced oxidative stress in them and altered their phagocytic functions. These macrophages showed elevated secretion of lysosomal hydrolases, and attenuated phagocytosis and respiratory burst. Activity of macrophage mannose receptor (MR) also diminished following oxidant exposure. Pretreatment of macrophages with gall extract preserved antioxidant armory near to control values and significantly protected against all the investigated functional mutilations. MTT assay revealed gall extract to enhance percent survival of tBOOH exposed macrophages. These results indicate that Q. infectoria galls possess potent antioxidant activity, when tested both in chemical as well as biological models. PMID:18076871

  19. Antifungal Activity of Fused Mannich Ketones Triggers an Oxidative Stress Response and Is Cap1-Dependent in Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Rossignol, Tristan; Kocsis, Béla; Bouquet, Orsolya; Kustos, Ildikó; Kilár, Ferenc; Nyul, Adrien; Jakus, Péter B.; Rajbhandari, Kshitij; Prókai, László; d’Enfert, Christophe; Lóránd, Tamás

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the antifungal activity of fused Mannich ketone (FMK) congeners and two of their aminoalcohol derivatives. In particular, FMKs with five-membered saturated rings were shown to have minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC90s) ranging from 0.8 to 6 µg/mL toward C. albicans and the closely related C. parapsilosis and C. krusei while having reduced efficacy toward C. glabrata and almost no efficacy against Aspergillus sp. Transcript profiling of C. albicans cells exposed for 30 or 60 min to 2-(morpholinomethyl)-1-indanone, a representative FMK with a five-membered saturated ring, revealed a transcriptional response typical of oxidative stress and similar to that of a C. albicans Cap1 transcriptional activator. Consistently, C. albicans lacking the CAP1 gene was hypersensitive to this FMK, while C. albicans strains overexpressing CAP1 had decreased sensitivity to 2-(morpholinomethyl)-1-indanone. Quantitative structure–activity relationship studies revealed a correlation of antifungal potency and the energy of the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital of FMKs and unsaturated Mannich ketones thereby implicating redox cycling-mediated oxidative stress as a mechanism of action. This conclusion was further supported by the loss of antifungal activity upon conversion of representative FMKs to aminoalcohols that were unable to participate in redox cycles. PMID:23646117

  20. Acetaldehyde Induces Cytotoxicity of SH-SY5Y Cells via Inhibition of Akt Activation and Induction of Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Tingting; Zhao, Yan; Zhang, Xia

    2016-01-01

    Excessive alcohol consumption can lead to brain tissue damage and cognitive dysfunction. It has been shown that heavy drinking is associated with an earlier onset of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease. Acetaldehyde, the most toxic metabolite of ethanol, is speculated to mediate the brain tissue damage and cognitive dysfunction induced by the chronic excessive consumption of alcohol. However, the exact mechanisms by which acetaldehyde induces neurotoxicity are not totally understood. In this study, we investigated the cytotoxic effects of acetaldehyde in SH-SY5Y cells and found that acetaldehyde induced apoptosis of SH-SY5Y cells by downregulating the expression of antiapoptotic Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL and upregulating the expression of proapoptotic Bax. Acetaldehyde treatment led to a significant decrease in the levels of activated Akt and cyclic AMP-responsive element binding protein (CREB). In addition, acetaldehyde induced the activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) while inhibiting the activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERKs, p44/p42MAPK). Meanwhile, acetaldehyde treatment caused an increase in the production of reactive oxygen species and elevated the oxidative stress in SH-SY5Y cells. Therefore, acetaldehyde induces cytotoxicity of SH-SY5Y cells via promotion of apoptotic signaling, inhibition of cell survival pathway, and induction of oxidative stress. PMID:26649137

  1. Oxidative stress and hepatic stellate cell activation are key events in arsenic induced liver fibrosis in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Ghatak, Subhadip; Biswas, Ayan; Dhali, Gopal Krishna; Chowdhury, Abhijit; Boyer, James L.; Santra, Amal

    2011-02-15

    Arsenic is an environmental toxicant and carcinogen. Exposure to arsenic is associated with development of liver fibrosis and portal hypertension through ill defined mechanisms. We evaluated hepatic fibrogenesis after long term arsenic exposure in a murine model. BALB/c mice were exposed to arsenic by daily gavages of 6 {mu}g/gm body weight for 1 year and were evaluated for markers of hepatic oxidative stress and fibrosis, as well as pro-inflammatory, pro-apoptotic and pro-fibrogenic factors at 9 and 12 months. Hepatic NADPH oxidase activity progressively increased in arsenic exposure with concomitant development of hepatic oxidative stress. Hepatic steatosis with occasional collection of mononuclear inflammatory cells and mild portal fibrosis were the predominant liver lesion observed after 9 months of arsenic exposure, while at 12 months, the changes included mild hepatic steatosis, inflammation, necrosis and significant fibrosis in periportal areas. The pathologic changes in the liver were associated with markers of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) activation, matrix reorganization and fibrosis including {alpha}-smooth muscle actin, transforming growth factor-{beta}1, PDGF-R{beta}, pro-inflammatory cytokines and enhanced expression of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 and pro({alpha}) collagen type I. Moreover, pro-apoptotic protein Bax was dominantly expressed and Bcl-2 was down-regulated along with increased number of TUNEL positive hepatocytes in liver of arsenic exposed mice. Furthermore, HSCs activation due to increased hepatic oxidative stress observed after in vivo arsenic exposure was recapitulated in co-culture model of isolated HSCs and hepatocytes exposed to arsenic. These findings have implications not only for the understanding of the pathology of arsenic related liver fibrosis but also for the design of preventive strategies in chronic arsenicosis.

  2. BRCA1 and Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Yong Weon; Kang, Hyo Jin; Bae, Insoo

    2014-01-01

    The breast cancer susceptibility gene 1 (BRCA1) has been well established as a tumor suppressor and functions primarily by maintaining genome integrity. Genome stability is compromised when cells are exposed to oxidative stress. Increasing evidence suggests that BRCA1 regulates oxidative stress and this may be another mechanism in preventing carcinogenesis in normal cells. Oxidative stress caused by reactive oxygen species (ROS) is implicated in carcinogenesis and is used strategically to treat human cancer. Thus, it is essential to understand the function of BRCA1 in oxidative stress regulation. In this review, we briefly summarize BRCA1’s many binding partners and mechanisms, and discuss data supporting the function of BRCA1 in oxidative stress regulation. Finally, we consider its significance in prevention and/or treatment of BRCA1-related cancers. PMID:24704793

  3. Effects of increased temperature on metabolic activity and oxidative stress in the first life stages of marble trout (Salmo marmoratus).

    PubMed

    Simčič, Tatjana; Jesenšek, Dušan; Brancelj, Anton

    2015-08-01

    Climate change may result in future alterations in thermal regime which could markedly affect the early developmental stages of cold water fish due to their expected high sensitivity to increasing temperature. In the present study, the effect of temperature increase of 2, 4 and 6°C on the oxygen consumption rate (R), the activity of respiratory electron transport system (ETS) and oxidative stress have been studied in four developmental stages of the marble trout (Salmo marmoratus)-eyed eggs, yolk-sac larvae and juveniles of 1 and 3 months. Oxygen consumption rate and ETS activity increased with level of development and with temperature in all four stages. ETS/R ratios decreased during development and correlated with temperature in eyed eggs, larvae and juveniles of 1 month, but not in juveniles of 3 months. Low ETS/R ratios at higher temperatures indicate stress response in eyed eggs, the most temperature sensitive developmental stage. Catalase (CAT) and glutathione reductase (GR) activities increased during development, but responded differently to elevated temperature in the different developmental stages. Stress in eyed eggs, caused by higher temperatures, resulted in increased oxygen consumption rate and increased activities of CAT and GR. Larvae were sensitive to increased temperature only at the highest experimental temperature of 16°C. Increased temperature did not stress the metabolism of the juveniles, since they were able to compensate their metabolic activity. The earlier developmental stages of marble trout are thus more sensitive to temperature increase than juveniles and therefore more endangered by higher water temperatures. This is the first report connecting oxygen consumption, ETS activity and ETS/R ratio with the activities of antioxidant enzymes in relation to increased temperature in salmonids. PMID:25935664

  4. Redox-sensitive TP53INP1 SUMOylation as an oxidative stress sensor to activate TP53

    PubMed Central

    Bonacci, Thomas; Peuget, Sylvain; Soubeyran, Philippe; Iovanna, Juan; Dusetti, Nelson J

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress-induced sumoylation of TP53INP1 (tumor protein p53-induced nuclear protein 1) is essential to enhance the TP53 response. Sumoylation of TP53INP1 on the K113 residue, which is mediated by protein inhibitor of activated STAT 3 (PIAS3) and chromobox homolog 4 (CBX4) and removed by SUMO1/sentrin specific peptidase (SENP1, 2 and 6), favors its interaction with TP53 in the nucleus and enhances TP53-induced gene expression. PMID:27308354

  5. Coal and tire burning mixtures containing ultrafine and nanoparticulate materials induce oxidative stress and inflammatory activation in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Gasparotto, Juciano; Somensi, Nauana; Caregnato, Fernanda F; Rabelo, Thallita K; DaBoit, Kátia; Oliveira, Marcos L S; Moreira, José C F; Gelain, Daniel P

    2013-10-01

    Ultra-fine and nano-particulate materials resulting from mixtures of coal and non-coal fuels combustion for power generation release to the air components with toxic potential. We evaluated toxicological and inflammatory effects at cellular level that could be induced by ultrafine/nanoparticles-containing ashes from burning mixtures of coal and tires from an American power plant. Coal fly ashes (CFA) samples from the combustion of high-S coal and tire-derived fuel, the latter about 2-3% of the total fuel feed, in a 100-MW cyclone utility boiler, were suspended in the cell culture medium of RAW 264.7 macrophages. Cell viability, assessed by MTT reduction, SRB incorporation and contrast-phase microscopy analysis demonstrated that CFA did not induce acute toxicity. However, CFA at 1mg/mL induced an increase of approximately 338% in intracellular TNF-α, while release of this proinflammatory cytokine was increased by 1.6-fold. The expression of the inflammatory mediator CD40 receptor was enhanced by 2-fold, the receptor for advanced glycation endproducts (RAGE) had a 5.7-fold increase and the stress response protein HSP70 was increased nearly 12-fold by CFA at 1mg/mL. Although CFA did not induce cell death, parameters of oxidative stress and reactive species production were found to be altered at several degrees, such as nitrite accumulation (22% increase), DCFH oxidation (3.5-fold increase), catalase (5-fold increase) and superoxide dismutase (35% inhibition) activities, lipoperoxidation (4.2 fold-increase) and sulfhydryl oxidation (40% decrease in free SH groups). The present results suggest that CFA containing ultra-fine and nano-particulate materials from coal and tire combustion may induce sub-chronic cell damage, as they alter inflammatory and oxidative stress parameters at the molecular and cellular levels, but do not induce acute cell death. PMID:23856402

  6. Crocin, the main active saffron constituent, mitigates dichlorvos-induced oxidative stress and apoptosis in HCT-116 cells.

    PubMed

    Ben Salem, Intidhar; Boussabbeh, Manel; Kantaoui, Hiba; Bacha, Hassen; Abid-Essefi, Salwa

    2016-08-01

    The protective effects of Crocin (CRO), a carotenoid with wide spectrum of pharmacological effects, against the cytotoxicity and the apoptosis produced by exposure to Dichlorvos (DDVP) in HCT116 cells were investigated in this work. The cytotoxicity was monitored by cell viability, ROS generation, antioxidant enzymes activities, malondialdehyde (MDA) production and DNA fragmentation. The apoptosis was assessed through the measurement of the mitochondrial transmembrane potential (ΔΨm) and caspases activation. The results indicated that pretreatment of HCT116 cells with CRO, 2h prior to DDVP exposure, significantly increased the survival of cells, inhibited the ROS generation, modulated the activities of catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) and reduced the MDA level. The reduction in mitochondrial membrane potential, DNA fragmentation and caspases activation were also inhibited by CRO. These findings suggest that CRO can protect HCT116 cells from DDVP-induced oxidative stress and apoptosis. PMID:27470340

  7. Middle age aggravates myocardial ischemia through surprising upholding of complex II activity, oxidative stress, and reduced coronary perfusion.

    PubMed

    Mourmoura, Evangelia; Leguen, Marie; Dubouchaud, Hervé; Couturier, Karine; Vitiello, Damien; Lafond, Jean-Luc; Richardson, Melanie; Leverve, Xavier; Demaison, Luc

    2011-09-01

    Aging compromises restoration of the cardiac mechanical function during reperfusion. We hypothesized that this was due to an ampler release of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS). This study aimed at characterising ex vivo the mitochondrial ROS release during reperfusion in isolated perfused hearts of middle-aged rats. Causes and consequences on myocardial function of the observed changes were then evaluated. The hearts of rats aged 10- or 52-week old were subjected to global ischemia followed by reperfusion. Mechanical function was monitored throughout the entire procedure. Activities of the respiratory chain complexes and the ratio of aconitase to fumarase activities were determined before ischemia and at the end of reperfusion. H(2)O(2) release was also evaluated in isolated mitochondria. During ischemia, middle-aged hearts displayed a delayed contracture, suggesting a maintained ATP production but also an increased metabolic proton production. Restoration of the mechanical function during reperfusion was however reduced in the middle-aged hearts, due to lower recovery of the coronary flow associated with higher mitochondrial oxidative stress indicated by the aconitase to fumarase ratio in the cardiac tissues. Surprisingly, activity of the respiratory chain complex II was better maintained in the hearts of middle-aged animals, probably because of an enhanced preservation of its membrane lipid environment. This can explain the higher mitochondrial oxidative stress observed in these conditions, since cardiac mitochondria produce much more H(2)O(2) when they oxidize FADH(2)-linked substrates than when they use NADH-linked substrates. In conclusion, the lower restoration of the cardiac mechanical activity during reperfusion in the middle-aged hearts was due to an impaired recovery of the coronary flow and an insufficient oxygen supply. The deterioration of the coronary perfusion was explained by an increased mitochondrial ROS release related to the

  8. Evaluation of Delta-Aminolevulinic Dehydratase Activity, Oxidative Stress Biomarkers, and Vitamin D Levels in Patients with Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Polachini, Carla Roberta Nunes; Spanevello, Roselia Maria; Zanini, Daniela; Baldissarelli, Jucimara; Pereira, Luciane Belmonte; Schetinger, Maria Rosa Chitolina; da Cruz, Ivana Beatrice Mânica; Assmann, Charles Elias; Bagatini, Margarete Dulce; Morsch, Vera Maria

    2016-02-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune neurological disorder of unknown etiology. Oxidative stress and alterations in vitamin D levels have been implicated in the pathophysiology of MS. The aim of this study was to investigate δ-aminolevulinate dehydratase (δ-ALA-D) activity as well as the levels of vitamin D, lipid peroxidation levels, carbonyl protein content, DNA damage, superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) activities, and the vitamin C, vitamin E, and non-protein thiol (NPSH) content in samples from patients with the relapsing-remitting form of MS (RRMS). The study population consisted of 29 RRMS patients and 29 healthy subjects. Twelve milliliters of blood was obtained from each individual and used for biochemical determinations. The results showed that δ-ALA-D and CAT activities were significantly increased, while SOD activity was decreased in the whole blood of RRMS patients compared to the control group (P < 0.05). In addition, we observed a significant increase in lipid peroxidation, carbonyl protein levels in serum and damaged DNA in leucocytes in RRMS patients compared with the control group (P < 0.05). Nonetheless, the levels of vitamin C, vitamin E, NPSH, and vitamin D were significantly decreased in RRMS patients in relation to the healthy individuals (P < 0.05). In conclusion, our results suggested that the increase in δ-ALA-D activity may be related to the inflammatory and immune process in MS in an attempt to maintain the cellular metabolism and reduce oxidative stress. Moreover, the alterations in the oxidant/antioxidant balance and lower vitamin D levels may contribute to the pathophysiology of MS. PMID:26690779

  9. Oxidative stress in Alzheimer disease

    PubMed Central

    Durany, Nuria

    2009-01-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is a progressive dementia affecting a large proportion of the aging population. The histopathological changes in AD include neuronal cell death, formation of amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles. There is also evidence that brain tissue in patients with AD is exposed to oxidative stress (e.g., protein oxidation, lipid oxidation, DNA oxidation and glycoxidation) during the course of the disease. Advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) are present in amyloid plaques in AD, and its extracellular accumulation may be caused by an accelerated oxidation of glycated proteins. AGEs participate in neuronal death causing direct (chemical) and indirect (cellular) free radical production and consequently increase oxidative stress. The development of drugs for the treatment of AD that breaks the vicious cycles of oxidative stress and neurodegeneration offer new opportunities. These approaches include AGE-inhibitors, antioxidants and anti-inflammatory substances, which prevent free radical production. PMID:19372765

  10. Caffeine impacts in the clam Ruditapes philippinarum: Alterations on energy reserves, metabolic activity and oxidative stress biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Diogo; Almeida, Ângela; Calisto, Vânia; Esteves, Valdemar I; Schneider, Rudolf J; Wrona, Frederick J; Soares, Amadeu M V M; Figueira, Etelvina; Freitas, Rosa

    2016-10-01

    Caffeine is known to be one of the most consumed psychoactive drugs. For this reason, caffeine is continuously released into the environment with potential impacts on inhabiting organisms. The current study evaluated the biochemical alterations induced in the clam species Ruditapes philippinarum after exposure for 28 days to caffeine (0.5, 3.0 and 18.0 μg/L). The results obtained showed that, with the increasing caffeine concentrations, an increase in clams defense mechanisms (such as antioxidant and biotransformation enzymes activity) was induced which was accompanied by an increase in protein content. Nevertheless, although an increase on defense mechanisms was observed, clams were not able to prevent cells from lipid peroxidation that increased with the increase of caffeine concentration. Furthermore, with the increase of exposure concentrations, clams increased their metabolic activity (measured by electron transport activity), reducing their energy reserves (glycogen content), to fight against oxidative stress. Overall, the present study demonstrated that caffeine may impact bivalves, even at environmentally relevant concentrations, inducing oxidative stress in organisms. The present study is an important contribution to address knowledge gaps regarding the impacts of long-term exposures to pharmaceuticals since most of the studies assessed the effects after acute exposures, most of them up to 96 h. PMID:27367177

  11. Styrene induces an inflammatory response in human lung epithelial cells via oxidative stress and NF-{kappa}B activation

    SciTech Connect

    Roeder-Stolinski, Carmen Fischaeder, Gundula Oostingh, Gertie Janneke Feltens, Ralph Kohse, Franziska; Bergen, Martin von Moerbt, Nora Eder, Klaus Duschl, Albert Lehmann, Irina

    2008-09-01

    Styrene is a volatile organic compound (VOC) that is widely used as a solvent in many industrial settings. Chronic exposure to styrene can result in irritation of the mucosa of the upper respiratory tract. Contact of styrene with epithelial cells stimulates the expression of a variety of inflammatory mediators, including the chemotactic cytokine monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1). To characterise the underlying mechanisms of the induction of inflammatory signals by styrene, we investigated the influence of this compound on the induction of oxidative stress and the activation of the nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-{kappa}B) signalling pathway in human lung epithelial cells (A549). The results demonstrate that styrene-induced MCP-1 expression, as well as the expression of the oxidative stress marker glutathione S-transferase (GST), is associated with a concentration dependent pattern of NF-{kappa}B activity. An inhibitor of NF-{kappa}B, IKK-NBD, and the anti-inflammatory antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC) were both effective in suppressing styrene-induced MCP-1 secretion. In addition, NAC was capable of inhibiting the upregulation of GST expression. Our findings suggest that the activation of the NF-{kappa}B signalling pathway by styrene is mediated via a redox-sensitive mechanism.

  12. Salvianolic acid A protects RPE cells against oxidative stress through activation of Nrf2/HO-1 signaling.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui; Liu, Yuan-yuan; Jiang, Qin; Li, Ke-ran; Zhao, Yu-xia; Cao, Cong; Yao, Jin

    2014-04-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) impair the physiological functions of retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells, which is known as one major cause of age-related macular degeneration. Salvianolic acid A (Sal A) is the main effective aqueous extract of Salvia miltiorrhiza. The aim of this study was to test the potential role of Sal A against oxidative stress in cultured RPE cells and to investigate the underlying mechanistic signaling pathways. We observed that Sal A significantly inhibited hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced primary and transformed RPE cell death and apoptosis. H2O2-stimulated mitogen-activated protein kinase activation, ROS production, and subsequent proapoptotic AMP-activated protein kinase activation were largely inhibited by Sal A. Further, Sal A stimulation resulted in a fast and dramatic activation of Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling, followed by phosphorylation, accumulation, and nuclear translocation of the NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), along with increased expression of the antioxidant-response element-dependent gene heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). Both Nrf2 and HO-1 were required for Sal A-mediated cytoprotective effect, as Nrf2/HO-1 inhibition abolished Sal A-induced beneficial effects against H2O2. Meanwhile, the PI3K/Akt/mTORC1 chemical inhibitors not only suppressed Sal A-induced Nrf2/HO-1 activation, but also eliminated its cytoprotective effect in RPE cells. These observations suggest that Sal A activates the Nrf2/HO-1 axis in RPE cells and protects against oxidative stress via activation of Akt/mTORC1 signaling. PMID:24486344

  13. Zinc oxide and titanium dioxide nanoparticles induce oxidative stress, inhibit growth, and attenuate biofilm formation activity of Streptococcus mitis.

    PubMed

    Khan, Shams Tabrez; Ahmad, Javed; Ahamed, Maqusood; Musarrat, Javed; Al-Khedhairy, Abdulaziz A

    2016-06-01

    Streptococcus mitis from the oral cavity causes endocarditis and other systemic infections. Rising resistance against traditional antibiotics amongst oral bacteria further aggravates the problem. Therefore, antimicrobial and antibiofilm activities of zinc oxide and titanium dioxide nanoparticles (NPs) synthesized and characterized during this study against S. mitis ATCC 6249 and Ora-20 were evaluated in search of alternative antimicrobial agents. ZnO and TiO2-NPs exhibited an average size of 35 and 13 nm, respectively. The IC50 values of ZnO and TiO2-NPs against S. mitis ATCC 6249 were 37 and 77 µg ml(-1), respectively, while the IC50 values against S. mitis Ora-20 isolate were 31 and 53 µg ml(-1), respectively. Live and dead staining, biofilm formation on the surface of polystyrene plates, and extracellular polysaccharide production show the same pattern. Exposure to these nanoparticles also shows an increase (26-83 %) in super oxide dismutase (SOD) activity. Three genes, namely bapA1, sodA, and gtfB like genes from these bacteria were identified and sequenced for quantitative real-time PCR analysis. An increase in sodA gene (1.4- to 2.4-folds) levels and a decrease in gtfB gene (0.5- to 0.9-folds) levels in both bacteria following exposure to ZnO and TiO2-NPs were observed. Results presented in this study verify that ZnO-NPs and TiO2-NPs can control the growth and biofilm formation activities of these strains at very low concentration and hence can be used as alternative antimicrobial agents for oral hygiene. PMID:26837748

  14. Potential benefits of physical activity during pregnancy for the reduction of gestational diabetes prevalence and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Cid, Marcela; González, Marcelo

    2016-03-01

    Changes in quality of nutrition, habits, and physical activity in modern societies increase susceptibility to obesity, which can deleteriously affect pregnancy outcome. In particular, a sedentary lifestyle causes dysfunction in blood flow, which impacts the cardiovascular function of pregnant women. The main molecular mechanism responsible for this effect is the synthesis and bioavailability of nitric oxide, a phenomenon regulated by the antioxidant capacity of endothelial cells. These alterations affect the vascular health of the mother and vascular performance of the placenta, the key organ responsible for the healthy development of the fetus. In addition to the increases in systemic vascular resistance in the mother, placental oxidative stress also affects the feto-placental blood flow. These changes can be integrated into the proteomics and metabolomics of newborns. PMID:26833143

  15. Hypoglycemic activity of Gymnema sylvestre extracts on oxidative stress and antioxidant status in diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Kang, Myung-Hwa; Lee, Min Sun; Choi, Mi-Kyeong; Min, Kwan-Sik; Shibamoto, Takayuki

    2012-03-14

    Diabetes mellitus, which is associated with oxidative damage, has a significant impact on health, quality of life, and life expectancy. An ethanol extract of Gymnema sylvestre leaf was examined in vitro and in vivo to investigate the role of antioxidants in diabetic rats. The extract exhibited strong antioxidant activity in the assays, including TBA (56%), SOD-like (92%), and ABTS (54%). Blood glucose levels in the diabetic rats fed G. sylvestre extract decreased to normal levels. The presence of the antihyperglycemic compounds gymnemagenin and gymnemic acids in G. sylvestre extract was detected by LC/MS analysis. Lipid peroxidation levels were decreased by 31.7% in serum, 9.9% in liver, and 9.1% in kidney in the diabetic rats fed the extract. Feeding G. sylvestre extract to the diabetic rats decreased the activity of glutathione peroxidase in cytosolic liver and glutamate pyruvate transaminase in serum to normal levels. PMID:22360666

  16. p66Shc, oxidative stress and aging

    PubMed Central

    Pinton, Paolo; Rizzuto, Rosario

    2009-01-01

    The 66 KDa isoform of Shc and its signalling properties have attracted in the past years major interest in aging research. Here, we summarize p66Shc functions and outline a specific signalling route leading to mitochondrial import, that accounts for its pro-apoptotic activity upon oxidative stress. This model, that could explain the alterations of mitochondrial Ca2+ homeostasis observed after oxidative stress, highlights novel pharmacological targets in age-related disorders. PMID:18235239

  17. Effect of sodium chloride and cadmium on the growth, oxidative stress and antioxidant enzyme activities of Zygosaccharomyces rouxii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chunsheng; Xu, Ying; Jiang, Wei; Lv, Xin; Dong, Xiaoyan

    2014-06-01

    Zygosaccharomyces rouxii is a salt-tolerant yeast species capable of removing cadmium (Cd) pollutant from aqueous solution. Presently, the physiological characteristics of Z. rouxii under the stress of sodium chloride (NaCl) and Cd are poorly understood. This study investigated the effects of NaCl and Cd on the growth, oxidative stress and antioxidant enzyme activities of Z. rouxii after stress treatment for 24 h. Results showed that NaCl or Cd alone negatively affected the growth of Z. rouxii, but the growth-inhibiting effect of Cd on Z. rouxii was reduced in the presence of NaCl. Flow cytometry assay showed that under Cd stress, NaCl significantly reduced the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and cell death of Z. rouxii compared with those in the absence of NaCl. The activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and peroxidase (POD) of Z. rouxii were significantly enhanced by 2%-6% NaCl, which likely contributed to the high salt tolerance of Z. rouxii. The POD activity was inhibited by 20 mg L-1 Cd while the SOD and CAT activities were enhanced by 8 mg L-1 Cd and inhibited by 20 mg L-1 or 50 mg L-1 Cd. The inhibitory effect of high-level Cd on the antioxidant enzyme activities of Z. rouxii was counteracted by the combined use of NaCl, especially at 6%. This probably accounted for the decrease in Cd-induced ROS production and cell death of Z. rouxii after incubation with NaCl and Cd. Our work provided physiological clues as to the use of Z. rouxii as a biosorbent for Cd removal from seawater and liquid highly salty food.

  18. Mechanisms Underlying the Delayed Activation of the Cap1 Transcription Factor in Candida albicans following Combinatorial Oxidative and Cationic Stress Important for Phagocytic Potency

    PubMed Central

    Kos, Iaroslava; Patterson, Miranda J.; Znaidi, Sadri; Kaloriti, Despoina; da Silva Dantas, Alessandra; Herrero-de-Dios, Carmen M.; d’Enfert, Christophe; Brown, Alistair J. P.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Following phagocytosis, microbes are exposed to an array of antimicrobial weapons that include reactive oxygen species (ROS) and cationic fluxes. This is significant as combinations of oxidative and cationic stresses are much more potent than the corresponding single stresses, triggering the synergistic killing of the fungal pathogen Candida albicans by “stress pathway interference.” Previously we demonstrated that combinatorial oxidative plus cationic stress triggers a dramatic increase in intracellular ROS levels compared to oxidative stress alone. Here we show that activation of Cap1, the major regulator of antioxidant gene expression in C. albicans, is significantly delayed in response to combinatorial stress treatments and to high levels of H2O2. Cap1 is normally oxidized in response to H2O2; this masks the nuclear export sequence, resulting in the rapid nuclear accumulation of Cap1 and the induction of Cap1-dependent genes. Here we demonstrate that following exposure of cells to combinatorial stress or to high levels of H2O2, Cap1 becomes trapped in a partially oxidized form, Cap1OX-1. Notably, Cap1-dependent gene expression is not induced when Cap1 is in this partially oxidized form. However, while Cap1OX-1 readily accumulates in the nucleus and binds to target genes following high-H2O2 stress, the nuclear accumulation of Cap1OX-1 following combinatorial H2O2 and NaCl stress is delayed due to a cationic stress-enhanced interaction with the Crm1 nuclear export factor. These findings define novel mechanisms that delay activation of the Cap1 transcription factor, thus preventing the rapid activation of the stress responses vital for the survival of C. albicans within the host. PMID:27025253

  19. Nutritional strategies to modulate inflammation and oxidative stress pathways via activation of the master antioxidant switch Nrf2.

    PubMed

    Cardozo, Ludmila F M F; Pedruzzi, Liliana M; Stenvinkel, Peter; Stockler-Pinto, Milena B; Daleprane, Julio B; Leite, Maurilo; Mafra, Denise

    2013-08-01

    The nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) plays an important role in cellular protection against cancer, renal, pulmonary, cardiovascular and neurodegenerative diseases where oxidative stress and inflammation are common conditions. The Nrf2 regulates the expression of detoxifying enzymes by recognizing the human Antioxidant Response Element (ARE) binding site and it can regulate antioxidant and anti-inflammatory cellular responses, playing an important protective role on the development of the diseases. Studies designed to investigate how effective Nrf2 activators or modulators are need to be initiated. Several recent studies have shown that nutritional compounds can modulate the activation of Nrf2-Keap1 system. This review aims to discuss some of the key nutritional compounds that promote the activation of Nrf2, which may have impact on the human health. PMID:23643732

  20. Etiologies of sperm oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Sabeti, Parvin; Pourmasumi, Soheila; Rahiminia, Tahereh; Akyash, Fatemeh; Talebi, Ali Reza

    2016-01-01

    Sperm is particularly susceptible to reactive oxygen species (ROS) during critical phases of spermiogenesis. However, the level of seminal ROS is restricted by seminal antioxidants which have beneficial effects on sperm parameters and developmental potentials. Mitochondria and sperm plasma membrane are two major sites of ROS generation in sperm cells. Besides, leukocytes including polymer phonuclear (PMN) leukocytes and macrophages produce broad category of molecules including oxygen free radicals, non-radical species and reactive nitrogen species. Physiological role of ROS increase the intracellular cAMP which then activate protein kinase in male reproductive system. This indicates that spermatozoa need small amounts of ROS to acquire the ability of nuclear maturation regulation and condensation to fertilize the oocyte. There is a long list of intrinsic and extrinsic factors which can induce oxidative stress to interact with lipids, proteins and DNA molecules. As a result, we have lipid peroxidation, DNA fragmentation, axonemal damage, denaturation of the enzymes, over generation of superoxide in the mitochondria, lower antioxidant activity and finally abnormal spermatogenesis. If oxidative stress is considered as one of the main cause of DNA damage in the germ cells, then there should be good reason for antioxidant therapy in these conditions. PMID:27351024

  1. Etiologies of sperm oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Sabeti, Parvin; Pourmasumi, Soheila; Rahiminia, Tahereh; Akyash, Fatemeh; Talebi, Ali Reza

    2016-04-01

    Sperm is particularly susceptible to reactive oxygen species (ROS) during critical phases of spermiogenesis. However, the level of seminal ROS is restricted by seminal antioxidants which have beneficial effects on sperm parameters and developmental potentials. Mitochondria and sperm plasma membrane are two major sites of ROS generation in sperm cells. Besides, leukocytes including polymer phonuclear (PMN) leukocytes and macrophages produce broad category of molecules including oxygen free radicals, non-radical species and reactive nitrogen species. Physiological role of ROS increase the intracellular cAMP which then activate protein kinase in male reproductive system. This indicates that spermatozoa need small amounts of ROS to acquire the ability of nuclear maturation regulation and condensation to fertilize the oocyte. There is a long list of intrinsic and extrinsic factors which can induce oxidative stress to interact with lipids, proteins and DNA molecules. As a result, we have lipid peroxidation, DNA fragmentation, axonemal damage, denaturation of the enzymes, over generation of superoxide in the mitochondria, lower antioxidant activity and finally abnormal spermatogenesis. If oxidative stress is considered as one of the main cause of DNA damage in the germ cells, then there should be good reason for antioxidant therapy in these conditions. PMID:27351024

  2. Activation of the Nrf2-regulated antioxidant cell response inhibits HEMA-induced oxidative stress and supports cell viability.

    PubMed

    Gallorini, Marialucia; Petzel, Christine; Bolay, Carola; Hiller, Karl-Anton; Cataldi, Amelia; Buchalla, Wolfgang; Krifka, Stephanie; Schweikl, Helmut

    2015-07-01

    Oxidative stress due to increased formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in target cells of dental resin monomers like 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) is a major mechanism underlying the disturbance of vital cell functions including mineralization and differentiation, responses of the innate immune system, and the induction of cell death via apoptosis. Although a shift in the equilibrium between cell viability and apoptosis is related to the non-enzymatic antioxidant glutathione (GSH) in HEMA-exposed cells, the major mechanisms of adaptive antioxidant cell responses to maintain cellular redox homeostasis are still unknown. The present study provides insight into the induction of a communicating network of pathways under the control of the redox-sensitive transcription factor Nrf2, a major transcriptional activator of genes coding for enzymatic antioxidants. Here, oxidative stress was indicated by DCF fluorescence in cells after a short exposure (1 h) to HEMA, while DHR123 fluorescence significantly increased about 1.8-fold after a long exposure period (24 h) showing the formation of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). The corresponding expression of Nrf2 was activated immediately after HEMA exposure (1 h) and remained constant up to 24 h. Nrf2-regulated expression of enzymes of the glutathione metabolism (glutathione peroxidase 1/2, glutathione reductase) decreased in HEMA-exposed cells as a result of GSH depletion, and superoxide dismutase expression was downregulated after H2O2 overproduction. However, the expression of Nrf2-controlled enzymatic antioxidants (catalase, peroxiredoxin, thioredoxin 1, thioredoxin reductase, heme oxygenase-1) and the NADPH-regenerating system (glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase, transaldolase) was increased. Phenolic tert-butylhydroquinone (tBHQ), a classic inducer of the Nrf2 pathway, reduced oxidative stress and protected cells from HEMA-induced cell death through a shift in the number of cells in necrosis to apoptosis. The

  3. Experimental study on apoptosis of TNFR1 receptor pro-endothelial progenitor cells activated by high glucose induced oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yong; Xei, Fei; Xu, Xiong-Fei; Zeng, Hong; He, Hu-Qiang; Zhang, Lei; Zheng, Ying-Qiang; He, Yan-Zheng

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate whether high glucose in vitro activating TNFR1 and further promote rat marrow endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) apoptosis. Methods: Rat morrow endothelial progenitor cells were cultured and identified by Confocal Microscopy; then were treated with high glucose (5.5, 15, 30, 60 mmol/L), mannitol (15, 30, 60, 90 mmol/L), high glucose + Tempol and high glucose+ MAB430. Apoptosis rate of the above cells were detected by flow cytometry. ROS and MDA level and anti-O2- were detected by colorimetric technique; the expression level of TNFR1 induced signal pathway related proteins were detected by Western blotting. Results: High glucose can induce endothelial progenitor cells apoptosis, which is mostly in the later stage (72 h-96 h) instead of the earlier stage (24 h-48 h); high glucose can also induce oxidative stress reaction and the produces ROS and MDA increase significantly in the later stage (after 72 h), but anti-O2- decrease significantly. TNF apoptosis signal pathway related protein expression level not increase in the earlier stage (before 24 h) but increase significantly in the later stage (after 72 h). Tempol and MAB430 down-regulate TNF apoptosis signal pathway related protein expression and reduce EPCs apoptosis. Conclusion: High glucose activates the TNFR1 of TPCs through oxidative stress reaction and further induces cell apoptosis. PMID:26884909

  4. Effect of Proline-Containing Oligopeptides PGP and RGP on Proliferative and Protein-Synthesizing Activity of Cultured Pulmonary Fibroblasts under Conditions of Oxidative Stress.

    PubMed

    Tolstenok, I V; Fleishman, M Yu; Sazonova, E N; Lebed'ko, O A; Maltseva, I M; Myasoedov, N F; Timoshin, S S

    2016-05-01

    We studied the effect of glyprolines Pro-Gly-Pro (PGP) and Arg-Gly-Pro (RGP) on the primary culture of pulmonary fibroblasts from newborn albino rats under normal conditions and during oxidative stress. Under physiological conditions, the peptides had no effect on parameters of cell division. Hydrogen peroxide induced intensive oxidative stress accompanied by suppression of protein-synthesizing function. When hydrogen peroxide was added to the culture containing the test peptides, correction of the oxidative status was observed accompanied by activation of DNA-synthesizing activity and inhibition of lucigenin-dependent chemiluminescence. PMID:27265140

  5. Biological Activities of Reactive Oxygen and Nitrogen Species: Oxidative Stress versus Signal Transduction

    PubMed Central

    Weidinger, Adelheid; Kozlov, Andrey V.

    2015-01-01

    In the past, reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) were shown to cause oxidative damage to biomolecules, contributing to the development of a variety of diseases. However, recent evidence has suggested that intracellular RONS are an important component of intracellular signaling cascades. The aim of this review was to consolidate old and new ideas on the chemical, physiological and pathological role of RONS for a better understanding of their properties and specific activities. Critical consideration of the literature reveals that deleterious effects do not appear if only one primary species (superoxide radical, nitric oxide) is present in a biological system, even at high concentrations. The prerequisite of deleterious effects is the formation of highly reactive secondary species (hydroxyl radical, peroxynitrite), emerging exclusively upon reaction with another primary species or a transition metal. The secondary species are toxic, not well controlled, causing irreversible damage to all classes of biomolecules. In contrast, primary RONS are well controlled (superoxide dismutase, catalase), and their reactions with biomolecules are reversible, making them ideal for physiological/pathophysiological intracellular signaling. We assume that whether RONS have a signal transducing or damaging effect is primarily defined by their quality, being primary or secondary RONS, and only secondly by their quantity. PMID:25884116

  6. Leptin Induces Oxidative Stress Through Activation of NADPH Oxidase in Renal Tubular Cells: Antioxidant Effect of L-Carnitine.

    PubMed

    Blanca, Antonio J; Ruiz-Armenta, María V; Zambrano, Sonia; Salsoso, Rocío; Miguel-Carrasco, José L; Fortuño, Ana; Revilla, Elisa; Mate, Alfonso; Vázquez, Carmen M

    2016-10-01

    Leptin is a protein involved in the regulation of food intake and in the immune and inflammatory responses, among other functions. Evidences demonstrate that obesity is directly associated with high levels of leptin, suggesting that leptin may directly link obesity with the elevated cardiovascular and renal risk associated with increased body weight. Adverse effects of leptin include oxidative stress mediated by activation of NADPH oxidase. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of L-carnitine (LC) in rat renal epithelial cells (NRK-52E) exposed to leptin in order to generate a state of oxidative stress characteristic of obesity. Leptin increased superoxide anion (O2 (•) -) generation from NADPH oxidase (via PI3 K/Akt pathway), NOX2 expression and nitrotyrosine levels. On the other hand, NOX4 expression and hydrogen peroxide (H2 O2 ) levels diminished after leptin treatment. Furthermore, the expression of antioxidant enzymes, catalase, and superoxide dismutase, was altered by leptin, and an increase in the mRNA expression of pro-inflammatory factors was also found in leptin-treated cells. LC restored all changes induced by leptin to those levels found in untreated cells. In conclusion, stimulation of NRK-52E cells with leptin induced a state of oxidative stress and inflammation that could be reversed by preincubation with LC. Interestingly, LC induced an upregulation of NOX4 and restored the release of its product, hydrogen peroxide, which suggests a protective role of NOX4 against leptin-induced renal damage. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 2281-2288, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26918530

  7. Gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase activity alters the T cell response to oxidative stress and Fas-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Carlisle, Margaret L; King, Miranda R; Karp, David R

    2003-01-01

    The ectoenzyme gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT) is absent on resting naive peripheral blood T cells, highly expressed upon stimulation and intermediate on resting memory T cells. In other tissues, GGT is essential for the recapture of the antioxidant glutathione (GSH). T cells with different levels of GGT activity were examined for their ability to withstand oxidative stress. To create a model system that reflected the level of GGT seen on naive and memory T cells, Jurkat T cells were cloned by limiting dilution and their GGT expression analyzed. Jurkat expressing GGT at levels comparable to resting memory T cells have levels of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) that are only 65% that seen in Jurkat that have low levels of GGT (similar to naive T cells). Treatment of the cells with H(2)O(2) increases ROS in both cells, although the level seen in the GGT(high) Jurkat is less than half that in the GGT(low) variant. Despite protection from oxidative stress, the GGT(high) Jurkat were found to be 2- to 3-fold more sensitive to Fas-induced apoptosis. The redox-regulated NF-kappaB pathway is activated in GGT(low) cells, resulting in higher levels of cIAP-1/2 proteins that limit caspase activity. The GGT(low) cells were found to have higher levels of NF-kappaB in the nucleus as well as lower levels of IkappaB-alpha. The GGT(low) cells also express higher levels of the caspase inhibitors cIAP-1/2 and have lower levels of caspase activity. These findings suggest that GGT expression regulates ROS in T lymphocytes and modulates Fas-induced killing by altering NF-kappaB activity. PMID:12502722

  8. Evaluation of levodopa and carbidopa antioxidant activity in normal human lymphocytes in vitro: implication for oxidative stress in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Colamartino, Monica; Santoro, Massimo; Duranti, Guglielmo; Sabatini, Stefania; Ceci, Roberta; Testa, Antonella; Padua, Luca; Cozzi, Renata

    2015-02-01

    The main pathochemical hallmark of Parkinson's disease (PD) is the loss of dopamine in the striatum of the brain, and the oral administration of levodopa (L-dopa) is a treatment that partially restores the dopaminergic transmission. In vitro assays have demonstrated both toxic and protective effects of L-dopa on dopaminergic cells, while in vivo studies have not provided any convincing data. The peripheral metabolic pathways significantly decrease the amount of L-dopa reaching the brain; therefore, all of the current commercial formulations require an association with an inhibitor of dopa-decarboxylase, such as carbidopa. However, the dosage and the actual effectiveness of carbidopa have not yet been well defined. PD patients exhibit a reduced efficiency of the endogenous antioxidant system, and peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) represent a dopaminergic system for use as a cellular model to study the pharmacological treatments of neurodegenerative disorders in addition to analysing the systemic oxidative stress. According to our previous studies demonstrating a protective effect of both L-dopa and carbidopa on neuroblastoma cells in vitro, we used the PBLs of healthy donors to evaluate the modulation of DNA damage by different concentrations of L-dopa and carbidopa in the presence of oxidative stress that was exogenously induced by H2O2. We utilised a TAS assay to evaluate the in vitro direct scavenging activity of L-dopa and carbidopa and analysed the expression of genes that were involved in cellular oxidative metabolism. Our data demonstrate the antioxidant capacity of L-dopa and carbidopa and their ability to protect DNA against oxidative-induced damage that derives from different mechanisms of action. PMID:25355370

  9. Cardiac peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ expression is modulated by oxidative stress in acutely infrasound-exposed cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Pei, Zhaohui; Meng, Rongsen; Zhuang, Zhiqiang; Zhao, Yiqiao; Liu, Fangpeng; Zhu, Miao-Zhang; Li, Ruiman

    2013-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the effects of acute infrasound exposure on oxidative damage and investigate the underlying mechanisms in rat cardiomyocytes. Neonatal rat cardiomyocytes were cultured and exposed to infrasound for several days. In the study, the expression of CAT, GPx, SOD1, and SOD2 and their activities in rat cardiomyocytes in infrasound exposure groups were significantly decreased compared to those in the various time controls, along with significantly higher levels of O2 (-) and H2O2. Decreased cardiac cell viability was not observed in various time controls. A significant reduction in cardiac cell viability was observed in the infrasound group compared to the control, while significantly increased cardiac cell viability was observed in the infrasound exposure and rosiglitazone pretreatment group. Compared to the control, rosiglitazone significantly upregulated CAT, GPx, SOD1, and SOD2 expression and their activities in rat cardiomyocytes exposed to infrasound, while the levels of O2 (-) or H2O2 were significantly decreased. A potential link between a significant downregulation of PPAR-γ expression in rat cardiomyocytes in the infrasound group was compared to the control and infrasound-induced oxidative stress. These findings indicate that infrasound can induce oxidative damage in rat cardiomyocytes by inactivating PPAR-γ. PMID:23632742

  10. Vanillic Acid Inhibits Inflammatory Pain by Inhibiting Neutrophil Recruitment, Oxidative Stress, Cytokine Production, and NFκB Activation in Mice.

    PubMed

    Calixto-Campos, Cássia; Carvalho, Thacyana T; Hohmann, Miriam S N; Pinho-Ribeiro, Felipe A; Fattori, Victor; Manchope, Marília F; Zarpelon, Ana C; Baracat, Marcela M; Georgetti, Sandra R; Casagrande, Rubia; Verri, Waldiceu A

    2015-08-28

    Vanillic acid (1) is a flavoring agent found in edible plants and fruits. It is an oxidized form of vanillin. Phenolic compounds form a substantial part of plant foods used as antioxidants with beneficial biological activities. These compounds have received considerable attention because of their role in preventing human diseases. Especially, 1 presents antibacterial, antimicrobial, and chemopreventive effects. However, the mechanisms by which 1 exerts its anti-inflammatory effects in vivo are incompletely understood. Thus, the effect of 1 was evaluated in murine models of inflammatory pain. Treatment with 1 inhibited the overt pain-like behavior induced by acetic acid, phenyl-p-benzoquinone, the second phase of the formalin test, and complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA). Treatment with 1 also inhibited carrageenan- and CFA-induced mechanical hyperalgesia, paw edema, myeloperoxidase activity, and N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase activity. The anti-inflammatory mechanisms of 1 involved the inhibition of oxidative stress, pro-inflammatory cytokine production, and NFκB activation in the carrageenan model. The present study demonstrated 1 presents analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects in a wide range of murine inflammation models, and its mechanisms of action involves antioxidant effects and NFκB-related inhibition of pro-inflammatory cytokine production. PMID:26192250

  11. [Statins and oxidative stress].

    PubMed

    Filip-Ciubotaru, Florina; Foia, Liliana; Manciuc, Carmen

    2009-01-01

    Statins, as inhibitors of the first regulatory enzyme in cholesterol biosynthesis --HMG-CoA reductase--have a special impact in medical practice. Given their therapeutic efficacy, statins are believed to be the strongest class of agents in the treatment of cardiovascular disorders. Moreover, besides decreasing total cholesterol and C-LDL levels, numerous fundamental and clinical researches suggest that statins also have an antiinflammatory effect. Inflammation is closely related to the production of oxygen-derived reactive species (ROS). The antioxidant effects of statins associated with their ability to block the formation and/or action of ROS may add up their therapeutic efficacy. Within this context, the present paper presents data in literature related to the effect of statins on the expression and activity of NAD(P)H oxidase, activity of the enzymes involved in the antioxidative defence (SOD, GPx, catalase, paraoxonase), and their ability to act as free radical scavengers and oxidized-LDL inhibitors. By their antioxidant properties statins may decrease the atherogenic potential of lipoproteins. PMID:21495335

  12. Uncoupling protein-2 up-regulation and enhanced cyanide toxicity are mediated by PPAR{alpha} activation and oxidative stress

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, X.; Li, L.; Prabhakaran, K.; Zhang, L.; Leavesley, H.B.; Borowitz, J.L.; Isom, G.E.

    2007-08-15

    Uncoupling protein 2 (UCP-2) is an inner mitochondrial membrane proton carrier that modulates mitochondrial membrane potential ({delta}{psi}{sub m}) and uncouples oxidative phosphorylation. We have shown that up-regulation of UCP-2 by Wy14,643, a selective peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{alpha} (PPAR{alpha}) agonist, enhances cyanide cytotoxicity. The pathway by which Wy14,643 up-regulates UCP-2 was determined in a dopaminergic cell line (N27 cells). Since dopaminergic mesencephalic cells are a primary brain target of cyanide, the N27 immortalized mesencephalic cell was used in this study. Wy14,643 produced a concentration- and time-dependent up-regulation of UCP-2 that was linked to enhanced cyanide-induced cell death. MK886 (PPAR{alpha} antagonist) or PPAR{alpha} knock-down by RNA interference (RNAi) inhibited PPAR{alpha} activity as shown by the peroxisome proliferator response element-luciferase reporter assay, but only partially decreased up-regulation of UCP-2. The role of oxidative stress as an alternative pathway to UCP-2 up-regulation was determined. Wy14,643 induced a rapid surge of ROS generation and loading cells with glutathione ethyl ester (GSH-EE) or pre-treatment with vitamin E attenuated up-regulation of UCP-2. On the other hand, RNAi knockdown of PPAR{alpha} did not alter ROS generation, suggesting a PPAR{alpha}-independent component to the response. Co-treatment with PPAR{alpha}-RNAi and GSH-EE blocked both the up-regulation of UCP-2 by Wy14,643 and the cyanide-induced cell death. It was concluded that a PPAR{alpha}-mediated pathway and an oxidative stress pathway independent of PPAR{alpha} mediate the up-regulation of UCP-2 and subsequent increased vulnerability to cyanide-induced cytotoxicity.

  13. Oxidative stress promotes the increase of matrix metalloproteinases-2 and -9 activities in the feto-placental unit of diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Pustovrh, María Carolina; Jawerbaum, Alicia; Capobianco, Evangelina; White, Verónica; Martínez, Nora; López-Costa, Juan José; González, Elida

    2005-12-01

    Maternal diabetes increases the risk of congenital malformations, placental dysfunction and diseases in both the neonate and the offspring's later life. Oxidative stress has been involved in the etiology of these abnormalities. Matrix metalloproteases (MMPs), involved in multiple developmental pathways, are increased in the fetus and placenta from diabetic experimental models. As oxidants could be involved in the activation of latent MMPs, we investigated a putative relationship between MMPs activities and oxidative stress in the feto-placental unit of diabetic rats at midgestation. We found that H2O2 enhanced and that superoxide dismutase (SOD) reduced MMPs activities in the maternal side of the placenta and in the fetuses from control and diabetic rats. MMPs were not modified by oxidative status in the fetal side of the placenta. Lipid peroxidation was enhanced in the maternal and fetal sides of the placenta and in the fetus from diabetic rats when compared to controls, and gradually decreased from the maternal placental side to the fetus in diabetic animals. The activities of the antioxidant enzymes SOD and catalase were decreased in the maternal placental side, catalase activity was enhanced in the fetal placental side and both enzymes were increased in the fetuses from diabetic rats when compared to controls. Our data demonstrate changes in the oxidative balance and capability of oxidants to upregulate MMPs activity in the feto-placental unit from diabetic rats, a basis to elucidate links between oxidative stress and alterations in the developmental pathways in which MMPs are involved. PMID:16298858

  14. Isorhamnetin protects against oxidative stress by activating Nrf2 and inducing the expression of its target genes

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Ji Hye; Shin, Bo Yeon; Han, Jae Yun; Kim, Mi Gwang; Wi, Ji Eun; Kim, Young Woo; Cho, Il Je; Kim, Sang Chan; Shin, Sang Mi; Ki, Sung Hwan

    2014-01-15

    Isorhamentin is a 3′-O-methylated metabolite of quercetin, and has been reported to have anti-inflammatory and anti-proliferative effects. However, the effects of isorhamnetin on Nrf2 activation and on the expressions of its downstream genes in hepatocytes have not been elucidated. Here, we investigated whether isorhamnetin has the ability to activate Nrf2 and induce phase II antioxidant enzyme expression, and to determine the protective role of isorhamnetin on oxidative injury in hepatocytes. In HepG2 cells, isorhamnetin increased the nuclear translocation of Nrf2 in a dose- and time-dependent manner, and consistently, increased antioxidant response element (ARE) reporter gene activity and the protein levels of hemeoxygenase (HO-1) and of glutamate cysteine ligase (GCL), which resulted in intracellular GSH level increases. The specific role of Nrf2 in isorhamnetin-induced Nrf2 target gene expression was verified using an ARE-deletion mutant plasmid and Nrf2-knockout MEF cells. Deletion of the ARE in the promoter region of the sestrin2 gene, which is recently identified as the Nrf2 target gene by us, abolished the ability of isorhamnetin to increase luciferase activity. In addition, Nrf2 deficiency completely blocked the ability of isorhamnetin to induce HO-1 and GCL. Furthermore, isorhamnetin pretreatment blocked t-BHP-induced ROS production and reversed GSH depletion by t-BHP and consequently, due to reduced ROS levels, decreased t-BHP-induced cell death. In addition isorhamnetin increased ERK1/2, PKCδ and AMPK phosphorylation. Finally, we showed that Nrf2 deficiency blocked the ability of isorhamnetin to protect cells from injury induced by t-BHP. Taken together, our results demonstrate that isorhamnetin is efficacious in protecting hepatocytes against oxidative stress by Nrf2 activation and in inducing the expressions of its downstream genes. - Highlights: • We investigated the effect of isorhamnetin on Nrf2 activation. • Isorhamnetin increased Nrf2

  15. PPAR{alpha} agonist fenofibrate protects the kidney from hypertensive injury in spontaneously hypertensive rats via inhibition of oxidative stress and MAPK activity

    SciTech Connect

    Hou, Xiaoyang; Shen, Ying H.; Li, Chuanbao; Wang, Fei; Zhang, Cheng; Bu, Peili; Zhang, Yun

    2010-04-09

    Oxidative stress has been shown to play an important role in the development of hypertensive renal injury. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors {alpha} (PPAR{alpha}) has antioxidant effect. In this study, we demonstrated that fenofibrate significantly reduced proteinuria, inflammatory cell recruitment and extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins deposition in the kidney of SHRs without apparent effect on blood pressure. To investigate the mechanisms involved, we found that fenofibrate treatment markedly reduced oxidative stress accompanied by reduced activity of renal NAD(P)H oxidase, increased activity of Cu/Zn SOD, and decreased phosphorylation of p38MAPK and JNK in the kidney of SHRs. Taken together, fenofibrate treatment can protect against hypertensive renal injury without affecting blood pressure by inhibiting inflammation and fibrosis via suppression of oxidative stress and MAPK activity.

  16. Oxidative Stress and Insulin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Park, Kyong; Gross, Myron; Lee, Duk-Hee; Holvoet, Paul; Himes, John H.; Shikany, James M.; Jacobs, David R.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Although cumulative evidence suggests that increased oxidative stress may lead to insulin resistance in vivo or in vitro, community-based studies are scarce. This study examined the longitudinal relationships of oxidative stress biomarkers with the development of insulin resistance and whether these relationships were independent of obesity in nondiabetic young adults. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Biomarkers of oxidative stress (F2-isoprostanes [F2Isop] and oxidized LDL [oxLDL]), insulin resistance (the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance [HOMA-IR]), and various fatness measures (BMI, waist circumference, and estimated percent fat) were obtained in a population-based observational study (Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults) and its ancillary study (Young Adult Longitudinal Trends in Antioxidants) during 2000–2006. RESULTS There were substantial increases in estimated mean HOMA-IR over time. OxLDL and F2Isop showed little association with each other. Mean evolving HOMA-IR increased with increasing levels of oxidative stress markers (P < 0.001 for oxLDL and P = 0.06 for F2Isop), measured in 2000–2001. After additional adjustment for adiposity, a positive association between oxLDL and HOMA-IR was strongly evident, whereas the association between F2Isop and HOMA-IR was not. CONCLUSIONS We observed positive associations between each of two oxidative stress markers and insulin resistance. The association with oxidized LDL was independent of obesity, but that with F2Isop was not. PMID:19389821

  17. Increased p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling is involved in the oxidative stress associated with oxygen and glucose deprivation in neonatal hippocampal slice cultures

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Qing; Rau, Thomas F.; Harris, Valerie; Johnson, Maribeth; Poulsen, David J.; Black, Stephen M.

    2016-01-01

    The pathological basis of neonatal hypoxia–ischemia (HI) brain damage is characterized by neuronal cell loss. Oxidative stress is thought to be one of the main causes of HI-induced neuronal cell death. The p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) is activated under conditions of cell stress. However, its pathogenic role in regulating the oxidative stress associated with HI injury in the brain is not well understood. Thus, this study was conducted to examine the role of p38 MAPK signaling in neonatal HI brain injury using neonatal rat hippocampal slice cultures exposed to oxygen / glucose deprivation (OGD). Our results indicate that OGD led to a transient increase in p38 MAPK activation that preceded increases in superoxide generation and neuronal death. This increase in neuronal cell death correlated with an increase in the activation of caspase-3 and the appearance of apoptotic neuronal cells. Pre-treatment of slice cultures with the p38 MAPK inhibitor, SB203580, or the expression of an antisense p38 MAPK construct only in neuronal cells, through a Synapsin I-1-driven adeno-associated virus vector, inhibited p38 MAPK activity and exerted a neuroprotective effect as demonstrated by decreases in OGD-mediated oxidative stress, caspase activation and neuronal cell death. Thus, we conclude that the activation of p38 MAPK in neuronal cells plays a key role in the oxidative stress and neuronal cell death associated with OGD. PMID:21939459

  18. Oxidative stress and damage to erythrocytes in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease--changes in ATPase and acetylcholinesterase activity.

    PubMed

    Bukowska, Bożena; Sicińska, Paulina; Pająk, Aneta; Koceva-Chyla, Aneta; Pietras, Tadeusz; Pszczółkowska, Anna; Górski, Paweł; Koter-Michalak, Maria

    2015-12-01

    The study indicates, for the first time, the changes in both ATPase and AChE activities in the membrane of red blood cells of patients diagnosed with COPD. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is one of the most common and severe lung disorders. We examined the impact of COPD on redox balance and properties of the membrane of red blood cells. The study involved 30 patients with COPD and 18 healthy subjects. An increase in lipid peroxidation products and a decrease in the content of -SH groups in the membrane of red blood cells in patients with COPD were observed. Moreover, an increase in the activity of glutathione peroxidase and a decrease in superoxide dismutase, but not in catalase activity, were found as well. Significant changes in activities of erythrocyte membrane enzymes in COPD patients were also evident demonstrated by a considerably lowered ATPase activity and elevated AChE activity. Changes in the structure and function of red blood cells observed in COPD patients, together with changes in the activity of the key membrane enzymes (ATPases and AChE), can result from the imbalance of redox status of these cells due to extensive oxidative stress induced by COPD disease. PMID:26369587

  19. Inflammation, Oxidative Stress, and Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Sánchez, Alba; Madrigal-Santillán, Eduardo; Bautista, Mirandeli; Esquivel-Soto, Jaime; Morales-González, Ángel; Esquivel-Chirino, Cesar; Durante-Montiel, Irene; Sánchez-Rivera, Graciela; Valadez-Vega, Carmen; Morales-González, José A.

    2011-01-01

    Obesity is a chronic disease of multifactorial origin and can be defined as an increase in the accumulation of body fat. Adipose tissue is not only a triglyceride storage organ, but studies have shown the role of white adipose tissue as a producer of certain bioactive substances called adipokines. Among adipokines, we find some inflammatory functions, such as Interleukin-6 (IL-6); other adipokines entail the functions of regulating food intake, therefore exerting a direct effect on weight control. This is the case of leptin, which acts on the limbic system by stimulating dopamine uptake, creating a feeling of fullness. However, these adipokines induce the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), generating a process known as oxidative stress (OS). Because adipose tissue is the organ that secretes adipokines and these in turn generate ROS, adipose tissue is considered an independent factor for the generation of systemic OS. There are several mechanisms by which obesity produces OS. The first of these is the mitochondrial and peroxisomal oxidation of fatty acids, which can produce ROS in oxidation reactions, while another mechanism is over-consumption of oxygen, which generates free radicals in the mitochondrial respiratory chain that is found coupled with oxidative phosphorylation in mitochondria. Lipid-rich diets are also capable of generating ROS because they can alter oxygen metabolism. Upon the increase of adipose tissue, the activity of antioxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and glutathione peroxidase (GPx), was found to be significantly diminished. Finally, high ROS production and the decrease in antioxidant capacity leads to various abnormalities, among which we find endothelial dysfunction, which is characterized by a reduction in the bioavailability of vasodilators, particularly nitric oxide (NO), and an increase in endothelium-derived contractile factors, favoring atherosclerotic disease. PMID:21686173

  20. On the antioxidant properties of kynurenic acid: free radical scavenging activity and inhibition of oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Lugo-Huitrón, R; Blanco-Ayala, T; Ugalde-Muñiz, P; Carrillo-Mora, P; Pedraza-Chaverrí, J; Silva-Adaya, D; Maldonado, P D; Torres, I; Pinzón, E; Ortiz-Islas, E; López, T; García, E; Pineda, B; Torres-Ramos, M; Santamaría, A; La Cruz, V Pérez-De

    2011-01-01

    Kynurenic acid (KYNA) is an endogenous metabolite of the kynurenine pathway for tryptophan degradation and an antagonist of both N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) and alpha-7 nicotinic acetylcholine (α7nACh) receptors. KYNA has also been shown to scavenge hydroxyl radicals (OH) under controlled conditions of free radical production. In this work we evaluated the ability of KYNA to scavenge superoxide anion (O(2)(-)) and peroxynitrite (ONOO(-)). The scavenging ability of KYNA (expressed as IC(50) values) was as follows: OH=O(2)(-)>ONOO(-). In parallel, the antiperoxidative and scavenging capacities of KYNA (0-150 μM) were tested in cerebellum and forebrain homogenates exposed to 5 μM FeSO(4) and 2.5 mM 3-nitropropionic acid (3-NPA). Both FeSO(4) and 3-NPA increased lipid peroxidation (LP) and ROS formation in a significant manner in these preparations, whereas KYNA significantly reduced these markers. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation were determined in the presence of FeSO(4) and/or KYNA (0-100 μM), both at intra and extracellular levels. An increase in ROS formation was induced by FeSO(4) in forebrain and cerebellum in a time-dependent manner, and KYNA reduced this effect in a concentration-dependent manner. To further know whether the effect of KYNA on oxidative stress is independent of NMDA and nicotinic receptors, we also tested KYNA (0-100 μM) in a biological preparation free of these receptors - defolliculated Xenopus laevis oocytes - incubated with FeSO(4) for 1 h. A 3-fold increase in LP and a 2-fold increase in ROS formation were seen after exposure to FeSO(4), whereas KYNA attenuated these effects in a concentration-dependent manner. In addition, the in vivo formation of OH evoked by an acute infusion of FeSO(4) (100 μM) in the rat striatum was estimated by microdialysis and challenged by a topic infusion of KYNA (1 μM). FeSO(4) increased the striatal OH production, while KYNA mitigated this effect. Altogether, these data strongly suggest that KYNA

  1. Vitamin B6 Supplementation Improves Oxidative Stress and Enhances Serum Paraoxonase/Arylesterase Activities in Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Taş, Sibel; Sarandöl, Emre

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of vitamin B6 (Vit B6) on oxidant and antioxidant status in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Thirty-two Wistar rats were divided into four groups: control (C), control + Vit B6 group (C + Vit B6), diabetes (D), and diabetes + Vit B6 group (D + Vit B6). Vit B6 (4 mg/kg body weight) was administered in drinking water for 4 weeks after the induction of diabetes. Vitamin B6 reduced serum total cholesterol level in the C + Vit B6 (P < 0.01) and D + Vit B6 (P < 0.05) groups. Plasma and tissue malondialdehyde levels were reduced in the C + Vit B6 and D + Vit B6 groups. Whole blood glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) and erythrocyte superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities were higher in the D group (P < 0.05). GSH-Px and SOD activities were increased in C + Vit B6 group while these parameters decreased in the D + Vit B6 group. Paraoxonase and arylesterase activities were decreased in the D group while they were increased in C + Vit B6 and D + Vit B6 groups. The results of present study suggest that vitamin B6 supplementation might be a promising adjunctive agent for improving oxidative stress and metabolic disturbances and for preventing diabetic complications including atherogenesis. PMID:25431786

  2. Deregulated tryptophan-kynurenine pathway is linked to inflammation, oxidative stress, and immune activation pathway in cardiovascular diseases

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qiongxin; Liu, Danxia; Song, Ping; Zou, Ming-Hui

    2016-01-01

    The kynurenine (Kyn) pathway is the major route for tryptophan (Trp) metabolism, and it contributes to several fundamental biological processes. Trp is constitutively oxidized by tryptophan 2, 3-dioxygenase in liver cells. In other cell types, it is catalyzed by an alternative inducible indoleamine-pyrrole 2, 3-dioxygenase (IDO) under certain pathophysiological conditions, which consequently increases the formation of Kyn metabolites. IDO is up-regulated in response to inflammatory conditions as a novel marker of immune activation in early atherosclerosis. Besides, IDO and the IDO-related pathway are important mediators of the immunoinflammatory responses in advanced atherosclerosis. In particular, Kyn, 3-hydroxykynurenine, and quinolinic acid are positively associated with inflammation, oxidative stress (SOX), endothelial dysfunction, and carotid artery intima-media thickness values in end-stage renal disease patients. Moreover, IDO is a potential novel contributor to vessel relaxation and metabolism in systemic infections, which is also activated in acute severe heart attacks. The Kyn pathway plays a key role in the increased prevalence of cardiovascular disease by regulating inflammation, SOX, and immune activation. PMID:25961549

  3. The Role Oxidative Stress in the Pathogenesis of Eye Diseases: Current Status and a Dual Role of Physical Activity.

    PubMed

    Kruk, Joanna; Kubasik-Kladna, Katarzyna; Aboul-Enein, Hassan Y

    2015-01-01

    Extensive research during the past three decades has demonstrated the mechanisms by which an imbalance in the redox status of prooxidant/antioxidant reactions in cells with advantage of prooxidant reactions (oxidative stress, OS) can cause peroxidation of nucleic acids, bases, lipids, proteins and carbohydrates, thus resulting in their damage. These actions result in stimulation of signal transduction pathways and activation of transcription factors that can lead to chronic inflammation and cause tissue dysfunction. The most important oxidants are reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) generated by various metabolic pathways, physical, chemical and biological factors, and pathological conditions. The eye is one of the major target of the ROS/RNS attack due to exposition on several environmental factors like high pressure of oxygen, light exposure, ultraviolet rays, ionizing radiation, chemical pollutants, irritant, and pathogenic microbes, which are able to shift the redox status of a cell towards oxidizing conditions. There is increasing evidence indicating that persistent OS contributes to the development of many ocular diseases. Increases in the accumulation of hydrogen peroxide and markers of the oxidative damage to DNA, lipids, proteins observed in several eye diseases and usage of antioxidants in their treatment and prevention emphasize the involvement of OS pathways. This paper summarizes the present state of knowledge in the involvement of OS in the etiology of non-cancer ocular diseases (dry eye syndrome; corneal and conjunctive diseases; cataract; glaucoma; age-related macular degeneration; retinitis pigmentosa; diabetic retinopathy, autoimmune and inflammatory uveitis) and cancer ocular diseases (melanoma; retinoblastoma; lymphoma). The paper also discusses the potential applications of antioxidants in the prevention of eye diseases and shows a duality of physical exercise actions: protection against the ROS/RNS damage by

  4. Hepatoprotective activity of polyherbal formulation (Normeta) in oxidative stress induced by alcohol, polyunsaturated fatty acids and iron in rats.

    PubMed

    Patere, Shilpa N; Saraf, Madhusudan N; Majumdar, Anuradha S

    2009-09-01

    In recent years, oxidative stress has been implicated in the pathophysiology of a large number of diseases or disorders which are initiated and/or exacerbated by pro-oxidants such as various drugs including alcohol and food additives. The present study was carried out to evaluate the effects of oral treatment with polyherbal formulation Normeta (2 ml and 4 ml/kg) on hepatic damage induced by alcohol 10-30% (blood alcohol was maintained at levels between 150 and 350 mg/dl), thermally oxidized oil (polyunsaturated fatty acids) (15% of diet) and carbonyl iron (1.5-2% of diet) for 30 days in rats. In vitro studies with 1, 1-Diphenyl, 2-Picrylhydrazyl (DPPH), Nitric oxide and Ferric chloride (Fe(+3) ions) showed that Normeta possesses antioxidant and metal chelating activity. Alcohol, polyunsaturated fatty acids and iron feeding produced an increase in serum levels of iron, serum glutamate pyruvate transaminase and decrease in serum proteins. It was also associated with elevated lipid peroxidation (thiobarbituric acid reactive substances) and disruption of antioxidant defence mechanism in liver, decreased body weight and increased liver to body weight ratio. Oral administration of Normeta along with alcohol, polyunsaturated fatty acids and iron decreased the serum iron, serum glutamate pyruvate transaminase levels and increased serum protein levels. The levels of liver thiobarbituric acid reactive substances were decreased and the activities of antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase and catalase were increased. Improvement in body weight and liver to body weight ratio was also observed. The effects of Normeta on physico-metabolic parameters were comparable with silymarin. This indicates that Normeta has favourable effect in bringing down the severity of hepatotoxicity. PMID:19486336

  5. Nitro-oxidative Stress Is Involved in Anticancer Activity of 17β-Estradiol Derivative in Neuroblastoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Gorska, Magdalena; Kuban-Jankowska, Alicja; Milczarek, Ryszard; Wozniak, Michal

    2016-04-01

    Neuroblastoma is one of the most common childhood malignancies and the primary cause of death from pediatric cancer. Derivatives of 17β-estradiol, 2-methoxyestradiol, as well as selective estrogen receptor modulators, such as fulvestrant, are novel potentially active anticancer agents. In particular, 2-methoxyestradiol is effective in treatment of numerous malignancies, including breast and prostate cancer, Ewing sarcoma, and osteosarcoma. Herein, we treated neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells with physiologically and pharmacologically relevant concentrations of 2-methoxyestradiol. We used flow cytometry in order to determine cell viability, cell death, level of nitric oxide and mitochondrial membrane potential. We demonstrated that at pharmacologically relevant concentrations, 2-methoxyestradiol results in induction of apoptosis of neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells via nitric oxide generation and reduction of mitochondrial membrane potential. Based on the obtained data, we propose that 2-methoxyestradiol may be a natural modulator of cancer cell death and survival through nitro-oxidative stress-dependent mechanisms. Moreover, the results confirm the efficiency of 2-methoxyestradiol in treatment of neuroblastoma. PMID:27069147

  6. Treatment of Platelet Concentrates with the Mirasol Pathogen Inactivation System Modulates Platelet Oxidative Stress and NF-κB Activation

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Lacey; Marks, Denese

    2015-01-01

    Background Pathogen inactivation (PI) technologies for platelets aim to improve transfusion safety by preventing the replication of contaminating pathogens. However, as a consequence of treatment, aspects of the platelet storage lesion are amplified. Mirasol treatment also affects platelet signal transduction and apoptotic protein expression. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of Mirasol treatment on the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and subsequent oxidative stress. Methods Pooled platelet concentrates were prepared in platelet-additive solution (70% SSP+ / 30% plasma). ABO-matched platelets were pooled and split, and treated with the Mirasol system (TerumoBCT) or left untreated as a control. Platelet samples were tested on day 1, 5, and 7 post-collection. Results Mirasol-treated platelets had increased formation of ROS by day 5 of storage. Oxidative damage, in the form of protein carbonylation, was higher in Mirasol-treated platelets, whilst no effect on nitrotyrosine formation or lipid peroxidation was detected. The NF-κB signaling pathway was also activated in Mirasol-treated platelets, with increased expression and phosphorylation of NF-κB p65 and IκBα. Conclusion These data demonstrate that Mirasol-treated platelets produce more ROS and display protein alterations consistent with oxidative damage. PMID:26195930

  7. NecroX-7 prevents oxidative stress-induced cardiomyopathy by inhibition of NADPH oxidase activity in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Joonghoon; Park, Eok; Ahn, Bong-Hyun; Kim, Hyoung Jin; Park, Ji-hoon; Koo, Sun Young; Kwak, Hyo-Shin; Park, Heui Sul; Kim, Dong Wook; Song, Myoungsub; Yim, Hyeon Joo; Seo, Dong Ook; Kim, Soon Ha

    2012-08-15

    Oxidative stress is one of the causes of cardiomyopathy. In the present study, NecroXs, novel class of mitochondrial ROS/RNS scavengers, were evaluated for cardioprotection in in vitro and in vivo model, and the putative mechanism of the cardioprotection of NecroX-7 was investigated by global gene expression profiling and subsequent biochemical analysis. NecroX-7 prevented tert-butyl hydroperoxide (tBHP)-induced death of H9C2 rat cardiomyocytes at EC{sub 50} = 0.057 μM. In doxorubicin (DOX)-induced cardiomyopathy in rats, NecroX-7 significantly reduced the plasma levels of creatine kinase (CK-MB) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) which were increased by DOX treatment (p < 0.05). Microarray analysis revealed that 21 genes differentially expressed in tBHP-treated H9C2 cells were involved in ‘Production of reactive oxygen species’ (p = 0.022), and they were resolved by concurrent NecroX-7 treatment. Gene-to-gene networking also identified that NecroX-7 relieved cell death through Ncf1/p47phox and Rac2 modulation. In subsequent biochemical analysis, NecroX-7 inhibited NADPH oxidase (NOX) activity by 53.3% (p < 0.001). These findings demonstrate that NecroX-7, in part, provides substantial protection of cardiomyopathy induced by tBHP or DOX via NOX-mediated cell death. -- Highlights: ► NecroX-7 prevented tert-butyl hydroperoxide-induced in vitro cardiac cell death. ► NecroX-7 ameliorated doxorubicin-induced in vivo cardiomyopathy. ► NecroX-7 prevented oxidative stress and necrosis-enriched transcriptional changes. ► NecroX-7 effectively inhibited NADPH oxidase activation. ► Cardioprotection of Necro-7 was brought on by modulation of NADPH oxidase activity.

  8. SIRT1 activation by pterostilbene attenuates the skeletal muscle oxidative stress injury and mitochondrial dysfunction induced by ischemia reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yedong; Di, Shouyin; Fan, Chongxi; Cai, Liping; Gao, Chao; Jiang, Peng; Hu, Wei; Ma, Zhiqiang; Jiang, Shuai; Dong, Yushu; Li, Tian; Wu, Guiling; Lv, Jianjun; Yang, Yang

    2016-08-01

    Ischemia reperfusion (IR) injury is harmful to skeletal muscles and causes mitochondrial oxidative stress. Pterostilbene (PTE), an analogue of resveratrol, has organic protective effects against oxidative stress. However, no studies have investigated whether PTE can protect against IR-related skeletal muscular injury. In this study, we sought to evaluate the protective effect of PTE against IR-related skeletal muscle injury and to determine the mechanisms in this process. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were pretreated with PTE for a week and then underwent limb IR surgery. The IR injury induced segmental necrosis and apoptosis, myofilament disintegration, thicker interstitial spaces, and inflammatory cell infiltration. Furthermore, mitochondrial respiratory chain activity in the muscular tissue was inhibited, methane dicarboxylic aldehyde concentration and myeloperoxidase activity were up-regulated, and superoxide dismutase was down-regulated after IR. However, these effects were significantly inhibited by PTE in a dose-dependent manner. The mechanism underlying IR injury is attributed to the down-regulation of silent information regulator 1 (SIRT1)-FOXO1/p53 pathway and the increase of the Bax/Bcl2 ratio, Cleaved poly ADP-ribose polymerase 1, Cleaved Caspase 3, which can be reversed with PTE. Furthermore, EX527, an SIRT1 inhibitor, counteracted the protective effects of PTE on IR-related muscle injury. In conclusion, PTE has protective properties against IR injury of the skeletal muscles. The mechanism of this protective effect depends on the activation of the SIRT1-FOXO1/p53 signaling pathway and the decrease of the apoptotic ratio in skeletal muscle cells. PMID:27270300

  9. Chronic photo-oxidative stress and subsequent MCP-1 activation as causative factors for age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Mihoko; Tsujikawa, Motokazu; Itabe, Hiroyuki; Du, Zhao-Jiang; Xie, Ping; Matsumura, Nagakazu; Fu, Xiaoming; Zhang, Renliang; Sonoda, Koh-hei; Egashira, Kensuke; Hazen, Stanley L; Kamei, Motohiro

    2012-05-15

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness among the elderly in developed countries. Although pathogenic factors, such as oxidative stress, inflammation and genetics are thought to contribute to the development of AMD, little is known about the relationships and priorities between these factors. Here, we show that chronic photo-oxidative stress is an environmental factor involved in AMD pathogenesis. We first demonstrated that exposure to light induced phospholipid oxidation in the mouse retina, which was more prominent in aged animals. The induced oxidized phospholipids led to an increase in the expression of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, which then resulted in macrophage accumulation, an inflammatory process. Antioxidant treatment prevented light-induced phospholipid oxidation and the subsequent increase of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (also known as C-C motif chemokine 2; CCL2), which are the beginnings of the light-induced changes. Subretinal application of oxidized phospholipids induced choroidal neovascularization, a characteristic feature of wet-type AMD, which was inhibited by blocking monocyte chemoattractant protein-1. These findings strongly suggest that a sequential cascade from photic stress to inflammatory processes through phospholipid oxidation has an important role in AMD pathogenesis. Finally, we succeeded in mimicking human AMD in mice with low-level, long-term photic stress, in which characteristic pathological changes, including choroidal neovascularization formation, were observed. Therefore, we propose a consecutive pathogenic pathway involving photic stress, oxidation of phospholipids and chronic inflammation, leading to angiogenesis. These findings add to the current understanding of AMD pathology and suggest protection from oxidative stress or suppression of the subsequent inflammation as new potential therapeutic targets for AMD. PMID:22357958

  10. Chronic photo-oxidative stress and subsequent MCP-1 activation as causative factors for age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Mihoko; Tsujikawa, Motokazu; Itabe, Hiroyuki; Du, Zhao-Jiang; Xie, Ping; Matsumura, Nagakazu; Fu, Xiaoming; Zhang, Renliang; Sonoda, Koh-hei; Egashira, Kensuke; Hazen, Stanley L.; Kamei, Motohiro

    2012-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness among the elderly in developed countries. Although pathogenic factors, such as oxidative stress, inflammation and genetics are thought to contribute to the development of AMD, little is known about the relationships and priorities between these factors. Here, we show that chronic photo-oxidative stress is an environmental factor involved in AMD pathogenesis. We first demonstrated that exposure to light induced phospholipid oxidation in the mouse retina, which was more prominent in aged animals. The induced oxidized phospholipids led to an increase in the expression of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, which then resulted in macrophage accumulation, an inflammatory process. Antioxidant treatment prevented light-induced phospholipid oxidation and the subsequent increase of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (also known as C-C motif chemokine 2; CCL2), which are the beginnings of the light-induced changes. Subretinal application of oxidized phospholipids induced choroidal neovascularization, a characteristic feature of wet-type AMD, which was inhibited by blocking monocyte chemoattractant protein-1. These findings strongly suggest that a sequential cascade from photic stress to inflammatory processes through phospholipid oxidation has an important role in AMD pathogenesis. Finally, we succeeded in mimicking human AMD in mice with low-level, long-term photic stress, in which characteristic pathological changes, including choroidal neovascularization formation, were observed. Therefore, we propose a consecutive pathogenic pathway involving photic stress, oxidation of phospholipids and chronic inflammation, leading to angiogenesis. These findings add to the current understanding of AMD pathology and suggest protection from oxidative stress or suppression of the subsequent inflammation as new potential therapeutic targets for AMD. PMID:22357958

  11. Transcriptional activation of follistatin by Nrf2 protects pulmonary epithelial cells against silica nanoparticle-induced oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chen; Zhao, Xinyuan; Sun, Desen; Zhang, Lingda; Fang, Wenpan; Zhu, Tingjia; Wang, Qiang; Liu, Botao; Wei, Saisai; Chen, Guangdi; Xu, Zhengping; Gao, Xiangwei

    2016-01-01

    Silica nanoparticles (SiO2 NPs) cause oxidative stress in respiratory system. Meanwhile, human cells launch adaptive responses to overcome SiO2 NP toxicity. However, besides a few examples, the regulation of SiO2 NP-responsive proteins and their functions in SiO2 NP response remain largely unknown. In this study, we demonstrated that SiO2 NP induced the expression of follistatin (FST), a stress responsive gene, in mouse lung tissue as well as in human lung epithelial cells (A549). The levels of Ac-H3(K9/18) and H3K4me2, two active gene markers, at FST promoter region were significantly increased during SiO2 NP treatment. The induction of FST transcription was mediated by the nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), as evidenced by the decreased FST expression in Nrf2-deficient cells and the direct binding of Nrf2 to FST promoter region. Down-regulation of FST promoted SiO2 NP-induced apoptosis both in cultured cells and in mouse lung tissue. Furthermore, knockdown of FST increased while overexpression of FST decreased the expression level of NADPH oxidase 1 (NOX1) and NOX5 as well as the production of cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). Taken together, these findings demonstrated a protective role of FST in SiO2 NP-induced oxidative stress and shed light on the interaction between SiO2 NPs and biological systems. PMID:26878911

  12. [Heme metabolism and oxidative stress].

    PubMed

    Kaliman, P A; Barannik, T B

    2001-01-01

    The role of heme metabolism in oxidative stress development and defense reactions formation in mammals under different stress factors are discussed in the article. Heme metabolism is considered as the totality of synthesis, degradation, transport and exchange processes of exogenous heme and heme liberated from erythrocyte hemoglobin under erythrocyte aging and hemolysis. The literature data presented display normal heme metabolism including mammals heme-binding proteins and intracellular free heme pool and heme metabolism alterations under oxidative stress development. The main attention is focused to the prooxidant action of heme, the interaction of heme transport and lipid exchange, and to the heme metabolism key enzymes (delta-aminolevulinate synthase and heme oxygenase), serum heme-binding protein hemopexin and intracellular heme-binding proteins participating in metabolism adaptation under the action of factors, which cause oxidative stress. PMID:11599427

  13. Oxidative stress induces itch via activation of transient receptor potential subtype ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) in mice

    PubMed Central

    LIU, Tong; JI, Ru-Rong

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the role of oxidative stress in itch-indicative scratching behavior in mice, and furthermore, to define the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying oxidative stress-mediated itch. Methods Scratching behavior was induced by intradermal injection of oxidants, including hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and tert-butylhydroperoxide (tBHP) into the nape of the neck in mice and observed for 30 min. Results Intradermal H2O2 (0.03-1%) or tert-butylhydroperoxide (tBHP, 1-30 μmol) elicited robust scratching behavior, displaying an inverted-U-shaped dose-related curve. Naloxone, an opioid receptor antagonist, but not morphine, largely suppressed the oxidants-induced scratching. Chlorpheniramine, a histamine H1 receptor antagonist, blocked histamine but not oxidants-induced scratching, indicating the involvement of histamine-independent mechanism in oxidants-evoked itch. Further, resiniferatoxin (RTX) treatment abolished oxidants-induced scratching, suggesting an essential role of C-fibers. Notably, blockade of transient receptor potential subtype ankyryn 1 (TRPA1) by selective TRPA1 antagonist HC-030031, or genetic deletion of Trpa1 but not Trpv1 resulted in a profound reduction in H2O2-evoked scratching. Finally, systemic administration of the antioxidants N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) or trolox (a water-soluble vitamin E analogue) attenuated scratching induced by the oxidants. Conclusion Oxidative stress by different oxidants can induce profound scratching behavior, which is largely histamine and TRPV1-independent but TRPA1-dependent. Antioxidants and TRPA1 antagonists may be used to treat human itch conditions associated with oxidative stress. PMID:22466125

  14. A Molecular Web: Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress, Inflammation, and Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhari, Namrata; Talwar, Priti; Parimisetty, Avinash; Lefebvre d’Hellencourt, Christian; Ravanan, Palaniyandi

    2014-01-01

    Execution of fundamental cellular functions demands regulated protein folding homeostasis. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is an active organelle existing to implement this function by folding and modifying secretory and membrane proteins. Loss of protein folding homeostasis is central to various diseases and budding evidences suggest ER stress as being a major contributor in the development or pathology of a diseased state besides other cellular stresses. The trigger for diseases may be diverse but, inflammation and/or ER stress may be basic mechanisms increasing the severity or complicating the condition of the disease. Chronic ER stress and activation of the unfolded-protein response (UPR) through endogenous or exogenous insults may result in impaired calcium and redox homeostasis, oxidative stress via protein overload thereby also influencing vital mitochondrial functions. Calcium released from the ER augments the production of mitochondrial Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS). Toxic accumulation of ROS within ER and mitochondria disturbs fundamental organelle functions. Sustained ER stress is known to potentially elicit inflammatory responses via UPR pathways. Additionally, ROS generated through inflammation or mitochondrial dysfunction could accelerate ER malfunction. Dysfunctional UPR pathways have been associated with a wide range of diseases including several neurodegenerative diseases, stroke, metabolic disorders, cancer, inflammatory disease, diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease, and others. In this review, we have discussed the UPR signaling pathways, and networking between ER stress-induced inflammatory pathways, oxidative stress, and mitochondrial signaling events, which further induce or exacerbate ER stress. PMID:25120434

  15. Chemically induced oxidative stress increases polyamine levels by activating the transcription of ornithine decarboxylase and spermidine/spermine-N1-acetyltransferase in human hepatoma HUH7 cells.

    PubMed

    Smirnova, Olga A; Isaguliants, Maria G; Hyvonen, Mervi T; Keinanen, Tuomo A; Tunitskaya, Vera L; Vepsalainen, Jouko; Alhonen, Leena; Kochetkov, Sergey N; Ivanov, Alexander V

    2012-09-01

    Biogenic polyamines spermine and spermidine participate in numerous cellular processes including transcription, RNA processing and translation. Specifically, they counteract oxidative stress, an alteration of cell redox balance involved in generation and progression of various pathological states including cancer. Here, we investigated how chemically induced oxidative stress affects polyamine metabolism, specifically the expression and activities of enzymes catalyzing polyamine synthesis (ornithine decarboxylase; ODC) and degradation (spermidine/spermine-N(1)-acetyltransferase; SSAT), in human hepatoma cells. Oxidative stress induced the up-regulation of ODC and SSAT gene transcription mediated by Nrf2, and in case of SSAT, also by NF-κB transcription factors. Activation of transcription led to the elevated intracellular activities of both enzymes. The balance in antagonistic activities of ODC and SSAT in the stressed hepatoma cells was shifted towards polyamine biosynthesis, which resulted in increased intracellular levels of putrescine, spermidine, and spermine. Accumulation of putrescine is indicating for accelerated degradation of polyamines by SSAT - acetylpolyamine oxidase (APAO) pathway generating toxic products that promote carcinogenesis, whereas accelerated polyamine synthesis via activation of ODC is favorable for proliferation of cells including those sub-lethally damaged by oxidative stress. PMID:22579641

  16. Oxidative Stress-Activated NHE1 Is Involved in High Glucose-Induced Apoptosis in Renal Tubular Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yiqing; Zhang, Min; Liu, Rui

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is a prevalent chronic microvascular complication of diabetes mellitus involving disturbances in electrolytes and the acid-base balance caused by a disorder of glucose metabolism. NHE1 is a Na+/H+ exchanger responsible for keeping intracellular pH (pHi) balance and cell growth. Our study aimed to investigate roles of NHE1 in high glucose (HG)-induced apoptosis in renal tubular epithelial cells. Materials and Methods Renal epithelial tubular cell line HK-2 was cultured in medium containing 5 mM or 30 mM glucose. Then, cell apoptosis, oxidative stress, NHE1 expression, and pHi were evaluated. NHE1 siRNA and inhibitor were used to evaluate its role in cell apoptosis. Results HG significantly increased cell apoptosis and the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and 8-OHdG (p<0.05). Meanwhile, we found that HG induced the expression of NHE1 and increased the pHi from 7.0 to 7.6 after 48 h of incubation. However, inhibiting NHE1 using its specific siRNA or antagonist DMA markedly reduced cell apoptosis stimulated by HG. In addition, suppressing cellular oxidative stress using antioxidants, such as glutathione and N-acetyl cysteine, significantly reduced the production of ROS, accompanied by a decrease in NHE1. We also found that activated cyclic GMP-Dependent Protein Kinase Type I (PKG) signaling promoted the production of ROS, which contributed to the regulation of NHE1 functions. Conclusion Our study indicated that HG activates PKG signaling and elevates the production of ROS, which was responsible for the induction of NHE1 expression and dysfunction, as well as subsequent cell apoptosis, in renal tubular epithelial cells. PMID:27401659

  17. MAPK pathway activation by chronic lead-exposure increases vascular reactivity through oxidative stress/cyclooxygenase-2-dependent pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Simões, Maylla Ronacher; Aguado, Andrea; Fiorim, Jonaína; Silveira, Edna Aparecida; Azevedo, Bruna Fernandes; Toscano, Cindy Medice; Zhenyukh, Olha; Briones, Ana María; Alonso, María Jesús; Vassallo, Dalton Valentim; Salaices, Mercedes

    2015-03-01

    Chronic exposure to low lead concentration produces hypertension; however, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. We analyzed the role of oxidative stress, cyclooxygenase-2-dependent pathways and MAPK in the vascular alterations induced by chronic lead exposure. Aortas from lead-treated Wistar rats (1st dose: 10 μg/100 g; subsequent doses: 0.125 μg/100 g, intramuscular, 30 days) and cultured aortic vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) from Sprague Dawley rats stimulated with lead (20 μg/dL) were used. Lead blood levels of treated rats attained 21.7 ± 2.38 μg/dL. Lead exposure increased systolic blood pressure and aortic ring contractile response to phenylephrine, reduced acetylcholine-induced relaxation and did not affect sodium nitroprusside relaxation. Endothelium removal and L-NAME left-shifted the response to phenylephrine more in untreated than in lead-treated rats. Apocynin and indomethacin decreased more the response to phenylephrine in treated than in untreated rats. Aortic protein expression of gp91(phox), Cu/Zn-SOD, Mn-SOD and COX-2 increased after lead exposure. In cultured VSMCs lead 1) increased superoxide anion production, NADPH oxidase activity and gene and/or protein levels of NOX-1, NOX-4, Mn-SOD, EC-SOD and COX-2 and 2) activated ERK1/2 and p38 MAPK. Both antioxidants and COX-2 inhibitors normalized superoxide anion production, NADPH oxidase activity and mRNA levels of NOX-1, NOX-4 and COX-2. Blockade of the ERK1/2 and p38 signaling pathways abolished lead-induced NOX-1, NOX-4 and COX-2 expression. Results show that lead activation of the MAPK signaling pathways activates inflammatory proteins such as NADPH oxidase and COX-2, suggesting a reciprocal interplay and contribution to vascular dysfunction as an underlying mechanisms for lead-induced hypertension. - Highlights: • Lead-exposure increases oxidative stress, COX-2 expression and vascular reactivity. • Lead exposure activates MAPK signaling pathway. • ROS and COX-2 activation by

  18. Exposure to inhaled particulate matter activates early markers of oxidative stress, inflammation and unfolded protein response in rat striatum.

    PubMed

    Guerra, R; Vera-Aguilar, E; Uribe-Ramirez, M; Gookin, G; Camacho, J; Osornio-Vargas, A R; Mugica-Alvarez, V; Angulo-Olais, R; Campbell, A; Froines, J; Kleinman, T M; De Vizcaya-Ruiz, A

    2013-10-24

    To study central nervous system airborne PM related subchronic toxicity, SD male rats were exposed for eight weeks to either coarse (32 μg/m³), fine (178 μg/m³) or ultrafine (107 μg/m³) concentrated PM or filtered air. Different brain regions (olfactory bulb, frontal cortex, striatum and hippocampus), were harvested from the rats following exposure to airborne PM. Subsequently, prooxidant (HO-1 and SOD-2), and inflammatory markers (IL-1β and TNFα), apoptotic (caspase 3), and unfolded protein response (UPR) markers (XBP-1S and BiP), were also measured using real-time PCR. Activation of nuclear transcription factors Nrf-2 and NF-κB, associated with antioxidant and inflammation processes, respectively, were also analyzed by GSMA. Ultrafine PM increased HO-1 and SOD-2 mRNA levels in the striatum and hippocampus, in the presence of Nrf-2 activation. Also, ultrafine PM activated NF-κB and increased IL-1β and TNFα in the striatum. Activation of UPR was observed after exposure to coarse PM through the increment of XBP-1S and BiP in the striatum, accompanied by an increase in antioxidant response markers HO-1 and SOD-2. Our results indicate that exposure to different size fractions of PM may induce physiological changes (in a neuroanatomical manner) in the central nervous system (CNS), specifically within the striatum, where inflammation, oxidative stress and UPR signals were effectively activated. PMID:23892126

  19. Exposure to inhaled particulate matter activates early markers of oxidative stress, inflammation and unfolded protein response in rat striatum

    PubMed Central

    Guerra, R.; Vera-Aguilar, E.; Uribe-Ramirez, M.; Gookin, G.; Camacho, J.; Osornio-Vargas, A.R.; Mugica-Alvarez, V.; Angulo-Olais, R.; Campbell, A.; Froines, J.; Kleinman, T.M.; De Vizcaya-Ruiz, A.

    2014-01-01

    To study central nervous system airborne PM related subchronic toxicity, SD male rats were exposed for eight weeks to either coarse (32 µg/m3), fine (178 µg/m3) or ultrafine (107 µg/m3) concentrated PM or filtered air. Different brain regions (olfactory bulb, frontal cortex, striatum and hippocampus), were harvested from the rats following exposure to airborne PM. Subsequently, prooxidant (HO-1 and SOD-2), and inflammatory markers (IL-1β and TNFα), apoptotic (caspase 3), and unfolded protein response (UPR) markers (XBP-1S and BiP), were also measured using real-time PCR. Activation of nuclear transcription factors Nrf-2 and NF-κB, associated with antioxidant and inflammation processes, respectively, were also analyzed by GSMA. Ultrafine PM increased HO-1 and SOD-2 mRNA levels in the striatum and hippocampus, in the presence of Nrf-2 activation. Also, ultrafine PM activated NF-κB and increased IL-1β and TNFα in the striatum. Activation of UPR was observed after exposure to coarse PM through the increment of XBP-1S and BiP in the striatum, accompanied by an increase in antioxidant response markers HO-1 and SOD-2. Our results indicate that exposure to different size fractions of PM may induce physiological changes (in a neuroanatomical manner) in the central nervous system (CNS), specifically within the striatum, where inflammation, oxidative stress and UPR signals were effectively activated. PMID:23892126

  20. Oxidative Stress in Placenta: Health and Diseases.

    PubMed

    Wu, Fan; Tian, Fu-Ju; Lin, Yi

    2015-01-01

    During pregnancy, development of the placenta is interrelated with the oxygen concentration. Embryo development takes place in a low oxygen environment until the beginning of the second trimester when large amounts of oxygen are conveyed to meet the growth requirements. High metabolism and oxidative stress are common in the placenta. Reactive oxidative species sometimes harm placental development, but they are also reported to regulate gene transcription and downstream activities such as trophoblast proliferation, invasion, and angiogenesis. Autophagy and apoptosis are two crucial, interconnected processes in the placenta that are often influenced by oxidative stress. The proper interactions between them play an important role in placental homeostasis. However, an imbalance between the protective and destructive mechanisms of autophagy and apoptosis seems to be linked with pregnancy-related disorders such as miscarriage, preeclampsia, and intrauterine growth restriction. Thus, potential therapies to hold oxidative stress in leash, promote placentation, and avoid unwanted apoptosis are discussed. PMID:26693479

  1. Oxidative Stress in Placenta: Health and Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Fan; Tian, Fu-Ju; Lin, Yi

    2015-01-01

    During pregnancy, development of the placenta is interrelated with the oxygen concentration. Embryo development takes place in a low oxygen environment until the beginning of the second trimester when large amounts of oxygen are conveyed to meet the growth requirements. High metabolism and oxidative stress are common in the placenta. Reactive oxidative species sometimes harm placental development, but they are also reported to regulate gene transcription and downstream activities such as trophoblast proliferation, invasion, and angiogenesis. Autophagy and apoptosis are two crucial, interconnected processes in the placenta that are often influenced by oxidative stress. The proper interactions between them play an important role in placental homeostasis. However, an imbalance between the protective and destructive mechanisms of autophagy and apoptosis seems to be linked with pregnancy-related disorders such as miscarriage, preeclampsia, and intrauterine growth restriction. Thus, potential therapies to hold oxidative stress in leash, promote placentation, and avoid unwanted apoptosis are discussed. PMID:26693479

  2. Oxidative Stress Markers in Sputum

    PubMed Central

    Antus, Balazs

    2016-01-01

    Although oxidative stress is thought to play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of inflammatory airway diseases, its assessment in clinical practice remains elusive. In recent years, it has been conceptualized that oxidative stress markers in sputum should be employed to monitor oxidative processes in patients with asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), or cystic fibrosis (CF). In this review, the use of sputum-based oxidative markers was explored and potential clinical applications were considered. Among lipid peroxidation-derived products, 8-isoprostane and malondialdehyde have been the most frequently investigated, while nitrosothiols and nitrotyrosine may serve as markers of nitrosative stress. Several studies have showed higher levels of these products in patients with asthma, COPD, or CF compared to healthy subjects. Marker concentrations could be further increased during exacerbations and decreased along with recovery of these diseases. Measurement of oxidized guanine species and antioxidant enzymes in the sputum could be other approaches for assessing oxidative stress in pulmonary patients. Collectively, even though there are promising findings in this field, further clinical studies using more established detection techniques are needed to clearly show the benefit of these measurements in the follow-up of patients with inflammatory airway diseases. PMID:26885248

  3. Simple ortho- and para-hydroquinones as compounds neuroprotective against oxidative stress in a manner associated with specific transcriptional activation

    SciTech Connect

    Satoh, Takumi Saitoh, Sachie; Hosaka, Manami; Kosaka, Kunio

    2009-02-06

    similar properties of cysteine binding as TBHQ and CA, which compounds were associated with the transcriptional activation and an increase in the level of reduced glutathione. These results suggest that para- and ortho-dihydroquinones may be neuroprotective compounds active against oxidative stress.

  4. Decreased glutamine synthetase, increased citrulline-nitric oxide cycle activities, and oxidative stress in different regions of brain in epilepsy rat model.

    PubMed

    Swamy, Mummedy; Yusof, Wan Roslina Wan; Sirajudeen, K N S; Mustapha, Zulkarnain; Govindasamy, Chandran

    2011-03-01

    To understand their role in epilepsy, the nitric oxide synthetase (NOS), argininosuccinate synthetase (AS), argininosuccinate lyase (AL), glutamine synthetase (GS), and arginase activities, along with the concentration of nitrate/nitrite (NOx), thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), and total antioxidant status (TAS), were estimated in different regions of brain in rats subjected to experimental epilepsy induced by subcutaneous administration of kainic acid (KA). The short-term (acute) group animals were killed after 2 h and the long term (chronic) group animals were killed after 5 days of single injection of KA (15 mg/kg body weight). After decapitation of rats, the brain regions were separated and in their homogenates, the concentration of NOx, TBARS and TAS and the activities of NOS, AS, AL, arginase and glutamine synthetase were assayed by colorimetric methods. The results of the study demonstrated the increased activity of NOS and formation of NO in acute and chronic groups epilepsy. The activities of AS and AL were increased and indicate the effective recycling of citrulline to arginine. The activity of glutamine synthetase was decreased in acute and chronic groups of epilepsy compared to control group and indicate the modulation of its activity by NO in epilepsy. The activity of arginase was not changed in acute group; however it was decreased in chronic group and may favor increased production of NO in this condition. The concentration TBARS were increased and TAS decreased in acute and chronic groups of epilepsy and supports the oxidative stress in epilepsy. PMID:20960085

  5. Phagocytes and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Babior, B M

    2000-07-01

    Neutrophils and other phagocytes manufacture O(2)(-) (superoxide) by the one-electron reduction of oxygen at the expense of NADPH. Most of the O(2)(-) reacts with itself to form H(2)O(2) (hydrogen peroxide). From these agents a large number of highly reactive microbicidal oxidants are formed, including HOCl (hypochlorous acid), which is produced by the myeloperoxidase-catalyzed oxidation of Cl(-) by H(2)O(2); OH(*) (hydroxyl radical), produced by the reduction of H(2)O(2) by Fe(++) or Cu(+); ONOO(-) (peroxynitrite), formed by the reaction between O(2)(-) and NO(*); and many others. These reactive oxidants are manufactured for the purpose of killing invading microorganisms, but they also inflict damage on nearby tissues, and are thought to be of pathogenic significance in a large number of diseases. Included among these are emphysema, acute respiratory distress syndrome, atherosclerosis, reperfusion injury, malignancy and rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:10936476

  6. Sustained stress response after oxidative stress in trabecular meshwork cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Guorong; Luna, Coralia; Liton, Paloma B.; Navarro, Iris; Epstein, David L.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the mechanisms by which chronic oxidative stress may lead to a sustained stress response similar to that previously observed in the trabecular meshwork (TM) of glaucoma donors. Methods Porcine TM cells were treated with 200 μM H2O2 twice a day for four days and were allowed to recover for three additional days. After the treatment, TM cells were analyzed for generation of intracellular reactive oxygen species (iROS), mitochondrial potential, activation of NF-κB, and the expression of inflammatory markers IL-1α, IL-6, IL-8, and ELAM-1. Potential sources of iROS were evaluated using inhibitors for nitric oxide, nitric oxide synthetase, cyclooxygenase, xanthine oxidase, NADPH oxidase, mitochondrial ROS, and PKC. The role of NF-κB activation in the induction of inflammatory markers was evaluated using the inhibitors Lactacystin and BAY11–7082. Results Chronic oxidative stress simulated by H2O2 exposure of porcine TM cells resulted in the sustained production of iROS by the mitochondria. Inhibition of mitochondrial iROS had a significant inhibitory effect on the activation of NF-κB and the induction of IL-1α, IL-6, IL-8, and ELAM-1 triggered by chronic oxidative stress. Inhibition of NF-κB partially prevented the induction of IL-1α, IL-8, and ELAM-1, but not IL-6. Conclusions Chronic oxidative stress in TM cells induced iROS production in mitochondria. This increase in iROS may contribute to the pathogenesis of the TM in glaucoma by inducing the expression of inflammatory mediators previously observed in glaucoma donors as well as the levels of oxidative damage in the tissue. PMID:18199969

  7. Mitochondrial oxidative stress is modulated by oleic acid via an epidermal growth factor receptor-dependent activation of glutathione peroxidase.

    PubMed Central

    Duval, Carine; Augé, Nathalie; Frisach, Marie-Françoise; Casteilla, Louis; Salvayre, Robert; Nègre-Salvayre, Anne

    2002-01-01

    Mitochondria generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) under various pathophysiological conditions. In isolated mitochondria, fatty acids (FA) exhibit an uncoupling effect of the respiratory activity and modulate ROS generation. The effect of FA on intact cultured cells remains to be elucidated. The present study reports that FA (buffered by BSA) decrease the level of cellular ROS generated by the mitochondrial respiratory chain in cultured cells incubated with antimycin A. Both saturated and unsaturated FA are effective. This fatty acid-induced antioxidant effect does not result from a decrease in ROS production, but is subsequent to cellular glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activation and enhanced ROS degradation. This fatty acid-induced GPx activation is mediated through epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signalling, since this response is (i) abrogated by the EGFR inhibitor AG1478 or by a defect in EGFR (in EGFR-deficient B82L fibroblasts), (ii) restored in B82LK+ cells expressing EGFR and (iii) mimicked by epidermal growth factor. These findings indicate that FA contribute to enhance cellular antioxidant defences against mitochondrial oxidative stress through EGFR-dependent GPx activation. PMID:12153397

  8. Mark4 promotes oxidative stress and inflammation via binding to PPARγ and activating NF-κB pathway in mice adipocytes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhenjiang; Gan, Lu; Chen, Yizhe; Luo, Dan; Zhang, Zhenzhen; Cao, Weina; Zhou, Zhongjie; Lin, Xueting; Sun, Chao

    2016-01-01

    MAP/Microtubule affinity-regulating kinase 4 (Mark4) plays an important role in the regulation of microtubule organization, adipogenesis and apoptosis. However, the role of Mark4 plays in oxidative stress and inflammation are poorly understood. In this study, we found Mark4 was induced by high fat diet (HFD) while PPARγ was elevated significantly in mice adipocytes. Further analyses revealed Mark4 impaired mitochondrial oxidative respiration and increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. At same time, the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) were greatly reduced. By treating cells with H2O2 and vitamin E (VE), Mark4 accentuated oxidative stress along with increased mRNA level of inflammatory factor interleukin-6 (IL-6) and decreased leptin mRNA. Furthermore, we found PPARγ bind to Mark4 promoter region and inhibited Mark4 expression. We showed PPARγ interacted with Mark4 and inhibited the stimulating effect of Mark4 on oxidative stress and inflammation. Finally, we demonstrated that the IKKα/NF-κB signal pathway was involved in Mark4 induced oxidative stress and inflammation, while PTDC, a special inhibitor of NF-κB signal pathway, reduced oxidative stress and inflammation. Thus, our study indicated that Mark4 was a potential drug target for treating metabolic diseases. PMID:26888669

  9. Effect of temperature on oxidative stress parameters and enzyme activity in tissues of Cape River crab (Potamanautes perlatus) following exposure to silver nanoparticles (AgNP).

    PubMed

    Walters, Chavon R; Cheng, Paul; Pool, Edmund; Somerset, Vernon

    2016-01-01

    Biomarkers of oxidative stress have been widely used in environmental assessments to evaluate the effects of exposure of aquatic organisms to contaminants from various anthropogenic sources. Silver nanoparticles (AgNP), the most produced NP worldwide and used in several consumer products, are known to produce oxidative stress in aquatic organisms. Similarly, temperature is also known to affect reactive oxygen species (ROS) by influencing the inputs of contaminants into the environment, as well as altering behavior, fate, and transport. Aquatic ecosystems are affected by both anthropogenic releases of contaminants and increased temperature. To test this hypothesis, the influence of AgNP and temperature in the response to multiple biomarkers of oxidative stress was studied in the gills and hepatopancreas of the Cape River crab Potamonautes perlatus. Responses were assessed through activities of antioxidant enzymes, including superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and the nonenzymatic antioxidant glutathione S-transferase (GST). The response of the oxidative stress biomarkers analyzed was always higher in hepatopancreas than in gills. Elevated temperatures (28°C) induced oxidative stress by increasing SOD, CAT, and GST activities, particularly at 100 µg/ml AgNP. These data indicate that AgNP-mediated toxicity to P. perlatus is modulated by elevated temperatures, but this relationship is not linear. Co-effects of AgNP and temperature are reported for the first time in P. perlatus. PMID:26730549

  10. Effects of dietary yeast extract on turkey stress response and heterophil oxidative burst activity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Effective nutritional approaches to counteract the negative effects of stress would both improve human health and provide food animal producers with useful alternatives to antibiotics. In this study, turkeys were fed a standard diet or the same diet supplemented with yeast extract (Alphamune™, YE), ...

  11. Potential Modulation of Sirtuins by Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Leonardo; Escande, Carlos; Denicola, Ana

    2016-01-01

    Sirtuins are a conserved family of NAD-dependent protein deacylases. Initially proposed as histone deacetylases, it is now known that they act on a variety of proteins including transcription factors and metabolic enzymes, having a key role in the regulation of cellular homeostasis. Seven isoforms are identified in mammals (SIRT1–7), all of them sharing a conserved catalytic core and showing differential subcellular localization and activities. Oxidative stress can affect the activity of sirtuins at different levels: expression, posttranslational modifications, protein-protein interactions, and NAD levels. Mild oxidative stress induces the expression of sirtuins as a compensatory mechanism, while harsh or prolonged oxidant conditions result in dysfunctional modified sirtuins more prone to degradation by the proteasome. Oxidative posttranslational modifications have been identified in vitro and in vivo, in particular cysteine oxidation and tyrosine nitration. In addition, oxidative stress can alter the interaction with other proteins, like SIRT1 with its protein inhibitor DBC1 resulting in a net increase of deacetylase activity. In the same way, manipulation of cellular NAD levels by pharmacological inhibition of other NAD-consuming enzymes results in activation of SIRT1 and protection against obesity-related pathologies. Nevertheless, further research is needed to establish the molecular mechanisms of redox regulation of sirtuins to further design adequate pharmacological interventions. PMID:26788256

  12. Potential Modulation of Sirtuins by Oxidative Stress.

    PubMed

    Santos, Leonardo; Escande, Carlos; Denicola, Ana

    2016-01-01

    Sirtuins are a conserved family of NAD-dependent protein deacylases. Initially proposed as histone deacetylases, it is now known that they act on a variety of proteins including transcription factors and metabolic enzymes, having a key role in the regulation of cellular homeostasis. Seven isoforms are identified in mammals (SIRT1-7), all of them sharing a conserved catalytic core and showing differential subcellular localization and activities. Oxidative stress can affect the activity of sirtuins at different levels: expression, posttranslational modifications, protein-protein interactions, and NAD levels. Mild oxidative stress induces the expression of sirtuins as a compensatory mechanism, while harsh or prolonged oxidant conditions result in dysfunctional modified sirtuins more prone to degradation by the proteasome. Oxidative posttranslational modifications have been identified in vitro and in vivo, in particular cysteine oxidation and tyrosine nitration. In addition, oxidative stress can alter the interaction with other proteins, like SIRT1 with its protein inhibitor DBC1 resulting in a net increase of deacetylase activity. In the same way, manipulation of cellular NAD levels by pharmacological inhibition of other NAD-consuming enzymes results in activation of SIRT1 and protection against obesity-related pathologies. Nevertheless, further research is needed to establish the molecular mechanisms of redox regulation of sirtuins to further design adequate pharmacological interventions. PMID:26788256

  13. Tongxinluo Protects against Hypertensive Kidney Injury in Spontaneously-Hypertensive Rats by Inhibiting Oxidative Stress and Activating Forkhead Box O1 Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Wei-min; Kong, Jing; Gong, Yan; Liu, Xiao-qiong; Yang, Rui-xue; Zhao, Yu-xia

    2015-01-01

    Hypertension is an independent risk factor for the progression of chronic renal failure, and oxidative stress plays a critical role in hypertensive renal damage. Forkbox O1(FoxO1) signaling protects cells against oxidative stress and may be a useful target for treating oxidative stress-induced hypertension. Tongxinluo is a traditional Chinese medicine with cardioprotective and renoprotective functions. Therefore, this study aimed to determine the effects of Tongxinluo in hypertensive renal damage in spontaneously hypertensive rats(SHRs)and elucidate the possible involvement of oxidative stress and FoxO1 signaling in its molecular mechanisms. SHRs treated with Tongxinluo for 12 weeks showed a reduction in systolic blood pressure. In addition to increasing creatinine clearance, Tongxinluo decreased urinary albumin excretion, oxidative stress injury markers including malondialdehyde and protein carbonyls, and expression of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase subunits and its activity in SHR kidneys. While decreasing phosphorylation of FoxO1, Tongxinluo also inhibited the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase1/2 and p38 and enhanced manganese superoxide dismutase and catalase activities in SHR kidneys. Furthermore, histology revealed attenuation of glomerulosclerosis and renal podocyte injury, while Tongxinluo decreased the expression of α-smooth muscle actin, extracellular matrixprotein, transforming growth factor β1 and small mothers against decapentaplegic homolog 3,and improved tubulointerstitial fibrosis in SHR kidneys. Finally, Tongxinluo inhibited inflammatory cell infiltration as well as expression of tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6. In conclusion, Tongxinluo protected SHRs against hypertension-induced renal injury by exerting antioxidant, antifibrotic, and anti-inflammatory activities. Moreover, the underlying mechanisms of these effects may involve inhibition of oxidative stress and functional activation of Fox

  14. Mesenchymal Stem/Stromal Cells Derived From a Reproductive Tissue Niche Under Oxidative Stress Have High Aldehyde Dehydrogenase Activity.

    PubMed

    Kusuma, Gina D; Abumaree, Mohamed H; Pertile, Mark D; Perkins, Anthony V; Brennecke, Shaun P; Kalionis, Bill

    2016-06-01

    The use of mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSC) in regenerative medicine often requires MSC to function in environments of high oxidative stress. Human pregnancy is a condition where the mother's tissues, and in particular her circulatory system, are exposed to increased levels of oxidative stress. MSC in the maternal decidua basalis (DMSC) are in a vascular niche, and thus would be exposed to oxidative stress products in the maternal circulation. Aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDH) are a large family of enzymes which detoxify aldehydes and thereby protect stem cells against oxidative damage. A subpopulation of MSC express high levels of ALDH (ALDH(br)) and these are more potent in repairing and regenerating tissues. DMSC was compared with chorionic villous MSC (CMSC) derived from the human placenta. CMSC reside in vascular niche and are exposed to the fetal circulation, which is in lower oxidative state. We screened an ALDH isozyme cDNA array and determined that relative to CMSC, DMSC expressed high levels of ALDH1 family members, predominantly ALDH1A1. Immunocytochemistry gave qualitative confirmation at the protein level. Immunofluorescence detected ALDH1 immunoreactivity in the DMSC and CMSC vascular niche. The percentage of ALDH(br) cells was calculated by Aldefluor assay and DMSC showed a significantly higher percentage of ALDH(br) cells than CMSC. Finally, flow sorted ALDH(br) cells were functionally potent in colony forming unit assays. DMSC, which are derived from pregnancy tissues that are naturally exposed to high levels of oxidative stress, may be better candidates for regenerative therapies where MSC must function in high oxidative stress environments. PMID:26880140

  15. Oxidative Stress in Atopic Dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Hongxiu; Li, Xiao-Kang

    2016-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic pruritic skin disorder affecting many people especially young children. It is a disease caused by the combination of genetic predisposition, immune dysregulation, and skin barrier defect. In recent years, emerging evidence suggests oxidative stress may play an important role in many skin diseases and skin aging, possibly including AD. In this review, we give an update on scientific progress linking oxidative stress to AD and discuss future treatment strategies for better disease control and improved quality of life for AD patients. PMID:27006746

  16. Effect of increasing temperature in the differential activity of oxidative stress biomarkers in various tissues of the Rock goby, Gobius paganellus.

    PubMed

    Vinagre, Catarina; Madeira, Diana; Mendonça, Vanessa; Dias, Marta; Roma, Joana; Diniz, Mário S

    2014-06-01

    Oxidative stress biomarkers have been widely used in the development of ecological indices and in the assessment of exposure of aquatic organisms to contaminants from agricultural, industrial and urban pollution. However, temperature is known to also have a significant effect on oxidative stress biomarkers. This way, temperature is a confounding factor that may result in difficulties in the interpretation of oxidative stress biomarkers response patterns. Since climate change is expected to result in more frequent and intense heat wave events it is pertinent to investigate the effect of increasing temperature in the oxidative stress response of common aquatic organisms. It is also important to assess the differential response of different body tissues, given that they are differently exposed to temperature depending on their location and physiological function. This study investigates the effect of increasing temperature (20 °C-34 °C) in the response of multiple biomarkers of oxidative stress: lipid peroxidation, glutathione-S-transferase, superoxide dismutase and catalase activities, in the muscle, liver and gills of a common coastal fish, the Rock goby, Gobius paganellus. The response of the oxidative stress biomarkers analysed were always higher in the gills than in the other tissues. Muscle generally presented the lower levels of any of the biomarkers tested when compared to other tissues. Nevertheless, muscle tissue always responded significantly to temperature, as did the liver, while the gills were unresponsive in terms of lipid peroxidation and glutathione-S-transferase. Unresponsive tissues to temperature may be particularly interesting as indicators of pollution, given that temperature will not be a confounding variable in their oxidative stress response. PMID:24534436

  17. N-acetylcysteine reduces oxidative stress, nuclear factor-κB activity and cardiomyocyte apoptosis in heart failure

    PubMed Central

    WU, XIAO-YAN; LUO, AN-YU; ZHOU, YI-RONG; REN, JIANG-HUA

    2014-01-01

    The roles of oxidative stress on nuclear factor (NF)-κB activity and cardiomyocyte apoptosis during heart failure were examined using the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC). Heart failure was established in Japanese white rabbits with intravenous injections of doxorubicin, with ten rabbits serving as a control group. Of the rabbits with heart failure, 12 were not treated (HF group) and 13 received NAC (NAC group). Cardiac function was assessed using echocardiography and hemodynamic analysis. Myocardial cell apoptosis, apoptosis-related protein expression, NF-κBp65 expression and activity, total anti-oxidative capacity (tAOC), 8-iso-prostaglandin F2α (8-iso-PGF2α) expression and glutathione (GSH) expression levels were determined. In the HF group, reduced tAOC, GSH levels and Bcl-2/Bax ratios as well as increased 8-iso-PGF2α levels and apoptosis were observed (all P<0.05), which were effects that were attenuated by the treatment with NAC. NF-κBp65 and iNOS levels were significantly higher and the P-IκB-α levels were significantly lower in the HF group; expression of all three proteins returned to pre-HF levels following treatment with NAC. Myocardial cell apoptosis was positively correlated with left ventricular end-diastolic pressure (LVEDP), NF-κBp65 expression and 8-iso-PGF2α levels, but negatively correlated with the maximal and minimal rates of increase in left ventricular pressure (+dp/dtmax and −dp/dtmin, respectively) and the Bcl-2/Bax ratio (all P<0.001). The 8-iso-PGF2α levels were positively correlated with LVEDP and negatively correlated with +dp/dtmax and −dp/dtmin (all P<0.001). The present study demonstrated that NAC increased the antioxidant capacity, decreased the NF-κB activation and reduced myocardial cell apoptosis in an in vivo heart failure model. PMID:24889421

  18. Ethanol and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Sun, A Y; Ingelman-Sundberg, M; Neve, E; Matsumoto, H; Nishitani, Y; Minowa, Y; Fukui, Y; Bailey, S M; Patel, V B; Cunningham, C C; Zima, T; Fialova, L; Mikulikova, L; Popov, P; Malbohan, I; Janebova, M; Nespor, K; Sun, G Y

    2001-05-01

    This article represents the proceedings of a workshop at the 2000 ISBRA Meeting in Yokohama, Japan. The chair was Albert Y. Sun. The presentations were (1) Ethanol-inducible cytochrome P-4502E1 in alcoholic liver disease, by Magnus Ingelman-Sundberg and Etienne Neve; (2) Regulation of NF-kappaB by ethanol, by H. Matsumoto, Y. Nishitani, Y. Minowa, and Y. Fukui; (3) Chronic ethanol consumption increases concentration of oxidized proteins in rat liver, by Shannon M. Bailey, Vinood B. Patel, and Carol C. Cunningham; (4) Antiphospholipids antibodies and oxidized modified low-density lipoprotein in chronic alcoholic patients, by Tomas Zima, Lenka Fialova, Ludmila Mikulikova, Ptr Popov, Ivan Malbohan, Marta Janebova, and Karel Nespor; and (5) Amelioration of ethanol-induced damage by polyphenols, by Albert Y. Sun and Grace Y. Sun. PMID:11391077

  19. Neuroprotective effects of trans-caryophyllene against kainic acid induced seizure activity and oxidative stress in mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hao; Song, Zhi; Liao, Daguang; Zhang, Tianyi; Liu, Feng; Zhuang, Kai; Luo, Kui; Yang, Liang

    2015-01-01

    Trans-caryophyllene (TC), a component of essential oil found in many flowering plants, has shown its neuroprotective effects in various neurological disorders. However, the effects of TC on epilepsy haven't been reported before. In this study, we investigated the effect of TC on kainic acid-induced seizure activity caused by oxidative stress and pro-inflammation. We found that TC pretreatment significantly decreased seizure activity score compared to kainic acid treated group. Importantly, TC pretreatment leads to lowering the mortality in kainic acid treated mice. In addition, TC was found to significantly inhibit KA-induced generation of malondialdehyde. TC pretreatment also preserved the activity of GPx, SOD, and CAT. Notably, our data shows that an important property of TC is its capacity to exert cerebral anti-inflammatory effects by mitigating the expression of proinflammatory cytokines, such as TNF-α and IL-1β. These data suggest that TC has a potential protective effect on chemical induced seizure and brain damage. PMID:25417010

  20. Cannabidiol-induced apoptosis in primary lymphocytes is associated with oxidative stress-dependent activation of caspase-8

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, H.-Y.; Chu, R.-M.; Wang, C.-C.; Lee, C.-Y.; Lin, S.-H.; Jan, T.-R.

    2008-02-01

    We recently reported that cannabidiol (CBD) exhibited a generalized suppressive effect on T-cell functional activities in splenocytes directly exposed to CBD in vitro or isolated from CBD-administered mice. To investigate the potential mechanisms of CBD effects on T cells, we characterized the pro-apoptotic effect of CBD on primary lymphocytes. The apoptosis of splenocytes was markedly enhanced following CBD exposure in a time- and concentration-dependent manner, as evidenced by nuclear hypodiploidity and DNA strand breaks. Exposure of splenocytes to CBD elicited an early production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) with the peak response at 1 h post CBD treatment. In parallel with the ROS production, a gradual diminishment in the cellular glutathione (GSH) content was detected in CBD-treated splenocytes. Both CBD-mediated ROS production and GSH diminishment were remarkably attenuated by the presence of N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC), a thiol antioxidant. In addition, CBD treatment significantly stimulated the activation of caspase-8, which was abrogated in the presence of NAC or GSH. Pretreatment of splenocytes with a cell-permeable inhibitor for caspase-8 significantly attenuated, in a concentration-dependent manner, CBD-mediated apoptosis, but not ROS production. Collectively, the present study demonstrated that the apoptotic effect of CBD in primary lymphocytes is closely associated with oxidative stress-dependent activation of caspase-8.

  1. Citicoline protects brain against closed head injury in rats through suppressing oxidative stress and calpain over-activation.

    PubMed

    Qian, Ke; Gu, Yi; Zhao, Yumei; Li, Zhenzong; Sun, Ming

    2014-07-01

    Citicoline, a natural compound that functions as an intermediate in the biosynthesis of cell membrane phospholipids, is essential for membrane integrity and repair. It has been reported to protect brain against trauma. This study was designed to investigate the protective effects of citicoline on closed head injury (CHI) in rats. Citicoline (250 mg/kg i.v. 30 min and 4 h after CHI) lessened body weight loss, and improved neurological functions significantly at 7 days after CHI. It markedly lowered brain edema and blood-brain barrier permeability, enhanced the activities of superoxide dismutase and the levels of glutathione, reduced the levels of malondialdehyde and lactic acid. Moreover, citicoline suppressed the activities of calpain, and enhanced the levels of calpastatin, myelin basic protein and αII-spectrin in traumatic tissue 24 h after CHI. Also, it attenuated the axonal and myelin sheath damage in corpus callosum and the neuronal cell death in hippocampal CA1 and CA3 subfields 7 days after CHI. These data demonstrate the protection of citicoline against white matter and grey matter damage due to CHI through suppressing oxidative stress and calpain over-activation, providing additional support to the application of citicoline for the treatment of traumatic brain injury. PMID:24691765

  2. Hemoglobin oxidative stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croci, S.; Ortalli, I.; Pedrazzi, G.; Passeri, G.; Piccolo, P.

    2000-07-01

    Venous blood obtained from healthy donors and from patients suffering from breast cancer have been treated with acetylphenylhydrazine (APH) for different time. Mössbauer spectra of the packed red cells have been recorded and compared. The largest difference occurs after 50 min of treatment with APH where the patient samples show a broad spectral pattern indicating an advanced hemoglobin oxidation. These results may have some relevance in early cancer diagnosis.

  3. Improvement in the electrical performance and bias-stress stability of dual-active-layered silicon zinc oxide/zinc oxide thin-film transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yu-Rong; Zhao, Gao-Wei; Lai, Pai-To; Yao, Ruo-He

    2016-08-01

    Si-doped zinc oxide (SZO) thin films are deposited by using a co-sputtering method, and used as the channel active layers of ZnO-based TFTs with single and dual active layer structures. The effects of silicon content on the optical transmittance of the SZO thin film and electrical properties of the SZO TFT are investigated. Moreover, the electrical performances and bias-stress stabilities of the single- and dual-active-layer TFTs are investigated and compared to reveal the effects of the Si doping and dual-active-layer structure. The average transmittances of all the SZO films are about 90% in the visible light region of 400 nm–800 nm, and the optical band gap of the SZO film gradually increases with increasing Si content. The Si-doping can effectively suppress the grain growth of ZnO, revealed by atomic force microscope analysis. Compared with that of the undoped ZnO TFT, the off-state current of the SZO TFT is reduced by more than two orders of magnitude and it is 1.5 × 10‑12 A, and thus the on/off current ratio is increased by more than two orders of magnitude. In summary, the SZO/ZnO TFT with dual-active-layer structure exhibits a high on/off current ratio of 4.0 × 106 and superior stability under gate-bias and drain-bias stress. Projected supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61076113 and 61274085), the Natural Science Foundation of Guangdong Province (Grant No. 2016A030313474), and the University Development Fund (Nanotechnology Research Institute, Grant No. 00600009) of the University of Hong Kong, China.

  4. Diabetic Cardiovascular Disease Induced by Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Kayama, Yosuke; Raaz, Uwe; Jagger, Ann; Adam, Matti; Schellinger, Isabel N.; Sakamoto, Masaya; Suzuki, Hirofumi; Toyama, Kensuke; Spin, Joshua M.; Tsao, Philip S.

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality among patients with diabetes mellitus (DM). DM can lead to multiple cardiovascular complications, including coronary artery disease (CAD), cardiac hypertrophy, and heart failure (HF). HF represents one of the most common causes of death in patients with DM and results from DM-induced CAD and diabetic cardiomyopathy. Oxidative stress is closely associated with the pathogenesis of DM and results from overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS). ROS overproduction is associated with hyperglycemia and metabolic disorders, such as impaired antioxidant function in conjunction with impaired antioxidant activity. Long-term exposure to oxidative stress in DM induces chronic inflammation and fibrosis in a range of tissues, leading to formation and progression of disease states in these tissues. Indeed, markers for oxidative stress are overexpressed in patients with DM, suggesting that increased ROS may be primarily responsible for the development of diabetic complications. Therefore, an understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms mediated by oxidative stress is crucial to the prevention and treatment of diabetes-induced CVD. The current review focuses on the relationship between diabetes-induced CVD and oxidative stress, while highlighting the latest insights into this relationship from findings on diabetic heart and vascular disease. PMID:26512646

  5. Reciprocal Effects of Oxidative Stress on Heme Oxygenase Expression and Activity Contributes to Reno-Vascular Abnormalities in EC-SOD Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kawakami, Tomoko; Puri, Nitin; Sodhi, Komal; Bellner, Lars; Takahashi, Toru; Morita, Kiyoshi; Rezzani, Rita; Oury, Tim D.; Abraham, Nader G.

    2012-01-01

    Heme oxygenase (HO) system is one of the key regulators of cellular redox homeostasis which responds to oxidative stress (ROS) via HO-1 induction. However, recent reports have suggested an inhibitory effect of ROS on HO activity. In light of these conflicting reports, this study was designed to evaluate effects of chronic oxidative stress on HO system and its role in contributing towards patho-physiological abnormalities observed in extracellular superoxide dismutase (EC-SOD, SOD3) KO animals. Experiments were performed in WT and EC-SOD(−/−) mice treated with and without HO inducer, cobalt protoporphyrin (CoPP). EC-SOD(−/−) mice exhibited oxidative stress, renal histopathological abnormalities, elevated blood pressure, impaired endothelial function, reduced p-eNOS, p-AKT and increased HO-1 expression; although, HO activity was significantly (P < 0.05) attenuated along with attenuation of serum adiponectin and vascular epoxide levels (P < 0.05). CoPP, in EC-SOD(−/−) mice, enhanced HO activity (P < 0.05) and reversed aforementioned pathophysiological abnormalities along with restoration of vascular EET, p-eNOS, p-AKT and serum adiponectin levels in these animals. Taken together our results implicate a causative role of insufficient activation of heme-HO-adiponectin system in pathophysiological abnormalities observed in animal models of chronic oxidative stress such as EC-SOD(−/−) mice. PMID:22292113

  6. ZnO nanoparticle-induced oxidative stress triggers apoptosis by activating JNK signaling pathway in cultured primary astrocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jieting; Deng, Xiaobei; Zhang, Fang; Chen, Deliang; Ding, Wenjun

    2014-03-01

    It has been documented in in vitro studies that zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) are capable of inducing oxidative stress, which plays a crucial role in ZnO NP-mediated apoptosis. However, the underlying molecular mechanism of apoptosis in neurocytes induced by ZnO NP exposure was not fully elucidated. In this study, we investigated the potential mechanisms of apoptosis provoked by ZnO NPs in cultured primary astrocytes by exploring the molecular signaling pathways triggered after ZnO NP exposure. ZnO NP exposure was found to reduce cell viability in MTT assays, increase lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release, stimulate intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, and elicit caspase-3 activation in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Apoptosis occurred after ZnO NP exposure as evidenced by nuclear condensation and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP) cleavage. A decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) with a concomitant increase in the expression of Bax/Bcl-2 ratio suggested that the mitochondria also mediated the pathway involved in ZnO NP-induced apoptosis. In addition, exposure of the cultured cells to ZnO NPs led to phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), extracellular signal-related kinase (ERK), and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK). Moreover, JNK inhibitor (SP600125) significantly reduced ZnO NP-induced cleaved PARP and cleaved caspase-3 expression, but not ERK inhibitor (U0126) or p38 MAPK inhibitor (SB203580), indicating that JNK signaling pathway is involved in ZnO NP-induced apoptosis in primary astrocytes.

  7. Oxidative Stress and Neurodegenerative Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jie; O, Wuliji; Li, Wei; Jiang, Zhi-Gang; Ghanbari, Hossein A.

    2013-01-01

    Living cells continually generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) through the respiratory chain during energetic metabolism. ROS at low or moderate concentration can play important physiological roles. However, an excessive amount of ROS under oxidative stress would be extremely deleterious. The central nervous system (CNS) is particularly vulnerable to oxidative stress due to its high oxygen consumption, weakly antioxidative systems and the terminal-differentiation characteristic of neurons. Thus, oxidative stress elicits various neurodegenerative diseases. In addition, chemotherapy could result in severe side effects on the CNS and peripheral nervous system (PNS) of cancer patients, and a growing body of evidence demonstrates the involvement of ROS in drug-induced neurotoxicities as well. Therefore, development of antioxidants as neuroprotective drugs is a potentially beneficial strategy for clinical therapy. In this review, we summarize the source, balance maintenance and physiologic functions of ROS, oxidative stress and its toxic mechanisms underlying a number of neurodegenerative diseases, and the possible involvement of ROS in chemotherapy-induced toxicity to the CNS and PNS. We ultimately assess the value for antioxidants as neuroprotective drugs and provide our comments on the unmet needs. PMID:24351827

  8. Oxidative stress in psoriasis and potential therapeutic use of antioxidants.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xiran; Huang, Tian

    2016-06-01

    The pathophysiology of psoriasis is complex and dynamic. Recently, the involvement of oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of psoriasis has been proposed. Oxidative stress is an imbalance between oxidants and antioxidants in favor of the oxidants, leading to a disruption of redox signaling and control and/or molecular damage. In this article, the published studies on the role of oxidative stress in psoriasis pathogenesis are reviewed, focusing on the impacts of oxidative stress on dendritic cells, T lymphocytes, and keratinocytes, on angiogenesis and on inflammatory signaling (mitogen-activated protein kinase, nuclear factor-κB, and Janus kinase/signal transducer and activator of transcription). As there is compelling evidence that oxidative stress is involved in the pathogenesis of psoriasis, the possibility of using this information to develop novel strategies for treatment of patients with psoriasis is of considerable interest. In this article, we also review the published studies on treating psoriasis with antioxidants and drugs with antioxidant activity. PMID:27098416

  9. U18666A Treatment Results in Cholesterol Accumulation, Reduced Na(+), K(+)-ATPase Activity, and Increased Oxidative Stress in Rat Cortical Astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Copetti-Santos, Daniela; Moraes, Vitoria; Weiler, Dácio Franco; de Mello, Alexandre Silva; Machado, Fernanda de Souza; Marinho, Jéssica Pereira; Siebert, Cassiana; Kolling, Janaina; Funchal, Cláudia; Wyse, Angela T S; Coelho, Janice Carneiro

    2015-10-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effect of U18666A, an inhibitor of cholesterol synthesis and its intracellular transport, on oxidative stress parameters in cortical astrocytes cultured from Wistar rats (0-3 days old). The cultures were incubated with U18666A (0.25 µg/mL) for 48 h, conditions that are considered ideal to mimic Niemann-Pick type C disease. A variety of indicators of oxidative stress were measured. U18666A treatment increased cholesterol 2-fold in treated compared to control astrocytes. Oxidative stress was significantly elevated in treated cells as demonstrated by a 1.7-fold increase in thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, a 60% decrease is sulfhydral groups, and a 3.7-fold increase in carbonyl groups, indicative of increased lipid and protein oxidation following U18666A treatment. Consistent with these changes, both catalase and superoxide dismutase activities were significantly reduced nearly 50% in treated compared to control astrocytes. Collectively, these change resulted in a 50% reduction in Na(+), K(+)-ATPase specific activity following U18666A treatment, suggesting a significant alteration in its plasma membrane environment. Overall, these changes indicate that U18666A treatment results in increased cholesterol levels and an increased level of oxidative stress in cortical astrocytes, consistent with what is observed in Niemann-Pick type C disease. PMID:26344921

  10. Deranged bioenergetics and defective redox capacity in T lymphocytes and neutrophils are related to cellular dysfunction and increased oxidative stress in patients with active systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Li, Ko-Jen; Wu, Cheng-Han; Hsieh, Song-Chou; Lu, Ming-Chi; Tsai, Chang-Youh; Yu, Chia-Li

    2012-01-01

    Urinary excretion of N-benzoyl-glycyl-Nε-(hexanonyl)lysine, a biomarker of oxidative stress, was higher in 26 patients with active systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) than in 11 non-SLE patients with connective tissue diseases and in 14 healthy volunteers. We hypothesized that increased oxidative stress in active SLE might be attributable to deranged bioenergetics, defective reduction-oxidation (redox) capacity, or other factors. We demonstrated that, compared to normal cells, T lymphocytes (T) and polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) of active SLE showed defective expression of facilitative glucose transporters GLUT-3 and GLUT-6, which led to increased intracellular basal lactate and decreased ATP production. In addition, the redox capacity, including intracellular GSH levels and the enzyme activity of glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) and γ-glutamyl-transpeptidase (GGT), was decreased in SLE-T. Compared to normal cells, SLE-PMN showed decreased intracellular GSH levels, and GGT enzyme activity was found in SLE-PMN and enhanced expression of CD53, a coprecipitating molecule for GGT. We conclude that deranged cellular bioenergetics and defective redox capacity in T and PMN are responsible for cellular immune dysfunction and are related to increased oxidative stress in active SLE patients. PMID:22007252

  11. Oxidative stress and alopecia areata

    PubMed Central

    Prie, BE; Voiculescu, VM; Ionescu-Bozdog, OB; Petrutescu, B; Iosif, L; Gaman, LE; Clatici, VG; Stoian, I; Giurcaneanu, C

    2015-01-01

    Alopecia areata (AA) is an inflammatory and autoimmune disease presenting with non-scarring hair loss. The aethiopathogenesis of alopecia areata is unclear and many factors including autoimmunity, genetic predisposition, emotional and environmental stress are thought to play important roles in its development. Antioxidant/ oxidant balance perturbation is a common feature in autoimmune, emotional and environmental stress. Therefore, our paper discusses the implications of oxidative stress in alopecia areata. Abbreviations: AA = alopecia areata, ROS = reactive oxygen species, H2O2 = hydrogen peroxide, TBARS = thiobarbituric acid rective substances, MDA = malondialdehyde, TBARS = thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances, SOD = superoxide dismutase, CAT = catalase, GSH-Px = glutathione peroxidase, PON1 = paraoxonase 1, HO-1 = hemoxigenase 1, TrxR = thioredoxin reductase, GSH = glutathione PMID:26361510

  12. Regulation of oxidative phosphorylation complex activity: effects of tissue-specific metabolic stress within an allometric series and acute changes in workload

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Darci; Covian, Raul; Aponte, Angel M.; Glancy, Brian; Taylor, Joni F.; Chess, David

    2012-01-01

    The concentration of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation complexes (MOPCs) is tuned to the maximum energy conversion requirements of a given tissue; however, whether the activity of MOPCs is altered in response to acute changes in energy conversion demand is unclear. We hypothesized that MOPCs activity is modulated by tissue metabolic stress to maintain the energy-metabolism homeostasis. Metabolic stress was defined as the observed energy conversion rate/maximum energy conversion rate. The maximum energy conversion rate was assumed to be proportional to the concentration of MOPCs, as determined with optical spectroscopy, gel electrophoresis, and mass spectrometry. The resting metabolic stress of the heart and liver across the range of resting metabolic rates within an allometric series (mouse, rabbit, and pig) was determined from MPOCs content and literature respiratory values. The metabolic stress of the liver was high and nearly constant across the allometric series due to the proportional increase in MOPCs content with resting metabolic rate. In contrast, the MOPCs content of the heart was essentially constant in the allometric series, resulting in an increasing metabolic stress with decreasing animal size. The MOPCs activity was determined in native gels, with an emphasis on Complex V. Extracted MOPCs enzyme activity was proportional to resting metabolic stress across tissues and species. Complex V activity was also shown to be acutely modulated by changes in metabolic stress in the heart, in vivo and in vitro. The modulation of extracted MOPCs activity suggests that persistent posttranslational modifications (PTMs) alter MOPCs activity both chronically and acutely, specifically in the heart. Protein phosphorylation of Complex V was correlated with activity inhibition under several conditions, suggesting that protein phosphorylation may contribute to activity modulation with energy metabolic stress. These data are consistent with the notion that metabolic

  13. Effects of 4-phenylbutyric acid on the process and development of diabetic nephropathy induced in rats by streptozotocin: Regulation of endoplasmic reticulum stress-oxidative activation

    SciTech Connect

    Luo Zhifeng; Feng Bing; Mu Jiao; Qi Wei; Zeng Wei; Guo Yanhong; Pang Qi; Ye Zilin; Liu Li; Yuan Fahuan

    2010-07-15

    Oxidative stress may contribute to the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy (DN), although the precise regulatory mechanism is still unclear. Recent reports have shown that chemical molecular chaperone 4-phenylbutyric acid (4-PBA) can suppress oxidative stress by attenuating endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. We therefore hypothesized that 4-PBA could provide renoprotection through the suppression of oxidative stress in DN rats. Male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were randomly divided into three groups: a normal control (NC) group, a streptozotocin (STZ)-induced DN model group, and a DN plus 4-PBA (1 g/kg) treatment group. At the end of 4, 8, and 12 weeks, hydroxyproline content, NADPH oxidase activity and the expression of phosphorylation of inositol-requiring enzyme-1{alpha} (p-IRE1{alpha}), p47phox, nitrotyrosine (NT) and NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) in the kidneys of all rats were determined; malondialdehyde (MDA) levels and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity in serum and urine were also detected; renal nuclear factor {kappa}B (NF-{kappa}B) activity in all of the rats was examined at the end of 12 weeks. Compared with the NC group, the DN rats showed a significant increase in hydroxyproline content, NADPH oxidase activity, NF-{kappa}B activity, the expression of p-IRE1{alpha}, p47phox, NT and Nrf2 in renal tissue; markedly, MDA levels were higher and SOD activity was lower in serum and urine of DN rats than in NC rats for the indicated time. These alterations were inhibited by the administration of 4-PBA. These findings first demonstrated that treatment with 4-PBA significantly inhibits the process and development of diabetic nephropathy in rats through the regulation of ER stress-oxidative activation.

  14. Critical role of oxidative stress and sustained JNK activation in aloe-emodin-mediated apoptotic cell death in human hepatoma cells.

    PubMed

    Lu, Guo Dong; Shen, Han-Ming; Chung, Maxey C M; Ong, Choon Nam

    2007-09-01

    Aloe-emodin (AE), one of the main bioactive anthraquinones of Rheum palmatum, possesses potent antitumor properties. Our previous proteomic study revealed that AE-induced apoptosis was associated with oxidative stress and oxidation of many redox-sensitive proteins. In this study, we aimed to further dissect the cell death-signaling pathways in AE-induced apoptosis. AE was found to cause redox imbalance and deplete the intracellular-reduced glutathione (GSH). Manipulation of the intracellular GSH with buthionine-L-sulfoximine (a GSH synthesis inhibitor) sensitized, and with glutathione monomethyl ester (a GSH donor) protected the AE-induced apoptosis, respectively. More importantly, AE treatment led to evident and sustained activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), an important stress-responsive mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). Over-expression of antioxidant gene sod1 significantly reduced AE-induced JNK activation and cell death, suggesting that oxidative stress-mediated JNK is the effector molecule in AE-induced apoptosis. Such a notion was clearly supported by subsequent studies in which JNK activation was inhibited by JNK inhibitor, JNK small interfering RNA knockdown or over-expression of dominant-negative JNK. In addition, we provided evidence demonstrating the critical role of apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1, a well-established MAPK kinase kinase, in AE-induced JNK activation and apoptotic cell death. Finally, we showed that dissociation of inactive JNK-Glutathione S-transferase pi (GST-pi) complex was also involved in JNK activation through GST-pi oxidation. Taken together, these results suggest that AE-induced apoptotic cell death is mediated via oxidative stress and sustained JNK activation. PMID:17698970

  15. Theileria induces oxidative stress and HIF1α activation that are essential for host leukocyte transformation.

    PubMed

    Medjkane, S; Perichon, M; Marsolier, J; Dairou, J; Weitzman, J B

    2014-04-01

    Complex links between infection and cancer suggest that we still can learn much about tumorigenesis by studying how infectious agents hijack the host cell machinery. We studied the effects of an intracellular parasite called Theileria that infects bovine leukocytes and turns them into invasive cancer-like cells. We investigated the host cells pathways that are deregulated in infected leukocytes and might link infection and lymphoproliferative disease. We show that intracellular Theileria parasites drive a Warburg-like phenotype in infected host leukocytes, characterized by increased expression of metabolic regulators, increased glucose uptake and elevated lactate production, which were lost when the parasite was eliminated. The cohabitation of the parasites within the host cells leads to disruption of the redox balance (as measured by reduced/oxidized glutathione ratio) and elevated ROS (reactive oxygen species) levels, associated with chronic stabilization of the hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha (HIF1α). Inhibition of HIF1α (pharmacologically or genetically), or treatment with antioxidants, led to a marked reduction in expression of aerobic glycolytic genes and inhibited the transformed phenotype. These data show that stabilization of HIF1α, following increased ROS production, modulates host glucose metabolism and is critical for parasite-induced transformation. Our study expands knowledge about the molecular strategy used by the parasite Theileria to induce the transformed phenotypes of infected cells via reprogramming of glucose metabolism and redox signaling. PMID:23665677

  16. Overexpression of amyloid-β protein precursor induces mitochondrial oxidative stress and activates the intrinsic apoptotic cascade.

    PubMed

    Bartley, Matthew G; Marquardt, Kristin; Kirchhof, Danielle; Wilkins, Heather M; Patterson, David; Linseman, Daniel A

    2012-01-01

    Aberrant processing of amyloid-β protein precursor (AβPP) into amyloid-β (Aβ) fragments underlies the formation of senile plaques in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Moreover, Aβ fragments, particularly Aβ(42), exert direct toxic effects within neurons including the induction of mitochondrial oxidative stress (MOS). Interestingly, individuals with Down syndrome (DS) frequently develop early onset AD as a major co-morbid phenotype. One hypothesis for AD associated with DS involves the overexpression of wild type (WT) AβPP protein, due to its location on chromosome 21. However, the mechanism by which the overexpression of WT AβPP might trigger MOS and induce cell death is presently unclear. Here we show that transient overexpression of DsRed2-tagged AβPP (WT) in CHO cells induces caspase-3 activation and nuclear fragmentation indicative of apoptosis. AβPP localizes to the mitochondrial fraction of transfected CHO cells and induces glutathione-sensitive opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) and cytochrome c release. MOS and intrinsic apoptosis induced by AβPP are significantly inhibited by co-expression of Bcl-2 or treatment with either glutathione or a pan-caspase inhibitor. The mPTP inhibitor, cyclosporin A, also significantly attenuates AβPP-induced apoptosis. AβPP-induced apoptosis is unaffected by a β-secretase inhibitor and is independent of detectable Aβ(42); however, a γ-secretase inhibitor significantly protects against AβPP overexpression, suggesting a possible role of the AβPP intracellular domain in cell death. These data indicate that overexpression of WT AβPP is sufficient to induce MOS and intrinsic apoptosis, suggesting a novel pro-oxidant role for AβPP at mitochondria which may be relevant in AD and DS disease pathologies. PMID:22133762

  17. Quercetin protects against aluminium induced oxidative stress and promotes mitochondrial biogenesis via activation of the PGC-1α signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Deep Raj; Sunkaria, Aditya; Wani, Willayat Yousuf; Sharma, Reeta Kumari; Verma, Deepika; Priyanka, Kumari; Bal, Amanjit; Gill, Kiran Dip

    2015-12-01

    The present investigation was carried out to elucidate a possible molecular mechanism related to the protective effect of quercetin administration against aluminium-induced oxidative stress on various mitochondrial respiratory complex subunits with special emphasis on the role of PGC-1α and its downstream targets, i.e. NRF-1, NRF-2 and Tfam in mitochondrial biogenesis. Aluminium lactate (10mg/kg b.wt./day) was administered intragastrically to rats, which were pre-treated with quercetin 6h before aluminium (10mg/kg b.wt./day, intragastrically) for 12 weeks. We found a decrease in ROS levels, mitochondrial DNA oxidation and citrate synthase activity in the hippocampus (HC) and corpus striatum (CS) regions of rat brain treated with quercetin. Besides this an increase in the mRNA levels of the mitochondrial encoded subunits - ND1, ND2, ND3, Cyt b, COX1, COX3 and ATPase6 along with increased expression of nuclear encoded subunits COX4, COX5A and COX5B of electron transport chain (ETC). In quercetin treated group an increase in the mitochondrial DNA copy number and mitochondrial content in both the regions of rat brain was observed. The PGC-1α was up regulated in quercetin treated rats along with NRF-1, NRF-2 and Tfam, which act downstream from PGC-1α. Electron microscopy results revealed a significant decrease in the mitochondrial cross-section area, mitochondrial perimeter length and increase in mitochondrial number in case of quercetin treated rats as compared to aluminium treated ones. Therefore it seems quercetin increases mitochondrial biogenesis and makes it an almost ideal flavanoid to control or limit the damage that has been associated with the defective mitochondrial function seen in many neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:26493151

  18. Expression of xCT and activity of system xc(-) are regulated by NRF2 in human breast cancer cells in response to oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Habib, Eric; Linher-Melville, Katja; Lin, Han-Xin; Singh, Gurmit

    2015-08-01

    Cancer cells adapt to high levels of oxidative stress in order to survive and proliferate by activating key transcription factors. One such master regulator, the redox sensitive transcription factor NF E2 Related Factor 2 (NRF2), controls the expression of cellular defense genes including those encoding intracellular redox-balancing proteins involved in glutathione (GSH) synthesis. Under basal conditions, Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1 (KEAP1) targets NRF2 for ubiquitination. In response to oxidative stress, NRF2 dissociates from KEAP1, entering the nucleus and binding to the antioxidant response element (ARE) in the promoter of its target genes. Elevated reactive oxygen species (ROS) production may deplete GSH levels within cancer cells. System xc(-), an antiporter that exports glutamate while importing cystine to be converted into cysteine for GSH synthesis, is upregulated in cancer cells in response to oxidative stress. Here, we provided evidence that the expression of xCT, the light chain subunit of system xc(-), is regulated by NRF2 in representative human breast cancer cells. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) treatment increased nuclear translocation of NRF2, also increasing levels of xCT mRNA and protein and extracellular glutamate release. Overexpression of NRF2 up-regulated the activity of the xCT promoter, which contains a proximal ARE. In contrast, overexpression of KEAP1 repressed promoter activity and decreased xCT protein levels, while siRNA knockdown of KEAP1 up-regulated xCT protein levels and transporter activity. These results demonstrate the importance of the KEAP1/NRF2 pathway in balancing oxidative stress in breast cancer cells through system xc(-). We have previously shown that xCT is upregulated in various cancer cell lines under oxidative stress. In the current investigation, we focused on MCF-7 cells as a model for mechanistic studies. PMID:25827424

  19. Hypoxia, Oxidative Stress and Fat.

    PubMed

    Netzer, Nikolaus; Gatterer, Hannes; Faulhaber, Martin; Burtscher, Martin; Pramsohler, Stephan; Pesta, Dominik

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic disturbances in white adipose tissue in obese individuals contribute to the pathogenesis of insulin resistance and the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Impaired insulin action in adipocytes is associated with elevated lipolysis and increased free fatty acids leading to ectopic fat deposition in liver and skeletal muscle. Chronic adipose tissue hypoxia has been suggested to be part of pathomechanisms causing dysfunction of adipocytes. Hypoxia can provoke oxidative stress in human and animal adipocytes and reduce the production of beneficial adipokines, such as adiponectin. However, time-dose responses to hypoxia relativize the effects of hypoxic stress. Long-term exposure of fat cells to hypoxia can lead to the production of beneficial substances such as leptin. Knowledge of time-dose responses of hypoxia on white adipose tissue and the time course of generation of oxidative stress in adipocytes is still scarce. This paper reviews the potential links between adipose tissue hypoxia, oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, and low-grade inflammation caused by adipocyte hypertrophy, macrophage infiltration and production of inflammatory mediators. PMID:26061760

  20. Oxidative Stress and Digestive Enzyme Activity of Flatfish Larvae in a Changing Ocean.

    PubMed

    Pimentel, Marta S; Faleiro, Filipa; Diniz, Mário; Machado, Jorge; Pousão-Ferreira, Pedro; Peck, Myron A; Pörtner, Hans O; Rosa, Rui

    2015-01-01

    Until now, it is not known how the antioxidant and digestive enzymatic machinery of fish early life stages will change with the combined effects of future ocean acidification and warming. Here we show that high pCO2 (~1600 μatm) significantly decreased metabolic rates (up to 27.4 %) of flatfish larvae, Solea senegalensis, at both present (18 °C) and warmer temperatures (+4 °C). Moreover, both warming and hypercapnia increased the heat shock response and the activity of antioxidant enzymes, namely catalase (CAT) and glutathione S-transferase (GST), mainly in post-metamorphic larvae (30 dph). The lack of changes in the activity of CAT and GST of pre-metamorphic larvae (10 dph) seems to indicate that earlier stages lack a fully-developed antioxidant defense system. Nevertheless, the heat shock and antioxidant responses of post-metamorphic larvae were not enough to avoid the peroxidative damage, which was greatly increased under future environmental conditions. Digestive enzymatic activity of S. senegalensis larvae was also affected by future predictions. Hypercapnic conditions led to a decrease in the activity of digestive enzymes, both pancreatic (up to 26.1 % for trypsin and 74.5 % for amylase) and intestinal enzymes (up to 36.1 % for alkaline phosphatase) in post-metamorphic larvae. Moreover, the impact of ocean acidification and warming on some of these physiological and biochemical variables (namely, lower OCR and higher HSP and MDA levels) were translated into larvae performance, being significantly correlated with decreased larval growth and survival or increased incidence of skeletal deformities. The increased vulnerability of flatfish early life stages under future ocean conditions is expected to potentially determine recruitment and population dynamics in marine ecosystems. PMID:26221723

  1. INHIBITORY ACTIVITY OF PROTECTED EDIBLE PLANTS ON OXIDATIVE STRESS INDUCED BY ORAL 1,4-DIOXANE.

    PubMed

    Mnaa, Said; Shaker, Emad S; Mahmoud, Hemdan I

    2016-04-01

    1,4-Dioxane (DX) with two oxygen atoms make it hydrophilic and infinitely soluble in water. As a synthetic organic compound, it used widely throughout industry as a solvent. Dioxane causes numerous human ailments such as liver damage and kidney failure. It has been shown in research to be carcinogenic to animals, and is a potential carcinogen to humans. Daily administration for 1,4-dioxane (100 mg/kg body weight) in drinking water for rats weighing 120 g, except for normal control group. Experimental animal for 42 days was followed through body weight, serum alkaline phosphatase, serum creatinine, malondialdehyde, and catalase enzyme activity; beside histological patterns for liver, kidney, brain and ovary sections. Protection treatment has been offered using oral injection N-acetyl cysteine (100 mg/kg b.wt.), and fresh 200 mg/kg b.wt. in diet meal for each of nabk, husk, and sycamore in separated groups. Body weight and CAT activity have decreased by 25.8, and 68.7%, respectively. While increase has found in MDA, ALP and creatinine values by 76, 48.9, and 67.3%, respectively. NAC showed improvement especially for MDA peroxidation marker and creatinine for kidney disorder. On the other hand, nabk improved CAT activity and husk for ALP liver mutagenicity marker. Intoxicated DX showed edema, kupffer cell activation, atrophy of glomerular tuft, and necrosis of neurons in liver, kidney and brain sections. Obviously nabk showed highly improvement in liver toxicity which is the most sensitive organ to DX as found in research. PMID:27363050

  2. Oxidative Stress and Digestive Enzyme Activity of Flatfish Larvae in a Changing Ocean

    PubMed Central

    Pimentel, Marta S.; Faleiro, Filipa; Diniz, Mário; Machado, Jorge; Pousão-Ferreira, Pedro; Peck, Myron A.; Pörtner, Hans O.; Rosa, Rui

    2015-01-01

    Until now, it is not known how the antioxidant and digestive enzymatic machinery of fish early life stages will change with the combined effects of future ocean acidification and warming. Here we show that high pCO2 (~1600 μatm) significantly decreased metabolic rates (up to 27.4 %) of flatfish larvae, Solea senegalensis, at both present (18 °C) and warmer temperatures (+4 °C). Moreover, both warming and hypercapnia increased the heat shock response and the activity of antioxidant enzymes, namely catalase (CAT) and glutathione S-transferase (GST), mainly in post-metamorphic larvae (30 dph). The lack of changes in the activity of CAT and GST of pre-metamorphic larvae (10 dph) seems to indicate that earlier stages lack a fully-developed antioxidant defense system. Nevertheless, the heat shock and antioxidant responses of post-metamorphic larvae were not enough to avoid the peroxidative damage, which was greatly increased under future environmental conditions. Digestive enzymatic activity of S. senegalensis larvae was also affected by future predictions. Hypercapnic conditions led to a decrease in the activity of digestive enzymes, both pancreatic (up to 26.1 % for trypsin and 74.5 % for amylase) and intestinal enzymes (up to 36.1 % for alkaline phosphatase) in post-metamorphic larvae. Moreover, the impact of ocean acidification and warming on some of these physiological and biochemical variables (namely, lower OCR and higher HSP and MDA levels) were translated into larvae performance, being significantly correlated with decreased larval growth and survival or increased incidence of skeletal deformities. The increased vulnerability of flatfish early life stages under future ocean conditions is expected to potentially determine recruitment and population dynamics in marine ecosystems. PMID:26221723

  3. Anti-inflammatory Activity of Berry Fruits in Mice Model of Inflammation is Based on Oxidative Stress Modulation

    PubMed Central

    Nardi, Geisson Marcos; Farias Januario, Adriana Graziele; Freire, Cassio Geremia; Megiolaro, Fernanda; Schneider, Kétlin; Perazzoli, Marlene Raimunda Andreola; Do Nascimento, Scheley Raap; Gon, Ana Cristina; Mariano, Luísa Nathália Bolda; Wagner, Glauber; Niero, Rivaldo; Locatelli, Claudriana

    2016-01-01

    Background: Many fruits have been used as nutraceuticals because the presence of bioactive molecules that play biological activities. Objective: The present study was designed to compare the anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects of methanolic extracts of Lycium barbarum (GOJI), Vaccinium macrocarpon (CRAN) and Vaccinium myrtillus (BLUE). Materials and Methods: Mices were treated with extracts (50 and 200 mg/kg, p.o.), twice a day through 10 days. Phytochemical analysis was performed by high-performance liquid chromatography. Antioxidant activity was determine by 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) assay, reducing power, lipid peroxidation thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), reduced glutathione (GSH) and catalase (CAT) activity. Anti-inflammatory activity was evaluated by paw edema followed by determination of myeloperoxidase (MPO) and TBARS. Results: High amount of phenolic compounds, including rutin, were identified in all berries extracts. However, quercetin was observed only in BLUE and CRAN. GOJI presents higher scavenging activity of DPPH radical and reducing power than BLUE and CRAN. The extracts improved antioxidant status in liver; BLUE showed the largest reduction (75.3%) in TBARS when compared to CRAN (70.7%) and GOJI (65.3%). Nonetheless, CAT activity was lower in BLUE group. However, hepatic concentrations of GSH were higher in animals treated with GOJI rather than CRAN and BLUE. Despite all fruits caused a remarkable reduction in paw edema and TBARS, only BLUE and CRAN were able to reduce MPO. Conclusion: These results suggest that quercetin, rutin, or other phenolic compound found in these berry fruits extracts could produce an anti-inflammatory response based on modulation of oxidative stress in paw edema model. SUMMARY Within fruits broadly consumed because of its nutraceuticals properties include, Lycium barbarum (Goji berry), Vaccinium myrtillus (Blueberry or Bilberry) and Vaccinium macrocarpon (Cranberry)The objectives of this

  4. DIEPOXYBUTANE ACTIVATES THE MITOCHONDRIAL APOPTOTIC PATHWAY AND MEDIATES APOPTOSIS IN HUMAN LYMPHOBLASTS THROUGH OXIDATIVE STRESS

    PubMed Central

    Yadavilli, Sridevi; Martinez-Ceballos, Eduardo; Snowden-Aikens, Janana; Hurst, Angela; Joseph, Tranole; Albrecht, Thomas; Muganda, Perpetua M.

    2007-01-01

    Diepoxybutane (DEB) is the most potent metabolite of the environmental chemical 1, 3-butadiene (BD), which is prevalent in petrochemical industrial areas. BD is a known mutagen and human carcinogen, and possesses multi-systems organ toxicity. We recently reported that DEB-induced cell death in TK6 lymphoblasts was due to the occurrence of apoptosis, and not necrosis. In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanisms responsible for DEB-induced apoptosis in these cells. Bax and Bak were found to be over-expressed and activated, and the mitochondrial trans-membrane potential was attenuated in cells undergoing DEB-induced apoptosis. Cytochrome c was depleted from the mitochondria of TK6 cells undergoing apoptosis, and was released into the cytosol in Jurkat-T lymphoblasts exposed to the same concentrations of DEB. Executioner caspase 3 was deduced to be activated by initiator caspase 9. DEB induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, and the ROS scavenger N-acetyl-L-cysteine effectively blocked DEB-induced apoptosis in TK6 cells. Collectively, these results demonstrate that the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway is activated to mediate DEB-induced apoptosis in human TK6 lymphoblasts. These results further demonstrate that DEB-induced apoptosis is also mediated by the DEB-induced generation of ROS. This is the first report to examine the mechanism of DEB-induced apoptosis in human lymphoblasts. PMID:17693053

  5. Acetylation of MnSOD directs enzymatic activity responding to cellular nutrient status or oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Ozden, Ozkan; Park, Seong-Hoon; Kim, Hyun-Seok; Jiang, Haiyan; Coleman, Mitchell C; Spitz, Douglas R; Gius, David

    2011-02-01

    A fundamental observation in biology is that mitochondrial function, as measured by increased reactive oxygen species (ROS), changes significantly with age, suggesting a potential mechanistic link between the cellular processes governing longevity and mitochondrial metabolism homeostasis. In addition, it is well established that altered ROS levels are observed in multiple age-related illnesses including carcinogenesis, neurodegenerative, fatty liver, insulin resistance, and cardiac disease, to name just a few. Manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) is the primary mitochondrial ROS scavenging enzyme that converts superoxide to hydrogen peroxide, which is subsequently converted to water by catalase and other peroxidases. It has recently been shown that MnSOD enzymatic activity is regulated by the reversible acetylation of specific, evolutionarily conserved lysine(s) in the protein. These results, suggest for the first time, that the mitochondria contain bidirectional post-translational signaling networks, similar to that observed in the cytoplasm and nucleus, and that changes in lysine acetylation alter MnSOD enzymatic activity. In addition, these new results demonstrate that the mitochondrial anti-aging or fidelity / sensing protein, SIRT3, responds to changes in mitochondrial nutrient and/or redox status to alter the enzymatic activity of specific downstream targets, including MnSOD that adjusts and/or maintains ROS levels as well as metabolic homeostatic poise. PMID:21386137

  6. Oxidative Stress in Schizophrenia: An Integrated Approach

    PubMed Central

    Bitanihirwe, Byron K.Y.; Woo, Tsung-Ung W.

    2010-01-01

    Oxidative stress has been suggested to contribute to the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. In particular, oxidative damage to lipids, proteins, and DNA as observed in schizophrenia is known to impair cell viability and function, which may subsequently account for the deteriorating course of the illness. Currently available evidence points towards an alteration in the activities of enzymatic and nonenzymatic antioxidant systems in schizophrenia. In fact, experimental models have demonstrated that oxidative stress induces behavioural and molecular anomalies strikingly similar to those observed in schizophrenia. These findings suggest that oxidative stress is intimately linked to a variety of pathophysiological processes, such as inflammation, oligodendrocyte abnormalities, mitochondrial dysfunction, hypoactive N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors and the impairment of fast-spiking gamma-aminobutyric acid interneurons.[bkyb1] Such self-sustaining mechanisms may progressively worsen producing the functional and structural consequences associated with schizophrenia. Recent clinical studies have shown antioxidant treatment to be effective in ameliorating schizophrenic symptoms. Hence, identifying viable therapeutic strategies to tackle oxidative stress and the resulting physiological disturbances provide an exciting opportunity for the treatment and ultimately prevention of schizophrenia. PMID:20974172

  7. Aqueous Extract of Phyllanthus niruri Leaves Displays In Vitro Antioxidant Activity and Prevents the Elevation of Oxidative Stress in the Kidney of Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Male Rats

    PubMed Central

    Giribabu, Nelli; Rao, Pasupuleti Visweswara; Kumar, Korla Praveen; Muniandy, Sekaran; Swapna Rekha, Somesula; Salleh, Naguib

    2014-01-01

    P. niruri has been reported to possess antidiabetic and kidney protective effects. In the present study, the phytochemical constituents and in vitro antioxidant activity of P. niruri leaf aqueous extract were investigated together with its effect on oxidative stress and antioxidant enzymes levels in diabetic rat kidney. Results. Treatment of diabetic male rats with P. niruri leaf aqueous extract (200 and 400 mg/kg) for 28 consecutive days prevents the increase in the amount of lipid peroxidation (LPO) product, malondialdehyde (MDA), and the diminution of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity levels in the kidney of diabetic rats. The amount of LPO showed strong negative correlation with SOD, CAT, and GPx activity levels. P. niruri leaf aqueous extract exhibits in vitro antioxidant activity with IC50 slightly lower than ascorbic acid. Phytochemical screening of plant extract indicates the presence of polyphenols. Conclusion. P. niruri leaf extract protects the kidney from oxidative stress induced by diabetes. PMID:24991228

  8. Myocardial oxidative stress contributes to transgenic β2-adrenoceptor activation-induced cardiomyopathy and heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Q; Dalic, A; Fang, L; Kiriazis, H; Ritchie, RH; Sim, K; Gao, X-M; Drummond, G; Sarwar, M; Zhang, Y-Y; Dart, AM; Du, X-J

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE While maintaining cardiac performance, chronic β-adrenoceptor activation eventually exacerbates the progression of cardiac remodelling and failure. We examined the adverse signalling pathways mediated by nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase and reactive oxygen species (ROS) after chronic β2-adrenoceptor activation. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Mice with transgenic β2-adrenoceptor overexpression (β2-TG) and non-transgenic littermates were either untreated or treated with an antioxidant (N-acetylcysteine, NAC) or NADPH oxidase inhibitors (apocynin, diphenyliodonium). Levels of ROS, phosphorylated p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), pro-inflammatory cytokines and collagen content in the left ventricle (LV) and LV function were measured and compared. KEY RESULTS β2-TG mice showed increased ROS production, phosphorylation of p38 MAPK and heat shock protein 27 (HSP27), expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and collagen, and progressive ventricular dysfunction. β2-adrenoceptor stimulation similarly increased ROS production and phosphorylation of p38 MAPK and HSP27 in cultured cardiomyocytes. Treatment with apocynin, diphenyliodonium or NAC reduced phosphorylation of p38 MAPK and HSP27 in both cultured cardiomyocytes and the LV of β2-TG mice. NAC treatment (500 mg·kg−1·day−1) for 2 weeks eliminated the up-regulated expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and collagen in the LV of β2-TG mice. Chronic NAC treatment to β2-TG mice from 7 to 10 months of age largely prevented progression of ventricular dilatation, preserved contractile function (fractional shortening 37 ± 5% vs. 25 ± 3%, ejection fraction 52 ± 5% vs. 32 ± 4%, both P < 0.05), reduced cardiac fibrosis and suppressed matrix metalloproteinase activity. CONCLUSION AND IMPLICATIONS β2-adrenoceptor stimulation provoked NADPH oxidase-derived ROS production in the heart. Elevated ROS activated p38 MAPK and contributed significantly to cardiac

  9. Anti-acetylcholinesterase and Antioxidant Activities of Inhaled Juniper Oil on Amyloid Beta (1-42)-Induced Oxidative Stress in the Rat Hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Cioanca, Oana; Hancianu, Monica; Mihasan, Marius; Hritcu, Lucian

    2015-05-01

    Juniper volatile oil is extracted from Juniperus communis L., of the Cupressaceae family, also known as common juniper. Also, in aromatherapy the juniper volatile oil is used against anxiety, nervous tension and stress-related conditions. In the present study, we identified the effects of the juniper volatile oil on amyloid beta (1-42)-induced oxidative stress in the rat hippocampus. Rats received a single intracerebroventricular injection of amyloid beta (1-42) (400 pmol/rat) and then were exposed to juniper volatile oil (200 μl, either 1 or 3 %) for controlled 60 min period, daily, for 21 continuous days. Also, the antioxidant activity in the hippocampus was assessed using superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase and catalase specific activities, the total content of the reduced glutathione, protein carbonyl and malondialdehyde levels. Additionally, the acetylcholinesterase activity in the hippocampus was assessed. The amyloid beta (1-42)-treated rats exhibited the following: increase of the acetylcholinesterase, superoxide dismutase and catalase specific activities, decrease of glutathione peroxidase specific activity and the total content of the reduced glutathione along with an elevation of malondialdehyde and protein carbonyl levels. Inhalation of the juniper volatile oil significantly decreases the acetylcholinesterase activity and exhibited antioxidant potential. These findings suggest that the juniper volatile oil may be a potential candidate for the development of therapeutic agents to manage oxidative stress associated with Alzheimer's disease through decreasing the activity of acetylcholinesterase and anti-oxidative mechanism. PMID:25743585

  10. Bioaccessible (poly)phenol metabolites from raspberry protect neural cells from oxidative stress and attenuate microglia activation.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Gonçalo; Nanni, Sara; Figueira, Inês; Ivanov, Ines; McDougall, Gordon J; Stewart, Derek; Ferreira, Ricardo B; Pinto, Paula; Silva, Rui F M; Brites, Dora; Santos, Cláudia N

    2017-01-15

    Neuroinflammation is an integral part of the neurodegeneration process inherent to several aging dysfunctions. Within the central nervous system, microglia are the effective immune cells, responsible for neuroinflammatory responses. In this study, raspberries were subjected to in vitro digestion simulation to obtain the components that result from the gastrointestinal (GI) conditions, which would be bioaccessible and available for blood uptake. Both the original raspberry extract and the gastrointestinal bioaccessible (GIB) fraction protected neuronal and microglia cells against H2O2-induced oxidative stress and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammation, at low concentrations. Furthermore, this neuroprotective capacity was independent of intracellular ROS scavenging mechanisms. We show for the first time that raspberry metabolites present in the GIB fraction significantly inhibited microglial pro-inflammatory activation by LPS, through the inhibition of Iba1 expression, TNF-α release and NO production. Altogether, this study reveals that raspberry polyphenols may present a dietary route to the retardation or amelioration of neurodegenerative-related dysfunctions. PMID:27542476

  11. Ursolic acid attenuates oxidative stress in nigrostriatal tissue and improves neurobehavioral activity in MPTP-induced Parkinsonian mouse model.

    PubMed

    Rai, Sachchida Nand; Yadav, Satyndra Kumar; Singh, Divakar; Singh, Surya Pratap

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is characterized by a slow and progressive degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc) region of brain. Oxidative stress and inflammation plays important role in the neurodegeneration and development of PD. Ursolic Acid (UA: 3β-hydroxy-urs-12-en-28-oic acid) is a natural pentacyclic triterpenoid found in various medicinal plants. Its anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activity is a well-established fact. In this paper, the neuroprotective efficiency of UA in MPTP induced PD mouse model has been explored. For this purpose, we divided 30 mice into 5 different groups; first was control, second was MPTP-treated, third, fourth and fifth were different doses of UA viz., 5 mg/kg, 25 mg/kg, and 50 mg/kg body weight (wt) respectively, along with MPTP. After 21 days of treatment, different behavioral parameters and biochemical assays were conducted. Tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) immunostaining of SN dopaminergic neurons as well as HPLC quantification of dopamine and its metabolites 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) and homovanilic acid (HVA) were also performed. Our results proved that, UA improves behavioral deficits, restored altered dopamine level and protect dopaminergic neurons in the MPTP intoxicated mouse. Among three different doses, 25 mg/kg body wt was the most effective dose for the PD. This work reveals the potential of UA as a promising drug candidate for PD treatment. PMID:26686287

  12. Oxidative Stress and Antimicrobial Activity of Chromium(III) and Ruthenium(II) Complexes on Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Páez, Paulina L.; Bazán, Claudia M.; Bongiovanni, María E.; Toneatto, Judith; Albesa, Inés; Becerra, María C.; Argüello, Gerardo A.

    2013-01-01

    The prevalence of antibiotic resistance has resulted in the need for new approaches to be developed to combat previously easily treatable infections. The main aim of this work was to establish the potential of the synthetic α-diimine chromium(III) and ruthenium(II) complexes (where the α-diimine ligands are bpy = 2,2-bipyridine, phen = 1,10-phenanthroline, and dppz = dipyrido[3,2-a:2′,3′-c]-phenazine) like [Cr(phen)3]3+, [Cr(phen)2(dppz)]3+, [Ru(phen)3]2+, and [Ru(bpy)3]2+ as antibacterial agents by generating oxidative stress. The [Cr(phen)3]3+ and [Cr(phen)2(dppz)]3+ complexes showed activity against Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria with minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) ranging from 0.125 μg/mL to 1 μg/mL, while [Ru(phen)3]2+ and [Ru(bpy)3]2+ do not exhibit antimicrobial activity against the two bacterial genera studied at the concentration range used. When ciprofloxacin was combined with [Cr(phen)3]3+ for the inhibition of Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli, an important synergistic effect was observed, FIC 0.066 for S. aureus and FIC 0.064 for E. coli. The work described here shows that chromium(III) complexes are bactericidal for S. aureus and E. coli. Our results indicate that α-diimine chromium(III) complexes may be interesting to open new paths for metallodrug chemotherapy against different bacterial genera since some of these complexes have been found to exhibit remarkable antibacterial activities. PMID:24093107

  13. 3,4-Dihydroxy-Benzohydroxamic Acid (Didox) Suppresses Pro-inflammatory Profiles and Oxidative Stress in TLR4-Activated RAW264.7 Murine Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Matsebatlela, Thabe M.; Anderson, Amy L.; Gallicchio, Vincent S.; Elford, Howard; Rice, Charles D.

    2015-01-01

    Didox (3,4-dihydroxy-benzohydroxamic acid), is a synthetic ribonucleotide reductase (RR) inhibitor derived from polyhydroxy-substituted benzohydroxamic acid, and originally developed as an anti-cancer agent. Some studies indicate that didox may have anti-oxidative stress-like properties, while other studies hint that didox may have anti-inflammatory properties. Using nitric oxide production in response to LPS treatment as a sensitive screening assay for anti-inflammatory compounds, we show that didox is very potent at levels as low as 6.25 μM, with maximal inhibition at 100 μM. A qRT-PCR array was then employed to screen didox for other potential anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative stress-related properties. Didox was very potent in suppressing the expression of these arrayed mRNA in response to LPS, and in some cases didox alone suppressed expression. Using qRT-PCR as a follow up to the array, we demonstrated that didox suppresses LPS-induced mRNA levels of iNOS, IL-6, IL-1, TNF-α, NF-κβ (p65), and p38-α, after 24 h of treatment. Treatment with didox also suppresses the secretion of nitric oxide, IL-6, and IL-10. Furthermore, oxidative stress, as quantified by intracellular ROS levels in response to macrophage activators LPS and phorbol ester (PMA), and the glutathione depleting agent BSO, is reduced by treatment with didox. Moreover, we demonstrate that nuclear translocation of NF-κβ (p65) in response to LPS is inhibited by didox. These findings were supported by qRT-PCR for oxidative stress genes SOD1 and catalase. Overall, this study supports the conclusion that didox may have a future role in managing acute and chronic inflammatory diseases and oxidative stress due to high production of ROS. PMID:25843059

  14. Selected oxidative stress markers in gynecological laparoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Koźlik, Jacek; Przybyłowska, Joanna; Mikrut, Kinga; Zwoliński, Jacek; Piątek, Jacek; Sobczak, Paweł

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The surgical stress response after laparoscopy is smaller when compared with open surgery, and it is expected that after minimally invasive surgery the possible development of oxidative stress will be less severe. Aim To evaluate markers of pro-oxidant activity – levels of lipid peroxides and malondialdehyde – and activity of the antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase in the perioperative period in patients undergoing gynecological laparoscopy and to determine whether the duration of laparoscopy can affect these changes. Material and methods The study included 64 patients, divided into two groups: group 1 with duration of laparoscopy up to 20 min, and group 2 with duration of the operation over 40 min. Blood samples were collected before anesthesia, 5 min after release of pneumoperitoneum, and 10 h after surgery. Results A statistically significant increase in the levels of lipid peroxides and malondialdehyde in samples collected after surgery was found in comparison with values obtained before surgery. Also statistically significant differences existed between groups of patients with different duration of surgery. Superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase activity values were significantly decreased. They were also significantly different between the two groups with different duration of surgery. Conclusions In our study, levels of the markers of pro-oxidant activity increased and levels of the markers of antioxidant enzymes decreased, suggesting development of oxidative stress. The duration of laparoscopic procedures affects the severity of the presented changes. PMID:25960799

  15. Peroxidase Activity and Involvement in the Oxidative Stress Response of Roseobacter denitrificans Truncated Hemoglobin

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yaya; Barbeau, Xavier; Bilimoria, Astha; Lagüe, Patrick; Couture, Manon; Tang, Joseph Kuo-Hsiang

    2015-01-01

    Roseobacter denitrificans is a member of the widespread marine Roseobacter genus. We report the first characterization of a truncated hemoglobin from R. denitrificans (Rd. trHb) that was purified in the heme-bound form from heterologous expression of the protein in Escherichia coli. Rd. trHb exhibits predominantly alpha-helical secondary structure and absorbs light at 412, 538 and 572 nm. The phylogenetic classification suggests that Rd. trHb falls into group II trHbs, whereas sequence alignments indicate that it shares certain important heme pocket residues with group I trHbs in addition to those of group II trHbs. The resonance Raman spectra indicate that the isolated Rd. trHb contains a ferric heme that is mostly 6-coordinate low-spin and that the heme of the ferrous form displays a mixture of 5- and 6-coordinate states. Two Fe-His stretching modes were detected, notably one at 248 cm-1, which has been reported in peroxidases and some flavohemoglobins that contain an Fe-His-Asp (or Glu) catalytic triad, but was never reported before in a trHb. We show that Rd. trHb exhibits a significant peroxidase activity with a (kcat/Km) value three orders of magnitude higher than that of bovine Hb and only one order lower than that of horseradish peroxidase. This enzymatic activity is pH-dependent with a pKa value ~6.8. Homology modeling suggests that residues known to be important for interactions with heme-bound ligands in group II trHbs from Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Bacillus subtilis are pointing toward to heme in Rd. trHb. Genomic organization and gene expression profiles imply possible functions for detoxification of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species in vivo. Altogether, Rd. trHb exhibits some distinctive features and appears equipped to help the bacterium to cope with reactive oxygen/nitrogen species and/or to operate redox biochemistry. PMID:25658318

  16. Oxidative stress and adrenocortical insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, R; Kowalczyk, J C; Meimaridou, E; Storr, H L; Metherell, L A

    2014-01-01

    Maintenance of redox balance is essential for normal cellular functions. Any perturbation in this balance due to increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) leads to oxidative stress and may lead to cell dysfunction/damage/death. Mitochondria are responsible for the majority of cellular ROS production secondary to electron leakage as a consequence of respiration. Furthermore, electron leakage by the cytochrome P450 enzymes may render steroidogenic tissues acutely vulnerable to redox imbalance. The adrenal cortex, in particular, is well supplied with both enzymatic (glutathione peroxidases and peroxiredoxins) and non-enzymatic (vitamins A, C and E) antioxidants to cope with this increased production of ROS due to steroidogenesis. Nonetheless oxidative stress is implicated in several potentially lethal adrenal disorders including X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy, triple A syndrome and most recently familial glucocorticoid deficiency. The finding of mutations in antioxidant defence genes in the latter two conditions highlights how disturbances in redox homeostasis may have an effect on adrenal steroidogenesis. PMID:24623797

  17. Oxidative stress in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Khandrika, Lakshmipathi; Kumar, Binod; Koul, Sweaty; Maroni, Paul; Koul, Hari K

    2009-09-18

    As prostate cancer and aberrant changes in reactive oxygen species (ROS) become more common with aging, ROS signaling may play an important role in the development and progression of this malignancy. Increased ROS, otherwise known as oxidative stress, is a result of either increased ROS generation or a loss of antioxidant defense mechanisms. Oxidative stress is associated with several pathological conditions including inflammation and infection. ROS are products of normal cellular metabolism and play vital roles in stimulation of signaling pathways in response to changing intra- and extracellular environmental conditions. Chronic increases in ROS over time are known to induce somatic mutations and neoplastic transformation. In this review we summarize the causes for increased ROS generation and its potential role in etiology and progression of prostate cancer. PMID:19185987

  18. Oxidative Stress and Major Depression

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Akhilesh Kumar; Srivastava, Mona; Srivastava, Ragini

    2014-01-01

    Background: Major causative factor for major depression is inflammation, autoimmune tissue damage and prolonged psychological stress, which leads to oxidative stress. The aim of this study was to know the association of free radicals and antioxidant status in subjects suffering from major depression. Materials and Methods: Sixty patients diagnosed as a case of unipolar depression as per DSM IV, fulfilling the inclusion and exclusion criteria were compared with 40 healthy age and sex matched controls. The sera of both the groups were collected taking aseptic precautions and were evaluated for the markers of oxidative stress and for the antioxidants. The age group of the sample and the controls was between 18-60 y, both males and females were equally represented in the groups. Results: A significantly high level of malondialdehyde (MDA) was found in the patients with major depression (1.95 ± 1.04 mmol/L) as compared to healthy controls (0.366 ± 0.175 mmol/L) (p < 0.0001). The serum level of nitrite was found to be lower in cases (23.18 ± 12.08 μmol/L) in comparison to controls (26.18 ± 8.68 μmol/L) (p = 0.1789). Similarly the serum level of ascorbic acid and superoxide dismutase (SOD) were significantly below as compared to healthy controls (all p < 0.0001). Ceruloplasmin levels were also depressed in cases (p = 0.3943). Conclusion: The study concluded that in the absence of known oxidative injury causative agents, the lowered levels of antioxidants and higher levels of MDA implicate the high degree of oxidative stress in unipolar depression. PMID:25653939

  19. Air pollution and circulating biomarkers of oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Staimer, Norbert; Vaziri, Nosratola D.

    2013-01-01

    Chemical components of air pollutant exposures that induce oxidative stress and subsequent inflammation may be partly responsible for associations of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality with airborne particulate matter and combustion-related pollutant gasses. However, epidemiologic evidence regarding this is limited. An exposure-assessment approach is to measure the oxidative potential of particle mixtures because it is likely that hundreds of correlated chemicals are involved in overall effects of air pollution on health. Oxidative potential likely depends on particle composition and size distribution, especially ultrafine particle concentration, and on transition metals and certain semivolatile and volatile organic chemicals. For health effects, measuring systemic oxidative stress in the blood is one feasible approach, but there is no universal biomarker of oxidative stress and there are many potential target molecules (lipids, proteins, DNA, nitric oxide, etc.), which may be more or less suitable for specific study goals. Concurrent with the measurement of oxidative stress, it is important to measure gene and/or protein expression of endogenous antioxidant enzymes because they can modify relations between oxidative stress biomarkers and air pollutants. Conversely, the expression and activities of these enzymes are modified by oxidative stress. This interplay will likely determine the observed effects of air pollutants on systemic inflammatory and thrombotic mediators and related clinical outcomes. Studies are needed to assess the reliability and validity of oxidative stress biomarkers, evaluate differences in associations between oxidative stress biomarkers and various pollutant measurements (mass, chemical components, and oxidative potential), and evaluate impacts of antioxidant responses on these relations. PMID:23626660

  20. Reduced cytochrome P4501A activity and recovery from oxidative stress during subchronic benzo[a]pyrene and benzo[e]pyrene treatment of rainbow trout

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis, Lawrence R.; Garzon, Claudia B.; Arkoosh, Mary; Collier, Tracy; Myers, Mark S.; Buzitis, Jon; Hahn, Mark E.

    2011-07-01

    This study assessed the role of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) affinity, and cytochrome P4501A (CYP1A) protein and activity in polyaromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-induced oxidative stress. In the 1-100 nM concentration range benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) but not benzo[e]pyrene (BeP) competitively displaced 2 nM [{sup 3}H]2, 3, 7, 8-tetrachloro-dibenzo-p-dioxin from rainbow trout AHR2{alpha}. Based on appearance of fluorescent aromatic compounds in bile over 3, 7, 14, 28 or 50 days of feeding 3 {mu}g of BaP or BeP/g fish/day, rainbow trout liver readily excreted these polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and their metabolites at near steady state rates. CYP1A proteins catalyzed more than 98% of ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD) activity in rainbow trout hepatic microsomes. EROD activity of hepatic microsomes initially increased and then decreased to control activities after 50 days of feeding both PAHs. Immunohistochemistry of liver confirmed CYP1A protein increased in fish fed both PAHs after 3 days and remained elevated for up to 28 days. Neither BaP nor BeP increased hepatic DNA adduct concentrations at any time up to 50 days of feeding these PAHs. Comet assays of blood cells demonstrated marked DNA damage after 14 days of feeding both PAHs that was not significant after 50 days. There was a strong positive correlation between hepatic EROD activity and DNA damage in blood cells over time for both PAHs. Neither CYP1A protein nor 3-nitrotyrosine (a biomarker for oxidative stress) immunostaining in trunk kidney were significantly altered by BaP or BeP after 3, 7, 14, or 28 days. There was no clear association between AHR2{alpha} affinity and BaP and BeP-induced oxidative stress. - Highlights: > No direct association between aryl hydrocarbon receptor affinity and polyaromatic hydrocarbon induced oxidative stress. > There was a strong correlation between cytochrome P4501A activity and oxidative stress as measured with the comet assay. > There was no correlation between cytochrome P

  1. Anti-inflammatory/Anti-oxidative stress activities and differential regulation of Nrf2-mediated genes by non-polar fractions of tea Chrysanthemum zawadskii and licorice Glycyrrhiza uralensis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tien-Yuan; Khor, Tin Oo; Saw, Constance Lay Lay; Loh, Stephanie C; Chen, Alvin I; Lim, Soon Sung; Park, Jung Han Yoon; Cai, Li; Kong, Ah-Ng Tony

    2011-03-01

    Accumulating evidence from epidemiological studies indicates that chronic inflammation and oxidative stress play critical roles in neoplastic development. The aim of this study was to investigate the anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidative stress activities, and differential regulation of Nrf2-mediated genes by tea Chrysanthemum zawadskii (CZ) and licorice Glycyrrhiza uralensis (LE) extracts. The anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative stress activities of hexane/ethanol extracts of CZ and LE were investigated using in vitro and in vivo approaches, including quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) and microarray. Additionally, the role of the transcriptional factor Nrf2 (nuclear erythroid-related factor 2) signaling pathways was examined. Our results show that CZ and LE extracts exhibited potent anti-inflammatory activities by suppressing the mRNA and protein expression levels of pro-inflammatory biomarkers IL-1β, IL-6, COX-2 and iNOS in LPS-stimulated murine RAW 264.7 macrophage cells. CZ and LE also significantly suppressed the NO production of LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells. Additionally, CZ and LE suppressed the NF-κB luciferase activity in human HT-29 colon cancer cells. Both extracts also showed strong Nrf2-mediated antioxidant/Phase II detoxifying enzymes induction. CZ and LE induced NQO1, Nrf2, and UGT and antioxidant response element (ARE)-luciferase activity in human hepatoma HepG2 C8 cells. Using Nrf2 knockout [Nrf2 (-/-)] and Nrf2 wild-type (+/+) mice, LE and CZ showed Nrf2-dependent transactivation of Nrf2-mediated antioxidant and phase II detoxifying genes. In summary, CZ and LE possess strong inhibitory effects against NF-κB-mediated inflammatory as well as strong activation of the Nrf2-ARE-anti-oxidative stress signaling pathways, which would contribute to their overall health promoting pharmacological effects against diseases including cancer. PMID:20967519

  2. Activity of myricetin and other plant-derived polyhydroxyl compounds in human LDL and human vascular endothelial cells against oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Bertin, Riccardo; Chen, Zheng; Marin, Raffaella; Donati, Maddalena; Feltrinelli, Angela; Montopoli, Monica; Zambon, Sabina; Manzato, Enzo; Froldi, Guglielmina

    2016-08-01

    Studies indicate that oxidative modifications of endothelium and LDL play a preeminent role in atherogenesis; therefore, the preservation of the endothelial antioxidant capacity and the inhibition of LDL oxidation by use of plant-derived compounds are an appealing strategy against several vascular disorders. On this basis, baicalein, eupatorin, galangin, magnolol, myricetin, oleuropein, silibinin and bilobalide were studied against various oxidative conditions. The radical scavenging capacity was analysed using DPPH and ORAC assays. Furthermore, the LDL oxidation was detected by measuring the formation of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and by monitoring the oxidation kinetics. Further, we used cultured HUVEC to investigate the activities of the polyhydroxyl compounds towards the oxidative stress induced by H2O2. The lowest levels of TBARS were observed in the presence of oleuropein and baicalein, while myricetin, magnolol and eupatorin inhibited these ones to a lesser extent. In addition, oleuropein and myricetin exhibited higher protection in copper-induced LDL oxidation kinetics. However, only myricetin and galangin showed significant protective effects against H2O2 oxidative injury in HUVEC cells. Taken all together the results indicate myricetin as the most active agent among the selected plant-derived polyhydroxyl compounds, with prominent capacities against ox-LDL and ROS production in HUVEC. PMID:27470387

  3. Transcription of Oxidative Stress Genes Is Directly Activated by SpxA1 and, to a Lesser Extent, by SpxA2 in Streptococcus mutans

    PubMed Central

    Kajfasz, Jessica K.; Rivera-Ramos, Isamar; Scott-Anne, Kathleen; Gregoire, Stacy; Abranches, Jacqueline

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The SpxA1 and SpxA2 (formerly SpxA and SpxB) transcriptional regulators of Streptococcus mutans are members of a highly conserved family of proteins found in Firmicutes, and they were previously shown to activate oxidative stress responses. In this study, we showed that SpxA1 exerts substantial positive regulatory influence over oxidative stress genes following exposure to H2O2, while SpxA2 appears to have a secondary regulatory role. In vitro transcription (IVT) assays using purified SpxA1 and/or SpxA2 showed that SpxA1 and, less often, SpxA2 directly activate transcription of some of the major oxidative stress genes. Addition of equimolar concentrations of SpxA1 and SpxA2 to the IVT reactions neither enhanced transcription of the tested genes nor disrupted the dominant role of SpxA1. Substitution of a conserved glycine residue (G52) present in both Spx proteins by arginine (SpxG52R) resulted in strains that phenocopied the Δspx strains. Moreover, addition of purified SpxA1G52R completely failed to activate transcription of ahpC, sodA, and tpx, further confirming that the G52 residue is critical for Spx functionality. IMPORTANCE Streptococcus mutans is a pathogen associated with the formation of dental caries in humans. Within the oral cavity, S. mutans routinely encounters oxidative stress. Our previous data revealed that two regulatory proteins, SpxA1 and SpxA2 (formerly SpxA and SpxB), bear high homology to the Spx regulator that has been characterized as a critical activator of oxidative stress genes in Bacillus subtilis. In this report, we prove that Spx proteins of S. mutans directly activate transcription of genes involved in the oxidative stress response, though SpxA1 appears to have a more dominant role than SpxA2. Therefore, the Spx regulators play a critical role in the ability of S. mutans to thrive within the oral cavity. PMID:25897032

  4. Type 1 5'-deiodinase activity is inhibited by oxidative stress and restored by alpha-lipoic acid in HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kanjun; Yan, Biao; Wang, Fei; Wen, Feiting; Xing, Xingan; Tang, Xue; Shi, Yonghui; Le, Guowei

    2016-04-01

    3,3',5-triiodothyronine (T3) is largely generated from thyroxine (T4) by the catalysis of deiodinases in peripheral tissues. Emerging evidences have indicated its broad participation in regulating various metabolic process via protecting tissues from oxidative stress and improving cellular antioxidant capacity. However, the potential correlation between the oxidative stress and conversion of T4 to T3 is still unclear. In the present study, the effects of T3 and T4 on redox homeostasis in HepG2 cells pre-treated with H2O2 was investigated. It revealed that T3 significantly rescued the apoptotic cell death, consistent with an upregulation of cell antioxidant ability and reduction of ROS accumulation while T4 did not. Afterwards, we examined the enzyme activity and mRNA expression of type 1 5'-deiodianse (DIO1), T3 and rT3 level and found that H2O2 reduced both DIO1 activity and expression in a dose-dependent manner, which consequently declined T3 and rT3 generation. Alpha-lipoic acid (LA) treatment notably restored DIO1 activity, T3 and rT3 level, as well as transcriptional abnormalities of inflammation-associated genes. It suggests that oxidative stress may reduce DIO1 activity by an indirect way like activating cellular inflammatory responses. All these results indicate that the oxidative stress downregulates the conversion of T4 to T3 through DIO1 function in HepG2 cells. PMID:26947333

  5. The Protective Effects of Isoliquiritigenin and Glycyrrhetinic Acid against Triptolide-Induced Oxidative Stress in HepG2 Cells Involve Nrf2 Activation

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Ling-Juan; Li, Huan-De; Yan, Miao; Li, Zhi-Hua; Gong, Hui; Jiang, Pei; Deng, Yang; Fang, Ping-Fei; Zhang, Bi-Kui

    2016-01-01

    Triptolide (TP), an active ingredient of Tripterygium wilfordii Hook f., possesses a wide range of biological activities. Oxidative stress likely plays a role in TP-induced hepatotoxicity. Isoliquiritigenin (ISL) and glycyrrhetinic acid (GA) are potent hepatoprotection agents. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether Nrf2 pathway is associated with the protective effects of ISL and GA against TP-induced oxidative stress or not. HepG2 cells were treated with TP (50 nM) for 24 h after pretreatment with ISL and GA (5, 10, and 20 μM) for 12 h and 24 h, respectively. The results demonstrated that TP treatment significantly increased ROS levels and decreased GSH levels. Both ISL and GA pretreatment decreased ROS and meanwhile enhanced intracellular GSH content. Additionally, TP treatment obviously decreased the protein expression of Nrf2 and its target genes including HO-1 and MRP2 except NQO1. Moreover, both ISL and GA displayed activities as inducers of Nrf2 and increased the expression of HO-1, NQO1, and MRP2. Taken together the current data confirmed that ISL and GA could activate the Nrf2 antioxidant response in HepG2 cells, increasing the expression of its target genes which may be partly associated with their protective effects in TP-induced oxidative stress. PMID:26904149

  6. Effect of Curcumin on Lifespan, Activity Pattern, Oxidative Stress, and Apoptosis in the Brains of Transgenic Drosophila Model of Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Siddique, Yasir Hasan; Naz, Falaq; Jyoti, Smita

    2014-01-01

    Background. A time dependent loss of dopaminergic neurons and the formation of intracellular aggregates of alpha synuclein have been reported in PD model flies. Methods. The progeny (PD flies) expressing human alpha synuclein was exposed to 25, 50, and 100 µM of curcumin mixed in the diet for 24 days. The effect of curcumin was studied on lifespan, activity pattern, oxidative stress, and apoptosis in the brains of PD model flies. The activity of PD model flies was monitored by using Drosophila activity monitors (DAMs). For the estimation of oxidative stress, lipid peroxidation and protein carbonyl content were estimated in the flies brains of each treated groups. The cell death in Drosophila brain was analyzed by isolating brains in Ringer's solution placing them in 70% ethanol and stained in acridine orange to calculate the gray scale values. Results. The exposure of flies to 25, 50, and 100 µM of curcumin showed a dose dependent significant delay in the loss of activity pattern, reduction in the oxidative stress and apoptosis, and increase in the life span of PD model flies. Conclusion. Curcumin is potent in reducing PD symptoms. PMID:24860828

  7. Role of PECAM-1 in the shear-stress-induced activation of Akt and the endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Ingrid; Fisslthaler, Beate; Dixit, Madhulika; Busse, Rudi

    2005-09-15

    The application of fluid shear stress to endothelial cells elicits the formation of nitric oxide (NO) and phosphorylation of the endothelial NO synthase (eNOS). Shear stress also elicits the enhanced tyrosine phosphorylation of endothelial proteins, especially of those situated in the vicinity of cell-cell contacts. Since a major constituent of these endothelial cell-cell contacts is the platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1) we assessed the role of PECAM-1 in the activation of eNOS. In human endothelial cells, shear stress induced the tyrosine phosphorylation of PECAM-1 and enhanced the association of PECAM-1 with eNOS. Endothelial cell stimulation with shear stress elicited the phosphorylation of Akt and eNOS as well as of the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). While the shear-stress-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of PECAM-1 as well as the serine phosphorylation of Akt and eNOS were abolished by the pre-treatment of cells with the tyrosine kinase inhibitor PP1 the phosphorylation of AMPK was unaffected. Down-regulation of PECAM-1 using a siRNA approach attenuated the shear-stress-induced phosphorylation of Akt and eNOS, as well as the shear-stress-induced accumulation of cyclic GMP levels while the shear-stress-induced phosphorylation of AMPK remained intact. A comparable attenuation of Akt and eNOS (but not AMPK) phosphorylation and NO production was also observed in endothelial cells generated from PECAM-1-deficient mice. These data indicate that the shear-stress-induced activation of Akt and eNOS in endothelial cells is modulated by the tyrosine phosphorylation of PECAM-1 whereas the shear-stress-induced phosphorylation of AMPK is controlled by an alternative signaling pathway. PMID:16118242

  8. A REDD1/TXNIP pro-oxidant complex regulates ATG4B activity to control stress-induced autophagy and sustain exercise capacity

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Shuxi; Dennis, Michael; Song, Xiufeng; Vadysirisack, Douangsone D.; Salunke, Devika; Nash, Zachary; Yang, Zhifen; Liesa, Marc; Yoshioka, Jun; Matsuzawa, Shu-Ichi; Shirihai, Orian S.; Lee, Richard T.; Reed, John C.; Ellisen, Leif W.

    2015-01-01

    Macroautophagy (autophagy) is a critical cellular stress response; however, the signal transduction pathways controlling autophagy induction in response to stress are poorly understood. Here we reveal a new mechanism of autophagy control whose deregulation disrupts mitochondrial integrity and energy homeostasis in vivo. Stress conditions including hypoxia and exercise induce reactive oxygen species (ROS) through upregulation of a protein complex involving REDD1, an mTORC1 inhibitor and the pro-oxidant protein TXNIP. Decreased ROS in cells and tissues lacking either REDD1 or TXNIP increases catalytic activity of the redox-sensitive ATG4B cysteine endopeptidase, leading to enhanced LC3B delipidation and failed autophagy. Conversely, REDD1/TXNIP complex expression is sufficient to induce ROS, suppress ATG4B activity and activate autophagy. In Redd1−/− mice, deregulated ATG4B activity and disabled autophagic flux cause accumulation of defective mitochondria, leading to impaired oxidative phosphorylation, muscle ATP depletion and poor exercise capacity. Thus, ROS regulation through REDD1/TXNIP is physiological rheostat controlling stress-induced autophagy. PMID:25916556

  9. Inflammatory and oxidative stress in rotavirus infection.

    PubMed

    Guerrero, Carlos A; Acosta, Orlando

    2016-05-12

    Rotaviruses are the single leading cause of life-threatening diarrhea affecting children under 5 years of age. Rotavirus entry into the host cell seems to occur by sequential interactions between virion proteins and various cell surface molecules. The entry mechanisms seem to involve the contribution of cellular molecules having binding, chaperoning and oxido-reducing activities. It appears to be that the receptor usage and tropism of rotaviruses is determined by the species, cell line and rotavirus strain. Rotaviruses have evolved functions which can antagonize the host innate immune response, whereas are able to induce endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, oxidative stress and inflammatory signaling. A networking between ER stress, inflammation and oxidative stress is suggested, in which release of calcium from the ER increases the generation of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) leading to toxic accumulation of ROS within ER and mitochondria. Sustained ER stress potentially stimulates inflammatory response through unfolded protein response pathways. However, the detailed characterization of the molecular mechanisms underpinning these rotavirus-induced stressful conditions is still lacking. The signaling events triggered by host recognition of virus-associated molecular patterns offers an opportunity for the development of novel therapeutic strategies aimed at interfering with rotavirus infection. The use of N-acetylcysteine, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and PPARγ agonists to inhibit rotavirus infection opens a new way for treating the rotavirus-induced diarrhea and complementing vaccines. PMID:27175349

  10. Inflammatory and oxidative stress in rotavirus infection

    PubMed Central

    Guerrero, Carlos A; Acosta, Orlando

    2016-01-01

    Rotaviruses are the single leading cause of life-threatening diarrhea affecting children under 5 years of age. Rotavirus entry into the host cell seems to occur by sequential interactions between virion proteins and various cell surface molecules. The entry mechanisms seem to involve the contribution of cellular molecules having binding, chaperoning and oxido-reducing activities. It appears to be that the receptor usage and tropism of rotaviruses is determined by the species, cell line and rotavirus strain. Rotaviruses have evolved functions which can antagonize the host innate immune response, whereas are able to induce endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, oxidative stress and inflammatory signaling. A networking between ER stress, inflammation and oxidative stress is suggested, in which release of calcium from the ER increases the generation of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) leading to toxic accumulation of ROS within ER and mitochondria. Sustained ER stress potentially stimulates inflammatory response through unfolded protein response pathways. However, the detailed characterization of the molecular mechanisms underpinning these rotavirus-induced stressful conditions is still lacking. The signaling events triggered by host recognition of virus-associated molecular patterns offers an opportunity for the development of novel therapeutic strategies aimed at interfering with rotavirus infection. The use of N-acetylcysteine, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and PPARγ agonists to inhibit rotavirus infection opens a new way for treating the rotavirus-induced diarrhea and complementing vaccines. PMID:27175349

  11. Ligustrazine attenuates oxidative stress-induced activation of hepatic stellate cells by interrupting platelet-derived growth factor-β receptor-mediated ERK and p38 pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Feng; Ni, Chunyan; Kong, Desong; Zhang, Xiaoping; Zhu, Xiaojing; Chen, Li; Lu, Yin; Zheng, Shizhong

    2012-11-15

    Hepatic fibrosis represents a frequent event following chronic insult to trigger wound healing reactions with accumulation of extracellular matrix (ECM) in the liver. Activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) is the pivotal event during liver fibrogenesis. Compelling evidence indicates that oxidative stress is concomitant with liver fibrosis irrespective of the underlying etiology. Natural antioxidant ligustrazine exhibits potent antifibrotic activities, but the mechanisms are poorly understood. Our studies were to investigate the ligustrazine effects on HSC activation stimulated by hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}), an in vitro model mimicking the oxidative stress in liver fibrogenesis, and to elucidate the possible mechanisms. Our results demonstrated that H{sub 2}O{sub 2} at 5 μM significantly stimulated HSC proliferation and expression of marker genes of HSC activation; whereas ligustrazine dose-dependently suppressed proliferation and induced apoptosis in H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-activated HSCs, and attenuated expression of fibrotic marker genes. Mechanistic investigations revealed that ligustrazine reduced platelet-derived growth factor-β receptor (PDGF-βR) expression and blocked the phosphorylation of extracellular regulated protein kinase (ERK) and p38 kinase, two downstream effectors of PDGF-βR. Further molecular evidence suggested that ligustrazine interruption of ERK and p38 pathways was dependent on the blockade of PDGF-βR and might be involved in ligustrazine reduction of fibrotic marker gene expression under H{sub 2}O{sub 2} stimulation. Furthermore, ligustrazine modulated some proteins critical for HSC activation and ECM homeostasis in H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-stimulated HSCs. These data collectively indicated that ligustrazine could attenuate HSC activation caused by oxidative stress, providing novel insights into ligustrazine as a therapeutic option for hepatic fibrosis. Highlights: ► Ligustrazine inhibits oxidative stress-induced HSC activation.

  12. Effect of the French Oak Wood Extract Robuvit on Markers of Oxidative Stress and Activity of Antioxidant Enzymes in Healthy Volunteers: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Orszaghova, Zuzana; Laubertova, Lucia; Sabaka, Peter; Rohdewald, Peter; Durackova, Zdenka; Muchova, Jana

    2014-01-01

    We examined in vitro antioxidant capacity of polyphenolic extract obtained from the wood of oak Quercus robur (QR), Robuvit, using TEAC (Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity) method and the effect of its intake on markers of oxidative stress, activity of antioxidant enzymes, and total antioxidant capacity in plasma of 20 healthy volunteers. Markers of oxidative damage to proteins, DNA, and lipids and activities of Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) were determined in the erythrocytes. We have found an in vitro antioxidant capacity of Robuvit of 6.37 micromole Trolox equivalent/mg of Robuvit. One month intake of Robuvit in daily dose of 300 mg has significantly decreased the serum level of advanced oxidation protein products (AOPP) and lipid peroxides (LP). Significantly increased activities of SOD and CAT as well as total antioxidant capacity of plasma after one month intake of Robuvit have been shown. In conclusion, we have demonstrated for the first time that the intake of Robuvit is associated with decrease of markers of oxidative stress and increase of activity of antioxidant enzymes and total antioxidant capacity of plasma in vivo. PMID:25254080

  13. Increased tolerance to salt stress in OPDA-deficient rice ALLENE OXIDE CYCLASE mutants is linked to an increased ROS-scavenging activity

    PubMed Central

    Hazman, Mohamed; Hause, Bettina; Eiche, Elisabeth; Nick, Peter; Riemann, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Salinity stress represents a global constraint for rice, the most important staple food worldwide. Therefore the role of the central stress signal jasmonate for the salt response was analysed in rice comparing the responses to salt stress for two jasmonic acid (JA) biosynthesis rice mutants (cpm2 and hebiba) impaired in the function of ALLENE OXIDE CYCLASE (AOC) and their wild type. The aoc mutants were less sensitive to salt stress. Interestingly, both mutants accumulated smaller amounts of Na+ ions in their leaves, and showed better scavenging of reactive oxygen species (ROS) under salt stress. Leaves of the wild type and JA mutants accumulated similar levels of abscisic acid (ABA) under stress conditions, and the levels of JA and its amino acid conjugate, JA–isoleucine (JA-Ile), showed only subtle alterations in the wild type. In contrast, the wild type responded to salt stress by strong induction of the JA precursor 12-oxophytodienoic acid (OPDA), which was not observed in the mutants. Transcript levels of representative salinity-induced genes were induced less in the JA mutants. The absence of 12-OPDA in the mutants correlated not only with a generally increased ROS-scavenging activity, but also with the higher activity of specific enzymes in the antioxidative pathway, such as glutathione S-transferase, and fewer symptoms of damage as, for example, indicated by lower levels of malondialdehyde. The data are interpreted in a model where the absence of OPDA enhanced the antioxidative power in mutant leaves. PMID:25873666

  14. Protein Quality Control Under Oxidative Stress Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Dahl, Jan-Ulrik; Gray, Michael J.; Jakob, Ursula

    2015-01-01

    Accumulation of reactive oxygen and chlorine species (RO/CS) is generally regarded to be a toxic and highly undesirable event, which serves as contributing factor in aging and many age-related diseases. However, it is also put to excellent use during host defense, when high levels of RO/CS are produced to kill invading microorganisms and regulate bacterial colonization. Biochemical and cell biological studies of how bacteria and other microorganisms deal with RO/CS have now provided important new insights into the physiological consequences of oxidative stress, the major targets that need protection, and the cellular strategies employed by organisms to mitigate the damage. This review examines the redox-regulated mechanisms by which cells maintain a functional proteome during oxidative stress. We will discuss the well-characterized redox-regulated chaperone Hsp33, and review recent discoveries demonstrating that oxidative stress-specific activation of chaperone function is a much more widespread phenomenon than previously anticipated. New members of this group include the cytosolic ATPase Get3 in yeast, the E. coli protein RidA, and the mammalian protein α2-macroglobin. We will conclude our review with recent evidence showing that inorganic polyphosphate (polyP), whose accumulation significantly increases bacterial oxidative stress resistance, works by a protein-like chaperone mechanism. Understanding the relationship between oxidative and proteotoxic stresses will improve our understanding of both host-microbe interactions and of how mammalian cells combat the damaging side effects of uncontrolled RO/CS production, a hallmark of inflammation. PMID:25698115

  15. Protein quality control under oxidative stress conditions.

    PubMed

    Dahl, Jan-Ulrik; Gray, Michael J; Jakob, Ursula

    2015-04-10

    Accumulation of reactive oxygen and chlorine species (RO/CS) is generally regarded to be a toxic and highly undesirable event, which serves as contributing factor in aging and many age-related diseases. However, it is also put to excellent use during host defense, when high levels of RO/CS are produced to kill invading microorganisms and regulate bacterial colonization. Biochemical and cell biological studies of how bacteria and other microorganisms deal with RO/CS have now provided important new insights into the physiological consequences of oxidative stress, the major targets that need protection, and the cellular strategies employed by organisms to mitigate the damage. This review examines the redox-regulated mechanisms by which cells maintain a functional proteome during oxidative stress. We will discuss the well-characterized redox-regulated chaperone Hsp33, and we will review recent discoveries demonstrating that oxidative stress-specific activation of chaperone function is a much more widespread phenomenon than previously anticipated. New members of this group include the cytosolic ATPase Get3 in yeast, the Escherichia coli protein RidA, and the mammalian protein α2-macroglobulin. We will conclude our review with recent evidence showing that inorganic polyphosphate (polyP), whose accumulation significantly increases bacterial oxidative stress resistance, works by a protein-like chaperone mechanism. Understanding the relationship between oxidative and proteotoxic stresses will improve our understanding of both host-microbe interactions and how mammalian cells combat the damaging side effects of uncontrolled RO/CS production, a hallmark of inflammation. PMID:25698115

  16. Nicotinamide treatment reduces the levels of oxidative stress, apoptosis, and PARP-1 activity in Aβ(1-42)-induced rat model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Turunc Bayrakdar, E; Uyanikgil, Y; Kanit, L; Koylu, E; Yalcin, A

    2014-02-01

    The underlying mechanisms of Alzheimer's Disease (AD) are still unclear. It is suggested that poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) overactivation can cause neuroinflammation and cell death. In this study we searched the effects of nicotinamide (NA), endogenous PARP-1 inhibitor, on oxidative stress, apoptosis, and the regulation of PARP-1 and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) in amyloid beta peptide (1-42) (Aβ(1-42))-induced neurodegeneration. Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into four groups as control, Aβ(1-42), Aβ(1-42) + NA(100 and 500 mg/kg). All groups were stereotaxically injected bilaterally into the hippocampus with Aβ(1-42) or saline. After surgery NA administrations were made intraperitoneally (ip) for 7 days. In order to investigate the effects of Aβ(1-42) and NA, protein carbonyls, lipid peroxidation, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, glutathione (GSH) levels, activities of antioxidant enzymes (catalase, superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase), mitochondrial function, mRNA and protein levels of PARP-1, NF-κB, p53, Bax, and Bcl-2 were measured in specific brain regions such as cortex and hippocampus. Aβ(1-42) treatment only increased the oxidative stress parameters and caused decline in antioxidant enzyme activities, mitochondrial function, and GSH levels. Also, overexpression of PARP-1, NF-κB, p53, Bax, and the decreased levels of Bcl-2 were observed in Aβ(1-42)-treated group. NA treatments against Aβ(1-42)-upregulated Bcl-2 and downregulated PARP-1, NF-κB, p53, and Bax levels. NA treatments also decreased the oxidative stress parameters and elevated antioxidant enzyme activities, GSH levels, and mitochondrial function against Aβ(1-42) treatment. These data suggest that NA may have a therapeutic potential in neurodegenerative processes due to the decreased levels of oxidative stress, apoptosis, and PARP-1 activity. PMID:24151909

  17. Shear stress stimulates nitric oxide signaling in pulmonary arterial endothelial cells via a reduction in catalase activity: role of protein kinase Cδ

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sanjiv; Sud, Neetu; Fonseca, Fabio V.; Hou, Yali

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies have indicated that acute increases in shear stress can stimulate endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) activity through increased PI3 kinase/Akt signaling and phosphorylation of Ser1177. However, the mechanism by which shear stress activates this pathway has not been adequately resolved nor has the potential role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) been evaluated. Thus, the purpose of this study was to determine if shear-mediated increases in ROS play a role in stimulating Ser1177 phosphorylation and NO signaling in pulmonary arterial endothelial cells (PAEC) exposed to acute increases in shear stress. Our initial studies demonstrated that although shear stress did not increase superoxide levels in PAEC, there was an increase in H2O2 levels. The increases in H2O2 were associated with a decrease in catalase activity but not protein levels. In addition, we found that acute shear stress caused an increase in eNOS phosphorylation at Ser1177 phosphorylation and a decrease in phosphorylation at Thr495. We also found that the overexpression of catalase significantly attenuated the shear-mediated increases in H2O2, phospho-Ser1177 eNOS, and NO generation. Further investigation identified a decrease in PKCδ activity in response to shear stress, and the overexpression of PKCδ attenuated the shear-mediated decrease in Thr495 phosphorylation and the increase in NO generation, and this led to increased eNOS uncoupling. PKCδ overexpression also attenuated Ser1177 phosphorylation through a posttranslational increase in catalase activity, mediated via a serine phosphorylation event, reducing shear-mediated increases in H2O2. Together, our data indicate that shear stress decreases PKCδ activity, altering the phosphorylation pattern catalase, leading to decreased catalase activity and increased H2O2 signaling, and this in turn leads to increases in phosphorylation of eNOS at Ser1177 and NO generation. PMID:19897742

  18. Arabidopsis FHY3 and FAR1 Regulate Light-Induced myo-Inositol Biosynthesis and Oxidative Stress Responses by Transcriptional Activation of MIPS1.

    PubMed

    Ma, Lin; Tian, Tian; Lin, Rongcheng; Deng, Xing-Wang; Wang, Haiyang; Li, Gang

    2016-04-01

    myo-Inositol-1-phosphate synthase (MIPS) catalyzes the limiting step of inositol biosynthesis and has crucial roles in plant growth and development. In response to stress, the transcription of MIPS1 is induced and the biosynthesis of inositol or inositol derivatives is promoted by unknown mechanisms. Here, we found that the light signaling protein FAR-RED ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL3 (FHY3) and its homolog FAR-RED IMPAIRED RESPONSE1 (FAR1) regulate light-induced inositol biosynthesis and oxidative stress responses by activating the transcription of MIPS1. Disruption of FHY3 and FAR1 caused light-induced cell death after dark-light transition, precocious leaf senescence, and increased sensitivity to oxidative stress. Reduction of salicylic acid (SA) accumulation by overexpression of SALICYLIC ACID 3-HYDROXYLASE largely suppressed the cell death phenotype of fhy3 far1 mutant plants, suggesting that FHY3- and FAR1-mediated cell death is dependent on SA. Furthermore, comparative analysis of chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing and microarray results revealed that FHY3 and FAR1 directly target both MIPS1 and MIPS2. The fhy3 far1 mutant plants showed severely decreased MIPS1/2 transcript levels and reduced inositol levels. Conversely, constitutive expression of MIPS1 partially rescued the inositol contents, caused reduced transcript levels of SA-biosynthesis genes, and prevented oxidative stress in fhy3 far1. Taken together, our results indicate that the light signaling proteins FHY3 and FAR1 directly bind the promoter of MIPS1 to activate its expression and thereby promote inositol biosynthesis to prevent light-induced oxidative stress and SA-dependent cell death. PMID:26714049

  19. Cofactor binding protects flavodoxin against oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Lindhoud, Simon; van den Berg, Willy A M; van den Heuvel, Robert H H; Heck, Albert J R; van Mierlo, Carlo P M; van Berkel, Willem J H

    2012-01-01

    In organisms, various protective mechanisms against oxidative damaging of proteins exist. Here, we show that cofactor binding is among these mechanisms, because flavin mononucleotide (FMN) protects Azotobacter vinelandii flavodoxin against hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidation. We identify an oxidation sensitive cysteine residue in a functionally important loop close to the cofactor, i.e., Cys69. Oxidative stress causes dimerization of apoflavodoxin (i.e., flavodoxin without cofactor), and leads to consecutive formation of sulfinate and sulfonate states of Cys69. Use of 7-chloro-4-nitrobenzo-2-oxa-1,3-diazole (NBD-Cl) reveals that Cys69 modification to a sulfenic acid is a transient intermediate during oxidation. Dithiothreitol converts sulfenic acid and disulfide into thiols, whereas the sulfinate and sulfonate forms of Cys69 are irreversible with respect to this reagent. A variable fraction of Cys69 in freshly isolated flavodoxin is in the sulfenic acid state, but neither oxidation to sulfinic and sulfonic acid nor formation of intermolecular disulfides is observed under oxidising conditions. Furthermore, flavodoxin does not react appreciably with NBD-Cl. Besides its primary role as redox-active moiety, binding of flavin leads to considerably improved stability against protein unfolding and to strong protection against irreversible oxidation and other covalent thiol modifications. Thus, cofactors can protect proteins against oxidation and modification. PMID:22829943

  20. Oat Attenuation of Hyperglycemia-Induced Retinal Oxidative Stress and NF-κB Activation in Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Rats

    PubMed Central

    Al-Malki, Abdulrahman L.

    2013-01-01

    The overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) plays a central role in the pathogenesis of endothelial damage in diabetes. To assess the effect of oat on experimental diabetic retinopathy, five groups of Albino rats were studied: nondiabetic control, untreated diabetic, and diabetic rats treated with 5%, 10%, and 20% (W/W) oat of the diet for 12 weeks. Novel data were obtained in this study indicating a protective role of oat against oxidative stress and diabetic retinopathy. The effects of oat on parameters of oxidative stress, AGE, and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) were assessed by ELISA and NF-κB activation by electrophoretic mobility shift assay. Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) were also determined. After 12 weeks of diabetes, oat treatment reduced blood glucose levels, HbA1c, all oxidative stress markers, CML, normalized NF-κB activation and TNFα expression. Furthermore it reduced VEGF in the diabetic retina by 43% (P < 0.001). In conclusion, oat modulates microvascular damage through normalized pathways downstream of ROS overproduction and reduction of NF-κB and its controlled genes activation, which may provide additional endothelial protection. PMID:23365614

  1. Overexpressed neuroglobin raises threshold for nitric oxide-induced impairment of mitochondrial respiratory activities and stress signaling in primary cortical neurons

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Shilpee; Zhuo, Ming; Gorgun, Murat; Englander, Ella W.

    2013-01-01

    Surges of nitric oxide compromise mitochondrial respiration primarily by competitive inhibition of oxygen binding to cytochrome c oxidase (complex IV) and are particularly injurious in neurons, which rely on oxidative phosphorylation for all their energy needs. Here, we show that transgenic overexpression of the neuronal globin protein, neuroglobin, helps diminish protein nitration, preserve mitochondrial function and sustain ATP content of primary cortical neurons challenged by extended nitric oxide exposure. Specifically, in transgenic neurons, elevated neuroglobin curtailed nitric oxide-induced alterations in mitochondrial oxygen consumption rates, including baseline oxygen consumption, consumption coupled with ATP synthesis, proton leak and spare respiratory capacity. Concomitantly, activation of genes involved in sensing and responding to oxidative/nitrosative stress, including the early-immediate c-Fos gene and the phase II antioxidant enzyme, heme oxygenase-1, was diminished in neuroglobin-overexpressing compared to wild-type neurons. Taken together, these differences reflect a lesser insult produced by similar concentrations of nitric oxide in neuroglobin-overexpressing compared to wild-type neurons, suggesting that abundant neuroglobin buffers nitric oxide and raises the threshold of nitric oxide-mediated injury in neurons. PMID:23587847

  2. Overexpressed neuroglobin raises threshold for nitric oxide-induced impairment of mitochondrial respiratory activities and stress signaling in primary cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Singh, Shilpee; Zhuo, Ming; Gorgun, Falih M; Englander, Ella W

    2013-08-01

    Surges of nitric oxide compromise mitochondrial respiration primarily by competitive inhibition of oxygen binding to cytochrome c oxidase (complex IV) and are particularly injurious in neurons, which rely on oxidative phosphorylation for all their energy needs. Here, we show that transgenic overexpression of the neuronal globin protein, neuroglobin, helps diminish protein nitration, preserve mitochondrial function and sustain ATP content of primary cortical neurons challenged by extended nitric oxide exposure. Specifically, in transgenic neurons, elevated neuroglobin curtailed nitric oxide-induced alterations in mitochondrial oxygen consumption rates, including baseline oxygen consumption, consumption coupled with ATP synthesis, proton leak and spare respiratory capacity. Concomitantly, activation of genes involved in sensing and responding to oxidative/nitrosative stress, including the early-immediate c-Fos gene and the phase II antioxidant enzyme, heme oxygenase-1, was diminished in neuroglobin-overexpressing compared to wild-type neurons. Taken together, these differences reflect a lesser insult produced by similar concentrations of nitric oxide in neuroglobin-overexpressing compared to wild-type neurons, suggesting that abundant neuroglobin buffers nitric oxide and raises the threshold of nitric oxide-mediated injury in neurons. PMID:23587847

  3. Oxidative Stress in Neurodegenerative Diseases.

    PubMed

    Niedzielska, Ewa; Smaga, Irena; Gawlik, Maciej; Moniczewski, Andrzej; Stankowicz, Piotr; Pera, Joanna; Filip, Małgorzata

    2016-08-01

    The pathophysiologies of neurodegenerative diseases, including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), Parkinson's disease (PD), and Alzheimer's disease (AD), are far from being fully explained. Oxidative stress (OS) has been proposed as one factor that plays a potential role in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders. Clinical and preclinical studies indicate that neurodegenerative diseases are characterized by higher levels of OS biomarkers and by lower levels of antioxidant defense biomarkers in the brain and peripheral tissues. In this article, we review the current knowledge regarding the involvement of OS in neurodegenerative diseases, based on clinical trials and animal studies. In addition, we analyze the effects of the drug-induced modulation of oxidative balance, and we explore pharmacotherapeutic strategies for OS reduction. PMID:26198567

  4. Oxidative stress in cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Csányi, Gábor; Miller, Francis J

    2014-01-01

    In the special issue "Oxidative Stress in Cardiovascular Disease" authors were invited to submit papers that investigate key questions in the field of cardiovascular free radical biology. The original research articles included in this issue provide important information regarding novel aspects of reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated signaling, which have important implications in physiological and pathophysiological cardiovascular processes. The issue also included a number of review articles that highlight areas of intense research in the fields of free radical biology and cardiovascular medicine. PMID:24722571

  5. Oxidative Stress in Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Csányi, Gábor; Miller, Francis J.

    2014-01-01

    In the special issue “Oxidative Stress in Cardiovascular Disease” authors were invited to submit papers that investigate key questions in the field of cardiovascular free radical biology. The original research articles included in this issue provide important information regarding novel aspects of reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated signaling, which have important implications in physiological and pathophysiological cardiovascular processes. The issue also included a number of review articles that highlight areas of intense research in the fields of free radical biology and cardiovascular medicine. PMID:24722571

  6. Oxidative Stress and Antioxidant Activity in Hypothermia and Rewarming: Can RONS Modulate the Beneficial Effects of Therapeutic Hypothermia?

    PubMed Central

    Alva, Norma; Palomeque, Jesús

    2013-01-01

    Hypothermia is a condition in which core temperature drops below the level necessary to maintain bodily functions. The decrease in temperature may disrupt some physiological systems of the body, including alterations in microcirculation and reduction of oxygen supply to tissues. The lack of oxygen can induce the generation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen free radicals (RONS), followed by oxidative stress, and finally, apoptosis and/or necrosis. Furthermore, since the hypothermia is inevitably followed by a rewarming process, we should also consider its effects. Despite hypothermia and rewarming inducing injury, many benefits of hypothermia have been demonstrated when used to preserve brain, cardiac, hepatic, and intestinal function against ischemic injury. This review gives an overview of the effects of hypothermia and rewarming on the oxidant/antioxidant balance and provides hypothesis for the role of reactive oxygen species in therapeutic hypothermia. PMID:24363826

  7. Oxidative stress in inherited mitochondrial diseases.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Genki; Cortopassi, Gino

    2015-11-01

    Mitochondria are a source of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Mitochondrial diseases are the result of inherited defects in mitochondrially expressed genes. One potential pathomechanism for mitochondrial disease is oxidative stress. Oxidative stress can occur as the result of increased ROS production or decreased ROS protection. The role of oxidative stress in the five most common inherited mitochondrial diseases, Friedreich ataxia, LHON, MELAS, MERRF, and Leigh syndrome (LS), is discussed. Published reports of oxidative stress involvement in the pathomechanisms of these five mitochondrial diseases are reviewed. The strongest evidence for an oxidative stress pathomechanism among the five diseases was for Friedreich ataxia. In addition, a meta-analysis was carried out to provide an unbiased evaluation of the role of oxidative stress in the five diseases, by searching for "oxidative stress" citation count frequency for each disease. Of the five most common mitochondrial diseases, the strongest support for oxidative stress is for Friedreich ataxia (6.42%), followed by LHON (2.45%), MELAS (2.18%), MERRF (1.71%), and LS (1.03%). The increased frequency of oxidative stress citations was significant relative to the mean of the total pool of five diseases (p<0.01) and the mean of the four non-Friedreich diseases (p<0.0001). Thus there is support for oxidative stress in all five most common mitochondrial diseases, but the strongest, significant support is for Friedreich ataxia. PMID:26073122

  8. Ferritin and the response to oxidative stress.

    PubMed Central

    Orino, K; Lehman, L; Tsuji, Y; Ayaki, H; Torti, S V; Torti, F M

    2001-01-01

    Iron is required for normal cell growth and proliferation. However, excess iron is potentially harmful, as it can catalyse the formation of toxic reactive oxygen species (ROS) via Fenton chemistry. For this reason, cells have evolved highly regulated mechanisms for controlling intracellular iron levels. Chief among these is the sequestration of iron in ferritin. Ferritin is a 24 subunit protein composed of two subunit types, termed H and L. The ferritin H subunit has a potent ferroxidase activity that catalyses the oxidation of ferrous iron, whereas ferritin L plays a role in iron nucleation and protein stability. In the present study we report that increased synthesis of both subunits of ferritin occurs in HeLa cells exposed to oxidative stress. An increase in the activity of iron responsive element binding proteins in response to oxidative stress was also observed. However, this activation was transient, allowing ferritin protein induction to subsequently proceed. To assess whether ferritin induction reduced the accumulation of ROS, and to test the relative contribution of ferritin H and L subunits in this process, we prepared stable transfectants that overexpressed either ferritin H or ferritin L cDNA under control of a tetracycline-responsive promoter. We observed that overexpression of either ferritin H or ferritin L reduced the accumulation of ROS in response to oxidant challenge. PMID:11415455

  9. Nitric oxide, stomatal closure, and abiotic stress.

    PubMed

    Neill, Steven; Barros, Raimundo; Bright, Jo; Desikan, Radhika; Hancock, John; Harrison, Judith; Morris, Peter; Ribeiro, Dimas; Wilson, Ian

    2008-01-01

    Various data indicate that nitric oxide (NO) is an endogenous signal in plants that mediates responses to several stimuli. Experimental evidence in support of such signalling roles for NO has been obtained via the application of NO, usually in the form of NO donors, via the measurement of endogenous NO, and through the manipulation of endogenous NO content by chemical and genetic means. Stomatal closure, initiated by abscisic acid (ABA), is effected through a complex symphony of intracellular signalling in which NO appears to be one component. Exogenous NO induces stomatal closure, ABA triggers NO generation, removal of NO by scavengers inhibits stomatal closure in response to ABA, and ABA-induced stomatal closure is reduced in mutants that are impaired in NO generation. The data indicate that ABA-induced guard cell NO generation requires both nitric oxide synthase-like activity and, in Arabidopsis, the NIA1 isoform of nitrate reductase (NR). NO stimulates mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activity and cGMP production. Both these NO-stimulated events are required for ABA-induced stomatal closure. ABA also stimulates the generation of H2O2 in guard cells, and pharmacological and genetic data demonstrate that NO accumulation in these cells is dependent on such production. Recent data have extended this model to maize mesophyll cells where the induction of antioxidant defences by water stress and ABA required the generation of H2O2 and NO and the activation of a MAPK. Published data suggest that drought and salinity induce NO generation which activates cellular processes that afford some protection against the oxidative stress associated with these conditions. Exogenous NO can also protect cells against oxidative stress. Thus, the data suggest an emerging model of stress responses in which ABA has several ameliorative functions. These include the rapid induction of stomatal closure to reduce transpirational water loss and the activation of antioxidant defences

  10. Oxidative stress in oral diseases.

    PubMed

    Kesarwala, A H; Krishna, M C; Mitchell, J B

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative species, including reactive oxygen species (ROS), are components of normal cellular metabolism and are required for intracellular processes as varied as proliferation, signal transduction, and apoptosis. In the situation of chronic oxidative stress, however, ROS contribute to various pathophysiologies and are involved in multiple stages of carcinogenesis. In head and neck cancers specifically, many common risk factors contribute to carcinogenesis via ROS-based mechanisms, including tobacco, areca quid, alcohol, and viruses. Given their widespread influence on the process of carcinogenesis, ROS and their related pathways are attractive targets for intervention. The effects of radiation therapy, a central component of treatment for nearly all head and neck cancers, can also be altered via interfering with oxidative pathways. These pathways are also relevant to the development of many benign oral diseases. In this review, we outline how ROS contribute to pathophysiology with a focus toward head and neck cancers and benign oral diseases, describing potential targets and pathways for intervention that exploit the role of oxidative species in these pathologic processes. PMID:25417961

  11. Analysis of Oxidative Stress in Zebrafish Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Mugoni, Vera; Camporeale, Annalisa; Santoro, Massimo M.

    2014-01-01

    High levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) may cause a change of cellular redox state towards oxidative stress condition. This situation causes oxidation of molecules (lipid, DNA, protein) and leads to cell death. Oxidative stress also impacts the progression of several pathological conditions such as diabetes, retinopathies, neurodegeneration, and cancer. Thus, it is important to define tools to investigate oxidative stress conditions not only at the level of single cells but also in the context of whole organisms. Here, we consider the zebrafish embryo as a useful in vivo system to perform such studies and present a protocol to measure in vivo oxidative stress. Taking advantage of fluorescent ROS probes and zebrafish transgenic fluorescent lines, we develop two different methods to measure oxidative stress in vivo: i) a “whole embryo ROS-detection method” for qualitative measurement of oxidative stress and ii) a “single-cell ROS detection method” for quantitative measurements of oxidative stress. Herein, we demonstrate the efficacy of these procedures by increasing oxidative stress in tissues by oxidant agents and physiological or genetic methods. This protocol is amenable for forward genetic screens and it will help address cause-effect relationships of ROS in animal models of oxidative stress-related pathologies such as neurological disorders and cancer. PMID:25046434

  12. Carvedilol, a third-generation β-blocker prevents oxidative stress-induced neuronal death and activates Nrf2/ARE pathway in HT22 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ouyang, Ying; Chen, Ziwei; Tan, Min; Liu, Anmin; Chen, Meihui; Liu, Jun; Pi, Rongbiao; Fang, Jianpei

    2013-11-29

    Highlights: •Carvedilol significantly prevented oxidative stress-induced cell death. •Carvedilol significantly decreased the production of ROS. •Carvedilol activated Nrf2/ARE pathway. •Carvedilol increased the protein levels of HO-1 and NQO-1. -- Abstract: Carvedilol, a nonselective β-adrenoreceptor blocker with pleiotropic activities has been shown to exert neuroprotective effect due to its antioxidant property. However, the neuroprotective mechanism of carvedilol is still not fully uncovered. Nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)/antioxidant response element (ARE) pathway is an important cellular stress response pathway involved in neuroprotection. Here we investigated the effect of carvedilol on oxidative stress-induced cell death (glutamate 2 mM and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} 600 μM) and the activity of Nrf2/ARE pathway in HT22 hippocampal cells. Carvedilol significantly increased cell viability and decreased ROS in HT22 cells exposed to glutamate or H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. Furthermore, carvedilol activated the Nrf2/ARE pathway in a concentration-dependent manner, and increased the protein levels of heme oxygenase-1(HO-1) and NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase-1(NQO-1), two downstream factors of the Nrf2/ARE pathway. Collectively, our results indicate that carvedilol protects neuronal cell against glutamate- and H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced neurotoxicity possibly through activating the Nrf2/ARE signaling pathway.

  13. Oxidative Stress Activates the Transcription Factors FoxO 1a and FoxO 3a in the Hippocampus of Rats Exposed to Low Doses of Ozone

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Crisóstomo, Nancy P.; Rodríguez Martínez, Erika

    2014-01-01

    The exposure to low doses of ozone induces an oxidative stress state, which is involved in neurodegenerative diseases. Forkhead box O (FoxO) family of transcription factors are activated by oxidative signals and regulate cell proliferation and resistance to oxidative stress. Our aim was to study the effect of chronic exposure to ozone on the activation of FoxO 1a and FoxO 3a in the hippocampus of rats. Male Wistar rats were divided into six groups and exposed to 0.25 ppm of ozone for 0, 7, 15, 30, 60, and 90 days. After treatment, the groups were processed for western blotting and immunohistochemistry against FoxO 3a, Mn SOD, cyclin D2, FoxO 1a, and active caspase 3. We found that exposure to ozone increased the activation of FoxO 3a at 30 and 60 days and expression of Mn SOD at all treatment times. Additionally, increases in cyclin D2 from 7 to 90 days; FoxO 1a at 15, 30, and 60 days; and activate caspase 3 from 30 to 60 days of exposure were noted. The results indicate that ozone alters regulatory pathways related to both the antioxidant system and the cell cycle, inducing neuronal reentry into the cell cycle and apoptotic death. PMID:24967006

  14. Oxidative stress and immunotoxicity induced by graphene oxide in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Chen, Minjie; Yin, Junfa; Liang, Yong; Yuan, Shaopeng; Wang, Fengbang; Song, Maoyong; Wang, Hailin

    2016-05-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) has been extensively explored as a promising nanomaterial for applications in biology because of its unique properties. Therefore, systematic investigation of GO toxicity is essential to determine its fate in the environment and potential adverse effects. In this study, acute toxicity, oxidative stress and immunotoxicity of GO were investigated in zebrafish. No obvious acute toxicity was observed when zebrafish were exposed to 1, 5, 10 or 50mg/L GO for 14 days. However, a number of cellular alterations were detected by histological analysis of the liver and intestine, including vacuolation, loose arrangement of cells, histolysis and disintegration of cell boundaries. As evidence for oxidative stress, malondialdehyde levels and superoxide dismutase and catalase activities were increased and glutathione content was decreased in the liver after treatment with GO. GO treatment induced an immune response in zebrafish, as demonstrated by increased expression of tumor necrosis factor α, interleukin-1 β, and interleukin-6 in the spleen. Our findings demonstrated that GO administration in an aquatic system can cause oxidative stress and immune toxicity in adult zebrafish. To our knowledge, this is the first report of immune toxicity of GO in zebrafish. PMID:26921726

  15. Electroacupuncture pretreatment prevents cognitive impairment induced by limb ischemia-reperfusion via inhibition of microglial activation and attenuation of oxidative stress in rats.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ye; Zhou, Jun; Li, Jun; Yang, Shi-Bin; Mo, Li-Qun; Hu, Jie-Hui; Yuan, Wan-Li

    2012-01-13

    Limb ischemia-reperfusion (LI/R) is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Furthermore, critical trauma survivors can present cognitive impairment. Cognitive function, survival rate, oxidative stress and neuronal health were examined to elucidate (1) the magnitude of cognitive effects of prolonged reperfusion, (2) potential players in the mechanistic pathway mediating such effects, and (3) possible benefits of electroacupuncture (EA) pretreatment at Baihui (GV20), Yanglingquan (GB34), Taichong (LR3), Zusanli (ST36) and Xuehai (SP10) acupoints. LI/R was induced in rats by placing a rubber tourniquet on each hind limb for 3h, and the animals were evaluated periodically for 7d after LI/R. Rats subjected to LI/R had significantly lower survival rates, and displayed evidence of brain injury and cognitive dysfunction (as determined by the Morris water maze test) 1d and 3d after reperfusion compared to sham-operated controls. LI/R also resulted in higher levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and malondialdehyde (MDA), microglial activation, and decreased superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity within Cornu Ammonis area 1 (CA1) of the hippocampus. Depressed survival rates, microglial activation, oxidative damage, and histological changes, as well as cognitive dysfunction were partially or fully attenuated in rats that received 14d of EA prior to LI/R. These findings indicate that LI/R can result in cognitive dysfunction related to activated microglia and elevated oxidative stress, and that EA has neuroprotective potential mediated, at least in part, by inhibition of microglial activation and attenuation of oxidative stress. PMID:22129788

  16. Oxidative Stress Induces Premature Senescence by Stimulating Caveolin-1 Gene Transcription through p38 Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase/Sp1–Mediated Activation of Two GC-Rich Promoter Elements

    PubMed Central

    Dasari, Arvind; Bartholomew, Janine N.; Volonte, Daniela; Galbiati, Ferruccio

    2015-01-01

    Cellular senescence is believed to represent a natural tumor suppressor mechanism. We have previously shown that up-regulation of caveolin-1 was required for oxidative stress–induced premature senescence in fibroblasts. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying caveolin-1 up-regulation in senescent cells remain unknown. Here, we show that subcytotoxic oxidative stress generated by hydrogen peroxide application promotes premature senescence and stimulates the activity of a (−1,296) caveolin-1 promoter reporter gene construct in fibroblasts. Functional deletion analysis mapped the oxidative stress response elements of the mouse caveolin-1 promoter to the sequences −244/−222 and −124/−101. The hydrogen peroxide–mediated activation of both Cav-1 (−244/−222) and Cav-1 (−124/−101) was prevented by the antioxidant quercetin. Combination of electrophoretic mobility shift studies, chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis, Sp1 overexpression experiments, as well as promoter mutagenesis identifies enhanced Sp1 binding to two GC-boxes at −238/−231 and −118/−106 as the core mechanism of oxidative stress–triggered caveolin-1 transactivation. In addition, signaling studies show p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) as the upstream regulator of Sp1-mediated activation of the caveolin-1 promoter following oxidative stress. Inhibition of p38 MAPK prevents the oxidant-induced Sp1-mediated up-regulation of caveolin-1 protein expression and development of premature senescence. Finally, we show that oxidative stress induces p38-mediated up-regulation of caveolin-1 and premature senescence in normal human mammary epithelial cells but not in MCF-7 breast cancer cells, which do not express caveolin-1 and undergo apoptosis. This study delineates for the first time the molecular mechanisms that modulate caveolin-1 gene transcription upon oxidative stress and brings new insights into the redox control of cellular senescence in both normal and cancer

  17. Peroxisomal metabolism and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Nordgren, Marcus; Fransen, Marc

    2014-03-01

    Peroxisomes are ubiquitous and multifunctional organelles that are primarily known for their role in cellular lipid metabolism. As many peroxisomal enzymes catalyze redox reactions as part of their normal function, these organelles are also increasingly recognized as potential regulators of oxidative stress-related signaling pathways. This in turn suggests that peroxisome dysfunction is not only associated with rare inborn errors of peroxisomal metabolism, but also with more common age-related diseases such as neurodegeneration, type 2 diabetes, and cancer. This review intends to provide a comprehensive picture of the complex role of mammalian peroxisomes in cellular redox metabolism. We highlight how peroxisomal metabolism may contribute to the bioavailability of important mediators of oxidative stress, with particular emphasis on reactive oxygen species. In addition, we review the biological properties of peroxisome-derived signaling messengers and discuss how these molecules may mediate various biological responses. Furthermore, we explore the emerging concepts that peroxisomes and mitochondria share an intricate redox-sensitive relationship and cooperate in cell fate decisions. This is particularly relevant to the observed demise of peroxisome function which accompanies cellular senescence, organismal aging, and age-related diseases. PMID:23933092

  18. Morin Mitigates Chronic Constriction Injury (CCI)-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy by Inhibiting Oxidative Stress Induced PARP Over-Activation and Neuroinflammation.

    PubMed

    Komirishetty, Prashanth; Areti, Aparna; Sistla, Ramakrishna; Kumar, Ashutosh

    2016-08-01

    Neuropathic pain is initiated or caused due to the primary lesion or dysfunction in the nervous system and is proposed to be linked to a cascade of events including excitotoxicity, oxidative stress, neuroinflammation and apoptosis. Oxidative/nitrosative stress aggravates the neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration through poly (ADP) ribose polymerase (PARP) overactivation. Hence, the present study investigated the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects of the phytoconstituent; morin in chronic constriction injury (CCI) induced neuropathy. Neuropathic pain was induced by chronic constriction of the left sciatic nerve in rats, and the effect of morin (15 and 30 mg/kg, p.o.) was evaluated by measuring behavioural and biochemical changes. Mechanical, chemical and thermal stimuli confirmed the CCI-induced neuropathic pain and treatment with morin significantly improved these behavioural deficits and improved the sciatic functional index by the 14th day after CCI induction. After 14 days of CCI induction, oxidative/nitrosative stress and inflammatory markers were elevated in rat lumbar spinal cord. Oxidative stress induced PARP overactivation resulted in depleted levels of ATP and elevated levels of poly (ADP) ribose (PAR). Treatment with morin reduced the levels of nitrites, restored glutathione levels and abrogated the oxidant induced DNA damage. It also mitigated the increased levels of TNF-α and IL-6. Protein expression studies confirmed the PARP inhibition and anti-inflammatory activity of morin. Findings of this study suggest that morin, by virtue of its antioxidant properties, limited PARP overactivation and neuroinflammation and protected against CCI induced functional, behavioural and biochemical deficits. PMID:27084773

  19. Curcumin alleviates oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction in astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Daverey, Amita; Agrawal, Sandeep K

    2016-10-01

    Oxidative stress plays a critical role in various neurodegenerative diseases, thus alleviating oxidative stress is a potential strategy for therapeutic intervention and/or prevention of neurodegenerative diseases. In the present study, alleviation of oxidative stress through curcumin is investigated in A172 (human glioblastoma cell line) and HA-sp (human astrocytes cell line derived from the spinal cord) astrocytes. H2O2 was used to induce oxidative stress in astrocytes (A172 and HA-sp). Data show that H2O2 induces activation of astrocytes in dose- and time-dependent manner as evident by increased expression of GFAP in A172 and HA-sp cells after 24 and 12h respectively. An upregulation of Prdx6 was also observed in A172 and HA-sp cells after 24h of H2O2 treatment as compared to untreated control. Our data also showed that curcumin inhibits oxidative stress-induced cytoskeleton disarrangement, and impedes the activation of astrocytes by inhibiting upregulation of GFAP, vimentin and Prdx6. In addition, we observed an inhibition of oxidative stress-induced inflammation, apoptosis and mitochondria fragmentation after curcumin treatment. Therefore, our results suggest that curcumin not only protects astrocytes from H2O2-induced oxidative stress but also reverses the mitochondrial damage and dysfunction induced by oxidative stress. This study also provides evidence for protective role of curcumin on astrocytes by showing its effects on attenuating reactive astrogliosis and inhibiting apoptosis. PMID:27423629

  20. Multiple myeloma–associated chromosomal translocation activates orphan snoRNA ACA11 to suppress oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Liang; Su, Mack Y.; Maggi, Leonard B.; Lu, Lan; Mullins, Chelsea; Crosby, Seth; Huang, Gaofeng; Chng, Wee Joo; Vij, Ravi; Tomasson, Michael H.

    2012-01-01

    The histone methyltransferase WHSC1 (also known as MMSET) is overexpressed in multiple myeloma (MM) as a result of the t(4;14) chromosomal translocation and in a broad variety of other cancers by unclear mechanisms. Overexpression of WHSC1 did not transform wild-type or tumor-prone primary hematopoietic cells. We found that ACA11, an orphan box H/ACA class small nucleolar RNA (snoRNA) encoded within an intron of WHSC1, was highly expressed in t(4;14)-positive MM and other cancers. ACA11 localized to nucleoli and bound what we believe to be a novel small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (snRNP) complex composed of several proteins involved in postsplicing intron complexes. RNA targets of this uncharacterized snRNP included snoRNA intermediates hosted within ribosomal protein (RP) genes, and an RP gene signature was strongly associated with t(4;14) in patients with MM. Expression of ACA11 was sufficient to downregulate RP genes and other snoRNAs implicated in the control of oxidative stress. ACA11 suppressed oxidative stress, afforded resistance to chemotherapy, and increased the proliferation of MM cells, demonstrating that ACA11 is a critical target of the t(4;14) translocation in MM and suggesting an oncogenic role in other cancers as well. PMID:22751105

  1. Enzyme activities associated with oxidative stress in Metarhizium anisopliae during germination, mycelial growth, and conidiation and in response to near-UV irradiation.

    PubMed

    Miller, Charles D; Rangel, Drauzio; Braga, Gilberto U L; Flint, Stephan; Kwon, Sun-Il; Messias, Claudio L; Roberts, Donald W; Anderson, Anne J

    2004-01-01

    Metarhizium anisopliae isolates have a wide insect host range, but an impediment to their commercial use as a biocontrol agent of above-ground insects is the high susceptibility of spores to the near-UV present in solar irradiation. To understand stress responses in M. anisopliae, we initiated studies of enzymes that protect against oxidative stress in two strains selected because their spores differed in sensitivity to UV-B. Spores of the more near-UV resistant strain in M. anisopliae 324 displayed different isozyme profiles for catalase-peroxidase, glutathione reductase, and superoxide dismutase when compared with the less resistant strain 2575. A transient loss in activity of catalase-peroxidase and glutathione reductase was observed during germination of the spores, whereas the intensity of isozymes displaying superoxide dismutase did not change as the mycelium developed. Isozyme composition for catalase-peroxidases and glutathione reductase in germlings changed with growth phase. UV-B exposure from lamps reduced the activity of isozymes displaying catalase-peroxidase and glutathione reductase activities in 2575 more than in 324. The major effect of solar UV-A plus UV-B also was a reduction in catalase-peroxidases isozyme level, a finding confirmed by measurement of catalase specific activity. Impaired growth of M. anisopliae after near-UV exposure may be related to reduced abilities to handle oxidative stress. PMID:15052320

  2. Endoplasmic reticulum and oxidant stress mediate nuclear factor-κB activation in the subfornical organ during angiotensin II hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Young, Colin N.; Li, Anfei; Dong, Frederick N.; Horwath, Julie A.; Clark, Catharine G.

    2015-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in the brain circumventricular subfornical organ (SFO) mediate the central hypertensive actions of Angiotensin II (ANG II). However, the downstream signaling events remain unclear. Here we tested the hypothesis that angiotensin type 1a receptors (AT1aR), ER stress, and ROS induce activation of the transcription factor nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) during ANG II-dependent hypertension. To spatiotemporally track NF-κB activity in the SFO throughout the development of ANG II-dependent hypertension, we used SFO-targeted adenoviral delivery and longitudinal bioluminescence imaging in mice. During low-dose infusion of ANG II, bioluminescence imaging revealed a prehypertensive surge in NF-κB activity in the SFO at a time point prior to a significant rise in arterial blood pressure. SFO-targeted ablation of AT1aR, inhibition of ER stress, or adenoviral scavenging of ROS in the SFO prevented the ANG II-induced increase in SFO NF-κB. These findings highlight the utility of bioluminescence imaging to longitudinally track transcription factor activation during the development of ANG II-dependent hypertension and reveal an AT1aR-, ER stress-, and ROS-dependent prehypertensive surge in NF-κB activity in the SFO. Furthermore, the increase in NF-κB activity before a rise in arterial blood pressure suggests a causal role for SFO NF-κB in the development of ANG II-dependent hypertension. PMID:25980014

  3. Up-regulation of an extracellular superoxide dismutase-like activity in hibernating hamsters subjected to oxidative stress in mid- to late arousal from torpor.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Iwao; Kayano, Tohru; Hanaya, Toshiharu; Arai, Shigeyuki; Ikeda, Masao; Kurimoto, Masashi

    2006-09-01

    Torpor-arousal cycles, one of the inherent features in hibernators, are associated with a rapid increase in body temperature and respiration, and it would lead to elevation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. However, hibernators apparently tolerate this oxidative stress. We have observed in Syrian hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus) a maximal temperature shift and respiratory rate in mid- to late arousal (16-33 degrees C rectal temperature) from torpor. To examine plasma antioxidant status during arousal, we studied total superoxide radical-scavenging activity in plasma by electron spin resonance. The superoxide radical-scavenging activity reached a maximum at 32 degrees C, coincident with a peak in plasma uric acid levels, a ROS generation indicator. The up-regulated activity at 32 degrees C was attributable to the peak of the activity eluted at 260-kDa on gel-filtration chromatography, but was not to small antioxidant molecules such as ascorbate and alpha-tocopherol. The activity eluted at 260-kDa increased 3-fold at 32 degrees C compared with that of the torpid state, and was not detected either at 6 h after the onset of arousal or in the euthermic state. Moreover, the activity exhibited extracellular SOD-like properties: its induction in plasma by heparin injection and its affinity for heparin. Our results suggest that the 260-kDa extracellular SOD-like activity plays a role in the tolerance for the oxidative stress during arousal from torpor. PMID:16807121

  4. Oxidative Stress in Cystinosis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Vaisbich, Maria Helena; Pache de Faria Guimaraes, Luciana; Shimizu, Maria Heloisa Mazzola; Seguro, Antonio Carlos

    2011-01-01

    Background/Aims Nephropathic cystinosis (NC) is a severe systemic disease and cysteamine improves its prognosis. Lysosomal cystine accumulation is the hallmark of cystinosis and is regarded as the primary defect due to mutations in the CTNS gene. However, there is great evidence that cystine accumulation itself is not responsible for all abnormalities observed in NC. Studies have demonstrated altered ATP metabolism, increased apoptosis, and cell oxidation. An increased number of autophagosomes and autophagic vacuoles have been observed in cystinotic fibroblasts and renal epithelial cells, suggesting that altered autophagy plays a role in NC, leading to increased production of reactive oxygen species. Therefore, cystinosis patients can be more susceptible to oxidative stress (OS) and it can contribute to the progression of the renal disease. Our goal was to evaluate a marker of OS (serum TBARS) in NC children, and to compare the results with those observed in healthy controls and correlated with renal function parameters. Methods The study included patients aged under 18 years, with good adherence to the treatment and out of renal replacement therapy. The following parameters were evaluated: serum creatinine, BUN, creatinine clearance estimated by stature and serum TBARS levels. Results We selected 20 patients aged 8.0 ±3.6 years and observed serum TBARS levels of 4.03 ±1.02 nmol/ml. Serum TBARS levels in the 43 healthy controls, aged 7.4 ±1.1 years, were 1.60 ±0.04 nmol/ml. There was a significant difference between the plasma TBARS levels among the 2 groups (p < 0.0001). We detected no significant correlation between plasma TBARS levels and renal function. Conclusion An increased level of serum TBARS in patients with NC was observed and this abnormality was not correlated with the renal function status degree. This is the first report that shows increased oxidative stress in serum of NC patients. PMID:22470381

  5. Antioxidant Activity of Syringic Acid Prevents Oxidative Stress in l-arginine–Induced Acute Pancreatitis: An Experimental Study on Rats

    PubMed Central

    Cikman, Oztekin; Soylemez, Omer; Ozkan, Omer Faruk; Kiraz, Hasan Ali; Sayar, Ilyas; Ademoglu, Serkan; Taysi, Seyithan; Karaayvaz, Muammer

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the possible protective role of antioxidant treatment with syringic acid (SA) on l-arginine–induced acute pancreatitis (AP) using biochemical and histopathologic approaches. A total of 30 rats were divided into 3 groups. The control group received normal saline intraperitoneally. The AP group was induced by 3.2 g/kg body weight l-arginine intraperitoneally, administered twice with an interval of 1 hour between administrations. The AP plus SA group, after having AP induced by 3.2 g/kg body weight l-arginine, was given SA (50 mg kg−1) in 2 parts within 24 hours. The rats were killed, and pancreatic tissue was removed and used in biochemical and histopathologic examinations. Compared with the control group, the mean pancreatic tissue total oxidant status level, oxidative stress index, and lipid hydroperoxide levels were significantly increased in the AP group, being 30.97 ± 7.13 (P < 0.05), 1.76 ± 0.34 (P < 0.0001), and 19.18 ± 4.91 (P < 0.01), respectively. However, mean total antioxidant status and sulfhydryl group levels were significantly decreased in the AP group compared with the control group, being 1.765 ± 0.21 (P < 0.0001) and 0.21 ± 0.04 (P < 0.0001), respectively. SA reduces oxidative stress markers and has antioxidant effects. It also augments antioxidant capacity in l-arginine–induced acute toxicity of pancreas in rats. PMID:26011211

  6. Oxidative stress-mediated HMGB1 biology

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yan; Tang, Daolin; Kang, Rui

    2015-01-01

    High mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) is a widely-expressed and highly-abundant protein that acts as an extracellular signal upon active secretion by immune cells or passive release by dead, dying, and injured cells. Both intracellular and extracellular HMGB1 play pivotal roles in regulation of the cellular response to stress. Targeting the translocation, release, and activity of HMGB1 can limit inflammation and reduce tissue damage during infection and sterile inflammation. Although the mechanisms contributing to HMGB1 biology are still under investigation, it appears that oxidative stress is a central regulator of HMGB1's translocation, release, and activity in inflammation and cell death (e.g., necrosis, apoptosis, autophagic cell death, pyroptosis, and NETosis). Thus, targeting HMGB1 with antioxidant compounds may be an attractive therapeutic strategy for inflammation-associated diseases such as sepsis, ischemia and reperfusion injury, arthritis, diabetes, and cancer. PMID:25904867

  7. Polydatin inhibits the oxidative stress-induced proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells by activating the eNOS/SIRT1 pathway.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yi; Gong, Xun; Mo, Yingli; Wu, Saizhu

    2016-06-01

    Oxidative stress-mediated proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) contributes to plaque formation and the progression of atherosclerosis. Polydatin is a derivative of resveratrol, and is widely present in certain herbal medications used for the treatment of cardiovascular diseases. In the present study, we examined whether polydatin was capable of attenuating VSMC proliferation induced by oxidative stress as well as the potential involvement of the endothelial nitric oxide synthetase (eNOS)/SIRT1 pathway. Briefly, VSMCs were exposed to H2O2 for 24 h in the absence or presence of polydatin (10-100 µM) prior to performing a cell proliferation assay. In mechanistic studies, the cells were incubated with the silent information regulator 1 (SIRT1) inhibitor, EX527, or the eNOS inhibitor, L-NAME, prior to polydatin treatment. The results showed that polydatin inhibited VSMC proliferation and the level of reactive oxygen species, increased the expression of Kip1/p27, SIRT1 and eNOS, whereas the expression of cyclin B1, Cdk1 and c-myc was decreased. The number of cells in the G2/M phase was increased. Pre-treatment with L-NAME attenuated the inhibitory effects of polydatin on cell proliferation, inhibited the expression of SIRT1 and the phosphorylation of eNOS. Pre-treatment with EX527 also attenuated the inhibitory effects of polydatin on cell proliferation, but failed to reduce the activation of eNOS and the production of nitric oxide. Taken together, these findings suggest that, polydatin inhibited the oxidative stress-induced proliferation of VMSCs by activating the eNOS/SIRT1 pathway. PMID:27081912

  8. GILZ overexpression attenuates endoplasmic reticulum stress-mediated cell death via the activation of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    André, Fanny; Corazao-Rozas, Paola; Idziorek, Thierry; Quesnel, Bruno; Kluza, Jérome; Marchetti, Philippe

    2016-09-16

    The Glucocorticoïd-induced leucine zipper (GILZ) protein has profound anti-inflammatory activities in haematopoietic cells. GILZ regulates numerous signal transduction pathways involved in proliferation and survival of normal and neoplastic cells. Here, we have demonstrated the potential of GILZ in alleviating apoptosis induced by ER stress inducers. Whereas the glucocorticoid, dexamethasone, protects from tunicamycin-induced cell death, silencing endogeneous GILZ in dexamethasone-treated cancer cells alter the capacity of glucocorticoids to protect from tunicamycin-mediated apoptosis. Under ER stress conditions, overexpression of GILZ significantly reduced activation of mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis by maintaining Bcl-xl level. GILZ protein affects the UPR signaling shifting the balance towards pro-survival signals as judged by down-regulation of CHOP, ATF4, XBP1s mRNA and increase in GRP78 protein level. Interestingly, GILZ sustains high mitochondrial OXPHOS during ER stress and cytoprotection mediated by GILZ is abolished in cells depleted of mitochondrial DNA, which are OXPHOS-deficient. These findings reveal a new role of GILZ, which acts as a cytoprotector against ER stress through a pathway involving mitochondrial OXPHOS. PMID:27416758

  9. Functionalized Fullerene Increases NF-κB Activity and Blocks Genotoxic Effect of Oxidative Stress in Serum-Starving Human Embryo Lung Diploid Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Ershova, E. S.; Sergeeva, V. A.; Tabakov, V. J.; Kameneva, L. A.; Voronov, I. I.; Khakina, E. A.; Troshin, P. A.; Kutsev, S. I.; Veiko, N. N.; Kostyuk, S. V.

    2016-01-01

    The influence of a water-soluble [60] fullerene derivative containing five residues of 3-phenylpropionic acid and a chlorine addend appended to the carbon cage (F-828) on serum-starving human embryo lung diploid fibroblasts (HELFs) was studied. Serum deprivation evokes oxidative stress in HELFs. Cultivation of serum-starving HELFs in the presence of 0.1–1 µM F-828 significantly decreases the level of free radicals, inhibits autophagy, and represses expression of NOX4 and NRF2 proteins. The activity of NF-κB substantially grows up in contrast to the suppressed NRF2 activity. In the presence of 0.2–0.25 µM F-828, the DSB rate and apoptosis level dramatically decrease. The maximum increase of proliferative activity of the HELFs and maximum activity of NF-κB are observed at these concentration values. Conclusion. Under the conditions of oxidative stress evoked by serum deprivation the water-soluble fullerene derivative F-828 used in concentrations of 0.1 to 1 µM strongly stimulates the NF-κB activity and represses the NRF2 activity in HELFs.

  10. Squamosamide derivative FLZ protects retinal pigment epithelium cells from oxidative stress through activation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-AKT signaling.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Li-Bo; Chen, Chun-Ming; Zhong, Hong; Zhu, Li-Juan

    2014-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cell apoptosis is attributed to age-related macular degeneration (AMD) pathogenesis. FLZ, a novel synthetic squamosamide derivative from a Chinese herb, Annona glabra, has displayed significant cyto-protective activity. In the current study, we explored the pro-survival effect of FLZ in oxidative stressed-RPE cells and studied the underlying signaling mechanisms. Our results showed that FLZ attenuated hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced viability decrease and apoptosis in the RPE cell line (ARPE-19 cells) and in primary mouse RPE cells. Western blotting results showed that FLZ activated AKT signaling in RPE cells. The AKT-specific inhibitor, MK-2206, the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT pan inhibitor, wortmannin, and AKT1-shRNA (short hairpin RNA) depletion almost abolished FLZ-mediated pro-survival/anti-apoptosis activity. We discovered that epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) trans-activation mediated FLZ-induced AKT activation and the pro-survival effect in RPE cells, and the anti-apoptosis effect of FLZ against H2O2 was inhibited by the EGFR inhibitor, PD153035, or by EGFR shRNA-knockdown. In conclusion, FLZ protects RPE cells from oxidative stress through activation of EGFR-AKT signaling, and our results suggest that FLZ might have therapeutic values for AMD. PMID:25329617

  11. Effects of Oxidative Stress on Mesenchymal Stem Cell Biology

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSCs) are multipotent stem cells present in most fetal and adult tissues. Ex vivo culture-expanded MSCs are being investigated for tissue repair and immune modulation, but their full clinical potential is far from realization. Here we review the role of oxidative stress in MSC biology, as their longevity and functions are affected by oxidative stress. In general, increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) inhibit MSC proliferation, increase senescence, enhance adipogenic but reduce osteogenic differentiation, and inhibit MSC immunomodulation. Furthermore, aging, senescence, and oxidative stress reduce their ex vivo expansion, which is critical for their clinical applications. Modulation of sirtuin expression and activity may represent a method to reduce oxidative stress in MSCs. These findings have important implications in the clinical utility of MSCs for degenerative and immunological based conditions. Further study of oxidative stress in MSCs is imperative in order to enhance MSC ex vivo expansion and in vivo engraftment, function, and longevity. PMID:27413419

  12. ROS Function in Redox Signaling and Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Schieber, Michael; Chandel, Navdeep S.

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress refers to elevated intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that cause damage to lipids, proteins and DNA. Oxidative stress has been linked to a myriad of pathologies. However, elevated ROS are also signaling molecules i.e. redox biology that maintain physiological functions. In this review we discuss the two faces of ROS, redox signaling and oxidative stress, and their contribution to both physiological and pathological conditions. Redox biology refers to low levels of ROS that activate signaling pathways to initiate biological processes while oxidative stress denotes high levels of ROS that incur damage to DNA, protein or lipids. Thus, the response to ROS displays hormesis. The In this review, we argue that redox biology, rather than oxidative stress, underlies physiological and pathological conditions. PMID:24845678

  13. Effects of Oxidative Stress on Mesenchymal Stem Cell Biology.

    PubMed

    Denu, Ryan A; Hematti, Peiman

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSCs) are multipotent stem cells present in most fetal and adult tissues. Ex vivo culture-expanded MSCs are being investigated for tissue repair and immune modulation, but their full clinical potential is far from realization. Here we review the role of oxidative stress in MSC biology, as their longevity and functions are affected by oxidative stress. In general, increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) inhibit MSC proliferation, increase senescence, enhance adipogenic but reduce osteogenic differentiation, and inhibit MSC immunomodulation. Furthermore, aging, senescence, and oxidative stress reduce their ex vivo expansion, which is critical for their clinical applications. Modulation of sirtuin expression and activity may represent a method to reduce oxidative stress in MSCs. These findings have important implications in the clinical utility of MSCs for degenerative and immunological based conditions. Further study of oxidative stress in MSCs is imperative in order to enhance MSC ex vivo expansion and in vivo engraftment, function, and longevity. PMID:27413419

  14. Reduced Cytochrome P4501A Activity and Recovery from Oxidative Stress During Subchronic Benzo[a]pyrene and Benzo[e]pyrene Treatment of Rainbow Trout

    PubMed Central

    Garzon, Claudia B.; Arkoosh, Mary; Collier, Tracy; Myers, Mark S.; Buzitis, Jon; Hahn, Mark E.

    2011-01-01

    This study assessed the role of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) affinity, and cytochrome P4501A (CYP1A) protein and activity in polyaromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-induced oxidative stress. In the 1–100 nM concentration range benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) but not benzo[e]pyrene (BeP) competitively displaced 2 nM [3H]2, 3, 7, 8-tetrachloro-dibenzo-p-dioxin from rainbow trout AHR2α. Based on appearance of fluorescent aromatic compounds in bile over 3, 7, 14, 28 or 50 days of feeding 3 μg of BaP or BeP/g fish/day, rainbow trout liver readily excreted these polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and their metabolites at near steady state rates. CYP1A proteins catalyzed more than 98% of ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD) activity in rainbow trout hepatic microsomes. EROD activity of hepatic microsomes initially increased and then decreased to control activities after 50 days of feeding both PAHs. Immunohistochemistry of liver confirmed CYP1A protein increased in fish fed both PAHs after 3 days and remained elevated for up to 28 days. Neither BaP nor BeP increased hepatic DNA adduct concentrations at any time up to 50 days of feeding these PAHs. Comet assays of blood cells demonstrated marked DNA damage after 14 days of feeding both PAHs that was not significant after 50 days. There was a strong positive correlation between hepatic EROD activity and DNA damage in blood cells over time for both PAHs. Neither CYP1A protein nor 3-nitrotyrosine (a biomarker for oxidative stress) immunostaining in trunk kidney were significantly altered by BaP or BeP after 3, 7, 14, or 28 days. There was no clear association between AHR2α affinity and BaP and BeP-induced oxidative stress. PMID:21550360

  15. Inhibition of the oxidative stress response by heat stress in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Crombie, Timothy A; Tang, Lanlan; Choe, Keith P; Julian, David

    2016-07-15

    It has long been recognized that simultaneous exposure to heat stress and oxidative stress shows a synergistic interaction that reduces organismal fitness, but relatively little is known about the mechanisms underlying this interaction. We investigated the role of molecular stress responses in driving this synergistic interaction using the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans To induce oxidative stress, we used the pro-oxidant compounds acrylamide, paraquat and juglone. As expected, we found that heat stress and oxidative stress interact synergistically to reduce survival. Compared with exposure to each stressor alone, during simultaneous sublethal exposure to heat stress and oxidative stress the normal induction of key oxidative-stress response (OxSR) genes was generally inhibited, whereas the induction of key heat-shock response (HSR) genes was not. Genetically activating the SKN-1-dependent OxSR increased a marker for protein aggregation and decreased whole-worm survival during heat stress alone, with the latter being independent of HSF-1. In contrast, compared with wild-type worms, inactivating the HSR by HSF-1 knockdown, which would be expected to decrease basal heat shock protein expression, increased survival during oxidative stress alone. Taken together, these data suggest that, in C. elegans, the HSR and OxSR cannot be simultaneously activated to the same extent that each can be activated during a single stressor exposure. We conclude that the observed synergistic reduction in survival during combined exposure to heat stress and oxidative stress is due, at least in part, to inhibition of the OxSR during activation of the HSR. PMID:27207646

  16. Cu(II)-disulfide complexes with superoxide dismutase- and catalase-like activities protect mitochondria and whole cells against oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Aliaga, Margarita E; Sandoval-Acuña, Cristián; López-Alarcón, Camilo; Fuentes, Jocelyn; Speisky, Hernan

    2014-10-01

    Mitochondria are a major subcellular site of superoxide (O2(-)) formation. Conditions leading to an uncontrolled production, accumulation and/or conversion of O2(-) into hydrogen peroxide result in an increment in the intramitochondrial oxidative tone which, ultimately leads to the loss of cell viability. Recently, we reported on the ability of a series of Cu(II)-disulfide complexes to act simultaneously as SOD- and catalase-like molecules. In the present study, we addressed the potential of such compounds to protect mitochondria and cells against the oxidative stress and the cytolytic damage induced by diclofenac. Exposure of Caco-2 cells to diclofenac (250µM, 20min) led to a near 80% inhibition of mitochondrial complex I activity and almost doubled the rate of mitochondrial O2(-) production (assessed by Mitosox). A comparable increment was seen in whole cells when the oxidative tone was assessed through the largely hydrogen peroxide-dependent dichlorofluorescein (DCFH) oxidation. The increment in mitochondrial O2(-) production was totally and concentration-dependently prevented by the addition of the complexes formed between Cu(II) and the disulfides of glutathione, homocysteine, or a-dehydro-lipoic acid (20µM each); comparatively, the Cu(II)-cystine complex exerted a weaker protection. A comparable protection pattern was seen at the whole cell level, as these complexes were also effective in preventing the increment in DCFH oxidation. The mitochondrial and whole cell antioxidant protection also translated into a full protection against the cytolytic effects of diclofenac (45min). Results from the present study indicate that the here-tested Cu(II)-disulfides complexes are able to effectively protect cells against the oxidative and the lytic effects of O2(-)-overproducing mitochondria, suggesting a potential for these type of compounds to act as SOD- and catalase-like molecules under oxidative-stress conditions. Supported by FONDECYT #1110018. PMID:26461399

  17. Renal oxidative stress, oxygenation, and hypertension.

    PubMed

    Palm, Fredrik; Nordquist, Lina

    2011-11-01

    Hypertension is closely associated with progressive kidney dysfunction, manifested as glomerulosclerosis, interstitial fibrosis, proteinuria, and eventually declining glomerular filtration. The postulated mechanism for development of glomerulosclerosis is barotrauma caused by increased capillary pressure, but the reason for development of interstitial fibrosis and the subsequently reduced kidney function is less clear. However, it has been hypothesized that tissue hypoxia induces fibrogenesis and progressive renal failure. This is very interesting, since recent reports highlight several different mechanisms resulting in altered oxygen handling and availability in the hypertensive kidney. Such mechanisms include decreased renal blood flow due to increased vascular tone induced by ANG II that limits oxygen delivery and increases oxidative stress, resulting in increased mitochondrial oxygen usage, increased oxygen usage for tubular electrolyte transport, and shunting of oxygen from arterial to venous blood in preglomerular vessels. It has been shown in several studies that interventions to prevent oxidative stress and to restore kidney tissue oxygenation prevent progression of kidney dysfunction. Furthermore, inhibition of ANG II activity, by either blocking ANG II type 1 receptors or angiotensin-converting enzyme, or by preventing oxidative stress by administration of antioxidants also results in improved blood pressure control. Therefore, it seems likely that tissue hypoxia in the hypertensive kidney contributes to progression of kidney damage, and perhaps also persistence the high blood pressure. PMID:21832206

  18. Chrononutrition against Oxidative Stress in Aging

    PubMed Central

    Garrido, M.; Terrón, M. P.; Rodríguez, A. B.

    2013-01-01

    Free radicals and oxidative stress have been recognized as important factors in the biology of aging and in many age-associated degenerative diseases. Antioxidant systems deteriorate during aging. It is, thus, considered that one way to reduce the rate of aging and the risk of chronic disease is to avoid the formation of free radicals and reduce oxidative stress by strengthening antioxidant defences. Phytochemicals present in fruits, vegetables, grains, and other foodstuffs have been linked to reducing the risk of major oxidative stress-induced diseases. Some dietary components of foods possess biological activities which influence circadian rhythms in humans. Chrononutrition studies have shown that not only the content of food, but also the time of ingestion contributes to the natural functioning of the circadian system. Dietary interventions with antioxidant-enriched foods taking into account the principles of chrononutrition are of particular interest for the elderly since they may help amplify the already powerful benefits of phytochemicals as natural instruments with which to prevent or delay the onset of common age-related diseases. PMID:23861994

  19. Asthmatic cough and airway oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Koskela, Heikki O; Purokivi, Minna K; Nieminen, Riina M; Moilanen, Eeva

    2012-05-31

    The mechanisms of cough in asthma are unclear. Asthma is associated with an oxidative stress. Many reactive oxygen species sensitize or activate sensory C-fibers which are capable to induce cough. It was hypothesized that oxidative stress in the airways might contribute to the cough severity in asthma. Exhaled breath condensate samples were collected in ten healthy and 26 asthmatic subjects. The concentration of 8-isoprostane was measured. In addition, the subjects filled in Leicester Cough Questionnaire and underwent cough provocation tests with dry air hyperpnoea and hypertonic saline, among other measurements. Among the asthmatic subjects, high 8-isoprostane was associated with severe cough response to hyperpnoea (p=0.001), low Leicester Cough Questionnaire values (indicating severe subjective cough, p=0.02), and usage of combination asthma drugs (p=0.03-0.04). However, the 8-isoprostane concentrations did not differ significantly between the healthy and the asthmatic subjects. Airway oxidative stress may be associated with experienced cough severity and measured cough sensitivity in asthma. PMID:22546340

  20. Aβ and tau toxicities in Alzheimer's are linked via oxidative stress-induced p38 activation: protective role of vitamin E.

    PubMed

    Giraldo, E; Lloret, A; Fuchsberger, T; Viña, J

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress is a hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD). We propose that rather than causing damage because of the action of free radicals, oxidative stress deranges signaling pathways leading to tau hyperphosphorylation, a hallmark of the disease. Indeed, incubation of neurons in culture with 5 µM beta-amyloid peptide (Aβ) causes an activation of p38 MAPK (p38) that leads to tau hyperphosphorylation. Inhibition of p38 prevents Aβ-induced tau phosphorylation. Aβ-induced effects are prevented when neurons are co-incubated with trolox (the water-soluble analog of vitamin E). We have confirmed these results in vivo, in APP/PS1 double transgenic mice of AD. We have found that APP/PS1 transgenic mice exhibit a high level of P-p38 in the hippocampus but not in cortex and this is prevented by feeding animals with a diet supplemented with vitamin E. Our results underpin the role of oxidative stress in the altered cell signaling in AD pathology and suggest that antioxidant prevention may be useful in AD therapeutics. PMID:25061569

  1. Aβ and tau toxicities in Alzheimer’s are linked via oxidative stress-induced p38 activation: Protective role of vitamin E

    PubMed Central

    Giraldo, E.; Lloret, A.; Fuchsberger, T.; Viña, J.

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress is a hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). We propose that rather than causing damage because of the action of free radicals, oxidative stress deranges signaling pathways leading to tau hyperphosphorylation, a hallmark of the disease. Indeed, incubation of neurons in culture with 5 µM beta-amyloid peptide (Aβ) causes an activation of p38 MAPK (p38) that leads to tau hyperphosphorylation. Inhibition of p38 prevents Aβ-induced tau phosphorylation. Aβ-induced effects are prevented when neurons are co-incubated with trolox (the water-soluble analog of vitamin E). We have confirmed these results in vivo, in APP/PS1 double transgenic mice of AD. We have found that APP/PS1 transgenic mice exhibit a high level of P-p38 in the hippocampus but not in cortex and this is prevented by feeding animals with a diet supplemented with vitamin E. Our results underpin the role of oxidative stress in the altered cell signaling in AD pathology and suggest that antioxidant prevention may be useful in AD therapeutics. PMID:25061569

  2. Pyrroloquinoline quinone enhances the resistance to oxidative stress and extends lifespan upon DAF-16 and SKN-1 activities in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Wu, J Z; Huang, J H; Khanabdali, R; Kalionis, B; Xia, S J; Cai, W J

    2016-07-01

    Pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) is linked to fundamental biological processes such as mitochondrial biogenesis and lipid metabolism. PQQ may also function as an essential micronutrient during animal development. Recent studies have shown the therapeutic potential of PQQ for several age-related diseases due to its antioxidant capacity. However, whether PQQ can promote longevity is unknown. Here, we investigate the effects of PQQ on oxidative stress resistance as well as lifespan modulation in Caenorhabditis elegans. We find that PQQ enhances resistance to oxidative stress and extends the lifespan of C. elegans at optimal doses. The underlying molecular mechanism involves the increased activities of the primary lifespan extension transcriptional factors DAF-16/FOXO, the conserved oxidative stress-responsive transcription factor SKN-1/Nrf2, and upregulation of daf-16, skn-1 downstream targets including sod-3, hsp16.2, gst-1 and gst-10. Our findings uncover a novel role of PQQ in longevity, supporting PQQ as a possible dietary supplement for overall health improvement. PMID:27090484

  3. ELECTROSTATIC CHARGE STIMULATES OXIDATIVE STRESS IN CNS MICROGLIA.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nanometer size particles carry free radical activity on their surface and can create oxidative stress (OS)-mediated inflammatory changes upon impact. The oxidative burst signals the activation of phage-lineage cells such as peripheral macrophages, Kupffer cells and CNS microgl...

  4. CONCENTRATED AMBIENT AIR POLLUTION CREATES OXIDATIVE STRESS IN CNS MICROGLIA.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nanometer size particles carry free radical activity on their surface and can produce oxidative stress (OS)-mediated damage upon impact to target cells. The initiating event of phage cell activation (i.e., the oxidative burst) is unknown, although many proximal events have been i...

  5. Intracerebral Hemorrhage, Oxidative Stress, and Antioxidant Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Xiaochun; Wen, Zunjia; Shen, Haitao; Shen, Meifen

    2016-01-01

    Hemorrhagic stroke is a common and severe neurological disorder and is associated with high rates of mortality and morbidity, especially for intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Increasing evidence demonstrates that oxidative stress responses participate in the pathophysiological processes of secondary brain injury (SBI) following ICH. The mechanisms involved in interoperable systems include endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, neuronal apoptosis and necrosis, inflammation, and autophagy. In this review, we summarized some promising advances in the field of oxidative stress and ICH, including contained animal and human investigations. We also discussed the role of oxidative stress, systemic oxidative stress responses, and some research of potential therapeutic options aimed at reducing oxidative stress to protect the neuronal function after ICH, focusing on the challenges of translation between preclinical and clinical studies, and potential post-ICH antioxidative therapeutic approaches. PMID:27190572

  6. Intracerebral Hemorrhage, Oxidative Stress, and Antioxidant Therapy.

    PubMed

    Duan, Xiaochun; Wen, Zunjia; Shen, Haitao; Shen, Meifen; Chen, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Hemorrhagic stroke is a common and severe neurological disorder and is associated with high rates of mortality and morbidity, especially for intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Increasing evidence demonstrates that oxidative stress responses participate in the pathophysiological processes of secondary brain injury (SBI) following ICH. The mechanisms involved in interoperable systems include endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, neuronal apoptosis and necrosis, inflammation, and autophagy. In this review, we summarized some promising advances in the field of oxidative stress and ICH, including contained animal and human investigations. We also discussed the role of oxidative stress, systemic oxidative stress responses, and some research of potential therapeutic options aimed at reducing oxidative stress to protect the neuronal function after ICH, focusing on the challenges of translation between preclinical and clinical studies, and potential post-ICH antioxidative therapeutic approaches. PMID:27190572

  7. Metformin increases APP expression and processing via oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction and NF-κB activation: Use of insulin to attenuate metformin's effect.

    PubMed

    Picone, Pasquale; Nuzzo, Domenico; Caruana, Luca; Messina, Elisa; Barera, Annalisa; Vasto, Sonya; Di Carlo, Marta

    2015-05-01

    Clinical and experimental biomedical studies have shown Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) to be a risk factor for the development of Alzheimer's disease (AD). This study demonstrates the effect of metformin, a therapeutic biguanide administered for T2DM therapy, on β-amyloid precursor protein (APP) metabolism in in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo models. Furthermore, the protective role of insulin against metformin is also demonstrated. In LAN5 neuroblastoma cells, metformin increases APP and presenilin levels, proteins involved in AD. Overexpression of APP and presenilin 1 (Pres 1) increases APP cleavage and intracellular accumulation of β-amyloid peptide (Aβ), which, in turn, promotes aggregation of Aβ. In the experimental conditions utilized the drug causes oxidative stress, mitochondrial damage, decrease of Hexokinase-II levels and cytochrome C release, all of which lead to cell death. Several changes in oxidative stress-related genes following metformin treatment were detected by PCR arrays specific for the oxidative stress pathway. These effects of metformin were found to be antagonized by the addition of insulin, which reduced Aβ levels, oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction and cell death. Similarly, antioxidant molecules, such as ferulic acid and curcumin, are able to revert metformin's effect. Comparable results were obtained using peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Finally, the involvement of NF-κB transcription factor in regulating APP and Pres 1 expression was investigated. Upon metformin treatment, NF-κB is activated and translocates from the cytoplasm to the nucleus, where it induces increased APP and Pres 1 transcription. The use of Bay11-7085 inhibitor suppressed the effect of metformin on APP and Pres 1 expression. PMID:25667085

  8. Iron, copper, and manganese complexes with in vitro superoxide dismutase and/or catalase activities that keep Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells alive under severe oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Thales P; Fernandes, Christiane; Melo, Karen V; Ferreira, Sarah S; Lessa, Josane A; Franco, Roberto W A; Schenk, Gerhard; Pereira, Marcos D; Horn, Adolfo

    2015-03-01

    Due to their aerobic lifestyle, eukaryotic organisms have evolved different strategies to overcome oxidative stress. The recruitment of some specific metalloenzymes such as superoxide dismutases (SODs) and catalases (CATs) is of great importance for eliminating harmful reactive oxygen species (hydrogen peroxide and superoxide anion). Using the ligand HPClNOL {1-[bis(pyridin-2-ylmethyl)amino]-3-chloropropan-2-ol}, we have synthesized three coordination compounds containing iron(III), copper(II), and manganese(II) ions, which are also present in the active site of the above-noted metalloenzymes. These compounds were evaluated as SOD and CAT mimetics. The manganese and iron compounds showed both SOD and CAT activities, while copper showed only SOD activity. The copper and manganese in vitro SOD activities are very similar (IC50~0.4 μmol dm(-3)) and about 70-fold higher than those of iron. The manganese compound showed CAT activity higher than that of the iron species. Analyzing their capacity to protect Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells against oxidative stress (H2O2 and the O2(•-) radical), we observed that all compounds act as antioxidants, increasing the resistance of yeast cells mainly due to a reduction of lipid oxidation. Especially for the iron compound, the data indicate complete protection when wild-type cells were exposed to H2O2 or O2(•-) species. Interestingly, these compounds also compensate for both superoxide dismutase and catalase deficiencies; their antioxidant activity is metal ion dependent, in the order iron(III)>copper(II)>manganese(II). The protection mechanism employed by the complexes proved to be independent of the activation of transcription factors (such as Yap1, Hsf1, Msn2/Msn4) and protein synthesis. There is no direct relation between the in vitro and the in vivo antioxidant activities. PMID:25511255

  9. Effects of Cigarette Smoke on the Activation of Oxidative Stress-Related Transcription Factors in Female A/J Mouse Lung

    PubMed Central

    Tharappel, Job C.; Cholewa, Jill; Espandiari, Parvaneh; Spear, Brett T.; Gairola, C. Gary; Glauert, Howard P.

    2010-01-01

    Cigarette smoke contains a high concentration of free radicals and induces oxidative stress in the lung and other tissues. Several transcription factors are known to be activated by oxidative stress, including nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), activator protein-1 (AP-1), and hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF). Studies were therefore undertaken to examine if cigarette smoke could activate these transcription factors, as well as other transcription factors that may be important in lung carcinogenesis. Female A/J mice were exposed to cigarette smoke for 2, 5, 10, 15, 20, 42, or 56 days (6 hr/day, 5 days/wk). Cigarette smoke did not increase NF-κB activation at any of these times, but NF-κB DNA binding activity was lower after 15 days and 56 days of smoke exposure. The DNA binding activity of AP-1 was lower after 10 days and 56 days but was not changed after 42 days of smoke exposure. The DNA binding activity of HIF was quantitatively increased after 42 days of smoke exposure but decreased after 56 days. Whether the activation of other transcription factors in the lung could be altered after exposure to cigarette smoke was subsequently examined. The DNA binding activities of FoxF2, myc-CF1, RORE, and p53 were examined after 10 days of smoke exposure. The DNA binding activities of FoxF2 and p53 were quantitatively increased, but those of myc-CF1 and RORE were unaffected. These studies show that cigarette smoke exposure leads to quantitative increases in DNA binding activities of FoxF2 and p53, while the activations of NF-κB, AP-1, and HIF are largely unaffected or reduced. PMID:20711931

  10. Oxidation of water to hydrogen peroxide at the rock-water interface due to stress-activated electric currents in rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balk, Melike; Bose, Milton; Ertem, Gözen; Rogoff, Dana A.; Rothschild, Lynn J.; Freund, Friedemann T.

    2009-06-01

    Common igneous and high-grade metamorphic rocks contain dormant defects, which release electronic charge carriers when stressed. Rocks thereby behave like a battery. The charge carriers of interest are defect electrons h •, e.g. electronic states associated with O - in a matrix of O 2-. Known as "positive holes" or pholes for short, the h • travel along stress gradients over distances on the order of meters in the laboratory and kilometers in the field. At rock-water interfaces the h • turn into •O radicals, e.g. highly reactive oxygen species, which oxidize H 2O to H 2O 2. For every two h • charge carriers one H 2O 2 molecule is formed. In the laboratory the battery circuit is closed by running a Cu wire from the stressed to the unstressed rock. In the field closure of the circuit may be provided through the electrolytical conductivity of water. The discovery of h • charge carriers, their stress-activation, and their effect on Earth's surface environment may help better understand the oxidation of the early Earth and the evolution of early life.

  11. Heavy metal exposure, in combination with physical activity and aging, is related with oxidative stress in Japanese women from a rural agricultural community.

    PubMed

    Cui, Xiaoyi; Ohtsu, Mayumi; Mise, Nathan; Ikegami, Akihiko; Mizuno, Atsuko; Sakamoto, Takako; Ogawa, Masanori; Machida, Munehito; Kayama, Fujio

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the relationships between oxidative stress and heavy metal exposure (lead [Pb] and cadmium [Cd]), as well as co-factors such as physical activity and age, in Japanese women. This study was conducted with female subjects from a rural agricultural community in Japan. Subjects were asked to complete lifestyle-related questionnaires and undergo a group health examination. Physical activity, alcohol consumption, body mass index, and other demographic information were collected. Blood and urine samples were collected to measure urinary 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) levels and blood and urinary Cd and Pb concentrations. Urine samples were analyzed using high performance liquid chromatography and flameless atomic absorption spectrometry; blood samples were analyzed using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. Age, physical activity, and blood and urinary Cd and Pb concentrations were included in structural equation modeling analysis. Two latent factors for heavy metal exposure and physical activity were produced to predict the total influence of the variables. The final model was good: CMIN/DF = 0.775, CFI = 1.000, GFI = 0.975, AGFI = 0.954, RMSEA = 0.000. 8-OHdG levels were positively associated with heavy metal exposure, physical activity, and age (standard β of path analysis: 0.33, 0.38, and 0.20, respectively). Therefore, oxidative stress is associated with both, environmental and lifestyle factors, in combination with aging. PMID:27386333

  12. C-Type Natriuretic Peptide Induces Anti-contractile Effect Dependent on Nitric Oxide, Oxidative Stress, and NPR-B Activation in Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Pernomian, Laena; Prado, Alejandro F.; Silva, Bruno R.; Azevedo, Aline; Pinheiro, Lucas C.; Tanus-Santos, José E.; Bendhack, Lusiane M.

    2016-01-01

    Aims: To evaluate the role of nitric oxide, reactive oxygen species (ROS), and natriuretic peptide receptor-B activation in C-type natriuretic peptide-anti-contractile effect on Phenylephrine-induced contraction in aorta isolated from septic rats. Methods and Results: Cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) surgery was used to induce sepsis in male rats. Vascular reactivity was conducted in rat aorta and resistance mesenteric artery (RMA). Measurement of survival rate, mean arterial pressure (MAP), plasma nitric oxide, specific protein expression, and localization were evaluated. Septic rats had a survival rate about 37% at 4 h after the surgery, and these rats presented hypotension compared to control-operated (Sham) rats. Phenylephrine-induced contraction was decreased in sepsis. C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) induced anti-contractile effect in aortas. Plasma nitric oxide was increased in sepsis. Nitric oxide-synthase but not natriuretic peptide receptor-B expression was increased in septic rat aortas. C-type natriuretic peptide-anti-contractile effect was dependent on nitric oxide-synthase, ROS, and natriuretic peptide receptor-B activation. Natriuretic peptide receptor-C, protein kinase-Cα mRNA, and basal nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH)-dependent ROS production were lower in septic rats. Phenylephrine and CNP enhanced ROS production. However, stimulated ROS production was low in sepsis. Conclusion: CNP induced anti-contractile effect on Phenylephrine contraction in aortas from Sham and septic rats that was dependent on nitric oxide-synthase, ROS, and natriuretic peptide receptor-B activation. PMID:27445832

  13. Mixed-function oxidase enzyme activity and oxidative stress in lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) exposed to 3,3{prime},4,4{prime}5-pentachlorobiphenyl (PCB-126)

    SciTech Connect

    Palace, V.P.; Klaverkamp, J.F.; Lockhart, W.L. |; Metner, D.A.; Muir, D.C.G.; Brown, S.B.

    1996-06-01

    Juvenile lake trout were intraperitoneally injected with corn oil containing nominal concentrations of 0, 0.6, 6.3, or 25 {micro}g [{sup 14}C]-3,3{prime},4,4{prime},5-pentachlorobiphenyl (PCB-126) per gram of body weight. The PCB-126 accumulated in liver in a dose-dependent manner to a sustained concentration by 6 weeks and remained elevated for the 30-week experimental period. Mixed-function oxidase (MFO) enzyme activity was elevated in the two highest dose groups relative to the control group, but not in the low-dose group throughout the 30 weeks. Oxidative stress, measured by the thiobarbituric acid reactive substances test, was correlated with ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase and was elevated in liver of the two highest PCB dose groups but not the low-dose group. The activities of the enzymatic antioxidants superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase were unaffected by PCB-126 exposure. The nonenzymatic antioxidants superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase were unaffected by PCB-126 exposure. The nonenzymatic antioxidant tocopherol was depleted to approximately 75% of the control concentration in liver of all three PCB-dosed groups. Hepatic ascorbic acid levels were not different in any of the treatment groups. Retinol was depleted by greater than an order of magnitude in liver of the two highest dose groups but not in the los-dose group. This study demonstrates a correlation between hepatic MFO activity and oxidative stress in PCB-exposed lake trout. Tocopherol and retinol may be important mediators of oxidative stress but additional study is required to confirm the antioxidant activity of retinol.

  14. Bridges between mitochondrial oxidative stress, ER stress and mTOR signaling in pancreatic β cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Yang, Xin; Zhang, Jingjing

    2016-08-01

    Pancreatic β cell dysfunction, i.e., failure to provide insulin in concentrations sufficient to control blood sugar, is central to the etiology of all types of diabetes. Current evidence implicates mitochondrial oxidative stress and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in pancreatic β cell loss and impaired insulin secretion. Oxidative and ER stress are interconnected so that misfolded proteins induce reactive oxygen species (ROS) production; likewise, oxidative stress disturbs the ER redox state thereby disrupting correct disulfide bond formation and proper protein folding. mTOR signaling regulates many metabolic processes including protein synthesis, cell growth, survival and proliferation. Oxidative stress inhibits mTORC1, which is considered an important suppressor of mitochondrial oxidative stress in β cells, and ultimately, controls cell survival. The interplay between ER stress and mTORC1 is complicated, since the unfolded protein response (UPR) activation can occur upstream or downstream of mTORC1. Persistent activation of mTORC1 initiates protein synthesis and UPR activation, while in the later phase induces ER stress. Chronic activation of ER stress inhibits Akt/mTORC1 pathway, while under particular settings, acute activation of UPR activates Akt-mTOR signaling. Thus, modulating mitochondrial oxidative stress and ER stress via mTOR signaling may be an approach that will effectively suppress obesity- or glucolipotoxicity-induced metabolic disorders such as insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). In this review, we focus on the regulations between mTOR signaling and mitochondrial oxidative or ER stress in pancreatic β cells. PMID:27185188

  15. ALCAR Exerts Neuroprotective and Pro-Neurogenic Effects by Inhibition of Glial Activation and Oxidative Stress via Activation of the Wnt/β-Catenin Signaling in Parkinsonian Rats.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sonu; Mishra, Akanksha; Shukla, Shubha

    2016-09-01

    Oxidative stress and neuroinflammation are known causative factors in progressive degeneration of dopaminergic (DAergic) neurons in Parkinson's disease (PD). Neural stem cells (NSCs) contribute in maintaining brain plasticity; therefore, survival of NSCs and neuroblasts during neurodegenerative process becomes important in replenishing the pool of mature neuronal population. Acetyl-L-carnitine (ALCAR), present in almost all body cells, increases endogenous antioxidants and regulates bioenergetics. Currently, no information is available about the putative mechanism and neuroprotective effects of ALCAR in 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced rat model of PD-like phenotypes. Herein, we investigated the effect of ALCAR on death/survival of DAergic neurons, neuroblasts and NSCs and associates mechanism of neuroprotection in 6-OHDA-induced rat model of PD-like phenotypes. ALCAR (100 mg/kg/day, intraperitoneal (i.p.)) treatment started 3 days prior to 6-OHDA lesioning and continued for another 14 day post-lesioning. We found that ALCAR pretreatment in 6-OHDA-lesioned rats increased expression of neurogenic and the Wnt pathway genes in the striatum and substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc) region. It suppressed the glial cell activation, improved antioxidant status, increased NSC/neuroblast population and rescued the DAergic neurons in nigrostriatal pathway. ALCAR pretreatment in 6-OHDA-lesioned rats decreased GSK-3β activation and increased nuclear translocation of β-catenin. Functional deficits were restored following ALCAR pretreatment in 6-OHDA-lesioned rats as demonstrated by improved motor coordination and rotational behaviour, confirming protection of DAergic innervations in lesioned striatum. These results indicate that ALCAR exerts neuroprotective effects through the activation of Wnt/β-catenin pathway, suggesting its therapeutic use to treat neurodegenerative diseases by enhancing regenerative capacity. PMID:26223802

  16. Nitric oxide and iron modulate heme oxygenase activity as a long distance signaling response to salt stress in sunflower seedling cotyledons.

    PubMed

    Singh, Neha; Bhatla, Satish C

    2016-02-29

    Nitric oxide is a significant component of iron signaling in plants. Heme is one of the iron sensors in plants. Free heme is highly toxic and can cause cell damage as it catalyzes the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Its catabolism is carried out by heme oxygenase (HOs; EC 1.14.99.3) which uses heme both as a prosthetic group and as a substrate. Two significant events, which accompany adaptation to salt stress in sunflower seedlings, are accumulation of ROS and enhanced production of nitric oxide (NO) in roots and cotyledons. Present investigations on the immunolocalization of heme oxygenase distribution in sunflower seedling cotyledons by confocal laser scanning microscopic (CLSM) imaging provide new information on the differential spatial distribution of the inducible form of HO (HO-1) as a long distance in response to NaCl stress. The enzyme is abundantly distributed in the specialized cells around the secretory canals (SCs) in seedling cotyledons. Abundance of tyrosine nitrated proteins has also been observed in the specialized cells around the secretory canals in cotyledons derived from salt stressed seedlings. The spatial distribution of tyrosine nitrated proteins and HO-1 expression further correlates with the abundance of mitochondria in these cells. Present findings, thus, highlight a link among distribution of HO-1 expression, abundance of tyrosine nitrated proteins and mitochondria in specialized cells around the secretory canal as a long distance mechanism of salt stress tolerance in sunflower seedlings. Enhanced spatial distribution of HO-1 in response to NaCl stress in seedling cotyledons is in congruence with the observed increase in specific activity of HO-1 in NaCl stressed conditions. The enzyme activity is further enhanced by hemin (HO-1 inducer) both in the absence or presence of NaCl stress and inhibited by zinc protoporphyrin. Western blot analysis of cotyledon homogenates using anti-HO-1 polyclonal antibody shows one major band (29

  17. Activation of an AP1-Like Transcription Factor of the Maize Pathogen Cochliobolus heterostrophus in Response to Oxidative Stress and Plant Signals

    SciTech Connect

    Lev, Sophie; hadar, Ruthi; Amedeo, Paolo; Baker, Scott E.; Yoder, Olen; Horwitz, Benjamin A.

    2005-02-01

    Redox sensing is a ubiquitous mechanism regulating cellular activity. Fungal pathogens face reactive oxygen species produced by the host plant's oxidative burst in addition to endogenous reactive oxygen species produced during aerobic metabolism. An array of preformed and induced detoxifying enzymes, including superoxide dismutase, catalases, and peroxidases, could allow fungi to infect plants despite the oxidative burst. We isolated a gene (CHAP1) encoding a redox-regulated transcription factor in Cochliobolus heterostrophus, a fungal pathogen of maize. CHAP1 is a bZIP protein that possesses two cysteine-rich domains structurally and functionally related to Saccharomyces cerevisiae YAP1. Deletion of CHAP1 in C. heterostrophus resulted in decreased resistance to oxidative stress caused by hydrogen peroxide and menadione, but the virulence of chap1 mutants was unaffected. Upon activation by oxidizing agents or plant signals, a green fluorescent protein (GFP)-CHAP1 fusion protein became localized in the nucleus. Expression of genes encoding antioxidant proteins was induced in the wild type but not in chap1 mutants. Activation of CHAP1 occurred from the earliest stage of plant infection, in conidial germ tubes on the leaf surface, and persisted during infection. Late in the course of infection, after extensive necrotic lesions were formed, GFP-CHAP1 redistributed to the cytosol in hyphae growing on the leaf surface. Localization of CHAP1 to the nucleus may, through changes in the redox state of the cell, provide a mechanism linking extracellular cues to transcriptional regulation during the plant-pathogen interaction.

  18. Oxidative stress, DNA damage and antioxidant enzyme activities in the pacific white shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei) when exposed to hypoxia and reoxygenation.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuhu; Wei, Lin; Cao, Jiangrong; Qiu, Liguo; Jiang, Xiu; Li, Ping; Song, Qinqin; Zhou, Hailong; Han, Qian; Diao, Xiaoping

    2016-02-01

    To evaluate the genotoxic and physiological effects of acute hypoxia on the pacific white shrimp (L. vannamei), shrimps were treated firstly with three dissolved oxygen levels 6.5 ppm (control), 3.0 ppm and 1.5 ppm for 24 h, respectively, and then reoxygenated (6.5 ppm) for 24 h. The changes of superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, glutathione peroxidases (GPX) activity, malondialdehyde (MDA) concentration and DNA damage in the tissues of gill, hepatopancreas and hemolymph were examined during the period of hypoxia and reoxygenation. The results indicated SOD activity, GPX activity, MDA concentration and DNA damage all increased basically compared with the control during the period of hypoxia except for MDA concentrations in the gill at 12 h and 24 h hypoxia (3.0 ppm), and these parameters were recovered to some degree during the period of reoxygenation. Moreover, the comet assays in the tissues of gill and hepatopancreas showed an obvious time- and dose-dependent response to hypoxia, which indicated comet assay in the two tissues could be used as sensitive biomarker to detect the occurrence of hypoxia. We conclude that acute hypoxia can induce oxidative stress, DNA damage and lipid peroxidation in the tissues of gill, hepatopancreas and hemolymph of L. vannamei and the DNA damage may come from hypoxia-induced oxidative stress. PMID:26363325

  19. Ziram and sodium N,N-dimethyldithiocarbamate inhibit ubiquitin activation through intracellular metal transport and increased oxidative stress in HEK293 cells.

    PubMed

    Dennis, Kathleen E; Valentine, William M

    2015-04-20

    Ubiquitin activating enzyme E1 plays a pivotal role in ubiquitin based protein signaling through regulating the initiating step of the cascade. Previous studies demonstrated that E1 is inhibited by covalent modification of reactive cysteines contained within the ubiquitin-binding groove and by conditions that increase oxidative stress and deplete cellular antioxidants. In this study, we determined the relative contribution of covalent adduction and oxidative stress to E1 inhibition produced by ziram and sodium N,N-dimethyldithiocarbamate (DMDC) in HEK293 cells. Although no dithiocarbamate-derived E1 adducts were identified on E1 using shotgun LC/MS/MS for either ziram or DMDC, both dithiocarbamates significantly decreased E1 activity, with ziram demonstrating greater potency. Ziram increased intracellular levels of zinc and copper, DMDC increased intracellular levels of only copper, and both dithiocarbamates enhanced oxidative injury evidenced by elevated levels of protein carbonyls and expression of heme oxygenase-1. To assess the contribution of intracellular copper transport to E1 inhibition, coincubations were performed with the copper chelator triethylenetetramine hydrochloride (TET). TET significantly protected E1 activity for both of the dithiocarbamates and decreased the associated oxidative injury in HEK293 cells as well as prevented dithiocarbamate-mediated lipid peroxidation assayed using an ethyl aracidonate micelle system. Because TET did not completely ameliorate intracellular transport of copper or zinc for ziram, TET apparently maintained E1 activity through its ability to diminish dithiocarbamate-mediated oxidative stress. Experiments to determine the relative contribution of elevated intracellular zinc and copper were performed using a metal free incubation system and showed that increases in either metal were sufficient to inhibit E1. To evaluate the utility of the HEK293 in vitro system for screening environmental agents, a series of additional

  20. Ziram and Sodium N,N-Dimethyldithiocarbamate Inhibit Ubiquitin Activation through Intracellular Metal Transport and Increased Oxidative Stress in HEK293 Cells

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Ubiquitin activating enzyme E1 plays a pivotal role in ubiquitin based protein signaling through regulating the initiating step of the cascade. Previous studies demonstrated that E1 is inhibited by covalent modification of reactive cysteines contained within the ubiquitin-binding groove and by conditions that increase oxidative stress and deplete cellular antioxidants. In this study, we determined the relative contribution of covalent adduction and oxidative stress to E1 inhibition produced by ziram and sodium N,N-dimethyldithiocarbamate (DMDC) in HEK293 cells. Although no dithiocarbamate-derived E1 adducts were identified on E1 using shotgun LC/MS/MS for either ziram or DMDC, both dithiocarbamates significantly decreased E1 activity, with ziram demonstrating greater potency. Ziram increased intracellular levels of zinc and copper, DMDC increased intracellular levels of only copper, and both dithiocarbamates enhanced oxidative injury evidenced by elevated levels of protein carbonyls and expression of heme oxygenase-1. To assess the contribution of intracellular copper transport to E1 inhibition, coincubations were performed with the copper chelator triethylenetetramine hydrochloride (TET). TET significantly protected E1 activity for both of the dithiocarbamates and decreased the associated oxidative injury in HEK293 cells as well as prevented dithiocarbamate-mediated lipid peroxidation assayed using an ethyl aracidonate micelle system. Because TET did not completely ameliorate intracellular transport of copper or zinc for ziram, TET apparently maintained E1 activity through its ability to diminish dithiocarbamate-mediated oxidative stress. Experiments to determine the relative contribution of elevated intracellular zinc and copper were performed using a metal free incubation system and showed that increases in either metal were sufficient to inhibit E1. To evaluate the utility of the HEK293 in vitro system for screening environmental agents, a series of additional

  1. Traffic-related exposures and biomarkers of systemic inflammation, endothelial activation and oxidative stress: a panel study in the US trucking industry

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Experimental evidence suggests that inhaled particles from vehicle exhaust have systemic effects on inflammation, endothelial activation and oxidative stress. In the present study we assess the relationships of short-term exposures with inflammatory endothelial activation and oxidative stress biomarker levels in a population of trucking industry workers. Methods Blood and urine samples were collected pre and post-shift, at the beginning and end of a workweek from 67 male non-smoking US trucking industry workers. Concurrent measurements of microenvironment concentrations of elemental and organic carbon (EC & OC), and fine particulate matter (PM2.5) combined with time activity patterns allowed for calculation of individual exposures. Associations between daily and first and last-day average levels of exposures and repeated measures of intercellular and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1 & VCAM-1), interleukin 6 (IL-6) and C-reactive protein (CRP) blood levels and urinary 8-Hydroxy-2′-Deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) were assessed using linear mixed effects models for repeated measures. Results There was a statistically significant association between first and last-day average PM2.5 and 8-OHdG (21% increase, 95% CI: 2, 42%) and first and last-day average OC and IL-6 levels (18% increase 95% CI: 1, 37%) per IQR in exposure. There were no significant findings associated with EC or associations suggesting acute cross-shift effects. Conclusion Our findings suggest associations between weekly average exposures of PM2.5 on markers of oxidative stress and OC on IL-6 levels. PMID:24314116

  2. Activation of p53 mediated glycolytic inhibition-oxidative stress-apoptosis pathway in Dalton's lymphoma by a ruthenium (II)-complex containing 4-carboxy N-ethylbenzamide.

    PubMed

    Koiri, Raj Kumar; Trigun, Surendra Kumar; Mishra, Lallan

    2015-03-01

    There is a general agreement that most of the cancer cells switch over to aerobic glycolysis (Warburg effect) and upregulate antioxidant enzymes to prevent oxidative stress induced apoptosis. Thus, there is an evolving view to target these metabolic alterations by novel anticancer agents to restrict tumor progression in vivo. Previously we have reported that when a non toxic dose (10 mg/kg bw i.p.) of a novel anticancer ruthenium(II)-complex containing 4-carboxy N-ethylbenzamide; Ru(II)-CNEB, was administered to the Dalton's lymphoma (DL) bearing mice, it regressed DL growth by inducing apoptosis in the DL cells. It also inactivated M4-LDH (M4-lactate dehydrogenase), an enzyme that drives anaerobic glycolysis in the tumor cells. In the present study we have investigated whether this compound is able to modulate regulation of glycolytic inhibition-apoptosis pathway in the DL cells in vivo. We observed that Ru(II)-CNEB could decline expression of the inducible form of 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase (iPFK2: PFKFB3), the master regulator of glycolysis in the DL cells. The complex also activated superoxide dismutase (the H2O2 producing enzyme) but declined the levels of catalase and glutathione peroxidase (the two H2O2 degrading enzymes) to impose oxidative stress in the DL cells. This was consistent with the enhanced p53 level, decline in Bcl2/Bax ratio and activation of caspase 9 in those DL cells. The findings suggest that Ru(II)-CNEB is able to activate oxidative stress-apoptosis pathway via p53 (a tumor supressor protein) mediated repression of iPFK2, a key glycolytic regulator, in the DL cells in vivo. PMID:25576833

  3. Oxidative stress in deep scattering layers: Heat shock response and antioxidant enzymes activities of myctophid fishes thriving in oxygen minimum zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopes, Ana Rita; Trübenbach, Katja; Teixeira, Tatiana; Lopes, Vanessa M.; Pires, Vanessa; Baptista, Miguel; Repolho, Tiago; Calado, Ricardo; Diniz, Mário; Rosa, Rui

    2013-12-01

    Diel vertical migrators, such as myctophid fishes, are known to encounter oxygen minimum zones (OMZ) during daytime in the Eastern Pacific Ocean and, therefore, have to cope with temperature and oxidative stress that arise while ascending to warmer, normoxic surface waters at night-time. The aim of this study was to investigate the antioxidant defense strategies and heat shock response (HSR) in two myctophid species, namely Triphoturus mexicanus and Benthosema panamense, at shallow and warm surface waters (21 kPa, 20-25 °C) and at hypoxic, cold (≤1 kPa, 10 °C) mesopelagic depths. More specifically, we quantified (i) heat shock protein concentrations (HSP70/HSC70) (ii) antioxidant enzyme activities [including superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione-S-transferase (GST)], and (iii) lipid peroxidation [malondialdehyde (MDA) levels]. HSP70/HSC70 levels increased in both myctophid species at warmer, well-oxygenated surface waters probably to prevent cellular damage (oxidative stress) due to increased oxygen demand under elevated temperatures and reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation. On the other hand, CAT and GST activities were augmented under hypoxic conditions, probably as preparatory response to a burst of oxyradicals during the reoxygenation phase (while ascending). SOD activity decreased under hypoxia in B. panamense, but was kept unchanged in T. mexicanus. MDA levels in B. panamense did not change between the surface and deep-sea conditions, whereas T. mexicanus showed elevated MDA and HSP70/HSC70 concentrations at warmer surface waters. This indicated that T. mexicanus seems to be not so well tuned to temperature and oxidative stress associated to diel vertical migrations. The understanding of such physiological strategies that are linked to oxygen deprivation and reoxygenation phases may provide valuable information about how different species might respond to the impacts of environmental stressors (e.g. expanding mesopelagic hypoxia

  4. Induction of Oxidative Stress in Kidney

    PubMed Central

    Ozbek, Emin

    2012-01-01

    Oxidative stress has a critical role in the pathophysiology of several kidney diseases, and many complications of these diseases are mediated by oxidative stress, oxidative stress-related mediators, and inflammation. Several systemic diseases such as hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and hypercholesterolemia; infection; antibiotics, chemotherapeutics, and radiocontrast agents; and environmental toxins, occupational chemicals, radiation, smoking, as well as alcohol consumption induce oxidative stress in kidney. We searched the literature using PubMed, MEDLINE, and Google scholar with “oxidative stress, reactive oxygen species, oxygen free radicals, kidney, renal injury, nephropathy, nephrotoxicity, and induction”. The literature search included only articles written in English language. Letters or case reports were excluded. Scientific relevance, for clinical studies target populations, and study design, for basic science studies full coverage of main topics, are eligibility criteria for articles used in this paper. PMID:22577546

  5. Primary and secondary oxidative stress in Bacillus.

    PubMed

    Mols, Maarten; Abee, Tjakko

    2011-06-01

    Coping with oxidative stress originating from oxidizing compounds or reactive oxygen species (ROS), associated with the exposure to agents that cause environmental stresses, is one of the prerequisites for an aerobic lifestyle of Bacillus spp. such as B. subtilis, B. cereus and B. anthracis. This minireview highlights novel insights in the primary oxidative stress response caused by oxidizing compounds including hydrogen peroxide and the secondary oxidative stress responses apparent upon exposure to a range of agents and conditions leading to environmental stresses such as antibiotics, heat and acid. Insights in the pathways and damaging radicals involved have been compiled based among others on transcriptome studies, network analyses and fluorescence techniques for detection of ROS at single cell level. Exploitation of the current knowledge for the control of spoilage and pathogenic bacteria is discussed. PMID:21352461

  6. Possible involvement of membrane lipids peroxidation and oxidation of catalytically essential thiols of the cerebral transmembrane sodium pump as component mechanisms of iron-mediated oxidative stress-linked dysfunction of the pump's activity

    PubMed Central

    Omotayo, T.I.; Akinyemi, G.S.; Omololu, P.A.; Ajayi, B.O.; Akindahunsi, A.A.; Rocha, J.B.T.; Kade, I.J.

    2014-01-01

    The precise molecular events defining the complex role of oxidative stress in the inactivation of the cerebral sodium pump in radical-induced neurodegenerative diseases is yet to be fully clarified and thus still open. Herein we investigated the modulation of the activity of the cerebral transmembrane electrogenic enzyme in Fe2+-mediated in vitro oxidative stress model. The results show that Fe2+ inhibited the transmembrane enzyme in a concentration dependent manner and this effect was accompanied by a biphasic generation of aldehydic product of lipid peroxidation. While dithiothreitol prevented both Fe2+ inhibitory effect on the pump and lipid peroxidation, vitamin E prevented only lipid peroxidation but not inhibition of the pump. Besides, malondialdehyde (MDA) inhibited the pump by a mechanism not related to oxidation of its critical thiols. Apparently, the low activity of the pump in degenerative diseases mediated by Fe2+ may involve complex multi-component mechanisms which may partly involve an initial oxidation of the critical thiols of the enzyme directly mediated by Fe2+ and during severe progression of such diseases; aldehydic products of lipid peroxidation such as MDA may further exacerbate this inhibitory effect by a mechanism that is likely not related to the oxidation of the catalytically essential thiols of the ouabain-sensitive cerebral electrogenic pump. PMID:25618580

  7. Possible involvement of membrane lipids peroxidation and oxidation of catalytically essential thiols of the cerebral transmembrane sodium pump as component mechanisms of iron-mediated oxidative stress-linked dysfunction of the pump's activity.

    PubMed

    Omotayo, T I; Akinyemi, G S; Omololu, P A; Ajayi, B O; Akindahunsi, A A; Rocha, J B T; Kade, I J

    2015-01-01

    The precise molecular events defining the complex role of oxidative stress in the inactivation of the cerebral sodium pump in radical-induced neurodegenerative diseases is yet to be fully clarified and thus still open. Herein we investigated the modulation of the activity of the cerebral transmembrane electrogenic enzyme in Fe(2+)-mediated in vitro oxidative stress model. The results show that Fe(2+) inhibited the transmembrane enzyme in a concentration dependent manner and this effect was accompanied by a biphasic generation of aldehydic product of lipid peroxidation. While dithiothreitol prevented both Fe(2+) inhibitory effect on the pump and lipid peroxidation, vitamin E prevented only lipid peroxidation but not inhibition of the pump. Besides, malondialdehyde (MDA) inhibited the pump by a mechanism not related to oxidation of its critical thiols. Apparently, the low activity of the pump in degenerative diseases mediated by Fe(2+) may involve complex multi-component mechanisms which may partly involve an initial oxidation of the critical thiols of the enzyme directly mediated by Fe(2+) and during severe progression of such diseases; aldehydic products of lipid peroxidation such as MDA may further exacerbate this inhibitory effect by a mechanism that is likely not related to the oxidation of the catalytically essential thiols of the ouabain-sensitive cerebral electrogenic pump. PMID:25618580

  8. Oxidative stress and metabolic disorders: Pathogenesis and therapeutic strategies.

    PubMed

    Rani, Vibha; Deep, Gagan; Singh, Rakesh K; Palle, Komaraiah; Yadav, Umesh C S

    2016-03-01

    Increased body weight and metabolic disorder including insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular complications together constitute metabolic syndrome. The pathogenesis of metabolic syndrome involves multitude of factors. A number of studies however indicate, with some conformity, that oxidative stress along with chronic inflammatory condition pave the way for the development of metabolic diseases. Oxidative stress, a state of lost balance between the oxidative and anti-oxidative systems of the cells and tissues, results in the over production of oxidative free radicals and reactive oxygen species (ROS). Excessive ROS generated could attack the cellular proteins, lipids and nucleic acids leading to cellular dysfunction including loss of energy metabolism, altered cell signalling and cell cycle control, genetic mutations, altered cellular transport mechanisms and overall decreased biological activity, immune activation and inflammation. In addition, nutritional stress such as that caused by high fat high carbohydrate diet also promotes oxidative stress as evident by increased lipid peroxidation products, protein carbonylation, and decreased antioxidant system and reduced glutathione (GSH) levels. These changes lead to initiation of pathogenic milieu and development of several chronic diseases. Studies suggest that in obese person oxidative stress and chronic inflammation are the important underlying factors that lead to development of pathologies such as carcinogenesis, obesity, diabetes, and cardiovascular diseases through altered cellular and nuclear mechanisms, including impaired DNA damage repair and cell cycle regulation. Here we discuss the aspects of metabolic disorders-induced oxidative stress in major pathological conditions and strategies for their prevention and therapy. PMID:26851532

  9. Role of oxidative stress and nitric oxide in atherothrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Lubos, Edith; Handy, Diane E.; Loscalzo, Joseph

    2008-01-01

    During the last decade basic and clinical research has highlighted the central role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cardiovascular disease. Enhanced production or attenuated degradation of ROS leads to oxidative stress, a process that affects endothelial and vascular function, and contributes to vascular disease. Nitric oxide (NO), a product of the normal endothelium, is a principal determinant of normal endothelial and vascular function. In states of inflammation, NO production by the vasculature increases considerably and, in conjunction with other ROS, contributes to oxidative stress. This review examines the role of oxidative stress and NO in mechanisms of endothelial and vascular dysfunction with an emphasis on atherothrombosis. PMID:18508590

  10. Aloin Protects Skin Fibroblasts from Heat Stress-Induced Oxidative Stress Damage by Regulating the Oxidative Defense System.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fu-Wei; Liu, Fu-Chao; Wang, Yu-Ren; Tsai, Hsin-I; Yu, Huang-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress is commonly involved in the pathogenesis of skin damage induced by environmental factors, such as heat stress. Skin fibroblasts are responsible for the connective tissue regeneration and the skin recovery from injury. Aloin, a bioactive compound in Aloe vera, has been reported to have various pharmacological activities, such as anti-inflammatory effects. The aim of this study was to investigate the protective effect of aloin against heat stress-mediated oxidative stress in human skin fibroblast Hs68 cells. Hs68 cells were first incubated at 43°C for 30 min to mimic heat stress. The study was further examined if aloin has any effect on heat stress-induced oxidative stress. We found that aloin protected Hs68 cells against heat stress-induced damage, as assessed by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide and lactate dehydrogenase assay. Aloin protected Hs68 cells by regulating reactive oxygen species production and increasing the levels of glutathione, cytosolic and mitochondrial superoxide dismutase. Aloin also prevented the elevation of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances and the reduction of 8-OH-dG induced by heat stress. These results indicated that aloin protected human skin fibroblasts from heat stress-induced oxidative stress damage by regulating the oxidative defense system. PMID:26637174

  11. Aloin Protects Skin Fibroblasts from Heat Stress-Induced Oxidative Stress Damage by Regulating the Oxidative Defense System

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yu-Ren; Tsai, Hsin-I; Yu, Huang-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress is commonly involved in the pathogenesis of skin damage induced by environmental factors, such as heat stress. Skin fibroblasts are responsible for the connective tissue regeneration and the skin recovery from injury. Aloin, a bioactive compound in Aloe vera, has been reported to have various pharmacological activities, such as anti-inflammatory effects. The aim of this study was to investigate the protective effect of aloin against heat stress-mediated oxidative stress in human skin fibroblast Hs68 cells. Hs68 cells were first incubated at 43°C for 30 min to mimic heat stress. The study was further examined if aloin has any effect on heat stress-induced oxidative stress. We found that aloin protected Hs68 cells against heat stress-induced damage, as assessed by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide and lactate dehydrogenase assay. Aloin protected Hs68 cells by regulating reactive oxygen species production and increasing the levels of glutathione, cytosolic and mitochondrial superoxide dismutase. Aloin also prevented the elevation of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances and the reduction of 8-OH-dG induced by heat stress. These results indicated that aloin protected human skin fibroblasts from heat stress-induced oxidative stress damage by regulating the oxidative defense system. PMID:26637174

  12. Oxidative stress in prostate hyperplasia and carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Udensi, Udensi K; Tchounwou, Paul B

    2016-01-01

    Prostatic hyperplasia (PH) is a common urologic disease that affects mostly elderly men. PH can be classified as benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), or prostate cancer (PCa) based on its severity. Oxidative stress (OS) is known to influence the activities of inflammatory mediators and other cellular processes involved in the initiation, promotion and progression of human neoplasms including prostate cancer. Scientific evidence also suggests that micronutrient supplementation may restore the antioxidant status and hence improve the clinical outcomes for patients with BPH and PCa. This review highlights the recent studies on prostate hyperplasia and carcinogenesis, and examines the role of OS on the molecular pathology of prostate cancer progression and treatment. PMID:27609145

  13. Oxidative stress-dependent activation of collagen synthesis is induced in human pulmonary smooth muscle cells by sera from patients with scleroderma-associated pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension is a major complication of systemic sclerosis. Although oxidative stress, intima hyperplasia and a progressive vessel occlusion appear to be clearly involved, the fine molecular mechanisms underpinning the onset and progression of systemic sclerosis-associated pulmonary arterial hypertension remain largely unknown. Here we shows for the first time that an increase of NADPH-derived reactive oxygen species production induced by sera from systemic sclerosis patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension drives collagen type I promoter activity in primary human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells, suggesting that antioxidant-based therapies should be considered in the treatment of systemic sclerosis-associated vascular diseases. PMID:25085432

  14. Influence of Insulin Resistance and TNF-α on the Inflammatory Process, Oxidative Stress, and Disease Activity in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Delongui, Francieli; Alfieri, Daniela Frizon; Lozovoy, Marcell Alysson Batisti; Amin, Ricardo Braga; Dichi, Isaias; Simão, Andréa Name Colado

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the involvement of TNF-α and insulin resistance (IR) in the inflammatory process, oxidative stress, and disease activity in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). This cross-sectional study included 270 subjects (control group, n = 97) and RA patients (n = 173). RA patients were divided into four groups: the first group without IR and not using antitumor necrosis factor-α (TNF−) (G1, IR− TNF−); the second group without IR and using anti-TNF-α (G2, IR− TNF+); the third group with IR and not using anti-TNF-α (G3, IR+ TNF−); and the fourth group with IR and using anti-TNF-α (G4, IR+ TNF+). G3 and G4 had higher (p < 0.05) advanced oxidation protein products (AOPPs) and oxidative stress index (OSI) compared to G1. G4 group presented higher (p < 0.05) AOPPs and OSI than G2. TRAP was significantly lower in G3 compared to G1. Plasma TNF-α levels were significantly higher in G4 and G2 compared to G1 (p < 0.0001) and G3 (p < 0.0001 and p < 0.01, resp.). The presence of insulin resistance was robustly associated with both oxidative stress and TNF-α levels. More studies are warranted to verify if IR can be involved in therapeutic failure with TNF-α inhibitors. This trial is registered with Brazilian Clinical Trials Registry Register number RBR-2jvj92. PMID:27340510

  15. Clinical Relevance of Biomarkers of Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Frijhoff, Jeroen; Winyard, Paul G.; Zarkovic, Neven; Davies, Sean S.; Stocker, Roland; Cheng, David; Knight, Annie R.; Taylor, Emma Louise; Oettrich, Jeannette; Ruskovska, Tatjana; Gasparovic, Ana Cipak; Cuadrado, Antonio; Weber, Daniela; Poulsen, Henrik Enghusen; Grune, Tilman; Schmidt, Harald H.H.W.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Oxidative stress is considered to be an important component of various diseases. A vast number of methods have been developed and used in virtually all diseases to measure the extent and nature of oxidative stress, ranging from oxidation of DNA to proteins, lipids, and free amino acids. Recent Advances: An increased understanding of the biology behind diseases and redox biology has led to more specific and sensitive tools to measure oxidative stress markers, which are very diverse and sometimes very low in abundance. Critical Issues: The literature is very heterogeneous. It is often difficult to draw general conclusions on the significance of oxidative stress biomarkers, as only in a limited proportion of diseases have a range of different biomarkers been used, and different biomarkers have been used to study different diseases. In addition, biomarkers are often measured using nonspecific methods, while specific methodologies are often too sophisticated or laborious for routine clinical use. Future Directions: Several markers of oxidative stress still represent a viable biomarker opportunity for clinical use. However, positive findings with currently used biomarkers still need to be validated in larger sample sizes and compared with current clinical standards to establish them as clinical diagnostics. It is important to realize that oxidative stress is a nuanced phenomenon that is difficult to characterize, and one biomarker is not necessarily better than others. The vast diversity in oxidative stress between diseases and conditions has to be taken into account when selecting the most appropriate biomarker. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 23, 1144–1170. PMID:26415143

  16. Anthocyanins suppress the secretion of proinflammatory mediators and oxidative stress, and restore ion pump activities in demyelination.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Fabiano B; Gutierres, Jessié M; Bohnert, Crystiani; Zago, Adriana M; Abdalla, Fátima H; Vieira, Juliano M; Palma, Heloisa E; Oliveira, Sara M; Spanevello, Roselia M; Duarte, Marta M; Lopes, Sonia T A; Aiello, Graciane; Amaral, Marta G; Pippi, Ney Luis; Andrade, Cinthia M

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the protective effect of anthocyanins (ANT) on oxidative and inflammatory parameters, as well as ion pump activities, in the pons of rats experimentally demyelinated with ethidium bromide (EB). Rats were divided in six groups: control, ANT 30 mg/kg, ANT 100 mg/kg, EB (0.1%), EB plus ANT 30 mg/kg and EB plus ANT 100 mg/kg. The EB cistern pons injection occurred on the first day. On day 7, there was a peak in the demyelination. During the 7 days, the animals were treated once per day with vehicle or ANT. It was observed that demyelination reduced Na(+),K(+)-ATPase and Ca(2+)-ATPase activities and increased 4-hydroxynonenal, malondialdehyde, protein carbonyl and NO2plus NO3 levels. In addition, a depletion of glutathione reduced level/nonprotein thiol content and a decrease in superoxide dismutase activity were also seen. The dose of 100 mg/kg showed a better dose-response to the protective effects. The demyelination did not affect the neuronal viability but did increase the inflammatory infiltrate (myeloperoxidase activity) followed by an elevation in interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor-α and interferon-γ levels. ANT promoted a reduction in cellular infiltration and proinflammatory mediators. Furthermore, ANT restored the levels of IL-10. Luxol fast blue staining confirmed the loss of myelin in the EB group and the protective effect of ANT 100 mg/kg. In conclusion, this study was the first to show that ANT are able to restore ion pump activities and protect cellular components against the inflammatory and oxidative damages induced by demyelination. PMID:25632845

  17. Ascorbic acid supplementation down-regulates the alcohol induced oxidative stress, hepatic stellate cell activation, cytotoxicity and mRNA levels of selected fibrotic genes in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Abhilash, P A; Harikrishnan, R; Indira, M

    2012-02-01

    Both oxidative stress and endotoxins mediated immunological reactions play a major role in the progression of alcoholic hepatic fibrosis. Ascorbic acid has been reported to reduce alcohol-induced toxicity and ascorbic acid levels are reduced in alcoholics. Hence, we investigated the hepatoprotective action of ascorbic acid in the reversal of alcohol-induced hepatic fibrosis in male guinea pigs (n = 36), and it was compared with the animals abstenting from alcohol treatment. In comparison with the alcohol abstention group, there was a reduction in the activities of toxicity markers and levels of lipid and protein peroxidation products, expression of α-SMA, caspase-3 activity and mRNA levels of CYP2E1, TGF-β(1), TNF-α and α(1)(I) collagen in liver of the ascorbic acid-supplemented group. The ascorbic acid content in liver was significantly reduced in the alcohol-treated guinea pigs. But it was reversed to normal level in the ascorbic acid-supplemented group. The anti-fibrotic action of ascorbic acid in the rapid regression of alcoholic liver fibrosis may be attributed to decrease in the oxidative stress, hepatic stellate cells activation, cytotoxicity and mRNA expression of fibrotic genes CYP2E1, TGF-β(1), TNF-α and α(1) (I) collagen in hepatic tissues. PMID:22149461

  18. High Glucose-Induced Oxidative Stress Mediates Apoptosis and Extracellular Matrix Metabolic Imbalances Possibly via p38 MAPK Activation in Rat Nucleus Pulposus Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Xiaofei; Ni, Bin; Zhang, Feng; Hu, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. To investigate whether high glucose-induced oxidative stress is implicated in apoptosis of rat nucleus pulposus cells (NPCs) and abnormal expression of critical genes involved in the metabolic balance of extracellular matrix (ECM). Methods. NPCs were cultured with various concentrations of glucose to detect cell viability and apoptosis. Cells cultured with high glucose (25 mM) were untreated or pretreated with N-acetylcysteine or a p38 MAPK inhibitor SB 202190. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) production was evaluated. Activation of p38 MAPK was measured by Western blot. The expression of ECM metabolism-related genes, including type II collagen, aggrecan, SRY-related high-mobility-group box 9 (Sox-9), matrix metalloproteinase 3 (MMP-3), and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 1 (TIMP-1), was analyzed by semiquantitative RT-PCR. Results. High glucose reduced viability of NPCs and induced apoptosis. High glucose resulted in increased ROS generation and p38 MAPK activation. In addition, it negatively regulated the expression of type II collagen, aggrecan, Sox-9, and TIMP-1 and positively regulated MMP-3 expression. These results were changed by pretreatment with N-acetylcysteine or SB 202190. Conclusions. High glucose might promote apoptosis of NPCs, trigger ECM catabolic pathways, and inhibit its anabolic activities, possibly through a p38 MAPK-dependent oxidative stress mechanism.

  19. Linoleic acid derivative DCP-LA protects neurons from oxidative stress-induced apoptosis by inhibiting caspase-3/-9 activation.

    PubMed

    Yaguchi, Takahiro; Fujikawa, Hirokazu; Nishizaki, Tomoyuki

    2010-05-01

    The present study aimed at understanding the effect of the linoleic acid derivative 8-[2-(2-pentyl-cyclopropylmethyl)-cyclopropyl]-octanoic acid (DCP-LA) on oxidative stress-induced neuronal death. Sodium nitroprusside (SNP; 1 mM) reduced viability of cultured rat cerebral cortical neurons to 50% of basal levels, but DCP-LA significantly prevented the SNP effect in a concentration (1-100 nM)-dependent manner. In addition, DCP-LA (100 nM) rescued neurons from SNP-induced degradation. SNP (1 mM) activated caspase-3 and -9 in cultured rat cerebral cortical neurons, but DCP-LA (100 nM) abolished the caspase activation. For a mouse model of middle cerebral artery occlusion, oral administration with DCP-LA (1 mg/kg) significantly diminished degraded area due to cerebral infarction. The results of the present study, thus, demonstrate that DCP-LA protects neurons at least in part from oxidative stress-induced apoptosis by inhibiting activation of caspase-3/-9. PMID:20099079

  20. Uric acid induces oxidative stress via an activation of the renin-angiotensin system in 3T3-L1 adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jun-xia; Zhang, Yu-ping; Wu, Qi-nan; Chen, Bing

    2015-02-01

    Hyperuricemia is recently reported involving in various obesity-related cardiovascular disorders, especially hypertension. However, the underlying mechanisms are not completely understood. In the present study, we investigated whether uric acid upregulates renin-angiotensin system (RAS) expression in adipocytes. We also examined whether RAS activation plays a role in uric acid-induced oxidative stress in adipocytes. The adipocytes of different phenotypes were incubated with uric acid for 48 h, respectively. Losartan (10(-4) M) or captopril (10(-4) M) was used to block adipose tissue RAS activation. mRNA expressions of angiotensinogen (AGT), angiotensin-converting enzyme-1 (ACE-1), renin, angiotensin type 1 receptor (AT1R), and angiotensin type 2 receptor (AT2R) were evaluated with real-time PCR. Angiotensin II concentrations in supernatant were measured by ELISA. Intracellular reactive species (ROS) levels were measured by fluorescent probe DCFH-DA, DHR, or NBT assay. The uric acid upregulated both RAS (AGT, ACE1, renin, AT1R, and AT2R) mRNA expressions and angiotensin II protein secretion and caused a significant increase in ROS production in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. These effects could be prevented by RAS inhibitors, either losartan or captopril. RAS activation has been causally implicated in oxidative stress induced by uric acid in 3T3-L1 adipocytes, suggesting a plausible mechanism through which hyperuricemia contributes to the pathogenesis of obesity-related cardiovascular diseases. PMID:24671741

  1. Tailoring Enzyme-Like Activities of Gold Nanoclusters by Polymeric Tertiary Amines for Protecting Neurons Against Oxidative Stress.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ching-Ping; Wu, Te-Haw; Lin, Yu-Lung; Liu, Chia-Yeh; Wang, Sabrina; Lin, Shu-Yi

    2016-08-01

    The cytotoxicity of nanozymes has drawn much attention recently because their peroxidase-like activity can decompose hydrogen peroxide (H2 O2 ) to produce highly toxic hydroxyl radicals (•OH) under acidic conditions. Although catalytic activities of nanozymes are highly associated with their surface properties, little is known about the mechanism underlying the surface coating-mediated enzyme-like activities. Herein, it is reported for the first time that amine-terminated PAMAM dendrimer-entrapped gold nanoclusters (AuNCs-NH2 ) unexpectedly lose their peroxidase-like activity while still retaining their catalase-like activity in physiological conditions. Surprisingly, the methylated form of AuNCs-NH2 (i.e., MAuNCs-N(+) R3 , where R = H or CH3 ) results in a dramatic recovery of the intrinsic peroxidase-like activity while blocking most primary and tertiary amines (1°- and 3°-amines) of dendrimers to form quaternary ammonium ions (4°-amines). However, the hidden peroxidase-like activity is also found in hydroxyl-terminated dendrimer-encapsulated AuNCs (AuNCs-OH, inside backbone with 3°-amines), indicating that 3°-amines are dominant in mediating the peroxidase-like activity. The possible mechanism is further confirmed that the enrichment of polymeric 3°-amines on the surface of dendrimer-encapsulated AuNCs provides sufficient suppression of the critical mediator •OH for the peroxidase-like activity. Finally, it is demonstrated that AuNCs-NH2 with diminished cytotoxicity have great potential for use in primary neuronal protection against oxidative damage. PMID:27346719

  2. Astaxanthin protects ARPE-19 cells from oxidative stress via upregulation of Nrf2-regulated phase II enzymes through activation of PI3K/Akt

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhongrui; Dong, Xin; Liu, Hongling; Chen, Xi; Shi, Huanqi; Fan, Yan; Hou, Dingshan

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Oxidative stress on retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells is thought to play a crucial role in the development and progression of age-related macular degeneration. Astaxanthin (AST) is a carotenoid that shows significant antioxidant properties. This study was designed to investigate the protective effect of AST on ARPE-19 cells against oxidative stress and the possible underlying mechanism. Methods ARPE-19 cells exposed to different doses of H2O2 were incubated with various concentrations of AST and cell viability subsequently detected with the (4-[3-[4-iodophenyl]-2–4(4-nitrophenyl)-2H-5- tetrazolio-1,3-benzene disulfonate]; WST-1) assay. The apoptosis rate and intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) were measured with flow cytometry. NAD(P)H quinine oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1), hemeoxygenase-1 (HO-1), glutamate-cysteine ligase modifier subunit (GCLM), and glutamate-cysteine ligase catalytic subunit (GCLC) expression were examined with real-time PCR and western blotting. The nuclear localization of nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2) protein and the expression levels of cleaved caspase-3 and protein kinase B proteins were evaluated with western blotting. Results AST clearly reduced H2O2-induced cell viability loss, cell apoptosis, and intracellular generation of ROS. Furthermore, treatment with AST activated the Nrf2-ARE pathway by inducing Nrf2 nuclear localization. Consequently, Phase II enzymes NQO1, HO-1, GCLM, and GCLC mRNA and proteins were increased. AST inhibited expression of H2O2-induced cleaved caspase-3 protein. Activation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/protein kinase B (PI3K/Akt) pathway was involved in the protective effect of AST on the ARPE-19 cells. Conclusions AST protected ARPE-19 cells against H2O2-induced oxidative stress via Nrf2-mediated upregulation of the expression of Phase II enzymes involving the PI3K/Akt pathway. PMID:23901249

  3. A study of brain insulin receptors, AChE activity and oxidative stress in rat model of ICV STZ induced dementia.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Rahul; Tyagi, Ethika; Shukla, Rakesh; Nath, Chandishwar

    2009-03-01

    In the present study, role of brain insulin receptors (IRs) in memory functions and its correlation with acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity and oxidative stress in different brain regions were investigated in intracerebroventricular (ICV) streptozotocin (STZ) induced dementia model. Rats were treated with STZ (3 mg/kg, ICV) on day 1 and 3. Donepezil (5 mg/kg po) and melatonin (20 mg/kg ip) were administered in pre- and post-treatment schedules. Morris water maze test was done on day 14 and animals were sacrificed on day 21 from 1st STZ injection. Memory deficit was found in STZ group as indicated by no significant decrease in latency time antagonized by donepezil and melatonin. IR protein level was found significantly increased in trained group as compared to control, whereas STZ decreased IR level significantly as compared to trained rats in hippocampus which indicates that IR is associated with memory functions. STZ induced decrease in IR was reversed by melatonin but not by donepezil. Melatonin per se did not show any significant change in IR level as compared to control. AChE activity (DS and SS fraction) was found to be increased in hippocampus in STZ group as compared to trained which was inhibited by donepezil and melatonin. Increase in MDA level and decrease in GSH level were obtained in STZ group indicating oxidative stress, which was attenuated by donepezil and melatonin. Effectiveness of antioxidant, melatonin but not of anti-cholinesterase, donepezil against STZ induced changes in IR indicates that IR is more affected with oxidative stress than cholinergic changes. PMID:19705549

  4. Impact of Reducing Shallow Trench Isolation Mechanical Stress on Active Length for 40 nm n-Type Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Field-Effect Transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yao-Tsung; Wu, San-Lein; Lin, Hau-Yu; Kuo, Cheng-Wen; Chang, Shoou-Jinn; Hong, De-Gong; Wu, Chung-Yi; Huang, Cheng-Tung; Cheng, Osbert

    2011-04-01

    We report an improved densification annealing process for sub atmospheric chemical vapor deposition (SACVD)-based shallow trench isolation (STI) to enhance n-type metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (nMOSFET) performance for 40 nm node and beyond. Experimental results show that this improved STI densification process leads to lower compressive stress in the small active area compared with the standard STI process. This is beneficial to electron mobility and leads to an enhancement of on-current (ION). Moreover, comparable drain induced barrier lowering (DIBL) and subthreshold swing (SS) characteristics for both devices indicate that the improved densification process would no significant influences on process variations or dopant diffusions. Hence, the improved STI process can be adopted in 40 nm complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) technology and beyond.

  5. Increased oxidative stress in foam cells obtained from hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Marlene S B; Fabris, Bruno A; Brinholi, Francis F; Bortolasci, Chiara C; Watanabe, Maria A E; Oliveira, Karen B; Delfino, Vinícius D A; Lavado, Edson L; Barbosa, Décio S

    2013-04-01

    Premature atherosclerosis represents the main cause of mortality among end-stage renal disease patients (ESRD). Increased inflammation and oxidative stress are involved in initiation and progression of the atherosclerotic plaque. As foam cells are capable of producing significant amounts of inflammatory mediators and free radicals, we hypothesized that foam cells from uremic patients could produce more inflammation and oxidative stress than foam cells from normal people and be, somehow, involved in the accelerated atherosclerosis of uremia. To test this hypothesis, the levels of a few markers of inflammation and oxidative stress: Tumor necrosis factor-α, inducible nitric oxide synthase, malondialdehyde, nitric oxide by-products were measured in the supernatants of macrophage-derived foam cells cultures from 18 hemodialysis patients and 18 apparently healthy individuals controls. Malondialdehyde levels in the supernatant of cell cultures (macrophages stimulated or not with native and oxidized lipoprotein) were significantly increased in uremic patients; no statistically significant difference was found between the supernatant concentrations of nitric oxide by-products, inducible nitric oxide synthase activity, and tumor necrosis factor-α between patients and controls. Our results, obtained with human macrophages and macrophage-derived foam cells, are compatible with the theory that increased cellular oxidative stress and inflammatory activity in ESRD patients could accelerate the atherosclerotic process. The present culture protocol showed it is possible to use human mononuclear cells to evaluate the oxidative metabolism of foam cells, which are considered to be the initial step of atherosclerotic lesions. PMID:22928784

  6. Aldehyde dehydrogenases in cellular responses to oxidative/electrophilic stress.

    PubMed

    Singh, Surendra; Brocker, Chad; Koppaka, Vindhya; Chen, Ying; Jackson, Brian C; Matsumoto, Akiko; Thompson, David C; Vasiliou, Vasilis

    2013-03-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are continuously generated within living systems and the inability to manage ROS load leads to elevated oxidative stress and cell damage. Oxidative stress is coupled to the oxidative degradation of lipid membranes, also known as lipid peroxidation. This process generates over 200 types of aldehydes, many of which are highly reactive and toxic. Aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDHs) metabolize endogenous and exogenous aldehydes and thereby mitigate oxidative/electrophilic stress in prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms. ALDHs are found throughout the evolutionary gamut, from single-celled organisms to complex multicellular species. Not surprisingly, many ALDHs in evolutionarily distant, and seemingly unrelated, species perform similar functions, including protection against a variety of environmental stressors such as dehydration and ultraviolet radiation. The ability to act as an "aldehyde scavenger" during lipid peroxidation is another ostensibly universal ALDH function found across species. Upregulation of ALDHs is a stress response in bacteria (environmental and chemical stress), plants (dehydration, salinity, and oxidative stress), yeast (ethanol exposure and oxidative stress), Caenorhabditis elegans (lipid peroxidation), and mammals (oxidative stress and lipid peroxidation). Recent studies have also identified ALDH activity as an important feature of cancer stem cells. In these cells, ALDH expression helps abrogate oxidative stress and imparts resistance against chemotherapeutic agents such as oxazaphosphorine, taxane, and platinum drugs. The ALDH superfamily represents a fundamentally important class of enzymes that contributes significantly to the management of electrophilic/oxidative stress within living systems. Mutations in various ALDHs are associated with a variety of pathological conditions in humans, highlighting the fundamental importance of these enzymes in physiological and pathological processes. PMID:23195683

  7. β-Caryophyllene, a phytocannabinoid attenuates oxidative stress, neuroinflammation, glial activation, and salvages dopaminergic neurons in a rat model of Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Ojha, Shreesh; Javed, Hayate; Azimullah, Sheikh; Haque, M Emdadul

    2016-07-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by progressive dopaminergic neurodegeneration in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc) area. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the neuroprotective effect of β-caryophyllene (BCP) against rotenone-induced oxidative stress and neuroinflammation in a rat model of PD. In the present study, BCP was administered once daily for 4 weeks at a dose of 50 mg/kg body weight prior to a rotenone (2.5 mg/kg body weight) challenge to mimic the progressive neurodegenerative nature of PD. Rotenone administration results in oxidative stress as evidenced by decreased activities of superoxide dismutase, catalase, and depletion of glutathione with a concomitant rise in lipid peroxidation product, malondialdehyde. Rotenone also significantly increased pro-inflammatory cytokines in the midbrain region and elevated the inflammatory mediators such as cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in the striatum. Further, immunohistochemical analysis revealed loss of dopaminergic neurons in the SNc area and enhanced expression of ionized calcium-binding adaptor molecule-1 (Iba-1) and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), indicators of microglia activation, and astrocyte hypertrophy, respectively, as an index of inflammation. However, treatment with BCP rescued dopaminergic neurons and decreased microglia and astrocyte activation evidenced by reduced Iba-1 and GFAP expression. BCP in addition to attenuation of pro-inflammatory cytokines and inflammatory mediators such as COX-2 and iNOS, also restored antioxidant enzymes and inhibited lipid peroxidation as well as glutathione depletion. The findings demonstrate that BCP provides neuroprotection against rotenone-induced PD and the neuroprotective effects can be ascribed to its potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. PMID:27316720

  8. Oxidative Stress Related Diseases in Newborns.

    PubMed

    Ozsurekci, Yasemin; Aykac, Kubra

    2016-01-01

    We review oxidative stress-related newborn disease and the mechanism of oxidative damage. In addition, we outline diagnostic and therapeutic strategies and future directions. Many reports have defined oxidative stress as an imbalance between an enhanced reactive oxygen/nitrogen species and the lack of protective ability of antioxidants. From that point of view, free radical-induced damage caused by oxidative stress seems to be a probable contributing factor to the pathogenesis of many newborn diseases, such as respiratory distress syndrome, bronchopulmonary dysplasia, periventricular leukomalacia, necrotizing enterocolitis, patent ductus arteriosus, and retinopathy of prematurity. We share the hope that the new understanding of the concept of oxidative stress and its relation to newborn diseases that has been made possible by new diagnostic techniques will throw light on the treatment of those diseases. PMID:27403229

  9. Oxidative Stress Related Diseases in Newborns

    PubMed Central

    Aykac, Kubra

    2016-01-01

    We review oxidative stress-related newborn disease and the mechanism of oxidative damage. In addition, we outline diagnostic and therapeutic strategies and future directions. Many reports have defined oxidative stress as an imbalance between an enhanced reactive oxygen/nitrogen species and the lack of protective ability of antioxidants. From that point of view, free radical-induced damage caused by oxidative stress seems to be a probable contributing factor to the pathogenesis of many newborn diseases, such as respiratory distress syndrome, bronchopulmonary dysplasia, periventricular leukomalacia, necrotizing enterocolitis, patent ductus arteriosus, and retinopathy of prematurity. We share the hope that the new understanding of the concept of oxidative stress and its relation to newborn diseases that has been made possible by new diagnostic techniques will throw light on the treatment of those diseases. PMID:27403229

  10. Oxidative Stress, Lens Gap Junctions, and Cataracts

    PubMed Central

    Beyer, Eric C.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract The eye lens is constantly subjected to oxidative stress from radiation and other sources. The lens has several mechanisms to protect its components from oxidative stress and to maintain its redox state, including enzymatic pathways and high concentrations of ascorbate and reduced glutathione. With aging, accumulation of oxidized lens components and decreased efficiency of repair mechanisms can contribute to the development of lens opacities or cataracts. Maintenance of transparency and homeostasis of the avascular lens depend on an extensive network of gap junctions. Communication through gap junction channels allows intercellular passage of molecules (up to 1 kDa) including antioxidants. Lens gap junctions and their constituent proteins, connexins (Cx43, Cx46, and Cx50), are also subject to the effects of oxidative stress. These observations suggest that oxidative stress-induced damage to connexins (and consequent altered intercellular communication) may contribute to cataract formation. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 11, 339–353. PMID:18831679

  11. [Oxidative stress, the functional activity of beta-cells, and the content of tumor necrosis factor alpha in patients with type II diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Klebanova, E M

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the effects of dietotherapy on oxidative stress (OS) condition, the fl-cell functional activity (BCFA), insulin resistance index (IRI), and the serum tumor necrosis factor alpha (alpha-TNF) level in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM 2). The subjects, 30 patients with DM 2 (9 men, 21 women), aged 42 to 70 (mean age 58.77 +/- 8.86 years), were examined. The duration of DM 2 in the subjects was from 1 month to 5 years. OS parameters, IRI and BCFA, as well as serum alpha-TNF were measured before the study and after 3 months of observation. The tests performed after the end of the study showed that hydrocarbonate exchange remained compensated, and IRI and BCFA were moderately lowered in DM 2 patients on dietotherapy. There was an insignificant elevation of serum alpha-TNF, while the condition of hydrocarbonate exchange had bettered. Changes in OS parameters in patients on dietotherapy evidence that the reserve activity of anti-oxidative system enzymes decreases. Thus, the compensation of hydrocarbonate exchange in DM 2 patients on dietotherapy retains, which is accompanied by a decrease in IRI and BCFA, while serum alpha-TNFincreases insignificantly, and reserved anti-oxidative system enzyme activity decreases moderately. PMID:17087190

  12. Curcumin Pretreatment Prevents Potassium Dichromate-Induced Hepatotoxicity, Oxidative Stress, Decreased Respiratory Complex I Activity, and Membrane Permeability Transition Pore Opening

    PubMed Central

    García-Niño, Wylly Ramsés; Tapia, Edilia; Zazueta, Cecilia; Zatarain-Barrón, Zyanya Lucía; Hernández-Pando, Rogelio; Vega-García, Claudia Cecilia; Pedraza-Chaverrí, José

    2013-01-01

    Curcumin is a polyphenol derived from turmeric with recognized antioxidant properties. Hexavalent chromium is an environmental toxic and carcinogen compound that induces oxidative stress. The objective of this study was to evaluate the potential protective effect of curcumin on the hepatic damage generated by potassium dichromate (K2Cr2O7) in rats. Animals were pretreated daily by 9-10 days with curcumin (400 mg/kg b.w.) before the injection of a single intraperitoneal of K2Cr2O7 (15 mg/kg b.w.). Groups of animals were sacrificed 24 and 48 h later. K2Cr2O7-induced damage to the liver was evident by histological alterations and increase in the liver weight and in the activity of alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, lactate dehydrogenase, and alkaline phosphatase in plasma. In addition, K2Cr2O7 induced oxidative damage in liver and isolated mitochondria, which was evident by the increase in the content of malondialdehyde and protein carbonyl and decrease in the glutathione content and in the activity of several antioxidant enzymes. Moreover, K2Cr2O7 induced decrease in mitochondrial oxygen consumption, in the activity of respiratory complex I, and permeability transition pore opening. All the above-mentioned alterations were prevented by curcumin pretreatment. The beneficial effects of curcumin against K2Cr2O7-induced liver oxidative damage were associated with prevention of mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID:23956771

  13. Potential role of punicalagin against oxidative stress induced testicular damage

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Faiza; Tian, Hui; Li, Wenqing; Hung, Helong; Sun, Fei

    2016-01-01

    Punicalagin is isolated from pomegranate and widely used for the treatment of different diseases in Chinese traditional medicine. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of Punicalagin (purity ≥98%) on oxidative stress induced testicular damage and its effect on fertility. We detected the antioxidant potential of punicalagin in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced oxidative stress damage in testes, also tried to uncover the boosting fertility effect of Punicalagin (PU) against oxidative stress-induced infertility. Results demonstrated that 9 mg kg−1 for 7 days treatment significantly decreases LPS induced oxidative damage in testes and nitric oxide production. The administration of oxidative stress resulted in a significant reduction in testes antioxidants GSH, T-SOD, and CAT raised LPO, but treatment with punicalagin for 7 days increased antioxidant defense GSH, T-SOD, and CAT by the end of the experiment and reduced LPO level as well. PU also significantly activates Nrf2, which is involved in regulation of antioxidant defense systems. Hence, the present research categorically elucidates the protective effect of punicalagin against LPS induced oxidative stress induced perturbation in the process of spermatogenesis and significantly increased sperm health and number. Moreover, fertility success significantly decreased in LPS-injected mice compared to controls. Mice injected with LPS had fertility indices of 12.5%, while others treated with a combination of PU + LPS exhibited 75% indices. By promoting fertility and eliminating oxidative stress and inflammation, PU may be a useful nutrient for the treatment of infertility. PMID:26763544

  14. Potential role of punicalagin against oxidative stress induced testicular damage.

    PubMed

    Rao, Faiza; Tian, Hui; Li, Wenqing; Hung, Helong; Sun, Fei

    2016-01-01

    Punicalagin is isolated from pomegranate and widely used for the treatment of different diseases in Chinese traditional medicine. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of Punicalagin (purity ≥98%) on oxidative stress induced testicular damage and its effect on fertility. We detected the antioxidant potential of punicalagin in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced oxidative stress damage in testes, also tried to uncover the boosting fertility effect of Punicalagin (PU) against oxidative stress-induced infertility. Results demonstrated that 9 mg kg-1 for 7 days treatment significantly decreases LPS induced oxidative damage in testes and nitric oxide production. The administration of oxidative stress resulted in a significant reduction in testes antioxidants GSH, T-SOD, and CAT raised LPO, but treatment with punicalagin for 7 days increased antioxidant defense GSH, T-SOD, and CAT by the end of the experiment and reduced LPO level as well. PU also significantly activates Nrf2, which is involved in regulation of antioxidant defense systems. Hence, the present research categorically elucidates the protective effect of punicalagin against LPS induced oxidative stress induced perturbation in the process of spermatogenesis and significantly increased sperm health and number. Moreover, fertility success significantly decreased in LPS-injected mice compared to controls. Mice injected with LPS had fertility indices of 12.5%, while others treated with a combination of PU + LPS exhibited 75% indices. By promoting fertility and eliminating oxidative stress and inflammation, PU may be a useful nutrient for the treatment of infertility. PMID:26763544

  15. Mitochondrial Oxidative Stress in Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Waldbaum, Simon; Patel, Manisha

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondrial oxidative stress and dysfunction are contributing factors to various neurological disorders. Recently, there has been increasing evidence supporting the association between mitochondrial oxidative stress and epilepsy. Although certain inherited epilepsies are associated with mitochondrial dysfunction, little is known about its role in acquired epilepsies such as temporal lobe epilepsy. Mitochondrial oxidative stress and dysfunction are emerging as key factors that not only result from seizures, but may also contribute to epileptogenesis. The occurrence of epilepsy increases with age, and mitochondrial oxidative stress is a leading mechanism of aging and age-related degenerative disease, suggesting a further involvement of mitochondrial dysfunction in seizure generation. Mitochondria have critical cellular functions that effect neuronal excitability including production of adenosine triphosphate (ATP), fatty acid oxidation, control of apoptosis and necrosis, regulation of amino acid cycling, neurotransmitter biosynthesis, and regulation of cytosolic Ca2+ homeostasis. Mitochondria are the primary site of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production making them uniquely vulnerable to oxidative stress and damage which can further affect cellular macromolecule function, the ability of the electron transport chain to produce ATP, antioxidant defenses, mitochondrial DNA stability, and synaptic glutamate homeostasis. Oxidative damage to one or more of these cellular targets may affect neuronal excitability and increase seizure susceptibility. The specific targeting of mitochondrial oxidative stress, dysfunction, and bioenergetics with pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatments may be a novel avenue for attenuating epileptogenesis and seizure initiation. PMID:19850449

  16. Melamine Induces Oxidative Stress in Mouse Ovary

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Xiao-Xin; Duan, Xing; Cui, Xiang-Shun; Kim, Nam-Hyung; Xiong, Bo; Sun, Shao-Chen

    2015-01-01

    Melamine is a nitrogen heterocyclic triazine compound which is widely used as an industrial chemical. Although melamine is not considered to be acutely toxic with a high LD50 in animals, food contaminated with melamine expose risks to the human health. Melamine has been reported to be responsible for the renal impairment in mammals, its toxicity on the reproductive system, however, has not been adequately assessed. In the present study, we examined the effect of melamine on the follicle development and ovary formation. The data showed that melamine increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels, and induced granulosa cell apoptosis as well as follicle atresia. To further analyze the mechanism by which melamine induces oxidative stress, the expression and activities of two key antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathi-one peroxidase (GPX) were analyzed, and the concentration of malondialdehyde (MDA) were compared between control and melamine-treated ovaries. The result revealed that melamine changed the expression and activities of SOD and GPX in the melamine-treated mice. Therefore, we demonstrate that melamine causes damage to the ovaries via oxidative stress pathway. PMID:26545251

  17. Diabetes enhances oxidative stress-induced TRPM2 channel activity and its control by N-acetylcysteine in rat dorsal root ganglion and brain.

    PubMed

    Sözbir, Ercan; Nazıroğlu, Mustafa

    2016-04-01

    N-acetylcysteine (NAC) is a sulfhydryl donor antioxidant that contributes to the regeneration of glutathione (GSH) and also scavengers via a direct reaction with free oxygen radicals. Recently, we observed a modulatory role of NAC on GSH-depleted dorsal root ganglion (DRG) cells in rats. NAC may have a protective role on oxidative stress and calcium influx through regulation of the TRPM2 channel in diabetic neurons. Therefore, we investigated the effects of NAC on DRG TRPM2 channel currents and brain oxidative stress in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats. Thirty-six rats divided into four groups: control, STZ, NAC and STZ + NAC. Diabetes was induced in the STZ and STZ + NAC groups by intraperitoneal STZ (65 mg/kg) administration. After the induction of diabetes, rats in the NAC and STZ + NAC groups received NAC (150 mg/kg) via gastric gavage. After 2 weeks, DRG neurons and the brain cortex were freshly isolated from rats. In whole-cell patch clamp experiments, TRPM2 currents in the DRG following diabetes induction with STZ were gated by H2O2. TRPM2 channel current densities in the DRG and lipid peroxidation levels in the DRG and brain were higher in the STZ groups than in controls; however, brain GSH, GSH peroxidase (GSH-Px), vitamin C and vitamin E concentrations and DRG GSH-Px activity were decreased by diabetes. STZ + H2O2-induced TRPM2 gating was totally inhibited by NAC and partially inhibited by N-(p-amylcinnamoyl) anthranilic acid (ACA) and 2-aminoethyl diphenylborinate (2-APB). GSH-Px activity and lipid peroxidation levels were also attenuated by NAC treatment. In conclusion, we observed a modulatory role of NAC on oxidative stress and Ca(2+) entry through the TRPM2 channel in the diabetic DRG and brain. Since excessive oxidative stress and overload Ca(2+) entry are common features of neuropathic pain, our findings are relevant to the etiology and treatment of pain neuropathology in DRG neurons. PMID:26612073

  18. Mitochondrial Apoptotic Pathway Is Activated by H2O2-Mediated Oxidative Stress in BmN-SWU1 Cells from Bombyx mori Ovary

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Peng; Hu, Yan-Fen; Wang, La; Xiao, Wen-Fu; Bao, Xi-Yan; Pan, Chun; Yi, Hua-Shan; Chen, Xiang-Yun; Pan, Min-Hui; Lu, Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Apoptosis is a known regulator of morphogenetic events. In mammals, the critical role of oxidative stress-induced apoptosis has been well-studied; however, in insects the role of oxidative stress in apoptosis is not clear. In a previous study, we showed that apoptosis-related genes are present in the silkworm Bombyx mori, an important lepidopteran insect model. In this study, we evaluated the effect of H2O2-induced oxidative stress on apoptosis, reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels, mitochondrial response, cytochrome c release and apoptosis-related gene expression in the BmN-SWU1 cell line from B. mori ovaries. Our results showed that BmN-SWU1 cells exposed to H2O2 showed cell protuberances, cytoplasmic condensation, apoptotic bodies, DNA ladder formation and caspase activities indicating apoptosis. H2O2-induced apoptosis also increased intracellular ROS level, changed mitochondrial distribution, reduced mitochondrial membrane potential and increased the release of cytochrome c from mitochondria. Furthermore, western blot analysis revealed a significant increase in p53 and cytochrome c expression, and a decrease in Bcl-2 expression compared to the controls. Moreover, quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) showed an increase in the transcript levels of BmICE, Bmapaf-1 and BmEndoG by 439.5%, 423.9% and 42.2%, respectively, after treatment with 1 μM H2O2 for 24 h. However, the transcript levels of Bmbuffy declined by 41.4% after 24 h of exposure to 1 μM H2O2. These results show that H2O2 treatment induced apoptosis in BmN-SWU1 cells via the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway. Further, it appears that oxidative stress induced by H2O2 activates both caspase-dependent and caspase-independent mitochondrial apoptotic pathways in silkworm cells. Taken together, these findings improve our knowledge of apoptosis in silkworm and the apoptotic pathways in insects. PMID:26225758

  19. Mitochondrial Apoptotic Pathway Is Activated by H2O2-Mediated Oxidative Stress in BmN-SWU1 Cells from Bombyx mori Ovary.

    PubMed

    Chen, Peng; Hu, Yan-Fen; Wang, La; Xiao, Wen-Fu; Bao, Xi-Yan; Pan, Chun; Yi, Hua-Shan; Chen, Xiang-Yun; Pan, Min-Hui; Lu, Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Apoptosis is a known regulator of morphogenetic events. In mammals, the critical role of oxidative stress-induced apoptosis has been well-studied; however, in insects the role of oxidative stress in apoptosis is not clear. In a previous study, we showed that apoptosis-related genes are present in the silkworm Bombyx mori, an important lepidopteran insect model. In this study, we evaluated the effect of H2O2-induced oxidative stress on apoptosis, reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels, mitochondrial response, cytochrome c release and apoptosis-related gene expression in the BmN-SWU1 cell line from B. mori ovaries. Our results showed that BmN-SWU1 cells exposed to H2O2 showed cell protuberances, cytoplasmic condensation, apoptotic bodies, DNA ladder formation and caspase activities indicating apoptosis. H2O2-induced apoptosis also increased intracellular ROS level, changed mitochondrial distribution, reduced mitochondrial membrane potential and increased the release of cytochrome c from mitochondria. Furthermore, western blot analysis revealed a significant increase in p53 and cytochrome c expression, and a decrease in Bcl-2 expression compared to the controls. Moreover, quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) showed an increase in the transcript levels of BmICE, Bmapaf-1 and BmEndoG by 439.5%, 423.9% and 42.2%, respectively, after treatment with 1 μM H2O2 for 24 h. However, the transcript levels of Bmbuffy declined by 41.4% after 24 h of exposure to 1 μM H2O2. These results show that H2O2 treatment induced apoptosis in BmN-SWU1 cells via the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway. Further, it appears that oxidative stress induced by H2O2 activates both caspase-dependent and caspase-independent mitochondrial apoptotic pathways in silkworm cells. Taken together, these findings improve our knowledge of apoptosis in silkworm and the apoptotic pathways in insects. PMID:26225758

  20. Effects of abamectin exposure on male fertility in rats: potential role of oxidative stress-mediated poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) activation.

    PubMed

    Celik-Ozenci, Ciler; Tasatargil, Arda; Tekcan, Merih; Sati, Leyla; Gungor, Ece; Isbir, Mehmet; Demir, Ramazan

    2011-12-01

    Despite the known adverse effects of abamectin pesticide, little is known about its action on male fertility. To explore the effects of exposure to abamectin on male fertility and its mechanism, low (1mg/kg/day) and high dose (4 mg/kg/day) abamectin were applied to male rats by oral gavage for 1week and for 6weeks. Weight of testes, serum reproductive hormone levels, sperm dynamics and histopathology of testes were used to evaluate the reproductive efficiency of abamectin-exposed rats. Abamectin level was determined at high concentrations in plasma and testicular tissues of male rats exposed to this pesticide. The testes weights of animals and serum testosterone concentrations did not show any significant changes after abamectin exposure. Abamectin administration was associated with decreased sperm count and motility and increased seminiferous tubule damage. In addition, significant elevations in the 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (4-HNE)-modified proteins and poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) expression, as markers for oxidative stress and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) activation, were observed in testes of rats exposed to abamectin. These results showed that abamectin exposure induces testicular damage and affects sperm dynamics. Oxidative stress-mediated PARP activation might be one of the possible mechanism(s) underlying testicular damage induced by abamectin. PMID:21945325

  1. The Reductase Activity of the Arabidopsis Caleosin RESPONSIVE TO DESSICATION20 Mediates Gibberellin-Dependent Flowering Time, Abscisic Acid Sensitivity, and Tolerance to Oxidative Stress1[W

    PubMed Central

    Blée, Elizabeth; Boachon, Benoît; Burcklen, Michel; Le Guédard, Marina; Hanano, Abdulsamie; Heintz, Dimitri; Ehlting, Jürgen; Herrfurth, Cornelia; Feussner, Ivo; Bessoule, Jean-Jacques

    2014-01-01

    Contrasting with the wealth of information available on the multiple roles of jasmonates in plant development and defense, knowledge about the functions and the biosynthesis of hydroxylated oxylipins remains scarce. By expressing the caleosin RESPONSIVE TO DESSICATION20 (RD20) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we show that the recombinant protein possesses an unusual peroxygenase activity with restricted specificity toward hydroperoxides of unsaturated fatty acid. Accordingly, Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plants overexpressing RD20 accumulate the product 13-hydroxy-9,11,15-octadecatrienoic acid, a linolenate-derived hydroxide. These plants exhibit elevated levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) associated with early gibberellin-dependent flowering and abscisic acid hypersensitivity at seed germination. These phenotypes are dependent on the presence of active RD20, since they are abolished in the rd20 null mutant and in lines overexpressing RD20, in which peroxygenase was inactivated by a point mutation of a catalytic histidine residue. RD20 also confers tolerance against stress induced by Paraquat, Rose Bengal, heavy metal, and the synthetic auxins 1-naphthaleneacetic acid and 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid. Under oxidative stress, 13-hydroxy-9,11,15-octadecatrienoic acid still accumulates in RD20-overexpressing lines, but this lipid oxidation is associated with reduced ROS levels, minor cell death, and delayed floral transition. A model is discussed where the interplay between fatty acid hydroxides generated by RD20 and ROS is counteracted by ethylene during development in unstressed environments. PMID:25056921

  2. The reductase activity of the Arabidopsis caleosin RESPONSIVE TO DESSICATION20 mediates gibberellin-dependent flowering time, abscisic acid sensitivity, and tolerance to oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Blée, Elizabeth; Boachon, Benoît; Burcklen, Michel; Le Guédard, Marina; Hanano, Abdulsamie; Heintz, Dimitri; Ehlting, Jürgen; Herrfurth, Cornelia; Feussner, Ivo; Bessoule, Jean-Jacques

    2014-09-01

    Contrasting with the wealth of information available on the multiple roles of jasmonates in plant development and defense, knowledge about the functions and the biosynthesis of hydroxylated oxylipins remains scarce. By expressing the caleosin RESPONSIVE TO DESSICATION20 (RD20) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we show that the recombinant protein possesses an unusual peroxygenase activity with restricted specificity toward hydroperoxides of unsaturated fatty acid. Accordingly, Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plants overexpressing RD20 accumulate the product 13-hydroxy-9,11,15-octadecatrienoic acid, a linolenate-derived hydroxide. These plants exhibit elevated levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) associated with early gibberellin-dependent flowering and abscisic acid hypersensitivity at seed germination. These phenotypes are dependent on the presence of active RD20, since they are abolished in the rd20 null mutant and in lines overexpressing RD20, in which peroxygenase was inactivated by a point mutation of a catalytic histidine residue. RD20 also confers tolerance against stress induced by Paraquat, Rose Bengal, heavy metal, and the synthetic auxins 1-naphthaleneacetic acid and 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid. Under oxidative stress, 13-hydroxy-9,11,15-octadecatrienoic acid still accumulates in RD20-overexpressing lines, but this lipid oxidation is associated with reduced ROS levels, minor cell death, and delayed floral transition. A model is discussed where the interplay between fatty acid hydroxides generated by RD20 and ROS is counteracted by ethylene during development in unstressed environments. PMID:25056921

  3. Effects of a Physical Activity Program on Markers of Endothelial Dysfunction, Oxidative Stress, and Metabolic Status in Adolescents with Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Camarillo-Romero, Eneida; Dominguez-Garcia, Ma Victoria; Amaya-Chavez, Araceli; Camarillo-Romero, Maria del Socorro; Talavera-Piña, Juan; Huitron-Bravo, Gerardo; Majluf-Cruz, Abraham

    2012-01-01

    The metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a precursor of diabetes. Physical activity (PA) improves endothelial dysfunction and may benefit patients with MetS. Aims. To evaluate the effect of a physical activity (PA) program on markers of endothelial dysfunction and oxidative stress in adolescents with (MetS). Methods. We carried out a cohort study of 38 adolescents with and without MetS (18 females and 20 males). All participants completed a 3-month PA program. All variables of the MetS as well as markers of endothelial dysfunction and oxidative stress tests were evaluated. Results. Females with and without MetS showed significant differences for almost all components of the MetS, whereas males were significantly different in half of the components. After the PA program, components of the MetS were not different from baseline values except for HDL-C levels. Some baseline endothelial dysfunction markers were significantly different among adolescents with and without MetS; however, after the PA program, most of these markers significantly improved in subjects with and without MetS. Conclusion. PA improves the markers of endothelial dysfunction in adolescents with MetS although other changes in the components of the MetS were not observed. Perhaps the benefits of PA on all components of MetS would appear after a PA program with a longer duration. PMID:22888450

  4. Oxidative stress contributes to autophagy induction in response to endoplasmic reticulum stress in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Martín, Marta; Pérez-Pérez, María Esther; Lemaire, Stéphane D; Crespo, José L

    2014-10-01

    The accumulation of unfolded/misfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) results in the activation of stress responses, such as the unfolded protein response or the catabolic process of autophagy to ultimately recover cellular homeostasis. ER stress also promotes the production of reactive oxygen species, which play an important role in autophagy regulation. However, it remains unknown whether reactive oxygen species are involved in ER stress-induced autophagy. In this study, we provide evidence connecting redox imbalance caused by ER stress and autophagy activation in the model unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Treatment of C. reinhardtii cells with the ER stressors tunicamycin or dithiothreitol resulted in up-regulation of the expression of genes encoding ER resident endoplasmic reticulum oxidoreductin1 oxidoreductase and protein disulfide isomerases. ER stress also triggered autophagy in C. reinhardtii based on the protein abundance, lipidation, cellular distribution, and mRNA levels of the autophagy marker ATG8. Moreover, increases in the oxidation of the glutathione pool and the expression of oxidative stress-related genes were detected in tunicamycin-treated cells. Our results revealed that the antioxidant glutathione partially suppressed ER stress-induced autophagy and decreased the toxicity of tunicamycin, suggesting that oxidative stress participates in the control of autophagy in response to ER stress in C. reinhardtii In close agreement, we also found that autophagy activation by tunicamycin was more pronounced in the C. reinhardtii sor1 mutant, which shows increased expression of oxidative stress-related genes. PMID:25143584

  5. Oxidative stress and oxidative damage in chemical carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Klaunig, James E. Wang Zemin; Pu Xinzhu; Zhou Shaoyu

    2011-07-15

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are induced through a variety of endogenous and exogenous sources. Overwhelming of antioxidant and DNA repair mechanisms in the cell by ROS may result in oxidative stress and oxidative damage to the cell. This resulting oxidative stress can damage critical cellular macromolecules and/or modulate gene expression pathways. Cancer induction by chemical and physical agents involves a multi-step process. This process includes multiple molecular and cellular events to transform a normal cell to a malignant neoplastic cell. Oxidative damage resulting from ROS generation can participate in all stages of the cancer process. An association of ROS generation and human cancer induction has been shown. It appears that oxidative stress may both cause as well as modify the cancer process. Recently association between polymorphisms in oxidative DNA repair genes and antioxidant genes (single nucleotide polymorphisms) and human cancer susceptibility has been shown.

  6. Isolated and combined exposure to ammonia and nitrite in giant freshwater pawn (Macrobrachium rosenbergii): effects on the oxidative stress, antioxidant enzymatic activities and apoptosis in haemocytes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yufan; Ye, Chaoxia; Wang, Anli; Zhu, Xuan; Chen, Changhong; Xian, Jianan; Sun, Zhenzhu

    2015-10-01

    The residual contaminators such as ammonia and nitrite are widely considered as relevant sources of aquatic environmental pollutants, posing a great threat to shrimp survival. To study the toxicological effects of ammonia and nitrite exposure on the innate immune response in invertebrates, we investigated the oxidative stress and apoptosis in haemocytes of freshwater prawn (Macrobrachium rosenbergii) under isolated and combined exposure to ammonia and nitrite in order to provide useful information about adult prawn immune responses. M. rosenbergii (13.44 ± 2.75 g) were exposed to 0, 5, and 25 mg/L total ammonia-N (TAN) and 0, 5, and 20 mg/L nitrite-N for 24 h. All ammonia concentrations were combined with all nitrite concentrations, making a total of nine treatments studied. Following the exposure treatment, antioxidant enzyme activity, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, nitric oxide (NO) generation, and apoptotic cell ratio of haemocytes were measured using flow cytometry. Results indicated that ROS generation was sensitive to the combined effect of ammonia and nitrite, which subsequently affected the Cu-Zn SOD activity. In addition, CAT showed the highest activity at 5 mg/L TAN while GPx decreased at 5 mg/L TAN and returned towards baseline at 25 mg/L. NO generation synchronized with the apoptotic cell ratio in haemocytes, indicating that NO production was closely associated with programmed cell death. Both NO production and apoptotic ratios significantly decreased following 25 mg/L TAN, which may be due to the antagonistic regulation of NO and GPx. We hypothesized that the toxicological effect of nitrite exhibited less change in physiological changes compared to that of ammonia, because of the high tolerance to nitrite exposure in mature M. rosenbergii and/or the competitive effects of chloride ions. Taken together, these results showed that ammonia and nitrite caused a series of combined oxidative stress and apoptosis in M. rosenbergi, but further

  7. Effect of a short-term diet and exercise intervention on oxidative stress, inflammation, MMP-9, and monocyte chemotactic activity in men with metabolic syndrome factors.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Christian K; Won, Dean; Pruthi, Sandeep; Kurtovic, Silvia; Sindhu, Ram K; Vaziri, Nosratola D; Barnard, R James

    2006-05-01

    The present study was designed to examine the effects of lifestyle modification on key contributing factors to atherogenesis, including oxidative stress, inflammation, chemotaxis, and cell adhesion. Obese men (n = 31), 15 of whom had metabolic syndrome, were placed on a high-fiber, low-fat diet in a 3-wk residential program where food was provided ad libitum and daily aerobic exercise was performed. In each subject, pre- and postintervention fasting blood was drawn for circulating levels of serum lipids, glucose and insulin (for estimation of insulin sensitivity), oxidative stress-generating enzyme myeloperoxidase and marker 8-isoprostaglandin F2alpha, the inflammatory protein C-reactive protein, soluble ICAM-1 as an indicator of endothelial activation, sP-selectin as a marker of platelet activation, the chemokine macrophage inflammatory protein-1alpha, and total matrix metalloproteinase-9. Using subject sera and human aortic endothelial cell culture systems, we measured VCAM-1 cell surface abundance and monocyte chemotactic protein-1, nitric oxide, superoxide, and hydrogen peroxide production in vitro by fluorometric detection. Also determined in vitro was serum-induced, monocyte adhesion and monocyte chemotactic activity. After 3 wk, significant reductions (P < 0.05) in body mass index, all serum lipids and lipid ratios, fasting glucose, insulin, homeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance, myeloperoxidase, 8-isoprostaglandin F2alpha, C-reactive protein, soluble ICAM-1, soluble P-selectin, macrophage inflammatory protein-1alpha, and matrix metalloproteinase-9 were noted. In vitro, serum-stimulated cellular VCAM-1 expression, monocyte chemotactic protein-1 production, and fluorometric detection of superoxide and hydrogen peroxide production decreased, whereas a concomitant increase in NO production was noted (all P < 0.01). Additionally, both monocyte adhesion (P < 0.05) and MCA (P < 0.01) decreased. Nine of 15 were no longer positive for metabolic

  8. Basic FGF attenuates amyloid beta-peptide-induced oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, and impairment of Na+/K+-ATPase activity in hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Mark, R J; Keller, J N; Kruman, I; Mattson, M P

    1997-05-01

    Basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) exhibits trophic activity for many populations of neurons in the brain, and can protect those neurons against excitotoxic, metabolic and oxidative insults. In Alzheimer's disease (AD), amyloid beta-peptide (A beta) fibrils accumulate in plaques which are associated with degenerating neurons. A beta can be neurotoxic by a mechanism that appears to involve induction of oxidative stress and disruption of calcium homeostasis. Plaques in AD brain contain high levels of bFGF suggesting a possible modulatory role for bFGF in the neurodegenerative process. We now report that bFGF can protect cultured hippocampal neurons against A beta25-35 toxicity by a mechanism that involves suppression of reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation and maintenance of Na+/K+-ATPase activity. A beta25-35 induced lipid peroxidation, accumulation of H2O2, mitochondrial ROS accumulation, and a decrease in mitochondrial transmembrane potential; each of these effects of A beta25-35 was abrogated in cultures pre-treated with bFGF. Na+/K+-ATPase activity was significantly reduced following exposure to A beta25-35 in control cultures, but not in cultures pre-treated with bFGF. bFGF did not protect neurons from death induced by ouabain (a specific inhibitor of the Na+/K+-ATPase) or 4-hydroxynonenal (an aldehydic product of lipid peroxidation) consistent with a site of action of bFGF prior to induction of oxidative stress and impairment of ion-motive ATPases. By suppressing accumulation of oxyradicals, bFGF may slow A beta-induced neurodegenerative cascades. PMID:9187334

  9. Activation of Type 4 Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor Attenuates Oxidative Stress-Induced Death of Neural Stem Cells with Inhibition of JNK and p38 MAPK Signaling.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhichao; Ma, Wen; Wang, Li; Gong, Hanshi; Tian, Yumei; Zhang, Jianshui; Liu, Jianxin; Lu, Haixia; Chen, Xinlin; Liu, Yong

    2015-11-15

    Promoting both endogenous and exogenous neural stem cells' (NSCs) survival in the hostile host environments is essential to cell replacement therapy for central nervous system (CNS) disorders. Type 4 metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR4), one of the members of mGluRs, has been shown to protect neurons from acute and chronic excitotoxic insults in various brain damages. The present study investigated the preventive effects of mGluR4 on NSC injury induced by oxidative stress. Under challenge with H2O2, loss of cell viability was observed in cultured rat NSCs, and treatment with selective mGluR4 agonist VU0155041 conferred protective effects against the loss of cellular viability in a concentration-dependent manner, as shown by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Pretreatment of VU0155041 (30 μM) also inhibited the excessive NSC death induced by H2O2, and group III mGluRs antagonist (RS)-a-methylserine-O-phosphate (MSOP) or gene-targeted knockdown abolished the protective action of mGluR4, indicated by propidium iodide-Hoechst and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated UTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) staining. Western blot assay demonstrated that mGluR4 activation reversed the decreased procaspase-8/9/3and the destructed Bcl-2/Bax expressing balance, and likewise, MSOP and mGluR4 knockdown abrogated the action of mGluR4 activity. Furthermore, inhibition of JNK and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) were observed after mGluR4 activation, and as paralleling control, JNK-specific inhibitor SP600125 and p38-specific inhibitor SB203580 significantly rescued the H2O2-mediated NSC apoptosis and cleavage of procaspase-3. We suggest that activation of mGluR4 prevents oxidative stress-induced NSC death and apoptotic-associated protein activities with involvement of inhibiting the JNK and p38 pathways in cell culture. Our findings may help to develop strategies for enhancing the resided and transplanted NSC survival

  10. Increased oxidative stress and decreased activities of Ca2+/Mg2+-ATPase and Na+/K+-ATPase in the red blood cells of the hibernating black bear

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chauhan, V.P.S.; Tsiouris, J.A.; Chauhan, A.; Sheikh, A.M.; Brown, W. Ted; Vaughan, M.

    2002-01-01

    During hibernation, animals undergo metabolic changes that result in reduced utilization of glucose and oxygen. Fat is known to be the preferential source of energy for hibernating animals. Malonyldialdehyde (MDA) is an end product of fatty acid oxidation, and is generally used as an index of lipid peroxidation. We report here that peroxidation of lipids is increased in the plasma and in the membranes of red blood cells in black bears during hibernation. The plasma MDA content was about four fold higher during hibernation as compared to that during the active, non-hibernating state (P < 0.0001). Similarly, MDA content of erythrocyte membranes was significantly increased during hibernation (P < 0.025). The activity of Ca2+/Mg2+-ATPase in the erythrocyte membrane was significantly decreased in the hibernating state as compared to the active state. Na+/K+-ATPase activity was also decreased, though not significant, during hibernation. These results suggest that during hibernation, the bears are under increased oxidative stress, and have reduced activities of membrane-bound enzymes such as Ca2+/Mg2+-ATPase and Na+/K+-ATPase. These changes can be considered part of the adaptive for survival process of metabolic depression. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Methyl jasmonate counteracts boron toxicity by preventing oxidative stress and regulating antioxidant enzyme activities and artemisinin biosynthesis in Artemisia annua L.

    PubMed

    Aftab, Tariq; Khan, M Masroor A; Idrees, Mohd; Naeem, M; Moinuddin; Hashmi, Nadeem

    2011-07-01

    Boron is an essential plant micronutrient, but it is phytotoxic if present in excessive amounts in soil for certain plants such as Artemisia annua L. that contains artemisinin (an important antimalarial drug) in its areal parts. Artemisinin is a sesquiterpene lactone with an endoperoxide bridge. It is quite expensive compound because the only commercial source available is A. annua and the compound present in the plant is in very low concentration. Since A. annua is a major source of the antimalarial drug and B stress is a deadly threat to its cultivation, the present research was conducted to determine whether the exogenous application of methyl jasmonate (MeJA) could combat the ill effects of excessive B present in the soil. According to the results obtained, the B toxicity induced oxidative stress and reduced the stem height as well as fresh and dry masses of the plant remarkably. The excessive amounts of soil B also lowered the net photosynthetic rate, stomatal conductance, internal CO(2) concentration and total chlorophyll content in the leaves. In contrast, the foliar application of MeJA enhanced the growth and photosynthetic efficiency both in the stressed and non-stressed plants. The excessive B levels also increased the activities of antioxidant enzymes, such as catalase, peroxidase and superoxide dismutase. Endogenous H(2)O(2) and O(2)(-) levels were also high in the stressed plants. However, the MeJA application to the stressed plants reduced the amount of lipid peroxidation and stimulated the synthesis of antioxidant enzymes, enhancing the content and yield of artemisinin as well. Thus, it was concluded that MeJA might be utilized in mitigating the B toxicity and improving the content and yield of artemisinin in A. annua plant. PMID:20957501

  12. Mitochondrial metabolism mediates oxidative stress and inflammation in fatty liver

    PubMed Central

    Satapati, Santhosh; Kucejova, Blanka; Duarte, Joao A.G.; Fletcher, Justin A.; Reynolds, Lacy; Sunny, Nishanth E.; He, Tianteng; Nair, L. Arya; Livingston, Kenneth; Fu, Xiaorong; Merritt, Matthew E.; Sherry, A. Dean; Malloy, Craig R.; Shelton, John M.; Lambert, Jennifer; Parks, Elizabeth J.; Corbin, Ian; Magnuson, Mark A.; Browning, Jeffrey D.; Burgess, Shawn C.

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria are critical for respiration in all tissues; however, in liver, these organelles also accommodate high-capacity anaplerotic/cataplerotic pathways that are essential to gluconeogenesis and other biosynthetic activities. During nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), mitochondria also produce ROS that damage hepatocytes, trigger inflammation, and contribute to insulin resistance. Here, we provide several lines of evidence indicating that induction of biosynthesis through hepatic anaplerotic/cataplerotic pathways is energetically backed by elevated oxidative metabolism and hence contributes to oxidative stress and inflammation during NAFLD. First, in murine livers, elevation of fatty acid delivery not only induced oxidative metabolism, but also amplified anaplerosis/cataplerosis and caused a proportional rise in oxidative stress and inflammation. Second, loss of anaplerosis/cataplerosis via genetic knockdown of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase 1 (Pck1) prevented fatty acid–induced rise in oxidative flux, oxidative stress, and inflammation